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Sample records for family practice system

  1. Understanding Families: Applying Family Systems Theory to Early Childhood Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christian, Linda Garris

    2006-01-01

    Working with families is one of the most important aspects of being an early childhood professional, yet it is an area in which many educators have received little preparation (Nieto 2004). Teachers spend hours learning about child development, developmentally appropriate practices, health and safety, playgrounds, and play. At times it seems that…

  2. Examining pedagogical practices in family systems nursing: intentionality, complexity, and doing well by families.

    PubMed

    Moules, Nancy J; Bell, Janice M; Paton, Brenda I; Morck, Angela C

    2012-05-01

    Teaching graduate family nursing students the important and delicate practice of entering into and mitigating families' illness suffering signifies an educational practice that is rigorous, intense, and contextual, yet not articulated as expounded knowledge. This study examined the pedagogical practices of the advanced practice of Family Systems Nursing (FSN) as taught to master's and doctoral nursing students at the Family Nursing Unit, University of Calgary, using observation of expert and novice clinical practice, live supervision, videotape review, presession hypothesizing, clinical documentation, and the writing of therapeutic letters to families. A triangulation of research methods and data collection strategies, interpretive ethnography, autoethnography, and hermeneutics, were used. Students reported an intensity of learning that had both useful and limiting consequences as they developed skills in therapeutic conversations with families experiencing illness. Faculty used an intentional pedagogical process to encourage growth in perceptual, conceptual, and executive knowledge and skills of working with families. PMID:22274936

  3. Examining pedagogical practices in family systems nursing: intentionality, complexity, and doing well by families.

    PubMed

    Moules, Nancy J; Bell, Janice M; Paton, Brenda I; Morck, Angela C

    2012-05-01

    Teaching graduate family nursing students the important and delicate practice of entering into and mitigating families' illness suffering signifies an educational practice that is rigorous, intense, and contextual, yet not articulated as expounded knowledge. This study examined the pedagogical practices of the advanced practice of Family Systems Nursing (FSN) as taught to master's and doctoral nursing students at the Family Nursing Unit, University of Calgary, using observation of expert and novice clinical practice, live supervision, videotape review, presession hypothesizing, clinical documentation, and the writing of therapeutic letters to families. A triangulation of research methods and data collection strategies, interpretive ethnography, autoethnography, and hermeneutics, were used. Students reported an intensity of learning that had both useful and limiting consequences as they developed skills in therapeutic conversations with families experiencing illness. Faculty used an intentional pedagogical process to encourage growth in perceptual, conceptual, and executive knowledge and skills of working with families.

  4. System of telemedicine services designed for family doctors' practices.

    PubMed

    Bujnowska-Fedak, M M; Staniszewski, A; Steciwko, A; Puchala, E

    2000-01-01

    The main goal of the most European telemedicine programs is to increase access to emergency and primary care; however, telemedicine presents both profound opportunities and challenges to general practice/family medicine. The aim of this project is to develop and demonstrate a regional primary care teleconsulting system in Poland linking an academic family medicine center and 10 family doctors' practices (both urban and rural) within a range of 100-200 km, serving a local population of 25,000 individuals. It is designed to support real-time consultations among health care providers via a computer network, provide secure access to multimedia patient records, and facilitate an innovative home monitoring and remote care from doctors to their patients. The entire process (planned for 3 years) includes: selecting the best technology (i.e., teletransmission system, communication protocols, etc.) and equipment; preparing the assumptions and conditions for formats and transmission rates; analysis of the existing techniques of compression and preparing own specific solution; finding an optimal infrastructure (i.e., equipment and communication configuration); implementing the system; evaluation of the medical, economic, organizational, and sociological aspects of the system (i.e., accessibility to primary health care, cost feasibility and cost-effectiveness of telemedicine services, quality of care assessment, etc.). The project offers the potential to improve: access to high-quality primary health care; the patient-physician bond and the attending physician's level of confidence; education of family doctors; use of expensive resources; and a convenient mode of delivering medical services to the patient.

  5. System for Observing Family Therapy Alliances: A Tool for Research and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedlander, Myrna L.; Escudero, Valentin; Horvath, Adam O.; Heatherington, Laurie; Cabero, Andres; Martens, Matthew P.

    2006-01-01

    To advance research and inform practice, the authors developed an observational rating system of client behavior reflecting strong and weak therapeutic alliances in couple and family therapy. The System for Observing Family Therapy Alliances (SOFTA), in both English and Spanish, has 2 dimensions that are common across therapy modalities…

  6. Understanding Family Involvement in the Preparation of Graduate Students: Measuring Family-Centered Beliefs, Skills, Systems, and Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giallourakis, Angie; Kent, Kristie Pretti-Frontczak; Cook, Bryan

    2005-01-01

    This research project sought to develop a measure to examine the family-centered beliefs, skills, work systems, and work practices of early childhood intervention, (ECI) and early childhood education (ECE) graduate students. The study was guided by four research questions: (1) To what extent do graduate students from preservice preparation…

  7. Adapting systems of care for child welfare practice with immigrant Latino children and families.

    PubMed

    Dettlaff, Alan J; Rycraft, Joan R

    2010-08-01

    Recent reform efforts in the child welfare system have called for child welfare agencies to provide community-based services and to increase the involvement of external stakeholders in identifying and developing services within the community. At the same time, child welfare agencies are faced with the challenge of providing services to an increasingly diverse population of children and families. As a result, there is a need for evidence-based practice models that respond to these challenges and promote positive outcomes for children and families. This paper describes the development of a program designed to train child welfare staff on the application of an existing evidence-based framework, systems of care, to practice with immigrant Latino children and families as a means of responding to these multiple calls for systems change and practice improvement. Immigrant Latino children and families represent the largest and fastest-growing population in the United States, and thus require the attention of child welfare systems and the development of evidence-based practices designed to respond to the unique needs of this population. Recommendations for program planners and evaluators on the application of systems of care to child welfare practice with immigrant Latino children and families are provided.

  8. Integrating the Illness Beliefs Model in clinical practice: a Family Systems Nursing knowledge utilization model.

    PubMed

    Duhamel, Fabie; Dupuis, France; Turcotte, Annie; Martinez, Anne-Marie; Goudreau, Johanne

    2015-05-01

    To promote the integration of Family Systems Nursing (FSN) in clinical practice, we need to better understand how nurses overcome the challenges of FSN knowledge utilization. A qualitative exploratory study was conducted with 32 practicing female nurses from hospital and community settings who had received FSN intervention training and skill development based on the Illness Beliefs Model and the Calgary Family Assessment and Intervention Models. The participants were interviewed about how they utilized FSN knowledge in their nursing practice. From the data analysis, a FSN Knowledge Utilization Model emerged that involves three major components: (a) nurses' beliefs in FSN and in their FSN skills, (b) nurses' knowledge utilization strategies to address the challenges of FSN practice, and (c) FSN positive outcomes. The FSN Knowledge Utilization Model describes a circular, incremental, and iterative process used by nurses to integrate FSN in daily nursing practice. Findings point to a need for re-evaluation of educational and management strategies in clinical settings for advancing the practice of FSN.

  9. Profession differences in family focused practice in the adult mental health system.

    PubMed

    Maybery, Darryl; Goodyear, Melinda; O'Hanlon, Brendan; Cuff, Rose; Reupert, Andrea

    2014-12-01

    There is a large gulf between what psychiatric services should (or could) provide and what they do in practice. This article sought to determine practice differences between the differing professions working in adult mental health services in terms of their family focused work. Three hundred and seven adult mental health professionals completed a cross-sectional survey of family focused practices in adult mental health services. Findings highlight that social workers engaged in more family focused practice compared to psychiatric nurses, who performed consistently the lowest on direct family care, compared to both social workers and psychologists. Clear skill, knowledge, and confidence differences are indicated between the professions. The article concludes by offering direction for future profession education and training in family focused practices.

  10. Family practice clinics. Survey of family practice residents' attitudes.

    PubMed Central

    Rubenstein, H.; Levitt, C.

    1993-01-01

    All residents of McGill University's Department of Family Medicine were surveyed by mail about their family practice clinic experience. Residents were generally satisfied with their training site and their supervision, but noted problems with volume and diversity of patients, learning certain procedures, and knowledge of community resources. They did not want more family medicine clinic time. PMID:8219838

  11. The Canadian Family Practice Accoucheur

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Michael

    1986-01-01

    Family practice obstetrics is strongly influenced by demography and marketing. The falling birth rate is leading to a surplus of caregivers who may inappropriately apply their technical skills to a population of low-risk pregnant women. This in turn may lead to a ‘cascade’ of negative consequences for the normal, child-bearing public. The family practice accoucheur has a key role to play as an advocate of high quality, humanistic maternity care. Training programs must address the academic base of family practice obstetrics through direct teaching, role modelling, research, and quality assurance. PMID:21267147

  12. State of family medicine practice in Lebanon

    PubMed Central

    Helou, Mariana; Rizk, Grace Abi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Many difficulties are encountered in family medicine practice and were subject to multinational studies. To date, no study was conducted in Lebanon to assess the challenges that family physicians face. This study aims to evaluate the family medicine practice in Lebanon stressing on the difficulties encountered by Lebanese family physicians. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire was sent to all 96 family medicine physicians practicing in Lebanon. Participants answered questions about characteristics of family medicine practice, evaluation of the quality of work, identification of obstacles, and their effect on the medical practice. Results: The response rate was 59%, and the average number of years of practice was 10.7 years. Physicians complain mainly of heavy load at work, too many bureaucratic tasks, demanding patients, and being undervalued by the specialists. Most physicians are able to adapt between their professional and private life. Conclusion: Despite all the obstacles encountered, Lebanese family physicians have a moderate satisfaction toward their practice. They remain positive and enthusiastic about their profession. Until the ministry of public health revises its current health system, the primary care profession in Lebanon will remain fragile as a profession. PMID:27453843

  13. Family support in general practice.

    PubMed Central

    Goodhart, C; Layzell, S; Cook, A; Graffy, J

    1999-01-01

    At a time when social services are overburdened in Britain, family support in general practice offers one way to fill the gap. In the Well Family Project, a 'family support coordinator' worked within a general practice in Hackney, London. In the first eighteen months she saw 113 clients. Evaluation was by semistructured interviews with a sample of these clients and with professional workers. Comments from those interviewed indicate that the family support was valued. The general practice base was convenient and non-stigmatizing. By adopting a proactive approach, the project was able to work with clients who had previously 'slipped through the net'. Some of the professionals interviewed would have liked to provide the same help, but were unable to do so because of time and other constraints. Family support provided through general practice was well received by vulnerable families. Although there was overlap with the remit of health visitors and social workers, the protected time and the independence of the coordinator enabled clients to obtain the help they wanted. The replicability of this strategy now needs to be assessed. PMID:10692905

  14. Family medicine residents’ practice intentions

    PubMed Central

    Grierson, Lawrence E.M.; Fowler, Nancy; Kwan, Matthew Y.W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess residents’ practice intentions since the introduction of the College of Family Physicians of Canada’s Triple C curriculum, which focuses on graduating family physicians who will provide comprehensive care within traditional and newer models of family practice. Design A survey based on Ajzen’s theory of planned behaviour was administered on 2 occasions. Setting McMaster University in Hamilton, Ont. Participants Residents (n = 135) who were enrolled in the Department of Family Medicine Postgraduate Residency Program at McMaster University in July 2012 and July 2013; 54 of the 60 first-year residents who completed the survey in 2012 completed it again in 2013. Main outcome measures The survey was modeled so as to measure the respondents’ intentions to practise with a comprehensive scope; determine the degree to which their attitudes, subjective norms, and perceptions of control about comprehensive practice influence those intentions; and investigate how these relationships change as residents progress through the curriculum. The survey also queried the respondents about their intentions with respect to particular medical services that underpin comprehensive practice. Results The responses indicate that the factors modeled by the theory of planned behaviour survey account for 60% of the variance in the residents’ intentions to adopt a comprehensive scope of practice upon graduation, that there is room for curricular improvement with respect to encouraging residents to practise comprehensive care, and that targeting subjective norms about comprehensive practice might have the greatest influence on improving resident intentions. Conclusion The theory of planned behaviour presents an effective approach to assessing curricular effects on resident practice intentions while also providing meaningful information for guiding further program evaluation efforts in the Department of Family Medicine at McMaster University. PMID:26889508

  15. Aging family caregivers: policies and practices.

    PubMed

    Heller, Tamar; Caldwell, Joe; Factor, Alan

    2007-01-01

    This review examines later life family support for adults with developmental disabilities from a life course perspective that takes into account social trends and changes in service patterns and in attitudes of families. Key issues addressed include: (1) trends affecting family caregiving, (2) health and social outcomes of life-long caregiving, (3) support needs of families, (4) family support policies and practices, and (5) recommendations for a research and policy agenda. Research examining outcomes of life-long caregiving has shown that most families adapt well to having a family member with disabilities. However, some families are at risk for poorer physical and mental health outcomes. These include cultural minorities and families of adults with behavioral challenges. Caregiving does seem to have a negative impact on maternal employment and family income as mothers often give up or cut back on employment to care for a child with developmental disabilities, who is more likely to continue living in the family home throughout adulthood than other adult children. Federal and state initiatives are addressing issues of family support through both the developmental disabilities and aging service systems.

  16. Family-Centered Practices. Research in Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBride, Susan L.

    1999-01-01

    Reviews early education practices that respect families' effects on child development, acknowledges families as decision makers, and supports families' role in educating and caring for children. Discusses three principles for family-centered practice and describes continuing challenges and opportunities suggested in the research findings. Charts…

  17. The Neurological Examination in Family Practice

    PubMed Central

    Siemens, Peter

    1974-01-01

    The family practitioner has the first opportunity and responsibility of making a diagnosis. Since a large portion of his work is concerned with neurological problems, he should be able to do a complete neurological examination. This examination should include evaluation of the gait, mental function, cranial nerves, motor system and sensory system. With practice, a routine neurological examination can be done rapidly and accurately. PMID:20469138

  18. Problems in family practice: the suicidal patient.

    PubMed

    Rockwell, D A; Pepitone-Rockwell, F

    1978-12-01

    Suicidal patients are common in family practice. Risk factors can alert the family physician to persons at unusual risk. Demographic factors, especially those revealing changing social status, recent loss, intentionality, lethality, past history, and high-risk groups, can be rapidly assessed. Viewing suicide as a final common pathway of system dysfunction at any or all major levels-biologic, psychologic, sociocultural-leads to an appreciation of the ubiquitous nature of passive or active "self murder" impulses. Persons depressed for any significant length of time for whatever reasons are potentially suicidal. Thus, the "typical" depression is suicidal but so are persons whose depression is related to drug side effects, primary illness effects, to living in a dysfunctional family system, or to normal grief. Diagnosis requires inquiry about the depth of the patient's depression pain. Treatment takes into account the aforementioned risk factors, plus interventions appropriate to the malfunctioning system. PMID:748493

  19. [Local registries in general/family practice].

    PubMed

    Cindrić, Jasna

    2007-02-01

    Entering medical records into registries of all sorts has always been a part of everyday work of a general/family physician. There is a distinction between public/population registries on the one hand, and internal, local registries on the other hand. Local registries refer to the catchment population of a particular general/family practice. While keeping population-registries has become a routine with a high level of uniformity in collecting, delivering, recording, analyzing and controlling information, there are no recommendations or standards for keeping local registries, although their importance as well as indisputable necessity have been recognized. They are invaluable for providing an insight into the condition and history of a particular disease in a particular area, planning and taking preventive measures and activities, supervising therapy and medical treatment, as well as for statistical analyses and scientific studies. The most important registry in the field of general practice is the one called "List of health care under the supervision of chosen general/family physicians", which can serve as an index for any other individual record or record of diseases by name kept at a particular general/family practice. Although local registries have "evolved" from notebooks into modern informatic databases, the problem of up-to-dateness cannot be solved until the whole health care system has been connected for competent and authorized persons to be able to record changes of data where and when they take place.

  20. ADULT EDUCATION IN FAMILY BUSINESS PRACTICES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DRAPER, ARGEN H.

    IN A STUDY OF FAMILY MONEY MANAGEMENT, A QUESTIONNAIRE WAS COMPLETED BY WIVES IN 94 FAMILIES SELECTED AT RANDOM FROM THOSE WHO HAD USED THE SERVICES OF THE EXTENSION OFFICE IN DEAF SMITH COUNTY, TEXAS. ONLY ONE FAMILY IN THE STUDY FOLLOWED ALL OF THE 16 SPECIFIED BUSINESS PRACTICES. IT WAS FOUND THAT, IN GENERAL, FAMILIES WERE FOLLOWING SPECIFIED…

  1. A Research Framework for Understanding the Practical Impact of Family Involvement in the Juvenile Justice System: The Juvenile Justice Family Involvement Model.

    PubMed

    Walker, Sarah Cusworth; Bishop, Asia S; Pullmann, Michael D; Bauer, Grace

    2015-12-01

    Family involvement is recognized as a critical element of service planning for children's mental health, welfare and education. For the juvenile justice system, however, parents' roles in this system are complex due to youths' legal rights, public safety, a process which can legally position parents as plaintiffs, and a historical legacy of blaming parents for youth indiscretions. Three recent national surveys of juvenile justice-involved parents reveal that the current paradigm elicits feelings of stress, shame and distrust among parents and is likely leading to worse outcomes for youth, families and communities. While research on the impact of family involvement in the justice system is starting to emerge, the field currently has no organizing framework to guide a research agenda, interpret outcomes or translate findings for practitioners. We propose a research framework for family involvement that is informed by a comprehensive review and content analysis of current, published arguments for family involvement in juvenile justice along with a synthesis of family involvement efforts in other child-serving systems. In this model, family involvement is presented as an ascending, ordinal concept beginning with (1) exclusion, and moving toward climates characterized by (2) information-giving, (3) information-eliciting and (4) full, decision-making partnerships. Specific examples of how courts and facilities might align with these levels are described. Further, the model makes predictions for how involvement will impact outcomes at multiple levels with applications for other child-serving systems. PMID:26407854

  2. A Research Framework for Understanding the Practical Impact of Family Involvement in the Juvenile Justice System: The Juvenile Justice Family Involvement Model.

    PubMed

    Walker, Sarah Cusworth; Bishop, Asia S; Pullmann, Michael D; Bauer, Grace

    2015-12-01

    Family involvement is recognized as a critical element of service planning for children's mental health, welfare and education. For the juvenile justice system, however, parents' roles in this system are complex due to youths' legal rights, public safety, a process which can legally position parents as plaintiffs, and a historical legacy of blaming parents for youth indiscretions. Three recent national surveys of juvenile justice-involved parents reveal that the current paradigm elicits feelings of stress, shame and distrust among parents and is likely leading to worse outcomes for youth, families and communities. While research on the impact of family involvement in the justice system is starting to emerge, the field currently has no organizing framework to guide a research agenda, interpret outcomes or translate findings for practitioners. We propose a research framework for family involvement that is informed by a comprehensive review and content analysis of current, published arguments for family involvement in juvenile justice along with a synthesis of family involvement efforts in other child-serving systems. In this model, family involvement is presented as an ascending, ordinal concept beginning with (1) exclusion, and moving toward climates characterized by (2) information-giving, (3) information-eliciting and (4) full, decision-making partnerships. Specific examples of how courts and facilities might align with these levels are described. Further, the model makes predictions for how involvement will impact outcomes at multiple levels with applications for other child-serving systems.

  3. Rural Idaho Family Physicians' Scope of Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Ed; Schmitz, David; Epperly, Ted; Nukui, Ayaka; Miller, Carissa Moffat

    2010-01-01

    Context: Scope of practice is an important factor in both training and recruiting rural family physicians. Purpose: To assess rural Idaho family physicians' scope of practice and to examine variations in scope of practice across variables such as gender, age and employment status. Methods: A survey instrument was developed based on a literature…

  4. Healthy Family 2009: Practicing Healthy Adult Living

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Healthy Family 2009 Practicing Healthy Adult Living Past Issues / Winter ... diabetes, or if heart disease runs in your family, begin checking cholesterol at age 20. Colorectal Cancer : ...

  5. Managing chronic pain in family practice.

    PubMed Central

    Librach, S. L.

    1993-01-01

    Pain is common in family practice. In dealing with chronic pain, both the family physician and the patient often have problems in defining and in understanding the origin of chronic pain and in providing effective pain relief. This article explores a practical, holistic approach to understanding and managing chronic pain. PMID:8471902

  6. Practice with Transgendered Youth and Their Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Ken

    1999-01-01

    Explores various issues confronting social work practice with transgendered youth and their families in order to help families understand and grow along with their transgendered members. Focuses on: sex, gender attributes, and roles; intersexuality in infants; gender variation in children; transsexuality; new gender options; family transitions…

  7. Therapy for Family Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosmann, Michael R.

    A family therapy model, based on a conceptualization of the family as a behavioral system whose members interact adaptively so that an optimal level of functioning is maintained within the system, is described. The divergent roots of this conceptualization are discussed briefly, as are the treatment approaches based on it. The author's model,…

  8. Scaling up Evidence-based Practices for Children and Families in New York State: Towards Evidence-based Policies on Implementation for State Mental Health Systems

    PubMed Central

    Hoagwood, Kimberly Eaton; Olin, S. Serene; Horwitz, Sarah; McKay, Mary; Cleek, Andrew; Gleacher, Alissa; Lewandowski, Eric; Nadeem, Erum; Acri, Mary; Chor, Ka Ho Brian; Kuppinger, Anne; Burton, Geraldine; Weiss, Dara; Frank, Samantha; Finnerty, Molly; Bradbury, Donna M.; Woodlock, Kristin M.; Hogan, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Dissemination of innovations is widely considered the sine qua non for system improvement. At least two dozen states are rolling-out evidence-based mental health practices targeted at children and families using trainings, consultations, webinars, and learning collaboratives to improve quality and outcomes. In New York State (NYS) a group of researchers, policy-makers, providers and family support specialists have worked in partnership since 2002 to redesign and evaluate the children’s mental health system. Five system strategies driven by empirically-based practices and organized within a state-supported infrastructure have been used in the child and family service system with over 2,000 providers: (a) business practices; (b) use of health information technologies in quality improvement; (c) specific clinical interventions targeted at common childhood disorders; (d) parent activation; and (e) quality indicator development. The NYS system has provided a laboratory for naturalistic experiments. We describe these initiatives, key findings and challenges, lessons learned for scaling, and implications for creating evidence-based implementation policies in state systems. PMID:24460518

  9. Strengthening family systems.

    PubMed

    Starn, J

    1993-01-01

    The childbearing year is a psychosocial transition that involves changes in roles and status for each member of the family. This change is perhaps most significant in the transition that occurs with the birth of the first child. Thus, childbirth education can be looked upon as an opportunity to strengthen family systems through anticipatory guidance and skill building that family members may use throughout the life cycle.

  10. A Summary: Responsive Evaluation and Family Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rakel, Robert E.

    1976-01-01

    The author feels that both responsive and preordinate methods would be useful in evaluating the family practice residency program at a medical school. Appropriate uses of both evaluation methods are suggested. (GDC)

  11. Family Literacy: From Theory to Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeBruin-Parecki, Andrea, Ed.; Krol-Sinclair, Barbara, Ed.

    This book addresses family literacy as a theoretically sound field of research and practice that can be used to improve literacy worldwide. The book's 14 chapters are divided into four sections. Following the "Introduction" (Andrea DeBruin-Parecki and Barbara Krol-Sinclair), under Section I--Theoretical Perspectives Related to Family Literacy--are…

  12. Paraprofessionals in Infant/Family Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenichel, Emily, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    "Zero to Three is a single focus bulletin of the National Center for Infants, Toddlers, and Families providing insight from multiple disciplines on the development of infants, toddlers, and their families. Noting that sometimes practice needs to be "translated" into research, as with understanding the phenomenon of paraprofessional workers in…

  13. Old wine in new bottles: decanting systemic family process research in the era of evidence-based practice.

    PubMed

    Rohrbaugh, Michael J

    2014-09-01

    Social cybernetic (systemic) ideas from the early Family Process era, though emanating from qualitative clinical observation, have underappreciated heuristic potential for guiding quantitative empirical research on problem maintenance and change. The old conceptual wines we have attempted to repackage in new, science-friendly bottles include ironic processes (when "solutions" maintain problems), symptom-system fit (when problems stabilize relationships), and communal coping (when we-ness helps people change). Both self-report and observational quantitative methods have been useful in tracking these phenomena, and together the three constructs inform a team-based family consultation approach to working with difficult health and behavior problems. In addition, a large-scale, quantitatively focused effectiveness trial of family therapy for adolescent drug abuse highlights the importance of treatment fidelity and qualitative approaches to examining it. In this sense, echoing the history of family therapy research, our experience with juxtaposing quantitative and qualitative methods has gone full circle-from qualitative to quantitative observation and back again. PMID:24905101

  14. Old wine in new bottles: decanting systemic family process research in the era of evidence-based practice.

    PubMed

    Rohrbaugh, Michael J

    2014-09-01

    Social cybernetic (systemic) ideas from the early Family Process era, though emanating from qualitative clinical observation, have underappreciated heuristic potential for guiding quantitative empirical research on problem maintenance and change. The old conceptual wines we have attempted to repackage in new, science-friendly bottles include ironic processes (when "solutions" maintain problems), symptom-system fit (when problems stabilize relationships), and communal coping (when we-ness helps people change). Both self-report and observational quantitative methods have been useful in tracking these phenomena, and together the three constructs inform a team-based family consultation approach to working with difficult health and behavior problems. In addition, a large-scale, quantitatively focused effectiveness trial of family therapy for adolescent drug abuse highlights the importance of treatment fidelity and qualitative approaches to examining it. In this sense, echoing the history of family therapy research, our experience with juxtaposing quantitative and qualitative methods has gone full circle-from qualitative to quantitative observation and back again.

  15. Scores on Standard Measures of Academic Achievement and Family Practice Clerkship Evaluations by Students Choosing Family Practice and Non-Family Practice Specialties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campos-Outcalt, Doug; And Others

    1993-01-01

    A study of 658 University of Arizona medical school graduates compared standardized test scores, grade point averages, and family practice clerkship evaluations for students selecting family practice and non-family practice specialties. Family practice graduates scored lower on the national licensing examination, but there was no difference in…

  16. The research environment in family practice.

    PubMed

    Perkoff, G T

    1985-11-01

    Both the place of family practice in academic medicine and the intellectual underpinning of the specialty itself are thought by many to depend on the development of successful research programs in academic departments of family medicine. Yet many believe less research than desired is being done in such departments, even by faculty trained in research. To gain additional information on this important subject, a survey was conducted of the departmental research experiences of 42 graduates of the several Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Family Practice Academic Fellowship Programs who had had the opportunity for at least one year of faculty experience. The responses indicate that the majority of such graduates spend 20 percent or less of their time in research, that most perceive administrative duties as interfering with research, that a minority have budgeted research time, and few have departmental research funds. Despite these obstacles, those who do research publish with surprising frequency, about one paper per fellow per year. Several ways are presented to improve the research environment in departments of family practice and to lead to even more productive, secure research activities of these and other family practice faculty.

  17. Fewer family physicians are in solo practices.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Lars E; Baxley, Elizabeth; Jaén, Carlos Roberto; Phillips, Robert L

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 20 years there has been a statistically significant trend toward fewer family physicians identifying as being in solo practice. Further study to determine the reasons for this decline and its impact on access to care will be critical because rural areas are more dependent on solo practitioners.

  18. Allocation of Allowances and Associated Family Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerr, M. Kaye; Cheadle, Tannis

    This study gathered information on general family practices concerning allowances given to children, parental reasons for the provision of allowances, the bases for their administration, and the frequency of conflicts generated around them. The subjects were 81 parents of elementary school children in a midwest Canadian city. Subjects completed…

  19. Sibling Family Practices: Guidelines for Healthy Boundaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Toni Cavanagh; Huang, Bevan Emma; Simpson, Pippa M.

    2009-01-01

    A questionnaire was given to 500 mental health and child welfare professionals asking for maximum acceptable ages for siblings to engage jointly in certain family practices related to hygiene, affection, and privacy. A large proportion of respondents felt it was never acceptable for siblings to take showers together (40%), kiss on the mouth (37%),…

  20. Parenting Practices, Child Adjustment, and Family Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amato, Paul R.; Fowler, Frieda

    2002-01-01

    Uses data from the National Survey of Families and Households to test the generality of the links between parenting practices and child outcomes. Parents' reports of support, monitoring, and harsh punishment were associated in the expected direction with parents' reports of children's adjustment, school grades, and behavior problems, and with…

  1. Family planning practices in families with children affected by β-thalassemia major in Southern Iran.

    PubMed

    Haghpanah, Sezaneh; Johari, Sheyda; Parand, Shirin; Bordbar, Mohammad Reza; Karimi, Mehran

    2013-01-01

    Preventing the birth of children with β-thalassemia major (β-TM) is an important health issue. We investigated family planning practices and related factors among families with affected children. We selected a total of 569 parents from the parents of patients with β-TM who were registered at thalassemia referral clinics in southern Iran. Information was recorded regarding demographic variables, socioeconomic status and family planning practices. The correlations between family planning practice and related factors were evaluated. Approximately 96.0% of the parents (546) were practicing contraception at the time of the study. Only 12.8% of the families whose first child had β-TM decided to have no more children. The most frequent contraceptive method was tubal ligation (TL) (37.5%) followed by oral contraceptive pills (OCP) (31.5%). Higher education level of the mothers and higher economic status of the families were found to be related with the lower numbers of children with β-TM (p = 0.001). We found a high percentage of safe contraception being used by at-risk couples. It seems that educational programs have been effective in influencing family planning practices. Further attention should be devoted to increasing the knowledge of at-risk couples with a greater focus on parents of low socioeconomic status. Because of cultural factors in Iran, many of these at-risk couples opted to achieve the desired family size, so implementation of a well-organized prenatal diagnostic system seems necessary.

  2. Using Family Paradigms to Improve Evidence-Based Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hidecker, Mary Jo Cooley; Jones, Rebecca S.; Imig, David R.; Villarruel, Francisco A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Evidence-based practice (EBP) describes clinical decision making using research, clinical experience, and client values. For family-centered practices, the client's family is integral to this process. This article proposes that using family paradigms, a family science framework, may help elicit and understand client/family values within…

  3. Changing Policy and Practice in the Child Welfare System through Collaborative Efforts to Identify and Respond Effectively to Family Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banks, Duren; Landsverk, John; Wang, Kathleen

    2008-01-01

    The "Greenbook" provides a roadmap for child welfare agencies to collaborate and provide effective responses to families who are experiencing co-occurring child maltreatment and domestic violence. A multisite developmental evaluation was conducted of six demonstration sites that received federal funding to implement "Greenbook" recommendations for…

  4. What do family physicians see in practice?

    PubMed Central

    Warrington, A. M.; Ponesse, D. J.; Hunter, M. E.; Grant, D. A.; Grasset, A. V.; Gray, D. W.; Hayward, C. D.; Long, B. F.; Morrison, G. E.; Sutherland, D.

    1977-01-01

    Health care problems dealt with in their practices were recorded by seven family physicians over a period of 1 year (two others recorded for 3 months), each diagnosis being coded according to the Canuck Disease Classification Index. Problems were classified into four types: physical, psychosocial, diseases of choice (or lifestyle) and diseases of social impact. More than 85% of the 23 108 problems recorded were physical in origin and had physical manifestations. More time was spent on routine checkups and treatment of respiratory disease than on any other activity. Venereal disease and alcoholism were infrequent problems. The family physician is in a favourable position to act as health educator and counsellor and must be throughly trained in the physical aspects of disease. PMID:578125

  5. Family Medicine's Waltz with Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downing, Raymond

    2012-01-01

    Family Medicine first formally confronted systems thinking with the adoption of the biopsychosocial model for understanding disease in a holistic manner; this is a description of a natural system. More recently, Family Medicine has been consciously engaged in developing itself as a system for delivering health care, an artificial system. We make…

  6. The Impact of Desired Family Size Upon Family Planning Practices in Rural East Pakistan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mosena, Patricia Wimberley

    1971-01-01

    Results indicated that women whose desired family size is equal to or less than their actual family size have significantly greater frequencies practicing family planning than women whose desired size exceeds their actual size. (Author)

  7. Preparing the personal physician for practice: changing family medicine residency training to enable new model practice.

    PubMed

    Green, Larry A; Jones, Samuel M; Fetter, Gerald; Pugno, Perry A

    2007-12-01

    After two years of intensive study, in 2004 the Future of Family Medicine report concluded that the current U.S. health care system is inadequate and unsustainable, and called for changes within the specialty of family medicine to ensure the future health of the American public. With guidance and encouragement from many disciplines and health experts, a set of 10 recommendations was established to accomplish a transformative change in how family physicians serve their patients and how the essential function of primary care is achieved. From these recommendations came a period of innovation and experimentation in the training of family physicians, entitled Preparing the Personal Physician for Practice (P4). The P4 project is a carefully designed and evaluated initiative led by the American Board of Family Medicine and the Association of Family Medicine Residency Directors and administered by TransforMED, a practice redesign initiative of the American Academy of Family Physicians. Fourteen family medicine programs were chosen to participate and will put their innovations into practice from 2007 to 2012, during which time regular evaluation will be conducted. The purpose of P4 is to learn how to improve the graduate medical education of family physicians such that they are prepared to be outstanding personal physicians and to work in the new models of practice now emerging. The innovations tested by P4 residencies are expected to inspire substantial changes in the content, structure, and locations of training of family physicians and to guide future revisions in accreditation and certification requirements. PMID:18046133

  8. Contracting for Trust in Family Practice Obstetrics

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Michael

    1983-01-01

    A case is presented, illustrating a problem faced by family physicians who practice obstetrics; women who present with lists of inflexible requirements for labor and delivery may be attempting to control a situation in which they feel a great deal of fear, and little trust for the physician. The physician who tries to deal with every item on the list, rather than to explore the meaning of the total presentation, risks establishing a contract that cannot be met—and attracting more demanding patients. It is better to offer to discuss the patient's fear and distrust; this is described as `contracting for trust', and is a way to promote patient and doctor flexibility. PMID:21283484

  9. Participatory Design Research as a Practice for Systemic Repair: Doing Hand-in-Hand Math Research with Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booker, Angela; Goldman, Shelley

    2016-01-01

    Success and failure in formal mathematics education has been used to legitimize stratification. We describe participatory design research as a methodology for systemic repair. The analysis describes epistemic authority--exercising the right or the power to know--as a form of agency in processes of mathematical problem solving and learning. We…

  10. Family planning: general practice and clinic services.

    PubMed

    Rowlands, S

    1985-04-01

    The growing trend in the UK toward family planning provision by general practitioners rather than physicians at community family planning clinics has been accompanied by a lack of cooperation and communication--even competition--between these 2 services. In general, clinics provide a wider range of contraceptive methods and personnel are more likely to have special training in counseling for psychosexual problems, abortion, and sterilization. On the other hand, general practitioners are often preferred because of their knowledge of a woman's medical history and longer office hours. Courses to update knowledge about contraception are an important asset for general practitioners. At times, however, it is in the best interests of the patient to be referred to a clinic by a general practitioner. If community clinics are to remain open, they must provide modern contraceptive technology and be able to deal with difficult problems. Pregnancy testing facilities should be available on the premises. Bureaucratic rules that make it difficult for individual clinic physicians to prescribe Depo-Provera, postcoital pills, or IUDs should be abolished. In addition, men should be welcomed. The future of the clinics is further dependent on the establishment of a proper career structure in community health. It is concluded that professionals working in both clinics and general practice should seek to improve their standards and work in greater cooperation.

  11. Indian family systems, collectivistic society and psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Chadda, Rakesh K; Deb, Koushik Sinha

    2013-01-01

    Indian society is collectivistic and promotes social cohesion and interdependence. The traditional Indian joint family, which follows the same principles of collectivism, has proved itself to be an excellent resource for the care of the mentally ill. However, the society is changing with one of the most significant alterations being the disintegration of the joint family and the rise of nuclear and extended family system. Although even in today's changed scenario, the family forms a resource for mental health that the country cannot neglect, yet utilization of family in management of mental disorders is minimal. Family focused psychotherapeutic interventions might be the right tool for greater involvement of families in management of their mentally ill and it may pave the path for a deeper community focused treatment in mental disorders. This paper elaborates the features of Indian family systems in the light of the Asian collectivistic culture that are pertinent in psychotherapy. Authors evaluate the scope and effectiveness of family focused psychotherapy for mental disorders in India, and debate the issues and concerns faced in the practice of family therapy in India. PMID:23858272

  12. Indian family systems, collectivistic society and psychotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Chadda, Rakesh K.; Deb, Koushik Sinha

    2013-01-01

    Indian society is collectivistic and promotes social cohesion and interdependence. The traditional Indian joint family, which follows the same principles of collectivism, has proved itself to be an excellent resource for the care of the mentally ill. However, the society is changing with one of the most significant alterations being the disintegration of the joint family and the rise of nuclear and extended family system. Although even in today's changed scenario, the family forms a resource for mental health that the country cannot neglect, yet utilization of family in management of mental disorders is minimal. Family focused psychotherapeutic interventions might be the right tool for greater involvement of families in management of their mentally ill and it may pave the path for a deeper community focused treatment in mental disorders. This paper elaborates the features of Indian family systems in the light of the Asian collectivistic culture that are pertinent in psychotherapy. Authors evaluate the scope and effectiveness of family focused psychotherapy for mental disorders in India, and debate the issues and concerns faced in the practice of family therapy in India. PMID:23858272

  13. Characteristics of Combined Family Practice-Psychiatry Residency Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rachal, James; Lacy, Timothy J.; Warner, Christopher H.; Whelchel, Jennifer

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate how family practice-psychiatry residency programs meet the challenges of rigorous accreditation demands, clinical supervision, and boundaries of practice. Method: A 54-question survey of program directors of family practice-psychiatry residency programs outlining program demographic data, curricula, coordination, resident…

  14. Introducing the Computer to Family Practice

    PubMed Central

    Petreman, Mel

    1984-01-01

    The medical profession has been far more reluctant than the general business community to adopt the computer as a useful business tool. The experience of a group of five family physicians who have been using a computer since 1979 demonstrates that it is possible to achieve significant financial benefits, and to reduce the stress and workload of both physicians and office staff. The computerization of medical records, scheduling, and patient billing is discussed in detail. Physicians have controlled the paper load of the modern medical office by pioneering their own medical software system. PMID:21279036

  15. Promotion of family planning services in practice leaflets.

    PubMed

    Marshall, M N; Gray, D J; Pearson, V; Phillips, D R; Owen, M

    1994-10-01

    Providing 75% of family planning services in the United Kingdom, general practitioners are required to produce leaflets which describe the contraceptive services they provide. The authors analyzed information about family planning provided to clients through practice leaflets. 88% of practice leaflets from the 198 practices in Devon were available from the Devon Family Health Services Authority for analysis. It was determined that the leaflets are not being best used to advertise the range and potential of family planning services. Although all practices in Devon offer contraceptive services, only 90% of leaflets mentioned that the services are available. Reference to postcoital contraception and information about services outside the practice for people who might not want to see their family doctor are also sorely lacking. A clear need exists to provide patients with more information. Finally, the authors found that group practices and those with female partners are most likely to give high priority to family planning issues in their leaflets.

  16. A Survey of Adverse Drug Reactions in Family Practice

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    In this study, 232 Canadian family physicians recorded suspected adverse drug reactions (SADRs) in their practices for five months. Patients' age and sex, the drug(s) implicated, type of reaction and any disability were recorded on a card and sent to a central coordinating office each week. The number of SADRs in clinical practice seems to be small. An estimated 300,000 patients were involved in the study, and a total of 314 suspected adverse drug reactions in 314 patients were reported. A proposal is made for a surveillance system for new drugs. Family physicians would monitor all patients taking a drug or group of drugs and matched controls. The status of patients and controls would be recorded regularly and any SADRs reported to a central coordinating centre. PMID:21283495

  17. Integrating School and Family Counseling: Practical Solutions. The Family Psychology and Counseling Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Lynn D., Ed.

    This book offers practical suggestions for school counselors to begin integrating family counseling methods into their practice, while providing a rationale and the research support for working with families from a school base. It also provides specific techniques for using solution-focused tools, conducting family therapy with children, working…

  18. Strengthening Adoption Practice, Listening to Adoptive Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkinson, Anne; Gonet, Patricia

    2007-01-01

    In-depth interviews with 500 adoptive families who received postadoption services through Virginia's Adoptive Family Preservation (AFP) program paint a richly detailed picture of the challenges adoptive families face and what they need to sustain adoption for many years after finalization. Findings document the need for support in a variety of…

  19. Guiding the Family: Practical Counseling Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grunwald, Bernice Bronia; McAbee, Harold V.

    This book, intended as a text for therapists and counselors in family counseling, is based on principles of Adlerian psychology. The first chapter examines Adlerian theory and family counseling. Basic principles of individual psychology are applied to family counseling, and the goals of children with disturbing behavior are discussed. Reasons why…

  20. Within a Family-Centered Practice, How Can Family Outcomes Be Identified?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeffries, Lynn

    2009-01-01

    Family-centered practice (care, intervention, services, or help giving) and family-focused, and family-based care are terms used interchangeably over the past 60 years to describe an approach to working with children with disabilities and their families. Common beliefs fundamental to the implementation of a program that incorporates…

  1. Collaborative Counselor and Medical Training at a Family Practice Residency Program: A Sharing of the Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBride, LeBron; Pilkington, Lloyd; Murray, Paige Johnson; Whitfield, Donna

    2000-01-01

    The reactions of a Ph.D.-level, counselor-in-training, a medical student, and a family practice resident to collaborative systems clinical training at a family practice residency program are given in this article. Addresses the initial impressions of the content and process of the teaching model and how the experience changed their views of…

  2. Social workers as "experts" in the family court system: is evidence-based practice a missing link or host-created knowledge?

    PubMed

    Prescott, Dana E

    2013-10-01

    The graduate school curriculum for social workers requires that students learn to critically distinguish between opinion-based knowledge and evidence-based practices, or empirically-supported interventions. Once graduated, licensed social workers are often called upon to offer diagnostic and predictive opinions as experts in a variety of macro-environments. When the family courts are that "host" environment, social workers proffer expert opinions that may categorize and label parents or children for purposes of a judge's allocation of physical or legal custody. In this article, it is suggested that the social work profession, within all three domains of education, practice, and research, should more precisely link the design and fidelity of an evidence-based practice (EBP) with its potential misapplication or warping when proffered as science in "host" environments like family courts. As Foucault and other scholars warn, the failure to verify that an intervention is applied correctly may actually enhance the risk of social injustice by interpreting and translating EBP knowledge in the non-empirical form of authority-by-license. This article, therefore, proposes that the social work profession, from the classroom to the field, has an obligation to thoroughly understand and engage interdisciplinary practices that assure respect for the strengths and limits of social work knowledge.

  3. Administrators' Understanding and Use of Family-Centered Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mandell, Colleen J.; Murray, Mary M.

    2009-01-01

    Employing qualitative methods, administrators' understanding and use of family-centered practices were examined. Results indicate differences in role perceptions and service delivery based on their level of understanding. Administrators with a comprehensive understanding of family-centered practices, in comparison to administrators with limited or…

  4. Applying Research on Family Violence to Clinical Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gelles, Richard J.

    1982-01-01

    Considers whether research on family violence can be applied to clinical practice. Suggests limitations of the knowledge base constrain the application of research on family violence to clinical work, and certain aspects of the research paradigm also limit the transfer of research knowledge to clinical practice. (Author)

  5. Experience with a Family-Practice-Resident-Directed Obstetrical Clinic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Jerry L.; Snyder, Frank

    1980-01-01

    At Toledo Hospital, family practice residents have assumed responsibility for the normal obstetrics clinic. Specialty consultations are provided by the hospital's obstetrics residency program. A medical audit of the clinic indicates that the family practice residents obtained consultations and made referrals at the appropriate times. (JMD)

  6. The content of family practice: do we need more studies?

    PubMed

    Curry, L; Macintyre, K

    1982-01-01

    Having an accurate job description of family physicians is important to a number of audiences. There is a tendency to produce another content profile of family practice in response to every specific request for an accurate job description, rather than examining the existing profiles. We analyzed the amount of similarity and therefore redundancy in currently available profiles of family practice. Our findings indicate remarkable consistency across profile studies. We conclude that there is no need to continue producing profiles of family practice unless something significant occurs in the medical environment to suggest there might be a change in the profile.

  7. The Practice of Marriage and Family Counseling in Cyberspace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jencius, Marty; Sager, Denise E.

    2001-01-01

    Reviews the current practice of using the Internet to provide marriage and family counseling services. Discusses how the Internet has developed into a medium that can be used for the provision of marriage and family counseling services. Ethical guidelines developed by other associations have direct implication in how marriage and family therapists…

  8. Family Counseling in Malaysia: Current Issues and Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noor, Norhayati Mohd.

    2014-01-01

    The study is carried out to explore the issues and practices in family counselling among the family counsellors at few counseling centres in Malaysia. Qualitative approach of single case embedded units was used for the study. Data collection was done using in-depth interview, observation and document analysis with 12 family counsellors. The data…

  9. The role of family institutes in promoting the practice of family therapy.

    PubMed

    Rampage, Cheryl

    2014-09-01

    Much of the development of family therapy as a discipline was an outcome of the clinical, training, and theory-building activities conducted at family institutes around the United States. Beginning in the 1960s, these institutes were the crucibles in which the concepts and practices of family therapy flourished. The author, a leader at one of the largest family institutes in the United States, discusses the role of family institutes in promoting the practice of family therapy, as well as the challenges of doing so. PMID:24785549

  10. [Family medicine and practice in the Mexican Social Security Institute].

    PubMed

    Casas Patiño, Donovan; Jarillo Soto, Edgar; Rodríguez Torres, Alejandra

    2014-06-26

    The central ideas of this research paper are related to the practice of family medicine as a specialty. It focuses in its origins, problems, unique characteristics, limitations, scope, management, and processes within the context of primary care of the Mexican Social Security System. This approach was based on a qualitative, hermeneutical study closely related to the Structural Functionalism Theory. Within this framework, medical practice is seen as an equation: Meaning = action + function/structure. This offers an approach to the understanding of reality through surveys and observations in five categories: identity, activity, purpose, values/norms, and power/relationship. The practice of family medicine is defined as a medical act in the Mexican Social Security Institute. This act is limited to a brief encounter and a prescription, which makes it a short, fleeting, medicalized interaction. The result is a negative social imaginary of the physician, the patient and the whole of society. Thus, individuals and society host a negative social imaginary bestowed on doctors and users of the health system.

  11. Strengthening Fragile Families through Research and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bembry, James X.

    2011-01-01

    Almost one third of all children in the United States are born to unmarried parents. This figure is even higher among poor and minority populations. Because of their heightened risk for economic and social problems and family dissolution, disadvantaged, unmarried parents have been called "fragile families." In 2002 the Bush administration…

  12. Why Incorporate Family Counseling into Your Practice?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, David M.

    This chapter addresses questions about the utility of family work as a separate discipline distinct from other helping professions. Empirical evidence is presented that supports the effectiveness of family involvement in treating childhood and school problems, psychotic disorders, mood disorders, anxiety disorders, physical health problems,…

  13. Understanding Latino Families: Scholarship, Policy, and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zambrana, Ruth E., Ed.

    This anthology examines the contemporary status of Latino families, especially their great racial and ethnic diversity. The book focuses on the strengths of Latino/Hispanic groups, structural processes that impede their progress, and cultural and familial processes that enhance their intergenerational adaptation and resiliency. Chapter 1, "The…

  14. Relationship between quality of care and choice of clinical computing system: retrospective analysis of family practice performance under the UK's quality and outcomes framework

    PubMed Central

    Kontopantelis, Evangelos; Buchan, Iain; Reeves, David; Checkland, Kath; Doran, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the relationship between performance on the UK Quality and Outcomes Framework pay-for-performance scheme and choice of clinical computer system. Design Retrospective longitudinal study. Setting Data for 2007–2008 to 2010–2011, extracted from the clinical computer systems of general practices in England. Participants All English practices participating in the pay-for-performance scheme: average 8257 each year, covering over 99% of the English population registered with a general practice. Main outcome measures Levels of achievement on 62 quality-of-care indicators, measured as: reported achievement (levels of care after excluding inappropriate patients); population achievement (levels of care for all patients with the relevant condition) and percentage of available quality points attained. Multilevel mixed effects multiple linear regression models were used to identify population, practice and clinical computing system predictors of achievement. Results Seven clinical computer systems were consistently active in the study period, collectively holding approximately 99% of the market share. Of all population and practice characteristics assessed, choice of clinical computing system was the strongest predictor of performance across all three outcome measures. Differences between systems were greatest for intermediate outcomes indicators (eg, control of cholesterol levels). Conclusions Under the UK's pay-for-performance scheme, differences in practice performance were associated with the choice of clinical computing system. This raises the question of whether particular system characteristics facilitate higher quality of care, better data recording or both. Inconsistencies across systems need to be understood and addressed, and researchers need to be cautious when generalising findings from samples of providers using a single computing system. PMID:23913774

  15. The practice of community family therapy.

    PubMed

    Rojano, Ramón

    2004-03-01

    This paper presents a summary of the basic theories and methods of Community Family Therapy (CFT), a relatively new therapeutic approach developed in response to the need for effective intervention in treating low-income, urban families. CFT operates outside of the traditional therapeutic box, successfully combining family therapy techniques with developmental and motivational theories, community mental health, social work, economic development, and community mobilization strategies. CFT utilizes a dualistic approach in which both client and therapist become involved with the same three levels of engagement. Specifically, the client strives for: (a) personal and family change and growth-level 1, (b) accessing community resources-level 2, and (c) leadership development and civic action-level 3. Also, CFT calls upon therapists to strive for: (a) personal growth and maturation-level 1, (b) collaboration with community resources for professional support-level 2, and (c) operation as a "citizen therapist," through civic action and volunteer services-level 3.

  16. Innovative Family-Centered Practices in Personnel Preparation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Mary M.; Mandell, Colleen J.

    2005-01-01

    Although early childhood special education recommended practices and professional standards support the use of family-centered practices in intervention service delivery, empirical investigations have concluded that providers either do not value such practices or lack the skills necessary to build and maintain parent-professional partnerships.…

  17. Preparing School Counseling Students to Aid Families: Integrating a Family Systems Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paylo, Matthew John

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the value of integrating family systems theory into a school counseling curriculum is explored. Some programs have historically placed school counselors in a difficult position by not adequately preparing them for the demands of incorporating family systems and community collaboration into clinical practice. The rationale for…

  18. Constructing the "Ideal" Family for Family-Centred Practice: Challenges for Delivery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodd, Jenny; Saggers, Sherry; Wildy, Helen

    2009-01-01

    Family-centred practice positions families as the key decision-makers, central to and experts in the wants and needs of their child. This paper discusses how families interviewed for a Western Australian study describe their relationships with a range of allied health professionals in the paediatric disability sector. The allied health…

  19. Discourses of Agency and Domestic Labor: Family Discourse and Gendered Practice in Dual-Earner Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blain, Jenny

    1994-01-01

    Uses the concept of family discourse to investigate the systematic structuring of social relations surrounding parents' gendered, often unequal, family responsibilities and practices. From in-depth interviews with parents in dual-earner families, two ways of analyzing parents' accounts of reasons for their divisions of labor are presented. (LKS)

  20. Genograms. Practical tools for family physicians.

    PubMed Central

    Waters, I.; Watson, W.; Wetzel, W.

    1994-01-01

    A genogram can help a physician integrate a patient's family information into the medical problem-solving process for better patient care. A genogram allows a physician to obtain medical and psychosocial information from a patient easily and, as a result, to have a better understanding of the context of the presenting symptoms. PMID:8130675

  1. A Balint seminar in the family practice residency setting.

    PubMed

    Scheingold, L

    1980-02-01

    British psychoanalyst Michael Balint made important theoretical and pragmatic contributions to family practice, through the seminars of general practitioners he led at the Tavistock Clinic. A weekly Balint seminar, modeled on the Tavistock groups, was held in a family practice residency. The group of second and third year residents, co-led by a behavioral scientist and a family practice faculty member, met for 12 weeks and then re-evaluated topics and discussion format. Issues covered included physician-patient relationships, ethical dilemmas, group therapy concerns, and coping with clinic pressures. Objective evaluation of these seminars, where the goal is attitudinal rather than behavioral change, presents some difficulty. The conclusion is that residents benefited from the seminar, and that some aspects of psychoanalytic theory and technique are applicable to the teaching of behavioral science in family practice residencies.

  2. Trajectories of Family Management Practices and Early Adolescent Behavioral Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Ming-Te; Dishion, Thomas J.; Stormshak, Elizabeth A.; Willett, John B.

    2011-01-01

    Stage-environment fit theory was used to examine the reciprocal lagged relations between family management practices and early adolescent problem behavior during the middle school years. In addition, the potential moderating roles of family structure and of gender were explored. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to describe patterns of growth…

  3. [Environmental Hazards Assessment Program annual report, June 1992--June 1993]. Results of the environmental health activities and needs assessment of the South Carolina statewide family practice system for the Environmental Hazards Assessment Program: EHAP Volume 1, No. 1

    SciTech Connect

    Musham, C.; Hainer, B.

    1993-05-01

    An activities and needs assessment was conducted to determine what each of the seven family practice residency programs in South Carolina is providing in environmental health education. In addition, this study was designed to determine: what are the barriers to greater emphasis on environmental health in family practice residency programs and, what the basic environmental health educational goals for family practice residency programs should be.

  4. Family Counseling Interventions: Understanding Family Systems and the Referral Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McWhirter, Ellen Hawley; And Others

    1993-01-01

    This article describes concepts underlying the idea of the "family as a system"; compares and contrasts four approaches to family therapy (those of Virginia Satir, Jay Haley, Murray Bowen, and Salvador Minuchin); and offers suggestions to teachers referring parents for family counseling. (DB)

  5. Rural Marriage and Family Therapy: Skills for Private Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyer, Patricia A.

    1987-01-01

    Identifies psychotherapeutic and professional skills and personal characteristics important for private practice of marriage/family therapy in rural areas. Discusses implications for professional training. Describes private practice in geographically isolated Wyoming community, citing importance of skills in adjunct professional activities, i.e.,…

  6. Characteristics and Clinical Practices of Rural Marriage and Family Therapists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, James

    2007-01-01

    This report presents a subset of data collected from the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy (AAMFT) Practice Research Network project conducted in 2002. A sample of 47 clinical members of AAMFT who indicated they practiced in a rural community provided descriptive information on demographic characteristics, training, clinical…

  7. Clinical Practice Patterns of Canadian Couple/Marital/Family Therapists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaton, John; Dienhart, Anna; Schmidt, Jonathan; Turner, Jean

    2009-01-01

    This clinical practice pattern survey had two unique aspects. It was a national survey of American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy (AAMFT) members in Canada that included all AAMFT membership categories, including student, affiliate, associate, clinical, and supervisor. It compared practice pattern data for clinical members from Canada…

  8. Biliteracy in the Home: Practices among Mexicano Families in Chicago.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farr, Marcia

    One segment of a larger study examined literacy activities occurring within the homes of immigrant families in Chicago's Mexican-American community. During the first year and a half of fieldwork, literacy practices seemed minimal and infrequent. However, further analysis indicated that such practices were occurring, and were woven into the fabric…

  9. Feminism Lives On: Incorporating Contemporary Feminism into Counseling Practice with Families and Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bordeau, Wendy Charkow; Briggs, Michele Kielty; Staton, A. Renee; Wasik, Suzan Zuljani

    2008-01-01

    Feminist contributions to counseling practice with families and children are reviewed, with a focus on the Third Wave feminist movement and its implications for family development and intervention. Recommendations for empowering young clients and their support systems as well as current challenges and research needs are also considered.

  10. A model for communication skills development for family practice residents.

    PubMed

    Hornsby, J L; Payne, F E

    1979-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is twofold: (1) to demonstrate the need for including interpersonal communication skills training in family practice residency programs, and (2) to present a communication model that can be used for such training. Interpersonal communication skills are important in almost all areas of contact with patients: history taking, physical examination, prescription writing and patient education, counseling, and psychotherapy. Presentation of the communication model includes definition of the interpersonal communication skills that would be stressed in family practice residency programs. These skills include empathy, respect, warmth, concreteness, genuineness, self-disclosure, confrontation, immediacy, and behavior modification. Examples of how a family physician may communicate each of these skills are also included. The implementation of the communication model in a department of family practice for training residents and faculty in the use of these communication skills is also described. PMID:759551

  11. A model for communication skills development for family practice residents.

    PubMed

    Hornsby, J L; Payne, F E

    1979-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is twofold: (1) to demonstrate the need for including interpersonal communication skills training in family practice residency programs, and (2) to present a communication model that can be used for such training. Interpersonal communication skills are important in almost all areas of contact with patients: history taking, physical examination, prescription writing and patient education, counseling, and psychotherapy. Presentation of the communication model includes definition of the interpersonal communication skills that would be stressed in family practice residency programs. These skills include empathy, respect, warmth, concreteness, genuineness, self-disclosure, confrontation, immediacy, and behavior modification. Examples of how a family physician may communicate each of these skills are also included. The implementation of the communication model in a department of family practice for training residents and faculty in the use of these communication skills is also described.

  12. Practising family history: 'identity' as a category of social practice.

    PubMed

    Bottero, Wendy

    2015-09-01

    Research on family history argues it performs the task of anchoring a sense of 'self' through tracing ancestral connection and cultural belonging, seeing it as a form of storied 'identity-work'. This paper draws on a small-scale qualitative study to think further on the identity-work of family history. Using practice theory, and a disaggregated notion of 'identity', it explores how the storying of family histories relates to genealogy as a leisure hobby, a form of historical research, and an information-processing activity; and examines the social organization of that narrativity, where various practical engagements render certain kinds of genealogical information more, or less, 'storyable'. Key features of 'identity-work' in family history, such as the construction of genealogy as a personal journey of discovery and identification with particular ancestors, emerge as a consequence of the procedures of family history, organized as a set of practical tasks. The paper explores 'identity-work' as a consequence of people's engagement in specific social practices which provide an internal logic to their actions, with various components of 'identity' emerging as categories of practice shaped within, and for, use. Focusing on 'identity' as something produced when we are engaged in doing other things, the paper examines how the practical organization of 'doing other things' helps produce 'identity' in particular ways.

  13. Practising family history: 'identity' as a category of social practice.

    PubMed

    Bottero, Wendy

    2015-09-01

    Research on family history argues it performs the task of anchoring a sense of 'self' through tracing ancestral connection and cultural belonging, seeing it as a form of storied 'identity-work'. This paper draws on a small-scale qualitative study to think further on the identity-work of family history. Using practice theory, and a disaggregated notion of 'identity', it explores how the storying of family histories relates to genealogy as a leisure hobby, a form of historical research, and an information-processing activity; and examines the social organization of that narrativity, where various practical engagements render certain kinds of genealogical information more, or less, 'storyable'. Key features of 'identity-work' in family history, such as the construction of genealogy as a personal journey of discovery and identification with particular ancestors, emerge as a consequence of the procedures of family history, organized as a set of practical tasks. The paper explores 'identity-work' as a consequence of people's engagement in specific social practices which provide an internal logic to their actions, with various components of 'identity' emerging as categories of practice shaped within, and for, use. Focusing on 'identity' as something produced when we are engaged in doing other things, the paper examines how the practical organization of 'doing other things' helps produce 'identity' in particular ways. PMID:26173995

  14. Transition to Family Practice in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunes, Evrim Didem; Yaman, Hakan

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Turkey's primary health care (PHC) system was established in the beginning of the 1960s and provides preventive and curative basic medical services to the population. This article describes the experience of the Turkish health system, as it tries to adapt to the European health system. It describes the current organization of primary…

  15. Examining the Relationships Between Family Meal Practices, Family Stressors, and the Weight of Youth in the Family

    PubMed Central

    Hearst, Mary O.; Fulkerson, Jayne; Murray, David M.; Martinson, Brian; Klein, Elizabeth; Pasch, Keryn; Samuelson, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Background Research is limited on how the social environment of the home is related to childhood obesity. Purpose The purpose of this research was to examine the relationships between positive family meal practices, family stressors, and the weight of youth and to examine parental weight status as a moderator of these relationships. Methods The study enrolled 368 parent/child dyads from a Minnesota sample. We used mediation analysis to examine the associations Results Families represented by an overweight parent reported fewer positive family meal practices (p<0.001), higher levels of depression (p=0.01), and fewer family rules (p=0.02) as compared to families represented by a healthy weight parent. For overweight parents, positive family meal practices mediated the relationship between some family stressors and child weight. Conclusions This research suggests that the home environment may affect the weight of children in the family, and the effect is more pronounced in families with at least one overweight parent. PMID:21136225

  16. Can naloxone prescription and overdose training for opioid users work in family practice?

    PubMed Central

    Leece, Pamela; Orkin, Aaron; Shahin, Rita; Steele, Leah S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To explore family physicians’ attitudes toward prescribing naloxone to at-risk opioid users, as well as to determine the opportunities and challenges for expanding naloxone access to patients in family practice settings. Design One-hour focus group session and SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats) analysis. Setting Workshop held at the 2012 Family Medicine Forum in Toronto, Ont. Participants Seventeen conference attendees from 3 Canadian cities who practised in various family practice settings and who agreed to participate in the workshop. Methods The workshop included an overview of information about naloxone distribution and overdose education programs, followed by group discussion in smaller focus groups. Participants were instructed to focus their discussion on the question, “Could this [overdose education and naloxone prescription] work in your practice?” and to record notes using a standardized discussion guide based on a SWOT analysis. Two investigators reviewed the forms, extracting themes using an open coding process. Main findings Some participants believed that naloxone could be used safely among family practice patients, that the intervention fit well with their clinical practice settings, and that its use in family practice could enhance engagement with at-risk individuals and create an opportunity to educate patients, providers, and the public about overdose. Participants also indicated that the current guidelines and support systems for prescribing or administering naloxone were inadequate, that medicolegal uncertainties existed for those who prescribed or administered naloxone, and that high-quality evidence about the intervention’s effectiveness in family practice was lacking. Conclusion Family physicians believe that overdose education and naloxone prescription might provide patients at risk of opioid overdose in their practices with broad access to a potentially lifesaving intervention. However, they

  17. Trajectories of Family Management Practices and Early Adolescent Behavioral Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ming-Te; Dishion, Thomas J.; Stormshak, Elizabeth A.; Willett, John B.

    2013-01-01

    Stage– environment fit theory was used to examine the reciprocal lagged relations between family management practices and early adolescent problem behavior during the middle school years. In addition, the potential moderating roles of family structure and of gender were explored. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to describe patterns of growth in family management practices and adolescents’ behavioral outcomes and to detect predictors of interindividual differences in initial status and rate of change. The sample comprised approximately 1,000 adolescents between ages 11 years and 15 years. The results indicated that adolescents’ antisocial behaviors and substance use increased and their positive behavioral engagement decreased over time. As adolescent age increased, parental knowledge of their adolescent’s activities decreased, as did parental rule making and support. The level and rate of change in family management and adolescent behavioral outcomes varied by family structure and by gender. Reciprocal longitudinal associations between parenting practices and adolescent problem behavior were found. Specifically, parenting practices predicted subsequent adolescent behavior, and adolescent behavior predicted subsequent parenting practices. In addition, parental warmth moderated the effects of parental knowledge and rule making on adolescent antisocial behavior and substance use over time. PMID:21688899

  18. Perceived Family Functioning and Family Resources of Hong Kong Families: Implications for Social Work Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Joyce L. C.; Wong, Timothy K. Y.; Lau, Luk King; Pun, Shuk Han

    2009-01-01

    This article reports the results of a telephone survey (n = 1,015 respondents) that aims to identify the perceived general family functioning and family resources of Hong Kong Chinese families and their linkage to each other in a rapidly transforming society. The perceived general family functioning of the respondents was average, and the five…

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging. Application to family practice.

    PubMed Central

    Goh, R. H.; Somers, S.; Jurriaans, E.; Yu, J.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review indications, contraindications, and risks of using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in order to help primary care physicians refer patients appropriately for MRI, screen for contraindications to using MRI, and educate patients about MRI. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Recommendations are based on classic textbooks, the policies of our MRI group, and a literature search using MEDLINE with the MeSH headings magnetic resonance imaging, brain, musculoskeletal, and spine. The search was limited to human, English-language, and review articles. Evidence in favour of using MRI for imaging the head, spine, and joints is well established. For cardiac, abdominal, and pelvic conditions, MRI has been shown useful for certain indications, usually to complement other modalities. MAIN MESSAGE: For demonstrating soft tissue conditions, MRI is better than computed tomography (CT), but CT shows bone and acute bleeding better. Therefore, patients with trauma or suspected intracranial bleeding should have CT. Tumours, congenital abnormalities, vascular structures, and the cervical or thoracic spine show better on MRI. Either modality can be used for lower back pain. Cardiac, abdominal, and pelvic abnormalities should be imaged with ultrasound or CT before MRI. Contraindications for MRI are mainly metallic implants or shrapnel, severe claustrophobia, or obesity. CONCLUSIONS: With the increasing availability of MRI scanners in Canada, better understanding of the indications, contraindications, and risks will be helpful for family physicians and their patients. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:10509224

  20. Are family practice trainers and their host practices any better? comparing practice trainers and non-trainers and their practices

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Family Physician (FP) trainees are expected to be provided with high quality training in well organized practice settings. This study examines differences between FP trainers and non-trainers and their practices to see whether there are differences in trainers and non-trainers and in how their practices are organized and their services are delivered. Method 203 practices (88 non-training and 115 training) with 512 FPs (335 non-trainers and 177 trainers) were assessed using the “Visit Instrument Practice organization (VIP)” on 369 items (142 FP-level; 227 Practice level). Analyses (ANOVA, ANCOVA) were conducted for each level by calculating differences between FP trainees and non-trainees and their host practices. Results Trainers scored higher on all but one of the items, and significantly higher on 47 items, of which 13 remained significant after correcting for covariates. Training practices scored higher on all items and significantly higher on 61 items, of which 23 remained significant after correcting for covariates. Trainers (and training practices) provided more diagnostic and therapeutic services, made better use of team skills and scored higher on practice organization, chronic care services and quality management than non-training practices. Trainers reported more job satisfaction and commitment and less job stress than non-trainers. Discussion There are positive differences between FP trainers and non-trainers in both the level and the quality of services provided by their host practices. Training institutions can use this information to promote the advantages of becoming a FP trainer and training practice as well as to improve the quality of training settings for FPs. PMID:23433175

  1. Effect of Prepaid Health Plans on a Family Practice Residency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Don W.; Gehlbach, Stephen H.

    1988-01-01

    Residents and faculty members completed a survey covering the effect of prepaid health care plans at a family medicine center on the program's practice profile, cost-containment, and education activities over a three-year period. Respondents agreed that prepaid plans increased the number of patient visits. (Author/MLW)

  2. Marital and Family Therapy Research: Outcomes and Implications for Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Cynthia; Huggins, Don

    1998-01-01

    A review of marriage-and-family therapy-outcome studies from the past 10 years is discussed. Results indicate success over a broad scope of practices, including problems traditionally treated with individual psychotherapy, and when used in collaboration with other treatment modalities. Implications for the field are presented. (Author/EMK)

  3. Results of the 2001 National Resident Matching Program: family practice.

    PubMed

    Pugno, P A; McPherson, D S; Schmittling, G T; Kahn, N B

    2001-09-01

    The results of the 2001 National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) reflect a persistent decline of student interest in family practice residency training in the United States. Compared with the 2000 Match, 240 fewer positions (317 fewer US seniors) were filled in family practice residency programs through the NRMP in 2001, as well as 76 fewer (47 fewer US seniors) in primary care internal medicine, 5 fewer in pediatrics-primary care (7 fewer US seniors), and 7 fewer (1 fewer US senior) in internal medicine-pediatric programs. In contrast, 40 more positions (64 more US seniors) were filled in anesthesiology and 11 more (10 more US seniors) in diagnostic radiology, two "marker" disciplines that have shown increases over the past 3 years. Ninety-one fewer positions (2 fewer US seniors) were also filled in categorical internal medicine, while 49 more positions (67 more US seniors) were filled in categorical pediatrics programs, where trainees perceive options for either practicing as generalists or entering subspecialty fellowships, depending on the market. While the needs of the nation, especially rural and underserved populations, continue to offer a market for family physicians, family practice experienced a fourth year of decline though the 2001 NRMP. Current forces, including student perspectives of specialty prestige, the turbulence of the health care environment, media hype, market factors, lifestyle choices, and student debt, all appear to be influencing many students to choose subspecialty rather than primary care careers. PMID:11573716

  4. Observed Parenting Practices of First-Generation Latino Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Domenech Rodriguez, Melanie; Davis, Melissa R.; Rodriguez, Jesus; Bates, Scott C.

    2006-01-01

    This study used an established behavioral observation methodology to examine the parenting practices of first-generation Latino parents of children 4 to 9 years of age. The study had three central aims, to examine: (1) the feasibility of using a behavioral observation methodology with Spanish-speaking immigrant families, (2) the utility of the…

  5. Best Practices in Working with Linguistically Diverse Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Araujo, Blanca E.

    2009-01-01

    Many schools face the challenge of forging partnerships with families from linguistically diverse backgrounds. Effective communication, funds of knowledge, culturally relevant teaching, and extending and accepting assistance are best practices that have been used successfully by school personnel when working with students who are identified as…

  6. Stress in Family Practice Residents: An Exploratory Study Using Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Julliard, Kell; Intilli, Nancy; Ryan, Jennifer; Vollmann, Sarah; Seshadri, Mahalakshmi

    2002-01-01

    Investigates the themes of 16 family practice residents' art work and their characteristics (age, gender, resident year, undergraduate training location) in relationship to stress. Residents' drawing were linked by common themes of psychological pressure, anxiety, a sense of being overwhelmed, and depression. Evidence of stress was more frequently…

  7. Social Work Practice with Native American Families: A Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wintemute, Ginger, Ed.; Messer, Bonnie, Ed.

    A handbook on social work practice with Native American families, developed for use by students in undergraduate social work programs and by social service practitioners who work with Native American people, is divided into four sections. The first section contains four articles, written by Joseph A. Dudley (Methodist minister and Yankton Sioux)…

  8. Anxiety disorders in family practice. Diagnosis and management.

    PubMed Central

    Rosser, W. W.; Borins, M.; Audet, D.

    1994-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are common in family practice. Although not ideal, the DSM 3-R definitions of anxiety disorders provide a framework for diagnostic precision that assists physicians in choosing the best treatment. Assessing functional status helps determine the need for psychotherapeutic or pharmacologic intervention. We evaluate specific interventions and suggest the risks and benefits for each disorder. PMID:8312758

  9. Guiding the Family: Practical Counseling Techniques. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grunwald, Bernice Bronia; McAbee, Harold V.

    This text on principles of Adlerian Psychology is designed for use in family counseling. It begins with an overview of Alfred Adler and his basic philosophy on human relationships. Throughout the book, as the Adlerian theory is discussed, practical application of theory is explained for counselors. Counselors must have a firm theoretical basis for…

  10. Results of the 2002 National Resident Matching Program: family practice.

    PubMed

    Pugno, Perry A; McPherson, Deborah S; Schmittling, Gordon T; Kahn, Norman B

    2002-09-01

    The results of the 2002 National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) reflect a persistent decline of student interest in family practice residency training in the United States. Compared with the 2001 Match, six fewer positions (103 fewer US seniors) were filled in family practice residency programs through the NRMP in 2002, as well as 48 fewer (30 fewer US seniors) in primary care internal medicine, 1 fewer in pediatrics-primary care (8 more US seniors), and 45 fewer (45 fewer US seniors) in internal medicine-pediatric programs. In comparison, 43 more positions (70 more US seniors) were filled in anesthesiology, but 11 fewer (16 fewer US seniors) in diagnostic radiology, two "marker" disciplines that have shown increases over the past 3 years. Eight fewer positions (60 fewer US seniors) were also filled in categorical internal medicine while 99 fewer positions (142 fewer US seniors) were filled in categorical pediatrics programs, where trainees perceive options for either practicing as generalists or entering subspecialty fellowships, depending on the market. While the needs of the nation, especially rural and underserved populations, continue to offer opportunities for family physicians, family practice experienced a fifth year of decline through the 2002 NRMP. Many different forces, however, are impacting medical student career choices, including student perspectives of the demands, rewards, and prestige of the specialty, the turbulence and uncertainty of the health care environment, liability protection issues, and the impact of faculty and resident role models. The 2002 NRMP results may herald the leveling of recent trends away from family practice careers. PMID:12269534

  11. Results of the 2003 National Resident Matching Program: family practice.

    PubMed

    Pugno, Perry A; McPherson, Deborah S; Schmittling, Gordon T; Kahn, Norman B

    2003-09-01

    The results of the 2003 National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) reflect a persistent decline of student interest in family practice residency training in the United States. Compared with the 2002 Match, 118 fewer positions (179 fewer US seniors) were filled in family practice residency programs through the NRMP in 2003, as well as 23 fewer (12 fewer US seniors) in primary care internal medicine, 20 fewer in pediatrics-primary care (11 fewer US seniors), and 23 fewer (34 fewer US seniors) in internal medicine-pediatric programs. In comparison, 40 more positions (14 more US seniors) were filled in anesthesiology and 8 more (8 more US seniors) in diagnostic radiology, two "marker" disciplines that have shown increases over the past 3 years. Sixty-seven more positions (but 148 fewer US seniors) were also filled in categorical internal medicine, while 107 more positions (33 more US seniors) were filled in categorical pediatrics programs, where trainees perceive options for either practicing as generalists or entering subspecialty fellowships, depending on the market. While the needs of the nation, especially rural and underserved populations, continue to offer opportunities for family physicians, family practice experienced continued decline though the 2003 NRMP. Many different forces, including student perspectives of the demands, rewards, and prestige of the specialty; the turbulence and uncertainty of the health care environment; liability protection issues; and the impact of faculty and resident role models, are impacting medical student career choices. The 2003 NRMP again confirms the trend away from family practice and primary care careers. PMID:12947519

  12. [Knowledge, attitudes and practices among religious students concerning family planning].

    PubMed

    Karout, N; Altuwaijri, S

    2012-07-01

    To determine the knowledge, attitude and practices concerning family planning of students attending religious schools in Lebanon, we conducted a cross-sectional study of 450 male and female students. A validated structured questionnaire was completed by the students. The majority of the students (65%) had a moderate level of knowledge, males more than females, but females had more positive beliefs and attitudes. More females agreed with family planning programmes and methods than males, but 35% had a negative attitude to family planning; a significant percentage had negative attitudes to contraceptive methods based on their view that they are not allowed (haram) in Islam. Among the married students, less than 40% used a family planning method; of those, the majority used a female method. Religion plays an important role in the health behaviour of religious students. Religious leaders can therefore inhibit or promote family planning, which will affect the success of family planning programmes. Thus, they should be included in the development and promotion of family planning programmes.

  13. Understanding partnership practice in child and family nursing through the concept of practice architectures.

    PubMed

    Hopwood, Nick; Fowler, Cathrine; Lee, Alison; Rossiter, Chris; Bigsby, Marg

    2013-09-01

    A significant international development agenda in the practice of nurses supporting families with young children focuses on establishing partnerships between professionals and service users. Qualitative data were generated through interviews and focus groups with 22 nurses from three child and family health service organisations, two in Australia and one in New Zealand. The aim was to explore what is needed in order to sustain partnership in practice, and to investigate how the concept of practice architectures can help understand attempts to enhance partnerships between nurses and families. Implementation of the Family Partnership Model (FPM) is taken as a specific point of reference. Analysis highlights a number of tensions between the goals of FPM and practice architectures relating to opportunities for ongoing learning; the role of individual nurses in shaping the practice; relationships with peers and managers; organisational features; and extra-organisational factors. The concept of practice architectures shows how changing practice requires more than developing individual knowledge and skills, and avoids treating individuals and context separately. The value of this framework for understanding change with reference to context rather than just individual's knowledge and skills is demonstrated, particularly with respect to approaches to practice development focused on providing additional training to nurses.

  14. Human-animal bonds II: the role of pets in family systems and family therapy.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Froma

    2009-12-01

    The vast majority of pet owners regard their companion animals as family members, yet the role of pets in family systems and family therapy has received little attention in research, training, and practice. This article first notes the benefits of family pets and their importance for resilience. It then examines their role in couple and family processes and their involvement in relational dynamics and tensions. Next, it addresses bereavement in the loss of a cherished pet, influences complicating grief, and facilitation of mourning and adaptation. Finally, it explores the ways that clients' pets and the use of therapists' companion animals in animal-assisted therapy can inform and enrich couple and family therapy as valuable resources in healing. PMID:19930434

  15. Personality types of family practice residents in the 1980s.

    PubMed

    Taylor, A D; Clark, C; Sinclair, A E

    1990-03-01

    This study was based on a nationwide sample of 778 family practice residents in the mid-1980s and was conducted to determine the personality types that were most common among those residents. The results showed that the single most common personality type was that in which the individual prefers to see the world in terms of challenges and future possibilities and to make decisions based upon his or her subjective values. These results showed that the sample differed significantly in Myers-Briggs personality type from both the general practitioners of the 1950s and the early family practice residents of the 1970s, who preferred to see the world in terms of the immediate facts of experience and to make decisions objectively. There were also significant differences between the civilian and military family practice residents, but not between the community-based and university-based residents. Implications regarding future practice styles, physicians' personal values, and manpower needs are discussed. PMID:2306322

  16. Family-centered care for children with cerebral palsy: conceptual and practical considerations to advance care and practice.

    PubMed

    King, Gillian; Chiarello, Lisa

    2014-08-01

    This article focuses on conceptual and practical considerations in family-centered care for children with cerebral palsy and their families. In the last 5 years, there have been important advances in our understanding of the components of family-centered care, and initial attempts to understand the client change processes at play. Recent research elaborates on family-centered care by delving into aspects of family-provider partnership, and applying family-centered principles to organizational service delivery to bring about organizational cultures of family-centered care. Recent research has also begun to consider mediators of client change, and new practice models have been proposed that embrace family-centered principles and illustrate the "art" of practice. Future research directions are discussed, including explorations of causal relationships between family-centered care principles, elements of caregiving practice, client change processes, and child and family outcomes. The meaning of the recent literature for pediatric neurology practice is considered. PMID:24810084

  17. Families, Infants and the Justice System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenichel, Emily, Ed.

    1993-01-01

    This periodical issue focuses on infants and toddlers and the justice system. The main article is entitled: "Families, Infants and the Justice System," written by Robert Horowitz. It looks at the role of the justice system in family dissolution and creation, the use of courts to resolve disputes, the role of the justice system in family…

  18. Family Systems Theory in the Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Vivian

    This paper presents a summary of Murray Brown's family systems theory as it applies to the workplace, lists some indicators of when a system is working well, and cites some other guidelines for gauging and improving one's own functioning in the work system. Major concepts of Bowen's theory include: (1) the family and the workplace are systems; (2)…

  19. Intervention fidelity: Ensuring application to practice for youth and families

    PubMed Central

    Faulkner, Melissa Spezia

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Limited information on intervention fidelity is available in published studies with youth and families. The components of intervention fidelity, the complexity of measurement in these studies, and strategies for measuring intervention fidelity are described. Conclusions Strategies for ensuring intervention fidelity according to the Treatment Fidelity Workgroup of the Behavior Change Consortium in the areas of study design, provider training, treatment delivery, treatment receipt, and treatment enactment provide guidance for evaluating or developing intervention fidelity plans. Practice Implications Ensuring the quality of intervention fidelity in evidence-based reviews or when developing new interventions is essential for translating findings into practice. PMID:22188270

  20. Educational role of nurse practitioners in a family practice centre

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Allyn; Moore, Ainsley; Barber, Anne; Opsteen, Joanne

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To examine the role of nurse practitioners (NPs) as educators of family medicine residents in order to better understand the interprofessional educational dynamics in a clinical teaching setting. Design A qualitative descriptive approach, using purposive sampling. Setting A family practice centre that is associated with an academic department of family medicine and is based in an urban area in southern Ontario. Participants First-year (8 of 9) and second-year (9 of 10) family medicine residents whose training program was based at the family practice centre, and all NPs (4 of 4) who worked at the centre. Methods Semistructured interviews were conducted, which were audiotaped and transcribed. An iterative approach was used for coding and analysis. Data management software guided organization and analysis of the data. Main findings Four interconnected themes were identified: role clarification, professional identity formation, factors that enhance the educational role of NPs, and factors that limit the educational role of NPs. Although residents recognized NPs’ value in team functioning and areas of specialized knowledge, they were unclear about NPs’ scope of practice. Depending on residents’ level of training, residents tended to respond differently to teaching by NPs. More of the senior residents believed they needed to think like physicians and preferred clinical teaching from physician teachers. Junior residents valued the step-by-step instructional approach used by NPs, and they had a decreased sense of vulnerability when being taught by NPs. Training in teaching skills was helpful for NPs. Barriers to providing optimal education included opportunity, time, and physician attitudes. Conclusion The lack of an intentional orientation of family medicine residents to NPs’ scope of practice and educational role can lead to difficulties in interprofessional education. More explicit recognition of the evolving professional identity of family

  1. The Transplant Patient and Transplant Medicine in Family Practice

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Lloyd D.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last two decades in particular there has been a remarkable increase in the number of solid organ transplants being performed worldwide alongside improvements in long-term survival rates. However, the infrastructure at transplant centres has been unable to keep pace with the current volume of the transplant patient work load. These pressures on transplant specialist centres has led to calls for an increased role of the general practitioner (GP) managing particular aspects of transplant patients’ medical care. Indeed, many aspects of follow-up care such as screening for malignancies, preventing infection through immunisation programmes, and managing cardiovascular risk factors are already important aspects of family practice medicine. This paper aims to review some of the aspects of transplant patient care that is important for healthcare workers in family practice to manage. PMID:25657941

  2. Recognizing borderline personality disorder in the family practice setting.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, J R; Saathoff, G B; Bernardo, M J; Barnett, B L

    1995-09-01

    The first step in the management of borderline personality disorder is making the correct diagnosis. A clinical example illustrates symptoms of a patient with borderline personality disorder in a family practice setting. Major characteristics of borderline personality disorder include severe mood instability, fear of abandonment, chronic boredom, self-injury, unstable interpersonal relationships, "splitting," identity instability and borderline rage. Early diagnosis may help prevent potential management problems and possible doctor-patient conflicts. PMID:7653428

  3. Results of the 1999 National Resident Matching Program: family practice.

    PubMed

    Kahn, N B; Schmittling, G T; Graham, R

    1999-09-01

    The 1999 National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) results reflect continued volatility in the perceptions and career choices of physicians entering graduate medical education in the United States. A total of 117 fewer positions (155 fewer US seniors) were filled in family practice residency programs in 1999, as well as 23 fewer (29 fewer US seniors) in primary care internal medicine and 38 fewer (27 fewer US seniors) in internal medicine-pediatric programs. In contrast, nine more positions (19 more US seniors) were filled in anesthesiology and one more (10 more US seniors) in diagnostic radiology, two "marker" disciplines that have recently been market sensitive. Seventy-three more positions (but 67 fewer US seniors) were also filled in categorical internal medicine, while 30 more positions (40 more US seniors) were filled in categorical pediatrics programs, where trainees are "pluripotential" with perceived options for practicing as generalists or entering subspecialty fellowships, depending on the market. While the demands of managed care and the needs of rural and underserved populations continue to offer a market for family physicians, family practice experienced a second year of "primary care backlash" through the 1999 NRMP. In addition, current forces appear to be influencing some students to choose subspecialty rather than primary care careers. PMID:10489637

  4. Results of the 2000 National Resident Matching Program: family practice.

    PubMed

    Pugno, P A; McPherson, D S; Schmittling, G T; Kahn, N B

    2000-09-01

    The results of the 2000 National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) reflect substantial volatility in the perceptions and career choices of physicians entering graduate medical education in the United States. Ninety-four fewer positions (191 fewer US seniors) were filled in family practice residency programs through the NRMP in 2000, compared with 1999, as well as 60 fewer (66 fewer US seniors) in primary care internal medicine, 12 fewer in pediatrics-primary care (6 fewer US seniors), and 10 fewer (9 fewer US seniors) in internal medicine-pediatric programs. In contrast, 37 more positions (36 more US seniors) were filled in anesthesiology and 4 more (13 more US seniors) in diagnostic radiology, two "marker" disciplines that have recently been market sensitive. Twelve fewer positions (63 fewer US seniors) were also filled in categorical internal medicine, while 35 fewer positions (104 fewer US seniors) were filled in categorical pediatrics programs, where trainees perceive options for practicing as generalists or entering subspecialty fellowships, depending on the market. While the needs of the nation, especially rural and underserved populations, continue to offer a market for family physicians, family practice experienced a third year of decline through the 2000 NRMP. Current forces, including media hype, market factors, lifestyle choices, debt, and the turbulence of the health care environment, appear to be influencing many students to choose subspecialty rather than primary care careers. PMID:11002864

  5. The framework of family therapy in clinical practice and research in Serbia.

    PubMed

    Pantovic, Maja; Dunjic-Kostic, Bojana; Ivkovic, Maja; Damjanovic, Aleksandar; Jovanovic, Aleksandar A

    2012-04-01

    In the last two decades, Serbia has had to deal with multiple social and economic problems reflecting on society's demographics and seemed to weaken its core cell - the family. The paper describes the framework of family therapy in clinical practice and research, within the recent transition of the Serbian family. Family therapy treatment in Serbia uses the systemic family therapy (SFT) approach, applied according to the standards of the European Association for Psychotherapy. A large number of professionals who practise in Serbia hold European qualifications, setting high standards in education, clinical practice, and research. Although SFT is also available in the private sector, the majority of patients are still treated in state institutions. Family therapy is often used for adults and adolescents with psychosis and addictions in psychiatric hospital settings. However, in counselling centres it is used for marital and relationship problems. Interestingly, family therapy has recently started to emerge as a more frequent tool in consultation-liaison, particularly psycho-oncology but also in correctional institutions. The clinical practice and research interests are interlinked with changes in social settings.

  6. First Steps toward School Success: Promising Practices in Even Start Family Projects Serving Infants and Toddlers and Their Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nathanson, Sara; Stief, Elizabeth; Marzke, Carolyn; O'Brien, Eileen

    The federally funded Even Start Family Literacy Program supports local family-centered education projects intended to help families with young children break the cycle of poverty and illiteracy. This report documents the efforts of nine Even Start projects that demonstrate promising practices in serving infants and toddlers and their families. The…

  7. Coparenting within the family system: review of literature.

    PubMed

    Marsanić, Vlatka Boricević; Kusmić, Enes

    2013-12-01

    Family systems theory which postulates that family-level processes affect children's development over and above any individual subsystem, has changed the emphasis in research on children and families. Previous research of child development in families focused on associations with individual parent-child relationships or on connections between the marital relationships and child adjustment. In contrast, researchers have recently articulated distinctive family group dynamic, coparenting, which uniquely predicts children's social and emotional adaptation, over and above the effects of parenting and marital processes. This article reviews the literature on recent coparenting research and studies linking this family relationship to important indicators of children's development and adjustment. The implications for clinical practice and directions for future research are discussed. PMID:24611362

  8. Implementing Family Health Nursing in Tajikistan: from policy to practice in primary health care reform.

    PubMed

    Parfitt, Barbara Ann; Cornish, Flora

    2007-10-01

    The health systems of former Soviet Union countries are undergoing reform away from the highly centralised, resource-intensive, specialised and hierarchical Soviet system, towards a more generalist, efficient health service with greater focus on primary health care. Family Health Nursing is a new model designed by WHO Europe in which skilled generalist community nurses deliver primary health care to local communities. This paper presents a qualitative evaluation of the implementation of Family Health Nursing in Tajikistan. Using Stufflebeam's 'Context, Input, Process, and Product' model, the paper aims to evaluate the progress of this reform, and to understand the factors that help or hinder its implementation. A four-phase research design investigates the development of the Family Health Nurse role over time. In 5 rural areas, 6 focus groups and 18 interviews with Family Health Nurses, 4 observations of their practice, 7 interviews with families and 9 interviews with physicians were carried out. Data were analysed according to the components of Stufflebeam's model. Although the legacy of the Soviet health system did not set a precedent for a nurse who is capable of decision-making and who works in partnership with the physician, Family Health Nurses were successfully implementing new practices. Crucial to their ability to do so were the co-operation of physicians and families. Physicians were impressed by the nurses' development of knowledge, and families were impressed that the nurses could offer real solutions to their problems. However, failure to pay the nurses regular salaries had led to serious attrition of the workforce. We conclude that the success of the Family Health Nurse role in other countries will depend upon its position in relation to the historical health care system. PMID:17651876

  9. How bipolar disorders are managed in family practice

    PubMed Central

    Balachandra, Krishna; Sharma, Verinder; Dozois, David; Bhayana, Bhooma

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate family physicians’ experience in diagnosing and managing bipolar disorder, how they rate their undergraduate and postgraduate training in this area, and what they think they need to learn in the future. DESIGN Survey questionnaire. SETTING Family practices in London, Ont. PARTICIPANTS Random sample of 297 family physicians. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Physicians’ experience in diagnosing and managing patients with bipolar disorder, rating of their undergraduate and postgraduate training in this area, and thoughts about what they need to learn in the future. RESULTS Of 297 surveys sent out, 147 (49.5%) were returned. Male respondents accounted for 62%, and female respondents 37%, of completed surveys. Average year of graduation from medical school was 1979. The most common response for level of experience in diagnosing and treating bipolar disorders was “somewhat comfortable.” Physicians frequently reported screening for symptoms of mood disorders (42%), and most of them were sharing care with other professionals (88%). Undergraduate training was rated as poor (42%) or satisfactory (46%), and postgraduate training was rated as poor (42%) or satisfactory (44%). Physicians thought they needed more education in issues of diagnosis and pharmacotherapy. CONCLUSION Family physicians were only somewhat comfortable with diagnosing and managing bipolar disorders, and most thought their undergraduate and graduate training in this area had been, at best, satisfactory. They expressed a need for more education in the areas of diagnosis and pharmacotherapy. PMID:16926928

  10. Changing Families in a Changing Military System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Edna J., Ed.

    Recently, the military system has begun to feel the impact of the military family. Whenever sudden dramatic changes or transitions occur, crises may result either for the individual or for the institution. At present both the military system and the military family are in a period of rapid transition. Perhaps one of the most important changes that…

  11. Indiana family physician attitudes and practices concerning smoking cessation.

    PubMed

    Saywell, R M; Jay, S J; Lukas, P J; Casebeer, L L; Mybeck, K C; Parchman, M L; Haley, A J

    1996-01-01

    Most physicians are aware of the health benefits of smoking cessation and agree they have a responsibility to help smokers quit. Many physicians, however, do not regularly address smoking cessation with their patients. Questionnaires were sent to 2,095 family practice physicians in Indiana. Information obtained included: demographic data; office-based smoking cessation practices; counseling; and physicians' perceptions of intervention outcomes. Most physicians (86%) asked new patients if they smoked, and 23% questioned patients about their exposure to passive smoke. Younger physicians, female physicians and urban physicians were more likely to ask new patients if they smoked. A formal smoking cessation program was used by 28% of the responding physicians. Among those not using a program, 7% reported plans to implement one in the coming year, 40% were not planning to implement one, and 53% were unsure. Physician and practice characteristics were not correlated with the use of smoking cessation programs. Only 11% of physicians considered their smoking cessation counseling skills to be excellent; 27% indicated the need for improvement in skills. One-half (52%) believed their counseling efforts were effective; almost half (45%) believed that current reimbursement policies limited their involvement in smoking cessation interventions. Most respondents have not instituted smoking cessation programs in their practices. It is likely that a combination of strategies, including both undergraduate, graduate and continuing medical education programs and reform in reimbursement practices for cessation programs, will be required to achieve significant increases in long-term smoking abstinence rates.

  12. Linkage between Graduate Medical Education Training Practice Profiles in Psychiatry, Obstetrics/Gynecology, and Family Practice. Appendices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SysteMetrics, Inc., Santa Barbara, CA.

    Provided are appendices for a study which examined the relationship between graduate medical education (GME) and practice profiles in three specialties: family practice, psychiatry, and obstetrics/gynecology. Appendix A includes materials related to methodology of the study. Appendices B-D include supplementary materials for family practice,…

  13. Biofeedback, humanistic psychology and psychosomatics in family practice.

    PubMed

    James, R T; Burrows, T

    1976-11-01

    An innovative educational approach to psychosomatic illness in family practice has been developed. It is a synthesis of experiential methods of non-verbal communication and creativity training developed from psychotronic applications of biofeedback, humanistic psychology and eidetics. The methodology, called eidetic biofeedback, operates on non-traditional models of human potential and involves a holistic approach to the mind-body/environment relationship. The methods work by transferring the responsibility for health back to the awareness of the individual.Of 200 office practice patients, 60 percent achieved major changes in personality integration and vitality. This was reflected in cessation of the presenting complaint, without symptom substitution and diminished demand for clinical services. PMID:21304760

  14. Biofeedback, Humanistic Psychology and Psychosomatics in Family Practice

    PubMed Central

    James, R. T.; Burrows, Terry

    1976-01-01

    An innovative educational approach to psychosomatic illness in family practice has been developed. It is a synthesis of experiential methods of non-verbal communication and creativity training developed from psychotronic applications of biofeedback, humanistic psychology and eidetics. The methodology, called eidetic biofeedback, operates on non-traditional models of human potential and involves a holistic approach to the mind-body/environment relationship. The methods work by transferring the responsibility for health back to the awareness of the individual. Of 200 office practice patients, 60 percent achieved major changes in personality integration and vitality. This was reflected in cessation of the presenting complaint, without symptom substitution and diminished demand for clinical services. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4 PMID:21304760

  15. Biofeedback, humanistic psychology and psychosomatics in family practice.

    PubMed

    James, R T; Burrows, T

    1976-11-01

    An innovative educational approach to psychosomatic illness in family practice has been developed. It is a synthesis of experiential methods of non-verbal communication and creativity training developed from psychotronic applications of biofeedback, humanistic psychology and eidetics. The methodology, called eidetic biofeedback, operates on non-traditional models of human potential and involves a holistic approach to the mind-body/environment relationship. The methods work by transferring the responsibility for health back to the awareness of the individual.Of 200 office practice patients, 60 percent achieved major changes in personality integration and vitality. This was reflected in cessation of the presenting complaint, without symptom substitution and diminished demand for clinical services.

  16. Guidelines for Establishing a Family Day Care System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newsome, Barbara; And Others

    Written as a basic guide, this report of the Community Coordinated Child Care Committee of Dane County, Wisconsin, aims to assist people interested in establishing family day care systems in their own communities. Practical information is provided on the prime factors that should be taken into account in selecting the ideal physical location and…

  17. Partnerships at Work: Lessons Learned from Programs and Practices of Families, Professionals and Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, Kathleen Kirk, Ed.; Taylor, Mary Skidmore, Ed.; Arango, Polly, Ed.

    Designed to celebrate family/interprofessional collaborative partnerships, this publication describes high-quality examples of how families and professionals at the family, community, state, and national levels have worked together to create programs and practices that are family-friendly and responsive to what families have said they want and…

  18. Systems Concept: A Practical Application

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corgan, Virginia

    1974-01-01

    The importance of the systems concept is in its "management by objectives" approach. Outcomes are determined first, followed by assessment of input including student ability, available facilities and equipment, materials and techniques. An example applying the systems concept in an office practice class might be the preparation of a newsletter.…

  19. Women, Family Systems & the TC. Chapter 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acampora, Alfonso P., Ed.; Nebelkopf, Ethan, Ed.

    This document contains 11 papers from the ninth World Conference of Therapeutic Communities (TCs) that deal with women's issues, family systems, and the TC. Papers include: (1) "Families in the Eighties" (Cecil Williams); (2) "Women, Work & Substance Abuse" (Lois Morris); (3) "The National Federation of Parents" (Shirley Colletti); (4) "The…

  20. Affirmative Action Implications for Worldwide Family Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liss, Lora

    This paper views the interrelatedness of political, economic, and family systems as they are being affected by the growing awareness of sex discrimination. The reduction in sex inequalities throughout the world, regardless of political or economic orientation, will necessitate a new perception of the woman's role in the family unit. The hypothesis…

  1. Literacy and Illiteracy in the Family System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryant, Lizbeth A.

    Scholars from various disciplines who examine the role an individual plays in the family as a major influence on his/her literacy are currently considering a factor often overlooked by researchers. Mikhail Bakhtin, Basil Bernstein, David Bleich and others find a cause-and-effect relationship between literacy and family systems. This suggests the…

  2. Waiting to return to normal: an exploration of family systems intervention in childhood cancer.

    PubMed

    West, Christina H; Bell, Janice M; Woodgate, Roberta L; Moules, Nancy J

    2015-05-01

    The illness suffering of families in childhood cancer is characterized in part by a loss of family normalcy. Hermeneutic phenomenology and family process research methods were used to analyze videotaped family intervention sessions and post-intervention family/clinician interviews. Within this article, some of the findings from the larger doctoral study that focused on the illness suffering of family members and relational, family systems intervention based on the Illness Beliefs Model are described. Although the larger study included findings of family interventions that addressed several aspects of the illness suffering experienced, this article details specific findings related to the theme of the loss of family normalcy and a longing to return home. Family systems intervention practices which facilitated a lessening of illness suffering included the following: offering new interpretations of suffering within a reflecting team, articulating family strength, sensitively acknowledging the illness suffering, and eliciting the experiences of family members in a shared therapeutic conversation. PMID:25794512

  3. Practical aspects of systems hardening

    SciTech Connect

    Shepherd, W.J.

    1989-01-01

    Applications of hardening technology in a practical system require a balance between the factors governing affordability, producibility, and survivability of the finished design. Without careful consideration of the top-level system operating constraints, a design engineer may find himself with a survivable but overweight, unproductive, expensive design. This paper explores some lessons learned in applying hardening techniques to several laser communications programs and is intended as an introductory guide to novice designers faced with the task of hardening a space system.

  4. Implementing family nursing: how do we translate knowledge into clinical practice? Part II: The evolution of 20 years of teaching, research, and practice to a Center of Excellence in Family Nursing.

    PubMed

    Duhamel, Fabie

    2010-02-01

    The author's reflections on knowledge transfer/translation highlight the importance of the circular process between science and practice knowledge, leading to the notion of "knowledge exchange." She addresses the dilemmas of translating knowledge into clinical practice by describing her academic contributions to knowledge exchange within Family Systems Nursing (FSN). Teaching and research strategies are offered that address the circularity between science and practice knowledge. The evolution of 20 years of teaching, research, and clinical experience has resulted in the recent creation of a Center of Excellence in Family Nursing at the University of Montreal. The three main objectives of the Center uniquely focus on knowledge exchange by providing (a) a training context for skill development for nurses specializing in FSN, (b) a research milieu for knowledge "creation" and knowledge "in action" studies to further advance the practice of FSN, and (c) a family healing setting to support families who experience difficulty coping with health issues.

  5. Manufactured housing plant injuries in a rural family practice.

    PubMed

    Kellerman, R

    1990-09-01

    The manufacture of mobile homes and prefabricated houses results in the second highest occupational injury and illness rate of any industry. The types of worker injuries sustained have never previously been characterized. This series of 138 injuries from a rural family practice categorizes the injuries sustained by workers in a manufactured housing plant. Most injuries were not judged to be serious, but did result in lost work time and morbidity. Forty-nine percent of all injuries involved lacerations or puncture wounds. Seventy-six percent of puncture wounds involved staple gun use. Two thirds of lacerations were from pieces of metal, siding, and other sharp objects; one third were from knives. Fingers, hands, and wrists were the most commonly injured anatomic sites. Nine cases of overuse injury were seen; two required carpal tunnel surgical release. Twelve injuries were serious enough to require hospitalization or consultation. There were no fatalities. Several suggestions for improved worker safety are presented. PMID:2391457

  6. Validity of the Maslach Burnout Inventory for family practice physicians.

    PubMed

    Rafferty, J P; Lemkau, J P; Purdy, R R; Rudisill, J R

    1986-05-01

    This study assesses the utility of Maslach's concept of burnout for family practice physicians. Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) subscale correlations for the 67 residents in this sample are compared with Maslach's normative sample. The residents scored in the moderate to high range on the MBI subscales. MBI interscale correlations were similar to the pattern reported by Maslach. Significant correlations between job satisfaction and five of the six MBI subscales suggest that the construct of burnout has considerable psychological import for these physicians. The validity of the emotional exhaustion subscale is demonstrated by significant correlations with self-assessed burnout, job satisfaction, and faculty assessments of resident burnout. Independent observers were most sensitive to residents' emotional exhaustion and less likely to assess accurately the less visible aspects of burnout related to depersonalization and lack of achievement, which suggests the usefulness of multiple measures for assessing the burnout phenomenon.

  7. School Access and Participation: Family Engagement Practices in the New Latino Diaspora

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowenhaupt, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    This article describes how schools shape family engagement practices in the context of the New Latino Diaspora. Building on critical scholarship that has called for more culturally appropriate definitions of family engagement, this study seeks to develop a theoretical understanding of how school practices influence immigrant families' access…

  8. Practical Applications of Space Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Assembly of Engineering.

    This report gives an overview of a study conducted by the Space Applications Board (SAB) on the practical applications of space systems. In this study, the SAB considered how the nation's space capability might be used to solve problems such as the shortage of food and energy; the improvement of the physical environment; inventorying and…

  9. Contributions of medical family therapy to the changing health care system.

    PubMed

    Doherty, William J; McDaniel, Susan H; Hepworth, Jeri

    2014-09-01

    Medical family therapy is a form of professional practice that uses a biopsychosocial approach and systemic family therapy principles in the collaborative treatment of individuals and families dealing with medical problems. It emerged out of the experience of family therapists working in primary medical care settings in the 1980s and 1990s. This article describes how contemporary medical family therapy can contribute to a transformed health care system in four areas: the patient experience of health care, the health of the population, the containment of health care costs, and enhanced practice environments.

  10. [Healthcare practices of Family Health Teams in four major cities].

    PubMed

    Santos, Adriano Maia dos; Giovanella, Ligia; Mendonça, Maria Helena Magalhães de; Andrade, Carla Lourenço Tavares de; Martins, Maria Inês Carsalade; Cunha, Marcela Silva da

    2012-10-01

    This paper examines reports on how care is administered by Family Health Teams (FHT) doctors and nurses in four state capitals. It identifies issues relating to priority actions, routine activities and the association between the professional profile and how selected activities are performed, in an attempt to ascertain how far these approximate to the comprehensive approach to primary health care. The cross-section reflects results from data collected via self-applied questionnaires. Cross-analyses were made using the Pearson chi-square (÷(2)) test for categorical variables. A and B variables are, or are not, associated, at a 5% level of significance. The analyses point to a tendency to strike a balance in meeting programmed and spontaneous demand, corroborating the person-centered approach. Action to address chronic infectious disorders is not a priority for all FHTs, which impairs health surveillance actions and comprehensive care. Home visits are not yet a weekly activity for all personnel. Lack of involvement in community activities restricts care to conventional practices and undermines the logic of change of model. Contradictions identified between training and practice indicate a need to review policies for ongoing professional development.

  11. Chronic unhappiness. Investigating the phenomenon in family practice.

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, C. G.

    1996-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the experience of chronic unhappiness as it presents in family practice. DESIGN: A descriptive, qualitative study of both patients and physicians using an existential phenomenologic approach. SETTING: Two village general practices in South Africa. PARTICIPANTS: Four patients who were difficult, "heartsink" patients, who gave their doctors an overwhelming feeling of exasperation and defeat. METHOD: We investigated the clinical records thoroughly and explored patients' relationships with others. Through interpretation and reflection, we tried to discover what role the doctor could play with these patients. FINDINGS: Chronic unhappiness was found to be not only a condition of life for the patients but also for the doctor. It was an important factor in the relationship they shared. Unhappiness was revealed in part by frequent visits by the patients, a constellation of negative feelings in the doctor, and difficult patient-doctor relationships. CONCLUSION: Chronic unhappiness is not "treatable" in the normal curative or therapeutic sense. This does not prevent our quest to diagnose and cure, but enlarges our horizons to recognizing and accepting our own human reactions to patients and understanding how we can meet their needs. PMID:8653032

  12. Premenstrual syndrome. Evidence-based treatment in family practice.

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, Sue

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the strength of evidence for treatments for premenstrual syndrome (PMS) and to derive a set of practical guidelines for managing PMS in family practice. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: An advanced MEDLINE search was conducted from January 1990 to December 2001. The Cochrane Library and personal contacts were also used. Quality of evidence in studies ranged from level I to level III, depending on the intervention. MAIN MESSAGE: Good scientific evidence shows that calcium carbonate (1200 mg/d) and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are effective treatments for PMS. The most commonly used therapies (including vitamin B6, evening primrose oil, and oral contraceptives) are based on inconclusive evidence. Other treatments for which there is inconclusive evidence include aerobic exercise, stress reduction, cognitive therapy, spironolactone, magnesium, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, various hormonal regimens, and a complex carbohydrate-rich diet. Although evidence for them is inconclusive, it is reasonable to recommend healthy lifestyle changes given their overall health benefits. Progesterone and bromocriptine, which are still widely used, are ineffective. CONCLUSION: Calcium carbonate should be recommended as first-line therapy for women with mild-to-moderate PMS. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors can be considered as first-line therapy for women with severe affective symptoms and for women with milder symptoms who have failed to respond to other therapies. Other therapies may be tried if these measures fail to provide adequate relief. PMID:12489244

  13. [Knowledge and practices in breastfeeding promotion by Family Health teams in Montes Claros, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Caldeira, Antônio Prates; Nobre de Aguiar, Gabriel; Cavalcanti Magalhães, Weslane Almeida; Fagundes, Gizele Carmem

    2007-08-01

    The Family Health Strategy has been implemented in Brazil with the aim of reorganizing the health care system with an emphasis on promotion and prevention. Thus, encouragement for breastfeeding is one of the most important activities by family health care teams. The objective of this study was to assess knowledge and practices by family health care teams in relation to breastfeeding. In addition to a questionnaire on health professionals' characteristics, a specific knowledge test on breastfeeding was conducted with 41 physicians and nurses and another test on the same subject was given to 152 community health workers. Scores were above 80% on the advantages of breastfeeding in all the teams, but knowledge on practical issues concerning technique and management of the main problems encountered in breastfeeding was not uniform among the health professions. Nurses scored better than physicians, and community health workers had the lowest scores. Practical activities to promote breastfeeding were not developed uniformly among health care professionals. There is a need for systematic and ongoing training in breastfeeding management in the family health teams.

  14. Language and Literacy Practices in Dominican Families in New York City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, M. Victoria

    2006-01-01

    This article presents the results of two ethnographic studies that explored the language and literacy practices present in the everyday lives of seven Dominican families living in the New York City metropolitan area. The families engaged in literacy practices that were embedded in their daily lives and often depended on the practical problems that…

  15. [Mental stress of immigrant patients and the family practice].

    PubMed

    Koch, E; Müller, M J

    2007-10-18

    People of non-German background still have difficulties obtaining adequate access to the German health care system. Reasons include communication barriers, differences in the concept of disease and low level of education in addition to a frequently difficult social situation and immigration-related stress factors. The majority of the patients consult the family physician first. Taking into consideration the different cultural concepts of disease and immigration-specific stress factors opens new therapeutic options and expands the intercultural competence of the treating physician. PMID:17987716

  16. Cultural transition of international medical graduate residents into family practice in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Triscott, Jean A.C.; Waugh, Earle H.; Torti, Jacqueline M.I.; Barton, Martina

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To identify the perceived strengths that international medical graduate (IMG) family medicine residents possess and the challenges they are perceived to encounter in integrating into Canadian family practice. Methods This was a qualitative, exploratory study employing focus groups and interviews with 27 participants - 10 family physicians, 13 health care professionals, and 4 family medicine residents. Focus group/interview questions addressed the strengths that IMGs possess and the challenges they face in becoming culturally competent within the Canadian medico-cultural context. Qualitative data were audiotaped, transcribed, and analyzed thematically. Results Participants identified that IMG residents brought multiple strengths to Canadian practice including strong clinical knowledge and experience, high education level, the richness of varied cultural perspectives, and positive personal strengths.  At the same time, IMG residents appeared to experience challenges in the areas of:  (1) communication skills (language nuances, unfamiliar accents, speech volume/tone, eye contact, directness of communication); (2) clinical practice (uncommon diagnoses, lack of familiarity with care of the opposite sex and mental health conditions); (3) learning challenges (limited knowledge of Canada’s health care system, patient-centered care and ethical principles, unfamiliarity with self-directed learning,  unease with receiving feedback); (4) cultural differences (gender roles, gender equality, personal space, boundary issues; and (5) personal struggles.   Conclusions Residency programs must recognize the challenges that can occur during the cultural transition to Canadian family practice and incorporate medico-cultural education into the curriculum.  IMG residents also need to be aware of cultural differences and be open to different perspectives and new learning. PMID:27149322

  17. Building Bridges: Supporting Families across Service Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goetz, Kathy, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    This double issue of the journal "Report" focuses on the collaboration among seven social service systems that support and serve children and families. Each of the sections discusses one of the seven systems, presents an overview essay, and profiles programs that execute the service. The first section, on education, emphasizes linkages between…

  18. Elder abuse and neglect in African American families: informing practice based on ecological and cultural frameworks.

    PubMed

    Horsford, Sheena R; Parra-Cardona, José Rubén; Schiamberg, Larry; Post, Lori A

    2011-01-01

    Despite the rapid growth of the elderly African American population in the U.S., elder abuse and neglect in African American families continue to be underdeveloped areas of study. This article presents an ecological and culturally informed framework for the study of elder abuse in African American populations. The model was developed based on Bronfenbrenner's Human Ecological Theory. The model identifies risk factors associated with different systems that have an influence on the lives of African American families. Cultural protective factors also are identified in the model. The model is intended to provide an understanding of elder abuse and neglect in African American families by considering the influence of contextual factors such as the legacy of slavery, social exclusion, and structural segregation and racism. Specific suggestions for practice are proposed according to cultural strengths of African American communities as well as the ecological premises of the model.

  19. Exploring the Literacy Practices of Refugee Families Enrolled in a Book Distribution Program and an Intergenerational Family Literacy Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Sunita; Sylvia, Monica R.; Ridzi, Frank

    2015-01-01

    This ethnographic study presents findings of the literacy practices of Burmese refugee families and their interaction with a book distribution program paired with an intergenerational family literacy program. The project was organized at the level of Bronfenbrenner's exosystem (in "Ecology of human development". Cambridge, Harvard…

  20. Improving the Nurse–Family Partnership in Community Practice

    PubMed Central

    Donelan-McCall, Nancy; O’Brien, Ruth; MacMillan, Harriet; Jack, Susan; Jenkins, Thomas; Dunlap, Wallace P.; O’Fallon, Molly; Yost, Elly; Thorland, Bill; Pinto, Francesca; Gasbarro, Mariarosa; Baca, Pilar; Melnick, Alan; Beeber, Linda

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Evidence-based preventive interventions are rarely final products. They have reached a stage of development that warrant public investment but require additional research and development to strengthen their effects. The Nurse-Family Partnership (NFP), a program of nurse home visiting, is grounded in findings from replicated randomized controlled trials. OBJECTIVE: Evidence-based programs require replication in accordance with the models tested in the original randomized controlled trials in order to achieve impacts comparable to those found in those trials, and yet they must be changed in order to improve their impacts, given that interventions require continuous improvement. This article provides a framework and illustrations of work our team members have developed to address this tension. METHODS: Because the NFP is delivered in communities outside of research contexts, we used quantitative and qualitative research to identify challenges with the NFP program model and its implementation, as well as promising approaches for addressing them. RESULTS: We describe a framework used to address these issues and illustrate its use in improving nurses’ skills in retaining participants, reducing closely spaced subsequent pregnancies, responding to intimate partner violence, observing and promoting caregivers’ care of their children, addressing parents’ mental health problems, classifying families’ risks and strengths as a guide for program implementation, and collaborating with indigenous health organizations to adapt and evaluate the program for their populations. We identify common challenges encountered in conducting research in practice settings and translating findings from these studies into ongoing program implementation. CONCLUSIONS: The conduct of research focused on quality improvement, model improvement, and implementation in NFP practice settings is challenging, but feasible, and holds promise for improving the impact of the NFP. PMID

  1. Salvador Minuchin's structural family therapy and its application to multicultural family systems.

    PubMed

    Navarre, S E

    1998-01-01

    The structural approach to family therapy offers a useful perspective to the nurse therapist working with families with various cultural backgrounds. Asian and Hispanic families are examined to illustrate using Minuchin's approach to family counseling. The rationale for the structural approach is explored, and specific therapeutic techniques for practice are described. Nurses who work with culturally diverse families might profit by using this approach. PMID:9883131

  2. Computer multitasking with Desqview 386 in a family practice.

    PubMed

    Davis, A E

    1990-08-15

    Computers are now widely used in medical practice for accounting and secretarial tasks. However, it has been much more difficult to use computers in more physician-related activities of daily practice. I investigated the Desqview multitasking system on a 386 computer as a solution to this problem. Physician-directed tasks of management of patient charts, retrieval of reference information, word processing, appointment scheduling and office organization were each managed by separate programs. Desqview allowed instantaneous switching back and forth between the various programs. I compared the time and cost savings and the need for physician input between Desqview 386, a 386 computer alone and an older, XT computer. Desqview significantly simplified the use of computer programs for medical information management and minimized the necessity for physician intervention. The time saved was 15 minutes per day; the costs saved were estimated to be $5000 annually.

  3. Family nursing practice and education: what is happening in Japan?

    PubMed

    Moriyama, Michiko

    2008-11-01

    Significant developments in family nursing in Japan are described and analyzed beginning with the political and health care legislation in the country that stimulated a need for family nursing and the early adoption of family nursing theories and models by visionary leaders in nursing education. In 1994, Japan was the first country in the world to establish a national family nursing association, the Japanese Association for Research in Family Nursing, that provided the necessary infrastructure and leadership for family nursing in Japan to flourish. The strengths and challenges of family nursing in Japan are identified and a call is made for innovations in nursing curricula as well as global networking of family nurses around the world.

  4. Factors Associated With the Perception of Family Nursing Practice Among Mental Health Nurses in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Chiu-Yueh; Tsai, Yun-Fang

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to examine factors that influenced the perceptions of mental health nurses about involving families in their nursing practice. A sample of 175 Taiwanese mental health nurses who are employed in both inpatient and community settings completed structured questionnaires designed to measure empathy, attitudes about involving families in care, and perceptions of family nursing practice. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, Pearson's product-moment correlation, t test, one-way ANOVA, and a hierarchical multiple regression analysis. Positive perceptions of family nursing practice were correlated with more years of clinical experience in mental health, empathy, supportive attitudes toward the importance of family nursing care, and personal experiences with family members with serious illness in need of professional care. These findings may assist in the development of effective educational programs designed to help nurses integrate family nursing knowledge and skills in the care of patients and families experiencing mental illness.

  5. Resources for Advancing Family Gerontology Education and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Christine A.; Brosi, Whitney A.

    2006-01-01

    The unprecedented growth in the older adult population combined with increased scholarly interest in family dynamics has resulted in the gradual expansion of family gerontology as its own area of study. Consisting of both university faculty and practitioners, family gerontology educators integrate multiple disciplines in order to teach about later…

  6. Preparing Educators to Involve Families: From Theory to Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Heather Bastow, Ed.; Kreider, Holly Marie, Ed.; Lopez, M. Elena, Ed.; Chatman, Celina M., Ed.

    2005-01-01

    Family involvement in children's education is widely considered critical to student achievement. Yet teachers and other education professionals often feel unprepared to engage families in children's learning. The goal of Preparing Educators to Involve Families is to help prepare teachers and other professionals to partner effectively with the…

  7. Practice-Informed Approaches to Addressing Substance Abuse and Trauma Exposure in Urban Native Families Involved with Child Welfare.

    PubMed

    Lucero, Nancy M; Bussey, Marian

    2015-01-01

    Similar to families from other groups, urban-based American Indian and Alaska Native ("Native") family members involved with the child welfare system due to substance abuse issues are also often challenged by untreated trauma exposure. The link between these conditions and the history of genocidal policies aimed at destroying Native family ties, as well as experiences of ongoing discrimination, bring added dimensions for consideration when pro- viding services to these families. Practice-based evidence indicates that the trauma-informed and culturally responsive model developed by the Denver Indian Family Resource Center (DIFRC) shows promise in reducing out-of-home placements and re-referrals in urban Native families with substance abuse and child welfare concerns, while also increasing caregiver capabilities, family safety, and child well-being. This article provides strategies from the DIFRC approach that non-Native caseworkers and supervisors can utilize to create an environment in their own agencies that supports culturally based practice with Native families while incorporating a trauma-informed understanding of service needs of these families. Casework consistent with this approach demonstrates actions that meet the Active Efforts requirement of the Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA) as well as sound clinical practice. Intensive and proactive case management designed specifically for families with high levels of service needs is a key strategy when combined with utilizing a caseworker brief screening tool for trauma exposure; training caseworkers to recognize trauma symptoms, making timely referrals to trauma treatment by behavioral health specialists experienced in working with Native clients, and providing a consistent service environment that focuses on client safety and worker trustworthiness. Finally, suggestions are put forth for agencies seeking to enhance their cultural responsiveness and include increasing workers' understanding of cultural values

  8. Practice-Informed Approaches to Addressing Substance Abuse and Trauma Exposure in Urban Native Families Involved with Child Welfare.

    PubMed

    Lucero, Nancy M; Bussey, Marian

    2015-01-01

    Similar to families from other groups, urban-based American Indian and Alaska Native ("Native") family members involved with the child welfare system due to substance abuse issues are also often challenged by untreated trauma exposure. The link between these conditions and the history of genocidal policies aimed at destroying Native family ties, as well as experiences of ongoing discrimination, bring added dimensions for consideration when pro- viding services to these families. Practice-based evidence indicates that the trauma-informed and culturally responsive model developed by the Denver Indian Family Resource Center (DIFRC) shows promise in reducing out-of-home placements and re-referrals in urban Native families with substance abuse and child welfare concerns, while also increasing caregiver capabilities, family safety, and child well-being. This article provides strategies from the DIFRC approach that non-Native caseworkers and supervisors can utilize to create an environment in their own agencies that supports culturally based practice with Native families while incorporating a trauma-informed understanding of service needs of these families. Casework consistent with this approach demonstrates actions that meet the Active Efforts requirement of the Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA) as well as sound clinical practice. Intensive and proactive case management designed specifically for families with high levels of service needs is a key strategy when combined with utilizing a caseworker brief screening tool for trauma exposure; training caseworkers to recognize trauma symptoms, making timely referrals to trauma treatment by behavioral health specialists experienced in working with Native clients, and providing a consistent service environment that focuses on client safety and worker trustworthiness. Finally, suggestions are put forth for agencies seeking to enhance their cultural responsiveness and include increasing workers' understanding of cultural values

  9. Family Resource System Preventing Unnecessary Foster Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Dolores B.

    Montgomery County Children's Services, which provides public child welfare services in Dayton, Ohio, has instituted a family resource system to better serve and reduce the number of black children placed in foster care. The agency is mandated to receive and investigate child abuse and neglect complaints and to provide support services. The system…

  10. Epilogue: Systems Approaches and Systems Practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Martin; Holwell, Sue

    Each of the five systems approaches discussed in this volume: system dynamics (SD), the viable systems model (VSM), strategic options development and analysis (SODA), soft systems methodology (SSM) and critical systems heuristics (CSH) has a pedigree. Not in the sense of the sometimes absurd spectacle of animals paraded at dog shows. Rather, their pedigree derives from their systems foundations, their capacity to evolve and their flexibility in use. None of the five approaches has developed out of use in restricted and controlled contexts of either low or high levels of complicatedness. Neither has any one of them evolved as a consequence of being applied only to situations with either presumed stakeholder agreement on purpose, or courteous disagreement amongst stakeholders, or stakeholder coercion. The compilation is not a celebration of abstract ‘methodologies', but of theoretically robust approaches that have a genuine pedigree in practice.

  11. The Family Impact Lens: A Family-Focused, Evidence-Informed Approach to Policy and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogenschneider, Karen; Little, Olivia M.; Ooms, Theodora; Benning, Sara; Cadigan, Karen; Corbett, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Families have long been recognized for the contributions they make to their members and to society. Yet families are seldom substantively incorporated into the normal course of policy and program development, implementation, and evaluation. We propose the family impact lens as one way to shift the rhetoric from appreciating families to…

  12. Programs That Work, from the Promising Practices Network on Children, Families and Communities. RAND Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilburn, M. Rebecca, Ed.

    2014-01-01

    The Promising Practices Network (PPN) on Children, Families and Communities (www.promisingpractices.net) began as a partnership between four state-level organizations that help public and private organizations improve the well-being of children and families. The PPN website, archived in June 2014, featured summaries of programs and practices that…

  13. The Impact of Family Socialization Practices on Children's Socialization in China.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Aimin; Stevens, Brenda; Chen, Ping; Qian, Mingyi

    1999-01-01

    Examined impact of Chinese family socialization practices on children's socialization over 4 years. Found that parental reasoning, intellectual stimulation, and encouragement of independence were significant indicators of overall family socialization practices. Children's self-control, and positive attitudes toward others and toward work were…

  14. Shared Knowledge and Mutual Respect: Enhancing Culturally Competent Practice through Collaboration with Families and Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verdon, Sarah; Wong, Sandie; McLeod, Sharynne

    2016-01-01

    Collaboration with families and communities has been identified as one of six overarching principles to speech and language therapists' (SLTs') engagement in culturally competent practice (Verdon et al., 2015a). The aim of this study was to describe SLTs' collaboration with families and communities when engaging in practice to support the speech,…

  15. Oppositional Defiant Disorder and the Need for Family-Centered Practice in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markward, Martha J.; Bride, Brian

    2001-01-01

    Examines the extent to which children with oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) need family-centered interventions. Provides an overview of ODD, highlighting interventions found to be most effective in working with this population of children. Relative to recommended practices, notes the need for family-centered practice and the resulting…

  16. Home Literacy Beliefs and Practices among Low-Income Latino Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Heather S.; Gonzalez, Jorge E.; Pollard-Durodola, Sharolyn; Saenz, Laura M.; Soares, Denise A.; Resendez, Nora; Zhu, Leina; Hagan-Burke, Shanna

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore within-group patterns of variability in the home literacy environments (HLEs) of low-income Latino families using latent profile analysis. Participants were (N = 193) families of Latino preschoolers enrolled in a larger study. In the fall of 2012, mothers filled out a family literacy practices inventory, a…

  17. Child Abuse and Neglect in Cambodian Refugee Families: Characteristics and Implications for Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Janet; Rhee, Siyon; Berthold, S. Megan

    2008-01-01

    This study examines the characteristics and patterns of child maltreatment among Cambodian refugee families in Los Angeles and assesses the implications for child welfare practice with Cambodian refugee families. Data were extracted from 243 active Cambodian case files maintained by the Los Angeles County Department of Children and Family Services…

  18. Relationship-Centered Practices in Early Childhood: Working with Families, Infants, and Young Children at Risk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ensher, Gail L.; Clark, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Strong working relationships with diverse families and children are the foundation of successful early intervention. Discover fresh, practical ways to build these relationships in this essential guidebook, every professional's blueprint for working with children and families within the specific context of their culture, family structure, and risk…

  19. On-the-Job Practices of Early Childhood Special Education Providers Trained in Family-Centered Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Mary M.; Mandell, Colleen J.

    2006-01-01

    This qualitative study investigated the use of family-centered practices by graduates of two early childhood special education personnel preparation programs that embedded family-centered pedagogy and involvement in all coursework. Three cohorts, involving 19 graduates employed in 19 different programs located in six states, participated in…

  20. Cultural Competency Training in a New-Start Rural/Frontier Family Practice Residency Program: A Cultural Immersion Integrative Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doty, Barbara J.; Pastorino, Ray

    The Alaska Family Practice Residency (AFPR) is a graduate medical education training program for family physicians headed for rural and remote practice sites. Located in Anchorage and affiliated with the University of Washington family practice residency network, the program has an integrated curriculum aimed at preparing family physicians to…

  1. Factors Influencing Satisfaction for Family Practice Residency Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kay, Lawrence E.; D'Amico, Frank

    1999-01-01

    A survey of 383 faculty in family medical-residency programs explored perceptions of 60 professional, scheduling, compensation, and regional factors as they related to overall job satisfaction and career plans, and 59 factors related to the initial decision to enter academic family medicine. Results indicate high levels of satisfaction, feeling…

  2. Family Sense-Making Practices in Science Center Conversations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmerman, Heather Toomey; Reeve, Suzanne; Bell, Philip

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we examine the interactional ways that families make meaning from biological exhibits during a visit to an interactive science center. To understand the museum visits from the perspectives of the families, we use ethnographic and discourse analytic methods, including pre- and postvisit interviews, videotaped observations of the…

  3. Theorizing in Family Gerontology: New Opportunities for Research and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberto, Karen A.; Blieszner, Rosemary; Allen, Katherine R.

    2006-01-01

    We examine the extent to which theory has been used in empirical studies of families in later life, identify prevalent types of theoretical frameworks, and assess connections between theory and both focal topics and analytic methods in the family gerontology literature. The paper is based on content and methodological analysis of 838 empirical…

  4. A Short Course in Family Therapy: Translating Research Into Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Robert

    2005-01-01

    This article outlines a graduate-level, one-time-only family therapy course that prepares counseling trainees to be competent at entry-level family therapy in the United States. The approach outlined addresses the training concerns of programs that significantly emphasize individual-focused paradigms and that have limited time to train counseling…

  5. Family, School, and Community Partnerships: Practical Strategies for Afterschool Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finn-Stevenson, Matia

    2014-01-01

    Much attention is given today to the importance of forging family, school, and community partnerships. Growing numbers of schools, many of them with afterschool programs, are dedicating resources to support and sustain relationships with families and community-based organizations. And, among government agencies and the philanthropic sector, there…

  6. Fostering Family-Centered Practices through a Family-Created Portfolio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregg, Katy; Rugg, Mary; Souto-Manning, Mariana

    2011-01-01

    When a child has disabilities, families and professionals must communicate their concerns and goals for the child. Often these concerns are expressed as weaknesses within a deficits-based framework. The use of a strengths-based, family-created portfolio is a communication strategy for reconceptualizing a child from the family's perspective in…

  7. Exploring Cumulative Risk and Family Literacy Practices in Low-Income Latino Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcella, Jennifer; Howes, Carollee; Fuligni, Allison Sidle

    2014-01-01

    Research Findings: The home literacy environment and other early learning settings such as preschool play a role in children's language and literacy outcomes, yet research suggests that Latino, Spanish-speaking families are less likely than other families to participate in family literacy activities. This study explored the relations among…

  8. Attitudes of Registered and Licensed Practical Nurses About the Importance of Families in Surgical Hospital Units: Findings From the Landspitali University Hospital Family Nursing Implementation Project.

    PubMed

    Blöndal, Katrin; Zoëga, Sigridur; Hafsteinsdottir, Jorunn E; Olafsdottir, Olof Asdis; Thorvardardottir, Audur B; Hafsteinsdottir, Sigrun A; Sveinsdóttir, Herdis

    2014-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to examine attitudes of registered nurses and licensed practical nurses about the importance of the family in surgical hospital units before (T1) and after (T2) implementation of a Family Systems Nursing educational intervention based on the Calgary Family Assessment and Intervention Models. This study was part of the Landspitali University Hospital Family Nursing Implementation Project and used a nonrandomized, quasi-experimental design with nonequivalent group before and after and without a control group. There were 181 participants at T1 and 130 at T2. No difference was found in nurses' attitudes as measured by the Families Importance in Nursing Care-Nurses' Attitudes (FINC-NA) questionnaire, before and after the educational intervention. Attitudes toward families were favorable at both times. Analysis of demographic variables showed that age, work experience, and workplace (inpatient vs. outpatient units) had an effect on the nurses' attitudes toward families. The influence of work experience on attitudes toward family care warrants further exploration.

  9. Systems effects on family planning innovativeness.

    PubMed

    Lee, S B

    1983-12-01

    Data from Korea were used to explore the importance of community level variables in explaining family planning adoption at the individual level. An open system concept was applied, assuming that individual family planning behavior is influenced by both environmental and individual factors. The environmental factors were measured at the village level and designated as community characteristics. The dimension of communication network variables was introduced. Each individual was characterized in terms of the degree of her involvement in family planning communication with others in her village. It was assumed that the nature of the communication network linking individuals with each other effects family planning adoption at the individual level. Specific objectives were to determine 1) the relative importance of the specific independent variables in explaining family planning adoption and 2) the relative importance of the community level variables in comparison with the individual level variables in explaining family planning adoption at the individual level. The data were originally gathered in a 1973 research project on Korea's mothers' clubs. 1047 respondents were interviewed, comprising all married women in 25 sample villages having mothers' clubs. The dependent variable was family planning adoption behavior, defined as current use of any of the modern methods of family planning. The independent variables were defined at 3 levels: individual, community, and at a level intermediate between them involving communication links between individuals. More of the individual level independent variables were significantly correlated with the dependent variables than the community level variables. Among those variables with statistically significant correlations, the correlation coefficients were consistently higher for the individual level than for the community level variables. More of the variance in the dependent variable was explained by individual level than by

  10. Family systems theory, attachment theory, and culture.

    PubMed

    Rothbaum, Fred; Rosen, Karen; Ujiie, Tatsuo; Uchida, Nobuko

    2002-01-01

    Family systems theory and attachment theory have important similarities and complementarities. Here we consider two areas in which the theories converge: (a) in family system theorists' description of an overly close, or "enmeshed," mother-child dyad, which attachment theorists conceptualize as the interaction of children's ambivalent attachment and mothers' preoccupied attachment; (b) in family system theorists' description of the "pursuer-distance cycle" of marital conflict, which attachment theorists conceptualize as the interaction of preoccupied and dismissive partners. We briefly review family systems theory evidence, and more extensively review attachment theory evidence, pertaining to these points of convergence. We also review cross-cultural research, which leads us to conclude that the dynamics described in both theories reflect, in part, Western ways of thinking and Western patterns of relatedness. Evidence from Japan suggests that extremely close ties between mother and child are perceived as adaptive, and are more common, and that children experience less adverse effects from such relationships than do children in the West. Moreover, in Japan there is less emphasis on the importance of the exclusive spousal relationship, and less need for the mother and father to find time alone to rekindle romantic, intimate feelings and to resolve conflicts by openly communicating their differences. Thus, the "maladaptive" pattern frequently cited by Western theorists of an extremely close mother-child relationship, an unromantic, conflictual marriage characterized by little verbal communication and a peripheral, distant father, may function very differently in other cultures. While we believe that both theories will be greatly enriched by their integration, we caution against the application of either theory outside the cultures in which they were developed.

  11. Family-Focused Autism Spectrum Disorder Research: A Review of the Utility of Family Systems Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cridland, Elizabeth K.; Jones, Sandra C.; Magee, Christopher A.; Caputi, Peter

    2014-01-01

    A family member with an autism spectrum disorder presents pervasive and bidirectional influences on the entire family system, suggesting a need for family-focused autism spectrum disorder research. While there has been increasing interest in this research area, family-focused autism spectrum disorder research can still be considered relatively…

  12. Priority setting in family change and clinical practice: the Family FIRO Model.

    PubMed

    Doherty, W J; Colangelo, N; Hovander, D

    1991-06-01

    We update a theoretical framework for understanding priority setting for the management of family change, with special emphasis on developmental change. We propose that three core dimensions of family interaction--inclusion, control, and intimacy--constitute an optimal priority sequence for managing major family change stemming from life-cycle transitions and other stressful experiences. In the next section of the article, we compare the Family FIRO Model and other models of family change. Finally, we suggest that therapists can benefit from an explicit, clinical decision-making model for setting priorities in treatment: issues of inclusion take precedence over issues of control, which in turn take precedence over issues of intimacy.

  13. The contribution of practice skills in a care management process for family caregivers.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Jeannine M; Rizzo, Victoria M

    2013-01-01

    Practice skills are believed to improve practice, yet, little is known about the extent to which skills affect outcomes. This exploratory study examined the extent to which 3 practice skills specific to a care management context for family caregivers, including communication skills, supportive skills, and linking skills, were associated with fidelity of a care management process. Twenty-one care managers who used a single process to serve 113 family caregivers were included in the study. Bivariate correlation analysis revealed the 3 practice skills are positively associated with process fidelity. Implications for social work practice, education, and research are discussed.

  14. Caregiving families within the long-term services and support system for older adults.

    PubMed

    Qualls, Sara Honn

    2016-01-01

    Long-term care services and supports are primarily a family industry that warrants psychologists' involvement through practice, research, and policy advocacy. Families are poorly integrated into service systems despite the dominance of family caregiving work within health care and long-term care. This article positions family caregiving work within the context of family life across the life span, noting overlaps and distinctions between normal family life and caregiving work for older adults whose physical or cognitive challenges require assistance. The prevalence, work, and consequences of family caregiving for older adults are described. Families are identified as key partners in long-term care, despite substantial policy and practice barriers to integrating them into care structures and systems. Policy options for reducing or eliminating barriers are suggested, as are professional practice opportunities for psychologists to support caregiving families. Approaches to assessment and interventions for caregivers across a variety of settings are described. Gaps in research are highlighted, with a focus on how to understand caregiving as embedded within context of family, long-term care services and supports, and health care. Caregiving work presents an imperative for expanding psychologists' engagement in integrating and supporting the families whose caregiving is so critical to a rapidly aging society. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27159435

  15. Building a framework for theory-based ethnographies for studying intergenerational family food practices.

    PubMed

    Visser, Sanne Siete; Hutter, Inge; Haisma, Hinke

    2016-02-01

    The growing rates of (childhood) obesity worldwide are a source concern for health professionals, policy-makers, and researchers. The increasing prevalence of associated diseases-such as diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and psychological problems-shows the impact of obesity on people's health, already from a young age. In turn, these problems have obvious consequences for the health care system, including higher costs. However, the treatment of obesity has proven to be difficult, which makes prevention an important goal. In this study, we focus on food practices, one of the determinants of obesity. In recent years, it has become increasingly clear that interventions designed to encourage healthy eating of children and their families are not having the desired impact, especially among groups with a lower socioeconomic background (SEB). To understand why interventions fail to have an impact, we need to study the embedded social and cultural constructions of families. We argue that we need more than just decision-making theories to understand this cultural embeddedness, and to determine what cultural and social factors influence the decision-making process. By allowing families to explain their cultural background, their capabilities, and their opportunities, we will gain new insights into how families choose what they eat from a complex set of food choices. We have thus chosen to build a framework based on Sen's capability approach and the theory of cultural schemas. This framework, together with a holistic ethnographic research approach, can help us better understand what drives the food choices made in families. The framework is built to serve as a starting point for ethnographic research on food choice in families, and could contribute to the development of interventions that are embedded in the cultural realities of the targeted groups. PMID:26593100

  16. Family Practice Perspectives on Psychiatric Care in the Northwest

    PubMed Central

    Newbery, Peter J.

    1988-01-01

    The major effort in psychiatric care in the North is directed toward dealing with depression. The family physician has a key role to play in the therapy of depression, both as a counsellor and as a therapist, and perhaps more important, as a team member, fostering the development of community resources to deal with family breakdown, sexual abuse, and loss of personal spiritual values. PMID:21253034

  17. Parental Psychopathology and Child-Rearing Practices in Young Alcoholic Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, W. Hobart; And Others

    The relationship of parent alcohol involvement, depression, and antisocial behavior to self-reported parenting practices in a sample of 79 intact alcoholic families with male children of 3-6 years of age was studied. Child rearing practices were measured with the Block Child Rearing Practices Report. Psychopathology was measured with the…

  18. Practical approaches to family-friendly medical studies.

    PubMed

    Liebhardt, Hubert; Niehues, Johanna; Fegert, Jörg M

    2012-01-01

    Based on the pilot study carried out by the Office of the Dean of the Medical University of Ulm on the family-friendliness of the organisation of medical education in Ulm, this paper describes concrete measures that were designed at the university or have been partly implemented already. More flexibility and customization are essential characteristics and prerequisites of a family-friendly medical school as part of university education structures. Flexibility and customization can be achieved by designing lesson plans and study regulations so that both childcare is assured and that in emergencies, help can be quickly offered with a minimum of bureaucracy. More flexibility includes, amongst other things, adequate means for the individual to compensate for missed compulsory attendances and examination dates. The necessary shift in thinking and the willingness to cooperate on behalf of the management and teaching staff can be supported through the audit for family-friendliness "berufundfamilie" (job and family) or "familiengerechte hochschule" (family-friendly university), as well as strategic management tools of family-friendly corporate policies. Supporting mechanisms such as effectively networked advice services, course progression monitoring based on data, providing a parents' passport with a cross-semester training contract, creating more interaction between student-parents or other students through a parent community or by study pairings and finally, reliable information on and compliance with the maternity leave rules for pregnant and breastfeeding medical students can help safeguard successful studying with children.

  19. Practical approaches to family-friendly medical studies.

    PubMed

    Liebhardt, Hubert; Niehues, Johanna; Fegert, Jörg M

    2012-01-01

    Based on the pilot study carried out by the Office of the Dean of the Medical University of Ulm on the family-friendliness of the organisation of medical education in Ulm, this paper describes concrete measures that were designed at the university or have been partly implemented already. More flexibility and customization are essential characteristics and prerequisites of a family-friendly medical school as part of university education structures. Flexibility and customization can be achieved by designing lesson plans and study regulations so that both childcare is assured and that in emergencies, help can be quickly offered with a minimum of bureaucracy. More flexibility includes, amongst other things, adequate means for the individual to compensate for missed compulsory attendances and examination dates. The necessary shift in thinking and the willingness to cooperate on behalf of the management and teaching staff can be supported through the audit for family-friendliness "berufundfamilie" (job and family) or "familiengerechte hochschule" (family-friendly university), as well as strategic management tools of family-friendly corporate policies. Supporting mechanisms such as effectively networked advice services, course progression monitoring based on data, providing a parents' passport with a cross-semester training contract, creating more interaction between student-parents or other students through a parent community or by study pairings and finally, reliable information on and compliance with the maternity leave rules for pregnant and breastfeeding medical students can help safeguard successful studying with children. PMID:22558029

  20. Family Systems as Seen in Sports and Business.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerson, Michael J.

    1991-01-01

    Reviews how successful, well-functioning family can be characterized in salient ways. Notes that, when basic tenets of well-functioning families are ignored by sports teams or business organizations, the same dysfunction that would be observed in families becomes readily apparent in these other systems as well. Uses concepts from family systems to…

  1. The uses of emotion maps in research and clinical practice with families and couples: methodological innovation and critical inquiry.

    PubMed

    Gabb, Jacqui; Singh, Reenee

    2015-03-01

    We explore how "emotion maps" can be productively used in clinical assessment and clinical practice with families and couples. This graphic participatory method was developed in sociological studies to examine everyday family relationships. Emotion maps enable us to effectively "see" the dynamic experience and emotional repertoires of family life. Through the use of a case example, in this article we illustrate how emotion maps can add to the systemic clinicians' repertoire of visual methods. For clinicians working with families, couples, and young people, the importance of gaining insight into how lives are lived, at home, cannot be understated. Producing emotion maps can encourage critical personal reflection and expedite change in family practice. Hot spots in the household become visualized, facilitating dialogue on prevailing issues and how these events may be perceived differently by different family members. As emotion maps are not reliant on literacy or language skills they can be equally completed by parents and children alike, enabling children's perspective to be heard. Emotion maps can be used as assessment tools, to demonstrate the process of change within families. Furthermore, emotion maps can be extended to use through technology and hence are well suited particularly to working with young people. We end the article with a wider discussion of the place of emotions and emotion maps within systemic psychotherapy.

  2. The Uses of Emotion Maps in Research and Clinical Practice with Families and Couples: Methodological Innovation and Critical Inquiry

    PubMed Central

    Gabb, Jacqui; Singh, Reenee

    2015-01-01

    We explore how “emotion maps” can be productively used in clinical assessment and clinical practice with families and couples. This graphic participatory method was developed in sociological studies to examine everyday family relationships. Emotion maps enable us to effectively “see” the dynamic experience and emotional repertoires of family life. Through the use of a case example, in this article we illustrate how emotion maps can add to the systemic clinicians’ repertoire of visual methods. For clinicians working with families, couples, and young people, the importance of gaining insight into how lives are lived, at home, cannot be understated. Producing emotion maps can encourage critical personal reflection and expedite change in family practice. Hot spots in the household become visualized, facilitating dialogue on prevailing issues and how these events may be perceived differently by different family members. As emotion maps are not reliant on literacy or language skills they can be equally completed by parents and children alike, enabling children's perspective to be heard. Emotion maps can be used as assessment tools, to demonstrate the process of change within families. Furthermore, emotion maps can be extended to use through technology and hence are well suited particularly to working with young people. We end the article with a wider discussion of the place of emotions and emotion maps within systemic psychotherapy. PMID:25091031

  3. The uses of emotion maps in research and clinical practice with families and couples: methodological innovation and critical inquiry.

    PubMed

    Gabb, Jacqui; Singh, Reenee

    2015-03-01

    We explore how "emotion maps" can be productively used in clinical assessment and clinical practice with families and couples. This graphic participatory method was developed in sociological studies to examine everyday family relationships. Emotion maps enable us to effectively "see" the dynamic experience and emotional repertoires of family life. Through the use of a case example, in this article we illustrate how emotion maps can add to the systemic clinicians' repertoire of visual methods. For clinicians working with families, couples, and young people, the importance of gaining insight into how lives are lived, at home, cannot be understated. Producing emotion maps can encourage critical personal reflection and expedite change in family practice. Hot spots in the household become visualized, facilitating dialogue on prevailing issues and how these events may be perceived differently by different family members. As emotion maps are not reliant on literacy or language skills they can be equally completed by parents and children alike, enabling children's perspective to be heard. Emotion maps can be used as assessment tools, to demonstrate the process of change within families. Furthermore, emotion maps can be extended to use through technology and hence are well suited particularly to working with young people. We end the article with a wider discussion of the place of emotions and emotion maps within systemic psychotherapy. PMID:25091031

  4. [Exhaustion of family caregivers: a masked domestic crisis? A psychodynamic and systemic approach].

    PubMed

    Bouati, Noureddine; Sagne, Alain; Hunsicker, Morgane; Gavazzi, Gaëtan; Couturier, Pascal

    2016-03-01

    We try, from our clinical practice in a geriatric medicine department, to identify the processes involved in family crisis, especially in the relationship carer/cared. Psychodynamic and systemic determinants are highlighted to understand how family caregivers may suffer burn out, and suggest preventive measures.

  5. Quality of care in family practice: does residency training make a difference?

    PubMed Central

    Borgiel, A E; Williams, J I; Bass, M J; Dunn, E V; Evensen, M K; Lamont, C T; MacDonald, P J; McCoy, J M; Spasoff, R A

    1989-01-01

    As the proportion of physicians who enter residency training in family practice steadily increases, so does the need to evaluate the impact of their training and postgraduate education on the quality of care in their practices. We audited the practices of 120 randomly selected family physicians in Ontario, who were separated into four groups: nonmembers of the College of Family Physicians of Canada (CFPC), members of the CFPC with no certification in family medicine, certificated members without residency training in family medicine and certificated members with residency training in family medicine. The practices were assessed according to predetermined criteria for charting, procedures in periodic health examination, quality of medical care and use of indicator drugs. Generally the scores were significantly higher for CFPC members with residency training in family medicine than for those in the other groups, nonmembers having the lowest scores. Patient questionnaires indicated no difference in satisfaction with specific aspects of care between the four groups. Self-selection into residency training and CFPC membership may account for some of the results; nevertheless, the findings support the contention that residency training in family medicine should be mandatory for family physicians. PMID:2706590

  6. Children's psychosocial problems presenting in a family medicine practice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yelena P; Messner, Brynne M; Roberts, Michael C

    2010-09-01

    Primary care physicians have an important role in identifying, treating, and referring children with psychosocial problems. However, there is a limited literature describing whether and how family physicians address psychosocial problems and why parents may not discuss children's problems with physicians. The current study examined how family physicians address psychosocial problems and reasons that parents do not discuss children's psychosocial problems with physicians. Results indicated that there are a variety of reasons involving parents, their perceptions of physicians, and the number of psychosocial problems reported, that may lead to fewer discussions of psychosocial problems. PMID:20508977

  7. Family Literacy and Digital Literacies: A Redefined Approach to Examining Social Practices of an African-American Family

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Tisha Y.

    2009-01-01

    This dissertation examines the digital literacy practices of an urban African-American family. Using an ethnographic case study approach (Stake, 2000), this qualitative study explores the multiple ways a mother (Larnee) and son (Gerard) interacted with digital literacies in the home. Situated within the framework of sociocultural traditions from…

  8. Measuring Family System Characteristics in Families Caring for Dementia Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niederehe, George; And Others

    This paper describes an ongoing study evaluating families that provide in-home care to elderly relatives wth dementia. Characteristics of the study, which include a focus on progressive senile dementia, use of a clinical approach, longitudinal design, descriptive nature, focus on the dyad of patient and primary caregiver, and use of videotaping…

  9. Telemedicine for diabetes support in family doctors' practices: a pilot project.

    PubMed

    Bujnowska-Fedak, Maria Magdalena; Puchała, Edward; Steciwko, Andrzej

    2006-01-01

    A telemedicine support system for diabetes management was compared with standard monitoring of patients with diabetes. The telemedicine system was composed of two modules: a Patient Unit and a Medical Unit connected by the telecommunication network. The study involved 60 patients of family doctors' practices in the Lower Silesia Region who were diagnosed with diabetes. There was no significant difference in haemoglobin A(1c) between telemonitoring and the traditional group of diabetic patients during the survey. The patients' quality of life slightly improved in the telemonitoring (mean score 3.4) and the traditionally monitored group (mean score 3.2), but there was no significant difference between them. Most of the telemonitoring patients (75%) expressed the desire to continue with telemedicine support and nearly 60% of patients monitored with traditional methods wanted to be included in the telemedicine group. The system seems to be reliable, simple to use and friendly for the patients.

  10. Risks and benefits of a family systems approach to medical care.

    PubMed

    Baird, M A; Doherty, W J

    1990-01-01

    The "art of medicine" is struggling for survival in medical education, practice, and research. The authors embrace the biopsychosocial model as an ideal new paradigm for medicine and propose that the family systems approach provides the best available vehicle for applying the biopsychosocial model to everyday medical practice and research. Such an approach would require major changes in the way health care is delivered and offers both benefits and risks for family physicians to consider. One important change would involve the sharing of physicians' power in a health care system that emphasizes collaboration among individuals, families, and a variety of professionals. Such revolutionary changes should be approached with caution. PMID:2227178

  11. Nurses' attitudes, abilities and educational preference related to using family pedigrees in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Pestka, Elizabeth L; Meiers, Sonja J; L Shah, Lisa; Junglen, Laura M; Delgado, Adriana

    2013-10-01

    There is growing worldwide interest in using family pedigrees to assess health risks for diseases and implementing potential preventive interventions for health promotion. Nurses have been identified as key professionals in the process of collecting family history information and constructing pedigrees, and there is a gap in the literature related to these activities. The purpose of this study was to determine nurses' knowledge about, attitudes towards, perceived ability to use, and educational preference related to inclusion of family pedigrees in clinical practice. The study utilized a survey method with 174 nurses and correlational descriptive design. Results showed 74% of the nurses were interested in learning about family pedigrees and 64% responded positively to including them in clinical practice with the belief by 88% that they are helpful for preventive health care. Findings may be used to advance education and utilization of family pedigrees for nurses in clinical practice.

  12. Parental Bookreading Practices among Families in the Netherlands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duursma, Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    Bookreading has proven to be beneficial for children's language and literacy development (e.g. Bus, Van Ijzendoorn and Pellegrini, 1995; Fletcher and Reese, 2005; Mol and Bus, 2011a). Families in Western countries are often advised to read to their young children, and many parents appear to be aware of the positive effects of bookreading.…

  13. Comprehensive understanding of "truth of China's family planning practices".

    PubMed

    Zhou, P

    1986-12-01

    This is an account of the tour by 25 U.S. Congressmen to the Peoples' Republic of China in November 1986 to determine the degree of coercion in the family planning program. 1st, the delegates attended a conference in Beijing, introducing the family planning program in China, lead by the minister of the China State Family Planning Commission. Then they had talks with researchers at the Population Research Centre. The group split up and some inspected the Nanjing Institute of Family Planning Management. Others went to Shanghai and visited the International Peace Hospital of Maternity and Child Care. 2 delegates travelled to a rural community in Jiangsu Province. Thus, the congressmen and women got a wide exposure of central authorities and local organizations. A spokesman for the Education, Science, Culture and Public Health Committee emphasized that the few incidents of coercion were exceptions, contrary to policy, and greatly spectacularized in the western press. Some cases were merely a variety of management style, and were dealt with by admonition. Women usually go for abortions on their own request. Those who have unplanned births are subject to social pressure and taxation. China's population policy must be respected as it is designed to meet her particular needs. PMID:12341212

  14. Systems and Complexity Thinking in the General Practice Literature: An Integrative, Historical Narrative Review

    PubMed Central

    Sturmberg, Joachim P.; Martin, Carmel M.; Katerndahl, David A.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE Over the past 7 decades, theories in the systems and complexity sciences have had a major influence on academic thinking and research. We assessed the impact of complexity science on general practice/family medicine. METHODS We performed a historical integrative review using the following systematic search strategy: medical subject heading [humans] combined in turn with the terms complex adaptive systems, nonlinear dynamics, systems biology, and systems theory, limited to general practice/family medicine and published before December 2010. A total of 16,242 articles were retrieved, of which 49 were published in general practice/family medicine journals. Hand searches and snowballing retrieved another 35. After a full-text review, we included 56 articles dealing specifically with systems sciences and general/family practice. RESULTS General practice/family medicine engaged with the emerging systems and complexity theories in 4 stages. Before 1995, articles tended to explore common phenomenologic general practice/family medicine experiences. Between 1995 and 2000, articles described the complex adaptive nature of this discipline. Those published between 2000 and 2005 focused on describing the system dynamics of medical practice. After 2005, articles increasingly applied the breadth of complex science theories to health care, health care reform, and the future of medicine. CONCLUSIONS This historical review describes the development of general practice/family medicine in relation to complex adaptive systems theories, and shows how systems sciences more accurately reflect the discipline’s philosophy and identity. Analysis suggests that general practice/family medicine first embraced systems theories through conscious reorganization of its boundaries and scope, before applying empirical tools. Future research should concentrate on applying nonlinear dynamics and empirical modeling to patient care, and to organizing and developing local practices, engaging in

  15. Involving family systems in critical care nursing: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Leon, Ana M; Knapp, Sandra

    2008-01-01

    The literature indicates that involvement of families in critical care settings is effective in meeting the needs of families and patients during a medical crisis. This article presents basic concepts from family systems theory, including cultural considerations useful in developing nursing care plans that integrate family involvement in the care of critically ill patients. PMID:18953193

  16. Community-Based Family-Focused Practice and Social Network Intervention. Data Trends #129

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Research and Training Center on Family Support and Children's Mental Health, 2006

    2006-01-01

    "Data Trends" reports present summaries of research on mental health services for children and adolescents and their families. The article summarized in this "Data Trends" examines research on the "contribution of informal support linkages in the achievement of treatment outcomes" in three models of family-based practice: Intensive Family…

  17. Marriage and Family Therapists and Psychotropic Medications: Practice Patterns from a National Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez, Barbara Couden; Doherty, William J.

    2005-01-01

    A national sample of marriage and family therapists (MFTs) was used to describe practice patterns of MFTs whose clients use psychotropics and to compare medicated and nonmedicated clients. Marriage and Family Therapists (n = 283) reported on 195 medicated and 483 nonmedicated adult clients. Clients (n = 375) rated their improvement and…

  18. The Development of Core Competencies for the Practice of Marriage and Family Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Thorana S.; Chenail, Ronald J.; Alexander, James F.; Crane, D. Russell; Johnson, Susan M.; Schwallie, Linda

    2007-01-01

    In response to a series of national policy reports regarding what has been termed the "quality chasm" in health and mental health care in the United States, in January 2003, the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy convened a task force to develop core competencies (CC) for the practice of marriage and family therapy (MFT). The…

  19. SOME PERSPECTIVES ON CHILD REARING PRACTICES AMONG URBAN LOW INCOME FAMILIES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    JEFFERS, CAMILLE

    BASED ON THE RESEARCH OF A PARTICIPANT-OBSERVER, THIS PAPER DESCRIBES THE CHILD REARING PRACTICES OF SOME LOW INCOME FAMILIES IN WASHINGTON, D.C. IT WAS FOUND THAT IN GENERAL BASIC PRIORITIES IN THE FAMILY WERE GIVEN TO FOOD, CLOTHING, AND RENT, AND THESE PRIORITIES AFFECTED THE MOTHER'S PERCEPTION OF HER CHILD'S NEEDS. THE MOTHERS SAW THEMSELVES…

  20. Child Welfare Worker Perception of the Implementation of Family-Centered Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michalopoulos, Lynn; Ahn, Haksoon; Shaw, Terry V.; O'Connor, Julia

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to explore perceptions of Family-Centered Practice (FCP) among child welfare workers who are expected to use FCP principles in their work with children and families. Method: Nine focus groups were conducted among child welfare workers across seven different regions within one state to assess caseworker's…

  1. Bilingual "Educación" in the Home: Everyday Mexican Immigrant Family Educational Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valdez, Verónica

    2015-01-01

    As we embrace the increasing numbers of young Mexican immigrant children and their families present in our schools, it is important for educators to better understand the many family educational practices present in these households. This article examines the strategies and resources utilized by two Mexican-born and two U.S.-born Mexican immigrant…

  2. Expressed reasons for the choice of a residency in family practice.

    PubMed

    Asken, M J; Strock, B K

    1978-04-01

    An analysis was conducted of expressed reasons for the choice of a family practice residency by prospective residents. The nature and frequency of reasons are presented. An attempt was also made to judge the importance of saliency of specific reasons expressed. The results are discussed in relation to past studies and future directions for the training of family physicians.

  3. The Impact of Public Housing Policy on Family Social Work Theory and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarty, Dawn

    2008-01-01

    Social workers are the professionals most engaged with families living in low-income and subsidized housing and most familiar with the problems associated with inadequate housing. Yet the discussion of public housing policy has been left largely to economists and housing activists and the clear implications for family social work practice have not…

  4. Supportive Housing for Homeless Families: Foster Care Outcomes and Best Practices. Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenz-Rashid, Sonja

    2013-01-01

    The "Supportive Housing for Homeless Families: Foster Care Outcomes and Best Practices" report describes the outcome evaluation of Cottage Housing Incorporated's Serna Village program in Sacramento, California. Serna Village is a supportive housing program serving homeless families. Outcomes from the program illustrate that it is possible to end…

  5. Minority Ethnic Adolescents' Wellbeing: Child Rearing Practices and Positive Family Influences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ochieng, Bertha M. N.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This paper examines Black adolescents' experiences and views on the interrelationships between their families' parenting practices and their wellbeing. Method: The material is drawn from a community-based qualitative study on the health and wellbeing experiences of Black African families and adolescents. A total of 53…

  6. The Relationship between Jewish Early Childhood Education and Family Jewish Practices: Phase II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ravid, Ruth; Ginsburg, Marvell

    The purpose of this study was to investigate changes in the practices of Jewish families which occurred after the first enrollment of a child in a Jewish Early Childhood Center operated by the Board of Jewish Education of Metropolitan Chicago. Participants included 109 families who completed survey questionnaires at the beginning and end of the…

  7. The Theory and Practice of Structural and Strategic Family Therapies: A Delphi Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fish, Linda Stone; Piercy, Fred P.

    1987-01-01

    Examined the similarities and differences in the theory and practice of structural and strategic family therapy. A national panel of structural and strategic therapists identified items they thought important to a profile of either structural or strategic family therapy. Mental Research Institute, Haley/Madanes, and Milan/Ackerman approaches to…

  8. A health/patient education database for family practice.

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, P A; Ruby, C; Craig, M D

    1991-01-01

    Using pilot project funding from the W. K. Kellogg Foundation, the American Academy of Family Physicians Foundation (AAFP/F) developed a program by which health/patient education print materials were reviewed. Favorably reviewed materials were entered into a database accessible through the AAFP/F's Huffington Library. The review service and resulting database were designed to help the busy clinician identify scientifically accurate, reliable materials for use in patient education. The review process developed for the project is described, as is the database and its use by family physicians. Research findings from the pilot project are discussed, some of which assisted in planning the self-supporting second phase of the program. PMID:1958908

  9. Young, vulnerable and pregnant: family support in practice.

    PubMed

    Halliday, Joyce; Wilkinson, Tina

    2009-10-01

    Intervention in the early years, including family support, can reduce inequality and disadvantage across the life course. This paper reports on an evaluation of a local project, which aims to increase resilience and avert crisis among vulnerable young mothers. It suggests that paraprofessional link workers, spanning the antenatal-postnatal period, may contribute to maternal health and wellbeing and increase use of support services and networks. However, challenges for inter-agency and interprofessional working remain.

  10. Flexible fibreoptic sigmoidoscopy. Safe and effective for family practice.

    PubMed Central

    Moran, J. A.

    1993-01-01

    Flexible fibreoptic sigmoidoscopy can detect malignancy, polyps, and other common diseases of the large bowel when they are distal to the splenic flexure. The procedure is safe and not painful when correctly performed. Family physicians could play an important role in the earlier diagnosis and prevention of colorectal cancer by adding the procedure to their repertoire. Images p1928-a p1930-a PMID:8219841

  11. Elderly adult survivors of family violence. Implications for clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Anetzberger, G J

    1997-10-01

    This article on elderly adult survivors of domestic violence (usually women) reviews the literature that examines the impact on later life of domestic violence experienced earlier in life and that examines the effects of elder abuse perpetrated by adult family members. The discussion is illustrated with case studies and figures that list the physical, psychological, behavioral, and social effects of each type of violence as well as intervening variables. Next, the paper reviews the influence of culture and ethnicity on the meaning attached to elder abuse and on help-seeking or accepting behavior. The article then proposes a conceptual framework that uses contributing factors (cultural background, individual influences, and cohort influences), modifying factors (the nature of violence, personal circumstances, and relationship with perpetrator), the meaning of violence, and the effects on the survivor to explain the effects of early or late family violence on elderly adult survivors. The discussion notes that the framework focuses on negative effects but that survivors of domestic violence can experience positive effects, such as the development of personal coping skills. The article ends by noting that this proposed framework has clinical implications because it recognizes that the effects of domestic violence on elderly adults may be complicated, it helps practitioners link symptoms to domestic violence, it helps practitioners realize that the meaning of domestic violence may vary among elderly victims, and it shows that family violence occurs in a social context.

  12. Family Functioning and Early Learning Practices in Immigrant Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jung, Sunyoung; Fuller, Bruce; Galindo, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    Poverty-related developmental-risk theories dominate accounts of uneven levels of household functioning and effects on children. But immigrant parents may sustain norms and practices--stemming from heritage culture, selective migration, and social support--that buffer economic exigencies. "Comparable" levels of social-emotional functioning in…

  13. Family Resource Systems: The Nebraska Model. Proceedings of the Family Resource Systems Conference (January 24-25, 1980).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stark, Jack A., Ed.

    Proceedings are presented from a 1980 conference on community based services for families of developmentaly disabled children. The following ten papers are included: "Leading Edge Services to Families of Persons with Developmental Disabilities" (R. Perske); "Family Resource Services and Support Systems for Families with Handicapped Children" (B.…

  14. Reciprocity, agreement, and family style in family systems with a disturbed and nondisturbed adolescent.

    PubMed

    Fischer, J L

    1980-10-01

    Doane's recent review of interaction studies of families with disturbed and nondisturbed adolescents enumerated a number of conclusions concerning relationships and family functioning in families with a disturbed adolescent. The present study used a questionnaire approach to test hypotheses based on these conclusions, hypotheses which were largely supported in the analyses. When a disturbed adolescent was involved, families evidenced less reciprocity of needs, had greater disagreement about parents' needs, greater disagreement about family-related issues, more marital dysfunction, more rigidity and less clarity about expectations, and less satisfaction and more anxiety on the part of the adolescents. That families with a disturbed adolescent were discriminably different from families without a disturbed adolescent is supportive of a family systems perspective to family functioning. Speculations of a causal nature are offered, with suggestions that future research be designed to take advantage of causal analysis procedures.

  15. Reciprocity, agreement, and family style in family systems with a disturbed and nondisturbed adolescent.

    PubMed

    Fischer, J L

    1980-10-01

    Doane's recent review of interaction studies of families with disturbed and nondisturbed adolescents enumerated a number of conclusions concerning relationships and family functioning in families with a disturbed adolescent. The present study used a questionnaire approach to test hypotheses based on these conclusions, hypotheses which were largely supported in the analyses. When a disturbed adolescent was involved, families evidenced less reciprocity of needs, had greater disagreement about parents' needs, greater disagreement about family-related issues, more marital dysfunction, more rigidity and less clarity about expectations, and less satisfaction and more anxiety on the part of the adolescents. That families with a disturbed adolescent were discriminably different from families without a disturbed adolescent is supportive of a family systems perspective to family functioning. Speculations of a causal nature are offered, with suggestions that future research be designed to take advantage of causal analysis procedures. PMID:24318200

  16. Uniqueness of family therapists as family business systems consultants: a cross-disciplinary investigation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jinhee; Danes, Sharon M

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to address how the consulting approaches of family therapists working with family businesses differ from those of business consultants. The logic of analytic induction was used to analyze qualitative data from family business consultants with and without training in family therapy. Consultants were asked to respond to two vignettes: one emphasized primarily family system problems, whereas the other emphasized business problems with influencing issues at the family/business intersection. Both similarities and differences were found in reference to problem assessment, consulting goal orientation, intervention strategy focus, consultant role and function, and consulting setting preference between consultants with and without family therapy training. Results indicate that consultants of each discipline provide a unique perspective and expertise that allow them to successfully address the spectrum of issues that family firms face. Further, findings highlight the unique contribution of family therapists to an interdisciplinary consulting team. PMID:22765327

  17. Uniqueness of family therapists as family business systems consultants: a cross-disciplinary investigation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jinhee; Danes, Sharon M

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to address how the consulting approaches of family therapists working with family businesses differ from those of business consultants. The logic of analytic induction was used to analyze qualitative data from family business consultants with and without training in family therapy. Consultants were asked to respond to two vignettes: one emphasized primarily family system problems, whereas the other emphasized business problems with influencing issues at the family/business intersection. Both similarities and differences were found in reference to problem assessment, consulting goal orientation, intervention strategy focus, consultant role and function, and consulting setting preference between consultants with and without family therapy training. Results indicate that consultants of each discipline provide a unique perspective and expertise that allow them to successfully address the spectrum of issues that family firms face. Further, findings highlight the unique contribution of family therapists to an interdisciplinary consulting team.

  18. Capturing the Family Context of Emotion Regulation: A Family Systems Model Comparison Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fosco, Gregory M.; Grych, John H.

    2013-01-01

    Several dimensions of family functioning are recognized as formative influences on children's emotion regulation. Historically, they have been studied separately, limiting our ability to understand how they function within the family system. The present investigation tested models including family emotional climate, interparental conflict,…

  19. In-Forming Practice through Action Research. Family and Consumer Sciences Teacher Education. Yearbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterat, Linda, Ed.; Smith, M. Gale

    This book contains 16 papers about informing family and consumer sciences educational practice through action research. The following papers are included: "Informing Practice through Classroom Inquiry" (Linda Peterat, M. Gale Smith); "Focusing Praxis Research on Sexism in a Primary Classroom" (Emily Sutherland); "Understanding the Meaning of…

  20. Heritage-Language Literacy Practices: A Case Study of Three Japanese American Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hashimoto, Kumi; Lee, Jin Sook

    2011-01-01

    This article documents the heritage-language (HL) literacy practices of three Japanese American families residing in a predominantly Anglo and Latino community. Through interviews and observations, this study investigates Japanese children's HL-literacy practices, parental attitudes toward HL literacy, and challenges in HL-literacy development in…

  1. The role of family communication and parents' feeding practices in children's food preferences.

    PubMed

    Alm, Siril; Olsen, Svein Ottar; Honkanen, Pirjo

    2015-06-01

    This study used Family Communication Patterns Theory (FCPT) to explore how family-dinner-related communication takes place and how parents' feeding practices may be associated with children's preferences for dinner meals. The sample consisted of 12 dyads with seven- and eight-year-old Norwegian children and their parents. In-depth photo interviews were used for collecting data. Interview transcripts and photographs were examined through content analysis. Results indicated that most families were conversation oriented, and communication tended to shift from consensual during weekdays to pluralistic at weekends. On weekdays, the dinner menu was often a compromise between children's preferences and parents' intentions to provide quick, healthy dinner options for the family. To a greater extent at weekends, children were allowed to choose dinner alternatives for the entire family. Restriction of unhealthy dinner alternatives was the practice most used to control children's diets and, in fact, might explain children's high preferences for unhealthy dinner alternatives. Results underline the importance of giving children control of what they eat and being responsive to children's preferences while guiding them towards healthy dinner alternatives rather than using force and restriction. From a more theoretical perspective, this study explored how FCPT could be combined with theories about parents' feeding practices to understand meal preferences and choices among young children and their families, and how time and situation (context) influence families' communication patterns and feeding practices in their homes.

  2. The role of family communication and parents' feeding practices in children's food preferences.

    PubMed

    Alm, Siril; Olsen, Svein Ottar; Honkanen, Pirjo

    2015-06-01

    This study used Family Communication Patterns Theory (FCPT) to explore how family-dinner-related communication takes place and how parents' feeding practices may be associated with children's preferences for dinner meals. The sample consisted of 12 dyads with seven- and eight-year-old Norwegian children and their parents. In-depth photo interviews were used for collecting data. Interview transcripts and photographs were examined through content analysis. Results indicated that most families were conversation oriented, and communication tended to shift from consensual during weekdays to pluralistic at weekends. On weekdays, the dinner menu was often a compromise between children's preferences and parents' intentions to provide quick, healthy dinner options for the family. To a greater extent at weekends, children were allowed to choose dinner alternatives for the entire family. Restriction of unhealthy dinner alternatives was the practice most used to control children's diets and, in fact, might explain children's high preferences for unhealthy dinner alternatives. Results underline the importance of giving children control of what they eat and being responsive to children's preferences while guiding them towards healthy dinner alternatives rather than using force and restriction. From a more theoretical perspective, this study explored how FCPT could be combined with theories about parents' feeding practices to understand meal preferences and choices among young children and their families, and how time and situation (context) influence families' communication patterns and feeding practices in their homes. PMID:25666300

  3. Family meals and eating practices among mothers in Santos, Brazil: A population-based study.

    PubMed

    Sato, Priscila de Morais; Lourenço, Bárbara Hatzlhoffer; Trude, Angela Cristina Bizzotto; Unsain, Ramiro Fernandez; Pereira, Patrícia Rocha; Martins, Paula Andrea; Scagliusi, Fernanda Baeza

    2016-08-01

    This study investigates family meals among mothers and explores associations between eating with family and sociodemographic characteristics, body mass index, and eating practices. A population-based cross-sectional study, using complex cluster-sampling, was conducted in the city of Santos, Brazil with 439 mothers. Frequency of family meals was assessed by asking if mothers did or did not usually have a) breakfast, b) lunch, and c) dinner with family. Linear regression analyses were conducted for the number of meals eaten with family per day and each of the potential explanatory variables, adjusting for the mother's age. Poisson regression with robust variance was used to analyze each factor associated with eating with family as classified categorically: a) sharing meals with family, b) not eating any meals with family. Only 16.4% (n = 72) of participants did not eat any meals with family. From the 83.6% (n = 367) of mothers that had at least one family meal per day, 69.70% (n = 306) ate dinner with their families. Mothers aged ≥40 years reported significantly fewer meals eaten with family compared to mothers aged 30-39 years (β: -0.26, p = 0.04). Having family meals was 54% more prevalent among mothers with ≥12 years of education (PR for no meals eaten with family: 0.54, 95% CI: 0.30; 0.96, p = 0.03), when compared to mothers with less than nine years of education. Eating no meals with family was 85% more prevalent among mothers who reported that eating was one of the biggest pleasures in their lives (PR: 1.85, 95% CI: 1.21; 2.82, p = 0.004). We suggest the need for further research investigating the effects of family meals on mothers' health through nutritional and phenomenological approaches. PMID:26994738

  4. Consulting with Parents: Applying Family Systems Concepts and Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullis, Fran; Edwards, Dana

    2001-01-01

    This article describes family systems concepts and techniques that school counselors, as consultants, can use to better understand the family system. The concepts are life cycle transitions and extrafamilial influences, extended family influences, boundaries, parental hierarchy and power, and triangulation. (Contains 39 references.) (GCP)

  5. Family self-tailoring: Applying a systems approach to improving family healthy living behaviors.

    PubMed

    Moore, Shirley M; Jones, Lenette; Alemi, Farrokh

    2016-01-01

    The adoption and maintenance of healthy living behaviors by individuals and families is a major challenge. We describe a new model of health behavior change, SystemCHANGE (SC), which focuses on the redesign of family daily routines using system improvement methods. In the SC intervention, families are taught a set of skills to engage in a series of small, family self-designed experiments to test ideas to change their daily routines. The family system-oriented changes brought about by these experiments build healthy living behaviors into family daily routines so that these new behaviors happen as a matter of course, despite wavering motivation, willpower, or personal effort on the part of individuals. Case stories of the use of SC to improve family healthy living behaviors are provided. Results of several pilot tests of SC indicate its potential effectiveness to change health living behaviors across numerous populations.

  6. A Systems Approach to Community Family Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hynson, Lawrence M., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    This paper sets forth a community family life education model within the structure-functional framework. Attention is first focused on societal and family needs, followed by the model, its goals, organization, and implementation. Finally, several recommendations and a challenge are given to family educators. (Author)

  7. A Family Systems Approach for the Career Counselor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zingaro, Joseph C.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses family influences on vocational development and maturity, and on perceptions of the vocational counseling client. Briefly describes family systems theory and applies it to the career counseling process. (WAS)

  8. Integration of Complementary and Alternative Medicine into Family Practices in Germany: Results of a National Survey

    PubMed Central

    Joos, Stefanie; Musselmann, Berthold; Szecsenyi, Joachim

    2011-01-01

    More than two-thirds of patients in Germany use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) provided either by physicians or non-medical practitioners (“Heilpraktiker”). There is little information about the number of family physicians (FPs) providing CAM. Given the widespread public interest in the use of CAM, this study aimed to ascertain the use of and attitude toward CAM among FPs in Germany. A postal questionnaire developed based on qualitatively derived data was sent to 3000 randomly selected FPs in Germany. A reminder letter including a postcard (containing a single question about CAM use in practice and reasons for non-particpation in the survey) was sent to all FPs who had not returned the questionnaire. Of the 3000 FPs, 1027 (34%) returned the questionnaire and 444 (15%) returned the postcard. Altogether, 886 of the 1471 responding FPs (60%) reported using CAM in their practice. A positive attitude toward CAM was indicated by 503 FPs (55%), a rather negative attitude by 127 FPs (14%). Chirotherapy, relaxation and neural therapy were rated as most beneficial CAM therapies by FPs, whereas neural therapy, phytotherapy and acupuncture were the most commonly used therapies in German family practices. This survey clearly demonstrates that CAM is highly valued by many FPs and is already making a substantial contribution to first-contact primary care in Germany. Therefore, education and research about CAM should be increased. Furthermore, with the provision of CAM by FPs, the role of non-medical CAM practitioners within the German healthcare system is to be questioned. PMID:19293252

  9. Patient Care and Paternalism: Dilemmas of Family Practice

    PubMed Central

    Wilbush, Joel

    1990-01-01

    From the clinical records of a country doctor, this vignette concerns a teenaged girl who, having refused treatment, is persuaded, under near duress, to accept a regimen that her family physician considers best for her. Although apparently arrogant paternalism, the practitioner's approach proves, on reflection, to possess considerable merit. The author discusses the ethical principles that have led to rejection of paternalism in the West. Formulated as absolute maxims, they soon require, like all absolutes, a multitude of explanations and additions. Some logical, social, and other “exceptions” are briefly mentioned, because the old doctor's intuitive actions seem to have oddly coincided with a number of them. Yet the questions remain: Should this medical practitioner have become so deeply involved? Should he have interfered with his patient's autonomy to the extent he did? Was he justified? PMID:11659246

  10. Male osteoporosis: clinical approach and management in family practice.

    PubMed

    Goh, Lay Hoon; How, Choon How; Lau, Tang Ching

    2014-07-01

    In Singapore, male osteoporosis is gaining greater importance due to our ageing population. Family physicians should screen for osteoporosis in elderly men and men with risk factors or secondary causes for the condition. A bone mineral density (BMD) test is used for diagnosis. FRAX® can be used to predict the absolute ten-year fracture risk. Management includes reduction of risk factors or secondary causes, fall prevention, appropriate physical activity and a diet adequate in calcium and vitamin D. Referrals to specialists for evaluation and therapy can be considered, particularly for younger men with more severe disease. Current first-line drug treatment includes bisphosphonates and teriparatide. Testosterone increases BMD of the spine, but data on fracture risk reduction is unavailable. Public and physician education with the involvement of health authorities can create greater awareness of this silent condition, which can lead to complications, morbidity and death, if left untreated.

  11. Family Values as Practiced by Feminist Parents: Bridging Third-Wave Feminism and Family Pluralism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mack-Canty, Colleen; Wright, Sue

    2004-01-01

    The shift from second-wave feminism, with its emphasis on gender equality, to third-wave feminism, whose concern is with oppression more generally, poses intriguing questions about theoretical and social change. We have chosen to explore these issues through the insight and perspectives of families who parent from feminist perspectives. To gain…

  12. Adoption of open-access scheduling in an academic family practice

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Stewart; Sadler, Laura; Lawson, Beverley

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT PROBLEM ADDRESSED Patients have to wait too long to see their family physicians. Open access, a new approach to office scheduling, has shown promise in reducing patient wait times to see primary care physicians. OBJECTIVE OF PROGRAM To offer same-day appointments to most patients who call the office, thus reducing wait times as measured by the third available appointment. Reductions in no-show rates have also been reported by those who have adopted the open-access system. PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Following extensive preparation, a 2-site academic practice in Halifax, NS, adopted open-access booking in October 2008. Data on third available appointment times, no-show appointments, and patient volumes were tracked before and during the yearlong implementation. CONCLUSION The clinics recorded a substantial, sustained reduction in third available appointment time, indicating improved patient access. There was also a decline in no-show appointments. Patient volumes were unaffected. PMID:20841595

  13. [Changes in midwifery practice. 26. Postwar legislative guideline concerning family planning].

    PubMed

    Obayashi, M

    1987-09-01

    Yoshio Furuya, who authored the 1951 legislative guidelines for family planning in Japan, designated 3 villages to model family planning upon his return from the United States in 1950. The instructors were public health nurses, midwives and regular nurses who had been trained and certified by the National Public Health Institute. They showed film strips and slides, and distributed contraceptives and medication. Population Research Group also embarked on the New Life Style Movement among Japanese industries in 1951. The new life style was said to have 3 pillars: family planning, career planning, and family morals. The idea of family planning was welcomed at the beginning by industries because it would mean less dependents of employees to provide financial aid for. The movement lasted only several years. In 1955, the International Family Planning Federation and the Japan Family Planning Federation co-sponsored the Fifth International Family Planning Conference in Tokyo. 572 participants including Margaret Sanger delivered 91 papers on techniques and practices of family planning. Soon after the conference, the Family Planning Study Committee was organized, and they met once a month to discuss socio-cultural implications of family planning, theory and practice of contraception, maternal and child health. Many of the committee members were idealistic/feminist public health officials but there were no women among them. A post-war family planning movement approved by the Japanese government resulted in the dramatic reduction in the birth rate from 34.3% in 1947 to 17.2% in 1957. Midwives played an important role in enforcing the policy but they were excluded from policy making.

  14. Family experiences, attitudes, and household safety practices regarding firearms.

    PubMed

    Wiley, C C; Casey, R

    1993-02-01

    To assess families' experiences with shootings and firearm ownership and attitudes, 208 children aged 5 to 12 years were interviewed and 242 parents filled out a questionnaire, all at an urban hospital. Forty-three percent of the parents and 25% of the children had personal knowledge of shootings. Of the parents, 10% owned guns, of which only 21% were stored safely. Gun ownership was more common in homes with resident adult males (14%) than in those with no adult males (3%). Most children (81%) played with guns, and 20% to 25% preferred violent TV shows, games, and toys. Parents' and children's attitudes toward firearms and children's gun play did not differ by level of mother's education; method of payment for, or site of, health care; income; or exposure to shootings. Children with personal knowledge of shootings more often expressed fears of being shot than did other children (52% vs 31%). The children in our study population were similar in their gun play and attitudes about gun use despite disparate socioeconomic backgrounds and exposure to shootings.

  15. The practice of travel medicine by family practitioners.

    PubMed

    Ross, M; Pinto, I; Sparks, B

    1995-06-01

    This study sought to determine the prevalence of family practitioners (FPs) in Johannesburg, South Africa, who are consulted by travelers. The study quantified the extent of medical activity of FPs and determined sources of physicians' updating information. Data were obtained from a random sample of 180 of the 576 nonspecialists listed as private medical practitioners in 1992-93 in the Johannesburg telephone directory. Interviews were obtained from 109 practitioners, of whom 105 were consulted by travelers. The average rate of consultations was an estimated 30/FP. Over 90% of FPs were asked about malaria prevention and/or immunization. 98% provided advice on malaria, and over 80% administered immunizations. The most common vaccine was Hepatitis B (63%), followed by gamma globulin for Hepatitis A (58%), and tetanus toxoid (50%). It was common for FPs to recommend antidiarrheal medications. Clients did not generally ask about diarrhea prevention. 47% gave preventive advice alone on diarrhea or recommendations for medication. FPs kept up to date on medical affairs by reading professional journals and following local experts or colleagues. In 1992, an estimated 100,000 travelers visited FPs in Johannesburg. PMID:12178510

  16. Examining the Role of Social Network Intervention as an Integral Component of Community-Based, Family-Focused Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Kathleen F.

    2005-01-01

    Social network intervention aimed at bolstering the informal supports of high risk families is recognized as a common element of community-based, family-focused practice models, such as intensive family preservation services (IFPS), multisystemic therapy (MST), and the wraparound process. The empirical research basis for these practice models is…

  17. Systemic psychotherapy with families where someone has an autism spectrum condition

    PubMed Central

    Helps, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Families play an important role in facilitating the development and well-being of children with autism spectrum conditions. OBJECTIVES: After setting the scene with a clinical example, and providing a brief discussion of the current thinking about the aetiology of Autism spectrum conditions, this paper provides a review of the literature regarding the practice of systemic psychotherapy with families in which a child has an autism spectrum condition (ASC). METHODS: A search of databases and journals revealed a large number of opinion papers regarding how family therapists might work with families of children with ASCs and a smaller number of papers that describe or explore actual clinical practice. RESULTS: Pilot studies using qualitative methods and practice-based evidence in the form of descriptions of clinical work offer a solid footing on which to develop systemic practice to help families where a person has an ASC. CONCLUSION: Given the multifactorial nature of the aetiology of ASCs it is suggested that systemic interventions have the potential to influence changes at multiple levels of functioning for the child and the family. PMID:27030899

  18. Practical Power System Aggregation Considering Dynamic Loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamagishi, Yoshio; Komami, Shintaro

    This paper presents a practical method for creating power system equivalents that can be used in power system stability analysis. The proposed method uses three branches to connect the boundary bus, generator, and load. The method is suitable to consider reactance from the boundary bus to the load for power system stability studies using a dynamic load model. Furthermore, this paper presents a practical procedure to determine the parameters of the aggregated generator, including control devices such as excitation systems, PSS (power system stabilizer), and speed governors. The quality of the various aggregation models is verified using power system stability simulations.

  19. The Finnish Day Care System and the Needs of Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huttunen, Eeva; Tamminen, Merja

    The Finnish family and day care, the child behavior and growth environment, and the development of day care are discussed in this paper. The Finnish family and day care is discussed in relation to policies regarding the Finnish family, the Finnish day care system, the basis of Finnish day care education, and ecological views in day care education.…

  20. An International Perspective on Regulated Family Day Care Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Elise; Freeman, Ramona; Doherty, Gillian; Karlsson, Malene; Everiss, Liz; Couch, Jane; Foote, Lyn; Murray, Patricia; Modigliani, Kathy; Owen, Sue; Griffin, Sue; Friendly, Martha; McDonald, Grace; Bohanna, India; Corr, Lara; Smyth, Lisa; Morkeseth, Elisabeth Ianke; Morreaunet, Sissel; Ogi, Mari; Fukukawa, Sumi; Hinke-Rahnau, Jutta

    2012-01-01

    Despite emerging evidence of the contributors to high-quality family day care, a comprehensive comparison of international family day care systems has not been undertaken. The aim of this paper is to compare regulated family day care (FDC) in Australia, Canada, England and Wales, Germany, Ireland, Japan, Norway, New Zealand, Sweden, and the USA,…

  1. Family Change and Gender Differences: Implications for Theory and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hare-Mustin, Rachel T.

    1988-01-01

    Examines theories of gender differences. Discusses alpha bias, exaggeration of gender opposition, as characteristic of psychodynamic and sex role theories; and beta bias, denial of gender differences, as evident in systems theories. Calls for new model of gender differences which recognizes asymmetry in women's and men's roles and…

  2. Ontario pharmacists practicing in family health teams and the patient-centered medical home.

    PubMed

    Dolovich, Lisa

    2012-04-01

    The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) approach continues to gather momentum in the United States and Canada as a broad approach to reform the delivery of the complete primary care system. The family health team (FHT) model implemented in Ontario, Canada, best mirrors the PCMH approach of the United States. The integration of pharmacists as key members of the health care team providing on-site, in-office coordinated care to FHT patients was included from the start of planning the FHT model and represents a substantial opportunity for pharmacists to realize their professional vision. Several research projects in Canada and elsewhere have contributed to providing evidence to support the integration of pharmacists into primary care practice sites. Two major research programs, the Seniors Medication Assessment Research Trial (SMART) cluster randomized controlled trial and the Integrating Family Medicine and Pharmacy to Advance Primary Care Therapeutics (IMPACT) multipronged demonstration project made substantial contributions to evidence-informed policy decisions supporting the integration of pharmacists into FHTs. These projects can provide useful information to support the integration of pharmacists into the PCMH and to encourage further research to better measure the effect of the pharmacist from the holistic patient-centered perspective.

  3. Prolepsis, Syncretism, and Synergy in Early Language and Literacy Practices: A Case Study of Family Language Policy in Singapore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ren, Li; Hu, Guangwei

    2013-01-01

    This article reports a case study of two Chinese-English bilingual families in Singapore and illustrates the importance of incorporating two hitherto disconnected fields of research--family language policy and family literacy practices--to an understanding of early language and literacy acquisition in the familial milieu. Specifically, this work…

  4. Approach to the new oral anticoagulants in family practice

    PubMed Central

    Douketis, James; Bell, Alan David; Eikelboom, John; Liew, Aaron

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To compare key features of the new oral anticoagulants (NOACs)—dabigatran, rivaroxaban, and apixaban—and to address questions that arise when comparing the NOACs. Sources of information PubMed was searched for recent (January 2008 to week 32 of 2013) clinical studies relating to NOAC use for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation (AF) and for the treatment of acute venous thromboembolism (VTE). Main message All NOACs are at least as effective as warfarin for stroke prevention in patients with nonvalvular AF, and are at least as safe in terms of bleeding risk according to 3 large trials. Meta-analyses of these trials have shown that, compared with warfarin therapy, NOACs reduced total mortality, cardiovascular mortality, and intracranial bleeding, and there was a trend toward less overall bleeding. Practical advantages of NOACs over warfarin include fixed once- or twice-daily oral dosing without the need for coagulation monitoring, and few known or defined drug or food interactions. Potential drawbacks of NOACs include a risk of bleeding that might be increased in patients older than 75 years, increased major gastrointestinal bleeding with high-dose dabigatran, increased dyspepsia with dabigatran, the lack of a routine laboratory test to reliably measure anticoagulant effect, and the lack of an antidote for reversal. No direct comparisons of NOACs have been made in randomized controlled trials, and the choice of NOAC is influenced by individual patient characteristics, including risk of stroke or VTE, risk of bleeding, and comorbidity (eg, renal dysfunction). Conclusion The NOACs represent important alternatives in the management of patients with AF and VTE, especially for patients who have difficulty accessing regular coagulation monitoring. The companion to this article addresses common “what if” questions that arise in the long-term clinical follow-up and management of patients receiving NOACs. PMID:25392438

  5. The practice of nurses caring for families of pediatric inpatients in light of Jean Watson.

    PubMed

    Santos, Maiara Rodrigues Dos; Bousso, Regina Szylit; Vendramim, Patrícia; Baliza, Michelle Freire; Misko, Maira Deguer; Silva, Lucía

    2014-08-01

    Objective To know the facilities and the difficulties of nurses in caring practice of hospitalized children's families in the light of Jean Watson's Theory of Human Caring. Method It was used the descriptive qualitative approach. The data collection was conducted in three stages: presentation of theoretical content; engagement with families in the light of Watson's theory; and semi-structured interview with 12 pediatric nurses. The interviews were analysed using inductive thematic analysis, being possible to form three themes: Recognizing a framework for care; Considering the institutional context; and Challenges in family's relationship. Results The theory favored reflections about self, about the institutions and about nurses' relationship with the family of the child, normalized by a consciousness toward caring attitudes. Conclusion In this process, it is imperative that nurses recognize the philosophical-theoretical foundations of care to attend the child's family in hospital.

  6. Analysis of Theoretical Metaphors with Illustrations from Family Systems Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenblatt, Paul C.

    Metaphoric analysis of family systems theory illustrates how metaphors and alternatives to those metaphors identify what a psychological theory has highlighted and obscured about the phenomena at its focus and how it has structured that phenomena. The most commonly used metaphors in family systems theory are the metaphors of system (system…

  7. A benzodiazepine discontinuation programme does not increase the frequency of contacts with the family practice

    PubMed Central

    Gorgels, Wim; Oude Voshaar, Richard; Mol, Audrey; Van De Lisdonk, Eloy; Mulder, Jan; Van Den Hoogen, Henk; Van Balkom, Anton; Breteler, Marinus; Zitman, Frans

    2008-01-01

    Objective The efficacy of programmes to reduce long-term benzodiazepine use could be compromised by subsequent increases in contacts with the family practice. In this study the hypothesis was tested as to whether participation in a benzodiazepine discontinuation programme affects the frequency of contacts with the family practice. Design A controlled stepped-care intervention programme to decrease long-term benzodiazepine use. Setting Family practices in the Netherlands. Subjects The experimental group consisted of 996 long-term benzodiazepine users and a control group of 883 long-term benzodiazepine users. Main outcome measures Practice contacts before and up to 12 months after the start of the programme. Results There was a general tendency visible for contacts to decrease during the follow-up time. The course of the number of contacts during the follow-up was not different for the experimental and control groups (p=0.45). The level of non-benzodiazepine prescriptions was generally not altered. The number of non-benzodiazepine prescriptions decreased in benzodiazepine quitters during the follow-up of the programme. Conclusion No clinically important differences in practice contacts were observed when the course of the number of contacts and non-benzodiazepine prescriptions were compared between the experimental and control groups. Family practitioners do not have to anticipate an increased workload associated with participation in such a benzodiazepine discontinuation programme. PMID:18570004

  8. Assessing Children's Appraisals of Security in the Family System: The Development of the Security in the Family System (SIFS) Scales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forman, Evan M.; Davies, Patrick T.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Although delineating the processes by which children appraise the family as a source of security from their collective experiences in the family subsystem has assumed center stage in many conceptualizations of child development, the dearth of measures of child adaptation in the family system has hindered empirical advances. Therefore,…

  9. Calculating Storage Requirements for Office Practice Systems

    PubMed Central

    Stead, William W.; Hammond, William E.

    1985-01-01

    The disk space requirements of small and medium sized group practices using a comprehensive medical information system supported by either a micro-computer or a mini-computer are analyzed. Efficient operation requires that 23%-54% of a typical system disk be used for files other than patient records. Data is presented to allow prediction of both the number of records that will need to be maintained for a practice and the average size of each record based upon the type of data required by the practice.

  10. Save It! A Practical Family Kit on Saving Resources, Saving Money, and...Saving the Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Canada, Edmonton (Alberta). Public Affairs.

    Suggestions and practical advice are offered for all members of a family in this guide on environmental stewardship. This publication contains information on a variety of home and work related environmental concerns. The environmental consequences of daily activities are discussed and specific recommendations are offered for saving energy,…

  11. Food and Nutrition Practices and Education Needs in Florida's Adult Family Care Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dahl, Wendy J.; Ford, Amanda L.; Gal, Nancy J.

    2014-01-01

    A statewide survey was carried out to determine food and nutrition practices and education needs of Florida's adult family care homes (AFCHs). The 30-item survey included questions on food and nutrition education, supplement use, and menu planning. Infrequent use of menus and nutrition supplements was reported. A strong need was indicated for…

  12. Nutrition and Physical Activity Practices in Childcare Centers versus Family Childcare Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Natale, Ruby; Page, Monica; Sanders, Lee

    2014-01-01

    Obesity rates among preschool-aged children have doubled in the past 10 years, and 60% of these children spend the majority of their day in childcare facilities. Few studies have examined the quality of nutrition and physical activity practices in childcare centers as compared to family childcare homes. The purpose of this study is to determine if…

  13. A National Survey of Procedural Skill Requirements in Family Practice Residency Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tenore, Josie L.; Sharp, Lisa K.; Lipsky, Martin S.

    2001-01-01

    Surveyed the use and composition of required procedure lists in U.S. family practice residency programs. Although a majority of respondents reported use of a required procedure list, programs differed greatly in terms of required procedures, and few defined how to evaluate the technical competency of their residents. (EV)

  14. Beliefs and Practices Regarding Autism in Indian Families Now Settled Abroad: An Internet Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ravindran, Neeraja; Myers, Barbara J.

    2013-01-01

    Beliefs and practices regarding autism were explored in Indian families living outside India. Parents (N = 24) of children (3 to 15 years) with an autism spectrum disorder wrote open-ended answers in an online questionnaire regarding their beliefs about causes, treatments and services received, use of and preference for Indian medicine and…

  15. Beyond Parenting Practices: Family Context and the Treatment of Pediatric Obesity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitzmann, Katherine M.; Dalton, William T., III; Buscemi, Joanna

    2008-01-01

    Many family-based treatments for pediatric obesity teach specific parenting practices related to weight management. Although youth in these programs show increases in positive health behaviors and reductions in the extent to which they are overweight, most remain overweight after treatment. A recent trend is to create tailored programs for…

  16. Family Involvement in Creative Teaching Practices for All in Small Rural Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vigo Arrazola, Begoña; Soriano Bozalongo, Juana

    2015-01-01

    Parental involvement is interpreted as a key form of support that can contribute to the establishment of inclusive practices in schools, but this can be difficult in sparsely populated areas. Using ethnographic methods of participant observation, informal conversations and document analysis, this article therefore focuses on family involvement…

  17. Referral Rates of Senior Family Practice Residents in an Ambulatory Care Clinic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawler, Frank H.

    1987-01-01

    A study of patterns in second- and third-year family practice residents' requests for referrals found higher rates for the senior students, suggesting possible differences in approach to case management, lack of experience in referral among younger students, and differences in case mix. (MSE)

  18. Best Practices: Engaging Limited English Proficient Students and Families. A Teaching Tolerance Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Poverty Law Center (NJ1), 2013

    2013-01-01

    Fueled by two decades of historic immigration, American demographics are changing. Many school districts are often ill prepared to meet the needs of limited English proficient (LEP) students and families. This Teaching Tolerance booklet points administrators to best practices in the effort to create a supportive learning environment for all…

  19. A National Survey on the Current Status of Family Practice Residency Education in Geriatric Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Ina; Arenson, Christine; Warshaw, Gregg; Bragg, Elizabeth; Shaull, Ruth; Counsell, Steven R.

    2003-01-01

    A survey of family practice residency directors found that 92 percent have a required geriatrics curriculum; nursing homes, assisted living facilities, and home care are the predominant training sites; the mean number of geriatrics faculty is 2.6 per program; and conflicting time demands with other curricula was ranked as the most significant…

  20. School Curriculum, Policies, and Practices Regarding Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, Christa M.; Atlas, Jana G.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined what elementary schools in New York State are doing to recognize lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) families in terms of curriculum, policies, and practices. In all, 116 school psychologists completed an online survey regarding their districts. Findings indicated that even though most school districts serve…

  1. Family Child Care Learning Environments: Caregiver Knowledge and Practices Related to Early Literacy and Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Beth M.; Morse, Erika E.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents findings from a stratified-random survey of family child care providers' backgrounds, caregiving environments, practices, attitudes, and knowledge related to language, literacy, and mathematics development for preschool children. Descriptive results are consistent with prior studies suggesting that home-based providers are…

  2. Report on Marketing Practices in the Federal Family Education Loan Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Senate, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This report was prepared by the Chairman's Staff of the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee setting forth the findings of an investigation into marketing practices in the Federal Family Education Loan program ("FFEL"). Evidence uncovered by the Chairman's investigation demonstrates that many FFEL lenders routinely engage in…

  3. Associations between Family Environment, Parenting Practices, and Executive Functioning of Children with and without ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schroeder, Valarie M.; Kelley, Michelle L.

    2009-01-01

    We examined the relationships between executive functioning, family environment, and parenting practices in children diagnosed with ADHD as compared to children without ADHD. Participants were parents (N = 134) of 6- to 12-year-old ADHD and non-ADHD-diagnosed children. Compared to the control group, parents of children diagnosed with ADHD reported…

  4. Genres, Contexts, and Literacy Practices: Literacy Brokering among Sudanese Refugee Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Kristen H.

    2009-01-01

    This ethnographic study examined literacy brokering among Sudanese refugee families in Michigan. Literacy brokering occurs as individuals seek informal help with unfamiliar texts and literacy practices. Data collection involved participant observation, semi-structured interviews, and collection of artifacts over 18 months. Researcher analysis of…

  5. Early Childhood Family Supports Community of Practice...: Creating Knowledge and Wisdom through Community Conversations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gotto, George S.; Beauchamp, Donna; Simpson, Mary-Margaret

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe Early Childhood Family Support Community of Practice (CoP), which was launched and facilitated by the Beach Center on Disability at the University of Kansas. A CoP is a group of people who share concerns or passions about a topic and who regularly interact based on their shared interests. The goal of Early…

  6. Reorienting Intensive Family Preservation Services in Relation to Public Child Welfare Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Kathleen; Tracy, Elizabeth

    1996-01-01

    Reviews the literature on the child welfare system, child maltreatment, interventions for child maltreatment, and family preservation programs. Concludes that the current goal of intensive family preservation services, reducing the number of children in out-of-home placement, should be abandoned. Proposes a new role, new goals, and a new target…

  7. The role of intact family childhood on women's earnings capacity: implications for evidence-based practices.

    PubMed

    Caputo, Richard K; Mason, Susan E

    2009-07-01

    This article examines the complexities of working with an evidence-based model to design intervention strategies benefiting individuals and families. It addresses the question, to what extent should the evidence of economic advantage for female children raised in two-parent families influence social work support for practices and policies that encourage marriage? The article reviews current research findings indicating benefits of two-parent families on children's well-being and contemporary policy prescriptions promoting marriage. It presents findings of the authors' study which considers the effects of being raised in an intact family on the economic future of young women. The evidence presented in the literature and found in our own study suggests that promotion of marriage may be a sound intervention strategy for parents interested in the economic advantages for their children later in life. For others, it may be the wrong choice based on women's personal circumstances. The association between early family structure and future well-being is further complicated by large gaps in the data on cultural and family diversity. Suggestions for social work practice are based on the synthesis of the evidence-based model and the values of the profession. PMID:20183676

  8. Aggressive family communication, weight gain, and improved eating attitudes during systemic family therapy for anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Shugar, G; Krueger, S

    1995-01-01

    During systemic family therapy with 15 hospitalized anorexics, family communication was evaluated, using a Family Aggression Scale developed by one of the authors. Initially members communicated aggression covertly. This finding may partially explain the common clinical observation that the families of anorexics present a strong facade of togetherness and avoid overt conflict. During therapy members shifted from covert communication of aggression to covert communication of aggression. This shift correlated with improvement in subjects' eating attitudes reflected by their EAT-26 scores. All subjects gained weight. Greater weight gain occurred in subjects whose families had low levels of covert or indirect aggression. A regression analysis showed that 86% of the variance in weight gain was predicted by two leading indicators in the middle phase of treatment. Two other factors accounted for 64% of the variance in EAT scores. The findings of this study suggest that family aggression as measured by the Family Aggression Scale is a significant index of pathology in anorexics' families and is also a clinically meaningful measure of improved conflict resolution during systemic family therapy.

  9. The Impact of Substance Use Disorders on Families and Children: From Theory to Practice

    PubMed Central

    Lander, Laura; Howsare, Janie; Byrne, Marilyn

    2013-01-01

    The effects of a substance use disorder (SUD) are felt by the whole family. The family context holds information about how SUDs develop, are maintained, and what can positively or negatively influence the treatment of the disorder. Family systems theory and attachment theory are theoretical models that provide a framework for understanding how SUDs affect the family. In addition, understanding the current developmental stage a family is in helps inform assessment of impairment and determination of appropriate interventions. SUDs negatively affect emotional and behavioral patterns from the inception of the family, resulting in poor outcomes for the children and adults with SUDs. Social workers can help address SUDs in multiple ways, which are summarized in this article. PMID:23731414

  10. Personalised medicine in Canada: a survey of adoption and practice in oncology, cardiology and family medicine

    PubMed Central

    Bonter, Katherine; Currier, Nathan; Pun, Jason; Ashbury, Fredrick D

    2011-01-01

    Introduction In order to provide baseline data on genetic testing as a key element of personalised medicine (PM), Canadian physicians were surveyed to determine roles, perceptions and experiences in this area. The survey measured attitudes, practice, observed benefits and impacts, and barriers to adoption. Methods A self-administered survey was provided to Canadian oncologists, cardiologists and family physicians and responses were obtained online, by mail or by fax. The survey was designed to be exploratory. Data were compared across specialties and geography. Results The overall response rate was 8.3%. Of the respondents, 43%, 30% and 27% were family physicians, cardiologists and oncologists, respectively. A strong majority of respondents agreed that genetic testing and PM can have a positive impact on their practice; however, only 51% agreed that there is sufficient evidence to order such tests. A low percentage of respondents felt that they were sufficiently informed and confident practicing in this area, although many reported that genetic tests they have ordered have benefited their patients. Half of the respondents agreed that genetic tests that would be useful in their practice are not readily available. A lack of practice guidelines, limited provider knowledge and lack of evidence-based clinical information were cited as the main barriers to practice. Differences across provinces were observed for measures relating to access to testing and the state of practice. Differences across specialties were observed for the state of practice, reported benefits and access to testing. Conclusions Canadian physicians recognise the benefits of genetic testing and PM; however, they lack the education, information and support needed to practice effectively in this area. Variability in practice and access to testing across specialties and across Canada was observed. These results support a need for national strategies and resources to facilitate physician knowledge

  11. Reform in the United States: its impact on medicine and education for family practice.

    PubMed

    Stephens, G G

    1976-10-01

    The historical concept of reform is useful as an aid to understand the modern rise of family practice education. Beginning about 1890, historians have identified several themes of reform in the United States which have been expressed culturally, politically, and socially. Each of these themes, agrarianism, bureaucratization of the professions, and utopianism, has influenced medicine and medical education--first at the turn of the century in the activities of the AMA in promoting public health and in establishing the natural sciences as a basis for medical education and practice. Since the end of World War II, additional reform themes have become visible which are also influencing medicine. Among these are humanism, consumerism, and the women's movement. It is the author's thesis that the present vitality and future development of family practice as a discipline is more dependent on its capacity and willingness to be identified with these expressions of reform than on its negotiations and compromises within the medical education establishment.

  12. Undergraduate medical education in general practice/family medicine throughout Europe – a descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background It is increasingly becoming evident that a strong primary health care system is more likely to provide better population health, more equity in health throughout the population, and better use of economic resources, compared to systems that are oriented towards specialty care. Developing and maintaining a strong and sustainable primary health care requires that a substantial part of graduating doctors go into primary care. This in turn requires that general practice/family medicine (GP/FM) strongly influences the curricula in medical schools. In the present paper we aim at describing the extent of GP/FM teaching in medical schools throughout Europe, checking for the presence of GP/FM curricula and clinical teaching in GP offices. Methods A brief questionnaire was e-mailed to GP/FM or other professors at European medical universities. Results 259 out of 400 existing universities in 39 European countries responded to our questionnaire. Out of these, 35 (13.5%) reported to have no GP/FM curriculum. These 35 medical faculties were located in 12 different European countries. In addition, 15 of the medical schools where a GP/FM curriculum did exist, reported that this curriculum did not include any clinical component (n = 5), or that the clinical part of the course was very brief - less than one week, mostly only a few hours (n = 10). In total, 50 universities (19%) thus had no or a very brief GP/FM curriculum. These were mainly located in the Eastern or Southern European regions. Conclusion It is still possible to graduate from European medical universities without having been exposed to a GP/FM curriculum. The European Academy of Teachers in General Practice (EURACT) will launch efforts to change this situation. PMID:24289459

  13. Meaningful Use of Data in Care Coordination by the Advanced Practice Registered Nurse: The TeleFamilies Project

    PubMed Central

    Looman, Wendy S.; Erickson, Mary M.; Garwick, Ann W.; Cady, Rhonda G.; Kelly, Anne; Pettey, Carrie; Finkelstein, Stanley M.

    2012-01-01

    Meaningful use of electronic health records to coordinate care requires skillful synthesis and integration of subjective and objective data by practitioners to provide context for information. This is particularly relevant in the coordination of care for children with complex special health care needs. The purpose of this paper is to present a conceptual framework and example of meaningful use within an innovative telenursing intervention to coordinate care for children with complex special health care needs. The TeleFamilies intervention engages an advanced practice nurse in a full-time care coordinator role within an existing hospital-based medical home for children with complex special health care needs. Care coordination is facilitated by the synthesis and integration of internal and external data using an enhanced electronic health record and telehealth encounters via telephone and videoconferencing between the advanced practice nurse and the family at home. The advanced practice nurse’s ability to maintain an updated plan of care that is shared across providers and systems and build a relationship over time with the patient and family supports meaningful use of these data. PMID:22948406

  14. Engaging patients and families in system-level improvement: a safety imperative.

    PubMed

    Kemper, Carol; Blackburn, Chrissie; Doyle, Judy A; Hyman, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Health care organizations have focused considerable effort and resources on improving patient safety and health care quality. Yet, despite these efforts, patients continue to experience harm events within our institutions. Family engagement is a powerful and often untapped resource to improve the quality and safety of organizations. While the value patients and families bring as partners in improving the safety and quality of health care is implicitly recognized, the adoption of structures to actively involve health care consumers has been slow, particularly in organizational or overall system work. Patients and families can stimulate and drive improved health care services through their involvement at the clinical/point of care, policy/design, and governance levels of the organization. For successful implementation, organization leaders must establish family engagement as a system-level priority. Roles to support the development of a family engagement program, methods to evaluate the level of family engagement, and strategies to enhance and sustain family engagement are described. Although there is limited evidence-based knowledge related to the best practices for family engagement, opportunities exist to drive the family engagement agenda at a regional and national level through participation in networks such as the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Partnership for Patients campaign Hospital Engagement Networks. PMID:23744466

  15. Collaborative Efforts to Improve System Response to Families Who Are Experiencing Child Maltreatment and Domestic Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banks, Duren; Dutch, Nicole; Wang, Kathleen

    2008-01-01

    The "Greenbook" demonstration initiative provided federal funding and other support to six communities to establish collaborations to plan and implement policy and practice changes in systems that serve families who are experiencing domestic violence and child maltreatment or child exposure to domestic violence. The demonstration sites established…

  16. Infant Developmental Outcomes: A Family Systems Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parfitt, Ylva; Pike, Alison; Ayers, Susan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to examine whether parental mental health, parent-infant relationship, infant characteristics and couple's relationship factors were associated with the infant's development. Forty-two families took part at three time points. The first, at 3?months postpartum, involved a video recorded observation…

  17. Systems Concepts Effectively Taught Using Systems Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ludwig, Claudia; Baliga, Nitin S.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes two lessons within the authors' education module entitled, Ecological Networks, that successfully teaches introductory systems content to middle and high school students. To catch students' attention when teaching these new concepts, they decided to use a network that was familiar and fun for students--a cell-phone…

  18. The effect of chronic disease family history on healthcare provider practice and patient behavior among Oregonians.

    PubMed

    Zlot, A I; Cox, S L; Silvey, K; Leman, R

    2012-01-01

    Family history is an independent risk factor for many chronic conditions. Therefore, efforts to prevent these diseases among asymptomatic people at high familial risk are justified to reduce the health burden of these chronic conditions. We analyzed 2006-2009 Oregon Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System data to examine associations between family history of diabetes, cardiovascular disease (CVD), colorectal cancer (CRC), breast cancer (BC), and: (1) patient-reported clinician recommendations, (2) adoption of preventive and screening behaviors, and (3) chronic disease risk factors among respondents without a personal history of the condition. A positive family history was associated with a higher likelihood of reported discussion by clinicians of CRC and BC screening and a greater likelihood of respondents having cholesterol and CRC screening. The combination of family history and clinician recommendations significantly increased the odds of CRC and BC screening compared to family history alone. A positive family history was also associated with respondents reporting lifestyle changes to prevent diabetes, CVD, and CRC, but not BC. Awareness of family history prompts clinicians to recommend screening and may motivate patients to be screened. Understanding positive family history may also motivate patients to adopt healthy lifestyles.

  19. Employed Family Physician Satisfaction and Commitment to Their Practice, Work Group, and Health Care Organization

    PubMed Central

    Karsh, Ben-Tzion; Beasley, John W; Brown, Roger L

    2010-01-01

    Objective Test a model of family physician job satisfaction and commitment. Data Sources/Study Setting Data were collected from 1,482 family physicians in a Midwest state during 2000–2001. The sampling frame came from the membership listing of the state's family physician association, and the analyzed dataset included family physicians employed by large multispecialty group practices. Study Design and Data Collection A cross-sectional survey was used to collect data about physician working conditions, job satisfaction, commitment, and demographic variables. Principal Findings The response rate was 47 percent. Different variables predicted the different measures of satisfaction and commitment. Satisfaction with one's health care organization (HCO) was most strongly predicted by the degree to which physicians perceived that management valued and recognized them and by the extent to which physicians perceived the organization's goals to be compatible with their own. Satisfaction with one's workgroup was most strongly predicted by the social relationship with members of the workgroup; satisfaction with one's practice was most strongly predicted by relationships with patients. Commitment to one's workgroup was predicted by relationships with one's workgroup. Commitment to one's HCO was predicted by relationships with management of the HCO. Conclusions Social relationships are stronger predictors of employed family physician satisfaction and commitment than staff support, job control, income, or time pressure. PMID:20070386

  20. Early childhood caries and infant oral health: Paediatricians’ and family physicians’ knowledge, practices and training

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Preeti; Lawrence, Herenia P; Harvey, Bart J; McIsaac, Warren J; Limeback, Hardy; Leake, James L

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To assess the knowledge of early childhood caries and to examine the current preventive oral health-related practices and training among Canadian paediatricians and family physicians who provide primary care to children younger than three years. METHODS A cross-sectional, self-administered survey was mailed to a random sample of 1928 paediatricians and family physicians. RESULTS A total of 1044 physicians met the study eligibility criteria, and of those, 537 returned completed surveys, resulting in an overall response rate of 51.4% (237 paediatricians and 300 family physicians). Six questions assessed knowledge of early childhood caries; only 1.8% of paediatricians and 0.7% of family physicians answered all of these questions correctly. In total, 73.9% of paediatricians and 52.4% of family physicians reported visually inspecting children’s teeth; 60.4% and 44.6%, respectively, reported counselling parents or caregivers regarding teething and dental care; 53.2% and 25.6%, respectively, reported assessing children’s risk of developing tooth decay; and 17.9% and 22.3%, respectively, reported receiving no oral health training in medical school or residency. Respondents who felt confident and knowledgeable and who considered their role in promoting oral health as “very important” were significantly more likely to carry out oral health-related practices. CONCLUSION Although the majority of paediatricians and family physicians reported including aspects of oral health in children’s well visits, a reported lack of dental knowledge and training appeared to pose barriers, limiting these physicians from playing a more active role in promoting the oral health of children in their practices. PMID:19030271

  1. Habitus and Flow in Primary School Musical Practice: Relations between Family Musical Cultural Capital, Optimal Experience and Music Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valenzuela, Rafael; Codina, Nuria

    2014-01-01

    Based on Bourdieu's idea that cultural capital is strongly related to family context, we describe the relations between family musical cultural capital and optimal experience during compulsory primary school musical practice. We analyse whether children from families with higher levels of musical cultural capital, and specifically with regard…

  2. Child Injury Prevention in the Home: A National Survey of Safety Practices and Use of Safety Equipment in Deprived Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulvaney, C. A.; Watson, M. C.; Smith, S.; Coupland, C.; Kendrick, D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of home safety practices and use of safety equipment by disadvantaged families participating in a national home safety equipment scheme in England. Design: Cross-sectional postal survey sent to a random sample of 1,000 families. Setting: England, United Kingdom. Results: Half the families (51%) returned a…

  3. Developing an Expert System for Nursing Practice

    PubMed Central

    Ozbolt, Judy G.; Schultz, Samuel; Swain, Mary Ann P.; Abraham, Ivo L.; Farchaus-Stein, Karen

    1984-01-01

    The American Nurses' Association has set eight Standards of Nursing Practice related to the nursing process. Computer-aided information systems intended to facilitate the nursing process must be designed to promote adherence to these professional standards. For each of the eight standards, the paper tells how a hypothetical expert system could help nurses to meet the standard. A prototype of such an expert system is being developed. The paper describes issues in conceptualizing clinical decision-making and developing decision strategies for the prototype system. The process of developing the prototype system is described.

  4. Inequalities in family practitioner use by sexual orientation: evidence from the English General Practice Patient Survey

    PubMed Central

    Urwin, Sean; Whittaker, William

    2016-01-01

    Objective To test for differences in primary care family practitioner usage by sexual orientation. Design Multivariate logistic analysis of pooled cross-sectional postal questionnaire responses to family practitioner usage. Setting Patient-reported use and experience of primary care in England, UK. Data from several waves of a postal questionnaire (General Practice Patient Survey) 2012–2014. Population 2 807 320 survey responses of adults aged 18 years and over, registered with a family practitioner. Main outcome measures Probability of a visit to a family practitioner within the past 3 months. Results Lesbian women were 0.803 times (95% CI 0.755 to 0.854) less likely to have seen a family practitioner in the past 3 months relative to heterosexual women (bisexual women OR=0.887, 95% CI 0.817 to 0.963). Gay men were 1.218 times (95% CI 1.163 to 1.276) more likely to have seen a family practitioner relative to heterosexual men (bisexual men OR=1.084, 95% CI 0.989 to 1.188). Our results are robust to the timing of the family practitioner visit (0–3, 0–6, 0–12 months). Gay men were more likely to have seen a family practitioner than heterosexual men where the proportion of women practitioners in the practice was higher (OR=1.238, 95% CI 1.041 to 1.472). Conclusions Inequalities in the use of primary care across sexual orientation in England exist having conditioned on several measures of health status, demographic and family practitioner characteristics. The findings suggest these differences may be reduced by policies targeting a reduction of differences in patient acceptability of primary care. In particular, further research is needed to understand whether lower use among heterosexual men represents unmet need or overutilisation among gay men, and the barriers to practitioner use seemingly occurring due to the gender distribution of practices. PMID:27173816

  5. Linkage between Graduate Medical Education Training Practice Profiles in Psychiatry, Obstetrics/Gynecology, and Family Practice. Deliverable No. 5. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moynihan, Christy; And Others

    This study examined the relationship between graduate medical education (GME) and practice profiles in three specialties: family practice, psychiatry, and obstetrics/gynecology. Two analyses were performed, the first assessing the relationship between GME and current practice patterns and the second assessing the relationship between GME and…

  6. The diversity of family health: constituent systems and resources.

    PubMed

    Hopia, Hanna; Paavilainen, Eija; Astedt-Kurki, Päivi

    2005-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore changes in family health associated with child's chronic illness and hospitalization. The aim was to answer the following questions: (i) What kind of changes do families experience when a child in the family is afflicted by a chronic illness; and (ii) What kind of changes do families experience when their child is admitted to hospital? The data were collected in 2002 in interviews with 29 such families whose children were receiving treatment or who had previously received treatment on the paediatric wards of two hospitals in Finland. Data were collected until reaching theoretical saturation, in which no additional data are found. Data analysis was based on the grounded theory method, proceeding to the stage of axial coding. Family health was formed out of two different dimensions: the constituent systems and the resources of family health. The constituent systems describe the impact of the child's chronic illness and period of hospitalization at the level of both individual family members and the family as a whole. These systems were described by five categories: (i) ill child at the centre of family attention, (ii) siblings in a minor role, (iii) the child's illness governs parental well-being, (iv) the roller coaster of the couple relationship and (v) the whole family is ill. The resources promoting and maintaining family health were divided into six different categories: (i) creative and maintaining mental images, (ii) active involvement, (iii) internal coping means, (iv) reinforcement of coping means, (v) awareness and change of values and (vi) social network shares emotional burden and responsibility for care. The results of the study show that family health is highly vulnerable when a child has to be admitted to hospital because of a chronic condition. They should help nursing staff gain a clearer picture of the depth and diversity of family health and support the resources that promote family health. Future research

  7. Chinese American Family Food Systems: Impact of Western Influences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lv, Nan; Brown, J. Lynne

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the family food system in first-generation Chinese American families. Design: Qualitative interviews using reciprocal determinism constructs to understand influences on food choices. Setting: Weekend Chinese schools in Pennsylvania. Participants: Twenty couples with at least 1 child aged 5 or older enrolled in a Chinese…

  8. Energy and the Structure of Social System: Significance for Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keefe, Dennis R.

    The purpose of the paper is to present a model and suggest hypotheses relating the family as a social system to the concepts of human and natural energy. Human energy is interpreted as the capacity of humans, in this case, family members, for doing work and natural energy as resources such as natural gas, carbon dioxide, and heat. A behavioral…

  9. Military family physicians' perceptions of a pocket point-of-care ultrasound device in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Bornemann, Paul; Bornemann, Gina

    2014-12-01

    Point-of-care ultrasonography with a pocket ultrasound device, General Electric Medical Systems Vscan (Milwaukee, Wisconsin), has been shown to be effective and easy to learn. However, no studies to date have evaluated its use in the military primary care setting where its portability and value in bedside diagnosis would be especially beneficial. We tested the feasibility of the Vscan in the day-to-day care of patients by family physicians in their clinic, inpatient wards, and its potential for use in the military-deployed setting. Participants were trained and credentialed in the use of the point-of-care ultrasonography. Then, participants were provided with a pocket ultrasound device to use in their normal day-to-day practice. Additionally, participants completed surveys and provided ratings on their perceptions regarding the use of the device. According to the survey analysis, participants found the devices to be easy to use, valuable in discerning a diagnosis, and were not prohibitively time consuming. Moreover, patients were perceived by the participants to have been satisfied with the use of the device. Overall, participants had high satisfaction with the Vscan and perceived that the device would be highly valuable in the military-deployed setting.

  10. Pain Medication Management Processes Used by Oncology Outpatients and Family Caregivers Part I: Health Systems Contexts

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Karen L.; Plano Clark, Vicki L.; West, Claudia M.; Dodd, Marylin J.; Rabow, Michael W.; Miaskowski, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Context Oncology patients with persistent pain treated in outpatient settings and their family caregivers have significant responsibility for managing pain medications. However, little is known about their practical, day-to-day experiences with pain medication management. Objective To describe day-to-day pain medication management from the perspectives of oncology outpatients and their family caregivers who participated in a randomized clinical trial of a psycho-educational intervention called the Pro-Self© Plus Pain Control Program. In this article, we focus on pain medication management by patients and family caregivers in the context of multiple, complex health systems. Methods We qualitatively analyzed audio-recorded intervention sessions that included extensive dialogue between patients, family caregivers, and nurses about pain medication management during the 10-week intervention. Results The health systems context for pain medication management included multiple complex systems for clinical care, reimbursement, and regulation of analgesic prescriptions. Pain medication management processes particularly relevant to this context were getting prescriptions and obtaining medications. Responsibilities that fell primarily to patients and family caregivers included facilitating communication and coordination among multiple clinicians, overcoming barriers to access, and serving as a final safety checkpoint. Significant effort was required of patients and family caregivers to insure safe and effective pain medication management. Conclusion Health systems issues related to access to needed analgesics, medication safety in outpatient settings, and the effort expended by oncology patients and their family caregivers require more attention in future research and healthcare reform initiatives. PMID:24704800

  11. Associations between Positive Parenting Practices and Child Externalizing Behavior in Underserved Latino Immigrant Families

    PubMed Central

    Holtrop, Kendal; Smith, Sharde' Mcneil; Scott, Jenna C.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined whether five specific parenting practices (i.e., monitoring, discipline, skill encouragement, problem solving, and positive involvement) were associated with reduced child externalizing behaviors among a sample of Latino immigrant families. It utilized baseline data from 83 Latino couples with children participating in a larger randomized controlled trial of a culturally adapted parenting intervention. Results reveal that monitoring, discipline, skill encouragement, and problem solving each made independent contributions to the prediction of child externalizing behavior, although not all in the expected direction. Further analyses examining mothers and fathers separately suggest that mother-reported monitoring and father-reported discipline practices uniquely contributed to these findings. These results may have important implications for prevention and clinical intervention efforts with Latino immigrant families, including the cultural adaptation and implementation of parenting interventions with this underserved population. PMID:25287585

  12. Associations between positive parenting practices and child externalizing behavior in underserved Latino immigrant families.

    PubMed

    Holtrop, Kendal; McNeil Smith, Sharde'; Scott, Jenna C

    2015-06-01

    This study examined whether five specific parenting practices (i.e., monitoring, discipline, skill encouragement, problem solving, and positive involvement) were associated with reduced child externalizing behaviors among a sample of Latino immigrant families. It utilized baseline data from 83 Latino couples with children participating in a larger randomized controlled trial of a culturally adapted parenting intervention. Results reveal that monitoring, discipline, skill encouragement, and problem solving each made independent contributions to the prediction of child externalizing behavior, although not all in the expected direction. Further analyses examining mothers and fathers separately suggest that mother-reported monitoring and father-reported discipline practices uniquely contributed to these findings. These results may have important implications for prevention and clinical intervention efforts with Latino immigrant families, including the cultural adaptation and implementation of parenting interventions with this underserved population.

  13. Delusional parasitosis: a practical guide for the family practitioner in evaluation and treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Winsten, M

    1997-02-01

    Delusional parasitosis (DP) is a psychiatric syndrome in which the patient falsely believes he or she is infested with parasites despite clear evidence to the contrary. Patients with DP generally think that mites, lice, or other insects have invaded their skin and most frequently seek treatment from dermatologists or family practitioners. These patients are usually reluctant to seek psychiatric care or to accept a referral to a psychiatrist. This article provides a comprehensive biopsychosocial understanding of the complexities of DP and suggests a practical strategy for evaluation and treatment by the family practitioner. Treatment with antipsychotic drugs, such as pimozide, is discussed as is a treatment team approach involving a psychiatrist, dermatologist, and family practitioner. PMID:9059004

  14. Family Physicians’ Quality Interventions and Performance Improvement Through the ABFM Diabetes Performance in Practice Module

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Lars E.; Blackburn, Brenna E.; Puffer, James C.; Phillips, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE Practice performance assessment is the fourth requirement of Maintenance of Certification for Family Physicians (MC-FP). American Board of Family Medicine (ABFM) diplomates have many options for completing Part 4 requirements, including Web-based Performance in Practice Modules (PPMs) developed by the ABFM. Our objective was to describe the actions and outcomes of family physicians who completed the ABFM diabetes PPM. METHODS We undertook a descriptive study of all diabetes PPMs completed by physicians in the 50 United States and Washington, DC, from 2005 to October 2012. Successful completion required quality measure abstraction from 10 patient charts before and after a plan-do-study-act cycle improvement effort. We used descriptive statistics to assess physician demographics and quality outcomes. RESULTS Family physicians completed 7,924 diabetes qualitative improvement modules. Their mean age was 48.2 years, they had practiced a mean of 13.8 years, and three-fourths lived in urban areas (76.9%). Nearly one-half selected diabetic foot examination or eye examination as their quality improvement measure. Performance on all quality measures improved. Significant improvement was seen in rates of hemoglobin A1c control (<7.0%; 57.4% to 61.3%), blood pressure control (<130/90 mm Hg; 53.3% to 56.3%), foot examinations (68.0% to 85.8%); and retina examinations (55.5% to 71.1%). The most common interventions were standing orders (51.6%) and patient education (37.1%). CONCLUSIONS Family physicians participating in MC-FP implemented improvement projects and showed quality improvements in caring for patients with diabetes. Emphasis on quality of care by payers will increasingly require physicians to embrace quality measurement and improvement. PMID:24445099

  15. PIRSF family classification system for protein functional and evolutionary analysis.

    PubMed

    Nikolskaya, Anastasia N; Arighi, Cecilia N; Huang, Hongzhan; Barker, Winona C; Wu, Cathy H

    2006-01-01

    The PIRSF protein classification system (http://pir.georgetown.edu/pirsf/) reflects evolutionary relationships of full-length proteins and domains. The primary PIRSF classification unit is the homeomorphic family, whose members are both homologous (evolved from a common ancestor) and homeomorphic (sharing full-length sequence similarity and a common domain architecture). PIRSF families are curated systematically based on literature review and integrative sequence and functional analysis, including sequence and structure similarity, domain architecture, functional association, genome context, and phyletic pattern. The results of classification and expert annotation are summarized in PIRSF family reports with graphical viewers for taxonomic distribution, domain architecture, family hierarchy, and multiple alignment and phylogenetic tree. The PIRSF system provides a comprehensive resource for bioinformatics analysis and comparative studies of protein function and evolution. Domain or fold-based searches allow identification of evolutionarily related protein families sharing domains or structural folds. Functional convergence and functional divergence are revealed by the relationships between protein classification and curated family functions. The taxonomic distribution allows the identification of lineage-specific or broadly conserved protein families and can reveal horizontal gene transfer. Here we demonstrate, with illustrative examples, how to use the web-based PIRSF system as a tool for functional and evolutionary studies of protein families.

  16. Literacy Practices in the Homes of African American Families and the Perceived Affects on the Language and Literacy Development of Their Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Delilah A.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the tenacities, practices, and discourse of family-based literacy practices and their connection in African American families. It scrutinized the influence of the practices of African American families on the multiple contexts of literacy practices in their passageway across the school-community periphery.…

  17. Family Planning Knowledge, Attitude and Practice among Married Couples in Jimma Zone, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Understanding why people do not use family planning is critical to address unmet needs and to increase contraceptive use. According to the Ethiopian Demographic and Health Survey 2011, most women and men had knowledge on some family planning methods but only about 29% of married women were using contraceptives. 20% women had an unmet need for family planning. We examined knowledge, attitudes and contraceptive practice as well as factors related to contraceptive use in Jimma zone, Ethiopia. Methods Data were collected from March to May 2010 among 854 married couples using a multi-stage sampling design. Quantitative data based on semi-structured questionnaires was triangulated with qualitative data collected during focus group discussions. We compared proportions and performed logistic regression analysis. Result The concept of family planning was well known in the studied population. Sex-stratified analysis showed pills and injectables were commonly known by both sexes, while long-term contraceptive methods were better known by women, and traditional methods as well as emergency contraception by men. Formal education was the most important factor associated with better knowledge about contraceptive methods (aOR = 2.07, p<0.001), in particular among women (aORwomen = 2.77 vs. aORmen = 1.49; p<0.001). In general only 4 out of 811 men ever used contraception, while 64% and 43% females ever used and were currently using contraception respectively. Conclusion The high knowledge on contraceptives did not match with the high contraceptive practice in the study area. The study demonstrates that mere physical access (proximity to clinics for family planning) and awareness of contraceptives are not sufficient to ensure that contraceptive needs are met. Thus, projects aiming at increasing contraceptive use should contemplate and establish better counseling about contraceptive side effects and method switch. Furthermore in all family planning activities

  18. Prevent elder abuse--using a family systems approach.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, G P

    1989-03-01

    1. Family stressors occur when the adult child is caregiver for an elderly parent, particularly when care is intensive or protracted. Under certain circumstances of high risk, severe and unresolved strains in intergenerational relationships can develop into elder abuse. 2. Elder abuse is a non-accidental act or omission that causes physical, psychological, or financial harm to an older person. 3. Using a family systems perspective, an original validated instrument is presented that evaluates the risk of elder abuse in the home (REAH). Using this instrument, the nurse can construct two profiles of 1) the older person, including personal data and dependency needs, and 2) the caregiver, including personal data and family dynamics. 4. The instrument provides a simple method for recognizing family strains and noting changes over time within the family system. Appropriate interventions and referrals can be initiated that may avert the crisis of elder abuse. PMID:2926101

  19. Family Planning Practice Among Rural Reproductive-Age Married Women in Myanmar.

    PubMed

    Jirapongsuwan, Ann; Latt, Kyaw Thu; Siri, Sukhontha; Munsawaengsub, Chokchai

    2016-05-01

    A cross-sectional study was undertaken to investigate family planning (FP) practices and associated factors among reproductive-age married women. Data were collected by interviewing the 300 married women living in a rural area of Myanmar. The questionnaire had reliability coefficients ranging from .8 to .9. Results indicated that 73.3% of women performed FP, and contraceptive injection was the most common method. Significant associations were found with age 21 to 35 years (adjusted odds ratio [adj OR] = 3.748, 95% CI = 2.179-6.445), adequacy of income (adj OR = 2.520, 95% CI = 1.477-4.290), good attitude toward FP (adj OR = 0.386, 95% CI = 0.228-0.656), good support from health care providers (adj OR = 0.129, 95% CI = 0.054-0.313), good support from family (adj OR = 0.304, 95% CI = 0.163-0.565), good support from friends (adj OR = 0.344, 95% CI = 0.193-0.613), and FP practice. It is recommended that designing FP programs with peers and family involvement could increase the practice of FP among rural Myanmar women. PMID:27122625

  20. Preparing for an influenza pandemic: model of an immunization clinic in an urban family practice

    PubMed Central

    Bourgeois, Nicole; Franke, Carolyn; O’Connor, Shirlee A.; Shaw, Holly; Hum, Susan; Dunn, Sheila

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Problem addressed The surge in patient demand for the H1N1 influenza vaccine during the 2009 pandemic. Objective of the program To facilitate timely delivery of the 2009 H1N1 influenza vaccine to a family practice population while preserving regular clinic function and to create a model of effective vaccination delivery for future outbreaks. Program description An academic family practice in Toronto, Ont, adopted a process-improvement approach and implemented 3 Saturday stand-alone H1N1 vaccination clinics to accommodate increased demand for the vaccine. Medical directives were developed to give nurses the authority to vaccinate patients. Consent forms with eligibility criteria and risks versus benefits sheets were provided to patients in the waiting area to make optimal use of time. The clinic with “appointment blocks” for patients had improved efficiency (ie, fewer bottlenecks from waiting area to vaccination room), which was satisfactory to both staff and patients. Conclusion During a pandemic, when patient demand for vaccination is high, such stand-alone vaccination clinics in conjunction with family practices can deliver vaccines to patients in a timely and acceptable manner while promoting continuity of care. This model requires the commitment of extra staffing resources if regular primary care delivery is to be maintained. PMID:21998244

  1. Predictors of high prescribing rates in family practice during actual consultation: a cross-sectional study from Slovenia.

    PubMed

    Tušek-Bunc, Ksenija; Klemenc-Ketiš, Zalika; Šter, Marija Petek; Matela, Jože; Kersnik, Janko

    2014-09-01

    With a cross-sectional survey wich was held on in Slovenia we would like to define the predictors of high prescribing rates in family practice. 42 involved family doctors reported 300 office contacts, i.e., a total of 12,596 contacts. The participants were asked to fulfil the questionnaire for each patient-doctor encounter in one day. In 12,596 recorded contacts, 14,485 prescriptions were issued to the patients. The patients got from 0 to 10 prescriptions per visit (X +/- SD: 1.2 +/- 1.4). Among 7,363 (58.5%)patients, who got at least one prescription, the mean number of prescriptions was 2.0 +/- 1.4. The majority ofprescribed drugs were for cardiovascular system. The multivariate model for higher number ofprescribed drugs explained 20.2% of the variation. Independent predictors for higher prescribing rates during a consultation were female sex, older age, higher number of problems dealt within the consultation (comorbidity), longer consultation times, lower education grade, higher patient quota on the list, higher prescribing quota indexed by NHII for the past year, being a spe- cialist in family medicine, male doctor and age of doctor more than 44 years. Practice characteristics did not show any correlations with high prescribing volumes. The results of this survey show that some patients' and doctors' characteristics and also some consultations' characteristics affect the prescribing rate. Additional analyses should be performed to identify reasons for that and to propose proper actions.

  2. State Firearm Laws, Firearm Ownership, and Safety Practices Among Families of Preschool-Aged Children

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Storey, Alexa; Crosnoe, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We investigated how state-level firearms legislation is associated with firearm ownership and storage among families with preschool-aged children. Methods. Using 2005 nationally representative data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Birth Cohort (n = 8100), we conducted multinomial regression models to examine the associations between state-level firearms legislation generally, child access prevention (CAP) firearms legislation specifically, and parental firearm ownership and storage safety practices. Results. Overall, 8% of families with children aged 4 years living in states with stronger firearm laws and CAP laws owned firearms compared with 24% of families in states with weaker firearm laws and no CAP laws. Storage behaviors of firearm owners differed minimally across legislative contexts. When we controlled for family- and state-level characteristics, we found that firearm legislation and CAP laws interacted to predict ownership and storage behaviors, with unsafe storage least likely among families in states with both CAP laws and stronger firearm legislation. Conclusions. Broader firearm legislation is linked with the efficacy of child-specific legislation in promoting responsible firearm ownership. PMID:24825210

  3. [The role of families in the Quebec mental health system].

    PubMed

    Bonin, Jean-Pierre; Chicoine, Gabrielle; Fradet, Hélène; Larue, Caroline; Racine, Hélène; Jacques, Marie-Claude; St-Cyr Tribble, Denise

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. This paper aims to summarize the current situation regarding the role of families of persons with mental disorders within the mental health system in Quebec.Methods. We made a research in the most recent and pertinent papers or books regarding: 1) the history of the family involvement in the mental health system in Quebec; 2) the present situation of these families and the models that we can see and 3) identify in recent governmental or research documents recommendations regarding a greater empowerment of the families in the mental health system.Results. The research provides a historical perspective to the roles occupied by families. First the family was described as a causal agent; the work of the psychoanalyst Freud described the family unit as a source of conflicts in the areas of affect and sexual dynamics, and which results in the appearance of psychiatric symptoms. Later, this view of a causal agent came both from the point of view of genetic and from expressed emotions. In the 70's new perspectives such as general systems theory (von Bertalanffy, 1968), described the family as responsive to mental disorder of one of its members rather than a responsible agent. With the deinstitutionalization movement, the family was perceived as a source of solutions for persons with mental illness, but also as persons who can live some burden. This subject became well described and a several studies reported about adverse effects of caring for a person with mental disorder on the health, well-being and feeling of caregiver burden. In the 90's, some government action plans called for the relationship between the family and the health system as a partnership. Also, families want to be involved in decisions about care and to be informed about the diagnosis and treatment options. ( Lefley et Wasow, 1993)A new model developed by FFAPAMM that identifies three main roles enables to contextualize the current role in the current system. This model, called CAP lists and

  4. Organizational structure of the Croatian family practice: a longitudinal study based on routinely collected data.

    PubMed

    Keglević, Mladenka Vrcić; Balint, Ines; Cvetković, Ivica; Gaćina, Ana

    2014-12-01

    This study was undertaken with the main aim of determining the trends in the number of family doctors' (FD), gender and educational structure, working status and the number of patients per FD between 1995 and 2013. As the main source of data collection served the Croatian Health Service Yearbooks and Croatian Health Insurance Fund (CHIF) databases on practices and FDs contracting in 2013. Obtained results indicated that the number of contracted FDs increased until 2007, then decreased, and again increased until 2350 in 2013. Average number of patients on FDs list was 1987 in 2012. Less than 50% FDs were specialist in family medicine, 70.3% of them were self-employed with the CHIF contract, and 81% were women. 123 practices planned by the Network did not have contracting FD in 2013. The lack of FDs, the huge number of patients over the standard number, and the location of the missing practices within the rural communities, together make Croatian FM practices less accessible.

  5. Effective maintenance practices to manage system aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chockie, Alan; Bjorkelo, Kenneth

    A study for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission was recently undertaken to identify effective maintenance practices that could be adapted by the nuclear industry in the United States to assist in managing the aging degradation of plant systems and components. Four organizations were examined to assess the influence of maintenance programs on addressing the system and component aging degradation issues. An effective maintenance program was found to be essential to the management of system and component aging. Four key elements of an effective maintenance program that are important to an aging management were identified: (1) the selection of critical systems and components; (2) the development of an understanding of aging through the collection and analysis of equipment performance information; (3) the development of appropriate preventive and predictive maintenance tasks to manage equipment and system aging degradation; and (4) the use of feedback mechanisms to continuously improve the management of aging systems and components. These elements were found to be common to all four organizations.

  6. Micellar systems: Novel family for drug carriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rana, Meenakshi; Chowdhury, Papia

    2016-05-01

    Micellar systems have attracted a great deal of interest, especially in the field of biomedical sciences. The paper deals with the encapsulation behavior of Pyrrole-2-carboxyldehyde (PCL) an anti-cancer drug in different micellar systems. The inculsion capability of PCL is verified experimentally (UV-Vis, Photoluminescence and Raman spectroscopy) in polymer matrix. Two-micellar systems sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and Polysorbate 80 (TWEEN 80) have been studied with a poorly water soluble PCL. The present work provides the effects of biocompatible organic PCL molecule entrap in micellar system in polymer phase due to its vast applicability in drug industry.

  7. [Development of a systemic teaching method of the family approach in nursing science: report of an educational situation].

    PubMed

    Charron, Danielle

    2007-06-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe a new educational practice that demonstrates new teaching strategies used to help nursing students better integrate a family systems approach in their clinical practice. This narration emerges from a qualitative study aiming to include the components of teaching practice, facilitating a change in family care approach toward a practice that considers the "person-family" as a unit of care. The methodological course of this qualitative research is guided by interrelationship of action research and introspective analysis globally supported by systemic constructivist perspectives towards the construction of an educational practice for teaching the family systems approach in nursing science, and the development of new knowledge concerning this practice. This article presents one of the six narratives from an educational situation. A partial description of the results demonstrates that the professor-researcher being present in a different manner creates and uses innovative strategies in her teaching, such as narratives, self dialogue and dramatization which helped nursing bachelor students in transforming their thoughts towards acting in a systemic way towards the family.

  8. The Family Medicine Residency Training Initiative in Miscarriage Management: Impact on Practice in Washington State

    PubMed Central

    Darney, Blair G.; Weaver, Marcia R.; Stevens, Nancy; Kimball, Jeana; Prager, Sarah W.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES Non-complicated spontaneous abortion cases should be counseled about the full range of management approaches, including uterine evacuation using manual vacuum aspiration (MVA). The Residency Training Initiative in Miscarriage Management (RTI-MM) is an intensive, multidimensional intervention designed to facilitate implementation of office-based management of spontaneous abortion using MVA in family medicine residency settings. The purpose of this study was to test the impact of the RTI-MM on self-reported use of MVA for management of spontaneous abortion. METHODS We used a pretest/posttest one group study design and a web-based, anonymous survey to collect data on knowledge, attitudes, perceived barriers, and practice of office-based management of spontaneous abortion. We used multivariable models to estimate incident relative risks and accounted for data clustering at the residency site level. RESULTS Our sample included 441 residents and faculty from 10 family medicine residency sites. Our findings show a positive association between the RTI-MM and self-reported use of MVA for management of spontaneous abortion (adjusted RR=9.11 [CI=4.20-19.78]) and were robust to model specification. Male gender, doing any type of management of spontaneous abortion (eg, expectant, medication), other on-site reproductive health training interventions, and support staff knowledge scores were also significant correlates of physician practice of MVA. CONCLUSIONS Our findings suggest that the RTI-MM was successful in influencing the practice of management of spontaneous abortion using MVA in this population and that support staff knowledge may impact physician practice. Integrating MVA into family medicine settings would potentially improve access to evidence-based, comprehensive care for women. PMID:23378077

  9. [The addiction patient in the family physicians' practice: tools and skills for a successful performance].

    PubMed

    Neuner-Jehle, Stefan

    2014-10-01

    Addiction patients are usually perceived as problematic patients in primary care practices: Encounters often are time-consuming and the approach to the patient is difficult. Moreover, patients sometimes are hiding their addictive behaviour and behave shameful. Other barriers are a lack of experience in communication skills among physicians or their own addictive behaviour. Nevertheless, to diagnose and treat addiction as early as possible is an important task for family doctors, as patients' confidence in them is an important factor to induce a behaviour change. We present four screening tests for the early diagnosis of addiction to alcohol (AUDIT, AUDIT-C, CAGE, SMAST-G) and discuss their strengths and shortcomings. The family doctor's practice is also a useful setting for brief interventions based on motivational interviewing (MI) techniques and the transtheoretical model of behaviour change (TTM). We shortly introduce to these techniques and attitudes using addiction to alcohol and nicotine as examples, and we present innovative methods as "defined drinking" and new quit smoking methods. A respectful attitude towards the patient and communication skills seem to be key factors for family physicians to successfully approach their addiction patients.

  10. Knowledge, attitude and practice of family planning in Eastern Nigeria: implications, prospects and suggestions.

    PubMed

    Uche, C; Ekanem, I I

    1982-01-01

    Despite high birthrates in most of Nigeria, government population and development policies stress economic development rather than attempts to reduce fertility. Findings on family planning knowledge, attitude, and practice from a national fertility and family planning survey conducted by the former Institute of Population and Manpower Studies of the University of Ife in 1972 are presented for 1725 Eastern Nigerian households. A total of 1839 currently married women aged 10-49 and 1585 of their husbands responded to questions about 14 contraceptive methods divided into 3 categories: folk (withdrawal, douche, breastfeeding, and abstinence), traditional (condom, diaphragm, foam, rhythm, jelly, suppositories, sponge) and modern (pill, IUD, and injectables). On the whole, husbands had greater knowledge of traditional and modern methods, while wives knew more about folk methods, regardless of residence. Wives began to approximate the knowledge level of their husbands with increasing education. Fewer than 17% of husbands or wives of any education or residence category could explain the use of modern methods. Female respondents agreed that children now had greater odds of surviving to adulthood than a generation or more ago, but 54.6% in urban areas and 58.7% in rural areas disapproved any kind of birth control. About 42.5% of urban women and 29.3% of rural women approved of birth control. 42.8% of the women felt that families have become smaller than in the past, while 37.4% felt they were larger. The mean desired family size was 5.9 in urban areas and 8.2 in rural, and did not differ significantly by education. Family size was found to be positively associated with desire for more children. Almost 3/4 of women in urban and rural areas wanted more children. Among husbands, 66.8% reported ever using folk methods, 29.9% traditional methods, and 4.2% modern methods, while among wives, 73.3% reported ever using folk methods, 22.6% traditional methods, and 4.1% modern methods

  11. Child abuse and neglect in Cambodian refugee families: characteristics and implications for practice.

    PubMed

    Chang, Janet; Rhee, Siyon; Berthold, S Megan

    2008-01-01

    This study examines the characteristics and patterns of child maltreatment among Cambodian refugee families in Los Angeles and assesses the implications for child welfare practice with Cambodian refugee families. Data were extracted from 243 active Cambodian case files maintained by the Los Angeles County Department of Children and Family Services (LAC-DCFS). Some of the major findings include (1) Cambodian child maltreatment cases were most frequently reported to the LAC-DCFS among various Asian Pacific ethnic groups; (2) Cambodian refugee families were more likely to be charged with neglect, while their Asian Pacific counterparts were more likely charged with physical abuse; (3) the circumstances under which maltreatment occurred most frequently were parental substance abuse and mental illness; and (4) while fathers who maltreated their child were likely to use alcohol, mothers were also more likely to have a mental health problem such as depression. This study suggests the importance of collaboration between Child Protective Service agencies, substance abuse programs, traditional healers, mental health services, and other social service agencies for effective child abuse prevention and intervention efforts. PMID:18575261

  12. A Home Health Care System for Family Doctor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamabe, Ryuji; Taketa, Norihiro

    We propose a constitution technique of small-scale Home Health Care system for family doctor that has been developed by applying various API of JAVA. One function is vital data transmission which allows a family doctor to check the data of elderly persons with ease via Internet. Vital data is encrypted and transmitted for the purpose of security. The other function is telecommunication with voice and face image for care consulting.

  13. Associations Between Individual and Family Level Characteristics and Parenting Practices in Incarcerated African American Fathers

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Melvin N.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the reported parenting practices of fifty incarcerated African American fathers. Fathers were interviewed using hypothetical vignettes adapted from the Parenting Dimensions Inventory (PDI) and received scores on two parenting practices: responsive and restrictive. Father's individual level (education and length of time spent incarcerated) and family level (number of relationships that have borne children) characteristics were significantly associated with their parenting practices. Based on canonical correlation analysis, on function one, responsive parenting was positively associated with education level and negatively associated with both cumulative incarceration time and more numerous partner fertility. Restrictive parenting was negatively associated with education level and positively associated with both cumulative incarceration time and more numerous partner fertility. Function 2 capitalized on variance in the restrictive parenting predictor that was not utilized in function 1, and likely captured lack of opportunity to parent. On function 2, restrictive parenting was negatively associated with cumulative time spent incarcerated and more numerous partner fertility. In all, results suggest that prison-based education programs should be part of an overall response to incarcerated fathers. These results add to the growing body of research on incarcerated fathers and fragile families. PMID:19802371

  14. Orthodoxy and reform: differing medical practices in a Glasgow Jewish Victorian family.

    PubMed

    Collins, K

    1995-01-01

    Medical botanists formed a major and growing element in the delivery of medical care in Victorian Britain, supplementing the provision made by qualified physicians. Medical reform, introduced into Britain from the United States in the middle of the nineteenth century, combined botanical treatment, including a strong emphasis on the use of lobelia, with physiotherapy. The Levenston family in Glasgow was represented among both qualified orthodox medical practitioners and unqualified practitioners of medical botany. Samuel Levenston graduated M.D. at the University of Glasgow in 1859 and had a long career in medical practice in Glasgow after years of work as an unqualified practitioner. His father and brothers were active in medical botany in Glasgow, Edinburgh and Dublin, often posing as doctors but without appropriate qualifications. This paper examines the history of the Levenstons and contrasts the practices of the different members of the family, showing the relationships between a university-trained physician and medical chemists. The surviving Glasgow pharmacopeia of Solomon (Alexander) Levenston illustrates the style of his medical treatments, setting the practice of his medical botany into context.

  15. Parenting self-efficacy and parenting practices over time in Mexican American families.

    PubMed

    Dumka, Larry E; Gonzales, Nancy A; Wheeler, Lorey A; Millsap, Roger E

    2010-10-01

    Drawing on social cognitive theory, this study used a longitudinal cross-lagged panel design and a structural equation modeling approach to evaluate parenting self-efficacy's reciprocal and causal associations with parents' positive control practices over time to predict adolescents' conduct problems. Data were obtained from teachers, mothers, and adolescents in 189 Mexican American families living in the southwest United States. After accounting for contemporaneous reciprocal relationships between parenting self-efficacy (PSE) and positive control, results indicated that parenting self-efficacy predicted future positive control practices rather than the reverse. PSE also showed direct effects on decreased adolescent conduct problems. PSE functioned in an antecedent causal role in relation to parents' positive control practices and adolescents' conduct problems in this sample. These results support the cross-cultural applicability of social cognitive theory to parenting in Mexican American families. An implication is that parenting interventions aimed at preventing adolescent conduct problems need to focus on elevating the PSE of Mexican American parents with low levels of PSE. In addition, future research should seek to specify the most effective strategies for enhancing PSE.

  16. Parenting self-efficacy and parenting practices over time in Mexican American families.

    PubMed

    Dumka, Larry E; Gonzales, Nancy A; Wheeler, Lorey A; Millsap, Roger E

    2010-10-01

    Drawing on social cognitive theory, this study used a longitudinal cross-lagged panel design and a structural equation modeling approach to evaluate parenting self-efficacy's reciprocal and causal associations with parents' positive control practices over time to predict adolescents' conduct problems. Data were obtained from teachers, mothers, and adolescents in 189 Mexican American families living in the southwest United States. After accounting for contemporaneous reciprocal relationships between parenting self-efficacy (PSE) and positive control, results indicated that parenting self-efficacy predicted future positive control practices rather than the reverse. PSE also showed direct effects on decreased adolescent conduct problems. PSE functioned in an antecedent causal role in relation to parents' positive control practices and adolescents' conduct problems in this sample. These results support the cross-cultural applicability of social cognitive theory to parenting in Mexican American families. An implication is that parenting interventions aimed at preventing adolescent conduct problems need to focus on elevating the PSE of Mexican American parents with low levels of PSE. In addition, future research should seek to specify the most effective strategies for enhancing PSE. PMID:20954762

  17. Linkages between Families and Political Extremism: A Theory of the Authoritarian Personality and Family System Dynamics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaziano, Cecilie

    This paper seeks to integrate some ideas from family systems theory and attachment theory within a theory of public opinion and social movement. Citing the classic "The Authoritarian Personality," the paper states that the first authorities children know, their parents or other caregivers, shape children's attitudes toward all authorities. The…

  18. Parents' Definition of Effective Child Disability Support Services: Implications for Implementing Family-Centered Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hiebert-Murphy, Diane; Trute, Barry; Wright, Alexandra

    2011-01-01

    The current study examined parents' perspectives of services within a community-based childhood disability program in the process of enhancing the family centeredness of its services. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 39 mothers and 22 fathers approximately 18 months after entering the service delivery system. Parents reported that…

  19. Family Assessment in Child Welfare: The Illinois DCFS Integrated Assessment Program in Policy and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smithgall, Cheryl; Jarpe-Ratner, Elizabeth; Yang, Duck-Hye; DeCoursey, Jan; Brooks, LaShaun; Goerge, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Launched in 2005, the Illinois Integrated Assessment (IA) program partners child welfare caseworkers with licensed clinicians to provide better information about the functioning of children entering foster care and about child and family strengths, support systems, and service needs. The information-gathering activities and the collaborative…

  20. Parenting Practices and Children's Academic Success in Low-SES Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayo, Aziza; Siraj, Iram

    2015-01-01

    Given the disadvantaged position of working-class children in the education system, it is important to understand how parents and families might support their children to succeed academically. This paper reports on 35 case studies that were conducted as part of the Effective Provision of Pre-School, Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3-16)…

  1. The Impact of Organizational Factors and Government Policy on Psychiatric Nurses' Family-Focused Practice With Parents Who Have Mental Illness, Their Dependent Children, and Families in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Grant, Anne; Reupert, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    Government policy and organizational factors influence family-focused practice (FFP) in adult mental health services. However, how these aspects shape psychiatric nurses' practice with parents who have mental illness, their dependent children, and families is less well understood. Drawing on the findings of a qualitative study, this article explores the way in which Irish policy and organizational factors might influence psychiatric nurses' FFP, and whether (and how) FFP might be further promoted. A purposive sample of 14 psychiatric nurses from eight mental health services completed semi-structured interviews. The analysis was inductive and presented as thematic networks. Both groups described how policies and organizational culture enabled and/or hindered FFP, with differences between community and acute participants seen. This study indicates a need for policies and organizational supports, including child and family skills training, to promote a whole family approach in adult mental health services.

  2. Family planning practice among primary school teachers and their perception of children.

    PubMed

    Paliwal, M B

    1978-01-01

    Valuation of children determines a couple's motivation to practice family planning. This study attempts to associate differing perceptions of the value of children with different motivations for family planning. The sample consisted of 70 teachers, 7 chosen randomly from each of 10 randomly-selected schools in west Delhi. The teachers were classified as motivated, ambivalent or unmotivated with regard to family planning on the basis of a questionnaire asking whether they endorsed certain motives for having children or for preventing births. To assess their valuation of children, the teachers were asked to rank pairs of 12 items relating to the value of children. Frequency distribution tables were constructed for each value item and each teacher. Mean proportions were compiled. From the individual scores on each item for each teacher, average scores for teachers in each motivation category were obtained. The reuslts of the study are represented in tabular form. Financial burden and restricted parental time were important considerations to the motivated group. The unmotivated group valued children particularly to strengthen the bond between husband and wife and to provide parental satisfaction. The valuation of children by the ambivalent group was mixed. The article concludes that the different motivational groups value children particularly to strengthen the bond between husband and wife and to provide parental satisfaction. The valuation of children by the ambivalent group was mixed. The article concludes that the different motivational groups value children differntly and that the valuation of children of the ambivalent and unmotivated groups needs to be altered by education in order to motivate them to practice family planning.

  3. Feasibility of improving identification of familial hypercholesterolaemia in general practice: intervention development study

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Nadeem; Weng, Stephen; Tranter, Jennifer; El-Kadiki, Alia; Kai, Joe

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess the feasibility of improving identification of familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH) in primary care, and of collecting outcome measures to inform a future trial. Design Feasibility intervention study. Setting 6 general practices (GPs) in central England. Participants 831 eligible patients with elevated cholesterol >7.5 mmol/L were identified, by search of electronic health records, for recruitment to the intervention. Intervention Educational session in practice; use of opportunistic computer reminders in consultations or universal postal invitation over 6 months to eligible patients invited to complete a family history questionnaire. Those fulfilling the Simon-Broome criteria for possible FH were invited for GP assessment and referred for specialist definitive diagnosis. Outcome measures Rates of recruitment of eligible patients, identification of patients with possible FH, referral to specialist care, diagnosis of confirmed FH in specialist care; and feasibility of collecting relevant outcome measures for a future trial. Results Of 173 general practices, 18 were interested in participating and 6 were recruited. From 831 eligible patients, 127 (15.3%) were recruited and completed family history questionnaires: 86 (10.7%) through postal invitation and 41 (4.9%) opportunistically. Among the 127 patients, 32 (25.6%) had a possible diagnosis of FH in primary care. Within 6 months of completing recruitment, 7 patients had had specialist assessment confirming 2 patients with definite FH (28.6%), and 5 patients with possible FH (71.4%). Potential trial outcome measures for lipid tests, statin prescribing and secondary causes of hypercholesterolaemia were extracted using automated data extraction from electronic records alone without recourse to other methods. Conclusions The intervention is feasible to implement in GP, and facilitates recruitment of patients with raised cholesterol for targeted assessment and identification of FH. Extracting

  4. Beyond the Systems Approach to Family Therapy: An Ecological Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Paul R.; Griffith, Mariellen

    A brief review of systems theory provides a rationale for an underlying theoretical model within which systems theory can be more completely understood. The essence of the model is that persons are the major unit of study because the available means of satisfying "basic needs" define and shape interaction patterns in the family as in other human…

  5. A Chaotic System with Different Families of Hidden Attractors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Viet-Thanh; Volos, Christos; Jafari, Sajad; Vaidyanathan, Sundarapandian; Kapitaniak, Tomasz; Wang, Xiong

    The presence of hidden attractors in dynamical systems has received considerable attention recently both in theory and applications. A novel three-dimensional autonomous chaotic system with hidden attractors is introduced in this paper. It is exciting that this chaotic system can exhibit two different families of hidden attractors: hidden attractors with an infinite number of equilibrium points and hidden attractors without equilibrium. Dynamical behaviors of such system are discovered through mathematical analysis, numerical simulations and circuit implementation.

  6. Parental visiting and family reunification: could inclusive practice make a difference?

    PubMed

    Leathers, Sonya J

    2002-01-01

    This study examines whether inclusive practice, or parental involvement in foster children's lives while in placement, is correlated with more frequent visiting and a greater likelihood of reunification. This hypothesis was tested among a random sample of 230 twelve- and thirteen-year-olds placed in traditional family foster care. Results suggest that mothers who visit their child and are involved in case reviews and child care activities visit more frequently than mothers who visit in settings such as agency offices and have no other types of involvement. In addition, visiting frequency is highly predictive of reunification. These associations were not explained by maternal substance abuse, mental illness, or the child's placement history.

  7. Family nurse practitioner students utilization of Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs): implications for practice.

    PubMed

    Tilghman, Joan; Raley, Dionne; Conway, Jia Joyce

    2006-01-01

    Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs) are a readily accessible source of information to aid in the delivery of patient care. A pilot group of five Family Nurse Practitioner students used PDAs to organize data and access information relevant to patient care. Utilization of the PDAs in the clinical setting provided practice guidelines, textbook information and protocols that were readily accessible. The PDA made it possible for students to utilize preexisting knowledge with additional learning resources. The PDAs were purchased with funds provided from a United States Department of Health and Human Services, Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) grant.

  8. Primary healthcare system and practice characteristics in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Khoo, Hwee Sing; Lim, Yee Wei; Vrijhoef, Hubertus Jm

    2014-01-01

    It is crucial to adapt and improve the (primary) health care systems of countries to prepare for future patient profiles and their related needs. The main aim of this study was to acquire a comprehensive overview of the perceptions of primary care experts in Singapore about the state of primary care in Singapore, and to compare this with the state of primary care in other countries. Notwithstanding ranked 2(nd) in terms of efficiency of health care, Singapore is facing significant health care challenges. Emails were sent to 85 experts, where they were asked to rate Singapore's primary care system based on nine internationally adopted health system characteristics and six practice characteristics (response rate = 29%). The primary care system in Singapore received an average of 10.9 out of 30 possible points. Lowest ratings were given to: earnings of primary care physicians compared to specialists, requirement for 24 hr accessibility of primary care services, standard of family medicine in academic departments, reflection of community served by practices in patient lists, and the access to specialists without needing to be referred by primary care physicians. Singapore was categorized as a 'low' primary care country according to the experts. PMID:25120380

  9. Linking Maternal Efficacy Beliefs, Developmental Goals, Parenting Practices, and Child Competence in Rural Single-Parent African American Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brody, Gene H.; Flor, Douglas L.; Gibson, Nicole Morgan

    1999-01-01

    Traced links among family financial resource adequacy, maternal beliefs and behavior, developmental goals, and child outcomes in rural, single-parent African American families of 6- to 9-year-olds. Found that financial adequacy was linked with childrearing efficacy. Efficacy beliefs were linked with parenting practices indirectly through…

  10. The Case of Three Karen Refugee Women and Their Children: Literacy Practices in a Family Literacy Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quadros, Sabrina; Sarroub, Loukia K.

    2016-01-01

    The lack of research about the Karen, one of 135 ethnic groups from Myanmar limits literacy educators charged with educating this refugee population in public schools. In this case study the authors explore the literacy practices of Karen families when at school and in their homes and within an ESL family literacy program. The case of these…

  11. Practicing Technology Implementation: The Case of an Enterprise System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Awazu, Yukika

    2013-01-01

    Drawing on four theories of practice--Communities of Practice (CoP), Bourdieu's theory of practice, Pickering's mangle of practice, and Actor Network Theory (ANT), the study provides an in-depth understanding about technology implementation practice. Analysis of an Enterprise System implementation project in a software manufacturing…

  12. Using an Informed Advocacy Framework to Advance the Practice of Family-Centered Care.

    PubMed

    Marcellus, Lenora; MacKinnon, Karen

    2016-01-01

    The philosophical framework of family-centered care (FCC) has been promoted consistently since the 1980s in perinatal and neonatal settings as a gold standard approach for developing programs and providing care that supports the meaningful involvement of parents in the care of their infants and children. Recent literature suggests that despite years of promotion, FCC remains an elusive practice. Sources frequently state that FCC is based on principles of communication and empowerment, but the literature overall does not suggest substantial underlying philosophical or theoretical underpinnings. There have been theoretical advances in nursing and other disciplines that hold potential for moving our practice of FCC forward. In this article, we describe the informed advocacy framework and apply the framework to FCC. PMID:27465458

  13. Knowledge, attitude and practice of family planning in rural communities in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Aja, G N; Nwangwa, M A; Egwu, I N

    1995-01-01

    Maternal and infant mortality rates, coupled with a high population growth rate, are unacceptably high in Nigeria. More recently, the Nigerian government endorsed the promotion of reproductive health, including family planning, through maternal and child health services. The Ohaozara Local Government Area (LGA) introduced a Five-Year Action Plan (FYAP) in 1989. To appraise the Ohaozara Five-Year Action Plan, 600 persons stratified by geographical location and sex were interviewed in three randomly selected autonomous communities in the Ohaozara Local Government Area to determine their knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP). The findings in this study showed a high awareness level with a moderately positive attitude and generally low level of practice. Comprehensive reproductive health education (RHE), budgetary increase, evaluation of FYAP, and program coordination are recommended. PMID:9037803

  14. [Disposal of drugs: an analysis of the practices in the family health program].

    PubMed

    Alencar, Tatiane de Oliveira Silva; Machado, Carla Silva Rocha; Costa, Sônia Carine Cova; Alencar, Bruno Rodrigues

    2014-07-01

    The scope of this article is to discuss the perception of health workers in relation to the disposal of drugs and analyze how this practice occurs in family health units in a city in the state of Bahia. It involved a qualitative and exploratory study together with nurses, nursing assistants, community health workers and pharmacists of Pharmaceutical Care and Health Surveillance. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with systematic observation and use of previously-drafted scripts and the content analysis method was used for data analysis. The results showed poor understanding regarding proper disposal among the workers, dissonant practices in the implementation of the regulations and a lack of communication between health surveillance and other health services. The creation of effective strategies must involve the whole process from management to the prescription and use of drugs and requires further political, economic and social participation.

  15. Service needs among Latino immigrant families: implications for social work practice.

    PubMed

    Ayón, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    This study sought to learn from Latino immigrant families what services they need to promote their families' well-being within a context of stringent anti-immigrant legislation. Fifty-two Latino immigrant parents participated in focus groups. Focus groups took place following the passage of Senate Bill 1070. Findings reveal five major categories of need: mental health, physical health care, education, information and support services, and community efforts. Participants' experiences as immigrants played a significant role in their narratives. The narratives reveal that families need assistance navigating systems of care, coping with discrimination and oppressive environments, strengthening ties among community members, and advocating for policy change. Social workers are called to address the needs of this community and advocate for human rights and social justice. PMID:24640227

  16. Service needs among Latino immigrant families: implications for social work practice.

    PubMed

    Ayón, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    This study sought to learn from Latino immigrant families what services they need to promote their families' well-being within a context of stringent anti-immigrant legislation. Fifty-two Latino immigrant parents participated in focus groups. Focus groups took place following the passage of Senate Bill 1070. Findings reveal five major categories of need: mental health, physical health care, education, information and support services, and community efforts. Participants' experiences as immigrants played a significant role in their narratives. The narratives reveal that families need assistance navigating systems of care, coping with discrimination and oppressive environments, strengthening ties among community members, and advocating for policy change. Social workers are called to address the needs of this community and advocate for human rights and social justice.

  17. [Systemic therapy of breast cancer: practice guideline].

    PubMed

    Horváth, Zsolt; Boér, Katalin; Dank, Magdolna; Kahán, Zsuzsanna; Kocsis, Judit; Kövér, Erika; Pajkos, Gábor; Pikó, Béla; Rubovszky, Gábor; Eckhardt, Sándor

    2016-09-01

    The article presents the practice guideline of systemic treatment of breast cancer and recommendations of the 3rd Hungarian Breast Cancer Consensus Conference. It reflects the recent international guidelines (ESMO, NCCN, ABC2, St Gallen's) irrespectively of the current financial opportunities. Here we follow the early - locally advanced - locally relapsed - metastatic breast cancer line for didactic considerations and we discuss the different subgroups of breast cancer based on hormone receptor and HER2 receptor status. Diagnosis and treatment options of rare clinical entities are summarised at the end of the paper. PMID:27579723

  18. Practical video indexing and retrieval system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yiqing; Wolf, Wayne H.; Liu, Bede; Huang, Jeffrey R.

    1998-03-01

    We integrated a practical digital video database system based on language and image analysis with components from digital video processing, still image search, information retrieval, closed captioning processing. The attempt is to utilize the multiple modalities of information in video and implement data fusion among the multiple modalities; image information, speech/dialog information, closed captioning information, sound track information such as music, gunfire, explosion, caption information, motion information, temporal information. Effort is made to allow access video contents at different levels including video program level, scene level, shot level, and object level. Approaches of browsing, subject-based classification, and random retrieving are available to gain access to the contents.

  19. A survey of management practices that influence production and welfare of dairy cattle on family farms in southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Costa, J H C; Hötzel, M J; Longo, C; Balcão, L F

    2013-01-01

    A survey on dairy production in family dairy farms in the northwest of Santa Catarina, Brazil, was carried out to assess husbandry practices and elements of the living environment that may influence animal welfare and productivity. Three farm systems common in the region were compared: extensive, pasture-based, and semi-intensive. Data were collected through face-to-face interviews with farmers, followed by an inspection of the production environment and of dairy cows on 124 dairy farms. Some welfare and production problems were common to the 3 systems, mainly subclinical mastitis and tick infestations, which affected one-third of cows, deficiencies in the provision of drinking water and shade, and poor hygiene practices during milking. Some problems were specific to farming systems, such as lameness and hock injuries on the semi-intensive farms, and inadequate milking infrastructure and greater frequencies of cows with low body condition scores on extensive and pasture-based farms. A greater proportion of farms in the semi-intensive group had modern, herringbone-type milking parlors, applied the California Mastitis Test, and followed teat disinfection practices, and more pasture-based farms provided shade in the paddocks. The widespread use of pasture and adapted genotypes and individual identification of animals were positive aspects present in all systems. The absence of health and production records in more than half of the farms may prevent farmers from recognizing certain problems. Results of this survey may guide public policies aiming to improve milk productivity and quality with sustainable and low-cost production practices. PMID:23102960

  20. A Survey to Assess Family Physicians’ Motivation to Teach Undergraduates in Their Practices

    PubMed Central

    May, Marcus; Mand, Peter; Biertz, Frank; Hummers-Pradier, Eva; Kruschinski, Carsten

    2012-01-01

    Background In Germany, family physicians (FPs) are increasingly needed to participate in undergraduate medical education. Knowledge of FPs’ motivation to teach medical students in their practices is lacking. Purpose To describe a novel questionnaire that assesses the motivation of FPs to teach undergraduates in their practices and to show the results of a subsequent survey using this instrument. Methods The questionnaire was developed based on a review of the literature. Previously used empirical instruments assessing occupational values and motivation were included. A preliminary version was pretested in a pilot study. The resulting 68-item questionnaire was sent to 691 FPs involved in undergraduate medical education. Reliability was assessed and subgroups were analyzed with regard to differences in motivation. Results A total of 523 physicians in n = 458 teaching practices participated (response rate 75.7%). ‘Helping others’ and ‘interest’ were revealed as the predominant motives. Responses showed a predominantly intrinsic motivation of the participating FPs. Their main incentives were an ambition to work as a medical preceptor, to generally improve undergraduate education and to share knowledge. Material compensation was of minor importance. Time restraints were indicated as a barrier by some FPs, but were not a general concern. Conclusion German FPs involved in medical education have altruistic attitudes towards teaching medical students in their practices. Motivational features give an important insight for the recruitment of FP preceptors as well as for their training in instructional methods. PMID:23029272

  1. A study of socioeconomic determinants of family planning practice based on cross cultural regressions.

    PubMed

    Rao, V V; Yuan, T

    1980-01-01

    It has been traditional in demographic research to undertake studies based on cross country regression analyses of crude birth rate (CBR), its correlates, or even marital fertility rates (MFR), on various socioeconomic indicators. The general conclusion to emerge from these studies has been that there exists a relationship between fertility and certain significant socioeconomic correlates. This conclusion does not go much beyond observations based on demographic transition theory or differential fertility studies. These multiple regression studies do not come close to the dynamics and underlying processes that generate the actual observations. It seems that cross country regression analyses of the prevalence of family planning may be more useful for policy purposes. Certain correlates of the level of family planning practice have been identified: foremost among these are per capita income, adult literacy, and the period of family planning advocacy. From a policy standpoint, the literacy of the population seems to be the most amenable to intervention by policy making bodies interested in achieving optimal demographic and socioeconomic conditions within a society.

  2. Resident and faculty perceptions of effective clinical teaching in family practice.

    PubMed

    Gjerde, C L; Coble, R J

    1982-02-01

    Increasing interest in clinical teaching has led to the realization that the unique subset of skills which characterizes effective clinical teaching needs to be identified. Such identification will lead to development of these skills and improvement in the quality of clinical teaching. Family practice faculty are vitally concerned with improving their clinical teaching skills, since clinical teaching is the core of education in family medicine and since many family physicians who become preceptors have had no formal training as teachers. In this investigation of effective clinical teaching behaviors, faculty and residents generally agree in their perceptions of the helpfulness of 58 clinical teaching behaviors. Neither group felt that emphasis on references and research is as important a factor in effective clinical teaching as are residents' active participation in the learning situation and positive preceptor attitudes toward teaching and residents. It was perceived that the ineffective clinical teacher has a negative attitude toward residents, is inaccessible, and lacks skills in providing feedback, while the effective clinical teacher has skills in two-way communication, creates an educational environment that facilitates learning, and provides constructive feedback to residents.

  3. Diagnosis and management of hypertension: the stated practices of family physicians.

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, E.; Hilditch, J.; Chipman, M.; Hardacre, G.; Morrison, M.

    1984-01-01

    Hypertension is an important and common problem in family practice, but there is no general agreement on the systolic and diastolic pressures at which it should be diagnosed and treated. Responses from 273 family physicians surveyed by mail in Metropolitan Toronto showed a wide variation in the pressures used as cut-off points. The probability that in a given patient hypertension would be diagnosed or treated at different systolic and diastolic pressures varied considerably among the physicians, the variation increasing with the age of the patient. There was also wide variation in opinion among the surveyed physicians about how often patients should be screened for hypertension; depending on the patient's age, up to 35% of the physicians stated that the blood pressure should be measured at every visit. Only one third reported using any one or more methods to ensure that patients with hypertension were not lost to follow-up. The family physicians with an academic appointment used higher cut-off points for diagnosis and treatment, and they screened and scheduled follow-up visits less frequently than those without an academic appointment. PMID:6704861

  4. A practical guide for the computational selection of residues to be experimentally characterized in protein families.

    PubMed

    Benítez-Páez, Alfonso; Cárdenas-Brito, Sonia; Gutiérrez, Andrés J

    2012-05-01

    In recent years, numerous biocomputational tools have been designed to extract functional and evolutionary information from multiple sequence alignments (MSAs) of proteins and genes. Most biologists working actively on the characterization of proteins from a single or family perspective use the MSA analysis to retrieve valuable information about amino acid conservation and the functional role of residues in query protein(s). In MSAs, adjustment of alignment parameters is a key point to improve the quality of MSA output. However, this issue is frequently underestimated and/or misunderstood by scientists and there is no in-depth knowledge available in this field. This brief review focuses on biocomputational approaches complementary to MSA to help distinguish functional residues in protein families. These additional analyses involve issues ranging from phylogenetic to statistical, which address the detection of amino acids pivotal for protein function at any level. In recent years, a large number of tools has been designed for this very purpose. Using some of these relevant, useful tools, we have designed a practical pipeline to perform in silico studies with a view to improving the characterization of family proteins and their functional residues. This review-guide aims to present biologists a set of specially designed tools to study proteins. These tools are user-friendly as they use web servers or easy-to-handle applications. Such criteria are essential for this review as most of the biologists (experimentalists) working in this field are unfamiliar with these biocomputational analysis approaches.

  5. Adaptive Systems Engineering: A Medical Paradigm for Practicing Systems Engineering

    SciTech Connect

    R. Douglas Hamelin; Ron D. Klingler; Christopher Dieckmann

    2011-06-01

    From its inception in the defense and aerospace industries, SE has applied holistic, interdisciplinary tools and work-process to improve the design and management of 'large, complex engineering projects.' The traditional scope of engineering in general embraces the design, development, production, and operation of physical systems, and SE, as originally conceived, falls within that scope. While this 'traditional' view has expanded over the years to embrace wider, more holistic applications, much of the literature and training currently available is still directed almost entirely at addressing the large, complex, NASA and defense-sized systems wherein the 'ideal' practice of SE provides the cradle-to-grave foundation for system development and deployment. Under such scenarios, systems engineers are viewed as an integral part of the system and project life-cycle from conception to decommissioning. In far less 'ideal' applications, SE principles are equally applicable to a growing number of complex systems and projects that need to be 'rescued' from overwhelming challenges that threaten imminent failure. The medical profession provides a unique analogy for this latter concept and offers a useful paradigm for tailoring our 'practice' of SE to address the unexpected dynamics of applying SE in the real world. In short, we can be much more effective as systems engineers as we change some of the paradigms under which we teach and 'practice' SE.

  6. Bridging Diversity and Family Systems: Culturally Informed and Flexible Family Based Treatment for Hispanic Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Santisteban, Daniel A.; Mena, Maite P.; Abalo, Clara

    2014-01-01

    There is growing interest in identifying interventions that have been tested and found efficacious with minority families. This interest is fueled in part by the growth of Hispanics in the U.S. as well as by research findings that suggest that Hispanics have better outcomes when treatments are adapted to their unique experiences, and risk and protective factors. Family-based treatments for culturally diverse populations require the integration of advances from both the cultural and family systems domains. Current intervention research has begun to move towards developing and advancing individualized interventions for patients/clients. Adaptive interventions, tailored interventions, adapted interventions, and targeted interventions have all been identified in the literature as appropriate for addressing distinct cultural characteristics which generic interventions may not address effectively. To date, research has focused less on tailored or adaptive interventions partly due to the fact that they require decision rules, more careful implementation, and measurement of individualized outcomes. In this article we present evidence for the usefulness of adaptive interventions that can address not only subgroup variability but within group variability as well. Culturally Informed and Flexible Family-Based Treatment for Adolescents is presented as an adaptive treatment that allows for the tailoring of treatment to the unique clinical and cultural variations of individual adolescents and families, but that does so in a systematic and replicable fashion. By building decision-making processes into the manualized treatment, the transportability of the treatment may be enhanced as family therapists appreciate it’s flexibility to address the complexity of clinical work. PMID:24772378

  7. Family Physicians’ Attitudes and Practices Regarding Assessments of Medical Fitness to Drive in Older Persons

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Raymond W.; Man-Son-Hing, Malcolm; Molnar, Frank J.; Hogan, David B.; Marshall, Shawn C.; Auger, Julie; Graham, Ian D.; Korner-Bitensky, Nicol; Tomlinson, George; Kowgier, Matthew E.

    2007-01-01

    Background Higher crash rates per mile driven in older drivers have focused attention on the assessment of older drivers. Objective To examine the attitudes and practices of family physicians regarding fitness-to-drive issues in older persons. Design Survey questionnaire. Participants The questionnaire was sent to 1,000 randomly selected Canadian family physicians. Four hundred sixty eligible physicians returned completed questionnaires. Measurements Self-reported attitudes and practices towards driving assessments and the reporting of medically unsafe drivers. Results Over 45% of physicians are not confident in assessing driving fitness and do not consider themselves to be the most qualified professionals to do so. The majority (88.6%) feel that they would benefit from further education in this area. About 75% feel that reporting a patient as an unsafe driver places them in a conflict of interest and negatively impacts on the patient and the physician–patient relationship. Nevertheless, most (72.4%) agree that physicians should be legally responsible for reporting unsafe drivers to the licensing authorities. Physicians from provinces with mandatory versus discretionary reporting requirements are more likely to report unsafe drivers (odds ratio [OR], 2.78; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.58 to 4.91), but less likely to perform driving assessments (OR, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.39 to 0.85). Most driving assessments take between 10 and 30 minutes, with much variability in the components included. Conclusions Family physicians lack confidence in performing driving assessments and note many negative consequences of reporting unsafe drivers. Education about assessing driving fitness and approaches that protect the physician–patient relationship when reporting occurs are needed. PMID:17372806

  8. System based practice: a concept analysis

    PubMed Central

    YAZDANI, SHAHRAM; HOSSEINI, FAKHROLSADAT; AHMADY, SOLEIMAN

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Systems-Based Practice (SBP) is one of the six competencies introduced by the ACGME for physicians to provide high quality of care and also the most challenging of them in performance, training, and evaluation of medical students. This concept analysis clarifies the concept of SBP by identifying its components to make it possible to differentiate it from other similar concepts. For proper training of SBP and to ensure these competencies in physicians, it is necessary to have an operational definition, and SBP’s components must be precisely defined in order to provide valid and reliable assessment tools. Methods Walker & Avant’s approach to concept analysis was performed in eight stages: choosing a concept, determining the purpose of analysis, identifying all uses of the concept, defining attributes, identifying a model case, identifying borderline, related, and contrary cases, identifying antecedents and consequences, and defining empirical referents. Results Based on the analysis undertaken, the attributes of SBP includes knowledge of the system, balanced decision between patients’ need and system goals, effective role playing in interprofessional health care team, system level of health advocacy, and acting for system improvement. System thinking and a functional system are antecedents and system goals are consequences. A case model, as well as border, and contrary cases of SBP, has been introduced. Conclusion he identification of SBP attributes in this study contributes to the body of knowledge in SBP and reduces the ambiguity of this concept to make it possible for applying it in training of different medical specialties. Also, it would be possible to develop and use more precise tools to evaluate SBP competency by using empirical referents of the analysis. PMID:27104198

  9. Family medicine in post-communist Europe needs a boost. Exploring the position of family medicine in healthcare systems of Central and Eastern Europe and Russia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The countries of Central and Eastern Europe have experienced a lot of changes at the end of the 20th century, including changes in the health care systems and especially in primary care. The aim of this paper is to systematically assess the position of family medicine in these countries, using the same methodology within all the countries. Methods A key informants survey in 11 Central and Eastern European countries and Russia using a questionnaire developed on the basis of systematic literature review. Results Formally, family medicine is accepted as a specialty in all the countries, although the levels of its implementation vary across the countries and the differences are important. In most countries, solo practice is the most predominant organisational form of family medicine. Family medicine is just one of many medical specialties (e.g. paediatrics and gynaecology) in primary health care. Full introduction of family medicine was successful only in Estonia. Conclusions Some of the unification of the systems may have been the result of the EU request for adequate training that has pushed the policies towards higher standards of training for family medicine. The initial enthusiasm of implementing family medicine has decreased because there was no initiative that would support this movement. Internal and external stimuli might be needed to continue transition process. PMID:22409775

  10. Culturally competent systems of care with Latino children and families.

    PubMed

    Dettlaff, Alan J; Rycraft, Joan R

    2009-01-01

    The Latino population represents the fastest growing ethnic minority in the United States. As a result, child welfare agencies need to be prepared to provide culturally appropriate services to Latino families. This paper describes an evaluation of a federally funded initiative designed to train child welfare practitioners in using an existing evidence-based framework--systems of care--with Latino children and families to address the need for culturally competent, community-based services with this population. Results indicate that trained participants responded positively to the systems of care framework, increased their knowledge of systems of care, and reported positive benefits to their clients through using this framework. However, challenges to implementing systems of care were identified. Implications of these findings and the use of systems of care in child welfare are presented.

  11. Family systems and adolescent development: shared and nonshared risk and protective factors in nondivorced and remarried families.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, T G; Hetherington, E M; Reiss, D

    1998-01-01

    The primary goal of this research is to increase the goodness-of-fit between the theoretical tenets of family systems theory and quantitative methods used to test systems hypotheses. A family systems perspective is applied to two specific research questions concerning family influences on adolescent development: To what extent are familial risk and protective factors for psychopathology and competence shared or not shared by siblings and are different family relationship patterns associated with optimal adolescent adjustment in nondivorced and remarried families? Multirater and multimethod data from a national sample of 516 nondivorced and remarried families from the Nonshared Environment and Adolescent Development (NEAD) project were examined using a combination of cluster, factor, and regression analyses. Results indicated that the effects of an individual relationship on adolescent adjustment is moderated by the larger network of relationships in which it is embedded. Evidence for nonshared familial processes in predicting adolescent psychopathology was also found but only in a subset of families, and the mechanisms of influence were neither main effects nor linear, as has been assumed by research to date. Results are discussed in light of family systems models of relationship influence on development. These results illustrate how family systems theory provides a specific example of contextualism as regards the development of psychopathology in adolescence. PMID:9635228

  12. Family planning practices and attitudes among former Soviet new immigrant women in Israel.

    PubMed

    Remennick, L I; Amir, D; Elimelech, Y; Novikov, Y

    1995-08-01

    One hundred young new immigrant women from the former U.S.S.R. now living in Israel answered a detailed semi-open questionnaire regarding their knowledge, attitudes and behaviors in fertility and birth control issues. A collective family planning profile of these women is largely in line with that of the urban population of Slavonic U.S.S.R., combining early marriage, early and low fertility, the latter achieved by both abortion and contraception. Most respondents and their partners tried to prevent unwanted pregnancies, usually starting from traditional methods and switching over time to modern ones. An IUD remained most popular contraceptive among parous women, while use of the pill, very rare in the U.S.S.R., has almost doubled upon migration, mostly among younger women. Still, they kept some misleading ideas on the pros and cons of traditional versus modern methods, suggesting lack of adequate information also upon migration. Like their ex-compatriots, our women preferred to solve their birth control problems without external professional involvement. Contrary to the expected, free abortion ideology was not universally advocated by our respondents, and most were fully aware of abortion limitations in Israel. While rationally condemning abortion in both moral and health terms, most respondents still use it, this gap between beliefs and practice being indicative of their readiness to adopt efficient contraception. This switch occurs faster in women actively involved with host society via work or studies. Younger women were found to be more flexible and advanced in their family planning practices than were older ones, while almost no differences were related to education and origin within the U.S.S.R. This exploratory study suggests that any investment into promotion of healthy fertility control practices among new immigrants will be cost-effective in the near future. PMID:7481951

  13. Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurst, Hunter, Ed.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    This document contains the fourth volume of "Today's Delinquent," an annual publication of the National Center for Juvenile Justice. This volume deals with the issue of the family and delinquency. "The Family and Delinquency" (LaMar T. Empey) systematically reviews and weighs the evidence to support prominent theories on the origins of…

  14. More Family Physicians or More Primary Care? An Analysis of the Family Practice Act (S. 3418). Health Manpower Policy Discussion Paper Series No. D.1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, George E., Jr.

    The crisis in primary care has long been discussed and the dismal litany of statistics is now familiar. The G.P. is vanishing from the medical scene. Over one-third of the active general practitioners are now over 60. In 1970 the U.S. Congress responded to the declining availability of primary health care by passing the Family Practice Act. The…

  15. Too close and too rigid: applying the Circumplex Model of Family Systems to first-generation family firms.

    PubMed

    Michael-Tsabari, Nava; Lavee, Yoav

    2012-06-01

    Despite growing research interest in family businesses, little is known about the characteristics of the families engaging in them. The present paper uses Olson's (Journal of Psychotherapy & the Family, 1988, 4(12), 7-49; Journal of Family Therapy, 2000, 22, 144-167) Circumplex Model of Marital and Family Systems to look at first-generation family firms. We describe existing typologies of family businesses and discuss similarities between the characteristics of first-generation family firms and the rigidly enmeshed family type described in the Circumplex Model. The Steinberg family business (Gibbon & Hadekel (1990) Steinberg: The breakup of a family empire. ON, Canada: MacMillan) serves to illustrate the difficulties of rigidly enmeshed first-generation family firms. Implications for understanding troubled family businesses are discussed together with guidelines for the assessment of a family business in crisis and for intervention: enhancing open communication; allowing for more flexible leadership style, roles, and rules; and maintaining a balance between togetherness and separateness. PMID:22765328

  16. Too close and too rigid: applying the Circumplex Model of Family Systems to first-generation family firms.

    PubMed

    Michael-Tsabari, Nava; Lavee, Yoav

    2012-06-01

    Despite growing research interest in family businesses, little is known about the characteristics of the families engaging in them. The present paper uses Olson's (Journal of Psychotherapy & the Family, 1988, 4(12), 7-49; Journal of Family Therapy, 2000, 22, 144-167) Circumplex Model of Marital and Family Systems to look at first-generation family firms. We describe existing typologies of family businesses and discuss similarities between the characteristics of first-generation family firms and the rigidly enmeshed family type described in the Circumplex Model. The Steinberg family business (Gibbon & Hadekel (1990) Steinberg: The breakup of a family empire. ON, Canada: MacMillan) serves to illustrate the difficulties of rigidly enmeshed first-generation family firms. Implications for understanding troubled family businesses are discussed together with guidelines for the assessment of a family business in crisis and for intervention: enhancing open communication; allowing for more flexible leadership style, roles, and rules; and maintaining a balance between togetherness and separateness.

  17. Family Child Care Programs within the Military System of Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Carolyn S.

    2011-01-01

    Military families face challenges not found in other work environments. Shifting work schedules that are often longer than the typical 8-hour day, as well as the ever-present possibility of being deployed anywhere in the world on a moment's notice, require a child care system that is flexible but maintains high-quality standards. The U.S.…

  18. Survey of Spouse Abuse Shelters: A Family Systems Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindegren, Tina M.

    Traditional psychological theories which focus on the pathological tendencies of the individual account for little of the reported widespread spouse abuse. Social exchange and general systems theories focus on problems in the relationship rather than problems in the person. Given that a family perspective may be helpful in long-term treatment of…

  19. Family Education and Support Services in Systems of Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gyamfi, Phyllis; Walrath, Christine; Burns, Barbara J.; Stephens, Robert L.; Geng, Yisong; Stambaugh, Leyla

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the use of family education and support (FES) services within community-based mental health systems. Using data from the national evaluation of the Children's Mental Health Initiative (CMHI), 2,853 caregivers and their children ages 6 to 18 years from 39 communities participated in this study. The findings indicated that during…

  20. Agoraphobia and Paradigm Strain: A Family Systems Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shean, Glenn; Rohrbaugh, Michael

    Agoraphobia is an increasingly common, often chronically incapacitating anxiety disorder. Both behavior therapy and pharmacotherapy can be effective in reducing the intensity of agoraphobic symptoms. There are promising new developments, however, from a family systems perspective. Researchers are finding that an agoraphobic's marriage and family…

  1. Family Engagement: A Collaborative, Systemic Approach for Middle School Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Keith M.; Lambie, Glenn W.

    2005-01-01

    Early adolescence is a period of intrapersonal and interpersonal transformation; thus, middle school counselors need to provide services that appropriately match their students' and families' developmental needs. A collaborative, systemic approach is one way that counselors can work with other school-based professionals to support…

  2. Building a Family-Centered Early Intervention System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Deborah Klein

    This paper examines the legal mandates as well as the definitions and indicators for a family-centered early childhood system of care for children with special needs. Legislation discussed includes the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act and the Maternal and Child Health Block Grant (Title V of the Social Security Act). Various definitions…

  3. Family Literacy: A Global Approach to Lifelong Learning. Effective Practices in Family Literacy and Intergenerational Learning around the World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elfert, Maren, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    Family literacy emphasises the intergenerational transfer of language and literacy from parents to their children or from one generation to another. A range of family literacy programmes exists, varying according to the groups at which each is aimed. Some programmes focus on children, some on adults, and others on both. Some programmes are run at…

  4. Family System of Advanced Charring Ablators for Planetary Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Congdon, William M.; Curry, Donald M.

    2005-01-01

    Advanced Ablators Program Objectives: 1) Flight-ready(TRL-6) ablative heat shields for deep-space missions; 2) Diversity of selection from family-system approach; 3) Minimum weight systems with high reliability; 4) Optimized formulations and processing; 5) Fully characterized properties; and 6) Low-cost manufacturing. Definition and integration of candidate lightweight structures. Test and analysis database to support flight-vehicle engineering. Results from production scale-up studies and production-cost analyses.

  5. Depression and the nature of Trinidadian family practice: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Maharaj, Rohan G

    2007-01-01

    Background Depression is the most common mental disorder; in an ambulatory-care setting 5 to 10% of patients meet the criteria for major depression. Despite extensive documentation in primary care internationally, Trinidadian studies published on depression have been primarily hospital-based and focussed on suicide. The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence of depression, the variables associated with depression and the commonest reason for the encounter (RFE) among adult patients attending Trinidadian fee-for-service family practice? Methods This was a cross-sectional descriptive survey of consecutive patients taken from a stratified random sample of family practices in the north-west region of Trinidad. To measure depression the Zung scale was modified for use as a brief diagnostic tool. This modified Zung scale, when tested against a psychiatric interview, revealed that at a cut off point of 60, the scale had a specificity of 94% (95% CI 87–100), a sensitivity of 60% (95% CI 45–75), and a likelihood ratio for a positive test result of 10 (95% CI 6–42). Results 508 patients from 28 practices participated; a response rate of 85%. Participants were primarily younger 18–49 years (66.7%), female (69.5%), and educated, with 72.8% having received a secondary school, technical school or university education. Sixty-five (12.8%) of the respondents (95% CI 9.9–15.7) were determined to be depressed. Chi-square analysis revealed no statistically significant association between depression and age, ethnicity, education levels, occupation or marital status (p > 0.05). Binary logistic regression indicated that the likelihood of being depressed (p < 0.05) decreased with the increasing age of the patient and was inversely proportional to patient's achieved level of education; and that patients not presently in a relationship were more likely to be depressed than patients who were currently in a relationship. The 508 participants had 630 RFE, with

  6. The Foster Care Crisis: Translating Research into Policy and Practice. Child, Youth, and Family Services Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Patrick A., Ed.; Dale, Grady, Jr., Ed.; Kendall, Joshua C., Ed.

    Noting that one of the biggest obstacles to reforming the foster care system has been the relative unavailability of research data from the field, this book provides an overview of the current state of foster care, describes the special needs of children living in foster care, and identifies policies and practices that address the foster care…

  7. The social dynamics of cigarette smoking: a family systems perspective.

    PubMed

    Doherty, W J; Whitehead, D A

    1986-09-01

    This paper uses family systems concepts and the Family FIRO model to show how cigarette smoking occurs in the context of the important relationships in a smoker's life. Specifically, smoking is viewed as a way a person is included in relationships, is in control in relationships, and perhaps is intimate in relationships. When smoking is well-established in the relationship, predictable interaction patterns surround it. When a person tries to quit or succeeds in quitting, these patterns change and may need to be replaced by nonsmoking alternatives. Partners may respond with support and willingness to create alternative patterns, or with undermining behavior stemming from a perceived threat to the established patterns. The model is offered for its heuristic value in guiding research and clinical experimentation. The paper also describes implications for family therapists as consultants to smoking-cessation programs.

  8. Family-centered early intervention: an opportunity for creative practice in speech-language pathology.

    PubMed

    Gillette, Y

    1992-01-01

    Services for developmentally delayed children from birth to age three consider the family first. Eligibility for services is determined through a multidisciplinary assessment. Once a child qualifies for service, a multidisciplinary team that includes the family develops an IFSP. The SLP may serve as the service coordinator for the plan or as a team member. The plans must contain specific information that includes documentation of current status and major outcomes for the coming year. An SLP may find that contributing effectively to an IFSP requires new competencies. First, the SLP will need to learn to function in the family-centered, multidisciplinary process of early intervention. Second, the SLP may need to develop creative models to deliver effective service. SLPs can contribute valuable information to the IFSP by finding ways to activate daily life routines to promote a child's communication skills. SLPs can explore the child's life-space, including routines and partners, as a source of contexts for treatment. SLPs also can explore partner communication strategies, note their effects on the child's communication experiences, and recommend additional strategies for treatment. The case study illustrated an individual, home-based intervention program (Gillette, 1989; Lombardino and Magnan, 1983). Other service delivery models can include classroom-based approaches (Wilcox, Kouri, and Caswell, 1991); group parent training approaches (Weistuch, Lewis, and Sullivan, 1991; Cheseldine and McConkey, 1979); and video-assisted approaches (McConkey, 1988; Johnson and Harrison, 1990; Gillette, in press). Many SLPs may find that the process of early intervention with the birth-to-three population offers unique opportunities for practice in their profession. To function effectively in this process, the SLP needs communication-based information to promote the child's communication skills within his or her daily life and sensitivity with which to design a plan that considers

  9. Family-centered early intervention: an opportunity for creative practice in speech-language pathology.

    PubMed

    Gillette, Y

    1992-01-01

    Services for developmentally delayed children from birth to age three consider the family first. Eligibility for services is determined through a multidisciplinary assessment. Once a child qualifies for service, a multidisciplinary team that includes the family develops an IFSP. The SLP may serve as the service coordinator for the plan or as a team member. The plans must contain specific information that includes documentation of current status and major outcomes for the coming year. An SLP may find that contributing effectively to an IFSP requires new competencies. First, the SLP will need to learn to function in the family-centered, multidisciplinary process of early intervention. Second, the SLP may need to develop creative models to deliver effective service. SLPs can contribute valuable information to the IFSP by finding ways to activate daily life routines to promote a child's communication skills. SLPs can explore the child's life-space, including routines and partners, as a source of contexts for treatment. SLPs also can explore partner communication strategies, note their effects on the child's communication experiences, and recommend additional strategies for treatment. The case study illustrated an individual, home-based intervention program (Gillette, 1989; Lombardino and Magnan, 1983). Other service delivery models can include classroom-based approaches (Wilcox, Kouri, and Caswell, 1991); group parent training approaches (Weistuch, Lewis, and Sullivan, 1991; Cheseldine and McConkey, 1979); and video-assisted approaches (McConkey, 1988; Johnson and Harrison, 1990; Gillette, in press). Many SLPs may find that the process of early intervention with the birth-to-three population offers unique opportunities for practice in their profession. To function effectively in this process, the SLP needs communication-based information to promote the child's communication skills within his or her daily life and sensitivity with which to design a plan that considers

  10. Testing the theory of holism: A study of family systems and adolescent health.

    PubMed

    Michaelson, Valerie; Pickett, William; King, Nathan; Davison, Colleen

    2016-12-01

    Holism is an ancient theory that can be applied contemporarily to adolescent health and its determinants. This theory suggests that there is value in considering factors that influence health together as integrated wholes, in addition to consideration of individual components. Characteristics of families are fundamental determinants of health and provide opportunity for exploration of this theory. In a "proof-of-concept" analysis we therefore: (1) developed a multidimensional, composite (holistic) measure to be used to characterize family systems; and (2) related this measure and its individual components to adolescent health outcomes, in order to test the theory of holism. Cross-sectional analyses of survey reports from the 2014 Canadian Health Behaviour in School-aged Children study (weighted n = 19,333) were performed. Factor analysis was used to confirm the psychometric properties of the holistic measure to describe a family system (the "holistic measure"). Associations between this holistic measure, its individual components, and various indicators of health were examined descriptively and using binomial regression. The holistic measure (4 items, α = 0.62; RMSEA = .04; SRMR = 0.01; AGFI = 0.99) included components describing family: material wealth, meal practices, neighbourhood social capital, and social connections. It was consistently associated with various health behaviours, and social and emotional health outcomes. In 22/24 comparisons, this holistic measure related to positive health outcomes more strongly than did its individual components; for negative health outcomes this occurred in 20/24 comparisons. Study findings suggest that it is possible to assess family systems holistically. Such systems are strongly associated with adolescent health outcomes, and there is etiological and theoretical value in considering family systems as integrated wholes. PMID:27486561

  11. Lyme disease: Knowledge and practices of family practitioners in southern Quebec

    PubMed Central

    Ferrouillet, Cécile; Milord, François; Lambert, Louise; Vibien, Anne; Ravel, André

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Public health authorities in Quebec have responded to the progressive emergence of Lyme disease (LD) with surveillance activities and education for family physicians (FPs) who are key actors in both vigilance and case management. OBJECTIVES: To describe FPs’ clinical experience with LD, their degree of knowledge, and their practices in two areas, one with known infected tick populations (Montérégie) and one without (regions nearby Montérégie). METHODS: In the present descriptive cross-sectional study, FPs were recruited during educational sessions. They were asked to complete a questionnaire assessing their clinical experience with Lyme disease, their knowledge of signs and symptoms of LD, and their familiarity with accepted guidelines for diagnosing and treating LD in two clinical scenarios (tick bite and erythema migrans). RESULTS: A total of 201 FPs participated, mostly from Montérégie (n=151). Overall, results revealed a moderate lack of knowledge and suboptimal practices rather than systematically insufficient knowledge or inadequate practices. A majority of participants agreed to more education on LD. As expected, FPs from Montérégie had a higher clinical experience with tick bites (57% versus 25%), better knowledge of LD endemic areas in Canada and erythema migrans characteristics, and better management of erythema migrans (72% versus 50%). CONCLUSION: The present study documented the inappropriate intention to order serology tests for tick bites and the unjustified intention to use tick analysis for diagnostic purposes. Such practices should be discouraged because they are unnecessary and overuse collective laboratory and medical resources. In addition, public health authorities must pursue their education efforts regarding FPs to optimize case management. PMID:26236357

  12. “Nothing Special, Everything Is Maamuli”: Socio-Cultural and Family Practices Influencing the Perinatal Period in Urban India

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Shanti; Srinivasan, Krishnamachari; Kurpad, Anura; Razee, Husna; Ritchie, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Background Globally, India contributes the largest share in sheer numbers to the burden of maternal and infant under-nutrition, morbidity and mortality. A major gap in our knowledge is how socio-cultural practices and beliefs influence the perinatal period and thus perinatal outcomes, particularly in the rapidly growing urban setting. Methods and Findings Using data from a qualitative study in urban south India, including in-depth interviews with 36 women who had recently been through childbirth as well as observations of family life and clinic encounters, we explored the territory of familial, cultural and traditional practices and beliefs influencing women and their families through pregnancy, childbirth and infancy. We found that while there were some similarities in cultural practices to those described before in studies from low resource village settings, there are changing practices and ideas. Fertility concerns dominate women’s experience of married life; notions of gender preference and ideal family size are changing rapidly in response to the urban context; however inter-generational family pressures are still considerable. While a rich repertoire of cultural practices persists throughout the perinatal continuum, their existence is normalised and even underplayed. In terms of diet and nutrition, traditional messages including notions of ‘hot’ and ‘cold’ foods, are stronger than health messages; however breastfeeding is the cultural norm and the practice of delayed breastfeeding appears to be disappearing in this urban setting. Marriage, pregnancy and childbirth are so much part of the norm for women, that there is little expectation of individual choice in any of these major life events. Conclusions A greater understanding is needed of the dynamic factors shaping the perinatal period in urban India, including an acknowledgment of the health promoting as well as potentially harmful cultural practices and the critical role of the family. This will

  13. Toward a Systems Theory of Family Socialization, Public Opinion, and Social Movements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaziano, Cecilie

    Integrating concepts from family systems theory, attachment theory, and family socialization theory within a systems theory of public opinion and social movements, this paper concentrates on linkages between family socialization and political attitudes, adding the influence of social structure. The paper holds that family systems theory…

  14. A Manual for Prioritizing the Topics of Clinical Practice Guidelines for Family Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Mounesan, Leila; Sayarifard, Azadeh; Haghjou, Leila; Ghadirian, Laleh; Rajabi, Fatemeh; Nedjat, Saharnaz

    2016-01-01

    Background: Development of a manual or well-defined criterion for prioritizing the topics of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) will help validate and organize this process evermore. This study was conducted to design an applicable manual that would prioritize the CPG topics for family physicians. Methods: This study was a multi-stage method using a qualitative approach that was conducted for the manual developing. The manual development process took place in four steps, as follows: Literature review, interviews with ten experts, preparing a list of criteria and determining its appropriateness by applying the RAND/UCLA Appropriateness method, and development of the final draft of the manual and pilot study. Results: Interview transcripts went under content analysis and were classified into eight main groups, 12 subgroups, and 85 themes. A comprehensive list consisting of fifty preliminary criteria were extracted. After summarizing and classifying the criteria, 12 appropriate criteria were evaluated using the RAND appropriateness method. Eventually, based on the literature review and our own results of the interview analysis, a manual consisting of five main sections and one clause on ethics was developed. Later, a pilot study was conducted on ten family physician topics, and prioritized by nine experts. Conclusions: The manual can be eyed as a tool ensuring the quality of the process of prioritizing CPG topics for family physicians, as it takes into account the issues involved in priority-setting. Selecting informed stakeholders for rating the criteria and ranking the topics was an issue that was greatly emphasized by the experts. Eventually, the application of this manual can be the first step toward systematizing the process of prioritizing CPG topics in the country. PMID:27141283

  15. Knowledge, attitude and practice of family planning among senior high school students in north Gonder.

    PubMed

    Fantahun, M; Chala, F; Loha, M

    1995-01-01

    Sexual experience, knowledge, attitude and practice on contraception was studied among 991 senior high school students in north Gonder in May 1993 using anonymous questionnaire. Three-hundred-four students (30.7%) answered that they had experienced sexual intercourse. Out of 83 sexually active female students 25(30.1%) reported to have been pregnant. Only four students admitted to have had abortion. Seven-hundred-fifty (75.7%) students claimed that they know at least one method of modern contraception. Of the variables considered in the study reported knowledge of pills and positive attitude to contraception were significantly associated with modern contraceptive use. The most common reason for not using modern contraceptive methods among sexually active respondents was little or no knowledge of contraceptives followed by no access to contraceptives and harmful effects of contraceptives. It is recommended that family life education should be conducted in high schools. Counselling and clinical services on family planning in high schools and places where adolescents gather for recreation and other purposes may also be considered.

  16. Evaluating the implementation of an online clinical log system for family nurse practitioner students.

    PubMed

    Joy, Liberty; Berner, Barbara; Tarrant, Dianne

    2012-01-01

    This pilot study analyzed the adoption of the Nurse Practitioner Student Tracking (NPST) system by a public university's family nurse practitioner graduate program. Using the diffusion-of-innovations research framework, the ease of transition, acceptance, and perceived advantage of the system were studied in a unique group of students (n = 9) and faculty members (n = 6). The study results pointed to a more rapid progression through the stages of technological adoption for students than for faculty members, a more pronounced acceptance of the database by students than by faculty, a higher learning curve for faculty than for students, and improved efficiency in clinical logging for students. The NPST system served to begin addressing identified issues within the program. Half (n = 3) of the faculty thought that the NPST system assisted them in ensuring student competencies were met. The system also helped them analyze how time was spent in clinical practice, identify how much time was spent conferring with preceptor in clinical practice, helped students improve the quality of their charting practices, and eliminated the concern of dishonest duplication of records. In addition, 80% of faculty stated the NPST system helped them see how much time was spent with each patient in clinical practice. PMID:21849888

  17. [Current practice of positive family planning service in the National Institute of Child Health in the last six years].

    PubMed

    Erős, Erika; Hajós, Anett; Kovács, Réka; Supák, Dorina

    2012-10-21

    The aim of positive family planning is to prevent preterm delivery and congenital abnormalities. Using primer prevention models at this time helps to prevent the common disorders which are the leading causes of death. The mission of the National Institute of Child Health is to promote preconceptional health and thus, mother and baby's health. This article introduces the practice of our institute's family planning department and the last six years' experiences.

  18. The organizational social context of mental health medicaid waiver programs with family support services: implications for research and practice.

    PubMed

    Glisson, Charles; Williams, Nathaniel J; Green, Philip; Hemmelgarn, Anthony; Hoagwood, Kimberly

    2014-01-01

    Peer family support specialists (FSS) are parents with practical experience in navigating children's mental health care systems who provide support, advocacy, and guidance to the families of children who need mental health services. Their experience and training differ from those of formally trained mental health clinicians, creating potential conflicts in priorities and values between FSS and clinicians. We hypothesized that these differences could negatively affect the organizational cultures and climates of mental health clinics that employ both FSS and mental health clinicians, and lower the job satisfaction and organizational commitment of FSS. The Organizational Social Context measure was administered on site to 209 FSS and clinicians in 21 mental health programs in New York State. The study compared the organizational-level culture and climate profiles of mental health clinics that employ both FSS and formally trained clinicians to national norms for child mental health clinics, assessed individual-level job satisfaction and organizational commitment as a function of job (FSS vs. clinician) and other individual-level and organizational-level characteristics, and tested whether FSS and clinicians job attitudes were differentially associated with organizational culture and climate. The programs organizational culture and climate profiles were not significantly different from national norms. Individual-level job satisfaction and organizational commitment were unrelated to position (FSS vs. clinician) or other individual-level and organizational-level characteristics except for culture and climate. Both FSS' and clinicians' individual-level work attitudes were associated similarly with organizational culture and climate. PMID:24065458

  19. Relationship between neighborhood context, family management practices and alcohol use among urban, multi-ethnic, young adolescents.

    PubMed

    Tobler, Amy L; Komro, Kelli A; Maldonado-Molina, Mildred M

    2009-12-01

    We examined relationships between alcohol-related neighborhood context, protective home and family management practices, and alcohol use among urban, racial/ethnic minority, adolescents. The sample comprised 5,655 youth who were primarily low SES (72%), African American (43%) and Hispanic (29%). Participants completed surveys in 2002-2005 (ages 11-14 years). Items assessed alcohol use, accessibility of alcohol at home and parental family management practices. Neighborhood context measures included: (1) alcohol outlet density; (2) commercial alcohol accessibility; (3) alcohol advertisement exposure; and (4) perceived neighborhood strength, reported by parents and community leaders. Structural equation modeling was used to assess direct and indirect relationships between alcohol-related neighborhood context at baseline, home alcohol access and family management practices in seventh grade, and alcohol use in eighth grade. Neighborhood strength was negatively associated with alcohol use (beta = -0.078, p < or = 0.05) and exposure to alcohol advertisements was positively associated with alcohol use (beta = 0.043, p < or = 0.05). Neighborhood strength and commercial alcohol access were associated with home alcohol access (beta = 0.050, p family management practices (beta = -0.061, p < or = 0.01 and beta = 0.083, p < or = 0.001, respectively). Home alcohol access showed a positive association with alcohol use (beta = 0.401, p < or = 0.001). Tests for indirect effects suggest that home alcohol access may partially mediate the relationship between neighborhood strength and alcohol use (beta = 0.025, p < 0.062). Results suggest inner-city parents respond to environmental risk, such that as neighborhood risk increases, so also do protective home and family management practices. Parent engagement in restricting alcohol access and improving family management practices may be key to preventive efforts to reduce

  20. Relationship between neighborhood context, family management practices and alcohol use among urban, multi-ethnic, young adolescents.

    PubMed

    Tobler, Amy L; Komro, Kelli A; Maldonado-Molina, Mildred M

    2009-12-01

    We examined relationships between alcohol-related neighborhood context, protective home and family management practices, and alcohol use among urban, racial/ethnic minority, adolescents. The sample comprised 5,655 youth who were primarily low SES (72%), African American (43%) and Hispanic (29%). Participants completed surveys in 2002-2005 (ages 11-14 years). Items assessed alcohol use, accessibility of alcohol at home and parental family management practices. Neighborhood context measures included: (1) alcohol outlet density; (2) commercial alcohol accessibility; (3) alcohol advertisement exposure; and (4) perceived neighborhood strength, reported by parents and community leaders. Structural equation modeling was used to assess direct and indirect relationships between alcohol-related neighborhood context at baseline, home alcohol access and family management practices in seventh grade, and alcohol use in eighth grade. Neighborhood strength was negatively associated with alcohol use (beta = -0.078, p < or = 0.05) and exposure to alcohol advertisements was positively associated with alcohol use (beta = 0.043, p < or = 0.05). Neighborhood strength and commercial alcohol access were associated with home alcohol access (beta = 0.050, p family management practices (beta = -0.061, p < or = 0.01 and beta = 0.083, p < or = 0.001, respectively). Home alcohol access showed a positive association with alcohol use (beta = 0.401, p < or = 0.001). Tests for indirect effects suggest that home alcohol access may partially mediate the relationship between neighborhood strength and alcohol use (beta = 0.025, p < 0.062). Results suggest inner-city parents respond to environmental risk, such that as neighborhood risk increases, so also do protective home and family management practices. Parent engagement in restricting alcohol access and improving family management practices may be key to preventive efforts to reduce

  1. Optics designs for an innovative LED lamp family system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Herbert; Muschaweck, Julius; Hadrath, Stefan; Kudaev, Sergey

    2011-10-01

    On the general lighting market of LED lamps for professional applications there are still mainly products for single purpose solutions existing. There is a lack of standardised lamp systems like they are common for conventional lighting technologies. Therefore, an LED lamp family system was studied using high power LED with the objective to entirely substitute standard conventional lamp families in general lighting applications in the professional market segment. This comprises the realization of sets of lamp types with compact and linear shapes as well as with light distribution characteristics ranging from diffuse to extreme collimation and exceptionally high candle power. Innovative secondary optics concepts are discussed which allow both, the design of lamps with non-bulky shape and to obtain sufficient colour mixing when using multicolour LED combinations in order to achieve a very high colour rendering quality.

  2. Annual night visiting rates in 129 general practices in one family health services authority: association with patient and general practice characteristics.

    PubMed Central

    Majeed, F A; Cook, D G; Hilton, S; Poloniecki, J; Hagen, A

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Rates of night visiting by general practitioners have increased steadily over the last 30 years and vary widely between general practices. AIM. An ecological study was carried out to examine night visiting rates by general practices in one family health services authority, and to determine the extent to which differences in night visiting rates between practices could be explained by patient and practice characteristics. METHOD. The study examined the variation in annual night visiting rates, based on night visit fees claimed between April 1993 and March 1994, among 129 general practices in Merton, Sutton and Wandsworth Family Health Services Authority, London. RESULTS. Practices' annual night visiting rates varied from three per 1000 to 75 per 1000 patients. The percentages of the practice population aged under five years and aged five to 14 years were both positively correlated with night visiting rates (r = 0.38 and r = 0.35, respectively), as were variables associated with social deprivation such as the estimated percentage of the practice population living in one-parent households (r = 0.24) and in households where the head of household was classified as unskilled (r = 0.20). The percentage of the practice population reporting chronic illness was also positively associated with night visiting rates (r = 0.26). The percentages of the practice population aged 35 to 44 years and 45 to 54 years were both negatively associated with night visiting rates (r = -0.34 and r = -0.31, respectively) as was the estimated list inflation for a practice (r = -0.31). There was no significant correlation between night visiting rates and the distance of the main practice surgery from the nearest hospital accident and emergency department. There was also no association between night visiting rates and permission to use a deputizing service. In a stepwise multiple regression model, the multiple correlation coefficient was 0.56 with four factors (percentage of the

  3. Troubled families and individualised solutions: an institutional discourse analysis of alcohol and drug treatment practices involving affected others.

    PubMed

    Selbekk, Anne Schanche; Sagvaag, Hildegunn

    2016-09-01

    Research shows that members of the families with patients suffering from alcohol and other drug-related issues (AOD) experience stress and strain. An important question is, what options do AOD treatment have for them when it comes to support? To answer this, we interviewed directors and clinicians from three AOD treatment institutions in Norway. The study revealed that family-oriented practices are gaining ground as a 'going concern'. However, the relative position of family-orientation in the services, is constrained and shaped by three other going concerns related to: (i) discourse on health and illness, emphasising that addiction is an individual medical and psychological phenomenon, rather than a relational one; (ii) discourse on rights and involvement, emphasising the autonomy of the individual patient and their right to define the format of their own treatment; and (iii) discourse on management, emphasising the relationship between cost and benefit, where family-oriented practices are defined as not being cost-effective. All three discourses are connected to underpin the weight placed on individualised practices. Thus, the findings point to a paradox: there is a growing focus on the needs of children and affected family members, while the possibility of performing integrated work on families is limited.

  4. Systemic hypnosis with depressed individuals and their families.

    PubMed

    Loriedo, Camillo; Torti, Chiara

    2010-04-01

    Historically, depression has been considered almost exclusively from an intrapersonal viewpoint, focusing almost entirely on the depressed individual in treatment. In this article, the focus is shifted to an interpersonal view of depression, emphasizing the role of family and cultural influences on the evolution of depression and its successful treatment. Patterns of hypnosis that can be applied in a systemic treatment framework are described and illustrated with case examples.

  5. A case for integrating the Patient and Family Centered Care Methodology and Practice in Lean healthcare organizations.

    PubMed

    DiGioia, Anthony M; Greenhouse, Pamela K; Chermak, Tanya; Hayden, Margaret A

    2015-12-01

    Many healthcare organizations using Lean are becoming interested in the Patient and Family Centered Care Methodology and Practice (PFCC M/P). We suggest that integrating the two approaches can accelerate the pace of improvement and provide a powerful mechanism to keep the patient and family as the primary focus of improvement activities. We describe the two approaches and note the ways in which they are complementary. We then discuss the ways in which integrating the PFCC M/P adds value to patients, families, providers, and organizations and accelerates transformation. Finally, we suggest ways to implement PFCC M/P within Lean healthcare organizations.

  6. Developing a Hybrid Model of Rational-Emotive Therapy and Systemic Family Therapy: A Response to Russell and Morrill.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guterman, Jeffrey T.

    1991-01-01

    Challenges Russell and Morrill's (1989) assertion that a practical blending of Rational Emotive Therapy (RET) and systemic family therapy is possible. Cautions that a connection between these approaches be made only with an appreciation and respect for these schools' epistemological differences and correspondingly disparate cognitive change…

  7. [How to carry out work on family planning after adopting production responsibility systems in rural areas].

    PubMed

    Xiao, S H

    1982-05-29

    After the Third Meeting of the Eleventh People's Congress, the entire responsibility for agricultural production was transferred to a lower level. Peasants in various areas have adopted the so called production responsibility system, and the phenomenon of an increased population rate has also appeared in some areas. In this article, the author discusses how to solve these problems created by the new situation. The 1st step is try to control population growth through socialist propaganda education, administrative measures, economic incentives and punishments, and family planning work. The 2nd step is to popularize the practice of having only 1 child per household in the rural areas. The 2nd and 3rd child in each family should be controlled and prohibited. This policy formulated by the Central Government should be carried out thoroughly. Families which follow the policy and have only 1 child should be encouraged with economic rewards, and those families which have 2 or more children should be punished economically. The 3rd step is to establish a national work team to be in charge of family planning and birth control. There should be an ideological unity among the nation's leadership. Party members and cadres should establish themselves as good examples for the people so that the population control work may become successful.

  8. Effectively Addressing Mental Health Issues in Child Welfare Practice: The Family Connection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pufahl, Elisabeth

    2007-01-01

    Nonprofit family-run organizations, such as Tennessee Voices for Children (TVC), are providing leadership in advocating for and delivering services to children and families in need. Utilizing a family-driven approach and a staff partially comprised of parent-professionals, TVC's Nashville Connection and Family Connection programs have strengthened…

  9. Family Therapy and Children of Alcoholics Implications for Continuing Education and Certification in Substance Abuse Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crespi, Tony D.; Rueckert, Quentin H.

    2006-01-01

    Clinicians involved in family therapy are increasingly concerned with the impact of parental alcoholism on individual development and family functioning. With more than 20 million adults raised within an alcoholic family, and with widespread problems associated with parental alcoholism, clinicians providing family treatment have a potentially…

  10. Family Policy and Practice in Early Child Care. Advances in Early Education and Day Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reifel, Stuart, Ed.; Dunst, Carl J., Ed.; Wolery, Mark, Ed.

    Family issues are an abiding concern for members of the profession of early education, and debate regarding government policies about families and child care continues to be timely. This volume provides a foundation for understanding programs, families, and the current social context, as well as particular areas of concern for families and child…

  11. Parenting Practices among Depressed Mothers in the Child Welfare System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohl, Patricia L.; Kagotho, Jacqueline Njeri; Dixon, David

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze a nationally representative sample of families referred to Child Protective Services (CPS) agencies, the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being, to examine the association between maternal depression and parenting practices over a 36-month follow-up period. Three hypotheses were tested: (1)…

  12. Family-Centered Practices & Positive Behavior Support: A Qualitative Examination of Families' Perspectives of Managing Preschoolers' Challenging Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berryhill, Laura F.

    2013-01-01

    Challenging behavior often impacts a child's education along with peer and family relationships. It is estimated that 10-30% of all typically developing preschool children have chronic, mild to moderate levels of behavior problems. Given the significant impact that challenging behavior can have on a child's development, relationships, and future…

  13. A Family Systems Approach for Preventing Adolescent Runaway Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coco, E. Lane; Courtney, Linda J.

    1998-01-01

    Utilizes a family therapy approach to restructure family relationships in order to prevent further runaway behavior of a 15-year-old Mexican-American female. The approach involves a family interview, genogram, and family therapy. The Family Satisfaction Scale was administered to evaluate the effectiveness of the approach. (Author/MKA)

  14. Formative Evaluation of Clinician Experience with Integrating Family History-Based Clinical Decision Support into Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Doerr, Megan; Edelman, Emily; Gabitzsch, Emily; Eng, Charis; Teng, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    Family health history is a leading predictor of disease risk. Nonetheless, it is underutilized to guide care and, therefore, is ripe for health information technology intervention. To fill the family health history practice gap, Cleveland Clinic has developed a family health history collection and clinical decision support tool, MyFamily. This report describes the impact and process of implementing MyFamily into primary care, cancer survivorship and cancer genetics clinics. Ten providers participated in semi-structured interviews that were analyzed to identify opportunities for process improvement. Participants universally noted positive effects on patient care, including increases in quality, personalization of care and patient engagement. The impact on clinical workflow varied by practice setting, with differences observed in the ease of integration and the use of specific report elements. Tension between the length of the report and desired detail was appreciated. Barriers and facilitators to the process of implementation were noted, dominated by the theme of increased integration with the electronic medical record. These results fed real-time improvement cycles to reinforce clinician use. This model will be applied in future institutional efforts to integrate clinical genomic applications into practice and may be useful for other institutions considering the implementation of tools for personalizing medical management. PMID:25563219

  15. Social Workers' Orientations toward the Evidence-Based Practice Process: A Comparison with Psychologists and Licensed Marriage and Family Therapists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parrish, Danielle E.; Rubin, Allen

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the results from a large, cross-sectional survey of social workers, psychologists, and licensed marriage and family therapists (LMFTs) in Texas (N = 865) regarding their orientation toward and implementation of evidence-based practice (EBP). All social workers were recruited by e-mail using the state NASW Listserv (analysis…

  16. Professionals' Perspectives on Organizational Factors that Support or Hinder the Successful Implementation of Family-Centered Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Alexandra; Hiebert-Murphy, Diane; Trute, Barry

    2010-01-01

    This article presents findings from an exploratory, qualitative study whose objective was to identify professionals' perceptions of organizational factors that support or hinder the implementation of family-centered practice (FCP). Two disability services organizations in Manitoba, Canada, were selected as the research sites. In 2002, all staff…

  17. Parent and Staff Expectations for Continuity of Home Practices in the Child Care Setting for Families with Diverse Cultural Backgrounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Gioia, Katey

    2009-01-01

    The use of childcare services for very young children (birth to three years) has increased dramatically in the past two decades (Department of Families, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs, 2004). This article investigates the expectations for cultural continuity of caregiving practices (with particular emphasis on sleep and feeding) between…

  18. Television, Language, and Literacy Practices in Sudanese Refugee Families: "I Learned How to Spell English on Channel 18"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Kristen H.; Moses, Annie M.

    2011-01-01

    This ethnographic study explored the ways in which media, particularly television, connected with English language and literacy practices among Sudanese refugees in Michigan. Three families with young children participated in this study. Data collection included participant observation, interviews, and collection of artifacts over 18 months, with…

  19. The Link between Preschoolers' Phonological Awareness and Mothers' Book-Reading and Reminiscing Practices in Low-Income Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leyva, Diana; Sparks, Alison; Reese, Elaine

    2012-01-01

    The relation between preschoolers' phonological awareness and the frequency and quality of parents' book-reading and reminiscing practices were examined in 54 low-income and ethnically diverse families. Children's phonological awareness was assessed at the beginning and end of preschool. Mothers reported the frequency with which they read books…

  20. Telecommuting, Control, and Boundary Management: Correlates of Policy Use and Practice, Job Control, and Work-Family Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kossek, Ellen Ernst; Lautsch, Brenda A.; Eaton, Susan C.

    2006-01-01

    We examine professionals' use of telecommuting, perceptions of psychological job control, and boundary management strategies. We contend that work-family research should distinguish between descriptions of flexibility use (formal telecommuting policy user, amount of telecommuting practiced) and how the individual psychologically experiences…

  1. Feeding style differences in food parenting practices associated with fruit and vegetable intake in children fromlow-income families

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to examine the moderating effects of feeding styles on the relationship between food parenting practices and fruit and vegetable intake in low-income families with preschool-aged children. Focus group meetings with Head Start parents were conducted by using the nomina...

  2. Adapting the Structural Family Systems Rating to Assess the Patterns of Interaction in Families of Dementia Caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Mitrani, Victoria B.; Feaster, Daniel J.; McCabe, Brian E.; Czaja, Sara J.; Szapocznik, Jose

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This study adapted the Structural Family Systems Ratings (SFSR), an observational measure of family interactions, for dementia caregivers. This article presents the development of the SFSR-Dementia Caregiver adaptation (SFSR-DC) and examines relationships between specific family-interaction patterns and caregiver distress. Design and Methods: The families of 177 Cuban American and White non-Hispanic American caregivers of dementia patients were assessed at baseline, 6, 12, and 18 months. Structural family theory and clinical experience were used to identify family interaction patterns believed to be related to caregiver emotional functioning. Factor analysis was used to refine subscales and develop a multiscale measure. Results: Six reliable subscales were related to caregiver distress and included in the SFSR-DC. There were two second-order factors. The SFSR-DC was provisionally cross-validated and showed invariance across the two ethnic groups. Implications: The SFSR-DC provides a method for examining specific and multiple interaction patterns in caregiver families and thus can advance knowledge regarding the role of the family in the stress processes of caregiving. These findings support the relevance of family interactions in caregiver distress and suggest that a treatment approach aimed at supporting family closeness and conflict resolution and reducing negativity might enhance caregiver well-being. PMID:16051907

  3. Module 3: Workplace Policy, Practice and Culture--Employer and Employee Perspectives. Work-Family Curriculum Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kossek, Ellen Ernst; Leana, Carrie; MacDermid, Shelley; Pitt-Catsouphes, Marcie; Raskin, Patricia; Secret, Mary; Sweet, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    The contents of this module have been prepared to address some of challenges associated with teaching about work-family issues from a human resource management and employment perspective. The goals of this module are: (1) To develop an understanding that work-family policies are part of a human resource management system and the employment…

  4. Practical opportunities to improve early detection and prevention of colorectal cancer (CRC) in members of high-risk families.

    PubMed

    Patel, S G; Lowery, J T; Gatof, D; Ahnen, D J

    2015-03-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence and mortality are steadily declining and CRC screening rates are increasing in the United States. Although this a very good news, several definable groups still have very low screening rates including younger (under age 50) members of high-risk CRC families. This opinion piece describes five strategies that could be incorporated into routine practice to improve identification and guideline-based screening in members of high-risk families. Routine incorporation of a simple family history screening tool and outreach to high-risk family members could substantially improve guideline-based screening in this population. Identification of CRCs and advanced adenomas in the endoscopy suite defines another group of high-risk families for similar outreach. Lynch syndrome families can be identified by testing CRCs and selected adenomas for microsatellite instability or loss of DNA repair protein expression. Finally, selective addition of aspirin to surveillance endoscopy can decrease the risk of new adenomas and CRCs. The rationale for these strategies as well as mechanisms for their implementation and evaluation in clinical practice is described. PMID:25698379

  5. Two families of exocomets in the β Pictoris system.

    PubMed

    Kiefer, F; des Etangs, A Lecavelier; Boissier, J; Vidal-Madjar, A; Beust, H; Lagrange, A-M; Hébrard, G; Ferlet, R

    2014-10-23

    The young planetary system surrounding the star β Pictoris harbours active minor bodies. These asteroids and comets produce a large amount of dust and gas through collisions and evaporation, as happened early in the history of our Solar System. Spectroscopic observations of β Pictoris reveal a high rate of transits of small evaporating bodies, that is, exocomets. Here we report an analysis of more than 1,000 archival spectra gathered between 2003 and 2011, which provides a sample of about 6,000 variable absorption signatures arising from exocomets transiting the disk of the parent star. Statistical analysis of the observed properties of these exocomets allows us to identify two populations with different physical properties. One family consists of exocomets producing shallow absorption lines, which can be attributed to old exhausted (that is, strongly depleted in volatiles) comets trapped in a mean motion resonance with a massive planet. Another family consists of exocomets producing deep absorption lines, which may be related to the recent fragmentation of one or a few parent bodies. Our results show that the evaporating bodies observed for decades in the β Pictoris system are analogous to the comets in our own Solar System.

  6. Two families of exocomets in the β Pictoris system.

    PubMed

    Kiefer, F; des Etangs, A Lecavelier; Boissier, J; Vidal-Madjar, A; Beust, H; Lagrange, A-M; Hébrard, G; Ferlet, R

    2014-10-23

    The young planetary system surrounding the star β Pictoris harbours active minor bodies. These asteroids and comets produce a large amount of dust and gas through collisions and evaporation, as happened early in the history of our Solar System. Spectroscopic observations of β Pictoris reveal a high rate of transits of small evaporating bodies, that is, exocomets. Here we report an analysis of more than 1,000 archival spectra gathered between 2003 and 2011, which provides a sample of about 6,000 variable absorption signatures arising from exocomets transiting the disk of the parent star. Statistical analysis of the observed properties of these exocomets allows us to identify two populations with different physical properties. One family consists of exocomets producing shallow absorption lines, which can be attributed to old exhausted (that is, strongly depleted in volatiles) comets trapped in a mean motion resonance with a massive planet. Another family consists of exocomets producing deep absorption lines, which may be related to the recent fragmentation of one or a few parent bodies. Our results show that the evaporating bodies observed for decades in the β Pictoris system are analogous to the comets in our own Solar System. PMID:25341784

  7. The evolution and practical application of machine translation system (1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tominaga, Isao; Sato, Masayuki

    This paper describes a development, practical applicatioin, problem of a system, evaluation of practical system, and development trend of machine translation. Most recent system contains next four problems. 1) the vagueness of a text, 2) a difference of the definition of the terminology between different language, 3) the preparing of a large-scale translation dictionary, 4) the development of a software for the logical inference. Machine translation system is already used practically in many industry fields. However, many problems are not solved. The implementation of an ideal system will be after 15 years. Also, this paper described seven evaluation items detailedly. This English abstract was made by Mu system.

  8. Safety practices and living conditions of low-income urban families.

    PubMed

    Santer, L J; Stocking, C B

    1991-12-01

    Injuries remain the leading cause of mortality in children and disproportionately affect poor children. Prior injury prevention efforts have neglected the injury prevention needs of these children. One hundred thirty-three care givers of medically indigent urban children younger than 6 years old were interviewed regarding living conditions, previous injuries, and safety practices and knowledge. Functional smoke detectors and fire extinguishers were present in 75% and 27% of homes, respectively. Few respondents, regardless of previous poisoning experience, were cognizant of ipecac, had it in their homes, or had a good response to a possible poisoning. Few homes had locked storage space, and most hazards were stored suboptimally. While the frequency of the use of automobiles was low, rides in a variety of vehicles were common with 63% of children who usually were restrained inadequately. Additionally, 89% of children aged 35 to 59 months and 6% of those younger than 3 years old sometimes bathed without adult supervision. These findings indicate the dramatic need for injury prevention programs focused on low-income urban families. Specific concerns include exposure to fires and burns, falls, hazardous travel conditions, dangerous chemical, choking, and drowning. Lack of information and isolated care givers may result in poor supervision and responses to injury of these children.

  9. Chronic use of hypnotics in a family practice--patients' reluctance to stop treatment.

    PubMed

    Matalon, A; Yinnon, A M; Hurwitz, A

    1990-12-01

    Insomnia is a common symptom in family practice, and hypnotics are frequently prescribed for its treatment. A survey was performed in an urban clinic serving 1900 persons in order to detect the prevalence of this disorder and to reassess the need for hypnotics. Sixty-one patients were identified who were taking prescribed hypnotic drugs, mainly benzodiazepines. All were over the age of 40, and they comprised 8.1% of this age group. Forty-five were chronic users, taking hypnotics for more than 4 months during a 6-month study period. Eighty-nine percent of these chronic users were above 60 years of age. Seventy-seven percent had difficulty initiating sleep and 23% had problems maintaining sleep. Information was given to these patients on the side effects and possible addictive nature of chronic hypnotic use. Different kinds of psychological support were offered as alternatives to drug treatment, but these were refused by all. We conclude that in view of the addiction associated with chronic use and the difficulty of weaning patients off the sleeping pill, there is a place for more careful evaluation and management before hypnotics are prescribed. PMID:2289635

  10. Chronic use of hypnotics in a family practice--patients' reluctance to stop treatment.

    PubMed

    Matalon, A; Yinnon, A M; Hurwitz, A

    1990-12-01

    Insomnia is a common symptom in family practice, and hypnotics are frequently prescribed for its treatment. A survey was performed in an urban clinic serving 1900 persons in order to detect the prevalence of this disorder and to reassess the need for hypnotics. Sixty-one patients were identified who were taking prescribed hypnotic drugs, mainly benzodiazepines. All were over the age of 40, and they comprised 8.1% of this age group. Forty-five were chronic users, taking hypnotics for more than 4 months during a 6-month study period. Eighty-nine percent of these chronic users were above 60 years of age. Seventy-seven percent had difficulty initiating sleep and 23% had problems maintaining sleep. Information was given to these patients on the side effects and possible addictive nature of chronic hypnotic use. Different kinds of psychological support were offered as alternatives to drug treatment, but these were refused by all. We conclude that in view of the addiction associated with chronic use and the difficulty of weaning patients off the sleeping pill, there is a place for more careful evaluation and management before hypnotics are prescribed.

  11. A survey of program evaluation practices in family-centered pediatric rehabilitation settings.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Katherine A; Cousins, J Bradley

    2014-04-01

    Program evaluation is becoming increasingly important in pediatric rehabilitation settings that adhere to the family-centered service (FCS) philosophy. However, researchers know little about the specific evaluation activities occurring in these settings or the extent to which evaluators/service providers uphold FCS in their program evaluation activities. Through a questionnaire survey, this study aimed to document evaluators/service providers' perceptions of the level of program evaluation occurring in their Canadian pediatric rehabilitation centers. It also investigated the extent to which evaluators/service providers perceive program evaluation practices at their centers to be consistent with the FCS context of Canadian pediatric rehabilitation settings. The findings suggested that the amount of evaluation activities occurring within the respondents' centers is variable; that the majority of individuals working in program evaluation do not have formal training in it; and that the respondents' centers have limited resources for evaluation. The study also showed that staff members believe their centers' evaluation activities are somewhat consistent with FCS philosophy, but that improvements are needed.

  12. Patient consent to observation. Responses to requests for written consent in an academic family practice unit.

    PubMed Central

    Shafir, M. S.; Silversides, C.; Waters, I.; MacRury, K.; Frank, J. W.; Becker, L. A.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine patient rates of consent to observation and response to being asked for written consent. DESIGN: Patients were asked to provide written consent for a supervising physician to observe a resident performing a physical examination, or for both direct observation and videotaping of the visit. After the visit, all patients were interviewed, and patients who had given written consent completed a questionnaire. SETTING: The family practice unit at a teaching hospital affiliated with the University of Toronto. PARTICIPANTS: A representative sample of new and returning patients. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Patient consent to observation or videotaping. RESULTS: Most patients (92.2%) agreed to be observed. Of those asked only for consent to observe, 97.3% agreed. Of those asked for consent to observe and videotape, 85.2% agreed. When specifically asked, 22% of patients who agreed to observation expressed concerns. CONCLUSION: We must devise clear policies and procedures for obtaining patient consent that are both sensitive to patients' concerns and administratively effective. PMID:7580386

  13. Best practices for stroke patient and family education in the acute care setting: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Vanessa

    2013-01-01

    After a stroke, patients and families face many changes--physical, mental, and emotional. It is imperative that the nurse is able to appropriately educate the patient and family in preparation for discharge from the acute care center.

  14. Economic Disadvantage in Complex Family Systems: Expansion of Family Stress Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, Melissa A.

    2008-01-01

    Economic disadvantage is associated with multiple risks to early socioemotional development. This article reviews research regarding family stress frameworks to model the pathways from economic disadvantage to negative child outcomes via family processes. Future research in this area should expand definitions of family and household to incorporate…

  15. Food safety knowledge, practices and beliefs of primary food preparers in families with young children. A mixed methods study.

    PubMed

    Meysenburg, Rebecca; Albrecht, Julie A; Litchfield, Ruth; Ritter-Gooder, Paula K

    2014-02-01

    Food preparers in families with young children are responsible for safe food preparation and handling to prevent foodborne illness. To explore the food safety perceptions, beliefs, and practices of primary food preparers in families with children 10 years of age and younger, a mixed methods convergent parallel design and constructs of the Health Belief Model were used. A random sampling of 72 primary food handlers (36.2±8.6 years of age, 88% female) within young families in urban and rural areas of two Midwestern states completed a knowledge survey and participated in ten focus groups. Quantitative data were analyzed using SPSS. Transcribed interviews were analyzed for codes and common themes. Forty-four percent scored less than the average knowledge score of 73%. Participants believe children are susceptible to foodborne illness but perceive its severity to be low with gastrointestinal discomfort as the primary outcome. Using safe food handling practices and avoiding inconveniences were benefits of preventing foodborne illness. Childcare duties, time and knowledge were barriers to practicing food safety. Confidence in preventing foodborne illness was high, especially when personal control over food handling is present. The low knowledge scores and reported practices revealed a false sense of confidence despite parental concern to protect their child from harm. Food safety messages that emphasize the susceptibility and severity of foodborne illness in children are needed to reach this audience for adoption of safe food handling practices. PMID:24211815

  16. Evolution of Functional Family Therapy as an Evidence-Based Practice for Adolescents with Disruptive Behavior Problems.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Michael S; Alexander, James F; Turner, Charles W; Hollimon, Amy

    2016-09-01

    This article summarizes the evolution of functional family therapy (FFT) based upon four decades of clinical practice and scientific scrutiny through research evidence. FFT research has evolved from an initial focus upon clinical process research, which examined sequential exchanges between therapists and family members. A key element of this research has been an examination of the way in which clinicians acquire, consolidate, and maintain the skills needed to implement FFT effectively with youth and families. Many randomized efficacy and effectiveness studies have evaluated the impact of FFT across diverse clinical populations. Subsequent research investigated factors that influence the effectiveness of implementation across more than 300 clinical settings in which more than 2,500 trained clinicians have provided service to nearly 400,000 families. Another important set of investigations concerned the cost-effectiveness of the interventions.

  17. Evolution of Functional Family Therapy as an Evidence-Based Practice for Adolescents with Disruptive Behavior Problems.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Michael S; Alexander, James F; Turner, Charles W; Hollimon, Amy

    2016-09-01

    This article summarizes the evolution of functional family therapy (FFT) based upon four decades of clinical practice and scientific scrutiny through research evidence. FFT research has evolved from an initial focus upon clinical process research, which examined sequential exchanges between therapists and family members. A key element of this research has been an examination of the way in which clinicians acquire, consolidate, and maintain the skills needed to implement FFT effectively with youth and families. Many randomized efficacy and effectiveness studies have evaluated the impact of FFT across diverse clinical populations. Subsequent research investigated factors that influence the effectiveness of implementation across more than 300 clinical settings in which more than 2,500 trained clinicians have provided service to nearly 400,000 families. Another important set of investigations concerned the cost-effectiveness of the interventions. PMID:27329051

  18. Family Cultural Socialization Practices and Ethnic Identity in College-Going Emerging Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juang, Linda; Syed, Moin

    2010-01-01

    We examined how family cultural socialization related to the ethnic identity of Asian American, Latino, White, and Mixed-Ethnic emerging adults (N = 225). Greater family cultural socialization was related to greater ethnic identity exploration and commitment. Ethnic minority students reported higher levels of family cultural socialization and…

  19. Recent Developments in Family Psychoeducation as an Evidence-Based Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucksted, Alicia; McFarlane, William; Downing, Donna; Dixon, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Among potential resources for people with serious mental illnesses (SMI) and their families, professionally delivered family psychoeducation (FPE) is designed to engage, inform, and educate family members, so that they can assist the person with SMI in managing their illness. In this article, we review research regarding FPE outcomes and…

  20. Policies and Practices in Canadian Family Child Care Agencies. You Bet I Care!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doherty, Gillian; Lero, Donna S.; Tougas, Jocelyne; LaGrange, Annette; Goelman, Hillel

    Four Canadian provinces license or contract with family child care agencies, which in turn recruit and monitor child care providers. These family child care agencies have two primary roles: monitoring and supervising providers, and supplying their affiliated family child care providers with professional development opportunities and other types of…

  1. Strategies and Practices for Working with Immigrant Families in Early Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vesely, Colleen K.; Ginsberg, Mark R.

    2011-01-01

    This study explores how early childhood education programs engage immigrant families in their children's learning, how programs learn about these families and incorporate their cultures into the classrooms, and what programs are doing in terms of their staff's professional development related to working with immigrant children and families. The…

  2. Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse among Social Work Colleagues and Their Families: Impact on Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fewell, Christine Huff; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Surveyed 198 social workers to determine prevalence of alcohol and other drug problems among colleagues, family members, and friends. Forty-three percent of respondents reported knowing at least one social worker who had alcohol or drug problem; 60% had close friends or family with problems; 39% had nuclear family member with problem; and 11% were…

  3. Conflicting Language Ideologies and Contradictory Language Practices in Singaporean Multilingual Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curdt-Christiansen, Xiao Lan

    2016-01-01

    Informed by family language policy (FLP) as the theoretical framework, I illustrate in this paper how language ideologies can be incongruous and language policies can be conflicting through three multilingual families in Singapore representing three major ethnic groups--Chinese, Malay and Indian. By studying their family language audits, observing…

  4. Becoming a Family: Parents' Stories and Their Implications for Practice, Policy, and Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harold, Rena D.

    Noting that the movement from young adulthood through coupling and the transition to parenthood may be among the most universal adult developmental transitions, this book uses a qualitative analysis of family narratives to examine the meanings that family members ascribe to the developmental process of becoming a family. Addressing issues of…

  5. Japanese system of family planning and MCH services.

    PubMed

    1985-03-01

    The Japanese Family Planning (FP)/Maternal and Child Health (MCH) programs can be devided into 2 major categories: 1) health services or preventive and health promotion programs, and 2) medical care services or curative programs. Health examinations of pregnant women are performed throughout pregnancy. After birth, each child is screened for inbornn metabolism defects. Vaccination programs covers both women and children. Additionally, health promotion services such as health guidance, including guidance for various groups as well as counselling for individuals, are carried out. The FP/MCH programs are conducted under the auspices of the Ministry of Health and Welfare. This division supervises the FP/MCH programs in 47 prefectures and 54 specially-selected cities and wards, makes policy, provides financial aid and oversees administration. The prefectures and wards independently plan and execute family planning and health administration. There are 856 health centers and 3271 local governments directly in charge of executing the programs. Population per prefecture ranges from 600,000 to 12 million for Tokyo. Population per health center varies from 10,000 to 750,000 with an average of about 140,000. Center staff includes doctors, public health nurses, veterinarians, pharmacists, x-ray specialists, nutritionists, hygiene inspectors and specialists in inspecting environmental contamination. Local governments coordinate programs with the centers to prevent program overlap. The Maternal and Child Health Promoter System, established in 1971, links public health nurses with families and is staffed by housewife volunteers appointed by local government heads. They play an especially important role in spreading family planning. PMID:12279991

  6. Emotion socialization and ethnicity: an examination of practices and outcomes in African American, Asian American, and Latin American families.

    PubMed

    Morelen, Diana; Thomassin, Kristel

    2013-06-01

    The current review paper summarizes the literature on parental emotion socialization in ethnically diverse families in the United States. Models of emotion socialization have been primarily developed using samples of European American parents and children. As such, current categorizations of "adaptive" and "maladaptive" emotion socialization practices may not be applicable to individuals from different ethnic backgrounds. The review examines current models of emotion socialization, with particular attention paid to the demographic breakdown of the studies used to develop these models. Additionally, the review highlights studies examining emotion socialization practices in African American, Asian American, and Latin American families. The review is synthesized with summarizing themes of similarities and differences across ethnic groups, and implications for culturally sensitive research and practice are discussed.

  7. Emotion Socialization and Ethnicity: An Examination of Practices and Outcomes in African American, Asian American, and Latin American Families

    PubMed Central

    Morelen, Diana; Thomassin, Kristel

    2013-01-01

    The current review paper summarizes the literature on parental emotion socialization in ethnically diverse families in the United States. Models of emotion socialization have been primarily developed using samples of European American parents and children. As such, current categorizations of “adaptive” and “maladaptive” emotion socialization practices may not be applicable to individuals from different ethnic backgrounds. The review examines current models of emotion socialization, with particular attention paid to the demographic breakdown of the studies used to develop these models. Additionally, the review highlights studies examining emotion socialization practices in African American, Asian American, and Latin American families. The review is synthesized with summarizing themes of similarities and differences across ethnic groups, and implications for culturally sensitive research and practice are discussed. PMID:23766738

  8. Economic Disadvantage in Complex Family Systems: Expansion of Family Stress Models

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, Melissa A.

    2014-01-01

    Economic disadvantage is associated with multiple risks to early socioemotional development. This paper reviews research regarding family stress frameworks to model the pathways from economic disadvantage to negative child outcomes via family processes. Future research in this area should expand definitions of family and household to incorporate diversity and instability. This expansion would be particularly relevant for research among low-income ethnic minority families and families with young children. This line of research would highlight specific pathways to target to prevent the onset of early parental and child dysfunction. PMID:18491229

  9. Family Systems as Predictors of Career Attitude Maturity for Korean High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Sang Kil; Yi, Hyun Sook

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the relationships between family systems and high school students' career development. Family adaptability and family cohesion were considered as indicators of family function, and career attitude maturity was conceptualized as a representative factor explaining adolescents' career development. A total of 634 high school…

  10. A Structural Approach to Unresolved Mourning in Single Parent Family Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fulmer, Richard H.

    1983-01-01

    Considers the mother's depression as a special problem in therapy of single-parent families, resulting from unresolved mourning maintained by the family system. Offers reasons why the single-parent family's structure seems inherently vulnerable to unresolved mourning. Suggests techniques of Structural Family Therapy to facilitate mourning in such…

  11. [Agricultural production responsibility system and the work of family planning in the rural area].

    PubMed

    Zhu, M

    1982-09-29

    With the establishment of the agricultural production responsibility system, the entire agricultural management and economic system has undergone great changes, and family planning in rural areas has met with many difficulties. Because of this responsibility system, households with more manpower seem to become wealthy more rapidly than others. An existing belief among the rural population is that more children will provide a larger labor force and thus more income. Birth control and family planning are therefore becoming more difficult. In order to change existing beliefs, a comprehensive ideological education for peasants is needed so that they may understand the question of birth control from the viewpoints of national interests. Economic rewards and administrative restrictions may be used as necessary birth control measures. Agricultural production and family planning can be managed well if there is close contact and cooperation between the cadres and the masses. Extra care and benefits should be given to women of childbearing age who undergo birth control operations and agree to a single child in each household. Welfare programs for the masses, such as kindergartens and nursing homes must be established in order to reduce their worries. In addition, efforts are needed to study the new situation and solve new problems. The goal of controlling the rural population growth should be achiefed through practical work and experience.

  12. Like daughter, like son? Fertility decline and the transformation of gender systems in the family

    PubMed Central

    Allendorf, Keera

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND An important question for population research is whether fertility decline transforms gender systems. OBJECTIVE This paper contributes to answering this broad question by examining how fertility decline may change the relative value and roles of daughters and sons in families. First, I outline theoretical pathways, suggesting that a key factor is the gender composition of families. As fertility declines, the proportion of families with children of only one gender increases, which may facilitate greater gender symmetry between daughters and sons. Second, I explore how fertility decline may have contributed to the transformation of the relative value and roles of sons and daughters in practice in one place. METHODS The analysis draws primarily on semi-structured interviews with 30 respondents living in one Indian village. This village is located in a district where fertility has declined to at least the replacement level. RESULTS Respondents perceive changes in the gender system, including less son preference, more equal schooling for sons and daughters, more freedom in marriage and premarital relationships, and perhaps greater daughter support of parents in old age. CONCLUSIONS The results describe changes in the relative value, treatment, and behavior of sons and daughters that are consistent with the theorized effects of fertility decline. Future research is needed, however, to determine whether fertility decline makes a causal contribution to changes in the gender system. PMID:27147902

  13. Conceptualizing Family Stress: A Systemic Revision of Hill's ABCX Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koch, Alberta Y.

    This report offers a theoretical approach to the study of family adaptation to stress. Major works pertaining to family theory, research, and stress, published since 1979, are explored as a theoretical framework, and three conclusions are drawn from these sources: (1) Hill's ABCX model of family stress still influences family stress research; (2)…

  14. Families as Nurturing Systems: Support across the Life Span.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unger, Donald G., Ed.; Powell, Douglas R., Ed.

    This volume seeks to refine and extend knowledge about approaches to supporting the caregiving roles of families. The chapters in the volume describe and appraise new directions in family support. After an introduction, the two parts of the volume address "New Directions for Family Resource and Support Programs" (six chapters) and "Family Support…

  15. Randomised controlled trial evaluating cardiovascular screening and intervention in general practice: principal results of British family heart study. Family Heart Study Group.

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To measure the change in cardiovascular risk factors achievable in families over one year by a cardiovascular screening and lifestyle intervention in general practice. DESIGN--Randomised controlled trial in 26 general practices in 13 towns in Britain. SUBJECTS--12,472 men aged 40-59 and their partners (7460 men and 5012 women) identified by household. INTERVENTION--Nurse led programme using a family centred approach with follow up according to degree of risk. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--After one year the pairs of practices were compared for differences in (a) total coronary (Dundee) risk score and (b) cigarette smoking, weight, blood pressure, and random blood cholesterol and glucose concentrations. RESULTS--In men the overall reduction in coronary risk score was 16% (95% confidence interval 11% to 21%) in the intervention practices at one year. This was partitioned between systolic pressure (7%), smoking (5%), and cholesterol concentration (4%). The reduction for women was similar. For both sexes reported cigarette smoking at one year was lower by about 4%, systolic pressure by 7 mm Hg, diastolic pressure by 3 mm Hg, weight by 1 kg, and cholesterol concentration by 0.1 mmol/l, but there was no shift in glucose concentration. Weight, blood pressure, and cholesterol concentration showed the greatest difference at the top of the distribution. If maintained long term the differences in risk factors achieved would mean only a 12% reduction in risk of coronary events. CONCLUSIONS--As most general practices are not using such an intensive programme the changes in coronary risk factors achieved by the voluntary health promotion package for primary care are likely to be even smaller. The government's screening policy cannot be justified by these results. PMID:8124121

  16. [Nutrition in pregnancy - Practice recommendations of the Network "Healthy Start - Young Family Network"].

    PubMed

    Koletzko, B; Bauer, C-P; Bung, P; Cremer, M; Flothkötter, M; Hellmers, C; Kersting, M; Krawinkel, M; Przyrembel, H; Rasenack, R; Schäfer, T; Vetter, K; Wahn, U; Weißenborn, A; Wöckel, A

    2012-06-01

    Nutrition, physical activity and lifestyle in pregnancy influence maternal and child health. The "Healthy start - Young Family Network" supported by the German Government with the national action plan IN FORM developed recommendations on nutrition in pregnancy. Folic acid supplements (400 µg/day) should be started before pregnancy and continue for at least the first trimester. Iodine rich foods and salt and an iodine supplement (100-150 µg/day) are recommended. Long-chain omega-3 fatty acids should be provided with ≥ 1 weekly portion of oily sea fish, or a DHA-supplement if regular fish consumption is avoided. Vitamin D supplementation is advisable unless there is regular exposure to sunlight. Iron supplements should be used based on medical history and blood testing. Vegetarian diets with nutritional supplements can provide adequate nutrition, but counselling is recommended. In contrast, a vegan diet is inadequate and requires additional micronutrient supplementation. For risk reduction of listeriosis and toxoplasmosis, raw animal foods, soft cheeses and packed fresh salads should be avoided; fresh fruit, vegetables and salad should be washed well and consumed promptly. Pregnant women should remain physically active and perform sports with moderate intensity. They should avoid alcohol, active and passive smoking. Up to 3 daily cups of coffee are considered harmless, but energy drinks should be avoided. Childhood allergy is not reduced by avoiding certain foods in pregnancy whereas oily sea fish is recommended. Health care professions should lead parents to health-promoting lifestyles. Subjects of part 1 of the article are practice recommendations on nutrition, on energy needs, micronutrient needs and body weight/weight gain in pregnancy.

  17. Patients and Computers as Reminders to Screen for Diabetes in Family Practice

    PubMed Central

    Kenealy, Tim; Arroll, Bruce; Petrie, Keith J

    2005-01-01

    Background In New Zealand, more than 5% of people aged 50 years and older have undiagnosed diabetes; most of them attend family practitioners (FPs) at least once a year. Objectives To test the effectiveness of patients or computers as reminders to screen for diabetes in patients attending FPs. Design A randomized-controlled trial compared screening rates in 4 intervention arms: patient reminders, computer reminders, both reminders, and usual care. The trial lasted 2 months. The patient reminder was a diabetes risk self-assessment sheet filled in by patients and given to the FP during the consultation. The computer reminder was an icon that flashed only for patients considered eligible for screening. Participants One hundred and seven FPs. Measurements The primary outcome was whether each eligible patient, who attended during the trial, was or was not tested for blood glucose. Analysis was by intention to treat and allowed for clustering by FP. Results Patient reminders (odds ratio [OR] 1.72, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.21, 2.43), computer reminders (OR 2.55, 1.68, 3.88), and both reminders (OR 1.69, 1.11, 2.59) were all effective compared with usual care. Computer reminders were more effective than patient reminders (OR 1.49, 1.07, 2.07). Patients were more likely to be screened if they visited the FP repeatedly, if patients were non-European, if they were “regular” patients of the practice, and if their FP had a higher screening rate prior to the study. Conclusions Patient and computer reminders were effective methods to increase screening for diabetes. However, the effects were not additive. PMID:16191138

  18. New family of generalized metrics for comparative imaging system evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russ, M.; Singh, V.; Loughran, B.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2015-03-01

    A family of imaging task-specific metrics designated Relative Object Detectability (ROD) metrics was developed to enable objective, quantitative comparisons of different x-ray systems. Previously, ROD was defined as the integral over spatial frequencies of the Fourier Transform of the object function, weighted by the detector DQE for one detector, divided by the comparable integral for another detector. When effects of scatter and focal spot unsharpness are included, the generalized metric, GDQE, is substituted for the DQE, resulting in the G-ROD metric. The G-ROD was calculated for two different detectors with two focal spot sizes using various-sized simulated objects to quantify the improved performance of new high-resolution CMOS detector systems. When a measured image is used as the object, a Generalized Measured Relative Object Detectability (GM-ROD) value can be generated. A neuro-vascular stent (Wingspan) was imaged with the high-resolution Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (MAF) and a standard flat panel detector (FPD) for comparison using the GM-ROD calculation. As the lower integration bound increased from 0 toward the detector Nyquist frequency, increasingly superior performance of the MAF was evidenced. Another new metric, the R-ROD, enables comparing detectors to a reference detector of given imaging ability. R-RODs for the MAF, a new CMOS detector and an FPD will be presented. The ROD family of metrics can provide quantitative more understandable comparisons for different systems where the detector, focal spot, scatter, object, techniques or dose are varied and can be used to optimize system selection for given imaging tasks.

  19. Obesity and Family Systems: A Family FIRO Approach to Assessment and Treatment Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doherty, William J.; Harkaway, Jill Elka

    1990-01-01

    Presents model for conceptualizing interactional patterns in families presenting for treatment of obesity and method for organizing assessment and for prioritizing treatment strategies. Uses the Family FIRO Model as a framework to organize complex assessment issues, to assign priorities for treatment of issues, and to select appropriate treatment…

  20. Child and Family Resource Program: Guidelines for a Child Development-Oriented Family Resource System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Child Development (DHEW), Washington, DC.

    The Child and Family Resource Program (CFRP) of the Office of Child Development (OCD) is described. CFRP is designed to provide family-oriented, comprehensive services to children from the prenatal period through age 8, according to their individual needs. The program description stresses the use of existing community resources in a linked program…

  1. Counseling Asian Families from a Systems Perspective. The Family Psychology and Counseling Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Kit S., Ed.

    The heterogeneous groups that make up Asian cultures with their diversity of educational, political, socioeconomic, and religious backgrounds are highlighted, and culturally relevant treatment strategies are presented. Chapters in Part 1 "Understanding and Assessing Asian Families" are: (1) "Theoretical Framework for Therapy with Asian Families"…

  2. Beyond the Individual Client: Families as Support Systems and Psychological Helpers. Symposium Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nuttall, Ena Vazquez; Nuttall, Ronald L.

    Knowledge gained from the theoretical and empirical literature on social support theory, family systems theory, and social ecology provide the foundation for a model which studies stress, support systems, and coping patterns within the family. Puerto Rican (N=87) and Italian (N=49) families were interviewed to identify stress factors and coping…

  3. Families of Chronically Ill Children: A Systems and Social-Ecological Model of Adaptation and Challenge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kazak, Anne E.

    1989-01-01

    Presents family systems model for understanding adaptation and coping in childhood chronic illness. Provides overview of systems and social-ecological theories relevant to this population. Reviews literature on stress and coping in these families. Examines unique issues and discusses importance of these models for responding to families with…

  4. Depression and the Family Life Cycle: Adjusting the System at Retirement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shean, Glenn

    This document uses family systems constructs to explain the onset and maintenance of clinical symptoms such as depression and their relation to life cycle issues among the elderly. The basic assumptions of family systems thinking about structure and function are summarized. Figures and tables are used to illustrate changing family circumstances…

  5. Improving System Integration: The Art and Science of Engaging Small Community Practices in Health System Innovation

    PubMed Central

    Pus, Laura; Stanaitis, Ian; Ivers, Noah; Baker, G. Ross; Lockhart, Elizabeth; Hawker, Gillian

    2016-01-01

    This paper focuses on successful engagement strategies in recruiting and retaining primary care physicians (PCPs) in a quality improvement project, as perceived by family physicians in small practices. Sustained physician engagement is critical for quality improvement (QI) aiming to enhance health system integration. Although there is ample literature on engaging physicians in hospital or team-based practice, few reports describe factors influencing engagement of community-based providers practicing with limited administrative support. The PCPs we describe participated in SCOPE: Seamless Care Optimizing the Patient Experience, a QI project designed to support their care of complex patients and reduce both emergency department (ED) visits and inpatient admissions. SCOPE outcome measures will inform subsequent papers. All the 30 participating PCPs completed surveys assessing perceptions regarding the importance of specific engagement strategies. Project team acknowledgement that primary care is challenging and new access to patient resources were the most important factors in generating initial interest in SCOPE. The opportunity to improve patient care via integration with other providers was most important in their commitment to participate, and a positive experience with project personnel was most important in their continued engagement. Our experience suggests that such providers respond well to personalized, repeated, and targeted engagement strategies. PMID:26904284

  6. A mixed methods study of food safety knowledge, practices and beliefs in Hispanic families with young children.

    PubMed

    Stenger, Kristen M; Ritter-Gooder, Paula K; Perry, Christina; Albrecht, Julie A

    2014-12-01

    Children are at a higher risk for foodborne illness. The objective of this study was to explore food safety knowledge, beliefs and practices among Hispanic families with young children (≤10 years of age) living within a Midwestern state. A convergent mixed methods design collected qualitative and quantitative data in parallel. Food safety knowledge surveys were administered (n = 90) prior to exploration of beliefs and practices among six focus groups (n = 52) conducted by bilingual interpreters in community sites in five cities/towns. Descriptive statistics determined knowledge scores and thematic coding unveiled beliefs and practices. Data sets were merged to assess concordance. Participants were female (96%), 35.7 (±7.6) years of age, from Mexico (69%), with the majority having a low education level. Food safety knowledge was low (56% ± 11). Focus group themes were: Ethnic dishes popular, Relating food to illness, Fresh food in home country, Food safety practices, and Face to face learning. Mixed method analysis revealed high self confidence in preparing food safely with low safe food handling knowledge and the presence of some cultural beliefs. On-site Spanish classes and materials were preferred venues for food safety education. Bilingual food safety messaging targeting common ethnic foods and cultural beliefs and practices is indicated to lower the risk of foodborne illness in Hispanic families with young children.

  7. The Family's Influence on Adolescent and Young Adult Career Development: Theory, Research and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Cathy; Thomas, Trang

    2003-01-01

    A research review identified a range of family process variables associated with enhanced career development for adolescents and young adults. Findings were consistent with the theories of Roe (personality development and career choice) and Super (life-span, life-space) regarding the influence of family processes on career development. (Contains…

  8. Mothers Roles in Traditional and Modern Korean Families: The Consequences for Parental Practices and Adolescent Socialization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Hye-On; Hoppe-Graff, Siegfried

    2001-01-01

    Compares mothers' roles in socializing their children in traditional South Korean families with that of mothers' in modern families. While Confusion influence remains strong, significant changes in South Korean culture often create complex, ambiguous, and emotionally unstable relationships between mothers and their adolescent children. Discusses…

  9. School Leadership for Authentic Family and Community Partnerships: Research Perspectives for Transforming Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auerbach, Susan, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    School leaders are increasingly called upon to pursue meaningful partnerships with families and community groups, yet many leaders are unprepared to meet the challenges of partnerships, to cross cultural boundaries, or to be accountable to the community. Alliances are needed among educators, families, and community groups that value relationship…

  10. A Practice Model for Enhancing Effective Coping in Child Welfare Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMillen, J. Curtis

    1997-01-01

    Suggests that stress is by necessity associated with child welfare interventions. Offers help to practitioners in reducing the kinds of stress involved in child welfare interventions by helping families build consumer-practitioner relationships, assessing family processes, generating ideas on coping with intervention-related stressors, and…

  11. Coordinated and Evidence-Based Policy and Practice for Protecting Children outside of Family Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boothby, Neil; Balster, Robert L.; Goldman, Philip; Wessells, Michael G.; Zeanah, Charles H.; Huebner, Gillian; Garbarino, James

    2012-01-01

    The 2011 U.S. Government Evidence Summit on Protecting Children Outside of Family Care brought together leading researchers and technical experts to assess the available evidence to inform policies, strategies, and programs relevant to protecting children outside of family care in lower and middle income countries. While child vulnerabilities are…

  12. Working with Arab American Families: Culturally Competent Practice for School Psychologists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haboush, Karen L.

    2007-01-01

    Individuals of Arab descent residing within the United States currently number between 1.2 million and 3.9 million. These families are characterized by considerable diversity depending upon their nationality, religion, and extent of acculturation to both Western and Arab cultures. More recently, Arab families have immigrated to the United States…

  13. Predicting Suicide Risks among Outpatient Adolescents Using the Family Environment Scale: Implications for Practice and Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucey, Christopher F.; Lam, Sarah K. Y.

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to identify characteristics of family functioning that relate to suicide potential in an outpatient adolescent population. Participants included 51 adolescents between the ages of 14 and 18 who were involved in outpatient counselling. The Family Environment Scale and the Suicide Probability Scale were used to assess…

  14. Using Family-Based Practices for Young Children with Special Needs in Preschool Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raver, Sharon A.

    2005-01-01

    Early childhood special educators often use a family-based approach to working with children and their families (Cook, Klein, Tessier, & Daley, 2004; Raver, 2004). Although this approach is not new, it is used inconsistently and is misunderstood by many early childhood teachers. Part of the difficulty stems from the discipline-specific training of…

  15. Intentional Practices in Supervision of Family Counseling: The Use of Supervisory Letters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desmond, Kimberly J.; Kindsvatter, Aaron

    2010-01-01

    Supervisors perform various roles in helping to guide the supervisee through the challenging process of family counseling. The use of letters in supervision helps to focus the supervisory processes in family counseling. Following the discrimination model of supervision, three types of supervisory letters are suggested for intentional supervision…

  16. Effective Child Welfare Practice with Immigrant and Refugee Children and Their Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pine, Barbara A.; Drachman, Diane

    2005-01-01

    This article presents a multistage migration framework to broaden the lens through which child welfare personnel can view immigrant and refugee families and their children. By better understanding the family's experiences in both emigration and immigration, including reasons for leaving their home country, experiences in transit, and reception and…

  17. Practice Related Home-Based Family Centered Services Course for Master of Social Work Curricula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virginia Commonwealth Univ., Richmond. Region III Child Welfare Training Center.

    This course outline provides a framework for incorporating material about home-based family centered services (HBFCS) in existing masters-level family/child welfare curricula. The placement of the course in the curriculum is discussed, with suggestions for appropriate background knowledge/course work. Seven major topics are outlined: (1)…

  18. Reggio Emilia, Vygotsky, and Family Childcare: Four American Providers Describe Their Pedagogical Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Ramona

    2011-01-01

    This case study considers pedagogical techniques used in family childcare to promote children's learning experiences. Data extracted from an earlier study were used to inform this examination of four family childcare providers' pedagogy. In the current study, I use socio-cultural theory and the Reggio Emilia approach to address the following…

  19. Family-Centered Practices and American Sign Language (ASL): Challenges and Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardin, Belinda J.; Blanchard, Sheresa Boone; Kemmery, Megan A.; Appenzeller, Margo; Parker, Samuel D.

    2014-01-01

    Families with children who are deaf face many important decisions, especially the mode(s) of communication their children will use. The purpose of this focus group study was to better understand the experiences and recommendations of families who chose American Sign Language (ASL) as their primary mode of communication and to identify strategies…

  20. Therapy with Muslim Couples and Families: Basic Guidelines for Effective Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Springer, Paul R.; Abbott, Douglas A.; Reisbig, Allison M. J.

    2009-01-01

    Despite the growing numbers of Muslims in the United States, there is a scarcity of research dealing with mental health practitioners working with Muslim families. This lack of research may leave clinicians unprepared to adequately help Muslim patients and families faced with discrimination and misunderstanding, which may inadvertently lead to the…

  1. How Much Is Enough: Training Issues Regarding Family-Centered Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trivette, Carol M.

    1998-01-01

    This commentary on "The Effects of Family-Centered Service Coordination: A Social Validity Study" (Romer), discusses findings that the three service coordinators did not change their behavior to be more family-centered after one workshop and that it took follow-up work to get their behaviors to a minimal level of performance. (CR)

  2. Economic Well-Being in Salvadoran Transnational Families: How Gender Affects Remittance Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abrego, Leisy

    2009-01-01

    This article examines how migrant parents' gender affects transnational families' economic well-being. Drawing on 130 in-depth interviews with Salvadoran immigrants in the United States and adolescent and young adult children of migrants in El Salvador, I demonstrate that the gender of migrant parents centrally affects how well their families are…

  3. A Comparative Study of Family Social Capital and Literacy Practices in Singapore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ren, Li; Hu, Guangwei

    2013-01-01

    Social capital--the social relations between people--is an important component of the family environment and is crucial for the creation of human capital for the next generation. Drawing on James S. Coleman's theory of family capital, this study focuses on parents' utilization of social capital to support children's literacy acquisition in four…

  4. Practical automatic Arabic license plate recognition system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammad, Khader; Agaian, Sos; Saleh, Hani

    2011-02-01

    Since 1970's, the need of an automatic license plate recognition system, sometimes referred as Automatic License Plate Recognition system, has been increasing. A license plate recognition system is an automatic system that is able to recognize a license plate number, extracted from image sensors. In specific, Automatic License Plate Recognition systems are being used in conjunction with various transportation systems in application areas such as law enforcement (e.g. speed limit enforcement) and commercial usages such as parking enforcement and automatic toll payment private and public entrances, border control, theft and vandalism control. Vehicle license plate recognition has been intensively studied in many countries. Due to the different types of license plates being used, the requirement of an automatic license plate recognition system is different for each country. [License plate detection using cluster run length smoothing algorithm ].Generally, an automatic license plate localization and recognition system is made up of three modules; license plate localization, character segmentation and optical character recognition modules. This paper presents an Arabic license plate recognition system that is insensitive to character size, font, shape and orientation with extremely high accuracy rate. The proposed system is based on a combination of enhancement, license plate localization, morphological processing, and feature vector extraction using the Haar transform. The performance of the system is fast due to classification of alphabet and numerals based on the license plate organization. Experimental results for license plates of two different Arab countries show an average of 99 % successful license plate localization and recognition in a total of more than 20 different images captured from a complex outdoor environment. The results run times takes less time compared to conventional and many states of art methods.

  5. Putting the "family" back into family therapy.

    PubMed

    Breunlin, Douglas C; Jacobsen, Elizabeth

    2014-09-01

    In this article, we examine the field of family therapy by drawing a distinction between two forms of practice: Whole Family Therapy (WFT), defined as treating the whole family, and Relational Family Therapy (RFT), defined as working with a subsystem of the family or an individual while retaining a systemic lens. Our thesis is that the practice of WFT has been in decline for some time and steps must be taken to keep it from becoming a defunct practice. We consider the trajectory of WFT and RFT throughout the development of family therapy through reference to the people, the literature, training, and practice patterns associated with family therapy. We remind the reader of the many benefits of WFT and suggest that today WFT is likely to be practiced in conjunction with RFT and individual therapy. Since training of family therapists today is largely located in degree-granting programs, we identify constraints to including WFT in such programs. We conclude by offering suggestions that can enhance a program's ability to train students in WFT.

  6. Systems and the Changing Architectural Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heimsath, Clovis B.

    The architecture profession needs to employ systems building design in order to raise the rate of productivity and performance in construction. Changes have been made in architecture educational programs that recognize the shift in the role of the architect from design genius to building production manager. Systems design has led to changes within…

  7. Electronic Resource Management Systems in Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grogg, Jill E.

    2008-01-01

    Electronic resource management (ERM) systems have inundated the library marketplace. Both integrated library systems (ILS) vendors and subscription agents are now offering products and service enhancements that claim to help libraries efficiently manage their electronic resources. Additionally, some homegrown and open-source solutions have emerged…

  8. The Single-Parent Family: A Complex System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bray, James H.; Anderson, Hillary

    Single-parent families have increased dramatically over the past decade, and it is estimated that by 1990, half of all children will have spent at least some time in a single-parent family. This paper briefly reviews the literature dealing with some of the unique problems that single-parent, female-headed families face, including role overload,…

  9. Over the Edge: Homeless Families and the Welfare System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Coalition for the Homeless, Washington, DC.

    Homelessness among families is quickly reaching crisis proportions across the country. Over 30 percent of America's three million homeless people are members of families, and families are the fastest growing segment of the homeless population. Perhaps more disturbing, homelessness represents only the most extreme manifestation of a more…

  10. Usability of a Wearable Camera System for Dementia Family Caregivers.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Judith T; Lingler, Jennifer H; Campbell, Grace B; Hunsaker, Amanda E; Hu, Lu; Pires, Bernardo R; Hebert, Martial; Schulz, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Health care providers typically rely on family caregivers (CG) of persons with dementia (PWD) to describe difficult behaviors manifested by their underlying disease. Although invaluable, such reports may be selective or biased during brief medical encounters. Our team explored the usability of a wearable camera system with 9 caregiving dyads (CGs: 3 males, 6 females, 67.00 ± 14.95 years; PWDs: 2 males, 7 females, 80.00 ± 3.81 years, MMSE 17.33 ± 8.86) who recorded 79 salient events over a combined total of 140 hours of data capture, from 3 to 7 days of wear per CG. Prior to using the system, CGs assessed its benefits to be worth the invasion of privacy; post-wear privacy concerns did not differ significantly. CGs rated the system easy to learn to use, although cumbersome and obtrusive. Few negative reactions by PWDs were reported or evident in resulting video. Our findings suggest that CGs can and will wear a camera system to reveal their daily caregiving challenges to health care providers. PMID:26288888

  11. Usability of a Wearable Camera System for Dementia Family Caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Judith T.; Lingler, Jennifer H.; Campbell, Grace B.; Hunsaker, Amanda E.; Hu, Lu; Pires, Bernardo R.; Hebert, Martial; Schulz, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Health care providers typically rely on family caregivers (CG) of persons with dementia (PWD) to describe difficult behaviors manifested by their underlying disease. Although invaluable, such reports may be selective or biased during brief medical encounters. Our team explored the usability of a wearable camera system with 9 caregiving dyads (CGs: 3 males, 6 females, 67.00 ± 14.95 years; PWDs: 2 males, 7 females, 80.00 ± 3.81 years, MMSE 17.33 ± 8.86) who recorded 79 salient events over a combined total of 140 hours of data capture, from 3 to 7 days of wear per CG. Prior to using the system, CGs assessed its benefits to be worth the invasion of privacy; post-wear privacy concerns did not differ significantly. CGs rated the system easy to learn to use, although cumbersome and obtrusive. Few negative reactions by PWDs were reported or evident in resulting video. Our findings suggest that CGs can and will wear a camera system to reveal their daily caregiving challenges to health care providers. PMID:26288888

  12. Excretory system of representatives from family Diplozoidae (Monogenea).

    PubMed

    Konstanzová, V; Koubková, B; Kašný, M; Ilgová, J; Dzika, E; Gelnar, M

    2016-04-01

    Diplozoons are representatives of blood-feeding ectoparasites from the family Diplozoidae (Polyopisthocotylea, Monogenea). Although these worms have been the subject of numerous taxonomical, phylogenetic, and ecological studies, the detailed study of their excretory system has remained relatively neglected. Our observations focused on the morphological and ultrastructural features of the excretory apparatus of four diplozoid species: Diplozoon paradoxum, Eudiplozoon nipponicum, Paradiplozoon bliccae, and Paradiplozoon homoion. Observations were obtained using two microscope methods: light microscopy, equipped with differential interference contrast (Nomarski DIC) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The ultrastructure of two basic compartments which forms the excretory apparatus, flame cells with filtration apparatus, and canal cells forming the protonephridial ducts is revealed in this study. A unique consecutive sequence of longitudinal semi-thin sections of the excretory pore of E. nipponicum is visualized there for the first time.

  13. Tramadol/Paracetamol Fixed-Dose Combination for Chronic Pain Management in Family Practice: A Clinical Review

    PubMed Central

    Morón Merchante, Ignacio; Pergolizzi, Joseph V.; van de Laar, Mart; Mellinghoff, Hans-Ulrich; O'Brien, Joanne; Perrot, Serge; Raffa, Robert B.

    2013-01-01

    The family practitioner plays an important role in the prevention, diagnosis, and early management of chronic pain. He/she is generally the first to be consulted, the one most familiar with the patients and their medical history, and is likely the first to be alerted in case of inadequate pain control or safety and tolerability issues. The family practitioner should therefore be at the center of the multidisciplinary team involved in a patient's pain management. The most frequent indications associated with chronic pain in family practice are of musculoskeletal origin, and the pain is often multimechanistic. Fixed-dose combination analgesics combine compounds with different mechanisms of action; their broader analgesic spectrum and potentially synergistic analgesic efficacy and improved benefit/risk ratio might thus be useful. A pain specialist meeting held in November 2010 agreed that the fixed-dose combination tramadol/paracetamol might be a useful pharmacological option for chronic pain management in family practice. The combination is effective in a variety of pain conditions with generally good tolerability. Particularly in elderly patients, it might be considered as an alternative to conventional analgesics such as NSAIDs, which should be used rarely with caution in this population. PMID:24959571

  14. Family physicians’ continuing professional development activities: current practices and potential for new options

    PubMed Central

    Lindsay, Elizabeth; Wooltorton, Eric; Hendry, Paul; Williams, Kathryn; Wells, George

    2016-01-01

    Background As part of needs assessment processes, our Faculty of Medicine (FOM) continuing professional development office investigated the differences between physicians who do and those who do not frequently participate in planned group learning to gain insight into their interest in new forms of continuing professional development (CPD). Method We sent a 19 item questionnaire to 485 randomly selected physicians of the 1050 family physicians in Eastern Ontario. The questionnaire examined present participation and satisfaction with CPD activities and perceptions regarding the potential impact of those; and appetite for new opportunities to meet their learning needs. Results Of the 151 (31%) physicians responding, 61% reported attending at least one FOM group learning program in the past 18 months (attenders) and 39% had not (non-attenders). Non-attenders indicated less satisfaction (p = 0.04) with present opportunities and requested development in newer approaches such as support for self-learning, on-line opportunities, and simulation. Conclusions Although there are high levels of satisfaction with the present CPD system that predominantly offers large group learning options, a substantial number of physicians expressed interest in accessing new options such as personal study and on-line resources. PMID:27103951

  15. Recommended Practice for Securing Control System Modems

    SciTech Connect

    James R. Davidson; Jason L. Wright

    2008-01-01

    This paper addresses an often overlooked “backdoor” into critical infrastructure control systems created by modem connections. A modem’s connection to the public telephone system is similar to a corporate network connection to the Internet. By tracing typical attack paths into the system, this paper provides the reader with an analysis of the problem and then guides the reader through methods to evaluate existing modem security. Following the analysis, a series of methods for securing modems is provided. These methods are correlated to well-known networking security methods.

  16. Family and family therapy in Russia.

    PubMed

    Bebtschuk, Marina; Smirnova, Daria; Khayretdinov, Oleg

    2012-04-01

    This article represents the information about family and family therapy in the context of culture, traditions and contemporary changes of social situations in Russia. The legislation of family rights are mentioned within items about marriage and family in the Constitution, Civil Code and Family Code of the Russian Federation which has changed during recent years. The definition of family and description of family structure are given through the prism of the current demographic situation, dynamics of statistics of marriage and divorce rates, mental disorders, disabilities and such phenomena as social abandonment. The actual curriculum, teaching of family therapy and its disadvantages, system of continuous education, supervision and initiatives of the Institute of Integrative Family Therapy in improvement of preparing of specialists who can provide qualified psychosocial assistance for the family according to the actual needs of society are noted. The directions of state and private practice of family counselling and therapy both for psychiatric patients and medical patients, for adults and children in a family systemic approach are highlighted with an indication of the spectrum of techniques and methods used by Russian professionals. The main obstacles and perspectives of development of family therapy in Russia are summarized. PMID:22515460

  17. Family and family therapy in Russia.

    PubMed

    Bebtschuk, Marina; Smirnova, Daria; Khayretdinov, Oleg

    2012-04-01

    This article represents the information about family and family therapy in the context of culture, traditions and contemporary changes of social situations in Russia. The legislation of family rights are mentioned within items about marriage and family in the Constitution, Civil Code and Family Code of the Russian Federation which has changed during recent years. The definition of family and description of family structure are given through the prism of the current demographic situation, dynamics of statistics of marriage and divorce rates, mental disorders, disabilities and such phenomena as social abandonment. The actual curriculum, teaching of family therapy and its disadvantages, system of continuous education, supervision and initiatives of the Institute of Integrative Family Therapy in improvement of preparing of specialists who can provide qualified psychosocial assistance for the family according to the actual needs of society are noted. The directions of state and private practice of family counselling and therapy both for psychiatric patients and medical patients, for adults and children in a family systemic approach are highlighted with an indication of the spectrum of techniques and methods used by Russian professionals. The main obstacles and perspectives of development of family therapy in Russia are summarized.

  18. A practical three visit complete denture system.

    PubMed

    Ling, B C

    2000-10-01

    Standard prosthodontic procedures require five visits to construct a set of complete maxillary and mandibular dentures. Various attempts have been made to reduce these procedures to four or three appointments. However, most of these techniques require the use of visible light polymerized resin as the final denture base materials. Visible light-cured resin materials have inferior physical properties and biocompatibility problems as compared with heat cured polymethylmethacrylate. This paper describes a system of complete denture construction which requires three clinical appointments instead of the usual five visits. This system is made possible by using the VLC base/tray material as the preliminary impression material as well as the application of a new biometric wax occlusion rim. It retains the use of polymethylmethacrylate as the denture base material. This system also utilizes all the procedures used in the conventional five appointment system of complete denture construction. PMID:11709981

  19. Family Relationships From Adolescence to Early Adulthood: Changes in the Family System Following Firstborns’ Leaving Home

    PubMed Central

    Whiteman, Shawn D.; McHale, Susan M.; Crouter, Ann C.

    2010-01-01

    This study charted the course of parent-child and sibling relationships from early adolescence to early adulthood and examined how these relationships changed following firstborns’ departure from their parents’ home for the first time. Data were drawn from a 10-year longitudinal study of family relationships. Participants included mothers, fathers, and first- and second-born children from 184, White, working and middle class families. Multilevel models revealed declines in parent-child conflict, acceptance, and sibling negativity, and increases or U-shaped patterns in sibling and parent-child intimacy over time. Birth order X leaving home interactions revealed that firstborns’ leaving home related to changes in family relationship qualities for both first- and second-borns, with relationships improving for firstborns and no changes or declines in relationship quality for second-borns. Overall, the results highlight the inter-relatedness of family subsystems. PMID:21765625

  20. Economic Systems, Child Rearing Practices and Personality Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozak, Conrad M.

    1978-01-01

    Reviews research on the relationship of a society's economic system to other aspects of the social structure, including socialization practices. Concludes that the relationship between personal values and the economic institution becomes reciprocal as society becomes more complex. (JG)