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Sample records for family therapy

  1. Family Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Family therapy is a type of psychological counseling (psychotherapy) that helps family members improve communication and resolve ... organizations? Do you have specialty training in family psychotherapy? What is your experience with my family's type ...

  2. Family Therapy and Ideology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernal, Guillermo; Ysern, Eduardo

    1986-01-01

    Argues that the family and the enterprise of family therapy are social systems and under the influence of the ideology particular to a given society. The strategic family therapy treatment of a family with a drug-addicted member serves as an example to clarify the ideological themes of contemporary family therapy. (Author/BL)

  3. Marriage or Family Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haley, Jay

    1984-01-01

    Reviews the differences between family therapy and marriage counseling in terms of professional organization, theory, and practice. Suggests that training in marriage therapy does not appear adequate for family therapy. The goal of the therapy field should be more consensus in theory and a single profession of therapists. (JAC)

  4. Marriage or Family Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haley, Jay

    1984-01-01

    Reviews the differences between family therapy and marriage counseling in terms of professional organization, theory, and practice. Suggests that training in marriage therapy does not appear adequate for family therapy. The goal of the therapy field should be more consensus in theory and a single profession of therapists. (JAC)

  5. Family Therapy and Disturbed Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuk, Gerald H., Ed.; Boszormenyi-Nagy, Ivan, Ed.

    Presented at a conference at which authors represented major theoretical positions in the field, most of the papers use family therapy as an important source of observations or ideas, or as a means to pinpoint methodological problems. Papers are grouped in sections as follows: four which introduce the reader to the field of specialization, provide…

  6. Family Therapy and Disturbed Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuk, Gerald H., Ed.; Boszormenyi-Nagy, Ivan, Ed.

    Presented at a conference at which authors represented major theoretical positions in the field, most of the papers use family therapy as an important source of observations or ideas, or as a means to pinpoint methodological problems. Papers are grouped in sections as follows: four which introduce the reader to the field of specialization, provide…

  7. Narrative Family Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, William M.; Keenan, Robert

    1997-01-01

    States that narrative family therapy is informed by social constructionism and postmodern worldviews, and is a relatively significant departure from mainstream psychotherapy. Discusses the use of narrative family therapy. Uses the story of Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden as an example. (MKA)

  8. Narrative Family Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, William M.; Keenan, Robert

    1997-01-01

    States that narrative family therapy is informed by social constructionism and postmodern worldviews, and is a relatively significant departure from mainstream psychotherapy. Discusses the use of narrative family therapy. Uses the story of Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden as an example. (MKA)

  9. Therapy for Family Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosmann, Michael R.

    A family therapy model, based on a conceptualization of the family as a behavioral system whose members interact adaptively so that an optimal level of functioning is maintained within the system, is described. The divergent roots of this conceptualization are discussed briefly, as are the treatment approaches based on it. The author's model,…

  10. Family and family therapy in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Wagenaar, Karin; Baars, Jan

    2012-04-01

    This article describes how families are functioning in the Netherlands, and how family therapy is used in mental healthcare. In the open Dutch society, new ideas are easily incorporated, as exemplified by the rapid introduction and growth of family therapy in the 1980s. In recent decades, however, family therapy has lost ground to other treatment models that are more individually orientated, and adhere to stricter protocols. This decline of family therapy has been exacerbated by recent budget cuts in mental healthcare. In regular healthcare institutes family therapy now has a marginal position at best, although family treatment models are used in specific areas such as forensic treatments. In addition, the higher trained family therapists have found their own niches to work with couples and families. We argue that a stronger position of family therapy would be beneficial for patients and for families, in order to counteract the strong individualization of Dutch society.

  11. Family Psychology and Family Therapy in Japan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kameguchi, Kenji; Murphy-Shigematsu, Stephen

    2001-01-01

    Reviews the development of family psychology and family therapy in Japan, tracing the origins of these movements, explaining how these fields were activated by the problem of school refusal, and describing an approach to family therapy that has been developed to work with families confronting this problem, as well as preventive programs of family…

  12. Collaboration in Family Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tuerk, Elena Hontoria; McCart, Michael R.; Henggeler, Scott W.

    2015-01-01

    This article summarizes and illustrates the collaboration strategies used by several family therapies. The strategies used within multisystemic therapy (MST) are emphasized because it has demonstrated high rates of treatment completion and favorable outcomes in multiple clinical trials. Many of the collaboration strategies in family work are common to other forms of evidence-based psychotherapy (e.g., reflective listening, empathy, reframing, and displays of authenticity and flexibility); however, some strategies are unique to family systems treatments, such as the identification of strengths across multiple systems in the youth’s social ecology and the maintenance of a family (versus a child) focus during treatment. A case example illustrates collaboration and engagement in the context of MST. PMID:23616297

  13. From Family Therapy to Family Intervention.

    PubMed

    Josephson, Allan M

    2015-07-01

    For many, family therapy refers to sessions in which all family members are present. Yet in contemporary psychiatry there are many ways to work with families in addition to this classic concept. This article proposes family intervention as an encompassing term for a new family paradigm in child and adolescent psychiatry. Developmental psychopathology is a guiding principle of this paradigm. A full range of ways to work with families clinically is described with clinical examples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Cybernetics of Brief Family Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeney, Bradford P.; Ross, Jeffrey M.

    1983-01-01

    Presents a cybernetic view of brief family therapy. Includes a historical discussion of the key ideas underlying brief family therapy, a cybernetic model of therapeutic change, and a clinical case for exemplification. (Author/JAC)

  15. Families and family therapy in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Tse, Samson; Ng, Roger M K; Tonsing, Kareen N; Ran, Maosheng

    2012-04-01

    Family therapy views humans not as separate entities, but as embedded in a network of relationships, highlighting the reciprocal influences of one's behaviours on one another. This article gives an overview of family demographics and the implementation of family therapy in Hong Kong. We start with a review of the family demographics in Hong Kong and brief notes on families in mainland China. Demographics show that the landscape has changed markedly in the past decade, with more cross-border marriages, an increased divorce rate, and an ageing overall population - all of which could mean that there is increasing demand for professional family therapy interventions. However, only a limited number of professionals are practising the systems-based approach in Hong Kong. Some possible reasons as to why family therapy is not well disseminated and practised are discussed. These reasons include a lack of mental health policy to support family therapy, a lack of systematic family therapy training, and a shortage of skilled professionals. Furthermore, challenges in applying the western model in Chinese culture are also outlined. We conclude that more future research is warranted to investigate how family therapy can be adapted for Chinese families.

  16. Family and family therapy in Russia.

    PubMed

    Bebtschuk, Marina; Smirnova, Daria; Khayretdinov, Oleg

    2012-04-01

    This article represents the information about family and family therapy in the context of culture, traditions and contemporary changes of social situations in Russia. The legislation of family rights are mentioned within items about marriage and family in the Constitution, Civil Code and Family Code of the Russian Federation which has changed during recent years. The definition of family and description of family structure are given through the prism of the current demographic situation, dynamics of statistics of marriage and divorce rates, mental disorders, disabilities and such phenomena as social abandonment. The actual curriculum, teaching of family therapy and its disadvantages, system of continuous education, supervision and initiatives of the Institute of Integrative Family Therapy in improvement of preparing of specialists who can provide qualified psychosocial assistance for the family according to the actual needs of society are noted. The directions of state and private practice of family counselling and therapy both for psychiatric patients and medical patients, for adults and children in a family systemic approach are highlighted with an indication of the spectrum of techniques and methods used by Russian professionals. The main obstacles and perspectives of development of family therapy in Russia are summarized.

  17. Putting the "family" back into family therapy.

    PubMed

    Breunlin, Douglas C; Jacobsen, Elizabeth

    2014-09-01

    In this article, we examine the field of family therapy by drawing a distinction between two forms of practice: Whole Family Therapy (WFT), defined as treating the whole family, and Relational Family Therapy (RFT), defined as working with a subsystem of the family or an individual while retaining a systemic lens. Our thesis is that the practice of WFT has been in decline for some time and steps must be taken to keep it from becoming a defunct practice. We consider the trajectory of WFT and RFT throughout the development of family therapy through reference to the people, the literature, training, and practice patterns associated with family therapy. We remind the reader of the many benefits of WFT and suggest that today WFT is likely to be practiced in conjunction with RFT and individual therapy. Since training of family therapists today is largely located in degree-granting programs, we identify constraints to including WFT in such programs. We conclude by offering suggestions that can enhance a program's ability to train students in WFT. © 2014 FPI, Inc.

  18. A Feminist Family Therapy Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Leora; Piercy, Fred P.

    1991-01-01

    Reports on development and psychometric properties of Feminist Family Therapy Scale (FFTS), a 17-item instrument intended to reflect degree to which family therapists conceptualize process of family therapy from feminist-informed perspective. Found that the instrument discriminated between self-identified feminists and nonfeminists, women and men,…

  19. Family Therapy and Psychosomatic Illness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waring, Edward M.

    1980-01-01

    Reviews the use of family therapy in dealing with illnesses such as childhood diabetes, asthma, pain, and anorexia nervosa. Marital and family therapy may be effective in treating some psychosomatic problems. Family assessment is helpful in the management of all psychosomatic problems. (Author/JAC)

  20. Family psychology and family therapy in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kameguchi, K; Murphy-Shigematsu, S

    2001-01-01

    The development of family psychology and family therapy in Japan has occurred mostly since the 1980s. This development was originally activated by the major social issue in contemporary Japan of school refusal, in which more than 127,000 children either overtly refuse to or claim that they cannot go to school. From a family perspective, this problem is analyzed as it relates to the confusion that children experience from unbalanced and unclear boundaries in family relations or "membranes." An approach to family therapy that adapts systems theory and integrates a clay sculpting medium has been developed to work with Japanese families confronting this problem. The design and implementation of preventative family psychology programs applied at the community level are also an important part of the future development in these fields.

  1. Using Dreams in Family Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, Connie M.

    1997-01-01

    States that current literature suggests that dreams are seldom used by marriage and family therapists, yet dreams can be powerful tools in therapeutic treatment. Includes clinical examples that demonstrate the effective use of dreams in marriage and family therapy. Discusses the interface between dream interpretation and systems therapy. (MKA)

  2. Convening strategies in family therapy.

    PubMed

    Teismann, M W

    1980-12-01

    Specific strategies for assembling or convening significant and often reluctant family members for family therapy seem undeveloped in the literature. The author develops and organizes specific convening methods and exemplifies these methods for clinical application. Methods adopted from strategic family therapists, including Haley, Selvini Palazzoli, and Watzlawick, are presented.

  3. Dignity therapy: family member perspectives.

    PubMed

    McClement, Susan; Chochinov, Harvey Max; Hack, Thomas; Hassard, Thomas; Kristjanson, Linda Joan; Harlos, Mike

    2007-10-01

    Dignity Therapy is a novel therapeutic intervention designed to address psychosocial and existential distress among the terminally ill. This brief, individualized approach to end-of-life care invites patients to discuss issues that are most important to them and to articulate things they would most want remembered as death draws near. These discussions and recollections are recorded, transcribed, and edited into a generativity document, which are usually given to family or loved ones. While the marked benefits of Dignity Therapy on patients' psychosocial and existential distress have been reported elsewhere, this paper presents data on bereft family members' perspectives regarding the impact of dignity therapy on patients and themselves. Sixty family members of deceased terminally ill patients who previously took part in Dignity Therapy completed a questionnaire to elicit feedback about the impact of Dignity Therapy on both the dying patient and themselves. Ninety-five percent of participants reported that Dignity Therapy helped the patient; 78% reported that it heightened the patient's sense of dignity; 72% reported that it heightened the patient's sense of purpose; 65% reported that it helped the patient prepare for death; 65% reported that it was as important as any other aspect of the patient's care; and 43% reported that Dignity Therapy reduced the patient's suffering. Regarding family members, 78% reported that the generativity document helped them during their time of grief; 77% reported that the document would continue to be a source of comfort for their families and themselves; and 95% reported they would recommend Dignity Therapy to other patients of family members confronting a terminal illness. Family members endorse Dignity Therapy as a therapeutic intervention that moderates their bereavement experiences and lessens suffering and distress in terminally ill relatives.

  4. Family Therapy in a Women's Group: Integrating Marriage and Family Therapy and Group Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Getz, Hildy G.

    2002-01-01

    Describes how a family therapy perspective can be integrated into group as a treatment modality. Concepts from family therapy are illustrated through a description of a specific women's group and case study. Techniques from family therapy applied in group are derived from multigenerational, experiential/humanistic, and cognitive-behavioral…

  5. Queer Youth in Family Therapy.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Rebecca G; Stone Fish, Linda

    2015-09-01

    Trends in popular belief about same-sex relationships have undergone noteworthy change in the United States over the last decade. Yet this change has been marked by stark polarizations and has occurred at varying rates depending upon regional, community, racial, religious, and individual family context. For queer youth and their families, this cultural transformation has broadened opportunities and created a new set of risks and vulnerabilities. At the same time, youth's increasingly open and playful gender fluidity and sexual identity is complicated by unique intersections of class, race, religion, and immigration. Effective family therapy with queer youth requires practitioner's and treatment models that are sensitive to those who bear the burden of multiple oppressions and the hidden resilience embedded in their layered identities. We present case examples of our model of family therapy which addresses refuge, supports difficult dialogs, and nurtures queerness by looking for hidden resilience in the unique intersections of queer youths' lives. These intersections provide transformational potential for youth, their families and even for family therapists as we are all nurtured and challenged to think more complexly about intersectionality, sexuality, and gender. © 2015 Family Process Institute.

  6. Latino Families in Therapy: Engagement and Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernal, Guillermo; Flores-Ortiz, Yvette

    1982-01-01

    Suggests that a therapist's involvement of Latinos in therapy requires both skills in family therapy and sensitivity to cultural issues. Presents factors found to be useful in the family assessment. Discusses issues in the engagement and evaluation phases of family therapy with Latino families. (Author)

  7. American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Approved Supervisors My Account Find Members Benefits American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy 112 South Alfred ... 838-9808 | Fax: (703) 838-9805 © 2002 - American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy Terms of Use | ...

  8. Family Therapy in a Biomedical Context.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abroms, Gene M.

    1981-01-01

    Redefines the role of family therapy in terms of the reemergence of the medical model in psychiatry. In this biopsychosocial model the goal of family therapy is defined as the achievement of socialization. Describes the goals of psychotherapy, sociotherapy, and biotherapy and suggests they are combined in family therapy. (Author/JAC)

  9. How Collaborative Is Structural Family Therapy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammond, Ryan T.; Nichols, Michael P.

    2008-01-01

    In response to the charge by "collaborative" therapies, such as solution focused and narrative, that structural family therapy is an aggressive, confrontational, and impositional approach, this investigation examines the role of therapist empathy in creating a collaborative partnership in structural family therapy. Twenty-four videotaped therapy…

  10. How Collaborative Is Structural Family Therapy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammond, Ryan T.; Nichols, Michael P.

    2008-01-01

    In response to the charge by "collaborative" therapies, such as solution focused and narrative, that structural family therapy is an aggressive, confrontational, and impositional approach, this investigation examines the role of therapist empathy in creating a collaborative partnership in structural family therapy. Twenty-four videotaped therapy…

  11. Family Therapy: A Very Proper Failure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Midlarsky, Elizabeth

    This first-person account of a case study on family therapy discusses two latency-age boys who were referred for treatment. The assessment was that in both cases it was the family itself that was disturbed and needed treatment. The therapist worked with the first boy and his family together. The therapy model used was the "proper" family…

  12. Cloe Madanes: Reflections on Family Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, John D.; Bubenzer, Donald L.

    1993-01-01

    Describes interview with Cloe Madanes, leading force in Strategic Family Therapy. Interview focuses on her introduction to marriage and family therapy, her perspective on the impact of social policy on the family, and her thoughts on clinical practice and training clinicians. (Author/NB)

  13. [Family relationships and family therapy of eating disorders].

    PubMed

    Reich, Günter

    2005-04-01

    A multitude of empirical studies clearly demonstrates that the origin and course of eating disorders is closely linked to family factors. The influence is exerted in a direct way by conveying attitudes towards food, eating, weight, shape and appearance within the family and in a more indirect way by the family relationships. Families of bulimics differ from those of anorexics by a higher degree of conflict, impulsivity, expressiveness and by lower affective resonance and cohesion. Family therapy has proven to be effective in the treatment of eating disorders. A sketch of a family therapy describes the conflict oriented approach which includes behavioral elements in oder to stabilize the eating behavior and the weight.

  14. Family Therapy for the "Truncated" Nuclear Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuk, Gerald H.

    1980-01-01

    The truncated nuclear family consists of a two-generation group in which conflict has produced a polarization of values. The single-parent family is at special risk. Go-between process enables the therapist to depolarize sharply conflicted values and reduce pathogenic relating. (Author)

  15. Mode Deactivation Therapy (MDT) Family Therapy: A Theoretical Case Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apsche, J. A.; Ward Bailey, S. R.

    2004-01-01

    This case study presents a theoretical analysis of implementing mode deactivation therapy (MDT) (Apsche & Ward Bailey, 2003) family therapy with a 13 year old Caucasian male. MDT is a form of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) that combines the balance of dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) (Linehan, 1993), the importance of perception from…

  16. Utilization of Family Photos and Movies in Family Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaslow, Florence W.; Friedman, Jack

    1977-01-01

    This article discusses a technique the authors have designated Family Photo Reconnaisance. They describe the rationale for and process of utilizatizing family photographs and movies in family therapy sessions to evoke past events and memories and to uncover feelings about these occurrences and the people involved in them. (Author)

  17. Functional Family Therapy. Family Strengthening Series. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sexton, Thomas L.; Alexander, James F.

    Increases in delinquency and violence over the past decade are often rooted in a number of interrelated social problems that may originate within the family structure. The focus of this publication is the effectiveness of family intervention programs and chronicles one type of intervention, the Functional Family Therapy (FFT). FFT draws on a…

  18. Family Therapy, Family Practice, and Child and Family Poverty: Historical Perspectives and Recent Developments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frankel, Harvy; Frankel, Sid

    2006-01-01

    This paper assesses the engagement of family therapy and family practice with families with children, who are living in poverty. It analyzes four promising models from two perspectives. The first perspective relates to critiques, which have been made of the practice of family therapy with families living in poverty; and the second relates to the…

  19. Simulated Family Therapy: A Classroom Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banyard, Victoria L.; Fernald, Peter S.

    2002-01-01

    In this article, we describe a demonstration and discussion of an initial family therapy interview simulated by 4 student volunteers. Several concepts and principles fundamental to family therapy are illustrated: interview stages, one-person definition of a problem, systemic perspective, clear generation line, unified executive team, disengaged…

  20. Simulated Family Therapy: A Classroom Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banyard, Victoria L.; Fernald, Peter S.

    2002-01-01

    In this article, we describe a demonstration and discussion of an initial family therapy interview simulated by 4 student volunteers. Several concepts and principles fundamental to family therapy are illustrated: interview stages, one-person definition of a problem, systemic perspective, clear generation line, unified executive team, disengaged…

  1. Family Mode Deactivation Therapy Results and Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apsche, Jack A.; Bass, Christopher K.

    2006-01-01

    This article highlights the inclusion of Mode Deactivation Therapy as a treatment modality for families in crisis. As an empirically validated treatment, Mode Deactivation Therapy has been effective in treating a wide variety of psychological issues. Mode Deactivation Therapy, (MDT) was developed to treat adolescents with disorders of conduct…

  2. Family Therapy: A Client-Centered Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levant, Ronald F.

    1978-01-01

    This article critiques therapist-directed approaches to family therapy in light of research findings on therapist variables associated with positive outcomes in psychotherapy. An alternative, phenomenological view of the family is developed, which assumes the family to be motivated for enhancement and growth. A client-centered approach is…

  3. Family therapy: critique from a feminist perspective.

    PubMed

    Penfold, P S

    1989-05-01

    Family therapy is a powerful modality which, all too often, is used without awareness of its possible constricting, or even crippling, effects. Textbooks and articles about family therapy focus soley or mainly on the family system alone, thus obscuring the influence of school, workplace, neighborhood, peer group, class, race and sex. Theorists, who are predominantly male, have developed rigid and mechanical concepts which encourage formulations encompassing the family system alone. Power inequalities between men and women are ignored and socially programmed sex roles are reflected and reinforced by theory and practice. Thus family therapy may function to locate and contain, within the family, difficulties and distress derived from stresses outside the family. The negative effects of traditional sex roles on emotional growth, sexuality and the development of mutually gratifying male-female relationships are never dealt with. As a result, family therapy may contribute to men's straitjacketing and women's oppression. To fulfill its promise, family therapy research and teaching must move beyond shortsighted and narrowly conceptualized theories which could damage, rather than heal, families who are suffering.

  4. [Multidimensional family therapy: which influences, which specificities?].

    PubMed

    Bonnaire, C; Bastard, N; Couteron, J-P; Har, A; Phan, O

    2014-10-01

    Among illegal psycho-active drugs, cannabis is the most consumed by French adolescents. Multidimensional family therapy (MDFT) is a family-based outpatient therapy which has been developed for adolescents with drug and behavioral problems. MDFT has shown its effectiveness in adolescents with substance abuse disorders (notably cannabis abuse) not only in the United States but also in Europe (International Cannabis Need of Treatment project). MDFT is a multidisciplinary approach and an evidence-based treatment, at the crossroads of developmental psychology, ecological theories and family therapy. Its psychotherapeutic techniques find its roots in a variety of approaches which include systemic family therapy and cognitive therapy. The aims of this paper are: to describe all the backgrounds of MDFT by highlighting its characteristics; to explain how structural and strategy therapies have influenced this approach; to explore the links between MDFT, brief strategic family therapy and multi systemic family therapy; and to underline the specificities of this family therapy method. The multidimensional family therapy was created on the bases of 1) the integration of multiple therapeutic techniques stemming from various family therapy theories; and 2) studies which have shown family therapy efficiency. Several trials have shown a better efficiency of MDFT compared to group treatment, cognitive-behavioral therapy and home-based treatment. Studies have also highlighted that MDFT led to superior treatment outcomes, especially among young people with severe drug use and psychiatric co-morbidities. In the field of systemic family therapies, MDFT was influenced by: 1) the structural family therapy (S. Minuchin), 2) the strategic family theory (J. Haley), and 3) the intergenerational family therapy (Bowen and Boszormenyi-Nagy). MDFT has specific aspects: MDFT therapists think in a multidimensional perspective (because an adolescent's drug abuse is a multidimensional disorder), they

  5. Focal family therapy outcome study. I: Patient and family functioning.

    PubMed

    Levene, J E; Newman, F; Jefferies, J J

    1989-10-01

    This pilot study compared the efficacy of two models of family therapy plus medication in the treatment of ten schizophrenic patients previously considered poor responders to neuroleptics alone. Focal Family Therapy (FFT), a limited psychodynamic model, was compared with Supportive Management Counselling (SMC), an educative, problem-solving approach. Family treatment was begun during admission to hospital and continued for up to six months post-discharge. Patient and family measures were administered on assessment, termination, and at three, six and 12 month follow-up interviews. Our data suggest that patients in both groups improved significantly following treatment on measures of social functioning and community tenure. The average increase in amount of time out of hospital was a full year, compared to previous rates. Patients receiving FFT demonstrated significantly greater improvement in symptoms, compared to patients in the SMC group. On average, families scored in the normal range on the family functioning measure at assessment and upon termination of treatment.

  6. Neuroscience Applications in Marital and Family Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tootle, A. Eugene

    2003-01-01

    Addresses the importance of a basic understanding of neuroscience in marital, couple, and family therapy training and practice. Examines the biological and physiological processes underlying emotions, memory, and neurochemistry, and emphasizes their impact on behavior. (Contains 20 references.) (GCP)

  7. Family therapy with a multiparental/multispousal family.

    PubMed

    al-Krenawi, A

    1998-01-01

    This article examines therapy with a Bedouin-Arab family from the Negev, Israel, which consisted of 69 members: a husband, 8 wives, and 60 siblings. The husband, who lived with his youngest wife, paid little attention to his other wives and their children. There was considerable competition, hostility, and jealousy among the wives; no communication between the co-wives or the children of different wives; and a variety of behavioral and psychosocial problems among family members. I describe the varied strategies and systems involved in family therapy. The main strategies were to establish good relationships among the co-wives and to build a coalition among them, including the youngest wife, through group therapy in a medical clinic. A secondary strategy was using the children's problems to get the husband involved in the therapy. With improvement of the children's functioning, and with reduced intra-subfamily hostility, the husband's relationships with his children and wives improved.

  8. Family therapy in the Czech Republic.

    PubMed

    Chvala, Vladislav; Trapkova, Ludmila; Novak, Tomas; Lattova, Zuzana

    2012-04-01

    Political, economic and cultural transformations in the Czech Republic after 1989 were reflected in a number of demographic indicators, including those that characterize family behaviour. The main features of these changes are declining birth and marriage rates, postponement of first marriage and first birth ages, and a growing proportion of children born outside of marriage. These changes are comparable to those that have taken place in western Europe since the 1960s; however, some of them are abrupt and cause rapid shift in the family structure. Over the last two decades, significant changes have also occurred in the organization of family therapy. Earlier less coordinated activities underwent institutionalization, and guidelines for training and supervision were established. Family therapy in the Czech Republic is covered by a national organization, the Society of Family Therapy (SOFT). Standards of training and supervision correspond to European standards. The problem remains the lack of support for family therapy from state institutions, especially in the health service. There are only a few healthcare facilities providing family therapy for the treatment of psychiatric disorders or chronic somatic diseases. The capacity of these centres is substantially inadequate.

  9. Family therapy in the treatment of adolescents.

    PubMed

    Matorin, S; Greenberg, L

    1992-06-01

    A family with an adolescent must transform itself from a predominantly nurturant unit to one that can tolerate and encourage the adolescent's need to separate. When an adolescent presents with symptoms that disrupt the developmental process, the clinician who is familiar with several models of family therapy is better able to select a therapeutic and cost-effective intervention. For family assessments, the authors recommend a biopsychosocial approach, which has replaced the outdated view that families cause psychiatric problems and which acknowledges the family as a potential source of healing. The authors describe several models of family therapy--Satir's communication model, the structural model of Minuchin, Bowen's cross-generational model, and psycho-education--and examine features of these approaches useful for working with adolescents. Illustrative vignettes and some guiding principles for matching model and problem are offered.

  10. Conversion Therapy: Ethical Considerations in Family Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steigerwald, Fran; Janson, Gregory R.

    2003-01-01

    Explores the ethical and practical considerations of conversion therapy when counseling families and individuals within families with gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transsexual concerns. Emphasis is placed on the need for counselors to assess personal biases in the area of working with sexual minorities. Presents a reflective exercise and case study…

  11. Family Therapy in the Black Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAdoo, John Lewis

    The field of family therapy is a relatively new one, growing and gaining wider acceptance in the areas of social work, psychiatry, psychology, and community mental health. It has influenced the shift from individually oriented theory and techniques to a social systems approach, emphasizing the relationship between family members. While research…

  12. Family therapy for autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Spain, Debbie; Sin, Jacqueline; Paliokosta, Eleni; Furuta, Marie; Prunty, Jonathan E; Chalder, Trudie; Murphy, Declan G; Happé, Francesca G

    2017-05-16

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are characterised by impairments in communication and reciprocal social interaction. These impairments can impact on relationships with family members, augment stress and frustration, and contribute to behaviours that can be described as challenging. Family members of individuals with ASD can experience high rates of carer stress and burden, and poor parental efficacy. While there is evidence to suggest that individuals with ASD and family members derive benefit from psychological interventions designed to reduce stress and mental health morbidity, and enhance coping, most studies to date have targeted the needs of either individuals with ASD, or family members. We wanted to examine whether family (systemic) therapy, aimed at enhancing communication, relationships or coping, is effective for individuals with ASD and their wider family network. To evaluate the clinical effectiveness and acceptability of family therapy as a treatment to enhance communication or coping for individuals with ASD and their family members. If possible, we will also seek to establish the economic costs associated with family therapy for this clinical population. On 16 January 2017 we searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, 10 other databases and three trials registers. We also handsearched reference lists of existing systematic reviews and contacted study authors in the field. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-RCTs investigating the effectiveness of family therapy for young people or adults with ASD or family members, or both, delivered via any modality and for an unspecified duration, compared with either standard care, a wait-list control, or an active intervention such as an alternative type of psychological therapy. Two authors independently screened each title and abstract and all full-text reports retrieved. To enhance rigour, 25% of these were independently screened by a third author. The search yielded 4809 records. Of these, we retrieved 37

  13. Family therapy for conduct disorders.

    PubMed

    Sholevar, G P

    2001-07-01

    Low levels of parental skill and cooperation are the prominent roots of arrested socialization, and a lack of appreciation for intimate and gratifying human relationships is evident in children with CD. The relational problems are exaggerated further by the child's observation of chronic parental discord and internalization of a family image constructed around intrafamilial conflict and isolation. Skills deficits in parental and marital communication and problem solving and conflicts in these relationships play significant roles in producing family dysfunction. The low level of parental differentiation and identity formation plays a fundamental role in family dysfunction by interfering with the development of an adequate self-image, self-esteem, and internal codes of behavior in the child. The transmission of parental antisocial tendencies to their children is facilitated by the low level of differentiation between parent and child. Family treatment should focus on enhancing cooperation between parents and children and between parents as co-parents and as a couple. Enhancing parent management skills can undermine the use of coercive, punitive, and impulsive interactions in the families. The higher divorce rate in parents of children with CD should be addressed with parents directly and early in treatment with the hope of mobilizing the rehabilitative and cooperative marital forces. In terms of future directions, family studies should address and incorporate the expanding knowledge of biologic and psychologic characteristics of children with CD and the possible impact of such characteristics in undermining family development and integrity. Such investigations should include the following information: The role of sustained and intense aggression in some children on family functioning and development. The possible role of diminished response to punishment and excessive search for gratification in children with CD. The role of the child with CD in promoting marital and

  14. Homework assignments in couple and family therapy.

    PubMed

    Dattilio, Frank M

    2002-05-01

    Homework has been cited as an integral part of a number of theoretical orientations and therapy formats; unfortunately, very little has been written about its use with couples and families. This is despite the fact that many couple and family therapists espouse the use of homework or out-of-session assignments in order to help the effects of therapy jell. This article reviews some of the empirical literature on homework assignments and their effectiveness in the domain of therapy for families and couples. It also highlights the effectiveness of and the need for out-of-session assignments in treatment. A case illustration is used to demonstrate how homework assignments may be used as a significant change agent in couple and family treatment.

  15. Which family--what therapy: Maori culture, families and family therapy in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Shailesh; Dean, Peter; Smith, Barry; Mellsop, Graham W

    2012-04-01

    New Zealand is a relatively young and small country which has seen steady migration for nearly seven centuries. Despite a long history of rivalry and hostility between Maori and European values, the country has also seen some significant synergism between the two cultures. For the last three decades Asians have also migrated at a significant pace. The country faces the challenge of delivering quality mental health services to such cultures which are bifurcated in being socio-centric (Maori, Pacific Islanders and Asian total 32% combined) or ego-centric (European total 68%). Significant progress has been made in including families of the mentally ill in their treatment and care planning. Legislative requirements have been introduced for the family to be consulted in the treatment of those who are being compelled to receive psychiatric care under the Mental Health Act. Models of family therapy developed through innovation meeting the unique local needs or adaptation of existing models from overseas are being used. An overview of such family therapy modalities is presented.

  16. Wither Couple/Family Therapy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoyt, Michael F.; Gurman, Alan S.

    2012-01-01

    Attention is called to disturbing developments in insurance reimbursement that threaten the practice of therapy involving more than one person. This can be seen as part of the movement to marginalize psychotherapy as first-line treatment and replace it with the inappropriate and excessive (and often exclusive) use of medication.

  17. Wither Couple/Family Therapy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoyt, Michael F.; Gurman, Alan S.

    2012-01-01

    Attention is called to disturbing developments in insurance reimbursement that threaten the practice of therapy involving more than one person. This can be seen as part of the movement to marginalize psychotherapy as first-line treatment and replace it with the inappropriate and excessive (and often exclusive) use of medication.

  18. Treating Adolescent Drug Abuse: A Comparison of Family Systems Therapy, Group Therapy, and Family Drug Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joanning, Harvey; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Assessed differential effectiveness of three models of adolescent drug abuse treatment: Family Systems Therapy (FST), Adolescent Group Therapy (AGT), and Family Drug Education (FDE). FST appeared more effective in stopping adolescent drug abuse than AGT or FDE, registering twice as many apparently drug-free clients as FDE and three times as many…

  19. Treating Adolescent Drug Abuse: A Comparison of Family Systems Therapy, Group Therapy, and Family Drug Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joanning, Harvey; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Assessed differential effectiveness of three models of adolescent drug abuse treatment: Family Systems Therapy (FST), Adolescent Group Therapy (AGT), and Family Drug Education (FDE). FST appeared more effective in stopping adolescent drug abuse than AGT or FDE, registering twice as many apparently drug-free clients as FDE and three times as many…

  20. Finding the heart of medical family therapy: a content analysis of medical family therapy casebook articles.

    PubMed

    Bischoff, Richard J; Springer, Paul R; Felix, Daniel S; Hollist, Cody S

    2011-09-01

    In an effort to identify the essential ingredients of medical family therapy, a content analysis of 15 peer-reviewed case studies in medical family therapy was conducted. The case studies were published from 1996 to 2007 in Families, Systems, & Health. Through a qualitative content analysis, three main themes emerged that describe the essence of the practice of medical family therapy: (1) The patient's multisystemic experience of disease, (2) treatment is about caring, not just caregiving, and (3) elevating the patient as collaborator in the care team.

  1. Family Counseling and Therapy: Major Issues and Topics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Robert L.; Stevens-Smith, Patricia

    The six chapters of this book on family counseling and therapy focus on healthy family functioning; marriage and family counseling theories; the practice of marriage and family counseling; training marriage and family counselors/therapists; issues and topics in family therapy; and images and projections for the future. The 33 articles distributed…

  2. Directions in Marriage and Family Therapy, 1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cermele, Debra E., Ed.

    1994-01-01

    In an effort to help practitioners deal with the great volume of current literature in the field of marriage and family therapy, this compilation attempts to present clinically relevant material in a user-friendly format. Topics selected for inclusion are believed to be up-to-date, informative, and clinically meaningful--as well as theoretically…

  3. Family Therapy Approach to Incapacitating Migraine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenstock, Harvey A.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    The case of a nine-year-old boy suffering from psycosomatic migraine headaches is discussed. The main article presents the case study and discusses the family systems approach which was successfully used in therapy. The following discussion deals with the psychosomatic personality. (HMV)

  4. Delayed Stress Response Syndrome: Family Therapy Indications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Figley, Charles R.; Sprenkle, Douglas H.

    1978-01-01

    The delayed stress response syndrome is a form of chronic catastrophic stress disorder. The theoretical nature of the syndrome and its most characteristic symptoms are delineated within the context of treating Vietnam combat veterans. The paper outlines treatment implications within a family therapy program. (Author)

  5. Family Therapy with the Homosexual: A Search

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dailey, Dennis M.

    1974-01-01

    The author discusses some generalizations that have come out of his 12 years of experience in working professionally with individuals and couples involved in homosexual relationships. He concludes that the concept of family therapy is a viable approach to use with homosexual couples. Hypotheses worthy of further testing are suggested. (BW/Author)

  6. Four Useful Interventions in Brief Family Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Shazer, Steve; Molnar, Alex

    1984-01-01

    Describes four interventions in brief family therapy, illustrated by case examples. Interventions are aimed at helping clients solve problems, and three assumptions about the nature of change are described. Results of these interventions suggest there is no clinical distinction between clients' perceived change and observed change. (JAC)

  7. Family Therapy Approach to Incapacitating Migraine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenstock, Harvey A.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    The case of a nine-year-old boy suffering from psycosomatic migraine headaches is discussed. The main article presents the case study and discusses the family systems approach which was successfully used in therapy. The following discussion deals with the psychosomatic personality. (HMV)

  8. Child and Family Therapy: A Collaborative Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuehl, Bruce P.

    1993-01-01

    Discusses how, when a child is the identified patient and family therapy is treatment, therapeutic process can be facilitated by conducting at least small number of individual sessions with child. Notes that such behavior by therapist communicates to children, parents, and involved referral sources respect for their opinions and lays groundwork…

  9. Family Therapy for Continuing Professional Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matter, Betty R.

    1980-01-01

    Reports on a program of family therapy instruction intended as a continuing professional education service to mental health personnel. Rapid expansion of the program since its inception in late 1971 is attributed to increasing demand from human service agencies in and around greater Philadelphia area. Some characteristics of participants are…

  10. Essentials of Family Therapy: A Therapist's Guide to Eight Approaches.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, William M.; McGraw, James A.

    This book provides a comprehensive overview of a number of popular approaches to family therapy, pointing out the similarities and differences in various approaches. It opens with a brief overview of family therapy models. The following eight chapters discuss eight separate models of therapy: (1) Communication/Validation Family Therapy; (2)…

  11. Postmodern Influence in Family Therapy Research: Reflections of Graduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hertlein, Katherine M.; Lambert-Shute, Jennifer; Benson, Kristen

    2004-01-01

    Postmodernism has influenced family therapy in significant ways, from clinical work to family therapy research. Little has been written, however, on how to conduct postmodern research in a manner reflecting marriage and family therapy inquiries. The present study seeks to investigate doctoral students understanding of postmodern family therapy…

  12. Postmodern Influence in Family Therapy Research: Reflections of Graduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hertlein, Katherine M.; Lambert-Shute, Jennifer; Benson, Kristen

    2004-01-01

    Postmodernism has influenced family therapy in significant ways, from clinical work to family therapy research. Little has been written, however, on how to conduct postmodern research in a manner reflecting marriage and family therapy inquiries. The present study seeks to investigate doctoral students understanding of postmodern family therapy…

  13. ["Secrecy" in individual and family therapy].

    PubMed

    Bertona, G

    1985-01-01

    After a reflexion about the etymology and the semantics of the word "secret", the author presents an historical review about the pathogenetic secret and its treatment, which has not been always the task of physicians or psychiatrists. Then, on the basis of the works of Ferreira and Watzlawick, the relationship between secret and myths are shown. In individual therapy, the secret may be considered to be a central place of the anal problematic. In family therapy, the analysis of secret implies not only to define the network of the concerned persons, but also the definition of the bonds between the secret and loyalties, the distribution of power, the alliances and the definitions of the private sphere (proper to each family) and of the protective function of the secret. The "secret" could supposed to be a potential meeting point between the representatives of different therapeutics views.

  14. Play Therapy: A Paradigm for Work with Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keith, David V.; Whitaker, Carl A.

    1981-01-01

    Provides a partial list of similarities between play therapy and family therapy and reviews methods for using play with families. Considers the question of indications and contraindications for play therapy with families. Clinical examples are utilized to illustrate throughout the paper. (Author)

  15. The Importance of Creativity in Family Therapy: A Preliminary Consideration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carson, David K.

    1999-01-01

    Looks at the importance of creativity in the context of family therapy. Examines creative techniques such as family sculpturing, family art therapy, puppetry, family drawings, and psychodrama. Focuses on the concept of creativity in prominent theories of counseling (i.e., humanistic, Gestalt, cognitive psychology) and the relation of divergent…

  16. Reinventing Family Therapy: Teaching Family Intervention as a New Treatment Modality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Josephson, Allan M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: This article discusses the pedagogy of teaching family therapy in the new millennium. It draws on the strengths of "family systems therapy" but goes beyond it--suggesting a new paradigm, new terminology, and a new teaching perspective. It discusses the historical background of family therapy training, a scientific foundation for what…

  17. Reinventing Family Therapy: Teaching Family Intervention as a New Treatment Modality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Josephson, Allan M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: This article discusses the pedagogy of teaching family therapy in the new millennium. It draws on the strengths of "family systems therapy" but goes beyond it--suggesting a new paradigm, new terminology, and a new teaching perspective. It discusses the historical background of family therapy training, a scientific foundation for what…

  18. Strategic Family Therapy: A High-Technology Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seligman, Linda

    Historically, family counseling grew from a focus on the individual to an emphasis on the importance of the entire family as the unit of treatment and the structure of the family as the key ingredient in family functioning. Strategic family therapy (SFT) has evolved from these traditional intervention approaches to the use of a brief, directive,…

  19. A Perfect Fit: Connecting Family Therapy Skills to Family Business Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Patricia M.; Johnson, Kit

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to encourage family therapists to become more interested in family business practice. It does so in three ways: (a) highlighting the number of therapists already involved in family business issues; (b) showing the parallels between family business and family therapy by applying family business research findings to…

  20. A Perfect Fit: Connecting Family Therapy Skills to Family Business Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Patricia M.; Johnson, Kit

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to encourage family therapists to become more interested in family business practice. It does so in three ways: (a) highlighting the number of therapists already involved in family business issues; (b) showing the parallels between family business and family therapy by applying family business research findings to…

  1. The Adolescent in Family Therapy: Breaking the Cycle of Conflict and Control. Guilford Family Therapy Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Micucci, Joseph A.

    Presenting a developmentally grounded approach to treating a wide range of adolescent problems, this book shows how troubled teenagers and their parents can be helped to use family relationships as catalysts for growth and change. Case examples, practical discussions of the process of assessment and therapy, and straightforward clinical advice are…

  2. The Adolescent in Family Therapy: Breaking the Cycle of Conflict and Control. Guilford Family Therapy Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Micucci, Joseph A.

    Presenting a developmentally grounded approach to treating a wide range of adolescent problems, this book shows how troubled teenagers and their parents can be helped to use family relationships as catalysts for growth and change. Case examples, practical discussions of the process of assessment and therapy, and straightforward clinical advice are…

  3. [The development of family therapy concepts--interrelationship between patients' and therapist's family].

    PubMed

    Buddeberg-Fischer, B

    1998-03-01

    During the last 20 years family therapy has well been established as a supplementary or alternative therapy to individual therapy within child and adolescent psychiatry. Along with the further development and the change of concepts of family therapy there has been a greater interest in the interrelationship within the triad of patient-family-therapist, too. In the training of family therapists the meaning of the family of origin has been recognized. The implications of the therapeutic professional activities on the psychiatrist's family has not yet thoroughly considered, however. In the present paper the development and the characteristics of some main concepts of family therapy are described. Illustrated by a case report the influences of family oriented therapeutic activities over the therapist's family are presented. Finally the interrelationship between the patient's and the therapist's family are discussed as a constructive element of a mutual learning process.

  4. Intrapersonal and Interpersonal Models: Blending Gestalt and Family Therapies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatcher, Chris

    1978-01-01

    Family therapy is primarily focused upon interpersonal or transactional issues. Gestalt therapy is particularly well suited for short term work on intrapersonal and boundary issues. This paper shows how the selective integration of the two approaches provides a significant, new dimension in the development of family therapy. (Author)

  5. Collaboration: Family and Therapist Perspectives of Helpful Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sundet, Rolf

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative study examined how a group of families and their therapists described helpful therapy. The qualitative analysis generated family and therapist perspectives. As a double description, the therapist and family perspectives highlighted conversation, participation, and relationship as three core areas of helpful therapy. These are…

  6. Solution-focused therapy for families coping with suicide.

    PubMed

    de Castro, Sahily; Guterman, Jeffrey T

    2008-01-01

    Solution-focused therapy is proposed as a model for families coping with suicide. The nature and incidence of suicide is described along with a consideration of the effects that suicide has on families and prevailing treatment approaches. Three case examples illustrate the application. Implications are discussed pertaining to the theory, practice, and research of solution-focused therapy for families coping with suicide.

  7. Salvador Minuchin's structural family therapy and its application to multicultural family systems.

    PubMed

    Navarre, S E

    1998-01-01

    The structural approach to family therapy offers a useful perspective to the nurse therapist working with families with various cultural backgrounds. Asian and Hispanic families are examined to illustrate using Minuchin's approach to family counseling. The rationale for the structural approach is explored, and specific therapeutic techniques for practice are described. Nurses who work with culturally diverse families might profit by using this approach.

  8. The Use of Family Assessment and Feedback in Ongoing Family Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuhr, Robert A.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Describes the Family Environment Scale (FES). Discussion of family member's real and ideal family environment identifies areas of agreement and disagreement about actual and desired aspects of family functioning. This procedure can focus each therapy session on specific interpersonal issues and encourage family members to take an active part.…

  9. Multiple Family Group Therapy: An Interpersonal/Postmodern Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorngren, Jill M.; Kleist, David M.

    2002-01-01

    Multiple Family Group Therapy has been identified as a viable treatment model for a variety of client populations. A combination of family systems theories and therapeutic group factors provide the opportunity to explore multiple levels of intrapersonal and interpersonal relationships between families. This article depicts a Multiple Family Group…

  10. Family Therapy of the Moderate Type of Parental Alienation Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Richard A.

    1999-01-01

    Modification of traditional family therapy approaches are warranted if there is to be any chance of success in the treatment of Parental Alienation Syndrome families. Especially important is the full support of the court. Describes the special family therapeutic techniques warranted in the treatment of families in which the Parental Alienation…

  11. A perfect fit: connecting family therapy skills to family business needs.

    PubMed

    Cole, Patricia M; Johnson, Kit

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this article is to encourage family therapists to become more interested in family business practice. It does so in three ways: (a) highlighting the number of therapists already involved in family business issues; (b) showing the parallels between family business and family therapy by applying family business research findings to couples therapy; (c) discussing how family therapists already have the practice wisdom to be effective in working with family business clients. Limitations of this practice are also discussed along with suggestions for overcoming them.

  12. The role of family institutes in promoting the practice of family therapy.

    PubMed

    Rampage, Cheryl

    2014-09-01

    Much of the development of family therapy as a discipline was an outcome of the clinical, training, and theory-building activities conducted at family institutes around the United States. Beginning in the 1960s, these institutes were the crucibles in which the concepts and practices of family therapy flourished. The author, a leader at one of the largest family institutes in the United States, discusses the role of family institutes in promoting the practice of family therapy, as well as the challenges of doing so.

  13. Proceedings of a Symposium on Family Counseling and Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gazda, G. M., Ed.

    The presentations of 3 top people in the field of family counseling and therapy were transcribed and slightly edited for this booklet. Three different but popular approaches are represented. Virginia Satir discusses and demonstrates the Conjoint Family Therapy approach which she pioneered. Dr. Oscar Christensen, a recognized leader in Adlerian…

  14. Family Therapy Training in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Fellowship Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rait, Douglas Samuel

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study describes the current state of family therapy training in a sample of child and adolescent psychiatry fellowship programs. Method: Child and adolescent psychiatry fellows (N = 66) from seven training programs completed a questionnaire assessing demographics, family therapy training experiences, common models of treatment and…

  15. The Family Therapy Institute: A State-Wide Deinstitutionalization Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Family Therapy Inst., Rugby, ND.

    The report--over half of which consists of appendixes--describes the Family Therapy Institute, a statewide program in Rugby, North Dakota devoted to the deinstitutionalization of juvenile delinquent status offenders by means of short term intensive family therapy treatment. Among the aspects covered are a history of the philosophical approach…

  16. Teaching Family Therapists about Sexual Attraction in Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Steven M.

    2001-01-01

    Reviews the literature on sexual attraction in relation to the practice of marriage and family therapy and investigates how family-therapists-in-training regard this phenomenon. Results reveal that new therapists dealing with attraction in therapy encounter a myriad of emotional responses. Proposes that it is the clinical supervisor's…

  17. Family Therapy Training in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Fellowship Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rait, Douglas Samuel

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study describes the current state of family therapy training in a sample of child and adolescent psychiatry fellowship programs. Method: Child and adolescent psychiatry fellows (N = 66) from seven training programs completed a questionnaire assessing demographics, family therapy training experiences, common models of treatment and…

  18. A Short Course in Family Therapy: Translating Research Into Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Robert

    2005-01-01

    This article outlines a graduate-level, one-time-only family therapy course that prepares counseling trainees to be competent at entry-level family therapy in the United States. The approach outlined addresses the training concerns of programs that significantly emphasize individual-focused paradigms and that have limited time to train counseling…

  19. The Family Therapy Institute: A State-Wide Deinstitutionalization Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Family Therapy Inst., Rugby, ND.

    The report--over half of which consists of appendixes--describes the Family Therapy Institute, a statewide program in Rugby, North Dakota devoted to the deinstitutionalization of juvenile delinquent status offenders by means of short term intensive family therapy treatment. Among the aspects covered are a history of the philosophical approach…

  20. Growth behind the Mirror: The Family Therapy Consortium's Group Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wendorf, Donald J.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Charts the development of the Family Therapy Consortium, a group that provides supervision and continuing education in family therapy and explores the peer supervision process at work in the consortium. The focus is on individual and group development, which are seen as complementary aspects of the same growth process. (Author/NRB)

  1. Up close: family therapy challenges and innovations around the world.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Janine; Abu-Baker, Khawla; Diez Fernández, Cristina; Chong Garcia, Nelly; Fredman, Glenda; Kamya, Hugo; Martín Higarza, Yolanda; Fortes de Leff, Jacqueline; Messent, Philip; Nakamura, Shin-Ichi; Torun Reid, Fatma; Sim, Timothy; Subrahmanian, Chitra; Zevallos Vega, Roxana

    2014-09-01

    Family therapists from 10 different countries (China, India, Israel including Palestinian citizens, Japan, Mexico, Peru, Spain, Turkey, Uganda, and the United Kingdom) describe systemic therapy in their contexts and current innovative work and challenges. They highlight the importance of family therapy continuing to cut across disciplines, the power of systems ideas in widely diverse settings and institutions (such as courts, HIV projects, working with people forced into exile), extensive new mental health initiatives (such as in Turkey and India), as well as the range of family therapy journals available (four alone in Spain). Many family therapy groups are collaborating across organizations (especially in Asia) and the article presents other ideas for connections such as a clearing house to inexpensively translate family therapy articles into other languages.

  2. Strengthening Family Resilience. The Guilford Family Therapy Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Froma

    Offering an alternative to clinician's prevalent focus on family dysfunction, this book draws upon extensive clinical and research experience to present a framework for therapeutic and preventive work with couples and families who are distressed, vulnerable, or at risk. The book identifies key interactional processes that enable family members to…

  3. Strengthening Family Resilience. The Guilford Family Therapy Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Froma

    Offering an alternative to clinician's prevalent focus on family dysfunction, this book draws upon extensive clinical and research experience to present a framework for therapeutic and preventive work with couples and families who are distressed, vulnerable, or at risk. The book identifies key interactional processes that enable family members to…

  4. Family therapy as a rite of passage: play's the thing.

    PubMed

    Kobak, R R; Waters, D B

    1984-03-01

    Although there is a considerable literature about the nature of family problems and techniques of therapeutic change, little is known about how change in the family therapy setting can be maintained over time. The current paper suggests that important insights into the nature of family therapy can be gleaned by comparison with "naturally occurring" rites of passage. Anthropological analysis of these rites suggests several concepts that may guide the family therapist. These include: (a) the idea of a "therapeutic frame" that marks off the therapy setting; (b) the role of symbolic process and flexibility; (c) the concepts of liminal play and flow as explanations of therapeutic technique and potential; and (d) the relationship between the family in treatment and a wider community. Rites of passage can serve as an important source of comparison and insight into the nature of change in the family therapy setting.

  5. Biologic therapy in familial Mediterranean fever.

    PubMed

    Koga, Tomohiro; Migita, Kiyoshi; Kawakami, Atsushi

    2016-09-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is the most common autoinflammatory hereditary disease characterized by self-limited attacks of fever and serositis. Although colchicine is the gold standard treatment for the attacks ∼10% of cases of FMF are resistant or intolerant to effective doses of colchicine. In such cases, however, there are increasing numbers of case reports or clinical trials treated by biologic agents which directly target the proinflammatory cytokines. Anti-interleukin-1 (IL-1) treatment has proven beneficial in improving the inflammation in terms of clinical manifestations and laboratory findings in clinical trials. Furthermore, anti-tumor necrosis factor treatment has also revealed the efficacy and safety in patients with colchicine-resistant FMF. More recently, cases of successful treatment with IL-6 inhibitor, tocilizumab (TCZ), has been reported from Japan and Turkey. Of note, TCZ may be preferable in the treatment as well as the prevention of secondary amyloidosis of FMF patients since it significantly suppresses acute inflammatory response. In the present review, we summarize the literatures regarding the efficacy of biologic therapy in colchicine-resistant or -intolerant patients with FMF.

  6. A narrative perspective on genograms: revisiting classical family therapy methods.

    PubMed

    Chrzastowski, Szymon K

    2011-10-01

    This article presents how genograms, a classic family therapy technique, can be used in the context of narrative therapy. Genograms create a unique opportunity to explore and re-tell family stories thus enabling their re-authoring. An important aspect of this process is that of tracking down family resources and wisdom. The graphic form of a genogram can be very helpful in distancing a person from the dominant narrations in her/his family. Additionally, genogram analysis is an excellent opportunity to conduct re-membering conversation and introducing the "club of life" metaphor. Finally, the creative approach to drawing genograms can be an invitation for family members to "play" with their family stories and, as a consequence, re-position their roles in these stories. The article completes the presentation of the family therapy case study which was inspired by narrative ideas and genogram analysis.

  7. Family Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Child Anxiety Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Jeffrey J.; Piacentini, John C.; Southam-Gerow, Michael; Chu, Brian C.; Sigman, Marian

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This study compared family-focused cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT: the Building Confidence Program) with traditional child-focused CBT with minimal family involvement for children with anxiety disorders. Method: Forty clinically anxious youth (6-13 years old) were randomly assigned to a family- or child-focused cognitive-behavioral…

  8. The Politics of Functional Family Therapy: A Feminist Critique.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avis, Judith Myers

    1985-01-01

    Discusses whether the Functional Family Therapy (FFT) model takes a covert political stance which reinforces traditional gender roles in both family and therapist. Examines FFT's affirmation of existing political functions in the family as well as suggested therapist use of self. Discusses implications and recommends changes. (BH)

  9. An Art Therapy Exploration of Immigration with Latino Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linesch, Debra; Aceves, Hilda C.; Quezada, Paul; Trochez, Melissa; Zuniga, Elena

    2012-01-01

    This grounded theory study utilized art therapy techniques to explore the experiences of 8 Latino families that had immigrated to the United States. Focus group facilitators invited the parents and adolescent children in the families to share their acculturation experiences verbally and in family drawings. Emergent themes from each of three focus…

  10. Family Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Child Anxiety Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Jeffrey J.; Piacentini, John C.; Southam-Gerow, Michael; Chu, Brian C.; Sigman, Marian

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This study compared family-focused cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT: the Building Confidence Program) with traditional child-focused CBT with minimal family involvement for children with anxiety disorders. Method: Forty clinically anxious youth (6-13 years old) were randomly assigned to a family- or child-focused cognitive-behavioral…

  11. Americans with Disabilities Act: Implications for Family Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woody, Robert Henley

    1993-01-01

    Provides a review of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (Public Law 101-596) and discusses its implications for family therapy. Consideration is given to the family therapist's proper form of advocacy of rights and therapeutic usage of the act for empowering the individual with a disability and his or her family. (Author)

  12. The Invisible Mirror: In-Home Family Therapy and Supervision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zarski, John J.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Discusses home-based family therapy intervention programs, designed as a preventive strategy for multiproblem, at-risk families in mental health agencies. Maintains that a review of the literature reveals little information on clinical supervision, which is a major component of home-based family intervention. Focuses on providing an alternative…

  13. An Art Therapy Exploration of Immigration with Latino Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linesch, Debra; Aceves, Hilda C.; Quezada, Paul; Trochez, Melissa; Zuniga, Elena

    2012-01-01

    This grounded theory study utilized art therapy techniques to explore the experiences of 8 Latino families that had immigrated to the United States. Focus group facilitators invited the parents and adolescent children in the families to share their acculturation experiences verbally and in family drawings. Emergent themes from each of three focus…

  14. Family Therapy for Lesbian and Gay Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shernoff, Michael J.

    1984-01-01

    Suggests that social workers develop a professional approach that includes the treatment of lesbian and gay clients within the context of the family. Discusses self disclosure, legal issues, family relationships, and friendship networks. (JAC)

  15. Family Therapy for Lesbian and Gay Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shernoff, Michael J.

    1984-01-01

    Suggests that social workers develop a professional approach that includes the treatment of lesbian and gay clients within the context of the family. Discusses self disclosure, legal issues, family relationships, and friendship networks. (JAC)

  16. Family Therapy with Reconstituted Families: A Crisis-Induction Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baptiste, David A.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a crisis-based therapeutic approach for overcoming resistance in reconstituted families. Presents therapeutically induced crisis as a means through which therapists might purposefully disequilibrate families in which resistance is high and subsequently redirect them to meaningful change. Reviews implications and contraindications for the…

  17. Using Family Reconstruction Techniques with Families in Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheras, Peter L.

    An examination of the technique of Family Reconstruction employed by Satir and others attempting to establish an appreciation of the client's personhood through the understanding of their parents' personhood is presented. In addition, the feeling of continuity with the family and the facilitation of integration is explored to further reveal the…

  18. Using Family Reconstruction Techniques with Families in Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheras, Peter L.

    An examination of the technique of Family Reconstruction employed by Satir and others attempting to establish an appreciation of the client's personhood through the understanding of their parents' personhood is presented. In addition, the feeling of continuity with the family and the facilitation of integration is explored to further reveal the…

  19. Family Therapy with Latino Families: An Interview with Patricia Arredondo

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardona, Betty; Softas-Nall, Lia

    2010-01-01

    In this interview, Patricia Arredondo shares with us her scholarship and expertise working with Latino families. Patricia talks about multicultural competencies, multicultural development as well as diversity assessment when working with Latino families. Dr. Arredondo has published widely on these topics and is the coauthor of "Counseling Latinos…

  20. Family Therapy with Latino Families: An Interview with Patricia Arredondo

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardona, Betty; Softas-Nall, Lia

    2010-01-01

    In this interview, Patricia Arredondo shares with us her scholarship and expertise working with Latino families. Patricia talks about multicultural competencies, multicultural development as well as diversity assessment when working with Latino families. Dr. Arredondo has published widely on these topics and is the coauthor of "Counseling Latinos…

  1. Brief strategic family therapy: engaging drug using/problem behavior adolescents and their families in treatment.

    PubMed

    Szapocznik, José; Zarate, Monica; Duff, Johnathan; Muir, Joan

    2013-01-01

    Despite the efficacy of family-based interventions for improving outcomes for adolescent behavior problems such as substance use, engaging and retaining whole families in treatment is one of the greatest challenges therapists confront. This article illustrates how the Brief Strategic Family Therapy model, a family-based, empirically validated intervention designed to treat children and adolescents' problem behaviors, can be used to increase engagement, improve retention, and bring about positive outcomes for families. Research evidence for efficacy and effectiveness is also presented.

  2. The perfect marriage: solution-focused therapy and motivational interviewing in medical family therapy.

    PubMed

    Stermensky, Gage; Brown, Kristina S

    2014-01-01

    Medical family therapy has many potential uses in behavioral medicine and primary care. Current research was reviewed to determine the most advantageous way to apply solution-focused therapy and motivational interviewing as a perfect marriage in medical family therapy. An extensive literature review was done in the following databases for medical family therapy: Proquest, EBSCO, Medline, and PsychInfo. The search resulted in 86 relevant articles, of which 46 of the most recent were selected for review. Medical family therapy lacks current research that supports solution-focused therapy or motivational interviewing. However, evidence supports the use of solution-focused therapy as a brief format, as well as the closely related intervention, motivational interviewing. While medical family therapy presents many hopeful possibilities in the fields of behavioral medicine, psychology, and marriage and family therapy, little evidence currently exists for the most effective implementation. This review found evidence supporting solution-focused therapy and motivational interviewing as the perfect marriage of the collaborative team approaches for the future implementation and use of specific interventions in medical family therapy.

  3. The Perfect Marriage: Solution-Focused Therapy and Motivational Interviewing in Medical Family Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Stermensky, Gage; Brown, Kristina S.

    2014-01-01

    Medical family therapy has many potential uses in behavioral medicine and primary care. Current research was reviewed to determine the most advantageous way to apply solution-focused therapy and motivational interviewing as a perfect marriage in medical family therapy. An extensive literature review was done in the following databases for medical family therapy: Proquest, EBSCO, Medline, and PsychInfo. The search resulted in 86 relevant articles, of which 46 of the most recent were selected for review. Medical family therapy lacks current research that supports solution-focused therapy or motivational interviewing. However, evidence supports the use of solution-focused therapy as a brief format, as well as the closely related intervention, motivational interviewing. While medical family therapy presents many hopeful possibilities in the fields of behavioral medicine, psychology, and marriage and family therapy, little evidence currently exists for the most effective implementation. This review found evidence supporting solution-focused therapy and motivational interviewing as the perfect marriage of the collaborative team approaches for the future implementation and use of specific interventions in medical family therapy. PMID:25657948

  4. Family therapy in Brazil: current status.

    PubMed

    Picon, Felipe

    2012-04-01

    In the last three decades there has been a noticeable trend in the redefinition of the nuclear family in Brazil. A recent increase in the rates of divorces and paradoxically also in the rates of marriages, the legalization of same-sex unions and adoption by these couples, and the phenomenon of teenage pregnancy are some of the aspects that reflect on the current Brazilian family. This review highlights these changes and describes how family therapists in Brazil are facing the challenge of assisting these families, in a continental-sized country with uneven distribution of training courses and healthcare assistance.

  5. The "Incestuous Family" Revisited: A Critical Analysis of Family Therapy Myths.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Kerrie; MacKinnon, Laurie

    1990-01-01

    Critiques family therapy literature concerning incest. Identifies pervasive myths claiming that (1) fathers and mothers are pathologically disturbed or inadequate; (2) incest is caused by separation and loss; (3) family isolation or a rigid external boundary explains incest; and (4) incest serves a function in maintaining family organization.…

  6. Action Technique for Therapy with Families with Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfe, Lawrence A.; Collins-Wolfe, Judith A.

    1983-01-01

    Presents some nonverbal activities which counselors can use to encourage participation by all family members, including young children. Timing and ways of using activities to promote communication and structured change in therapy are also discussed. (Author/JAC)

  7. Are Written or Verbal Contracts More Effective in Family Therapy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klier, JoLynn; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Compared the effectiveness of verbal and written contracts in family therapy (N=65). Results indicated that while neither technique was superior, there were several distinctions between them. Written contracts were more successful in communicating explicit goals. (JAC)

  8. Are Written or Verbal Contracts More Effective in Family Therapy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klier, JoLynn; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Compared the effectiveness of verbal and written contracts in family therapy (N=65). Results indicated that while neither technique was superior, there were several distinctions between them. Written contracts were more successful in communicating explicit goals. (JAC)

  9. Action Technique for Therapy with Families with Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfe, Lawrence A.; Collins-Wolfe, Judith A.

    1983-01-01

    Presents some nonverbal activities which counselors can use to encourage participation by all family members, including young children. Timing and ways of using activities to promote communication and structured change in therapy are also discussed. (Author/JAC)

  10. Attributional Effects of Therapy With Incestuous Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sagatun, Inger J.

    1982-01-01

    Examines the effects of a self-help program, Parents United, on families in which incest has occurred. Studied male incest offenders (N=56). Results indicated the program was successful in increasing participants' feelings of responsibility, and decreasing recidivism, but less successful in keeping the families together. (Author/JAC)

  11. Brief Family Therapy: A Metaphorical Task.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Shazer, Steve

    1980-01-01

    Presents a therapeutic procedure designed to prescribe the family's troublesome behavior pattern. A complement precedes delivering a task assignment. The metaphorical task redefines the serious complaint pattern into only one of the many options a family has for dealing with each other. A case study is presented. (Author/BEF)

  12. Juvenile Anorexia Nervosa: Family Therapy's Natural Niche

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fishman, H. Charles

    2006-01-01

    Juvenile Anorexia Nervosa (AN) is a severe problem both in terms of presenting symptomatology and its tendency toward chronicity. Researchers have consistently shown that family-based approaches are superior to individual approaches for the treatment of juvenile AN. This article addresses the capacity deficit of trained family therapists to treat…

  13. Juvenile Anorexia Nervosa: Family Therapy's Natural Niche

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fishman, H. Charles

    2006-01-01

    Juvenile Anorexia Nervosa (AN) is a severe problem both in terms of presenting symptomatology and its tendency toward chronicity. Researchers have consistently shown that family-based approaches are superior to individual approaches for the treatment of juvenile AN. This article addresses the capacity deficit of trained family therapists to treat…

  14. Family Health Strategy doctors and nurses' perceptions of complementary therapies.

    PubMed

    Thiago, Sônia de Castro S; Tesser, Charles Dalcanale

    2011-04-01

    To analyze Estratégia de Saúde da Família (Family Health Strategy) professionals' perception of complementary and integrative therapies. A study with 177 doctors and nurses was conducted in 2008, based on a self-administered questionnaire. The outcome variables were "interest in complementary and integrative therapies" and "agreement with the National Policy on Complementary and Integrative Therapies. Sex, age, graduate level of education, postgraduate level of education, length of time since graduation, length of time of work, having children, providing complementary and integrative therapies in the workplace, and using homeopathy or acupuncture comprised the independent variables. Data were analyzed using Chi-square test and Fisher's exact test. A total of 17 health centers provided complementary and integrative therapies; 12.4% of professionals had a specialization in homeopathy or acupuncture; 43.5% of doctors were specialists in family and community medicine/family health. Of all participants, 88.7% did not know the national directives for this area, although 81.4% agreed with their inclusion in the Sistema Único de Saúde (Unified Health System). The majority (59.9%) showed an interest in qualifications and all agreed that these therapies should be approached during the graduate course. Agreement with the inclusion of such therapies was significantly associated with the fact of being a nurse (p = 0.027) and using homeopathy for oneself (p = 0.019). Interest in complementary therapies was associated with the use of homeopathy for oneself (p = 0.02) and acupuncture by family members (p = 0.013). Complementary and integrative therapies are accepted by the professionals studied. This acceptance is associated with previous contact with such therapies and, probably, with residency/specialization in family and community medicine/family health.

  15. Complementarity as a Function of Stage in Therapy: An Analysis of Minuchin's Structural Family Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laird, Heather; Vande Kemp, Hendrika

    1987-01-01

    Explored the level of family therapist complementarity in the early, middle and late stages of therapy performing a micro-analysis of Salvador Minuchin with one family in successful therapy. Level of therapist complementarity was signficantly greater in the early and late stages than in the middle stage, and was significantly correlated with…

  16. Considering Justice: An Exploratory Study of Family Therapy with Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowling, Stephanie Weiland; Kearney, Lisa K.; Lumadue, Christine A.; St. Germain, Noelle R.

    2002-01-01

    Feminist approaches to therapy with adolescents emphasize an empowering focus on the strengths of adolescents while simultaneously insisting that therapists become aware of their own biases toward today's adolescents. However, a review of the family therapy literature finds little mention of feminist approaches for addressing injustices (e.g.,…

  17. Selecting Marriage and Family Therapy Program Applicants: One Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allred, G. Hugh; Briggs, Kathleen

    1988-01-01

    Describes how Brigham Young University selects applicants to master's and doctoral programs in marriage and family therapy. Explains how traditional methods are augmented by use of highly reliable interaction-analysis instrument, a microcomputer, and large computer frame to analyze verbal interactions of applicants who conduct therapy with coached…

  18. Multi-Family Group Therapy for Sexually Abusive Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nahum, David; Brewer, Marci Mandel

    2004-01-01

    Although Multi-Family Group Therapy (MFGT) has been a researched intervention for nearly 40 years, clinicians working with sexually abusive youth and their families have only more recently begun to utilize the intervention. We believe MFGT for a sexual offense-specific treatment population is a sophisticated and powerful clinical intervention with…

  19. Terminal Stage Leukemia: Integrating Art Therapy and Family Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teufel, Emily Scudder

    1995-01-01

    Through art therapy, children express symbolically what they will not or cannot express emotionally to those close to them, and some children have the added stress of family problems that are magnified due to the situation. Presents the case history of a nine-year-old girl in the terminal stages of leukemia whose artwork symbolized family unity.…

  20. Solution-Focused Therapy for Families Coping with Suicide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Castro, Sahily; Guterman, Jeffrey T.

    2008-01-01

    Solution-focused therapy is proposed as a model for families coping with suicide. The nature and incidence of suicide is described along with a consideration of the effects that suicide has on families and prevailing treatment approaches. Three case examples illustrate the application. Implications are discussed pertaining to the theory, practice,…

  1. Terminal Stage Leukemia: Integrating Art Therapy and Family Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teufel, Emily Scudder

    1995-01-01

    Through art therapy, children express symbolically what they will not or cannot express emotionally to those close to them, and some children have the added stress of family problems that are magnified due to the situation. Presents the case history of a nine-year-old girl in the terminal stages of leukemia whose artwork symbolized family unity.…

  2. Couples or Family Therapy for Prisoners and Their Significant Others.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaslow, Florence W.

    1987-01-01

    Presents a brief portrait of perceptions of prison life and reactions of family member to the incarceration. Proposes a model for prerelase and postrelease couples and/or family therapy and addresses why this approach often constitutes an "essential part" of the package of services that should be offered prior to and after discharge. (Author/ABL)

  3. Family Therapy with Selectively Mute Children: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sloan, Trish L.

    2007-01-01

    Due to its rarity (less than 1% of all clinical cases), few Marriage and Family Therapists have significant expertise in dealing with children who have become selectively mute, and little research has been conducted to determine the effectiveness of family therapy in treating this disorder. Much of what has been researched does not serve to…

  4. Simulated Family Therapy Interviews in Clinical Social Work Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mooradian, John K.

    2007-01-01

    This article describes a learning method that employed theatre students as family clients in an advanced social work practice course. Students were provided with an opportunity to integrate and apply their learning of theory, clinical skills, and professional conduct in full-length family therapy sessions that occurred in the classroom and were…

  5. Marital and Family Therapy Certification and Licensing Examinations: One Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markowski, Edward Mel; Cain, Harry I.

    1984-01-01

    Describes the purpose, procedures, resources, guidelines, content, and normative data of the North Carolina Marital and Family Therapy Certification Examination as a frame of reference for the development of other licensing and certification instruments. Presents guidelines toward the development of a national marital and family therapy…

  6. Marriage and Family Therapy: Its Evolution from Revolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosella, John D.

    This essay on marriage and family therapy begins with background information on the institutions of marriage and the family, including religious and social forces, and the effects of the industrial revolution on American society. The impact of the two world wars on the social, political, economic, and psychological climate of the United States is…

  7. Family Therapy of Terroristic Trauma: Psychological Syndromes and Treatment Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Laurence

    2003-01-01

    Reviews pertinent literature on terroristic trauma and combines this information with the author's experience in treating adults, children, and family victims and survivors of recent terrorist attacks. Describes the psychological syndromes resulting from terrorism and discusses the relevant individual and family therapy modalities for treating…

  8. Simulated Family Therapy Interviews in Clinical Social Work Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mooradian, John K.

    2007-01-01

    This article describes a learning method that employed theatre students as family clients in an advanced social work practice course. Students were provided with an opportunity to integrate and apply their learning of theory, clinical skills, and professional conduct in full-length family therapy sessions that occurred in the classroom and were…

  9. Marriage and Family Therapy Research: Ethical Issues and Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hohmann-Marriott, Bryndl E.

    2001-01-01

    Research in the field of marriage and family therapy requires many ethical considerations due to the complexity of relationships among family members and the sensitive information involved. The AAMFT Code of Ethics and ethical standards for research attempt to address these concerns. The guidelines cover issues such as risk management, informed…

  10. Family Therapy of Terroristic Trauma: Psychological Syndromes and Treatment Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Laurence

    2003-01-01

    Reviews pertinent literature on terroristic trauma and combines this information with the author's experience in treating adults, children, and family victims and survivors of recent terrorist attacks. Describes the psychological syndromes resulting from terrorism and discusses the relevant individual and family therapy modalities for treating…

  11. Multi-Family Group Therapy for Sexually Abusive Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nahum, David; Brewer, Marci Mandel

    2004-01-01

    Although Multi-Family Group Therapy (MFGT) has been a researched intervention for nearly 40 years, clinicians working with sexually abusive youth and their families have only more recently begun to utilize the intervention. We believe MFGT for a sexual offense-specific treatment population is a sophisticated and powerful clinical intervention with…

  12. Solution-Focused Therapy for Families Coping with Suicide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Castro, Sahily; Guterman, Jeffrey T.

    2008-01-01

    Solution-focused therapy is proposed as a model for families coping with suicide. The nature and incidence of suicide is described along with a consideration of the effects that suicide has on families and prevailing treatment approaches. Three case examples illustrate the application. Implications are discussed pertaining to the theory, practice,…

  13. Human-animal bonds II: the role of pets in family systems and family therapy.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Froma

    2009-12-01

    The vast majority of pet owners regard their companion animals as family members, yet the role of pets in family systems and family therapy has received little attention in research, training, and practice. This article first notes the benefits of family pets and their importance for resilience. It then examines their role in couple and family processes and their involvement in relational dynamics and tensions. Next, it addresses bereavement in the loss of a cherished pet, influences complicating grief, and facilitation of mourning and adaptation. Finally, it explores the ways that clients' pets and the use of therapists' companion animals in animal-assisted therapy can inform and enrich couple and family therapy as valuable resources in healing.

  14. Multi-Family Therapy for Bulimia Nervosa in Adolescence.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Catherine; Voulgari, Stamatoula; Eisler, Ivan; Hunt, Katrina; Simic, Mima

    2015-01-01

    Existing randomized controlled trials of family therapy for treatment of bulimia nervosa in adolescence highlight the need for further development of treatments. This article describes the development of multi-family treatment for bulimia nervosa in adolescents aged 13-18. It outlines the theory guiding this development, the areas of need identified by previous studies, and the treatment that has been designed to meet these needs. Particular attention is given to the need to increase communication between family members, strategies to reduce high levels of criticism or hostility, and skills to manage emotion dysregulation and low tolerance for negative emotions. To these ends the program draws on the multi-family treatment for anorexia nervosa, cognitive behavioral therapy techniques, and dialectical behavior therapy.

  15. The FGF family: biology, pathophysiology and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Beenken, Andrew; Mohammadi, Moosa

    2013-01-01

    The family of fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) regulates a plethora of developmental processes, including brain patterning, branching morphogenesis and limb development. Several mitogenic, cytoprotective and angiogenic therapeutic applications of FGFs are already being explored, and the recent discovery of the crucial roles of the endocrine-acting FGF19 subfamily in bile acid, glucose and phosphate homeostasis has sparked renewed interest in the pharmacological potential of this family. This Review discusses traditional applications of recombinant FGFs and small-molecule FGF receptor kinase inhibitors in the treatment of cancer and cardiovascular disease and their emerging potential in the treatment of metabolic syndrome and hypophosphataemic diseases. PMID:19247306

  16. Neuro-Linguistic Programming and Family Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Susan L. R.; Davis, Donald I.

    1983-01-01

    Presents a brief introduction to Neuro-Linguistic Programming (NLP), followed by case examples which illustrate some of the substantive gains which NLP techniques have provided in work with couples and families. NLP's major contributions involve understanding new models of human experience. (WAS)

  17. Puerto Rican Familism: Considerations for Family Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zayas, Luis H.; Palleja, Josephine

    1988-01-01

    Puerto Rican cultural value of familism, emphasizing obligation and duties of family members to one another, has endured changes in cultural values caused by migrations between United States and Puerto Rico, influences of social and economic trends, and pressures to acculturate to American society. Understanding of familism is useful to family…

  18. Neuro-Linguistic Programming and Family Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Susan L. R.; Davis, Donald I.

    1983-01-01

    Presents a brief introduction to Neuro-Linguistic Programming (NLP), followed by case examples which illustrate some of the substantive gains which NLP techniques have provided in work with couples and families. NLP's major contributions involve understanding new models of human experience. (WAS)

  19. Targeting the Bcl-2 Family for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Shibu; Quinn, Bridget A.; Das, Swadesh K.; Dash, Rupesh; Emdad, Luni; Dasgupta, Santanu; Wang, Xiang-Yang; Dent, Paul; Reed, John C.; Pellecchia, Maurizio; Sarkar, Devanand; Fisher, Paul B.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Programmed cell death is well-orchestrated process regulated by multiple pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic genes, particularly those of the Bcl-2 gene family. These genes are well documented in cancer with aberrant expression being strongly associated with resistance to chemotherapy and radiation. Areas covered This review focuses on the resistance induced by the Bcl-2 family of anti-apoptotic proteins and current therapeutic interventions currently in preclinical or clinical trials that target this pathway. Major resistance mechanisms that are regulated by Bcl-2 family proteins and potential strategies to circumvent resistance are also examined. Although antisense and gene therapy strategies are used to nullify Bcl-2 family proteins, recent approaches use small molecule inhibitors and peptides. Structural similarity of the Bcl-2 family of proteins greatly favors development of inhibitors that target the BH3 domain, called BH3 mimetics. Expert opinion Strategies to specifically identify and inhibit critical determinants that promote therapy-resistance and tumor progression represent viable approaches for developing effective cancer therapies. From a clinical perspective, pretreatment with novel, potent Bcl-2 inhibitors either alone or in combination with conventional therapies hold significant promise for providing beneficial clinical outcomes. Identifying small molecule inhibitors with broader and higher affinities for inhibiting all of the Bcl-2 pro-survival proteins will facilitate development of superior cancer therapies. PMID:23173842

  20. Solution-focused therapy. Counseling model for busy family physicians.

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, G.; Ganshorn, K.; Danilkewich, A.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide family doctors in busy office practices with a model for counseling compatible with patient-centred medicine, including the techniques, strategies, and questions necessary for implementation. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: The MEDLINE database was searched from 1984 to 1999 using the terms psychotherapy in family practice, brief therapy in family practice, solution-focused therapy, and brief psychotherapy. A total of 170 relevant articles were identified; 75 abstracts were retrieved and a similar number of articles read. Additional resources included seminal books on solution-focused therapy (SFT), bibliographies of salient articles, participation in workshops on SFT, and observation of SFT counseling sessions taped by leaders in the field. MAIN MESSAGE: Solution-focused therapy's concentration on collaborative identification and amplification of patient strengths is the foundation upon which solutions to an array of problems are built. Solution-focused therapy offers simplicity, practicality, and relative ease of application. From the perspective of a new learner, MECSTAT provides a framework that facilitates development of skills. CONCLUSION: Solution-focused therapy recognizes that, even in the bleakest of circumstances, an emphasis on individual strength is empowering. In recognizing patients as experts in self-care, family physicians support and accentuate patient-driven change, and in so doing, are freed from the hopelessness and burnout that can accompany misplaced feelings of responsibility. PMID:11768927

  1. The Effects of Family Therapies for Adolescent Delinquency and Substance Abuse: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Scott A.; Christian, Sarah; Berkeljon, Arjan; Shadish, William R.

    2012-01-01

    This meta-analysis summarizes results from k = 24 studies comparing either Brief Strategic Family Therapy, Functional Family Therapy, Multidimensional Family Therapy, or Multisystemic Therapy to either treatment-as-usual, an alternative therapy, or a control group in the treatment of adolescent substance abuse and delinquency. Additionally, the…

  2. The Effects of Family Therapies for Adolescent Delinquency and Substance Abuse: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Scott A.; Christian, Sarah; Berkeljon, Arjan; Shadish, William R.

    2012-01-01

    This meta-analysis summarizes results from k = 24 studies comparing either Brief Strategic Family Therapy, Functional Family Therapy, Multidimensional Family Therapy, or Multisystemic Therapy to either treatment-as-usual, an alternative therapy, or a control group in the treatment of adolescent substance abuse and delinquency. Additionally, the…

  3. Family-based therapy for dementia caregivers: clinical observations

    PubMed Central

    MITRANI, V. B.; CZAJA, S. J.

    2008-01-01

    Family caregiving for dementia patients is a major social and clinical problem. Family caregivers face major stressful emotional, social and economic burdens, and the negative consequences associated with caregiving are well documented. Given the projected increase in the number of people with dementia, there is a need to identify approaches that will help families manage the challenges of caregiving. Social support from friends and family members has consistently been found to mediate caregiver outcomes, yet many caregivers face problems with isolation and estrangement from family members. In this regard, family-based therapy is a promising intervention for increasing social support for caregivers, and enhancing their quality of life and ability to provide care.This paper will discuss how family-based therapy can be applied as an intervention for family caregivers of dementia patients.The clinical implications of specific interactional patterns will be presented via case examples from an ongoing clinical trial with white American and Cuban American caregivers of dementia patients.The intent is to demonstrate how identification of interactional patterns is a valuable tool for implementing family-based interventions. PMID:18548132

  4. Virtualizing intimacy: information communication technologies and transnational families in therapy.

    PubMed

    Bacigalupe, Gonzalo; Lambe, Susan

    2011-03-01

    Information communication technologies (ICTs) are a ubiquitous feature of immigrant family life. Affordable, widely accessible, and highly adaptable ICTs have transformed the immigrant experience into a transnational process with family networks redesigned but not lost. Being a transnational family is not a new phenomenon. Transnationalism, however, has historically been reserved for the wealthier professional and political immigrant class who were able to freely travel and use expensive forms of communication before the emergence of accessible technologies. This paper systematically reviews the research literature to investigate the potential impact of ICTs on the lives of transnational families and how these families utilize them. The wide penetration of ICTs also puts into question some of the ways in which scholars have conceptualized the immigrant experience. The appropriate use of technology in family therapy should strengthen culturally competent and equity-based approaches to address the needs of these families. A family therapy with a transnational family illuminates some of the potential that these technologies introduce in the practice of relational clinicians.

  5. Brief Strategic Family Therapy: Engaging Drug Using/Problem Behavior Adolescents and their Families into Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Szapocznik, José; Zarate, Monica; Duff, Johnathan; Muir, Joan

    2013-01-01

    Despite the efficacy of family-based interventions for improving outcomes for adolescent behavior problems such as substance use, engaging and retaining whole families in treatment is one of the greatest challenges therapists confront. This article illustrates how the Brief Strategic Family Therapy® (BSFT®) model, a family-based, empirically validated intervention designed to treat children and adolescents’ problem behaviors, can be used to increase engagement, improve retention, and bring about positive outcomes for families. Research evidence for efficacy and effectiveness is also presented. PMID:23731415

  6. Centering the Voices of International Students in Family Studies and Family Therapy Graduate Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDowell, Teresa; Fang, Shi-Ruei; Kosutic, Iva; Griggs, Julie

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we report the results of a survey that accessed the perceptions of family studies and family therapy international master's and doctoral students across the United States. Our goals included giving collective voice to the experience of international students and gathering their suggestions for improving programs. Themes that…

  7. How was it for you? Families' experiences of receiving Behavioural Family Therapy.

    PubMed

    Campbell, A S

    2004-06-01

    The benefits of family interventions for families having to cope with serious mental health problems are well documented but routine implementation of these interventions is often problematic. Despite a wealth of research on the clinical outcomes of such interventions, very little is known about families' subjective perceptions of receiving them. This study reports the findings of a phenomenological enquiry into the lived experience of 10 families who received Behavioural Family Therapy (BFT) as part of a training initiative in the West Midlands Health Region of the UK. The results show that families were very satisfied with the intervention. They reported reductions in the levels of stress within the family, reduction in levels of carer burden, enhanced communication skills and a positive sense of empowerment. They attributed these changes to receiving BFT. The majority of families viewed mental health professionals and services more favourably compared to their experiences before receiving BFT. This is an important finding for service providers, commissioners and mental heath workers.

  8. Taking it to the streets: family therapy and family-centered services.

    PubMed

    Madsen, William C

    2014-09-01

    This article examines the interconnections between family therapy, specifically postmodern and poststructural approaches, and family-centered services. It introduces particular applications of family-centered services such as systems of care, wraparound, family-driven care, the recovery movement, and family group conferencing and then summarizes the heart of family-centered approaches as a shift in how services are provided to families. It examines the "fit" between the values and principles of family-centered practice and postmodern/poststructural approaches and then offers particular ideas and practices from these approaches that can help frontline workers inhabit a spirit of respect, connection, curiosity and hope in their work. © 2014 FPI, Inc.

  9. The advance of poststructuralism and its influence on family therapy.

    PubMed

    Dickerson, Victoria C

    2014-09-01

    Postmodernism began to influence family therapy very early in the 1980s with articles referencing postmodern ideas, focusing on meaning and multiplicity. With the appearance of narrative therapy on the scene in the 1990s there was a shift toward poststructural thinking, which refined the movement and politicized the clinical work. Even with a bit of a backlash, whether because this was a new idea or it somehow threatened a positivistic culture, a poststructural view has continued to have effects on family therapy. This article explores the variety of influences: the expansion of narrative ideas, the innovation of Madsen's collaborative helping, and also more nuanced effects. I argue that a poststructural view has effectively changed how many family therapists think and may also be subtly influencing how they might work.

  10. Use of an anecdotal client feedback note in family therapy.

    PubMed

    Haber, Russell; Carlson, Ryan G; Braga, Cristina

    2014-06-01

    To attain information about divergent agendas in family therapy, as well as incorporate client feedback, we present the Client Feedback Note (CFN). The CFN elicits information about each family member's feelings, learning, dislikes, and wishes for each session. Anecdotal feedback after each session may help the therapist have better insight into the clients' perceptions and experience of the therapy and the therapist. Sensitivity to information generated by the CFN can help both therapist and client work to coconstruct a therapeutic process that is relevant to the diverse needs of the client system. This manuscript will (a) discuss literature supporting the use of client feedback in therapy; (b) present the CFN and rationale for its development; (c) discuss our experiences utilizing the CFN along with case examples that illustrate its use; and (d) identify practical applications, limitations, and potential research with using the CFN in systemic therapy. © 2014 FPI, Inc.

  11. The Dalhousie Family Therapy Training Program: Our 6-Year Experience

    PubMed Central

    Carrey, Normand; Costanzo, Lou; Sexton, Ann; Aspin, John

    2004-01-01

    Introduction Training in family therapy for general psychiatry residents during their child rotation is either not taught or the objectives not well described in psychiatric curricula. Method Based on the combined experience of 4 family therapists over a 6 year period with 56 students (psychiatry, social work, psychology), we describe our experience with training general psychiatry residents in an introduction to an interdisciplinary family therapy, systemic-reflective course during their child psychiatry rotation. The model was based on experiential training, where both trainees and supervisors could build skills as they reflect on their process as learners and teachers. Results Residents’ ratings at the end of rotation indicated extremely high satisfaction with the course. Conclusion We advocate that an experiential interdisciplinary course serving as an introduction to family assessment and systemic/reflective principles are valuable skills that have lasting value to general psychiatry residents. PMID:19030490

  12. Families and individual development: provocations from the field of family therapy.

    PubMed

    Minuchin, P

    1985-04-01

    Family therapy suggests a reformulation of concept and method in studying the family and individual development: to regard the family as an organized system and the individual as a contributing member, part of the process that creates and maintains the patterns that regulate behavior. In this review, the theories and clinical experiences of family therapists are regarded as a resource for developmental psychology, and particular attention is paid to those aspects that challenge traditional formulations in the developmental field. The review focuses on systems theory as the paradigm underlying family therapy and considers the implications of this framework for conceptions of the individual, the study of parent-child interaction, and new research formulations and areas of study. It also considers trends in the developmental field that move toward such formulations.

  13. p53 family interactions and yeast: together in anticancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Sara; Leão, Mariana; Raimundo, Liliana; Ramos, Helena; Soares, Joana; Saraiva, Lucília

    2016-04-01

    The p53 family proteins are among the most appealing targets for cancer therapy. A deeper understanding of the complex interplay that these proteins establish with murine double minute (MDM)2, MDMX, and mutant p53 could reveal new exciting therapeutic opportunities in cancer treatment. Here, we summarize the most relevant advances in the biology of p53 family protein-protein interactions (PPIs), and the latest pharmacological developments achieved from targeting these interactions. We also highlight the remarkable contributions of yeast-based assays to this research. Collectively, we emphasize promising strategies, based on the inhibition of p53 family PPIs, which have expedited anticancer drug development.

  14. A conceptual model of psychosomatic illness in children. Family organization and family therapy.

    PubMed

    Minuchin, S; Baker, L; Rosman, B L; Liebman, R; Milman, L; Todd, T C

    1975-08-01

    Linear and open systems (multiple feedback) models of psychosomatic illness in children are contrasted in terms of their implications for cause and treatment. An open systems family model is presented that describes three necessary (but not independently sufficient) conditions for the development and maintenance of severe psychosomatic problems in children: (1) a certain type of family organization that encourages somatization; (2) involvement of the child in parental conflict; and (3) physiological vulnerability. Predisposition for psychosomatic illness, symptom choice, and maintenance are discussed within this conceptual framework. We report on family therapy strategies based on this model and the results of family treatment with 48 cases of "brittle" diabetes, psychosomatic asthma, and anorexia nervosa.

  15. Generalizing Treatment Effects of Functional Family Therapy: Three Replications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barton, Cole; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Functional Family Therapy (FFT) with status delinquents has undergone careful scrutiny in well designed studies. Describes three replications which extended FFT to new populations, utilized less formally trained therapists, and applied it in new treatment contexts. Provides support for the generalizability of FFT across client and therapist…

  16. Attachment-Based Family Therapy: "Adherence" and Differentiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diamond, Gary M.; Diamond, Guy S.; Hogue, Aaron

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the fidelity of attachment-based family therapy (ABFT) for depressed adolescents. Trained observers used the therapist behavior rating scale (3rd version) to code therapist behaviors in 45 sessions of ABFT and 45 sessions each from two empirically based treatments for adolescent substance abusers: multidimensional family…

  17. Marital and Family Therapy Research: Outcomes and Implications for Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Cynthia; Huggins, Don

    1998-01-01

    A review of marriage-and-family therapy-outcome studies from the past 10 years is discussed. Results indicate success over a broad scope of practices, including problems traditionally treated with individual psychotherapy, and when used in collaboration with other treatment modalities. Implications for the field are presented. (Author/EMK)

  18. Observing Change in the Family Therapy Supervisory Relationship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moy, Caryl T.; Goodman, Earl O.

    A common assumption in family therapy supervision is that the relationship between supervisor and supervisee changes over time, following a developmental continuum from the tentative competency of the supervisee as a therapist to relative competency. In particular, Ard (1973) theorizes that supervisees and supervisors move steadily together…

  19. The Use of Family Therapy within a University Counseling Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Kathryn

    2009-01-01

    As a counterpoint to the oftentimes adversarial way that parents are viewed when they appear to be overinvolved in the lives of their college-aged students, this article advocates for the use of a family therapy perspective in university counseling centers. Benefits of this perspective include a broadening of the lens through which individual…

  20. Attachment-Based Family Therapy: "Adherence" and Differentiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diamond, Gary M.; Diamond, Guy S.; Hogue, Aaron

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the fidelity of attachment-based family therapy (ABFT) for depressed adolescents. Trained observers used the therapist behavior rating scale (3rd version) to code therapist behaviors in 45 sessions of ABFT and 45 sessions each from two empirically based treatments for adolescent substance abusers: multidimensional family…

  1. The Use of Family Therapy within a University Counseling Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Kathryn

    2009-01-01

    As a counterpoint to the oftentimes adversarial way that parents are viewed when they appear to be overinvolved in the lives of their college-aged students, this article advocates for the use of a family therapy perspective in university counseling centers. Benefits of this perspective include a broadening of the lens through which individual…

  2. Sexual addiction and marriage and family therapy: facilitating individual and relationship healing through couple therapy.

    PubMed

    Bird, Mark H

    2006-07-01

    In recent decades there has been an increase in literature regarding sexual addiction as well as a growing number of clients presenting in therapy with problems related to their sexual behaviors (including internet sexual addiction). This article (a) presents a synthesis of the research on the impact of sexual addiction on the addict, the partner, and the couple; (b) outlines the process of healing for each based on the research synthesis; and (c) discusses the role of marriage and family therapy in facilitating both individual and relationship healing from sexual addiction. Implications for future research in sexual addiction, generally, and in marriage and family therapy, specifically, are presented.

  3. Diagnoses, Relational Processes and Resourceful Dialogs: Tensions for Families and Family Therapy.

    PubMed

    Strong, Tom

    2015-09-01

    The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5), given its psychiatric focus on mental disorders in individuals, presents families and family therapists with challenges. Despite considerable controversies over its adoption, the DSM-5 extends a process of standardizing a language for human and relational concerns. No longer a diagnostic language of professionals alone, its use is medicalizing how mental health funders and administrators, as well as clients, respond to human concerns. For family therapists who practice systemically, particularly from poststructuralist and strengths-based orientations, many tensions can follow when use of the DSM-5 is expected by mental health administrators and funders, or by clients who present concerns about themselves or a diagnosed family member. In this paper, I explore how such DSM-5 related tensions might be recognized, navigated, and negotiated in the practice of family therapy with clients, and with administrators and funders. © 2015 Family Process Institute.

  4. Stress-related asthma and family therapy: Case study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This paper applies the Biobehavioral Family Model (BBFM) of stress- related illness to the study and treatment of an adolescent with intractable asthma. The model is described, along with supportive research findings. Then a case study is presented, demonstrating how the model is clinically applied. We tell the story of an asthmatic adolescent presenting for therapy due to her intense asthmatic crises, and the case is presented to exemplify how the BBFM can help understand the family-psychobiological contribution to exacerbation of disease activity, and therefore guide treatment towards the amelioration of severe physical symptoms. Facets of the patient’s intra-familial interactions are consistent with the BBFM, which support clinical validation of the model. In the case described, it is likely that additional asthma medications would not have had the desired ameliorative effect, because they did not target the family relational processes contributing to the symptoms. The recognition of the influences of family relational processes on the disease was crucial for effective intervention. The therapy incorporates and weaves together BBFM understanding of family patterns of interaction and physiological/medical concerns integrated with Bowenian intervention strategies. This case study validates the importance and usefulness of BBFM for intervention with stress-sensitive illnesses such as asthma. PMID:23148727

  5. Centering the voices of international students in family studies and family therapy graduate programs.

    PubMed

    McDowell, Teresa; Fang, Shi-Ruei; Kosutic, Iva; Griggs, Julie

    2012-06-01

    In this article, we report the results of a survey that accessed the perceptions of family studies and family therapy international master's and doctoral students across the United States. Our goals included giving collective voice to the experience of international students and gathering their suggestions for improving programs. Themes that emerged from responses to open- and closed-ended questions included feeling (mis)understood and (de)valued; forming personal connections and experiencing marginalization; the importance of including international perspectives in curricula; considering the relevance/transferability of knowledge; and attending to barriers to learning. Based on the results, we share suggestions for improving family studies and family therapy graduate programs relative to program planning, curricula revision, teaching strategies, and faculty development.

  6. Marital and Family Therapy in the Treatment of Multiple Personality Disorder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sachs, Roberta G.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Explores marital and family therapy in treatment of Multiple Personality Disorder (MPD), discussing role of family of origin in MPD development and role of nuclear family in its perpetuation. Suggests family and marital interventions, illustrating them with case examples. Proposes involving MPD client in marital or family therapy, in addition to…

  7. Marital and Family Therapy in the Treatment of Multiple Personality Disorder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sachs, Roberta G.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Explores marital and family therapy in treatment of Multiple Personality Disorder (MPD), discussing role of family of origin in MPD development and role of nuclear family in its perpetuation. Suggests family and marital interventions, illustrating them with case examples. Proposes involving MPD client in marital or family therapy, in addition to…

  8. Key Issues to Consider in Therapy with Muslim Families.

    PubMed

    Weatherhead, Stephen; Daiches, Anna

    2015-12-01

    We present the key issues to consider in therapy with Muslim families. Following a brief introduction, five themes are presented: self, family dynamics, causation, and coping strategies. The section on "self" includes a discussion of three terms which link the four Islamic models of "self" identified through the review. The family dynamics section pays particular attention to interconnectedness, family roles, and gender. Causation is discussed with reference to supernatural and spiritual causes. On the theme of coping strategies, religious responses are discussed as are the roles of religious leaders, and professional mental health services. Clinical implications from the key themes are also discussed in addition to limitations of the published literature in this area. This includes a discussion of the epistemological and paradigmatic issues related to the research. The review concludes by summarising these issues and presenting areas for further research.

  9. Notes for a cultural history of family therapy.

    PubMed

    Beels, C Christian

    2002-01-01

    The official history of family therapy describes its beginnings as a daring technical and philosophical departure from traditional individual treatment in the 1960s, inspired especially by the "system thinking" of Gregory Bateson. This celebrated origin story needs to be supplemented with a longer and larger history of both practice and thought about the family, and that is the subject of this article. The longer history goes back to the founding of social work by Mary Richmond, of pragmatism by William James, and of the organic view of social systems intervention by John Dewey. Seen against this background, family therapy is, among other things, a consequence of the development of persistent elements of American professional culture, experience, and philosophy. The taking of this historical-anthropological view discloses also the origins of two other histories that have made their contribution to the development of family therapy: a science of observing communication processes that starts with Edward Sapir and leads to contemporary conversation analysis, and a history of mesmerism in the United States that culminates in Milton Erickson and his followers.

  10. A dialogue on occupational therapy, culture, and families.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Maureen H

    2004-01-01

    This paper, based on a broad body of relevant data, presents a dialogue that explores and integrates two important concepts: family and culture. An understanding of these concepts is important for enhancing occupational therapy practice, in particular a practice that claims to be client-centered and holistic. The dialogue focuses particularly on issues students involved in the Intercultural Interaction Project, The University of Sydney, Australia, in 2002 identified as important. These include: a lack of understanding of the concept of culture, the confounding of culture and ethnicity, considering culture as an issue only in families from "other" cultural backgrounds, assumptions about the nature of families and therapists' points of reference for making these assumptions, differences in client or family and therapist expectations, and how these expectations affect what happens in therapy and participants' level of satisfaction with the outcomes of the interactions involved. The information suggests that there is a need for a better understanding of how culture influences ideas about families and how to work with them.

  11. The use of teaching stories in conjoint family therapy.

    PubMed

    Fellner, C

    1976-12-01

    Two general factors have been singled out as being held in common by all types of psychotherapy: an educational, rational factor (often called "content") and a factor operative in the relationship between the therapist and his patient (often called "process"). In the field of family therapy, the non-educational aspects of intervention are sometimes presented in the form of "therapeutic, paradoxical communications" (Haley, Bateson, Jackson, Weakland) or the 'therapy of the absurd" (Whitaker, Malone). In the present paper, I wish to present a form of therapeutic communication, the teaching story, that embodies a unique mixture of both the educational and the paradox, or absurd.

  12. Families and Individual Development: Provocations from the Field of Family Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minuchin, Patricia

    1985-01-01

    Focuses on systems theory as the paradigm underlying family therapy and considers the implications of this framework for conceptions of the individual, the study of parent-child interaction, and new research formulations and areas of study. Considers trends in the developmental field that move toward such formulations. (RH)

  13. Family therapy for adolescent anorexia nervosa: the results of a controlled comparison of two family interventions.

    PubMed

    Eisler, I; Dare, C; Hodes, M; Russell, G; Dodge, E; Le Grange, D

    2000-09-01

    This paper reports the results of a randomised treatment trial of two forms of outpatient family intervention for anorexia nervosa. Forty adolescent patients with anorexia nervosa were randomly assigned to "conjoint family therapy" (CFT) or to "separated family therapy" (SFT) using a stratified design controlling for levels of critical comments using the Expressed Emotion index. The design required therapists to undertake both forms of treatment and the distinctiveness of the two therapies was ensured by separate supervisors conducting live supervision of the treatments. Measures were undertaken on admission to the study, at 3 months, at 6 months and at the end of treatment. Considerable improvement in nutritional and psychological state occurred across both treatment groups. On global measure of outcome, the two forms of therapy were associated with equivalent end of treatment results. However, for those patients with high levels of maternal criticism towards the patient, the SFT was shown to be superior to the CFT. When individual status measures were explored, there were further differences between the treatments. Symptomatic change was more marked in the SFT whereas there was considerably more psychological change in the CFT group. There were significant changes in family measures of Expressed Emotion. Critical comments between parents and patient were significantly reduced and that between parents was also diminished. Warmth between parents increased.

  14. Psychoeducational family therapy for schizophrenia: a review essay.

    PubMed

    Steinglass, P

    1987-02-01

    The recent publication of Schizophrenia and the Family, by Carol M. Anderson, Douglas J. Reiss, and Gerald E. Hogarty (Guilford Press, 1986; 365 pp; $26.95), has provided an excellent opportunity for the field to take a fresh look at what has been called the "psychoeducational" approach to family therapy for schizophrenia. Although Anderson and her colleagues are not the first group to have provided us with a "treatment manual" for this innovative approach to therapy (e.g., see Falloon et al. 1984), their efforts come at a time when the psychoeducational approach is beginning to receive widespread attention. For example, a new multicenter NIMH study is currently under way examining the efficacy of such psychoeducational approaches as components of the posthospital treatment of schizophrenia. Hence this is a particularly propitious moment to review the issues raised by this book and the treatment it describes.

  15. Ecologically based family therapy outcome with substance abusing runaway adolescents.

    PubMed

    Slesnick, Natasha; Prestopnik, Jillian L

    2005-04-01

    Runaway youth report a broader range and higher severity of substance-related, mental health and family problems relative to non-runaway youth. Most studies to date have collected self-report data on the family and social history; virtually no research has examined treatment effectiveness with this population. This study is a treatment development project in which 124 runaway youth were randomly assigned to (1) ecologically based family therapy (EBFT) or (2) service as usual (SAU) through a shelter. Youth completed an intake, posttreatment, 6 and 12 months follow-up assessment. Youth assigned to EBFT reported greater reductions in overall substance abuse compared to youth assigned to SAU while other problem areas improved in both conditions. Findings suggest that EBFT is an efficacious intervention for this relatively severe population of youth.

  16. Scaling Up Family Therapy in Fragile, Conflict-Affected States.

    PubMed

    Charlés, Laurie L

    2015-09-01

    This article discusses the design and delivery of two international family therapy-focused mental health and psychosocial support training projects, one in a fragile state and one in a post-conflict state. The training projects took place in Southeast Asia and the Middle East/North Africa. Each was funded, supported, and implemented by local, regional, and international stakeholders, and delivered as part of a broader humanitarian agenda to develop human resource capacity to work with families affected by atrocities. The two examples illustrate how task-shifting/task-sharing and transitional justice approaches were used to inform the scaling-up of professionals involved in each project. They also exemplify how state-citizen phenomena in each location affected the project design and delivery. © 2014 Family Process Institute.

  17. Healing traumatized children: creating illustrated storybooks in family therapy.

    PubMed

    Hanney, Lesley; Kozlowska, Kasia

    2002-01-01

    In this article we describe the therapeutic practice of creating illustrated storybooks in family therapy with traumatized children. Illustrated stories offer a predictable structure to sessions and facilitate engagement and participation of children in therapy. The therapeutic emphasis of storybooks can be adjusted to take into account a child's life story, verbal capacity, level of anxiety, and traumatic hyperarousal. The creation of storybooks is an active process that embraces important aspects of trauma-specific interventions, including expression of trauma-related feelings; clarification of erroneous beliefs about the self, others, or the traumatic event; and externalization of traumatic stimuli into artwork, allowing for exposure and habituation of the arousal response. A focus on visual images together with narrative takes advantage of children's developmental capacities and spontaneous pleasure in the creation of art, thus minimizing anxiety and enhancing feelings of mastery, competence, and hope. The creation of storybooks is compatible with family interventions that foster a safe family context, strengthen attachment relationships, insure appropriate structure and boundaries, and enhance parenting capacity as well as those interactions that facilitate understanding and dialogue between family members.

  18. Family Therapy in Iran: A Case Study of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khodayarifard, Mohammad; McClenon, James

    2011-01-01

    Iranian clinical psychologists have devised family therapy methods that use cognitive behavior models that ft with their collectivist Islamic culture. The authors review Islamic-based strategies and describe family therapy with a culturally specific case of childhood obsessive-compulsive disorder. Family therapy, adapted to integrated,…

  19. A Study of Solution-Focused Brief Family Therapy: Outcomes and Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Mo-Yee

    1997-01-01

    Discusses a descriptive study on solution-focused brief family therapy in a children's mental health facility. Results, based on work with 59 children and their families, indicate a 64.9% success rate (average of 5.5 therapy sessions over 3.9 months). Findings support the applicability of solution-focused brief family therapy to a wide range of…

  20. Family Therapy in Iran: A Case Study of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khodayarifard, Mohammad; McClenon, James

    2011-01-01

    Iranian clinical psychologists have devised family therapy methods that use cognitive behavior models that ft with their collectivist Islamic culture. The authors review Islamic-based strategies and describe family therapy with a culturally specific case of childhood obsessive-compulsive disorder. Family therapy, adapted to integrated,…

  1. Impact of Home-Based Family Therapy on Maternal and Child Outcomes in Disadvantaged Adolescent Mothers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cherniss, Cary; Herzog, Elaine

    1996-01-01

    Evaluates the effects of home-based family therapy on 116 high- risk teenage mothers and their children. Subjects received case management, supportive counseling and some received family therapy. Twelve-month follow-up indicated family therapy subjects improved parenting and became less welfare dependent. No significant difference was found at 24…

  2. Families changing families: the protective function of multi-family therapy for children in education.

    PubMed

    Morris, Emma; Le Huray, Corin; Skagerberg, Elin; Gomes, Rosemary; Ninteman, Aafke

    2014-10-01

    The Marlborough Family Education Centre (MFEC) uses a specific multi-family group approach with families where children exhibit (primarily) conduct problems and function poorly in school. Research indicates that failure to intervene with these children carries great potential cost to both the family and society. Outcomes for 50 families receiving intervention from the MFEC were compared with a control group of 28 who had access to a range of interventions, but not the multi-family group approach pioneered by the MFEC. Data on child and family social, emotional and behavioural functioning were collected at the point of referral, and at 6 and 12 months. Parents of children receiving support from the MFEC reported statistically and clinically significant improvements in their children that were maintained at 12 months whereas there was no change in the control group. In addition, measures of family functioning were fairly stable for the MFEC group, while the control group showed significant deterioration over the same time period. Other results were not significant. These findings are interpreted within the context of early intervention. The methodological limitations of the study are considered and suggestions for future research are outlined. © The Author(s) 2013.

  3. Interpersonal communication in and through family: structure and therapy in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Eraslan, Defne; Yakali-Çamoğlu, Dikmen; Harunzade, Yael Profeta; Ergun, Berk Murat; Dokur, Murat

    2012-04-01

    It is essential for professionals in the mental health sector to identify and understand the different family models and the effects of social transformations. Historically and at present, however, Turkish families live in a 'culture of relatedness', with emotional and/or material interdependence between generations. Marriage and family therapy is a newly emerging discipline in Turkey. Although studies on family structure and common problems in families have been made, data on the practice of family therapy are limited. To our knowledge, this is the first paper aiming to describe the practice of family therapies in Turkey, situating them against a backdrop of sociological and social/psychological studies in family structure.

  4. Effects of Solution Focused Therapy's "Formula First Session Task" on Compliance and Outcome in Family Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Jerome F.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Examined differential effects of formula first session task (FFST), FFST plus solution focused therapy, and standard problem focused structural-strategic intervention. At one week, FFST groups were significantly higher on measures of family compliance, clarity of treatment goals, and improvement in presenting problem. Found no significant…

  5. Family Mode Deactivation Therapy as a Manualized Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apsche, Jack A.; Bass, Christopher K.; Houston, Marsha-Ann

    2008-01-01

    This article examines the effectiveness of Mode Deactivation Family Therapy (MDT) in an outpatient setting as compared to Treatment as Usual (TAU). MDT is an evidence-based psychotherapy and has been shown to be effective treating adolescents with a variety of problems involving emotional disorder, physical and sexual aggression, as well as…

  6. Family therapy in the treatment of anorexia nervosa: theory and technique.

    PubMed

    Lagos, J M

    1981-01-01

    Family systems theory views anorexia nervosa not only as a product of dysfunctional transactional patterns within a family, but also as a crucial stabilizing element within the family. This paper describes the dysfunctional characteristics of anorexic families as well as the relevance of these characteristics to the anorexic symptoms. Two approaches to the treatment of these families, one developed by Minuchin and the other by Selvini Palazzoli, are described and the compatability of family therapy with individual therapy is briefly discussed.

  7. Targeting Hyaluronic Acid Family for Cancer Chemoprevention and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lokeshwar, Vinata B.; Mirza, Summan; Jordan, Andre

    2016-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid or hyaluronan (HA) is perhaps one of the most uncomplicated large polymers that regulates several normal physiological processes and, at the same time, contributes to the manifestation of a variety of chronic and acute diseases, including cancer. Members of the HA signaling pathway (HA synthases, HA receptors, and HYAL-1 hyaluronidase) have been experimentally shown to promote tumor growth, metastasis, and angiogenesis, and hence each of them is a potential target for cancer therapy. Furthermore, as these members are also overexpressed in a variety of carcinomas, targeting of the HA family is clinically relevant. A variety of targeted approaches have been developed to target various HA family members, including small-molecule inhibitors and antibody and vaccine therapies. These treatment approaches inhibit HA-mediated intracellular signaling that promotes tumor cell proliferation, motility, and invasion, as well as induction of endothelial cell functions. Being nontoxic, nonimmunogenic, and versatile for modifications, HA has been used in nanoparticle preparations for the targeted delivery of chemotherapy drugs and other anticancer compounds to tumor cells through interaction with cell-surface HA receptors. This review discusses basic and clinical translational aspects of targeting each HA family member and respective treatment approaches that have been described in the literature. PMID:25081525

  8. Examining the impact of child parent relationship therapy (CPRT) on family functioning.

    PubMed

    Cornett, Nick; Bratton, Sue C

    2014-07-01

    Research supports that child parent relationship therapy (CPRT), a filial therapy approach, has strong effects on participating parents and children. Some speculate that filial therapy improves the family system; however, minimal research exists to support this claim. Using a single-case design, researchers examined CPRT's impact on the functioning of 8 families. Results revealed that 6 families experienced statistically significant improvements in targeted areas of family functioning. Results from self-reported measures indicated that 7 families improved in family satisfaction, 4 in cohesion, 3 in communication, and 1 in flexibility. Observational measures also revealed improvements: 5 families in flexibility, 4 families in cohesion, and 4 families in communication. The results support that the benefits of CPRT may extend to the family system. © 2013 American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy.

  9. Review of family therapy and dementia: twenty-five years on.

    PubMed

    Benbow, Susan Mary; Sharman, Victoria

    2014-12-01

    We reviewed the literature on family therapy and dementia to investigate the following: what is known about the use of family therapy in the context of living with dementia; what are the challenges of working in this context; and what guidelines/models are available to guide family therapists working with families living with dementia. We searched English language literature from 1992 onwards, classified the resulting papers into broad categories of theoretical, expository, or research (descriptive, quantitative, or qualitative), and conducted a narrative review to draw learning points from the identified papers. In total 31 papers were identified: five theoretical, 11 expository; and 15 research papers. Several papers described methodologies; psychotherapeutic interventions applied to family members; or complex intervention packages in which the role of family therapy could not be separately identified, rather than family therapy. A range of outcomes were investigated, often involving the caregiver. Several authors suggest areas in dementia care where family therapy is likely to be beneficial. Although the literature on family therapy and dementia has grown over the past 25 years and suggests potentially useful roles for therapy, a number of challenges exist in terms of context, family, and therapy itself. There is a need for further research, particularly into the following fields: How to evaluate the success of therapy; how to ensure treatment integrity; how to make techniques from family therapy available more widely; and how to train the health and social care workforce in working with families.

  10. Who's in the Room? A Parent-Focused Family Therapy for Adolescent Anorexia Nervosa.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Elizabeth K; Sawyer, Susan M; Loeb, Katharine L; Le Grange, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Family therapy is often assumed to involve the whole family; that is both parents and children attending the therapist's office together. In practice, however, which family members are included in family therapy, how often, and in what ways, is much more variable. In this article we provide an overview of the recent history of family therapy in regard to who is directly involved in therapy, and contrast changing practices in the eating disorders field with those in the family therapy field more widely. This overview leads into a discussion of current practices in family-based treatment for adolescent anorexia nervosa and the development of a new form of family therapy that is parent-focused.

  11. [Effect of structural family therapy on family structure and function in children with hematological tumors].

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiao-Yan; Xie, Xiao-Tian; Mei, Zhu

    2014-09-01

    To explore the effect of structural family therapy (SFT), which refers to the application of the theory and technology of SFT for improving the internal family environment of pediatric patients through reorganization of the family roles, tasks, and boundaries, on the family structure and function in children with hematological tumors. Forty children with hematological tumors were randomly divided into SFT and control groups (n=20 each). The control group received conventional chemotherapy. The SFT group received SFT by a trained therapist in addition to conventional chemotherapy; the family of each patient received SFT four times (once every two weeks). Both groups were assessed by the Family Assessment Device (FAD) and Family Environment Scale-Chinese Version (FES-CV) on admission and one month after the end of SFT. After treatment, the SFT group showed significant decreases in all factor scores of FAD (P<0.05); the SFT group had significantly lower scores of problem solving, communication, roles, affective involvement, behavior control, and general functioning than the control group (P<0.05). In addition, the SFT group had significantly increased FES-CV scores of cohesion, emotional expression, intellectual-cultural orientation, and active-recreational orientation and a significantly decreased score of conflict after treatment (P<0.05), and the SFT group was significantly superior to the control group in terms of these items (P<0.05). SFT could promote beneficial family changes in children with hematological tumors by improving the family function and internal environment, which would increase the long-term chemotherapy compliance of these children and their parents.

  12. Human Sexuality Education in Marriage and Family Therapy Graduate Programs.

    PubMed

    Zamboni, Brian D; Zaid, Samantha J

    2017-02-20

    Given the likelihood that marriage and family therapists will encounter clients with sexual concerns, it is important to know how graduate training programs are preparing future clinicians to work with this domain of life. Sixty-nine marriage and family therapy (MFT) program directors completed an online survey to examine how sexual health education is integrated into graduate training programs. Findings indicate that while the majority of program directors value sexuality curriculum, and most programs require at least one course in this area, there are barriers to privileging sex topics in MFT graduate programs. Barriers include few MFT faculties with expertise in human sexuality and marginalized sexual health topics. Implications for training MFT graduate students and their work with future clients are discussed.

  13. Recent Developments in Gene Therapy for Homozygous Familial Hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Ajufo, Ezim; Cuchel, Marina

    2016-05-01

    Homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HoFH) is a life-threatening Mendelian disorder with a mean life expectancy of 33 years despite maximally tolerated standard lipid-lowering therapies. This disease is an ideal candidate for gene therapy, and in the last few years, a number of exciting developments have brought this approach closer to the clinic than ever before. In this review, we discuss in detail the most advanced of these developments, a recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector carrying a low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) transgene which has recently entered phase 1/2a testing. We also review ongoing development of approaches to enhance transgene expression, improve the efficiency of hepatocyte transduction, and minimize the AAV capsid-specific adaptive immune response. We include a summary of key gene therapy approaches for HoFH in pre-clinical development, including RNA silencing of the gene encoding HMG-CoA reductase (HMGCR) and induced pluripotent stem cell transplant therapy.

  14. The teenager's confession: regulating shame in internal family systems therapy.

    PubMed

    Sweezy, Martha

    2011-01-01

    This case study explores the clinical relevance of the differences among shame, guilt that is linked with shame, and pure guilt. Empirical literature on emotion suggests that shame is instrumental in a host of psychiatric symptoms while pure guilt is prosocial and adaptive. Regulating shame and being able to feel pure guilt may be especially important for trauma patients like the one described here, who have transgressors as well as victims. The protocol of internal family systems (IFS), a mode of therapy that utilizes psychic multiplicity and actively recruits internal compassion, is described as a treatment for regulating shame and facilitating adaptive guilt.

  15. Action-oriented evaluation of an in-home family therapy program for families at risk for foster care placement.

    PubMed

    McWey, Lenore M; Humphreys, Julie; Pazdera, Andrea L

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct an action-oriented evaluation of an in-home family therapy program serving families deemed at risk for the placement of children in foster care. In this study, feedback was solicited from both clients and therapists. Results indicate "duality" associated with several aspects of in-home family therapy, including the opportunity to observe families in their own homes versus the vulnerability some families feel when therapy is conducted in-home; therapists suggesting that sufficient training is required for in-home family therapy to be effective versus clients' opinions that therapists' lived experiences are more relevant; and the importance of the therapeutic alliance versus feelings of abandonment upon termination. Implications for researchers and practitioners are discussed.

  16. Treatment Efficacy of Multiple Family Therapy for Chinese Families of Children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.

    PubMed

    Ma, Joyce L C; Lai, Kelly Y C; Xia, Lily Li Li

    2017-05-30

    The treatment efficacy of multiple family therapy (MFT) for Chinese families of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has not been studied in the past. In this paper, the effect of MFT on different aspects of the lives of the parents in the experimental group (n = 61) was compared with the effect of only the psychoeducational talks on parents in the control group (n = 53). The results of a MANOVA have shown that by the time they reached the posttreatment phase, the parents who had completed the full 42 hours of the MFT program perceived their children's ADHD symptoms as being less serious and less pathological than they had originally thought compared to the parents in the control group. The effect of MFT on parent-child relationships, parenting stress, parental efficacy, hope, and perceived social support was statistically insignificant. Contributions and limitations of our study are discussed. © 2017 Family Process Institute.

  17. Family therapy in the Forbidden City: a review of Chinese journals from 1978 to 2006.

    PubMed

    Sim, Timothy; Hu, Chiyi

    2009-12-01

    This article provides a glimpse into the development of family therapy in China, by reviewing family therapy articles written in Chinese and published in journals in China that are not, therefore, readily accessible to the international community. A content analysis of journals published between 1978 and 2006 revealed 199 family therapy articles in 109 Chinese journals. Most of the studies were conducted by psychiatry or medical professionals, and were based on general systems theory or a systemic family therapy model. The articles focused on the promotion of family therapy theories and interventions in China, but did not specify the application of theory to specific clientele or symptoms. After the year 2000, a threefold increase in the number of family therapy publications was noted. These papers included the introduction of additional theories, but did not include critical assessment of the applicability of Western family therapy models to Chinese families. The researchers noted an absence of articles that identified Chinese approaches to family therapy, and a paucity of papers on gender, professional reflection, and the therapy process. The article concludes that there is room for improvement in the quality of family therapy publications in China, and that gains may be made by interdisciplinary collaboration among academics and practitioners.

  18. Understanding Radiation Therapy: A Guide for Patients and Families

    MedlinePlus

    ... En Español Treatments and Side Effects Treatment Types Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy is one of the most ... it works and what to expect. Learn About Radiation Therapy Radiation Therapy Basics External Beam Radiation Therapy ...

  19. Early Therapeutic Alliance and Treatment Outcome in Individual and Family Therapy for Adolescent Behavior Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogue, Aaron; Dauber, Sarah; Stambaugh, Leyla Faw; Cecero, John J.; Liddle, Howard A.

    2006-01-01

    The impact of early therapeutic alliance was examined in 100 clients receiving either individual cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) or family therapy for adolescent substance abuse. Observational ratings of adolescent alliance in CBT and adolescent and parent alliance in family therapy were used to predict treatment retention (in CBT only) and…

  20. Comparison of Family Therapy Outcome with Alcohol-Abusing, Runaway Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slesnick, Natasha; Prestopnik, Jillian L

    2009-01-01

    Treatment evaluation for alcohol problem, runaway adolescents and their families is rare. This study recruited primary alcohol problem adolescents (N = 119) and their primary caretakers from two runaway shelters and assigned them to (a) home-based ecologically based family therapy (EBFT), (b) office-based functional family therapy (FFT), or (c)…

  1. A Model for Reintegrating Couples and Family Therapy Training in Psychiatric Residency Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rait, Douglas; Glick, Ira

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The authors propose a family-systems training model for general residency training programs in psychiatry based on the couples and family therapy training program in Stanford's Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. Methods: The authors review key elements in couples and family therapy training. Examples are drawn from the…

  2. Comparison of Family Therapy Outcome with Alcohol-Abusing, Runaway Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slesnick, Natasha; Prestopnik, Jillian L

    2009-01-01

    Treatment evaluation for alcohol problem, runaway adolescents and their families is rare. This study recruited primary alcohol problem adolescents (N = 119) and their primary caretakers from two runaway shelters and assigned them to (a) home-based ecologically based family therapy (EBFT), (b) office-based functional family therapy (FFT), or (c)…

  3. Integrating Gender on Multiple Levels: A Conceptual Model for Teaching Gender Issues in Family Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Lee; McBain, Heidi

    2006-01-01

    As the field of family therapy has evolved, there has been growing recognition as to the importance of gender in family therapy. To prepare the next generation of family therapists adequately, it is important that they recognize the many and complex ways in which gender permeates their work. In this article we present an integrative model to help…

  4. Family therapy process - works on the Polish version of SCORE-15 tool.

    PubMed

    Józefik, Barbara; Matusiak, Feliks; Wolska, Małgorzata; Ulasińska, Romualda

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to demonstrate progress of the works on the Polish version of SCORE-15 and the results of the preliminary data analysis of changes in the process of family therapy, obtained with this tool. The works on the Polish version, ongoing since 2010, were inspired by the Research Committee European Family Therapy Association EFTA. Since the Polish version of SCORE-15 will be make public and published on EFTA website in the near future, therefore, it is important that people interested in the tool know the context of its development. The Polish version of SCORE-15, the tool designed to examine the process of family therapy, was used. The comparison of the results obtained by family members before the first family session and before the fourth one and psychotherapists' assessments show that the perception of the weight of the problem with which the family members came to therapy is indeed significantly lower already after three sessions of family therapy. Additionally, the obtained results show great coherence of the assessment of the family therapy progress in families and their therapists. The preliminary analysis of data obtained during the research project conducted in Outpatient Family Therapy Clinic, Department of Adult, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, University Hospital in Krakow and in Laboratory of Psychology and Systemic Psychotherapy, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Jagiellonian University Medical College between 2010 and 2014 revealed that SCORE-15 is a useful tool in research on changes in the systemic family therapy process.

  5. Clients' relational conceptions of conjoint couple and family therapy quality: a grounded formal theory.

    PubMed

    Chenail, Ronald J; George, Sally St; Wulff, Dan; Duffy, Maureen; Scott, Karen Wilson; Tomm, Karl

    2012-01-01

    Based upon a qualitative metasynthesis of 49 articles centered on clients' experiences of their conjoint couple and family therapy, the investigators constructed a grounded formal theory of Clients' Relational Conceptions of Conjoint Couple and Family Therapy Quality. The theory suggests from pretherapy conceptions to posttherapy reflections, clients' perceptions of conjoint couple and family therapy quality appear to consist of clients' constructed meanings regarding a series of interrelated relationships between clients and their therapists and therapy environments, between clients and themselves, between clients and other family members, and between process and outcome both inside and outside therapy. Within and across these relationships, clients appear to focus on expectations, connections, balance, and change when evaluating the quality of their clinical experiences. Based upon this theory, the investigators recommend that researchers continue to explore this clinical phenomenon and that therapists regularly seek clients' conceptions of quality in therapy. © 2011 American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy.

  6. Family therapy with unmarried African American mothers and their adolescents.

    PubMed

    Becker, D; Liddle, H A

    2001-01-01

    Almost two-thirds of African American births are to unmarried mothers, and these single parents are among the most economically vulnerable in the United States. The effects of chronic stressors such as poverty can compromise the ability of these mothers to parent effectively, particularly during the developmental period of adolescence, typically a stressful phase of parenting. This article describes a multidimensional family therapy (MDFT) approach to working with African American adolescents who have drug and/or behavior problems. It is maintained that addressing the intrapersonal functioning of African American single mothers is vital if they are to re-establish the attachment bonds necessary for the maintenance of essential parental influence in the lives of their adolescents. Through systematic attention to the parent as an individual, leading to a balance between self-care and care for others, parental supervision is more easily achieved and relational impasses between parent and adolescent more equitably resolved.

  7. Integration of Sexual Counseling and Family Therapy with Surgical Treatment of Breast Cancer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Harold J.

    1981-01-01

    The impact of breast cancer and mastectomy on women and their families is examined from a family systems orientation. Sexual counseling and family therapy are advocated to reduce the psychological and sexual trauma of mastectomy and enhance family adjustment. Clinical case studies provide support for therapeutic intervention. (Author)

  8. A Step toward Disentangling the Alliance/Improvement Cycle in Family Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedlander, Myrna L.; Lambert, Jessica E.; de la Pena, Cristina Muniz

    2008-01-01

    The authors focused on 2 unique aspects of the alliance in conjoint therapy: feeling safe in the therapeutic context with other family members and the family's shared sense of purpose about treatment (i.e., productive within-family collaboration). Low-income, multiproblem families were seen in a community clinic by therapists with varying…

  9. Family Therapy and Children of Alcoholics Implications for Continuing Education and Certification in Substance Abuse Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crespi, Tony D.; Rueckert, Quentin H.

    2006-01-01

    Clinicians involved in family therapy are increasingly concerned with the impact of parental alcoholism on individual development and family functioning. With more than 20 million adults raised within an alcoholic family, and with widespread problems associated with parental alcoholism, clinicians providing family treatment have a potentially…

  10. Integration of Sexual Counseling and Family Therapy with Surgical Treatment of Breast Cancer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Harold J.

    1981-01-01

    The impact of breast cancer and mastectomy on women and their families is examined from a family systems orientation. Sexual counseling and family therapy are advocated to reduce the psychological and sexual trauma of mastectomy and enhance family adjustment. Clinical case studies provide support for therapeutic intervention. (Author)

  11. Family Therapy and Children of Alcoholics Implications for Continuing Education and Certification in Substance Abuse Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crespi, Tony D.; Rueckert, Quentin H.

    2006-01-01

    Clinicians involved in family therapy are increasingly concerned with the impact of parental alcoholism on individual development and family functioning. With more than 20 million adults raised within an alcoholic family, and with widespread problems associated with parental alcoholism, clinicians providing family treatment have a potentially…

  12. Adolescent and Parent Alliances with Therapists in Brief Strategic Family Therapy[TM] with Drug-Using Hispanic Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robbins, Michael S.; Mayorga, Carla C.; Mitrani, Victoria B.; Szapocznik, Jose; Turner, Charles W.; Alexander, James F.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between alliance and retention in family therapy. Alliance was examined at the individual (parent, adolescent) and family level (within-family differences) for families that either dropped out or completed family therapy. Participants were 31 Hispanic adolescents and their family members who received brief…

  13. Adolescent and Parent Alliances with Therapists in Brief Strategic Family Therapy[TM] with Drug-Using Hispanic Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robbins, Michael S.; Mayorga, Carla C.; Mitrani, Victoria B.; Szapocznik, Jose; Turner, Charles W.; Alexander, James F.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between alliance and retention in family therapy. Alliance was examined at the individual (parent, adolescent) and family level (within-family differences) for families that either dropped out or completed family therapy. Participants were 31 Hispanic adolescents and their family members who received brief…

  14. Contributions of medical family therapy to the changing health care system.

    PubMed

    Doherty, William J; McDaniel, Susan H; Hepworth, Jeri

    2014-09-01

    Medical family therapy is a form of professional practice that uses a biopsychosocial approach and systemic family therapy principles in the collaborative treatment of individuals and families dealing with medical problems. It emerged out of the experience of family therapists working in primary medical care settings in the 1980s and 1990s. This article describes how contemporary medical family therapy can contribute to a transformed health care system in four areas: the patient experience of health care, the health of the population, the containment of health care costs, and enhanced practice environments.

  15. Behavioral couples and family therapy for substance abusers.

    PubMed

    O'Farrell, Timothy J; Fals-Stewart, William

    2002-10-01

    Behavioral couples therapy (BCT) sees the substance-abusing patient with the spouse to arrange a daily "sobriety contract" in which the patient states his or her intent not to drink or use drugs, and the spouse expresses support for the patient's efforts to stay abstinent. For patients taking a recovery-related medication (eg, disulfiram, naltrexone), daily medication ingestion witnessed and verbally reinforced by the spouse also is part of the contract. Behavioral couples therapy also teaches communication and increases positive activities. Findings of the past few years have added considerably to the evidence base showing that BCT produces greater abstinence and better relationship functioning than typical individual-based treatment; BCT also reduces social costs and domestic violence. Noteworthy recent advances have extended the positive effects of BCT to women drug abusers, showed the indirect benefits of BCT for the couple's children, expanded BCT to include family members other than spouses, integrated BCT with pharmacotherapy, and started to address barriers to technology transfer.

  16. Targeted Therapies for Advanced Ewing Sarcoma Family of Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yunyun; Ludwig, Joseph; Janku, Filip

    2015-01-01

    The prognosis of adolescent and young adult patients battling metastatic Ewing Sarcoma Family of Tumours (ESFT) remains less than 30% despite the development of systemic therapies. In the era of personalized medicine, novel molecular targets have been tested in preclinical or clinical settings in ESFT. In this review, we focus on early clinical and translational research that identified multiple molecular targets, including IGF-1R; mTOR; tyrosine kinase inhibitors; EWS-FLI1-related targets, and others. Overall, novel targeted therapies demonstrated modest efficacy; however pronounced and durable antineoplastic responses have been observed in small subsets of treated patients, for example with IGF-1R antibodies. Identifying outcome-predicting biomarkers and overcoming treatment resistance remain major challenges. Due to the rarity of ESFT, multi-institutional collaboration efforts of clinicians, basic and translational scientists are needed in order to understand biology of therapeutic response or resistance, which can lead to development of novel therapeutic methods and improved patient outcomes. PMID:25869102

  17. Solution Generation and Family Conflict over Time in Problem-Solving Therapy with Families of Adolescents: The Impact of Therapist Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sternberg, Juliet A.; Bry, Brenna H.

    1994-01-01

    Examines two aspects of the process of family problem-solving therapy: (1) a therapist intervention intended to increase family members' suggestions of solutions; and (2) changes in parent-adolescent conflict as therapy progresses. (LKS)

  18. When do paediatric patients with familial hypercholesterolemia need statin therapy?

    PubMed

    Hennig, Matylda; Brandt, Agnieszka; Bautembach-Minkowska, Joanna; Świętoń, Dominik; Mickiewicz, Agnieszka; Chmara, Magdalenia; Wasąg, Bartosz; Kamińska, Ewa; Balcerska, Anna; Limon, Janusz; Rynkiewicz, Andrzej; Gruchała, Marcin; Myśliwiec, Małgorzata

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is one of the most common autosomal dominant disorders. It is characterized by elevated LDL cholesterol levels occurring already by early childhood. Awareness of health risks in FH patients should incite health professionals to actively seek and treat children with lipid disorders to reduce their risk of myocardial infarction and stroke. The aim of the study was to evaluate the suitability of taking into account the following parameters: ApoB/ApoA index, IMT and e-tracking examination, when initiating statin therapy in FH patients. Materials and methods The study included 57 male and female patients aged 9.57±3.2 years (ranging from 1 year to 17 years), diagnosed with familial hypercholesterolemia confirmed by molecular testing. All the participants had their lipid profile, ApoA and ApoB levels determined. Carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) was measured by carotid ultrasound and arterial stiffness was assessed by e-tracking. The dietary treatment efficacy was monitored in 40 patients and the 12-month combination treatment efficacy in 27 patients. The study was conducted prospectively and retrospectively. Statistical analysis was performed with the EPIINFO Ver. 7.1.1.14 statistical software package. Patients with familial hypercholesterolemia had high mean levels of total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol (287±67 mg/dL and 213±73 mg/dL respectively). 34.37% of the study subjects had a markedly increased ApoB/ApoA index. On IMT or e-tracking examination all the subjects (100%) had vascular abnormalities. After 6 months of a low-cholesterol diet, the mean total and LDL cholesterol levels in the serum had been reduced by 7.2% and 6.2%, respectively. Statins in an average dose of 10.42±2.49 mg daily were prescribed to 36 patients. After one year of the statin therapy, the average serum total and LDL cholesterol levels were 203.5±34.8 mg/dL and 139.1±32.1 mg/dL, respectively, and were still above the target values. Moreover, side

  19. Maternal Experience of Lego Therapy in Families with Children with Autism Spectrum Conditions: What Is the Impact on Family Relationships?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peckett, Helen; MacCallum, Fiona; Knibbs, Jacky

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to explore mothers' experience of implementing Lego Therapy at home within the family. Following a Lego Therapy training session, mothers carried out hourly sessions with their child with an autism spectrum condition and the child's sibling, once a week, for 6 weeks. Mothers were interviewed following the intervention, and the…

  20. Maternal Experience of Lego Therapy in Families with Children with Autism Spectrum Conditions: What Is the Impact on Family Relationships?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peckett, Helen; MacCallum, Fiona; Knibbs, Jacky

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to explore mothers' experience of implementing Lego Therapy at home within the family. Following a Lego Therapy training session, mothers carried out hourly sessions with their child with an autism spectrum condition and the child's sibling, once a week, for 6 weeks. Mothers were interviewed following the intervention, and the…

  1. Integrative Families and Systems Treatment: A Middle Path toward Integrating Common and Specific Factors in Evidence-Based Family Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, J. Scott; Solovey, Andrew D.; Grove, David; Lee, Mo Yee; Greene, Gilbert J.

    2012-01-01

    A moderate common factors approach is proposed as a synthesis or middle path to integrate common and specific factors in evidence-based approaches to high-risk youth and families. The debate in family therapy between common and specific factors camps is reviewed and followed by suggestions from the literature for synthesis and creative flexibility…

  2. Integrative Families and Systems Treatment: A Middle Path toward Integrating Common and Specific Factors in Evidence-Based Family Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, J. Scott; Solovey, Andrew D.; Grove, David; Lee, Mo Yee; Greene, Gilbert J.

    2012-01-01

    A moderate common factors approach is proposed as a synthesis or middle path to integrate common and specific factors in evidence-based approaches to high-risk youth and families. The debate in family therapy between common and specific factors camps is reviewed and followed by suggestions from the literature for synthesis and creative flexibility…

  3. Treatment Techniques and Outcomes in Multidimensional Family Therapy for Adolescent Behavior Problems

    PubMed Central

    Hogue, Aaron; Dauber, Sarah; Samuolis, Jessica; Liddle, Howard A.

    2010-01-01

    The link between treatment techniques and long-term treatment outcome was examined in an empirically supported family-based treatment for adolescent drug abuse. Observational ratings of therapist interventions were used to predict outcomes at 6 and 12 months posttreatment for 63 families receiving multidimensional family therapy. Greater use of in-session family-focused techniques predicted reduction in internalizing symptoms and improvement in family cohesion. Greater use of family-focused techniques also predicted reduced externalizing symptoms and family conflict, but only when adolescent focus was also high. In addition, greater use of adolescent-focused techniques predicted improvement in family cohesion and family conflict. Results suggest that both individual and multiperson interventions can exert an influential role in family-based therapy for clinically referred adolescents. PMID:17176187

  4. Systemic family psychotherapy in China: a qualitative analysis of therapy process.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liang; Miller, John K; Zhao, Xudong; Ma, Xiquan; Wang, Jikun; Li, Wentian

    2013-12-01

    Although the procedure of systemic family therapy has been extensively researched in Western culture, few studies on this subject have been conducted in China. The aim of this study was to specify the therapy-delivered interventions in Chinese systemic family therapy and to explore how Western-imported systemic therapy model is delivered in Chinese culture. A qualitative and exploratory research approach was taken in which thematic analysis was used to analyse the transcribed psychotherapy videotapes with Chinese families. Twenty-six hours of video-recorded systemic family therapy sessions from 14 Chinese family cases were sampled. Thematic analysis was used to analyse the transcriptions of therapy sessions and identify therapist-generated interventions in therapy. Frequencies of different interventions were counted, and correspondence analysis (CA) was used to reveal the corresponding relationships between different interventions. Analysis led to two main themes related to therapists-delivered interventions: Therapist's intention and therapy technique. Results revealed 15 types of therapist's intentions and 16 categories of therapy techniques. CA indicated that therapists' intentions changed across different therapy stages and specific techniques were used to achieve corresponding intentions. Interventions delivered in Chinese systemic therapy are mainly adherent with Milan and post-Milan systemic models. Due to the shortage in systemic therapy service in China and Chinese culture advocating reverence to authority, components of psycho-education, guidance, and metaphor are adopted in Chinese systemic practice. Some directions for future research are suggested. © 2012 The British Psychological Society.

  5. AAMFT Master Series Tapes: An Analysis of the Inclusion of Feminist Principles into Family Therapy Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haddock, Shelley A.; MacPhee, David; Zimmerman, Toni Schindler

    2001-01-01

    Content analysis of 23 American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy Master Series tapes was used to determine how well feminist behaviors have been incorporated into ideal family therapy practice. Feminist behaviors were infrequent, being evident in fewer than 3% of time blocks in event sampling and 10 of 39 feminist behaviors of the…

  6. The Development of Core Competencies for the Practice of Marriage and Family Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Thorana S.; Chenail, Ronald J.; Alexander, James F.; Crane, D. Russell; Johnson, Susan M.; Schwallie, Linda

    2007-01-01

    In response to a series of national policy reports regarding what has been termed the "quality chasm" in health and mental health care in the United States, in January 2003, the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy convened a task force to develop core competencies (CC) for the practice of marriage and family therapy (MFT). The…

  7. Better versus Worse Family Therapy Sessions as Reflected in Clients' Alliance-Related Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedlander, Myrna L.; Bernardi, Shaina; Lee, Hsin-Hua

    2010-01-01

    To be responsive to clients' evaluations of the unfolding therapy process, therapists must first accurately "read" client behavior, a particularly challenging task in conjoint family therapy. In this study, the authors compared client behavior in 28 sessions that one family member and the therapist concurred, on the Session Evaluation…

  8. Iconoclasm versus Innovation: Building a Science of Family Therapy: Comments on Moon, Dillon, and Sprenkle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavell, Timothy A.; Snyder, Douglas K.

    1991-01-01

    Disputes Moon, Dillon, and Sprenkle's (1990) claims regarding advantages of qualitative methods and limitations of quantitative approaches for family therapy research. Supports role of qualitative research in theory development and concurs that exclusive allegiance to standard methods may limit attention to important family therapy processes; but…

  9. Family Therapy for Drug Abuse: Review and Updates 2003-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, Cynthia L.

    2012-01-01

    Just 15 years ago, Liddle and Dakof ("Journal of Marital and Family Therapy," 1995; 21, 511) concluded, based on the available evidence, that family therapy represented a "promising, but not definitive" approach for the treatment of drug problems among adolescents and adults. Seven years later, Rowe and Liddle (2003) review described considerable…

  10. Family Attachment Narrative Therapy: Healing the Experience of Early Childhood Maltreatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Joanne C.

    2005-01-01

    Based on attachment theory and research, Family Attachment Narrative Therapy is introduced as a new family therapy modality developed to heal the experience of early childhood maltreatment. Unresolved childhood trauma has been correlated with impaired and delayed cognitive, behavioral and emotional functioning. Gentle, soothing, nonprovocative and…

  11. Family Attachment Narrative Therapy: Healing the Experience of Early Childhood Maltreatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Joanne C.

    2005-01-01

    Based on attachment theory and research, Family Attachment Narrative Therapy is introduced as a new family therapy modality developed to heal the experience of early childhood maltreatment. Unresolved childhood trauma has been correlated with impaired and delayed cognitive, behavioral and emotional functioning. Gentle, soothing, nonprovocative and…

  12. Assessing Competencies in Couples and Family Therapy/Counseling: A Call to the Profession

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perosa, Linda M.; Perosa, Sandra L.

    2010-01-01

    Psychometrically sound measures of family therapy competencies are necessary to assess the effectiveness of training on student performance. This article critiques the self-report and observer rating measures developed to date to assess the clinical skills of trainees in the individual and in the family therapy fields. Suggestions are made to…

  13. Residency Training and the Later Use of Marital and Family Therapy in Psychiatric Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Ross E.

    1989-01-01

    Compared marital and family therapy training during psychiatry residency to later use among psychiatrists (N=87). Results indicated that respondents reported modest to minimal amounts of training in residency but practiced marital and family therapy with variety of problems, identified spread of effect to other treatment modalities, and preferred…

  14. Better versus Worse Family Therapy Sessions as Reflected in Clients' Alliance-Related Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedlander, Myrna L.; Bernardi, Shaina; Lee, Hsin-Hua

    2010-01-01

    To be responsive to clients' evaluations of the unfolding therapy process, therapists must first accurately "read" client behavior, a particularly challenging task in conjoint family therapy. In this study, the authors compared client behavior in 28 sessions that one family member and the therapist concurred, on the Session Evaluation…

  15. Counseling and Family Therapy in India: Evolving Professions in a Rapidly Developing Nation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carson, David K.; Jain, Sachin; Ramirez, Sylvia

    2009-01-01

    Outpatient counseling is a relatively new concept and form of clinical practice in India. This article provides an overview of the need for and current status of counseling and family therapy in India. Examples of training programs are presented, and future prospects for the counseling and family therapy professions are highlighted. The authors…

  16. Assessing Competencies in Couples and Family Therapy/Counseling: A Call to the Profession

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perosa, Linda M.; Perosa, Sandra L.

    2010-01-01

    Psychometrically sound measures of family therapy competencies are necessary to assess the effectiveness of training on student performance. This article critiques the self-report and observer rating measures developed to date to assess the clinical skills of trainees in the individual and in the family therapy fields. Suggestions are made to…

  17. Family Focused Therapy for Bipolar Adolescents: Lessons from a Difficult Treatment Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, Elizabeth L.; Taylor, Dawn O.; Goldstein, Benjamin I.; Miklowitz, David J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines obstacles and challenges encountered in the manualized Family Focused Therapy-A of an adolescent with bipolar disorder. We begin by describing adolescent bipolar disorder and some of the many complications that frequently accompany it. We summarize Family Focused Therapy (FFT-A), an empirically validated treatment approach for…

  18. Predictors of Substance Use and Family Therapy Outcome among Physically and Sexually Abused Runaway Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slesnick, Natasha; Bartle-Haring, Suzanne; Gangamma, Rashmi

    2006-01-01

    There is a dearth of research that examines the impact of family systems therapy on problems among sexually and/or physically abused youth. Given this void, differential outcome and predictors of substance use change were evaluated for abused, as compared with nonabused, runaway adolescents who were randomly assigned to family therapy or treatment…

  19. Family Therapy for Drug Abuse: Review and Updates 2003-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, Cynthia L.

    2012-01-01

    Just 15 years ago, Liddle and Dakof ("Journal of Marital and Family Therapy," 1995; 21, 511) concluded, based on the available evidence, that family therapy represented a "promising, but not definitive" approach for the treatment of drug problems among adolescents and adults. Seven years later, Rowe and Liddle (2003) review described considerable…

  20. The Theory and Practice of Structural and Strategic Family Therapies: A Delphi Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fish, Linda Stone; Piercy, Fred P.

    1987-01-01

    Examined the similarities and differences in the theory and practice of structural and strategic family therapy. A national panel of structural and strategic therapists identified items they thought important to a profile of either structural or strategic family therapy. Mental Research Institute, Haley/Madanes, and Milan/Ackerman approaches to…

  1. Career Aspirations and Perceived Level of Preparedness among Marriage and Family Therapy Doctoral Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, John K.; Lambert-Shute, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    The authors conducted a survey of marriage and family therapy (MFT) doctoral students in programs accredited by the Commission on Accreditation for Marriage and Family Therapy Education (COAMFTE). MFT doctoral students (N = 82) from across the United States responded to a web-based survey that focused on career aspirations, training opportunities,…

  2. The Theory and Practice of Structural and Strategic Family Therapies: A Delphi Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fish, Linda Stone; Piercy, Fred P.

    1987-01-01

    Examined the similarities and differences in the theory and practice of structural and strategic family therapy. A national panel of structural and strategic therapists identified items they thought important to a profile of either structural or strategic family therapy. Mental Research Institute, Haley/Madanes, and Milan/Ackerman approaches to…

  3. Family Focused Therapy for Bipolar Adolescents: Lessons from a Difficult Treatment Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, Elizabeth L.; Taylor, Dawn O.; Goldstein, Benjamin I.; Miklowitz, David J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines obstacles and challenges encountered in the manualized Family Focused Therapy-A of an adolescent with bipolar disorder. We begin by describing adolescent bipolar disorder and some of the many complications that frequently accompany it. We summarize Family Focused Therapy (FFT-A), an empirically validated treatment approach for…

  4. The theory, structure, and techniques for the inclusion of children in family therapy: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Lund, Lori K; Zimmerman, Toni Schindler; Haddock, Shelley A

    2002-10-01

    Many barriers prevent therapists from including young children in family therapy, despite the theoretical belief that every family member should be present. Although there is a wealth of literature describing how to include children, the information has not been compiled in a way that is easily accessible to therapists. In this article, we report the findings of an exhaustive and systematic literature review of 64 publications, published between 1972 and 1999, related to including children in family therapy. The purpose of this article is to offer therapists a succinct compilation of theoretical, structural, and practical aspects as well as a comprehensive listing of specific techniques for including children in family therapy.

  5. Adolescent and parent therapeutic alliances as predictors of dropout in multidimensional family therapy.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Michael S; Liddle, Howard A; Turner, Charles W; Dakof, Gayle A; Alexander, James F; Kogan, Steven M

    2006-03-01

    The authors examined the relations between adolescent-therapist and mother-therapist therapeutic alliances and dropout in multidimensional family therapy for adolescents who abuse drugs. The authors rated videotapes of family therapy sessions using observational methods to identify therapist-adolescent and therapist-mother alliances in the first 2 therapy sessions. Differences in adolescent and mother alliances in families that dropped out of therapy and families that completed therapy were compared. Results indicate that both adolescent and mother alliances with the therapist discriminated between dropout and completer families. Although no differences were observed between the 2 groups in Session 1, adolescents and mothers in the dropout group demonstrated statistically significantly lower alliance scores in Session 2 than adolescents and parents in the completer group. These findings are consistent with other research that has established a relationship between therapeutic alliance and treatment response. Copyright 2006 APA, all rights reserved.

  6. A combined therapy model (individual and family) for children with sexual behavior problems.

    PubMed

    Etgar, Talia; Shulstain-Elrom, Hadar

    2009-10-01

    This article describes one model from a variety of therapy methods used in the Center for the Prevention and Treatment of Sexual Aggression Among Children. The model combines family and individual therapy for children with sexual behavior problems. The frequency is of two successive individual sessions followed by one family session. The family sessions include the child and both parents, and in some cases siblings are also invited. The article specifies the importance of family therapy for this population and describes the context for appropriate interventions. It gives the characteristics of families whose children are having sexual behavior problems and who are suitable for therapy according to this model. The article deals, among other issues, with the importance of marking boundaries, talking about the fear, restructuring the family and changing behavioral patterns, and recreating communication channels.

  7. Biomarkers in the Assessment of Therapies for Familial Amyloidotic Polyneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Macedo, Bárbara; Batista, Ana Rita; do Amaral, José Barbas; Saraiva, Maria João

    2007-01-01

    The identification of specific biomarkers provides opportunities to develop early diagnostic parameters, monitor disease progression, and test drug efficiency in clinical trials. We previously demonstrated that in familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy (FAP) related to the abnormal extracellular tissue deposition of mutant transthyretin (TTR), inflammatory and apoptotic pathways are triggered in the presymptomatic stages of the disease, when nonfibrillar TTR deposits are present. In the present work, to better define biomarkers for future assessment of prophylactic and therapeutic drugs in the treatment of FAP, we extended the search for oxidative stress and apoptotic biomarkers to clinical samples and animal models presenting nonfibrillar and fibrillar TTR. We found that lipid peroxidation measured by hydroxynonenal, oxidative DNA damage measured by 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine, and cellular redox homeostasis measured by glutaredoxin 1 were consistently increased in biopsy specimens from FAP patients and in tissues from transgenic mouse models presenting nonfibrillar TTR deposition. Death-receptor Fas, caspase-8, and Bax were also found to be increased, indicative of the involvement of death receptors in the observed apoptosis process. Removal of TTR deposition by an immunization protocol resulted in significant decreases of the selected markers we describe, corroborating the relationship between TTR deposition, oxidative stress, and apoptosis. Taken together, our results provide a robust biomarker profile for initial experimental animal studies and clinical trials to assess the application of the selected markers in therapies aimed at removal and/or inhibition of TTR polymerization. PMID:17932549

  8. Family Therapy Supervision for School Counselors and Related Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Sondra

    There has been a recent increase in attention given to the school counselor's role in family counseling. Family counseling can be a useful way to provide early intervention with families whose children exhibit difficulties in school. However, many school systems do not adequately supervise counselors. Additional training in family counseling and…

  9. [Family Climate, Parental Partner Relationships and Symptom Formation in Children - Mentalisation- Based Family Therapy for Childhood Headache].

    PubMed

    Hantel-Quitmann, Wolfgang; Weidtmann, Katja

    2016-01-01

    The emotional family climate is considered both an effective risk and protective factor for child development. Factors such as negative experiences parents made during their childhood or adolescence, which can reoccur as intergenerational transmission, a low partnership quality and a high level of conflict seem to be particularly relevant for the quality of the emotional family climate. Consequently, the relationship between partners, as the core relation within families, is particularly important for the family climate and subsequently for the development of the child. For this reason, problems in parent relationships should receive special attention in family therapeutic interventions. Mentalisation-based family therapy (MBF-T) offers promising approaches in this context. The key principles of mentalisation are introduced and the links between family and mentalisation are presented, followed by information on the history, objectives and the procedures of MBF-T. A case study of a family therapy, in which a child suffers from chronic headache, illustrates the connection and interrelation between family climate, family conflicts and the parental relationship, and it will further show the importance of mentalisation-based elements for therapeutic treatments.

  10. Pilot study comparing multi-family therapy to single family therapy for adults with anorexia nervosa in an intensive eating disorder program.

    PubMed

    Dimitropoulos, Gina; Farquhar, Jamie C; Freeman, Victoria Emily; Colton, Patricia Anne; Olmsted, Marion Patricia

    2015-07-01

    Multi-family therapy (MFT) has yet to be evaluated in families of adults with anorexia nervosa (AN). The study aims were: (i) assess the feasibility of MFT for AN; and, (ii) assess whether MFT is associated with improved outcomes for families compared with single-family therapy (SFT). Adult patients with AN consecutively referred to an eating disorder treatment program were assigned (non-randomly) to receive eight sessions of SFT or MFT. Assessment occurred pre-therapy, immediately post-therapy, and at 3-month follow-up. A total of 37 female patients (13 SFT, 24 MFT) and 45 family members (16 SFT, 29 MFT) completed treatment. There were significant time effects for patients' BMI, eating disorder-related psychopathology and multiple family outcome measures. There were no differences between MFT and SFT on family outcome measures at end of treatment and 3 months post treatment. MFT is a feasible intervention that can be used in adult intensive treatment for those with AN.

  11. Occupational Therapy: Meeting the Needs of Families of People With Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Kuhaneck, Heather Miller; Watling, Renee

    2015-01-01

    Occupational therapy has much to offer to families of people with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). However, people outside the profession may be unaware of occupational therapy's breadth and scope. It is our responsibility and our duty to express the full range of occupational therapy services through research, clinical practice, advocacy, and consumer education. This special issue of the American Journal of Occupational Therapy, with its focus on autism, embarks on this endeavor by highlighting research and theoretical articles that address the various aspects of occupational therapy practice that can help to fully meet the needs of people with ASD and their families.

  12. The Therapist's Role in Effective Marriage and Family Therapy Practice: The Case for Evidence Based Therapists.

    PubMed

    Blow, Adrian J; Karam, Eli A

    2016-09-30

    In this paper we argue that the therapist is a crucial change variable in psychotherapy as a whole and in couple, marital, and family therapy specifically. Therapists who work with complex systems require more skills to negotiate demanding therapy contexts. Yet, little is known about what differentiates effective couple, marital, and family therapists from those who are less effective, what innate therapy skills they possess, how they learn, and how they operationalize their knowledge in the therapy room. We discuss the need to emphasize evidence based therapists (as opposed to therapies), and implications of the importance of the role therapists for training, practice, research priorities, and policy.

  13. Ethnic background, therapeutic alliance, and treatment retention in functional family therapy with adolescents who abuse substances.

    PubMed

    Flicker, Sharon M; Turner, Charles W; Waldron, Holly B; Brody, Janet L; Ozechowski, Timothy J

    2008-02-01

    In this study, the authors examined the role of balance between adolescent-therapist and parent-therapist alliances in the retention of functional family therapy clients. Therapeutic alliances of mothers, fathers, and adolescents were assessed from videotapes of the 1st treatment session for 43 Hispanic and 43 Anglo families. Hispanic families who dropped out before completing the requisite number of sessions were found to have greater imbalance in alliance (parent-adolescent) than those who did complete therapy. However, this finding was not replicated with Anglo families. Results are interpreted in terms of previous research on family-level balanced alliance effects.

  14. Families Who Begin versus Decline Therapy for Children Who Are Sexually Abused

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lippert, Tonya; Favre, Tricia; Alexander, Cindy; Cross, Theodore P.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To identify child characteristics, factors related to the therapy referral, and caregivers' psychological and social variables that predict sexually abused children's beginning therapy following a therapy referral. Method: Investigators abstracted data from case records of 101 families whose children were referred to a Children's…

  15. Adventure Family Therapy: An Innovative Approach Answering the Question of Lasting Change with Adjudicated Youth?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gass, Michael A.

    The field of adventure family therapy has emerged as a means to construct lasting functional change for troubled youth. Seven reasons why adventure therapy can be successful with troubled youth are: (1) therapeutic processes are centered in action-oriented experiences; (2) therapy is conducted in an unfamiliar environment; (3) adventure therapy…

  16. [Brief strategic family therapy: an empirically-validated intervention for reducing adolescent behavior problems].

    PubMed

    Robbins, Michael S; Horigian, Viviana E; Szapocznik, José

    2008-01-01

    Brief Strategic Family Therapy (BSFT) is an empirically-supported treatment for children and adolescents with behavior problems and substance use problems. For three decades, the efficacy and effectiveness of BSFT has been established through the results of rigorous clinical trials studies conducted at the University of Miami's Center for Family Studies. BSFT is based on family systems approaches, most notably the work of Salvador Minuchin and Jay Haley, but has been refined to meet the pressing needs of youth with behavior problems. BSFT theory and interventions cover four broad domains: joining with family members and the family system, assessing problematic family interactions, creating a motivational context for change, and restructuring family interactions.

  17. Brief Structural/Strategic Family Therapy with African American and Hispanic High Risk Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santisteban, Daniel A.; Coatsworth, J. Douglas; Perez-Vidal, Angel; Mitrani, Victoria; Jean-Gilles, Michele; Szapocnik, Jose

    The intervention described in this paper used Brief Strategic/Structural Family Therapy (BSFT) to reduce the likelihood that African American and Hispanic youth would initiate drug use by decreasing existing behavior problems at the individual level and improving maladaptive family functioning at the family level. The program targeted African…

  18. Application of Alternatives for Families: A Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy to School Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herschell, Amy D.; Kolko, David J.; Baumann, Barbara L.; Brown, Elissa J.

    2012-01-01

    Alternatives for Families: A Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (AF-CBT) is an evidence-based treatment for families with children aged 5 to 15 years who have been affected by verbal and physical aggression in the family. AF-CBT was designed to address risks for exposure to emotional and physical aggression as well as common clinical consequences of…

  19. Sugar and Spice, Toads and Mice: Gender Issues in Family Therapy Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Janine McGill

    1991-01-01

    Presents methods to help family therapy trainees and clinicians articulate how to address gender in families. Describes four experiential exercises (including gender survival messages, gender framed circular questions, and process observation sheets) for training and use with clients. Can examine learnings about gender from families of origin,…

  20. Therapist Adherence in Brief Strategic Family Therapy for Adolescent Drug Abusers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robbins, Michael S.; Feaster, Daniel J.; Horigian, Viviana E.; Puccinelli, Marc J.; Henderson, Craig; Szapocznik, Jose

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Therapist adherence has been shown to predict clinical outcomes in family therapy. In prior studies, adherence has been represented broadly by core principles and a consistent family (vs. individual) focus. To date, these studies have not captured the range of clinical skills that are represented in complex family-based approaches or…

  1. Therapist Adherence in Brief Strategic Family Therapy for Adolescent Drug Abusers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robbins, Michael S.; Feaster, Daniel J.; Horigian, Viviana E.; Puccinelli, Marc J.; Henderson, Craig; Szapocznik, Jose

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Therapist adherence has been shown to predict clinical outcomes in family therapy. In prior studies, adherence has been represented broadly by core principles and a consistent family (vs. individual) focus. To date, these studies have not captured the range of clinical skills that are represented in complex family-based approaches or…

  2. Sugar and Spice, Toads and Mice: Gender Issues in Family Therapy Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Janine McGill

    1991-01-01

    Presents methods to help family therapy trainees and clinicians articulate how to address gender in families. Describes four experiential exercises (including gender survival messages, gender framed circular questions, and process observation sheets) for training and use with clients. Can examine learnings about gender from families of origin,…

  3. A Conceptual Model and Clinical Framework for Integrating Mindfulness into Family Therapy with Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Brody, Janet L; Scherer, David G; Turner, Charles W; Annett, Robert D; Dalen, Jeanne

    2017-06-07

    Individual and group-based psychotherapeutic interventions increasingly incorporate mindfulness-based principles and practices. These practices include a versatile set of skills such as labeling and attending to present-moment experiences, acting with awareness, and avoiding automatic reactivity. A primary motivation for integrating mindfulness into these therapies is compelling evidence that it enhances emotion regulation. Research also demonstrates that family relationships have a profound influence on emotion regulation capacities, which are central to family functioning and prosocial behavior more broadly. Despite this evidence, no framework exists to describe how mindfulness might integrate into family therapy. This paper describes the benefits of mindfulness-based interventions, highlighting how and why informal mindfulness practices might enhance emotion regulation when integrated with family therapy. We provide a clinical framework for integrating mindfulness into family therapy, particularly as it applies to families with adolescents. A brief case example details sample methods showing how incorporating mindfulness practices into family therapy may enhance treatment outcomes. A range of assessment modalities from biological to behavioral demonstrates the breadth with which the benefits of a family-based mindfulness intervention might be evaluated. © 2017 The Authors. Family Process published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Family Process Institute.

  4. [The Therapy Process of Accompanying Mothers in Multiple Family Therapy Groups: Evidence from a German Child Psychiatric Setting].

    PubMed

    von der Lippe, Holger; Radloff, Josefine; Schadow, Jeanette; Röttger, Ulrike; Flechtner, Hans-Henning

    2016-10-01

    The Therapy Process of Accompanying Mothers in Multiple Family Therapy Groups: Evidence from a German Child Psychiatric Setting This study provides an empirical contribution to the understanding of parents that accompany their children in psychiatric multiple family therapy settings (MFT). To this end, we conducted qualitative interviews with mothers that had successfully participated, with their diagnosed children (ages 3 to 9), in disorder-independent, age-homogeneous, and open family groups (the "Magdeburg Model") for several months. We performed a theoretical coding approach to the extensive interview material (n = 6 interviews, duration = 70 to 100 minutes each) according to Grounded Theory and extracted seven main and 29 sub-categories. These categories yield a coherent, complete, and specific subjective therapy model for this setting. One of the central findings is a profound understanding of to what extent and by which means the family group as a social arena paves and supports the arrival of the mothers in the group, their engagement into the therapy process, and their motivational and volitional steps during therapy. Another relevant result is a reconstruction of what we termed Arriving Home, which is the epitome of the positive cognitive, affective, and behavioral therapeutic development that mothers perceive. Conclusions for clinical practice as well as for qualitative and mixed methods therapy research are discussed.

  5. A Piagetian view of family therapy: Selvini-Palazzoli and the Invariant Approach.

    PubMed

    Gelcer, E; Schwartzbein, D

    1989-12-01

    The Invariant Approach of Mara Selvini-Palazzoli is a new development in the Milan approach to family therapy. In order to distinguish and explain it, an overview of the Invariant Approach is given. Jean Piaget's theory of cognitive development is used to provide a framework for explaining how Selvini-Palazzoli's therapy alters the family's epistemology and facilitates change in the "family game." It is suggested that family members in therapy tend to think about their problems in a style that resembles Piaget's preoperational period. The process of therapy can be seen as geared to facilitate a shift from a preoperational to an operational style of cognitive functioning. This shift gives family members access to more adaptive ways of thinking about their problem-solving strategies.

  6. The Use of Theory in Family Therapy Research: Content Analysis and Update.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ruoxi; Hughes, Alexandria C; Austin, Jason P

    2017-02-22

    In this study, we evaluated 275 empirical studies from Journal of Marital and Family Therapy and Family Process from 2010 to 2015 on their use of theory, and compared our findings to those of a similar previous analysis (Hawley & Geske, 2000). Overall, theory seems to have become much better incorporated in empirical family therapy research, with only 16.4% of the articles not using theory in either their introductory or discussion sections. Theory appeared better incorporated in the introductory sections than in the discussion sections. Systems theory remained the most commonly used conceptual framework, followed by attachment theory. We discuss areas for improving theory incorporation in family therapy research, and offer suggestions for both family therapy researchers and educators.

  7. The Influence of Living Situations on Family Therapy Involvement Among Youth Adjudicated of a Sexual Crime.

    PubMed

    Yoder, Jamie R

    2016-04-01

    Clinical and research professionals working with youth who have sexually offended have increasingly advocated for community-based care. However, other scholars have noted the appropriateness of residential placements for many youth. Research is inconclusive concerning the degree to which youth with sexually harmful behaviors receive family services, particularly family therapy in either community-based care settings or residential settings, and has yet to thoroughly identify how placement influences family therapy involvement. This study reviews the files of youth who have been adjudicated of a sexual crime (N = 85) to quantitatively identify how living situations influence family therapy involvement. Using bivariate estimations, findings reveal that youth living out of the home and those who change placements were more involved in family therapy than those treated in their own communities or homes. Implications and future research directions are considered. © The Author(s) 2014.

  8. Short-Term Family Intervention: A Therapy Outcome Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, Bruce V., Jr.; Alexander, James F.

    1973-01-01

    Based on a matching-to-sample philosphy, modification of the destructive communication patterns of delinquent families was attempted by systematically shaping in behaviors characteristic of adaptive family systems (increased clarity). Based on direct observation of family interaction in a discussion task, the results indicated a significant change…

  9. Family presence during cardiopulmonary resuscitation: grief therapy or prolonged futility?

    PubMed

    Sherman, David A

    2008-01-01

    Nursing leaders are responsible in part for implementing procedures supporting family presence during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Family presence has received broad support in nursing literature and from professional organizations. A case study suggests that, when a patient's spokesperson is struggling with the question of whether to set limits to treatments, allowing family presence may inappropriately prolong futile care.

  10. Marital and Family Therapy: Implications of Research for Alcoholism Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Farrell, Timothy J.

    This synopsis of the outcome literature on marital and family treatment (MFT) drew three conclusions. First, intervening at the marital/family level with nonalcoholic family members can motivate an initial commitment to change in the alcoholic who is unwilling to seek help. Second, MFT alone, or with individual alcoholism treatment, produces…

  11. Family grief therapy: a preliminary account of a new model to promote healthy family functioning during palliative care and bereavement.

    PubMed

    Kissane, D W; Bloch, S; McKenzie, M; McDowall, A C; Nitzan, R

    1998-01-01

    The family is usually the primary provider of care for the terminally ill patient with cancer or other serious progressive illness. The way in which such a family functions is a major determinant of psychological well-being for its members. Through screening with the Family Relationships Index (FRI) (Moos and Moos, 1981), dysfunctional families and those at risk can be identified, and then helped to achieve better family functioning, thus improving psychosocial outcome of their grief. In this paper, we describe the techniques and themes involved in the application of our empirically developed model of family grief therapy, designed as a preventive intervention for use in the setting of palliative care and bereavement.

  12. Therapeutic Alliance and Retention in Brief Strategic Family Therapy: A Mixed-Methods Study.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, Alyson H; Friedlander, Myrna L

    2015-10-01

    We explored how the therapeutic alliance contributed to retention in Brief Strategic Family Therapy by analyzing videotapes of eight-first sessions in which four therapists worked with one family that stayed in treatment and one family that dropped out. Although behavioral exchange patterns between clients and therapists did not differ by retention status, positive therapist alliance-related behavior followed negative client alliance behavior somewhat more frequently in the retained cases. In the qualitative aspect of the study, four family therapy experts each viewed two randomly assigned sessions and commented on their quality without knowing the families' retention status. A qualitative analysis of the audiotaped commentaries revealed 18 alliance-related themes that were more characteristic of either the retained or the nonretained cases. © 2015 American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy.

  13. Family Experiences During the Dying Process After Withdrawal of Life-Sustaining Therapy.

    PubMed

    Wiegand, Debra L

    2016-01-01

    Life-sustaining therapy is commonly withdrawn in intensive care units, yet little is known about the perceptions of families when a critically ill patient dies after life-sustaining therapy is withdrawn. The purpose of this investigation was to understand the experience of families when a family member had an unexpected life-threatening illness or injury and who died after life-sustaining therapy was withdrawn. This investigation used a hermeneutic phenomenological approach. Interviews were conducted with family members after the patient's death. All interviews were transcribed with units of meaning and clusters, and then categories inductively determined. Methodological rigor was established. A purposive sample of family members was recruited into the study from 3 intensive care units. Twenty-two family members participated in the study. Six categories evolved from the analysis: preparing for the dying process, the dying environment, perceptions of patient comfort, the death vigil, essential aspects of care, and together as a family. Families described the death vigil as extremely difficult. Family members described several aspects of care as very meaningful to them during the dying process. Families described how important it was for the family to be together as a family during the dying process.

  14. Statin therapy and risk of diabetes in patients with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia or familial combined hyperlipidemia.

    PubMed

    Skoumas, John; Liontou, Catherine; Chrysohoou, Christina; Masoura, Constantina; Aznaouridis, Konstantinos; Pitsavos, Christos; Stefanadis, Christodoulos

    2014-11-01

    Controversial findings exist regarding potential influence of statin therapy on diabetic incidence. Aim of this study was to investigate the role of long duration statin treatment on diabetes mellitus (DM) incidence of Heterozygous Familial Hypercholesterolemia (hFH) and Familial Combined Hyperlipidemia (FCH) patients. Study population consisted of 212 hFH and 147 FCH patients that visited Lipid Outpatient Department (mean follow up of 11 and 10 years respectively). Several clinical data such as history of DM, cardiovascular disease, thyroid function, metabolic syndrome, glucose levels, lipid profile and lifestyle data were obtained. In order to compare the effects of different doses of different types of statins, a "statin treatment intensity product" was used. 14% of FCH and only 1% of hFH patients developed DM during follow up. Although univariate analysis showed a statistical trend (p = 0.06) in the association between new onset DM and statin treatment intensity (STI) in the FCH subgroup of patients with normal baseline glucose levels, this was no longer significant after adjusting for several confounders. Furthermore, the type of statins used did not seem to play a role in the development of DM either in hFH or FCH patients. Long duration of high STI does not seem to be associated with diabetic risk in hFH patients. High STI used in the FCH population is not associated with increased risk of new onset DM compared to low STI. Further studies are required in order to clarify the potential diabetogenic effects of statins in these high risk populations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Treating adolescent drug abuse: a randomized trial comparing multidimensional family therapy and cognitive behavior therapy.

    PubMed

    Liddle, Howard A; Dakof, Gayle A; Turner, Ralph M; Henderson, Craig E; Greenbaum, Paul E

    2008-10-01

    To examine the efficacy of two adolescent drug abuse treatments: individual cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and multidimensional family therapy (MDFT). A 2 (treatment condition) x 4 (time) repeated-measures intent-to-treat randomized design. Data were gathered at baseline, termination, 6 and 12 months post-termination. Analyses used latent growth curve modeling. Community-based drug abuse clinic in the northeastern United States. A total of 224 youth, primarily male (81%), African American (72%), from low-income single-parent homes (58%) with an average age of 15 years were recruited into the study. All youth were drug users, with 75% meeting DSM-IV criteria for cannabis dependence and 13% meeting criteria for abuse. Five outcomes were measured: (i) substance use problem severity; (ii) 30-day frequency of cannabis use; (iii) 30-day frequency of alcohol use; (iv) 30-day frequency of other drug use; and (v) 30-day abstinence. Both treatments produced significant decreases in cannabis consumption and slightly significant reductions in alcohol use, but there were no treatment differences in reducing frequency of cannabis and alcohol use. Significant treatment effects were found favoring MDFT on substance use problem severity, other drug use and minimal use (zero or one occasion of use) of all substances, and these effects continued to 12 months following treatment termination. Both interventions are promising treatments. Consistent with previous controlled trials, MDFT is distinguished by the sustainability of treatment effects.

  16. Family-Based Therapy for Parent-Child Reunification.

    PubMed

    Smith, Linda S

    2016-05-01

    Children in highly conflicted, divorced families can become triangulated and polarized in their relationships with their parents. In time, this can lead to a child refusing to have a relationship with a parent, refusing for example, to see or talk to him or her. This access refusal can sometimes become extended, lasting months to years. When this occurs, the courts may request professional involvement to help facilitate parent-child reunification. This article outlines a family-based treatment model for parent-child reunification cases. This family-based treatment incorporates treatment goals for each family member and each family member is asked to be a part of the solution in resolving the family's problems. I provide a case illustration as well as helpful tips for treating these families. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. The Daily Events and Emotions of Master's-Level Family Therapy Trainees in Off-Campus Practicum Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Todd M.; Patterson, Jo Ellen

    2012-01-01

    The Day Reconstruction Method (DRM) was used to assess the daily events and emotions of one program's master's-level family therapy trainees in off-campus practicum settings. This study examines the DRM reports of 35 family therapy trainees in the second year of their master's program in marriage and family therapy. Four themes emerged from the…

  18. The Daily Events and Emotions of Master's-Level Family Therapy Trainees in Off-Campus Practicum Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Todd M.; Patterson, Jo Ellen

    2012-01-01

    The Day Reconstruction Method (DRM) was used to assess the daily events and emotions of one program's master's-level family therapy trainees in off-campus practicum settings. This study examines the DRM reports of 35 family therapy trainees in the second year of their master's program in marriage and family therapy. Four themes emerged from the…

  19. Adolescent and parent alliances with therapists in Brief Strategic Family Therapy with drug-using Hispanic adolescents.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Michael S; Mayorga, Carla C; Mitrani, Victoria B; Szapocznik, José; Turner, Charles W; Alexander, James F

    2008-07-01

    This study examined the relationship between alliance and retention in family therapy. Alliance was examined at the individual (parent, adolescent) and family level (within-family differences) for families that either dropped out or completed family therapy. Participants were 31 Hispanic adolescents and their family members who received brief strategic family therapy for the treatment of adolescent drug use. Videotapes of first sessions were rated to identify parent and adolescent alliances with the therapist. Results demonstrated that Completer cases had significantly higher levels of alliance across all family members than Dropout cases, and Dropout cases had significantly higher unbalanced alliances than Completer cases. Clinical implications are discussed.

  20. The Family Impacts of Proton Radiation Therapy for Children With Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Houtrow, Amy J.; Yock, Torunn I.; Delahaye, Jennifer; Kuhlthau, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Children with brain tumors experience significant alterations to their health and well-being due to the tumors themselves and oncologic treatment. Caring for children with brain tumors can have significant impacts on families, especially during and shortly after treatment. In this study of the impacts on families caring for children undergoing proton radiation therapy for brain tumors, the authors found that families experienced a broad array of negative impacts. Families reported feeling like they were living on a roller coaster, feeling that others treated them differently, and having to give up things as a family. In the multivariable linear regression model, older age of the child and higher reported child health–related quality of life were associated with less family impact. The presence of concurrent chemotherapy was associated with increased family impact. This is the first study to specifically evaluate the families of children being treated with proton radiation therapy. The findings in this study are consistent with the findings in other studies of children treated with standard therapy that show that families experience a variety of stressors and negative impacts while their children are receiving treatment. Health care providers should be aware of the potential impacts on families of children with brain tumors and their treatment to provide robust services to meet the health, psychological, and social needs of such children and their families. PMID:22647729

  1. Renal replacement therapy for children: a family decision.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Semiramis Melani Melo; Correia, Carolina Camilo; Molzahn, Anita; Nascimento, Lucila Castanheira

    2010-01-01

    Although Anne had many complex health issues and experienced considerable support from her extended family, she wanted freedom from the restrictions posed by peritoneal dialysis. Her quality of life changed after transplantation, with more opportunities to engage in leisure activities, ability to travel, a less restricted diet, and an improved self-image. She required fewer treatments, surgeries, and hospitalizations. She left behind the role of sick child and took up a role more like a healthy child. During the disease and decision-making process, Anne learned coping mechanisms, allowing her to gain autonomy to make decisions. The case study illustrates both the need to listen to children as well as to care for the entire family. The nursing management of this child and her family was continually changing, and multiple strategies were used to support the family. The nurse came to understand the roles of family members in constant change, the sources of their resources, and foci of tensions. Based on this knowledge, the nurse can act by mobilizing resources, strengthening the confidence of family members, and helping them develop coping mechanisms. In conclusion, care of the ill child must be family-centered. Stresses on the family have an impact on the child and vice versa. The potential to influence the quality of life of both the child and the family is considerable.

  2. [Significance of measuring family satisfaction in the intensive therapy unit].

    PubMed

    Suchorzewska, Janina; Basińska, Krystyna

    2011-01-01

    Recently, numerous studies have been devoted to the issues of satisfaction of ITU patients and their families. Good relationships between the medical personnel and family members are essential for interpersonal communication built by both parties. The knowledge of rules ensuring proper relations with patients and their families is an important element of the medical staff education. To date, neither the medical curriculum nor additional training have focused on this issue. Good communication between the patients` families and physicians, thus the feeling of safety and satisfaction with the intensive care provided, should be based on controlled paternalism, provision of reliable information, confidence moulded, by mutual understanding and respect, elimination of impulsive reactions.

  3. Marriage and family therapy: examining the impact of licensure on an evolving profession.

    PubMed

    West, Charles; Jeff Hinton, W; Grames, Heath; Adams, Mary Ann

    2013-01-01

    Regulatory responsibilities for the profession of marriage and family therapy have shifted from the American Association of Marriage and Family Therapy (AAMFT) to state regulatory boards. The impact of these changes has not been adequately addressed. The purpose of this article is to highlight many of these changes and explore their implications. The educational, experience, and supervision requirements of states regulating the profession of marriage and family therapy in 2007 are examined using descriptive data from 47 regulatory entities and then compared with the current (2012) regulatory standards from 51 regulatory entities. In turn, these are compared with AAMFT prelicensure clinical membership requirements. Results indicate a marked difference between AAMFT prelicensure and state licensure requirements in both 2007 and 2012, but that state requirements continue to evolve. Additionally, the changing roles of the AAMFT and the Association of Marital and Family Therapy Regulatory Boards (AMFTRB) within the profession are explored.

  4. Perceptions of family members of palliative medicine and hospice patients who experienced music therapy.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Lisa M; Lagman, Ruth; Bates, Debbie; Edsall, Melissa; Eden, Patricia; Janaitis, Jessica; Rybicki, Lisa

    2017-06-01

    Evidence shows that music therapy aids in symptom management and improves quality of life for palliative medicine and hospice patients. The majority of previous studies have addressed patient needs, while only a few addressed the needs of family members. The primary purpose of this study was to understand family members' perceptions of music therapy experienced by a relative in palliative medicine or hospice. Patient self-reported scales and music therapist assessment of change were also investigated. Patients scored their symptoms (pain, anxiety, depression, shortness of breath, and mood) before and after music therapy sessions. One family member present during the session assessed perceived effect on the patient's pain, anxiety, depression, shortness of breath, stress level, restlessness, comfort level, mood, and quality of life. The effect on family member's stress level, quality of life, and mood and helpfulness of the music therapy session for the patient and self were studied. Recommendations about future patient participation in music therapy and qualitative comments were also solicited. Fifty family member/patient dyads participated in the study. Family member perceptions were positive, with 82% of responders indicating improvement for self and patient in stress, mood, and quality of life; 80% rating the session as extremely helpful; and 100% of 49 recommending further music therapy sessions for the patient. Patients reported statistically significant improvement in pain, depression, distress, and mood scores. Family members of patients in palliative medicine and hospice settings reported an immediate positive impact of music therapy on the patient and on themselves. More research needs to be conducted to better understand the benefits of music therapy for family members.

  5. Non-Equilibrium, Chance and Change in Family Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elkaim, Mony

    1981-01-01

    Uses a case study to show how a therapist can help a family by breaking their loops of preferential behaviors. Describes a systemic approach that helps prevent families from using the same feedback loops that lead to dead-ends in their behavior. (JAC)

  6. Paradoxical Prescriptions in Family Therapy: From Child to Marital Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Protinsky, Howard; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Proposes a technique using paradoxical prescription with families to successfully move away from the identified patient to an emphasis on family and marital dynamics. Presents three clinical illustrations to demonstrate the procedure. Poses some research questions regarding the use of this technique and the need for further refinement. (Author)

  7. Structural Ecosystems Therapy for HIV-Seropositive African American Women: Effects on Psychological Distress, Family Hassles, and Family Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szapocznik, Jose; Feaster, Daniel J.; Mitrani, Victoria B.; Prado, Guillermo; Smith, Lila; Robinson-Batista, Carleen; Schwartz, Seth J.; Mauer, Magaly H.; Robbins, Michael S.

    2004-01-01

    This study tests the efficacy of Structural Ecosystems Therapy (SET), a family-ecological intervention, in improving psychosocial functioning when compared with an attention-comparison person-centered condition and a community control condition. A sample of 209 HIV-seropositive, urban, low-income, African American women was randomized into 1 of…

  8. Quantifying the dynamics of emotional expressions in family therapy of patients with anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Pezard, Laurent; Doba, Karyn; Lesne, Annick; Nandrino, Jean-Louis

    2017-07-01

    Emotional interactions have been considered dynamical processes involved in the affective life of humans and their disturbances may induce mental disorders. Most studies of emotional interactions have focused on dyadic behaviors or self-reports of emotional states but neglected the dynamical processes involved in family therapy. The main objective of this study is to quantify the dynamics of emotional expressions and their changes using the family therapy of patients with anorexia nervosa as an example. Nonlinear methods characterize the variability of the dynamics at the level of the whole therapeutic system and reciprocal influence between the participants during family therapy. Results show that the variability of the dynamics is higher at the end of the therapy than at the beginning. The reciprocal influences between therapist and each member of the family and between mother and patient decrease with the course of family therapy. Our results support the development of new interpersonal strategies of emotion regulation during family therapy. The quantification of emotional dynamics can help understanding the emotional processes underlying psychopathology and evaluating quantitatively the changes achieved by the therapeutic intervention. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Family Systems Therapy for Substance Using Mothers and their 8–16 Year Old Children

    PubMed Central

    Slesnick, Natasha; Zhang, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Family systems therapy has shown to be a powerful adjunct to substance use treatment for couples and for adolescent substance users (Rowe, 2012). However, studies including children (8–16 years) in the treatment of their substance using mothers have been overlooked and are essentially non-existent. Addressing the quality of the mother-child relationship and communication through family systems therapy may prove to be a potent intervention focus for improving mothers’ substance use outcomes and parent-child interaction. As such, the current study recruited 183 mothers who sought outpatient treatment through a local substance use treatment facility and randomly assigned them to also receive family systems therapy or Women’s Health Education. Self-report and observational data were collected, and assessment interviews were completed at baseline, 3, 6, 12 and 18 months post-baseline. Findings showed that women assigned to family systems therapy showed a quicker decline in alcohol, marijuana and cocaine use, supporting the efficacy of family therapy as an important addition to mother’s substance use treatment plans. Data also revealed an association between change in observed autonomy-relatedness and substance use, though mediation was not found. To our knowledge this is the first effort to successfully document a family systems therapy for substance using mothers with minor children in their care. PMID:27454370

  10. The framework of family therapy in clinical practice and research in Serbia.

    PubMed

    Pantovic, Maja; Dunjic-Kostic, Bojana; Ivkovic, Maja; Damjanovic, Aleksandar; Jovanovic, Aleksandar A

    2012-04-01

    In the last two decades, Serbia has had to deal with multiple social and economic problems reflecting on society's demographics and seemed to weaken its core cell - the family. The paper describes the framework of family therapy in clinical practice and research, within the recent transition of the Serbian family. Family therapy treatment in Serbia uses the systemic family therapy (SFT) approach, applied according to the standards of the European Association for Psychotherapy. A large number of professionals who practise in Serbia hold European qualifications, setting high standards in education, clinical practice, and research. Although SFT is also available in the private sector, the majority of patients are still treated in state institutions. Family therapy is often used for adults and adolescents with psychosis and addictions in psychiatric hospital settings. However, in counselling centres it is used for marital and relationship problems. Interestingly, family therapy has recently started to emerge as a more frequent tool in consultation-liaison, particularly psycho-oncology but also in correctional institutions. The clinical practice and research interests are interlinked with changes in social settings.

  11. Parallel Demand-Withdraw Processes in Family Therapy for Adolescent Drug Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Rynes, Kristina N.; Rohrbaugh, Michael J.; Lebensohn-Chialvo, Florencia; Shoham, Varda

    2013-01-01

    Isomorphism, or parallel process, occurs in family therapy when patterns of therapist-client interaction replicate problematic interaction patterns within the family. This study investigated parallel demand-withdraw processes in Brief Strategic Family Therapy (BSFT) for adolescent drug abuse, hypothesizing that therapist-demand/adolescent-withdraw interaction (TD/AW) cycles observed early in treatment would predict poor adolescent outcomes at follow-up for families who exhibited entrenched parent-demand/adolescent-withdraw interaction (PD/AW) before treatment began. Participants were 91 families who received at least 4 sessions of BSFT in a multi-site clinical trial on adolescent drug abuse (Robbins et al., 2011). Prior to receiving therapy, families completed videotaped family interaction tasks from which trained observers coded PD/AW. Another team of raters coded TD/AW during two early BSFT sessions. The main dependent variable was the number of drug use days that adolescents reported in Timeline Follow-Back interviews 7 to 12 months after family therapy began. Zero-inflated Poisson (ZIP) regression analyses supported the main hypothesis, showing that PD/AW and TD/AW interacted to predict adolescent drug use at follow-up. For adolescents in high PD/AW families, higher levels of TD/AW predicted significant increases in drug use at follow-up, whereas for low PD/AW families, TD/AW and follow-up drug use were unrelated. Results suggest that attending to parallel demand-withdraw processes in parent/adolescent and therapist/adolescent dyads may be useful in family therapy for substance-using adolescents. PMID:23438248

  12. Parallel demand-withdraw processes in family therapy for adolescent drug abuse.

    PubMed

    Rynes, Kristina N; Rohrbaugh, Michael J; Lebensohn-Chialvo, Florencia; Shoham, Varda

    2014-06-01

    Isomorphism, or parallel process, occurs in family therapy when patterns of therapist-client interaction replicate problematic interaction patterns within the family. This study investigated parallel demand-withdraw processes in brief strategic family therapy (BSFT) for adolescent drug abuse, hypothesizing that therapist-demand/adolescent-withdraw interaction (TD/AW) cycles observed early in treatment would predict poor adolescent outcomes at follow-up for families who exhibited entrenched parent-demand/adolescent-withdraw interaction (PD/AW) before treatment began. Participants were 91 families who received at least four sessions of BSFT in a multisite clinical trial on adolescent drug abuse (Robbins et al., 2011). Prior to receiving therapy, families completed videotaped family interaction tasks from which trained observers coded PD/AW. Another team of raters coded TD/AW during two early BSFT sessions. The main dependent variable was the number of drug-use days that adolescents reported in timeline follow-back interviews 7 to 12 months after family therapy began. Zero-inflated Poisson regression analyses supported the main hypothesis, showing that PD/AW and TD/AW interacted to predict adolescent drug use at follow-up. For adolescents in high PD/AW families, higher levels of TD/AW predicted significant increases in drug use at follow-up, whereas for low PD/AW families, TD/AW and follow-up drug use were unrelated. Results suggest that attending to parallel demand-withdraw processes in parent-adolescent and therapist-adolescent dyads may be useful in family therapy for substance-using adolescents.

  13. Latino values in the context of palliative care: illustrative cases from the Family Focused Grief Therapy trial.

    PubMed

    Del Gaudio, F; Hichenberg, S; Eisenberg, M; Kerr, E; Zaider, T I; Kissane, D W

    2013-05-01

    Clinicians meet a variety of ethnicities among patients and families in hospice programs. This article focuses on Latino families. Within a controlled trial of family therapy in the context of palliative care, 17 families identified as Hispanic. Five were examined qualitatively herein. A synopsis of each family's narrative is presented here. Patterns of strong family loyalty (Familismo), the gender roles of Machismo and Marianismo, the importance of family tradition, expectations about caregiving, and the place of faith and religion emerged as prominent and able potentially to impact on the therapy. Family therapists need to be thoughtful about cultural issues as they strive to support families.

  14. Approaches to the Study of Gender in Marriage and Family Therapy Curricula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown-Filkowski, Melissa; Storm, Cheryl L.; York, Charles D.; Brandon, Antonius D.

    2001-01-01

    Compares two accredited marriage and family therapy programs: one includes a separate course on gender, and the other integrates gender through the curriculum. Results indicate that students from the integrated program view their peers as incorporating gender ideas in therapy to a significantly greater extent. Students from the program that has a…

  15. The "Consulting-Your-Consultants Interview": A Final Narrative Conversation with Graduating Family Therapy Masters' Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keiley, Margaret K.; Piercy, Fred P.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses a Master's program exit interview that used questions from narrative therapy to celebrate the transition of Masters students into the world of marital and family therapy professionals. This process helps to underling students' agency and competence, and elevates them to the level of consultant during the interview. (Author/MKA)

  16. Dramatherapy and Family Therapy in Education: Essential Pieces of the Multi-Agency Jigsaw

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFarlane, Penny; Harvey, Jenny

    2012-01-01

    A collaborative therapeutic approach often proves the best way to assess and meet the needs of children experiencing barriers to learning. This book gives a concise overview of drama and family therapy and describes how both therapies can work together to provide essential pieces of the jigsaw of emotional support for troubled children within an…

  17. Male Cross-Dressers in Therapy: A Solution-Focused Perspective for Marriage and Family Therapists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dzelme, Kristina; Jones, Rene A.

    2001-01-01

    Offers techniques on how to work with male cross-dressers using solution focused therapy. Solution focused therapy is discussed as a way to work with male cross dressers and their partners. A case study of a male cross dresser and his wife is presented and possible directions are suggested for marriage and family therapists. (BF)

  18. Initial Levels of Differentiation and Reduction in Psychological Symptoms for Clients in Marriage and Family Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartle-Haring, Suzanne; Glade, Aaron C.; Vira, Rohini

    2005-01-01

    Using Bowen Family Systems Theory as a theoretical underpinning, in this study, we investigated the hypothesis that clients with higher levels of differentiation would improve more quickly in therapy than clients with lower levels of differentiation. Hierarchical Linear Modeling was used to analyze the data over nine sessions of therapy in a…

  19. Using Mock Trials to Teach Students Forensic Core Competencies in Marriage and Family Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, John K.; Linville, Deanna; Todahl, Jeff; Metcalfe, Joe

    2009-01-01

    This article provides a description of a university-based project that used mock trials to train both practicum-level marriage and family therapy and law students in forensic work, and a qualitative investigation of student experiences with the training. The content of the training focused on American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy…

  20. Toward an Integrative Approach to Assessment and Treatment Planning in Family Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olsen, David C.

    The rapid increase in literature and modalities of family therapy has made it difficult for counselors working with families to find an integrative approach to assessment and treatment planning. As a result, many counselors move from one paradigm to another without attempting to integrate approaches. This paper attempts to integrate five paradigms…

  1. An Adapted Brief Strategic Family Therapy for Gang-Affiliated Mexican American Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valdez, Avelardo; Cepeda, Alice; Parrish, Danielle; Horowitz, Rosalind; Kaplan, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study assessed the effectiveness of an adapted Brief Strategic Family Therapy (BSFT) intervention for gang-affiliated Mexican American adolescents and their parents. Methods: A total of 200 adolescents and their family caregivers were randomized to either a treatment or a control condition. Outcomes included adolescent substance…

  2. Family Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Children and Adolescents with Clinical Anxiety Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogels, Susan M.; Siqueland, Lynne

    2006-01-01

    Objective: A family cognitive-behavioral therapy for children and adolescents ages 8 to 18 years with clinical anxiety disorders was developed and evaluated. Method: Seventeen families were measured before and after waitlist, after treatment, and at 3-month and 1-year follow-up. Results: No children changed their diagnostic status during waitlist,…

  3. Social Class in Family Therapy Education: Experiences of Low SES Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDowell, Teresa; Brown, Andrae' L.; Cullen, Nicole; Duyn, April

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we report the results of a national survey of students in COAMFTE-accredited family therapy programs who self-identify as coming from lower- or working-class backgrounds. Results of the study reveal opportunity and tension relative to family, friends, and community because of social mobility associated with graduate education.…

  4. The Effect of a Videotape about Death on Bereaved Children in Family Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    York, Janet B.; Weinstein, Sanford A.

    1980-01-01

    Children who had lost a family member were tested to determine the effect of a videotape about reactions to death. Those who viewed the tape were more able to discuss death in family therapy sessions than those who did not view the tape. (JAC)

  5. Effects of Structural Family Therapy on Child and Maternal Mental Health Symptomatology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, Addie; Greeno, Catherine G.; Marcus, Steven C.; Fusco, Rachel A.; Zimmerman, Tina; Anderson, Carol

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This pilot study examined the effect of structural family therapy (SFT) on children's impairment and depressive symptomatology and mothers' depressive symptomatology and anxiety for 31 families served by a community mental health clinic. Method: A one group predesign/postdesign, with a baseline and two follow-up time points, was used.…

  6. An Adapted Brief Strategic Family Therapy for Gang-Affiliated Mexican American Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valdez, Avelardo; Cepeda, Alice; Parrish, Danielle; Horowitz, Rosalind; Kaplan, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study assessed the effectiveness of an adapted Brief Strategic Family Therapy (BSFT) intervention for gang-affiliated Mexican American adolescents and their parents. Methods: A total of 200 adolescents and their family caregivers were randomized to either a treatment or a control condition. Outcomes included adolescent substance…

  7. Using Mock Trials to Teach Students Forensic Core Competencies in Marriage and Family Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, John K.; Linville, Deanna; Todahl, Jeff; Metcalfe, Joe

    2009-01-01

    This article provides a description of a university-based project that used mock trials to train both practicum-level marriage and family therapy and law students in forensic work, and a qualitative investigation of student experiences with the training. The content of the training focused on American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy…

  8. Perceptions of Effectiveness among College Students: Toward Marriage and Family Counseling and Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tse, Luke M.; Wantz, Richard A.; Firmin, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Unlike perceptions toward professional counseling, public opinions do not typically associate marriage and family counseling or therapy with treatments of mental disorders. The current survey of college students in this sample confirmed that most would not recommend, specifically, marriage and family therapists (MFTs) for mental health…

  9. Perceptions of Effectiveness among College Students: Toward Marriage and Family Counseling and Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tse, Luke M.; Wantz, Richard A.; Firmin, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Unlike perceptions toward professional counseling, public opinions do not typically associate marriage and family counseling or therapy with treatments of mental disorders. The current survey of college students in this sample confirmed that most would not recommend, specifically, marriage and family therapists (MFTs) for mental health…

  10. "Structured Spontaneity": The Thoughtful Art of Integrative Family Therapy at BFI.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duhl, Frederick J.; Duhl, Bunny S.

    1979-01-01

    Describes the "structured spontaneity" approach to family therapy training at the Boston Family Institute as it exists after ten years, considering the context of training as well as the flavor of the program. Reward for trainers is a kind of competent and creative independent thinking, focused on unjamming a deadlocked system.…

  11. Medical Family Therapy for a Woman with End-stage Crohn's Disease and Her Son.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDaniel, Susan H.; Harkness, Jennifer L.; Epstein, Ronald M.

    2001-01-01

    Medical family therapy grew out of the experiences of family therapists working with other professionals to provide comprehensive, integrated healthcare for patients. This is the story of one such patient and provides an account of the experience through quotes from videotaped sessions and electronic mail communications that occurred throughout…

  12. Social Class in Family Therapy Education: Experiences of Low SES Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDowell, Teresa; Brown, Andrae' L.; Cullen, Nicole; Duyn, April

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we report the results of a national survey of students in COAMFTE-accredited family therapy programs who self-identify as coming from lower- or working-class backgrounds. Results of the study reveal opportunity and tension relative to family, friends, and community because of social mobility associated with graduate education.…

  13. The Theory, Structure, and Techniques for the Inclusion of Children in Family Therapy: A Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lund, Lori K.; Zimmerman, Toni Schindler; Haddock, Shelley A.

    2002-01-01

    Many barriers prevent therapists from including young children in family therapy, despite the theoretical belief that every family member should be present. Although there is a wealth of literature describing how to include children, the information has not been compiled in a way that is easily accessible to therapists. In this article, we report…

  14. Effects of Structural Family Therapy on Child and Maternal Mental Health Symptomatology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, Addie; Greeno, Catherine G.; Marcus, Steven C.; Fusco, Rachel A.; Zimmerman, Tina; Anderson, Carol

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This pilot study examined the effect of structural family therapy (SFT) on children's impairment and depressive symptomatology and mothers' depressive symptomatology and anxiety for 31 families served by a community mental health clinic. Method: A one group predesign/postdesign, with a baseline and two follow-up time points, was used.…

  15. A Comparison of Short- And Long-Term Family Therapy for Adolescent Anorexia Nervosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lock, James; Agras, W. Stewart; Bryson, Susan; Kraemer, Helena C.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Research suggests that family treatment for adolescents with anorexia nervosa may be effective. This study was designed to determine the optimal length of such family therapy. Method: Eighty-six adolescents (12-18 years of age) diagnosed with anorexia nervosa were allocated at random to either a short-term (10 sessions over 6 months) or…

  16. Medical Family Therapy for a Woman with End-stage Crohn's Disease and Her Son.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDaniel, Susan H.; Harkness, Jennifer L.; Epstein, Ronald M.

    2001-01-01

    Medical family therapy grew out of the experiences of family therapists working with other professionals to provide comprehensive, integrated healthcare for patients. This is the story of one such patient and provides an account of the experience through quotes from videotaped sessions and electronic mail communications that occurred throughout…

  17. A Comparison of Short- And Long-Term Family Therapy for Adolescent Anorexia Nervosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lock, James; Agras, W. Stewart; Bryson, Susan; Kraemer, Helena C.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Research suggests that family treatment for adolescents with anorexia nervosa may be effective. This study was designed to determine the optimal length of such family therapy. Method: Eighty-six adolescents (12-18 years of age) diagnosed with anorexia nervosa were allocated at random to either a short-term (10 sessions over 6 months) or…

  18. Clinical Dilemmas in Marital and Family Therapy: Art, Science, and Wisdom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scaturo, Douglas J.

    Expanding the treatment system from the individual to the couple or family carries with it some unique challenges and fundamental clinical dilemmas for the marital and family therapist. Marital and couple therapy is explored with a focus on the dilemmas that dyadic relationships bring to the treatment context. The couples central relationship…

  19. Randomized Trial of Family Therapy versus Non-Family Treatment for Adolescent Behavior Problems in Usual Care

    PubMed Central

    Hogue, Aaron; Dauber, Sarah; Henderson, Craig E.; Bobek, Molly; Johnson, Candace; Lichvar, Emily; Morgenstern, Jon

    2014-01-01

    Objective A major focus of implementation science is discovering whether evidence-based approaches can be delivered with fidelity and potency in routine practice. This randomized trial compared usual care family therapy (UC-FT), implemented without a treatment manual or extramural support as the standard-of-care approach in a community clinic, to non-family treatment (UC-Other) for adolescent conduct and substance use disorders. Method The study recruited 205 adolescents (mean age 15.7 years; 52% male; 59% Hispanic American, 21% African American) from a community referral network, enrolling 63% for primary mental health problems and 37% for primary substance use problems. Clients were randomly assigned to either the UC-FT site or one of five UC-Other sites. Implementation data confirmed that UC-FT showed adherence to the family therapy approach and differentiation from UC-Other. Follow-ups were completed at 3, 6, and 12 months post-baseline. Results There was no between-group difference in treatment attendance. Both conditions demonstrated improvements in externalizing, internalizing, and delinquency symptoms. However, UC-FT produced greater reductions in youth-reported externalizing and internalizing among the whole sample, in delinquency among substance-using youth, and in alcohol and drug use among substance-using youth. The degree to which UC-FT outperformed UC-Other was consistent with effect sizes from controlled trials of manualized family therapy models. Conclusions Non-manualized family therapy can be effective for adolescent behavior problems within diverse populations in usual care, and it may be superior to non-family alternatives. PMID:25496283

  20. A Filial Therapy Model through a Family Therapy Lens: See the Possibilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornett, Nick

    2012-01-01

    The call for family-centered therapeutic services, especially for families of young children, has come from governmental organizations, professional associations, practitioners, and families. Play therapists and family therapists are prime candidates to provide such services, but professional research and literature suggest that practitioners…

  1. A Filial Therapy Model through a Family Therapy Lens: See the Possibilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornett, Nick

    2012-01-01

    The call for family-centered therapeutic services, especially for families of young children, has come from governmental organizations, professional associations, practitioners, and families. Play therapists and family therapists are prime candidates to provide such services, but professional research and literature suggest that practitioners…

  2. Attachment-Based Family Therapy: A Review of the Empirical Support.

    PubMed

    Diamond, Guy; Russon, Jody; Levy, Suzanne

    2016-09-01

    Attachment-based family therapy (ABFT) is an empirically supported treatment designed to capitalize on the innate, biological desire for meaningful and secure relationships. The therapy is grounded in attachment theory and provides an interpersonal, process-oriented, trauma-focused approach to treating adolescent depression, suicidality, and trauma. Although a process-oriented therapy, ABFT offers a clear structure and road map to help therapists quickly address attachment ruptures that lie at the core of family conflict. Several clinical trials and process studies have demonstrated empirical support for the model and its proposed mechanism of change. This article provides an overview of the clinical model and the existing empirical support for ABFT.

  3. Music therapy in pediatric palliative care: family-centered care to enhance quality of life.

    PubMed

    Lindenfelser, Kathryn J; Hense, Cherry; McFerran, Katrina

    2012-05-01

    Research into the value of music therapy in pediatric palliative care (PPC) has identified quality of life as one area of improvement for families caring for a child in the terminal stages of a life-threatening illness. This small-scale investigation collected data in a multisite, international study including Minnesota, USA, and Melbourne, Australia. An exploratory mixed method design used the qualitative data collected through interviews with parents to interpret results from the PedsQL Family Impact Module of overall parental quality of life. Parents described music therapy as resulting in physical improvements of their child by providing comfort and stimulation. They also valued the positive experiences shared by the family in music therapy sessions that were strength oriented and family centered. This highlighted the physical and communication scales within the PedsQL Family Impact Module, where minimal improvements were achieved in contrast to some strong results suggesting diminished quality of life in cognitive and daily activity domains. Despite the significant challenges faced by parents during this difficult time, parents described many positive experiences in music therapy, and the overall score for half of the parents in the study did not diminish. The value of music therapy as a service that addresses the family-centered agenda of PPC is endorsed by this study.

  4. Early Therapeutic Alliance and Treatment Outcome in Individual and Family Therapy for Adolescent Behavior Problems

    PubMed Central

    Hogue, Aaron; Dauber, Sarah; Faw Stambaugh, Leyla; Cecero, John J.; Liddle, Howard A.

    2010-01-01

    The impact of early therapeutic alliance was examined in 100 clients receiving either individual cognitive– behavioral therapy (CBT) or family therapy for adolescent substance abuse. Observational ratings of adolescent alliance in CBT and adolescent and parent alliance in family therapy were used to predict treatment retention (in CBT only) and outcome (drug use, externalizing, and internalizing symptoms in both conditions) at post and 6-month follow-up. There were no alliance effects in CBT. In family therapy, stronger parent alliance predicted declines in drug use and externalizing. Adolescents with weak early alliances that subsequently improved by midtreatment showed significantly greater reductions in externalizing than adolescents whose alliances declined. Results underscore the need for ongoing developmental calibration of intervention theory and practice for adolescent clinical populations. PMID:16551149

  5. Interactional positions and the production of identities: negotiating fatherhood in family therapy talk.

    PubMed

    Suoninen, Eero; Wahlström, Jarl

    2009-01-01

    Participants in a conversation may, even within the same basic role staging create different cooperation settings. To describe these cooperative settings, we employ the concept of interactional position as a basic analytical tool. From our understanding of identity as a conversational achievement, we demonstrate how evolving interactional positions frame the construction of client identities in family therapy meetings. We focus particularly on how constructions of fatherhood identity are negotiated in the meetings. The methodological perspective of our study draws on social psychological discourse analysis, conversation analysis and social constructionism, and the data consists of video recordings of six family therapy meetings dealing with a single case. The analysis demonstrates the large variety of combinations of interactional positions that are possible in family therapy conversation and explicates how strongly the construction of the client's identity depends on the position combinations allowed in a therapy session.

  6. Integrative family therapy for high-conflict divorce with disputes over child custody and visitation.

    PubMed

    Lebow, Jay; Rekart, Kathleen Newcomb

    2007-03-01

    A growing number of divorcing families become locked in intractable disputes over child custody and visitation. This article describes an integrative family therapy approach targeted toward such families. Aspects of this treatment include negotiating a clear therapy contract, creating a multipartial alliance with all parties, assessing through the lens of specific understandings about these cases, incorporating multiple therapy session formats, holding both systemic and individual focused perspectives, incorporating a solution-oriented focus, and drawing upon a wide range of intervention techniques. The treatment aims to create a good-enough postdivorce climate in which a new family structure can be constituted in which parents maintain distance from one another, and conflict and triangulation can be minimized.

  7. Attachment-based family therapy for depressed and suicidal adolescents: theory, clinical model and empirical support.

    PubMed

    Ewing, E Stephanie Krauthamer; Diamond, Guy; Levy, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    Attachment-Based Family Therapy (ABFT) is a manualized family-based intervention designed for working with depressed adolescents, including those at risk for suicide, and their families. It is an empirically informed and supported treatment. ABFT has its theoretical underpinnings in attachment theory and clinical roots in structural family therapy and emotion focused therapies. ABFT relies on a transactional model that aims to transform the quality of adolescent-parent attachment, as a means of providing the adolescent with a more secure relationship that can support them during challenging times generally, and the crises related to suicidal thinking and behavior, specifically. This article reviews: (1) the theoretical foundations of ABFT (attachment theory, models of emotional development); (2) the ABFT clinical model, including training and supervision factors; and (3) empirical support.

  8. Behavior therapy in a family context: treating elective mutism.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, J B; Lindblad, M B

    1978-03-01

    This paper discusses the necessity of using both behavioral and family approaches in combination, while working with electively mute children. The symptom and its significance within the family system is presented along with a rationale for avoiding the pitfalls of individual approaches with such children. A case history outlining specific behavioral techniques is described in detail with an exploration of the use of reinforcement theory, counter-conditioning, and successive approximations in bringing about change in electively mute children. The need for bringing about changes within the family system so as to maintain the changes that have occurred through use of the behavior techniques is discussed and presented as crucial to the treatment process. The paper takes the position that either approach, by itself, will not be effective in helping electively mute children but that the treatment of choice is a combination of therapeutic techniques.

  9. Family mechanisms of structural ecosystems therapy for HIV-seropositive women in drug recovery.

    PubMed

    Mitrani, Victoria B; McCabe, Brian E; Burns, Myron J; Feaster, Daniel J

    2012-09-01

    Examined the effects of Structural Ecosystems Therapy (SET), a family intervention for women living with HIV or AIDS, compared to a psycho-educational health group (HG) intervention, and reciprocal relationships between women and family members. Women (n = 126) and their family members (n = 269) were randomized to one of two conditions and assessed every 4 months for 12 months. Family functioning, drug use, and psychological distress was reported by multiple family members. Multilevel growth curve modeling showed a different family functioning trajectory between SET and HG, B = -0.05, SE = 0.02, p < .01. There was no intervention effect on the trajectory of family-level drug abstinence or psychological distress, but there was a significant difference in the trajectory of psychological distress after controlling for change in family functioning, B = -0.28, SE = 0.13, p < .05. There was an indirect effect from treatment through change in family functioning to change in psychological distress, B = 0.29, SE = 0.12, p < .05. With respect to reciprocal effects, family drug abstinence significantly predicted women's abstinence 4 months later, B = 0.22, SE = 0.06, p < .001. Findings demonstrated the interdependence of family members and the impact of family in relapse prevention and partially supported SET's potential for maintaining family functioning and well-being for women living with HIV or AIDS in drug recovery. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved.

  10. Family Mechanisms of Structural Ecosystems Therapy for HIV-Seropositive Women in Drug Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Mitrani, Victoria B.; McCabe, Brian E.; Burns, Myron J.; Feaster, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Examined the effects of Structural Ecosystems Therapy (SET), a family intervention for women living with HIV or AIDS, compared to a psycho-educational health group (HG) intervention, and reciprocal relationships between women and family members. Method Women (n = 126) and their family members (n = 269) were randomized to one of two conditions and assessed every 4 months for 12 months. Family functioning, drug use, and psychological distress was reported by multiple family members. Results Multilevel growth curve modeling showed a different family functioning trajectory between SET and HG, B = −0.05, SE = 0.02, p < .01. There was no intervention effect on the trajectory of family-level drug abstinence or psychological distress, but there was a significant difference in the trajectory of psychological distress after controlling for change in family functioning, B = −0.28, SE = 0.13, p < .05. There was an indirect effect from treatment through change in family functioning to change in psychological distress, B = 0.29, SE = 0.12, p < .05. With respect to reciprocal effects, family drug abstinence significantly predicted women’s abstinence 4 months later, B = 0.22, SE = 0.06, p < .001. Conclusion Findings demonstrated the interdependence of family members and the impact of family in relapse prevention and partially supported SET’s potential for maintaining family functioning and well-being for women living with HIV or AIDS in drug recovery. PMID:22708519

  11. Patient and Family Perceptions of Physical Therapy in the Medical Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Sottile, Peter D; Nordon-Craft, Amy; Malone, Daniel; Schenkman, Margaret; Moss, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Patient and family member perceptions of physical therapy (PT) in the intensive care unit and the factors that influence their degree of satisfaction have not been described. Methods A panel of experts developed a questionnaire that assessed patient and family perceptions of PT. Critically ill patients and their family members were asked to complete the survey. Patient and family member scores were compared and stratified by age, gender, and mechanical ventilation for greater than 14 days compared to 14 days or less. Results A total of 55 patients and 49 family members completed the survey. Patients and family members reported that PT was necessary and beneficial to recovery, despite associating PT with difficulty, exertion, and discomfort. Patient perceptions were similar regardless of age or gender. Family members underestimated a patient's enjoyment of PT (p=0.03). For individuals who required prolonged mechanical ventilation (>14 days), patients reported that PT was more difficult (p=0.03), less enjoyable (p=0.049), and family members reported PT as causing greater discomfort (p=0.005). Additionally, family members of patients who required prolonged mechanical ventilation felt that PT was less beneficial (p=0.01). Conclusions Physical therapy is perceived as necessary and beneficial to recovery by critically ill patients and family members. PMID:26038155

  12. Patient and family perceptions of physical therapy in the medical intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Sottile, Peter D; Nordon-Craft, Amy; Malone, Daniel; Schenkman, Margaret; Moss, Marc

    2015-10-01

    Patient and family member perceptions of physical therapy (PT) in the intensive care unit and the factors that influence their degree of satisfaction have not been described. A panel of experts developed a questionnaire that assessed patient and family perceptions of PT. Critically ill patients and their family members were asked to complete the survey. Patient and family member scores were compared and stratified by age, sex, and mechanical ventilation for greater than 14 days compared to 14 days or less. A total of 55 patients and 49 family members completed the survey. Patients and family members reported that PT was necessary and beneficial to recovery, despite associating PT with difficulty, exertion, and discomfort. Patient perceptions were similar regardless of age or sex. Family members underestimated a patient's enjoyment of PT (P = .03). For individuals who required prolonged mechanical ventilation (>14 days), patients reported that PT was more difficult (P = .03) and less enjoyable (P = .049), and family members reported PT as causing greater discomfort (P = .005). In addition, family members of patients who required prolonged mechanical ventilation felt that PT was less beneficial (P = .01). Physical therapy is perceived as necessary and beneficial to recovery by critically ill patients and family members. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. [Nursing experience helping a client with schizophrenia improve her family relationships: application of reality therapy].

    PubMed

    Yu, Chin-Hsing; Yang, Pei-Yi; Lu, Shu-Chin; Ma, Da-Yuan

    2012-12-01

    Reality therapy has been demonstrated to be an effective strategy in achieving behavioral change. This case study used reality therapy as a therapeutic communication tool to help improve the family relationships of a client with schizophrenia. We used a four-tiered questioning technique to address, respectively, the aspects of "want," "doing/direction," "evaluation" and "plan" (WDEP). Nursing interventions were held between October 21st and November 19th, 2010. The authors used the reality therapy framework and WDEP system to guide the client to explore her inner needs, review problems objectively, and determine where efforts could be focused most effectively. Better appreciation of her abilities and strengths and encouragement of effective actions helped improve client relationships with her family members. This study introduced reality therapy and shared clinical experiences in order to help readers better understand reality therapy as an alternative framework of communication in nursing care.

  14. PREDICTORS OF SUBSTANCE USE AND FAMILY THERAPY OUTCOME AMONG PHYSICALLY AND SEXUALLY ABUSED RUNAWAY ADOLESCENTS

    PubMed Central

    Slesnick, Natasha; Bartle-Haring, Suzanne; Gangamma, Rashjmi

    2008-01-01

    There is a dearth of research that examines the impact of family systems therapy on problems among sexually and/or physically abused youth. Given this void, differential outcome and predictors of substance use change were evaluated for abused, as, compared with nonabused, runaway adolescents who were randomly assigned to family therapy or treatment as usual Abused adolescents reported lower family cohesion at baseline, although both abused and nonabused adolescents showed similar substance use reductions. Utilizing hierarchical linear modeling, we found that substance use changed with change in cohesion over time. These findings link change in family functioning to change in adolescent substance use, supporting family systems theory. Findings suggest that a potent target of intervention involves focus on increasing positive communication interactions. PMID:16933433

  15. Examination of the Film "My Father and My Son" According to the Basic Concepts of Multigenerational Family Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acar, Tulin; Voltan-Acar, Nilufer

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the basic concepts of multigenerational Family Therapy and to evaluate the scenes of the film ''My Father and My Son'' according to these concepts. For these purposes firstly basic concepts of Multigenerational Family Therapy such as differentiation of self, triangles/triangulation, nuclear family emotional…

  16. Family Therapy with Intellectually and Creatively Gifted Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moon, Sidney M.; Hall, Alex S.

    1998-01-01

    Provides an overview of research literature on gifted children and their families with an emphasis on the endogenous and exogenous factors that can create or exacerbate psychosocial problems. Describes current conceptualizations of giftedness. Suggests an eclectic, eco-systemic approach to three common concerns that bring gifted children and their…

  17. Beyond the Systems Approach to Family Therapy: An Ecological Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Paul R.; Griffith, Mariellen

    A brief review of systems theory provides a rationale for an underlying theoretical model within which systems theory can be more completely understood. The essence of the model is that persons are the major unit of study because the available means of satisfying "basic needs" define and shape interaction patterns in the family as in other human…

  18. Reading Minds: Using Literary Resources in Family Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Liz

    A qualitative enquiry explored, with a range of family therapists and systemic practitioners, the influence they perceive to have been made on their personal and professional lives by the literary texts they have read. Noting that "literary" is broadly interpreted to include poetry, prose, drama/film, song lyrics, etc., the study's aims…

  19. Beyond the Systems Approach to Family Therapy: An Ecological Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Paul R.; Griffith, Mariellen

    A brief review of systems theory provides a rationale for an underlying theoretical model within which systems theory can be more completely understood. The essence of the model is that persons are the major unit of study because the available means of satisfying "basic needs" define and shape interaction patterns in the family as in other human…

  20. Feminist Family Therapy: Ethical Considerations for the Clinician.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costa, Luann; Sorenson, Jody

    1993-01-01

    Notes the traditional minimization of gender and power issues in the cultural context by systemic family therapists. Presents five questions that can serve as guidelines in examining ethical and personal issues and provides ethical considerations for the clinician. (Author/NB)

  1. CFL's Clinical Training Program in Family Systems Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubbard, Irene Matis; Kautto, Judith Gilbert

    1988-01-01

    Reviews the elements of constancy and the changes that have taken place in the training program of the 15-year-old Center for Family Learning (CFL) in Rye Brook, New York. Includes a discussion of historical and philosophical perspective, the structure of the training program, its theoretical approach, and the makeup of its faculty and student…

  2. Compassion fatigue in marriage and family therapy: implications for therapists and clients.

    PubMed

    Negash, Sesen; Sahin, Seda

    2011-01-01

    Given that marriage and family therapists are exposed to a wide range of circumstances that leave them uniquely vulnerable to experiencing compassion fatigue, it is important to examine the stresses and hazards they face and what those consequences mean for both themselves and clients. It is essential that they identify how compassion fatigue negatively affects the therapeutic relationship and overall treatment outcome as well as that of the personal life of the family therapist. The marriage and family therapist is responsible and ethically obligated to identify and implement ways in which he or she can prevent and remedy compassion fatigue. © 2011 American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy.

  3. Family lunch session: an introduction to family therapy in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Rosman, B L; Minuchin, S; Liebman, R

    1975-10-01

    Family lunch sessions have proved a useful diagnostic and therapeutic technique in the treatment of anorexia nervosa. This paper describes the goals of these sessions and the strategies employed in the restructuring of family relationships. Data are presented illustrating changes in eating behavior of eight identified patients.

  4. A critical methodological review of discourse and conversation analysis studies of family therapy.

    PubMed

    Tseliou, Eleftheria

    2013-12-01

    Discourse (DA) and conversation (CA) analysis, two qualitative research methods, have been recently suggested as potentially promising for the study of family therapy due to common epistemological adherences and their potential for an in situ study of therapeutic dialog. However, to date, there is no systematic methodological review of the few existing DA and CA studies of family therapy. This study aims at addressing this lack by critically reviewing published DA and CA studies of family therapy on methodological grounds. Twenty-eight articles in total are reviewed in relation to certain methodological axes identified in the relevant literature. These include choice of method, framing of research question(s), data/sampling, type of analysis, epistemological perspective, content/type of knowledge claims, and attendance to criteria for good quality practice. It is argued that the reviewed studies show "glimpses" of the methods' potential for family therapy research despite the identification of certain "shortcomings" regarding their methodological rigor. These include unclearly framed research questions and the predominance of case study designs. They also include inconsistencies between choice of method, stated or unstated epistemological orientations and knowledge claims, and limited attendance to criteria for good quality practice. In conclusion, it is argued that DA and CA can add to the existing quantitative and qualitative methods for family therapy research. They can both offer unique ways for a detailed study of the actual therapeutic dialog, provided that future attempts strive for a methodologically rigorous practice and against their uncritical deployment.

  5. A Randomized Clinical Trial of Family Therapy in Juvenile Drug Court

    PubMed Central

    Dakof, Gayle A.; Henderson, Craig E.; Rowe, Cynthia L.; Boustani, Maya; Greenbaum, Paul E.; Wang, Wei; Hawes, Samuel; Linares, Clarisa; Liddle, Howard A.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this article is to examine the effectiveness of 2 theoretically different treatments delivered in juvenile drug court—family therapy represented by multidimensional family therapy (MDFT) and group-based treatment represented by adolescent group therapy (AGT)—on offending and substance use. Intent-to-treat sample included 112 youth enrolled in juvenile drug court (primarily male [88%], and Hispanic [59%] or African American [35%]), average age 16.1 years, randomly assigned to either family therapy (n = 55) or group therapy (n = 57). Participants were assessed at baseline and 6, 12, 18 and 24 months following baseline. During the drug court phase, youth in both treatments showed significant reduction in delinquency (average d = .51), externalizing symptoms (average d = 2.32), rearrests (average d = 1.22), and substance use (average d = 4.42). During the 24-month follow-up, family therapy evidenced greater maintenance of treatment gains than group-based treatment for externalizing symptoms (d = 0.39), commission of serious crimes (d = .38), and felony arrests (d = .96). There was no significant difference between the treatments with respect to substance use or misdemeanor arrests. The results suggest that family therapy enhances juvenile drug court outcomes beyond what can be achieved with a nonfamily based treatment, especially with respect to what is arguably the primary objective of juvenile drug courts: reducing criminal behavior and rearrests. More research is needed on the effectiveness of juvenile drug courts generally and on whether treatment type and family involvement influence outcomes. PMID:25621927

  6. A randomized clinical trial of family therapy in juvenile drug court.

    PubMed

    Dakof, Gayle A; Henderson, Craig E; Rowe, Cynthia L; Boustani, Maya; Greenbaum, Paul E; Wang, Wei; Hawes, Samuel; Linares, Clarisa; Liddle, Howard A

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this article is to examine the effectiveness of 2 theoretically different treatments delivered in juvenile drug court--family therapy represented by multidimensional family therapy (MDFT) and group-based treatment represented by adolescent group therapy (AGT)--on offending and substance use. Intent-to-treat sample included 112 youth enrolled in juvenile drug court (primarily male [88%], and Hispanic [59%] or African American [35%]), average age 16.1 years, randomly assigned to either family therapy (n = 55) or group therapy (n = 57). Participants were assessed at baseline and 6, 12, 18 and 24 months following baseline. During the drug court phase, youth in both treatments showed significant reduction in delinquency (average d = .51), externalizing symptoms (average d = 2.32), rearrests (average d = 1.22), and substance use (average d = 4.42). During the 24-month follow-up, family therapy evidenced greater maintenance of treatment gains than group-based treatment for externalizing symptoms (d = 0.39), commission of serious crimes (d = .38), and felony arrests (d = .96). There was no significant difference between the treatments with respect to substance use or misdemeanor arrests. The results suggest that family therapy enhances juvenile drug court outcomes beyond what can be achieved with a nonfamily based treatment, especially with respect to what is arguably the primary objective of juvenile drug courts: reducing criminal behavior and rearrests. More research is needed on the effectiveness of juvenile drug courts generally and on whether treatment type and family involvement influence outcomes. Clinical Trials.gov, Identified NCT01668303. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. Structured parallel therapy with parents in time-limited psychotherapy with children experiencing difficult family situations.

    PubMed

    Haugvik, Marianne

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this article is to discuss how parallel therapy work with parents can be structured to achieve the goals of therapy with their children. Time-limited psychotherapy with children is a structured therapeutic method, where the goal and the number of sessions are contracted together with the child and parents. In this study, we focus on parallel parental therapy for three separate families whose children are experiencing difficult family situations. Six main themes emerge from our interviews with the parents and an analysis of session notes: The parents expressed positive experiences with the therapy; their perspectives about the family situation changed; they reported positive changes on behalf of the children, and they reported an increasing number of factors to explain these changes. In addition, a number of positive changes in the family situation itself were reported, and the parents were increasingly concerned with understanding their children's expressions. Our findings indicate that this therapy method gives parents an opportunity for reflection and mentalization, which is found to be crucial to the child's mental health. Based on these findings, we suggest some guidelines for effectively engaging in therapy work with parents.

  8. Beyond division: convergences between postmodern qualitative research and family therapy.

    PubMed

    De Haene, Lucia

    2010-01-01

    Starting from examples of postmodern research and therapeutic practice, we raise the question on the role of the research-therapy dichotomy within these approaches. The article aims to show the profound convergence between postmodern ethnographic research and constructionist, collaborative therapeutic approaches on a double, epistemological and practice level. First, we point out their converging development toward narrative and constructionist epistemologies. Second, an inquiry into the core features of these disciplinary activities' goal, process, and expert role reveals their profound convergence into a dialogical practice in which the boundaries between research and therapy are radically transgressed. We conclude by questioning the implications and acceptability of this convergence for researchers' and therapists' understanding of their practices.

  9. Tocotrienols induce IKBKAP expression: a possible therapy for familial dysautonomia.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Sylvia L; Qiu, Jinsong; Rubin, Berish Y

    2003-06-20

    Familial dysautonomia (FD), a neurodegenerative genetic disorder primarily affecting individuals of Ashkenazi Jewish descent, is caused by mutations in the IKBKAP gene which encodes the IkappaB kinase complex-associated protein (IKAP). The more common or major mutation causes aberrant splicing, resulting in a truncated form of IKAP. Tissues from individuals homozygous for the major mutation contain both mutant and wild-type IKAP transcripts. The apparent leaky nature of this mutation prompted a search for agents capable of elevating the level of expression of the wild-type IKAP transcript. We report the ability of tocotrienols, members of the vitamin E family, to increase transcription of IKAP mRNA in FD-derived cells, with corresponding increases in the correctly spliced transcript and normal protein. These findings suggest that in vivo supplementation with tocotrienols may elevate IKBKAP gene expression and in turn increase the amount of functional IKAP protein produced in FD patients.

  10. Therapist Adherence in Brief Strategic Family Therapy for Adolescent Drug Abusers

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Michael S.; Feaster, Daniel J.; Horigian, Viviana E.; Puccinelli, Marc J.; Henderson, Craig; Szapocznik, José

    2012-01-01

    Objective Therapist adherence has been shown to predict clinical outcomes in family therapy. In prior studies, adherence has been represented broadly by core principles and a consistent family (vs. individual) focus. To date, these studies have not captured the range of clinical skills that are represented in complex family-based approaches or examined how variations in these skills predict different clinically relevant outcomes over the course of treatment. In this study, the authors examined the reliability and validity of an observational adherence measure and the relationship between adherence and outcome in a sample of drug-using adolescents who received brief strategic family therapy within a multisite effectiveness study. Method Participants were 480 adolescents (age 12–17) and their family members, who were randomized to the Brief Strategic Family Therapist treatment condition (J. Szapocznik, U. Hervis, & S. Schwartz, 2003) or treatment as usual. The adolescents were mostly male (377 vs. 103 female) and Hispanic (213), whereas 148 were White, and 110 were Black. Therapists were also randomly assigned to treatment condition within agencies. Results Results supported the proposed factor structure of the adherence measure, providing evidence that it is possible to capture and discriminate between distinct dimensions of family therapy. Analyses demonstrated that the mean levels of the factors varied over time in theoretically and clinically relevant ways and that therapist adherence was associated with engagement and retention in treatment, improvements in family functioning, and reductions in adolescent drug use. Conclusions Clinical implications and future research directions are discussed, including the relevance of these findings on training therapists and studies focusing on mechanisms of action in family therapy. PMID:21261433

  11. Culture at work: Family therapy and the culture concept in post-World War II America.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, Deborah F

    2004-01-01

    During the 1950s and 1960s, the concept of culture had currency beyond the disciplinary boundaries of anthropology and sociology. This article takes up a clinical example of the invocation of the culture concept by examining how early family therapists such as Nathan Ackerman, Murray Bowen, and Don Jackson used culture as a category of analysis during the formative years of their new field. The culture concept played an integral role in the processes by which family therapists simultaneously defined the object of their research and treatment, the family, and built their new field. Their varied uses of culture also contained tensions and contradictions, most notably between universal and relativist views of family and psychopathology and between views of family therapy as a conservative force for maintaining the nuclear family or a progressive force for overcoming social inequality.

  12. [Separation anxiety family therapy (SAFT): a cognitive behavioral treatment program for children suffering from separation anxiety].

    PubMed

    Blatter-Meunier, Judith; Schneider, Silvia

    2011-01-01

    Separation Anxiety Disorder is one oft the most frequent mental disorders in children. The SAFT treatment manual is an evidence-based cognitive behavioral therapy program for children with separation anxiety. Its first part consists of four weekly sessions with the child and four weekly sessions with the parents. Children and parents receive psychoeducation about anxiety, learn to recognize and reframe irrational beliefs about separation situations, expand their repertoire of coping strategies, and are introduced to the rationale for exposure. The second part of treatment consists of eight weekly family sessions followed by a short parent-only session. During the family sessions, exposure in vivo is planned and practiced. The parent-only portions of the family sessions involve reframing parental irrational beliefs about separation, parenting strategies and practicing parental behavior during exposure. Evaluation data shows that disorder-specific family-based therapy (SAFT) results in improvement compared with waiting list controls.

  13. Working with African American clients: considering the "homeplace" in marriage and family therapy practices.

    PubMed

    Burton, Linda M; Winn, Donna-Marie; Stevenson, Howard; Clark, Sherri Lawson

    2004-10-01

    In this article, we discuss perspectives on the "homeplace" that are important to consider in marriage and family therapy involving African American clients. The homeplace comprises individual and family processes that are anchored in a defined physical space that elicits feelings of empowerment, rootedness, ownership, safety, and renewal. Critical elements of the homeplace include social relationships that shape individuals' and families' sense of social and cultural identity. We draw on our ethnographic and clinical research with African American families in urban and rural settings to describe typical schisms between therapists and African American clients when communicating about the homeplace. We also explore the impact of homeplace disruptions on experiences of "yearning." Recommendations for integrating a homeplace perspective into therapy practices are provided.

  14. The Influence of Family Therapy on Flexibility and Cohesion among Family Members Seeking Male Residential Treatment for Adolescent and Young Adult Substance Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marlowe, Stephanie L.

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigated within a substance abuse treatment center the influence of family therapy on flexibility and cohesion among family members. Past studies have suggested adolescents who abuse substances exist in families who have a lack of balance of flexibility and cohesion. Unfortunately, few studies have examined the influence of…

  15. The Influence of Family Therapy on Flexibility and Cohesion among Family Members Seeking Male Residential Treatment for Adolescent and Young Adult Substance Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marlowe, Stephanie L.

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigated within a substance abuse treatment center the influence of family therapy on flexibility and cohesion among family members. Past studies have suggested adolescents who abuse substances exist in families who have a lack of balance of flexibility and cohesion. Unfortunately, few studies have examined the influence of…

  16. Using mock trials to teach students forensic core competencies in marriage and family therapy.

    PubMed

    Miller, John K; Linville, Deanna; Todahl, Jeff; Metcalfe, Joe

    2009-10-01

    This article provides a description of a university-based project that used mock trials to train both practicum-level marriage and family therapy and law students in forensic work, and a qualitative investigation of student experiences with the training. The content of the training focused on American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy (AAMFT) core competencies that relate specifically to the legal aspects of therapy. This article describes the didactic training the students received to prepare for the mock trials, the structure and protocol of the mock trials themselves, and the specific AAMFT core competencies addressed in the project. The results of an analysis of focus group interviews with participating law school (n = 15) and marriage and family therapy (n = 19) students are presented as well as the results of a 36-item Knowledge, Skills, and Comfort Level Questionnaire completed by participating marriage and family therapy students. Participants discussed the value of the training with regard to preparation for mock trial procedures, preparation for testimony, importance of documentation, and cross-discipline collaboration issues. The article concludes with a discussion of how this type of training may be used in developing students' skills with regard to forensic and legal core competencies, and future research directions.

  17. The impact of winning and losing on family interactions: a biological approach to family therapy.

    PubMed

    Sloman, Leon; Sturman, Edward D

    2012-10-01

    To examine the connection between winning and losing and family functioning. We do this by hypothesizing a link between successful outcomes in individual competition and in functional family interaction. This enables us to show how therapeutic interventions can be directed toward the attachment system, by lowering anxiety and fostering mutual trust, and toward the social rank system, by promoting success and feelings of empowerment. A search of online databases was conducted with key search terms related to winning and losing, and their effects on attachment patterns and family interactions. Winning in agonistic encounters has been associated with lowered dysphoria, anxiety, and hostility. These affective states trigger positive patterns of family interaction through their effect on the social rank and attachment systems. Continued success promotes adaptive cycles of interaction, whereas inability to accept loss has the reverse effect. Early humans, who were more successful in competition, were better able to promote the survival and well-being of other family members, which would have accelerated our phylogenetic adaptation.

  18. [As index patient into therapeutic alternatives?--Children in systemic family therapy and counseling].

    PubMed

    Vossler, A

    2000-01-01

    Since systemic therapy and counseling approaches have become established in child guidance, and children and adolescent psychiatry the understanding for children in the therapeutic context has also changed. They are part of the family system who, with their symptoms, point to restricting reality constructions and interaction patterns which create suffering (index patients). They are often treated correspondingly in the family setting. On this background this article investigates the special situation of children in the practice of systemic family therapy. The few results from studies from practice research dealing with this subject are compared with system-theoretical basic assumptions. The results indicate that the children are only insufficiently integrated into the therapy sessions and are excluded partly. They often experience the family discussions as being adult-oriented and feel that their needs and views are considered only slightly. Possible causes for this may be expecting too much emotionally and/or cognitively especially from younger children with family-oriented methods (such as circular questioning) as well as deficits in the training of family therapists. The closing thoughts on the therapeutic implications from the presented results include suggestions on methodical approaches more suitable for children and a reflected therapeutic attitude (transparency, participation, respect) towards children.

  19. Topical therapies for glaucoma: what family physicians need to know.

    PubMed

    Lewis, P R; Phillips, T G; Sassani, J W

    1999-04-01

    Medication classes historically used in the management of glaucoma include beta blockers, miotics, sympathomimetics and carbonic anhydrase inhibitors. Because topically applied medications are more site specific, they are preferred in the treatment of glaucoma. Compared with oral medications, topical agents are associated with a decreased incidence of systemic side effects. With topical administration, conjunctival and localized skin allergic reactions are relatively common, whereas severe reactions, including death, are rare. Recently introduced topical agents for glaucoma therapy include dorzolamide and brinzolamide, the first topical carbonic anhydrase inhibitors; brimonidine and apraclonidine, more ocular-specific alpha agonists; and latanoprost, a prostaglandin analog, which is a new class of glaucoma medication. Latanoprost has the unique side effect of increasing iris pigmentation. Like their predecessors, the newer agents lower intraocular pressure by a statistically significant degree. Preservation of visual field, the more substantial patient-oriented end point, continues to be studied.

  20. Family therapy for drug abuse: review and updates 2003-2010.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Cynthia L

    2012-01-01

    Just 15 years ago, Liddle and Dakof (Journal of Marital and Family Therapy, 1995; 21, 511) concluded, based on the available evidence, that family therapy represented a "promising, but not definitive" approach for the treatment of drug problems among adolescents and adults. Seven years later, Rowe and Liddle (2003) review described considerable progress in this specialty with encouraging findings on adolescent-focused models based on rigorous methodology, as well as advances with adult-focused family-based treatments. The current review brings the field up to date with highlights from research conducted in the intervening 7 years, cross-cutting issues, recommendations for new research, and practice implications of these findings. Adolescent-focused family-based models that attend to the ecology of the teen and family show the most consistent and strongest findings in recent studies. Adult-focused models based on behavioral and systems theories of change also show strong effects with drug abusers and their families. The overarching conclusion is that family-based models are not only a viable treatment alternative for the treatment of drug abuse, but are now consistently recognized among the most effective approaches for treating both adults and adolescents with drug problems.

  1. Functional hoarseness in children: short-term play therapy with family dynamic counseling as therapy of choice.

    PubMed

    Kollbrunner, Jürg; Seifert, Eberhard

    2013-09-01

    Children with nonorganic voice disorders (NVDs) are treated mainly using direct voice therapy techniques such as the accent method or glottal attack changes and indirect methods such as vocal hygiene and voice education. However, both approaches tackle only the symptoms and not etiological factors in the family dynamics and therefore often enjoy little success. The aim of the "Bernese Brief Dynamic Intervention" (BBDI) for children with NVD was to extend the effectiveness of pediatric voice therapies with a psychosomatic concept combining short-term play therapy with the child and family dynamic counseling of the parents. This study compares the therapeutic changes in three groups where different procedures were used, before intervention and 1 year afterward: counseling of parents (one to two consultations; n = 24), Brief Dynamic Intervention on the lines of the BBDI (three to five play therapy sessions with the child plus two to four sessions with the parents; n = 20), and traditional voice therapy (n = 22). A Voice Questionnaire for Parents developed by us with 59 questions to be answered on a four-point Likert scale was used to measure the change. According to the parents' assessment, a significant improvement in voice quality was achieved in all three methods. Counseling of parents (A) appears to have led parents to give their child more latitude, for example, they stopped nagging the child or demanding that he/she should behave strictly by the rules. After BBDI (B), the mothers were more responsive to their children's wishes and the children were more relaxed and their speech became livelier. At home, they called out to them less often at a distance, which probably improved parent-child dialog. Traditional voice therapy (C) seems to have had a positive effect on the children's social competence. BBDI seems to have the deepest, widest, and therefore probably the most enduring therapeutic effect on children with NVD. Copyright © 2013 The Voice Foundation

  2. A View of the Symbolic-Experiential Family Therapy of Carl Whitaker through Movie Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cag, Pinar; Voltan Acar, Nilufer

    2015-01-01

    The movie "Ya Sonra" is evaluated in respect to the basic concepts and principles of symbolic-experiential family therapy. Carl Whitaker, who called his approach "Psychotherapy of Absurdity" mainly emphasized the concepts of absurdity, experientiality, and symbolism. Based on the hypothesis that film analysis supports and…

  3. Systemic Family Therapy Using the Reflecting Team: The Experiences of Adults with Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anslow, Katharine

    2014-01-01

    This research aimed to illuminate the experiences of adults with learning disabilities of the reflecting team, in the context of their systemic family therapy. Five adults with learning disabilities were recruited from one community learning disability team. A qualitative design using interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA) was appropriate…

  4. Exploring Marriage and Family Therapy Supervisees' Perspectives about Postgraduate Supervision and the Acquisition of Core Competencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, Stephanie J.

    2013-01-01

    The topic of core competencies has been a central focus in the marriage and family therapy field since 2003. There are currently no published studies from the supervisees' perspective about the role of supervision in the acquisition of core competencies. This qualitative study used transcendental phenomenology to explore supervisees' perspectives…

  5. Trends in Family Therapy Supervision: The Past 25 Years and into the Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Robert E.; Nichols, David P.; Nichols, William C.; Odom, Temple

    2004-01-01

    This investigation repeats a survey of American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy (AAMFT) Approved Supervisors done in 1976 and 1986. Despite negative contemporary contextual influences, the AAMFT Approved Supervisor credential is still attractive to the same percentage of the AAMFT clinical membership as formerly and reflects in general…

  6. Family Therapy Trainees' Perceptions of Divorced Mothers: A Test of Bias in Information Recall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, M. Christine; Leslie, Leigh A.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate marriage and family therapy (MFT) trainees perceptions of divorced mothers relative to married mothers. We used a recall design in which participants recalled details from a vignette about either a divorced mother or a married mother. Participants were 74 students currently enrolled in five American…

  7. Attachment-Based Family Therapy for Adolescents with Suicidal Ideation: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diamond, Guy S.; Wintersteen, Matthew B.; Brown, Gregory K.; Diamond, Gary M.; Gallop, Robert; Shelef, Karni; Levy, Suzanne

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate whether Attachment-Based Family Therapy (ABFT) is more effective than Enhanced Usual Care (EUC) for reducing suicidal ideation and depressive symptoms in adolescents. Method: This was a randomized controlled trial of suicidal adolescents between the ages of 12 and 17, identified in primary care and emergency departments. Of…

  8. Adolescent and Parent Alliance and Treatment Outcome in Multidimensional Family Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shelef, Karni; Diamond, Gary M.; Diamond, Guy S.; Liddle, Howard A.

    2005-01-01

    In this study, the authors examined the relation between adolescent and parent therapeutic alliances and treatment outcome among 65 substance-abusing adolescents receiving multidimensional family therapy. Observer ratings of parent alliance predicted premature termination from treatment. Observer ratings, but not self-report, of adolescent…

  9. Challenge and Urgency in Defining Doctoral Education in Marriage and Family Therapy: Valuing Complementary Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wampler, Karen S.

    2010-01-01

    In this overview, I comment on the strong theme of the need to define and improve the quality of doctoral education in marriage and family therapy that pervades the three essays. Deficits in research training are the central concern, although the essayists take different perspectives on the nature of the research training needed. The different…

  10. Implementing Dialectical Behavior Therapy with Adolescents and Their Families in a Community Outpatient Clinic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodberry, Kristen A.; Popenoe, Ellen J.

    2008-01-01

    Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT), an empirically supported treatment for adult women diagnosed with borderline personality disorder (BPD), has been increasingly adapted for use with adolescents across a variety of settings. This article describes a community-based application of DBT principles and strategies for adolescents and their families.…

  11. The Efficacy of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy with Chinese Families: Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, Cynthia; Tsang, Sandra; Sin, Tammy C. S.; Choi, Siu-yan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to examine the efficacy of the Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) in Hong Kong Chinese families, using randomized controlled trial design. Methods: The participants included 111 Hong Kong Chinese parents with children aged 2--7 years old, who were randomized into the intervention group (n = 54) and control group (n…

  12. The Efficacy of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy with Chinese Families: Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, Cynthia; Tsang, Sandra; Sin, Tammy C. S.; Choi, Siu-yan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to examine the efficacy of the Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) in Hong Kong Chinese families, using randomized controlled trial design. Methods: The participants included 111 Hong Kong Chinese parents with children aged 2--7 years old, who were randomized into the intervention group (n = 54) and control group (n…

  13. Transformative Learning through International Immersion: Building Multicultural Competence in Family Therapy and Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDowell, Teresa; Goessling, Kristen; Melendez, Tatiana

    2012-01-01

    This study explores the experiences of graduate students who completed one of two international courses facilitated by family therapy faculty in a U.S. master's-level counseling psychology department. Participants reported that international courses were personally and professionally transformative. Spending time in a foreign country gave them…

  14. Substance Abuse Treatment And Family Therapy. A Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) Series 39

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Jonathan Max; Oliff, Helen; Sutton, David; Bartlett, Catalina; Henderson, Randi

    2004-01-01

    This Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) addresses substance abuse treatment in the context of family therapy. TIPs are best-practice guidelines for the treatment of substance use disorders that make the latest research in substance abuse treatment available to counselors and educators. The content was generated by a panel of experts in the…

  15. Breaking the Patriarchal Vision of Social Science: Lessons from a Family Therapy Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNamee, Sheila

    The Milan model of systemic family therapy, developed in Italy and based on G. Bateson's cybernetic epistemology, can help meet the goals of a feminist/systemic epistemology in research by accepting data in its "traditional" form yet also connecting it to the act of researching, itself, thereby merging a feminist perspective with the…

  16. [The concept of "dialogical self" and its' application for psychotherapy and especially for family therapy].

    PubMed

    Janusz, Bernadetta; Józefik, Barbara; de Barbaro, Bogdan

    2012-01-01

    The authors show how to use the concept of a "dialogical self' to conduct therapy, supervision and qualitative research of the process of psychotherapy. They pay special attention to usefulness of the presented concept and to investigate what happens to a therapist during a family meeting, i.e., the so called "inner conversation of the therapist".

  17. Publication Patterns of Faculty in Commission on Accreditation for Marriage and Family Therapy Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawley, Dale R.; Gonzalez, Chris

    2005-01-01

    Journal articles published by faculty in Commission on Accreditation for Marriage and Family Therapy Education (COAMFTE) programs from 1998 to 2002 were analyzed to determine patterns regarding the amount and type of research conducted by this group. Fifty-eight percent of the articles were identified as research. Slightly more than 10% of these…

  18. Competency-Based Training: Objective Structured Clinical Exercises (OSCE) in Marriage and Family Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, John K.

    2010-01-01

    The field of marriage and family therapy (MFT) has recently engaged in the process of defining core competencies for the profession. Many MFT training programs are adapting their curriculum to develop more competency-based training strategies. The Objective Structured Clinical "Examination" (OSCE) is widely used in the medical profession to assess…

  19. Theoretical Unity and Technical Eclecticism: Pathways to Coherence in Family Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Terence

    1997-01-01

    Claims the diverse field of family therapy will be better served if the major theory underlying a clinical model is identified clearly and various techniques are integrated into it on a systematic basis. Proposes that the specification of the underlying causality and objectives inherent in a theoretical model will accomplish this. (Author/MKA)

  20. Decreased Family Accommodation Associated with Improved Therapy Outcome in Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merlo, Lisa J.; Lehmkuhl, Heather D.; Geffken, Gary R.; Storch, Eric A.

    2009-01-01

    Pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a chronic, disabling condition that affects both patients and their families. Despite the identification of efficacious treatments (e.g., cognitive-behavioral therapy and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor medications), not all patients respond fully. The purpose of the present study was to…

  1. Supervising Family Therapy Trainees in Primary Care Medical Settings: Context Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Todd M.; Patterson, Jo Ellen

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to identify and describe four essential skills for effective supervision of family therapy trainees in primary care medical settings. The supervision skills described include: (1) Understand medical culture; (2) Locate the trainee in the treatment system; (3) Investigate the biological/health issues; and (4) Be…

  2. Voices of Family Therapy Doctoral Students of Color: Aspirations and Factors Influencing Careers in Academia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, John K.; Stone, Dana J.

    2011-01-01

    The authors examined factors influencing career aspirations of doctoral students of color in family therapy doctoral programs across the country, with a special focus on careers in the professoriate. Qualitative interviews were conducted with students at varying levels of degree completion. Respondents discussed barriers to careers in academia as…

  3. TSL Family Therapy Followed by Improved Marital Quality and Reduced Oxidative Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Jae Yop; Kim, Dong Goo; Nam, Seok In

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The current study evaluated the effectiveness of a form of family therapy developed in Korea. The "Thank you--Sorry--Love" (TSL) model was applied to a group of elderly retired men to improve the quality of their marriage and to reduce their stress. Methods: Thirty married retired Korean men were assigned to three groups.…

  4. Systemic Family Therapy Using the Reflecting Team: The Experiences of Adults with Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anslow, Katharine

    2014-01-01

    This research aimed to illuminate the experiences of adults with learning disabilities of the reflecting team, in the context of their systemic family therapy. Five adults with learning disabilities were recruited from one community learning disability team. A qualitative design using interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA) was appropriate…

  5. Cultural Competency as a Relational Process: Scenes from a Family Therapy Training Context in the Philippines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charles, Laurie L.

    2007-01-01

    This article describes the experiences of a U.S.-based family therapy practitioner during a 3-week academic consultation in the Philippines. Revisioning the concept of cultural competency as a performance that occurs in relationship, the author shares three autoethnographic stories that illustrate cultural borderlands in the global arena of family…

  6. Integrity of the Marriage and Family Therapy Research Literature: Perceptions and Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brock, Gregory W.; Whiting, Jason B.; Matern, Brianne; Fife, Stephen T.

    2009-01-01

    Reports of falsification, fabrication, plagiarism, and other violations of research integrity across the sciences are on the increase. Joining with other disciplines to actively protect the integrity of the marriage and family therapy (MFT) research literature is of utmost importance to both the discipline and the future of the profession. To…

  7. Transformative Learning through International Immersion: Building Multicultural Competence in Family Therapy and Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDowell, Teresa; Goessling, Kristen; Melendez, Tatiana

    2012-01-01

    This study explores the experiences of graduate students who completed one of two international courses facilitated by family therapy faculty in a U.S. master's-level counseling psychology department. Participants reported that international courses were personally and professionally transformative. Spending time in a foreign country gave them…

  8. Exploring Marriage and Family Therapy Supervisees' Perspectives about Postgraduate Supervision and the Acquisition of Core Competencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, Stephanie J.

    2013-01-01

    The topic of core competencies has been a central focus in the marriage and family therapy field since 2003. There are currently no published studies from the supervisees' perspective about the role of supervision in the acquisition of core competencies. This qualitative study used transcendental phenomenology to explore supervisees' perspectives…

  9. Reintegrating Family Therapy Training in Psychiatric Residency Programs: Making the Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rait, Douglas; Glick, Ira

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Given the marginalization of couples and family therapy in psychiatric residency programs over the past two decades, the authors propose a rationale for the reintegration of these important psychosocial treatments into the mainstream of general psychiatric residency education. Methods: After reviewing recent trends in the field that…

  10. Brief Strategic Family Therapy for Young People in Treatment for Drug Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindstrøm, Maia; Filges, Trine; Jørgensen, Anne-Marie Klint

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This review evaluates the evidence on the effects of brief strategic family therapy (BSFT) on drug use reduction for young people in treatment for nonopioid drug use. Method: We followed Campbell Collaboration guidelines to prepare this review and ultimately located three studies for final analysis and interpretation. Results: The results…

  11. The Never-Ending Journey: Constraint, Possibility, and Relational Potential in Family Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernal, Anibal Torres

    2004-01-01

    Taking a meta-theoretical perspective, this article presents a critical analytical model through which human knowledge, existence, and behaviour can be understood. The article describes the meta-theoretical model and then explains how this model applies to the evolution of seminal family therapy theories.

  12. The Use of Family Therapy in Drug Abuse Treatment: A National Survey. Services Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George Washington Univ. Medical Center, Washington, DC.

    A survey sought to determine the nature and extent of family therapy practiced in treatment and rehabilitation agencies serving drug abuse clients. Questionnaire responses to a three-phase study were on a voluntary basis. Phase I, with a 60% response rate, gathered information on the number of drug abuse treatment agencies providing family…

  13. Factors Influencing Student Selection of Marriage and Family Therapy Graduate Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hertlein, Katherine M.; Lambert-Shute, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    To understand which factors students consider most important in choosing a marriage and family therapy (MFT) graduate program and how programs met or did not meet these expectations of students over the course of graduate study, we conducted an online mixed-method investigation. One hundred twelve graduate students in Commission on Accreditation…

  14. Comparison of Long-Term Outcomes in Adolescents with Anorexia Nervosa Treated with Family Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lock, James; Couturier, Jennifer; Agras, W. Stewart

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To describe the relative effectiveness of a short versus long course of family-based therapy (FBT) for adolescent anorexia nervosa at long-term follow-up. Method: This study used clinical and structured interviews to assess psychological and psychosocial outcomes of adolescents (ages 12-18 years at baseline) who were previously treated…

  15. Ethical, Legal and Professional Issues in Family Therapy: A Graduate Level Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piercy, Fred P.; Sprenkle, Douglas H.

    1983-01-01

    Reports on the curricular components of a 16-week graduate course entitled "Ethical, Legal and Professional Issues in Family Therapy." To aid in replication and assessment, selected teaching strategies are also presented. Course topics include feminism and hedonism, confidentiality, paradox, malpractice, court testimony, job hunting, private…

  16. Brief Strategic Family Therapy for Young People in Treatment for Drug Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindstrøm, Maia; Filges, Trine; Jørgensen, Anne-Marie Klint

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This review evaluates the evidence on the effects of brief strategic family therapy (BSFT) on drug use reduction for young people in treatment for nonopioid drug use. Method: We followed Campbell Collaboration guidelines to prepare this review and ultimately located three studies for final analysis and interpretation. Results: The results…

  17. The Intersection of Catholic Social Teaching, Internationalization, and Marriage and Family Therapy: Lessons from the Borderlands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estrada, Ana Ulloa

    2011-01-01

    This article explores the relevance and challenge of Catholic Social Teaching (CST) and internationalization to the Marriage and Family Therapy (MFT) program at the University of San Diego. These issues are discussed in the context of a graduate level course on human diversity that culminated in a 1-day cultural immersion and service learning trip…

  18. Challenge and Urgency in Defining Doctoral Education in Marriage and Family Therapy: Valuing Complementary Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wampler, Karen S.

    2010-01-01

    In this overview, I comment on the strong theme of the need to define and improve the quality of doctoral education in marriage and family therapy that pervades the three essays. Deficits in research training are the central concern, although the essayists take different perspectives on the nature of the research training needed. The different…

  19. Setting up the On-Site Marriage and Family Therapy Clinical Training Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratanasiripong, Paul; Ghafoori, Bita

    2009-01-01

    The first clinical training experience or practicum for graduate students in a Marriage and Family Therapy (MFT) program is one of the most important aspects of the entire training program. After a year-long journey through textbook and classroom knowledge, students have the opportunity to finally apply their skills to real life environments with…

  20. Integrity of the Marriage and Family Therapy Research Literature: Perceptions and Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brock, Gregory W.; Whiting, Jason B.; Matern, Brianne; Fife, Stephen T.

    2009-01-01

    Reports of falsification, fabrication, plagiarism, and other violations of research integrity across the sciences are on the increase. Joining with other disciplines to actively protect the integrity of the marriage and family therapy (MFT) research literature is of utmost importance to both the discipline and the future of the profession. To…

  1. Gender and Diversity Topics Taught in Commission on Accreditation for Marriage and Family Therapy Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winston, Ebony Joy; Piercy, Fred P.

    2010-01-01

    This article explores how the topics of gender and diversity are being taught and defined in accredited marriage and family therapy programs through syllabi content analysis and interviews with selected faculty. We examined findings by program (master's and doctoral) and type of training (those that taught specific gender and culture courses and…

  2. Live Supervision in Family Therapy: An Interview With Barbara Okun and Fred Piercy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, John D.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Describes special program on live supervision in family therapy given at 1988 annual American Association for Counseling and Development (AACD) Conference that featured experts Barbara Okun and Fred Piercy discussing "cotherapy" and "one-way mirror" live supervision approaches. Provides edited transcript of their program.…

  3. Competency-Based Training: Objective Structured Clinical Exercises (OSCE) in Marriage and Family Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, John K.

    2010-01-01

    The field of marriage and family therapy (MFT) has recently engaged in the process of defining core competencies for the profession. Many MFT training programs are adapting their curriculum to develop more competency-based training strategies. The Objective Structured Clinical "Examination" (OSCE) is widely used in the medical profession to assess…

  4. Decreased Family Accommodation Associated with Improved Therapy Outcome in Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merlo, Lisa J.; Lehmkuhl, Heather D.; Geffken, Gary R.; Storch, Eric A.

    2009-01-01

    Pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a chronic, disabling condition that affects both patients and their families. Despite the identification of efficacious treatments (e.g., cognitive-behavioral therapy and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor medications), not all patients respond fully. The purpose of the present study was to…

  5. Perceived Treatment Effectiveness of Family Therapy for Chinese Patients Suffering from Anorexia Nervosa: A Qualitative Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Joyce L. C.; Lai, Kelly

    2006-01-01

    Although family therapy has become highly acceptable in the West, its applicability and acceptability for Chinese adolescents and young women with anorexia nervosa (AN) remains unknown. In this article, we report the results of a qualitative study using post-treatment in-depth interviews to understand the subjective perceptions of sufferers of AN…

  6. Setting up the On-Site Marriage and Family Therapy Clinical Training Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratanasiripong, Paul; Ghafoori, Bita

    2009-01-01

    The first clinical training experience or practicum for graduate students in a Marriage and Family Therapy (MFT) program is one of the most important aspects of the entire training program. After a year-long journey through textbook and classroom knowledge, students have the opportunity to finally apply their skills to real life environments with…

  7. Adolescent and Parent Alliance and Treatment Outcome in Multidimensional Family Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shelef, Karni; Diamond, Gary M.; Diamond, Guy S.; Liddle, Howard A.

    2005-01-01

    In this study, the authors examined the relation between adolescent and parent therapeutic alliances and treatment outcome among 65 substance-abusing adolescents receiving multidimensional family therapy. Observer ratings of parent alliance predicted premature termination from treatment. Observer ratings, but not self-report, of adolescent…

  8. TSL Family Therapy Followed by Improved Marital Quality and Reduced Oxidative Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Jae Yop; Kim, Dong Goo; Nam, Seok In

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The current study evaluated the effectiveness of a form of family therapy developed in Korea. The "Thank you--Sorry--Love" (TSL) model was applied to a group of elderly retired men to improve the quality of their marriage and to reduce their stress. Methods: Thirty married retired Korean men were assigned to three groups.…

  9. Perceived Treatment Effectiveness of Family Therapy for Chinese Patients Suffering from Anorexia Nervosa: A Qualitative Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Joyce L. C.; Lai, Kelly

    2006-01-01

    Although family therapy has become highly acceptable in the West, its applicability and acceptability for Chinese adolescents and young women with anorexia nervosa (AN) remains unknown. In this article, we report the results of a qualitative study using post-treatment in-depth interviews to understand the subjective perceptions of sufferers of AN…

  10. Comparison of Long-Term Outcomes in Adolescents with Anorexia Nervosa Treated with Family Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lock, James; Couturier, Jennifer; Agras, W. Stewart

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To describe the relative effectiveness of a short versus long course of family-based therapy (FBT) for adolescent anorexia nervosa at long-term follow-up. Method: This study used clinical and structured interviews to assess psychological and psychosocial outcomes of adolescents (ages 12-18 years at baseline) who were previously treated…

  11. Attachment-Based Family Therapy for Adolescents with Suicidal Ideation: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diamond, Guy S.; Wintersteen, Matthew B.; Brown, Gregory K.; Diamond, Gary M.; Gallop, Robert; Shelef, Karni; Levy, Suzanne

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate whether Attachment-Based Family Therapy (ABFT) is more effective than Enhanced Usual Care (EUC) for reducing suicidal ideation and depressive symptoms in adolescents. Method: This was a randomized controlled trial of suicidal adolescents between the ages of 12 and 17, identified in primary care and emergency departments. Of…

  12. Implementing Dialectical Behavior Therapy with Adolescents and Their Families in a Community Outpatient Clinic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodberry, Kristen A.; Popenoe, Ellen J.

    2008-01-01

    Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT), an empirically supported treatment for adult women diagnosed with borderline personality disorder (BPD), has been increasingly adapted for use with adolescents across a variety of settings. This article describes a community-based application of DBT principles and strategies for adolescents and their families.…

  13. The Core Competency Movement in Marriage and Family Therapy: Key Considerations from Other Disciplines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, John K.; Todahl, Jeff L.; Platt, Jason J.

    2010-01-01

    There is a growing movement to define competency within the field of marriage and family therapy (MFT), particularly with respect to the training of practitioners and the evaluation of clinical practice. Efforts to define competency, however, transcend the practice of MFT and much can be learned from the experiences of other disciplines.…

  14. Qualitative Research in Family Therapy: Publication Trends from 1980 to 1999

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faulkner, Rhonda A.; Klock, Kathryn; Gale, Jerry E.

    2002-01-01

    In the early 1990s, scholars from a variety of disciplines encouraged greater inclusion of qualitative research methodology in the mental health field. Moon, Dillon, and Sprenkle (1990) hoped their paper "Family therapy and qualitative research" would serve as a stimulus for further development of qualitative research in the field of family…

  15. Family outcomes from a randomized control trial of relapse prevention therapy in first-episode psychosis.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, John F M; Cotton, Sue M; Alvarez-Jimenez, Mario; Wade, Darryl; Crisp, Kingsley; Newman, Belinda; Spiliotacopoulos, Daniela; McGorry, Patrick D

    2010-04-01

    We have previously reported that our combined individual and family cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) relapse prevention therapy (RPT) was effective in reducing relapse rates compared to treatment as usual (TAU) within a specialist program for young, first-episode psychosis patients who had reached remission on positive symptoms. Here, we report the outcomes for family participants of DSM-IV-diagnosed first-episode psychosis patients recruited between November 2003 and May 2005 over a 2.5-year follow-up period. The primary hypothesis was that, compared to family members receiving TAU, family participants who received RPT would have significantly improved appraisals of stressors related to caregiving. Secondary hypotheses were that RPT would be associated with reduced expressed emotion and improved psychological distress. Family members were assessed at baseline and at 7-month, 12-month, 18-month, 24-month, and 30-month follow-up on appraisal of caregiving, expressed emotion, and psychological distress using the Experience of Caregiving Inventory, The Family Questionnaire, and the General Health Questionnaire of 28 Items, respectively. The family component of RPT was based on family behavioral therapy for schizophrenia with a specific focus on psychoeducation and CBT for relapse prevention. Thirty-two families received RPT, and 31 families received TAU. There were significant group effects for aspects of the appraisal of caregiving, including negative symptoms, positive personal experiences, and total positive score on the Experience of Caregiving Inventory. Time effects were evident for emotional overinvolvement and for aspects of the appraisal of caregiving. There were no significant effects for psychological distress. The relatives of patients who received RPT perceived less stress related to their relative's negative symptoms and an increase in perceived opportunities to make a positive contribution to the care of their relative compared to carers in the TAU

  16. Short-term intensive family therapy for adolescent eating disorders: 30-month outcome.

    PubMed

    Marzola, Enrica; Knatz, Stephanie; Murray, Stuart B; Rockwell, Roxanne; Boutelle, Kerri; Eisler, Ivan; Kaye, Walter H

    2015-05-01

    Family therapy approaches have generated impressive empirical evidence in the treatment of adolescent eating disorders (EDs). However, the paucity of specialist treatment providers limits treatment uptake; therefore, our group developed the intensive family therapy (IFT)-a 5-day treatment based on the principles of family-based therapy for EDs. We retrospectively examined the long-term efficacy of IFT in both single-family (S-IFT) and multi-family (M-IFT) settings evaluating 74 eating disordered adolescents who underwent IFT at the University of California, San Diego, between 2006 and 2013. Full remission was defined as normal weight (≥ 95% of expected for sex, age, and height), Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire (EDE-Q) global score within 1 SD of norms, and absence of binge-purging behaviours. Partial remission was defined as weight ≥ 85% of expected or ≥ 95% but with elevated EDE-Q global score and presence of binge-purging symptoms (<1/week). Over a mean follow-up period of 30 months, 87.8% of participants achieved either full (60.8%) or partial remission (27%), while 12.2% reported a poor outcome, with both S-IFT and M-IFT showing comparable outcomes. Short-term, intensive treatments may be cost-effective and clinically useful where access to regular specialist treatment is limited.

  17. [Family Focused Grief Therapy - A Suitable Model for the Palliative Care of Cancer Patients and their Families?].

    PubMed

    Weißflog, Gregor; Mehnert, Anja

    2015-11-01

    Loss is a universal human experience. Within the context of cancer and especially in the palliative care of oncological patients, anticipated and real losses and their management play a crucial role. A high proportion of patients and family members develop a treatment requiring psychiatric comorbidity (for both groups between 20 and 30%, mainly adjustment and anxiety disorders and depression). Approximately 15% of the bereaved persons suffer from complicated grief after the death of their relative. Within the early palliative care, the implementation of the Family Focused Grief Therapy (FFGT) has the potential to reduce psychological distress incl. mental comorbidities in patients and their relatives. Simultaneously, the incidence of the prolonged grief disorder in bereaved persons could be diminished (after the death of their relative). Thus, the FFGT can make a substantial contribution in order to improve the palliative care of cancer patients and their bereaved persons. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. The impact of Asian American value systems on palliative care: illustrative cases from the family-focused grief therapy trial.

    PubMed

    Mondia, Stephen; Hichenberg, Shira; Kerr, Erica; Eisenberg, Megan; Kissane, David W

    2012-09-01

    Clinicians meet people from different ethnic backgrounds, yet need to respond in culturally sensitive ways. This article focuses on Asian American families. Within a randomized controlled trial of family therapy commenced during palliative care and continued into bereavement, 3 families of Asian American background were examined qualitatively from a cultural perspective by listening to recordings of 26 therapy sessions and reviewing detailed supervision notes compiled by each therapist. A synopsis of each family's therapy narrative is presented. Prominent themes include family closeness, respect for hierarchy within the family, gender-determined roles, intergenerational tensions, preoccupation with shame and limited emotional expressiveness. Family therapists working with culturally diverse families need to pay thoughtful attention to ethnic issues as they strive to support them during palliative care and bereavement.

  19. miRNAs: mediators of ErbB family targeted therapy resistance.

    PubMed

    Adem, Bárbara Filipa; Bastos, Nuno Ricardo Alves; Dias, Francisca; Teixeira, Ana Luísa; Medeiros, Rui

    2016-07-01

    The ErbB/HER tyrosine kinase receptors family plays a key regulatory role in different cellular processes by activating several signaling pathways. In different tumor types, mutations or overexpression of the ErbB family members are a common feature, which led to the development of targeted therapies against this receptors. Although with this kind of treatment we are heading to a more personalized medicine, the development of acquired resistance is still an issue, therefore, several studies focused on discovering the mechanisms behind it. More recently, miRNAs have been described as important mediators of acquired resistance, specifically, acquired resistance to ErbB family targeted therapies. Ultimately, miRNA-based therapeutics using exosomes as a drug delivery model can revolutionize today's approach of cancer treatment.

  20. Transformative learning through international immersion: building multicultural competence in family therapy and counseling.

    PubMed

    McDowell, Teresa; Goessling, Kristen; Melendez, Tatiana

    2012-04-01

    This study explores the experiences of graduate students who completed one of two international courses facilitated by family therapy faculty in a U.S. master's-level counseling psychology department. Participants reported that international courses were personally and professionally transformative. Spending time in a foreign country gave them opportunities to learn from cultural differences, ultimately increasing the social and global awareness required for multicultural sensitivity. Experiential learning, reflection, and dialogue resulted in raised critical consciousness among participants. In this article, we discuss the transformational learning processes embedded in international courses and the potential benefits of these experiences on the development of multicultural sensitivity in family therapists and counselors in training. © 2010 American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy.

  1. Multidimensional Family Therapy: Addressing Co-Occurring Substance Abuse and Other Problems among Adolescents with Comprehensive Family-Based Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Cynthia L.

    2010-01-01

    Synopsis Adolescent substance abuse rarely occurs without other psychiatric and developmental problems, yet it is often treated and researched as if it can be isolated from comorbid conditions. Few comprehensive interventions are available that effectively address the range of co-occurring problems associated with adolescent substance abuse. This article reviews the clinical interventions and research evidence supporting the use of Multidimensional Family Therapy (MDFT) for adolescents with substance abuse and co-occurring problems. MDFT is uniquely suited to address adolescent substance abuse and related disorders given its comprehensive interventions that systematically target the multiple interacting risk factors underlying many developmental disruptions of adolescence. PMID:20682221

  2. Multidimensional family therapy: addressing co-occurring substance abuse and other problems among adolescents with comprehensive family-based treatment.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Cynthia L

    2010-07-01

    Adolescent substance abuse rarely occurs without other psychiatric and developmental problems, but it is often treated and researched as if it can be isolated from comorbid conditions. Few comprehensive interventions are available that effectively address the range of co-occurring problems associated with adolescent substance abuse. This article reviews the clinical interventions and research evidence supporting the use of Multidimensional Family Therapy (MDFT) for adolescents with substance abuse and co-occurring problems. MDFT is uniquely suited to address adolescent substance abuse and related disorders given its comprehensive interventions that systematically target the multiple interacting risk factors underlying many developmental disruptions of adolescence.

  3. The Effectiveness of Functional Family Therapy in Reducing Adolescent Mental Health Risk and Family Adjustment Difficulties in an Irish Context.

    PubMed

    Hartnett, Dan; Carr, Alan; Sexton, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of Functional Family Therapy (FFT) 42 cases were randomized to FFT and 55 to a waiting-list control group. Minimization procedures controlled the effects of potentially confounding baseline variables. Cases were treated by a team of five therapists who implemented FFT with a moderate degree of fidelity. Rates of clinical recovery were significantly higher in the FFT group than in the control group. Compared to the comparison group, parents in the FFT group reported significantly greater improvement in adolescent problems on the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) and both parents and adolescents reported improvements in family adjustment on the Systemic Clinical Outcomes and Routine Evaluation (SCORE). In addition, 93% of youth and families in the treatment condition completed FFT. Improvements shown immediately after treatment were sustained at 3-month follow-up. Results provide a current demonstration of FFT's effectiveness for youth with behavior problems in community-based settings, expand our understanding of the range of positive outcomes of FFT to include mental health risk and family-defined problem severity and impact, and suggests that it is an effective intervention when implemented in an Irish context.

  4. Family history influences the tumor characteristics and prognosis of breast cancers developing during postmenopausal hormone therapy.

    PubMed

    Fagerholm, Rainer; Faltinova, Maria; Aaltonen, Kirsi; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Heikkilä, Päivi; Halttunen-Nieminen, Mervi; Nevanlinna, Heli; Blomqvist, Carl

    2017-10-10

    Long term use of postmenopausal hormone therapy (HT) has been reported to increase breast cancer risk. On the other hand, observational studies suggest that breast cancers diagnosed during HT may have a more favorable prognosis. While family history is a risk factor for breast cancer, and genetic factors also influence prognosis, the role of family history in combination with HT use has been little studied. We investigated the relationship between HT, family history, and prognosis in 584 (267 exposed) familial and 952 (460 exposed) non-familial breast cancer cases, using three survival end points: death from breast cancer (BCS), distant disease free survival (DDFS), and local recurrence free survival (LRFS). Among non-familial cases, HT was associated with better BCS (HR 0.63, 95% CI 0.41-0.94; p = 0.025), and DDFS (HR 0.58, 95% CI 0.40-0.85; p = 0.005), with a consistent but not statistically significant effect in LRFS. This effect was not seen in familial cases (HR > 1.0), and family history was found to interact with HT in BCS (p(interaction) = 0.0067) (BC-death) and DDFS (p(interaction) = 0.0070). There was phenotypic heterogeneity between HT-associated tumors in familial and non-familial cases, particularly on estrogen receptor (ER) status, although the interaction between HT and family history appears to be at least partially independent of these markers (p = 0.0370 after adjustment for standard prognostic factors). If confirmed by further studies, our results suggest that family history should be taken into consideration in clinical counseling before beginning a HT regimen.

  5. Brief Strategic Family Therapy versus Treatment as Usual: Results of a Multisite Randomized Trial for Substance Using Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robbins, Michael S.; Feaster, Daniel J.; Horigian, Viviana E.; Rohrbaugh, Michael; Shoham, Varda; Bachrach, Ken; Miller, Michael; Burlew, Kathleen A.; Hodgkins, Candy; Carrion, Ibis; Vandermark, Nancy; Schindler, Eric; Werstlein, Robert; Szapocznik, Jose

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effectiveness of brief strategic family therapy (BSFT; an evidence-based family therapy) compared to treatment as usual (TAU) as provided in community-based adolescent outpatient drug abuse programs. Method: A randomized effectiveness trial in the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network compared BSFT to…

  6. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Anxiety Disordered Youth: A Randomized Clinical Trial Evaluating Child and Family Modalities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendall, Philip C.; Hudson, Jennifer L.; Gosch, Elizabeth; Flannery-Schroeder, Ellen; Suveg, Cynthia

    2008-01-01

    This randomized clinical trial compared the relative efficacy of individual (child) cognitive-behavioral therapy (ICBT), family cognitive-behavioral therapy (FCBT), and a family-based education/support/attention (FESA) active control for treating anxiety disordered youth ages 7-14 years (M = 10.27). Youth (N = 161; 44% female; 85% Caucasian, 9%…

  7. Child- And Family-Focused Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Pediatric Bipolar Disorder: Development and Preliminary Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavuluri, Mani N.; Graczyk, Patricia A.; Henry, David B.; Carbray, Julie A.; Heidenreich, Jodi; Miklowitz, David J.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To describe child- and family-focused cognitive-behavioral therapy (CFF-CBT), a new developmentally sensitive psychosocial intervention for pediatric bipolar disorder (PBD) that is intended for use along with medication. CFF-CBT integrates principles of family-focused therapy with those of CBT. The theoretical framework is based on (1)…

  8. Brief Strategic Family Therapy versus Treatment as Usual: Results of a Multisite Randomized Trial for Substance Using Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robbins, Michael S.; Feaster, Daniel J.; Horigian, Viviana E.; Rohrbaugh, Michael; Shoham, Varda; Bachrach, Ken; Miller, Michael; Burlew, Kathleen A.; Hodgkins, Candy; Carrion, Ibis; Vandermark, Nancy; Schindler, Eric; Werstlein, Robert; Szapocznik, Jose

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effectiveness of brief strategic family therapy (BSFT; an evidence-based family therapy) compared to treatment as usual (TAU) as provided in community-based adolescent outpatient drug abuse programs. Method: A randomized effectiveness trial in the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network compared BSFT to…

  9. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Anxiety Disordered Youth: A Randomized Clinical Trial Evaluating Child and Family Modalities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendall, Philip C.; Hudson, Jennifer L.; Gosch, Elizabeth; Flannery-Schroeder, Ellen; Suveg, Cynthia

    2008-01-01

    This randomized clinical trial compared the relative efficacy of individual (child) cognitive-behavioral therapy (ICBT), family cognitive-behavioral therapy (FCBT), and a family-based education/support/attention (FESA) active control for treating anxiety disordered youth ages 7-14 years (M = 10.27). Youth (N = 161; 44% female; 85% Caucasian, 9%…

  10. A Classification of the Field of Family Therapy: A Review of Prior Attempts and a New Paradigmatic Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levant, Ronald F.

    1980-01-01

    Reviews early attempts to classify the field of family therapy, including Haley's caricatures, the Group for the Advancement of Psychiatry's classification, and others. The new paradigmatic model proposes a classification of the field of family therapy in terms of three therapeutic paradigms: the historical, the structure/process, and the…

  11. A Classification of the Field of Family Therapy: A Review of Prior Attempts and a New Paradigmatic Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levant, Ronald F.

    1980-01-01

    Reviews early attempts to classify the field of family therapy, including Haley's caricatures, the Group for the Advancement of Psychiatry's classification, and others. The new paradigmatic model proposes a classification of the field of family therapy in terms of three therapeutic paradigms: the historical, the structure/process, and the…

  12. Family Mode Deactivation Therapy in a Residential Setting: Treating Adolescents with Conduct Disorder and Multi-Axial Diagnosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apsche, Jack A.; Bass, Christopher K.; Zeiter, J. Scott; Houston, Marsha Ann

    2008-01-01

    Mode Deactivation Therapy (MDT) has been shown to be an effective treatment for a variety of adolescent disorders including emotional dysregulation, behavioral dysregulation, physical aggression, sexual aggression, and many harmful symptoms of anxiety and traumatic stress. MDT Family Therapy has been effective in reducing family disharmony in case…

  13. Intractable itch relieved by 4-phenylbutyrate therapy in patients with progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis type 1

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis type 1 (PFIC1), an inherited liver disease caused by mutations in ATP8B1, progresses to severe cholestasis with a sustained intractable itch. Currently, no effective therapy has been established for PFIC1. Decreased function of the bile salt export pump (BSEP) in hepatocytes is suggested to be responsible for the severe cholestasis observed in PFIC1. We found a previously unidentified pharmacological effect of 4-phenylbutyrate (4PB) that increases the expression and function of BSEP. Here, we tested 4PB therapy in three patients with PFIC1. Methods The therapeutic potency of 4PB in these patients was tested by oral administration of this drug with gradually increasing dosage (200, 350, and 500 mg/kg/day) for 6 months. Biochemical, histological, and clinical data were collected. Results 4PB therapy had no beneficial effect on the patients’ liver functions, as assessed by biochemical and histological analyses, despite an increase in hepatic BSEP expression. However, therapy with 4PB at a dosage of 350 or 500 mg/kg/day significantly relieved the intractable itch. Serum levels of potential pruritogens in cholestasis were much higher than the reference ranges during the 4PB therapy. Conclusions 4PB therapy may be a new medication for patients with intractable cholestatic pruritus and may improve quality of life for patients and their families. PMID:25022842

  14. The Primacy of Discourse in the Study of Gender in Family Therapy.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Olga; LaMarre, Andrea; Rice, Carla

    2017-09-01

    Family therapists and scholars increasingly adopt poststructural and postmodern conceptions of social reality, challenging the notion of stable, universal dynamics within family members and families and favoring a view of reality as produced through social interaction. In the study of gender and diversity, many envision differences as social constructed rather than as "residing" in people or groups. There is a growing interest in discourse or people's everyday use of language and how it may reflect and advance interests of dominant groups in a society. Despite this shift from structures to discourse, therapists struggle to locate the dynamics of power in concrete actions and interactions. By leaving undisturbed the social processes through which gendered and other subjectivities and relations of power are produced, therapists may inadvertently become complicit in the very dynamics of power they seek to undermine. In this article, we argue that discourse analysis can help family therapy scholars and practitioners clarify the link between language and power. We present published examples of discourse analytic studies of gender and sexism and examine the relevance of these ideas for family therapy practice and research. © 2017 Family Process Institute.

  15. How many bytes does it take? A content analysis of cyber issues in couple and family therapy journals.

    PubMed

    Blumer, Markie L C; Hertlein, Katherine M; Smith, Justin M; Allen, Harrison

    2014-01-01

    In the fifteen years since the explosion of the Internet, using cyber technology for work and social functions has exponentially increased. Yet, questions around how to manage such changes remain elusive in family therapy literature. In this investigation, we conducted a content analysis to determine to what extent marriage/couple and family therapy (M/CFT) journals have responded to the integration of the Internet in couple and family life. We found 79 of 13,274 articles across seventeen journals focused on the Internet in some capacity. Implications for clinical practice, training, and future research are discussed. © 2013 American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy.

  16. Beyond the Binary: Trans-Negotiations in Couple and Family Therapy.

    PubMed

    Giammattei, Shawn V

    2015-09-01

    Dualistic notions about gender and sexuality have permeated the field of couple and family therapy. These binary constructions have been limiting for everyone, especially those who fall outside the male/female dichotomy. This article examines the impact of these binary notions, especially on transgender and gender-creative individuals, couples, and families. Current theory and research in the field as they relate to gender identity, sexuality, and gender minority stress in couples and families are presented. Case examples are used to illustrate affirmative approaches to treatment issues such as coming out, safety, grief and loss, redefining relationships, and social/medical transitions that may arise for transgender or gender nonconforming (TGNC) individuals, couples, and families.

  17. INTEGRATIVE BORDERLINE ADOLESCENT FAMILY THERAPY: MEETING THE CHALLENGES OF TREATING ADOLESCENTS WITH BORDERLINE PERSONALITY DISORDER

    PubMed Central

    SANTISTEBAN, DANIEL A.; MUIR, JOAN A.; MENA, MAITE P.; MITRANI, VICTORIA B.

    2014-01-01

    With the growing acceptance of the borderline personality disorder diagnosis for adolescents has come a need for specialized treatments for this challenging population. Further, because of the prominence of the family system during early and later adolescence, family treatments are particularly needed. The purpose of this article is to present the integrative borderline adolescent family therapy (I-BAFT) model that emerged from a National Institute on Drug Abuse–funded (Stage 1) treatment development and enhancement effort. I-BAFT integrates (a) key interventions from the family treatment of adolescent drug abuse (D. A. Santisteban et al., 2003; J. Szapocznik & W. Kurtines, 1989), (b) skills training shown effective with adults with borderline personality disorder (M. Linehan, 1993a) and adapted for adolescents, and (c) individual treatment interventions that promote motivation for treatment and enhance the integration of the 3 treatment components. PMID:25663719

  18. Feasibility, acceptability and potential effectiveness of dignity therapy for family carers of people with motor neurone disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Dignity therapy is a brief psychotherapy that has been shown to enhance the end of life experience. Dignity therapy often involves family carers to support patients weakened by illness and family carers are also the usual recipients of the legacy documents created. No research to date has examined the impact of dignity therapy on family carers at the time of the intervention. This study examined the effects of dignity therapy on family carers of people with motor neurone disease (MND). Methods This is a cross-sectional study utilizing a one-group pre-test post-test design with 18 family carers of people diagnosed with MND. Outcomes measured caregiver burden, anxiety, depression, and hopefulness. Acceptability was measured with a questionnaire. Feasibility was assessed by examining family carers’ involvement in the therapy sessions, time taken to conduct sessions, and any special accommodations or deviations from the dignity therapy protocol. Results There were no significant pre-test post-test changes on the group level, but there were decreases in anxiety and depression on the individual level. Baseline measures indicate that 50% of family carers had moderate to severe scores for anxiety prior to dignity therapy. MND family carers saw benefits to the person with MND and to themselves after bereavement, but acceptability of dignity therapy at the time of the intervention was mixed with some family carers indicating it was helpful, some indicating it was harmful, and many expressing ambivalence. Dignity therapy involving MND family carers is feasible and the involvement of family carers has minimal impact on the therapy. Conclusion Dignity therapy is not likely to alleviate caregiver burden in MND family carers, but it may have the ability to decrease or moderate anxiety and depression in distressed MND family carers. Dignity therapy is feasible and generally acceptable to MND family carers. Dignity therapists may provide a better experience for family

  19. Family Therapy for Child and Adolescent Eating Disorders: A Critical Review.

    PubMed

    Jewell, Tom; Blessitt, Esther; Stewart, Catherine; Simic, Mima; Eisler, Ivan

    2016-09-01

    Eating disorder-focused family therapy has emerged as the strongest evidence-based treatment for adolescent anorexia nervosa, supported by evidence from nine RCTs, and there is increasing evidence of its efficacy in treating adolescent bulimia nervosa (three RCTs). There is also emerging evidence for the efficacy of multifamily therapy formats of this treatment, with a recent RCT demonstrating the benefits of this approach in the treatment of adolescent anorexia nervosa. In this article, we critically review the evidence for eating disorder-focused family therapy through the lens of a moderate common factors paradigm. From this perspective, this treatment is likely to be effective as it provides a supportive and nonblaming context that: one, creates a safe, predictable environment that helps to contain anxiety generated by the eating disorder; two, promotes specific change early on in treatment in eating disorder-related behaviors; and three, provides a vehicle for the mobilization of common factors such as hope and expectancy reinforced by the eating disorder expertise of the multidisciplinary team. In order to improve outcomes for young people, there is a need to develop an improved understanding of the moderators and mediators involved in this treatment approach. Such an understanding could lead to the refining of the therapy, and inform adaptations for those families who do not currently benefit from treatment.

  20. Systemic Family Therapy of Comorbidity of Anxiety and Depression with Epilepsy in Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Meng, Huaqing; Zeng, Kebin; Quan, Fengying; Liu, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to find if systemic family therapy (SFT) does work in anxiety and depression with epilepsy in adolescents (ADAE). Methods 104 adolescents with epilepsy, aged 13–20 years old, were included from December 2009 to December 2010, the enrolled patients were with anxiety [Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAMA) score ≥14 points] or depression [Hamilton Depression Scale (HAMD) score ≥20 points]. The patients were randomly divided into the control group (n=52) treated with antiepileptic drugs (AED) and the intervention group (n=52) undergone Systemic Family Therapy (SFT) as well as AED. The AED improvements, anxiety and depression scores, Social Support Rating Scale (SSRS), Family Assessment Device (FAD) and scale of systemic family dynamics (SSFD) were observed after 3-month treatment. Results The frequencies of epileptic seizures in intervention group was decreased much more significantly than the control group (4.22±3.54 times/month vs. 6.20±5.86 times/month, p=0.04); and the scores of anxiety (9.52±6.28 points vs. 13.48±8.47 points, p=0.01) and depression (13.86±9.17 points vs. 18.89±8.73 points, p=0.02) were significantly decreased than the control group; meanwhile, the family dynamics and family functions were significantly improved, and the social support was also increased (p<0.05). Conclusion SFT combined with AEDs had better efficacies than AEDs alone, not only the frequency of epileptic seizures was decreased, but also the patients' anxiety and depression were improved, and the family dynamics, family functions and social support were improved. PMID:27247596

  1. Randomized, Controlled Trial of Behavioral Family Systems Therapy for Diabetes: Maintenance and Generalization of Effects on Parent-Adolescent Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wysocki, Tim; Harris, Michael A.; Buckloh, Lisa M.; Mertlich, Deborah; Lochrie, Amanda Sobel; Taylor, Alexandra; Sadler, Michelle; White, Neil H.

    2008-01-01

    We report a randomized trial of a revised Behavioral Family Systems Therapy for Diabetes (BFST-D) intervention. Families of 104 adolescents with diabetes were randomized to standard care (SC) or to 6 months of an educational support group (ES) or BFST-D. Family communication and problem-solving skills were assessed at 0, 6, 12, and 18 months by…

  2. Randomized, Controlled Trial of Behavioral Family Systems Therapy for Diabetes: Maintenance and Generalization of Effects on Parent-Adolescent Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wysocki, Tim; Harris, Michael A.; Buckloh, Lisa M.; Mertlich, Deborah; Lochrie, Amanda Sobel; Taylor, Alexandra; Sadler, Michelle; White, Neil H.

    2008-01-01

    We report a randomized trial of a revised Behavioral Family Systems Therapy for Diabetes (BFST-D) intervention. Families of 104 adolescents with diabetes were randomized to standard care (SC) or to 6 months of an educational support group (ES) or BFST-D. Family communication and problem-solving skills were assessed at 0, 6, 12, and 18 months by…

  3. REVIEW OF OUTCOME RESEARCH ON MARITAL AND FAMILY THERAPY IN TREATMENT OF ALCOHOLISM

    PubMed Central

    O’Farrell, Timothy J.

    2011-01-01

    This review of controlled studies of marital and family therapy (MFT) in alcoholism treatment updates our earlier review (XXXXXXX). We conclude that, when the alcoholic is unwilling to seek help, MFT is effective in helping the family cope better and motivating alcoholics to enter treatment. Specifically, both Al-Anon facilitation and referral and spouse coping skills training (based on new findings) help family members cope better; and Community Reinforcement and Family Training (CRAFT) promotes treatment entry and was successfully transported to a community clinic in a new study. Once the alcoholic enters treatment, MFT, particularly behavioral couples therapy (BCT), is clearly more effective than individual treatment at increasing abstinence and improving relationship functioning. New BCT studies showed efficacy with women alcoholics and with gay and lesbian alcoholics; and BCT was successfully transported to a community clinic, a brief BCT version was tested, and BCT was adapted for family members other than spouses. Future studies should evaluate: MFT with couples where both members have a current alcohol problem and with minority patients, mechanisms of change, transportability of evidence-based MFT approaches to clinical practice settings, and replication of MFT outcomes of reduced partner violence and improved child functioning. PMID:22283384

  4. Effectiveness of online cognitive behavioral therapy on family caregivers of people with dementia.

    PubMed

    Kwok, Timothy; Au, Alma; Wong, Bel; Ip, Isaac; Mak, Vivian; Ho, Florence

    2014-01-01

    Family caregivers of persons with dementia (PWD) may receive caregiver training because of logistical constraints and privacy concerns. This study evaluated the effectiveness of an online intervention for family caregivers of PWD in improving their self-efficacy in managing behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD), and their emotion well-being. A total of 36 family caregivers of people with dementia participated in a 9-week online intervention based on the cognitive behavioral therapy model. Outcomes of the intervention were measured by the Chinese version of the Neuropsychiatric Inventory Questionnaire and two domains of the Revised Scale for Caregiving Self-Efficacy. Wilcoxon signed rank tests were used to compare the change in outcome variables. The severity of BPSD of PWD and BPSD-related distress in family caregivers showed a statistically significant reduction after the intervention. Subgroup analysis showed self-efficacy in controlling upsetting thoughts significantly improved in caregivers of PWD at moderate to severe stages. Online cognitive behavioral therapy for family caregivers reduced BPSD of PWD and the related distress in their caregivers.

  5. Combination therapy of statin and ezetimibe for the treatment of familial hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton-Craig, Ian; Kostner, Karam; Colquhoun, David; Woodhouse, Stan

    2010-01-01

    High-dose potent statin therapy in combination with ezetimibe is now standard practice for the treatment of adult patients with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (heFH), as the result of numerous studies in patients with primary hypercholesterolemia or heFH. These studies have shown the combination to be both effective and safe in the short to medium term. Recently, short-term ezetimibe therapy has also been shown to be effective and safe in combination with statin therapy for children and adolescents with heFH. Effective statin–ezetimibe combination therapy is capable of achieving near-normal lipid profiles in heFH patients, with expected improvement in risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and improved life expectancy resulting predominantly from reduction in levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. There are few data to support a pleiotropic action of ezetimibe with regard to CVD benefit, unlike therapy with statins. No serious and unexpected clinical adverse effects of combination statin–ezetimibe therapy have emerged till date, although data are limited in children and adolescents, for whom longer-term studies are required. Recent data suggesting possible proatherogenic effects of ezetimibe require confirmation. One large long-term randomized controlled clinical outcomes trial is in progress in non-FH patients to determine the efficacy and safety of ezetimibe therapy; it is unlikely that such a trial will ever be performed in patients with FH. PMID:21127699

  6. Lesbians, gay men, and their parents: family therapy for the coming-out crisis.

    PubMed

    LaSala, M C

    2000-01-01

    It is considered psychologically healthy for lesbians and gay men to come out and live outside of the closet. However, parents tend to react with shock, disappointment, and shame when they learn of a son's or daughter's gay sexual orientation. Disclosure often precipitates a painful family crisis, which can lead to cutoffs between members. This article describes family therapy theories and interventions that can aid therapists in sheparding families through the initial stages of the coming-out crisis. Family therapists are advised to acknowledge and address the distinct emotional needs of coming-out individuals and their parents. Parents must grieve and obtain accurate information about gay lifestyles. Lesbians and gay men need support as they struggle to cope with their parents' negative reactions. Family members should be coached to maintain non-combative communication following the disclosure, even if contacts are initially brief and superficial. Case examples, drawn from the author's clinical work, will demonstrate how to address the separate needs of lesbians, gay men, and their parents while maintaining (or rebuilding) family relationships and ultimately guiding families toward successful resolution of this crisis.

  7. Postmodernism in marriage and family therapy training: doctoral students' understanding and experiences.

    PubMed

    Wieling, E; Negretti, M A; Stokes, S; Kimball, T; Christensen, F B; Bryan, L

    2001-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to advance our understanding of how doctoral students perceive postmodernism's influence in the field of Marriage and Family Therapy (MFT). According to the literature, postmodernism has had a profound impact on many fields, including MFT. However, tracking of how postmodernism is actually being rendered in theory, research, practice, and training warrants investigation. This study utilized focus group interviews to investigate the perceptions of MFT doctoral students. Findings suggest that while participants are attracted to postmodern tenets, they also report feeling a mixture of liberation and excitement with confusion and fear regarding how postmodernism is influencing MFT models of therapy.

  8. Influence of family, religion, and social conformity on client participation in sexual reorientation therapy.

    PubMed

    Maccio, Elaine M

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the likelihood of participating in sexual reorientation therapy (SRT) based on actual or expected family reactions to the disclosure of one's same-sex sexuality, religious fundamentalism, social conformity, and several demographic variables. A sample of 52 SRT participants and 211 SRT nonparticipants who had ever identified as gay, lesbian, or bisexual completed a survey either online or in hardcopy format. Actual or expected negative family reactions, high religious fundamentalism, and identifying as spiritual significantly increased one's odds of participating in SRT. The findings are essential for preparing practitioners in any clinical practice setting to work with clients struggling with their sexuality.

  9. Canakinumab as rescue therapy in familial Mediterranean fever refractory to conventional treatment.

    PubMed

    Alpa, Mirella; Roccatello, Dario

    2015-01-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever is an autosomal recessive autoinflammatory disorder mainly affecting Mediterranean populations, which is associated with mutations of the MEFV gene that encodes pyrin. Functional studies suggest that pyrin is implicated in the maturation and secretion of interleukin-1 (IL-1). The IL-1 receptor antagonist or anti-IL-1 monoclonal antibody may therefore represent a rational approach for the treatment of the rare patients who are refractory to conventional therapy. We report the case of a young female affected by familial Mediterranean fever who proved to be resistant to colchicine and was successfully treated with canakinumab.

  10. The cybernetic metaphor: a critical examination of ecosystemic epistemology as a foundation of family therapy.

    PubMed

    Falzer, P R

    1986-09-01

    This article proposes that recent disputes between two groups of family therapists, represented by Watzlawick and Keeney, have a substantive base as yet unexplicated in current literature. However, guiding principles of the approach known as ecosystemic epistemology have received considerable attention by Wittgenstein, a colleague of Russell's, and Rorty, a contemporary philosopher. Both contend that the prospect of systematizing language and culture may be ill advised. The article suggests that discussion regarding the nature and practice of family therapy ought not be confined to epistemological thinking.

  11. The cost-effectiveness of family/family-based therapy for treatment of externalizing disorders, substance use disorders and delinquency: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Goorden, Maartje; Schawo, Saskia J; Bouwmans-Frijters, Clazien A M; van der Schee, Evelien; Hendriks, Vincent M; Hakkaart-van Roijen, Leona

    2016-07-13

    Family therapy and family-based treatment has been commonly applied in children and adolescents in mental health care and has been proven to be effective. There is an increased interest in economic evaluations of these, often expensive, interventions. The aim of this systematic review is to summarize and evaluate the evidence on cost-effectiveness of family/family-based therapy for externalizing disorders, substance use disorders and delinquency. A systematic literature search was performed in PubMed, Education Resource information Centre (ERIC), Psycinfo and Cochrane reviews including studies conducted after 1990 and before the first of August of 2013. Full economic evaluations investigating family/family-based interventions for adolescents between 10 and 20 years treated for substance use disorders, delinquency or externalizing disorders were included. Seven hundred thirty-one articles met the search criteria and 51 studies were initially selected. The final selection resulted in the inclusion of 11 studies. The quality of these studies was assessed. Within the identified studies, there was great variation in the specific type of family/family-based interventions and disorders. According to the outcomes of the checklists, the overall quality of the economic evaluations was low. Results varied by study. Due to the variations in setting, design and outcome it was not feasible to pool results using a meta-analysis. The quality of the identified economic evaluations of family/family-based therapy for treatment of externalizing disorders, adolescent substance use disorders and delinquency was insufficient to determine the cost-effectiveness. Although commonly applied, family/family-based therapy is costly and more research of higher quality is needed.

  12. Brief Strategic Family Therapy: Implementing evidence-based models in community settings

    PubMed Central

    Szapocznik, José; Muir, Joan A.; Duff, Johnathan H.; Schwartz, Seth J.; Brown, C. Hendricks

    2014-01-01

    Reflecting a nearly 40-year collaborative partnership between clinical researchers and clinicians, the present article reviews the authors’ experience in developing, investigating, and implementing the Brief Strategic Family Therapy (BSFT) model. The first section of the article focuses on the theory, practice, and studies related to this evidence-based family therapy intervention targeting adolescent drug abuse and delinquency. The second section focuses on the implementation model created for the BSFT intervention– a model that parallels many of the recommendations furthered within the implementation science literature. Specific challenges encountered during the BSFT implementation process are reviewed, along with ways of conceptualizing and addressing these challenges from a systemic perspective. The implementation approach that we employ uses the same systemic principles and intervention techniques as those that underlie the BSFT model itself. Recommendations for advancing the field of implementation science, based on our on-the-ground experiences, are proposed. PMID:24274187

  13. Providing therapy to children and families in foster care: a systemic-relational approach.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Catherine

    2011-12-01

    Foster care is a system created to protect children from an unsafe home environment yet multiple foster home placements, conflictual or nonexistent relationships between foster parents and birth parents, long, drawn out court battles, and living in an on-going state of not knowing when or if they will be going home are just some of the challenges many children in care are expected to manage. This paper presents a guide for therapists working with families involved in foster care. Utilizing ideas from the postmodern therapies and structural family therapy, suggestions will be provided about who needs to talk to whom about what, when to have these necessary conversations, and how to talk to people in a way that mobilizes adults to take action for the children, with the goal of minimizing postplacement trauma, strengthening and repairing relational bonds, and moving children out of foster care and into permanent homes as quickly as possible.

  14. Save the young--the elderly have lived their lives: ageism in marriage and family therapy.

    PubMed

    Ivey, D C; Wieling, E; Harris, S M

    2000-01-01

    The paucity of literature addressing mental health issues concerning geriatric populations represents the perpetuation of ageist practices and beliefs in the field of marriage and family therapy. The purpose of this study was to assess whether client age and clinical training relate to the evaluation of couples who present for conjoint therapy. Written vignettes describing two couples, one older and one younger, who report issues involving the absence of sexual intimacy, increased frequency of arguments, and increased use of alcohol were evaluated by practicing marriage and family therapists, therapists-in-training, and individuals with no clinical background. It was hypothesized that respondents' views would vary in connection with the age of the couple and with the three levels of participant training. Results indicate that client age and participant training are associated with perceptions of individual and couple functioning. Our findings suggest that the relational and mental health concerns experienced by elder couples are not perceived as seriously as are identical concerns experienced by younger couples. Contrary to our expectations the observed differences between views of the two age conditions did not significantly differ between levels of participant training. Training and experience in marriage and family therapy may not significantly mitigate vulnerability to age-discrepant views.

  15. The effects of a multiple family therapy on adolescents with eating disorders: an outcome study.

    PubMed

    Gelin, Zoé; Fuso, Silvana; Hendrick, Stephan; Cook-Darzens, Solange; Simon, Yves

    2015-03-01

    Multiple Family Therapy (MFT) has gained increasing popularity in the treatment of eating disorders and many programs have been developed over the past decade. Still, there is little evidence in the literature on the effectiveness on MFT for treating eating disorders. The present study examines the effects of a particular model of Multiple Family Therapy on eating disorder symptoms, quality of life, and percentage of Expected Body Weight (%EBW) in adolescents with eating disorders (ED). Eighty-two adolescents with ED, aged between 11 and 19 years, were assessed before and after treatment using the Eating Disorders Inventory 2 (EDI-2), the Outcome Questionnaire 45 (OQ-45) and %EBW. Results showed a significant increase in %EBW between the beginning and end of treatment, with a large effect size. 52.4% of patients achieved an EBW above 85%. Symptoms relative to all EDI dimensions (except for bulimia) significantly decreased during treatment. The three dimensions related to quality of life assessment also improved over the course of MFT. At the end of treatment, 70.7% of patients had a total OQ-45 score below clinical significance. This study suggests that Multiple Family Therapy may benefit adolescents with eating disorders, with improvement on several outcome measures (%EBW, ED symptoms, and quality of life). However, the lack of a comparison group entails caution when drawing conclusions.

  16. Approaches to the study of gender in marriage and family therapy curricula.

    PubMed

    Filkowski, M B; Storm, C L; York, C D; Brandon, A D

    2001-01-01

    This study compares two accredited marriage and family therapy programs: One includes a separate course on gender, and the other integrates gender throughout the curriculum. Students from the two programs rated their own and their peers' experience of how gender education effects therapy, program culture, and personal life. Results indicate that students from the integrated program view their peers as incorporating gender ideas in therapy to a significantly greater extent (t = 2.83, p < .05) than do students in the gender course program. However, students from the program that has a gender course leaned more toward agreement with feminist concepts than did students from the integrated program. Overall, students appear to be learning about gender and integrating these concepts into their work as therapists. Discussion is included on how to choose a gender curriculum.

  17. Breaking down the barriers to clinical service delivery: walk-in family therapy.

    PubMed

    Miller, John K; Slive, Arnold

    2004-01-01

    This article provides a description of a unique walk-in family therapy service designed to overcome barriers to clinical delivery, as well as a survey of client experiences with the therapy. This therapy modality is aimed at providing an immediately accessible, affordable, nonstigmatizing, single-session-focused resource. The service operates from a systemic, collaborative, consumer oriented, pragmatic, non-pathology perspective. Follow-up telephone interviews were conducted with 43 clients 3 to 6 months after they received treatment. Generally, former clients reported satisfaction with the service. The majority (67%) indicated some level of improvement, and 43% of participants found their single session sufficient to address their concerns. At the time of the session, the majority (86%) of clients were rated by their therapists as "customers" regarding their motivational readiness for change.

  18. The role of antisense oligonucleotide therapy in patients with familial hypercholesterolemia: risks, benefits, and management recommendations.

    PubMed

    Agarwala, Anandita; Jones, Peter; Nambi, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotide therapy is a promising approach for the treatment of a broad variety of medical conditions. It functions at the cellular level by interfering with RNA function, often leading to degradation of specifically targeted abnormal gene products implicated in the disease process. Mipomersen is a novel antisense oligonucleotide directed at apolipoprotein (apoB)-100, the primary apolipoprotein associated with low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), which has recently been approved for the treatment of familial hypercholesterolemia. A number of clinical studies have demonstrated its efficacy in lowering LDL-C and apoB levels in patients with elevated LDL-C despite maximal medical therapy using conventional lipid-lowering agents. This review outlines the risks and benefits of therapy and provides recommendations on the use of mipomersen.

  19. Integrating motivational interviewing and narrative therapy to teach behavior change to family medicine resident physicians.

    PubMed

    Oshman, Lauren D; Combs, Gene N

    2016-05-01

    Motivational interviewing is a useful skill to address the common problem of patient ambivalence regarding behavior change by uncovering and strengthening a person's own motivation and commitment to change. The Family Medicine Milestones underline the need for clear teaching and monitoring of skills in communication and behavior change in Family Medicine postgraduate training settings. This article reports the integration of a motivational interviewing curriculum into an existing longitudinal narrative therapy-based curriculum on patient-centered communication. Observed structured clinical examination for six participants indicate that intern physicians are able to demonstrate moderate motivational interviewing skill after a brief 2-h workshop. Participant self-evaluations for 16 participants suggest a brief 2-h curriculum was helpful at increasing importance of learning motivational interviewing by participants, and that participants desire further training opportunities. A brief motivational interviewing curriculum can be integrated into existing communication training in a Family Medicine residency training program. © The Author(s) 2016.

  20. Brief Strategic Family Therapy: An Intervention to Reduce Adolescent Risk Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Szapocznik, José; Schwartz, Seth J.; Muir, Joan A.; Brown, C. Hendricks

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews the brief strategic family therapy (BSFT; J. Szapocznik, M. A. Scopetta, & O. E. King, 1978, The effect and degree of treatment comprehensiveness with a Latino drug abusing population. In D. E. Smith, S. M. Anderson, M. Burton, N. Gotlieb, W. Harvey, & T. Chung, Eds, A multicultural view of drug abuse, pp. 563–573, Cambridge, MA: G. K. Hall & J. Szapocznik, M. A. Scopetta, & O. E. King, 1978, Theory and practice in matching treatment to the special characteristics and problems of Cuban immigrants, Journal of Community Psychology, 6, 112–122.) approach to treating adolescent drug abuse and related problem behaviors. The treatment intervention is reviewed, including specialized features such as engagement of difficult families. Empirical evidence supporting the BSFT approach is presented. We then illustrate ways in which clinicians can use the model with troubled families whose adolescents may be at risk for drug use and HIV. Finally, future directions for BSFT research are described. PMID:23936750

  1. Ecologically-Based Family Therapy Outcome with Substance Abusing Runaway Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Slesnick, Natasha; Prestopnik, Jillian L.

    2007-01-01

    Runaway youth report a broader range and higher severity of substance-related, mental health and family problems relative to non-runaway youth. Most studies to date have collected self-report data on the family and social history; virtually no research has examined treatment effectiveness with this population. This study is a treatment development project in which 124 runaway youth were randomly assigned to 1) Ecologically-Based Family Therapy (EBFT) or 2) Service as Usual (SAU) through a shelter. Youth completed an intake, posttreatment, 6 and 12 month follow-up assessment. Youth assigned to EBFT reported greater reductions in overall substance abuse compared to youth assigned to SAU while other problem areas improved in both conditions. Findings suggest that EBFT is an efficacious intervention for this relatively severe population of youth. PMID:15878048

  2. Dissemination and Implementation Research in Marriage and Family Therapy: An Introduction and Call to the Field.

    PubMed

    Withers, Mathew C; Reynolds, Jamila E; Reed, Kayla; Holtrop, Kendal

    2017-04-01

    Despite the considerable resources allocated to research to promote public health, interventions capable of benefiting individuals and families are not finding their way into regular practice. An important avenue for addressing this problem is through dissemination and implementation (D&I) science, a burgeoning research area focusing on translating empirical knowledge into everyday practice. This article begins by suggesting ways in which MFTs are uniquely equipped to contribute to and benefit from D&I research. We will then provide an overview of D&I research, outlines key D&I models, and highlight examples of family intervention research relevant to MFTs using the key models. Finally, we conclude by providing the field with important next steps to advance the presence of MFT research within D&I scholarship. © 2016 American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy.

  3. Brief Strategic Family Therapy: An Intervention to Reduce Adolescent Risk Behavior.

    PubMed

    Szapocznik, José; Schwartz, Seth J; Muir, Joan A; Brown, C Hendricks

    2012-06-01

    This article reviews the brief strategic family therapy (BSFT; J. Szapocznik, M. A. Scopetta, & O. E. King, 1978, The effect and degree of treatment comprehensiveness with a Latino drug abusing population. In D. E. Smith, S. M. Anderson, M. Burton, N. Gotlieb, W. Harvey, & T. Chung, Eds, A multicultural view of drug abuse, pp. 563-573, Cambridge, MA: G. K. Hall & J. Szapocznik, M. A. Scopetta, & O. E. King, 1978, Theory and practice in matching treatment to the special characteristics and problems of Cuban immigrants, Journal of Community Psychology, 6, 112-122.) approach to treating adolescent drug abuse and related problem behaviors. The treatment intervention is reviewed, including specialized features such as engagement of difficult families. Empirical evidence supporting the BSFT approach is presented. We then illustrate ways in which clinicians can use the model with troubled families whose adolescents may be at risk for drug use and HIV. Finally, future directions for BSFT research are described.

  4. Affiliative Behaviour and Conflictual Communication during Brief Family Therapy of Patients with Anorexia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Doba, Karyn; Pezard, Laurent; Berna, Guillaume; Vignau, Jean; Nandrino, Jean-Louis

    2013-01-01

    Objective Although patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) present positive responses to family therapy, the key features of therapeutic changes still require identification. This study explores the role of conflictual communication and affiliative nonverbal behaviour in therapeutic change in brief strategic family therapy (BSFT) for AN patients. Methods Ten female AN patients and their parents were included in the sample and took part in a 6-month follow-up of BSFT. The durations of conflictual communication and of affiliative nonverbal behaviour estimated by eye contact were compared between the first and the last sessions of family-based treatment using nonparametric statistical tests. Results An increase of the Body Mass Index associated with an increase in the conflictual communication expressed during BSFT sessions were observed. Moreover, affiliative nonverbal behaviour expressed by the father and the patient decrease, after a BSFT follow-up, in conflictual situations only. By contrast, no significant difference was observed in affiliative nonverbal behaviour expressed by the mother. Conclusion The present study demonstrates that the impact of the BSFT differs between members of a family: the AN patient and the father have established a new form of emotional functioning with a decrease in emotional involvement. The study of the combination between verbal and nonverbal communication can represent an important step in the understanding of the mechanisms of therapeutic change. PMID:23936421

  5. Affiliative behaviour and conflictual communication during brief family therapy of patients with anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Doba, Karyn; Pezard, Laurent; Berna, Guillaume; Vignau, Jean; Nandrino, Jean-Louis

    2013-01-01

    Although patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) present positive responses to family therapy, the key features of therapeutic changes still require identification. This study explores the role of conflictual communication and affiliative nonverbal behaviour in therapeutic change in brief strategic family therapy (BSFT) for AN patients. Ten female AN patients and their parents were included in the sample and took part in a 6-month follow-up of BSFT. The durations of conflictual communication and of affiliative nonverbal behaviour estimated by eye contact were compared between the first and the last sessions of family-based treatment using nonparametric statistical tests. An increase of the Body Mass Index associated with an increase in the conflictual communication expressed during BSFT sessions were observed. Moreover, affiliative nonverbal behaviour expressed by the father and the patient decrease, after a BSFT follow-up, in conflictual situations only. By contrast, no significant difference was observed in affiliative nonverbal behaviour expressed by the mother. The present study demonstrates that the impact of the BSFT differs between members of a family: the AN patient and the father have established a new form of emotional functioning with a decrease in emotional involvement. The study of the combination between verbal and nonverbal communication can represent an important step in the understanding of the mechanisms of therapeutic change.

  6. Attachment-based family therapy and emotion-focused therapy for unresolved anger: The role of productive emotional processing.

    PubMed

    Diamond, Gary M; Shahar, Ben; Sabo, Daphna; Tsvieli, Noa

    2016-03-01

    A growing body of research suggests that emotional processing is a central and common change mechanism across various types of therapies (Diener & Hilsenroth, 2009; Foa, Huppert, & Cahill, 2006; Greenberg, 2011). This study examined whether 10 weeks of attachment-based family therapy (ABFT), characterized by the use of in-session young adult-parent dialogues, were more effective than 10 weeks of individual emotion-focused therapy (EFT), characterized by the use of imaginal dialogues, in terms of facilitating productive emotional processing among a sample of 32 young adults presenting with unresolved anger toward a parent. This study also examined whether greater amounts of productive emotional processing predicted more favorable treatment outcomes. In contrast to our expectations, we found significantly more productive emotional processing in individual EFT than in conjoint ABFT. Results also showed that while both treatments led to significant and equivalent decreases in unresolved anger, state anger, attachment anxiety, and psychological symptoms, only ABFT was associated with decreases in attachment avoidance. Although amount of emotional processing did not explain the unique decrease in attachment avoidance in ABFT, greater amounts of productive emotional processing predicted greater decreases in psychological symptoms (but not other outcome measures) across both treatments. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. Introduction to the special section: The role of cognitive-behavioral interventions in couple and family therapy.

    PubMed

    Dattilio, Frank M; Epstein, Norman B

    2005-01-01

    Marriage and family therapists' perspectives on cognitive-behavior family therapy (CBFT) have seen major changes over the years. The focus on cognitions and behaviors in treatment is now widely embraced by marriage and family therapists because of the effectiveness of the approach and its flexibility and integrative potential. This article provides an introduction to the special section and a brief history and overview of the application of CBFT to the field and some of the benefits it can provide to the growing and ever-challenging area of couples and family therapy.

  8. Implementing evidence-based patient and family education on oral anticoagulation therapy: a community-based participatory project.

    PubMed

    Shaha, Maya; Wüthrich, Erika; Stauffer, Yvonne; Herczeg, Franziska; Fattinger, Karin; Hirter, Kathrin; Papalini, Marianne; Herrmann, Luzia

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed at developing and implementing evidence-based patient and family education on oral anticoagulation therapy. The number of persons with chronic diseases who live at home is increasing. They have to manage multiple diseases and complex treatments. One such treatment is oral anticoagulation therapy, a high risk variable dose medication. Adherence to oral anticoagulation therapy is jeopardised by limited information about the medications, their risk and complications, the impact of individual daily routine and the limited inclusion of family members in education. Hence, improved and tailored education is essential for patients and families to manage oral anticoagulation therapy at home. A community-based participatory research design combined with the Precede-Proceed model was used including a systematic literature review, posteducation analysis, an online nurse survey, a documentation analysis and patient/family interviews. The study was conducted between April 2010-December 2012 at a department of general internal medicine in a teaching hospital in Switzerland. Participants were the department's nursing and medical professionals including the patients and their families. The evidence-based patient and family education on oral anticoagulation therapy emerged comprising a learning assessment, teaching units, clarification of responsibilities of nurse professionals and documentation guidelines. The inclusion of the whole department has contributed to the development and implementation of this evidence-based patient family education on oral anticoagulation therapy, which encompasses local characteristics and patient preferences. This education is now being used throughout the department. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Negotiating a pathological identity in the clinical dialogue: discourse analysis of a family therapy.

    PubMed

    Avdi, Evrinomy

    2005-12-01

    Within the framework of social constructionism, psychotherapy has been re-conceptualized as a semiotic process, which consists of the creative generation of new meanings in the context of collaborative discourse. In recent years, research approaches that draw from social constructionism, such as discourse analysis, have been fruitfully employed in the study of psychotherapy processes, whilst being in line with the contemporary emphasis on language, narrative, and meaning making. This paper aims to further the exploration of the usefulness of discourse analysis in the study of psychotherapy processes, and in particular, in situations where the medical discourse is powerfully implicated in the construction of a person's identity. It is based on the analysis of a family therapy with a family whose child has a diagnosis of autism. The analysis focuses on two features of the family's talk, namely shifts in the flexibility of employment of a diverse range of discourses and subject positions, and shifts in the ways agency is constructed and discursively negotiated in the clinical conversations. It is suggested that these shifts can be used as indications of change in the family's network of meanings. The analysis suggests that an important aspect in clinical work with families with a member with a psychiatric diagnosis lies in decentring, or deconstructing, the dominant, pathology-maintaining accounts, and allowing for a wider range of less problematic narratives and subject positions to emerge.

  10. Analysis of barriers to adoption of buprenorphine maintenance therapy by family physicians.

    PubMed

    DeFlavio, Jeffrey R; Rolin, Stephanie A; Nordstrom, Benjamin R; Kazal, Louis A

    2015-01-01

    Opioid abuse has reached epidemic levels. Evidence-based treatments such as buprenorphine maintenance therapy (BMT) remain underutilized. Offering BMT in primary care settings has the potential to reduce overall costs of care, decrease medical morbidity associated with opioid dependence, and improve treatment outcomes. However, access to BMT, especially in rural areas, remains limited. This article will present a review of barriers to adoption of BMT among family physicians in a primarily rural area in the USA. An anonymous survey of family physicians practicing in Vermont or New Hampshire, two largely rural states, was conducted. The survey included both quantitative and qualitative questions, focused on BMT adoption and physician opinions of opioids. Specific factors assessed included physician factors, physicians' understanding of patient factors, and logistical issues. One-hundred and eight family physicians completed the survey. Approximately 10% were buprenorphine prescribers. More than 80% of family physicians felt they regularly saw patients addicted to opiates. The majority (70%) felt that they, as family physicians, bore responsibility for treating opiate addiction. Potential logistical barriers to buprenorphine adoption included inadequately trained staff (88%), insufficient time (80%), inadequate office space (49%), and cumbersome regulations (37%). Common themes addressed in open-ended questions included lack of knowledge, time, or interest; mistrust of people with addiction or buprenorphine; and difficult patient population. This study aims to quantify perceived barriers to treatment and provide insight expanding the community of family physicians offering BMT. The results suggest family physicians are excellent candidates to provide BMT, as most report regularly seeing opioid-addicted patients and believe that treating opioid addiction is their responsibility. Significant barriers remain, including inadequate staff training, lack of access to

  11. Prevalence of Medical Conditions Potentially Amenable to Cellular Therapy among Families Privately Storing Umbilical Cord Blood.

    PubMed

    Mazonson, Peter; Kane, Mark; Colberg, Kelin; Harris, Heather; Brown, Heather; Mohr, Andrew; Ziman, Alyssa; Santas, Chris

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Little is known about the prevalence of conditions potentially amenable to cellular therapy among families storing umbilical cord blood in private cord blood banks. Methods A cross-sectional study of families with at least one child who stored umbilical cord blood in the largest private cord blood bank in the United States was performed. Respondent families completed a questionnaire to determine whether children with stored cord blood or a first-degree relative had one or more of 16 conditions amenable primarily to allogeneic stem cell transplant ("transplant indications") or 16 conditions under investigation for autologous stem cell infusion ("regenerative indications"), regardless of whether they received a transplant or infusion. Results 94,803 families responded, representing 33.3 % of those surveyed. Of respondent families, 16.01 % indicated at least one specified condition. 1.64 % reported at least one first-degree member with a transplant indication potentially treatable with an allogeneic stem cell transplant. The most common transplant indications reported among first-degree family members were Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma (0.33 %), Hodgkin's Lymphoma (0.30 %), and Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (0.28 %). 4.23 % reported at least one child with a regenerative indication potentially treatable with an autologous stem cell infusion. The most common regenerative indications among children with stored umbilical cord blood were Autism/Autism Spectrum Disorder/Apraxia (1.93 %), Other Developmental Delay (1.36 %), and Congenital Heart Defect (0.87 %). Discussion Among families storing umbilical cord blood in private cord blood banks, conditions for which stem cell transplant or infusion may be indicated, or are under investigation, appear to be prevalent, especially for regenerative medicine indications.

  12. Anxious Children and Adolescents Non-responding to CBT: Clinical Predictors and Families' Experiences of Therapy.

    PubMed

    Lundkvist-Houndoumadi, Irene; Thastum, Mikael

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine clinical predictors of non-response to manualized cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) among youths (children and adolescents) with anxiety disorders, and to explore families' perspective on therapy, using a mixed methods approach. Non-response to manualized group CBT was determined among 106 youths of Danish ethnicity (7-17 years old) with a primary anxiety disorder, identified with the Clinical Global Impression of Improvement Scale at the 3-month follow-up. Twenty-four youths (22.6 %) had not responded to treatment, and a logistic regression analysis revealed that youths with a primary diagnosis of social phobia were seven times more likely not to respond, whereas youths with a comorbid mood disorder were almost four times more likely. Families of non-responding youths with primary social phobia and/or a comorbid mood disorder (n = 15) were interviewed, and data were analysed through interpretative phenomenological analysis. Two superordinate themes emerged: youths were not involved in therapy work, and manualized group format posed challenges to families. The mixed methods approach provided new perspectives on the difficulties that may be encountered by families of non-responding youths with a primary social phobia diagnosis and youths with a comorbid mood disorder during manualized group CBT. Clinical implications related to youths' clinical characteristics, and families' experience and suggestions are drawn. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Youths with an anxiety disorder, who had a primary social phobia diagnosis and those, who had a comorbid mood disorder, were more likely not to respond to manualized group CBT. Parents of those non-responding youths often considered them as motivated to overcome their difficulties, but due to their symptomatology, they were unreceptive, reluctant and ambivalent and therefore not actively involved in therapy. The non-responding youths with social phobia felt evaluated and

  13. Rethinking Family Caregiving: Tailoring Cognitive–Behavioral Therapies to the Hospice Experience

    PubMed Central

    Washington, Karla T.; Wittenberg-Lyles, Elaine; Parker Oliver, Debra; Baldwin, Paula K.; Tappana, Jessica; Wright, Jesse H.; Demiris, George

    2014-01-01

    Hospice family caregivers experience significantly higher rates of psychological distress than demographically similar noncaregivers. Interventions based on cognitive–behavioral therapy have been shown to reduce psychological distress in the general population by providing tools to modify thinking patterns that directly affect emotions and behavior. Such interventions might reasonably be incorporated into hospice social work; however, numerous contextual factors must be taken into account to ensure that any interventions are appropriate to the unique needs of clients. The purpose of the study discussed in this article was to contextualize one aspect of the cognitive–behavioral model based on firsthand accounts of hospice family caregivers. Following a modified grounded theory approach, researchers engaged in a secondary analysis of data from a larger study provided in a subsample of 90 audio-recorded conversations between hospice family caregivers and interventionists. Findings indicated that distressed caregivers engaged in five dominant thinking patterns: (1) “should” statements, (2) catastrophizing or minimizing, (3) personalizing, (4) absolute thinking, and (5) making assumptions. Implementing cognitive–behavioral therapies based on identified caregiver thinking patterns will allow hospice social workers to empower caregivers to cope more effectively with the numerous stressors they encounter while caring for a dying loved one. PMID:25369725

  14. Family systems therapy for substance-using mothers and their 8- to 16-year-old children.

    PubMed

    Slesnick, Natasha; Zhang, Jing

    2016-09-01

    Family systems therapy has shown to be a powerful adjunct to substance use treatment for couples and for adolescent substance users (Rowe, 2012). However, studies including children (8-16 years of age) in the treatment of their substance using mothers have been overlooked and are essentially nonexistent. Addressing the quality of the mother-child relationship and communication through family systems therapy may prove to be a potent intervention focus for improving mothers' substance use outcomes and parent-child interaction. As such, the current study recruited 183 mothers who sought outpatient treatment through a local substance use treatment facility and randomly assigned them to also receive family systems therapy or Women's Health Education. Self-report and observational data were collected, and assessment interviews were completed at baseline and 3, 6, 12, and 18 months postbaseline. Findings showed that women assigned to family systems therapy showed a quicker decline in alcohol, marijuana, and cocaine use, supporting the efficacy of family therapy as an important addition to mother's substance use treatment plans. Data also revealed an association between change in observed autonomy-relatedness and substance use, though mediation was not found. To our knowledge this is the first effort to successfully document a family systems therapy for substance using mothers with minor children in their care. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. Effectiveness of Multidimensional Family Therapy with Higher Severity Substance-Abusing Adolescents: Report from Two Randomized Controlled Trials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Craig E.; Dakof, Gayle A.; Greenbaum, Paul E.; Liddle, Howard A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: We used growth mixture modeling to examine heterogeneity in treatment response in a secondary analysis of 2 randomized controlled trials testing multidimensional family therapy (MDFT), an established evidence-based therapy for adolescent drug abuse and delinquency. Method: The first study compared 2 evidence-based adolescent substance…

  16. Some Influences of Family Group Therapy on the Rehabilitation Potential of Clients. A Delgado Research Study. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galloway, John P.; Goldstein, Harris K.

    The Delgado Rehabilitation Center, New Orleans, Louisiana, conducted this study to determine the influence of family therapy on clients receiving rehabilitation services at the Center. An experimental group of randomly selected relatives of 33 clients received group therapy while 39 other randomly selected relatives served as controls. Criteria…

  17. Trends in Author Characteristics and Diversity Issues in the Journal of Marital and Family Therapy from 1990 to 2000

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, C. Everett; Pryce, Julia; Walsh, Froma

    2002-01-01

    In this article, we present an analysis and comparison of published articles in the "Journal of Marital and Family Therapy" (JMFT) between 1990-1995 and 1996-2000. This study focused on trends in author gender, highest degree, and professional affiliation, and article content on issues of cultural and family diversity (race/ethnicity, class,…

  18. Controlled Comparison of Family Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Psychoeducation/Relaxation Training for Child Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piacentini, John; Bergman, R. Lindsey; Chang, Susanna; Langley, Audra; Peris, Tara; Wood, Jeffrey J.; McCracken, James

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To examine the efficacy of exposure-based cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) plus a structured family intervention (FCBT) versus psychoeducation plus relaxation training (PRT) for reducing symptom severity, functional impairment, and family accommodation in youths with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Method: A total of 71…

  19. Letter Writing as an Intervention in Family Therapy with Adolescents Who Engage in Nonsuicidal Self-Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Rachel; Hinkle, Michelle Gimenez; Kress, Victoria White

    2010-01-01

    Family therapy can be an important component of a comprehensive treatment plan when counseling adolescents who engage in nonsuicidal self-injury. The authors provide a rationale for the use of letter writing as a therapeutic intervention when counseling families in which an adolescent engages in nonsuicidal self-injury. Descriptions of types of…

  20. A Qualitative Study of Intimate Partner Violence Universal Screening by Family Therapy Interns: Implications for Practice, Research, Training, and Supervision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todahl, Jeffrey L.; Linville, Deanna; Chou, Liang-Ying; Maher-Cosenza, Patricia

    2008-01-01

    Although a few family therapy researchers and clinicians have urged universal screening for intimate partner violence (IPV), how screening is implemented--and, in particular, client and therapist response to screening--is vaguely defined and largely untested. This qualitative study examined the dilemmas experienced by couples and family therapy…