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Sample records for family physician office-based

  1. Family Violence and Family Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Carol P.

    1991-01-01

    The acronym IDEALS summarizes family physicians' obligations when violence is suspected: to identify family violence; document injuries; educate families and ensure safety for victims; access resources and coordinate care; co-operate in the legal process; and provide support for families. Failure to respond reflects personal and professional experience and attitudes, fear of legal involvement, and lack of knowledge. Risks of intervention include physician burnout, physician overfunctioning, escalation of violence, and family disruption. PMID:21228987

  2. Family Physicians and Exercise Counseling

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Douglas M.C.; Ciliska, Donna; Singer, Joel; Williams, Kimberly; Alleyne, Julia; Lindsay, Elizabeth

    1992-01-01

    This trial took 22 volunteer family physicians and randomly exposed some to training intervention and some to no training to study the effect on frequency and quality of exercise prescription to ambulatory adults. During the 6 weeks after training, the trained physicians addressed the issue of exercise with 35.3% of patients. The untrained physicians discussed exercise with only 8.6% of their patients. PMID:21221270

  3. High physician concern about malpractice risk predicts more aggressive diagnostic testing in office-based practice.

    PubMed

    Carrier, Emily R; Reschovsky, James D; Katz, David A; Mello, Michelle M

    2013-08-01

    Despite widespread agreement that physicians who practice defensive medicine drive up health care costs, the extent to which defensive medicine increases costs is unclear. The differences in findings to date stem in part from the use of two distinct approaches for assessing physicians' perceived malpractice risk. In this study we used an alternative strategy: We linked physicians' responses regarding their levels of malpractice concern as reported in the 2008 Health Tracking Physician Survey to Medicare Parts A and B claims for the patients they treated during the study period, 2007-09. We found that physicians who reported a high level of malpractice concern were most likely to engage in practices that would be considered defensive when diagnosing patients who visited their offices with new complaints of chest pain, headache, or lower back pain. No consistent relationship was seen, however, when state-level indicators of malpractice risk replaced self-rated concern. Reducing defensive medicine may require approaches focused on physicians' perceptions of legal risk and the underlying factors driving those perceptions.

  4. Indiana family physician attitudes and practices concerning smoking cessation.

    PubMed

    Saywell, R M; Jay, S J; Lukas, P J; Casebeer, L L; Mybeck, K C; Parchman, M L; Haley, A J

    1996-01-01

    Most physicians are aware of the health benefits of smoking cessation and agree they have a responsibility to help smokers quit. Many physicians, however, do not regularly address smoking cessation with their patients. Questionnaires were sent to 2,095 family practice physicians in Indiana. Information obtained included: demographic data; office-based smoking cessation practices; counseling; and physicians' perceptions of intervention outcomes. Most physicians (86%) asked new patients if they smoked, and 23% questioned patients about their exposure to passive smoke. Younger physicians, female physicians and urban physicians were more likely to ask new patients if they smoked. A formal smoking cessation program was used by 28% of the responding physicians. Among those not using a program, 7% reported plans to implement one in the coming year, 40% were not planning to implement one, and 53% were unsure. Physician and practice characteristics were not correlated with the use of smoking cessation programs. Only 11% of physicians considered their smoking cessation counseling skills to be excellent; 27% indicated the need for improvement in skills. One-half (52%) believed their counseling efforts were effective; almost half (45%) believed that current reimbursement policies limited their involvement in smoking cessation interventions. Most respondents have not instituted smoking cessation programs in their practices. It is likely that a combination of strategies, including both undergraduate, graduate and continuing medical education programs and reform in reimbursement practices for cessation programs, will be required to achieve significant increases in long-term smoking abstinence rates.

  5. Colonoscopy: Perspectives for Family Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, R. D. A.

    1983-01-01

    Fiber-optic endoscopy is an important investigation of the lower gastrointestinal tract, whether or not the radiologist has discovered a lesion. Colonoscopy affords a unique opportunity to visualize the entire colonic mucosa. At the same time, the physician can obtain biopsy specimens, remove polyps, and decompress volvuli. Most experienced endoscopists can reach the cecum in over 90% of patients. If colonoscopy is properly performed, it has a low risk of complications, such as perforation and bleeding. The few absolute contraindications include serious illnesses such as acute myocardial infarction and severe acute inflammatory bowel diseases. Family physicians referring patients for investigations of lower gastrointestinal problems should explain that colonoscopy is an adjunct to, not a replacement for, a barium enema examination. If possible they should find out what preparation the patient will require. PMID:21283399

  6. Giving office-based physicians electronic access to patients' prior imaging and lab results did not deter ordering of tests.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Danny; Bor, David H; Woolhandler, Stephanie; Himmelstein, David U

    2012-03-01

    Policy-based incentives for health care providers to adopt health information technology are predicated on the assumption that, among other things, electronic access to patient test results and medical records will reduce diagnostic testing and save money. To test the generalizability of findings that support this assumption, we analyzed the records of 28,741 patient visits to a nationally representative sample of 1,187 office-based physicians in 2008. Physicians' access to computerized imaging results (sometimes, but not necessarily, through an electronic health record) was associated with a 40-70 percent greater likelihood of an imaging test being ordered. The electronic availability of lab test results was also associated with ordering of additional blood tests. The availability of an electronic health record in itself had no apparent impact on ordering; the electronic access to test results appears to have been the key. These findings raise the possibility that, as currently implemented, electronic access does not decrease test ordering in the office setting and may even increase it, possibly because of system features that are enticements to ordering. We conclude that use of these health information technologies, whatever their other benefits, remains unproven as an effective cost-control strategy with respect to reducing the ordering of unnecessary tests.

  7. PCBs and the Family Physician

    PubMed Central

    Cappon, I.D.

    1986-01-01

    Pcbs are widespread environmental contaminants present in virtually every mammal on earth. Great controversy and debate has been evoked over the past two decades concerning their potential toxicity. They, along with other organochlorine compounds such as DDT, have been reasonably well studied in field and experimental situations. In general, PCBs are not very toxic, especially in concentrations to which most people are exposed, even those who work in the industrial setting or who eat contaminated fish. In terms of environmental hazards to health, PCBs should be considered as relatively low on the list. The public cannot depend on media information as a source of objective knowledge on controversial compounds like PCBs. The family physician should be able to provide to concerned individuals objective information on the definition, sources and relative toxicity of PCBs. PMID:21267326

  8. Rural Idaho Family Physicians' Scope of Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Ed; Schmitz, David; Epperly, Ted; Nukui, Ayaka; Miller, Carissa Moffat

    2010-01-01

    Context: Scope of practice is an important factor in both training and recruiting rural family physicians. Purpose: To assess rural Idaho family physicians' scope of practice and to examine variations in scope of practice across variables such as gender, age and employment status. Methods: A survey instrument was developed based on a literature…

  9. A physician's office-based digoxin assay (Seralyzer) evaluated for interference by endogenous digoxin-like immunoreactive factors.

    PubMed

    Matheke, M L; Valdes, R

    1989-01-01

    A digoxin test for a physician's office based-chemistry analyzer (Ames Seralyzer) was evaluated for possible interference by digoxin-like immunoreactive factors (DLIF). Sera from patients likely to have high concentrations of DLIF (renal and hepatic patients, pregnant women, and neonates) as well as from normal patients and umbilical cord blood were analysed by the Seralyzer digoxin immunoassay and by a fluorescence polarization digoxin immunoassay (Abbott TDx) known to detect DLIF. For all patients who were not taking digoxin (n = 85) only four patients (4.7 percent) measured apparent digoxin values greater than 0.2 ng per mL by the Seralyzer compared to 64 (75 percent) by the TDx analyzer. Measurements of DLIF from adrenal extracts demonstrated a 17-fold greater potency for detection of DLIF by the TDx (2.9 ng per mL) compared to the Seralyzer technique (0.18 ng per mL). However, recovery data suggest that the presence of digoxin reduces the potency of DLIF interference as a function of increasing digoxin concentrations especially for the TDx assay. This diminished DLIF crossreactivity in the presence of digoxin is one explanation for the comparable correlation observed for both non-renal and renal failure patients taking digoxin when measured by these two immunoassays.

  10. Selection of the Family Physician

    PubMed Central

    Christ, L. W. A. C.; Harris, A. L.; Korchinski, E. D.

    1976-01-01

    This study was conducted to examine the characteristics of ‘initial visits’ by patients, contrasted with ‘average visits’, to discover what is needed to establish a satisfactory patient-physician relationship leading to long term continuous care. In the initial visit, the patient presents with a relatively simple problem which will enable the physician to demonstrate his ability without unduly taxing his skills. This suggests that patients create an opportunity for a thorough face-to-face contact to provide an opportunity for the physician to display his ability so that the patient's desire for a long term relationship can be achieved. The study also suggests that patients' expectations have changed in proportion to changes in the mode of medical practice. PMID:21308071

  11. The Army Wants More Family Physicians.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-03-23

    initiatives required physicians with greater capabilities than those of the current General Medical Officers ( GMOs ). The Family Physician fit the new...and hence AMEDD active duty andstrength by 285, and it would convert a majority of Army GMO authorizations to Family Practice4 (see appendix 1). This...obligation as a GMO . Almost all GMO requirements are in Primary Care, where a broad-based Knowledge is essential. Therefore, when a Categorical Intern

  12. Family Physician Perspectives on Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Orange, Jordan S.; Seeborg, Filiz O.; Boyle, Marcia; Scalchunes, Christopher; Hernandez-Trujillo, Vivian

    2016-01-01

    Primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDs) include over 250 diverse disorders. The current study assessed management of PID by family practice physicians. The American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology Primary Immunodeficiency Committee and the Immune Deficiency Foundation conducted an incentivized mail survey of family practice physician members of the American Medical Association and the American Osteopathic Association in direct patient care. Responses were compared with subspecialist immunologist responses from a similar survey. Surveys were returned by 528 (of 4500 surveys mailed) family practice physicians, of whom 44% reported following ≥1 patient with PID. Selective immunoglobulin A deficiency (21%) and chronic granulomatous disease (11%) were most common and were followed by significantly more subspecialist immunologists (P < 0.05). Use of intravenously administered immunoglobulin and live viral vaccinations across PID was significantly different (P < 0.05). Few family practice physicians were aware of professional guidelines for diagnosis and management of PID (4 vs. 79% of subspecialist immunologists, P < 0.05). Family practice physicians will likely encounter patients with PID diagnoses during their career. Differences in how family practice physicians and subspecialist immunologists manage patients with PID underscore areas where improved educational and training initiatives may benefit patient care. PMID:27066486

  13. Mental health activities of family physicians.

    PubMed

    Cassata, D M; Kirkman-Liff, B L

    1981-04-01

    A questionnaire survey of residency trained graduates and nonresidency trained family physicians showed both groups reporting relatively infrequent practice of behavioral medicine. Referrals and counseling sessions/visits produce a combined total of 20 activities per month, or two to four percent of all patient encounters, even though the physicians in the sample reported that 33 percent of their diagnoses were behavioral/psychological. More than 85 percent of the physicians reported access to more than one mental health provider. The six most common health problems encountered in the office were depression, anxiety, obesity, marital discord, alcohol abuse, and sexual problems. Physicians responding to this survey expressed an interest in continuing education programs that emphasize individual, marital, and parenting counseling, and psychopharmacology. There is a major need to improve the mental health component of residency training, which will enable physicians to better manage psychosocial problems in practice settings.

  14. Collaboration between family physicians and nurse clinicians

    PubMed Central

    Maheux, Brigitte; Côté, Luc; Sobanjo, Omobola; Authier, Louise; Lajeunesse, Julie; Leclerc, Mylène; Lefort, Louise

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine whether graduating family physicians are exposed to collaboration between family physicians and nurse clinicians during their training, as well as their opinions about shared care between doctors and nurse clinicians in the delivery of patient care. Design Anonymous online survey. Setting Two French-Canadian university family medicine residency programs. Participants The 2010 and 2011 graduating family physicians (N = 343) from the University of Montreal and Laval University in Quebec. Main outcome measures The extent to which nurse clinicians in graduating family physicians’ training milieu were involved in preventive and curative patient care activities, and graduates’ opinions about nurse clinicians sharing care with physicians. Results Of 343 graduates, 186 (54.2%) participated in the survey. Although as residents in family medicine their exposure to shared care with nurse clinicians was somewhat limited, respondents indicated that they were generally quite open to the idea of sharing care with nurse clinicians. More than 70% of respondents agreed or strongly agreed that nurse clinicians could adjust, according to protocols of clinical guidelines, the treatment of patients with diabetes, hypertension, and asthma, as well as regulate medication for pain control in terminally ill patients. By contrast, respondents were less favourable to nurse clinicians adjusting the treatment of patients with depression. More than 80% of respondents agreed or strongly agreed that nurse clinicians could initiate treatment via a medical directive for routine hormonal contraception, acne, uncomplicated cystitis, and sexually transmitted infections. Respondents’ opinions on nurse clinicians initiating treatment for pharyngitis and otitis were more divided. Conclusion Graduating family physicians are quite open to collaborating with nurse clinicians. Although they have observed some collaboration between physicians and nurses, there are areas of

  15. The Family Physician's Role During Disasters

    PubMed Central

    Crosby, John

    1986-01-01

    Family physicians can encourage disaster planning and mock disaster exercises in their community. If involved in an actual disaster, the family physician can be helpful as a triage officer in emergency, in initial resuscitation, in minor treatment, in discharging stable patients, and in counselling victims of post-traumatic shock syndrome. The key to effective performance is being prepared beforehand to cope with the stress and confusion of the incident. Use of laboratory and diagnostic imaging must be curtailed until all severely injured patients are treated. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4 PMID:21267128

  16. Keeping family physicians in rural practice. Solutions favoured by rural physicians and family medicine residents.

    PubMed Central

    Rourke, James T. B.; Incitti, Filomena; Rourke, Leslie L.; Kennard, MaryAnn

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine how family medicine residents and practising rural physicians rate possible solutions for recruiting and sustaining physicians in rural practice. DESIGN: Cross-sectional mailed survey. SETTING: Rural family practices and family medicine residency programs in Ontario. PARTICIPANTS: Two hundred seventy-six physicians and 210 residents. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Ratings of proposed solutions on a 4-point scale from "very unimportant" to "very important". RESULTS: Rural family physicians rated funding for learner-driven continuing medical education (CME) and limiting on-call duty to 1 night in 5 as the most important education and practice solutions, respectively. Residents rated an alternate payment plan to include time off for attending and teaching CME and comprehensive payment plans with a guaranteed income for locums as the most important education and practice solutions, respectively. CONCLUSION: Residents and physicians rated solutions very similarly. A comprehensive package of the highest-rated solutions could help recruit and sustain physicians in rural practice because the solutions were developed by experts on rural practice and rated by family medicine residents and practising rural physicians. PMID:14526866

  17. High altitude medicine for family physicians.

    PubMed Central

    McMurray, S. J.

    1994-01-01

    High altitude medicine deals with a continuum of diseases ranging from a mild discomfort to serious ailments affecting all organ systems, including the lungs, brain, and eyes. Decreased oxygen tension is the primary cause. The main principles of prevention are staging and graded ascent to allow acclimatization. Adventure travel to high altitude destinations is becoming increasingly popular; family physicians should be informed of the medical problems associated with such travel. Images p712-a p715-a p716-a PMID:8199523

  18. A Family Physician's Guide to Sewage Sludge

    PubMed Central

    Connop, Peter J.

    1983-01-01

    The potential environmental and personal health effects from the agricultural uses of domestic sewage sludge may increasingly require the guidance of the family physician, especially in farming communities. This article summarizes the potential health hazards and outlines the tripartite risk phenomenon—hazard identification, risk assessment, and social evaluation. For the agricultural use of dewatered sewage sludge, strict adherence to regulated procedures should not increase risk beyond that of agriculture generally. Confirmation by prospective epidemiological studies is recommended. PMID:21283298

  19. Family physicians' approach to psychotherapy and counseling. Perceptions and practices.

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, J. G.

    1994-01-01

    To determine how family physicians perceive the support they get for psychotherapy and counseling, we surveyed a random sample of Ontario College of Family Physicians members. Of 100 physicians who had family medicine residency training with psychotherapy experience, 43% indicated that such training was inadequate for their current needs. Because family physicians often provide psychotherapy and counseling, their training should reflect the needs found in practice. PMID:8080505

  20. Solving Problems: How Does the Family Physician Do It?

    PubMed Central

    Feightner, J. W.; Barrows, H. S.; Neufeld, V. R.; Norman, G. R.

    1977-01-01

    Objective evidence exists for a model of clinical problem solving by family physicians. Previous studies have examined the activities of family physicians, but there have been no data indicating the mental process behind these activities. This study, exploring the thought processes of family physicians engaged in clinical problem solving, has lead to the model described in this paper. Its educational and clinical implications are considered. PMID:21304873

  1. Alternative medicine and the family physician.

    PubMed

    Gordon, J S

    1996-11-15

    The seven categories of alternative medicine, as established by the National Institutes of Health Office of Alternative Medicine, are mind-body interventions, bioelectromagnetic therapies, alternative systems of medical practice, manual healing methods, pharmacologic and biologic treatments, herbal medicine, and diet and nutrition. Mind-body approaches have been shown to be effective in a variety of conditions. Acupuncture and homeopathy are alternative systems of medical practice that may be beneficial. Chiropractic manipulation for low back pain and infant message for enhancing growth are two methods of manual healing. While the literature on herbal medicine is vast, most of it focuses on a single approach for a specific condition. Traditional herbalists use a combination of herbs individualized for the specific person. As more and more people turn to alternative therapies, it is important for family physicians to be open to their patients' interest in alternative approaches.

  2. Family Physicians and Teaching Hospitals: A Litany of Woes

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Niels H.

    1984-01-01

    Retreat of family physicians from caring for their patients in teaching hospitals has been partly imposed and partly passively accepted. Confusion of patient, family doctor and consultant relationships has resulted. Town/gown and family physician/specialist communication problems disrupt a proper model of care. Family physicians need to take individual and group action to initiate change, but little action has been evident. Everyone is the loser. We should reinstitute a model in which family physicians are the closest professionals to their patients, wherever they are in the health care system. Demonstrating the value of family physician coordination of care and continuity of care will positively affect the current financial `loss leader' status of this work. PMID:21279057

  3. Autism: A review for family physicians.

    PubMed

    Karande, Sunil

    2006-05-01

    Autism is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by qualitative impairments in social interaction and communication, with restricted, repetitive, stereotyped patterns of behavior, interests and activities. These behaviors manifest along a wide spectrum and commence before 36 months of age. Diagnosis of autism is made by ascertaining whether the child's specific behaviors meet the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-IV-Revised criteria. Its etiology is still unclear but recent studies suggest that genetics plays a major role in conferring susceptibility. Recent neuroimaging research studies indicate that autism may be caused by atypical functioning in the central nervous system, particularly in the limbic system: amygdala and hippocampus. In a third of autistic children, loss of language and/or social skills occurs during the second year of life, usually between 15 and 21 months of age. Comorbidity with mental retardation, epilepsy, disruptive behaviors and learning difficulty is not uncommon. Although there is currently no known cure for autism there is evidence to suggest that early intervention therapy can improve functioning of autistic children. Judicious use of psychotropic drugs is necessary to manage associated aggression, hyperactivity, self-mutilation, temper tantrums; but drugs are not a substitute for behavioral and educational interventions. The family physician can play an important role in detecting autism early, coordinating its assessment and treatment, counseling the parents and classroom teacher, and monitoring the child's progress on a long term basis.

  4. The availability of fellowship training for foreign family physicians.

    PubMed

    Cohen, M D; Merenstein, J H

    1990-05-01

    The authors surveyed the 49 U.S. fellowship programs in family medicine listed in the 1988 Fellowship Directory published by the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine. The past experience and future intentions of the 47 responding programs toward non-immigrant foreign family physicians coming to the United States to undergo fellowship training in academic family practice were studied. Only a minority of the programs (22%) had ever trained a foreign fellow, and of these only five of 11 were definitely able to do so in the future. Over half (52%) of the programs that had never trained a foreign fellow stated that they were not prepared to train a foreign physician. Although foreign family physicians are encouraged by the American Academy of Family Practice to come to the United States for fellowships, this study shows that it is extremely difficult for these physicians to find programs willing to act as host.

  5. Immigration, ethnicity, and accessibility to culturally diverse family physicians.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu

    2007-09-01

    The study concerns ethnicity, spatial equity, and healthcare access in the context of diversity and integration. The paper first explores how Chinese immigrants in the Toronto Census Metropolitan Area choose between ethnic Chinese family physicians and other family physicians, based on a probability survey. It then applies and modifies gravity-type accessibility measures, of which a special type is the so-called floating catchment area (FCA) method, to evaluate three types of geographical accessibility in family physician utilization. The study suggests a certain degree of spatial inequality among Chinese immigrants in accessing culturally sensitive care. The paper yields important methodological and policy implications.

  6. Cancer Risk Assessment by Rural and Appalachian Family Medicine Physicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Kimberly M.; Love, Margaret M.; Pearce, Kevin A.; Porter, Kyle; Barron, Mary A.; Andrykowski, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Context: Challenges to the identification of hereditary cancer in primary care may be more pronounced in rural Appalachia, a medically underserved region. Purpose: To examine primary care physicians' identification of hereditary cancers. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was mailed to family physicians in the midwestern and southeastern United…

  7. What do Victoria family physicians think about housecalls?

    PubMed Central

    Hammett, Tess

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the proportion of family physicians doing housecalls, the types of patients they think are appropriate to visit at home, whether physicians are satisfied with the number of housecalls they make, reasons family physicians list for not doing housecalls, and what they consider acceptable remuneration and travel time for housecalls. Design A 12-question paper survey was formulated specifically for this study and piloted by 6 family physicians in British Columbia. It was then mailed with a cover letter to 250 physicians' offices and faxed back anonymously. Setting Family physicians' private offices in Victoria, BC, between December 1 and 19, 2010. Participants A total of 250 randomly selected family physicians from a list of 552 physicians practising in Victoria on the College of Physicians and Surgeons of British Columbia website. Main outcome measures Proportion of physicians doing housecalls, reasons stated for not doing housecalls, and mean acceptable remuneration and travel time for a housecall. Results A total of 73 surveys (29.2%) were returned, 5 of which were not fully completed but were included for the questions that were answered. Sixty-four physicians (87.7%) did at least 1 housecall in the past year, 23 (31.5%) did housecalls at least once a month, and 12 (16.4%) did them at least once a week. Of 71 respondents, 64 physicians (90.1%) listed lack of time as a barrier to performing housecalls, 37 (52.1%) listed unsatisfactory remuneration, and 35 (49.3%) listed lengthy travel times. Most physicians indicated that appropriate remuneration for a housecall was either $142.21 (n = 30, 42.9%) or $108.41 (n = 26, 37.1%). Thirty-seven physicians (52.9%) noted that 20 minutes was an acceptable maximum 1-way travel time for a housecall, while 29 (41.4%) listed 10 minutes. Conclusion Several systemic factors, including lack of time, unsatisfactory remuneration, and large geographic catchment areas, make it difficult for urban family physicians

  8. Office Management of Chemical Dependency by Family Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Ray

    1991-01-01

    Family physicians are in an ideal position to identify, intervene with, and treat substance use disorders. If family physicians position themselves to reflect objective evidence of consequences of substance use and offer suggestions for change while leaving responsibility for recovery with the patient, patients often choose to recover. Because the disease is characterized by exacerbations, remissions, and relapses, continued involvement with the recovering patient ensures the greatest chance of recovery. PMID:21228969

  9. Female family physicians in obstetrics: achieving personal balance.

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, J C; Brown, J B; Reid, A J

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the experiences of female family physicians who practise obstetrics in balancing professional obligations with personal and family needs, given the unique challenges that such practice poses for these physicians. DESIGN: Qualitative study. SETTING: Ontario. PARTICIPANTS: A purposefully selected sample of nine female family physicians who met the criteria of being married, having children and currently practising obstetrics. OUTCOME MEASURES: Experiences of female family physicians and their strategies in their personal, family and professional lives that enable them to continue practising obstetrics. RESULTS: All participants continued to practise obstetrics because of the pleasure they derived from it, despite the challenges of balancing the unpredictable demands of obstetrics with their personal and family needs. To continue in obstetrics, they needed to make changes in their lives, either through a gradual, evolutionary process or in response to a critical event. Alterations to work and family arrangements permitted them to meet the challenges and led to increased satisfaction. Changes included making supportive call-group arrangements, limiting work hours and the number of births attended and securing help with household duties. CONCLUSIONS: An in-depth examination, through the use of qualitative methods, showed the reasons why some female family physicians continue to practise obstetrics despite the stressful aspects of doing so. This knowledge may be useful for women who are residents or experienced clinicians and who are considering including obstetrics in their practice. PMID:7497390

  10. A new, but old business model for family physicians: cash.

    PubMed

    Weber, J Michael

    2013-01-01

    The following study is an exploratory investigation into the opportunity identification, opportunity analysis, and strategic implications of implementing a cash-only family physician practice. The current market dynamics (i.e., increasing insurance premiums, decreasing benefits, more regulations and paperwork, and cuts in federal and state programs) suggest that there is sufficient motivation for these practitioners to change their current business model. In-depth interviews were conducted with office managers and physicians of family physician practices. The results highlighted a variety of issues, including barriers to change, strategy issues, and opportunities/benefits. The implications include theory applications, strategic marketing applications, and managerial decision-making.

  11. The Family Physician in the Witness Box

    PubMed Central

    Emson, H. E.

    1983-01-01

    The doctor appearing in court must learn a new language and be prepared to deal with the legal profession, which is quite different from his own. Adequate preparation for a court case can make it less confusing; this article gives guidelines for doctors occasionally called to give evidence, or who are accused of malpractice. Doctors called as witnesses must consult with lawyers early, to determine exactly what information the court wants and the form a report should take. Physicians should carefully study and summarize all their evidence in non-technical language before a court appearance. By learning some legal language, they can also understand and adequately answer lawyers' questions. A physician accused of negligence must make no admissions before the case and have no contact with the plaintiff other than to formally acknowledge the charge. The Canadian Medical Protective Association should be contacted as soon as possible. PMID:21283283

  12. Do people with disabilities have difficulty finding a family physician?

    PubMed

    McColl, Mary Ann; Aiken, Alice; Schaub, Michael

    2015-04-28

    Primary care has been ideally characterized as the medical home for all citizens, and yet recent data shows that approximately 6% do not have a family physician, and only 17.5% of family practices are open to new patients. Given acknowledged shortages of family physicians, this research asks the question: Do people with disabilities have particular difficulty finding a family physician? Health Care Connect (HCC) is a government-funded agency in Ontario Canada, designed to "help Ontarians who are without a family health care provider to find one". Using data from HCC, supplemented by interviews with HCC staff, the study explores the average wait time for patients with disabilities to be linked with a primary care physician, and the challenges faced by agency staff in doing so. The study found that disabled registrants with the program are only slightly disadvantaged in terms of wait times to find a family physician, and success rates are ultimately comparable; however, agency staff report that there are a number of significant challenges associated with placing disabled patients.

  13. The Family Physician and the Ophthalmologist: Defining Areas of Work

    PubMed Central

    Hørven, Ivar; Elle, Egil

    1975-01-01

    In our April issue, Dr. Bentsen described the educational objectives for training family physicians which are being established by the Norwegian College of General Practitioners. One activity of that College has been to define clinical management and boundaries of family medicine in relation to the various specialties. This article describes those boundaries in relation to ophthalmology. PMID:20469202

  14. Role of family physicians in an urban hospital

    PubMed Central

    Neimanis, Ieva; Woods, Anne; Zizzo, Angelo; Dickson, Robert; Levy, Richard; Goebel, Cindy; Corsini, John; Burns, Sheri; Gaebel, Kathryn

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective To investigate changes in family doctors’ attitudes about and participation in hospital activities and inpatient care in an urban hospital family medicine department from 1977 to 1997 and 2014. Design Cross-sectional survey design. Setting The Department of Family Medicine at St Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton in Ontario. Participants Family physicians affiliated with the Department of Family Medicine at St Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton were surveyed in 2014. Data were compared with findings from similar surveys administered at this institution in 1977 and 1997. Main outcome measures Family physicians’ roles in hospital activities, attitudes toward the role of the family physician in the hospital setting, and the barriers to and facilitators of maintaining this role. Results A total of 93 physicians returned completed surveys (37.3% response rate). In 2014, half of the respondents provided some inpatient care. This patient care was largely supportive and newborn care (71.7% and 67.4%, respectively). In 2014, 47.3% believed the quality of care would suffer (compared with 92.1% in 1977 and 87.5% in 1997) if they were not involved in patient care in the hospital. There was also a considerable shift away from the 1977 and 1997 perception that the family physician had a role as patient advocate: 92.0% and 95.3%, respectively, compared with only 49.5% in the 2014 survey. Conclusion Family physicians’ hospital activities and attitudes continued to change from 1977 to 1997 and 2014 in this urban hospital setting. Most of the respondents had stopped providing direct inpatient care, with a few continuing to provide supportive care. Despite this, most respondents still see a role for the Department of Family Medicine within the hospital as a focus for identifying with their family physician community, a place to interact with other specialist colleagues, and a source of some continuing medical education. PMID:28292802

  15. Patient Satisfaction with the Family Physician Program in Sabzevar, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Ghorbani, Alireza; Raeissi, Pouran; Saffari, Ehsan; Reissi, Nahid

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Patient satisfaction with the family physician program is an important factor for more favorable treatment results. Evaluation of patient satisfaction improves the services and approximates them to patient’s preferences. The family physician program has been executed since late March, 2005 in Iran. This study aimed to measure patient satisfaction with family physician services and determines factors affecting the level of satisfaction in order to propose appropriate suggestions for providing medical services based on patients’ expectations. Methods: Forty-one centers provide healthcare services in rural and urban areas. The participants in this study comprised 1263 people. The data were collected by an inventory with 11 items about demographic specifications, waiting time and the importance of physician’s sex and 40 items for assessing the level of patient satisfaction. Results: A total of 1199 patients participated in the current study, 72.1% of them were female and 19.6% waited 10-20 minutes for receiving services. About 55.72% of the participants chose high and very high for the items of the inventory. Total satisfaction with the family physician program decreased with age (p-value= 0.029).Moreover, total satisfaction did not show any significant differences in different groups in terms of sex, place of residence, education level and marital status. Also family physicians’ sex did not affect patient satisfaction significantly. Based on results of regression model, an increase in patients’ age by one year decreased their satisfaction by 0.12 and level of satisfaction in rural patients was lower than that in urban patients by 7.93. Conclusions: The level of patient satisfaction with family physician services was moderate, which mostly arose from the components of the family physician program and services such as the waiting time, costs, welfare facilities, accessibility and the service-providing team rather than patients

  16. Female Physicians and the Work-Family Conflict.

    PubMed

    Treister-Goltzman, Yulia; Peleg, Roni

    2016-05-01

    There has been a dramatic increase in the number of female physicians in all fields and specializations of medicine, but this increase has not resulted in a redistribution of domestic tasks and responsibilities. Reviewing the literature of the last two decades (April 1994 to April 2014) on how female physicians cope with the challenge of balancing their family and professional lives for the duration of their professional careers revealed that they suffer from the work-family conflict more than other professionals and that it has a more negative effect on women than on men. Women physicians consider work-family balance significantly when making career choices. These considerations affect their career success, their productivity as faculty members, their marital life, and parenthood. Having a supportive spouse at home and a facilitating mentor at work are important for a positive work-family balance among female physicians. Special career-supporting measures, such as flexible work schedules and expanded support for childcare over the course of work and when taking part in academic activities, are critical for female physicians.

  17. Prevalence of abusive encounters in the workplace of family physicians

    PubMed Central

    Miedema, Baukje; Hamilton, Ryan; Lambert-Lanning, Anita; Tatemichi, Sue R.; Lemire, Francine; Manca, Donna; Ramsden, Vivian R.

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To examine the career prevalence of abusive encounters for family physicians in Canada. DESIGN A 7-page cross-sectional mailed survey in English and French. SETTING Canada. PARTICIPANTS A total of 3802 randomly selected practising family physicians who were members of the College of Family Physicians of Canada. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Demographic characteristics of survey participants, career prevalence of abusive encounters, and perpetrators of abuse. MAIN FINDINGS Twenty percent (20.4%) of the surveys (n = 774) were returned. Of the respondents, 44% were men and 56% were women. Most were in private practice in urban settings. The average number of years in practice was 15. The career prevalence of abusive encounters was divided into “minor,” “major,” and “severe” incidents. Of all the respondents, 98% had experienced at least 1 incident of minor abuse, 75% had experienced at least 1 incident of major abuse, and 39% had experienced at least 1 incident of severe abuse. Using χ2 analysis, a number of demographic variables were found to be significantly associated with abuse including the physician’s race and sex. Patients were the most common perpetrators of abuse. Ninety percent of family physicians surveyed reported that they had been abused by patients, while 70% reported that they had been abused by family members of patients. CONCLUSION Approximately 2 in 5 family physicians surveyed were subjected to a considerable amount of severe abuse during practice. Abuse in the office setting might have grave consequences for the health and well-being of the victimized physicians and might hinder service retention where the risk of abuse is greatest. PMID:20228289

  18. Tension Headaches: A Challenge to the Family Physician

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, May

    1978-01-01

    Tension headache is a frequently encountered symptom. The skills of the family physician make him or her ideally suited to assess and manage the patient with this problem. Diagnosis depends on a thorough understanding of the nature and ‘life-history’ of the headache as well as knowledge of the patient as an individual and as part of his or her family and social environment. Management requires a holistic ongoing approach, employing a judicious combination of medication and physical therapy. Above all, the physician must help the patient develop different ways of dealing with anxiety and conflict. PMID:21301541

  19. Family-physician interactions in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Azoulay, Elie; Sprung, Charles L

    2004-11-01

    Surrogate designation has the potential to represent the patient's wishes and promote successful family involvement in decision making when options exist as to the patient's medical management. In recent years, intensive care unit physicians and nurses have promoted family-centered care on the basis that adequate and effective communication with family members is the key to substitute decision making, thereby protecting patient autonomy. The two-step model for the family-physician relationship in the intensive care unit including early and effective provision of information to the family followed by family input into decision making is described as well as specific needs of the family members of dying patients. A research agenda is outlined for further investigating the family-physician relationship in the intensive care unit. This agenda includes a) improvement of communication skills for health care workers; b) research in the area of information and communication; c) interventions in non-intensive care unit areas to promote programs for teaching communication skills to all members of the medical profession; d) research on potential conflict between medical best interest and the ethics of autonomy; and e) publicity to enhance society's interest in advance care planning and surrogate designation amplified by debate in the media and other sounding boards. These studies should focus both on families and on intensive care unit workers. Assessments of postintervention outcomes in family members would provide insights into how well family-centered care matches family expectations and protects families from distress, not only during the intensive care unit stay but also during the ensuing weeks and months.

  20. The Irritable Colon: The Family Physician's Most Common Gastroenterological Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Rosser, W.W.

    1988-01-01

    The irritable colon syndrome presents the family physician with a diagnostic dilemma that tests both diagnostic and physician-patient relationship skills. Although the syndrome is common, it has no pathology, and the pathophysiology does not explain fully its signs and symptoms, which are not distinct, but are similar to those of a number of serious organic conditions. Careful history taking, simple investigations, and the addition of 20g of wheat germ fibre to the patient's daily diet will usually control the symptoms. Regulation or reduction of aggravating factors such as anxiety, depression, dietary intolerance or food allergies, antibiotic use, GI infections, and laxative abuse will also control the symptoms. The family physician who is able to tailor the diagnosis and management of the problem to the individual patient demonstrates the benefits of having an on-going relationship with the patient. PMID:21253150

  1. The Irritable Colon: The Family Physician's Most Common Gastroenterological Dilemma.

    PubMed

    Rosser, W W

    1988-03-01

    The irritable colon syndrome presents the family physician with a diagnostic dilemma that tests both diagnostic and physician-patient relationship skills. Although the syndrome is common, it has no pathology, and the pathophysiology does not explain fully its signs and symptoms, which are not distinct, but are similar to those of a number of serious organic conditions. Careful history taking, simple investigations, and the addition of 20g of wheat germ fibre to the patient's daily diet will usually control the symptoms. Regulation or reduction of aggravating factors such as anxiety, depression, dietary intolerance or food allergies, antibiotic use, GI infections, and laxative abuse will also control the symptoms. The family physician who is able to tailor the diagnosis and management of the problem to the individual patient demonstrates the benefits of having an on-going relationship with the patient.

  2. What Is So Special About a Family Physician?

    PubMed Central

    Deisher, Joseph B.

    1974-01-01

    Around a core of common, acute and chronic, recurrent health problems, a family physician must marshall the traditional episodic management for both inpatient and outpatient illness. He must also be especially adept at recently emerging routines of prevention and early detection. He provides individual and familial psychologic support and counselling, for both its therapeutic and preventive values. In addition, he must relate the individual care of his patient and the patient's family to the community as a whole. In doing this he will use not only his own skills but those of lay health volunteers, trained allied health care professionals and skilled subspecialists in the limited medical disciplines. The proper preparation of family physicians for this complicated role has far-reaching implications for change in both medical education and medical practice. PMID:4439902

  3. The Family Physician's Role in Managing Chronic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Galbraith, Peter R.

    1988-01-01

    This article provides a brief update on the clinical approach to chronic myelogenous leukemia and chronic lymphocytic leukemia, based on advances in pathbiology and the effect of new concepts on treatment policies. These disorders were selected because family physicians take most responsibility for the day-to-day management of these most common forms of chronic leukemias. PMID:21253119

  4. Work Values and Job Satisfaction of Family Physicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouwkamp-Memmer, Jennifer C.; Whiston, Susan C.; Hartung, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Theory and prior research suggest linkages between work values and job satisfaction. The present study examined such linkages in a group of workers in a professional occupation. Family physicians (134 women, 206 men, 88% Caucasian) responded to context-specific measures of work values and job satisfaction. ANOVA results indicated a work values…

  5. Exercise-induced asthma. What family physicians should do.

    PubMed Central

    D'Urzo, A.

    1995-01-01

    Exercise-induced asthma is described as a transitory increase in airway resistance during or after vigorous exercise. Nearly 90% of patients with chronic asthma and 40% of allergic nonasthmatic patients have the condition. Family physicians should try to educate patients about their asthma and, barring contraindications, encourage them to participate in regular physical activity. PMID:8563507

  6. Celiac disease. CME update for family physicians.

    PubMed Central

    Devlin, Shane M.; Andrews, Christopher N.; Beck, Paul L.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review current understanding of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of celiac disease. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Few recent randomized controlled trials (level I evidence) have studied treatments for celiac disease. There are recent comparative studies (level II evidence) and there is well established consensus (level III evidence) on diagnosis and treatment of celiac disease. MAIN MESSAGE: Celiac disease is an immune-mediated small bowel enteropathy caused by exposure to wheat gluten protein. The disease can be insidious and often presents with only subtle extraintestinal manifestations in a variety of organ systems. Recent epidemiologic surveys suggest celiac disease is much more common in North America than previously thought. Advances in immunology and screening have made diagnosis more reliable than in the past. Removing gluten from the diet is effective in most cases. CONCLUSION: Celiac disease manifests subtly and is an easy diagnosis to miss. Good laboratory screening tests and effective treatment are available. Family practitioners should consider celiac disease in patients who present with confounding symptoms. PMID:15171674

  7. Factors influencing palliative care. Qualitative study of family physicians' practices.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, J. B.; Sangster, M.; Swift, J.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine factors that influence family physicians' decisions to practise palliative care. DESIGN: Qualitative method of in-depth interviews. SETTING: Southwestern Ontario. PARTICIPANTS: Family physicians who practise palliative care on a full-time basis, who practise on a part-time basis, or who have retired from active involvement in palliative care. METHOD: Eleven in-depth interviews were conducted to explore factors that influence family physicians' decisions to practise palliative care and factors that sustain their interest in palliative care. All interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. The analysis strategy used a phenomenological approach and occurred concurrently rather than sequentially. All interview transcriptions were read independently by the researchers, who then compared and combined their analyses. Final analysis involved examining all interviews collectively, thus permitting relationships between and among central themes to emerge. MAIN OUTCOME FINDINGS: The overriding theme was a common philosophy of palliative care focusing on acceptance of death, whole person care, compassion, communication, and teamwork. Participants' philosophies were shaped by their education and by professional and personal experiences. In addition, participants articulated personal and systemic factors currently affecting their practice of palliative care. CONCLUSIONS: Participants observed that primary care physicians should be responsible for their patients' palliative care within the context of interdisciplinary teams. For medical students to be knowledgeable and sensitive to the needs of dying patients, palliative care should be given higher priority in the curriculum. Finally, participants argued compellingly for transferring the philosophy of palliative care to the overall practice of medicine. PMID:9612588

  8. Pod people. Response of family physicians and family practice nurses to Kosovar refugees in Greenwood, NS.

    PubMed Central

    Twohig, P. L.; Burge, F.; MacLachlan, R.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore roles of family physicians and family practice nurses who provided care to Kosovar refugees at Greenwood, NS. DESIGN: Qualitative study based on individual interviews with family physicians and family practice nurses. SETTING: Family practices in Halifax, NS. PARTICIPANTS: Six family practice nurses, four physician faculty members, four community-based family physicians, and two family medicine residents were interviewed. Participants were purposefully chosen from the roster of service providers. METHOD: All interviews were conducted by one of the researchers and were semistructured. Interviews lasted approximately 30 minutes and were immediately transcribed. Key words and phrases were identified and compared with subsequent interviews until saturation was achieved. MAIN FINDINGS: Data yielded four analytical categories: the clinical encounter, expectation and experience, role and team functioning, and response. Participants reported how providing care in the context of a refugee camp was both similar to and different from their daily activities in family practice, as were their working relationships with other health care professionals. CONCLUSION: Primary care for refugees during complex health emergencies is often underreported in the literature. Yet family practice physicians and nurses recounted that they had the requisite skills to provide care in such a context. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:11143581

  9. Modeling spatial accessibility of immigrants to culturally diverse family physicians.

    PubMed

    Wanga, Lu; Roisman, Deborah

    2011-01-01

    This article uses accessibility as an analytical tool to examine health care access among immigrants in a multicultural urban setting. It applies and improves on two widely used accessibility models—the gravity model and the two-step floating catchment area model—in measuring spatial accessibility by Mainland Chinese immigrants in the Toronto Census Metropolitan Area. Empirical data on physician-seeking behaviors are collected through two rounds of questionnaire surveys. Attention is focused on journey to physician location and utilization of linguistically matched family physicians. Based on the survey data, a two-zone accessibility model is developed by relaxing the travel threshold and distance impedance parameters that are traditionally treated as a constant in the accessibility models. General linear models are used to identify relationships among spatial accessibility, geography, and socioeconomic characteristics of Mainland Chinese immigrants. The results suggest a spatial mismatch in the supply of and demand for culturally sensitive care, and residential location is the primary factor that determines spatial accessibility to family physicians. The article yields important policy implications.

  10. Monthly Incidence Rates of Abusive Encounters for Canadian Family Physicians by Patients and Their Families

    PubMed Central

    Miedema, Baukje (Bo); Hamilton, Ryan; Tatemichi, Sue; Lambert-Lanning, Anita; Lemire, Francine; Manca, Donna; Ramsden, Vivian R.

    2010-01-01

    Objective. The goal of this study was to examine the monthly incidence rates of abusive encounters for family physicians in Canada. Methods. A 7-page cross-sectional survey. Results. Of the entire study sample (N = 720), 29% of the physicians reported having experienced an abusive event in the last month by a patient or patient family member. Abusive incidents were classified as minor, major, or severe. Of the physician participants who reported having been abused, all reported having experienced a minor event, 26% a major, and 8% a severe event. Of the physicians who experienced an abusive event, 55% were not aware of any policies to protect them, 76% did not seek help, and 64% did not report the abusive event. Conclusion. Family physicians are subjected to significant amounts of abuse in their day-to-day practices. Few physicians are aware of workplace policies that could protect them, and fewer report abusive encounters. Physicians would benefit from increased awareness of institutional policies that can protect them against abusive patients and their families and from the development of a national policy. PMID:22332007

  11. Assessment of Family Physicians' Knowledge of Social and Community Services

    PubMed Central

    Craven, Marilyn A.; Kates, N.; Raso, P.

    1990-01-01

    A survey of 255 family physicians and general practitioners in the Hamilton-Wentworth area, revealed that knowledge of social services and community treatment programs was often poor: 65% of 122 respondents did not know about one or more points of access to social services information, and 26% reported that they knew of appropriate social services for less than half of 13 psychosocial problems commonly encountered in family practice. Although 43% indicated that they preferred to treat patients themselves, 47% agreed that lack of information precluded referral, and 75% agreed that opportunities to increase their knowledge of community services would be helpful. PMID:21234060

  12. Abuse of family physicians by patients seeking controlled substances

    PubMed Central

    Saveland, Christine; Hawker, Leisha; Miedema, Baukje; MacDougall, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To examine family physicians’ career prevalence and monthly incidence of workplace abuse by controlled substance prescription seekers. Design A 4-page cross-sectional survey. Setting A family medicine continuing medical education event in Halifax, NS. Participants The survey was distributed to 316 family physicians attending the continuing medical education event. Main outcome measures Career prevalence and monthly incidence of workplace abuse related to the act of prescribing controlled substances. Results Fifty-six percent (n = 178) of the 316 surveys were returned completed. Half the study participants were men (49%). Most study participants were in private practice and lived in Nova Scotia, and approximately half (51%) practised in urban settings. On average, the study participants had 20 years of practice experience. The career prevalence of abusive encounters related to controlled substance prescribing was divided into “minor,” “major,” and “severe” incidents. Overall, 95% of study participants reported having experienced at least 1 incident of minor abuse; 48% had experienced at least 1 incident of major abuse; and 17% had experienced at least 1 incident of severe abuse during their careers. Further, 30% reported having been abused in the past month; among those, the average number of abusive encounters was 3. Most (82%) of the abusers were male with a history of addiction (85%) and mental illness (39%). Opioids were the most frequently sought controlled substance. Conclusion Abuse of family physicians by patients seeking controlled substances is substantial. Family physicians who prescribe controlled substances are at risk of being subjected to minor, major, or even severe abuse. Opioids were the most often sought controlled substance. A national discussion to deal with this issue is needed. PMID:24522691

  13. Family physicians’ attitude and interest toward participation in urban family physician program and related factors

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Masoumeh; Dehghani, Mohsen; Aghaee, Monavar Afzal

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Every family physician has a key role in achieving the goals of the family physician program (FPP). Low satisfaction of physicians in certain areas of Iran and their low maintenance level in the program is quite challenging. The aims of the present study were; (1) to assess the attitude of rural/rural-urban family physicians about FPP and (2) to investigate their interest toward participation in urban FPP and (3) to explore the influencing factors. Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed on 137 family physicians who were working in rural/rural-urban FPP in Mashhad University of Medical Sciences (Iran). A self-designed valid and reliable questionnaire including demographic data and thirty questions on the participants’ attitudes toward the FPP in Likert scale were used. Data were analyzed by multiple logistic regression models using SPSS software. Results: 49.3% of physicians were interested in continuing their cooperation in the urban-FPP. The mean total attitude score was 62.18 out of 100. The highest agreement and positive attitude of physicians were related to achievements of the program goals dimension. Multiple analyses showed that gender (odds ratio [OR] =5.5; male vs. female) and employment status (OR = 16.7 and 10.9 for permanent employment and by contract compared to legal obligation, respectively) were significantly associated with physicians’ willingness toward participation in the urban-FPP. Conclusion: About half of the studied physicians were interested toward participation in the urban-FPP; Male physicians more than females and permanent employees more than others were willing and interested to participate in the urban-FPP. PMID:28349002

  14. Physician Dismissal of Families Who Refuse Vaccination: An Ethical Assessment.

    PubMed

    Diekema, Douglas S

    2015-01-01

    Thousands of U.S. parents choose to refuse or delay the administration of selected vaccines to their children each year, and some choose not to vaccinate their children at all. While most physicians continue to provide care to these families over time, using each visit as an opportunity to educate and encourage vaccination, an increasing number of physicians are choosing to dismiss these families from their practice unless they agree to vaccinate their children. This paper will examine this emerging trend along with the reasons given by those who advocate such an approach. I will argue that the strategy of refusing to allow families into a clinic unless they agree to vaccinate their children is misguided, and the arguments for doing so fail to stand up to close scrutiny. Such a strategy does not benefit the child or the health of the community, and may have a negative impact on both. Furthermore, some of the arguments in support of dismissal policies ignore the importance of professional obligation and appear to favor self-interest over the interest of the patient.

  15. The grief process for patient, family, and physician.

    PubMed

    Bruce, Christine A

    2002-09-01

    In the grieving process, patient, family, and health professionals have the same needs-rest, relaxation, nourishment, a sense of security, trust, hope in the future, and humor among them. Grief, defined as a shared, universal, and natural neuropsychobiologic expression in response to loss, is distinct from mourning, a practice that varies in expression across diverse cultures. To aid in an understanding of grief and its effects, the author looks at the models for grief proposed by Kubler-Ross, Bowlby, Parkes, Worden, and Wolfelt. Addressing patients' concerns requires physicians be empathic, attentive, and respective and have willingness to take time, be present, and listen.

  16. Managing diabetes during pregnancy. Guide for family physicians.

    PubMed Central

    Sempowski, Ian P.; Houlden, R. L.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide a guide family physicians can use to interpret current evidence on treating women with pregestational and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and to develop a model for managing these patients. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: A MEDLINE search from January 1980 to December 2002 found randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and descriptive studies that had conflicting results regarding screening recommendations. Studies of intensive insulin therapy were predominantly large RCTs (level I evidence). Glycemic targets and guidelines for monitoring pregnant women are based primarily on consensus statements from large national societies. MAIN MESSAGE: Most pregnant women should be screened for GDM. Good glycemic control during pregnancy reduces congenital anomalies and stillbirths. Women failing to meet glycemic targets should be referred to multidisciplinary teams and considered for insulin therapy. Intensive insulin therapy reduces the risk of macrosomia and might reduce cesarean section rates and other serious outcomes. CONCLUSION: Despite controversy, family physicians can follow a plan for managing diabetic patients during pregnancy that is supported by the best available evidence. PMID:12836864

  17. Infertility evaluation and management. Strategies for family physicians.

    PubMed Central

    Case, Allison M.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review family physicians' role in investigation and management of infertile couples. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: MEDLINE and PubMed were searched using the MeSH headings infertility, advanced maternal age, polycystic ovarian syndrome, clomiphene citrate, and insulin sensitizers. Bibliographies of review articles and textbooks were also searched. Review articles, randomized trials, observational studies, and case series are cited. MAIN MESSAGE: Approximately 8% of Canadian couples have difficulty conceiving. Mother's age significantly affects ability to conceive. Infertility assessment focuses on ovulatory dysfunction, tubal factors, sexual factors, and male factors. Women older than 35 years more than 12 months infertile; women younger than 35 more than 18 months infertile; women likely to have such problems as anovulation, tubal disease, or endometriosis; women whose partners' semen tests abnormal; and women who request referral should be referred. Patients treated with clomiphene citrate should be aware of its potential side effects. CONCLUSION: Family physicians have an important role in preconception counseling. Detailed and focused assessment facilitates initial investigations and treatment and can identify couples who could benefit from referral for further assessment. PMID:14649985

  18. Solution-focused therapy. Counseling model for busy family physicians.

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, G.; Ganshorn, K.; Danilkewich, A.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide family doctors in busy office practices with a model for counseling compatible with patient-centred medicine, including the techniques, strategies, and questions necessary for implementation. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: The MEDLINE database was searched from 1984 to 1999 using the terms psychotherapy in family practice, brief therapy in family practice, solution-focused therapy, and brief psychotherapy. A total of 170 relevant articles were identified; 75 abstracts were retrieved and a similar number of articles read. Additional resources included seminal books on solution-focused therapy (SFT), bibliographies of salient articles, participation in workshops on SFT, and observation of SFT counseling sessions taped by leaders in the field. MAIN MESSAGE: Solution-focused therapy's concentration on collaborative identification and amplification of patient strengths is the foundation upon which solutions to an array of problems are built. Solution-focused therapy offers simplicity, practicality, and relative ease of application. From the perspective of a new learner, MECSTAT provides a framework that facilitates development of skills. CONCLUSION: Solution-focused therapy recognizes that, even in the bleakest of circumstances, an emphasis on individual strength is empowering. In recognizing patients as experts in self-care, family physicians support and accentuate patient-driven change, and in so doing, are freed from the hopelessness and burnout that can accompany misplaced feelings of responsibility. PMID:11768927

  19. Empowering women in a violent society. Role of the family physician.

    PubMed Central

    Archer, L. A.

    1994-01-01

    Despite erosion of key societal institutions, family physicians have remained a focal point for many troubled individuals--particularly women. The prevalence and types of abuse women experience and the effects on women's lives are summarized. Disclosures of abuse can affect family physicians. Increased awareness of gender role socialization messages for women is also relevant to family practice. PMID:8038640

  20. An Algorithm Using Administrative Data to Identify Patient Attachment to a Family Physician

    PubMed Central

    Provost, Sylvie; Pérez, José; Pineault, Raynald; Borgès Da Silva, Roxane; Tousignant, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Background. Commonly self-reported questions in population health surveys, such as “do you have a family physician?”, represent one of the best-known sources of information about patients' attachment to family physicians. Is it possible to find a proxy for this information in administrative data? Objective. To identify the type of patient attachment to a family physician using administrative data. Methods. Using physician fee-for-service database and patients enrolment registries (Quebec, Canada, 2008–2010), we developed a step-by-step algorithm including three dimensions of the physician-patient relationship: patient enrolment with a physician, complete annual medical examinations (CME), and concentration of visits to a physician. Results. 68.1% of users were attached to a family physician; for 34.4% of them, attachment was defined by enrolment with a physician, for 31.5%, by CME without enrolment, and, for 34.1%, by concentration of visits to a physician without enrolment or CME. Eight types of patient attachment were described. Conclusion. When compared to findings with survey data, our measure comes out as a solid conceptual framework to identify patient attachment to a family physician in administrative databases. This measure could be of great value for physician/patient-based cohort development and impact assessment of different types of patient attachment on health services utilization. PMID:26413320

  1. Perceived Learning Needs of Family Physicians in British Columbia

    PubMed Central

    Craig, Jennifer

    1990-01-01

    To determine family physicians' preferences for time, location, instructional format, and topics, the Division of Continuing Medical Education at the University of British Columbia conducted a survey, in which 1200 questionnaires were mailed to a stratified, proportional random sample of the 3270 general practitioners in the province, the stratifications being urban or rural and decade of graduation. A return rate of 61% yielded 648 usable questionnaires, which exceeds the sample required for analysis with no stratifications. Most popular days for involvement in continuing medical education were Fridays and Saturdays in the months of February, March, October, and November. Common skin disorders and hypertension headed the list of most relevant topics for the whole group and for the urban stratification. Hypertension was superseded by eye emergencies in the rural stratification. PMID:21234037

  2. E-Learning Readiness in Medicine: Turkish Family Medicine (FM) Physicians Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parlakkiliç, Alaattin

    2015-01-01

    This research investigates e-learning readiness level of family medicine physicians (FM) in Turkey. The study measures the level of e-learning readiness of Turkish FM physicians by an online e-learning readiness survey. According to results five areas are ready at Turkish FM physicians but need a few improvements:…

  3. Team Development Curriculum. Family Nurse Practitioner/Physician Assistant Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dostal, Lori

    A curriculum consisting of four modules is presented to help nurse practitioners, physician assistants, and physicians develop team practices and improve and increase the utilization of nurse practitioners and physician assistants in primary care settings. The curriculum was prepared in 1981-1982 by the California Area Health Education Center…

  4. Team Development Manual. Family Nurse Practitioner/Physician Assistant Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dostal, Lori

    A manual is presented to help incorporate team development into training programs for nurse practitioners, physician assistants, and primary care physicians. It is also directed to practitioners who wish to improve teamwork and is designed to improve the utilization of the nurse practitioners and physician assistants. A group of one or more…

  5. Procedures in ambulatory care. Which family physicians do what in southwestern Ontario?

    PubMed Central

    Wetmore, S. J.; Agbayani, R.; Bass, M. J.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine how often family physicians perform 12 ambulatory care procedures and factors associated with procedure performance. DESIGN: Mailed, self-administered survey. The survey was conducted according to the Dillman Total Design method. SETTING: Family physicians' offices in London, Ont, and in surrounding communities. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 395 family physicians practising within the London area were mailed surveys, 237 in London and 158 outside London. Response rates were 80.6% and 75.9%, respectively. Nonresponders did not differ significantly from responders in sex but included more solo practitioners. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Performance of ambulatory care procedures, sex, and practice characteristics of participant family physicians. RESULTS: For all responders, activities significantly associated with procedure performance were delivering babies, managing psychological problems, working emergency, and teaching. Mean total procedure scores ranged from 6.55 for managing psychological problems to 7.68 for working emergency. Sex-specific analysis showed that practice location and years in practice were significant factors for female but not for male family physicians. Mean total procedure scores for female physicians were 7.06 (outside London) and 4.74 (in London). CONCLUSIONS: Factors associated with procedure performance for family physicians in and around London included delivering babies, working in emergency, managing psychological problems, and teaching. Practice location was a significant factor for only female family physicians; those practising outside London performed procedures more than their urban counterparts and at similar rates to male physicians. PMID:9559192

  6. Caring for adult survivors of child sexual abuse. Issues for family physicians.

    PubMed

    Bala, M

    1994-05-01

    Traditional medical education has not taught physicians about the long-term effects of child sexual abuse. Family physicians often feel poorly equipped to appreciate the effect of such a childhood history on current health or to recognize and treat survivors. This article links the experience of the sexually abused child to long-term effects and outlines the role of family physicians in screening and caring for survivors.

  7. Health care setting and severity, symptom burden, and complications in patients with Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN): a comparison between university hospitals, community hospitals, and office-based physicians.

    PubMed

    Kaifie, A; Isfort, S; Gattermann, N; Hollburg, W; Klausmann, M; Wolf, D; Maintz, C; Hänel, M; Goekkurt, E; Göthert, J R; Platzbecker, U; Geer, T; Parmentier, S; Jost, E; Serve, H; Ehninger, G; Berdel, W E; Brümmendorf, T H; Koschmieder, Steffen

    2016-09-01

    Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) comprise a heterogeneous group of chronic hematological malignancies with significant variations in clinical characteristics. Due to the long survival and the feasibility of oral or subcutaneous therapy, these patients are frequently treated outside of larger academic centers. This analysis was performed to elucidate differences in MPN patients in three different health care settings: university hospitals (UH), community hospitals (CH), and office-based physicians (OBP). The MPN registry of the Study Alliance Leukemia is a non-interventional prospective study including adult patients with an MPN according to WHO criteria (2008). For statistical analysis, descriptive methods and tests for significant differences were used. Besides a different distribution of MPN subtypes between the settings, patients contributed by UH showed an impaired medical condition, a higher comorbidity burden, and more vascular complications. In the risk group analyses, the majority of polycythemia vera (PV) and essential thrombocythemia (ET) patients from UH were classified into the high-risk category due to previous vascular events, while for PV and ET patients in the CH and OBP settings, age was the major parameter for a high-risk categorization. Regarding MPN-directed therapy, PV patients from the UH setting were more likely to receive ruxolitinib within the framework of a clinical trial. In summary, the characteristics and management of patients differed significantly between the three health care settings with a higher burden of vascular events and comorbidities in patients contributed by UH. These differences need to be taken into account for further analyses and design of clinical trials.

  8. Managing Diabetes Mellitus: A Survey of Attitudes and Practices Among Family Physicians.

    PubMed

    Fogelman, Yacov; Goldfracht, Margalit; Karkabi, Khaled

    2015-10-01

    Due to the increasing prevalence of diabetes and the shortage of endocrinologists, family physicians have an important role in diabetes management. The purpose of this study was to examine the sources of knowledge, attitudes and practices of family physicians regarding the management of type 2 diabetes. Attendees at continuous medical education (CME) programs in Israel were requested to respond anonymously to written questions about their sources of knowledge about diabetes, the methods of diabetes management they advise their patients, their knowledge of diabetes medication treatments, and their attitudes toward people with type 2 diabetes. Questionnaires were completed by 362 family physicians (79% response rate). Of them, 329 (91%) reported that they usually manage their patients' diabetes care, including that of patients with concomitant risk factors. Their most common recommendations for diabetes control were: to increase physical activity, decrease total calorie intake, consult with a dietitian and undergo weight loss counseling. Almost all physicians (97%) reported providing lifestyle change counseling. Sixty percent reported lacking knowledge about nutritional issues. Only 58% answered correctly regarding the effect of the anti-diabetic drug, GLP1 analog. Board certified family physicians and their residents exhibited more knowledge about diabetes practice than did non-board certified family physicians. The great majority of family physicians surveyed usually manage their patients' diabetes themselves, and do not refer them to diabetes specialists. The implementation of strategies that will enhance the competencies and confidence of family physicians in diabetes management are important for achieving successful treatment.

  9. Situational Analysis of Human Resources in Family Physician Program: Survey from Iran

    PubMed Central

    Kalhor, Rohollah; Azmal, Mohammad; Kiaei, Mohammad Zakaria; Eslamian, Maryam; Tabatabaee, Seyed Saeed; Jafari, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Family physician is the increasing efforts to promote physician and other human resources in the health care systems. Goal: Investigate Human resources situation of the family physician program in six pilot cities in Khuzestan province in the southwest of Iran. Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted to examine the family physician program in 2011. In this study, 15 healthcare teams in six pilot cities in Iran were assessed. Data was compiled from family physician officer document in vice treatment of Ahwaz University of medical sciences. National instructions of family physician was used to identify current gaps. Results: The survey findings indicated that there is a doctor’s shortage about 36% in the health team that deployed in the first level of referral system. Also on the team, the 34% shortage of nurses and 60% shortages of nutrition personnel are seen. Specialists with offices in cities of second referral level, there have not welcomed the program. Conclusions: It seems that to facilitate patient access to physicians under contract with family physician program and the referral system in level two and level three, adopting arrangements to attract specialists and improving their maintenance is necessary. PMID:25126016

  10. Moving towards an electronic patient record: a survey to assess the needs of community family physicians.

    PubMed Central

    Strasberg, H. R.; Tudiver, F.; Holbrook, A. M.; Geiger, G.; Keshavjee, K. K.; Troyan, S.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the needs of community family physicians regarding electronic patient records (EPRs). DESIGN: A comprehensive survey was sent to 101 community family physicians in Hamilton, Ontario, who had expressed an interest in EPRs. RESULTS: 46 physicians responded (46%). 87% felt that an EPR would result in their providing better patient care. A wide variety of items were deemed to be important to be included on the EPR "front page". Desired functionality emphasized labs, medications, consultation, hospital follow-up and health maintenance. Family physicians tended to prefer templates to other data entry methods such as typing and dictating. Respondents were more willing to view information from the hospital than to let the hospital view information from their own offices. CONCLUSION: This survey provided useful information on the perceived EPR needs of community-based family physicians. It will be repeated post-computerization. PMID:9929216

  11. Office-based anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Treasure, Trevor; Bennett, Jeffrey

    2007-02-01

    The practice of office-based oral and maxillofacial surgery is continuously expanding and involves the management of a diverse population in regards to the surgical procedures performed within the office and the age and medical health of the patients treated within the office. Comfort, cooperation, and hemodynamic stability are critical to satisfactorily accomplishing the surgical procedure. Various anesthetic techniques are used, including local anesthesia, anxiolysis, analgesia and sedation, and general anesthesia. The topic is vast and too extensive to be fully discussed in this article. The intent of this article is to provide a discussion of some fundamental concepts that can optimize anesthetic safety and care.

  12. The role of family of origin in physicians referred to a CME course.

    PubMed

    Samenow, Charles P; Yabiku, Scott T; Ghulyan, Marine; Williams, Betsy; Swiggart, William

    2012-06-01

    Few studies exist which look at psychological factors associated with physician sexual misconduct. In this study, we explore family dysfunction as a possible risk factor associated with physician sexual misconduct. Six hundred thirteen physicians referred to a continuing medical education (CME) course for sexual misconduct were administered the FACES-II survey, a validated and reliable measure of family dynamics. The survey was part of a self-learning activity. We collected data from February 2000 to February 2009. Participants were predominantly white, middle-aged males who represented the full range of medical specialties. Their results were compared against a sample of 177 physicians. The FACES-II is a self-report test that measures family of origin (the family in which one was raised) dynamics on two dimensions (1) flexibility, ranging from too flexible (chaotic) to not flexible enough (rigid) and (2) cohesion ranging from too close (enmeshed) to not close enough (disengaged). The most common family pattern observed among physicians accused of sexual misconduct was rigid flexibility paired with disengaged cohesion, indicative of unhealthy family functioning. This pattern was significantly different than the pattern observed in the comparison group. Physicians who engage in sexual misconduct are more likely to have family of origin dysfunction. Ethics is developmental and learned in one's family of origin. Family of origin dynamics may be one risk factor predisposing one to ethical violations. These findings have important implications for screening, education, and treatment across the medical education continuum.

  13. Employed Family Physician Satisfaction and Commitment to Their Practice, Work Group, and Health Care Organization

    PubMed Central

    Karsh, Ben-Tzion; Beasley, John W; Brown, Roger L

    2010-01-01

    Objective Test a model of family physician job satisfaction and commitment. Data Sources/Study Setting Data were collected from 1,482 family physicians in a Midwest state during 2000–2001. The sampling frame came from the membership listing of the state's family physician association, and the analyzed dataset included family physicians employed by large multispecialty group practices. Study Design and Data Collection A cross-sectional survey was used to collect data about physician working conditions, job satisfaction, commitment, and demographic variables. Principal Findings The response rate was 47 percent. Different variables predicted the different measures of satisfaction and commitment. Satisfaction with one's health care organization (HCO) was most strongly predicted by the degree to which physicians perceived that management valued and recognized them and by the extent to which physicians perceived the organization's goals to be compatible with their own. Satisfaction with one's workgroup was most strongly predicted by the social relationship with members of the workgroup; satisfaction with one's practice was most strongly predicted by relationships with patients. Commitment to one's workgroup was predicted by relationships with one's workgroup. Commitment to one's HCO was predicted by relationships with management of the HCO. Conclusions Social relationships are stronger predictors of employed family physician satisfaction and commitment than staff support, job control, income, or time pressure. PMID:20070386

  14. An assessment of practice support and continuing medical education needs of rural Pennsylvania family physicians.

    PubMed

    Forti, E M; Martin, K E; Jones, R L; Herman, J M

    1996-01-01

    Family physicians provide the greatest proportion of care in rural communities. Yet, the number of physicians choosing family practice and rural practice has continued to decline. Undesirable aspects of rural practice, such as professional isolation and a lack of or inadequate resources, are assumed to be associated with this decline. This article reports on the practice support and continuing medical education needs of rural family physicians. A mail survey was conducted in 1993 on a purposive sample of family physicians in 39 of 67 rural-designated or urban Pennsylvania counties with low population densities. The physicians identified needs that included patient education materials and programs, community health promotion, federal regulation updates, technical assistance with computers and business management, database software and a videotape lending library, a drug hotline, and mini-fellowships on clinical skill development. A majority of respondents were willing to participate in clinical educational experiences for students and residents. Some physicians indicated a lack of interest in access to information through telecommunications, e.g., video conference referrals and consultations. Overall, findings revealed that family physicians need and are receptive to a variety of practice support and continuing education programs. A practice support program coupled with policy coordination among public and private organizations is likely to lessen complaints by rural primary care physicians.

  15. How the Medical Culture Contributes to Coworker-Perpetrated Harassment and Abuse of Family Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Miedema, Baukje; MacIntyre, Leslie; Tatemichi, Sue; Lambert-Lanning, Anita; Lemire, Francine; Manca, Donna; Ramsden, Vivian

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE Harassment and abuse in the workplace of family physicians has been associated with higher levels of stress, increased consumption of alcohol, and higher risk for developing mental health problems. Few studies have examined issues contributing to abusive encounters in the workplace of family physicians. METHODS For the overall study we used a mixed methods design, which included a cross-sectional survey of a randomly selected sample of active family physicians from the database of the College of Family Physicians of Canada and telephone interviews with those who reported experiencing work related harassment and abuse in the last year. The data presented here arise from the qualitative interviews of the study, which were analyzed thematically. RESULTS The interview arm of the study included 23 female and 14 male participants. The major themes that emerged from the study were (1) modeling of abusive behaviors, (2) status hierarchy among various medical disciplines, (3) shortage of physicians, and (4) lack of transparent policies and follow-up procedures after abusive encounters. The results are discussed using the broken window theory. CONCLUSION Many family physicians experience harassing and abusive encounters during their training or in the workplace. The current medical culture appears to contribute to harassment and abuse in the workplace of family physicians in Canada. We described the components that intentionally or unintentionally facilitate abusive behavior in the medical culture. PMID:22412002

  16. A Critical Look at the Family Physician's Role in Preventing Childhood Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Rosser, W.; Feldman, W.; McGrath, P.

    1987-01-01

    Childhood injuries stand as the most common causes of death among Canadian children. Physician advice and advocacy of appropriate legislation, parent education and legislative action could reduce this toll. There is a role for family physicians in the important process of providing a safer environment for our children. PMID:21263865

  17. Short-Term Educational Intervention Improves Family Physicians' Knowledge of Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kutcher, Stanley; Lauria-Horner, Bianca; MacLaren, Connie; Bujas-Bobanovic, Maja; Karlovic, Zlatko

    2003-01-01

    Introduction: Depression is frequently unrecognized and undertreated. Therefore, there is a need to increase the knowledge and skills of primary care physicians regarding management of depression. The aim of this study was to determine if a brief educational intervention can affect family physicians' knowledge of the diagnosis and treatment of…

  18. Medical abortion and family physicians. Survey of residents and practitioners in two Ontario settings.

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, Elin; Kaczorowski, Janusz; Smith, Pat; Sellors, John; Walsh, Allyn

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the knowledge, attitudes, and interest in providing medical abortion reported by family physicians and residents in rural and urban settings. DESIGN: A self-administered mailed survey using the modified Dillman method. SETTING: Hamilton and Thunder Bay County in Ontario. PARTICIPANTS: Family medicine residents (n = 93) and physicians (n = 234) in predominantly urban (Hamilton) and rural (Thunder Bay) settings. All faculty family physicians at McMaster University practising general family medicine and all family physicians in Thunder Bay County were surveyed. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Knowledge of, attitudes toward, and interest in providing medical abortion. RESULTS: Overall response rate to the survey was 62.7% (n = 327); 74.2% (69/93) of residents responded; 58.1% (136/234) of physicians responded. Physicians and residents rated their knowledge about medical abortion as poor, but most were interested in receiving more information and training in this area. Many (83.1%, 157/189) reported that medical abortion was an acceptable procedure for family physicians to perform, and 52.0% (64/123) of the physicians would consider providing medical abortions for their patients. Residents training in the more rural Thunder Bay program were less likely to support first-trimester abortions for both medical and nonmedical reasons than those training in Hamilton (P < .05). Male respondents were significantly less supportive of abortion for nonmedical reasons and were less likely to consider providing medical abortions for their patients (P < .05). CONCLUSION: Most family physicians and residents showed interest in receiving more information about and training in medical abortion. PMID:11935718

  19. Irritable bowel syndrome. Strategy for the family physician.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, W. G.

    1994-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome is one of the most common reasons for disability and health care seeking. A sensible strategy for management incorporates a confident diagnosis based upon history, physical examination, and pertinent tests. The physician can then reassure the patient, offer dietary and stress management advice, and recommend bran to relieve constipation and to evoke the placebo response. Patients who do not respond could require supportive psychotherapy or a drug for the dominant symptom. A few require careful referral, but overall responsibility should remain with the primary physician. Images Figures 1-2 PMID:8130678

  20. Perceptions of the first family physicians to adopt advanced access in the province of Quebec, Canada.

    PubMed

    Breton, Mylaine; Maillet, Lara; Paré, Isabelle; Abou Malham, Sabina; Touati, Nassera

    2016-09-08

    In Quebec, several primary care physicians have made the transition to the advanced access model to address the crisis of limited access to primary care. The objectives are to describe the implementation of the advanced access model, as perceived by the first family physicians; to analyze the factors influencing the implementation of its principles; and to document the physicians' perceptions of its effects on their practice, colleagues and patients. Qualitative methods were used to explore, through semi-structured interviews, the experiences of 21 family physicians who had made the transition to advanced access. Of the 21 physicians, 16 succeeded in adopting all five advanced access principles to varying degrees. Core implementation issues revolved around the dynamics of collaboration between physicians, nurses and other colleagues. Secretaries' functions, in particular, had to be expanded. Facilitating factors were mainly related to the physicians' leadership and the professional resources available in the organizations. Impediments related to resource availability and team functioning were also encountered. This is the first exploratory study to examine the factors influencing the adoption of the advanced access model conducted with early-adopter family physicians. The lessons drawn will inform discussions on scaling up to other settings experiencing the same problems. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. The Foreigner Talk of a Family Physician: An Observational Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Dana Kristine

    A study analyzed the characteristics of one male physician's foreigner talk over the telephone with non-native speakers (NNSs) of English and compared it to that of native speakers (NSs). The conversations all related to requests that patients come into the office for a periodic, preventative physical exam. Data came from tape recordings of the…

  2. The future role of the family physician in the United States: a rigorous exercise in definition.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Robert L; Brundgardt, Stacy; Lesko, Sarah E; Kittle, Nathan; Marker, Jason E; Tuggy, Michael L; Lefevre, Michael L; Borkan, Jeffrey M; Degruy, Frank V; Loomis, Glenn A; Krug, Nathan

    2014-01-01

    As the U.S. health care delivery system undergoes rapid transformation, there is an urgent need to define a comprehensive, evidence-based role for the family physician. A Role Definition Group made up of members of seven family medicine organizations developed a statement defining the family physician's role in meeting the needs of individuals, the health care system, and the country. The Role Definition Group surveyed more than 50 years of foundational manuscripts including published works from the Future of Family Medicine project and Keystone III conference, external reviews, and a recent Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical Education Family Medicine Milestones definition. They developed candidate definitions and a "foil" definition of what family medicine could become without change. The following definition was selected: "Family physicians are personal doctors for people of all ages and health conditions. They are a reliable first contact for health concerns and directly address most health care needs. Through enduring partnerships, family physicians help patients prevent, understand, and manage illness, navigate the health system and set health goals. Family physicians and their staff adapt their care to the unique needs of their patients and communities. They use data to monitor and manage their patient population, and use best science to prioritize services most likely to benefit health. They are ideal leaders of health care systems and partners for public health." This definition will guide the second Future of Family Medicine project and provide direction as family physicians, academicians, clinical networks, and policy-makers negotiate roles in the evolving health system.

  3. Adoption of Liquid-Based Cervical Cancer Screening Tests by Family Physicians and Gynecologists

    PubMed Central

    Rappaport, Karen M; Forrest, Christopher B; Holtzman, Neil A

    2004-01-01

    Objective To examine reasons for the adoption of liquid-based cervical cancer screening tests. Data Sources/Study Setting A mailed survey of 250 family physicians and 250 gynecologists in Maryland in 2000. Additional data were obtained from the AMA Master File of Physicians. Study Design Key outcome variables in this cross-sectional survey were early adoption of a liquid-based test by the end of 1997 and overall adoption by the time of the survey. Adoption was viewed in terms of a supply and demand theoretical framework with marketing influencing physician and patient demand as well as supply by insurance companies and laboratories. Data Collection Random samples of family physicians and gynecologists were selected from the AMA Master File of Physicians. The overall response rate was 61.9 percent. Principal Findings By 2000, 96 percent of gynecologists and 75 percent of family physicians in Maryland were using liquid-based cervical cancer screening tests, most commonly the ThinPrep® Pap Test™. Gynecologists were more likely than family physicians to have been early adopters (34 percent versus 5 percent, p<.01). Part of this variation in adoption was due to aggressive marketing to gynecologists, who were more likely than family physicians to receive information in the mail from the test manufacturer (89 percent versus 56 percent, p<.01) and to have been informed by the manufacturer that a patient had inquired about physicians' use of the test (22 percent versus 8 percent, p<.01). Conclusions The rapid diffusion of liquid-based cervical cancer screening tests occurred despite general agreement that the Pap smear has been one of the most successful cancer prevention interventions ever. Commercial marketing campaigns appear to contribute to the more rapid rate of diffusion of technology among specialists compared with generalists. PMID:15230935

  4. Oncologists and family physicians. Using a standardized letter to improve communication.

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Ted C.; Hagen, Neil A.; Smith, Colum; Summers, Nancy

    2003-01-01

    PROBLEM BEING ADDRESSED: Communication between oncologists at a regional cancer centre and family physicians caring for palliative cancer patients in the community was ineffective. OBJECTIVE OF PROGRAM: To improve communication between oncologists and family physicians by routine use of a template for dictated letters concerning follow-up care. PROGRAM DESCRIPTION: A consultation letter template was constructed and tested at a single clinic. The template was designed to guide oncologists dictating letters to family physicians for patients' follow-up visits. Effectiveness of the standardized letter was evaluated with a before-after survey. CONCLUSION: Using the template letter improved communication with respect to the relevance, timeliness, format, and amount of information. As care for patients at the end of life increasingly shifts to the community, ongoing efforts are required to improve communication between cancer centres and primary care physicians. PMID:12901484

  5. Using Conjoint Analysis to Elicit GPs’ Preferences for Family Physician Contracts: A Case Study in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Ranjbar Ezatabadi, Mohammad; Rashidian, Arash; Shariati, Mohammad; Rahimi Foroushani, Abbas; Akbari Sari, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background Family physician plans in Iran face several challenges, one of which is developing attractive and efficient contracts that motivate physicians to participate in the plan. Objectives This study aimed to elicit GPs’ preferences for family physician contracts. Patients and Methods In a cross-sectional study using the conjoint analysis technique, 580 GPs selected from the family physician database in Iran in 2014. Through qualitative and quantitative methods, 18 contract scenarios were developed via orthogonal design i.e., the impact of each attribute is measured independently from changes in other attributes and a questionnaire was developed. Data were collected through this questionnaire and analyzed using the ordered logistic regression (OLR) model. Results The results show that “quotas for admission to specialized courses” is the strongest preference of GPs (β = 1.123). In order of importance, the other preferences are having the right to provide services outside of the specified package (β = 0.962), increased number of covered population (β = 0.814), capitation payment + 15% bonus (β = 0.644), increased catchment area to 5 km (β = 0.349), and increased length of contract to five years (β = 0.345). Conclusions The conjoint analysis results show that GPs concerned about various factors of family physician contracts. These results can be helpful for policy-makers as they complete the process of creating family physician plans, which can help increase the motivation of GPs to participate in the plan. PMID:28191339

  6. Family physicians clinical aptitude for the nutritional management of type 2 diabetes mellitus in Guadalajara, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Cabrera Pivaral, C E; Gutiérrez Roman, E A; Gonzalez Pérez, G; Gonzalez Reyes, F; Valadez Toscano, F; Gutiérrez Ruvalcaba, C; Rios Riebeling, C D

    2008-02-01

    There are 180,000 new Diabetes Mellitus cases in Mexico each year (1). This chronic, complex and multifactor disease requires an adequate nutritional management plan to be prescribed by family physicians. They should be trained to identify the potential difficulties in the patient's dietary schedule and orientate their management from an integrative point of view. The purpose of this study was to detect and measure family physician's clinical aptitudes for the nutritional management of Type 2 diabetes, in a representative family physician's sample from five Family Medicine Units of the Mexican Institute of Social Security in Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico. A structured and validated instrument was applied to 117 physicians from a total of 450 in Guadalajara, Jalisco. The main study variable was clinical aptitude for nutritional management of Type 2 diabetes. Aptitude levels were defined by an ordinal scale and related to the other variables using the median, Mann-Whitney's U test and Kruskal Wallis (KW) test. Global results showed a median of 30 points that relates to a low and a very low aptitude level for the 72% of physicians without statistical significance (KW: p>0.05) with the rest of variables. These results reflect family physician's difficulties to orientate the nutritional management of Type 2 diabetes, as well as the lack of work environments that facilitate case reflection and formative educational strategies.

  7. Noise-induced hearing loss: the family physician's role

    SciTech Connect

    Dobie, R.A.

    1987-12-01

    Noise is an environmental health problem that has not received sufficient attention. Physicians should become knowledgeable about the medical consequences of excessive noise, support legislation to reduce the problem and promote programs aimed at noise control and prevention of hearing loss. Questions about noise and hearing should be incorporated into the medical history, and pure-tone audiometry should be a part of periodic physical evaluations.

  8. Effect of communication style and physician-family relationships on satisfaction with pediatric chronic disease care.

    PubMed

    Swedlund, Matthew P; Schumacher, Jayna B; Young, Henry N; Cox, Elizabeth D

    2012-01-01

    Over 8% of children have a chronic disease and many are unable to adhere to treatment. Satisfaction with chronic disease care can impact adherence. We examine how visit satisfaction is associated with physician communication style and ongoing physician-family relationships. We collected surveys and visit videos for 75 children ages 9-16 years visiting for asthma, diabetes, or sickle cell disease management. Raters assessed physician communication style (friendliness, interest, responsiveness, and dominance) from visit videos. Quality of the ongoing relationship was measured with four survey items (parent-physician relationship, child-physician relationship, comfort asking questions, and trust in the physician), while a single item assessed satisfaction. Correlations and chi square were used to assess association of satisfaction with communication style or quality of the ongoing relationship. Satisfaction was positively associated with physician to parent (p < 0.05) friendliness. Satisfaction was also associated with the quality of the ongoing parent-physician (p < 0.001) and child-physician relationships (p < 0.05), comfort asking questions (p < 0.001), and trust (p < 0.01). This shows that both the communication style and the quality of the ongoing relationship contribute to pediatric chronic disease visit satisfaction.

  9. More Comprehensive Care Among Family Physicians is Associated with Lower Costs and Fewer Hospitalizations

    PubMed Central

    Bazemore, Andrew; Petterson, Stephen; Peterson, Lars E.; Phillips, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE Comprehensiveness is lauded as 1 of the 5 core virtues of primary care, but its relationship with outcomes is unclear. We measured associations between variations in comprehensiveness of practice among family physicians and healthcare utilization and costs for their Medicare beneficiaries. METHODS We merged data from 2011 Medicare Part A and B claims files for a complex random sample of family physicians engaged in direct patient care, including 100% of their claimed care of Medicare beneficiaries, with data reported by the same physicians during their participation in Maintenance of Certification for Family Physicians (MC-FP) between the years 2007 and 2011. We created a measure of comprehensiveness from mandatory self-reported survey items as part of MC-FP examination registration. We compared this measure to another derived from Medicare’s Berenson-Eggers Type of Service (BETOS) codes. We then examined the association between the 2 measures of comprehensiveness and hospitalizations, Part B payments, and combined Part A and B payments. RESULTS Our full family physician sample consists of 3,652 physicians providing the plurality of care to 555,165 Medicare beneficiaries. Of these, 1,133 recertified between 2007 and 2011 and cared for 185,044 beneficiaries. There was a modest correlation (0.30) between the BETOS and self-reported comprehensiveness measures. After adjusting for beneficiary and physician characteristics, increasing comprehensiveness was associated with lower total Medicare Part A and B costs and Part B costs alone, but not with hospitalizations; the association with spending was stronger for the BETOS measure than for the self-reported measure; higher BETOS scores significantly reduced the likelihood of a hospitalization. CONCLUSIONS Increasing family physician comprehensiveness of care, especially as measured by claims measures, is associated with decreasing Medicare costs and hospitalizations. Payment and practice policies that enhance

  10. A proposal for the curriculum and evaluation for training rural family physicians in enhanced surgical skills

    PubMed Central

    Caron, Nadine; Iglesias, Stuart; Friesen, Randall; Berjat, Vanessa; Humber, Nancy; Falk, Ryan; Prins, Mark; Haines, Victoria Vogt; Geller, Brian; Janke, Fred; Woollard, Robert; Batchelor, Bret; Van Bussel, Jared

    2015-01-01

    Summary Rural western Canada relies heavily on family physicians with enhanced surgical skills (ESS) for surgical services. The recent decision by the College of Family Physicians of Canada (CFPC) to recognize ESS as a “community of practice” section offers a potential home akin to family practice anesthesia and emergency medicine. To our knowledge, however, a skill set for ESS in Canada has never been described formally. In this paper the Curriculum Committee of the National ESS Working Group proposes a generic curriculum for the training and evaluation of the ESS skill set. PMID:26574835

  11. Family Physicians' Satisfaction with Current Practice: What Is the Role of Their Interactions with Specialists?

    PubMed Central

    Thind, Amardeep; Freeman, Tom; Thorpe, Cathy; Burt, Andrea; Stewart, Moira

    2009-01-01

    Provision of high-quality care sometimes necessitates a referral to, and receipt of timely feedback from, specialist physicians. Interaction with specialists is a key role of family physicians, but it has not received significant attention with respect to its impact on family physician satisfaction. The authors conducted a cross-sectional analysis of data gathered from a decennial census of family physicians in southwestern Ontario. The conceptual framework was based on the model developed by the Society of General Internal Medicine (SGIM) Career Satisfaction Work Group. More than two-thirds of respondents were “very satisfied” with their current practice. Stepwise regression analysis based on a generalized linear model showed that greater difficulty in referring patients to specialists was associated with 23% lower odds of being “very satisfied”. Not receiving a timely response from specialists was associated with 26% higher odds of not being “very satisfied.” Marital status, teaching involvement and practice volume were also associated with satisfaction. The findings indicate that the practice of family medicine offers a fulfilling career in today's medical marketplace. However, linkages and feedback between family physicians and specialists need to be augmented. PMID:19377349

  12. Does having regular care by a family physician improve preventive care?

    PubMed Central

    McIsaac, W. J.; Fuller-Thomson, E.; Talbot, Y.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess whether regular care from a family physician is associated with receiving preventive services. DESIGN: Secondary analysis of the 1994 National Population Health Survey. SETTING: Cross-sectional sample of the Canadian population. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 15,731 non-institutionalized adults. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Reported visits to general practitioners and specialists in the previous year and reports of having had blood pressure measurements, mammography, and Pap smears. RESULTS: A graded relationship was observed between level of regular care by a family physician in the previous year (none, some, regular) and receiving preventive services. Those without regular doctors and those reporting only some care by a family physician were less likely to have ever had their blood pressure checked than adults receiving ongoing care from a regular family physician. Women reporting some or no care were less likely to have had mammography within 2 years or to have ever had Pap smears. CONCLUSION: Adults who receive regular care from a family physician are more likely to receive recommended preventive services. PMID:11212436

  13. Are family physicians the answer to ED doctor shortage, or 'blasphemy'?

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    Some organizations maintain that family physicians have the skills and training necessary to practice in the ED and help combat the current physician shortage, while others maintain their training is inadequate. Here are some issues to take into consideration with such candidates: Have they obtained thorough experience the necessary skills to practice in the ED? Have they received a significant amount of clinical training in an ED? Has their training progress been monitored by a teaching attending?

  14. Collaborative approaches to patient education in the family physician's office.

    PubMed

    Hankey, T L; Elandt, N J

    1988-12-01

    The collaboration of a doctor and nurse in a solo family practice provides a model for implementation of various modalities of patient education. This requires an integrated approach in which patient education becomes part of the routine visit. The impediments and advantages of solo family practice with respect to delivering patient education are discussed. The importance of continuity of care is emphasized. Fifteen "practical tips" for successful patient education in this setting are offered so that they may be reproduced elsewhere.

  15. [Zurich physician-pharmacist family Lavater and Johann Wolfgang von Goethe].

    PubMed

    Mannetstätter, A; Friedrich, C

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the connections between Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832) and the physician and pharmacist family Lavater in Zurich. The analysis of the correspondence between Johann Bartholomäus Trommsdorff (1770-1837) and the Lavater family and between the Lavater family and the government of the duchy of Weimar shows an interesting story about a picture "Goethe in Italy".

  16. Continuing educational needs in computers and informatics. McGill survey of family physicians.

    PubMed Central

    McClaran, J.; Snell, L.; Duarte-Franco, E.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe family physicians' perceived educational needs in computers and informatics. DESIGN: Mailed survey. SETTING: General or family practices in Canada. PARTICIPANTS: Physicians (489 responded to a mailing sent to 2,500 physicians) who might attend sessions at the McGill Centre for CME. Two duplicate questionnaires were excluded from the analysis. METHOD: Four domains were addressed: practice profile, clinical CME needs, professional CME needs, and preferred learning formats. Data were entered on dBASE IV; analyses were performed on SPSS. MAIN FINDINGS: In the 487 questionnaires retained for analysis, "informatics and computers" was mentioned more than any other clinical diagnostic area, any other professional area, and all but three patient groups and service areas as a topic where improvement in knowledge and skills was needed in the coming year. Most physicians had no access to computer support for practice (62.6%); physicians caring for neonates, toddlers, or hospital inpatients were more likely to report some type of computer support. CONCLUSIONS: Family physicians selected knowledge and skills for computers and informatics as an area for improvement in the coming year more frequently than they selected most traditional clinical CME topics. This educational need is particularly great in small towns and in settings where some computerized hospital data are already available. PMID:10790816

  17. Satisfaction and Dissatisfaction Toward Urban Family Physician Program: A Population Based Study in Shiraz, Southern Iran

    PubMed Central

    Honarvar, Behnam; Lankarani, Kamran Bagheri; Ghahramani, Sulmaz; Akbari, Maryam; Tabrizi, Reza; Bagheri, Zahra; Poostforoushfard, Sima

    2016-01-01

    Background: A national project of extending a family physician program to urban areas has been started since May 2013 in Iran. The present study aimed to detect correlates of people's satisfaction and dissatisfaction about urban family physician program. Methods: This cross-sectional and population-based study was conducted in Shiraz, Southern Iran. Multistage and proportional to size random sampling were used. Different items about satisfaction and dissatisfaction toward urban family physician program were queried. Single variable and then multiple variable analyses of data were done using SPSS software (Chicago, IL. USA). Results: Mean age of 1257 participants in the study was 38.1 ± 13.2 years. Respondents included men (634; 50.4%), married (882; 70.2%), those who were educated at universities (529; 42%) and self-employed groups (405; 32.2%). One thousand fifty-eight (84.1%) were covered by the family physician program. Mean of referral times to a family physician was 2.2 ± 2.9 during the year before the study. Satisfaction toward urban family physician program was high in 198 (15.8%), moderate in 394 (31.3%), and low in 391 (31.1%). Dissatisfaction about this program was more among younger than 51-year-old groups (for 31–50 years odds ratio [OR] =2.3, 95% confidence interval [CI] =1.4–3.7, P < 0.001 and for 18–30 years OR = 2, 95% CI = 1.2–3.4, P = 0.005), less knowledgeable ones (OR = 2.2, 95% CI = 1.3–3.6, P = 0.001), singles (OR = 2.1, 95% CI = 1.2–3.4, P = 0.003), and those with more than 4 of family members (OR = 1.3, 95% CI = 1–1.7, P = 0.05). Conclusions: Overall, the majority of the people are not very satisfied with the urban family physician program. This shows the need for a multi-disciplinary approach including training, improvement of infrastructures and referral system, continuous supervision, and frequent monitoring of user's and provider's feedback about this program. According the results, the family physician program should be

  18. How are family physicians managing osteoporosis? Qualitative study of their experiences and educational needs.

    PubMed Central

    Jaglal, Susan B.; Carroll, June; Hawker, Gillian; McIsaac, Warren J.; Jaakkimainen, Liisa; Cadarette, Suzanne M.; Cameron, Cathy; Davis, Dave

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore family physicians' experiences and perceptions of osteoporosis and to identify their educational needs in this area. DESIGN: Qualitative study using focus groups. SETTING: Four Ontario sites: one each in Thunder Bay and Timmins, and two in Toronto, chosen to represent a range of practice sizes, populations, locations, and use of bone densitometry. PARTICIPANTS: Thirty-two FPs participated in four focus groups. Physicians were identified by investigators or local contacts to provide maximum variation sampling. METHOD: Focus groups using a semistructured interview guide were audiotaped and transcribed. The constant comparative method of data analysis was used to identify key words and concepts until saturation of themes was reached. MAIN FINDINGS: Family physicians order bone densitometry and try to manage osteoporosis appropriately, but lack a rationale for testing and are confused about management. Participants' main concern was clinical management, followed by disease prevention and their educational needs. CONCLUSION: Family physicians are confused about how to manage osteoporosis. To reduce the burden of illness due to osteoporosis, educational interventions should be tailored to family physicians' needs. PMID:12729242

  19. Impact of an electronic link between the emergency department and family physicians: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Eddy; Afilalo, Marc; Vandal, Alain C.; Boivin, Jean-François; Xue, Xiaoqing; Colacone, Antoinette; Léger, Ruth; Shrier, Ian; Rosenthal, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    Background Electronic information exchange is believed to improve efficiency and reduce resource utilization. We developed a Web-based standardized communication system (SCS) that enables family physicians to receive detailed reports of their patients' care in the emergency department. We sought to determine the impact of the SCS on measures of resource utilization in the emergency department and family physician offices. Methods We used an open 4-period crossover cluster-randomized controlled design. During 2 separate 10-week intervention phases, family physicians received detailed reports of their patients' emergency department visits over the Internet, and in the alternating control phases they received a 1-page copy of the emergency department notes by mail. The primary outcome was the number of repeat visits to the emergency department within 14 days of the initial visit. Secondary outcomes included duplication of test and specialty consultation requests by the emergency and family physician. Outcomes were measured using the hospital database and questionnaires sent to the family physicians. Results A total of 2022 patient visits to the emergency department from 23 practices were used in the study. Use of the SCS failed to reduce the number of repeat visits to the emergency department within 14 days (odds ratio [OR] 1.10, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.8–1.51) and 28 days (OR 1.01, 95% CI 0.8–1.27). There was no significant duplication of requests for diagnostic tests between the emergency and family physician during the intervention and control phases (24 v. 22, p = 0.93), but there was significantly greater duplication in specialty consultation requests in the intervention phase than in the control phase (20 v. 8, p = 0.049). Interpretation An electronic link between emergency and family physicians did not result in a significant reduction in resource utilization at either service point. Investments in improved electronic information exchange between

  20. Take aim and fire again: laboratory investigation and the family physician.

    PubMed

    Emson, H E

    1988-02-01

    This article discusses the attitude of the family physician to laboratory investigation and specifically reviews changes that have taken place in the last 12 years. It focuses on the problems of allocation of limited resources, the planning of laboratory services, out-of-laboratory testing, and responsibility for quality assurance. As well as bearing individual responsibility for the optimal use of a limited resource, the family physician has a co-operative part to exercise in support of the pathologist's role in organizing and planning the service on which their patients depend.

  1. Factors associated with the decision of family physicians to provide intrapartum care.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, L F; Reynolds, J L

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate which characteristics and beliefs of family physicians determine their decision to provide intrapartum care. DESIGN: Confidential survey questionnaire mailed in spring 1993. SETTING: Alberta and Ontario. SUBJECTS: Random selection of 207 physicians who had graduated from medical school between 1953 and 1990 and were thought to be in family or general practice. Of 178 eligible physicians, usable replies were received from 104 (58.4%). OUTCOME MEASURES: Beliefs (measured on a 7-point Likert scale) about the relevance of 16 primary factors to the type of obstetric care provided; demographic, training and practice characteristics. RESULTS: The respondents who provided intrapartum care differed from those who did not in their beliefs about the availability of a local hospital suitable for intrapartum care (p < 0.001), their practice partners' views on the role of family physicians in providing obstetric care (p < 0.002), their own concept of the role of family physicians in providing obstetric care (p < 0.001) and women's views on the type of obstetric care they want (p < 0.002). They also differed, although less significantly, in their beliefs about the adequacy of their obstetric training before entering family practice (p < 0.04), the expected effects of providing obstetric care on their free time (p < 0.006), their fear of malpractice litigation (p < 0.028) and their perceived competence in performing practical obstetric procedures (p < 0.05). Logistic regression analysis revealed that certain secondary factors were particularly relevant to the respondents' provision of intrapartum care at present. These included the physician's perceived competence at managing postpartum maternal hemorrhage (odds ratio [OR] 48.90, 90% confidence interval [CI] 4.70 to 509), the belief that medical insurance premiums should not be affected by the type of obstetric care provided (OR 3.55, 90% CI 1.67 to 7.57]) and the number of practice partners who provided

  2. Email communication in a developing country: different family physician and patient perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Makarem, Nisrine N.; Antoun, Jumana

    2016-01-01

    Background Email communication between physicians and patients could improve access to and delivery of health care. Most of the literature studies about email communication between physicians and patients have been conducted in developing countries. Therefore, this study aims to analyze the practices, attitudes, and barriers of both physicians’ and patients’ use of email within the same health care setting of a developing country. Methods A cross-sectional paper-based survey was conducted among 39 physicians and 500 patients at the Family Medicine clinics of the American University of Beirut, a tertiary academic medical center. Results Most of the surveyed patients and physicians reported that they would like to communicate through email and agreed that it is useful. However, only 19% of the patients have ever communicated with their physicians via email, and only 5.1% of physicians have often communicated with their patients via email. Almost half of the patients surveyed were unaware of the possibility of this form of communication, and only 17% reported that their physician offered them his or her email address. In addition, physicians and patients did not agree on the services to be provided by email communication. For instance, almost half of the patients indicated consultation for an urgent medical matter as suitable for email communication. Conclusion The use of email communication in health care is still scarce. Patients and physicians have different perspectives of its use and importance. Further rigorous research is needed to clarify the advantages and disadvantages of this form of communication, especially in the developing world. Interested physicians are encouraged to establish appropriate personal policies for email communication with adequate announcement and patient education plans. PMID:27855773

  3. Resource-based relative value units: a primer for academic family physicians.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Sarah E; Newton, Warren P

    2002-03-01

    The Resource-based Relative Value Scale (RBRVS) is the prevailing model used to reimburse physician services today. Based on empirical research, relative value units (RVUs) quantify the relative work, practice expense, and malpractice costs for specific physician services to appropriately establish payment. The fee schedule, implemented by the Health Care Financing Administration in 1992, dramatically affected physician reimbursement, with the goal of correcting disparities across disciplines. In the first 6 years, Medicare payments to family physicians increased by 36%, while payments to specialists decreased by as much as 18%. Recent changes include new practice expense estimates and adjustment of payment based on facility type. The impact of RVUs is even more widespread as many private payers use the fee schedule to set payment rates and as RVUs become the yardstick for physician productivity measures. Despite the initial successes, the ability of RVUs to capture the work done by primary care providers is still limited. Primary care services today are not as easily quantified as surgical procedures, and coding limitations hinder documentation of services. Rapid changes in health care make comparisons to work done 2 decades ago difficult. Understanding the strengths and limitations of RVUs as they apply to family physicians is fundamental to safeguarding the role of primary care.

  4. Should Medical Anthropology be Required for Family Physicians?

    PubMed Central

    Deagle, George L.

    1992-01-01

    The educational preparation of practitioners might change as family medicine shifts its emphasis to a more humanistic approach. Medical anthropology offers particular promise as a training experience. Learning about the role of culture, including beliefs and values surrounding illness, can supplement basic science training. Improved delivery of health care is likely if caregivers are sensitive to cultural dimensions of patients' illnesses. Imagesp1178-ap1179-ap1180-a PMID:21221336

  5. Rural Women Family Physicians: Strategies for Successful Work-Life Balance

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Julie; Hustedde, Carol; Bjorkman, Sarah; Prasad, Rupa; Sola, Orlando; Wendling, Andrea; Bjorkman, Kurt; Paladine, Heather

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE Women family physicians experience challenges in maintaining work-life balance while practicing in rural communities. We sought to better understand the personal and professional strategies that enable women in rural family medicine to balance work and personal demands and achieve long-term career satisfaction. METHODS Women family physicians practicing in rural communities in the United States were interviewed using a semistructured format. Interviews were recorded, professionally transcribed, and analyzed using an immersion and crystallization approach, followed by detailed coding of emergent themes. RESULTS The 25 participants described a set of strategies that facilitated successful work-life balance. First, they used reduced or flexible work hours to help achieve balance with personal roles. Second, many had supportive relationships with spouses and partners, parents, or other members of the community, which facilitated their ability to be readily available to their patients. Third, participants maintained clear boundaries around their work lives, which helped them to have adequate time for parenting, recreation, and rest. CONCLUSIONS Women family physicians can build successful careers in rural communities, but supportive employers, relationships, and patient approaches provide a foundation for this success. Educators, employers, communities, and policymakers can adapt their practices to help women family physicians thrive in rural communities. PMID:27184995

  6. The role of expert searching in the Family Physicians' Inquiries Network (FPIN)*

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Deborah; Meadows, Susan E.; Nashelsky, Joan E.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: This article describes the contributions of medical librarians, as members of the Family Physicians' Inquiries Network (FPIN), to the creation of a database of clinical questions and answers that allows family physicians to practice evidence-based medicine using high-quality information at the point of care. The medical librarians have contributed their evidence-based search expertise and knowledge of information systems that support the processes and output of the consortium. Methods: Since its inception, librarians have been included as valued members of the FPIN community. FPIN recognizes the search expertise of librarians, and each FPIN librarian must meet qualifications demonstrating appropriate experience and training in evidence-based medicine. The consortium works collaboratively to produce the Clinical Inquiries series published in family medicine publications. Results: Over 170 Clinical Inquiries have appeared in Journal of Family Practice (JFP) and American Family Physician (AFP). Surveys have shown that this series has become the most widely read part of the JFP Website. As a result, FPIN has formalized specific librarian roles that have helped build the organizational infrastructure. Conclusions: All of the activities of the consortium are highly collaborative, and the librarian community reflects that. The FPIN librarians are valuable and equal contributors to the process of creating, updating, and maintaining high-quality clinical information for practicing primary care physicians. Of particular value is the skill of expert searching that the librarians bring to FPIN's products. PMID:15685280

  7. Nurses versus physicians' knowledge, attitude, and performance on care for the family members of dying patients

    PubMed Central

    Abdollahimohammad, Abdolghani; Firouzkouhi, Mohammadreza; Amrollahimishvan, Fatemeh; Alimohammadi, Nasrollah

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Nurses and physicians must be competent enough to provide care for the clients. As a lack of knowledge and a poor attitude result in a low performance of delivering care, this study aimed to explore the nurses versus physicians’ knowledge, attitude, and performance on care for the family members of dying patients (FMDPs). Methods: This descriptive study was conducted at the educational hospitals in Isfahan, Iran. The samples were 110 nurses and 110 physicians. The data were collected through a convenience sampling method and using a valid and reliable questionnaire. Results: The average knowledge, attitude, and performance on care for the FMDPs were not significantly different between nurses and physicians (p>0.05). The majority of nurses (55.4%) and physician (63.6%) were at a moderate and a fair level of knowledge of care for the FMDPs. Most of the nurses (81%) and physicians (87.3%) had a positive attitude towards caring the FMDPs. Most of the nurses (70%) and physicians (86.3%) had a moderate and fair performance. Conclusion: Having enough knowledge and skills, and a positive attitude are necessary for caring the FMDPs. Nurses’ and physicians' competencies must be improved through continuing educational programs and holding international and national conferences with a focus on the palliative care. PMID:26838571

  8. Coordination of cancer care between family physicians and cancer specialists

    PubMed Central

    Easley, Julie; Miedema, Baukje; Carroll, June C.; Manca, Donna P.; O’Brien, Mary Ann; Webster, Fiona; Grunfeld, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To explore health care provider (HCP) perspectives on the coordination of cancer care between FPs and cancer specialists. Design Qualitative study using semistructured telephone interviews. Setting Canada. Participants A total of 58 HCPs, comprising 21 FPs, 15 surgeons, 12 medical oncologists, 6 radiation oncologists, and 4 GPs in oncology. Methods This qualitative study is nested within a larger mixed-methods program of research, CanIMPACT (Canadian Team to Improve Community-Based Cancer Care along the Continuum), focused on improving the coordination of cancer care between FPs and cancer specialists. Using a constructivist grounded theory approach, telephone interviews were conducted with HCPs involved in cancer care. Invitations to participate were sent to a purposive sample of HCPs based on medical specialty, sex, province or territory, and geographic location (urban or rural). A coding schema was developed by 4 team members; subsequently, 1 team member coded the remaining transcripts. The resulting themes were reviewed by the entire team and a summary of results was mailed to participants for review. Main findings Communication challenges emerged as the most prominent theme. Five key related subthemes were identified around this core concept that occurred at both system and individual levels. System-level issues included delays in medical transcription, difficulties accessing patient information, and physicians not being copied on all reports. Individual-level issues included the lack of rapport between FPs and cancer specialists, and the lack of clearly defined and broadly communicated roles. Conclusion Effective and timely communication of medical information, as well as clearly defined roles for each provider, are essential to good coordination of care along the cancer care trajectory, particularly during transitions of care between cancer specialist and FP care. Despite advances in technology, substantial communication challenges still

  9. Evidence-based medicine in primary care: qualitative study of family physicians

    PubMed Central

    Tracy, C Shawn; Dantas, Guilherme Coelho; Upshur, Ross EG

    2003-01-01

    Background The objectives of this study were: a) to examine physician attitudes to and experience of the practice of evidence-based medicine (EBM) in primary care; b) to investigate the influence of patient preferences on clinical decision-making; and c) to explore the role of intuition in family practice. Method Qualitative analysis of semi-structured interviews of 15 family physicians purposively selected from respondents to a national survey on EBM mailed to a random sample of Canadian family physicians. Results Participants mainly welcomed the promotion of EBM in the primary care setting. A significant number of barriers and limitations to the implementation of EBM were identified. EBM is perceived by some physicians as a devaluation of the 'art of medicine' and a threat to their professional/clinical autonomy. Issues regarding the trustworthiness and credibility of evidence were of great concern, especially with respect to the influence of the pharmaceutical industry. Attempts to become more evidence-based often result in the experience of conflicts. Patient factors exert a powerful influence on clinical decision-making and can serve as trumps to research evidence. A widespread belief that intuition plays a vital role in primary care reinforced views that research evidence must be considered alongside other factors such as patient preferences and the clinical judgement and experience of the physician. Discussion Primary care physicians are increasingly keen to consider research evidence in clinical decision-making, but there are significant concerns about the current model of EBM. Our findings support the proposed revisions to EBM wherein greater emphasis is placed on clinical expertise and patient preferences, both of which remain powerful influences on physician behaviour. PMID:12740025

  10. What Motivates Family Physicians to Participate in Training Programs in Shared Decision Making?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allaire, Anne-Sophie; Labrecque, Michel; Giguere, Anik; Gagnon, Marie-Pierre; Legare, France

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Little is known about the factors that influence family physician (FP) participation in continuing professional development (CPD) programs in shared decision making (SDM). We sought to identify the factors that motivate FPs to participate in DECISION+, a CPD program in SDM. Methods: In 2007-2008, we collected data from 39 FPs who…

  11. Preventing crises in palliative care in the home. Role of family physicians and nurses.

    PubMed Central

    Howarth, G.; Willison, K. B.

    1995-01-01

    With the current shift to community care, the need for palliative care in the home involving the family physician has increased. Potential causes of crises in the home care of the dying are identified. Strategies to prevent crises are suggested that rely on a team's providing comprehensive and anticipatory care. PMID:7539653

  12. Urban family physician plan in Iran: challenges of implementation in Kerman

    PubMed Central

    Dehnavieh, Reza; Kalantari, Ali Reza; Jafari Sirizi, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background: The Family Physician Plan has recently been implemented in three provinces of Iran on a pilot basis and is going to be implemented throughout Iran in the future. Through a qualitative design, this study aims to determine probable implementation challenges of Family Physician Plan in Kerman. Methods: This study was conducted in Kerman in 2013. Data were collected through interviews with 21 experts in the field. Sampling continued until data saturation level was achieved. All interviews were recorded and then analyzed, and main themes and subgroups were extracted from them based on a framework analysis model. Results: most prevalent establishment challenges of Family Physician Plan were classified into policy-making, financial supply, laws and resources. Conclusion: The urban Family Physician Plan can be carried out more effectively by implementing this plan step by step, highlighting the relationships between the related organizations, using new payment mechanisms e.g Per Capita, DRG, make national commitment and proper educational programs for providers, development the health electronic Record, justifying providers and community about advantages of this plan, clarifying regulatory status about providers' Duties and most importantly considering a specific funding source. PMID:26913266

  13. Barriers to Physician Identification and Treatment of Family Violence: Lessons from Five Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Stu; And Others

    1997-01-01

    A study involving over 480 interviews in five diverse communities (Atlanta, Georgia; Duluth, Minnesota; Providence, Rhode Island; Riverside, California; Roswell, New Mexico) identified barriers facing physicians and other health care providers in identifying, treating, and referring victims of family violence, and illuminated the relationships of…

  14. Practice patterns of rural family physicians based on the American Diabetes Association standards of care.

    PubMed

    Zoorob, R J; Mainous, A G

    1996-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine practice patterns of rural family physicians in the care of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus based on the standards of care of the American Diabetes Association (ADA). One hundred patient charts were randomly chosen, twenty for each physician, from the practices of five family physicians in rural Ohio. A standardized collection protocol was used, based upon the ADA recommendations. The charts were reviewed for compliance with the ADA parameters. The patients' records demonstrated 66% compliance with dietary counseling and 33% with counseling about exercise. Moreover, there was low compliance with physical examination guidelines. Specifically, 66% of the patients had fundoscopic examination and 64% had a complete foot examination done. With respect to the laboratory guidelines, 70% of the charts reviewed had a urinalysis ordered and 45% annual lipids measured. However, glycosylated hemoglobin was performed in only 15% of the patients. The results suggest that rural family physicians do not consistently follow the ADA standards of care.

  15. Knowledge, Attitude, Practice, and Perceived Barriers of Colorectal Cancer Screening among Family Physicians in National Guard Health Affairs, Riyadh

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. The objective of this study is to explore the current knowledge, attitude, and practice of family physicians working in family medicine clinics in National Guard Health Affairs (NGHA), Riyadh, toward colorectal cancer (CRC) screening and to identify the barriers of the screening. Methods. Data were collected using a validated self-administered questionnaire adopted from the National Cancer Institute in USA, customized by adding and eliminating questions to be in line with the institution (NGHA) characteristics. Results. Of the 130 physicians, 56.2% of the physicians were not practicing CRC screening although 94.6% considered CRC screening effective. Board certified physicians had higher knowledge score and were practicing CRC screening more when compared to other physicians. Physicians who reported practicing CRC screening scored more on the knowledge score than those not practicing. Male physicians scored better on attitude score than female physicians. The study found that barriers were cited in higher rates among physicians not practicing CRC screening compared with practicing physicians. Lack of patients' awareness was the most cited barrier. Conclusion. Large percentage of family physicians in this study do not practice CRC screening, despite the knowledge level and the positive attitude. PMID:25328703

  16. ‘Meeting People Where They’re At’: Experiences of Family Physicians Engaging Women Who Use Illicit Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Woolhouse, Susan; Brown, Judith Belle; Thind, Amardeep

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE There is little research exploring the experiences of family physicians caring for women who use illicit drugs. This study explores the experiences of these physicians in order to better understand the process of engaging these women in the patient-physician relationship. METHODS We conducted a phenomenologic, qualitative study using individual, in-depth interviews with 10 family physicians working in inner-city Toronto and Ottawa, Ontario. An iterative and interpretive analysis was used. RESULTS Three broad themes emerged from the analysis. The predominant theme was that of the patient-physician relationship, which consisted of 2 phases: the engagement phase and the maintenance phase. During the engagement phase, issues such as access and women’s experiences of trauma and violence were evident and impeded participants’ ability to engage with this population. As such, the patient-physician relationship during the engagement phase was tenuous. Trust and presence were paramount during this phase. Once a family physician engaged a woman, the transition to the maintenance phase was made. Within the maintenance phase, 2 subthemes were identified: continuity of care and “meeting people where they’re at” (finding common ground). CONCLUSIONS This study identified a 2-phase process of the patient-physician relationship from the perspective of family physicians caring for women using illicit drugs: the engagement and maintenance phases. Our findings identified strategies to support the patient-physician relationship during each of these phases that have implications for improving the health of these women. PMID:21555752

  17. How Do Physicians Assess Their Family Physician Colleagues' Performance? Creating a Rubric to Inform Assessment and Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sargeant, Joan; MacLeod, Tanya; Sinclair, Douglas; Power, Mary

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: The Colleges of Physicians and Surgeons of Alberta and Nova Scotia (CPSNS) use a standardized multisource feedback program, the Physician Achievement Review (PAR/NSPAR), to provide physicians with performance assessment data via questionnaires from medical colleagues, coworkers, and patients on 5 practice domains: consultation…

  18. Community resources for psychiatric and psychosocial problems. Family physicians' referral patterns in urban Ontario.

    PubMed Central

    Craven, M. A.; Allen, C. J.; Kates, N.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To document the number and pattern of psychiatric and psychosocial referrals to community resources by family physicians (FPs) and to determine whether referral practices correlate with physician variables. DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey of referrals by FPs to 34 key psychiatric and psychosocial community resources identified by a panel of FPs, psychiatric social workers, psychiatric nurses, public health nurses, and the local community information service. SETTING: Regional municipality of 434,000 persons in Ontario. PARTICIPANTS: Twenty-seven of 34 (79%) community agencies identified 261 FPs who made 4487 referrals to participating agencies (range 0 to 65, median 15, mean 17.19 +/- 13.42). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Number of referrals to all agencies; variables, such as physician sex, school of graduation, year of graduation, and certificate status in the College of Family Physicians of Canada, related to referral patterns. RESULTS: Referrals to outpatient psychiatric clinics, support services, and general counseling services accounted for 96% of all referrals. Physicians' average annual referral profile was as follows: 8.6 patients to a support service, 6.3 to an outpatient psychiatric service, 1.6 to a counseling service, and 0.46 to a substance abuse service. Referral profiles of individual physicians varied greatly. Female FPs made fewer referrals than male FPs to support services, but both made similar numbers of referrals to psychiatric, counseling, and substance abuse services. The more recent the year of graduation, the greater the number of referrals to psychiatric (r = 0.158, P = 0.0107) and counseling services (r = 0.137, P = 0.0272) and the higher the fraction of referrals to psychiatric services (r = 0.286, P = 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: Family physicians in Hamilton-Wentworth made few referrals to psychiatric and psychosocial services. Only physician sex and year of graduation correlated significantly with numbers of referrals made. Recent

  19. Family physician clinical compensation in an academic environment: moving away from the relative value unit

    PubMed Central

    Lochner, Jennifer; Trowbridge, Elizabeth; Kamnetz, Sandra; Pandhi, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Primary care physician compensation structures have remained largely volume-based, lagging behind changes in reimbursement that increasingly include population approaches such as capitation, bundled payments, and care management fees. We describe a population health-based physician compensation plan developed for two departmental family medicine faculty groups (residency teaching clinic faculty and community clinic faculty) along with outcomes before and after the plan’s implementation. Methods An observational study was conducted. A pre-post email survey assessed satisfaction with the plan, salary, and salary equity. Physician retention, panel size, and relative value unit (RVU) productivity metrics also were assessed before and after the plan’s implementation. Results Before implementation of the new plan, 18% of residency faculty and 33% of community faculty were satisfied or very satisfied with compensation structure. After implementation, those numbers rose to 47% for residency physicians and 74% for community physicians (p<0.01). Satisfaction with the amount of compensation also rose from 33% to 68% for residency faculty and from 26% to 87% for community faculty (p<0.01). For both groups, panel size per clinical full-time equivalent increased and RVUs moved closer to national benchmarks. RVUs decreased for residency faculty and increased for community faculty. Conclusions Aligning a compensation plan with population health delivery by moving rewards away from RVU productivity and towards panel management resulted in improved physician satisfaction and retention, as well as larger panel sizes. RVU changes were less predictable. Physician compensation is an important component of care model redesign that emphasizes population health. PMID:27272423

  20. Practice-Generated Questions: A Method of Formulating True Learning Needs of Family Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Jennett, Penny A.; Lockyer, Jocelyn M.; Parboosingh, I. John P.; Maes, William R.

    1989-01-01

    The importance of identifying true learning needs prior to planning and conducting educational programs is well documented. In this study a collection of 579 clinical questions forwarded by 87 family physicians in southern Alberta was reviewed and analysed to determine if the questions would cluster and, therefore, be useful as sources for planning continuing medical education (CME) conferences and newsletters. The nature of submitted questions was also examined to determine if particular groups of physicians, as identified by socio-demographic characteristics, significanly differed by type of questions submitted. The study findings indicate that the questions generated by the clinical practices of family practitioners did cluster into meaningful categories, and did vary significantly by identified physician groups. Questions relating to the genito-urinary system; adverse drug effects, interactions and contraindications; and nervous system and sense organs were most frequently submitted. The nature of questions generated differed significantly by gender, size of practice setting, and year and place of medical graduation. When highly relevant and specific clinical questions, as contrasted with broadly expressed needs, serve as sources of identified learning needs for CME planners, the daily clinical problems faced by practitioners are better addressed. The learning needs identified by this approach provide an optimum framework for planned CME to influence physician behaviour or practice patterns. PMID:21248985

  1. Smoking behaviour, knowledge and attitudes among Family Medicine physicians and nurses in Bosnia and Herzegovina

    PubMed Central

    Hodgetts, Geoffrey; Broers, Teresa; Godwin, Marshall

    2004-01-01

    Background Smoking rates among the general population in Bosnia and Herzegovina are extremely high, and national campaigns to lower smoking rates have not yet begun. As part of future activities of the Queen's University Family Medicine Development Program in the Balkans Region, technical assistance may be provided to Bosnia and Herzegovina to develop of national tobacco control strategies. This assistance may focus on training doctors and nurses on smoking cessation strategies with a view to helping their patients to stop smoking. Given this important role that health professionals have, data is needed on smoking rates as well as on smoking behaviour among doctors and nurses in Bosnia and Herzegovina. This study therefore seeks to determine the smoking rates and behaviour of family medicine physicians and nurses in Bosnia and Herzegovina and to determine how well prepared they feel with respect to counselling their patients on smoking cessation strategies. Methods The WHO Global Health Professional Survey, a self-administered questionnaire, was distributed to physicians and nurses in 19 Family Medicine Teaching Centres in Bosnia and Herzegovina in June 2002. Smoking rates and behaviour, as well as information on knowledge and attitudes regarding smoking were determined for both physicians and nurses. Results Of the 273 physicians and nurses currently working in Family Medicine Teaching Centres, 209 (77%) completed the questionnaire. Approximately 45% of those surveyed currently smoke, where 51% of nurses smoked, compared to 40% of physicians. With respect to knowledge and attitudes, all respondents agreed that smoking is harmful to one's health. However, "ever" smokers, compared to "never" smokers, were less likely to agree that health professionals who smoke were less likely to advise patients to quit smoking than non-smoking health professionals. Less than half of physicians and nurses had received formal training in smoking cessations strategies, but about two

  2. How do family physicians measure blood pressure in routine clinical practice?

    PubMed Central

    Kaczorowski, Janusz; Myers, Martin G.; Gelfer, Mark; Dawes, Martin; Mang, Eric J.; Berg, Angelique; Grande, Claudio Del; Kljujic, Dragan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective To describe the techniques currently used by family physicians in Canada to measure blood pressure (BP) for screening for, diagnosing, and treating hypertension. Design A Web-based cross-sectional survey distributed by e-mail. Setting Stratified random sample of family physicians in Canada. Participants Family physician members of the College of Family Physicians of Canada with valid e-mail addresses. Main outcome measures Physicians’ self-reported routine methods for recording BP in their practices to screen for, diagnose, and manage hypertension. Results A total of 774 valid responses were received, for a response rate of 16.2%. Respondents were similar to nonrespondents except for underrepresentation of male physicians. Of 769 respondents, 417 (54.2%) indicated that they used manual office BP measurement with a mercury or aneroid device and stethoscope as the routine method to screen patients for high BP, while 42.9% (330 of 769) reported using automated office BP (AOBP) measurement. The method most frequently used to make a diagnosis of hypertension was AOBP measurement (31.1%, 240 of 771), followed by home BP measurement (22.4%, 173 of 771) and manual office BP measurement (21.4%, 165 of 771). Ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) was used for diagnosis by 14.4% (111 of 771) of respondents. The most frequently reported method for ongoing management was home BP monitoring (68.7%, 528 of 769), followed by manual office BP measurement (63.6%, 489 of 769) and AOBP measurement (59.2%, 455 of 769). More than three-quarters (77.8%, 598 of 769) of respondents indicated that ABPM was readily available for their patients. Conclusion Canadian family physicians exhibit overall high use of electronic devices for BP measurement, However, more efforts are needed to encourage practitioners to follow current Canadian guidelines, which advocate the use of AOBP measurement for hypertension screening, ABPM and home BP measurement for making a diagnosis, and both

  3. Quality of care in hospital emergency departments and family physicians' offices.

    PubMed Central

    Spasoff, R. A.; Lane, P.; Steele, R.

    1977-01-01

    Indicator conditions were used to evaluate the quality of 686 episodes of care provided in two emergency departments and in five family physicians' offices. Overall, the care was considered adequate in 53% of the emergency department cases and in 40% of the cases dealt with in family physicians' offices, the difference being significant (P less than 0.01). Referrals were very common in both settings, and when quality was assessed solely on the basis of the care actually given by the primary-care providers the difference between the two settings disappeared. Half the observed deficiencies in care related to failure to document the findings from history-taking and physical examination. From these and earlier findings we conclude that the emergency department can be an appropriate setting for the care of nontraumatic illness. PMID:880525

  4. Interconception Care for Mothers During Well-Child Visits With Family Physicians: An IMPLICIT Network Study

    PubMed Central

    Rosener, Stephanie E.; Barr, Wendy B.; Frayne, Daniel J.; Barash, Joshua H.; Gross, Megan E.; Bennett, Ian M.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE Interconception care (ICC) is recommended to improve birth outcomes by targeting maternal risk factors, but little is known about its implementation. We evaluated the frequency and nature of ICC delivered to mothers at well-child visits and maternal receptivity to these practices. METHODS We surveyed a convenience sample of mothers accompanying their child to well-child visits at family medicine academic practices in the IMPLICIT (Interventions to Minimize Preterm and Low Birth Weight Infants Through Continuous Improvement Techniques) Network. Health history, behaviors, and the frequency of the child’s physician addressing maternal depression, tobacco use, family planning, and folic acid supplementation were assessed, along with maternal receptivity to advice. RESULTS Three-quarters of the 658 respondents shared a medical home with their child. Overall, 17% of respondents reported a previous preterm birth, 19% reported a history of depression, 25% were smoking, 26% were not using contraception, and 58% were not taking folic acid. Regarding advice, 80% of mothers who smoked were counseled to quit, 59% reported depression screening, 71% discussed contraception, and 44% discussed folic acid. Screening for depression and family planning was more likely when the mother and child shared a medical home (P <.05). Most mothers, nearly 95%, were willing to accept health advice from their child’s physician regardless of whether a medical home was shared (P >.05). CONCLUSIONS Family physicians provide key elements of ICC at well-child visits, and mothers are highly receptive to advice from their child’s physician even if they receive primary care elsewhere. Routine integration of ICC at these visits may provide an opportunity to reduce maternal risk factors for adverse subsequent birth outcomes. PMID:27401423

  5. Patient, family physician and community pharmacist perspectives on expanded pharmacy scope of practice: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Donald, Maoliosa; King-Shier, Kathryn; Tsuyuki, Ross T.; Al Hamarneh, Yazid N.; Jones, Charlotte A.; Manns, Braden; Tonelli, Marcello; Tink, Wendy; Scott-Douglas, Nairne; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R.

    2017-01-01

    Background: The RxEACH trial was a randomized trial to evaluate the efficacy of community pharmacy-based case finding and intervention in patients at high risk for cardiovascular (CV) events. Community-dwelling patients with poorly controlled risk factors were identified and their CV risk reduced through patient education, prescribing and follow-up by their pharmacist. Perspectives of patients, family physicians and community pharmacists were obtained regarding pharmacists' identification and management of patients at high risk for CV events, to identify strategies to facilitate implementation of the pharmacist's expanded role in routine patient care. Methods: We used a qualitative methodology (individual semistructured interviews) with conventional qualitative content analysis to describe perceptions about community pharmacists' care of patients at high risk for CV events. Perceptions were categorized into macro (structure), meso (institution) and micro (practice) health system levels, based on a conceptual framework of care for optimizing scopes of practice. Results: We interviewed 48 participants (14 patients, 13 family physicians and 21 community pharmacists). Patients were supportive of the expanded scope of practice of pharmacists. All participant groups emphasized the importance of communication, ability to share patient information, trust and better understanding of the roles, responsibilities, accountabilities and liabilities of the pharmacist within their expanded role. Interpretation: Despite support from patients and changes to delivery of care in primary care settings, ongoing efforts are needed to understand how to best harmonize family physician and community pharmacist roles across the health system. This will require collaboration and input from professional associations, regulatory bodies, pharmacists, family physicians and patients.

  6. Barriers to physician identification and treatment of family violence: lessons from five communities.

    PubMed

    Cohen, S; De Vos, E; Newberger, E

    1997-01-01

    Since the Surgeon General's Workshop on Violence and Public Health (Leesburg, Virginia, October 27-29, 1985), a substantial literature has developed about the limitations of the health care response to family violence. Many contributions have reflected experiences in limited numbers of practice settings (e.g., a single emergency department or hospital). Until 1990, however, there had been no community-based studies. The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation asked a multidisciplinary team from Education Development Center, Inc. and Children's Hospital (Boston) to investigate the health care responses to family violence in five diverse communities. This qualitative study, comprising more than 480 interviews, provided a vivid picture of the barriers facing physicians and other health care providers in identifying, treating, and referring victims of family violence. It also illuminated the relations of the health care systems in these communities with other key sectors, including agencies and the judiciary. The key findings from the five-city study remain relevant because (1) it is the only large-scale, multi-community-based assessment of the barriers facing physicians; (2) it identified, or in some cases confirmed, both institutional and educational barriers limiting the effectiveness of even the most committed physicians; (3) it identified, or in some cases confirmed, specific areas of knowledge, attitudes, and skills development that should be incorporated in medical education; and (4) its conclusions continue to be reflected in subsequent contributions to the literature. In each of these ways, therefore, it informs the other articles in this supplement.

  7. The Experience of Risk-Adjusted Capitation Payment for Family Physicians in Iran: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Esmaeili, Reza; Hadian, Mohammad; Rashidian, Arash; Shariati, Mohammad; Ghaderi, Hossien

    2016-01-01

    Background When a country’s health system is faced with fundamental flaws that require the redesign of financing and service delivery, primary healthcare payment systems are often reformed. Objectives This study was conducted with the purpose of exploring the experiences of risk-adjusted capitation payment of urban family physicians in Iran when it comes to providing primary health care (PHC). Materials and Methods This is a qualitative study using the framework method. Data were collected via digitally audio-recorded semi-structured interviews with 24 family physicians and 5 executive directors in two provinces of Iran running the urban family physician pilot program. The participants were selected using purposive and snowball sampling. The codes were extracted using inductive and deductive methods. Results Regarding the effects of risk-adjusted capitation on the primary healthcare setting, five themes with 11 subthemes emerged, including service delivery, institutional structure, financing, people’s behavior, and the challenges ahead. Our findings indicated that the health system is enjoying some major changes in the primary healthcare setting through the implementation of risk-adjusted capitation payment. Conclusions With regard to the current challenges in Iran’s health system, using risk-adjusted capitation as a primary healthcare payment system can lead to useful changes in the health system’s features. However, future research should focus on the development of the risk-adjusted capitation model. PMID:27340558

  8. The birth of a collaborative model: obstetricians, midwives, and family physicians.

    PubMed

    Pecci, Christine Chang; Mottl-Santiago, Julie; Culpepper, Larry; Heffner, Linda; McMahan, Therese; Lee-Parritz, Aviva

    2012-09-01

    In the United States, the challenges of maternity care include provider workforce, cost containment, and equal access to quality care. This article describes a collaborative model of care involving midwives, family physicians, and obstetricians at the Boston Medical Center, which serves a low-income multicultural population. Leadership investment in a collaborative model of care from the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Section of Midwifery, and the Department of Family Medicine created a culture of safety and commitment to patient-centered care. Essential elements of the authors' successful model include a commitment to excellence in patient care, communication, and interdisciplinary education.

  9. Investigating fatigue of less than 6 months' duration. Guidelines for family physicians.

    PubMed Central

    Godwin, M.; Delva, D.; Miller, K.; Molson, J.; Hobbs, N.; MacDonald, S.; MacLeod, C.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop an evidence-based systematic approach to assessment of adult patients who present to family physicians complaining of fatigue of less than 6 months' duration. The guidelines present investigative options, making explicit what should be considered in all cases and what should be considered only in specific situations. They aim to provide physicians with an approach that, to the extent possible, is based on evidence so that time and cost are minimized and detection and management of the cause of the fatigue are optimized. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: MEDLINE was searched from 1966 to 1997 using the key words "family practice" and "fatigue." Articles about chronic fatigue syndrome were excluded. Articles with level 3 evidence were found, but no randomized trials, cohort studies, or case-control studies were found. Articles looking specifically at the epidemiology, demographics, investigations, and diagnoses of patients with fatigue were chosen. Articles based on studies at referral and specialty centres were given less weight than those based on studies in family physicians' offices. MAIN MESSAGE: Adherence to these guidelines will decrease the cost of investigating the symptom of fatigue and optimize diagnosis and management. This needs to be proved in practice, however, and with research that produces level 1 and 2 evidence. CONCLUSIONS: Adults presenting with fatigue of less than 6 months' duration should be assessed for psychosocial causes and should have a focused history and physical examination to determine whether further investigations should be done. The guidelines outline investigations to be considered. The elderly require special consideration. These guidelines have group validation, but they need to be tested by more physicians in various locations and types of practices. PMID:10065311

  10. Growing Old Together: The Influence of Population and Workforce Aging on Supply and Use of Family Physicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Diane E.; Reid, Robert; Roos, Noralou P.; Heppner, Petra

    2005-01-01

    Canadians have expressed concern that access to a family physician (FP) has declined precipitously. Yet FP to population ratios remained relatively stable over the last decade, and there were perceptions of physician surpluses, at least in urban centres, 10 years ago. We evaluated whether demographic changes among patients and FPs, and in the…

  11. Defining the eHealth Information Niche in the Family Physician/Patient Examination and Knowledge Transfer Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellington, Virginia Beth Elder

    2012-01-01

    This research study was undertaken to gain a richer understanding of the use of patient-introduced online health information during the physician/patient examination and knowledge transfer process. Utilizing qualitative data obtained from ten family physician interviews and workflow modeling using activity diagrams and task structure charts, this…

  12. Comparing the Performance of Allopathically and Osteopathically Trained Physicians on the American Board of Family Medicine's Certification Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neill, Thomas R.; Royal, Kenneth D.; Schulte, Bradley M.; Leigh, Terrence

    2009-01-01

    Background: Two medical specialty boards offer certification in family medicine: the American Board of Family Medicine (ABFM) and the American Osteopathic Board of Family Physicians (AOBFP). The AOBFP certification is offered only to graduates of osteopathic colleges; however, graduates of both osteopathic and allopathic medical schools who have…

  13. [Family health and family physician's influence on prevention psychoactive substances abuse].

    PubMed

    Lapčević, Mirjana; Dimitrijević, Ivan

    2010-01-01

    The family, as the basic social unit, has a decisive role in the health and disease of its members. It is the primary unit where health needs are formed and solved. By its own resources the family independently resolves about 75% of the total health requirements. In the paper the authors study family characteristics which influence family health and diseases, indicators of family health and the scale of life values. Also, the study evaluates social factors, communication and the influence of the usage of psychoactive substances on family health and the quality of family life. To form the personality of a child three factors are most significant: love, the feeling of safety and the presence of harmonious relationship between the parents. Life harmony in a family also depends on the quality of structural components of the personality and the interaction of motivation of its members. Early childhood determines the future personality of the adult person. At that period, habits and partially attitudes are formed. In harmonious family relationships the parents are the role model to children. Verbal and non-verbal communication enrich the relationship among people and enable efforts in supporting understanding, compassion and care for others by mutual agreement. On the scale of life values of Serbian citizens health holds the first position. Immediately following the health issue is good relationship in the family. As healthcare is not only the task of healthcare services, but also of each individual, family and the society as a whole, it is on healthcare personnel to educate the citizens how to preserve and improve their own health and the health of their family by a continual healthcare and education. Above all, this concerns avoidance of bad habits, such as smoking, immoderate alcohol consumption, narcotic abuse, physical inactivity, hypercaloric nutrition, etc. Also, it is significant to make an early recognition of disease symptoms and to turn for help to the chosen

  14. The role of family physicians contracted healthcare in China: A "Cardiotonic" or a "Band-Aid" for healthcare reform?

    PubMed

    Tang, Qi; Song, Peipei; Xu, Lingzhong

    2016-09-05

    On June 6, 2016, as a mode expected to open a new prospect for tiered system of medical care in China, family physicians contracted healthcare was officially launched, intending to facilitate such healthcare be universal coverage by 2020.There are some doubts as to whether this goal is possible. The role of family physicians contracted healthcare in China should also be carefully identified. We hold that family physicians contracted healthcare will promote healthcare reform if it provides a "Cardiotonic" that alleviates the long-standing inequitable allocation of healthcare resources. However, this form of care faces many obstacles given the current state of medical care in China. It will just be a "Band-Aid" if the aforementioned issues of the shortage of family physicians, coordination with referring hospitals, and incomplete oversight are not resolved.

  15. Family Physician Involvement in Cancer Care Follow-up: The Experience of a Cohort of Patients With Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Aubin, Michèle; Vézina, Lucie; Verreault, René; Fillion, Lise; Hudon, Éveline; Lehmann, François; Leduc, Yvan; Bergeron, Rénald; Reinharz, Daniel; Morin, Diane

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE There has been little research describing the involvement of family physicians in the follow-up of patients with cancer, especially during the primary treatment phase. We undertook a prospective longitudinal study of patients with lung cancer to assess their family physician’s involvement in their follow-up at the different phases of cancer. METHODS In 5 hospitals in the province of Quebec, Canada, patients with a recent diagnosis of lung cancer were surveyed every 3 to 6 months, whether they had metastasis or not, for a maximum of 18 months, to assess aspects of their family physician’s involvement in cancer care. RESULTS Of the 395 participating patients, 92% had a regular family physician but only 60% had been referred to a specialist by him/her or a colleague for the diagnosis of their lung cancer. A majority of patients identified the oncology team or oncologists as mainly responsible for their cancer care throughout their cancer journey, except at the advanced phase, where a majority attributed this role to their family physician. At baseline, only 16% of patients perceived a shared care pattern between their family physician and oncologists, but this proportion increased with cancer progression. Most patients would have liked their family physician to be more involved in all aspects of cancer care. CONCLUSIONS Although patients perceive that the oncology team is the main party responsible for the follow-up of their lung cancer, they also wish their family physicians to be involved. Better communication and collaboration between family physicians and the oncology team are needed to facilitate shared care in cancer follow-up. PMID:21060123

  16. [The addiction patient in the family physicians' practice: tools and skills for a successful performance].

    PubMed

    Neuner-Jehle, Stefan

    2014-10-01

    Addiction patients are usually perceived as problematic patients in primary care practices: Encounters often are time-consuming and the approach to the patient is difficult. Moreover, patients sometimes are hiding their addictive behaviour and behave shameful. Other barriers are a lack of experience in communication skills among physicians or their own addictive behaviour. Nevertheless, to diagnose and treat addiction as early as possible is an important task for family doctors, as patients' confidence in them is an important factor to induce a behaviour change. We present four screening tests for the early diagnosis of addiction to alcohol (AUDIT, AUDIT-C, CAGE, SMAST-G) and discuss their strengths and shortcomings. The family doctor's practice is also a useful setting for brief interventions based on motivational interviewing (MI) techniques and the transtheoretical model of behaviour change (TTM). We shortly introduce to these techniques and attitudes using addiction to alcohol and nicotine as examples, and we present innovative methods as "defined drinking" and new quit smoking methods. A respectful attitude towards the patient and communication skills seem to be key factors for family physicians to successfully approach their addiction patients.

  17. Cruising the information highway: online services and electronic mail for physicians and families.

    PubMed

    Faughnan, J G; Doukas, D J; Ebell, M H; Fox, G N

    1994-10-01

    Commercial online service providers, bulletin board services, and the Internet make up the rapidly expanding "information highway." Physicians and their families can use these services for professional and personal communication, for recreation and commerce, and to obtain reference information and computer software. Commercial providers include America Online, CompuServe, GEnie, and MCIMail. Internet access can be obtained indirectly through America Online or directly through specialized access providers. Today's online services are destined to evolve into a National Information Infrastructure that will change the way we work and play.

  18. Mining reflective continuing medical education data for family physician learning needs.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Denice Colleen; Pluye, Pierre; Rodriguez, Charo; Grad, Roland

    2016-04-06

    A mixed methods research (sequential explanatory design) studied the potential of mining the data from the consumers of continuing medical education (CME) programs, for the developers of CME programs. The quantitative data generated by family physicians, through applying the information assessment method to CME content, was presented to key informants from the CME planning community through a qualitative description study.The data were revealed to have many potential applications including supporting the creation of CME content, CME program planning and personal learning portfolios.

  19. Importance of telemedicine in diabetes care: Relationships between family physicians and ophthalmologists

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Aroca, Pedro; Sagarra-Alamo, Ramon; Pareja-Rios, Alicia; López, Maribel

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the worldwide leading cause of legal blindness. In 2010, 1.9% of diabetes mellitus (DM) patients were legally blind and 10.2% had visual impairment. The control of DM parameters (glycemia, arterial tension and lipids) is the gold standard for preventing DR complications, although, unfortunately, DR still appeared in a 25% to 35% of patients. The stages of severe vision threading DR, include proliferative DR (6.96%) and diabetic macular edema (6.81%). This review aims to update our knowledge on DR screening using telemedicine, the different techniques, the problems, and the inclusion of different professionals such as family physicians in care programs. PMID:26240697

  20. Comparing the quality of oral anticoagulant management by anticoagulation clinics and by family physicians: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, S. Jo-Anne; Wells, Philip S.; Kovacs, Michael J.; Lewis, Geoffrey M.; Martin, Janet; Burton, Erica; Anderson, David R.

    2003-01-01

    Background There is growing evidence that better outcomes are achieved when anticoagulation is managed by anticoagulation clinics rather than by family physicians. We carried out a randomized controlled trial to evaluate these 2 models of anticoagulant care. Methods We randomly allocated patients who were expected to require warfarin sodium for 3 months either to anticoagulation clinics located in 3 Canadian tertiary hospitals or to their family physician practices. We evaluated the quality of oral anticoagulant management by comparing the proportion of time that the international normalized ratio (INR) of patients receiving warfarin sodium was within the target therapeutic range ± 0.2 INR units (expanded therapeutic range) while they were managed in anticoagulation clinics as opposed to family physicians' care over 3 months. We measured the rates of thromboembolic and major hemorrhagic events and patient satisfaction in the 2 groups. Results Of the 221 patients enrolled, 112 were randomly assigned to anticoagulation clinics and 109 to family physicians. The INR values of patients who were managed by anticoagulation clinics were within the expanded therapeutic range 82% of the time versus 76% of the time for those managed by family physicians (p = 0.034). High-risk INR values (defined as being < 1.5 or > 5.0) were more commonly observed in patients managed by family physicians (40%) than in patients managed by anticoagulation clinics (30%, p = 0.005). More INR measurements were performed by family physicians than by anticoagulation clinics (13 v. 11, p = 0.001). Major bleeding events (2 [2%] v. 1 [1%]), thromboembolic events (1 [1%] v. 2 [2%]) and deaths (5 [4%] v. 6 [6%]) occurred at a similar frequency in the anticoagulation clinic and family physician groups respectively. Of the 170 (77%) patients who completed the patient satisfaction questionnaire, more were satisfied when their anticoagulant management was managed through anticoagulation clinics than by

  1. Study of musculoskeletal risks of the office-based surgeries.

    PubMed

    Hermanson, James E; Choi, Sang D

    2012-01-01

    Due to the cost and time benefits associated with patients and physicians, outpatient surgeries continue to become more and more popular over time. With the increase in the number of office-based surgical procedures, the prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs) associated with office-based surgeries has been reported. The purpose of this pilot study is to ergonomically evaluate the risk of work-related musculoskeletal disorders of physicians/surgeons performing office-based surgery (OBS). Ergonomic assessment tools included Questionnaire, the BodyMap and the Rapid Upper Limb Assessment for measuring potential ergonomic concerns. The findings have shown that the ergonomic issues of greatest concerns were the discomforts in the neck, shoulders, arms/wrists, and back. Some additional comments were provided by the participants regarding the duration of discomfort or clarification on the frequency of their body discomfort. This study suggests that there is a considerable risk of musculoskeletal injuries of physicians/surgeons performing the OBS tasks. By properly using the ergonomic assessment techniques, valuable information on ergonomic OBS workplace design and selection could assist in the early interventions of WMSD prevention.

  2. LEVEL OF COMPETENCIES OF FAMILY PHYSICIANS IN KOSOVO FROM DIFFERENT PERSPECTIVES

    PubMed Central

    Bojaj, Gazmend; Skeraj, Fitim; Czabanowska, Katarzyna; Burazeri, Genc

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this analysis was to compare the level of self-perceived competencies of primary health care physicians in Kosovo with patients’ viewpoint, as well as the necessary (required) level of such competencies from decision-makers’ standpoint. Methods: Three cross-sectional studies were carried out in Kosovo in 2013 including: i) a representative sample of 1340 primary health care users aged ≥18 years (49% men; overall mean age: 50.5±17.9 years; response rate: 89%); ii) a representative sample of 597 primary health care physicians (49% men; overall mean age: 46.0±9.4 years; response rate: 90%), and; iii) a nationwide representative sample of 100 decision-makers operating at different primary health care institutions or public health agencies in Kosovo (63% men; mean age: 47.7±5.7 years). A structured self-administered questionnaire (consisting of 37 items) was used in the three surveys in order to assess physicians’ competencies regarding different domains of the quality of health care. Results: There was a significant gap in the level of self-perceived physicians’ competencies and patients’ perspective in transitional Kosovo. Furthermore, there was a gap in the level of self-perceived physicians’ competencies and the necessary (required) level of physicians’ competencies from decision-makers perspective which was less evident in Prishtina, but considerable in the other regions of Kosovo. Conclusion: Our analysis provides valuable evidence about the level of competencies of primary health care physicians in Kosovo from different stakeholders’ perspectives. There is an urgent need for continuous professional development of family physicians in post-war Kosovo. PMID:27999483

  3. A case of informed consent obtained from a patient with terminal cancer and his family using family function by the primary care physician.

    PubMed

    Tsuboi, Keiko; Minegishi, Yukiko; Harada, Toshihide; Ishizaki, Fumiko; Nitta, Kohsaku

    2007-06-01

    We evaluated the contents and characteristics of informed consent obtained by the primary care physician from a male patient with advanced cancer and his family, and clarified the influences of the informed consent on family function. This patient was diagnosed as having advanced cancer at the age of 46 years, underwent surgery/chemotherapy, but died after 4 months at the hospital. Semi-structured interviews were held with the elder daughter of the patient, and notes on the patient's disease, the course of treatment, his family's responses, and the informed consent obtained by the primary care physician were taken during the interview. The informed consent obtained by the primary care physician had the following characteristics: (1) The physician transmitted accurate and detailed information on the treatment methods, side effects, and prognosis by appropriate communication techniques with consideration for the feelings of the patient and his family, and proposed choices so that they could participate in the decision of treatment principles. (2) During the entire course, the primary care physician frequently visited the bedside and encouraged the patient and his family to express their feelings of anxiety and to ask questions, giving continuous emotional support. With the progression of the disease and explanation by the primary care physician, the patient and his family expressed and shared feelings such as grief and powerlessness and supported each another. Gradually, they began to show practical/adaptive coping behavior and could accept the patient's death. Appropriate informed consent obtained by the primary-care physician promoted the family function of this family.

  4. Access to Healthcare in Urban Family Physician Reform from Physicians and Patients’ Perspective: a survey-based project in two pilot provinces in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Jahromi, Vahid Kohpeima; Dehnavieh, Reza; Mehrolhassani, Mohammad Hossein; Anari, Hosain Saberi

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Iran introduced the urban family physician reform, based on the primary healthcare (PHC) approach, in 2012. The reform is restricted to two pilot provinces, which are Fars and Mazandaran and its policymakers request evidence of the reform progress. The study aimed to determine the accessibility of health care in the two pilot sites. Methods A cross-sectional study using Primary Care Evaluation Tool (PCET) questionnaires was performed with a multistage stratified cluster sample of the family physicians (n=141) and patients (n=710) in the two provinces between September 2015 and March 2016. The questionnaires contained essential dimensions of health accessibility: organizational, financial, geographical, and cultural access. The data were analyzed by IBM-SPSS software and the descriptive statistics. Results With an average population of 2,332, the main daily task for family physicians was patient visits (n=39). Most patients were satisfied with the current hours (80%) but visiting a family physician on holidays or after working hours were only rarely possible. The co-payment was an inconvenience to access health services in getting medicines, getting paraclinic exams and a visiting specialist. At least 70% of patients could receive their preferred healthcare facilities within 40 minutes. The majority of FPs (64%) believed there were some cultural characteristics in the population that made a limited role for providing better health services. Conclusion In the reform the providers were geographically well distributed and some features of the organizational access were relatively high. However there were some difficulties in the financial, cultural, and other features of organizational access. PMID:28243420

  5. Giving patients responsibility or fostering mutual response-ability: family physicians' constructions of effective chronic illness management.

    PubMed

    Thille, Patricia H; Russell, Grant M

    2010-10-01

    Current visions of family medicine and models of chronic illness management integrate evidence-based medicine with collaborative, patient-centered care, despite critiques that these constructs conflict with each other. With this potential conflict in mind, we applied a critical discursive psychology methodology to present discursive patterns articulated by 13 family physicians in Ontario, Canada, regarding care of patients living with multiple chronic illnesses. Physicians constructed competing versions of the terms "effective chronic illness management" and "patient involvement." One construction integrated individual responsibility for health with primacy of "evidence," resulting in a conceptualization consistent with paternalistic care. The second constructed effective care as involving active partnership of physician and patient, implying a need to foster the ability of both practitioners and patients to respond to complex challenges as they arose. The former pattern is inconsistent with visions of family medicine and chronic illness management, whereas the latter embodies it.

  6. Supporting frail seniors through a family physician and Home Health integrated care model in Fraser Health

    PubMed Central

    Park, Grace; Miller, Diane; Tien, George; Sheppard, Irene; Bernard, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Background A major effort is underway to integrate primary and community care in Canada's western province of British Columbia and in Fraser Health, its largest health authority. Integrated care is a critical component of Fraser Health's planning, to meet the challenges of caring for a growing, elderly population that is presenting more complex and chronic medical conditions. Description of integrated practice An integrated care model partners family physicians with community-based home health case managers to support frail elderly patients who live at home. It is resulting in faster response times to patient needs, more informed assessments of a patient's state of health and pro-active identification of emerging patient issues. Early results The model is intended to improve the quality of patient care and maintain the patients’ health status, to help them live at home confidently and safely, as long as possible. Preliminary pilot data measuring changes in home care services is showing positive trends when it comes to extending the length of a person's survival/tenure in the community (living in their home vs. admitted to residential care or deceased). Conclusion Fraser Health's case manager–general practitioner partnership model is showing promising results including higher quality, appropriate, coordinated and efficient care; improved patient, caregiver and physician interactions with the system; improved health and prevention of acute care visits by senior adult patients. PMID:24648834

  7. Investigating the barriers to teaching family physicians' and specialists' collaboration in the training environment: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Beaulieu, Marie-Dominique; Samson, Louise; Rocher, Guy; Rioux, Marc; Boucher, Laurier; Del Grande, Claudio

    2009-01-01

    Background Collaboration between physicians in different specialties is often taken for granted. However, poor interactions between family physicians and specialists contribute significantly to the observed discontinuity between primary and specialty care. The objective of this study was to explore how collaboration between family physicians and specialists was conceptualised as a competency and experienced in residency training curricula of four faculties of medicine in Canada. Methods This is a multiple-case study based on Abbott's theory of professions. Programs targeted were family medicine, general psychiatry, radiology, and internal medicine. The content of the programs' objectives was analyzed. Associate deans of postgraduate studies, program directors, educators, and residents were interviewed individually or in focus groups (47 residents and 45 faculty members). Results The training objectives related to family physicians-specialists collaboration were phrased in very general terms and lacked specificity. Obstacles to effective collaboration were aggregated under themes of professional responsibility and questioned expertise. Both trainees and trainers reported increasing distances between specialty and general medicine in three key fields of the professional system: the workplace arena, the training setting, and the production of academic knowledge. Conclusion The challenges of developing collaborating skills between generalists and specialist physicians are comparable in many ways to those encountered in inter-professional collaboration and should be given more consideration than they currently receive if we want to improve coordination between primary and specialty care. PMID:19500409

  8. Working as a family physician in Canada and Portugal: How different is it?

    PubMed Central

    Barata, Ana Nunes

    2016-01-01

    Background: The work of a family physician is quite different in each country, and if we consider different continents, differences are even more remarkable. Social and cultural contexts justify a particular organization, not only of the health-care system but also its providers as well. Objectives: By analyzing different health-care systems, new ideas may come about which may trigger positive changes in a health-care service to diminish healthcare disparities. Methods: Description and comparison of the Primary Healthcare Service in Canada and Portugal. Results: Although both health-care systems are mainly public, organizational differences can be found that condition primary healthcare access. Conclusion: Exchanges in other health-care systems contribute for an active knowledge exchange that prompts participants to analyze options on how to improve healthcare access to citizens. This ultimately, leads to the development of primary care, the pillar of a well-functioning health-care system. PMID:28217575

  9. Factors Affecting Leave out of General Practitioners from Rural Family Physician Program: A Case of Kerman, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Amiresmaili, Mohammadreza; Khosravi, Sajad; Feyzabadi, Vahid Yazdi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Rural family physician program as the new reform in the Iranian health system has been implemented since 2005. Its success depends much on physicians’ retention. The present study aimed to identify influential factors on physicians’ willingness to leave out this program in Kerman province. Methods: The present cross-sectional study was performed in Kerman province in 2011. All family physicians working in this program (n = 271) were studied using a questionnaire. Data analysis was carried out using descriptive statistics and logistic regression through SPSS version 18.0. Results: Twenty-six percent (70) of the physicians had left out the program in the past. In addition, 77.3% (208) intended to leave out in the near future. Opportunity for continuing education, inappropriate and long working hours, unsuitable requirements of salary, irregular payments, lack of job security and high working responsibility were regarded as the most important reasons for leaving out the program in the past and intention to leave out in future orderly. According to univariate logistic regression, younger physicians (odds ratio [OR] =2.479; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.261-4.872) and physicians who had older children (OR = 4.743; 95% CI: 1.441-15.607) were more willing to leave out the plan in the near future, however it was not significant in multivariate logistic regression. Conclusions: Physician retention in family physician program is faced with serious doubts due to different reasons. The success of the program is endangered because of the pivotal role of human resources. Hence, the revision of human resources policies of the program seems necessary in order to reduce physicians leave out and improving its effectiveness. PMID:25400891

  10. Family physician access to and wait times for cancer diagnostic investigations

    PubMed Central

    Barisic, Andriana; Kish, Maxine; Gilbert, Julie; Mittmann, Nicole; Moineddin, Rahim; Sisler, Jeffrey; Vedsted, Peter; Grunfeld, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To examine provincial and regional differences in FPs’ direct access to cancer diagnostic investigations and advice from other specialists regarding investigations and referrals, and to explore FPs’ perceptions about wait times for diagnostic investigations and receipt of results. Design A cross-sectional, online survey. Setting British Columbia, Manitoba, and Ontario. Participants A sample of FPs from participating provinces. Main outcome measures Direct FP access to various diagnostic investigations and advice from other specialists regarding investigations and referrals; FPs’ perceptions about wait times for diagnostic investigations ordered directly; and FPs’ perceptions about wait times for results. Results A total of 1054 surveys were completed by FPs from British Columbia (n = 229), Manitoba (n = 228), and Ontario (n = 597). Distance from a cancer centre was not significantly associated with direct access to or wait times for diagnostic investigations for most of the investigations studied; however, provincial differences were observed. Family physicians in Manitoba and British Columbia were 30% to 45% less likely to report having direct access to endoscopy and some imaging investigations compared with FPs in Ontario. Family physicians in Manitoba and British Columbia were also at increased odds of waiting longer than 12 weeks for endoscopy investigations and longer than 4 weeks for imaging investigations compared with FPs in Ontario. Most FPs reported wait times of less than 2 weeks for imaging results; however, the proportion of FPs who waited longer than 2 weeks for colonoscopy results ranged from 15% in Ontario to 96% in British Columbia. Conclusion Given the disparities observed among provinces, there is an opportunity for provinces to learn from one another to improve direct access to and shorten wait times for diagnostic investigations. This in turn has the potential to shorten the primary care interval for cancer diagnostic

  11. The duty of the physician to care for the family in pediatric palliative care: context, communication, and caring.

    PubMed

    Jones, Barbara L; Contro, Nancy; Koch, Kendra D

    2014-02-01

    Pediatric palliative care physicians have an ethical duty to care for the families of children with life-threatening conditions through their illness and bereavement. This duty is predicated on 2 important factors: (1) best interest of the child and (2) nonabandonment. Children exist in the context of a family and therefore excellent care for the child must include attention to the needs of the family, including siblings. The principle of nonabandonment is an important one in pediatric palliative care, as many families report being well cared for during their child's treatment, but feel as if the physicians and team members suddenly disappear after the death of the child. Family-centered care requires frequent, kind, and accurate communication with parents that leads to shared decision-making during treatment, care of parents and siblings during end-of-life, and assistance to the family in bereavement after death. Despite the challenges to this comprehensive care, physicians can support and be supported by their transdisciplinary palliative care team members in providing compassionate, ethical, and holistic care to the entire family when a child is ill.

  12. Physician-Patient Encounters: The Structure of Performance in Family and General Office Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wenghofer, Elizabeth F.; Williams, A. Paul; Klass, Daniel J.; Faulkner, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: The College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario, the regulatory authority for physicians in Ontario, Canada, conducts peer assessments of physicians' practices as part of a broad quality assurance program. Outcomes are summarized as a single score and there is no differentiation between performance in various aspects of care. In…

  13. Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias: An Organizational Approach to Identifying and Addressing Practices and Learning Needs of Family Physicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Michael; Ferrier, Suzanne; Sargeant, Joan; Loney, Elaine; Bethune, Graeme; Murphy, Gerard

    2005-01-01

    Caring for patients with dementia is complex and demanding. Since family physicians (FPs) provide much of this care, we examined their practices, learning needs, and barriers to care concerning Alzheimer's disease and other dementias. We surveyed 392 (approximately 50%) Nova Scotia FPs and conducted focus groups and interviews with: FPs; staff of…

  14. A Correlational Study of Self-Directed Learning Readiness and Learning Activity Preference for Continuing Medical Education among Family Physicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Theresa J.

    2014-01-01

    This quantitative, nonexperimental, correlational study sought to determine whether a relationship exists between family physicians' levels of self-directed learning readiness (SDLR) and their preferences for continuing medical education (CME) activities. The study also sought to determine whether years in clinical practice or size of clinical…

  15. Recognition and management of common acute conditions of the oral cavity resulting from tooth decay, periodontal disease, and trauma: an update for the family physician.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Paul C; Kanjirath, Preetha

    2010-01-01

    This article presents an overview of common and/or significant diseases of the oral cavity that the family physician is likely to encounter, with an emphasis on pathogenesis, recognition, complications, and management. Topics reviewed include the sequelae of dental caries, periodontal disease, and trauma. Prevention and early intervention strategies are emphasized. Recent updates and practical issues for the family physician are highlighted.

  16. Human immunodeficiency virus risk awareness. Evaluation of a CME program for family physicians.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, F.; Murphy, P.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether a continuing medical education (CME) program on AIDS risk awareness would enhance physicians' knowledge of HIV and AIDS, their "intent-to-change" practice behaviour, and their ability to integrate their knowledge into hypothetical clinical scenarios; and to identify participant characteristics that affect their knowledge of risks and how they intend to behave regarding HIV testing. DESIGN: Before-and-after study using a questionnaire. SETTING: The city of Winnipeg and 16 rural communities in Manitoba. PARTICIPANTS: Convenience sample of physicians who attended the AIDS Risk Awareness Program and completed a questionnaire before the presentation (96 of 142 eligible physicians). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: A two-point or greater change on a Likert scale in the desired direction for each questionnaire item. RESULTS: Physicians were classified as sensitized or less sensitized depending on previous experience with HIV-positive and AIDS patients. Less sensitized physicians significantly improved their scores in all three areas. Sensitized physicians and women physicians significantly improved their knowledge and reported more intent to ask patients routinely about HIV risk behaviours. Physicians' sex, age, religion, and years in practice had an effect on these improvements. CONCLUSIONS: The AIDS Risk Awareness Program was successful in improving physicians' knowledge, attitude to intent-to-change behaviour and ability to integrate knowledge into practice scenarios. Physicians with true learning needs benefited the most from the CME program. PMID:9266123

  17. The impact of Medicaid on physician use by low-income children.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbach, M L

    1989-01-01

    This study evaluated the determinants of physician use by low-income children, with an emphasis on the effect of Medicaid. Data are from the 1980 National Medical Care Utilization and Expenditure Survey. Regression analysis revealed that Medicaid children were more likely than both privately insured and uninsured children to visit an office-based physician. Also, Medicaid children with at least one visit to any setting had a higher number of visits than uninsured children. Such factors as age, health status, number of children in the family, educational status, and income also accounted for differences within the low-income population. The results suggest that access to physicians' services (including office-based physicians) can be increased by expanding Medicaid eligibility to uninsured low-income children and by improving private health insurance benefits among the underinsured. PMID:2669539

  18. THE BUDGET, THE FAMILY PHYSICIAN AND THE PATIENT A DIFFERENT APPROACH.

    PubMed

    Keidar, Ilan

    2014-10-01

    Modern medicine offers better health and longer life expectancy, yet consumes huge budgets. The Israeli Health Insurance Law (IHIL) regulates the delivery of health services to all Israel's residents through Health Maintenance Organizations (HMOS). These organizations confront constant struggles with their budgets and have to reduce expenses as much as possible (without harming the health level rendered). In the constant necessity to restrain expenses are embedded difficulties that might cause unrest to the Public Health System (PHS). At the edge of the public health spear are the Family Physicians (FPS) who have not only to supply the best possible medicine to their patients, and at the same time confront budgetary constraints that have the potential to hinder the level of rendered medicine, but also have, at times, to mediate between the conflicting interests of their patients' wish to receive the best available health measures, the FP own medical believes, the HMO's directives and, between the FPS wish, to keep up the number of their (content) patients. One of the World Health Organization's (WHO) concepts, like Israel's one, is that soul and body are inseparable and must be addressed simultaneously in the process of healing. Real life at the Family Physicians' clinics shows, at times, that despite the Israeli physicians' very high professional level, and the Israeli Health System (IHS)'s high efficiency, such a process, due to budgetary constraints, workload and various other reasons, does not always take place and, on the personal level, there are patients who feel that the "system" has treated them incorrectly and in an unsatisfactory manner. Unsatisfied and restless patients might cause undesirable consequences to the "system", like losing faith in one's FP and HMO, which might lead to the patients' reduced cooperation in the healing process, lawsuits amplification, patients leaving their FPS and their HMOs etc. Addressing the patient's soul and body as an

  19. Preventing a Mass Disease: The Case of Gallstones Disease: Role and Competence for Family Physicians.

    PubMed

    Portincasa, Piero; Di Ciaula, Agostino; Grattagliano, Ignazio

    2016-07-01

    Gallstone formation is the result of a complex interaction between genetic and nongenetic factors. We searched and reviewed the available literature to define how the primary prevention of gallstones (cholesterol gallstones in particular) could be applied in general practice. Electronic bibliographical databases were searched. Prospective and retrospective cohort studies and case-controlled studies were analyzed and graded for evidence quality. The epidemiological data confirmed that genetic factors are estimated to account for only approximately 25% of the overall risk of gallstones, while metabolic/environmental factors are at least partially modifiable in stone-free risk groups, and are thus modifiable by primary prevention measures related to diet, lifestyle, and environmental factors (i.e., rapid weight loss, bariatric surgery, somatostatin or analogues therapy, transient gallbladder stasis, and hormone therapy). There is no specific recommendation for the secondary prevention of recurrent gallstones. Family physicians can contribute to preventing gallstones due to their capability to identify and effectively manage several risk factors discussed in this study. Although further studies are needed to better elucidate the involvement of epigenetic factors that may regulate the effect of environment and lifestyle on gene expression in the primary prevention of gallstone formation, preventive interventions are feasible and advisable in the general practice setting.

  20. Family physician program in Iran: considerations for adapting the policy in urban settings.

    PubMed

    Khayatzadeh-Mahani, Akram; Takian, Amirhossein

    2014-11-01

    Nationwide implementation of Family Physician (FP) program started in 2005 and targeted almost 25,000,000 citizens residing in rural areas and cities with less than 20,000 populations in Iran. Despite its blatant initiation that resulted in some modest achievements, the future of FP looks unclear in Iran. Thus far, no longitudinal evaluation of the implementation and impact of FP program has been conducted. However, meager evidence highlights the facilitating role of an existing and strong Primary Health Care (PHC) network in the implementation of FP in rural areas in Iran. A longstanding challenge, however, as emphasized by most stakeholders, remains to be the expansion of FP program into urban settings, where the PHC is undeveloped and fragile as well as the powerful private sector is resistant. Using an adapted conceptual framework of institutions, ideas, and interests, this policy perspective aims to shed light on main difficulties of FP implementation in urban areas of Iran. We analyze FP policy in the context of ongoing interactions and conflicts among institutions (the structures and rules that shape policies), interests (the groups and individuals influencing policy), and ideas (discourses around policies). Our argument will, we envisage, help plan for more appropriate implementation of FP in cities in Iran, and hopefully beyond.

  1. Barriers to the provision of smoking cessation assistance: a qualitative study among Romanian family physicians

    PubMed Central

    Panaitescu, Catalina; Moffat, Mandy A; Williams, Siân; Pinnock, Hilary; Boros, Melinda; Oana, Cristian Sever; Alexiu, Sandra; Tsiligianni, Ioanna

    2014-01-01

    Background: Smoking cessation is the most effective intervention to prevent and slow down the progression of several respiratory and other diseases and improve patient outcomes. Romania has legislation and a national tobacco control programme in line with the World Health Organization Framework for Tobacco Control. However, few smokers are advised to quit by their family physicians (FPs). Aim: To identify and explore the perceived barriers that prevent Romanian FPs from engaging in smoking cessation with patients. Methods: A qualitative study was undertaken. A total of 41 FPs were recruited purposively from Bucharest and rural areas within 600 km of the city. Ten FPs took part in a focus group and 31 participated in semistructured interviews. Analysis was descriptive, inductive and themed, according to the barriers experienced. Results: Five main barriers were identified: limited perceived role for FPs; lack of time during consultations; past experience and presence of disincentives; patients’ inability to afford medication; and lack of training in smoking cessation skills. Overarching these specific barriers were key themes of a medical and societal hierarchy, which undermined the FP role, stretched resources and constrained care. Conclusions: Many of the barriers described by the Romanian FPs reflected universally recognised challenges to the provision of smoking cessation advice. The context of a relatively hierarchical health-care system and limitations of time and resources exacerbated many of the problems and created new barriers that will need to be addressed if Romania is to achieve the aims of its National Programme Against Tobacco Consumption. PMID:25010432

  2. Visiting family physicians and naturopathic practitioners. Comparing patient-practitioner interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Boon, Heather; Stewart, Moira; Kennard, Mary Ann; Guimond, Jessica

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore similarities and differences in patient visits with family physicians (FPs) and naturopathic practitioners (NPs). DESIGN: Exploratory study combining quantitative and qualitative methods. SETTING: Southern Ontario. PARTICIPANTS: A purposeful sample of 10 practitioners (five FPs and five NPs matched for age, sex, and number of years in practice): each agreed to recruit three consecutive patients with new complaints to participate in the study. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Patient and visit characteristics; qualitative (content analysis of audiotaped interactions) and quantitative (ie, patient-centred care scores) information was gathered and analyzed. RESULTS: Qualitative analysis revealed that information gathering and treatment planning were very similar whether patients were visiting FPs or NPs. Most important differences were length of interaction (mean 54 minutes for NPs and 16.5 minutes for FPs) and patients' reasons for visits. Naturopathic practitioners were more likely to recommend medications (usually natural health products) than FPs. Quantitative data suggested that patients perceived no differences in patient-centred care from FPs and NPs. CONCLUSION: Overall, there were more similarities than differences in visits to the two types of practitioners. PMID:14649987

  3. Preventing a Mass Disease: The Case of Gallstones Disease: Role and Competence for Family Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Di Ciaula, Agostino; Grattagliano, Ignazio

    2016-01-01

    Gallstone formation is the result of a complex interaction between genetic and nongenetic factors. We searched and reviewed the available literature to define how the primary prevention of gallstones (cholesterol gallstones in particular) could be applied in general practice. Electronic bibliographical databases were searched. Prospective and retrospective cohort studies and case–controlled studies were analyzed and graded for evidence quality. The epidemiological data confirmed that genetic factors are estimated to account for only approximately 25% of the overall risk of gallstones, while metabolic/environmental factors are at least partially modifiable in stone-free risk groups, and are thus modifiable by primary prevention measures related to diet, lifestyle, and environmental factors (i.e., rapid weight loss, bariatric surgery, somatostatin or analogues therapy, transient gallbladder stasis, and hormone therapy). There is no specific recommendation for the secondary prevention of recurrent gallstones. Family physicians can contribute to preventing gallstones due to their capability to identify and effectively manage several risk factors discussed in this study. Although further studies are needed to better elucidate the involvement of epigenetic factors that may regulate the effect of environment and lifestyle on gene expression in the primary prevention of gallstone formation, preventive interventions are feasible and advisable in the general practice setting. PMID:27468338

  4. Death by request in The Netherlands: facts, the legal context and effects on physicians, patients and families

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    In this article I intend to describe an issue of the Dutch euthanasia practice that is not common knowledge. After some general introductory descriptions, by way of formulating a frame of reference, I shall describe the effects of this practice on patients, physicians and families, followed by a more philosophical reflection on the significance of these effects for the assessment of the authenticity of a request and the nature of unbearable suffering, two key concepts in the procedure towards euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide. This article does not focus on the arguments for or against euthanasia and the ethical justification of physician-assisted dying. These arguments have been described extensively in Kimsma and Van Leeuwen (Asking to die. Inside the Dutch debate about euthanasia, Kluwer Academic Publishers, Dordrecht, 1998). PMID:20668949

  5. Determinants of customer satisfaction with the health care system, with the possibility to choose a personal physician and with a family doctor in a transition country.

    PubMed

    Kersnik, J

    2001-08-01

    Many Eastern and Central European counties are reforming their health care systems. The aim of this study was to determine customer satisfaction with a reformed health care system, with the possibility of free choice of a family physician and patient satisfaction with the family physician in Slovenia and their major determinants. We used a postal survey of the patients who attended their family physician's offices during the study period. We obtained an 84% response rate. Some 72.9% of the respondents were satisfied with the current organisation of health care services, 95.5% of the respondents were satisfied with the possibility of choosing their own family physician and 58% of participants were very satisfied with the level of care received from their personal family practitioners. It was shown that higher patient satisfaction with the family physician was the most powerful predictor of patients' satisfaction with the health care system. The results show that health care reform in Slovenia has a positive impact on the consumers' perceptions of health care quality, measured in terms of consumer satisfaction with the health care system, the possibility to choose a family physician and the overall satisfaction with the family physician.

  6. The Delivery of Sexuality-related Patient Education to Adolescent Patients: A Preliminary Study of Family Practice Resident Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Jeffrey K.; Brey, Rebecca A.; Banter, Amy E.; Khubchandani, Jagdish

    2012-01-01

    Background: Risky sexual behavior among adolescents is one of the leading health behaviors most associated with mortality, morbidity, and social problems. Adolescents need reliable sources of information to help them promote healthy sexual behaviors. Physicians in the United States are often seen by adolescents as a reliable and trustworthy source of accurate sexual information. However, many physicians feel uncomfortable or ill-prepared to deal with sexuality issues among their adolescent patients. Purpose: This study examined the impact of family resident physicians’ sexual attitudes, knowledge, and comfort, on the delivery of sexuality-related patient education to their adolescent patients. Materials and Methods: Pre-post-test scales were administered to 21 physicians. Data were also collected for patient (n=644) charts. Factors that determined the delivery of sexuality-related patient education were analyzed. Results: Results indicate that sexuality-related patient education was rarely provided to adolescent patients. Conclusions: Adolescent sexuality education is not a high priority for physicians. Professional medical organizations should play a leadership role in training physicians on delivering sexuality education to adolescent patients. PMID:24478998

  7. Continuity of Care Evaluation: The View of Patients and Professionals about Urban Family Physician Program

    PubMed Central

    Jahromi, Vahid Kohpeima; Mehrolhassani, Mohammad Hossein; Dehnavieh, Reza; Anari, Hosein Saberi

    2017-01-01

    Background: A responsibility of the family physician (FP) and one of the four aspects of the delivery of primary care services is continuity of care (COC). This study aimed to determine the COC of health care in urban health centers. Methods: Between September 2015 and March 2016, we conducted a cross-sectional study using Primary Care Evaluation Tool questionnaires with multistage stratified cluster sample of FPs (n = 141) and patients (n = 710) in two provinces in Iran, Fars and Mazandaran. The questionnaires contained essential dimensions of COC: Informational, interpersonal, and longitudinal COC. Results: Almost all FPs had a computer. The FPs hadn’t kept their patients’ medical records routinely. The software had some problems, so the FPs couldn’t produce lists of patients based on their health risk and they couldn’t monitor their population. Almost 88% of FPs have written referral letters for all referred patients but 57% of them got medical feedback from specialists. About 80% of patients’ consultation times were up to 10 min. 29% of FPs knew the past problems and illnesses of the patients. From 40% to 50% of the patients stated that their FPs asked them for their desire about prescribed medicine and gave clear explanation about their illnesses. On average, patients visited their doctor 5.5 times during the previous year. Generally, patients and FPs in Mazandaran could summarize their experiences better than Fars in most topics of COC. Conclusions: It seems that after 3 years of using urban FP program in two pilot provinces, there were still some problems in COC. Strengthen software program, introducing incentives for FPs, and promoting patients’ responsibility can be used by policy-makers when they seek to enhance COC. PMID:28299031

  8. A Qualitative Study on Factors that Influence Turkish Medical Students’ Decisions to Become Family Physicians After the Health Transformation Programme

    PubMed Central

    Tanriover, Ozlem; Hidiroglu, Seyhan; Akan, Hulya; Ay, Pinar; Erdogan, Yalcin; Karavus, Melda; Vitrinel, Ayca; Hayran, Osman

    2014-01-01

    Background: In Turkey, general practitioners were authorized to work as family physicians without specialization, within the scope of the Health Transformation Programme, due to inadequate number of family medicine specialists since 2004. With this new implementation Family Medicine specialty became a less preferable option for medical students. Aims: The study was to investigate the perspectives of medical students and understand the issues to choose Family Medicine specialty as a career option. Materials and Methods: This qualitative study was performed with 48 final year medical students using a convenience sample from two medical universities. Results: Three main categories emerged from the data viewing Family Medicine ‘as a specialty’, ‘as an employment’, and finally ‘as a system’. Very few students stated that Family Medicine would be their choice for specialty. Conclusions: Family Medicine does not seem to be an attractive option in career planning by medical students. Several factors that may constrain students from choosing Family Medicine include: not perceiving Family Medicine as a field of expertise, and the adverse conditions at work which may originate from duality in the system. PMID:25006564

  9. Perceptions of the Utilization of Family Nurse Practitioners by Current Air Force Outpatient Physicians

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-03-26

    setting. The nurses had constant caseloads, did patient education , instruction, interpretation of laboratory work, though they neither examined...increase the amount of patient education " , were obtained from a 1985 study in which physician perceptions were surveyed for association with nurse...Utjlization *To increase the amount of patient education provided? *To increase the amount of counseling given to patients? *To allow physicians to

  10. [The physicians role in a quarreling family of a demented patriarch].

    PubMed

    Wettstein, A

    2009-01-07

    The physician of a demented patient whose wealth is disputed by two fractions of his quarreling familiy had to examine his power of judgement and his ability to controll authorized persons. The courts up to the supreme court of Switzerland based their decisions on the physisians findings. Physicians have to base their opinion on carefull examination of the patients mental ability to understand and reason the contested issues.

  11. National Trends in Child and Adolescent Psychotropic Polypharmacy in Office-Based Practice, 1996-2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comer, Jonathan S.; Olfson, Mark; Mojtabai, Ramin

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To examine patterns and recent trends in multiclass psychotropic treatment among youth visits to office-based physicians in the United States. Method: Annual data from the 1996-2007 National Ambulatory Medical Care Surveys were analyzed to examine patterns and trends in multiclass psychotropic treatment within a nationally…

  12. What keeps family physicians busy in Portugal? A multicentre observational study of work other than direct patient contacts

    PubMed Central

    Granja, Mónica; Ponte, Carla; Cavadas, Luís Filipe

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To quantify the time spent by family physicians (FP) on tasks other than direct patient contact, to evaluate job satisfaction, to analyse the association between time spent on tasks and physician characteristics, the association between the number of tasks performed and physician characteristics and the association between time spent on tasks and job satisfaction. Design Cross-sectional, using time-and-motion techniques. Two workdays were documented by direct observation. A significance level of 0.05 was adopted. Setting Multicentric in 104 Portuguese family practices. Participants A convenience sample of FP, with lists of over 1000 patients, teaching senior medical students and first-year family medicine residents in 2012, was obtained. Of the 217 FP invited to participate, 155 completed the study. Main outcomes measured Time spent on tasks other than direct patient contact and on the performance of more than one task simultaneously, the number of direct patient contacts in the office, the number of indirect patient contacts, job satisfaction, demographic and professional characteristics associated with time spent on tasks and the number of different tasks performed, and the association between time spent on tasks and job satisfaction. Results FP (n=155) spent a mean of 143.6 min/day (95% CI 135.2 to 152.0) performing tasks such as prescription refills, teaching, meetings, management and communication with other professionals (33.4% of their workload). FP with larger patient lists spent less time on these tasks (p=0.002). Older FP (p=0.021) and those with larger lists (p=0.011) performed fewer tasks. The mean job satisfaction score was 3.5 (out of 5). No association was found between job satisfaction and time spent on tasks. Conclusions FP spent one-third of their workday in coordinating care, teaching and managing. Time devoted to these tasks decreases with increasing list size and physician age. PMID:24934208

  13. Constructing and Communicating Privacy Boundaries: How Family Medicine Physicians Manage Patient Requests for Religious Disclosure in the Clinical Interaction.

    PubMed

    Canzona, Mollie Rose; Peterson, Emily Bylund; Villagran, Melinda M; Seehusen, Dean A

    2015-01-01

    Religion/spirituality (R/S) is an important component of some patients' psychosocial framework when facing illness. While many patients report an increased desire for R/S dialogue in clinical interaction, especially when facing a frightening diagnosis, some physicians report discomfort talking about R/S and hold various beliefs regarding the appropriateness of such discussions. Not only do physicians manage conversations centering on patient disclosures in the clinical visit, they must also navigate requests to share their own personal information. Farber et al. (2000) found that over a 12-month period nearly 40% of physicians reported that patients asked questions that transgressed professional boundaries. This article uses Petronio's communication privacy management theory as a lens through which to situate our understanding of how family medicine physicians construct and communicate privacy boundaries in response to patient requests for religious disclosure. Results provide an in-depth theoretical understanding of issues surrounding religious disclosure in the medical visit and expand the discussion on health care providers' personal and professional privacy boundaries as documented by Petronio and Sargent (2011). Implications for health care training and practice are discussed.

  14. Family physician and endocrinologist coordination as the basis for diabetes care in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Duran, Alejandra; Runkle, Isabelle; Matía, Pilar; de Miguel, Maria P; Garrido, Sofia; Cervera, Emilio; Fernandez, Maria D; Torres, Pilar; Lillo, Tomas; Martin, Patricia; Cabrerizo, Lucio; de la Torre, Nuria Garcia; Calle, Jose R; Ibarra, Jose; Charro, Aniceto L; Calle-Pascual, Alfonso L

    2008-01-01

    Background To estimate the proportion of diabetic patients (DPts) with peripheral vascular disease treated at a primary health care site after an endocrinologist-based intervention, who meet ATP III and Steno targets of metabolic control, as well as to compare the outcome with the results of the patients treated by endocrinologists. Methods A controlled, prospective over 30-months period study was conducted in area 7 of Madrid. One hundred twenty six eligible diabetic patients diagnosed as having peripheral vascular disease between January 2003 and June 2004 were included in the study. After a treatment period of three months by the Diabetes team at St Carlos Hospital, 63 patients were randomly assigned to continue their follow up by diabetes team (Group A) and other 63 to be treated by the family physicians (FP) at primary care level with continuous diabetes team coordination (Group B). 57 DPts from Group A and 59 from Group B, completed the 30 months follow-up period. At baseline both groups were similar in age, weight, time from diagnosis and metabolic control. The main outcomes of this study were the proportion of patients meeting ATP III and Steno goals for HbA1c (%), Cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, blood pressure, albumine-to-creatinine excretion ratio (ACR), body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), anti-aggregation treatment and smoking status. Results At the end of the follow up, no differences were found between the groups. More than 37% of diabetic patients assigned to be treated by FP achieved a HbA1c < 6.5%, more than 50% a ACR < 30 mg/g, and more than 80% reached low risk values for cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, diastolic blood pressure and were anti-aggregated, and 12% remained smokers. In contrast, less than 45% achieved a systolic blood pressure < 130 mm Hg, less than 12% had a BMI < 25 Kg.m-2 (versus 23% in group A; p < 0.05) and 49%/30% (men/women) had a waist circumference of low risk

  15. Factors affecting the opinions of family physicians regarding generic drugs – a questionnaire based study

    PubMed Central

    Lewek, Pawel; Smigielski, Janusz; Kardas, Przemyslaw

    2015-01-01

    A range of factors are believed to exert a negative influence on opinions of physicians about generic drugs. The aim of this study was to survey the opinions of primary care doctors on generics, and determine the factors which may affect them. A questionnaire comprising thirty eight questions was distributed among primary care doctors working in seventy out-patient clinics of the Lodzkie province, Poland, during the period of January 1, 2010 – December 31, 2010. A total of 170 of 183 participants completed the survey (average age 48.5; 70.0% women): a 92.9% response rate. While 38.8% of physicians claimed that generics were worse than brand name drugs, 54.1% considered them to be better. However, 36.5% of the doctors did not choose generics for their own use. Two key opinions were identified among the responses concerning the effectiveness of generic drugs: use of generic drugs by the physician (p<0.001), and their opinion that pharmacists do inform patients about generic drugs (p<0.05). Although existing evidence confirms that generic and brand name drugs are equally effective, many physicians doubt this, which prevents them from being used as cost effective drug therapy. In order to increase healthcare savings through the use of generics, these factors should be addressed: for example, convincing a physician to adopt generics for personal use may be an efficient way to support more cost effective treatment of his patients. PMID:25725136

  16. Behavioral interventions for office-based care: behavior change.

    PubMed

    Delfino, Matthew; Larzelere, Michele McCarthy

    2014-03-01

    Family physicians play an important role in identifying and treating the behavioral etiologies of morbidity and mortality. Changing behavior is a challenging process that begins with identifying a patient's readiness to change. Interventions, such as motivational interviewing, are used to increase a patient's desire to change, and cognitive behavioral therapy can be initiated to increase a patient's likelihood of change, particularly if barriers are identified. After patients embark on change, family physicians are uniquely positioned to connect them to self-help programs, more intensive psychotherapy, and newer technology-based support programs, and to provide repeated, brief, positive reinforcement. Specific behavioral interventions that can be effective include computerized smoking cessation programs; electronic reminders and support delivered by family physicians or other clinicians for weight loss; linkage to community-based programs for seniors; increased length and demands of in-school programs to support exercise participation by children; and access reduction education to prevent firearm injury.

  17. "Sometimes I Feel Overwhelmed": Educational Needs of Family Physicians Caring for People with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, Joanne; Dreyfus, Deborah; Cerreto, Mary; Bokhour, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Primary care physicians who care for adults with intellectual disability often lack experience with the population, and patients with intellectual disability express dissatisfaction with their care. Establishing a secure primary care relationship is particularly important for adults with intellectual disability, who experience health disparities…

  18. Helping Family Physicians Improve Their Cardiac Auscultation Skills with an Interactive CD-ROM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Douglas; Sargeant, Joan; Gray, Jean; Hoyt, Brian; Allen, Michael; Fleming, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Physicians (n=42) studied cardiac auscultation using a 15-hour CD-ROM program. Nine months later, 21 who completed a posttest showed significant improvement in identifying heart sounds. CDs were valued for opportunities to review material at an individual pace. Lack of computer skills hindered use. (Contains 26 references.) (SK)

  19. Structured oral interview. One way to identify family physicians' educational needs.

    PubMed Central

    Jacques, A.; Sindon, A.; Bourque, A.; Bordage, G.; Ferland, J. J.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To design and test a structured oral interview that would elicit information on the educational needs of physicians in order to help them plan individualized continuing education. DESIGN: Seven different sets of problems were prepared, each including 40 cases, of which 26 are common. Each pilot test candidate was interviewed by two physician-interviewers during a 1-day session. After each answer, candidates were told the predetermined correct answer. PARTICIPANTS: Six candidates were selected at random from among Montreal physicians aged 50 and older with no hospital privileges. All had to have no history of professional complaints or prosecution and to be unknown to the interviewers. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Inter-rater reliability and perceived difficulty of the cases. RESULTS: Candidates rated the interview process and cases used pertinent, credible, and not too difficult. Candidates' performance level was about 50%. Agreement between interviewers averaged 91.2%. CONCLUSIONS: A structured oral interview appears to be a credible instrument for helping determine practising physicians' deficiencies in clinical knowledge and reasoning. PMID:7580383

  20. Physicians' interactions with health care teams and systems in the care of dying patients: perspectives of dying patients, family members, and health care professionals.

    PubMed

    Carline, Jan D; Curtis, J Randall; Wenrich, Marjorie D; Shannon, Sarah E; Ambrozy, Donna M; Ramsey, Paul G

    2003-01-01

    This study investigated the specific physician skills required to interact with health care systems in order to provide high quality care at the end of life. We used focus groups of patients with terminal diseases, family members, nurses and social workers from hospice or acute care settings, and physicians. We performed content analysis based on grounded theory. Groups were interviewed. Two domains were found related to physician interactions with health care systems: 1) access and continuity, and 2) team communication and coordination. Components of these domains most frequently mentioned included taking as much time as needed with the patient, accessibility, and respect shown in working with health team members. This study highlights the need for both physicians and health care systems to improve accessibility for patients and families and increase coordination of efforts between health care team members when working with dying patients and their families.

  1. Communication between Physicians and Family Caregivers about Care at the End of Life: When Do Discussions Occur and What Is Said?

    PubMed Central

    CHERLIN, EMILY; FRIED, TERRI; PRIGERSON, HOLLY G.; SCHULMAN-GREEN, DENA; JOHNSON-HURZELER, ROSEMARY; BRADLEY, ELIZABETH H.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Few studies have examined physician-family caregiver communication at the end of life, despite the important role families have in end-of-life care decisions. We examined family caregiver reports of physician communication about incurable illness, life expectancy, and hospice; the timing of these discussions; and subsequent family understanding of these issues. Design: Mixed methods study using a closed-ended survey of 206 family caregivers and open-ended, in-depth interviews with 12 additional family caregivers. Setting/Subjects: Two hundred eighteen primary family caregivers of patients with cancer enrolled with hospice between October 1999 and June 2002 Measurements: Family caregiver reports provided at the time of hospice enrollment of physician discussions of incurable illness, life expectancy, and hospice. Results: Many family caregivers reported that a physician never told them the patient’s illness could not be cured (20.8%), never provided life expectancy (40% of those reportedly told illness was incurable), and never discussed using hospice (32.2%). Caregivers reported the first discussion of the illness being incurable and of hospice as a possibility occurred within 1 month of the patient’s death in many cases (23.5% and 41.1%, respectively). In open-ended interviews, however, family caregivers expressed ambivalence about what they wanted to know, and their difficulty comprehending and accepting “bad news” was apparent in both qualitative and quantitative data. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that ineffective communication about end-of-life issues likely results from both physician’s lack of discussion and family caregiver’s difficulty hearing the news. Future studies should examine strategies for optimal physician-family caregiver communication about incurable illness, so that families and patients can begin the physical, emotional, and spiritual work that can lead to acceptance of the irreversible condition. PMID:16351531

  2. [Inspection of a corpse by the family physician (general practitioner) in practice and nursing home].

    PubMed

    Peschel, O; Graw, M

    2005-05-12

    Inspection of a corpse by the physician is a responsible last service he can offer his patient. Apart from reliably establishing death and the time of its occurrence, the physician must thoroughly inspect the corpse to clarify the cause of death. Regrettably, the results of an autopsy are often at odds with the cause of death as entered in the death certificate. Poor nursing care and homicides can be detected only on the basis of correct information about the cause of death. Only then do statistics on causes of death in the population make sense and can provide useful data. If an unnatural cause of death is suspected, or if it is not possible to ascertain the cause, the police or public prosecutor (coroner) must be notified.

  3. Emerging Role of the Army Family Physician in Primary Health Care Delivery.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-12-13

    IN PRI1Y~?f IfALTh CARE DELIVERY BY COLONEL DAVID G. LbANE VEDICAL CORPs ~~~ CORRESPONDING COURSE _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ~ AR...Physician in Primary Health Care Delivery. Research Project 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHORft ) 8. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER(.) Doane, David G...influence of specialists of all kinds. Emphasis was placed on research , medical education, government grants, publishing H and training of super

  4. An Asclepiad family - The Chamberlens and DeLaunes, 1569-1792: Five generations of surgeons, physicians, accoucheurs and apothecaries.

    PubMed

    Russell, Lesley

    2016-11-01

    When in 1747 Dr Peter Chamberlen wrote in his apologia, 'A Voice in Rhama', that he was nursed up (as from the Cradle) to all Parts of Physick, and that in Asclepiad-Families, he was not referring simply to his father and uncle, the Peters (Younger and Elder) Chamberlen of obstetric forceps' fame. They were surgeons and accoucheurs; his mother's family counted clergymen as well as physicians and apothecaries among their number and the young Peter must indeed have grown up in a family steeped in both medical practice and religious study. Both families were refugees from the religious terrors of sixteenth century France, arriving in England in the second half of the reign of Elizabeth l. Both were to find fortune and royal patronage as they became established in their new lives. One was to found a medical dynasty that lasted through five generations, the other to produce a generation whose varied accomplishments died as the eldest son outlived all his siblings, only one of whose children became an apothecary - and he was to predecease his uncle. This is a brief biography of these two families, bound together by the ties of marriage, profession, faith and nationality.

  5. Family medicine education in rural communities as a health service intervention supporting recruitment and retention of physicians

    PubMed Central

    Soles, Trina Larsen; Ruth Wilson, C.; Oandasan, Ivy F.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective To develop a pan-Canadian rural education road map to advance the recruitment and retention of family physicians in rural, remote, and isolated regions of Canada in order to improve access and health care outcomes for these populations. Composition of the task force Members of the task force were chosen from key stakeholder groups including educators, practitioners, the College of Family Physicians of Canada education committee chairs, deans, chairs of family medicine, experts in rural education, and key decision makers. The task force members were purposefully selected to represent a mix of key perspectives needed to ensure the work produced was rigorous and of high quality. Observers from the Canadian Medical Association and Health Canada’s Council on Health Workforce, and representatives from the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada, were also invited to provide their perspectives and to encourage and coordinate multiorganization action. Methods The task force commissioned a focused literature review of the peer-reviewed and gray literature to examine the status of rural medical education, training, and practice in relation to the health needs of rural and remote communities in Canada, and also completed an environmental scan. Report The environmental scan included interviews with more than 100 policy makers, government representatives, providers, educators, learners, and community leaders; 17 interviews with practising rural physicians; and 2 surveys administered to all 17 faculties of medicine. The gaps identified from the focused literature review and the results of the environmental scan will be used to develop the task force’s recommendations for action, highlighting the role of key partners in implementation and needed action. Conclusion The work of the task force provides an opportunity to bring the various partners together in a coordinated way. By understanding who is responsible and the actions each stakeholder

  6. Reproducibility and reliability of the ankle-brachial index as assessed by vascular experts, family physicians and nurses.

    PubMed

    Holland-Letz, Tim; Endres, Heinz G; Biedermann, Stefanie; Mahn, Matthias; Kunert, Joachim; Groh, Sabine; Pittrow, David; von Bilderling, Peter; Sternitzky, Reinhardt; Diehm, Curt

    2007-05-01

    The reliability of ankle-brachial index (ABI) measurements performed by different observer groups in primary care has not yet been determined. The aims of the study were to provide precise estimates for all effects influencing the variability of the ABI (patients' individual variability, intra- and inter-observer variability), with particular focus on the performance of different observer groups. Using a partially balanced incomplete block design, 144 unselected individuals aged > or = 65 years underwent double ABI measurements by one vascular surgeon or vascular physician, one family physician and one nurse with training in Doppler sonography. Three groups comprising a total of 108 individuals were analyzed (only two with ABI < 0.90). Errors for two repeated measurements for all three observer groups did not differ (experts 8.5%, family physicians 7.7%, and nurses 7.5%, p = 0.39). There was no relevant bias among observer groups. Intra-observer variability expressed as standard deviation divided by the mean was 8%, and inter-observer variability was 9%. In conclusion, reproducibility of the ABI measurement was good in this cohort of elderly patients who almost all had values in the normal range. The mean error of 8-9% within or between observers is smaller than with established screening measures. Since there were no differences among observers with different training backgrounds, our study confirms the appropriateness of ABI assessment for screening peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and generalized atherosclerosis in the primary case setting. Given the importance of the early detection and management of PAD, this diagnostic tool should be used routinely as a standard for PAD screening. Additional studies will be required to confirm our observations in patients with PAD of various severities.

  7. Family physicians' management of genetic aspects of a cardiac disease: a scenario-based study from slovenia.

    PubMed

    Klemenc-Ketiš, Z; Peterlin, B

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to find out how Slovenian family physicians (FPs) would manage a hypothetical clinical case, to explore their views about possible ethical dilemmas associated with this clinical case and to determine possible associations with demographic and other characteristics of FPs. This was an observational cross-sectional postal study in the Slovenian FPs' surgeries. The study population consisted of the whole population of Slovenian FPs (n = 950). The main outcome measures were the percentages of the answers of FPs on different questions about the clinical case on the management of patient and his relative with hereditary cardiomyopathy. There were 271 FPs who answered the questionnaire (response rate was 27.1%). A sample included 66 (24.4%) men and the mean age of all respondents was 45.5 ± 10.6 years. When dealing with the clinical case, most FPs expressed willingness to take the patient's family history. Only 34.2% FPs did not believe that ordering genetic tests was part of their job. Additionally, only 50.0% of them felt competent to interpret the genetic risk, 25.0% of them would give information about genetic testing and only 6.0% would interpret the results of the genetic testing. Family physicians in Slovenia were willing to include genetic tasks into routine management of their patients, but they do not feel competent enough to interpret the genetic risks and the results of genetic testing. However, an important part of FPs would not refer patients at risk to genetic counseling. The inclusion of genetic topics to family medicine specialization curriculum is needed.

  8. Evaluation of Physicians' and Nurses' Knowledge, Attitudes, and Compliance With Family Presence During Resuscitation in an Emergency Department Setting After an Educational Intervention.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Gineen; Ramponi, Denise; Cline, Thomas W

    2016-01-01

    Family presence during resuscitation (FPDR) has been an ongoing topic of discussion in many hospital emergency departments throughout the United States. With the current emphasis promoting patient- and family-centered care, families are now exercising their right to be present at the bedside during resuscitation. With or without a policy, there is continued resistance to allow families to remain with their loved ones during resuscitation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate if an evidence-based educational intervention would increase physicians' and nurses' knowledge, attitudes, and compliance with allowing FPDR. This quasi-experimental study evaluated 30 attending physicians' and 65 registered nurses' knowledge of an existing family presence policy and their attitudes toward family presence post-educational intervention in an emergency department setting. Compliance of family presence was observed for 2 months pre- and post-educational intervention. Results show that most physicians and nurses either were not sure or were not aware that there was an existing written policy. The study demonstrated that nurses agree more than physicians that the option of FPDR is a patient/family right. The results also showed that the educational intervention had no effect on the physicians and nurses attitudes for FPDR, but it did change behaviors. Of the events involving professionals who were exposed to the educational intervention, family members were present 87.5% of the time. In contrast, only 23% of the events involving professionals who did not receive the educational intervention had families present. Ongoing staff education will heighten awareness to FPDR, make the staff more comfortable with families being present, and will presumably continue to increase invitations for FPDR.

  9. A Novel Network for Mentoring Family Physicians on Mental Health Issues Using E-Mail

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Jon J.; Rockman, Patricia; Gingrich, Nadine; Silveira, Jose; Salach, Lena

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Family practitioners are significant providers of mental health care and routinely report difficulty acquiring timely support in this area. The Collaborative Mental Health Care Network assembled groups of family practitioners and provided them with mental health practitioner mentors. This article addresses communication in the Network,…

  10. The acute hospital setting as a place of death and final care: a qualitative study on perspectives of family physicians, nurses and family carers.

    PubMed

    Reyniers, Thijs; Houttekier, Dirk; Cohen, Joachim; Pasman, H Roeline; Deliens, Luc

    2014-05-01

    While the focus of end-of-life care research and policy has predominantly been on 'death in a homelike environment', little is known about perceptions of the acute hospital setting as a place of final care or death. Using a qualitative design and constant comparative analysis, the perspectives of family physicians, nurses and family carers were explored. Participants generally perceived the acute hospital setting to be inadequate for terminally ill patients, although they indicated that in some circumstances it might be a 'safe haven'. This implies that a higher quality of end-of-life care provision in the acute hospital setting needs to be ensured, preferably by improving communication skills. At the same time alternatives to the acute hospital setting need to be developed or expanded.

  11. Law, policy and the use of non-physicians in family planning service delivery.

    PubMed

    Paxman, J M

    1979-04-01

    A great deal of attention is being devoted to the use of nonphysicians to provide such fertility control services as contraception, sterilization, and abortion. Legal obstacles exist, however, which must be overcome before the role of nonphysicians can be expanded. Such obstacles include medical practice statutes, nursing and midwifery legislation, and laws and regulations directly related to such fertility control measures as the provision of contraceptions and the performance of sterilizations. On the other hand, the following 3 main approaches have been used to permit increased participation of nonphysicians: delegation of tasks by physicians, liberal interpretation of existing laws, and authorization. Thus, the important elements in expanding the roles of nonphysicians are 1) authorization; 2) training; 3) qualification; 4) supervision; and 5) opportunities for referrals to physicians. The ultimate role of paramedicals will depend upon the continued simplification of technology, the results of research on the quality of care which they can provide, the attitudes of the medical profession, and the elimination of the legal ambiguities and obstacles which exist.

  12. City mouse, country mouse: a mixed-methods evaluation of perceived communication barriers between rural family physicians and urban consultants in Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Renouf, Tia; Alani, Sabrina; Whalen, Desmond; Harty, Chris; Pollard, Megan; Morrison, Megan; Coombs-Thorne, Heidi; Dubrowski, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To examine perceived communication barriers between urban consultants and rural family physicians practising routine and emergency care in remote subarctic Newfoundland and Labrador (NL). Design This study used a mixed-methods design. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected through exploratory surveys, comprised of closed and open-ended questions. The quantitative data was analysed using comparative statistical analyses, and a thematic analysis was applied to the qualitative data. Participants 52 self-identified rural family physicians and 23 urban consultants were recruited via email. Rural participants were also recruited at the Family Medicine Rural Preceptor meetings in St John's, NL. Setting Rural family physicians and urban consultants in NL completed a survey assessing perceived barriers to effective communication. Results Data confirmed that both groups perceived communication difficulties with one another; with 23.1% rural and 27.8% urban, rating the difficulties as frequent (p=0.935); 71.2% rural and 72.2% urban as sometimes (p=0.825); 5.8% rural and 0% urban acknowledged never perceiving difficulties (p=0.714). Overall, 87.1% of participants indicated that perceived communication difficulties impacted patient care. Primary trends that emerged as perceived barriers for rural physicians were time constraints and misunderstanding of site limitations. Urban consultants' perceived barriers were inadequate patient information and lack of native language skills. Conclusions Barriers to effective communication are perceived between rural family physicians and urban consultants in NL. PMID:27154475

  13. Differences between willingness to pay and willingness to accept for visits by a family physician: A contingent valuation study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The economic value attributed by users of health services in public health systems can be useful in planning and evaluation. This value can differ from the perspectives of Willingness to Pay (WTP) and Willingness to Accept [Compensation] (WTA). Our objective was to study the perceptions of the patient about the service provided by the family physician by means of the WTA/WTP ratio. Methods An economic evaluation study by the Contingent Valuation Method was designed. Interviews were conducted with 451 subjects at six health centres (four urban and two rural) in areas with different socioeconomic characteristics. A payment card was used to measure the WTP and WTA. Other characteristics of the subject or service that could influence these responses were collected. An explicative model was constructed to study the WTA/WTP relationship. Results Four hundred and four subjects (89.6%) expressed a WTP and WTA different from zero. The WTA/WTP quotient showed a median of 1.55 (interquartile range 1-3.08) and a mean of 3.30 (IC 95%: 2.84-3.75). The WTA/WTP ratio increases with age and in low-income areas. It decreases in professional groups with more specialized activities, with growing family income, and in the chronically ill. Other characteristics related to the perception of state of health, accessibility to the service, satisfaction, or perception of risk were not explicative. Conclusions Subjects who were older and had a less favourable socioeconomic situation expressed a higher WTA/WTP ratio when valuing the visit to the family physician. These characteristics could identify a profile of "aversion to loss" with respect to this service. PMID:20459714

  14. Correlates of Family Health History Discussions between College Students and Physicians: Does Family Cancer History Make a Difference?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Matthew Lee; Sosa, Erica T.; Hochhalter, Angela K.; Covin, Julie; Ory, Marcia G.; McKyer, E. Lisako J.

    2011-01-01

    Effective communication between young adults and their healthcare providers can contribute to early detection of risk for developing cancer and establishment of lifelong habits for engagement in healthcare and health promotion behaviors. Our objectives were to examine factors influencing family health history discussions between college students…

  15. Professional Success and Gender in Family Medicine: Design of Scales and Examination of Gender Differences in Subjective and Objective Success Among Family Physicians.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Ana; Saletti-Cuesta, Lorena; López-Fernández, Luis Andrés; Toro-Cárdenas, Silvia; Luna del Castillo, Juan de Dios

    2016-03-01

    Two components of professional success have been defined: objective career success (OCS) and subjective career success (SCS). Despite the increasing number of women practicing medicine, gender inequalities persist. The objectives of this descriptive, cross-sectional, and multicenter study were (a) to construct and validate OCS and SCS scales, (b) to determine the relationships between OCS and SCS and between each scale and professional/family characteristics, and (c) to compare these associations between male and female family physicians (FPs). The study sample comprised 250 female and 250 male FPs from urban health centers in Andalusia (Spain). Data were gathered over 6 months on gender, age, care load, professional/family variables, and family-work balance, using a self-administered questionnaire. OSC and SCS scales were examined by using exploratory factorial analysis and Cronbach's α, and scores were compared by gender-stratified bivariate and multiple regression analyses. Intraclass correlation coefficients were calculated using a multilevel analysis. The response rate was 73.6%. We identified three OCS factors and two SCS factors. Lower scores were obtained by female versus male FPs in the OCS dimensions, but there were no gender differences in either SCS dimension.

  16. Revealing a cancer diagnosis to patients: attitudes of patients, families, friends, nurses, and physicians in Lebanon—results of a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Farhat, F.; Othman, A.; el Baba, G.; Kattan, J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Disclosure of a cancer diagnosis to patients is a major problem for physicians in Lebanon. Our survey aimed to identify the attitudes of patients, families and friends, nurses, and physicians regarding disclosure of a cancer diagnosis. Methods Study participants included 343 physicians, nurses, cancer patients, families, and friends from clinics in two major hospitals in Lebanon. All completed a 29-item questionnaire that assessed, by demographic group, the information provided about cancer, opinions about the disclosure of the diagnosis to cancer patients, perceived consequences to patients, and the roles of family, friends, and religion. Results Overall, 7.8% of the patients were convinced that cancer is incurable. Nearly 82% preferred to be informed about their diagnosis. Similarly, 83% of physicians were in favour of disclosing a cancer diagnosis to their patients. However, only 14% of the physicians said that they revealed the truth to the patients themselves, with only 9% doing so immediately after confirmation of the diagnosis. Disclosure of a cancer diagnosis was preferred before the start of the treatment by 59% of the patients and immediately after confirmation of the diagnosis by 72% of the physicians. Overall, 86% of physicians, 51% of nurses, and 69% of patients and their families believed that religion helped with the acceptance of a cancer diagnosis. A role for family in accepting the diagnosis was reported by 74% of the patients, 56% of the nurses, and 88% of the physicians. All participants considered that fear was the most difficult feeling (63%) experienced by cancer patients, followed by pain (29%), pity (8%), and death (1%), with no statistically significant difference between the answers given by the participant groups. Conclusions The social background in Lebanese society is the main obstacle to revealing the truth to cancer patients. Lebanese patients seem to prefer direct communication of the truth, but families take the opposite

  17. Factors Associated with Behavior Change in Family Physicians After CME Presentation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Kristi J.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Registrants of a four-day family practice refresher course responded to a survey assessing their reaction to a brief presentation recommending the use of penile anesthesia in newborn circumcision. The results suggest that evaluation of behavior change should consider attitudinal variables. (Author/MLW)

  18. Practice patterns of family physicians with 2-year residency v. 1-year internship training: do both roads lead to Rome?

    PubMed

    Sheps, S B; Schechter, M T; Grantham, P; Finlayson, N; Sizto, R

    1989-04-15

    Are there differences in patterns of practice between actively practising physicians who have been certified after a 2-year family practice residency and matched physicians without certification who have completed the standard 1-year internship? With the use of billing files prepared by the British Columbia Medical Association a group of 65 family practice certificants in active practice in British Columbia was compared with a control group of 130 internship trainees matched by year and school of graduation, category of billing (i.e., solo or group) and region. A wide range of practice features was assessed for the fiscal years 1984-85, 1985-86 and 1986-87. No differences were detected between the groups in 1986-87 for the following practice variables: number of patients (1888 and 1842 respectively), number of personal services billed for (7265 and 7173), number of personal services per patient (3.9), amount of funding for personal services ($140,192 and $140,100) and amount per patient for personal services ($77 and $79). Age-adjusted costs for male and female patients were similar in the two groups. Of six services thought to be influenced by type of training, only maternity care generated a significantly higher number of billings in the study group (341 v. 249). These results suggest that there is no demonstrable effect of training on patterns of practice. However, the question of the effect of training on quality of care and whether the 2-year residency may have a longer effect on practice patterns should be the focus of future research.

  19. Assessment of the impact of family physicians in the district health system of the Western Cape, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Mash, Bob; Naledi, Tracey

    2014-01-01

    Background: In 2007, South Africa made family medicine a new speciality. Family physicians that have trained for this new speciality have been employed in the district health system since 2011. The aim of the present study was to explore the perceptions of district managers on the impact of family physicians on clinical processes, health system performance and health outcomes in the district health system (DHS) of the Western Cape. Methods: Nine in-depth interviews were performed: seven with district managers and two with the chief directors of the metropolitan and rural DHS. Interviews were recorded, transcribed and analysed using the ATLAS-ti and the framework method. Results: There was a positive impact on clinical processes for HIV/AIDS, TB, trauma, non-communicable chronic diseases, mental health, maternal and child health. Health system performance was positively impacted in terms of access, coordination, comprehensiveness and efficiency. An impact on health outcomes was anticipated. The impact was not uniform throughout the province due to different numbers of family physicians and different abilities to function optimally. There was also a perception that the positive impact attributed to family physicians was in the early stages of development. Unanticipated effects included concerns with their roles in management and training of students, as well as tensions with career medical officers. Conclusion: Early feedback from district managers suggests that where family physicians are employed and able to function optimally, they are making a significant impact on health system performance and the quality of clinical processes. In the longer term, this is likely to impact on health outcomes. Evaluation de l'impact des médecins de famille dans le système de santé du district du Western Cape, en Afrique du Sud. Contexte: En 2007, l'Afrique du Sud a institué une nouvelle spécialité, la médecine de famille. Les médecins de famille qui se sont sp

  20. Family physicians can play important role helping women overcome drinking problems.

    PubMed Central

    Lechky, O

    1995-01-01

    When alcoholic women seek medical assistance, it is more likely to be because of distress over interpersonal or family problems, and their complaints of anxiety, depression and insomnia will be treated with prescription drugs. The alcoholism, which presents differently in women than men, is often left undiagnosed and untreated. However, even when women seek help for a drinking problem, traditional and male-dominated support groups may not meet their unique needs. When it comes to alcoholism, men and women are certainly not created equal. PMID:7728702

  1. Profile of Julie Phillips, MD, MPH: Family physician, medical educator, researcher, poet.

    PubMed

    Fogarty, Colleen T; Shapiro, Johanna

    2015-12-01

    Dr. Julie Phillips, an Associate Professor of Family Medicine at Michigan State University College of Human Medicine, has contributed several poems to Families, Systems, and Health over the last 2 years. This month's issue features her fourth poem in this journal, titled "Autumn Chores" (Phillips, 2015). We were interested in learning more about Julie's creative writing, why she writes poetry, how she balances writing and a demanding academic medical career, and what she hopes her poems might contribute to clinical practice and medical education. Colleen Fogarty interviewed her to find out the answers in this article. Julie's poems are indeed, as she says, carved from small moments in time, but they have a disproportionately large emotional impact. Her poems tackle issues such as the tension between medical and parental authority; professional boundaries; worklife balance; the still-gaping holes in our health care system; and what it means to care for others. To read her work, please search the journal index. (PsycINFO Database Record

  2. Family Physicians with a Certificate of Added Qualifications (CAQs) in Sports Medicine Spend the Majority of Their Time Practicing Sports Medicine.

    PubMed

    Rankin, Wade M; Cochrane, Anneli; Puffer, James C

    2015-01-01

    While family physicians holding certificates of added qualifications in sports medicine practice in multiple settings, little is currently known about the proportion of their time devoted exclusively to the practice of sports medicine. We found that most spend a majority of their time doing so, and this number has been increasing over the past decade.

  3. Sources of evidence in HIV/AIDS care: pilot study comparing family physicians and AIDS service organization staff

    PubMed Central

    Stefanski, Kasia E; Tracy, C Shawn; Upshur, Ross EG

    2004-01-01

    Background The improvement of the quality of the evidence used in treatment decision-making is especially important in the case of patients with complicated disease processes such as HIV/AIDS for which multiple treatment strategies exist with conflicting reports of efficacy. Little is known about the perceptions of distinct groups of health care workers regarding various sources of evidence and how these influence the clinical decision-making process. Our objective was to investigate how two groups of treatment information providers for people living with HIV/AIDS perceive the importance of various sources of treatment information. Methods Surveys were distributed to staff at two local AIDS service organizations and to family physicians at three community health centres treating people living with HIV/AIDS. Participants were asked to rate the importance of 10 different sources of evidence for HIV/AIDS treatment information on a 5-point Likert-type scale. Mean rating scores and relative rankings were compared. Results Findings suggest that a discordance exists between the two health information provider groups in terms of their perceptions of the various sources of evidence. Furthermore, AIDS service organization staff ranked health care professionals as the most important source of information whereas physicians deemed AIDS service organizations to be relatively unimportant. The two groups appear to share a common mistrust for information from pharmaceutical industries. Conclusions Discordance exists between medical "experts" from different backgrounds relating to their perceptions of evidence. Further investigation is warranted in order to reveal any effects on the quality of treatment information and implications in the decision-making process. Possible effects on collaboration and working relationships also warrant further exploration. PMID:15245578

  4. US physician practices for diagnosing familial hypercholesterolemia: data from the CASCADE-FH registry

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Zahid S.; Andersen, Rolf L.; Andersen, Lars H.; O'Brien, Emily C.; Kindt, Iris; Shrader, Peter; Vasandani, Chandna; Newman, Connie B.; deGoma, Emil M.; Baum, Seth J.; Hemphill, Linda C.; Hudgins, Lisa C.; Ahmed, Catherine D.; Kullo, Iftikhar J.; Gidding, Samuel S.; Duffy, Danielle; Neal, William; Wilemon, Katherine; Roe, Matthew T.; Rader, Daniel J.; Ballantyne, Christie M.; Linton, MacRae F.; Duell, P. Barton; Shapiro, Michael D.; Moriarty, Patrick M.; Knowles, Joshua W.

    2017-01-01

    Background In the US familial hypercholesterolemia (FH), patients are underidentified, despite an estimated prevalence of 1:200 to 1:500. Criteria to identify FH patients include Simon Broome, Dutch Lipid Clinic Network (DLCN), or Make Early Diagnosis to Prevent Early Deaths (MEDPED). The use of these criteria in US clinical practices remains unclear. Objective To characterize the FH diagnostic criteria applied by US lipid specialists participating in the FH Foundation's CASCADE FH (CAscade SCreening for Awareness and DEtection of Familial Hypercholesterolemia) patient registry. Methods We performed an observational, cross-sectional analysis of diagnostic criteria chosen for each adult patient, both overall and by baseline patient characteristics, at 15 clinical sites that had contributed data to the registry as of September 8, 2015. A sample of 1867 FH adults was analyzed. The median age at FH diagnosis was 50 years, and the median pretreatment low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) value was 238 mg/dL. The main outcome was the diagnostic criteria chosen. Diagnostic criteria were divided into five nonexclusive categories: “clinical diagnosis,” MEDPED, Simon Broome, DLCN, and other. Results Most adults enrolled in CASCADE FH (55.0%) received a “clinical diagnosis.” The most commonly used formal criteria was Simon–Broome only (21%), followed by multiple diagnostic criteria (16%), MEDPED only (7%), DLCN only (1%), and other (0.5%), P < .0001. Of the patients with only a “clinical diagnosis,” 93% would have met criteria for Simon Broome, DLCN, or MEDPED based on the data available in the registry. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate heterogeneity in the application of FH diagnostic criteria in the United States. A nationwide consensus definition may lead to better identification, earlier treatment, and ultimately CHD prevention. PMID:27678440

  5. Family physician-led, team-based, lifestyle intervention in patients with metabolic syndrome: results of a multicentre feasibility project

    PubMed Central

    Jeejeebhoy, Khursheed; Dhaliwal, Rupinder; Heyland, Daren K.; Leung, Roger; Day, Andrew G.; Brauer, Paula; Royall, Dawna; Tremblay, Angelo; Mutch, David M.; Pliamm, Lew; Rhéaume, Caroline; Klein, Doug

    2017-01-01

    Background: Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a medical condition with major complications and health care costs. Previous research has shown that diet and exercise can improve and reverse this condition. The goal of this study was to test the feasibility and effectiveness of implementing the Canadian Health Advanced by Nutrition and Graded Exercise (CHANGE) program into diverse family medicine practices to improve MetS. Methods: In this longitudinal before-after study, 305 adult patients with MetS were recruited from 3 diverse family medicine team-based organizations to the CHANGE personalized diet and exercise program. Participants were followed for 12 months. Primary outcomes included feasibility and reversal of MetS. Secondary outcomes included improvement in MetS components, changes in diet quality, aerobic fitness and cardiovascular risk. Results: Participants attended 76% and 90% of the kinesiologist and dietitian visits, respectively. At 12 months, 19% of patients (95% confidence interval [CI] 14%-24%) showed reversal of MetS, VO2max increased by 16% (95% CI 13%-18%), and Healthy Eating Index and Mediterranean Diet Scores improved by 9.6% (95% CI 7.6%-11.6%) and 1.4% (1.1%-1.6%), respectively. In addition, the Prospective Cardiovascular Munster (PROCAM) 10-year risk of acute coronary event decreased by 1.4%, from a baseline of 8.6%. Interpretation: A team-based program led by the family physician that educates patients about the risks of MetS, and with a dietitian and kinesiologist, empowers them to undertake an individualized supervised program of diet modification and exercise, is feasible, improves aerobic capacity and diet quality, reverses MetS and improves MetS components at 12 months.

  6. Knowledge and Practice of People toward their Rights in Urban Family Physician Program: A Population-Based Study in Shiraz, Southern Iran

    PubMed Central

    Honarvar, Behnam; Lankarani, Kamran Bagheri; Rostami, Sara; Honarvar, Fatemeh; Akbarzadeh, Armin; Odoomi, Neda; Honarvar, Hossein; Malekmakan, Leila; Rabiye, Parisa; Arefi, Nafiseh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Urban family physician program has been launched as a pilot in Fars and Mazandaran provinces of Iran since 2012. Attitudes of policy makers and people toward urban family physician program have become challenging. This study shows what people know and practice toward this program. Methods: This cross-sectional population-based study was conducted by a multistage randomized sampling in Shiraz, Southern Iran. Knowledge and practice of adults toward urban family physician program were queried through filing the questionnaires. Single and multiple variable analyzes of data were performed. Results: Participation rate was 1257 of 1382 (90.9%), and the mean age of the respondents was 38.1 ± 13.2 years. Of 1257, 634 (50.4%) were men and 882 (70.2%) were married. Peoples’ total knowledge toward urban family physician program was 5 ± 2.7 of 19, showed that 1121 (89.2%) had a low level of knowledge. This was correlated positively and in order to being under coverage of this program (P < 0.001), being under coverage of one of the main insurance systems (P = 0.04) and being married (P = 0.002). The mean score of people's practice toward the program was 2.3 ± 0.9 of total score 7, showed that 942 (74%) had poor performance, and it was correlated positively and in order to being under coverage of this program (P < 0.001) and having higher than 1000$ monthly income (P = 0.004). Correlation of people's knowledge and practice toward the program was 24%. Conclusions: Current evidences show a low level of knowledge, poor practice and weak correlation of knowledge-practice of people toward urban family physician program. PMID:26124943

  7. Appropriate osteoporosis treatment by family physicians in response to FRAX vs CAROC reporting: results from a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Beattie, Karen A; Ioannidis, George; MacDermid, Joy C; Grewal, Ruby; Papaioannou, Alexandra; Adachi, Jonathan D; Hodsman, Anthony B

    2014-01-01

    Canadian guidelines recommend either the FRAX or the Canadian Association of Radiologists and Osteoporosis Canada (CAROC) fracture risk assessment tools to report 10-yr fracture risk as low (<10%), moderate (10%-20%) or high (>20%). It is unknown whether one reporting system is more effective in helping family physicians (FPs) identify individuals who require treatment. Individuals ≥50 yr old with a distal radius fracture and no previous osteoporosis diagnosis or treatment were recruited. Participants underwent a dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry scan and answered questions about fracture risk factors. Participants' FPs were randomized to receive either a FRAX report or the standard CAROC-derived bone mineral density report currently used by the institution. Only the FRAX report included statements regarding treatment recommendations. Within 3 mo, all participants were asked about follow-up care by their FP, and treatment recommendations were compared with an osteoporosis specialist. Sixty participants were enrolled (31 to FRAX and 29 to CAROC). Kappa statistics of agreement in treatment recommendation were 0.64 for FRAX and 0.32 for bone mineral density. The FRAX report was preferred by FPs and resulted in better postfracture follow-up and treatment that agreed more closely with a specialist. Either the clear statement of fracture risk or the specific statement of treatment recommendations on the FRAX report may have supported FPs to make better treatment decisions.

  8. Intrapartum care by general practitioners and family physicians. Provincial trends from 1984-1985 to 1994-1995.

    PubMed Central

    Kaczorowski, J.; Levitt, C.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine provincial trends in provision of intrapartum care by general practitioners and family physicians (GP/FPs) for the 11 years from 1984 to 1995. DESIGN: Analyses of provincial Medical Care Fee-for-Service Utilization data for births from 1984-1985 to 1994-1995. SETTING: 10 provinces of Canada. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Proportion of vaginal births billed by GP/FPs (expressed as total number of vaginal births billed by GP/FPs divided by total number of vaginal births). RESULTS: In 1994-1995, the proportion of vaginal births billed by GP/FPs ranged from 77.2% in British Columbia and 70.8% in Nova Scotia to 28.9% in Ontario and 23.6% in Prince Edward Island. These proportions have remained relatively high and stable during the period studied in some provinces, such as British Columbia and Nova Scotia, and have declined steadily and notably in others. CONCLUSIONS: Data show that GP/FPs' involvement in vaginal births in most Canadian provinces is decreasing. This trend demonstrates a shift in GP/FPs' practice patterns and could indicate a coming shortage of obstetrical care providers. PMID:10751998

  9. Family attitudes in youth as a possible precursor of cancer among physicians: a search for explanatory mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Shaffer, J.W.; Duszynski, K.R.; Thomas, C.B.

    1982-06-01

    A measure of youthful family attitudes, the Closeness to Parents Scale, has continued to be predictive of cancer among physicians in a prospective study of medical students. Nonetheless, questions have remained concerning the meaning and reliability of this measure and whether its predictive value is diminishing over time. Perhaps more important, it is necessary to ascertain whether the relationship is the result of some methodological artifact or whether it is mediated by an association with known risk factors, such as smoking, drinking, and radiation exposure. Each of these issues was examined in turn, using a variety of statistical techniques to refine the scale and to equate cancer and control groups with respect to risk factors as well as possible artifacts. In a group of 913 men, it was found that the scale is primarily a function of good father-son relationships and that its association with later cancer persists even after the influence of possible mediating and artifactual variables is statistically controlled. Several possible explanations for these findings are discussed.

  10. Perceptions of Family Physician Trainees and Trainers Regarding the Usefulness of a Virtual Community of Practice

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Sandra C; Bennett, Sue; Iverson, Don; Bonney, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Background Training for Australian general practice, or family medicine, can be isolating, with registrars (residents or trainees) moving between rural and urban environments, and between hospital and community clinic posts. Virtual communities of practice (VCoPs), groups of people sharing knowledge about their domain of practice online and face-to-face, may have a role in overcoming the isolation associated with general practice training. Objective This study explored whether Australian general practice registrars and their supervisors (trainers) would be able to use, and would be interested in using, a VCoP in the form of a private online network for work and training purposes. It also sought to understand the facilitators and barriers to intention to use such a community, and considers whether any of these factors may be modifiable. Methods A survey was developed assessing computer, Internet, and social media access and usage, confidence, perceived usefulness, and barriers, facilitators, and intentions to use a private online network for training purposes. The survey was sent by email link to all 139 registrars and 224 supervisors in one of Australia’s 17 general practice training regions. Complete and usable responses were received from 131 participants (response rate=0.4). Results Most respondents had access to broadband at home (125/131, 95.4%) and at work (130/131, 99.2%). Registrars were more likely to spend more than 2 hours on the Internet (P=.03), and to use social media sites for nonwork purposes (P=.01). On a 5-point Likert scale, confidence was high (mean 3.93, SD 0.63) and was negatively associated with higher age (P=.04), but not associated with training stage. Social media confidence was lower, with registrars more confident than supervisors for almost all social media activities. On a 5-point Likert scale, overall usefulness was scored positively (n=123, mean 3.63, SD 0.74), and was not significantly associated with age or training level. The

  11. Office-based anesthesia: an overview.

    PubMed

    Koch, Marc E; Dayan, Steve; Barinholtz, David

    2003-06-01

    Office-based anesthesia, like other specific forms of anesthesia practice, has many unique attributes. Better work hours and a closer working relationship with surgeons and patients can provide the forum for a considerable amount of professional resonance. Moreover, the itinerant nature of the practice, the limited resources, and the need to innovate on the spur of the moment can make for variety and excitement. The gamut of anesthesia techniques, patient comorbidities, and surgeon expectations does not necessarily produce a facile experience, of course. But no specific anesthesia specialty or venue is devoid of challenge. While OBA is different from other types of anesthesia practice, this distinction does not necessarily make it superior or inferior. The political climate has improved, with more states acknowledging the status of OBS and OBA. This may force those OBA providers who routinely practice without regard to practical and appropriate industry standards out of business. AAAHC accreditation of an OBA practice may serve as a confidence-inspiring indication to patients that nationwide peer-reviewed standards are being met. However, everyone involved must recognize that accreditation is not a substitute for the sound application of clinical knowledge and expertise, as well as the collection and assessment of quality assurance data. It is inappropriate to view each OBS client as a minihospital. Although this may seem a simpler business model, the business and legal issues can be far more complex than those found in more traditional locales. A meld between business-person and clinician is becoming more a rule than an exception, and efforts to maintain and promote professional sovereignty will help forge continued growth of this unique form of anesthesiology practice.

  12. Office-based Management of Recurrent Respiratory Papilloma.

    PubMed

    Motz, Kevin M; Hillel, Alexander T

    2016-06-01

    This review will highlight the indications and benefits of office-based therapy for recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP) and discuss the utilization of photo-dynamic lasers and adjuvant medical therapy in office-based settings. Office-based management of RRP allows for more timely interventions, is preferred by the majority of patients, and negates the risk of general anesthesia. Current literature argues for the utilization of KTP laser over CO2 laser for office-based treatment of RRP. Medical therapies for RRP are limited, but agents such as bevacizumab are promising and have been shown to reduce disease burden. Medical therapies that can induce disease remission are still needed. Office-based procedures save time and healthcare expenses compared to like procedures in the operating room. However, the increased frequency for office-based procedures predicts similar overall healthcare costs for office-based and OR laser excision of RRP. Office-based management of RRP is a feasible and well-tolerated strategy in appropriately selected patients with adequate local anesthesia.

  13. Perspectives of patients, family caregivers and physicians about the use of opioids for refractory dyspnea in advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Rocker, Graeme; Young, Joanne; Donahue, Margaret; Farquhar, Morag; Simpson, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Background: A recent national practice guideline recommends the use of opioids for the treatment of refractory dyspnea in patients with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We conducted two qualitative studies to explore the experiences of patients and family caregivers with opioids for refractory COPD-related dyspnea and the perspectives and attitudes of physicians toward opioids in this context. Methods: Patients (n = 8; 5 men, 3 women), their caregivers (n = 12; 5 men, 7 women) and physicians (n = 28, 17 men, 11 women) in Nova Scotia participated in the studies. Semistructured interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, coded conceptually and analyzed for emergent themes using interpretive description methodology. Results: Patients reported that opioids provided a sense of calm and relief from severe dyspnea. Family caregivers felt that opioids helped patients to breathe more “normally,” observed improvements in patients’ symptoms of anxiety and depression, and experienced reductions in their own stress. Patients reported substantial improvements in their quality of life. All patients and family caregivers wanted opioid therapy to continue. Most physicians were reluctant to prescribe opioids for refractory dyspnea, describing a lack of related knowledge and experience, and fears related to the potential adverse effects and legal censure. Interpretation: Discrepancies between the positive experiences of patients and family caregivers with opioids and the reluctance of physicians to prescribe opioids for refractory dyspnea constitute an important gap in care. Bridging this gap will require initiatives to improve the uptake of practice guidelines and to increase confidence in prescribing opioids for dyspnea refractory to conventional treatment. PMID:22529167

  14. Physician and Family Recommendations to Obtain a Mammogram and Mammography Intentions: The Moderating Effects of Perceived Seriousness and Risk of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Yamile; Thompson, Beti; Ceballos, Rachel M

    2014-01-01

    A growing body of literature has demonstrated psychosocial factors enable mammography intentions and usage among Latinas. Although these factors (e.g., family recommendations, breast cancer perceptions) likely influence one another, little research has examined interactive effects. The current study assessed the moderating effect of perceived breast cancer seriousness and risk on associations between recommendations to obtain mammography and mammography intentions. This sample included 97 Latinas in rural Eastern Washington State. After adjusting for age, two significant interactions emerged: perceived seriousness × physician recommendation and perceived risk × family recommendation. This exploratory study provides important directions for future communication research and planning to improve screening disparities. PMID:25558437

  15. Dying patients' need for emotional support and personalized care from physicians: perspectives of patients with terminal illness, families, and health care providers.

    PubMed

    Wenrich, Marjorie D; Curtis, J Randall; Ambrozy, Donna A; Carline, Jan D; Shannon, Sarah E; Ramsey, Paul G

    2003-03-01

    This study addressed the emotional and personal needs of dying patients and the ways physicians help or hinder these needs. Twenty focus groups were held with 137 individuals, including patients with chronic and terminal illnesses, family members, health care workers, and physicians. Content analyses were performed based on grounded theory. Emotional support and personalization were 2 of the 12 domains identified as important in end-of-life care. Components of emotional support were compassion, responsiveness to emotional needs, maintaining hope and a positive attitude, and providing comfort through touch. Components of personalization were treating the whole person and not just the disease, making the patient feel unique and special, and considering the patient's social situation. Although the levels of emotional support and personalization varied, there was a minimal level, defined by compassion and treating the whole person and not just the disease, that physicians should strive to meet in caring for all dying patients. Participants also identified intermediate and advanced levels of physician behavior that provide emotional and personal support.

  16. Family physicians' ability to perform population management is associated with adoption of other aspects of the patient-centered medical home.

    PubMed

    Ottmar, Jessica; Blackburn, Brenna; Phillips, Robert L; Peterson, Lars E; Jaén, Carlos Roberto

    2015-04-01

    The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) model is considered a promising approach to improving population health, but how elements of these advanced practice models relate to population health capability is unknown. To measure associations between family physicians' performance of population management with PCMH components, a cross-sectional survey was conducted with physicians accessing the American Board of Family Medicine Web site in 2011. Bivariate analysis and logistic regression tested associations between physician and practice demographics and specific PCMH features. The primary outcome was performance of population management. The final sample included 3855 physicians, 37.3% of whom reported performing population management. Demographic characteristics significantly associated with greater use of population management were female sex and graduation from an international medical school. PCMH components that remained associated with population management after adjustment were access to clinical case managers (odds ratio [OR]=2.01, 95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 1.69, 2.39), behavioral health collaboration (OR=1.49, 95% CI: 1.26, 1.77), having an electronic health record that supports meaningful use (OR=1.47, 95% CI: 1.25, 1.74), recent participation in a quality improvement project (OR=2.47, 95% CI: 2.12, 2.89), and routine measurement of patient difficulty securing an appointment (OR=2.87, 95% CI: 2.45, 3.37). Performance of population management was associated with several PCMH elements and resources not present in traditional primary care offices. Attention to these elements likely will enhance delivery of population management services in primary care.

  17. An Analytical Comparison of the Opinions of Physicians Working in Emergency and Trauma Surgery Departments at Tabriz and Vienna Medical Universities Regarding Family Presence during Resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Soleimanpour, Hassan; Behringer, Wilhelm; Tabrizi, Jafar Sadegh; Sarahrudi, Kambiz; Golzari, Samad E J; Hajdu, Stefan; Rasouli, Maryam; Nikakhtar, Mehdi; Mehdizadeh Esfanjani, Robab

    2015-01-01

    The present study evaluated the opinions of physicians working in the emergency and trauma surgery departments of Vienna Medical University, in Austria, and Tabriz Medical University, in Iran, regarding the presence of patients’ relatives during resuscitation. In a descriptive-analytical study, the data obtained from questionnaires that had been distributed randomly to 40 specialists and residents at each of the participating universities were analyzed. The questionnaire consisted of two sections aimed at capturing the participants’ demographic data, the participants’ opinions regarding their support for the family’s presence during resuscitation, and the multiple potential factors affecting the participants’ attitudes, including health beliefs, triggers that could facilitate the procedure, self-efficacy, intellectual norms, and perceived behavioral control. The questionnaire also included a direct question (Question 16) on whether the participants approved of family presence. Each question could be answered using a Likert-type scale. The results showed that the mean scores for Question 16 were 4.31 ± 0.64 and 3.57 ± 1.31 for participants at Vienna and Tabriz universities, respectively. Moreover, physicians at Vienna University disapproved of the presence of patients’ families during resuscitation to a higher extent than did those at Tabriz University (P = 0.018). Of the studied prognostic factors affecting the perspectives of Vienna Medical University’s physicians, health beliefs (P = 0.000; B = 1.146), triggers (P = 0.000; B = 1.050), and norms (P = 0.000; B = 0.714) were found to be significant. Moreover, of the studied prognostic factors affecting the perspectives of Tabriz Medical University’s physicians, health beliefs (P = 0.000; B = 0.875), triggers (P = 0.000; B = 1.11), self-efficacy (P = 0.001; B = 0.5), and perceived behavioral control (P = 0.03; B = 0.713) were significant. Most physicians at Vienna and Tabriz Medical universities

  18. Electronic Health Record Use a Bitter Pill for Many Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Meigs, Stephen L.; Solomon, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Electronic health record (EHR) adoption among office-based physician practices in the United States has increased significantly in the past decade. However, the challenges of using EHRs have resulted in growing dissatisfaction with the systems among many of these physicians. The purpose of this qualitative multiple-case study was to increase understanding of physician perceptions regarding the value of using EHR technology. Important findings included the belief among physicians that EHR systems need to be more user-friendly and adaptable to individual clinic workflow preferences, physician beliefs that lack of interoperability among EHRs is a major barrier to meaningful use of the systems, and physician beliefs that EHR use does not improve the quality of care provided to patients. These findings suggest that although government initiatives to encourage EHR adoption among office-based physician practices have produced positive results, additional support may be required in the future to maintain this momentum. PMID:26903782

  19. Educational needs of family physicians in the domains of health and conformity with continuing education in Fasa University of Medical Sciences

    PubMed Central

    ZARIF SANAIEY, NAHID; KARAMNEJAD, SAHAR; REZAEE, RITA

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Assessment and prioritization are the first steps of planning. According to the family physician's idea, evaluating programs in order to improve them is one of the necessities of promoting quality and increases the efficiency and effectiveness of continuing education. This study aimed to determine family physicians’ educational needs regarding health and its applicability in continuous medical education in Fasa University of Medical Sciences. Methods In this cross-sectional study, viewpoints of 45 general physicians working at Fasa University of Medical Sciences in 2013 were studied. Samples were selected through census. Data collection was done using a researcher-made questionnaire using 10-point Likert scale and a checklist with Delphi technique.  Content validity of the questionnaire and its reliability were confirmed by the experts’ opinion and Cronbach's alpha of 80%.  The data were analyzed through SPSS software version 16, using both descriptive and inferential statistics (mean and standard deviation, standard score (SQ), t-test, ANOVAs). A significance level of <0.05 was considered. Results The highest educational priority was in the field of mental health (SQ= 0.38), and environmental and professional health was the lowest priority (SQ= _0.24). Additionally, within each of the areas above specific priorities were determined. Based on the results of this study, gender, graduation date, cooperation time, and university they were educated in did not affect expressing educational needs (p>0.05). The most educational conformity with continuing education was in the diseases area (topic 27%, content 37%). In the areas of environmental and professional health and health education, compliance was zero. Conclusions The physicians stated that mental health was the first educational need and environmental and professional health was the last one. According to the results, proper continuing medical programs should be coordinated with educational

  20. Knowledge and management of Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis among family physicians, pediatricians, chiropractors and physiotherapists in Québec, Canada: An exploratory study

    PubMed Central

    Théroux, Jean; Grimard, Guy; Beauséjour, Marie; Labelle, Hubert; Feldman, Debbie Ehrmann

    2013-01-01

    Background: Health professionals (HPs) are likely to encounter adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) patients. Best practice dictates that early detection leads to better decision making regarding optimal management. The aim of our study was to appraise the basic knowledge, evaluation and management skills concerning AIS care among family physicians, pediatricians, chiropractors, and physiotherapists. Methods: A semi-structured questionnaire including 3 clinical scenarios was developed. Telephone interviews were conducted with 51 HPs to assess their knowledge of the clinical signs, risk factors, and management options of AIS and their preferences in clinical guidelines for AIS care. Results: The majority of HPs (70–90%) would refer the patient who required prompt referral, but only 38–60% actually rated the case as requiring prompt referral. Forty percent of HPs (predominantly physiotherapists and family physicians) stated that they would not be comfortable providing AIS patient follow-up. Access to specialized care was considered a problem, and nearly all believed that establishment of clinical guidelines would be beneficial. Conclusions: Considerable gaps exist regarding the knowledge of the clinical signs and risk factors of AIS. The importance of a patient in need of a prompt referral is recognized by the majority of the HPs, but they believe that there are problems regarding accessibility to a specialist. Interprofessional collaboration is discussed as a promising approach to improve the management of AIS. PMID:23997251

  1. Use and Characteristics of Electronic Health Record Systems among Office-Based Physician Practices: United States, ...

    MedlinePlus

    ... Mortality Series 21. Data on Natality, Marriage, and Divorce Series 22. Data from the National Natality and ... Compilations of Data on Natality, Mortality, Marriage, and Divorce Vital Statistics Rapid Release Quarterly Provisional Estimates Dashboard ...

  2. Medical Students' vs. Family Physicians' Assessment of Practical and Logical Values of Pathophysiology Multiple-Choice Questions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Secic, Damir; Husremovic, Dzenana; Kapur, Eldan; Jatic, Zaim; Hadziahmetovic, Nina; Vojnikovic, Benjamin; Fajkic, Almir; Meholjic, Amir; Bradic, Lejla; Hadzic, Amila

    2017-01-01

    Testing strategies can either have a very positive or negative effect on the learning process. The aim of this study was to examine the degree of consistency in evaluating the practicality and logic of questions from a medical school pathophysiology test, between students and family medicine doctors. The study engaged 77 family medicine doctors…

  3. Optimizing psychosocial support during office-based buprenorphine treatment in primary care: patients’ experiences and preferences

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Aaron D.; Masyukova, Mariya; Cunningham, Chinazo O.

    2015-01-01

    Background Buprenorphine maintenance treatment is effective and has been successfully integrated into HIV and primary care settings. However, one key barrier to providers prescribing buprenorphine is their perception that they are unable to provide adequate counseling or psychosocial support to patients with opioid addiction. This qualitative study investigated supportive elements of office-based buprenorphine treatment that patients perceived to be most valuable. Methods We conducted five focus groups with 33 buprenorphine treatment-experienced participants. Focus groups were audio-recorded and transcribed. Iterative readings of transcripts and grounded theory analysis revealed common themes. Results Overall, participants perceived that buprenorphine treatment helped them to achieve their treatment goals and valued the flexibility, accessibility, and privacy of treatment. Participants identified interpersonal and structural elements of buprenorphine treatment that provided psychosocial support. Participants desired good physician-patient relationships, but also valued care delivery models that were patient-centered, created a safe place for self-disclosure, and utilized coordinated team-based care. Conclusions Participants derived psychosocial support from their prescribing physician, but were also open to collaborative or team-based models of care, as long as they were voluntary and confidential. Buprenorphine prescribing physicians without access to referral options for psychosocial counseling could focus on maintaining non-judgmental attitudes and shared decision making during patient encounters. Adding structure and psychosocial support to buprenorphine treatment through coordinated team-based care also seems to have great promise. PMID:26566712

  4. Mobile phone use patterns and preferences in safety net office-based buprenorphine patients

    PubMed Central

    Tofighi, Babak; Grossman, Ellie; Buirkle, Emily; McNeely, Jennifer; Gourevitch, Marc; Lee, Joshua D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Integrating mobile phone technologies in addiction treatment is of increasing importance, and may optimize patient engagement with their care and enhance the delivery of existing treatment strategies. Few studies have evaluated mobile phone and text message (TM) use patterns in persons enrolled in addiction treatment, and none have assessed use in safety net, office-based buprenorphine practices. Methods A 28-item, quantitative and qualitative semi-structured survey was administered to opiate-dependent adults in an urban, publicly funded, office-based buprenorphine program. Survey domains included: demographic characteristics, mobile phone and TM use patterns, and mobile phone and TM use patterns and preferences pertaining to their recovery. Results Surveyors approached 73 of the 155 eligible subjects (47%); 71 respondents completed the survey. Nearly all participants reported mobile phone ownership (93%) and TM use (93%), and most reported ‘very much’ or ‘somewhat’ comfort sending TM (79%). TM contact with 12-step group sponsors, friends, family members, and counselors was also described (32%). Nearly all preferred having their providers’ mobile phone number (94%) and alerting the clinic via TM in the event of a potential relapse to receive both supportive TM and a phone call from their buprenorphine provider was also well received (62%). Conclusions Mobile phone and TM use patterns and preferences among this sample of office-based buprenorphine participants highlight the potential of adopting patient-centered mobile phone based interventions in this treatment setting. PMID:25918966

  5. Nurse practitioners, certified nurse midwives, and physician assistants in physician offices.

    PubMed

    Park, Melissa; Cherry, Donald; Decker, Sandra L

    2011-08-01

    The expansion of health insurance coverage through health care reform, along with the aging of the population, are expected to strain the capacity for providing health care. Projections of the future physician workforce predict declines in the supply of physicians and decreasing physician work hours for primary care. An expansion of care delivered by nurse practitioners (NPs), certified nurse midwives (CNMs), and physician assistants (PAs) is often cited as a solution to the predicted surge in demand for health care services and calls for an examination of current reliance on these providers. Using a nationally based physician survey, we have described the employment of NPs, CNMs, and PAs among office-based physicians by selected physician and practice characteristics.

  6. Real-world approach to actinic keratosis management: practical treatment algorithm for office-based dermatology.

    PubMed

    Dirschka, Thomas; Gupta, Girish; Micali, Giuseppe; Stockfleth, Eggert; Basset-Séguin, Nicole; Del Marmol, Véronique; Dummer, Reinhard; Jemec, Gregor B E; Malvehy, Josep; Peris, Ketty; Puig, Susana; Stratigos, Alexander J; Zalaudek, Iris; Pellacani, Giovanni

    2016-11-13

    Actinic keratosis (AK) is a chronic skin disease in which multiple clinical and subclinical lesions co-exist across large areas of sun-exposed skin, resulting in field cancerisation. Lesions require treatment because of their potential to transform into invasive squamous cell carcinoma. This article aims to provide office-based dermatologists and general practitioners with simple guidance on AK treatment in daily clinical practice to supplement existing evidence-based guidelines. Novel aspects of the proposed treatment algorithm include differentiating patients according to whether they have isolated scattered lesions, lesions clustered in small areas or large affected fields without reference to specific absolute numbers of lesions. Recognising that complete lesion clearance is rarely achieved in real-life practice and that AK is a chronic disease, the suggested treatment goals are to reduce the number of lesions, to achieve long-term disease control and to prevent disease progression to invasive squamous cell carcinoma. In the clinical setting, physicians should select AK treatments based on local availability, and the presentation and needs of their patients. The proposed AK treatment algorithm is easy-to-use and has high practical relevance for real-life, office-based dermatology.

  7. Office-based dynamic imaging of vocal cords in awake patients with swept-source optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lingfeng; Liu, Gangjun; Rubinstein, Marc; Saidi, Arya; Wong, Brian J. F.; Chen, Zhongping

    2009-11-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an evolving noninvasive imaging modality that has been used to image the human larynx during surgical endoscopy. The design of a long gradient index (GRIN) lens-based probe capable of capturing images of the human larynx by use of swept-source OCT during a typical office-based laryngoscopy examination is presented. In vivo OCT imaging of the human larynx is demonstrated with a rate of 40 frames per second. Dynamic vibration of the vocal folds is recorded to provide not only high-resolution cross-sectional tissue structures but also vibration parameters, such as the vibration frequency and magnitude of the vocal cords, which provides important information for clinical diagnosis and treatment, as well as fundamental research of the voice itself. Office-based OCT is a promising imaging modality to study the larynx for physicians in otolaryngology.

  8. A Study to Develop a Uniform Measure of Clinical Productivity among Family Practice Physicians from Selected Army Community Hospitals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-11-01

    9 2. ro Problem Noted ....... ................... . 80 3. V700 - Exam, medical .......... .................... 81 4. V7231 - Exam...97 20. 7840 - Headacne .......... ...................... 98 iv I. INTRODUCTION Conditions Which Prompted the Study Medical ...They were chosen because there is a close comparison between these medical care facilities in regard to the scope and breadth of family practice ifn

  9. [Physician--where to?].

    PubMed

    Luban-Plozza, B

    1993-06-08

    These questions are addressed: What does it mean to be a physician, and how can a physician continue his education? Where is his place in family crises? The psychosomatic point of view of diseases is not a specialty, but a concept, a basic attitude, a global principle encompassing all medical specialties. In particular, disorders of relations and basic needs are discussed in the context of a novel therapeutic access. The doctor as a 'drug' corresponds to a therapeutic alliance, also in group work. The problems of communication, even as a flash, influence the language of the patient and the physician. In the tension between anxiety and trust, psychosomatic thinking and medical intervention come to life also for the experience of disease and in the search for a meaning. The physician is not as much an achiever than a provider.

  10. “Maternal Health and Family Planning Distance Education” experience among physicians: a three-phase study to determine the educational needs, develop education program, and evaluate efficacy of the education administered

    PubMed Central

    Ciftci, Bestami; Uzel, Nesibe; Ozel, M Onur; Zergeroglu, Sema; Deger, Cetin; Turasan, S Sare; Karakoc, Ayse Gul; Ozbalci, Semra

    2016-01-01

    Aim This study aims to assess the educational needs of family practitioners and evaluate the efficacy of the ongoing “Maternal Health and Family Planning Distance Education” program conducted by the General Directorate of Health Research (SAGEM) of the Turkish Ministry of Health. Methods This study consisted of three phases. In the first phase, an online survey on maternal health and family planning educational needs was sent to 20,611 physicians via e-mail. Of the 20,611 physicians, 4,729 completed the survey. In the second phase, of the 1,061 physicians registered to the education program, 632 physicians with active participation were included. In the third phase, the preeducation expectations of 287 physicians and posteducation satisfaction of 54 physicians were analyzed with a questionnaire. Results The majority of the physicians were employed in a family health center (97.4%) and practicing for 16–20 years (23.2%) without any prior in-service training (60.9%). High-to-very high educational need was expressed by 56.4% of physicians for pregnancy, delivery, and puerperality. Topics that the physicians, including both those with ≥16 years in practice and without prior in-service training, expressed need for more detailed content were pregnancy, delivery, and puerperality (37.5%); emergency obstetric approach in the primary care setting (33.1%); and gynecological infectious diseases and treatment approach (32.4%). Following the education program, the participants’ expectations were fulfilled in terms of refreshing their knowledge, particularly in the field of Maternal Health and Family Planning (87.1% and 75.9%) and the percentage of participants who expressed that they had sufficient high level knowledge increased from 55% to 68.5%. Conclusion The education on Maternal Health and Family Planning refreshed the knowledge of participants and highly met the preeducation expectations. Determining the educational needs and expectations of the target

  11. [Outpatient anesthesia--the office-based anesthetist].

    PubMed

    Fischer, Guntram

    2013-03-01

    The aim of the present article is to describe the field of activity and prevailing conditions for office-based anesthetists in Germany. From the introduction of outpatient operations on the basis of actual numbers, data and facts, we present the project profile and the structures of the different fields of activity and practice constellations for office-based anesthesiology. Particular emphasis is placed on the requirements for room space and technical facilities, the criteria for patient selection, and the structural and procedural quality as well as quality management of outpatient anesthesia. With the aid of current numerical data the anesthetic procedures performed in the outpatient field through to the possibilities for development of continuous regional anesthetic procedures in catheter technique are illustrated. In conclusion, we discuss the economic conditions and the health-care economic significance together with a description of the current health-care quality of ambulant anesthesiology and the possibilities for participation in an error-reporting system.

  12. More Family Physicians or More Primary Care? An Analysis of the Family Practice Act (S. 3418). Health Manpower Policy Discussion Paper Series No. D.1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, George E., Jr.

    The crisis in primary care has long been discussed and the dismal litany of statistics is now familiar. The G.P. is vanishing from the medical scene. Over one-third of the active general practitioners are now over 60. In 1970 the U.S. Congress responded to the declining availability of primary health care by passing the Family Practice Act. The…

  13. Medical students' vs. family physicians' assessment of practical and logical values of pathophysiology multiple-choice questions.

    PubMed

    Secic, Damir; Husremovic, Dzenana; Kapur, Eldan; Jatic, Zaim; Hadziahmetovic, Nina; Vojnikovic, Benjamin; Fajkic, Almir; Meholjic, Amir; Bradic, Lejla; Hadzic, Amila

    2017-03-01

    Testing strategies can either have a very positive or negative effect on the learning process. The aim of this study was to examine the degree of consistency in evaluating the practicality and logic of questions from a medical school pathophysiology test, between students and family medicine doctors. The study engaged 77 family medicine doctors and 51 students. Ten questions were taken from cardiac pathophysiology and 10 questions from pulmonary pathophysiology, and each question was assessed on the criteria of practicality and logic. A nonparametric Mann-Whitney test was used to test the difference between evaluators. On the criteria of logic, only four out of 20 items were evaluated differently by students in comparison to doctors, two items each from the fields of cardiology and pulmonology. On the criteria of practicality, for six of the 20 items there were statistically significant differences between the students and doctors, with three items each from cardiology and pulmonology. Based on these indicative results, students should be involved in the qualitative assessment of exam questions, which should be performed regularly under a strictly regulated process.

  14. Instituting an office-based surgery program in the gynecologist's office.

    PubMed

    Wortman, Morris

    2010-01-01

    Office-based surgery (OBS) provides many advantages for the patient, physician, operating room team, and health care system. Newer technologies provide an array of procedures appropriate to the office setting, and with careful preparation, many can be performed without compromising patient safety or comfort. Several states have specific regulatory requirements for OBS, although half of them provide neither guidelines nor regulation. The Federation of State Medical Boards provides current regulatory information across the United States; the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology has recently issued guidelines that provide recommendations for instituting an OBS practice, and the American Medical Association and the American Society of Anesthesiologists provide guidelines that promote patient safety and comfort in the office setting. Many issues must be considered before instituting an OBS program. Practices that perform invasive procedures requiring more than minimal sedation are encouraged to seek formal accreditation because it assures patients of quality of care. Residency programs and professional societies are encouraged to provide training in OBS surgery and to develop programs to mentor the next generation of physicians.

  15. Physicians slow to e-mail routinely with patients.

    PubMed

    Boukus, Ellyn R; Grossman, Joy M; O'Malley, Ann S

    2010-10-01

    Some experts view e-mail between physicians and patients as a potential tool to improve physician-patient communication and, ultimately, patient care. Despite indications that many patients want to e-mail their physicians, physician adoption and use of e-mail with patients remains uncommon--only 6.7 percent of office-based physicians routinely e-mailed patients in 2008, according to a new national study from the Center for Studying Health System Change (HSC). Overall, about one-third of office-based physicians reported that information technology (IT) was available in their practice for e-mailing patients about clinical issues. Of those, fewer than one in five reported using e-mail with patients routinely; the remaining physicians were roughly evenly split between occasional users and non-users. Physicians in practices with access to electronic medical records and those working in health maintenance organizations (HMOs) or medical school settings were more likely to adopt and use e-mail to communicate with patients compared with other physicians. However, even among the highest users--physicians in group/staff-model HMOs--only 50.6 percent reported routinely e-mailing patients.

  16. Revealing a Child's Pathology: Physicians' Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scelles, Regine; Aubert-Godard, Anne; Gargiulo, Marcela; Avant, Monique; Gortais, Jean

    2010-01-01

    In this study, 12 physicians and 12 care-givers were interviewed using semi-structured interviews. We explored physicians' experiences when they revealed a diagnosis. We also tried to understand which family members the physician was thinking of, with whom they identified themselves, and their first choice of the person to whom they prefer to…

  17. Changing roles for primary-care physicians: addressing challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, C P; Kaluzny, A D; Kibbe, D C; Tredway, R

    2005-01-01

    Direct-to-consumer advertising is but one example of a process called disintermediation that is directly affecting primary-care physicians and their patients. This paper examines the trends and the actors involved in disintermediation, which threatens the traditional patient-physician relationship. The paper outlines the social forces behind these threats and illustrates the resulting challenges and opportunities. A rationale and strategies are presented to rebuild, maintain and strengthen the patient-physician relationship in an era of growing disintermediation and anticipated advancements in cost-effective office-based information systems. Primary care--as we know it--is under siege from a number of trends in healthcare delivery, resulting in loss of physician autonomy, disrupted continuity of care and potential erosion of professional values (Rastegar 2004; Future of Family Medicine Project Leadership Committee 2004). The halcyon days of medicine as a craft guild with a monopoly on (1) technical knowledge and (2) the means of implementation, reached its zenith in the mid-twentieth century and has been under pressure ever since (Starr 1982; Schlesinger 2002). While this is a trend within the US health system, it is likely to affect other delivery systems in the years ahead.

  18. Physician, heal thyself

    PubMed Central

    Blais, Régis; Safianyk, Catherine; Magnan, Anne; Lapierre, André

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To document the opinions of the users of the Quebec Physicians Health Program (QPHP) about the services they received. DESIGN Mailed questionnaire. SETTING Quebec. PARTICIPANTS A total of 126 physicians who used QPHP services between 1999 and 2004. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Users’ overall rating of the QPHP services, their opinions about the program, and whether their situations improved as a result of accessing QPHP services. RESULTS Ninety-two of the 126 physicians surveyed returned their completed questionnaires, providing a response rate of 73%. Most respondents thought that the QPHP services were good or excellent (90%), most would use the program again (86%) or recommend it (96%), and most thought the Quebec physician associations and the Collège des médecins du Québec should continue funding the QPHP (97%). Most respondents thought the service confidentiality was excellent (84%), as was staff professionalism (82%), and 62% thought the quality of the services they were referred to was excellent. However, only 57% believed their situations had improved with the help of the QPHP. CONCLUSION The QPHP received good marks from its users. Given the effects of physician burnout on patients and on the health care system, it is not only a personal problem, but also a collective problem. Thus, actions are needed not only to set up programs like the QPHP for those suffering from burnout, but also to prevent these types of problems. Because family physicians are likely to be the first ones consulted by their physician patients in distress, they play a key role in acknowledging these problems and referring those colleagues to the appropriate help programs when needed. PMID:20944027

  19. Collaborative Care for Older Adults with low back pain by family medicine physicians and doctors of chiropractic (COCOA): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Low back pain is a prevalent and debilitating condition that affects the health and quality of life of older adults. Older people often consult primary care physicians about back pain, with many also receiving concurrent care from complementary and alternative medicine providers, most commonly doctors of chiropractic. However, a collaborative model of treatment coordination between these two provider groups has yet to be tested. The primary aim of the Collaborative Care for Older Adults Clinical Trial is to develop and evaluate the clinical effectiveness and feasibility of a patient-centered, collaborative care model with family medicine physicians and doctors of chiropractic for the treatment of low back pain in older adults. Methods/design This pragmatic, pilot randomized controlled trial will enroll 120 participants, age 65 years or older with subacute or chronic low back pain lasting at least one month, from a community-based sample in the Quad-Cities, Iowa/Illinois, USA. Eligible participants are allocated in a 1:1:1 ratio to receive 12 weeks of medical care, concurrent medical and chiropractic care, or collaborative medical and chiropractic care. Primary outcomes are self-rated back pain and disability. Secondary outcomes include general and functional health status, symptom bothersomeness, expectations for treatment effectiveness and improvement, fear avoidance behaviors, depression, anxiety, satisfaction, medication use and health care utilization. Treatment safety and adverse events also are monitored. Participant-rated outcome measures are collected via self-reported questionnaires and computer-assisted telephone interviews at baseline, and at 4, 8, 12, 24, 36 and 52 weeks post-randomization. Provider-rated expectations for treatment effectiveness and participant improvement also are evaluated. Process outcomes are assessed through qualitative interviews with study participants and research clinicians, chart audits of progress notes and content

  20. Financial implications of serving as team physician.

    PubMed

    Lemak, Larry

    2007-04-01

    Time is the greatest negative financial burden that you accept as a sports medicine physician, because the only way to produce revenue as a physician is with your time. This cost measured in time of doing business as a team physician can be high. Unless being a team physician is very rewarding to you through personal satisfaction or the other intangible indirect benefits associated with the role, being a team physician may not be a good financial decision for you as a person and a physician, or for your practice and your family.

  1. Novel Uses of Office-Based Measures of Arterial Compliance

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Raymond R.

    2015-01-01

    Office-based blood pressure monitoring has been the primary way of managing the cardiovascular risk associated with a diagnosis of hypertension. As research unfolds the nature in which the pulse waveform is generated, additional insights beyond standard measures of systolic and diastolic blood pressure have emerged to help reclassify the cardiovascular risk of patients or point out patterns that have, in longitudinal cohort studies, shown promise as predictors of outcomes such as heart failure. In this review, we focus on the pressure profile in the proximal aorta that can be obtained easily and noninvasively from the radial or brachial artery during a clinical office encounter and the potential value of these measures in outcomes such as left ventricular hypertrophy and heart failure. PMID:27057290

  2. [Burnout syndrome among family physicians].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Cruz, Juan; Mugártegui-Sánchez, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    Introducción: el síndrome de agotamiento profesional es un estado de agotamiento físico y emocional que puede presentarse en trabajadores que interactúan con otras personas. El objetivo de esta investigación fue conocer la prevalencia de este síndrome y los factores relacionados en médicos familiares de Mérida, Yucatán, México. Métodos: se realizó una encuesta transversal en la que se aplicó el Maslach Burnout Inventory a médicos familiares seleccionados mediante muestreo no probabilístico por conveniencia. Se analizaron las medidas de tendencia central y dispersión y se determinó la prevalencia del síndrome de agotamiento profesional. La significación estadística de los factores asociados se determinó mediante χ(2). Resultados: se obtuvieron 59 casos de síndrome de agotamiento profesional: 36 con afectación en un componente del Maslach Burnout Inventory, 15 en dos y ocho en los tres. El 35 % de los casos indicó trabajar en promedio 10 turnos extra al mes (p = 0.013); tener un segundo trabajo también se relacionó con el síndrome. Conclusiones: los resultados son consistentes con los obtenidos en estudios similares. Trabajar turnos extra o tener otro trabajo fueron los factores relacionados con el síndrome de agotamiento profesional.

  3. Office-based cryoablation of breast fibroadenomas with long-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, Cary S; Littrup, Peter J; Freeman-Gibb, Laurie A; Smith, J Stanley; Francescatti, Darius; Simmons, Rache; Stocks, Lewis H; Bailey, Lisa; Harness, Jay K; Bachman, Barbara A; Henry, C Alan

    2005-01-01

    Approximately 10% of women will experience a breast fibroadenoma in their lifetime. Cryoablation is a new treatment that combines the better attributes of the current standards: surveillance and surgery. It is a minimally invasive office-based procedure that is administered without the use of general anesthesia, involving minimal patient discomfort and little to no scarring. This work aimed to establish the long-term (2-3 years) efficacy, safety, and satisfaction of the procedure, as well as the impact of cryoablation on mammogram and ultrasound images. Thirty-seven treated fibroadenomas were available for assessment with an average follow-up period of 2.6 years. Of the original 84% that were palpable prior to treatment, only 16% remained palpable to the patient as of this writing. Of those fibroadenomas that were initially < or = 2.0 cm in size, only 6% remained palpable. A median volume reduction of 99% was observed with ultrasound. Ninety-seven percent of patients and 100% of physicians were satisfied with the long-term treatment results. Mammograms and ultrasounds showed cryoablation produced no artifact that would adversely affect interpretation. Cryoablation for breast fibroadenomas has previously been reported as safe and effective both acutely and at the 1-year follow-up mark, and thus has been implemented as a treatment option. At long-term follow-up, cryoablation as a primary therapy for breast fibroadenomas demonstrates progressive resolution of the treated area, durable safety, and excellent patient and physician satisfaction. The treatment is performed in an office setting rather than an operating room, resulting in a cost-effective and patient-friendly procedure. Cryoablation should be considered a preferred option for those patients desiring definitive therapy for their fibroadenomas without surgical intervention.

  4. There are considerable drawbacks to oral anticoagulant for monitoring patients at home which should lead family physicians to discuss alternative or enhanced solutions: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background INR (International Normalized Ratio) is the biological reference test for the monitoring of vitamin K antagonist (VKA) therapy. Overdosage of VKAs causes about 17,000 hospitalizations and 5,000 deaths each year in France. To avoid these complications, monitoring and blood sampling conditions must be rigorous. In France, more than half of INRs are carried out at home. The aim was to determine blood-sampling conditions at home, transit time and the quality of the laboratory reagents used. Method Questionnaire-based, descriptive epidemiological cross-sectional prevalence study involving home care nurses, family physicians (FPs) and clinical laboratories. Setting: Brittany, France, 2008. Study of the pre-analytical phase of INRs sampled at home and its influence on INR results. Results The study included 291 FPs, 249 home care nurses, and 49 laboratories. 32.5% of reported INRs were outside the therapeutic range. Samples were drawn into unsuitable tubes in 5.5% of cases and delivered in a chilled condition in 9% of cases. In urban areas 50% of the tubes took more than 2 hours to reach the laboratory compared with 71% from rural areas. The average International Sensitivity Index (ISI) of the thromboplastin was 1.62. The INRs provided by the laboratories were not analyzable in 64.7% of cases where blood samples had been taken at home. Conclusion Blood sample quality, transit time and the reagents used are currently inadequate. The majority of INRs taken at home are not reliable. FPs should consider these drawbacks in comparison with alternative solutions to increase patient safety. PMID:24024556

  5. Family Practice—What's The Difference?

    PubMed Central

    Brown, D. C.

    1979-01-01

    Twelve significant differences of family practice are presented with supporting information from the literature. Seven differences between family physicians and other primary care physicians are presented. PMID:20469306

  6. The role of economic evaluation in the decision-making process of family physicians: design and methods of a qualitative embedded multiple-case study

    PubMed Central

    Lessard, Chantale; Contandriopoulos, André-Pierre; Beaulieu, Marie-Dominique

    2009-01-01

    Background A considerable amount of resource allocation decisions take place daily at the point of the clinical encounter; especially in primary care, where 80 percent of health problems are managed. Ignoring economic evaluation evidence in individual clinical decision-making may have a broad impact on the efficiency of health services. To date, almost all studies on the use of economic evaluation in decision-making used a quantitative approach, and few investigated decision-making at the clinical level. An important question is whether economic evaluations affect clinical practice. The project is an intervention research study designed to understand the role of economic evaluation in the decision-making process of family physicians (FPs). The contributions of the project will be from the perspective of Pierre Bourdieu's sociological theory. Methods/design A qualitative research strategy is proposed. We will conduct an embedded multiple-case study design. Ten case studies will be performed. The FPs will be the unit of analysis. The sampling strategies will be directed towards theoretical generalization. The 10 selected cases will be intended to reflect a diversity of FPs. There will be two embedded units of analysis: FPs (micro-level of analysis) and field of family medicine (macro-level of analysis). The division of the determinants of practice/behaviour into two groups, corresponding to the macro-structural level and the micro-individual level, is the basis for Bourdieu's mode of analysis. The sources of data collection for the micro-level analysis will be 10 life history interviews with FPs, documents and observational evidence. The sources of data collection for the macro-level analysis will be documents and 9 open-ended, focused interviews with key informants from medical associations and academic institutions. The analytic induction approach to data analysis will be used. A list of codes will be generated based on both the original framework and new themes

  7. An open cluster-randomized, 18-month trial to compare the effectiveness of educational outreach visits with usual guideline dissemination to improve family physician prescribing

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Portuguese National Health Directorate has issued clinical practice guidelines on prescription of anti-inflammatory drugs, acid suppressive therapy, and antiplatelets. However, their effectiveness in changing actual practice is unknown. Methods The study will compare the effectiveness of educational outreach visits regarding the improvement of compliance with clinical guidelines in primary care against usual dissemination strategies. A cost-benefit analysis will also be conducted. We will carry out a parallel, open, superiority, randomized trial directed to primary care physicians. Physicians will be recruited and allocated at a cluster-level (primary care unit) by minimization. Data will be analyzed at the physician level. Primary care units will be eligible if they use electronic prescribing and have at least four physicians willing to participate. Physicians in intervention units will be offered individual educational outreach visits (one for each guideline) at their workplace during a six-month period. Physicians in the control group will be offered a single unrelated group training session. Primary outcomes will be the proportion of cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors prescribed in the anti-inflammatory class, and the proportion of omeprazole in the proton pump inhibitors class at 18 months post-intervention. Prescription data will be collected from the regional pharmacy claims database. We estimated a sample size of 110 physicians in each group, corresponding to 19 clusters with a mean size of 6 physicians. Outcome collection and data analysis will be blinded to allocation, but due to the nature of the intervention, physicians and detailers cannot be blinded. Discussion This trial will attempt to address unresolved issues in the literature, namely, long term persistence of effect, the importance of sequential visits in an outreach program, and cost issues. If successful, this trial may be the cornerstone for deploying large scale educational outreach

  8. Cost Analysis of an Office-based Surgical Suite

    PubMed Central

    LaBove, Gabrielle

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Operating costs are a significant part of delivering surgical care. Having a system to analyze these costs is imperative for decision making and efficiency. We present an analysis of surgical supply, labor and administrative costs, and remuneration of procedures as a means for a practice to analyze their cost effectiveness; this affects the quality of care based on the ability to provide services. The costs of surgical care cannot be estimated blindly as reconstructive and cosmetic procedures have different percentages of overhead. Methods: A detailed financial analysis of office-based surgical suite costs for surgical procedures was determined based on company contract prices and average use of supplies. The average time spent on scheduling, prepping, and doing the surgery was factored using employee rates. Results: The most expensive, minor procedure supplies are suture needles. The 4 most common procedures from the most expensive to the least are abdominoplasty, breast augmentation, facelift, and lipectomy. Conclusions: Reconstructive procedures require a greater portion of collection to cover costs. Without the adjustment of both patient and insurance remuneration in the practice, the ability to provide quality care will be increasingly difficult. PMID:27536482

  9. Office-Based Opioid Treatment with Buprenorphine (OBOT-B): Statewide Implementation of the Massachusetts Collaborative Care Model in Community Health Centers.

    PubMed

    LaBelle, Colleen T; Han, Steve Choongheon; Bergeron, Alexis; Samet, Jeffrey H

    2016-01-01

    We describe a Massachusetts Bureau of Substance Abuse Services' (BSAS) initiative to disseminate the office-based opioid treatment with buprenorphine (OBOT-B) Massachusetts Model from its development at Boston Medical Center (BMC) to its implementation at fourteen community health centers (CHCs) beginning in 2007. The Massachusetts Collaborative Care Model for the delivery of opioid agonist therapy with buprenorphine, in which nurses working with physicians play a central role in the evaluation and monitoring of patients, holds promise for the effective expansion of treatment for opioid use disorders. The training of and technical assistance for the OBOT nurses as well as a limited program assessment are described. Data spanning 6years (2007-2013) report patient demographics, prior treatment for opioid use disorders, history of overdose, housing, and employment. The expansion of OBOT to the fourteen CHCs increased the number of physicians who were "waivered" (i.e., enabling their prescribing of buprenorphine) by 375%, from 24 to 114, within 3years. During this period the annual admissions of OBOT patients to CHCs markedly increased. Dissemination of the Massachusetts Model of the Office-Based Opioid Treatment with Buprenorphine employing a collaborative care model with a central role for nursing enabled implementation of effective treatment for patients with an opioid use disorder at community health centers throughout Massachusetts while effectively engaging primary care physicians in this endeavor.

  10. Telephone versus office-based management of warfarin: impact on international normalized ratios and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Stoudenmire, Laura G; DeRemer, Christina E; Elewa, Hazem

    2014-08-01

    Studies have concluded that telephone-based management of warfarin is an effective alternative to in-office management. High rates of patient and physician satisfaction have been reported with telephone-based monitoring. Proposed benefits of telephone-based monitoring include time- and cost savings for patients and healthcare providers alike as well as increased access to care for those patients who have difficulty making in-office appointments. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of telephone versus office-based management of warfarin on extreme INR values. A retrospective cohort study was conducted to assess outcomes of patients receiving warfarin managed either by telephone or in-office appointments. The primary endpoint of the study was the frequency of extreme INR values, defined as an INR ≤1.5 or ≥4.5. A total of 110 patients were evaluated; subjects were distributed 2:1 between the in-office and telephone groups. Baseline characteristics were similar between groups. Subjects followed via telephone had a twofold increase in the incidence of extreme INR values compared to the patients followed in-office (15.18 vs. 7.98 %; p < 0.0001). Overall TTR was similar between groups (85.39 vs. 80.38 %, p = 0.1171). There was no difference between the two groups in the incidence of major bleeding events (2.67 vs. 0 %, p = 1.00), thromboembolic events (8 vs. 0 %, p = 0.1740), or hospitalizations related to anticoagulation therapy (6.67 vs. 0 %, p = 0.1758). Patients monitored via telephone had a higher incidence of extreme INR values than patients followed in-office, which may lead to an increased incidence of adverse outcomes in the long-term. Well-designed, prospective studies are needed to confirm such findings.

  11. Family practice in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Ozsahin, Akatli Kursad

    2014-03-01

    The national project 'Transformation in Health' was started in 2005 to provide expert primary care by family physicians, and decrease expenses in Turkey. The number of family physicians was far below the need, so public physicians were promoted to family physician status after a 10-day intensive course. The government declared some satisfactory results, but privately paid family physicians were not accepted into the system. Furthermore, the government stopped paying for their services from private settings. Some family physicians became unemployed as the major payer for all forms of medical care in Turkey denied their services. The process showed it's value in time. Nevertheless, family physicians should be the core of this transformation as family medicine is an academic and a scientific discipline and a primary care-oriented specialty with its own specific educational content, research and base of evidence, which cannot be achieved through standard medical education.

  12. The Mindful Physician and Pooh

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winter, Robin O.

    2013-01-01

    Resident physicians are particularly susceptible to burnout due to the stresses of residency training. They also experience the added pressures of multitasking because of the increased use of computers and mobile devices while delivering patient care. Our Family Medicine residency program addresses these problems by teaching residents about the…

  13. A Study of the Educationally Influential Physician.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, David M.; Ryan, Kurt; Hodder, Ian

    1999-01-01

    A survey of 172 family doctors found that they approached educationally influential (EI) physicians they knew through their hospitals; only 20% used e-mail and 40% the Internet for medical information; EI physicians helped extend their knowledge and validate innovations found in the literature; and health care reform was negatively affecting…

  14. Electronic Health Record Systems and Intent to Apply for Meaningful Use Incentives among Office-based Physician ...

    MedlinePlus

    ... Mortality Series 21. Data on Natality, Marriage, and Divorce Series 22. Data from the National Natality and ... Compilations of Data on Natality, Mortality, Marriage, and Divorce Vital Statistics Rapid Release Quarterly Provisional Estimates Dashboard ...

  15. [Collaboration between occupational physicians and other specialists including insurance physicians].

    PubMed

    Rijkenberg, A M; van Sprundel, M; Stassijns, G

    2013-09-01

    Collaboration between various stakeholders is essential for a well-operating vocational rehabilitation process. Researchers have mentioned, among other players, insurance physicians, the curative sector and employers. In 2011 the WHO organised the congress "Connecting Health and Labour: What role for occupational health in primary care". The congress was also attended by representatives of the WONCA (World Organisations of Family Medicine). In general, everyone agreed that occupational health aspects should continue to be seen as an integral part of primary health care. However, it is not easy to find literature on this subject. For this reason we conducted a review. We searched for literature relating to collaboration with occupational physicians in Dutch, English and German between 2001 and autumn 2011. Our attention focused on cooperation with specialists and insurance physicians. Therefore, we searched PUBMED using MeSH terms and made use of the database from the "Tijdschrift voor bedrijfs- en verzekeringsgeneeskunde (TBV) [Dutch Journal for Occupational - and Insurance Medicine]". We also checked the database from the "Deutsches Arzteblatt [German Medical Journal]" and made use of the online catalogue from THIEME - eJOURNALS. Last but not least, I used the online catalogue from the German paper "Arbeits -, Sozial -, Umweltmedizin [Occupational -, Social -, Milieu Medicine]". Additionally, we made use of the "snowball - method" to find relevant literature. We found many references to this subject. The Netherlands in particular has done a lot of research in this field. However, there is little research on the cooperation between occupational physicians and specialists; in particular insurance physicians. This is interesting, because several authors have mentioned its importance. However, cooperation with other specialists seems not to be the norm. Therefore, cooperation between curative physicians (specialists but also family doctors), insurance physicians and

  16. Sex role ideology among physicians.

    PubMed Central

    Leichner, P.; Harper, D.

    1982-01-01

    Physicians have been accused by some feminist writers of having traditional views on sex roles that make them part of society's oppressive power structure and therefore responsible in part for the high incidence of psychologic problems and drug dependency among women. To assess whether physicians' attitudes towards women are indeed polarized in a traditional fashion, a sex role ideology questionnaire was given to all practising physicians belonging to the Manitoba Medical Association. Overall the physicians were found to be more feminist than male college students and a group of women with traditional beliefs. Psychiatrists, who had the highest adjusted group mean score on a sex role ideology scale (high indicating feminist beliefs), were found to be significantly more feminist than family practitioners, surgeons, and obstetricians and gynecologists, although not more so than internists, radiologists, pediatricians and anesthesiologists. These findings do not support the assumption that physicians have traditional views that reflect those of society. However, the significant differences between specialties emphasize the need for educating physicians and medical students in the behaviour of women. PMID:7104916

  17. Anesthesia and safety considerations for office-based cosmetic surgery practice.

    PubMed

    Bogan, Vincent

    2012-08-01

    With more surgical procedures than ever before being performed in office settings, office-based anesthesia is a rapidly growing area of anesthesia practice. Although there are many advantages to office-based practice, limitations inherent to this setting, if not recognized and addressed, may threaten patient safety. The demand for cosmetic surgery is considered one of the driving factors in the exponential growth of office-based anesthesia. Anesthesia for cosmetic surgery procedures in the office setting is frequently performed under monitored anesthesia care (MAC) with its own unique safety considerations. Anesthetists practicing in office-based cosmetic surgery practices must understand the special characteristics of this setting, the MAC-based approach often used, the anesthesia and safety considerations for the cosmetic surgical procedures performed, and the importance of prophylaxis for venous thromboembolism.

  18. Physician transition plans: planning for physician slowdown.

    PubMed

    Walker Keegan, Deborah

    2008-01-01

    Transition is a natural progression for physicians in a medical practice. At some point, at least one physician will seek to deviate from the work norm of the group, either due to retirement, need for part-time status, or other reason. Medical practices that have a formal transition plan in place have a competitive advantage over other practices in terms of physician recruitment and retention. Not only do the formal transition plans permit physicians to proactively plan for work slowdown, but they also permit the medical practice to ensure its financial health and effectively position itself for the future. Key issues addressed in physician transition plans include governance, continuity of care, eligibility, time limits, on-call schedules, practice overhead, and physician compensation.

  19. Effects of managed care contracting on physician labor supply.

    PubMed

    Libby, A M; Thurston, N K

    2001-06-01

    We examine the effect of managed care contracting on physician labor supply for office-based medical practices. We extend the standard labor supply model to incorporate choices regarding the patient base. Empirical tests use data from the 1985 and 1988 national HCFA Physician Practice Costs and Income Surveys and InterStudy Managed Care Surveys. We use physician-level information on participation in managed care contracting to estimate changes in work hours. Managed care contracting is generally associated with lower physician work hours. However, accounting for motivations to participate in contracts and the extent of contracting, the effect on hours is reduced in magnitude and significance. We conclude that relying on broad aggregate measures for policy analysis will likely be misleading as underlying motivations and contracting incentives change over time.

  20. Career changes among Saskatchewan physicians.

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, S; Goplen, G; Houston, D S

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine how often Saskatchewan physicians changed career paths during medical training and practice. DESIGN: Population survey (mailed questionnaire). SETTING: Saskatchewan. PARTICIPANTS: All 1077 active members of the Saskatchewan Medical Association were sent a questionnaire; 493 (45.8%) responded. OUTCOME MEASURES: Long-term career goal or plan in next-to-last year of undergraduate medical school, probable choice of career if forced to choose at that time, and number of physicians who changed their field of training or practice at any time since graduation. RESULTS: In all, 57.8% (237/410) of the respondents were currently practising in a field different from that planned in their next-to-last year of medical school, 63.5% (275/436) were not practising in the field they would have chosen if forced to at that time, and 42.9% (211/492) had changed their field of training or practice at some time since graduation. Older physicians, those who graduated outside of Canada and specialists were the most likely to have changed career paths, family physicians, and those who graduated in Saskatchewan were the least likely to have changed. CONCLUSION: The current system of postgraduate training in Canada does not permit career changes of the sort made by most of the practising Saskatchewan physicians in the survey sample. The implications of this new system are as yet unknown but require careful monitoring. PMID:8625024

  1. Psychiatric rehabilitation education for physicians.

    PubMed

    Rudnick, Abraham; Eastwood, Diane

    2013-06-01

    As part of a rapidly spreading reform toward recovery-oriented services, mental health care systems are adopting Psychiatric/Psychosocial Rehabilitation (PSR). Accordingly, PSR education and training programs are now available and accessible. Although psychiatrists and sometimes other physicians (such as family physicians) provide important services to people with serious mental illnesses and may, therefore, need knowledge and skill in PSR, it seems that the medical profession has been slow to participate in PSR education. Based on our experience working in Canada as academic psychiatrists who are also Certified Psychiatric Rehabilitation Practitioners (CPRPs), we offer descriptions of several Canadian initiatives that involve physicians in PSR education. Multiple frameworks guide PSR education for physicians. First, guidance is provided by published PSR principles, such as the importance of self-determination (www.psrrpscanada.ca). Second, guidance is provided by adult education (andragogy) principles, emphasizing the importance of addressing attitudes in addition to knowledge and skills (Knowles, Holton, & Swanson, 2011). Third, guidance in Canada is provided by Canadian Medical Education Directives for Specialists (CanMEDS) principles, which delineate the multiple roles of physicians beyond that of medical expert (Frank, 2005) and have recently been adopted in Australia (Boyce, Spratt, Davies, & McEvoy, 2011).

  2. Not for industry only: medical students and office-based academic detailing the PIVOT (Pregnant women Influenza Vaccine Optimization Team) initiative.

    PubMed

    Blitz, Daina A; Mallen, Jonathan R; Kwiatkowski, Thomas G; Rabin, Jill M; Dlugacz, Yosef D; Silverman, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Academic detailing is a method of educational outreach that utilizes individualized encounters with physicians to broach specific medical issues in an evidence-based and quality-driven manner. Medical students utilized the matter of influenza vaccination during pregnancy as a lens through which to explore the methods of academic detailing in a community setting. Structured and customized dialogues between North Shore-LIJ affiliated obstetricians and Hofstra North Shore-LIJ medical students were conducted regarding the disparity between the proportion of providers that recommend the vaccine and the percentage of pregnant women being vaccinated annually. Ultimately the project aimed to increase vaccine-carrying rates throughout office based practices in the community, while establishing a viable method for up-to-date information exchange between practicing physicians and academic medicine. While the extent of affected change is currently being quantified, the project proved successful insofar as academic detailing allowed the students to gain access to physicians, and engage in compelling and educational conversations. Both the physicians and students felt these interactions were valuable and well worth continuing. The goal for the future is to expand these practices to other pressing public health issues while continuing to refine the technique.

  3. Office-based endoscopic revision using a microdebrider for failed endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy.

    PubMed

    Park, Jongyeop; Kim, Hochang

    2016-12-01

    This article is to introduce office-based endoscopic revision surgery using a microdebrider for failed endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy (EN-DCR). The authors conducted retrospective, non-comparative, interventional case series analysis of 27 eyes of 24 patients, treated by office-based revision EN-DCR using a microdebrider. After local anesthesia, anatomical failures (cicatrization, granuloma, synechia) after primary EN-DCR were treated with a microdebrider (Osseoduo 120, Bien-Air Surgery, Le Noirmont, Switzerland) in an office setting, and a bicanalicular silicone tube was placed. Anatomical improvement and functional relief of epiphora were evaluated at 6-months after revision. The causes of failed EN-DCR were rhinostomy site cicatrization (17/27, 63.0 %), granulomatous obstruction (7/27, 25.9 %) and synechial formation (3/27, 11.1 %). The anatomical success rate was 100 %, and 85.2 % cases achieved complete relief of epiphora. The surgery did not exceed 10 min in any case and no complications were observed. Office-based revision EN-DCR using a microdebrider provided prompt management of post-DCR epiphora. The portable nature and all-round ability of the microdebrider allowed office-based surgery, which offered advantage to work with the surgeon's own well-trained office staff. Office-based revision EN-DCR can be both time- and money-saving, and might be regarded the treatment of choice for failed EN-DCR.

  4. Survey reveals physicians' experiences with cults.

    PubMed

    Lottick, E A

    1993-02-01

    In late June 1992, a stratified random sample of Pennsylvania physicians (5,400) were mailed a two-page questionnaire asking about experiences with destructive cults, either personal, professional, or both. Professional experience was defined as "with patients or their families," and personal experience was defined as "with self, family, or friends." The survey sample group was drawn from primary care physicians (family practice, general practice, internal medicine, and pediatrics) and psychiatrists. Surveys were returned by 1,396 participants, a 26 percent rate of return. A number of the returned surveys (173) included personal observations and comments.

  5. Physician-assisted death.

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Physician-assisted death includes both euthanasia and assistance in suicide. The CMA urges its members to adhere to the principles of palliative care. It does not support euthanasia and assisted suicide. The following policy summary includes definitions of euthanasia and assisted suicide, background information, basic ethical principles and physician concerns about legalization of physician-assisted death. PMID:7632208

  6. Patient–physician mistrust and violence against physicians in Guangdong Province, China: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Joseph D; Cheng, Yu; Wong, Bonnie; Gong, Ni; Nie, Jing-Bao; Zhu, Wei; McLaughlin, Megan M; Xie, Ruishi; Deng, Yinghui; Huang, Meijin; Wong, William C W; Lan, Ping; Liu, Huanliang; Miao, Wei; Kleinman, Arthur

    2015-01-01

    Objective To better understand the origins, manifestations and current policy responses to patient–physician mistrust in China. Design Qualitative study using in-depth interviews focused on personal experiences of patient–physician mistrust and trust. Setting Guangdong Province, China. Participants One hundred and sixty patients, patient family members, physicians, nurses and hospital administrators at seven hospitals varying in type, geography and stages of achieving goals of health reform. These interviews included purposive selection of individuals who had experienced both trustful and mistrustful patient–physician relationships. Results One of the most prominent forces driving patient–physician mistrust was a patient perception of injustice within the medical sphere, related to profit mongering, knowledge imbalances and physician conflicts of interest. Individual physicians, departments and hospitals were explicitly incentivised to generate revenue without evaluation of caregiving. Physicians did not receive training in negotiating medical disputes or humanistic principles that underpin caregiving. Patient–physician mistrust precipitated medical disputes leading to the following outcomes: non-resolution with patient resentment towards physicians; violent resolution such as physical and verbal attacks against physicians; and non-violent resolution such as hospital-mediated dispute resolution. Policy responses to violence included increased hospital security forces, which inadvertently fuelled mistrust. Instead of encouraging communication that facilitated resolution, medical disputes sometimes ignited a vicious cycle leading to mob violence. However, patient–physician interactions at one hospital that has implemented a primary care model embodying health reform goals showed improved patient–physician trust. Conclusions The blind pursuit of financial profits at a systems level has eroded patient–physician trust in China. Restructuring incentives

  7. Physician Enabling Skills Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Hudon, Catherine; Lambert, Mireille; Almirall, José

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To evaluate the reliability and validity of the newly developed Physician Enabling Skills Questionnaire (PESQ) by assessing its internal consistency, test-retest reliability, concurrent validity with patient-centred care, and predictive validity with patient activation and patient enablement. Design Validation study. Setting Saguenay, Que. Participants One hundred patients with at least 1 chronic disease who presented in a waiting room of a regional health centre family medicine unit. Main outcome measures Family physicians’ enabling skills, measured with the PESQ at 2 points in time (ie, while in the waiting room at the family medicine unit and 2 weeks later through a mail survey); patient-centred care, assessed with the Patient Perception of Patient-Centredness instrument; patient activation, assessed with the Patient Activation Measure; and patient enablement, assessed with the Patient Enablement Instrument. Results The internal consistency of the 6 subscales of the PESQ was adequate (Cronbach α = .69 to .92). The test-retest reliability was very good (r = 0.90; 95% CI 0.84 to 0.93). Concurrent validity with the Patient Perception of Patient-Centredness instrument was good (r = −0.67; 95% CI −0.78 to −0.53; P < .001). The PESQ accounts for 11% of the total variance with the Patient Activation Measure (r2 = 0.11; P = .002) and 19% of the variance with the Patient Enablement Instrument (r2 = 0.19; P < .001). Conclusion The newly developed PESQ presents good psychometric properties, allowing for its use in practice and research. PMID:26889507

  8. Physician supply, supplier-induced demand and competition: empirical evidence from a single-payer system.

    PubMed

    Xirasagar, Sudha; Lin, Herng-Ching

    2006-01-01

    We examined the earnings of 8106 office-based (FTE) physicians in 2002 in Taiwan for evidence of supplier-induced demand (SID). We hypothesize that SID, operating in the form of mutual cross-specialty referral, will cause earnings to increase with total physician density (all specialties taken together), but simultaneously, decrease with increasing competition within specialties. We used multiple regression analyses controlling for high-user population, physician demographics and practice type. The evidence supports our hypotheses. Increasing total physician density (all specialties) is positively associated with earnings. Concurrently, within specialties, increased competition is associated with reduced earnings. The medical appropriateness of increasing health care utilization with increasing physician supply cannot be directly determined from the data. However, evidence of a steady earnings increase with increasing total physician density, which precludes a saturation point (of appropriate care levels) at some optimum physician density, substantiates SID in the office-based practice market. Empirically, our data suggest that the average market effect of physicians on one another is synergic when all specialties are considered together, but competitive within each specialty.

  9. Safety and Feasibility of Quantitative Multiplexed Cytokine Analysis From Office-Based Vitreous Aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Ghodasra, Devon H.; Fante, Ryan; Gardner, Thomas W.; Langue, Michael; Niziol, Leslie M.; Besirli, Cagri; Cohen, Steven R.; Dedania, Vaidehi S.; Demirci, Hakan; Jain, Nieraj; Jayasundera, K. Thiran; Johnson, Mark W.; Kalyani, Partho S.; Rao, Rajesh C.; Zacks, David N.; Sundstrom, Jeffrey M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The goals of this study were to evaluate the safety of office-based vitreous sampling, and determine the utility of these samples with multiplex cytokine analysis. Methods Vitreous samples were collected from office-based needle aspiration and the rate of adverse events during follow-up was reviewed. The vitreous cytokine concentrations in a subset of patients with diabetic macular edema (DME) were analyzed using a 42 plex-cytokine bead array. These results were compared with vitreous cytokine concentrations in proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) and controls (macular hole, epiretinal membrane, symptomatic vitreous floaters) from pars plana vitrectomy. Results An adequate volume of vitreous fluid (100–200 μL) was obtained in 52 (88%) of 59 office-based sampling attempts. The average length of follow-up was 300 days (range, 42–926 days). There were no complications, including cataract, retinal tear or detachment, and endophthalmitis. Two patients (3%) had posterior vitreous detachments within 3 months. Vitreous cytokine concentrations were measured in 44 patients: 14 controls, 13 with DME, and 17 with PDR. The concentration of ADAM11, CXCL-10, IL-8, and PDGF-A were higher in PDR compared with controls and DME. The concentration of IL-6 was higher in PDR compared with controls, but not compared with DME. Conclusions Office-based vitreous aspiration is safe and yields high-quality samples for multiplex vitreous cytokine analysis. Significant elevations of vitreous cytokines were found in PDR compared with DME and controls, including the novel finding of elevated ADAM11. As such, office-based aspiration is a safe and effective means to identify vitreous factors associated with vitreoretinal disease. PMID:27273720

  10. The association between office-based provider visits and emergency department utilization among Medicaid beneficiaries.

    PubMed

    Widmer, Andrew J; Basu, Rashmita; Hochhalter, Angela K

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of our study was to describe the relationship between office-based provider visits and emergency department (ED) utilization by adult Medicaid beneficiaries. Data were extracted from the publicly-available Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, a nationally representative sample of the civilian non-institutionalized population in the United States. The sample included 1,497 respondents who had full year Medicaid coverage in 2009. Study variables included insurance coverage type, usual source of care, chronic illnesses, and beneficiary demographics. Multivariate analyses were conducted to describe associations between individual characteristics and (a) likelihood of any ED utilization, and (b) number of ED visits by those who utilized the ED at least once in the study year. The analysis was adjusted for demographic characteristics and chronic health conditions. A greater number of office-based provider visits was associated with a higher likelihood of ED utilization. Among those with at least one ED visit, a greater number of office-based visits was associated with a higher number of ED visits. A respondent's age, history of hypertension or myocardial infarction, and Hispanic/Latino ethnicity were associated with having one or more ED visits; age and Hispanic/Latino ethnicity were associated with total number of ED visits among those with at least one. In this representative sample of adult Medicaid beneficiaries, there was no evidence that office-based provider visits reduced ED utilization. Office visits were associated with higher ED utilization, as were certain chronic conditions, older age, and Hispanic/Latino ethnicity. Findings do not support efforts to reduce ED utilization by increasing office-based visits alone.

  11. Relationships of physician characteristics to performance quality and improvement.

    PubMed Central

    Payne, B C; Lyons, T F; Neuhaus, E

    1984-01-01

    The quality of ambulatory medical care provided by 1,135 physicians in five separate practice settings in the Midwest was measured using predetermined process criteria. Specialists performed better in their own areas of specialized training than did family/general practitioners or specialists performing outside their specialty areas. Physicians with fewer years of practice performed somewhat better than physicians with more years since medical school graduation. Board certification was not consistently related to performance. Performances of the physicians improved following quality assurance interventions in these sites. Differences in the rates of change in performance quality were not consistently related to any of the physician characteristics studied. PMID:6746295

  12. Physician stress: is it inevitable?

    PubMed

    Orman, M C

    1989-01-01

    Early attempts to understand the causes of physician stress focused almost exclusively upon the role of external stressors and demands. Recent psychosocial and behavioral research, however, suggests that individual attitudes, beliefs, personality factors, and learned coping strategies probably play a more important role. In addition, such cognitive and behavioral tendencies are within the control of each individual, and clinical experience has shown that these factors can indeed be modified. Freudenberger noted that most health professionals who are experiencing high levels of stress fail to identify the role that they themselves play in generating such symptoms. Instead, they tend to blame others as the cause of their problems and tend to react cynically toward suggestions that they could benefit from help. A large-scale study of family physicians in North Carolina, conducted by May, Revicki, and Jones in 1983, confirmed the fact that most physicians who reported a high level of professional stress also tended to score high on measures of external locus of control--i.e. the perception that external or environmental factors are mainly responsible for one's problems or successes. My own experience in treating physicians and other people with stress tends to confirm these findings. More importantly, I have found that once individuals are helped to identify the role that their own cognitive and behavioral tendencies play in the origin of their stress, they can usually bring about impressive reductions in stress and tension without significant changes in environmental factors or demands. While many people advocate stress-releasing and other relaxation skills for physicians, I have found that such approaches are often counterproductive.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Hope and Persuasion by Physicians During Informed Consent

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Victoria A.; Cousino, Melissa; Leek, Angela C.; Kodish, Eric D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To describe hopeful and persuasive messages communicated by physicians during informed consent for phase I trials and examine whether such communication is associated with physician and parent ratings of the likelihood of benefit, physician and parent ratings of the strength of the physician's recommendation to enroll, parent ratings of control, and parent ratings of perceived pressure. Patients and Methods Participants were children with cancer (n = 85) who were offered a phase I trial along with their parents and physicians. Informed consent conferences (ICCs) were audiotaped and coded for physician communication of hope and persuasion. Parents completed an interview (n = 60), and physicians completed a case-specific questionnaire. Results The most frequent hopeful statements related to expectations of positive outcomes and provision of options. Physicians failed to mention no treatment and/or palliative care as options in 68% of ICCs and that the disease was incurable in 85% of ICCs. When physicians mentioned no treatment and/or palliative care as options, both physicians and parents rated the physician's strength of recommendation to enroll in the trial lower. Conclusion Hopes and goals other than cure or longer life were infrequently mentioned, and a minority of physicians communicated that the disease was incurable and that no treatment and/or palliative care were options. These findings are of concern, given the low likelihood of medical benefit from phase I trials. Physicians have an important role to play in helping families develop alternative goals when no curative options remain. PMID:25199753

  14. Physician assistants in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Ian W.; Hooker, Roderick S.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective To analyze the health policies related to physician assistants (PAs) and to understand the factors influencing this medical work force movement. Quality of evidence This work combines a review of the literature and qualitative information, and it serves as a historical bookmark. The approach was selected when attempts to obtain reports or literature using customary electronic bibliography (PubMed, CINAHL, Google Scholar, EBSCO, and MEDLINE) searches in English and French, from 1970 through 2010, identified only 14 documents (including gray literature) of relevance. Reports, provincial documents, and information from developers of the PA movement supplemented the literature base. Main message The historical development of the role of PAs in Canada spans 2 decades. There are now more than 250 PAs, most working in family medicine and emergency medicine. Enabling legislation for PAs has been formalized in Manitoba, and 3 provinces have recognized PAs in various policy statements or initiatives. Three universities and 1 military training centre have enrolled more than 120 students in PA programs. Retired PAs of the Canadian Forces, returning ex-patriot Canadians who had trained as PAs in PA programs in the United States, and American immigrants are working as PAs in Canada. Demonstration projects are under way to better understand the usefulness of PAs in various medical settings. Conclusion For a public health policy enactment of this size and effect, the literature on PAs in Canada is sparse and limited. In spite of this, PA employment is expanding, family medicine practices are using PAs, and there is enabling legislation planned. The result will likely be increased use of PAs. Documentation about PAs, review of their use, and outcomes research are needed to evaluate this new type of clinician in Canadian society. PMID:21402955

  15. Attitudes of patients and physicians regarding physician dress and demeanor in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Colt, H G; Solot, J A

    1989-02-01

    To compare the opinions of patients and physicians regarding physician dress and demeanor in the emergency department, we conducted a cross-sectional survey of 190 ED patients and 129 medical specialists, family practitioners, surgeons, and emergency physicians in a community hospital. Seventy-three percent of physicians and 43% of patients thought that physical appearance influenced patient opinion of medical care. Forty-nine percent of patients believed emergency physicians should wear white coats, but only 18% disliked scrub suits. Patients were more tolerant of casual dress than were physicians. Both groups disliked excessive jewelry, prominent ruffles or ribbons, long fingernails, blue jeans, and sandals. Opinions and practices of emergency physicians were similar to those of other medical specialists. Most physicians (96%) addressed patients by surname or title, but 43% of patients preferred being called by their first names. The age, gender, income, and education of patients did not influence how they wished to be addressed. Larger studies are needed to assess the influence of age, sex, race, and depth of feeling regarding first-name address and physician attire in the ED.

  16. Confronting the disruptive physician.

    PubMed

    Linney, B J

    1997-01-01

    Ignoring disruptive behavior is no longer an option in today's changing health care environment. Competition and managed care have caused more organizations to deal with the disruptive physician, rather than look the other way as many did in years past. But it's not an easy task, possibly the toughest of your management career. How should you confront a disruptive physician? By having clearly stated expectations for physician behavior and policies in place for dealing with problem physicians, organizations have a context from which to address the situation.

  17. Using a Learning Collaborative Strategy With Office-based Practices to Increase Access and Improve Quality of Care for Patients With Opioid Use Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Nordstrom, Benjamin R.; Saunders, Elizabeth C.; McLeman, Bethany; Meier, Andrea; Xie, Haiyi; Lambert-Harris, Chantal; Tanzman, Beth; Brooklyn, John; King, Gregory; Kloster, Nels; Lord, Clifton Frederick; Roberts, William; McGovern, Mark P.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Rapidly escalating rates of heroin and prescription opioid use have been widely observed in rural areas across the United States. Although US Food and Drug Administration-approved medications for opioid use disorders exist, they are not routinely accessible to patients. One medication, buprenorphine, can be prescribed by waivered physicians in office-based practice settings, but practice patterns vary widely. This study explored the use of a learning collaborative method to improve the provision of buprenorphine in the state of Vermont. Methods We initiated a learning collaborative with 4 cohorts of physician practices (28 total practices). The learning collaborative consisted of a series of 4 face-to-face and 5 teleconference sessions over 9 months. Practices collected and reported on 8 quality-improvement data measures, which included the number of patients prescribed buprenorphine, and the percent of unstable patients seen weekly. Changes from baseline to 8 months were examined using a p-chart and logistic regression methodology. Results Physician engagement in the learning collaborative was favorable across all 4 cohorts (85.7%). On 6 of the 7 quality-improvement measures, there were improvements from baseline to 8 months. On 4 measures, these improvements were statistically significant (P < 0.001). Importantly, practice variation decreased over time on all measures. The number of patients receiving medication increased only slightly (3.4%). Conclusions Results support the effectiveness of a learning collaborative approach to engage physicians, modestly improve patient access, and significantly reduce practice variation. The strategy is potentially generalizable to other systems and regions struggling with this important public health problem. PMID:26900669

  18. Compliance of Perioperative Antibiotic Dosing and Surgical Site Infection Rate in Office-Based Elective Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Davison, Steven P.; Jackson, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Background: A best practice goal to reduce surgical site infection includes administration of antibiotics in the ideal preoperative window. This article evaluates an office surgical suite antibiotic administration rate and compares it with the timing of a local hospital treating a similar patient population. The hypothesis was that similar or better compliance and surgical site infection rates can be achieved in the office-based suite. Methods: A total of 277 office-based surgeries were analyzed for antibiotic administration time before incision and their corresponding surgical site infection rate. Results: Our facility administered timely prophylactic antibiotics in 96% of cases with a surgical site infection rate of 0.36%. This rate was significantly lower than a reported rate of 3.7%. Conclusion: Low infection rates with high antibiotic administration rate suggest that compliance with best possible practice protocols is possible in the outpatient setting. PMID:27579234

  19. A plastic surgery office-based Website: an asset to any practice!

    PubMed

    Drye, C

    2000-01-01

    We are living in a "connected world" and our patients are taking a more active role in their health care management as well as educating themselves about health-related issues. An office-based website can be an effective tool for plastic surgery practices as well as plastic and reconstructive surgical nurses. This type of a website can serve as a source of information for potential and current clients.

  20. Machines and cutters: VersaVIT - potential and perspectives of office-based vitrectomy.

    PubMed

    Morales-Canton, Virgilio; Kawakami-Campos, P Ayumi

    2014-01-01

    The concept of office-based vitrectomy has been a topic for several years; however, the large size of the vitrectomy machines has limited the options for many years. Today, though, smaller machines can offer adequate performance regarding vitrectomy. As a result, we can now make more arguments for this type of surgery to be performed in the office environment, despite the limitations these machines may still have.

  1. Office based multi-functional anterior eye segment optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Yiheng; Yamanari, Masahiro; Hong, Young-Joo; Makita, Shuichi; Miura, Masahiro; Yasuno, Yoshiaki

    2012-03-01

    An office based Doppler and polarization sensitive swept-source optical coherence tomography (Doppler-PS-SS-OCT) was developed for diagnosis and evaluation of abnormalities of anterior eye segment in clinic. A healthy eye was measured in vivo by the Doppler PS-OCT. The results showed that the Doppler PS-OCT may have potential to identify blood vessels and discriminate fibrous tissues in abnormalities, such as scarring in bleb, and scleral inflammation.

  2. Negotiation for physicians.

    PubMed

    Hill, Micah J; DeCherney, Alan H

    2013-05-01

    Physicians are involved in negotiations on a daily basis. Interactions with patients, support staff, nurses, fellow physicians, administrators, lawyers, and third parties all can occur within the context of negotiation. This article reviews the basic principles of negotiation and negotiation styles, models, and practical tools.

  3. Marketing specialty physician services.

    PubMed

    Olson, E A

    1993-01-01

    Physicians take into account many factors when making referral decisions, primarily provider expertise, good communication and good patient care. This professional paper will show that provider expertise and patient care are the most important factors in referral decisions, and that physicians rely primarily on direct experience for the information necessary to make a referral choice.

  4. Autism Speaks Toolkits: Resources for Busy Physicians.

    PubMed

    Bellando, Jayne; Fussell, Jill J; Lopez, Maya

    2016-02-01

    Given the increased prevalence of autism spectrum disorders (ASD), it is likely that busy primary care providers (PCP) are providing care to individuals with ASD in their practice. Autism Speaks provides a wealth of educational, medical, and treatment/intervention information resources for PCPs and families, including at least 32 toolkits. This article serves to familiarize PCPs and families on the different toolkits that are available on the Autism Speaks website. This article is intended to increase physicians' knowledge on the issues that families with children with ASD frequently encounter, to increase their ability to share evidence-based information to guide treatment and care for affected families in their practice.

  5. Questions & answers about hospice: a guide for Missouri's physicians.

    PubMed

    Zweig, Steven

    2002-01-01

    Hospice provides multidisciplinary care to dying patients with and without cancer. Most adults would prefer to be cared for in their home or that of a family member. This guide provides answers to the questions most commonly asked of physicians. Its goal is to facilitate a better understanding of what hospice does, who is eligible, physician roles, and how physicians can use hospice to help their patients.

  6. Genetic counseling, a health department service to physicians.

    PubMed

    Jolly, E; Blum, H L

    1965-11-01

    Questions about inheritance in all kinds of diseases and defects are commonly asked of nearly all physicians. In attempting to answer these questions, however, the physician is often hampered by lack of formal instruction in clinical genetics. Since the health department, if it is to carry out its epidemiologic function, must be as concerned over the increasing identification of genetic agents in disease as it is and has been over environmental disease agents, it should come to represent a source of assistance not now generally available to the physician. In short, as it carries out those activities by which its store of general genetic information is increased, and until other sources of genetic consultation become reasonably available, the health department can be of real service to physicians as a resource to which they may turn for help when dealing with families wanting genetic information. Such a service has been provided experimentally for the last two years by the Contra Costa County Health Department. This program calls for the taking of family pedigrees by public health nurses on families with questions of a genetic nature who are health department clients and on families who are referred by their private physicians for this service. An interpretation of each pedigree is made by the department's physician in charge of the program and submitted to the family's physician for his use in counseling the family. Evidence to date suggests the process can be a highly useful service to the practitioner and his patient.

  7. The Changing Distribution of Physicians in Regionville.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorensen, Andrew A.; Kunitz, Stephen J.

    1978-01-01

    The consequences of medical reform, the myth of the family doctor, the importance of foreign medical graduates in providing medical care, the importance of facilities and innovative practice settings for the attraction of physicians, and the significance of suburbanization in influencing the growth of the local service sector are addressed in this…

  8. Revising the Definition of the Generalist Physician.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altman, David F.

    1995-01-01

    Although generalist physicians have traditionally been defined by their specialties (family, internal, pediatric medicine), this approach may not recognize specific competencies and training needed. A new definition based on functional requirements of generalist practice and the central role of the generalist in comprehensive care is proposed.…

  9. Childhood bullying: implications for physicians.

    PubMed

    Lyznicki, James M; McCaffree, Mary Anne; Robinowitz, Carolyn B

    2004-11-01

    Childhood bullying has potentially serious implications for bullies and their targets. Bullying involves a pattern of repeated aggression, a deliberate intent to harm or disturb a victim despite the victim's apparent distress, and a real or perceived imbalance of power. Bullying can lead to serious academic, social, emotional, and legal problems. Studies of successful antibullying programs suggest that a comprehensive approach in schools can change student behaviors and attitudes, and increase adults' willingness to intervene. Efforts to prevent bullying must address individual, familial, and community risk factors, as well as promote an understanding of the severity of the problem. Parents, teachers, and health care professionals must become more adept at identifying possible victims and bullies. Physicians have important roles in identifying at-risk patients, screening for psychiatric comorbidities, counseling families about the problem, and advocating for bullying prevention in their communities.

  10. Autism Spectrum Disorder Early Screening Practices: A Survey of Physicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Self, Trisha L.; Parham, Douglas F.; Rajagopalan, Jagadeesh

    2015-01-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) released a policy statement in 2007 urging physicians to screen for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) at 18 and 24 months. This study sought to identify the screening practices of pediatricians and family physicians (FPs) in following the AAP guidelines for ASD. A survey was mailed to 1,500 pediatricians and…

  11. Physicians' Knowledge of Alcohol, Tobacco and Folic Acid in Pregnancy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lefebvre, L. G.; Ordean, A.; Midmer, D.; Kahan, M.; Tolomiczenko, G.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To assess: (1) physicians' knowledge and clinical confidence regarding problematic substance use in pregnancy compared to folic acid, and (2) physicians' desire for education in this area and their preferred learning modalities tools. Design: Self-administered survey. Setting: "Family Medicine Forum 2004" in Toronto, Canada.…

  12. Determinants of Rural Physicians' Life and Job Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavanchy, Marcel; Connelly, Ian; Grzybowski, Stefan; Michalos, Alex C.; Berkowitz, Jonathan; Thommasen, Harvey V.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To identify and quantify factors that contribute to rural physicians' satisfaction with their jobs and life as a whole. Design: Cross-sectional, mailed survey. Study population: Family physicians practicing in rural communities eligible for British Columbia's Northern and Isolation Allowance. Main measures: Demographics, Domain…

  13. Improving Physician-Patient Communication through Coaching of Simulated Encounters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ravitz, Paula; Lancee, William J.; Lawson, Andrea; Maunder, Robert; Hunter, Jonathan J.; Leszcz, Molyn; McNaughton, Nancy; Pain, Clare

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Effective communication between physicians and their patients is important in optimizing patient care. This project tested a brief, intensive, interactive medical education intervention using coaching and standardized psychiatric patients to teach physician-patient communication to family medicine trainees. Methods: Twenty-six family…

  14. Physician collective bargaining.

    PubMed

    Schiff, Anthony Hunter

    2009-11-01

    Current antitrust enforcement policy unduly restricts physician collaboration, especially among small physician practices. Among other matters, current enforcement policy has hindered the ability of physicians to implement efficient healthcare delivery innovations, such as the acquisition and implementation of health information technology (HIT). Furthermore, the Federal Trade Commission and Department of Justice have unevenly enforced the antitrust laws, thereby fostering an increasingly severe imbalance in the healthcare market in which dominant health insurers enjoy the benefit of largely unfettered consolidation at the cost of both consumers and providers. This article traces the history of antitrust enforcement in healthcare, describe the current marketplace, and suggest the problems that must be addressed to restore balance to the healthcare market and help to ensure an innovative and efficient healthcare system capable of meeting the demands of the 21st century. Specifically, the writer explains how innovative physician collaborations have been improperly stifled by the policies of the federal antitrust enforcement agencies, and recommend that these policies be relaxed to permit physicians more latitude to bargain collectively with health insurers in conjunction with procompetitive clinical integration efforts. The article also explains how the unbridled consolidation of the health insurance industry has resulted in higher premiums to consumers and lower compensation to physicians, and recommends that further consolidation be prohibited. Finally, the writer discusses how health insurers with market power are improperly undermining the physician-patient relationship, and recommend federal antitrust enforcement agencies take appropriate steps to protect patients and their physicians from this anticompetitive conduct. The article also suggests such steps will require changes in three areas: (1) health insurers must be prohibited from engaging in anticompetitive

  15. A Family Physician's Approach to Acne

    PubMed Central

    Turgeon, Eugene

    1981-01-01

    Because of the potential for permanent physical and psychological sequelae, acne vulgaris should be regarded as a true disease—not the “normal” physiologic response one might infer from its near universal prevalence in adolescence. Effective therapy reduces pilosebaceous unit obstruction, minimizes secondary inflammation, and lessens the chance of significant scarring. This article reviews current therapeutic modalities, and suggests a sequence for implementation of specific agents. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5 PMID:21289790

  16. Toxic Shock Syndrome: A Family Physician's Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Myhre, D. L.

    1982-01-01

    Although similar cases have been reported as far back as 1927, the term toxic shock syndrome was coined in 1978 to describe an acute fever involving Staph. aureus. The reported mortality rate in Canada is 3.8%, but may be much higher. Association with tampon use was made in 1980, but is still unclear. Treatment remains supportive and is aimed at reducing risk of recurrence, until the role of the exotoxin can be explained. This article reviews reported cases to date, listing diagnostic criteria, signs and symptoms. A high index of suspicion for this new syndrome is recommended. PMID:21286566

  17. Remembering More Jewish Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Weisz, George M.; Grzybowski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    The history of medicine has been an intriguing topic for both authors. The modern relevance of past discoveries led both authors to take a closer look at the lives and contributions of persecuted physicians. The Jewish physicians who died in the Holocaust stand out as a stark example of those who merit being remembered. Many made important contributions to medicine which remain relevant to this day. Hence, this paper reviews the lives and important contributions of two persecuted Jewish physicians: Arthur Kessler (1903–2000) and Bronislawa Fejgin (1883–1943). PMID:27487308

  18. The Growth of a Family

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, June C.; Biringer, Anne

    1991-01-01

    Caring for a family during pregnancy and birth is an ideal opportunity for family physicians to assess family functioning and help the family adjust to the birth of a new child. Stress and support systems can influence the course of pregnancy, including obstetric and perinatal outcomes. A family-centered approach can help patients during this critical stage of family development. PMID:21229107

  19. Physician Assistant profession (PA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... medicine. The rest are involved in teaching, research, administration, or other nonclinical roles. PAs may practice in any setting in which a physician provides care. This allows doctors to focus their skills and knowledge in a more effective way. PAs ...

  20. Hitler's Jewish Physicians.

    PubMed

    Weisz, George M

    2014-07-01

    The mystery behind the behavior of infamous personalities leaves many open questions, particularly when related to the practice of medicine. This paper takes a brief look at two Jewish physicians who played memorable roles in the life of Adolf Hitler.

  1. State Variability in Supply of Office-based Primary Care Providers: United States, 2012

    MedlinePlus

    ... in physician practices ( 2 – 4 , 10 , 11 ). Definitions Nurse practitioner : Defined as an RN with advanced ... to December 2009, Office of Management and Budget definitions of core-based statistical areas. For more information, ...

  2. The medical home: locus of physician formation.

    PubMed

    Daaleman, Timothy P

    2008-01-01

    Family medicine is currently undergoing a transformation and, amid such change, the medical home has emerged as the new polestar. This article examines the medical home through the lens of philosopher Alasdair MacIntyre and offers a perspective, informed by Hubert Dreyfus and Peter Senge, about medical homes as practical sites of formation for family physicians. The intellectual past of family medicine points to contextually sensitive patient care as a practice that is particular to the discipline, with the virtue of "placing patients within contexts over time" as a commonly held virtue. Dreyfus provides a model of knowledge and skill acquisition that is relevant to the training of family physicians in practical wisdom. In this model, there is a continuum from novice to more advanced stages of professional formation that is aided by rules that not only must be learned, but must be applied in greater contextually informed situations. Senge's emphasis on learning organizations-organizations where people are continually learning how to learn together-presents a framework for evaluating the extent to which future medical homes facilitate or retard the formation of family physicians.

  3. The Medical Home: Locus of Physician Formation

    PubMed Central

    Daaleman, Timothy P.

    2013-01-01

    Family medicine is currently undergoing a transformation and, amid such change, the medical home has emerged as the new polestar. This article examines the medical home through the lens of philosopher Alasdair MacIntyre and offers a perspective, informed by Hubert Dreyfus and Peter Senge, about medical homes as practical sites of formation for family physicians. The intellectual past of family medicine points to contextually sensitive patient care as a practice that is particular to the discipline, with the virtue of “placing patients within contexts over time” as a commonly held virtue. Dreyfus provides a model of knowledge and skill acquisition that is relevant to the training of family physicians in practical wisdom. In this model, there is a continuum from novice to more advanced stages of professional formation that is aided by rules that not only must be learned, but must be applied in greater contextually informed situations. Senge’s emphasis on learning organizations— organizations where people are continually learning how to learn together—presents a framework for evaluating the extent to which future medical homes facilitate or retard the formation of family physicians. PMID:18772299

  4. Women marginalized by poverty and violence. How patient-physician relationships can help.

    PubMed Central

    Woolhouse, Susan; Brown, Judith Belle; Lent, Barbara

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore the experiences of women relegated to the margins of society by poverty or violence. DESIGN: Qualitative method of focus groups. SETTING: Shelters and transitional housing in southwestern Ontario. PARTICIPANTS: Thirty-six women staying at shelters or transitional housing. METHOD: Focus groups conducted at five locations explored the women's experiences and interactions with family physicians. MAIN FINDINGS: Two themes emerged from the analysis: power imbalances in patient-physician relationships, and the role of family physicians in creating collaborative relationships. Women who felt demeaned in patient-physician relationships described their family physicians as dominating and intimidating. Women who described relationships as collaborative felt valued and understood. CONCLUSION: Poor or abused women living in shelters who felt powerless in patient-physician relationships felt even more demeaned as they coped with the struggles associated with being poor. Women who had continuous collaborative relationships with their family physicians were able to articulate their needs more readily. PMID:15526876

  5. Office-based versus high-field strength MRI: diagnostic and technical considerations.

    PubMed

    Sanal, Hatice Tuba; Cardoso, Fabiano; Chen, Lina; Chung, Christine

    2009-03-01

    Low-field office magnetic resonance scanners have been an exciting, innovative, and controversial development in medical imaging. These units boost cost efficiency, with ease of installation and no additional external radiofrequency shielding necessary. The open design enables imaging of those who are claustrophobic and overweight, and offer the potential of dynamic imaging for athletes. Experienced centers have reported that the diagnostic accuracy obtained with office-based systems is satisfactory and comparable with that of high-field systems. However, with the advantages afforded by these convenient units, some significant limitations owing primarily to decreased signal-to-noise ratio of low-field MR imaging and lower image quality compared with conventional high-field magnetic resonance scanners. In this article, we comprehensively reviewed the literature focusing on the diagnostic accuracy of low-field imaging with respect to individual joints and the major pathology that occur in these joints. According to most studies, there are still a number of patients in whom clinical treatment is affected owing to under or misdiagnosis by low-field MR imaging. For clinicians and radiologists who are an integral part of this office-based diagnostic system, it is important to be knowledgeable of the potential limitations of these low-field scanners compared with conventional systems. Specialized training and expertize is required to optimize imaging parameters, and provide quality control and accurate interpretation.

  6. Practice setting and physician influences on judgments of colon cancer treatment by community physicians.

    PubMed Central

    McFall, S L; Warnecke, R B; Kaluzny, A D; Ford, L

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. This article compares judgments about the treatment of Dukes' B2 and C colon cancer made by general surgeons to those of internists and family practitioners. Physician and practice variables were specialty, affiliation with a Community Clinical Oncology Program (CCOP) hospital, time in practice, professional centrality (level of participation in cancer information networks), solo practice, and number of colon cancer patients. DATA COLLECTION METHODS. Data are combined from national probability samples of CCOP- and non-CCOP-affiliated physicians. This study focused on 1,138 internists, family physicians, and general surgeons who participated in decision making for patients diagnosed with Dukes' B2 or C stage colon cancer. Judgments were elicited using brief vignettes. METHODS OF ANALYSIS. Judgments of adjuvant therapy are classified as (a) consistent with the National Institutes of Health Consensus Conference recommendations (experimental for Dukes' B2, accepted for Dukes' C); (b) accepted treatment for both stages; or (c) experimental for both stages. Multinomial logit analyses were used to examine the association of practice setting and physician characteristics to judgments of treatment. RESULTS. Surgeons and CCOP-affiliated physicians were more likely to endorse the NIH consensus conference position. Surgeons, younger physicians, and those in group practice were more likely to approve of chemotherapy for both cancer stages. The most common position (chemotherapy experimental) was more likely from nonsurgeons, solo practitioners, and non-CCOP physicians. CONCLUSION. Physician and practice setting characteristics, including organized structures such as the CCOP, are possible mediating structures that can facilitate dissemination of standards of treatment. Images Figure 1 PMID:8617610

  7. The physician's reaction to a malpractice suit.

    PubMed

    Lavery, J P

    1988-01-01

    A malpractice suit can have a devastating impact on a practitioner's professional and personal life. The physician's reaction to this event is profound, affecting his own life-style and that of family, colleagues, and patients. This commentary presents an analogy between the physician's reaction to a malpractice suit and the stages of grief described by Elisabeth Kübler-Ross: the sequence of denial, anger, bargaining, depression, and acceptance. Understanding the psychodynamics of this reaction can help physicians to cope with the problems inherent in a malpractice suit and to maintain a greater stability in their personal lives. Adverse effects on medical practice and private life-style, and on the legal proceedings, can be minimized.

  8. Is Office-Based Counseling About Media Use, Timeouts, and Firearm Storage Effective? Results From a Cluster-Randomized, Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Barkin, Shari L.; Finch, Stacia A.; Ip, Edward H.; Scheindlin, Benjamin; Craig, Joseph A.; Steffes, Jennifer; Weiley, Victoria; Slora, Eric; Altman, David; Wasserman, Richard C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to determine whether patients' families' violence-prevention behaviors would be affected by their primary care practitioner's use of a violence-prevention clinical intervention during the routine well-child examination. Methods In this cluster-randomized, controlled trial (2002–2006), 137 Pediatric Research in Office Settings practices were randomly assigned and initiated patient recruitment for either an office-based violence-prevention intervention or a control group (educational handout on literacy promotion provided). Primary caregivers of children who were aged 2 to 11 years and presented for a well-child visit were surveyed at baseline and 1 and 6 months. Practitioners were trained to (1) review a parent previsit summary regarding patient-family behavior and parental concern about media use, discipline strategies, and children's exposure to firearms, (2) counsel using brief principles of motivational interviewing, (3) identify and provide local agency resources for anger and behavior management when indicated, and (4) instruct patient-families on use of tangible tools (minute timers to monitor media time/timeouts and firearm cable locks to store firearms more safely where children live or play). Main outcomes were change over time in self-reported media use < 120 minutes per day, use of timeouts, and use of firearm cable locks. Results Generalized estimating equation analysis revealed a significant effect at 6 months for decreased media use and safer firearm storage. The intervention group compared with the control group showed an increase in limiting media use to < 120 minutes per day. There was no significant effect for timeout use. There was a substantial increase in storing firearms with cable locks for the intervention group versus a decrease for the control group. Conclusions This randomized, controlled trial demonstrated decreased media exposure and increased safe firearm storage as a result of a brief office-based

  9. Use of Physician Services by Older Adults: 1991/1992 to 2000/2001

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Diane E.; Heppner, Petra; Reid, Robert; Bogdanovic, Bogdan; Roos, Noralou P.

    2005-01-01

    Canadians have expressed concern that access to family physicians (FP) has declined. Anonymized physician services data for 1991/1992 to 2000/2001 were used to evaluate changes in supply and age-specific rates of use of FPs and specialists in Winnipeg, Manitoba. Physician-to-population ratios declined 7.5 per cent, FP-to-population ratios declined…

  10. Dismembering the ethical physician

    PubMed Central

    Genuis, S J

    2006-01-01

    Physicians may experience ethical distress when they are caught in difficult clinical situations that demand ethical decision making, particularly when their preferred action may contravene the expectations of patients and established authorities. When principled and competent doctors succumb to patient wishes or establishment guidelines and participate in actions they perceive to be ethically inappropriate, or agree to refrain from interventions they believe to be in the best interests of patients, individual professional integrity may be diminished, and ethical reliability is potentially compromised. In a climate of ever‐proliferating ethical quandaries, it is essential for the medical community, health institutions, and governing bodies to pursue a judicious tension between the indispensable regulation of physicians necessary to maintain professional standards and preserve public safety, and the support for “freedom of conscience” that principled physicians require to practise medicine in keeping with their personal ethical orientation. PMID:16597808

  11. Leasing physician office space.

    PubMed

    Murray, Charles

    2009-01-01

    When leasing office space, physicians should determine the effective lease rate (ELR) for each building they are considering before making a selection. The ELR is based on a number of factors, including building quality, building location, basic form of lease agreement, rent escalators and add-on factors in the lease, tenant improvement allowance, method of square footage measurement, quality of building management, and other variables. The ELR enables prospective physician tenants to accurately compare lease rates being quoted by building owners and to make leasing decisions based on objective criteria.

  12. [Hippocrates' treatise physician].

    PubMed

    Frøland, Anders

    2005-01-01

    This small treatise does not appear to have been published in Danish in its entirety. It gives a vivid picture of the physician in ancient Greece. The well known first chapter describes the attitudes and attributes of the doctor. It goes on discussing in some detail how the light should be in the surgery, the instruments to be used, the preparations of bandages and drugs, and the use of cupping instruments. The author stresses both the needs of the patient and the necessity of the physician's dignity and integrity.

  13. Mobile physician order entry.

    PubMed

    Ying, Alan

    2003-01-01

    Because both computerized physician order entry (CPOE) systems and mobile technologies such as handheld devices have the potential to greatly impact the industry's future, IT vendors, hospitals, and clinicians are simply merging them into a logical convergence--"CPOE on a handheld"--with an expectation of full functionality on all platforms: computer workstations, rolling laptops, tablet PCs, and handheld devices. For these trends to succeed together, however, this expectation must be revised to establish a distinct category--mobile physician order entry (MPOE)--that is different from CPOE in form, function, and implementation.

  14. Adoption of new drugs by physicians: a survival analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background New drugs often substitute others cheaper and with a risk-benefit balance better established. Our aim was to analyse the diffusion of new drugs during the first months of use, examining the differences between family physicians and specialists. Methods Prescription data were obtained of cefditoren, duloxetine, etoricoxib, ezetimibe, levocetirizine, olmesartan, pregabalin and tiotropium 36 months after their launching. We obtained the monthly number of prescriptions per doctor and the number prescribers of each drug by specialty. After discarding those with less than 10 prescriptions during this period, physicians were defined as adopters if the number of prescriptions was over the 25th percentile for each drug and level (primary or secondary care). The diffusion of each drug was studied by determining the number of adopter family physicians throughout the study period. Among the group of adopters, we compared the month of the first prescription by family physicians to that of other specialists using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results The adoption of the drugs in primary care follows an exponential diffusion curve that reaches a plateau at month 6 to 23. Tiotropium was the most rapidly and widely adopted drug. Cefditoren spread at a slower rate and was the least adopted. The diffusion of etoricoxib was initially slowed down due to administrative requirements for its prescription. The median time of adoption in the case of family physicians was 4-6 months. For each of the drugs, physicians of a specialty other than family physicians adopted it first. Conclusions The number of adopters of a new drug increases quickly in the first months and reaches a plateau. The number of adopter family physicians varies considerably for different drugs. The adoption of new drugs is faster in specialists. The time of adoption should be considered to promote rational prescribing by providing timely information about new drugs and independent medical education. PMID:22401169

  15. Diagnosis and office-based treatment of urinary incontinence in adults. Part one: diagnosis and testing

    PubMed Central

    Heidelbaugh, Joel J.; Jimbo, Masahito

    2013-01-01

    Urinary incontinence is a common problem in both men and women. This review article addresses its prevalence, risk factors, cost, the various types of incontinence, as well as how to diagnose them. The US Preventive Services Task Force, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and PubMed were reviewed for articles focusing on urinary incontinence. Incontinence is a common problem with a high societal cost. It is frequently underreported by patients so it is appropriate for primary-care providers to screen all women and older men during visits. A thorough history and physical examination combined with easy office-based tests can often yield a clear diagnosis and rule out other transient illnesses contributing to the incontinence. Specialist referral is occasionally needed in specific situations before embarking on a treatment plan. PMID:23904857

  16. Diagnosis and office-based treatment of urinary incontinence in adults. Part two: treatment

    PubMed Central

    Jimbo, Masahito; Heidelbaugh, Joel J.

    2013-01-01

    Urinary incontinence is a common problem in both men and women. In this review article we address treatment of the various forms of incontinence with conservative treatments, medical therapy, devices and surgery. The US Preventive Services Task Force, The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and PubMed were reviewed for articles focusing on urinary incontinence. Conservative therapy with education, fluid and food management, weight loss, timed voiding and pelvic floor physical therapy are all simple office-based treatments for incontinence. Medical therapy for incontinence currently is only available for urgency incontinence in the form of anticholinergic medication. Condom catheters, penile clamps, urethral inserts and pessaries can be helpful in specific situations. Surgical therapies vary depending on the type of incontinence, but are typically offered if conservative measures fail. PMID:23904858

  17. Informational influences on physician referrals.

    PubMed

    Beltramini, R F; Sirsi, A K

    1992-01-01

    Today's health care marketers are devoting significant resources to increase physician referrals, an area vital to their continued survival. The goal of this investigation was to integrate the findings of previous research on physician referrals, and to provide an up-to-date assessment of those influences underlying physician referral behavior. A questionnaire was mailed to 1,800 physicians differing in specialty and years in practice. Three informational influences were found to affect physician referrals: Program Information, Patient Input, and Location. The results suggest a need for specialists and other organizations interested in managing physician referrals to (a) establish and maintain a network of relationships among those physicians referring patients and specialists being referred to through personal communication, (b) maintain a pool of knowledgeable professionals willing to supply relevant and current information to physicians, and (c) provide complete and prompt feedback information to the referring physician. Managerial implications and directions for future research are also discussed.

  18. Information for travellers' physicians.

    PubMed

    Allison, D J; Blinco, K

    1990-07-01

    Physicians can obtain advice about international travel for their patients from many different sources of information. The authors review some of the most common sources based on their experience at the International Travellers' Clinic operated by the New Brunswick Department of Health and Community Services in Fredericton. They identify readily available handbooks and periodicals and compare two computer software programs.

  19. Medication counselling: physicians' perspective.

    PubMed

    Bonnerup, Dorthe Krogsgaard; Lisby, Marianne; Eskildsen, Anette Gjetrup; Saedder, Eva Aggerholm; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2013-12-01

    Medication reviews have the potential to lower the incidence of prescribing errors. To benefit from a medication review, the prescriber must adhere to medication counselling. Adherence rates vary from 39 to 100%. The aim of this study was to examine counselling-naive hospital physicians' perspectives and demands to medication counselling as well as study factors that might increase adherence to the counselling. The study was conducted as a questionnaire survey among physicians at Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. The questionnaire was developed based on focus group interviews and literature search, and was pilot-tested among 30 physicians before being sent to 669 physicians. The questionnaire consisted of 35 items divided into four categories: attitudes (19 items), behaviours (3 items), assessment (8 items) and demographics (5 items). The response rate was 60% (400/669). Respondents were employed at psychiatric, medical or surgical departments. Eighty-five per cent of respondents agreed that patients would benefit of an extra medication review, and 72% agreed that there was a need for external medication counselling. The most important factor that could increase adherence was the clinical relevance of the counselling as 78% rated it of major importance. The most favoured method for receiving counselling was via the electronic patient record.

  20. Physicians in transition.

    PubMed

    Bluestein, P

    1995-12-01

    The study of physicians as managed care executives has been relatively recent. Much of what was written in the past focused primarily on doctors who had taken hospital-based administrative positions, especially as medical directors or vice presidents of medical affairs.1 But the '80s brought rising health care costs and the emergence of the "O's"--HMOs, PPOs, UROs, EPOs, PHOs, H2Os, and Uh-Ohs--in response. It also brought a growing number of physicians who traded their white coats and their particular "ologies" for the blue suits of executive management. I am convinced that it is important now, and will be increasingly important in the future, to better understand that transition. That belief led me to undertake, with the help and support of ACPE, the survey that is reported in this article. A questionnaire was sent in 1994 to a random sample of 300 managed care physician executive members of ACPE. Responses were returned by 225 members, a response rate of better than 80 percent. Twenty-five of the responses were not applicable, having been returned by physicians who had never made a transition from clinical careers. The remaining 230 responses form the basis for this report.

  1. Physicians and Insider Trading.

    PubMed

    Kesselheim, Aaron S; Sinha, Michael S; Joffe, Steven

    2015-12-01

    Although insider trading is illegal, recent high-profile cases have involved physicians and scientists who are part of corporate governance or who have access to information about clinical trials of investigational products. Insider trading occurs when a person in possession of information that might affect the share price of a company's stock uses that information to buy or sell securities--or supplies that information to others who buy or sell--when the person is expected to keep such information confidential. The input that physicians and scientists provide to business leaders can serve legitimate social functions, but insider trading threatens to undermine any positive outcomes of these relationships. We review insider-trading rules and consider approaches to securities fraud in the health care field. Given the magnitude of the potential financial rewards, the ease of concealing illegal conduct, and the absence of identifiable victims, the temptation for physicians and scientists to engage in insider trading will always be present. Minimizing the occurrence of insider trading will require robust education, strictly enforced contractual provisions, and selective prohibitions against high-risk conduct, such as participation in expert consulting networks and online physician forums, by those individuals with access to valuable inside information.

  2. The aeromedical physician assistant.

    PubMed

    Radi, Joshua; Brisson, Michael; Line, Michael

    2016-12-01

    The US Army aeromedical physician assistant (PA) serves aviation units in regards to crewmember medical readiness. All PAs are graduates of a 6-week flight surgeon course. They are responsible for conducting nearly 40% of the annual US Army flight physicals. This unique training and deployment illustrates the growing adaptability of PAs to assume a greater role in military medicine.

  3. Small primary care physician practices have low rates of preventable hospital admissions.

    PubMed

    Casalino, Lawrence P; Pesko, Michael F; Ryan, Andrew M; Mendelsohn, Jayme L; Copeland, Kennon R; Ramsay, Patricia Pamela; Sun, Xuming; Rittenhouse, Diane R; Shortell, Stephen M

    2014-09-01

    Nearly two-thirds of US office-based physicians work in practices of fewer than seven physicians. It is often assumed that larger practices provide better care, although there is little evidence for or against this assumption. What is the relationship between practice size--and other practice characteristics, such as ownership or use of medical home processes--and the quality of care? We conducted a national survey of 1,045 primary care-based practices with nineteen or fewer physicians to determine practice characteristics. We used Medicare data to calculate practices' rate of potentially preventable hospital admissions (ambulatory care-sensitive admissions). Compared to practices with 10-19 physicians, practices with 1-2 physicians had 33 percent fewer preventable admissions, and practices with 3-9 physicians had 27 percent fewer. Physician-owned practices had fewer preventable admissions than hospital-owned practices. In an era when health care reform appears to be driving physicians into larger organizations, it is important to measure the comparative performance of practices of all sizes, to learn more about how small practices provide patient care, and to learn more about the types of organizational structures--such as independent practice associations--that may make it possible for small practices to share resources that are useful for improving the quality of care.

  4. Even when physicians adopt e-prescribing, use of advanced features lags.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Joy M

    2010-07-01

    Physician practice adoption of electronic prescribing has not guaranteed that individual physicians will routinely use the technology, particularly the more advanced features the federal government is promoting with financial incentives, according to a new national study from the Center for Studying Health System Change (HSC). Slightly more than two in five physicians providing office-based ambulatory care reported that information technology (IT) was available in their practice to write prescriptions in 2008, the year before implementation of federal incentives. Among physicians with e-prescribing capabilities, about a quarter used the technology only occasionally or not at all. Moreover, fewer than 60 percent of physicians with e-prescribing had access to three advanced features included as part of the Medicare and Medicaid incentive programs--identifying potential drug interactions, obtaining formulary information and transmitting prescriptions to pharmacies electronically--and less than a quarter routinely used all three features. Physicians in practices using electronic medical records exclusively were much more likely to report routine use of e-prescribing than physicians with stand-alone e-prescribing. systems. Other gaps in adoption and routine use of e-prescribing also exist, most notably between physicians in larger and smaller practices

  5. Strategies for Working with Families

    PubMed Central

    Bader, Edward; Maimets, Talvi

    1991-01-01

    Family physicians are in contact with families as they pass through various stages and become aware of marital and family problems. By offering guidance and patient education before problems arise, physicians can avoid trouble and encourage healthy marital and parenting patterns. This article presents the Family Life Cycle framework and discusses the stresses that occur at marriage and at the birth of the first child. Helpful tools can be shared with patients. PMID:21228986

  6. Burnout among physicians

    PubMed Central

    Romani, Maya; Ashkar, Khalil

    2014-01-01

    Burnout is a common syndrome seen in healthcare workers, particularly physicians who are exposed to a high level of stress at work; it includes emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and low personal accomplishment. Burnout among physicians has garnered significant attention because of the negative impact it renders on patient care and medical personnel. Physicians who had high burnout levels reportedly committed more medical errors. Stress management programs that range from relaxation to cognitive-behavioral and patient-centered therapy have been found to be of utmost significance when it comes to preventing and treating burnout. However, evidence is insufficient to support that stress management programs can help reducing job-related stress beyond the intervention period, and similarly mindfulness-based stress reduction interventions efficiently reduce psychological distress and negative vibes, and encourage empathy while significantly enhancing physicians’ quality of life. On the other hand, a few small studies have suggested that Balint sessions can have a promising positive effect in preventing burnout; moreover exercises can reduce anxiety levels and exhaustion symptoms while improving the mental and physical well-being of healthcare workers. Occupational interventions in the work settings can also improve the emotional and work-induced exhaustion. Combining both individual and organizational interventions can have a good impact in reducing burnout scores among physicians; therefore, multidisciplinary actions that include changes in the work environmental factors along with stress management programs that teach people how to cope better with stressful events showed promising solutions to manage burnout. However, until now there have been no rigorous studies to prove this. More interventional research targeting medical students, residents, and practicing physicians are needed in order to improve psychological well-being, professional careers, as well as

  7. The Physician's Life Cycle: Picketing the Outposts

    PubMed Central

    McSherry, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    The changes which occur in a physician's life relate to stages of personal and professional development. The balance between the demands of practice and the needs of self and family is critical. Early establishment of personal goals and priorities makes it easy to avoid specific hazards which would otherwise compromise enjoyment of a full life and a productive career. A lifelong personal program of medical education nourishes the professional interest which sustains a busy practitioner throughout a demanding career.

  8. [Short course for primary physicians care].

    PubMed

    Eshet, I; Van Relta, R; Margalit, A; Baharir, Z

    1995-11-15

    This department of family medicine has been challenged with helping a group of Russian immigrant physicians find places in primary care clinics, quickly and at minimal expense. A 3-month course was set up based on the Family Practice Residency Syllabus and the SFATAM approach, led by teachers and tutors from our department. 30 newly immigrated Russian physicians participated. The course included: lectures and exercises in treatment and communication with patients with a variety of common medical problems in the primary care setting; improvement of fluency in Hebrew relevant to the work setting; and information on the function of primary care and professional clinics. Before-and-after questionnaires evaluating optimal use of a 10- minute meeting with a client presenting with headache were administered. The data showed that the physicians had learned to use more psychosocial diagnostic question and more psychosocial interventions. There was a cleared trend toward greater awareness of the patient's environment, his family, social connections and work. There was no change in biomedical inquiry and interventions but a clear trend to a decrease in recommendations for tests and in referrals. The authors recommend the following didactic tools: adopting a biopsychosocial attitude, active participation of students in the learning situation, working in small groups, use of simulations and video clips, and acquiring basic communication experience.

  9. Motivational determinants among physicians in Lahore, Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Human resource crises in developing countries have been identified as a critical aspect of poor quality and low accessibility in health care. Worker motivation is an important facet of this issue. Specifically, motivation among physicians, who are an important bridge between health systems and patients, should be considered. This study aimed to identify the determinants of job motivation among physicians, a neglected perspective, especially in developing countries. Methods A stratified random sample of 360 physicians was selected from public primary, public secondary and public and private tertiary health facilities in the Lahore district, Pakistan. Pretested, semi-structured, self-administered questionnaires were used. For the descriptive part of this study, physicians were asked to report their 5 most important work motivators and demotivators within the context of their current jobs and in general. Responses were coded according to emergent themes and frequencies calculated. Of the 30 factors identified, 10 were classified as intrinsic, 16 as organizational and 4 as socio-cultural. Results Intrinsic and socio-cultural factors like serving people, respect and career growth were important motivators. Conversely, demotivators across setups were mostly organizational, especially in current jobs. Among these, less pay was reported the most frequently. Fewer opportunities for higher qualifications was a demotivator among primary and secondary physicians. Less personal safety and poor working conditions were important in the public sector, particularly among female physicians. Among private tertiary physicians financial incentives other than pay and good working conditions were motivators in current jobs. Socio-cultural and intrinsic factors like less personal and social time and the inability to financially support oneself and family were more important among male physicians. Conclusion Motivational determinants differed across different levels of care

  10. A Physician's Guide to Radon

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This booklet has been developed for physicians by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in consultation with the American Medical Association (AMA). Its purpose is to enlist physicians in the national effort to inform the American public about radon.

  11. The future for physician assistants.

    PubMed

    Cawley, J F; Ott, J E; DeAtley, C A

    1983-06-01

    Physician assistants were intended to be assistants to primary care physicians. Physicians in private practice have only moderately responded to the availability of these professionals. Cutbacks in the numbers of foreign medical graduates entering American schools for graduate medical education, concern for overcrowding in some specialties, and the economic and clinical capabilities of physician assistants have lead to new uses for these persons. Physician assistants are employed in surgery and surgical subspecialties; in practice settings in institutions such as medical, pediatric, and surgical house staff; and in geriatric facilities, occupational medicine clinics, emergency rooms, and prison health systems. The projected surplus of physicians by 1990 may affect the use of physician assistants by private physicians in primary care.

  12. [Is substance abuse among physicians a problem?].

    PubMed

    Akvardar, Yildiz; Türkcan, Ahmet; Cakmak, Duran

    2002-01-01

    In today's medical community, there is growing concern about substance use among physicians, not only because of their own health, but also because of the potential adverse effects on their clinical practices. Physicians affect public health both by treatment and preventive studies and as role models. Prevalence data concerning substance abuse are generally lacking. There is no consensus on the rates of substance abuse being higher among physicians than among the general public. Physicians are less likely to smoke cigarettes and use illicit substances (like marijuana, cocaine and heroin) and more likely to use alcohol and two types of prescription medications--benzodiazepines and minor opioids--compared with their age groups. Doctors are at special risk of developing addiction problems owing to the strain of medical practice, erosion of the taboo against injecting and using opiates, and particularly access to supplies. The most common precipitating factors mentioned are physical pain and illness, usually chronic, with family tragedy such as death of a wife or child next. The third most common factor is an addicted wife. Stress, overwork and marital problems are also mentioned. No data were found about physicians' substance use in Turkey. This article generally aims to review the knowledge on the prevalence of substance use among physicians, the drug of choice, the development of dependence, the treatment and prognosis and to discuss the importance of this issue by evaluating three cases treated at the Alcohol and Drug Addiction Treatment and Research Center (AMATEM), Bakirköy State Hospital for Mental and Neurological Diseases.

  13. Physicians of ancient India

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Anu

    2016-01-01

    A survey of Indian medical historiography will reveal no dearth of work on the systems of medicine and medical literature of ancient India. However, the people who were responsible for the healing have not received much attention. This article traces the evolution of the physician as a professional in ancient India. This article reviews the secondary literature on healing and medical practice in India, specifically pertaining to the individual medical practitioner, drawing from varied sources. The healers of ancient India hailed from different castes and classes. They were well-respected and enjoyed state patronage. They were held to the highest ethical standards of the day and were bound by a strict code of conduct. They underwent rigorous training in both medicine and surgery. Most physicians were multi-skilled generalists, and expected to be skilled in elocution and debate. They were reasonably well-off financially. The paper also briefly traces the evolution of medicinal ideas in ancient India. PMID:27843823

  14. Split-Session Focus Group Interviews in the Naturalistic Setting of Family Medicine Offices

    PubMed Central

    Fetters, Michael D.; Guetterman, Timothy C.; Power, Debra; Nease, Donald E.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE When recruiting health care professionals to focus group interviews, investigators encounter challenges such as busy clinic schedules, recruitment, and a desire to get candid responses from diverse participants. We sought to overcome these challenges using an innovative, office-based, split-session focus group procedure in a project that elicited feedback from family medicine practices regarding a new preventive services model. This procedure entails allocating a portion of time to the entire group and the remaining time to individual subgroups. We discuss the methodologic procedure and the implications of using this approach for data collection. METHODS We conducted split-session focus groups with physicians and staff in 4 primary care practices. The procedure entailed 3 sessions, each lasting 30 minutes: the moderator interviewed physicians and staff together, physicians alone, and staff alone. As part of the focus group interview, we elicited and analyzed participant comments about the split-session format and collected observational field notes. RESULTS The split-session focus group interviews leveraged the naturalistic setting of the office for context-relevant discussion. We tested alternate formats that began in the morning and at lunchtime, to parallel each practice’s workflow. The split-session approach facilitated discussion of topics primarily relevant to staff among staff, topics primarily relevant to physicians among physicians, and topics common to all among all. Qualitative feedback on this approach was uniformly positive. CONCLUSION A split-session focus group interview provides an efficient, effective way to elicit candid qualitative information from all members of a primary care practice in the naturalistic setting where they work. PMID:26755786

  15. Beyond compassion fatigue: the transactional model of physician compassion.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Antonio T; Consedine, Nathan S

    2014-08-01

    Physician compassion is expected by both patients and the medical profession and is central to effective clinical practice. Yet, despite the centrality of compassion to medical practice, most compassion-related research has focused on compassion fatigue, a specific type of burnout among health providers. Although such research has highlighted the phenomenon among clinicians, the focus on compassion fatigue has neglected the study of compassion itself. In this article, we present the Transactional Model of Physician Compassion. After briefly critiquing the utility of the compassion fatigue concept, we offer a view in which physician compassion stems from the dynamic but interrelated influences of physician, patient and family, clinical situation, and environmental factors. Illuminating the specific aspects of physicians' intrapersonal, interpersonal, clinical, and professional functioning that may interfere with or enhance compassion allows for targeted interventions to promote compassion in both education and practice as well as to reduce the barriers that impede it.

  16. Physicians in literature: three portrayals.

    PubMed

    Cameron, I A

    1986-02-01

    Literature can provide an objective glimpse of how the public perceives physicians. Physicians have been recipients of the full range of human response in literature, from contempt to veneration. This article examines the impressions of three authors: Mark Twain, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, and Arthur Hailey. Their descriptions provide insight into the complex relationship physicians have with their colleagues and patients.

  17. Physicians in Literature: Three Portrayals

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Ian A.

    1986-01-01

    Literature can provide an objective glimpse of how the public perceives physicians. Physicians have been recipients of the full range of human response in literature, from contempt to veneration. This article examines the impressions of three authors: Mark Twain, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, and Arthur Hailey. Their descriptions provide insight into the complex relationship physicians have with their colleagues and patients. PMID:21267273

  18. [Professional ethics of physicians].

    PubMed

    de Micheli-Serra, Alfredo

    2004-01-01

    Socrates is considered the great classic moralist, although he was not the first to take care of man and morality. Aristotle instituted ethics as an autonomous science and clearly defined its fields, its methods and its purposes, formulating the concept of "happy medium". In the Aristotelian methodology we find traces of Hippocrates, who believed that the physician must always consider the peculiar aspects and that the individual characteristics' determinations can be reached by sensitivity. Once these particularities have been proved, the physician must rely on the "happy medium". Only Stoics could discover, and gradually elaborate, the concept of natural law. Apparently they were the first to establish the classic distinction between the theorical or ideal morality and the practical morality, which is accessible to all people. They refused to compare wisdom, entirely turned inward, with the medical art, which does not constitute an aim by itself. Modern authors assert that, with stoicism, the notion we can denominated wisdom's humanism rised. Today it is admitted that "medicine is more than simply learning medical data.... Physicians must have a wisdom learned from human finitude. They will need this wisdom to tackle the health care policy debates in the next decades". This would be a major cultural undertaking.

  19. Physician nutrition education.

    PubMed

    Kiraly, Laszlo N; McClave, Stephen A; Neel, Dustin; Evans, David C; Martindale, Robert G; Hurt, Ryan T

    2014-06-01

    Nutrition education for physicians in the United States is limited in scope, quality, and duration due to a variety of factors. As new data and quality improvement initiatives highlight the importance of nutrition and a generation of nutrition experts retire, there is a need for new physician educators and leaders in clinical nutrition. Traditional nutrition fellowships and increased didactic lecture time in school and postgraduate training are not feasible strategies to develop the next generation of physician nutrition specialists in the current environment. One strategy is the development of short immersion courses for advanced trainees and junior attendings. The most promising courses include a combination of close mentorship and adult learning techniques such as lectures, clinical experiences, literature review, curricular development, research and writing, multidisciplinary interactions, and extensive group discussion. These courses also allow the opportunity for advanced discourse, development of long-term collaborative relationships, and continued longitudinal career development for alumni after the course ends. Despite these curricular developments, ultimately the field of nutrition will not mature until the American Board of Medical Specialties recognizes nutrition medicine with specialty board certification.

  20. Organizational culture, team climate and diabetes care in small office-based practices

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, Marije; Dijkstra, Rob; Wensing, Michel; van der Weijden, Trudy; Grol, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Background Redesigning care has been proposed as a lever for improving chronic illness care. Within primary care, diabetes care is the most widespread example of restructured integrated care. Our goal was to assess to what extent important aspects of restructured care such as multidisciplinary teamwork and different types of organizational culture are associated with high quality diabetes care in small office-based general practices. Methods We conducted cross-sectional analyses of data from 83 health care professionals involved in diabetes care from 30 primary care practices in the Netherlands, with a total of 752 diabetes mellitus type II patients participating in an improvement study. We used self-reported measures of team climate (Team Climate Inventory) and organizational culture (Competing Values Framework), and measures of quality of diabetes care and clinical patient characteristics from medical records and self-report. We conducted multivariate analyses of the relationship between culture, climate and HbA1c, total cholesterol, systolic blood pressure and a sum score on process indicators for the quality of diabetes care, adjusting for potential patient- and practice level confounders and practice-level clustering. Results A strong group culture was negatively associated to the quality of diabetes care provided to patients (β = -0.04; p = 0.04), whereas a more 'balanced culture' was positively associated to diabetes care quality (β = 5.97; p = 0.03). No associations were found between organizational culture, team climate and clinical patient outcomes. Conclusion Although some significant associations were found between high quality diabetes care in general practice and different organizational cultures, relations were rather marginal. Variation in clinical patient outcomes could not be attributed to organizational culture or teamwork. This study therefore contributes to the discussion about the legitimacy of the widespread idea that aspects of redesigning

  1. Joint Commission of Accreditation of Healthcare Organization accreditation for the office-based oral and maxillofacial surgeon.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Orville; McIver, Phillip

    2008-07-01

    Office-based surgery has become a vital component of the practice of oral and maxillofacial surgeons and periodontists. It has enabled these specialties to provide needed service to patients in an outpatient setting, including the option of intravenous sedation. It is the stance of this article to promote professional oversight and quality assurance through accreditation by the Joint Commission to maintain a standard in the delivery of office-based surgical services, thus upholding the integrity of the profession in the clinical setting.

  2. Physician-industry relations. Part 1: individual physicians.

    PubMed

    Coyle, Susan L

    2002-03-05

    This is part 1 of a 2-part paper on ethics and physician-industry relationships. Part 1 offers advice to individual physicians; part 2 gives recommendations to medical education providers and medical professional societies. Physicians and industry have a shared interest in advancing medical knowledge. Nonetheless, the primary ethic of the physician is to promote the patient's best interests, while the primary ethic of industry is to promote profitability. Although partnerships between physicians and industry can result in impressive medical advances, they also create opportunities for bias and can result in unfavorable public perceptions. Many physicians and physicians-in-training think they are impervious to commercial influence. However, recent studies show that accepting industry hospitality and gifts, even drug samples, can compromise judgment about medical information and subsequent decisions about patient care. It is up to the physician to judge whether a gift is acceptable. A very general guideline is that it is ethical to accept modest gifts that advance medical practice. It is clearly unethical to accept gifts or services that obligate the physician to reciprocate. Conflicts of interest can arise from other financial ties between physicians and industry, whether to outside companies or self-owned businesses. Such ties include honorariums for speaking or writing about a company's product, payment for participating in clinic-based research, and referrals to medical resources. All of these relationships have the potential to influence a physician's attitudes and practices. This paper explores the ethical quandaries involved and offers guidelines for ethical business relationships.

  3. Physician resource databank: numbers, distribution and activities of Canada's physicians

    PubMed Central

    Woodward, Christel; Adams, Orvill

    1985-01-01

    The physician resource databank, compiled and maintained by the Canadian Medical Association (CMA), contains functional information from 41 599 of Canada's licensed physicians. The information was gathered from a 20-item questionnaire sent to 47 162 physicians. Of the total, 38 653 responses came from physicians who had completed their training and these were included in the analysis to produce a profile of the supply of physicians in Canada. The data from physicians younger than 35 years indicate some changes in the structure of the supply: 27% are women (compared with only about 9% of physicians older than 45 years). The implications of these statistics are not yet clear, but within the next decade the numbers in some specialties—surgery, anesthesia, obstetrics and gynecology, and radiology—may be too few to meet the demand as more than 20% of the current practitioners reach retirement age. Other findings are that [List: see text] PMID:3995440

  4. Familial Hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Bouhairie, Victoria Enchia; Goldberg, Anne Carol

    2015-01-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia is a common, inherited disorder of cholesterol metabolism that leads to early cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. It is underdiagnosed and undertreated. Statins, ezetimibe, bile acid sequestrants, niacin, lomitapide, mipomersen and LDL apheresis are treatments that can lower LDL cholesterol levels. Early treatment can lead to substantial reduction of cardiovascular events and death in patients with FH. It is important to increase awareness of this disorder in physicians and patients in order to reduce the burden of this disorder. PMID:25939291

  5. Mad scientists, compassionate healers, and greedy egotists: the portrayal of physicians in the movies.

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Glenn

    2002-01-01

    Cinematic depictions of physicians potentially can affect public expectations and the patient-physician relationship, but little attention has been devoted to portrayals of physicians in movies. The objective of the study was the analysis of cinematic depictions of physicians to determine common demographic attributes of movie physicians, major themes, and whether portrayals have changed over time. All movies released on videotape with physicians as main characters and readily available to the public were viewed in their entirety. Data were collected on physician characteristics, diagnoses, and medical accuracy, and dialogue concerning physicians was transcribed. The results showed that in the 131 films, movie physicians were significantly more likely to be male (p < 0.00001), White (p < 0.00001), and < 40 years of age (p < 0.009). The proportion of women and minority film physicians has declined steadily in recent decades. Movie physicians are most commonly surgeons (33%), psychiatrists (26%), and family practitioners (18%). Physicians were portrayed negatively in 44% of movies, and since the 1960s positive portrayals declined while negative portrayals increased. Physicians frequently are depicted as greedy, egotistical, uncaring, and unethical, especially in recent films. Medical inaccuracies occurred in 27% of films. Compassion and idealism were common in early physician movies but are increasingly scarce in recent decades. A recurrent theme is the "mad scientist," the physician-researcher that values research more than patients' welfare. Portrayals of physicians as egotistical and materialistic have increased, whereas sexism and racism have waned. Movies from the past two decades have explored critical issues surrounding medical ethics and managed care. We conclude that negative cinematic portrayals of physicians are on the rise, which may adversely affect patient expectations and the patient-physician relationship. Nevertheless, films about physicians can

  6. Modeling physicians' prescribing decisions for patients with panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Freeman, J K; Barnes, J H; Summers, K H; Szeinbach, S L

    1993-01-01

    The authors asked general and family practitioners to rate the importance of several items relating to the prescribing of drug products for patients with panic disorder. Physicians preferred to use benzodiazepines alone and in combination with antidepressants for treatment, regardless of the presence or absence of phobic avoidance. Adverse drug events, efficacy, and patient characteristics were found to be important considerations when physicians prescribe medication. Educational and promotional strategies for pharmaceutical manufacturers and marketers are discussed.

  7. Physicians' perceptions of doctor shopping in West Virginia.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, E Gail; Moss, Alvin H

    2010-01-01

    Prescription drug abuse and diversion continue to be serious problems in West Virginia and nationwide. Doctor shopping (visiting multiple doctors in a short time frame with the intent to deceive them to obtain controlled substances) is illegal and one way that patients gain access to prescription drugs. We surveyed West Virginia physicians in emergency medicine, family medicine, and internal medicine to determine their experience with and attitudes toward doctor shopping, and to assess attitudes toward proposed legislation to protect physicians who report doctor shoppers to law enforcement officials. Of 452 physicians surveyed, 258 responded (57%). Emergency medicine physicians had the highest response rate (61%) and most frequent encounters (once a week or more often) with doctor shoppers compared to family medicine and internal medicine physicians (88% vs 25% vs 14%, P < .001). Eighty-one percent of physicians reported using the West Virginia Board of Pharmacy Controlled Substances Monitoring Program website, but only 22 percent presently report doctor shoppers. If the law protected them, 85 percent of all physicians reported they would be likely to report doctor shoppers.

  8. Management of childhood "hyperactivity" by primary care physicians.

    PubMed

    Bennett, F C; Sherman, R

    1983-06-01

    A questionnaire assessing current clinical approach to the problem of childhood hyperactivity was mailed to 910 primary care physicians in the state of Washington. A response of 462 (50.8%) was obtained. Pediatricians assess and manage hyperactivity in a manner significantly different from that of family physicians or general practitioners. Age of physician also accounted for significant differences, although to a lesser degree than type of training. Few differences were determined by size of community. An overall high prevalence of the problem of hyperactivity was apparent. Combined use of stimulant medications, behavioral programs, and special diets was common.

  9. A broken heart--the physician's role: bereaved parents' perceptions of interactions with physicians.

    PubMed

    Bright, Katherine L; Huff, Marlene Belew; Hollon, Karen

    2009-05-01

    This survey study provides pediatricians the opportunity to hear directly from surviving parents and caretakers and is an initial step in developing training curricula for doctors and other health care professionals who wish to improve the effectiveness of their interactions with grieving families. A privately maintained listserve, originating in Kentucky, of bereaved parents and guardians was used to send written surveys via the U.S. Postal Service to those individuals living in Kentucky. Survey results include thematic concerns identified by the bereaved parents about physician interaction and actions at the time of a child's death. Although published guidelines are available for physicians attending to bereaved parents at the time of a child's death, these results suggest that the availability of guidelines alone may be insufficient and that more in-depth physician training and education are needed.

  10. Physicians and American political leadership.

    PubMed

    Jameson, M G

    1983-02-18

    Physicians have actively participated in the political processes of American democracy throughout the nation's history. The purpose of this study was to compare physicians' participation in public office during the first and second centuries of American democracy. Following the commencement of the US Congress, physicians were active members of the legislative branch. However, physicians' membership in Congress has diminished significantly in modern times. The executive and judicial branches of the federal government have recorded only marginal representation by physicians and none during the 20th century.

  11. Managed care and physician disability.

    PubMed

    Fraunfelder, F T; Fraunfelder, N

    1999-07-01

    The number of disability claims by physicians has skyrocketed during the last decade. One of the primary reasons for this escalation is decreased job satisfaction brought about by managed care. Certain physician groups are more vulnerable to the stress of advanced managed care: solo practitioners, specialists and subspecialists, certain generalists, doctors with independent personalities, middle-aged or near-retirement physicians, impaired physicians, and those whose practices are almost solely contract driven. Based on analysis of physician disability claims, certain protective measures are recommended to relieve stress and promote survival in today's health care market.

  12. Role of the school physician.

    PubMed

    Devore, Cynthia DiLaura; Wheeler, Lani S M

    2013-01-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics recognizes the important role physicians play in promoting the optimal biopsychosocial well-being of children in the school setting. Although the concept of a school physician has existed for more than a century, uniformity among states and school districts regarding physicians in schools and the laws governing it are lacking. By understanding the roles and contributions physicians can make to schools, pediatricians can support and promote school physicians in their communities and improve health and safety for children.

  13. Apathy, empathy, physicians, and Chekhov.

    PubMed

    Gianakos, D

    1997-01-01

    Healing depends on a caring, involved physician. In his story "Ward Number Six," Anton Chekhov illustrated how patients suffer when physicians become apathetic. Reading this story may inspire physicians to resist apathy and assume greater responsibility for the social conditions that impact on their patients' well-being. It may also stimulate physicians' imagination in such a way as to improve their ability to empathize with their patients. Finally, the act of reading itself--particularly reading great literature such as "Ward Number Six," can help rejuvenate those physicians who struggle with their own apathy.

  14. Roles of the Team Physician.

    PubMed

    Kinderknecht, James

    2016-07-01

    The roles of the team physician are much more than providing medical coverage at a sport's event. The team physician has numerous administrative and medical responsibilities. The development of an emergency action plan is an essential administrative task as an example. The implementation of the components of this plan requires the team physician to have the necessary medical knowledge and skill. An expertise in returning an athlete to play after an injury or other medical condition is a unique attribute of the trained team physician. The athlete's return to participation needs to start with the athlete's safety and best medical interests but not inappropriately restrict the individual from play. The ability to communicate on numerous levels needs to be a characteristic of the team physician. There are several potential ethical conflicts the team physician needs to control. These conflicts can create unique medicolegal issues. The true emphasis of the team physician is to focus on what is best for the athlete.

  15. Soviet pilot-physician program.

    PubMed

    Vlassov, V; Ushakov, I

    1999-07-01

    The program for training pilot-physicians was started in 1952. It was the first and the only one in the history of the USSR/Russia. Young military physicians from different military forces and graduates of the Saratov Military Medical Faculty were invited to participate in the program. Selected military physicians were sent for 2 yr of flight training. Six graduates from Omsk School became bomber pilots, while eight graduates from Chuguev School were appointed instructor pilots. Special positions and regulations for pilot-physicians were not created. Some pilot-physicians continued their aviation career, and some returned to medicine. For a short time a limited number of pilot-physician positions existed in the research institute in Moscow. Two graduates from this program were appointed to these positions. One of the pilot-physicians became a cosmonaut; and at least six obtained scientific degrees in medicine and made significant contributions to the development of aerospace medicine.

  16. Changing Trends In Family Practice Obstetrics

    PubMed Central

    Ranson, Peter J.

    1978-01-01

    Since trends in some countries show less involvement of the family doctor in obstetrics, and even more reliance on the obstetrician/gynecologist as the primary care physician for women, this study was designed to find out if obstetrics could be adequately practiced in a small rural hospital by family physicians with occasional surgical help. Also, a questionnaire was sent to 200 family physicians, 100 in Ottawa and 100 in Vancouver, to ascertain their involvement in obstetrics.

  17. Patients' and physicians' attitudes regarding the physician's professional appearance.

    PubMed

    Gjerdingen, D K; Simpson, D E; Titus, S L

    1987-07-01

    Although physician appearance has been a topic of interest to medical historians for more than two centuries, little objective investigation has been made into patients' and physicians' attitudes toward the physician's appearance. This study analyzed responses from 404 patients, residents, and staff physicians regarding their attitudes toward various aspects of the male and female physician's professional appearance. Positive responses from all participants were associated with traditional items of dress such as the dress, shirt and tie, dress shoes, and nylons, and for physician-identifying items such as a white coat and a name tag. Negative responses were associated with casual items such as blue jeans, scrub suits, athletic shoes, clogs, and sport socks. Negative ratings were also associated with overly feminine items such as prominent ruffles and female dangling earrings and such temporarily fashionable items as long hair on men, male earrings, and patterned hose on women. Overall, patients were less discriminating in their attitude toward physician appearance than physicians. Patients rated traditional items less positively and casual items less negatively. This study confirms the importance of the physician's appearance in physician-patient communication.

  18. Canadian Physicians' Attitudes towards Accessing Mental Health Resources

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Tariq M.; Asmer, M. Selim; Mazhar, Nadeem; Munshi, Tariq; Tran, Tanya; Groll, Dianne L.

    2016-01-01

    Despite their rigorous training, studies have shown that physicians experience higher rates of mental illness, substance abuse, and suicide compared to the general population. An online questionnaire was sent to a random sample of physicians across Canada to assess physicians' knowledge of the incidence of mental illness among physicians and their attitudes towards disclosure and treatment in a hypothetical situation where one developed a mental illness. We received 139 responses reflecting mostly primary care physicians and nonsurgical specialists. The majority of respondents underestimated the incidence of mental illness in physicians. The most important factors influencing respondent's will to disclose their illness included career implications, professional integrity, and social stigma. Preference for selecting mental health treatment services, as either outpatients or inpatients, was mostly influenced by quality of care and confidentiality, with lower importance of convenience and social stigma. Results from this study suggest that the attitudes of physicians towards becoming mentally ill are complex and may be affected by the individual's previous diagnosis of mental illness and the presence of a family member with a history of mental illness. Other factors include the individual's medical specialty and level of experience. As mental illness is common among physicians, one must be conscious of these when offering treatment options. PMID:27144156

  19. Sexual minorities and selection of a primary care physician in a midwestern U.S. city.

    PubMed

    Labig, Chalmer E; Peterson, Tim O

    2006-01-01

    How and why sexual minorities select a primary care physician is critical to the development of methods for attracting these clients to a physician's practice. Data obtained from a sample of sexual minorities in a mid-size city in our nation's heartland would indicate that these patients are loyal when the primary care physician has a positive attitude toward their sexual orientation. The data also confirms that most sexual minorities select same sex physicians but not necessarily same sexual orientation physicians because of lack of knowledge of physicians' sexual orientation. Family practice physicians and other primary care physicians can reach out to this population by encouraging word of mouth advertising and by displaying literature on health issues for all sexual orientations in their offices.

  20. Issues in physician contracting.

    PubMed

    Fanburg, John D; Leone, Alyson M

    2005-09-01

    Dermatologists will enter into a number of different contracts during their professional careers. It is important that in each agreement they enter, dermatologists reap the benefits that they aspire for and understand the consequences of each provision. This article addresses just a few of the different issues that arise in physician contracting, such as choosing the appropriate form of business entity; the importance of a writing; term and termination of the contract; compensation models; benefits, vacation and other time off included in the contract; malpractice insurance; and restrictive covenants. Each provision should be carefully analyzed to ensure that it will protect the best interests of the dermatologist in that situation.

  1. Negotiation skills for physicians.

    PubMed

    Anastakis, Dimitri J

    2003-01-01

    As stakeholders vie for increasingly limited resources in health care, physicians would be well advised to hone their skills of negotiation. Negotiation is defined as a strategy to resolve a divergence of interests, be they real or perceived, where common interests also exist. Negotiation requires effective communication of goals, needs, and wants. The "basic needs" model of negotiation is best suited to the current health care environment. In this model, negotiator must to be able to identify their needs in the negotiation, establish their best alternative to a negotiated agreement, and identify their strategies and tactics for the negotiation.

  2. The impact of a physician intervention program on older women's mammography use.

    PubMed

    Preston, J A; Grady, J N; Schulz, A F; Petrillo, M K; Scinto, J D

    1998-12-01

    The Mammography Optimum Referral Effort (MORE) is a physician office-based intervention program initiated by the Connecticut Peer Review Organization (CPRO) to increase mammography use among older women in Connecticut. Three locales in the state were targeted for the MORE intervention based on identified low mammography rates in women aged 65 years and older. Thirty-seven physicians participated from March 1, 1996, to August 31, 1996. Annual mammography rates were derived by merging Medicare Part B mammography claims with a database from the Connecticut Tumor Registry. This strategy allowed us to exclude women with a prior history of breast cancer from the analysis, in order to estimate screening rates. The MORE intervention was associated with an absolute increase of 5.9%, which represents a relative increase of 15.4%, in annual mammography use. Our findings suggest that a multifaceted physician intervention is capable of increasing mammography use among older women.

  3. How do Physicians Decide to Refer Their Patients for Psychiatric Genetic Counseling? A Qualitative Study of Physicians' Practice.

    PubMed

    Leach, Emma; Morris, Emily; White, Hannah J; Inglis, Angela; Lehman, Anna; Austin, Jehannine

    2016-12-01

    Psychiatric genetic counseling (PGC) is an emerging specialty discipline within the genetic counseling profession. A specialist PGC service was founded in 2012 in Vancouver, Canada, and though patient benefits have been demonstrated, many physicians do not regularly refer patients to the service despite awareness of its availability. We conducted a qualitative study involving semi-structured telephone interviews with Vancouver-based physicians who were aware of the PGC service to explore this phenomenon. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, coded, and analysed for emergent themes. Consistent with a grounded theory approach, constant comparison was employed throughout data collection and analysis. Analyses of interviews conducted with 12 physicians revealed that referral practices were informed by perceptions about the purpose of PGC and interpretation of patient cues. Physicians perceived PGC as an information-focused intervention, and considered referral when patients explicitly expressed desire for information about recurrence risk or etiology that they felt unable to adequately address themselves. Even when physicians identified psychotherapeutic benefits of PGC, patient needs of this nature were not perceived as cues prompting referral to PGC. These data suggest that further work is necessary to position PGC in physicians' minds as a service that could potentially benefit most individuals with psychiatric disorders and their families, and that it encompasses more than information provision. It is important to increase physicians' awareness of the complementary role that genetic counselors can play to that of the physician in providing psychotherapeutically oriented counselling about illness etiology.

  4. Work in progress. Integrating physicians' services in the home.

    PubMed Central

    McWilliam, C. L.; Stewart, M.; Sangster, J.; Cohen, I.; Mitchell, J.; Sutherland, C.; Ryan, B.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: While increasing acuity levels and the concomitant complexity of service demand that physicians be involved in in-home care, conflicting evidence and opinions do not show how this can best be achieved. DESIGN: A phenomenologic research design was used to obtain insights into the challenges and opportunities of integrating physicians' services into the usual in-home services in London, Ont. SETTING: Home care in London, Ont. PARTICIPANTS: Twelve participants included three patients, two family caregivers, two family physicians, the program's nurse practitioner, two case managers, and two community nurses. METHOD: In-depth interviews with a maximally varied purposeful sample of patients, caregivers, and providers were analyzed using immersion and crystallization techniques. MAIN FINDINGS: Findings revealed the potential for enhanced continuity of care and interdisciplinary team functioning. Having a nurse practitioner, interdisciplinary team-building exercises and meetings, regular face-to-face contact among all providers, support for family caregivers, and 24-hour coverage for physicians were found to be essential for success. CONCLUSION: Integration of services takes time, money, and sustained commitment, particularly when undertaken in geographically isolated communities. Informed choice and a fair remuneration system remain important considerations for family physicians. PMID:11785281

  5. Physician Event Reporting: Training the Next Generation of Physicians

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    353 Physician Event Reporting: Training the Next Generation of Physicians Quang-Tuyen Nguyen, Joanna Weinberg, Lee H. Hilborne Abstract...and the quality of health care by explicitly educating and training the next generation of physicians in these areas. Although quality of care is...implicit in most medical and other professional school curricula, medical students generally are not given the training necessary to meet the specific

  6. Office-Based Elastographic Technique for Quantifying Mechanical Properties of Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Ballyns, Jeffrey J.; Turo, Diego; Otto, Paul; Shah, Jay P.; Hammond, Jennifer; Gebreab, Tadesse; Gerber, Lynn H.; Sikdar, Siddhartha

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Our objectives were to develop a new, efficient, and easy-to-administer approach to ultrasound elastography and assess its ability to provide quantitative characterization of viscoelastic properties of skeletal muscle in an outpatient clinical environment. We sought to show its validity and clinical utility in assessing myofascial trigger points, which are associated with myofascial pain syndrome. Methods Ultrasound imaging was performed while the muscle was externally vibrated at frequencies in the range of 60 to 200 Hz using a handheld vibrator. The spatial gradient of the vibration phase yielded the shear wave speed, which is related to the viscoelastic properties of tissue. The method was validated using a calibrated experimental phantom, the biceps brachii muscle in healthy volunteers (n = 6), and the upper trapezius muscle in symptomatic patients with axial neck pain (n = 13) and asymptomatic (pain-free) control participants (n = 9). Results Using the experimental phantom, our method was able to quantitatively measure the shear moduli with error rates of less than 20%. The mean shear modulus ± SD in the normal biceps brachii measured 12.5 ± 3.4 kPa, within the range of published values using more sophisticated methods. Shear wave speeds in active myofascial trigger points and the surrounding muscle tissue were significantly higher than those in normal tissue at high frequency excitations (>100 Hz; P < .05). Conclusions Off-the-shelf office-based equipment can be used to quantitatively characterize skeletal muscle viscoelastic properties with estimates comparable to those using more sophisticated methods. Our preliminary results using this method indicate that patients with spontaneous neck pain and symptomatic myofascial trigger points have increased tissue heterogeneity at the trigger point site and the surrounding muscle tissue. PMID:22837285

  7. Parent-reported physician diagnosis is an important factor in asthma management: an elementary school survey.

    PubMed

    Homnick, Douglas N; DeJong, Sandra R

    2007-06-01

    Parent surveys seem to provide sufficient information for asthma case selection. In this study, elementary school children were identified for an asthma education program through a screening questionnaire, followed by a comprehensive family survey. The data were analyzed by groups according to those with parent-reported physician diagnosis or no physician diagnosis. Those with an asthma diagnosis had less nighttime symptoms, less family stress, and more asthma follow-up visits, and were prescribed appropriate medications and peak flow meters more often than those students without a physician diagnosis of asthma. A physician commitment to or recognition of an asthma diagnosis is an important factor in subsequent asthma care.

  8. How Physicians Support Mothers of Children with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Fujino, Haruo; Saito, Toshio; Matsumura, Tsuyoshi; Shibata, Saki; Iwata, Yuko; Fujimura, Harutoshi; Shinno, Susumu; Imura, Osamu

    2015-09-01

    Communicating about Duchenne muscular dystrophy and its prognosis can be difficult for affected children and their family. We focused on how physicians provide support to the mothers of children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy who have difficulty communicating about the condition with their child. The eligible participants were certified child neurologists of the Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Participants responded to questionnaires consisting of free descriptions of a vignette of a child with Duchenne muscular dystrophy and a mother. We analyzed 263 responses of the participants. We found 4 themes on advising mothers, involving encouraging communication, family autonomy, supporting family, and considering the child's concerns. These results provide a better understanding of the communication between physicians and family members who need help sharing information with a child with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. These findings will assist clinical practitioners in supporting families and the affected children throughout the course of their illness.

  9. John Keats: poet, patient, physician.

    PubMed

    Smith, H

    1984-01-01

    John Keats, son of an ostler , was born in London in 1795. Despite an early interest in literature he was, surprisingly, apprenticed to an apothecary and continued his medical training at Guy's Hospital, obtaining the Licentiate of the Society of Apothecaries in 1816. He never practiced medicine. His early poems were not well received, and for the young poet with very slender means, life was difficult. Tragedy was added to difficulty when tuberculosis, which had already caused the death of his mother and uncle, became apparent in his brother Tom, whom Keats nursed through his illness when the brothers were living together in Hampstead . Subsequently Keats developed the disease, but despite its rapid progress, he managed in a single year - 1819 - to produce some of the finest lyrical poetry in the language. He went to Italy in the hope of obtaining a cure but died in Rome in 1821, aged 25. Medicine certainly contributed to the man, but also something to the poet, Keats; his training and his family and personal experience of tuberculosis speak for themselves. More subtly , his medical experience influenced in some degree his ideas and even his choice of words. The interrelations of poet-patient and trainee-physician are examined in this essay.

  10. Physician-older patient communication at the end of life.

    PubMed

    Siegler, E L; Levin, B W

    2000-02-01

    Communication with dying patients and their families requires special skills to assist them in this extremely stressful period. This article begins with a case that illustrates many of the challenges of communicating with the dying. It then reviews the literature about communication with older patients at the end of life, focusing on physician-patient discussions, decision-making, advance directives, and cultural factors. The article concludes with a practical discussion of problems that physicians may encounter when working with older patients at the end of life and their families and recommendations to improve communication.

  11. The physician-surrogate relationship.

    PubMed

    Torke, Alexia M; Alexander, G Caleb; Lantos, John; Siegler, Mark

    2007-06-11

    The physician-patient relationship is a cornerstone of the medical encounter and has been analyzed extensively. But in many cases, this relationship is altered because patients are unable to make decisions for themselves. In such cases, physicians rely on surrogates, who are often asked to "speak for the patient." This view overlooks the fundamental fact that the surrogate decision maker cannot be just a passive spokesperson for the patient but is also an active agent who develops a complex relationship with the physician. Although there has been much analysis of the ethical guidelines by which surrogates should make decisions, there has been little previous analysis of the special features of the physician-surrogate relationship. Such an analysis seems crucial as the population ages and life-sustaining technologies improve, which is likely to make surrogate decision making even more common. We outline key issues affecting the physician-surrogate relationship and provide guidance for physicians who are making decisions with surrogates.

  12. The physician leader as logotherapist.

    PubMed

    Washburn, E R

    1998-01-01

    Today's physicians feel helpless and angry about changing conditions in the medical landscape. This is due, in large part, to our postmodernist world view and the influence of corporations on medical practice. The life and work of existentialist psychiatrist Viktor Frankl is proposed as a role model for physicians to take back control of their profession. Physician leaders are in the best position to bring the teachings and insight of Frankl's logotherapy to rank-and-file physicians in all practice settings, as well as into the board rooms of large medical corporations. This article considers the spiritual and moral troubles of American medicine, Frankl's answer to that affliction, and the implications of logotherapy for physician organizations and leadership. Physician executives are challenged to take up this task.

  13. Physicians in Nursing Homes: Effectiveness of Physician Accountability and Communication

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Julie C; Intrator, Orna; Wetle, Terrie

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To develop a measure of the perceptions of nursing home (NH) Directors of Nursing (DON) on the adequacy of physician care and to examine its variation as well as its construct validity. Design A nationwide cross-sectional study with primary data collection Setting 2043 NHs surveyed August 2009 – April 2011 Participants Directors of Nursing (DONs) and NH Administrators responded to questions pertaining to their perceptions of the care provided by physicians in their NH. Measurements Ten items were used to create three domains: medical staff attentiveness, physician communication, and staff concerns about physician practice. These were combined into an overall summary score measure called “Effectiveness of Physician Accountability and Communication” (EPAC). EPAC construct validity was ascertained from other DON questions and from a complementary survey of NH Administrators. RESULTS The established EPAC score is the first measure to capture specific components of the adequacy of physician care in NHs. EPAC exhibited good construct validity: more effective practices were correlated with greater physician involvement in discussions of Do-Not-Resuscitate orders, the frequency that the Medical Director checked on the medical care delivered by attending physician, the tightness of nursing home's control of its physician resources, and the DON's perception of whether or not avoidable hospitalizations and ER visits could be reduced with greater physician attention to resident needs. Conclusion As increased attention is given to the quality of care provided to vulnerable elders, effective measures of processes of care are essential. The EPAC measure provides an important new metric that can be used in these efforts. The goal is that future studies could use EPAC and its individual domains to shed light on the manner through which physician presence is related to resident outcomes in the NH setting. PMID:25858283

  14. Chemical Dependency and the Physician

    PubMed Central

    Berge, Keith H.; Seppala, Marvin D.; Schipper, Agnes M.

    2009-01-01

    Although the nature and scope of addictive disease are commonly reported in the lay press, the problem of physician addiction has largely escaped the public's attention. This is not due to physician immunity from the problem, because physicians have been shown to have addiction at a rate similar to or higher than that of the general population. Additionally, physicians' addictive disease (when compared with the general public) is typically advanced before identification and intervention. This delay in diagnosis relates to physicians' tendency to protect their workplace performance and image well beyond the time when their life outside of work has deteriorated and become chaotic. We provide an overview of the scope and risks of physician addiction, the challenges of recognition and intervention, the treatment of the addicted physician, the ethical and legal implications of an addicted physician returning to the workplace, and their monitored aftercare. It is critical that written policies for dealing with workplace addiction are in place at every employment venue and that they are followed to minimize risk of an adverse medical or legal outcome and to provide appropriate care to the addicted physician. PMID:19567716

  15. Physician ownership of medical equipment.

    PubMed

    Reschovsky, James; Cassil, Alwyn; Pham, Hoangmai H

    2010-12-01

    This Data Bulletin presents findings from the Center for Studying Health System Change (HSC) 2008 Health Tracking Physician Survey, a nationally rep­resentative mail survey of U.S. physicians providing at least 20 hours per week of direct patient care. The sample of physicians was drawn from the American Medical Association master file and included active, nonfederal, office- and hospital-based physicians. Residents and fellows were excluded, as well as radiologists, anesthesiologists and pathologists. The survey includes responses from more than 4,700 phy­sicians, and the response rate was 62 percent. Since this Data Bulletin examines the extent of physician practice ownership or leasing of medical equipment, the sample was limited to 2,750 physicians practic­ing in community-based, physician-owned practices, who represent 58 percent of all physicians surveyed. Physicians employed by hospitals, who practiced in hospital-based settings or who worked in hospital-owned practices were excluded.

  16. Fractals for physicians.

    PubMed

    Thamrin, Cindy; Stern, Georgette; Frey, Urs

    2010-06-01

    There is increasing interest in the study of fractals in medicine. In this review, we provide an overview of fractals, of techniques available to describe fractals in physiological data, and we propose some reasons why a physician might benefit from an understanding of fractals and fractal analysis, with an emphasis on paediatric respiratory medicine where possible. Among these reasons are the ubiquity of fractal organisation in nature and in the body, and how changes in this organisation over the lifespan provide insight into development and senescence. Fractal properties have also been shown to be altered in disease and even to predict the risk of worsening of disease. Finally, implications of a fractal organisation include robustness to errors during development, ability to adapt to surroundings, and the restoration of such organisation as targets for intervention and treatment.

  17. Arise the systems physician.

    PubMed

    Scott, I; Phelps, G; Dalton, S

    2014-12-01

    Healthcare in Australia faces significant challenges. Variations in care, suboptimal safety and reliability, fragmentation of care and unsustainable cost increases are compounded by substantial overuse and underuse of clinical interventions. These problems arise not from intentional actions of individual clinicians, but from deficiencies in the design, operations and governance of systems of care. Physicians play an important role in optimising systems of care and, in doing so, must rely on enhanced skills in a range of domains. These include: how to evaluate and improve quality and safety of clinical processes; analyse and interpret clinical and administrative data in ways that can be used to enhance care delivery; build and lead cohesive multidisciplinary teams capable of solving operational defects and inefficient workarounds; and implement new and effective innovations in clinical service delivery. While clinical skills are essential in individual patient care, skills that improve systems of care targeting whole patient populations will become increasingly desirable and recognised as core skills.

  18. Brief Psychotherapy in Family Practice

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, Peter J.; Brown, Alan

    1986-01-01

    A large number of patients with psychosocial or psychiatric disorders present to family physicians, and the family physician needs a model of psychotherapy with which to cope with their problems. A model of brief psychotherapy is presented which is time limited, goal directed and easy to learn. It consists of four facets drawn from established areas of psychotherapy: characteristics of the therapist; characteristics of the patient; Eriksonian developmental stages; and the process of therapy as described by Carkhuff. These facets fit together in a way which is useful to the family physician in managing those patient problems for which brief psychotherapy is indicated. PMID:21267176

  19. Increasing physician engagement: start with what's important to physicians.

    PubMed

    Stark, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Physician engagement has never been more important in this environment of healthcare reform--yet few healthcare organizations can define it or identify the elements of engagement that make increasing it possible. This may explain why a recent survey of physicians on the specifics regarding engagement from their perspective found, among other things, that levels of engagement over the past three years have increased at a lukewarm pace, at best. The survey confirmed that feeling engaged was very important to physicians' job satisfaction. It delved into what was important to them--and where there are gaps between what they want and what they are currently experiencing in their organizations--at a granular level, as well as measuring their current levels of engagement with their organizations and their work. It also explored the impact that feelings of engagement have on physicians' decisions around accepting or leaving a job or practice. A companion survey with administrators pointed out areas where there were gaps between their perceptions and those of physicians. The results point to actions that healthcare organizations can take to increase engagement--and, by extension, participation and buy-in--among their physician populations to reach critical goals and achieve greater success with key initiatives at a time of increasing physician shortages and competition between health systems for top physician talent.

  20. Medicare physician payments: impacts of changes on rural physicians.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Keith J; MacKinney, A Clinton; McBride, Timothy D

    2006-09-01

    Medicare payment disproportionately impacts rural physicians compared to urban. For example, 51% of rural physicians, compared to 44% of urban physicians, receive at least 38% of their payments from Medicare.1 Thus, the Medicare physician payment system is of significant rural interest. In this policy brief, we present the effects of the Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and Modernization Act (MMA) of 2003 on physician payment rates in rural areas. Specifically, we examine the impact of creating a floor of 1.00 in the geographic practice cost index (GPCI) for work expense. We also show the effects of the Medicare incentive payment (MIP) for providing services in shortage areas and of the bonus for practicing in a physician scarcity area. Our principal findings are the following: (1) Increases to the GPCI for work expense accounted for a substantial percentage of the two-year increases in total payment to physicians in rural payment areas. (2) Increases in the conversion factor (CF) (base payment) accounted for most of the increases in total payment in all but 6 of the 89 Medicare payment localities; in those 6 areas, the dominant factor was GPCI adjustment. (3) Bonus payments are a more direct means of targeting increased payments to physicians in specific areas than is a general increase in one part of the payment formula.

  1. Writing to Heal Thyself: Physician as Person & Person as Physician

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kasman, Deborah L.

    2006-01-01

    An experienced physician-teacher shares her own experiences with loss in medicine and loss in her personal life. Through personal writings during her divorce, she exemplifies the healing effect writing can have during difficult transformations that occur in life. She shares her bias that physicians need to accept and own their emotions and can use…

  2. French Experience with Buprenorphine : Do Physicians Follow the Guidelines?

    PubMed Central

    Guillou Landreat, Morgane; Rozaire, Charles; Guillet, Jean yves; Victorri Vigneau, Caroline; Le Reste, Jean Yves; Grall Bronnec, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Opiate dependence affects about 15,479,000 people worldwide. The effectiveness of opiate substitution treatments (OST) has been widely demonstrated. Buprenorphine plays a particular role in opiate dependence care provision in France. It is widely prescribed by physicians and national opiate substitution treatment guidelines have been available since 2004. In order to study the prescribing of buprenorphine, we used a questionnaire sent by email, to a large sample of physicians. These physicians were either in practice, or belonged to an addiction treatment network or a hospital. The main objective of this work was to measure the extent to which the theoretical, clinical attitude of physicians towards prescribing buprenorphine (BHD) complied with the statutory guidelines. We showed that the physicians we interviewed rarely took into account the guidelines regarding buprenorphine prescription. The actual prescribing of Buprenorphine differed from the guidelines. Only 42% of independent Family Physicians (FPs), working outside the national health care system, had prescribed buprenorphine as a first-time prescription and 40% of FPs do not follow up patients on buprenorphine. In terms of compliance with the guidelines, 55% of FPs gave theoretical answers that only partially complied with the guidelines. The variations in compliance with the guidelines was noted according to different variables and took into particular account whether the physician were affiliated to a network or in training. PMID:26479400

  3. Ethical Dilemmas in Office Practice: Physician Response and Rationale

    PubMed Central

    Secundy, Marian Gray

    1985-01-01

    A survey of black and white family physicians in the District of Columbia is described. The survey provides insight into decision-making processes and the ability to recognize ethical dilemmas in medical practice. Comments were elicited to hypothetical case vignettes typical of ethical conflict in office practice. Findings note physician ability to recognize ethical dilemmas in day-to-day aspects of medical practice. Methods of decision making and rationale for decisions made, however, appear to be inconsistent, nonuniversal, and individualistic without evidence of specific models or criteria. No significant differences were noted between black and white physicians. The need in physician training for clarification and development of criteria is evident. PMID:4078929

  4. Electronic health records: postadoption physician satisfaction and continued use.

    PubMed

    Wright, Edward; Marvel, Jon

    2012-01-01

    One goal of public-policy makers in general and health care managers in particular is the adoption and efficient utilization of electronic health record (EHR) systems throughout the health care industry. Consequently, this investigation focused on the effects of known antecedents of technology adoption on physician satisfaction with EHR technology and the continued use of such systems. The American Academy of Family Physicians provided support in the survey of 453 physicians regarding their satisfaction with their EHR use experience. A conceptual model merging technology adoption and computer user satisfaction models was tested using structural equation modeling. Results indicate that effort expectancy (ease of use) has the most substantive effect on physician satisfaction and the continued use of EHR systems. As such, health care managers should be especially sensitive to the user and computer interface of prospective EHR systems to avoid costly and disruptive system selection mistakes.

  5. In vivo office-based dynamic imaging of vocal cords in awake patients with swept-source optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lingfeng; Liu, Gangjun; Rubinstein, Marc; Saidi, Arya; Guo, Shuguang; Wong, Brian J. F.; Chen, Zhongping

    2009-02-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an evolving noninvasive imaging modality and has been used to image the human larynx during surgical endoscopy. The design of a long GRIN lens based probe capable of capturing images of the human larynx by use of swept-source OCT during a typical office-based laryngoscopy examination is presented. In vivo OCT imaging of the human larynx is demonstrated with 40 fame/second. Dynamic vibration of the vocal folds is recorded to provide not only high-resolution cross-sectional tissue structures but also vibration parameters, such as the vibration frequency and magnitude of the vocal cord, which provide important information for clinical diagnosis and treatment, as well as in fundamental research of the voice. Office-based OCT is a promising imaging modality to study the larynx.

  6. An ongoing six-year innovative osteoporosis disease management program: challenges and success in an IPA physician group environment.

    PubMed

    Woo, Ann; Hittell, Jodi; Beardsley, Carrie; Noh, Charles; Stoukides, Cheryl A; Kaul, Alan F

    2004-01-01

    The goal of this ongoing comprehensive osteoporosis disease management initiative is to provide the adult primary care physicians' (PCPs) offices with a program enabling them to systematically identify and manage their population for osteoporosis. For over six years, Hill Physicians Medical Group (Hill Physicians) has implemented multiple strategies to develop a best practice for identifying and treating members who were candidates for osteoporosis therapy. Numerous tools were used to support this disease management effort, including: evidence-based clinical practice guidelines, patient education sessions, the Simple Calculated Osteoporosis Risk Estimation (SCORE) questionnaire tool, member specific reports for PCPs, targeted member mailings, office-based Peripheral Instantaneous X-ray Imaging (PIXI) test and counseling, dual x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) scan guidelines, and web-based Electronic Simple Calculated Osteoporosis Risk Estimation (eSCORE) questionnaire tools. Hill Physicians tabulated results for patients who completed 2649 SCORE tests, screened 978 patients with PIXI tests, and identified 338 osteopenic and 124 osteoporotic patients. The preliminary results of this unique six-year ongoing educational initiative are slow but promising. New physician offices express interest in participating and those offices that have participated in the program continue to screen for osteoporosis. Hill Physicians' message is consistent and is communicated to the physicians repeatedly in different ways in accordance with the principles of educational outreach. Physicians who have conducted the program have positive feedback from their patients and office staff and have begun to communicate their experience to their peers.

  7. Ethics, economics, and physician reimbursement.

    PubMed

    Baily, Mary Ann

    2004-09-01

    There has been much debate among health care professionals over how physicians should be paid for their services. This paper addresses the topic through an economic and ethical analysis. It starts from the premise that fairness and cost effectiveness should be the goals of a good physician reimbursement system. Using the goals of fairness and cost effectiveness as measures, it examines the current market model. Finding that the current model provides neither fairness nor cost effectiveness, the paper compares the structure of the physician services market to the assumptions made by economists in the idealized market model. Two major imperfections are found in the former. These imperfections are an asymmetry in information between patient and physician, and the uneven and unpredictable distribution of health needs. These two imperfections are examined in light of the goals set out in the beginning of the paper. The paper finds that, given the imperfections, physician reimbursement as it currently exists is incompatible with the goals of fairness and cost effectiveness. In conclusion, several recommendations are made, most significantly a broadening of the interpretation of physician agency, i.e., physician as "agent," and the switch from a fee-for-service physician payment system to a salaried medical practice.

  8. Abortion and compelled physician speech.

    PubMed

    Orentlicher, David

    2015-01-01

    Informed consent mandates for abortion providers may infringe the First Amendment's freedom of speech. On the other hand, they may reinforce the physician's duty to obtain informed consent. Courts can promote both doctrines by ensuring that compelled physician speech pertains to medical facts about abortion rather than abortion ideology and that compelled speech is truthful and not misleading.

  9. Physician Requirements-1990. For Cardiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tracy, Octavious; Birchette-Pierce, Cheryl

    Professional requirements for physicians specializing in cardiology were estimated to assist policymakers in developing guidelines for graduate medical education. The determination of physician requirements was based on an adjusted needs rather than a demand or utilization model. For each illness, manpower requirements were modified by the…

  10. Communicating Drug Information to Physicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, Colman M.; Rodowskas, Christopher A.

    1976-01-01

    Reviews the studies of researchers who have attempted to identify the sources of drug information, both professional and commercial, utilized by physicians, discussing relationship between physicians' sources and the choice of drugs and severity of conditions being treated. Also notes new sources of drug information being considered by the Food…

  11. How consumers view physician advertising.

    PubMed

    Johns, H E; Moser, H R

    1989-01-01

    In this study, it was found that consumers generally favor advertising by physicians. They felt that newspaper and professional magazines were more appropriate media for such advertising than television, radio, billboards, telephones, direct mail, and popular magazines. Finally, most consumers have not seen physicians advertise, but of those who have, most have noticed such advertising in a newspaper.

  12. Effect of lidocaine spray in pain management during office-based endometrial sampling: A randomised placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Aksoy, H; Aksoy, U; Ozyurt, S; Acmaz, G; Babayigit, M A; Yücel, B; Aydin, T

    2016-01-01

    Office-based endometrial sampling is the most frequently performed gynaecological procedure. The procedure is usually associated with pain and discomfort. Several anaesthetic and analgesic techniques (e.g., non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, paracervical block, misoprostol and topical anaesthetics) are used for pain management during endometrial sampling. There is no comprehensive study using lidocaine in spray form; we sought to investigate the analgesic efficacy of 10% lidocaine spray in patients undergoing office-based endometrial biopsy. We conducted a prospective, randomised (lidocaine spray (n = 60) and placebo (n = 60), respectively), double-blind study. The mean pain score during procedure was 3.51 ± 1.51 in the lidocaine spray group and 5.11 ± 1.66 in the placebo group. Lidocaine spray treatment significantly lowered the pain scores compared with placebo (p < 0.001). Lidocaine spray can be accepted as a non-invasive, easy to apply and more comfortable anaesthetic method for office-based endometrial sampling.

  13. Office-Based Intracordal Hyaluronate Injections Improve Quality of Life in Thoracic-Surgery-Related Unilateral Vocal Fold Paralysis.

    PubMed

    Fang, Tuan-Jen; Hsin, Li-Jen; Chung, Hsiu-Feng; Chiang, Hui-Chen; Li, Hsueh-Yu; Wong, Alice M K; Pei, Yu-Chen

    2015-10-01

    Thoracic-surgery-related unilateral vocal fold paralysis (UVFP) may cause severe morbidity and can cause profound functional impairment and psychosocial stress in patients with pre-existing thoracic diseases. In-office intracordal hyaluronate (HA) injections have recently been applied to improve voice and quality of life in patients with vocal incompetence, but their effect on thoracic-surgery-related UVFP remains inconclusive. We therefore conducted a prospective study to clarify the effect of early HA injection on voice and quality of life in patients with thoracic-surgery-related UVFP. Patients with UVFP within 3 months after thoracic surgery who received office-based HA injection were recruited. Quantitative laryngeal electromyography, videolaryngostroboscopy, voice-related life quality (voice outcome survey), laboratory voice analysis, and health-related quality of life (SF-36) were evaluated at baseline, and at 1 month postinjection. A total of 104 consecutive patients accepted office-based HA intracordal injection during the study period, 34 of whom were treated in relation to thoracic surgery and were eligible for inclusion. Voice-related life quality, voice laboratory analysis, and most generic quality of life domains were significantly improved at 1 month after in-office HA intracordal injection. No HA-related complications were reported. Single office-based HA intracordal injection is a safe and effective treatment for thoracic-surgery-related UVFP, resulting in immediate improvements in patient quality of life, voice quality, and swallowing ability.

  14. Office-Based Intracordal Hyaluronate Injections Improve Quality of Life in Thoracic-Surgery-Related Unilateral Vocal Fold Paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Tuan-Jen; Hsin, Li-Jen; Chung, Hsiu-Feng; Chiang, Hui-Chen; Li, Hsueh-Yu; Wong, Alice M.K.; Pei, Yu-Chen

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Thoracic-surgery-related unilateral vocal fold paralysis (UVFP) may cause severe morbidity and can cause profound functional impairment and psychosocial stress in patients with pre-existing thoracic diseases. In-office intracordal hyaluronate (HA) injections have recently been applied to improve voice and quality of life in patients with vocal incompetence, but their effect on thoracic-surgery-related UVFP remains inconclusive. We therefore conducted a prospective study to clarify the effect of early HA injection on voice and quality of life in patients with thoracic-surgery-related UVFP. Patients with UVFP within 3 months after thoracic surgery who received office-based HA injection were recruited. Quantitative laryngeal electromyography, videolaryngostroboscopy, voice-related life quality (voice outcome survey), laboratory voice analysis, and health-related quality of life (SF-36) were evaluated at baseline, and at 1 month postinjection. A total of 104 consecutive patients accepted office-based HA intracordal injection during the study period, 34 of whom were treated in relation to thoracic surgery and were eligible for inclusion. Voice-related life quality, voice laboratory analysis, and most generic quality of life domains were significantly improved at 1 month after in-office HA intracordal injection. No HA-related complications were reported. Single office-based HA intracordal injection is a safe and effective treatment for thoracic-surgery-related UVFP, resulting in immediate improvements in patient quality of life, voice quality, and swallowing ability. PMID:26448034

  15. Nutrition Education for Physicians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lasswell, Anita B.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    A study of three hospitals' family medicine residents' knowledge of and interest in nutrition education revealed large gaps in residents' knowledge of nutritional aspects of certain conditions likely to arise in general practice. Previous medical school nutrition courses had little influence on residents' perceived knowledge. (MSE)

  16. Physician Labor Market in Croatia

    PubMed Central

    Bagat, Mario; Sekelj Kauzlarić, Katarina

    2006-01-01

    Aim To analyze the physician labor market in Croatia with respect to the internship and employment opportunities, Croatian needs for physicians and specialists, and trends in physician labor market in the European Union (EU) in the context of EU enlargement. Methods Data were collected from the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare, the Croatian Employment Service, and the Croatian Institute for Public Health. We compared the number of physicians waiting for internship before and 14 months after the implementation of the State Program for Intern Employment Stimulation. Also, the number of employed specialists in internal medicine, general surgery, gynecology and obstetrics, and pediatrics was compared with estimated number of specialists that will have been needed by the end of 2007. Average age of hospital physicians in the four specialties was determined and the number of Croatian physicians compared with the number of physicians in EU countries. Results The number of unemployed physicians waiting for internship decreased from 335 in 2003 to 82 in 2004, while a total number of unemployed physicians decreased from 436 to 379 (χ2 = 338, P<0.001). In October 2004, 79.3% of unemployed physicians waited for internship <6 months; of them, 89.2% waited for internship <3 months. In February 2005, 365 unemployed physicians were registered at the Croatian Employment Service and that number has been decreasing in the last couple of years. The number of employed specialists was lower than the estimated number of specialists needed in the analyzed specialists, as defined by the prescribed standards. A shortage of 328 internists, 319 surgeons, 209 gynecologists, and 69 pediatricians in Croatian hospitals is expected in 2007. Conclusion The lack of employment incentive seems to be the main reason for the large number of unemployed physicians waiting for internship before the implementation of the Employment Stimulation Program. According to the number of physicians per 100

  17. Minnesota physician workforce analysis: rural supply and demand.

    PubMed

    Buck, Sally T; Trauba, Vicki; Christensen, Raymond G

    2004-09-01

    Considering the physician supply in 2002, the potential number of new physicians, and the number of vacancies that year, rural Minnesota has shortages in the following specialties: family practice, internal medicine, obstetrics/gynecology, pediatrics, general surgery, gastroenterology, ophthalmology, orthopedic surgery, otolaryngology, psychiatry, and urology. Metropolitan areas have fewer shortages; however, there is a gap between supply and demand in obstetrics/gynecology, gastroenterology, general surgery, otolaryngology, and urology. Future areas of concern for all parts of the state include family practice, internal medicine, obstetrics/gynecology, pediatrics, cardiology, general surgery, psychiatry, ophthalmology, orthopedic surgery, and urology. In Minnesota, with several specialties facing a substantial number of retirements in the next 10 years, the number of new physicians completing graduate medical education remaining steady or declining, and the population growing--especially among people ages 65 to 84, the current shortages may increase, and additional specialties may experience a gap if the supply is not increased.

  18. Preventive Medicine and the Family

    PubMed Central

    Christie-Seely, Janet

    1981-01-01

    Studies have demonstrated the links between the family system and illness, emphasizing the importance of prevention on a family level for physical as well as psychological illness. Brief preventive counselling on routine visits is possible if the physician knows the family well and understands the principles of the family as a system. Periods of high risk when illness and family dysfunction increase in incidence are the normal “crises” of the family life cycle, medical crises of illness, hospitalization and death, and non-medical crises. High-risk families should be identified; secondary prevention is an important role for the family physician who sees family problems at a much earlier stage than the psychiatrist or marital or family therapist. PMID:21289689

  19. Gender and the professional career of primary care physicians in Andalusia (Spain)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Although the proportion of women in medicine is growing, female physicians continue to be disadvantaged in professional activities. The purpose of the study was to determine and compare the professional activities of female and male primary care physicians in Andalusia and to assess the effect of the health center on the performance of these activities. Methods Descriptive, cross-sectional, and multicenter study. Setting: Spain. Participants: Population: urban health centers and their physicians. Sample: 88 health centers and 500 physicians. Independent variable: gender. Measurements: Control variables: age, postgraduate family medicine specialty (FMS), patient quota, patients/day, hours/day housework from Monday to Friday, idem weekend, people at home with special care, and family situation. Dependent variables: 24 professional activities in management, teaching, research, and the scientific community. Self-administered questionnaire. Descriptive, bivariate, and multilevel logistic regression analyses. Results Response: 73.6%. Female physicians: 50.8%. Age: female physicians, 49.1 ± 4.3 yrs; male physicians, 51.3 ± 4.9 yrs (p < 0.001). Female physicians with FMS: 44.2%, male physicians with FMS: 33.3% (p < 0.001). Female physicians dedicated more hours to housework and more frequently lived alone versus male physicians. There were no differences in healthcare variables. Thirteen of the studied activities were less frequently performed by female physicians, indicating their lesser visibility in the production and diffusion of scientific knowledge. Performance of the majority of professional activities was independent of the health center in which the physician worked. Conclusions There are gender inequities in the development of professional activities in urban health centers in Andalusia, even after controlling for family responsibilities, work load, and the effect of the health center, which was important in only a few of the activities under study

  20. Barriers to Office-Based Mental Health Care and Interest in E-Communication With Providers: A Survey Study

    PubMed Central

    Vigod, Simone N

    2016-01-01

    Background With rising availability and use of Internet and mobile technology in society, the demand and need for its integration into health care is growing. Despite great potential within mental health care and growing uptake, there is still little evidence to guide how these tools should be integrated into traditional care, and for whom. Objective To examine factors that might inform how e-communication should be implemented in our local outpatient mental health program, including barriers to traditional office-based care, patient preferences, and patient concerns. Methods We conducted a survey in the waiting room of our outpatient mental health program located in an urban, academic ambulatory hospital. The survey assessed (1) age, mobile phone ownership, and general e-communication usage, (2) barriers to attending office-based appointments, (3) preferences for, and interest in, e-communication for mental health care, and (4) concerns about e-communication use for mental health care. We analyzed the data descriptively and examined associations between the presence of barriers, identifying as a social media user, and interest level in e-communication. Results Respondents (N=68) were predominantly in the age range of 25-54 years. The rate of mobile phone ownership was 91% (62/68), and 59% (40/68) of respondents identified as social media users. There was very low existing use of e-communication between providers and patients, with high levels of interest endorsed by survey respondents. Respondents expressed an interest in using e-communication with their provider to share updates and get feedback, coordinate care, and get general information. In regression analysis, both a barrier to care and identifying as a social media user were significantly associated with e-communication interest (P=.03 and P=.003, respectively). E-communication interest was highest among people who both had a barrier to office-based care and were a social media user. Despite high interest

  1. Recovering from Opioid Overdose: Resources for Overdose Survivors & Family Members

    MedlinePlus

    ... survivors and their families can be found at: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)  National Helpline ... treatment/ physician- program- data/ treatment- physician- locator  State Substance Abuse Agencies: https: / / findtreatment. samhsa. gov/ TreatmentLocator/ faces/ about. ...

  2. A Cooperative Education Program for Nurse Practitioners/Physician's Assistants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fowkes, Virginia; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Traditionally, nurse practitioners and physician's assistants have been trained separately. In l977, the Family Nurse Practitioner Program at the University of California, Davis, and the Primary Care Associate Program at Stanford University merged clinical curricula. The cooperative program is described and its first year evaluated. (Author/JMD)

  3. Online PTSD Diagnosis and Treatment Training for Primary Care Physicians

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    day retention in knowledge and comfort with PTSD-related skills, we did not assess for long - term impact of the training, nor did we audit 13...SUBJECT TERMS Posttraumatic stress disorder, primary care, web-based training, medical education 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION...Eligible participants were English -speaking PCPs, including licensed physicians (internists, family practitioners, pediatricians), nurse practitioners

  4. Physician Attitudes Regarding School-Located Vaccination Clinics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fiala, Steven C.; Cieslak, Paul R.; DeBess, Emilio E.; Young, Collette M.; Winthrop, Kevin L.; Stevenson, Ellen B.

    2013-01-01

    Background: School-located vaccination clinics offer an opportunity to target children for vaccination programs during communicable disease outbreaks. However, children in the United States are primarily vaccinated in the pediatrician's or family physician's office, and the concept of school-located vaccinations may be unfamiliar to some parents…

  5. Physician Educational Needs in Osteoporosis: An Approach to Needs Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockyer, Jocelyn; Hanley, David; Fidler, Herta; Toews, John; Lysholm-Andrews, Elaine

    1998-01-01

    A literature review, focus groups (n=200), and questionnaire responses from 324 family physicians identified their learning needs related to osteoporosis. The three methods identified different learning issues, suggesting the importance of triangulation to ensure currency and relevance in continuing-education needs-assessment. (SK)

  6. Getting into the System: The Physician's Staff and Waiting Room

    PubMed Central

    1976-01-01

    This article represents a panel discussion with the staff of the Family Practice Unit at the Plains Health Centre, Regina, Sask. It outlines those things found helpful in presenting a positive image to the patient by a physician and his staff - telephone contacts, waiting rooms, patient flow, and common complaints. PMID:21308056

  7. A Continuing Medical Education Course for Physicians and Mid-Level Practitioners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burr, Bill D.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    An expanded concept of continuing medical education (CME) is reported that fills the needs of both physicians and mid-level practitioners (nurse practitioners or physician's assistants). The Family Practice Refresher Course sponsored by the University of California, Davis, School of Medicine and its evaluation are described. (LBH)

  8. Title VII Funding and Physician Practice in Rural or Low-Income Areas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krist, Alex H.; Johnson, Robert E.; Callahan, David; Woolf, Steven H.; Marsland, David

    2005-01-01

    Whether Title VII funding enhances physician supply in underserved areas has not clearly been established. The purpose was to determine the relation between Title VII funding in medical school, residency, or both, and the number of family physicians practicing in rural or low-income communities. A retrospective cross sectional analysis was carried…

  9. Effects of a Distance Learning Program on Physicians' Opioid- and Benzodiazepine-Prescribing Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Midmer, Deana; Kahan, Meldon; Marlow, Bernard

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: Opioid misuse is common among patients with chronic nonmalignant pain. There is a pressing need for physicians to increase their confidence and competence in managing these patients. Methods: A randomized controlled trial of family physicians (N = 88) attending 1 of 4 continuing medical education events helped to determine the…

  10. Effect of Physician Tutorials on Prescribing Patterns of Graduate Physicians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Lawrence E.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Physicians in an experimental group were surveyed to assess their knowledge of the effectiveness, cost, and side effects of antibiotics, and a tutorial was developed to modify some prescribing patterns. Prescribing patterns were statistically different. (Author/MLW)

  11. Multispecialty physician networks in Ontario

    PubMed Central

    Stukel, Therese A; Glazier, Richard H; Schultz, Susan E; Guan, Jun; Zagorski, Brandon M; Gozdyra, Peter; Henry, David A

    2013-01-01

    Background Large multispecialty physician group practices, with a central role for primary care practitioners, have been shown to achieve high-quality, low-cost care for patients with chronic disease. We assessed the extent to which informal multispecialty physician networks in Ontario could be identified by using health administrative data to exploit natural linkages among patients, physicians, and hospitals based on existing patient flow. Methods We linked each Ontario resident to his or her usual provider of primary care over the period from fiscal year 2008/2009 to fiscal year 2010/2011. We linked each specialist to the hospital where he or she performed the most inpatient services. We linked each primary care physician to the hospital where most of his or her ambulatory patients were admitted for non-maternal medical care. Each resident was then linked to the same hospital as his or her usual provider of primary care. We computed “loyalty” as the proportion of care to network residents provided by physicians and hospitals within their network. Smaller clusters were aggregated to create networks based on a minimum population size, distance, and loyalty. Networks were not constrained geographically. Results We identified 78 multispecialty physician networks, comprising 12 410 primary care physicians, 14 687 specialists, and 175 acute care hospitals serving a total of 12 917 178 people. Median network size was 134 723 residents, 125 primary care physicians, and 143 specialists. Virtually all eligible residents were linked to a usual provider of primary care and to a network. Most specialists (93.5%) and primary care physicians (98.2%) were linked to a hospital. Median network physician loyalty was 68.4% for all physician visits and 81.1% for primary care visits. Median non-maternal admission loyalty was 67.4%. Urban networks had lower loyalties and were less self-contained but had more health care resources. Interpretation We demonstrated the feasibility

  12. [Legal Analysis of the Implementation Rules of Delegation of Home Visits by Family Doctors to Non-Physician Health Professionals: Is the Implementation in Accordance with the Intention of the Law?

    PubMed

    Ruppel, T; van den Berg, N; Hoffmann, W

    2016-10-01

    Objective: Triggered by the AGnES model project of the University Medicine Greifswald, the Code of Social Law V was changed by the German Lower and Upper House of Parliament (Bundestag and Bundesrat) in 2008 so that the delegation of GP's activities to non-physician colleagues was allowed under highly restricted preconditions. Delegated home visits should become an integral part of the standard care in Germany. In this study, the implementation of § 87 para 2b clause 5 SGB V, established in Annex 8 of the Federal Collective Agreement, was checked for its legality in terms of qualification. Methods: The problem was checked with the legal methods of interpretation in pursuance of the norm and the methods of systematic, historic and teleologic interpretation. Results: Even though the Parliament clearly required orientation to the AGnES model project (in order to assure safety and effective care of delegated home visits), self-management in the implementation of the law remained far behind these guidelines. The main outcome of the legal analysis was that the implementation arrangements of the Code of Social Law V are predominantly illegal. Conclusions: The parties of the Federal Collective Agreement have to change the arrangements to meet the requirements of the Parliament and to avoid risks of liability for delegating GPs.

  13. Physician wellness: a missing quality indicator.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Jean E; Lemaire, Jane B; Ghali, William A

    2009-11-14

    When physicians are unwell, the performance of health-care systems can be suboptimum. Physician wellness might not only benefit the individual physician, it could also be vital to the delivery of high-quality health care. We review the work stresses faced by physicians, the barriers to attending to wellness, and the consequences of unwell physicians to the individual and to health-care systems. We show that health systems should routinely measure physician wellness, and discuss the challenges associated with implementation.

  14. The difficult doctor? Characteristics of physicians who report frustration with patients: an analysis of survey data

    PubMed Central

    Krebs, Erin E; Garrett, Joanne M; Konrad, Thomas R

    2006-01-01

    Background Literature on difficult doctor-patient relationships has focused on the "difficult patient." Our objective was to determine physician and practice characteristics associated with greater physician-reported frustration with patients. Methods We conducted a secondary analysis of the Physicians Worklife Survey, which surveyed a random national sample of physicians. Participants were 1391 family medicine, general internal medicine, and medicine subspecialty physicians. The survey assessed physician and practice characteristics, including stress, depression and anxiety symptoms, practice setting, work hours, case-mix, and control over administrative and clinical practice. Physicians estimated the percentage of their patients who were "generally frustrating to deal with." We categorized physicians by quartile of reported frustrating patients and compared characteristics of physicians in the top quartile to those in the other three quartiles. We used logistic regression to model physician characteristics associated with greater frustration. Results In unadjusted analyses, physicians who reported high frustration with patients were younger (p < 0.001); worked more hours per week (p = 0.041); and had more symptoms of depression, stress, and anxiety (p < 0.004 for all). In the final model, factors independently associated with high frustration included age < 40 years, work hours > 55 per week, higher stress, practice in a medicine subspeciality, and greater number of patients with psychosocial problems or substance abuse. Conclusion Personal and practice characteristics of physicians who report high frustration with patients differ from those of other physicians. Understanding factors contributing to physician frustration with patients may allow us to improve the quality of patient-physician relationships. PMID:17026762

  15. An empirical analysis of consumers' attitudes toward physicians' advertising.

    PubMed

    Moser, H

    2008-01-01

    Advertising by physicians is a relatively recent phenomenon. Historically, most professions prohibited licensed members from engaging in speech activities that proposed a commercial transaction-advertising. However the history of a physician's legal right to advertise is not the main focus of this article. A brief review of the past, present, and possible future of such rights might assist readers in understanding the revolutionary constitutional and commercial speech changes that have occurred over the past three decades. A physician's legal right to advertise has developed as part of the evolutionary interpretation of the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution. The purposes of this study were to determine (a) consumers' attitudes toward advertising by physicians and (b) whether city of residence, occupation, age, sex, race, marital status, number of children in household, total family household income, and education of the consumer accounted for any significant difference in attitude toward physicians who advertise. The intent was to discover information that would be useful to physicians in planning marketing strategies and improving the quality of their advertising. The study seems to confirm the belief of many marketing professionals that advertising and marketing clearly have a place in the future of health care services.

  16. Comparative Analysis: Potential Barriers to Career Participation by North American Physicians in Global Health

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Daniel S.; Heckman, Jennifer E.

    2014-01-01

    Physician interest in global health, particularly among family physicians, is reflected by an increasing proliferation of field training and service experiences. However, translating initial training involvement into a defined and sustainable global health career remains difficult and beset by numerous barriers. Existing global health literature has largely examined training experiences and related ethical considerations while neglecting the role of career development in global health. To explore this, this paper extrapolates potential barriers to global health career involvement from existing literature and compares these to salary and skills requirements for archetypal physician positions in global health, presenting a framework of possible barriers to sustained physician participation in global health work. Notable barriers identified include financial limitations, scheduling conflicts, security/family concerns, skills limitations, limited awareness of opportunities, and specialty choice, with family practice often closely aligned with global health experience. Proposed solutions include financial support, protected time, family relocation support, and additional training. This framework delineates barriers to career involvement in global health by physicians. Further research regarding these barriers as well as potential solutions may help direct policy and initiatives to better utilize physicians, particularly family physicians, as a valuable global health human resource. PMID:25405030

  17. Role of the Physician Anesthesiologist

    MedlinePlus

    ... range of knowledge about medications and how the human body works and responds to the stress of surgery at all stages of a procedure. Think of physician anesthesiologists as your seat belt during ...

  18. Medicare physician payments and spending.

    PubMed

    Dummit, Laura A

    2006-10-09

    The Medicare program's physician payment method is intended to control spending while ensuring beneficiary access to physician services, but there are signs that it may not be working. The physician's role in the health care delivery system as the primary source of information and treatment options, together with growing demand for services and the imperfect state of knowledge about appropriate service use, challenge Medicare's ability to achieve these two goals. This issue brief describes the history of physician spending and the contribution of escalating service use and intensity of services to the rise in Medicare outlays, setting the stage for further discussion about the use of the Medicare payment system to control spending and ensure access.

  19. ERISA litigation and physician autonomy.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, P D; Pomfret, S D

    2000-02-16

    The Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA), enacted in 1974 to regulate pension and health benefit plans, is a complex statute that dominates the managed care environment. Physicians must understand ERISA's role in the relationship between themselves and managed care organizations (MCOs), including how it can influence clinical decision making and physician autonomy. This article describes ERISA's central provisions and how ERISA influences health care delivery in MCOs. We analyze ERISA litigation trends in 4 areas: professional liability, utilization management, state legislative initiatives, and compensation arrangements. This analysis demonstrates how courts have interpreted ERISA to limit physician autonomy and subordinate clinical decision making to MCOs' cost containment decisions. Physicians should support efforts to amend ERISA, thus allowing greater state regulatory oversight of MCOs and permitting courts to hold MCOs accountable for their role in medical decision making.

  20. Family Medicine Specialty in Singapore

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Santosh Lional

    2013-01-01

    Family Medicine in Singapore has its roots in a generalist ethos and found its origin as a counter culture movement to the increasing sub-specialisation of medicine which resulted in a complex healthcare system where that patients are often cared for by multiple specialists potentially resulting in fragmentation of care. The aim of the discipline of Family Medicine was to train and develop more generalist physicians so as to promote holistic care. Family physicians are the largest pool of generalists who are trained to provide general medical care to patients in the context of the person, the family and the community that they live in. PMID:24479066

  1. [Dangerous liaisons--physicians and pharmaceutical sales representatives].

    PubMed

    Granja, Mónica

    2005-01-01

    Interactions between physicians and detailers (even when legitimate ones) raise scientific and ethical questions. In Portugal little thinking and discussion has been done on the subject and the blames for bribery have monopolized the media. This work intended to review what has been said in medical literature about these interactions. How do physicians see themselves when interacting with pharmaceutical companies and their representatives? Do these companies in fact change their prescriptive behaviour, and, if so, how do they change it? How can physicians interact with detailers and still keep their best practice? A Medline research, from 1966 till 2002, was performed using the key-words as follows. A database similar to Medline but concerning medical journals published in Portugal, Index das Revistas Médicas Portuguesas, was also researched from 1992 to 2002. Pharmaceutical companies are profit bound and they allot promoting activities, and detailing in particular, huge amounts of money. Most physicians hold firmly to the belief that they are able to resist and not be influenced by drug companies promotion activities. Nevertheless, all previous works on literature tell us the opposite. Market research also indicates that detailers effectively promote drug sales. Various works also suggest that the information detailers provide to physicians may be largely incorrect, even comparing it to the written information provided by the pharmaceutical companies they work for. The frequency at which portuguese physicians (especially family physicians) contact with pharmaceutical sales representatives is higher than the frequency reported in countries where the available studies come from (namely, Canada and the United States of America). This may put portuguese physicians at a higher risk, making it imperative that work and wide debate are initiated among the class.

  2. [Sleep disorders among physicians on shift work].

    PubMed

    Schlafer, O; Wenzel, V; Högl, B

    2014-11-01

    Sleep disorders in physicians who perform shift work can result in increased risks of health problems that negatively impact performance and patient safety. Even those who cope well with shift work are likely to suffer from sleep disorders. The aim of this manuscript is to discuss possible causes, contributing factors and consequences of sleep disorders in physicians and to identify measures that can improve adaptation to shift work and treatment strategies for shift work-associated sleep disorders. The risk factors that influence the development of sleep disorders in physicians are numerous and include genetic factors (15 % of the population), age (> 50 years), undiagnosed sleep apnea,, alcohol abuse as well as multiple stress factors inherent in clinical duties (including shift work), research, teaching and family obligations. Several studies have reported an increased risk for medical errors in sleep-deprived physicians. Shift workers have an increased risk for psychiatric and cardiovascular diseases and shift work may also be a contributing factor to cancer. A relationship has been reported not only with sleep deprivation and changes in food intake but also with diabetes mellitus, obesity, hypertension and coronary heart disease. Nicotine and alcohol consumption are more frequent among shift workers. Increased sickness and accident rates among physicians when commuting (especially after night shifts) have a socioeconomic impact. In order to reduce fatigue and to improve performance, short naps during shiftwork or naps plus caffeine, have been proposed as coping strategies; however, napping during adverse circadian phases is less effective, if not impossible when unable to fall asleep. Bright and blue light supports alertness during a night shift. After shiftwork, direct sunlight exposure to the retina can be avoided by using dark sunglasses or glasses with orange lenses for commuting home. The home environment for daytime sleeping after a night shift should be

  3. Physician Satisfaction With Integrated Behavioral Health in Pediatric Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Hine, Jeffrey F; Grennan, Allison Q; Menousek, Kathryn M; Robertson, Gail; Valleley, Rachel J; Evans, Joseph H

    2017-04-01

    As the benefits of integrated behavioral health care services are becoming more widely recognized, this study investigated physician satisfaction with ongoing integrated psychology services in pediatric primary care clinics. Data were collected across 5 urban and 6 rural clinics and demonstrated the specific factors that physicians view as assets to having efficient access to a pediatric behavioral health practitioner. Results indicated significant satisfaction related to quality and continuity of care and improved access to services. Such models of care may increase access to care and reduce other service barriers encountered by individuals and their families with behavioral health concerns (ie, those who otherwise would seek services through referrals to traditional tertiary care facilities).

  4. Office-based nursing staff management of hypertension in primary care.

    PubMed

    Gindlesberger, Danielle R

    2012-08-01

    A family medicine practice in a large multi-specialty clinic undertook a quality improvement initiative focusing on blood pressure control. Current rooming procedures were reviewed, including obtaining accurate and reliable blood pressures. All rooming staff were instructed how to take an accurate blood pressure and were observed at random over a 3-month period to ensure continued accuracy. Rooming staff (medical assistants and licensed practical nurses) were engaged to give patient education and to arrange a standard 2-week follow-up with a rooming staff team member (nurse visit) if the patient's blood pressure was elevated. Clinicians were educated briefly about the importance of managing hypertension regardless of reason for visit. Blood pressure control (<140/90) in patients age 18-85 without diabetes improved from 68.4% to 75.8% in 3 months.

  5. Family Exercise: Designing a Program to Fit Everyone.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sallis, James F.; Nader, Philip R.

    1990-01-01

    Discusses ways physicians can develop family exercise programs for patients, with recommendations for preparing families to exercise and maintain physical activity at all levels. Family exercise lets people spend time together with mutual support that helps them make long-term commitments to fitness. The physician's role is to support that…

  6. Use of personal computers, electronic medical records and availability of Internet among office based GPs and internists in Austrian province of Styria.

    PubMed

    Rakovac, Ivo; Seereiner, Sabine; Ratz, Birgit; Habacher, Wolfgang; Pieber, Thomas R; Beck, Peter

    2008-11-06

    We conducted a survey of personal computer (PC), electronic medical record (EMR) usage, and Internet accessibility among Austrian office based general practitioners and internists. PCs were available to 97% of responders, and among PC users, 91% used EMRs.

  7. Assessing Postpartum Family Functioning

    PubMed Central

    Midmer, Deana; Talbot, Yves

    1988-01-01

    The birth of a child requires adaptation and reorganization within the family system in order to accommodate the new family member and to allow the family to continue in its psychosocial development. Knowledge of the normative and transitional changes required at this stage of family life will enhance family practitioners' understanding of some of the common concerns and complaints related to them by various family members during the postpartum period. The Family FIRO model represents a helpful conceptual framework to increase the family physician's understanding of the issues of inclusion, control, and intimacy that are highlighted during the transition to parenthood. The authors briefly present this model and discuss its application to postpartum adjustment and its implications for health-care professionals. PMID:21253238

  8. Outcomes of a Pilot Hand Hygiene Randomized Cluster Trial to Reduce Communicable Infections Among US Office-Based Employees

    PubMed Central

    DuBois, Cathy L.Z.; Grey, Scott F.; Kingsbury, Diana M.; Shakya, Sunita; Scofield, Jennifer; Slenkovich, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effectiveness of an office-based multimodal hand hygiene improvement intervention in reducing self-reported communicable infections and work-related absence. Methods: A randomized cluster trial including an electronic training video, hand sanitizer, and educational posters (n = 131, intervention; n = 193, control). Primary outcomes include (1) self-reported acute respiratory infections (ARIs)/influenza-like illness (ILI) and/or gastrointestinal (GI) infections during the prior 30 days; and (2) related lost work days. Incidence rate ratios calculated using generalized linear mixed models with a Poisson distribution, adjusted for confounders and random cluster effects. Results: A 31% relative reduction in self-reported combined ARI-ILI/GI infections (incidence rate ratio: 0.69; 95% confidence interval, 0.49 to 0.98). A 21% nonsignificant relative reduction in lost work days. Conclusions: An office-based multimodal hand hygiene improvement intervention demonstrated a substantive reduction in self-reported combined ARI-ILI/GI infections. PMID:25719534

  9. Physician recruitment success: how to acquire top physician talent.

    PubMed

    Rosman, Judy

    2011-01-01

    This article provides step-by-step instructions on how to complete the strategic planning needed to ensure success in physician recruitment efforts, outlines how to build a successful recruitment team, and provides helpful advice to avoid common recruiting mistakes that can sabotage the recruitment efforts of even the best practices. This article discusses the role of the in-house hospital recruiter in the recruitment process, how to evaluate independent search firms, how to make use of the physicians in your group to ensure success during a site visit, and how to ensure that your new hire will be able to successfully develop a practice. The article also discusses how to find and use benchmarking data to ensure that your compensation package is competitive, and provides advice on how to help your new physician hit the ground running.

  10. Find a Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation Physician

    MedlinePlus

    ... Physiatry About AAPM&R Loading Find a PM&R Physician Welcome to Find a PM&R Physician, ... Find Physicians by Name Loading FieldSet Find PM&R Physicians Near Me Starting Zip/Postal Code Distance ( ...

  11. Physician Perspectives on Comparative Effectiveness Research: Implications for Practice-based Evidence.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Beverly A; Chesney, Margaret A; Witt, Claudia M; Berman, Brian M

    2012-09-01

    Comparative effectiveness research (CER) is defined by the Institute of Medicine as "the generation and synthesis of evidence that compares the benefits and harms of alternative methods to prevent, diagnose, treat, and monitor a clinical condition or to improve the delivery of care." The goal of CER is to provide timely, useful evidence to healthcare decision makers including physicians, patients, policymakers, and payers. A prime focus for the use of CER evidence is the interaction between physician and patient. Physicians in primary practice are critical to the success of the CER enterprise. A 2009 survey suggests, however, that physician attitudes toward CER may be mixed-somewhat positive toward the potential for patient care improvement, yet negative toward potential restriction on physician freedom of practice. CER methods and goals closely parallel those of practice-based research, an important movement in family medicine in the United States since the 1970s. This article addresses apparent physician ambivalence toward CER and makes a case for family medicine engagement in CER to produce useful practice-based evidence. Such an effort has potential to expand care options through personalized medicine, individualized guidelines, focus on patient preferences and patient-reported outcomes, and study of complex therapeutic interventions, such as integrative care. Academic medical researchers will need to collaborate with experienced family physicians to identify significant practice-based research questions and design meaningful studies. Such collaborations would shape CER to produce high-quality practice-based evidence to inform family and community medicine.

  12. [Erasmian influences among renaissance physicians].

    PubMed

    de Micheli, Alfredo

    2002-01-01

    The fundamental aspects of Erasmus's ethic humanism consisted of ideals of universal peace and tolerance. These ideals are exposed in the great works of his maturity Colloquia and Adagia read and meditated on by renaissance physicians in England, Spain, Germany, Italy, and also in the New Spain. Erasmus's readers were learned and numerous. Among his pupils and supporters in Spain were humanist physicians of Madrid such as Doctors Suárez and Juan de Jarava. Other supporters were in the group of the Sevillian physicians and naturalists. Among the Erasmist physicians, residing in other regions was doctor Andrés Laguna, who translated into Spanish the Dioscorides treatise on medical botany. Many physicians living in New Spain owned copies of Erasmian works, such as Doctors Pedro López (the second) and Juan de la Fuente, who was in charge of the first medical chair at the University of Mexico. The protophysician Francisco Hernández, in response to a petition of Archbishop Pedro Moya de Contreras, wrote a Christian catechism of Erasmian influence, destined for humanists in NewSpain. As asserted by Johan Huizinga, Erasmus was the sole humanist who really wrote for everyone, i.e. for all cultured people.

  13. Physician business deals: surveying the new landscape.

    PubMed

    Harris, John M; Kaplan, Karin Chernoff

    2009-05-01

    Strong hospitals and health systems should be on the lookout for opportunities today to acquire physician businesses at depressed fair market values. In some instances, an outright purchase of physicians' interest in a physician-hospital joint venture may be preferable; in others, the hospital may benefit more from simply increasing its interest in the venture. A critical part of the strategy should be taking steps to ensure the physicians remain engaged, including addressing physicians' income goals and need for control.

  14. Violence against women: the physician's role.

    PubMed

    Schmuel, E; Schenker, J G

    1998-10-01

    Violence against women is one reflection of the unequal power relationship between men and women in societies. Reflections of this inequality include marriage at a very young age, lack of information or choice about fertility control and forced pregnancy within marriage. The different forms of violence against women are: domestic violence and rape, genital mutilation or, gender-based violence by police and security forces, gender-based violence against women during armed conflict, gender-based violence against women refugees and asylum-seekers, violence associated with prostitution and pornography, violence in the workplace, including sexual harassment. Violence against women is condemned, whether it occurs in a societal setting or a domestic setting. It is not a private or family matter. The FIGO Committee for the Study of Ethical Aspects of Human Reproduction released statements to physicians treating women on this issue. Physicians are ethically obliged to inform themselves about the manifestations of violence and recognize cases, to treat the physical and psychological results of violence, to affirm to their patients that violent acts toward them are not acceptable and to advocate for social infrastructures to provide women the choice of seeking secure refuge and ongoing counselling.

  15. Comparison of Family Therapy Outcome with Alcohol-Abusing, Runaway Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slesnick, Natasha; Prestopnik, Jillian L

    2009-01-01

    Treatment evaluation for alcohol problem, runaway adolescents and their families is rare. This study recruited primary alcohol problem adolescents (N = 119) and their primary caretakers from two runaway shelters and assigned them to (a) home-based ecologically based family therapy (EBFT), (b) office-based functional family therapy (FFT), or (c)…

  16. Prevalence of Formal Accusations of Murder and Euthanasia against Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Lewis M.; Arnold, Robert M.; Goy, Elizabeth; Arons, Stephen; Ganzini, Linda

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Little is known about how often physicians are formally accused of hastening patient deaths while practicing palliative care. Methods We conducted an Internet-based survey on a random 50% sample of physician-members of a national hospice and palliative medicine society. Results The final sample consisted of 663 physicians (response rate 53%). Over half of the respondents had had at least one experience in the last 5 years in which a patient's family, another physician, or another health care professional had characterized palliative treatments as being euthanasia, murder, or killing. One in four stated that at least one friend or family member, or a patient had similarly characterized their treatments. Respondents rated palliative sedation and stopping artificial hydration/nutrition as treatments most likely to be misconstrued as euthanasia. Overall, 25 physicians (4%) had been formally investigated for hastening a patient's death when that had not been their intention—13 while using opiates for symptom relief and six for using medications while discontinuing mechanical ventilation. In eight (32%) cases, another member of the health care team had initiated the charges. At the time of the survey, none had been found guilty, but they reported experiencing substantial anger and worry. Conclusions Commonly used palliative care practices continue to be misconstrued as euthanasia or murder, despite this not being the intention of the treating physician. Further efforts are needed to explain to the health care community and the public that treatments often used to relieve patient suffering at the end of life are ethical and legal. PMID:22401355

  17. 42 CFR 415.172 - Physician fee schedule payment for services of teaching physicians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... teaching physicians. 415.172 Section 415.172 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... PHYSICIANS IN PROVIDERS, SUPERVISING PHYSICIANS IN TEACHING SETTINGS, AND RESIDENTS IN CERTAIN SETTINGS Physician Services in Teaching Settings § 415.172 Physician fee schedule payment for services of...

  18. 42 CFR 415.172 - Physician fee schedule payment for services of teaching physicians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... teaching physicians. 415.172 Section 415.172 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... PROVIDERS, SUPERVISING PHYSICIANS IN TEACHING SETTINGS, AND RESIDENTS IN CERTAIN SETTINGS Physician Services in Teaching Settings § 415.172 Physician fee schedule payment for services of teaching physicians....

  19. 42 CFR 415.172 - Physician fee schedule payment for services of teaching physicians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... teaching physicians. 415.172 Section 415.172 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... PHYSICIANS IN PROVIDERS, SUPERVISING PHYSICIANS IN TEACHING SETTINGS, AND RESIDENTS IN CERTAIN SETTINGS Physician Services in Teaching Settings § 415.172 Physician fee schedule payment for services of...

  20. 42 CFR 415.172 - Physician fee schedule payment for services of teaching physicians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... teaching physicians. 415.172 Section 415.172 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... PROVIDERS, SUPERVISING PHYSICIANS IN TEACHING SETTINGS, AND RESIDENTS IN CERTAIN SETTINGS Physician Services in Teaching Settings § 415.172 Physician fee schedule payment for services of teaching physicians....

  1. 42 CFR 415.172 - Physician fee schedule payment for services of teaching physicians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... teaching physicians. 415.172 Section 415.172 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... PHYSICIANS IN PROVIDERS, SUPERVISING PHYSICIANS IN TEACHING SETTINGS, AND RESIDENTS IN CERTAIN SETTINGS Physician Services in Teaching Settings § 415.172 Physician fee schedule payment for services of...

  2. [Sherlock Holmes as amateur physician].

    PubMed

    Madsen, S

    1998-03-30

    The medical literature contains numerous articles dealing with Sherlock Holmes and his companion Dr. Watson. Some of the articles are concerned with the medical and scientific aspects of his cases. Other articles adopt a more philosophical view: They compare the methods of the master detective with those of the physician--the ideal clinician should be as astute in his profession as the detective must be in his. It this article the author briefly reviews the abilities of Sherlock Holmes as an amateur physician. Often Holmes was brilliant, but sometimes he made serious mistakes. In one of his cases (The Adventure of the Lion's Mane) he misinterpreted common medical signs.

  3. How Is Physician Work Valued?

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Lahey, Stephen J; Nichols, Francis C; Levett, James M; Johnston, George Gilbert; Freeman, Richard K; St Louis, James D; Painter, Julie; Yohe, Courtney; Wright, Cameron D; Kanter, Kirk R; Mayer, John E; Naunheim, Keith S; Rich, Jeffrey B; Bavaria, Joseph E

    2017-02-01

    Strategies to value physician work continue to evolve. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons and The Society of Thoracic Surgeons National Database have an increasingly important role in this evolution. An understanding of the Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) system (American Medical Association [AMA], Chicago, IL) and the Relative Value Scale Update Committee (RUC) is necessary to comprehend how physician work is valued. In 1965, with the dawn of increasingly complex medical care, immense innovation, and the rollout of Medicare, the need for a common language describing medical services and procedures was recognized as being of critical importance. In 1966, the AMA, in cooperation with multiple major medical specialty societies, developed the CPT system, which is a coding system for the description of medical procedures and medical services. The RUC was created by the AMA in response to the passage of the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1989, legislation of the United States of America Federal government that mandated that the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services adopt a relative value methodology for Medicare physician payment. The role of the RUC is to develop relative value recommendations for the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. These recommendations include relative value recommendations for new procedures or services and also updates to relative value recommendations for previously valued procedures or services. These recommendations pertain to all physician work delivered to Medicare beneficiaries and propose relative values for all physician services, including updates to those based on the original resource-based relative value scale developed by Hsaio and colleagues. In so doing, widely differing work and services provided can be reviewed and comparisons of their relative value (to each other) can be established. The resource-based relative value scale assigns value to physician services using relative value units (RVUs), which consist

  4. Psychiatric comorbidity, red flag behaviors, and associated outcomes among office-based buprenorphine patients following Hurricane Sandy.

    PubMed

    Williams, Arthur R; Tofighi, Babak; Rotrosen, John; Lee, Joshua D; Grossman, Ellie

    2014-04-01

    In October 2012, Bellevue Hospital Center (Bellevue) in New York City was temporarily closed as a result of Hurricane Sandy, the largest hurricane in US history. Bellevue's primary care office-based buprenorphine program was temporarily closed and later relocated to an affiliate public hospital. Previous research indicates that the relationships between disaster exposure, substance use patterns, psychiatric symptoms, and mental health services utilization is complex, with often conflicting findings regarding post-event outcomes (on the individual and community level) and antecedent risk factors. In general, increased use of tobacco, alcohol, and illicit drugs is associated with both greater disaster exposure and the development or exacerbation of other psychiatric symptoms and need for treatment. To date, there is limited published information regarding post-disaster outcomes among patients enrolled in office-based buprenorphine treatment, as the treatment modality has only been relatively approved recently. Patients enrolled in the buprenorphine program at the time of the storm were surveyed for self-reported buprenorphine adherence and illicit substance and alcohol use, as well as disaster-related personal consequences and psychiatric sequelae post-storm. Baseline demographic characteristics and insurance status were available from the medical record. Analysis was descriptive (counts and proportions) and qualitative, coding open-ended responses for emergent themes. There were 132 patients enrolled in the program at the time of the storm; of those, 91 were contacted and 89 completed the survey. Almost half of respondents reported disruption of their buprenorphine supply. Unexpectedly, patients with psychiatric comorbidity were no more likely to report increased use/relapse as a result. Rather, major risk factors associated with increased use or relapse post-storm were: (1) shorter length of time in treatment, (2) exposure to storm losses such as buprenorphine

  5. Physicians' attitudes toward using deception to resolve difficult ethical problems.

    PubMed

    Novack, D H; Detering, B J; Arnold, R; Forrow, L; Ladinsky, M; Pezzullo, J C

    1989-05-26

    To assess physicians' attitudes toward the use of deception in medicine, we sent a questionnaire to 407 practicing physicians. The questionnaire asked for responses to difficult ethical problems potentially resolvable by deception and asked general questions about attitudes and practices. Two hundred eleven (52%) of the physicians responded. The majority indicated a willingness to misrepresent a screening test as a diagnostic test to secure an insurance payment and to allow the wife of a patient with gonorrhea to be misled about her husband's diagnosis if that were believed necessary to ensure her treatment and preserve a marriage. One third indicated they would offer incomplete or misleading information to a patient's family if a mistake led to a patient's death. Very few physicians would deceive a mother to avoid revealing an adolescent daughter's pregnancy. When forced to make difficult ethical choices, most physicians indicated some willingness to engage in forms of deception. They appear to justify their decisions in terms of the consequences and to place a higher value on their patients' welfare and keeping patients' confidences than truth telling for its own sake.

  6. Barriers to physician identification and reporting of child abuse.

    PubMed

    Flaherty, Emalee G; Sege, Robert

    2005-05-01

    with local Emergency Departments with pediatric expertise. Improve the relationship between CPS and medical providers. For example, CPS workers should systematically inform the reporting physician about the progress of their investigation and the outcome for the child and family. Several past reports have made specific suggestions to improve the working relationship. Warner and Hanson recommended that positive outcomes be programmed into the reporting process. They suggested that CPS have special phone lines staffed by well-trained employees for mandated reporters to call. Finkelhor and Zellman proposed a more radical change to improve the working relationship between CPS and mandated reporters. They suggested that certain professionals, with demonstrated expertise in the recognition and treatment of child abuse and registered as such, should have "flexible reporting options." Options include the ability to defer reporting, if there are no immediate threats to a child, or to make a report in confidence and defer the investigation until necessary. Finkelhor and Zellman emphasized that this model would improve physician-reporting compliance and enhance the role of CPS while reducing the work burden for CPS. Improve interaction with the legal system. Child abuse pediatric experts who have courtroom experience could provide education and support to physicians who have little preexisting experience with the legal system. Reimbursement for time spent supporting legal proceedings should be equitable and may reduce physician concerns about lost patient revenue. Retrospective studies and vignette analyses provide much information about some of the barriers to child maltreatment reporting and describe many of the reasons why physicians do not identify and report all child maltreatment. Future prospective examinations of physician decision-making may further explain the physician's decision-making process and the barriers he or she faces when identifying and reporting child abuse.

  7. An Office-Based Fluid to Fluid Exchange Technique for the Treatment of Postvitrectomy Vitreous Cavity Hemorrhage and Secondary Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    A case of postvitrectomy hemorrhage with secondary glaucoma successfully treated with an office-based fluid to fluid exchange is described. A 25 Ga trocar was placed 3 mm from the sclerocorneal limbus at the 2 o'clock position and connected to a 250 cc elevated bottle of balanced salt solution (BSS) through an intravenous (IV) line and an infusion cannula. Afterward, a 25 Ga needle was inserted 3 mm from the limbus at the 5 o'clock position approximately. The BSS fluid entered the eye through the 25 Ga trocar lavaging the vitreous cavity and the anterior chamber. About 4 to 6 cc of hemorrhagic fluid egressed the eye through the 25 Ga needle. PMID:28321352

  8. Family Planning Handbook for Doctors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleinman, Ronald L., Ed.

    The International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) believes that all people have the right to family planning information, including premarital and marital counseling, contraception information, and sex education. This physician's handbook is designed to provide all doctors with the necessary instructions on the latest family planning methods…

  9. Costs of Physician-Hospital Integration.

    PubMed

    Cho, Na-Eun

    2015-10-01

    Given that the enactment of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 is expected to generate forces toward physician-hospital integration, this study examined an understudied, albeit important, area of costs incurred in physician-hospital integration. Such costs were analyzed through 24 semi-structured interviews with physicians and hospital administrators in a multiple-case, inductive study. Two extreme types of physician-hospital arrangements were examined: an employed model (ie, integrated salary model, a group of physicians integrated by a hospital system) and a private practice (ie, a physician or group of physicians who are independent of economic or policy control). Interviews noted that integration leads to 3 evident costs, namely, monitoring, coordination, and cooperation costs. Improving our understanding of the kinds of costs that are incurred after physician-hospital integration will help hospitals and physicians to avoid common failures after integration.

  10. A physician assistant rheumatology fellowship.

    PubMed

    Hooker, Roderick S

    2013-06-01

    A rheumatology postgraduate fellowship for physician assistants was inaugurated in 2004 as a pilot initiative to supplement shortages in rheumatologists. An administrative analysis documented that each PA trainee achieved a high level of rheumatology exposure and proficiency. Classes in immunology, rheumatology, and internal medicine augmented clinical training. Faculty and trainees considered PA postgraduate training in rheumatology worthwhile.

  11. Physician Requirements-1990. For Nephrology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenbach, Joan K.

    Professional requirements for physicians specializing in nephrology were estimated to assist policymakers in developing guidelines for graduate medical education. In estimating service requirements for nephrology, a nephrology Delphi panel reviewed reference and incidence-prevalence and utilization data for 34 conditions that are treated in the…

  12. Individual Physician Profile. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin Univ., Madison. Dept. of Postgraduate Medical Education.

    This document reports the procedures and data of a study designed to examine the hypotheses that medical practices do vary significantly. Detailed data on 76 participants were collected; three mechanisms were developed to determine the needs of primary care physicians. These mechanism were: subjective analysis by both participants and study staff,…

  13. Information Searching Behavior of Physicians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trueswell, R.W.; Rubenstein, A.H.

    The purpose of this study was to provide some preliminary data about the information-searching behavior of the physician in order to (1) facilitate the development of models describing the search behavior and (2) provide the behavioral data necessary for the development of effective information retrieval systems for use by the medical profession.…

  14. Training Physicians in Palliative Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muir, J. Cameron; Krammer, Lisa M.; von Gunten, Charles F.

    1999-01-01

    Describes the elements of a program in hospice and palliative medicine that may serve as a model of an effective system of physician education. Topics for the palliative-care curriculum include hospice medicine, breaking bad news, pain management, the process of dying, and managing personal stress. (JOW)

  15. Choosing among the physician databases.

    PubMed

    Heller, R H

    1988-04-01

    Prudent examination and knowing how to ask the "right questions" can enable hospital marketers and planners to find the most accurate and appropriate database. The author compares the comprehensive AMA physician database with the less expensive MEDEC database to determine their strengths and weaknesses.

  16. Marketer's forgotten challenge: physician recruitment.

    PubMed

    Plank, D

    1997-01-01

    As marketing department missions continue to expand, more and more people are finding themselves not just recruiting customers, but doctors. The good news: May of the tips and tricks of direct marketing can be used to reach out to in-demand physicians.

  17. Business plan writing for physicians.

    PubMed

    Cohn, Kenneth H; Schwartz, Richard W

    2002-08-01

    Physicians are practicing in an era in which they are often expected to write business plans in order to acquire, develop, and implement new technology or programs. This task is yet another reminder of the importance of business principles in providing quality patient care amid allocation of increasingly scarce resources. Unfortunately, few physicians receive training during medical school, residencies, or fellowships in performing such tasks. The process of writing business plans follows an established format similar to writing a consultation, in which the risks, benefits, and alternatives to a treatment option are presented. Although administrative assistance may be available in compiling business plans, it is important for physicians to understand the rationale, process, and pitfalls of business planning. Writing a business plan will serve to focus, clarify, and justify a request for scarce resources, and thus, increase its chance of success, both in terms of funding and implementation. A well-written business plan offers a plausible, coherent story of an uncertain future. Therefore, a business plan is not merely an exercise to obtain funding but also a rationale for investment that can help physicians reestablish leadership in health care.

  18. Hitler’s Jewish Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Weisz, George M.

    2014-01-01

    The mystery behind the behavior of infamous personalities leaves many open questions, particularly when related to the practice of medicine. This paper takes a brief look at two Jewish physicians who played memorable roles in the life of Adolf Hitler. PMID:25120923

  19. Facets of career satisfaction for women physicians in the United States: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Rizvi, Rabab; Raymer, Lindsay; Kunik, Mark; Fisher, Joslyn

    2012-01-01

    Women make up a growing proportion of the physician workforce, and their career satisfaction may affect their health. The authors hypothesized that many facets adversely affecting career satisfaction in women physicians were extrinsic, therefore, preventable or modifiable. The authors conducted a systematic review of the literature in English published through February 2010 to examine facets of career satisfaction of U.S. women physicians. The authors used the women physician AND job satisfaction OR career satisfaction Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) terms, and reviewed bibliographies of key articles to ensure inclusion of relevant studies. The authors used the "Strengthening the Reporting of Observation Studies in Epidemiology" quality tool. Of an initial 1,000 studies, only 30 met the inclusion criteria. Facets reported most frequently to influence career satisfaction for women physicians were income/prestige, practice characteristics, and personal/family characteristics. Overall, career satisfaction for women and men physicians was 73.4% (range = 56.4% to 90%) and 73.2% (range = 59% to 90%), respectively. When compared with men, women physicians were more concerned with perceived lack of time for relationships with patients, colleagues, and family; less satisfied with mentoring relationships and support from all sources; and less satisfied with career-advancement opportunities, recognition, and salary. Career satisfaction can affect health, as well as health and safety of patients. Many factors adversely affecting career satisfaction for women physicians are extrinsic and, therefore, modifiable.

  20. [Family medicine and functional somatic syndromes].

    PubMed

    Nago, Naoki

    2009-09-01

    Between psychosomatic medicine and psychiatry, FSS (functional somatic syndromes) patients are often visiting a family doctor. For FSS, the role of family physicians is large, but the family physicians are not required for the role of diagnosis and treatment of FSS. Rather, appropriate referral to a specialist to exclude organic disease is important and a role as the coordinator is large to the patient to refuse a psychiatric consultation. To serve as a role for such coordination, a family physician has to response the patient's emotional side and focus on the construction of the doctor-patient relationship and response. I also think of structuralism medicine approach to describe disease from the meta-level as a new procedure to the patient. This approach consists of 4 components, 'entity', 'phenomenon', 'words', and 'I'. This may be a useful approach to family physicians who coordinate the overall for FSS patients' management.

  1. Nurses' and Physicians' Perceptions of Nurse-Physician Collaboration: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    House, Sherita; Havens, Donna

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this systematic review was to explore nurses' and physicians' perceptions of nurse-physician collaboration and the factors that influence their perceptions. Overall, nurses and physicians held different perceptions of nurse-physician collaboration. Shared decision making, teamwork, and communication were reoccurring themes in reports of perceptions about nurse-physician collaboration. These findings have implications for more interprofessional educational courses and more intervention studies that focus on ways to improve nurse-physician collaboration.

  2. [An international comparison of physician control systems].

    PubMed

    Jian, Wei-yan; Xiong, Xian-jun; Li, Jing-hu; Ding, Yang; Wang, Li-li; Guo, Yan

    2011-04-18

    This study compares physicians' regulations set by the United Kingdom, the United States, Canada and Germany which have typical healthcare systems. Physicians' regulations are defined in this study as four aspects: physicians' training and qualifications, career pathways, payment methods and behavior regulations. Strict access rules, practicing with freedom, different training models between general and special practitioners, health services priced by negotiations and regulations by professional organizations are the common features of physicians' regulations in these four western countries. Three aspects--introducing contract mechanism, enhancing the roles of professional organizations and extending physicians' practice space should be taken into account in China's future reform of physicians' regulations.

  3. Caring for LGBTQ patients: Methods for improving physician cultural competence.

    PubMed

    Klein, Elizabeth W; Nakhai, Maliheh

    2016-05-01

    This article summarizes the components of a curriculum used to teach family medicine residents and faculty about LGBTQ patients' needs in a family medicine residency program in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States. This curriculum was developed to provide primary care physicians and physicians-in-training with skills to provide better health care for LGBTQ-identified patients. The curriculum covers topics that range from implicit and explicit bias and appropriate terminology to techniques for crafting patient-centered treatment plans. Additionally, focus is placed on improving the understanding of specific and unique barriers to competent health care encountered by LGBTQ patients. Through facilitated discussion, learners explore the health disparities that disproportionately affect LGBTQ individuals and develop skills that will improve their ability to care for LGBTQ patients. The goal of the curriculum is to teach family medicine faculty and physicians in training how to more effectively communicate with and treat LGBTQ patients in a safe, non-judgmental, and welcoming primary care environment.

  4. Toward Audience Involvement: Extending Audiences of Written Physician Notes in a Hospital Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breuch, Lee-Ann Kastman; Bakke, Abigail; Thomas-Pollei, Kimberly; Mackey, L. Elizabeth; Weinert, Craig

    2016-01-01

    This article explores rhetorical implications of extending the audience of written physician notes in hospital settings to include patients and/or family members (the OpenNotes program). Interviews of participating hospital patients and family members (n = 16) underscored the need for more complex understandings of audience beyond…

  5. AMA Physician Select: Online Doctor Finder

    MedlinePlus

    ... Membership | JAMA Network | AMA Store DoctorFinder This online physician Locator helps you find a perfect match for ... with basic professional information on virtually every licensed physician in the United States. This includes more than ...

  6. AMA launches partnership to lease physician database.

    PubMed

    2000-12-01

    A joint venture is allowing the AMA to refine the physician data it sells to marketers. Physicians in the organization's heavily used database get some latitude in how information about them is distributed.

  7. 20 CFR 702.404 - Physician defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... correct a subluxation shown by X-ray or clinical findings. Physicians defined in this part may interpret their own X-rays. All physicians in these categories are authorized by the Director to render...

  8. 20 CFR 702.404 - Physician defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... correct a subluxation shown by X-ray or clinical findings. Physicians defined in this part may interpret their own X-rays. All physicians in these categories are authorized by the Director to render...

  9. 20 CFR 702.404 - Physician defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... correct a subluxation shown by X-ray or clinical findings. Physicians defined in this part may interpret their own X-rays. All physicians in these categories are authorized by the Director to render...

  10. 20 CFR 702.404 - Physician defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... correct a subluxation shown by X-ray or clinical findings. Physicians defined in this part may interpret their own X-rays. All physicians in these categories are authorized by the Director to render...

  11. 20 CFR 702.404 - Physician defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... correct a subluxation shown by X-ray or clinical findings. Physicians defined in this part may interpret their own X-rays. All physicians in these categories are authorized by the Director to render...

  12. The Crucible of Physician Performance Reports

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Individualized physician performance reports are an emerging phenomena. The narrative piece examines one physician’s experience with individualized physician performance reports. Reforming the data collection process could enhance the value of the reports to stakeholders. PMID:20838915

  13. Motivations for Physician-assisted Suicide

    PubMed Central

    Pearlman, Robert A; Hsu, Clarissa; Starks, Helene; Back, Anthony L; Gordon, Judith R; Bharucha, Ashok J; Koenig, Barbara A; Battin, Margaret P

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To obtain detailed narrative accounts of patients' motivations for pursuing physician-assisted suicide (PAS). DESIGN Longitudinal case studies. PARTICIPANTS Sixty individuals discussed 35 cases. Participants were recruited through advocacy organizations that counsel individuals interested in PAS, as well as hospices and grief counselors. SETTING Participants' homes. MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS We conducted a content analysis of 159 semistructured interviews with patients and their family members, and family members of deceased patients, to characterize the issues associated with pursuit of PAS. Most patients deliberated about PAS over considerable lengths of time with repeated assessments of the benefits and burdens of their current experience. Most patients were motivated to engage in PAS due to illness-related experiences (e.g., fatigue, functional losses), a loss of their sense of self, and fears about the future. None of the patients were acutely depressed when planning PAS. CONCLUSIONS Patients in this study engaged in PAS after a deliberative and thoughtful process. These motivating issues point to the importance of a broad approach in responding to a patient's request for PAS. The factors that motivate PAS can serve as an outline of issues to explore with patients about the far-reaching effects of illness, including the quality of the dying experience. The factors also identify challenges for quality palliative care: assessing patients holistically, conducting repeated assessments of patients' concerns over time, and tailoring care accordingly. PMID:15836526

  14. Potential of physician assistants to support primary care

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, Sarah; Botting, Ingrid; Huebner, Lori-Anne; Wright, Brock; Beaupre, Beth; Permack, Sheldon; Jones, Ian; Mihlachuk, Ainslie; Edwards, Jeanette; Rhule, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine effective strategies for introducing physician assistants (PAs) in primary care settings and provide guidance to support ongoing provincial planning for PA roles in primary care. Design Time-series research design using multiple qualitative methods. Setting Manitoba. Participants Physician assistants, supervising family physicians, clinic staff, members of the Introducing Physician Assistants into Primary Care Steering Committee, and patients receiving care from PAs. Methods The PA role was evaluated at 6 health care sites between 2012 and 2014; sites varied in size, funding models, geographic locations (urban or rural), specifics of the PA role, and setting type (clinic or hospital). Semistructured interviews and focus groups were conducted; patient feedback on quality improvement was retrieved; observational methods were employed; and documents were reviewed. A baseline assessment was conducted before PA placement. In 2013, there was a series of interviews and focus groups about the introduction of PAs at the 3 initial sites; in 2014 interviews and focus groups included all 6 sites. Main findings The concerns that were expressed during baseline interviews about the introduction of PAs (eg, community and patient acceptance) informed planning. Most concerns that were identified did not materialize. Supervising family physicians, site staff, and patients were enthusiastic about the introduction of PAs. There were a few challenges experienced at the site level (eg, front-desk scheduling), but they were perceived as manageable. Unanticipated challenges at the provincial level were identified (eg, diagnostic test ordering). Increased attachment and improved access—the goals of introducing PAs to primary care—were only some of the positive effects that were reported. Conclusion This first systematic multisite evaluation of PAs in primary care in Canada demonstrated that with appropriate collaborative planning, PAs can effectively

  15. Transitioning to value-based physician compensation.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Johanna

    2014-12-01

    An effective strategy for creating a viable physician compensation plan should include nine key steps or tactics: Get physicians on board early. Engage a physician champion. Create a compensation committee. Address department-level issues and differences. Verify the plan's affordability. Adopt a routine review schedule. Understand the payer environment and keep in contact with payers. Stay abreast of industry trends. Maintain an ongoing dialogue with physicians.

  16. Expansion of Physician Assistant Education.

    PubMed

    Cawley, James F; Eugene Jones, P; Miller, Anthony A; Orcutt, Venetia L

    2016-12-01

    Physician assistant (PA) educational programs were created in the 1960s to prepare a new type of health care practitioner. Physician assistant programs began as experiments in medical education, and later, they proved to be highly successful in preparing capable, flexible, and productive clinicians. The growth of PA educational programs in US medical education-stimulated by grants, public policy, and anticipated shortages of providers-has gone through 3 distinct phases. At present, such programs are in the midst of the third growth spurt that is expected to continue beyond 2020, as a large number of colleges and universities seek to sponsor PA programs and attain accreditation status. Characteristics of these new programs are described, and the implications of the current expansion of PA education are examined.

  17. Organizational commitment of military physicians.

    PubMed

    Demir, Cesim; Sahin, Bayram; Teke, Kadir; Ucar, Muharrem; Kursun, Olcay

    2009-09-01

    An individual's loyalty or bond to his or her employing organization, referred to as organizational commitment, influences various organizational outcomes such as employee motivation, job satisfaction, performance, accomplishment of organizational goals, employee turnover, and absenteeism. Therefore, as in other sectors, employee commitment is crucial also in the healthcare market. This study investigates the effects of organizational factors and personal characteristics on organizational commitment of military physicians using structural equation modeling (SEM) on a self-report, cross-sectional survey that consisted of 635 physicians working in the 2 biggest military hospitals in Turkey. The results of this study indicate that professional commitment and organizational incentives contribute positively to organizational commitment, whereas conflict with organizational goals makes a significantly negative contribution to it. These results might help develop strategies to increase employee commitment, especially in healthcare organizations, because job-related factors have been found to possess greater impact on organizational commitment than personal characteristics.

  18. Psychological contracts: a new strategy for retaining reduced-hour physicians.

    PubMed

    Hartwell, Jennifer K

    2010-01-01

    As a retention strategy, healthcare organizations offer reduced-hour schedules to physicians seeking better work-family balance. However, this quantitative study of 94 full-time and reduced-hour female physicians in the Boston area found that working fewer hours helps physicians achieve better balance but does not improve their burnout or career satisfaction, or impact their intention to quit or leave the field of medicine. Instead, the findings demonstrate that psychological contract fulfillment, which reflects the subjective nature of the employment relationship, is more important than work hours, an objective job condition, in predicting intention to quit and these other outcomes. A fine-grained analysis is initiated uncovering the multidimensionality of the psychological contract construct. To integrate successful reduced-hour arrangements for physicians, medical managers are directed to the importance of understanding the composition of reduced-hour physicians' psychological contracts, specifically, their need to do challenging work, receive high levels of supervisor support, and promotion opportunities.

  19. Empowering Physicians with Financial Literacy.

    PubMed

    Bar-Or, Yuval

    2015-01-01

    Most doctors complete their medical training without sufficient knowledge of business and finance. This leads to inefficient financial decisions, avoidable losses, and unnecessary anxiety. A big part of the problem is that the existing options for gaining financial knowledge are flawed. The ideal solution is to provide a simple framework of financial literacy to all students: one that can be adapted to their specific circumstances. That framework must be delivered by an objective expert to young physicians before they complete medical training.

  20. Opinion and Special Articles: "Physician debtor".

    PubMed

    Scharf, Eugene L; Jones, Lyell K

    2016-01-19

    The increasing cost of attending medical school has contributed to increasing physician indebtedness. The burden of medical school debt has implications for physician career choice, professional satisfaction, and burnout. This opinion discusses the impact of physician indebtedness, the importance of improving debt awareness among neurology trainees, and program- and policy-level solutions to the debt crisis.

  1. Mentoring to Help Prevent Physician Burnout.

    PubMed

    Herring, Malcolm; Forbes Kaufman, Rachel; Bogue, Richard

    2016-07-01

    The importance of a person's spirit and eternal destiny are eclipsed in American medi- cine. The most alarming effect of this eclipse is that the prevalence of burnout among physicians is high (about 46 percent) and growing.' It is alarming because trends that deplete the physician's spirit tragically impair the physician's capacity as a healer and as one who renews the spirit.

  2. 22 CFR 62.27 - Alien physicians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Alien physicians. 62.27 Section 62.27 Foreign... Provisions § 62.27 Alien physicians. (a) Purpose. Pursuant to the Mutual Educational and Cultural Exchange... Foreign Medical Graduates must sponsor alien physicians who wish to pursue programs of graduate...

  3. 22 CFR 62.27 - Alien physicians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Alien physicians. 62.27 Section 62.27 Foreign... Provisions § 62.27 Alien physicians. (a) Purpose. Pursuant to the Mutual Educational and Cultural Exchange... Foreign Medical Graduates must sponsor alien physicians who wish to pursue programs of graduate...

  4. 22 CFR 62.27 - Alien physicians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Alien physicians. 62.27 Section 62.27 Foreign... Provisions § 62.27 Alien physicians. (a) Purpose. Pursuant to the Mutual Educational and Cultural Exchange... Foreign Medical Graduates must sponsor alien physicians who wish to pursue programs of graduate...

  5. Training of aerospace medicine physicians.

    PubMed

    Mohler, S R

    1985-03-01

    In the U. S. there are 23 recognized medical specialty boards. One of these is preventive medicine. Within preventive medicine there are three areas: Aerospace Medicine, Occupational Medicine, and Public Health/General Preventive Medicine. The preventive medicine specialties have a common core of required training including biostatistics, epidemiology, health services administration and environmental health. These, plus associated topics are covered during year one of training. Year two of training involves clinical rotations specifically tailored to the eye, ear, heart, lungs and brain, plus flight training to the private pilot level, and a Masters Degree research project for the required thesis. During year three the physicians in aerospace medicine practice full-time aerospace medicine in a NASA or other government laboratory or a private facility. To date, more than 40 physicians have received aerospace medicine training through the Wright State University School of Medicine program. Among these are physicians from Japan, Australia, Taiwan, Canada and Mexico. In addition to the civilian program at Wright State University, there are programs conducted by the U. S. Air Force and Navy. The Wright State program has been privileged to have officers from the U. S. Army, Navy and Air Force. A substantial supporter of the Wright State program is the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and a strong space component is contained in the program.

  6. "The physician as poet" review of: Pereira, Peter Saying the World

    PubMed Central

    Weishaus, Joel

    2006-01-01

    Peter Pereira is a family physician and a poet. I weave excerpts from Dr. Pereira's poems into a brief history of medicine's mythological and historical roots, beginning with the Egyptian god Thoth, and the Greek physician Hippocrates. Along the way, I touch on the European Middle Ages and the Islamic World. Finally, I quote poet-critic T.S. Eliot, who was an early influence on Dr. Pereira's decision to become a poet, and contemporary physician-poets Rafael Campo and William Carlos Williams. I end by placing Dr. Pereira, whose practice is oriented toward immigrant families, in his indigenous Pacific Northwest, arguing that being both physician and poet helps Pereira to live in a world that is both intimately human and naturally impersonal.

  7. Discretionary use of family practice information systems: an empirical examination in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Ada, Serkan; Bal, Canan Gamze; Çelik, Adnan; Akgemci, Tahir

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the antecedents and consequences of the discretionary use of the family practice information systems (FPIS) by family physicians in Turkey. A structured survey was conducted among family physicians located in Kahramanmaras, a southern province in Turkey. The partial least squares (PLS) method was used to analyse the survey data. Findings showed that (1) physicians' discretionary use of FPIS is positively related to their perceived value of patient care; (2) physicians' computer self-efficacy is positively related to their discretionary use of FPIS; (3) physicians' innovativeness in information technology (IT) is positively related to their computer self-efficacy; and (4) physicians' innovativeness in IT does not significantly impact on their discretionary use of FPIS. The present study's findings revealed that physicians should be adequately informed about the discretionary use of FPIS, and policies should be established to improve family physicians' understanding and competence of information systems, including computer self-efficacy.

  8. Stress among Croatian physicians: comparison between physicians working in emergency medical service and health centers – pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Gregov, Ljiljana; Kovačević, Ana; Slišković, Ana

    2011-01-01

    Aim To determine the sources of stress, its intensity, frequency, and psychophysical and behavioral reactions in physicians working in emergency medical service and those working in health centers. Methods To a convenience sample of primary care physicians employed in emergency medical service (n = 79) and health centers (n = 81), we administered the list of demographic questions, Scale of Sources of Stress, Scale of Intentions of Leaving the Job, and Scale of Psychosomatic Symptoms. Results Emergency medicine physicians experienced significantly more intense and more frequent uncontrollable working situations, conflict between work and family roles, and unfavorable relationships with coworkers than physicians working in health centers. They were also more likely to leave the job during the next few years and/or change jobs within the profession (scores 2.2 ± 0.9 vs 1.7 ± 0.9 out of maximum 5.0, F = 12.2, P = 0.001) and they had a poorer physical health status (scores 1.8 ± 0.5 vs 1.7 ± 0.5 out of maximum 4.0, F = 5.3, P = 0.023). Conclusion Physicians working in emergency medical service experience more stress in almost all aspects of their work than physicians working in health centers. They also have a stronger intention of leaving the job, which decreases with years of experience. PMID:21328715

  9. The Practicality and Significance of Microbiological Culturing in Family Practice

    PubMed Central

    Smith, John A.

    1976-01-01

    Many recommendations from microbiologists and infectious diseases physicians are suitable for hospital infectious diseases practice but are very difficult to employ in family practice. This paper bears that situation in mind when outlining worthwhile cultures for diseases commonly seen by family physicians. PMID:21308047

  10. The patient-physician relationship. Ensuring competency in end-of-life care: communication and relational skills.

    PubMed

    von Gunten, C F; Ferris, F D; Emanuel, L L

    2000-12-20

    Physician competence in end-of-life care requires skill in communication, decision making, and building relationships, yet these skills were not taught to the majority of physicians during their training. This article presents a 7-step approach for physicians for structuring communication regarding care at the end of life. Physicians should prepare for discussions by confirming medical facts and establishing an appropriate environment; establish what the patient (and family) knows by using open-ended questions; determine how information is to be handled at the beginning of the patient-physician relationship; deliver the information in a sensitive but straightforward manner; respond to emotions of the patients, parents, and families; establish goals for care and treatment priorities when possible; and establish an overall plan. These 7 steps can be used in situations such as breaking bad news, setting treatment goals, advance care planning, withholding or withdrawing therapy, making decisions in sudden life-threatening illness, resolving conflict around medical futility, responding to a request for physician-assisted suicide, and guiding patients and families through the last hours of living and early stages after death. Effective application as part of core end-of-life care competencies is likely to improve patients' and families' experiences of care. It may also enhance physicians' professional fulfillment from satisfactory relationships with their patients and patients' families.

  11. Male Spouses of Women Physicians: Communication, Compromise, and Carving Out Time.

    PubMed

    Isaac, Carol; Petrashek, Kara; Steiner, Megan; Manwell, Linda Baier; Byars-Winston, Angela; Carnes, Molly

    2013-01-01

    As the numbers of female physicians continue to grow, fewer medical marriages are comprised of the traditional dyad of male physician and stay-at-home wife. The "two-career family" is an increasingly frequent state for both male and female physicians' families, and dual-doctor marriages are on the rise. This qualitative study explored the contemporary medical marriage from the perspective of male spouses of female physicians. In 2010, we conducted semi-structured, in-depth interviews with nine spouses of internal medicine resident and faculty physicians. Interviewers queried work-home balance, career choices, and support networks. We used an interpretive, inductive, iterative approach to thematically analyze interview transcripts and develop broad, consensus-derived themes. A conceptual framework based on three major themes emerged: "A time for us? Really?", "Supporting and protecting her, sometimes at my expense,'" and "Hers is a career, mine is a job." This framework described the inflexibility of physicians' time and its impact on spousal time, career development, and choices. Having a set time for synchronizing schedules, frequent verbal support, and shared decision-making were seen as important by the husbands of female, full-time physicians. This exploratory study examined the contemporary medical marriage from the male spouse's perspective and highlights specific strategies for success.

  12. Influenza vaccination of pregnant women: attitudes and behaviors of Oregon physician prenatal care providers.

    PubMed

    Arao, Robert F; Rosenberg, Kenneth D; McWeeney, Shannon; Hedberg, Katrina

    2015-04-01

    In spite of increased risk of influenza complications during pregnancy, only half of US pregnant women get influenza vaccination. We surveyed physician prenatal care providers in Oregon to assess their knowledge and behaviors regarding vaccination of pregnant women. From September through November 2011, a state-wide survey was mailed to a simple random sample (n = 1,114) of Oregon obstetricians and family physicians. The response rate was 44.5 %. Of 496 survey respondents, 187 (37.7 %) had provided prenatal care within the last 12 months. Of these, 88.5 % reported that they routinely recommended influenza vaccine to healthy pregnant patients. No significant differences in vaccine recommendation were found by specialty, practice location, number of providers in their practice, physician gender or years in practice. In multivariable regression analysis, routinely recommending influenza vaccine was significantly associated with younger physician age [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 2.01, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.29-3.13] and greater number of pregnant patients seen per week (AOR 1.95, 95 % CI 1.25-3.06). Among rural physicians, fewer obstetricians (90.3 %) than family physicians (98.5 %) had vaccine-appropriate storage units (p = 0.001). Most physician prenatal care providers understand the importance of influenza vaccination during pregnancy. To increase influenza vaccine coverage among pregnant women, it will be necessary to identify and address patient barriers to receiving influenza vaccination during pregnancy.

  13. The Effects of Cultural Differences on the Physician-Patient Relationship

    PubMed Central

    Manassis, Katharina

    1986-01-01

    Differences between patients' and physicians' perceptions of illness can result in poor communication and unsatisfactory treatment results. These differences are more likely when the patient's cultural background is different from the physician's. This article provides a case history of a cultural conflict between a patient, the patient's family, and the medical care system. The beliefs and practices of people unfamiliar with the North American health care system are discussed, and physicians' assumptions about how patients should behave are explored. Ways of preventing cultural conflict with patients are suggested. PMID:21267272

  14. Factors influencing the frequency of visits by hypertensive patients to primary care physicians in Winnipeg

    PubMed Central

    Roos, N P; Carrière, K C; Friesen, D

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As part of a recent project focused on needs-based planning for generalist physicians, the authors documented the variety of practice styles of primary care physicians for managing patients with hypertension. They investigated the validity of various explanations for these different styles and the relative contributions of physician and patient characteristics to the rates at which hypertensive patients contact physicians. METHODS: Retrospective descriptive study using regression analyses to simultaneously adjust for the influence of key patient and physician characteristics. Hypertensive patients in Winnipeg were identified using Manitoba physician claims data for fiscal years 1993/94 and 1994/95. Patients were included if they were 25 years of age or more and had at least one physician contact in both 1993/94 and 1994/95 during which hypertension was diagnosed. In addition, the primary care physician had to be the physician that the patient contacted most frequently in 1993/94 and 1994/95 and with whom she or he had at least 2 visits during this period. Only patients of family practitioners whose practice included at least 50 hypertensive patients were included. RESULTS: To control for the effects of large samples and to validate the results, the authors conducted all analyses for half (6282) the sample of hypertensive patients who met the study criteria (12,563). A total of 132 primary care physicians who met the study criteria were identified. The patients made on average 9.3 ambulatory visits to physicians (both general practitioners and specialists) in 1994/95. Those who had more complex medical conditions (i.e., were formally referred to a specialist), those who had 3 or more serious medical problems and those who had been admitted to hospital made more visits to their primary care physician than those without these characteristics. After these and other key patient characteristics were controlled for, a primary care physician's patient recall

  15. A Balanced Approach to Physician Responsibilities: Oncologists' Duties toward Themselves.

    PubMed

    Abernethy, Amy P

    2012-01-01

    Although critical to the provision of best patient care, physician self-care is an underattended aspect of responsibility in the medical professions, including oncology. Neglecting self-care bears negative consequences for the individual oncologist, ranging from burnout and fatigue to interpersonal and relationship stress, addiction, and disruptive behavior. It may also contribute to medical errors, disinterest in or depersonalization of patient care, and lower quality of care. Because of its effect on physicians, patients, and the health care environment, physician self-care is increasingly recognized as an important professional responsibility. Nonetheless, professional obligations, competing demands on time, and personal priorities conspire to prevent a large proportion of oncologists from adequately attending to self-care in even simple ways, such as getting sufficient exercise and sleep. This chapter discusses the need for physician self-care and the repercussions of not meeting this fundamental responsibility. Self-care is described in the context of three life domains: professional, personal (physical, psychological, mental, and spiritual), and interpersonal (relationships, family, social, and community). Strategies are provided for caring for the self in each domain.

  16. AIDS, the female patient, and the family physician.

    PubMed Central

    Mackie, I. D.

    1993-01-01

    Women constitute the most rapidly growing population with human immunodeficiency virus infection in Canada. Problems unique to women and related to HIV include gynecological disorders such as recurrent candidiasis, cervical dysplasia, and neoplasia. Women also face unique psychosocial issues related to their socioeconomic status, pregnancy, and sex. This article addresses these issues. PMID:8348021

  17. Physicians' attitudes about their professional appearance.

    PubMed

    Gjerdingen, D K; Simpson, D E

    1989-01-01

    Thirty-five residents and 77 staff physicians from three residency programs in Minnesota and Wisconsin completed questionnaires about their attitudes toward various components of the physician's appearance. Most participants showed positive responses to traditional physician attire such as white coat, name tag, shirt and tie, dress pants, skirt or dress, nylons, and dress shoes. Negative responses were associated with casual items such as sandals, clogs, athletic shoes, scrub suits, and blue jeans. Cronbach's alpha analysis identified four cohesive appearance scales: traditional male appearance, casual male appearance, traditional female appearance, and casual female appearance. Older physician participants favored a more traditional appearance than did younger physicians, and of the physicians who were 35 years and younger, staff physicians tended to show more conservative views toward professional appearance than did residents.

  18. Improving physician-patient interactions: a review.

    PubMed

    Strecher, V J

    1983-01-01

    The interaction between physician and patient comprises aspects of communication common to any two human beings and other aspects peculiar to the roles exclusively adopted by physicians and patients. In this review, nonverbal and verbal elements of general communication are discussed, detailing important aspects of vocal tone, body postures, appearance, and verbal cues that may influence attributions made of physicians by patients. Role-related elements of physician-patient interactions are discussed in light of findings from research on interactions between physicians and patients. Developmental elements of general communication are discussed, relating stages tht evolve in interactions to physician-patient interactions. Finally, an examination is made of how interpersonal skills are taught to physicians and medical students. Discussion of what skills are specified for teaching, whether they are effectively taught, and whether the learning of these skills produces desired patient health-related outcomes is presented.

  19. HMO employment and African-American physicians.

    PubMed Central

    Briscoe, Forrest; Konrad, Thomas R.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the level and determinants of African-American physicians' employment in health maintenance organizations (HMOs), particularly early in their careers. METHODS: We analyzed data from the 1991 and 1996 Young Physicians Surveys to assess racial differences in the likelihood of HMO employment (n = 3,705). Using multinomial logistic regression, we evaluated four explanations for an observed relationship between African-American physicians and HMO employment: human capital stratification among organizations, race-based affinity between physicians and patients, financial constraints due to debt burden, and different organizational hiring practices. Using binomial logistic regression, we also evaluated differences in the odds of being turned down for a prior practice position, of subsequently leaving the current practice organization and of later having career doubts. RESULTS: Without any controls, African-American physicians were 4.52 times more likely to practice in HMOs than Caucasian physicians. After controlling for human capital stratification, racial concordance and financial constraints, African-American physicians remained 2.48 times more likely to practice in HMOs than Caucasian physicians. In addition, 19.2% of African-American physicians in HMOs reported being turned down for another job, far more than any other racial/ethnic group in the HMO setting and any racial/ethnic group, including African-American physicians in the non-HMO setting (including all other practice locations). Five years later, those same African-American physicians from HMOs also reported significantly more turnover (7.50 times more likely than non-HMO African-American physicians to leave their current practice) and doubt about their careers (2.17 times more likely than non-HMO African-American physicians to express serious career doubts). CONCLUSIONS: African-American physicians were disproportionately hired into HMO settings, impacting their subsequent careers. PMID

  20. A1cNow® InView™: A New Simple Method for Office-Based Glycohemoglobin Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Mattewal, Amarbir; Aldasouqi, Saleh; Solomon, David; Gossain, Ved; Koller, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    Background Glycohemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) is a universally accepted tool for glycemic control. Portable HbA1c devices for use in physicians' offices are desirable because they provide immediate results that physicians can share with their patients. This has been shown to enhance self-management in patients with diabetes. We undertook this study to evaluate the accuracy and precision of a recently introduced device, the A1cNow® InView™ capillary monitor. Methods Previously tested EDTA-preserved whole blood samples from our laboratory pool were preselected based on the results of HbA1c to cover a range from 4 to 13%. HbA1c was then measured using an A1cNow InView capillary monitor. Blinded aliquots of these samples were then sent to a National Glycohemoglobin Standardization Program (NGSP)-certified reference laboratory for comparison. One sample with a laboratory HbA1c result of 9.2% was measured with the InView device nine successive times to assess the device precision. The consistency between the measurement of HbA1c measured by the reference laboratory and the A1cNow InView device was analyzed via linear regression. Results Thirty-five samples were tested. The correlation between HbA1c measured by the InView device and the reference laboratory, as well as our own laboratory, was 0.96. The coefficient of variation was 2.71%. Conclusions Results of this study confirm the accuracy and precision of the InView capillary HbA1c monitor. However, the feasibility, reproducibility, and cost-effectiveness of this promising device in the real-life settings of physicians' offices must be verified by prospective clinical studies. PMID:19885160