Science.gov

Sample records for family physician office-based

  1. Family Violence and Family Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Carol P.

    1991-01-01

    The acronym IDEALS summarizes family physicians' obligations when violence is suspected: to identify family violence; document injuries; educate families and ensure safety for victims; access resources and coordinate care; co-operate in the legal process; and provide support for families. Failure to respond reflects personal and professional experience and attitudes, fear of legal involvement, and lack of knowledge. Risks of intervention include physician burnout, physician overfunctioning, escalation of violence, and family disruption. PMID:21228987

  2. Contraceptive methods available to patients of office-based physicians and title X clinics --- United States, 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    2011-01-14

    Unintended pregnancies, which accounted for an estimated 49% of all pregnancies in the United States in 2001, more often are associated with adverse outcomes for both mother and child than are intended pregnancies. In 2008, an estimated 36 million U.S. women of reproductive age were in need of family planning services because they were sexually active, able to get pregnant, and not trying to get pregnant; this represented a 6% increase from year 2000 estimates. To assess the provision of various reversible contraceptive methods by U.S family planning providers, CDC mailed a survey on contraceptive provision to random samples of 2,000 office-based physicians and 2,000 federally funded Title X clinics. This report summarizes those results, which indicated that a greater proportion of Title X clinic providers than office-based physicians offered on-site availability of a number of methods, including injectable depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) (96.6% versus 60.9%) and combined oral contraceptive pills (92.1% versus 48.8%). However, a greater proportion of office-based physicians than Title X clinic providers reported on-site availability of the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine device (LNG-IUD) (56.4% versus 46.6%). Less than maximal use of long-acting, reversible contraceptive methods (LARCs), including IUDs and contraceptive implants, might be a contributing factor to high unintended pregnancy rates in the United States. Improving contraceptive delivery by increasing on-site availability in physicians' offices and clinics of a range of contraceptive methods, including LARCs, might increase contraceptive use and reduce rates of unintended pregnancy.

  3. Use of hospitalists and office-based primary care physicians' productivity.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeongyoung; Jones, Karen

    2015-05-01

    Growth in the care of hospitalized patients by hospitalists has the potential to increase the productivity of office-based primary care physicians (PCPs) by allowing them to focus on outpatient practice. Our aim was to examine the association between utilization of hospitalists and the productivity of office-based PCPs. The cross-sectional study was conducted using the 2008 Health Tracking Physician Survey Restricted Use File linked to the Area Resource File. We analyzed a total of 1,158 office-based PCPs representing a weighted total of 97,355 physicians. Utilization of hospitalists was defined as the percentage of a PCP's hospitalized patients treated by a hospitalist. The measures of PCPs' productivity were: (1) number of hospital visits per week, (2) number of office and outpatient clinic visits per week, and (3) direct patient care time per visit. We found that the use of hospitalists was significantly associated with a decreased number of hospital visits. The use of hospitalists was also associated with an increased number of office visits, but this was only significant for high users. Physicians who used hospitalists for more than three-quarters of their hospitalized patients had an extra 8.8 office visits per week on average (p = 0.05), which was equivalent to a 10 % increase in productivity over the predicted mean of 87 visits for physicians who did not use hospitalists. We did not find any significant differences in direct patient care time per visit. Our study demonstrates that the increase in productivity for the one-third of PCPs who use hospitalists extensively may not be sufficient to offset the current loss of PCP workforce. However, our findings provide cautious optimism that if more PCPs effectively and efficiently used hospitalists, this could help mitigate a PCP shortage and improve access to primary care services.

  4. Age Differences in Visits to Office-based Physicians by Adults With Hypertension: United States, 2013.

    PubMed

    Ashman, Jill J; Rui, Pinyao; Schappert, Susan M

    2016-11-01

    Data from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey •The percentage of all adult visits to office-based physicians made by adults with hypertension increased with age, from 9% for those aged 18-44 to 58% for those aged 75 and over. •Hypertensive medications were provided, prescribed, or continued at 62% of visits made by adults with hypertension. •Eighty-two percent of visits by adults with hypertension were made by those with multiple chronic conditions, and the number of chronic conditions increased with age. •Diseases of the circulatory system increased as age increased, from 23% for those aged 18-44 to 29% for those aged 75 and over. Hypertension is a chronic condition that affects 31% of adults in the United States (1). The prevalence of hypertension increases with age, from 7% among those aged 18-39 to 65% among those aged 60 and over (2). This report describes age differences for chronic conditions mentioned, hypertensive medications prescribed, doctor visits in the past year, and selected primary diagnoses for office-based physician visits made by adults with hypertension. Adults with hypertension were defined as those aged 18 and over who have been diagnosed with hypertension, regardless of the diagnosis for the current visit. In 2013, there were 258.5 million visits made by such patients, representing 34% of all office-based physician visits by adults (3). All material appearing in this report is in the public domain and may be reproduced or copied without permission; citation as to source, however, is appreciated.

  5. Trends in menopausal hormone therapy use of US office-based physicians, 2000-2009.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Sandra A; Stefanick, Marcia L; Stafford, Randall S

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate recent trends and the adoption of practice recommendations for menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) use from 2001 to 2009 by formulation, dose, woman's age, and characteristics of physicians reporting MHT visits. The IMS Health (Plymouth Meeting PA) National Disease and Therapeutic Index physician survey data from 2001 to 2009 were analyzed for visits in which MHT use was reported by US office-based physicians. Estimated national volume of visits for which MHT use was reported. MHT use declined each year since 2002. Systemic MHT use fell from 16.3 million (M) visits in 2001 to 6.1 M visits in 2009. Declines were greatest for women 60 years or older (64%) but were also substantial for women younger than 50 years (59%) and women 50 to 59 years old (60%). Women 60 years or older accounted for 37% of MHT use. Lower dose product use increased modestly, from 0.7 M (2001) to 1.3 M (2009), as did vaginal MHT use, from 1.8 M (2001) to 2.4 M (2009). Declines in continuing systemic MHT use (65%) were greater than for newly initiated MHT use (51%). Compared with other physicians, obstetrician/gynecologists changed their practices less, thereby increasing their overall share of total MHT visits from 72% (2001) to 82% (2009). Total MHT use has steadily declined. Increased use of lower dose and vaginal products reflects clinical recommendations. Uptake of these products, however, has been modest, and substantial use of MHT continues in older women. © 2011 by The North American Menopause Society

  6. Mental Health Care Delivered to Younger Adults and Older Adults by Office-Based Physicians Nationally

    PubMed Central

    Maust, Donovan T.; Kales, Helen C.; Blow, Frederic C.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objectives While older adults comprise the most rapidly growing population segment, little is known about the provision of mental health care to older adults relative to younger adults. Design Analysis of the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey. Setting Visits to office-based physicians, 2007-2010 (N=100,661). Participants Patient encounters with a mental health diagnosis or treatment, defined as visits: 1) resulting in mental disorder diagnosis; 2) including prescription or continuation of psychotropic medication; 3) to a psychiatrist; or 4) including psychotherapy. Measurements Visits were stratified by patient age (21-64y, ≥65y) and the percentage of each mental health care visit type among all office-based care was estimated by age group and converted to an annual rate per 100 population. Within each visit type, age groups were compared by clinical and demographic characteristics such as gender, diagnosed mental illness, and use of psychotropic agents. Results Relative to younger adults, older adults had a smaller proportion of visits with a mental disorder diagnosis (4.76% v. 9.53%, X2=228.21, p<.001), to a psychiatrist (0.94% v. 4.01%; X2=233.76, p<.001), and including psychotherapy (0.65% v. 2.30%; X2=57.65, p<.001). The percentage of older adult psychotropic visits was slightly smaller than among younger adults (18.06% v. 19.23%; X2=5.33, p=.02). Older adults had a higher rate of psychotropic visits (121.40 per 100 population) than adults (56.77). Conclusions Less care of older adults is from psychiatrists or incorporates psychotherapy. On a per-population basis, older adults have a far higher rate of psychotropic use compared to younger adults. Addressing the mental health care needs of older adults will require care in non-specialty settings. PMID:26140422

  7. National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey: terrorism preparedness among office-based physicians, United States, 2003-2004.

    PubMed

    Niska, Richard W; Burt, Catharine W

    2007-07-24

    This investigation describes terrorism preparedness among U.S. office-based physicians and their staffs in identification and diagnosis of terrorism-related conditions, training methods and sources, and assistance with diagnosis and reporting. The National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS) is an annual national probability survey of approximately 3,000 U.S. nonfederal, office-based physicians. Terrorism preparedness items were added in 2003 and 2004. About 40 percent of physicians or their staffs received training for anthrax or smallpox, but less than one-third received training for any of the other exposures. About 42.2 percent of physicians, 13.5 percent of nurses, and 9.4 percent of physician assistants and nurse practitioners received training in at least one exposure. Approximately 56.2 percent of physicians indicated that they would contact state or local public health officials for diagnostic assistance more frequently than federal agencies and other sources. About 67.1 percent of physicians indicated that they would report a suspected terrorism-related condition to the state or local health department, 50.9 percent to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 27.5 percent to the local hospital, and 1.8 percent to a local elected official's office. Approximately 78.8 percent of physicians had contact information for the local health department readily available. About 53.7 percent had reviewed the diseases reportable to health departments since September 2001, 11.3 percent had reviewed them before that month, and 35 percent had never reviewed them.

  8. Family Homeostasis and the Physician

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Don D.

    1965-01-01

    Physical illness, including psychosomatic disorders, often play an unexpected role in maintaining emotional balances within the family. The outbreak of such disorders, conversely, can be utilized by the physician as a barometer of family emotional difficulties. PMID:5828172

  9. Family Physicians and Exercise Counseling

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Douglas M.C.; Ciliska, Donna; Singer, Joel; Williams, Kimberly; Alleyne, Julia; Lindsay, Elizabeth

    1992-01-01

    This trial took 22 volunteer family physicians and randomly exposed some to training intervention and some to no training to study the effect on frequency and quality of exercise prescription to ambulatory adults. During the 6 weeks after training, the trained physicians addressed the issue of exercise with 35.3% of patients. The untrained physicians discussed exercise with only 8.6% of their patients. PMID:21221270

  10. High physician concern about malpractice risk predicts more aggressive diagnostic testing in office-based practice.

    PubMed

    Carrier, Emily R; Reschovsky, James D; Katz, David A; Mello, Michelle M

    2013-08-01

    Despite widespread agreement that physicians who practice defensive medicine drive up health care costs, the extent to which defensive medicine increases costs is unclear. The differences in findings to date stem in part from the use of two distinct approaches for assessing physicians' perceived malpractice risk. In this study we used an alternative strategy: We linked physicians' responses regarding their levels of malpractice concern as reported in the 2008 Health Tracking Physician Survey to Medicare Parts A and B claims for the patients they treated during the study period, 2007-09. We found that physicians who reported a high level of malpractice concern were most likely to engage in practices that would be considered defensive when diagnosing patients who visited their offices with new complaints of chest pain, headache, or lower back pain. No consistent relationship was seen, however, when state-level indicators of malpractice risk replaced self-rated concern. Reducing defensive medicine may require approaches focused on physicians' perceptions of legal risk and the underlying factors driving those perceptions.

  11. Giving office-based physicians electronic access to patients' prior imaging and lab results did not deter ordering of tests.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Danny; Bor, David H; Woolhandler, Stephanie; Himmelstein, David U

    2012-03-01

    Policy-based incentives for health care providers to adopt health information technology are predicated on the assumption that, among other things, electronic access to patient test results and medical records will reduce diagnostic testing and save money. To test the generalizability of findings that support this assumption, we analyzed the records of 28,741 patient visits to a nationally representative sample of 1,187 office-based physicians in 2008. Physicians' access to computerized imaging results (sometimes, but not necessarily, through an electronic health record) was associated with a 40-70 percent greater likelihood of an imaging test being ordered. The electronic availability of lab test results was also associated with ordering of additional blood tests. The availability of an electronic health record in itself had no apparent impact on ordering; the electronic access to test results appears to have been the key. These findings raise the possibility that, as currently implemented, electronic access does not decrease test ordering in the office setting and may even increase it, possibly because of system features that are enticements to ordering. We conclude that use of these health information technologies, whatever their other benefits, remains unproven as an effective cost-control strategy with respect to reducing the ordering of unnecessary tests.

  12. Primary care physicians in underserved areas. Family physicians dominate.

    PubMed Central

    Burnett, W H; Mark, D H; Midtling, J E; Zellner, B B

    1995-01-01

    Using the definitions of "medically underserved areas" developed by the California Health Manpower Policy Commission and data on physician location derived from a survey of California physicians applying for licensure or relicensure between 1984 and 1986, we examined the extent to which different kinds of primary care physicians located in underserved areas. Among physicians completing postgraduate medical education after 1974, board-certified family physicians were 3 times more likely to locate in medically underserved rural communities than were other primary care physicians. Non-board-certified family and general physicians were 1.6 times more likely than other non-board-certified primary care physicians to locate in rural underserved areas. Family and general practice physicians also showed a slightly greater likelihood than other primary care physicians of being located in urban underserved areas. PMID:8553635

  13. Impact of patients' preexisting metabolic risk factors on the choice of antipsychotics by office-based physicians.

    PubMed

    Li, Chenghui; Mittal, Dinesh; Owen, Richard R

    2011-12-01

    This study examined the association between patients' preexisting metabolic risk factors and the physician's choice of antipsychotic agent based on its propensity to cause metabolic side effects. Data were from the 2005-2007 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS); 1,898 office-based visits were identified during which prescriptions of antipsychotics were mentioned. Antipsychotics were classified as having high, medium, or low risk based on their propensity to cause metabolic abnormalities; a separate category for antipsychotic polypharmacy was specified for visits during which multiple antipsychotics were mentioned. Patients' preexisting metabolic risk was assessed by the presence of diabetes, hyperlipidemia, obesity, or hypertension. With controls for other patient and physician characteristics, multinomial logit regression models were applied to examine the association between the level of metabolic risk of the prescribed antipsychotic agents and the patient's baseline metabolic risk. Compared with patients of normal weight or who were underweight according to body mass index, obese patients were less likely to receive antipsychotics with high risk (relative risk ratio [RRR]=.14, 95% confidence interval [CI]=.05-.37) or medium risk (RRR=.39, CI=.19-.78) of causing metabolic abnormalities. However, having preexisting metabolic conditions, such as diabetes, hyperlipidemia, or hypertension, had little effect on physicians' choice of antipsychotics with regard to metabolic risk properties. Patients' weight appeared to be the key consideration in providers' decision to order or continue antipsychotics according to the associated metabolic risk. Further studies are warranted to understand the factors that determine the choice of antipsychotics for patients with preexisting metabolic conditions, such as diabetes, hyperlipidemia, or hypertension.

  14. Indiana family physician attitudes and practices concerning smoking cessation.

    PubMed

    Saywell, R M; Jay, S J; Lukas, P J; Casebeer, L L; Mybeck, K C; Parchman, M L; Haley, A J

    1996-01-01

    Most physicians are aware of the health benefits of smoking cessation and agree they have a responsibility to help smokers quit. Many physicians, however, do not regularly address smoking cessation with their patients. Questionnaires were sent to 2,095 family practice physicians in Indiana. Information obtained included: demographic data; office-based smoking cessation practices; counseling; and physicians' perceptions of intervention outcomes. Most physicians (86%) asked new patients if they smoked, and 23% questioned patients about their exposure to passive smoke. Younger physicians, female physicians and urban physicians were more likely to ask new patients if they smoked. A formal smoking cessation program was used by 28% of the responding physicians. Among those not using a program, 7% reported plans to implement one in the coming year, 40% were not planning to implement one, and 53% were unsure. Physician and practice characteristics were not correlated with the use of smoking cessation programs. Only 11% of physicians considered their smoking cessation counseling skills to be excellent; 27% indicated the need for improvement in skills. One-half (52%) believed their counseling efforts were effective; almost half (45%) believed that current reimbursement policies limited their involvement in smoking cessation interventions. Most respondents have not instituted smoking cessation programs in their practices. It is likely that a combination of strategies, including both undergraduate, graduate and continuing medical education programs and reform in reimbursement practices for cessation programs, will be required to achieve significant increases in long-term smoking abstinence rates.

  15. A physician's office-based digoxin assay (Seralyzer) evaluated for interference by endogenous digoxin-like immunoreactive factors.

    PubMed

    Matheke, M L; Valdes, R

    1989-01-01

    A digoxin test for a physician's office based-chemistry analyzer (Ames Seralyzer) was evaluated for possible interference by digoxin-like immunoreactive factors (DLIF). Sera from patients likely to have high concentrations of DLIF (renal and hepatic patients, pregnant women, and neonates) as well as from normal patients and umbilical cord blood were analysed by the Seralyzer digoxin immunoassay and by a fluorescence polarization digoxin immunoassay (Abbott TDx) known to detect DLIF. For all patients who were not taking digoxin (n = 85) only four patients (4.7 percent) measured apparent digoxin values greater than 0.2 ng per mL by the Seralyzer compared to 64 (75 percent) by the TDx analyzer. Measurements of DLIF from adrenal extracts demonstrated a 17-fold greater potency for detection of DLIF by the TDx (2.9 ng per mL) compared to the Seralyzer technique (0.18 ng per mL). However, recovery data suggest that the presence of digoxin reduces the potency of DLIF interference as a function of increasing digoxin concentrations especially for the TDx assay. This diminished DLIF crossreactivity in the presence of digoxin is one explanation for the comparable correlation observed for both non-renal and renal failure patients taking digoxin when measured by these two immunoassays.

  16. Medical interviewing by exemplary family physicians.

    PubMed

    Marvel, M K; Doherty, W J; Weiner, E

    1998-11-01

    Little is known about the extent to which models of ideal physician-patient interviews are actually practiced by physicians. This study examined physician-patient communication during medical interviews by exemplary family physicians. We performed a cross-sectional study of verbal exchanges using 300 transcripts of office visits made to two groups of family physicians: 9 exemplars and 20 controls. The exemplars were family physicians with fellowship training in family therapy; the control group consisted of a convenience sample of board-certified family physicians with no special training in communication skills or counseling. Data were collected from June 1995 to July 1996. Physician statements were rated according to the Level of Physician Involvement model, which measures physicians' abilities to collaborate with patients and address the psychosocial concerns of patients and their families. Patient satisfaction ratings were obtained by a research assistant immediately after the visit. Compared with the control physicians, the exemplars showed higher levels of psychosocial involvement with patients during routine office visits. In particular, they involved patients more in the medical interview, offered more emotional support, and showed more family involvement. Despite this greater depth of involvement, the length of office visits did not differ between the two physician groups. Our findings show that exemplars were more involved with their patients and provided more family-oriented care than community physicians. Exemplars routinely applied a biopsychosocial approach, collaborating with patients and addressing psychosocial topics without sacrificing efficiency, while community physicians focused on biomedical issues.

  17. Colonoscopy: Perspectives for Family Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, R. D. A.

    1983-01-01

    Fiber-optic endoscopy is an important investigation of the lower gastrointestinal tract, whether or not the radiologist has discovered a lesion. Colonoscopy affords a unique opportunity to visualize the entire colonic mucosa. At the same time, the physician can obtain biopsy specimens, remove polyps, and decompress volvuli. Most experienced endoscopists can reach the cecum in over 90% of patients. If colonoscopy is properly performed, it has a low risk of complications, such as perforation and bleeding. The few absolute contraindications include serious illnesses such as acute myocardial infarction and severe acute inflammatory bowel diseases. Family physicians referring patients for investigations of lower gastrointestinal problems should explain that colonoscopy is an adjunct to, not a replacement for, a barium enema examination. If possible they should find out what preparation the patient will require. PMID:21283399

  18. [Burnout syndrome among family physicians].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Cruz, Juan; Mugártegui-Sánchez, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    burnout syndrome is a state of physical and emotional exhaustion that can occur among workers who interact directly with others. This could affect job performance. The objective was to determine the prevalence of this syndrome and its associated factors among family physicians. a cross-sectional survey applying the Maslach Burnout Inventory was conducted in a selected convenience non-probability sampling of family physicians. Central tendency and dispersion measures were used in determining the prevalence of burnout syndrome; the associated factors were analysed by χ(2) test. there were 59 cases of burnout syndrome, 36 had involvement in a single component, 15 in 2 and 8 were affected in 3 components; we observed that 35 % of positive cases reported doing an average of 10 extra shifts a month (p = 0.013). Having a second job was associated with positive cases of burnout syndrome. the results are consistent with similar studies. Working extra shifts or having a second job were the related factors most associated to this syndrome.

  19. PCBs and the Family Physician

    PubMed Central

    Cappon, I.D.

    1986-01-01

    Pcbs are widespread environmental contaminants present in virtually every mammal on earth. Great controversy and debate has been evoked over the past two decades concerning their potential toxicity. They, along with other organochlorine compounds such as DDT, have been reasonably well studied in field and experimental situations. In general, PCBs are not very toxic, especially in concentrations to which most people are exposed, even those who work in the industrial setting or who eat contaminated fish. In terms of environmental hazards to health, PCBs should be considered as relatively low on the list. The public cannot depend on media information as a source of objective knowledge on controversial compounds like PCBs. The family physician should be able to provide to concerned individuals objective information on the definition, sources and relative toxicity of PCBs. PMID:21267326

  20. Electronic health record systems and intent to apply for meaningful use incentives among office-based physician practices: United States, 2001-2011.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Chun-Ju; Hing, Esther; Socey, Thomas C; Cai, Bill

    2011-11-01

    An increasing trend in EMR/EHR system use among office-based physicians was noted from 2001 through preliminary 2011 estimates. In 2011, the NAMCS mail survey showed about 57% of office-based physicians used any EMR/EHR system, a 12% increase from the 2010 estimate. Between 2010 and 2011, the percentage of physicians who reported having systems meeting the criteria for a basic system increased 36%. Adoption of EMR/EHR systems varied greatly by state. In 2011, the percentage of physicians using any EMR/EHR system ranged from 40% in Louisiana to 84% in North Dakota. Compared with the national average, 3 states had a significantly lower percentage of office-based physicians using any EMR/EHR system, and 11 states had a significantly higher percentage. The percentage of physicians having a system that met the criteria for a basic system ranged from 16% in New Jersey to 61% in Minnesota. Compared with the national average, six states had a significantly lower percentage of office-based physicians with a basic system, and eight states had a significantly higher percentage. In 2011, 52% of physicians reported intending to apply for the Medicare or Medicaid EHR incentive payments, a 26% increase from 2010. In 2010, interest among physicians in applying for meaningful use incentive payments was similar to the national average (41%) across most states. In only four states (Alaska, New York, North Dakota, and West Virginia) and the District of Columbia was the percentage lower than the national average. To qualify for Stage 1 meaningful use incentive payments, eligible physicians need to meet all 15 Stage 1 Core Set objectives and 5 of 10 Menu Set objectives, using certified EHR systems (see "Definitions"). In this report, estimates of physicians’ readiness to meet Stage 1 Core Set meaningful use measures were limited to data collected on the computerized functions needed to meet eight Stage 1 objectives. A previous study found that 15% of physicians eligible to apply for

  1. Case reviews in the family physician's office.

    PubMed

    Kates, N; Craven, M; Webb, S; Low, J; Perry, K

    1992-02-01

    The majority of patients with emotional or psychiatric disorders are treated in the primary care setting without psychiatric input. Psychiatrists need to find ways of helping family physicians manage these patients without necessarily taking over their care. One way of achieving this is for a psychiatric consultant to visit the family physician's office on a regular basis to discuss the physician's problem cases. This paper describes such a pilot project, outlines the kinds of problems family physicians discussed and recommendations that were made, and discusses the benefits of this collaborative approach.

  2. Rural Idaho Family Physicians' Scope of Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Ed; Schmitz, David; Epperly, Ted; Nukui, Ayaka; Miller, Carissa Moffat

    2010-01-01

    Context: Scope of practice is an important factor in both training and recruiting rural family physicians. Purpose: To assess rural Idaho family physicians' scope of practice and to examine variations in scope of practice across variables such as gender, age and employment status. Methods: A survey instrument was developed based on a literature…

  3. Rural Idaho Family Physicians' Scope of Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Ed; Schmitz, David; Epperly, Ted; Nukui, Ayaka; Miller, Carissa Moffat

    2010-01-01

    Context: Scope of practice is an important factor in both training and recruiting rural family physicians. Purpose: To assess rural Idaho family physicians' scope of practice and to examine variations in scope of practice across variables such as gender, age and employment status. Methods: A survey instrument was developed based on a literature…

  4. Colorado family physicians' attitudes toward medical marijuana.

    PubMed

    Kondrad, Elin; Reid, Alfred

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decade, the use of medical marijuana has expanded dramatically; it is now permitted in 16 states and the District of Columbia. Our study of family physicians in Colorado is the first to gather information about physician attitudes toward this evolving practice. We distributed an anonymous web-based electronic survey to the 1727 members of the Colorado Academy of Family Physicians' listserv. Items included individual and practice characteristics as well as experience with and attitudes toward medical marijuana. Five hundred twenty family physicians responded (30% response rate). Of these, 46% did not support physicians recommending medical marijuana; only 19% thought that physicians should recommend it. A minority thought that marijuana conferred significant benefits to physical (27%) and mental (15%) health. Most agreed that marijuana poses serious mental (64%) and physical (61%) health risks. Eighty-one percent agreed that physicians should have formal training before recommending medical marijuana, and 92% agreed that continuing medical education about medical marijuana should be available to family physicians. Despite a high prevalence of use in Colorado, most family physicians are not convinced of marijuana's health benefits and believe its use carries risks. Nearly all agreed on the need for further medical education about medical marijuana.

  5. Rural Idaho family physicians' scope of practice.

    PubMed

    Baker, Ed; Schmitz, David; Epperly, Ted; Nukui, Ayaka; Miller, Carissa Moffat

    2010-01-01

    Scope of practice is an important factor in both training and recruiting rural family physicians. To assess rural Idaho family physicians' scope of practice and to examine variations in scope of practice across variables such as gender, age and employment status. A survey instrument was developed based on a literature review and was validated by physician educators, practicing family physicians and executives at the state hospital association. This survey was mailed to rural family physicians practicing in Idaho counties with populations of less than 50,000. Descriptive, bivariate and multivariate analyses were employed to describe and compare scope of practice patterns. Responses were obtained from 92 of 248 physicians (37.1% response rate). Idaho rural family physicians reported providing obstetrical services in the areas of prenatal care (57.6%), vaginal delivery (52.2%) and C-sections (37.0%); other operating room services (43.5%); esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) or colonoscopy services (22.5%); emergency room coverage (48.9%); inpatient admissions (88.9%); mental health services (90.1%); nursing home services (88.0%); and supervision to midlevel care providers (72.5%). Bivariate analyses showed differences in scope of practice patterns across gender, age group and employment status. Binomial logistic regression models indicated that younger physicians were roughly 3 times more likely to provide prenatal care and perform vaginal deliveries than older physicians in rural areas. Idaho practicing rural family physicians report a broad scope of practice. Younger, employed and female rural family medicine physicians are important subgroups for further study.

  6. Family physicians and HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Hall, N; Crochette, N; Blanchi, S; Lavoix, A; Billaud, E; Baron, C; Abgueguen, P; Perré, P; Rabier, V

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to describe the current and desired involvement of family physicians (FPs) in the treatment of HIV patients (screening practices, potential training and patient follow-up) to reduce the duration and frequency of their hospital treatment. We conducted a descriptive cross-sectional survey between 2011 and 2012 with the support of COREVIH (Regional Coordinating Committee on HIV). We sent a self-assessment questionnaire to all FPs of the Pays de la Loire region to enquire about their HIV screening practices and expectations for the management of HIV patients. A total of 871 FPs completed the questionnaire (response rate: 30.4%). A total of 54.2% said to provide care to HIV patients; the mean number of HIV patients per FP was estimated at 1.4. With regard to HIV screening, 12.2% systematically suggest an HIV serology to their patients and 72.7% always suggest it to pregnant women. About 45.4% of responding FPs said to be willing to manage HIV patients (clinical and biological monitoring, compliance checks and prescription renewal). FPs mainly reported the lack of training and the low number of HIV patients as a barrier to their further involvement in the management of HIV patients. The responding FPs provide care to very few HIV patients. They are, however, willing to be more involved in the routine care of these patients. Medical training provided by COREVIH would help improve HIV screening. The management of HIV patients could thus be handed over to willing FPs. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  7. Care partnerships between family physicians and rheumatologists.

    PubMed

    Lou, Benjamin; DE Civita, Mirella; Ehrmann Feldman, Debbie; Bissonauth, Asvina; Bernatsky, Sasha

    2011-09-01

    To describe care partnerships between family physicians and rheumatologists. A random sample (20%, n = 478) of family physicians was mailed a questionnaire, asking if there was at least 1 particular rheumatologist to whom the physician tended to refer patients. If the answer was affirmative, the physician would be considered as having a "care partnership" with that rheumatologist. The family physician then rated, on a 5-point scale, factors of importance regarding the relationship with that rheumatologist. The questionnaire was completed by 84/462 (18.2%) of family physicians; 52/84 (61.9%) reported having rheumatology care partnerships according to our definition. Regarding interactions with rheumatologists, most respondents rated the following as important (score ≥ 4): adequate communication and information exchange (44/50, 88.0%); waiting time for new patients (40/50, 80.0%); clear and appropriate balance of responsibilities (39/49, 79.6%); and patient feedback and preferences (34/50, 68%). Male family physicians were more likely than females to accord high importance to personal knowledge of the rheumatologist, and to physical proximity of the rheumatologist's practice. Regarding relationships with rheumatologists, 30/50 (60.0%) of respondents felt communication and information exchange were adequate, and 35/50 (70.0%) felt they had a clear balance of responsibilities. Almost two-thirds of family physicians have rheumatology care partnerships, according to our definition. In this partnership, establishing adequate communication and shorter waiting time seem of paramount importance to family physicians. A balanced sharing of responsibilities and patients' preferences are also valued. Although many physicians reported adequate communication and clear and appropriate balance of responsibilities in their current interactions with rheumatologists, there appears to be room for improvement.

  8. Selection of the Family Physician

    PubMed Central

    Christ, L. W. A. C.; Harris, A. L.; Korchinski, E. D.

    1976-01-01

    This study was conducted to examine the characteristics of ‘initial visits’ by patients, contrasted with ‘average visits’, to discover what is needed to establish a satisfactory patient-physician relationship leading to long term continuous care. In the initial visit, the patient presents with a relatively simple problem which will enable the physician to demonstrate his ability without unduly taxing his skills. This suggests that patients create an opportunity for a thorough face-to-face contact to provide an opportunity for the physician to display his ability so that the patient's desire for a long term relationship can be achieved. The study also suggests that patients' expectations have changed in proportion to changes in the mode of medical practice. PMID:21308071

  9. Family Physician Perspectives on Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Orange, Jordan S.; Seeborg, Filiz O.; Boyle, Marcia; Scalchunes, Christopher; Hernandez-Trujillo, Vivian

    2016-01-01

    Primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDs) include over 250 diverse disorders. The current study assessed management of PID by family practice physicians. The American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology Primary Immunodeficiency Committee and the Immune Deficiency Foundation conducted an incentivized mail survey of family practice physician members of the American Medical Association and the American Osteopathic Association in direct patient care. Responses were compared with subspecialist immunologist responses from a similar survey. Surveys were returned by 528 (of 4500 surveys mailed) family practice physicians, of whom 44% reported following ≥1 patient with PID. Selective immunoglobulin A deficiency (21%) and chronic granulomatous disease (11%) were most common and were followed by significantly more subspecialist immunologists (P < 0.05). Use of intravenously administered immunoglobulin and live viral vaccinations across PID was significantly different (P < 0.05). Few family practice physicians were aware of professional guidelines for diagnosis and management of PID (4 vs. 79% of subspecialist immunologists, P < 0.05). Family practice physicians will likely encounter patients with PID diagnoses during their career. Differences in how family practice physicians and subspecialist immunologists manage patients with PID underscore areas where improved educational and training initiatives may benefit patient care. PMID:27066486

  10. Sustaining Family Physicians in Urban Underserved Settings.

    PubMed

    Getzin, Anne; Bobot, Bonnie L; Simpson, Deborah

    2016-11-01

    Our objective was to identify factors that sustain family physicians practicing in Milwaukee's underserved urban areas. Family physicians with clinical careers in Milwaukee's urban, underserved communities were identified and invited to participate in a 45-60 minute interview using a literature-based semi-structured protocol. Each interview was transcribed and de-identified prior to independent analysis using a grounded theory qualitative approach by two authors to yield sustaining themes. The project was determined not human subjects research per Aurora Health Care IRB. Sixteen family physicians were identified; six of 11 who met inclusion criteria agreed to interview. Four general domains central to sustaining family physicians working with underserved populations were identified: (1) cognitive traits and qualities (trouble shooting, resilience, flexibility), (2) core values (medicine as mechanism to address social justice), (3) skills (self-care, communication, clinical management), and (4) support systems (supportive family/employer, job flexibility, leadership opportunities, staff function as team). The formation of these personal attributes and skills was partly shaped by experiences (from childhood to medical training to work experience) and by personal drivers that varied by individual. Common was that the challenges of providing care in urban underserved settings was seen as rewarding in and of itself and aligned with these physicians' values and skills. Family physicians working with underserved populations described possessing a combination of values, cognitive qualities, skill sets, and support systems. While family physicians face complex challenges in quality care goals in urban underserved settings, training in the personal and professional skill sets identified by participants may improve physician retention in such communities.

  11. Electronic Health Record Systems and Intent to Apply for Meaningful Use Incentives among Office-based Physician ...

    MedlinePlus

    ... decision support rule implemented. In this report, the percentage of physicians who had systems that would allow them to meet eight Stage 1 Core Set meaningful use objectives excludes unknowns. Statements of differences in estimates are based on statistical tests with ...

  12. Family physician participation in maintenance of certification.

    PubMed

    Xierali, Imam M; Rinaldo, Jason C B; Green, Larry A; Petterson, Stephen M; Phillips, Robert L; Bazemore, Andrew W; Newton, Warren P; Puffer, James C

    2011-01-01

    The American Board of Family Medicine has completed the 7-year transition of all of its diplomates into Maintenance of Certification (MOC). Participation in this voluntary process must be broad-based and balanced for MOC to have any practical national impact on health care. This study explores family physicians' geographic, demographic, and practice characteristics associated with the variations in MOC participation to examine whether MOC has potential as a viable mechanism for dissemination of information or for altering practice. To investigate characteristics associated with differential participation in MOC by family physicians, we performed a cross-sectional comparison of all active family physicians using descriptive and multinomial logistic regression analyses. Eighty-five percent of active family physicians in this study (n = 70,323) have current board certification. Ninety-one percent of all active board-certified family physicians eligible for MOC are participating in MOC. Physicians who work in poorer neighborhoods (odds ratio [OR] = 1.105; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.038-1.176), who are US-born or foreign-born international medical graduates (OR = 1.221; 95% CI, 1.124-1.326; OR = 1.444; 95% CI, 1.238-1.684, respectively), or who are solo practitioners (OR = 1.460; 95% CI, 1.345-1.585) are more likely to have missed initial MOC requirements than those from a large, undifferentiated reference group of certified family physicians. When age is held constant, female physicians are less likely to miss initial MOC requirements (OR = 0.849; 95% CI, 0.794-0.908). Physicians practicing in rural areas were found to be performing similarly in meeting initial MOC requirements to those in urban areas (OR = 0.966; 95% CI, 0.919-1.015, not significant). Large numbers of family physicians are participating in MOC. The significant association between practicing in underserved areas and lapsed board certification, however, warrants more research examining causes of

  13. Patient expectations from consultation with family physician.

    PubMed

    Tähepold, Heli; van den Brink-Muinen, Atie; Maaroos, Heidi-Ingrid

    2006-02-01

    To assess patient expectations from a consultation with a family physician and determine the level and area of patient involvement in the communication process. We videotaped 403 consecutive patient-physician consultations in the offices of 27 Estonian family physicians. All videotaped patients completed a questionnaire about their expectations before and after the consultation. Patient assessment of expected and obtained psychosocial support and biomedical information during the consultation with physician were compared. Two investigators independently assessed patient involvement in the consultation process on the basis of videotaped consultations, using a 5-point scale. Receiving an explanation of biomedical information and discussing psychosocial aspects was assessed as important by 57.4-66.8% and 17.8-36.1% patients, respectively. The physicians did not meet patient expectations in the case of three biomedical aspects of consultation: cause of symptoms, severity of symptoms, and test results. Younger patients evaluated the importance of discussing psychological problems higher than older patients. The involvement of the patients was high in the problem defining process, in the physicians' overall responsiveness to the patients, and in their picking up of the patient's cues. The patients were involved less in the decision making process. Discussing biomedical issues was more important for the patients than discussing psychological issues. The patients wanted to hear more about the cause and seriousness of their symptoms and about test results. The family physicians provided more psychosocial care than the patients had expected. Considering high patient involvement in the consultation process and the overall responsiveness of the family physicians to the patients during the consultation, Estonian physicians provide patient-centered consultations.

  14. Fewer family physicians are in solo practices.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Lars E; Baxley, Elizabeth; Jaén, Carlos Roberto; Phillips, Robert L

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 20 years there has been a statistically significant trend toward fewer family physicians identifying as being in solo practice. Further study to determine the reasons for this decline and its impact on access to care will be critical because rural areas are more dependent on solo practitioners. © Copyright 2015 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  15. Mental health activities of family physicians.

    PubMed

    Cassata, D M; Kirkman-Liff, B L

    1981-04-01

    A questionnaire survey of residency trained graduates and nonresidency trained family physicians showed both groups reporting relatively infrequent practice of behavioral medicine. Referrals and counseling sessions/visits produce a combined total of 20 activities per month, or two to four percent of all patient encounters, even though the physicians in the sample reported that 33 percent of their diagnoses were behavioral/psychological. More than 85 percent of the physicians reported access to more than one mental health provider. The six most common health problems encountered in the office were depression, anxiety, obesity, marital discord, alcohol abuse, and sexual problems. Physicians responding to this survey expressed an interest in continuing education programs that emphasize individual, marital, and parenting counseling, and psychopharmacology. There is a major need to improve the mental health component of residency training, which will enable physicians to better manage psychosocial problems in practice settings.

  16. Trends in the use of buprenorphine by office-based physicians in the United States, 2003-2013.

    PubMed

    Turner, Lydia; Kruszewski, Stefan P; Alexander, G Caleb

    2014-11-19

    Despite buprenorphine's promise as a novel therapy for opioid dependence, little is known about its clinical adoption. We characterized trends in ambulatory use of buprenorphine in the United States. Cross-sectional, descriptive analyses of buprenorphine utilization from 2003 to 2013 using the IMS Health National Disease and Therapeutic Index, a nationally representative audit of ambulatory care. The primary unit of analysis was an office visit where buprenorphine was used for opioid dependence (treatment visit). Between 2003 and 2013, there was significant uptake of buprenorphine in ambulatory treatment visits, from 0.16 million [M] (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.10-0.20) visits in 2003 to 2.1M (CI 1.9-2.3M) treatment visits during 2013. Approximately 90% involved the use of brand name combination buprenorphine/naloxone (Suboxone), although this percentage decreased modestly to 80% by the last quarter of 2013. Buprenorphine prescribing increased among all specialties, but the proportion accounted for by primary care physicians increased significantly from 6.0% in 2003 to 63.5% in 2013 and decreased among psychiatrists from 92.2% to 32.8% over the same time period. The use of buprenorphine products to treat opioid dependence has increased significantly in the past 10 years and has shifted to greater use by primary care physicians, indicating a rapidly changing face of opioid maintenance therapy in the United States. (Am J Addict 2014;XX:XX-XX). © American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry.

  17. Trends in the use of buprenorphine by office-based physicians in the United States, 2003-2013.

    PubMed

    Turner, Lydia; Kruszewski, Stefan P; Alexander, G Caleb

    2015-01-01

    Despite buprenorphine's promise as a novel therapy for opioid dependence, little is known about its clinical adoption. We characterized trends in ambulatory use of buprenorphine in the United States. Cross-sectional, descriptive analyses of buprenorphine utilization from 2003 to 2013 using the IMS Health National Disease and Therapeutic Index, a nationally representative audit of ambulatory care. The primary unit of analysis was an office visit where buprenorphine was used for opioid dependence (treatment visit). Between 2003 and 2013, there was significant uptake of buprenorphine in ambulatory treatment visits, from 0.16 million [M] (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.10-0.20) visits in 2003 to 2.1M (CI 1.9-2.3M) treatment visits during 2013. Approximately 90% involved the use of brand name combination buprenorphine/naloxone (Suboxone), although this percentage decreased modestly to 80% by the last quarter of 2013. Buprenorphine prescribing increased among all specialties, but the proportion accounted for by primary care physicians increased significantly from 6.0% in 2003 to 63.5% in 2013 and decreased among psychiatrists from 92.2% to 32.8% over the same time period. The use of buprenorphine products to treat opioid dependence has increased significantly in the past 10 years and has shifted to greater use by primary care physicians, indicating a rapidly changing face of opioid maintenance therapy in the United States. © American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry.

  18. Collaboration between family physicians and nurse clinicians

    PubMed Central

    Maheux, Brigitte; Côté, Luc; Sobanjo, Omobola; Authier, Louise; Lajeunesse, Julie; Leclerc, Mylène; Lefort, Louise

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine whether graduating family physicians are exposed to collaboration between family physicians and nurse clinicians during their training, as well as their opinions about shared care between doctors and nurse clinicians in the delivery of patient care. Design Anonymous online survey. Setting Two French-Canadian university family medicine residency programs. Participants The 2010 and 2011 graduating family physicians (N = 343) from the University of Montreal and Laval University in Quebec. Main outcome measures The extent to which nurse clinicians in graduating family physicians’ training milieu were involved in preventive and curative patient care activities, and graduates’ opinions about nurse clinicians sharing care with physicians. Results Of 343 graduates, 186 (54.2%) participated in the survey. Although as residents in family medicine their exposure to shared care with nurse clinicians was somewhat limited, respondents indicated that they were generally quite open to the idea of sharing care with nurse clinicians. More than 70% of respondents agreed or strongly agreed that nurse clinicians could adjust, according to protocols of clinical guidelines, the treatment of patients with diabetes, hypertension, and asthma, as well as regulate medication for pain control in terminally ill patients. By contrast, respondents were less favourable to nurse clinicians adjusting the treatment of patients with depression. More than 80% of respondents agreed or strongly agreed that nurse clinicians could initiate treatment via a medical directive for routine hormonal contraception, acne, uncomplicated cystitis, and sexually transmitted infections. Respondents’ opinions on nurse clinicians initiating treatment for pharyngitis and otitis were more divided. Conclusion Graduating family physicians are quite open to collaborating with nurse clinicians. Although they have observed some collaboration between physicians and nurses, there are areas of

  19. Research in the Family Physician's Office

    PubMed Central

    Style, Alec J.

    1977-01-01

    Family medicine as a specialty has now “come of age.” To maintain its new status, the specialty must be able to survive the vigorous assessment that is given other specialties by the public, the profession, and the academic community. One way of achieving this is for the family physician to do research of excellent quality and quantity. Traditionally, medical research has been done by secondary and tertiary care specialists and little has been done on the primary care needs of the black patient. The research done is of limited value for the family physician's daily work, a reason why family practitioners must do their own research. A research methodology has been described which is readily applicable to the family physician's office. It is an extension of good record keeping and includes Problem-Oriented Medical Records, an Age-Sex Register, a Daily Worksheet or Encounter Form, and a Morbidity Index, incorporating the “Pri-Care” (ICHPPC) code. The system is simple to use and requires only a small increase in administrative time. Every family physician is encouraged to consider its use. PMID:752730

  20. Family physicians and dementia in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Pimlott, Nicholas J.G.; Persaud, Malini; Drummond, Neil; Cohen, Carole A.; Silvius, James L.; Seigel, Karen; Hollingworth, Gary R.; Dalziel, William B.

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To assess Canadian family physicians’ awareness of, attitudes toward, and use of the 1999 Canadian Consensus Conference on Dementia (CCCD) clinical practice guidelines (CPGs); to explore the barriers and enablers to implementing dementia CPGs in clinical practice; and to identify more effective strategies for future dementia guideline development and dissemination. DESIGN Qualitative study using focus groups. SETTING Academic family practice clinics in Calgary, Alta, Ottawa, Ont, and Toronto, Ont. PARTICIPANTS Eighteen family physicians. METHODS Using a semistructured interview guide, we conducted 4 qualitative focus groups of 4 to 6 family physicians whose practices we had audited in a previous study. Transcripts were coded using an inductive data analytic strategy, and categories and themes were identified and described using the principles of thematic analysis. MAIN FINDINGS Four major themes emerged from the focus group discussions. Family physicians 1) were minimally aware of the existence and the detailed contents of the CCCD guidelines; 2) had strong views about the purposes of guidelines in general; 3) expressed strong concerns about the role of the pharmaceutical industry in the development of such guidelines; and 4) had many ideas to improve future dementia guidelines and CPGs in general. CONCLUSION Family physicians were minimally aware of the 1999 CCCD CPGs. They acknowledged, however, the potential of future CPGs to assist them in patient care and offered many strategies to improve the development and dissemination of future dementia guidelines. Future guidelines should more accurately reflect the day-to-day practice experiences and challenges of family physicians, and guideline developers should also be cognizant of family physicians’ perceptions that pharmaceutical companies’ funding of CPGs undermines the objectivity and credibility of those guidelines. PMID:19439707

  1. The Family Physician's Role During Disasters

    PubMed Central

    Crosby, John

    1986-01-01

    Family physicians can encourage disaster planning and mock disaster exercises in their community. If involved in an actual disaster, the family physician can be helpful as a triage officer in emergency, in initial resuscitation, in minor treatment, in discharging stable patients, and in counselling victims of post-traumatic shock syndrome. The key to effective performance is being prepared beforehand to cope with the stress and confusion of the incident. Use of laboratory and diagnostic imaging must be curtailed until all severely injured patients are treated. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4 PMID:21267128

  2. A graduate programme for academic family physicians.

    PubMed

    Brennan, M; McWhinney, I R; Stewart, M; Weston, W

    1985-09-01

    The paper describes a graduate studies programme designed to prepare outstanding family physicians for academic leadership and reports an evaluation of the programme. The programme aims to produce academic family physicians who exhibit certain qualities: outstanding clinical skills, professional interest in the organization and transmission of knowledge, and a scholarly approach through research and skills of leadership. The course includes clinical and teaching practice, formal course work and a scholarly thesis; the emphasis is on teaching and learning, theoretical foundations of family medicine, whole person medicine, research design and techniques, ethical decision making, and administration of organizations. A survey of the first 30 graduates of the programme indicated that the majority did more clinical teaching, small group teaching, research, writing and administration than before the course. The graduates' opinions of the programme indicated the extent to which the programme goals have been met; to provide a coherent learning experience integrating the art, science and technology of the discipline of family medicine.

  3. The choice of home blood pressure result reporting method is essential: Results mailed to physicians did not improve hypertension control compared with ordinary office-based blood pressure treatment.

    PubMed

    Varis, Juha; Kantola, Ilkka

    2010-10-01

    Effective antihypertensive care is not possible without regular and reliable blood pressure measurements. The use of blood pressure home measurement has increased a lot during the last years. Various methods have been used in communication between the patients and physicians. In a randomized study we compared traditional office-based hypertension treatment protocol (n=68) to the home-based blood pressure measurement protocol (n=89) in which the patient mailed their home-measured BP diary in a letter to the office of their physician. The studied home-based antihypertensive care system was not more effective than the ordinary office-based treatment. The results highlight the importance of continuous home measurement data interpretation by the physician. The system based on mailing the results to the physician office does not seem to be a suitable method in communication between the patient and the physician. Online or other telemedicine-aided means of communication might yield better antihypertensive control.

  4. Training family physicians: a case study.

    PubMed

    Ebersole, J B; Keisler, D; Michels, P J; Hornung, C A

    1993-06-01

    A survey of USC/RMH Family Medicine alumni indicated that a large proportion have remained in South Carolina, providing primary care especially in small towns and rural areas. These physicians engage in a broad range of clinical activities and feel comfortable with treating a wide spectrum of patient problems. The alumni are active participants in religious, cultural and civic programs in their communities and they express satisfaction with their decision to practice Family Medicine in South Carolina.

  5. Economic impact of converting an interventional pain medicine physician office-based practice into a provider-based ambulatory pain practice.

    PubMed

    Grider, Jay S; Findley, Kelley A; Higdon, Courtney; Curtright, Jonathan; Clark, Don P

    2014-01-01

    One consequence of the shifting economic health care landscape is the growing trend of physician employment and practice acquisition by hospitals. These acquired practices are often converted into hospital- or provider-based clinics. This designation brings the increased services of the hospital, the accreditation of the hospital, and a new billing structure verses the private clinic (the combination of the facility and professional fee billing). One potential concern with moving to a provider-based designation is that this new structure might make the practice less competitive in a marketplace that may still be dominated by private physician office-based practices. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the impact of the provider-based/hospital fee structure on clinical volume. Determine the effect of transition to a hospital- or provider-based practice setting (with concomitant cost implications) on patient volume in the current practice milieu.   Community hospital-based academic interventional pain medicine practice. Economic analysis of effect of change in price structure on clinical volumes. The current study evaluates the effect of a change in designation with price implications on the demand for clinical services that accompany the transition to a hospital-based practice setting from a physician office setting in an academic community hospital. Clinical volumes of both procedures and clinic volumes increased in a mature practice setting following transition to a provider-based designation and the accompanying facility and professional fee structure. Following transition to a provider-based designation clinic visits were increased 24% while procedural volume demand did not change. Single practice entity and single geographic location in southeastern United States. The conversion to a hospital- or provider-based setting does not negatively impact clinical volume and referrals to community-based pain medicine practice. These results imply that factors

  6. Collaboration between family physicians and community pharmacists

    PubMed Central

    Côté, Luc; Normandeau, Michelle; Maheux, Brigitte; Authier, Louise; Lefort, Louise

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective To ascertain the opinions of graduating family physicians about collaboration between family physicians and community pharmacists. Design Anonymous online survey. Setting Two French-Canadian university family medicine residency programs. Participants The 2010 and 2011 graduating family physicians (N = 343) from the University of Montreal and Laval University in Quebec. Main outcome measures Content of written prescriptions; frequency of and reasons for consultations with community pharmacists; and graduates’ perceptions of sharing professional responsibilities with community pharmacists. Results The response rate was 54.2%. Overall, graduates were open to collaborating actively with community pharmacists. For example, at least 60% of graduates reported that it was important to write on prescriptions about any changes to patients’ medication and creatinine clearance. Most graduates responded positively to sharing responsibility for the adjustment of treatment of patients with certain chronic conditions (88.3% for anticoagulation, 64.7% for hypercholesterolemia, 61.2% for hypertension, and 60.6% for diabetes) and for the initiation of treatment of minor conditions according to a collective prescription (80.6% for traveler’s diarrhea, 74.1% for juvenile acne, and 73.6% for allergic rhinitis). However, such interprofessional collaboration requires that each professional group continues to adapt to its roles and responsibilities. Conclusion Family medicine graduates are open to actively collaborating with community pharmacists, but they have some reservations regarding sharing certain responsibilities. As collaborative practices are changing, graduates’ opinions should be documented once they are actually practising. PMID:24029528

  7. Smoking Cessation Strategies: The Family Physician's Role.

    PubMed

    Wilson, D

    1982-03-01

    Family physicians are in an ideal position to help patients who smoke. Our most effective strategy is ourselves, offering clear information and advice to stop smoking, combined with a follow up plan. Although controlled research is lacking for most intervention strategies, a number of them do work at least for the short-term. Combined with the physician's ongoing support and reinforcement, patients may choose from 'cold turkey', hypnotherapy, nicotine-containing gum, acupuncture, group programs or behavioral methods such as rapid smoking. The author's experience with some of these interventions is included.

  8. Keeping family physicians in rural practice. Solutions favoured by rural physicians and family medicine residents.

    PubMed Central

    Rourke, James T. B.; Incitti, Filomena; Rourke, Leslie L.; Kennard, MaryAnn

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine how family medicine residents and practising rural physicians rate possible solutions for recruiting and sustaining physicians in rural practice. DESIGN: Cross-sectional mailed survey. SETTING: Rural family practices and family medicine residency programs in Ontario. PARTICIPANTS: Two hundred seventy-six physicians and 210 residents. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Ratings of proposed solutions on a 4-point scale from "very unimportant" to "very important". RESULTS: Rural family physicians rated funding for learner-driven continuing medical education (CME) and limiting on-call duty to 1 night in 5 as the most important education and practice solutions, respectively. Residents rated an alternate payment plan to include time off for attending and teaching CME and comprehensive payment plans with a guaranteed income for locums as the most important education and practice solutions, respectively. CONCLUSION: Residents and physicians rated solutions very similarly. A comprehensive package of the highest-rated solutions could help recruit and sustain physicians in rural practice because the solutions were developed by experts on rural practice and rated by family medicine residents and practising rural physicians. PMID:14526866

  9. [Methodical aspects of postgraduate education of family physicians in internship].

    PubMed

    Koshlia, V I; Dmitrieva, S N; Zelenskaia, L M; Puzik, S G; Shcheblykina, N K; Odrinskiĭ, V A

    2006-06-01

    The article presents some methodical issues on postgraduate education of physicians studying at Zaporozhye Institute for advanced physicians training, chair of family medicin. The authors showed the priority of programmed learning and modern educational technologies in postgraduate education of physicians.

  10. Family physicians' attitude and interest toward participation in urban family physician program and related factors.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Masoumeh; Dehghani, Mohsen; Aghaee, Monavar Afzal

    2016-01-01

    Every family physician has a key role in achieving the goals of the family physician program (FPP). Low satisfaction of physicians in certain areas of Iran and their low maintenance level in the program is quite challenging. The aims of the present study were; (1) to assess the attitude of rural/rural-urban family physicians about FPP and (2) to investigate their interest toward participation in urban FPP and (3) to explore the influencing factors. This cross-sectional study was performed on 137 family physicians who were working in rural/rural-urban FPP in Mashhad University of Medical Sciences (Iran). A self-designed valid and reliable questionnaire including demographic data and thirty questions on the participants' attitudes toward the FPP in Likert scale were used. Data were analyzed by multiple logistic regression models using SPSS software. 49.3% of physicians were interested in continuing their cooperation in the urban-FPP. The mean total attitude score was 62.18 out of 100. The highest agreement and positive attitude of physicians were related to achievements of the program goals dimension. Multiple analyses showed that gender (odds ratio [OR] =5.5; male vs. female) and employment status (OR = 16.7 and 10.9 for permanent employment and by contract compared to legal obligation, respectively) were significantly associated with physicians' willingness toward participation in the urban-FPP. About half of the studied physicians were interested toward participation in the urban-FPP; Male physicians more than females and permanent employees more than others were willing and interested to participate in the urban-FPP.

  11. A Family Physician's Guide to Sewage Sludge

    PubMed Central

    Connop, Peter J.

    1983-01-01

    The potential environmental and personal health effects from the agricultural uses of domestic sewage sludge may increasingly require the guidance of the family physician, especially in farming communities. This article summarizes the potential health hazards and outlines the tripartite risk phenomenon—hazard identification, risk assessment, and social evaluation. For the agricultural use of dewatered sewage sludge, strict adherence to regulated procedures should not increase risk beyond that of agriculture generally. Confirmation by prospective epidemiological studies is recommended. PMID:21283298

  12. High altitude medicine for family physicians.

    PubMed Central

    McMurray, S. J.

    1994-01-01

    High altitude medicine deals with a continuum of diseases ranging from a mild discomfort to serious ailments affecting all organ systems, including the lungs, brain, and eyes. Decreased oxygen tension is the primary cause. The main principles of prevention are staging and graded ascent to allow acclimatization. Adventure travel to high altitude destinations is becoming increasingly popular; family physicians should be informed of the medical problems associated with such travel. Images p712-a p715-a p716-a PMID:8199523

  13. Health Promotion — The Family Physician's Responsibility

    PubMed Central

    Vinger, Irving

    1972-01-01

    All health professionals are presently spending the majority of their service time helping families inflicted with chronic, incurable illness. We must begin to place our emphasis on prevention. We have recently begun to look at the problem of early detection of illness but there has been a conspicuous lack of labor in the area of primary prevention or health promotion. This seems to be due not to a lack of knowledge or resources but to the lack of a delineation of responsibility. This article places that responsibility primarily with the family physician. PMID:20468805

  14. Family physicians' approach to psychotherapy and counseling. Perceptions and practices.

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, J. G.

    1994-01-01

    To determine how family physicians perceive the support they get for psychotherapy and counseling, we surveyed a random sample of Ontario College of Family Physicians members. Of 100 physicians who had family medicine residency training with psychotherapy experience, 43% indicated that such training was inadequate for their current needs. Because family physicians often provide psychotherapy and counseling, their training should reflect the needs found in practice. PMID:8080505

  15. The post-suicide family and the family physician.

    PubMed

    Fisher, J V; Barnett, B L; Collins, J

    1976-06-01

    It is estimated that there are 750,000 people each year who are intimately affected by suicide. Prominent among these are the family survivors and their family physician. This paper offers a time frame which divides the period following the suicide into three phases: Immediate (the first ten days after the suicide); Intermediate (after the first ten days through the first year); and Extended (from the first year until restitution occurs). It identifies the chief emotional reactions which occur in each phase, explores their psychodynamic origins, and proposes suggestions for appropriate management during each of the three periods. The goal of this plan of management is to enable the family physician to function in a supportive emphatic, and restorative manner for the post-suicide family.

  16. Family physician perceptions of personal health records.

    PubMed

    Witry, Matthew J; Doucette, William R; Daly, Jeanette M; Levy, Barcey T; Chrischilles, Elizabeth A

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine family practice physician and staff views on the benefits of, barriers to, and use of personal health records (PHRs). Four focus groups were conducted at four family medicine practices in Iowa and included a total of 28 providers. Overall, participants seemed to view PHRs as a source of medical information for healthcare providers when the patient's medical record is not available. Providers appeared unaware of the patient-centered features available in many electronic PHRs and how such features might affect patients and their medical practice. While physicians identified numerous patient groups that could benefit from using PHRs, they also perceived several unique barriers, including the potential of PHRs to facilitate narcotic abuse, low levels of patient computer and health literacy, low levels of patient motivation, and difficulties with PHR and electronic medical record interoperability. Physicians' relatively narrow view of PHR functions and benefits and perception of barriers to using PHRs may restrict widespread support of PHR use.

  17. Professional activity. How is family physicians' work time changing?

    PubMed Central

    Woodward, C. A.; Ferrier, B.; Cohen, M.; Brown, J.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine hours worked professionally, work preferences, and changes in both of these and their correlates. DESIGN: Repeated surveys done in 1993 and 1999. SETTING: Ontario family practices. PARTICIPANTS: Cohort of physicians certified in family medicine between 1989 and 1991 after family medicine residency who were surveyed in 1993 when they resided in Ontario. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Self-reported hours spent weekly on professional activities, desired hours of professional work, and balance between work and other activities. RESULTS: Fifty-three percent (293) of 553 physicians responded to the 1999 survey; 91% had remained family physicians; 85% of these had participated in the 1993 survey. The difference between the hours that family physicians preferred to work professionally and their actual hours of work had increased since 1993. Childless physicians, women physicians with preschool children, and women physicians married to other physicians worked fewer hours professionally than other physicians in 1999. Female physicians and physicians without children worked closer to their preferred hours than other physicians. Reporting a preference to work fewer hours professionally in 1993 was linked with a reduction in professional activities by 1999. CONCLUSION: Greater attention should be paid in physician resource planning to the family life cycle of female physicians. Lifestyle changes could lead to a reduction in professional activity among these physicians. PMID:11494929

  18. Alternative medicine and the family physician.

    PubMed

    Gordon, J S

    1996-11-15

    The seven categories of alternative medicine, as established by the National Institutes of Health Office of Alternative Medicine, are mind-body interventions, bioelectromagnetic therapies, alternative systems of medical practice, manual healing methods, pharmacologic and biologic treatments, herbal medicine, and diet and nutrition. Mind-body approaches have been shown to be effective in a variety of conditions. Acupuncture and homeopathy are alternative systems of medical practice that may be beneficial. Chiropractic manipulation for low back pain and infant message for enhancing growth are two methods of manual healing. While the literature on herbal medicine is vast, most of it focuses on a single approach for a specific condition. Traditional herbalists use a combination of herbs individualized for the specific person. As more and more people turn to alternative therapies, it is important for family physicians to be open to their patients' interest in alternative approaches.

  19. Solving Problems: How Does the Family Physician Do It?

    PubMed Central

    Feightner, J. W.; Barrows, H. S.; Neufeld, V. R.; Norman, G. R.

    1977-01-01

    Objective evidence exists for a model of clinical problem solving by family physicians. Previous studies have examined the activities of family physicians, but there have been no data indicating the mental process behind these activities. This study, exploring the thought processes of family physicians engaged in clinical problem solving, has lead to the model described in this paper. Its educational and clinical implications are considered. PMID:21304873

  20. Comprehensiveness of care by family physicians in Edmonton.

    PubMed

    Cave, Andrew J; Parameswaran, Lakshmi

    2011-01-01

    The scope of practice by general practitioners and family physicians in North America has been changing over time. Are academic practices providing residents the same scope of practice as the urban practices into which they are going? A survey describing the activities and scope of general practice/family practice was constructed from the literature and checked with general practitioners/family physicians for face validity. It was administered by mail to academic family physicians at the University of Alberta Department of Family Medicine in Edmonton and to all practicing general practitioners/family physicians in the city and Capital Region around Edmonton. There was a response rate of 78% and 50.9%, respectively. Academic physicians' practices differed from those of their urban colleagues. The former were all certified by the College of Family Physicians of Canada, worked in group practices, and included more males and fewer immigrants. They worked as many hours, but did less clinical work than their urban colleagues. Even so, 25% did more than 40 hours of clinical work each week compared with 68% of urban physicians. There was a wide scope of services and procedures provided by both groups and other services that were different from group to group. There was no difference between groups in intention to add or remove services in the next two years, but academic physicians had removed more services in the last two years. General practitioners/family physicians still provide a wide range of services. Although both academic and urban general practitioners/family physicians have reduced some services in the last two years, they have both added others to their repertoire. Although the teaching and urban general practitioners/family physicians practices have many similarities, they also have differences, which may have implications for the training of future urban family physicians.

  1. Comprehensiveness of care by family physicians in Edmonton

    PubMed Central

    Cave, Andrew J; Parameswaran, Lakshmi

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The scope of practice by general practitioners and family physicians in North America has been changing over time. Are academic practices providing residents the same scope of practice as the urban practices into which they are going? Methods A survey describing the activities and scope of general practice/family practice was constructed from the literature and checked with general practitioners/family physicians for face validity. It was administered by mail to academic family physicians at the University of Alberta Department of Family Medicine in Edmonton and to all practicing general practitioners/family physicians in the city and Capital Region around Edmonton. There was a response rate of 78% and 50.9%, respectively. Results Academic physicians’ practices differed from those of their urban colleagues. The former were all certified by the College of Family Physicians of Canada, worked in group practices, and included more males and fewer immigrants. They worked as many hours, but did less clinical work than their urban colleagues. Even so, 25% did more than 40 hours of clinical work each week compared with 68% of urban physicians. There was a wide scope of services and procedures provided by both groups and other services that were different from group to group. There was no difference between groups in intention to add or remove services in the next two years, but academic physicians had removed more services in the last two years. Conclusion General practitioners/family physicians still provide a wide range of services. Although both academic and urban general practitioners/family physicians have reduced some services in the last two years, they have both added others to their repertoire. Although the teaching and urban general practitioners/family physicians practices have many similarities, they also have differences, which may have implications for the training of future urban family physicians. PMID:23745084

  2. Family Physicians and Teaching Hospitals: A Litany of Woes

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Niels H.

    1984-01-01

    Retreat of family physicians from caring for their patients in teaching hospitals has been partly imposed and partly passively accepted. Confusion of patient, family doctor and consultant relationships has resulted. Town/gown and family physician/specialist communication problems disrupt a proper model of care. Family physicians need to take individual and group action to initiate change, but little action has been evident. Everyone is the loser. We should reinstitute a model in which family physicians are the closest professionals to their patients, wherever they are in the health care system. Demonstrating the value of family physician coordination of care and continuity of care will positively affect the current financial `loss leader' status of this work. PMID:21279057

  3. Assessing Idaho Rural Family Physician Scope of Practice Over Time.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, David; Baker, Ed; MacKenzie, Lisa; Kinney, Logan; Epperly, Ted

    2015-01-01

    An important consideration determining health outcomes is to have an adequate supply of physicians to address the health needs of the community. The purpose of this investigation was to assess scope of practice factors for Idaho rural family physicians in 2012 and to compare these results to findings from a 2007 study. The target population in this study was rural family physicians in Idaho counties with populations of fewer than 50,000. Identical surveys and methods were utilized in both 2007 and 2012. The physician survey was mailed to 252 rural physicians and was returned by 89 for a response rate of 35.3%. Parametric and nonparametric statistical analyses were conducted to analyze the 2012 results and to assess changes in scope of practice across the time periods. The percentage of rural family physicians in Idaho in 2012 who provided prenatal care, vaginal deliveries, and nursing home care was significantly lower than the results from the 2007 survey. Female physicians were more likely to provide prenatal care and vaginal deliveries than males in 2012. Male physicians were more likely to provide emergency room coverage and esophagogastroduodenoscopy or colonoscopy services than females in 2012. Younger physicians were found to be more likely to provide inpatient admissions and mental health services in 2012 than older physicians. Employed physicians were more likely to provide cesarean delivery, other operating room services and emergency room coverage in 2012 than nonemployed physicians. Further research is needed to assess the root causes of these changes. © 2015 National Rural Health Association.

  4. Engagement of family physicians seven years into maintenance of certification.

    PubMed

    Puffer, James C; Bazemore, Andrew W; Newton, Warren P; Makaroff, Laura; Xierali, Imam M; Green, Larry A

    2011-01-01

    Transitioning Family Physicians to continuous Maintenance of Certification (MOC) was intended to support the quality improvement movement nationally, but it also risked decreasing their engagement due to the increased requirements for retaining certification. However, after completing the transition of all family physicians into MOC in 2010, participation appears higher than ever.

  5. Autism: A review for family physicians.

    PubMed

    Karande, Sunil

    2006-05-01

    Autism is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by qualitative impairments in social interaction and communication, with restricted, repetitive, stereotyped patterns of behavior, interests and activities. These behaviors manifest along a wide spectrum and commence before 36 months of age. Diagnosis of autism is made by ascertaining whether the child's specific behaviors meet the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-IV-Revised criteria. Its etiology is still unclear but recent studies suggest that genetics plays a major role in conferring susceptibility. Recent neuroimaging research studies indicate that autism may be caused by atypical functioning in the central nervous system, particularly in the limbic system: amygdala and hippocampus. In a third of autistic children, loss of language and/or social skills occurs during the second year of life, usually between 15 and 21 months of age. Comorbidity with mental retardation, epilepsy, disruptive behaviors and learning difficulty is not uncommon. Although there is currently no known cure for autism there is evidence to suggest that early intervention therapy can improve functioning of autistic children. Judicious use of psychotropic drugs is necessary to manage associated aggression, hyperactivity, self-mutilation, temper tantrums; but drugs are not a substitute for behavioral and educational interventions. The family physician can play an important role in detecting autism early, coordinating its assessment and treatment, counseling the parents and classroom teacher, and monitoring the child's progress on a long term basis.

  6. The availability of fellowship training for foreign family physicians.

    PubMed

    Cohen, M D; Merenstein, J H

    1990-05-01

    The authors surveyed the 49 U.S. fellowship programs in family medicine listed in the 1988 Fellowship Directory published by the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine. The past experience and future intentions of the 47 responding programs toward non-immigrant foreign family physicians coming to the United States to undergo fellowship training in academic family practice were studied. Only a minority of the programs (22%) had ever trained a foreign fellow, and of these only five of 11 were definitely able to do so in the future. Over half (52%) of the programs that had never trained a foreign fellow stated that they were not prepared to train a foreign physician. Although foreign family physicians are encouraged by the American Academy of Family Practice to come to the United States for fellowships, this study shows that it is extremely difficult for these physicians to find programs willing to act as host.

  7. Nutrition Education Practices and Opinions of Alberta Family Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, S. Ann; Joffres, Michel R.

    1990-01-01

    A questionnaire was mailed to a random sample of 532 members of the Alberta Chapter of the College of Family Physicians in order to assess the role of physicians in providing nutrition education to their patients. Of the 255 respondents (53% response rate), over 97% agreed that “educating patients about nutrition is an important role for physicians.” Physicians most often gave nutrition information on obesity, constipation, heart disease and hypertension, alcohol, coffee, infant feeding, osteoporosis, and prenatal nutrition. Female physicians gave nutrition information significantly more often than male physicians on four maternal and child health topics. Perceived barriers to nutrition education included lack of reimbursement for physicians (86%), lack of time (48%), and limited access to patient information (42%). Most physicians often informed patients on the seven most common nutrition topics despite these concerns. PMID:21249103

  8. Canadian family physician knowledge and attitudes toward laboratory utilization management.

    PubMed

    Thommasen, Amy; Clement, Fiona; Kinniburgh, David W; Lau, Cheryl K; Guo, Maggie; Viczko, Jeannine; Guggisberg, Kelly; Thomas, Roger E; Turin, Tanvir Chowdhury; Wesenberg, James C; Abdullah, Amid; Hnydyk, William S; Naugler, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Mitigation of unnecessary and redundant laboratory testing is an important quality assurance priority for laboratories and represents an opportunity for cost savings in the health care system. Family physicians represent the largest utilizers of laboratory testing by a large margin. Engagement of family physicians is therefore key to any laboratory utilization management initiatives. Despite this, family physicians have been largely excluded from the planning and implementation of such initiatives. Our purposes were to (1) assess the importance of lab management issues to family physicians, and (2) attempt to define the types of initiatives most acceptable to family physicians. We invited all Alberta family practice residents and practicing physicians to participate in a self-administered online electronic survey. Survey questions addressed the perceived importance of lab misutilization, prevalence of various types of misutilization, acceptability of specific approaches to quality control, and responsibility of various parties to address this issue. Of 162 respondents, 95% considered lab misutilization to be either important or very important. Many physicians placed the responsibility for addressing lab misutilization issues on multiple parties, including patients, but most commonly the ordering physician (97%). Acceptability for common strategies for quality improvement in lab misutilization showed a wide range (35%-98%). These responses could serve as a framework for laboratories to begin discussions on this important topic with primary care groups. Copyright © 2015 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Family medicine education in Singapore: a long-standing collaboration between specialists and family physicians.

    PubMed

    Wong, Teck Yee; Koh, Gerald Ch; Lee, Eng Hin; Cheong, Seng Kwing; Goh, Lee Gan

    2008-02-01

    In many countries, family medicine (FM) training has been conducted mainly by senior family physicians alone. However, FM training in Singapore in the last 30 years has involved specialists working in close collaboration with family physicians. The areas in which specialists are currently involved include the training of FM trainees in tertiary hospitals, the Master of Medicine in Family Medicine [MMed (FM)] and Graduate Diploma in Family Medicine (GDFM) programmes. This close relationship has been crucial in the continuing vocational and professional development of family physicians and in fostering closer collaboration between family physicians and specialists, thus ultimately benefiting patient care.

  10. Family physicians and patients: is effective nutrition interaction possible?

    PubMed

    Truswell, A S

    2000-01-01

    This article summarizes presentations from an international workshop held in Heelsum, Netherlands, 14-16 December 1998 that was sponsored by the Dutch Dairy Foundation on Nutrition and Health, the Department of Nutrition at Wageningen Agricultural University, the Dutch College of General Practitioners, and the International Union of Nutritional Sciences. Twenty-one speakers and 12 other participants were invited from 9 countries: the Netherlands, the United States, the United Kingdom, Australia, Canada, Denmark, New Zealand, Spain, and Sweden. The workshop was chaired by GJAJ Hautvast and the scientific secretary was GJ Hiddink. Family physicians are highly trusted. Many consultations include a nutritional aspect, but physicians do not discuss nutrition with their patients as often as they could. Major barriers include short visit times, the paucity of nutrition teaching in medical schools, and poor compliance of patients with physicians' dietary prescriptions. Problems, practicalities, operational research, and some solutions were discussed at this meeting of leading family doctors with interested nutritionists. Family physicians have to distill the essentials for their patients from many different specialties ranging from ophthalmology to podiatry. They look for clarity of recommendations from nutrition researchers. Among developments discussed at the meeting that can increase nutritional work in family medicine are 1) new opportunities to teach nutrition in vocational training programs, 2) some manuals and a new journal specially written by nutritional scientists for family physicians, 3) nutritional advice being incorporated into computer software for family physicians, 4) more dietitians working with family physicians, and 5) nutrition training for practice nurses in some countries.

  11. Performance assessment. Family physicians in Montreal meet the mark!

    PubMed Central

    Goulet, François; Jacques, André; Gagnon, Robert; Bourbeau, Denis; Laberge, Denis; Melanson, Jacques; Ménard, Claude; Racette, Pierre; Rivest, Raymond

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the clinical performance of a representative non-volunteer sample of family physicians in metropolitan Montreal, Que. DESIGN: Assessment of clinical performance was based on inspection visits to offices, peer review of medical records, and chart-stimulated recall interviews. The procedure was the one usually followed by the Professional Inspection Committee of the Collège des médecins du Québec. SETTING: Family physicians' practices in metropolitan Montreal. PARTICIPANTS: One hundred randomly selected family physicians. INTERVENTIONS: For each physician, 30 randomly chosen patient charts with data on three to five previous visits were reviewed using explicit criteria and a standard scale using global scores from 1 to 5 (unacceptable to excellent). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Scores were assigned for office practices; record keeping; number of continuing medical education (CME) activities; and quality of clinical performance assessed in terms of investigation plan, diagnostic accuracy, treatment plan, and relevance of care. RESULTS: Overall performance was judged to be good to excellent for 98% of physicians in their private practices; for 90% of physicians concerning CME activities; for 94% of physicians concerning their clinical performance in terms of quality of care; and for 75% of physicians as to record keeping. There was a link between record keeping and quality of care as well as between the number of CME activities and quality of care. CONCLUSION: The overall clinical performance of family physicians in the greater Montreal region is excellent. PMID:12228963

  12. Is that your pager or mine: a survey of women academic family physicians in dual physician families.

    PubMed

    Schrager, Sarina; Kolan, Anne; Dottl, Susan L

    2007-08-01

    This study explored the unique challenges and strategies of women in academic family medicine who are in dual physician families. An e-mail survey was sent to all female physician members of the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine (STFM) who were listed in the on-line database. The survey collected demographic information, details of job descriptions and family life, and included 3 open-ended questions about the experiences of dual physician families. Over 1200 surveys were sent to women physicians in academic family medicine. One hundred fifty-nine surveys were returned. Half of all women worked full time compared to 87% of their partners. Most women reported benefits of having a physician partner including support and having an understanding person at home, though scheduling conflicts and childcare responsibilities contributed to the need for job compromises. Women prioritized finding work-life balance and having supportive partners and mentors as most important to their success as academic family physicians. Dual physician relationships involve rewards and conflicts. More research should explore the competing demands of family life with success in academic medicine.

  13. Immigration, ethnicity, and accessibility to culturally diverse family physicians.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu

    2007-09-01

    The study concerns ethnicity, spatial equity, and healthcare access in the context of diversity and integration. The paper first explores how Chinese immigrants in the Toronto Census Metropolitan Area choose between ethnic Chinese family physicians and other family physicians, based on a probability survey. It then applies and modifies gravity-type accessibility measures, of which a special type is the so-called floating catchment area (FCA) method, to evaluate three types of geographical accessibility in family physician utilization. The study suggests a certain degree of spatial inequality among Chinese immigrants in accessing culturally sensitive care. The paper yields important methodological and policy implications.

  14. How respected family physicians manage difficult patient encounters.

    PubMed

    Elder, Nancy; Ricer, Rick; Tobias, Barbara

    2006-01-01

    Nearly all family physicians have patients that engender a sense of frustration or dislike, often described as "difficult." Most research in this area focuses on describing these patients and their physicians, not management or coping. To describe how respected family physicians identify, manage, and cope with difficult patient encounters. Qualitative semi-structured interview study. Participant physicians described as "excellent" were recommended by medical school family medicine faculty around the county. Interview questions included "describe the patient you least like seeing," and "how do you keep sane but still assure adequate care for the patient?" Interviews were analyzed using the editing method, looking for common categories and themes. 102 physicians were interviewed. Physicians described both patient behaviors (stay sick and demanding) as well as medical problems (multiple, chronic pain, drug seeking, psychiatric) that they found frustrating. Difficult encounters occurred when these patient behaviors and medical problems clashed with physicians' personal and practice traits. Their management strategies to return the encounter to success incorporated collaboration, appropriate use of power and empathy. We propose a model where clashes between patient behaviors and physicians' traits turn a successful encounter of collaboration, appropriate use of power and empathy into a difficult encounter of opposition, misuse of power and compassion fatigue. Management strategies used by our participants aim to return success to the encounter and may serve as a guide for practicing physicians and for future research.

  15. Cancer Risk Assessment by Rural and Appalachian Family Medicine Physicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Kimberly M.; Love, Margaret M.; Pearce, Kevin A.; Porter, Kyle; Barron, Mary A.; Andrykowski, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Context: Challenges to the identification of hereditary cancer in primary care may be more pronounced in rural Appalachia, a medically underserved region. Purpose: To examine primary care physicians' identification of hereditary cancers. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was mailed to family physicians in the midwestern and southeastern United…

  16. Cancer Risk Assessment by Rural and Appalachian Family Medicine Physicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Kimberly M.; Love, Margaret M.; Pearce, Kevin A.; Porter, Kyle; Barron, Mary A.; Andrykowski, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Context: Challenges to the identification of hereditary cancer in primary care may be more pronounced in rural Appalachia, a medically underserved region. Purpose: To examine primary care physicians' identification of hereditary cancers. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was mailed to family physicians in the midwestern and southeastern United…

  17. What do Victoria family physicians think about housecalls?

    PubMed Central

    Hammett, Tess

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the proportion of family physicians doing housecalls, the types of patients they think are appropriate to visit at home, whether physicians are satisfied with the number of housecalls they make, reasons family physicians list for not doing housecalls, and what they consider acceptable remuneration and travel time for housecalls. Design A 12-question paper survey was formulated specifically for this study and piloted by 6 family physicians in British Columbia. It was then mailed with a cover letter to 250 physicians' offices and faxed back anonymously. Setting Family physicians' private offices in Victoria, BC, between December 1 and 19, 2010. Participants A total of 250 randomly selected family physicians from a list of 552 physicians practising in Victoria on the College of Physicians and Surgeons of British Columbia website. Main outcome measures Proportion of physicians doing housecalls, reasons stated for not doing housecalls, and mean acceptable remuneration and travel time for a housecall. Results A total of 73 surveys (29.2%) were returned, 5 of which were not fully completed but were included for the questions that were answered. Sixty-four physicians (87.7%) did at least 1 housecall in the past year, 23 (31.5%) did housecalls at least once a month, and 12 (16.4%) did them at least once a week. Of 71 respondents, 64 physicians (90.1%) listed lack of time as a barrier to performing housecalls, 37 (52.1%) listed unsatisfactory remuneration, and 35 (49.3%) listed lengthy travel times. Most physicians indicated that appropriate remuneration for a housecall was either $142.21 (n = 30, 42.9%) or $108.41 (n = 26, 37.1%). Thirty-seven physicians (52.9%) noted that 20 minutes was an acceptable maximum 1-way travel time for a housecall, while 29 (41.4%) listed 10 minutes. Conclusion Several systemic factors, including lack of time, unsatisfactory remuneration, and large geographic catchment areas, make it difficult for urban family physicians

  18. Office Management of Chemical Dependency by Family Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Ray

    1991-01-01

    Family physicians are in an ideal position to identify, intervene with, and treat substance use disorders. If family physicians position themselves to reflect objective evidence of consequences of substance use and offer suggestions for change while leaving responsibility for recovery with the patient, patients often choose to recover. Because the disease is characterized by exacerbations, remissions, and relapses, continued involvement with the recovering patient ensures the greatest chance of recovery. PMID:21228969

  19. Female family physicians in obstetrics: achieving personal balance.

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, J C; Brown, J B; Reid, A J

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the experiences of female family physicians who practise obstetrics in balancing professional obligations with personal and family needs, given the unique challenges that such practice poses for these physicians. DESIGN: Qualitative study. SETTING: Ontario. PARTICIPANTS: A purposefully selected sample of nine female family physicians who met the criteria of being married, having children and currently practising obstetrics. OUTCOME MEASURES: Experiences of female family physicians and their strategies in their personal, family and professional lives that enable them to continue practising obstetrics. RESULTS: All participants continued to practise obstetrics because of the pleasure they derived from it, despite the challenges of balancing the unpredictable demands of obstetrics with their personal and family needs. To continue in obstetrics, they needed to make changes in their lives, either through a gradual, evolutionary process or in response to a critical event. Alterations to work and family arrangements permitted them to meet the challenges and led to increased satisfaction. Changes included making supportive call-group arrangements, limiting work hours and the number of births attended and securing help with household duties. CONCLUSIONS: An in-depth examination, through the use of qualitative methods, showed the reasons why some female family physicians continue to practise obstetrics despite the stressful aspects of doing so. This knowledge may be useful for women who are residents or experienced clinicians and who are considering including obstetrics in their practice. PMID:7497390

  20. Emergency Room Practice among Family Physicians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansel, Nancy K.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    A self-report questionnaire of graduates of a family practice residency program obtained information on their practices, professional and emergency medicine experiences, and attitudes toward the practice of emergency medicine by family practioners. (Author/MLW)

  1. A new, but old business model for family physicians: cash.

    PubMed

    Weber, J Michael

    2013-01-01

    The following study is an exploratory investigation into the opportunity identification, opportunity analysis, and strategic implications of implementing a cash-only family physician practice. The current market dynamics (i.e., increasing insurance premiums, decreasing benefits, more regulations and paperwork, and cuts in federal and state programs) suggest that there is sufficient motivation for these practitioners to change their current business model. In-depth interviews were conducted with office managers and physicians of family physician practices. The results highlighted a variety of issues, including barriers to change, strategy issues, and opportunities/benefits. The implications include theory applications, strategic marketing applications, and managerial decision-making.

  2. The economic impact of rural family physicians practicing obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Avery, Daniel M; Hooper, Dwight E; McDonald, John T; Love, Michael W; Tucker, Melanie T; Parton, Jason M

    2014-01-01

    The economic impact of a family physician practicing family medicine in rural Alabama is $1,000,000 a year in economic benefit to the community. The economic benefit of those rural family physicians practicing obstetrics has not been studied. This study was designed to determine whether there was any added economic benefit of rural family physicians practicing obstetrics in rural, underserved Alabama. The Alabama Family Practice Rural Health Board has funded the University of Alabama Family Medicine Obstetrics Fellowship since its beginning in 1986. Family medicine obstetrics fellowship graduates who practice obstetrics in rural, underserved areas were sent questionnaires and asked to participate in the study. The questions included the most common types and average annual numbers of obstetrics/gynecological procedures they performed. Ten physicians, or 77% of the graduates asked to participate in the study, returned the questionnaire. Fourteen common obstetrics/gynecological procedures performed by the graduates were identified. A mean of 115 deliveries were performed. The full-time equivalent reduction in family medicine time to practice obstetrics was 20%. A family physician practicing obstetrics in a rural area adds an additional $488,560 in economic benefit to the community in addition to the $1,000,000 from practicing family medicine, producing a total annual benefit of $1,488,560. The investment of $616,385 from the Alabama Family Practice Rural Health Board resulted in a $399 benefit to the community for every dollar invested. The cumulative effect of fellowship graduates practicing both family medicine and obstetrics in rural, underserved areas over the 26 years studied was $246,047,120. © Copyright 2014 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  3. The Family Physician in the Witness Box

    PubMed Central

    Emson, H. E.

    1983-01-01

    The doctor appearing in court must learn a new language and be prepared to deal with the legal profession, which is quite different from his own. Adequate preparation for a court case can make it less confusing; this article gives guidelines for doctors occasionally called to give evidence, or who are accused of malpractice. Doctors called as witnesses must consult with lawyers early, to determine exactly what information the court wants and the form a report should take. Physicians should carefully study and summarize all their evidence in non-technical language before a court appearance. By learning some legal language, they can also understand and adequately answer lawyers' questions. A physician accused of negligence must make no admissions before the case and have no contact with the plaintiff other than to formally acknowledge the charge. The Canadian Medical Protective Association should be contacted as soon as possible. PMID:21283283

  4. Use of clotrimazole/betamethasone diproprionate by family physicians.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, M P; Feldman, S R; Fleischer, A B

    2000-09-01

    Clotrimazole/betamethasone diproprionate contains a fluorinated, high-potency topical corticosteroid and is the most frequently prescribed topical agent in the United States. Family physicians are more likely than pediatricians and dermatologists to use this product when faced with a common fungal infection. To better understand the settings in which US family physicians recommend the use of clotrimazole/betamethasone diproprionate, we determined the diagnoses and characteristics of patients for whom family physicians prescribe this drug. Data from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey were used to determine the demographic characteristics of patients who were given a prescription for clotrimazole/betamethasone diproprionate, the diagnoses of patients treated with the drug, and the potency of other topical corticosteroids by family physicians. Wholesale costs of drugs were used to estimate potential drug cost savings obtainable by switching to specific monotherapy agents. Clotrimazole/betamethasone diproprionate was prescribed at 3.1% of visits to family physicians but at only .6% of visits to dermatologists for either inflammatory or fungal/candidal conditions. Family physicians frequently prescribed clotrimazole/betamethasone diproprionate to children under age 5 and for use on genital skin disorders. Dermatologists rarely used clotrimazole/betamethasone diproprionate in these settings. The frequent use by family physicians of clotrimazole/betamethasone diproprionate in high-risk settings is of concern. Use of alternative agents with anti-inflammatory and antifungal properties without the risks associated with the use of high-potency topical corticosteroids may be the most practical approach to replacing use of clotrimazole/betamethasone diproprionate.

  5. Do People with Disabilities Have Difficulty Finding a Family Physician?

    PubMed Central

    McColl, Mary Ann; Aiken, Alice; Schaub, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Primary care has been ideally characterized as the medical home for all citizens, and yet recent data shows that approximately 6% do not have a family physician, and only 17.5% of family practices are open to new patients. Given acknowledged shortages of family physicians, this research asks the question: Do people with disabilities have particular difficulty finding a family physician? Health Care Connect (HCC) is a government-funded agency in Ontario Canada, designed to “help Ontarians who are without a family health care provider to find one”. Using data from HCC, supplemented by interviews with HCC staff, the study explores the average wait time for patients with disabilities to be linked with a primary care physician, and the challenges faced by agency staff in doing so. The study found that disabled registrants with the program are only slightly disadvantaged in terms of wait times to find a family physician, and success rates are ultimately comparable; however, agency staff report that there are a number of significant challenges associated with placing disabled patients. PMID:25927477

  6. Do people with disabilities have difficulty finding a family physician?

    PubMed

    McColl, Mary Ann; Aiken, Alice; Schaub, Michael

    2015-04-28

    Primary care has been ideally characterized as the medical home for all citizens, and yet recent data shows that approximately 6% do not have a family physician, and only 17.5% of family practices are open to new patients. Given acknowledged shortages of family physicians, this research asks the question: Do people with disabilities have particular difficulty finding a family physician? Health Care Connect (HCC) is a government-funded agency in Ontario Canada, designed to "help Ontarians who are without a family health care provider to find one". Using data from HCC, supplemented by interviews with HCC staff, the study explores the average wait time for patients with disabilities to be linked with a primary care physician, and the challenges faced by agency staff in doing so. The study found that disabled registrants with the program are only slightly disadvantaged in terms of wait times to find a family physician, and success rates are ultimately comparable; however, agency staff report that there are a number of significant challenges associated with placing disabled patients.

  7. Role of family physicians in an urban hospital

    PubMed Central

    Neimanis, Ieva; Woods, Anne; Zizzo, Angelo; Dickson, Robert; Levy, Richard; Goebel, Cindy; Corsini, John; Burns, Sheri; Gaebel, Kathryn

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective To investigate changes in family doctors’ attitudes about and participation in hospital activities and inpatient care in an urban hospital family medicine department from 1977 to 1997 and 2014. Design Cross-sectional survey design. Setting The Department of Family Medicine at St Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton in Ontario. Participants Family physicians affiliated with the Department of Family Medicine at St Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton were surveyed in 2014. Data were compared with findings from similar surveys administered at this institution in 1977 and 1997. Main outcome measures Family physicians’ roles in hospital activities, attitudes toward the role of the family physician in the hospital setting, and the barriers to and facilitators of maintaining this role. Results A total of 93 physicians returned completed surveys (37.3% response rate). In 2014, half of the respondents provided some inpatient care. This patient care was largely supportive and newborn care (71.7% and 67.4%, respectively). In 2014, 47.3% believed the quality of care would suffer (compared with 92.1% in 1977 and 87.5% in 1997) if they were not involved in patient care in the hospital. There was also a considerable shift away from the 1977 and 1997 perception that the family physician had a role as patient advocate: 92.0% and 95.3%, respectively, compared with only 49.5% in the 2014 survey. Conclusion Family physicians’ hospital activities and attitudes continued to change from 1977 to 1997 and 2014 in this urban hospital setting. Most of the respondents had stopped providing direct inpatient care, with a few continuing to provide supportive care. Despite this, most respondents still see a role for the Department of Family Medicine within the hospital as a focus for identifying with their family physician community, a place to interact with other specialist colleagues, and a source of some continuing medical education. PMID:28292802

  8. Physician recommendations regarding SIDS risk reduction: a national survey of pediatricians and family physicians.

    PubMed

    Moon, Rachel Y; Kington, Marit; Oden, Rosalind; Iglesias, Joana; Hauck, Fern R

    2007-11-01

    Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is a leading cause of death among infants. Recently, new SIDS risk factors have emerged. To determine knowledge and recommendations of pediatricians and family physicians regarding SIDS-relevant practices. Cross-sectional survey of 3005 pediatricians and family physicians. Of the 783 respondents, pediatricians comprised 64% and females 52%; 78% recognized supine as the recommended sleep position; 69% recommended supine. Almost all physicians recommended a firm mattress, 82% recommended a crib or bassinet, and 42% recommended a separate room for infants; 63% had no preference about or did not recommend restricting pacifier use. Pediatricians were more likely to discuss infant sleep position and room sharing at every well-child visit. Knowledge about recommended infant sleep position is relatively high, but there are gaps in physician knowledge regarding safe sleep recommendations. Greater dissemination of information is required, and barriers to implementation need to be identified and addressed.

  9. Discrimination against gay, lesbian and bisexual family physicians by patients

    PubMed Central

    Druzin, P; Shrier, I; Yacowar, M; Rossignol, M

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Discrimination against gay, lesbian and bisexual (GLB) patients by physicians is well known. Discrimination against GLB physicians by their colleagues and superiors is also well known and includes harassment, denial of positions and refusal to refer patients to them. The purpose of this study was to identify and quantify the attitudes of patients toward GLB physicians. METHODS: Telephone interviews were conducted with 500 randomly selected people living in a large urban Canadian city. Subjects were asked if they would refuse to see a GLB family physician and, if so, to describe the reason why. They were then given a choice of 6 reasons obtained from consultation with 10 GLB people and 10 heterosexual people. RESULTS: Of the 500 subjects 346 (69.2%) were reached and agreed to participate. Of the 346 respondents 41 (11.8%) stated that they would refuse to see a GLB family physician. The 2 most common reasons for the discrimination (prevalence rate more than 50%) were that GLB physicians would be incompetent and the respondent would feel "uncomfortable" having a GLB physician. Although more male than female respondents discriminated against GLB physicians, the difference was not statistically significant. The proportion of male and female respondents who discriminated increased with age (p < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: The observed prevalence of patient discrimination against GLB family physicians is significant. The results suggest that the discrimination is based on emotional reasons and is not related to such factors as misinformation about STDs and fear of being thought of sexually. Therefore, educational efforts should be directed against general perceptions of homosexuality rather than targeting specific medical concerns. PMID:9526472

  10. Patient Satisfaction with the Family Physician Program in Sabzevar, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Ghorbani, Alireza; Raeissi, Pouran; Saffari, Ehsan; Reissi, Nahid

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Patient satisfaction with the family physician program is an important factor for more favorable treatment results. Evaluation of patient satisfaction improves the services and approximates them to patient’s preferences. The family physician program has been executed since late March, 2005 in Iran. This study aimed to measure patient satisfaction with family physician services and determines factors affecting the level of satisfaction in order to propose appropriate suggestions for providing medical services based on patients’ expectations. Methods: Forty-one centers provide healthcare services in rural and urban areas. The participants in this study comprised 1263 people. The data were collected by an inventory with 11 items about demographic specifications, waiting time and the importance of physician’s sex and 40 items for assessing the level of patient satisfaction. Results: A total of 1199 patients participated in the current study, 72.1% of them were female and 19.6% waited 10-20 minutes for receiving services. About 55.72% of the participants chose high and very high for the items of the inventory. Total satisfaction with the family physician program decreased with age (p-value= 0.029).Moreover, total satisfaction did not show any significant differences in different groups in terms of sex, place of residence, education level and marital status. Also family physicians’ sex did not affect patient satisfaction significantly. Based on results of regression model, an increase in patients’ age by one year decreased their satisfaction by 0.12 and level of satisfaction in rural patients was lower than that in urban patients by 7.93. Conclusions: The level of patient satisfaction with family physician services was moderate, which mostly arose from the components of the family physician program and services such as the waiting time, costs, welfare facilities, accessibility and the service-providing team rather than patients

  11. Family physicians' barriers to cancer screening in extremely obese patients.

    PubMed

    Ferrante, Jeanne M; Fyffe, Denise C; Vega, Marielos L; Piasecki, Alicja K; Ohman-Strickland, Pamela A; Crabtree, Benjamin F

    2010-06-01

    Extremely obese women are less likely than nonobese women to receive breast and cervical cancer screening examinations. Reasons for this disparity are unclear and may stem from patient and/or physician barriers. This sequential mixed-methods study used individual in-depth interviews of 15 family physicians followed by a mail survey of 255 family physicians (53% response rate) to understand the barriers they faced in performing cancer screening examinations in extremely obese women. Barriers fell into three main areas: (i) difficulty doing pelvic and breast exams; (ii) inadequate equipment; and (iii) challenges overcoming patient barriers and refusal. This led some physicians to avoid performing breast and pelvic examinations on extremely obese women. Having more knowledge about specific examination techniques was associated with less difficulty in palpating lumps on breast and pelvic examinations (P < 0.005). Physicians perceived that embarrassment, aversion to undressing, and avoidance of discussions related to their weight were the most frequent barriers extremely obese women had with getting physical examinations. Educating and/or motivating patients and addressing fears were strategies used most frequently when patients refused mammograms or Pap smears. Interventions focusing on physician barriers, such as educating them on specific examination techniques, obtaining adequate equipment and supplies, and providing resources to assist physicians in dealing with patient barriers and refusal, may be fruitful in increasing cancer screening rates in extremely obese patients. Future research studies testing the effectiveness of these strategies are needed to improve cancer outcomes in this high-risk population.

  12. Who gets a family physician through centralized waiting lists?

    PubMed

    Breton, Mylaine; Brousselle, Astrid; Boivin, Antoine; Roberge, Danièle; Pineault, Raynald; Berbiche, Djamal

    2015-02-05

    North American patients are experiencing difficulties in securing affiliations with family physicians. Centralized waiting lists are increasingly being used in Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development countries to improve access. In 2011, the Canadian province of Quebec introduced new financial incentives for family physicians' enrolment of orphan patients through centralized waiting lists, the Guichet d'accès aux clientèles orphelines, with higher payments for vulnerable patients. This study analyzed whether any significant changes were observed in the numbers of patient enrolments with family physicians' after the introduction of the new financial incentives. Prior to then, financial incentives had been offered for enrolment of vulnerable patients only and there were no incentives for enrolling non-vulnerable patients. After 2011, financial incentives were also offered for enrolment of non-vulnerable patients, while those for enrolment of vulnerable patients were doubled. A longitudinal quantitative analysis spanning a five-year period (2008-2013) was performed using administrative databases covering all patients enrolled with family physicians through centralized waiting lists in the province of Quebec (n = 494,697 patients). Mixed regression models for repeated-measures were used. The number of patients enrolled with a family physician through centralized waiting lists more than quadrupled after the changes in financial incentives. Most of this increase involved non-vulnerable patients. After the changes, 70% of patients enrolled with a family physician through centralized waiting lists were non-vulnerable patients, most of whom had been referred to the centralized waiting lists by the physician who enrolled them, without first being registered in those lists or having to wait because of their priority level. Centralized waiting lists linked to financial incentives increased the number of family physicians' patient enrolments. However, although

  13. Female Physicians and the Work-Family Conflict.

    PubMed

    Treister-Goltzman, Yulia; Peleg, Roni

    2016-05-01

    There has been a dramatic increase in the number of female physicians in all fields and specializations of medicine, but this increase has not resulted in a redistribution of domestic tasks and responsibilities. Reviewing the literature of the last two decades (April 1994 to April 2014) on how female physicians cope with the challenge of balancing their family and professional lives for the duration of their professional careers revealed that they suffer from the work-family conflict more than other professionals and that it has a more negative effect on women than on men. Women physicians consider work-family balance significantly when making career choices. These considerations affect their career success, their productivity as faculty members, their marital life, and parenthood. Having a supportive spouse at home and a facilitating mentor at work are important for a positive work-family balance among female physicians. Special career-supporting measures, such as flexible work schedules and expanded support for childcare over the course of work and when taking part in academic activities, are critical for female physicians.

  14. Tension Headaches: A Challenge to the Family Physician

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, May

    1978-01-01

    Tension headache is a frequently encountered symptom. The skills of the family physician make him or her ideally suited to assess and manage the patient with this problem. Diagnosis depends on a thorough understanding of the nature and ‘life-history’ of the headache as well as knowledge of the patient as an individual and as part of his or her family and social environment. Management requires a holistic ongoing approach, employing a judicious combination of medication and physical therapy. Above all, the physician must help the patient develop different ways of dealing with anxiety and conflict. PMID:21301541

  15. Family-physician interactions in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Azoulay, Elie; Sprung, Charles L

    2004-11-01

    Surrogate designation has the potential to represent the patient's wishes and promote successful family involvement in decision making when options exist as to the patient's medical management. In recent years, intensive care unit physicians and nurses have promoted family-centered care on the basis that adequate and effective communication with family members is the key to substitute decision making, thereby protecting patient autonomy. The two-step model for the family-physician relationship in the intensive care unit including early and effective provision of information to the family followed by family input into decision making is described as well as specific needs of the family members of dying patients. A research agenda is outlined for further investigating the family-physician relationship in the intensive care unit. This agenda includes a) improvement of communication skills for health care workers; b) research in the area of information and communication; c) interventions in non-intensive care unit areas to promote programs for teaching communication skills to all members of the medical profession; d) research on potential conflict between medical best interest and the ethics of autonomy; and e) publicity to enhance society's interest in advance care planning and surrogate designation amplified by debate in the media and other sounding boards. These studies should focus both on families and on intensive care unit workers. Assessments of postintervention outcomes in family members would provide insights into how well family-centered care matches family expectations and protects families from distress, not only during the intensive care unit stay but also during the ensuing weeks and months.

  16. Family physicians' perceptions of health manpower needs in West Virginia.

    PubMed

    Sebert, S L

    1991-11-01

    West Virginia family physicians feel that they are able to assess the health care needs of their communities. There is a need for more physicians in all of the major specialties in West Virginia, but the largest numbers of physicians are needed in family practice and obstetrics. More registered nurses and licensed practical nurses are needed than any other health care professionals. Twenty-five percent of the respondents are actively recruiting associates, and 48 percent have seriously considered leaving, or are leaving West Virginia. The most commonly cited reasons for leaving are inadequate reimbursement, the state's economy, SB-576, lack of tort reform, and state government in general. The greatest advantage given to practicing in the state are its people, the quality of life, and home and family. In addition, the greatest problems are reimbursement, state government, the malpractice climate and the state economy. The survey shows that state government needs to show a good faith effort to enact tort reform to improve relations with physicians. The threat of losing more physicians is real and must be addressed. Improving the climate for the practice of medicine is a viable solution to West Virginia's manpower problems. There is also a need to continue all present health care professional training programs. More emphasis should be placed on recruitment and retention of nursing students. There is expressed support for nurse midwives, nurse practitioners, and physicians' assistants all working under the supervision of physicians. The finding that home and family are frequently listed as advantages to practicing here indicates recruitment and nurturing of students from underserved areas should be increased.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Mentorship and job satisfaction among Navy family physicians.

    PubMed

    Saperstein, Adam K; Viera, Anthony J; Firnhaber, Gina C

    2012-08-01

    Among civilian academic physicians, having a mentor is associated with greater job satisfaction. Whether this is true for military physicians is unknown. We sought to examine whether having a mentor is associated with positive job satisfaction among Navy family physicians. A web-based survey was sent to all Navy family physicians in the Specialty leader's database in May 2008. Our main outcome variable was "positive job satisfaction," and our main exposure variable was being in a mentor relationship. Chi-square was used to test for difference in frequencies in categorical variables and logistic regression was used to adjust for covariates. The response rate was 60.2% (186/309). Among respondents, 73.7% reported positive job satisfaction. Factors associated with positive job satisfaction included having a mentor, being >9 years postresidency, spending <50% of time in patient care, higher rank, male gender, and being active in research. After adjustment for these factors, having a mentor remained significantly associated with positive job satisfaction (odds ratio 2.86, 95% confidence interval 1.22-6.71). Having a mentor is associated with positive job satisfaction among Navy family physicians, even after adjusting for multiple other factors. An implication is that a mentorship program may be a strategy for improving job satisfaction.

  18. Clinical supervision among family physicians: prevalence, needs, and attitudes.

    PubMed

    Torppa, Martina A; Toivola, Kristiina; Ruskoaho, Juho; Pitkälä, Kaisu H

    2013-10-01

    Clinical supervision (CS) is not an established support system among physicians. Family physicians (FPs) have used Balint groups as a form of clinical supervision. In all, not much is known about the prevalence of physicians' attendance to or needs for CS. We studied what proportion of FPs compared with other physicians have attended or report they would need CS and whether having patients who request certain tests or medicines is associated with FPs' attendance to or need for CS. A postal survey for all working-aged Finnish physicians was performed in 2008. Special questions concerning CS (eg, Balint) and patients' requests were included. Response rate for the survey was 74% (N = 13 708). Special questions were responded by 10 559 physicians of whom 1252 were FPs. FPs had attended CS more often than other physicians (42% vs 29%, P < .001). Of FPs, 25% reported a need for CS with no availability of it. FPs experienced with or needing for CS were more often than other FPs females, had participated in continuing medical education, and reported that patients with requests have increased in recent years. Both experience of CS and a need for CS with no availability are common among Finnish FPs. Experiences of patients with requests may reflect a need for CS among FPs. Studies on the content, significance and effectiveness CS among FPs are needed.

  19. Confidentiality of Medical Information: A Study of Albertan Family Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Gerald L.

    1988-01-01

    The author of this paper examines physicians' regard for the confidentiality of medical information in the light of their perception of their own role. Five case studies of increasing complexity of medical management and ethical issues, derived from practice and accompanied by questions relating to confidentiality and medical management, were submitted to randomly selected family physicians in Alberta. Analysis of the replies to determine attitudes to confidentiality and how the respondents perceived patients' best interests, and statements of how they would act in certain situations, disclosed that a substantial minority of the physicians were still prepared to breach confidentiality and exercise Hippocratic professional judgement in certain situations. The bases of confidentiality of medical information are reviewed, together with changing modes of medical ethics and the increasing trend to rights derived from patients, autonomy, and the ways in which these factors may affect the physician-patient relationship. PMID:11660314

  20. What Is So Special About a Family Physician?

    PubMed Central

    Deisher, Joseph B.

    1974-01-01

    Around a core of common, acute and chronic, recurrent health problems, a family physician must marshall the traditional episodic management for both inpatient and outpatient illness. He must also be especially adept at recently emerging routines of prevention and early detection. He provides individual and familial psychologic support and counselling, for both its therapeutic and preventive values. In addition, he must relate the individual care of his patient and the patient's family to the community as a whole. In doing this he will use not only his own skills but those of lay health volunteers, trained allied health care professionals and skilled subspecialists in the limited medical disciplines. The proper preparation of family physicians for this complicated role has far-reaching implications for change in both medical education and medical practice. PMID:4439902

  1. Sharing care: the psychiatrist in the family physician's office.

    PubMed

    Kates, N; Craven, M A; Crustolo, A M; Nikolaou, L; Allen, C; Farrar, S

    1997-11-01

    One way of strengthening ties between primary care providers and psychiatrists is for a psychiatrist to visit a primary care practice on a regular basis to see and discuss patients and to provide educational input and advice for family physicians. This paper reviews the experiences of a program in Hamilton, Ontario that brings psychiatrists and counsellors into the offices of 88 local family physicians in 36 practices. Data are presented based on the activities of psychiatrists working in 13 practices over a 2-year period. Data were gathered from forms routinely completed by family physicians when making a referral and by psychiatrists whenever they saw a new case. An annual satisfaction questionnaire for all providers participating in the program was also used to gather information. Over a 2-year period, 1021 patients were seen in consultation by one full-time equivalent psychiatrist. The average duration of a consultation was 51 minutes, and a family member was present for 12% of the visits. Twenty-one percent of the patients were seen for at least one follow-up visit, 75% of which were prearranged. In addition, 1515 cases were discussed during these visits without the patient being seen. All participants had a high satisfaction rating for their involvement with the project. Benefits of this approach include increased accessibility to psychiatric consultation, enhanced continuity of care, support for family physicians, and improved communication between psychiatrists and family physicians. This model, which has great potential for innovative approaches to continuing education and resident placements, demands new skills of participating psychiatrists.

  2. The Irritable Colon: The Family Physician's Most Common Gastroenterological Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Rosser, W.W.

    1988-01-01

    The irritable colon syndrome presents the family physician with a diagnostic dilemma that tests both diagnostic and physician-patient relationship skills. Although the syndrome is common, it has no pathology, and the pathophysiology does not explain fully its signs and symptoms, which are not distinct, but are similar to those of a number of serious organic conditions. Careful history taking, simple investigations, and the addition of 20g of wheat germ fibre to the patient's daily diet will usually control the symptoms. Regulation or reduction of aggravating factors such as anxiety, depression, dietary intolerance or food allergies, antibiotic use, GI infections, and laxative abuse will also control the symptoms. The family physician who is able to tailor the diagnosis and management of the problem to the individual patient demonstrates the benefits of having an on-going relationship with the patient. PMID:21253150

  3. Comparison of nurse practitioner and family physician relative work values.

    PubMed

    Sullivan-Marx, E M; Maislin, G

    2000-01-01

    With the enactment of the Balanced Budget Act of 1997, American nurse practitioners were granted direct Medicare reimbursement for Part B services. Payment structures in fee-for-service and managed care systems are physician-based, leading to difficulties in constructing payments for other health care professionals. The purpose of this pilot study was to examine the feasibility of using nurse practitioner data for specifying relative work values in the Medicare Fee Schedule for three office-visit codes. An exploratory survey was designed to establish relative work values using magnitude-estimation scaling. Nurse practitioners (N = 43) responded to a structured questionnaire in a national mail survey. Physician data (N = 46) were obtained from a computerized database from the American Academy of Family Physicians. The methods used in this study were the same as the process used by the American Medical Association and the Health Care Financing Administration to establish relative work values in the Medicare Fee Schedule. Respondents established relative work values for three Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) codes for office visits (99203, 99213, 99215) commonly billed in primary care practice. Each CPT code descriptor and associated vignette were compared with reference services germane to the practice of nurse practitioners and family physicians, using magnitude-estimation scaling. To establish relative work values for each code, respondents were asked to consider the time to provide the service and intensity of the work involved for each CPT code. No significant differences between nurse practitioners and family physicians were found in the three CPT codes for relative work values and intensity. Nurse practitioners estimated significantly (p < .01) higher intraservice (face to face) time with patients than did family physicians, and family physicians estimated significantly (p < .05) higher pre-service time for two codes and significantly (p < .05) higher

  4. Work Values and Job Satisfaction of Family Physicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouwkamp-Memmer, Jennifer C.; Whiston, Susan C.; Hartung, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Theory and prior research suggest linkages between work values and job satisfaction. The present study examined such linkages in a group of workers in a professional occupation. Family physicians (134 women, 206 men, 88% Caucasian) responded to context-specific measures of work values and job satisfaction. ANOVA results indicated a work values…

  5. A multifaceted education intervention for improving family physicians' case management.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Morales, Hortensia; Flores-Hernández, Sergio; Tomé-Sandoval, Patricia; Pérez-Cuevas, Ricardo

    2009-04-01

    The Mexican Institute of Social Security (IMSS) is the largest public health care system in Mexico. IMSS family physicians' management of clinical problems is frequently not consistent with published evidence. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of a multifaceted educational intervention to improve management of acute respiratory infections (ARI) by IMSS family physicians. A non-randomized pre-post intervention with comparison group design was conducted in eight IMSS family medicine clinics in which 106 family physicians practiced. An evidence-based clinical guideline for ARI management was developed, and clinical tutors were trained. The three-stage intervention comprised interactive workshops, individual tutorials, and round-table peer-review sessions. The main outcome was appropriate ARI case management. The intervention effect was calculated by using the differences-in-differences model, adjusting for cluster of physicians. In the intervention group, the difference in mean proportion of improvement compared with baseline evaluation was 22.6% (95% confidence interval [CI]=10.3 to 34.9) for appropriate prescription of antibiotics, 29.8% (95% CI=17.2 to 42.4) for indication of worsening signs, and 19.6% (95% CI=11.2 to 28.0) for overall appropriate case management. The comparison group showed no significant changes. The educational intervention improved ARI management. Further studies are needed to analyze organizational implications, cost, sustainability, and effects on health outcomes.

  6. Work Values and Job Satisfaction of Family Physicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouwkamp-Memmer, Jennifer C.; Whiston, Susan C.; Hartung, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Theory and prior research suggest linkages between work values and job satisfaction. The present study examined such linkages in a group of workers in a professional occupation. Family physicians (134 women, 206 men, 88% Caucasian) responded to context-specific measures of work values and job satisfaction. ANOVA results indicated a work values…

  7. The Family Physician's Role in Managing Chronic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Galbraith, Peter R.

    1988-01-01

    This article provides a brief update on the clinical approach to chronic myelogenous leukemia and chronic lymphocytic leukemia, based on advances in pathbiology and the effect of new concepts on treatment policies. These disorders were selected because family physicians take most responsibility for the day-to-day management of these most common forms of chronic leukemias. PMID:21253119

  8. Exercise-induced asthma. What family physicians should do.

    PubMed Central

    D'Urzo, A.

    1995-01-01

    Exercise-induced asthma is described as a transitory increase in airway resistance during or after vigorous exercise. Nearly 90% of patients with chronic asthma and 40% of allergic nonasthmatic patients have the condition. Family physicians should try to educate patients about their asthma and, barring contraindications, encourage them to participate in regular physical activity. PMID:8563507

  9. Periodic health evaluation of adults: a survey of family physicians.

    PubMed

    Luckmann, R; Melville, S K

    1995-06-01

    The routine periodic health evaluation (PHE) is a popular format in primary care practice for the delivery of clinical preventive services to adults, but knowledge of the current pattern of use and of the content of the PHE is limited. We surveyed a random sample of 567 family physicians (response rate, 60.1%) in New England regarding their approach to and attitudes about the PHE of adults. Family physicians reported spending a mean of 35.2% (11.6 hours per week) of their total ambulatory care time on adult PHEs, which were usually scheduled for 20 to 30 minutes each. All respondents recommended a PHE to men > or = 50 years old and to women > or = 40 years old, and more than 90% recommended a PHE to younger patients. Most physicians (80.7%) reported that the PHE is their primary mechanism for delivering preventive services, and 90.6% believed that the PHE should include a comprehensive physical examination. The mean number of physical examination items performed during the PHE was 11.6 to 13.9, depending on patient age and sex. As part of the PHE, most physicians (71.6% to 90.7%, depending on patient age and sex) ordered one or more screening laboratory tests not recommended by the US Preventive Services Task Force. Utilization of fewer laboratory tests was associated with residency training, employment in a health maintenance organization (HMO), and limited concern about malpractice suits. Family physicians reported spending a substantial amount of time on the PHE of adults, performing extensive screening physical examinations and many screening laboratory tests of unknown effectiveness. Among family physicians, there is considerable unexplained variation in the form and content of the PHE.

  10. Comparison of burnout pattern between hospital physicians and family physicians working in Suez Canal University Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Kotb, Amany Ali; Mohamed, Khalid Abd-Elmoez; Kamel, Mohammed Hbany; Ismail, Mosleh Abdul Rahman; Abdulmajeed, Abdulmajeed Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The burnout syndrome is characterized by emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and low personal accomplishment. It is associated with impaired job performance. Methods This descriptive study examined 171 physicians for the presence of burnout and its related risk factors. The evaluation of burnout was through Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI). The participant was considered to meet the study criteria for burnout if he or she got a “high“ score on at least 2 of the three dimensions of MBI. Results In the current study, the prevalence of burnout in hospital physicians (53.9%) was significantly higher than family physicians (41.94%) with (p=0.001). Participants who work in the internal medicine department scored the highest prevalence (69.64%) followed by Surgeons (56.50%) and Emergency doctors (39.39%). On the other hand, Pediatricians got the lowest prevalence (18.75%). Working in the teaching hospital and being married are strong predictors for occurrence of burnout. Conclusion There is a significant difference of burnout between hospital physicians and family physicians among the study subjects. Working in the teaching hospital and being married are strong predictors for occurrence of burnout. PMID:25422682

  11. Celiac disease. CME update for family physicians.

    PubMed Central

    Devlin, Shane M.; Andrews, Christopher N.; Beck, Paul L.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review current understanding of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of celiac disease. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Few recent randomized controlled trials (level I evidence) have studied treatments for celiac disease. There are recent comparative studies (level II evidence) and there is well established consensus (level III evidence) on diagnosis and treatment of celiac disease. MAIN MESSAGE: Celiac disease is an immune-mediated small bowel enteropathy caused by exposure to wheat gluten protein. The disease can be insidious and often presents with only subtle extraintestinal manifestations in a variety of organ systems. Recent epidemiologic surveys suggest celiac disease is much more common in North America than previously thought. Advances in immunology and screening have made diagnosis more reliable than in the past. Removing gluten from the diet is effective in most cases. CONCLUSION: Celiac disease manifests subtly and is an easy diagnosis to miss. Good laboratory screening tests and effective treatment are available. Family practitioners should consider celiac disease in patients who present with confounding symptoms. PMID:15171674

  12. Do family physicians, emergency department physicians, and pediatricians give consistent sport-related concussion management advice?

    PubMed

    Stoller, Jacqueline; Carson, James D; Garel, Alisha; Libfeld, Paula; Snow, Catherine L; Law, Marcus; Frémont, Pierre

    2014-06-01

    To identify differences and gaps in recommendations to patients for the management of sport-related concussion among FPs, emergency department physicians (EDPs), and pediatricians. A self-administered, multiple-choice survey was e-mailed to FPs, EDPs, and pediatricians. The survey had been assessed for content validity. Two community teaching hospitals in the greater Toronto area in Ontario. Two hundred seventy physicians, including FPs, EDPs, and pediatricians, were invited to participate. Identification of sources of concussion management information, usefulness of concussion diagnosis strategies, and whether physicians use common terminology when explaining cognitive rest strategies to patients after sport-related concussions. The response rate was 43.7%. Surveys were completed by 70 FPs, 23 EDPs, and 11 pediatricians. In total, 49% of FP, 52% of EDP, and 27% of pediatrician respondents reported no knowledge of any consensus statements on concussion in sport, and 54% of FPs, 86% of EDPs, and 78% of pediatricians never used the Sport Concussion Assessment Tool, version 2. Only 49% of FPs, 57% of EDPs, and 36% of pediatricians always advised cognitive rest. This study identified large gaps in the knowledge of concussion guidelines and implementation of recommendations for treating patients with sport-related concussions. Although some physicians recommended physical and cognitive rest, a large proportion failed to consistently advise this strategy. Better knowledge transfer efforts should target all 3 groups of physicians. Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

  13. [Ability to detect psychiatric disorders by the family physician].

    PubMed

    Garrido-Elustondo, Sofía; Reneses, Blanca; Navalón, Aida; Martín, Olga; Ramos, Isabel; Fuentes, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    To determine the ability of family physicians to detect psychiatric disorders, comparing the presence of psychiatric disorders detected using validated tests and referrals by family physicians. Cross-sectional, two-phase study. Primary healthcare centres in an urban area of Madrid. Patients between 18 and 65years attending primary healthcare centres for non-administrative purposes. To detect psychiatric disorders in the waiting room, an interview was performed using GHQ-28 and MULTICAGE CAD-4 in the screening phase (considered positive: score of 6 or higher on the GHQ-28 or a score 2 or higher on MULTICAGE CAD-4). Patients with a positive score and 20% with negative were recruited for the second phase (case identification) using MINI interview. During family physician consultation, the patient gave his doctor a card with an identification number to record the presence of psychiatric illness in his/her opinion and whether there was treatment with psychotropic drugs. A total of 628 subjects participated. The prevalence of psychiatric disorders corrected by two phase methodology was 31.7% (95%CI: 27.9 to 35.5). Of the 185 patients with a psychiatric disorder detected, 44.2% (95%CI: 36.7 to 51.7) were identified as patients with psychiatric disorders by their family physician. Disorders best detected were: hypomania, dysthymic disorder, depressive episode with melancholic symptoms, and panic disorder. A significant percentage of patients with possible psychiatric disorders detected with validated test have not been identified by their family physician. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. How family practice physicians, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants incorporate spiritual care in practice.

    PubMed

    Tanyi, Ruth A; McKenzie, Monica; Chapek, Cynthia

    2009-12-01

    To investigate how primary care family practice providers incorporate spirituality into their practices in spite of documented barriers. A phenomenological qualitative design was used. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with three physicians, five nurse practitioners, and two physician assistants. Five major theme clusters emerged: (1) discerning instances for overt spiritual assessment; (2) displaying a genuine and caring attitude; (3) encouraging the use of existing spiritual practices; (4) documenting spiritual care for continuity of care; (5) managing perceived barriers to spiritual care. Findings support that patients' spiritual needs can be addressed in spite of documented barriers. Techniques to assist providers in providing spiritual care are discussed and directions for future research are suggested.

  15. How do family physicians measure blood pressure in routine clinical practice? National survey of Canadian family physicians.

    PubMed

    Kaczorowski, Janusz; Myers, Martin G; Gelfer, Mark; Dawes, Martin; Mang, Eric J; Berg, Angelique; Grande, Claudio Del; Kljujic, Dragan

    2017-03-01

    To describe the techniques currently used by family physicians in Canada to measure blood pressure (BP) for screening for, diagnosing, and treating hypertension. A Web-based cross-sectional survey distributed by e-mail. Stratified random sample of family physicians in Canada. Family physician members of the College of Family Physicians of Canada with valid e-mail addresses. Physicians' self-reported routine methods for recording BP in their practices to screen for, diagnose, and manage hypertension. A total of 774 valid responses were received, for a response rate of 16.2%. Respondents were similar to nonrespondents except for underrepresentation of male physicians. Of 769 respondents, 417 (54.2%) indicated that they used manual office BP measurement with a mercury or aneroid device and stethoscope as the routine method to screen patients for high BP, while 42.9% (330 of 769) reported using automated office BP (AOBP) measurement. The method most frequently used to make a diagnosis of hypertension was AOBP measurement (31.1%, 240 of 771), followed by home BP measurement (22.4%, 173 of 771) and manual office BP measurement (21.4%, 165 of 771). Ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) was used for diagnosis by 14.4% (111 of 771) of respondents. The most frequently reported method for ongoing management was home BP monitoring (68.7%, 528 of 769), followed by manual office BP measurement (63.6%, 489 of 769) and AOBP measurement (59.2%, 455 of 769). More than three-quarters (77.8%, 598 of 769) of respondents indicated that ABPM was readily available for their patients. Canadian family physicians exhibit overall high use of electronic devices for BP measurement, However, more efforts are needed to encourage practitioners to follow current Canadian guidelines, which advocate the use of AOBP measurement for hypertension screening, ABPM and home BP measurement for making a diagnosis, and both AOBP and home BP monitoring for ongoing management. Copyright© the College of Family

  16. Pod people. Response of family physicians and family practice nurses to Kosovar refugees in Greenwood, NS.

    PubMed Central

    Twohig, P. L.; Burge, F.; MacLachlan, R.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore roles of family physicians and family practice nurses who provided care to Kosovar refugees at Greenwood, NS. DESIGN: Qualitative study based on individual interviews with family physicians and family practice nurses. SETTING: Family practices in Halifax, NS. PARTICIPANTS: Six family practice nurses, four physician faculty members, four community-based family physicians, and two family medicine residents were interviewed. Participants were purposefully chosen from the roster of service providers. METHOD: All interviews were conducted by one of the researchers and were semistructured. Interviews lasted approximately 30 minutes and were immediately transcribed. Key words and phrases were identified and compared with subsequent interviews until saturation was achieved. MAIN FINDINGS: Data yielded four analytical categories: the clinical encounter, expectation and experience, role and team functioning, and response. Participants reported how providing care in the context of a refugee camp was both similar to and different from their daily activities in family practice, as were their working relationships with other health care professionals. CONCLUSION: Primary care for refugees during complex health emergencies is often underreported in the literature. Yet family practice physicians and nurses recounted that they had the requisite skills to provide care in such a context. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:11143581

  17. Workplace Bullying Among Family Physicians: A Gender Focused Study.

    PubMed

    Rouse, Linda P; Gallagher-Garza, Shalena; Gebhard, Roberta E; Harrison, Suzanne L; Wallace, Lorraine S

    2016-09-01

    Continuing gender disparities within the medical profession have raised concerns about the extent to which women physicians face an inhospitable work environment. The purpose of this study was to examine the types and frequency of workplace bullying reported by a national sample of family physicians employed in academic settings, as related to gender. Data for this study were gathered as part of the Council of Academic Family Medicine (CAMF) Educational Research Alliance (CERA) omnibus electronic survey. Respondents completed questions addressing sociodemographic and practice characteristics, general experience with bullying, types of bullying, actions in response to bullying, and outcomes. A total of 1065 academic family physicians (male = 56.8%; female = 43.2%), mostly non-Hispanic white (84.2%) or Asian (5.3%) and between the ages 30 and 60 (58.7%) completed the CERA survey. One in 10 respondents acknowledged bullying someone in the workplace; 30% had been personally bullied in the workplace. Compared to men, female physicians were more likely to report being bullied overall and, specifically, to experience having their opinions ignored, lack of recognition for good work, feeling pressured not to claim rightful benefits, and being given unmanageable workloads. Despite some gender differences in actions taken, outcomes for each kind of action were the same for men and women.

  18. Factors influencing palliative care. Qualitative study of family physicians' practices.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, J. B.; Sangster, M.; Swift, J.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine factors that influence family physicians' decisions to practise palliative care. DESIGN: Qualitative method of in-depth interviews. SETTING: Southwestern Ontario. PARTICIPANTS: Family physicians who practise palliative care on a full-time basis, who practise on a part-time basis, or who have retired from active involvement in palliative care. METHOD: Eleven in-depth interviews were conducted to explore factors that influence family physicians' decisions to practise palliative care and factors that sustain their interest in palliative care. All interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. The analysis strategy used a phenomenological approach and occurred concurrently rather than sequentially. All interview transcriptions were read independently by the researchers, who then compared and combined their analyses. Final analysis involved examining all interviews collectively, thus permitting relationships between and among central themes to emerge. MAIN OUTCOME FINDINGS: The overriding theme was a common philosophy of palliative care focusing on acceptance of death, whole person care, compassion, communication, and teamwork. Participants' philosophies were shaped by their education and by professional and personal experiences. In addition, participants articulated personal and systemic factors currently affecting their practice of palliative care. CONCLUSIONS: Participants observed that primary care physicians should be responsible for their patients' palliative care within the context of interdisciplinary teams. For medical students to be knowledgeable and sensitive to the needs of dying patients, palliative care should be given higher priority in the curriculum. Finally, participants argued compellingly for transferring the philosophy of palliative care to the overall practice of medicine. PMID:9612588

  19. Family physicians' knowledge of commonly overused treatments and tests.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Douglas; Stephens, Mark; Reamy, Brian; Crownover, Brian; Crawford, Paul; Chang, Tammy

    2014-01-01

    In 2010, several primary care physician organizations drafted the "Promoting Good Stewardship in Clinical Practice" list for family medicine to advance the appropriate use of 5 commonly ordered treatments and tests. The goal was to achieve excellent patient care while appropriately conserving health care resources. The purpose of this study was to assess knowledge regarding the appropriate use of these treatments and tests among the memberships of the Uniformed Services Academy of Family Physicians (USAFP) and the Council of Academic Family Medicine (CAFM). An online, cross-sectional survey of all family physician members of the USAFP and the CAFM was conducted. The survey consisted of 5 clinical cases administered as part of a larger omnibus CAFM Educational Research Alliance survey and a separate USAFP membership survey. The primary outcome was correct answers to clinical scenarios. The response rate was 11% (n = 236 of 2165) for members of USAFP and 47% (n = 519 of 1099) for CAFM members, with an overall response rate of 23% (n = 755 of 3264). Overall, respondents answered 78% of cases correctly (USAFP 79%, CAFM 78%; no significant difference). In rank order, respondents were most likely to answer the Papanicolaou test question correctly (90.1%), followed by the low-back pain (86.7%), the dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry screening (85.4%), the sinusitis (66.5%), and the cardiac screening questions (61.4%). Among the family physicians surveyed, knowledge about the appropriate use of commonly overused tests and treatments was high. Two clinical scenarios (sinusitis and cardiac screening) demonstrate areas where further education could improve care and reduce costs. © Copyright 2014 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  20. Abuse of family physicians by patients seeking controlled substances.

    PubMed

    Saveland, Christine; Hawker, Leisha; Miedema, Baukje; Macdougall, Peter

    2014-02-01

    To examine family physicians' career prevalence and monthly incidence of workplace abuse by controlled substance prescription seekers. A 4-page cross-sectional survey. A family medicine continuing medical education event in Halifax, NS. The survey was distributed to 316 family physicians attending the continuing medical education event. Career prevalence and monthly incidence of workplace abuse related to the act of prescribing controlled substances. Fifty-six percent (n = 178) of the 316 surveys were returned completed. Half the study participants were men (49%). Most study participants were in private practice and lived in Nova Scotia, and approximately half (51%) practised in urban settings. On average, the study participants had 20 years of practice experience. The career prevalence of abusive encounters related to controlled substance prescribing was divided into "minor," "major," and "severe" incidents. Overall, 95% of study participants reported having experienced at least 1 incident of minor abuse; 48% had experienced at least 1 incident of major abuse; and 17% had experienced at least 1 incident of severe abuse during their careers. Further, 30% reported having been abused in the past month; among those, the average number of abusive encounters was 3. Most (82%) of the abusers were male with a history of addiction (85%) and mental illness (39%). Opioids were the most frequently sought controlled substance. Abuse of family physicians by patients seeking controlled substances is substantial. Family physicians who prescribe controlled substances are at risk of being subjected to minor, major, or even severe abuse. Opioids were the most often sought controlled substance. A national discussion to deal with this issue is needed.

  1. Family violence assessment practices of pediatric ED nurses and physicians.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, Donna M; Kelly, Patricia J; Cheng, An-Lin

    2013-05-01

    Recommendations by the ENA and other professional organizations have not resulted in widespread adoption of routine assessment for family violence such as child abuse and intimate partner violence. The aim of this qualitative study was to use a theory-driven approach to explore the salient beliefs and attitudes of nurses and physicians related to routine assessment of child abuse and intimate partner violence in the pediatric emergency department. Nurse and physician participants from a large Midwestern pediatric trauma center responded to a series of open-ended questions designed to identify positive or negative attitudes toward family violence assessment, approving or disapproving beliefs about family violence assessment, and the perception of ease or difficulty in performing family violence assessment. Respondents valued early identification and the associated health benefits of keeping pediatric patients safe, as well as linking at-risk families to community resources. They believe that victims, health care organizations, and some providers approve of routine family violence assessment but also believe that some providers and families who value privacy disapprove. Previously identified barriers and facilitators to family violence assessment were confirmed by participants. A finding unique to this study was that participants expressed the belief that routine family violence assessment offers more complete health care to children. Participants viewed child abuse and intimate partner violence as an event in a child's life that affects the child's health. Participants valued the benefits of routine family violence assessment; however, translating these value beliefs into practice remains elusive. A theoretical framework may provide insight into yet unidentified aspects of known barriers and facilitators. Copyright © 2013 Emergency Nurses Association. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The content of family physicians' online videos and biographies.

    PubMed

    Perrault, Evan K

    2014-03-01

    Finding information about new physicians can sometimes be challenging. The purpose of the current study was to determine if the information and qualities prospective patients want to know about family physicians, before selecting one to visit, are present within videos placed in their online biographies. More than 150 family physician videos, and their accompanying text biographies, were coded from 20 health systems within the United States. Videos and biographies were coded for the presence or absence of 50 pieces of information (eg, was a philosophy of care mentioned, were personal hobbies/interests noted?). The majority of videos (80.4%) contained the doctor's philosophy of care. Nearly half (47.7%) contained at least one piece of personal information about the doctor (ie, where the doctor is originally from, the doctor's marital status, the number of children the doctor has, other family members the doctor has, the doctor's religion/faith, and personal hobbies/interests). Only 30.7% of videos showed footage of the doctor's office, and 25.5% showed footage of the doctor interacting with a patient. The full potential of video is not being utilized by health systems in constructing videos of their physicians to place alongside online biographies. Previous research indicates patients want to know not only what a doctor's office looks like but also how that doctor will treat them in a consultation. The inclusion of footage of the doctor's office, as well as of the doctor interacting with a patient, could help to reduce the uncertainty and apprehension sometimes present when choosing a new physician.

  3. Family practice physicians' beliefs, attitudes, and practices regarding obesity.

    PubMed

    Price, J H; Desmond, S M; Krol, R A; Snyder, F F; O'Connell, J K

    1987-01-01

    This study examined 318 family practice physicians' beliefs, attitudes, and practices regarding obese patients. Most physicians surveyed were aware of the health effects of obesity and that normal weight is important to the health of their patients. Beliefs, attitudes, and practices differed significantly based on the physicians' sex, weight, years in practice, and belief that counseling patients on weight loss is professionally gratifying and that most obese patients can lose significant amounts of weight. A notable number of respondents held negative or stereotypical attitudes toward obese patients (i.e., obese patients lack self-control, are lazy and sad). The most commonly recommended weight loss techniques were decreasing caloric consumption (92 percent), participating in Weight Watchers (84 percent), consulting a dietitian/nutritionist (76 percent), and aerobic exercise (75 percent). The two sources of weight control information most frequently cited were past experience (73 percent) and medical journals (71 percent). The results of this survey indicate that there is considerable room for improvement in the beliefs, attitudes, and practices of family physicians regarding obese patients.

  4. Modeling spatial accessibility of immigrants to culturally diverse family physicians.

    PubMed

    Wanga, Lu; Roisman, Deborah

    2011-01-01

    This article uses accessibility as an analytical tool to examine health care access among immigrants in a multicultural urban setting. It applies and improves on two widely used accessibility models—the gravity model and the two-step floating catchment area model—in measuring spatial accessibility by Mainland Chinese immigrants in the Toronto Census Metropolitan Area. Empirical data on physician-seeking behaviors are collected through two rounds of questionnaire surveys. Attention is focused on journey to physician location and utilization of linguistically matched family physicians. Based on the survey data, a two-zone accessibility model is developed by relaxing the travel threshold and distance impedance parameters that are traditionally treated as a constant in the accessibility models. General linear models are used to identify relationships among spatial accessibility, geography, and socioeconomic characteristics of Mainland Chinese immigrants. The results suggest a spatial mismatch in the supply of and demand for culturally sensitive care, and residential location is the primary factor that determines spatial accessibility to family physicians. The article yields important policy implications.

  5. The Family Physician's Role in Preventing Early Termination of Breastfeeding

    PubMed Central

    Livingstone, Verity H.

    1986-01-01

    Despite the high rate of breastfeeding among mothers as they leave the hospital, early termination of breastfeeding continues to be a problem. A new mother needs considerable education, support and, often, early intervention, not only to initiate breastfeeding successfully, but also to prevent breastfeeding problems occurring and to continue breastfeeding successfully for several months. Knowledgeable health-care providers are the key to promoting and protecting breastfeeding, yet in the community, many of these mothers, lacking the support of such knowledgeable advisers, often terminate early. Family physicians are in a key position to help the nursing dyad. This article looks at the role that family physicians can play in advising and helping mothers, and discusses the management of common breastfeeding difficulties. PMID:21267318

  6. Office-based anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Treasure, Trevor; Bennett, Jeffrey

    2007-02-01

    The practice of office-based oral and maxillofacial surgery is continuously expanding and involves the management of a diverse population in regards to the surgical procedures performed within the office and the age and medical health of the patients treated within the office. Comfort, cooperation, and hemodynamic stability are critical to satisfactorily accomplishing the surgical procedure. Various anesthetic techniques are used, including local anesthesia, anxiolysis, analgesia and sedation, and general anesthesia. The topic is vast and too extensive to be fully discussed in this article. The intent of this article is to provide a discussion of some fundamental concepts that can optimize anesthetic safety and care.

  7. Attitudes about human papillomavirus vaccine among family physicians.

    PubMed

    Riedesel, J M; Rosenthal, S L; Zimet, G D; Bernstein, D I; Huang, B; Lan, D; Kahn, J A

    2005-12-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines will soon be available for clinical use, and the effectiveness of vaccine delivery programs will depend largely upon whether providers recommend the vaccine. The objectives of this study were to examine family physicians' attitudes about HPV immunization and to identify predictors of intention to recommend immunization. Cross-sectional survey instrument assessing provider and practice characteristics, knowledge about HPV, attitudes about HPV vaccination, and intention to administer two hypothetical HPV vaccines. Surveys were mailed to a national random sample of 1,000 American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP) members. Intention to administer two hypothetical HPV vaccines (a cervical cancer/genital wart vaccine and a cervical cancer vaccine) to boys and girls of different ages. One hundred fifty-five surveys (15.5%) were returned and 145 were used in the final sample. Participants reported higher intention to recommend both hypothetical HPV vaccines to girls vs. boys (P < 0.0001) and to older vs. younger adolescents (P < 0.0001). They were more likely to recommend a cervical cancer/genital wart vaccine than a cervical cancer vaccine to boys and girls (P < 0.001). Variables independently associated with intention (P < 0.05) included: female gender of provider, knowledge about HPV, belief that organizations such as the AAFP would endorse vaccination, and fewer perceived barriers to vaccination. Female gender, knowledge about HPV, and attitudes about vaccination were independently associated with family physicians' intention to recommend HPV vaccines. Vaccination initiatives directed toward family physicians should focus on modifiable predictors of intention to vaccinate, such as HPV knowledge and attitudes about vaccination.

  8. Assessment of Family Physicians' Knowledge of Social and Community Services

    PubMed Central

    Craven, Marilyn A.; Kates, N.; Raso, P.

    1990-01-01

    A survey of 255 family physicians and general practitioners in the Hamilton-Wentworth area, revealed that knowledge of social services and community treatment programs was often poor: 65% of 122 respondents did not know about one or more points of access to social services information, and 26% reported that they knew of appropriate social services for less than half of 13 psychosocial problems commonly encountered in family practice. Although 43% indicated that they preferred to treat patients themselves, 47% agreed that lack of information precluded referral, and 75% agreed that opportunities to increase their knowledge of community services would be helpful. PMID:21234060

  9. Personal values of exemplary family physicians: implications for professional satisfaction in family medicine.

    PubMed

    Eliason, B C; Schubot, D B

    1995-09-01

    Personal social values have been identified as important determinants of generalists' specialty choice. However, the personal values or "guiding principles" of generalist physicians have not been identified scientifically. To establish a benchmark, we measured the personal values of exemplary family physicians because they serve as role models for current and future physicians. We also explored the relationship between personal values and practice satisfaction. We obtained a list of 330 family physicians nominated for the American Academy of Family Physicians' (AAFP) Family Doctor of the Year award for the years 1988 through 1993. We asked them to complete the Schwartz Values Questionnaire, a 56-item instrument for measuring personal values. They also answered three questions concerning practice satisfaction. The return rate was 83%. The physicians' mean age was 63 years. They had been in practice an average of 34 years, 93% were male, and 52% practiced in rural areas. Honesty was rated as the most important of the 56 values, and social power as the least important. Of the 10 value types (groups of common values), the responding physicians rated "Benevolence" as most important and "Power" as least important. Practice satisfaction correlated positively with the Benevolence value type (r = .21, P = .001) and negatively with the Power value type (r = -.15, P = .023). Of the 10 value types, Benevolence was rated the most important and Power the least important by exemplary family physicians, and both value types also correlated, positively and negatively, respectively, with their practice satisfaction. These results have implications for the selection, training, and career satisfaction of generalist physicians.

  10. Abuse of family physicians by patients seeking controlled substances

    PubMed Central

    Saveland, Christine; Hawker, Leisha; Miedema, Baukje; MacDougall, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To examine family physicians’ career prevalence and monthly incidence of workplace abuse by controlled substance prescription seekers. Design A 4-page cross-sectional survey. Setting A family medicine continuing medical education event in Halifax, NS. Participants The survey was distributed to 316 family physicians attending the continuing medical education event. Main outcome measures Career prevalence and monthly incidence of workplace abuse related to the act of prescribing controlled substances. Results Fifty-six percent (n = 178) of the 316 surveys were returned completed. Half the study participants were men (49%). Most study participants were in private practice and lived in Nova Scotia, and approximately half (51%) practised in urban settings. On average, the study participants had 20 years of practice experience. The career prevalence of abusive encounters related to controlled substance prescribing was divided into “minor,” “major,” and “severe” incidents. Overall, 95% of study participants reported having experienced at least 1 incident of minor abuse; 48% had experienced at least 1 incident of major abuse; and 17% had experienced at least 1 incident of severe abuse during their careers. Further, 30% reported having been abused in the past month; among those, the average number of abusive encounters was 3. Most (82%) of the abusers were male with a history of addiction (85%) and mental illness (39%). Opioids were the most frequently sought controlled substance. Conclusion Abuse of family physicians by patients seeking controlled substances is substantial. Family physicians who prescribe controlled substances are at risk of being subjected to minor, major, or even severe abuse. Opioids were the most often sought controlled substance. A national discussion to deal with this issue is needed. PMID:24522691

  11. Effectiveness of "Primary Bereavement Care" for Widows: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial Involving Family Physicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    García, Jesus A.; Landa, Victor; Grandes, Gonzalo; Pombo, Haizea; Mauriz, Amaia

    2013-01-01

    Thirty-one family physicians, from 19 primary care teams in Biscay (Spain), were randomly assigned to intervention or control group. The 15 intervention family physicians, after training in primary bereavement care, saw 43 widows for 7 sessions, from the 4th to 13th month after their loss. The 16 control family physicians, without primary…

  12. Effectiveness of "Primary Bereavement Care" for Widows: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial Involving Family Physicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    García, Jesus A.; Landa, Victor; Grandes, Gonzalo; Pombo, Haizea; Mauriz, Amaia

    2013-01-01

    Thirty-one family physicians, from 19 primary care teams in Biscay (Spain), were randomly assigned to intervention or control group. The 15 intervention family physicians, after training in primary bereavement care, saw 43 widows for 7 sessions, from the 4th to 13th month after their loss. The 16 control family physicians, without primary…

  13. Influence of Obstetric Practice on Workload and Practice Patterns of Family Physicians and Obstetrician-Gynecologists

    PubMed Central

    Dresden, Graham M.; Baldwin, Laura-Mae; Andrilla, C. Holly A.; Skillman, Susan M.; Benedetti, Thomas J.

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE Obstetric practice among family physicians has declined in recent years. This study compared the practice patterns of family physicians and obstetrician-gynecologists with and without obstetric practices to provide objective information on one potential reason for this decline—the impact of obstetrics on physician lifestyle. METHODS In 2004, we surveyed all obstetrician-gynecologists, all rural family physicians, and a random sample of urban family physicians identified from professional association lists (N =2,564) about demographics, practice characteristics, and obstetric practices. RESULTS A total of 1,197 physicians (46.7%) overall responded to the survey (41.5% of urban family physicians, 54.7% of rural family physicians, and 55.0% of obstetrician-gynecologists). After exclusions, 991 were included in the final data set. Twenty-seven percent of urban family physicians, 46% of rural family physicians, and 79% of obstetrician-gynecologists practiced obstetrics. The mean number of total professional hours worked per week was greater with obstetric practice than without for rural family physicians (55.4 vs 50.2, P=.005) and for obstetrician-gynecologists (58.3 vs 43.5, P = .000), but not for urban family physicians (47.8 vs 49.5, P = .27). For all 3 groups, physicians practicing obstetrics were more likely to provide inpatient care and take call than physicians not practicing obstetrics. Large proportions of family physicians, but not obstetrician-gynecologists, took their own call for obstetrics. Concerns about the litigation environment and personal issues were the most frequent reasons for stopping obstetric practice. CONCLUSIONS Practicing obstetrics is associated with an increased workload for family physicians. Organizing practices to decrease the impact on lifestyle may support family physicians in practicing obstetrics. PMID:18195307

  14. Family physicians’ attitude and interest toward participation in urban family physician program and related factors

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Masoumeh; Dehghani, Mohsen; Aghaee, Monavar Afzal

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Every family physician has a key role in achieving the goals of the family physician program (FPP). Low satisfaction of physicians in certain areas of Iran and their low maintenance level in the program is quite challenging. The aims of the present study were; (1) to assess the attitude of rural/rural-urban family physicians about FPP and (2) to investigate their interest toward participation in urban FPP and (3) to explore the influencing factors. Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed on 137 family physicians who were working in rural/rural-urban FPP in Mashhad University of Medical Sciences (Iran). A self-designed valid and reliable questionnaire including demographic data and thirty questions on the participants’ attitudes toward the FPP in Likert scale were used. Data were analyzed by multiple logistic regression models using SPSS software. Results: 49.3% of physicians were interested in continuing their cooperation in the urban-FPP. The mean total attitude score was 62.18 out of 100. The highest agreement and positive attitude of physicians were related to achievements of the program goals dimension. Multiple analyses showed that gender (odds ratio [OR] =5.5; male vs. female) and employment status (OR = 16.7 and 10.9 for permanent employment and by contract compared to legal obligation, respectively) were significantly associated with physicians’ willingness toward participation in the urban-FPP. Conclusion: About half of the studied physicians were interested toward participation in the urban-FPP; Male physicians more than females and permanent employees more than others were willing and interested to participate in the urban-FPP. PMID:28349002

  15. Management of dementia by family physicians in academic settings

    PubMed Central

    Pimlott, Nicholas J.G.; Siegel, Karen; Persaud, Malini; Slaughter, Susan; Cohen, Carole; Hollingworth, Gary; Cummings, Sandy; Drummond, Neil; Dalziel, William; Sylvius, James; Pringle, Dorothy; Eliasziw, Tex

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine what proportion of patients with dementia seen by family physicians are assessed and managed according to the recommendations of the Canadian Consensus Conference on Dementia (CCCD). DESIGN Retrospective medical record review. SETTING Outpatient services in university-affiliated family practice clinics in Calgary, Alta; Ottawa, Ont; and Toronto, Ont. PARTICIPANTS One hundred sixty patients who were diagnosed with dementia between January 1, 2000, and June 1, 2004. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Use of the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE); collateral history; physical examination maneuvers; initial laboratory tests; diagnostic imaging; caregiver identification, assessment, and referral; driving assessment; specialist referral patterns; and other recommendations of the CCCD. RESULTS The average age of patients assessed was 83 years; most patients (66.3%) were female. More than half (54.1%) were diagnosed with Alzheimer disease or vascular dementia. More than 25% of patients were not given a specific diagnosis: 13.1% were labeled as “dementia,” and 12.5% as “not yet diagnosed.” For most patients (69.6%) a collateral history was obtained and a primary caregiver identified (79.4%). Few physicians, however, assessed caregiver stress (33.1%) or referred caregivers for support (12.5%). Most patients (80.6%) seen by their family physicians for cognitive changes underwent at least one MMSE. The average score on the first MMSE was 23.5 (of 30) points. Most physicians ordered appropriate “basic” blood tests as part of their assessment. Forty percent of patients had computed tomographic examinations within 3 months of reporting symptoms of cognitive difficulties to their family physicians. Of these, 25% met the criteria for computed tomographic scan as recommended by the guidelines. Only 36.5% were asked about driving status or safety concerns and had this inquiry documented. Of those, 15.5% were referred for driving evaluations and 12.5% were

  16. Osteoporosis screening for men: are family physicians following the guidelines?

    PubMed

    Cheng, Natalie; Green, Michael E

    2008-08-01

    To determine rates of screening for osteoporosis among men older than 65 years and to find out whether family physicians are following the recommendations of the Osteoporosis Society of Canada's 2002 Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Osteoporosis in Canada. Chart audit. The Family Medicine Centre at Hotel Dieu Hospital in Kingston, Ont. All male patients at the Family Medicine Centre older than 65 years for a total of 565 patients associated with 20 different physicians' practices. Rates of screening with bone mineral density (BMD) scans for osteoporosis, results of BMD testing, and associations between results of BMD testing and age. Of the 565 patients reviewed, 108 (19.1% of the study population) had received BMD testing. Rates of screening ranged from 0% to 38% in the 20 practices. Among 105 patients tested (reports for 3 patients were not retrievable), 15 (14.3%) were found to have osteoporosis, 43 (41.0%) to have osteopenia, and 47 (44.8%) to have normal BMD results. No significant association was found between BMD results and age. Screening rates were higher among men older than 75 years than among men aged 65 to 75 and peaked among those 85 to 89 years old. On average, only about 20% of male patients older than 65 years had been screened for osteoporosis, so most of these men were not being screened by BMD testing as recommended in the guidelines. Considering the relatively high rates of osteoporosis and osteopenia found in this study and the known morbidity and mortality associated with osteoporotic fractures in this population, higher rates of BMD screening and more widespread treatment of osteoporosis could prevent many fractures among these patients. Family physicians need to become more aware of the risk factors indicating screening, and barriers to screening and treatment of osteoporosis in men need to be identified and addressed.

  17. Measuring family physician identity: the development of a new instrument.

    PubMed

    Carney, Patricia A; Waller, Elaine; Eiff, M Patrice; Saultz, John W; Jones, Samuel; Fogarty, Colleen T; Corboy, Jane E; Green, Larry

    2013-01-01

    Our objective was to describe the development and psychometric assessment of an instrument designed to assess family medicine identity in residency training sites and compare responses from physician faculty and residents. We conducted 28 focus groups between 2007--2008, 14 with faculty and 14 with residents who were part of the Preparing Personal Physicians for Practice (P4) Project. The first 22 focus groups were exploratory, and the second six were confirmatory where we shared working variable statements scored using a 5-point Likert scale. We then administered the survey to 223 faculty and 147 residents who were part of the P4 Project, followed by a principal component (factor) analysis, retaining items that reflected domains with eigenvalues higher than 1.0. A total of 223 family physician faculty and 147 residents completed the identity survey. The item analysis extraction loadings ranged from 0.36 to 0.70. Based on item grouping patterns, five domains were reflected in the data: Patient/Family Relationships, Patient Advocacy, Career Flexibility, Balancing the Breadth and Depth in Practice, and Comprehensive Nature of Patient Care. Compared to residents, faculty conveyed stronger agreement about being comfortable balancing the breadth and depth of medical knowledge needed in practice and using a variety of approaches to supplement their medical knowledge about patient care compared to residents (90.6% versus 68.7% for breadth and depth, 95.9% versus 88.3 for using a variety of approaches). Compared to faculty, residents agreed more strongly that the ability to choose many options in how to build their practice appeals to them compared to faculty (89.1% versus 82.9%). We successfully developed and tested a survey designed to measure family medicine identity in residencies, with five domains. Survey item responses were different between residents and faculty, which indicates the instrument may be sensitive to important changes over time.

  18. Factors affecting uptake of influenza vaccination among family physicians.

    PubMed

    Akan, H; Yavuz, E; Yayla, M E; Külbay, H; Kaspar, E Ç; Zahmacıoğlu, O; Badur, S

    2016-03-29

    The aim of this study was to determine the factors that influenced the decisions of family physicians working in primary care health services to receive influenza vaccines. This cross-sectional study was performed between June 2014 and September 2014. Physicians were reached electronically via e-mail. A self-reported questionnaire consisting of 50 items covering potential factors that may have influenced their decision to receive vaccination, including perceived risk, severity of the perceived risk, perceived benefit, perceived barriers, cues to action, attitudes, social influences and personal efficacy, was administered to the study participants. Cronbach's alpha for the questionnaire was determined to be 0.92 in the pilot study. The response rate was 27.5% (n=596). Regularly vaccinated physicians accounted for 27.3% of the responses. The median age was 41.84±7.80, and the median working duration of the group was 17.0±7.8years. The factors that led to increased vaccination compliance (p<0.05) included working duration, age, chronic disease history and living with a person over 65years. Nearly all major domains, i.e., perceived risk, severity of the perceived risk, perceived benefit, perceived barriers, attitudes, social influences and personal efficacy, there were differences between the compliant and noncompliant groups. Multi-regression analyses revealed that risk perception, organizational factors such as time and convenient vaccination increased vaccine compliance. However, the perceived necessity to be vaccinated annually had a negative effect on vaccination behaviour (p<0.05). Strategies aimed to increase the flu vaccination ratio among physicians that do not take different factors into account are more likely to be unsuccessful. In the planning and implementation of strategies aiming to increase the vaccination ratio among physicians, it is both necessary and important to take into account behavioural and organizational factors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier

  19. Health care setting and severity, symptom burden, and complications in patients with Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN): a comparison between university hospitals, community hospitals, and office-based physicians.

    PubMed

    Kaifie, A; Isfort, S; Gattermann, N; Hollburg, W; Klausmann, M; Wolf, D; Maintz, C; Hänel, M; Goekkurt, E; Göthert, J R; Platzbecker, U; Geer, T; Parmentier, S; Jost, E; Serve, H; Ehninger, G; Berdel, W E; Brümmendorf, T H; Koschmieder, Steffen

    2016-09-01

    Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) comprise a heterogeneous group of chronic hematological malignancies with significant variations in clinical characteristics. Due to the long survival and the feasibility of oral or subcutaneous therapy, these patients are frequently treated outside of larger academic centers. This analysis was performed to elucidate differences in MPN patients in three different health care settings: university hospitals (UH), community hospitals (CH), and office-based physicians (OBP). The MPN registry of the Study Alliance Leukemia is a non-interventional prospective study including adult patients with an MPN according to WHO criteria (2008). For statistical analysis, descriptive methods and tests for significant differences were used. Besides a different distribution of MPN subtypes between the settings, patients contributed by UH showed an impaired medical condition, a higher comorbidity burden, and more vascular complications. In the risk group analyses, the majority of polycythemia vera (PV) and essential thrombocythemia (ET) patients from UH were classified into the high-risk category due to previous vascular events, while for PV and ET patients in the CH and OBP settings, age was the major parameter for a high-risk categorization. Regarding MPN-directed therapy, PV patients from the UH setting were more likely to receive ruxolitinib within the framework of a clinical trial. In summary, the characteristics and management of patients differed significantly between the three health care settings with a higher burden of vascular events and comorbidities in patients contributed by UH. These differences need to be taken into account for further analyses and design of clinical trials.

  20. The future supply of family physicians: implications for rural America.

    PubMed

    Colwill, Jack M; Cultice, James M

    2003-01-01

    Throughout the past century rural health care has been dependent upon general practitioners (GPs) and their successors, family physicians (FPs). Only FPs and GPs have practiced in rural areas in proportion to the population, then and now. As specialization occurred, numbers of GPs declined and physician shortages developed in rural areas. The creation of family practice residencies in the 1970s halted this decline, but rural shortages persist today. During the 1990s the number of allopathic and osteopathic FP residency graduates rose 54 percent. At the same time, the percentage of women enrolled in these residencies increased to 46 percent, and women have been less likely than men to select rural practice. We project that if current numbers of graduates continue, the nonmetropolitan FP/GP-to-population ratio will increase 17 percent by the year 2020. However, today, medical students' interest in primary care residencies (including family practice) is declining precipitously. If numbers of FP graduates return to 1993 levels, the density of FPs in rural America and in the nation as a whole will decline after 2010.

  1. Physician Dismissal of Families Who Refuse Vaccination: An Ethical Assessment.

    PubMed

    Diekema, Douglas S

    2015-01-01

    Thousands of U.S. parents choose to refuse or delay the administration of selected vaccines to their children each year, and some choose not to vaccinate their children at all. While most physicians continue to provide care to these families over time, using each visit as an opportunity to educate and encourage vaccination, an increasing number of physicians are choosing to dismiss these families from their practice unless they agree to vaccinate their children. This paper will examine this emerging trend along with the reasons given by those who advocate such an approach. I will argue that the strategy of refusing to allow families into a clinic unless they agree to vaccinate their children is misguided, and the arguments for doing so fail to stand up to close scrutiny. Such a strategy does not benefit the child or the health of the community, and may have a negative impact on both. Furthermore, some of the arguments in support of dismissal policies ignore the importance of professional obligation and appear to favor self-interest over the interest of the patient.

  2. The grief process for patient, family, and physician.

    PubMed

    Bruce, Christine A

    2002-09-01

    In the grieving process, patient, family, and health professionals have the same needs-rest, relaxation, nourishment, a sense of security, trust, hope in the future, and humor among them. Grief, defined as a shared, universal, and natural neuropsychobiologic expression in response to loss, is distinct from mourning, a practice that varies in expression across diverse cultures. To aid in an understanding of grief and its effects, the author looks at the models for grief proposed by Kubler-Ross, Bowlby, Parkes, Worden, and Wolfelt. Addressing patients' concerns requires physicians be empathic, attentive, and respective and have willingness to take time, be present, and listen.

  3. Evidence-based medicine among Jordanian family physicians

    PubMed Central

    Barghouti, Farihan; Halaseh, Lana; Said, Tania; Mousa, Abdel Halim; Dabdoub, Adel

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To assess family practitioners’ attitudes toward and awareness of evidence-based medicine (EBM). DESIGN A cross-sectional study from a questionnaire distributed between January and March 2007. SETTING Rural and urban family medicine centres throughout Jordan that are affiliated with the Ministry of Health, military centres, university medical centres, and the private sector. PARTICIPANTS Two hundred family physicians. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Family physicians’ attitudes toward EBM; training in EBM; barriers to practising EBM; level of awareness of and access to EBM journals and databases; and knowledge and understanding of related technical terms. RESULTS The response rate was 70.5%. Among those who responded, 56.7% were women and 42.6% were between the ages of 40 and 49 years. More than 50% of the respondents were working in mixed urban and rural practice settings. Most of the respondents had a positive attitude toward EBM: 63.5% welcomed the concept of EBM; more than 40% used EBM in their daily practices; and 90% agreed that practising EBM improved patient care. Of the respondents, 42.6% thought that the best way to move from opinion-based medicine to EBM was through learning the skills of EBM. Fifty percent of the respondents had access to MEDLINE, while only 20.4% of them had received formal training in research and critical appraisal. Lack of personal time was the main perceived barrier to practising EBM. Participants reported a low level of awareness of some of the technical terms. CONCLUSION Jordanian family physicians showed eagerness to learn and implement EBM in their daily practices. Nevertheless, they need more guidance and training to ensure the correct application of EBM ideals. PMID:19602641

  4. The cost-effectiveness of training US primary care physicians to conduct colorectal cancer screening in family medicine residency programs.

    PubMed

    Edwardson, Nicholas; Bolin, Jane N; McClellan, David A; Nash, Philip P; Helduser, Janet W

    2016-04-01

    Demand for a wide array of colorectal cancer screening strategies continues to outpace supply. One strategy to reduce this deficit is to dramatically increase the number of primary care physicians who are trained and supportive of performing office-based colonoscopies or flexible sigmoidoscopies. This study evaluates the clinical and economic implications of training primary care physicians via family medicine residency programs to offer colorectal cancer screening services as an in-office procedure. Using previously established clinical and economic assumptions from existing literature and budget data from a local grant (2013), incremental cost-effectiveness ratios are calculated that incorporate the costs of a proposed national training program and subsequent improvements in patient compliance. Sensitivity analyses are also conducted. Baseline assumptions suggest that the intervention would produce 2394 newly trained residents who could perform 71,820 additional colonoscopies or 119,700 additional flexible sigmoidoscopies after ten years. Despite high costs associated with the national training program, incremental cost-effectiveness ratios remain well below standard willingness-to-pay thresholds under base case assumptions. Interestingly, the status quo hierarchy of preferred screening strategies is disrupted by the proposed intervention. A national overhaul of family medicine residency programs offering training for colorectal cancer screening yields satisfactory incremental cost-effectiveness ratios. However, the model places high expectations on primary care physicians to improve current compliance levels in the US. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Reported practice patterns among family physicians with a geriatrics certificate of added qualifications.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Lars E; Cochrane, Anneli; Bazemore, Andrew W; Petterson, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Practice patterns of family physicians with additional certification are unknown but are important to workforce planners and policymakers, who may presume that all family physicians provide primary care to patients of all ages. We found that a majority of family medicine geriatricians self-report practicing primarily geriatric medicine. © Copyright 2015 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  6. Weighty Problems: Predictors of Family Physicians Documenting Overweight and Obesity.

    PubMed

    Cyr, Peggy R; Haskins, Amy E; Holt, Christina; Hanifi, Jasmine

    2016-03-01

    Documenting obesity on the problem list has been shown to promote action about obesity and overweight, yet a majority of primary care providers do not record obesity on the medical problem list. With this in mind, our objectives were to determine the proportion of physicians' documentation of overweight (OW) or obesity on the problem list in our primary care teaching practice and to identify predictors of physician documentation of OW/obesity. De-identified health records of 6,195 adult patients with BMI ? 25 kg/m2 seen by a family physician over a 2-year period were included. Using multivariate logistic regression, patient age, BMI, gender, race, insurance, comorbidities, number of visits, physician gender or role, and practice site (suburban versus urban) were examined in relation to inclusion of OW/obesity on the medical problem list. Few (21.1%) patients had OW/obesity on their problem list. In the multivariate model, female PCPs were significantly more likely to document OW/obesity (OR=1.39, 95% CI=1.18--1.63) compared to male PCPs, and faculty were 26% more likely to document obesity (95% CI=1.07--1.48) compared to residents. Female patients, those with hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, and those with six or more visits were significantly more likely to have obesity on their problem lists, while patients with Medicaid were less likely to have obesity recorded. No significant difference was seen by race. Nearly 80% of OW and obese patients were not identified on the problem list. Patient gender, comorbidity, and number of visits were associated with documentation. Future research should examine automatic documentation of OW/obesity on the medical problem list.

  7. The assessment of pharmaceutical sales representatives by family physicians--does it affect the prescribing index?

    PubMed

    Klemenc-Ketis, Zalika; Kersnik, Janko

    2013-06-01

    Physicians' prescribing patterns depend on fixed and influence-sensitive factors. The latter include the influence of interactions with the pharmaceutical industry. To determine whether the assessment of pharmaceutical sales representatives (PSRs) by family physicians was associated with their actual prescribing index. Cross-sectional anonymous postal study. We included all family physicians working in practice settings in Slovenia in 2011. Slovenian family physicians' surgeries. Prescribing index of Slovenian family physicians. We received 247 responses (27.6% response rate). A prescribing index >100% was present in 57 (23.1%) of the respondents. Multivariate analysis revealed that working in regions of Slovenia other than the central region might be associated with a prescribing index >100%. Assessment of PSRs by family physicians was not significantly associated with a prescribing index >100%. The assessment of PSRs by family physicians does not have any substantial correlations with their prescribing index.

  8. Developing and supporting school health programs. Role for family physicians.

    PubMed Central

    Yaffe, M. J.

    1998-01-01

    PROBLEM BEING ADDRESSED: School staff are anxious about the demands on their time associated with a perceived increase in health problems among their students. OBJECTIVE OF PROGRAM: To respond to these concerns by developing a health committee in two elementary schools and one high school. The health committee could perform needs assessments and, with the results of these assessments and a careful literature review, could develop health policies and procedures appropriate to the school environment and to evolving community expectations. MAIN COMPONENTS OF PROGRAM: A committee of four family physicians (nonremunerated parents of students), one of whom served as Chair, four school administrators, and one part-time remunerated nurse practitioner explored aspects of illness in the schools. They studied approaches to acute and chronic student illness; emergency response; management of children with special needs; environmental safety; health promotion; and the availability and quality of resources for learning about health for teachers, administrators, parents, and students. CONCLUSION: Opportunities exist for family physicians to expand their involvement in child and adolescent health in schools. Involvement should be collaborative and multidisciplinary and reflect community interests and needs. PMID:9585855

  9. [Critical reading of theoretical texts in family physicians].

    PubMed

    Castillo-Medina, Nidia C; Castillo-Sánchez, Eduardo J; Pavía-Carrillo, Emilio F

    2009-01-01

    the critical reading is skill which allows to extend the reality that surrounds us, and strengthens our own point of view, through the reflection of the experience. Our objective was to consider the reach of a participative educational strategy (PES) for the development of an skill for critical theoretical text reading in family physician residents. interventional study in a group of family physician junior residents who were measure at the beginning and the end, comparing with a single measurement of a group of senior residents. The strategy was carried out in two ways: individual and group work. In order to determine the advancement of the intervention, an evaluation instrument with two indicators was applied: understanding and interpretation. a significant advance in the interpretation indicator was observed, the global result and the understanding indicator did not show significant changes. When comparing the group with senior residents significant differences in the global result and the indicator of interpretation were observed. the strategy caused the development of the skills for the critical theoretical text reading.

  10. Developing and supporting school health programs. Role for family physicians.

    PubMed

    Yaffe, M J

    1998-04-01

    School staff are anxious about the demands on their time associated with a perceived increase in health problems among their students. To respond to these concerns by developing a health committee in two elementary schools and one high school. The health committee could perform needs assessments and, with the results of these assessments and a careful literature review, could develop health policies and procedures appropriate to the school environment and to evolving community expectations. A committee of four family physicians (nonremunerated parents of students), one of whom served as Chair, four school administrators, and one part-time remunerated nurse practitioner explored aspects of illness in the schools. They studied approaches to acute and chronic student illness; emergency response; management of children with special needs; environmental safety; health promotion; and the availability and quality of resources for learning about health for teachers, administrators, parents, and students. Opportunities exist for family physicians to expand their involvement in child and adolescent health in schools. Involvement should be collaborative and multidisciplinary and reflect community interests and needs.

  11. Free Fecal Immunochemical Test Disbursement in Eight Family Physician Offices

    PubMed Central

    Daly, Jeanette M.; Levy, Barcey T.; Xu, Yinghui

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer death. CRC screening with a fecal immunochemical test (FIT) is important as occult blood may be detected. To offer Iowa Research Network members in family physician offices the opportunity to provide FITs at no charge to patients in need and determine how many of the tests would be handed out to patients and how many would be returned to the office. Eight family physician offices agreed to participate and 50 two-day FITs were provided, potentially providing 400 patients a CRC screening test. One hundred and eighty (45 %) of the 400 FITs were handed out to patients. Of the 92 (51 %) patients who returned at least one card, 77 (84 %) had negative results, 13 (14 %) were positive, and 2 (2 %) were indeterminate. Of 13 patients with a positive result, 11 (85 %) had a follow-up colonoscopy. Providing 400 FITs at no charge to the offices was an expensive endeavor. Implementing this forced a change in office routine and the type of fecal occult blood test used. Less than half of the FITs were given out to patients and of those given out, about half of the patients returned a FIT. For those who returned FITs and had positive findings, 85 % followed-up with a colonoscopy. Office nurses implementing the CRC screening need to be included in the planning of the type of fecal occult blood test used and receptive to the project PMID:25980522

  12. Managing diabetes during pregnancy. Guide for family physicians.

    PubMed Central

    Sempowski, Ian P.; Houlden, R. L.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide a guide family physicians can use to interpret current evidence on treating women with pregestational and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and to develop a model for managing these patients. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: A MEDLINE search from January 1980 to December 2002 found randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and descriptive studies that had conflicting results regarding screening recommendations. Studies of intensive insulin therapy were predominantly large RCTs (level I evidence). Glycemic targets and guidelines for monitoring pregnant women are based primarily on consensus statements from large national societies. MAIN MESSAGE: Most pregnant women should be screened for GDM. Good glycemic control during pregnancy reduces congenital anomalies and stillbirths. Women failing to meet glycemic targets should be referred to multidisciplinary teams and considered for insulin therapy. Intensive insulin therapy reduces the risk of macrosomia and might reduce cesarean section rates and other serious outcomes. CONCLUSION: Despite controversy, family physicians can follow a plan for managing diabetic patients during pregnancy that is supported by the best available evidence. PMID:12836864

  13. Infertility evaluation and management. Strategies for family physicians.

    PubMed Central

    Case, Allison M.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review family physicians' role in investigation and management of infertile couples. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: MEDLINE and PubMed were searched using the MeSH headings infertility, advanced maternal age, polycystic ovarian syndrome, clomiphene citrate, and insulin sensitizers. Bibliographies of review articles and textbooks were also searched. Review articles, randomized trials, observational studies, and case series are cited. MAIN MESSAGE: Approximately 8% of Canadian couples have difficulty conceiving. Mother's age significantly affects ability to conceive. Infertility assessment focuses on ovulatory dysfunction, tubal factors, sexual factors, and male factors. Women older than 35 years more than 12 months infertile; women younger than 35 more than 18 months infertile; women likely to have such problems as anovulation, tubal disease, or endometriosis; women whose partners' semen tests abnormal; and women who request referral should be referred. Patients treated with clomiphene citrate should be aware of its potential side effects. CONCLUSION: Family physicians have an important role in preconception counseling. Detailed and focused assessment facilitates initial investigations and treatment and can identify couples who could benefit from referral for further assessment. PMID:14649985

  14. Early identification of palliative care needs by family physicians: A qualitative study of barriers and facilitators from the perspective of family physicians, community nurses, and patients.

    PubMed

    Beernaert, Kim; Deliens, Luc; De Vleminck, Aline; Devroey, Dirk; Pardon, Koen; Van den Block, Lieve; Cohen, Joachim

    2014-06-01

    There is a growing recognition that a palliative care approach should be initiated early and not just in the terminal phase for patients with life-limiting diseases. Family physicians then play a central role in identifying and managing palliative care needs, but appear to not identify them accurately or in a timely manner. To explore the barriers to and facilitators of the early identification by family physicians of the palliative care needs. Six focus groups (four with family physicians, n = 20, and two with community nurses, n = 12) and 18 interviews with patients with cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, heart failure, and dementia were held. Thematic analysis was used to derive themes that covered barriers and facilitators. Key barriers and facilitators found relate to communication styles, the perceived role of a family physician, and continuity of care. Family physicians do not systematically assess non-acute care needs, and patients do not mention them or try to mask them from the family physician. This is embedded within a predominant perception among patients, nurses, and family physicians of the family physician as the person to appeal to in acute and standard follow-up situations rather than for palliative care needs. Family physicians also seemed to pay more often attention to palliative care needs of patients in a terminal phase. The current practice of palliative care in Belgium is far from the presently considered ideal palliative care approaches. Facilitators such as proactive communication and communication tools could contribute to the development of guidelines for family physicians and policymakers in primary care.

  15. Which physicians' behaviors on death pronouncement affect family-perceived physician compassion? A randomized, scripted, video-vignette study.

    PubMed

    Mori, Masanori; Fujimori, Maiko; Hamano, Jun; Naito, Akemi Shirado; Morita, Tatsuya

    2017-09-05

    Although the death of a loved one is a devastating family event, little is known about which behaviors positively affect families' perceptions on death pronouncements. To evaluate the effect of a compassionate death pronouncement on participant-perceived physician compassion, trust in physicians, and emotions. In this randomized, video-vignette study, 92 people (≥50 years) in Tokyo metropolitan area viewed two videos of death pronouncements by an on-call physician with or without compassion-enhanced behaviors, including 5 components: waiting until the families calm themselves down; explaining that the physician has received a sign-out about information of the patient's condition; performing examination respectfully; ascertaining the time of death with a wristwatch (vs. smartphone); and reassuring the families that the patient did not experience pain. Main outcomes were physician compassion score, trust in physician, and emotions. After viewing the video with compassion-enhanced behaviors as compared with the video without them, participants assigned significantly lower compassion scores (reflecting higher physician compassion) (mean, 26.2 vs. 36.4, F=33.1, p<0.001); higher trust in physician (5.10 vs. 3.00, F=39.7, p<0.001); and lower scores for anger (2.49 vs. 3.78, F=18.0, p<0.001), sadness (3.42 vs. 3.85, F=11.8, p=0.001), fear (1.93 vs. 2.55, F=15.8, p<0.001), and disgust (2.45 vs. 3.71, F=19.4, p<0.001). To convey compassion on death pronouncement, we recommend that physicians initiate prompt examination; explain that the physician has received a sign-out; perform examination respectfully; ascertain the time of death with a wristwatch; and reassure the families that the patient did not experience pain. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Solution-focused therapy. Counseling model for busy family physicians.

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, G.; Ganshorn, K.; Danilkewich, A.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide family doctors in busy office practices with a model for counseling compatible with patient-centred medicine, including the techniques, strategies, and questions necessary for implementation. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: The MEDLINE database was searched from 1984 to 1999 using the terms psychotherapy in family practice, brief therapy in family practice, solution-focused therapy, and brief psychotherapy. A total of 170 relevant articles were identified; 75 abstracts were retrieved and a similar number of articles read. Additional resources included seminal books on solution-focused therapy (SFT), bibliographies of salient articles, participation in workshops on SFT, and observation of SFT counseling sessions taped by leaders in the field. MAIN MESSAGE: Solution-focused therapy's concentration on collaborative identification and amplification of patient strengths is the foundation upon which solutions to an array of problems are built. Solution-focused therapy offers simplicity, practicality, and relative ease of application. From the perspective of a new learner, MECSTAT provides a framework that facilitates development of skills. CONCLUSION: Solution-focused therapy recognizes that, even in the bleakest of circumstances, an emphasis on individual strength is empowering. In recognizing patients as experts in self-care, family physicians support and accentuate patient-driven change, and in so doing, are freed from the hopelessness and burnout that can accompany misplaced feelings of responsibility. PMID:11768927

  17. Training family physicians in community health centers: a health workforce solution.

    PubMed

    Morris, Carl G; Johnson, Brian; Kim, Sara; Chen, Frederick

    2008-04-01

    For more than 25 years, family medicine residencies (FMRs) have worked with community health centers (CHCs) to train family physicians. Despite the long history of this affiliation, little research has been done to understand the effects of training residents in this underserved community setting. This study compares CHC and non-CHC-trained family physicians regarding practice location, job and training satisfaction, and recruitment and retention to underserved areas. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of a cohort of the 838 graduates from the WAMI (Washington, Alaska, Montana, and Idaho) Family Medicine Residency Network from 1986-2002. CHC-trained family physicians were almost twice as likely to work in underserved settings than their non-CHC-trained counterparts (64% versus 37%). When controlling for gender, percent full-time equivalent, and years from graduation, CHC-trained family physicians were 2.7 times more likely to work in underserved settings than non-CHC-trained family physicians. CHC and non-CHC-trained family physicians report similar job and training satisfaction and scope of practice. Training family physicians in CHCs meets the health workforce needs of the underserved, enhances the recruitment of family physicians to CHCs, and prepares family physicians similarly to their non-CHC trained counterparts.

  18. [Family physician attitudes towards insulinization in type II diabetics].

    PubMed

    Díaz-Rodríguez, M I; Sánchez-Morales, M C; Aceña-Gutiérrez, M T; Carrasco-Flores, J; Villarín-Castro, A

    2014-04-01

    To determine the attitudes of Toledo Health Area family physicians about starting insulinization in type 2 diabetic patients. Descriptive, cross-sectional study. A self-completed questionnaire was given to 353 family physicians of the Toledo Health Area, asking about socio-demographic and occupational data, and including the Spanish version of the Diabetes Attitude Scale (DAS-3sp) questionnaire to evaluate attitudes and motivations related to diabetes. A total of 66 responses were received, of which 50.8% were from females. Mean age (±standard deviation) was 49.97±7.40. Results of the different DAS-3sp subscales (values from 1 to 5) were: S1 (need for special training): 4.52±0.38; S2 (seriousness of type2 diabetes): 4.18±0.42; S3 (value of tight control): 4.15±0.39; S4 (psychosocial impact of diabetes): 3.79±0.48; and S5 (need for patient autonomy): 3.72±0.55. No statistically significant differences were obtained with the four first subscales with sex, specialized training, being a resident tutor, type of contract or clinical setting. There were statistically significant differences in S5 compared with sex (3.90±0,60 in men vs 3.54±0.45 in women; t=2.701; P=.009) and with being a resident tutor (3.99±0.58 vs 3.64±0.52 in non-tutors; t=2.188; P=.033). The attitudes regarding starting insulin treatment in type2 diabetic patients are positives among Toledo Health Area family physicians, specially in the clinical aspects, but they are lower in the psychosocial impact and patient autonomy. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  19. Empowering women in a violent society. Role of the family physician.

    PubMed Central

    Archer, L. A.

    1994-01-01

    Despite erosion of key societal institutions, family physicians have remained a focal point for many troubled individuals--particularly women. The prevalence and types of abuse women experience and the effects on women's lives are summarized. Disclosures of abuse can affect family physicians. Increased awareness of gender role socialization messages for women is also relevant to family practice. PMID:8038640

  20. Perceived Learning Needs of Family Physicians in British Columbia

    PubMed Central

    Craig, Jennifer

    1990-01-01

    To determine family physicians' preferences for time, location, instructional format, and topics, the Division of Continuing Medical Education at the University of British Columbia conducted a survey, in which 1200 questionnaires were mailed to a stratified, proportional random sample of the 3270 general practitioners in the province, the stratifications being urban or rural and decade of graduation. A return rate of 61% yielded 648 usable questionnaires, which exceeds the sample required for analysis with no stratifications. Most popular days for involvement in continuing medical education were Fridays and Saturdays in the months of February, March, October, and November. Common skin disorders and hypertension headed the list of most relevant topics for the whole group and for the urban stratification. Hypertension was superseded by eye emergencies in the rural stratification. PMID:21234037

  1. An Algorithm Using Administrative Data to Identify Patient Attachment to a Family Physician

    PubMed Central

    Provost, Sylvie; Pérez, José; Pineault, Raynald; Borgès Da Silva, Roxane; Tousignant, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Background. Commonly self-reported questions in population health surveys, such as “do you have a family physician?”, represent one of the best-known sources of information about patients' attachment to family physicians. Is it possible to find a proxy for this information in administrative data? Objective. To identify the type of patient attachment to a family physician using administrative data. Methods. Using physician fee-for-service database and patients enrolment registries (Quebec, Canada, 2008–2010), we developed a step-by-step algorithm including three dimensions of the physician-patient relationship: patient enrolment with a physician, complete annual medical examinations (CME), and concentration of visits to a physician. Results. 68.1% of users were attached to a family physician; for 34.4% of them, attachment was defined by enrolment with a physician, for 31.5%, by CME without enrolment, and, for 34.1%, by concentration of visits to a physician without enrolment or CME. Eight types of patient attachment were described. Conclusion. When compared to findings with survey data, our measure comes out as a solid conceptual framework to identify patient attachment to a family physician in administrative databases. This measure could be of great value for physician/patient-based cohort development and impact assessment of different types of patient attachment on health services utilization. PMID:26413320

  2. E-Learning Readiness in Medicine: Turkish Family Medicine (FM) Physicians Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parlakkiliç, Alaattin

    2015-01-01

    This research investigates e-learning readiness level of family medicine physicians (FM) in Turkey. The study measures the level of e-learning readiness of Turkish FM physicians by an online e-learning readiness survey. According to results five areas are ready at Turkish FM physicians but need a few improvements:…

  3. Team Development Manual. Family Nurse Practitioner/Physician Assistant Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dostal, Lori

    A manual is presented to help incorporate team development into training programs for nurse practitioners, physician assistants, and primary care physicians. It is also directed to practitioners who wish to improve teamwork and is designed to improve the utilization of the nurse practitioners and physician assistants. A group of one or more…

  4. Team Development Curriculum. Family Nurse Practitioner/Physician Assistant Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dostal, Lori

    A curriculum consisting of four modules is presented to help nurse practitioners, physician assistants, and physicians develop team practices and improve and increase the utilization of nurse practitioners and physician assistants in primary care settings. The curriculum was prepared in 1981-1982 by the California Area Health Education Center…

  5. Team Development Manual. Family Nurse Practitioner/Physician Assistant Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dostal, Lori

    A manual is presented to help incorporate team development into training programs for nurse practitioners, physician assistants, and primary care physicians. It is also directed to practitioners who wish to improve teamwork and is designed to improve the utilization of the nurse practitioners and physician assistants. A group of one or more…

  6. A national study of factors influencing the career choice of osteopathic and allopathic family physicians.

    PubMed

    Xu, G; Cummings, M; Veloski, J J; Brose, J

    1996-12-01

    This study examines the differences between osteopathic and allopathic physicians regarding those factors influencing their career choice of family practice. A total of 256 osteopathic physicians and 717 allopathic family physicians were surveyed. The surveyed physicians graduated in 1983 and 1984. Comparisons were made on 19 variables that influenced the physicians' decisions to enter family practice as well as on the six factor scores derived from these 19 variables. Osteopathic physicians' decisions to choose family practice was more influenced by financial obligations, medical school experiences, and family values, whereas the allopathic physicians were more influenced by personal social value. Overall, medical school experience and personal social value were two important factors that explained the largest variances of the 19 predictors influencing physicians' decisions to enter family practice. Those allopathic medical schools whose mission emphasizes the production of generalist physicians may be able to model some approaches already in place at osteopathic medical schools. Because of the influence of the personal social value factor in medical students' choosing family practice medicine, this factor warrants further study.

  7. Procedures in ambulatory care. Which family physicians do what in southwestern Ontario?

    PubMed Central

    Wetmore, S. J.; Agbayani, R.; Bass, M. J.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine how often family physicians perform 12 ambulatory care procedures and factors associated with procedure performance. DESIGN: Mailed, self-administered survey. The survey was conducted according to the Dillman Total Design method. SETTING: Family physicians' offices in London, Ont, and in surrounding communities. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 395 family physicians practising within the London area were mailed surveys, 237 in London and 158 outside London. Response rates were 80.6% and 75.9%, respectively. Nonresponders did not differ significantly from responders in sex but included more solo practitioners. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Performance of ambulatory care procedures, sex, and practice characteristics of participant family physicians. RESULTS: For all responders, activities significantly associated with procedure performance were delivering babies, managing psychological problems, working emergency, and teaching. Mean total procedure scores ranged from 6.55 for managing psychological problems to 7.68 for working emergency. Sex-specific analysis showed that practice location and years in practice were significant factors for female but not for male family physicians. Mean total procedure scores for female physicians were 7.06 (outside London) and 4.74 (in London). CONCLUSIONS: Factors associated with procedure performance for family physicians in and around London included delivering babies, working in emergency, managing psychological problems, and teaching. Practice location was a significant factor for only female family physicians; those practising outside London performed procedures more than their urban counterparts and at similar rates to male physicians. PMID:9559192

  8. Effect of a brief emergency medicine education course on emergency department work intensity of family physicians.

    PubMed

    Vaillancourt, Samuel; Schultz, Susan E; Leaver, Chad; Stukel, Thérèse A; Schull, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    Recently, many Canadian emergency departments (EDs) have struggled with physician staffing shortages. In 2006, the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care funded a brief "emergency medicine primer" (EMP) course for family physicians to upgrade or refresh skills, with the goal of increasing their ED work intensity. We sought to determine the effect of the EMP on the ED work intensity of family physicians. A retrospective longitudinal study was conducted of the ED work of 239 family physicians in the 2 years before and after a minimum of 6 months and up to 2 years from completing an EMP course in 2006 to 2008 compared to non-EMP physicians. ED work intensity was defined as the number of ED shifts per month and the number of ED patients seen per month. We conducted two analyses: a before and after comparison of all EMP physicians and a matched cohort analysis matching each EMP physician to four non-EMP physicians on sex, year of medical school graduation, rurality, and pre-EMP ED work intensity. Postcourse, EMP physicians worked 0.5 more ED shifts per month (13% increase, p  =  0.027). Compared to their matched controls, EMP physicians worked 0.7 more shifts per month (13% increase, p  =  0.0032) and saw 15 more patients per month (17% increase, p  =  0.0008) compared to matched non-EMP physicians. The greatest increases were among EMP physicians who were younger, were urban, had previous ED experience, or worked in a high-volume ED. The effect of the EMP course was negligible for physicians with no previous ED experience or working in rural areas. The EMP course is associated with modest increases in ED work intensity among some family physicians, in particular younger physicians in urban areas. No increase was seen among physicians without previous ED experience or working in rural areas.

  9. Caring for adult survivors of child sexual abuse. Issues for family physicians.

    PubMed

    Bala, M

    1994-05-01

    Traditional medical education has not taught physicians about the long-term effects of child sexual abuse. Family physicians often feel poorly equipped to appreciate the effect of such a childhood history on current health or to recognize and treat survivors. This article links the experience of the sexually abused child to long-term effects and outlines the role of family physicians in screening and caring for survivors.

  10. Family physicians' attitude and practice of infertility management at primary care--Suez Canal University, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Eldein, Hebatallah Nour

    2013-01-01

    The very particular natures of infertility problem and infertility care make them different from other medical problems and services in developing countries. Even after the referral to specialists, the family physicians are expected to provide continuous support for these couples. This place the primary care service at the heart of all issues related to infertility. to improve family physicians' attitude and practice about the approach to infertility management within primary care setting. This study was conducted in the between June and December 2010. The study sample comprised 100 family physician trainees in the family medicine department and working in family practice centers or primary care units. They were asked to fill a questionnaire about their personal characteristics, attitude, and practice towards support, investigations, and treatment of infertile couples. Hundred family physicians were included in the study. They were previously received training in infertility management. Favorable attitude scores were detected among (68%) of physicians and primary care was considered a suitable place for infertility management among (77%) of participants. There was statistically significant difference regarding each of age groups, gender and years of experience with the physicians' attitude. There was statistically significant difference regarding gender, perceiving PHC as an appropriate place to manage infertility and attitude towards processes of infertility management with the physicians' practice. Favorable attitude and practice were determined among the study sample. Supporting the structure of primary care and evidence-based training regarding infertility management are required to improve family physicians' attitude and practice towards infertility management.

  11. Managing Diabetes Mellitus: A Survey of Attitudes and Practices Among Family Physicians.

    PubMed

    Fogelman, Yacov; Goldfracht, Margalit; Karkabi, Khaled

    2015-10-01

    Due to the increasing prevalence of diabetes and the shortage of endocrinologists, family physicians have an important role in diabetes management. The purpose of this study was to examine the sources of knowledge, attitudes and practices of family physicians regarding the management of type 2 diabetes. Attendees at continuous medical education (CME) programs in Israel were requested to respond anonymously to written questions about their sources of knowledge about diabetes, the methods of diabetes management they advise their patients, their knowledge of diabetes medication treatments, and their attitudes toward people with type 2 diabetes. Questionnaires were completed by 362 family physicians (79% response rate). Of them, 329 (91%) reported that they usually manage their patients' diabetes care, including that of patients with concomitant risk factors. Their most common recommendations for diabetes control were: to increase physical activity, decrease total calorie intake, consult with a dietitian and undergo weight loss counseling. Almost all physicians (97%) reported providing lifestyle change counseling. Sixty percent reported lacking knowledge about nutritional issues. Only 58% answered correctly regarding the effect of the anti-diabetic drug, GLP1 analog. Board certified family physicians and their residents exhibited more knowledge about diabetes practice than did non-board certified family physicians. The great majority of family physicians surveyed usually manage their patients' diabetes themselves, and do not refer them to diabetes specialists. The implementation of strategies that will enhance the competencies and confidence of family physicians in diabetes management are important for achieving successful treatment.

  12. Psychiatric outpatient consultation for seniors. Perspectives of family physicians, consultants, and patients / family: A descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    Yaffe, Mark J; Primeau, Francois; McCusker, Jane; Cole, Martin G; Belzile, Eric; Dendukuri, Nandini; Elie, Michel; Laplante, Johanne

    2005-01-01

    Background Family practitioners take care of large numbers of seniors with increasingly complex mental health problems. Varying levels of input may be necessary from psychiatric consultants. This study examines patients'/family, family practitioners', and psychiatrists' perceptions of the bi-directional pathway between such primary care doctors and consultants. Methods An 18 month survey was conducted in an out-patient psychogeriatric clinic of a Montreal university-affiliated community hospital. Cognitively intact seniors referred by family practitioners for assessment completed a satisfaction and expectation survey following their visits with the psychiatric consultants. The latter completed a self-administered process of care questionnaire at the end of the visit, while family doctors responded to a similar survey by telephone after the consultants' reports had been received. Responses of the 3 groups were compared. Results 101 seniors, referred from 63 family practitioners, met the study entry criteria for assessment by 1 of 3 psychogeriatricians. Both psychiatrists and family doctors agreed that help with management was the most common reason for referral. Family physicians were accepting of care of elderly with mental health problems, but preferred that the psychiatrists assume the initial treatment; the consultants preferred direct return of the patient; and almost 1/2 of patients did not know what to expect from the consultation visit. The rates of discordance in expectations were high when each unique patient-family doctor-psychiatrist triad was examined. Conclusion Gaps in expectations exist amongst family doctors, psychiatrists, and patients/family in the shared mental health care of seniors. Goals and anticipated outcomes of psychogeriatric consultation require better definition. PMID:15840163

  13. Family physician perceptions of working with LGBTQ patients: physician training needs.

    PubMed

    Beagan, Brenda; Fredericks, Erin; Bryson, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Medical students and physicians report feeling under-prepared for working with patients who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender or queer (LGBTQ). Understanding physician perceptions of this area of practice may aid in developing improved education. In-depth interviews with 24 general practice physicians in Halifax and Vancouver, Canada, were used to explore whether, when and how the gender identity and sexual orientation of LGBTQ women were relevant to good care. Inductive thematic analysis was conducted using ATLAS.ti data analysis software. Three major themes emerged: 1) Some physicians perceived that sexual/gender identity makes little or no difference; treating every patient as an individual while avoiding labels optimises care for everyone. 2) Some physicians perceived sexual/gender identity matters primarily for the provision of holistic care, and in order to address the effects of discrimination. 3) Some physicians perceived that sexual/gender identity both matters and does not matter, as they strove to balance the implications of social group membership with recognition of individual differences. Physicians may be ignoring important aspects of social group memberships that affect health and health care. The authors hold that individual and socio-cultural differences are both important to the provision of quality health care. Distinct from stereotypes, generalisations about social group differences can provide valuable starting points, raising useful lines of inquiry. Emphasizing this distinction in medical education may help change physician approaches to the care of LGBTQ women.

  14. Family physician perceptions of working with LGBTQ patients: physician training needs

    PubMed Central

    Beagan, Brenda; Fredericks, Erin; Bryson, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Background Medical students and physicians report feeling under-prepared for working with patients who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender or queer (LGBTQ). Understanding physician perceptions of this area of practice may aid in developing improved education. Method In-depth interviews with 24 general practice physicians in Halifax and Vancouver, Canada, were used to explore whether, when and how the gender identity and sexual orientation of LGBTQ women were relevant to good care. Inductive thematic analysis was conducted using ATLAS.ti data analysis software. Results Three major themes emerged: 1) Some physicians perceived that sexual/gender identity makes little or no difference; treating every patient as an individual while avoiding labels optimises care for everyone. 2) Some physicians perceived sexual/gender identity matters primarily for the provision of holistic care, and in order to address the effects of discrimination. 3) Some physicians perceived that sexual/gender identity both matters and does not matter, as they strove to balance the implications of social group membership with recognition of individual differences. Conclusions Physicians may be ignoring important aspects of social group memberships that affect health and health care. The authors hold that individual and socio-cultural differences are both important to the provision of quality health care. Distinct from stereotypes, generalisations about social group differences can provide valuable starting points, raising useful lines of inquiry. Emphasizing this distinction in medical education may help change physician approaches to the care of LGBTQ women. PMID:26451226

  15. [Characteristics of the family of origin and family formed by women and men primary care physicians of Andalusia, Spain].

    PubMed

    Delgado, Ana; Cuesta, Lorena Saletti; López-Fernández, Luis Andrés; Luna, Juan de Dios; Rodríguez, Inmaculada Mateo; Martín, Juan Manuel Jiménez

    2009-01-01

    The origin and formed family characteristics are related to physician's professional career. The purpose of this study was to know and compare by sex the characteristics of the origin family and formed family of women and men family physician in Andalusia. Cross sectional and multicenter study. Urban primary health care centres from Andalusian province capitals. Physician of primary health care centres. at least one year using computerized medical history with the same quota patients. Multistage random sample, 88 primary health care centres and 500 physicians, 50% of both sexes (alpha=5%, power=90%, precision=15%). Postal auto administrated questionnaire. sex, age, tutor of resident in family medicine, last father's activity, last mother's activity, number of brothers or sisters, family situation, last couple's activity (if any), to have or not children. 73.6 % responses. In no responses there weren't differences of sex neither tutor of resident in family medicine. Mean age: women physicians 49.5 +/- 4.3 and men physician 51.3 +/- 4.9 (p= or < 0.005). Postgraduate formation in family medicine: 42.2% of women and 33.3% of men (p=0.016). Live alone: 6.1% of women physician and 2.7% men physician (p=0.005). Live alone with children 9.9% of women and 2.2% of men (p=0.005). 16.5% of women and 10.2% of men don t have children (p=0.077). 21.1% of men physician s couples work only at home vs. 0.1% of women physician s couples (p= or < 0.005). 46% of women physician s couples is also physician vs. 22% of men physician s couples (p= or < 0.005). No significant differences registered in parent s activities neither in the number of brother or sisters. There are no significant differences in physician s origin family. However important differences in the characteristics of formed family are observed in both sexes.

  16. A cross sectional survey of urban Canadian family physicians' provision of minor office procedures.

    PubMed

    Sempowski, Ian P; Rungi, Arne A; Seguin, Rachelle

    2006-03-19

    A discordance exists between the proportion of Canadian family physicians that we expect should be able to perform minor office procedures and the actual provision of care. This pattern has not been extensively studied. The objective of this study was to determine the current patterns and obstacles relating to the provision of four minor office procedures by GP/FPs in a small city in Ontario, Canada. An additional goal was to determine the impact of the remuneration method on the provision of such services. A survey was mailed to all GP/FPs practising in Kingston, Ontario. The main outcomes measured in the study were work setting and remuneration method, current procedural practices with respect to four procedures, reasons for not performing procedures, current skill levels, and desire to upgrade. Surveys were mailed to all 108 GP/FPs in the City of Kingston. Completed surveys were collected for 82 percent (89/108) and 10 were excluded leaving 79 eligible participants. The percentages of GP/FPs who reported performing the procedure were as follows: dermatological excision (63.3%), endometrial biopsy (35.4%), shoulder injection (31.6%), and knee injection (43.0%). The majority of GP/FPs who would not do the procedure themselves would refer to a specialist colleague rather than to another GP/FP. The top reason cited for not performing a specific procedure was "lack of up to date skills" followed by "lack of time". The latter was the only statistically significant difference reported between GP/FPs working in Family Health Networks and GP/FPs working in fee for service settings (26.7% vs 47.0%, chi2 = 4.191 p = 0.041). A large number of Kingston, Ontario GP/FPs refer patients who require one of four minor office-based procedures for specialist consultation. Referral to other GP/FP colleagues appears underutilized. A perceived lack of up to date skills and a lack of time appear to be concerns. GP/FPs working in Family Health Networks were more likely to perform these

  17. Using the family covenant in planning end-of-life care: obligations and promises of patients, families, and physicians.

    PubMed

    Doukas, David J; Hardwig, John

    2003-08-01

    Physicians and families need to interact more meaningfully to clarify the values and preferences at stake in advance care planning. The current use of advance directives fails to respect patient autonomy. This paper proposes using the family covenant as a preventive ethics process designed to improve end-of-life planning by incorporating other family members--as agreed to by the patient and those family members--into the medical care dialogue. The family covenant formulates advance directives in conversation with family members and with the assistance of a physician, thereby making advance directives more acceptable to the family, and more intelligible to other physicians. It adds the moral force of a promise to the obligation of respecting a patient's preferences about end-of-life care. These negotiations between patient, family, and physician, from early planning phases through implementation, should greatly reduce the incidence of family disagreements on what the patient would have wanted. The family covenant ensures advance directive discussions within the family, promotes and respects the autonomy of other family members, and might even spur others in the family to complete advance directives through additional covenants. The family covenant holds the potential to transform moral quagmires into meaningful moral conversation.

  18. How family physicians address diagnosis and management of depression in palliative care patients.

    PubMed

    Warmenhoven, Franca; van Rijswijk, Eric; van Hoogstraten, Elise; van Spaendonck, Karel; Lucassen, Peter; Prins, Judith; Vissers, Kris; van Weel, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Depression is highly prevalent in palliative care patients. In clinical practice, there is concern about both insufficient and excessive diagnosis and treatment of depression. In the Netherlands, family physicians have a central role in delivering palliative care. We explored variation in family physicians' opinions regarding the recognition, diagnosis, and management of depression in palliative care patients. We conducted a focus group study in a sample of family physicians with varied practice locations and varying expertise in palliative care. Transcripts were analyzed independently by 2 researchers using constant comparative analysis in ATLAS.ti. In 4 focus group discussions with 22 family physicians, the physicians described the diagnostic and therapeutic process for depression in palliative care patients as a continuous and overlapping process. Differentiating between normal and abnormal sadness was viewed as challenging. The physicians did not strictly apply criteria of depressive disorder but rather relied on their clinical judgment and strongly considered patients' context and background factors. They indicated that managing depression in palliative care patients is mainly supportive and nonspecific. Antidepressant drugs were seldom prescribed. The physicians described difficulties in diagnosing and treating depression in palliative care, and gave suggestions to improve management of depression in palliative care patients in primary care. Family physicians perceive the diagnosis and management of depression in palliative care patients as challenging. They rely on open communication and a long-standing physician-patient relationship in which the patient's context is of great importance. This approach fits with the patient-centered care that is promoted in primary care.

  19. Situational Analysis of Human Resources in Family Physician Program: Survey from Iran

    PubMed Central

    Kalhor, Rohollah; Azmal, Mohammad; Kiaei, Mohammad Zakaria; Eslamian, Maryam; Tabatabaee, Seyed Saeed; Jafari, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Family physician is the increasing efforts to promote physician and other human resources in the health care systems. Goal: Investigate Human resources situation of the family physician program in six pilot cities in Khuzestan province in the southwest of Iran. Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted to examine the family physician program in 2011. In this study, 15 healthcare teams in six pilot cities in Iran were assessed. Data was compiled from family physician officer document in vice treatment of Ahwaz University of medical sciences. National instructions of family physician was used to identify current gaps. Results: The survey findings indicated that there is a doctor’s shortage about 36% in the health team that deployed in the first level of referral system. Also on the team, the 34% shortage of nurses and 60% shortages of nutrition personnel are seen. Specialists with offices in cities of second referral level, there have not welcomed the program. Conclusions: It seems that to facilitate patient access to physicians under contract with family physician program and the referral system in level two and level three, adopting arrangements to attract specialists and improving their maintenance is necessary. PMID:25126016

  20. Moving towards an electronic patient record: a survey to assess the needs of community family physicians.

    PubMed Central

    Strasberg, H. R.; Tudiver, F.; Holbrook, A. M.; Geiger, G.; Keshavjee, K. K.; Troyan, S.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the needs of community family physicians regarding electronic patient records (EPRs). DESIGN: A comprehensive survey was sent to 101 community family physicians in Hamilton, Ontario, who had expressed an interest in EPRs. RESULTS: 46 physicians responded (46%). 87% felt that an EPR would result in their providing better patient care. A wide variety of items were deemed to be important to be included on the EPR "front page". Desired functionality emphasized labs, medications, consultation, hospital follow-up and health maintenance. Family physicians tended to prefer templates to other data entry methods such as typing and dictating. Respondents were more willing to view information from the hospital than to let the hospital view information from their own offices. CONCLUSION: This survey provided useful information on the perceived EPR needs of community-based family physicians. It will be repeated post-computerization. PMID:9929216

  1. The role of family of origin in physicians referred to a CME course.

    PubMed

    Samenow, Charles P; Yabiku, Scott T; Ghulyan, Marine; Williams, Betsy; Swiggart, William

    2012-06-01

    Few studies exist which look at psychological factors associated with physician sexual misconduct. In this study, we explore family dysfunction as a possible risk factor associated with physician sexual misconduct. Six hundred thirteen physicians referred to a continuing medical education (CME) course for sexual misconduct were administered the FACES-II survey, a validated and reliable measure of family dynamics. The survey was part of a self-learning activity. We collected data from February 2000 to February 2009. Participants were predominantly white, middle-aged males who represented the full range of medical specialties. Their results were compared against a sample of 177 physicians. The FACES-II is a self-report test that measures family of origin (the family in which one was raised) dynamics on two dimensions (1) flexibility, ranging from too flexible (chaotic) to not flexible enough (rigid) and (2) cohesion ranging from too close (enmeshed) to not close enough (disengaged). The most common family pattern observed among physicians accused of sexual misconduct was rigid flexibility paired with disengaged cohesion, indicative of unhealthy family functioning. This pattern was significantly different than the pattern observed in the comparison group. Physicians who engage in sexual misconduct are more likely to have family of origin dysfunction. Ethics is developmental and learned in one's family of origin. Family of origin dynamics may be one risk factor predisposing one to ethical violations. These findings have important implications for screening, education, and treatment across the medical education continuum.

  2. Cancer in remission. Challenge in collaboration for family physicians and oncologists.

    PubMed

    Wood, M L; McWilliam, C L

    1996-05-01

    To explore oncologists' perspectives on the process of cancer patient follow up and to identify what oncologists need from family physicians during the remission stage of cancer disease. Qualitative study with in-depth interviews. Regional cancer centre serving a catchment area of 1.4 million people. A purposive sample of 10 oncologists. One was unable to participate because of sabbatical leave. The nine who participated represented both radiation and medical oncology. Oncologists who had practised at the cancer centre for less than 2 years were excluded from the study. Existing barriers to communication and collaboration between oncologists and family physicians in cancer patient follow up. Oncologists described roles for themselves in reassuring patients, detecting recurrence, monitoring toxicity of treatment, and gathering data for clinical trials. Collaboration with family physicians in the remission phase was identified as desirable but inhibited by variable and unpredictable interest, poor communication with family physicians, and patients' own preferences for follow up. Oncologists perceived the cancer system structure as a "black box" within which multidisciplinary teams worked well but seldom included family physicians. Oncologists expressed a need to see healthy patients and to have more understanding and support from family physicians, preferably through sharing follow-up care. Developing dialogue and a more collaborative approach were suggested. Family physicians should maintain a role in remission follow-up. However, a more collaborative approach with oncologists is warranted. Communication barriers, patient preferences, and misperceptions between groups must be addressed before roles are redefined.

  3. Which Health Cares Are Related to the Family Physician? A Critical Interpretive Synthesis of Literature.

    PubMed

    Yazdani, Shahram; Akbarilakeh, Maryam

    2017-05-01

    This study provided the theoretical basis for program development through a new conceptualization of the concept of family physician related health care. Critical interpretive synthesis (CIS) was used to carry out qualitative analysis and synthesis of the literature from 2006 until 2015. At the beginning of CIS, the search strategy was designed to access electronic databases such as CINAHL, Medline, Cochrane library, PsycINFO, Embase, EBMreviews, and Thomson scientific web of science database. The main review question was the clarification of the health care related to family physician in health system, which produced over related 750 articles; 60 articles related to the research objective were studied by purposive sampling. After identifying the main categories and sub-categories, synthesis of the contradictory findings in different studies was conducted. New concepts and relationships between concepts were created using CIS of documentation related to the place of family physician in health system. To define the original position of family physician in health system, clarify its related health care and determine its boundaries from other health care providers, and its use in the design and development of family physician's educational program, a frame of concepts related to the main concept and question was created. A more useful means of understanding family physician is offered by the synthetic constructs of this framework. The theoretical conceptualization of family physician position and duties in the health system can be an appropriate guide for educational program and curricula in our context.

  4. The opinions and experiences of family physicians regarding direct-to-consumer advertising.

    PubMed

    Lipsky, M S; Taylor, C A

    1997-12-01

    The use of direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA) by pharmaceutical companies is increasing. Our study examines the opinions and experiences of family physicians concerning DTCA. A survey instrument designed to elicit the opinions, experiences, and perceptions of family physicians about DTCA was sent to a 2% (N = 880) systematic sampling of active physician members of the American Academy of Family Physicians. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze responses with t tests and chi 2 tests for independence used to examine subgroup response differences. Four hundred fifty-four (52%) physicians responded to the survey. Most physicians (95%) had encountered DTCA personally, and had been approached by an average of 7 patients over the previous 6 months with requests for specific prescription drugs. Prescription antihistamines and antihypertensive drugs were the most commonly requested. Overall, 80% of the physician respondents believed that print DTCA was not a good idea, while 84% expressed negative feelings about television and radio advertising. Both groups cited "misleading biased view" and "increased costs" as the most common disadvantages. Some reported benefits included "better informed patients" and "promoting physician-patient communication." Overall, the study group physicians had negative feelings about DTCA in both print and electronic media. Studies directly examining patient perspectives, as well as cost benefits, are necessary to test the validity of the physicians' perceptions about DTCA.

  5. Difficulties faced by family physicians in primary health care centers in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Mumenah, Sahar H; Al-Raddadi, Rajaa M

    2015-01-01

    The aim was to determine the difficulties faced by family physicians, and compare how satisfied those working with the Ministry of Health (MOH) are with their counterparts who work at some selected non-MOH hospitals. An analytical, cross-sectional study was conducted at King Abdulaziz University Hospital, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center (KFSH and RC), and 40 MOH primary health care centers across Jeddah. A structured multi-item questionnaire was used to collect demographic data and information on the difficulties family physicians face. The physicians' level of satisfaction and how it was affected by the difficulties was assessed. Women constituted 71.9% of the sample. Problems with transportation formed one of the main difficulties encountered by physicians. Compared to non-MOH physician, a significantly higher proportion of MOH physicians reported unavailability of radiology technicians (P = 0.011) and radiologists (P < 0.001), absence of the internet and computer access (P < 0.001), unavailability of laboratory services (P = 0.004), reagents (P = 0.001), X-ray equipment (P = 0.027), ultrasound equipment (P < 0.001), an electronic medical records system (P < 0.001), insufficient laboratory tests (P = 0.0001), and poor building maintenance (P < 0.001). Family physicians with the MOH were less satisfied with their jobs compared with non-MOH physicians (P = 0.032). MOH family physicians encountered difficulties relating to staff, services, and infrastructure, which consequently affected their level of satisfaction.

  6. Office-based strategies for the management of obesity.

    PubMed

    Rao, Goutham

    2010-06-15

    Roughly two thirds of U.S. adults are overweight or obese. Obesity increases the risk of hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, heart disease, pulmonary disease, hepatobiliary disease, cancer, and a number of psychosocial complications. Physicians often feel unprepared to handle this important problem. Practical office-based strategies include: (1) making recommendations for assisted self-management, including guidance on popular diets, (2) advising patients about commercial weight-loss programs, (3) advising patients about and prescribing medications, (4) recommending bariatric surgery, and (5) supplementing these strategies with counseling about lifestyle changes using a systematic approach. Family physicians should provide basic information about the effectiveness and safety of popular diets and commercial weight-loss programs, and refer patients to appropriate information sources. Sibutramine and orlistat, the only medications currently approved for the long-term treatment of obesity, should only be prescribed in combination with lifestyle changes. Bariatric surgery is an option for adults with a body mass index of 40 kg per m2 or higher, or for those with a body mass index of 35 kg per m2 or higher who have obesity-related comorbidities such as type 2 diabetes. The five A's behavioral counseling paradigm (ask, advise, assess, assist, and arrange) can be used as the basis for a systematic, practical approach to the management of obesity that incorporates evidence for managing common obesity-related behaviors.

  7. [Preanalytical step in bacteriology : a practical overview for family physicians].

    PubMed

    Eyer, Myriam M; Droz, Sara

    2016-10-12

    Physicians play a key role in the accuracy of bacteriological results by appropriate prescription and the quality of sample collection, preservation and transport. Samples for diagnostic purposes are of use if analysis results have an impact on the therapeutic approach. They have minimal risk of contamination, are usually obtained invasively, and may be targeted to detection of specific bacteria. Physicians should refer to the laboratory technical manual to provide proper sample quality. Furthermore, they have to provide clinical and administrative information to the microbiologist, because the laboratory analytical process depends on these. Close collaboration between physicians and microbiologists is essential.

  8. An assessment of practice support and continuing medical education needs of rural Pennsylvania family physicians.

    PubMed

    Forti, E M; Martin, K E; Jones, R L; Herman, J M

    1996-01-01

    Family physicians provide the greatest proportion of care in rural communities. Yet, the number of physicians choosing family practice and rural practice has continued to decline. Undesirable aspects of rural practice, such as professional isolation and a lack of or inadequate resources, are assumed to be associated with this decline. This article reports on the practice support and continuing medical education needs of rural family physicians. A mail survey was conducted in 1993 on a purposive sample of family physicians in 39 of 67 rural-designated or urban Pennsylvania counties with low population densities. The physicians identified needs that included patient education materials and programs, community health promotion, federal regulation updates, technical assistance with computers and business management, database software and a videotape lending library, a drug hotline, and mini-fellowships on clinical skill development. A majority of respondents were willing to participate in clinical educational experiences for students and residents. Some physicians indicated a lack of interest in access to information through telecommunications, e.g., video conference referrals and consultations. Overall, findings revealed that family physicians need and are receptive to a variety of practice support and continuing education programs. A practice support program coupled with policy coordination among public and private organizations is likely to lessen complaints by rural primary care physicians.

  9. Employed Family Physician Satisfaction and Commitment to Their Practice, Work Group, and Health Care Organization

    PubMed Central

    Karsh, Ben-Tzion; Beasley, John W; Brown, Roger L

    2010-01-01

    Objective Test a model of family physician job satisfaction and commitment. Data Sources/Study Setting Data were collected from 1,482 family physicians in a Midwest state during 2000–2001. The sampling frame came from the membership listing of the state's family physician association, and the analyzed dataset included family physicians employed by large multispecialty group practices. Study Design and Data Collection A cross-sectional survey was used to collect data about physician working conditions, job satisfaction, commitment, and demographic variables. Principal Findings The response rate was 47 percent. Different variables predicted the different measures of satisfaction and commitment. Satisfaction with one's health care organization (HCO) was most strongly predicted by the degree to which physicians perceived that management valued and recognized them and by the extent to which physicians perceived the organization's goals to be compatible with their own. Satisfaction with one's workgroup was most strongly predicted by the social relationship with members of the workgroup; satisfaction with one's practice was most strongly predicted by relationships with patients. Commitment to one's workgroup was predicted by relationships with one's workgroup. Commitment to one's HCO was predicted by relationships with management of the HCO. Conclusions Social relationships are stronger predictors of employed family physician satisfaction and commitment than staff support, job control, income, or time pressure. PMID:20070386

  10. Analysis of barriers to adoption of buprenorphine maintenance therapy by family physicians.

    PubMed

    DeFlavio, Jeffrey R; Rolin, Stephanie A; Nordstrom, Benjamin R; Kazal, Louis A

    2015-01-01

    Opioid abuse has reached epidemic levels. Evidence-based treatments such as buprenorphine maintenance therapy (BMT) remain underutilized. Offering BMT in primary care settings has the potential to reduce overall costs of care, decrease medical morbidity associated with opioid dependence, and improve treatment outcomes. However, access to BMT, especially in rural areas, remains limited. This article will present a review of barriers to adoption of BMT among family physicians in a primarily rural area in the USA. An anonymous survey of family physicians practicing in Vermont or New Hampshire, two largely rural states, was conducted. The survey included both quantitative and qualitative questions, focused on BMT adoption and physician opinions of opioids. Specific factors assessed included physician factors, physicians' understanding of patient factors, and logistical issues. One-hundred and eight family physicians completed the survey. Approximately 10% were buprenorphine prescribers. More than 80% of family physicians felt they regularly saw patients addicted to opiates. The majority (70%) felt that they, as family physicians, bore responsibility for treating opiate addiction. Potential logistical barriers to buprenorphine adoption included inadequately trained staff (88%), insufficient time (80%), inadequate office space (49%), and cumbersome regulations (37%). Common themes addressed in open-ended questions included lack of knowledge, time, or interest; mistrust of people with addiction or buprenorphine; and difficult patient population. This study aims to quantify perceived barriers to treatment and provide insight expanding the community of family physicians offering BMT. The results suggest family physicians are excellent candidates to provide BMT, as most report regularly seeing opioid-addicted patients and believe that treating opioid addiction is their responsibility. Significant barriers remain, including inadequate staff training, lack of access to

  11. Patterns of Lyme disease diagnosis and treatment by family physicians in a southeastern state.

    PubMed

    Boltri, John M; Hash, Robert B; Vogel, Robert L

    2002-12-01

    This study examined how often physicians in Georgia diagnose and treat Lyme disease as well as the criteria they use to reach a diagnosis of Lyme disease. A survey was sent to 1,331 family physicians in Georgia concerning how many cases of Lyme disease the physicians diagnosed, and the criteria used to make the diagnosis, during the preceding 12 months. Of 710 responses, 167 physicians treated 316 cases of Lyme disease without a firm diagnosis. In addition, 125 physicians diagnosed 262 cases of Lyme disease, 130 without serologic testing and 132 with serologic testing. Family Physicians in Georgia diagnose Lyme disease at a rate 40 times greater than the surveillance case rate reported in Georgia.

  12. How the Medical Culture Contributes to Coworker-Perpetrated Harassment and Abuse of Family Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Miedema, Baukje; MacIntyre, Leslie; Tatemichi, Sue; Lambert-Lanning, Anita; Lemire, Francine; Manca, Donna; Ramsden, Vivian

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE Harassment and abuse in the workplace of family physicians has been associated with higher levels of stress, increased consumption of alcohol, and higher risk for developing mental health problems. Few studies have examined issues contributing to abusive encounters in the workplace of family physicians. METHODS For the overall study we used a mixed methods design, which included a cross-sectional survey of a randomly selected sample of active family physicians from the database of the College of Family Physicians of Canada and telephone interviews with those who reported experiencing work related harassment and abuse in the last year. The data presented here arise from the qualitative interviews of the study, which were analyzed thematically. RESULTS The interview arm of the study included 23 female and 14 male participants. The major themes that emerged from the study were (1) modeling of abusive behaviors, (2) status hierarchy among various medical disciplines, (3) shortage of physicians, and (4) lack of transparent policies and follow-up procedures after abusive encounters. The results are discussed using the broken window theory. CONCLUSION Many family physicians experience harassing and abusive encounters during their training or in the workplace. The current medical culture appears to contribute to harassment and abuse in the workplace of family physicians in Canada. We described the components that intentionally or unintentionally facilitate abusive behavior in the medical culture. PMID:22412002

  13. Family physician ethnicity influences quality of diabetes care for Chinese but not South Asian patients.

    PubMed

    Shah, Baiju R; Hwee, Jeremiah; Anand, Sonia S; Austin, Peter C; Manuel, Douglas G; Hux, Janet E

    2015-12-01

    To determine whether sharing the same ethnicity as their family physician influenced the quality of diabetes care for Chinese and South Asian patients in Ontario, Canada. We conducted two related studies: a population-based cohort study of Chinese and South Asian patients with incident diabetes using health care administrative data (n=49,484), and a cross-sectional study of Chinese and South Asian patients with established diabetes using data collected directly from their family physicians' clinical records (n=416). In both studies, quality of care measures were compared between patients whose family physicians were or were not from the same ethnic group. In the cohort study, Chinese patients whose family physicians were also Chinese were more likely to have a diabetes-related family physician visit and appropriate HbA1c and cholesterol testing. In the cross-sectional study, they were more likely to have foot examinations, to have microalbuminuria testing, and to achieve recommended treatment targets for HbA1c and for LDL-cholesterol. In contrast, for South Asian patients, most quality measures in either study did not differ by physician ethnicity. Having a family physician from the same ethnic group was associated with better quality of diabetes care for Chinese but not for South Asian patients. Copyright © 2015 Primary Care Diabetes Europe. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Idaho rural family physician workforce study: the Community Apgar Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, D F; Baker, E; Nukui, A; Epperly, T

    2011-01-01

    Community factors of varied importance help determine the success of achieving and maintaining a physician workforce. The purpose of this study was to develop an evaluation instrument (Community Apgar Questioinnaire) useful to rural Idaho communities' in their assessment of the assets and capabilities related to physician recruitment and retention. A quantitative scoring interview instrument was developed based on a literature review, site visits and discussions with rural physicians and hospital administrators. A total of 11 rural Idaho communities differing in geography and other known variables were selected, some identified historically to have more success in recruitment and retention (α communities) and some historically noted to have more challenges (β comunities). In each community, the administrator of the hospital and the physician with recruiting responsibilities participated individually in a structured interview. A total of 11 physicians and 11 CEOs participated in the study. Differences were found across and within classes of factors associated with success in physician recruitment and retention where alpha communities scored higher on Community Apgar Questionnaire metrics. Some differences were noted by respondent class. Cumulative mean Community Apgar scores are higher in communities that have historically better track records in recruitment and retention. The Community Apgar Questionnaire seems to discriminate between communities with differing assets and capabilities, based on historical community-specific workforce trends. This assessment may allow for identification of both modifiable and non-modifiable factors and also may suggest which factors are most important for a community with limited available resources to address.

  15. Do family physicians, emergency department physicians, and pediatricians give consistent sport-related concussion management advice?

    PubMed Central

    Stoller, Jacqueline; Carson, James D.; Garel, Alisha; Libfeld, Paula; Snow, Catherine L.; Law, Marcus; Frémont, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To identify differences and gaps in recommendations to patients for the management of sport-related concussion among FPs, emergency department physicians (EDPs), and pediatricians. Design A self-administered, multiple-choice survey was e-mailed to FPs, EDPs, and pediatricians. The survey had been assessed for content validity. Setting Two community teaching hospitals in the greater Toronto area in Ontario. Participants Two hundred seventy physicians, including FPs, EDPs, and pediatricians, were invited to participate. Main outcome measures Identification of sources of concussion management information, usefulness of concussion diagnosis strategies, and whether physicians use common terminology when explaining cognitive rest strategies to patients after sport-related concussions. Results The response rate was 43.7%. Surveys were completed by 70 FPs, 23 EDPs, and 11 pediatricians. In total, 49% of FP, 52% of EDP, and 27% of pediatrician respondents reported no knowledge of any consensus statements on concussion in sport, and 54% of FPs, 86% of EDPs, and 78% of pediatricians never used the Sport Concussion Assessment Tool, version 2. Only 49% of FPs, 57% of EDPs, and 36% of pediatricians always advised cognitive rest. Conclusion This study identified large gaps in the knowledge of concussion guidelines and implementation of recommendations for treating patients with sport-related concussions. Although some physicians recommended physical and cognitive rest, a large proportion failed to consistently advise this strategy. Better knowledge transfer efforts should target all 3 groups of physicians. PMID:24925947

  16. Short-Term Educational Intervention Improves Family Physicians' Knowledge of Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kutcher, Stanley; Lauria-Horner, Bianca; MacLaren, Connie; Bujas-Bobanovic, Maja; Karlovic, Zlatko

    2003-01-01

    Introduction: Depression is frequently unrecognized and undertreated. Therefore, there is a need to increase the knowledge and skills of primary care physicians regarding management of depression. The aim of this study was to determine if a brief educational intervention can affect family physicians' knowledge of the diagnosis and treatment of…

  17. A Critical Look at the Family Physician's Role in Preventing Childhood Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Rosser, W.; Feldman, W.; McGrath, P.

    1987-01-01

    Childhood injuries stand as the most common causes of death among Canadian children. Physician advice and advocacy of appropriate legislation, parent education and legislative action could reduce this toll. There is a role for family physicians in the important process of providing a safer environment for our children. PMID:21263865

  18. Which Health Cares Are Related to the Family Physician? A Critical Interpretive Synthesis of Literature

    PubMed Central

    YAZDANI, Shahram; AKBARILAKEH, Maryam

    2017-01-01

    Background: This study provided the theoretical basis for program development through a new conceptualization of the concept of family physician related health care. Methods: Critical interpretive synthesis (CIS) was used to carry out qualitative analysis and synthesis of the literature from 2006 until 2015. At the beginning of CIS, the search strategy was designed to access electronic databases such as CINAHL, Medline, Cochrane library, PsycINFO, Embase, EBMreviews, and Thomson scientific web of science database. The main review question was the clarification of the health care related to family physician in health system, which produced over related 750 articles; 60 articles related to the research objective were studied by purposive sampling. After identifying the main categories and sub-categories, synthesis of the contradictory findings in different studies was conducted. New concepts and relationships between concepts were created using CIS of documentation related to the place of family physician in health system. Results: To define the original position of family physician in health system, clarify its related health care and determine its boundaries from other health care providers, and its use in the design and development of family physician’s educational program, a frame of concepts related to the main concept and question was created. A more useful means of understanding family physician is offered by the synthetic constructs of this framework. Conclusion: The theoretical conceptualization of family physician position and duties in the health system can be an appropriate guide for educational program and curricula in our context. PMID:28560187

  19. Professional satisfaction of family physicians in Pakistan--results of a cross-sectional postal survey.

    PubMed

    Ashraf, Hiba; Shah, Nasir; Anwer, Fahad; Akhtar, Hina; Abro, Mairaj Anwar; Khan, Asma

    2014-04-01

    To assess the level of professional satisfaction amongst family physicians of Pakistan and to identify the factors associated with professional dissatisfaction. The study was part of a larger national survey for "Status of PostgraduateTraining and Continuing Medical Education of Family Physicians in Pakistan" which was a cross-sectional, postal survey of family physicians conducted over 10 months between November 2009 and September 2010. The main outcome variables were professional satisfaction, as well as reasons for professional satisfaction and dissatisfaction. SPSS 17 was used for data analysis. Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine factors associated with professional dissatisfaction. Of the total 1200 survey forms distributed, 288 (24%) were received back. The mean age of the participants was 37 +/- 9 years with a range between 26 and 72 years. Of the total, 226 (78.5%) were males. Overall, 213 (74%) family physicians were satisfied with their profession. The factors significantly associated with professional dissatisfaction included the participants opinion that they were not respected by the public (OR: 11.6, C.I: 1.9-71.5); as well as regretting being a doctor (OR:62.9, C.I: 8.4-469.8). Most of the family physicians had professional satisfaction, but a minority had regrets about being a doctor and were dissatisfied over how their profession affected their family life. Further research may be needed to study work-life balance amongst family physicians of Pakistan.

  20. Medical abortion and family physicians. Survey of residents and practitioners in two Ontario settings.

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, Elin; Kaczorowski, Janusz; Smith, Pat; Sellors, John; Walsh, Allyn

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the knowledge, attitudes, and interest in providing medical abortion reported by family physicians and residents in rural and urban settings. DESIGN: A self-administered mailed survey using the modified Dillman method. SETTING: Hamilton and Thunder Bay County in Ontario. PARTICIPANTS: Family medicine residents (n = 93) and physicians (n = 234) in predominantly urban (Hamilton) and rural (Thunder Bay) settings. All faculty family physicians at McMaster University practising general family medicine and all family physicians in Thunder Bay County were surveyed. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Knowledge of, attitudes toward, and interest in providing medical abortion. RESULTS: Overall response rate to the survey was 62.7% (n = 327); 74.2% (69/93) of residents responded; 58.1% (136/234) of physicians responded. Physicians and residents rated their knowledge about medical abortion as poor, but most were interested in receiving more information and training in this area. Many (83.1%, 157/189) reported that medical abortion was an acceptable procedure for family physicians to perform, and 52.0% (64/123) of the physicians would consider providing medical abortions for their patients. Residents training in the more rural Thunder Bay program were less likely to support first-trimester abortions for both medical and nonmedical reasons than those training in Hamilton (P < .05). Male respondents were significantly less supportive of abortion for nonmedical reasons and were less likely to consider providing medical abortions for their patients (P < .05). CONCLUSION: Most family physicians and residents showed interest in receiving more information about and training in medical abortion. PMID:11935718

  1. Physician extender services in family planning agencies: issues in Medicaid reimbursement.

    PubMed

    Mondy, L W; Lutz, D B; Heartwell, S F; Zetzman, M R

    1986-01-01

    The US Social Security Amendments of 1972 mandated the inclusion of family planning services in state Medicaid plans, authorized 90% of reimbursements for family planning care, and imposed financial penalties for failure to provide these services to Medicaid-eligible clients. On the other hand, many states have retrictive policies regarding Medicaid reimbursements to family planning agencies for services provided by physician extenders (e.g.s nurse practitioners and physician assistants). There is concern that such restrictions greatly reduce accessibility to family planning services. Reasons that hae been suggested as causes of such restrictive policies include physician concern over loss of income, the uncertain status of physician extenders in some states, a fear that this step will lead to a demand for reiimbursement for the services of other allied health care providers such as social workers, and concern that care for the indigent will lead to an expensive increase in state reimbursement for family planning services. However, a review of relevant federal law and regulations indicates that Medicaid reimbursement for services provided to eligible patients by physician extenders has never been prohibited or discouraged. Physician supervision is required in reimbursement cases, but this does not mean that a physician must be on the premises while services are delivered. The Medicaid program actually allows significant latitude in establishing administrative policies and procedures. Rather, problems faced by family planning agencies in receiving Medicaid reimbursements for physician extenders' services are due to restrictions in state laws and staff misinterpretations of policy. Research has demonstrated that physcian extenders can contribute significantly to cost effectiveness, while providing types of care in localities such as rural areas that physicians tend to avoid. Given the importance of family planning services to Medicaid-eligible clients, unwarranted

  2. Shared mental health care. Model for supporting and mentoring family physicians.

    PubMed

    Rockman, Patricia; Salach, Lena; Gotlib, David; Cord, Michael; Turner, Tyrone

    2004-03-01

    Family physicians lack access to psychiatrists and mental health services for patients with serious and persistent mental illnesses. To develop a mentoring program to provide FPs with education and e-mail, telephone, and face-to-face support for managing patients with mental illness. The Ontario College of Family Physicians' Collaborative Mental Health Care Network developed a mentoring program. Family physicians are grouped according to clinical interest with psychiatrist and general practice psychotherapist mentors whom they can contact for help. Communication is established via e-mail, telephone, fax, or listserv, or even face to face. Monitoring and evaluation is carried out through surveys and chart audits to examine use of, satisfaction with, and effectiveness of the program. Mental health care can be enhanced through collaborative at-a-distance relationships between FPs and psychotherapists and psychiatrists. Family physicians can get timely consultation in the areas of psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy, and access to community resources.

  3. Exemplary family physicians and consultants: empirical definition of contemporary medical practice.

    PubMed Central

    Langley, G R; Till, J E

    1989-01-01

    To identify the characteristics of exemplary family physicians and consultants, we interviewed 25 family physicians and 25 consultants (5 each in the specialties of internal medicine, obstetrics and gynecology, pediatrics, psychiatry and surgery) selected by their peers as being exemplary in their own practice setting. The results indicated that the participants had well-formulated concepts of exemplary practitioners, defining five main categories of performance: clinical competence, relationship with patients, availability, family physician-consultant relationship and a fifth category that included organizational ability and personality attributes. The family physicians and the consultants placed different values on these categories and indicated that these values might change under different clinical circumstances. Their concepts appear to be compatible with, but not restricted to, a model of contemporary medical practice based on an ethic specific to medicine. PMID:2766165

  4. Exemplary family physicians and consultants: empirical definition of contemporary medical practice.

    PubMed

    Langley, G R; Till, J E

    1989-08-15

    To identify the characteristics of exemplary family physicians and consultants, we interviewed 25 family physicians and 25 consultants (5 each in the specialties of internal medicine, obstetrics and gynecology, pediatrics, psychiatry and surgery) selected by their peers as being exemplary in their own practice setting. The results indicated that the participants had well-formulated concepts of exemplary practitioners, defining five main categories of performance: clinical competence, relationship with patients, availability, family physician-consultant relationship and a fifth category that included organizational ability and personality attributes. The family physicians and the consultants placed different values on these categories and indicated that these values might change under different clinical circumstances. Their concepts appear to be compatible with, but not restricted to, a model of contemporary medical practice based on an ethic specific to medicine.

  5. Irritable bowel syndrome. Strategy for the family physician.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, W. G.

    1994-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome is one of the most common reasons for disability and health care seeking. A sensible strategy for management incorporates a confident diagnosis based upon history, physical examination, and pertinent tests. The physician can then reassure the patient, offer dietary and stress management advice, and recommend bran to relieve constipation and to evoke the placebo response. Patients who do not respond could require supportive psychotherapy or a drug for the dominant symptom. A few require careful referral, but overall responsibility should remain with the primary physician. Images Figures 1-2 PMID:8130678

  6. Perceptions of the first family physicians to adopt advanced access in the province of Quebec, Canada.

    PubMed

    Breton, Mylaine; Maillet, Lara; Paré, Isabelle; Abou Malham, Sabina; Touati, Nassera

    2016-09-08

    In Quebec, several primary care physicians have made the transition to the advanced access model to address the crisis of limited access to primary care. The objectives are to describe the implementation of the advanced access model, as perceived by the first family physicians; to analyze the factors influencing the implementation of its principles; and to document the physicians' perceptions of its effects on their practice, colleagues and patients. Qualitative methods were used to explore, through semi-structured interviews, the experiences of 21 family physicians who had made the transition to advanced access. Of the 21 physicians, 16 succeeded in adopting all five advanced access principles to varying degrees. Core implementation issues revolved around the dynamics of collaboration between physicians, nurses and other colleagues. Secretaries' functions, in particular, had to be expanded. Facilitating factors were mainly related to the physicians' leadership and the professional resources available in the organizations. Impediments related to resource availability and team functioning were also encountered. This is the first exploratory study to examine the factors influencing the adoption of the advanced access model conducted with early-adopter family physicians. The lessons drawn will inform discussions on scaling up to other settings experiencing the same problems. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. The Foreigner Talk of a Family Physician: An Observational Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Dana Kristine

    A study analyzed the characteristics of one male physician's foreigner talk over the telephone with non-native speakers (NNSs) of English and compared it to that of native speakers (NSs). The conversations all related to requests that patients come into the office for a periodic, preventative physical exam. Data came from tape recordings of the…

  8. The future role of the family physician in the United States: a rigorous exercise in definition.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Robert L; Brundgardt, Stacy; Lesko, Sarah E; Kittle, Nathan; Marker, Jason E; Tuggy, Michael L; Lefevre, Michael L; Borkan, Jeffrey M; Degruy, Frank V; Loomis, Glenn A; Krug, Nathan

    2014-01-01

    As the U.S. health care delivery system undergoes rapid transformation, there is an urgent need to define a comprehensive, evidence-based role for the family physician. A Role Definition Group made up of members of seven family medicine organizations developed a statement defining the family physician's role in meeting the needs of individuals, the health care system, and the country. The Role Definition Group surveyed more than 50 years of foundational manuscripts including published works from the Future of Family Medicine project and Keystone III conference, external reviews, and a recent Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical Education Family Medicine Milestones definition. They developed candidate definitions and a "foil" definition of what family medicine could become without change. The following definition was selected: "Family physicians are personal doctors for people of all ages and health conditions. They are a reliable first contact for health concerns and directly address most health care needs. Through enduring partnerships, family physicians help patients prevent, understand, and manage illness, navigate the health system and set health goals. Family physicians and their staff adapt their care to the unique needs of their patients and communities. They use data to monitor and manage their patient population, and use best science to prioritize services most likely to benefit health. They are ideal leaders of health care systems and partners for public health." This definition will guide the second Future of Family Medicine project and provide direction as family physicians, academicians, clinical networks, and policy-makers negotiate roles in the evolving health system.

  9. Ethnicity and utilization of family physicians: a case study of Mainland Chinese immigrants in Toronto, Canada.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Rosenberg, Mark; Lo, Lucia

    2008-11-01

    This paper seeks to examine how immigrants in a multicultural society access and utilize culturally- and linguistically-diverse family physicians. It focuses on Mainland Chinese (MLC) immigrants - the most important source of immigrants to Canada since 1996 - in the Toronto Census Metropolitan Area (CMA), Canada. Specifically, the paper aims to explore the choice between Chinese-speaking and non-Chinese-speaking family physicians by MLC immigrants and to determine the underlying reasons for MLC immigrants use of ethnically- and linguistically-matched family physicians. A wide range of data are analyzed including survey and focus group data, physician data from the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario (CPSO) and geo-referenced 2001 Canadian Census data. A mixed-method approach is employed combining quantitative analysis of survey data and Census data, spatial analysis of patient travel behaviour based on the survey and qualitative analysis based on focus groups. The paper reveals an overwhelming preference among MLC survey respondents for Chinese-speaking family physicians regardless of study areas and socioeconomic and demographic status. The focus groups suggest that language, culture and ethnicity are intertwined in a complex way to influence the choice of health care providers and health management strategies in the host society. The paper yields important policy implications for identifying health professional shortage areas for culturally-diverse populations, addressing issues related to foreign-trained physicians and enhancing primary care delivery relevant for immigrant populations.

  10. Maternity care by family physicians: characteristics of successful and sustainable models.

    PubMed

    Price, David J; Lane, Carolyn; Klein, Michael C

    2005-05-01

    To provide examples of sustainable and rewarding models of maternity care that can help reduce the attrition of family practitioners from intrapartum maternity care practice. We surveyed a cohort of family physicians providing maternity care in primary care settings, using various models, to determine how each model handled the challenges of this practice. Different models of care are effective; there is no single best model of family practice maternity care. Successful models provide care for a substantial volume of patients, have call schedules that are appropriate for the volume of patients and number of participating physicians, have protocols for patient management, and have flexible and compatible clinic members. Structured sign-out models of care that incorporate innovative models for funding assist many family physicians in Canada in continuing to provide maternity care. Family medicine residents must be encouraged to incorporate these models of maternity care into their future practices.

  11. Adoption of Liquid-Based Cervical Cancer Screening Tests by Family Physicians and Gynecologists

    PubMed Central

    Rappaport, Karen M; Forrest, Christopher B; Holtzman, Neil A

    2004-01-01

    Objective To examine reasons for the adoption of liquid-based cervical cancer screening tests. Data Sources/Study Setting A mailed survey of 250 family physicians and 250 gynecologists in Maryland in 2000. Additional data were obtained from the AMA Master File of Physicians. Study Design Key outcome variables in this cross-sectional survey were early adoption of a liquid-based test by the end of 1997 and overall adoption by the time of the survey. Adoption was viewed in terms of a supply and demand theoretical framework with marketing influencing physician and patient demand as well as supply by insurance companies and laboratories. Data Collection Random samples of family physicians and gynecologists were selected from the AMA Master File of Physicians. The overall response rate was 61.9 percent. Principal Findings By 2000, 96 percent of gynecologists and 75 percent of family physicians in Maryland were using liquid-based cervical cancer screening tests, most commonly the ThinPrep® Pap Test™. Gynecologists were more likely than family physicians to have been early adopters (34 percent versus 5 percent, p<.01). Part of this variation in adoption was due to aggressive marketing to gynecologists, who were more likely than family physicians to receive information in the mail from the test manufacturer (89 percent versus 56 percent, p<.01) and to have been informed by the manufacturer that a patient had inquired about physicians' use of the test (22 percent versus 8 percent, p<.01). Conclusions The rapid diffusion of liquid-based cervical cancer screening tests occurred despite general agreement that the Pap smear has been one of the most successful cancer prevention interventions ever. Commercial marketing campaigns appear to contribute to the more rapid rate of diffusion of technology among specialists compared with generalists. PMID:15230935

  12. Increasing the supply of rural family physicians: recent outcomes from Jefferson Medical College's Physician Shortage Area Program (PSAP).

    PubMed

    Rabinowitz, Howard K; Diamond, James J; Markham, Fred W; Santana, Abbie J

    2011-02-01

    The shortage of primary care physicians in rural areas is an enduring problem with serious implications for access to care. Although studies have previously shown that medical school rural programs-such as Jefferson Medical College's Physician Shortage Area Program (PSAP)-significantly increase the rural workforce, determining whether these programs continue to be successful is important. The authors obtained, from the Jefferson Longitudinal Study, the 2007 practice location and specialty for the 2,394 PSAP and non-PSAP graduates of 11 previously unreported Jefferson graduating classes (1992-2002). They determined the relative likelihood both of PSAP versus non-PSAP graduates practicing rural family medicine and of all PSAP versus non-PSAP graduates practicing in Pennsylvania's rural counties. PSAP graduates were much more likely both to practice rural family medicine than their non-PSAP peers (32.0% [31/97] versus 3.2% [65/2,004]; relative risk [RR] = 9.9, confidence interval [CI] 6.8-14.4, P < .001) and to practice any specialty in rural Pennsylvania (PSAP 24.7% [24/97] versus non-PSAP 2.0% [40/2,004]; RR = 12.4, CI 7.8-19.7, P < .001). Despite major changes in health care in recent decades, Jefferson's PSAP continues to represent a successful model for substantially increasing the supply and distribution of rural family physicians. Especially with the forthcoming expansion in health insurance, access to care for rural residents will require an increased supply of providers. These results may also be important for medical schools planning to develop similar rural programs, given the new Rural Physician Training Grants program.

  13. Oncologists and family physicians. Using a standardized letter to improve communication.

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Ted C.; Hagen, Neil A.; Smith, Colum; Summers, Nancy

    2003-01-01

    PROBLEM BEING ADDRESSED: Communication between oncologists at a regional cancer centre and family physicians caring for palliative cancer patients in the community was ineffective. OBJECTIVE OF PROGRAM: To improve communication between oncologists and family physicians by routine use of a template for dictated letters concerning follow-up care. PROGRAM DESCRIPTION: A consultation letter template was constructed and tested at a single clinic. The template was designed to guide oncologists dictating letters to family physicians for patients' follow-up visits. Effectiveness of the standardized letter was evaluated with a before-after survey. CONCLUSION: Using the template letter improved communication with respect to the relevance, timeliness, format, and amount of information. As care for patients at the end of life increasingly shifts to the community, ongoing efforts are required to improve communication between cancer centres and primary care physicians. PMID:12901484

  14. Using Conjoint Analysis to Elicit GPs’ Preferences for Family Physician Contracts: A Case Study in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Ranjbar Ezatabadi, Mohammad; Rashidian, Arash; Shariati, Mohammad; Rahimi Foroushani, Abbas; Akbari Sari, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background Family physician plans in Iran face several challenges, one of which is developing attractive and efficient contracts that motivate physicians to participate in the plan. Objectives This study aimed to elicit GPs’ preferences for family physician contracts. Patients and Methods In a cross-sectional study using the conjoint analysis technique, 580 GPs selected from the family physician database in Iran in 2014. Through qualitative and quantitative methods, 18 contract scenarios were developed via orthogonal design i.e., the impact of each attribute is measured independently from changes in other attributes and a questionnaire was developed. Data were collected through this questionnaire and analyzed using the ordered logistic regression (OLR) model. Results The results show that “quotas for admission to specialized courses” is the strongest preference of GPs (β = 1.123). In order of importance, the other preferences are having the right to provide services outside of the specified package (β = 0.962), increased number of covered population (β = 0.814), capitation payment + 15% bonus (β = 0.644), increased catchment area to 5 km (β = 0.349), and increased length of contract to five years (β = 0.345). Conclusions The conjoint analysis results show that GPs concerned about various factors of family physician contracts. These results can be helpful for policy-makers as they complete the process of creating family physician plans, which can help increase the motivation of GPs to participate in the plan. PMID:28191339

  15. Family physicians clinical aptitude for the nutritional management of type 2 diabetes mellitus in Guadalajara, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Cabrera Pivaral, C E; Gutiérrez Roman, E A; Gonzalez Pérez, G; Gonzalez Reyes, F; Valadez Toscano, F; Gutiérrez Ruvalcaba, C; Rios Riebeling, C D

    2008-02-01

    There are 180,000 new Diabetes Mellitus cases in Mexico each year (1). This chronic, complex and multifactor disease requires an adequate nutritional management plan to be prescribed by family physicians. They should be trained to identify the potential difficulties in the patient's dietary schedule and orientate their management from an integrative point of view. The purpose of this study was to detect and measure family physician's clinical aptitudes for the nutritional management of Type 2 diabetes, in a representative family physician's sample from five Family Medicine Units of the Mexican Institute of Social Security in Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico. A structured and validated instrument was applied to 117 physicians from a total of 450 in Guadalajara, Jalisco. The main study variable was clinical aptitude for nutritional management of Type 2 diabetes. Aptitude levels were defined by an ordinal scale and related to the other variables using the median, Mann-Whitney's U test and Kruskal Wallis (KW) test. Global results showed a median of 30 points that relates to a low and a very low aptitude level for the 72% of physicians without statistical significance (KW: p>0.05) with the rest of variables. These results reflect family physician's difficulties to orientate the nutritional management of Type 2 diabetes, as well as the lack of work environments that facilitate case reflection and formative educational strategies.

  16. Noise-induced hearing loss: the family physician's role

    SciTech Connect

    Dobie, R.A.

    1987-12-01

    Noise is an environmental health problem that has not received sufficient attention. Physicians should become knowledgeable about the medical consequences of excessive noise, support legislation to reduce the problem and promote programs aimed at noise control and prevention of hearing loss. Questions about noise and hearing should be incorporated into the medical history, and pure-tone audiometry should be a part of periodic physical evaluations.

  17. Value of a regional family practice residency training program site: perceptions of residents, nurses, and physicians.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Sarah; Mullett, Jennifer; Beerman, Steve

    2014-09-01

    To examine the perceptions of residents, nurses, and physicians about the effect of a regional family practice residency site on the delivery of health services in the community, as well as on the community health care providers. Interviews and focus groups were conducted. Nanaimo, BC. A total of 16 residents, 15 nurses, and 20 physicians involved with the family practice residency training program at the Nanaimo site. A series of semistructured interviews and focus groups was conducted. Transcripts of interviews and focus groups were analyzed thematically by the research team. Overall, participants agreed that having a family practice residency training site in the community contributed to community life and to the delivery of health services in the following ways: increased community capacity and social capital; motivated positive relationships and attitudes in the hospital and community settings; improved communication and teamwork, as well as accessibility and understanding of the health care system; increased the standard of care; and facilitated the recruitment and retention of family physicians. This family practice residency training site was beneficial for the community it served. Future planning for distributed medical education sites should take into account the effects of these sites on the health care community and ensure that they continue to be positive influences. Further research in this area could focus on patients' perceptions of how residency programs affect their care, as well as on the effect of residency programs on wait times and workload for physicians and nurses. Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

  18. The correlation of family physician work with submitted codes and fees.

    PubMed

    Young, Richard; Overton, Tiffany L

    2014-01-01

    The income disparity between primary care and other physicians has been attributed in part to the evaluation and management (E/M) rules written by CMS. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between family physicians' work and their actual coding practices and fees collected under these widely used rules. This was a direct observational time-motion study. A diverse group of 15 family physicians were shadowed over consecutive patient visits at their ambulatory practices, usually for a half-day of clinic. Data about each visit were recorded, including time parameters; number of issues covered; number of labs, images, and chronic prescriptions ordered; the physician fee code from the Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) system that was submitted; the actual payer for each patient; and the actual fee collected. The primary outcome was the correlation between the time spent for each patient's care and coding/financial measures. The average total time a physician spent per patient including documentation time was 20.0 minutes. The average fee collected was $101.40, including patient co-pays. The correlation between the actual fee collected and the physician's time spent working on each patient's behalf was poor (R2 = 0.137, P < .001). There was a wide variation in times and fees for each CPT code category. The existing E/M rules and CPT coding system have created office visit fees that correlate poorly with family physician work. These findings provide another justification for disruptive primary care payment reform.

  19. Collaboration between family physicians and community pharmacists to enhance adherence to chronic medications

    PubMed Central

    Laubscher, Tessa; Evans, Charity; Blackburn, Dave; Taylor, Jeff; McKay, Shari

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To ascertain the opinions of family physicians about medication adherence in patients with chronic diseases and the role of community pharmacists in improving adherence to chronic medications, as well as their opinions on increased collaboration with pharmacists to enhance medication adherence. DESIGN A self-administered postal survey of 19 questions, with opinions collected by ordinal (5-point Likert scale) and open responses. SETTING Saskatchewan. PARTICIPANTS Two hundred and eighty-six family physicians working in Saskatchewan in January 2008. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Descriptive statistics of physicians’ opinions on the following: medication adherence in patients with chronic diseases; their current interaction with community pharmacists; and potential collaborative strategies to promote medication adherence. RESULTS The response rate was 39.4%. Approximately 75% of the physicians acknowledged that nonadherence to chronic medications was a problem among their patients. Medication costs and side effects were identified as the 2 most common reasons for medication nonadherence. Only one-quarter of physicians communicated regularly with community pharmacists about adherence issues; most of these physicians were rural physicians. Most physicians agreed that increased collaboration with pharmacists would improve adherence, although support for potential interactions with pharmacists varied. Concerns were expressed about time required by physicians and financial reimbursement. Physicians in practice for less than 10 years and those practising in rural areas were more willing to share clinical information and communicate with pharmacists to promote medication adherence. CONCLUSION Saskatchewan family physicians appreciate the importance of medication nonadherence but currently seldom interact with community pharmacists on this issue. They believe that pharmacists have a role in supporting patients with medication adherence and indicate a willingness

  20. The use of recommended communication techniques by Maryland family physicians and pediatricians.

    PubMed

    Weatherspoon, Darien J; Horowitz, Alice M; Kleinman, Dushanka V; Wang, Min Qi

    2015-01-01

    Health literacy experts and the American Medical Association have developed recommended communication techniques for healthcare providers given that effective communication has been shown to greatly improve health outcomes. The purpose of this study was to determine the number and types of communication techniques routinely used by Maryland physicians. In 2010, a 30-item survey was mailed to a random sample of 1,472 Maryland family physicians and pediatricians, with 294 surveys being returned and usable. The survey contained questions about provider and practice characteristics, and 17 items related to communication techniques, including seven basic communication techniques. Physicians' use of recommended communication techniques was analyzed using descriptive statistics, analysis of variance, and ordinary least squares regression. Family physicians routinely used an average of 6.6 of the 17 total techniques and 3.3 of the seven basic techniques, whereas pediatricians routinely used 6.4 and 3.2 techniques, respectively. The use of simple language was the only technique that nearly all physicians routinely utilized (Family physicians, 91%; Pediatricians, 93%). Physicians who had taken a communications course used significantly more techniques than those who had not. Physicians with a low percentage of patients on Medicaid were significantly less likely to use the recommended communication techniques compared to those providers who had high proportion of their patient population on Medicaid. Overall, the use of recommended communication techniques was low. Additionally, many physicians were unsure of the effectiveness of several of the recommended techniques, which could suggest that physicians are unaware of valuable skills that could enhance their communication. The findings of this study suggest that communications training should be given a higher priority in the medical training process in the United States.

  1. [Effectiveness of dermatologic minor surgery in the office of the family physician and patient satisfaction in relation with ambulatory surgery].

    PubMed

    Arribas Blanco, J M; Gil Sanz, M E; Sanz Rodrigo, C; Morón Merchante, I; Muñoz-Quirós Aliaga, S; Lòpez Romero, A; González-Baylín Monje, M L; Laguna Delgado, L; Verdugo Rosado, M

    1996-12-07

    The minor surgery by family physicians increase the primary care competences. The purpose of this work is to prove patients' satisfaction and minor surgery effectiveness practiced by family physicians in health centers with respect to ambulatory's general surgeon. Case-control retrospective study, comparing dermatological surgical procedures performed by 4 family physicians and 8 3rd-year Family Physician residents with surgical procedures wade made by a surgeon over one a year period. Variables analysed include: descriptive samples homogeneity, surgery effectiveness (waiting time, esthetic results, healing time and number of visits, and histopathologic correlation) and patients' satisfaction (with the waiting time, with the results of surgery and with the physician). Minor surgical procedures carried out by 146 family physicians and 61 general surgeons were compared, in congruence with the analyzed descriptive homogeneity's parameters. Family physicians average waiting time was the lower, with a mean of 45 days less than the surgeon. Patient's satisfaction with the physician was higher when family physician were involved (p < 0.001); the same could be applied for the waiting time (p < 0.001). There were no significant differences over the effectiveness and patients' satisfaction. The dermatologic minor surgery by family physician is effective, satisfactory for patients, and has less waiting time. This results justify the introduction of minor surgery in the family physicians office.

  2. THE INTERNET AND THE WORLD WIDE WEB: APPLICATIONS FOR FAMILY PHYSICIANS IN SAUDI ARABIA

    PubMed Central

    Sebiany, Abdulaziz M.

    2001-01-01

    The introduction of the World Wide Web has revolutionized the applications of the computer and the Internet in the medical field. The Web provides an easy and cost-effective way of retrieving medical information and a more flexible way of communicating with patients and colleagues. Family practice is a specialty in which care is given to persons as individuals and members of families regardless of their age, gender or specific problems. To provide quality family practice, a family physician should be a good communicator, a critical thinker, a resource and information manager, a life-long learner, a care giver and a community advocate. Providing such high quality care requires that family practice be an information-sensitive specialty. However, the expansion of the new electronic resources on the Internet and the Web poses a real challenge to the family physician. Family physician in Saudi Arabia need to have basic skills and knowledge for easily retrieving and finding reliable Internet information for his professional development and the care of his patients. This article addresses the Web applications for family physicians in Saudi Arabia, giving examples of the most important Websites. PMID:23008644

  3. The Tertiary Care Medical Center as a Training Ground for Family Physicians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheets, Kent J.; Doherty, Mary K.

    This document reports on a study of influences on the choice of family practice as a medical speciality in a setting in which primary care is not stressed. The study surveyed 392 alumni of the University of Michigan Medical School who graduated between 1950 and 1984 and were members of the American Academy of Family Physicians and/or were…

  4. A proposal for the curriculum and evaluation for training rural family physicians in enhanced surgical skills

    PubMed Central

    Caron, Nadine; Iglesias, Stuart; Friesen, Randall; Berjat, Vanessa; Humber, Nancy; Falk, Ryan; Prins, Mark; Haines, Victoria Vogt; Geller, Brian; Janke, Fred; Woollard, Robert; Batchelor, Bret; Van Bussel, Jared

    2015-01-01

    Summary Rural western Canada relies heavily on family physicians with enhanced surgical skills (ESS) for surgical services. The recent decision by the College of Family Physicians of Canada (CFPC) to recognize ESS as a “community of practice” section offers a potential home akin to family practice anesthesia and emergency medicine. To our knowledge, however, a skill set for ESS in Canada has never been described formally. In this paper the Curriculum Committee of the National ESS Working Group proposes a generic curriculum for the training and evaluation of the ESS skill set. PMID:26574835

  5. More Comprehensive Care Among Family Physicians is Associated with Lower Costs and Fewer Hospitalizations

    PubMed Central

    Bazemore, Andrew; Petterson, Stephen; Peterson, Lars E.; Phillips, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE Comprehensiveness is lauded as 1 of the 5 core virtues of primary care, but its relationship with outcomes is unclear. We measured associations between variations in comprehensiveness of practice among family physicians and healthcare utilization and costs for their Medicare beneficiaries. METHODS We merged data from 2011 Medicare Part A and B claims files for a complex random sample of family physicians engaged in direct patient care, including 100% of their claimed care of Medicare beneficiaries, with data reported by the same physicians during their participation in Maintenance of Certification for Family Physicians (MC-FP) between the years 2007 and 2011. We created a measure of comprehensiveness from mandatory self-reported survey items as part of MC-FP examination registration. We compared this measure to another derived from Medicare’s Berenson-Eggers Type of Service (BETOS) codes. We then examined the association between the 2 measures of comprehensiveness and hospitalizations, Part B payments, and combined Part A and B payments. RESULTS Our full family physician sample consists of 3,652 physicians providing the plurality of care to 555,165 Medicare beneficiaries. Of these, 1,133 recertified between 2007 and 2011 and cared for 185,044 beneficiaries. There was a modest correlation (0.30) between the BETOS and self-reported comprehensiveness measures. After adjusting for beneficiary and physician characteristics, increasing comprehensiveness was associated with lower total Medicare Part A and B costs and Part B costs alone, but not with hospitalizations; the association with spending was stronger for the BETOS measure than for the self-reported measure; higher BETOS scores significantly reduced the likelihood of a hospitalization. CONCLUSIONS Increasing family physician comprehensiveness of care, especially as measured by claims measures, is associated with decreasing Medicare costs and hospitalizations. Payment and practice policies that enhance

  6. Effect of communication style and physician-family relationships on satisfaction with pediatric chronic disease care.

    PubMed

    Swedlund, Matthew P; Schumacher, Jayna B; Young, Henry N; Cox, Elizabeth D

    2012-01-01

    Over 8% of children have a chronic disease and many are unable to adhere to treatment. Satisfaction with chronic disease care can impact adherence. We examine how visit satisfaction is associated with physician communication style and ongoing physician-family relationships. We collected surveys and visit videos for 75 children ages 9-16 years visiting for asthma, diabetes, or sickle cell disease management. Raters assessed physician communication style (friendliness, interest, responsiveness, and dominance) from visit videos. Quality of the ongoing relationship was measured with four survey items (parent-physician relationship, child-physician relationship, comfort asking questions, and trust in the physician), while a single item assessed satisfaction. Correlations and chi square were used to assess association of satisfaction with communication style or quality of the ongoing relationship. Satisfaction was positively associated with physician to parent (p < 0.05) friendliness. Satisfaction was also associated with the quality of the ongoing parent-physician (p < 0.001) and child-physician relationships (p < 0.05), comfort asking questions (p < 0.001), and trust (p < 0.01). This shows that both the communication style and the quality of the ongoing relationship contribute to pediatric chronic disease visit satisfaction.

  7. GOSPEL 3: Management of gout by primary-care physicians and office-based rheumatologists in France in the early 21st century - comparison with 2006 EULAR Recommendations.

    PubMed

    Goossens, Julia; Lancrenon, Sylvie; Lanz, Sabine; Ea, Hang-Korng; Lambert, Charles; Guggenbuhl, Pascal; Saraux, Alain; Delva, Catherine; Sahbane, Samy; Lioté, Frédéric

    2017-07-01

    In 2006, recommendations about the management of gout were issued by the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR). The objective of this work was to compare these recommendations to practice patterns of physicians working in private practices in France. In a prospective multicenter nationwide study conducted in France, a random sample of primary-care physicians (PCPs) and private-practice rheumatologists (PPRs) was taken in 2009. Each physician included 2 consecutive patients with gout. Each patient was evaluated twice at an interval of 3-6months. Information on EULAR 2006 management modalities were collected in a standardized manner. Of 1003 patients, 771 were evaluated twice. Allopurinol was prescribed to 75.1% of patients in all and was initiated at the first study visit in 44 patients, among whom 19 (43.2%) 19 patients received the recommended starting dosage of 100mg/day. Colchicine therapy to prevent flares was prescribed to 74.3% of patients. Of the 522 patients on allopurinol therapy at the first visit, only 34.5% had serum uric acid levels≤360μmoL/L (mean dosage, 173 mg/day). Excessive dietary intake by patients who were overweight or obese was recorded in 31.5% of patients seen by PCPs and in 19.7% of those seen by OBRs. This finding prompted the delivery of nutritional advice to 45.8% of patients. Discontinuation of excessive alcohol intake was recommended to only 10% of patients. Diuretic therapy discontinuation was feasible in 175 patients but was recommended in only 7 patients. Differences between practice patterns and 2006 EULAR recommendations were identified. Simplifying the recommendations and teaching them during medical training and continued medical education may deserve consideration. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  8. Collaborative approaches to patient education in the family physician's office.

    PubMed

    Hankey, T L; Elandt, N J

    1988-12-01

    The collaboration of a doctor and nurse in a solo family practice provides a model for implementation of various modalities of patient education. This requires an integrated approach in which patient education becomes part of the routine visit. The impediments and advantages of solo family practice with respect to delivering patient education are discussed. The importance of continuity of care is emphasized. Fifteen "practical tips" for successful patient education in this setting are offered so that they may be reproduced elsewhere.

  9. Does having regular care by a family physician improve preventive care?

    PubMed Central

    McIsaac, W. J.; Fuller-Thomson, E.; Talbot, Y.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess whether regular care from a family physician is associated with receiving preventive services. DESIGN: Secondary analysis of the 1994 National Population Health Survey. SETTING: Cross-sectional sample of the Canadian population. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 15,731 non-institutionalized adults. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Reported visits to general practitioners and specialists in the previous year and reports of having had blood pressure measurements, mammography, and Pap smears. RESULTS: A graded relationship was observed between level of regular care by a family physician in the previous year (none, some, regular) and receiving preventive services. Those without regular doctors and those reporting only some care by a family physician were less likely to have ever had their blood pressure checked than adults receiving ongoing care from a regular family physician. Women reporting some or no care were less likely to have had mammography within 2 years or to have ever had Pap smears. CONCLUSION: Adults who receive regular care from a family physician are more likely to receive recommended preventive services. PMID:11212436

  10. Family Physicians' Satisfaction with Current Practice: What Is the Role of Their Interactions with Specialists?

    PubMed Central

    Thind, Amardeep; Freeman, Tom; Thorpe, Cathy; Burt, Andrea; Stewart, Moira

    2009-01-01

    Provision of high-quality care sometimes necessitates a referral to, and receipt of timely feedback from, specialist physicians. Interaction with specialists is a key role of family physicians, but it has not received significant attention with respect to its impact on family physician satisfaction. The authors conducted a cross-sectional analysis of data gathered from a decennial census of family physicians in southwestern Ontario. The conceptual framework was based on the model developed by the Society of General Internal Medicine (SGIM) Career Satisfaction Work Group. More than two-thirds of respondents were “very satisfied” with their current practice. Stepwise regression analysis based on a generalized linear model showed that greater difficulty in referring patients to specialists was associated with 23% lower odds of being “very satisfied”. Not receiving a timely response from specialists was associated with 26% higher odds of not being “very satisfied.” Marital status, teaching involvement and practice volume were also associated with satisfaction. The findings indicate that the practice of family medicine offers a fulfilling career in today's medical marketplace. However, linkages and feedback between family physicians and specialists need to be augmented. PMID:19377349

  11. In for the long haul. Which family physicians plan to continue delivering babies?

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Michael C.; Kelly, Ann; Spence, Andrea; Kaczorowski, Janusz; Grzybowski, Stefan

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare characteristics of family physicians planning to discontinue or stay in intrapartum care. DESIGN: Self-administered questionnaire. SETTING: Department of Family Practice at Children's and Women's Health Centre of British Columbia. PARTICIPANTS: Ninety-five family physicians who attended at least one birth at the Health Centre between April 1997 and August 1998. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Intention to leave or stay in family practice maternity care, physician characteristics and beliefs. RESULTS: Forty-five percent (43/95) of family physicians planned to leave maternity care within the next 5 years. Physicians planning to leave had more negative attitudes about the alternative birthing centre, doulas, and practising in free-standing settings without on-site obstetricians; were more likely to report missing personal events because they had put their maternity patients first; were less likely to make housecalls during women's labour; and were more likely to be paid through fee-for-service. CONCLUSION: Being paid by fee-for-service, having negative attitudes toward non-traditional maternity care, and conflict between maternity care and personal life were associated with intention to leave intrapartum care. PMID:12166012

  12. Dialogues in the exam room: medical interviewing by resident family physicians.

    PubMed

    Marvel, K; Major, G; Jones, K; Pfaffly, C

    2000-10-01

    Limited information exists about the application of the biopsychosocial model in medical practice. This study expanded our knowledge about the extent to which psychosocial content is included in medical interviews conducted by resident family physicians. Interviews of 180 patients conducted by six second-year family practice residents were audiotaped and transcribed. Physician statements were analyzed and coded as social talk, physician-centered statements, patient-centered statements, and discussion of patient affect, family, health promotion, and patient education. The proportion of interviews in which specific physician interactions occurred were physician-centered statements: 100%, patient-centered statements: 66%, dealing with patient affect: 18%, information about family: 61%, initiation of health promotion: 33%, and initiation of patient education: 46%. Discussions of patient opinion/perception, patient affect, family information, and health promotion occurred most commonly during well-care visits and with female patients. In this sample of residents, providers extended the interview beyond a purely biomedical focus. However, the psychosocial focus often was brief and applied inconsistently across patients.

  13. The Use of Recommended Communication Techniques by Maryland Family Physicians and Pediatricians

    PubMed Central

    Weatherspoon, Darien J.; Horowitz, Alice M.; Kleinman, Dushanka V.; Wang, Min Qi

    2015-01-01

    Background Health literacy experts and the American Medical Association have developed recommended communication techniques for healthcare providers given that effective communication has been shown to greatly improve health outcomes. The purpose of this study was to determine the number and types of communication techniques routinely used by Maryland physicians. Methods In 2010, a 30-item survey was mailed to a random sample of 1,472 Maryland family physicians and pediatricians, with 294 surveys being returned and usable. The survey contained questions about provider and practice characteristics, and 17 items related to communication techniques, including seven basic communication techniques. Physicians’ use of recommended communication techniques was analyzed using descriptive statistics, analysis of variance, and ordinary least squares regression. Results Family physicians routinely used an average of 6.6 of the 17 total techniques and 3.3 of the seven basic techniques, whereas pediatricians routinely used 6.4 and 3.2 techniques, respectively. The use of simple language was the only technique that nearly all physicians routinely utilized (Family physicians, 91%; Pediatricians, 93%). Physicians who had taken a communications course used significantly more techniques than those who had not. Physicians with a low percentage of patients on Medicaid were significantly less likely to use the recommended communication techniques compared to those providers who had high proportion of their patient population on Medicaid. Conclusions Overall, the use of recommended communication techniques was low. Additionally, many physicians were unsure of the effectiveness of several of the recommended techniques, which could suggest that physicians are unaware of valuable skills that could enhance their communication. The findings of this study suggest that communications training should be given a higher priority in the medical training process in the United States. PMID:25856371

  14. [Zurich physician-pharmacist family Lavater and Johann Wolfgang von Goethe].

    PubMed

    Mannetstätter, A; Friedrich, C

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the connections between Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832) and the physician and pharmacist family Lavater in Zurich. The analysis of the correspondence between Johann Bartholomäus Trommsdorff (1770-1837) and the Lavater family and between the Lavater family and the government of the duchy of Weimar shows an interesting story about a picture "Goethe in Italy".

  15. Are family physicians the answer to ED doctor shortage, or 'blasphemy'?

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    Some organizations maintain that family physicians have the skills and training necessary to practice in the ED and help combat the current physician shortage, while others maintain their training is inadequate. Here are some issues to take into consideration with such candidates: Have they obtained thorough experience the necessary skills to practice in the ED? Have they received a significant amount of clinical training in an ED? Has their training progress been monitored by a teaching attending?

  16. When cultures clash: physician, patient, and family wishes in truth disclosure for dying patients.

    PubMed

    Lapine, A; Wang-Cheng, R; Goldstein, M; Nooney, A; Lamb, G; Derse, A R

    2001-01-01

    We describe two cases involving male foreign nationals (a Chinese and a Georgian) treated in a U.S. hospital. Both patients had terminal illnesses, and both cases involved clashes between families and the treating physicians, which occurred because of differing cultural beliefs about truth disclosure. Based on the specific backgrounds of these two patients, we discuss ethical and cultural considerations and make suggestions for physicians who care for ethnically diverse patients.

  17. Survey of general practitioner, family physician, and chiropractor's beliefs regarding the management of acute whiplash patients.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Robert; Russell, Anthony Science

    2004-10-01

    Questionnaire Survey. The purpose of this study was to survey the whiplash management beliefs for practicing general practitioners, family physicians, and chiropractors. Many treatments are prescribed by general practitioners, family physicians, and chiropractors for acute whiplash, but to date no survey of management beliefs for acute whiplash has been reported. A total of 483 physicians and 123 chiropractors in the urban setting of Edmonton, Alberta, Canada were asked to participate by completing a questionnaire with 24 items designed to assess management beliefs regarding acute whiplash. A total of 362 physicians (75%) and 88 chiropractors (72%) completed the survey. Only 1% of physicians and none of the chiropractors believed that whiplash patients should be prescribed bed rest until almost all their pain goes away. As well, only 1% of physicians and none of the chiropractors believed that patients with acute whiplash should not return to work until almost all their pain goes away. More than 89% of physicians and 76% of chiropractors believed that encouragement of maintaining normal activities, even if they hurt, is important in the recovery from whiplash. Also, 91% of physicians and 84% of chiropractors agreed that exercise therapy was effective in acute whiplash patients. Physicians are more likely to have negative feelings about treating patients who have whiplash, were more likely to believe there was nothing physically wrong with many patients with chronic whiplash, and agree that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and muscle relaxants are effective in acute whiplash. Chiropractors are more likely to agree that traction, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, manipulation, massage, and acupuncture are effective in acute whiplash. Physicians and chiropractors generally hold beliefs that are consistent with the current evidence regarding the most helpful approaches to acute whiplash, although chiropractors were more likely to be supportive of passive

  18. "Sometimes I feel overwhelmed": educational needs of family physicians caring for people with intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Joanne; Dreyfus, Deborah; Cerreto, Mary; Bokhour, Barbara

    2012-06-01

    Primary care physicians who care for adults with intellectual disability often lack experience with the population, and patients with intellectual disability express dissatisfaction with their care. Establishing a secure primary care relationship is particularly important for adults with intellectual disability, who experience health disparities and may rely on their physician to direct/coordinate their care. The authors conducted semistructured interviews with 22 family physicians with the goal of identifying educational needs of family physicians who care for people with intellectual disability. Interviews were transcribed and coded using tools from grounded theory. Several themes related to educational needs were identified. Physician participants identified themes of "operating without a map," discomfort with patients with intellectual disability, and a need for more exposure to/experience with people with intellectual disability as important content areas. The authors also identified physician frustration and lack of confidence, compounded by anxiety related to difficult behaviors and a lack of context or frame of reference for patients with intellectual disability. Primary care physicians request some modification of their educational experience to better equip them to care for patients with intellectual disability. Their request for experiential, not theoretical, learning fits well under the umbrella of cultural competence (a required competency in U.S. medical education).

  19. Continuing educational needs in computers and informatics. McGill survey of family physicians.

    PubMed Central

    McClaran, J.; Snell, L.; Duarte-Franco, E.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe family physicians' perceived educational needs in computers and informatics. DESIGN: Mailed survey. SETTING: General or family practices in Canada. PARTICIPANTS: Physicians (489 responded to a mailing sent to 2,500 physicians) who might attend sessions at the McGill Centre for CME. Two duplicate questionnaires were excluded from the analysis. METHOD: Four domains were addressed: practice profile, clinical CME needs, professional CME needs, and preferred learning formats. Data were entered on dBASE IV; analyses were performed on SPSS. MAIN FINDINGS: In the 487 questionnaires retained for analysis, "informatics and computers" was mentioned more than any other clinical diagnostic area, any other professional area, and all but three patient groups and service areas as a topic where improvement in knowledge and skills was needed in the coming year. Most physicians had no access to computer support for practice (62.6%); physicians caring for neonates, toddlers, or hospital inpatients were more likely to report some type of computer support. CONCLUSIONS: Family physicians selected knowledge and skills for computers and informatics as an area for improvement in the coming year more frequently than they selected most traditional clinical CME topics. This educational need is particularly great in small towns and in settings where some computerized hospital data are already available. PMID:10790816

  20. Satisfaction and Dissatisfaction Toward Urban Family Physician Program: A Population Based Study in Shiraz, Southern Iran

    PubMed Central

    Honarvar, Behnam; Lankarani, Kamran Bagheri; Ghahramani, Sulmaz; Akbari, Maryam; Tabrizi, Reza; Bagheri, Zahra; Poostforoushfard, Sima

    2016-01-01

    Background: A national project of extending a family physician program to urban areas has been started since May 2013 in Iran. The present study aimed to detect correlates of people's satisfaction and dissatisfaction about urban family physician program. Methods: This cross-sectional and population-based study was conducted in Shiraz, Southern Iran. Multistage and proportional to size random sampling were used. Different items about satisfaction and dissatisfaction toward urban family physician program were queried. Single variable and then multiple variable analyses of data were done using SPSS software (Chicago, IL. USA). Results: Mean age of 1257 participants in the study was 38.1 ± 13.2 years. Respondents included men (634; 50.4%), married (882; 70.2%), those who were educated at universities (529; 42%) and self-employed groups (405; 32.2%). One thousand fifty-eight (84.1%) were covered by the family physician program. Mean of referral times to a family physician was 2.2 ± 2.9 during the year before the study. Satisfaction toward urban family physician program was high in 198 (15.8%), moderate in 394 (31.3%), and low in 391 (31.1%). Dissatisfaction about this program was more among younger than 51-year-old groups (for 31–50 years odds ratio [OR] =2.3, 95% confidence interval [CI] =1.4–3.7, P < 0.001 and for 18–30 years OR = 2, 95% CI = 1.2–3.4, P = 0.005), less knowledgeable ones (OR = 2.2, 95% CI = 1.3–3.6, P = 0.001), singles (OR = 2.1, 95% CI = 1.2–3.4, P = 0.003), and those with more than 4 of family members (OR = 1.3, 95% CI = 1–1.7, P = 0.05). Conclusions: Overall, the majority of the people are not very satisfied with the urban family physician program. This shows the need for a multi-disciplinary approach including training, improvement of infrastructures and referral system, continuous supervision, and frequent monitoring of user's and provider's feedback about this program. According the results, the family physician program should be

  1. Effectiveness of "primary bereavement care" for widows: a cluster randomized controlled trial involving family physicians.

    PubMed

    García, Jesús A; Landa, Victor; Grandes, Gonzalo; Pombo, Haizea; Mauriz, Amaia

    2013-04-01

    Thirty-one family physicians, from 19 primary care teams in Biscay (Spain), were randomly assigned to intervention or control group. The 75 intervention family physicians, after training in primary bereavement care, saw 43 widows for 7 sessions, from the 4th to 13th month after their loss. The 16 control family physicians, without primary bereavement care training, saw 44 widows for 7 ordinary appointments, with the same schedule. Outcome measures were collected at 4, 10, 16, and 24 months after the loss. A linear mixed model was used. No significant differences were found in favor of the intervention group on grief and indeed control group widows experienced more improvement in somatisation, general health, and general emotional outcomes.

  2. Rural Women Family Physicians: Strategies for Successful Work-Life Balance.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Julie; Hustedde, Carol; Bjorkman, Sarah; Prasad, Rupa; Sola, Orlando; Wendling, Andrea; Bjorkman, Kurt; Paladine, Heather

    2016-05-01

    Women family physicians experience challenges in maintaining work-life balance while practicing in rural communities. We sought to better understand the personal and professional strategies that enable women in rural family medicine to balance work and personal demands and achieve long-term career satisfaction. Women family physicians practicing in rural communities in the United States were interviewed using a semistructured format. Interviews were recorded, professionally transcribed, and analyzed using an immersion and crystallization approach, followed by detailed coding of emergent themes. The 25 participants described a set of strategies that facilitated successful work-life balance. First, they used reduced or flexible work hours to help achieve balance with personal roles. Second, many had supportive relationships with spouses and partners, parents, or other members of the community, which facilitated their ability to be readily available to their patients. Third, participants maintained clear boundaries around their work lives, which helped them to have adequate time for parenting, recreation, and rest. Women family physicians can build successful careers in rural communities, but supportive employers, relationships, and patient approaches provide a foundation for this success. Educators, employers, communities, and policymakers can adapt their practices to help women family physicians thrive in rural communities. © 2016 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc.

  3. Family physicians' perception of plastic surgery and its influence on referral. A survey from Poland.

    PubMed

    Antoszewski, Boguslaw; Kardas, Przemyslaw; Kasielska, Anna; Fijalkowska, Marta

    2012-03-01

    Inadequate family physicians' knowledge of plastic surgery might be a barrier for patients to benefit from plastic surgery treatments reimbursed by the Polish National Health Service (NHS). The aim of this study was to assess family physicians' awareness of the indications for plastic surgery, and their knowledge of conditions that are treated without extra costs for the patient in plastic surgery outpatient clinics (OCs). An e-mail survey was carried out in a group of 100 out of 378 randomly selected primary care doctors currently practicing in Lodz, central Poland. Respondents were asked to fill in a questionnaire, which contained questions about conditions with reimbursed treatments in plastic surgery OCs. We also provided them with a list of diseases and asked them to which OC they would refer a patient in such case. 58 primary care physicians responded: 30 specialists in family medicine and 28 residents in the final year of their specialization in family medicine. Respondents had good knowledge of the range of conditions managed in plastic surgery OCs. They were also aware of most of the medical procedures not being reimbursed by the Polish NHS. However, some indications for plastic surgery as well as the free availability of relevant medical procedures were known by less than half of the respondents (e.g. lipoma 47%, gynaecomastia 28%, and xanthelasma palpebrarum 16%). To improve collaboration between plastic surgeons and family physicians basic information regarding plastic surgery might be included in residency programmes in family medicine.

  4. Email communication in a developing country: different family physician and patient perspectives.

    PubMed

    Makarem, Nisrine N; Antoun, Jumana

    2016-01-01

    Background Email communication between physicians and patients could improve access to and delivery of health care. Most of the literature studies about email communication between physicians and patients have been conducted in developing countries. Therefore, this study aims to analyze the practices, attitudes, and barriers of both physicians' and patients' use of email within the same health care setting of a developing country. Methods A cross-sectional paper-based survey was conducted among 39 physicians and 500 patients at the Family Medicine clinics of the American University of Beirut, a tertiary academic medical center. Results Most of the surveyed patients and physicians reported that they would like to communicate through email and agreed that it is useful. However, only 19% of the patients have ever communicated with their physicians via email, and only 5.1% of physicians have often communicated with their patients via email. Almost half of the patients surveyed were unaware of the possibility of this form of communication, and only 17% reported that their physician offered them his or her email address. In addition, physicians and patients did not agree on the services to be provided by email communication. For instance, almost half of the patients indicated consultation for an urgent medical matter as suitable for email communication. Conclusion The use of email communication in health care is still scarce. Patients and physicians have different perspectives of its use and importance. Further rigorous research is needed to clarify the advantages and disadvantages of this form of communication, especially in the developing world. Interested physicians are encouraged to establish appropriate personal policies for email communication with adequate announcement and patient education plans.

  5. Email communication in a developing country: different family physician and patient perspectives.

    PubMed

    Makarem, Nisrine N; Antoun, Jumana

    2016-01-01

    Email communication between physicians and patients could improve access to and delivery of health care. Most of the literature studies about email communication between physicians and patients have been conducted in developing countries. Therefore, this study aims to analyze the practices, attitudes, and barriers of both physicians' and patients' use of email within the same health care setting of a developing country. A cross-sectional paper-based survey was conducted among 39 physicians and 500 patients at the Family Medicine clinics of the American University of Beirut, a tertiary academic medical center. Most of the surveyed patients and physicians reported that they would like to communicate through email and agreed that it is useful. However, only 19% of the patients have ever communicated with their physicians via email, and only 5.1% of physicians have often communicated with their patients via email. Almost half of the patients surveyed were unaware of the possibility of this form of communication, and only 17% reported that their physician offered them his or her email address. In addition, physicians and patients did not agree on the services to be provided by email communication. For instance, almost half of the patients indicated consultation for an urgent medical matter as suitable for email communication. The use of email communication in health care is still scarce. Patients and physicians have different perspectives of its use and importance. Further rigorous research is needed to clarify the advantages and disadvantages of this form of communication, especially in the developing world. Interested physicians are encouraged to establish appropriate personal policies for email communication with adequate announcement and patient education plans.

  6. Families, patients, and physicians in medical decisionmaking: a Pakistani perspective.

    PubMed

    Moazam, F

    2000-01-01

    In Pakistan, as in many non-Western cultures, decisions about a patient's health care are often made by the family or the doctor. For doctors educated in the West, the Pakistani approach requires striking a balance between preserving indigenous values and carving out room for patients to participate in their medical decisions. (HCR)

  7. Factors Impacting Transgender Patients’ Discomfort with Their Family Physicians: A Respondent-Driven Sampling Survey

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Greta R.; Zong, Xuchen; Scheim, Ayden I.; Hammond, Rebecca; Thind, Amardeep

    2015-01-01

    Background Representing approximately 0.5% of the population, transgender (trans) persons in Canada depend on family physicians for both general and transition-related care. However, physicians receive little to no training on this patient population, and trans patients are often profoundly uncomfortable and may avoid health care. This study examined factors associated with patient discomfort discussing trans health issues with a family physician in Ontario, Canada. Methods 433 trans people age 16 and over were surveyed using respondent-driven sampling for the Trans PULSE Project; 356 had a family physician. Weighted logistic regression models were fit to produce prevalence risk ratios (PRRs) via average marginal predictions, for transmasculine (n = 184) and transfeminine (n = 172) trans persons. Results Among the 83.1% (95% CI = 77.4, 88.9) of trans Ontarians who had a family physician, approximately half reported discomfort discussing trans health issues. 37.2% of transmasculine and 38.1% of transfeminine persons reported at least one trans-specific negative experience. In unadjusted analysis, sociodemographics did not predict discomfort, but those who planned to medically transition sex, but had not begun, were more likely to report discomfort (transmasculine: PRR = 2.62 (95% CI = 1.44, 4.77); transfeminine: PRR = 1.85 (95% CI = 1.08, 3.15)). Adjusted for other factors, greater perceived physician knowledge about trans issues was associated with reduced likelihood of discomfort, and previous trans-specific negative experiences with a family physician with increased discomfort. Transfeminine persons who reported three or more types of negative experiences were 2.26 times as likely, and transmasculine persons 1.61 times as likely, to report discomfort. In adjusted analyses, sociodemographic associations differed by gender, with being previously married or having higher education associated with increased risk of discomfort among transfeminine persons, but

  8. Advantages and disadvantages of educational email alerts for family physicians: viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Badran, Hani; Pluye, Pierre; Grad, Roland

    2015-02-27

    Electronic knowledge resources constitute an important channel for accredited Continuing Medical Education (CME) activities. However, email usage for educational purposes is controversial. On the one hand, family physicians become aware of new information, confirm what they already know, and obtain reassurance by reading educational email alerts. Email alerts can also encourage physicians to search Web-based resources. On the other hand, technical difficulties and privacy issues are common obstacles. The purpose of this discussion paper, informed by a literature review and a small qualitative study, was to understand family physicians' knowledge, attitudes, and behavior in regard to email in general and educational emails in particular, and to explore the advantages and disadvantages of educational email alerts. In addition, we documented participants' suggestions to improve email alert services for CME. We conducted a qualitative descriptive study using the "Knowledge, Attitude, Behavior" model. We conducted semi-structured face-to-face interviews with 15 family physicians. We analyzed the collected data using inductive-deductive thematic qualitative data analysis. All 15 participants scanned and prioritized their email, and 13 of them checked their email daily. Participants mentioned (1) advantages of educational email alerts such as saving time, convenience and valid information, and (2) disadvantages such as an overwhelming number of emails and irrelevance. They offered suggestions to improve educational email. The advantages of email alerts seem to compensate for their disadvantages. Suggestions proposed by family physicians can help to improve educational email alerts.

  9. How are family physicians managing osteoporosis? Qualitative study of their experiences and educational needs.

    PubMed Central

    Jaglal, Susan B.; Carroll, June; Hawker, Gillian; McIsaac, Warren J.; Jaakkimainen, Liisa; Cadarette, Suzanne M.; Cameron, Cathy; Davis, Dave

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore family physicians' experiences and perceptions of osteoporosis and to identify their educational needs in this area. DESIGN: Qualitative study using focus groups. SETTING: Four Ontario sites: one each in Thunder Bay and Timmins, and two in Toronto, chosen to represent a range of practice sizes, populations, locations, and use of bone densitometry. PARTICIPANTS: Thirty-two FPs participated in four focus groups. Physicians were identified by investigators or local contacts to provide maximum variation sampling. METHOD: Focus groups using a semistructured interview guide were audiotaped and transcribed. The constant comparative method of data analysis was used to identify key words and concepts until saturation of themes was reached. MAIN FINDINGS: Family physicians order bone densitometry and try to manage osteoporosis appropriately, but lack a rationale for testing and are confused about management. Participants' main concern was clinical management, followed by disease prevention and their educational needs. CONCLUSION: Family physicians are confused about how to manage osteoporosis. To reduce the burden of illness due to osteoporosis, educational interventions should be tailored to family physicians' needs. PMID:12729242

  10. The attitudes of family physicians toward a child with delayed growth and development.

    PubMed

    Aker, Servet; Şahin, Mustafa Kürşat; Kınalı, Ömer; Şimşek Karadağ, Elif; Korkmaz, Tuğba

    2017-09-01

    Aim The purpose of this study was to assess the attitude of family physicians toward a child with delayed growth and development. Primary healthcare professionals play a key role in monitoring growth and development, the best indicator of the child's health status. If delayed growth and development can be detected early, then it is usually possible to restore functioning. This descriptive study was performed in Samsun, Turkey, in May and June 2015. In total, 325 family physicians were included. The study consisted of two parts. In the first session of the research, the story of an 18-month-old child with delayed growth and development was presented using visual materials. An interview between the child's mother and a member of primary healthcare staff was then enacted by two of the authors using role-playing. Subsequently, participants were given the opportunity to ask the mother and member of primary healthcare staff questions about the case. During the sessions, two observers observed the participants, took notes and compared these after the presentation. In the second part of the study, the participants were asked to complete a questionnaire consisting of three open-ended questions. Findings When asking questions of the mother, family physicians generally used accusatory and judgmental language. One of the questions most commonly put to the mother was 'Do you think you are a good mother?' Family physicians were keen to provide instruction for the patient and relatives. Family physicians to a large extent thought that the problem of a child with delayed growth and development can be resolved through education. Family physicians' manner of establishing relations with the patient and relatives is inappropriate. We therefore think that they should receive on-going in-service training on the subject.

  11. Perspectives of family medicine physicians on the importance of adolescent preventive care: a multivariate analysis.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Jaime L; Aalsma, Matthew C; Gilbert, Amy L; Hensel, Devon J; Rickert, Vaughn I

    2016-01-20

    The study objective was to identify commonalities amongst family medicine physicians who endorse annual adolescent visits. A nationally weighted representative on-line survey was used to explore pediatrician (N = 204) and family medicine physicians (N = 221) beliefs and behaviors surrounding adolescent wellness. Our primary outcome was endorsement that adolescents should receive annual preventive care visits. Pediatricians were significantly more likely (p < .01) to endorse annual well visits. Among family medicine physicians, bivariate comparisons were conducted between those who endorsed an annual visit (N = 164) compared to those who did not (N = 57) with significant predictors combined into two multivariate logistic regression models. Model 1 controlled for: patient race, proportion of 13-17 year olds in provider's practice, discussion beliefs scale and discussion behaviors with parents scale. Model 2 controlled for the same first three variables as well as discussion behaviors with adolescents scale. Model 1 showed for each discussion beliefs scale topic selected, family medicine physicians had 1.14 increased odds of endorsing annual visits (p < .001) and had 1.11 greater odds of endorsing annual visits with each one-point increase in discussion behaviors with parents scale (p = .51). Model 2 showed for each discussion beliefs scale topic selected, family medicine physicians had 1.15 increased odds of also endorsing the importance of annual visits (p < .001). Family medicine physicians that endorse annual visits are significantly more likely to affirm they hold strong beliefs about topics that should be discussed during the annual exam. They also act on these beliefs by talking to parents of teens about these topics. This group appears to focus on quality of care in thought and deed.

  12. Interviews with primary care physicians regarding taking and interpreting the cancer family history

    PubMed Central

    Stockdale, Alan; Flynn, Brian S

    2008-01-01

    Background. The cancer family history can be used to stratify risk and guide management regarding screening and prevention of cancer. Objective. The current study was designed to gain understanding of specific barriers to obtaining and using the cancer family history for the primary care physician. Methods. Interviews were conducted with structured samples of specialists in family medicine, general internal medicine and gynaecology in three settings in two north-eastern states. A medical anthropologist conducted interviews based on a topical outline; transcripts were systematically analyzed by a research team to identify major themes expressed by participants. Results. Among 40 urban, suburban and rural physicians interviewed, 40% were women and medical school graduation years ranged from 1963 to 2000. These physicians regarded cancer family history as important, but process and content were not standardized. Major barriers to more focused use of this information included limitations of patients’ family history knowledge; time needed to clarify and interpret this information and the lack of clear and accessible guidelines to assist in collection, interpretation and management decisions for average, moderate and higher risk patients. Language and cultural barriers made it more difficult to collect family histories in some populations. Conclusions. Barriers to effective application of cancer family history information included limitations of patients’ family history information; lack of methods to systematically and efficiently focus on the most useful information and lack of accessible guidance for risk stratification and management. Results suggest a need for support addressing these concerns to better utilize several readily available cancer risk management opportunities. PMID:18765407

  13. Patients' and physicians' satisfaction with a pharmacist managed anticoagulation program in a family medicine clinic.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Lisa; Young, Stephanie; Twells, Laurie; Dillon, Carla; Hawboldt, John

    2015-06-09

    A pharmacist managed anticoagulation service was initiated in a multi-physician family medicine clinic in December 2006. In order to determine the patient and physician satisfaction with the service, a study was designed to describe the patients' satisfaction with the warfarin education and management they received from the pharmacist, and to describe the physicians' satisfaction with the level of care provided by the pharmacist for patients taking warfarin. A self-administered survey was completed by both eligible patients receiving warfarin and physicians prescribing warfarin between December 2006 and May 2008. The patient survey collected information on patient demographics, satisfaction with warfarin education and daily warfarin management. The physician survey collected data about the satisfaction with patient education and daily anticoagulation management by the pharmacist. Seventy-six of 94 (81%) patients completed the survey. Fifty-nine percent were male with a mean age of 65 years (range 24-90). Ninety-six percent agreed/strongly agreed the pharmacist did a good job teaching the importance of warfarin adherence, the necessity of INR testing and the risks of bleeding. Eighty-five percent agreed/strongly agreed the risk of blood clots was well explained, 79% felt the pharmacist did a good job teaching about dietary considerations and 77% agreed/strongly agreed the pharmacist explained when to see a doctor. All patients felt the pharmacist gave clear instructions on warfarin dosing and INR testing. Four of nine physicians (44%) completed the survey. All agreed/strongly agreed the pharmacist was competent in the care provided, were confident in the care their patients received, would like the pharmacist to continue the service, and would recommend this program to other clinics. Patients and family physicians were satisfied with the pharmacist managed anticoagulation program and recommended continuation of the program. These results support the role of the

  14. Communication skills of tutors and family medicine physician residents in Primary Care clinics.

    PubMed

    Valverde Bolívar, Francisco Javier; Pedregal González, Miguel; Pérez Fuentes, María Francisca; Alcalde Molina, María Dolores; Torío Durántez, Jesús; Delgado Rodríguez, Miguel

    2016-12-01

    To determine the communicative profiles of family physicians and the characteristics associated with an improved level of communication with the patient. A descriptive multicentre study. Primary Healthcare Centres in Almeria, Granada, Jaen and Huelva. 119 family physicians (tutors and 4th year resident physicians) filmed and observed with patients. Demographic and professional characteristics. Analysis of the communication between physicians and patients, using a CICAA (Connect, Identify, Understand, Agree and Assist, in English) scale. A descriptive, bivariate, multiple linear regression analysis was performed. There were 436 valid interviews. Almost 100% of physicians were polite and friendly, facilitating a dialogue with the patient and allowing them to express their doubts. However, few physicians attempted to explore the state of mind of the patient, or enquire about their family situation or any important stressful events, nor did they ask open questions. Furthermore, few physicians summarised the information gathered. The mean score was 21.43±5.91 points (maximum 58). There were no differences in the total score between gender, city, or type of centre. The linear regression verified that the highest scores were obtained from tutors (B: 2.98), from the duration of the consultations (B: 0.63), and from the age of the professionals (B: -0.1). Physicians excel in terms of creating a friendly environment, possessing good listening skills, and providing the patient with information. However the ability to empathise, exploring the psychosocial sphere, carrying out shared decision-making, and asking open questions must be improved. Being a tutor, devoting more time to consultations, and being younger, results in a significant improvement in communication with the patient. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Take aim and fire again: laboratory investigation and the family physician.

    PubMed

    Emson, H E

    1988-02-01

    This article discusses the attitude of the family physician to laboratory investigation and specifically reviews changes that have taken place in the last 12 years. It focuses on the problems of allocation of limited resources, the planning of laboratory services, out-of-laboratory testing, and responsibility for quality assurance. As well as bearing individual responsibility for the optimal use of a limited resource, the family physician has a co-operative part to exercise in support of the pathologist's role in organizing and planning the service on which their patients depend.

  16. Impact of an electronic link between the emergency department and family physicians: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Eddy; Afilalo, Marc; Vandal, Alain C.; Boivin, Jean-François; Xue, Xiaoqing; Colacone, Antoinette; Léger, Ruth; Shrier, Ian; Rosenthal, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    Background Electronic information exchange is believed to improve efficiency and reduce resource utilization. We developed a Web-based standardized communication system (SCS) that enables family physicians to receive detailed reports of their patients' care in the emergency department. We sought to determine the impact of the SCS on measures of resource utilization in the emergency department and family physician offices. Methods We used an open 4-period crossover cluster-randomized controlled design. During 2 separate 10-week intervention phases, family physicians received detailed reports of their patients' emergency department visits over the Internet, and in the alternating control phases they received a 1-page copy of the emergency department notes by mail. The primary outcome was the number of repeat visits to the emergency department within 14 days of the initial visit. Secondary outcomes included duplication of test and specialty consultation requests by the emergency and family physician. Outcomes were measured using the hospital database and questionnaires sent to the family physicians. Results A total of 2022 patient visits to the emergency department from 23 practices were used in the study. Use of the SCS failed to reduce the number of repeat visits to the emergency department within 14 days (odds ratio [OR] 1.10, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.8–1.51) and 28 days (OR 1.01, 95% CI 0.8–1.27). There was no significant duplication of requests for diagnostic tests between the emergency and family physician during the intervention and control phases (24 v. 22, p = 0.93), but there was significantly greater duplication in specialty consultation requests in the intervention phase than in the control phase (20 v. 8, p = 0.049). Interpretation An electronic link between emergency and family physicians did not result in a significant reduction in resource utilization at either service point. Investments in improved electronic information exchange between

  17. Factors associated with the decision of family physicians to provide intrapartum care.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, L F; Reynolds, J L

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate which characteristics and beliefs of family physicians determine their decision to provide intrapartum care. DESIGN: Confidential survey questionnaire mailed in spring 1993. SETTING: Alberta and Ontario. SUBJECTS: Random selection of 207 physicians who had graduated from medical school between 1953 and 1990 and were thought to be in family or general practice. Of 178 eligible physicians, usable replies were received from 104 (58.4%). OUTCOME MEASURES: Beliefs (measured on a 7-point Likert scale) about the relevance of 16 primary factors to the type of obstetric care provided; demographic, training and practice characteristics. RESULTS: The respondents who provided intrapartum care differed from those who did not in their beliefs about the availability of a local hospital suitable for intrapartum care (p < 0.001), their practice partners' views on the role of family physicians in providing obstetric care (p < 0.002), their own concept of the role of family physicians in providing obstetric care (p < 0.001) and women's views on the type of obstetric care they want (p < 0.002). They also differed, although less significantly, in their beliefs about the adequacy of their obstetric training before entering family practice (p < 0.04), the expected effects of providing obstetric care on their free time (p < 0.006), their fear of malpractice litigation (p < 0.028) and their perceived competence in performing practical obstetric procedures (p < 0.05). Logistic regression analysis revealed that certain secondary factors were particularly relevant to the respondents' provision of intrapartum care at present. These included the physician's perceived competence at managing postpartum maternal hemorrhage (odds ratio [OR] 48.90, 90% confidence interval [CI] 4.70 to 509), the belief that medical insurance premiums should not be affected by the type of obstetric care provided (OR 3.55, 90% CI 1.67 to 7.57]) and the number of practice partners who provided

  18. Should Medical Anthropology be Required for Family Physicians?

    PubMed Central

    Deagle, George L.

    1992-01-01

    The educational preparation of practitioners might change as family medicine shifts its emphasis to a more humanistic approach. Medical anthropology offers particular promise as a training experience. Learning about the role of culture, including beliefs and values surrounding illness, can supplement basic science training. Improved delivery of health care is likely if caregivers are sensitive to cultural dimensions of patients' illnesses. Imagesp1178-ap1179-ap1180-a PMID:21221336

  19. Study of musculoskeletal risks of the office-based surgeries.

    PubMed

    Hermanson, James E; Choi, Sang D

    2012-01-01

    Due to the cost and time benefits associated with patients and physicians, outpatient surgeries continue to become more and more popular over time. With the increase in the number of office-based surgical procedures, the prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs) associated with office-based surgeries has been reported. The purpose of this pilot study is to ergonomically evaluate the risk of work-related musculoskeletal disorders of physicians/surgeons performing office-based surgery (OBS). Ergonomic assessment tools included Questionnaire, the BodyMap and the Rapid Upper Limb Assessment for measuring potential ergonomic concerns. The findings have shown that the ergonomic issues of greatest concerns were the discomforts in the neck, shoulders, arms/wrists, and back. Some additional comments were provided by the participants regarding the duration of discomfort or clarification on the frequency of their body discomfort. This study suggests that there is a considerable risk of musculoskeletal injuries of physicians/surgeons performing the OBS tasks. By properly using the ergonomic assessment techniques, valuable information on ergonomic OBS workplace design and selection could assist in the early interventions of WMSD prevention.

  20. The economic benefit for family/general medicine practices employing physician assistants.

    PubMed

    Grzybicki, Dana M; Sullivan, Paul J; Oppy, J Miller; Bethke, Anne-Marie; Raab, Stephen S

    2002-07-01

    To measure the economic benefit of a family/general medicine physician assistant (PA) practice. Qualitative description of a model PA practice in a family/general medicine practice office setting, and comparison of the financial productivity of a PA practice with that of a non-PA (physician-only) practice. The study site was a family/general medicine practice office in southwestern Pennsylvania. The description of PA practice was obtained through direct observation and semistructured interviews during site visits in 1998. Comparison of site practice characteristics with published national statistics was performed to confirm the site's usefulness as a model practice. Data used for PA productivity analyses were obtained from site visits, interviews, office billing records, office appointment logs, and national organizations. The PA in the model practice had a same-task substitution ratio of 0.86 compared with the supervising physician. The PA was economically beneficial for the practice, with a compensation-to-production ratio of 0.36. Compared with a practice employing a full-time physician, the annual financial differential of a practice employing a full-time PA was $52,592. Sensitivity analyses illustrated the economic benefit of a PA practice in a variety of theoretical family/general medicine practice office settings. Family/general medicine PAs are of significant economic benefit to practices that employ them.

  1. The role of expert searching in the Family Physicians' Inquiries Network (FPIN)*

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Deborah; Meadows, Susan E.; Nashelsky, Joan E.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: This article describes the contributions of medical librarians, as members of the Family Physicians' Inquiries Network (FPIN), to the creation of a database of clinical questions and answers that allows family physicians to practice evidence-based medicine using high-quality information at the point of care. The medical librarians have contributed their evidence-based search expertise and knowledge of information systems that support the processes and output of the consortium. Methods: Since its inception, librarians have been included as valued members of the FPIN community. FPIN recognizes the search expertise of librarians, and each FPIN librarian must meet qualifications demonstrating appropriate experience and training in evidence-based medicine. The consortium works collaboratively to produce the Clinical Inquiries series published in family medicine publications. Results: Over 170 Clinical Inquiries have appeared in Journal of Family Practice (JFP) and American Family Physician (AFP). Surveys have shown that this series has become the most widely read part of the JFP Website. As a result, FPIN has formalized specific librarian roles that have helped build the organizational infrastructure. Conclusions: All of the activities of the consortium are highly collaborative, and the librarian community reflects that. The FPIN librarians are valuable and equal contributors to the process of creating, updating, and maintaining high-quality clinical information for practicing primary care physicians. Of particular value is the skill of expert searching that the librarians bring to FPIN's products. PMID:15685280

  2. Rural Women Family Physicians: Strategies for Successful Work-Life Balance

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Julie; Hustedde, Carol; Bjorkman, Sarah; Prasad, Rupa; Sola, Orlando; Wendling, Andrea; Bjorkman, Kurt; Paladine, Heather

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE Women family physicians experience challenges in maintaining work-life balance while practicing in rural communities. We sought to better understand the personal and professional strategies that enable women in rural family medicine to balance work and personal demands and achieve long-term career satisfaction. METHODS Women family physicians practicing in rural communities in the United States were interviewed using a semistructured format. Interviews were recorded, professionally transcribed, and analyzed using an immersion and crystallization approach, followed by detailed coding of emergent themes. RESULTS The 25 participants described a set of strategies that facilitated successful work-life balance. First, they used reduced or flexible work hours to help achieve balance with personal roles. Second, many had supportive relationships with spouses and partners, parents, or other members of the community, which facilitated their ability to be readily available to their patients. Third, participants maintained clear boundaries around their work lives, which helped them to have adequate time for parenting, recreation, and rest. CONCLUSIONS Women family physicians can build successful careers in rural communities, but supportive employers, relationships, and patient approaches provide a foundation for this success. Educators, employers, communities, and policymakers can adapt their practices to help women family physicians thrive in rural communities. PMID:27184995

  3. FEE-SCHEDULE INCREASES IN CANADA: IMPLICATION FOR SERVICE VOLUMES AMONG FAMILY AND SPECIALIST PHYSICIANS.

    PubMed

    Ariste, Ruolz

    2015-01-01

    Physician spending has substantially increased over the last few years in Canada to reach $27.4 billion in 2010. Total clinical payment to physicians has grown at an average annual rate of 7.6% from 2004 to 2010. The key policy question is whether or not this additional money has bought more physician services. So, the purpose of this study is to understand if we are paying more for the same amount of medical services in Canada or we are getting more bangs for our buck. At the same time, the paper attempts to find out whether or not there is a productivity difference between family physician services and surgical procedures. Using the Baumol theory and data from the National Physician Database for the period 2004-2010, the paper breaks down growth in physician remuneration into growth in unit cost and number of services, both from the physician and the payer perspectives. After removing general inflation and population growth from the 7.6% growth in total clinical payment, we found that real payment per service and volume of services per capita grew at an average annual rate of 3.2% and 1.4% respectively, suggesting that payment per service was the main cost driver of physician remuneration at the national level. Taking the payer perspective, it was found that, for the fee-for-service (FFS) scheme, volume of services per physician decreased at an average annual rate of -0.6%, which is a crude indicator that labour productivity of physicians on FFS has fallen during the period. However, the situation differs for the surgical procedures. Results also vary by province. Overall, our finding is consistent with the Baumol theory, which hypothesizes higher productivity growth in technology-driven sectors.

  4. Email communication in a developing country: different family physician and patient perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Makarem, Nisrine N.; Antoun, Jumana

    2016-01-01

    Background Email communication between physicians and patients could improve access to and delivery of health care. Most of the literature studies about email communication between physicians and patients have been conducted in developing countries. Therefore, this study aims to analyze the practices, attitudes, and barriers of both physicians’ and patients’ use of email within the same health care setting of a developing country. Methods A cross-sectional paper-based survey was conducted among 39 physicians and 500 patients at the Family Medicine clinics of the American University of Beirut, a tertiary academic medical center. Results Most of the surveyed patients and physicians reported that they would like to communicate through email and agreed that it is useful. However, only 19% of the patients have ever communicated with their physicians via email, and only 5.1% of physicians have often communicated with their patients via email. Almost half of the patients surveyed were unaware of the possibility of this form of communication, and only 17% reported that their physician offered them his or her email address. In addition, physicians and patients did not agree on the services to be provided by email communication. For instance, almost half of the patients indicated consultation for an urgent medical matter as suitable for email communication. Conclusion The use of email communication in health care is still scarce. Patients and physicians have different perspectives of its use and importance. Further rigorous research is needed to clarify the advantages and disadvantages of this form of communication, especially in the developing world. Interested physicians are encouraged to establish appropriate personal policies for email communication with adequate announcement and patient education plans. PMID:27855773

  5. Resource-based relative value units: a primer for academic family physicians.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Sarah E; Newton, Warren P

    2002-03-01

    The Resource-based Relative Value Scale (RBRVS) is the prevailing model used to reimburse physician services today. Based on empirical research, relative value units (RVUs) quantify the relative work, practice expense, and malpractice costs for specific physician services to appropriately establish payment. The fee schedule, implemented by the Health Care Financing Administration in 1992, dramatically affected physician reimbursement, with the goal of correcting disparities across disciplines. In the first 6 years, Medicare payments to family physicians increased by 36%, while payments to specialists decreased by as much as 18%. Recent changes include new practice expense estimates and adjustment of payment based on facility type. The impact of RVUs is even more widespread as many private payers use the fee schedule to set payment rates and as RVUs become the yardstick for physician productivity measures. Despite the initial successes, the ability of RVUs to capture the work done by primary care providers is still limited. Primary care services today are not as easily quantified as surgical procedures, and coding limitations hinder documentation of services. Rapid changes in health care make comparisons to work done 2 decades ago difficult. Understanding the strengths and limitations of RVUs as they apply to family physicians is fundamental to safeguarding the role of primary care.

  6. Coordination of cancer care between family physicians and cancer specialists

    PubMed Central

    Easley, Julie; Miedema, Baukje; Carroll, June C.; Manca, Donna P.; O’Brien, Mary Ann; Webster, Fiona; Grunfeld, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To explore health care provider (HCP) perspectives on the coordination of cancer care between FPs and cancer specialists. Design Qualitative study using semistructured telephone interviews. Setting Canada. Participants A total of 58 HCPs, comprising 21 FPs, 15 surgeons, 12 medical oncologists, 6 radiation oncologists, and 4 GPs in oncology. Methods This qualitative study is nested within a larger mixed-methods program of research, CanIMPACT (Canadian Team to Improve Community-Based Cancer Care along the Continuum), focused on improving the coordination of cancer care between FPs and cancer specialists. Using a constructivist grounded theory approach, telephone interviews were conducted with HCPs involved in cancer care. Invitations to participate were sent to a purposive sample of HCPs based on medical specialty, sex, province or territory, and geographic location (urban or rural). A coding schema was developed by 4 team members; subsequently, 1 team member coded the remaining transcripts. The resulting themes were reviewed by the entire team and a summary of results was mailed to participants for review. Main findings Communication challenges emerged as the most prominent theme. Five key related subthemes were identified around this core concept that occurred at both system and individual levels. System-level issues included delays in medical transcription, difficulties accessing patient information, and physicians not being copied on all reports. Individual-level issues included the lack of rapport between FPs and cancer specialists, and the lack of clearly defined and broadly communicated roles. Conclusion Effective and timely communication of medical information, as well as clearly defined roles for each provider, are essential to good coordination of care along the cancer care trajectory, particularly during transitions of care between cancer specialist and FP care. Despite advances in technology, substantial communication challenges still

  7. Transforming Training to Build the Family Physician Workforce Our Country Needs.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Lauren S; Tuggy, Michael; Pugno, Perry A; Peterson, Lars E; Brungardt, Stacy H; Hoekzema, Grant; Jones, Samuel; Weida, Jane; Bazemore, Andrew

    2015-09-01

    The Affordable Care Act has spurred significant change in the US health care system, including expansion of Medicaid and private insurance coverage to millions of Americans. As a result, the need for the medical education continuum to produce a family physician workforce that is sizable enough and highly skilled is significant. These two interdependent goals have emerged as top priorities for Family Medicine for America's Health, a new, 5-year, $21 million collaborative strategic effort of the eight US family medicine organizations to lead continued change in the US health care system. To achieve these important goals, reforms are needed across the entire educational continuum, including how we recruit, train, and help practicing family physicians refresh their skills. Such reforms must provide opportunities to acquire skills needed in new practice and payment environments, to incorporate new educational standards that reflect the public's expectations of family physicians, to collaborate with our primary care colleagues to develop effective interprofessional training, and to design educational programs that are socially accountable to the patients, families, and communities we serve. Through Family Medicine for America's Health, the discipline is well positioned to emerge as a leader in primary care workforce development and educational quality.

  8. [Future family physicians - reasons for their specialty choice and crucial professional skills].

    PubMed

    Hasler, L B; Stamm, M; Buddeberg-Fischer, B

    2008-12-03

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the motivation of young physicians to work in family medicine/general practice and the skills to be acquired during residency. As part of a prospective study on career determinants in young physicians starting in 2001, 84 future family physicians at the end of their residency were asked about their motivation for specialty choice and about core competencies in general practice. Content analysis was applied to assign the answers given to open questions to inductively defined categories. The 254 answers concerning the motivation for specialty choice of general medicine or general internal medicine, and the 375 answers concerning core competencies of a family physician were assigned to eleven categories. The most frequently named motives fall into the categories , , , and <physician-patient-relationship>. The most frequently named core competencies fall into the categories , and . Motivation for working in general practice and the core competencies to be acquired stand for a patient centered conception of the medical profession. They also imply personal responsibility and latitude in medical practice.

  9. Family physicians and human rights: a case example from former Yugoslavia.

    PubMed

    Sonis, J; Crane, T

    1995-04-01

    The role of family physicians in the protection of human rights is unclear. The purpose of this article is to explore this role through examination of the specific case of former Yugoslavia. In January/February 1993, we investigated medical aspects of human rights abuses as part of a fact-finding mission for the Physicians for Human Rights organization. We used primarily qualitative methods, including direct observation, key informant interviews, focus groups, and key document review. We observed pervasive violations of medical neutrality, as indicated by the shelling of Kosevo Hospital, the major tertiary care hospital in Sarajevo. Forty-one percent of former prison camp detainees from north Bosnia housed at the Karlovac, Croatia, refugee camp had scars consistent with physical abuse. Civilians in north central Bosnia and Sarajevo were targeted through physical violence, artillery shelling, and strangulation of the public health infrastructure--food, water, electricity, heat, and medical supplies. Physicians can be uniquely useful in the investigation of human rights. The flexibility of family physicians and their attention to the biopsycosocial aspects of health can be especially useful. Family physicians should become actively involved in the protection of human rights.

  10. Nurses versus physicians' knowledge, attitude, and performance on care for the family members of dying patients

    PubMed Central

    Abdollahimohammad, Abdolghani; Firouzkouhi, Mohammadreza; Amrollahimishvan, Fatemeh; Alimohammadi, Nasrollah

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Nurses and physicians must be competent enough to provide care for the clients. As a lack of knowledge and a poor attitude result in a low performance of delivering care, this study aimed to explore the nurses versus physicians’ knowledge, attitude, and performance on care for the family members of dying patients (FMDPs). Methods: This descriptive study was conducted at the educational hospitals in Isfahan, Iran. The samples were 110 nurses and 110 physicians. The data were collected through a convenience sampling method and using a valid and reliable questionnaire. Results: The average knowledge, attitude, and performance on care for the FMDPs were not significantly different between nurses and physicians (p>0.05). The majority of nurses (55.4%) and physician (63.6%) were at a moderate and a fair level of knowledge of care for the FMDPs. Most of the nurses (81%) and physicians (87.3%) had a positive attitude towards caring the FMDPs. Most of the nurses (70%) and physicians (86.3%) had a moderate and fair performance. Conclusion: Having enough knowledge and skills, and a positive attitude are necessary for caring the FMDPs. Nurses’ and physicians' competencies must be improved through continuing educational programs and holding international and national conferences with a focus on the palliative care. PMID:26838571

  11. Integrating personal computers into family practice: a comparison of practicing physicians and residents.

    PubMed Central

    Cook, M C; Hartman, J A; Russell, L R

    1998-01-01

    A survey was used to assess levels of experience with personal computers and interest in learning personal computer applications among Alabama family practice physicians and residents in 1994. The study compared responses of 272 physicians and 77 residents as well as responses of physicians and residents in a sample of respondents thirty-eight years old or younger, including 77 physicians and 73 residents. Almost 25% of physicians reported never having used a computer, compared to 7.9% of residents. Respondents had learned computer skills through various combinations of methods, with over half of each group claiming to be self-taught through reading and hands-on experience. More than 86% of both groups expressed interest in learning more; interest increased in the population thirty-eight years or younger. Respondents, especially physicians, reported using professional applications less often than personal applications. Overall, there was a high level of interest in learning various practice-related applications; however, a significantly larger proportion of residents reported interest in each type of application than did physicians. PMID:9681166

  12. What do you do when your loved one is ill? The line between physician and family member.

    PubMed

    Fromme, Erik K; Farber, Neil J; Babbott, Stewart F; Pickett, Mary E; Beasley, Brent W

    2008-12-02

    Conventional wisdom and professional ethics generally dictate that physicians should avoid doctoring family members because of potential conflicts of interest. Nevertheless, cross-sectional surveys find that the practice is commonplace. Physicians have unique opportunities to influence their family member's care because they possess knowledge and status within the health care system; however, when physicians participate in the care of family members, they must not lose objectivity and confuse their personal and professional roles. Because health care systems are complicated, medical information is difficult to understand, and medical errors are common, it can be a great relief for families to have someone "on the inside" who is accessible and trustworthy. Yet, the benefits of becoming involved in a loved one's care are accompanied by risks, especially when a physician takes action that a nonphysician would be incapable of performing. Except for convenience, most if not all of the benefits of getting involved can be realized by physician-family members acting as a family member or an advocate rather than as a physician. Rules about what is or what is not appropriate for physician-family members are important but insufficient to guide physicians in every circumstance. Physician-family members can ask themselves, "What could I do in this situation if I did not have a medical degree?" and consider avoiding acts that require a medical license.

  13. Differential Effects of Economic Factors on Specialist and Family Physician Distribution in Illinois: A County-Level Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mistretta, Martin J.

    2007-01-01

    Context: Uneven distribution of physicians across geographic areas of the United States remains a significant problem that may have implications for health. Purpose: To develop a statistical model of physician distribution in Illinois counties that predicts where specialists and family physicians practice, and to suggest policy strategies for…

  14. Evidence-based medicine in primary care: qualitative study of family physicians

    PubMed Central

    Tracy, C Shawn; Dantas, Guilherme Coelho; Upshur, Ross EG

    2003-01-01

    Background The objectives of this study were: a) to examine physician attitudes to and experience of the practice of evidence-based medicine (EBM) in primary care; b) to investigate the influence of patient preferences on clinical decision-making; and c) to explore the role of intuition in family practice. Method Qualitative analysis of semi-structured interviews of 15 family physicians purposively selected from respondents to a national survey on EBM mailed to a random sample of Canadian family physicians. Results Participants mainly welcomed the promotion of EBM in the primary care setting. A significant number of barriers and limitations to the implementation of EBM were identified. EBM is perceived by some physicians as a devaluation of the 'art of medicine' and a threat to their professional/clinical autonomy. Issues regarding the trustworthiness and credibility of evidence were of great concern, especially with respect to the influence of the pharmaceutical industry. Attempts to become more evidence-based often result in the experience of conflicts. Patient factors exert a powerful influence on clinical decision-making and can serve as trumps to research evidence. A widespread belief that intuition plays a vital role in primary care reinforced views that research evidence must be considered alongside other factors such as patient preferences and the clinical judgement and experience of the physician. Discussion Primary care physicians are increasingly keen to consider research evidence in clinical decision-making, but there are significant concerns about the current model of EBM. Our findings support the proposed revisions to EBM wherein greater emphasis is placed on clinical expertise and patient preferences, both of which remain powerful influences on physician behaviour. PMID:12740025

  15. What Motivates Family Physicians to Participate in Training Programs in Shared Decision Making?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allaire, Anne-Sophie; Labrecque, Michel; Giguere, Anik; Gagnon, Marie-Pierre; Legare, France

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Little is known about the factors that influence family physician (FP) participation in continuing professional development (CPD) programs in shared decision making (SDM). We sought to identify the factors that motivate FPs to participate in DECISION+, a CPD program in SDM. Methods: In 2007-2008, we collected data from 39 FPs who…

  16. Barriers to Physician Identification and Treatment of Family Violence: Lessons from Five Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Stu; And Others

    1997-01-01

    A study involving over 480 interviews in five diverse communities (Atlanta, Georgia; Duluth, Minnesota; Providence, Rhode Island; Riverside, California; Roswell, New Mexico) identified barriers facing physicians and other health care providers in identifying, treating, and referring victims of family violence, and illuminated the relationships of…

  17. Patient, family physician and community pharmacist perspectives on expanded pharmacy scope of practice: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Donald, Maoliosa; King-Shier, Kathryn; Tsuyuki, Ross T; Al Hamarneh, Yazid N; Jones, Charlotte A; Manns, Braden; Tonelli, Marcello; Tink, Wendy; Scott-Douglas, Nairne; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R

    2017-01-01

    The RxEACH trial was a randomized trial to evaluate the efficacy of community pharmacy-based case finding and intervention in patients at high risk for cardiovascular (CV) events. Community-dwelling patients with poorly controlled risk factors were identified and their CV risk reduced through patient education, prescribing and follow-up by their pharmacist. Perspectives of patients, family physicians and community pharmacists were obtained regarding pharmacists' identification and management of patients at high risk for CV events, to identify strategies to facilitate implementation of the pharmacist's expanded role in routine patient care. We used a qualitative methodology (individual semistructured interviews) with conventional qualitative content analysis to describe perceptions about community pharmacists' care of patients at high risk for CV events. Perceptions were categorized into macro (structure), meso (institution) and micro (practice) health system levels, based on a conceptual framework of care for optimizing scopes of practice. We interviewed 48 participants (14 patients, 13 family physicians and 21 community pharmacists). Patients were supportive of the expanded scope of practice of pharmacists. All participant groups emphasized the importance of communication, ability to share patient information, trust and better understanding of the roles, responsibilities, accountabilities and liabilities of the pharmacist within their expanded role. Despite support from patients and changes to delivery of care in primary care settings, ongoing efforts are needed to understand how to best harmonize family physician and community pharmacist roles across the health system. This will require collaboration and input from professional associations, regulatory bodies, pharmacists, family physicians and patients.

  18. Barriers to Physician Identification and Treatment of Family Violence: Lessons from Five Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Stu; And Others

    1997-01-01

    A study involving over 480 interviews in five diverse communities (Atlanta, Georgia; Duluth, Minnesota; Providence, Rhode Island; Riverside, California; Roswell, New Mexico) identified barriers facing physicians and other health care providers in identifying, treating, and referring victims of family violence, and illuminated the relationships of…

  19. Urban family physician plan in Iran: challenges of implementation in Kerman

    PubMed Central

    Dehnavieh, Reza; Kalantari, Ali Reza; Jafari Sirizi, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background: The Family Physician Plan has recently been implemented in three provinces of Iran on a pilot basis and is going to be implemented throughout Iran in the future. Through a qualitative design, this study aims to determine probable implementation challenges of Family Physician Plan in Kerman. Methods: This study was conducted in Kerman in 2013. Data were collected through interviews with 21 experts in the field. Sampling continued until data saturation level was achieved. All interviews were recorded and then analyzed, and main themes and subgroups were extracted from them based on a framework analysis model. Results: most prevalent establishment challenges of Family Physician Plan were classified into policy-making, financial supply, laws and resources. Conclusion: The urban Family Physician Plan can be carried out more effectively by implementing this plan step by step, highlighting the relationships between the related organizations, using new payment mechanisms e.g Per Capita, DRG, make national commitment and proper educational programs for providers, development the health electronic Record, justifying providers and community about advantages of this plan, clarifying regulatory status about providers' Duties and most importantly considering a specific funding source. PMID:26913266

  20. Perceptions of the influence of prescription medicine samples on prescribing by family physicians.

    PubMed

    Hall, Kristine B; Tett, Susan E; Nissen, Lisa M

    2006-04-01

    The provision of free prescription medicine samples is a common and traditional marketing strategy used by pharmaceutical companies, but concerns have been raised about their influence on physician prescribing behavior and patient safety. We sought to investigate the knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors of Australian family physicians regarding the use of sample prescription medications. Qualitative and quantitative techniques were used, including (1) mailed questionnaires to family physicians, (2) semistructured interviews with family physicians, and (3) sample cupboard inventories. A number of issues about samples were identified by the questionnaires (208) and interviews (17 doctors), including insufficient labeling, poor record keeping, diversion of stock (personal use by doctors, their families, practice staff and pharmaceutical representatives), and wasting of expired stock. Prescription medicine samples also influenced prescribing behavior. Australian doctors were less likely to provide samples to patients on financial grounds compared with a previous study in the United States on medical residents. Six sample cupboards were inventoried. Median wholesale value of sample cupboards was AUD Dollars 4959 (range Dollars 2395-Dollars 8709), with 6% of stock expired. Very little generic medicine was included in the sample cupboards. Better methods are needed to meet legislative requirements and to ensure quality use of medicines (and optimal public health) with respect to prescription medicine samples. Doctors and practice staff require training on the appropriate handling and storage of prescription medications. Alternative ways for distribution of sample medications need to be investigated.

  1. What Motivates Family Physicians to Participate in Training Programs in Shared Decision Making?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allaire, Anne-Sophie; Labrecque, Michel; Giguere, Anik; Gagnon, Marie-Pierre; Legare, France

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Little is known about the factors that influence family physician (FP) participation in continuing professional development (CPD) programs in shared decision making (SDM). We sought to identify the factors that motivate FPs to participate in DECISION+, a CPD program in SDM. Methods: In 2007-2008, we collected data from 39 FPs who…

  2. The Snow Machine and the Family Physician (Medical and Social Aspects)

    PubMed Central

    Eaid, C. R.

    1970-01-01

    The snow machine is here to stay. The family physician must acquaint himself with possible increasing numbers of trauma. Etiology is important. College of Family Physicians with other bodies should conduct a symposium on the dangers of this sport before 1970-71 season. Family physician should cooperate in reporting all injuries; their cause and possible prevention. Prevention is combined responsibility of organized medicine, manufacturer and the operator. Club activity is endorsed over private activity. Snow machines induce special type of trauma. Increased soft tissue damage. Shock more prominent feature due to chill factor and possible delay in reaching treatment centre. Major cause of death is head injury and brain damage. Present helmets are less than adequate. Manufacturers to be increasingly safety conscious. Safety is joint effort of the former, the profession and legislation. Snow machining is a recreation, not an exercise. It is not recommended for certain restricted groups. Family physician has a special role in treatment, evaluation and recommendations. More statistical analysis and co-operation required. Snow machine can be a killer and a source of major trauma. Imagesp43-ap44-ap44-bp45-ap45-b PMID:20468483

  3. Preventing crises in palliative care in the home. Role of family physicians and nurses.

    PubMed Central

    Howarth, G.; Willison, K. B.

    1995-01-01

    With the current shift to community care, the need for palliative care in the home involving the family physician has increased. Potential causes of crises in the home care of the dying are identified. Strategies to prevent crises are suggested that rely on a team's providing comprehensive and anticipatory care. PMID:7539653

  4. Advantages and Disadvantages of Educational Email Alerts for Family Physicians: Viewpoint

    PubMed Central

    Badran, Hani; Grad, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Background Electronic knowledge resources constitute an important channel for accredited Continuing Medical Education (CME) activities. However, email usage for educational purposes is controversial. On the one hand, family physicians become aware of new information, confirm what they already know, and obtain reassurance by reading educational email alerts. Email alerts can also encourage physicians to search Web-based resources. On the other hand, technical difficulties and privacy issues are common obstacles. Objective The purpose of this discussion paper, informed by a literature review and a small qualitative study, was to understand family physicians’ knowledge, attitudes, and behavior in regard to email in general and educational emails in particular, and to explore the advantages and disadvantages of educational email alerts. In addition, we documented participants’ suggestions to improve email alert services for CME. Methods We conducted a qualitative descriptive study using the “Knowledge, Attitude, Behavior” model. We conducted semi-structured face-to-face interviews with 15 family physicians. We analyzed the collected data using inductive-deductive thematic qualitative data analysis. Results All 15 participants scanned and prioritized their email, and 13 of them checked their email daily. Participants mentioned (1) advantages of educational email alerts such as saving time, convenience and valid information, and (2) disadvantages such as an overwhelming number of emails and irrelevance. They offered suggestions to improve educational email. Conclusions The advantages of email alerts seem to compensate for their disadvantages. Suggestions proposed by family physicians can help to improve educational email alerts. PMID:25803184

  5. Shared mental health care. Model for supporting and mentoring family physicians.

    PubMed Central

    Rockman, Patricia; Salach, Lena; Gotlib, David; Cord, Michael; Turner, Tyrone

    2004-01-01

    PROBLEM BEING ADDRESSED: Family physicians lack access to psychiatrists and mental health services for patients with serious and persistent mental illnesses. OBJECTIVE OF PROGRAM: To develop a mentoring program to provide FPs with education and e-mail, telephone, and face-to-face support for managing patients with mental illness. PROGRAM DESCRIPTION: The Ontario College of Family Physicians' Collaborative Mental Health Care Network developed a mentoring program. Family physicians are grouped according to clinical interest with psychiatrist and general practice psychotherapist mentors whom they can contact for help. Communication is established via e-mail, telephone, fax, or listserv, or even face to face. Monitoring and evaluation is carried out through surveys and chart audits to examine use of, satisfaction with, and effectiveness of the program. CONCLUSION: Mental health care can be enhanced through collaborative at-a-distance relationships between FPs and psychotherapists and psychiatrists. Family physicians can get timely consultation in the areas of psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy, and access to community resources. PMID:15318677

  6. Urban family physician plan in Iran: challenges of implementation in Kerman.

    PubMed

    Dehnavieh, Reza; Kalantari, Ali Reza; Jafari Sirizi, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    The Family Physician Plan has recently been implemented in three provinces of Iran on a pilot basis and is going to be implemented throughout Iran in the future. Through a qualitative design, this study aims to determine probable implementation challenges of Family Physician Plan in Kerman. This study was conducted in Kerman in 2013. Data were collected through interviews with 21 experts in the field. Sampling continued until data saturation level was achieved. All interviews were recorded and then analyzed, and main themes and subgroups were extracted from them based on a framework analysis model. most prevalent establishment challenges of Family Physician Plan were classified into policy-making, financial supply, laws and resources. The urban Family Physician Plan can be carried out more effectively by implementing this plan step by step, highlighting the relationships between the related organizations, using new payment mechanisms e.g Per Capita, DRG, make national commitment and proper educational programs for providers, development the health electronic Record, justifying providers and community about advantages of this plan, clarifying regulatory status about providers' Duties and most importantly considering a specific funding source.

  7. Pediatricians', obstetricians', gynecologists', and family medicine physicians' experiences with and attitudes about breast-feeding.

    PubMed

    Anchondo, Inés; Berkeley, Lizabeth; Mulla, Zuber D; Byrd, Theresa; Nuwayhid, Bahij; Handal, Gilbert; Akins, Ralitsa

    2012-05-01

    Investigate physicians' breast-feeding experiences and attitudes using a survey based on two behavioral theories: theory of reasoned action (TRA) and the health belief model (HBM). There were 73 participants included in the investigation. These participants were resident and faculty physicians from pediatrics, obstetrics/gynecology, and family medicine at a university campus, located on the US-Mexico border. The sample was reduced to 53 and 56 records for the attitude and confidence variables, respectively. Physicians answered a survey about their breast-feeding experiences and attitudes to learn about intention and ability applying constructs from TRA and HBM. An attitude scale, confidence variable (from self-efficacy items), and a lactation training index were created for the analysis. Analysis of the association between physicians' breastfeeding experiences and their attitudes revealed physicians are knowledgeable about breast-feeding and have positive attitudes towards breast-feeding. They did not seem to remember how long they breast-fed their children or whether they enjoyed breast-feeding, but they wanted to continue breast-feeding. Physicians cite work as a main reason for not continuing to breast-feed. Physicians' attitudes toward breast-feeding are positive. They are expected to practice health-promotion behavior including breast-feeding; however, physicians' breast-feeding rates are low and although they are knowledgeable about breast-feeding their training lacks on didactic depth and hands-on experience. If physicians learn more about breast-feeding and breast-feed exclusively and successfully, the rates in the United States would increase naturally.

  8. Patients' anxiety and expectations: how they influence family physicians' decisions to order cancer screening tests.

    PubMed

    Haggerty, Jeannie; Tudiver, Fred; Brown, Judith Belle; Herbert, Carol; Ciampi, Antonio; Guibert, Remi

    2005-12-01

    To compare the influence of physicians' recommendations and patients' anxiety or expectations on the decision to order four cancer screening tests in clinical situations where guidelines were equivocal: screening for prostate cancer with prostate-specific antigen for men older than 50; breast cancer screening with mammography for women 40 to 49; colorectal cancer screening with fecal occult blood testing; and colorectal cancer screening with colonoscopy for patients older than 40. Cross-sectional mailed survey with clinical vignettes. British Columbia, Alberta, Ontario, Quebec, and Prince Edward Island. Of 600 randomly selected family physicians in active practice approached, 351 responded, but 35 respondents were ineligible (response rate 62%). Decisions to order cancer screening tests, physicians' perceptions of recommendations, patients' anxiety about cancer, and patients' expectation to be tested. For all screening situations, physicians most likely to order the tests believed that routine screening with the test was recommended; physicians least likely to order tests believed routine screening was not. Patients' expectations or anxiety, however, markedly increased screening by physicians who did not believe that routine screening was recommended. In regression models, the interaction between physicians' recommendations and patients' anxiety or expectation was significant for all four screening tests. When patients had no anxiety or expectations, physicians' beliefs about screening strongly predicted test ordering. Physicians who believed routine screening was recommended ordered the test in most cases regardless of patient characteristics. But patients' anxiety or expectations markedly increased the probability that the test would be ordered. The probability of test ordering went from 0.28 to 0.54 for prostate-specific antigen (odds ratio [OR] = 1.9), from 0.15 to 0.44 for mammography (OR = 2.8), from 0.33 to 0.79 for fecal occult blood testing (OR = 2.4), and

  9. National survey of family physicians to define functional decline in elderly patients with minor trauma.

    PubMed

    Abdulaziz, Kasim E; Brehaut, Jamie; Taljaard, Monica; Émond, Marcel; Sirois, Marie-Josée; Lee, Jacques S; Wilding, Laura; Perry, Jeffrey J

    2016-08-22

    Failing to assess elderly patients for functional decline at the time around a minor injury may result in adverse health outcomes. This study was conducted to define what constitutes clinically significant functional decline and the sensitivity required for a clinical decision instrument to identify such functional decline after an injury in previously independent elderly patients. After a thorough development process, a survey questionnaire was administered to a random sample of 178 family physicians. The surveys were distributed using a modified Dillman technique. From 143 eligible surveys, we received 67 completed surveys (response rate, 46.9 %). Respondents indicated that a drop of at least 3 points on the 28-point Older Americans Resources and Services (OARS) ADL Scale was considered clinically significant by 90 % of physicians. Ninety percent (90 %) of physicians would be satisfied with a sensitivity of 90 % or more for a clinical decision instrument to detect patients at risk of functional decline at 6 months following an injury. The majority of family physicians do not routinely assess the majority of the tasks on the OARS scale for injured elderly patients. A high proportion of physicians (90 %) would consider a drop of 3 points on the OARS ADL Scale as significant to define functional decline and would be satisfied with a sensitivity of 90 % for a clinical decision instrument to detect such a decline. Any instrument to identify patients at elevated risk for subsequent decline should consider these outcome measures to be clinically useful.

  10. Family physicians believe the placebo effect is therapeutic but often use real drugs as placebos.

    PubMed

    Kermen, Rachel; Hickner, John; Brody, Howard; Hasham, Irma

    2010-10-01

    Few national data exist on physicians' use of and beliefs about placebos in routine health care. We mailed a 22-question, confidential survey about placebo use and beliefs to a random sample of 1,000 members of the American Academy of Family Physicians. A total of 412 of 970 (43%) eligible physicians responded, and 56% of respondents said they had used a placebo in clinical practice. Forty percent of respondents had used an antibiotic as a placebo, and 11% had used inert substances. The most common reason for prescribing placebos was "after unjustified demand for medication." Eighty-five percent of respondents believed placebos can have both psychological and physical benefits. The majority (61%) recommended a placebo over offering no treatment, while 8% said clinical placebo use should be categorically prohibited. Nearly all respondents believed a number of routine clinical practices promote the placebo effect. Many US family physicians use placebos and generally believe the placebo effect has both psychological and physical benefits. Physicians recognize the broader application of the placebo effect but they commonly use active medication as placebos. The responses to this survey raise important questions about the appropriate use of placebos and the therapeutic value of the placebo effect in clinical practice.

  11. [Familial characteristics and self-perceived health among female and male primary care physicians in Andalusia (Spain)].

    PubMed

    Delgado, Ana; Saletti-Cuesta, Lorena; López-Fernández, Luis Andrés; Toro-Cárdenas, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    To determine the relationships between a group of professional and family characteristics and the components of physical and mental health in female and male primary care physicians working in health centers in Andalusia (Spain). A descriptive, cross-sectional, multicenter study was performed. The population consisted of urban health centers in Andalusia and their physicians. The sample comprised 88 health centers and 500 physicians. Measurements consisted of sex, age, professional characteristics (postgraduate training in family medicine, position of health center manager, accreditation as a residents' tutor, and workload based on patient quota and the mean number of patients/day); family responsibilities, defined by two dimensions of the family-work relationship (support overload-family support deficit and family-work conflict); and perceived physical and mental health. The data source was a self-administered questionnaire sent by surface mail. Multiple regression analyses were performed for physical and mental health for the whole sample and by gender. Responses were obtained from 368 physicians (73.6%). Mental health was worse in female physicians than in male physicians; no differences were found between genders in physical health. The family-work conflict was associated with physical and mental health in physicians of both genders. Physical health deteriorated with increasing age in both genders, improved in the female tutors of residents, and decreased with increasing family-work conflict in male physicians. Mental health decreased with increasing housework on the weekends and with family-work conflict in both genders. In male physicians, mental health deteriorated with postgraduate training in family medicine and improved if they were health center managers. Workload and professional characteristics have little relationship with the health of primary care physicians. Family characteristics play a greater role. Copyright © 2012 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier

  12. Work-family conflict and prolonged fatigue among Japanese married male physicians.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Hiroshi; Wada, Koji; Kawashima, Masatoshi; Arimatsu, Mayuri; Higashi, Toshiaki; Yoshikawa, Toru; Aizawa, Yoshiharu

    2011-12-01

    Fatigue experienced by physicians may not only endanger their own health but may also affect the safety of patients. Such fatigue may be associated with the work environment and personal factors such as work-family conflict (WFC). This study aimed to determine the association between WFC and prolonged fatigue among Japanese married male physicians. Physicians who graduated from a Japanese medical school answered a mailed anonymous self-report questionnaire. For assessment of WFC and prolonged fatigue, the Japanese versions of the WFC scale and the Checklist of Individual Strength questionnaire (CIS) were used. Prolonged fatigue was defined as the upper quartile of total CIS scores. The WFC scale comprises six dimensions. Total scores were divided into tertiles: low, intermediate, and high levels of WFC. A multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to examine the association between WFC and prolonged fatigue. A total of 540 male physicians answered the questionnaire, and the data of 444 married male physicians were analyzed. The data were then adjusted for age and work condition factors. Prolonged fatigue was significantly associated with high strain-based work interference with family (WIF; corrected odds ratio, 5.56; 95% confidence interval, 2.55-12.1), intermediate strain-based WIF (2.53, 1.25-5.10), high time-based family interference with work (FIW; 1.92, 1.08-3.40), and there was a weak association with high strain-based FIW (1.93, 0.98-3.83). Employers should take measures to improve working conditions in hospitals, and give physicians the opportunity to learn how to cope with WFC. These measures could ultimately help prevent prolonged fatigue.

  13. [Information needs of physicians, professional carers and family carers for an evidence-based dementia website].

    PubMed

    Komarahadi, Fely L; Ruf, Daniela; Hüll, Michael; Härter, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Despite the demographically driven rapid growth of the number of persons with dementia, in Germany a website is lacking that provides evidence based information about the disease, its burden and therapeutic options to family and professional carers as well as physicians. A website was developed with the objective to give free access to evidence based information concerning the disease and care for patients with dementia. In order to meet the expectations of the user groups an analysis of information needs was performed with 80 physicians, 163 professional carers and 104 family carers. All user groups rated information on symptoms, course and treatment of dementia and support for family carers as important topics. Group differences were found for the need to be informed on financial support, daily care and interaction with patients. The contents of the website will be accommodated to the specific needs of the user groups. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. Practice patterns of rural family physicians based on the American Diabetes Association standards of care.

    PubMed

    Zoorob, R J; Mainous, A G

    1996-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine practice patterns of rural family physicians in the care of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus based on the standards of care of the American Diabetes Association (ADA). One hundred patient charts were randomly chosen, twenty for each physician, from the practices of five family physicians in rural Ohio. A standardized collection protocol was used, based upon the ADA recommendations. The charts were reviewed for compliance with the ADA parameters. The patients' records demonstrated 66% compliance with dietary counseling and 33% with counseling about exercise. Moreover, there was low compliance with physical examination guidelines. Specifically, 66% of the patients had fundoscopic examination and 64% had a complete foot examination done. With respect to the laboratory guidelines, 70% of the charts reviewed had a urinalysis ordered and 45% annual lipids measured. However, glycosylated hemoglobin was performed in only 15% of the patients. The results suggest that rural family physicians do not consistently follow the ADA standards of care.

  15. LEVEL OF COMPETENCIES OF FAMILY PHYSICIANS IN KOSOVO FROM DIFFERENT PERSPECTIVES.

    PubMed

    Bojaj, Gazmend; Skeraj, Fitim; Czabanowska, Katarzyna; Burazeri, Genc

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this analysis was to compare the level of self-perceived competencies of primary health care physicians in Kosovo with patients' viewpoint, as well as the necessary (required) level of such competencies from decision-makers' standpoint. Three cross-sectional studies were carried out in Kosovo in 2013 including: i) a representative sample of 1340 primary health care users aged ≥18 years (49% men; overall mean age: 50.5±17.9 years; response rate: 89%); ii) a representative sample of 597 primary health care physicians (49% men; overall mean age: 46.0±9.4 years; response rate: 90%), and; iii) a nationwide representative sample of 100 decision-makers operating at different primary health care institutions or public health agencies in Kosovo (63% men; mean age: 47.7±5.7 years). A structured self-administered questionnaire (consisting of 37 items) was used in the three surveys in order to assess physicians' competencies regarding different domains of the quality of health care. There was a significant gap in the level of self-perceived physicians' competencies and patients' perspective in transitional Kosovo. Furthermore, there was a gap in the level of self-perceived physicians' competencies and the necessary (required) level of physicians' competencies from decision-makers perspective which was less evident in Prishtina, but considerable in the other regions of Kosovo. Our analysis provides valuable evidence about the level of competencies of primary health care physicians in Kosovo from different stakeholders' perspectives. There is an urgent need for continuous professional development of family physicians in post-war Kosovo.

  16. Complaints Against Family Physicians Submitted to Disciplinary Tribunals in the Netherlands: Lessons for Patient Safety

    PubMed Central

    Gaal, Sander; Hartman, Chantal; Giesen, Paul; van Weel, Chris; Verstappen, Wim; Wensing, Michel

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE We analyzed the disciplinary law verdicts concerning family physicians, submitted to the Dutch disciplinary law system, to identify domains of high risk of harm for patients in family practice. METHODS The Dutch disciplinary law system offers patients the opportunity to file complaints against physicians outside a legal malpractice system, without possibility of financial compensation in case of verdicts in which the physician was found to be at fault. We performed an analysis of 250 random disciplinary law verdicts on Dutch family physicians submitted to disciplinary tribunals and published between 2008 and 2010. Our analysis focused on clinical domains represented in the verdicts with serious permanent damage or death. RESULTS Of the 74 complaints with a serious health outcome, 44.6% (n = 33) were related to a wrong diagnosis, 23.0% (n = 17) to insufficient care, 8.1% (n = 6) to a wrong treatment, 8.1% (n = 6) to a late arrival at a house visit, 5.4% (n = 4) to a late referral to the hospital, and 1.4% (n = 1) to insufficient information given; 9.5% (n = 7) consisted of other complaints. The wrong or late diagnosis-related cases mostly consisted of myocardial infarction and stroke (35.1%) and malignancies (33.7%). The family physician was disciplined as a result of 37 of these 74 complaints (50%). Logistic regression analysis showed that a serious outcome was associated with a higher probability of disciplinary measures (B=0.703; P =.02) CONCLUSIONS The disciplinary law system in the Netherlands differs fundamentally from a legal malpractice system. It can be used to learn from patients’ complaints with a view on improving patient safety. PMID:22084263

  17. Relationship between job satisfaction and performance of primary care physicians after the family physician reform of east Azerbaijan province in Northwest Iran.

    PubMed

    Jabbari, Hossein; Pezeshki, Mohamad Zakarria; Naghavi-Behzad, Mohammad; Asghari, Mohammad; Bakhshian, Fariba

    2014-01-01

    Following the implementation of family physician program in 2004 in Iranian healthcare system, the understanding in changes in physicians' practice has become important. The objective of this study was to determine the level of family physicians' job satisfaction and its relationship with their performance level. A cross-sectional study was conducted among all 367 family physicians of East Azerbaijan province in during December 2009 to May 2011 using a self-administered, anonymous questionnaire for job satisfaction. The performance scores of primary care physicians were obtained from health deputy of Tabriz Medical University. In this study, overall response rate was 64.5%. The average score of job satisfaction was 42.10 (±18.46), and performance score was 87.52 (±5.74) out of 100. There was significant relationships between working history and job satisfaction (P = 0.014), marital status (P = 0.014), and sex (P = 0.018) with performance among different personal and organizational variables. However, there was no significant relationship between job satisfaction and performance, but satisfied people had about three times better performance than their counterparts (all P < 0.05). The low scores of family physicians in performance and job satisfaction are obvious indications for more extensive research in identifying causes and finding mechanisms to improve the situation, especially in payment methods and work condition, in existing health system.

  18. [Attitudes of general physicians and family medicine residents towards patients with borderline personality disorder].

    PubMed

    Imbeau, Dominique; Bouchard, Sébastien; Terradas, Miguel M; Simard, Valérie

    2014-01-01

    Several studies suggest that health professionals show negative attitudes towards people with Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD). Many publications have focused on the attitudes of nurses or other type of clinicians like social workers or psychologists. Few researches concern the attitudes of general physicians towards BPD even if they are the main professionals involved in the evaluation and treatment of these patients. Additionally, patients with BPD frequently consult general physicians and, because of the difficulties interacting with these patients, they do not always receive the treatments required by their condition. This research aims to assess the attitudes of general physicians and family medicine residents regarding patients presenting with this disorder. Forty family medicine residents and thirty-five general physicians were compared to thirty-nine mental health professionals using the Attitudes toward people with BPD Scale (ABPDS; Bouchard, 2001). This measure has two subscales labeled Comfort when interacting with someone who has BPD and Positives perceptions about BPD. The internal consistency of the scale as well as the two distinct factors are satisfactory. The participants also complete a socio-demographic questionnaire. Means, t tests, ANOVAs and factorial ANOVAs are completed in order to compare the three groups on the ABPDS and explore the influence of variables such as sex, age, years of experience, and professional setting (urban or rural) on the results. The results show that general physicians have similar attitudes than mental health professionals towards people presenting with BPD and that family medicine residents present less positive attitude than the other two groups. In addition, clinicians with less experience tend to have less positive attitudes towards people with BPD and clinicians from urban settings seem to have more positive attitude. It was difficult to determinate which variables influence the results because the years of

  19. Which family physician should I choose? The analytic hierarchy process approach for ranking of criteria in the selection of a family physician.

    PubMed

    Kuruoglu, Emel; Guldal, Dilek; Mevsim, Vildan; Gunvar, Tolga

    2015-08-05

    Choosing the most appropriate family physician (FP) for the individual, plays a fundamental role in primary care. The aim of this study is to determine the selection criteria for the patients in choosing their family doctors and priority ranking of these criteria by using the multi-criteria decision-making method of the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) model. The study was planned and conducted in two phases. In the first phase, factors affecting the patients' decisions were revealed with a qualitative research. In the next phase, the priorities of FP selection criteria were determined by using AHP model. Criteria were compared in pairs. 96 patient were asked to fill the information forms which contains comparison scores in the Family Health Centres. According to the analysis of focus group discussions FP selection criteria were congregated in to five groups: Individual Characteristics, Patient-Doctor relationship, Professional characteristics, the Setting, and Ethical Characteristics. For each of the 96 participants, comparison matrixes were formed based on the scores of their information forms. Of these, models of only 5 (5.2 %) of the participants were consistent, in other words, they have been able to score consistent ranking. The consistency ratios (CR) were found to be smaller than 0.10. Therefore the comparison matrix of this new model, which was formed based on the medians of scores only given by these 5 participants, was consistent (CR = 0.06 < 0.10). According to comparison results; with a 0.467 value-weight, the most important criterion for choosing a family physician is his/her 'Professional characteristics'. Selection criteria for choosing a FP were put in a priority order by using AHP model. These criteria can be used as measures for selecting alternative FPs in further researches.

  20. [High prevalence of work-family conflict among female physicians: lack of social support as a potential antecedent].

    PubMed

    Adám, Szilvia

    2009-12-13

    According to stress theory, social support from work and non-work-related sources may influence the level of perceived work-family conflict. Despite the high prevalence of work-family conflict as a source of distress among female physicians, no information is available on the associations between work-family conflict and social support in a traditional, family-centric cultural setting, where female role expectations are demanding. The author hypothesized that high prevalence of work-family conflict could be attributed to the lack of social support among female physicians. To investigate the prevalence and psychosocial characteristics of social support and its relations to work-family conflict among female physicians. Quantitative and qualitative study using questionnaires ( n = 420) and in-depth interviews ( n = 123) among female and male physicians. Female physicians reported significantly higher mean level and prevalence of work-family conflict compared to men. The predominant form of work-family was work-to-family conflict among physicians; however, significantly more female physicians experienced family-to-work conflict and strain-based work-family conflict compared to men (39% vs. 18% and 68% vs. 20%, respectively). Significantly more male physicians experienced time-based work-family conflict compared to women. Content analyses of interview data revealed that provision of support to physicians manifested itself in parental support in career selection, spousal support with household duties, peer support with enabling access to professional role models-mentors, peer support to ensure gender equity, and organizational support with family-centric policies. Female physicians reported significantly less parental, spousal, and peer support compared to men. Female physicians lacking parental, peer, or organizational support experienced significantly higher level of work-family conflict compared to appropriate control. In regression analyses, high job demands, job

  1. Knowledge, Attitude, Practice, and Perceived Barriers of Colorectal Cancer Screening among Family Physicians in National Guard Health Affairs, Riyadh

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. The objective of this study is to explore the current knowledge, attitude, and practice of family physicians working in family medicine clinics in National Guard Health Affairs (NGHA), Riyadh, toward colorectal cancer (CRC) screening and to identify the barriers of the screening. Methods. Data were collected using a validated self-administered questionnaire adopted from the National Cancer Institute in USA, customized by adding and eliminating questions to be in line with the institution (NGHA) characteristics. Results. Of the 130 physicians, 56.2% of the physicians were not practicing CRC screening although 94.6% considered CRC screening effective. Board certified physicians had higher knowledge score and were practicing CRC screening more when compared to other physicians. Physicians who reported practicing CRC screening scored more on the knowledge score than those not practicing. Male physicians scored better on attitude score than female physicians. The study found that barriers were cited in higher rates among physicians not practicing CRC screening compared with practicing physicians. Lack of patients' awareness was the most cited barrier. Conclusion. Large percentage of family physicians in this study do not practice CRC screening, despite the knowledge level and the positive attitude. PMID:25328703

  2. Chronic pain, patient-physician engagement, and family communication associated with drug-using HIV patients' discussing advanced care planning with their physicians.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Eric D; Mitchell, Mary M; Smith, Tom; Hutton, Nancy; Keruly, Jeanne; Knowlton, Amy R

    2017-07-22

    In the era of effective antiretroviral therapy, persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) are living longer, transforming HIV into a serious chronic illness, warranting patient-provider discussion about advanced care planning (ACP). Evidence is needed to inform physicians on how to approach ACP for these patients. Chronic pain is common in PLWHA, particularly in those who have substance use disorders; although it is known this population is at risk for poorer patient-physician engagement, the effects on ACP are unknown. To further characterize factors associated with successful advanced care planning in PLWHA, we examined associations between patient-physician relationship, chronic pain, family communication and problem solving skills and rates of patients discussing ACP with their physicians. Data were from the AFFIRM Care study (N=325), which examined social and environmental factors associated with health outcomes among PLWHA and their informal caregivers. In multivariate analysis, higher odds of patient reports of discussing ACP with their physicians were associated with their higher rating of their relationship with their physician (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) =1.73, p<0.05), higher levels of chronic pain (AOR=2.16, p<0.05), experiencing prior family arguments about end-of-life medical decisions (AOR=2.43, p<0.01), and feeling comfortable talking to family members about problems (AOR=1.33, p<0.05). These results suggest that interventions to increase ACP among HIV patients and their physicians should promote patient-centered patient-provider relationships and PLWHAs' family communication and family problem-solving skills. The findings also suggest that PLWHA with chronic pain and prior family discord over end-of-life medical decisions may be primed for ACP. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. ‘Meeting People Where They’re At’: Experiences of Family Physicians Engaging Women Who Use Illicit Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Woolhouse, Susan; Brown, Judith Belle; Thind, Amardeep

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE There is little research exploring the experiences of family physicians caring for women who use illicit drugs. This study explores the experiences of these physicians in order to better understand the process of engaging these women in the patient-physician relationship. METHODS We conducted a phenomenologic, qualitative study using individual, in-depth interviews with 10 family physicians working in inner-city Toronto and Ottawa, Ontario. An iterative and interpretive analysis was used. RESULTS Three broad themes emerged from the analysis. The predominant theme was that of the patient-physician relationship, which consisted of 2 phases: the engagement phase and the maintenance phase. During the engagement phase, issues such as access and women’s experiences of trauma and violence were evident and impeded participants’ ability to engage with this population. As such, the patient-physician relationship during the engagement phase was tenuous. Trust and presence were paramount during this phase. Once a family physician engaged a woman, the transition to the maintenance phase was made. Within the maintenance phase, 2 subthemes were identified: continuity of care and “meeting people where they’re at” (finding common ground). CONCLUSIONS This study identified a 2-phase process of the patient-physician relationship from the perspective of family physicians caring for women using illicit drugs: the engagement and maintenance phases. Our findings identified strategies to support the patient-physician relationship during each of these phases that have implications for improving the health of these women. PMID:21555752

  4. Perspectives of korean patients, families, physicians and nurses on advance directives.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jia; Kim, Ki Hyun

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the perspectives of lung cancer patients, their families, physicians and nurses on advance directives. The study employed a comparative descriptive design. A total of 124 participants from six general hospitals in Seoul and metropolitan area participated in this study from January 1, 2009 to November 15, 2009. Face-to-face interviews were conducted using a structured questionnaire. The majority of participants were not aware of advance directives. Most participants desired the establishment of a reliable legal system and a specific legal protocol for the design and application of advance directives. The perspectives of patients, their families, physicians and nurses differed regarding end-of-life care decisions. The least preferred treatment by patients with lung cancer was intensive care, followed by cardiopulmonary resuscitation, tracheotomy and artificial ventilation, and radiotherapy. There were many differences in the perspectives of patients, families, physicians and nurses on advance directives. End-of-life care decisions should take the wishes of patients into account, and that such decisions should therefore be made before the patients lose the capacity to make them. To make well-informed decisions regarding future care, patients and families must be fully educated about advance directives and expected outcomes. Copyright © 2010 Korean Society of Nursing Science. Published by . All rights reserved.

  5. Attaching a new understanding to the patient-physician relationship in family practice.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Darren; Ciechanowski, Paul S

    2003-01-01

    As a result of continuity of care with patients and their families, family physicians are uniquely poised to form enduring clinical relationships with their patients. The degree of collaboration in and satisfaction with the patient-provider alliance has been shown to have important implications for treatment outcomes across a range of medical problems. Providing optimal care can require family physicians to appreciate the sequelae of having clinically relevant aspects of past relationships emerge in the health care relationship, both in their patients and in themselves. A conceptual model is essential to assist in recognizing these key aspects. A literature search was conducted using MEDLINE. Key words entered were "illness" and "attachment theory." Thirty-five English-only articles appeared from which further relevant references were gathered. Attachment theory serves as a useful model for highlighting important features of physician-patient relationships, which can affect treatment outcome in the family practice setting. It posits that everyone has an innate need to form strong attachment bonds to their earliest caregivers. To ensure survival, the child adapts its bonding to the caregiver's attachment style. With time, the maturing person develops a style of relating in subsequent caregiving relationships based on these early, and to some extent later, close relationships. Insecure attachment styles that can develop--dismissing, preoccupied, and fearful--have been shown to affect the clinical relationship and medical treatment outcomes often in important and predictable ways. Family physicians can more easily adopt an understanding, compassionate, and flexible treatment stance by recognizing patients' unique attachment relationship patterns, thereby improving medical treatment outcome.

  6. Community resources for psychiatric and psychosocial problems. Family physicians' referral patterns in urban Ontario.

    PubMed Central

    Craven, M. A.; Allen, C. J.; Kates, N.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To document the number and pattern of psychiatric and psychosocial referrals to community resources by family physicians (FPs) and to determine whether referral practices correlate with physician variables. DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey of referrals by FPs to 34 key psychiatric and psychosocial community resources identified by a panel of FPs, psychiatric social workers, psychiatric nurses, public health nurses, and the local community information service. SETTING: Regional municipality of 434,000 persons in Ontario. PARTICIPANTS: Twenty-seven of 34 (79%) community agencies identified 261 FPs who made 4487 referrals to participating agencies (range 0 to 65, median 15, mean 17.19 +/- 13.42). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Number of referrals to all agencies; variables, such as physician sex, school of graduation, year of graduation, and certificate status in the College of Family Physicians of Canada, related to referral patterns. RESULTS: Referrals to outpatient psychiatric clinics, support services, and general counseling services accounted for 96% of all referrals. Physicians' average annual referral profile was as follows: 8.6 patients to a support service, 6.3 to an outpatient psychiatric service, 1.6 to a counseling service, and 0.46 to a substance abuse service. Referral profiles of individual physicians varied greatly. Female FPs made fewer referrals than male FPs to support services, but both made similar numbers of referrals to psychiatric, counseling, and substance abuse services. The more recent the year of graduation, the greater the number of referrals to psychiatric (r = 0.158, P = 0.0107) and counseling services (r = 0.137, P = 0.0272) and the higher the fraction of referrals to psychiatric services (r = 0.286, P = 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: Family physicians in Hamilton-Wentworth made few referrals to psychiatric and psychosocial services. Only physician sex and year of graduation correlated significantly with numbers of referrals made. Recent

  7. How Do Physicians Assess Their Family Physician Colleagues' Performance? Creating a Rubric to Inform Assessment and Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sargeant, Joan; MacLeod, Tanya; Sinclair, Douglas; Power, Mary

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: The Colleges of Physicians and Surgeons of Alberta and Nova Scotia (CPSNS) use a standardized multisource feedback program, the Physician Achievement Review (PAR/NSPAR), to provide physicians with performance assessment data via questionnaires from medical colleagues, coworkers, and patients on 5 practice domains: consultation…

  8. How Do Physicians Assess Their Family Physician Colleagues' Performance? Creating a Rubric to Inform Assessment and Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sargeant, Joan; MacLeod, Tanya; Sinclair, Douglas; Power, Mary

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: The Colleges of Physicians and Surgeons of Alberta and Nova Scotia (CPSNS) use a standardized multisource feedback program, the Physician Achievement Review (PAR/NSPAR), to provide physicians with performance assessment data via questionnaires from medical colleagues, coworkers, and patients on 5 practice domains: consultation…

  9. Knowledge and attitudes of family physicians coming to COPD continuing medical education.

    PubMed

    Yawn, Barbara P; Wollan, Peter C

    2008-01-01

    COPD remains under-recognized and under-treated. Much of early COPD care is given by primary care physicians but only when COPD is recognized. This survey explores the attitudes, beliefs, and knowledge related to COPD recognition, diagnosis, and treatment from family physicians and nurse practitioners (NPs) and physician assistants (PAs) working in primary care. We completed a survey of family physicians, and NPs/PAs attending one of three CME programs on five common chronic conditions including COPD. Return rate was 62% (n = 284) including 178 physicians and 100 NPs/PAs. Fewer than half of the respondents reported knowledge of or use of COPD guidelines. The barriers to recognition and diagnosis of COPD they reported included the multiple morbidities of most COPD patients, failure of patients to report COPD symptoms, as well as lack of knowledge and inadequate training in COPD diagnosis and management. Three quarters (74%) of respondents reported use of spirometry to diagnose COPD but only 32% said they included reversibility assessment. COPD was incorrectly assessed as a disease primarily of men (78% ofrespondents) that appeared after age 60 (61%). Few respondents reported that they believed COPD treatment was useful or very useful for improving symptoms (15%) or decreasing exacerbations (3%) or that pulmonary rehabilitation was helpful (3%), but 13% reported they thought COPD treatment could extend longevity. Primary care physicians and NPs/PAs working in primary care continue to report lack of awareness and use of COPD guidelines, as well as correct information related to COPD epidemiology or potential benefits of available treatments including pulmonary rehabilitation. It is unlikely that diagnosis and management of COPD will improve in primary care until these knowledge gaps and discrepancies with published efficacy of therapy issues are addressed.

  10. Knowledge and attitudes of family physicians coming to COPD continuing medical education

    PubMed Central

    Yawn, Barbara P; Wollan, Peter C

    2008-01-01

    Purpose COPD remains under-recognized and under-treated. Much of early COPD care is given by primary care physicians but only when COPD is recognized. This survey explores the attitudes, beliefs, and knowledge related to COPD recognition, diagnosis, and treatment from family physicians and nurse practitioners (NPs) and physician assistants (PAs) working in primary care. Methods We completed a survey of family physicians, and NPs/PAs attending one of three CME programs on five common chronic conditions including COPD. Results Return rate was 62% (n = 284) including 178 physicians and 100 NPs/PAs. Fewer than half of the respondents reported knowledge of or use of COPD guidelines. The barriers to recognition and diagnosis of COPD they reported included the multiple morbidities of most COPD patients, failure of patients to report COPD symptoms, as well as lack of knowledge and inadequate training in COPD diagnosis and management. Three quarters (74%) of respondents reported use of spirometry to diagnose COPD but only 32% said they included reversibility assessment. COPD was incorrectly assessed as a disease primarily of men (78% of respondents) that appeared after age 60 (61%). Few respondents reported that they believed COPD treatment was useful or very useful for improving symptoms (15%) or decreasing exacerbations (3%) or that pulmonary rehabilitation was helpful (3%), but 13% reported they thought COPD treatment could extend longevity. Conclusions Primary care physicians and NPs/PAs working in primary care continue to report lack of awareness and use of COPD guidelines, as well as correct information related to COPD epidemiology or potential benefits of available treatments including pulmonary rehabilitation. It is unlikely that diagnosis and management of COPD will improve in primary care until these knowledge gaps and discrepancies with published efficacy of therapy issues are addressed. PMID:18686740

  11. Family physician clinical compensation in an academic environment: moving away from the relative value unit

    PubMed Central

    Lochner, Jennifer; Trowbridge, Elizabeth; Kamnetz, Sandra; Pandhi, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Primary care physician compensation structures have remained largely volume-based, lagging behind changes in reimbursement that increasingly include population approaches such as capitation, bundled payments, and care management fees. We describe a population health-based physician compensation plan developed for two departmental family medicine faculty groups (residency teaching clinic faculty and community clinic faculty) along with outcomes before and after the plan’s implementation. Methods An observational study was conducted. A pre-post email survey assessed satisfaction with the plan, salary, and salary equity. Physician retention, panel size, and relative value unit (RVU) productivity metrics also were assessed before and after the plan’s implementation. Results Before implementation of the new plan, 18% of residency faculty and 33% of community faculty were satisfied or very satisfied with compensation structure. After implementation, those numbers rose to 47% for residency physicians and 74% for community physicians (p<0.01). Satisfaction with the amount of compensation also rose from 33% to 68% for residency faculty and from 26% to 87% for community faculty (p<0.01). For both groups, panel size per clinical full-time equivalent increased and RVUs moved closer to national benchmarks. RVUs decreased for residency faculty and increased for community faculty. Conclusions Aligning a compensation plan with population health delivery by moving rewards away from RVU productivity and towards panel management resulted in improved physician satisfaction and retention, as well as larger panel sizes. RVU changes were less predictable. Physician compensation is an important component of care model redesign that emphasizes population health. PMID:27272423

  12. Practice-Generated Questions: A Method of Formulating True Learning Needs of Family Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Jennett, Penny A.; Lockyer, Jocelyn M.; Parboosingh, I. John P.; Maes, William R.

    1989-01-01

    The importance of identifying true learning needs prior to planning and conducting educational programs is well documented. In this study a collection of 579 clinical questions forwarded by 87 family physicians in southern Alberta was reviewed and analysed to determine if the questions would cluster and, therefore, be useful as sources for planning continuing medical education (CME) conferences and newsletters. The nature of submitted questions was also examined to determine if particular groups of physicians, as identified by socio-demographic characteristics, significanly differed by type of questions submitted. The study findings indicate that the questions generated by the clinical practices of family practitioners did cluster into meaningful categories, and did vary significantly by identified physician groups. Questions relating to the genito-urinary system; adverse drug effects, interactions and contraindications; and nervous system and sense organs were most frequently submitted. The nature of questions generated differed significantly by gender, size of practice setting, and year and place of medical graduation. When highly relevant and specific clinical questions, as contrasted with broadly expressed needs, serve as sources of identified learning needs for CME planners, the daily clinical problems faced by practitioners are better addressed. The learning needs identified by this approach provide an optimum framework for planned CME to influence physician behaviour or practice patterns. PMID:21248985

  13. How do family physicians measure blood pressure in routine clinical practice?

    PubMed Central

    Kaczorowski, Janusz; Myers, Martin G.; Gelfer, Mark; Dawes, Martin; Mang, Eric J.; Berg, Angelique; Grande, Claudio Del; Kljujic, Dragan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective To describe the techniques currently used by family physicians in Canada to measure blood pressure (BP) for screening for, diagnosing, and treating hypertension. Design A Web-based cross-sectional survey distributed by e-mail. Setting Stratified random sample of family physicians in Canada. Participants Family physician members of the College of Family Physicians of Canada with valid e-mail addresses. Main outcome measures Physicians’ self-reported routine methods for recording BP in their practices to screen for, diagnose, and manage hypertension. Results A total of 774 valid responses were received, for a response rate of 16.2%. Respondents were similar to nonrespondents except for underrepresentation of male physicians. Of 769 respondents, 417 (54.2%) indicated that they used manual office BP measurement with a mercury or aneroid device and stethoscope as the routine method to screen patients for high BP, while 42.9% (330 of 769) reported using automated office BP (AOBP) measurement. The method most frequently used to make a diagnosis of hypertension was AOBP measurement (31.1%, 240 of 771), followed by home BP measurement (22.4%, 173 of 771) and manual office BP measurement (21.4%, 165 of 771). Ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) was used for diagnosis by 14.4% (111 of 771) of respondents. The most frequently reported method for ongoing management was home BP monitoring (68.7%, 528 of 769), followed by manual office BP measurement (63.6%, 489 of 769) and AOBP measurement (59.2%, 455 of 769). More than three-quarters (77.8%, 598 of 769) of respondents indicated that ABPM was readily available for their patients. Conclusion Canadian family physicians exhibit overall high use of electronic devices for BP measurement, However, more efforts are needed to encourage practitioners to follow current Canadian guidelines, which advocate the use of AOBP measurement for hypertension screening, ABPM and home BP measurement for making a diagnosis, and both

  14. Smoking behaviour, knowledge and attitudes among Family Medicine physicians and nurses in Bosnia and Herzegovina

    PubMed Central

    Hodgetts, Geoffrey; Broers, Teresa; Godwin, Marshall

    2004-01-01

    Background Smoking rates among the general population in Bosnia and Herzegovina are extremely high, and national campaigns to lower smoking rates have not yet begun. As part of future activities of the Queen's University Family Medicine Development Program in the Balkans Region, technical assistance may be provided to Bosnia and Herzegovina to develop of national tobacco control strategies. This assistance may focus on training doctors and nurses on smoking cessation strategies with a view to helping their patients to stop smoking. Given this important role that health professionals have, data is needed on smoking rates as well as on smoking behaviour among doctors and nurses in Bosnia and Herzegovina. This study therefore seeks to determine the smoking rates and behaviour of family medicine physicians and nurses in Bosnia and Herzegovina and to determine how well prepared they feel with respect to counselling their patients on smoking cessation strategies. Methods The WHO Global Health Professional Survey, a self-administered questionnaire, was distributed to physicians and nurses in 19 Family Medicine Teaching Centres in Bosnia and Herzegovina in June 2002. Smoking rates and behaviour, as well as information on knowledge and attitudes regarding smoking were determined for both physicians and nurses. Results Of the 273 physicians and nurses currently working in Family Medicine Teaching Centres, 209 (77%) completed the questionnaire. Approximately 45% of those surveyed currently smoke, where 51% of nurses smoked, compared to 40% of physicians. With respect to knowledge and attitudes, all respondents agreed that smoking is harmful to one's health. However, "ever" smokers, compared to "never" smokers, were less likely to agree that health professionals who smoke were less likely to advise patients to quit smoking than non-smoking health professionals. Less than half of physicians and nurses had received formal training in smoking cessations strategies, but about two

  15. Quality of care in hospital emergency departments and family physicians' offices.

    PubMed Central

    Spasoff, R. A.; Lane, P.; Steele, R.

    1977-01-01

    Indicator conditions were used to evaluate the quality of 686 episodes of care provided in two emergency departments and in five family physicians' offices. Overall, the care was considered adequate in 53% of the emergency department cases and in 40% of the cases dealt with in family physicians' offices, the difference being significant (P less than 0.01). Referrals were very common in both settings, and when quality was assessed solely on the basis of the care actually given by the primary-care providers the difference between the two settings disappeared. Half the observed deficiencies in care related to failure to document the findings from history-taking and physical examination. From these and earlier findings we conclude that the emergency department can be an appropriate setting for the care of nontraumatic illness. PMID:880525

  16. Preventive health services implemented by family physicians in Portugal—a cross-sectional study based on two clinical scenarios

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Carlos; Azevedo, Luís Filipe; Santos, Cristina; Sá, Luísa; Santos, Paulo; Couto, Maria; Pereira, Altamiro; Hespanhol, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To assess whether Portuguese family physicians perform preventive health services in accordance with scientific evidence, based on the recommendations of the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF). Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Primary healthcare, Portuguese National Health Service. Participants 255 Portuguese family physicians selected by a stratified cluster sampling design were invited to participate in a computer-assisted telephone survey. Outcomes Prevalence of compliance with USPSTF recommendations for screening, given a male and female clinical scenario and a set of proposed medical interventions, including frequency of the intervention and performance in their own daily practice. Results A response rate of 95.7% was obtained (n=244). 98–100% of family physicians answered according to the USPSTF recommendations in most interventions. In the male scenario, the lowest concordance was observed in the evaluation of prostate-specific antigen with 37% of family physicians answering according to the USPSTF recommendations. In the female scenario, the lowest concordance was for cholesterol testing with 2% of family physicians complying. Family physicians younger than 50 years had significantly better compliance scores than older ones (mean 77% vs 72%; p<0.001). Conclusions We found a high degree of agreement with USPSTF recommendations among Portuguese family physicians. However, we also found results suggesting excessive use of some medical interventions, raising concerns related to possible harm associated with overdiagnosis and overtreatment. PMID:24861550

  17. Interconception Care for Mothers During Well-Child Visits With Family Physicians: An IMPLICIT Network Study

    PubMed Central

    Rosener, Stephanie E.; Barr, Wendy B.; Frayne, Daniel J.; Barash, Joshua H.; Gross, Megan E.; Bennett, Ian M.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE Interconception care (ICC) is recommended to improve birth outcomes by targeting maternal risk factors, but little is known about its implementation. We evaluated the frequency and nature of ICC delivered to mothers at well-child visits and maternal receptivity to these practices. METHODS We surveyed a convenience sample of mothers accompanying their child to well-child visits at family medicine academic practices in the IMPLICIT (Interventions to Minimize Preterm and Low Birth Weight Infants Through Continuous Improvement Techniques) Network. Health history, behaviors, and the frequency of the child’s physician addressing maternal depression, tobacco use, family planning, and folic acid supplementation were assessed, along with maternal receptivity to advice. RESULTS Three-quarters of the 658 respondents shared a medical home with their child. Overall, 17% of respondents reported a previous preterm birth, 19% reported a history of depression, 25% were smoking, 26% were not using contraception, and 58% were not taking folic acid. Regarding advice, 80% of mothers who smoked were counseled to quit, 59% reported depression screening, 71% discussed contraception, and 44% discussed folic acid. Screening for depression and family planning was more likely when the mother and child shared a medical home (P <.05). Most mothers, nearly 95%, were willing to accept health advice from their child’s physician regardless of whether a medical home was shared (P >.05). CONCLUSIONS Family physicians provide key elements of ICC at well-child visits, and mothers are highly receptive to advice from their child’s physician even if they receive primary care elsewhere. Routine integration of ICC at these visits may provide an opportunity to reduce maternal risk factors for adverse subsequent birth outcomes. PMID:27401423

  18. The quality assessment of family physician service in rural regions, Northeast of Iran in 2012

    PubMed Central

    Vafaee-Najar, Ali; Nejatzadegan, Zohreh; Pourtaleb, Arefeh; Kaffashi, Shahnaz; Vejdani, Marjan; Molavi-Taleghani, Yasamin; Ebrahimipour, Hosein

    2014-01-01

    Background: Following the implementation of family physician plan in rural areas, the quantity of provided services has been increased, but what leads on the next topic is the improvement in expected quality of service, as well. The present study aims at determining the gap between patients’ expectation and perception from the quality of services provided by family physicians during the spring and summer of 2012. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study in which 480 patients who referred to family physician centers were selected with clustering and simple randomized method. Data were collected through SERVQUAL standard questionnaire and were analyzed with descriptive statistics, using statistical T-test, Kruskal-Wallis, and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests by SPSS 16 at a significance level of 0.05. Results: The difference between the mean scores of expectation and perception was about -0.93, which is considered as statistically significant difference (P≤ 0.05). Also, the differences in five dimensions of quality were as follows: tangible -1.10, reliability -0.87, responsiveness -1.06, assurance -0.83, and empathy -0.82. Findings showed that there was a significant difference between expectation and perception in five concepts of the provided services (P≤ 0.05). Conclusion: There was a gap between the ideal situation and the current situation of family physician quality of services. Our suggestion is maintaining a strong focus on patients, creating a medical practice that would exceed patients’ expectations, providing high-quality healthcare services, and realizing the continuous improvement of all processes. In both tangible and responsive, the gap was greater than the other dimensions. It is recommended that more attention should be paid to the physical appearance of the health center environment and the availability of staff and employees. PMID:24757691

  19. Patient, family physician and community pharmacist perspectives on expanded pharmacy scope of practice: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Donald, Maoliosa; King-Shier, Kathryn; Tsuyuki, Ross T.; Al Hamarneh, Yazid N.; Jones, Charlotte A.; Manns, Braden; Tonelli, Marcello; Tink, Wendy; Scott-Douglas, Nairne; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R.

    2017-01-01

    Background: The RxEACH trial was a randomized trial to evaluate the efficacy of community pharmacy-based case finding and intervention in patients at high risk for cardiovascular (CV) events. Community-dwelling patients with poorly controlled risk factors were identified and their CV risk reduced through patient education, prescribing and follow-up by their pharmacist. Perspectives of patients, family physicians and community pharmacists were obtained regarding pharmacists' identification and management of patients at high risk for CV events, to identify strategies to facilitate implementation of the pharmacist's expanded role in routine patient care. Methods: We used a qualitative methodology (individual semistructured interviews) with conventional qualitative content analysis to describe perceptions about community pharmacists' care of patients at high risk for CV events. Perceptions were categorized into macro (structure), meso (institution) and micro (practice) health system levels, based on a conceptual framework of care for optimizing scopes of practice. Results: We interviewed 48 participants (14 patients, 13 family physicians and 21 community pharmacists). Patients were supportive of the expanded scope of practice of pharmacists. All participant groups emphasized the importance of communication, ability to share patient information, trust and better understanding of the roles, responsibilities, accountabilities and liabilities of the pharmacist within their expanded role. Interpretation: Despite support from patients and changes to delivery of care in primary care settings, ongoing efforts are needed to understand how to best harmonize family physician and community pharmacist roles across the health system. This will require collaboration and input from professional associations, regulatory bodies, pharmacists, family physicians and patients. PMID:28401136

  20. The Experience of Risk-Adjusted Capitation Payment for Family Physicians in Iran: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Esmaeili, Reza; Hadian, Mohammad; Rashidian, Arash; Shariati, Mohammad; Ghaderi, Hossien

    2016-01-01

    Background When a country’s health system is faced with fundamental flaws that require the redesign of financing and service delivery, primary healthcare payment systems are often reformed. Objectives This study was conducted with the purpose of exploring the experiences of risk-adjusted capitation payment of urban family physicians in Iran when it comes to providing primary health care (PHC). Materials and Methods This is a qualitative study using the framework method. Data were collected via digitally audio-recorded semi-structured interviews with 24 family physicians and 5 executive directors in two provinces of Iran running the urban family physician pilot program. The participants were selected using purposive and snowball sampling. The codes were extracted using inductive and deductive methods. Results Regarding the effects of risk-adjusted capitation on the primary healthcare setting, five themes with 11 subthemes emerged, including service delivery, institutional structure, financing, people’s behavior, and the challenges ahead. Our findings indicated that the health system is enjoying some major changes in the primary healthcare setting through the implementation of risk-adjusted capitation payment. Conclusions With regard to the current challenges in Iran’s health system, using risk-adjusted capitation as a primary healthcare payment system can lead to useful changes in the health system’s features. However, future research should focus on the development of the risk-adjusted capitation model. PMID:27340558

  1. Titrating Guidance: A Model to Guide Physicians Assisting Patients and Families Facing Complex Decisions

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Nathan E.; Back, Anthony L.; Morrison, R. Sean

    2009-01-01

    Over the last century, developments in new medical treatments have led to an exponential increase in longevity, but as a consequence, patients may be left with chronic illness associated with long-term severe functional and cognitive disability. Patients and their families are often forced to make a difficult and complex choices between death and long-term debility, neither of which are acceptable outcomes. Traditional models of medical decision making, however, do not fully address how clinicians should best assist with these decisions. In this manuscript, we present a new paradigm which demonstrates how the role of the physician changes over time in response to the curved relationship between the predictability of a patient's outcome and the chance of returning to an acceptable quality of life. To translate this model into clinical practice, we present a five step model for physicians where they: 1) determine where the patient is on the curve; 2) identify the cognitive factors and preferences for outcomes which affect the patient/family's decision-making process; 3) reflect on their own reaction to the decision at hand; 4) acknowledge how these factors can be addressed in conversation; and 5) guide the patient/family in creation of plan of care. This model can help improve patient-physician communication and decision making so that complex and difficult decisions can be turned into ones that yield to medical expertise, good communication, and personal caring. PMID:18779459

  2. Barriers to physician identification and treatment of family violence: lessons from five communities.

    PubMed

    Cohen, S; De Vos, E; Newberger, E

    1997-01-01

    Since the Surgeon General's Workshop on Violence and Public Health (Leesburg, Virginia, October 27-29, 1985), a substantial literature has developed about the limitations of the health care response to family violence. Many contributions have reflected experiences in limited numbers of practice settings (e.g., a single emergency department or hospital). Until 1990, however, there had been no community-based studies. The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation asked a multidisciplinary team from Education Development Center, Inc. and Children's Hospital (Boston) to investigate the health care responses to family violence in five diverse communities. This qualitative study, comprising more than 480 interviews, provided a vivid picture of the barriers facing physicians and other health care providers in identifying, treating, and referring victims of family violence. It also illuminated the relations of the health care systems in these communities with other key sectors, including agencies and the judiciary. The key findings from the five-city study remain relevant because (1) it is the only large-scale, multi-community-based assessment of the barriers facing physicians; (2) it identified, or in some cases confirmed, both institutional and educational barriers limiting the effectiveness of even the most committed physicians; (3) it identified, or in some cases confirmed, specific areas of knowledge, attitudes, and skills development that should be incorporated in medical education; and (4) its conclusions continue to be reflected in subsequent contributions to the literature. In each of these ways, therefore, it informs the other articles in this supplement.

  3. The birth of a collaborative model: obstetricians, midwives, and family physicians.

    PubMed

    Pecci, Christine Chang; Mottl-Santiago, Julie; Culpepper, Larry; Heffner, Linda; McMahan, Therese; Lee-Parritz, Aviva

    2012-09-01

    In the United States, the challenges of maternity care include provider workforce, cost containment, and equal access to quality care. This article describes a collaborative model of care involving midwives, family physicians, and obstetricians at the Boston Medical Center, which serves a low-income multicultural population. Leadership investment in a collaborative model of care from the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Section of Midwifery, and the Department of Family Medicine created a culture of safety and commitment to patient-centered care. Essential elements of the authors' successful model include a commitment to excellence in patient care, communication, and interdisciplinary education.

  4. Teaching primary care obstetrics: insights and recruitment recommendations from family physicians.

    PubMed

    Koppula, Sudha; Brown, Judith B; Jordan, John M

    2014-03-01

    To explore the experiences and recommendations for recruitment of family physicians who practise and teach primary care obstetrics. Qualitative study using in-depth interviews. Six primary care obstetrics groups in Edmonton, Alta, that were involved in teaching family medicine residents in the Department of Family Medicine at the University of Alberta. Twelve family physicians who practised obstetrics in groups. All participants were women, which was reasonably representative of primary care obstetrics providers in Edmonton. Each participant underwent an in-depth interview. The interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. The investigators independently reviewed the transcripts and then analyzed the transcripts together in an iterative and interpretive manner. Themes identified in this study include lack of confidence in teaching, challenges of having learners, benefits of having learners, and recommendations for recruiting learners to primary care obstetrics. While participants described insecurity and challenges related to teaching, they also identified positive aspects, and offered suggestions for recruiting learners to primary care obstetrics. Despite describing poor confidence as teachers and having challenges with learners, the participants identified positive experiences that sustained their interest in teaching. Supporting these teachers and recruiting more such role models is important to encourage family medicine learners to enter careers such as primary care obstetrics.

  5. Evidence-based medicine among Jordanian family physicians: awareness, attitude, and knowledge.

    PubMed

    Barghouti, Farihan; Halaseh, Lana; Said, Tania; Mousa, Abdel Halim; Dabdoub, Adel

    2009-07-01

    To assess family practitioners' attitudes toward and awareness of evidence-based medicine (EBM). A cross-sectional study from a questionnaire distributed between January and March 2007. Rural and urban family medicine centres throughout Jordan that are affiliated with the Ministry of Health, military centres, university medical centres, and the private sector. Two hundred family physicians. Family physicians' attitudes toward EBM; training in EBM; barriers to practising EBM; level of awareness of and access to EBM journals and databases; and knowledge and understanding of related technical terms. The response rate was 70.5%. Among those who responded, 56.7% were women and 42.6% were between the ages of 40 and 49 years. More than 50% of the respondents were working in mixed urban and rural practice settings. Most of the respondents had a positive attitude toward EBM: 63.5% welcomed the concept of EBM; more than 40% used EBM in their daily practices; and 90% agreed that practising EBM improved patient care. Of the respondents, 42.6% thought that the best way to move from opinion-based medicine to EBM was through learning the skills of EBM. Fifty percent of the respondents had access to MEDLINE, while only 20.4% of them had received formal training in research and critical appraisal. Lack of personal time was the main perceived barrier to practising EBM. Participants reported a low level of awareness of some of the technical terms. Jordanian family physicians showed eagerness to learn and implement EBM in their daily practices. Nevertheless, they need more guidance and training to ensure the correct application of EBM ideals.

  6. [Family health and family physician's influence on prevention psychoactive substances abuse].

    PubMed

    Lapčević, Mirjana; Dimitrijević, Ivan

    2010-01-01

    The family, as the basic social unit, has a decisive role in the health and disease of its members. It is the primary unit where health needs are formed and solved. By its own resources the family independently resolves about 75% of the total health requirements. In the paper the authors study family characteristics which influence family health and diseases, indicators of family health and the scale of life values. Also, the study evaluates social factors, communication and the influence of the usage of psychoactive substances on family health and the quality of family life. To form the personality of a child three factors are most significant: love, the feeling of safety and the presence of harmonious relationship between the parents. Life harmony in a family also depends on the quality of structural components of the personality and the interaction of motivation of its members. Early childhood determines the future personality of the adult person. At that period, habits and partially attitudes are formed. In harmonious family relationships the parents are the role model to children. Verbal and non-verbal communication enrich the relationship among people and enable efforts in supporting understanding, compassion and care for others by mutual agreement. On the scale of life values of Serbian citizens health holds the first position. Immediately following the health issue is good relationship in the family. As healthcare is not only the task of healthcare services, but also of each individual, family and the society as a whole, it is on healthcare personnel to educate the citizens how to preserve and improve their own health and the health of their family by a continual healthcare and education. Above all, this concerns avoidance of bad habits, such as smoking, immoderate alcohol consumption, narcotic abuse, physical inactivity, hypercaloric nutrition, etc. Also, it is significant to make an early recognition of disease symptoms and to turn for help to the chosen

  7. Inter-Provincial Migration Intentions of Family Physicians in Canada: The Roles of Income and Community Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Mou, Haizhen; Olfert, M Rose

    2015-11-01

    The inter-provincial migration patterns of family physicians in canada show that some provinces like newfoundland and saskatchewan experience persistent net out-migration, while others, including ontario and british columbia, are destinations more often than origins of migrants. Governments in provinces exhibiting net out-migration have responded with a number of incentive and recruitment programs. In this study, we investigate the determinants of the stated interprovincial migration intentions of 3,995 rural and urban family physicians in the 2010 wave of the national physician survey. We consider a range of physician characteristics, community attributes and working conditions. We find that in the intention to move, higher compensation has a modest effect, while the community characteristics have a consistently important influence. Our results suggest that policy and program designers should acknowledge the critical role of community-level living and working conditions in their family physician recruitment and retention efforts. Copyright © 2015 Longwoods Publishing.

  8. Comparing the Performance of Allopathically and Osteopathically Trained Physicians on the American Board of Family Medicine's Certification Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neill, Thomas R.; Royal, Kenneth D.; Schulte, Bradley M.; Leigh, Terrence

    2009-01-01

    Background: Two medical specialty boards offer certification in family medicine: the American Board of Family Medicine (ABFM) and the American Osteopathic Board of Family Physicians (AOBFP). The AOBFP certification is offered only to graduates of osteopathic colleges; however, graduates of both osteopathic and allopathic medical schools who have…

  9. Defining the eHealth Information Niche in the Family Physician/Patient Examination and Knowledge Transfer Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellington, Virginia Beth Elder

    2012-01-01

    This research study was undertaken to gain a richer understanding of the use of patient-introduced online health information during the physician/patient examination and knowledge transfer process. Utilizing qualitative data obtained from ten family physician interviews and workflow modeling using activity diagrams and task structure charts, this…

  10. Growing Old Together: The Influence of Population and Workforce Aging on Supply and Use of Family Physicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Diane E.; Reid, Robert; Roos, Noralou P.; Heppner, Petra

    2005-01-01

    Canadians have expressed concern that access to a family physician (FP) has declined precipitously. Yet FP to population ratios remained relatively stable over the last decade, and there were perceptions of physician surpluses, at least in urban centres, 10 years ago. We evaluated whether demographic changes among patients and FPs, and in the…

  11. Defining the eHealth Information Niche in the Family Physician/Patient Examination and Knowledge Transfer Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellington, Virginia Beth Elder

    2012-01-01

    This research study was undertaken to gain a richer understanding of the use of patient-introduced online health information during the physician/patient examination and knowledge transfer process. Utilizing qualitative data obtained from ten family physician interviews and workflow modeling using activity diagrams and task structure charts, this…

  12. Use of health care guidelines in patients with Down syndrome by family physicians across Canada

    PubMed Central

    Virji-Babul, Naznin; Eichmann, Anne; Kisly, David; Down, Jonathan; Haslam, Robert HA

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To describe the occurrence of common medical and psychological conditions in individuals with Down syndrome during their life span, and to measure the use of the Down Syndrome Medical Interest Group’s health care guidelines by family physicians across Canada, as reported by parents or caregivers. METHODS The Down Syndrome Research Foundation sent a questionnaire to 314 families across Canada who were part of the Canadian Voluntary Registry on Down Syndrome. This questionnaire was designed to collect information from parents about physical examinations, laboratory tests, referrals and discussions with family physicians that are listed in the health care guidelines. RESULTS Two hundred twenty-three families responded to the survey. The highest response rates were in families with children in the five- to 12-year-old age range (41.7%) and the 13- to 18-year-old age range (19.7%). The most common medical conditions reported were visual, hearing and cardiac related. A high percentage of sleep-, gastrointestinal- and thyroid-related conditions were also reported. In the adult group (ie, 30 years of age and older), there was a high proportion of depression and/or anxiety disorders reported. The percentage of those reporting physical examinations and medical referrals by family physicians were highest in the five- to 12-year-old age range and dropped below 50% in those aged 19 years and older. In the one- to four-year-old and five- to 12-year-old age groups, the percentages of those with Down syndrome referred for hearing tests and celiac screens were reported to be below 30%. The percentages of those reporting discussions on behavioural issues were below 50% in all age groups. CONCLUSIONS Physical examinations, as per the recommended guidelines, were followed only in the five- to 12-year-old age group. Many of the recommendations regarding discussion of behavioural problems, transition planning, diet, exercise and issues around puberty or sexual health were

  13. The role of family physicians contracted healthcare in China: A "Cardiotonic" or a "Band-Aid" for healthcare reform?

    PubMed

    Tang, Qi; Song, Peipei; Xu, Lingzhong

    2016-09-05

    On June 6, 2016, as a mode expected to open a new prospect for tiered system of medical care in China, family physicians contracted healthcare was officially launched, intending to facilitate such healthcare be universal coverage by 2020.There are some doubts as to whether this goal is possible. The role of family physicians contracted healthcare in China should also be carefully identified. We hold that family physicians contracted healthcare will promote healthcare reform if it provides a "Cardiotonic" that alleviates the long-standing inequitable allocation of healthcare resources. However, this form of care faces many obstacles given the current state of medical care in China. It will just be a "Band-Aid" if the aforementioned issues of the shortage of family physicians, coordination with referring hospitals, and incomplete oversight are not resolved.

  14. Integrating motivational interviewing and narrative therapy to teach behavior change to family medicine resident physicians.

    PubMed

    Oshman, Lauren D; Combs, Gene N

    2016-05-01

    Motivational interviewing is a useful skill to address the common problem of patient ambivalence regarding behavior change by uncovering and strengthening a person's own motivation and commitment to change. The Family Medicine Milestones underline the need for clear teaching and monitoring of skills in communication and behavior change in Family Medicine postgraduate training settings. This article reports the integration of a motivational interviewing curriculum into an existing longitudinal narrative therapy-based curriculum on patient-centered communication. Observed structured clinical examination for six participants indicate that intern physicians are able to demonstrate moderate motivational interviewing skill after a brief 2-h workshop. Participant self-evaluations for 16 participants suggest a brief 2-h curriculum was helpful at increasing importance of learning motivational interviewing by participants, and that participants desire further training opportunities. A brief motivational interviewing curriculum can be integrated into existing communication training in a Family Medicine residency training program. © The Author(s) 2016.

  15. Family matters: a social system perspective on physician-assisted suicide and the older adult.

    PubMed

    King, D A; Kim, S Y H; Conwell, Y

    2000-06-01

    Physician-assisted suicide is one of the most controversial issues facing health care providers today, provoking contentious debate that spans medical, psychological, legal, religious, and moral realms. Despite the wealth of theories and opinions proffered, most of this work focuses on concepts of individual competence and autonomy, with little or no attention paid to the dynamics of family or other psychosocial systems likely to affect an individual's decision to ask for assistance in ending his or her life. Moreover, concepts such as "autonomy" typically are examined from a legal perspective without consideration of the late-life developmental themes confronting older adults and their families, that is, the stages of life cycle transition and the predictable family stresses that typically accompany serious illness.

  16. A case study of team work and performance-linked payment of family physicians in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Conceição, Claudia; Van Lerberghe, Wim; Ramos, Vitor; Hipólito, Fátima; Ferrinho, Paulo

    2007-01-01

    In Portugal, the design and the implementation of models of primary care teams has a history of 30 years. The evolution observed is from individual medical work, in Health Centres, supported on an ad hoc basis by other health professionals, to health centres integrating a diversity of formal working groups, including primary care/family health teams called "Family Health Units" (FHU). This evolution included the creation and gradual affirmation of the speciality of family medicine and the experimentation with different models of primary health care provision: voluntary primary care health teams without financial incentives (Alfa project), voluntary primary care health teams with a performance-related-remuneration system and the current phase of scaling up FHU. The process described here illustrates how a group of physicians has established a non-formal strategy of reform throughout 30 years. This strategy involves mobilization policies and the development of field experiences by individual leaders, groups and organizations.

  17. Screening and Treatment for Alcohol, Tobacco and Opioid Use Disorders: A Survey of Family Physicians across Ontario

    PubMed Central

    Loheswaran, Genane; Soklaridis, Sophie; Selby, Peter; Le Foll, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Introduction As a primary point of contact within the health care system, family physicians are able to play a vital role in identifying individuals with substance use disorders and connecting them to the appropriate treatment. However, there is very little data available on whether family physicians are actively screening for and treating substance use disorders. The objective of the current survey was to assess whether family physicians in Ontario are screening for alcohol, opioid and tobacco use disorders, using validated tools and providing treatment. Methods An online survey consisting of a series of 38 primarily close-ended questions was circulated to family physicians in Ontario. Rates of screening for alcohol, opioid and tobacco dependence, use of validated tools for screening, providing treatment for dependent individuals and the current barriers to the prescription of pharmacotherapies for these drug dependences were assessed. Results The use of validated screening tools was limited for all three substances. Screening by family physicians for the substance use disorders among adolescents was much lower than screening among adults. Pharmacotherapy was more commonly used as an intervention for tobacco dependence than for alcohol and opioid dependence. This was explained by the lack of knowledge among family physicians on the pharmacotherapies for alcohol and opioid dependence. Conclusions Findings from the current study suggest there is a need for family physicians to integrate screening for substance use disorders using validated tools into their standard medical practice. Furthermore, there is a need for increased knowledge on pharmacotherapies for alcohol and opioid use disorders. It is important to note that the low response rate is a major limitation to this study. One possible reason for this low response rate may be a lack of interest and awareness among family physicians on the importance of screening and treatment of substance use disorders in

  18. Sponsoring Institutions with Five or Fewer Residency Programs Produce a Larger Proportion of General Internists and Family Physicians.

    PubMed

    Hemeida, Sarah; Klink, Kathleen; Bazemore, Andrew; Petterson, Stephen; Peterson, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Policymakers are increasingly interested in addressing the US primary care physician shortage and achieving measurable accountability for the products of the nation's $15 billion investment in graduate medical education (GME). Using one such measure, we found that sponsoring institutions (SIs) with ≤5 residency programs produce a higher percentage of general internists and family physicians than larger SIs. © Copyright 2016 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  19. Fitwits MD™: an office-based tool and games for conversations about obesity with 9- to 12-year-old children.

    PubMed

    McGaffey, Ann L; Abatemarco, Diane J; Jewell, Ilene Katz; Fidler, Susan K; Hughes, Kristin

    2011-01-01

    Physician feelings of ineffectiveness and family-related barriers hamper childhood obesity discussions. Physicians desire appealing, time-efficient tools to frame and sensitively address obesity, body mass index, physical activity, nutrition, and portion size. Our university design-led coalition codeveloped tools and games for this purpose. In this feasibility study, we evaluated physician-level counseling of 9- to 12-year-old children and their parents/caretakers using Fitwits MD (Carnegie Mellon University School of Design, Pittsburgh, PA), a brief, structured intervention with flashcards and take-home games. Residency-based physicians in three low- to mid-level socioeconomic urban offices provided self-report data over 8 months through surveys, comment cards, and interviews. We recruited 33 physicians and 93 preadolescents and families. Child-centered key messages resulted in 7-minute conversations, on average. For those physicians who used Fitwits MD, 96% felt improved comfort and competence and 78% noted barrier reduction. Fitwits MD improved residency-based physician self-efficacy and emphasized important health education topics regarding office-based childhood obesity discussions with preadolescents and parents/caretakers.

  20. The family physician and the psychologist in the office together: a response to fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Solano, Luigi; Pirrotta, Enzo; Ingravalle, Veronica; Fayella, Paolo

    2009-06-01

    It is well known that motives for consulting the family physician, though expressed as physical symptoms, often derive from problems needing a holistic, psychosocial approach. Progressive differentiation between medicine and psychology makes co-operation through referral to the psychologist by the physician quite problematic, in terms of both which patients are referred and the modalities of referral. Acceptance of psychological referral may, in any case, be difficult, due to the social stigma that still surrounds mental distress.The authors report a possible solution in an experiment implemented by the postgraduate Health Psychology School of the Rome University 'Sapienza', entailing joint, direct co-operation between a family physician and a psychologist through the psychologist's presence in the doctor's office during consultations. This allowed direct access to a psychologist in the absence of any filter and without the need for a formal request on the patient's part and a biopsychosocial approach to distress. In a small number of cases, more formal consultation with the psychologist was proposed. Cases were always discussed between the two professionals. To date, the experiment has involved nine psychologists and seven physicians over a period of nine years. It appears to be entirely feasible, though requiring a period of adaptation between the two professionals. Patients have welcomed the presence of the psychologist and, as expected, take a broader approach in reporting their distress.An illustrative case is presented, in which finding the meaning of a symptom avoided unnecessary and costly investigations, and facilitated the patient in taking a new direction in his life.

  1. Emotional impact of patient safety incidents on family physicians and their office staff.

    PubMed

    O'Beirne, Maeve; Sterling, Pam; Palacios-Derflingher, Luz; Hohman, Stacey; Zwicker, Karen

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the emotional responses and coping strategies that family physicians and their office staff reported in response to a patient safety incident. Two questions contained in a patient safety incident report developed for a study of patient safety in family practice were analyzed. The questions asked reporters to indicate their emotional response to a patient safety incident and how they coped with it. A total of 264 confidential patient safety incident reports collected from September 2007 to August 2010 were analyzed. An emotional response was reported on 82.4% of reports. Of those reports on which an emotional response was reported, a coping strategy was reported on 62.8%. The top 4 reported emotional responses were frustration (48.3%), embarrassment (31.5%), anger (12.6%), and guilt (10.1%). Physicians reported an emotional response more often than clinic staff. An emotional response was reported more often when there was a possibility of harm. Coping strategies were reported as follows: 52% talked to someone about the incident, 37.2% did nothing in response to the incident, 17.9% told the patient about the incident, and 3.6% did something else. Female physicians reported using coping strategies less often than male physicians. A coping strategy was reported more often when there was a possibility of harm. All members of the health care team report experiencing emotions related to patient safety incidents in their practice. Incidents with minor or no harm still invoked emotional responses from the providers. It is important to understand the impact that patient safety incidents have on the medical clinic as a whole.

  2. Family physicians' professional identity formation: a study protocol to explore impression management processes in institutional academic contexts.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Charo; Pawlikowska, Teresa; Schweyer, Francois-Xavier; López-Roig, Sofia; Bélanger, Emmanuelle; Burns, Jane; Hugé, Sandrine; Pastor-Mira, Maria Ángeles; Tellier, Pierre-Paul; Spencer, Sarah; Fiquet, Laure; Pereiró-Berenguer, Inmaculada

    2014-09-06

    Despite significant differences in terms of medical training and health care context, the phenomenon of medical students' declining interest in family medicine has been well documented in North America and in many other developed countries as well. As part of a research program on family physicians' professional identity formation initiated in 2007, the purpose of the present investigation is to examine in-depth how family physicians construct their professional image in academic contexts; in other words, this study will allow us to identify and understand the processes whereby family physicians with an academic appointment seek to control the ideas others form about them as a professional group, i.e. impression management. The methodology consists of a multiple case study embedded in the perspective of institutional theory. Four international cases from Canada, France, Ireland and Spain will be conducted; the "case" is the medical school. Four levels of analysis will be considered: individual family physicians, interpersonal relationships, family physician professional group, and organization (medical school). Individual interviews and focus groups with academic family physicians will constitute the main technique for data generation, which will be complemented with a variety of documentary sources. Discourse techniques, more particularly rhetorical analysis, will be used to analyze the data gathered. Within- and cross-case analysis will then be performed. This empirical study is strongly grounded in theory and will contribute to the scant body of literature on family physicians' professional identity formation processes in medical schools. Findings will potentially have important implications for the practice of family medicine, medical education and health and educational policies.

  3. Family Physician Involvement in Cancer Care Follow-up: The Experience of a Cohort of Patients With Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Aubin, Michèle; Vézina, Lucie; Verreault, René; Fillion, Lise; Hudon, Éveline; Lehmann, François; Leduc, Yvan; Bergeron, Rénald; Reinharz, Daniel; Morin, Diane

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE There has been little research describing the involvement of family physicians in the follow-up of patients with cancer, especially during the primary treatment phase. We undertook a prospective longitudinal study of patients with lung cancer to assess their family physician’s involvement in their follow-up at the different phases of cancer. METHODS In 5 hospitals in the province of Quebec, Canada, patients with a recent diagnosis of lung cancer were surveyed every 3 to 6 months, whether they had metastasis or not, for a maximum of 18 months, to assess aspects of their family physician’s involvement in cancer care. RESULTS Of the 395 participating patients, 92% had a regular family physician but only 60% had been referred to a specialist by him/her or a colleague for the diagnosis of their lung cancer. A majority of patients identified the oncology team or oncologists as mainly responsible for their cancer care throughout their cancer journey, except at the advanced phase, where a majority attributed this role to their family physician. At baseline, only 16% of patients perceived a shared care pattern between their family physician and oncologists, but this proportion increased with cancer progression. Most patients would have liked their family physician to be more involved in all aspects of cancer care. CONCLUSIONS Although patients perceive that the oncology team is the main party responsible for the follow-up of their lung cancer, they also wish their family physicians to be involved. Better communication and collaboration between family physicians and the oncology team are needed to facilitate shared care in cancer follow-up. PMID:21060123

  4. [The addiction patient in the family physicians' practice: tools and skills for a successful performance].

    PubMed

    Neuner-Jehle, Stefan

    2014-10-01

    Addiction patients are usually perceived as problematic patients in primary care practices: Encounters often are time-consuming and the approach to the patient is difficult. Moreover, patients sometimes are hiding their addictive behaviour and behave shameful. Other barriers are a lack of experience in communication skills among physicians or their own addictive behaviour. Nevertheless, to diagnose and treat addiction as early as possible is an important task for family doctors, as patients' confidence in them is an important factor to induce a behaviour change. We present four screening tests for the early diagnosis of addiction to alcohol (AUDIT, AUDIT-C, CAGE, SMAST-G) and discuss their strengths and shortcomings. The family doctor's practice is also a useful setting for brief interventions based on motivational interviewing (MI) techniques and the transtheoretical model of behaviour change (TTM). We shortly introduce to these techniques and attitudes using addiction to alcohol and nicotine as examples, and we present innovative methods as "defined drinking" and new quit smoking methods. A respectful attitude towards the patient and communication skills seem to be key factors for family physicians to successfully approach their addiction patients.

  5. Perceptions of patients, families, physicians and nurses regarding challenges in cancer disclosure: A descriptive qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Ehsani, Maryam; Taleghani, Fariba; Hematti, Simin; Abazari, Parvaneh

    2016-12-01

    The findings of numerous studies have illustrated that there is still a high proportion of cancer patients in Eastern and Middle-East countries including Iran, who are not properly informed of their disease due to the concealment atmosphere which still prevails. This descriptive qualitative study is aimed at exploring perceptions of patients, patients' family members, physicians and nurses regarding cancer disclosure challenges. Thirty-five participants (15 patients, 6 family members, 9 physicians, and 5 nurses) were selected through purposive sampling. The data were collected through in-depth interviews; after which they were analyzed using a qualitative content analysis with an inductive approach. Data analysis revealed the following three categories: first, challenges related to healthcare system which deals with the deficiencies, strains and concerns in medical setting and healthcare team training; second, challenges related to family insistence on concealment which includes their fear of cancer disclosure and its negative impact on the patients; and third, challenges related to policy making which consists of deficiencies in legislative and supportive institutions for advocacy of truth telling. Successful move from concealment to effective disclosure attitude in cancer patients in Iran requires a national determination for resolving challenges in medical education as well as other different social, cultural and policy making dimensions. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Respiratory support withdrawal in intensive care units: families, physicians and nurses views on two hypothetical clinical scenarios.

    PubMed

    Fumis, Renata R L; Deheinzelin, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Evidence suggests that dying patients' physical and emotional suffering is inadequately treated in intensive care units. Although there are recommendations regarding decisions to forgo life-sustaining therapy, deciding on withdrawal of life support is difficult, and it is also difficult to decide who should participate in this decision. We distributed a self-administered questionnaire in 13 adult intensive care units (ICUs) assessing the attitudes of physicians and nurses regarding end-of-life decisions. Family members from a medical-surgical ICU in a tertiary cancer hospital were also invited to participate. Questions were related to two hypothetical clinical scenarios, one with a competent patient and the other with an incompetent patient, asking whether the ventilator treatment should be withdrawn and about who should make this decision. Physicians (155) and nurses (204) of 12 ICUs agreed to take part in this study, along with 300 family members. The vast majority of families (78.6%), physicians (74.8%) and nurses (75%) want to discuss end-of-life decisions with competent patients. Most of the physicians and nurses desire family involvement in end-of-life decisions. Physicians are more likely to propose withdrawal of the ventilator with competent patients than with incompetent patients (74.8% × 60.7%, P = 0.028). When the patient was incompetent, physicians (34.8%) were significantly less prone than nurses (23.0%) and families (14.7%) to propose decisions regarding withdrawal of the ventilator support (P < 0.001). Physicians, nurses and families recommended limiting life-support therapy with terminally ill patients and favored family participation. In decisions concerning an incompetent patient, physicians were more likely to maintain the therapy.

  7. Knowledge of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance in patients followed by family physicians.

    PubMed

    Robert, A; Nguyen, Y; Bajolet, O; Vuillemin, B; Defoin, B; Vernet-Garnier, V; Drame, M; Bani-Sadr, F

    2017-03-01

    We aimed to evaluate factors associated with knowledge of antibiotics and drug resistance. A questionnaire was handed out by 14 family physicians to their patients between December 20, 2014 and April 20, 2015 in Rethel (North-East of France). We conducted a cross-sectional study using a logistical regression model to assess factors associated with antibiotic knowledge. Three criteria were used to assess that knowledge. Overall, 293 questionnaires were analysed; 48% of patients had received antibiotics in the previous 12 months. Only 44% and 26% gave a correct answer for the statements "Antibiotics are effective against bacteria and ineffective against viruses" and "Antibiotic resistance decreases if the antibiotic use decreases", respectively. Characteristics such as female sex, age>30 years, high level of education, high professional categories, and having received antibiotic information by the media were associated with high level of knowledge about antibiotics and/or antibiotic resistance. In contrast, having received antibiotic information from family physicians was not associated with good knowledge. Although media awareness campaigns had an independent impact on a higher public knowledge of antibiotics, the overall public knowledge remains low. It would be necessary to strengthen antibiotic campaigns with clearer information on the relation between the excessive use of antibiotics and the increased risk of antibiotic resistance. Family physicians should be more involved to improve antibiotic knowledge among target groups such as men, young patients, and people from a poor social and cultural background. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Interventions at the laboratory level to reduce laboratory test ordering by family physicians: Systematic review.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Roger E; Vaska, Marcus; Naugler, Christopher; Turin, Tanvir C

    2015-12-01

    To assess the effectiveness of interventions by laboratories and to increase rational and reduce unnecessary family physician test ordering. MEDLINE [1946-present], EMBASE [1980-present], EBM Reviews [1991-present](Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, ACP Journal Club, Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects, - Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cochrane Methodology Register, Health Technology Assessment, NHS Economic Evaluation Database), PubMed [1966-present], PubMed Central [1900-present], Scopus [1960-present], Web of Science [1900-present] and CINAHL [1982-present] were searched with no language or publication limits. Non-randomised studies were assessed with the Newcastle-Ottawa scale. The search identified 9282 titles and abstracts, 238 were read in full-text and 3 cohort and 7 before- and after-studies were included. Most focused on changing a few tests and evaluated the interventions over several months. Seven changed laboratory forms (the two largest involved 5.2 million and 3.2 million tests), one negotiated a test ordering protocol with family physicians, and two required laboratory approval. They achieved an average 35% reduction in the 19 targeted tests, with a wide range (0%-100% reduction). Ten studies were identified which tested interventions by laboratories to reduce test ordering by family physicians, and achieved an average 35% reduction in the 19 targeted tests. The rationale for choosing specific tests for intervention was often not explained, most studies targeted a few tests for several months, the tests and test volumes differed widely across studies, no author improved the results of previous interventions or asked participants their opinions about the intervention or assessed factors impeding change. Copyright © 2015 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A Manual for Prioritizing the Topics of Clinical Practice Guidelines for Family Physicians.

    PubMed

    Mounesan, Leila; Sayarifard, Azadeh; Haghjou, Leila; Ghadirian, Laleh; Rajabi, Fatemeh; Nedjat, Saharnaz

    2016-01-01

    Development of a manual or well-defined criterion for prioritizing the topics of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) will help validate and organize this process evermore. This study was conducted to design an applicable manual that would prioritize the CPG topics for family physicians. This study was a multi-stage method using a qualitative approach that was conducted for the manual developing. The manual development process took place in four steps, as follows: Literature review, interviews with ten experts, preparing a list of criteria and determining its appropriateness by applying the RAND/UCLA Appropriateness method, and development of the final draft of the manual and pilot study. Interview transcripts went under content analysis and were classified into eight main groups, 12 subgroups, and 85 themes. A comprehensive list consisting of fifty preliminary criteria were extracted. After summarizing and classifying the criteria, 12 appropriate criteria were evaluated using the RAND appropriateness method. Eventually, based on the literature review and our own results of the interview analysis, a manual consisting of five main sections and one clause on ethics was developed. Later, a pilot study was conducted on ten family physician topics, and prioritized by nine experts. The manual can be eyed as a tool ensuring the quality of the process of prioritizing CPG topics for family physicians, as it takes into account the issues involved in priority-setting. Selecting informed stakeholders for rating the criteria and ranking the topics was an issue that was greatly emphasized by the experts. Eventually, the application of this manual can be the first step toward systematizing the process of prioritizing CPG topics in the country.

  10. A Manual for Prioritizing the Topics of Clinical Practice Guidelines for Family Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Mounesan, Leila; Sayarifard, Azadeh; Haghjou, Leila; Ghadirian, Laleh; Rajabi, Fatemeh; Nedjat, Saharnaz

    2016-01-01

    Background: Development of a manual or well-defined criterion for prioritizing the topics of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) will help validate and organize this process evermore. This study was conducted to design an applicable manual that would prioritize the CPG topics for family physicians. Methods: This study was a multi-stage method using a qualitative approach that was conducted for the manual developing. The manual development process took place in four steps, as follows: Literature review, interviews with ten experts, preparing a list of criteria and determining its appropriateness by applying the RAND/UCLA Appropriateness method, and development of the final draft of the manual and pilot study. Results: Interview transcripts went under content analysis and were classified into eight main groups, 12 subgroups, and 85 themes. A comprehensive list consisting of fifty preliminary criteria were extracted. After summarizing and classifying the criteria, 12 appropriate criteria were evaluated using the RAND appropriateness method. Eventually, based on the literature review and our own results of the interview analysis, a manual consisting of five main sections and one clause on ethics was developed. Later, a pilot study was conducted on ten family physician topics, and prioritized by nine experts. Conclusions: The manual can be eyed as a tool ensuring the quality of the process of prioritizing CPG topics for family physicians, as it takes into account the issues involved in priority-setting. Selecting informed stakeholders for rating the criteria and ranking the topics was an issue that was greatly emphasized by the experts. Eventually, the application of this manual can be the first step toward systematizing the process of prioritizing CPG topics in the country. PMID:27141283

  11. Do Family Physicians Retrieve Synopses of Clinical Research Previously Read as Email Alerts?

    PubMed Central

    Pluye, Pierre; Johnson-Lafleur, Janique; Granikov, Vera; Shulha, Michael; Bartlett, Gillian; Marlow, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    Background A synopsis of new clinical research highlights important aspects of one study in a brief structured format. When delivered as email alerts, synopses enable clinicians to become aware of new developments relevant for practice. Once read, a synopsis can become a known item of clinical information. In time-pressured situations, remembering a known item may facilitate information retrieval by the clinician. However, exactly how synopses first delivered as email alerts influence retrieval at some later time is not known. Objectives We examined searches for clinical information in which a synopsis previously read as an email alert was retrieved (defined as a dyad). Our study objectives were to (1) examine whether family physicians retrieved synopses they previously read as email alerts and then to (2) explore whether family physicians purposefully retrieved these synopses. Methods We conducted a mixed-methods study in which a qualitative multiple case study explored the retrieval of email alerts within a prospective longitudinal cohort of practicing family physicians. Reading of research-based synopses was tracked in two contexts: (1) push, meaning to read on email and (2) pull, meaning to read after retrieval from one electronic knowledge resource. Dyads, defined as synopses first read as email alerts and subsequently retrieved in a search of a knowledge resource, were prospectively identified. Participants were interviewed about all of their dyads. Outcomes were the total number of dyads and their type. Results Over a period of 341 days, 194 unique synopses delivered to 41 participants resulted in 4937 synopsis readings. In all, 1205 synopses were retrieved over an average of 320 days. Of the 1205 retrieved synopses, 21 (1.7%) were dyads made by 17 family physicians. Of the 1205 retrieved synopses, 6 (0.5%) were known item type dyads. However, dyads also occurred serendipitously. Conclusion In the single knowledge resource we studied, email alerts containing

  12. Mining reflective continuing medical education data for family physician learning needs.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Denice Colleen; Pluye, Pierre; Rodriguez, Charo; Grad, Roland

    2016-04-06

    A mixed methods research (sequential explanatory design) studied the potential of mining the data from the consumers of continuing medical education (CME) programs, for the developers of CME programs. The quantitative data generated by family physicians, through applying the information assessment method to CME content, was presented to key informants from the CME planning community through a qualitative description study.The data were revealed to have many potential applications including supporting the creation of CME content, CME program planning and personal learning portfolios.

  13. Cruising the information highway: online services and electronic mail for physicians and families.

    PubMed

    Faughnan, J G; Doukas, D J; Ebell, M H; Fox, G N

    1994-10-01

    Commercial online service providers, bulletin board services, and the Internet make up the rapidly expanding "information highway." Physicians and their families can use these services for professional and personal communication, for recreation and commerce, and to obtain reference information and computer software. Commercial providers include America Online, CompuServe, GEnie, and MCIMail. Internet access can be obtained indirectly through America Online or directly through specialized access providers. Today's online services are destined to evolve into a National Information Infrastructure that will change the way we work and play.

  14. Importance of telemedicine in diabetes care: Relationships between family physicians and ophthalmologists

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Aroca, Pedro; Sagarra-Alamo, Ramon; Pareja-Rios, Alicia; López, Maribel

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the worldwide leading cause of legal blindness. In 2010, 1.9% of diabetes mellitus (DM) patients were legally blind and 10.2% had visual impairment. The control of DM parameters (glycemia, arterial tension and lipids) is the gold standard for preventing DR complications, although, unfortunately, DR still appeared in a 25% to 35% of patients. The stages of severe vision threading DR, include proliferative DR (6.96%) and diabetic macular edema (6.81%). This review aims to update our knowledge on DR screening using telemedicine, the different techniques, the problems, and the inclusion of different professionals such as family physicians in care programs. PMID:26240697

  15. Do family physicians retrieve synopses of clinical research previously read as email alerts?

    PubMed

    Grad, Roland; Pluye, Pierre; Johnson-Lafleur, Janique; Granikov, Vera; Shulha, Michael; Bartlett, Gillian; Marlow, Bernard

    2011-11-30

    A synopsis of new clinical research highlights important aspects of one study in a brief structured format. When delivered as email alerts, synopses enable clinicians to become aware of new developments relevant for practice. Once read, a synopsis can become a known item of clinical information. In time-pressured situations, remembering a known item may facilitate information retrieval by the clinician. However, exactly how synopses first delivered as email alerts influence retrieval at some later time is not known. We examined searches for clinical information in which a synopsis previously read as an email alert was retrieved (defined as a dyad). Our study objectives were to (1) examine whether family physicians retrieved synopses they previously read as email alerts and then to (2) explore whether family physicians purposefully retrieved these synopses. We conducted a mixed-methods study in which a qualitative multiple case study explored the retrieval of email alerts within a prospective longitudinal cohort of practicing family physicians. Reading of research-based synopses was tracked in two contexts: (1) push, meaning to read on email and (2) pull, meaning to read after retrieval from one electronic knowledge resource. Dyads, defined as synopses first read as email alerts and subsequently retrieved in a search of a knowledge resource, were prospectively identified. Participants were interviewed about all of their dyads. Outcomes were the total number of dyads and their type. Over a period of 341 days, 194 unique synopses delivered to 41 participants resulted in 4937 synopsis readings. In all, 1205 synopses were retrieved over an average of 320 days. Of the 1205 retrieved synopses, 21 (1.7%) were dyads made by 17 family physicians. Of the 1205 retrieved synopses, 6 (0.5%) were known item type dyads. However, dyads also occurred serendipitously. In the single knowledge resource we studied, email alerts containing research-based synopses were rarely retrieved

  16. Comparing the quality of oral anticoagulant management by anticoagulation clinics and by family physicians: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, S. Jo-Anne; Wells, Philip S.; Kovacs, Michael J.; Lewis, Geoffrey M.; Martin, Janet; Burton, Erica; Anderson, David R.

    2003-01-01

    Background There is growing evidence that better outcomes are achieved when anticoagulation is managed by anticoagulation clinics rather than by family physicians. We carried out a randomized controlled trial to evaluate these 2 models of anticoagulant care. Methods We randomly allocated patients who were expected to require warfarin sodium for 3 months either to anticoagulation clinics located in 3 Canadian tertiary hospitals or to their family physician practices. We evaluated the quality of oral anticoagulant management by comparing the proportion of time that the international normalized ratio (INR) of patients receiving warfarin sodium was within the target therapeutic range ± 0.2 INR units (expanded therapeutic range) while they were managed in anticoagulation clinics as opposed to family physicians' care over 3 months. We measured the rates of thromboembolic and major hemorrhagic events and patient satisfaction in the 2 groups. Results Of the 221 patients enrolled, 112 were randomly assigned to anticoagulation clinics and 109 to family physicians. The INR values of patients who were managed by anticoagulation clinics were within the expanded therapeutic range 82% of the time versus 76% of the time for those managed by family physicians (p = 0.034). High-risk INR values (defined as being < 1.5 or > 5.0) were more commonly observed in patients managed by family physicians (40%) than in patients managed by anticoagulation clinics (30%, p = 0.005). More INR measurements were performed by family physicians than by anticoagulation clinics (13 v. 11, p = 0.001). Major bleeding events (2 [2%] v. 1 [1%]), thromboembolic events (1 [1%] v. 2 [2%]) and deaths (5 [4%] v. 6 [6%]) occurred at a similar frequency in the anticoagulation clinic and family physician groups respectively. Of the 170 (77%) patients who completed the patient satisfaction questionnaire, more were satisfied when their anticoagulant management was managed through anticoagulation clinics than by

  17. Evidence-based cardiovascular care. Family physicians' views of obstacles and opportunities.

    PubMed Central

    Putnam, Wayne; Twohig, Peter L.; Burge, Frederick I.; Jackson, Lois A.; Cox, Jafna L.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore obstacles to and opportunities for applying specific lifestyle and pharmacologic recommendations on chronic ischemic heart disease. DESIGN: Qualitative study. SETTING: Rural, town, and city settings in Nova Scotia. PARTICIPANTS: Fifty family physicians caring for patients with cardiovascular (CV) disease. METHOD: Nine focus groups were conducted, audiotaped, and transcribed. Seven recommendations had been selected for discussion based on their relevance to primary care, strength, and class of supporting evidence. Analysis was guided by grounded-theory methodology. MAIN FINDINGS: "Ischemic events" can be powerful motivators for change, whereas the asymptomatic nature of CV risks and distant outcomes can form obstacles. Trust built through previous experiences and the opportunity to repeat important messages can facilitate application of evidence, but patient-physician relationships can also pose obstacles. CONCLUSION: Physicians can take steps to improve care, but success at reducing CV risks depends upon active involvement of many health professionals and community resources. Future guideline implementation should focus on patient-oriented issues, such as comorbidity and treatment preferences. PMID:15526877

  18. LEVEL OF COMPETENCIES OF FAMILY PHYSICIANS IN KOSOVO FROM DIFFERENT PERSPECTIVES

    PubMed Central

    Bojaj, Gazmend; Skeraj, Fitim; Czabanowska, Katarzyna; Burazeri, Genc

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this analysis was to compare the level of self-perceived competencies of primary health care physicians in Kosovo with patients’ viewpoint, as well as the necessary (required) level of such competencies from decision-makers’ standpoint. Methods: Three cross-sectional studies were carried out in Kosovo in 2013 including: i) a representative sample of 1340 primary health care users aged ≥18 years (49% men; overall mean age: 50.5±17.9 years; response rate: 89%); ii) a representative sample of 597 primary health care physicians (49% men; overall mean age: 46.0±9.4 years; response rate: 90%), and; iii) a nationwide representative sample of 100 decision-makers operating at different primary health care institutions or public health agencies in Kosovo (63% men; mean age: 47.7±5.7 years). A structured self-administered questionnaire (consisting of 37 items) was used in the three surveys in order to assess physicians’ competencies regarding different domains of the quality of health care. Results: There was a significant gap in the level of self-perceived physicians’ competencies and patients’ perspective in transitional Kosovo. Furthermore, there was a gap in the level of self-perceived physicians’ competencies and the necessary (required) level of physicians’ competencies from decision-makers perspective which was less evident in Prishtina, but considerable in the other regions of Kosovo. Conclusion: Our analysis provides valuable evidence about the level of competencies of primary health care physicians in Kosovo from different stakeholders’ perspectives. There is an urgent need for continuous professional development of family physicians in post-war Kosovo. PMID:27999483

  19. A case of informed consent obtained from a patient with terminal cancer and his family using family function by the primary care physician.

    PubMed

    Tsuboi, Keiko; Minegishi, Yukiko; Harada, Toshihide; Ishizaki, Fumiko; Nitta, Kohsaku

    2007-06-01

    We evaluated the contents and characteristics of informed consent obtained by the primary care physician from a male patient with advanced cancer and his family, and clarified the influences of the informed consent on family function. This patient was diagnosed as having advanced cancer at the age of 46 years, underwent surgery/chemotherapy, but died after 4 months at the hospital. Semi-structured interviews were held with the elder daughter of the patient, and notes on the patient's disease, the course of treatment, his family's responses, and the informed consent obtained by the primary care physician were taken during the interview. The informed consent obtained by the primary care physician had the following characteristics: (1) The physician transmitted accurate and detailed information on the treatment methods, side effects, and prognosis by appropriate communication techniques with consideration for the feelings of the patient and his family, and proposed choices so that they could participate in the decision of treatment principles. (2) During the entire course, the primary care physician frequently visited the bedside and encouraged the patient and his family to express their feelings of anxiety and to ask questions, giving continuous emotional support. With the progression of the disease and explanation by the primary care physician, the patient and his family expressed and shared feelings such as grief and powerlessness and supported each another. Gradually, they began to show practical/adaptive coping behavior and could accept the patient's death. Appropriate informed consent obtained by the primary-care physician promoted the family function of this family.

  20. The future prospects of Lithuanian family physicians: a 10-year forecasting study.

    PubMed

    Starkiene, Liudvika; Smigelskas, Kastytis; Padaiga, Zilvinas; Reamy, Jack

    2005-10-04

    When health care reform was started in 1991, the physician workforce in Lithuania was dominated by specialists, and the specialty of family physician (FP) did not exist at all. During fifteen years of Lithuania's independence this specialty evolved rapidly and over 1,900 FPs were trained or retrained. Since 2003, the Lithuanian health care sector has undergone restructuring to optimize the network of health care institutions as well as the delivery of services; specific attention has been paid to the development of services provided by FPs, with more health care services shifted from the hospital level to the primary health care level. In this paper we analyze if an adequate workforce of FPs will be available in the future to take over new emerging tasks. A computer spreadsheet simulation model was used to project the supply of FPs in 2006-2015. The supply was projected according to three scenarios, which took into account different rates of retirement, migration and drop out from training. In addition different population projections and enrollment numbers in residency programs were also considered. Three requirement scenarios were made using different approaches. In the first scenario we used the requirement estimated by a panel of experts using the Delphi technique. The second scenario was based on the number of visits to FPs in 2003 and took into account the goal to increase the number of visits. The third scenario was based on the determination that one FP should serve no more than 2,000 inhabitants. The three scenarios for the projection of supply were compared with the three requirement scenarios. The supply of family physicians will be higher in 2015 compared to 2005 according to all projection scenarios. The largest differences in the supply scenarios were caused by different migration rates, enrollment numbers to training programs and the retirement age. The second supply scenario, which took into account 1.1% annual migration rate, stable enrollment to

  1. Too many referrals of low-risk women for BRCA1/2 genetic services by family physicians.

    PubMed

    White, Della Brown; Bonham, Vence L; Jenkins, Jean; Stevens, Nancy; McBride, Colleen M

    2008-11-01

    The increasing availability and public awareness of BRCA1/2 genetic testing will increase women's self-referrals to genetic services. The objective of this study was to examine whether patient characteristics influence the referral decisions of family physicians when a patient requests BRCA1/2 genetic testing. Family physicians (n = 284) completed a Web-based survey in 2006 to assess their attitudes and practices related to the use of genetics in their clinical practice. Using a 2 x 2 x 2 factorial design, we tested the effects of a hypothetical patient's race, level of worry, and insurance status on the decisions of family physicians to refer her for BRCA1/2 testing. The patient was not appropriate for referral based on U.S. Preventive Services Task Force guidelines. No patient characteristics were associated with the family physicians' referral decisions. Although referral was not indicated, only 8% did not refer to genetic services; 92% referred for genetic services, and 50% referred to genetic counseling. Family physicians regarded it unlikely that the patient carried a mutation, but 65% of family physicians believed that if they refused to refer for genetic services it would harm their relationship with the patient. Despite scarce and costly genetic services, family physicians were likely to inappropriately refer a low-risk patient who requested BRCA1/2 testing. The implications of this inappropriate referral on women's screening behavior, genetic services, and health care costs are unknown. Clinicians and patients could benefit from education about the appropriate use of genetic services so that both are more comfortable with a decision against referral.

  2. Factors Affecting Leave out of General Practitioners from Rural Family Physician Program: A Case of Kerman, Iran.

    PubMed

    Amiresmaili, Mohammadreza; Khosravi, Sajad; Feyzabadi, Vahid Yazdi

    2014-10-01

    Rural family physician program as the new reform in the Iranian health system has been implemented since 2005. Its success depends much on physicians' retention. The present study aimed to identify influential factors on physicians' willingness to leave out this program in Kerman province. The present cross-sectional study was performed in Kerman province in 2011. All family physicians working in this program (n = 271) were studied using a questionnaire. Data analysis was carried out using descriptive statistics and logistic regression through SPSS version 18.0. Twenty-six percent (70) of the physicians had left out the program in the past. In addition, 77.3% (208) intended to leave out in the near future. Opportunity for continuing education, inappropriate and long working hours, unsuitable requirements of salary, irregular payments, lack of job security and high working responsibility were regarded as the most important reasons for leaving out the program in the past and intention to leave out in future orderly. According to univariate logistic regression, younger physicians (odds ratio [OR] =2.479; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.261-4.872) and physicians who had older children (OR = 4.743; 95% CI: 1.441-15.607) were more willing to leave out the plan in the near future, however it was not significant in multivariate logistic regression. Physician retention in family physician program is faced with serious doubts due to different reasons. The success of the program is endangered because of the pivotal role of human resources. Hence, the revision of human resources policies of the program seems necessary in order to reduce physicians leave out and improving its effectiveness.

  3. Follow-up after treatment for breast cancer: Practical guide to survivorship care for family physicians.

    PubMed

    Sisler, Jeffrey; Chaput, Genevieve; Sussman, Jonathan; Ozokwelu, Emmanuel

    2016-10-01

    To offer FPs a summary of evidence-based recommendations to guide their follow-up survivorship care of women treated for breast cancer. A literature search was conducted in MEDLINE from 2000 to 2016 using the search words breast cancer, survivorship, follow-up care, aftercare, guidelines, and survivorship care plans, with a focus on review of recent guidelines published by national cancer organizations. Evidence ranges from level I to level III. Survivorship care involves 4 main tasks: surveillance and screening, management of long-term effects, health promotion, and care coordination. Surveillance for recurrence involves only annual mammography, and screening for other cancers should be done according to population guidelines. Management of the long-term effects of cancer and its treatment addresses common issues of pain, fatigue, lymphedema, distress, and medication side effects, as well as longer-term concerns for cardiac and bone health. Health promotion emphasizes the benefits of active lifestyle change in cancer survivors, with an emphasis on physical activity. Survivorship care is enhanced by the involvement of various health professionals and services, and FPs play an important role in care coordination. Family physicians are increasingly the main providers of follow-up care after breast cancer treatment. Breast cancer should be viewed as a chronic medical condition even in women who remain disease free, and patients benefit from the approach afforded other chronic conditions in primary care. Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

  4. Fostering excellence: roles, responsibilities, and expectations of new family physician clinician investigators.

    PubMed

    Hogg, William; Kendall, Claire; Muggah, Elizabeth; Mayo-Bruinsma, Liesha; Ziebell, Laura

    2014-02-01

    A key priority in primary health care research is determining how to ensure the advancement of new family physician clinician investigators (FP-CIs). However, there is little consensus on what expectations should be implemented for new investigators to ensure the successful and timely acquisition of independent salary support. Support new FP-CIs to maximize early career research success. This program description aims to summarize the administrative and financial support provided by the C.T. Lamont Primary Health Care Research Centre in Ottawa, Ont, to early career FP-CIs; delineate career expectations; and describe the results in terms of research productivity on the part of new FP-CIs. Family physician CI's achieved a high level of research productivity during their first 5 years, but most did not secure external salary support. It might be unrealistic to expect new FP-CIs to be self-financing by the end of 5 years. This is a career-development program, and supporting new career FP-CIs requires a long-term investment. This understanding is critical to fostering and strengthening sustainable primary care research programs.

  5. [Scope of two educational strategies to develop the clinical aptitude of the family physician].

    PubMed

    Reyes-Ruiz, María Esther; García-Mangas, José Alberto; Pérez-Ilagor, Víctor Manuel

    2014-01-01

    The evaluation of the clinical aptitude is expressed in challenging clinical situations and the scope of learning is conditioned by the quality of the educational strategy. The aim of this study was to value the scope of two different educational approaches, in order to develop the clinical aptitude of 20 family physicians. Quasi experimental design, in which 20 general physicians in training process of Family Medicine were randomized: a teaching-centered strategy (TCS) was applied in 10, and a learning-centered strategy (LCS) in the remaining 10. The application of both strategies lasted 24 hours, and the same content was used on them. While applying TCS, it was employed an exposition with questions (which privileged the transmission of information). While implementing LCS, it was used discussion in small groups (which favored the point of view and the confrontation). To validate the evaluation, it was used the Kuder-Richardson formula 20, with a reliability of 0.91. Before the intervention, TCS group had a median of 124 and LCS group, 105 (p = 0.19). After the intervention, TCS group showed a median of 126, and LCS group of 156 (p = 0.012). Both groups were compared using Mann Whitney U, and the same subjects were also compared with the matched pairs Wilcoxon test. The differences were statistically significant, which it does not differ from earlier studies. The clinical aptitude reaches best development in the LCS when tested against TCS.

  6. What is the role of family in promoting faecal occult blood test screening? Exploring physician, average-risk individual, and family perceptions.

    PubMed

    Lobchuk, Michelle M; Bapuji, Sunita B; McClement, Susan E; Sisler, Jeffrey J; Katz, Alan; Martens, Patricia; Turner, Donna; Clouston, Kathleen

    2012-06-01

    Although the number of Canadians being screened for colon cancer is rising, only 40% of Canadians aged 50 years or older reported they had engaged in faecal occult blood test (FOBT) screening as recommended. The notion of 'partnerships' that is inclusive of physicians, individuals at average-risk for colorectal cancer, and influential family members is receiving more attention in primary health care literature and policy on promoting health maintenance behaviours. To the best of our knowledge there are no studies that have taken a tripartite approach in describing perspectives of these three key stakeholders on the role of family in promoting adherence to FOBT. The aim of this study was to address the gap in understanding the perspectives of primary care physicians, individuals at average-risk for colorectal cancer, and family on family role in promoting adherence to FOBT screening. We employed a qualitative design and conducted semi-structured interviews with 15 physicians, 27 patients at average-risk for colorectal cancer, and 19 family members or friends from urban and rural Manitoba, Canada between October 2008 and March 2010. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analysed using content analysis and constant comparative techniques. While physicians described a clear role for family in managing chronic disease or dealing with acute or serious illness, they identified barriers in working with family to promote FOBT screening: lack of time, privacy and confidentiality concerns, and family dynamics. Conversely, patients and family described instrumental, emotional, informational, and appraisal roles that family play in promoting FOBT outside medical encounters. Adherence to colorectal cancer screening is based on supportive 'patient-physician' dialogue that is separate from assistive 'patient-family member' relations. Further research is required to explore social support mechanisms involving family members outside medical encounters that hold

  7. What Families Need and Physicians Deliver: Contrasting Communication Preferences Between Surrogate Decision-Makers and Physicians During Outcome Prognostication in Critically Ill TBI Patients.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Thomas; Moskowitz, Jesse; Khan, Muhammad W; Shutter, Lori; Goldberg, Robert; Col, Nananda; Mazor, Kathleen M; Muehlschlegel, Susanne

    2017-07-06

    Surrogate decision-makers ("surrogates") and physicians of incapacitated patients have different views of prognosis and how it should be communicated, but this has not been investigated in neurocritically ill patients. We examined surrogates' communication preferences and physicians' practices during the outcome prognostication for critically ill traumatic brain injury (ciTBI) patients in two level-1 trauma centers and seven academic medical centers in the USA. We used qualitative content analysis and descriptive statistics of transcribed interviews to identify themes in surrogates (n = 16) and physicians (n = 20). The majority of surrogates (82%) preferred numeric estimates describing the patient's prognosis, as they felt it would increase prognostic certainty, and limit the uncertainty perceived as frustrating. Conversely, 75% of the physicians reported intentionally omitting numeric estimates during prognostication meetings due to low confidence in family members' abilities to appropriately interpret probabilities, worry about creating false hope, and distrust in the accuracy and data quality of existing TBI outcome models. Physicians felt that these models are for research only and should not be applied to individual patients. Surrogates valued compassion during prognostication discussions, and acceptance of their goals-of-care decision by clinicians. Physicians and surrogates agreed on avoiding false hope. We identified fundamental differences in the communication preferences of prognostic information between ciTBI patient surrogates and physicians. These findings inform the content of a future decision aid for goals-of-care discussions in ciTBI patients. If validated, these findings may have important implications for improving communication practices in the neurointensive care unit independent of whether a formal decision aid is used.

  8. Attitudes of Slovenian family practice patients toward changing unhealthy lifestyle and the role of family physicians: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Klemenc-Ketis, Zalika; Bulc, Mateja; Kersnik, Janko

    2011-01-01

    Aim To assess patients’ attitudes toward changing unhealthy lifestyle, confidence in the success, and desired involvement of their family physicians in facilitating this change. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study in 15 family physicians’ practices on a consecutive sample of 472 patients (44.9% men, mean age  [± standard deviation] 49.3 ± 10.9 years) from October 2007 to May 2008. Patients were given a self-administered questionnaire on attitudes toward changing unhealthy diet, increasing physical activity, and reducing body weight. It also included questions on confidence in the success, planning lifestyle changes, and advice from family physicians. Results Nearly 20% of patients planned to change their eating habits, increase physical activity, and reach normal body weight. Approximately 30% of patients (more men than women) said that they wanted to receive advice on this issue from their family physicians. Younger patients and patients with higher education were more confident that they could improve their lifestyle. Patients who planned to change their lifestyle and were more confident in the success wanted to receive advice from their family physicians. Conclusion Family physicians should regularly ask the patients about the intention of changing their lifestyle and offer them help in carrying out this intention. PMID:21495204

  9. Working conditions and Work-Family Conflict in German hospital physicians: psychosocial and organisational predictors and consequences

    PubMed Central

    Fuß, Isabelle; Nübling, Matthias; Hasselhorn, Hans-Martin; Schwappach, David; Rieger, Monika A

    2008-01-01

    Background Germany currently experiences a situation of major physician attrition. The incompatibility between work and family has been discussed as one of the major reasons for the increasing departure of German physicians for non-clinical occupations or abroad. This study investigates predictors for one particular direction of Work-Family Conflict – namely work interfering with family conflict (WIF) – which are located within the psychosocial work environment or work organisation of hospital physicians. Furthermore, effects of WIF on the individual physicians' physical and mental health were examined. Analyses were performed with an emphasis on gender differences. Comparisons with the general German population were made. Methods Data were collected by questionnaires as part of a study on Psychosocial work hazards and strains of German hospital physicians during April–July 2005. Two hundred and ninety-six hospital physicians (response rate 38.9%) participated in the survey. The Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire (COPSOQ), work interfering with family conflict scale (WIF), and hospital-specific single items on work organisation were used to assess WIF, its predictors, and consequences. Results German hospital physicians reported elevated levels of WIF (mean = 74) compared to the general German population (mean = 45, p < .01). No significant gender difference was found. Predictors for the WIF were lower age, high quantitative demands at work, elevated number of days at work despite own illness, and consequences of short-notice changes in the duty roster. Good sense of community at work was a protective factor. Compared to the general German population, we observed a significant higher level of quantitative work demands among hospital physicians (mean = 73 vs. mean = 57, p < .01). High values of WIF were significantly correlated to higher rates of personal burnout, behavioural and cognitive stress symptoms, and the intention to leave the job. In contrast

  10. National Trends in Child and Adolescent Psychotropic Polypharmacy in Office-Based Practice, 1996-2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comer, Jonathan S.; Olfson, Mark; Mojtabai, Ramin

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To examine patterns and recent trends in multiclass psychotropic treatment among youth visits to office-based physicians in the United States. Method: Annual data from the 1996-2007 National Ambulatory Medical Care Surveys were analyzed to examine patterns and trends in multiclass psychotropic treatment within a nationally…

  11. National Trends in Child and Adolescent Psychotropic Polypharmacy in Office-Based Practice, 1996-2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comer, Jonathan S.; Olfson, Mark; Mojtabai, Ramin

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To examine patterns and recent trends in multiclass psychotropic treatment among youth visits to office-based physicians in the United States. Method: Annual data from the 1996-2007 National Ambulatory Medical Care Surveys were analyzed to examine patterns and trends in multiclass psychotropic treatment within a nationally…

  12. Access to Healthcare in Urban Family Physician Reform from Physicians and Patients’ Perspective: a survey-based project in two pilot provinces in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Jahromi, Vahid Kohpeima; Dehnavieh, Reza; Mehrolhassani, Mohammad Hossein; Anari, Hosain Saberi

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Iran introduced the urban family physician reform, based on the primary healthcare (PHC) approach, in 2012. The reform is restricted to two pilot provinces, which are Fars and Mazandaran and its policymakers request evidence of the reform progress. The study aimed to determine the accessibility of health care in the two pilot sites. Methods A cross-sectional study using Primary Care Evaluation Tool (PCET) questionnaires was performed with a multistage stratified cluster sample of the family physicians (n=141) and patients (n=710) in the two provinces between September 2015 and March 2016. The questionnaires contained essential dimensions of health accessibility: organizational, financial, geographical, and cultural access. The data were analyzed by IBM-SPSS software and the descriptive statistics. Results With an average population of 2,332, the main daily task for family physicians was patient visits (n=39). Most patients were satisfied with the current hours (80%) but visiting a family physician on holidays or after working hours were only rarely possible. The co-payment was an inconvenience to access health services in getting medicines, getting paraclinic exams and a visiting specialist. At least 70% of patients could receive their preferred healthcare facilities within 40 minutes. The majority of FPs (64%) believed there were some cultural characteristics in the population that made a limited role for providing better health services. Conclusion In the reform the providers were geographically well distributed and some features of the organizational access were relatively high. However there were some difficulties in the financial, cultural, and other features of organizational access. PMID:28243420

  13. Patterns of relating between physicians and medical assistants in small family medicine offices.

    PubMed

    Elder, Nancy C; Jacobson, C Jeffrey; Bolon, Shannon K; Fixler, Joseph; Pallerla, Harini; Busick, Christina; Gerrety, Erica; Kinney, Dee; Regan, Saundra; Pugnale, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The clinician-colleague relationship is a cornerstone of relationship-centered care (RCC); in small family medicine offices, the clinician-medical assistant (MA) relationship is especially important. We sought to better understand the relationship between MA roles and the clinician-MA relationship within the RCC framework. We conducted an ethnographic study of 5 small family medicine offices (having <5 clinicians) in the Cincinnati Area Research and Improvement Group (CARInG) Network using interviews, surveys, and observations. We interviewed 19 MAs and supervisors and 11 clinicians (9 family physicians and 2 nurse practitioners) and observed 15 MAs in practice. Qualitative analysis used the editing style. MAs' roles in small family medicine offices were determined by MA career motivations and clinician-MA relationships. MA career motivations comprised interest in health care, easy training/workload, and customer service orientation. Clinician-MA relationships were influenced by how MAs and clinicians respond to their perceptions of MA clinical competence (illustrated predominantly by comparing MAs with nurses) and organizational structure. We propose a model, trust and verify, to describe the structure of the clinician-MA relationship. This model is informed by clinicians' roles in hiring and managing MAs and the social familiarity of MAs and clinicians. Within the RCC framework, these findings can be seen as previously undefined constraints and freedoms in what is known as the Complex Responsive Process of Relating between clinicians and MAs. Improved understanding of clinician-MA relationships will allow a better appreciation of how clinicians and MAs function in family medicine teams. Our findings may assist small offices undergoing practice transformation and guide future research to improve the education, training, and use of MAs in the family medicine setting.

  14. Attitudes of elderly patients and their families toward physician-assisted suicide.

    PubMed

    Koenig, H G; Wildman-Hanlon, D; Schmader, K

    1996-10-28

    To examine and compare attitudes of elderly outpatients and their families toward physician-assisted suicide (PAS), explore sociodemographic and health correlates of these attitudes, assess family members' ability to predict patients' attitudes toward PAS, and determine family members' ability to agree on these predictions. Elderly patients with medical and psychiatric problems (n = 168; mean age, 75.8 years) who were attending a geriatrics specialty clinic, along with accompanying family members (n = 146), were systematically surveyed on their attitudes toward PAS in case of terminal illness, chronic illness, and mental incompetence. Relatives were also asked to predict patients' responses to items on the questionnaire. Patients and relatives were blinded to each others' responses. Favorable attitudes toward PAS were reported by 39.9% of the patients and 59.3% of the relatives (P < .001) in case of terminal illness, 18.2% and 25.3%, respectively, in case of chronic illness, 13.5% and 15.4%, respectively, in case of mental incompetence, and 34.0% and 55.6% (P < .001), respectively, for legalization of PAS. Family members showed a marginal ability to predict patients' attitudes toward PAS with kappa values of agreement that ranged from 0.09 to 0.41. Family members also had difficulty agreeing with each other on how they thought patients would respond (range of kappa values, 0.18-0.47). Patients who opposed PAS were women, black individuals, and those with less education, low incomes, and dementia or cognitive impairment. While many frail elderly patients favored PAS in cases of terminal illness, the proportion that opposed it was significantly higher than that among relatives; relatives, in turn, displayed only a marginal ability either to predict patients' attitudes or to agree among themselves. Patients who oppose PAS represent a particularly vulnerable element of society (elderly persons, women, black individuals, and poor, uneducated, and demented persons), and

  15. The role of lack of reciprocity, supervisory support, workload and work-family conflict on exhaustion: evidence from physicians.

    PubMed

    Tayfur, Ozge; Arslan, Mahmut

    2013-01-01

    Emotional exhaustion, argued to be burnout's core dimension, can manifest itself as decreased productivity and job dissatisfaction. This study aims to determine how lack of reciprocity, lack of supervisory support, high workload, and work-family conflict affect emotional exhaustion. Data were collected from 295 physicians working at private and public hospitals in Antalya and İstanbul, Turkey. The survey included lack of reciprocity, supervisory support, workload, WFC items, and exhaustion subscale of Maslach Burnout Inventrory: General Survey (MBI:GS). The proposed model was tested using AMOS 17, which enables assessment of hypothesized relations and degree of fit between data and model. Workload and lack reciprocity were found to increase emotional exhaustion, while supervisory support alleviated the exhaustion physicians experienced. As expected, workload increased work-family conflict. Quite unexpectedly, workload was associated with lack of reciprocity; meaning, physicians more likely perceive their efforts go unappreciated and their patient relationships are inequitable (i.e. investing more than receiving) when they perceive a high workload. In addition, supervisory support was also associated with lack of reciprocity. Physicians experiencing inadequate supervisory support tend to describe their patient relationships in negative terms and perceive inequitable relations. Physicians who do not receive either adequate supervisory support or patient appreciation tend to feel emotionally exhausted. Moreover, both workload and work-family conflict increase physicians' exhaustion. Suggestions to reduce workload and social problems in hospitals are offered to reduce exhaustion.

  16. The influence of a market-oriented primary care reform on family physicians' working conditions: A qualitative study in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Çiçeklioğlu, Meltem; Öcek, Zeliha Aslı; Turk, Meral; Taner, Şafak

    2015-06-01

    Turkey has undergone a 'Health transformation programme' putting emphasis on the reorganization of primary care (PC) services towards a more market-oriented system. To obtain a deep understanding of how family physicians (FPs) experienced the process of the reforms by focusing on working conditions. This phenomenological and qualitative research used maximum variation sampling and 51 FPs were interviewed in 36 in-depth and four focus-group interviews. Thematic analysis of interviews provided seven themes: (1) change in the professional identity of PC physicians (physician as businessperson); (2) transformation of the physician-patient relationship in PC (into a provider-customer relationship); (3) job description and workload; (4) interpersonal relationships; (5) remuneration of FPs, (6) uncertainty about the future and (7) exhaustion. Most FPs felt that the Family medicine model (FMM) placed more emphasis on the business function of family practice and this conflicted with their professional characteristics as physicians. FPs complained that some of their patients behaved as extremely demanding consumers. Continuously increasing responsibilities and extremely high workload were commonly reported problems. Most participants described the negative incentives in the performance scheme as a degrading method of punishment. The main factor was job insecurity caused by contract-based employment. FPs described the point at which they are with terms such as exhaustion. By increasing workload and creating uncertainty about the future and about income, the PC reforms have led to working conditions, which has led to changes in the professional attitudes of physicians and their practice of medicine.

  17. Family planning and pregnancy issues for women with systemic inflammatory diseases: patient and physician perspectives.

    PubMed

    Chakravarty, Eliza; Clowse, Megan E B; Pushparajah, Daphnee S; Mertens, Sarah; Gordon, Caroline

    2014-02-05

    To identify family planning and pregnancy (FPP) issues for female patients of childbearing age living with a chronic inflammatory disease and to assess whether current clinical practice routinely provides adequate support to alleviate these concerns. Multinational survey and an analysis of online patient activity. Premenopausal women (aged 20-45 years; N=969) were surveyed in the USA, the UK, Germany, France, Italy and Spain. Rheumatologists were surveyed in Germany (N=50), France (N=50), Italy (N=50) and the USA (N=100), and gastroenterologists were also surveyed in the USA (N=100). Two online surveys were undertaken to identify FPP issues for physicians and patients. The surveys examined the frequency of dialogue on these topics between physicians and patients, alongside assessment of patient satisfaction regarding these conversations. Online analysis identified key themes for patient discussion outside their doctors' office/clinic/surgery. 32-56% of physicians spontaneously reported having talked about FPP with their female patients of childbearing age. When prompted, the majority of rheumatologists (74-92%) and gastroenterologists (74%) reported having discussed conception/pregnancy with female patients; however, less than half reported consulting their patient's treating general practitioner/gynaecologist about these topics. The majority of patients reported their FPP-related concerns are not adequately addressed/settled during their medical appointments. Furthermore, only 30-40% of patients considered advice/information to be consistent across multiple healthcare professionals. Key online FPP-related patient discussions included disease state, adverse effects, treatment, switch behaviour and wash-out requirements. Female patients who live with chronic inflammatory disease have important FPP concerns. The majority of patients, however, do not feel that their FPP concerns are adequately addressed in current clinical practice and report that they receive

  18. Family Physician Clinical Inertia in Glycemic Control among Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Valerija Bralić; Marković, Biserka Bergman; Kranjčević, Ksenija

    2015-01-01

    Background Many patients with diabetes do not achieve target values. One of the reasons for this is clinical inertia. The correct explanation of clinical inertia requires a conjunction of patient with physician and health care system factors. Our aim was to determine the rate of clinical inertia in treating diabetes in primary care and association of patient, physician, and health care setting factors with clinical inertia. Material/Methods This was a national, multicenter, observational, cross-sectional study in primary care in Croatia. Each family physician (FP) provided professional data and collected clinical data on 15–25 type 2 diabetes (T2DM) patients. Clinical inertia was defined as a consultation in which treatment change based on glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels was indicated but did not occur. Results A total of 449 FPs (response rate 89.8%) collected data on 10275 patients. Mean clinical inertia per FP was 55.6% (SD ±26.17) of consultations. All of the FPs were clinically inert with some patients, and 9% of the FPs were clinically inert with all patients. The main factors associated with clinical inertia were: higher percentage of HbA1c, oral anti-diabetic drug initiated by diabetologist, increased postprandial glycemia and total cholesterol, physical inactivity of patient, and administration of drugs other than oral antidiabetics. Conclusions Clinical inertia in treating patients with T2DM is a serious problem. Patients with worse glycemic control and those whose therapy was initiated by a diabetologist experience more clinical inertia. More research on causes of clinical inertia in treating patients with T2DM should be conducted to help achieve more effective diabetes control. PMID:25652941

  19. Family physician clinical inertia in glycemic control among patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Bralić Lang, Valerija; Bergman Marković, Biserka; Kranjčević, Ksenija

    2015-02-05

    Many patients with diabetes do not achieve target values. One of the reasons for this is clinical inertia. The correct explanation of clinical inertia requires a conjunction of patient with physician and health care system factors. Our aim was to determine the rate of clinical inertia in treating diabetes in primary care and association of patient, physician, and health care setting factors with clinical inertia. This was a national, multicenter, observational, cross-sectional study in primary care in Croatia. Each family physician (FP) provided professional data and collected clinical data on 15-25 type 2 diabetes (T2DM) patients. Clinical inertia was defined as a consultation in which treatment change based on glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels was indicated but did not occur. A total of 449 FPs (response rate 89.8%) collected data on 10275 patients. Mean clinical inertia per FP was 55.6% (SD ±26.17) of consultations. All of the FPs were clinically inert with some patients, and 9% of the FPs were clinically inert with all patients. The main factors associated with clinical inertia were: higher percentage of HbA1c, oral anti-diabetic drug initiated by diabetologist, increased postprandial glycemia and total cholesterol, physical inactivity of patient, and administration of drugs other than oral antidiabetics. Clinical inertia in treating patients with T2DM is a serious problem. Patients with worse glycemic control and those whose therapy was initiated by a diabetologist experience more clinical inertia. More research on causes of clinical inertia in treating patients with T2DM should be conducted to help achieve more effective diabetes control.

  20. Giving patients responsibility or fostering mutual response-ability: family physicians' constructions of effective chronic illness management.

    PubMed

    Thille, Patricia H; Russell, Grant M

    2010-10-01

    Current visions of family medicine and models of chronic illness management integrate evidence-based medicine with collaborative, patient-centered care, despite critiques that these constructs conflict with each other. With this potential conflict in mind, we applied a critical discursive psychology methodology to present discursive patterns articulated by 13 family physicians in Ontario, Canada, regarding care of patients living with multiple chronic illnesses. Physicians constructed competing versions of the terms "effective chronic illness management" and "patient involvement." One construction integrated individual responsibility for health with primacy of "evidence," resulting in a conceptualization consistent with paternalistic care. The second constructed effective care as involving active partnership of physician and patient, implying a need to foster the ability of both practitioners and patients to respond to complex challenges as they arose. The former pattern is inconsistent with visions of family medicine and chronic illness management, whereas the latter embodies it.

  1. How physicians support children with disabilities and their families: Roles, responsibilities and collaborative partnerships.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, Mary E; Vitalone-Raccaro, Nancy

    2016-10-01

    The American Association of Pediatricians (AAP), in collaboration with the Council for Children with Disabilities and the Council on School Health, recommends that physicians learn special education law and practices in order to increase their ability to work with schools to support children with disabilities and their families. However, there is limited research that examines how doctors perceive their role as collaborators with families and school personnel. The purpose of this study was to explore the perceptions and collaborative experiences of doctors treating children with disabilities in order to develop an initial understanding of how doctors collaborate within the doctor/family/school triad. Semi-structured interviews with doctors (n = 13) from two states in the North Eastern United States were collected and analyzed using grounded theory methodology. Doctor specialty areas included general pediatrics, developmental pediatrics, rehabilitation pediatrics, and neurology. Analysis of the data revealed four key categories: (a) what doctors do with regard to children with disabilities and schools, (b) elements that interfere with doctor/family/school collaboration, (c) what doctors know and understand about topics related to special education, and (d) how doctors learned about topics related to special education. Doctors disclosed they learned about these topics through mentorship and on-the job training, not formally during medical school or residency. This research presents powerful evidence in support of a paradigm shift with regard to infusing a focus on doctor/family/school collaboration for children with disabilities into the medical school curriculum. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Examining the influence of family physician supply on district health system performance in South Africa: An ecological analysis of key health indicators.

    PubMed

    Von Pressentin, Klaus B; Mash, Bob J; Esterhuizen, Tonya M

    2017-04-28

    The supply of appropriate health workers is a key building block in the World Health Organization's model of effective health systems. Primary care teams are stronger if they contain doctors with postgraduate training in family medicine. The contribution of such family physicians to the performance of primary care systems has not been evaluated in the African context. Family physicians with postgraduate training entered the South African district health system (DHS) from 2011. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of family physicians within the DHS of South Africa. The objectives were to evaluate the impact of an increase in family physician supply in each district (number per 10 000 population) on key health indicators. All 52 South African health districts were included as units of analysis. An ecological study evaluated the correlations between the supply of family physicians and routinely collected data on district performance for two time periods: 2010/2011 and 2014/2015. Five years after the introduction of the new generation of family physicians, this study showed no demonstrable correlation between family physician supply and improved health indicators from the macro-perspective of the district. The lack of a measurable impact at the level of the district is most likely because of the very low supply of family physicians in the public sector. Studies which evaluate impact closer to the family physician's circle of control may be better positioned to demonstrate a measurable impact in the short term.

  3. A survey to assess family physicians' motivation to teach undergraduates in their practices.

    PubMed

    May, Marcus; Mand, Peter; Biertz, Frank; Hummers-Pradier, Eva; Kruschinski, Carsten

    2012-01-01

    In Germany, family physicians (FPs) are increasingly needed to participate in undergraduate medical education. Knowledge of FPs' motivation to teach medical students in their practices is lacking. To describe a novel questionnaire that assesses the motivation of FPs to teach undergraduates in their practices and to show the results of a subsequent survey using this instrument. The questionnaire was developed based on a review of the literature. Previously used empirical instruments assessing occupational values and motivation were included. A preliminary version was pretested in a pilot study. The resulting 68-item questionnaire was sent to 691 FPs involved in undergraduate medical education. Reliability was assessed and subgroups were analyzed with regard to differences in motivation. A total of 523 physicians in n = 458 teaching practices participated (response rate 75.7%). 'Helping others' and 'interest' were revealed as the predominant motives. Responses showed a predominantly intrinsic motivation of the participating FPs. Their main incentives were an ambition to work as a medical preceptor, to generally improve undergraduate education and to share knowledge. Material compensation was of minor importance. Time restraints were indicated as a barrier by some FPs, but were not a general concern. German FPs involved in medical education have altruistic attitudes towards teaching medical students in their practices. Motivational features give an important insight for the recruitment of FP preceptors as well as for their training in instructional methods.

  4. Supporting frail seniors through a family physician and Home Health integrated care model in Fraser Health

    PubMed Central

    Park, Grace; Miller, Diane; Tien, George; Sheppard, Irene; Bernard, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Background A major effort is underway to integrate primary and community care in Canada's western province of British Columbia and in Fraser Health, its largest health authority. Integrated care is a critical component of Fraser Health's planning, to meet the challenges of caring for a growing, elderly population that is presenting more complex and chronic medical conditions. Description of integrated practice An integrated care model partners family physicians with community-based home health case managers to support frail elderly patients who live at home. It is resulting in faster response times to patient needs, more informed assessments of a patient's state of health and pro-active identification of emerging patient issues. Early results The model is intended to improve the quality of patient care and maintain the patients’ health status, to help them live at home confidently and safely, as long as possible. Preliminary pilot data measuring changes in home care services is showing positive trends when it comes to extending the length of a person's survival/tenure in the community (living in their home vs. admitted to residential care or deceased). Conclusion Fraser Health's case manager–general practitioner partnership model is showing promising results including higher quality, appropriate, coordinated and efficient care; improved patient, caregiver and physician interactions with the system; improved health and prevention of acute care visits by senior adult patients. PMID:24648834

  5. Use and perceptions of information among family physicians: sources considered accessible, relevant, and reliable

    PubMed Central

    Kosteniuk, Julie G.; Morgan, Debra G.; D'Arcy, Carl K.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The research determined (1) the information sources that family physicians (FPs) most commonly use to update their general medical knowledge and to make specific clinical decisions, and (2) the information sources FPs found to be most physically accessible, intellectually accessible (easy to understand), reliable (trustworthy), and relevant to their needs. Methods: A cross-sectional postal survey of 792 FPs and locum tenens, in full-time or part-time medical practice, currently practicing or on leave of absence in the Canadian province of Saskatchewan was conducted during the period of January to April 2008. Results: Of 666 eligible physicians, 331 completed and returned surveys, resulting in a response rate of 49.7% (331/666). Medical textbooks and colleagues in the main patient care setting were the top 2 sources for the purpose of making specific clinical decisions. Medical textbooks were most frequently considered by FPs to be reliable (trustworthy), and colleagues in the main patient care setting were most physically accessible (easy to access). Conclusions: When making specific clinical decisions, FPs were most likely to use information from sources that they considered to be reliable and generally physically accessible, suggesting that FPs can best be supported by facilitating easy and convenient access to high-quality information. PMID:23405045

  6. iPad Use in Iowa Research Network Family Physician Offices

    PubMed Central

    Daly, Jeanette M.; Xu, Yinghui; Levy, Barcey T.

    2015-01-01

    Background Through a cancer research infrastructure building grant, iPads were given to healthcare providers in family physician offices. The purpose of this study was to determine the use and application of iPads in the Iowa Research Network. Methods A Qualtrics survey was sent to 81 iPad recipients after Institutional Review Board approval. Results Fifty-nine percent responded and 85% reported they have used the iPad. The main reason for use of the iPad was browsing the World Wide Web for healthcare information. Open-ended comments supported use of the iPad for photographic documentation of wound and other skin lesions for insertion into the medical record and it helped improve clinic flow by making it easier to put orders in the system through the iPad. Conclusions Tablet uses are variable in physician offices with provider’s gathering health care information from the Internet and securing education material for patients as the frequent usages. PMID:25398430

  7. iPad use in Iowa Research Network family physician offices.

    PubMed

    Daly, Jeanette M; Xu, Yinghui; Levy, Barcey T

    2015-04-01

    Through a cancer research infrastructure building grant, iPads were given to health care providers in family physician offices. The purpose of this study was to determine the use and application of iPads in the Iowa Research Network. A Qualtrics survey was sent to 81 iPad recipients after institutional review board approval. Fifty-nine percent responded and 85% reported they have used the iPad. The main reason for use of the iPad was browsing the World Wide Web for health care information. Open-ended comments supported use of the iPad for photographic documentation of wound and other skin lesions for insertion into the medical record and it helped improve clinic flow by making it easier to put orders in the system through the iPad. Tablet uses are variable in physician offices with provider's gathering health care information from the Internet and securing education material for patients as the frequent usages. © The Author(s) 2014.

  8. Investigating the barriers to teaching family physicians' and specialists' collaboration in the training environment: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Beaulieu, Marie-Dominique; Samson, Louise; Rocher, Guy; Rioux, Marc; Boucher, Laurier; Del Grande, Claudio

    2009-01-01

    Background Collaboration between physicians in different specialties is often taken for granted. However, poor interactions between family physicians and specialists contribute significantly to the observed discontinuity between primary and specialty care. The objective of this study was to explore how collaboration between family physicians and specialists was conceptualised as a competency and experienced in residency training curricula of four faculties of medicine in Canada. Methods This is a multiple-case study based on Abbott's theory of professions. Programs targeted were family medicine, general psychiatry, radiology, and internal medicine. The content of the programs' objectives was analyzed. Associate deans of postgraduate studies, program directors, educators, and residents were interviewed individually or in focus groups (47 residents and 45 faculty members). Results The training objectives related to family physicians-specialists collaboration were phrased in very general terms and lacked specificity. Obstacles to effective collaboration were aggregated under themes of professional responsibility and questioned expertise. Both trainees and trainers reported increasing distances between specialty and general medicine in three key fields of the professional system: the workplace arena, the training setting, and the production of academic knowledge. Conclusion The challenges of developing collaborating skills between generalists and specialist physicians are comparable in many ways to those encountered in inter-professional collaboration and should be given more consideration than they currently receive if we want to improve coordination between primary and specialty care. PMID:19500409

  9. Working as a family physician in Canada and Portugal: How different is it?

    PubMed Central

    Barata, Ana Nunes

    2016-01-01

    Background: The work of a family physician is quite different in each country, and if we consider different continents, differences are even more remarkable. Social and cultural contexts justify a particular organization, not only of the health-care system but also its providers as well. Objectives: By analyzing different health-care systems, new ideas may come about which may trigger positive changes in a health-care service to diminish healthcare disparities. Methods: Description and comparison of the Primary Healthcare Service in Canada and Portugal. Results: Although both health-care systems are mainly public, organizational differences can be found that condition primary healthcare access. Conclusion: Exchanges in other health-care systems contribute for an active knowledge exchange that prompts participants to analyze options on how to improve healthcare access to citizens. This ultimately, leads to the development of primary care, the pillar of a well-functioning health-care system. PMID:28217575

  10. Working as a family physician in Canada and Portugal: How different is it?

    PubMed

    Barata, Ana Nunes

    2016-01-01

    The work of a family physician is quite different in each country, and if we consider different continents, differences are even more remarkable. Social and cultural contexts justify a particular organization, not only of the health-care system but also its providers as well. By analyzing different health-care systems, new ideas may come about which may trigger positive changes in a health-care service to diminish healthcare disparities. Description and comparison of the Primary Healthcare Service in Canada and Portugal. Although both health-care systems are mainly public, organizational differences can be found that condition primary healthcare access. Exchanges in other health-care systems contribute for an active knowledge exchange that prompts participants to analyze options on how to improve healthcare access to citizens. This ultimately, leads to the development of primary care, the pillar of a well-functioning health-care system.

  11. Family physician access to and wait times for cancer diagnostic investigations

    PubMed Central

    Barisic, Andriana; Kish, Maxine; Gilbert, Julie; Mittmann, Nicole; Moineddin, Rahim; Sisler, Jeffrey; Vedsted, Peter; Grunfeld, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To examine provincial and regional differences in FPs’ direct access to cancer diagnostic investigations and advice from other specialists regarding investigations and referrals, and to explore FPs’ perceptions about wait times for diagnostic investigations and receipt of results. Design A cross-sectional, online survey. Setting British Columbia, Manitoba, and Ontario. Participants A sample of FPs from participating provinces. Main outcome measures Direct FP access to various diagnostic investigations and advice from other specialists regarding investigations and referrals; FPs’ perceptions about wait times for diagnostic investigations ordered directly; and FPs’ perceptions about wait times for results. Results A total of 1054 surveys were completed by FPs from British Columbia (n = 229), Manitoba (n = 228), and Ontario (n = 597). Distance from a cancer centre was not significantly associated with direct access to or wait times for diagnostic investigations for most of the investigations studied; however, provincial differences were observed. Family physicians in Manitoba and British Columbia were 30% to 45% less likely to report having direct access to endoscopy and some imaging investigations compared with FPs in Ontario. Family physicians in Manitoba and British Columbia were also at increased odds of waiting longer than 12 weeks for endoscopy investigations and longer than 4 weeks for imaging investigations compared with FPs in Ontario. Most FPs reported wait times of less than 2 weeks for imaging results; however, the proportion of FPs who waited longer than 2 weeks for colonoscopy results ranged from 15% in Ontario to 96% in British Columbia. Conclusion Given the disparities observed among provinces, there is an opportunity for provinces to learn from one another to improve direct access to and shorten wait times for diagnostic investigations. This in turn has the potential to shorten the primary care interval for cancer diagnostic

  12. Factors Affecting Leave out of General Practitioners from Rural Family Physician Program: A Case of Kerman, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Amiresmaili, Mohammadreza; Khosravi, Sajad; Feyzabadi, Vahid Yazdi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Rural family physician program as the new reform in the Iranian health system has been implemented since 2005. Its success depends much on physicians’ retention. The present study aimed to identify influential factors on physicians’ willingness to leave out this program in Kerman province. Methods: The present cross-sectional study was performed in Kerman province in 2011. All family physicians working in this program (n = 271) were studied using a questionnaire. Data analysis was carried out using descriptive statistics and logistic regression through SPSS version 18.0. Results: Twenty-six percent (70) of the physicians had left out the program in the past. In addition, 77.3% (208) intended to leave out in the near future. Opportunity for continuing education, inappropriate and long working hours, unsuitable requirements of salary, irregular payments, lack of job security and high working responsibility were regarded as the most important reasons for leaving out the program in the past and intention to leave out in future orderly. According to univariate logistic regression, younger physicians (odds ratio [OR] =2.479; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.261-4.872) and physicians who had older children (OR = 4.743; 95% CI: 1.441-15.607) were more willing to leave out the plan in the near future, however it was not significant in multivariate logistic regression. Conclusions: Physician retention in family physician program is faced with serious doubts due to different reasons. The success of the program is endangered because of the pivotal role of human resources. Hence, the revision of human resources policies of the program seems necessary in order to reduce physicians leave out and improving its effectiveness. PMID:25400891

  13. Dealing with symptoms and issues of hospitalized patients with cancer in indonesia: the role of families, nurses, and physicians.

    PubMed

    Effendy, Christantie; Vissers, Kris; Tejawinata, Sunaryadi; Vernooij-Dassen, Myrra; Engels, Yvonne

    2015-06-01

    Patients with cancer often face physical, psychological, social, spiritual, and emotional symptoms. Our aim was to study symptoms and issues of hospitalized patients with cancer in Indonesia, a country with strong family ties, and how family members, nurses, and physicians deal with them. In 2011, 150 hospitalized cancer patients in 3 general hospitals in Indonesia were invited to fill in a questionnaire, which was based on the validated Problems and Needs of Palliative Care (short version) questionnaire. Descriptive statistics were performed. Of 119 patients (79%) who completed the questionnaire, 85% stated that their symptoms and issues were addressed. According to these patients, financial (56%), autonomy (36%), and psychosocial (34%) issues were most often addressed by the family alone. Physical symptoms (52%) and spiritual issues (33%) were addressed mainly by a combination of family, nurses, and physicians. Hospitalized patients with cancer in Indonesia felt that most of their symptoms and issues had been addressed, and the family was highly involved. The strong family ties in Indonesian culture may have contributed to this family role. More research is needed to clarify how this influences patient outcome, quality of care, and quality of life of both the patients and their families, along with the degree of partnership between families and professionals. This information might help answer the question what advantages and disadvantages the family role in caring for a hospitalized patient with cancer generates for the patient, the family, and professional caregivers. © 2014 World Institute of Pain.

  14. Help-seeking preferences in the area of mild cognitive impairment: comparing family physicians and the lay public.

    PubMed

    Werner, Perla; Heinik, Jeremia; Giveon, Shmuel; Segel-Karpas, Dikla; Kitai, Eliezer

    2014-01-01

    Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or mild neurocognitive disorder is a well-established clinical entity included in current diagnostic guidelines for Alzheimer's disease and in major psychiatric classifications. In all, a loosely defined concern obtained from conceptually different sources (the individual, a knowledgeable informant, or a clinician) regarding a decline in cognition and change in functioning constitutes a sine qua non for initiating diagnostics and providing therapy and support. This concern in practice may translate into complex proactive help-seeking behavior. A better understanding of help-seeking preferences is required in order to promote early detection and management. To compare help-seeking preferences of family physicians and the lay public in the area of MCI. A structured questionnaire was used to collect data from 197 family physicians (self-administered) and 517 persons aged 45 and over from the lay public (face to face). Information regarding familiarity with MCI and help-seeking preferences was assessed. The vast majority in both samples reported that family physician, spouse, and children are the most highly recommended sources of help-seeking. In regard to professional sources of help-seeking, a higher percentage of the physicians than the lay public sample consistently recommended seeking help from nurses and social workers and psychiatrists, but a higher percentage of the lay public recommended turning to a neurologist for help. There were both similarities and differences between family physicians and the lay public in their preferences regarding help-seeking for a person with MCI. Most prominent is the physicians' greater tendency to recommend professional sources of help-seeking. Understanding of help-seeking preferences of both physicians and lay persons might help overcome barriers for establishing diagnosis, receiving care, and improving communication between doctors and patients.

  15. The costs of preventing the spread of respiratory infection in family physician offices: a threshold analysis.

    PubMed

    Hogg, William; Gray, David; Huston, Patricia; Zhang, Wei

    2007-11-13

    Influenza poses concerns about epidemic respiratory infection. Interventions designed to prevent the spread of respiratory infection within family physician (FP) offices could potentially have a significant positive influence on the health of Canadians. The main purpose of this paper is to estimate the explicit costs of such an intervention. A cost analysis of a respiratory infection control was conducted. The costs were estimated from the perspective of provincial government. In addition, a threshold analysis was conducted to estimate a threshold value of the intervention's effectiveness that could generate potential savings in terms of averted health-care costs by the intervention that exceed the explicit costs. The informational requirements for these implicit costs savings are high, however. Some of these elements, such as the cost of hospitalization in the event of contacting influenza, and the number of patients passing through the physicians' office, were readily available. Other pertinent points of information, such as the proportion of infected people who require hospitalization, could be imported from the existing literature. We take an indirect approach to calculate a threshold value for the most uncertain piece of information, namely the reduction in the probability of the infection spreading as a direct result of the intervention, at which the intervention becomes worthwhile. The 5-week intervention costs amounted to a total of $52,810.71, or $131,094.73 prorated according to the length of the flu season, or $512,729.30 prorated for the entire calendar year. The variable costs that were incurred for this 5-week project amounted to approximately $923.16 per participating medical practice. The (fixed) training costs per practice were equivalent to $73.27 for the 5-week intervention, or $28.14 for 13-week flu season, or $7.05 for an entire one-year period. Based on our conservative estimates for the direct cost savings, there are indications that the

  16. Primary care obesity management in Hungary: evaluation of the knowledge, practice and attitudes of family physicians.

    PubMed

    Rurik, Imre; Torzsa, Péter; Ilyés, István; Szigethy, Endre; Halmy, Eszter; Iski, Gabriella; Kolozsvári, László Róbert; Mester, Lajos; Móczár, Csaba; Rinfel, József; Nagy, Lajos; Kalabay, László

    2013-10-19

    Obesity, a threatening pandemic, has an important public health implication. Before proper medication is available, primary care providers will have a distinguished role in prevention and management. Their performance may be influenced by many factors but their personal motivation is still an under-researched area. The knowledge, attitudes and practice were reviewed in this questionnaire study involving a representative sample of 10% of all Hungarian family physicians. In different settings, 521 practitioners (448 GPs and 73 residents/vocational trainees) were questioned using a validated questionnaire. The knowledge about multimorbidity, a main consequence of obesity was balanced.Only 51% of the GPs were aware of the diagnostic threshold for obesity; awareness being higher in cities (60%) and the highest among residents (90%). They also considered obesity an illness rather than an aesthetic issue.There were wider differences regarding attitudes and practice, influenced by the the doctors' age, gender, known BMI, previous qualification, less by working location.GPs with qualification in family medicine alone considered obesity management as higher professional satisfaction, compared to physicians who had previously other board qualification (77% vs 68%). They measured their patients' waist circumference and waist/hip ratio (72% vs 62%) more frequently, provided the obese with dietary advice more often, while this service was less frequent among capital-based doctors who accepted the self-reported body weight dates by patients more commonly. Similar reduced activity and weight-measurement in outdoor clothing were more typical among older doctors.Diagnosis based on BMI alone was the highest in cities (85%). Consultations were significantly shorter in practices with a higher number of enrolled patients and were longer by female providers who consulted longer with patients about the suspected causes of developing obesity (65% vs 44%) and offered dietary records for

  17. Primary care obesity management in Hungary: evaluation of the knowledge, practice and attitudes of family physicians

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Obesity, a threatening pandemic, has an important public health implication. Before proper medication is available, primary care providers will have a distinguished role in prevention and management. Their performance may be influenced by many factors but their personal motivation is still an under-researched area. Methods The knowledge, attitudes and practice were reviewed in this questionnaire study involving a representative sample of 10% of all Hungarian family physicians. In different settings, 521 practitioners (448 GPs and 73 residents/vocational trainees) were questioned using a validated questionnaire. Results The knowledge about multimorbidity, a main consequence of obesity was balanced. Only 51% of the GPs were aware of the diagnostic threshold for obesity; awareness being higher in cities (60%) and the highest among residents (90%). They also considered obesity an illness rather than an aesthetic issue. There were wider differences regarding attitudes and practice, influenced by the the doctors’ age, gender, known BMI, previous qualification, less by working location. GPs with qualification in family medicine alone considered obesity management as higher professional satisfaction, compared to physicians who had previously other board qualification (77% vs 68%). They measured their patients’ waist circumference and waist/hip ratio (72% vs 62%) more frequently, provided the obese with dietary advice more often, while this service was less frequent among capital-based doctors who accepted the self-reported body weight dates by patients more commonly. Similar reduced activity and weight-measurement in outdoor clothing were more typical among older doctors. Diagnosis based on BMI alone was the highest in cities (85%). Consultations were significantly shorter in practices with a higher number of enrolled patients and were longer by female providers who consulted longer with patients about the suspected causes of developing obesity (65% vs 44

  18. The impact of Medicaid on physician use by low-income children.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbach, M L

    1989-01-01

    This study evaluated the determinants of physician use by low-income children, with an emphasis on the effect of Medicaid. Data are from the 1980 National Medical Care Utilization and Expenditure Survey. Regression analysis revealed that Medicaid children were more likely than both privately insured and uninsured children to visit an office-based physician. Also, Medicaid children with at least one visit to any setting had a higher number of visits than uninsured children. Such factors as age, health status, number of children in the family, educational status, and income also accounted for differences within the low-income population. The results suggest that access to physicians' services (including office-based physicians) can be increased by expanding Medicaid eligibility to uninsured low-income children and by improving private health insurance benefits among the underinsured. PMID:2669539

  19. Primary care physician management, referral, and relations with specialists concerning patients at risk for cancer due to family history.

    PubMed

    Wood, M E; Flynn, B S; Stockdale, A

    2013-01-01

    Risk stratification based on family history is a feature of screening guidelines for a number of cancers and referral guidelines for genetic counseling/testing for cancer risk. Our aim was to describe primary care physician perceptions of their role in managing cancer risk based on family history. Structured interviews were conducted by a medical anthropologist with primary care physicians in 3 settings in 2 north-eastern states. Transcripts were systematically analyzed by a research team to identify major themes expressed by participants. Forty interviews were conducted from May 2003 through May 2006. Physicians provided a diversity of views on roles in management of cancer risk based on family history, management practices and patient responses to risk information. They also provided a wide range of perspectives on criteria used for referral to specialists, types of specialists referred to and expected management roles for referred patients. Some primary care physicians appeared to make effective use of family history information for cancer risk management, but many in this sample did not. Increased focus on efficient assessment tools based on recognized guidelines, accessible guides to management options, and patient education and decision aids may be useful directions to facilitate broader use of family history information for cancer risk management. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Spirometry can be done in family physicians' offices and alters clinical decisions in management of asthma and COPD.

    PubMed

    Yawn, Barbara P; Enright, Paul L; Lemanske, Robert F; Israel, Elliot; Pace, Wilson; Wollan, Peter; Boushey, Homer

    2007-10-01

    Spirometry is recommended for diagnosis and management of obstructive lung disease. While many patients with asthma and COPD are cared for by primary care practices, limited data are available on the use and results associated with spirometry in primary care. To assess the technical adequacy, accuracy of interpretation, and impact of office spirometry. A before-and-after quasiexperimental design. Three hundred eighty-two patients from 12 family medicine practices across the United States. Patients with asthma and COPD, and staff from the 12 practices. Technical adequacy of spirometry results, concordance between family physician and pulmonary expert interpretations of spirometry test results, and changes in asthma and COPD management following spirometry testing. Of the 368 tests completed over the 6 months, 71% were technically adequate for interpretation. Family physician and pulmonary expert interpretations were concordant in 76% of completed tests. Spirometry was followed by changes in management in 48% of subjects with completed tests, including 107 medication changes (>85% concordant with guideline recommendations) and 102 nonpharmacologic changes. Concordance between family physician and expert interpretations of spirometry results was higher in those patients with asthma compared to those with COPD. US family physicians can perform and interpret spirometry for asthma and COPD patients at rates comparable to those published in the literature for international primary care studies, and the spirometry results modify care.

  1. Nature and nurture in the family physician's choice of practice location.

    PubMed

    Orzanco, Maria Gabriela; Lovato, Chris; Bates, Joanna; Slade, Steve; Grand'Maison, Paul; Vanasse, Alain

    2011-01-01

    An understanding of the contextual, professional, and personal factors that affect choice of practice location for physicians is needed to support successful strategies in addressing geographic maldistribution of physicians. This study compared two categories of predictors of family practice location in non-metropolitan areas among undergraduate medical students: individual characteristics (nature), and the rural program component of their training program (nurture). The study aimed to identify factors that predict the location of practice 2 years post-residency training and determine the predictive value of combining nature and nurture variables using administrative data from two undergraduate medical education programs. Databases were developed from available administrative sources for a retrospective analysis of two undergraduate medical education programs in Canada: Université de Sherbrooke (UdeS) and University of British Columbia (UBC). Both schools have a strong mandate to evaluate the impact of their programs on physician distribution. The dependent variable was location of practice 2 years after completing postgraduate training in family medicine. Independent variables included individual and program characteristics. Separate analyses were conducted for each program using multiple logistic regression. The nature and nurture variables considered in the models explained only 21% to 27% of the variance in the eventual location of practice of family physician graduates. For UdeS, having an address in a rural/small-town environment at application to medical school (OR=2.61, 95% CI: 1.24-6.06) and for UBC, location of high school in a rural/small town (OR=4.03, 95% CI: 1.05-15.41), both increased the chances of practicing in a non-metropolitan area. For UdeS the nurture variable (ie length of clerkship in a non-metropolitan area) was the most significant predictor (OR=1.14, 95% CI: 1.067-1.22). For both medical schools, adding a single nurture variable to the

  2. The duty of the physician to care for the family in pediatric palliative care: context, communication, and caring.

    PubMed

    Jones, Barbara L; Contro, Nancy; Koch, Kendra D

    2014-02-01

    Pediatric palliative care physicians have an ethical duty to care for the families of children with life-threatening conditions through their illness and bereavement. This duty is predicated on 2 important factors: (1) best interest of the child and (2) nonabandonment. Children exist in the context of a family and therefore excellent care for the child must include attention to the needs of the family, including siblings. The principle of nonabandonment is an important one in pediatric palliative care, as many families report being well cared for during their child's treatment, but feel as if the physicians and team members suddenly disappear after the death of the child. Family-centered care requires frequent, kind, and accurate communication with parents that leads to shared decision-making during treatment, care of parents and siblings during end-of-life, and assistance to the family in bereavement after death. Despite the challenges to this comprehensive care, physicians can support and be supported by their transdisciplinary palliative care team members in providing compassionate, ethical, and holistic care to the entire family when a child is ill.

  3. Examining the influence of family physician supply on district health system performance in South Africa: An ecological analysis of key health indicators

    PubMed Central

    Mash, Robert J.

    2017-01-01

    Background The supply of appropriate health workers is a key building block in the World Health Organization’s model of effective health systems. Primary care teams are stronger if they contain doctors with postgraduate training in family medicine. The contribution of such family physicians to the performance of primary care systems has not been evaluated in the African context. Family physicians with postgraduate training entered the South African district health system (DHS) from 2011. Aim This study aimed to evaluate the impact of family physicians within the DHS of South Africa. The objectives were to evaluate the impact of an increase in family physician supply in each district (number per 10 000 population) on key health indicators. Setting All 52 South African health districts were included as units of analysis. Methods An ecological study evaluated the correlations between the supply of family physicians and routinely collected data on district performance for two time periods: 2010/2011 and 2014/2015. Results Five years after the introduction of the new generation of family physicians, this study showed no demonstrable correlation between family physician supply and improved health indicators from the macro-perspective of the district. Conclusion The lack of a measurable impact at the level of the district is most likely because of the very low supply of family physicians in the public sector. Studies which evaluate impact closer to the family physician’s circle of control may be better positioned to demonstrate a measurable impact in the short term. PMID:28470076

  4. Behavioral interventions for office-based care: behavior change.

    PubMed

    Delfino, Matthew; Larzelere, Michele McCarthy

    2014-03-01

    Family physicians play an important role in identifying and treating the behavioral etiologies of morbidity and mortality. Changing behavior is a challenging process that begins with identifying a patient's readiness to change. Interventions, such as motivational interviewing, are used to increase a patient's desire to change, and cognitive behavioral therapy can be initiated to increase a patient's likelihood of change, particularly if barriers are identified. After patients embark on change, family physicians are uniquely positioned to connect them to self-help programs, more intensive psychotherapy, and newer technology-based support programs, and to provide repeated, brief, positive reinforcement. Specific behavioral interventions that can be effective include computerized smoking cessation programs; electronic reminders and support delivered by family physicians or other clinicians for weight loss; linkage to community-based programs for seniors; increased length and demands of in-school programs to support exercise participation by children; and access reduction education to prevent firearm injury.

  5. Opportunities and barriers to enhance research capacity and outputs among academic family physicians in the Arab world.

    PubMed

    Romani, Maya H; Hamadeh, Ghassan N; Mahmassani, Dina M; AlBeri, Adel A K; AlDabbagh, Abdul-Munem Y; Farahat, Taghreed M; AlShafaee, Mohammed A; Lakkis, Najla A

    2016-01-01

    To explore the current status of academic primary care research in Arab countries and investigate the barriers to its adequate implementation. Research is an essential building block that ensures the advancement of the discipline of Family Medicine (FM). FM research thus ought to be contributed to by all family physicians; nevertheless, its development is being hindered worldwide by several challenges. The amount of research conducted by academic academic family physicians and general practitioners is scant. This phenomenon is more pronounced in the Arab countries. An online questionnaire was emailed to all academic family physicians practicing in member Arab countries of the World Organization of Family Doctors WONCA-East Mediterranean Region. Seventy-six out of 139 academic family physicians from eight Arab countries completed the questionnaire. Around 75% reported that they are required to conduct research studies, yet only 46% contributed to at least one publication. While 75% and 52.6% disclosed their interest in participating in a research team and in leading a research team respectively, 64.5% reported being currently involved in research activities. Of all, 56% have attended a research ethics course. Lack of training in research, the unavailability of a healthcare system that is supportive of research, insufficient financial resources, and the unavailability of electronic health records were perceived as major barriers in conducting FM research. Although many physicians in Arab academic institutions expressed enthusiasm to conduct research projects, FM research infrastructure remains to be weak. This demonstrates the need for immense efforts from different parties particularly governments and academic institutions.

  6. The effects of patient characteristics on ADHD diagnosis and treatment: a factorial study of family physicians

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a costly and prevalent disorder in the U.S., especially among youth. However, significant disparities in diagnosis and treatment appear to be predicted by the race and insurance status of patients. Methods This study employed a web-based factorial survey with four ADHD cases derived from an ADHD clinic, two diagnosed with ADHD in actual evaluation, and two not. Randomized measures included race and insurance status of the patients. Participants N = (187) included clinician members of regional and national practice-based research networks and the U.S. clinical membership of the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine. The main outcomes were decisions to 1) diagnose and 2) treat the cases, based upon the information presented, analyzed via binary logistic regression of the randomized factors and case indicators on diagnosis and treatment. Results ADHD-positive cases were 8 times more likely to be diagnosed and 12 times more likely to be treated, and the male ADHD positive case was more likely to be diagnosed and treated than the female ADHD positive case. Uninsured cases were significantly more likely to be treated overall, but male cases that were uninsured were about half as likely to be diagnosed and treated with ADHD. Additionally, African-American race appears to increase the likelihood of medicinal treatment for ADHD and being both African-American and uninsured appears to cut the odds of medicinal treatment in half, but not significantly. Conclusions Family physicians were competent at discerning between near-threshold ADHD-negative and ADHD positive cases. However, insurance status and race, as well as gender, appear to affect the likelihood of diagnosis and treatment for ADHD in Family Medicine settings. PMID:20144184

  7. Selection of a hospital for a transfer: the roles of patients, families, physicians and payers.

    PubMed

    Gombeski, W R; Konrad, D; Kanoti, G; Ulreich, S; Skilogianis, J; Clough, J

    1997-01-01

    This study investigates the reasons for hospital transfers and the role patients, their families, physicians, and payers play in the choice of a referral center. A thirty-three item questionnaire and clinical data from the hospital's discharge database. A study of all 307 hospital transfer patients admitted between November 9 and December 3, 1993 was conducted to understand the factors contributing to the increase in transfers and the reasons patients were sent to CCH. Data on the transfer decision were collected by interviewing patients 48 hours after admittance to the hospital or by telephone if they were discharged before an interview could be completed. Two hundred and sixty-two (85%) patients were interviewed. (1) Almost 58% of transfers were patient-initiated or -influenced; the remainder were physician- (38%) or payer-directed (4%); (2) More than 78% of the patients identified lack of clinical expertise/technology at originating hospital as the main reason for transferring. Other reasons included: established CCH patient status (43%), CCH marketing (31%), and concerns regarding quality of care at originating hospital (10%). Financial and quality dumping were not identified as reasons for the transfer. New patients to CCH were more likely to indicate that marketing and lack of clinical resources at originating hospital were reasons for selecting CCH than previous patients. Patients significantly influenced the transfer decision and the transfer decision-making process can be influenced by marketing. The opinions of the consumer should not be underestimated, especially by those seeking non-marketing solutions to health care reform.

  8. Louisiana and Mississippi Family Physicians' Contraception Counseling for Adolescents with a Focus on Intrauterine Contraception.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Susan E; Coy, Lauren N; Yu, Qingzhao; Muncie, Herbert L

    2016-10-01

    The adolescent pregnancy rate in Louisiana (LA) and Mississippi (MS) is one of the highest in the United States. One approach to decrease that rate is to increase contraceptive use. We sought to characterize LA and MS family physicians' (FPs) contraception counseling for adolescents with a focus on the intrauterine contraceptive device (IUD). DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS, INTERVENTIONS, AND MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Online survey of resident and practicing physician members of the LA and MS Academy of FPs. Three hundred ninety-eight of 1616 invited FPs responded; 244 were included in our analysis. When counseling adolescents about contraception, respondents "frequently discussed" oral contraceptives and condoms 87.5% (210/240) and 83.8% (202/241) of the time, respectively. Newer and more highly effective contraceptives such as the ring, patch, IUD, and implant were "frequently discussed" only 34.6% (82/237)-39.3% (92/234) of the time. In the previous 6 months, 56% (136/243) of respondents ever discussed an IUD with an adolescent. Respondents were more likely to have discussed IUDs if they learned IUD insertion during residency, had on-site access to IUD inserters, believed they were competent and/or comfortable with IUD counseling. In 5 clinical scenarios asking whether the respondent would recommend an IUD to a 17- or a 27-year-old patient (in all scenarios patients were eligible for an IUD), respondents were restrictive overall and significantly fewer would recommend an IUD for the adolescent. Our results suggest that there are missed opportunities for full-scope contraception counseling by LA and MS FPs. When these FPs counsel adolescents about contraception they less frequently discuss newer methods and more highly effective methods. Additionally many LA and MS FPs use overly restrictive eligibility criteria when considering IUDs. Copyright © 2016 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Coordination of cancer care between family physicians and cancer specialists: Importance of communication.

    PubMed

    Easley, Julie; Miedema, Baukje; Carroll, June C; Manca, Donna P; O'Brien, Mary Ann; Webster, Fiona; Grunfeld, Eva

    2016-10-01

    . Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

  10. A Correlational Study of Self-Directed Learning Readiness and Learning Activity Preference for Continuing Medical Education among Family Physicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Theresa J.

    2014-01-01

    This quantitative, nonexperimental, correlational study sought to determine whether a relationship exists between family physicians' levels of self-directed learning readiness (SDLR) and their preferences for continuing medical education (CME) activities. The study also sought to determine whether years in clinical practice or size of clinical…

  11. Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias: An Organizational Approach to Identifying and Addressing Practices and Learning Needs of Family Physicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Michael; Ferrier, Suzanne; Sargeant, Joan; Loney, Elaine; Bethune, Graeme; Murphy, Gerard

    2005-01-01

    Caring for patients with dementia is complex and demanding. Since family physicians (FPs) provide much of this care, we examined their practices, learning needs, and barriers to care concerning Alzheimer's disease and other dementias. We surveyed 392 (approximately 50%) Nova Scotia FPs and conducted focus groups and interviews with: FPs; staff of…

  12. A Correlational Study of Self-Directed Learning Readiness and Learning Activity Preference for Continuing Medical Education among Family Physicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Theresa J.

    2014-01-01

    This quantitative, nonexperimental, correlational study sought to determine whether a relationship exists between family physicians' levels of self-directed learning readiness (SDLR) and their preferences for continuing medical education (CME) activities. The study also sought to determine whether years in clinical practice or size of clinical…

  13. Physician-Patient Encounters: The Structure of Performance in Family and General Office Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wenghofer, Elizabeth F.; Williams, A. Paul; Klass, Daniel J.; Faulkner, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: The College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario, the regulatory authority for physicians in Ontario, Canada, conducts peer assessments of physicians' practices as part of a broad quality assurance program. Outcomes are summarized as a single score and there is no differentiation between performance in various aspects of care. In…

  14. Physician-Patient Encounters: The Structure of Performance in Family and General Office Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wenghofer, Elizabeth F.; Williams, A. Paul; Klass, Daniel J.; Faulkner, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: The College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario, the regulatory authority for physicians in Ontario, Canada, conducts peer assessments of physicians' practices as part of a broad quality assurance program. Outcomes are summarized as a single score and there is no differentiation between performance in various aspects of care. In…

  15. Family planning and pregnancy issues for women with systemic inflammatory diseases: patient and physician perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarty, Eliza; Clowse, Megan E B; Pushparajah, Daphnee S; Mertens, Sarah; Gordon, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To identify family planning and pregnancy (FPP) issues for female patients of childbearing age living with a chronic inflammatory disease and to assess whether current clinical practice routinely provides adequate support to alleviate these concerns. Setting Multinational survey and an analysis of online patient activity. Participants Premenopausal women (aged 20–45 years; N=969) were surveyed in the USA, the UK, Germany, France, Italy and Spain. Rheumatologists were surveyed in Germany (N=50), France (N=50), Italy (N=50) and the USA (N=100), and gastroenterologists were also surveyed in the USA (N=100). Primary and secondary outcome measures Two online surveys were undertaken to identify FPP issues for physicians and patients. The surveys examined the frequency of dialogue on these topics between physicians and patients, alongside assessment of patient satisfaction regarding these conversations. Online analysis identified key themes for patient discussion outside their doctors’ office/clinic/surgery. Results 32–56% of physicians spontaneously reported having talked about FPP with their female patients of childbearing age. When prompted, the majority of rheumatologists (74–92%) and gastroenterologists (74%) reported having discussed conception/pregnancy with female patients; however, less than half reported consulting their patient's treating general practitioner/gynaecologist about these topics. The majority of patients reported their FPP-related concerns are not adequately addressed/settled during their medical appointments. Furthermore, only 30–40% of patients considered advice/information to be consistent across multiple healthcare professionals. Key online FPP-related patient discussions included disease state, adverse effects, treatment, switch behaviour and wash-out requirements. Conclusions Female patients who live with chronic inflammatory disease have important FPP concerns. The majority of patients, however, do not feel that their

  16. Assessing the performance of centralized waiting lists for patients without a regular family physician using clinical-administrative data.

    PubMed

    Breton, Mylaine; Smithman, Mélanie Ann; Brousselle, Astrid; Loignon, Christine; Touati, Nassera; Dubois, Carl-Ardy; Nour, Kareen; Boivin, Antoine; Berbiche, Djamal; Roberge, Danièle

    2017-01-05

    With 4.6 million patients who do not have a regular family physician, Canada performs poorly compared to other OECD countries in terms of attachment to a family physician. To address this issue, several provinces have implemented centralized waiting lists to coordinate supply and demand for attachment to a family physician. Although significant resources are invested in these centralized waiting lists, no studies have measured their performance. In this article, we present a performance assessment of centralized waiting lists for unattached patients implemented in Quebec, Canada. We based our approach on the Balanced Scorecard method. A committee of decision-makers, managers, healthcare professionals, and researchers selected five indicators for the performance assessment of centralized waiting lists, including both process and outcome indicators. We analyzed and compared clinical-administrative data from 86 centralized waiting lists (GACOs) located in 14 regions in Quebec, from April 1, 2013, to March 31, 2014. During the study period, although over 150,000 patients were attached to a family physician, new requests resulted in a 30% median increase in patients on waiting lists. An inverse correlation of average strength was found between the rates of patients attached to a family physician and the proportion of vulnerable patients attached to a family physician meaning that as more patients became attached to an FP through GACOs, the proportion of vulnerable patients became smaller (r = -0.31, p < 0.005). The results showed very large performance variations both among GACOs of different regions and among those of a same region for all performance indicators. Centralized waiting lists for unattached patients in Quebec seem to be achieving their twofold objective of attaching patients to a family physician and giving priority to vulnerable patients. However, the demand for attachment seems to exceed the supply and there appears to be a tension between giving

  17. Attitudes of Family Physicians, Specialists and Radiologists about the Use of Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Ontario

    PubMed Central

    You, John J.; Levinson, Wendy; Laupacis, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    Background: Despite efforts to reduce wait times for computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in Ontario, little is known about physicians' attitudes regarding contemporary patterns of CT and MRI scan use in this province. Methods: We interviewed 19 Ontario family physicians, specialists and radiologists from diverse settings between November 2006 and April 2007. Our detailed written notes were independently reviewed to identify major recurring themes. Results: Major themes were grouped under two categories: (a) non-clinical reasons for ordering CT and MRI (“defensive ordering,” indeterminate imaging reports, patient demand, supply-induced demand, marked variation in ordering practices) and (b) communication among groups of physicians (increasing isolation between clinicians and radiologists; specialists and family physicians working in silos). Conclusion: These interviews revealed infrequent communication among physician groups and marked variations in ordering practices that are often driven by a number of non-clinical factors, such as fear of litigation and patient demand. Recent increases in CT and MRI capacity may not be leading to better care for patients. Our findings, however, are very preliminary and require validation in other studies. PMID:20676251

  18. Recognition and management of common acute conditions of the oral cavity resulting from tooth decay, periodontal disease, and trauma: an update for the family physician.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Paul C; Kanjirath, Preetha

    2010-01-01

    This article presents an overview of common and/or significant diseases of the oral cavity that the family physician is likely to encounter, with an emphasis on pathogenesis, recognition, complications, and management. Topics reviewed include the sequelae of dental caries, periodontal disease, and trauma. Prevention and early intervention strategies are emphasized. Recent updates and practical issues for the family physician are highlighted.

  19. Development and validation of an instrument to measure family physicians' clinical aptitude in metabolic syndrome in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Cabrera-Pivaral, Carlos E; Gutiérrez-Ruvalcaba, Clara Luz; Peralta-Heredia, Irma Concepción; Alonso-Reynoso, Carlos

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to measure family physicians' clinical aptitude for the diagnosis and treatment of metabolic syndrome in a representative sample from six Family Medicine Units (UMF) at the Mexican Institute for Social Security (IMSS), in Guadalajara, Jalisco, México. This is a cross-sectional study. A validated and structured instrument was used, with a confidence coefficient (Kuder-Richardson) of 0.95, that was applied to a representative sample of 90 family physicians throughout six UMFs in Guadalajara, between 2003 and 2004. Mann-Whitney's U and Kruskal-Wallis' tests were used to compare two or more groups, and the Perez-Viniegra Test was used to define aptitude development levels. No statistically significant differences were found in aptitude development between the six family medicine units groups and other comparative groups. The generally low level of clinical aptitude, and its indicators, reflects limitations on the part of family physicians at the IMSS in Jalisco to identify and manage metabolic syndrome.

  20. Physicians underestimate calcium intake in women.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Sandra M; Tyler, Carl V; Panaite, Vanessa; Smolak, Michael J; Powell, Brenda L; Young, Christopher W; Conway, Jessica L; Ford, Donald B; Zyzanski, Stephen J

    2010-06-01

    Personalized nutritional counseling about calcium intake during office encounters requires rapid estimation of calcium intake. We compared the accuracy of physician estimates to a validated calcium intake measure and characterized women whose intakes were incorrectly deemed inadequate by physicians. As part of a controlled trial of brief, office-based calcium intake counseling of women, family physicians estimated calcium intake from patients' self-reported intake of dairy food/beverage intake and from their supplement use. We compared estimates to the Short Calcium Questionnaire (SCQ), a validated 7-day dietary recall measure completed by patients. Sensitivity/specificity of physician-estimated calcium intake was estimated by comparison with the SCQ. For 97 women, SCQ rated 32 (33%) as inadequate, 55 (57%) as adequate, and 10 (10%) as excessive. When compared to SCQ, the sensitivity of physician-estimated calcium intake inadequacy was 97% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 94%-100%), specificity was 51% (95% CI: 41%-61%), and positive predictive value was 49% (95% CI: 39%-59%). Women with underestimated intakes were more likely to report a family history of osteoporosis and take a daily multivitamin. The major source of physician underestimation of calcium intake was underestimate of dairy product contribution. More accurate estimates of dairy-based calcium intake will lead to greater specificity in identifying inadequate calcium intake.

  1. Knowledge of, attitudes toward, and use of low-dose computed tomography for lung cancer screening among family physicians.

    PubMed

    Ersek, Jennifer L; Eberth, Jan M; McDonnell, Karen Kane; Strayer, Scott M; Sercy, Erica; Cartmell, Kathleen B; Friedman, Daniela B

    2016-08-01

    The results of the National Lung Screening Trial showed a 20% reduction in lung cancer mortality and a 6.7% reduction in all-cause mortality when high-risk patients were screened with low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) versus chest x-ray (CXR). The US Preventive Services Task Force has issued a grade B recommendation for LDCT screening, and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services and private insurers now cover the screening cost under certain conditions. The purpose of this study was to assess the knowledge of, attitudes toward, and use of LDCT screening for lung cancer among family physicians. A 32-item questionnaire was distributed to members of the South Carolina Academy of Family Physicians in 2015. Descriptive statistics were calculated. There were 101 respondents, and most had incorrect knowledge about which organizations recommended screening. Many physicians continued to recommend CXR for lung cancer screening. Most felt that LDCT screening increased the odds of detecting disease at earlier stages (98%) and that the benefits outweighed the harms (75%). Concerns included unnecessary procedures (88%), stress/anxiety (52%), and radiation exposure (50%). Most physicians discussed the risks/benefits of screening with their patients in some capacity (76%); however, more than 50% reported making 1 or no screening recommendations in the past year. Most family physicians report discussing LDCT with patients at high risk for lung cancer; however, referrals remain low. There are gaps in physician knowledge about screening guidelines and reimbursement, and this indicates a need for further educational outreach. The development of decision aids may facilitate shared decision-making discussions about screening, and targeted interventions may improve knowledge gaps. Cancer 2016;122:2324-2331. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  2. THE BUDGET, THE FAMILY PHYSICIAN AND THE PATIENT A DIFFERENT APPROACH.

    PubMed

    Keidar, Ilan

    2014-10-01

    Modern medicine offers better health and longer life expectancy, yet consumes huge budgets. The Israeli Health Insurance Law (IHIL) regulates the delivery of health services to all Israel's residents through Health Maintenance Organizations (HMOS). These organizations confront constant struggles with their budgets and have to reduce expenses as much as possible (without harming the health level rendered). In the constant necessity to restrain expenses are embedded difficulties that might cause unrest to the Public Health System (PHS). At the edge of the public health spear are the Family Physicians (FPS) who have not only to supply the best possible medicine to their patients, and at the same time confront budgetary constraints that have the potential to hinder the level of rendered medicine, but also have, at times, to mediate between the conflicting interests of their patients' wish to receive the best available health measures, the FP own medical believes, the HMO's directives and, between the FPS wish, to keep up the number of their (content) patients. One of the World Health Organization's (WHO) concepts, like Israel's one, is that soul and body are inseparable and must be addressed simultaneously in the process of healing. Real life at the Family Physicians' clinics shows, at times, that despite the Israeli physicians' very high professional level, and the Israeli Health System (IHS)'s high efficiency, such a process, due to budgetary constraints, workload and various other reasons, does not always take place and, on the personal level, there are patients who feel that the "system" has treated them incorrectly and in an unsatisfactory manner. Unsatisfied and restless patients might cause undesirable consequences to the "system", like losing faith in one's FP and HMO, which might lead to the patients' reduced cooperation in the healing process, lawsuits amplification, patients leaving their FPS and their HMOs etc. Addressing the patient's soul and body as an

  3. Young Doctor Movements: motives for membership among aspiring and young family physicians.

    PubMed

    Yakubu, Kenneth; Hoedebecke, Kyle; Nashat, Nagwa

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decade, young doctor movements (YDMs) have gained recognition for their efforts in promoting the discipline of family medicine. With growth and expansion comes the need for an inquiry into the membership motives of current/intending members. This study was aimed at determining the main reasons why young and aspiring family physicians (FPs) joined their regional YDM. It was also concerned with determining the main factors that will make non-members want to join a YDM as well as assessing for differences in the responses within YDM members on the one hand, and between YDM members and non-members on the other. This was a cross-sectional web-based study. Using a list of 11 items generated following a series of discussions and feedback among selected FPs and FP trainees, respondents annotated levels of agreement on reasons for current or desired YDM membership. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to determine the distribution and differences in the mean of rank scores of the responses from YDM and non-YDM members while the Kruskal-Wallis test was used to describe same for the various YDMs. The total number of respondents was 200, out of which 102 (51.0%) were current YDM members, 97 (48.5%) were non-members and 1 (0.5%) respondent did not state his/her membership status. Non-YDM members indicated a predominantly academic/professional motive for membership while YDM members indicated the opportunity to socialise with FPs abroad and in their country as their foremost reasons for membership. A mixture of academic, professional and social motives was observed for respondents from Vasco da Gama; predominantly academic and professional motives for respondents from Spice route. While gaining recognition and improving one's practice may be the ultimate goal of an aspiring FP, socialising within a network of like-minded professionals maybe the young FP's way of coping with demands of the discipline.

  4. Human immunodeficiency virus risk awareness. Evaluation of a CME program for family physicians.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, F.; Murphy, P.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether a continuing medical education (CME) program on AIDS risk awareness would enhance physicians' knowledge of HIV and AIDS, their "intent-to-change" practice behaviour, and their ability to integrate their knowledge into hypothetical clinical scenarios; and to identify participant characteristics that affect their knowledge of risks and how they intend to behave regarding HIV testing. DESIGN: Before-and-after study using a questionnaire. SETTING: The city of Winnipeg and 16 rural communities in Manitoba. PARTICIPANTS: Convenience sample of physicians who attended the AIDS Risk Awareness Program and completed a questionnaire before the presentation (96 of 142 eligible physicians). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: A two-point or greater change on a Likert scale in the desired direction for each questionnaire item. RESULTS: Physicians were classified as sensitized or less sensitized depending on previous experience with HIV-positive and AIDS patients. Less sensitized physicians significantly improved their scores in all three areas. Sensitized physicians and women physicians significantly improved their knowledge and reported more intent to ask patients routinely about HIV risk behaviours. Physicians' sex, age, religion, and years in practice had an effect on these improvements. CONCLUSIONS: The AIDS Risk Awareness Program was successful in improving physicians' knowledge, attitude to intent-to-change behaviour and ability to integrate knowledge into practice scenarios. Physicians with true learning needs benefited the most from the CME program. PMID:9266123

  5. Preventing a Mass Disease: The Case of Gallstones Disease: Role and Competence for Family Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Di Ciaula, Agostino; Grattagliano, Ignazio

    2016-01-01

    Gallstone formation is the result of a complex interaction between genetic and nongenetic factors. We searched and reviewed the available literature to define how the primary prevention of gallstones (cholesterol gallstones in particular) could be applied in general practice. Electronic bibliographical databases were searched. Prospective and retrospective cohort studies and case–controlled studies were analyzed and graded for evidence quality. The epidemiological data confirmed that genetic factors are estimated to account for only approximately 25% of the overall risk of gallstones, while metabolic/environmental factors are at least partially modifiable in stone-free risk groups, and are thus modifiable by primary prevention measures related to diet, lifestyle, and environmental factors (i.e., rapid weight loss, bariatric surgery, somatostatin or analogues therapy, transient gallbladder stasis, and hormone therapy). There is no specific recommendation for the secondary prevention of recurrent gallstones. Family physicians can contribute to preventing gallstones due to their capability to identify and effectively manage several risk factors discussed in this study. Although further studies are needed to better elucidate the involvement of epigenetic factors that may regulate the effect of environment and lifestyle on gene expression in the primary prevention of gallstone formation, preventive interventions are feasible and advisable in the general practice setting. PMID:27468338

  6. Educating family physicians to recognize and manage depression: where are we now?

    PubMed

    Gask, Linda

    2013-08-01

    To consider what the barriers are to effective depression education; to understand what attitudes, knowledge, and skills doctors need to acquire, and finally to examine what we currently know about effective ways of training family physicians (FPs) about depression. A narrative review of the published literature compiled from searching reviews and original articles was conducted using the following key words: education, training, attitudes, depression, and primary care. Further relevant articles were identified from reference lists. The identified barriers are FPs' attitudes and confidence toward recognizing and managing depression, the way in which they conceptualize depression, and the difficulties they face in implementing change in the systems in which they work. We, as educators, can identify what FPs need to know, and this should include novel ways of organizing care. However, of key importance is the need to address how more effective interventions may be provided, recognizing that FPs may be starting from many different points on 3 differing continua of attitude, skills, and knowledge in relation to depression. We have to not only ensure that the content of what we teach is perceived as relevant to primary care but also review exactly how we go about providing it, using methods that will engage and stimulate doctors at differing stages of readiness to acquire new attitudes, skills, and knowledge about depression. However, we still need to find better ways of helping FPs to recognize and acknowledge their educational needs. Further research is also required to thoroughly evaluate these novel approaches to tailoring educational interventions.

  7. Barriers to the provision of smoking cessation assistance: a qualitative study among Romanian family physicians

    PubMed Central

    Panaitescu, Catalina; Moffat, Mandy A; Williams, Siân; Pinnock, Hilary; Boros, Melinda; Oana, Cristian Sever; Alexiu, Sandra; Tsiligianni, Ioanna

    2014-01-01

    Background: Smoking cessation is the most effective intervention to prevent and slow down the progression of several respiratory and other diseases and improve patient outcomes. Romania has legislation and a national tobacco control programme in line with the World Health Organization Framework for Tobacco Control. However, few smokers are advised to quit by their family physicians (FPs). Aim: To identify and explore the perceived barriers that prevent Romanian FPs from engaging in smoking cessation with patients. Methods: A qualitative study was undertaken. A total of 41 FPs were recruited purposively from Bucharest and rural areas within 600 km of the city. Ten FPs took part in a focus group and 31 participated in semistructured interviews. Analysis was descriptive, inductive and themed, according to the barriers experienced. Results: Five main barriers were identified: limited perceived role for FPs; lack of time during consultations; past experience and presence of disincentives; patients’ inability to afford medication; and lack of training in smoking cessation skills. Overarching these specific barriers were key themes of a medical and societal hierarchy, which undermined the FP role, stretched resources and constrained care. Conclusions: Many of the barriers described by the Romanian FPs reflected universally recognised challenges to the provision of smoking cessation advice. The context of a relatively hierarchical health-care system and limitations of time and resources exacerbated many of the problems and created new barriers that will need to be addressed if Romania is to achieve the aims of its National Programme Against Tobacco Consumption. PMID:25010432

  8. Military family physicians' perceptions of a pocket point-of-care ultrasound device in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Bornemann, Paul; Bornemann, Gina

    2014-12-01

    Point-of-care ultrasonography with a pocket ultrasound device, General Electric Medical Systems Vscan (Milwaukee, Wisconsin), has been shown to be effective and easy to learn. However, no studies to date have evaluated its use in the military primary care setting where its portability and value in bedside diagnosis would be especially beneficial. We tested the feasibility of the Vscan in the day-to-day care of patients by family physicians in their clinic, inpatient wards, and its potential for use in the military-deployed setting. Participants were trained and credentialed in the use of the point-of-care ultrasonography. Then, participants were provided with a pocket ultrasound device to use in their normal day-to-day practice. Additionally, participants completed surveys and provided ratings on their perceptions regarding the use of the device. According to the survey analysis, participants found the devices to be easy to use, valuable in discerning a diagnosis, and were not prohibitively time consuming. Moreover, patients were perceived by the participants to have been satisfied with the use of the device. Overall, participants had high satisfaction with the Vscan and perceived that the device would be highly valuable in the military-deployed setting. Reprint & Copyright © 2014 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  9. Preventing a Mass Disease: The Case of Gallstones Disease: Role and Competence for Family Physicians.

    PubMed

    Portincasa, Piero; Di Ciaula, Agostino; Grattagliano, Ignazio

    2016-07-01

    Gallstone formation is the result of a complex interaction between genetic and nongenetic factors. We searched and reviewed the available literature to define how the primary prevention of gallstones (cholesterol gallstones in particular) could be applied in general practice. Electronic bibliographical databases were searched. Prospective and retrospective cohort studies and case-controlled studies were analyzed and graded for evidence quality. The epidemiological data confirmed that genetic factors are estimated to account for only approximately 25% of the overall risk of gallstones, while metabolic/environmental factors are at least partially modifiable in stone-free risk groups, and are thus modifiable by primary prevention measures related to diet, lifestyle, and environmental factors (i.e., rapid weight loss, bariatric surgery, somatostatin or analogues therapy, transient gallbladder stasis, and hormone therapy). There is no specific recommendation for the secondary prevention of recurrent gallstones. Family physicians can contribute to preventing gallstones due to their capability to identify and effectively manage several risk factors discussed in this study. Although further studies are needed to better elucidate the involvement of epigenetic factors that may regulate the effect of environment and lifestyle on gene expression in the primary prevention of gallstone formation, preventive interventions are feasible and advisable in the general practice setting.

  10. Family physician program in Iran: considerations for adapting the policy in urban settings.

    PubMed

    Khayatzadeh-Mahani, Akram; Takian, Amirhossein

    2014-11-01

    Nationwide implementation of Family Physician (FP) program started in 2005 and targeted almost 25,000,000 citizens residing in rural areas and cities with less than 20,000 populations in Iran. Despite its blatant initiation that resulted in some modest achievements, the future of FP looks unclear in Iran. Thus far, no longitudinal evaluation of the implementation and impact of FP program has been conducted. However, meager evidence highlights the facilitating role of an existing and strong Primary Health Care (PHC) network in the implementation of FP in rural areas in Iran. A longstanding challenge, however, as emphasized by most stakeholders, remains to be the expansion of FP program into urban settings, where the PHC is undeveloped and fragile as well as the powerful private sector is resistant. Using an adapted conceptual framework of institutions, ideas, and interests, this policy perspective aims to shed light on main difficulties of FP implementation in urban areas of Iran. We analyze FP policy in the context of ongoing interactions and conflicts among institutions (the structures and rules that shape policies), interests (the groups and individuals influencing policy), and ideas (discourses around policies). Our argument will, we envisage, help plan for more appropriate implementation of FP in cities in Iran, and hopefully beyond.

  11. Role of the family physician in the care of children with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bunt, Christopher W; Bunt, Stephanie K

    2014-12-15

    Down syndrome is the most common chromosomal abnormality, occurring in one in 691 live births in the United States each year. Prenatally, the sequential contingent test for aneuploidy screening is highly sensitive for Down syndrome and has a low false-positive rate. The diagnosis should be confirmed with fluorescent in situ hybridization followed by chromosomal karyotyping at birth. Children with Down syndrome have varied degrees of intellectual disability and more health complications than other children. However, advancements in recent decades have led to improved life expectancy, satisfaction, and quality of life. Newborns with Down syndrome require echocardiography and cardiology evaluation. Children should have annual screenings for vision and hearing, and laboratory studies for subclinical thyroid disease and blood disorders. Clinicians should provide unbiased and comprehensive culturally sensitive information regarding available services for children with Down syndrome. There is good evidence that comprehensive early intervention programs (e.g., speech, visual, physical, and occupational therapy; child psychology) enhance development. It is important to enroll children with Down syndrome in state-specific resources as early as possible. Given the advances in medical care and early intervention programs, regular health supervision by family physicians can allow children with Down syndrome to lead healthy and productive lives.

  12. Visiting family physicians and naturopathic practitioners. Comparing patient-practitioner interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Boon, Heather; Stewart, Moira; Kennard, Mary Ann; Guimond, Jessica

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore similarities and differences in patient visits with family physicians (FPs) and naturopathic practitioners (NPs). DESIGN: Exploratory study combining quantitative and qualitative methods. SETTING: Southern Ontario. PARTICIPANTS: A purposeful sample of 10 practitioners (five FPs and five NPs matched for age, sex, and number of years in practice): each agreed to recruit three consecutive patients with new complaints to participate in the study. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Patient and visit characteristics; qualitative (content analysis of audiotaped interactions) and quantitative (ie, patient-centred care scores) information was gathered and analyzed. RESULTS: Qualitative analysis revealed that information gathering and treatment planning were very similar whether patients were visiting FPs or NPs. Most important differences were length of interaction (mean 54 minutes for NPs and 16.5 minutes for FPs) and patients' reasons for visits. Naturopathic practitioners were more likely to recommend medications (usually natural health products) than FPs. Quantitative data suggested that patients perceived no differences in patient-centred care from FPs and NPs. CONCLUSION: Overall, there were more similarities than differences in visits to the two types of practitioners. PMID:14649987

  13. Chemotherapy treatment decision-making experiences of older adults with cancer, their family members, oncologists and family physicians: a mixed methods study.

    PubMed

    Puts, Martine T E; Sattar, Schroder; McWatters, Kara; Lee, Katherine; Kulik, Michael; MacDonald, Mary-Ellen; Jang, Raymond; Amir, Eitan; Krzyzanowska, Monika K; Leighl, Natasha; Fitch, Margaret; Joshua, Anthony M; Warde, Padraig; Tourangeau, Ann E; Alibhai, Shabbir M H

    2017-03-01

    Although comorbidities, frailty, and functional impairment are common in older adults (OA) with cancer, little is known about how these factors are considered during the treatment decision-making process by OAs, their families, and health care providers. Our aim was to better understand the treatment decision process from all these perspectives. A mixed methods multi-perspective longitudinal study using semi-structured interviews and surveys with 29 OAs aged ≥70 years with advanced prostate, breast, colorectal, or lung cancer, 24 of their family members,13 oncologists, and 15 family physicians was conducted. The sample was stratified on age (70-79 and 80+). All interviews were analyzed using thematic analysis. There was no difference in the treatment decision-making experience based on age. Most OAs felt that they should have the final say in the treatment decision, but strongly valued their oncologists' opinion. "Trust in my oncologist" and "chemotherapy as the last resort to prolong life" were the most important reasons to accept treatment. Families indicated a need to improve communication between them, the patient and the specialist, particularly around goals of treatment. Comorbidity and potential side-effects did not play a major role in the treatment decision-making for patients, families, or oncologists. Family physicians reported no involvement in decisions but desired to be more involved. This first study using multiple perspectives showed neither frailty nor comorbidity played a role in the treatment decision-making process. Efforts to improve communication were identified as an opportunity that may enhance quality of care. In a mixed methods study multiple perspective study with older adults with cancer, their family members, their oncologist and their family physician we explored the treatment decision making process and found that most older adults were satisfied with their decision. Comorbidity, functional status and frailty did not impact the

  14. Death by request in The Netherlands: facts, the legal context and effects on physicians, patients and families

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    In this article I intend to describe an issue of the Dutch euthanasia practice that is not common knowledge. After some general introductory descriptions, by way of formulating a frame of reference, I shall describe the effects of this practice on patients, physicians and families, followed by a more philosophical reflection on the significance of these effects for the assessment of the authenticity of a request and the nature of unbearable suffering, two key concepts in the procedure towards euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide. This article does not focus on the arguments for or against euthanasia and the ethical justification of physician-assisted dying. These arguments have been described extensively in Kimsma and Van Leeuwen (Asking to die. Inside the Dutch debate about euthanasia, Kluwer Academic Publishers, Dordrecht, 1998). PMID:20668949

  15. Death by request in The Netherlands: facts, the legal context and effects on physicians, patients and families.

    PubMed

    Kimsma, G K

    2010-11-01

    In this article I intend to describe an issue of the Dutch euthanasia practice that is not common knowledge. After some general introductory descriptions, by way of formulating a frame of reference, I shall describe the effects of this practice on patients, physicians and families, followed by a more philosophical reflection on the significance of these effects for the assessment of the authenticity of a request and the nature of unbearable suffering, two key concepts in the procedure towards euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide. This article does not focus on the arguments for or against euthanasia and the ethical justification of physician-assisted dying. These arguments have been described extensively in Kimsma and Van Leeuwen (Asking to die. Inside the Dutch debate about euthanasia, Kluwer Academic Publishers, Dordrecht, 1998).

  16. Exploring perceptions and preferences of patients, families, physicians, and nurses regarding cancer disclosure: a descriptive qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Abazari, Parvaneh; Taleghani, Fariba; Hematti, Simin; Ehsani, Maryam

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to explore perceptions and preferences of cancer patients, their families, physicians, and nurses in disclosing cancer diagnosis. We selected 35 participants (15 patients, 6 family members, 9 physicians, and 5 nurses) by purposive sampling. We collected data by in-depth interviews and used qualitative content analysis for analysis. Data analysis resulted in three categories: (1) establishing a basis for breaking bad news; (2) adjusting to the tragedy of bad news; and (3) helping the patient cope with the shattering news. The first category comprised the following subcategories: provision of proper background; adhering to a patient-centered approach; and being unhurried. The second category comprised the following subcategories: cancer as a cultural taboo; death as a frightening vision of unattainable dreams and punishment; hope as an opening in the utter darkness of disease; and empathy as liniment for the injuries of disease. The third category comprised the following subcategories: the family as the most powerful healing source for the patient; the force of spirituality in achieving peace; and a multiprofessional, harmonious physician-centered team. The findings of this study can help healthcare teams break the bad news of cancer diagnosis in a more effective, satisfactory, and culture-based manner for patients and their families.

  17. Views of family physicians about survivorship care plans to provide breast cancer follow-up care: exploration of results from a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, M A; Grunfeld, E; Sussman, J; Porter, G; Mobilio, M Hammond

    2015-08-01

    The U.S. Institute of Medicine recommends that cancer patients receive survivorship care plans, but evaluations to date have found little evidence of the effectiveness of such plans. We conducted a qualitative follow-on study to a randomized controlled trial (rct) to understand the experiences of family physicians using survivorship care plans to support the follow-up of breast cancer patients. A subset of family physicians whose patients were enrolled in the parent rct in Ontario and Nova Scotia were eligible for this study. In interviews, the physicians discussed survivorship care plans (intervention) or usual discharge letters (control), and their confidence in providing follow-up cancer care. Of 123 eligible family physicians, 18 (10 intervention, 8 control) were interviewed. In general, physicians receiving a survivorship care plan found only the 1-page care record to be useful. Physicians who received only a discharge letter had variable views about the letter's usefulness; several indicated that it lacked information about potential cancer- or treatment-related problems. Most physicians were comfortable providing care 3-5 years after diagnosis, but desired timely and informative communication with oncologists. Although family physicians did not find extensive survivorship care plans useful, discharge letters might not be sufficiently comprehensive for follow-up breast cancer care. Effective strategies for two-way communication between family physicians and oncologists are still lacking.

  18. Equipping family physician trainees as teachers: a qualitative evaluation of a twelve-week module on teaching and learning.

    PubMed

    de Villiers, Marietjie R; Cilliers, Francois J; Coetzee, Francois; Herman, Nicoline; van Heusden, Martie; von Pressentin, Klaus B

    2014-10-22

    There is a dire need to expand the capacity of institutions in Africa to educate health care professionals. Family physicians, as skilled all-rounders at district level, are potentially well placed to contribute to an extended training platform in this context. To play this role, they need to both have an understanding of their specialist role that incorporates teaching and be equipped for their role as trainers of current and future health workers and specialists. A teaching and learning capacity-building module was introduced into a new master's programme in family medicine at Stellenbosch University, South Africa. We report on the influence of this module on graduates after the first six years. A qualitative study was undertaken, interviewing thirteen graduates of the programme. Thematic analysis of data was done by a team comprising tutors and graduates of the programme and an independent researcher. Ethical clearance was obtained. The module influenced knowledge, skills and attitudes of respondents. Perceptions and evidence of changes in behaviour, changes in practice beyond the individual respondent and benefits to students and patients were apparent. Factors underlying these changes included the role of context and the role of personal factors. Contextual factors included clinical workload and opportunity pressure i.e., the pressure and responsibility to undertake teaching. Personal factors comprised self-confidence, modified attitudes and perceptions towards the roles of a family physician and towards learning and teaching, in addition to the acquisition of knowledge and skills in teaching and learning. The interaction between opportunity pressure and self-confidence influenced the application of what was learned about teaching. A module on teaching and learning influenced graduates' perceptions of, and self-reported behaviour relating to, teaching as practicing family physicians. This has important implications for educating family physicians in and for

  19. Determinants of customer satisfaction with the health care system, with the possibility to choose a personal physician and with a family doctor in a transition country.

    PubMed

    Kersnik, J

    2001-08-01

    Many Eastern and Central European counties are reforming their health care systems. The aim of this study was to determine customer satisfaction with a reformed health care system, with the possibility of free choice of a family physician and patient satisfaction with the family physician in Slovenia and their major determinants. We used a postal survey of the patients who attended their family physician's offices during the study period. We obtained an 84% response rate. Some 72.9% of the respondents were satisfied with the current organisation of health care services, 95.5% of the respondents were satisfied with the possibility of choosing their own family physician and 58% of participants were very satisfied with the level of care received from their personal family practitioners. It was shown that higher patient satisfaction with the family physician was the most powerful predictor of patients' satisfaction with the health care system. The results show that health care reform in Slovenia has a positive impact on the consumers' perceptions of health care quality, measured in terms of consumer satisfaction with the health care system, the possibility to choose a family physician and the overall satisfaction with the family physician.

  20. [The Quality of the Family Physician-Patient Relationship. Patient-Related Predictors in a Sample Representative for the German Population].

    PubMed

    Dinkel, Andreas; Schneider, Antonius; Schmutzer, Gabriele; Brähler, Elmar; Henningsen, Peter; Häuser, Winfried

    2016-03-01

    Patient-centeredness and a strong working alliance are core elements of family medicine. Surveys in Germany showed that most people are satisfied with the quality of the family physician-patient relationship. However, factors that are responsible for the quality of the family physician-patient relationship remain unclear. This study aimed at identifying patient-related predictors of the quality of this relationship. Participants of a cross-sectional survey representative for the general German population were assessed using standardized questionnaires. The perceived quality of the family physician-patient relationship was measured with the German version of the Patient-Doctor Relationship Questionnaire (PDRQ-9). Associations of demographic and clinical variables (comorbidity, somatic symptom burden, psychological distress) with the quality of the family physician-patient relationship were assessed by applying hierarchical linear regression. 2278 participants (91,9%) reported having a family physician. The mean total score of the PDRQ-9 was high (M=4,12, SD=0,70). The final regression model showed that higher age, being female, and most notably less somatic and less depressive symptoms predicted a higher quality of the family physician-patient relationship. Comorbidity lost significance when somatic symptom burden was added to the regression model. The final model explained 11% of the variance, indicating a small effect. Experiencing somatic and depressive symptoms emerged as most relevant patient-related predictors of the quality of the family physician-patient relationship. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.