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Sample records for family physician office-based

  1. Family Violence and Family Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Carol P.

    1991-01-01

    The acronym IDEALS summarizes family physicians' obligations when violence is suspected: to identify family violence; document injuries; educate families and ensure safety for victims; access resources and coordinate care; co-operate in the legal process; and provide support for families. Failure to respond reflects personal and professional experience and attitudes, fear of legal involvement, and lack of knowledge. Risks of intervention include physician burnout, physician overfunctioning, escalation of violence, and family disruption. PMID:21228987

  2. Physician reimbursement reform and family physicians.

    PubMed

    Higgins, C W

    1991-02-01

    In the final hours of the 1989 session, Congress passed the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act (OBRA) of 1989, which included the most important change in physician reimbursement policy since the introduction of Medicare. The new payment system will base physician Medicare reimbursement on a fee schedule, establish uniform percentage limits on balance billing, and set targets for total Part B physician expenditures. Medicare payments to family physicians will increase substantially under the new system. This will enhance the status and attractiveness of the specialty. The new system will decrease physician autonomy in some respects, and it is not clear that it will successfully control spending. However, on balance it offers significant advantages for family physicians.

  3. Family Homeostasis and the Physician

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Don D.

    1965-01-01

    Physical illness, including psychosomatic disorders, often play an unexpected role in maintaining emotional balances within the family. The outbreak of such disorders, conversely, can be utilized by the physician as a barometer of family emotional difficulties. PMID:5828172

  4. Expanding treatment capacity for opioid dependence with office-based treatment with buprenorphine: National surveys of physicians.

    PubMed

    Arfken, Cynthia L; Johanson, Chris-Ellyn; di Menza, Salvatore; Schuster, Charles Roberts

    2010-09-01

    Office-based treatment of opioid dependence with buprenorphine has the potential to expand treatment capacity in the United States. However, nationally, little is known about the number, characteristics, and experiences of physicians certified to prescribe buprenorphine. Moreover, little is known about the impact of easing federal regulations on the number of patients a physician is allowed to treat concurrently. To address these questions, surveys of national samples of physicians certified to prescribe buprenorphine (2004-2008) were analyzed (N = 6,892). There has been a continual increase in the number of physicians certified to prescribe buprenorphine, increase in the mean number of patients treated by physicians, and decrease in patients turned away, coinciding temporally with easing of federal regulations. In addition, most physicians prescribed buprenorphine outside of traditional treatment settings. The U.S. experiment in expanding Schedule III-V medications for opioid dependence to physicians outside of formal substance abuse treatment facilities appears to have resulted in expanded capacity.

  5. Incest and the family physician.

    PubMed

    Boekelheide, P D

    1978-01-01

    This paper is a review of incest from epidemiologic, familial, and individual points of view. The incest taboo has characterized almost every culture and society throughout the ages. Respect for the incest barrier is a cultural demand made by society and is not a physiological or biological imperative. Overt incest occurs in a dysfunctional family through tension-reducing "acting out." The family physician is in a unique position to observe and understand the family dynamics which both help maintain defenses against the incestuous wishes as well as, in some families, contribute to the practice of incest. For 2,000 years physicians have taken the Hippocratic oath, with its explicit love relationship clause, as a reminder of their ethical responsibilities towards their patients. Examples of para-incestuous relationships between vulnerable individuals and authoritative helping figures are cited. A psychodynamic rationale is offered as to why sexual relationships between patients and their family physicians are not therapeutically beneficial. Clues for assessment and ten preventive measures are presented to enable physicians to monitor themselves and the families in their practice.

  6. Health Care of Adolescents by Office-Based Physicians: National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, 1980-81.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cypress, Beulah K.

    1984-01-01

    This report examines the nature of the conditions presented by adolescents and the health care provided by office-based physicians. The characteristics of patients are noted and the reason for the visit to the doctor and the length of the visit are summarized. Tables present information on: (1) average annual rate of office visits of adolescents…

  7. Internet resources for family physicians.

    PubMed Central

    Anthes, D. L.; Berry, R. E.; Lanning, A.

    1997-01-01

    PROBLEM BEING ADDRESSED: The internet has experienced tremendous growth over the past few years and has many resources in the field of family medicine. However, many family physicians remain unaware of how the Internet can be used to enhance their practice and of how to gain access to this powerful tool. OBJECTIVE OF PROGRAM: To characterize components of the Internet, to explore how family physicians can use the Internet to enhance practice, and to increase awareness of how to gain access to Internet sites relevant to family medicine. MAIN COMPONENTS OF THE PROGRAM: An on-line search through the World Wide Web was conducted using multiple search engines including Lycos, WebCrawler, OpenText, and Yahoo as well as a conventional MEDLINE search of Internet publications for the past 5 years. A website containing an evolving selection of resources can be found at http:@dfcm 18.med.utoronto.ca/anthes/hpgdfcm1.htm. CONCLUSION: The Internet has useful applications and resources for family physicians including rapid communication between physicians, access to medical literature, continuing medical education programs, and lists of patient support and discussion groups. PMID:9189299

  8. Indiana family physician attitudes and practices concerning smoking cessation.

    PubMed

    Saywell, R M; Jay, S J; Lukas, P J; Casebeer, L L; Mybeck, K C; Parchman, M L; Haley, A J

    1996-01-01

    Most physicians are aware of the health benefits of smoking cessation and agree they have a responsibility to help smokers quit. Many physicians, however, do not regularly address smoking cessation with their patients. Questionnaires were sent to 2,095 family practice physicians in Indiana. Information obtained included: demographic data; office-based smoking cessation practices; counseling; and physicians' perceptions of intervention outcomes. Most physicians (86%) asked new patients if they smoked, and 23% questioned patients about their exposure to passive smoke. Younger physicians, female physicians and urban physicians were more likely to ask new patients if they smoked. A formal smoking cessation program was used by 28% of the responding physicians. Among those not using a program, 7% reported plans to implement one in the coming year, 40% were not planning to implement one, and 53% were unsure. Physician and practice characteristics were not correlated with the use of smoking cessation programs. Only 11% of physicians considered their smoking cessation counseling skills to be excellent; 27% indicated the need for improvement in skills. One-half (52%) believed their counseling efforts were effective; almost half (45%) believed that current reimbursement policies limited their involvement in smoking cessation interventions. Most respondents have not instituted smoking cessation programs in their practices. It is likely that a combination of strategies, including both undergraduate, graduate and continuing medical education programs and reform in reimbursement practices for cessation programs, will be required to achieve significant increases in long-term smoking abstinence rates.

  9. Family physicians: importance and relevance.

    PubMed

    Yeravdekar, Rajiv; Yeravdekar, Vidya Rajiv; Tutakne, M A

    2012-07-01

    Due to rapid advancement in medical technology and knowledge patients today prefer treatment from specialists, if they can afford it. Medical treatment has become a purchasable commodity, to be procured as and when required, based on cost and availability.This is unfortunate but true. Specialisation tends to divide the patients into'parts' and increases the cost of treatment. Moreover no single physician is in charge of the patient as a whole to maintain long term continuity and coordinate the treatments given by different specialists. Since long term dependence on 'family doctor' has reduced, trust deficit in the profession has started creeping in. It is essential to rejuvenate the concept of family doctors equipped with skills suitable for modern technology and practice, to restore the faith of patients in medical professionals. Family doctor can provide a 'single window clearance' for all healthcare needs of an individual. Exploitation of gullible patient can be prevented when the family doctor becomes the friend and guide for all treatments being given to the individual. Society should be educated on the benefits of getting the treatment through the family doctor. The family doctor then becomes the Authorised Medical Attendant (AMA), responsible for all treatments beings provided to the patients. The Medical Council of India (MCI) may consider incorporating this in code of medical ethics.

  10. Alternate site infusion: the physician-directed, office-based model.

    PubMed

    Tice, A D

    1996-01-01

    The physician-directed, clinic-based system for alternate site infusion therapy offers the advantages of easy communication and integrated decision making through the close teamwork and particular expertise of the nurse, physician, and pharmacist. With this system, any type of delivery model for home or outpatient IV antibiotic can be administered safely and efficiently. Through the involvement of the physician, it is easy to do clinical outcomes studies and develop bundling of services for risk-sharing contracts under managed care.

  11. Rural Idaho Family Physicians' Scope of Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Ed; Schmitz, David; Epperly, Ted; Nukui, Ayaka; Miller, Carissa Moffat

    2010-01-01

    Context: Scope of practice is an important factor in both training and recruiting rural family physicians. Purpose: To assess rural Idaho family physicians' scope of practice and to examine variations in scope of practice across variables such as gender, age and employment status. Methods: A survey instrument was developed based on a literature…

  12. Genograms. Practical tools for family physicians.

    PubMed Central

    Waters, I.; Watson, W.; Wetzel, W.

    1994-01-01

    A genogram can help a physician integrate a patient's family information into the medical problem-solving process for better patient care. A genogram allows a physician to obtain medical and psychosocial information from a patient easily and, as a result, to have a better understanding of the context of the presenting symptoms. PMID:8130675

  13. Ethical decision making by Canadian family physicians.

    PubMed Central

    Christie, R J; Hoffmaster, C B; Stewart, M A

    1987-01-01

    Canadian family physicians were sent questionnaires that asked how they would handle the ethical problems posed by six sample cases and what reasons were relevant to their decisions. The ethical problems concerned how much information to divulge to patients, how extensively a physician should become involved in the lifestyles of patients and how to deal with a possible family problem. The study identified characteristics of family physicians that affect their ethical decision making and tested a theoretical model that regards ethical problems as conflicts between respecting patient autonomy and promoting patient welfare. The varied responses suggested that ethical issues are resolved on a case-by-case, rather than a theoretical, basis. Certification in family medicine was the only characteristic associated with a consistent pattern of responses; certificants were more likely than other physicians to involve patients in decisions. PMID:3676930

  14. Family Physician Perspectives on Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Orange, Jordan S.; Seeborg, Filiz O.; Boyle, Marcia; Scalchunes, Christopher; Hernandez-Trujillo, Vivian

    2016-01-01

    Primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDs) include over 250 diverse disorders. The current study assessed management of PID by family practice physicians. The American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology Primary Immunodeficiency Committee and the Immune Deficiency Foundation conducted an incentivized mail survey of family practice physician members of the American Medical Association and the American Osteopathic Association in direct patient care. Responses were compared with subspecialist immunologist responses from a similar survey. Surveys were returned by 528 (of 4500 surveys mailed) family practice physicians, of whom 44% reported following ≥1 patient with PID. Selective immunoglobulin A deficiency (21%) and chronic granulomatous disease (11%) were most common and were followed by significantly more subspecialist immunologists (P < 0.05). Use of intravenously administered immunoglobulin and live viral vaccinations across PID was significantly different (P < 0.05). Few family practice physicians were aware of professional guidelines for diagnosis and management of PID (4 vs. 79% of subspecialist immunologists, P < 0.05). Family practice physicians will likely encounter patients with PID diagnoses during their career. Differences in how family practice physicians and subspecialist immunologists manage patients with PID underscore areas where improved educational and training initiatives may benefit patient care. PMID:27066486

  15. Family Physician Perspectives on Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases.

    PubMed

    Orange, Jordan S; Seeborg, Filiz O; Boyle, Marcia; Scalchunes, Christopher; Hernandez-Trujillo, Vivian

    2016-01-01

    Primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDs) include over 250 diverse disorders. The current study assessed management of PID by family practice physicians. The American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology Primary Immunodeficiency Committee and the Immune Deficiency Foundation conducted an incentivized mail survey of family practice physician members of the American Medical Association and the American Osteopathic Association in direct patient care. Responses were compared with subspecialist immunologist responses from a similar survey. Surveys were returned by 528 (of 4500 surveys mailed) family practice physicians, of whom 44% reported following ≥1 patient with PID. Selective immunoglobulin A deficiency (21%) and chronic granulomatous disease (11%) were most common and were followed by significantly more subspecialist immunologists (P < 0.05). Use of intravenously administered immunoglobulin and live viral vaccinations across PID was significantly different (P < 0.05). Few family practice physicians were aware of professional guidelines for diagnosis and management of PID (4 vs. 79% of subspecialist immunologists, P < 0.05). Family practice physicians will likely encounter patients with PID diagnoses during their career. Differences in how family practice physicians and subspecialist immunologists manage patients with PID underscore areas where improved educational and training initiatives may benefit patient care. PMID:27066486

  16. Collaboration between family physicians and nurse clinicians

    PubMed Central

    Maheux, Brigitte; Côté, Luc; Sobanjo, Omobola; Authier, Louise; Lajeunesse, Julie; Leclerc, Mylène; Lefort, Louise

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine whether graduating family physicians are exposed to collaboration between family physicians and nurse clinicians during their training, as well as their opinions about shared care between doctors and nurse clinicians in the delivery of patient care. Design Anonymous online survey. Setting Two French-Canadian university family medicine residency programs. Participants The 2010 and 2011 graduating family physicians (N = 343) from the University of Montreal and Laval University in Quebec. Main outcome measures The extent to which nurse clinicians in graduating family physicians’ training milieu were involved in preventive and curative patient care activities, and graduates’ opinions about nurse clinicians sharing care with physicians. Results Of 343 graduates, 186 (54.2%) participated in the survey. Although as residents in family medicine their exposure to shared care with nurse clinicians was somewhat limited, respondents indicated that they were generally quite open to the idea of sharing care with nurse clinicians. More than 70% of respondents agreed or strongly agreed that nurse clinicians could adjust, according to protocols of clinical guidelines, the treatment of patients with diabetes, hypertension, and asthma, as well as regulate medication for pain control in terminally ill patients. By contrast, respondents were less favourable to nurse clinicians adjusting the treatment of patients with depression. More than 80% of respondents agreed or strongly agreed that nurse clinicians could initiate treatment via a medical directive for routine hormonal contraception, acne, uncomplicated cystitis, and sexually transmitted infections. Respondents’ opinions on nurse clinicians initiating treatment for pharyngitis and otitis were more divided. Conclusion Graduating family physicians are quite open to collaborating with nurse clinicians. Although they have observed some collaboration between physicians and nurses, there are areas of

  17. The Family Physician's Role During Disasters

    PubMed Central

    Crosby, John

    1986-01-01

    Family physicians can encourage disaster planning and mock disaster exercises in their community. If involved in an actual disaster, the family physician can be helpful as a triage officer in emergency, in initial resuscitation, in minor treatment, in discharging stable patients, and in counselling victims of post-traumatic shock syndrome. The key to effective performance is being prepared beforehand to cope with the stress and confusion of the incident. Use of laboratory and diagnostic imaging must be curtailed until all severely injured patients are treated. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4 PMID:21267128

  18. Fewer family physicians are in solo practices.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Lars E; Baxley, Elizabeth; Jaén, Carlos Roberto; Phillips, Robert L

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 20 years there has been a statistically significant trend toward fewer family physicians identifying as being in solo practice. Further study to determine the reasons for this decline and its impact on access to care will be critical because rural areas are more dependent on solo practitioners.

  19. Emergency Dental Treatment for the Family Physician

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Brian

    1987-01-01

    The family physician is often expected, and should be able, competently to provide emergency dental treatment. With the knowledge of relatively few techniques and materials, this care can often be simply provided. Treatment discussed includes: odontogenic infections, avulsions, fractured teeth, post-operative bleeding and pain, dentures, dental caries, periodontal problems, analgesics, and allergy to local anesthetic. PMID:21263889

  20. Behavioral interventions for office-based care: interventions in the family medicine setting.

    PubMed

    Larzelere, Michele McCarthy

    2014-03-01

    The practice of family medicine includes the care of many patients with mental health or behavior change needs. Patients in mild to moderate distress may benefit from brief interventions performed in the family physician's office. Patients in more extreme distress may be helped by referral to behavioral health clinicians for short-term or open-ended therapies. Electronic therapy programs and bibliotherapy are also useful resources. The transition to the patient-centered medical home model may allow for more widespread integration of behavioral health care clinicians into primary care, in person and through telemental health care. Integrated care holds the promise of improved access, greater effectiveness of behavioral health service provision, and enhanced efficiency of primary care for patients with behavioral health care needs.

  1. Electronic health record systems and intent to apply for meaningful use incentives among office-based physician practices: United States, 2001-2011.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Chun-Ju; Hing, Esther; Socey, Thomas C; Cai, Bill

    2011-11-01

    An increasing trend in EMR/EHR system use among office-based physicians was noted from 2001 through preliminary 2011 estimates. In 2011, the NAMCS mail survey showed about 57% of office-based physicians used any EMR/EHR system, a 12% increase from the 2010 estimate. Between 2010 and 2011, the percentage of physicians who reported having systems meeting the criteria for a basic system increased 36%. Adoption of EMR/EHR systems varied greatly by state. In 2011, the percentage of physicians using any EMR/EHR system ranged from 40% in Louisiana to 84% in North Dakota. Compared with the national average, 3 states had a significantly lower percentage of office-based physicians using any EMR/EHR system, and 11 states had a significantly higher percentage. The percentage of physicians having a system that met the criteria for a basic system ranged from 16% in New Jersey to 61% in Minnesota. Compared with the national average, six states had a significantly lower percentage of office-based physicians with a basic system, and eight states had a significantly higher percentage. In 2011, 52% of physicians reported intending to apply for the Medicare or Medicaid EHR incentive payments, a 26% increase from 2010. In 2010, interest among physicians in applying for meaningful use incentive payments was similar to the national average (41%) across most states. In only four states (Alaska, New York, North Dakota, and West Virginia) and the District of Columbia was the percentage lower than the national average. To qualify for Stage 1 meaningful use incentive payments, eligible physicians need to meet all 15 Stage 1 Core Set objectives and 5 of 10 Menu Set objectives, using certified EHR systems (see "Definitions"). In this report, estimates of physicians’ readiness to meet Stage 1 Core Set meaningful use measures were limited to data collected on the computerized functions needed to meet eight Stage 1 objectives. A previous study found that 15% of physicians eligible to apply for

  2. What do family physicians see in practice?

    PubMed Central

    Warrington, A. M.; Ponesse, D. J.; Hunter, M. E.; Grant, D. A.; Grasset, A. V.; Gray, D. W.; Hayward, C. D.; Long, B. F.; Morrison, G. E.; Sutherland, D.

    1977-01-01

    Health care problems dealt with in their practices were recorded by seven family physicians over a period of 1 year (two others recorded for 3 months), each diagnosis being coded according to the Canuck Disease Classification Index. Problems were classified into four types: physical, psychosocial, diseases of choice (or lifestyle) and diseases of social impact. More than 85% of the 23 108 problems recorded were physical in origin and had physical manifestations. More time was spent on routine checkups and treatment of respiratory disease than on any other activity. Venereal disease and alcoholism were infrequent problems. The family physician is in a favourable position to act as health educator and counsellor and must be throughly trained in the physical aspects of disease. PMID:578125

  3. A Family Physician's Guide to Sewage Sludge

    PubMed Central

    Connop, Peter J.

    1983-01-01

    The potential environmental and personal health effects from the agricultural uses of domestic sewage sludge may increasingly require the guidance of the family physician, especially in farming communities. This article summarizes the potential health hazards and outlines the tripartite risk phenomenon—hazard identification, risk assessment, and social evaluation. For the agricultural use of dewatered sewage sludge, strict adherence to regulated procedures should not increase risk beyond that of agriculture generally. Confirmation by prospective epidemiological studies is recommended. PMID:21283298

  4. Electronic Health Record Systems and Intent to Apply for Meaningful Use Incentives among Office-based Physician ...

    MedlinePlus

    ... in Wisconsin. The 2009 Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act authorized incentive payments through Medicare and Medicaid to increase physician adoption of electronic health record (EHR) systems ( 1 , 2 ). Eligible Medicare and Medicaid physicians may ...

  5. The Role of the Family Physician in the Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Turgeon, Sue A.

    1984-01-01

    The trend amongst urban family physicians away from hospital practice is a major threat to the family physician's role in the health care system. Continuity and comprehensiveness in patient care are the basis for a family physician's involvement in hospital care. The family physician brings the valuable perspective of the generalist to the specialized hospital environment and benefits from the educational stimulus that environment provides. PMID:21279056

  6. Office-based physicians are responding to incentives and assistance by adopting and using electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Chun-Ju; Jha, Ashish K; King, Jennifer; Patel, Vaishali; Furukawa, Michael F; Mostashari, Farzad

    2013-08-01

    Expanding the use of interoperable electronic health record (EHR) systems to improve health care delivery is a national policy priority. We used the 2010-12 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey--Electronic Health Records Survey to examine which physicians in what types of practices are implementing the systems, and how they are using them. We found that 72 percent of physicians had adopted some type of system and that 40 percent had adopted capabilities required for a basic EHR system. The highest relative increases in adoption were among physicians with historically low adoption levels, including older physicians and those working in solo practices or community health centers. As of 2012, physicians in rural areas had higher rates of adoption than those in large urban areas, and physicians in counties with high rates of poverty had rates of adoption comparable to those in areas with less poverty. However, small practices continued to lag behind larger practices. Finally, the majority of physicians who adopted the EHR capabilities required to obtain federal financial incentives used the capabilities routinely, with few differences across physician groups. PMID:23840050

  7. Resources available to help family physicians provide advice to travellers.

    PubMed Central

    Lechky, O

    1995-01-01

    Because many Canadians are travelling to exotic destinations, family physicians may be asked for advice on immunization and health tips to prevent illnesses such as malaria, altitude disease, meningitis and schistosomiasis. A Toronto family physician who is on staff at a travel clinic says a few guiding principles and good resources can help family physicians ensure that their patients are healthy when they return from a trip. PMID:7553504

  8. Maintenance of skills for today's family physician: the SAGE approach to physician learning.

    PubMed

    Oh, Robert C; Junnila, Jennifer L; Seehusen, Dean A; Edwards, John A; Runkle, Guy P

    2005-12-01

    Physicians need practical ways to maintain and augment clinical skills after residency training. The problem is amplified when a physician encounters a new practice environment that requires retraining in particular skills. With their broad scope of practice, family physicians are especially prone to deterioration of infrequently used skills. The SAGE model for lifelong learning provides a simple solution for today's military family physicians. Scan, assess, gather, and experience are four key steps physicians should take when maintaining or upgrading clinical skills. This approach allows physicians to identify available resources and to develop action plans to improve skills. Supervisors must encourage physicians to be honest in self-assessment of patient care skills and should support the acquisition of improved skills. System-based solutions, in keeping with suggestions from the Institute of Medicine, are introduced.

  9. Engagement of family physicians seven years into maintenance of certification.

    PubMed

    Puffer, James C; Bazemore, Andrew W; Newton, Warren P; Makaroff, Laura; Xierali, Imam M; Green, Larry A

    2011-01-01

    Transitioning Family Physicians to continuous Maintenance of Certification (MOC) was intended to support the quality improvement movement nationally, but it also risked decreasing their engagement due to the increased requirements for retaining certification. However, after completing the transition of all family physicians into MOC in 2010, participation appears higher than ever. PMID:21900427

  10. The Availability of Fellowship Training for Foreign Family Physicians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Michael D.; Merenstein, Joel H.

    1990-01-01

    The authors surveyed 49 U.S. fellowship programs in family medicine. Although foreign physicians are encouraged by the American Academy of Family Practice to come to the United States, this study shows that it is extremely difficult for these physicians to find programs willing to act as host. (Author/MLW)

  11. Autism: A review for family physicians.

    PubMed

    Karande, Sunil

    2006-05-01

    Autism is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by qualitative impairments in social interaction and communication, with restricted, repetitive, stereotyped patterns of behavior, interests and activities. These behaviors manifest along a wide spectrum and commence before 36 months of age. Diagnosis of autism is made by ascertaining whether the child's specific behaviors meet the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-IV-Revised criteria. Its etiology is still unclear but recent studies suggest that genetics plays a major role in conferring susceptibility. Recent neuroimaging research studies indicate that autism may be caused by atypical functioning in the central nervous system, particularly in the limbic system: amygdala and hippocampus. In a third of autistic children, loss of language and/or social skills occurs during the second year of life, usually between 15 and 21 months of age. Comorbidity with mental retardation, epilepsy, disruptive behaviors and learning difficulty is not uncommon. Although there is currently no known cure for autism there is evidence to suggest that early intervention therapy can improve functioning of autistic children. Judicious use of psychotropic drugs is necessary to manage associated aggression, hyperactivity, self-mutilation, temper tantrums; but drugs are not a substitute for behavioral and educational interventions. The family physician can play an important role in detecting autism early, coordinating its assessment and treatment, counseling the parents and classroom teacher, and monitoring the child's progress on a long term basis. PMID:16733293

  12. Changes in Glitazone Use Among Office-Based Physicians in the U.S., 2003–2009

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Andrew; Rabbani, Atonu; Shah, Nilay; Alexander, G. Caleb

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Little is known regarding recent changes in glitazone use. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Interrupted time series analyses of nationally representative office-visit data using IMS Health's National Disease and Therapeutic Index. RESULTS From 2003 through 2005, glitazone use increased steadily. From February 2005 to January 2007, rosiglitazone use decreased by 16% (95% CI −20 to −11) annually; pioglitazone use increased at an annual rate of 14% (9–18). During a period of Food and Drug Administration (FDA) advisories, rosiglitazone use declined sharply from 0.42 million monthly treatment visits (February 2007) to 0.13 million monthly visits (May 2008). Pioglitazone use remained stable, accounting for ∼5.8 million physician visits (77% of all glitazone use) where a treatment was used during the final 12 months of observation. CONCLUSIONS The combined effect of scientific publications, advisories, and media exposure was associated with a substantial decrease in rosiglitazone use. Despite a class-level FDA advisory, pioglitazone use was not similarly affected. PMID:20103549

  13. Family Physician attitudes about prescribing using a drug formulary

    PubMed Central

    Suggs, L Suzanne; Raina, Parminder; Gafni, Amiram; Grant, Susan; Skilton, Kevin; Fan, Aimei; Szala-Meneok, Karen

    2009-01-01

    Background Drug formularies have been created by third party payers to control prescription drug usage and manage costs. Physicians try to provide the best care for their patients. This research examines family physicians' attitudes regarding prescription reimbursement criteria, prescribing and advocacy for patients experiencing reimbursement barriers. Methods Focus groups were used to collect qualitative data on family physicians' prescribing decisions related to drug reimbursement guidelines. Forty-eight family physicians from four Ontario cities participated. Ethics approval for this study was received from the Hamilton Health Sciences/Faculty of Health Sciences Research Ethics Board at McMaster University. Four clinical scenarios were used to situate and initiate focus group discussions about prescribing decisions. Open-ended questions were used to probe physicians' experiences and attitudes and responses were audio recorded. NVivo software was used to assist in data analysis. Results Most physicians reported that drug reimbursement guidelines complicated their prescribing process and can require lengthy interpretation and advocacy for patients who require medication that is subject to reimbursement restrictions. Conclusion Physicians do not generally see their role as being cost-containment monitors and observed that cumbersome reimbursement guidelines influence medication choice beyond the clinical needs of the patient, and produce unequal access to medication. They observed that frustration, discouragement, fatigue, and lack of appreciation can often contribute to family physicians' failure to advocate more for patients. Physicians argue cumbersome reimbursement regulations contribute to lower quality care and misuse of physicians' time increasing overall health care costs by adding unnecessary visits to family physicians, specialists, and emergency rooms. PMID:19835601

  14. Cancer Risk Assessment by Rural and Appalachian Family Medicine Physicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Kimberly M.; Love, Margaret M.; Pearce, Kevin A.; Porter, Kyle; Barron, Mary A.; Andrykowski, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Context: Challenges to the identification of hereditary cancer in primary care may be more pronounced in rural Appalachia, a medically underserved region. Purpose: To examine primary care physicians' identification of hereditary cancers. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was mailed to family physicians in the midwestern and southeastern United…

  15. What do Victoria family physicians think about housecalls?

    PubMed Central

    Hammett, Tess

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the proportion of family physicians doing housecalls, the types of patients they think are appropriate to visit at home, whether physicians are satisfied with the number of housecalls they make, reasons family physicians list for not doing housecalls, and what they consider acceptable remuneration and travel time for housecalls. Design A 12-question paper survey was formulated specifically for this study and piloted by 6 family physicians in British Columbia. It was then mailed with a cover letter to 250 physicians' offices and faxed back anonymously. Setting Family physicians' private offices in Victoria, BC, between December 1 and 19, 2010. Participants A total of 250 randomly selected family physicians from a list of 552 physicians practising in Victoria on the College of Physicians and Surgeons of British Columbia website. Main outcome measures Proportion of physicians doing housecalls, reasons stated for not doing housecalls, and mean acceptable remuneration and travel time for a housecall. Results A total of 73 surveys (29.2%) were returned, 5 of which were not fully completed but were included for the questions that were answered. Sixty-four physicians (87.7%) did at least 1 housecall in the past year, 23 (31.5%) did housecalls at least once a month, and 12 (16.4%) did them at least once a week. Of 71 respondents, 64 physicians (90.1%) listed lack of time as a barrier to performing housecalls, 37 (52.1%) listed unsatisfactory remuneration, and 35 (49.3%) listed lengthy travel times. Most physicians indicated that appropriate remuneration for a housecall was either $142.21 (n = 30, 42.9%) or $108.41 (n = 26, 37.1%). Thirty-seven physicians (52.9%) noted that 20 minutes was an acceptable maximum 1-way travel time for a housecall, while 29 (41.4%) listed 10 minutes. Conclusion Several systemic factors, including lack of time, unsatisfactory remuneration, and large geographic catchment areas, make it difficult for urban family physicians

  16. Office Management of Chemical Dependency by Family Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Ray

    1991-01-01

    Family physicians are in an ideal position to identify, intervene with, and treat substance use disorders. If family physicians position themselves to reflect objective evidence of consequences of substance use and offer suggestions for change while leaving responsibility for recovery with the patient, patients often choose to recover. Because the disease is characterized by exacerbations, remissions, and relapses, continued involvement with the recovering patient ensures the greatest chance of recovery. PMID:21228969

  17. A new, but old business model for family physicians: cash.

    PubMed

    Weber, J Michael

    2013-01-01

    The following study is an exploratory investigation into the opportunity identification, opportunity analysis, and strategic implications of implementing a cash-only family physician practice. The current market dynamics (i.e., increasing insurance premiums, decreasing benefits, more regulations and paperwork, and cuts in federal and state programs) suggest that there is sufficient motivation for these practitioners to change their current business model. In-depth interviews were conducted with office managers and physicians of family physician practices. The results highlighted a variety of issues, including barriers to change, strategy issues, and opportunities/benefits. The implications include theory applications, strategic marketing applications, and managerial decision-making. PMID:23924222

  18. A new, but old business model for family physicians: cash.

    PubMed

    Weber, J Michael

    2013-01-01

    The following study is an exploratory investigation into the opportunity identification, opportunity analysis, and strategic implications of implementing a cash-only family physician practice. The current market dynamics (i.e., increasing insurance premiums, decreasing benefits, more regulations and paperwork, and cuts in federal and state programs) suggest that there is sufficient motivation for these practitioners to change their current business model. In-depth interviews were conducted with office managers and physicians of family physician practices. The results highlighted a variety of issues, including barriers to change, strategy issues, and opportunities/benefits. The implications include theory applications, strategic marketing applications, and managerial decision-making.

  19. Role Expectations in Dementia Care Among Family Physicians and Specialists

    PubMed Central

    Hum, Susan; Cohen, Carole; Persaud, Malini; Lee, Joyce; Drummond, Neil; Dalziel, William; Pimlott, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    Background The assessment and ongoing management of dementia falls largely on family physicians. This pilot study explored perceived roles and attitudes towards the provision of dementia care from the perspectives of family physicians and specialists. Methods Semi-structured, one-to-one interviews were conducted with six family physicians and six specialists (three geriatric psychiatrists, two geriatricians, and one neurologist) from University of Toronto-affiliated hospitals. Transcripts were subjected to thematic content analysis. Results Physicians’ clinical experience averaged 16 years. Both physician groups acknowledged that family physicians are more confident in diagnosing/treating uncomplicated dementia than a decade ago. They agreed on care management issues that warranted specialist involvement. Driving competency was contentious, and specialists willingly played the “bad cop” to resolve disputes and preserve long-standing therapeutic relationships. While patient/caregiver education and support were deemed essential, most physicians commented that community resources were fragmented and difficult to access. Improving collaboration and communication between physician groups, and clarifying the roles of other multi-disciplinary team members in dementia care were also discussed. Conclusions Future research could further explore physicians’ and other multi-disciplinary members’ perceived roles and responsibilities in dementia care, given that different health-care system-wide dementia care strategies and initiatives are being developed and implemented across Ontario. PMID:25232368

  20. Influences upon reported health promotion by family physicians.

    PubMed

    Bredfeldt, R C; Brewer, M L; Junker, J A

    1990-01-01

    Disease prevention and the promotion of healthy life-styles have received increasing attention over the past two decades. The purpose of this study was to determine the current level of health promotional activity as reported by family physicians. In addition, the study addressed various factors which may influence the level of physician promotion of healthy life-styles. This was accomplished by means of a survey of 815 active members of the American Academy of Family Physicians. A total of 521 questionnaires was returned, providing a 64 percent response rate. The results of this survey indicate that the level of physician personal health activity tends to influence their reported professional promotion of healthy habits. In addition, residency faculty and physicians working for health maintenance organizations were significantly more likely to report offering a higher frequency of health promotional activity than physicians in private practice. Finally, age and family practice residency training appear to have no influence on self-reported physician health promotional activity.

  1. Family physicians and patients: is effective nutrition interaction possible?

    PubMed

    Truswell, A S

    2000-01-01

    This article summarizes presentations from an international workshop held in Heelsum, Netherlands, 14-16 December 1998 that was sponsored by the Dutch Dairy Foundation on Nutrition and Health, the Department of Nutrition at Wageningen Agricultural University, the Dutch College of General Practitioners, and the International Union of Nutritional Sciences. Twenty-one speakers and 12 other participants were invited from 9 countries: the Netherlands, the United States, the United Kingdom, Australia, Canada, Denmark, New Zealand, Spain, and Sweden. The workshop was chaired by GJAJ Hautvast and the scientific secretary was GJ Hiddink. Family physicians are highly trusted. Many consultations include a nutritional aspect, but physicians do not discuss nutrition with their patients as often as they could. Major barriers include short visit times, the paucity of nutrition teaching in medical schools, and poor compliance of patients with physicians' dietary prescriptions. Problems, practicalities, operational research, and some solutions were discussed at this meeting of leading family doctors with interested nutritionists. Family physicians have to distill the essentials for their patients from many different specialties ranging from ophthalmology to podiatry. They look for clarity of recommendations from nutrition researchers. Among developments discussed at the meeting that can increase nutritional work in family medicine are 1) new opportunities to teach nutrition in vocational training programs, 2) some manuals and a new journal specially written by nutritional scientists for family physicians, 3) nutritional advice being incorporated into computer software for family physicians, 4) more dietitians working with family physicians, and 5) nutrition training for practice nurses in some countries. PMID:10617940

  2. Do People with Disabilities Have Difficulty Finding a Family Physician?

    PubMed Central

    McColl, Mary Ann; Aiken, Alice; Schaub, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Primary care has been ideally characterized as the medical home for all citizens, and yet recent data shows that approximately 6% do not have a family physician, and only 17.5% of family practices are open to new patients. Given acknowledged shortages of family physicians, this research asks the question: Do people with disabilities have particular difficulty finding a family physician? Health Care Connect (HCC) is a government-funded agency in Ontario Canada, designed to “help Ontarians who are without a family health care provider to find one”. Using data from HCC, supplemented by interviews with HCC staff, the study explores the average wait time for patients with disabilities to be linked with a primary care physician, and the challenges faced by agency staff in doing so. The study found that disabled registrants with the program are only slightly disadvantaged in terms of wait times to find a family physician, and success rates are ultimately comparable; however, agency staff report that there are a number of significant challenges associated with placing disabled patients. PMID:25927477

  3. Ankle injuries and the family physician.

    PubMed

    Birrer, R B

    1988-01-01

    In transmitting the body's weight, the ankle is subject to frequent static and dynamic injury due to concentrated stresses during standing and movement. The frequency of athletic ankle injuries ranges from 10 to 90 percent, with the highest rate occurring in basketball players. There is prolonged disability and recurrent instability for months to years for 25 to 40 per cent of these patients. Because most of this trauma is handled by primary care physicians, this review presents the mechanism of injury, relevant anatomy, physical examination, and appropriate therapeutic intervention in the acute and rehabilitative phases.

  4. Family physicians' recommendations for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Werner, Perla

    The aim of this study was to examine family physicians' recommendations for various pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatments for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and its correlates. A phone survey was conducted with 395 family physicians using an experimental vignette methodology, varying in the severity of the disease. Information regarding participants' recommendations about 10 interventions for the person described in the vignette was elicited. Sociodemographic and professional correlates were examined. Engagement in social activities and participation in support groups were the interventions most recommended by the physicians. Isolation and physical restraints were the least recommended. Recommendations about AD treatments were associated with the severity of the disease and the extent to which the person described in the vignette was perceived as dangerous. Physicians' recommendations were very similar to those of the lay public, a fact that might contribute to the efficiency of the treatment plan. PMID:17267372

  5. Universal influenza immunization. Were Ontario family physicians prepared?

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Grant; Sutton, Judy; Reid, Graham J.; Beynon, Charlene; Cohen, Irene; Huffman, David

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore family physicians' experiences during the first year of Ontario's universal influenza immunization program. DESIGN: Qualitative study using in-depth interviews. SETTING: Thames Valley region of southwestern Ontario. PARTICIPANTS: A maximum variation sample of nine family physicians selected by snowball sampling after initial consultation with a local family physician advisory committee. METHOD: Interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. Analysis was sequential, using a combination of editing, immersion, and crystallization. Interview transcripts were read by individual members of the team who met to compare findings at several stages during data collection. MAIN FINDINGS: The program affected family physicians because immunization strategies designed for immunizing high-risk patients needed to be modified to deal with greater numbers of patients. While generally supportive of the program, physicians found it difficult to implement. Responses reflected ongoing conflict between individual and public health priorities, particularly regarding children and pregnant women. CONCLUSION: The program could have been more effective if the culture and climate of Ontario family practice had been considered during its development and implementation. PMID:14594100

  6. Discrimination against gay, lesbian and bisexual family physicians by patients

    PubMed Central

    Druzin, P; Shrier, I; Yacowar, M; Rossignol, M

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Discrimination against gay, lesbian and bisexual (GLB) patients by physicians is well known. Discrimination against GLB physicians by their colleagues and superiors is also well known and includes harassment, denial of positions and refusal to refer patients to them. The purpose of this study was to identify and quantify the attitudes of patients toward GLB physicians. METHODS: Telephone interviews were conducted with 500 randomly selected people living in a large urban Canadian city. Subjects were asked if they would refuse to see a GLB family physician and, if so, to describe the reason why. They were then given a choice of 6 reasons obtained from consultation with 10 GLB people and 10 heterosexual people. RESULTS: Of the 500 subjects 346 (69.2%) were reached and agreed to participate. Of the 346 respondents 41 (11.8%) stated that they would refuse to see a GLB family physician. The 2 most common reasons for the discrimination (prevalence rate more than 50%) were that GLB physicians would be incompetent and the respondent would feel "uncomfortable" having a GLB physician. Although more male than female respondents discriminated against GLB physicians, the difference was not statistically significant. The proportion of male and female respondents who discriminated increased with age (p < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: The observed prevalence of patient discrimination against GLB family physicians is significant. The results suggest that the discrimination is based on emotional reasons and is not related to such factors as misinformation about STDs and fear of being thought of sexually. Therefore, educational efforts should be directed against general perceptions of homosexuality rather than targeting specific medical concerns. PMID:9526472

  7. Patient Satisfaction with the Family Physician Program in Sabzevar, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Ghorbani, Alireza; Raeissi, Pouran; Saffari, Ehsan; Reissi, Nahid

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Patient satisfaction with the family physician program is an important factor for more favorable treatment results. Evaluation of patient satisfaction improves the services and approximates them to patient’s preferences. The family physician program has been executed since late March, 2005 in Iran. This study aimed to measure patient satisfaction with family physician services and determines factors affecting the level of satisfaction in order to propose appropriate suggestions for providing medical services based on patients’ expectations. Methods: Forty-one centers provide healthcare services in rural and urban areas. The participants in this study comprised 1263 people. The data were collected by an inventory with 11 items about demographic specifications, waiting time and the importance of physician’s sex and 40 items for assessing the level of patient satisfaction. Results: A total of 1199 patients participated in the current study, 72.1% of them were female and 19.6% waited 10-20 minutes for receiving services. About 55.72% of the participants chose high and very high for the items of the inventory. Total satisfaction with the family physician program decreased with age (p-value= 0.029).Moreover, total satisfaction did not show any significant differences in different groups in terms of sex, place of residence, education level and marital status. Also family physicians’ sex did not affect patient satisfaction significantly. Based on results of regression model, an increase in patients’ age by one year decreased their satisfaction by 0.12 and level of satisfaction in rural patients was lower than that in urban patients by 7.93. Conclusions: The level of patient satisfaction with family physician services was moderate, which mostly arose from the components of the family physician program and services such as the waiting time, costs, welfare facilities, accessibility and the service-providing team rather than patients

  8. Female Physicians and the Work-Family Conflict.

    PubMed

    Treister-Goltzman, Yulia; Peleg, Roni

    2016-05-01

    There has been a dramatic increase in the number of female physicians in all fields and specializations of medicine, but this increase has not resulted in a redistribution of domestic tasks and responsibilities. Reviewing the literature of the last two decades (April 1994 to April 2014) on how female physicians cope with the challenge of balancing their family and professional lives for the duration of their professional careers revealed that they suffer from the work-family conflict more than other professionals and that it has a more negative effect on women than on men. Women physicians consider work-family balance significantly when making career choices. These considerations affect their career success, their productivity as faculty members, their marital life, and parenthood. Having a supportive spouse at home and a facilitating mentor at work are important for a positive work-family balance among female physicians. Special career-supporting measures, such as flexible work schedules and expanded support for childcare over the course of work and when taking part in academic activities, are critical for female physicians. PMID:27430080

  9. Female Physicians and the Work-Family Conflict.

    PubMed

    Treister-Goltzman, Yulia; Peleg, Roni

    2016-05-01

    There has been a dramatic increase in the number of female physicians in all fields and specializations of medicine, but this increase has not resulted in a redistribution of domestic tasks and responsibilities. Reviewing the literature of the last two decades (April 1994 to April 2014) on how female physicians cope with the challenge of balancing their family and professional lives for the duration of their professional careers revealed that they suffer from the work-family conflict more than other professionals and that it has a more negative effect on women than on men. Women physicians consider work-family balance significantly when making career choices. These considerations affect their career success, their productivity as faculty members, their marital life, and parenthood. Having a supportive spouse at home and a facilitating mentor at work are important for a positive work-family balance among female physicians. Special career-supporting measures, such as flexible work schedules and expanded support for childcare over the course of work and when taking part in academic activities, are critical for female physicians.

  10. Prevalence of abusive encounters in the workplace of family physicians

    PubMed Central

    Miedema, Baukje; Hamilton, Ryan; Lambert-Lanning, Anita; Tatemichi, Sue R.; Lemire, Francine; Manca, Donna; Ramsden, Vivian R.

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To examine the career prevalence of abusive encounters for family physicians in Canada. DESIGN A 7-page cross-sectional mailed survey in English and French. SETTING Canada. PARTICIPANTS A total of 3802 randomly selected practising family physicians who were members of the College of Family Physicians of Canada. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Demographic characteristics of survey participants, career prevalence of abusive encounters, and perpetrators of abuse. MAIN FINDINGS Twenty percent (20.4%) of the surveys (n = 774) were returned. Of the respondents, 44% were men and 56% were women. Most were in private practice in urban settings. The average number of years in practice was 15. The career prevalence of abusive encounters was divided into “minor,” “major,” and “severe” incidents. Of all the respondents, 98% had experienced at least 1 incident of minor abuse, 75% had experienced at least 1 incident of major abuse, and 39% had experienced at least 1 incident of severe abuse. Using χ2 analysis, a number of demographic variables were found to be significantly associated with abuse including the physician’s race and sex. Patients were the most common perpetrators of abuse. Ninety percent of family physicians surveyed reported that they had been abused by patients, while 70% reported that they had been abused by family members of patients. CONCLUSION Approximately 2 in 5 family physicians surveyed were subjected to a considerable amount of severe abuse during practice. Abuse in the office setting might have grave consequences for the health and well-being of the victimized physicians and might hinder service retention where the risk of abuse is greatest. PMID:20228289

  11. Confidentiality of medical information: a study of Albertan family physicians.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Gerald L

    1988-06-01

    The author of this paper examines physicians' regard for the confidentiality of medical information in the light of their perception of their own role. Five case studies of increasing complexity of medical management and ethical issues, derived from practice and accompanied by questions relating to confidentiality and medical management, were submitted to randomly selected family physicians in Alberta. Analysis of the replies to determine attitudes to confidentiality and how the respondents perceived patients' best interests, and statements of how they would act in certain situations, disclosed that a substantial minority of the physicians were still prepared to breach confidentiality and exercise Hippocratic professional judgement in certain situations. The bases of confidentiality of medical information are reviewed, together with changing modes of medical ethics and the increasing trend to rights derived from patients, autonomy, and the ways in which these factors may affect the physician-patient relationship.

  12. Family Physician Support for a Family With a Mentally Ill Member.

    PubMed

    McBride, J LeBron

    2016-09-01

    Mentally ill family members can have a formidable impact on the families in which they reside. Family physicians can intervene in powerful ways when they are sensitive to those who are mentally ill and their families and can provide much needed compassionate support. PMID:27621163

  13. Family physician anesthetists: continuing education, observations, evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Vandewater, Stuart L.; Kraus, Arthur S.

    1973-01-01

    A method is described whereby continuing education for family practitioner anesthetists is taken to community hospitals, where patterns of practice, local problems and facilities are different from those of larger urban areas. Five Ontario communities were visited for 4½ days each, by invitation, providing the visiting clinician with an opportunity to observe the quality of anesthesia services and to measure, through a self-evaluation test, the deficiencies in applied basic and clinical knowledge thought to be necessary for modern, safe practice. These programs were well received and thought to be of real benefit to the participants. Similar programs could be provided in general medicine, cardiology, gastroenterology, pediatrics and psychiatry. PMID:4758596

  14. What Is So Special About a Family Physician?

    PubMed Central

    Deisher, Joseph B.

    1974-01-01

    Around a core of common, acute and chronic, recurrent health problems, a family physician must marshall the traditional episodic management for both inpatient and outpatient illness. He must also be especially adept at recently emerging routines of prevention and early detection. He provides individual and familial psychologic support and counselling, for both its therapeutic and preventive values. In addition, he must relate the individual care of his patient and the patient's family to the community as a whole. In doing this he will use not only his own skills but those of lay health volunteers, trained allied health care professionals and skilled subspecialists in the limited medical disciplines. The proper preparation of family physicians for this complicated role has far-reaching implications for change in both medical education and medical practice. PMID:4439902

  15. Comparison of burnout pattern between hospital physicians and family physicians working in Suez Canal University Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Kotb, Amany Ali; Mohamed, Khalid Abd-Elmoez; Kamel, Mohammed Hbany; Ismail, Mosleh Abdul Rahman; Abdulmajeed, Abdulmajeed Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The burnout syndrome is characterized by emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and low personal accomplishment. It is associated with impaired job performance. Methods This descriptive study examined 171 physicians for the presence of burnout and its related risk factors. The evaluation of burnout was through Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI). The participant was considered to meet the study criteria for burnout if he or she got a “high“ score on at least 2 of the three dimensions of MBI. Results In the current study, the prevalence of burnout in hospital physicians (53.9%) was significantly higher than family physicians (41.94%) with (p=0.001). Participants who work in the internal medicine department scored the highest prevalence (69.64%) followed by Surgeons (56.50%) and Emergency doctors (39.39%). On the other hand, Pediatricians got the lowest prevalence (18.75%). Working in the teaching hospital and being married are strong predictors for occurrence of burnout. Conclusion There is a significant difference of burnout between hospital physicians and family physicians among the study subjects. Working in the teaching hospital and being married are strong predictors for occurrence of burnout. PMID:25422682

  16. Work Values and Job Satisfaction of Family Physicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouwkamp-Memmer, Jennifer C.; Whiston, Susan C.; Hartung, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Theory and prior research suggest linkages between work values and job satisfaction. The present study examined such linkages in a group of workers in a professional occupation. Family physicians (134 women, 206 men, 88% Caucasian) responded to context-specific measures of work values and job satisfaction. ANOVA results indicated a work values…

  17. Exercise-induced asthma. What family physicians should do.

    PubMed Central

    D'Urzo, A.

    1995-01-01

    Exercise-induced asthma is described as a transitory increase in airway resistance during or after vigorous exercise. Nearly 90% of patients with chronic asthma and 40% of allergic nonasthmatic patients have the condition. Family physicians should try to educate patients about their asthma and, barring contraindications, encourage them to participate in regular physical activity. PMID:8563507

  18. Enhancing family physician capacity to deliver quality palliative home care

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Denise; Howell, Doris; Brazil, Kevin; Howard, Michelle; Taniguchi, Alan

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT PROBLEM BEING ADDRESSED Family physicians face innumerable challenges to delivering quality palliative home care to meet the complex needs of end-of-life patients and their families. OBJECTIVE OF PROGRAM To implement a model of shared care to enhance family physicians’ ability to deliver quality palliative home care, particularly in a community-based setting. PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Family physicians in 3 group practices (N = 21) in Ontario’s Niagara West region collaborated with an interprofessional palliative care team (including a palliative care advanced practice nurse, a palliative medicine physician, a bereavement counselor, a psychosocial-spiritual advisor, and a case manager) in a shared-care partnership to provide comprehensive palliative home care. Key features of the program included systematic and timely identification of end-of-life patients, needs assessments, symptom and psychosocial support interventions, regular communication between team members, and coordinated care guided by outcome-based assessment in the home. In addition, educational initiatives were provided to enhance family physicians’ knowledge and skills. CONCLUSION Because of the program, participants reported improved communication, effective interprofessional collaboration, and the capacity to deliver palliative home care, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, to end-of-life patients in the community. PMID:19074714

  19. [The physician faced with the mentally handicapped and his family].

    PubMed

    Bettschart, W

    1979-01-01

    In his work in the field of mental retardation, the physician is exposed to his vivid emotive reactions. He risks either to withdraw in a scientific relation or to identify himself with either family's members. The physician must learn to join with a pluridisciplinary team, to build up his emotional impulses, to answer to the needs of the mental handicapped and his family and to estimate the evolutive potential rather than the deficits. He must be conscious that the handicapped and his family are called, in an imperative manner, to resolve many tasks: they must not only confront themselves with many specialists (doctors, teachers, educators, logopedists, physiotherapists) and many Services, but also overcome the shock of the diagnosis and build, on the existential plan, a new life. PMID:482887

  20. Effectiveness of a 3-hour breastfeeding course for family physicians

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Anjana; Graves, Lisa; D’Souza, Vinita

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To test the effectiveness of a 3-hour course on breastfeeding for family physicians. Design A previously validated questionnaire testing confidence in, attitudes toward, and knowledge of breastfeeding issues was administered to participants 1 week before and 2 months after taking the Breastfeeding Basics for the Practicing Physician course. Setting Canada. Participants Family physicians and residents who attended the Breastfeeding Basics for the Practicing Physician course between July 2008 and December 2010. Interventions Participants’ scores on the questionnaires that were filled out before and after the course were collected and analyzed. Main outcome measures Changes in participants’ confidence in, attitudes toward, and knowledge of breastfeeding issues before and after the course were examined. Results A total of 80 participants completed the questionnaire before the course, and 72 completed the questionnaire after the course. Of these, 40 participants completed questionnaires both before and after the course; data from these participants were used for paired analysis. Mean scores for attitudes increased significantly from 77.4 before the course to 83.0 after the course (P < .001). Mean scores for knowledge also increased significantly from 150.2 before the course to 159.2 after the course (P < .001). No significant difference in confidence was seen (P = .486). Conclusion This study demonstrated the effectiveness of a 3-hour breastfeeding course in improving participants’ attitudes toward and knowledge of breastfeeding issues. PMID:25642487

  1. Modeling spatial accessibility of immigrants to culturally diverse family physicians.

    PubMed

    Wanga, Lu; Roisman, Deborah

    2011-01-01

    This article uses accessibility as an analytical tool to examine health care access among immigrants in a multicultural urban setting. It applies and improves on two widely used accessibility models—the gravity model and the two-step floating catchment area model—in measuring spatial accessibility by Mainland Chinese immigrants in the Toronto Census Metropolitan Area. Empirical data on physician-seeking behaviors are collected through two rounds of questionnaire surveys. Attention is focused on journey to physician location and utilization of linguistically matched family physicians. Based on the survey data, a two-zone accessibility model is developed by relaxing the travel threshold and distance impedance parameters that are traditionally treated as a constant in the accessibility models. General linear models are used to identify relationships among spatial accessibility, geography, and socioeconomic characteristics of Mainland Chinese immigrants. The results suggest a spatial mismatch in the supply of and demand for culturally sensitive care, and residential location is the primary factor that determines spatial accessibility to family physicians. The article yields important policy implications.

  2. Family physicians improve patient health care quality and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Marjorie A; Neale, Anne Victoria

    2013-01-01

    This issue exemplifies family physicians' ability to provide great care and to continuously improve. For example, beyond other specialty care, the care provided by family physicians is associated with improved melanoma diagnosis and outcomes and improved preventive services for those with a history of breast cancer. Electronic health records are providing new avenues to both assess outcomes and influence care. However, to truly reward quality care, simplistic and readily measurable items such as laboratory results or assessment of the provision of preventive services must be adjusted for risk. Health insurance influences classic preventive care services more than personal health behaviors. The care provided at federally qualified health centers throughout the nation is highly appreciated by the people they serve and is not plagued by the types of disparities in other settings.

  3. Psychotropic Drugs in Children: A Guide for the Family Physician

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Benjamin

    1989-01-01

    Pediatric psychopharmacology, an emerging field, is a field fraught with potential abuses, about which consumer groups are concerned. These concerns have initiated legislation in some jurisdictions of Canada. Abuse is most likely to occur in the absence of other professional services, such as psychology, education, or social services. After careful assessment, diagnosis, and consultation, if necessary, the family physician can prescribe these medications responsibly, sharing the decision-making with the child and parent. PMID:20469507

  4. Dealing with office emergencies. Stepwise approach for family physicians.

    PubMed Central

    Sempowski, Ian P.; Brison, Robert J.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop a simple stepwise approach to initial management of emergencies in family physicians' offices; to review how to prepare health care teams and equipment; and to illustrate a general approach to three of the most common office emergencies. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: MEDLINE was searched from January 1980 to December 2001. Articles were selected based on their clinical relevance, quality of evidence, and date of publication. We reviewed American family medicine, pediatric, dental, and dermatologic articles, but found that the area has not been well studied from a Canadian family medicine perspective. Consensus statements by specialty professional groups were used to identify accepted emergency medical treatments. MAIN MESSAGE: Family medicine offices are frequently poorly equipped and inadequately prepared to deal with emergencies. Straightforward emergency response plans can be designed and tailored to an office's risk profile. A systematic team approach and effective use of skills, support staff, and equipment is important. The general approach can be modified for specific patients or conditions. CONCLUSION: Family physicians can plan ahead and use a team approach to develop a simple stepwise response to emergency situations in the office. PMID:12371305

  5. Effectiveness of "Primary Bereavement Care" for Widows: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial Involving Family Physicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    García, Jesus A.; Landa, Victor; Grandes, Gonzalo; Pombo, Haizea; Mauriz, Amaia

    2013-01-01

    Thirty-one family physicians, from 19 primary care teams in Biscay (Spain), were randomly assigned to intervention or control group. The 15 intervention family physicians, after training in primary bereavement care, saw 43 widows for 7 sessions, from the 4th to 13th month after their loss. The 16 control family physicians, without primary…

  6. Abuse of family physicians by patients seeking controlled substances

    PubMed Central

    Saveland, Christine; Hawker, Leisha; Miedema, Baukje; MacDougall, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To examine family physicians’ career prevalence and monthly incidence of workplace abuse by controlled substance prescription seekers. Design A 4-page cross-sectional survey. Setting A family medicine continuing medical education event in Halifax, NS. Participants The survey was distributed to 316 family physicians attending the continuing medical education event. Main outcome measures Career prevalence and monthly incidence of workplace abuse related to the act of prescribing controlled substances. Results Fifty-six percent (n = 178) of the 316 surveys were returned completed. Half the study participants were men (49%). Most study participants were in private practice and lived in Nova Scotia, and approximately half (51%) practised in urban settings. On average, the study participants had 20 years of practice experience. The career prevalence of abusive encounters related to controlled substance prescribing was divided into “minor,” “major,” and “severe” incidents. Overall, 95% of study participants reported having experienced at least 1 incident of minor abuse; 48% had experienced at least 1 incident of major abuse; and 17% had experienced at least 1 incident of severe abuse during their careers. Further, 30% reported having been abused in the past month; among those, the average number of abusive encounters was 3. Most (82%) of the abusers were male with a history of addiction (85%) and mental illness (39%). Opioids were the most frequently sought controlled substance. Conclusion Abuse of family physicians by patients seeking controlled substances is substantial. Family physicians who prescribe controlled substances are at risk of being subjected to minor, major, or even severe abuse. Opioids were the most often sought controlled substance. A national discussion to deal with this issue is needed. PMID:24522691

  7. Urinary incontinence. Non-surgical management by family physicians.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, K. N.; Saltmarche, B.; Query, A.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review current evidence on conservative management of urinary incontinence (UI) by family physicians. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Articles were sought through MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, CINAHL, PsycLit, ERIC, two consensus meetings, and review of abstracts presented at urology meetings. References of these articles were searched for relevant trials. Strong evidence supports bladder training, pelvic floor exercises, and some medications, but only fair evidence supports fluid adjustment, caffeine reduction, and stopping smoking. Weight loss and exercise are supported by expert opinion only. Consensus opinion is that, whenever possible, conservative management should be considered first. MAIN MESSAGE: Good evidence shows that initial management by primary care physicians is effective. After basic assessment and tests, strategies such as bladder retraining, pelvic floor exercises, and lifestyle modifications, augmented by appropriate medications, can be successful. If initial strategies are unsuccessful, patients can be referred. CONCLUSION: More than a million Canadians suffer from UI. In almost all cases, family physicians are the first health professionals contacted by patients. Basic assessment and conservative management can go far to ameliorate the problem. PMID:12790272

  8. Validity of the Maslach Burnout Inventory for family practice physicians.

    PubMed

    Rafferty, J P; Lemkau, J P; Purdy, R R; Rudisill, J R

    1986-05-01

    This study assesses the utility of Maslach's concept of burnout for family practice physicians. Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) subscale correlations for the 67 residents in this sample are compared with Maslach's normative sample. The residents scored in the moderate to high range on the MBI subscales. MBI interscale correlations were similar to the pattern reported by Maslach. Significant correlations between job satisfaction and five of the six MBI subscales suggest that the construct of burnout has considerable psychological import for these physicians. The validity of the emotional exhaustion subscale is demonstrated by significant correlations with self-assessed burnout, job satisfaction, and faculty assessments of resident burnout. Independent observers were most sensitive to residents' emotional exhaustion and less likely to assess accurately the less visible aspects of burnout related to depersonalization and lack of achievement, which suggests the usefulness of multiple measures for assessing the burnout phenomenon.

  9. Effect of colleague and coworker abuse on family physicians in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Miedema, Baukje; Tatemichi, Sue; Hamilton, Ryan; Lambert-Lanning, Anita; Lemire, Francine; Manca, Donna P.; Ramsden, Vivian R.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess the effects of physician-colleague and coworker abuse on family physicians in Canada. Design A mixed-methods, bilingual study that included surveys and telephone interviews. Setting Canada. Participants Family physicians in active practice who were members of the College of Family Physicians of Canada in 2009. Methods Surveys were mailed to a random sample of family physicians (N = 3802), and 37 family physicians who had been abused in the past year participated in telephone interviews. Main findings A total of 770 surveys (20%) were completed. A small number of respondents reported having been subjected to abuse by physician colleagues (9%) or coworkers (6%) in the previous month. Many of the respondents reported that the same physician colleagues or coworkers were repeat abusers. More than three-quarters (77%) of the physician-colleague abusers were men, whereas more than three-quarters (77%) of the other coworker abusers were women. Interviewed family physicians described feeling humiliated and unappreciated, and developed symptoms of anxiety or depression. As a result of the abuse, some family physicians terminated their employment or refused to work in certain environments. The most striking effect of this abuse was that respondents reported losing confidence in their professional abilities and skills. Conclusion Although only a small number of family physicians experience abuse by physician colleagues and other coworkers, the effects can be considerable. Victims reported a loss of confidence in their clinical abilities and some subsequently were faced with mental health issues. PMID:22170201

  10. Certification status of family physicians in the initial cohort entering maintenance of certification.

    PubMed

    Puffer, James C; Bazemore, Andrew W; Phillips, Robert L; Beebe, Diane K

    2014-01-01

    There existed considerable concern that participation in Maintenance of Certification by board-certified physicians would be less than optimal when it was introduced by the American Board of Medical Specialties in 2000. However, family physicians who entered the first 10-year Maintenance of Certification for Family Physicians cycle in 2003 participated at levels consistent with historical norms.

  11. Free Fecal Immunochemical Test Disbursement in Eight Family Physician Offices

    PubMed Central

    Daly, Jeanette M.; Levy, Barcey T.; Xu, Yinghui

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer death. CRC screening with a fecal immunochemical test (FIT) is important as occult blood may be detected. To offer Iowa Research Network members in family physician offices the opportunity to provide FITs at no charge to patients in need and determine how many of the tests would be handed out to patients and how many would be returned to the office. Eight family physician offices agreed to participate and 50 two-day FITs were provided, potentially providing 400 patients a CRC screening test. One hundred and eighty (45 %) of the 400 FITs were handed out to patients. Of the 92 (51 %) patients who returned at least one card, 77 (84 %) had negative results, 13 (14 %) were positive, and 2 (2 %) were indeterminate. Of 13 patients with a positive result, 11 (85 %) had a follow-up colonoscopy. Providing 400 FITs at no charge to the offices was an expensive endeavor. Implementing this forced a change in office routine and the type of fecal occult blood test used. Less than half of the FITs were given out to patients and of those given out, about half of the patients returned a FIT. For those who returned FITs and had positive findings, 85 % followed-up with a colonoscopy. Office nurses implementing the CRC screening need to be included in the planning of the type of fecal occult blood test used and receptive to the project PMID:25980522

  12. Empowering women in a violent society. Role of the family physician.

    PubMed Central

    Archer, L. A.

    1994-01-01

    Despite erosion of key societal institutions, family physicians have remained a focal point for many troubled individuals--particularly women. The prevalence and types of abuse women experience and the effects on women's lives are summarized. Disclosures of abuse can affect family physicians. Increased awareness of gender role socialization messages for women is also relevant to family practice. PMID:8038640

  13. Muscle relaxation techniques: a therapeutic tool for family physicians.

    PubMed Central

    Rapp, M. S.; Thomas, M. R.; Leith, M. G.

    1984-01-01

    Muscle relaxation techniques are important adjunctive therapy for anxiety-related conditions. Family physicians can learn to teach the techniques so as to try helping anxious patients themselves rather than automatically referring them to a psychiatrist. The exercises are generally acceptable to patients, are easy to learn and do not require expensive equipment. They are beneficial in insomnia and tension headache, of some value in chronic anxiety states and a useful adjunct in hypertension. In this paper the evidence supporting the value of muscle relaxation therapy is briefly reviewed, methods of teaching and of practising the techniques are described in detail, and answers to some of the questions and problems that may arise are presented. PMID:6365300

  14. E-Learning Readiness in Medicine: Turkish Family Medicine (FM) Physicians Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parlakkiliç, Alaattin

    2015-01-01

    This research investigates e-learning readiness level of family medicine physicians (FM) in Turkey. The study measures the level of e-learning readiness of Turkish FM physicians by an online e-learning readiness survey. According to results five areas are ready at Turkish FM physicians but need a few improvements:…

  15. Diagnostic and therapeutic tools for the family physician's office of the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Deutchman, M E; Connor, P D; Hahn, R G; Rodney, W M

    1992-06-01

    Several new technologies are available to family physicians; however, numerous factors influence a physician's decision to adopt them. This study sought to determine interests and problems related to adopting new technology. The survey population was a group of family physicians who visited our scientific exhibit at the 1990 meeting of the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP). A 13-item questionnaire collected information on their use of and/or interest in technological procedures and equipment. Respondents were interested in a variety of new technological procedures. The most important criteria when considering new technology were training, costs, and office scheduling. The emphasis on outpatient care makes it increasingly important for family physicians to use modern technology in their offices and for departments of family medicine to offer training in these procedures. Our study provides a springboard for a broader discussion of the problems involved in selecting and implementing new technology in family practice.

  16. Caring for adult survivors of child sexual abuse. Issues for family physicians.

    PubMed Central

    Bala, M.

    1994-01-01

    Traditional medical education has not taught physicians about the long-term effects of child sexual abuse. Family physicians often feel poorly equipped to appreciate the effect of such a childhood history on current health or to recognize and treat survivors. This article links the experience of the sexually abused child to long-term effects and outlines the role of family physicians in screening and caring for survivors. PMID:7802772

  17. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder--a review for family physicians.

    PubMed

    Karande, S

    2005-12-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a chronic behavioral disorder characterized by persistent hyperactivity, impulsivity, and inattention that impairs educational achievement and/or social functioning. Its diagnosis is made by ascertaining whether the child's specific behaviors meet the diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders-IV-revised criteria. Its etiology is still unclear but recent studies suggest that genetics plays a major role in conferring susceptibility. Comorbidity with psychiatric disorders such as anxiety disorder, depression, oppositional defiant disorder and conduct disorder; and with specific learning disability is not uncommon. Although medication works well in most cases of ADHD, optimal treatment requires integrated medical and behavioral treatment. Methylphenidate (MPH) and atomoxetine are the two drugs being currently prescribed and their efficacy in decreasing the symptoms of ADHD is well documented. Pyschoeducational interventions in school can help increase the successful functioning of affected children and improve their academic performance. Almost half of affected children continue to show significant symptoms of the disorder into adolescence and young adulthood. The family physician can play an important role in detecting this condition early, coordinating its assessment and treatment, counseling the parents and classroom teacher, and monitoring the child's academic and psychosocial progress on a long-term basis.

  18. Family physician perceptions of working with LGBTQ patients: physician training needs

    PubMed Central

    Beagan, Brenda; Fredericks, Erin; Bryson, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Background Medical students and physicians report feeling under-prepared for working with patients who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender or queer (LGBTQ). Understanding physician perceptions of this area of practice may aid in developing improved education. Method In-depth interviews with 24 general practice physicians in Halifax and Vancouver, Canada, were used to explore whether, when and how the gender identity and sexual orientation of LGBTQ women were relevant to good care. Inductive thematic analysis was conducted using ATLAS.ti data analysis software. Results Three major themes emerged: 1) Some physicians perceived that sexual/gender identity makes little or no difference; treating every patient as an individual while avoiding labels optimises care for everyone. 2) Some physicians perceived sexual/gender identity matters primarily for the provision of holistic care, and in order to address the effects of discrimination. 3) Some physicians perceived that sexual/gender identity both matters and does not matter, as they strove to balance the implications of social group membership with recognition of individual differences. Conclusions Physicians may be ignoring important aspects of social group memberships that affect health and health care. The authors hold that individual and socio-cultural differences are both important to the provision of quality health care. Distinct from stereotypes, generalisations about social group differences can provide valuable starting points, raising useful lines of inquiry. Emphasizing this distinction in medical education may help change physician approaches to the care of LGBTQ women. PMID:26451226

  19. Boundary issues. What do they mean for family physicians?

    PubMed Central

    Linklater, D.; MacDougall, S.

    1993-01-01

    Clear boundaries between physicians and patients help prevent abusive behaviour. Enforced boundaries help physicians fulfil their legal, ethical, and professional tasks. We review common elements in boundary violations: role reversal, secrecy, double binds, and indulgence of professional privilege. We also outline the legal and licensing issues of boundary violations and offer examples of nine boundaries. PMID:8292932

  20. Caring for seriously mentally ill patients. Qualitative study of family physicians' experiences.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Judith Belle; Lent, Barbara; Stirling, April; Takhar, Jatinder; Bishop, Joan

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine family physicians' experiences in caring for patients with serious mental illness and their expectations of a shared mental health care (SMHC) model. DESIGN: Qualitative method of in-depth interviews. SETTING: London, Ont. PARTICIPANTS: Purposive sample of 11 full-time family physicians providing ongoing care for patients with serious mental illness. METHOD: Eleven interviews were conducted to explore family physicians' experiences. All interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. Analysis was done using a constant comparative approach and was carried out concurrently rather than sequentially. Researchers read all interview transcripts independently before comparing and combining their analyses. Final analysis involved examining all interviews together to discover relationships between and among emerging themes. MAIN FINDINGS: Findings reflected three main themes: what family physicians perceive they bring to care of seriously mentally ill patients (i.e., whole-person approach to care); challenges family physicians face in participating in shared care of these patients (i.e., communication and access issues); and family physicians' expectations of a SMHC model (i.e., guidance and feedback). CONCLUSION: As seriously mentally ill patients are moved out of institutions, the need for an effective and efficient SMHC model becomes imperative. Our findings suggest that family physicians could be an important part of SMHC models but only if systemic barriers are removed and collaborative practice is encouraged. PMID:12053636

  1. Employed Family Physician Satisfaction and Commitment to Their Practice, Work Group, and Health Care Organization

    PubMed Central

    Karsh, Ben-Tzion; Beasley, John W; Brown, Roger L

    2010-01-01

    Objective Test a model of family physician job satisfaction and commitment. Data Sources/Study Setting Data were collected from 1,482 family physicians in a Midwest state during 2000–2001. The sampling frame came from the membership listing of the state's family physician association, and the analyzed dataset included family physicians employed by large multispecialty group practices. Study Design and Data Collection A cross-sectional survey was used to collect data about physician working conditions, job satisfaction, commitment, and demographic variables. Principal Findings The response rate was 47 percent. Different variables predicted the different measures of satisfaction and commitment. Satisfaction with one's health care organization (HCO) was most strongly predicted by the degree to which physicians perceived that management valued and recognized them and by the extent to which physicians perceived the organization's goals to be compatible with their own. Satisfaction with one's workgroup was most strongly predicted by the social relationship with members of the workgroup; satisfaction with one's practice was most strongly predicted by relationships with patients. Commitment to one's workgroup was predicted by relationships with one's workgroup. Commitment to one's HCO was predicted by relationships with management of the HCO. Conclusions Social relationships are stronger predictors of employed family physician satisfaction and commitment than staff support, job control, income, or time pressure. PMID:20070386

  2. Withdrawing life support. Do families and physicians decide as patients do?

    PubMed

    Munoz Silva, J E; Kjellstrand, C M

    1988-01-01

    We studied whether families and physicians decided as patients do, in discontinuation of life-supporting treatment. We did so by comparing 66 competent patients, who themselves decided to stop dialysis to die, and 66 incompetent patients for whom families and physicians decided. We also compared comatose to demented patients and families' to physician's decision-making. There was no difference in sex, diagnosis, age, time period, decision maker (family or physician), site of residence, duration or type of dialysis, home or in-center dialysis or survival time after discontinuation. More competent than incompetent patients died at home (p less than 0.005). All incompetent patients had emerging complications, but such complications were present in only 40/60 competent patients (p less than 0.0005). In the early 1970s the physician initiated the termination of dialysis in all cases of incompetent patients; in the 1980s this had decreased to 48% (less than 0.001). No case was decided by court or hospital committee. There was no difference between comatose or demented incompetent patients, nor was there any important difference between family and physician decision-making. We believe our study indicates that substitute judgement is applied appropriately and that the decision can safely and best be left to families and physicians.

  3. A Critical Look at the Family Physician's Role in Preventing Childhood Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Rosser, W.; Feldman, W.; McGrath, P.

    1987-01-01

    Childhood injuries stand as the most common causes of death among Canadian children. Physician advice and advocacy of appropriate legislation, parent education and legislative action could reduce this toll. There is a role for family physicians in the important process of providing a safer environment for our children. PMID:21263865

  4. Patients' Perceived Quality of Family Physicians' Primary Care with or without 'Family Medicine' in the Clinic Name

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ka Young; Lim, Kangjin; Choi, Eun Young; Cheong, Yoo Seock

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients' perspectives of family medicine according to the physician's identity and role as a primary-care specialist need to be investigated. This study was conducted to investigate the perceived quality of the primary care of family medicine clinics as assessed by patients in a community setting. Methods Patients (or their guardians) visiting nine community family medicine clinics were surveyed using the Korean Primary Care Assessment Tool from April 2014 to June 2014. The scores of the Korean Primary Care Assessment Tool domains were compared according to the clinics' designation (or not) as 'family medicine' and the patients' recognition (or not) of the physicians as board-certified family medicine specialists. Results A total of 196 subjects responded to the questionnaire. They assessed the community clinics' quality of primary care as moderate to high. Of the clinics, those that were not designated as family medicine scored higher than those that were designated as family medicine (P<0.05). The group of patients that recognized a clinic as that of a board-certified family medicine specialist awarded higher scores than the non-recognition group in the domains of coordination function and personalized care (P<0.05). Conclusion The moderate to high scores for the community family medicine clinics' quality of primary care are encouraging. It seems that patients' recognition of the family physician's role and of the physician-patient relationship has a significant influence on their assessment of the quality of primary care.

  5. Patients' Perceived Quality of Family Physicians' Primary Care with or without 'Family Medicine' in the Clinic Name

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ka Young; Lim, Kangjin; Choi, Eun Young; Cheong, Yoo Seock

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients' perspectives of family medicine according to the physician's identity and role as a primary-care specialist need to be investigated. This study was conducted to investigate the perceived quality of the primary care of family medicine clinics as assessed by patients in a community setting. Methods Patients (or their guardians) visiting nine community family medicine clinics were surveyed using the Korean Primary Care Assessment Tool from April 2014 to June 2014. The scores of the Korean Primary Care Assessment Tool domains were compared according to the clinics' designation (or not) as 'family medicine' and the patients' recognition (or not) of the physicians as board-certified family medicine specialists. Results A total of 196 subjects responded to the questionnaire. They assessed the community clinics' quality of primary care as moderate to high. Of the clinics, those that were not designated as family medicine scored higher than those that were designated as family medicine (P<0.05). The group of patients that recognized a clinic as that of a board-certified family medicine specialist awarded higher scores than the non-recognition group in the domains of coordination function and personalized care (P<0.05). Conclusion The moderate to high scores for the community family medicine clinics' quality of primary care are encouraging. It seems that patients' recognition of the family physician's role and of the physician-patient relationship has a significant influence on their assessment of the quality of primary care. PMID:27688865

  6. Preparing the personal physician for practice: changing family medicine residency training to enable new model practice.

    PubMed

    Green, Larry A; Jones, Samuel M; Fetter, Gerald; Pugno, Perry A

    2007-12-01

    After two years of intensive study, in 2004 the Future of Family Medicine report concluded that the current U.S. health care system is inadequate and unsustainable, and called for changes within the specialty of family medicine to ensure the future health of the American public. With guidance and encouragement from many disciplines and health experts, a set of 10 recommendations was established to accomplish a transformative change in how family physicians serve their patients and how the essential function of primary care is achieved. From these recommendations came a period of innovation and experimentation in the training of family physicians, entitled Preparing the Personal Physician for Practice (P4). The P4 project is a carefully designed and evaluated initiative led by the American Board of Family Medicine and the Association of Family Medicine Residency Directors and administered by TransforMED, a practice redesign initiative of the American Academy of Family Physicians. Fourteen family medicine programs were chosen to participate and will put their innovations into practice from 2007 to 2012, during which time regular evaluation will be conducted. The purpose of P4 is to learn how to improve the graduate medical education of family physicians such that they are prepared to be outstanding personal physicians and to work in the new models of practice now emerging. The innovations tested by P4 residencies are expected to inspire substantial changes in the content, structure, and locations of training of family physicians and to guide future revisions in accreditation and certification requirements. PMID:18046133

  7. Correlates of family health history discussions between college students and physicians: does family cancer history make a difference?

    PubMed

    Smith, Matthew Lee; Sosa, Erica T; Hochhalter, Angela K; Covin, Julie; Ory, Marcia G; McKyer, E Lisako J

    2011-12-01

    Effective communication between young adults and their healthcare providers can contribute to early detection of risk for developing cancer and establishment of lifelong habits for engagement in healthcare and health promotion behaviors. Our objectives were to examine factors influencing family health history discussions between college students and physicians and factors associated with perceptions about who is responsible for initiating such discussions. Data from an internet-based study of 632 college students were analyzed. Approximately 60% of college student participants reported they had discussed their family health history with a physician. The perception that physicians are responsible for initiating family health history discussions was associated with being non-White and less than completely knowledgeable about cancer. Having a discussion with a physician was associated with being female, having a regular physician, perceiving genetics as a risk for developing cancer, and having a family member diagnosed with cancer. Understanding variation among college students' perceptions about their role in initiating health-history-related discussions and characteristics of those who have or have not discussed family health issues with physicians can inform healthcare practice to foster optimal healthcare interactions in early adulthood.

  8. Privacy beliefs and the violent family. Extending the ethical argument for physician intervention.

    PubMed

    Jecker, N S

    1993-02-10

    Privacy beliefs associated with the family impede physicians' response to domestic violence. As a private sphere, the family is regarded as sacred, separate, and hidden from public view. Hence, physicians who look for or uncover violence in the family risk defilling a sacred object and violating norms of non-interference. Privacy beliefs also obfuscate the ethical analysis of physicians' duties to intercede on behalf of battered patients. Ethical principles of beneficence and nonmaleficence have been invoked to justify physicians' duties to abused patients; however, the principle of justice has not been invoked. Ethical analysis of physicians' duties in this area must be broadened to include the principle of justice. Justice is at stake because establishing conditions favorable to self-respect is a requirement of justice, and the response physicians make to battered patients carries important ramifications for supporting patients' self-respect and dignity. If justice forms part of the ethical foundation for physician intervention in domestic violence, mandatory steps that do not transgress the confidentiality of the physician-patient relationship or infringe the patient's autonomy should be taken, such as requiring domestic violence training in medical education and following treatment plans and protocols to identify abuse and provide assistance to battered patients. PMID:8423660

  9. The Care Of The Aged: A Responsibility & Challenge For The Family Physician

    PubMed Central

    de Buda, Yvonne

    1979-01-01

    The population increase in the over 65 age group creates a challenge and responsibility for family physicians in the continuing and comprehensive care of the aged. Family physicians have to assess the medical, psychological and social needs of the elderly and provide them with the best care available by utilizing local facilities, community resources, health care personnel, and whenever possible, the cooperation of the patient's family. Medical students, family practice trainees and other health professionals require the appropriate training. New trends in the care of the elderly and medical education geared towards this task are discussed. PMID:20469307

  10. The future role of the family physician in the United States: a rigorous exercise in definition.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Robert L; Brundgardt, Stacy; Lesko, Sarah E; Kittle, Nathan; Marker, Jason E; Tuggy, Michael L; Lefevre, Michael L; Borkan, Jeffrey M; Degruy, Frank V; Loomis, Glenn A; Krug, Nathan

    2014-01-01

    As the U.S. health care delivery system undergoes rapid transformation, there is an urgent need to define a comprehensive, evidence-based role for the family physician. A Role Definition Group made up of members of seven family medicine organizations developed a statement defining the family physician's role in meeting the needs of individuals, the health care system, and the country. The Role Definition Group surveyed more than 50 years of foundational manuscripts including published works from the Future of Family Medicine project and Keystone III conference, external reviews, and a recent Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical Education Family Medicine Milestones definition. They developed candidate definitions and a "foil" definition of what family medicine could become without change. The following definition was selected: "Family physicians are personal doctors for people of all ages and health conditions. They are a reliable first contact for health concerns and directly address most health care needs. Through enduring partnerships, family physicians help patients prevent, understand, and manage illness, navigate the health system and set health goals. Family physicians and their staff adapt their care to the unique needs of their patients and communities. They use data to monitor and manage their patient population, and use best science to prioritize services most likely to benefit health. They are ideal leaders of health care systems and partners for public health." This definition will guide the second Future of Family Medicine project and provide direction as family physicians, academicians, clinical networks, and policy-makers negotiate roles in the evolving health system.

  11. The future role of the family physician in the United States: a rigorous exercise in definition.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Robert L; Brundgardt, Stacy; Lesko, Sarah E; Kittle, Nathan; Marker, Jason E; Tuggy, Michael L; Lefevre, Michael L; Borkan, Jeffrey M; Degruy, Frank V; Loomis, Glenn A; Krug, Nathan

    2014-01-01

    As the U.S. health care delivery system undergoes rapid transformation, there is an urgent need to define a comprehensive, evidence-based role for the family physician. A Role Definition Group made up of members of seven family medicine organizations developed a statement defining the family physician's role in meeting the needs of individuals, the health care system, and the country. The Role Definition Group surveyed more than 50 years of foundational manuscripts including published works from the Future of Family Medicine project and Keystone III conference, external reviews, and a recent Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical Education Family Medicine Milestones definition. They developed candidate definitions and a "foil" definition of what family medicine could become without change. The following definition was selected: "Family physicians are personal doctors for people of all ages and health conditions. They are a reliable first contact for health concerns and directly address most health care needs. Through enduring partnerships, family physicians help patients prevent, understand, and manage illness, navigate the health system and set health goals. Family physicians and their staff adapt their care to the unique needs of their patients and communities. They use data to monitor and manage their patient population, and use best science to prioritize services most likely to benefit health. They are ideal leaders of health care systems and partners for public health." This definition will guide the second Future of Family Medicine project and provide direction as family physicians, academicians, clinical networks, and policy-makers negotiate roles in the evolving health system. PMID:24821896

  12. Psychosocial risk factors during pregnancy. What do family physicians ask about?

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, J. C.; Reid, A. J.; Biringer, A.; Wilson, L. M.; Midmer, D. K.

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether physician characteristics affect attitudes or practices regarding assessment of psychosocial risk factors during pregnancy, and to evaluate whether an antenatal psychosocial risk factor assessment form would help family physicians. DESIGN AND SETTING: A questionnaire asking physicians to rate the importance of information on a scale of one to five was mailed to all active members of the University of Toronto Department of Family and Community Medicine's Survey Network of Attitudes and Practice (SNAP). PARTICIPANTS: A volunteer sample of physicians doing prenatal and intrapartum obstetrics who are active members of SNAP. The network is made up of full-time faculty in the University of Toronto's family practice units and teaching practice physicians (rural, suburban, and urban) who are interested in participating in research projects. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Response rate was 78%. Responses of the 45 SNAP members who did not practise obstetrics were excluded; 125 of 218 questionnaires mailed were analyzed. RESULTS: Women family physicians rated the form potentially helpful more frequently than their male colleagues. Urban and suburban physicians' concerns differed from those of rural physicians. Alcohol and drug abuse, abuse in the relationship, and acceptance of the pregnancy were rated highly important by physicians. Of the physicians surveyed, 77% thought that an antenatal psychosocial risk assessment form would be of some benefit or very helpful. Only 15% indicated it would be useless or not helpful. CONCLUSION: The importance respondents accorded to risk factors showed little correspondence to the frequency of inquiry about them. The survey confirmed our plan to design an antenatal psychosocial risk factor assessment form. PMID:8086843

  13. Canadian family physicians' decision to collaborate: age, period and cohort effects.

    PubMed

    Sarma, Sisira; Devlin, Rose Anne; Thind, Amardeep; Chu, Man-Kee

    2012-11-01

    One of the core primary care reform initiatives seen across provinces in Canada is the introduction of inter-professional primary healthcare teams in which family physicians are encouraged to collaborate with other health professionals. Although a higher proportion of physicians are collaborating with various health professionals now compared to the previous decade, a substantial number of physicians still do not work in a collaborative setting. The objective of this paper is to examine the age, period and cohort effects of Canadian family physicians' decisions to collaborate with seven types of health professionals: specialists, nurse practitioners, nurses, dieticians, physiotherapists, psychologists and occupational therapists. To this end, this paper employs a multivariate probit model consisting of seven equations and a cross-classified fixed-effects strategy to explain the collaborative decisions of family physicians. Utilizing three cross-sectional physician surveys from Canada over the 2001-2007 period, cohorts are defined over five-year intervals according to their year of graduation from medical school. We find that newer cohorts of physicians are more likely to collaborate with dieticians, physiotherapists, psychologists and occupational therapists; newer female cohorts are more likely to collaborate with nurses while newer male cohorts are less likely to collaborate with nurses but more likely to collaborate with specialists. Older physicians are more likely to collaborate with specialists, physiotherapists, psychologists, and occupational therapists; the age effect for nurses is U-shaped for male physicians while it is inverse U-shaped for females. Family physicians are collaborating more with all seven health professionals in 2004 and 2007 compared to 2001. Belonging to a group practice has a largely positive influence on collaborations; and being paid by a fee-for-service remuneration scheme exerts a negative influence on collaboration, ceteris

  14. Family physicians' awareness and knowledge of the Genetic Information Non-Discrimination Act (GINA).

    PubMed

    Laedtke, Amanda L; O'Neill, Suzanne M; Rubinstein, Wendy S; Vogel, Kristen J

    2012-04-01

    Historically, physicians have expressed concern about their patients' risk of genetic discrimination, which has acted as a barrier to uptake of genetic services. The Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008 (GINA) is intended to protect patients against employer and health insurance discrimination. Physicians' awareness and knowledge of GINA has yet to be evaluated. In 2009, we mailed surveys to 1500 randomly selected members of the American Academy of Family Physicians. Questions measured physicians' current knowledge of GINA and their level of concern for genetic discrimination. In total, 401 physicians completed the survey (response rate 26.9%). Approximately half (54.5%) of physicians had no awareness of GINA. Of physicians who reported basic knowledge of GINA, the majority were aware of the protections offered for group health insurance (92.7%), private health insurance (82.9%), and employment (70.7%). Fewer physicians were aware of GINA's limitations regarding life insurance (53.7%) and long-term care insurance (58.8%). Physicians demonstrated highest levels of concern for health insurance, life insurance, and long-term care insurance discrimination, with less concern for employer and family/social discrimination. Level of concern for the risk of genetic discrimination did not correlate significantly with awareness of GINA. Approximately 17 months after GINA was signed into federal law, physicians' knowledge remained limited regarding the existence of this legislation and relevant details. Physicians who are aware of GINA continue to have significant concerns regarding the risk of genetic discrimination. This study reveals the need to further educate physicians about the existence of GINA and the protections offered.

  15. Adoption of Liquid-Based Cervical Cancer Screening Tests by Family Physicians and Gynecologists

    PubMed Central

    Rappaport, Karen M; Forrest, Christopher B; Holtzman, Neil A

    2004-01-01

    Objective To examine reasons for the adoption of liquid-based cervical cancer screening tests. Data Sources/Study Setting A mailed survey of 250 family physicians and 250 gynecologists in Maryland in 2000. Additional data were obtained from the AMA Master File of Physicians. Study Design Key outcome variables in this cross-sectional survey were early adoption of a liquid-based test by the end of 1997 and overall adoption by the time of the survey. Adoption was viewed in terms of a supply and demand theoretical framework with marketing influencing physician and patient demand as well as supply by insurance companies and laboratories. Data Collection Random samples of family physicians and gynecologists were selected from the AMA Master File of Physicians. The overall response rate was 61.9 percent. Principal Findings By 2000, 96 percent of gynecologists and 75 percent of family physicians in Maryland were using liquid-based cervical cancer screening tests, most commonly the ThinPrep® Pap Test™. Gynecologists were more likely than family physicians to have been early adopters (34 percent versus 5 percent, p<.01). Part of this variation in adoption was due to aggressive marketing to gynecologists, who were more likely than family physicians to receive information in the mail from the test manufacturer (89 percent versus 56 percent, p<.01) and to have been informed by the manufacturer that a patient had inquired about physicians' use of the test (22 percent versus 8 percent, p<.01). Conclusions The rapid diffusion of liquid-based cervical cancer screening tests occurred despite general agreement that the Pap smear has been one of the most successful cancer prevention interventions ever. Commercial marketing campaigns appear to contribute to the more rapid rate of diffusion of technology among specialists compared with generalists. PMID:15230935

  16. Health care setting and severity, symptom burden, and complications in patients with Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN): a comparison between university hospitals, community hospitals, and office-based physicians.

    PubMed

    Kaifie, A; Isfort, S; Gattermann, N; Hollburg, W; Klausmann, M; Wolf, D; Maintz, C; Hänel, M; Goekkurt, E; Göthert, J R; Platzbecker, U; Geer, T; Parmentier, S; Jost, E; Serve, H; Ehninger, G; Berdel, W E; Brümmendorf, T H; Koschmieder, Steffen

    2016-09-01

    Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) comprise a heterogeneous group of chronic hematological malignancies with significant variations in clinical characteristics. Due to the long survival and the feasibility of oral or subcutaneous therapy, these patients are frequently treated outside of larger academic centers. This analysis was performed to elucidate differences in MPN patients in three different health care settings: university hospitals (UH), community hospitals (CH), and office-based physicians (OBP). The MPN registry of the Study Alliance Leukemia is a non-interventional prospective study including adult patients with an MPN according to WHO criteria (2008). For statistical analysis, descriptive methods and tests for significant differences were used. Besides a different distribution of MPN subtypes between the settings, patients contributed by UH showed an impaired medical condition, a higher comorbidity burden, and more vascular complications. In the risk group analyses, the majority of polycythemia vera (PV) and essential thrombocythemia (ET) patients from UH were classified into the high-risk category due to previous vascular events, while for PV and ET patients in the CH and OBP settings, age was the major parameter for a high-risk categorization. Regarding MPN-directed therapy, PV patients from the UH setting were more likely to receive ruxolitinib within the framework of a clinical trial. In summary, the characteristics and management of patients differed significantly between the three health care settings with a higher burden of vascular events and comorbidities in patients contributed by UH. These differences need to be taken into account for further analyses and design of clinical trials. PMID:27334946

  17. A national survey of Turkish emergency physicians perspectives regarding family witnessed cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Yanturali, S; Ersoy, G; Yuruktumen, A; Aksay, E; Suner, S; Sonmez, Y; Oray, D; Colak, N; Cimrin, A H

    2005-04-01

    We investigated Turkish emergency physicians' views regarding family witnessed resuscitation (FWR) and to determine the current practice in Turkish academic emergency departments with regard to family members during resuscitation. A national cross-sectional, anonymous survey of emergency physicians working in academic emergency departments was conducted. Nineteen of the 23 university-based emergency medicine programs participated in the study. Two hundred and thirty-nine physicians completed the survey. Of the respondents, 83% did not endorse FWR. The most common reasons for not endorsing FWR was reported as higher stress levels of the resuscitation team and fear of causing physiological trauma to family members. Previous experience, previous knowledge in FWR, higher level of training and the acceptance of FWR in the institution where the participant works were associated with higher rates of FWR endorsement for this practice among emergency physicians.

  18. Oncologists and family physicians. Using a standardized letter to improve communication.

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Ted C.; Hagen, Neil A.; Smith, Colum; Summers, Nancy

    2003-01-01

    PROBLEM BEING ADDRESSED: Communication between oncologists at a regional cancer centre and family physicians caring for palliative cancer patients in the community was ineffective. OBJECTIVE OF PROGRAM: To improve communication between oncologists and family physicians by routine use of a template for dictated letters concerning follow-up care. PROGRAM DESCRIPTION: A consultation letter template was constructed and tested at a single clinic. The template was designed to guide oncologists dictating letters to family physicians for patients' follow-up visits. Effectiveness of the standardized letter was evaluated with a before-after survey. CONCLUSION: Using the template letter improved communication with respect to the relevance, timeliness, format, and amount of information. As care for patients at the end of life increasingly shifts to the community, ongoing efforts are required to improve communication between cancer centres and primary care physicians. PMID:12901484

  19. Noise-induced hearing loss: the family physician's role

    SciTech Connect

    Dobie, R.A.

    1987-12-01

    Noise is an environmental health problem that has not received sufficient attention. Physicians should become knowledgeable about the medical consequences of excessive noise, support legislation to reduce the problem and promote programs aimed at noise control and prevention of hearing loss. Questions about noise and hearing should be incorporated into the medical history, and pure-tone audiometry should be a part of periodic physical evaluations.

  20. Collaboration between family physicians and community pharmacists to enhance adherence to chronic medications

    PubMed Central

    Laubscher, Tessa; Evans, Charity; Blackburn, Dave; Taylor, Jeff; McKay, Shari

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To ascertain the opinions of family physicians about medication adherence in patients with chronic diseases and the role of community pharmacists in improving adherence to chronic medications, as well as their opinions on increased collaboration with pharmacists to enhance medication adherence. DESIGN A self-administered postal survey of 19 questions, with opinions collected by ordinal (5-point Likert scale) and open responses. SETTING Saskatchewan. PARTICIPANTS Two hundred and eighty-six family physicians working in Saskatchewan in January 2008. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Descriptive statistics of physicians’ opinions on the following: medication adherence in patients with chronic diseases; their current interaction with community pharmacists; and potential collaborative strategies to promote medication adherence. RESULTS The response rate was 39.4%. Approximately 75% of the physicians acknowledged that nonadherence to chronic medications was a problem among their patients. Medication costs and side effects were identified as the 2 most common reasons for medication nonadherence. Only one-quarter of physicians communicated regularly with community pharmacists about adherence issues; most of these physicians were rural physicians. Most physicians agreed that increased collaboration with pharmacists would improve adherence, although support for potential interactions with pharmacists varied. Concerns were expressed about time required by physicians and financial reimbursement. Physicians in practice for less than 10 years and those practising in rural areas were more willing to share clinical information and communicate with pharmacists to promote medication adherence. CONCLUSION Saskatchewan family physicians appreciate the importance of medication nonadherence but currently seldom interact with community pharmacists on this issue. They believe that pharmacists have a role in supporting patients with medication adherence and indicate a willingness

  1. THE INTERNET AND THE WORLD WIDE WEB: APPLICATIONS FOR FAMILY PHYSICIANS IN SAUDI ARABIA

    PubMed Central

    Sebiany, Abdulaziz M.

    2001-01-01

    The introduction of the World Wide Web has revolutionized the applications of the computer and the Internet in the medical field. The Web provides an easy and cost-effective way of retrieving medical information and a more flexible way of communicating with patients and colleagues. Family practice is a specialty in which care is given to persons as individuals and members of families regardless of their age, gender or specific problems. To provide quality family practice, a family physician should be a good communicator, a critical thinker, a resource and information manager, a life-long learner, a care giver and a community advocate. Providing such high quality care requires that family practice be an information-sensitive specialty. However, the expansion of the new electronic resources on the Internet and the Web poses a real challenge to the family physician. Family physician in Saudi Arabia need to have basic skills and knowledge for easily retrieving and finding reliable Internet information for his professional development and the care of his patients. This article addresses the Web applications for family physicians in Saudi Arabia, giving examples of the most important Websites. PMID:23008644

  2. The Future Role of the Family Physician in the United States: A Rigorous Exercise in Definition

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Robert L.; Brundgardt, Stacy; Lesko, Sarah E.; Kittle, Nathan; Marker, Jason E.; Tuggy, Michael L.; LeFevre, Michael L.; Borkan, Jeffrey M.; DeGruy, Frank V.; Loomis, Glenn A.; Krug, Nathan

    2014-01-01

    As the US health care delivery system undergoes rapid transformation, there is an urgent need to define a comprehensive, evidence-based role for the family physician. A Role Definition Group made up of members of seven family medicine organizations developed a statement defining the family physician’s role in meeting the needs of individuals, the health care system, and the country. The Role Definition Group surveyed more than 50 years of foundational manuscripts including published works from the Future of Family Medicine project and Keystone III conference, external reviews, and a recent Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical Education Family Medicine Milestones definition. They developed candidate definitions and a “foil” definition of what family medicine could become without change. The following definition was selected: “Family physicians are personal doctors for people of all ages and health conditions. They are a reliable first contact for health concerns and directly address most health care needs. Through enduring partnerships, family physicians help patients prevent, understand, and manage illness, navigate the health system and set health goals. Family physicians and their staff adapt their care to the unique needs of their patients and communities. They use data to monitor and manage their patient population, and use best science to prioritize services most likely to benefit health. They are ideal leaders of health care systems and partners for public health.” This definition will guide the second Future of Family Medicine project and provide direction as family physicians, academicians, clinical networks, and policy-makers negotiate roles in the evolving health system. PMID:24821896

  3. A proposal for the curriculum and evaluation for training rural family physicians in enhanced surgical skills

    PubMed Central

    Caron, Nadine; Iglesias, Stuart; Friesen, Randall; Berjat, Vanessa; Humber, Nancy; Falk, Ryan; Prins, Mark; Haines, Victoria Vogt; Geller, Brian; Janke, Fred; Woollard, Robert; Batchelor, Bret; Van Bussel, Jared

    2015-01-01

    Summary Rural western Canada relies heavily on family physicians with enhanced surgical skills (ESS) for surgical services. The recent decision by the College of Family Physicians of Canada (CFPC) to recognize ESS as a “community of practice” section offers a potential home akin to family practice anesthesia and emergency medicine. To our knowledge, however, a skill set for ESS in Canada has never been described formally. In this paper the Curriculum Committee of the National ESS Working Group proposes a generic curriculum for the training and evaluation of the ESS skill set. PMID:26574835

  4. Office-based ultrasound screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Blois, Beau

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess the efficacy of an office-based, family physician–administered ultrasound examination to screen for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Design A prospective observational study. Consecutive patients were approached by nonphysician staff. Setting Rural family physician offices in Grand Forks and Revelstoke, BC. Participants The Canadian Society for Vascular Surgery screening recommendations for AAA were used to help select patients who were at risk of AAA. All men 65 years of age or older were included. Women 65 years of age or older were included if they were current smokers or had diabetes, hypertension, a history of coronary artery disease, or a family history of AAA. Main outcome measures A focused “quick screen,” which measured the maximal diameter of the abdominal aorta using point-of-care ultrasound technology, was performed in the office by a resident physician trained in emergency ultrasonography. Each patient was then booked for a criterion standard scan (ie, a conventional abdominal ultrasound scan performed by a technician and interpreted by a radiologist). The maximal abdominal aortic diameter measured by ultrasound in the office was compared with that measured by the criterion standard method. The time to screen each patient was recorded. Results Forty-five patients were included in data analysis; 62% of participants were men. The mean age was 73 years. The mean pairwise difference between the office-based ultrasound scan and the criterion standard scan was not statistically significant. The mean absolute difference between the 2 scans was 0.20 cm (95% CI 0.15 to 0.25 cm). Correlation between the scans was 0.81. The office-based ultrasound scan had both a sensitivity and a specificity of 100%. The mean time to screen each patient was 212 seconds (95% CI 194 to 230 seconds). Conclusion Abdominal aortic aneurysm screening can be safely performed in the office by family physicians who are trained to use point

  5. Lifestyle management for type 2 diabetes. Are family physicians ready and willing?

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Stewart B.; Petrella, Robert J.; Lambert-Lanning, Anita; Leadbetter, Wendy; Cranston, Lynda

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine practices and perceptions of family physicians regarding lifestyle interventions to prevent and manage type 2 diabetes (T2D). DESIGN: Confidential mailed survey. SETTING: Canadian family practices. PARTICIPANTS: Random, stratified sample of 1499 respondents to the 2001 National Family Physician Workforce Survey. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Physicians' self-reported practice patterns and perceptions of lifestyle counseling for patients at risk for, and diagnosed with, T2D. RESULTS: Response rate was 53% (749/1410). Respondents frequently asked patients at risk for, or diagnosed with, T2D about physical activity and weight loss, but far fewer provided written advice, particularly about physical activity. Respondents thought counseling with such interventions as generic patient handouts was preferable to more intensive lifestyle management strategies, such as appointments to provide stage-matched counseling on physical activity. Most respondents thought family physicians should perform lifestyle interventions but realized they are confounded by such barriers as patients' lack of interest and limited referral resources. CONCLUSION: Family physicians keen to implement lifestyle interventions for T2D are hampered by barriers and use of ineffective strategies. PMID:15508373

  6. "Sometimes I feel overwhelmed": educational needs of family physicians caring for people with intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Joanne; Dreyfus, Deborah; Cerreto, Mary; Bokhour, Barbara

    2012-06-01

    Primary care physicians who care for adults with intellectual disability often lack experience with the population, and patients with intellectual disability express dissatisfaction with their care. Establishing a secure primary care relationship is particularly important for adults with intellectual disability, who experience health disparities and may rely on their physician to direct/coordinate their care. The authors conducted semistructured interviews with 22 family physicians with the goal of identifying educational needs of family physicians who care for people with intellectual disability. Interviews were transcribed and coded using tools from grounded theory. Several themes related to educational needs were identified. Physician participants identified themes of "operating without a map," discomfort with patients with intellectual disability, and a need for more exposure to/experience with people with intellectual disability as important content areas. The authors also identified physician frustration and lack of confidence, compounded by anxiety related to difficult behaviors and a lack of context or frame of reference for patients with intellectual disability. Primary care physicians request some modification of their educational experience to better equip them to care for patients with intellectual disability. Their request for experiential, not theoretical, learning fits well under the umbrella of cultural competence (a required competency in U.S. medical education). PMID:22731973

  7. Length of stay and hospital costs among patients admitted to hospital by family physicians

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Chuck K.; Chambers, Catharine; Fang, Dianne; Mazowita, Garey; Hwang, Stephen W.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective To compare length of stay and total hospital costs among patients admitted to hospital under the care of family physicians who were their usual health care providers in the community (group A) and patients admitted to the same inpatient service under the care of family physicians who were not their usual health care providers (group B). Design Retrospective observational study. Setting A large urban hospital in Vancouver, BC. Participants All adult admissions to the family practice inpatient service between April 1, 2006, and June 30, 2008. Main outcome measures Ratio of length of stay to expected length of stay and total hospital costs per resource intensity weight unit. Multivariate linear regression was performed to determine the effect of admitting group (group A vs group B) on the natural logarithm transformations of the outcomes. Results The median acute length of stay was 8.0 days (interquartile range [IQR] 4.0 to 13.0 days) for group A admissions and 8.0 days (IQR 4.0 to 15.0 days) for group B admissions. The median (IQR) total hospital costs were $6498 ($4035 to $11 313) for group A admissions and $6798 ($4040 to $12 713) for group B admissions. After adjustment for patient characteristics, patients admitted to hospital under the care of their own family physicians did not significantly differ in terms of acute length of stay to expected length of stay ratio (percent change 0.6%, P = .942) or total hospital costs per resource intensity weight unit (percent change −2.0%, P = .722) compared with patients admitted under the care of other family physicians. Conclusion These findings suggest that having networks of family physicians involved in hospital care for patients is not less efficient than having family physicians provide care for their own patients. PMID:22518905

  8. Factors Impacting Transgender Patients’ Discomfort with Their Family Physicians: A Respondent-Driven Sampling Survey

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Greta R.; Zong, Xuchen; Scheim, Ayden I.; Hammond, Rebecca; Thind, Amardeep

    2015-01-01

    Background Representing approximately 0.5% of the population, transgender (trans) persons in Canada depend on family physicians for both general and transition-related care. However, physicians receive little to no training on this patient population, and trans patients are often profoundly uncomfortable and may avoid health care. This study examined factors associated with patient discomfort discussing trans health issues with a family physician in Ontario, Canada. Methods 433 trans people age 16 and over were surveyed using respondent-driven sampling for the Trans PULSE Project; 356 had a family physician. Weighted logistic regression models were fit to produce prevalence risk ratios (PRRs) via average marginal predictions, for transmasculine (n = 184) and transfeminine (n = 172) trans persons. Results Among the 83.1% (95% CI = 77.4, 88.9) of trans Ontarians who had a family physician, approximately half reported discomfort discussing trans health issues. 37.2% of transmasculine and 38.1% of transfeminine persons reported at least one trans-specific negative experience. In unadjusted analysis, sociodemographics did not predict discomfort, but those who planned to medically transition sex, but had not begun, were more likely to report discomfort (transmasculine: PRR = 2.62 (95% CI = 1.44, 4.77); transfeminine: PRR = 1.85 (95% CI = 1.08, 3.15)). Adjusted for other factors, greater perceived physician knowledge about trans issues was associated with reduced likelihood of discomfort, and previous trans-specific negative experiences with a family physician with increased discomfort. Transfeminine persons who reported three or more types of negative experiences were 2.26 times as likely, and transmasculine persons 1.61 times as likely, to report discomfort. In adjusted analyses, sociodemographic associations differed by gender, with being previously married or having higher education associated with increased risk of discomfort among transfeminine persons, but

  9. Abused and Neglected Elderly: What Can the Family Physician Do?

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Niels H.

    1986-01-01

    Family abuse involving children and spouses is estimated to occur with one Canadian child or spouse in 10. The same figures probably apply to elderly persons cared for by a family member. This paper defines and describes abuse and neglect of the elderly, reviews the stress factors that often underlie it and profiles high-risk candidates for giving and receiving abuse. It provides guidance in detecting the occurrence of abuse of the elderly and suggests means of handling such occurrences in a humane, sensible and protective way. PMID:20469454

  10. Do family physicians treat older patients with mental disorders differently from younger patients?

    PubMed Central

    Mackenzie, C. S.; Gekoski, W. L.; Knox, V. J.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether there are differences between family physicians' beliefs and treatment intentions regarding older patients with mental disorders and younger patients with similar disorders. Such differences might contribute to older adults' lower rates of mental health service use. DESIGN: Mailed survey. SETTING: Primary care practices in and around Kingston, Ont. PARTICIPANTS: Questionnaires were mailed to 294 general practitioners listed in the 42nd Annual Canadian Medical Directory. Of the 285 eligible physicians, 115 (40%) completed and returned questionnaires. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Physicians' ratings of preparedness to identify and treat, likelihood of treating, likelihood of using each of five different treatment methods, likelihood of referral, preferences for six referral options, and treatment effectiveness with respect to hypothetical older and younger patients with panic disorder or dysthymia. RESULTS: Physicians reported being less prepared to identify and treat older patients than younger patients. In addition, physicians reported being significantly less likely to treat and to refer older patients than younger patients. Finally, physicians reported that both psychotherapy alone, and in combination with pharmacotherapy, were less effective for older patients than for younger patients. CONCLUSIONS: In addition to other possible reasons for older adults' low rates of mental health service use, this study suggests that family physicians' beliefs and treatment intentions could be contributing factors. Changes in medical education aimed at replacing inaccurate beliefs with accurate information regarding older patients might be one way to increase rates of use in this underserved age group, because family physicians play a key role in the mental health care of older adults. PMID:10349066

  11. Patient health information materials in waiting rooms of family physicians: do patients care?

    PubMed Central

    Moerenhout, Tania; Borgermans, Liesbeth; Schol, Sandrina; Vansintejan, Johan; Van De Vijver, Erwin; Devroey, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Background Patient health information materials (PHIMs), such as leaflets and posters are widely used by family physicians to reinforce or illustrate information, and to remind people of information received previously. This facilitates improved health-related knowledge and self-management by patients. Objective This study assesses the use of PHIMs by patient. It also addresses their perception of the quality and the impact of PHIMs on the interaction with their physician, along with changes in health-related knowledge and self-management. Methods Questionnaire survey among patients of family practices of one town in Belgium, assessing: (1) the extent to which patients read PHIMs in waiting rooms (leaflets and posters) and take them home, (2) the patients’ perception of the impact of PHIMs on interaction with their physician, their change in health-related knowledge and self-management, and (3) the patients judgment of the quality of PHIMs. Results We included 903 questionnaires taken from ten practices. Ninety-four percent of respondents stated they read PHIMs (leaflets), 45% took the leaflets home, and 78% indicated they understood the content of the leaflets. Nineteen percent of respondents reportedly discussed the content of the leaflets with their physician and 26% indicated that leaflets allowed them to ask fewer questions of their physician. Thirty-four percent indicated that leaflets had previously helped them to improve their health-related knowledge and self-management. Forty-two percent reportedly discussed the content of the leaflets with others. Patient characteristics are of significant influence on the perceived impact of PHIMS in physician interaction, health-related knowledge, and self-management. Conclusion This study suggests that patients value health information materials in the waiting rooms of family physicians and that they perceive such materials as being helpful in improving patient–physician interaction, health-related knowledge, and

  12. Is burnout in family physicians in Croatia related to interpersonal quality of care?

    PubMed

    Ožvačić Adžić, Zlata; Katić, Milica; Kern, Josipa; Soler, Jean Karl; Cerovečki, Venija; Polašek, Ozren

    2013-06-01

    The impact of physician burnout on the quality of patient care is unclear. This cross-sectional study aimed to investigate the prevalence of burnout in family physicians in Croatia and its association with physician and practice characteristics, and patient enablement as a consultation outcome measure. Hundred and twenty-five out of 350 family physicians responded to our invitation to participate in the study. They were asked to collect data from 50 consecutive consultations with their adult patients who had to provide information on patient enablement (Patient Enablement Instrument). Physicians themselves provided their demographic and professional data, including workload, job satisfaction, consultation length, and burnout [Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey (MBI-HSS)]. MBI-HSS scores were analysed in three dimensions: emotional exhaustion (EE), depersonalisation (DP), and personal accomplishment (PA). Of the responding physicians, 42.4% scored high for EE burnout, 16.0% for DP, and 15.2% for PA. Multiple regression analysis showed that low job satisfaction and more patients per day predicted high EE scores. Low job satisfaction, working more years at a current workplace, and younger age predicted high DP scores. Lack of engagement in education and academic work, shorter consultations, and working more years at current workplace predicted low PA scores, respectively (P<0.05 for each). Burnout is common among family physicians in Croatia yet burnout in our physicians was not associated with patient enablement, suggesting that it did not affect the quality of interpersonal care. Job satisfaction, participation in educational or academic activities and sufficient consultation time seem to reduce the likelihood of burnout. PMID:23819934

  13. The role of expert searching in the Family Physicians' Inquiries Network (FPIN)*

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Deborah; Meadows, Susan E.; Nashelsky, Joan E.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: This article describes the contributions of medical librarians, as members of the Family Physicians' Inquiries Network (FPIN), to the creation of a database of clinical questions and answers that allows family physicians to practice evidence-based medicine using high-quality information at the point of care. The medical librarians have contributed their evidence-based search expertise and knowledge of information systems that support the processes and output of the consortium. Methods: Since its inception, librarians have been included as valued members of the FPIN community. FPIN recognizes the search expertise of librarians, and each FPIN librarian must meet qualifications demonstrating appropriate experience and training in evidence-based medicine. The consortium works collaboratively to produce the Clinical Inquiries series published in family medicine publications. Results: Over 170 Clinical Inquiries have appeared in Journal of Family Practice (JFP) and American Family Physician (AFP). Surveys have shown that this series has become the most widely read part of the JFP Website. As a result, FPIN has formalized specific librarian roles that have helped build the organizational infrastructure. Conclusions: All of the activities of the consortium are highly collaborative, and the librarian community reflects that. The FPIN librarians are valuable and equal contributors to the process of creating, updating, and maintaining high-quality clinical information for practicing primary care physicians. Of particular value is the skill of expert searching that the librarians bring to FPIN's products. PMID:15685280

  14. Chinese herbal medicine and acupuncture. How do patients who consult family physicians use these therapies?

    PubMed Central

    Wong, L. K.; Jue, P.; Lam, A.; Yeung, W.; Cham-Wah, Y.; Birtwhistle, R.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine how a population of Chinese patients consulting family physicians in Vancouver use traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), specifically Chinese herbal medicine and acupuncture. DESIGN: Bilingual survey (English and Chinese). SETTING: Four family practices with predominantly Chinese patients in metropolitan Vancouver. PARTICIPANTS: The 932 patients or family members who visited one of the practices. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Demographic characteristics; frequency and reason for visiting a family physician, Chinese herbalist, or acupuncturist; choice of practitioner if affected by one of 16 common conditions. RESULTS: The study population was mostly Chinese and immigrant to Canada. Chinese herbal medicine was currently used by 28% (262/930) of respondents (more than one visit in the last year), and another 18% (172/930) were past users. Acupuncture was currently used by 7% (64/927) and had been used in the past by another 8% (71/927). Use of Chinese herbal medicine varied significantly (P < .01) according to age, sex, immigrant status, and ethnicity. Acupuncture use varied significantly only by age. The main reasons for consulting Chinese herbalists were infection (41%, 157/382), respiratory problems (11%, 42/382), and rheumatologic problems (10%, 38/382), whereas acupuncturists were consulted almost exclusively for rheumatologic problems (80%, 45/56). CONCLUSIONS: Using TCM in conjunction with visiting family physicians was very popular among this predominantly Chinese study population. Patients with acute conditions, such as influenza, consulted both their family physicians and Chinese herbalists in quick succession. On the other hand, those suffering from more chronic conditions, such as rheumatologic diseases, were more likely to start using TCM after repeated visits to their family physicians. Images p1011-a PMID:9612586

  15. Should Medical Anthropology be Required for Family Physicians?

    PubMed Central

    Deagle, George L.

    1992-01-01

    The educational preparation of practitioners might change as family medicine shifts its emphasis to a more humanistic approach. Medical anthropology offers particular promise as a training experience. Learning about the role of culture, including beliefs and values surrounding illness, can supplement basic science training. Improved delivery of health care is likely if caregivers are sensitive to cultural dimensions of patients' illnesses. Imagesp1178-ap1179-ap1180-a PMID:21221336

  16. Diagnosis and management of hypertension: the stated practices of family physicians.

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, E.; Hilditch, J.; Chipman, M.; Hardacre, G.; Morrison, M.

    1984-01-01

    Hypertension is an important and common problem in family practice, but there is no general agreement on the systolic and diastolic pressures at which it should be diagnosed and treated. Responses from 273 family physicians surveyed by mail in Metropolitan Toronto showed a wide variation in the pressures used as cut-off points. The probability that in a given patient hypertension would be diagnosed or treated at different systolic and diastolic pressures varied considerably among the physicians, the variation increasing with the age of the patient. There was also wide variation in opinion among the surveyed physicians about how often patients should be screened for hypertension; depending on the patient's age, up to 35% of the physicians stated that the blood pressure should be measured at every visit. Only one third reported using any one or more methods to ensure that patients with hypertension were not lost to follow-up. The family physicians with an academic appointment used higher cut-off points for diagnosis and treatment, and they screened and scheduled follow-up visits less frequently than those without an academic appointment. PMID:6704861

  17. [Physicians and surgeons in Saragossa during the modern age. Number, social and family structure].

    PubMed

    Fernandez Doctor, A

    1997-01-01

    Documentation at the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Saragossa, scattered throughout many archives, made it possible to trace the evolution of the number of physicians and surgeons in the city of Saragossa in the Modern Age with regard to the number of inhabitants of this city. Also studied are the possible causes of increases or decreases in their numbers, and the proportions of physicians and surgeons to inhabitants are compared with figures from other Spanish regions. By studying a 1723 census, the social and family structures of the different health professions in Saragossa are analyzed. Comparisons of these figures to the structures of other professions made it possible to determine the different social level of each structure. The social level of physicians was the same as that of apothecaries, whereas it was higher than that of surgeons and veterinarians and lower than that of legal professionals, notaries and jurists.

  18. Coordination of cancer care between family physicians and cancer specialists

    PubMed Central

    Easley, Julie; Miedema, Baukje; Carroll, June C.; Manca, Donna P.; O’Brien, Mary Ann; Webster, Fiona; Grunfeld, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To explore health care provider (HCP) perspectives on the coordination of cancer care between FPs and cancer specialists. Design Qualitative study using semistructured telephone interviews. Setting Canada. Participants A total of 58 HCPs, comprising 21 FPs, 15 surgeons, 12 medical oncologists, 6 radiation oncologists, and 4 GPs in oncology. Methods This qualitative study is nested within a larger mixed-methods program of research, CanIMPACT (Canadian Team to Improve Community-Based Cancer Care along the Continuum), focused on improving the coordination of cancer care between FPs and cancer specialists. Using a constructivist grounded theory approach, telephone interviews were conducted with HCPs involved in cancer care. Invitations to participate were sent to a purposive sample of HCPs based on medical specialty, sex, province or territory, and geographic location (urban or rural). A coding schema was developed by 4 team members; subsequently, 1 team member coded the remaining transcripts. The resulting themes were reviewed by the entire team and a summary of results was mailed to participants for review. Main findings Communication challenges emerged as the most prominent theme. Five key related subthemes were identified around this core concept that occurred at both system and individual levels. System-level issues included delays in medical transcription, difficulties accessing patient information, and physicians not being copied on all reports. Individual-level issues included the lack of rapport between FPs and cancer specialists, and the lack of clearly defined and broadly communicated roles. Conclusion Effective and timely communication of medical information, as well as clearly defined roles for each provider, are essential to good coordination of care along the cancer care trajectory, particularly during transitions of care between cancer specialist and FP care. Despite advances in technology, substantial communication challenges still

  19. Evidence-based medicine in primary care: qualitative study of family physicians

    PubMed Central

    Tracy, C Shawn; Dantas, Guilherme Coelho; Upshur, Ross EG

    2003-01-01

    Background The objectives of this study were: a) to examine physician attitudes to and experience of the practice of evidence-based medicine (EBM) in primary care; b) to investigate the influence of patient preferences on clinical decision-making; and c) to explore the role of intuition in family practice. Method Qualitative analysis of semi-structured interviews of 15 family physicians purposively selected from respondents to a national survey on EBM mailed to a random sample of Canadian family physicians. Results Participants mainly welcomed the promotion of EBM in the primary care setting. A significant number of barriers and limitations to the implementation of EBM were identified. EBM is perceived by some physicians as a devaluation of the 'art of medicine' and a threat to their professional/clinical autonomy. Issues regarding the trustworthiness and credibility of evidence were of great concern, especially with respect to the influence of the pharmaceutical industry. Attempts to become more evidence-based often result in the experience of conflicts. Patient factors exert a powerful influence on clinical decision-making and can serve as trumps to research evidence. A widespread belief that intuition plays a vital role in primary care reinforced views that research evidence must be considered alongside other factors such as patient preferences and the clinical judgement and experience of the physician. Discussion Primary care physicians are increasingly keen to consider research evidence in clinical decision-making, but there are significant concerns about the current model of EBM. Our findings support the proposed revisions to EBM wherein greater emphasis is placed on clinical expertise and patient preferences, both of which remain powerful influences on physician behaviour. PMID:12740025

  20. The snow machine and the family physician (medical and social aspects).

    PubMed

    Eaid, C R

    1970-03-01

    The snow machine is here to stay. The family physician must acquaint himself with possible increasing numbers of trauma. Etiology is important.College of Family Physicians with other bodies should conduct a symposium on the dangers of this sport before 1970-71 season.Family physician should cooperate in reporting all injuries; their cause and possible prevention. Prevention is combined responsibility of organized medicine, manufacturer and the operator.Club activity is endorsed over private activity.Snow machines induce special type of trauma. Increased soft tissue damage. Shock more prominent feature due to chill factor and possible delay in reaching treatment centre.Major cause of death is head injury and brain damage. Present helmets are less than adequate.Manufacturers to be increasingly safety conscious. Safety is joint effort of the former, the profession and legislation.Snow machining is a recreation, not an exercise. It is not recommended for certain restricted groups.Family physician has a special role in treatment, evaluation and recommendations. More statistical analysis and co-operation required.Snow machine can be a killer and a source of major trauma. PMID:20468483

  1. Advantages and Disadvantages of Educational Email Alerts for Family Physicians: Viewpoint

    PubMed Central

    Badran, Hani; Grad, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Background Electronic knowledge resources constitute an important channel for accredited Continuing Medical Education (CME) activities. However, email usage for educational purposes is controversial. On the one hand, family physicians become aware of new information, confirm what they already know, and obtain reassurance by reading educational email alerts. Email alerts can also encourage physicians to search Web-based resources. On the other hand, technical difficulties and privacy issues are common obstacles. Objective The purpose of this discussion paper, informed by a literature review and a small qualitative study, was to understand family physicians’ knowledge, attitudes, and behavior in regard to email in general and educational emails in particular, and to explore the advantages and disadvantages of educational email alerts. In addition, we documented participants’ suggestions to improve email alert services for CME. Methods We conducted a qualitative descriptive study using the “Knowledge, Attitude, Behavior” model. We conducted semi-structured face-to-face interviews with 15 family physicians. We analyzed the collected data using inductive-deductive thematic qualitative data analysis. Results All 15 participants scanned and prioritized their email, and 13 of them checked their email daily. Participants mentioned (1) advantages of educational email alerts such as saving time, convenience and valid information, and (2) disadvantages such as an overwhelming number of emails and irrelevance. They offered suggestions to improve educational email. Conclusions The advantages of email alerts seem to compensate for their disadvantages. Suggestions proposed by family physicians can help to improve educational email alerts. PMID:25803184

  2. Preventing crises in palliative care in the home. Role of family physicians and nurses.

    PubMed Central

    Howarth, G.; Willison, K. B.

    1995-01-01

    With the current shift to community care, the need for palliative care in the home involving the family physician has increased. Potential causes of crises in the home care of the dying are identified. Strategies to prevent crises are suggested that rely on a team's providing comprehensive and anticipatory care. PMID:7539653

  3. Family-Building Patterns of Professional Women: A Comparison of Lawyers, Physicians, and Postsecondary Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooney, Teresa M.; Uhlenberg, Peter

    1989-01-01

    Compared family careers of professional women in law, medicine, and postsecondary teaching using 1980 U.S. Census of women (N=2,445) aged 30-39. Found female physicians had greatest marriage and childbearing involvement, and female lawyers experienced highest rates of divorce and lowest rates of remarriage. (Author/CM)

  4. Urban family physician plan in Iran: challenges of implementation in Kerman

    PubMed Central

    Dehnavieh, Reza; Kalantari, Ali Reza; Jafari Sirizi, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background: The Family Physician Plan has recently been implemented in three provinces of Iran on a pilot basis and is going to be implemented throughout Iran in the future. Through a qualitative design, this study aims to determine probable implementation challenges of Family Physician Plan in Kerman. Methods: This study was conducted in Kerman in 2013. Data were collected through interviews with 21 experts in the field. Sampling continued until data saturation level was achieved. All interviews were recorded and then analyzed, and main themes and subgroups were extracted from them based on a framework analysis model. Results: most prevalent establishment challenges of Family Physician Plan were classified into policy-making, financial supply, laws and resources. Conclusion: The urban Family Physician Plan can be carried out more effectively by implementing this plan step by step, highlighting the relationships between the related organizations, using new payment mechanisms e.g Per Capita, DRG, make national commitment and proper educational programs for providers, development the health electronic Record, justifying providers and community about advantages of this plan, clarifying regulatory status about providers' Duties and most importantly considering a specific funding source. PMID:26913266

  5. The Snow Machine and the Family Physician (Medical and Social Aspects)

    PubMed Central

    Eaid, C. R.

    1970-01-01

    The snow machine is here to stay. The family physician must acquaint himself with possible increasing numbers of trauma. Etiology is important. College of Family Physicians with other bodies should conduct a symposium on the dangers of this sport before 1970-71 season. Family physician should cooperate in reporting all injuries; their cause and possible prevention. Prevention is combined responsibility of organized medicine, manufacturer and the operator. Club activity is endorsed over private activity. Snow machines induce special type of trauma. Increased soft tissue damage. Shock more prominent feature due to chill factor and possible delay in reaching treatment centre. Major cause of death is head injury and brain damage. Present helmets are less than adequate. Manufacturers to be increasingly safety conscious. Safety is joint effort of the former, the profession and legislation. Snow machining is a recreation, not an exercise. It is not recommended for certain restricted groups. Family physician has a special role in treatment, evaluation and recommendations. More statistical analysis and co-operation required. Snow machine can be a killer and a source of major trauma. Imagesp43-ap44-ap44-bp45-ap45-b PMID:20468483

  6. Barriers to Physician Identification and Treatment of Family Violence: Lessons from Five Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Stu; And Others

    1997-01-01

    A study involving over 480 interviews in five diverse communities (Atlanta, Georgia; Duluth, Minnesota; Providence, Rhode Island; Riverside, California; Roswell, New Mexico) identified barriers facing physicians and other health care providers in identifying, treating, and referring victims of family violence, and illuminated the relationships of…

  7. Palliative care by family physicians in the 1990s. Resilience amid reform.

    PubMed Central

    Burge, F.; McIntyre, P.; Twohig, P.; Cummings, I.; Kaufman, D.; Frager, G.; Pollett, A.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore issues family physicians face in providing community-based palliative care to their patients in the context of a changing health care system. DESIGN: Focus groups. SETTING: Small (< 10,000 population), medium-sized (10,000 to 50,000), and large (> 50,000) communities in Nova Scotia. PARTICIPANTS: Twenty-five men and women physicians with varying years of practice experience in both solo and group practices. METHOD: A semistructured approach was used, asking physicians to reflect on recent palliative care experiences in order to explore issues of care. MAIN FINDINGS: Five themes emerged from the discussions: resources needed, availability of family support, time and money supporting physicians' activities, symptom control for patients, and physicians' emotional reactions to caring for dying patients. CONCLUSION: With downsizing of hospitals and greater emphasis on community-based care, the issues identified in this study will need attention, particularly in designing an integrated service delivery model for palliative care. PMID:11723593

  8. How Do Physicians Assess Their Family Physician Colleagues' Performance? Creating a Rubric to Inform Assessment and Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sargeant, Joan; MacLeod, Tanya; Sinclair, Douglas; Power, Mary

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: The Colleges of Physicians and Surgeons of Alberta and Nova Scotia (CPSNS) use a standardized multisource feedback program, the Physician Achievement Review (PAR/NSPAR), to provide physicians with performance assessment data via questionnaires from medical colleagues, coworkers, and patients on 5 practice domains: consultation…

  9. Family physician clinical compensation in an academic environment: moving away from the relative value unit

    PubMed Central

    Lochner, Jennifer; Trowbridge, Elizabeth; Kamnetz, Sandra; Pandhi, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Primary care physician compensation structures have remained largely volume-based, lagging behind changes in reimbursement that increasingly include population approaches such as capitation, bundled payments, and care management fees. We describe a population health-based physician compensation plan developed for two departmental family medicine faculty groups (residency teaching clinic faculty and community clinic faculty) along with outcomes before and after the plan’s implementation. Methods An observational study was conducted. A pre-post email survey assessed satisfaction with the plan, salary, and salary equity. Physician retention, panel size, and relative value unit (RVU) productivity metrics also were assessed before and after the plan’s implementation. Results Before implementation of the new plan, 18% of residency faculty and 33% of community faculty were satisfied or very satisfied with compensation structure. After implementation, those numbers rose to 47% for residency physicians and 74% for community physicians (p<0.01). Satisfaction with the amount of compensation also rose from 33% to 68% for residency faculty and from 26% to 87% for community faculty (p<0.01). For both groups, panel size per clinical full-time equivalent increased and RVUs moved closer to national benchmarks. RVUs decreased for residency faculty and increased for community faculty. Conclusions Aligning a compensation plan with population health delivery by moving rewards away from RVU productivity and towards panel management resulted in improved physician satisfaction and retention, as well as larger panel sizes. RVU changes were less predictable. Physician compensation is an important component of care model redesign that emphasizes population health. PMID:27272423

  10. Delisting of drugs in Ontario. How attitudes and prescribing strategies of family physicians in the Kingston area changed.

    PubMed Central

    Godwin, M.; Chapman, J.; Mowat, D.; Racz, W.; McBride, J.; Tang, J.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess how attitudes and prescribing strategies of family physicians changed when drugs were delisted from the Ontario Drug Benefit formulary. DESIGN: Mailed, self-administered survey. SETTING: Family physicians' offices in Ontario. PARTICIPANTS: All family physicians practising in the Kingston, Frontenac, Lennox, and Addington Health District. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Physicians were presented with six vignettes involving patients receiving a delisted drug. The choices were to recommend the patient pay for the medication, to substitute a drug still listed on the formulary, to make a special request that the medication be covered for this patient, or to offer another option. As well, the physicians were asked to indicate, on a 5-point Likert scale, their opinions regarding the effect of delisting on themselves and their patients. RESULTS: Physicians were most likely to change to a medication that was still on the formulary. Patient sex and ability to pay were factors in physicians' decisions. Physicians believe that the delistings are not likely to have adversely affected patients' health, that noncompliance is a problem because many once-daily formulations have been removed, that suitable alternatives are not always available, and that physicians should have been consulted more before the changes were made. CONCLUSIONS: Physicians usually substitute listed medications for medications that have been delisted. This is especially true for female patients and patients who are unable to pay. PMID:8754700

  11. The quality assessment of family physician service in rural regions, Northeast of Iran in 2012

    PubMed Central

    Vafaee-Najar, Ali; Nejatzadegan, Zohreh; Pourtaleb, Arefeh; Kaffashi, Shahnaz; Vejdani, Marjan; Molavi-Taleghani, Yasamin; Ebrahimipour, Hosein

    2014-01-01

    Background: Following the implementation of family physician plan in rural areas, the quantity of provided services has been increased, but what leads on the next topic is the improvement in expected quality of service, as well. The present study aims at determining the gap between patients’ expectation and perception from the quality of services provided by family physicians during the spring and summer of 2012. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study in which 480 patients who referred to family physician centers were selected with clustering and simple randomized method. Data were collected through SERVQUAL standard questionnaire and were analyzed with descriptive statistics, using statistical T-test, Kruskal-Wallis, and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests by SPSS 16 at a significance level of 0.05. Results: The difference between the mean scores of expectation and perception was about -0.93, which is considered as statistically significant difference (P≤ 0.05). Also, the differences in five dimensions of quality were as follows: tangible -1.10, reliability -0.87, responsiveness -1.06, assurance -0.83, and empathy -0.82. Findings showed that there was a significant difference between expectation and perception in five concepts of the provided services (P≤ 0.05). Conclusion: There was a gap between the ideal situation and the current situation of family physician quality of services. Our suggestion is maintaining a strong focus on patients, creating a medical practice that would exceed patients’ expectations, providing high-quality healthcare services, and realizing the continuous improvement of all processes. In both tangible and responsive, the gap was greater than the other dimensions. It is recommended that more attention should be paid to the physical appearance of the health center environment and the availability of staff and employees. PMID:24757691

  12. Decreasing supply of family physicians and general practitioners. Serious implications for the future.

    PubMed Central

    Thurber, A. D.; Busing, N.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To document a decrease in the supply of family physicians (FPs) and general practitioners among Canadian graduates of medical schools since rotating internships ceased to serve as a route to national licensure. DESIGN: Review of data from the Association of Canadian Medical Colleges, the Canadian Post-M.D. Education Registry, and the Canadian Institute for Health Information to track final training fields and eventual types of practice of graduates of Canadian faculties of medicine from 1987 to 1997. SETTING: Canadian faculties of medicine and residency training programs. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Number of Canadian medical graduates entering family medicine training programs from 1991 to 1998, number of Canadian graduate physicians exiting from these training programs, and proportion of each graduating class (1987 to 1994) practising as FPs or GPs in Canada in 1997. RESULTS: In 1993, 890 physicians (51% of graduates) were trained as FPs or GPs. By 1994, although the proportion remained at 40%, the number of Canadian graduates entering family medicine had dropped to 646, and by 1998, to 619. CONCLUSIONS: A deficit of FPs is already noticeable in the practice environment. For the way in which medical care is delivered in Canada, with FPs serving as first contact for patients, the authors conclude that the number of graduating FPs in Canada will not be sufficient to provide the primary care services Canadians need. PMID:10509220

  13. Barriers to physician identification and treatment of family violence: lessons from five communities.

    PubMed

    Cohen, S; De Vos, E; Newberger, E

    1997-01-01

    Since the Surgeon General's Workshop on Violence and Public Health (Leesburg, Virginia, October 27-29, 1985), a substantial literature has developed about the limitations of the health care response to family violence. Many contributions have reflected experiences in limited numbers of practice settings (e.g., a single emergency department or hospital). Until 1990, however, there had been no community-based studies. The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation asked a multidisciplinary team from Education Development Center, Inc. and Children's Hospital (Boston) to investigate the health care responses to family violence in five diverse communities. This qualitative study, comprising more than 480 interviews, provided a vivid picture of the barriers facing physicians and other health care providers in identifying, treating, and referring victims of family violence. It also illuminated the relations of the health care systems in these communities with other key sectors, including agencies and the judiciary. The key findings from the five-city study remain relevant because (1) it is the only large-scale, multi-community-based assessment of the barriers facing physicians; (2) it identified, or in some cases confirmed, both institutional and educational barriers limiting the effectiveness of even the most committed physicians; (3) it identified, or in some cases confirmed, specific areas of knowledge, attitudes, and skills development that should be incorporated in medical education; and (4) its conclusions continue to be reflected in subsequent contributions to the literature. In each of these ways, therefore, it informs the other articles in this supplement.

  14. The Experience of Risk-Adjusted Capitation Payment for Family Physicians in Iran: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Esmaeili, Reza; Hadian, Mohammad; Rashidian, Arash; Shariati, Mohammad; Ghaderi, Hossien

    2016-01-01

    Background When a country’s health system is faced with fundamental flaws that require the redesign of financing and service delivery, primary healthcare payment systems are often reformed. Objectives This study was conducted with the purpose of exploring the experiences of risk-adjusted capitation payment of urban family physicians in Iran when it comes to providing primary health care (PHC). Materials and Methods This is a qualitative study using the framework method. Data were collected via digitally audio-recorded semi-structured interviews with 24 family physicians and 5 executive directors in two provinces of Iran running the urban family physician pilot program. The participants were selected using purposive and snowball sampling. The codes were extracted using inductive and deductive methods. Results Regarding the effects of risk-adjusted capitation on the primary healthcare setting, five themes with 11 subthemes emerged, including service delivery, institutional structure, financing, people’s behavior, and the challenges ahead. Our findings indicated that the health system is enjoying some major changes in the primary healthcare setting through the implementation of risk-adjusted capitation payment. Conclusions With regard to the current challenges in Iran’s health system, using risk-adjusted capitation as a primary healthcare payment system can lead to useful changes in the health system’s features. However, future research should focus on the development of the risk-adjusted capitation model. PMID:27340558

  15. Inter-Provincial Migration Intentions of Family Physicians in Canada: The Roles of Income and Community Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Mou, Haizhen; Olfert, M Rose

    2015-11-01

    The inter-provincial migration patterns of family physicians in canada show that some provinces like newfoundland and saskatchewan experience persistent net out-migration, while others, including ontario and british columbia, are destinations more often than origins of migrants. Governments in provinces exhibiting net out-migration have responded with a number of incentive and recruitment programs. In this study, we investigate the determinants of the stated interprovincial migration intentions of 3,995 rural and urban family physicians in the 2010 wave of the national physician survey. We consider a range of physician characteristics, community attributes and working conditions. We find that in the intention to move, higher compensation has a modest effect, while the community characteristics have a consistently important influence. Our results suggest that policy and program designers should acknowledge the critical role of community-level living and working conditions in their family physician recruitment and retention efforts.

  16. Investigating fatigue of less than 6 months' duration. Guidelines for family physicians.

    PubMed Central

    Godwin, M.; Delva, D.; Miller, K.; Molson, J.; Hobbs, N.; MacDonald, S.; MacLeod, C.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop an evidence-based systematic approach to assessment of adult patients who present to family physicians complaining of fatigue of less than 6 months' duration. The guidelines present investigative options, making explicit what should be considered in all cases and what should be considered only in specific situations. They aim to provide physicians with an approach that, to the extent possible, is based on evidence so that time and cost are minimized and detection and management of the cause of the fatigue are optimized. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: MEDLINE was searched from 1966 to 1997 using the key words "family practice" and "fatigue." Articles about chronic fatigue syndrome were excluded. Articles with level 3 evidence were found, but no randomized trials, cohort studies, or case-control studies were found. Articles looking specifically at the epidemiology, demographics, investigations, and diagnoses of patients with fatigue were chosen. Articles based on studies at referral and specialty centres were given less weight than those based on studies in family physicians' offices. MAIN MESSAGE: Adherence to these guidelines will decrease the cost of investigating the symptom of fatigue and optimize diagnosis and management. This needs to be proved in practice, however, and with research that produces level 1 and 2 evidence. CONCLUSIONS: Adults presenting with fatigue of less than 6 months' duration should be assessed for psychosocial causes and should have a focused history and physical examination to determine whether further investigations should be done. The guidelines outline investigations to be considered. The elderly require special consideration. These guidelines have group validation, but they need to be tested by more physicians in various locations and types of practices. PMID:10065311

  17. Defining the eHealth Information Niche in the Family Physician/Patient Examination and Knowledge Transfer Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellington, Virginia Beth Elder

    2012-01-01

    This research study was undertaken to gain a richer understanding of the use of patient-introduced online health information during the physician/patient examination and knowledge transfer process. Utilizing qualitative data obtained from ten family physician interviews and workflow modeling using activity diagrams and task structure charts, this…

  18. Comparing the Performance of Allopathically and Osteopathically Trained Physicians on the American Board of Family Medicine's Certification Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neill, Thomas R.; Royal, Kenneth D.; Schulte, Bradley M.; Leigh, Terrence

    2009-01-01

    Background: Two medical specialty boards offer certification in family medicine: the American Board of Family Medicine (ABFM) and the American Osteopathic Board of Family Physicians (AOBFP). The AOBFP certification is offered only to graduates of osteopathic colleges; however, graduates of both osteopathic and allopathic medical schools who have…

  19. [Family health and family physician's influence on prevention psychoactive substances abuse].

    PubMed

    Lapčević, Mirjana; Dimitrijević, Ivan

    2010-01-01

    The family, as the basic social unit, has a decisive role in the health and disease of its members. It is the primary unit where health needs are formed and solved. By its own resources the family independently resolves about 75% of the total health requirements. In the paper the authors study family characteristics which influence family health and diseases, indicators of family health and the scale of life values. Also, the study evaluates social factors, communication and the influence of the usage of psychoactive substances on family health and the quality of family life. To form the personality of a child three factors are most significant: love, the feeling of safety and the presence of harmonious relationship between the parents. Life harmony in a family also depends on the quality of structural components of the personality and the interaction of motivation of its members. Early childhood determines the future personality of the adult person. At that period, habits and partially attitudes are formed. In harmonious family relationships the parents are the role model to children. Verbal and non-verbal communication enrich the relationship among people and enable efforts in supporting understanding, compassion and care for others by mutual agreement. On the scale of life values of Serbian citizens health holds the first position. Immediately following the health issue is good relationship in the family. As healthcare is not only the task of healthcare services, but also of each individual, family and the society as a whole, it is on healthcare personnel to educate the citizens how to preserve and improve their own health and the health of their family by a continual healthcare and education. Above all, this concerns avoidance of bad habits, such as smoking, immoderate alcohol consumption, narcotic abuse, physical inactivity, hypercaloric nutrition, etc. Also, it is significant to make an early recognition of disease symptoms and to turn for help to the chosen

  20. Do family physicians need medical assistants to detect and manage hypertension?

    PubMed

    Bass, M J; McWhinney, I R; Donner, A

    1986-06-01

    To test a new approach to detecting and managing hypertension, 34 family practices in southwestern Ontario that comprised 32 124 patients aged 20 to 65 years were randomly assigned in a 5-year study to either undertake a system of care in which a medical assistant oversaw screening and attended to education, compliance and follow-up (experimental group) or continue their usual practices (control group). The 17 physicians in the experimental practices (15 659 patients) were matched with the 17 in the control practices (16 465 patients) according to size of the community, sex, level of practice activity and length of time in practice. Hypertension was defined as at least two diastolic blood pressure readings over 90 mm Hg. More patients in the experimental group than in the control group were screened at least once (91% v. 80%); the former were more likely to have lower systolic blood pressure (p less than 0.02), to be compliant (p less than 0.05) and to be very satisfied with care (p less than 0.01). There were no significant differences between the two groups in the rates of illness and death due to cardiovascular disease for all patients or for hypertensive patients. The unassisted family physician can provide effective care for hypertensive patients. However, minor modifications in the physician's practices can improve care.

  1. Assessment of family physicians' knowledge as an indicator of burn management knowledge among non-burn practitioners in Ismialia, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Moghazy, A M; Kamel, M H; Farghaly, R M

    2014-03-31

    The management of burns within the first hours of injury has a significant impact on mortality and morbidity. In case of burns disasters, most patients are managed by non-burn practitioners. The knowledge held by our local family physicians is thought to be representative of that of non-burn practitioners, as they had not partaken in any courses or training on burn management beyond graduation. With regard to emergency burn management, the knowledge required is: assessment of burn extent and depth, associated injuries, indications of escharotomy, fluid therapy and airway management, as well as safe transportation. The aim of this study therefore was to assess the knowledge of family physicians - as an indicator of that of non-burn practitioners - on emergency burn management, and design accordingly an appropriate burn educational program. An interview questionnaire was distributed to all physicians working in Family Medicine Centers in Ismailia, Egypt, who did not possess a post-graduate degree. A total of twenty-four family physicians (100%) participated in this study. The questionnaire findings showed that, out of a possible score of 25 correct answers, the highest result was 12; achieved by 6 physicians (25%). The highest frequency score was 8 correct responses; obtained by 10 physicians (29.2%). This demonstrated a knowledge deficit among Ismailia's family physicians, and subsequently non-burn practitioners, with regard to burns management, due to gaps in undergraduate teaching. PMID:25249845

  2. Screening and Treatment for Alcohol, Tobacco and Opioid Use Disorders: A Survey of Family Physicians across Ontario

    PubMed Central

    Loheswaran, Genane; Soklaridis, Sophie; Selby, Peter; Le Foll, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Introduction As a primary point of contact within the health care system, family physicians are able to play a vital role in identifying individuals with substance use disorders and connecting them to the appropriate treatment. However, there is very little data available on whether family physicians are actively screening for and treating substance use disorders. The objective of the current survey was to assess whether family physicians in Ontario are screening for alcohol, opioid and tobacco use disorders, using validated tools and providing treatment. Methods An online survey consisting of a series of 38 primarily close-ended questions was circulated to family physicians in Ontario. Rates of screening for alcohol, opioid and tobacco dependence, use of validated tools for screening, providing treatment for dependent individuals and the current barriers to the prescription of pharmacotherapies for these drug dependences were assessed. Results The use of validated screening tools was limited for all three substances. Screening by family physicians for the substance use disorders among adolescents was much lower than screening among adults. Pharmacotherapy was more commonly used as an intervention for tobacco dependence than for alcohol and opioid dependence. This was explained by the lack of knowledge among family physicians on the pharmacotherapies for alcohol and opioid dependence. Conclusions Findings from the current study suggest there is a need for family physicians to integrate screening for substance use disorders using validated tools into their standard medical practice. Furthermore, there is a need for increased knowledge on pharmacotherapies for alcohol and opioid use disorders. It is important to note that the low response rate is a major limitation to this study. One possible reason for this low response rate may be a lack of interest and awareness among family physicians on the importance of screening and treatment of substance use disorders in

  3. Health Related Absenteeism of Family Physicians in the Negev Region of Israel: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Khalaila, Ahmed; Margolin, Ilana; Peleg, Roni

    2016-10-01

    Physicians tend to treat their own illnesses differently than the general population, sometimes continuing to come to work when ill. To assess whether family physicians continue to work when ill. A cross-sectional study with a convenience sample. A self-administered, anonymous questionnaire, that included socio-demographic data, questions relating to illness, and reasons for work absenteeism, was completed by family physicians in the Negev region of Israel. 107 physicians participated in the study including 46 women (43 %). The mean age was 45.1 ± 11.4. Forty physicians (37.4 %) said they come to work with an acute illness, 47 (43.9 %) answered that they do so some of the time, and 19 (17.8 %) said that they did not come to work ill. On a scale from 1 to 10 the mean score for the question as to whether physicians are liable to infect their patients was 7.4, with a higher score meaning more likely to infect. Older physicians were more likely to say that the decision to stay away from work was related to the lack of available physicians (P = 0.002), while board certified physicians were more likely than residents to stay away from work due to an acute illness (P = 0.023). Family physicians in the Negev sometimes work when they are ill. This finding has positive sides related to dedication to patients and the work place, but one cannot ignore the fact that patients may be infected by their physicians. Behavioral guidelines, including social, legal, and ethical aspects, should be formulated on this issue.

  4. [The addiction patient in the family physicians' practice: tools and skills for a successful performance].

    PubMed

    Neuner-Jehle, Stefan

    2014-10-01

    Addiction patients are usually perceived as problematic patients in primary care practices: Encounters often are time-consuming and the approach to the patient is difficult. Moreover, patients sometimes are hiding their addictive behaviour and behave shameful. Other barriers are a lack of experience in communication skills among physicians or their own addictive behaviour. Nevertheless, to diagnose and treat addiction as early as possible is an important task for family doctors, as patients' confidence in them is an important factor to induce a behaviour change. We present four screening tests for the early diagnosis of addiction to alcohol (AUDIT, AUDIT-C, CAGE, SMAST-G) and discuss their strengths and shortcomings. The family doctor's practice is also a useful setting for brief interventions based on motivational interviewing (MI) techniques and the transtheoretical model of behaviour change (TTM). We shortly introduce to these techniques and attitudes using addiction to alcohol and nicotine as examples, and we present innovative methods as "defined drinking" and new quit smoking methods. A respectful attitude towards the patient and communication skills seem to be key factors for family physicians to successfully approach their addiction patients.

  5. Dosing variability in prescriptions of acetaminophen to children: comparisons between pediatricians, family physicians and otolaryngologists

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To estimate the extents of dosing variability in prescriptions of acetaminophen to children among pediatricians, family physicians and otolaryngologists. Methods The acetaminophen prescriptions in the systematic sampling datasets from the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan were analyzed. The distribution of dosages was measured and expressed in terms of coefficient of variation (CV). The analyses were stratified by patient’s age, prescriber’s specialty and preparation form. Results From 13,868 prescribed items of acetaminophen in 2009, liquids accounted only for 11.1% (n = 1544). More than half (56.9%) of liquids were prescribed by pediatricians. The median dose (83.3 mg, n = 1683) of acetaminophen prescriptions in infants is around half of that in preschool children (166.7 mg, n = 3921), one-third in children (250.0 mg, n = 4926) and one-sixth in adolescents (500.0 mg, n = 3338). In infants, the prescriptions by pediatricians had the highest CV (86.7%), followed by family physicians (82.3%) and otolaryngologists (70.3%). The patterns were similar in preschool children and children, but the difference of CV among specialties narrowed down with the patient’s age. Conclusions In acetaminophen prescriptions to children, pediatricians had a wider variability of dosages and a higher ratio of liquid preparations than family physicians and otolaryngologists. Further investigations can be undertaken to estimate the accuracy of dosing variability as an indicator of prescribing quality. Besides, child-suitable drug preparations should be promoted to ensure patient safety. PMID:23617266

  6. A Manual for Prioritizing the Topics of Clinical Practice Guidelines for Family Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Mounesan, Leila; Sayarifard, Azadeh; Haghjou, Leila; Ghadirian, Laleh; Rajabi, Fatemeh; Nedjat, Saharnaz

    2016-01-01

    Background: Development of a manual or well-defined criterion for prioritizing the topics of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) will help validate and organize this process evermore. This study was conducted to design an applicable manual that would prioritize the CPG topics for family physicians. Methods: This study was a multi-stage method using a qualitative approach that was conducted for the manual developing. The manual development process took place in four steps, as follows: Literature review, interviews with ten experts, preparing a list of criteria and determining its appropriateness by applying the RAND/UCLA Appropriateness method, and development of the final draft of the manual and pilot study. Results: Interview transcripts went under content analysis and were classified into eight main groups, 12 subgroups, and 85 themes. A comprehensive list consisting of fifty preliminary criteria were extracted. After summarizing and classifying the criteria, 12 appropriate criteria were evaluated using the RAND appropriateness method. Eventually, based on the literature review and our own results of the interview analysis, a manual consisting of five main sections and one clause on ethics was developed. Later, a pilot study was conducted on ten family physician topics, and prioritized by nine experts. Conclusions: The manual can be eyed as a tool ensuring the quality of the process of prioritizing CPG topics for family physicians, as it takes into account the issues involved in priority-setting. Selecting informed stakeholders for rating the criteria and ranking the topics was an issue that was greatly emphasized by the experts. Eventually, the application of this manual can be the first step toward systematizing the process of prioritizing CPG topics in the country. PMID:27141283

  7. Impact of psychotherapy. Does it affect frequency of visits to family physicians?

    PubMed Central

    Golden, G. A.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether a course of psychotherapy with a psychologist affected the frequency of patients' visits to their family doctors. DESIGN: Retrospective analysis of patients' medical records to determine the frequency of visits to their family doctors in the 6 months before psychotherapy, during therapy, and in the 6 months after therapy. SETTING: A teaching family medical centre in London, Ont. PARTICIPANTS: Thirty-three patients who had completed a course of psychotherapy between 1984 and 1991. INTERVENTIONS: Psychotherapy was provided by two psychologists employed at the medical centre. Patients did not pay a direct fee. The median length of psychotherapy was 12.5 1-hour sessions, and the therapeutic approach was eclectic and humanistic. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Frequency of visits to family physicians before, during, and after psychotherapy. RESULTS: Frequency of visits to family doctors decreased both during and after psychotherapy. The decrease was especially apparent from before therapy to after therapy (49%, P < .001). Psychotherapy given by psychologists in a Canadian family medical centre appears to follow the pattern of the "offset effect," a reduction in medical use following psychotherapy, which has been demonstrated in other medical settings. CONCLUSIONS: Psychotherapy can be an effective and efficient part of total medical care for patients with complex psychological problems. PMID:9189298

  8. Mining reflective continuing medical education data for family physician learning needs.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Denice Colleen; Pluye, Pierre; Rodriguez, Charo; Grad, Roland

    2016-01-01

    A mixed methods research (sequential explanatory design) studied the potential of mining the data from the consumers of continuing medical education (CME) programs, for the developers of CME programs. The quantitative data generated by family physicians, through applying the information assessment method to CME content, was presented to key informants from the CME planning community through a qualitative description study.The data were revealed to have many potential applications including supporting the creation of CME content, CME program planning and personal learning portfolios. PMID:27348489

  9. The role of lack of reciprocity, supervisory support, workload and work-family conflict on exhaustion: evidence from physicians.

    PubMed

    Tayfur, Ozge; Arslan, Mahmut

    2013-01-01

    Emotional exhaustion, argued to be burnout's core dimension, can manifest itself as decreased productivity and job dissatisfaction. This study aims to determine how lack of reciprocity, lack of supervisory support, high workload, and work-family conflict affect emotional exhaustion. Data were collected from 295 physicians working at private and public hospitals in Antalya and İstanbul, Turkey. The survey included lack of reciprocity, supervisory support, workload, WFC items, and exhaustion subscale of Maslach Burnout Inventrory: General Survey (MBI:GS). The proposed model was tested using AMOS 17, which enables assessment of hypothesized relations and degree of fit between data and model. Workload and lack reciprocity were found to increase emotional exhaustion, while supervisory support alleviated the exhaustion physicians experienced. As expected, workload increased work-family conflict. Quite unexpectedly, workload was associated with lack of reciprocity; meaning, physicians more likely perceive their efforts go unappreciated and their patient relationships are inequitable (i.e. investing more than receiving) when they perceive a high workload. In addition, supervisory support was also associated with lack of reciprocity. Physicians experiencing inadequate supervisory support tend to describe their patient relationships in negative terms and perceive inequitable relations. Physicians who do not receive either adequate supervisory support or patient appreciation tend to feel emotionally exhausted. Moreover, both workload and work-family conflict increase physicians' exhaustion. Suggestions to reduce workload and social problems in hospitals are offered to reduce exhaustion. PMID:23330970

  10. The role of lack of reciprocity, supervisory support, workload and work-family conflict on exhaustion: evidence from physicians.

    PubMed

    Tayfur, Ozge; Arslan, Mahmut

    2013-01-01

    Emotional exhaustion, argued to be burnout's core dimension, can manifest itself as decreased productivity and job dissatisfaction. This study aims to determine how lack of reciprocity, lack of supervisory support, high workload, and work-family conflict affect emotional exhaustion. Data were collected from 295 physicians working at private and public hospitals in Antalya and İstanbul, Turkey. The survey included lack of reciprocity, supervisory support, workload, WFC items, and exhaustion subscale of Maslach Burnout Inventrory: General Survey (MBI:GS). The proposed model was tested using AMOS 17, which enables assessment of hypothesized relations and degree of fit between data and model. Workload and lack reciprocity were found to increase emotional exhaustion, while supervisory support alleviated the exhaustion physicians experienced. As expected, workload increased work-family conflict. Quite unexpectedly, workload was associated with lack of reciprocity; meaning, physicians more likely perceive their efforts go unappreciated and their patient relationships are inequitable (i.e. investing more than receiving) when they perceive a high workload. In addition, supervisory support was also associated with lack of reciprocity. Physicians experiencing inadequate supervisory support tend to describe their patient relationships in negative terms and perceive inequitable relations. Physicians who do not receive either adequate supervisory support or patient appreciation tend to feel emotionally exhausted. Moreover, both workload and work-family conflict increase physicians' exhaustion. Suggestions to reduce workload and social problems in hospitals are offered to reduce exhaustion.

  11. [The physician-patient relationship under the Family Health Program in three municipalities in Bahia State, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Franco, Anamélia Lins e Silva; Bastos, Ana Cecília de Sousa; Alves, Vânia Sampaio

    2005-01-01

    This study discusses the physician-patient relationship under the Family Health Program (FHP) in Bahia State, Brazil. Assuming that the physician-patient relationship is influenced by macro and micro-contextual factors, we linked health surveillance and the ecological model of human development, both influenced by contextualism. The methodological strategies included: a census of FHP physicians in Bahia and direct observation of consultations by 20 physicians in three municipalities (counties). There were significant differences in the implementation of the FHP in the three municipalities, with an impact on the physician-patient relationship. As for orientation of clinical practice, health surveillance has not been incorporated by the physicians observed in this study. According to the micro-contextual analysis, health problems were frequently not treated in a contextualized way. FHP guidelines, when incorporated by the municipalities, produce differences in care as observed in the physician-patient relationship. The health surveillance approach, reported as a tool for collective work, proves efficient for describing, evaluating, and improving the FHP, and this study concludes that it is a powerful conceptual tool for dealing with the physician-patient relationship. PMID:15692658

  12. Family Physician Clinical Inertia in Glycemic Control among Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Valerija Bralić; Marković, Biserka Bergman; Kranjčević, Ksenija

    2015-01-01

    Background Many patients with diabetes do not achieve target values. One of the reasons for this is clinical inertia. The correct explanation of clinical inertia requires a conjunction of patient with physician and health care system factors. Our aim was to determine the rate of clinical inertia in treating diabetes in primary care and association of patient, physician, and health care setting factors with clinical inertia. Material/Methods This was a national, multicenter, observational, cross-sectional study in primary care in Croatia. Each family physician (FP) provided professional data and collected clinical data on 15–25 type 2 diabetes (T2DM) patients. Clinical inertia was defined as a consultation in which treatment change based on glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels was indicated but did not occur. Results A total of 449 FPs (response rate 89.8%) collected data on 10275 patients. Mean clinical inertia per FP was 55.6% (SD ±26.17) of consultations. All of the FPs were clinically inert with some patients, and 9% of the FPs were clinically inert with all patients. The main factors associated with clinical inertia were: higher percentage of HbA1c, oral anti-diabetic drug initiated by diabetologist, increased postprandial glycemia and total cholesterol, physical inactivity of patient, and administration of drugs other than oral antidiabetics. Conclusions Clinical inertia in treating patients with T2DM is a serious problem. Patients with worse glycemic control and those whose therapy was initiated by a diabetologist experience more clinical inertia. More research on causes of clinical inertia in treating patients with T2DM should be conducted to help achieve more effective diabetes control. PMID:25652941

  13. Use and perceptions of information among family physicians: sources considered accessible, relevant, and reliable

    PubMed Central

    Kosteniuk, Julie G.; Morgan, Debra G.; D'Arcy, Carl K.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The research determined (1) the information sources that family physicians (FPs) most commonly use to update their general medical knowledge and to make specific clinical decisions, and (2) the information sources FPs found to be most physically accessible, intellectually accessible (easy to understand), reliable (trustworthy), and relevant to their needs. Methods: A cross-sectional postal survey of 792 FPs and locum tenens, in full-time or part-time medical practice, currently practicing or on leave of absence in the Canadian province of Saskatchewan was conducted during the period of January to April 2008. Results: Of 666 eligible physicians, 331 completed and returned surveys, resulting in a response rate of 49.7% (331/666). Medical textbooks and colleagues in the main patient care setting were the top 2 sources for the purpose of making specific clinical decisions. Medical textbooks were most frequently considered by FPs to be reliable (trustworthy), and colleagues in the main patient care setting were most physically accessible (easy to access). Conclusions: When making specific clinical decisions, FPs were most likely to use information from sources that they considered to be reliable and generally physically accessible, suggesting that FPs can best be supported by facilitating easy and convenient access to high-quality information. PMID:23405045

  14. Factors Affecting Leave out of General Practitioners from Rural Family Physician Program: A Case of Kerman, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Amiresmaili, Mohammadreza; Khosravi, Sajad; Feyzabadi, Vahid Yazdi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Rural family physician program as the new reform in the Iranian health system has been implemented since 2005. Its success depends much on physicians’ retention. The present study aimed to identify influential factors on physicians’ willingness to leave out this program in Kerman province. Methods: The present cross-sectional study was performed in Kerman province in 2011. All family physicians working in this program (n = 271) were studied using a questionnaire. Data analysis was carried out using descriptive statistics and logistic regression through SPSS version 18.0. Results: Twenty-six percent (70) of the physicians had left out the program in the past. In addition, 77.3% (208) intended to leave out in the near future. Opportunity for continuing education, inappropriate and long working hours, unsuitable requirements of salary, irregular payments, lack of job security and high working responsibility were regarded as the most important reasons for leaving out the program in the past and intention to leave out in future orderly. According to univariate logistic regression, younger physicians (odds ratio [OR] =2.479; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.261-4.872) and physicians who had older children (OR = 4.743; 95% CI: 1.441-15.607) were more willing to leave out the plan in the near future, however it was not significant in multivariate logistic regression. Conclusions: Physician retention in family physician program is faced with serious doubts due to different reasons. The success of the program is endangered because of the pivotal role of human resources. Hence, the revision of human resources policies of the program seems necessary in order to reduce physicians leave out and improving its effectiveness. PMID:25400891

  15. In search of attachment: a qualitative study of chronically ill women transitioning between family physicians in rural Ontario, Canada

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Most Canadians receive basic health services from a family physician and these physicians are particularly critical in the management of chronic disease. Canada, however, has an endemic shortage of family physicians. Physician shortages and turnover are particularly acute in rural regions, leaving their residents at risk of needing to transition between family physicians. The knowledge base about how patients manage transitioning in a climate of scarcity remains nascent. The purpose of this study is to explore the experience of transitioning for chronically ill, rurally situated Canadian women to provide insight into if and how the system supports transitioning patients and to identify opportunities for enhancing that support. Methods Chronically ill women managing rheumatic diseases residing in two rural counties in the province of Ontario were recruited to participate in face-to-face, semi-structured interviews. Interview transcripts were analysed thematically to identify emergent themes associated with the transitioning experience. Results Seventeen women participated in this study. Ten had experienced transitioning and four with long-standing family physicians anticipated doing so soon. The remaining three expressed concerns about transitioning. Thematic analysis revealed the presence of a transitioning trajectory with three phases. The detachment phase focused on activities related to the termination of a physician-patient relationship, including haphazard notification tactics and the absence of referrals to replacement physicians. For those unable to immediately find a new doctor, there was a phase of unattachment during which patients had to improvise ways to receive care from alternative providers or walk-in clinics. The final phase, attachment, was characterized by acceptance into the practice of a new family physician. Conclusions Participants often found transitioning challenging, largely due to perceived gaps in support from the health care

  16. The development of a guideline implementability tool (GUIDE-IT): a qualitative study of family physician perspectives

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The potential of clinical practice guidelines has not been realized due to inconsistent adoption in clinical practice. Optimising intrinsic characteristics of guidelines (e.g., its wording and format) that are associated with uptake (as perceived by their end users) may have potential. Using findings from a realist review on guideline uptake and consultation with experts in guideline development, we designed a conceptual version of a future tool called Guideline Implementability Tool (GUIDE-IT). The tool will aim to involve family physicians in the guideline development process by providing a process to assess draft guideline recommendations. This feedback will then be given back to developers to consider when finalizing the recommendations. As guideline characteristics are best assessed by end-users, the objectives of the current study were to explore how family physicians perceive guideline implementability, and to determine what components should comprise the final GUIDE-IT prototype. Methods We conducted a qualitative study with family physicians inToronto, Ontario. Two experienced investigators conducted one-hour interviews with family physicians using a semi-structured interview guide to 1) elicit feedback on perceptions on guideline implementability; 2) to generate a discussion in response to three draft recommendations; and 3) to provide feedback on the conceptual GUIDE-IT. Sessions were audio taped and transcribed verbatim. Data collection and analysis were guided by content analyses. Results 20 family physicians participated. They perceived guideline uptake according to facilitators and barriers across 6 categories of guideline implementability (format, content, language, usability, development, and the practice environment). Participants’ feedback on 3 draft guideline recommendations were grouped according to guideline perception, cognition, and agreement. When asked to comment on GUIDE-IT, most respondents believed that the tool would be

  17. Family physician access to and wait times for cancer diagnostic investigations

    PubMed Central

    Barisic, Andriana; Kish, Maxine; Gilbert, Julie; Mittmann, Nicole; Moineddin, Rahim; Sisler, Jeffrey; Vedsted, Peter; Grunfeld, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To examine provincial and regional differences in FPs’ direct access to cancer diagnostic investigations and advice from other specialists regarding investigations and referrals, and to explore FPs’ perceptions about wait times for diagnostic investigations and receipt of results. Design A cross-sectional, online survey. Setting British Columbia, Manitoba, and Ontario. Participants A sample of FPs from participating provinces. Main outcome measures Direct FP access to various diagnostic investigations and advice from other specialists regarding investigations and referrals; FPs’ perceptions about wait times for diagnostic investigations ordered directly; and FPs’ perceptions about wait times for results. Results A total of 1054 surveys were completed by FPs from British Columbia (n = 229), Manitoba (n = 228), and Ontario (n = 597). Distance from a cancer centre was not significantly associated with direct access to or wait times for diagnostic investigations for most of the investigations studied; however, provincial differences were observed. Family physicians in Manitoba and British Columbia were 30% to 45% less likely to report having direct access to endoscopy and some imaging investigations compared with FPs in Ontario. Family physicians in Manitoba and British Columbia were also at increased odds of waiting longer than 12 weeks for endoscopy investigations and longer than 4 weeks for imaging investigations compared with FPs in Ontario. Most FPs reported wait times of less than 2 weeks for imaging results; however, the proportion of FPs who waited longer than 2 weeks for colonoscopy results ranged from 15% in Ontario to 96% in British Columbia. Conclusion Given the disparities observed among provinces, there is an opportunity for provinces to learn from one another to improve direct access to and shorten wait times for diagnostic investigations. This in turn has the potential to shorten the primary care interval for cancer diagnostic

  18. The duty of the physician to care for the family in pediatric palliative care: context, communication, and caring.

    PubMed

    Jones, Barbara L; Contro, Nancy; Koch, Kendra D

    2014-02-01

    Pediatric palliative care physicians have an ethical duty to care for the families of children with life-threatening conditions through their illness and bereavement. This duty is predicated on 2 important factors: (1) best interest of the child and (2) nonabandonment. Children exist in the context of a family and therefore excellent care for the child must include attention to the needs of the family, including siblings. The principle of nonabandonment is an important one in pediatric palliative care, as many families report being well cared for during their child's treatment, but feel as if the physicians and team members suddenly disappear after the death of the child. Family-centered care requires frequent, kind, and accurate communication with parents that leads to shared decision-making during treatment, care of parents and siblings during end-of-life, and assistance to the family in bereavement after death. Despite the challenges to this comprehensive care, physicians can support and be supported by their transdisciplinary palliative care team members in providing compassionate, ethical, and holistic care to the entire family when a child is ill.

  19. A Follow-up Survey of Family Physicians' Interest in and Knowledge of Nutrition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jack, Brian W.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Physicians (N=71) completed a questionnaire about 33 nutrition topics. Perceived knowledge significantly increased except for nutritional biochemistry. Physicians wished to learn more only in the areas of nutrition counseling and nutrition in the life cycle. (DB)

  20. Physician-Patient Encounters: The Structure of Performance in Family and General Office Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wenghofer, Elizabeth F.; Williams, A. Paul; Klass, Daniel J.; Faulkner, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: The College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario, the regulatory authority for physicians in Ontario, Canada, conducts peer assessments of physicians' practices as part of a broad quality assurance program. Outcomes are summarized as a single score and there is no differentiation between performance in various aspects of care. In…

  1. A Correlational Study of Self-Directed Learning Readiness and Learning Activity Preference for Continuing Medical Education among Family Physicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Theresa J.

    2014-01-01

    This quantitative, nonexperimental, correlational study sought to determine whether a relationship exists between family physicians' levels of self-directed learning readiness (SDLR) and their preferences for continuing medical education (CME) activities. The study also sought to determine whether years in clinical practice or size of clinical…

  2. THE BUDGET, THE FAMILY PHYSICIAN AND THE PATIENT A DIFFERENT APPROACH.

    PubMed

    Keidar, Ilan

    2014-10-01

    Modern medicine offers better health and longer life expectancy, yet consumes huge budgets. The Israeli Health Insurance Law (IHIL) regulates the delivery of health services to all Israel's residents through Health Maintenance Organizations (HMOS). These organizations confront constant struggles with their budgets and have to reduce expenses as much as possible (without harming the health level rendered). In the constant necessity to restrain expenses are embedded difficulties that might cause unrest to the Public Health System (PHS). At the edge of the public health spear are the Family Physicians (FPS) who have not only to supply the best possible medicine to their patients, and at the same time confront budgetary constraints that have the potential to hinder the level of rendered medicine, but also have, at times, to mediate between the conflicting interests of their patients' wish to receive the best available health measures, the FP own medical believes, the HMO's directives and, between the FPS wish, to keep up the number of their (content) patients. One of the World Health Organization's (WHO) concepts, like Israel's one, is that soul and body are inseparable and must be addressed simultaneously in the process of healing. Real life at the Family Physicians' clinics shows, at times, that despite the Israeli physicians' very high professional level, and the Israeli Health System (IHS)'s high efficiency, such a process, due to budgetary constraints, workload and various other reasons, does not always take place and, on the personal level, there are patients who feel that the "system" has treated them incorrectly and in an unsatisfactory manner. Unsatisfied and restless patients might cause undesirable consequences to the "system", like losing faith in one's FP and HMO, which might lead to the patients' reduced cooperation in the healing process, lawsuits amplification, patients leaving their FPS and their HMOs etc. Addressing the patient's soul and body as an

  3. Preventing a Mass Disease: The Case of Gallstones Disease: Role and Competence for Family Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Di Ciaula, Agostino; Grattagliano, Ignazio

    2016-01-01

    Gallstone formation is the result of a complex interaction between genetic and nongenetic factors. We searched and reviewed the available literature to define how the primary prevention of gallstones (cholesterol gallstones in particular) could be applied in general practice. Electronic bibliographical databases were searched. Prospective and retrospective cohort studies and case–controlled studies were analyzed and graded for evidence quality. The epidemiological data confirmed that genetic factors are estimated to account for only approximately 25% of the overall risk of gallstones, while metabolic/environmental factors are at least partially modifiable in stone-free risk groups, and are thus modifiable by primary prevention measures related to diet, lifestyle, and environmental factors (i.e., rapid weight loss, bariatric surgery, somatostatin or analogues therapy, transient gallbladder stasis, and hormone therapy). There is no specific recommendation for the secondary prevention of recurrent gallstones. Family physicians can contribute to preventing gallstones due to their capability to identify and effectively manage several risk factors discussed in this study. Although further studies are needed to better elucidate the involvement of epigenetic factors that may regulate the effect of environment and lifestyle on gene expression in the primary prevention of gallstone formation, preventive interventions are feasible and advisable in the general practice setting. PMID:27468338

  4. Integrating physiotherapists within primary health care teams: perspectives of family physicians and nurse practitioners.

    PubMed

    Dufour, Sinéad Patricia; Brown, Judith; Deborah Lucy, S

    2014-09-01

    The international literature suggests a number of benefits related to integrating physiotherapists into primary health care (PHC) teams. Considering the mandate of PHC teams in Canada, emphasizing healthy living and chronic disease management, a broad range of providers, inclusive of physiotherapists is required. However, physiotherapists are only sparsely integrated into these teams. This study explores the perspectives of "core" PHC team members, family physicians and nurse practitioners, regarding the integration of physiotherapists within Ontario (Canada) PHC teams. Twenty individual semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted, transcribed verbatim, and then analyzed following an iterative process drawing from an interpretive phenomenological approach. Five key themes emerged which highlighted "how physiotherapists could and do contribute as team members within PHC teams particularly related to musculoskeletal health and chronic disease management". The perceived value of physiotherapists within Ontario, Canada PHC teams was a unanimous sentiment particularly in terms of musculoskeletal health, chronic disease management and maximizing health human resources efficiency to ensure the right care, is delivered by the right practitioner, at the right time.

  5. Visiting family physicians and naturopathic practitioners. Comparing patient-practitioner interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Boon, Heather; Stewart, Moira; Kennard, Mary Ann; Guimond, Jessica

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore similarities and differences in patient visits with family physicians (FPs) and naturopathic practitioners (NPs). DESIGN: Exploratory study combining quantitative and qualitative methods. SETTING: Southern Ontario. PARTICIPANTS: A purposeful sample of 10 practitioners (five FPs and five NPs matched for age, sex, and number of years in practice): each agreed to recruit three consecutive patients with new complaints to participate in the study. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Patient and visit characteristics; qualitative (content analysis of audiotaped interactions) and quantitative (ie, patient-centred care scores) information was gathered and analyzed. RESULTS: Qualitative analysis revealed that information gathering and treatment planning were very similar whether patients were visiting FPs or NPs. Most important differences were length of interaction (mean 54 minutes for NPs and 16.5 minutes for FPs) and patients' reasons for visits. Naturopathic practitioners were more likely to recommend medications (usually natural health products) than FPs. Quantitative data suggested that patients perceived no differences in patient-centred care from FPs and NPs. CONCLUSION: Overall, there were more similarities than differences in visits to the two types of practitioners. PMID:14649987

  6. Understanding Referral Patterns for Bone Mineral Density Testing among Family Physicians: A Qualitative Descriptive Study.

    PubMed

    Munce, Sarah E P; Allin, Sonya; Carlin, Leslie; Sale, Joanna; Hawker, Gillian; Kim, Sandra; Butt, Debra A; Polidoulis, Irene; Tu, Karen; Jaglal, Susan B

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Evidence of inappropriate bone mineral density (BMD) testing has been identified in terms of overtesting in low risk women and undertesting among patients at high risk. In light of these phenomena, the objective of this study was to understand the referral patterns for BMD testing among Ontario's family physicians (FPs). Methods. A qualitative descriptive approach was adopted. Twenty-two FPs took part in a semi-structured interview lasting approximately 30 minutes. An inductive thematic analysis was performed on the transcribed data in order to understand the referral patterns for BMD testing. Results. We identified a lack of clarity about screening for osteoporosis with a tendency for baseline BMD testing in healthy, postmenopausal women and a lack of clarity on the appropriate age for screening for men in particular. A lack of clarity on appropriate intervals for follow-up testing was also described. Conclusions. These findings lend support to what has been documented at the population level suggesting a tendency among FPs to refer menopausal women (at low risk). Emphasis on referral of high-risk groups as well as men and further clarification and education on the appropriate intervals for follow-up testing is warranted.

  7. Military family physicians' perceptions of a pocket point-of-care ultrasound device in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Bornemann, Paul; Bornemann, Gina

    2014-12-01

    Point-of-care ultrasonography with a pocket ultrasound device, General Electric Medical Systems Vscan (Milwaukee, Wisconsin), has been shown to be effective and easy to learn. However, no studies to date have evaluated its use in the military primary care setting where its portability and value in bedside diagnosis would be especially beneficial. We tested the feasibility of the Vscan in the day-to-day care of patients by family physicians in their clinic, inpatient wards, and its potential for use in the military-deployed setting. Participants were trained and credentialed in the use of the point-of-care ultrasonography. Then, participants were provided with a pocket ultrasound device to use in their normal day-to-day practice. Additionally, participants completed surveys and provided ratings on their perceptions regarding the use of the device. According to the survey analysis, participants found the devices to be easy to use, valuable in discerning a diagnosis, and were not prohibitively time consuming. Moreover, patients were perceived by the participants to have been satisfied with the use of the device. Overall, participants had high satisfaction with the Vscan and perceived that the device would be highly valuable in the military-deployed setting.

  8. Lithium and Psoriasis: What Primary Care and Family Physicians Should Know

    PubMed Central

    Jafferany, Mohammad

    2008-01-01

    Objective This review focuses on the association of lithium treatment and psoriasis. The mechanism of action of lithium in causing psoriasis and the clinical presentation of psoriasis secondary to lithium treatment are considered. Data Sources A search of the literature from 1949 to 2007 was performed using MEDLINE, with the following search terms: lithium, psoriasis, skin, dermatology, and psychodermatology. Data Synthesis Lithium is involved in a variety of cutaneous reactions including psoriasis, which may present as exacerbation of preexisting psoriasis, induction of de novo psoriasis, pustular psoriasis, nail changes, and psoriatic arthropathy. The appearance of psoriatic lesions may occur at normal therapeutic serum lithium levels. The refractory period for the development of psoriatic lesions is variable and generally longer in induction and shorter in exacerbation of psoriasis. Lithium-induced psoriasis is often resistant to conventional treatment modalities, and some cases may require dose reduction or discontinuation of lithium treatment. Conclusion Lithium is the mainstay of treatment in bipolar disorder and is associated with a variety of cutaneous side effects including psoriasis. Primary care providers and family physicians should be knowledgeable about the association of lithium and its dermatologic side effects. Early recognition and management could be beneficial in avoiding the issues of noncompliance and further deterioration of mood symptoms secondary to obviously disfiguring skin appearance. Primary care, psychiatry, and dermatology liaison services will prove helpful in managing these patients. PMID:19287551

  9. Family physicians in the child health care workforce: opportunities for collaboration in improving the health of children.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Robert L; Bazemore, Andrew W; Dodoo, Martey S; Shipman, Scott A; Green, Larry A

    2006-09-01

    Pediatric workforce studies suggest that there may be a sufficient number of pediatricians for the current and projected US child population. These analyses do not fully consider the role of family medicine in the care of children. Family physicians provide 16% to 26% of visits for children, providing a medical home for one third of the child population, but face shrinking panels of children. Family medicine's role in children's health care is more stable in rural communities, for adolescents, and for underserved populations. For these populations, in particular, family medicine's role remains important. The erosion of the proportion of visits to family medicine is likely caused by the rapid rise in the number of pediatricians relative to a declining birth rate. Between 1981 and 2004, the general pediatrician population grew at 7 times the rate of the US population, and the family physician workforce grew at nearly 5 times the rate. The number of clinicians caring for children meets or exceeds most estimates of sufficiency; however, the workforce distribution is skewed, leaving certain populations and settings underserved. More than 5 million children and adolescents live in counties with no pediatrician. Unmet need, addressing health in the context of families and communities, and tackling "millennial morbidities" represent common ground for both specialties that could lead to specific, collaborative training, research, intervention, and advocacy.

  10. Death by request in The Netherlands: facts, the legal context and effects on physicians, patients and families

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    In this article I intend to describe an issue of the Dutch euthanasia practice that is not common knowledge. After some general introductory descriptions, by way of formulating a frame of reference, I shall describe the effects of this practice on patients, physicians and families, followed by a more philosophical reflection on the significance of these effects for the assessment of the authenticity of a request and the nature of unbearable suffering, two key concepts in the procedure towards euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide. This article does not focus on the arguments for or against euthanasia and the ethical justification of physician-assisted dying. These arguments have been described extensively in Kimsma and Van Leeuwen (Asking to die. Inside the Dutch debate about euthanasia, Kluwer Academic Publishers, Dordrecht, 1998). PMID:20668949

  11. Use of email in a family practice setting: opportunities and challenges in patient- and physician-initiated communication

    PubMed Central

    Virji, Ayaz; Yarnall, Kimberly SH; Krause, Katrina M; Pollak, Kathryn I; Scannell, Margaret A; Gradison, Margaret; Østbye, Truls

    2006-01-01

    Background Electronic mail (email) has the potential to improve communication between physicians and patients. Methods We conducted two research studies in a family practice setting: 1) a brief, anonymous patient survey of a convenience sample to determine the number of clinic patients receptive to communicating with their physician via email, and 2) a randomized, controlled pilot study to assess the feasibility of providing health education via email to family practice patients. Results Sixty-eight percent of patients used email, and the majority of those (80%) were interested in using email to communicate with the clinic. The majority also reported that their email address changed less frequently than their home address (65%, n = 173) or telephone number (68%, n = 181). Forty-two percent were willing to pay an out-of-pocket fee to have email access to their physicians. When evaluating email initiated by the clinic, 26% of otherwise eligible patients could not participate because they lacked email access; those people were more likely to be black and to be insured through Medicaid. Twenty-four subjects agreed to participate, but one-third failed to return the required consent form by mail. All participants who received the intervention emails said they would like to receive health education emails in the future. Conclusion Our survey results show that patients are interested in email communication with the family practice clinic. Our feasibility study also illustrates important challenges in physician-initiated electronic communication. The 'digital divide' – decreased access to electronic technologies in lower income groups – is an ethical concern in the use of email for patient-physician communication. PMID:16911780

  12. Attitudes toward the Diagnosis and Disclosure of Dementia among Family Caregivers and Primary Care Physicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connell, Cathleen M.; Boise, Linda; Stuckey, John C.; Holmes, Sara B.; Hudson, Margaret L.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined attitudes of caregivers and physicians toward assessing and diagnosing dementia, with an emphasis on how a diagnosis is disclosed. Design and Methods: Seventeen focus group interviews were conducted with caregivers or physicians from three sites; 52 caregivers participated in nine interviews (three each at the three…

  13. Outcomes of deliveries by family physicians or obstetricians: a population-based cohort study using an instrumental variable

    PubMed Central

    Aubrey-Bassler, Kris; Cullen, Richard M.; Simms, Alvin; Asghari, Shabnam; Crane, Joan; Wang, Peizhong Peter; Godwin, Marshall

    2015-01-01

    Background: Previous research has suggested that obstetric outcomes are similar for deliveries by family physicians and obstetricians, but many of these studies were small, and none of them adjusted for unmeasured selection bias. We compared obstetric outcomes between these provider types using an econometric method designed to adjust for unobserved confounding. Methods: We performed a retrospective population-based cohort study of all Canadian (except Quebec) hospital births with delivery by family physicians and obstetricians at more than 20 weeks gestational age, with birth weight greater than 500 g, between Apr. 1, 2006, and Mar. 31, 2009. The primary outcomes were the relative risks of in-hospital perinatal death and a composite of maternal mortality and major morbidity assessed with multivariable logistic regression and instrumental variable–adjusted multivariable regression. Results: After exclusions, there were 3600 perinatal deaths and 14 394 cases of maternal morbidity among 799 823 infants and 793 053 mothers at 390 hospitals. For deliveries by family physicians v. obstetricians, the relative risk of perinatal mortality was 0.98 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.85–1.14) and of maternal morbidity was 0.81 (95% CI 0.70–0.94) according to logistic regression. The respective relative risks were 0.97 (95% CI 0.58–1.64) and 1.13 (95% CI 0.65–1.95) according to instrumental variable methods. Interpretation: After adjusting for both observed and unobserved confounders, we found a similar risk of perinatal mortality and adverse maternal outcome for obstetric deliveries by family physicians and obstetricians. Whether there are differences between these groups for other outcomes remains to be seen. PMID:26303244

  14. Young Doctor Movements: motives for membership among aspiring and young family physicians

    PubMed Central

    Yakubu, Kenneth; Hoedebecke, Kyle; Nashat, Nagwa

    2015-01-01

    Background: Over the past decade, young doctor movements (YDMs) have gained recognition for their efforts in promoting the discipline of family medicine. With growth and expansion comes the need for an inquiry into the membership motives of current/intending members. Aim and Objectives: This study was aimed at determining the main reasons why young and aspiring family physicians (FPs) joined their regional YDM. It was also concerned with determining the main factors that will make non-members want to join a YDM as well as assessing for differences in the responses within YDM members on the one hand, and between YDM members and non-members on the other. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional web-based study. Using a list of 11 items generated following a series of discussions and feedback among selected FPs and FP trainees, respondents annotated levels of agreement on reasons for current or desired YDM membership. The Mann–Whitney U test was used to determine the distribution and differences in the mean of rank scores of the responses from YDM and non-YDM members while the Kruskal–Wallis test was used to describe same for the various YDMs. Results: The total number of respondents was 200, out of which 102 (51.0%) were current YDM members, 97 (48.5%) were non-members and 1 (0.5%) respondent did not state his/her membership status. Non-YDM members indicated a predominantly academic/professional motive for membership while YDM members indicated the opportunity to socialise with FPs abroad and in their country as their foremost reasons for membership. A mixture of academic, professional and social motives was observed for respondents from Vasco da Gama; predominantly academic and professional motives for respondents from Spice route. Conclusions: While gaining recognition and improving one's practice may be the ultimate goal of an aspiring FP, socialising within a network of like-minded professionals maybe the young FP's way of coping with demands of the

  15. What keeps family physicians busy in Portugal? A multicentre observational study of work other than direct patient contacts

    PubMed Central

    Granja, Mónica; Ponte, Carla; Cavadas, Luís Filipe

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To quantify the time spent by family physicians (FP) on tasks other than direct patient contact, to evaluate job satisfaction, to analyse the association between time spent on tasks and physician characteristics, the association between the number of tasks performed and physician characteristics and the association between time spent on tasks and job satisfaction. Design Cross-sectional, using time-and-motion techniques. Two workdays were documented by direct observation. A significance level of 0.05 was adopted. Setting Multicentric in 104 Portuguese family practices. Participants A convenience sample of FP, with lists of over 1000 patients, teaching senior medical students and first-year family medicine residents in 2012, was obtained. Of the 217 FP invited to participate, 155 completed the study. Main outcomes measured Time spent on tasks other than direct patient contact and on the performance of more than one task simultaneously, the number of direct patient contacts in the office, the number of indirect patient contacts, job satisfaction, demographic and professional characteristics associated with time spent on tasks and the number of different tasks performed, and the association between time spent on tasks and job satisfaction. Results FP (n=155) spent a mean of 143.6 min/day (95% CI 135.2 to 152.0) performing tasks such as prescription refills, teaching, meetings, management and communication with other professionals (33.4% of their workload). FP with larger patient lists spent less time on these tasks (p=0.002). Older FP (p=0.021) and those with larger lists (p=0.011) performed fewer tasks. The mean job satisfaction score was 3.5 (out of 5). No association was found between job satisfaction and time spent on tasks. Conclusions FP spent one-third of their workday in coordinating care, teaching and managing. Time devoted to these tasks decreases with increasing list size and physician age. PMID:24934208

  16. Constructing and Communicating Privacy Boundaries: How Family Medicine Physicians Manage Patient Requests for Religious Disclosure in the Clinical Interaction.

    PubMed

    Canzona, Mollie Rose; Peterson, Emily Bylund; Villagran, Melinda M; Seehusen, Dean A

    2015-01-01

    Religion/spirituality (R/S) is an important component of some patients' psychosocial framework when facing illness. While many patients report an increased desire for R/S dialogue in clinical interaction, especially when facing a frightening diagnosis, some physicians report discomfort talking about R/S and hold various beliefs regarding the appropriateness of such discussions. Not only do physicians manage conversations centering on patient disclosures in the clinical visit, they must also navigate requests to share their own personal information. Farber et al. (2000) found that over a 12-month period nearly 40% of physicians reported that patients asked questions that transgressed professional boundaries. This article uses Petronio's communication privacy management theory as a lens through which to situate our understanding of how family medicine physicians construct and communicate privacy boundaries in response to patient requests for religious disclosure. Results provide an in-depth theoretical understanding of issues surrounding religious disclosure in the medical visit and expand the discussion on health care providers' personal and professional privacy boundaries as documented by Petronio and Sargent (2011). Implications for health care training and practice are discussed.

  17. Safety considerations for office-based obstetric and gynecologic procedures.

    PubMed

    Urman, Richard D; Punwani, Nathan; Bombaugh, Maryanne; Shapiro, Fred E

    2013-01-01

    The migration of gynecologic procedures to office-based settings provides numerous advantages for patients and providers alike, including reduced patient expenses, improved scheduling convenience, favorable provider reimbursement, and enhanced continuity of care and patient satisfaction. With rising health care costs-a major concern in health care-procedures will continue to shift to practice environments that optimize care, quality, value, and efficiency. It is imperative that gynecologic offices ensure that performance and quality variations are minimized across different sites of care; physicians should strive to provide care to patients that optimizes safety and is at least equivalent to that delivered at traditional sites. The gynecologic community should nonetheless heed the Institute of Medicine's recommendations and embrace continuous quality improvement. By exercising leadership, office-based gynecologists can forge a culture of competency, teamwork, communication, and performance measurement. PMID:23687556

  18. Safety considerations for office-based obstetric and gynecologic procedures.

    PubMed

    Urman, Richard D; Punwani, Nathan; Bombaugh, Maryanne; Shapiro, Fred E

    2013-01-01

    The migration of gynecologic procedures to office-based settings provides numerous advantages for patients and providers alike, including reduced patient expenses, improved scheduling convenience, favorable provider reimbursement, and enhanced continuity of care and patient satisfaction. With rising health care costs-a major concern in health care-procedures will continue to shift to practice environments that optimize care, quality, value, and efficiency. It is imperative that gynecologic offices ensure that performance and quality variations are minimized across different sites of care; physicians should strive to provide care to patients that optimizes safety and is at least equivalent to that delivered at traditional sites. The gynecologic community should nonetheless heed the Institute of Medicine's recommendations and embrace continuous quality improvement. By exercising leadership, office-based gynecologists can forge a culture of competency, teamwork, communication, and performance measurement.

  19. Family physician and endocrinologist coordination as the basis for diabetes care in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Duran, Alejandra; Runkle, Isabelle; Matía, Pilar; de Miguel, Maria P; Garrido, Sofia; Cervera, Emilio; Fernandez, Maria D; Torres, Pilar; Lillo, Tomas; Martin, Patricia; Cabrerizo, Lucio; de la Torre, Nuria Garcia; Calle, Jose R; Ibarra, Jose; Charro, Aniceto L; Calle-Pascual, Alfonso L

    2008-01-01

    Background To estimate the proportion of diabetic patients (DPts) with peripheral vascular disease treated at a primary health care site after an endocrinologist-based intervention, who meet ATP III and Steno targets of metabolic control, as well as to compare the outcome with the results of the patients treated by endocrinologists. Methods A controlled, prospective over 30-months period study was conducted in area 7 of Madrid. One hundred twenty six eligible diabetic patients diagnosed as having peripheral vascular disease between January 2003 and June 2004 were included in the study. After a treatment period of three months by the Diabetes team at St Carlos Hospital, 63 patients were randomly assigned to continue their follow up by diabetes team (Group A) and other 63 to be treated by the family physicians (FP) at primary care level with continuous diabetes team coordination (Group B). 57 DPts from Group A and 59 from Group B, completed the 30 months follow-up period. At baseline both groups were similar in age, weight, time from diagnosis and metabolic control. The main outcomes of this study were the proportion of patients meeting ATP III and Steno goals for HbA1c (%), Cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, blood pressure, albumine-to-creatinine excretion ratio (ACR), body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), anti-aggregation treatment and smoking status. Results At the end of the follow up, no differences were found between the groups. More than 37% of diabetic patients assigned to be treated by FP achieved a HbA1c < 6.5%, more than 50% a ACR < 30 mg/g, and more than 80% reached low risk values for cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, diastolic blood pressure and were anti-aggregated, and 12% remained smokers. In contrast, less than 45% achieved a systolic blood pressure < 130 mm Hg, less than 12% had a BMI < 25 Kg.m-2 (versus 23% in group A; p < 0.05) and 49%/30% (men/women) had a waist circumference of low risk

  20. Structured oral interview. One way to identify family physicians' educational needs.

    PubMed Central

    Jacques, A.; Sindon, A.; Bourque, A.; Bordage, G.; Ferland, J. J.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To design and test a structured oral interview that would elicit information on the educational needs of physicians in order to help them plan individualized continuing education. DESIGN: Seven different sets of problems were prepared, each including 40 cases, of which 26 are common. Each pilot test candidate was interviewed by two physician-interviewers during a 1-day session. After each answer, candidates were told the predetermined correct answer. PARTICIPANTS: Six candidates were selected at random from among Montreal physicians aged 50 and older with no hospital privileges. All had to have no history of professional complaints or prosecution and to be unknown to the interviewers. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Inter-rater reliability and perceived difficulty of the cases. RESULTS: Candidates rated the interview process and cases used pertinent, credible, and not too difficult. Candidates' performance level was about 50%. Agreement between interviewers averaged 91.2%. CONCLUSIONS: A structured oral interview appears to be a credible instrument for helping determine practising physicians' deficiencies in clinical knowledge and reasoning. PMID:7580383

  1. "Sometimes I Feel Overwhelmed": Educational Needs of Family Physicians Caring for People with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, Joanne; Dreyfus, Deborah; Cerreto, Mary; Bokhour, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Primary care physicians who care for adults with intellectual disability often lack experience with the population, and patients with intellectual disability express dissatisfaction with their care. Establishing a secure primary care relationship is particularly important for adults with intellectual disability, who experience health disparities…

  2. Like Father, like Son? Familial Aggregation of Physicians among Medical and Psychology Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voracek, Martin; Tran, Ulrich S.; Fischer-Kern, Melitta; Formann, Anton K.; Springer-Kremser, Marianne

    2010-01-01

    Various research findings, mostly from Anglo-American countries, evidence the medical profession to be strongly familial and further suggest that a medical family background may be associated with study success in medical undergraduates. This study explored the familial aggregation of the medical profession among 1-year cohort samples of medical…

  3. Practical approaches to eating disorders in adolescence. Primer for family physicians.

    PubMed Central

    Tonkin, R. S.

    1994-01-01

    Primary care physicians have an important role in assessing and managing adolescents who present with low weight. Initial diagnosis should be based on current understanding of adolescents' eating behaviours and be followed by obtaining supportive evidence. A practical developmental approach to management should be emphasized. Criteria for hospitalization, a three-step approach to management, and indications for expanding from a primary care to a team approach are discussed. PMID:8130677

  4. Empowering family physicians to impart proper inhaler teaching to patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Janice M; Bhutani, Mohit; Leigh, Richard; Pelletier, Dan; Good, Cathy; Sin, Don D

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma depend on inhalers for management, but critical errors committed during inhaler use can limit drug effectiveness. Outpatient education in inhaler technique remains inconsistent due to limited resources and inadequate provider knowledge. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether a simple, two-session inhaler education program can improve physician attitudes toward inhaler teaching in primary care practice. METHODS: An inhaler education program with small-group hands-on device training was instituted for family physicians (FP) in British Columbia and Alberta. Sessions were spaced one to three months apart. All critical errors were corrected in the first session. Questionnaires surveying current inhaler teaching practices and attitudes toward inhaler teaching were distributed to physicians before and after the program. RESULTS: Forty-one (60%) of a total 68 participating FPs completed both before and after program questionnaires. Before the program, only 20 (49%) reported providing some form of inhaler teaching in their practices, and only four (10%) felt fully competent to teach patients inhaler technique. After the program, 40 (98%) rated their inhaler teaching as good to excellent. Thirty-four (83%) reported providing inhaler teaching in their practices, either by themselves or by an allied health care professional they had personally trained. All stated they could teach inhaler technique within 5 min. Observation of FPs during the second session by certified respiratory educators found that none made critical errors and all had excellent technique. CONCLUSION: A physician inhaler education program can improve attitudes toward inhaler teaching and facilitate implementation in clinical practices. PMID:26436910

  5. Routine programs of health care systems as an opportunity toward communication skills training for family physicians: A randomized field trial

    PubMed Central

    Zamani, Ahmad Reza; Motamedi, Narges; Farajzadegan, Ziba

    2015-01-01

    Background: To have high-quality primary health care services, an adequate doctor–patient communication is necessary. Because of time restrictions and limited budget in health system, an effective, feasible, and continuous training approach is important. The aim of this study is to assess the appropriateness of a communication skills training program simultaneously with routine programs of health care system. Materials and Methods: It was a randomized field trial in two health network settings during 2013. Twenty-eight family physicians through simple random sampling and 140 patients through convenience sampling participated as intervention and control group. The physicians in the intervention group (n = 14) attended six educational sessions, simultaneous organization meeting, with case discussion and peer education method. In both the groups, physicians completed communication skills knowledge and attitude questionnaires, and patients completed patient satisfaction of medical interview questionnaire at baseline, immediately after intervention, and four months postintervention. Physicians and health network administrators (stakeholders), completed a set of program evaluation forms. Descriptive statistics and Chi-square test, t-test, and repeated measure analysis of variance were used to analyze the data. Results: Use of routine program as a strategy of training was rated by stakeholders highly on “feasibility” (80.5%), “acceptability” (93.5%), “educational content and method appropriateness” (80.75%), and “ability to integrating in the health system programs” (approximate 60%). Significant improvements were found in physicians’ knowledge (P < 0.001), attitude (P < 0.001), and patients’ satisfaction (P = 0.002) in intervention group. Conclusions: Communication skills training program, simultaneous organization meeting was successfully implemented and well received by stakeholders, without considering extra time and manpower. Therefore it can be

  6. An Asclepiad family - The Chamberlens and DeLaunes, 1569-1792: Five generations of surgeons, physicians, accoucheurs and apothecaries.

    PubMed

    Russell, Lesley

    2014-06-26

    When in 1747 Dr Peter Chamberlen wrote in his apologia, 'A Voice in Rhama', that he was nursed up (as from the Cradle) to all Parts of Physick, and that in Asclepiad-Families, he was not referring simply to his father and uncle, the Peters (Younger and Elder) Chamberlen of obstetric forceps' fame. They were surgeons and accoucheurs; his mother's family counted clergymen as well as physicians and apothecaries among their number and the young Peter must indeed have grown up in a family steeped in both medical practice and religious study. Both families were refugees from the religious terrors of sixteenth century France, arriving in England in the second half of the reign of Elizabeth l. Both were to find fortune and royal patronage as they became established in their new lives. One was to found a medical dynasty that lasted through five generations, the other to produce a generation whose varied accomplishments died as the eldest son outlived all his siblings, only one of whose children became an apothecary - and he was to predecease his uncle. This is a brief biography of these two families, bound together by the ties of marriage, profession, faith and nationality. PMID:24972618

  7. A Novel Network for Mentoring Family Physicians on Mental Health Issues Using E-Mail

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Jon J.; Rockman, Patricia; Gingrich, Nadine; Silveira, Jose; Salach, Lena

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Family practitioners are significant providers of mental health care and routinely report difficulty acquiring timely support in this area. The Collaborative Mental Health Care Network assembled groups of family practitioners and provided them with mental health practitioner mentors. This article addresses communication in the Network,…

  8. Differences between Groups of Family Physicians with Different Attitudes towards At-Risk Drinkers: A Post Hoc Study of the ODHIN Survey in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Rosário, Frederico; Wojnar, Marcin; Ribeiro, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. We have recently shown that family physicians can be classified into two groups based on their attitudes towards at-risk drinkers: one with better and the other with worse attitudes. Objective. To compare the two groups regarding demographics, alcohol-related clinical practice, knowledge of sensible drinking limits, and barriers and facilitators to working with at-risk drinkers. Methods. A random sample of 234 Portuguese family physicians who answered the Optimizing Delivery of Health Care Interventions survey was included. The questionnaire asked questions on demographics, alcohol-related clinical practice, knowledge of sensible drinking limits, and barriers and facilitators to working with at-risk drinkers. Results. Family physicians with better attitudes were younger (p = 0.005) and less experienced (p = 0.04) and with higher male proportion (p = 0.01). This group had more hours of postgraduate training (p < 0.001), felt more prepared to counsel risky drinkers (p < 0.001), and considered themselves to have better counselling efficacy (p < 0.001). More family physicians in the group with worse attitudes considered that doctors cannot identify risky drinkers without symptoms (p = 0.01) and believed counselling is difficult (p = 0.005). Conclusions. Family physicians with better attitudes had more education on alcohol and fewer barriers to work with at-risk drinkers. These differences should be taken into account when designing implementation programs seeking to increase alcohol screening and brief advice.

  9. Differences between Groups of Family Physicians with Different Attitudes towards At-Risk Drinkers: A Post Hoc Study of the ODHIN Survey in Portugal

    PubMed Central

    Rosário, Frederico; Wojnar, Marcin; Ribeiro, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. We have recently shown that family physicians can be classified into two groups based on their attitudes towards at-risk drinkers: one with better and the other with worse attitudes. Objective. To compare the two groups regarding demographics, alcohol-related clinical practice, knowledge of sensible drinking limits, and barriers and facilitators to working with at-risk drinkers. Methods. A random sample of 234 Portuguese family physicians who answered the Optimizing Delivery of Health Care Interventions survey was included. The questionnaire asked questions on demographics, alcohol-related clinical practice, knowledge of sensible drinking limits, and barriers and facilitators to working with at-risk drinkers. Results. Family physicians with better attitudes were younger (p = 0.005) and less experienced (p = 0.04) and with higher male proportion (p = 0.01). This group had more hours of postgraduate training (p < 0.001), felt more prepared to counsel risky drinkers (p < 0.001), and considered themselves to have better counselling efficacy (p < 0.001). More family physicians in the group with worse attitudes considered that doctors cannot identify risky drinkers without symptoms (p = 0.01) and believed counselling is difficult (p = 0.005). Conclusions. Family physicians with better attitudes had more education on alcohol and fewer barriers to work with at-risk drinkers. These differences should be taken into account when designing implementation programs seeking to increase alcohol screening and brief advice. PMID:26885392

  10. City mouse, country mouse: a mixed-methods evaluation of perceived communication barriers between rural family physicians and urban consultants in Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Renouf, Tia; Alani, Sabrina; Whalen, Desmond; Harty, Chris; Pollard, Megan; Morrison, Megan; Coombs-Thorne, Heidi; Dubrowski, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To examine perceived communication barriers between urban consultants and rural family physicians practising routine and emergency care in remote subarctic Newfoundland and Labrador (NL). Design This study used a mixed-methods design. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected through exploratory surveys, comprised of closed and open-ended questions. The quantitative data was analysed using comparative statistical analyses, and a thematic analysis was applied to the qualitative data. Participants 52 self-identified rural family physicians and 23 urban consultants were recruited via email. Rural participants were also recruited at the Family Medicine Rural Preceptor meetings in St John's, NL. Setting Rural family physicians and urban consultants in NL completed a survey assessing perceived barriers to effective communication. Results Data confirmed that both groups perceived communication difficulties with one another; with 23.1% rural and 27.8% urban, rating the difficulties as frequent (p=0.935); 71.2% rural and 72.2% urban as sometimes (p=0.825); 5.8% rural and 0% urban acknowledged never perceiving difficulties (p=0.714). Overall, 87.1% of participants indicated that perceived communication difficulties impacted patient care. Primary trends that emerged as perceived barriers for rural physicians were time constraints and misunderstanding of site limitations. Urban consultants' perceived barriers were inadequate patient information and lack of native language skills. Conclusions Barriers to effective communication are perceived between rural family physicians and urban consultants in NL. PMID:27154475

  11. A Digital Health System to Assist Family Physicians to Safely Prescribe NOAC Medications.

    PubMed

    Abidi, Samina Raza; Cox, Jafna; Abusharekh, Ashraf; Hashemian, Nima; Abidi, Syed Sibte Raza

    2016-01-01

    Atrial Fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia. Generally, the therapeutic options for managing AF include the use of anticoagulant drugs that prevent the coagulation of blood. New Oral Anticoagulants (NOACs) are not optimally prescribed to patients, despite their efficacy. In Canada, NOAC medications are not directly available to patients who belong to provincial benefits programs, rather a NOAC special authorization process establishes the eligibility of a patient to receive a NOAC and be paid by the provincial Pharmacare program. This special authorization process is tedious and paper-based which inhibits physicians to prescribe NOAC leading to suboptimal AF care to patients. In this paper, we present a computerized NOAC Authorization Decision Support System (NOAC-ADSS), accessible to physicians to help them (a) determine a patient eligibility for NOAC based on Canadian AF clinical guidelines, and (b) complete the special authorization form. We present a semantic web based system to ontologically model the NOAC eligibility criteria and execute the knowledge to determine a patient NOAC eligibility and dosage. PMID:27577437

  12. Correlates of Family Health History Discussions between College Students and Physicians: Does Family Cancer History Make a Difference?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Matthew Lee; Sosa, Erica T.; Hochhalter, Angela K.; Covin, Julie; Ory, Marcia G.; McKyer, E. Lisako J.

    2011-01-01

    Effective communication between young adults and their healthcare providers can contribute to early detection of risk for developing cancer and establishment of lifelong habits for engagement in healthcare and health promotion behaviors. Our objectives were to examine factors influencing family health history discussions between college students…

  13. National Trends in Child and Adolescent Psychotropic Polypharmacy in Office-Based Practice, 1996-2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comer, Jonathan S.; Olfson, Mark; Mojtabai, Ramin

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To examine patterns and recent trends in multiclass psychotropic treatment among youth visits to office-based physicians in the United States. Method: Annual data from the 1996-2007 National Ambulatory Medical Care Surveys were analyzed to examine patterns and trends in multiclass psychotropic treatment within a nationally…

  14. Revealing a cancer diagnosis to patients: attitudes of patients, families, friends, nurses, and physicians in Lebanon—results of a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Farhat, F.; Othman, A.; el Baba, G.; Kattan, J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Disclosure of a cancer diagnosis to patients is a major problem for physicians in Lebanon. Our survey aimed to identify the attitudes of patients, families and friends, nurses, and physicians regarding disclosure of a cancer diagnosis. Methods Study participants included 343 physicians, nurses, cancer patients, families, and friends from clinics in two major hospitals in Lebanon. All completed a 29-item questionnaire that assessed, by demographic group, the information provided about cancer, opinions about the disclosure of the diagnosis to cancer patients, perceived consequences to patients, and the roles of family, friends, and religion. Results Overall, 7.8% of the patients were convinced that cancer is incurable. Nearly 82% preferred to be informed about their diagnosis. Similarly, 83% of physicians were in favour of disclosing a cancer diagnosis to their patients. However, only 14% of the physicians said that they revealed the truth to the patients themselves, with only 9% doing so immediately after confirmation of the diagnosis. Disclosure of a cancer diagnosis was preferred before the start of the treatment by 59% of the patients and immediately after confirmation of the diagnosis by 72% of the physicians. Overall, 86% of physicians, 51% of nurses, and 69% of patients and their families believed that religion helped with the acceptance of a cancer diagnosis. A role for family in accepting the diagnosis was reported by 74% of the patients, 56% of the nurses, and 88% of the physicians. All participants considered that fear was the most difficult feeling (63%) experienced by cancer patients, followed by pain (29%), pity (8%), and death (1%), with no statistically significant difference between the answers given by the participant groups. Conclusions The social background in Lebanese society is the main obstacle to revealing the truth to cancer patients. Lebanese patients seem to prefer direct communication of the truth, but families take the opposite

  15. Growing old together: the influence of population and workforce aging on supply and use of family physicians.

    PubMed

    Watson, Diane E; Reid, Robert; Roos, Noralou; Heppner, Petra

    2005-01-01

    Canadians have expressed concern that access to a family physician (FP) has declined precipitously. Yet FP-topopulation ratios remained relatively stable over the last decade, and there were perceptions of physician surpluses, at least in urban centres, 10 years ago. We evaluated whether demographic changes among patients and FPs, and in the volume of care received and provided over the period, contribute to this paradox. Given the relationship between age and FP use in fiscal year 1991/1992, an aging population should have been associated with a 2 per cent increase in visits by 2000/2001. Likewise, given the relationship between FP age and workloads in 1991/1992, an aging workforce should have been associated with a 12 per cent increase in service provision a decade later. Yet visit rates and average FP workloads remained unchanged. There was an increase in age-specific rates of FP use among older adults and a decline in rates among the young, and an increase in age-specific workloads such that older FPs provided many more services than their predecessors (30%) and younger FPs provided many fewer (20%). In terms of impact on future requirements for FPs, both changes in age-specific rates of use, and changes in age-specific patterns of FP productivity, trump population aging as key drivers. PMID:16080135

  16. Factors Associated with Behavior Change in Family Physicians After CME Presentation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Kristi J.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Registrants of a four-day family practice refresher course responded to a survey assessing their reaction to a brief presentation recommending the use of penile anesthesia in newborn circumcision. The results suggest that evaluation of behavior change should consider attitudinal variables. (Author/MLW)

  17. Number Needed to Benefit From Information (NNBI): Proposal From a Mixed Methods Research Study With Practicing Family Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Pluye, Pierre; Grad, Roland M.; Johnson-Lafleur, Janique; Granikov, Vera; Shulha, Michael; Marlow, Bernard; Ricarte, Ivan Luiz Marques

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE We wanted to describe family physicians’ use of information from an electronic knowledge resource for answering clinical questions, and their perception of subsequent patient health outcomes; and to estimate the number needed to benefit from information (NNBI), defined as the number of patients for whom clinical information was retrieved for 1 to benefit. METHODS We undertook a mixed methods research study, combining quantitative longitudinal and qualitative research studies. Participants were 41 family physicians from primary care clinics across Canada. Physicians were given access to 1 electronic knowledge resource on handheld computer in 2008–2009. For the outcome assessment, participants rated their searches using a validated method. Rated searches were examined during interviews guided by log reports that included ratings. Cases were defined as clearly described searches where clinical information was used for a specific patient. For each case, interviewees described information-related patient health outcomes. For the mixed methods data analysis, quantitative and qualitative data were merged into clinical vignettes (each vignette describing a case). We then estimated the NNBI. RESULTS In 715 of 1,193 searches for information conducted during an average of 86 days, the search objective was directly linked to a patient. Of those searches, 188 were considered to be cases. In 53 cases, participants associated the use of information with at least 1 patient health benefit. This finding suggested an NNBI of 14 (715/53). CONCLUSION The NNBI may be used in further experimental research to compare electronic knowledge resources. A low NNBI can encourage clinicians to search for information more frequently. If all searches had benefits, the NNBI would be 1. In addition to patient benefits, learning and knowledge reinforcement outcomes are frequently reported. PMID:24218380

  18. Behavioral interventions for office-based care: behavior change.

    PubMed

    Delfino, Matthew; Larzelere, Michele McCarthy

    2014-03-01

    Family physicians play an important role in identifying and treating the behavioral etiologies of morbidity and mortality. Changing behavior is a challenging process that begins with identifying a patient's readiness to change. Interventions, such as motivational interviewing, are used to increase a patient's desire to change, and cognitive behavioral therapy can be initiated to increase a patient's likelihood of change, particularly if barriers are identified. After patients embark on change, family physicians are uniquely positioned to connect them to self-help programs, more intensive psychotherapy, and newer technology-based support programs, and to provide repeated, brief, positive reinforcement. Specific behavioral interventions that can be effective include computerized smoking cessation programs; electronic reminders and support delivered by family physicians or other clinicians for weight loss; linkage to community-based programs for seniors; increased length and demands of in-school programs to support exercise participation by children; and access reduction education to prevent firearm injury. PMID:24628011

  19. Assessment of the impact of family physicians in the district health system of the Western Cape, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Mash, Bob; Naledi, Tracey

    2014-01-01

    Background: In 2007, South Africa made family medicine a new speciality. Family physicians that have trained for this new speciality have been employed in the district health system since 2011. The aim of the present study was to explore the perceptions of district managers on the impact of family physicians on clinical processes, health system performance and health outcomes in the district health system (DHS) of the Western Cape. Methods: Nine in-depth interviews were performed: seven with district managers and two with the chief directors of the metropolitan and rural DHS. Interviews were recorded, transcribed and analysed using the ATLAS-ti and the framework method. Results: There was a positive impact on clinical processes for HIV/AIDS, TB, trauma, non-communicable chronic diseases, mental health, maternal and child health. Health system performance was positively impacted in terms of access, coordination, comprehensiveness and efficiency. An impact on health outcomes was anticipated. The impact was not uniform throughout the province due to different numbers of family physicians and different abilities to function optimally. There was also a perception that the positive impact attributed to family physicians was in the early stages of development. Unanticipated effects included concerns with their roles in management and training of students, as well as tensions with career medical officers. Conclusion: Early feedback from district managers suggests that where family physicians are employed and able to function optimally, they are making a significant impact on health system performance and the quality of clinical processes. In the longer term, this is likely to impact on health outcomes. Evaluation de l'impact des médecins de famille dans le système de santé du district du Western Cape, en Afrique du Sud. Contexte: En 2007, l'Afrique du Sud a institué une nouvelle spécialité, la médecine de famille. Les médecins de famille qui se sont sp

  20. Assessment of the impact of family physicians in the district health system of the Western Cape, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Mash, Bob; Naledi, Tracey

    2014-01-01

    Background: In 2007, South Africa made family medicine a new speciality. Family physicians that have trained for this new speciality have been employed in the district health system since 2011. The aim of the present study was to explore the perceptions of district managers on the impact of family physicians on clinical processes, health system performance and health outcomes in the district health system (DHS) of the Western Cape. Methods: Nine in-depth interviews were performed: seven with district managers and two with the chief directors of the metropolitan and rural DHS. Interviews were recorded, transcribed and analysed using the ATLAS-ti and the framework method. Results: There was a positive impact on clinical processes for HIV/AIDS, TB, trauma, non-communicable chronic diseases, mental health, maternal and child health. Health system performance was positively impacted in terms of access, coordination, comprehensiveness and efficiency. An impact on health outcomes was anticipated. The impact was not uniform throughout the province due to different numbers of family physicians and different abilities to function optimally. There was also a perception that the positive impact attributed to family physicians was in the early stages of development. Unanticipated effects included concerns with their roles in management and training of students, as well as tensions with career medical officers. Conclusion: Early feedback from district managers suggests that where family physicians are employed and able to function optimally, they are making a significant impact on health system performance and the quality of clinical processes. In the longer term, this is likely to impact on health outcomes. Evaluation de l'impact des médecins de famille dans le système de santé du district du Western Cape, en Afrique du Sud. Contexte: En 2007, l'Afrique du Sud a institué une nouvelle spécialité, la médecine de famille. Les médecins de famille qui se sont sp

  1. Family and Friend Participation in Primary Care Visits of Patients with Diabetes or Heart Failure: Patient and Physician Determinants and Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Rosland, Ann-Marie; Piette, John D; Choi, HwaJung; Heisler, Michele

    2013-01-01

    Background Professional and patient groups have called for increased participation of patients’ informal support networks in chronic disease care, as a means to improve clinical care and self-management. Little is known about the current level of participation of family and friends in the physician visits of adults with chronic illnesses or how that participation affects the experience of patients and physicians. Methods Written survey of 439 functionally independent adults with diabetes or heart failure and 88 of their primary care physicians (PCPs). Patients were ineligible if they had a memory disorder, needed help with activities of daily living, or were undergoing cancer treatment. Results Non-professional friends or family (“companions”) regularly participated in PCP visits for nearly half (48%) of patients. In multivariable models, patients with low health literacy (Adjusted Odds Ratio [AOR] 2.9, CI 1.4-5.7), more depressive symptoms (AOR 1.3, CI 1.1-1.6), and 4 or more comorbid illnesses (AOR 3.7, CI 1.3-10.5) were more likely to report companion participation. Patients reported that they were more likely to understand PCP advice (77%) and discuss difficult topics with the physician (44%) when companions participated in clinic visits. In multivariable models, companion participation was associated with greater patient satisfaction with their PCP (AOR 1.7, CI 1.1-2.7). While most PCPs perceived visit companions positively, 66% perceived one or more barriers to increasing companion participation, including increased physician burden (39%), inadequate physician training (27%), and patient privacy concerns (24%). Conclusion Patients’ companions represent an important source of potential support for the clinical care of functionally independent patients with diabetes or heart failure, particularly for patients vulnerable to worse outcomes. Companion participation in care was associated with positive patient and physician experiences. Physician concerns

  2. Profile of Julie Phillips, MD, MPH: Family physician, medical educator, researcher, poet.

    PubMed

    Fogarty, Colleen T; Shapiro, Johanna

    2015-12-01

    Dr. Julie Phillips, an Associate Professor of Family Medicine at Michigan State University College of Human Medicine, has contributed several poems to Families, Systems, and Health over the last 2 years. This month's issue features her fourth poem in this journal, titled "Autumn Chores" (Phillips, 2015). We were interested in learning more about Julie's creative writing, why she writes poetry, how she balances writing and a demanding academic medical career, and what she hopes her poems might contribute to clinical practice and medical education. Colleen Fogarty interviewed her to find out the answers in this article. Julie's poems are indeed, as she says, carved from small moments in time, but they have a disproportionately large emotional impact. Her poems tackle issues such as the tension between medical and parental authority; professional boundaries; worklife balance; the still-gaping holes in our health care system; and what it means to care for others. To read her work, please search the journal index. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26641866

  3. Family Physicians with a Certificate of Added Qualifications (CAQs) in Sports Medicine Spend the Majority of Their Time Practicing Sports Medicine.

    PubMed

    Rankin, Wade M; Cochrane, Anneli; Puffer, James C

    2015-01-01

    While family physicians holding certificates of added qualifications in sports medicine practice in multiple settings, little is currently known about the proportion of their time devoted exclusively to the practice of sports medicine. We found that most spend a majority of their time doing so, and this number has been increasing over the past decade.

  4. Office-based ultrasound for the urologist.

    PubMed

    Terris, Martha K; Klaassen, Zachary

    2013-11-01

    This article presents an overview of the techniques and indications for office-based ultrasound for the clinical urologist. Discussion includes renal, bladder, scrotal, penile Doppler, and prostate ultrasonography and a review of the pertinent literature and images for each anatomic location.

  5. International challenges without borders: a descriptive study of family physicians' educational needs in the field of diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The optimal care of persons with diabetes by general practitioners and family physicians (GP/FP) is complex and requires multiple competencies. This is a fairly unrecognized key challenge in the healthcare systems. In some cases, local and national Continuous Professional Development (CPD) initiatives target these challenges; however there have been few international initiatives, possibly because challenges emerging from different studies have not been linked across national boundaries. In this context, the authors have compiled data about gaps and/or barriers inherent to GP/FP care of persons with type 2 diabetes from Austria, Canada, Germany and the United Kingdom. Methods Secondary analyzes of pre-existing studies were conducted to identify challenges in the care of patients with type 2 diabetes as faced by GPs/FPs. Two sources of data were reviewed: unpublished research data from collaborating organizations and articles from a literature search (in English and German). Articles retrieved were scanned by the research team for relevance to the study objectives and to extract existing gaps and barriers. The identified challenges were then categorized along three major axes: (1) phase of the continuum of care {from screening to management}; (2) learning domain {knowledge, skills, attitudes, behavior, context}; and (3) by country/region. Compilation and categorization were performed by qualitative researchers and discrepancies were resolved through discussion until concordance was achieved. Results and discussion Thirteen challenges faced by GPs/FPs in the care for patients with type 2 diabetes were common in at least 3 of the 4 targeted countries/regions. These issues were found across the entire continuum of care and included: pathophysiology of diabetes, diagnostic criteria, treatment targets assessment, drugs' modes of action, decision-making in therapies, treatment guidelines, insulin therapy, adherence, management of complications, lifestyle changes

  6. A qualitative descriptive study on the alignment of care goals between older persons with multi-morbidities, their family physicians and informal caregivers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Goal setting is a recommended approach in clinical care that can help individuals with multi-morbidities and their caregivers manage chronic conditions. In this paper, the types of goals that were important for older persons with multi-morbidities were explored from the perspectives of patients, their caregivers and physicians. Comparisons of goals were made across each patient, caregiver and physician triad to determine alignment. Methods The study was a qualitative descriptive study facilitated through semi-structured one-on-one interviews. The study took place between May and October 2012 at a Family Health Team located in Ontario, Canada. The sample included 28 family medicine patients, their informal caregivers and family physicians. Socio-demographic data were analyzed via descriptive statistics in SPSS Version 17. Open ended questions pertaining to patient goals of care were analyzed thematically using NVivo9. Themes were derived on patient care goals for each of the participant groups (patients, caregivers and family physicians). Following this, alignment of goals across each of the triads was examined. Goal alignment was defined as concurrence on at least one goal by all three parties in a particular triad (i.e., patient, caregiver and family physician). Results Just over half of the patients were male (56%); they had an average age of 82.3 years and 4.61 health conditions. Most of the caregivers were female (82%); and 61% were a spouse of the care recipient. At the aggregate level, common goals expressed among patients, caregivers and family physicians were the maintenance of functional independence of patients and the management of their symptoms or functional challenges. Despite these common goals at the aggregate level, little alignment of goals was found when looking across patient-caregiver and physician triads. Lack of alignment tended to occur when patients had unstable or declining functional or cognitive health; when safety threats

  7. Physicians' reflections on the personal learning process and the significance of distance learning in family health.

    PubMed

    Thumé, Elaine; Wachs, Louriele Soares; Soares, Mariangela Uhlmann; Cubas, Marcia Regina; Fassa, Maria Elizabeth Gastal; Tomasi, Elaine; Fassa, Anaclaudia Gastal; Facchini, Luiz Augusto

    2016-09-01

    The scope of the article is to present the reflections of professionals from the Mais Médicos Program (More Doctors Program) on the significance of the specialization course in Family Health in terms of professional practice and learning the most important concepts. This is an empirically based qualitative study on the statements recorded in the "Critical reflection on their personal learning process" of the final work of the specialization course at the Federal University of Pelotas. For textual analysis, 101 reports were randomly selected from a total of 1,011 reports completed in seven states of the North, Northeast and South of Brazil from June to December 2015. The initial barriers were overcome with tutor support and team integration, with emphasis on teaching tools for the improvement of clinical practice and strategic organization of work and greater understanding of the public health system. Fostering the learning of the Portuguese language and the exchange of experience in the forums were considered valuable positive aspects. Despite the difficulty in Internet access in some municipalities it reaffirmed the central role of ongoing education and the viability of the problem-solving methodology, even from a distance. PMID:27653065

  8. Physicians' reflections on the personal learning process and the significance of distance learning in family health.

    PubMed

    Thumé, Elaine; Wachs, Louriele Soares; Soares, Mariangela Uhlmann; Cubas, Marcia Regina; Fassa, Maria Elizabeth Gastal; Tomasi, Elaine; Fassa, Anaclaudia Gastal; Facchini, Luiz Augusto

    2016-09-01

    The scope of the article is to present the reflections of professionals from the Mais Médicos Program (More Doctors Program) on the significance of the specialization course in Family Health in terms of professional practice and learning the most important concepts. This is an empirically based qualitative study on the statements recorded in the "Critical reflection on their personal learning process" of the final work of the specialization course at the Federal University of Pelotas. For textual analysis, 101 reports were randomly selected from a total of 1,011 reports completed in seven states of the North, Northeast and South of Brazil from June to December 2015. The initial barriers were overcome with tutor support and team integration, with emphasis on teaching tools for the improvement of clinical practice and strategic organization of work and greater understanding of the public health system. Fostering the learning of the Portuguese language and the exchange of experience in the forums were considered valuable positive aspects. Despite the difficulty in Internet access in some municipalities it reaffirmed the central role of ongoing education and the viability of the problem-solving methodology, even from a distance.

  9. Training family physicians and residents in family medicine in shared decision making to improve clinical decisions regarding the use of antibiotics for acute respiratory infections: protocol for a clustered randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background To explore ways to reduce the overuse of antibiotics for acute respiratory infections (ARIs), we conducted a pilot clustered randomized controlled trial (RCT) to evaluate DECISION+, a training program in shared decision making (SDM) for family physicians (FPs). This pilot project demonstrated the feasibility of conducting a large clustered RCT and showed that DECISION+ reduced the proportion of patients who decided to use antibiotics immediately after consulting their physician. Consequently, the objective of this study is to evaluate, in patients consulting for ARIs, if exposure of physicians to a modified version of DECISION+, DECISION+2, would reduce the proportion of patients who decide to use antibiotics immediately after consulting their physician. Methods/design The study is a multi-center, two-arm, parallel clustered RCT. The 12 family practice teaching units (FPTUs) in the network of the Department of Family Medicine and Emergency Medicine of Université Laval will be randomized to a DECISION+2 intervention group (experimental group) or to a no-intervention control group. These FPTUs will recruit patients consulting family physicians and residents in family medicine enrolled in the study. There will be two data collection periods: pre-intervention (baseline) including 175 patients with ARIs in each study arm, and post-intervention including 175 patients with ARIs in each study arm (total n = 700). The primary outcome will be the proportion of patients reporting a decision to use antibiotics immediately after consulting their physician. Secondary outcome measures include: 1) physicians and patients' decisional conflict; 2) the agreement between the parties' decisional conflict scores; and 3) perception of patients and physicians that SDM occurred. Also in patients, at 2 weeks follow-up, adherence to the decision, consultation for the same reason, decisional regret, and quality of life will be assessed. Finally, in both patients and physicians

  10. Family physicians who provide intrapartum care and those who do not

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Michael C.; Kaczorowski, Janusz; Tomkinson, Jocelyn; Hearps, Stephen; Baradaran, Nazli; Brant, Rollin

    2011-01-01

    maternity care. Conclusion The FPIs had a more positive, evidence-based view of birth. It is likely that FPs providing only APC are influencing women in their practices toward a relatively negative view of birth before referral to obstetricians, FPIs, or midwives for the actual birth. The relatively negative views of birth held by FPs providing only APC need to be addressed in family practice education and in continuing education. PMID:21490345

  11. Appropriate Osteoporosis Treatment by Family Physicians in Response to FRAX vs CAROC Reporting: Results From a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Beattie, Karen A.; Ioannidis, George; MacDermid, Joy C.; Grewal, Ruby; Papaioannou, Alexandra; Adachi, Jonathan D.; Hodsman, Anthony B.

    2016-01-01

    Canadian guidelines recommend either the FRAX or the Canadian Association of Radiologists and Osteoporosis Canada (CAROC) fracture risk assessment tools to report 10-yr fracture risk as low (<10%), moderate (10%–20%) or high (>20%). It is unknown whether one reporting system is more effective in helping family physicians (FPs) identify individuals who require treatment. Individuals ≥50 yr old with a distal radius fracture and no previous osteoporosis diagnosis or treatment were recruited. Participants underwent a dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry scan and answered questions about fracture risk factors. Participants’ FPs were randomized to receive either a FRAX report or the standard CAROC-derived bone mineral density report currently used by the institution. Only the FRAX report included statements regarding treatment recommendations. Within 3 mo, all participants were asked about follow-up care by their FP, and treatment recommendations were compared with an osteoporosis specialist. Sixty participants were enrolled (31 to FRAX and 29 to CAROC). Kappa statistics of agreement in treatment recommendation were 0.64 for FRAX and 0.32 for bone mineral density. The FRAX report was preferred by FPs and resulted in better postfracture follow-up and treatment that agreed more closely with a specialist. Either the clear statement of fracture risk or the specific statement of treatment recommendations on the FRAX report may have supported FPs to make better treatment decisions. PMID:24206869

  12. An Analytical Comparison of the Opinions of Physicians Working in Emergency and Trauma Surgery Departments at Tabriz and Vienna Medical Universities Regarding Family Presence during Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Soleimanpour, Hassan; Behringer, Wilhelm; Tabrizi, Jafar Sadegh; Sarahrudi, Kambiz; Golzari, Samad E J; Hajdu, Stefan; Rasouli, Maryam; Nikakhtar, Mehdi; Mehdizadeh Esfanjani, Robab

    2015-01-01

    The present study evaluated the opinions of physicians working in the emergency and trauma surgery departments of Vienna Medical University, in Austria, and Tabriz Medical University, in Iran, regarding the presence of patients' relatives during resuscitation. In a descriptive-analytical study, the data obtained from questionnaires that had been distributed randomly to 40 specialists and residents at each of the participating universities were analyzed. The questionnaire consisted of two sections aimed at capturing the participants' demographic data, the participants' opinions regarding their support for the family's presence during resuscitation, and the multiple potential factors affecting the participants' attitudes, including health beliefs, triggers that could facilitate the procedure, self-efficacy, intellectual norms, and perceived behavioral control. The questionnaire also included a direct question (Question 16) on whether the participants approved of family presence. Each question could be answered using a Likert-type scale. The results showed that the mean scores for Question 16 were 4.31 ± 0.64 and 3.57 ± 1.31 for participants at Vienna and Tabriz universities, respectively. Moreover, physicians at Vienna University disapproved of the presence of patients' families during resuscitation to a higher extent than did those at Tabriz University (P = 0.018). Of the studied prognostic factors affecting the perspectives of Vienna Medical University's physicians, health beliefs (P = 0.000; B = 1.146), triggers (P = 0.000; B = 1.050), and norms (P = 0.000; B = 0.714) were found to be significant. Moreover, of the studied prognostic factors affecting the perspectives of Tabriz Medical University's physicians, health beliefs (P = 0.000; B = 0.875), triggers (P = 0.000; B = 1.11), self-efficacy (P = 0.001; B = 0.5), and perceived behavioral control (P = 0.03; B = 0.713) were significant. Most physicians at Vienna and Tabriz Medical universities were not open

  13. Effectiveness of training family physicians to deliver a brief intervention to address excessive substance use among young patients: a cluster randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Haller, Dagmar M.; Meynard, Anne; Lefebvre, Daniele; Ukoumunne, Obioha C.; Narring, Françoise; Broers, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Background: Brief interventions delivered by family physicians to address excessive alcohol use among adult patients are effective. We conducted a study to determine whether such an intervention would be similarly effective in reducing binge drinking and excessive cannabis use among young people. Methods: We conducted a cluster randomized controlled trial involving 33 family physicians in Switzerland. Physicians in the intervention group received training in delivering a brief intervention to young people during the consultation in addition to usual care. Physicians in the control group delivered usual care only. Consecutive patients aged 15–24 years were recruited from each practice and, before the consultation, completed a confidential questionnaire about their general health and substance use. Patients were followed up at 3, 6 and 12 months after the consultation. The primary outcome measure was self-reported excessive substance use (≥ 1 episode of binge drinking, or ≥ 1 joint of cannabis per week, or both) in the past 30 days. Results: Of the 33 participating physicians, 17 were randomly allocated to the intervention group and 16 to the control group. Of the 594 participating patients, 279 (47.0%) identified themselves as binge drinkers or excessive cannabis users, or both, at baseline. Excessive substance use did not differ significantly between patients whose physicians were in the intervention group and those whose physicians were in the control group at any of the follow-up points (odds ratio [OR] and 95% confidence interval [CI] at 3 months: 0.9 [0.6–1.4]; at 6 mo: 1.0 [0.6–1.6]; and at 12 mo: 1.1 [0.7–1.8]). The differences between groups were also nonsignificant after we re stricted the analysis to patients who reported excessive substance use at baseline (OR 1.6, 95% CI 0.9–2.8, at 3 mo; OR 1.7, 95% CI 0.9–3.2, at 6 mo; and OR 1.9, 95% CI 0.9–4.0, at 12 mo). Interpretation: Training family physicians to use a brief intervention to

  14. Counseling adolescents about the intrauterine contraceptive device: A comparison of primary care Pediatricians with Family Physicians and Obstetrician-Gynecologists in the Bronx, NY

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, Susan Elizabeth; Cohen, Hillel W; Santelli, John S; McKee, M. Diane

    2015-01-01

    Background The intrauterine device (IUD) is a highly effective contraceptive, yet not all primary care providers (PCPs) counsel adolescents about IUDs. We sought to describe PCPs’ frequency of counseling adolescents about IUDs and identify whether different factors are associated with frequent counseling by Pediatricians compared with Family Physicians and Gynecologists. Methods Surveyed PCPs affiliated with a Bronx, NY academic institution. Main outcome: frequent counseling of female adolescents about IUDs. Results Frequent counseling was lower in Pediatricians compared with Family Physicians and Gynecologists (35.8% and 81.6%, p<.001). Among all PCP types frequent counseling was associated with feeling more competent counseling and managing expected IUD side effects (p=<.001). Other significant variables included inserting IUDs themselves (p <.001, Family Physicians and Gynecologists) or having access to an inserter in their office (p=.04, Pediatricians). Conclusions Correlates of frequent IUD counseling differed according to PCP specialty. Our results suggest that interventions to increase IUD counseling should focus on improving PCPs’ competency around counseling and side effect management as well as increasing access to IUD inserters. PMID:25628297

  15. Reproductive Health of Women in Rural Areas of East Azerbaijan – Iran, before and after Implementation of rural Family Physician Program: an Ecologic Study

    PubMed Central

    Alizadeh, Mahasti; Jabbari Birami, Hossein; Moradi, Siavash

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Implementation of rural family physician program in Iran in 2005 has been evaluated and shown that this program has been led to some improvements in health indicators. In this study, some reproductive health (RH) indicators were compared before and after implementation of this program in rural areas of East Azerbaijan, Iran. Methods: In this ecologic- time trend study, the data of 191075 births of rural women of East Azerbaijan from 2001 to 2010 was extracted from vital horoscope (ZIJ) and used for calculation of 20 important RH indicators. The paired t-test and correlation analysis wear used for data analysis. Results: Some indicators such as adolescent marriage rate, adolescent birth and over 35 year olds birth rate were increased after rural family physician program implementation in 2005. Also stillbirth rate and unsafe delivery were decreased during this period. There was a significant correlation between increasing adolescent birth rate and increasing low birth weight deliveries (r= 0.911, P= 0.031) and also between increasing over 35 year olds birth rate and increasing neonatal mortality rate in term of prematurity and congenital malformations (r= 0.912, P= 0.031) after program implementation. Conclusion: Perinatal care and safe delivery even for pregnancies outside the typical child-bearing ages are promoting after implementation of rural family physician program in East Azerbaijan. Also decreasing unsafe delivery and stillbirth rate can be considered as achievements of running this program in this province. PMID:26744731

  16. Physician and Family Recommendations to Obtain a Mammogram and Mammography Intentions: The Moderating Effects of Perceived Seriousness and Risk of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Yamile; Thompson, Beti; Ceballos, Rachel M

    2014-01-01

    A growing body of literature has demonstrated psychosocial factors enable mammography intentions and usage among Latinas. Although these factors (e.g., family recommendations, breast cancer perceptions) likely influence one another, little research has examined interactive effects. The current study assessed the moderating effect of perceived breast cancer seriousness and risk on associations between recommendations to obtain mammography and mammography intentions. This sample included 97 Latinas in rural Eastern Washington State. After adjusting for age, two significant interactions emerged: perceived seriousness × physician recommendation and perceived risk × family recommendation. This exploratory study provides important directions for future communication research and planning to improve screening disparities. PMID:25558437

  17. Effects of Recruiting Midwives into a Family Physician Program on Women's Awareness and Preference for Mode of Delivery and Caesarean Section Rates in Rural Areas of Kurdistan

    PubMed Central

    Hajizadeh, Shayesteh; Tehrani, Fahimeh Ramezani; Simbar, Masoumeh; Farzadfar, Farshad

    2016-01-01

    Background The accepted rate rate of caesarean section is 15%. It is expected that an increase in the density of midwives in the family physician program lead to a decrease in this indicator. This study aimed to compare the rates of caesarean section and women's awareness and preference for mode of delivery before and after the implementation of the family physician program in health centres with and without an increase in midwives density. Methods In this cross-sectional study, using multistage cluster sampling method a total of 668 mothers with two-month-old children were selected from among all mothers with two-month-old children who were living in rural areas of Kurdistan province. Using the difference-in-differences model and Matchit statistical model, the factors associated with caesarean section rates and women's awareness and preference for mode of delivery were compared in centres with and without an increase in midwives density after the implementation of the family physician program. To compare the changes before and after the program, we used the data collected from the same number of women in 2005 as the baseline. Results After adjusting for baseline data collected in 2005, the resutls showed no significant change in caesarean section rates and women's awareness and preference for mode of delivery in the centres with and without an increase in midwives density after the implementation of the family physician program. The Matchit model showed a significant mean increase 14%(0.03–0.25) in women’s awareness of the benefits of natural childbirth between 2005 and 2013 in health centres where the density of midwives increased compared with health centres where it did not. The difference-in-differences model showed that the odds ratio of women’s preference for caesarean section decreased by 41% among participants who were aware of the benefits of natural childbirth, (OR = 0.59, 95% CI: (0.22–0.85); P>0.001). Conclusions The results of this study

  18. Effect of the Implementation of the Family Physician Program 2015 on Fair Accessibility for People to Health Care Services in the Sistan Region.

    PubMed

    Sarani, Mohammad; Arbabisarjou, Azizollah; Saravani, Soleyman; Miri, Ali; Shahrakivahed, Aziz

    2016-01-01

    Equitable access to primary health care is an indispensable right and a basic need of all human beings. Currently, the development of any society is judged based on the level of public access to primary health care services. This comparative study attempted to examine the fairness accessibility of people in Sistan to health care services through Family Physician Program 2015.This was a descriptive, analytical research focusing on the level of equitable public access to primary health care in Sistan. Samples were taken from all the service-providing centers. Data were collected through HNIS software, network management center to analyze the gathered data. The results showed that prior to the implementation of the family doctor plan (before 2005), there was a doctor for every 9545 people, a midwife for every 10,000 people and one paramedic for 1,111 people. After beginning the family doctor plan, the figures showed that there was one doctor or MD for every 3387 people and one midwife for every 2916 people, and one health worker for every 549 rural residents. The implementation of the family physician program was an opportunity for the health system in Sistan region, where the appropriate resources management and equitable distribution of health care services throughout the region could facilitate accessibility to identical services. PMID:27357871

  19. Patients’ Ratings of Family Physician Practices on the Internet: Usage and Associations With Conventional Measures of Quality in the English National Health Service

    PubMed Central

    Pape, Utz J; Lee, Henry; Smith, Dianna M; Darzi, Ara; Majeed, Azeem; Millett, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Background Patients are increasingly rating their family physicians on the Internet in the same way as they might rate a hotel on TripAdvisor or a seller on eBay, despite physicians’ concerns about this process. Objective This study aims to examine the usage of NHS Choices, a government website that encourages patients to rate the quality of family practices in England, and associations between web-based patient ratings and conventional measures of patient experience and clinical quality in primary care. Methods We obtained all (16,952) ratings of family practices posted on NHS Choices between October 2009 and December 2010. We examined associations between patient ratings and family practice and population characteristics. Associations between ratings and survey measures of patient experience and clinical outcomes were examined. Results 61% of the 8089 family practices in England were rated, and 69% of ratings would recommend their family practice. Practices serving younger, less deprived, and more densely populated areas were more likely to be rated. There were moderate associations with survey measures of patient experience (Spearman ρ 0.37−0.48, P<.001 for all 5 variables), but only weak associations with measures of clinical process and outcome (Spearman ρ less than ±0.18, P<.001 for 6 of 7 variables). Conclusion The frequency of patients rating their family physicians on the Internet is variable in England, but the ratings are generally positive and are moderately associated with other measures of patient experience and weakly associated with clinical quality. Although potentially flawed, patient ratings on the Internet may provide an opportunity for organizational learning and, as it becomes more common, another lens to look at the quality of primary care. PMID:23076301

  20. Family physicians' ability to perform population management is associated with adoption of other aspects of the patient-centered medical home.

    PubMed

    Ottmar, Jessica; Blackburn, Brenna; Phillips, Robert L; Peterson, Lars E; Jaén, Carlos Roberto

    2015-04-01

    The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) model is considered a promising approach to improving population health, but how elements of these advanced practice models relate to population health capability is unknown. To measure associations between family physicians' performance of population management with PCMH components, a cross-sectional survey was conducted with physicians accessing the American Board of Family Medicine Web site in 2011. Bivariate analysis and logistic regression tested associations between physician and practice demographics and specific PCMH features. The primary outcome was performance of population management. The final sample included 3855 physicians, 37.3% of whom reported performing population management. Demographic characteristics significantly associated with greater use of population management were female sex and graduation from an international medical school. PCMH components that remained associated with population management after adjustment were access to clinical case managers (odds ratio [OR]=2.01, 95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 1.69, 2.39), behavioral health collaboration (OR=1.49, 95% CI: 1.26, 1.77), having an electronic health record that supports meaningful use (OR=1.47, 95% CI: 1.25, 1.74), recent participation in a quality improvement project (OR=2.47, 95% CI: 2.12, 2.89), and routine measurement of patient difficulty securing an appointment (OR=2.87, 95% CI: 2.45, 3.37). Performance of population management was associated with several PCMH elements and resources not present in traditional primary care offices. Attention to these elements likely will enhance delivery of population management services in primary care.

  1. An Analytical Comparison of the Opinions of Physicians Working in Emergency and Trauma Surgery Departments at Tabriz and Vienna Medical Universities Regarding Family Presence during Resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Soleimanpour, Hassan; Behringer, Wilhelm; Tabrizi, Jafar Sadegh; Sarahrudi, Kambiz; Golzari, Samad E J; Hajdu, Stefan; Rasouli, Maryam; Nikakhtar, Mehdi; Mehdizadeh Esfanjani, Robab

    2015-01-01

    The present study evaluated the opinions of physicians working in the emergency and trauma surgery departments of Vienna Medical University, in Austria, and Tabriz Medical University, in Iran, regarding the presence of patients’ relatives during resuscitation. In a descriptive-analytical study, the data obtained from questionnaires that had been distributed randomly to 40 specialists and residents at each of the participating universities were analyzed. The questionnaire consisted of two sections aimed at capturing the participants’ demographic data, the participants’ opinions regarding their support for the family’s presence during resuscitation, and the multiple potential factors affecting the participants’ attitudes, including health beliefs, triggers that could facilitate the procedure, self-efficacy, intellectual norms, and perceived behavioral control. The questionnaire also included a direct question (Question 16) on whether the participants approved of family presence. Each question could be answered using a Likert-type scale. The results showed that the mean scores for Question 16 were 4.31 ± 0.64 and 3.57 ± 1.31 for participants at Vienna and Tabriz universities, respectively. Moreover, physicians at Vienna University disapproved of the presence of patients’ families during resuscitation to a higher extent than did those at Tabriz University (P = 0.018). Of the studied prognostic factors affecting the perspectives of Vienna Medical University’s physicians, health beliefs (P = 0.000; B = 1.146), triggers (P = 0.000; B = 1.050), and norms (P = 0.000; B = 0.714) were found to be significant. Moreover, of the studied prognostic factors affecting the perspectives of Tabriz Medical University’s physicians, health beliefs (P = 0.000; B = 0.875), triggers (P = 0.000; B = 1.11), self-efficacy (P = 0.001; B = 0.5), and perceived behavioral control (P = 0.03; B = 0.713) were significant. Most physicians at Vienna and Tabriz Medical universities

  2. [An unrivalled physician? Family strategies for child care in the late 19th century South Tyrolean countryside].

    PubMed

    Unterkircher, Alois

    2012-01-01

    Who was responsible for the treatment of sick children in the countryside during the second half of the 19th century? This paper investigates the medical complaint accusing the rural population of only reluctantly bringing their sick offspring to academic physicians. The following analyses the role Franz v. Ottenthal (1818-1899), a 'representative' of a private rural medical practice, played in the specialised medical market attending to childhood diseases. An exemplary survey of Ottenthal's medical records for patients from the age of one to 14 years throughout the 1890s has shown that children contributed a relevant percentage of the whole of the physician's patient distribution. It may therefore be assumed that Ottenthal knew how to successfully merchandise his specific therapies. On the demand side, however, parents of sick children were not solely reliant upon this physician. Evidence from the medical records provides information as to when parents regarded medical self-help as no longer supporting the recovery of their children, the cures of lay healers failed, or cases when parents were not satisfied with the therapeutic treatments other physicians had to offer and therefore consulted Ottenthal. PMID:23320379

  3. The practice of physicians and nurses in the Brazilian Family Health Programme – evidences of change in the delivery health care model

    PubMed Central

    Peres, Ellen M; Andrade, Ana M; Dal Poz, Mario R; Grande, Nuno R

    2006-01-01

    The article analyzes the practice of physicians and nurses working on the Family Health Programme (Programa de Saúde da Família or PSF, in Portuguese). A questionnaire was used to assess the evidences of assimilation of the new values and care principles proposed by the programme. The results showed that a great number of professionals seem to have incorporated the practice of home visits, health education actions and planning of the teams' work agenda to their routine labour activities. PMID:17107622

  4. Scalable office-based health care

    PubMed Central

    Koepp, Gabriel A.; Manohar, Chinmay U.; McCrady-Spitzer, Shelly K.; Levine, James A.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of healthcare is to provide high quality care at an affordable cost for its patients. However, the population it serves has changed dramatically since the popularization of hospital-based healthcare. With available new technology, alternative healthcare delivery methods can be designed and tested. This study examines Scalable Office Based Healthcare for Small Business, where healthcare is delivered to the office floor. This delivery was tested in 18 individuals at a small business in Minneapolis, Minnesota. The goal was to deliver modular healthcare and mitigate conditions such as diabetes, hyperlipidemia, obesity, sedentariness, and metabolic disease. The modular healthcare system was welcomed by employees – 70% of those eligible enrolled. The findings showed that the modular healthcare deliverable was feasible and effective. The data demonstrated significant improvements in weight loss, fat loss, and blood variables for at risk participants. This study leaves room for improvement and further innovation. Expansion to include offerings such as physicals, diabetes management, smoking cessation, and pre-natal treatment would improve its utility. Future studies could include testing the adaptability of delivery method, as it should adapt to reach rural and underserved populations. PMID:21471576

  5. Electronic Health Record Use a Bitter Pill for Many Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Meigs, Stephen L.; Solomon, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Electronic health record (EHR) adoption among office-based physician practices in the United States has increased significantly in the past decade. However, the challenges of using EHRs have resulted in growing dissatisfaction with the systems among many of these physicians. The purpose of this qualitative multiple-case study was to increase understanding of physician perceptions regarding the value of using EHR technology. Important findings included the belief among physicians that EHR systems need to be more user-friendly and adaptable to individual clinic workflow preferences, physician beliefs that lack of interoperability among EHRs is a major barrier to meaningful use of the systems, and physician beliefs that EHR use does not improve the quality of care provided to patients. These findings suggest that although government initiatives to encourage EHR adoption among office-based physician practices have produced positive results, additional support may be required in the future to maintain this momentum. PMID:26903782

  6. [Short communication: The sensitivity of measles diagnosis by physicians and families during an intraepidemic period in Edirne: implications for measles surveillance].

    PubMed

    Eskiocak, Muzaffer; Ekuklu, Galip; Doğaner, E; Yilmaz, Neziha; Saltik, Ahmet

    2008-01-01

    Measles is still a leading cause of death among young children, despite the availability of a safe and effective vaccine for the past 40 years. EURO Region of World Health Organisation including Turkey has targeted elimination of measles by the year 2010. It is concluded that there must be a sensitive surveillance system to investigate all suspicious measles cases, and diagnosis should be based on both standardized case definition and laboratory confirmation. Standardized case definition based notification has started in 2005 in Turkey. This study was carried out to determine the sensitivity and specificity of clinical measles diagnosis by physicians and families during a measles epidemic affecting 597 cases in Edirne province in 1997. Blood samples and data were collected by trained teams consisting of one physician and one nurse. Thirty clusters sampling method was used for sampling and 210 blood samples were taken from the children. The sera were then sent to Refik Saydam Hygiene Institute, Ankara, for the detection of measles specific IgG and IgM antibodies. Positive results for IgM were considered as acute measles during epidemics, and positive results for IgG were considered as acquired immunity due to vaccination or passed infection. Of 210 children, 19 were found to have recent infection (IgM+, IgG-), 101 were found immune (IgM-, IgG+), 67 were found in convalescence phase after infection (IgM+, IgG+), and 23 were found susceptible (IgM-, IgG-) to measles. The overall IgM seropositivity was detected as 40.9% in the study group. Only half of confirmed cases (43/86) were diagnosed as measles clinically by the physicians. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV, respectively) of clinical diagnosis by physicians were estimated as 33%, 89%, 67% and 86%, respectively. Validity measures for measles diagnosis by the families were as follows; 8% sensitivity, 96% specificity, 6% PPV and 60% NPV. It is concluded that, all

  7. Continuous sedation until death: the everyday moral reasoning of physicians, nurses and family caregivers in the UK, The Netherlands and Belgium

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Continuous sedation is increasingly used as a way to relieve symptoms at the end of life. Current research indicates that some physicians, nurses, and relatives involved in this practice experience emotional and/or moral distress. This study aims to provide insight into what may influence how professional and/or family carers cope with such distress. Methods This study is an international qualitative interview study involving interviews with physicians, nurses, and relatives of deceased patients in the UK, The Netherlands and Belgium (the UNBIASED study) about a case of continuous sedation at the end of life they were recently involved in. All interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed by staying close to the data using open coding. Next, codes were combined into larger themes and categories of codes resulting in a four point scheme that captured all of the data. Finally, our findings were compared with others and explored in relation to theories in ethics and sociology. Results The participants’ responses can be captured as different dimensions of ‘closeness’, i.e. the degree to which one feels connected or ‘close’ to a certain decision or event. We distinguished four types of ‘closeness’, namely emotional, physical, decisional, and causal. Using these four dimensions of ‘closeness’ it became possible to describe how physicians, nurses, and relatives experience their involvement in cases of continuous sedation until death. More specifically, it shined a light on the everyday moral reasoning employed by care providers and relatives in the context of continuous sedation, and how this affected the emotional impact of being involved in sedation, as well as the perception of their own moral responsibility. Conclusion Findings from this study demonstrate that various factors are reported to influence the degree of closeness to continuous sedation (and thus the extent to which carers feel morally responsible), and that some of these

  8. An opportunity for office-based research.

    PubMed

    Stein, M T; Barbaresi, W J; Benuck, I

    2001-02-01

    Robert, a nearly 12-year-old boy, traveled an hour to see a new pediatrician. Robert's mom told the pediatrician that Robert had not been seen by a doctor for several years because "no one seems to be able to help him with his problem." Robert had been wetting the bed "ever since he was toilet-trained" at age 2 years. Robert wets the bed about 5 out of 7 nights. He never has daytime accidents. He did not have a history of urinary tract infection, dysuria, urgency, or increased frequency of urination. He has daily bowel movements and denied soiling or accidents. Robert's mom said he had "toilet-trained himself" at age 2 years. Both Robert's mom and maternal grandfather had nocturnal enuresis "into their teenage years." The pediatrician was surprised to learn that another physician had treated Robert with imipramine at age 5 years. The medication worked intermittently and Robert continued to take it for about a year. At age 6 years, Robert's parents saw an advertisement for a bed-wetting alarm. They purchased the alarm but found that Robert never woke up when the alarm sounded. At age 7 years, Robert saw a urologist who told him he would "outgrow the problem." A year later, the urologist prescribed desmopressin acetate (DDAVP) nasal spray, which Robert took on occasion during the next 2 years. Every time he stopped the DDAVP, he resumed wetting the bed. His parents never punished him for his accidents, but they did try restricting fluids after dinner and also woke Robert in the middle of the night and encouraged him to go to the bathroom. Neither of these strategies was successful. Robert said he was "frustrated" and wondered if "I would still be wetting the bed as a grown-up." The pediatrician explained the nature of enuresis to Robert and his mom, provided them with instructions and an order form for a bed-wetting alarm, and arranged a follow-up visit. The next day, during nursery rounds, he asked several of his colleagues about their approaches to the treatment of

  9. Physician strikes.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Stephen L; Salmon, J Warren

    2014-11-01

    Throughout medical history, physicians have rarely formed unions and/or carried out strikes. In a profession faced with the turmoil of health reform and increasing pressure to change their practices and lifestyles, will physicians resort to unionization for collective bargaining, and will a strike weapon be used to fight back against the array of corporate and government powers involved in the transformation of the American health-care system? This article examines the question of whether there could be such a thing as an ethical physician strike. Although physicians have not historically used collective bargaining or the strike weapon, the rapidly changing practice environment in the United States might push physicians and other health-care professionals toward unionization. This article considers the ethical questions that would arise if physicians started taking advantage of labor laws, and it lays out criteria for an ethical strike.

  10. “Maternal Health and Family Planning Distance Education” experience among physicians: a three-phase study to determine the educational needs, develop education program, and evaluate efficacy of the education administered

    PubMed Central

    Ciftci, Bestami; Uzel, Nesibe; Ozel, M Onur; Zergeroglu, Sema; Deger, Cetin; Turasan, S Sare; Karakoc, Ayse Gul; Ozbalci, Semra

    2016-01-01

    Aim This study aims to assess the educational needs of family practitioners and evaluate the efficacy of the ongoing “Maternal Health and Family Planning Distance Education” program conducted by the General Directorate of Health Research (SAGEM) of the Turkish Ministry of Health. Methods This study consisted of three phases. In the first phase, an online survey on maternal health and family planning educational needs was sent to 20,611 physicians via e-mail. Of the 20,611 physicians, 4,729 completed the survey. In the second phase, of the 1,061 physicians registered to the education program, 632 physicians with active participation were included. In the third phase, the preeducation expectations of 287 physicians and posteducation satisfaction of 54 physicians were analyzed with a questionnaire. Results The majority of the physicians were employed in a family health center (97.4%) and practicing for 16–20 years (23.2%) without any prior in-service training (60.9%). High-to-very high educational need was expressed by 56.4% of physicians for pregnancy, delivery, and puerperality. Topics that the physicians, including both those with ≥16 years in practice and without prior in-service training, expressed need for more detailed content were pregnancy, delivery, and puerperality (37.5%); emergency obstetric approach in the primary care setting (33.1%); and gynecological infectious diseases and treatment approach (32.4%). Following the education program, the participants’ expectations were fulfilled in terms of refreshing their knowledge, particularly in the field of Maternal Health and Family Planning (87.1% and 75.9%) and the percentage of participants who expressed that they had sufficient high level knowledge increased from 55% to 68.5%. Conclusion The education on Maternal Health and Family Planning refreshed the knowledge of participants and highly met the preeducation expectations. Determining the educational needs and expectations of the target

  11. More Family Physicians or More Primary Care? An Analysis of the Family Practice Act (S. 3418). Health Manpower Policy Discussion Paper Series No. D.1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, George E., Jr.

    The crisis in primary care has long been discussed and the dismal litany of statistics is now familiar. The G.P. is vanishing from the medical scene. Over one-third of the active general practitioners are now over 60. In 1970 the U.S. Congress responded to the declining availability of primary health care by passing the Family Practice Act. The…

  12. Toward a More Complete Picture of Outpatient, Office-Based Health Care in the U.S.

    PubMed

    Lau, Denys T; McCaig, Linda F; Hing, Esther

    2016-09-01

    The healthcare system in the U.S., particularly outpatient, office-based care, has been shifting toward service delivery by advanced practice providers, particularly nurse practitioners (NPs) and physician assistants (PAs). The National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS), conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, is the leading source of nationally representative data on care delivered by office-based physicians. This paper first describes NAMCS, then discusses key NAMCS expansion efforts, and finally presents major findings from two exploratory studies that assess the feasibility of collecting data from NPs and PAs as sampled providers in NAMCS. The first NAMCS expansion effort began in 2006 when the NAMCS sample was expanded to include community health centers and started collecting and disseminating data on physicians, NPs, PAs, and nurse midwives in these settings. Then, in 2013, NCHS included workforce questions in NAMCS on the composition and clinical tasks of all healthcare staff in physician offices. Finally, in 2013-2014, NCHS conducted two exploratory studies and found that collecting data from NPs and PAs as sampled providers in NAMCS is feasible. However, modifications to the current NAMCS procedures may be necessary, for example, changing recruitment strategies, visit sampling procedures, and physician-centric survey items. Collectively, these NCHS initiatives are important for healthcare research, practice, and policy communities in their efforts toward providing a more complete picture of the changing outpatient, office-based workforce, team-based care approach, and service utilization in the U.S. PMID:27079637

  13. Use and Characteristics of Electronic Health Record Systems among Office-Based Physician Practices: United States, ...

    MedlinePlus

    ... NCHS Publications and Electronic Media Errata List Listservs Data and Statistics Data Visualization Gallery FastStats MMWR QuickStats ... Stage 2 meaningful use objectives for which 2010 data are available increased significantly. Increased adoption occurred for ...

  14. Seamless health care for chronic diseases in a dual health care system: managed care and the role of family physicians.

    PubMed

    Lee, A

    1998-01-01

    Neither private nor state run health care systems are perfect. Although there is increasing evidence that Health Maintenance Organizations (HMOs) provide comparable care at lower cost, HMOs tend to select healthy patients. The dual health care system in Hong Kong spends about 3.9 per cent of GDP, with health indices among the best in the world. Hong Kong still faces the problem of escalating health care expenditure. One should take advantage of the dual health care system to evolve a new paradigm for a primary-led seamless health care service. The Diabetes Centre of a university teaching hospital together with the University of Community and Family Medicine has started a structured shared care programme in diabetes mellitus, involving general practitioners in both the private and public sectors integrating the primary and secondary care, and the private and public sectors. This programme starts to develop an infrastructure for providing quality care at an affordable cost for a large pool of patients with chronic disease. Unlike other "managed care schemes", this one is not run by profit-oriented companies, but by health professionals with an interest in providing best possible care at an affordable cost. The "disease management" approach needs a care delivery system without traditional boundaries; and a continuous improvement process which develops and refines the knowledge base, guidelines and delivery system. PMID:10351265

  15. Optimizing psychosocial support during office-based buprenorphine treatment in primary care: patients’ experiences and preferences

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Aaron D.; Masyukova, Mariya; Cunningham, Chinazo O.

    2015-01-01

    Background Buprenorphine maintenance treatment is effective and has been successfully integrated into HIV and primary care settings. However, one key barrier to providers prescribing buprenorphine is their perception that they are unable to provide adequate counseling or psychosocial support to patients with opioid addiction. This qualitative study investigated supportive elements of office-based buprenorphine treatment that patients perceived to be most valuable. Methods We conducted five focus groups with 33 buprenorphine treatment-experienced participants. Focus groups were audio-recorded and transcribed. Iterative readings of transcripts and grounded theory analysis revealed common themes. Results Overall, participants perceived that buprenorphine treatment helped them to achieve their treatment goals and valued the flexibility, accessibility, and privacy of treatment. Participants identified interpersonal and structural elements of buprenorphine treatment that provided psychosocial support. Participants desired good physician-patient relationships, but also valued care delivery models that were patient-centered, created a safe place for self-disclosure, and utilized coordinated team-based care. Conclusions Participants derived psychosocial support from their prescribing physician, but were also open to collaborative or team-based models of care, as long as they were voluntary and confidential. Buprenorphine prescribing physicians without access to referral options for psychosocial counseling could focus on maintaining non-judgmental attitudes and shared decision making during patient encounters. Adding structure and psychosocial support to buprenorphine treatment through coordinated team-based care also seems to have great promise. PMID:26566712

  16. Revealing a Child's Pathology: Physicians' Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scelles, Regine; Aubert-Godard, Anne; Gargiulo, Marcela; Avant, Monique; Gortais, Jean

    2010-01-01

    In this study, 12 physicians and 12 care-givers were interviewed using semi-structured interviews. We explored physicians' experiences when they revealed a diagnosis. We also tried to understand which family members the physician was thinking of, with whom they identified themselves, and their first choice of the person to whom they prefer to…

  17. Collaborative Care for Older Adults with low back pain by family medicine physicians and doctors of chiropractic (COCOA): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Low back pain is a prevalent and debilitating condition that affects the health and quality of life of older adults. Older people often consult primary care physicians about back pain, with many also receiving concurrent care from complementary and alternative medicine providers, most commonly doctors of chiropractic. However, a collaborative model of treatment coordination between these two provider groups has yet to be tested. The primary aim of the Collaborative Care for Older Adults Clinical Trial is to develop and evaluate the clinical effectiveness and feasibility of a patient-centered, collaborative care model with family medicine physicians and doctors of chiropractic for the treatment of low back pain in older adults. Methods/design This pragmatic, pilot randomized controlled trial will enroll 120 participants, age 65 years or older with subacute or chronic low back pain lasting at least one month, from a community-based sample in the Quad-Cities, Iowa/Illinois, USA. Eligible participants are allocated in a 1:1:1 ratio to receive 12 weeks of medical care, concurrent medical and chiropractic care, or collaborative medical and chiropractic care. Primary outcomes are self-rated back pain and disability. Secondary outcomes include general and functional health status, symptom bothersomeness, expectations for treatment effectiveness and improvement, fear avoidance behaviors, depression, anxiety, satisfaction, medication use and health care utilization. Treatment safety and adverse events also are monitored. Participant-rated outcome measures are collected via self-reported questionnaires and computer-assisted telephone interviews at baseline, and at 4, 8, 12, 24, 36 and 52 weeks post-randomization. Provider-rated expectations for treatment effectiveness and participant improvement also are evaluated. Process outcomes are assessed through qualitative interviews with study participants and research clinicians, chart audits of progress notes and content

  18. Office-based dynamic imaging of vocal cords in awake patients with swept-source optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lingfeng; Liu, Gangjun; Rubinstein, Marc; Saidi, Arya; Wong, Brian J. F.; Chen, Zhongping

    2009-11-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an evolving noninvasive imaging modality that has been used to image the human larynx during surgical endoscopy. The design of a long gradient index (GRIN) lens-based probe capable of capturing images of the human larynx by use of swept-source OCT during a typical office-based laryngoscopy examination is presented. In vivo OCT imaging of the human larynx is demonstrated with a rate of 40 frames per second. Dynamic vibration of the vocal folds is recorded to provide not only high-resolution cross-sectional tissue structures but also vibration parameters, such as the vibration frequency and magnitude of the vocal cords, which provides important information for clinical diagnosis and treatment, as well as fundamental research of the voice itself. Office-based OCT is a promising imaging modality to study the larynx for physicians in otolaryngology.

  19. Physician, heal thyself

    PubMed Central

    Blais, Régis; Safianyk, Catherine; Magnan, Anne; Lapierre, André

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To document the opinions of the users of the Quebec Physicians Health Program (QPHP) about the services they received. DESIGN Mailed questionnaire. SETTING Quebec. PARTICIPANTS A total of 126 physicians who used QPHP services between 1999 and 2004. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Users’ overall rating of the QPHP services, their opinions about the program, and whether their situations improved as a result of accessing QPHP services. RESULTS Ninety-two of the 126 physicians surveyed returned their completed questionnaires, providing a response rate of 73%. Most respondents thought that the QPHP services were good or excellent (90%), most would use the program again (86%) or recommend it (96%), and most thought the Quebec physician associations and the Collège des médecins du Québec should continue funding the QPHP (97%). Most respondents thought the service confidentiality was excellent (84%), as was staff professionalism (82%), and 62% thought the quality of the services they were referred to was excellent. However, only 57% believed their situations had improved with the help of the QPHP. CONCLUSION The QPHP received good marks from its users. Given the effects of physician burnout on patients and on the health care system, it is not only a personal problem, but also a collective problem. Thus, actions are needed not only to set up programs like the QPHP for those suffering from burnout, but also to prevent these types of problems. Because family physicians are likely to be the first ones consulted by their physician patients in distress, they play a key role in acknowledging these problems and referring those colleagues to the appropriate help programs when needed. PMID:20944027

  20. Financial implications of serving as team physician.

    PubMed

    Lemak, Larry

    2007-04-01

    Time is the greatest negative financial burden that you accept as a sports medicine physician, because the only way to produce revenue as a physician is with your time. This cost measured in time of doing business as a team physician can be high. Unless being a team physician is very rewarding to you through personal satisfaction or the other intangible indirect benefits associated with the role, being a team physician may not be a good financial decision for you as a person and a physician, or for your practice and your family.

  1. Physician use of IT: results from the Deloitte Research Survey.

    PubMed

    Miller, Robert H; Hillman, John M; Given, Ruth S

    2004-01-01

    The authors analyzed 1,200 physician responses to a Deloitte Research/Fulcrum Analytics survey of office-based physician use of the Internet and other information technology (IT). Overall, the results suggest that 40 to 50 percent of all respondents are using, or are ready to use, IT for substantial clinical care. However, time and liability concerns about patient e-mail were pervasive across all IT user categories. The results also indicate that some public/private policies aimed at increasing physician IT use for clinical management should be tailored to specific segments of the physician IT user spectrum, rather than using a "one-size-fits-all" policy approach.

  2. Barriers to office-based screening sigmoidoscopy: does reimbursement cover costs?

    PubMed

    Lewis, J D; Asch, D A

    1999-03-16

    Screening with flexible sigmoidoscopy may reduce mortality rates from colorectal cancer. Primary care physicians are able to provide this screening procedure, but many have been reluctant to do so, partly because of the impression that reimbursement rates are inadequate to cover physician costs. This study examines the cost of performing flexible sigmoidoscopy in a primary care practice and compares this cost with the new Medicare reimbursement rate for flexible sigmoidoscopy. Fixed and variable costs associated with the performance of office-based flexible sigmoidoscopy were derived from the published literature. The principal assumption in the analyses is that the time required to perform flexible sigmoidoscopy represents an opportunity cost because the physician could use that time to see additional patients during routine office hours. Sensitivity analyses were done across a range of estimates for the cost variables. When Medicare reimbursement rates were used, the physician's total cost for flexible sigmoidoscopy without biopsy was $86.86, which is similar to the Medicare reimbursement rate for screening flexible sigmoidoscopy (code 45330, $87.84). The calculations were most sensitive to estimates of equipment cost, procedure time, number of procedures performed per year, additional malpractice coverage, and revenue generated per hour of outpatient care. The estimated cost per procedure in a screening program that includes the ability to perform biopsy is $152.93, which exceeds Medicare reimbursement rates across the range of all variables included in the sensitivity analyses. Thus, low reimbursement may limit the adoption of screening flexible sigmoidoscopy with or without biopsy in primary care practices.

  3. Changing roles for primary-care physicians: addressing challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, C P; Kaluzny, A D; Kibbe, D C; Tredway, R

    2005-01-01

    Direct-to-consumer advertising is but one example of a process called disintermediation that is directly affecting primary-care physicians and their patients. This paper examines the trends and the actors involved in disintermediation, which threatens the traditional patient-physician relationship. The paper outlines the social forces behind these threats and illustrates the resulting challenges and opportunities. A rationale and strategies are presented to rebuild, maintain and strengthen the patient-physician relationship in an era of growing disintermediation and anticipated advancements in cost-effective office-based information systems. Primary care--as we know it--is under siege from a number of trends in healthcare delivery, resulting in loss of physician autonomy, disrupted continuity of care and potential erosion of professional values (Rastegar 2004; Future of Family Medicine Project Leadership Committee 2004). The halcyon days of medicine as a craft guild with a monopoly on (1) technical knowledge and (2) the means of implementation, reached its zenith in the mid-twentieth century and has been under pressure ever since (Starr 1982; Schlesinger 2002). While this is a trend within the US health system, it is likely to affect other delivery systems in the years ahead. PMID:15828571

  4. [Burnout syndrome among family physicians].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Cruz, Juan; Mugártegui-Sánchez, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    Introducción: el síndrome de agotamiento profesional es un estado de agotamiento físico y emocional que puede presentarse en trabajadores que interactúan con otras personas. El objetivo de esta investigación fue conocer la prevalencia de este síndrome y los factores relacionados en médicos familiares de Mérida, Yucatán, México. Métodos: se realizó una encuesta transversal en la que se aplicó el Maslach Burnout Inventory a médicos familiares seleccionados mediante muestreo no probabilístico por conveniencia. Se analizaron las medidas de tendencia central y dispersión y se determinó la prevalencia del síndrome de agotamiento profesional. La significación estadística de los factores asociados se determinó mediante χ(2). Resultados: se obtuvieron 59 casos de síndrome de agotamiento profesional: 36 con afectación en un componente del Maslach Burnout Inventory, 15 en dos y ocho en los tres. El 35 % de los casos indicó trabajar en promedio 10 turnos extra al mes (p = 0.013); tener un segundo trabajo también se relacionó con el síndrome. Conclusiones: los resultados son consistentes con los obtenidos en estudios similares. Trabajar turnos extra o tener otro trabajo fueron los factores relacionados con el síndrome de agotamiento profesional.

  5. The role of economic evaluation in the decision-making process of family physicians: design and methods of a qualitative embedded multiple-case study

    PubMed Central

    Lessard, Chantale; Contandriopoulos, André-Pierre; Beaulieu, Marie-Dominique

    2009-01-01

    Background A considerable amount of resource allocation decisions take place daily at the point of the clinical encounter; especially in primary care, where 80 percent of health problems are managed. Ignoring economic evaluation evidence in individual clinical decision-making may have a broad impact on the efficiency of health services. To date, almost all studies on the use of economic evaluation in decision-making used a quantitative approach, and few investigated decision-making at the clinical level. An important question is whether economic evaluations affect clinical practice. The project is an intervention research study designed to understand the role of economic evaluation in the decision-making process of family physicians (FPs). The contributions of the project will be from the perspective of Pierre Bourdieu's sociological theory. Methods/design A qualitative research strategy is proposed. We will conduct an embedded multiple-case study design. Ten case studies will be performed. The FPs will be the unit of analysis. The sampling strategies will be directed towards theoretical generalization. The 10 selected cases will be intended to reflect a diversity of FPs. There will be two embedded units of analysis: FPs (micro-level of analysis) and field of family medicine (macro-level of analysis). The division of the determinants of practice/behaviour into two groups, corresponding to the macro-structural level and the micro-individual level, is the basis for Bourdieu's mode of analysis. The sources of data collection for the micro-level analysis will be 10 life history interviews with FPs, documents and observational evidence. The sources of data collection for the macro-level analysis will be documents and 9 open-ended, focused interviews with key informants from medical associations and academic institutions. The analytic induction approach to data analysis will be used. A list of codes will be generated based on both the original framework and new themes

  6. Physician unionization.

    PubMed

    Lebowitz, P H

    1997-01-01

    Typically, doctors have seemed unsuited for and uncomfortable with the idea of unions but with the current changes in practices and referral patterns, doctors are looking--at least warily--at unions. Two sets of laws apply to possible unionization of physicians; one, federal antitrust laws, the other, both federal and state labor laws as they apply to changes in the medical profession. Antitrust laws are designed to protect competition by prohibiting price fixing. Another typical antitrust issue that applies to healthcare is that of a group boycott or refusal to deal, where competitors try to coerce a third party to set prices where competitors want them set. Congress' earliest legislation to aide the labor movement involved exceptions to the antitrust laws. Some provisions of the laws are limited to workers who are employees, defined as someone who is employed by any person. Doctors are searching for solutions that provide the collective power of the labor laws without offending the antitrust laws. The question is whether doctors can form unions under these two conflicting forces. The first main issue is whether the doctor is or is not an employee. Although radiologic technologists, typically employees of hospitals or provider groups, have been unionized for years, doctors are usually not employees, at least not if they have their own practices. Although not employees, physicians may affiliate with a larger union to use that broader bargaining power, a purpose that is permissible under current law. Membership in a union does have its responsibilities and disadvantages. Some have suggested that the definition of employee be broadened to cover physician duties under managed care payer agreements, for example. Meanwhile, the Federal Trade Commission and the Justice Department are watching that non-employee physicians not use the union label to mask price fixing, boycotts or refusals to deal.

  7. Making our offices universally accessible: guidelines for physicians

    PubMed Central

    Jones, K E; Tamari, I E

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop recommendations for office-based physicians who wish to make their offices accessible to all patients. OPTIONS: Include taking steps to make offices more accessible, or not; offices may be accessible to varying degrees. OUTCOMES: Outcomes of accessibility involve patient-care, economic, ethical and legal issues. Stakeholders in these outcomes include patients, physicians, government and society. EVIDENCE: Data were obtained from a series of searches of MEDLINE, CINAHL and Healthstar (previously Health) databases for articles on disability and family medicine, primary (health) care and family practice, and on access and offices, and health services accessibility, and from a telephone survey of 50 stakeholders. VALUES: A high value was placed on services to persons with disabilities and on stakeholder input. Universal accessibility was valued as an overall goal; improved accessibility was also highly valued. BENEFITS, HARMS AND COSTS: Benefits to patients include improved access to care as guaranteed by the Canada Health Act and in keeping with provincial Human Rights Codes. Benefits to physicians include contact with a broader patient population and freedom from fear of litigation. Costs of improved accessibility vary depending on individual circumstances and on whether an office is being built or renovated; some improvement costs are minimal. RECOMMENDATIONS: All physicians should take measures to improve practice accessibility. Improved access should be considered in each of the following areas: transportation and entrance to the facility, entrance to the office, waiting rooms, rest rooms, examination rooms, general building features and other features. VALIDATION: No similar guidelines exist. To assess the content validity of these guidelines, the authors had a draft document reviewed by 18 stakeholders. All specific recommendations met the minimum criterion of adherence to current legislation, including national and provincial building

  8. Physician, Practice, and Patient Characteristics Related to Primary Care Physician Physical and Mental Health: Results from the Physician Worklife Study

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Eric S; Konrad, Thomas R; Linzer, Mark; McMurray, Julia; Pathman, Donald E; Gerrity, Martha; Schwartz, Mark D; Scheckler, William E; Douglas, Jeff

    2002-01-01

    Objective To study the impact that physician, practice, and patient characteristics have on physician stress, satisfaction, mental, and physical health. Data Sources Based on a survey of over 5,000 physicians nationwide. Four waves of surveys resulted in 2,325 complete responses. Elimination of ineligibles yielded a 52 percent response rate; 1,411 responses from primary care physicians were used. Study Design A conceptual model was tested by structural equation modeling. Physician job satisfaction and stress mediated the relationship between physician, practice, and patient characteristics as independent variables and physician physical and mental health as dependent variables. Principle Findings The conceptual model was generally supported. Practice and, to a lesser extent, physician characteristics influenced job satisfaction, whereas only practice characteristics influenced job stress. Patient characteristics exerted little influence. Job stress powerfully influenced job satisfaction and physical and mental health among physicians. Conclusions These findings support the notion that workplace conditions are a major determinant of physician well-being. Poor practice conditions can result in poor outcomes, which can erode quality of care and prove costly to the physician and health care organization. Fortunately, these conditions are manageable. Organizational settings that are both “physician friendly” and “family friendly” seem to result in greater well-being. These findings are particularly important as physicians are more tightly integrated into the health care system that may be less clearly under their exclusive control.

  9. [Cooperation between the family physician, rheumatologist, hospital and rehabilitation clinic. Contribution of regional cooperative rheumatic disease centers for total quality management].

    PubMed

    Hülsemann, J L

    1998-12-01

    The building-up of multipurpose arthritis centers in Germany led to a network including outpatient and inpatient services, primary care physicians, rheumatologists, physiotherapists, occupational therapists, psychologists, acute care clinics, and rehabilitation centers. The structural improvement in the care of patients with chronic inflammatory rheumatic diseases has to be followed by an improvement of processes in the care of these patients and by an improvement of outcome. Coordination offices can help not only to further improve cooperation between primary care physicians, specialized rheumatologists and hospitals but also to establish a comprehensive clinical quality management.

  10. Smoking cessation treatment among office-based buprenorphine treatment patients.

    PubMed

    Nahvi, Shadi; Blackstock, Oni; Sohler, Nancy L; Thompson, Devin; Cunningham, Chinazo O

    2014-08-01

    Opioid-dependent patients smoke at high rates, and office-based buprenorphine treatment provides an opportunity to offer cessation treatment. We examined tobacco use and smoking cessation treatment patterns among office-based buprenorphine treatment patients. We reviewed records of 319 patients treated with buprenorphine from 2005 to 2010. We examined smoking status, cessation medication prescriptions, and factors associated with receipt of cessation prescriptions. Mean age was 43.9 years; most were men (74.2%) and Hispanic (70.9%). At buprenorphine initiation, 21.9% had no documentation of smoking status, while 67.4% were current, 10% former, and 0.9% never smokers. Of current smokers, 16.8% received smoking cessation prescriptions. Patients retained (vs. not retained) in buprenorphine treatment were more likely to receive smoking cessation medications (26.3% vs. 11.2%, p<0.005). We observed a high tobacco use prevalence among buprenorphine patients, and limited provision of cessation treatment. This is a missed opportunity to impact the high tobacco use burden in opioid-dependent persons.

  11. The Mindful Physician and Pooh

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winter, Robin O.

    2013-01-01

    Resident physicians are particularly susceptible to burnout due to the stresses of residency training. They also experience the added pressures of multitasking because of the increased use of computers and mobile devices while delivering patient care. Our Family Medicine residency program addresses these problems by teaching residents about the…

  12. [Collaboration between occupational physicians and other specialists including insurance physicians].

    PubMed

    Rijkenberg, A M; van Sprundel, M; Stassijns, G

    2013-09-01

    Collaboration between various stakeholders is essential for a well-operating vocational rehabilitation process. Researchers have mentioned, among other players, insurance physicians, the curative sector and employers. In 2011 the WHO organised the congress "Connecting Health and Labour: What role for occupational health in primary care". The congress was also attended by representatives of the WONCA (World Organisations of Family Medicine). In general, everyone agreed that occupational health aspects should continue to be seen as an integral part of primary health care. However, it is not easy to find literature on this subject. For this reason we conducted a review. We searched for literature relating to collaboration with occupational physicians in Dutch, English and German between 2001 and autumn 2011. Our attention focused on cooperation with specialists and insurance physicians. Therefore, we searched PUBMED using MeSH terms and made use of the database from the "Tijdschrift voor bedrijfs- en verzekeringsgeneeskunde (TBV) [Dutch Journal for Occupational - and Insurance Medicine]". We also checked the database from the "Deutsches Arzteblatt [German Medical Journal]" and made use of the online catalogue from THIEME - eJOURNALS. Last but not least, I used the online catalogue from the German paper "Arbeits -, Sozial -, Umweltmedizin [Occupational -, Social -, Milieu Medicine]". Additionally, we made use of the "snowball - method" to find relevant literature. We found many references to this subject. The Netherlands in particular has done a lot of research in this field. However, there is little research on the cooperation between occupational physicians and specialists; in particular insurance physicians. This is interesting, because several authors have mentioned its importance. However, cooperation with other specialists seems not to be the norm. Therefore, cooperation between curative physicians (specialists but also family doctors), insurance physicians and

  13. Army Physicians' Attitudes Towards Physicians' Assistants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuart, Richard B.; Bair, Jeffrey H.

    In February 1972 the U. S. Army Medical Field Service School will commence training a new category of health personnel, to be known as the physicians' assistant. This type of allied health personnel will be an assistant to the physician, trained to do many of the traditional tasks usually performed by a physician, but requiring less education.…

  14. An overview of diabetes management in schizophrenia patients: office based strategies for primary care practitioners and endocrinologists.

    PubMed

    Annamalai, Aniyizhai; Tek, Cenk

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is common and seen in one in five patients with schizophrenia. It is more prevalent than in the general population and contributes to the increased morbidity and shortened lifespan seen in this population. However, screening and treatment for diabetes and other metabolic conditions remain poor for these patients. Multiple factors including genetic risk, neurobiologic mechanisms, psychotropic medications, and environmental factors contribute to the increased prevalence of diabetes. Primary care physicians should be aware of adverse effects of psychotropic medications that can cause or exacerbate diabetes and its complications. Management of diabetes requires physicians to tailor treatment recommendations to address special needs of this population. In addition to behavioral interventions, medications such as metformin have shown promise in attenuating weight loss and preventing hyperglycemia in those patients being treated with antipsychotic medications. Targeted diabetes prevention and treatment is critical in patients with schizophrenia and evidence-based interventions should be considered early in the course of treatment. This paper reviews the prevalence, etiology, and treatment of diabetes in schizophrenia and outlines office based interventions for physicians treating this vulnerable population. PMID:25878665

  15. Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurst, Hunter, Ed.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    This document contains the fourth volume of "Today's Delinquent," an annual publication of the National Center for Juvenile Justice. This volume deals with the issue of the family and delinquency. "The Family and Delinquency" (LaMar T. Empey) systematically reviews and weighs the evidence to support prominent theories on the origins of…

  16. Cost Analysis of an Office-based Surgical Suite

    PubMed Central

    LaBove, Gabrielle

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Operating costs are a significant part of delivering surgical care. Having a system to analyze these costs is imperative for decision making and efficiency. We present an analysis of surgical supply, labor and administrative costs, and remuneration of procedures as a means for a practice to analyze their cost effectiveness; this affects the quality of care based on the ability to provide services. The costs of surgical care cannot be estimated blindly as reconstructive and cosmetic procedures have different percentages of overhead. Methods: A detailed financial analysis of office-based surgical suite costs for surgical procedures was determined based on company contract prices and average use of supplies. The average time spent on scheduling, prepping, and doing the surgery was factored using employee rates. Results: The most expensive, minor procedure supplies are suture needles. The 4 most common procedures from the most expensive to the least are abdominoplasty, breast augmentation, facelift, and lipectomy. Conclusions: Reconstructive procedures require a greater portion of collection to cover costs. Without the adjustment of both patient and insurance remuneration in the practice, the ability to provide quality care will be increasingly difficult. PMID:27536482

  17. The effect of seeing a family physician on the level of glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) in type 2 Diabetes Mellitus patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) in diabetic patients reflects the average blood glucose level, and will not be affected by variability in blood glucose in short time. Regular care of patients by medical staff could effectively control glycemic situation. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of medical care by general physicians on glycemic control by measuring of HbA1c. Methods In order to assess the effectiveness of National program for diabetes control and prevention in Iran, we compare HbA1c, Fasting blood glucose (FBS), systolic and diastolic blood pressure in two groups of diabetic patients diagnosed in this program. The first group consisted of patients who received at least four visits by General Physician (GP) during one year after the diagnosis, and second group were patients who did not visited by GPs or received 1–3 visits. Results After one year, 24.1% of patients did not receive any care, while 57.9% examined at least once a year. Among visited patients, 23.5% received 1–3 times medical care and 23.5% received four or more visits. HbA1c was significantly lowered in patients with appropriate care (four and more) compared with the non cared patients and patients with less than four cares. Conclusion Appropriate number of visits for each patient by GPs is an effective glycemic control in diabetic patients. Although this study provides a framework for medical care in diabetes, how to take care of these patients depends on specific situation of each patient and should be determined for each of them individually. PMID:23497576

  18. Hospital-Based Physicians: Current Issues and Descriptive Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Steinwald, Bruce

    1980-01-01

    Hospital-based physicians (HBPs) have been the recipients of considerable attention in health policy debates in recent years. This paper discusses issues and trends concerning HBPs and presents evidence on practice characteristics, compensation methods, and incomes of anesthesiologists, pathologists, and radiologists. Some comparisons with office-based MDs are included. The primary data source is composed of physician surveys sponsored by the Health Care Financing Administration and conducted by the National Opinion Research Center in 1977 and 1978. Findings generated from these surveys support past research showing that radiology is the most lucrative HBP specialty, followed by pathology and anesthesiology; hospital-based practice tends to be considerably more lucrative than office-based practice, taken as a whole. Survey findings are discussed in light of current policy developments in the health services sector. PMID:10309258

  19. A role for physician assistants in organ procurement.

    PubMed

    Anderson, M E

    2001-12-01

    Healthcare in the United States, as well as the environment in which physician assistants work, is rapidly changing. Consequently, the role of a physician assistant is expanding to meet the needs of patients and physicians of all specialties of medicine and surgery. In organ procurement, physician assistants can be a valuable asset to an organ procurement organization because of their medical education, versatility, and commitment to personalized care to organ donors and their families. Physician assistants are healthcare professionals who are uniquely qualified for a variety of roles within the organization: clinician, educator, consultant, donor and family liaison, and researcher.

  20. HMO physicians' use of referrals.

    PubMed

    Bachman, K H; Freeborn, D K

    1999-02-01

    Clinical uncertainty is a source of variation in medical decision-making as well as a source of work-related stress. Increasing enrollment in organized health care systems has intensified interest in understanding referral utilization as well as issues such as physician dissatisfaction and burnout. We examined whether primary care physicians' affective reactions to uncertainty and their job characteristics were associated with use of referrals and burnout. Data came from mail surveys of primary care physicians practicing in two large group model health maintenance organizations (HMOs) in the USA. Consistent with past research, we found that younger physicians had higher referral rates than older physicians, and that general internists had higher rates than either family practitioners or pediatricians. Greater stress from uncertainty increased referrals and referrals were negatively correlated with heavier work demands (patient visits per hour). Greater stress from uncertainty, perceived workload (too high) and a sense of loss of control over the practice environment were associated with higher levels of burnout.

  1. Do osteopathic physicians differ in patient interaction from allopathic physicians? An empirically derived approach.

    PubMed

    Carey, Timothy S; Motyka, Thomas M; Garrett, Joanne M; Keller, Robert B

    2003-07-01

    Colleges of osteopathic medicine teach osteopathic principles, which provide a different approach to and interaction with patients than principles taught in allopathic medical schools. The authors examined whether osteopathic primary care physicians' interactions with patients reflect the principles of osteopathic medicine when compared with allopathic physicians' interactions. The principles of osteopathic medicine were adapted to elements that could be measured from an audio recording. This 26-item index was refined with two focus groups of practicing osteopathic physicians. Fifty-four patient visits to 11 osteopathic and 7 allopathic primary care physicians in Maine for screening physicals, headache, low back pain, and hypertension were recorded on audiotape and were dual-abstracted. When the 26-item index of osteopathic principles was summed, the osteopathic physicians had consistently higher scores (11 vs. 6.9; P = .01) than allopathic physicians, and visit length was similar (22 minutes vs. 20 minutes, respectively). Twenty-three of the 26 items were used more commonly by the osteopathic physicians. Osteopathic physicians were more likely than allopathic physicians to use patients' first names; explain etiologic factors to patients; and discuss social, family, and emotional impact of illnesses. In this study, osteopathic physicians were easily distinguishable from allopathic physicians by their verbal interactions with patients. Future studies should replicate this finding as well as determine whether it correlates with patient outcomes and satisfaction.

  2. Survey reveals physicians' experiences with cults.

    PubMed

    Lottick, E A

    1993-02-01

    In late June 1992, a stratified random sample of Pennsylvania physicians (5,400) were mailed a two-page questionnaire asking about experiences with destructive cults, either personal, professional, or both. Professional experience was defined as "with patients or their families," and personal experience was defined as "with self, family, or friends." The survey sample group was drawn from primary care physicians (family practice, general practice, internal medicine, and pediatrics) and psychiatrists. Surveys were returned by 1,396 participants, a 26 percent rate of return. A number of the returned surveys (173) included personal observations and comments. PMID:8327257

  3. The practice and earnings of preventive medicine physicians.

    PubMed

    Salive, M E

    1992-01-01

    A shortage of preventive medicine (PM) physicians exists in the United States. Researchers know little about these physicians' earnings and practice characteristics. The American College of Preventive Medicine (ACPM) mailed a survey to all self-identified PM physicians on the American Medical Association (AMA) Physician Masterfile. A total of 3,771 (54%) responded; respondents' sex and region of residence were typical for PM physicians in general, with a slight excess of older physicians and those reporting board certification. A total of 2,664 (71%) were working full time, with median earnings of $85,000 (mean $90,000). Among full-time physicians, relatively higher earnings were associated with the following characteristics: male sex; age 45 to 64 years; major source of income from clinical, business, or industrial sources, rather than governmental or academic; and PM board certification. Full-time PM physicians earned much less than office-based private practitioners in several primary care specialties in 1989. The gap in earnings between PM specialists in government positions and those in the private sector is also substantial. Both disparities may require creative solutions.

  4. Child Abuse: A Survey of Physicians' Attitudes and Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krinsky, Janice A.; Kossan, Nancy E.

    A questionnaire designed to investigate physicians' knowledge of and experiences with child abuse, familiarity with New York State reporting laws, and characteristics of abusing families was sent to pediatricians and family practitioners in Monroe County, New York. The physicians were asked to estimate the number of child abuse cases that they saw…

  5. Information-Seeking Strategies and Differences among Primary Care Physicians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gruppen, Larry D.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Ninety-eight internists and 73 family physicians were asked which of six information sources they consulted when faced with difficult medical problems. Results indicate that internists prefer consulting the medical literature, whereas family physicians rely on colleagues and specialists as sources of information. (Author/CH)

  6. Speech and language support: How physicians can identify and treat speech and language delays in the office setting

    PubMed Central

    Moharir, Madhavi; Barnett, Noel; Taras, Jillian; Cole, Martha; Ford-Jones, E Lee; Levin, Leo

    2014-01-01

    Failure to recognize and intervene early in speech and language delays can lead to multifaceted and potentially severe consequences for early child development and later literacy skills. While routine evaluations of speech and language during well-child visits are recommended, there is no standardized (office) approach to facilitate this. Furthermore, extensive wait times for speech and language pathology consultation represent valuable lost time for the child and family. Using speech and language expertise, and paediatric collaboration, key content for an office-based tool was developed. The tool aimed to help physicians achieve three main goals: early and accurate identification of speech and language delays as well as children at risk for literacy challenges; appropriate referral to speech and language services when required; and teaching and, thus, empowering parents to create rich and responsive language environments at home. Using this tool, in combination with the Canadian Paediatric Society’s Read, Speak, Sing and Grow Literacy Initiative, physicians will be better positioned to offer practical strategies to caregivers to enhance children’s speech and language capabilities. The tool represents a strategy to evaluate speech and language delays. It depicts age-specific linguistic/phonetic milestones and suggests interventions. The tool represents a practical interim treatment while the family is waiting for formal speech and language therapy consultation. PMID:24627648

  7. [The pharmacist-physician collaboration for IPW: from physician's perspective].

    PubMed

    Son, Daisuke; Kawamura, Kazumi; Nakashima, Mitsuko; Utsumi, Miho

    2015-01-01

    Interprofessional work (IPW) is increasingly important in various settings including primary care, in which the role of pharmacists is particularly important. Many studies have shown that in cases of hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, and metabolic syndrome, physician-pharmacist collaboration can improve medication adherence and help to identify drug-related problems. Some surveys and qualitative studies revealed barriers and key factors for effective physician-pharmacist collaboration, including trustworthiness and role clarification. In Japan, some cases of good collaborative work between pharmacists and physicians in hospitals and primary care settings have been reported. Still, community pharmacists in particular have difficulties collaborating with primary care doctors because they have insufficient medical information about patients, they feel hesitant about contacting physicians, and they usually communicate by phone or fax rather than face to face. Essential competencies for good interprofessional collaboration have been proposed by the Canadian Interprofessional Health Collaborative (CIHC): interprofessional communication; patient/client/family/community-centered care; role clarification; team functioning; collaborative leadership; and interprofessional conflict resolution. Our interprofessional education (IPE) team regularly offers educational programs to help health professionals learn interprofessional collaboration skills. We expect many pharmacists to learn those skills and actively to facilitate interprofessional collaboration. PMID:25743907

  8. Patient–physician mistrust and violence against physicians in Guangdong Province, China: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Joseph D; Cheng, Yu; Wong, Bonnie; Gong, Ni; Nie, Jing-Bao; Zhu, Wei; McLaughlin, Megan M; Xie, Ruishi; Deng, Yinghui; Huang, Meijin; Wong, William C W; Lan, Ping; Liu, Huanliang; Miao, Wei; Kleinman, Arthur

    2015-01-01

    Objective To better understand the origins, manifestations and current policy responses to patient–physician mistrust in China. Design Qualitative study using in-depth interviews focused on personal experiences of patient–physician mistrust and trust. Setting Guangdong Province, China. Participants One hundred and sixty patients, patient family members, physicians, nurses and hospital administrators at seven hospitals varying in type, geography and stages of achieving goals of health reform. These interviews included purposive selection of individuals who had experienced both trustful and mistrustful patient–physician relationships. Results One of the most prominent forces driving patient–physician mistrust was a patient perception of injustice within the medical sphere, related to profit mongering, knowledge imbalances and physician conflicts of interest. Individual physicians, departments and hospitals were explicitly incentivised to generate revenue without evaluation of caregiving. Physicians did not receive training in negotiating medical disputes or humanistic principles that underpin caregiving. Patient–physician mistrust precipitated medical disputes leading to the following outcomes: non-resolution with patient resentment towards physicians; violent resolution such as physical and verbal attacks against physicians; and non-violent resolution such as hospital-mediated dispute resolution. Policy responses to violence included increased hospital security forces, which inadvertently fuelled mistrust. Instead of encouraging communication that facilitated resolution, medical disputes sometimes ignited a vicious cycle leading to mob violence. However, patient–physician interactions at one hospital that has implemented a primary care model embodying health reform goals showed improved patient–physician trust. Conclusions The blind pursuit of financial profits at a systems level has eroded patient–physician trust in China. Restructuring incentives

  9. PERFORMANCE MEASURES OF PHYSICIANS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PRICE, PHILIP B.; AND OTHERS

    CRITERION MEASURES DEVELOPED FOR ON-THE-JOB PERFORMANCE OF PHYSICIANS WILL BE USED IN A SUBSEQUENT STUDY TO DETERMINE HOW MUCH THE PERFORMANCE OF PHYSICIANS CAN BE PREDICTED BY THEIR INDIVIDUAL ACHIEVEMENTS IN MEDICAL AND PREMEDICAL SCHOOL. APPROXIMATELY 29 MEASURES OF THE UNIVERSITY OF UTAH COLLEGE OF MEDICINE AND OTHER PHYSICIANS IN THE UTAH…

  10. Time management: a review for physicians.

    PubMed Central

    Brunicardi, F. C.; Hobson, F. L.

    1996-01-01

    This article reviews the basic concepts and techniques of time management as they relate to a medical lifestyle. Essential tools are described to help the physician reassess and sharpen skills for handling intensifying demands and constraints of juggling patient care, research, teaching, and family responsibilities. The historical background and principles of time management for three popular "best selling" techniques are critiqued. In addition, a fourth technique, or model, of time management is introduced for physician use. PMID:8855650

  11. Physician Enabling Skills Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Hudon, Catherine; Lambert, Mireille; Almirall, José

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To evaluate the reliability and validity of the newly developed Physician Enabling Skills Questionnaire (PESQ) by assessing its internal consistency, test-retest reliability, concurrent validity with patient-centred care, and predictive validity with patient activation and patient enablement. Design Validation study. Setting Saguenay, Que. Participants One hundred patients with at least 1 chronic disease who presented in a waiting room of a regional health centre family medicine unit. Main outcome measures Family physicians’ enabling skills, measured with the PESQ at 2 points in time (ie, while in the waiting room at the family medicine unit and 2 weeks later through a mail survey); patient-centred care, assessed with the Patient Perception of Patient-Centredness instrument; patient activation, assessed with the Patient Activation Measure; and patient enablement, assessed with the Patient Enablement Instrument. Results The internal consistency of the 6 subscales of the PESQ was adequate (Cronbach α = .69 to .92). The test-retest reliability was very good (r = 0.90; 95% CI 0.84 to 0.93). Concurrent validity with the Patient Perception of Patient-Centredness instrument was good (r = −0.67; 95% CI −0.78 to −0.53; P < .001). The PESQ accounts for 11% of the total variance with the Patient Activation Measure (r2 = 0.11; P = .002) and 19% of the variance with the Patient Enablement Instrument (r2 = 0.19; P < .001). Conclusion The newly developed PESQ presents good psychometric properties, allowing for its use in practice and research. PMID:26889507

  12. Medical futility and physician discretion

    PubMed Central

    Wreen, M

    2004-01-01

    Some patients have no chance of surviving if not treated, but very little chance if treated. A number of medical ethicists and physicians have argued that treatment in such cases is medically futile and a matter of physician discretion. This paper critically examines that position. According to Howard Brody and others, a judgment of medical futility is a purely technical matter, which physicians are uniquely qualified to make. Although Brody later retracted these claims, he held to the view that physicians need not consult the patient or his family to determine their values before deciding not to treat. This is because professional integrity dictates that treatment should not be undertaken. The argument for this claim is that medicine is a profession and a social practice, and thus capable of breaches of professional integrity. Underlying professional integrity are two moral principles, one concerning harm, the other fraud. According to Brody both point to the fact that when the odds of survival are very low treatment is a violation of professional integrity. The details of this skeletal argument are exposed and explained, and the full argument is criticised. On a number of counts, it is found wanting. If anything, professional integrity points to the opposite conclusion. PMID:15173362

  13. Healthcare Service Utilization for Practicing Physicians: A Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Senyong; Lin, Herng-Ching; Lee, Cha-Ze

    2016-01-01

    Background Physicians are considered to be the most informed consumers in the use of medical services since they have more information about diseases or medical technology. However, although plenty of researchers have suggested that different medical seeking behavior exists among physicians, very few empirical studies have been conducted to investigate differences in medical utilization between physicians and the general population. Objective We explored differences in the utilization of healthcare services between physicians and the general population using a population-based dataset. Design A cross-sectional study. Participants Data for this study were sourced from the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000. We included 1426 physicians and 1426 sex- and age-matched comparison subjects. Methods We used Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney tests to explore differences in variables of healthcare resource utilization between physicians and comparison subjects. We further used Kruskal-Wallis tests to examine differences in variables of healthcare resource utilization between physician practice location and comparison subjects. Results We found that physicians had significantly fewer outpatient visits (13.2 vs. 15.7, p<0.001) and significantly lower outpatient costs (US$477 vs. US$680, p<0.001) than comparison subjects. Furthermore, physicians had lower total health service costs than comparison subjects (US$643 vs. US$1066, p<0.001). This indicates that the mean total health service costs in the year 2010 was 1.66-fold greater for comparison subjects than for physicians. We also found that there were significant differences in the mean number of outpatient services (p<0.001), outpatient costs (p = 0.001), inpatients costs (p = 0.018), and total costs (p = 0.001) among office-based physicians, hospital-based physicians, and comparison subjects. Specifically, Scheffe contrast tests showed that office-based physicians had significantly more outpatient visits (19.3 vs.10

  14. Physicians: Requirements for Becoming a Physician

    MedlinePlus

    ... Us Contact Us A | A Text size Email Requirements for Becoming a Physician Note: We are not ... the doctor's knowledge and skills remain current. CME requirements vary by state, by professional organizations, and by ...

  15. Physician leadership. Physician executives share insights.

    PubMed

    Kirschman, D

    1996-09-01

    Senior physician executives were asked to share their insights about how the medical management field has evolved. The Physician Executive Management Center, a Tampa, Florida-based search firm, has been surveying senior physician executives each year for the past decade. This year's report on physician executive compensation and duties in hospitals, managed care organizations, and group practices provides an excellent picture of the growth of the profession, as well as a broad perspective of anticipated changes for the future of medical management. The respondents addressed the following questions: What are the skills necessary for success? How have their jobs changed over the years? Have they made the right choice in pursuing medical management careers? PMID:10161950

  16. Doc Medich: A Physician on Team Physicians.

    PubMed

    Lincoln, E

    1981-06-01

    George F. Medich, MD, is in his ninth season as a professional baseball pitcher. He draws on his experience as a player and orthopedic surgeon to shed some light on the problems inherent in the team physician's position.

  17. Emergency physicians' experience with pediatric death.

    PubMed

    Ahrens, W R; Hart, R G

    1997-11-01

    Based on the hypothesis that managing pediatric death--particularly, communicating with survivors--is extremely difficult for most emergency physicians, 122 general emergency physicians at a written board review course were surveyed to assess their attitudes toward pediatric death. Sixty-six percent reported that communicating with the family of a child who had died was the most difficult experience in emergency medicine. Sixty-six percent considered communication with the family of a child who had died to be much more difficult than communication with the family of an adult who had died. Sixty-four percent reported feelings of guilt or inadequacy after unsuccessful pediatric resuscitation, and 47% reported feeling impaired for the remainder of their shift. Only 8% of physicians were aware of published guidelines regarding managing pediatric emergency department (ED) deaths, and only 14% of physicians had ever had any training in death notification. Ninety-two percent of physicians responded that a course directed toward managing the family of a child who had died in the ED would be helpful in dealing with this difficult situation.

  18. Seizures and spells: physician awareness of Minnesota driving laws.

    PubMed

    Selmo, K K; Asp, D S; Anderson, D C

    1997-05-01

    Personal physicians are the primary source of information about state driving regulations for individuals with episodic disturbances of neurologic function (e.g., epilepsy, syncope, hypoglycemia). However, a May 1994 survey of Twin Cities metro-area neurologists and a sample of family practice physicians statewide revealed that many Minnesota physicians are unfamiliar with the relevant laws, and what knowledge doctors have of these laws is influenced by their specialties. Some physicians thought the regulations were more restrictive than they actually are, some less. Even physicians familiar with the laws didn't know which spells should be reported.

  19. Not for industry only: medical students and office-based academic detailing the PIVOT (Pregnant women Influenza Vaccine Optimization Team) initiative.

    PubMed

    Blitz, Daina A; Mallen, Jonathan R; Kwiatkowski, Thomas G; Rabin, Jill M; Dlugacz, Yosef D; Silverman, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Academic detailing is a method of educational outreach that utilizes individualized encounters with physicians to broach specific medical issues in an evidence-based and quality-driven manner. Medical students utilized the matter of influenza vaccination during pregnancy as a lens through which to explore the methods of academic detailing in a community setting. Structured and customized dialogues between North Shore-LIJ affiliated obstetricians and Hofstra North Shore-LIJ medical students were conducted regarding the disparity between the proportion of providers that recommend the vaccine and the percentage of pregnant women being vaccinated annually. Ultimately the project aimed to increase vaccine-carrying rates throughout office based practices in the community, while establishing a viable method for up-to-date information exchange between practicing physicians and academic medicine. While the extent of affected change is currently being quantified, the project proved successful insofar as academic detailing allowed the students to gain access to physicians, and engage in compelling and educational conversations. Both the physicians and students felt these interactions were valuable and well worth continuing. The goal for the future is to expand these practices to other pressing public health issues while continuing to refine the technique.

  20. Re-utilization outcomes and costs of minor acute illness treated at family physician offices, walk-in clinics, and emergency departments

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, M. Karen; Silver, Rachel Wulf; Hoch, Jeffrey S.; Østbye, Truls; Stewart, Moira; Barnsley, Jan; Hutchison, Brian; Mathews, Maria; Tyrrell, Christine

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine factors associated with re-utilization of health services and to estimate and compare costs of treatment for minor acute illnesses in family physicians’ offices (FPOs), walk-in clinics (WICs), and emergency departments (EDs). DESIGN Prospective cohort study using questionnaires, telephone follow up, medical chart data, and costs according to Ontario Health Insurance Plan (OHIP) schedules. SETTING 16 FPOs, 12 WICs, and 13 EDs in three Ontario cities. PARTICIPANTS Consecutive patients with one of eight predefined minor acute illnesses found in all three settings (upper respiratory infection, pharyngitis, acute bronchitis, acute otitis media, serous otitis media, low back pain, gastroenteritis, and urinary tract infection). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES “Early” (<3 days) versus “later” (3 days to 2 weeks) re-utilization of health services after initial encounter and direct cost to OHIP. RESULTS The overall rate of re-utilization of health services for the same episode of illness was 11.3% for early and 20.6% for later re-utilization. Factors associated with early re-utilization were initial evaluation in ED setting (odds ratio [OR]=6.5, confidence interval [CI]=2.2-19.2) and, regardless of setting, less satisfaction with patient-centred care (OR=1.7 for each one-point decrease on a four-point scale; CI=1.1-2.7). Factors associated with later re-utilization were ED setting (OR=4.9; CI=2.4-9.9) and diagnosis of urinary tract infection (OR=2.4; CI=1.1-5.2). Factors tested and found not signifcantly associated with rate of re-utilization were patients’ age, sex, responses to a variety of questions assessing psychosocial factors (stress, social support, independence), and opinions on health care. Cost of care was similar for FPOs and WICs and higher for EDs for all diagnoses. The initial visit was the largest component of cost in all settings, and this component (as well as total cost) was consistently higher in EDs. CONCLUSION Both re

  1. Better off alone? Why physicians don't merge.

    PubMed

    Bauman, Randy R

    2007-01-01

    The era of the small medical practice is over. How many times have we heard that? It was widely proclaimed back in the 90s, in the wake of the Clinton administration's healthcare reform proposal. But 15 years have passed, and there are stillplenty of physicians working in solo and small group practices. Despite all the predictions that small practices could not survive in an environment of "big healthcare," they persist. A report published recently by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimated that as of 2003-2004 more than 35% of office-based physicians were in solo practice, and roughly 66% practiced in groups of five or fewer. This article examines why, in spite of the challenges of being in solo and small group practices, many physicians still prefer the status quo and resist forming or joining larger groups.

  2. Legalizing physician-assisted suicide: some thoughts and concerns.

    PubMed

    Koenig, H G

    1993-08-01

    Surveys show that most Americans favor the decriminalization of physician-assisted suicide in certain circumstances. Several states are now considering legislation to bring this about and make the United States the first place in the civilized world where physician aid in dying is sanctioned. In the Netherlands, where physician-assisted suicide is practiced but officially remains illegal, 85% of assisted suicides occur in the elderly, and most involve the help of general practitioners. In the United States, family physicians provide health care to many older adults with chronic or terminal illness whose numbers will increase as the elderly population expands. The legalization of physician-assisted suicide would affect the way American physicians practice medicine in unpredictable ways, yet physicians are participating relatively little in deliberations concerning this issue. The problem of suffering in persons with chronic and terminal illness cannot be ignored. Compassionate, effective, and ethical solutions must be found. As a former family physician and now geriatric psychiatrist, I review the pros and cons of physician-assisted suicide (emphasizing arguments against legalization) and encourage family physicians to debate this matter. PMID:8336099

  3. Attitudes of patients and physicians regarding physician dress and demeanor in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Colt, H G; Solot, J A

    1989-02-01

    To compare the opinions of patients and physicians regarding physician dress and demeanor in the emergency department, we conducted a cross-sectional survey of 190 ED patients and 129 medical specialists, family practitioners, surgeons, and emergency physicians in a community hospital. Seventy-three percent of physicians and 43% of patients thought that physical appearance influenced patient opinion of medical care. Forty-nine percent of patients believed emergency physicians should wear white coats, but only 18% disliked scrub suits. Patients were more tolerant of casual dress than were physicians. Both groups disliked excessive jewelry, prominent ruffles or ribbons, long fingernails, blue jeans, and sandals. Opinions and practices of emergency physicians were similar to those of other medical specialists. Most physicians (96%) addressed patients by surname or title, but 43% of patients preferred being called by their first names. The age, gender, income, and education of patients did not influence how they wished to be addressed. Larger studies are needed to assess the influence of age, sex, race, and depth of feeling regarding first-name address and physician attire in the ED.

  4. Patient or physician safety? Physicians' views of informed consent and nurses' roles in an Indonesian setting.

    PubMed

    Susilo, Astrid Pratidina; Nurmala, Ira; van Dalen, Jan; Scherpbier, Albert

    2012-05-01

    Informed consent is a reflection of patients' autonomy in health decision-making. The main responsibility lies with the doctor. In practice, the nurses' contributions matter as well. This paper presents a case study that explored physicians' perceptions of the existing informed consent process, their suggestions for improvement and their views on the nurses' roles in this process. A two-phase approach was conducted. First, six physicians with different expertise were interviewed. Second, after attending presentations about informed consent and physician-patient relationship principles, 32 physicians were asked to complete an open-ended questionnaire. Data were analyzed by two independent coders and emerging themes were compared. The results of the questionnaires and the interviews were triangulated. Of 32 physicians attending the presentations, 24 (75%) completed the questionnaire. The results indicate that physicians perceive patients, physicians and the hospital as main factors influencing the process of informed consent. Physicians' misinterpretation of informed consent principles, (mis)perceptions regarding patients and their family, and deficient hospital policy and support challenge the informed consent process. Physicians value nurses' roles, provided nurses have sufficient clinical knowledge, sound comprehension of informed consent principles and effective communication skills.

  5. Barriers to Primary Care Physicians Prescribing Buprenorphine

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, Eliza; Catlin, Mary; Andrilla, C. Holly A.; Baldwin, Laura-Mae; Rosenblatt, Roger A.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE Despite the efficacy of buprenorphine-naloxone for the treatment of opioid use disorders, few physicians in Washington State use this clinical tool. To address the acute need for this service, a Rural Opioid Addiction Management Project trained 120 Washington physicians in 2010–2011 to use buprenorphine. We conducted this study to determine what proportion of those trained physicians began prescribing this treatment and identify barriers to incorporating this approach into outpatient practice. METHODS We interviewed 92 of 120 physicians (77%), obtaining demographic information, current prescribing status, clinic characteristics, and barriers to prescribing buprenorphine. Residents and 7 physicians who were prescribing buprenorphine at the time of the course were excluded from the study. We analyzed the responses of the 78 remaining respondents. RESULTS Almost all respondents reported positive attitudes toward buprenorphine, but only 22 (28%) reported prescribing buprenorphine. Most (95%, n = 21) new prescribers were family physicians. Physicians who prescribed buprenorphine were more likely to have partners who had received a waiver to prescribe buprenorphine. A lack of institutional support was associated with not prescribing the medication (P = .04). A lack of mental health and psychosocial support was the most frequently cited barrier by both those who prescribe and who do not prescribe buprenorphine. CONCLUSION Interventions before and after training are needed to increase the number of physicians who offer buprenorphine for treatment of addiction. Targeting physicians in clinics that agree in advance to institute services, coupled with technical assistance after they have completed their training, their clinical teams, and their administrations is likely to help more physicians become active providers of this highly effective outpatient treatment. PMID:24615308

  6. Physicians, unions, and antitrust.

    PubMed

    Hirshfeld, E B

    1999-01-01

    The increasing consolidation of our healthcare delivery systems and the concomitant push for perceived efficiencies, speed, and profits has laid the foundation for a renewed interest in unionization by many physicians. This Article analyzes the barriers to such unionization that are posed by the antitrust laws, and provides an analysis of how to proceed with unionization without violating those laws. The Article also analyzes the current status of physician ability to unionize, and surveys the present status of physician unions.

  7. Cancer Incidence in Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yu-Sung; Hsu, Chien-Chin; Weng, Shih-Feng; Lin, Hung-Jung; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Su, Shih-Bin; Huang, Chien-Cheng; Guo, How-Ran

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Cancer has been the leading cause of death in Taiwan since 1982. Physicians have many health-related risk factors which may contribute to cancer, such as rotating night shift, radiation, poor lifestyle, and higher exposure risk to infection and potential carcinogenic drugs. However, the cancer risk in physicians is not clear. In Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database, we identified 14,889 physicians as the study cohort and randomly selected 29,778 nonmedical staff patients as the comparison cohort for this national population-based cohort study. Cox proportional-hazard regression was used to compare the cancer risk between physicians and comparisons. Physician subgroups were also analyzed. Physicians had a lower all-cancer risk than did the comparisons (hazard ratio [HR] 0.86, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.76–0.97). In the sex-based analysis, male physicians had a lower all-cancer risk than did male comparisons (HR 0.82, 95% CI 0.73–0.94); and female physicians did not (HR 1.29, 95% CI 0.88–1.91). In the cancer-type analysis, male physicians had a higher risk of prostate cancer (HR 1.72, 95% CI 1.12–2.65) and female physicians had twice the risk of breast cancer (HR 2.00, 95% CI 1.11–3.62) than did comparisons. Cancer risk was not significantly associated with physician specialties. Physicians in Taiwan had a lower all-cancer risk but higher risks for prostate and breast cancer than did the general population. These new epidemiological findings require additional study to clarify possible mechanisms. PMID:26632715

  8. Physician Assistants in Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Although physician assistants have played a key role in the delivery of medical care since the mid-1960s, their utilization in the dermatology specialty has been a more recent occurrence. Dermatology physician assistants have experienced tremendous growth over the last 10 years, largely due to the imbalance between patient demand for skin care services and a lack of supply in residency-trained dermatologists. Working under the supervision of dermatologists, physician assistants have been able to extend the reach of the physician and improve patient access to quality dermatologic care. PMID:21103320

  9. [The relevance of occupational physician for physicians].

    PubMed

    Hosaka, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    The Japan Medical Association launched a project team to examine health conditions of physicians working at hospitals in 2008. First, cross-sectional study was conducted among total number of 10,000 physicians, who were randomly selected from the Japan Medical Association (JMA). They were asked to fill in a basic questionnaire that was used to collect demographic data and to complete the Japanese version of Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (QIDS-SR-16). As a result, an adjusted response rate was 40.5%. Fifty-three % of the respondents did not consult with the colleagues about their unhealthy conditions, 46% had less than 4 holidays in a month, and 41% slept for less than 6 hours. More importantly, from a psychiatric point of view, 6% thought of committing suicide several times a week, 9% showed lack of interest, and 6% felt lack of energy. The QIDS-SR-16 also indicated 8.7% were in a moderately depressed state and 1.9% suffered from severe depression. Secondly, the project team provided a consulation service through E-mail and telephone to listen and advice to JMA members who had the needs. However, there were only few consultations that took place. Thirdly, the project team held several workshops in 12 different locations targeting occupational physicians working in hospitals. The workshops included case conferences and lectures on mental health. From 2010 to 2011, there were total of 450 participants. Finally, in addition to these attempts, the author has been working as an occupational physician for a major department of a University hospital. The author thinks from these experiences that the location of an external occupational physician would be most effective for prevention and early detection of mental problems among physicians working in hospitals. PMID:22712204

  10. Medicare payment changes and physicians' incomes.

    PubMed

    Weeks, William B; Wallace, Amy E

    2002-01-01

    An effort to control the physician portion of Medicare expenditures and to narrow the income gap between primary care and procedure-based physicians was effected through t he enactment of the Medicare Fee Schedule (MFS). To determine whether academic and private sector physicians' incomes had demonstrated changes consistent with payment changes, we collected income information from surveys of private sector physicians and academic physicians in six specialties: (1) family practice; (2) general internal medicine; (3) psychiatry; (4) general surgery; (5) radiology; and (6) anesthesiology. With the exception of general internal medicine, the anticipated changes in Medicare revenue were not closely associated with income changes in either the academic or private sector group. Academic physicians were underpaid, relative to their private sector counterparts, but modestly less so at the end of the period examined. Our findings suggest that using changes in payment schedules to change incomes in order to influence the attractiveness of different specialties, even with a very large payer, may be ineffective. Should academic incomes remain uncompetitive with private sector incomes, it may be increasingly difficult to persuade physicians to enter academic careers. PMID:12462656

  11. Organizing uninsured safety-net access to specialist physician services.

    PubMed

    Hall, Mark A

    2013-05-01

    Arranging referrals for specialist services is often the greatest difficulty that safety-net access programs face in attempting to provide fairly comprehensive services for the uninsured. When office-based community specialists are asked to care for uninsured patients, they cite the following barriers: difficulty determining which patients merit charity care, having to arrange for services patients need from other providers, and concerns about liability for providing inadequate care. Solutions to these barriers to specialist access can be found in the same institutional arrangements that support primary care and hospital services for the uninsured. These safety-net organization structures can be extended to include specialist physician care by funding community health centers to contract for specialist referrals, using free-standing referral programs to subsidize community specialists who accept uninsured patients at discounted rates, and encouraging hospitals through tax exemption or disproportionate share funding to require specialists on their medical staffs to accept an allocation of uninsured office-based referrals.

  12. Autism Speaks Toolkits: Resources for Busy Physicians.

    PubMed

    Bellando, Jayne; Fussell, Jill J; Lopez, Maya

    2016-02-01

    Given the increased prevalence of autism spectrum disorders (ASD), it is likely that busy primary care providers (PCP) are providing care to individuals with ASD in their practice. Autism Speaks provides a wealth of educational, medical, and treatment/intervention information resources for PCPs and families, including at least 32 toolkits. This article serves to familiarize PCPs and families on the different toolkits that are available on the Autism Speaks website. This article is intended to increase physicians' knowledge on the issues that families with children with ASD frequently encounter, to increase their ability to share evidence-based information to guide treatment and care for affected families in their practice.

  13. Liabilities of a physician confronted with child abuse.

    PubMed

    Vansweevelt, Thierry

    2013-06-01

    Several research questions raises when physicians are confronted with a possible case of child abuse. First, there is a problem of professional secrecy. In most European countries, physicians have the right to speak when confronted with a state of emergency. In other countries, physicians have a duty to speak and alert the police when the life or physical integrity of a person is at stake. A second topic to be discussed involves the possible liability of physicians who do not report child abuse. By not reporting a case of possible child abuse, the physician is respecting the family life of the parents, even though the child might continue to suffer damages. Third and essentially, I analyse the possible liability of physicians who do inform the prosecutor ofa suspected child abuse. Specific criteria are elaborated to establish negligence when physicians report child abuse to the prosecutor. PMID:23984493

  14. The Development of a Physician Vitality Program: A Brief Report.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Barbara Couden; Thomas, Tamara L

    2015-10-01

    We describe the development of an innovative program to support physician vitality. We provide the context and process of program delivery which includes a number of experimental support programs. We discuss a model for intervention and methods used to enhance physician resilience, support work-life balance, and change the culture to one that explicitly addresses the physician's biopsychosocial-spiritual needs. Recommendations are given for marriage and family therapists (MFTs) who wish to develop similar support programs for healthcare providers. Video Abstract.

  15. [The humble physician].

    PubMed

    Barnhoorn, P C

    2016-01-01

    A good physician is a humble physician. Humility can be defined as the middle ground between meekness and vanity, or the insight that what we know and what we are capable of is incomplete. This insight is needed to develop a realistic self-image and to prevent unprofessional behaviour among doctors. PMID:27650023

  16. Physician-Assisted Suicide

    Cancer.gov

    Module fourteen of the EPEC-O Self-Study Original Version focuses on the skills that the physician can use to respond both compassionately and confidently to a request, not on the merits of arguments for or against legalizing physician-assisted suicide (PAS) or euthanasia.

  17. The Growth of a Family

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, June C.; Biringer, Anne

    1991-01-01

    Caring for a family during pregnancy and birth is an ideal opportunity for family physicians to assess family functioning and help the family adjust to the birth of a new child. Stress and support systems can influence the course of pregnancy, including obstetric and perinatal outcomes. A family-centered approach can help patients during this critical stage of family development. PMID:21229107

  18. Gender Issues in Physician Career Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrew, Louise B.; Bickel, Janet

    1998-01-01

    Most women physicians practice primary-care specialities such as internal medicine, pediatrics, family practice, ob-gyn, or psychiatry. The profession still has discriminatory practices, resulting in differences between men's and women's practices, and women are dealing in their own ways with the stresses of the profession. (JOW)

  19. Physicians' and Medical Students' Knowledge of Nutrition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mlodinow, Steven G.; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth

    1989-01-01

    A study was conducted to assess the knowledge of nutrition of family practitioners and general internists and first- and second-year medical students before they had received medical school instruction in clinical nutrition. The physicians scored better on topics most heavily researched and worse on less heavily investigated topics. (Author/MLW)

  20. Can physicians help curb adolescent violence?

    PubMed

    Prothrow-Stith, D

    1992-06-15

    Some of the factors associated with such violence, notably racism and poverty, clearly demand societal solutions. Other factors, however, may respond to public health intervention strategies. Emergency room workers can practice secondary intervention, as they do with victims of child abuse, sexual assault, or attempted suicide. Family physicians can refer adolescents for appropriate help.

  1. How Physicians Integrate Advances into Clinical Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockyer, Jocelyn M.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Family physicians and specialists were asked to identify the sources of information they used in the process of making changes in their clinical practices. An average of 3.08 sources of information were utilized for each change and over 50 percent of the changes were complete in less than one year. (CT)

  2. Childhood bullying: implications for physicians.

    PubMed

    Lyznicki, James M; McCaffree, Mary Anne; Robinowitz, Carolyn B

    2004-11-01

    Childhood bullying has potentially serious implications for bullies and their targets. Bullying involves a pattern of repeated aggression, a deliberate intent to harm or disturb a victim despite the victim's apparent distress, and a real or perceived imbalance of power. Bullying can lead to serious academic, social, emotional, and legal problems. Studies of successful antibullying programs suggest that a comprehensive approach in schools can change student behaviors and attitudes, and increase adults' willingness to intervene. Efforts to prevent bullying must address individual, familial, and community risk factors, as well as promote an understanding of the severity of the problem. Parents, teachers, and health care professionals must become more adept at identifying possible victims and bullies. Physicians have important roles in identifying at-risk patients, screening for psychiatric comorbidities, counseling families about the problem, and advocating for bullying prevention in their communities. PMID:15554490

  3. Physicians' Knowledge of Alcohol, Tobacco and Folic Acid in Pregnancy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lefebvre, L. G.; Ordean, A.; Midmer, D.; Kahan, M.; Tolomiczenko, G.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To assess: (1) physicians' knowledge and clinical confidence regarding problematic substance use in pregnancy compared to folic acid, and (2) physicians' desire for education in this area and their preferred learning modalities tools. Design: Self-administered survey. Setting: "Family Medicine Forum 2004" in Toronto, Canada.…

  4. Autism Spectrum Disorder Early Screening Practices: A Survey of Physicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Self, Trisha L.; Parham, Douglas F.; Rajagopalan, Jagadeesh

    2015-01-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) released a policy statement in 2007 urging physicians to screen for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) at 18 and 24 months. This study sought to identify the screening practices of pediatricians and family physicians (FPs) in following the AAP guidelines for ASD. A survey was mailed to 1,500 pediatricians and…

  5. Improving Physician-Patient Communication through Coaching of Simulated Encounters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ravitz, Paula; Lancee, William J.; Lawson, Andrea; Maunder, Robert; Hunter, Jonathan J.; Leszcz, Molyn; McNaughton, Nancy; Pain, Clare

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Effective communication between physicians and their patients is important in optimizing patient care. This project tested a brief, intensive, interactive medical education intervention using coaching and standardized psychiatric patients to teach physician-patient communication to family medicine trainees. Methods: Twenty-six family…

  6. Determinants of Rural Physicians' Life and Job Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavanchy, Marcel; Connelly, Ian; Grzybowski, Stefan; Michalos, Alex C.; Berkowitz, Jonathan; Thommasen, Harvey V.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To identify and quantify factors that contribute to rural physicians' satisfaction with their jobs and life as a whole. Design: Cross-sectional, mailed survey. Study population: Family physicians practicing in rural communities eligible for British Columbia's Northern and Isolation Allowance. Main measures: Demographics, Domain…

  7. A Family Physician's Approach to Acne

    PubMed Central

    Turgeon, Eugene

    1981-01-01

    Because of the potential for permanent physical and psychological sequelae, acne vulgaris should be regarded as a true disease—not the “normal” physiologic response one might infer from its near universal prevalence in adolescence. Effective therapy reduces pilosebaceous unit obstruction, minimizes secondary inflammation, and lessens the chance of significant scarring. This article reviews current therapeutic modalities, and suggests a sequence for implementation of specific agents. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5 PMID:21289790

  8. Toxic Shock Syndrome: A Family Physician's Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Myhre, D. L.

    1982-01-01

    Although similar cases have been reported as far back as 1927, the term toxic shock syndrome was coined in 1978 to describe an acute fever involving Staph. aureus. The reported mortality rate in Canada is 3.8%, but may be much higher. Association with tampon use was made in 1980, but is still unclear. Treatment remains supportive and is aimed at reducing risk of recurrence, until the role of the exotoxin can be explained. This article reviews reported cases to date, listing diagnostic criteria, signs and symptoms. A high index of suspicion for this new syndrome is recommended. PMID:21286566

  9. Insurance Medicine: Introduction for the Family Physician

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Elliot A.

    1983-01-01

    Insurance companies request reports on patients' health to corroborate and clarify information on insurance application forms. Illegible or vague reports, or one that varies from the patient's understanding of his health, can result in patients being offered substandard policies at increased premiums. Reports, even if brief, must include known risk factors, disease history, and information on stability of medical conditions. PMID:21283404

  10. Physician collective bargaining.

    PubMed

    Schiff, Anthony Hunter

    2009-11-01

    Current antitrust enforcement policy unduly restricts physician collaboration, especially among small physician practices. Among other matters, current enforcement policy has hindered the ability of physicians to implement efficient healthcare delivery innovations, such as the acquisition and implementation of health information technology (HIT). Furthermore, the Federal Trade Commission and Department of Justice have unevenly enforced the antitrust laws, thereby fostering an increasingly severe imbalance in the healthcare market in which dominant health insurers enjoy the benefit of largely unfettered consolidation at the cost of both consumers and providers. This article traces the history of antitrust enforcement in healthcare, describe the current marketplace, and suggest the problems that must be addressed to restore balance to the healthcare market and help to ensure an innovative and efficient healthcare system capable of meeting the demands of the 21st century. Specifically, the writer explains how innovative physician collaborations have been improperly stifled by the policies of the federal antitrust enforcement agencies, and recommend that these policies be relaxed to permit physicians more latitude to bargain collectively with health insurers in conjunction with procompetitive clinical integration efforts. The article also explains how the unbridled consolidation of the health insurance industry has resulted in higher premiums to consumers and lower compensation to physicians, and recommends that further consolidation be prohibited. Finally, the writer discusses how health insurers with market power are improperly undermining the physician-patient relationship, and recommend federal antitrust enforcement agencies take appropriate steps to protect patients and their physicians from this anticompetitive conduct. The article also suggests such steps will require changes in three areas: (1) health insurers must be prohibited from engaging in anticompetitive

  11. Marriage and Medicine: The Physician as Partner, Parent, and Person

    PubMed Central

    Christie-Seely, J.

    1986-01-01

    Physicians are beginning to see the need to heal themselves, and to change the statistics on their morbidity, mortality, and marital distress. Stress for physicians comes from five sources: the nature of the work, their training, their public image, their families, and themselves. Medical school stress as an ‘initiation rite’ is discussed. Three theoretical frameworks are described which will enable family physicians to take a closer look at their own marriages and families as well as those of patients. A systems orientation will help avoid blame of self or partner or parents; object relations theory clarifies the human tendency to repeat history; a theory connecting self-esteem and communication styles will allow physicians to be more open at work and with their families. The importance of developing priorities and meaningful interests outside medicine is also discussed. PMID:21267270

  12. LEGAL DUTIES OF PHYSICIANS

    PubMed Central

    Sandor, Andrew A.

    1951-01-01

    The history of the physician's legal duties has been traced from the first recorded writings of the Babylonian era to the present day. There has been a transition from the days of absolute liability to the modern idea of liability based on culpability. The doctrine of stare decisis developed in early English law forms the very backbone of our own jurisprudence. Broadly, if a physician renders reasonable care and skill, he is absolved from liability. Some of the more important legal duties and proscriptions applying to physicians are discussed in particular in this presentation. PMID:14848696

  13. Involve physicians in marketing.

    PubMed

    Randolph, G T; Baker, K M; Laubach, C A

    1984-01-01

    Many everyday problems in medical group practice can be attacked by a marketing approach. To be successful, however, this kind of approach must have the full support of those involved, especially the physicians, since they are the principal providers of healthcare services. When marketing is presented in a broad context, including elements such as patient mix, population distribution, and research, physicians are more likely to be interested and supportive. The members of Geisinger Medical Center's Department of Cardiovascular Medicine addressed their patient appointment backlog problem with a marketing approach. Their method is chronicled here and serves as a fine example of how physician involvement in marketing can lead to a positive outcome.

  14. Remembering More Jewish Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Weisz, George M.; Grzybowski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    The history of medicine has been an intriguing topic for both authors. The modern relevance of past discoveries led both authors to take a closer look at the lives and contributions of persecuted physicians. The Jewish physicians who died in the Holocaust stand out as a stark example of those who merit being remembered. Many made important contributions to medicine which remain relevant to this day. Hence, this paper reviews the lives and important contributions of two persecuted Jewish physicians: Arthur Kessler (1903–2000) and Bronislawa Fejgin (1883–1943). PMID:27487308

  15. Remembering More Jewish Physicians.

    PubMed

    Weisz, George M; Grzybowski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    The history of medicine has been an intriguing topic for both authors. The modern relevance of past discoveries led both authors to take a closer look at the lives and contributions of persecuted physicians. The Jewish physicians who died in the Holocaust stand out as a stark example of those who merit being remembered. Many made important contributions to medicine which remain relevant to this day. Hence, this paper reviews the lives and important contributions of two persecuted Jewish physicians: Arthur Kessler (1903-2000) and Bronislawa Fejgin (1883-1943). PMID:27487308

  16. Remembering More Jewish Physicians.

    PubMed

    Weisz, George M; Grzybowski, Andrzej

    2016-07-28

    The history of medicine has been an intriguing topic for both authors. The modern relevance of past discoveries led both authors to take a closer look at the lives and contributions of persecuted physicians. The Jewish physicians who died in the Holocaust stand out as a stark example of those who merit being remembered. Many made important contributions to medicine which remain relevant to this day. Hence, this paper reviews the lives and important contributions of two persecuted Jewish physicians: Arthur Kessler (1903-2000) and Bronislawa Fejgin (1883-1943).

  17. Physician medical malpractice

    PubMed Central

    LeMasurier, Jean

    1985-01-01

    Malpractice insurance premiums for physicians have increased at an average rate of over 30 percent per year. This rate is significantly higher than health care cost inflation and the increase in physician costs. Trends indicate that malpractice related costs, both liability insurance and defensive medicine costs, will continue to increase for the near future. Pressures to limit physician costs under Medicare raise a concern about how malpractice costs can be controlled. This paper presents an overview of the problem, reviews options that are available to policymakers, and discusses State and legislative efforts to address the issue. PMID:10311396

  18. California physician's professional image of therapists.

    PubMed

    Silva, D M; Clark, S D; Raymond, G

    1981-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the attitudes of California physicians toward the professional image of physical therapists and to determine the influence of several independent variables on that image. A three-part questionnaire was used to survey the sample of physicians. The first two sections contained attitudinal statements based on criteria representing degrees of professionalism; the third section contained questions on demographic variables. The results indicated that, although the majority of responding physicians viewed physical therapists as possessing all of the criteria denoting professionalism, there was relatively less agreement with the two criteria representing the highest degrees of professionalism-evaluative skills and autonomy of judgment. None of the independent variables influenced physicians' professional image of physical therapists except physician specialty area, in which family practitioners held a significantly higher professional image of physical therapists than did neurosurgeons and orthopedists. The authors suggest further study of other factors that may affect physicians' professional image of physical therapists as well as recommend steps that may be taken to improve the professional image of physical therapists. PMID:7267705

  19. House physicians. Accountabilities and possibilities.

    PubMed

    La Puma, J

    Current house physicians' practice, responsibilities, and earnings are reviewed. House physicians are licensed, ordinarily institutionally based, typically salaried physician employees of 1 or more hospitals or systems. Many are hourly workers, often foreign medical graduates or physicians in training, with little professional status and less visibility. Yet managed care sees a new, creative role for house physicians that makes them masters of quality and models of service. No longer dependent beings shielded by an institution's coverage, house physicians can emerge as efficient, educated champions of inpatient medicine. To produce hospital generalist physicians for the patient's good, physician availability, institutional financial incentives, and patient values must align.

  20. Hitler's Jewish Physicians.

    PubMed

    Weisz, George M

    2014-07-01

    The mystery behind the behavior of infamous personalities leaves many open questions, particularly when related to the practice of medicine. This paper takes a brief look at two Jewish physicians who played memorable roles in the life of Adolf Hitler.

  1. Complementary therapy use by cancer patients. Physicians' perceptions, attitudes, and ideas.

    PubMed Central

    O'Beirne, Maeve; Verhoef, Marja; Paluck, Elan; Herbert, Carol

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore family physicians' perceptions of their cancer patients' use of complementary therapy. DESIGN: Qualitative pilot study. SETTING: British Columbia and Alberta. PARTICIPANTS: Rural and urban family physicians. METHOD: Five focus groups were conducted with a total of 28 participants. Content analysis of focus group transcripts. MAIN FINDINGS: Eight themes were identified: definition of complementary therapies, importance of holistic health, role of evidence, attitudes toward complementary therapies, perceptions of cancer patients' use of complementary therapies, patient-physician communication, perceptions of family physicians' role with respect to complementary therapies, and concerns about complementary therapies. Family physicians believed that many of their patients were using complementary therapies and that patients and physicians needed to communicate about this practice. CONCLUSION: The study increased understanding of physicians'perspectives on communication about complementary therapies and exposed issues that need to be addressed through education and research. PMID:15233371

  2. [The physician-patient relationship in glaucoma].

    PubMed

    Hamelin, N

    2008-07-01

    Healthcare of chronic pathologies, especially in glaucoma, which is asymptomatic for a long period of time, is based on a good, confident relationship between physicians and patients. This relationship has to be created, maintained, and reinforced throughout follow-up. The patient's information source is to a large extent the physician, who must provide all the necessary information concerning the disease, including the definition, prognosis, follow-up, and treatment. How the information is transmitted should be personally adapted to patients, taking into account their own and their family's psychological reactions. It is also important to keep in mind the factors influencing poor compliance when talking to our patients. PMID:18957912

  3. General Grant: his physicians and his cancer.

    PubMed

    Steckler, R M; Shedd, D P

    1976-10-01

    In early June 1884, seven years after leaving office as President of the United States, General Ulysses S. Grant was found to have carcinoma of the right tonsillar pillar. The General's physicians kept a detailed record of the course of their patient's disease. Speaking was quite painful for the patient, and his words and thoughts have been preserved on the scraps of paper on which he communicated to family, physicians, and friends. The diagnosis, symptomatic treatment, and inexorably progressive course of General Grant's mouth cancer taking place in an atmosphere of personal financial ruin are discussed in detail. PMID:797264

  4. Understanding Dying Patients and Their Families

    PubMed Central

    Librach, S.L.; Talbot, Yves

    1991-01-01

    Caring for dying patients and their families presents unique opportunities and challenges for the family physician. The family FIRO model provides a simple way of assessing families and providing appropriate, individualized care. This article outlines the model, discusses the care of dying patients and their families from the FIRO perspective, and provides a guideline for the family physician. A framework is suggested for teaching residents to support families. PMID:21228989

  5. [Physicians working part-time].

    PubMed

    Kiechl-Kohlendorfer, Ursula; Hackl, Johann Michael

    2004-04-01

    In order to ensure the best possible medical care and high-quality research, hospital medical staff must be well educated and highly motivated. Part-time work can help to provide good human resources. Moreover, part-time jobs are often necessary as a means of juggling work and family responsibilities. The aim of this study was to illustrate the legal and educational groundwork for part-time work for physicians in Austria and to outline the advantages and drawbacks of part-time work. In March 2003, all medical doctors working part-time at hospitals in the Austrian state of the Tyrol (n = 60) were surveyed by means of a written questionnaire with the aim of finding out their motives for taking a part-time job as well as the positive and negative aspects involved. The response rate was nearly 70% (n = 40). Most of the part-time hospital physicians were female. The vast majority chose part-time employment in order to better balance family and job. Problems involved in part-time work are legal issues (part-time employment does not always qualify for medical training), the comparatively low salary and the fewer career opportunities. All respondents agreed that patient care, teaching and research are not compatible on a part-time basis. Another negative aspect is the generally strong time pressure experienced in part-time jobs. Despite these negative aspects of working part-time, advantages are considered more important, especially the better balancing of job and family and the possibility of an important early professional reintegration. Better acceptance of part-time jobs would help to make part-time work more attractive. An important improvement is associated with the forthcoming changes in the laws governing part-time work and medical training. PMID:15182044

  6. How infectious disease outbreaks affect community-based primary care physicians

    PubMed Central

    Jaakkimainen, R. Liisa; Bondy, Susan J.; Parkovnick, Meredith; Barnsley, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To compare how the infectious disease outbreaks H1N1 and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) affected community-based GPs and FPs. Design A mailed survey sent after the H1N1 outbreak compared with the results of similar survey completed after the SARS outbreak. Setting Greater Toronto area in Ontario. Participants A total of 183 randomly selected GPs and FPs who provided office-based care. Main outcome measures The perceptions of GPs and FPs on how serious infectious disease outbreaks affected their clinical work and personal lives; their preparedness for a serious infectious disease outbreak; and the types of information they want to receive and the sources they wanted to receive information from during a serious infectious disease outbreak. The responses from this survey were compared with the responses of GPs and FPs in the greater Toronto area who completed a similar survey in 2003 after the SARS outbreak. Results After the H1N1 outbreak, GPs and FPs still had substantial concerns about the effects of serious infectious disease outbreaks on the health of their family members. Physicians made changes to various office practices in order to manage and deal with patients with serious infectious diseases. They expressed concerns about the effects of an infectious disease on the provision of health care services. Also, physicians wanted to quickly receive accurate information from the provincial government and their medical associations. Conclusion Serious community-based infectious diseases are a personal concern for GPs and FPs, and have considerable effects on their clinical practice. Further work examining the timely flow of relevant information through different health care sectors and government agencies still needs to be undertaken. PMID:25316747

  7. Cigaret Smoking and Lifestyle Modification: Patients' Views on Physicians' Roles

    PubMed Central

    Pederson, Linda; Vanderheyden, Debbie

    1986-01-01

    Six hundred and twenty-eight patients completed a Health Habits Questionnaire in family practice waiting rooms. The questions covered lifestyle and health habits, how to improve health, and what the family physician could do to help. Current smokers believed they should quit smoking, and some thought the physician could help by providing advice and encouragement. Physicians should continue to educate their patients about the health risks of smoking, to advise patients repeatedly, if necessary, to quit and to reinforce abstinence on a continuing basis. More research is needed, however, to assess the effectiveness of these recommendations in relation to long-term abstinence from cigarets. PMID:21267206

  8. Values Held by Office-Based and Home-Based Therapists in Northern New England.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, H. D.; McCain, Victoria M.

    1999-01-01

    In first study of values of rural mental-health professionals, the Survey of Personal Values and Survey of Interpersonal Values were completed by 51 office-based psychotherapists and 87 home-based therapists from rural areas in three northern New England states. That home-based therapists would more highly value independence and goal orientation…

  9. The Family Medicine Residency Training Initiative in Miscarriage Management: Impact on Practice in Washington State

    PubMed Central

    Darney, Blair G.; Weaver, Marcia R.; Stevens, Nancy; Kimball, Jeana; Prager, Sarah W.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES Non-complicated spontaneous abortion cases should be counseled about the full range of management approaches, including uterine evacuation using manual vacuum aspiration (MVA). The Residency Training Initiative in Miscarriage Management (RTI-MM) is an intensive, multidimensional intervention designed to facilitate implementation of office-based management of spontaneous abortion using MVA in family medicine residency settings. The purpose of this study was to test the impact of the RTI-MM on self-reported use of MVA for management of spontaneous abortion. METHODS We used a pretest/posttest one group study design and a web-based, anonymous survey to collect data on knowledge, attitudes, perceived barriers, and practice of office-based management of spontaneous abortion. We used multivariable models to estimate incident relative risks and accounted for data clustering at the residency site level. RESULTS Our sample included 441 residents and faculty from 10 family medicine residency sites. Our findings show a positive association between the RTI-MM and self-reported use of MVA for management of spontaneous abortion (adjusted RR=9.11 [CI=4.20-19.78]) and were robust to model specification. Male gender, doing any type of management of spontaneous abortion (eg, expectant, medication), other on-site reproductive health training interventions, and support staff knowledge scores were also significant correlates of physician practice of MVA. CONCLUSIONS Our findings suggest that the RTI-MM was successful in influencing the practice of management of spontaneous abortion using MVA in this population and that support staff knowledge may impact physician practice. Integrating MVA into family medicine settings would potentially improve access to evidence-based, comprehensive care for women. PMID:23378077

  10. The association between office-based provider visits and emergency department utilization among Medicaid beneficiaries.

    PubMed

    Widmer, Andrew J; Basu, Rashmita; Hochhalter, Angela K

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of our study was to describe the relationship between office-based provider visits and emergency department (ED) utilization by adult Medicaid beneficiaries. Data were extracted from the publicly-available Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, a nationally representative sample of the civilian non-institutionalized population in the United States. The sample included 1,497 respondents who had full year Medicaid coverage in 2009. Study variables included insurance coverage type, usual source of care, chronic illnesses, and beneficiary demographics. Multivariate analyses were conducted to describe associations between individual characteristics and (a) likelihood of any ED utilization, and (b) number of ED visits by those who utilized the ED at least once in the study year. The analysis was adjusted for demographic characteristics and chronic health conditions. A greater number of office-based provider visits was associated with a higher likelihood of ED utilization. Among those with at least one ED visit, a greater number of office-based visits was associated with a higher number of ED visits. A respondent's age, history of hypertension or myocardial infarction, and Hispanic/Latino ethnicity were associated with having one or more ED visits; age and Hispanic/Latino ethnicity were associated with total number of ED visits among those with at least one. In this representative sample of adult Medicaid beneficiaries, there was no evidence that office-based provider visits reduced ED utilization. Office visits were associated with higher ED utilization, as were certain chronic conditions, older age, and Hispanic/Latino ethnicity. Findings do not support efforts to reduce ED utilization by increasing office-based visits alone.

  11. National survey of physicians to determine the effect of unconditional incentives on response rates of physician postal surveys

    PubMed Central

    Abdulaziz, Kasim; Brehaut, Jamie; Taljaard, Monica; Émond, Marcel; Sirois, Marie-Josée; Lee, Jacques S; Wilding, Laura; Perry, Jeffrey J

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Physicians are a commonly targeted group in health research surveys, but their response rates are often relatively low. The goal of this paper was to evaluate the effect of unconditional incentives in the form of a coffee card on physician postal survey response rates. Design Following 13 key informant interviews and eight cognitive interviews a survey questionnaire was developed. Participants A random sample of 534 physicians, stratified by physician group (geriatricians, family physicians, emergency physicians) was selected from a national medical directory. Setting Using computer generated random numbers; half of the physicians in each stratum were allocated to receive a coffee card to a popular national coffee chain together with the first survey mailout. Interventions The intervention was a $10 Tim Hortons gift card given to half of the physicians who were randomly allocated to receive the incentive. Results 265 (57.0%) physicians completed the survey. The response rate was significantly higher in the group allocated to receive the incentive (62.7% vs 51.3% in the control group; p=0.01). Conclusions Our results indicate that an unconditional incentive in the form of a coffee gift card can substantially improve physician response rates. Future research can look at the effect of varying amounts of cash on the gift cards on response rates. PMID:25694460

  12. Instrumentation problems for physicians.

    PubMed

    Turner, G O

    1980-01-01

    The physician has, for whatever reasons, diminished his or her level of involvement on the team dedicated to developing, refining, and evaluating medical technology. As a result, the challenge confronting the physician and the technology development team today is to orchestrate a team structure that will ensure the greatest input and commitment from physicians and other professionals during current and future technology development. The charges of cost escalation and dehumanization in our system of health care delivery will also be discussed, as will the lack of, or confusion about, access to data concerning cost of a given instrument, and fuzzy semantics and perspectives on technology and instrumentation. The author suggests answers to, or means to ameliorate, the problems.

  13. Dismembering the ethical physician

    PubMed Central

    Genuis, S J

    2006-01-01

    Physicians may experience ethical distress when they are caught in difficult clinical situations that demand ethical decision making, particularly when their preferred action may contravene the expectations of patients and established authorities. When principled and competent doctors succumb to patient wishes or establishment guidelines and participate in actions they perceive to be ethically inappropriate, or agree to refrain from interventions they believe to be in the best interests of patients, individual professional integrity may be diminished, and ethical reliability is potentially compromised. In a climate of ever‐proliferating ethical quandaries, it is essential for the medical community, health institutions, and governing bodies to pursue a judicious tension between the indispensable regulation of physicians necessary to maintain professional standards and preserve public safety, and the support for “freedom of conscience” that principled physicians require to practise medicine in keeping with their personal ethical orientation. PMID:16597808

  14. Marital stability among physicians.

    PubMed

    Rose, K D; Rosow, I

    1972-03-01

    Analysis of 57,514 initial complaints for divorce, separate maintenance, and annulment filed in California during the first six months of 1968 reveals that physicians are considerably less prone to marital failure than men of comparable age in the general population. Furthermore, when compared to professionals in general, doctors also appear less prone to marital collapse. For physicians, marriages break down in the greatest numbers and at the greatest rate between the ages of 35 and 44. Women doctors are at least 40% more prone to marital instability than men, and black physicians are nearly 70% more prone to divorce than their white colleagues. Of the individual specialists, orthopedists and psychiatrists possibly have the highest rates of marital demise.

  15. Adoption of new drugs by physicians: a survival analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background New drugs often substitute others cheaper and with a risk-benefit balance better established. Our aim was to analyse the diffusion of new drugs during the first months of use, examining the differences between family physicians and specialists. Methods Prescription data were obtained of cefditoren, duloxetine, etoricoxib, ezetimibe, levocetirizine, olmesartan, pregabalin and tiotropium 36 months after their launching. We obtained the monthly number of prescriptions per doctor and the number prescribers of each drug by specialty. After discarding those with less than 10 prescriptions during this period, physicians were defined as adopters if the number of prescriptions was over the 25th percentile for each drug and level (primary or secondary care). The diffusion of each drug was studied by determining the number of adopter family physicians throughout the study period. Among the group of adopters, we compared the month of the first prescription by family physicians to that of other specialists using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results The adoption of the drugs in primary care follows an exponential diffusion curve that reaches a plateau at month 6 to 23. Tiotropium was the most rapidly and widely adopted drug. Cefditoren spread at a slower rate and was the least adopted. The diffusion of etoricoxib was initially slowed down due to administrative requirements for its prescription. The median time of adoption in the case of family physicians was 4-6 months. For each of the drugs, physicians of a specialty other than family physicians adopted it first. Conclusions The number of adopters of a new drug increases quickly in the first months and reaches a plateau. The number of adopter family physicians varies considerably for different drugs. The adoption of new drugs is faster in specialists. The time of adoption should be considered to promote rational prescribing by providing timely information about new drugs and independent medical education. PMID:22401169

  16. The Internet for Louisiana physicians.

    PubMed

    Ellis, M S

    2000-09-01

    Fewer than 50% of Louisiana physicians actively use the Internet, and many of them confine their usage to e-mailing among family and friends. The purpose of this article is to acquaint the reader with many of the benefits of exploiting the incredible potential of this technological invention. I provide addresses and information about sites that I believe warrant usage by our colleagues. Of the vast smorgasbord of data available we highlight educational Web sites for professionals and the public, how to determine credibility of information, clinical research of scientific articles, computer security, federal and state government sites, newspapers, political and socioeconomic functions, medical supply shops, e-mail and other computerized communication, electronic medical records, personal or professional Web sites, and future medical internet uses. It is hoped that this process will encourage nonparticipating colleagues to begin using this modality while also supplying sites that current users may not yet have discovered. PMID:11064554

  17. Nurse-physician collaboration.

    PubMed

    Taylor-Seehafer, M

    1998-09-01

    The literature indicates that collaboration between nurses and physicians has become more sophisticated as these relationships have become collegial in nature and as nurses have become assertive, autonomous, and accountable. On an individual level, physicians and nurses now entering collaborative relationships are successful at minimizing the obstacles of turf and territoriality as well as at managing practice boundaries. However, both need to consciously examine their patterns of communication in order to effect clinical interaction styles that maintain unequal or hierarchical relationships. Studies of interprofessional communication, including style of clinical interaction, conflict resolution, use of humor, and negotiation, contribute support for nurses and physicians in collaborative relationships (Balzer, 1993; Campbell, Mauksch, Neikirk, & Hosokawa, 1990; Feiger & Schmitt, 1979; Lenkman & Gribbins, 1994; Pike, 1991). Research on differences in health outcomes of patients cared for in the traditional and collaborative models of health care delivery, identification of the unique product of collaborative practice models, and further identification of the type of attitudinal climate in which collaborative relationships can be nurtured should be undertaken if the elusive nature of collaboration is to be captured (Siegler, Whitney, & Schmitt, 1994). Providing collaborative, interdisciplinary clinical experiences for students, as well as role modeling of collaborative relationships in nurse-physician faculty practice, can contribute to a greater understanding and acceptance of each professional's role in health care delivery (Campbell, 1993; Forbes & Fitzsimons, 1993; Larson, 1995). Tradition and professionalism and progressive concern about practice boundaries continue to be obstacles to collaborative practice. These need to be addressed by medical and nursing professionals on the institutional level and in the political arena. Collaboration between nurses and

  18. Burnout among physicians.

    PubMed

    Romani, Maya; Ashkar, Khalil

    2014-01-01

    Burnout is a common syndrome seen in healthcare workers, particularly physicians who are exposed to a high level of stress at work; it includes emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and low personal accomplishment. Burnout among physicians has garnered significant attention because of the negative impact it renders on patient care and medical personnel. Physicians who had high burnout levels reportedly committed more medical errors. Stress management programs that range from relaxation to cognitive-behavioral and patient-centered therapy have been found to be of utmost significance when it comes to preventing and treating burnout. However, evidence is insufficient to support that stress management programs can help reducing job-related stress beyond the intervention period, and similarly mindfulness-based stress reduction interventions efficiently reduce psychological distress and negative vibes, and encourage empathy while significantly enhancing physicians' quality of life. On the other hand, a few small studies have suggested that Balint sessions can have a promising positive effect in preventing burnout; moreover exercises can reduce anxiety levels and exhaustion symptoms while improving the mental and physical well-being of healthcare workers. Occupational interventions in the work settings can also improve the emotional and work-induced exhaustion. Combining both individual and organizational interventions can have a good impact in reducing burnout scores among physicians; therefore, multidisciplinary actions that include changes in the work environmental factors along with stress management programs that teach people how to cope better with stressful events showed promising solutions to manage burnout. However, until now there have been no rigorous studies to prove this. More interventional research targeting medical students, residents, and practicing physicians are needed in order to improve psychological well-being, professional careers, as well as the

  19. The feminization of the physician assistant profession.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, Sally

    2005-01-01

    Although the physician assistant profession has historically been male-dominated, women now comprise over sixty percent of physician assistants (PAs) in the U.S. This paper explores the reason for the increase of women into the physician assistant profession in recent decades and whether gender differences exist in how PAs are utilized. Twenty-one qualitative interviews with male and female physician assistants and key informants were conducted to assess the reasons for the influx of women. In addition, data from the American Academy of Physician Assistants Census Survey (n = 16, 569) were analyzed to assess current gender differences in employment characteristics of PAs. In the interviews, female PAs reported entering the profession because it allowed them to practice within the medical model without having the high expense and demanding schedule of medical school. In fact, they claimed that the profession was quite compatible with family life. Significant gender differences were found in work characteristics, primary employer type, and practice specialty. Although women tend to concentrate in practice areas of women and children's health, evidence suggests that they are moving beyond these traditional roles into areas such as internal medicine and surgery. PMID:16260413

  20. The characteristics of physicians disciplined by professional colleges in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Asim; Klemensberg, Jason; Griesman, Joshua; Bell, Chaim M

    2011-01-01

    Background The identification of health care professionals who are incompetent, impaired, uncaring or have criminal intent has received increasing attention in recent years. These individuals are often subject to disciplinary action by professional licensing authorities. To date, no national data exist for Canadian physicians disciplined for professional misconduct. We sought to describe the characteristics of physicians disciplined by Canadian professional licensing authorities. Methods We constructed a database of physicians disciplined by provincial licensing authorities during the years 2000 to 2009. Comparisons were made with the general population of physicians licensed in Canada. Data on demographic characteristics, type of misconduct and penalty imposed were collected for each disciplined physician. Results A total of 606 identifiable physicians were disciplined by their professional college during the years 2000 to 2009. The proportion of licensed physicians who were disciplined in a given year ranged from 0.06% to 0.11%. Fifty-one of the disciplined physicians committed 64 repeat offences, accounting for a total of 113 (19%) offences. Most of the disciplined physicians were independent practitioners (99%), male (92%) and trained in Canada (67%). The most common specialties of physicians subject to disciplinary action were family medicine (62%), psychiatry (14%) and surgery (9%). For disciplined physicians, the average number of years from medical school graduation to disciplinary action was 28.9 (standard deviation [SD] = 11.3). The 3 most frequent violations were sexual misconduct (20%), failure to meet a standard of care (19%) and unprofessional conduct (16%). The 3 most frequently imposed penalties were fines (27%), suspensions (19%) and formal reprimands (18%). Interpretation A small proportion of registered physicians in Canada were disciplined by their medical licensing authorities. Sexual misconduct was the most common disciplined offence. The

  1. Leasing physician office space.

    PubMed

    Murray, Charles

    2009-01-01

    When leasing office space, physicians should determine the effective lease rate (ELR) for each building they are considering before making a selection. The ELR is based on a number of factors, including building quality, building location, basic form of lease agreement, rent escalators and add-on factors in the lease, tenant improvement allowance, method of square footage measurement, quality of building management, and other variables. The ELR enables prospective physician tenants to accurately compare lease rates being quoted by building owners and to make leasing decisions based on objective criteria. PMID:19743715

  2. Leasing physician office space.

    PubMed

    Murray, Charles

    2009-01-01

    When leasing office space, physicians should determine the effective lease rate (ELR) for each building they are considering before making a selection. The ELR is based on a number of factors, including building quality, building location, basic form of lease agreement, rent escalators and add-on factors in the lease, tenant improvement allowance, method of square footage measurement, quality of building management, and other variables. The ELR enables prospective physician tenants to accurately compare lease rates being quoted by building owners and to make leasing decisions based on objective criteria.

  3. Physicians as Patient Teachers

    PubMed Central

    Brunton, Stephen A.

    1984-01-01

    Physicians have a central role in educating patients and the public in the elements of personal health maintenance. To be an effective teacher, one must recognize the learning needs of each patient and use methods of information transfer that will result in comprehension and compliance. To bring about a change in life-style, one must also have an understanding of a patient's health beliefs and the determinants of human behavior. Using this information together with behavior modification strategies, physicians can forge an effective partnership with patients working toward the goal of optimum health. PMID:6395500

  4. Understanding Dying Patients and Their Families: Using the family FIRO model.

    PubMed

    Librach, S L; Talbot, Y

    1991-02-01

    Caring for dying patients and their families presents unique opportunities and challenges for the family physician. The family FIRO model provides a simple way of assessing families and providing appropriate, individualized care. This article outlines the model, discusses the care of dying patients and their families from the FIRO perspective, and provides a guideline for the family physician. A framework is suggested for teaching residents to support families.

  5. Compliance of Perioperative Antibiotic Dosing and Surgical Site Infection Rate in Office-Based Elective Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Davison, Steven P.; Jackson, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Background: A best practice goal to reduce surgical site infection includes administration of antibiotics in the ideal preoperative window. This article evaluates an office surgical suite antibiotic administration rate and compares it with the timing of a local hospital treating a similar patient population. The hypothesis was that similar or better compliance and surgical site infection rates can be achieved in the office-based suite. Methods: A total of 277 office-based surgeries were analyzed for antibiotic administration time before incision and their corresponding surgical site infection rate. Results: Our facility administered timely prophylactic antibiotics in 96% of cases with a surgical site infection rate of 0.36%. This rate was significantly lower than a reported rate of 3.7%. Conclusion: Low infection rates with high antibiotic administration rate suggest that compliance with best possible practice protocols is possible in the outpatient setting. PMID:27579234

  6. Medication counselling: physicians' perspective.

    PubMed

    Bonnerup, Dorthe Krogsgaard; Lisby, Marianne; Eskildsen, Anette Gjetrup; Saedder, Eva Aggerholm; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2013-12-01

    Medication reviews have the potential to lower the incidence of prescribing errors. To benefit from a medication review, the prescriber must adhere to medication counselling. Adherence rates vary from 39 to 100%. The aim of this study was to examine counselling-naive hospital physicians' perspectives and demands to medication counselling as well as study factors that might increase adherence to the counselling. The study was conducted as a questionnaire survey among physicians at Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. The questionnaire was developed based on focus group interviews and literature search, and was pilot-tested among 30 physicians before being sent to 669 physicians. The questionnaire consisted of 35 items divided into four categories: attitudes (19 items), behaviours (3 items), assessment (8 items) and demographics (5 items). The response rate was 60% (400/669). Respondents were employed at psychiatric, medical or surgical departments. Eighty-five per cent of respondents agreed that patients would benefit of an extra medication review, and 72% agreed that there was a need for external medication counselling. The most important factor that could increase adherence was the clinical relevance of the counselling as 78% rated it of major importance. The most favoured method for receiving counselling was via the electronic patient record.

  7. Physician Challenges in 2015.

    PubMed

    Cascardo, Debra

    2015-01-01

    While the influx of new patients resulting from the ACA will increase the number of people receiving healthcare, the regulations associated with it will add to physicians' administrative duties, as will government regulations associated with HIPAA and Meaningful Use. Further stress will come from the demands of both payers and patients, requiring doctors to walk a fine line to protect themselves from litigation. Technology also will play an increasing role. The continuing move toward EHRs and the new ICD-10 coding standard will require investments in software, testing, and training staff, and may also require an investment in new computer hardware. Physicians and staff will have to teach patients how to use EHR portals and how to follow the record-keeping requirements of their insurance providers. The regulatory changes and increased costs of time and money associated with them may drive many physicians out of private practice and into hospital system-based team practices, which will face a greater challenge in recruiting and retaining top talent. Other physicians, in contrast, may continue to seek the independence of private practice; some of them may decide to stop accepting insurance because of their need for autonomy in their practices. Regardless of what decisions doctors choose to make within the changing nature of healthcare, it is important to keep abreast of the changes and develop a plan for dealing with them, in 2015 and beyond. PMID:26182706

  8. Physicians and Insider Trading.

    PubMed

    Kesselheim, Aaron S; Sinha, Michael S; Joffe, Steven

    2015-12-01

    Although insider trading is illegal, recent high-profile cases have involved physicians and scientists who are part of corporate governance or who have access to information about clinical trials of investigational products. Insider trading occurs when a person in possession of information that might affect the share price of a company's stock uses that information to buy or sell securities--or supplies that information to others who buy or sell--when the person is expected to keep such information confidential. The input that physicians and scientists provide to business leaders can serve legitimate social functions, but insider trading threatens to undermine any positive outcomes of these relationships. We review insider-trading rules and consider approaches to securities fraud in the health care field. Given the magnitude of the potential financial rewards, the ease of concealing illegal conduct, and the absence of identifiable victims, the temptation for physicians and scientists to engage in insider trading will always be present. Minimizing the occurrence of insider trading will require robust education, strictly enforced contractual provisions, and selective prohibitions against high-risk conduct, such as participation in expert consulting networks and online physician forums, by those individuals with access to valuable inside information. PMID:26457747

  9. Physicians and Insider Trading.

    PubMed

    Kesselheim, Aaron S; Sinha, Michael S; Joffe, Steven

    2015-12-01

    Although insider trading is illegal, recent high-profile cases have involved physicians and scientists who are part of corporate governance or who have access to information about clinical trials of investigational products. Insider trading occurs when a person in possession of information that might affect the share price of a company's stock uses that information to buy or sell securities--or supplies that information to others who buy or sell--when the person is expected to keep such information confidential. The input that physicians and scientists provide to business leaders can serve legitimate social functions, but insider trading threatens to undermine any positive outcomes of these relationships. We review insider-trading rules and consider approaches to securities fraud in the health care field. Given the magnitude of the potential financial rewards, the ease of concealing illegal conduct, and the absence of identifiable victims, the temptation for physicians and scientists to engage in insider trading will always be present. Minimizing the occurrence of insider trading will require robust education, strictly enforced contractual provisions, and selective prohibitions against high-risk conduct, such as participation in expert consulting networks and online physician forums, by those individuals with access to valuable inside information.

  10. The ideal physician entrepreneur.

    PubMed

    Bottles, K

    2000-01-01

    How does the sometimes elusive and high-stakes world of venture capital really work? How can physician executives with innovative ideas or new technologies approach venture capitalists to help them raise capital to form a start-up company? These important questions are explored in this new column on the physician as entrepreneur. The ideal physician executive is described as: (1) an expert in an area that Wall Street perceives as hot; (2) a public speaker who can enthusiastically communicate scientific and business plans to a variety of audiences; (3) a team leader who is willing to share equity in the company with other employees; (4) a recruiter and a motivator; (5) an implementer who can achieve milestones quickly that allow the company to go public as soon as possible; and (6) a realist who does not resent the terms of the typical deal. The lucrative world of the venture capitalists is foreign territory for physician executives and requires a great idea, charisma, risk-taking, connections, patience, and perseverance to navigate it successfully.

  11. Hitler's Jewish Physicians.

    PubMed

    Weisz, George M

    2014-07-01

    The mystery behind the behavior of infamous personalities leaves many open questions, particularly when related to the practice of medicine. This paper takes a brief look at two Jewish physicians who played memorable roles in the life of Adolf Hitler. PMID:25120923

  12. Physician mentoring and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Bauman, Randy R

    2007-01-01

    Maintaining a cohesive medical group requires more than partners who get along with one another. Physicians must share the same values and be willing to give (and graciously receive) honest feedback on issues such as quality of care, technical competence, patient- and staff relations, behavior, work ethic, and productivity. This article shows group leaders how to start this process by mentoring new physicians and how to then extend the process to include all physicians in the group. Medical practices that have evaluation systems in place enjoy benefits that include better communication, accountability, increased retention rates, and a more unified group. Many physician groups avoid the evaluation process because they are not comfortable "judging" their peers, they don't know how to approach the process, or they don't want to invest the time. This article presents alternative approaches to establishing a mentoring and evaluation process, shows group leaders how to identify which is right for them, and provides do's and don'ts for a smooth implementation ofthe process.

  13. The Physician's Life Cycle: Picketing the Outposts

    PubMed Central

    McSherry, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    The changes which occur in a physician's life relate to stages of personal and professional development. The balance between the demands of practice and the needs of self and family is critical. Early establishment of personal goals and priorities makes it easy to avoid specific hazards which would otherwise compromise enjoyment of a full life and a productive career. A lifelong personal program of medical education nourishes the professional interest which sustains a busy practitioner throughout a demanding career.

  14. What Physicians Should Know About Hospice

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Susan L

    2011-01-01

    Hospice is both a philosophy and a system of care that attends to the physical, psychosocial, and spiritual needs of patients at the end of life as well as family members. The author details hospice care as it exists in the United States, focusing on topics such as levels of care provided and by whom, Medicare coverage, the roles of physicians and other practitioners, and special issues in hospice care. PMID:22190888

  15. Longevity of Thai physicians.

    PubMed

    Sithisarankul, Pornchai; Piyasing, Veera; Boontheaim, Benjaporn; Ratanamongkolgul, Suthee; Wattanasirichaigoon, Somkiat

    2004-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to explore characteristics of the long-lived Thai physicians. We sent 983 posted questionnaires to 840 male and 143 female physicians. We obtained 327 of them back after 2 rounds of mailing, yielding a response rate of 33.3 percents. The response rate of male physicians was 32.4 percents and that of female physicians was 38.5 percents. Their ages were between 68-93 years (75.1 +/- 4.86 years on average). The majority were married, implying that their spouses were also long-lived. Around half of them still did some clinical work, one-fourth did some charity work, one-fourth did various voluntary works, one-fifth did some business, one-fifth did some academic work, and some did more than one type of work. Most long-lived physicians were not obese, with BMI of 16.53-34.16 (average 23.97 +/- 2.80). Only 8 had BMI higher than 30. BMIs were not different between male and female physicians. However, four-fifths of them had diseases that required treatment, and some of them had more than one disease. The five most frequent diseases were hypertension, diabetes, ischemic heart disease, dyslipidemia, and benign prostate hypertrophy, respectively. Most long-lived physicians did exercise (87.8%), and some did more than one method. The most frequent one was walking (52.3%). Most did not drink alcohol or drank occasionally, only 9.0% drank regularly. Most of them slept 3-9 hours per night (average 6.75 +/- 1.06). Most (78.3%) took some medication regularly; of most were medicine for their diseases. Most did not eat macrobiotic food, vegetarian food, or fast food regularly. Most long-lived physicians practiced some religious activities by praying, paying respect to Buddha, giving food to monks, practicing meditation, and listening to monks' teaching. They also used Buddhist practice and guidelines for their daily living and work, and also recommended these to their younger colleagues. Their recreational activities were playing musical instruments

  16. Office-Based Preventive Dental Program and Statewide Trends in Dental Caries

    PubMed Central

    Kranz, Ashley M.; Rozier, R. Gary

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the impact of a North Carolina Medicaid preventive dentistry program in primary care medical offices (Into the Mouths of Babes Program [IMBP]) on decayed, missing, and filled teeth (dmft) of kindergarten students statewide and in schools with a large proportion of students from low-income families. METHODS: An ecologic study using panel data of 920 505 kindergarten students with 11 694 school-year observations examined the effect of the IMBP on dmft scores from 1998 to 2009. Ordinary least squares regression with fixed effects determined the association between IMBP visits per child 0 to 4 years of age per county and mean dmft scores per kindergarten student per school, controlling for school-level poverty and ethnicity, county-level Medicaid enrollment, and supply of dentists and physicians. RESULTS: Mean dmft per kindergarten student per school increased from 1.53 in 1998 to 1.84 in 2004, then decreased to 1.59 in 2009. The mean number of IMBP visits per child 0 to 4 years of age per county increased from 0.01 in 2000 to 0.22 in 2009. A 1-unit increase in IMBP visits per county was associated with a 0.248 (95% confidence interval, −0.40 to −0.10) decrease in dmft per kindergarten student per school. For schools with more students at high risk for dental disease, a 1-unit increase in IMBP visits was associated with a 0.320 (95% confidence interval, −0.55 to −0.09) decrease in dmft. CONCLUSIONS: IMBP reduced dental caries among targeted vulnerable children, which helped reduce oral health disparities among preschool-aged children in North Carolina. PMID:24685954

  17. Familial Hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Bouhairie, Victoria Enchia; Goldberg, Anne Carol

    2015-01-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia is a common, inherited disorder of cholesterol metabolism that leads to early cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. It is underdiagnosed and undertreated. Statins, ezetimibe, bile acid sequestrants, niacin, lomitapide, mipomersen and LDL apheresis are treatments that can lower LDL cholesterol levels. Early treatment can lead to substantial reduction of cardiovascular events and death in patients with FH. It is important to increase awareness of this disorder in physicians and patients in order to reduce the burden of this disorder. PMID:25939291

  18. Small primary care physician practices have low rates of preventable hospital admissions.

    PubMed

    Casalino, Lawrence P; Pesko, Michael F; Ryan, Andrew M; Mendelsohn, Jayme L; Copeland, Kennon R; Ramsay, Patricia Pamela; Sun, Xuming; Rittenhouse, Diane R; Shortell, Stephen M

    2014-09-01

    Nearly two-thirds of US office-based physicians work in practices of fewer than seven physicians. It is often assumed that larger practices provide better care, although there is little evidence for or against this assumption. What is the relationship between practice size--and other practice characteristics, such as ownership or use of medical home processes--and the quality of care? We conducted a national survey of 1,045 primary care-based practices with nineteen or fewer physicians to determine practice characteristics. We used Medicare data to calculate practices' rate of potentially preventable hospital admissions (ambulatory care-sensitive admissions). Compared to practices with 10-19 physicians, practices with 1-2 physicians had 33 percent fewer preventable admissions, and practices with 3-9 physicians had 27 percent fewer. Physician-owned practices had fewer preventable admissions than hospital-owned practices. In an era when health care reform appears to be driving physicians into larger organizations, it is important to measure the comparative performance of practices of all sizes, to learn more about how small practices provide patient care, and to learn more about the types of organizational structures--such as independent practice associations--that may make it possible for small practices to share resources that are useful for improving the quality of care. PMID:25122562

  19. Motivational determinants among physicians in Lahore, Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Human resource crises in developing countries have been identified as a critical aspect of poor quality and low accessibility in health care. Worker motivation is an important facet of this issue. Specifically, motivation among physicians, who are an important bridge between health systems and patients, should be considered. This study aimed to identify the determinants of job motivation among physicians, a neglected perspective, especially in developing countries. Methods A stratified random sample of 360 physicians was selected from public primary, public secondary and public and private tertiary health facilities in the Lahore district, Pakistan. Pretested, semi-structured, self-administered questionnaires were used. For the descriptive part of this study, physicians were asked to report their 5 most important work motivators and demotivators within the context of their current jobs and in general. Responses were coded according to emergent themes and frequencies calculated. Of the 30 factors identified, 10 were classified as intrinsic, 16 as organizational and 4 as socio-cultural. Results Intrinsic and socio-cultural factors like serving people, respect and career growth were important motivators. Conversely, demotivators across setups were mostly organizational, especially in current jobs. Among these, less pay was reported the most frequently. Fewer opportunities for higher qualifications was a demotivator among primary and secondary physicians. Less personal safety and poor working conditions were important in the public sector, particularly among female physicians. Among private tertiary physicians financial incentives other than pay and good working conditions were motivators in current jobs. Socio-cultural and intrinsic factors like less personal and social time and the inability to financially support oneself and family were more important among male physicians. Conclusion Motivational determinants differed across different levels of care

  20. Physician Information Seeking Behaviors: Are Physicians Successful Searchers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swiatek-Kelley, Janice

    2010-01-01

    In the recent past, physicians found answers to questions by consulting colleagues, textbooks, and professional journals. Now, the availability of medical information through electronic resources has changed physician information-seeking behaviors. Evidence-based medicine is now the accepted decision-making paradigm, and a physician's ability to…

  1. The future for physician assistants.

    PubMed

    Cawley, J F; Ott, J E; DeAtley, C A

    1983-06-01

    Physician assistants were intended to be assistants to primary care physicians. Physicians in private practice have only moderately responded to the availability of these professionals. Cutbacks in the numbers of foreign medical graduates entering American schools for graduate medical education, concern for overcrowding in some specialties, and the economic and clinical capabilities of physician assistants have lead to new uses for these persons. Physician assistants are employed in surgery and surgical subspecialties; in practice settings in institutions such as medical, pediatric, and surgical house staff; and in geriatric facilities, occupational medicine clinics, emergency rooms, and prison health systems. The projected surplus of physicians by 1990 may affect the use of physician assistants by private physicians in primary care.

  2. How to fire a physician.

    PubMed

    Rock, W

    1995-09-01

    How does one fire a physician? In a word, carefully! Most of the legal protections for other employees apply just as well to physicians. And physicians have access to an expanded realm of protections because of the nature of their profession and because of its role in the health care delivery system. The ordinary employee cannot raise antitrust; the fired physician may very well raise just that issue. And yet the need to terminate a physician will sometimes, even though rarely, occur. How can the organization be certain that it has treated the physician fairly, has documented any and all offenses in a defensible fashion, and has generally followed accepted practices in all aspects of dealing with the physician? The author provides some guidelines for dealing with the problem or the incompetent physician.

  3. Physician Knowledge of Risks of Surgical and Invasive Diagnostic Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, William R.; Kronlund, Scott F.

    1985-01-01

    Knowledge of the rates of major complications of surgical and invasive diagnostic procedures is essential to effective clinical decision making. A mail survey of 128 family or general physicians and general surgeons in Washington state tested their knowledge of the rates of death and major complications for ten procedures. Overall accuracy of physician knowledge was low, with 27% of responses correct, 26% underestimates, 27% overestimates and 21% admitting no knowledge. No significant differences in accuracy were found between specialty groups. Few associations were found between accuracy and physician board certification, years in practice or performance of the procedure. For every complication, many physicians made underestimation or overestimation errors by several orders of magnitude and a few consistently denied existence of any risk. Physicians could improve their knowledge of the rates of complications associated with procedures they carry out. PMID:4013275

  4. Beyond compassion fatigue: the transactional model of physician compassion.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Antonio T; Consedine, Nathan S

    2014-08-01

    Physician compassion is expected by both patients and the medical profession and is central to effective clinical practice. Yet, despite the centrality of compassion to medical practice, most compassion-related research has focused on compassion fatigue, a specific type of burnout among health providers. Although such research has highlighted the phenomenon among clinicians, the focus on compassion fatigue has neglected the study of compassion itself. In this article, we present the Transactional Model of Physician Compassion. After briefly critiquing the utility of the compassion fatigue concept, we offer a view in which physician compassion stems from the dynamic but interrelated influences of physician, patient and family, clinical situation, and environmental factors. Illuminating the specific aspects of physicians' intrapersonal, interpersonal, clinical, and professional functioning that may interfere with or enhance compassion allows for targeted interventions to promote compassion in both education and practice as well as to reduce the barriers that impede it.

  5. Split-Session Focus Group Interviews in the Naturalistic Setting of Family Medicine Offices

    PubMed Central

    Fetters, Michael D.; Guetterman, Timothy C.; Power, Debra; Nease, Donald E.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE When recruiting health care professionals to focus group interviews, investigators encounter challenges such as busy clinic schedules, recruitment, and a desire to get candid responses from diverse participants. We sought to overcome these challenges using an innovative, office-based, split-session focus group procedure in a project that elicited feedback from family medicine practices regarding a new preventive services model. This procedure entails allocating a portion of time to the entire group and the remaining time to individual subgroups. We discuss the methodologic procedure and the implications of using this approach for data collection. METHODS We conducted split-session focus groups with physicians and staff in 4 primary care practices. The procedure entailed 3 sessions, each lasting 30 minutes: the moderator interviewed physicians and staff together, physicians alone, and staff alone. As part of the focus group interview, we elicited and analyzed participant comments about the split-session format and collected observational field notes. RESULTS The split-session focus group interviews leveraged the naturalistic setting of the office for context-relevant discussion. We tested alternate formats that began in the morning and at lunchtime, to parallel each practice’s workflow. The split-session approach facilitated discussion of topics primarily relevant to staff among staff, topics primarily relevant to physicians among physicians, and topics common to all among all. Qualitative feedback on this approach was uniformly positive. CONCLUSION A split-session focus group interview provides an efficient, effective way to elicit candid qualitative information from all members of a primary care practice in the naturalistic setting where they work. PMID:26755786

  6. The Future Supply of Physicians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ginzberg, Eli

    1996-01-01

    Reviews policy positions regarding the supply of physicians in the United States, from the 1910 Flexner Report to the present, and evaluates current policy alternatives that address the problem of physician oversupply. Maintains that, if future health care outlays increase as predicted, the demand for physicians should continue to grow. (MDM)

  7. Disaster management and physician preparedness.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ajoy; Weibley, Eilene

    2013-01-01

    There are an increasing amount and variety of disasters occurring throughout the United States. Many of these disasters require physicians to provide medical assistance. This article provides a brief introduction to disaster preparedness and its recent history and physicians' obligations, role, education, preparation, and response. It is the intent of this article to increase awareness and provide pathways for physician education and involvement.

  8. Physicians in literature: three portrayals.

    PubMed

    Cameron, I A

    1986-02-01

    Literature can provide an objective glimpse of how the public perceives physicians. Physicians have been recipients of the full range of human response in literature, from contempt to veneration. This article examines the impressions of three authors: Mark Twain, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, and Arthur Hailey. Their descriptions provide insight into the complex relationship physicians have with their colleagues and patients.

  9. Physician nutrition education.

    PubMed

    Kiraly, Laszlo N; McClave, Stephen A; Neel, Dustin; Evans, David C; Martindale, Robert G; Hurt, Ryan T

    2014-06-01

    Nutrition education for physicians in the United States is limited in scope, quality, and duration due to a variety of factors. As new data and quality improvement initiatives highlight the importance of nutrition and a generation of nutrition experts retire, there is a need for new physician educators and leaders in clinical nutrition. Traditional nutrition fellowships and increased didactic lecture time in school and postgraduate training are not feasible strategies to develop the next generation of physician nutrition specialists in the current environment. One strategy is the development of short immersion courses for advanced trainees and junior attendings. The most promising courses include a combination of close mentorship and adult learning techniques such as lectures, clinical experiences, literature review, curricular development, research and writing, multidisciplinary interactions, and extensive group discussion. These courses also allow the opportunity for advanced discourse, development of long-term collaborative relationships, and continued longitudinal career development for alumni after the course ends. Despite these curricular developments, ultimately the field of nutrition will not mature until the American Board of Medical Specialties recognizes nutrition medicine with specialty board certification.

  10. Mad scientists, compassionate healers, and greedy egotists: the portrayal of physicians in the movies.

    PubMed

    Flores, Glenn

    2002-07-01

    Cinematic depictions of physicians potentially can affect public expectations and the patient-physician relationship, but little attention has been devoted to portrayals of physicians in movies. The objective of the study was the analysis of cinematic depictions of physicians to determine common demographic attributes of movie physicians, major themes, and whether portrayals have changed over time. All movies released on videotape with physicians as main characters and readily available to the public were viewed in their entirety. Data were collected on physician characteristics, diagnoses, and medical accuracy, and dialogue concerning physicians was transcribed. The results showed that in the 131 films, movie physicians were significantly more likely to be male (p < 0.00001), White (p < 0.00001), and < 40 years of age (p < 0.009). The proportion of women and minority film physicians has declined steadily in recent decades. Movie physicians are most commonly surgeons (33%), psychiatrists (26%), and family practitioners (18%). Physicians were portrayed negatively in 44% of movies, and since the 1960s positive portrayals declined while negative portrayals increased. Physicians frequently are depicted as greedy, egotistical, uncaring, and unethical, especially in recent films. Medical inaccuracies occurred in 27% of films. Compassion and idealism were common in early physician movies but are increasingly scarce in recent decades. A recurrent theme is the "mad scientist," the physician-researcher that values research more than patients' welfare. Portrayals of physicians as egotistical and materialistic have increased, whereas sexism and racism have waned. Movies from the past two decades have explored critical issues surrounding medical ethics and managed care. We conclude that negative cinematic portrayals of physicians are on the rise, which may adversely affect patient expectations and the patient-physician relationship. Nevertheless, films about physicians can

  11. Mad scientists, compassionate healers, and greedy egotists: the portrayal of physicians in the movies.

    PubMed

    Flores, Glenn

    2002-07-01

    Cinematic depictions of physicians potentially can affect public expectations and the patient-physician relationship, but little attention has been devoted to portrayals of physicians in movies. The objective of the study was the analysis of cinematic depictions of physicians to determine common demographic attributes of movie physicians, major themes, and whether portrayals have changed over time. All movies released on videotape with physicians as main characters and readily available to the public were viewed in their entirety. Data were collected on physician characteristics, diagnoses, and medical accuracy, and dialogue concerning physicians was transcribed. The results showed that in the 131 films, movie physicians were significantly more likely to be male (p < 0.00001), White (p < 0.00001), and < 40 years of age (p < 0.009). The proportion of women and minority film physicians has declined steadily in recent decades. Movie physicians are most commonly surgeons (33%), psychiatrists (26%), and family practitioners (18%). Physicians were portrayed negatively in 44% of movies, and since the 1960s positive portrayals declined while negative portrayals increased. Physicians frequently are depicted as greedy, egotistical, uncaring, and unethical, especially in recent films. Medical inaccuracies occurred in 27% of films. Compassion and idealism were common in early physician movies but are increasingly scarce in recent decades. A recurrent theme is the "mad scientist," the physician-researcher that values research more than patients' welfare. Portrayals of physicians as egotistical and materialistic have increased, whereas sexism and racism have waned. Movies from the past two decades have explored critical issues surrounding medical ethics and managed care. We conclude that negative cinematic portrayals of physicians are on the rise, which may adversely affect patient expectations and the patient-physician relationship. Nevertheless, films about physicians can

  12. Mad scientists, compassionate healers, and greedy egotists: the portrayal of physicians in the movies.

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Glenn

    2002-01-01

    Cinematic depictions of physicians potentially can affect public expectations and the patient-physician relationship, but little attention has been devoted to portrayals of physicians in movies. The objective of the study was the analysis of cinematic depictions of physicians to determine common demographic attributes of movie physicians, major themes, and whether portrayals have changed over time. All movies released on videotape with physicians as main characters and readily available to the public were viewed in their entirety. Data were collected on physician characteristics, diagnoses, and medical accuracy, and dialogue concerning physicians was transcribed. The results showed that in the 131 films, movie physicians were significantly more likely to be male (p < 0.00001), White (p < 0.00001), and < 40 years of age (p < 0.009). The proportion of women and minority film physicians has declined steadily in recent decades. Movie physicians are most commonly surgeons (33%), psychiatrists (26%), and family practitioners (18%). Physicians were portrayed negatively in 44% of movies, and since the 1960s positive portrayals declined while negative portrayals increased. Physicians frequently are depicted as greedy, egotistical, uncaring, and unethical, especially in recent films. Medical inaccuracies occurred in 27% of films. Compassion and idealism were common in early physician movies but are increasingly scarce in recent decades. A recurrent theme is the "mad scientist," the physician-researcher that values research more than patients' welfare. Portrayals of physicians as egotistical and materialistic have increased, whereas sexism and racism have waned. Movies from the past two decades have explored critical issues surrounding medical ethics and managed care. We conclude that negative cinematic portrayals of physicians are on the rise, which may adversely affect patient expectations and the patient-physician relationship. Nevertheless, films about physicians can

  13. Physician-industry relations. Part 1: individual physicians.

    PubMed

    Coyle, Susan L

    2002-03-01

    This is part 1 of a 2-part paper on ethics and physician-industry relationships. Part 1 offers advice to individual physicians; part 2 gives recommendations to medical education providers and medical professional societies. Physicians and industry have a shared interest in advancing medical knowledge. Nonetheless, the primary ethic of the physician is to promote the patient's best interests, while the primary ethic of industry is to promote profitability. Although partnerships between physicians and industry can result in impressive medical advances, they also create opportunities for bias and can result in unfavorable public perceptions. Many physicians and physicians-in-training think they are impervious to commercial influence. However, recent studies show that accepting industry hospitality and gifts, even drug samples, can compromise judgment about medical information and subsequent decisions about patient care. It is up to the physician to judge whether a gift is acceptable. A very general guideline is that it is ethical to accept modest gifts that advance medical practice. It is clearly unethical to accept gifts or services that obligate the physician to reciprocate. Conflicts of interest can arise from other financial ties between physicians and industry, whether to outside companies or self-owned businesses. Such ties include honorariums for speaking or writing about a company's product, payment for participating in clinic-based research, and referrals to medical resources. All of these relationships have the potential to influence a physician's attitudes and practices. This paper explores the ethical quandaries involved and offers guidelines for ethical business relationships. PMID:11874314

  14. Patient-Physician Web Messaging

    PubMed Central

    Liederman, Eric M; Lee, Jerry C; Baquero, Victor H; Seites, Paul G

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND Patients want electronic access to providers. Providers fear being overwhelmed by unreimbursed messages. OBJECTIVE Measure the effects of patient-physician web messaging on primary care practices. DESIGN/SETTING Retrospective analysis of 6 case and 9 control internal medicine (IM) and family practice (FP) physicians' message volume, and a survey of 5,971 patients' web messaging with 267 providers and staff in 16 community primary care clinics in the Sacramento, CA region. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS Case telephone volume was 18.2% lower (P =.002) and fell 6.50 times faster than control. Case total telephone plus web message volume was 13.7% lower (P =.025) and fell 5.84 times faster than control. Surveys were responded to by 40.3% (1,743/4,320) of patients and 61.4% (164/267) of providers and staff. Patients were overwhelmingly satisfied and providers and staff were generally satisfied; both found the system easy to use. Patient satisfaction correlated strongly with provider response time (Γ=0.557), and provider/staff satisfaction with computer skills (Γ=0.626) (Goodman-Kruskal Gamma [Γ] measure of ordinal association). CONCLUSIONS Secure web messaging improves on e-mail with encryption, access controls, message templates, customized message and prescription routing, knowledge content, and reimbursement. Further study is needed to determine whether reducing telephone traffic through the use of web messaging decreases provider interruptions and increases clinical efficiency during the workday. Satisfaction with web messaging may increase patient retention. PMID:15693928

  15. Physician practice management companies: should physicians be scared?

    PubMed

    Scott-Rotter, A E; Brown, J A

    1999-01-01

    Physician practice management companies (PPMCs) manage nonclinical aspects of physician care and control physician groups by buying practice assets. Until recently, PPMCs were a favorite of Wall Street. Suddenly, in early 1998, the collapse of the MedPartners-PhyCor merger led to the rapid fall of most PPMC stock, thereby increasing wariness of physicians to sell to or invest in PPMCs. This article explores not only the broken promises made by and false assumptions about PPMCs, but also suggests criteria that physicians should use and questions would-be PPMC members should ask before joining. Criteria include: demonstrated expertise, a company philosophy that promotes professional autonomy, financial stability, freedom from litigation, and satisfied physicians already in the PPMC. The authors recommend that physicians seek out relatively small, single-specialty PPMCs, which hold the best promise of generating profits and permitting professional control over clinical decisions.

  16. Physicians' perceptions of doctor shopping in West Virginia.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, E Gail; Moss, Alvin H

    2010-01-01

    Prescription drug abuse and diversion continue to be serious problems in West Virginia and nationwide. Doctor shopping (visiting multiple doctors in a short time frame with the intent to deceive them to obtain controlled substances) is illegal and one way that patients gain access to prescription drugs. We surveyed West Virginia physicians in emergency medicine, family medicine, and internal medicine to determine their experience with and attitudes toward doctor shopping, and to assess attitudes toward proposed legislation to protect physicians who report doctor shoppers to law enforcement officials. Of 452 physicians surveyed, 258 responded (57%). Emergency medicine physicians had the highest response rate (61%) and most frequent encounters (once a week or more often) with doctor shoppers compared to family medicine and internal medicine physicians (88% vs 25% vs 14%, P < .001). Eighty-one percent of physicians reported using the West Virginia Board of Pharmacy Controlled Substances Monitoring Program website, but only 22 percent presently report doctor shoppers. If the law protected them, 85 percent of all physicians reported they would be likely to report doctor shoppers. PMID:21932747

  17. Assessment of physician performance in Alberta: the Physician Achievement Review

    PubMed Central

    Hall, W; Violato, C; Lewkonia, R; Lockyer, J; Fidler, H; Toews, J; Jennett, P; Donoff, M; Moores, D

    1999-01-01

    The College of Physicians and Surgeons of Alberta, in collaboration with the Universities of Calgary and Alberta, has developed a program to routinely assess the performance of physicians, intended primarily for quality improvement in medical practice. The Physician Achievement Review (PAR) provides a multidimensional view of performance through structured feedback to physicians. The program will also provide a new mechanism for identifying physicians for whom more detailed assessment of practice performance or medical competence may be needed. Questionnaires were created to assess an array of performance attributes, and then appropriate assessors were designated--the physician himself or herself (self-evaluation), patients, medical peers, consultants and referring physicians, and non-physician coworkers. A pilot study with 308 physician volunteers was used to evaluate the psychometric and statistical properties of the questionnaires and to develop operating policies. The pilot surveys showed good statistical validity and technical reliability of the PAR questionnaires. For only 28 (9.1%) of the physicians were the PAR results more than one standard deviation from the peer group means for 3 or more of the 5 major domains of assessment (self, patients, peers, consultants and coworkers). In post-survey feedback, two-thirds of the physicians indicated that they were considering or had implemented changes to their medical practice on the basis of their PAR data. The estimated operating cost of the PAR program is approximately $200 per physician. In February 1999, on the basis of the operating experience and the results of the pilot survey, the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Alberta implemented this innovative program, in which all Alberta physicians will be required to participate every 5 years. PMID:10420867

  18. Managing margins through physician engagement.

    PubMed

    Sears, Nicholas J

    2012-07-01

    Hospitals should take the following steps as they seek to engage physicians in an enterprisewide effort to effectively manage margins: Consider physicians' daily professional practice requirements and demands for time in balancing patient care and administrative duties. Share detailed transactional supply data with physicians to give them a behind-the-scenes look at the cost of products used for procedures. Institute physician-led management and monitoring of protocol compliance and shifts in utilization to promote clinical support for change. Select a physician champion to provide the framework for managing initiatives with targeted, efficient communication. PMID:22788036

  19. Office-based behavioral therapy for management of incontinence and other pelvic disorders.

    PubMed

    Newman, Diane K; Wein, Alan J

    2013-11-01

    According to evidence-based research and guidelines, behavioral interventions are effective and are recommended as first-line office-based treatment for incontinence and other pelvic disorders. These interventions are aimed at improving symptoms through education on healthy voiding habits and lifestyle modifications. Bladder training techniques are included, which involve progressive voiding schedules together with relaxation and distraction for urgency suppression as well as, pelvic floor muscle strengthening to prevent urine leakage, control urgency, and improve bladder emptying. This article presents the model for providing these treatments in urologic practice and details specifics of each intervention, including education guides for patients.

  20. An office-based emergencies course for third-year dental students.

    PubMed

    Wald, David A; Wang, Alvin; Carroll, Gerry; Trager, Jonathan; Cripe, Jane; Curtis, Michael

    2013-08-01

    Although uncommon, medical emergencies do occur in the dental office setting. This article describes the development and implementation of an office-based emergencies course for third-year dental students. The course reviews the basic management of selected medical emergencies. Background information is provided that further highlights the importance of proper training to manage medical emergencies in the dental office. Details regarding course development, implementation, logistics, and teaching points are highlighted. The article provides a starting point from which dental educators can modify and adapt this course and its objectives to fit their needs or resources. This is a timely topic that should benefit both dental students and dental educators.

  1. [Physicians' households in the 16th century].

    PubMed

    Walter, Tilmann

    2008-01-01

    16th-century's medicine was marked by a wave of professionalization: besides scientific influences--evident by new ambitious texts on botany, anatomy, and chemiatry--functions of medical expertise for political purposes were an important factor. Based on findings made in my DFG-funded project "Arztliche Autorität in der Frühen Neuzeit" (medical authority in early modem times) is discussed how these influences altered the professional conditions for physicians. "Haushalt" (household) can be understood as a social community as well as a monetary budget in this context: physicians earned their money with a lot of different ventures beside medical practice, as commerce, farming, banking, or mining etc. Expenses for houses, gardens, interior etc. were based on needs of everyday life but could also be signs of luxury. Thus the physicians demonstrated the high social status they had acquired, and some of them thereby placed themselves at one social level with the nobility. Even scientific books can be estimated as a special case of such a conspicuous consumption for in most cases publishing made high investments without monetary benefit necessary. Thus scientific reputation was to some degree foreseeable: epoch-making books like above all Andreas Vesalius' "De humani Corporis fabrica libri septem" (Basel 1543) had to be financed out of the assets of the family (in Vesalius' case: a high-standing family in the emperor's services). Other sources show clearly that many doctors were not able to afford publishing comparable elaborated and expensive books. PMID:19830955

  2. Patients' and physicians' attitudes regarding the physician's professional appearance.

    PubMed

    Gjerdingen, D K; Simpson, D E; Titus, S L

    1987-07-01

    Although physician appearance has been a topic of interest to medical historians for more than two centuries, little objective investigation has been made into patients' and physicians' attitudes toward the physician's appearance. This study analyzed responses from 404 patients, residents, and staff physicians regarding their attitudes toward various aspects of the male and female physician's professional appearance. Positive responses from all participants were associated with traditional items of dress such as the dress, shirt and tie, dress shoes, and nylons, and for physician-identifying items such as a white coat and a name tag. Negative responses were associated with casual items such as blue jeans, scrub suits, athletic shoes, clogs, and sport socks. Negative ratings were also associated with overly feminine items such as prominent ruffles and female dangling earrings and such temporarily fashionable items as long hair on men, male earrings, and patterned hose on women. Overall, patients were less discriminating in their attitude toward physician appearance than physicians. Patients rated traditional items less positively and casual items less negatively. This study confirms the importance of the physician's appearance in physician-patient communication.

  3. Negotiation skills for physicians.

    PubMed

    Anastakis, Dimitri J

    2003-01-01

    As stakeholders vie for increasingly limited resources in health care, physicians would be well advised to hone their skills of negotiation. Negotiation is defined as a strategy to resolve a divergence of interests, be they real or perceived, where common interests also exist. Negotiation requires effective communication of goals, needs, and wants. The "basic needs" model of negotiation is best suited to the current health care environment. In this model, negotiator must to be able to identify their needs in the negotiation, establish their best alternative to a negotiated agreement, and identify their strategies and tactics for the negotiation.

  4. Issues in physician contracting.

    PubMed

    Fanburg, John D; Leone, Alyson M

    2005-09-01

    Dermatologists will enter into a number of different contracts during their professional careers. It is important that in each agreement they enter, dermatologists reap the benefits that they aspire for and understand the consequences of each provision. This article addresses just a few of the different issues that arise in physician contracting, such as choosing the appropriate form of business entity; the importance of a writing; term and termination of the contract; compensation models; benefits, vacation and other time off included in the contract; malpractice insurance; and restrictive covenants. Each provision should be carefully analyzed to ensure that it will protect the best interests of the dermatologist in that situation. PMID:16202950

  5. Clinical Competencies Specific to Family-Based Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stinchfield, Tracy Anne

    2004-01-01

    Research has indicated that traditional office-based family therapy services are not always effective with at-risk families and that there is an increasing trend toward home-based delivered services (W. Snyder & E. McCollum, 1999). In this qualitative study, the author explored experienced home-based family therapists' perceptions of the…

  6. The liberal arts physician.

    PubMed

    Burrow, G N

    1999-10-01

    The United States is in the midst of the second revolution in American health care to occur during this century, as Kenneth Ludmerer makes clear in his book Time to Heal: American Medical Education from the Turn of the Century to the Era of Managed Care. The "Flexnerian revolution" eventually led to the closing of a third of the medical schools. Although such closures are not likely this time, familiar arrangements are collapsing, without a clear picture of the shape of things to come. Whatever the outcome of the current revolution, well-trained physicians will be needed to care for the sick. Academic medical centers truly are at risk and increasingly require public support to flourish or even to survive, but medical schools and their teaching hospitals must demonstrate that they deserve this support. These institutions have responded by focusing on the business aspects of medicine, perhaps to the detriment of medical education. Lost in this focus is teaching time, and perhaps even more important, the time for mentoring. Often lacking too is a clear vision of the preparation needed by the student to practice medicine successfully in the future: different specialty mixes, interdisciplinary group practice; vastly increased use of information technologies, and overwhelming amounts of relevant and interrelated information. Yet the answer is the same as it was 75 years ago when Yale introduced the first radical medical curricular reform--the "liberal arts physician," trained in science, the values of medicine, and particularly for uncertainly and with the capacity to adapt.

  7. The Ontario printed educational message (OPEM) trial to narrow the evidence-practice gap with respect to prescribing practices of general and family physicians: a cluster randomized controlled trial, targeting the care of individuals with diabetes and hypertension in Ontario, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Zwarenstein, Merrick; Hux, Janet E; Kelsall, Diane; Paterson, Michael; Grimshaw, Jeremy; Davis, Dave; Laupacis, Andreas; Evans, Michael; Austin, Peter C; Slaughter, Pamela M; Shiller, Susan K; Croxford, Ruth; Tu, Karen

    2007-01-01

    Background There are gaps between what family practitioners do in clinical practice and the evidence-based ideal. The most commonly used strategy to narrow these gaps is the printed educational message (PEM); however, the attributes of successful printed educational messages and their overall effectiveness in changing physician practice are not clear. The current endeavor aims to determine whether such messages change prescribing quality in primary care practice, and whether these effects differ with the format of the message. Methods/design The design is a large, simple, factorial, unblinded cluster-randomized controlled trial. PEMs will be distributed with informed, a quarterly evidence-based synopsis of current clinical information produced by the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, Toronto, Canada, and will be sent to all eligible general and family practitioners in Ontario. There will be three replicates of the trial, with three different educational messages, each aimed at narrowing a specific evidence-practice gap as follows: 1) angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, hypertension treatment, and cholesterol lowering agents for diabetes; 2) retinal screening for diabetes; and 3) diuretics for hypertension. For each of the three replicates there will be three intervention groups. The first group will receive informed with an attached postcard-sized, short, directive "outsert." The second intervention group will receive informed with a two-page explanatory "insert" on the same topic. The third intervention group will receive informed, with both the above-mentioned outsert and insert. The control group will receive informed only, without either an outsert or insert. Routinely collected physician billing, prescription, and hospital data found in Ontario's administrative databases will be used to monitor pre-defined prescribing changes relevant and specific to each replicate, following delivery of the educational messages. Multi-level modeling will be

  8. Physician Assistant profession (PA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... primary care areas, including family practice. Other common practice areas are general surgery, surgery specialties, and emergency medicine. The rest are involved in teaching, research, administration, or other nonclinical roles. PAs may ...

  9. Primary-care physician compensation.

    PubMed

    Olson, Arik

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews existing models of physician compensation and presents information about current compensation patterns for primary-care physicians in the United States. Theories of work motivation are reviewed where they have relevance to the desired outcome of satisfied, productive physicians whose skills and expertise are retained in the workforce. Healthcare reforms that purport to bring accountability for healthcare quality and value-rather than simply volume-bring opportunities to redesign primary-care physician compensation and may allow for new compensation methodologies that increase job satisfaction. Physicians are increasingly shunning the responsibility of private practice and choosing to work as employees of a larger organization, often a hospital. Employers of physicians are seeking compensation models that reward both productivity and value. PMID:22786738

  10. The physician leader as logotherapist.

    PubMed

    Washburn, E R

    1998-01-01

    Today's physicians feel helpless and angry about changing conditions in the medical landscape. This is due, in large part, to our postmodernist world view and the influence of corporations on medical practice. The life and work of existentialist psychiatrist Viktor Frankl is proposed as a role model for physicians to take back control of their profession. Physician leaders are in the best position to bring the teachings and insight of Frankl's logotherapy to rank-and-file physicians in all practice settings, as well as into the board rooms of large medical corporations. This article considers the spiritual and moral troubles of American medicine, Frankl's answer to that affliction, and the implications of logotherapy for physician organizations and leadership. Physician executives are challenged to take up this task.

  11. Blue Shield Plan Physician Participation

    PubMed Central

    Yett, Donald E.; Der, William; Ernst, Richard L.; Hay, Joel W.

    1981-01-01

    Many Blue Shield Plans offer participation agreements to physicians that are structurally similar to the participation provisions of Medicaid programs. This paper examines physicians' participation decisions in two such Blue Shield Plans where the participation agreements were on an all-or-nothing basis. The major results show that increases in the Plans' reasonable fees or fee schedules significantly raise the probability of participation, and that physicians with characteristics associated with “low quality” are significantly more likely to participate than are physicians with characteristics associated with “high quality.” In this sense the results highlight the tradeoff that must be faced in administering governmental health insurance policy. On the one hand, restricting reasonable and scheduled fees is the principal current tool for containing expenditures on physicians' services. Yet these restrictions tend to depress physicians' willingness to participate in government programs, thereby reducing access to high quality care by the populations those programs were designed to serve. PMID:10309468

  12. When physicians intervene in their relatives' health care.

    PubMed

    Scarff, Jonathan R; Lippmann, Steven

    2012-06-01

    Physicians often struggle with ethical issues surrounding intervention in their relatives' health care. Many editorials, letters, and surveys have been written on this topic, but there is no systematic review of its prevalence. An Ovid Medline search was conducted for articles in English, written between January 1950 and December 2010, using the key words family member, relatives, treatment, prescribing, physician, and ethics. The search identified 41 articles (editorials, letters, and surveys). Surveys were reviewed to explore demographics of these treating physicians and reasons for and against intervention. Physicians often intervene directly or indirectly in the health care of relatives. The most common reasons were convenience, cost savings, and the perception of having greater knowledge or concern than colleagues. Lost objectivity, fear of misdiagnosis, and inability to provide complete care were the main considerations against intervention. The characteristics of treating doctors were nonspecific. Most surveys recommend against this practice except for emergencies or minor ailments. This review included only a few surveys with small sample size and only assessed scientific literature written in English after 1950. Survey data may be biased by physicians' self-reporting. In conclusion, most doctors occasionally intervene in their relatives' care. The decision to do so is determined by multiple factors. Physicians should treat only short-term or minor illnesses within their scope of practice. Future research should evaluate doctors' attitudes toward their relatives, medical student feelings about treating family, and intervention frequencies of medical and nonmedical professionals. PMID:22262264

  13. Physician ownership of medical equipment.

    PubMed

    Reschovsky, James; Cassil, Alwyn; Pham, Hoangmai H

    2010-12-01

    This Data Bulletin presents findings from the Center for Studying Health System Change (HSC) 2008 Health Tracking Physician Survey, a nationally rep­resentative mail survey of U.S. physicians providing at least 20 hours per week of direct patient care. The sample of physicians was drawn from the American Medical Association master file and included active, nonfederal, office- and hospital-based physicians. Residents and fellows were excluded, as well as radiologists, anesthesiologists and pathologists. The survey includes responses from more than 4,700 phy­sicians, and the response rate was 62 percent. Since this Data Bulletin examines the extent of physician practice ownership or leasing of medical equipment, the sample was limited to 2,750 physicians practic­ing in community-based, physician-owned practices, who represent 58 percent of all physicians surveyed. Physicians employed by hospitals, who practiced in hospital-based settings or who worked in hospital-owned practices were excluded.

  14. The making of a physician.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, V

    2009-01-01

    Medicine is a science, and healing, an art. The right mix of a scientist and an artist is essential in a good physician. Clinical detachment is the balance between the scientist and the human. Good physicians are born; however, it is possible to cultivate the qualities. Gaining the patient's confidence is an art; a sense of humor can greatly help. Give a child respect and he becomes your friend. Death is inevitable, but a physician can help make it less agonizing. A good physician is a philosopher, aware of the beauty of life, of his limitations and conscious of the power that controls us.

  15. The physician exodus from hospitals.

    PubMed

    Royce, P C

    1997-04-01

    Physicians are spending increasingly less of their work week in the hospital. This is true of surgeons because they are performing more ambulatory surgery, often off the hospital premises, and for primary care physicians because they are delegating hospital care of their patients to others. What are the effects of this physician exodus on hospitals, patients, physicians, and medical education? Some of these consequences are explored, from disruptions in the continuity of care, to increase in practice productivity, to preparing undergraduates for the realities of medical practice.

  16. Fractals for physicians.

    PubMed

    Thamrin, Cindy; Stern, Georgette; Frey, Urs

    2010-06-01

    There is increasing interest in the study of fractals in medicine. In this review, we provide an overview of fractals, of techniques available to describe fractals in physiological data, and we propose some reasons why a physician might benefit from an understanding of fractals and fractal analysis, with an emphasis on paediatric respiratory medicine where possible. Among these reasons are the ubiquity of fractal organisation in nature and in the body, and how changes in this organisation over the lifespan provide insight into development and senescence. Fractal properties have also been shown to be altered in disease and even to predict the risk of worsening of disease. Finally, implications of a fractal organisation include robustness to errors during development, ability to adapt to surroundings, and the restoration of such organisation as targets for intervention and treatment.

  17. Veterans as physician assistants.

    PubMed

    Brock, Douglas; Evans, Timothy; Garcia, Drew; Bester, Vanessa; Gianola, F J

    2015-11-01

    The physician assistant (PA) profession emerged nearly 50 years ago to leverage the healthcare experience of Vietnam-era military trained medics and corpsmen to fill workforce shortages in medical care. In 2009, the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Primary Care Training and Enhancement program was established to improve access to primary care. Training military veterans as PAs was again identified as a strategy to meet provider access shortages. However, fewer than 4% of veterans with military healthcare training are likely to apply to PA school and little is known regarding the factors that predict acceptance to training. In 2012, we surveyed all veteran applicants and a stratified random sample of nonveterans applying to PA training. We compare the similarities and differences between veteran and nonveteran applicants, application barriers, and the factors predicting acceptance. We conclude with a discussion of the link between modern veterans and the PA profession. PMID:26501578

  18. Computerized Physician Order Entry

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, Raman; Yen, Tony

    2014-01-01

    Computerized physician order entry (CPOE) has been promoted as an important component of patient safety, quality improvement, and modernization of medical practice. In practice, however, CPOE affects health care delivery in complex ways, with benefits as well as risks. Every implementation of CPOE is associated with both generally recognized and unique local factors that can facilitate or confound its rollout, and neurohospitalists will often be at the forefront of such rollouts. In this article, we review the literature on CPOE, beginning with definitions and proceeding to comparisons to the standard of care. We then proceed to discuss clinical decision support systems, negative aspects of CPOE, and cultural context of CPOE implementation. Before concluding, we follow the experiences of a Chief Medical Information Officer and neurohospitalist who rolled out a CPOE system at his own health care organization and managed the resulting workflow changes and setbacks. PMID:24381708

  19. Disclosing Medical Mistakes: A Communication Management Plan for Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Petronio, Sandra; Torke, Alexia; Bosslet, Gabriel; Isenberg, Steven; Wocial, Lucia; Helft, Paul R

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: There is a growing consensus that disclosure of medical mistakes is ethically and legally appropriate, but such disclosures are made difficult by medical traditions of concern about medical malpractice suits and by physicians’ own emotional reactions. Because the physician may have compelling reasons both to keep the information private and to disclose it to the patient or family, these situations can be conceptualized as privacy dilemmas. These dilemmas may create barriers to effectively addressing the mistake and its consequences. Although a number of interventions exist to address privacy dilemmas that physicians face, current evidence suggests that physicians tend to be slow to adopt the practice of disclosing medical mistakes. Methods: This discussion proposes a theoretically based, streamlined, two-step plan that physicians can use as an initial guide for conversations with patients about medical mistakes. The mistake disclosure management plan uses the communication privacy management theory. Results: The steps are 1) physician preparation, such as talking about the physician’s emotions and seeking information about the mistake, and 2) use of mistake disclosure strategies that protect the physician-patient relationship. These include the optimal timing, context of disclosure delivery, content of mistake messages, sequencing, and apology. A case study highlighted the disclosure process. Conclusion: This Mistake Disclosure Management Plan may help physicians in the early stages after mistake discovery to prepare for the initial disclosure of a medical mistakes. The next step is testing implementation of the procedures suggested. PMID:23704848

  20. Use of physician services under two prepaid plans.

    PubMed

    Scitovsky, A A; Benham, L; McCall, N

    1979-05-01

    Use of physician services under two prepaid plans offered to Stanford University staff is analyzed and compared. One is a Kaiser plan; under the other (Clinic plan), physician and outpatient ancillary services are provided by a predominantly fee-for-service group practice and hospital services are covered by a Blue Cross policy. The two plans provide much the same benefits but, in addition to the difference in their organization, they differ in their financial provisions. While the Kaiser plan has only a token copayment for office and home visits, the Clinic plan has a 25 per cent coinsurance provision applying to all physician and outpatient ancillary services. Despite these differences, the mean number of physician visits per year is the same for the two groups after account is taken of differences in age composition, socioeconomic status, health status, attitudes toward seeking care, length of plan membership, family size and satisfaction with the plan. However, when adjustment is also made for differences in physician affiliation, the Kaiser rate becomes half a visit higher than the Clinic rate. This is because under both plans, members who have a specific plan physician as regular source of care use more services than those without one, and because only 42 per cent of Kaiser members compared with 87 per cent of Clinic members stated that they had a specific plan physician.

  1. Writing to Heal Thyself: Physician as Person & Person as Physician

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kasman, Deborah L.

    2006-01-01

    An experienced physician-teacher shares her own experiences with loss in medicine and loss in her personal life. Through personal writings during her divorce, she exemplifies the healing effect writing can have during difficult transformations that occur in life. She shares her bias that physicians need to accept and own their emotions and can use…

  2. A Question of Identity: Physician Versus Physician's Assistant

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fink, Paul Jay

    1975-01-01

    The role of the physician's assistant grew out of a need for a change in the health delivery system. However, the pressure for speed in the growth of this new concept did not allow for a gradual evolution, and has resulted in many discrepancies in the physician's assistant role. (PG)

  3. Medical school tuition and young physicians' indebtedness.

    PubMed

    Jolly, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Medical school tuition and medical student debt have increased dramatically during the past two decades, but loans are available on favorable terms, which makes it possible for students without personal or family means to get a medical education. As an investment, medical education is an excellent choice; its net present value is more than a million dollars. Cost is nevertheless a strong deterrent to potential applicants, especially minority applicants. If tuition and indebtedness continue to increase while physician incomes do not, there may come a time when only the wealthy can finance a medical education, and medical schools may have increasing difficulty recruiting qualified students. PMID:15757940

  4. Medical school tuition and young physicians' indebtedness.

    PubMed

    Jolly, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Medical school tuition and medical student debt have increased dramatically during the past two decades, but loans are available on favorable terms, which makes it possible for students without personal or family means to get a medical education. As an investment, medical education is an excellent choice; its net present value is more than a million dollars. Cost is nevertheless a strong deterrent to potential applicants, especially minority applicants. If tuition and indebtedness continue to increase while physician incomes do not, there may come a time when only the wealthy can finance a medical education, and medical schools may have increasing difficulty recruiting qualified students.

  5. Diagnosis and office-based treatment of urinary incontinence in adults. Part two: treatment

    PubMed Central

    Jimbo, Masahito; Heidelbaugh, Joel J.

    2013-01-01

    Urinary incontinence is a common problem in both men and women. In this review article we address treatment of the various forms of incontinence with conservative treatments, medical therapy, devices and surgery. The US Preventive Services Task Force, The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and PubMed were reviewed for articles focusing on urinary incontinence. Conservative therapy with education, fluid and food management, weight loss, timed voiding and pelvic floor physical therapy are all simple office-based treatments for incontinence. Medical therapy for incontinence currently is only available for urgency incontinence in the form of anticholinergic medication. Condom catheters, penile clamps, urethral inserts and pessaries can be helpful in specific situations. Surgical therapies vary depending on the type of incontinence, but are typically offered if conservative measures fail. PMID:23904858

  6. Diagnosis and office-based treatment of urinary incontinence in adults. Part one: diagnosis and testing

    PubMed Central

    Heidelbaugh, Joel J.; Jimbo, Masahito

    2013-01-01

    Urinary incontinence is a common problem in both men and women. This review article addresses its prevalence, risk factors, cost, the various types of incontinence, as well as how to diagnose them. The US Preventive Services Task Force, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and PubMed were reviewed for articles focusing on urinary incontinence. Incontinence is a common problem with a high societal cost. It is frequently underreported by patients so it is appropriate for primary-care providers to screen all women and older men during visits. A thorough history and physical examination combined with easy office-based tests can often yield a clear diagnosis and rule out other transient illnesses contributing to the incontinence. Specialist referral is occasionally needed in specific situations before embarking on a treatment plan. PMID:23904857

  7. Should Physicians Have Facial Piercings?

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Alison W; Wright, Seth W; Wrenn, Keith D; Bernard, Aline

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The objective of this study was to assess attitudes of patrons and medical school faculty about physicians with nontraditional facial piercings. We also examined whether a piercing affected the perceived competency and trustworthiness of physicians. DESIGN Survey. SETTING Teaching hospital in the southeastern United States. PARTICIPANTS Emergency department patrons and medical school faculty physicians. INTERVENTIONS First, patrons were shown photographs of models with a nontraditional piercing and asked about the appropriateness for a physician or medical student. In the second phase, patrons blinded to the purpose of the study were shown identical photographs of physician models with or without piercings and asked about competency and trustworthiness. The third phase was an assessment of attitudes of faculty regarding piercings. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS Nose and lip piercings were felt to be appropriate for a physician by 24% and 22% of patrons, respectively. Perceived competency and trustworthiness of models with these types of piercings were also negatively affected. An earring in a male was felt to be appropriate by 35% of patrons, but an earring on male models did not negatively affect perceived competency or trustworthiness. Nose and eyebrow piercings were felt to be appropriate by only 7% and 5% of faculty physicians and working with a physician or student with a nose or eyebrow piercing would bother 58% and 59% of faculty, respectively. An ear piercing in a male was felt to be appropriate by 20% of faculty, and 25% stated it would bother them to work with a male physician or student with an ear piercing. CONCLUSIONS Many patrons and physicians feel that some types of nontraditional piercings are inappropriate attire for physicians, and some piercings negatively affect perceived competency and trustworthiness. Health care providers should understand that attire may affect a patient's opinion about their abilities and possibly erode confidence

  8. Patient Access to U.S. Physicians Who Conduct Internet or E-mail Consults

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Michelle L.; Shenassa, Edmond D.; Houston, Thomas K.

    2007-01-01

    Background E-mail communication has the potential to improve communication between patients and doctors. Objective The objective of the study is to describe the access of patients to physicians who conduct e-mail consults. Methods We analyzed data from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS), a nationally representative cross-sectional survey of office-based physician visits, in 2001, 2002, and 2003. The main outcome measure was the percentage of visits to a provider who reported doing internet or e-mail consults. Results There was fewer than 1 in 10 outpatient visits in 2001 (9.2%) to physicians who reported doing internet or e-mail consults, and this did not increase in 2002 (5.8%) or 2003 (5.5%). Access to these physicians was greater among patients who were male, nonminority, lived in the Western United States, seen for pre-/postoperative care, seen by a primary care provider, and not seen by a nurse during their visit. Access to physicians who conducted internet or e-mail consults was independent of other patient (e.g., chronic conditions), provider (e.g., office setting), and visit (e.g., medications prescribed) characteristics. Conclusions Access to physicians who do internet or e-mail consults is generally low and did not increase between 2001 and 2003, despite growth in internet access and in other internet-related activities. PMID:17356972

  9. Vietnamese diabetic patients and their physicians

    PubMed Central

    Mull, Dorothy S; Nguyen, Nghia; Mull, J Dennis

    2001-01-01

    Objectives To describe the cultural context of type 2 diabetes mellitus among Vietnamese immigrants in the United States, including people's ideas about cause and proper treatment; and to suggest ways in which better control of the disease can be achieved in this population. Design The method was ethnographic. A native speaker used a structured interview guide to talk with 38 Vietnamese patients, and family members of 2 other patients, being treated for type 2 diabetes. In addition, 8 Vietnamese health providers—5 physicians, 2 nurses, and an herbalist—were interviewed. Setting A low-income area of southern California populated by a large number of Vietnamese. Participants Forty patients being treated for type 2 diabetes and 8 health practitioners. Results Three quarters of the patients had not achieved good control of their diabetes. Ideas about the cause and proper treatment of the disease were culturally shaped. Many patients used eastern (herbal) medicine and described a strong aversion to insulin injections. Patients stopped taking their oral medications when using eastern medicine, and a quarter lowered their dose whenever they felt “out of balance.” Almost two thirds had used traditional home remedies for diabetes. Two had received nonstandard medical care from neighborhood physicians trained in Viet Nam; 1 of these patients died during the study. Conclusion The Vietnamese community and physicians serving that community need culturally appropriate education about type 2 diabetes and modern therapy for the disease. PMID:11694472

  10. Discourses of influence and autonomy in physicians' accounts of treatment decision making for depression.

    PubMed

    McMullen, Linda M

    2012-02-01

    Models of patient-physician decision making are typically framed on a continuum of discourses and practices ranging from patient autonomy to physician paternalism, with the middle ground being occupied by terms such as shared decision making. Critiques of these models center on the gulf between these idealized models and actual practice and on how context influences decision-making practices. In this article I focus on how 11 Canadian family physicians talked about patient-physician decision making in interviews about their diagnostic and treatment practices for depression. I adopt a discursive approach to analyzing extracts from these interviews, and show how these physicians constructed themselves as engaging in acts of professional judgment and persuasion, and patients as having the final say in decision making about treatment for depression. I argue that whether the intertwining of discourses of physician influence and patient autonomy is understood as a balance of power between physicians and patients is an open question.

  11. Physician Requirements-1990. For Cardiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tracy, Octavious; Birchette-Pierce, Cheryl

    Professional requirements for physicians specializing in cardiology were estimated to assist policymakers in developing guidelines for graduate medical education. The determination of physician requirements was based on an adjusted needs rather than a demand or utilization model. For each illness, manpower requirements were modified by the…

  12. Abortion and compelled physician speech.

    PubMed

    Orentlicher, David

    2015-01-01

    Informed consent mandates for abortion providers may infringe the First Amendment's freedom of speech. On the other hand, they may reinforce the physician's duty to obtain informed consent. Courts can promote both doctrines by ensuring that compelled physician speech pertains to medical facts about abortion rather than abortion ideology and that compelled speech is truthful and not misleading. PMID:25846035

  13. Abortion and compelled physician speech.

    PubMed

    Orentlicher, David

    2015-01-01

    Informed consent mandates for abortion providers may infringe the First Amendment's freedom of speech. On the other hand, they may reinforce the physician's duty to obtain informed consent. Courts can promote both doctrines by ensuring that compelled physician speech pertains to medical facts about abortion rather than abortion ideology and that compelled speech is truthful and not misleading.

  14. Gender and the professional career of primary care physicians in Andalusia (Spain)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Although the proportion of women in medicine is growing, female physicians continue to be disadvantaged in professional activities. The purpose of the study was to determine and compare the professional activities of female and male primary care physicians in Andalusia and to assess the effect of the health center on the performance of these activities. Methods Descriptive, cross-sectional, and multicenter study. Setting: Spain. Participants: Population: urban health centers and their physicians. Sample: 88 health centers and 500 physicians. Independent variable: gender. Measurements: Control variables: age, postgraduate family medicine specialty (FMS), patient quota, patients/day, hours/day housework from Monday to Friday, idem weekend, people at home with special care, and family situation. Dependent variables: 24 professional activities in management, teaching, research, and the scientific community. Self-administered questionnaire. Descriptive, bivariate, and multilevel logistic regression analyses. Results Response: 73.6%. Female physicians: 50.8%. Age: female physicians, 49.1 ± 4.3 yrs; male physicians, 51.3 ± 4.9 yrs (p < 0.001). Female physicians with FMS: 44.2%, male physicians with FMS: 33.3% (p < 0.001). Female physicians dedicated more hours to housework and more frequently lived alone versus male physicians. There were no differences in healthcare variables. Thirteen of the studied activities were less frequently performed by female physicians, indicating their lesser visibility in the production and diffusion of scientific knowledge. Performance of the majority of professional activities was independent of the health center in which the physician worked. Conclusions There are gender inequities in the development of professional activities in urban health centers in Andalusia, even after controlling for family responsibilities, work load, and the effect of the health center, which was important in only a few of the activities under study

  15. Physician Labor Market in Croatia

    PubMed Central

    Bagat, Mario; Sekelj Kauzlarić, Katarina

    2006-01-01

    Aim To analyze the physician labor market in Croatia with respect to the internship and employment opportunities, Croatian needs for physicians and specialists, and trends in physician labor market in the European Union (EU) in the context of EU enlargement. Methods Data were collected from the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare, the Croatian Employment Service, and the Croatian Institute for Public Health. We compared the number of physicians waiting for internship before and 14 months after the implementation of the State Program for Intern Employment Stimulation. Also, the number of employed specialists in internal medicine, general surgery, gynecology and obstetrics, and pediatrics was compared with estimated number of specialists that will have been needed by the end of 2007. Average age of hospital physicians in the four specialties was determined and the number of Croatian physicians compared with the number of physicians in EU countries. Results The number of unemployed physicians waiting for internship decreased from 335 in 2003 to 82 in 2004, while a total number of unemployed physicians decreased from 436 to 379 (χ2 = 338, P<0.001). In October 2004, 79.3% of unemployed physicians waited for internship <6 months; of them, 89.2% waited for internship <3 months. In February 2005, 365 unemployed physicians were registered at the Croatian Employment Service and that number has been decreasing in the last couple of years. The number of employed specialists was lower than the estimated number of specialists needed in the analyzed specialists, as defined by the prescribed standards. A shortage of 328 internists, 319 surgeons, 209 gynecologists, and 69 pediatricians in Croatian hospitals is expected in 2007. Conclusion The lack of employment incentive seems to be the main reason for the large number of unemployed physicians waiting for internship before the implementation of the Employment Stimulation Program. According to the number of physicians per 100

  16. The chaotic physician work world.

    PubMed

    Paterick, Timothy E

    2014-01-01

    Physicians are immersed in a work environment where daily challenges seem to represent a condition or place of increasing disorder and confusion. The degree of "entropy" in the physician workplace is increasing exponentially. Healthcare systems are in a state of chaos and are dynamic--meaning the behavior at one time influences its behavior in the future. The initial changes have future exponential fluctuations that have created a state of healthcare crisis. These systems are nonlinear; the metaphor to describe the unruly nature of the physician work world is that in which the flap of a butterfly wing in Brazil can set off a tornado in Texas. The tornado affecting physician work life must be understood to be rectified. Physicians must slow down and pay attention. PMID:25807614

  17. [The changing role of physicians].

    PubMed

    Siegrist, J

    2012-09-01

    Despite a very successful process of professionalisation during the past 150 years, today's physicians face several challenges urging them to adapt their traditional professional role and the patient-physician relationship inherent in this role. Among these challenges, a growing economic influence on physicians' practices, new demands from particular groups of patients (consumerism, role of the Internet etc.), and increasing inter-professional competition deserve special attention. New evidence of an association between a stressful work environment and physician's increased health risks provides additional support in favour of this notion. This contribution suggests potential directions of change of the physician's role by pointing to (a) a growing 'feminisation' of medicine, (b) an even stronger emphasis on patient needs and (c) extended teamwork and inter-professional cooperation.

  18. Physician Religion and End-of-Life Pediatric Care: A Qualitative Examination of Physicians' Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Bateman, Lori Brand; Clair, Jeffrey Michael

    2015-01-01

    Physician religion/spirituality has the potential to influence the communication between physicians and parents of children at the end of life. In order to explore this relationship, the authors conducted two rounds of narrative interviews to examine pediatric physicians' perspectives (N=17) of how their religious/spiritual beliefs affect end-of-life communication and care. Grounded theory informed the design and analysis of the study. As a proxy for religiosity/spirituality, physicians were classified into the following groups based on the extent to which religious/spiritual language was infused into their responses: Religiously Rich Responders (RRR), Moderately Religious Responders (MRR), and Low Religious Responders (LRR). Twelve of the 17 participants (71%) were classified into the RRR or MRR groups. The majority of participants suggested that religion/spirituality played a role in their practice of medicine and communication with parents in a myriad of ways and to varying degrees. Participants used their religious/spiritual beliefs to support families' spirituality, uphold hope, participate in prayer, and alleviate their own emotional distress emerging from their patients' deaths.

  19. Children's psychosocial problems presenting in a family medicine practice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yelena P; Messner, Brynne M; Roberts, Michael C

    2010-09-01

    Primary care physicians have an important role in identifying, treating, and referring children with psychosocial problems. However, there is a limited literature describing whether and how family physicians address psychosocial problems and why parents may not discuss children's problems with physicians. The current study examined how family physicians address psychosocial problems and reasons that parents do not discuss children's psychosocial problems with physicians. Results indicated that there are a variety of reasons involving parents, their perceptions of physicians, and the number of psychosocial problems reported, that may lead to fewer discussions of psychosocial problems. PMID:20508977

  20. Getting into the System: The Physician's Staff and Waiting Room

    PubMed Central

    1976-01-01

    This article represents a panel discussion with the staff of the Family Practice Unit at the Plains Health Centre, Regina, Sask. It outlines those things found helpful in presenting a positive image to the patient by a physician and his staff - telephone contacts, waiting rooms, patient flow, and common complaints. PMID:21308056

  1. Social Workers Training Primary Care Physicians: Essential Psychosocial Principles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zayas, Luis H.; Dyche, Larry A.

    1992-01-01

    Notes that growth of primary care medicine is opening new roles for social worker in medical education. Describes family-oriented, community-based medical residency program in which social work faculty plays prominent role in education of young physicians. Discusses relevance of core social work principles to medicine and how they are introduced…

  2. Physician Attitudes Regarding School-Located Vaccination Clinics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fiala, Steven C.; Cieslak, Paul R.; DeBess, Emilio E.; Young, Collette M.; Winthrop, Kevin L.; Stevenson, Ellen B.

    2013-01-01

    Background: School-located vaccination clinics offer an opportunity to target children for vaccination programs during communicable disease outbreaks. However, children in the United States are primarily vaccinated in the pediatrician's or family physician's office, and the concept of school-located vaccinations may be unfamiliar to some…

  3. Physician Educational Needs in Osteoporosis: An Approach to Needs Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockyer, Jocelyn; Hanley, David; Fidler, Herta; Toews, John; Lysholm-Andrews, Elaine

    1998-01-01

    A literature review, focus groups (n=200), and questionnaire responses from 324 family physicians identified their learning needs related to osteoporosis. The three methods identified different learning issues, suggesting the importance of triangulation to ensure currency and relevance in continuing-education needs-assessment. (SK)

  4. Physicians' Attitudes toward Children with AIDS: Issues of Group Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagy, M. Christine; Jessee, Peggy O.; Gresham, Cathy

    1998-01-01

    Examined experiences with and opinions on dealing with pediatric AIDS patients among Pediatric and Family Medicine senior residents. Found that residents were willing to certify children to attend group care activities, but differences were observed by physician specialty and child age. Most felt that program administrators should be made aware,…

  5. Physician Care Patterns and Adherence to Postpartum Glucose Testing after Gestational Diabetes Mellitus in Oregon

    PubMed Central

    Hunsberger, Monica L.; Donatelle, Rebecca J.; Lindsay, Karen; Rosenberg, Kenneth D.

    2012-01-01

    Objective This study examines obstetrician/gynecologists and family medicine physicians' reported care patterns, attitudes and beliefs and predictors of adherence to postpartum testing in women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus. Research Design and Methods In November–December 2005, a mailed survey went to a random, cross-sectional sample of 683 Oregon licensed physicians in obstetrician/gynecologists and family medicine from a population of 2171. Results Routine postpartum glucose tolerance testing by both family physicians (19.3%) and obstetrician/gynecologists physicians (35.3%) was reportedly low among the 285 respondents (42% response rate). Factors associated with high adherence to postpartum testing included physician stated priority (OR 4.39, 95% CI: 1.69–7.94) and physician beliefs about norms or typical testing practices (OR 3.66, 95% CI: 1.65–11.69). Specialty, sex of physician, years of practice, location, type of practice, other attitudes and beliefs were not associated with postpartum glucose tolerance testing. Conclusions Postpartum glucose tolerance testing following a gestational diabetes mellitus pregnancy was not routinely practiced by responders to this survey. Our findings indicate that physician knowledge, attitudes and beliefs may in part explain suboptimal postpartum testing. Although guidelines for postpartum care are established, some physicians do not prioritize these guidelines in practice and do not believe postpartum testing is the norm among their peers. PMID:23071709

  6. Physicians beware: revisiting the physician practice acquisition frenzy.

    PubMed

    Eichmiller, Judith Riley

    2014-01-01

    This commentary compares the current physician practice acquisition frenzy to that of the mid-1990s and reflects on lessons learned. The bottom line: Physicians must understand that there were no "white knights" in the 1990s, and there really aren't any today. This article delineates five main factors that both physicians and hospital executives should thoroughly explore and agree on before an alignment or acquisition. Agreement on these issues is the glue that holds the deal together after the merger. These factors eliminate both buyer and seller remorse and delve into the true cultural alignment that must take place as the healthcare industry addresses the challenges of the future.

  7. Physicians' strikes and the competing bases of physicians' moral obligations.

    PubMed

    MacDougall, D Robert

    2013-09-01

    Many authors have addressed the morality of physicians' strikes on the assumption that medical practice is morally different from other kinds of occupations. This article analyzes three prominent theoretical accounts that attempt to ground such special moral obligations for physicians--practice-based accounts, utilitarian accounts, and social contract accounts--and assesses their applicability to the problem of the morality of strikes. After critiquing these views, it offers a fourth view grounding special moral obligations in voluntary commitments, and explains why this is a preferable basis for understanding physicians' moral obligations in general and especially as pertaining to strikes.

  8. Effects of a Distance Learning Program on Physicians' Opioid- and Benzodiazepine-Prescribing Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Midmer, Deana; Kahan, Meldon; Marlow, Bernard

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: Opioid misuse is common among patients with chronic nonmalignant pain. There is a pressing need for physicians to increase their confidence and competence in managing these patients. Methods: A randomized controlled trial of family physicians (N = 88) attending 1 of 4 continuing medical education events helped to determine the…

  9. Developing physician referrals for the new physician: techniques to market your physician's practice.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Chad; Baum, Neil

    2011-01-01

    New physicians will need to be proactive to market and promote their practices. Generating referrals from colleagues is one of the best ways to attract new patients to a start-up practice. This article will provide techniques that will help new physicians enhance their relationships with their colleagues in the community.

  10. Developing physician referrals for the new physician: techniques to market your physician's practice.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Chad; Baum, Neil

    2011-01-01

    New physicians will need to be proactive to market and promote their practices. Generating referrals from colleagues is one of the best ways to attract new patients to a start-up practice. This article will provide techniques that will help new physicians enhance their relationships with their colleagues in the community. PMID:21815560

  11. Family Medicine Specialty in Singapore

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Santosh Lional

    2013-01-01

    Family Medicine in Singapore has its roots in a generalist ethos and found its origin as a counter culture movement to the increasing sub-specialisation of medicine which resulted in a complex healthcare system where that patients are often cared for by multiple specialists potentially resulting in fragmentation of care. The aim of the discipline of Family Medicine was to train and develop more generalist physicians so as to promote holistic care. Family physicians are the largest pool of generalists who are trained to provide general medical care to patients in the context of the person, the family and the community that they live in. PMID:24479066

  12. Promoting childhood water safety: the physician's role.

    PubMed

    Schnake, Elena M; Peterson, Nan M; Corden, Timothy E

    2005-02-01

    Injuries and deaths secondary to drowning are a significant issue for children. The risks associated with drowning change with a child's age and developmental abilities. Nationally, children under the age of 4 years and male adolescents represent the pediatric groups with the highest rates of drowning. In Wisconsin, 1998-2002, preteen children were involved in drowning or near-drowning events more often than teens, with boys being involved more than 2 times as often as girls for all childhood ages assessed. The drowning gender disparity is even greater among adults. Physicians are in a position to promote water safety for their patients and the community by educating families on age-appropriate drowning-prevention methods, supporting community safety campaigns, and advocating for "best practice" drowning-prevention legislation. Although injury prevention anticipatory guidance is important for all family members, directing the message to males is particularly important. Physicians can help children enjoy the benefits of water recreation while decreasing the risk for water-associated injury. PMID:15856742

  13. The family and family medicine: should this marriage be saved?

    PubMed

    Merkel, W T

    1983-11-01

    Although there have been many noteworthy attempts to integrate a family focus into family medicine, there is little evidence that this integration has occurred in either residency education or community practice. When the specialty was founded, a family emphasis may have been politically useful as a way to differentiate the new family physician from the old general practitioner. Now, however, it is unclear what specific family-related material should be taught or who should teach it since few family practice faculty are trained in understanding families. If a practicing family physician actually wants to see a family, practical problems concerning time, space, and money arise. Furthermore, the medicolegal system is structured to protect the confidential relationship between one patient and one physician. Other obstacles to the integration include the difficult epistemological shift required to apply systems theory, the current chaos in the family field, and family medicine's need to gain professional stature by being proficient in traditional medicine. It may be time for the family and family medicine to reconsider their well-intended but ill-advised relationship. PMID:6631349

  14. Effect of Physician Tutorials on Prescribing Patterns of Graduate Physicians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Lawrence E.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Physicians in an experimental group were surveyed to assess their knowledge of the effectiveness, cost, and side effects of antibiotics, and a tutorial was developed to modify some prescribing patterns. Prescribing patterns were statistically different. (Author/MLW)

  15. Can physicians lead other physicians into the future?

    PubMed

    Bujak, J S

    1998-01-01

    This article reflects upon some of the dynamics that prevent physicians from successfully engaging change. Physicians are enculturated to the competitive and hierarchical, and to value personal autonomy. These traits promote distrust and inhibit the formation of collaborative relationships. At this time of growing complexity, when most other industries are developing styles of work based on teamwork, worker empowerment, cross training, and information sharing, physicians cling to the metaphor of the ship's captain, a lone decision-marker and authoritarian possessor of grand knowledge. And yet, in order to lead, physicians need to learn to work differently and nurture a more collaborative approach. The author's blueprint for change includes: Stop trying to manage consensus; commit to measured accountability; think systemically; don't make the mistake of thinking that people will follow because you are right; and, most importantly, create relationships based on shared purpose and principles.

  16. Assessing physician attitudes and perceptions of Alzheimer's disease across Europe.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Lage, P; Frolich, L; Knox, S; Berthet, K

    2010-08-01

    Given the important role that physicians play in clinical care, disease advocacy, national health policy making and clinical research, the IMPACT survey sought to assess the attitudes and perceptions of physicians in 3 general categories: diagnosis and treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD); caregivers and families of patients with AD; and the role of government in dealing with this disease and its consequences. Survey respondents comprised a total of 250 generalists and 250 specialists (neurologists, geriatricians, neuro-psychiatrists, psychiatrists and psychogeriatricians) from France, Germany, Italy, Spain and the United Kingdom. Physicians were aged 25 to 69 years, in practice for between 5 and 30 years and currently spending more than 50% of their time in direct patient care. Results showed that a sizable majority of physicians throughout Europe, specialists and generalists alike, agree that: 1) AD is underdiagnosed and undertreated; 2) patients and families are not prepared to recognise the early symptoms of the disease; 3) early treatment can help to slow the progression of the disease; and 4) more effective treatments are needed. Attitudes were statistically significantly different between some groups of physicians regarding disclosure of the diagnosis of AD, the benefits of lifestyle modification, and the value of AD-specific medication in patients whose symptoms are worsening. Differences in attitudes and perceptions of AD between specialists and generalists were limited; differences between countries were more common and of greater magnitude, particularly with respect to barriers to the use of prescription medications.

  17. Physician reported perception in the treatment of high blood pressure does not correspond to practice

    PubMed Central

    Wexler, Randy; Elton, Terry; Taylor, Christopher A; Pleister, Adam; Feldman, David

    2009-01-01

    Background High blood pressure is a significant health problem world-wide. Physician factors play a significant role in the suboptimal control of hypertension in the United States. We sought to better understand primary care physician's opinions regarding use of hypertension guidelines, patient and physician related barriers to treatment and physician treatment decision making in the management of hypertension as part of a first step in developing research tools and interventions designed to address these issues. Methods An IRB approved survey pertaining to physician opinion regarding the treatment of hypertension. Items consisted of questions regarding: 1) knowledge of hypertension treatment guidelines; 2) barriers to hypertension control (physician vs. patient); and 3) self-estimation of physician treatment of hypertension. Descriptive Statistics were used to describe results. Results All physicians were board certified in family or general internal medicine (n = 28). Practices were located in urban (n = 12), suburban (n = 14) and inner city locations (n = 1). All physicians felt they did a good job of treating hypertension. Most physicians felt the biggest barrier to hypertension control was patient non-compliance. Half of physicians would fail to intensify treatment for hypertension when blood pressure was above recommended levels for all disease states studied (essential hypertension, heart disease, diabetes, and renal disease). Conclusion Physician ability to assess personal performance in the treatment of hypertension and physician opinion that patient noncompliance is the greatest barrier to optimal hypertension control is contradictory to reported practice behavior. Optimal blood pressure control requires increased physician understanding on the evaluation and management of blood pressure. These data provide crucial formative data to enhance the content validity of physician education efforts currently underway to improve the treatment of blood pressure in

  18. Physician-hospital joint venture addresses mutual needs.

    PubMed

    Gleason, S C; Sullivan, P C

    1986-12-01

    Establishing a system of family practice clinics with physicians from its medical staff enabled Mercy Hospital Medical Center, Des Moines, IA, not only to meet consumers' changing needs and wants but also to develop a long-term strategy for survival. The joint venture, which has grown to 9 clinics and 30 physicians since its inception in 1983, does not restrict the hospital from entering into similar relationships with other physician groups. Neither does it restrict physicians from entering new arrangements or using other hospitals. Each clinic operates quasi-autonomously in serving its own patients, and issues such as hiring, firing, hours of operation, and local public relations are handled in a decentralized manner. Other matters--insurance coverage, marketing programs, accounting and data processing systems--are standardized throughout the organization. Challenges involved in undertaking such a project include overcoming resistance from employees, building public awareness of the project, and creating an open, trusting relationship between physicians and administrators. It is particularly important to foster the support of physicians "outside" the partnership and to include those who remain in private practice in marketing efforts.

  19. Assessing postpartum family functioning.

    PubMed

    Midmer, D; Talbot, Y

    1988-09-01

    The birth of a child requires adaptation and reorganization within the family system in order to accommodate the new family member and to allow the family to continue in its psychosocial development. Knowledge of the normative and transitional changes required at this stage of family life will enhance family practitioners' understanding of some of the common concerns and complaints related to them by various family members during the postpartum period. The Family FIRO model represents a helpful conceptual framework to increase the family physician's understanding of the issues of inclusion, control, and intimacy that are highlighted during the transition to parenthood. The authors briefly present this model and discuss its application to postpartum adjustment and its implications for health-care professionals.

  20. Assessing Postpartum Family Functioning

    PubMed Central

    Midmer, Deana; Talbot, Yves

    1988-01-01

    The birth of a child requires adaptation and reorganization within the family system in order to accommodate the new family member and to allow the family to continue in its psychosocial development. Knowledge of the normative and transitional changes required at this stage of family life will enhance family practitioners' understanding of some of the common concerns and complaints related to them by various family members during the postpartum period. The Family FIRO model represents a helpful conceptual framework to increase the family physician's understanding of the issues of inclusion, control, and intimacy that are highlighted during the transition to parenthood. The authors briefly present this model and discuss its application to postpartum adjustment and its implications for health-care professionals. PMID:21253238

  1. Physicians' experiences with HPV vaccine delivery: evidence from developing country with multiethnic populations.

    PubMed

    Wong, Li Ping

    2009-03-01

    Physicians' experiences in providing human papillomavirus (HPV) immunization were assessed by mailed questionnaire. Response rate of 41.4% was achieved. Malay Muslim physicians were more likely to agree that cultural sensitivity is an issue when recommending HPV vaccines. Pediatricians and family physicians were more likely to agree that acceptance is better if vaccines were recommended to prevent cervical cancer than to prevent a sexually transmitted disease. Near 70% rated success of HPV vaccines recommendation in their practice as very poor with the majority patients preferred to postpone immunization. Physicians reported cultural disparities in vaccine uptake and perceived high vaccination cost limits its use. PMID:19100803

  2. Role of the Physician Anesthesiologist

    MedlinePlus

    ... an anesthesia plan, taking into consideration the patient’s medical history and physical condition. During surgery : Physician anesthesiologists use advanced technology to monitor the body’s functions and determine how ...

  3. Working with Generation X physicians.

    PubMed

    Shields, Mark C; Shields, Margaux T

    2003-01-01

    Learn ways to integrate Generation X physicians into your hospital or practice. Discover how their career goals differ from the earlier generation's and find out how health care organizations can help meet those goals.

  4. Today's Physicians Seek Career Direction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan-Haker, Veronica R.

    1998-01-01

    Changes in the role of the physician in today's society have made their career choices risky. Career specialists have an opportunity to assist those who do not normally seek career advice outside their own profession. (JOW)

  5. ERISA litigation and physician autonomy.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, P D; Pomfret, S D

    2000-02-16

    The Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA), enacted in 1974 to regulate pension and health benefit plans, is a complex statute that dominates the managed care environment. Physicians must understand ERISA's role in the relationship between themselves and managed care organizations (MCOs), including how it can influence clinical decision making and physician autonomy. This article describes ERISA's central provisions and how ERISA influences health care delivery in MCOs. We analyze ERISA litigation trends in 4 areas: professional liability, utilization management, state legislative initiatives, and compensation arrangements. This analysis demonstrates how courts have interpreted ERISA to limit physician autonomy and subordinate clinical decision making to MCOs' cost containment decisions. Physicians should support efforts to amend ERISA, thus allowing greater state regulatory oversight of MCOs and permitting courts to hold MCOs accountable for their role in medical decision making.

  6. Physician discontent: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Mechanic, David

    2003-08-20

    Most physicians continue to report overall career satisfaction, but increased public and patient expectations and administrative and regulatory controls contribute to perceptions of increased time pressures and erosion of autonomy. Increasingly, knowledgeable patients armed with information from the media, as well as guidelines developed by health plans, government, specialty societies, professional organizations, and advocacy groups, confront physicians with a bewildering array of new expectations and demands. Although physicians are spending more time with patients than in earlier periods they feel themselves on a treadmill. Strategies to ease pressures include increased use and enhanced scope of nonphysician clinicians, adoption of information technology and disease management programs to reduce errors and to increase efficiency and quality, and thoughtful practice design. Use of such strategies, combined with leadership and a clear sense of direction, can empower physicians, provide them with expanded knowledge and expert systems, and relieve some practice burdens and frustrations.

  7. Geriatric depression assessment by rural primary care physicians

    PubMed Central

    Glasser, M; Vogels, L; Gravdal, J

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Depression is the fourth leading cause of the global disease burden, and approximately one in four elderly people may suffer from depression or depressive symptoms. Depression in later life is generally regarded as highly treatable, but under-treatment is still common in this population, especially among those in rural areas where access to healthcare is often an issue. In this study rural primary care physicians’ practices, attitudes, barriers and perceived needs in the diagnosis and treatment of geriatric depression were described, and trends in care delivery examined. Methods A survey was sent to 162 rural Illinois family physicians and general internists. The survey focused on current practices, attitudes and perceptions regarding geriatric depression, barriers to and needs for improvement in depression care and physician and practice characteristics. Results Seventy-six physicians (47%) responded. The rural physicians indicated that over one-third of their patients aged 60 years and older were depressed. All reported routine screening for depression, with 24% using the Beck Depression Inventory. Overall, physicians expressed positive attitudes about their involvement in treating older depressed patients. However, 45% indicated a ‘gap’ between ideal and available care in their rural practices. Physicians with higher proportions of elderly patients in their panels were more likely to feel that more training in residency in geriatric care would be helpful in improving care, and that better availability of psychologists and counselors would be important for improvement of care for older, depressed patients. Conclusions This study responds to recent calls to better understand how primary care physicians diagnose and treat depression in older adults. Generally, primary care physicians appear comfortable and prepared in depression diagnosis and management, but factors such as availability of appropriate care remain a challenge. PMID:19929129

  8. [Dangerous liaisons--physicians and pharmaceutical sales representatives].

    PubMed

    Granja, Mónica

    2005-01-01

    Interactions between physicians and detailers (even when legitimate ones) raise scientific and ethical questions. In Portugal little thinking and discussion has been done on the subject and the blames for bribery have monopolized the media. This work intended to review what has been said in medical literature about these interactions. How do physicians see themselves when interacting with pharmaceutical companies and their representatives? Do these companies in fact change their prescriptive behaviour, and, if so, how do they change it? How can physicians interact with detailers and still keep their best practice? A Medline research, from 1966 till 2002, was performed using the key-words as follows. A database similar to Medline but concerning medical journals published in Portugal, Index das Revistas Médicas Portuguesas, was also researched from 1992 to 2002. Pharmaceutical companies are profit bound and they allot promoting activities, and detailing in particular, huge amounts of money. Most physicians hold firmly to the belief that they are able to resist and not be influenced by drug companies promotion activities. Nevertheless, all previous works on literature tell us the opposite. Market research also indicates that detailers effectively promote drug sales. Various works also suggest that the information detailers provide to physicians may be largely incorrect, even comparing it to the written information provided by the pharmaceutical companies they work for. The frequency at which portuguese physicians (especially family physicians) contact with pharmaceutical sales representatives is higher than the frequency reported in countries where the available studies come from (namely, Canada and the United States of America). This may put portuguese physicians at a higher risk, making it imperative that work and wide debate are initiated among the class. PMID:16202335

  9. [Dangerous liaisons--physicians and pharmaceutical sales representatives].

    PubMed

    Granja, Mónica

    2005-01-01

    Interactions between physicians and detailers (even when legitimate ones) raise scientific and ethical questions. In Portugal little thinking and discussion has been done on the subject and the blames for bribery have monopolized the media. This work intended to review what has been said in medical literature about these interactions. How do physicians see themselves when interacting with pharmaceutical companies and their representatives? Do these companies in fact change their prescriptive behaviour, and, if so, how do they change it? How can physicians interact with detailers and still keep their best practice? A Medline research, from 1966 till 2002, was performed using the key-words as follows. A database similar to Medline but concerning medical journals published in Portugal, Index das Revistas Médicas Portuguesas, was also researched from 1992 to 2002. Pharmaceutical companies are profit bound and they allot promoting activities, and detailing in particular, huge amounts of money. Most physicians hold firmly to the belief that they are able to resist and not be influenced by drug companies promotion activities. Nevertheless, all previous works on literature tell us the opposite. Market research also indicates that detailers effectively promote drug sales. Various works also suggest that the information detailers provide to physicians may be largely incorrect, even comparing it to the written information provided by the pharmaceutical companies they work for. The frequency at which portuguese physicians (especially family physicians) contact with pharmaceutical sales representatives is higher than the frequency reported in countries where the available studies come from (namely, Canada and the United States of America). This may put portuguese physicians at a higher risk, making it imperative that work and wide debate are initiated among the class.

  10. Resource allocation and physician liability

    PubMed Central

    Capen, K

    1997-01-01

    Lawyer Karen Capen says funding cutbacks that have affected the services physicians can provide may cause legal problems for Canada's doctors. If cutbacks affect the care that is being provided, they should be discussed with the patient and noted on the chart. She says physicians have "good reason to be concerned" about increasing pressures that create an imbalance between health care resources and the demand and need for services. For some doctors, these have resulted in court cases. PMID:9033422

  11. Physician motivation, satisfaction and survival.

    PubMed

    Zimberg, S E; Clement, D G

    1997-01-01

    Physicians are working harder today and enjoying it less. What has happened to create such dissatisfaction among those in one of the most autonomous professions? What can be done to address the anger, fear and unhappiness? This article is an analysis of the factors influencing human motivation. Maslow's hierarchy of needs--physiological, safety/security, social/affiliation, esteem and self-actualization--is used to suggest ways physicians can satisfy their needs in turbulent financial and professional times.

  12. Marketing a physician referral service.

    PubMed

    Wiggins, C

    1988-01-01

    A recent survey of 670 CEOs revealed that 51 percent had already established physician referral services and 65.2 percent were involved in various activities geared towards strengthening physician relations, one of which was increasing staff personnel to perform these functions (Hospitals March 20, 1987). It is apparent that PRPs have gained wide acceptance and have proved helpful in bettering relations between hospitals and physicians and, at the same time, helped both of them to offer better health care to the public. These programs can be very beneficial to patients and help make the referral system more organized and formal, based on relevant data and knowledge of patients' needs and physicians' needs, qualifications and specialties. Current literature on PRPs is appearing more frequently. Enough hospitals have begun such programs that a new PRP director should be able to research the subject quite thoroughly and become familiar with the possible strengths and weaknesses. Software for PRPs has been developed by various companies which should make the program more useful in terms of data collection, follow-up and provision of feedback. In my opinion PRPs are needed, and if they are marketed correctly, to the physicians initially and then to patients, such programs will prove extremely advantageous to all involved: hospitals, physicians and patients.

  13. Children of Disrupted Families

    PubMed Central

    Robson, Bonnie E.

    1991-01-01

    While some children cope well with divorce, children of divorced parents are at increased risk for suicide, low self-esteem, affective disorders, and general distress. Useful intervention from the family physician usually begins with educating parents about what to expect and about the importance of open communication, co-operation between parents, and consistent discipline. PMID:21228993

  14. Clinical Expert or Service Provider? Physicians' Identity Work in the Context of Counterprofessional Patient Requests.

    PubMed

    Yagil, Dana; Medler-Liraz, Hana

    2015-09-01

    Researchers often discuss patient-related outcomes of the shift from the paternalistic physician-to-patient model to those of patient participation, yet little is known about the impact of patient participation on physicians' professional identity. In this study, we explored the context of counterprofessional patient requests in which patient participation conflicts with medical professionalism. We interviewed 34 physicians, of whom 14 were family physicians and pediatricians, and 20 were specialists in various fields. Data were analyzed by a grounded theory approach. Our findings indicate that physicians experienced conflicts between their identities as clinical experts, caretakers, service providers, and resource allocators. To cope with the resulting tension, physicians used the strategies of hierarchy setting, integrating, incorporating the patient, and changing the meaning of an identity or the event. All strategies were implemented by cognitive and relational tactics.

  15. Physician Perspectives on Comparative Effectiveness Research: Implications for Practice-based Evidence.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Beverly A; Chesney, Margaret A; Witt, Claudia M; Berman, Brian M

    2012-09-01

    Comparative effectiveness research (CER) is defined by the Institute of Medicine as "the generation and synthesis of evidence that compares the benefits and harms of alternative methods to prevent, diagnose, treat, and monitor a clinical condition or to improve the delivery of care." The goal of CER is to provide timely, useful evidence to healthcare decision makers including physicians, patients, policymakers, and payers. A prime focus for the use of CER evidence is the interaction between physician and patient. Physicians in primary practice are critical to the success of the CER enterprise. A 2009 survey suggests, however, that physician attitudes toward CER may be mixed-somewhat positive toward the potential for patient care improvement, yet negative toward potential restriction on physician freedom of practice. CER methods and goals closely parallel those of practice-based research, an important movement in family medicine in the United States since the 1970s. This article addresses apparent physician ambivalence toward CER and makes a case for family medicine engagement in CER to produce useful practice-based evidence. Such an effort has potential to expand care options through personalized medicine, individualized guidelines, focus on patient preferences and patient-reported outcomes, and study of complex therapeutic interventions, such as integrative care. Academic medical researchers will need to collaborate with experienced family physicians to identify significant practice-based research questions and design meaningful studies. Such collaborations would shape CER to produce high-quality practice-based evidence to inform family and community medicine.

  16. Office-Based Elastographic Technique for Quantifying Mechanical Properties of Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Ballyns, Jeffrey J.; Turo, Diego; Otto, Paul; Shah, Jay P.; Hammond, Jennifer; Gebreab, Tadesse; Gerber, Lynn H.; Sikdar, Siddhartha

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Our objectives were to develop a new, efficient, and easy-to-administer approach to ultrasound elastography and assess its ability to provide quantitative characterization of viscoelastic properties of skeletal muscle in an outpatient clinical environment. We sought to show its validity and clinical utility in assessing myofascial trigger points, which are associated with myofascial pain syndrome. Methods Ultrasound imaging was performed while the muscle was externally vibrated at frequencies in the range of 60 to 200 Hz using a handheld vibrator. The spatial gradient of the vibration phase yielded the shear wave speed, which is related to the viscoelastic properties of tissue. The method was validated using a calibrated experimental phantom, the biceps brachii muscle in healthy volunteers (n = 6), and the upper trapezius muscle in symptomatic patients with axial neck pain (n = 13) and asymptomatic (pain-free) control participants (n = 9). Results Using the experimental phantom, our method was able to quantitatively measure the shear moduli with error rates of less than 20%. The mean shear modulus ± SD in the normal biceps brachii measured 12.5 ± 3.4 kPa, within the range of published values using more sophisticated methods. Shear wave speeds in active myofascial trigger points and the surrounding muscle tissue were significantly higher than those in normal tissue at high frequency excitations (>100 Hz; P < .05). Conclusions Off-the-shelf office-based equipment can be used to quantitatively characterize skeletal muscle viscoelastic properties with estimates comparable to those using more sophisticated methods. Our preliminary results using this method indicate that patients with spontaneous neck pain and symptomatic myofascial trigger points have increased tissue heterogeneity at the trigger point site and the surrounding muscle tissue. PMID:22837285

  17. Distance therapy to improve symptoms and quality of life: complementing office-based care with telehealth.

    PubMed

    Kroenke, Kurt

    2014-10-01

    Two randomized trials exemplify strategies for administering behavioral interventions through distance therapy-the use of telemedicine or e-health approaches to treating patients outside the conventional in-person office-based visit. In the first trial, telephone-based coping skills training for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was not more effective than an education control in reducing mortality or rehospitalization. However, it was superior in improving psychological and somatic quality of life. In the second trial, a web-based distress management program was not more effective than usual care in postoperative psychological outcomes in patients receiving an implantable cardioverter defibrillator. However, both of these trials raise important methodological issues in designing and interpreting trials testing telehealth delivery of behavioral interventions. Key issues include: 1) selection of the appropriate control group (e.g., when may a usual care or active comparator be preferable to an attention control?); 2) choice of the appropriate outcome (i.e., one most likely to respond to the specific intervention); 3) enrolling only patients who have at least some threshold level of the symptom or risk level for the outcome being targeted by the intervention; 4) focusing on patients likely to participate in telehealth or other distance-administered treatment programs; and 5) optimal timing for the delivery of behavioral interventions that may occur around the time of major events such as hospitalization or procedures. A policy implication is that once distance therapy interventions are proven effective, reimbursement changes will be necessary to enhance the likelihood of uptake by providers and health care systems. PMID:25304115

  18. Office-Based Buprenorphine Versus Clinic-Based Methadone: A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis.

    PubMed

    King, Jordan B; Sainski-Nguyen, Amy M; Bellows, Brandon K

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this analysis was to compare the cost-effectiveness of clinic-based methadone maintenance therapy (MMT) and office-based buprenorphine maintenance therapy (BMT) from the perspective of third-party payers in the United States. The authors used a Markov cost-effectiveness model. A hypothetical cohort of 1000 adult, opioid-dependent patients was modeled over a 1-year time horizon. Patients were allowed to transition between the health states of in opioid dependence treatment and either abusing or not abusing opioids, or to have dropped out of treatment. Probabilities were derived from randomized clinical trials comparing methadone and buprenorphine. Costs included drug and administration, clinic visits, and therapy sessions. Effectiveness outcomes examined were (1) retention in the treatment program and (2) opioid abuse-free weeks. For retention in treatment at 1 year, MMT was more costly ($4,613 vs. $4,155) and more effective (20.3% vs. 15.9%) than BMT, resulting in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of $10,437 per additional patient retained in treatment. MMT was also more effective than BMT in terms of opioid abuse-free weeks (9.2 vs. 9.1 weeks), resulting in an ICER of $8,515 per opioid abuse-free week gained. One-way sensitivity analyses found costs per week of MMT to have the largest impact on the retention-in-treatment outcome, whereas the probability of dropping out with MMT had the greatest impact on opioid abuse-free weeks. The authors conclude that MMT is cost-effective compared with BMT for the treatment of patients with opioid dependence. However, the treatment of substance abuse is complex, and decision makers should also consider individual patient characteristics when making coverage decisions. PMID:27007583

  19. Physicians beware: revisiting the physician practice acquisition frenzy.

    PubMed

    Eichmiller, Judith Riley

    2014-01-01

    This commentary compares the current physician practice acquisition frenzy to that of the mid-1990s and reflects on lessons learned. The bottom line: Physicians must understand that there were no "white knights" in the 1990s, and there really aren't any today. This article delineates five main factors that both physicians and hospital executives should thoroughly explore and agree on before an alignment or acquisition. Agreement on these issues is the glue that holds the deal together after the merger. These factors eliminate both buyer and seller remorse and delve into the true cultural alignment that must take place as the healthcare industry addresses the challenges of the future. PMID:25108989

  20. Family Planning Handbook for Doctors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleinman, Ronald L., Ed.

    The International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) believes that all people have the right to family planning information, including premarital and marital counseling, contraception information, and sex education. This physician's handbook is designed to provide all doctors with the necessary instructions on the latest family planning methods…

  1. Who Goes into Family Medicine?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rezler, A. G.; Kalishman, S. G.

    The results of a study to identify criteria that could help select applicants to medical school who have a lasting commitment to family medicine are presented. During the past 15 years major efforts have been made to increase the number of family physicians in the United States. Although primary care programs attract more students whose initial…

  2. Teaching office-based couples counseling skills: enhancing residents professional and personal relationship skills.

    PubMed

    Stern, Patricia J; Carlton, Janice C

    2014-01-01

    Effective communication skills are essential for: 1) developing therapeutic physician-patient relationships; 2) negotiating within healthcare teams; and 3) maintaining meaningful personal relationships. This article describes a behavioral science seminar designed to teach residents the fundamentals of couple dynamics and familiarize them with a variety of tools for enhancing communication skills. The seminar consists of a didactic portion, a review of learning materials and instructional DVD, and group discussion. Learning objectives include: a) recognizing the developmental stages of relationships; b) identifying potential communication barriers; and c) use of communication skills tools in three contexts including patient care, healthcare teams, and personal relationships. The seminar is conducted for third-year residents on an annual basis; concepts and materials are reinforced throughout all 3 years of training.

  3. Prevalence of Formal Accusations of Murder and Euthanasia against Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Lewis M.; Arnold, Robert M.; Goy, Elizabeth; Arons, Stephen; Ganzini, Linda

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Little is known about how often physicians are formally accused of hastening patient deaths while practicing palliative care. Methods We conducted an Internet-based survey on a random 50% sample of physician-members of a national hospice and palliative medicine society. Results The final sample consisted of 663 physicians (response rate 53%). Over half of the respondents had had at least one experience in the last 5 years in which a patient's family, another physician, or another health care professional had characterized palliative treatments as being euthanasia, murder, or killing. One in four stated that at least one friend or family member, or a patient had similarly characterized their treatments. Respondents rated palliative sedation and stopping artificial hydration/nutrition as treatments most likely to be misconstrued as euthanasia. Overall, 25 physicians (4%) had been formally investigated for hastening a patient's death when that had not been their intention—13 while using opiates for symptom relief and six for using medications while discontinuing mechanical ventilation. In eight (32%) cases, another member of the health care team had initiated the charges. At the time of the survey, none had been found guilty, but they reported experiencing substantial anger and worry. Conclusions Commonly used palliative care practices continue to be misconstrued as euthanasia or murder, despite this not being the intention of the treating physician. Further efforts are needed to explain to the health care community and the public that treatments often used to relieve patient suffering at the end of life are ethical and legal. PMID:22401355

  4. Lessons learned from the reimbursement profile of a mature private medical toxicology practice: office-based practice pays.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Trevonne M; Leikin, Jerrold B

    2015-03-01

    We previously reported the financial data for the first 5 years of one of the author's medical toxicology practice. The practice has matured; changes have been made. The practice is increasing its focus on office-based encounters and reducing hospital-based acute care encounters. We report the reimbursement rates and other financial metrics of the current practice. Financial records from October 2009 through September 2013 were reviewed. This is a period of 4 fiscal years and represents the currently available financial data. Charges, payments, and reimbursement rates were recorded according to the type and setting of the medical toxicology encounter: forensic consultations, outpatient clinic encounters, nonpsychiatric inpatient consultations, emergency department (ED) consultations, and inpatient psychiatric consultations. All patients were seen regardless of ability to pay or insurance status. The number of billed Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) codes for office-based encounters increased over the study period; the number of billed CPT codes for inpatient and ED consultations reduced. Office-based encounters demonstrate a higher reimbursement rate and higher payments. In the fiscal year (FY) of 2012, office-based revenue exceeded hospital-based acute care revenue by over $140,000 despite a higher number of billed CPT encounters in acute care settings, and outpatient payments were 2.39 times higher than inpatient, inpatient psychiatry, observation unit, and ED payments combined. The average payment per CPT code was higher for outpatient clinic encounters than inpatient encounters for each fiscal year studied. There was an overall reduction in CPT billing volume between FY 2010 and FY 2013. Despite this, there was an increase in total practice revenue. There was no change in payor mix, practice logistics, or billing/collection service company. In this medical toxicology practice, office-based encounters demonstrate higher reimbursement rates and overall

  5. [Primary health care physician in modern conditions].

    PubMed

    Cindrić, Jasna

    2007-02-01

    Some basic considerations about the role and responsibilities of primary health care physician are presented. The attitude towards the patient and other activities of general practitioners are described. Rational, multidisciplinary and multifactorial dialogues and cooperation with other colleagues is also stressed. Team work and collaboration with other segments involved in the patient health care is an imperative. Working conditions are not equal in all health care settings, however, all health care personnel, regardless of their place of work, must implement rationalization of health care expenses and keep high professional level in urban and rural settings, even those distant from large medical centers. The possible misunderstandings of professional interests that can be destructive for working atmosphere are also mentioned. Primary health care is the cheapest and economically most efficient type of health care for a particular population. In this context, primary health care physicians/family doctors find their role and responsibilities, follow organizational principles, system and methods of work. To conclude, a more positive potential of primary health care and its affirmation is stressed.

  6. Update on Office-Based Strategies for the Management of Obesity.

    PubMed

    Erlandson, Michael; Ivey, Laurie C; Seikel, Katie

    2016-09-01

    Obesity is a common condition that is associated with numerous medical problems such as cardiovascular disease, pulmonary disease, and diabetes mellitus. Primary care physicians have an important role in helping patients develop a successful weight loss plan to improve their overall health. Dietary strategies emphasizing reduced caloric intake, regardless of the nutrient composition, are important for weight loss. Behavioral interventions such as motivational interviewing and encouraging physical activity lead to additional weight loss when combined with dietary changes. Medication regimens for concomitant medical problems should take into account the effect of specific agents on the patient's weight. Persons with a body mass index of 30 kg per m2 or greater or 27 kg per m2 or greater with comorbidities who do not succeed in losing weight with diet and activity modifications may consider medication to assist with weight loss. Medications approved for long-term treatment of obesity include orlistat, lorcaserin, liraglutide, phentermine/topiramate, and naltrexone/bupropion. Physicians should consider referring patients for bariatric surgery if they have a body mass index of 40 kg per m2 or greater. For those with obesity-related comorbid conditions, patients should be considered for adjustable gastric banding or other bariatric surgical approaches if they have a body mass index of 30 to 39.9 kg per m2. The most commonly performed procedures for weight loss are Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, sleeve gastrectomy, and adjustable gastric banding. Bariatric surgery is the most effective intervention for weight loss in obese patients, and it leads to improvement in multiple obesity-related conditions, including remission of diabetes. PMID:27583422

  7. 42 CFR 415.172 - Physician fee schedule payment for services of teaching physicians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... teaching physicians. 415.172 Section 415.172 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... PHYSICIANS IN PROVIDERS, SUPERVISING PHYSICIANS IN TEACHING SETTINGS, AND RESIDENTS IN CERTAIN SETTINGS Physician Services in Teaching Settings § 415.172 Physician fee schedule payment for services of...

  8. 42 CFR 415.172 - Physician fee schedule payment for services of teaching physicians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... teaching physicians. 415.172 Section 415.172 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... PHYSICIANS IN PROVIDERS, SUPERVISING PHYSICIANS IN TEACHING SETTINGS, AND RESIDENTS IN CERTAIN SETTINGS Physician Services in Teaching Settings § 415.172 Physician fee schedule payment for services of...

  9. 42 CFR 415.172 - Physician fee schedule payment for services of teaching physicians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... teaching physicians. 415.172 Section 415.172 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... PHYSICIANS IN PROVIDERS, SUPERVISING PHYSICIANS IN TEACHING SETTINGS, AND RESIDENTS IN CERTAIN SETTINGS Physician Services in Teaching Settings § 415.172 Physician fee schedule payment for services of...

  10. 42 CFR 415.172 - Physician fee schedule payment for services of teaching physicians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... teaching physicians. 415.172 Section 415.172 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... PROVIDERS, SUPERVISING PHYSICIANS IN TEACHING SETTINGS, AND RESIDENTS IN CERTAIN SETTINGS Physician Services in Teaching Settings § 415.172 Physician fee schedule payment for services of teaching physicians....

  11. Katrina Kinetics: The Physician Supply.

    PubMed

    Rigby, Perry Gardner; Paragi Gururaja, Ramnaryan

    2016-01-01

    In the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina 10 years ago, acute changes were recognized and reported; acute kinetic destruction and desperation. Physicians performed heroically, but after the flood and the closing of hospitals, most left at least briefly. The chronic recovery began with spirit, but was uncharted and unplanned with the recognition that individual decisions were a necessity. The documentation of physician numbers of practicing doctors, residents and fellows, from the AMA as related to geography, population, and other circumstances tells an additional story of renewal, more objectively without the hype. The fall and rise of the physician population occurred, and was and is remarkable in its consistency, smaller than expected variations. Its effect generated promise for continuous chronic conditions of recovery and positive change. PMID:27598896

  12. William Harvey, physician and scientist.

    PubMed

    Sloan, A W

    1978-08-01

    William Harvey was born in 1578 and died in 1657. He studied arts at the University of Cambridge and medicine at the University of Padua. He was a Fellow of the College of Physicians of London and physician to St Bartholomew's Hospital and to King James I and King Charles I. His discovery of the circulation of the blood was announced in his Lumleian Lectures to the College of Physicians and later published in his book, De Motu Cordis. His other major work was on embryology, published under the title De Generatione Animalium. Harvey was distinguished in many fields of medicine and medical science and is widely regarded as the founder of modern physiology.

  13. Are Physicians' Recommendations to Limit Life Support Beneficial or Burdensome?

    PubMed Central

    White, Douglas B.; Evans, Leah R.; Bautista, Christopher A.; Luce, John M.; Lo, Bernard

    2009-01-01

    Rationale: Although there is a growing belief that physicians should routinely provide a recommendation to surrogates during deliberations about withdrawing life support, there is a paucity of empirical data on surrogates' perspectives on this topic. Objectives: To understand the attitudes of surrogate decision-makers toward receiving a physician's recommendation during deliberations about whether to limit life support for an incapacitated patient. Methods: We conducted a prospective, mixed methods study among 169 surrogate decision-makers for critically ill patients. Surrogates sequentially viewed two videos of simulated physician–surrogate discussions about whether to limit life support, which varied only by whether the physician gave a recommendation. Measurements and Main Results: The main quantitative outcome was whether surrogates preferred to receive a physicians' recommendation. Surrogates also participated in an in-depth, semistructured interview to explore the reasons for their preference. Fifty-six percent (95/169) of surrogates preferred to receive a recommendation, 42% (70/169) preferred not to receive a recommendation, and 2% (4/169) felt that both approaches were equally acceptable. We identified four main themes that explained surrogates' preferences, including surrogates' perceptions of physicians' appropriate role in life or death decisions and their perceptions of the positive or negative consequences of a recommendation on the physician–surrogate relationship, on the decision-making process, and on long-term regret for the family. Conclusions: There is no consensus among surrogates about whether physicians should routinely provide a recommendation regarding life support decisions for incapacitated patients. These findings suggest that physicians should ask surrogates whether they wish to receive a recommendation regarding life support decisions and should be flexible in their approach to decision-making. PMID:19498057

  14. Physicians' experience with Norplant implantable contraceptives in Finland.

    PubMed

    Ollila, E; Hemminki, E; Kajesalo, K

    1995-03-01

    Norplant contraceptives are manufactured in Finland, but the majority of Norplant users live in the Third World. The objective of this study was to study Finnish family planning physicians experience with and attitudes towards Norplant contraceptives. Three data sources were used: (1) review of articles published in non-commercial Finnish medical journals between 1980 and 1990, (2) a sample of eleven physicians known to have experience with Norplant and chosen by a snow-ball method, and (3) a random sample of 22 physicians in charge of public family planning services stratified by municipality and degree of urbanization. The articles reflected a positive attitude towards Norplant, but the authors did not believe that Norplant should replace any previous method of contraception. In the random sample the amount of experience with Norplant was low. In both groups the general attitude towards Norplant was reserved. It was not used as a method of first choice, but was considered a good method for carefully selected women. Norplant was considered troublesome for the physician, requiring surgical procedures, producing side-effects and demanding time for counselling. Adequate use of Norplant calls for a good health care infrastructure, hygienic facilities and trained personnel. These are often lacking in Third World settings.

  15. [Sherlock Holmes as amateur physician].

    PubMed

    Madsen, S

    1998-03-30

    The medical literature contains numerous articles dealing with Sherlock Holmes and his companion Dr. Watson. Some of the articles are concerned with the medical and scientific aspects of his cases. Other articles adopt a more philosophical view: They compare the methods of the master detective with those of the physician--the ideal clinician should be as astute in his profession as the detective must be in his. It this article the author briefly reviews the abilities of Sherlock Holmes as an amateur physician. Often Holmes was brilliant, but sometimes he made serious mistakes. In one of his cases (The Adventure of the Lion's Mane) he misinterpreted common medical signs.

  16. Familial hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Turgeon, Ricky D.; Barry, Arden R.; Pearson, Glen J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To summarize the pathophysiology, epidemiology, screening, diagnosis, and treatment of familial hypercholesterolemia (FH). Quality of evidence A PubMed search was conducted (inception to July 2014) for articles on pathophysiology, screening, diagnosis, and management of FH, supplemented with hand searches of bibliographies of guidelines and reviews. A supporting level of evidence for each recommendation was categorized as level I (randomized controlled trial or systematic review of randomized controlled trials), level II (observational study), or level III (expert opinion). The best available evidence is mostly level II or III. Main message Familial hypercholesterolemia affects 1 in 500 Canadians. Risk of a coronary event is high in these patients and is underestimated by risk calculators (eg, Framingham). Clinicians should screen patients according to guidelines and suspect FH in any patient with a premature cardiovascular event, physical stigmata of hypercholesterolemia, or an elevated plasma lipid level. Physicians should diagnose FH using either the Simon Broome or Dutch Lipid Network criteria. Management of heterozygous FH includes reducing low-density lipoprotein levels by 50% or more from baseline with high-dose statins and other lipid-lowering agents. Clinicians should refer any patient with homozygous FH to a specialized centre. Conclusion Familial hypercholesterolemia represents an important cause of premature cardiovascular disease in Canadians. Early identification and aggressive treatment of individuals with FH reduces cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. PMID:26796832

  17. In vivo office-based dynamic imaging of vocal cords in awake patients with swept-source optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lingfeng; Liu, Gangjun; Rubinstein, Marc; Saidi, Arya; Guo, Shuguang; Wong, Brian J. F.; Chen, Zhongping

    2009-02-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an evolving noninvasive imaging modality and has been used to image the human larynx during surgical endoscopy. The design of a long GRIN lens based probe capable of capturing images of the human larynx by use of swept-source OCT during a typical office-based laryngoscopy examination is presented. In vivo OCT imaging of the human larynx is demonstrated with 40 fame/second. Dynamic vibration of the vocal folds is recorded to provide not only high-resolution cross-sectional tissue structures but also vibration parameters, such as the vibration frequency and magnitude of the vocal cord, which provide important information for clinical diagnosis and treatment, as well as in fundamental research of the voice. Office-based OCT is a promising imaging modality to study the larynx.

  18. Barriers to physician identification and reporting of child abuse.

    PubMed

    Flaherty, Emalee G; Sege, Robert

    2005-05-01

    with local Emergency Departments with pediatric expertise. Improve the relationship between CPS and medical providers. For example, CPS workers should systematically inform the reporting physician about the progress of their investigation and the outcome for the child and family. Several past reports have made specific suggestions to improve the working relationship. Warner and Hanson recommended that positive outcomes be programmed into the reporting process. They suggested that CPS have special phone lines staffed by well-trained employees for mandated reporters to call. Finkelhor and Zellman proposed a more radical change to improve the working relationship between CPS and mandated reporters. They suggested that certain professionals, with demonstrated expertise in the recognition and treatment of child abuse and registered as such, should have "flexible reporting options." Options include the ability to defer reporting, if there are no immediate threats to a child, or to make a report in confidence and defer the investigation until necessary. Finkelhor and Zellman emphasized that this model would improve physician-reporting compliance and enhance the role of CPS while reducing the work burden for CPS. Improve interaction with the legal system. Child abuse pediatric experts who have courtroom experience could provide education and support to physicians who have little preexisting experience with the legal system. Reimbursement for time spent supporting legal proceedings should be equitable and may reduce physician concerns about lost patient revenue. Retrospective studies and vignette analyses provide much information about some of the barriers to child maltreatment reporting and describe many of the reasons why physicians do not identify and report all child maltreatment. Future prospective examinations of physician decision-making may further explain the physician's decision-making process and the barriers he or she faces when identifying and reporting child abuse.

  19. Barriers to physician identification and reporting of child abuse.

    PubMed

    Flaherty, Emalee G; Sege, Robert

    2005-05-01

    with local Emergency Departments with pediatric expertise. Improve the relationship between CPS and medical providers. For example, CPS workers should systematically inform the reporting physician about the progress of their investigation and the outcome for the child and family. Several past reports have made specific suggestions to improve the working relationship. Warner and Hanson recommended that positive outcomes be programmed into the reporting process. They suggested that CPS have special phone lines staffed by well-trained employees for mandated reporters to call. Finkelhor and Zellman proposed a more radical change to improve the working relationship between CPS and mandated reporters. They suggested that certain professionals, with demonstrated expertise in the recognition and treatment of child abuse and registered as such, should have "flexible reporting options." Options include the ability to defer reporting, if there are no immediate threats to a child, or to make a report in confidence and defer the investigation until necessary. Finkelhor and Zellman emphasized that this model would improve physician-reporting compliance and enhance the role of CPS while reducing the work burden for CPS. Improve interaction with the legal system. Child abuse pediatric experts who have courtroom experience could provide education and support to physicians who have little preexisting experience with the legal system. Reimbursement for time spent supporting legal proceedings should be equitable and may reduce physician concerns about lost patient revenue. Retrospective studies and vignette analyses provide much information about some of the barriers to child maltreatment reporting and describe many of the reasons why physicians do not identify and report all child maltreatment. Future prospective examinations of physician decision-making may further explain the physician's decision-making process and the barriers he or she faces when identifying and reporting child abuse

  20. Adopting a Family-Oriented Approach

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Lorne A.

    1991-01-01

    Although many family physicians believe that a family-oriented approach to patient care leads to better outcomes, and in spite of a growing body of literature on the principles and theory of working with families in primary care, most physicians have been very slow to move from an individual approach to a family approach with their patients. This paper will examine some of the issues involved in the adoption of innovations by practitioners and explore their implications for the increased inclusion of the family in medical practice. PMID:21229054

  1. Office-Based Intracordal Hyaluronate Injections Improve Quality of Life in Thoracic-Surgery-Related Unilateral Vocal Fold Paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Tuan-Jen; Hsin, Li-Jen; Chung, Hsiu-Feng; Chiang, Hui-Chen; Li, Hsueh-Yu; Wong, Alice M.K.; Pei, Yu-Chen

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Thoracic-surgery-related unilateral vocal fold paralysis (UVFP) may cause severe morbidity and can cause profound functional impairment and psychosocial stress in patients with pre-existing thoracic diseases. In-office intracordal hyaluronate (HA) injections have recently been applied to improve voice and quality of life in patients with vocal incompetence, but their effect on thoracic-surgery-related UVFP remains inconclusive. We therefore conducted a prospective study to clarify the effect of early HA injection on voice and quality of life in patients with thoracic-surgery-related UVFP. Patients with UVFP within 3 months after thoracic surgery who received office-based HA injection were recruited. Quantitative laryngeal electromyography, videolaryngostroboscopy, voice-related life quality (voice outcome survey), laboratory voice analysis, and health-related quality of life (SF-36) were evaluated at baseline, and at 1 month postinjection. A total of 104 consecutive patients accepted office-based HA intracordal injection during the study period, 34 of whom were treated in relation to thoracic surgery and were eligible for inclusion. Voice-related life quality, voice laboratory analysis, and most generic quality of life domains were significantly improved at 1 month after in-office HA intracordal injection. No HA-related complications were reported. Single office-based HA intracordal injection is a safe and effective treatment for thoracic-surgery-related UVFP, resulting in immediate improvements in patient quality of life, voice quality, and swallowing ability. PMID:26448034

  2. Costs of Physician-Hospital Integration.

    PubMed

    Cho, Na-Eun

    2015-10-01

    Given that the enactment of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 is expected to generate forces toward physician-hospital integration, this study examined an understudied, albeit important, area of costs incurred in physician-hospital integration. Such costs were analyzed through 24 semi-structured interviews with physicians and hospital administrators in a multiple-case, inductive study. Two extreme types of physician-hospital arrangements were examined: an employed model (ie, integrated salary model, a group of physicians integrated by a hospital system) and a private practice (ie, a physician or group of physicians who are independent of economic or policy control). Interviews noted that integration leads to 3 evident costs, namely, monitoring, coordination, and cooperation costs. Improving our understanding of the kinds of costs that are incurred after physician-hospital integration will help hospitals and physicians to avoid common failures after integration. PMID:26496300

  3. Attitudes toward physician advertising among rural consumers.

    PubMed

    Kviz, F J

    1984-04-01

    The issue of whether physicians should advertise their services has been the subject of much debate among health policymakers. This study reports data from a survey of rural residents in Illinois regarding attitudes toward physician advertising and reasons for opposition or support of the practice. The results indicate neither strong opposition nor strong support for physician advertising. While those who are opposed are largely nonspecific regarding their reasons, those in favor primarily expect that it will aid in the selection of a physician. However, few respondents indicate a predisposition to shop for a physician. Although the major concern about physician advertising is a danger of false advertising by some physicians, it appears that the respondents are not trusting of advertising in general rather than of advertising by physicians in particular. These findings suggest that regardless of its potential advantages, physician advertising may be relatively ineffective because consumers may be inattentive, unresponsive, or distrusting . PMID:6717113

  4. Costs of Physician-Hospital Integration

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Na-Eun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Given that the enactment of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 is expected to generate forces toward physician-hospital integration, this study examined an understudied, albeit important, area of costs incurred in physician-hospital integration. Such costs were analyzed through 24 semi-structured interviews with physicians and hospital administrators in a multiple-case, inductive study. Two extreme types of physician-hospital arrangements were examined: an employed model (ie, integrated salary model, a group of physicians integrated by a hospital system) and a private practice (ie, a physician or group of physicians who are independent of economic or policy control). Interviews noted that integration leads to 3 evident costs, namely, monitoring, coordination, and cooperation costs. Improving our understanding of the kinds of costs that are incurred after physician-hospital integration will help hospitals and physicians to avoid common failures after integration. PMID:26496300

  5. [Physicians in Mexico, 1970-1990].

    PubMed

    Frenk, J; Durán-Arenas, L; Vázquez-Segovia, A; García, C; Vázquez, D

    1995-01-01

    A study was carried out in 1970 on the distribution of medical personnel in Mexico. At that time an unequal distribution of physicians was detected, but not emphasized given the general shortage of physicians in the country. At the present time, the situation has changed. In this article the analysis of the 1990 census data using traditional indicators of availability of physicians in the country, as well as indirect criteria of physician requirements is presented. In the year of reference there were 157,407 physicians in the country, with a national average of 673 persons per physician. The distribution of physicians by state showed a great deal of variation in the number of persons per physician. For example, the state of Chiapas has 1,642 inhabitants per physician, whereas the Federal District has 292. The relation between trained and employed physicians shows another important phenomenon: there is a high percentage of physicians that do not practice clinical medicine (19.4%). Nevertheless, the number of physicians almost tripled the growth experienced by the general population, and important differences among and within states do persist. Furthermore, a new paradoxical effect has emerged, the presence of underemployment and unemployment of physicians, even in communities with greater needs for medical care. This indicates that the strategy of training more physicians has not solved the problems of accessibility and coverage, but in fact has fostered new problems and perhaps greater inequalities. PMID:7754425

  6. Information Searching Behavior of Physicians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trueswell, R.W.; Rubenstein, A.H.

    The purpose of this study was to provide some preliminary data about the information-searching behavior of the physician in order to (1) facilitate the development of models describing the search behavior and (2) provide the behavioral data necessary for the development of effective information retrieval systems for use by the medical profession.…

  7. [The tragic fate of physicians].

    PubMed

    Ohry, Avi

    2013-10-01

    Physicians and surgeons were always involved in revolutions, wars and political activities, as well as in various medical humanities. Tragic fate met these doctors, whether in the Russian prisons gulags, German labor or concentration camps, pogroms or at the hands of the Inquisition. PMID:24450039

  8. Training Physicians in Palliative Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muir, J. Cameron; Krammer, Lisa M.; von Gunten, Charles F.

    1999-01-01

    Describes the elements of a program in hospice and palliative medicine that may serve as a model of an effective system of physician education. Topics for the palliative-care curriculum include hospice medicine, breaking bad news, pain management, the process of dying, and managing personal stress. (JOW)

  9. Physician-centered management guidelines.

    PubMed

    Pulde, M F

    1999-01-01

    The "Fortune 500 Most Admired" companies fully understand the irreverent premise "the customer comes second" and that there is a direct correlation between a satisfied work force and productivity, service quality, and, ultimately, organizational success. If health care organizations hope to recruit and retain the quality workforce upon which their core competency depends, they must develop a vision strategic plan, organizational structure, and managerial style that acknowledges the vital and central role of physicians in the delivery of care. This article outlines a conceptual framework for effective physician management, a "critical pathway," that will enable health care organizations to add their name to the list of "most admired." The nine principles described in this article are based on a more respectful and solicitous treatment of physicians and their more central directing role in organizational change. They would permit the transformation of health care into a system that both preserves the virtues of the physician-patient relationship and meets the demand for quality and cost-effectiveness. PMID:10387270

  10. Physician burnout: A neurologic crisis.

    PubMed

    Sigsbee, Bruce; Bernat, James L

    2014-12-01

    The prevalence of burnout is higher in physicians than in other professions and is especially high in neurologists. Physician burnout encompasses 3 domains: (1) emotional exhaustion: the loss of interest and enthusiasm for practice; (2) depersonalization: a poor attitude with cynicism and treating patients as objects; and (3) career dissatisfaction: a diminished sense of personal accomplishment and low self-value. Burnout results in reduced work hours, relocation, depression, and suicide. Burned-out physicians harm patients because they lack empathy and make errors. Studies of motivational factors in the workplace suggest several preventive interventions: (1) Provide counseling for physicians either individually or in groups with a goal of improving adaptive skills to the stress and rapid changes in the health care environment. (2) Identify and eliminate meaningless required hassle factors such as electronic health record "clicks" or insurance mandates. (3) Redesign practice to remove pressure to see patients in limited time slots and shift to team-based care. (4) Create a culture that promotes career advancement, mentoring, and recognition of accomplishments. PMID:25378679

  11. Hitler’s Jewish Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Weisz, George M.

    2014-01-01

    The mystery behind the behavior of infamous personalities leaves many open questions, particularly when related to the practice of medicine. This paper takes a brief look at two Jewish physicians who played memorable roles in the life of Adolf Hitler. PMID:25120923

  12. Early Islamic physicians and thorax.

    PubMed

    Batirel, H F

    1999-02-01

    Modern anatomic knowledge has developed throughout centuries with transfer of knowledge from generations to generations. Ibn-i Sina (980-1037), Razi (850-923), Davud El-Antaki (?-1008), Ali ibn Abbas (?-982), Ahmed bin Mansur (14th century), Semseddin-i Itaki (1570-1640), and Ibn-i Nafis (1210-1288) were Islamic physicians who all contributed to the understanding of anatomy. They benefited from Greek and Roman pioneers, as well as from each other. To show the situation of thoracic anatomy in early Islamic physicians, we analyzed two original manuscripts in the Süleymaniye Library and some contemporary texts. There were original drawings of the trachea, lung, and vascular system in Semseddin-i Itaki's and Ahmed bin Mansur's anatomy texts. Ibn-i Nafis's writings revealed that he was the first person to describe the pulmonary circulation. Also Ali ibn Abbas wrote that the pulmonary artery wall had two layers and these layers may have a role in constriction and relaxation of this vessel. He also stated that pulmonary veins branched together with the bronchial tree. Ahmed bin Mansur, Ali ibn Abbas, and Ibn-i Nafis each wrote that the heart has two cavities. They also added that the wall of the septum is very thick and there are no passages in between. These show that Islamic physicians had important contributions to thoracic anatomy and physiology. European physicians benefited from these contributions till the end of the 16th century. PMID:10197707

  13. TQM: a paradigm for physicians.

    PubMed

    Snyder, D A

    1993-01-01

    Change, even when for the better, is always accompanied by apprehension and even outright fear. It is therefore not surprising to hear health care workers, especially physicians, expressing their concerns about this "new" management philosophy through a spectrum of reactions that vary from skeptical or grudging acceptance to outright dismissal of all of the new "alphabet soup" associated with TQM.

  14. Involving physicians in TQM. To gain physician support for quality management, hospital administrators must treat physicians as customers.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, G J

    1993-12-01

    The process of integrating physicians into a hospital's total quality management (TQM) program is not simple. Physicians will not view TQM as an acceptable strategy in the absence of a positive working relationship with hospital managers. Physicians must see hospital managers as colleagues who can help improve their medical practices both in efficiency and patient care. The first step in involving physicians in TQM is creating an environment that enhances physician relationships. The CEO should be actively involved with the medical staff, and senior hospital managers should work at cultivating physician relationships. Physician needs and the centrality of the physician-management relationship should enter into every management discussion. Also, managers must solicit physician feedback regularly. Managers can introduce physicians to TQM by accompanying them to off-site TQM programs for a few days. Managers should also coordinate a continuing education program at the hospital, inviting a physician to address medical staff about TQM. Physicians are more likely to respond positively to one of their peers than they would to a consultant or business manager. Managers should then invite hospital-based physicians to participate on TQM interdisciplinary teams to resolve a problem chosen by the senior medical staff. The problem should be one that promises to be a quick fix, thereby ensuring demonstrable success of TQM and allaying any doubts. After an initial demonstration of TQM's success, the cycle is repeated. A year or two later, managers should invite off-site clinicians to join interdisciplinary teams on issues important to them.

  15. Meeting the Health Care Needs of Rural Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Small, Linda H.; Whitfield, Thomas J.

    1977-01-01

    Describes the Children's Health Program, designed to provide screening and follow up services to isolated rural families. A staff of physicians, nurses, teachers, and nutritionists work at traveling well-child clinics and individually visit isolated families. (SB)

  16. Barriers to Office-Based Mental Health Care and Interest in E-Communication With Providers: A Survey Study

    PubMed Central

    Vigod, Simone N

    2016-01-01

    Background With rising availability and use of Internet and mobile technology in society, the demand and need for its integration into health care is growing. Despite great potential within mental health care and growing uptake, there is still little evidence to guide how these tools should be integrated into traditional care, and for whom. Objective To examine factors that might inform how e-communication should be implemented in our local outpatient mental health program, including barriers to traditional office-based care, patient preferences, and patient concerns. Methods We conducted a survey in the waiting room of our outpatient mental health program located in an urban, academic ambulatory hospital. The survey assessed (1) age, mobile phone ownership, and general e-communication usage, (2) barriers to attending office-based appointments, (3) preferences for, and interest in, e-communication for mental health care, and (4) concerns about e-communication use for mental health care. We analyzed the data descriptively and examined associations between the presence of barriers, identifying as a social media user, and interest level in e-communication. Results Respondents (N=68) were predominantly in the age range of 25-54 years. The rate of mobile phone ownership was 91% (62/68), and 59% (40/68) of respondents identified as social media users. There was very low existing use of e-communication between providers and patients, with high levels of interest endorsed by survey respondents. Respondents expressed an interest in using e-communication with their provider to share updates and get feedback, coordinate care, and get general information. In regression analysis, both a barrier to care and identifying as a social media user were significantly associated with e-communication interest (P=.03 and P=.003, respectively). E-communication interest was highest among people who both had a barrier to office-based care and were a social media user. Despite high interest

  17. Caring for LGBTQ patients: Methods for improving physician cultural competence.

    PubMed

    Klein, Elizabeth W; Nakhai, Maliheh

    2016-05-01

    This article summarizes the components of a curriculum used to teach family medicine residents and faculty about LGBTQ patients' needs in a family medicine residency program in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States. This curriculum was developed to provide primary care physicians and physicians-in-training with skills to provide better health care for LGBTQ-identified patients. The curriculum covers topics that range from implicit and explicit bias and appropriate terminology to techniques for crafting patient-centered treatment plans. Additionally, focus is placed on improving the understanding of specific and unique barriers to competent health care encountered by LGBTQ patients. Through facilitated discussion, learners explore the health disparities that disproportionately affect LGBTQ individuals and develop skills that will improve their ability to care for LGBTQ patients. The goal of the curriculum is to teach family medicine faculty and physicians in training how to more effectively communicate with and treat LGBTQ patients in a safe, non-judgmental, and welcoming primary care environment. PMID:27497452

  18. State of family medicine practice in Lebanon

    PubMed Central

    Helou, Mariana; Rizk, Grace Abi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Many difficulties are encountered in family medicine practice and were subject to multinational studies. To date, no study was conducted in Lebanon to assess the challenges that family physicians face. This study aims to evaluate the family medicine practice in Lebanon stressing on the difficulties encountered by Lebanese family physicians. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire was sent to all 96 family medicine physicians practicing in Lebanon. Participants answered questions about characteristics of family medicine practice, evaluation of the quality of work, identification of obstacles, and their effect on the medical practice. Results: The response rate was 59%, and the average number of years of practice was 10.7 years. Physicians complain mainly of heavy load at work, too many bureaucratic tasks, demanding patients, and being undervalued by the specialists. Most physicians are able to adapt between their professional and private life. Conclusion: Despite all the obstacles encountered, Lebanese family physicians have a moderate satisfaction toward their practice. They remain positive and enthusiastic about their profession. Until the ministry of public health revises its current health system, the primary care profession in Lebanon will remain fragile as a profession. PMID:27453843

  19. How to develop breakthrough physician-to-physician relationships.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Lito

    2008-01-01

    In today's highly competitive marketplace, specialty practices must strive to distinguish themselves from the competition. One key strategy is to provide exceptional levels of service based on fundamentals already in play among many non-healthcare service providers. The problem is that too many practices are failing to deliver. This article outlines precautionary principles that will enable specialty practices, and even hospitals, to develop stronger, more positive physician relationships that increase loyalty and keep your patient pipeline filled.

  20. Where do Young Children in Speciality Care Come From?: A Preliminary Investigation of the Role of Primary Care Physicians

    PubMed Central

    McLennan, John D.; Sheehan, Debbie

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Young children with mental health and developmental problems may not receive appropriate or timely interventions. Primary care physicians are well positioned to play an important role in the early identification and referral of such children. The objective of this pilot study was to explore the role primary care physicians played for a group of such children. Methods A single mailing of 1196 self-report questionnaires were sent to parents/caregivers of children under six years of age at four specialty centers in Ontario and Alberta. Key items on the survey included the role of primary care physicians (family physicians and community paediatricians). Results Twenty percent of parents/caregivers returned questionnaires. All children saw either a family physician or a community paediatrician, while 65% saw both. Families were more likely to have come to the specialty centre via a referral from a community paediatrician than a family physician. Ten percent reportedly received no referrals from a primary care physician, while 21% did not receive a referral to a specialty centre from these providers. Conclusions The majority of children received at least one referral from a primary care physician. Further inquiry is required to determine the timeliness and appropriateness of these referrals. PMID:18392162