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Sample records for family vibrionaceae reveals

  1. Development of a Simple and Rapid Fluorogenic Procedure for Identification of Vibrionaceae Family Members

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Gary P.; Watson, Michael A.; Parveen, Salina

    2005-01-01

    We describe a simple colony overlay procedure for peptidases (COPP) for the rapid fluorogenic detection and quantification of Vibrionaceae from seawater, shellfish, sewage, and clinical samples. The assay detects phosphoglucose isomerase with a lysyl aminopeptidase activity that is produced by Vibrionaceae family members. Overnight cultures are overlaid for 10 min with membranes containing a synthetic substrate, and the membranes are examined for fluorescent foci under UV illumination. Fluorescent foci were produced by all the Vibrionaceae tested, including Vibrio spp., Aeromonas spp., and Plesiomonas spp. Fluorescence was not produced by non-Vibrionaceae pathogens. Vibrio cholerae strains O1, O139, O22, and O155 were strongly positive. Seawater and oysters were assayed, and 87 of 93 (93.5%) of the positive isolates were identified biochemically as Vibrionaceae, principally Vibrio vulnificus, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Aeromonas hydrophila, Photobacterium damselae, and Shewanella putrefaciens. None of 50 nonfluorescent isolates were Vibrionaceae. No Vibrionaceae were detected in soil, and only A. hydrophila was detected in sewage. The COPP technique may be particularly valuable in environmental and food-testing laboratories and for monitoring water quality in the aquaculture industry. PMID:16000757

  2. [Allomonads, a new group of microorganisms of the Vibrionaceae family. III. Taxonomic analysis of the similarities between allomonads and other genera of the family].

    PubMed

    Kalina, G P; Nikonova, V A; Grafova, T I; Podosinnikova, L S; Somova, A G

    1980-08-01

    24 strains of Gram-negative bacilli with the polar location of flagellae, oxidase positive, releasing no gas in the process of glucose fermentation in aerobic and anaerobic conditions in the High-Leifson test, belonging to the family Vibrionaceae, were isolated from the feces of healthy persons, polluted water and sewage. Analysis by the method of numerical taxonomy revealed that these strains were essentially different from all other members of this family, and 19 of them formed a sharply defined group on the S-0,85 level, tentatively named Allomonas enterica comb. nov. Strain No. 40 (16-11-12), defined as a phenotype, is available from the USSR Collection of Type Cultures (Tarasevich State Research Institute for Standardization and Control of Medical Biological Preparations, Moscow) as No. 17.

  3. Genomic and systems evolution in Vibrionaceae species

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Jianying; Neary, Jennifer; Cai, Hong; Moshfeghian, Audrey; Rodriguez, Stephen A; Lilburn, Timothy G; Wang, Yufeng

    2009-01-01

    pathogenesis mechanisms as well as in the fundamental life cycle of Vibrionaceae species. Conclusion Our results provide evidence of genome plasticity and rapid evolution within the family Vibrionaceae. The comparisons point to sources of genomic variation and candidates for lineage-specific adaptations of each Vibrionaceae pathogen or nonpathogen strain. Such lineage specific expansions could reveal components in bacterial systems that, by their enhanced genetic variability, can be tied to responses to environmental challenges, interesting phenotypes, or adaptive pathogenic responses to host challenges. PMID:19594870

  4. Advanced Microbial Taxonomy Combined with Genome-Based-Approaches Reveals that Vibrio astriarenae sp. nov., an Agarolytic Marine Bacterium, Forms a New Clade in Vibrionaceae

    PubMed Central

    Al-saari, Nurhidayu; Gao, Feng; A.K.M. Rohul, Amin; Sato, Kazumichi; Sato, Keisuke; Mino, Sayaka; Suda, Wataru; Oshima, Kenshiro; Hattori, Masahira; Ohkuma, Moriya; Meirelles, Pedro M.; Thompson, Fabiano L.; Thompson, Cristiane; A. Filho, Gilberto M.; Gomez-Gil, Bruno; Sawabe, Toko; Sawabe, Tomoo

    2015-01-01

    Advances in genomic microbial taxonomy have opened the way to create a more universal and transparent concept of species but is still in a transitional stage towards becoming a defining robust criteria for describing new microbial species with minimum features obtained using both genome and classical polyphasic taxonomies. Here we performed advanced microbial taxonomies combined with both genome-based and classical approaches for new agarolytic vibrio isolates to describe not only a novel Vibrio species but also a member of a new Vibrio clade. Two novel vibrio strains (Vibrio astriarenae sp. nov. C7T and C20) showing agarolytic, halophilic and fermentative metabolic activity were isolated from a seawater sample collected in a coral reef in Okinawa. Intraspecific similarities of the isolates were identical in both sequences on the 16S rRNA and pyrH genes, but the closest relatives on the molecular phylogenetic trees on the basis of 16S rRNA and pyrH gene sequences were V. hangzhouensis JCM 15146T (97.8% similarity) and V. agarivorans CECT 5085T (97.3% similarity), respectively. Further multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) on the basis of 8 protein coding genes (ftsZ, gapA, gyrB, mreB, pyrH, recA, rpoA, and topA) obtained by the genome sequences clearly showed the V. astriarenae strain C7T and C20 formed a distinct new clade protruded next to V. agarivorans CECT 5085T. The singleton V. agarivorans has never been included in previous MLSA of Vibrionaceae due to the lack of some gene sequences. Now the gene sequences are completed and analysis of 100 taxa in total provided a clear picture describing the association of V. agarivorans into pre-existing concatenated network tree and concluded its relationship to our vibrio strains. Experimental DNA-DNA hybridization (DDH) data showed that the strains C7T and C20 were conspecific but were separated from all of the other Vibrio species related on the basis of both 16S rRNA and pyrH gene phylogenies (e.g., V. agarivorans CECT

  5. Comparative genomic analysis of regulation of anaerobic respiration in ten genomes from three families of gamma-proteobacteria (Enterobacteriaceae, Pasteurellaceae, Vibrionaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Ravcheev, Dmitry A; Gerasimova, Anna V; Mironov, Andrey A; Gelfand, Mikhail S

    2007-01-01

    Background Gamma-proteobacteria, such as Escherichia coli, can use a variety of respiratory substrates employing numerous aerobic and anaerobic respiratory systems controlled by multiple transcription regulators. Thus, in E. coli, global control of respiration is mediated by four transcription factors, Fnr, ArcA, NarL and NarP. However, in other Gamma-proteobacteria the composition of global respiration regulators may be different. Results In this study we applied a comparative genomic approach to the analysis of three global regulatory systems, Fnr, ArcA and NarP. These systems were studied in available genomes containing these three regulators, but lacking NarL. So, we considered several representatives of Pasteurellaceae, Vibrionaceae and Yersinia spp. As a result, we identified new regulon members, functioning in respiration, central metabolism (glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, pentose phosphate pathway, citrate cicle, metabolism of pyruvate and lactate), metabolism of carbohydrates and fatty acids, transcriptional regulation and transport, in particular: the ATP synthase operon atpIBEFHAGCD, Na+-exporting NADH dehydrogenase operon nqrABCDEF, the D-amino acids dehydrogenase operon dadAX. Using an extension of the comparative technique, we demonstrated taxon-specific changes in regulatory interactions and predicted taxon-specific regulatory cascades. Conclusion A comparative genomic technique was applied to the analysis of global regulation of respiration in ten gamma-proteobacterial genomes. Three structurally different but functionally related regulatory systems were described. A correlation between the regulon size and the position of a transcription factor in regulatory cascades was observed: regulators with larger regulons tend to occupy top positions in the cascades. On the other hand, there is no obvious link to differences in the species' lifestyles and metabolic capabilities. PMID:17313674

  6. Microbial experimental evolution as a novel research approach in the Vibrionaceae and squid-Vibrio symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Soto, William; Nishiguchi, Michele K.

    2014-01-01

    The Vibrionaceae are a genetically and metabolically diverse family living in aquatic habitats with a great propensity toward developing interactions with eukaryotic microbial and multicellular hosts (as either commensals, pathogens, and mutualists). The Vibrionaceae frequently possess a life history cycle where bacteria are attached to a host in one phase and then another where they are free from their host as either part of the bacterioplankton or adhered to solid substrates such as marine sediment, riverbeds, lakebeds, or floating particulate debris. These two stages in their life history exert quite distinct and separate selection pressures. When bound to solid substrates or to host cells, the Vibrionaceae can also exist as complex biofilms. The association between bioluminescent Vibrio spp. and sepiolid squids (Cephalopoda: Sepiolidae) is an experimentally tractable model to study bacteria and animal host interactions, since the symbionts and squid hosts can be maintained in the laboratory independently of one another. The bacteria can be grown in pure culture and the squid hosts raised gnotobiotically with sterile light organs. The partnership between free-living Vibrio symbionts and axenic squid hatchlings emerging from eggs must be renewed every generation of the cephalopod host. Thus, symbiotic bacteria and animal host can each be studied alone and together in union. Despite virtues provided by the Vibrionaceae and sepiolid squid-Vibrio symbiosis, these assets to evolutionary biology have yet to be fully utilized for microbial experimental evolution. Experimental evolution studies already completed are reviewed, along with exploratory topics for future study. PMID:25538686

  7. The fur Gene as a New Phylogenetic Marker for Vibrionaceae Species Identification

    PubMed Central

    Gram, Lone

    2015-01-01

    Microbial taxonomy is essential in all areas of microbial science. The 16S rRNA gene sequence is one of the main phylogenetic species markers; however, it does not provide discrimination in the family Vibrionaceae, where other molecular techniques allow better interspecies resolution. Although multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) has been used successfully in the identification of Vibrio species, the technique has several limitations. They include the fact that several locus amplifications and sequencing have to be performed, which still sometimes lead to doubtful identifications. Using an in silico approach based on genomes from 103 Vibrionaceae strains, we demonstrate here the high resolution of the fur gene in the identification of Vibrionaceae species and its usefulness as a phylogenetic marker. The fur gene showed within-species similarity higher than 95%, and the relationships inferred from its use were in agreement with those observed for 16S rRNA analysis and MLSA. Furthermore, we developed a fur PCR sequencing-based method that allowed identification of Vibrio species. The discovery of the phylogenetic power of the fur gene and the development of a PCR method that can be used in amplification and sequencing of the gene are of general interest whether for use alone or together with the previously suggested loci in an MLSA. PMID:25662978

  8. Production of bioactive secondary metabolites by marine vibrionaceae.

    PubMed

    Mansson, Maria; Gram, Lone; Larsen, Thomas O

    2011-01-01

    Bacteria belonging to the Vibrionaceae family are widespread in the marine environment. Today, 128 species of vibrios are known. Several of them are infamous for their pathogenicity or symbiotic relationships. Despite their ability to interact with eukaryotes, the vibrios are greatly underexplored for their ability to produce bioactive secondary metabolites and studies have been limited to only a few species. Most of the compounds isolated from vibrios so far are non-ribosomal peptides or hybrids thereof, with examples of N-containing compounds produced independent of nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS). Though covering a limited chemical space, vibrios produce compounds with attractive biological activities, including antibacterial, anticancer, and antivirulence activities. This review highlights some of the most interesting structures from this group of bacteria. Many compounds found in vibrios have also been isolated from other distantly related bacteria. This cosmopolitan occurrence of metabolites indicates a high incidence of horizontal gene transfer, which raises interesting questions concerning the ecological function of some of these molecules. This account underlines the pending potential for exploring new bacterial sources of bioactive compounds and the challenges related to their investigation.

  9. FurIOS: A Web-Based Tool for Identification of Vibrionaceae Species Using the fur Gene

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Henrique; Cardoso, João; Giubergia, Sonia; Rapacki, Kristoffer; Gram, Lone

    2017-01-01

    Gene based methods for identification of species from the Vibrionaceae family have been developed during the last decades to address the limitations of the commonly used 16S rRNA gene phylogeny. Recently, we found that the ferric-uptake regulator gene (fur) can be used as a single identification marker providing species discrimination, consistent with multi-locus sequencing analyses and whole genome phylogenies. To allow for broader and easy use of this marker, we have developed an online prediction service that allows the identification of Vibrionaceae species based on their fur-sequence. The input is a DNA sequence that can be uploaded on the web service; the output is a table containing the strain identifier, e-value, and percentage of identity for each of the matches with rows colored in green for hits with high probability of being the same species. The service is available on the web at: http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/furIOS-1.0/. The fur-sequences can be derived either from genome sequences or from PCR-amplification of the genomic region encoding the fur gene. We have used 191 strains identified as Vibrionaceae based on 16S rRNA gene sequence to test the PCR method and the web service on a large dataset. We were able to classify 171 of 191 strains at the species level and 20 strains remained unclassified. Furthermore, the fur phylogenetics and subsequent in silico DNA-DNA hybridization demonstrated that two strains (ATCC 33789 and ZS-139) previously identified as Vibrio splendidus are more closely related to V. tasmaniensis and V. cyclitrophicus, respectively. FurIOS is an easy-to-use online service that allows the identification of bacteria from the Vibrionaceae family at the species level using the fur gene as a single marker. Its simplistic design and straightforward pipeline makes it suitable for any research environment, from academia to industry. PMID:28348552

  10. FurIOS: A Web-Based Tool for Identification of Vibrionaceae Species Using the fur Gene.

    PubMed

    Machado, Henrique; Cardoso, João; Giubergia, Sonia; Rapacki, Kristoffer; Gram, Lone

    2017-01-01

    Gene based methods for identification of species from the Vibrionaceae family have been developed during the last decades to address the limitations of the commonly used 16S rRNA gene phylogeny. Recently, we found that the ferric-uptake regulator gene (fur) can be used as a single identification marker providing species discrimination, consistent with multi-locus sequencing analyses and whole genome phylogenies. To allow for broader and easy use of this marker, we have developed an online prediction service that allows the identification of Vibrionaceae species based on their fur-sequence. The input is a DNA sequence that can be uploaded on the web service; the output is a table containing the strain identifier, e-value, and percentage of identity for each of the matches with rows colored in green for hits with high probability of being the same species. The service is available on the web at: http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/furIOS-1.0/. The fur-sequences can be derived either from genome sequences or from PCR-amplification of the genomic region encoding the fur gene. We have used 191 strains identified as Vibrionaceae based on 16S rRNA gene sequence to test the PCR method and the web service on a large dataset. We were able to classify 171 of 191 strains at the species level and 20 strains remained unclassified. Furthermore, the fur phylogenetics and subsequent in silico DNA-DNA hybridization demonstrated that two strains (ATCC 33789 and ZS-139) previously identified as Vibrio splendidus are more closely related to V. tasmaniensis and V. cyclitrophicus, respectively. FurIOS is an easy-to-use online service that allows the identification of bacteria from the Vibrionaceae family at the species level using the fur gene as a single marker. Its simplistic design and straightforward pipeline makes it suitable for any research environment, from academia to industry.

  11. Familial research reveals new practice model.

    PubMed

    Denham, Sharon A

    2003-01-01

    Three ethnographic studies investigated how families define and practice family health within their household and community settings. Synthesis of these findings prompted the Family Health Model. It suggests ways to dialogue about the complex variables associated with family health and approaches to family-focused practice.

  12. Comparative analysis of quantitative methodologies for Vibrionaceae biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Chavez-Dozal, Alba A.; Nourabadi, Neda; Erken, Martina; McDougald, Diane; Nishiguchi, Michele K.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple symbiotic and free living Vibrio sp. grow as a form of microbial community known as biofilm. In the laboratory, methods to quantify Vibrio biofilm mass include crystal violet staining, direct Colony Forming Unit (CFU) counting, dry biofilm cell mass measurement, and observation of development of wrinkled colonies. Another approach for bacterial biofilms also involves the use of tetrazolium (XTT) assays (used widely in studies of fungi) that are an appropriate measure of metabolic activity and vitality of cells within the biofilm matrix. This study systematically tested five techniques, among which the XTT assay and wrinkled colony measurement provided the most reproducible, accurate, and efficient methods for the quantitative estimation of Vibrionaceae biofilms. PMID:27009592

  13. [Familial congenital hypomagnesemia revealed by neonatal convulsions].

    PubMed

    Ndiaye, M; Dehanin, T; Sow, A-D; Sène, M-S; Basse, A-M; Fall, A-L; Seck, L-B; Touré, K; Diop, A-G; Sow, H-D; Ndiaye, M-M

    2013-11-01

    Congenital hypomagnesemia is a rare disease, with an impact on cognitive and neurological development. We report on three familial cases of congenital hypomagnesemia, two boys and one girl who belong to the same consanguineous family. They all presented neonatal seizures and a psychomotor developmental delay. Cerebral computed tomography showed cerebral atrophy and calcifications in one case and magnetic resonance imaging found predominant cerebellar atrophy in the two other cases. All three patients also had hypocalcemia, hyperphosphoremia, and hypomagnesemia. The parathyroid hormone blood level was low in two cases and normal in the third. One 7-month old patient died. The others received a supplementation of calcium and magnesium, which normalized calcemia, phosphatemia but not magnesemia, which remained low despite high doses. They have both developed cognitive and behavioral impairments.

  14. Associations and dynamics of Vibrionaceae in the environment, from the genus to the population level

    PubMed Central

    Takemura, Alison F.; Chien, Diana M.; Polz, Martin F.

    2013-01-01

    The Vibrionaceae, which encompasses several potential pathogens, including V. cholerae, the causative agent of cholera, and V. vulnificus, the deadliest seafood-borne pathogen, are a well-studied family of marine bacteria that thrive in diverse habitats. To elucidate the environmental conditions under which vibrios proliferate, numerous studies have examined correlations with bulk environmental variables—e.g., temperature, salinity, nitrogen, and phosphate—and association with potential host organisms. However, how meaningful these environmental associations are remains unclear because data are fragmented across studies with variable sampling and analysis methods. Here, we synthesize findings about Vibrio correlations and physical associations using a framework of increasingly fine environmental and taxonomic scales, to better understand their dynamics in the wild. We first conduct a meta-analysis to determine trends with respect to bulk water environmental variables, and find that while temperature and salinity are generally strongly predictive correlates, other parameters are inconsistent and overall patterns depend on taxonomic resolution. Based on the hypothesis that dynamics may better correlate with more narrowly defined niches, we review evidence for specific association with plants, algae, zooplankton, and animals. We find that Vibrio are attached to many organisms, though evidence for enrichment compared to the water column is often lacking. Additionally, contrary to the notion that they flourish predominantly while attached, Vibrio can have, at least temporarily, a free-living lifestyle and even engage in massive blooms. Fine-scale sampling from the water column has enabled identification of such lifestyle preferences for ecologically cohesive populations, and future efforts will benefit from similar analysis at fine genetic and environmental sampling scales to describe the conditions, habitats, and resources shaping Vibrio dynamics. PMID:24575082

  15. Activity screening of environmental metagenomic libraries reveals novel carboxylesterase families

    PubMed Central

    Popovic, Ana; Hai, Tran; Tchigvintsev, Anatoly; Hajighasemi, Mahbod; Nocek, Boguslaw; Khusnutdinova, Anna N.; Brown, Greg; Glinos, Julia; Flick, Robert; Skarina, Tatiana; Chernikova, Tatyana N.; Yim, Veronica; Brüls, Thomas; Paslier, Denis Le; Yakimov, Michail M.; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Ferrer, Manuel; Golyshina, Olga V.; Savchenko, Alexei; Golyshin, Peter N.; Yakunin, Alexander F.

    2017-01-01

    Metagenomics has made accessible an enormous reserve of global biochemical diversity. To tap into this vast resource of novel enzymes, we have screened over one million clones from metagenome DNA libraries derived from sixteen different environments for carboxylesterase activity and identified 714 positive hits. We have validated the esterase activity of 80 selected genes, which belong to 17 different protein families including unknown and cyclase-like proteins. Three metagenomic enzymes exhibited lipase activity, and seven proteins showed polyester depolymerization activity against polylactic acid and polycaprolactone. Detailed biochemical characterization of four new enzymes revealed their substrate preference, whereas their catalytic residues were identified using site-directed mutagenesis. The crystal structure of the metal-ion dependent esterase MGS0169 from the amidohydrolase superfamily revealed a novel active site with a bound unknown ligand. Thus, activity-centered metagenomics has revealed diverse enzymes and novel families of microbial carboxylesterases, whose activity could not have been predicted using bioinformatics tools. PMID:28272521

  16. Evolution of Arginine Biosynthesis in the Bacterial Domain: Novel Gene-Enzyme Relationships from Psychrophilic Moritella Strains (Vibrionaceae) and Evolutionary Significance of N-α-Acetyl Ornithinase

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ying; Liang, Ziyuan; Legrain, Christianne; Rüger, Hans J.; Glansdorff, Nicolas

    2000-01-01

    In the arginine biosynthetic pathway of the vast majority of prokaryotes, the formation of ornithine is catalyzed by an enzyme transferring the acetyl group of N-α-acetylornithine to glutamate (ornithine acetyltransferase [OATase]) (argJ encoded). Only two exceptions had been reported—the Enterobacteriaceae and Myxococcus xanthus (members of the γ and δ groups of the class Proteobacteria, respectively)—in which ornithine is produced from N-α-acetylornithine by a deacylase, acetylornithinase (AOase) (argE encoded). We have investigated the gene-enzyme relationship in the arginine regulons of two psychrophilic Moritella strains belonging to the Vibrionaceae, a family phylogenetically related to the Enterobacteriaceae. Most of the arg genes were found to be clustered in one continuous sequence divergently transcribed in two wings, argE and argCBFGH(A) [“H(A)” indicates that the argininosuccinase gene consists of a part homologous to known argH sequences and of a 3′ extension able to complement an Escherichia coli mutant deficient in the argA gene, encoding N-α-acetylglutamate synthetase, the first enzyme committed to the pathway]. Phylogenetic evidence suggests that this new clustering pattern arose in an ancestor common to Vibrionaceae and Enterobacteriaceae, where OATase was lost and replaced by a deacylase. The AOase and ornithine carbamoyltransferase of these psychrophilic strains both display distinctly cold-adapted activity profiles, providing the first cold-active examples of such enzymes. PMID:10692366

  17. Evaluation of the Phoenix 100 ID/AST system and NID panel for identification of Enterobacteriaceae, Vibrionaceae, and commonly isolated nonenteric gram-negative bacilli.

    PubMed

    O'Hara, Caroline M

    2006-03-01

    The Phoenix 100 ID/AST system (Becton Dickinson Co., Sparks, Md.) is an automated system for the identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of bacterial isolates. This system with its negative identification (NID) panel was evaluated for its accuracy in the identification of 507 isolates of the family Enterobacteriaceae, 57 other nonenteric gram-negative isolates that are commonly isolated in clinical microbiology laboratories, and 138 isolates of the family Vibrionaceae. All of the isolates had been characterized by using approximately 48 conventional tube biochemicals. Of the 507 isolates of the Enterobacteriaceae, 456 (89.9%) were correctly identified to the genus and species levels. The five isolates of Proteus penneri required an off-line indole test, as suggested by the system to differentiate them from Proteus vulgaris. The identifications of 20 (3.9%) isolates were correct to the genus level but incorrect at the species level. Two (0.4%) isolates were reported as "no identification." Misidentifications to the genus and species levels occurred for 29 (5.7%) isolates of the Enterobacteriaceae. These incorrect identifications were spread over 14 different genera. The most common error was the misidentification of Salmonella species. The shortest time for a correct identification was 2 h 8 min. The longest time was 12 h 27 min, for the identification of a Serratia marcescens isolate. Of the 57 isolates of nonenteric gram-negative bacilli (Acinetobacter, Aeromonas, Burkholderia, Plesiomonas, Pseudomonas, and Stenotrophomonas spp.), 48 (84.2%) were correctly identified to the genus and species levels and 7 (12.3%) were correctly identified to the genus level but not to the species level. The average time for a correct identification was 5 h 11 min. Of the Vibrionaceae spp., 123 (89.1%) were correctly identified at the end of the initial incubation period, which averaged 4 h. Based on the findings of this study, the Phoenix 100 ID/AST system NID panel

  18. Family level phylogenies reveal modes of macroevolution in RNA viruses

    PubMed Central

    Kitchen, Andrew; Shackelton, Laura A.; Holmes, Edward C.

    2011-01-01

    Despite advances in understanding the patterns and processes of microevolution in RNA viruses, little is known about the determinants of viral diversification at the macroevolutionary scale. In particular, the processes by which viral lineages assigned as different “species” are generated remain largely uncharacterized. To address this issue, we use a robust phylogenetic approach to analyze patterns of lineage diversification in five representative families of RNA viruses. We ask whether the process of lineage diversification primarily occurs when viruses infect new host species, either through cross-species transmission or codivergence, and which are defined here as analogous to allopatric speciation in animals, or by acquiring new niches within the same host species, analogous to sympatric speciation. By mapping probable primary host species onto family level viral phylogenies, we reveal a strong clustering among viral lineages that infect groups of closely related host species. Although this is consistent with lineage diversification within individual hosts, we argue that this pattern more likely represents strong biases in our knowledge of viral biodiversity, because we also find that better-sampled human viruses rarely cluster together. Hence, although closely related viruses tend to infect related host species, it is unlikely that they often infect the same host species, such that evolutionary constraints hinder lineage diversification within individual host species. We conclude that the colonization of new but related host species may represent the principle mode of macroevolution in RNA viruses. PMID:21173251

  19. Water quality parameters and total aerobic bacterial and vibrionaceae loads in eastern oysters (Crassostrea virginica) from oyster gardening sites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oyster gardening is a practice designed to restore habitat for marine life and to improve water quality. This study determined physical and chemical water quality parameters at two oyster gardening sites in the Delaware Inland Bays and compared them with total aerobic bacteria and Vibrionaceae conc...

  20. Influence of Niche-Specific Nutrients on Secondary Metabolism in Vibrionaceae

    PubMed Central

    Phippen, Christopher; Gotfredsen, Charlotte H.; Nielsen, Kristian Fog

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Many factors, such as the substrate and the growth phase, influence biosynthesis of secondary metabolites in microorganisms. Therefore, it is crucial to consider these factors when establishing a bioprospecting strategy. Mimicking the conditions of the natural environment has been suggested as a means of inducing or influencing microbial secondary metabolite production. The purpose of the present study was to determine how the bioactivity of Vibrionaceae was influenced by carbon sources typical of their natural environment. We determined how mannose and chitin, compared to glucose, influenced the antibacterial activity of a collection of Vibrionaceae strains isolated because of their ability to produce antibacterial compounds but that in subsequent screenings seemed to have lost this ability. The numbers of bioactive isolates were 2- and 3.5-fold higher when strains were grown on mannose and chitin, respectively, than on glucose. As secondary metabolites are typically produced during late growth, potential producers were also allowed 1 to 2 days of growth before exposure to the pathogen. This strategy led to a 3-fold increase in the number of bioactive strains on glucose and an 8-fold increase on both chitin and mannose. We selected two bioactive strains belonging to species for which antibacterial activity had not previously been identified. Using ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography–high-resolution mass spectrometry and bioassay-guided fractionation, we found that the siderophore fluvibactin was responsible for the antibacterial activity of Vibrio furnissii and Vibrio fluvialis. These results suggest a role of chitin in the regulation of secondary metabolism in vibrios and demonstrate that considering bacterial ecophysiology during development of screening strategies will facilitate bioprospecting. IMPORTANCE A challenge in microbial natural product discovery is the elicitation of the biosynthetic gene clusters that are silent when

  1. Unique Features of Germline Variation in Five Egyptian Familial Breast Cancer Families Revealed by Exome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeong C.; Soliman, Amr S.; Cui, Jian; Ramadan, Mohamed; Hablas, Ahmed; Abouelhoda, Mohamed; Hussien, Nehal; Ahmed, Ola; Zekri, Abdel-Rahman Nabawy; Seifeldin, Ibrahim A.

    2017-01-01

    Genetic predisposition increases the risk of familial breast cancer. Recent studies indicate that genetic predisposition for familial breast cancer can be ethnic-specific. However, current knowledge of genetic predisposition for the disease is predominantly derived from Western populations. Using this existing information as the sole reference to judge the predisposition in non-Western populations is not adequate and can potentially lead to misdiagnosis. Efforts are required to collect genetic predisposition from non-Western populations. The Egyptian population has high genetic variations in reflecting its divergent ethnic origins, and incident rate of familial breast cancer in Egypt is also higher than the rate in many other populations. Using whole exome sequencing, we investigated genetic predisposition in five Egyptian familial breast cancer families. No pathogenic variants in BRCA1, BRCA2 and other classical breast cancer-predisposition genes were present in these five families. Comparison of the genetic variants with those in Caucasian familial breast cancer showed that variants in the Egyptian families were more variable and heterogeneous than the variants in Caucasian families. Multiple damaging variants in genes of different functional categories were identified either in a single family or shared between families. Our study demonstrates that genetic predisposition in Egyptian breast cancer families may differ from those in other disease populations, and supports a comprehensive screening of local disease families to determine the genetic predisposition in Egyptian familial breast cancer. PMID:28076423

  2. Isolated recurrent pleuritis revealing familial mediterranean Fever in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Lega, J C; Khouatra, C; Cottin, V; Cordier, J F

    2010-01-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is a genetic autoinflammatory disease especially affecting populations of Mediterranean origin with an autosomal recessive inheritance. The cardinal manifestations consist of short febrile and painful attacks of peritonitis, arthritis and pleuritis developing during childhood. We report the case of a 26-year-old man of Tunisian descent who had febrile episodes of right-sided pleuritis without any extrathoracic complaints. Disappearance of attacks with one dose of colchicine (1 mg/day) strengthened the presumptive diagnosis of atypical FMF, which was further confirmed by genetic testing identifying the homozygous mutation M694I/M694I of the MEFV gene.

  3. Vibrio galatheae sp. nov., a member of the family Vibrionaceae isolated from a mussel.

    PubMed

    Giubergia, Sonia; Machado, Henrique; Valentina Mateiu, Ramona; Gram, Lone

    2016-01-01

    Based on genetic, chemotaxonomic and phenotypic characteristics, a novel species belonging to the genus Vibrio is described. The facultatively anaerobic strain S2757T was isolated from a mussel collected in the Solomon Sea (Solomon Islands). Phylogenetic analyses based on sequences of 16S rRNA and fur genes indicated affiliation of the strain to a novel species. This observation was supported by a multilocus sequence analysis including sequences of the housekeeping genes 16S rRNA, gyrB, pyrH, recA and topA. In silico DNA-DNA hybridization and average nucleotide identity values comparing the genomic sequence of strain S2757T with those of closely related type strains were lower than 23 and 82 %, respectively. The DNA G+C content of the strain was 45.3 mol%. Phenotypic and chemotaxonomic analyses clearly differentiated the strain from other Vibrio species. Hence, strain S2757T should be considered to represent a novel species of the genus Vibrio, for which the name Vibrio galatheae sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is S2757T ( = DSM 100497T = LMG 28895T).

  4. Phylogenetic analysis of the incidence of lux gene horizontal transfer in Vibrionaceae.

    PubMed

    Urbanczyk, Henryk; Ast, Jennifer C; Kaeding, Allison J; Oliver, James D; Dunlap, Paul V

    2008-05-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is thought to occur frequently in bacteria in nature and to play an important role in bacterial evolution, contributing to the formation of new species. To gain insight into the frequency of HGT in Vibrionaceae and its possible impact on speciation, we assessed the incidence of interspecies transfer of the lux genes (luxCDABEG), which encode proteins involved in luminescence, a distinctive phenotype. Three hundred three luminous strains, most of which were recently isolated from nature and which represent 11 Aliivibrio, Photobacterium, and Vibrio species, were screened for incongruence of phylogenies based on a representative housekeeping gene (gyrB or pyrH) and a representative lux gene (luxA). Strains exhibiting incongruence were then subjected to detailed phylogenetic analysis of horizontal transfer by using multiple housekeeping genes (gyrB, recA, and pyrH) and multiple lux genes (luxCDABEG). In nearly all cases, housekeeping gene and lux gene phylogenies were congruent, and there was no instance in which the lux genes of one luminous species had replaced the lux genes of another luminous species. Therefore, the lux genes are predominantly vertically inherited in Vibrionaceae. The few exceptions to this pattern of congruence were as follows: (i) the lux genes of the only known luminous strain of Vibrio vulnificus, VVL1 (ATCC 43382), were evolutionarily closely related to the lux genes of Vibrio harveyi; (ii) the lux genes of two luminous strains of Vibrio chagasii, 21N-12 and SB-52, were closely related to those of V. harveyi and Vibrio splendidus, respectively; (iii) the lux genes of a luminous strain of Photobacterium damselae, BT-6, were closely related to the lux genes of the lux-rib(2) operon of Photobacterium leiognathi; and (iv) a strain of the luminous bacterium Photobacterium mandapamensis was found to be merodiploid for the lux genes, and the second set of lux genes was closely related to the lux genes of the lux-rib(2

  5. [Reactions of different Enterobacteriaceae and Vibrionaceae species in BRILA-MUG (Fluorocult) bouillion].

    PubMed

    Aleksić, S; Bockemühl, J; Schulze, G; Havemeister, G; Heinemeyer, E A; Müller, H E; von Pritzbuer, E

    1990-10-01

    In order to test the usefulness of BRILA-MUG (= Fluorocult) medium (Merck) for isolation and identification of total coliforms and faecal coliforms in surface water according to the EC guidelines for bathing waters a total of 969 strains of different Enterobacteriaceae and Vibrionaceae species was examined under different culture conditions. These included 486 E. coli (reference strains of O-groups 1-170, enterotoxin and Verotoxin-producing strains), 149 Salmonella (subspecies I-VI), 92 Yersinia, 44 Shigella, 64 Vibrio, 16 Aeromonas, and 118 strains of other Enterobacteriaceae species. After 48 h incubation at 36 degrees C 372 (82.0%) of 486 E. coli showed the typical reactions of gas formation, fluorescence (beta-glucuronidase activity), and indole production. Examination of fluorescence after addition of 1 N NaOH (0.5 ml), or testing of indole production after subculture in tryptophane containing broth improved the amount of typical reactions to 434 (95.4%). Incubation at 44 degrees C for 48 h gave less favourable results as compared with that at 36 degrees C. Out of 483 strains of other species 3.9% Salmonella strains of subspecies II-IV, 6.25% Citrobacter freundii, and 50% Edwardsiella tarda strains yielded reactions typical of E. coli. Shigella and Yersinia strains occasionally produced indole or fluorescence, but never visible gas.

  6. Comparative analysis of superintegrons: engineering extensive genetic diversity in the Vibrionaceae.

    PubMed

    Rowe-Magnus, Dean A; Guerout, Anne-Marie; Biskri, Latefa; Bouige, Philippe; Mazel, Didier

    2003-03-01

    Integrons are natural tools for bacterial evolution and innovation. Their involvement in the capture and dissemination of antibiotic-resistance genes among Gram-negative bacteria is well documented. Recently, massive ancestral versions, the superintegrons (SIs), were discovered in the genomes of diverse proteobacterial species. SI gene cassettes with an identifiable activity encode proteins related to simple adaptive functions, including resistance, virulence, and metabolic activities, and their recruitment was interpreted as providing the host with an adaptive advantage. Here, we present extensive comparative analysis of SIs identified among the Vibrionaceae. Each was at least 100 kb in size, reaffirming the participation of SIs in the genome plasticity and heterogeneity of these species. Phylogenetic and localization data supported the sedentary nature of the functional integron platform and its coevolution with the host genome. Conversely, comparative analysis of the SI cassettes was indicative of both a wide range of origin for the entrapped genes and of an active cassette assembly process in these bacterial species. The signature attC sites of each species displayed conserved structural characteristics indicating that symmetry rather than sequence was important in the recognition of such a varied collection of target recombination sequences by a single site-specific recombinase. Our discovery of various addiction module cassettes within each of the different SIs indicates a possible role for them in the overall stability of large integron cassette arrays.

  7. An augmented supermatrix phylogeny of the avian family Picidae reveals uncertainty deep in the family tree.

    PubMed

    Dufort, Matthew J

    2016-01-01

    The accumulation of DNA sequence data in public repositories allows for phylogenetic inference on unprecedented taxonomic scales using supermatrix approaches. Careful analysis of available data allows strategic augmentation with new sequences in order to maximize taxonomic sampling and coverage of informative loci. I inferred relationships among 179 species (76%) in the avian family Picidae (woodpeckers, piculets, and wrynecks), using publicly available sequence data supplemented with targeted sequencing to increase species-level and locus-level sampling and maximize resolution. Results of these analyses generally corroborate previous molecular studies, with consensus on the membership of most genera and tribes. However, several newly placed taxa show surprising affinities, and several genera as currently delineated appear to be paraphyletic. Relationships among major clades of Picidae remain poorly resolved, particularly among the three lineages of piculets, the unusual woodpecker genus Hemicircus, and the remaining woodpeckers, and among the major groups of true woodpeckers (Picinae). If these deep relationships are to be resolved, phylogenomic approaches may be necessary.

  8. Family Based Whole Exome Sequencing Reveals the Multifaceted Role of Notch Signaling in Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chetaille, Philippe; Prince, Andrea; Godard, Beatrice; Leclerc, Severine; Sobreira, Nara; Ling, Hua; Awadalla, Philip; Thibeault, Maryse; Khairy, Paul; Samuels, Mark E.; Andelfinger, Gregor

    2016-01-01

    Left-ventricular outflow tract obstructions (LVOTO) encompass a wide spectrum of phenotypically heterogeneous heart malformations which frequently cluster in families. We performed family based whole-exome and targeted re-sequencing on 182 individuals from 51 families with multiple affected members. Central to our approach is the family unit which serves as a reference to identify causal genotype-phenotype correlations. Screening a multitude of 10 overlapping phenotypes revealed disease associated and co-segregating variants in 12 families. These rare or novel protein altering mutations cluster predominantly in genes (NOTCH1, ARHGAP31, MAML1, SMARCA4, JARID2, JAG1) along the Notch signaling cascade. This is in line with a significant enrichment (Wilcoxon, p< 0.05) of variants with a higher pathogenicity in the Notch signaling pathway in patients compared to controls. The significant enrichment of novel protein truncating and missense mutations in NOTCH1 highlights the allelic and phenotypic heterogeneity in our pediatric cohort. We identified novel co-segregating pathogenic mutations in NOTCH1 associated with left and right-sided cardiac malformations in three independent families with a total of 15 affected individuals. In summary, our results suggest that a small but highly pathogenic fraction of family specific mutations along the Notch cascade are a common cause of LVOTO. PMID:27760138

  9. Study of Alzheimer family case reveals hemochromotosis-associated HFE mutation

    PubMed Central

    Artemov, Artem V; Boulygina, Eugenia S; Tsygankova, Svetlana V; Nedoluzhko, Artem V; Chekanov, Nikolay N; Gruzdeva, Natalia M; Selezneva, Natalia D; Roshchina, Irina F; Gavrilova, Svetlana I; Velichkovsky, Boris B; Skryabin, Konstantin G; Prokhortchouk, Egor B

    2014-01-01

    We report a family case of type II early-onset Alzheimer’s disease (AD) inherited over three generations. None of the patients in the family had mutations in the genes believed to be the major risk factors for AD, such as APP, presenilin 1 or 2. Targeted exome sequencing of 249 genes that were previously reported to be associated with AD revealed a rare mutation in hemochromatosis (HFE) gene known to be associated with hemochromotosis. Compared to previous studies, we show that HFE mutation can possess the risk of AD in transferrin-, APOE- and APP-normal patients. PMID:27081498

  10. Study of Alzheimer family case reveals hemochromotosis-associated HFE mutation.

    PubMed

    Artemov, Artem V; Boulygina, Eugenia S; Tsygankova, Svetlana V; Nedoluzhko, Artem V; Chekanov, Nikolay N; Gruzdeva, Natalia M; Selezneva, Natalia D; Roshchina, Irina F; Gavrilova, Svetlana I; Velichkovsky, Boris B; Skryabin, Konstantin G; Prokhortchouk, Egor B

    2014-01-01

    We report a family case of type II early-onset Alzheimer's disease (AD) inherited over three generations. None of the patients in the family had mutations in the genes believed to be the major risk factors for AD, such as APP, presenilin 1 or 2. Targeted exome sequencing of 249 genes that were previously reported to be associated with AD revealed a rare mutation in hemochromatosis (HFE) gene known to be associated with hemochromotosis. Compared to previous studies, we show that HFE mutation can possess the risk of AD in transferrin-, APOE- and APP-normal patients.

  11. Comparative Analysis of RNA Families Reveals Distinct Repertoires for Each Domain of Life

    PubMed Central

    Hoeppner, Marc P.; Gardner, Paul P.; Poole, Anthony M.

    2012-01-01

    The RNA world hypothesis, that RNA genomes and catalysts preceded DNA genomes and genetically-encoded protein catalysts, has been central to models for the early evolution of life on Earth. A key part of such models is continuity between the earliest stages in the evolution of life and the RNA repertoires of extant lineages. Some assessments seem consistent with a diverse RNA world, yet direct continuity between modern RNAs and an RNA world has not been demonstrated for the majority of RNA families, and, anecdotally, many RNA functions appear restricted in their distribution. Despite much discussion of the possible antiquity of RNA families, no systematic analyses of RNA family distribution have been performed. To chart the broad evolutionary history of known RNA families, we performed comparative genomic analysis of over 3 million RNA annotations spanning 1446 families from the Rfam 10 database. We report that 99% of known RNA families are restricted to a single domain of life, revealing discrete repertoires for each domain. For the 1% of RNA families/clans present in more than one domain, over half show evidence of horizontal gene transfer (HGT), and the rest show a vertical trace, indicating the presence of a complex protein synthesis machinery in the Last Universal Common Ancestor (LUCA) and consistent with the evolutionary history of the most ancient protein-coding genes. However, with limited interdomain transfer and few RNA families exhibiting demonstrable antiquity as predicted under RNA world continuity, our results indicate that the majority of modern cellular RNA repertoires have primarily evolved in a domain-specific manner. PMID:23133357

  12. [Family in the waiting room of an intensive care unit revealed feelings].

    PubMed

    Frizon, Gloriana; do Nascimento, Eliane Regina Pereira; Bertoncello, Kátia Cilene Godinho; Martinse, Josiane de Jesus

    2011-03-01

    This is a qualitative study that aims to understand the feelings of relatives of patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). The study was conducted in the ICU of a large general hospital in the western region of Santa Catarina. The data collection occurred in 2009 with a semi structured interview to eighteen families. For data treatment the collective subject discourse was used. Reports emerged of two items related to feelings: hospitalization in the ICU and while waiting to enter the unit. The analysis revealed feelings as pain, anguish, sadness, helplessness,fear, despair, anxiety and expectation infinite. It is hoped that these results may assist in the training of professionals, to host the family and its insertion in the ICU environment as an element to be integrated into nursing care, through actions welcoming, helping them to cope with hospitalization of a relative in a critical unit.

  13. Structural and functional analysis of amphioxus HIFα reveals ancient features of the HIFα family.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shan; Lu, Ling; Bai, Yan; Zhang, Peng; Song, Weibo; Duan, Cunming

    2014-04-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) are master regulators of the transcriptional response to hypoxia. To gain insight into the structural and functional evolution of the HIF family, we characterized the HIFα gene from amphioxus, an invertebrate chordate, and identified several alternatively spliced HIFα isoforms. Whereas HIFα Ia, the full-length isoform, contained a complete oxygen-dependent degradation (ODD) domain, the isoforms Ib, Ic, and Id had 1 or 2 deletions in the ODD domain. When tagged with GFP and tested in mammalian cells, the amphioxus HIFα Ia protein level increased in response to hypoxia or CoCl2 treatment, whereas HIFα Ib, Ic, and Id showed reduced or no hypoxia regulation. Deletion of the ODD sequence in HIFα Ia up-regulated the HIFα Ia levels under normoxia. Gene expression analysis revealed HIFα Ic to be the predominant isoform in embryos and larvae, whereas isoform Ia was the most abundant form in the adult stage. The expression levels of Ib and Id were very low. Hypoxia treatment of adults had no effect on the mRNA levels of these HIFα isoforms. Functional analyses in mammalian cells showed all 4 HIFα isoforms capable of entering the nucleus and activating hypoxia response element-dependent reporter gene expression. The functional nuclear location signal (NLS) mapped to 3 clusters of basic residues. (775)KKARL functioned as the primary NLS, but (737)KRK and (754)KK also contributed to the nuclear localization. All amphioxus HIFα isoforms had 2 functional transactivation domains (TADs). Its C-terminal transactivation (C-TAD) shared high sequence identity with the human HIF-1α and HIF-2α C-TAD. This domain contained a conserved asparagine, and its mutation resulted in an increase in transcriptional activity. These findings reveal many ancient features of the HIFα family and provide novel insights into the evolution of the HIFα family.

  14. RNA profiling reveals familial aggregation of molecular subtypes in non-BRCA1/2 breast cancer families

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In more than 70% of families with a strong history of breast and ovarian cancers, pathogenic mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2 cannot be identified, even though hereditary factors are expected to be involved. It has been proposed that tumors with similar molecular phenotypes also share similar underlying pathophysiological mechanisms. In the current study, the aim was to investigate if global RNA profiling can be used to identify functional subgroups within breast tumors from families tested negative for BRCA1/2 germline mutations and how these subgroupings relate to different breast cancer patients within the same family. Methods In the current study we analyzed a collection of 70 frozen breast tumor biopsies from a total of 58 families by global RNA profiling and promoter methylation analysis. Results We show that distinct functional subgroupings, similar to the intrinsic molecular breast cancer subtypes, exist among non-BRCA1/2 breast cancers. The distribution of subtypes was markedly different from the distribution found among BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. From 11 breast cancer families, breast tumor biopsies from more than one affected family member were included in the study. Notably, in 8 of these families we found that patients from the same family shared the same tumor subtype, showing a tendency of familial aggregation of tumor subtypes (p-value = 1.7e-3). Using our previously developed BRCA1/2-signatures, we identified 7 non-BRCA1/2 tumors with a BRCA1-like molecular phenotype and provide evidence for epigenetic inactivation of BRCA1 in three of the tumors. In addition, 7 BRCA2-like tumors were found. Conclusions Our finding indicates involvement of hereditary factors in non-BRCA1/2 breast cancer families in which family members may carry genetic susceptibility not just to breast cancer but to a particular subtype of breast cancer. This is the first study to provide a biological link between breast cancers from family members of high-risk non-BRCA1

  15. Structure–function characterization reveals new catalytic diversity in the galactose oxidase and glyoxal oxidase family

    PubMed Central

    Yin, DeLu (Tyler); Urresti, Saioa; Lafond, Mickael; Johnston, Esther M.; Derikvand, Fatemeh; Ciano, Luisa; Berrin, Jean-Guy; Henrissat, Bernard; Walton, Paul H.; Davies, Gideon J.; Brumer, Harry

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol oxidases, including carbohydrate oxidases, have a long history of research that has generated fundamental biological understanding and biotechnological applications. Despite a long history of study, the galactose 6-oxidase/glyoxal oxidase family of mononuclear copper-radical oxidases, Auxiliary Activity Family 5 (AA5), is currently represented by only very few characterized members. Here we report the recombinant production and detailed structure–function analyses of two homologues from the phytopathogenic fungi Colletotrichum graminicola and C. gloeosporioides, CgrAlcOx and CglAlcOx, respectively, to explore the wider biocatalytic potential in AA5. EPR spectroscopy and crystallographic analysis confirm a common active-site structure vis-à-vis the archetypal galactose 6-oxidase from Fusarium graminearum. Strikingly, however, CgrAlcOx and CglAlcOx are essentially incapable of oxidizing galactose and galactosides, but instead efficiently catalyse the oxidation of diverse aliphatic alcohols. The results highlight the significant potential of prospecting the evolutionary diversity of AA5 to reveal novel enzyme specificities, thereby informing both biology and applications. PMID:26680532

  16. Transcriptomes of the parasitic plant family Orobanchaceae reveal surprising conservation of chlorophyll synthesis.

    PubMed

    Wickett, Norman J; Honaas, Loren A; Wafula, Eric K; Das, Malay; Huang, Kan; Wu, Biao; Landherr, Lena; Timko, Michael P; Yoder, John; Westwood, James H; dePamphilis, Claude W

    2011-12-20

    Parasitism in flowering plants has evolved at least 11 times [1]. Only one family, Orobanchaceae, comprises all major nutritional types of parasites: facultative, hemiparasitic (partially photosynthetic), and holoparasitic (nonphotosynthetic) [2]. Additionally, the family includes Lindenbergia, a nonparasitic genus sister to all parasitic Orobanchaceae [3-6]. Parasitic Orobanchaceae include species with severe economic impacts: Striga (witchweed), for example, affects over 50 million hectares of crops in sub-Saharan Africa, causing more than $3 billion in damage annually [7]. Although gene losses and increased substitution rates have been characterized for parasitic plant plastid genomes [5, 8-11], the nuclear genome and transcriptome remain largely unexplored. The Parasitic Plant Genome Project (PPGP; http://ppgp.huck.psu.edu/) [2] is leveraging the natural variation in Orobanchaceae to explore the evolution and genomic consequences of parasitism in plants through a massive transcriptome and gene discovery project involving Triphysaria versicolor (facultative hemiparasite), Striga hermonthica (obligate hemiparasite), and Phelipanche aegyptiaca (Orobanche [12]; holoparasite). Here we present the first set of large-scale genomic resources for parasitic plant comparative biology. Transcriptomes of above-ground tissues reveal that, in addition to the predictable loss of photosynthesis-related gene expression in P. aegyptiaca, the nonphotosynthetic parasite retains an intact, expressed, and selectively constrained chlorophyll synthesis pathway.

  17. Who's on base? Revealing the catalytic mechanism of inverting family 6 glycoside hydrolases

    SciTech Connect

    Mayes, Heather B.; Knott, Brandon C.; Crowley, Michael F.; Broadbelt, Linda J.; Ståhlberg, Jerry; Beckham, Gregg T.

    2016-06-01

    In several important classes of inverting carbohydrate-active enzymes, the identity of the catalytic base remains elusive, including in family 6 Glycoside Hydrolase (GH6) enzymes, which are key components of cellulase cocktails for cellulose depolymerization. Despite many structural and kinetic studies with both wild-type and mutant enzymes, especially on the Trichoderma reesei (Hypocrea jecorina) GH6 cellulase (TrCel6A), the catalytic base in the single displacement inverting mechanism has not been definitively identified in the GH6 family. Here, we employ transition path sampling to gain insight into the catalytic mechanism, which provides unbiased atomic-level understanding of key order parameters involved in cleaving the strong glycosidic bond. Our hybrid quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics (QM/MM) simulations reveal a network of hydrogen bonding that aligns two active site water molecules that play key roles in hydrolysis: one water molecule drives the reaction by nucleophilic attack on the substrate and a second shuttles a proton to the putative base (D175) via a short water wire. We also investigated the case where the putative base is mutated to an alanine, an enzyme that is experimentally still partially active. The simulations predict that proton hopping along a water wire via a Grotthuss mechanism provides a mechanism of catalytic rescue. Further simulations reveal that substrate processive motion is 'driven' by strong electrostatic interactions with the protein at the product sites and that the -1 sugar adopts a 2SO ring configuration as it reaches its binding site. Lastly, this work thus elucidates previously elusive steps in the processive catalytic mechanism of this important class of enzymes.

  18. Who's on base? Revealing the catalytic mechanism of inverting family 6 glycoside hydrolases

    DOE PAGES

    Mayes, Heather B.; Knott, Brandon C.; Crowley, Michael F.; ...

    2016-06-01

    In several important classes of inverting carbohydrate-active enzymes, the identity of the catalytic base remains elusive, including in family 6 Glycoside Hydrolase (GH6) enzymes, which are key components of cellulase cocktails for cellulose depolymerization. Despite many structural and kinetic studies with both wild-type and mutant enzymes, especially on the Trichoderma reesei (Hypocrea jecorina) GH6 cellulase (TrCel6A), the catalytic base in the single displacement inverting mechanism has not been definitively identified in the GH6 family. Here, we employ transition path sampling to gain insight into the catalytic mechanism, which provides unbiased atomic-level understanding of key order parameters involved in cleaving themore » strong glycosidic bond. Our hybrid quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics (QM/MM) simulations reveal a network of hydrogen bonding that aligns two active site water molecules that play key roles in hydrolysis: one water molecule drives the reaction by nucleophilic attack on the substrate and a second shuttles a proton to the putative base (D175) via a short water wire. We also investigated the case where the putative base is mutated to an alanine, an enzyme that is experimentally still partially active. The simulations predict that proton hopping along a water wire via a Grotthuss mechanism provides a mechanism of catalytic rescue. Further simulations reveal that substrate processive motion is 'driven' by strong electrostatic interactions with the protein at the product sites and that the -1 sugar adopts a 2SO ring configuration as it reaches its binding site. Lastly, this work thus elucidates previously elusive steps in the processive catalytic mechanism of this important class of enzymes.« less

  19. New insights on the sialidase protein family revealed by a phylogenetic analysis in metazoa.

    PubMed

    Giacopuzzi, Edoardo; Bresciani, Roberto; Schauer, Roland; Monti, Eugenio; Borsani, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Sialidases are glycohydrolytic enzymes present from virus to mammals that remove sialic acid from oligosaccharide chains. Four different sialidase forms are known in vertebrates: the lysosomal NEU1, the cytosolic NEU2 and the membrane-associated NEU3 and NEU4. These enzymes modulate the cell sialic acid content and are involved in several cellular processes and pathological conditions. Molecular defects in NEU1 are responsible for sialidosis, an inherited disease characterized by lysosomal storage disorder and neurodegeneration. The studies on the biology of sialic acids and sialyltransferases, the anabolic counterparts of sialidases, have revealed a complex picture with more than 50 sialic acid variants selectively present in the different branches of the tree of life. The gain/loss of specific sialoconjugates have been proposed as key events in the evolution of deuterostomes and Homo sapiens, as well as in the host-pathogen interactions. To date, less attention has been paid to the evolution of sialidases. Thus we have conducted a survey on the state of the sialidase family in metazoan. Using an in silico approach, we identified and characterized sialidase orthologs from 21 different organisms distributed among the evolutionary tree: Metazoa relative (Monosiga brevicollis), early Deuterostomia, precursor of Chordata and Vertebrata (teleost fishes, amphibians, reptiles, avians and early and recent mammals). We were able to reconstruct the evolution of the sialidase protein family from the ancestral sialidase NEU1 and identify a new form of the enzyme, NEU5, representing an intermediate step in the evolution leading to the modern NEU3, NEU4 and NEU2. Our study provides new insights on the mechanisms that shaped the substrate specificity and other peculiar properties of the modern mammalian sialidases. Moreover, we further confirm findings on the catalytic residues and identified enzyme loop portions that behave as rapidly diverging regions and may be involved in

  20. New Insights on the Sialidase Protein Family Revealed by a Phylogenetic Analysis in Metazoa

    PubMed Central

    Giacopuzzi, Edoardo; Bresciani, Roberto; Schauer, Roland; Monti, Eugenio; Borsani, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Sialidases are glycohydrolytic enzymes present from virus to mammals that remove sialic acid from oligosaccharide chains. Four different sialidase forms are known in vertebrates: the lysosomal NEU1, the cytosolic NEU2 and the membrane-associated NEU3 and NEU4. These enzymes modulate the cell sialic acid content and are involved in several cellular processes and pathological conditions. Molecular defects in NEU1 are responsible for sialidosis, an inherited disease characterized by lysosomal storage disorder and neurodegeneration. The studies on the biology of sialic acids and sialyltransferases, the anabolic counterparts of sialidases, have revealed a complex picture with more than 50 sialic acid variants selectively present in the different branches of the tree of life. The gain/loss of specific sialoconjugates have been proposed as key events in the evolution of deuterostomes and Homo sapiens, as well as in the host-pathogen interactions. To date, less attention has been paid to the evolution of sialidases. Thus we have conducted a survey on the state of the sialidase family in metazoan. Using an in silico approach, we identified and characterized sialidase orthologs from 21 different organisms distributed among the evolutionary tree: Metazoa relative (Monosiga brevicollis), early Deuterostomia, precursor of Chordata and Vertebrata (teleost fishes, amphibians, reptiles, avians and early and recent mammals). We were able to reconstruct the evolution of the sialidase protein family from the ancestral sialidase NEU1 and identify a new form of the enzyme, NEU5, representing an intermediate step in the evolution leading to the modern NEU3, NEU4 and NEU2. Our study provides new insights on the mechanisms that shaped the substrate specificity and other peculiar properties of the modern mammalian sialidases. Moreover, we further confirm findings on the catalytic residues and identified enzyme loop portions that behave as rapidly diverging regions and may be involved in

  1. Analysis of a cAMP regulated coactivator family reveals an alternative phosphorylation motif for AMPK family members

    PubMed Central

    Moresco, James J.; Vaughan, Joan M.; Matsumura, Shigenobu; Yates, John R.; Montminy, Marc

    2017-01-01

    The second messenger cAMP stimulates cellular gene expression via the PKA-mediated phosphorylation of the transcription factor CREB and through dephosphorylation of the cAMP-responsive transcriptional coactivators (CRTCs). Under basal conditions, CRTCs are phosphorylated by members of the AMPK family of Ser/Thr kinases and sequestered in the cytoplasm via a phosphorylation-dependent association with 14-3-3 proteins. Increases in cAMP promote the dephosphorylation and nuclear translocation of CRTCs, where they bind to CREB and stimulate relevant target genes. Although they share considerable sequence homology, members of the CRTC family exert non-overlapping effects on cellular gene expression through as yet unidentified mechanisms. Here we show that the three CRTCs exhibit distinct patterns of 14-3-3 binding at three conserved sites corresponding to S70, S171, and S275 (in CRTC2). S171 functions as the gatekeeper site for 14-3-3 binding; it acts cooperatively with S275 in stabilizing this interaction following its phosphorylation by the cAMP-responsive SIK and the cAMP-nonresponsive MARK kinases. Although S171 contains a consensus recognition site for phosphorylation by AMPK family members, S70 and S275 carry variant motifs (MNTGGS275LPDL), lacking basic residues that are otherwise critical for SIK/MARK recognition as well as 14-3-3 binding. Correspondingly, the activity of these motifs differs between CRTC family members. As the variant (SLPDL) motif is present and apparently phosphorylated in other mammalian proteins, our studies suggest that the regulation of cellular targets by AMPK family members is more extensive than previously appreciated. PMID:28235073

  2. Genome Sequencing of the Behavior Manipulating Virus LbFV Reveals a Possible New Virus Family

    PubMed Central

    Lepetit, David; Gillet, Benjamin; Hughes, Sandrine; Kraaijeveld, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Parasites are sometimes able to manipulate the behavior of their hosts. However, the molecular cues underlying this phenomenon are poorly documented. We previously reported that the parasitoid wasp Leptopilina boulardi which develops from Drosophila larvae is often infected by an inherited DNA virus. In addition to being maternally transmitted, the virus benefits from horizontal transmission in superparasitized larvae (Drosophila that have been parasitized several times). Interestingly, the virus forces infected females to lay eggs in already parasitized larvae, thus increasing the chance of being horizontally transmitted. In a first step towards the identification of virus genes responsible for the behavioral manipulation, we present here the genome sequence of the virus, called LbFV. The sequencing revealed that its genome contains an homologous repeat sequence (hrs) found in eight regions in the genome. The presence of this hrs may explain the genomic plasticity that we observed for this genome. The genome of LbFV encodes 108 ORFs, most of them having no homologs in public databases. The virus is however related to Hytrosaviridae, although distantly. LbFV may thus represent a member of a new virus family. Several genes of LbFV were captured from eukaryotes, including two anti-apoptotic genes. More surprisingly, we found that LbFV captured from an ancestral wasp a protein with a Jumonji domain. This gene was afterwards duplicated in the virus genome. We hypothesized that this gene may be involved in manipulating the expression of wasp genes, and possibly in manipulating its behavior. PMID:28173110

  3. Clinical and genetic analyses reveal novel pathogenic ABCA4 mutations in Stargardt disease families

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Bing; Cai, Xue-Bi; Zheng, Zhi-Li; Huang, Xiu-Feng; Liu, Xiao-Ling; Qu, Jia; Jin, Zi-Bing

    2016-01-01

    Stargardt disease (STGD1) is a juvenile macular degeneration predominantly inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern, characterized by decreased central vision in the first 2 decades of life. The condition has a genetic basis due to mutation in the ABCA4 gene, and arises from the deposition of lipofuscin-like substance in the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) with secondary photoreceptor cell death. In this study, we describe the clinical and genetic features of Stargardt patients from four unrelated Chinese cohorts. The targeted exome sequencing (TES) was carried out in four clinically confirmed patients and their family members using a gene panel comprising 164 known causative inherited retinal dystrophy (IRD) genes. Genetic analysis revealed eight ABCA4 mutations in all of the four pedigrees, including six mutations in coding exons and two mutations in adjacent intronic areas. All the affected individuals showed typical manifestations consistent with the disease phenotype. We disclose two novel ABCA4 mutations in Chinese patients with STGD disease, which will expand the existing spectrum of disease-causing variants and will further aid in the future mutation screening and genetic counseling, as well as in the understanding of phenotypic and genotypic correlations. PMID:27739528

  4. Functional divergence of the glutathione S-transferase supergene family in Physcomitrella patens reveals complex patterns of large gene family evolution in land plants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan-Jing; Han, Xue-Min; Ren, Lin-Ling; Yang, Hai-Ling; Zeng, Qing-Yin

    2013-02-01

    Plant glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are multifunctional proteins encoded by a large gene family that play major roles in the detoxification of xenobiotics and oxidative stress metabolism. To date, studies on the GST gene family have focused mainly on vascular plants (particularly agricultural plants). In contrast, little information is available on the molecular characteristics of this large gene family in nonvascular plants. In addition, the evolutionary patterns of this family in land plants remain unclear. In this study, we identified 37 GST genes from the whole genome of the moss Physcomitrella patens, a nonvascular representative of early land plants. The 37 P. patens GSTs were divided into 10 classes, including two new classes (hemerythrin and iota). However, no tau GSTs were identified, which represent the largest class among vascular plants. P. patens GST gene family members showed extensive functional divergence in their gene structures, gene expression responses to abiotic stressors, enzymatic characteristics, and the subcellular locations of the encoded proteins. A joint phylogenetic analysis of GSTs from P. patens and other higher vascular plants showed that different class GSTs had distinct duplication patterns during the evolution of land plants. By examining multiple characteristics, this study revealed complex patterns of evolutionary divergence among the GST gene family in land plants.

  5. Human mast cell tryptase: Multiple cDNAs and genes reveal a multigene serine protease family

    SciTech Connect

    Vanderslice, P.; Ballinger, S.M., Tam, E.K.; Goldstein, S.M.; Craik, C.S.; Caughey, G.H. )

    1990-05-01

    Three different cDNAs and a gene encoding human skin mast cell tryptase have been cloned and sequenced in their entirety. The deduced amino acid sequences reveal a 30-amino acid prepropeptide followed by a 245-amino acid catalytic domain. The C-terminal undecapeptide of the human preprosequence is identical in dog tryptase and appears to be part of a prosequence unique among serine proteases. The differences among the three human tryptase catalytic domains include the loss of a consensus N-glycosylation site in one cDNA, which may explain some of the heterogeneity in size and susceptibility to deglycosylation seen in tryptase preparations. All three tryptase cDNAs are distinct from a recently reported cDNA obtained from a human lung mast cell library. A skin tryptase cDNA was used to isolate a human tryptase gene, the exons of which match one of the skin-derived cDNAs. The organization of the {approx}1.8-kilobase-pair tryptase gene is unique and is not closely related to that of any other mast cell or leukocyte serine protease. The 5{prime} regulatory regions of the gene share features with those of other serine proteases, including mast cell chymase, but are unusual in being separated from the protein-coding sequence by an intron. High-stringency hybridization of a human genomic DNA blot with a fragment of the tryptase gene confirms the presence of multiple tryptase genes. These findings provide genetic evidence that human mast cell tryptases are the products of a multigene family.

  6. Human mast cell tryptase: multiple cDNAs and genes reveal a multigene serine protease family.

    PubMed Central

    Vanderslice, P; Ballinger, S M; Tam, E K; Goldstein, S M; Craik, C S; Caughey, G H

    1990-01-01

    Three different cDNAs and a gene encoding human skin mast cell tryptase have been cloned and sequenced in their entirety. The deduced amino acid sequences reveal a 30-amino acid prepropeptide followed by a 245-amino acid catalytic domain. The C-terminal undecapeptide of the human preprosequence is identical in dog tryptase and appears to be part of a prosequence unique among serine proteases. The differences among the three human tryptase catalytic domains include the loss of a consensus N-glycosylation site in one cDNA, which may explain some of the heterogeneity in size and susceptibility to deglycosylation seen in tryptase preparations. All three tryptase cDNAs are distinct from a recently reported cDNA obtained from a human lung mast cell library. A skin tryptase cDNA was used to isolate a human tryptase gene, the exons of which match one of the skin-derived cDNAs. The organization of the approximately 1.8-kilobase-pair tryptase gene is unique and is not closely related to that of any other mast cell or leukocyte serine protease. The 5' regulatory regions of the gene share features with those of other serine proteases, including mast cell chymase, but are unusual in being separated from the protein-coding sequence by an intron. High-stringency hybridization of a human genomic DNA blot with a fragment of the tryptase gene confirms the presence of multiple tryptase genes. These findings provide genetic evidence that human mast cell tryptases are the products of a multigene family. Images PMID:2187193

  7. Cross-species gene-family fluctuations reveal the dynamics of horizontal transfers.

    PubMed

    Grilli, Jacopo; Romano, Mariacristina; Bassetti, Federico; Cosentino Lagomarsino, Marco

    2014-06-01

    Prokaryotes vary their protein repertoire mainly through horizontal transfer and gene loss. To elucidate the links between these processes and the cross-species gene-family statistics, we perform a large-scale data analysis of the cross-species variability of gene-family abundance (the number of members of the family found on a given genome). We find that abundance fluctuations are related to the rate of horizontal transfers. This is rationalized by a minimal theoretical model, which predicts this link. The families that are not captured by the model show abundance profiles that are markedly peaked around a mean value, possibly because of specific abundance selection. Based on these results, we define an abundance variability index that captures a family's evolutionary behavior (and thus some of its relevant functional properties) purely based on its cross-species abundance fluctuations. Analysis and model, combined, show a quantitative link between cross-species family abundance statistics and horizontal transfer dynamics, which can be used to analyze genome 'flux'. Groups of families with different values of the abundance variability index correspond to genome sub-parts having different plasticity in terms of the level of horizontal exchange allowed by natural selection.

  8. Comparative and functional triatomine genomics reveals reductions and expansions in insecticide resistance-related gene families

    PubMed Central

    Traverso, Lucila; Lavore, Andrés; Sierra, Ivana; Palacio, Victorio; Martinez-Barnetche, Jesús; Latorre-Estivalis, José Manuel; Mougabure-Cueto, Gaston; Francini, Flavio; Lorenzo, Marcelo G.; Rodríguez, Mario Henry; Ons, Sheila; Rivera-Pomar, Rolando V.

    2017-01-01

    Background Triatomine insects are vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi, a protozoan parasite that is the causative agent of Chagas’ disease. This is a neglected disease affecting approximately 8 million people in Latin America. The existence of diverse pyrethroid resistant populations of at least two species demonstrates the potential of triatomines to develop high levels of insecticide resistance. Therefore, the incorporation of strategies for resistance management is a main concern for vector control programs. Three enzymatic superfamilies are thought to mediate xenobiotic detoxification and resistance: Glutathione Transferases (GSTs), Cytochromes P450 (CYPs) and Carboxyl/Cholinesterases (CCEs). Improving our knowledge of key triatomine detoxification enzymes will strengthen our understanding of insecticide resistance processes in vectors of Chagas’ disease. Methods and findings The discovery and description of detoxification gene superfamilies in normalized transcriptomes of three triatomine species: Triatoma dimidiata, Triatoma infestans and Triatoma pallidipennis is presented. Furthermore, a comparative analysis of these superfamilies among the triatomine transcriptomes and the genome of Rhodnius prolixus, also a triatomine vector of Chagas’ disease, and other well-studied insect genomes was performed. The expression pattern of detoxification genes in R. prolixus transcriptomes from key organs was analyzed. The comparisons reveal gene expansions in Sigma class GSTs, CYP3 in CYP superfamily and clade E in CCE superfamily. Moreover, several CYP families identified in these triatomines have not yet been described in other insects. Conversely, several groups of insecticide resistance related enzymes within each enzyme superfamily are reduced or lacking in triatomines. Furthermore, our qRT-PCR results showed an increase in the expression of a CYP4 gene in a T. infestans population resistant to pyrethroids. These results could point to an involvement of metabolic

  9. Genes similar to the Vibrio parahaemolyticus virulence-related genes tdh, tlh, and vscC2 occur in other vibrionaceae species isolated from a pristine estuary.

    PubMed

    Klein, Savannah L; Gutierrez West, Casandra K; Mejia, Diana M; Lovell, Charles R

    2014-01-01

    Detection of the human pathogen Vibrio parahaemolyticus often relies on molecular biological analysis of species-specific virulence factor genes. These genes have been employed in determinations of V. parahaemolyticus population numbers and the prevalence of pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus strains. Strains of the Vibrionaceae species Photobacterium damselae, Vibrio diabolicus, Vibrio harveyi, and Vibrio natriegens, as well as strains similar to Vibrio tubiashii, were isolated from a pristine salt marsh estuary. These strains were examined for the V. parahaemolyticus hemolysin genes tdh, trh, and tlh and for the V. parahaemolyticus type III secretion system 2α gene vscC2 using established PCR primers and protocols. Virulence-related genes occurred at high frequencies in non-V. parahaemolyticus Vibrionaceae species. V. diabolicus was of particular interest, as several strains were recovered, and the large majority (>83%) contained virulence-related genes. It is clear that detection of these genes does not ensure correct identification of virulent V. parahaemolyticus. Further, the occurrence of V. parahaemolyticus-like virulence factors in other vibrios potentially complicates tracking of outbreaks of V. parahaemolyticus infections.

  10. Genes Similar to the Vibrio parahaemolyticus Virulence-Related Genes tdh, tlh, and vscC2 Occur in Other Vibrionaceae Species Isolated from a Pristine Estuary

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Savannah L.; Gutierrez West, Casandra K.; Mejia, Diana M.

    2014-01-01

    Detection of the human pathogen Vibrio parahaemolyticus often relies on molecular biological analysis of species-specific virulence factor genes. These genes have been employed in determinations of V. parahaemolyticus population numbers and the prevalence of pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus strains. Strains of the Vibrionaceae species Photobacterium damselae, Vibrio diabolicus, Vibrio harveyi, and Vibrio natriegens, as well as strains similar to Vibrio tubiashii, were isolated from a pristine salt marsh estuary. These strains were examined for the V. parahaemolyticus hemolysin genes tdh, trh, and tlh and for the V. parahaemolyticus type III secretion system 2α gene vscC2 using established PCR primers and protocols. Virulence-related genes occurred at high frequencies in non-V. parahaemolyticus Vibrionaceae species. V. diabolicus was of particular interest, as several strains were recovered, and the large majority (>83%) contained virulence-related genes. It is clear that detection of these genes does not ensure correct identification of virulent V. parahaemolyticus. Further, the occurrence of V. parahaemolyticus-like virulence factors in other vibrios potentially complicates tracking of outbreaks of V. parahaemolyticus infections. PMID:24212573

  11. The crystal structure of phosphorylated MAPK13 reveals common structural features and differences in p38 MAPK family activation

    PubMed Central

    Yurtsever, Zeynep; Scheaffer, Suzanne M.; Romero, Arthur G.; Holtzman, Michael J.; Brett, Tom J.

    2015-01-01

    The p38 MAP kinases (p38 MAPKs) represent an important family centrally involved in mediating extracellular signaling. Recent studies indicate that family members such as MAPK13 (p38δ) display a selective cellular and tissue expression and are therefore involved in specific diseases. Detailed structural studies of all p38 MAPK family members are crucial for the design of specific inhibitors. In order to facilitate such ventures, the structure of MAPK13 was determined in both the inactive (unphosphorylated; MAPK13) and active (dual phosphorylated; MAPK13/pTpY) forms. Here, the first preparation, crystallization and structure determination of MAPK13/pTpY are presented and the structure is compared with the previously reported structure of MAPK13 in order to facilitate studies for structure-based drug design. A comprehensive analysis of inactive versus active structures for the p38 MAPK family is also presented. It is found that MAPK13 undergoes a larger interlobe configurational rearrangement upon activation compared with MAPK14. Surprisingly, the analysis of activated p38 MAPK structures (MAP12/pTpY, MAPK13/pTpY and MAPK14/pTpY) reveals that, despite a high degree of sequence similarity, different side chains are used to coordinate the phosphorylated residues. There are also differences in the rearrangement of the hinge region that occur in MAPK14 compared with MAPK13 which would affect inhibitor binding. A thorough examination of all of the active (phosphorylated) and inactive (unphosphorylated) p38 MAPK family member structures was performed to reveal a common structural basis of activation for the p38 MAP kinase family and to identify structural differences that may be exploited for developing family member-specific inhibitors. PMID:25849390

  12. The crystal structure of phosphorylated MAPK13 reveals common structural features and differences in p38 MAPK family activation.

    PubMed

    Yurtsever, Zeynep; Scheaffer, Suzanne M; Romero, Arthur G; Holtzman, Michael J; Brett, Tom J

    2015-04-01

    The p38 MAP kinases (p38 MAPKs) represent an important family centrally involved in mediating extracellular signaling. Recent studies indicate that family members such as MAPK13 (p38δ) display a selective cellular and tissue expression and are therefore involved in specific diseases. Detailed structural studies of all p38 MAPK family members are crucial for the design of specific inhibitors. In order to facilitate such ventures, the structure of MAPK13 was determined in both the inactive (unphosphorylated; MAPK13) and active (dual phosphorylated; MAPK13/pTpY) forms. Here, the first preparation, crystallization and structure determination of MAPK13/pTpY are presented and the structure is compared with the previously reported structure of MAPK13 in order to facilitate studies for structure-based drug design. A comprehensive analysis of inactive versus active structures for the p38 MAPK family is also presented. It is found that MAPK13 undergoes a larger interlobe configurational rearrangement upon activation compared with MAPK14. Surprisingly, the analysis of activated p38 MAPK structures (MAP12/pTpY, MAPK13/pTpY and MAPK14/pTpY) reveals that, despite a high degree of sequence similarity, different side chains are used to coordinate the phosphorylated residues. There are also differences in the rearrangement of the hinge region that occur in MAPK14 compared with MAPK13 which would affect inhibitor binding. A thorough examination of all of the active (phosphorylated) and inactive (unphosphorylated) p38 MAPK family member structures was performed to reveal a common structural basis of activation for the p38 MAP kinase family and to identify structural differences that may be exploited for developing family member-specific inhibitors.

  13. Exome sequencing reveals a high genetic heterogeneity on familial Hirschsprung disease

    PubMed Central

    Luzón-Toro, Berta; Gui, Hongsheng; Ruiz-Ferrer, Macarena; Sze-Man Tang, Clara; Fernández, Raquel M.; Sham, Pak-Chung; Torroglosa, Ana; Kwong-Hang Tam, Paul; Espino-Paisán, Laura; Cherny, Stacey S.; Bleda, Marta; Enguix-Riego, María del Valle; Dopazo, Joaquín; Antiñolo, Guillermo; García-Barceló, María-Mercé; Borrego, Salud

    2015-01-01

    Hirschsprung disease (HSCR; OMIM 142623) is a developmental disorder characterized by aganglionosis along variable lengths of the distal gastrointestinal tract, which results in intestinal obstruction. Interactions among known HSCR genes and/or unknown disease susceptibility loci lead to variable severity of phenotype. Neither linkage nor genome-wide association studies have efficiently contributed to completely dissect the genetic pathways underlying this complex genetic disorder. We have performed whole exome sequencing of 16 HSCR patients from 8 unrelated families with SOLID platform. Variants shared by affected relatives were validated by Sanger sequencing. We searched for genes recurrently mutated across families. Only variations in the FAT3 gene were significantly enriched in five families. Within-family analysis identified compound heterozygotes for AHNAK and several genes (N = 23) with heterozygous variants that co-segregated with the phenotype. Network and pathway analyses facilitated the discovery of polygenic inheritance involving FAT3, HSCR known genes and their gene partners. Altogether, our approach has facilitated the detection of more than one damaging variant in biologically plausible genes that could jointly contribute to the phenotype. Our data may contribute to the understanding of the complex interactions that occur during enteric nervous system development and the etiopathology of familial HSCR. PMID:26559152

  14. Molecular and Morphological Analyses Reveal Phylogenetic Relationships of Stingrays Focusing on the Family Dasyatidae (Myliobatiformes)

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Kean Chong; Lim, Phaik-Eem; Chong, Ving Ching; Loh, Kar-Hoe

    2015-01-01

    Elucidating the phylogenetic relationships of the current but problematic Dasyatidae (Order Myliobatiformes) was the first priority of the current study. Here, we studied three molecular gene markers of 43 species (COI gene), 33 species (ND2 gene) and 34 species (RAG1 gene) of stingrays to draft out the phylogenetic tree of the order. Nine character states were identified and used to confirm the molecularly constructed phylogenetic trees. Eight or more clades (at different hierarchical level) were identified for COI, ND2 and RAG1 genes in the Myliobatiformes including four clades containing members of the present Dasyatidae, thus rendering the latter non-monophyletic. The uncorrected p-distance between these four ‘Dasytidae’ clades when compared to the distance between formally known families confirmed that these four clades should be elevated to four separate families. We suggest a revision of the present classification, retaining the Dasyatidae (Dasyatis and Taeniurops species) but adding three new families namely, Neotrygonidae (Neotrygon and Taeniura species), Himanturidae (Himantura species) and Pastinachidae (Pastinachus species). Our result indicated the need to further review the classification of Dasyatis microps. By resolving the non-monophyletic problem, the suite of nine character states enables the natural classification of the Myliobatiformes into at least thirteen families based on morphology. PMID:25867639

  15. Exome sequencing reveals VCP mutations as a cause of familial ALS

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Janel O.; Mandrioli, Jessica; Benatar, Michael; Abramzon, Yevgeniya; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Gibbs, J Raphael; Brunetti, Maura; Gronka, Susan; Wuu, Joanne; Ding, Jinhui; McCluskey, Leo; Martinez-Lage, Maria; Falcone, Dana; Hernandez, Dena G.; Arepalli, Sampath; Chong, Sean; Schymick, Jennifer C.; Rothstein, Jeffrey; Landi, Francesco; Wang, Michael; Calvo, Andrea; Mora, Gabriele; Sabatelli, Mario; Monsurrò, Maria Rosaria; Battistini, Stefania; Salvi, Fabrizio; Spataro, Rossella; Sola, Patrizia; Borghero, Giuseppe; Galassi, Giuliana; Scholz, Sonja W.; Taylor, J. Paul; Restagno, Gabriella; Chiò, Adriano; Traynor, Bryan J.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Using exome sequencing, we identified a p.R191Q amino acid change in the valosin-containing protein (VCP) gene in an Italian family with autosomal dominantly inherited amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Mutations in VCP have previously been identified in families with Inclusion Body Myopathy, Paget’s disease and Frontotemporal Dementia (IBMPFD). Screening of VCP in a cohort of 210 familial ALS cases and 78 autopsy-proven ALS cases identified four additional mutations including a p.R155H mutation in a pathologically-proven case of ALS. VCP protein is essential for maturation of ubiquitin-containing autophagosomes, and mutant VCP toxicity is partially mediated through its effect on TDP-43 protein, a major constituent of ubiquitin inclusions that neuropathologically characterize ALS. Our data broaden the phenotype of IBMPFD to include motor neuron degeneration, suggest that VCP mutations may account for ~1–2% of familial ALS, and represent the first evidence directly implicating defects in the ubiquitination/protein degradation pathway in motor neuron degeneration. PMID:21145000

  16. Oxylipin diversity in the diatom family Leptocylindraceae reveals DHA derivatives in marine diatoms.

    PubMed

    Nanjappa, Deepak; d'Ippolito, Giuliana; Gallo, Carmela; Zingone, Adriana; Fontana, Angelo

    2014-01-17

    Marine planktonic organisms, such as diatoms, are prospective sources of novel bioactive metabolites. Oxygenated derivatives of fatty acids, generally referred to as oxylipins, in diatoms comprise a highly diverse and complex family of secondary metabolites. These molecules have recently been implicated in several biological processes including intra- and inter-cellular signaling as well as in defense against biotic stressors and grazers. Here, we analyze the production and diversity of C20 and C22 non-volatile oxylipins in five species of the family Leptocylindraceae, which constitute a basal clade in the diatom phylogeny. We report the presence of species-specific lipoxygenase activity and oxylipin patterns, providing the first demonstration of enzymatic production of docosahexaenoic acid derivatives in marine diatoms. The differences observed in lipoxygenase pathways among the species investigated broadly reflected the relationships observed with phylogenetic markers, thus providing functional support to the taxonomic diversity of the individual species.

  17. Evolution of the RH gene family in vertebrates revealed by brown hagfish (Eptatretus atami) genome sequences.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Akinori; Komata, Hidero; Iwashita, Shogo; Seto, Shotaro; Ikeya, Hironobu; Tabata, Mitsutoshi; Kitano, Takashi

    2017-02-01

    In vertebrates, there are four major genes in the RH (Rhesus) gene family, RH, RHAG, RHBG, and RHCG. These genes are thought to have been formed by the two rounds of whole-genome duplication (2R-WGD) in the common ancestor of all vertebrates. In our previous work, where we analyzed details of the gene duplications process of this gene family, three nucleotide sequences belonging to this family were identified in Far Eastern brook lamprey (Lethenteron reissneri), and the phylogenetic positions of the genes were determined. Lampreys, along with hagfishes, are cyclostomata (jawless fishes), which is a sister group of gnathostomata (jawed vertebrates). Although those results suggested that one gene was orthologous to the gnathostome RHCG genes, we did not identify clear orthologues for other genes. In this study, therefore, we identified three novel cDNA sequences that belong to the RH gene family using de novo transcriptome analysis of another cyclostome: the brown hagfish (Eptatretus atami). We also determined the nucleotide sequences for the RHBG and RHCG genes in a red stingray (Dasyatis akajei), which belongs to the cartilaginous fishes. The phylogenetic tree showed that two brown hagfish genes, which were probably duplicated in the cyclostome lineage, formed a cluster with the gnathostome RHAG genes, whereas another brown hagfish gene formed a cluster with the gnathostome RHCG genes. We estimated that the RH genes had a higher evolutionary rate than the RHAG, RHBG, and RHCG genes. Interestingly, in the RHBG genes, only the bird lineage showed a higher rate of nonsynonymous substitutions. It is likely that this higher rate was caused by a state of relaxed functional constraints rather than positive selection nor by pseudogenization.

  18. Systematic genome-wide annotation of spliceosomal proteins reveals differential gene family expansion

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa-Morais, Nuno L.; Carmo-Fonseca, Maria; Aparício, Samuel

    2006-01-01

    Although more than 200 human spliceosomal and splicing-associated proteins are known, the evolution of the splicing machinery has not been studied extensively. The recent near-complete sequencing and annotation of distant vertebrate and chordate genomes provides the opportunity for an exhaustive comparative analysis of splicing factors across eukaryotes. We describe here our semiautomated computational pipeline to identify and annotate splicing factors in representative species of eukaryotes. We focused on protein families whose role in splicing is confirmed by experimental evidence. We visually inspected 1894 proteins and manually curated 224 of them. Our analysis shows a general conservation of the core spliceosomal proteins across the eukaryotic lineage, contrasting with selective expansions of protein families known to play a role in the regulation of splicing, most notably of SR proteins in metazoans and of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNP) in vertebrates. We also observed vertebrate-specific expansion of the CLK and SRPK kinases (which phosphorylate SR proteins), and the CUG-BP/CELF family of splicing regulators. Furthermore, we report several intronless genes amongst splicing proteins in mammals, suggesting that retrotransposition contributed to the complexity of the mammalian splicing apparatus. PMID:16344558

  19. Biochemical characterization of Arabidopsis APYRASE family reveals their roles in regulating endomembrane NDP/NMP homoeostasis.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Tsan-Yu; Lao, Jeemeng; Manalansan, Bianca; Loqué, Dominique; Roux, Stanley J; Heazlewood, Joshua L

    2015-11-15

    Plant apyrases are nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) diphosphohydrolases (NTPDases) and have been implicated in an array of functions within the plant including the regulation of extracellular ATP. Arabidopsis encodes a family of seven membrane bound apyrases (AtAPY1-7) that comprise three distinct clades, all of which contain the five conserved apyrase domains. With the exception of AtAPY1 and AtAPY2, the biochemical and the sub-cellular characterization of the other members are currently unavailable. In this research, we have shown all seven Arabidopsis apyrases localize to internal membranes comprising the cis-Golgi, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and endosome, indicating an endo-apyrase classification for the entire family. In addition, all members, with the exception of AtAPY7, can function as endo-apyrases by complementing a yeast double mutant (Δynd1Δgda1) which lacks apyrase activity. Interestingly, complementation of the mutant yeast using well characterized human apyrases could only be accomplished by using a functional ER endo-apyrase (NTPDase6), but not the ecto-apyrase (NTPDase1). Furthermore, the substrate specificity analysis for the Arabidopsis apyrases AtAPY1-6 indicated that each member has a distinct set of preferred substrates covering various NDPs (nucleoside diphosphates) and NTPs. Combining the biochemical analysis and sub-cellular localization of the Arabidopsis apyrases family, the data suggest their possible roles in regulating endomembrane NDP/NMP (nucleoside monophosphate) homoeostasis.

  20. Genome Sequencing of Autism-Affected Families Reveals Disruption of Putative Noncoding Regulatory DNA

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Tychele N.; Hormozdiari, Fereydoun; Duyzend, Michael H.; McClymont, Sarah A.; Hook, Paul W.; Iossifov, Ivan; Raja, Archana; Baker, Carl; Hoekzema, Kendra; Stessman, Holly A.; Zody, Michael C.; Nelson, Bradley J.; Huddleston, John; Sandstrom, Richard; Smith, Joshua D.; Hanna, David; Swanson, James M.; Faustman, Elaine M.; Bamshad, Michael J.; Stamatoyannopoulos, John; Nickerson, Deborah A.; McCallion, Andrew S.; Darnell, Robert; Eichler, Evan E.

    2016-01-01

    We performed whole-genome sequencing (WGS) of 208 genomes from 53 families affected by simplex autism. For the majority of these families, no copy-number variant (CNV) or candidate de novo gene-disruptive single-nucleotide variant (SNV) had been detected by microarray or whole-exome sequencing (WES). We integrated multiple CNV and SNV analyses and extensive experimental validation to identify additional candidate mutations in eight families. We report that compared to control individuals, probands showed a significant (p = 0.03) enrichment of de novo and private disruptive mutations within fetal CNS DNase I hypersensitive sites (i.e., putative regulatory regions). This effect was only observed within 50 kb of genes that have been previously associated with autism risk, including genes where dosage sensitivity has already been established by recurrent disruptive de novo protein-coding mutations (ARID1B, SCN2A, NR3C2, PRKCA, and DSCAM). In addition, we provide evidence of gene-disruptive CNVs (in DISC1, WNT7A, RBFOX1, and MBD5), as well as smaller de novo CNVs and exon-specific SNVs missed by exome sequencing in neurodevelopmental genes (e.g., CANX, SAE1, and PIK3CA). Our results suggest that the detection of smaller, often multiple CNVs affecting putative regulatory elements might help explain additional risk of simplex autism. PMID:26749308

  1. Whole Genome Sequencing Reveals a De Novo SHANK3 Mutation in Familial Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Nemirovsky, Sergio I.; Córdoba, Marta; Zaiat, Jonathan J.; Completa, Sabrina P.; Vega, Patricia A.; González-Morón, Dolores; Medina, Nancy M.; Fabbro, Mónica; Romero, Soledad; Brun, Bianca; Revale, Santiago; Ogara, María Florencia; Pecci, Adali; Marti, Marcelo; Vazquez, Martin; Turjanski, Adrián; Kauffman, Marcelo A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Clinical genomics promise to be especially suitable for the study of etiologically heterogeneous conditions such as Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Here we present three siblings with ASD where we evaluated the usefulness of Whole Genome Sequencing (WGS) for the diagnostic approach to ASD. Methods We identified a family segregating ASD in three siblings with an unidentified cause. We performed WGS in the three probands and used a state-of-the-art comprehensive bioinformatic analysis pipeline and prioritized the identified variants located in genes likely to be related to ASD. We validated the finding by Sanger sequencing in the probands and their parents. Results Three male siblings presented a syndrome characterized by severe intellectual disability, absence of language, autism spectrum symptoms and epilepsy with negative family history for mental retardation, language disorders, ASD or other psychiatric disorders. We found germline mosaicism for a heterozygous deletion of a cytosine in the exon 21 of the SHANK3 gene, resulting in a missense sequence of 5 codons followed by a premature stop codon (NM_033517:c.3259_3259delC, p.Ser1088Profs*6). Conclusions We reported an infrequent form of familial ASD where WGS proved useful in the clinic. We identified a mutation in SHANK3 that underscores its relevance in Autism Spectrum Disorder. PMID:25646853

  2. Portrait of the Polana-Eulalia family complex: Surface homogeneity revealed from near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinilla-Alonso, Noemí; de León, J.; Walsh, K. J.; Campins, H.; Lorenzi, V.; Delbo, M.; DeMeo, F.; Licandro, J.; Landsman, Z.; Lucas, M. P.; Alí-Lagoa, V.; Burt, B.

    2016-08-01

    The inner asteroid belt is an important source of near-Earth asteroids (NEAs). Dynamical studies of the inner asteroid belt have identified several families overlapping in proper orbital elements, including the Polana and Eulalia families that contain a large fraction of the low-albedo asteroids in this region. We present results from two coordinated observational campaigns to characterize this region through near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy. These campaigns ran from August 2012 to May 2014 and used the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility and the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo. The observations focused on objects within these families or in the background, with low albedo (pv ≤ 0.1) and low inclination (iP ≤ 7°). We observed 63 asteroids (57 never before observed in the NIR): 61 low-albedo objects and two interlopers, both compatible with S- or E- taxonomical types. We found our sample to be spectrally homogeneous in the NIR. The sample shows a continuum of neutral to moderately-red concave-up spectra, very similar within the uncertainties. Only one object in the sample, asteroid (3429) Chuvaev, has a blue spectrum, with a slope (S‧ = - 1.33 ± 0.21%/1000 Å) significantly different from the average spectrum (S‧ = 0.68 ± 0.68%/1000 Å). This spectral homogeneity is independent of membership in families or the background population. Furthermore, we show that the Eulalia and Polana families cannot be distinguished using NIR data. We also searched for rotational variability on the surface of (495) Eulalia which we do not detect. (495) Eulalia shows a red concave-up spectrum with an average slope S‧ = 0.91 ± 0.60%/1000 Å, very similar to the average slope of our sample. The spectra of two targets of sample-return missions, (101955) Bennu, target of NASA's OSIRIS-Rex and (162173) 1999 JU3 target of the Japanese Space Agency's Hayabusa-2, are very similar to our average spectrum, which would be compatible with an origin in this region of the inner belt.

  3. Evolutionary patterns of metazoan microRNAs reveal targeting principles in the let-7 and miR-10 families

    PubMed Central

    Le, Hoai Huang Thi; Linse, Alexander; Godlove, Victoria A.; Nguyen, Thuy-Duyen; Kotagama, Kasuen; Lynch, Alissa; Rawls, Alan

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate gene output by targeting degenerate elements in mRNAs and have undergone drastic expansions in higher metazoan genomes. The evolutionary advantage of maintaining copies of highly similar miRNAs is not well understood, nor is it clear what unique functions, if any, miRNA family members possess. Here, we study evolutionary patterns of metazoan miRNAs, focusing on the targeting preferences of the let-7 and miR-10 families. These studies reveal hotspots for sequence evolution with implications for targeting and secondary structure. High-throughput screening for functional targets reveals that each miRNA represses sites with distinct features and regulates a large number of genes with cooperative function in regulatory networks. Unexpectedly, given the high degree of similarity, single-nucleotide changes grant miRNA family members with distinct targeting preferences. Together, our data suggest complex functional relationships among miRNA duplications, novel expression patterns, sequence change, and the acquisition of new targets. PMID:27927717

  4. A holistic approach to dissecting SPARC family protein complexity reveals FSTL-1 as an inhibitor of pancreatic cancer cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Viloria, Katrina; Munasinghe, Amanda; Asher, Sharan; Bogyere, Roberto; Jones, Lucy; Hill, Natasha J.

    2016-01-01

    SPARC is a matricellular protein that is involved in both pancreatic cancer and diabetes. It belongs to a wider family of proteins that share structural and functional similarities. Relatively little is known about this extended family, but evidence of regulatory interactions suggests the importance of a holistic approach to their study. We show that Hevin, SPOCKs, and SMOCs are strongly expressed within islets, ducts, and blood vessels, suggesting important roles for these proteins in the normal pancreas, while FSTL-1 expression is localised to the stromal compartment reminiscent of SPARC. In direct contrast to SPARC, however, FSTL-1 expression is reduced in pancreatic cancer. Consistent with this, FSTL-1 inhibited pancreatic cancer cell proliferation. The complexity of SPARC family proteins is further revealed by the detection of multiple cell-type specific isoforms that arise due to a combination of post-translational modification and alternative splicing. Identification of splice variants lacking a signal peptide suggests the existence of novel intracellular isoforms. This study underlines the importance of addressing the complexity of the SPARC family and provides a new framework to explain their controversial and contradictory effects. We also demonstrate for the first time that FSTL-1 suppresses pancreatic cancer cell growth. PMID:27886258

  5. Vitamin E analyses in seeds reveal a dominant presence of tocotrienols over tocopherols in the Arecaceae family.

    PubMed

    Siles, Laura; Cela, Jana; Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2013-11-01

    Tocopherols are thought to prevent oxidative damage during seed quiescence and dormancy in all angiosperms. However, several monocot species accumulate tocotrienols in seeds and their role remains elusive. Here, we aimed to unravel the distribution of tocopherols and tocotrienols in seeds of the Arecaceae family, to examine possible trends of vitamin E accumulation within different clades of the same family. We examined the tocopherol and tocotrienol content in seeds of 84 species. Furthermore, we evaluated the vitamin E composition of the seed coat, endosperm and embryo of seeds from 6 species, to determine possible tissue-specific functions of particular vitamin E forms. While seeds of 98.8% (83 out of 84) of the species accumulated tocotrienols, only 58.3% (49 out of 84) accumulated tocopherols. The presence of tocopherols did not follow a clear evolutionary trend, and appeared randomly in some clades only. In addition, the tissue-specific location of vitamin E in seeds revealed that the embryo contains mostly α-tocopherol (in seed tocopherol-accumulating species) or α-tocotrienol (in seed tocopherol-deficient species). However, some species such as Socratea exorrhiza mostly accumulate β-tocotrienol, and Parajubaea torallyi accumulates a mixture of tocopherols and tocotrienols in the embryo. This suggests that tocotrienols can play a similar protective role to that exerted by tocopherols in seeds, at least in some species of the Arecaceae family. We conclude that tocotrienol, rather than tocopherol, accumulation is a conserved trait in seeds of the Arecaceae family.

  6. Comparative Genome Analysis of Filamentous Fungi Reveals Gene Family Expansions Associated with Fungal Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Soanes, Darren M.; Alam, Intikhab; Cornell, Mike; Wong, Han Min; Hedeler, Cornelia; Paton, Norman W.; Rattray, Magnus; Hubbard, Simon J.; Oliver, Stephen G.; Talbot, Nicholas J.

    2008-01-01

    Fungi and oomycetes are the causal agents of many of the most serious diseases of plants. Here we report a detailed comparative analysis of the genome sequences of thirty-six species of fungi and oomycetes, including seven plant pathogenic species, that aims to explore the common genetic features associated with plant disease-causing species. The predicted translational products of each genome have been clustered into groups of potential orthologues using Markov Chain Clustering and the data integrated into the e-Fungi object-oriented data warehouse (http://www.e-fungi.org.uk/). Analysis of the species distribution of members of these clusters has identified proteins that are specific to filamentous fungal species and a group of proteins found only in plant pathogens. By comparing the gene inventories of filamentous, ascomycetous phytopathogenic and free-living species of fungi, we have identified a set of gene families that appear to have expanded during the evolution of phytopathogens and may therefore serve important roles in plant disease. We have also characterised the predicted set of secreted proteins encoded by each genome and identified a set of protein families which are significantly over-represented in the secretomes of plant pathogenic fungi, including putative effector proteins that might perturb host cell biology during plant infection. The results demonstrate the potential of comparative genome analysis for exploring the evolution of eukaryotic microbial pathogenesis. PMID:18523684

  7. A survey of Populus PIN-FORMED family genes reveals their diversified expression patterns.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bobin; Zhang, Jin; Wang, Lin; Li, Jianbo; Zheng, Huanquan; Chen, Jun; Lu, Mengzhu

    2014-06-01

    The plant hormone auxin is a key regulator of plant development, and its uneven distribution maintained by polar intercellular auxin transport in plant tissues can trigger a wide range of developmental processes. Although the roles of PIN-FORMED (PIN) proteins in intercellular auxin flow have been extensively characterized in Arabidopsis, their roles in woody plants remain unclear. Here, a comprehensive analysis of PIN proteins in Populus is presented. Fifteen PINs are encoded in the genome of Populus, including four PIN1s, one PIN2, two PIN3s, three PIN5s, three PIN6s, and two PIN8s. Similar to Arabidopsis AtPIN proteins, PtPINs share conserved topology and transmembrane domains, and are either plasma membrane- or endoplasmic reticulum-localized. The more diversified expansion of the PIN family in Populus, comparing to that in Arabidopsis, indicates that some auxin-regulated developmental processes, such as secondary growth, may exhibit unique features in trees. More importantly, different sets of PtoPINs have been found to be strongly expressed in the roots, leaves, and cambium in Populus; the dynamic expression patterns of selected PtoPINs were further examined during the regeneration of shoots and roots. This genome-wide analysis of the Populus PIN family provides important cues for their potential roles in tree growth and development.

  8. Complete mitochondrial genomes reveal phylogeny relationship and evolutionary history of the family Felidae.

    PubMed

    Zhang, W Q; Zhang, M H

    2013-09-03

    Many mitochondrial DNA sequences are used to estimate phylogenetic relationships among animal taxa and perform molecular phylogenetic evolution analysis. With the continuous development of sequencing technology, numerous mitochondrial sequences have been released in public databases, especially complete mitochondrial DNA sequences. Using multiple sequences is better than using single sequences for phylogenetic analysis of animals because multiple sequences have sufficient information for evolutionary process reconstruction. Therefore, we performed phylogenetic analyses of 14 species of Felidae based on complete mitochondrial genome sequences, with Canis familiaris as an outgroup, using neighbor joining, maximum likelihood, maximum parsimony, and Bayesian inference methods. The consensus phylogenetic trees supported the monophyly of Felidae, and the family could be divided into 2 subfamilies, Felinae and Pantherinae. The genus Panthera and species tigris were also studied in detail. Meanwhile, the divergence of this family was estimated by phylogenetic analysis using the Bayesian method with a relaxed molecular clock, and the results shown were consistent with previous studies. In summary, the evolution of Felidae was reconstructed by phylogenetic analysis based on mitochondrial genome sequences. The described method may be broadly applicable for phylogenetic analyses of anima taxa.

  9. Transcriptional analysis of histone deacetylase family members reveal similarities between differentiating and aging spermatogonial stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kofman, Amber E; Huszar, Jessica M; Payne, Christopher J

    2013-02-01

    The differentiation of adult stem cells involves extensive chromatin remodeling, mediated in part by the gene products of histone deacetylase (HDAC) family members. While the transcriptional downregulation of HDACs can impede stem cell self-renewal in certain contexts, it may also promote stem cell maintenance under other circumstances. In self-renewing, differentiating, and aging spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs), the gene expression dynamics of HDACs have not yet been characterized. To gain further insight with these studies, we analyzed the transcriptional profiles of six HDAC family members, previously identified to be the most highly expressed in self-renewing SSCs, during stem cell differentiation and aging. Here we discovered that in both differentiating and aging SSCs the expression of Sirt4 increases, while the expression of Hdac2, Hdac6, and Sirt1 decreases. When SSCs are exposed to the lifespan-enhancing drug rapamycin in vivo, the resultant HDAC gene expression patterns are opposite of those seen in the differentiating and aging SSCs, with increased Hdac2, Hdac6, and Sirt1 and decreased Hdac8, Hdac9, and Sirt4. Our findings suggest that HDACs important for stem cell maintenance and oxidative capacity are downregulated as adult stem cells differentiate or age. These results provide important insights into the epigenetic regulation of stem cell differentiation and aging in mammals.

  10. Exome sequencing revealed PMM2 gene mutations in a French-Canadian family with congenital atrophy of the cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Noreau, Anne; Beauchemin, Philippe; Dionne-Laporte, Alexandre; Dion, Patrick A; Rouleau, Guy A; Dupré, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Two affected and one unaffected siblings from a French-Canadian family were evaluated in our neurogenetic clinic. The oldest brother had intentional and postural hand tremor while his youngest sister presented mild ataxia, a similar hand tremor and global developmental delay. Brain MRIs of the two affected family members further revealed a significant cerebellar atrophy. For this study we conducted a whole exome sequencing (WES) investigation using genomic DNA prepared from the affected brother and sister, alongside DNA prepared from their unaffected mother, and identified two mutations previously reported to cause a rare disorder known as Congenital Disorder of Glycosylation, type Ia (CDG1A) (OMIM #212065). This study emphasizes how the diagnosis of patients presenting a mild tremor phenotype associated with cerebellar atrophy may benefit from WES in establishing genetic defects associated with their conditions.

  11. Genetic analysis of long-lived families reveals novel variants influencing high density-lipoprotein cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Feitosa, Mary F.; Wojczynski, Mary K.; Straka, Robert; Kammerer, Candace M.; Lee, Joseph H.; Kraja, Aldi T.; Christensen, Kaare; Newman, Anne B.; Province, Michael A.; Borecki, Ingrid B.

    2014-01-01

    The plasma levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL) have an inverse relationship to the risks of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease (CVD), and have also been associated with longevity. We sought to identify novel loci for HDL that could potentially provide new insights into biological regulation of HDL metabolism in healthy-longevous subjects. We performed a genome-wide association (GWA) scan on HDL using a mixed model approach to account for family structure using kinship coefficients. A total of 4114 subjects of European descent (480 families) were genotyped at ~2.3 million SNPs and ~38 million SNPs were imputed using the 1000 Genome Cosmopolitan reference panel in MACH. We identified novel variants near-NLRP1 (17p13) associated with an increase of HDL levels at genome-wide significant level (p < 5.0E-08). Additionally, several CETP (16q21) and ZNF259-APOA5-A4-C3-A1 (11q23.3) variants associated with HDL were found, replicating those previously reported in the literature. A possible regulatory variant upstream of NLRP1 that is associated with HDL in these elderly Long Life Family Study (LLFS) subjects may also contribute to their longevity and health. Our NLRP1 intergenic SNPs show a potential regulatory function in Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE); however, it is not clear whether they regulate NLRP1 or other more remote gene. NLRP1 plays an important role in the induction of apoptosis, and its inflammasome is critical for mediating innate immune responses. Nlrp1a (a mouse ortholog of human NLRP1) interacts with SREBP-1a (17p11) which has a fundamental role in lipid concentration and composition, and is involved in innate immune response in macrophages. The NLRP1 region is conserved in mammals, but also has evolved adaptively showing signals of positive selection in European populations that might confer an advantage. NLRP1 intergenic SNPs have also been associated with immunity/inflammasome disorders which highlights the biological

  12. Thermodynamic Characterization of a Triheme Cytochrome Family from Geobacter sulfurreducens Reveals Mechanistic and Functional Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Morgado, Leonor; Bruix, Marta; Pessanha, Miguel; Londer, Yuri Y.; Salgueiro, Carlos A.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract A family of five periplasmic triheme cytochromes (PpcA-E) was identified in Geobacter sulfurreducens, where they play a crucial role by driving electron transfer from the cytoplasm to the cell exterior and assisting the reduction of extracellular acceptors. The thermodynamic characterization of PpcA using NMR and visible spectroscopies was previously achieved under experimental conditions identical to those used for the triheme cytochrome c7 from Desulfuromonas acetoxidans. Under such conditions, attempts to obtain NMR data were complicated by the relatively fast intermolecular electron exchange. This work reports the detailed thermodynamic characterization of PpcB, PpcD, and PpcE under optimal experimental conditions. The thermodynamic characterization of PpcA was redone under these new conditions to allow a proper comparison of the redox properties with those of other members of this family. The heme reduction potentials of the four proteins are negative, differ from each other, and cover different functional ranges. These reduction potentials are strongly modulated by heme-heme interactions and by interactions with protonated groups (the redox-Bohr effect) establishing different cooperative networks for each protein, which indicates that they are designed to perform different functions in the cell. PpcA and PpcD appear to be optimized to interact with specific redox partners involving e−/H+ transfer via different mechanisms. Although no evidence of preferential electron transfer pathway or e−/H+ coupling was found for PpcB and PpcE, the difference in their working potential ranges suggests that they may also have different physiological redox partners. This is the first study, to our knowledge, to characterize homologous cytochromes from the same microorganism and provide evidence of their different mechanistic and functional properties. These findings provide an explanation for the coexistence of five periplasmic triheme cytochromes in G

  13. Characterization of Amphioxus IFN Regulatory Factor Family Reveals an Archaic Signaling Framework for Innate Immune Response.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shaochun; Zheng, Tingting; Li, Peiyi; Yang, Rirong; Ruan, Jie; Huang, Shengfeng; Wu, Zhenxin; Xu, Anlong

    2015-12-15

    The IFN regulatory factor (IRF) family encodes transcription factors that play important roles in immune defense, stress response, reproduction, development, and carcinogenesis. Although the origin of the IRF family has been dated back to multicellular organisms, invertebrate IRFs differ from vertebrate IRFs in genomic structure and gene synteny, and little is known about their functions. Through comparison of multiple amphioxus genomes, in this study we suggested that amphioxus contains nine IRF members, whose orthologs are supposed to be shared among three amphioxus species. As the orthologs to the vertebrate IRF1 and IRF4 subgroups, Branchiostoma belcheri tsingtauense (bbt)IRF1 and bbtIRF8 bind the IFN-stimulated response element (ISRE) and were upregulated when amphioxus intestinal cells were stimulated with poly(I:C). As amphioxus-specific IRFs, both bbtIRF3 and bbtIRF7 bind ISRE. When activated, they can be phosphorylated by bbtTBK1 and then translocate into nucleus for target gene transcription. As transcriptional repressors, bbtIRF2 and bbtIRF4 can inhibit the transcriptional activities of bbtIRF1, 3, 7, and 8 by competing for the binding of ISRE. Interestingly, amphioxus IRF2, IRF8, and Rel were identified as target genes of bbtIRF1, bbtIRF7, and bbtIRF3, respectively, suggesting a dynamic feedback regulation among amphioxus IRF and NF-κB. Collectively, to our knowledge we present for the first time an archaic IRF signaling framework in a basal chordate, shedding new insights into the origin and evolution of vertebrate IFN-based antiviral networks.

  14. Functional specialization among insect chitinase family genes revealed by RNA interference.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qingsong; Arakane, Yasuyuki; Beeman, Richard W; Kramer, Karl J; Muthukrishnan, Subbaratnam

    2008-05-06

    The biological functions of individual members of the large family of chitinase-like proteins from the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum (Tc), were examined by using gene-specific RNAi. One chitinase, TcCHT5, was found to be required for pupal-adult molting only. A lethal phenotype was observed when the transcript level of TcCHT5 was down-regulated by injection of TcCHT5-specific dsRNA into larvae. The larvae had metamorphosed into pupae and then to pharate adults but did not complete adult eclosion. Specific knockdown of transcripts for another chitinase, TcCHT10, which has multiple catalytic domains, prevented embryo hatch, larval molting, pupation, and adult metamorphosis, indicating a vital role for TcCHT10 during each of these processes. A third chitinase-like protein, TcCHT7, was required for abdominal contraction and wing/elytra extension immediately after pupation but was dispensable for larval-larval molting, pupation, and adult eclosion. The wing/elytra abnormalities found in TcCHT7-silenced pupae were also manifest in the ensuing adults. A fourth chitinase-like protein, TcIDGF4, exhibited no chitinolytic activity but contributed to adult eclosion. No phenotypic effects were observed after knockdown of transcripts for several other chitinase-like proteins, including imaginal disk growth factor IDGF2. These data indicate functional specialization among insect chitinase family genes, primarily during the molting process, and provide a biological rationale for the presence of a large assortment of chitinase-like proteins.

  15. Lineage-specific evolution of the vertebrate Otopetrin gene family revealed by comparative genomic analyses

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Mutations in the Otopetrin 1 gene (Otop1) in mice and fish produce an unusual bilateral vestibular pathology that involves the absence of otoconia without hearing impairment. The encoded protein, Otop1, is the only functionally characterized member of the Otopetrin Domain Protein (ODP) family; the extended sequence and structural preservation of ODP proteins in metazoans suggest a conserved functional role. Here, we use the tools of sequence- and cytogenetic-based comparative genomics to study the Otop1 and the Otop2-Otop3 genes and to establish their genomic context in 25 vertebrates. We extend our evolutionary study to include the gene mutated in Usher syndrome (USH) subtype 1G (Ush1g), both because of the head-to-tail clustering of Ush1g with Otop2 and because Otop1 and Ush1g mutations result in inner ear phenotypes. Results We established that OTOP1 is the boundary gene of an inversion polymorphism on human chromosome 4p16 that originated in the common human-chimpanzee lineage more than 6 million years ago. Other lineage-specific evolutionary events included a three-fold expansion of the Otop genes in Xenopus tropicalis and of Ush1g in teleostei fish. The tight physical linkage between Otop2 and Ush1g is conserved in all vertebrates. To further understand the functional organization of the Ushg1-Otop2 locus, we deduced a putative map of binding sites for CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF), a mammalian insulator transcription factor, from genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing (ChIP-seq) data in mouse and human embryonic stem (ES) cells combined with detection of CTCF-binding motifs. Conclusions The results presented here clarify the evolutionary history of the vertebrate Otop and Ush1g families, and establish a framework for studying the possible interaction(s) of Ush1g and Otop in developmental pathways. PMID:21261979

  16. Conserved evolutionary units in the heme-copper oxidase superfamily revealed by novel homologous protein families

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Jimin; Li, Wenlin; Kinch, Lisa N; Grishin, Nick V

    2014-01-01

    The heme-copper oxidase (HCO) superfamily includes HCOs in aerobic respiratory chains and nitric oxide reductases (NORs) in the denitrification pathway. The HCO/NOR catalytic subunit has a core structure consisting of 12 transmembrane helices (TMHs) arranged in three-fold rotational pseudosymmetry, with six conserved histidines for heme and metal binding. Using sensitive sequence similarity searches, we detected a number of novel HCO/NOR homologs and named them HCO Homology (HCOH) proteins. Several HCOH families possess only four TMHs that exhibit the most pronounced similarity to the last four TMHs (TMHs 9–12) of HCOs/NORs. Encoded by independent genes, four-TMH HCOH proteins represent a single evolutionary unit (EU) that relates to each of the three homologous EUs of HCOs/NORs comprising TMHs 1–4, TMHs 5–8, and TMHs 9–12. Single-EU HCOH proteins could form homotrimers or heterotrimers to maintain the general structure and ligand-binding sites defined by the HCO/NOR catalytic subunit fold. The remaining HCOH families, including NnrS, have 12-TMHs and three EUs. Most three-EU HCOH proteins possess two conserved histidines and could bind a single heme. Limited experimental studies and genomic context analysis suggest that many HCOH proteins could function in the denitrification pathway and in detoxification of reactive molecules such as nitric oxide. HCO/NOR catalytic subunits exhibit remarkable structural similarity to the homotrimers of MAPEG (membrane-associated proteins in eicosanoid and glutathione metabolism) proteins. Gene duplication, fusion, and fission likely play important roles in the evolution of HCOs/NORs and HCOH proteins. PMID:24931479

  17. Next-generation sequencing of a 40 Mb linkage interval reveals TSPAN12 mutations in patients with familial exudative vitreoretinopathy.

    PubMed

    Nikopoulos, Konstantinos; Gilissen, Christian; Hoischen, Alexander; van Nouhuys, C Erik; Boonstra, F Nienke; Blokland, Ellen A W; Arts, Peer; Wieskamp, Nienke; Strom, Tim M; Ayuso, Carmen; Tilanus, Mauk A D; Bouwhuis, Sanne; Mukhopadhyay, Arijit; Scheffer, Hans; Hoefsloot, Lies H; Veltman, Joris A; Cremers, Frans P M; Collin, Rob W J

    2010-02-12

    Familial exudative vitreoretinopathy (FEVR) is a genetically heterogeneous retinal disorder characterized by abnormal vascularisation of the peripheral retina, often accompanied by retinal detachment. To date, mutations in three genes (FZD4, LRP5, and NDP) have been shown to be causative for FEVR. In two large Dutch pedigrees segregating autosomal-dominant FEVR, genome-wide SNP analysis identified an FEVR locus of approximately 40 Mb on chromosome 7. Microsatellite marker analysis suggested similar at risk haplotypes in patients of both families. To identify the causative gene, we applied next-generation sequencing in the proband of one of the families, by analyzing all exons and intron-exon boundaries of 338 genes, in addition to microRNAs, noncoding RNAs, and other highly conserved genomic regions in the 40 Mb linkage interval. After detailed bioinformatic analysis of the sequence data, prioritization of all detected sequence variants led to three candidates to be considered as the causative genetic defect in this family. One of these variants was an alanine-to-proline substitution in the transmembrane 4 superfamily member 12 protein, encoded by TSPAN12. This protein has very recently been implicated in regulating the development of retinal vasculature, together with the proteins encoded by FZD4, LRP5, and NDP. Sequence analysis of TSPAN12 revealed two mutations segregating in five of 11 FEVR families, indicating that mutations in TSPAN12 are a relatively frequent cause of FEVR. Furthermore, we demonstrate the power of targeted next-generation sequencing technology to identify disease genes in linkage intervals.

  18. Vibrational Circular Dichroism (VCD) Reveals Subtle Conformational Aspects and Intermolecular Interactions in the Carnitine Family.

    PubMed

    Mazzeo, Giuseppe; Abbate, Sergio; Longhi, Giovanna; Castiglioni, Ettore; Villani, Claudio

    2015-12-01

    Vibrational circular dichroism spectra (VCD) in the mid-IR region and electronic circular dichroism (ECD) spectra for three carnitine derivatives in the form of hydrochloride salts were recorded in deuterated methanol solutions. Density Functional Theory calculations help one to understand the significance of the observed VCD bands. VCD and ECD spectra are informative about the absolute configuration of the molecule, but VCD data reveal also some conformational aspects in the N,N,N-trimethyl moiety and inform us about intermolecular interactions gained from the carbonyl stretching region for the acyl substituted carnitines.

  19. The extracellular interactome of the human adenovirus family reveals diverse strategies for immunomodulation

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Martin, Nadia; Ramani, Sree R.; Hackney, Jason A.; Tom, Irene; Wranik, Bernd J.; Chan, Michelle; Wu, Johnny; Paluch, Maciej T.; Takeda, Kentaro; Hass, Philip E.; Clark, Hilary; Gonzalez, Lino C.

    2016-01-01

    Viruses encode secreted and cell-surface expressed proteins essential to modulate host immune defenses and establish productive infections. However, to date there has been no systematic study of the extracellular interactome of any human virus. Here we utilize the E3 proteins, diverse and rapidly evolving transmembrane-containing proteins encoded by human adenoviruses, as a model system to survey the extracellular immunomodulatory landscape. From a large-scale protein interaction screen against a microarray of more than 1,500 human proteins, we find and validate 51 previously unidentified virus–host interactions. Our results uncover conserved strategies as well as substantial diversity and multifunctionality in host targeting within and between viral species. Prominent modulation of the leukocyte immunoglobulin-like and signalling lymphocyte activation molecule families and a number of inhibitory receptors were identified as hubs for viral perturbation, suggesting unrecognized immunoregulatory strategies. We describe a virus–host extracellular interaction map of unprecedented scale that provides new insights into viral immunomodulation. PMID:27145901

  20. Molecular phylogenetic analysis reveals the new genus Hemisphaericaspora of the family Debaryomycetaceae.

    PubMed

    Hui, Fengli; Ren, Yongcheng; Chen, Liang; Li, Ying; Zhang, Lin; Niu, Qiuhong

    2014-01-01

    Four strains of a novel ascomycetous yeast species were recovered from the frass of wood-boring beetles collected from the Baotianman Nature Reserve and the Laojieling Nature Reserve in Henan Province, China. This species produced unconjugated and deliquescent asci with hemispheroid or helmet-shaped ascospores. Analysis of gene sequences for the D1/D2 domain of the large subunit (LSU) rRNA, as well as analysis of concatenated gene sequences for the nearly complete small subunit (SSU) rRNA and D1/D2 domain of the large subunit (LSU) rRNA placed the novel species in a small clade including only one recognised species, Candida insectamans, in the family Debaryomycetaceae (Saccharomycotina, Ascomycota). DNA sequence analyses demonstrated that the novel species was distinct from all currently recognised teleomorphic yeast genus. The name Hemisphaericaspora nanyangensis gen nov., sp. nov. is proposed to accommodate the novel genus and species. The new genus can be distinguished from closely related teleomorphic genera Lodderomyces and Spathaspora through sequence comparison and ascospore morphology. The ex-type strain of H. nanyangensis is CBS 13020T ( = CICC 33021 = NYNU 13717). Furthermore, based on phenotypic and genotypic characteristics, C. insectamans is transferred to the newly described genus as Hemisphaericaspora insectamans comb. nov., in accordance with the changes in the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi and plants.

  1. Molecular Phylogenetic Analysis Reveals the New Genus Hemisphaericaspora of the Family Debaryomycetaceae

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Fengli; Ren, Yongcheng; Chen, Liang; Li, Ying; Zhang, Lin; Niu, Qiuhong

    2014-01-01

    Four strains of a novel ascomycetous yeast species were recovered from the frass of wood-boring beetles collected from the Baotianman Nature Reserve and the Laojieling Nature Reserve in Henan Province, China. This species produced unconjugated and deliquescent asci with hemispheroid or helmet-shaped ascospores. Analysis of gene sequences for the D1/D2 domain of the large subunit (LSU) rRNA, as well as analysis of concatenated gene sequences for the nearly complete small subunit (SSU) rRNA and D1/D2 domain of the large subunit (LSU) rRNA placed the novel species in a small clade including only one recognised species, Candida insectamans, in the family Debaryomycetaceae (Saccharomycotina, Ascomycota). DNA sequence analyses demonstrated that the novel species was distinct from all currently recognised teleomorphic yeast genus. The name Hemisphaericaspora nanyangensis gen nov., sp. nov. is proposed to accommodate the novel genus and species. The new genus can be distinguished from closely related teleomorphic genera Lodderomyces and Spathaspora through sequence comparison and ascospore morphology. The ex-type strain of H. nanyangensis is CBS 13020T ( = CICC 33021 = NYNU 13717). Furthermore, based on phenotypic and genotypic characteristics, C. insectamans is transferred to the newly described genus as Hemisphaericaspora insectamans comb. nov., in accordance with the changes in the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi and plants. PMID:25075963

  2. Family Wide Molecular Adaptations to Underground Life in African Mole-Rats Revealed by Phylogenomic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Davies, Kalina T J; Bennett, Nigel C; Tsagkogeorga, Georgia; Rossiter, Stephen J; Faulkes, Christopher G

    2015-12-01

    During their evolutionary radiation, mammals have colonized diverse habitats. Arguably the subterranean niche is the most inhospitable of these, characterized by reduced oxygen, elevated carbon dioxide, absence of light, scarcity of food, and a substrate that is energetically costly to burrow through. Of all lineages to have transitioned to a subterranean niche, African mole-rats are one of the most successful. Much of their ecological success can be attributed to a diet of plant storage organs, which has allowed them to colonize climatically varied habitats across sub-Saharan Africa, and has probably contributed to the evolution of their diverse social systems. Yet despite their many remarkable phenotypic specializations, little is known about molecular adaptations underlying these traits. To address this, we sequenced the transcriptomes of seven mole-rat taxa, including three solitary species, and combined new sequences with existing genomic data sets. Alignments of more than 13,000 protein-coding genes encompassed, for the first time, all six genera and the full spectrum of ecological and social variation in the clade. We detected positive selection within the mole-rat clade and along ancestral branches in approximately 700 genes including loci associated with tumorigenesis, aging, morphological development, and sociality. By combining these results with gene ontology annotation and protein-protein networks, we identified several clusters of functionally related genes. This family wide analysis of molecular evolution in mole-rats has identified a suite of positively selected genes, deepening our understanding of the extreme phenotypic traits exhibited by this group.

  3. The Expanding Family of Natural Anion Channelrhodopsins Reveals Large Variations in Kinetics, Conductance, and Spectral Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Govorunova, Elena G.; Sineshchekov, Oleg A.; Rodarte, Elsa M.; Janz, Roger; Morelle, Olivier; Melkonian, Michael; Wong, Gane K.-S.; Spudich, John L.

    2017-01-01

    Natural anion channelrhodopsins (ACRs) discovered in the cryptophyte alga Guillardia theta generate large hyperpolarizing currents at membrane potentials above the Nernst equilibrium potential for Cl− and thus can be used as efficient inhibitory tools for optogenetics. We have identified and characterized new ACR homologs in different cryptophyte species, showing that all of them are anion-selective, and thus expanded this protein family to 20 functionally confirmed members. Sequence comparison of natural ACRs and engineered Cl−-conducting mutants of cation channelrhodopsins (CCRs) showed radical differences in their anion selectivity filters. In particular, the Glu90 residue in channelrhodopsin 2, which needed to be mutated to a neutral or alkaline residue to confer anion selectivity to CCRs, is nevertheless conserved in all of the ACRs identified. The new ACRs showed a large variation of the amplitude, kinetics, and spectral sensitivity of their photocurrents. A notable variant, designated “ZipACR”, is particularly promising for inhibitory optogenetics because of its combination of larger current amplitudes than those of previously reported ACRs and an unprecedentedly fast conductance cycle (current half-decay time 2–4 ms depending on voltage). ZipACR expressed in cultured mouse hippocampal neurons enabled precise photoinhibition of individual spikes in trains of up to 50 Hz frequency. PMID:28256618

  4. Phylogenomics of the dog and fox family (Canidae, Carnivora) revealed by chromosome painting.

    PubMed

    Graphodatsky, Alexander S; Perelman, Polina L; Sokolovskaya, Natalya V; Beklemisheva, Violetta R; Serdukova, Natalya A; Dobigny, Gauthier; O'Brien, Stephen J; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A; Yang, Fengtang

    2008-01-01

    Canid species (dogs and foxes) have highly rearranged karyotypes and thus represent a challenge for conventional comparative cytogenetic studies. Among them, the domestic dog is one of the best-mapped species in mammals, constituting an ideal reference genome for comparative genomic study. Here we report the results of genome-wide comparative mapping of dog chromosome-specific probes onto chromosomes of the dhole, fennec fox, and gray fox, as well as the mapping of red fox chromosome-specific probes onto chromosomes of the corsac fox. We also present an integrated comparative chromosome map between the species studied here and all canids studied previously. The integrated map demonstrates an extensive conservation of whole chromosome arms across different canid species. In addition, we have generated a comprehensive genome phylogeny for the Canidae on the basis of the chromosome rearrangements revealed by comparative painting. This genome phylogeny has provided new insights into the karyotypic relationships among the canids. Our results, together with published data, allow the formulation of a likely Canidae ancestral karyotype (CAK, 2n = 82), and reveal that at least 6-24 chromosomal fission/fusion events are needed to convert the CAK karyotype to that of the modern canids.

  5. Structural characterization of Helicobacter pylori dethiobiotin synthetase reveals differences between family members

    SciTech Connect

    Porebski, Przemyslaw J.; Klimecka, Maria; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Nicholls, Robert A.; Murzyn, Krzysztof; Cuff, Marianne E.; Xu, Xiaohui; Cymborowski, Marcin; Murshudov, Garib N.; Savchenko, Alexei; Edwards, Aled; Minor, Wladek

    2012-07-11

    Dethiobiotin synthetase (DTBS) is involved in the biosynthesis of biotin in bacteria, fungi, and plants. As humans lack this pathway, DTBS is a promising antimicrobial drug target. We determined structures of DTBS from Helicobacter pylori (hpDTBS) bound with cofactors and a substrate analog, and described its unique characteristics relative to other DTBS proteins. Comparison with bacterial DTBS orthologs revealed considerable structural differences in nucleotide recognition. The C-terminal region of DTBS proteins, which contains two nucleotide-recognition motifs, differs greatly among DTBS proteins from different species. The structure of hpDTBS revealed that this protein is unique and does not contain a C-terminal region containing one of the motifs. The single nucleotide-binding motif in hpDTBS is similar to its counterpart in GTPases; however, isothermal titration calorimetry binding studies showed that hpDTBS has a strong preference for ATP. The structural determinants of ATP specificity were assessed with X-ray crystallographic studies of hpDTBS-ATP and hpDTBS-GTP complexes. The unique mode of nucleotide recognition in hpDTBS makes this protein a good target for H. pylori-specific inhibitors of the biotin synthesis pathway.

  6. Family Wide Molecular Adaptations to Underground Life in African Mole-Rats Revealed by Phylogenomic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Kalina T.J.; Bennett, Nigel C.; Tsagkogeorga, Georgia; Rossiter, Stephen J.; Faulkes, Christopher G.

    2015-01-01

    During their evolutionary radiation, mammals have colonized diverse habitats. Arguably the subterranean niche is the most inhospitable of these, characterized by reduced oxygen, elevated carbon dioxide, absence of light, scarcity of food, and a substrate that is energetically costly to burrow through. Of all lineages to have transitioned to a subterranean niche, African mole-rats are one of the most successful. Much of their ecological success can be attributed to a diet of plant storage organs, which has allowed them to colonize climatically varied habitats across sub-Saharan Africa, and has probably contributed to the evolution of their diverse social systems. Yet despite their many remarkable phenotypic specializations, little is known about molecular adaptations underlying these traits. To address this, we sequenced the transcriptomes of seven mole-rat taxa, including three solitary species, and combined new sequences with existing genomic data sets. Alignments of more than 13,000 protein-coding genes encompassed, for the first time, all six genera and the full spectrum of ecological and social variation in the clade. We detected positive selection within the mole-rat clade and along ancestral branches in approximately 700 genes including loci associated with tumorigenesis, aging, morphological development, and sociality. By combining these results with gene ontology annotation and protein–protein networks, we identified several clusters of functionally related genes. This family wide analysis of molecular evolution in mole-rats has identified a suite of positively selected genes, deepening our understanding of the extreme phenotypic traits exhibited by this group. PMID:26318402

  7. Molecular phylogenetics reveals a pattern of biome conservatism in New World anchovies (family Engraulidae).

    PubMed

    Bloom, Devin D; Lovejoy, N R

    2012-04-01

    Evolutionary transitions between marine and freshwater biomes are relatively rare events, yielding a widespread pattern of biome conservatism among aquatic organisms. We investigated biome transitions in anchovies (Engraulidae), a globally distributed clade of economically important fishes. Most anchovy species are near-shore marine fishes, but several exclusively freshwater species are known from tropical rivers of South America and were previously thought to be the product of six or more independent freshwater invasions. We generated a comprehensive molecular phylogeny for Engraulidae, including representatives from 15 of 17 currently recognized genera. Our data support previous hypotheses of higher-level relationships within Engraulidae, but show that most New World genera are not monophyletic and in need of revision. Ancestral character reconstruction reveals that New World freshwater anchovies are the product of a single marine to freshwater transition, supporting a pattern of biome conservatism. We argue that competition is the principal mechanism that regulates aquatic biome transitions on a continental scale.

  8. Structure of the N-terminal fragment of topoisomerase V reveals a new family of topoisomerases

    SciTech Connect

    Taneja, Bhupesh; Patel, Asmita; Slesarev, Alexei; Mondragon, Alfonso

    2010-09-02

    Topoisomerases are involved in controlling and maintaining the topology of DNA and are present in all kingdoms of life. Unlike all other types of topoisomerases, similar type IB enzymes have only been identified in bacteria and eukarya. The only putative type IB topoisomerase in archaea is represented by Methanopyrus kandleri topoisomerase V. Despite several common functional characteristics, topoisomerase V shows no sequence similarity to other members of the same type. The structure of the 61 kDa N-terminal fragment of topoisomerase V reveals no structural similarity to other topoisomerases. Furthermore, the structure of the active site region is different, suggesting no conservation in the cleavage and religation mechanism. Additionally, the active site is buried, indicating the need of a conformational change for activity. The presence of a topoisomerase in archaea with a unique structure suggests the evolution of a separate mechanism to alter DNA.

  9. Reconstitution of a fungal meroterpenoid biosynthesis reveals the involvement of a novel family of terpene cyclases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Takayuki; Tokunaga, Kinya; Matsuda, Yudai; Fujii, Isao; Abe, Ikuro; Ebizuka, Yutaka; Kushiro, Tetsuo

    2010-10-01

    Meroterpenoids are hybrid natural products of both terpenoid and polyketide origin. We identified a biosynthetic gene cluster that is responsible for the production of the meroterpenoid pyripyropene in the fungus Aspergillus fumigatus through reconstituted biosynthesis of up to five steps in a heterologous fungal expression system. The cluster revealed a previously unknown terpene cyclase with an unusual sequence and protein primary structure. The wide occurrence of this sequence in other meroterpenoid and indole-diterpene biosynthetic gene clusters indicates the involvement of these enzymes in the biosynthesis of various terpenoid-bearing metabolites produced by fungi and bacteria. In addition, a novel polyketide synthase that incorporated nicotinyl-CoA as the starter unit and a prenyltransferase, similar to that in ubiquinone biosynthesis, was found to be involved in the pyripyropene biosynthesis. The successful production of a pyripyropene analogue illustrates the catalytic versatility of these enzymes for the production of novel analogues with useful biological activities.

  10. Mutational and structural analyses of Caldanaerobius polysaccharolyticus Man5B reveal novel active site residues for family 5 glycoside hydrolases.

    PubMed

    Oyama, Takuji; Schmitz, George E; Dodd, Dylan; Han, Yejun; Burnett, Alanna; Nagasawa, Naoko; Mackie, Roderick I; Nakamura, Haruki; Morikawa, Kosuke; Cann, Isaac

    2013-01-01

    CpMan5B is a glycoside hydrolase (GH) family 5 enzyme exhibiting both β-1,4-mannosidic and β-1,4-glucosidic cleavage activities. To provide insight into the amino acid residues that contribute to catalysis and substrate specificity, we solved the structure of CpMan5B at 1.6 Å resolution. The structure revealed several active site residues (Y12, N92 and R196) in CpMan5B that are not present in the active sites of other structurally resolved GH5 enzymes. Residue R196 in GH5 enzymes is thought to be strictly conserved as a histidine that participates in an electron relay network with the catalytic glutamates, but we show that an arginine fulfills a functionally equivalent role and is found at this position in every enzyme in subfamily GH5_36, which includes CpMan5B. Residue N92 is required for full enzymatic activity and forms a novel bridge over the active site that is absent in other family 5 structures. Our data also reveal a role of Y12 in establishing the substrate preference for CpMan5B. Using these molecular determinants as a probe allowed us to identify Man5D from Caldicellulosiruptor bescii as a mannanase with minor endo-glucanase activity.

  11. Mutational and Structural Analyses of Caldanaerobius polysaccharolyticus Man5B Reveal Novel Active Site Residues for Family 5 Glycoside Hydrolases

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yejun; Burnett, Alanna; Nagasawa, Naoko; Mackie, Roderick I.; Nakamura, Haruki; Morikawa, Kosuke; Cann, Isaac

    2013-01-01

    CpMan5B is a glycoside hydrolase (GH) family 5 enzyme exhibiting both β-1,4-mannosidic and β-1,4-glucosidic cleavage activities. To provide insight into the amino acid residues that contribute to catalysis and substrate specificity, we solved the structure of CpMan5B at 1.6 Å resolution. The structure revealed several active site residues (Y12, N92 and R196) in CpMan5B that are not present in the active sites of other structurally resolved GH5 enzymes. Residue R196 in GH5 enzymes is thought to be strictly conserved as a histidine that participates in an electron relay network with the catalytic glutamates, but we show that an arginine fulfills a functionally equivalent role and is found at this position in every enzyme in subfamily GH5_36, which includes CpMan5B. Residue N92 is required for full enzymatic activity and forms a novel bridge over the active site that is absent in other family 5 structures. Our data also reveal a role of Y12 in establishing the substrate preference for CpMan5B. Using these molecular determinants as a probe allowed us to identify Man5D from Caldicellulosiruptor bescii as a mannanase with minor endo-glucanase activity. PMID:24278284

  12. Familial longevity study reveals a significant association of mitochondrial DNA copy number between centenarians and their offspring.

    PubMed

    He, Yong-Han; Chen, Xiao-Qiong; Yan, Dong-Jing; Xiao, Fu-Hui; Lin, Rong; Liao, Xiao-Ping; Liu, Yao-Wen; Pu, Shao-Yan; Yu, Qin; Sun, Hong-Peng; Jiang, Jian-Jun; Cai, Wang-Wei; Kong, Qing-Peng

    2016-11-01

    Reduced mitochondrial function is an important cause of aging and age-related diseases. We previously revealed a relatively higher level of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content in centenarians. However, it is still unknown whether such an mtDNA content pattern of centenarians could be passed on to their offspring and how it was regulated. To address these issues, we recruited 60 longevity families consisting of 206 family members (cohort 1) and explored their mtDNA copy number. The results showed that the first generation of the offspring (F1 offspring) had a higher level of mtDNA copy number than their spouses (p < 0.05) independent of a gender effect. In addition, we found a positive association of mtDNA copy number in centenarians with that in F1 offspring (r = 0.54, p = 0.0008) but not with that in F1 spouses. These results were replicated in another independent cohort consisting of 153 subjects (cohort 2). RNA sequencing analysis suggests that the single-stranded DNA-binding protein 4 was significantly associated with mtDNA copy number and was highly expressed in centenarians as well as F1 offspring versus the F1 spouses, thus likely regulates the mtDNA copy number in the long-lived family members. In conclusion, our results suggest that the pattern of high mtDNA copy number is likely inheritable, which may act as a favorable factor to familial longevity through assuring adequate energy supply.

  13. Genome-wide analysis of the Dof transcription factor gene family reveals soybean-specific duplicable and functional characteristics.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yong; Qiu, Li-Juan

    2013-01-01

    The Dof domain protein family is a classic plant-specific zinc-finger transcription factor family involved in a variety of biological processes. There is great diversity in the number of Dof genes in different plants. However, there are only very limited reports on the characterization of Dof transcription factors in soybean (Glycine max). In the present study, 78 putative Dof genes were identified from the whole-genome sequence of soybean. The predicted GmDof genes were non-randomly distributed within and across 19 out of 20 chromosomes and 97.4% (38 pairs) were preferentially retained duplicate paralogous genes located in duplicated regions of the genome. Soybean-specific segmental duplications contributed significantly to the expansion of the soybean Dof gene family. These Dof proteins were phylogenetically clustered into nine distinct subgroups among which the gene structure and motif compositions were considerably conserved. Comparative phylogenetic analysis of these Dof proteins revealed four major groups, similar to those reported for Arabidopsis and rice. Most of the GmDofs showed specific expression patterns based on RNA-seq data analyses. The expression patterns of some duplicate genes were partially redundant while others showed functional diversity, suggesting the occurrence of sub-functionalization during subsequent evolution. Comprehensive expression profile analysis also provided insights into the soybean-specific functional divergence among members of the Dof gene family. Cis-regulatory element analysis of these GmDof genes suggested diverse functions associated with different processes. Taken together, our results provide useful information for the functional characterization of soybean Dof genes by combining phylogenetic analysis with global gene-expression profiling.

  14. RNA-Seq Analysis Reveals MAPKKK Family Members Related to Drought Tolerance in Maize

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Wen; Yang, Fengling; He, Hang; Zhao, Jiuran

    2015-01-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade is an evolutionarily conserved signal transduction pathway that is involved in plant development and stress responses. As the first component of this phosphorelay cascade, mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinases (MAPKKKs) act as adaptors linking upstream signaling steps to the core MAPK cascade to promote the appropriate cellular responses; however, the functions of MAPKKKs in maize are unclear. Here, we identified 71 MAPKKK genes, of which 14 were novel, based on a computational analysis of the maize (Zea mays L.) genome. Using an RNA-seq analysis in the leaf, stem and root of maize under well-watered and drought-stress conditions, we identified 5,866 differentially expressed genes (DEGs), including 8 MAPKKK genes responsive to drought stress. Many of the DEGs were enriched in processes such as drought stress, abiotic stimulus, oxidation-reduction, and metabolic processes. The other way round, DEGs involved in processes such as oxidation, photosynthesis, and starch, proline, ethylene, and salicylic acid metabolism were clearly co-expressed with the MAPKKK genes. Furthermore, a quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis was performed to assess the relative expression levels of MAPKKKs. Correlation analysis revealed that there was a significant correlation between expression levels of two MAPKKKs and relative biomass responsive to drought in 8 inbred lines. Our results indicate that MAPKKKs may have important regulatory functions in drought tolerance in maize. PMID:26599013

  15. Amoebae-Based Screening Reveals a Novel Family of Compounds Restricting Intracellular Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Christopher F; Chiriano, Gianpaolo; Finsel, Ivo; Manske, Christian; Hoffmann, Christine; Steiner, Bernhard; Kranjc, Agata; Patthey-Vuadens, Ophelie; Kicka, Sébastien; Trofimov, Valentin; Ouertatani-Sakouhi, Hajer; Soldati, Thierry; Scapozza, Leonardo; Hilbi, Hubert

    2015-07-10

    The causative agent of Legionnaires' disease, Legionella pneumophila, grows in environmental amoebae and mammalian macrophages within a distinct compartment, the 'Legionella-containing vacuole' (LCV). Intracellular bacteria are protected from many antibiotics, and thus are notoriously difficult to eradicate. To identify novel compounds that restrict intracellular bacterial replication, we previously developed an assay based on a coculture of amoebae and GFP-producing L. pneumophila. This assay was used to screen a pathway-based, highly diverse chemical library, referred to as the Sinergia library. In this work, we chose to focus on a group of 11 hit compounds, the majority of which originated from the query molecule CN585, a compound that targets the protein phosphatase calcineurin. Further studies on 78 related compound variants revealed crucial structural attributes, namely a triple-ring scaffold with a central triazine moiety, substituted in positions 3 and 5 by two piperidine or pyrrolidine rings, and in position 1 by an amine group bearing a single aliphatic chain moiety. The most effective compound, ZINC00615682, inhibited intracellular replication of L. pneumophila with an IC50 of approximately 20 nM in Acanthamoeba castellanii and slightly less efficiently in Dictyostelium discoideum or macrophages. Pharmacological and genetic attempts to implicate calcineurin in the intracellular replication of L. pneumophila failed. Taken together, these results show that the amoebae-based screen and structure-activity relationship analysis is suitable for the identification of novel inhibitors of the intracellular replication of L. pneumophila. The most potent compound identified in this study targets (an) as yet unidentified host factor(s).

  16. PHYLOGENETIC ANALYSIS OF PSEUDOCHLORODESMIS STRAINS REVEALS CRYPTIC DIVERSITY ABOVE THE FAMILY LEVEL IN THE SIPHONOUS GREEN ALGAE (BRYOPSIDALES, CHLOROPHYTA)(1).

    PubMed

    Verbruggen, Heroen; Vlaeminck, Caroline; Sauvage, Thomas; Sherwood, Alison R; Leliaert, Frederik; De Clerck, Olivier

    2009-06-01

    The genus Pseudochlorodesmis (Bryopsidales) is composed of diminutive siphons of extreme morphological simplicity. The discovery of Pseudochlorodesmis-like juveniles in more complex Bryopsidales (e.g., the Halimeda microthallus stage) jeopardized the recognition of this genus. Confronted with this uncertainty, taxonomists transferred many simple siphons into a new genus, Siphonogramen. In this study, we used a multimarker approach to clarify the phylogenetic and taxonomic affinities of the Pseudochlorodesmis-Siphonogramen (PS) complex within the more morphologically complex bryopsidalean taxa. Our analyses reveal a new layer of diversity largely distinct from the lineages containing the structurally complex genera. The PS complex shows profound cryptic diversity exceeding the family level. We discuss a potential link between thallus complexity and the prevalence and profundity of cryptic diversity. For taxonomic simplicity and as a first step toward clarifying the taxonomy of these simple siphons, we propose to maintain Pseudochlorodesmis as a form genus and subsume Siphonogramen and Botryodesmis therein.

  17. Microarray analysis of Ewing's sarcoma family of tumours reveals characteristic gene expression signatures associated with metastasis and resistance to chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Karl-Ludwig; Eisenacher, Martin; Braun, Yvonne; Brachwitz, Kristin; Wai, Daniel H; Dirksen, Uta; Lanvers-Kaminsky, Claudia; Juergens, Heribert; Herrero, David; Stegmaier, Sabine; Koscielniak, Ewa; Eggert, Angelika; Nathrath, Michaela; Gosheger, Georg; Schneider, Dominik T; Bury, Carsten; Diallo-Danebrock, Raihanatou; Ottaviano, Laura; Gabbert, Helmut E; Poremba, Christopher

    2008-03-01

    In Ewing's sarcoma family of tumours (ESFT), the clinically most adverse prognostic parameters are the presence of tumour metastasis at time of diagnosis and poor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. To identify genes differentially regulated between metastatic and localised tumours, we analysed 27 ESFT specimens using Affymetrix microarrays. Functional annotation of differentially regulated genes revealed 29 over-represented pathways including PDGF, TP53, NOTCH, and WNT1-signalling. Regression of primary tumours (n=20) induced by polychemotherapy was found to be correlated with the expression of genes involved in angiogenesis, apoptosis, ubiquitin proteasome pathway, and PI3 kinase and p53 pathways. These findings could be confirmed by in vitro cytotoxicity assays. A set of 46 marker genes correctly classifies these 20 tumours as responding versus non-responding. We conclude that expression signatures of initial tumour biopsies can help to identify ESFT patients at high risk to develop tumour metastasis or to suffer from a therapy refractory cancer.

  18. Biochemical and Structural Analyses of a Bacterial Endo-β-1,2-Glucanase Reveal A New Glycoside Hydrolase Family.

    PubMed

    Abe, Koichi; Nakajima, Masahiro; Yamashita, Tetsuro; Matsunaga, Hiroki; Kamisuki, Shinji; Nihira, Takanori; Takahashi, Yuta; Sugimoto, Naohisa; Miyanaga, Akimasa; Nakai, Hiroyuki; Arakawa, Takatoshi; Fushinobu, Shinya; Taguchi, Hayao

    2017-03-07

    β-1,2-Glucan is an extracellular cyclic or linear polysaccharide from Gram-negative bacteria, with important roles in infection and symbiosis. Despite β-1,2-glucan's importance in bacterial persistence and pathogenesis, only few reports exist on enzymes acting on both cyclic and linear β-1,2-glucan. To this end, we purified an endo-β-1,2-glucanase to homogeneity from cell extracts of the environmental species Chitinophaga arvensicola, and an endo-β-1,2-glucanase candidate gene (Cpin_6279) was cloned from the related species Chitinophaga pinensis. The Cpin_6279 protein specifically hydrolyzed linear β-1,2-glucan with polymerization degrees of ≥ 5 and a cyclic counterpart, indicating that Cpin_6279 is an endo-β-1,2-glucananase. Stereochemical analysis demonstrated that the Cpin_6279-catalyzed reaction proceeds via an inverting mechanism. Cpin_6279 exhibited no significant sequence similarity with known glycoside hydrolases (GHs) and thus the enzyme defines a novel GH family, GHxxx. The crystal structures of the ligand-free and complex forms of Cpin_6279 with glucose (Glc) and sophorotriose (Glc-β-1,2-Glc-β-1,2-Glc) determined up to 1.7 Å revealed that it has a large cavity appropriate for polysaccharide degradation and adopts an (α/α)6-fold slightly similar to that of GH family 15 and 8 enzymes. Mutational analysis indicated that some of the highly conserved acidic residues in the active site are important for catalysis, and the Cpin_6279 active site architecture provided insights into the substrate recognition by the enzyme. The biochemical characterization and crystal structure of this novel GH may enable discovery of other β-1,2-glucanases and represents a critical advance toward elucidating structure-function relationships of GH enzymes.

  19. Functional and transcriptome analysis reveals an acclimatization strategy for abiotic stress tolerance mediated by Arabidopsis NF-YA family members.

    PubMed

    Leyva-González, Marco Antonio; Ibarra-Laclette, Enrique; Cruz-Ramírez, Alfredo; Herrera-Estrella, Luis

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear Factor Y (NF-Y) is a heterotrimeric complex formed by NF-YA/NF-YB/NF-YC subunits that binds to the CCAAT-box in eukaryotic promoters. In contrast to other organisms, in which a single gene encodes each subunit, in plants gene families of over 10 members encode each of the subunits. Here we report that five members of the Arabidopsis thaliana NF-YA family are strongly induced by several stress conditions via transcriptional and miR169-related post-transcriptional mechanisms. Overexpression of NF-YA2, 7 and 10 resulted in dwarf late-senescent plants with enhanced tolerance to several types of abiotic stress. These phenotypes are related to alterations in sucrose/starch balance and cell elongation observed in NF-YA overexpressing plants. The use of transcriptomic analysis of transgenic plants that express miR169-resistant versions of NF-YA2, 3, 7, and 10 under an estradiol inducible system, as well as a dominant-repressor version of NF-YA2 revealed a set of genes, whose promoters are enriched in NF-Y binding sites (CCAAT-box) and that may be directly regulated by the NF-Y complex. This analysis also suggests that NF-YAs could participate in modulating gene regulation through positive and negative mechanisms. We propose a model in which the increase in NF-YA transcript levels in response to abiotic stress is part of an adaptive response to adverse environmental conditions in which a reduction in plant growth rate plays a key role.

  20. Predicting the Proteins of Angomonas deanei, Strigomonas culicis and Their Respective Endosymbionts Reveals New Aspects of the Trypanosomatidae Family

    PubMed Central

    Motta, Maria Cristina Machado; Martins, Allan Cezar de Azevedo; de Souza, Silvana Sant’Anna; Catta-Preta, Carolina Moura Costa; Silva, Rosane; Klein, Cecilia Coimbra; de Almeida, Luiz Gonzaga Paula; de Lima Cunha, Oberdan; Ciapina, Luciane Prioli; Brocchi, Marcelo; Colabardini, Ana Cristina; de Araujo Lima, Bruna; Machado, Carlos Renato; de Almeida Soares, Célia Maria; Probst, Christian Macagnan; de Menezes, Claudia Beatriz Afonso; Thompson, Claudia Elizabeth; Bartholomeu, Daniella Castanheira; Gradia, Daniela Fiori; Pavoni, Daniela Parada; Grisard, Edmundo C.; Fantinatti-Garboggini, Fabiana; Marchini, Fabricio Klerynton; Rodrigues-Luiz, Gabriela Flávia; Wagner, Glauber; Goldman, Gustavo Henrique; Fietto, Juliana Lopes Rangel; Elias, Maria Carolina; Goldman, Maria Helena S.; Sagot, Marie-France; Pereira, Maristela; Stoco, Patrícia H.; de Mendonça-Neto, Rondon Pessoa; Teixeira, Santuza Maria Ribeiro; Maciel, Talles Eduardo Ferreira; de Oliveira Mendes, Tiago Antônio; Ürményi, Turán P.; de Souza, Wanderley; Schenkman, Sergio; de Vasconcelos, Ana Tereza Ribeiro

    2013-01-01

    Endosymbiont-bearing trypanosomatids have been considered excellent models for the study of cell evolution because the host protozoan co-evolves with an intracellular bacterium in a mutualistic relationship. Such protozoa inhabit a single invertebrate host during their entire life cycle and exhibit special characteristics that group them in a particular phylogenetic cluster of the Trypanosomatidae family, thus classified as monoxenics. In an effort to better understand such symbiotic association, we used DNA pyrosequencing and a reference-guided assembly to generate reads that predicted 16,960 and 12,162 open reading frames (ORFs) in two symbiont-bearing trypanosomatids, Angomonas deanei (previously named as Crithidia deanei) and Strigomonas culicis (first known as Blastocrithidia culicis), respectively. Identification of each ORF was based primarily on TriTrypDB using tblastn, and each ORF was confirmed by employing getorf from EMBOSS and Newbler 2.6 when necessary. The monoxenic organisms revealed conserved housekeeping functions when compared to other trypanosomatids, especially compared with Leishmania major. However, major differences were found in ORFs corresponding to the cytoskeleton, the kinetoplast, and the paraflagellar structure. The monoxenic organisms also contain a large number of genes for cytosolic calpain-like and surface gp63 metalloproteases and a reduced number of compartmentalized cysteine proteases in comparison to other TriTryp organisms, reflecting adaptations to the presence of the symbiont. The assembled bacterial endosymbiont sequences exhibit a high A+T content with a total of 787 and 769 ORFs for the Angomonas deanei and Strigomonas culicis endosymbionts, respectively, and indicate that these organisms hold a common ancestor related to the Alcaligenaceae family. Importantly, both symbionts contain enzymes that complement essential host cell biosynthetic pathways, such as those for amino acid, lipid and purine/pyrimidine metabolism

  1. A Genome-Wide Analysis Reveals Stress and Hormone Responsive Patterns of TIFY Family Genes in Brassica rapa

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Gopal; Park, Jong-In; Kayum, Md. Abdul; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2016-01-01

    The TIFY family is a plant-specific group of proteins with a diversity of functions and includes four subfamilies, viz. ZML, TIFY, PPD, and JASMONATE ZIM-domain (JAZ) proteins. TIFY family members, particularly JAZ subfamily proteins, play roles in biological processes such as development and stress and hormone responses in Arabidopsis, rice, chickpea, and grape. However, there is no information about this family in any Brassica crop. This study identifies 36 TIFY genes in Brassica rapa, an economically important crop species in the Brassicaceae. An extensive in silico analysis of phylogenetic grouping, protein motif organization and intron-exon distribution confirmed that there are four subfamilies of BrTIFY proteins. Out of 36 BrTIFY genes, we identified 21 in the JAZ subfamily, seven in the TIFY subfamily, six in ZML and two in PPD. Extensive expression profiling of 21 BrTIFY JAZs in various tissues, especially in floral organs and at different flower growth stages revealed constitutive expression patterns, which suggest that BrTIFY JAZ genes are important during growth and development of B. rapa flowers. A protein interaction network analysis also pointed to association of these proteins with fertility and defense processes of B. rapa. Using a low temperature-treated whole-genome microarray data set, most of the JAZ genes were found to have variable transcript abundance between the contrasting inbred lines Chiifu and Kenshin of B. rapa. Subsequently, the expression of all 21 BrTIFY JAZs in response to cold stress was characterized in the same two lines via qPCR, demonstrating that nine genes were up-regulated. Importantly, the BrTIFY JAZs showed strong and differential expression upon JA treatment, pointing to their probable involvement in JA-mediated growth regulatory functions, especially during flower development and stress responses. Additionally, BrTIFY JAZs were induced in response to salt, drought, Fusarium, ABA, and SA treatments, and six genes (BrTIFY3

  2. A Genome-Wide Analysis Reveals Stress and Hormone Responsive Patterns of TIFY Family Genes in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Saha, Gopal; Park, Jong-In; Kayum, Md Abdul; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2016-01-01

    The TIFY family is a plant-specific group of proteins with a diversity of functions and includes four subfamilies, viz. ZML, TIFY, PPD, and JASMONATE ZIM-domain (JAZ) proteins. TIFY family members, particularly JAZ subfamily proteins, play roles in biological processes such as development and stress and hormone responses in Arabidopsis, rice, chickpea, and grape. However, there is no information about this family in any Brassica crop. This study identifies 36 TIFY genes in Brassica rapa, an economically important crop species in the Brassicaceae. An extensive in silico analysis of phylogenetic grouping, protein motif organization and intron-exon distribution confirmed that there are four subfamilies of BrTIFY proteins. Out of 36 BrTIFY genes, we identified 21 in the JAZ subfamily, seven in the TIFY subfamily, six in ZML and two in PPD. Extensive expression profiling of 21 BrTIFY JAZs in various tissues, especially in floral organs and at different flower growth stages revealed constitutive expression patterns, which suggest that BrTIFY JAZ genes are important during growth and development of B. rapa flowers. A protein interaction network analysis also pointed to association of these proteins with fertility and defense processes of B. rapa. Using a low temperature-treated whole-genome microarray data set, most of the JAZ genes were found to have variable transcript abundance between the contrasting inbred lines Chiifu and Kenshin of B. rapa. Subsequently, the expression of all 21 BrTIFY JAZs in response to cold stress was characterized in the same two lines via qPCR, demonstrating that nine genes were up-regulated. Importantly, the BrTIFY JAZs showed strong and differential expression upon JA treatment, pointing to their probable involvement in JA-mediated growth regulatory functions, especially during flower development and stress responses. Additionally, BrTIFY JAZs were induced in response to salt, drought, Fusarium, ABA, and SA treatments, and six genes (BrTIFY3

  3. Genomic Selection For Bacterial Cold Water Disease Resistance In Rainbow Trout Reveals Large Within-Family Variation That Cannot Be Exploited In Traditional Family-based Selective Breeding

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Selective breeding is an effective strategy to improve resistance to specific pathogens, and thus has the potential to mitigate antibiotic use in aquaculture. Large family sizes of aquaculture species permits family-based selective breeding programs, but the need for specific-pathogen-free nucleus p...

  4. Structural Enzymology of Cellvibrio japonicus Agd31B Protein Reveals α-Transglucosylase Activity in Glycoside Hydrolase Family 31*

    PubMed Central

    Larsbrink, Johan; Izumi, Atsushi; Hemsworth, Glyn R.; Davies, Gideon J.; Brumer, Harry

    2012-01-01

    The metabolism of the storage polysaccharides glycogen and starch is of vital importance to organisms from all domains of life. In bacteria, utilization of these α-glucans requires the concerted action of a variety of enzymes, including glycoside hydrolases, glycoside phosphorylases, and transglycosylases. In particular, transglycosylases from glycoside hydrolase family 13 (GH13) and GH77 play well established roles in α-glucan side chain (de)branching, regulation of oligo- and polysaccharide chain length, and formation of cyclic dextrans. Here, we present the biochemical and tertiary structural characterization of a new type of bacterial 1,4-α-glucan 4-α-glucosyltransferase from GH31. Distinct from 1,4-α-glucan 6-α-glucosyltransferases (EC 2.4.1.24) and 4-α-glucanotransferases (EC 2.4.1.25), this enzyme strictly transferred one glucosyl residue from α(1→4)-glucans in disproportionation reactions. Substrate hydrolysis was undetectable for a series of malto-oligosaccharides except maltose for which transglycosylation nonetheless dominated across a range of substrate concentrations. Crystallographic analysis of the enzyme in free, acarbose-complexed, and trapped 5-fluoro-β-glucosyl-enzyme intermediate forms revealed extended substrate interactions across one negative and up to three positive subsites, thus providing structural rationalization for the unique, single monosaccharide transferase activity of the enzyme. PMID:23132856

  5. Gourds afloat: a dated phylogeny reveals an Asian origin of the gourd family (Cucurbitaceae) and numerous oversea dispersal events

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Hanno; Heibl, Christoph; Renner, Susanne S.

    2008-01-01

    Knowing the geographical origin of economically important plants is important for genetic improvement and conservation, but has been slowed by uneven geographical sampling where relatives occur in remote areas of difficult access. Less biased species sampling can be achieved when herbarium collections are included as DNA sources. Here, we address the history of Cucurbitaceae, one of the most economically important families of plants, using a multigene phylogeny for 114 of the 115 genera and 25 per cent of the 960 species. Worldwide sampling was achieved by using specimens from 30 herbaria. Results reveal an Asian origin of Cucurbitaceae in the Late Cretaceous, followed by the repeated spread of lineages into the African, American and Australian continents via transoceanic long-distance dispersal (LDD). North American cucurbits stem from at least seven range expansions of Central and South American lineages; Madagascar was colonized 13 times, always from Africa; Australia was reached 12 times, apparently always from Southeast Asia. Overall, Cucurbitaceae underwent at least 43 successful LDD events over the past 60 Myr, which would translate into an average of seven LDDs every 10 Myr. These and similar findings from other angiosperms stress the need for an increased tapping of museum collections to achieve extensive geographical sampling in plant phylogenetics. PMID:19033142

  6. Structural enzymology of Cellvibrio japonicus Agd31B protein reveals α-transglucosylase activity in glycoside hydrolase family 31.

    PubMed

    Larsbrink, Johan; Izumi, Atsushi; Hemsworth, Glyn R; Davies, Gideon J; Brumer, Harry

    2012-12-21

    The metabolism of the storage polysaccharides glycogen and starch is of vital importance to organisms from all domains of life. In bacteria, utilization of these α-glucans requires the concerted action of a variety of enzymes, including glycoside hydrolases, glycoside phosphorylases, and transglycosylases. In particular, transglycosylases from glycoside hydrolase family 13 (GH13) and GH77 play well established roles in α-glucan side chain (de)branching, regulation of oligo- and polysaccharide chain length, and formation of cyclic dextrans. Here, we present the biochemical and tertiary structural characterization of a new type of bacterial 1,4-α-glucan 4-α-glucosyltransferase from GH31. Distinct from 1,4-α-glucan 6-α-glucosyltransferases (EC 2.4.1.24) and 4-α-glucanotransferases (EC 2.4.1.25), this enzyme strictly transferred one glucosyl residue from α(1→4)-glucans in disproportionation reactions. Substrate hydrolysis was undetectable for a series of malto-oligosaccharides except maltose for which transglycosylation nonetheless dominated across a range of substrate concentrations. Crystallographic analysis of the enzyme in free, acarbose-complexed, and trapped 5-fluoro-β-glucosyl-enzyme intermediate forms revealed extended substrate interactions across one negative and up to three positive subsites, thus providing structural rationalization for the unique, single monosaccharide transferase activity of the enzyme.

  7. Exome sequencing of a colorectal cancer family reveals shared mutation pattern and predisposition circuitry along tumor pathways

    PubMed Central

    Suleiman, Suleiman H.; Koko, Mahmoud E.; Nasir, Wafaa H.; Elfateh, Ommnyiah; Elgizouli, Ubai K.; Abdallah, Mohammed O. E.; Alfarouk, Khalid O.; Hussain, Ayman; Faisal, Shima; Ibrahim, Fathelrahamn M. A.; Romano, Maurizio; Sultan, Ali; Banks, Lawrence; Newport, Melanie; Baralle, Francesco; Elhassan, Ahmed M.; Mohamed, Hiba S.; Ibrahim, Muntaser E.

    2015-01-01

    The molecular basis of cancer and cancer multiple phenotypes are not yet fully understood. Next Generation Sequencing promises new insight into the role of genetic interactions in shaping the complexity of cancer. Aiming to outline the differences in mutation patterns between familial colorectal cancer cases and controls we analyzed whole exomes of cancer tissues and control samples from an extended colorectal cancer pedigree, providing one of the first data sets of exome sequencing of cancer in an African population against a background of large effective size typically with excess of variants. Tumors showed hMSH2 loss of function SNV consistent with Lynch syndrome. Sets of genes harboring insertions–deletions in tumor tissues revealed, however, significant GO enrichment, a feature that was not seen in control samples, suggesting that ordered insertions–deletions are central to tumorigenesis in this type of cancer. Network analysis identified multiple hub genes of centrality. ELAVL1/HuR showed remarkable centrality, interacting specially with genes harboring non-synonymous SNVs thus reinforcing the proposition of targeted mutagenesis in cancer pathways. A likely explanation to such mutation pattern is DNA/RNA editing, suggested here by nucleotide transition-to-transversion ratio that significantly departed from expected values (p-value 5e-6). NFKB1 also showed significant centrality along with ELAVL1, raising the suspicion of viral etiology given the known interaction between oncogenic viruses and these proteins. PMID:26442106

  8. Gourds afloat: a dated phylogeny reveals an Asian origin of the gourd family (Cucurbitaceae) and numerous oversea dispersal events.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Hanno; Heibl, Christoph; Renner, Susanne S

    2009-03-07

    Knowing the geographical origin of economically important plants is important for genetic improvement and conservation, but has been slowed by uneven geographical sampling where relatives occur in remote areas of difficult access. Less biased species sampling can be achieved when herbarium collections are included as DNA sources. Here, we address the history of Cucurbitaceae, one of the most economically important families of plants, using a multigene phylogeny for 114 of the 115 genera and 25 per cent of the 960 species. Worldwide sampling was achieved by using specimens from 30 herbaria. Results reveal an Asian origin of Cucurbitaceae in the Late Cretaceous, followed by the repeated spread of lineages into the African, American and Australian continents via transoceanic long-distance dispersal (LDD). North American cucurbits stem from at least seven range expansions of Central and South American lineages; Madagascar was colonized 13 times, always from Africa; Australia was reached 12 times, apparently always from Southeast Asia. Overall, Cucurbitaceae underwent at least 43 successful LDD events over the past 60Myr, which would translate into an average of seven LDDs every 10Myr. These and similar findings from other angiosperms stress the need for an increased tapping of museum collections to achieve extensive geographical sampling in plant phylogenetics.

  9. Structure of human cGAS reveals a conserved family of second-messenger enzymes in innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Kranzusch, Philip J; Lee, Amy Si-Ying; Berger, James M; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2013-05-30

    Innate immune recognition of foreign nucleic acids induces protective interferon responses. Detection of cytosolic DNA triggers downstream immune signaling through activation of cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS). We report here the crystal structure of human cGAS, revealing an unanticipated zinc-ribbon DNA-binding domain appended to a core enzymatic nucleotidyltransferase scaffold. The catalytic core of cGAS is structurally homologous to the RNA-sensing enzyme, 2'-5' oligo-adenylate synthase (OAS), and divergent C-terminal domains account for specific ligand-activation requirements of each enzyme. We show that the cGAS zinc ribbon is essential for STING-dependent induction of the interferon response and that conserved amino acids displayed within the intervening loops are required for efficient cytosolic DNA recognition. These results demonstrate that cGAS and OAS define a family of innate immunity sensors and that structural divergence from a core nucleotidyltransferase enables second-messenger responses to distinct foreign nucleic acids.

  10. Structural Analysis of a Family 101 Glycoside Hydrolase in Complex with Carbohydrates Reveals Insights into Its Mechanism*

    PubMed Central

    Gregg, Katie J.; Suits, Michael D. L.; Deng, Lehua; Vocadlo, David J.; Boraston, Alisdair B.

    2015-01-01

    O-Linked glycosylation is one of the most abundant post-translational modifications of proteins. Within the secretory pathway of higher eukaryotes, the core of these glycans is frequently an N-acetylgalactosamine residue that is α-linked to serine or threonine residues. Glycoside hydrolases in family 101 are presently the only known enzymes to be able to hydrolyze this glycosidic linkage. Here we determine the high-resolution structures of the catalytic domain comprising a fragment of GH101 from Streptococcus pneumoniae TIGR4, SpGH101, in the absence of carbohydrate, and in complex with reaction products, inhibitor, and substrate analogues. Upon substrate binding, a tryptophan lid (residues 724-WNW-726) closes on the substrate. The closing of this lid fully engages the substrate in the active site with Asp-764 positioned directly beneath C1 of the sugar residue bound within the −1 subsite, consistent with its proposed role as the catalytic nucleophile. In all of the bound forms of the enzyme, however, the proposed catalytic acid/base residue was found to be too distant from the glycosidic oxygen (>4.3 Å) to serve directly as a general catalytic acid/base residue and thereby facilitate cleavage of the glycosidic bond. These same complexes, however, revealed a structurally conserved water molecule positioned between the catalytic acid/base and the glycosidic oxygen. On the basis of these structural observations we propose a new variation of the retaining glycoside hydrolase mechanism wherein the intervening water molecule enables a Grotthuss proton shuttle between Glu-796 and the glycosidic oxygen, permitting this residue to serve as the general acid/base catalytic residue. PMID:26304114

  11. Next-Generation Sequencing of Two Mitochondrial Genomes from Family Pompilidae (Hymenoptera: Vespoidea) Reveal Novel Patterns of Gene Arrangement

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Peng-Yan; Zheng, Bo-Ying; Liu, Jing-Xian; Wei, Shu-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Animal mitochondrial genomes have provided large and diverse datasets for evolutionary studies. Here, the first two representative mitochondrial genomes from the family Pompilidae (Hymenoptera: Vespoidea) were determined using next-generation sequencing. The sequenced region of these two mitochondrial genomes from the species Auplopus sp. and Agenioideus sp. was 16,746 bp long with an A + T content of 83.12% and 16,596 bp long with an A + T content of 78.64%, respectively. In both species, all of the 37 typical mitochondrial genes were determined. The secondary structure of tRNA genes and rRNA genes were predicted and compared with those of other insects. Atypical trnS1 using abnormal anticodons TCT and lacking D-stem pairings was identified. There were 49 helices belonging to six domains in rrnL and 30 helices belonging to three domains in rrns present. Compared with the ancestral organization, four and two tRNA genes were rearranged in mitochondrial genomes of Auplopus and Agenioideus, respectively. In both species, trnM was shuffled upstream of the trnI-trnQ-trnM cluster, and trnA was translocated from the cluster trnA-trnR-trnN-trnS1-trnE-trnF to the region between nad1 and trnL1, which is novel to the Vespoidea. In Auplopus, the tRNA cluster trnW-trnC-trnY was shuffled to trnW-trnY-trnC. Phylogenetic analysis within Vespoidea revealed that Pompilidae and Mutillidae formed a sister lineage, and then sistered Formicidae. The genomes presented in this study have enriched the knowledge base of molecular markers, which is valuable in respect to studies about the gene rearrangement mechanism, genomic evolutionary processes and phylogeny of Hymenoptera. PMID:27727175

  12. Structural Analysis of a Family 101 Glycoside Hydrolase in Complex with Carbohydrates Reveals Insights into Its Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Gregg, Katie J; Suits, Michael D L; Deng, Lehua; Vocadlo, David J; Boraston, Alisdair B

    2015-10-16

    O-Linked glycosylation is one of the most abundant post-translational modifications of proteins. Within the secretory pathway of higher eukaryotes, the core of these glycans is frequently an N-acetylgalactosamine residue that is α-linked to serine or threonine residues. Glycoside hydrolases in family 101 are presently the only known enzymes to be able to hydrolyze this glycosidic linkage. Here we determine the high-resolution structures of the catalytic domain comprising a fragment of GH101 from Streptococcus pneumoniae TIGR4, SpGH101, in the absence of carbohydrate, and in complex with reaction products, inhibitor, and substrate analogues. Upon substrate binding, a tryptophan lid (residues 724-WNW-726) closes on the substrate. The closing of this lid fully engages the substrate in the active site with Asp-764 positioned directly beneath C1 of the sugar residue bound within the -1 subsite, consistent with its proposed role as the catalytic nucleophile. In all of the bound forms of the enzyme, however, the proposed catalytic acid/base residue was found to be too distant from the glycosidic oxygen (>4.3 Å) to serve directly as a general catalytic acid/base residue and thereby facilitate cleavage of the glycosidic bond. These same complexes, however, revealed a structurally conserved water molecule positioned between the catalytic acid/base and the glycosidic oxygen. On the basis of these structural observations we propose a new variation of the retaining glycoside hydrolase mechanism wherein the intervening water molecule enables a Grotthuss proton shuttle between Glu-796 and the glycosidic oxygen, permitting this residue to serve as the general acid/base catalytic residue.

  13. Diverse retrotransposon families and an AT-rich satellite DNA revealed in giant genomes of Fritillaria lilies

    PubMed Central

    Ambrožová, Kateřina; Mandáková, Terezie; Bureš, Petr; Neumann, Pavel; Leitch, Ilia J.; Koblížková, Andrea; Macas, Jiří; Lysak, Martin A.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims The genus Fritillaria (Liliaceae) comprises species with extremely large genomes (1C = 30 000–127 000 Mb) and a bicontinental distribution. Most North American species (subgenus Liliorhiza) differ from Eurasian Fritillaria species by their distinct phylogenetic position and increased amounts of heterochromatin. This study examined the contribution of major repetitive elements to the genome obesity found in Fritillaria and identified repeats contributing to the heterochromatin arrays in Liliorhiza species. Methods Two Fritillaria species of similar genome size were selected for detailed analysis, one from each phylogeographical clade: F. affinis (1C = 45·6 pg, North America) and F. imperialis (1C = 43·0 pg, Eurasia). Fosmid libraries were constructed from their genomic DNAs and used for identification, sequence characterization, quantification and chromosome localization of clones containing highly repeated sequences. Key Results and Conclusions Repeats corresponding to 6·7 and 4·7 % of the F. affinis and F. imperialis genome, respectively, were identified. Chromoviruses and the Tat lineage of Ty3/gypsy group long terminal repeat retrotransposons were identified as the predominant components of the highly repeated fractions in the F. affinis and F. imperialis genomes, respectively. In addition, a heterogeneous, extremely AT-rich satellite repeat was isolated from F. affinis. The FriSAT1 repeat localized in heterochromatic bands makes up approx. 26 % of the F. affinis genome and substantial genomic fractions in several other Liliorhiza species. However, no evidence of a relationship between heterochromatin content and genome size variation was observed. Also, this study was unable to reveal any predominant repeats which tracked the increasing/decreasing trends of genome size evolution in Fritillaria. Instead, the giant Fritillaria genomes seem to be composed of many diversified families of transposable elements. We hypothesize that the

  14. Genome-wide association study reveals greater polygenic loading for schizophrenia in cases with a family history of illness.

    PubMed

    Bigdeli, Tim B; Ripke, Stephan; Bacanu, Silviu-Alin; Lee, Sang Hong; Wray, Naomi R; Gejman, Pablo V; Rietschel, Marcella; Cichon, Sven; St Clair, David; Corvin, Aiden; Kirov, George; McQuillin, Andrew; Gurling, Hugh; Rujescu, Dan; Andreassen, Ole A; Werge, Thomas; Blackwood, Douglas H R; Pato, Carlos N; Pato, Michele T; Malhotra, Anil K; O'Donovan, Michael C; Kendler, Kenneth S; Fanous, Ayman H

    2016-03-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of schizophrenia have yielded more than 100 common susceptibility variants, and strongly support a substantial polygenic contribution of a large number of small allelic effects. It has been hypothesized that familial schizophrenia is largely a consequence of inherited rather than environmental factors. We investigated the extent to which familiality of schizophrenia is associated with enrichment for common risk variants detectable in a large GWAS. We analyzed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data for cases reporting a family history of psychotic illness (N = 978), cases reporting no such family history (N = 4,503), and unscreened controls (N = 8,285) from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium (PGC1) study of schizophrenia. We used a multinomial logistic regression approach with model-fitting to detect allelic effects specific to either family history subgroup. We also considered a polygenic model, in which we tested whether family history positive subjects carried more schizophrenia risk alleles than family history negative subjects, on average. Several individual SNPs attained suggestive but not genome-wide significant association with either family history subgroup. Comparison of genome-wide polygenic risk scores based on GWAS summary statistics indicated a significant enrichment for SNP effects among family history positive compared to family history negative cases (Nagelkerke's R(2 ) = 0.0021; P = 0.00331; P-value threshold <0.4). Estimates of variability in disease liability attributable to the aggregate effect of genome-wide SNPs were significantly greater for family history positive compared to family history negative cases (0.32 and 0.22, respectively; P = 0.031). We found suggestive evidence of allelic effects detectable in large GWAS of schizophrenia that might be specific to particular family history subgroups. However, consideration of a polygenic risk score indicated a significant

  15. A comparative genome analysis of PME and PMEI families reveals the evolution of pectin metabolism in plant cell walls.

    PubMed

    Wang, Maojun; Yuan, Daojun; Gao, Wenhui; Li, Yang; Tan, Jiafu; Zhang, Xianlong

    2013-01-01

    Pectins are fundamental polysaccharides in the plant primary cell wall. Pectins are synthesized and secreted to cell walls as highly methyl-esterified polymers and then demethyl-esterified by pectin methylesterases (PMEs), which are spatially regulated by pectin methylesterase inhibitors (PMEIs). Although PME and PMEI genes are pivotal in plant cell wall formation, few studies have focused on the evolutionary patterns of the PME and PMEI gene families. In this study, the gene origin, evolution, and expression diversity of these two families were systematically analyzed using 11 representative species, including algae, bryophytes, lycophytes and flowering land plants. The results show that 1) for the two subfamilies (PME and proPME) of PME, the origin of the PME subfamily is consistent with the appearance of pectins in early charophyte cell walls, 2) Whole genome duplication (WGD) and tandem duplication contribute to the expansion of proPME and PMEI families in land plants, 3) Evidence of selection pressure shows that the proPME and PMEI families have rapidly evolved, particularly the PMEI family in vascular plants, and 4) Comparative expression profile analysis of the two families indicates that the eudicot Arabidopsis and monocot rice have different expression patterns. In addition, the gene structure and sequence analyses show that the origin of the PMEI domain may be derived from the neofunctionalization of the pro domain after WGD. This study will advance the evolutionary understanding of the PME and PMEI families and plant cell wall development.

  16. Ligand-binding specificity and promiscuity of the main lignocellulolytic enzyme families as revealed by active-site architecture analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Li; Liu, Shijia; Wang, Shuai; Wang, Lushan

    2016-01-01

    Biomass can be converted into sugars by a series of lignocellulolytic enzymes, which belong to the glycoside hydrolase (GH) families summarized in CAZy databases. Here, using a structural bioinformatics method, we analyzed the active site architecture of the main lignocellulolytic enzyme families. The aromatic amino acids Trp/Tyr and polar amino acids Glu/Asp/Asn/Gln/Arg occurred at higher frequencies in the active site architecture than in the whole enzyme structure. And the number of potential subsites was significantly different among different families. In the cellulase and xylanase families, the conserved amino acids in the active site architecture were mostly found at the −2 to +1 subsites, while in β-glucosidase they were mainly concentrated at the −1 subsite. Families with more conserved binding amino acid residues displayed strong selectivity for their ligands, while those with fewer conserved binding amino acid residues often exhibited promiscuity when recognizing ligands. Enzymes with different activities also tended to bind different hydroxyl oxygen atoms on the ligand. These results may help us to better understand the common and unique structural bases of enzyme-ligand recognition from different families and provide a theoretical basis for the functional evolution and rational design of major lignocellulolytic enzymes. PMID:27009476

  17. A combined morphological, ultrastructural, molecular, and biochemical study of the peculiar family Gomontiellaceae (Oscillatoriales) reveals a new cylindrospermopsin-producing clade of cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Bohunická, Markéta; Mareš, Jan; Hrouzek, Pavel; Urajová, Petra; Lukeš, Martin; Šmarda, Jan; Komárek, Jiří; Gaysina, Lira A; Strunecký, Otakar

    2015-12-01

    Members of the morphologically unusual cyanobacterial family Gomontiellaceae were studied using a polyphasic approach. Cultured strains of Hormoscilla pringsheimii, Starria zimbabweënsis, Crinalium magnum, and Crinalium epipsammum were thoroughly examined, and the type specimen of the family, Gomontiella subtubulosa, was investigated. The results of morphological observations using both light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were consistent with previous reports and provided evidence for the unique morphological and ultrastructural traits of this family. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene confirmed the monophyletic origin of non-marine repre-sentatives of genera traditionally classified into this family. The family was phylogenetically placed among other groups of filamentous cyanobacterial taxa. The presence of cellulose in the cell wall was analyzed and confirmed in all cultured Gomontiellaceae members using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and fluorescence microscopy. Evaluation of toxins produced by the studied strains revealed the hepatotoxin cylindrospermopsin (CYN) in available strains of the genus Hormoscilla. Production of this compound in both Hormoscilla strains was detected using high-performance liquid chromatography in tandem with high resolution mass spectrometry and confirmed by positive PCR amplification of the cyrJ gene from the CYN biosynthetic cluster. To our knowledge, this is the first report of CYN production by soil cyanobacteria, establishing a previously unreported CYN-producing lineage. This study indicates that cyanobacteria of the family Gomontiellaceae form a separate but coherent cluster defined by numerous intriguing morphological, ultrastructural, and biochemical features, and exhibiting a toxic potential worthy of further investigation.

  18. Whole Exome Sequencing Reveals a Mutation in CRYBB2 in a Large Mexican Family with Autosomal Dominant Pulverulent Cataract

    PubMed Central

    Messina-Baas, Olga; Gonzalez-Garay, Manuel L.; González-Huerta, Luz M.; Toral-López, Jaime; Cuevas-Covarrubias, Sergio A.

    2016-01-01

    Congenital cataract, an important cause of reversible blindness, is due to several causes including Mendelian inheritance. Thirty percent of cataracts are hereditary with participation of the gamma crystallin genes. Clinical and genetic heterogeneity is observed in patients with gene mutations and congenital cataract; about 40 genetic loci have been associated with hereditary cataract. In this study, we identified the underlying genetic cause of an autosomal dominant pulverulent cataract (ADPC) in a large Mexican family. Twenty-one affected patients and 20 healthy members of a family with ADPC were included. Genomic DNA was analyzed by whole exome sequencing in the proband, a normal daughter, and in an affected son, whereas DNA Sanger sequencing was performed in all members of the family. After the bioinformatics analysis, all samples were genotyped using Sanger sequencing to eliminate variants that do not cosegregate with the cataract. We observed a perfect cosegregation of a nonsense mutation c.475C>T (p.Q155*) in exon 6 of the CRYBB2 gene with ADPC. We calculated a logarithm of the odds score of 5.5. This mutation was not detected in healthy members of the family and in 100 normal controls. This is the first Mexican family with ADPC associated with a p.Q155* mutation. Interestingly, this specific mutation in the CRYBB2 gene seems to be exclusively associated with pulverulent/cerulean cataract (with some clinical variability) independent of the population's genetic background. PMID:27385965

  19. Whole Exome Sequencing Reveals Mutations in Known Retinal Disease Genes in 33 out of 68 Israeli Families with Inherited Retinopathies

    PubMed Central

    Beryozkin, Avigail; Shevah, Elia; Kimchi, Adva; Mizrahi-Meissonnier, Liliana; Khateb, Samer; Ratnapriya, Rinki; Lazar, Csilla H.; Blumenfeld, Anat; Ben-Yosef, Tamar; Hemo, Yitzhak; Pe’er, Jacob; Averbuch, Eduard; Sagi, Michal; Boleda, Alexis; Gieser, Linn; Zlotogorski, Abraham; Falik-Zaccai, Tzipora; Alimi-Kasem, Ola; Jacobson, Samuel G.; Chowers, Itay; Swaroop, Anand; Banin, Eyal; Sharon, Dror

    2015-01-01

    Whole exome sequencing (WES) is a powerful technique for identifying sequence changes in the human genome. The goal of this study was to delineate the genetic defects in patients with inherited retinal diseases (IRDs) using WES. WES was performed on 90 patient DNA samples from 68 families and 226 known genes for IRDs were analyzed. Sanger sequencing was used to validate potential pathogenic variants that were also subjected to segregation analysis in families. Thirty-three causative mutations (19 novel and 14 known) in 25 genes were identified in 33 of the 68 families. The vast majority of mutations (30 out of 33) have not been reported in the Israeli and the Palestinian populations. Nine out of the 33 mutations were detected in additional families from the same ethnic population, suggesting a founder effect. In two families, identified phenotypes were different from the previously reported clinical findings associated with the causative gene. This is the largest genetic analysis of IRDs in the Israeli and Palestinian populations to date. We also demonstrate that WES is a powerful tool for rapid analysis of known disease genes in large patient cohorts. PMID:26306921

  20. The structure of the first representative of Pfam family PF06475 reveals a new fold with possible involvement in glycolipid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Bakolitsa, Constantina; Kumar, Abhinav; McMullan, Daniel; Krishna, S. Sri; Miller, Mitchell D.; Carlton, Dennis; Najmanovich, Rafael; Abdubek, Polat; Astakhova, Tamara; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Clayton, Thomas; Deller, Marc C.; Duan, Lian; Elias, Ylva; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grant, Joanna C.; Grzechnik, Slawomir K.; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Kozbial, Piotr; Marciano, David; Morse, Andrew T.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Okach, Linda; Oommachen, Silvya; Paulsen, Jessica; Reyes, Ron; Rife, Christopher L.; Trout, Christina V.; van den Bedem, Henry; Weekes, Dana; White, Aprilfawn; Xu, Qingping; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Elsliger, Marc-André; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2010-01-01

    The crystal structure of PA1994 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a member of the Pfam PF06475 family classified as a domain of unknown function (DUF1089), reveals a novel fold comprising a 15-stranded β-sheet wrapped around a single α-helix that assembles into a tight dimeric arrangement. The remote structural similarity to lipoprotein localization factors, in addition to the presence of an acidic pocket that is conserved in DUF1089 homologs, phospholipid-binding and sugar-binding proteins, indicate a role for PA1994 and the DUF1089 family in glycolipid metabolism. Genome-context analysis lends further support to the involvement of this family of proteins in glycolipid metabolism and indicates possible activation of DUF1089 homologs under conditions of bacterial cell-wall stress or host–pathogen interactions. PMID:20944213

  1. Pre-steady-state Kinetic Analysis of a Family D DNA Polymerase from Thermococcus sp. 9°N Reveals Mechanisms for Archaeal Genomic Replication and Maintenance.

    PubMed

    Schermerhorn, Kelly M; Gardner, Andrew F

    2015-09-04

    Family D DNA polymerases (polDs) have been implicated as the major replicative polymerase in archaea, excluding the Crenarchaeota branch, and bear little sequence homology to other DNA polymerase families. Here we report a detailed kinetic analysis of nucleotide incorporation and exonuclease activity for a Family D DNA polymerase from Thermococcus sp. 9°N. Pre-steady-state single-turnover nucleotide incorporation assays were performed to obtain the kinetic parameters, kpol and Kd, for correct nucleotide incorporation, incorrect nucleotide incorporation, and ribonucleotide incorporation by exonuclease-deficient polD. Correct nucleotide incorporation kinetics revealed a relatively slow maximal rate of polymerization (kpol ∼ 2.5 s(-1)) and especially tight nucleotide binding (Kd (dNTP) ∼ 1.7 μm), compared with DNA polymerases from Families A, B, C, X, and Y. Furthermore, pre-steady-state nucleotide incorporation assays revealed that polD prevents the incorporation of incorrect nucleotides and ribonucleotides primarily through reduced nucleotide binding affinity. Pre-steady-state single-turnover assays on wild-type 9°N polD were used to examine 3'-5' exonuclease hydrolysis activity in the presence of Mg(2+) and Mn(2+). Interestingly, substituting Mn(2+) for Mg(2+) accelerated hydrolysis rates > 40-fold (kexo ≥ 110 s(-1) versus ≥ 2.5 s(-1)). Preference for Mn(2+) over Mg(2+) in exonuclease hydrolysis activity is a property unique to the polD family. The kinetic assays performed in this work provide critical insight into the mechanisms that polD employs to accurately and efficiently replicate the archaeal genome. Furthermore, despite the unique properties of polD, this work suggests that a conserved polymerase kinetic pathway is present in all known DNA polymerase families.

  2. Pre-steady-state Kinetic Analysis of a Family D DNA Polymerase from Thermococcus sp. 9°N Reveals Mechanisms for Archaeal Genomic Replication and Maintenance*

    PubMed Central

    Schermerhorn, Kelly M.; Gardner, Andrew F.

    2015-01-01

    Family D DNA polymerases (polDs) have been implicated as the major replicative polymerase in archaea, excluding the Crenarchaeota branch, and bear little sequence homology to other DNA polymerase families. Here we report a detailed kinetic analysis of nucleotide incorporation and exonuclease activity for a Family D DNA polymerase from Thermococcus sp. 9°N. Pre-steady-state single-turnover nucleotide incorporation assays were performed to obtain the kinetic parameters, kpol and Kd, for correct nucleotide incorporation, incorrect nucleotide incorporation, and ribonucleotide incorporation by exonuclease-deficient polD. Correct nucleotide incorporation kinetics revealed a relatively slow maximal rate of polymerization (kpol ∼2.5 s−1) and especially tight nucleotide binding (Kd(dNTP) ∼1.7 μm), compared with DNA polymerases from Families A, B, C, X, and Y. Furthermore, pre-steady-state nucleotide incorporation assays revealed that polD prevents the incorporation of incorrect nucleotides and ribonucleotides primarily through reduced nucleotide binding affinity. Pre-steady-state single-turnover assays on wild-type 9°N polD were used to examine 3′-5′ exonuclease hydrolysis activity in the presence of Mg2+ and Mn2+. Interestingly, substituting Mn2+ for Mg2+ accelerated hydrolysis rates >40-fold (kexo ≥110 s−1 versus ≥2.5 s−1). Preference for Mn2+ over Mg2+ in exonuclease hydrolysis activity is a property unique to the polD family. The kinetic assays performed in this work provide critical insight into the mechanisms that polD employs to accurately and efficiently replicate the archaeal genome. Furthermore, despite the unique properties of polD, this work suggests that a conserved polymerase kinetic pathway is present in all known DNA polymerase families. PMID:26160179

  3. Mutational and Structural Analysis of l-N-Carbamoylase Reveals New Insights into a Peptidase M20/M25/M40 Family Member

    PubMed Central

    García-Pino, Abel; Las Heras-Vázquez, Francisco Javier; Clemente-Jiménez, Josefa María; Rodríguez-Vico, Felipe; García-Ruiz, Juan M.; Loris, Remy; Gavira, Jose Antonio

    2012-01-01

    N-Carbamoyl-l-amino acid amidohydrolases (l-carbamoylases) are important industrial enzymes used in kinetic resolution of racemic mixtures of N-carbamoyl-amino acids due to their strict enantiospecificity. In this work, we report the first l-carbamoylase structure belonging to Geobacillus stearothermophilus CECT43 (BsLcar), at a resolution of 2.7 Å. Structural analysis of BsLcar and several members of the peptidase M20/M25/M40 family confirmed the expected conserved residues at the active site in this family, and site-directed mutagenesis revealed their relevance to substrate binding. We also found an unexpectedly conserved arginine residue (Arg234 in BsLcar), proven to be critical for dimerization of the enzyme. The mutation of this sole residue resulted in a total loss of activity and prevented the formation of the dimer in BsLcar. Comparative studies revealed that the dimerization domain of the peptidase M20/M25/M40 family is a “small-molecule binding domain,” allowing further evolutionary considerations for this enzyme family. PMID:22904279

  4. RNAi screening reveals requirement for host cell secretory pathway in infection by diverse families of negative-strand RNA viruses

    PubMed Central

    Panda, Debasis; Das, Anshuman; Dinh, Phat X.; Subramaniam, Sakthivel; Nayak, Debasis; Barrows, Nicholas J.; Pearson, James L.; Thompson, Jesse; Kelly, David L.; Ladunga, Istvan; Pattnaik, Asit K.

    2011-01-01

    Negative-strand (NS) RNA viruses comprise many pathogens that cause serious diseases in humans and animals. Despite their clinical importance, little is known about the host factors required for their infection. Using vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), a prototypic NS RNA virus in the family Rhabdoviridae, we conducted a human genome-wide siRNA screen and identified 72 host genes required for viral infection. Many of these identified genes were also required for infection by two other NS RNA viruses, the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus of the Arenaviridae family and human parainfluenza virus type 3 of the Paramyxoviridae family. Genes affecting different stages of VSV infection, such as entry/uncoating, gene expression, and assembly/release, were identified. Depletion of the proteins of the coatomer complex I or its upstream effectors ARF1 or GBF1 led to detection of reduced levels of VSV RNA. Coatomer complex I was also required for infection of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus and human parainfluenza virus type 3. These results highlight the evolutionarily conserved requirements for gene expression of diverse families of NS RNA viruses and demonstrate the involvement of host cell secretory pathway in the process. PMID:22065774

  5. Genome-wide analysis of the AP2/ERF family in Musa species reveals divergence and neofunctionalisation during evolution.

    PubMed

    Lakhwani, Deepika; Pandey, Ashutosh; Dhar, Yogeshwar Vikram; Bag, Sumit Kumar; Trivedi, Prabodh Kumar; Asif, Mehar Hasan

    2016-01-06

    AP2/ERF domain containing transcription factor super family is one of the important regulators in the plant kingdom. The involvement of AP2/ERF family members has been elucidated in various processes associated with plant growth, development as well as in response to hormones, biotic and abiotic stresses. In this study, we carried out genome-wide analysis to identify members of AP2/ERF family in Musa acuminata (A genome) and Musa balbisiana (B genome) and changes leading to neofunctionalisation of genes. Analysis identified 265 and 318 AP2/ERF encoding genes in M. acuminata and M. balbisiana respectively which were further classified into ERF, DREB, AP2, RAV and Soloist groups. Comparative analysis indicated that AP2/ERF family has undergone duplication, loss and divergence during evolution and speciation of the Musa A and B genomes. We identified nine genes which are up-regulated during fruit ripening and might be components of the regulatory machinery operating during ethylene-dependent ripening in banana. Tissue-specific expression analysis of the genes suggests that different regulatory mechanisms might be involved in peel and pulp ripening process through recruiting specific ERFs in these tissues. Analysis also suggests that MaRAV-6 and MaERF026 have structurally diverged from their M. balbisiana counterparts and have attained new functions during ripening.

  6. Molecular evolution analysis of WUSCHEL-related homeobox transcription factor family reveals functional divergence among clades in the homeobox region.

    PubMed

    Segatto, Ana Lúcia A; Thompson, Claudia E; Freitas, Loreta B

    2016-07-01

    Gene families have been shown to play important roles in plant evolution and are associated with diversification and speciation. Genes of WUSCHEL-related homeobox family of transcription factors have important functions in plant development and are correlated with the appearance of evolutionary novelties. There are several published studies related to this family, but little is known about the relationships among the main clades in the phylogeny and the molecular evolution of the family. In this study, we obtained a well-resolved Bayesian phylogenetic tree establishing the relationships among the main clades and determining the position of Selaginella moellendorffii WOX genes. Moreover, a correlation was identified between the number of genes in the genomes and the events of whole-genome duplications. The intron-exon structure is more consistent across the modern clade, which appeared more recently in the WOX evolutionary history, and coincides with the development of higher complexity in plant species. No positive selection was detected among sites through the branches in the tree. However, with regard to the main clades, functional divergence among certain amino acids in the homeodomain region was found. Relaxed purifying selection could be the main driving force in the evolution of these genes and in agreement with some genes have been demonstrated to be functionally redundant.

  7. Familial risk and ADHD-specific neural activity revealed by case-control, discordant twin pair design.

    PubMed

    Godinez, Detre A; Willcutt, Erik G; Burgess, Gregory C; Depue, Brendan E; Andrews-Hanna, Jessica R; Banich, Marie T

    2015-09-30

    Individuals with ADHD, as well as their family members who do not meet clinical criteria, have shown deficits in executive function. However, it remains unclear whether underlying neural alterations are familial or ADHD-specific. To investigate this issue, neural activation underlying executive function was assessed using functional magnetic resonance imaging during performance of a Stroop task in three groups of individuals: 20 young adults who were diagnosed with ADHD in childhood, their 20 dizygotic co-twins without ADHD in childhood, and 20 unrelated controls selected from dizygotic twin pairs in which neither twin had ADHD in childhood (total n=60). Implicating the frontoparietal network as a location of effects specific to ADHD, activation in the superior frontal (Brodmann's Area - BA 6) and parietal regions (BA 40) was significantly reduced in twins with childhood ADHD compared to both their control co-twins and unrelated control twins. Consistent with familial influences, activity in the anterior cingulate and insula was significantly reduced in both the twins with ADHD and their co-twins compared to the unrelated controls. These results show that both ADHD-specific and familial influences related to an ADHD diagnosis impact neural systems underlying executive function.

  8. Transcriptome analyses of the Dof-like gene family in grapevine reveal its involvement in berry, flower and seed development

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Danielle Costenaro; da Silveira Falavigna, Vítor; Fasoli, Marianna; Buffon, Vanessa; Porto, Diogo Denardi; Pappas, Georgios Joannis; Pezzotti, Mario; Pasquali, Giancarlo; Revers, Luís Fernando

    2016-01-01

    The Dof (DNA-binding with one finger) protein family spans a group of plant transcription factors involved in the regulation of several functions, such as plant responses to stress, hormones and light, phytochrome signaling and seed germination. Here we describe the Dof-like gene family in grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.), which consists of 25 genes coding for Dof. An extensive in silico characterization of the VviDofL gene family was performed. Additionally, the expression of the entire gene family was assessed in 54 grapevine tissues and organs using an integrated approach with microarray (cv Corvina) and real-time PCR (cv Pinot Noir) analyses. The phylogenetic analysis comparing grapevine sequences with those of Arabidopsis, tomato, poplar and already described Dof genes in other species allowed us to identify several duplicated genes. The diversification of grapevine DofL genes during evolution likely resulted in a broader range of biological roles. Furthermore, distinct expression patterns were identified between samples analyzed, corroborating such hypothesis. Our expression results indicate that several VviDofL genes perform their functional roles mainly during flower, berry and seed development, highlighting their importance for grapevine growth and production. The identification of similar expression profiles between both approaches strongly suggests that these genes have important regulatory roles that are evolutionally conserved between grapevine cvs Corvina and Pinot Noir. PMID:27610237

  9. Transcriptome analyses of the Dof-like gene family in grapevine reveal its involvement in berry, flower and seed development.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Danielle Costenaro; da Silveira Falavigna, Vítor; Fasoli, Marianna; Buffon, Vanessa; Porto, Diogo Denardi; Pappas, Georgios Joannis; Pezzotti, Mario; Pasquali, Giancarlo; Revers, Luís Fernando

    2016-01-01

    The Dof (DNA-binding with one finger) protein family spans a group of plant transcription factors involved in the regulation of several functions, such as plant responses to stress, hormones and light, phytochrome signaling and seed germination. Here we describe the Dof-like gene family in grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.), which consists of 25 genes coding for Dof. An extensive in silico characterization of the VviDofL gene family was performed. Additionally, the expression of the entire gene family was assessed in 54 grapevine tissues and organs using an integrated approach with microarray (cv Corvina) and real-time PCR (cv Pinot Noir) analyses. The phylogenetic analysis comparing grapevine sequences with those of Arabidopsis, tomato, poplar and already described Dof genes in other species allowed us to identify several duplicated genes. The diversification of grapevine DofL genes during evolution likely resulted in a broader range of biological roles. Furthermore, distinct expression patterns were identified between samples analyzed, corroborating such hypothesis. Our expression results indicate that several VviDofL genes perform their functional roles mainly during flower, berry and seed development, highlighting their importance for grapevine growth and production. The identification of similar expression profiles between both approaches strongly suggests that these genes have important regulatory roles that are evolutionally conserved between grapevine cvs Corvina and Pinot Noir.

  10. Genome-wide analysis of the AP2/ERF family in Musa species reveals divergence and neofunctionalisation during evolution

    PubMed Central

    Lakhwani, Deepika; Pandey, Ashutosh; Dhar, Yogeshwar Vikram; Bag, Sumit Kumar; Trivedi, Prabodh Kumar; Asif, Mehar Hasan

    2016-01-01

    AP2/ERF domain containing transcription factor super family is one of the important regulators in the plant kingdom. The involvement of AP2/ERF family members has been elucidated in various processes associated with plant growth, development as well as in response to hormones, biotic and abiotic stresses. In this study, we carried out genome-wide analysis to identify members of AP2/ERF family in Musa acuminata (A genome) and Musa balbisiana (B genome) and changes leading to neofunctionalisation of genes. Analysis identified 265 and 318 AP2/ERF encoding genes in M. acuminata and M. balbisiana respectively which were further classified into ERF, DREB, AP2, RAV and Soloist groups. Comparative analysis indicated that AP2/ERF family has undergone duplication, loss and divergence during evolution and speciation of the Musa A and B genomes. We identified nine genes which are up-regulated during fruit ripening and might be components of the regulatory machinery operating during ethylene-dependent ripening in banana. Tissue-specific expression analysis of the genes suggests that different regulatory mechanisms might be involved in peel and pulp ripening process through recruiting specific ERFs in these tissues. Analysis also suggests that MaRAV-6 and MaERF026 have structurally diverged from their M. balbisiana counterparts and have attained new functions during ripening. PMID:26733055

  11. Systematic Analysis of the Maize PHD-Finger Gene Family Reveals a Subfamily Involved in Abiotic Stress Response.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qianqian; Liu, Jinyang; Wang, Yu; Zhao, Yang; Jiang, Haiyang; Cheng, Beijiu

    2015-09-30

    Plant homeodomain (PHD)-finger proteins were found universally in eukaryotes and known as key players in regulating transcription and chromatin structure. Many PHD-finger proteins have been well studied on structure and function in animals. Whereas, only a few of plant PHD-finger factors had been characterized, and majority of PHD-finger proteins were functionally unclear. In this study, a complete comprehensive analysis of maize PHD family is presented. Sixty-seven PHD-finger genes in maize were identified and further divided into ten groups according to phylogenetic analysis that was supported by motif and intron/exon analysis. These genes were unevenly distributed on ten chromosomes and contained 12 segmental duplication events, suggesting that segmental duplications were the major contributors in expansion of the maize PHD family. The paralogous genes mainly experienced purifying selection with restrictive functional divergence after the duplication events on the basis of the Ka/Ks ratio. Gene digital expression analysis showed that the PHD family had a wide expression profile in maize development. In addition, 15 potential stress response genes were detected by promoter cis-element and expression analysis. Two proteins ZmPHD14 and ZmPHD19 were located in the nucleus. These results provided a solid base for future functional genome study of the PHD-finger family in maize and afforded important clues for characterizing and cloning potentially important candidates in response to abiotic stresses.

  12. Multiple endocrine neoplasia phenocopy revealed as a co-occurring neuroendocrine tumor and familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia type 3.

    PubMed

    Hovden, Silje; Jespersen, Marie Louise; Nissen, Peter H; Poulsen, Per Løgstrup; Rolighed, Lars; Ladefoged, Søren A; Rejnmark, Lars

    2016-10-01

    Familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia type 3 should be considered as differential diagnosis in patients with suspected primary hyperparathyroidism and/or suspected multiple neoplasia syndrome, as correct diagnosis will spare the patients for going through multiple futile parathyroidectomies and for the worry of being diagnosed with a cancer susceptibility syndrome.

  13. Genetic and morphological evidence reveals the existence of a new family, genus and species of Echinorhynchida (Acanthocephala).

    PubMed

    Braicovich, Paola E; Lanfranchi, Ana L; Farber, Marisa D; Marvaldi, Adriana E; Luque, José L; Timi, Juan T

    2014-08-01

    Gymnorhadinorhynchus gen. n. is proposed to accommodate its type species, G. decapteri sp. n., a parasite of the marine fish Decapterus punctatus (Cuvier), caught from the coastal waters of Brazil. Gymnorhadinorhynchus decapteri sp. n. was morphologically most similar to species of two echinorhynchid families, the Rhadinorhynchidae and the Cavisomidae, particularly in the structure of the proboscis and the absence of somatic spines, respectively. This combination of morphological features made it difficult to assign our specimen to an extant family of the Acanthocephala. Therefore, in order to clarify the systematic placement of G. decapteri, a molecular phylogenetic analysis was performed based on the SSU and LSU rDNA and the mitochondrial cox1 gene sequences obtained for the new taxon and other 26 acanthocephalan species. The results of parsimony and maximum likelihood analyses, using individual, combined and concatenated sequence data, consistently indicate that the specimens do not belong to any known family of the Echinorhynchida. Rather, G. decapteri represents a distinct lineage that is closely related to the Transvenidae, but distantly related to both the Rhadinorhynchidae and the Cavisomidae. Gymnorhadinorhynchidae fam. n. is therefore erected. This newly described family can be distinguished from other families of Echinorhynchida by the combination of the following morphological characters: a proboscis cylindrical with 10 rows of 22-26 hooks, dorsoventral differences in proboscis hooks, basal hooks forming a ring and being abruptly larger than anterior hooks, absence of trunk spines and presence of four tubular cement glands. This combination, in addition to several molecular autapomorphies, justifies the erection of a new genus, Gymnorhadinorhynchus gen. n., in order to accommodate this new species.

  14. Genome-wide analysis of tandem repeats in Tribolium castaneum genome reveals abundant and highly dynamic tandem repeat families with satellite DNA features in euchromatic chromosomal arms.

    PubMed

    Pavlek, Martina; Gelfand, Yevgeniy; Plohl, Miroslav; Meštrović, Nevenka

    2015-12-01

    Although satellite DNAs are well-explored components of heterochromatin and centromeres, little is known about emergence, dispersal and possible impact of comparably structured tandem repeats (TRs) on the genome-wide scale. Our bioinformatics analysis of assembled Tribolium castaneum genome disclosed significant contribution of TRs in euchromatic chromosomal arms and clear predominance of satellite DNA-typical 170 bp monomers in arrays of ≥5 repeats. By applying different experimental approaches, we revealed that the nine most prominent TR families Cast1-Cast9 extracted from the assembly comprise ∼4.3% of the entire genome and reside almost exclusively in euchromatic regions. Among them, seven families that build ∼3.9% of the genome are based on ∼170 and ∼340 bp long monomers. Results of phylogenetic analyses of 2500 monomers originating from these families show high-sequence dynamics, evident by extensive exchanges between arrays on non-homologous chromosomes. In addition, our analysis shows that concerted evolution acts more efficiently on longer than on shorter arrays. Efficient genome-wide distribution of nine TR families implies the role of transposition only in expansion of the most dispersed family, and involvement of other mechanisms is anticipated. Despite similarities in sequence features, FISH experiments indicate high-level compartmentalization of centromeric and euchromatic tandem repeats.

  15. Study of large inbred Friedreich ataxia families reveals a recombination between D9S15 and the disease locus

    SciTech Connect

    Belal, S.; Ben Hamida, C.; Hentati, F.; Ben Hamida, M. ); Panayides, K.; Ioannou, P.; MIddleton, L.T. ); Sirugo, G.; Koenig, S.; Mandel, J.L ); Beckmann, J. )

    1992-12-01

    Friedreich ataxia is a neurodegenerative disorder with autosomal recessive inheritance. Precise linkage mapping of the Friedreich ataxia locus (FRDA) in 9q13-q21 should lead to the isolation of the defective gene by positional cloning. The two closest DNA markers, D9S5 and D9S15, show very tight linkage to FRDA, making difficult the ordering of the three loci. The authors present a linkage study of three large Friedreich ataxia families of Tunisian origin, with several multiallelic markers around D9S5 and D9S15. Haplotype data were used to investigate genetic homogeneity of the disease in these geographically related families. A meiotic recombination was found in a nonaffected individual, which excludes a 150-kb segment, including D9S15, as a possible location for the Freidreich ataxia gene and which should orient the search in the D9S5 region. 16 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  16. Characterization of two avian MHC-like genes reveals an ancient origin of the CD1 family

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Marcia M.; Wang, Carren; Parisini, Emilio; Coletta, Ricardo D.; Goto, Ronald M.; Lee, Stella Y.; Barral, Duarte C.; Townes, Maria; Roura-Mir, Carme; Ford, Heide L.; Brenner, Michael B.; Dascher, Christopher C.

    2005-01-01

    Many of the genes that comprise the vertebrate adaptive immune system are conserved across wide evolutionary time scales. Most notably, homologs of the mammalian MHC gene family have been found in virtually all jawed vertebrates, including sharks, bony fishes, reptiles, and birds. The CD1 family of antigen-presenting molecules are related to the MHC class I family but have evolved to bind and present lipid antigens to T cells. Here, we describe two highly divergent nonclassical MHC class I genes found in the chicken (Gallus gallus) that have sequence homology to the mammalian CD1 family of proteins. One of the chicken CD1 genes expresses a full-length transcript, whereas the other has multiple splice variants. Both Southern blot and single nucleotide polymorphism analysis indicates that chicken CD1 is relatively nonpolymorphic. Moreover, cross-hybridizing bands are present in other bird species, suggesting broad conservation in the avian class. Northern analysis of chicken tissue shows a high level of CD1 expression in the bursa and spleen. In addition, molecular modeling predicts that the potential antigen-binding pocket is probably hydrophobic, a universal characteristic of CD1 molecules. Genomic analysis indicates that the CD1 genes are located on chicken chromosome 16 and maps to within 200 kb of the chicken MHC B locus, suggesting that CD1 genes diverged from classical MHC genes while still linked to the major histocompatibility complex locus. The existence of CD1 genes in an avian species suggests that the origin of CD1 extends deep into the evolutionary history of terrestrial vertebrates. PMID:15939884

  17. Clade classification of monolignol biosynthesis gene family members reveals target genes to decrease lignin in Lolium perenne.

    PubMed

    van Parijs, F R D; Ruttink, T; Boerjan, W; Haesaert, G; Byrne, S L; Asp, T; Roldán-Ruiz, I; Muylle, H

    2015-07-01

    In monocots, lignin content has a strong impact on the digestibility of the cell wall fraction. Engineering lignin biosynthesis requires a profound knowledge of the role of paralogues in the multigene families that constitute the monolignol biosynthesis pathway. We applied a bioinformatics approach for genome-wide identification of candidate genes in Lolium perenne that are likely to be involved in the biosynthesis of monolignols. More specifically, we performed functional subtyping of phylogenetic clades in four multigene families: 4CL, COMT, CAD and CCR. Essential residues were considered for functional clade delineation within these families. This classification was complemented with previously published experimental evidence on gene expression, gene function and enzymatic activity in closely related crops and model species. This allowed us to assign functions to novel identified L. perenne genes, and to assess functional redundancy among paralogues. We found that two 4CL paralogues, two COMT paralogues, three CCR paralogues and one CAD gene are prime targets for genetic studies to engineer developmentally regulated lignin in this species. Based on the delineation of sequence conservation between paralogues and a first analysis of allelic diversity, we discuss possibilities to further study the roles of these paralogues in lignin biosynthesis, including expression analysis, reverse genetics and forward genetics, such as association mapping. We propose criteria to prioritise paralogues within multigene families and certain SNPs within these genes for developing genotyping assays or increasing power in association mapping studies. Although L. perenne was the target of the analyses presented here, this functional subtyping of phylogenetic clades represents a valuable tool for studies investigating monolignol biosynthesis genes in other monocot species.

  18. Evolutionary studies of the nerve growth factor family reveal a novel member abundantly expressed in Xenopus ovary.

    PubMed

    Hallböök, F; Ibáñez, C F; Persson, H

    1991-05-01

    Evolutionary conservation of members of the NGF family in vertebrates was studied by DNA sequence analysis of PCR fragments for NGF, BDNF, and NT-3 from human, rat, chicken, viper, Xenopus, salmon, and ray. The results showed that the three factors are highly conserved from fishes to mammals. Phylogenetic trees reflecting the evolution and speciation of the members of the NGF family were constructed. In addition, the gene for a fourth member of the family, neurotrophin-4 (NT-4), was isolated from Xenopus and viper. The NT-4 gene encodes a precursor protein of 236 amino acids, which is processed into a 123 amino acid mature NT-4 protein with 50%-60% amino acid identity to NGF, BDNF, and NT-3. The NT-4 protein was shown to interact with the low affinity NGF receptor and elicited neurite outgrowth from explanted dorsal root ganglia with no and lower activity in sympathetic and nodose ganglia, respectively. Northern blot analysis of different tissues from Xenopus showed NT-4 mRNA only in ovary, where it was present at levels over 100-fold higher than those of NGF mRNA in heart.

  19. Molecular cloning and expression analysis of PDK family genes in Xenopus laevis reveal oocyte-specific PDK isoform.

    PubMed

    Terazawa, Yumiko; Tokmakov, Alexander A; Shirouzu, Mikako; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2005-12-30

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) inactivates the multienzyme mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex by the phosphorylation of three seryl residues in the pyruvate dehydrogenase moiety, and thus plays an important role in the control of glucose homeostasis. Genetically and biochemically distinct PDK family isozymes have been identified in mammalian species. In the present study, we demonstrate that the complete family of expressed PDK family genes in the tissues of the African clawed frog, Xenopus laevis, consists of four members, which are divided into two evolutionary groups. Xenopus PDKs (xPDKs) share an overall homology of about 70% to the human isoforms of PDK. The abundance of mRNAs for the four xPDK isoforms was analyzed by the real-time reverse transcriptase PCR technique in the various tissues of Xenopus laevis, including heart, lung, spleen, liver, kidney, skin, testis, oocytes, and eggs. Our data suggest that one of the xPDK isozymes can be referred to as an oocyte-specific xPDK. Functional differences between the xPDK isoforms are discussed, based on their different tissue-specific distributions and phylogenetic similarities to human PDKs.

  20. Genome-wide Study of Families with Absolute Pitch Reveals Linkage to 8q24.21 and Locus Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Theusch, Elizabeth; Basu, Analabha; Gitschier, Jane

    2009-01-01

    Absolute pitch (AP) is the rare ability to instantaneously recognize and label tones with their musical note names without using a reference pitch for comparison. The etiology of AP is complex. Prior studies have implicated both genetic and environmental factors in its genesis, yet the molecular basis for AP remains unknown. To locate regions of the human genome that may harbor AP-predisposing genetic variants, we performed a genome-wide linkage study on 73 multiplex AP families by genotyping them with 6090 SNP markers. Nonparametric multipoint linkage analyses were conducted, and the strongest evidence for linkage was observed on chromosome 8q24.21 in the subset of 45 families with European ancestry (exponential LOD score = 3.464, empirical genome-wide p = 0.03). Other regions with suggestive LOD scores included chromosomes 7q22.3, 8q21.11, and 9p21.3. Of these four regions, only the 7q22.3 linkage peak was also evident when 19 families with East Asian ancestry were analyzed separately. Though only one of these regions has yet reached statistical significance individually, we detected a larger number of independent linkage peaks than expected by chance overall, indicating that AP is genetically heterogeneous. PMID:19576568

  1. Bayesian reconstruction of ancestral expression of the LEA gene families reveals propagule-derived desiccation tolerance in resurrection plants.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Kirsten M

    2008-04-01

    Desiccation tolerance is a complex trait that is broadly but infrequently present throughout the evolutionary tree of life. Desiccation tolerance has played a significant role in land plant evolution, in both the vegetative and reproductive life history stages. In the land plants, the late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) gene families are involved in both abiotic stress tolerance and the development of reproductive propagules. They are also a major component of vegetative desiccation tolerance. Phylogenies were estimated for four families of LEA genes from Arabidopsis, Physcomitrella, and the desiccation tolerant plants Tortula ruralis, Craterostigma plantagineum, and Xerophyta humilis. Microarray expression data from Arabidopsis and a subset of the Physcomitrella LEAs were used to estimate ancestral expression patterns in the LEA families and to evaluate alternative hypotheses for the origins of vegetative desiccation tolerance in the flowering plants. The results contradict the idea that vegetative desiccation tolerance in the resurrection angiosperms Craterostigma and Xerophyta arose through the co-option of genes exclusively related to stress tolerance, and support the propagule-derived origin of vegetative desiccation tolerance in the resurrection plants.

  2. High-Resolution Survey in Familial Parkinson Disease Genes Reveals Multiple Independent Copy Number Variation Events in PARK2

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liyong; Nuytemans, Karen; Bademci, Guney; Jauregui, Cherylyn; Martin, Eden R.; Scott, William K.; Vance, Jeffery M.; Zuchner, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    A high density comparative genomic hybridization array was designed to evaluate CNVs in the genomic region of six familial PD genes in 181 PD cases and 67 controls. No CNV was found in PARK7, ATP13A2, PINK1, and LRRK2. Intronic-only CNVs were found in SNCA and PARK2 but were not associated with PD risk. A whole-gene duplication of SNCA was found in one case. The allele frequency of PARK2 exonic CNV is significantly higher in cases than in controls (P = 0.02), higher in early-onset (AAO ≤ 40) than in late-onset cases (P = 0.001), and higher in familial than in sporadic cases (P = 0.005). Except for single exon 2 duplications, all PARK2 exonic CNVs have different breakpoints, even when the same exon(s) were involved. In conclusion, except for SNCA and PARK2, CNVs are not a major contributing mechanism for the familial PD genes examined. The majority of PARK2 exonic CNVs are not recurrent. PMID:23616242

  3. Characterization of the split ends-like gene spenito reveals functional antagonism between SPOC family members during Drosophila eye development.

    PubMed

    Jemc, Jennifer; Rebay, Ilaria

    2006-05-01

    The novel family of SPOC domain proteins is composed of broadly conserved nuclear factors that fall into two subclasses, termed large and small, based on protein size. Members of the large subgroup, which includes Drosophila SPEN and human SHARP, have been characterized as transcriptional corepressors acting downstream of a variety of essential cell signaling pathways, while those of the small subclass have remained largely unstudied. Since SPEN has been implicated in Drosophila eye development, and the small SPOC protein NITO is also expressed in the developing eye, we have used this context to perform a structure-function analysis of NITO and to examine the relationship between the two SPOC family subclasses. Our results demonstrate that the phenotypes obtained from overexpressing NITO share striking similarity to those associated with loss of spen. Dosage-sensitive genetic interactions further support a model of functional antagonism between NITO and SPEN during Drosophila eye development. These results suggest that large and small SPOC family proteins may have opposing functions in certain developmental contexts.

  4. Whole Exome Sequencing Reveals Homozygous Mutations in RAI1, OTOF, and SLC26A4 Genes Associated with Nonsyndromic Hearing Loss in Altaian Families (South Siberia)

    PubMed Central

    Karafet, Tatiana M.; Morozov, Igor V.; Mikhalskaia, Valeriia Yu.; Zytsar, Marina V.; Bondar, Alexander A.

    2016-01-01

    Hearing loss (HL) is one of the most common sensorineural disorders and several dozen genes contribute to its pathogenesis. Establishing a genetic diagnosis of HL is of great importance for clinical evaluation of deaf patients and for estimating recurrence risks for their families. Efforts to identify genes responsible for HL have been challenged by high genetic heterogeneity and different ethnic-specific prevalence of inherited deafness. Here we present the utility of whole exome sequencing (WES) for identifying candidate causal variants for previously unexplained nonsyndromic HL of seven patients from four unrelated Altaian families (the Altai Republic, South Siberia). The WES analysis revealed homozygous missense mutations in three genes associated with HL. Mutation c.2168A>G (SLC26A4) was found in one family, a novel mutation c.1111G>C (OTOF) was revealed in another family, and mutation c.5254G>A (RAI1) was found in two families. Sanger sequencing was applied for screening of identified variants in an ethnically diverse cohort of other patients with HL (n = 116) and in Altaian controls (n = 120). Identified variants were found only in patients of Altaian ethnicity (n = 93). Several lines of evidences support the association of homozygosity for discovered variants c.5254G>A (RAI1), c.1111C>G (OTOF), and c.2168A>G (SLC26A4) with HL in Altaian patients. Local prevalence of identified variants implies possible founder effect in significant number of HL cases in indigenous population of the Altai region. Notably, this is the first reported instance of patients with RAI1 missense mutation whose HL is not accompanied by specific traits typical for Smith-Magenis syndrome. Presumed association of RAI1 gene variant c.5254G>A with isolated HL needs to be proved by further experimental studies. PMID:27082237

  5. Family-based association analyses of imputed genotypes reveal genome-wide significant association of Alzheimer's disease with OSBPL6, PTPRG, and PDCL3.

    PubMed

    Herold, C; Hooli, B V; Mullin, K; Liu, T; Roehr, J T; Mattheisen, M; Parrado, A R; Bertram, L; Lange, C; Tanzi, R E

    2016-11-01

    The genetic basis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is complex and heterogeneous. Over 200 highly penetrant pathogenic variants in the genes APP, PSEN1, and PSEN2 cause a subset of early-onset familial AD. On the other hand, susceptibility to late-onset forms of AD (LOAD) is indisputably associated to the ɛ4 allele in the gene APOE, and more recently to variants in more than two-dozen additional genes identified in the large-scale genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and meta-analyses reports. Taken together however, although the heritability in AD is estimated to be as high as 80%, a large proportion of the underlying genetic factors still remain to be elucidated. In this study, we performed a systematic family-based genome-wide association and meta-analysis on close to 15 million imputed variants from three large collections of AD families (~3500 subjects from 1070 families). Using a multivariate phenotype combining affection status and onset age, meta-analysis of the association results revealed three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that achieved genome-wide significance for association with AD risk: rs7609954 in the gene PTPRG (P-value=3.98 × 10(-8)), rs1347297 in the gene OSBPL6 (P-value=4.53 × 10(-8)), and rs1513625 near PDCL3 (P-value=4.28 × 10(-8)). In addition, rs72953347 in OSBPL6 (P-value=6.36 × 10(-7)) and two SNPs in the gene CDKAL1 showed marginally significant association with LOAD (rs10456232, P-value=4.76 × 10(-7); rs62400067, P-value=3.54 × 10(-7)). In summary, family-based GWAS meta-analysis of imputed SNPs revealed novel genomic variants in (or near) PTPRG, OSBPL6, and PDCL3 that influence risk for AD with genome-wide significance.

  6. A Novel Mutation of LAMB2 in a Multi-Generational Mennonite Family Reveals a New Phenotypic Variant of Pierson Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mohney, Brian G.; Pulido, Jose S.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Hogan, Marie C.; Consugar, Mark B.; Peters, Justin; Pankratz, V. Shane; Nasr, Samih H.; Smith, Stephen J.; Gloor, James; Kubly, Vickie; Spencer, Dorothy; Nielson, Rebecca; Puffenberger, Erik G.; Strauss, Kevin A.; Morton, D. Holmes; Eldahdah, Lama; Harris, Peter C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To describe a novel laminin beta-2 (LAMB2) mutation associated with nephritic syndrome and severe retinal disease without microcoria in a large, multi-generational family with Pierson syndrome. Design Retrospective chart review and prospective family examination. Participants An extended consanguineous family of 52 members. Methods The eyes, urine, and serum DNA were evaluated in all family members after discovering 2 patients, both less than 10 years of age, with bilateral retinal detachments and concurrent renal dysfunction. Linkage analysis was performed in the 9 living affected individuals, 7 using the Illumina Human Hap370 Duo Bead Array and 2 using GeneChip 10K mapping arrays. Main Outcome Measures The prevalence and severity of ocular and kidney involvement and genetic findings. Results Eleven affected family members were identified (9 living), all manifesting chronic kidney disease and bilateral chrioretinal pigmentary changes, with or without retinal detachments, but without microcoria or neurodevelopmental deficits, segregating in an autosomal recessive pattern. The causative gene was localized to a 9Mb region on chromosome 3. Comprehensive gene sequencing revealed a novel LAMB2 variant (c. 440A>G; His147R) that was homozygous in the 9 living, affected family members, observed at a frequency of 2.1% in the Old Order Mennonite population, and absent in 91 non-Mennonite controls. The mutation is located in a highly conserved site in the N-terminal domain VI of LAMB2. Conclusions This study describes a novel mutation of LAMB2 and further expands the spectrum of eye and renal manifestations associated with defects in the laminin beta-2 chain. PMID:21236492

  7. Whole-Genome Sequencing of a Canine Family Trio Reveals a FAM83G Variant Associated with Hereditary Footpad Hyperkeratosis.

    PubMed

    Sayyab, Shumaila; Viluma, Agnese; Bergvall, Kerstin; Brunberg, Emma; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Leeb, Tosso; Andersson, Göran; Bergström, Tomas F

    2016-01-08

    Over 250 Mendelian traits and disorders, caused by rare alleles have been mapped in the canine genome. Although each disease is rare in the dog as a species, they are collectively common and have major impact on canine health. With SNP-based genotyping arrays, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have proven to be a powerful method to map the genomic region of interest when 10-20 cases and 10-20 controls are available. However, to identify the genetic variant in associated regions, fine-mapping and targeted resequencing is required. Here we present a new approach using whole-genome sequencing (WGS) of a family trio without prior GWAS. As a proof-of-concept, we chose an autosomal recessive disease known as hereditary footpad hyperkeratosis (HFH) in Kromfohrländer dogs. To our knowledge, this is the first time this family trio WGS-approach has been used successfully to identify a genetic variant that perfectly segregates with a canine disorder. The sequencing of three Kromfohrländer dogs from a family trio (an affected offspring and both its healthy parents) resulted in an average genome coverage of 9.2X per individual. After applying stringent filtering criteria for candidate causative coding variants, 527 single nucleotide variants (SNVs) and 15 indels were found to be homozygous in the affected offspring and heterozygous in the parents. Using the computer software packages ANNOVAR and SIFT to functionally annotate coding sequence differences, and to predict their functional effect, resulted in seven candidate variants located in six different genes. Of these, only FAM83G:c155G > C (p.R52P) was found to be concordant in eight additional cases, and 16 healthy Kromfohrländer dogs.

  8. Crystal structure of cytomegalovirus IE1 protein reveals targeting of TRIM family member PML via coiled-coil interactions.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Myriam; Klingl, Stefan; Sevvana, Madhumati; Otto, Victoria; Schilling, Eva-Maria; Stump, Joachim D; Müller, Regina; Reuter, Nina; Sticht, Heinrich; Muller, Yves A; Stamminger, Thomas

    2014-11-01

    PML nuclear bodies (PML-NBs) are enigmatic structures of the cell nucleus that act as key mediators of intrinsic immunity against viral pathogens. PML itself is a member of the E3-ligase TRIM family of proteins that regulates a variety of innate immune signaling pathways. Consequently, viruses have evolved effector proteins to modify PML-NBs; however, little is known concerning structure-function relationships of viral antagonists. The herpesvirus human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) expresses the abundant immediate-early protein IE1 that colocalizes with PML-NBs and induces their dispersal, which correlates with the antagonization of NB-mediated intrinsic immunity. Here, we delineate the molecular basis for this antagonization by presenting the first crystal structure for the evolutionary conserved primate cytomegalovirus IE1 proteins. We show that IE1 consists of a globular core (IE1CORE) flanked by intrinsically disordered regions. The 2.3 Å crystal structure of IE1CORE displays an all α-helical, femur-shaped fold, which lacks overall fold similarity with known protein structures, but shares secondary structure features recently observed in the coiled-coil domain of TRIM proteins. Yeast two-hybrid and coimmunoprecipitation experiments demonstrate that IE1CORE binds efficiently to the TRIM family member PML, and is able to induce PML deSUMOylation. Intriguingly, this results in the release of NB-associated proteins into the nucleoplasm, but not of PML itself. Importantly, we show that PML deSUMOylation by IE1CORE is sufficient to antagonize PML-NB-instituted intrinsic immunity. Moreover, co-immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrate that IE1CORE binds via the coiled-coil domain to PML and also interacts with TRIM5α We propose that IE1CORE sequesters PML and possibly other TRIM family members via structural mimicry using an extended binding surface formed by the coiled-coil region. This mode of interaction might render the antagonizing activity less susceptible to

  9. Whole-Genome Sequencing of a Canine Family Trio Reveals a FAM83G Variant Associated with Hereditary Footpad Hyperkeratosis

    PubMed Central

    Sayyab, Shumaila; Viluma, Agnese; Bergvall, Kerstin; Brunberg, Emma; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Leeb, Tosso; Andersson, Göran; Bergström, Tomas F.

    2016-01-01

    Over 250 Mendelian traits and disorders, caused by rare alleles have been mapped in the canine genome. Although each disease is rare in the dog as a species, they are collectively common and have major impact on canine health. With SNP-based genotyping arrays, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have proven to be a powerful method to map the genomic region of interest when 10–20 cases and 10–20 controls are available. However, to identify the genetic variant in associated regions, fine-mapping and targeted resequencing is required. Here we present a new approach using whole-genome sequencing (WGS) of a family trio without prior GWAS. As a proof-of-concept, we chose an autosomal recessive disease known as hereditary footpad hyperkeratosis (HFH) in Kromfohrländer dogs. To our knowledge, this is the first time this family trio WGS-approach has been used successfully to identify a genetic variant that perfectly segregates with a canine disorder. The sequencing of three Kromfohrländer dogs from a family trio (an affected offspring and both its healthy parents) resulted in an average genome coverage of 9.2X per individual. After applying stringent filtering criteria for candidate causative coding variants, 527 single nucleotide variants (SNVs) and 15 indels were found to be homozygous in the affected offspring and heterozygous in the parents. Using the computer software packages ANNOVAR and SIFT to functionally annotate coding sequence differences, and to predict their functional effect, resulted in seven candidate variants located in six different genes. Of these, only FAM83G:c155G > C (p.R52P) was found to be concordant in eight additional cases, and 16 healthy Kromfohrländer dogs. PMID:26747202

  10. Revealing a cancer diagnosis to patients: attitudes of patients, families, friends, nurses, and physicians in Lebanon—results of a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Farhat, F.; Othman, A.; el Baba, G.; Kattan, J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Disclosure of a cancer diagnosis to patients is a major problem for physicians in Lebanon. Our survey aimed to identify the attitudes of patients, families and friends, nurses, and physicians regarding disclosure of a cancer diagnosis. Methods Study participants included 343 physicians, nurses, cancer patients, families, and friends from clinics in two major hospitals in Lebanon. All completed a 29-item questionnaire that assessed, by demographic group, the information provided about cancer, opinions about the disclosure of the diagnosis to cancer patients, perceived consequences to patients, and the roles of family, friends, and religion. Results Overall, 7.8% of the patients were convinced that cancer is incurable. Nearly 82% preferred to be informed about their diagnosis. Similarly, 83% of physicians were in favour of disclosing a cancer diagnosis to their patients. However, only 14% of the physicians said that they revealed the truth to the patients themselves, with only 9% doing so immediately after confirmation of the diagnosis. Disclosure of a cancer diagnosis was preferred before the start of the treatment by 59% of the patients and immediately after confirmation of the diagnosis by 72% of the physicians. Overall, 86% of physicians, 51% of nurses, and 69% of patients and their families believed that religion helped with the acceptance of a cancer diagnosis. A role for family in accepting the diagnosis was reported by 74% of the patients, 56% of the nurses, and 88% of the physicians. All participants considered that fear was the most difficult feeling (63%) experienced by cancer patients, followed by pain (29%), pity (8%), and death (1%), with no statistically significant difference between the answers given by the participant groups. Conclusions The social background in Lebanese society is the main obstacle to revealing the truth to cancer patients. Lebanese patients seem to prefer direct communication of the truth, but families take the opposite

  11. Genome-wide characterisation and expression profile of the grapevine ATL ubiquitin ligase family reveal biotic and abiotic stress-responsive and development-related members

    PubMed Central

    Ariani, Pietro; Regaiolo, Alice; Lovato, Arianna; Giorgetti, Alejandro; Porceddu, Andrea; Camiolo, Salvatore; Wong, Darren; Castellarin, Simone; Vandelle, Elodie; Polverari, Annalisa

    2016-01-01

    The Arabidopsis Tóxicos en Levadura (ATL) protein family is a class of E3 ubiquitin ligases with a characteristic RING-H2 Zn-finger structure that mediates diverse physiological processes and stress responses in plants. We carried out a genome-wide survey of grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.) ATL genes and retrieved 96 sequences containing the canonical ATL RING-H2 domain. We analysed their genomic organisation, gene structure and evolution, protein domains and phylogenetic relationships. Clustering revealed several clades, as already reported in Arabidopsis thaliana and rice (Oryza sativa), with an expanded subgroup of grapevine-specific genes. Most of the grapevine ATL genes lacked introns and were scattered among the 19 chromosomes, with a high level of duplication retention. Expression profiling revealed that some ATL genes are expressed specifically during early or late development and may participate in the juvenile to mature plant transition, whereas others may play a role in pathogen and/or abiotic stress responses, making them key candidates for further functional analysis. Our data offer the first genome-wide overview and annotation of the grapevine ATL family, and provide a basis for investigating the roles of specific family members in grapevine physiology and stress responses, as well as potential biotechnological applications. PMID:27910910

  12. Genome-wide characterisation and expression profile of the grapevine ATL ubiquitin ligase family reveal biotic and abiotic stress-responsive and development-related members.

    PubMed

    Ariani, Pietro; Regaiolo, Alice; Lovato, Arianna; Giorgetti, Alejandro; Porceddu, Andrea; Camiolo, Salvatore; Wong, Darren; Castellarin, Simone; Vandelle, Elodie; Polverari, Annalisa

    2016-12-02

    The Arabidopsis Tóxicos en Levadura (ATL) protein family is a class of E3 ubiquitin ligases with a characteristic RING-H2 Zn-finger structure that mediates diverse physiological processes and stress responses in plants. We carried out a genome-wide survey of grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.) ATL genes and retrieved 96 sequences containing the canonical ATL RING-H2 domain. We analysed their genomic organisation, gene structure and evolution, protein domains and phylogenetic relationships. Clustering revealed several clades, as already reported in Arabidopsis thaliana and rice (Oryza sativa), with an expanded subgroup of grapevine-specific genes. Most of the grapevine ATL genes lacked introns and were scattered among the 19 chromosomes, with a high level of duplication retention. Expression profiling revealed that some ATL genes are expressed specifically during early or late development and may participate in the juvenile to mature plant transition, whereas others may play a role in pathogen and/or abiotic stress responses, making them key candidates for further functional analysis. Our data offer the first genome-wide overview and annotation of the grapevine ATL family, and provide a basis for investigating the roles of specific family members in grapevine physiology and stress responses, as well as potential biotechnological applications.

  13. Functional analysis of a group A streptococcal glycoside hydrolase Spy1600 from family 84 reveals it is a β-N-acetylglucosaminidase and not a hyaluronidase

    PubMed Central

    Sheldon, William L.; Macauley, Matthew S.; Taylor, Edward J.; Robinson, Charlotte E.; Charnock, Simon J.; Davies, Gideon J.; Vocadlo, David J.; Black, Gary W.

    2006-01-01

    Group A streptococcus (Streptococcus pyogenes) is the causative agent of severe invasive infections such as necrotizing fasciitis (the so-called ‘flesh eating disease’) and toxic-shock syndrome. Spy1600, a glycoside hydrolase from family 84 of the large superfamily of glycoside hydrolases, has been proposed to be a virulence factor. In the present study we show that Spy1600 has no activity toward galactosaminides or hyaluronan, but does remove β-O-linked N-acetylglucosamine from mammalian glycoproteins – an observation consistent with the inclusion of eukaryotic O-glycoprotein 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-β-D-glucopyranosidases within glycoside hydrolase family 84. Proton NMR studies, structure–reactivity studies for a series of fluorinated analogues and analysis of 1,2-dideoxy-2′-methyl-α-D-glucopyranoso-[2,1-d]-Δ2′-thiazoline as a competitive inhibitor reveals that Spy1600 uses a double-displacement mechanism involving substrate-assisted catalysis. Family 84 glycoside hydrolases are therefore comprised of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic β-N-acetylglucosaminidases using a conserved catalytic mechanism involving substrate-assisted catalysis. Since these enzymes do not have detectable hyaluronidase activity, many family 84 glycoside hydrolases are most likely incorrectly annotated as hyaluronidases. PMID:16822234

  14. A comprehensive analysis of the geranylgeranylglyceryl phosphate synthase enzyme family identifies novel members and reveals mechanisms of substrate specificity and quaternary structure organization.

    PubMed

    Peterhoff, David; Beer, Barbara; Rajendran, Chitra; Kumpula, Esa-Pekka; Kapetaniou, Evangelia; Guldan, Harald; Wierenga, Rik K; Sterner, Reinhard; Babinger, Patrick

    2014-05-01

    Geranylgeranylglyceryl phosphate synthase (GGGPS) family enzymes catalyse the formation of an ether bond between glycerol-1-phosphate and polyprenyl diphosphates. They are essential for the biosynthesis of archaeal membrane lipids, but also occur in bacterial species, albeit with unknown physiological function. It has been known that there exist two phylogenetic groups (I and II) of GGGPS family enzymes, but a comprehensive study has been missing. We therefore visualized the variability within the family by applying a sequence similarity network, and biochemically characterized 17 representative GGGPS family enzymes regarding their catalytic activities and substrate specificities. Moreover, we present the first crystal structures of group II archaeal and bacterial enzymes. Our analysis revealed that the previously uncharacterized bacterial enzymes from group II have GGGPS activity like the archaeal enzymes and differ from the bacterial group I enzymes that are heptaprenylglyceryl phosphate synthases. The length of the isoprenoid substrate is determined in group II GGGPS enzymes by 'limiter residues' that are different from those in group I enzymes, as shown by site-directed mutagenesis. Most of the group II enzymes form hexamers. We could disrupt these hexamers to stable and catalytically active dimers by mutating a single amino acid that acts as an 'aromatic anchor'.

  15. Complete nucleotide sequence of plasmid pNA6 reveals the high plasticity of IncU family plasmids.

    PubMed

    Dang, Bingjun; Xu, Yan; Mao, Daqing; Luo, Yi

    2016-10-10

    Antibiotic resistance is a serious problem in health care and is of widespread public concern. Conjugative plasmids are the most important vectors in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes. In this study, we determined the complete sequence of plasmid pNA6, a plasmid which was isolated from the sediments of Haihe River. This plasmid confers reduced susceptibility to ampicillin, erythromycin and sulfamethoxazole. The complete sequence of plasmid pNA6 was 52,210bp in length with an average G+C content of 52.70%. Plasmid pNA6 belongs to the IncU group by sequence queries against the GenBank database. This plasmid has a typical IncU backbone and shows the highest similarities with plasmid RA3 and plasmid pFBAOT6. Plasmid pNA6 carries a class 1 integron consisting of aacA4, ereA and dfrA1 genes. Moreover, plasmid pNA6 also harbors a blaTEM-1-containing complex structure which inserted into the replication region and maintenance region. This insertion site has never been found on other IncU plasmids. The sequencing of plasmid pNA6 will add new sequence information to IncU family plasmids and enhance our understanding of the plasticity of IncU family plasmids.

  16. Structure-Guided Functional Characterization of DUF1460 Reveals a New, Highly Specific NlpC/P60 Amidase Family

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qingping; Mengin-Lecreulx, Dominique; Patin, Delphine; Grant, Joanna C.; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Knuth, Mark W.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Elsliger, Marc-André; Deacon, Ashley M.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY GlcNAc-1,6-anhydro-MurNAc-tetrapeptide is a major peptidoglycan degradation intermediate and a cytotoxin. It is generated by lytic transglycosylases and further degraded and recycled by various enzymes. We have identified and characterized a novel, highly specific N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase (AmiA) from Bacteroides uniformis, a member of the DUF1460 protein family, that hydrolyzes GlcNAc-1,6-anhydro-MurNAc-peptide into disaccharide and stem peptide. The high-resolution apo-structure at 1.15 Å resolution shows that AmiA is related to NlpC/P60 γ-D-Glu-meso-diaminopimelic acid amidases and shares a common catalytic core and cysteine peptidase-like active site. AmiA has evolved structural adaptations that reconfigure the substrate recognition site. The preferred substrates for AmiA were predicted in silico based on structural and bioinformatics data, and were subsequently characterized experimentally. Further crystal structures of AmiA in complexes with GlcNAc-1,6-anhydro-MurNAc and GlcNAc have enabled us to elucidate substrate recognition and specificity. DUF1460 is highly conserved in structure and defines a new amidase family. PMID:25465128

  17. Structural studies of the yeast DNA damage-inducible protein Ddi1 reveal domain architecture of this eukaryotic protein family

    PubMed Central

    Trempe, Jean-François; Šašková, Klára Grantz; Sivá, Monika; Ratcliffe, Colin D. H.; Veverka, Václav; Hoegl, Annabelle; Ménade, Marie; Feng, Xin; Shenker, Solomon; Svoboda, Michal; Kožíšek, Milan; Konvalinka, Jan; Gehring, Kalle

    2016-01-01

    The eukaryotic Ddi1 family is defined by a conserved retroviral aspartyl protease-like (RVP) domain found in association with a ubiquitin-like (UBL) domain. Ddi1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae additionally contains a ubiquitin-associated (UBA) domain. The substrate specificity and role of the protease domain in the biological functions of the Ddi family remain unclear. Yeast Ddi1 has been implicated in the regulation of cell cycle progression, DNA-damage repair, and exocytosis. Here, we investigated the multi-domain structure of yeast Ddi1 using X-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance, and small-angle X-ray scattering. The crystal structure of the RVP domain sheds light on a putative substrate recognition site involving a conserved loop. Isothermal titration calorimetry confirms that both UBL and UBA domains bind ubiquitin, and that Ddi1 binds K48-linked diubiquitin with enhanced affinity. The solution NMR structure of a helical domain that precedes the protease displays tertiary structure similarity to DNA-binding domains from transcription regulators. Our structural studies suggest that the helical domain could serve as a landing platform for substrates in conjunction with attached ubiquitin chains binding to the UBL and UBA domains. PMID:27646017

  18. Structure-guided functional characterization of DUF1460 reveals a highly specific NlpC/P60 amidase family.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qingping; Mengin-Lecreulx, Dominique; Patin, Delphine; Grant, Joanna C; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Knuth, Mark W; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A; Elsliger, Marc-André; Deacon, Ashley M; Wilson, Ian A

    2014-12-02

    GlcNAc-1,6-anhydro-MurNAc-tetrapeptide is a major peptidoglycan degradation intermediate and a cytotoxin. It is generated by lytic transglycosylases and further degraded and recycled by various enzymes. We have identified and characterized a highly specific N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase (AmiA) from Bacteroides uniformis, a member of the DUF1460 protein family, that hydrolyzes GlcNAc-1,6-anhydro-MurNAc-peptide into disaccharide and stem peptide. The high-resolution apo structure at 1.15 Å resolution shows that AmiA is related to NlpC/P60 γ-D-Glu-meso-diaminopimelic acid amidases and shares a common catalytic core and cysteine peptidase-like active site. AmiA has evolved structural adaptations that reconfigure the substrate recognition site. The preferred substrates for AmiA were predicted in silico based on structural and bioinformatics data, and subsequently were characterized experimentally. Further crystal structures of AmiA in complexes with GlcNAc-1,6-anhydro-MurNAc and GlcNAc have enabled us to elucidate substrate recognition and specificity. DUF1460 is highly conserved in structure and defines another amidase family.

  19. Crystal structures of Cg1458 reveal a catalytic lid domain and a common catalytic mechanism for the FAH family.

    PubMed

    Ran, Tingting; Gao, Yanyan; Marsh, May; Zhu, Wenjun; Wang, Meitian; Mao, Xiang; Xu, Langlai; Xu, Dongqing; Wang, Weiwu

    2013-01-01

    Cg1458 was recently characterized as a novel soluble oxaloacetate decarboxylase. However, sequence alignment identified that Cg1458 has no similarity with other oxaloacetate decarboxylases and instead belongs to the FAH (fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase) family. Differences in the function of Cg1458 and other FAH proteins may suggest a different catalytic mechanism. To help elucidate the catalytic mechanism of Cg1458, crystal structures of Cg1458 in both the open and closed conformations have been determined for the first time up to a resolution of 1.9 Å (1 Å=0.1 nm) and 2.0 Å respectively. Comparison of both structures and detailed biochemical studies confirmed the presence of a catalytic lid domain which is missing in the native enzyme structure. In this lid domain, a glutamic acid-histidine dyad was found to be critical in mediating enzymatic catalysis. On the basis of structural modelling and comparison, as well as large-scale sequence alignment studies, we further determined that the catalytic mechanism of Cg1458 is actually through a glutamic acid-histidine-water triad, and this catalytic triad is common among FAH family proteins that catalyse the cleavage of the C-C bond of the substrate. Two sequence motifs, HxxE and Hxx…xxE have been identified as the basis for this mechanism.

  20. The structure of the first representative of Pfam family PF09836 reveals a two-domain organization and suggests involvement in transcriptional regulation

    PubMed Central

    Das, Debanu; Grishin, Nick V.; Kumar, Abhinav; Carlton, Dennis; Bakolitsa, Constantina; Miller, Mitchell D.; Abdubek, Polat; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Burra, Prasad; Chen, Connie; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Chiu, Michelle; Clayton, Thomas; Deller, Marc C.; Duan, Lian; Ellrott, Kyle; Ernst, Dustin; Farr, Carol L.; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grzechnik, Anna; Grzechnik, Slawomir K.; Grant, Joanna C.; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K.; Johnson, Hope A.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Kozbial, Piotr; Krishna, S. Sri; Marciano, David; McMullan, Daniel; Morse, Andrew T.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Nopakun, Amanda; Okach, Linda; Oommachen, Silvya; Paulsen, Jessica; Puckett, Christina; Reyes, Ron; Rife, Christopher L.; Sefcovic, Natasha; Tien, Henry J.; Trame, Christine B.; van den Bedem, Henry; Weekes, Dana; Wooten, Tiffany; Xu, Qingping; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Elsliger, Marc-André; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2010-01-01

    Proteins with the DUF2063 domain constitute a new Pfam family, PF09836. The crystal structure of a member of this family, NGO1945 from Neisseria gonorrhoeae, has been determined and reveals that the N-terminal DUF2063 domain is likely to be a DNA-binding domain. In conjunction with the rest of the protein, NGO1945 is likely to be involved in transcriptional regulation, which is consistent with genomic neighborhood analysis. Of the 216 currently known proteins that contain a DUF2063 domain, the most significant sequence homologs of NGO1945 (∼40–99% sequence identity) are from various Neisseria and Haemophilus species. As these are important human pathogens, NGO1945 represents an interesting candidate for further exploration via biochemical studies and possible therapeutic intervention. PMID:20944208

  1. Knockout of the PKN Family of Rho Effector Kinases Reveals a Non-redundant Role for PKN2 in Developmental Mesoderm Expansion

    PubMed Central

    Quétier, Ivan; Marshall, Jacqueline J.T.; Spencer-Dene, Bradley; Lachmann, Sylvie; Casamassima, Adele; Franco, Claudio; Escuin, Sarah; Worrall, Joseph T.; Baskaran, Priththivika; Rajeeve, Vinothini; Howell, Michael; Copp, Andrew J.; Stamp, Gordon; Rosewell, Ian; Cutillas, Pedro; Gerhardt, Holger; Parker, Peter J.; Cameron, Angus J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary In animals, the protein kinase C (PKC) family has expanded into diversely regulated subgroups, including the Rho family-responsive PKN kinases. Here, we describe knockouts of all three mouse PKN isoforms and reveal that PKN2 loss results in lethality at embryonic day 10 (E10), with associated cardiovascular and morphogenetic defects. The cardiovascular phenotype was not recapitulated by conditional deletion of PKN2 in endothelial cells or the developing heart. In contrast, inducible systemic deletion of PKN2 after E7 provoked collapse of the embryonic mesoderm. Furthermore, mouse embryonic fibroblasts, which arise from the embryonic mesoderm, depend on PKN2 for proliferation and motility. These cellular defects are reflected in vivo as dependence on PKN2 for mesoderm proliferation and neural crest migration. We conclude that failure of the mesoderm to expand in the absence of PKN2 compromises cardiovascular integrity and development, resulting in lethality. PMID:26774483

  2. Simulated annealing reveals the kinetic activity of SGLT1, a member of the LeuT structural family.

    PubMed

    Longpré, Jean-Philippe; Sasseville, Louis J; Lapointe, Jean-Yves

    2012-10-01

    The Na(+)/glucose cotransporter (SGLT1) is the archetype of membrane proteins that use the electrochemical Na(+) gradient to drive uphill transport of a substrate. The crystal structure recently obtained for vSGLT strongly suggests that SGLT1 adopts the inverted repeat fold of the LeuT structural family for which several crystal structures are now available. What is largely missing is an accurate view of the rates at which SGLT1 transits between its different conformational states. In the present study, we used simulated annealing to analyze a large set of steady-state and pre-steady-state currents measured for human SGLT1 at different membrane potentials, and in the presence of different Na(+) and α-methyl-d-glucose (αMG) concentrations. The simplest kinetic model that could accurately reproduce the time course of the measured currents (down to the 2 ms time range) is a seven-state model (C(1) to C(7)) where the binding of the two Na(+) ions (C(4)→C(5)) is highly cooperative. In the forward direction (Na(+)/glucose influx), the model is characterized by two slow, electroneutral conformational changes (59 and 100 s(-1)) which represent reorientation of the free and of the fully loaded carrier between inside-facing and outside-facing conformations. From the inward-facing (C(1)) to the outward-facing Na-bound configuration (C(5)), 1.3 negative elementary charges are moved outward. Although extracellular glucose binding (C(5)→C(6)) is electroneutral, the next step (C(6)→C(7)) carries 0.7 positive charges inside the cell. Alignment of the seven-state model with a generalized model suggested by the structural data of the LeuT fold family suggests that electrogenic steps are associated with the movement of the so-called thin gates on each side of the substrate binding site. To our knowledge, this is the first model that can quantitatively describe the behavior of SGLT1 down to the 2 ms time domain. The model is highly symmetrical and in good agreement with the

  3. The receptor kinase family: primary structure of rhodopsin kinase reveals similarities to the beta-adrenergic receptor kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, W; Inglese, J; Palczewski, K; Onorato, J J; Caron, M G; Lefkowitz, R J

    1991-01-01

    Light-dependent deactivation of rhodopsin as well as homologous desensitization of beta-adrenergic receptors involves receptor phosphorylation that is mediated by the highly specific protein kinases rhodopsin kinase (RK) and beta-adrenergic receptor kinase (beta ARK), respectively. We report here the cloning of a complementary DNA for RK. The deduced amino acid sequence shows a high degree of homology to beta ARK. In a phylogenetic tree constructed by comparing the catalytic domains of several protein kinases, RK and beta ARK are located on a branch close to, but separate from the cyclic nucleotide-dependent protein kinase and protein kinase C subfamilies. From the common structural features we conclude that both RK and beta ARK are members of a newly delineated gene family of guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein)-coupled receptor kinases that may function in diverse pathways to regulate the function of such receptors. Images PMID:1656454

  4. Fine-mapping butyrophilin family genes revealed several polymorphisms influencing viral genotype selection in hepatitis C infection.

    PubMed

    Ampuero, J; del Campo, J A; Rojas, L; García-Lozano, R J; Buti, M; Solá, R; Forns, X; Moreno-Otero, R; Andrade, R; Diago, M; Salmerón, J; Rodrigo, L; Pons, J A; Navarro, J M; Calleja, J L; García-Samaniego, J; García-Valdecasas, M; Rojas, Á; Millán, R; González-Escribano, M F; Romero-Gómez, M

    2015-01-01

    Host-viral genetic interaction has a key role in hepatitis C infection (HCV) and maybe in the viral selection. In a preliminary GWAS analysis, we identified BTN3A2 rs9104 to be associated with HCV genotype 1. Therefore, our aim was to determine the influence of BTN family on the selection of HCV genotype. We performed a fine-mapping analysis of BTN gene region in a cohort of chronic HCV infection (N=841), validating significant results in another independent chronic HCV infection cohort (N=637), according to selection of viral genotype. BTN3A2 rs9104, BTN3A2 rs733528, BTN2A1 rs6929846, BTN2A1 rs7763910 and BTN3A3 rs13220495 were associated with viral genotype selection. Interestingly, BTN3A2 rs9104 GG genotype was closely related to genotype 1 infection (80.7% (394/488) compared with genotype 3 infection (53.5% (23/43); P=0.0001) in patients harboring IL28B-CT/TT genotype, although this effect was not observed in IL28B-CC genotype. Similarly, BTN3A3 rs13220495 CC genotype was linked to genotype 3 infection (100% (32/32)) compared to genotype 1 (87.3% (137/157); P=0.028) in patients harboring IL28B-CC genotype, but did not in IL28B-CT/TT genotype. Genetic variants in the butyrophilin family genes may alter susceptibility to infection, selecting HCV genotype and influencing disease progression. BTN3A2 rs9104 was strongly associated with genotype 1 infection and the haplotype BTN3A3 rs13220495 CC+IL28B genotype CC was universal in patients with hepatitis C genotype 3a.

  5. Structural analyses of the CRISPR protein Csc2 reveal the RNA-binding interface of the type I-D Cas7 family.

    PubMed

    Hrle, Ajla; Maier, Lisa-Katharina; Sharma, Kundan; Ebert, Judith; Basquin, Claire; Urlaub, Henning; Marchfelder, Anita; Conti, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Upon pathogen invasion, bacteria and archaea activate an RNA-interference-like mechanism termed CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats). A large family of Cas (CRISPR-associated) proteins mediates the different stages of this sophisticated immune response. Bioinformatic studies have classified the Cas proteins into families, according to their sequences and respective functions. These range from the insertion of the foreign genetic elements into the host genome to the activation of the interference machinery as well as target degradation upon attack. Cas7 family proteins are central to the type I and type III interference machineries as they constitute the backbone of the large interference complexes. Here we report the crystal structure of Thermofilum pendens Csc2, a Cas7 family protein of type I-D. We found that Csc2 forms a core RRM-like domain, flanked by three peripheral insertion domains: a lid domain, a Zinc-binding domain and a helical domain. Comparison with other Cas7 family proteins reveals a set of similar structural features both in the core and in the peripheral domains, despite the absence of significant sequence similarity. T. pendens Csc2 binds single-stranded RNA in vitro in a sequence-independent manner. Using a crosslinking - mass-spectrometry approach, we mapped the RNA-binding surface to a positively charged surface patch on T. pendens Csc2. Thus our analysis of the key structural and functional features of T. pendens Csc2 highlights recurring themes and evolutionary relationships in type I and type III Cas proteins.

  6. Structures of the first representatives of Pfam family PF06938 (DUF1285) reveal a new fold with repeated structural motifs and possible involvement in signal transduction

    PubMed Central

    Han, Gye Won; Bakolitsa, Constantina; Miller, Mitchell D.; Kumar, Abhinav; Carlton, Dennis; Najmanovich, Rafael J.; Abdubek, Polat; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Chen, Connie; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Clayton, Thomas; Das, Debanu; Deller, Marc C.; Duan, Lian; Ernst, Dustin; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grant, Joanna C.; Grzechnik, Anna; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K.; Johnson, Hope A.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Kozbial, Piotr; Krishna, S. Sri; Marciano, David; McMullan, Daniel; Morse, Andrew T.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Okach, Linda; Reyes, Ron; Rife, Christopher L.; Sefcovic, Natasha; Tien, Henry J.; Trame, Christine B.; van den Bedem, Henry; Weekes, Dana; Xu, Qingping; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Elsliger, Marc-André; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2010-01-01

    The crystal structures of SPO0140 and Sbal_2486 were determined using the semiautomated high-throughput pipeline of the Joint Center for Structural Genomics (JCSG) as part of the NIGMS Protein Structure Initiative (PSI). The structures revealed a conserved core with domain duplication and a superficial similarity of the C-terminal domain to pleckstrin homology-like folds. The conservation of the domain interface indicates a potential binding site that is likely to involve a nucleotide-based ligand, with genome-context and gene-fusion analyses additionally supporting a role for this family in signal transduction, possibly during oxidative stress. PMID:20944214

  7. Putative WRKYs associated with regulation of fruit ripening revealed by detailed expression analysis of the WRKY gene family in pepper

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yuan; JalalAhammed, Golam; Yu, Jiahong; Yao, Zhuping; Ruan, Meiying; Ye, Qingjing; Li, Zhimiao; Wang, Rongqing; Feng, Kun; Zhou, Guozhi; Yang, Yuejian; Diao, Weiping; Wan, Hongjian

    2016-01-01

    WRKY transcription factors play important roles in plant development and stress responses. Here, global expression patterns of pepper CaWRKYs in various tissues as well as response to environmental stresses and plant hormones were systematically analyzed, with an emphasis on fruit ripening. The results showed that most CaWRKYs were expressed in at least two of the tissues tested. Group I, a subfamily of the entire CaWRKY gene family, had a higher expression level in vegetative tissues, whereas groups IIa and III showed relatively lower expression levels. Comparative analysis showed that the constitutively highly expressed WRKY genes were conserved in tomato and pepper, suggesting potential functional similarities. Among the identified 61 CaWRKYs, almost 60% were expressed during pepper fruit maturation, and the group I genes were in higher proportion during the ripening process, indicating an as-yet unknown function of group I in the fruit maturation process. Further analysis suggested that many CaWRKYs expressed during fruit ripening were also regulated by abiotic stresses or plant hormones, indicating that these CaWRKYs play roles in the stress-related signaling pathways during fruit ripening. This study provides new insights to the current research on CaWRKY and contributes to our knowledge about the global regulatory network in pepper fruit ripening. PMID:27991526

  8. Quantitative Proteomics Reveals GIMAP Family Proteins 1 and 4 to Be Differentially Regulated during Human T Helper Cell Differentiation *S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Filén, Jan-Jonas; Filén, Sanna; Moulder, Robert; Tuomela, Soile; Ahlfors, Helena; West, Anne; Kouvonen, Petri; Kantola, Suvi; Björkman, Mari; Katajamaa, Mikko; Rasool, Omid; Nyman, Tuula A.; Lahesmaa, Riitta

    2009-01-01

    T helper (Th) cells differentiate into functionally distinct effector cell subsets of which Th1 and Th2 cells are best characterized. Besides T cell receptor signaling, IL-12-induced STAT4 and T-bet- and IL-4-induced STAT6 and GATA3 signaling pathways are the major players regulating the Th1 and Th2 differentiation process, respectively. However, there are likely to be other yet unknown factors or pathways involved. In this study we used quantitative proteomics exploiting cleavable ICAT labeling and LC-MS/MS to identify IL-4-regulated proteins from the microsomal fractions of CD4+ cells extracted from umbilical cord blood. We were able to identify 557 proteins of which 304 were also quantified. This study resulted in the identification of the down-regulation of small GTPases GIMAP1 and GIMAP4 by IL-4 during Th2 differentiation. We also showed that both GIMAP1 and GIMAP4 genes are up-regulated by IL-12 and other Th1 differentiation-inducing cytokines in cells induced to differentiate toward Th1 lineage and down-regulated by IL-4 in cells induced to Th2. Our results indicate that the GIMAP (GTPase of the immunity-associated protein) family of proteins is differentially regulated during Th cell differentiation. PMID:18701445

  9. Molecular basis of fatty acid selectivity in the zDHHC family of S-acyltransferases revealed by click chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Greaves, Jennifer; Munro, Kevin R.; Davidson, Stuart C.; Riviere, Matthieu; Wojno, Justyna; Smith, Terry K.; Tomkinson, Nicholas C. O.; Chamberlain, Luke H.

    2017-01-01

    S-acylation is a major posttranslational modification, catalyzed by the zinc finger DHHC domain containing (zDHHC) enzyme family. S-acylated proteins can be modified by different fatty acids; however, very little is known about how zDHHC enzymes contribute to acyl chain heterogeneity. Here, we used fatty acid-azide/alkyne labeling of mammalian cells, showing their transformation into acyl-CoAs and subsequent click chemistry-based detection, to demonstrate that zDHHC enzymes have marked differences in their fatty acid selectivity. This difference in selectivity was apparent even for highly related enzymes, such as zDHHC3 and zDHHC7, which displayed a marked difference in their ability to use C18:0 acyl-CoA as a substrate. Furthermore, we identified isoleucine-182 in transmembrane domain 3 of zDHHC3 as a key determinant in limiting the use of longer chain acyl-CoAs by this enzyme. This study uncovered differences in the fatty acid selectivity profiles of cellular zDHHC enzymes and mapped molecular determinants governing this selectivity. PMID:28167757

  10. Avirulence gene mapping in the Hessian fly (Mayetiola destructor) reveals a protein phosphatase 2C effector gene family.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chaoyang; Shukle, Richard; Navarro-Escalante, Lucio; Chen, Mingshun; Richards, Stephen; Stuart, Jeffrey J

    2016-01-01

    The genetic tractability of the Hessian fly (HF, Mayetiola destructor) provides an opportunity to investigate the mechanisms insects use to induce plant gall formation. Here we demonstrate that capacity using the newly sequenced HF genome by identifying the gene (vH24) that elicits effector-triggered immunity in wheat (Triticum spp.) seedlings carrying HF resistance gene H24. vH24 was mapped within a 230-kb genomic fragment near the telomere of HF chromosome X1. That fragment contains only 21 putative genes. The best candidate vH24 gene in this region encodes a protein containing a secretion signal and a type-2 serine/threonine protein phosphatase (PP2C) domain. This gene has an H24-virulence associated insertion in its promoter that appears to silence transcription of the gene in H24-virulent larvae. Candidate vH24 is a member of a small family of genes that encode secretion signals and PP2C domains. It belongs to the fraction of genes in the HF genome previously predicted to encode effector proteins. Because PP2C proteins are not normally secreted, our results suggest that these are PP2C effectors that HF larvae inject into wheat cells to redirect, or interfere, with wheat signal transduction pathways.

  11. Dynamics of PLCγ and Src Family Kinase 1 Interactions during Nuclear Envelope Formation Revealed by FRET-FLIM

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Richard D.; Applebee, Christopher; Poccia, Dominic L.; Larijani, Banafshé

    2012-01-01

    The nuclear envelope (NE) breaks down and reforms during each mitotic cycle. A similar process happens to the sperm NE following fertilisation. The formation of the NE in both these circumstances involves endoplasmic reticulum membranes enveloping the chromatin, but PLCγ-dependent membrane fusion events are also essential. Here we demonstrate the activation of PLCγ by a Src family kinase (SFK1) during NE assembly. We show by time-resolved FRET for the first time the direct in vivo interaction and temporal regulation of PLCγ and SFK1 in sea urchins. As a prerequisite for protein activation, there is a rapid phosphorylation of PLCγ on its Y783 residue in response to GTP in vitro. This phosphorylation is dependent upon SFK activity; thus Y783 phosphorylation and NE assembly are susceptible to SFK inhibition. Y783 phosphorylation is also observed on the surface of the male pronucleus (MPN) in vivo during NE formation. Together the corroborative in vivo and in vitro data demonstrate the phosphorylation and activation of PLCγ by SFK1 during NE assembly. We discuss the potential generality of such a mechanism. PMID:22848394

  12. Whole exome sequencing reveals a C-terminal germline variant in CEBPA-associated acute myeloid leukemia: 45-year follow up of a large family

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Anand; Seipel, Katja; Pemov, Alexander; Dewan, Ramita; Brown, Christina; Ravichandran, Sarangan; Luke, Brian T.; Malasky, Michael; Suman, Shalabh; Yeager, Meredith; Gatti, Richard A.; Caporaso, Neil E.; Mulvihill, John J.; Goldin, Lynn R.; Pabst, Thomas; McMaster, Mary L.; Stewart, Douglas R.

    2016-01-01

    Familial acute myeloid leukemia is rare and linked to germline mutations in RUNX1, GATA2 or CCAAT/enhancer binding protein-α (CEBPA). We re-evaluated a large family with acute myeloid leukemia originally seen at NIH in 1969. We used whole exome sequencing to study this family, and conducted in silico bioinformatics analysis, protein structural modeling and laboratory experiments to assess the impact of the identified CEBPA Q311P mutation. Unlike most previously identified germline mutations in CEBPA, which were N-terminal frameshift mutations, we identified a novel Q311P variant that was located in the C-terminal bZip domain of C/EBPα. Protein structural modeling suggested that the Q311P mutation alters the ability of the CEBPA dimer to bind DNA. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that the Q311P mu-tant had attenuated binding to DNA, as predicted by the protein modeling. Consistent with these findings, we found that the Q311P mutation has reduced transactivation, consistent with a loss-of-function mutation. From 45 years of follow up, we observed incomplete penetrance (46%) of CEBPA Q311P. This study of a large multi-generational pedigree reveals that a germline mutation in the C-terminal bZip domain can alter the ability of C/EBP-α to bind DNA and reduces transactivation, leading to acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:26721895

  13. Structure of Natural Killer Receptor 2B4 Bound to CD48 Reveals Basis for Heterophilic Recognition in Signaling Lymphocyte Activation Molecule Family

    SciTech Connect

    Velikovsky,C.; Deng, L.; Chlewicki, L.; Fernandez, M.; Kumar, V.; Mariuzza, R.

    2007-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells eliminate virally infected and tumor cells. Among the receptors regulating NK cell function is 2B4 (CD244), a member of the signaling lymphocyte-activation molecule (SLAM) family that binds CD48. 2B4 is the only heterophilic receptor of the SLAM family, whose other members, e.g., NK-T-B-antigen (NTB-A), are self-ligands. We determined the structure of the complex between the N-terminal domains of mouse 2B4 and CD48, as well as the structures of unbound 2B4 and CD48. The complex displayed an association mode related to, yet distinct from, that of the NTB-A dimer. Binding was accompanied by the rigidification of flexible 2B4 regions containing most of the polymorphic residues across different species and receptor isoforms. We propose a model for 2B4-CD48 interactions that permits the intermixing of SLAM receptors with major histocompatibility complex-specific receptors in the NK cell immune synapse. This analysis revealed the basis for heterophilic recognition within the SLAM family.

  14. Family-based Association Analyses of Imputed Genotypes Reveal Genome-Wide Significant Association of Alzheimer’s disease with OSBPL6, PTPRG and PDCL3

    PubMed Central

    Herold, Christine; Hooli, Basavaraj V.; Mullin, Kristina; Liu, Tian; Roehr, Johannes T; Mattheisen, Manuel; Parrado, Antonio R.; Bertram, Lars; Lange, Christoph; Tanzi, Rudolph E.

    2015-01-01

    The genetic basis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is complex and heterogeneous. Over 200 highly penetrant pathogenic variants in the genes APP, PSEN1 and PSEN2 cause a subset of early-onset familial Alzheimer's disease (EOFAD). On the other hand, susceptibility to late-onset forms of AD (LOAD) is indisputably associated to the ε4 allele in the gene APOE, and more recently to variants in more than two-dozen additional genes identified in the large-scale genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and meta-analyses reports. Taken together however, although the heritability in AD is estimated to be as high as 80%, a large proportion of the underlying genetic factors still remain to be elucidated. In this study we performed a systematic family-based genome-wide association and meta-analysis on close to 15 million imputed variants from three large collections of AD families (~3,500 subjects from 1,070 families). Using a multivariate phenotype combining affection status and onset age, meta-analysis of the association results revealed three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that achieved genome-wide significance for association with AD risk: rs7609954 in the gene PTPRG (P-value = 3.98·10−08), rs1347297 in the gene OSBPL6 (P-value = 4.53·10−08), and rs1513625 near PDCL3 (P-value = 4.28·10−08). In addition, rs72953347 in OSBPL6 (P-value = 6.36·10−07) and two SNPs in the gene CDKAL1 showed marginally significant association with LOAD (rs10456232, P-value: 4.76·10−07; rs62400067, P-value: 3.54·10−07). In summary, family-based GWAS meta-analysis of imputed SNPs revealed novel genomic variants in (or near) PTPRG, OSBPL6, and PDCL3 that influence risk for AD with genome-wide significance. PMID:26830138

  15. Phylogenetic and experimental characterization of an acyl-ACP thioesterase family reveals significant diversity in enzymatic specificity and activity

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Acyl-acyl carrier protein thioesterases (acyl-ACP TEs) catalyze the hydrolysis of the thioester bond that links the acyl chain to the sulfhydryl group of the phosphopantetheine prosthetic group of ACP. This reaction terminates acyl chain elongation of fatty acid biosynthesis, and in plant seeds it is the biochemical determinant of the fatty acid compositions of storage lipids. Results To explore acyl-ACP TE diversity and to identify novel acyl ACP-TEs, 31 acyl-ACP TEs from wide-ranging phylogenetic sources were characterized to ascertain their in vivo activities and substrate specificities. These acyl-ACP TEs were chosen by two different approaches: 1) 24 TEs were selected from public databases on the basis of phylogenetic analysis and fatty acid profile knowledge of their source organisms; and 2) seven TEs were molecularly cloned from oil palm (Elaeis guineensis), coconut (Cocos nucifera) and Cuphea viscosissima, organisms that produce medium-chain and short-chain fatty acids in their seeds. The in vivo substrate specificities of the acyl-ACP TEs were determined in E. coli. Based on their specificities, these enzymes were clustered into three classes: 1) Class I acyl-ACP TEs act primarily on 14- and 16-carbon acyl-ACP substrates; 2) Class II acyl-ACP TEs have broad substrate specificities, with major activities toward 8- and 14-carbon acyl-ACP substrates; and 3) Class III acyl-ACP TEs act predominantly on 8-carbon acyl-ACPs. Several novel acyl-ACP TEs act on short-chain and unsaturated acyl-ACP or 3-ketoacyl-ACP substrates, indicating the diversity of enzymatic specificity in this enzyme family. Conclusion These acyl-ACP TEs can potentially be used to diversify the fatty acid biosynthesis pathway to produce novel fatty acids. PMID:21831316

  16. Functional genomics reveals that a compact terpene synthase gene family can account for terpene volatile production in apple.

    PubMed

    Nieuwenhuizen, Niels J; Green, Sol A; Chen, Xiuyin; Bailleul, Estelle J D; Matich, Adam J; Wang, Mindy Y; Atkinson, Ross G

    2013-02-01

    Terpenes are specialized plant metabolites that act as attractants to pollinators and as defensive compounds against pathogens and herbivores, but they also play an important role in determining the quality of horticultural food products. We show that the genome of cultivated apple (Malus domestica) contains 55 putative terpene synthase (TPS) genes, of which only 10 are predicted to be functional. This low number of predicted functional TPS genes compared with other plant species was supported by the identification of only eight potentially functional TPS enzymes in apple 'Royal Gala' expressed sequence tag databases, including the previously characterized apple (E,E)-α-farnesene synthase. In planta functional characterization of these TPS enzymes showed that they could account for the majority of terpene volatiles produced in cv Royal Gala, including the sesquiterpenes germacrene-D and (E)-β-caryophyllene, the monoterpenes linalool and α-pinene, and the homoterpene (E)-4,8-dimethyl-1,3,7-nonatriene. Relative expression analysis of the TPS genes indicated that floral and vegetative tissues were the primary sites of terpene production in cv Royal Gala. However, production of cv Royal Gala floral-specific terpenes and TPS genes was observed in the fruit of some heritage apple cultivars. Our results suggest that the apple TPS gene family has been shaped by a combination of ancestral and more recent genome-wide duplication events. The relatively small number of functional enzymes suggests that the remaining terpenes produced in floral and vegetative and fruit tissues are maintained under a positive selective pressure, while the small number of terpenes found in the fruit of modern cultivars may be related to commercial breeding strategies.

  17. Transposon mutagenesis reveals cooperation of ETS family transcription factors with signaling pathways in erythro-megakaryocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jian Zhong; Carmichael, Catherine L.; Shi, Wei; Metcalf, Donald; Ng, Ashley P.; Hyland, Craig D.; Jenkins, Nancy A.; Copeland, Neal G.; Howell, Viive M.; Zhao, Zhizhuang Joe; Smyth, Gordon K.; Kile, Benjamin T.; Alexander, Warren S.

    2013-01-01

    To define genetic lesions driving leukemia, we targeted cre-dependent Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon mutagenesis to the blood-forming system using a hematopoietic-selective vav 1 oncogene (vav1) promoter. Leukemias of diverse lineages ensued, most commonly lymphoid leukemia and erythroleukemia. The inclusion of a transgenic allele of Janus kinase 2 (JAK2)V617F resulted in acceleration of transposon-driven disease and strong selection for erythroleukemic pathology with transformation of bipotential erythro-megakaryocytic cells. The genes encoding the E-twenty-six (ETS) transcription factors Ets related gene (Erg) and Ets1 were the most common sites for transposon insertion in SB-induced JAK2V617F-positive erythroleukemias, present in 87.5% and 65%, respectively, of independent leukemias examined. The role of activated Erg was validated by reproducing erythroleukemic pathology in mice transplanted with fetal liver cells expressing translocated in liposarcoma (TLS)-ERG, an activated form of ERG found in human leukemia. Via application of SB mutagenesis to TLS-ERG–induced erythroid transformation, we identified multiple loci as likely collaborators with activation of Erg. Jak2 was identified as a common transposon insertion site in TLS-ERG–induced disease, strongly validating the cooperation between JAK2V617F and transposon insertion at the Erg locus in the JAK2V617F-positive leukemias. Moreover, loci expressing other regulators of signal transduction pathways were conspicuous among the common transposon insertion sites in TLS-ERG–driven leukemia, suggesting that a key mechanism in erythroleukemia may be the collaboration of lesions disturbing erythroid maturation, most notably in genes of the ETS family, with mutations that reduce dependence on exogenous signals. PMID:23533276

  18. Transposon mutagenesis reveals cooperation of ETS family transcription factors with signaling pathways in erythro-megakaryocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jian Zhong; Carmichael, Catherine L; Shi, Wei; Metcalf, Donald; Ng, Ashley P; Hyland, Craig D; Jenkins, Nancy A; Copeland, Neal G; Howell, Viive M; Zhao, Zhizhuang Joe; Smyth, Gordon K; Kile, Benjamin T; Alexander, Warren S

    2013-04-09

    To define genetic lesions driving leukemia, we targeted cre-dependent Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon mutagenesis to the blood-forming system using a hematopoietic-selective vav 1 oncogene (vav1) promoter. Leukemias of diverse lineages ensued, most commonly lymphoid leukemia and erythroleukemia. The inclusion of a transgenic allele of Janus kinase 2 (JAK2)V617F resulted in acceleration of transposon-driven disease and strong selection for erythroleukemic pathology with transformation of bipotential erythro-megakaryocytic cells. The genes encoding the E-twenty-six (ETS) transcription factors Ets related gene (Erg) and Ets1 were the most common sites for transposon insertion in SB-induced JAK2V617F-positive erythroleukemias, present in 87.5% and 65%, respectively, of independent leukemias examined. The role of activated Erg was validated by reproducing erythroleukemic pathology in mice transplanted with fetal liver cells expressing translocated in liposarcoma (TLS)-ERG, an activated form of ERG found in human leukemia. Via application of SB mutagenesis to TLS-ERG-induced erythroid transformation, we identified multiple loci as likely collaborators with activation of Erg. Jak2 was identified as a common transposon insertion site in TLS-ERG-induced disease, strongly validating the cooperation between JAK2V617F and transposon insertion at the Erg locus in the JAK2V617F-positive leukemias. Moreover, loci expressing other regulators of signal transduction pathways were conspicuous among the common transposon insertion sites in TLS-ERG-driven leukemia, suggesting that a key mechanism in erythroleukemia may be the collaboration of lesions disturbing erythroid maturation, most notably in genes of the ETS family, with mutations that reduce dependence on exogenous signals.

  19. Conserved synteny at the protein family level reveals genes underlying Shewanella species cold tolerance and predicts their novel phenotypes

    SciTech Connect

    Karpinets, Tatiana V.; Obraztsova, Anna; Wang, Yanbing; Schmoyer, Denise D.; Kora, Guruprasad; Park, Byung H.; Serres, Margrethe H.; Romine, Margaret F.; Land, Miriam L.; Kothe, Terence B.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Uberbacher, Edward

    2010-03-01

    Bacteria of the genus Shewanella can thrive in different environments and demonstrate significant variability in their metabolic and ecophysiological capabilities including cold and salt tolerance. Genomic characteristics underlying this variability across species are largely unknown. In this study we address the problem by a comparison of the physiological, metabolic and genomic characteristics of 19 sequenced Shewanella species. We have employed two novel approaches based on association of a phenotypic trait with the number of the trait-specific protein families (Pfam domains) and on the conservation of synteny (order in the genome) of the trait-related genes. Our first approach is top-down and involves experimental evaluation and quantification of the species’ cold tolerance followed by identification of the correlated Pfam domains and genes with a conserved synteny. The second, a bottom-up approach, predicts novel phenotypes of the species by calculating profiles of each Pfam domain among their genomes and following pair-wise correlation of the profiles and their network clustering. Using the first approach we find a link between cold and salt tolerance of the species and the presence in the genome of a Na+/H+ antiporter gene cluster. Other cold tolerance related genes includes peptidases, chemotaxis sensory transducer proteins, a cysteine exporter, and helicases. Using the bottom-up approach we found several novel phenotypes in the newly sequenced Shewanella species, including degradation of aromatic compounds by an aerobic hybrid pathway in S. woodyi, degradation of ethanolamine by S. benthica, and propanediol degradation by S. putrefaciens CN32 and S. sp. W3-18-1.

  20. Functional Genomics Reveals That a Compact Terpene Synthase Gene Family Can Account for Terpene Volatile Production in Apple1[W

    PubMed Central

    Nieuwenhuizen, Niels J.; Green, Sol A.; Chen, Xiuyin; Bailleul, Estelle J.D.; Matich, Adam J.; Wang, Mindy Y.; Atkinson, Ross G.

    2013-01-01

    Terpenes are specialized plant metabolites that act as attractants to pollinators and as defensive compounds against pathogens and herbivores, but they also play an important role in determining the quality of horticultural food products. We show that the genome of cultivated apple (Malus domestica) contains 55 putative terpene synthase (TPS) genes, of which only 10 are predicted to be functional. This low number of predicted functional TPS genes compared with other plant species was supported by the identification of only eight potentially functional TPS enzymes in apple ‘Royal Gala’ expressed sequence tag databases, including the previously characterized apple (E,E)-α-farnesene synthase. In planta functional characterization of these TPS enzymes showed that they could account for the majority of terpene volatiles produced in cv Royal Gala, including the sesquiterpenes germacrene-D and (E)-β-caryophyllene, the monoterpenes linalool and α-pinene, and the homoterpene (E)-4,8-dimethyl-1,3,7-nonatriene. Relative expression analysis of the TPS genes indicated that floral and vegetative tissues were the primary sites of terpene production in cv Royal Gala. However, production of cv Royal Gala floral-specific terpenes and TPS genes was observed in the fruit of some heritage apple cultivars. Our results suggest that the apple TPS gene family has been shaped by a combination of ancestral and more recent genome-wide duplication events. The relatively small number of functional enzymes suggests that the remaining terpenes produced in floral and vegetative and fruit tissues are maintained under a positive selective pressure, while the small number of terpenes found in the fruit of modern cultivars may be related to commercial breeding strategies. PMID:23256150

  1. IDENTIFICATION OF NICOTINAMIDE MONONUCLEOTIDE DEAMIDASE OF THE BACTERIAL PYRIDINE NUCLEOTIDE CYCLE REVEALS A NOVEL BROADLY CONSERVED AMIDOHYDROLASE FAMILY

    SciTech Connect

    Galeazzi, Luca; Bocci, Paolo; Amici, Adolfo; Brunetti, Lucia; Ruggieri, Silverio; Romine, Margaret F.; Reed, Samantha B.; Osterman, Andrei; Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Sorci, Leonardo; Raffaelli, Nadia

    2011-09-27

    The pyridine nucleotide cycle (PNC) is a network of salvage and recycling routes maintaining homeostasis of NAD(P) cofactor pool in the cell. Nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) deamidase (EC 3.5.1.42), one of the key enzymes of the bacterial PNC was originally described in Enterobacteria, but the corresponding gene eluded identification for over 30 years. A genomics-based reconstruction of NAD metabolism across hundreds bacterial species suggested that NMN deamidase reaction is the only possible way of nicotinamide salvage in the marine bacterium Shewanella oneidensis. This prediction was verified via purification of native NMN deamidase from S. oneidensis followed by the identification of the respective gene, termed pncC. Enzymatic characterization of the PncC protein, as well as phenotype analysis of deletion mutants, confirmed its proposed biochemical and physiological function in S. oneidensis. Of the three PncC homologs present in E. coli, NMN deamidase activity was confirmed only for the recombinant purified product of the ygaD gene. A comparative analysis at the level of sequence and three dimensional structure, which is available for one of the PncC family member, shows no homology with any previously described amidohydrolases. Multiple alignment analysis of functional and non functional PncC homologs, together with NMN docking experiments, allowed us to tentatively identify the active site area and conserved residues therein. An observed broad phylogenomic distribution of predicted functional PncCs in bacterial kingdom is consistent with a possible role in detoxification of NMN, resulting from NAD utilization by DNA ligase.

  2. A systematic, family-wide investigation reveals that ~30% of mammalian PDZ domains engage in PDZ-PDZ interactions

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Bryan H.; Gujral, Taranjit S.; Karp, Ethan S.; BuKhalid, Raghida; Grantcharova, Viara P.; MacBeath, Gavin

    2012-01-01

    Summary PDZ domains are independently folded modules that typically mediate protein-protein interactions by binding to the C-termini of their target proteins. In a few instances, however, PDZ domains have been reported to dimerize with other PDZ domains. To investigate this noncanonical binding mode further, we used protein microarrays comprising virtually every mouse PDZ domain to systematically query all possible PDZ-PDZ pairs. We then used fluorescence polarization to retest and quantify novel interactions and co-affinity purification to test biophysically validated interactions in the context of their full-length proteins. Overall, we discovered 37 PDZ-PDZ interactions involving 46 PDZ domains (~30% of all PDZ domains tested), revealing that dimerization is a more frequently used binding mode than was previously appreciated. This suggests that many PDZ domains evolved to form multiprotein complexes by simultaneously interacting with more than one ligand. PMID:21944753

  3. Exome sequencing reveals a heterozygous DLX5 mutation in a Chinese family with autosomal-dominant split-hand/foot malformation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xue; Xin, Qian; Li, Lin; Li, Jiangxia; Zhang, Changwu; Qiu, Rongfang; Qian, Chenmin; Zhao, Hailing; Liu, Yongchao; Shan, Shan; Dang, Jie; Bian, Xianli; Shao, Changshun; Gong, Yaoqin; Liu, Qiji

    2014-01-01

    Split-hand/foot malformation (SHFM) is a congenital limb deformity due to the absence or dysplasia of central rays of the autopod. Six SHFM loci have already been identified. Here we describe a Chinese family with autosomal-dominant SHFM1 that has previously been mapped to 7q21.2-21.3. The two affected family members, mother and son, showed deep median clefts between toes, ectrodactyly and syndactyly; the mother also showed triphalangeal thumbs. Exome sequencing and variant screening of candidate genes in the six loci known to be responsible for SHFM revealed a novel heterozygous mutation, c.558G>T (p.(Gln186His)), in distal-less homeobox 5 (DLX5). As DLX5 encodes a transcription factor capable of transactivating MYC, we also tested whether the mutation could affect DLX5 transcription acitivity. Results from luciferase reporter assay revealed that a mutation in DLX5 compromised its transcriptional activity. This is the first report of a mutation in DLX5 leading to autosomal-dominant SHFM1. PMID:24496061

  4. Knock-down of transcript abundance of a family of Kunitz proteinase inhibitor genes in white clover (Trifolium repens) reveals a redundancy and diversity of gene function.

    PubMed

    Islam, Afsana; Leung, Susanna; Burgess, Elisabeth P J; Laing, William A; Richardson, Kim A; Hofmann, Rainer W; Dijkwel, Paul P; McManus, Michael T

    2015-12-01

    The transcriptional regulation of four phylogenetically distinct members of a family of Kunitz proteinase inhibitor (KPI) genes isolated from white clover (Trifolium repens; designated Tr-KPI1, Tr-KPI2, Tr-KPI4 and Tr-KPI5) has been investigated to determine their wider functional role. The four genes displayed differential transcription during seed germination, and in different tissues of the mature plant, and transcription was also ontogenetically regulated. Heterologous over-expression of Tr-KPI1, Tr-KPI2, Tr-KPI4 and Tr-KPI5 in Nicotiana tabacum retarded larval growth of the herbivore Spodoptera litura, and an increase in the transcription of the pathogenesis-related genes PR1 and PR4 was observed in the Tr-KPI1 and Tr-KPI4 over-expressing lines. RNA interference (RNAi) knock-down lines in white clover displayed significantly altered vegetative growth phenotypes with inhibition of shoot growth and a stimulation of root growth, while knock-down of Tr-KPI1, Tr-KPI2 and Tr-KPI5 transcript abundance also retarded larval growth of S. litura. Examination of these RNAi lines revealed constitutive stress-associated phenotypes as well as altered transcription of cellular signalling genes. These results reveal a functional redundancy across members of the KPI gene family. Further, the regulation of transcription of at least one member of the family, Tr-KPI2, may occupy a central role in the maintenance of a cellular homeostasis.

  5. Biochemical characterization of PE_PGRS61 family protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv reveals the binding ability to fibronectin

    PubMed Central

    Monu; Meena, Laxman S

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): The periodic binding of protein expressed by Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv with the host cell receptor molecules i.e. fibronectin (Fn) is gaining significance because of its adhesive properties. The genome sequencing of M. tuberculosis H37Rv revealed that the proline-glutamic (PE) proteins contain polymorphic GC-rich repetitive sequences (PGRS) which have clinical importance in pathogenesis events when the host encounters M. tuberculosis H37Rv. The functional parts of PE_PGRS family proteins, have not been extensively studied in tuberculosis biology. Materials and Methods: Fibronectin (10 ng and 20 ng) were used for FnBP assay and its enzymatic activities were observed by using various protein concentrations. Results: Therefore, in the present work, we cloned, expressed, purified and identified a novel PE_PGRS61 (Rv3653) family protein in M. tuberculosis H37Rv. Our experiment, observation suggested that at particular concentrations of 10 ng and 20 ng of Fn exhibits optimum binding to the purified Fibronectin Binding Protein (FnBP), a PE_PGRS61 family protein at 0.20 μg and 0.25 μg concentrations, respectively. Moreover, for better understanding the computational analysis, the B-cell and T-cell epitopes prediction prospect some amino acid propensity scales with hydrophilicity and antigenic variation index at their respective locations. Conclusion: Thus, the current findings provide an opportunity to illuminate the functions of PE_PGRS61 family protein. So, in this point of view, it could be useful to develop a novel therapeutic approach or diagnostic pipeline through targeting these fibronectin binding protein (FnBP) expressing genes. PMID:27872707

  6. Mass-spectrometric analysis of myelin proteolipids reveals new features of this family of palmitoylated membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Bizzozero, Oscar A; Malkoski, Steve P; Mobarak, Charlotte; Bixler, Heather A; Evans, James E

    2002-05-01

    In this study, we have investigated the structure of the native myelin proteolipid protein (PLP), DM-20 protein and several low molecular mass proteolipids by mass spectrometry. The various proteolipid species were isolated from bovine spinal cord by size-exclusion and ion-exchange chromatography in organic solvents. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight-mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) of PLP and DM-20 revealed molecular masses of 31.6 and 27.2 kDa, respectively, which is consistent with the presence of six and four molecules of thioester-bound fatty acids. Electrospray ionization-MS analysis of the deacylated proteins in organic solvents produced the predicted molecular masses of the apoproteins (29.9 and 26.1 kDa), demonstrating that palmitoylation is the major post-translational modification of PLP, and that the majority of PLP and DM-20 molecules in the CNS are fully acylated. A series of myelin-associated, palmitoylated proteolipids with molecular masses raging between 12 kDa and 18 kDa were also isolated and subjected to amino acid analysis, fatty acid analysis, N- and C-terminal sequencing, tryptic digestion and peptide mapping by MALDI-TOF-MS. The results clearly showed that these polypeptides correspond to the N-terminal region (residues 1-105/112) and C-terminal region (residues 113/131-276) of the major PLP, and they appear to be produced by natural proteolytic cleavage within the 60 amino acid-long cytoplasmic domain. These proteolipids are not postmortem artifacts of PLP and DM-20, and are differentially distributed across the CNS.

  7. Molecular Characterization of the 14-3-3 Gene Family in Brachypodium distachyon L. Reveals High Evolutionary Conservation and Diverse Responses to Abiotic Stresses

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Hui; Xu, Yuxing; Yuan, Linlin; Bian, Yanwei; Wang, Lihui; Zhen, Shoumin; Hu, Yingkao; Yan, Yueming

    2016-01-01

    The 14-3-3 gene family identified in all eukaryotic organisms is involved in a wide range of biological processes, particularly in resistance to various abiotic stresses. Here, we performed the first comprehensive study on the molecular characterization, phylogenetics, and responses to various abiotic stresses of the 14-3-3 gene family in Brachypodium distachyon L. A total of seven 14-3-3 genes from B. distachyon and 120 from five main lineages among 12 species were identified, which were divided into five well-conserved subfamilies. The molecular structure analysis showed that the plant 14-3-3 gene family is highly evolutionarily conserved, although certain divergence had occurred in different subfamilies. The duplication event investigation revealed that segmental duplication seemed to be the predominant form by which the 14-3-3 gene family had expanded. Moreover, seven critical amino acids were detected, which may contribute to functional divergence. Expression profiling analysis showed that BdGF14 genes were abundantly expressed in the roots, but showed low expression in the meristems. All seven BdGF14 genes showed significant expression changes under various abiotic stresses, including heavy metal, phytohormone, osmotic, and temperature stresses, which might play important roles in responses to multiple abiotic stresses mainly through participating in ABA-dependent signaling and reactive oxygen species-mediated MAPK cascade signaling pathways. In particular, BdGF14 genes generally showed upregulated expression in response to multiple stresses of high temperature, heavy metal, abscisic acid (ABA), and salicylic acid (SA), but downregulated expression under H2O2, NaCl, and polyethylene glycol (PEG) stresses. Meanwhile, dynamic transcriptional expression analysis of BdGF14 genes under longer treatments with heavy metals (Cd2+, Cr3+, Cu2+, and Zn2+) and phytohormone (ABA) and recovery revealed two main expression trends in both roots and leaves: up-down and up

  8. Systematic mutagenesis of all predicted gntR genes in Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris reveals a GntR family transcriptional regulator controlling hypersensitive response and virulence.

    PubMed

    An, Shi-Qi; Lu, Guang-Tao; Su, Hui-Zhao; Li, Rui-Fang; He, Yong-Qiang; Jiang, Bo-Le; Tang, Dong-Jie; Tang, Ji-Liang

    2011-09-01

    The GntR family is one of the most abundant and widely distributed groups of helix-turn-helix transcriptional regulators in bacteria. Six open reading frames in the genome of the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris were predicted to encode GntR regulators. All six of the predicted GntR-encoding genes were individually mutagenized and mutants from five of them were successfully obtained. Plant disease response assays revealed that one, whose product belongs to the YtrA subfamily and has been named HpaR1, is involved in the hypersensitive response (HR) and virulence. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and in vitro transcription assays revealed that HpaR1 could repress its own transcription level through binding to its promoter sequence, indicating an autoregulatory feedback inhibition mechanism for HpaR1 expression. Promoter-gusA reporter and reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction analyses revealed that HpaR1 positively and negatively affects the expression of HR and pathogenicity (hrp) genes in host plant and standard media, respectively. Constitutive expression of the key hrp regulator, hrpG, in the hpaR1 mutant could bypass the requirement of HpaR1 for the induction of wild-type HR, suggesting that HpaR1 regulates the expression of hrp genes that encode the type III secretion system via hrpG.

  9. Characterization of the FAD2 Gene Family in Soybean Reveals the Limitations of Gel-Based TILLING in Genes with High Copy Number

    PubMed Central

    Lakhssassi, Naoufal; Zhou, Zhou; Liu, Shiming; Colantonio, Vincent; AbuGhazaleh, Amer; Meksem, Khalid

    2017-01-01

    Soybean seed oil typically contains 18–20% oleic acid. Increasing the content of oleic acid is beneficial for health and biodiesel production. Mutations in FAD2-1 genes have been reported to increase seed oleic acid content. A subset of 1,037 mutant families from a mutagenized soybean cultivar (cv.) Forrest population was screened using reverse genetics (TILLING) to identify mutations within FAD2 genes. Although no fad2 mutants were identified using gel-based TILLING, four fad2-1A and one fad2-1B mutants were identified to have high seed oleic acid content using forward genetic screening and subsequent target sequencing. TILLING has been successfully used as a non-transgenic reverse genetic approach to identify mutations in genes controlling important agronomic traits. However, this technique presents limitations in traits such as oil composition due to gene copy number and similarities within the soybean genome. In soybean, FAD2 are present as two copies, FAD2-1 and FAD2-2. Two FAD2-1 members: FAD2-1A and FAD2-1B; and three FAD2-2 members: FAD2-2A, FAD2-2B, and FAD2-2C have been reported. Syntenic, phylogenetic, and in silico analysis revealed two additional members constituting the FAD2 gene family: GmFAD2-2D and GmFAD2-2E, located on chromosomes 09 and 15, respectively. They are presumed to have diverged from other FAD2-2 members localized on chromosomes 19 (GmFAD2-2A and GmFAD2-2B) and 03 (GmFAD2-2C). This work discusses alternative solutions to the limitations of gel-based TILLING in functional genomics due to high copy number and multiple paralogs of the FAD2 gene family in soybean. PMID:28348573

  10. Characterization of the FAD2 Gene Family in Soybean Reveals the Limitations of Gel-Based TILLING in Genes with High Copy Number.

    PubMed

    Lakhssassi, Naoufal; Zhou, Zhou; Liu, Shiming; Colantonio, Vincent; AbuGhazaleh, Amer; Meksem, Khalid

    2017-01-01

    Soybean seed oil typically contains 18-20% oleic acid. Increasing the content of oleic acid is beneficial for health and biodiesel production. Mutations in FAD2-1 genes have been reported to increase seed oleic acid content. A subset of 1,037 mutant families from a mutagenized soybean cultivar (cv.) Forrest population was screened using reverse genetics (TILLING) to identify mutations within FAD2 genes. Although no fad2 mutants were identified using gel-based TILLING, four fad2-1A and one fad2-1B mutants were identified to have high seed oleic acid content using forward genetic screening and subsequent target sequencing. TILLING has been successfully used as a non-transgenic reverse genetic approach to identify mutations in genes controlling important agronomic traits. However, this technique presents limitations in traits such as oil composition due to gene copy number and similarities within the soybean genome. In soybean, FAD2 are present as two copies, FAD2-1 and FAD2-2. Two FAD2-1 members: FAD2-1A and FAD2-1B; and three FAD2-2 members: FAD2-2A, FAD2-2B, and FAD2-2C have been reported. Syntenic, phylogenetic, and in silico analysis revealed two additional members constituting the FAD2 gene family: GmFAD2-2D and GmFAD2-2E, located on chromosomes 09 and 15, respectively. They are presumed to have diverged from other FAD2-2 members localized on chromosomes 19 (GmFAD2-2A and GmFAD2-2B) and 03 (GmFAD2-2C). This work discusses alternative solutions to the limitations of gel-based TILLING in functional genomics due to high copy number and multiple paralogs of the FAD2 gene family in soybean.

  11. Analyses of Sox-B and Sox-E Family Genes in the Cephalopod Sepia officinalis: Revealing the Conserved and the Unusual

    PubMed Central

    Focareta, Laura; Cole, Alison G.

    2016-01-01

    Cephalopods provide an unprecedented opportunity for comparative studies of the developmental genetics of organ systems that are convergent with analogous vertebrate structures. The Sox-family of transcription factors is an important class of DNA-binding proteins that are known to be involved in many aspects of differentiation, but have been largely unstudied in lophotrochozoan systems. Using a degenerate primer strategy we have isolated coding sequence for three members of the Sox family of transcription factors from a cephalopod mollusk, the European cuttlefish Sepia officinalis: Sof-SoxE, Sof-SoxB1, and Sof-SoxB2. Analyses of their expression patterns during organogenesis reveals distinct spatial and temporal expression domains. Sof-SoxB1 shows early ectodermal expression throughout the developing epithelium, which is gradually restricted to presumptive sensory epithelia. Expression within the nervous system appears by mid-embryogenesis. Sof-SoxB2 expression is similar to Sof-SoxB1 within the developing epithelia in early embryogenesis, however appears in largely non-overlapping expression domains within the central nervous system and is not expressed in the maturing sensory epithelium. In contrast, Sof-SoxE is expressed throughout the presumptive mesodermal territories at the onset of organogenesis. As development proceeds, Sof-SoxE expression is elevated throughout the developing peripheral circulatory system. This expression disappears as the circulatory system matures, but expression is maintained within undifferentiated connective tissues throughout the animal, and appears within the nervous system near the end of embryogenesis. SoxB proteins are widely known for their role in neural specification in numerous phylogenetic lineages. Our data suggests that Sof-SoxB genes play similar roles in cephalopods. In contrast, Sof-SoxE appears to be involved in the early stages of vasculogenesis of the cephalopod closed circulatory system, a novel role for a member of

  12. Unconventional Superconductivity in La(7)Ir(3) Revealed by Muon Spin Relaxation: Introducing a New Family of Noncentrosymmetric Superconductor That Breaks Time-Reversal Symmetry.

    PubMed

    Barker, J A T; Singh, D; Thamizhavel, A; Hillier, A D; Lees, M R; Balakrishnan, G; Paul, D McK; Singh, R P

    2015-12-31

    The superconductivity of the noncentrosymmetric compound La(7)Ir(3) is investigated using muon spin rotation and relaxation. Zero-field measurements reveal the presence of spontaneous static or quasistatic magnetic fields below the superconducting transition temperature T(c)=2.25  K-a clear indication that the superconducting state breaks time-reversal symmetry. Furthermore, transverse-field rotation measurements suggest that the superconducting gap is isotropic and that the pairing symmetry of the superconducting electrons is predominantly s wave with an enhanced binding strength. The results indicate that the superconductivity in La(7)Ir(3) may be unconventional and paves the way for further studies of this family of materials.

  13. Genome-Wide Comparative Analyses Reveal the Dynamic Evolution of Nucleotide-Binding Leucine-Rich Repeat Gene Family among Solanaceae Plants.

    PubMed

    Seo, Eunyoung; Kim, Seungill; Yeom, Seon-In; Choi, Doil

    2016-01-01

    Plants have evolved an elaborate innate immune system against invading pathogens. Within this system, intracellular nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) immune receptors are known play critical roles in effector-triggered immunity (ETI) plant defense. We performed genome-wide identification and classification of NLR-coding sequences from the genomes of pepper, tomato, and potato using fixed criteria. We then compared genomic duplication and evolution features. We identified intact 267, 443, and 755 NLR-encoding genes in tomato, potato, and pepper genomes, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis and classification of Solanaceae NLRs revealed that the majority of NLR super family members fell into 14 subgroups, including a TIR-NLR (TNL) subgroup and 13 non-TNL subgroups. Specific subgroups have expanded in each genome, with the expansion in pepper showing subgroup-specific physical clusters. Comparative analysis of duplications showed distinct duplication patterns within pepper and among Solanaceae plants suggesting subgroup- or species-specific gene duplication events after speciation, resulting in divergent evolution. Taken together, genome-wide analysis of NLR family members provide insights into their evolutionary history in Solanaceae. These findings also provide important foundational knowledge for understanding NLR evolution and will empower broader characterization of disease resistance genes to be used for crop breeding.

  14. Genetic testing in Tunisian families with heritable retinoblastoma using a low cost approach permits accurate risk prediction in relatives and reveals incomplete penetrance in adults.

    PubMed

    Ayari Jeridi, Hajer; Bouguila, Hédi; Ansperger-Rescher, Birgit; Baroudi, Olfa; Mdimegh, Imen; Omran, Ines; Charradi, Khaoula; Bouzayene, Hssan; Benammar-Elgaaïed, Amel; Lohmann, Dietmar R

    2014-07-01

    Heritable retinoblastoma is caused by oncogenic mutations in the RB1 tumor suppressor gene. Identification of these mutations in patients is important for genetic counseling and clinical management of relatives at risk. In order to lower analytical efforts, we designed a stepwise mutation detection strategy that was adapted to the spectrum of oncogenic RB1 gene mutations. We applied this strategy on 20 unrelated patients with familial and/or de novo bilateral retinoblastoma from Tunisia. In 19 (95%) patients, we detected oncogenic mutations including base substitutions, small length mutations, and large deletions. Further analyses on the origin of the mutations showed mutational mosaicism in one unilaterally affected father of a bilateral proband and incomplete penetrance in two mothers. In a large family with several retinoblastoma patients, the mutation identified in the index patient was also detected in several non-penetrant relatives. RNA analyses showed that this mutation results in an in-frame loss of exon 9. In summary, our strategy can serve as a model for RB1 mutation identification with high analytical sensitivity. Our results point out that genetic testing is needed to reveal or exclude incomplete penetrance specifically in parents of patients with sporadic disease.

  15. Genome-Wide Comparative Analyses Reveal the Dynamic Evolution of Nucleotide-Binding Leucine-Rich Repeat Gene Family among Solanaceae Plants

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Eunyoung; Kim, Seungill; Yeom, Seon-In; Choi, Doil

    2016-01-01

    Plants have evolved an elaborate innate immune system against invading pathogens. Within this system, intracellular nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) immune receptors are known play critical roles in effector-triggered immunity (ETI) plant defense. We performed genome-wide identification and classification of NLR-coding sequences from the genomes of pepper, tomato, and potato using fixed criteria. We then compared genomic duplication and evolution features. We identified intact 267, 443, and 755 NLR-encoding genes in tomato, potato, and pepper genomes, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis and classification of Solanaceae NLRs revealed that the majority of NLR super family members fell into 14 subgroups, including a TIR-NLR (TNL) subgroup and 13 non-TNL subgroups. Specific subgroups have expanded in each genome, with the expansion in pepper showing subgroup-specific physical clusters. Comparative analysis of duplications showed distinct duplication patterns within pepper and among Solanaceae plants suggesting subgroup- or species-specific gene duplication events after speciation, resulting in divergent evolution. Taken together, genome-wide analysis of NLR family members provide insights into their evolutionary history in Solanaceae. These findings also provide important foundational knowledge for understanding NLR evolution and will empower broader characterization of disease resistance genes to be used for crop breeding. PMID:27559340

  16. The structure of mouse cytomegalovirus m04 protein obtained from sparse NMR data reveals a conserved fold of the m02-m06 viral immune modulator family.

    PubMed

    Sgourakis, Nikolaos G; Natarajan, Kannan; Ying, Jinfa; Vogeli, Beat; Boyd, Lisa F; Margulies, David H; Bax, Ad

    2014-09-02

    Immunoevasins are key proteins used by viruses to subvert host immune responses. Determining their high-resolution structures is key to understanding virus-host interactions toward the design of vaccines and other antiviral therapies. Mouse cytomegalovirus encodes a unique set of immunoevasins, the m02-m06 family, that modulates major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) antigen presentation to CD8+ T cells and natural killer cells. Notwithstanding the large number of genetic and functional studies, the structural biology of immunoevasins remains incompletely understood, largely because of crystallization bottlenecks. Here we implement a technology using sparse nuclear magnetic resonance data and integrative Rosetta modeling to determine the structure of the m04/gp34 immunoevasin extracellular domain. The structure reveals a β fold that is representative of the m02-m06 family of viral proteins, several of which are known to bind MHC-I molecules and interfere with antigen presentation, suggesting its role as a diversified immune regulation module.

  17. The Crystal Structure of Rv0813c from Mycobacterium tuberculosis Reveals a New Family of Fatty Acid-Binding Protein-Like Proteins in Bacteria▿

    PubMed Central

    Shepard, William; Haouz, Ahmed; Graña, Martin; Buschiazzo, Alejandro; Betton, Jean-Michel; Cole, Stewart T.; Alzari, Pedro M.

    2007-01-01

    The gene Rv0813c from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which codes for a hypothetical protein of unknown function, is conserved within the order Actinomycetales but absent elsewhere. The crystal structure of Rv0813c reveals a new family of proteins that resemble the fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs) found in eukaryotes. Rv0813c adopts the 10-stranded β-barrel fold typical of FABPs but lacks the double-helix insert that covers the entry to the binding site in the eukaryotic proteins. The barrel encloses a deep cavity, at the bottom of which a small cyclic ligand was found to bind to the hydroxyl group of Tyr192. This residue is part of a conserved Arg-X-Tyr motif much like the triad that binds the carboxylate group of fatty acids in FABPs. Most of the residues forming the internal surface of the cavity are conserved in homologous protein sequences found in CG-rich prokaryotes, strongly suggesting that Rv0813c is a member of a new family of bacterial FABP-like proteins that may have roles in the recognition, transport, and/or storage of small molecules in the bacterial cytosol. PMID:17172346

  18. Driving south: a multi-gene phylogeny of the brown algal family Fucaceae reveals relationships and recent drivers of a marine radiation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Understanding the processes driving speciation in marine ecosystems remained a challenge until recently, due to the unclear nature of dispersal boundaries. However, recent evidence for marine adaptive radiations and ecological speciation, as well as previously undetected patterns of cryptic speciation is overturning this view. Here, we use multi-gene phylogenetics to infer the family-level evolutionary history of Fucaceae (intertidal brown algae of the northern Pacific and Atlantic) in order to investigate recent and unique patterns of radiative speciation in the genus Fucus in the Atlantic, in contrast with the mainly monospecific extant genera. Results We developed a set of markers from 13 protein coding genes based on polymorphic cDNA from EST libraries, which provided novel resolution allowing estimation of ancestral character states and a detailed reconstruction of the recent radiative history. Phylogenetic reconstructions yielded similar topologies and revealed four independent trans-Arctic colonization events by Fucaceae lineages, two of which also involved transitions from hermaphroditism to dioecy associated with Atlantic invasions. More recently, reversion of dioecious ancestral lineages towards hermaphroditism has occurred in the genus Fucus, particularly coinciding with colonization of more extreme habitats. Novel lineages in the genus Fucus were also revealed in association with southern habitats. These most recent speciation events occurred during the Pleistocene glaciations and coincided with a shift towards selfing mating systems, generally southward shifts in distribution, and invasion of novel habitats. Conclusions Diversification of the family occurred in the Late-Mid Miocene, with at least four independent trans-Artic lineage crossings coincident with two reproductive mode transitions. The genus Fucus arose in the Pliocene but radiated within a relatively short time frame about 2.5 million years ago. Current species distributions of

  19. Creating a Family Health History

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn Javascript on. Creating a Family Health History Why Create a Family Health History? Click for more information A Family Tree for ... Click for more information What a Family Health History May Reveal You can use a family health ...

  20. Cloning of three human tyrosine phosphatases reveals a multigene family of receptor-linked protein-tyrosine-phosphatases expressed in brain.

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, R; Morse, B; Huebner, K; Croce, C; Howk, R; Ravera, M; Ricca, G; Jaye, M; Schlessinger, J

    1990-01-01

    A human brainstem cDNA library in bacteriophage lambda gt11 was screened under conditions of reduced hybridization stringency with a leukocyte common antigen (LCA) probe that spanned both conserved cytoplasmic domains. cDNA encoding a receptor-linked protein-tyrosine-phosphatase (protein-tyrosine-phosphate phosphohydrolase, EC 3.1.3.48), RPTPase alpha, has been cloned and sequenced. Human RPTPase alpha consists of 802 amino acids. The extracellular domain of 150 residues includes a hydrophobic signal peptide and eight potential N-glycosylation sites. This is followed by a transmembrane region and two tandemly repeated conserved domains characteristic of all RPTPases identified thus far. The gene for RPTPase alpha has been localized to human chromosome region 20pter-20q12 by analysis of its segregation pattern in rodent-human somatic cell hybrids. Northern blot analysis revealed the presence of two major transcripts of 4.3 and 6.3 kilobases. In addition to RPTPase alpha, two other RPTPases (beta and gamma), identified in the same screen, have been partially cloned and sequenced. Analysis of sequence comparisons among LCA, the LCA-related protein LAR, and RPTPases alpha, beta, and gamma reveals the existence of a multigene family encoding different RPTPases, each containing a distinct extracellular domain, a single hydrophobic transmembrane region, and two tandemly repeated conserved cytoplasmic domains. Images PMID:2169617

  1. Spitzer Reveals Stellar 'Family Tree'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] High resolution poster version

    Generations of stars can be seen in this new infrared portrait from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. In this wispy star-forming region, called W5, the oldest stars can be seen as blue dots in the centers of the two hollow cavities (other blue dots are background and foreground stars not associated with the region). Younger stars line the rims of the cavities, and some can be seen as dots at the tips of the elephant-trunk-like pillars. The white knotty areas are where the youngest stars are forming.

    W5 spans an area of sky equivalent to four full moons and is about 6,500 light-years away in the constellation Cassiopeia. The Spitzer picture was taken over a period of 24 hours.

    Like other massive star-forming regions, such as Orion and Carina, W5 contains large cavities that were carved out by radiation and winds from the region's most massive stars. According to the theory of triggered star-formation, the carving out of these cavities pushes gas together, causing it to ignite into successive generations of new stars.

    This image contains some of the best evidence yet for the triggered star-formation theory. Scientists analyzing the photo have been able to show that the ages of the stars become progressively and systematically younger with distance from the center of the cavities.

    This picture was taken with Spitzer's infrared array camera. It is a four-color composite, in which light with a wavelength of 3.6 microns is blue; 4.5-micron light is green; 5.8-micron light is orange; and 8-micron light is red.

  2. Spitzer Reveals Stellar 'Family Tree'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] High resolution poster version

    Generations of stars can be seen in this new infrared portrait from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. In this wispy star-forming region, called W5, the oldest stars can be seen as blue dots in the centers of the two hollow cavities (other blue dots are background and foreground stars not associated with the region). Younger stars line the rims of the cavities, and some can be seen as pink dots at the tips of the elephant-trunk-like pillars. The white knotty areas are where the youngest stars are forming. Red shows heated dust that pervades the region's cavities, while green highlights dense clouds.

    W5 spans an area of sky equivalent to four full moons and is about 6,500 light-years away in the constellation Cassiopeia. The Spitzer picture was taken over a period of 24 hours.

    Like other massive star-forming regions, such as Orion and Carina, W5 contains large cavities that were carved out by radiation and winds from the region's most massive stars. According to the theory of triggered star-formation, the carving out of these cavities pushes gas together, causing it to ignite into successive generations of new stars.

    This image contains some of the best evidence yet for the triggered star-formation theory. Scientists analyzing the photo have been able to show that the ages of the stars become progressively and systematically younger with distance from the center of the cavities.

    This is a three-color composite showing infrared observations from two Spitzer instruments. Blue represents 3.6-micron light and green shows light of 8 microns, both captured by Spitzer's infrared array camera. Red is 24-micron light detected by Spitzer's multiband imaging photometer.

  3. Nucleotide sequence and characterization of the cryptic Bacillus thuringiensis plasmid pGI3 reveal a new family of rolling circle replicons.

    PubMed Central

    Hoflack, L; Seurinck, J; Mahillon, J

    1997-01-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of plasmid pGI3 from Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. thuringiensis H1.1. was obtained. Although this 11,365-bp molecule contained at least 11 putative open reading frames (ORFs), extensive database searches did not reveal any homologous sequences with the exception of ORF6, which displayed similarity to the largest ORF of pSTK1, a 1,883-bp cryptic plasmid isolated from Bacillus stearothermophilus. Deletion analysis to determine the pGI3 minimal replicon revealed that ORF6 is the rep gene. Replication occurred via a single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) intermediate, as demonstrated by S1 treatment and Southern hybridization in nondenaturating conditions. Interestingly, however, no homology was found between the pGI3 (ORF6) and pSTK1 (ORF3) rep genes and those from other single-stranded DNA plasmids, nor was there any DNA similarity to the double-strand origins of replication characterized so far, indicating that pGI3 and pSTK1 form another, new family of ssDNA plasmids. PCR analysis revealed that the pGI3 rep gene is largely distributed among B. thuringiensis strains but can also be found in B. cereus and B. mycoides strains, albeit at a lower frequency. Finally, segregation experiments performed with B. subtilis and B. thuringiensis showed that the pGI3 derivatives, including the minimal replicon, were segregationally stable at temperatures suitable for B. thuringiensis growth (<43 degrees C). PMID:9260939

  4. A Glimpse into the World of Integrative and Mobilizable Elements in Streptococci Reveals an Unexpected Diversity and Novel Families of Mobilization Proteins.

    PubMed

    Coluzzi, Charles; Guédon, Gérard; Devignes, Marie-Dominique; Ambroset, Chloé; Loux, Valentin; Lacroix, Thomas; Payot, Sophie; Leblond-Bourget, Nathalie

    2017-01-01

    Recent analyses of bacterial genomes have shown that integrated elements that transfer by conjugation play an essential role in horizontal gene transfer. Among these elements, the integrative and mobilizable elements (IMEs) are known to encode their own excision and integration machinery, and to carry all the sequences or genes necessary to hijack the mating pore of a conjugative element for their own transfer. However, knowledge of their prevalence and diversity is still severely lacking. In this work, an extensive analysis of 124 genomes from 27 species of Streptococcus reveals 144 IMEs. These IMEs encode either tyrosine or serine integrases. The identification of IME boundaries shows that 141 are specifically integrated in 17 target sites. The IME-encoded relaxases belong to nine superfamilies, among which four are previously unknown in any mobilizable or conjugative element. A total of 118 IMEs are found to encode a non-canonical relaxase related to rolling circle replication initiators (belonging to the four novel families or to MobT). Surprisingly, among these, 83 encode a TcpA protein (i.e., a non-canonical coupling protein (CP) that is more closely related to FtsK than VirD4) that was not previously known to be encoded by mobilizable elements. Phylogenetic analyses reveal not only many integration/excision module replacements but also losses, acquisitions or replacements of TcpA genes between IMEs. This glimpse into the still poorly known world of IMEs reveals that mobilizable elements have a very high prevalence. Their diversity is even greater than expected, with most encoding a CP and/or a non-canonical relaxase.

  5. A Glimpse into the World of Integrative and Mobilizable Elements in Streptococci Reveals an Unexpected Diversity and Novel Families of Mobilization Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Coluzzi, Charles; Guédon, Gérard; Devignes, Marie-Dominique; Ambroset, Chloé; Loux, Valentin; Lacroix, Thomas; Payot, Sophie; Leblond-Bourget, Nathalie

    2017-01-01

    Recent analyses of bacterial genomes have shown that integrated elements that transfer by conjugation play an essential role in horizontal gene transfer. Among these elements, the integrative and mobilizable elements (IMEs) are known to encode their own excision and integration machinery, and to carry all the sequences or genes necessary to hijack the mating pore of a conjugative element for their own transfer. However, knowledge of their prevalence and diversity is still severely lacking. In this work, an extensive analysis of 124 genomes from 27 species of Streptococcus reveals 144 IMEs. These IMEs encode either tyrosine or serine integrases. The identification of IME boundaries shows that 141 are specifically integrated in 17 target sites. The IME-encoded relaxases belong to nine superfamilies, among which four are previously unknown in any mobilizable or conjugative element. A total of 118 IMEs are found to encode a non-canonical relaxase related to rolling circle replication initiators (belonging to the four novel families or to MobT). Surprisingly, among these, 83 encode a TcpA protein (i.e., a non-canonical coupling protein (CP) that is more closely related to FtsK than VirD4) that was not previously known to be encoded by mobilizable elements. Phylogenetic analyses reveal not only many integration/excision module replacements but also losses, acquisitions or replacements of TcpA genes between IMEs. This glimpse into the still poorly known world of IMEs reveals that mobilizable elements have a very high prevalence. Their diversity is even greater than expected, with most encoding a CP and/or a non-canonical relaxase. PMID:28373865

  6. Systematic Identification, Evolution and Expression Analysis of the Zea mays PHT1 Gene Family Reveals Several New Members Involved in Root Colonization by Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fang; Xu, Yunjian; Jiang, Huanhuan; Jiang, Chaosheng; Du, Yibin; Gong, Cheng; Wang, Wei; Zhu, Suwen; Han, Guomin; Cheng, Beijiu

    2016-06-13

    The Phosphate Transporter1 (PHT1) family of genes plays pivotal roles in the uptake of inorganic phosphate from soils. However, there is no comprehensive report on the PHT1 family in Zea mays based on the whole genome. In the present study, a total of 13 putative PHT1 genes (ZmPHT1;1 to 13) were identified in the inbred line B73 genome by bioinformatics methods. Then, their function was investigated by a yeast PHO84 mutant complementary experiment and qRT-PCR. Thirteen ZmPHT1 genes distributed on six chromosomes (1, 2, 5, 7, 8 and 10) were divided into two paralogues (Class A and Class B). ZmPHT1;1/ZmPHT1;9 and ZmPHT1;9/ZmPHT1;13 are produced from recent segmental duplication events. ZmPHT1;1/ZmPHT1;13 and ZmPHT1;8/ZmPHT1;10 are produced from early segmental duplication events. All 13 putative ZmPHT1s can completely or partly complement the yeast Pi-uptake mutant, and they were obviously induced in maize under low Pi conditions, except for ZmPHT1;1 (p < 0.01), indicating that the overwhelming majority of ZmPHT1 genes can respond to a low Pi condition. ZmPHT1;2, ZmPHT1;4, ZmPHT1;6, ZmPHT1;7, ZmPHT1;9 and ZmPHT1;11 were up-regulated by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), implying that these genes might participate in mediating Pi absorption and/or transport. Analysis of the promoters revealed that the MYCS and P1BS element are widely distributed on the region of different AMF-inducible ZmPHT1 promoters. In light of the above results, five of 13 ZmPHT1 genes were newly-identified AMF-inducible high-affinity phosphate transporters in the maize genome. Our results will lay a foundation for better understanding the PHT1 family evolution and the molecular mechanisms of inorganic phosphate transport under AMF inoculation.

  7. Identification and characterization of fructose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolase genes in Arabidopsis reveal a gene family with diverse responses to abiotic stresses.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wei; Tang, Xiaoli; Huo, Yanqing; Xu, Rui; Qi, Shengdong; Huang, Jinguang; Zheng, Chengchao; Wu, Chang-ai

    2012-07-15

    Fructose 1,6-biphosphate aldolase (FBA) is a key enzyme in plants, which is involved not only in glycolysis and gluconeogenesis in the cytoplasm, but also in the Calvin cycle in plastids. Research on FBAs in various organisms has been reported, but there is none on FBAs in Arabidopsis at the molecular level. In the current study, eight FBA family genes (AtFBA1-8) were identified and analyzed in Arabidopsis thaliana. These genes have a highly conserved aldolase-type TIM barrel domain and a C-terminal peptide, but variable N-terminal peptides. Based on the phylogenetic analysis of FBA protein sequences from Arabidopsis and other plant species, AtFBA family was classified into two subfamilies, including three members (AtFBA1-3) with high similarities to FBAs occurring at plastid, and five (AtFBA4-8) with high similarities to FBAs localized in the cytoplasm. By confocal microscopy analysis with GFP fusion protein, AtFBA3 and AtFBA4 as well as AtFBA6 were observed to be localized in the plastid and cytoplasm, respectively. At least two duplicated gene pairs of AtFBA1 and AtFBA2, as well as AtFBA4 and AtFBA8 were found. Transcript level analysis of AtFBA genes in various tissues revealed the unique and overlapping expression patterns of plastid and cytosol AtFBA genes, suggesting that these genes may function at different stages of plant growth and development. Interestingly, AtFBA1, AtFBA2, AtFBA5 and AtFBA7 showed undetectable expression in roots. The expression patterns of AtFBA genes under different stress conditions suggested that all the members showed different expression patterns in response to stresses, including ABA, NaCl, Cd, abnormal temperature and drought, and, except for AtFBA3, most of the AtFBA genes were significantly responsive to drought stress in roots. Moreover, AtFBA1, AtFBA2, AtFBA5, AtFBA7 and AtFBA8 were induced by at least one of three sugars (sucrose, glucose and fructose) after 24h of treatment. Further functional analyses indicated important

  8. Interaction of a putative BH3 domain of clusterin with anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins as revealed by NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Dong-Hwa; Ha, Ji-Hyang; Kim, Yul; Bae, Kwang-Hee; Park, Jae-Yong; Choi, Wan Sung; Yoon, Ho Sup; Park, Sung Goo; Park, Byoung Chul; Yi, Gwan-Su; Chi, Seung-Wook

    2011-05-20

    Highlights: {yields} Identification of a conserved BH3 motif in C-terminal coiled coil region of nCLU. {yields} The nCLU BH3 domain binds to BH3 peptide-binding grooves in both Bcl-X{sub L} and Bcl-2. {yields} A conserved binding mechanism of nCLU BH3 and the other pro-apoptotic BH3 peptides with Bcl-X{sub L}. {yields} The absolutely conserved Leu323 and Asp328 of nCLU BH3 domain are critical for binding to Bcl-X{sub L.} {yields} Molecular understanding of the pro-apoptotic function of nCLU as a novel BH3-only protein. -- Abstract: Clusterin (CLU) is a multifunctional glycoprotein that is overexpressed in prostate and breast cancers. Although CLU is known to be involved in the regulation of apoptosis and cell survival, the precise molecular mechanism underlying the pro-apoptotic function of nuclear CLU (nCLU) remains unclear. In this study, we identified a conserved BH3 motif in C-terminal coiled coil (CC2) region of nCLU by sequence analysis and characterized the molecular interaction of the putative nCLU BH3 domain with anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The chemical shift perturbation data demonstrated that the nCLU BH3 domain binds to pro-apoptotic BH3 peptide-binding grooves in both Bcl-X{sub L} and Bcl-2. A structural model of the Bcl-X{sub L}/nCLU BH3 peptide complex reveals that the binding mode is remarkably similar to those of other Bcl-X{sub L}/BH3 peptide complexes. In addition, mutational analysis confirmed that Leu323 and Asp328 of nCLU BH3 domain, absolutely conserved in the BH3 motifs of BH3-only protein family, are critical for binding to Bcl-X{sub L}. Taken altogether, our results suggest a molecular basis for the pro-apoptotic function of nCLU by elucidating the residue specific interactions of the BH3 motif in nCLU with anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins.

  9. Systematic Identification, Evolution and Expression Analysis of the Zea mays PHT1 Gene Family Reveals Several New Members Involved in Root Colonization by Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fang; Xu, Yunjian; Jiang, Huanhuan; Jiang, Chaosheng; Du, Yibin; Gong, Cheng; Wang, Wei; Zhu, Suwen; Han, Guomin; Cheng, Beijiu

    2016-01-01

    The Phosphate Transporter1 (PHT1) family of genes plays pivotal roles in the uptake of inorganic phosphate from soils. However, there is no comprehensive report on the PHT1 family in Zea mays based on the whole genome. In the present study, a total of 13 putative PHT1 genes (ZmPHT1;1 to 13) were identified in the inbred line B73 genome by bioinformatics methods. Then, their function was investigated by a yeast PHO84 mutant complementary experiment and qRT-PCR. Thirteen ZmPHT1 genes distributed on six chromosomes (1, 2, 5, 7, 8 and 10) were divided into two paralogues (Class A and Class B). ZmPHT1;1/ZmPHT1;9 and ZmPHT1;9/ZmPHT1;13 are produced from recent segmental duplication events. ZmPHT1;1/ZmPHT1;13 and ZmPHT1;8/ZmPHT1;10 are produced from early segmental duplication events. All 13 putative ZmPHT1s can completely or partly complement the yeast Pi-uptake mutant, and they were obviously induced in maize under low Pi conditions, except for ZmPHT1;1 (p < 0.01), indicating that the overwhelming majority of ZmPHT1 genes can respond to a low Pi condition. ZmPHT1;2, ZmPHT1;4, ZmPHT1;6, ZmPHT1;7, ZmPHT1;9 and ZmPHT1;11 were up-regulated by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), implying that these genes might participate in mediating Pi absorption and/or transport. Analysis of the promoters revealed that the MYCS and P1BS element are widely distributed on the region of different AMF-inducible ZmPHT1 promoters. In light of the above results, five of 13 ZmPHT1 genes were newly-identified AMF-inducible high-affinity phosphate transporters in the maize genome. Our results will lay a foundation for better understanding the PHT1 family evolution and the molecular mechanisms of inorganic phosphate transport under AMF inoculation. PMID:27304955

  10. Genetic analysis of Arabidopsis GATA transcription factor gene family reveals a nitrate-inducible member important for chlorophyll synthesis and glucose sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Bi, Yong-Mei; Zhang, Yu; Signorelli, Tara; Zhao, Rong; Zhu, Tong; Rothstein, Steven

    2005-11-01

    The Arabidopsis GATA transcription factor family has 30 members, the biological function of most of which is poorly understood. Homozygous T-DNA insertion lines for 23 of the 30 members were identified and analyzed. Genetic screening of the insertion lines in defined growth conditions revealed one line with an altered phenotype, while the other lines showed no obvious change. This line, SALK_001778, has a T-DNA insertion in the second exon of At5g56860 which prevents the expression of the GATA domain. Genetic analysis of the mutant demonstrated that the phenotypic change is caused by a single gene effect and is recessive to the wild-type allele. In wild-type plants, the expression of At5g56860 is shoot-specific, occurs at an early stage of development and is inducible by nitrate. Loss of expression of At5g56860 in the loss-of-function mutant plants resulted in reduced chlorophyll levels. A transcript profiling experiment revealed that a considerable proportion of genes downregulated in the loss-of-function mutants are involved in carbon metabolism and At5g56860 is thus designated GNC (GATA, nitrate-inducible, carbon metabolism-involved). gnc mutants with no GNC expression are more sensitive to exogenous glucose, and two hexose transporter genes, with a possible connection to glucose signaling, are significantly downregulated, while GNC over-expressing transgenic plants upregulate their expression and are less sensitive to exogenous glucose. These observations suggest a function for GNC in regulating carbon and nitrogen metabolism.

  11. Random Sampling of Squamate Reptiles in Spanish Natural Reserves Reveals the Presence of Novel Adenoviruses in Lacertids (Family Lacertidae) and Worm Lizards (Amphisbaenia)

    PubMed Central

    Szirovicza, Leonóra; López, Pilar; Kopena, Renáta; Benkő, Mária; Martín, José; Pénzes, Judit J.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the results of a large-scale PCR survey on the prevalence and diversity of adenoviruses (AdVs) in samples collected randomly from free-living reptiles. On the territories of the Guadarrama Mountains National Park in Central Spain and of the Chafarinas Islands in North Africa, cloacal swabs were taken from 318 specimens of eight native species representing five squamate reptilian families. The healthy-looking animals had been captured temporarily for physiological and ethological examinations, after which they were released. We found 22 AdV-positive samples in representatives of three species, all from Central Spain. Sequence analysis of the PCR products revealed the existence of three hitherto unknown AdVs in 11 Carpetane rock lizards (Iberolacerta cyreni), nine Iberian worm lizards (Blanus cinereus), and two Iberian green lizards (Lacerta schreiberi), respectively. Phylogeny inference showed every novel putative virus to be a member of the genus Atadenovirus. This is the very first description of the occurrence of AdVs in amphisbaenian and lacertid hosts. Unlike all squamate atadenoviruses examined previously, two of the novel putative AdVs had A+T rich DNA, a feature generally deemed to mirror previous host switch events. Our results shed new light on the diversity and evolution of atadenoviruses. PMID:27399970

  12. [Differential expression of genes related to photoperiod-temperature sensitive genic male sterility in wheat, revealed by mRNA differential display using G-box family primer].

    PubMed

    Cao, Shuang-He; Liu, Dong-Cheng; Liu, Li-Ke; Guo, Xiao-Li; Zhang, Ai-Min

    2003-01-01

    mRNA differential display with G-box family primer was used to analyze the differential expression of genes of the photoperiod-temperature sensitive genic male sterile(PTSGMS) line of wheat, BAU3338, between the sterile and fertile conditions. The result indicated that gene expression was significantly different between the two types of condition during the fertility transformation phase. The twelve qualitatively different DNA bands were identified with reverse Northern blot hybridization and five positive clones, HT1-G10, HT1-G3, HT2-G2, HT1-G4 and HT2-G5 were sequenced. The homology search indicated that HT1-G10 was highly homological (96%) to the partial sequences of Triticum aestivum chloroplast genes, rbcL and atpB, HT1-G3 was also homological (88%) to Triticum aestivum histone H2A gene and the other three gene fragments were new sequences in Gen-Bank. The analysis of the candidate gene fragments supplied some effective evidences to reveal the developmental mechanism of PTSGMS.

  13. Characterization of the polyphenol oxidase gene family reveals a novel microRNA involved in posttranscriptional regulation of PPOs in Salvia miltiorrhiza

    PubMed Central

    Li, Caili; Li, Dongqiao; Li, Jiang; Shao, Fenjuan; Lu, Shanfa

    2017-01-01

    Salvia miltiorrhiza is a well-known material of traditional Chinese medicine. Understanding the regulatory mechanisms of phenolic acid biosynthesis and metabolism are important for S. miltiorrhiza quality improvement. We report here that S. miltiorrhiza contains 19 polyphenol oxidases (PPOs), forming the largest PPO gene family in plant species to our knowledge. Analysis of gene structures and sequence features revealed the conservation and divergence of SmPPOs. SmPPOs were differentially expressed in plant tissues and eight of them were predominantly expressed in phloem and xylem, indicating that some SmPPOs are functionally redundant, whereas the others are associated with different physiological processes. Expression patterns of eighteen SmPPOs were significantly altered under MeJA treatment, and twelve were yeast extract and Ag+-responsive, suggesting the majority of SmPPOs are stress-responsive. Analysis of high-throughput small RNA sequences and degradome data showed that miR1444-mediated regulation of PPOs existing in P. trichocarpa is absent from S. miltiorrhiza. Instead, a subset of SmPPOs was posttranscriptionally regulated by a novel miRNA, termed Smi-miR12112. It indicates the specificity and significance of miRNA-mediated regulation of PPOs. The results shed light on the regulation of SmPPO expression and suggest the complexity of SmPPO-associated phenolic acid biosynthesis and metabolism. PMID:28304398

  14. Genome-Wide Identification, Phylogeny, and Expression Analyses of the 14-3-3 Family Reveal Their Involvement in the Development, Ripening, and Abiotic Stress Response in Banana

    PubMed Central

    Li, Meiying; Ren, Licheng; Xu, Biyu; Yang, Xiaoliang; Xia, Qiyu; He, Pingping; Xiao, Susheng; Guo, Anping; Hu, Wei; Jin, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    Plant 14-3-3 proteins act as critical components of various cellular signaling processes and play an important role in regulating multiple physiological processes. However, less information is known about the 14-3-3 gene family in banana. In this study, 25 14-3-3 genes were identified from the banana genome. Based on the evolutionary analysis, banana 14-3-3 proteins were clustered into ε and non-ε groups. Conserved motif analysis showed that all identified banana 14-3-3 genes had the typical 14-3-3 motif. The gene structure of banana 14-3-3 genes showed distinct class-specific divergence between the ε group and the non-ε group. Most banana 14-3-3 genes showed strong transcript accumulation changes during fruit development and postharvest ripening in two banana varieties, indicating that they might be involved in regulating fruit development and ripening. Moreover, some 14-3-3 genes also showed great changes after osmotic, cold, and salt treatments in two banana varieties, suggested their potential role in regulating banana response to abiotic stress. Taken together, this systemic analysis reveals the involvement of banana 14-3-3 genes in fruit development, postharvest ripening, and response to abiotic stress and provides useful information for understanding the functions of 14-3-3 genes in banana. PMID:27713761

  15. X chromosome exome sequencing reveals a novel ALG13 mutation in a nonsyndromic intellectual disability family with multiple affected male siblings.

    PubMed

    Bissar-Tadmouri, Nesrine; Donahue, Whithey L; Al-Gazali, Lihadh; Nelson, Stanley F; Bayrak-Toydemir, Pinar; Kantarci, Sibel

    2014-01-01

    X-linked intellectual disability (XLID) is a heterogeneous condition associated with mutations in >100 genes, accounting for over 10% of all cases of intellectual impairment. The majority of XLID cases show nonsyndromic forms (NSXLID), in which intellectual disability is the sole clinically consistent manifestation. Here we performed X chromosome exome (X-exome) sequencing to identify the causative mutation in an NSXLID family with four affected male siblings and five unaffected female siblings. The X-exome sequencing at 88× coverage in one affected male sibling revealed a novel missense mutation (p.Tyr1074Cys) in the asparagine-linked glycosylation 13 homolog (ALG13) gene. Segregation analysis by Sanger sequencing showed that the all affected siblings were hemizygous and the mother was heterozygous for the mutation. Recently, a de novo missense mutation in ALG13 has been reported in a patient with X-linked congenital disorders of glycosylation type I. Our study reports the first case of NSXLID caused by a mutation in ALG13 involved in protein N-glycosylation.

  16. Genome-wide analyses of the bZIP family reveal their involvement in the development, ripening and abiotic stress response in banana

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wei; Wang, Lianzhe; Tie, Weiwei; Yan, Yan; Ding, Zehong; Liu, Juhua; Li, Meiying; Peng, Ming; Xu, Biyu; Jin, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    The leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors play important roles in multiple biological processes. However, less information is available regarding the bZIP family in the important fruit crop banana. In this study, 121 bZIP transcription factor genes were identified in the banana genome. Phylogenetic analysis showed that MabZIPs were classified into 11 subfamilies. The majority of MabZIP genes in the same subfamily shared similar gene structures and conserved motifs. The comprehensive transcriptome analysis of two banana genotypes revealed the differential expression patterns of MabZIP genes in different organs, in various stages of fruit development and ripening, and in responses to abiotic stresses, including drought, cold, and salt. Interaction networks and co-expression assays showed that group A MabZIP-mediated networks participated in various stress signaling, which was strongly activated in Musa ABB Pisang Awak. This study provided new insights into the complicated transcriptional control of MabZIP genes and provided robust tissue-specific, development-dependent, and abiotic stress-responsive candidate MabZIP genes for potential applications in the genetic improvement of banana cultivars. PMID:27445085

  17. Genome-wide analysis reveals diverged patterns of codon bias, gene expression, and rates of sequence evolution in picea gene families.

    PubMed

    De La Torre, Amanda R; Lin, Yao-Cheng; Van de Peer, Yves; Ingvarsson, Pär K

    2015-03-05

    The recent sequencing of several gymnosperm genomes has greatly facilitated studying the evolution of their genes and gene families. In this study, we examine the evidence for expression-mediated selection in the first two fully sequenced representatives of the gymnosperm plant clade (Picea abies and Picea glauca). We use genome-wide estimates of gene expression (>50,000 expressed genes) to study the relationship between gene expression, codon bias, rates of sequence divergence, protein length, and gene duplication. We found that gene expression is correlated with rates of sequence divergence and codon bias, suggesting that natural selection is acting on Picea protein-coding genes for translational efficiency. Gene expression, rates of sequence divergence, and codon bias are correlated with the size of gene families, with large multicopy gene families having, on average, a lower expression level and breadth, lower codon bias, and higher rates of sequence divergence than single-copy gene families. Tissue-specific patterns of gene expression were more common in large gene families with large gene expression divergence than in single-copy families. Recent family expansions combined with large gene expression variation in paralogs and increased rates of sequence evolution suggest that some Picea gene families are rapidly evolving to cope with biotic and abiotic stress. Our study highlights the importance of gene expression and natural selection in shaping the evolution of protein-coding genes in Picea species, and sets the ground for further studies investigating the evolution of individual gene families in gymnosperms.

  18. Analysis of Multiple Families With Single Individuals Affected by Pseudohypoparathyroidism Type Ib (PHP1B) Reveals Only One Novel Maternally Inherited GNAS Deletion

    PubMed Central

    Takatani, Rieko; Molinaro, Angelo; Grigelioniene, Giedre; Tafaj, Olta; Watanabe, Tomoyuki; Reyes, Monica; Sharma, Amita; Singhal, Vibha; Raymond, F Lucy; Linglart, Agnès; Jüppner, Harald

    2016-01-01

    Proximal tubular resistance to parathyroid hormone (PTH) resulting in hypocalcemia and hyperphosphatemia are preeminent abnormalities in pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ib (PHP1B), but resistance toward other hormones as well as variable features of Albright’s Hereditary Osteodystrophy (AHO) can occur also. Genomic DNA from PHP1B patients shows epigenetic changes at one or multiple differentially methylated regions (DMRs) within GNAS, the gene encoding Gαs and splice variants thereof. In the autosomal dominant disease variant, these methylation abnormalities are caused by deletions in STX16 or GNAS on the maternal allele. The molecular defect(s) leading to sporadic PHP1B (sporPHP1B) remains in most cases unknown and we therefore analyzed 60 sporPHP1B patients and available family members by microsatellite markers, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA), and methylation-specific MLPA (MS-MLPA). All investigated cases revealed broad GNAS methylation changes, but no evidence for inheritance of two paternal chromosome 20q alleles. Some patients with partial epigenetic modifications in DNA from peripheral blood cells showed more complete GNAS methylation changes when testing their immortalized lymphoblastoid cells. Analysis of siblings and children of sporPHP1B patients provided no evidence for an abnormal mineral ion regulation and no changes in GNAS methylation. Only one patient revealed, based on MLPA and microsatellite analyses, evidence for an allelic loss, which resulted in the discovery of two adjacent, maternally inherited deletions (37,597 and 1427 bp, respectively) that remove the area between GNAS antisense exons 3 and 5, including exon NESP. Our findings thus emphasize that the region comprising antisense exons 3 and 4 is required for establishing all maternal GNAS methylation imprints. The genetic defect(s) leading in sporPHP1B to epigenetic GNAS changes and thus PTH-resistance remains unknown, but

  19. Sequencing of Pax6 Loci from the Elephant Shark Reveals a Family of Pax6 Genes in Vertebrate Genomes, Forged by Ancient Duplications and Divergences

    PubMed Central

    Gautier, Philippe; Loosli, Felix; Tay, Boon-Hui; Tay, Alice; Murdoch, Emma; Coutinho, Pedro; van Heyningen, Veronica; Brenner, Sydney; Venkatesh, Byrappa; Kleinjan, Dirk A.

    2013-01-01

    Pax6 is a developmental control gene essential for eye development throughout the animal kingdom. In addition, Pax6 plays key roles in other parts of the CNS, olfactory system, and pancreas. In mammals a single Pax6 gene encoding multiple isoforms delivers these pleiotropic functions. Here we provide evidence that the genomes of many other vertebrate species contain multiple Pax6 loci. We sequenced Pax6-containing BACs from the cartilaginous elephant shark (Callorhinchus milii) and found two distinct Pax6 loci. Pax6.1 is highly similar to mammalian Pax6, while Pax6.2 encodes a paired-less Pax6. Using synteny relationships, we identify homologs of this novel paired-less Pax6.2 gene in lizard and in frog, as well as in zebrafish and in other teleosts. In zebrafish two full-length Pax6 duplicates were known previously, originating from the fish-specific genome duplication (FSGD) and expressed in divergent patterns due to paralog-specific loss of cis-elements. We show that teleosts other than zebrafish also maintain duplicate full-length Pax6 loci, but differences in gene and regulatory domain structure suggest that these Pax6 paralogs originate from a more ancient duplication event and are hence renamed as Pax6.3. Sequence comparisons between mammalian and elephant shark Pax6.1 loci highlight the presence of short- and long-range conserved noncoding elements (CNEs). Functional analysis demonstrates the ancient role of long-range enhancers for Pax6 transcription. We show that the paired-less Pax6.2 ortholog in zebrafish is expressed specifically in the developing retina. Transgenic analysis of elephant shark and zebrafish Pax6.2 CNEs with homology to the mouse NRE/Pα internal promoter revealed highly specific retinal expression. Finally, morpholino depletion of zebrafish Pax6.2 resulted in a “small eye” phenotype, supporting a role in retinal development. In summary, our study reveals that the pleiotropic functions of Pax6 in vertebrates are served by a divergent

  20. Deep RNA-Seq profile reveals biodiversity, plant-microbe interactions and a large family of NBS-LRR resistance genes in walnut (Juglans regia) tissues.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Sandeep; Britton, Monica; Martínez-García, P J; Dandekar, Abhaya M

    2016-03-01

    Deep RNA-Seq profiling, a revolutionary method used for quantifying transcriptional levels, often includes non-specific transcripts from other co-existing organisms in spite of stringent protocols. Using the recently published walnut genome sequence as a filter, we present a broad analysis of the RNA-Seq derived transcriptome profiles obtained from twenty different tissues to extract the biodiversity and possible plant-microbe interactions in the walnut ecosystem in California. Since the residual nature of the transcripts being analyzed does not provide sufficient information to identify the exact strain, inferences made are constrained to the genus level. The presence of the pathogenic oomycete Phytophthora was detected in the root through the presence of a glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. Cryptococcus, the causal agent of cryptococcosis, was found in the catkins and vegetative buds, corroborating previous work indicating that the plant surface supported the sexual cycle of this human pathogen. The RNA-Seq profile revealed several species of the endophytic nitrogen fixing Actinobacteria. Another bacterial species implicated in aerobic biodegradation of methyl tert-butyl ether (Methylibium petroleiphilum) is also found in the root. RNA encoding proteins from the pea aphid were found in the leaves and vegetative buds, while a serine protease from mosquito with significant homology to a female reproductive tract protease from Drosophila mojavensis in the vegetative bud suggests egg-laying activities. The comprehensive analysis of RNA-seq data present also unraveled detailed, tissue-specific information of ~400 transcripts encoded by the largest family of resistance (R) genes (NBS-LRR), which possibly rationalizes the resistance of the specific walnut plant to the pathogens detected. Thus, we elucidate the biodiversity and possible plant-microbe interactions in several walnut (Juglans regia) tissues in California using deep RNA-Seq profiling.

  1. The Vanadium Iodoperoxidase from the Marine Flavobacteriaceae Species Zobellia galactanivorans Reveals Novel Molecular and Evolutionary Features of Halide Specificity in the Vanadium Haloperoxidase Enzyme Family

    PubMed Central

    Fournier, Jean-Baptiste; Rebuffet, Etienne; Delage, Ludovic; Grijol, Romain; Meslet-Cladière, Laurence; Rzonca, Justyna; Potin, Philippe; Michel, Gurvan; Czjzek, Mirjam

    2014-01-01

    Vanadium haloperoxidases (VHPO) are key enzymes that oxidize halides and are involved in the biosynthesis of organo-halogens. Until now, only chloroperoxidases (VCPO) and bromoperoxidases (VBPO) have been characterized structurally, mainly from eukaryotic species. Three putative VHPO genes were predicted in the genome of the flavobacterium Zobellia galactanivorans, a marine bacterium associated with macroalgae. In a phylogenetic analysis, these putative bacterial VHPO were closely related to other VHPO from diverse bacterial phyla but clustered independently from eukaryotic algal VBPO and fungal VCPO. Two of these bacterial VHPO, heterogeneously produced in Escherichia coli, were found to be strictly specific for iodide oxidation. The crystal structure of one of these vanadium-dependent iodoperoxidases, Zg-VIPO1, was solved by multiwavelength anomalous diffraction at 1.8 Å, revealing a monomeric structure mainly folded into α-helices. This three-dimensional structure is relatively similar to those of VCPO of the fungus Curvularia inaequalis and of Streptomyces sp. and is superimposable onto the dimeric structure of algal VBPO. Surprisingly, the vanadate binding site of Zg-VIPO1 is strictly conserved with the fungal VCPO active site. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we showed that specific amino acids and the associated hydrogen bonding network around the vanadate center are essential for the catalytic properties and also the iodide specificity of Zg-VIPO1. Altogether, phylogeny and structure-function data support the finding that iodoperoxidase activities evolved independently in bacterial and algal lineages, and this sheds light on the evolution of the VHPO enzyme family. PMID:25261522

  2. Sequence-Based Screening for Rare Enzymes: New Insights into the World of AMDases Reveal a Conserved Motif and 58 Novel Enzymes Clustering in Eight Distinct Families

    PubMed Central

    Maimanakos, Janine; Chow, Jennifer; Gaßmeyer, Sarah K.; Güllert, Simon; Busch, Florian; Kourist, Robert; Streit, Wolfgang R.

    2016-01-01

    Arylmalonate Decarboxylases (AMDases, EC 4.1.1.76) are very rare and mostly underexplored enzymes. Currently only four known and biochemically characterized representatives exist. However, their ability to decarboxylate α-disubstituted malonic acid derivatives to optically pure products without cofactors makes them attractive and promising candidates for the use as biocatalysts in industrial processes. Until now, AMDases could not be separated from other members of the aspartate/glutamate racemase superfamily based on their gene sequences. Within this work, a search algorithm was developed that enables a reliable prediction of AMDase activity for potential candidates. Based on specific sequence patterns and screening methods 58 novel AMDase candidate genes could be identified in this work. Thereby, AMDases with the conserved sequence pattern of Bordetella bronchiseptica’s prototype appeared to be limited to the classes of Alpha-, Beta-, and Gamma-proteobacteria. Amino acid homologies and comparison of gene surrounding sequences enabled the classification of eight enzyme clusters. Particularly striking is the accumulation of genes coding for different transporters of the tripartite tricarboxylate transporters family, TRAP transporters and ABC transporters as well as genes coding for mandelate racemases/muconate lactonizing enzymes that might be involved in substrate uptake or degradation of AMDase products. Further, three novel AMDases were characterized which showed a high enantiomeric excess (>99%) of the (R)-enantiomer of flurbiprofen. These are the recombinant AmdA and AmdV from Variovorax sp. strains HH01 and HH02, originated from soil, and AmdP from Polymorphum gilvum found by a data base search. Altogether our findings give new insights into the class of AMDases and reveal many previously unknown enzyme candidates with high potential for bioindustrial processes. PMID:27610105

  3. Family Structure and Family Processes in Mexican American Families

    PubMed Central

    Zeiders, Katharine H.; Roosa, Mark W.; Tein, Jenn-Yun

    2010-01-01

    Despite increases in single-parent families among Mexican Americans (MA), few studies have examined the association of family structure and family adjustment. Utilizing a diverse sample of 738 Mexican American families (21.7% single parent), the current study examined differences across family structure on early adolescent outcomes, family functioning, and parent-child relationship variables. Results revealed that early adolescents in single parent families reported greater school misconduct, CD/ODD and MDD symptoms, and greater parent-child conflict than their counterparts in two parent families. Single parent mothers reported greater economic hardship, depression and family stress. Family stress and parent-child conflict emerged as significant mediators of the association between family structure and early adolescent outcomes, suggesting important processes linking MA single parent families and adolescent adjustment. PMID:21361925

  4. Whole-genome sequencing in multiplex families with psychoses reveals mutations in the SHANK2 and SMARCA1 genes segregating with illness

    PubMed Central

    Homann, Oliver R; Misura, Kira; Lamas, Edwin; Sandrock, Robert W; Nelson, Paul; McDonough, Stefan I; DeLisi, Lynn E

    2016-01-01

    A current focus in psychiatric genetics is detection of multiple common risk alleles through very large GWAS analyses. Yet families do exist, albeit rare, that have multiple affected members who are presumed to have a similar inherited cause to their illnesses. We hypothesized that within some of these families there may be rare highly penetrant mutations that segregate with illness. In this exploratory study, the genomes of ninety individuals across nine families were sequenced. Each family included a minimum of three available relatives affected with a psychotic illness and three available unaffected relatives. Twenty-six variants were identified that are private to a family, alter protein sequence, and are transmitted to all affected individuals within the family. In one family, seven siblings with schizophrenia spectrum disorders each carry a novel private missense variant within the SHANK2 gene. This variant lies within the consensus SH3 protein-binding motif by which SHANK2 may interact with post-synaptic glutamate receptors. In another family, four affected siblings and their unaffected mother each carry a novel private missense variant in the SMARCA1 gene on the X chromosome. Both variants represent candidates that may be causal for psychotic disorders when considered in the context of their transmission pattern and known gene and disease biology. PMID:27001614

  5. Molecular phylogeny based on increased number of species and genes revealed more robust family-level systematics of the order Euryalida (Echinodermata: Ophiuroidea).

    PubMed

    Okanishi, Masanori; Fujita, Toshihiko

    2013-12-01

    Previous molecular analysis of the order Euryalida (Echinodermata: Ophiuroidea), has identified three monophyletic families, the Euryalidae, Asteronychidae and Gorgonocephalidae. However, family-level relationships have remained unresolved due to inadequate taxon sampling and insufficient molecular markers. Here, we present a family-level revision of the Euryalida based on sequences from mitochondrial genes (16S rRNA and COI) and a nuclear gene (18S rRNA) from 83 euryalid ophiuroids. The monophyly of the three families, Euryalidae, Asteronychidae and Gorgonocephalidae is confirmed. The Euryalidae and Asteronychidae+Gorgonocephalidae are assigned to superfamilies, the Euryalidea and the Gorgonocephalidea, respectively. Three subclades within the family Gorgonocephalidae are identified and assigned to three subfamilies; Astrotominae includes Astrocrius, Astrohamma and Astrotoma, Astrothamninae (subfamily nov.) includes Astrothamnus and Astrothrombus with Gorgonocephalinae including the remaining genera. Morphological characters are consistent with the newly recognised superfamilies and subfamilies.

  6. Structural Determination of Functional Domains in Early B-cell Factor (EBF) Family of Transcription Factors Reveals Similarities to Rel DNA-binding Proteins and a Novel Dimerization Motif*

    PubMed Central

    Siponen, Marina I.; Wisniewska, Magdalena; Lehtiö, Lari; Johansson, Ida; Svensson, Linda; Raszewski, Grzegorz; Nilsson, Lennart; Sigvardsson, Mikael; Berglund, Helena

    2010-01-01

    The early B-cell factor (EBF) transcription factors are central regulators of development in several organs and tissues. This protein family shows low sequence similarity to other protein families, which is why structural information for the functional domains of these proteins is crucial to understand their biochemical features. We have used a modular approach to determine the crystal structures of the structured domains in the EBF family. The DNA binding domain reveals a striking resemblance to the DNA binding domains of the Rel homology superfamily of transcription factors but contains a unique zinc binding structure, termed zinc knuckle. Further the EBF proteins contain an IPT/TIG domain and an atypical helix-loop-helix domain with a novel type of dimerization motif. The data presented here provide insights into unique structural features of the EBF proteins and open possibilities for detailed molecular investigations of this important transcription factor family. PMID:20592035

  7. Clinical and Molecular Studies Reveal a PSEN1 Mutation (L153V) in a Peruvian Family with Early-Onset Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cornejo-Olivas, Mario R.; Yu, Chang-En; Mazzetti, Pilar; Mata, Ignacio F.; Meza, Maria; Lindo-Samanamud, Saul; Leverenz, James B.; Bird, Thomas D.

    2014-01-01

    Presenilin 1 (PSEN1) gene mutations are found in 30 to 70% of familial early onset Alzheimer disease (EOAD) cases (onset <60 years). Prevalence of these mutations is highly variable including ethnic differences worldwide. No Peruvian kindred with familial AD (FAD) have been described. Standardized clinical evaluation and cognitive assessment was completed in a Peruvian family with severe EOAD. Clinical course was characterized by very early onset (before age 35 years), progressive cognitive impairment with early memory loss, spatial disorientation and executive dysfunction. We sequenced all exons of PSEN1 in the proband and identified a c.475C>G DNA change resulting in a p.L153V missense mutation in the transmembrane domain 2 of the gene. This mutation is also present in the three additional affected siblings but not in a non-affected family member consistent with segregation of this mutation with the disease. This is the first report of a Peruvian family affected with EOAD associated with a PSEN1 mutation. This same mutation has been reported previously in English and French families, but a novel variants very close to the mutation and ancestry informative markers analysis suggests the mutation might be of Amerindian or African origin in this Peruvian family. PMID:24495933

  8. Clinical and molecular studies reveal a PSEN1 mutation (L153V) in a Peruvian family with early-onset Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Cornejo-Olivas, Mario R; Yu, Chang-En; Mazzetti, Pilar; Mata, Ignacio F; Meza, Maria; Lindo-Samanamud, Saul; Leverenz, James B; Bird, Thomas D

    2014-03-20

    Presenilin 1 (PSEN1) gene mutations are found in 30-70% of familial early-onset Alzheimer disease (EOAD) cases (onset <60 years). Prevalence of these mutations is highly variable including ethnic differences worldwide. No Peruvian kindred with familial AD (FAD) have been described. Standardized clinical evaluation and cognitive assessment were completed in a Peruvian family with severe EOAD. Clinical course was characterized by very early onset (before age 35 years), progressive cognitive impairment with early memory loss, spatial disorientation and executive dysfunction. We sequenced all exons of PSEN1 in the proband and identified a c.475C>G DNA change resulting in a p.L153V missense mutation in the transmembrane domain 2 of the gene. This mutation is also present in the three additional affected siblings but not in a non-affected family member consistent with segregation of this mutation with the disease. This is the first report of a Peruvian family affected with EOAD associated with a PSEN1 mutation. This same mutation has been reported previously in English and French families, but a novel variants very close to the mutation and ancestry informative markers analysis suggests the mutation might be of Amerindian or African origin in this Peruvian family.

  9. Genomic Resources of Three Pulsatilla Species Reveal Evolutionary Hotspots, Species-Specific Sites and Variable Plastid Structure in the Family Ranunculaceae

    PubMed Central

    Szczecińska, Monika; Sawicki, Jakub

    2015-01-01

    Background: The European continent is presently colonized by nine species of the genus Pulsatilla, five of which are encountered only in mountainous regions of southwest and south-central Europe. The remaining four species inhabit lowlands in the north-central and eastern parts of the continent. Most plants of the genus Pulsatilla are rare and endangered, which is why most research efforts focused on their biology, ecology and hybridization. The objective of this study was to develop genomic resources, including complete plastid genomes and nuclear rRNA clusters, for three sympatric Pulsatilla species that are most commonly found in Central Europe. The results will supply valuable information about genetic variation, which can be used in the process of designing primers for population studies and conservation genetics research. The complete plastid genomes together with the nuclear rRNA cluster can serve as a useful tool in hybridization studies. Methodology/principal findings: Six complete plastid genomes and nuclear rRNA clusters were sequenced from three species of Pulsatilla using the Illumina sequencing technology. Four junctions between single copy regions and inverted repeats and junctions between the identified locally-collinear blocks (LCB) were confirmed by Sanger sequencing. Pulsatilla genomes of 120 unique genes had a total length of approximately 161–162 kb, and 21 were duplicated in the inverted repeats (IR) region. Comparative plastid genomes of newly-sequenced Pulsatilla and the previously-identified plastomes of Aconitum and Ranunculus species belonging to the family Ranunculaceae revealed several variations in the structure of the genome, but the gene content remained constant. The nuclear rRNA cluster (18S-ITS1-5.8S-ITS2-26S) of studied Pulsatilla species is 5795 bp long. Among five analyzed regions of the rRNA cluster, only Internal Transcribed Spacer 2 (ITS2) enabled the molecular delimitation of closely-related Pulsatilla patens and

  10. Structure of the first representative of Pfam family PF09410 (DUF2006) reveals a structural signature of the calycin superfamily that suggests a role in lipid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Bakolitsa, Constantina; Skerra, Arne; Lomize, Andrei; Carlton, Dennis; Miller, Mitchell D.; Krishna, S. Sri; Abdubek, Polat; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Clayton, Thomas; Deller, Marc C.; Duan, Lian; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grant, Joanna C.; Grzechnik, Slawomir K.; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Kozbial, Piotr; Kumar, Abhinav; Marciano, David; McMullan, Daniel; Morse, Andrew T.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Okach, Linda; Paulsen, Jessica; Reyes, Ron; Rife, Christopher L.; van den Bedem, Henry; Weekes, Dana; Xu, Qingping; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Elsliger, Marc-André; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2010-01-01

    The first structural representative of the domain of unknown function DUF2006 family, also known as Pfam family PF09410, comprises a lipocalin-like fold with domain duplication. The finding of the calycin signature in the N-­terminal domain, combined with remote sequence similarity to two other protein families (PF07143 and PF08622) implicated in isoprenoid metabolism and the oxidative stress response, support an involvement in lipid metabolism. Clusters of conserved residues that interact with ligand mimetics suggest that the binding and regulation sites map to the N-terminal domain and to the interdomain interface, respectively. PMID:20944205

  11. Structure of the first representative of Pfam family PF09410 (DUF2006) reveals a structural signature of the calycin superfamily that suggests a role in lipid metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Bakolitsa, Constantina; Skerra, Arne; Lomize, Andrei; Carlton, Dennis; Miller, Mitchell D.; Krishna, S. Sri; Abdubek, Polat; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Clayton, Thomas; Deller, Marc C.; Duan, Lian; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grant, Joanna C.; Grzechnik, Slawomir K.; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Kozbial, Piotr; Kumar, Abhinav; Marciano, David; McMullan, Daniel; Morse, Andrew T.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Okach, Linda; Paulsen, Jessica; Reyes, Ron; Rife, Christopher L.; van den Bedem, Henry; Weekes, Dana; Xu, Qingping; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Elsliger, Marc-Andre; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2015-10-15

    The first structural representative of the domain of unknown function DUF2006 family, also known as Pfam family PF09410, comprises a lipocalin-like fold with domain duplication. The finding of the calycin signature in the N-terminal domain, combined with remote sequence similarity to two other protein families (PF07143 and PF08622) implicated in isoprenoid metabolism and the oxidative stress response, support an involvement in lipid metabolism. Clusters of conserved residues that interact with ligand mimetics suggest that the binding and regulation sites map to the N-terminal domain and to the interdomain interface, respectively.

  12. Dissection of Genomewide-Scan Data in Extended Families Reveals a Major Locus and Oligogenic Susceptibility for Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Iyengar, Sudha K.; Song, Danhong; Klein, Barbara E. K.; Klein, Ronald; Schick, James H.; Humphrey, Jennifer; Millard, Christopher; Liptak, Rachel; Russo, Karlie; Jun, Gyungah; Lee, Kristine E.; Fijal, Bonnie; Elston, Robert C.

    2004-01-01

    To examine the genetic basis of age-related macular degeneration (ARMD), a degenerative disease of the retinal pigment epithelium and neurosensory retina, we conducted a genomewide scan in 34 extended families (297 individuals, 349 sib pairs) ascertained through index cases with neovascular disease or geographic atrophy. Family and medical history was obtained from index cases and family members. Fundus photographs were taken of all participating family members, and these were graded for severity by use of a quantitative scale. Model-free linkage analysis was performed, and tests of heterogeneity and epistasis were conducted. We have evidence of a major locus on chromosome 15q (GATA50C03 multipoint P=1.98×10-7; empirical P⩽1.0×10-5; single-point P=3.6×10-7). This locus was present as a weak linkage signal in our previous genome scan for ARMD, in the Beaver Dam Eye Study sample (D15S659, multipoint P=.047), but is otherwise novel. In this genome scan, we observed a total of 13 regions on 11 chromosomes (1q31, 2p21, 4p16, 5q34, 9p24, 9q31, 10q26, 12q13, 12q23, 15q21, 16p12, 18p11, and 20q13), with a nominal multipoint significance level of P⩽.01 or LOD ⩾1.18. Family-by-family analysis of the data, performed using model-free linkage methods, suggests that there is evidence of heterogeneity in these families. For example, a single family (family 460) individually shows linkage evidence at 8 loci, at the level of P<.0001. We conducted tests for heterogeneity, which suggest that ARMD susceptibility loci on chromosomes 9p24, 10q26, and 15q21 are not present in all families. We tested for mutations in linked families and examined SNPs in two candidate genes, hemicentin-1 and EFEMP1, in subsamples (145 and 189 sib pairs, respectively) of the data. Mutations were not observed in any of the 11 exons of EFEMP1 nor in exon 104 of hemicentin-1. The SNP analysis for hemicentin-1 on 1q31 suggests that variants within or in very close proximity to this gene cause ARMD

  13. Functional Complementation Analyses Reveal that the Single PRAT Family Protein of Trypanosoma brucei Is a Divergent Homolog of Tim17 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Weems, Ebony; Singha, Ujjal K.; Hamilton, VaNae; Smith, Joseph T.; Waegemann, Karin; Mokranjac, Dejana

    2015-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei, a parasitic protozoan that causes African trypanosomiasis, possesses a single member of the presequence and amino acid transporter (PRAT) protein family, which is referred to as TbTim17. In contrast, three homologous proteins, ScTim23, ScTim17, and ScTim22, are found in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and higher eukaryotes. Here, we show that TbTim17 cannot rescue Tim17, Tim23, or Tim22 mutants of S. cerevisiae. We expressed S. cerevisiae Tim23, Tim17, and Tim22 in T. brucei. These heterologous proteins were properly imported into mitochondria in the parasite. Further analysis revealed that although ScTim23 and ScTim17 were integrated into the mitochondrial inner membrane and assembled into a protein complex similar in size to TbTim17, only ScTim17 was stably associated with TbTim17. In contrast, ScTim22 existed as a protease-sensitive soluble protein in the T. brucei mitochondrion. In addition, the growth defect caused by TbTim17 knockdown in T. brucei was partially restored by the expression of ScTim17 but not by the expression of either ScTim23 or ScTim22, whereas the expression of TbTim17 fully complemented the growth defect caused by TbTim17 knockdown, as anticipated. Similar to the findings for cell growth, the defect in the import of mitochondrial proteins due to depletion of TbTim17 was in part restored by the expression of ScTim17 but was not complemented by the expression of either ScTim23 or ScTim22. Together, these results suggest that TbTim17 is divergent compared to ScTim23 but that its function is closer to that of ScTim17. In addition, ScTim22 could not be sorted properly in the T. brucei mitochondrion and thus failed to complement the function of TbTim17. PMID:25576485

  14. Global Mapping of Cell Type–Specific Open Chromatin by FAIRE-seq Reveals the Regulatory Role of the NFI Family in Adipocyte Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jing; Hirose-Yotsuya, Lisa; Take, Kazumi; Sun, Wei; Iwabu, Masato; Okada-Iwabu, Miki; Fujita, Takanori; Aoyama, Tomohisa; Tsutsumi, Shuichi; Ueki, Kohjiro; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Sakai, Juro; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Kadowaki, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Identification of regulatory elements within the genome is crucial for understanding the mechanisms that govern cell type–specific gene expression. We generated genome-wide maps of open chromatin sites in 3T3-L1 adipocytes (on day 0 and day 8 of differentiation) and NIH-3T3 fibroblasts using formaldehyde-assisted isolation of regulatory elements coupled with high-throughput sequencing (FAIRE-seq). FAIRE peaks at the promoter were associated with active transcription and histone modifications of H3K4me3 and H3K27ac. Non-promoter FAIRE peaks were characterized by H3K4me1+/me3-, the signature of enhancers, and were largely located in distal regions. The non-promoter FAIRE peaks showed dynamic change during differentiation, while the promoter FAIRE peaks were relatively constant. Functionally, the adipocyte- and preadipocyte-specific non-promoter FAIRE peaks were, respectively, associated with genes up-regulated and down-regulated by differentiation. Genes highly up-regulated during differentiation were associated with multiple clustered adipocyte-specific FAIRE peaks. Among the adipocyte-specific FAIRE peaks, 45.3% and 11.7% overlapped binding sites for, respectively, PPARγ and C/EBPα, the master regulators of adipocyte differentiation. Computational motif analyses of the adipocyte-specific FAIRE peaks revealed enrichment of a binding motif for nuclear family I (NFI) transcription factors. Indeed, ChIP assay showed that NFI occupy the adipocyte-specific FAIRE peaks and/or the PPARγ binding sites near PPARγ, C/EBPα, and aP2 genes. Overexpression of NFIA in 3T3-L1 cells resulted in robust induction of these genes and lipid droplet formation without differentiation stimulus. Overexpression of dominant-negative NFIA or siRNA–mediated knockdown of NFIA or NFIB significantly suppressed both induction of genes and lipid accumulation during differentiation, suggesting a physiological function of these factors in the adipogenic program. Together, our study

  15. Point Mutations in Exon 1B of APC Reveal Gastric Adenocarcinoma and Proximal Polyposis of the Stomach as a Familial Adenomatous Polyposis Variant.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Woods, Susan L; Healey, Sue; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Lee, Jason S; Sivakumaran, Haran; Wayte, Nicci; Nones, Katia; Waterfall, Joshua J; Pearson, John; Patch, Anne-Marie; Senz, Janine; Ferreira, Manuel A; Kaurah, Pardeep; Mackenzie, Robertson; Heravi-Moussavi, Alireza; Hansford, Samantha; Lannagan, Tamsin R M; Spurdle, Amanda B; Simpson, Peter T; da Silva, Leonard; Lakhani, Sunil R; Clouston, Andrew D; Bettington, Mark; Grimpen, Florian; Busuttil, Rita A; Di Costanzo, Natasha; Boussioutas, Alex; Jeanjean, Marie; Chong, George; Fabre, Aurélie; Olschwang, Sylviane; Faulkner, Geoffrey J; Bellos, Evangelos; Coin, Lachlan; Rioux, Kevin; Bathe, Oliver F; Wen, Xiaogang; Martin, Hilary C; Neklason, Deborah W; Davis, Sean R; Walker, Robert L; Calzone, Kathleen A; Avital, Itzhak; Heller, Theo; Koh, Christopher; Pineda, Marbin; Rudloff, Udo; Quezado, Martha; Pichurin, Pavel N; Hulick, Peter J; Weissman, Scott M; Newlin, Anna; Rubinstein, Wendy S; Sampson, Jone E; Hamman, Kelly; Goldgar, David; Poplawski, Nicola; Phillips, Kerry; Schofield, Lyn; Armstrong, Jacqueline; Kiraly-Borri, Cathy; Suthers, Graeme K; Huntsman, David G; Foulkes, William D; Carneiro, Fatima; Lindor, Noralane M; Edwards, Stacey L; French, Juliet D; Waddell, Nicola; Meltzer, Paul S; Worthley, Daniel L; Schrader, Kasmintan A; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia

    2016-05-05

    Gastric adenocarcinoma and proximal polyposis of the stomach (GAPPS) is an autosomal-dominant cancer-predisposition syndrome with a significant risk of gastric, but not colorectal, adenocarcinoma. We mapped the gene to 5q22 and found loss of the wild-type allele on 5q in fundic gland polyps from affected individuals. Whole-exome and -genome sequencing failed to find causal mutations but, through Sanger sequencing, we identified point mutations in APC promoter 1B that co-segregated with disease in all six families. The mutations reduced binding of the YY1 transcription factor and impaired activity of the APC promoter 1B in luciferase assays. Analysis of blood and saliva from carriers showed allelic imbalance of APC, suggesting that these mutations lead to decreased allele-specific expression in vivo. Similar mutations in APC promoter 1B occur in rare families with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). Promoter 1A is methylated in GAPPS and sporadic FGPs and in normal stomach, which suggests that 1B transcripts are more important than 1A in gastric mucosa. This might explain why all known GAPPS-affected families carry promoter 1B point mutations but only rare FAP-affected families carry similar mutations, the colonic cells usually being protected by the expression of the 1A isoform. Gastric polyposis and cancer have been previously described in some FAP-affected individuals with large deletions around promoter 1B. Our finding that GAPPS is caused by point mutations in the same promoter suggests that families with mutations affecting the promoter 1B are at risk of gastric adenocarcinoma, regardless of whether or not colorectal polyps are present.

  16. Point Mutations in Exon 1B of APC Reveal Gastric Adenocarcinoma and Proximal Polyposis of the Stomach as a Familial Adenomatous Polyposis Variant

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Woods, Susan L.; Healey, Sue; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Lee, Jason S.; Sivakumaran, Haran; Wayte, Nicci; Nones, Katia; Waterfall, Joshua J.; Pearson, John; Patch, Anne-Marie; Senz, Janine; Ferreira, Manuel A.; Kaurah, Pardeep; Mackenzie, Robertson; Heravi-Moussavi, Alireza; Hansford, Samantha; Lannagan, Tamsin R.M.; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Simpson, Peter T.; da Silva, Leonard; Lakhani, Sunil R.; Clouston, Andrew D.; Bettington, Mark; Grimpen, Florian; Busuttil, Rita A.; Di Costanzo, Natasha; Boussioutas, Alex; Jeanjean, Marie; Chong, George; Fabre, Aurélie; Olschwang, Sylviane; Faulkner, Geoffrey J.; Bellos, Evangelos; Coin, Lachlan; Rioux, Kevin; Bathe, Oliver F.; Wen, Xiaogang; Martin, Hilary C.; Neklason, Deborah W.; Davis, Sean R.; Walker, Robert L.; Calzone, Kathleen A.; Avital, Itzhak; Heller, Theo; Koh, Christopher; Pineda, Marbin; Rudloff, Udo; Quezado, Martha; Pichurin, Pavel N.; Hulick, Peter J.; Weissman, Scott M.; Newlin, Anna; Rubinstein, Wendy S.; Sampson, Jone E.; Hamman, Kelly; Goldgar, David; Poplawski, Nicola; Phillips, Kerry; Schofield, Lyn; Armstrong, Jacqueline; Kiraly-Borri, Cathy; Suthers, Graeme K.; Huntsman, David G.; Foulkes, William D.; Carneiro, Fatima; Lindor, Noralane M.; Edwards, Stacey L.; French, Juliet D.; Waddell, Nicola; Meltzer, Paul S.; Worthley, Daniel L.; Schrader, Kasmintan A.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia

    2016-01-01

    Gastric adenocarcinoma and proximal polyposis of the stomach (GAPPS) is an autosomal-dominant cancer-predisposition syndrome with a significant risk of gastric, but not colorectal, adenocarcinoma. We mapped the gene to 5q22 and found loss of the wild-type allele on 5q in fundic gland polyps from affected individuals. Whole-exome and -genome sequencing failed to find causal mutations but, through Sanger sequencing, we identified point mutations in APC promoter 1B that co-segregated with disease in all six families. The mutations reduced binding of the YY1 transcription factor and impaired activity of the APC promoter 1B in luciferase assays. Analysis of blood and saliva from carriers showed allelic imbalance of APC, suggesting that these mutations lead to decreased allele-specific expression in vivo. Similar mutations in APC promoter 1B occur in rare families with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). Promoter 1A is methylated in GAPPS and sporadic FGPs and in normal stomach, which suggests that 1B transcripts are more important than 1A in gastric mucosa. This might explain why all known GAPPS-affected families carry promoter 1B point mutations but only rare FAP-affected families carry similar mutations, the colonic cells usually being protected by the expression of the 1A isoform. Gastric polyposis and cancer have been previously described in some FAP-affected individuals with large deletions around promoter 1B. Our finding that GAPPS is caused by point mutations in the same promoter suggests that families with mutations affecting the promoter 1B are at risk of gastric adenocarcinoma, regardless of whether or not colorectal polyps are present. PMID:27087319

  17. Molecular cloning of the microtubule-associated mechanochemical enzyme dynamin reveals homology with a new family of GTP-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Obar, R A; Collins, C A; Hammarback, J A; Shpetner, H S; Vallee, R B

    1990-09-20

    A complementary DNA encoding the D100 polypeptide of rat brain dynamin--a force-producing, microtubule-activated nucleotide triphosphatase--has been cloned and sequenced. The predicted amino acid sequence includes a guanine nucleotide-binding domain that is homologous with those of a family of antiviral factors, inducible by interferon and known as Mx proteins, and with the product of the essential yeast vacuolar protein sorting gene VPS1. These relationships imply the existence of a new family of GTPases with physiological roles that may include microtubule-based motility and protein sorting.

  18. The structure of SSO2064, the first representative of Pfam family PF01796, reveals a novel two-domain zinc-ribbon OB-fold architecture with a potential acyl-CoA-binding role

    PubMed Central

    Krishna, S. Sri; Aravind, L.; Bakolitsa, Constantina; Caruthers, Jonathan; Carlton, Dennis; Miller, Mitchell D.; Abdubek, Polat; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Clayton, Thomas; Deller, Marc C.; Duan, Lian; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grant, Joanna C.; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Kumar, Abhinav; Marciano, David; McMullan, Daniel; Morse, Andrew T.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Okach, Linda; Reyes, Ron; Rife, Christopher L.; van den Bedem, Henry; Weekes, Dana; Xu, Qingping; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Elsliger, Marc-André; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2010-01-01

    SSO2064 is the first structural representative of PF01796 (DUF35), a large prokaryotic family with a wide phylogenetic distribution. The structure reveals a novel two-domain architecture comprising an N-terminal, rubredoxin-like, zinc ribbon and a C-terminal, oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding (OB) fold domain. Additional N-terminal helical segments may be involved in protein–protein interactions. Domain architectures, genomic context analysis and functional evidence from certain bacterial representatives of this family suggest that these proteins form a novel fatty-acid-binding component that is involved in the biosynthesis of lipids and polyketide antibiotics and that they possibly function as acyl-CoA-binding proteins. This structure has led to a re-evaluation of the DUF35 family, which has now been split into two entries in the latest Pfam release (v.24.0). PMID:20944206

  19. Screening of DFNB3 in Iranian families with autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss reveals a novel pathogenic mutation in the MyTh4 domain of the MYO15A gene in a linked family

    PubMed Central

    Reiisi, Somayeh; Tabatabaiefar, Mohammad Amin; Sanati, Mohammad Hosein; Chaleshtori, Morteza Hashemzadeh

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Non-syndromic sensorineural hearing loss (NSHL) is a common disorder affecting approximately 1 in 500 newborns. This type of hearing loss is extremely heterogeneous and includes over 100 loci. Mutations in the GJB2 gene have been implicated in about half of autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss (ARNSHL) cases, making this the most common cause of ARNSHL. For the latter form of deafness, most frequent genes proposed include GJB2, SLC26A4, MYO15A, OTOF, and CDH23 worldwide. Materials and Methods: The aim of the present study was to define the role and frequency of MYO15A gene mutation in Iranian families. In this study 30 Iranian families were enrolled with over three deaf children and negative for GJB2. Then linkage analysis was performed by six DFNB3 short tandem repeat markers. Following that, mutation detection accomplished using DNA sequencing. Results: One family (3.33%) showed linkage to DFNB3 and a novel mutation was identified in the MYO15A gene (c.6442T>A): as the disease-causing mutation. Mutation co-segregated with hearing loss in the family but was not present in the 100 ethnicity-matched controls. Conclusion: Our results confirmed that the hearing loss of the linked Iranian family was caused by a novel missense mutation in the MYO15A gene. This mutation is the first to be reported in the world and affects the first MyTH4 domain of the protein. PMID:27635202

  20. Linear ion-trap MSn with high resolution mass spectrometry reveals structural diversity of epidermal 1-O-acyl ceramide family in mouse epidermis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Meei-Hua; Miner, Jeffery; Turk, John; Hsu, Fong-Fu

    2017-02-02

    1-O-acylceramide is a new class of epidermal ceramide found in humans and mice. Here, we report ESI linear ion-trap (LIT) multiple stage mass spectrometric (MSn) approach with high resolution towards structural characterization of this lipid family isolated from mice. Molecular species desorbed as the [M + H]+ ions was subjected to LIT MS2 to yield predominately the [M + H - H2O]+ ions, followed by MS3 to cleave the 1-O-acyl residue to yield the [M + H - H2O - (1-O-fatty acid)]+ ions. The structures of the N-acyl chain and long-chain base (LCB) of the molecule were determined by MS4 on ([M + H - H2O - (1-O-fatty acid)]+) ions that yielded multiple sets of specific ions. Using this approach, isomers varied in the 1-O-acyl (from 14:0- to 26:0-O-acyl) and N-acyl chains (from 20:0- to 26:0-N-acyl) with 18:1-sphingosine as the major LCB were found for the entire family. Minor isomers consisting of 16:1- 17:1-, 18:2-, and 19:1-sphingosine LCB, with odd fatty acyl chain, or with monounsaturated N- or O- fatty acyl substituents were also identified. An estimation of more than 700 1-O-acylceramide species, largely isobaric isomers are present, underscoring the complexity of this ceramide family.

  1. Karyotype stability in the family Issidae (Hemiptera, Auchenorrhyncha) revealed by chromosome techniques and FISH with telomeric (TTAGG)n and 18S rDNA probes

    PubMed Central

    Maryańska-Nadachowska, Anna; Anokhin, Boris A.; Gnezdilov, Vladimir M.; Kuznetsova, Valentina G.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We report several chromosomal traits in 11 species from 8 genera of the planthopper family Issidae, the tribes Issini, Parahiraciini and Hemisphaeriini. All species present a 2n = 27, X(0) chromosome complement known to be ancestral for the family. The karyotype is conserved in structure and consists of a pair of very large autosomes; the remaining chromosomes gradually decrease in size and the X chromosome is one of the smallest in the complement. For selected species, analyses based on C-, AgNOR- and CMA3-banding techniques were also carried out. By fluorescence in situ hybridization, the (TTAGG)n probe identified telomeres in all species, and the major rDNA loci were detected on the largest pair of autosomes. In most species, ribosomal loci were found in an interstitial position while in two species they were located in telomeric regions suggesting that chromosomal rearrangements involving the rDNA segments occurred in the evolution of the family Issidae. Furthermore, for 8 species the number of testicular follicles is provided for the first time. PMID:27830046

  2. Quantitative label-free phosphoproteomics of six different life stages of the late blight pathogen Phytophthora infestans reveals abundant phosphorylation of members of the CRN effector family.

    PubMed

    Resjö, Svante; Ali, Ashfaq; Meijer, Harold J G; Seidl, Michael F; Snel, Berend; Sandin, Marianne; Levander, Fredrik; Govers, Francine; Andreasson, Erik

    2014-04-04

    The oomycete Phytophthora infestans is the causal agent of late blight in potato and tomato. Since the underlying processes that govern pathogenicity and development in P. infestans are largely unknown, we have performed a large-scale phosphoproteomics study of six different P. infestans life stages. We have obtained quantitative data for 2922 phosphopeptides and compared their abundance. Life-stage-specific phosphopeptides include ATP-binding cassette transporters and a kinase that only occurs in appressoria. In an extended data set, we identified 2179 phosphorylation sites and deduced 22 phosphomotifs. Several of the phosphomotifs matched consensus sequences of kinases that occur in P. infestans but not Arabidopsis. In addition, we detected tyrosine phosphopeptides that are potential targets of kinases resembling mammalian tyrosine kinases. Among the phosphorylated proteins are members of the RXLR and Crinkler effector families. The latter are phosphorylated in several life stages and at multiple positions, in sites that are conserved between different members of the Crinkler family. This indicates that proteins in the Crinkler family have functions beyond their putative role as (necrosis-inducing) effectors. This phosphoproteomics data will be instrumental for studies on oomycetes and host-oomycete interactions. The data sets have been deposited to ProteomeXchange (identifier PXD000433).

  3. Proteomic Plasma Membrane Profiling Reveals an Essential Role for gp96 in the Cell Surface Expression of LDLR Family Members, Including the LDL Receptor and LRP6

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum chaperone gp96 is required for the cell surface expression of a narrow range of proteins, including toll-like receptors (TLRs) and integrins. To identify a more comprehensive repertoire of proteins whose cell surface expression is dependent on gp96, we developed plasma membrane profiling (PMP), a technique that combines SILAC labeling with selective cell surface aminooxy-biotinylation. This approach allowed us to compare the relative abundance of plasma membrane (PM) proteins on gp96-deficient versus gp96-reconstituted murine pre-B cells. Analysis of unfractionated tryptic peptides initially identified 113 PM proteins, which extended to 706 PM proteins using peptide prefractionation. We confirmed a requirement for gp96 in the cell surface expression of certain TLRs and integrins and found a marked decrease in cell surface expression of four members of the extended LDL receptor family (LDLR, LRP6, Sorl1 and LRP8) in the absence of gp96. Other novel gp96 client proteins included CD180/Ly86, important in the B-cell response to lipopolysaccharide. We highlight common structural motifs in these client proteins that may be recognized by gp96, including the beta-propeller and leucine-rich repeat. This study therefore identifies the extended LDL receptor family as an important new family of proteins whose cell surface expression is regulated by gp96. PMID:22292497

  4. Characterization of Bipolar Disorder Patient-Specific Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from a Family Reveals Neurodevelopmental and mRNA Expression Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Madison, Jon M.; Zhou, Fen; Nigam, Aparna; Hussain, Ali; Barker, Douglas D.; Nehme, Ralda; van der Ven, Karlijn; Hsu, Jenny; Wolf, Pavlina; Fleishman, Morgan; O’Dushlaine, Colm; Rose, Sam; Chambert, Kimberly; Lau, Frank H.; Ahfeldt, Tim; Rueckert, Erroll H.; Sheridan, Steven D.; Fass, Daniel M.; Nemesh, James; Mullen, Thomas E.; Daheron, Laurence; McCarroll, Steve; Sklar, Pamela; Perlis, Roy H.; Haggarty, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a common neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by chronic recurrent episodes of depression and mania. Despite evidence for high heritability of BD, little is known about its underlying pathophysiology. To develop new tools for investigating the molecular and cellular basis of BD we applied a family-based paradigm to derive and characterize a set of 12 induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines from a quartet consisting of two BD-affected brothers and their two unaffected parents. Initially, no significant phenotypic differences were observed between iPSCs derived from the different family members. However, upon directed neural differentiation we observed that CXCR4 (CXC chemokine receptor-4) expressing central nervous system (CNS) neural progenitor cells (NPCs) from both BD patients compared to their unaffected parents exhibited multiple phenotypic differences at the level of neurogenesis and expression of genes critical for neuroplasticity, including WNT pathway components and ion channel subunits. Treatment of the CXCR4+ NPCs with a pharmacological inhibitor of glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3), a known regulator of WNT signaling, was found to rescue a progenitor proliferation deficit in the BD-patient NPCs. Taken together, these studies provide new cellular tools for dissecting the pathophysiology of BD and evidence for dysregulation of key pathways involved in neurodevelopment and neuroplasticity. Future generation of additional iPSCs following a family-based paradigm for modeling complex neuropsychiatric disorders in conjunction with in-depth phenotyping holds promise for providing insights into the pathophysiological substrates of BD and is likely to inform the development of targeted therapeutics for its treatment and ideally prevention. PMID:25733313

  5. Analysis of Family Structures Reveals Robustness or Sensitivity of Bursting Activity to Parameter Variations in a Half-Center Oscillator (HCO) Model

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The underlying mechanisms that support robustness in neuronal networks are as yet unknown. However, recent studies provide evidence that neuronal networks are robust to natural variations, modulation, and environmental perturbations of parameters, such as maximal conductances of intrinsic membrane and synaptic currents. Here we sought a method for assessing robustness, which might easily be applied to large brute-force databases of model instances. Starting with groups of instances with appropriate activity (e.g., tonic spiking), our method classifies instances into much smaller subgroups, called families, in which all members vary only by the one parameter that defines the family. By analyzing the structures of families, we developed measures of robustness for activity type. Then, we applied these measures to our previously developed model database, HCO-db, of a two-neuron half-center oscillator (HCO), a neuronal microcircuit from the leech heartbeat central pattern generator where the appropriate activity type is alternating bursting. In HCO-db, the maximal conductances of five intrinsic and two synaptic currents were varied over eight values (leak reversal potential also varied, five values). We focused on how variations of particular conductance parameters maintain normal alternating bursting activity while still allowing for functional modulation of period and spike frequency. We explored the trade-off between robustness of activity type and desirable change in activity characteristics when intrinsic conductances are altered and identified the hyperpolarization-activated (h) current as an ideal target for modulation. We also identified ensembles of model instances that closely approximate physiological activity and can be used in future modeling studies. PMID:27595135

  6. Genome-Wide Transcription Profiles Reveal Genotype-Dependent Responses of Biological Pathways and Gene-Families in Daphnia Exposed to Single and Mixed Stressors

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated the possibilities and limitations of implementing a genome-wide transcription-based approach that takes into account genetic and environmental variation to better understand the response of natural populations to stressors. When exposing two different Daphnia pulex genotypes (a cadmium-sensitive and a cadmium-tolerant one) to cadmium, the toxic cyanobacteria Microcystis aeruginosa, and their mixture, we found that observations at the transcriptomic level do not always explain observations at a higher level (growth, reproduction). For example, although cadmium elicited an adverse effect at the organismal level, almost no genes were differentially expressed after cadmium exposure. In addition, we identified oxidative stress and polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolism-related pathways, as well as trypsin and neurexin IV gene-families as candidates for the underlying causes of genotypic differences in tolerance to Microcystis. Furthermore, the whole-genome transcriptomic data of a stressor mixture allowed a better understanding of mixture responses by evaluating interactions between two stressors at the gene-expression level against the independent action baseline model. This approach has indicated that ubiquinone pathway and the MAPK serine-threonine protein kinase and collagens gene-families were enriched with genes showing an interactive effect in expression response to exposure to the mixture of the stressors, while transcription and translation-related pathways and gene-families were mostly related with genotypic differences in interactive responses to this mixture. Collectively, our results indicate that the methods we employed may improve further characterization of the possibilities and limitations of transcriptomics approaches in the adverse outcome pathway framework and in predictions of multistressor effects on natural populations. PMID:24552364

  7. Characterization of DNA Binding Sites of RokB, a ROK-Family Regulator from Streptomyces coelicolor Reveals the RokB Regulon

    PubMed Central

    Bekiesch, Paulina; Forchhammer, Karl; Apel, Alexander Kristian

    2016-01-01

    ROK-family proteins have been described to act either as sugar kinases or as transcriptional regulators. Few ROK-family regulators have been characterized so far and most of them are involved in carbon catabolite repression. RokB (Sco6115) has originally been identified in a DNA-affinity capturing approach as a possible regulator of the heterologously expressed novobiocin biosynthetic gene cluster in Streptomyces coelicolor M512. Interestingly, both, the rokB deletion mutants as well as its overexpressing mutants showed significantly reduced novobiocin production in the host strain S.coelicolor M512. We identified the DNA-binding site for RokB in the promoter region of the novobiocin biosynthetic genes novH-novW. It overlaps with the novH start codon which may explain the reduction of novobiocin production caused by overexpression of rokB. Bioinformatic screening coupled with surface plasmon resonance based interaction studies resulted in the discovery of five RokB binding sites within the genome of S. coelicolor. Using the genomic binding sites, a consensus motif for RokB was calculated, which differs slightly from previously determined binding motifs for ROK-family regulators. The annotations of the possible members of the so defined RokB regulon gave hints that RokB might be involved in amino acid metabolism and transport. This hypothesis was supported by feeding experiments with casamino acids and L-tyrosine, which could also explain the reduced novobiocin production in the deletion mutants. PMID:27145180

  8. Crystal structure of a member of a novel family of dioxygenases (PF10014) reveals a conserved cupin fold and active site

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qingping; Grant, Joanna; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Farr, Carol L.; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Knuth, Mark W.; Miller, Mitchell D.; Lesley, Scott A.; Godzik, Adam; Elsliger, Marc-André; Deacon, Ashley M.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2014-01-01

    PF10014 is a novel family of 2-oxyglutarate-Fe2+-dependent dioxygenases that are involved in biosynthesis of antibiotics and regulation of biofilm formation, likely by catalyzing hydroxylation of free amino acids or other related ligands. The crystal structure of a PF10014 member from Methylibium petroleiphilum at 1.9 Å resolution shows strong structural similarity to cupin dioxygenases in overall fold and active site, despite very remote homology. However, one of the β-strands of the cupin catalytic core is replaced by a loop that displays conformational isomerism that likely regulates the active site. PMID:23852666

  9. Crystal structure of a member of a novel family of dioxygenases (PF10014) reveals a conserved cupin fold and active site.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qingping; Grant, Joanna; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Farr, Carol L; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Knuth, Mark W; Miller, Mitchell D; Lesley, Scott A; Godzik, Adam; Elsliger, Marc-André; Deacon, Ashley M; Wilson, Ian A

    2014-01-01

    PF10014 is a novel family of 2-oxyglutarate-Fe(2+) -dependent dioxygenases that are involved in biosynthesis of antibiotics and regulation of biofilm formation, likely by catalyzing hydroxylation of free amino acids or other related ligands. The crystal structure of a PF10014 member from Methylibium petroleiphilum at 1.9 Å resolution shows strong structural similarity to cupin dioxygenases in overall fold and active site, despite very remote homology. However, one of the β-strands of the cupin catalytic core is replaced by a loop that displays conformational isomerism that likely regulates the active site.

  10. A one-generation cluster of malignant mesothelioma within a family reveals exposure to asbestos-contaminated jute bags in Naples, Italy.

    PubMed

    Ascoli, V; Carnovale-Scalzo, C; Nardi, F; Efrati, C; Menegozzo, M

    2003-01-01

    Substantial evidence supports the role of asbestos in malignant mesothelioma. Clustering for this malignancy among relatives not only suggests genetic susceptibility as a relevant component but also provides a clue to investigate non-occupational sources of exposure. We identified five cases of malignant mesothelioma within one family with exposure to asbestos experienced during childhood, as 'next door' residents of a workshop recycling asbestos-contaminated jute sacks in Naples, Italy. This cluster discloses the health risk in the reuse of bags that previously had contained asbestos. Furthermore, it emphasizes the role of asbestos in the genetic-environmental interaction issue of malignant mesothelioma.

  11. Genome-wide identification and comparative expression analysis reveal a rapid expansion and functional divergence of duplicated genes in the WRKY gene family of cabbage, Brassica oleracea var. capitata.

    PubMed

    Yao, Qiu-Yang; Xia, En-Hua; Liu, Fei-Hu; Gao, Li-Zhi

    2015-02-15

    WRKY transcription factors (TFs), one of the ten largest TF families in higher plants, play important roles in regulating plant development and resistance. To date, little is known about the WRKY TF family in Brassica oleracea. Recently, the completed genome sequence of cabbage (B. oleracea var. capitata) allows us to systematically analyze WRKY genes in this species. A total of 148 WRKY genes were characterized and classified into seven subgroups that belong to three major groups. Phylogenetic and synteny analyses revealed that the repertoire of cabbage WRKY genes was derived from a common ancestor shared with Arabidopsis thaliana. The B. oleracea WRKY genes were found to be preferentially retained after the whole-genome triplication (WGT) event in its recent ancestor, suggesting that the WGT event had largely contributed to a rapid expansion of the WRKY gene family in B. oleracea. The analysis of RNA-Seq data from various tissues (i.e., roots, stems, leaves, buds, flowers and siliques) revealed that most of the identified WRKY genes were positively expressed in cabbage, and a large portion of them exhibited patterns of differential and tissue-specific expression, demonstrating that these gene members might play essential roles in plant developmental processes. Comparative analysis of the expression level among duplicated genes showed that gene expression divergence was evidently presented among cabbage WRKY paralogs, indicating functional divergence of these duplicated WRKY genes.

  12. Characterization of multigene families in the micronuclear genome of Paramecium tetraurelia reveals a germline specific sequence in an intron of a centrin gene.

    PubMed Central

    Vayssié, L; Sperling, L; Madeddu, L

    1997-01-01

    In Paramecium, as in other ciliates, the transcriptionally active macronucleus is derived from the germline micronucleus by programmed DNA rearrangements, which include the precise excision of thousands of germline-specific sequences (internal eliminated sequences, IESs). We report the characterization of micronuclear versions of genes encoding Paramecium secretory granule proteins (trichocyst matrix proteins, TMPs) and Paramecium centrins. TMP and centrin multigene families, previously studied in the macronuclear genome, consist of genes that are co-expressed to provide mixtures of related polypeptides that co-assemble to form respectively the crystalline trichocyst matrix and the infraciliary lattice, a contractile cytoskeletal network. We present evidence that TMP and centrin genes identified in the macronucleus are also present in the micronucleus, ruling out the possibility that these novel multigene families are generated by somatic rearrangements during macronuclear development. No IESs were found in TMP genes, however, four IESs in or near germline centrin genes were characterized. The only intragenic IES is 75 bp in size, interrupts a 29 bp intron and is absent from at least one other closely related centrin gene. This is the first report of an IES in an intron in Paramecium. PMID:9023115

  13. Expression of human Cfdp1 gene in Drosophila reveals new insights into the function of the evolutionarily conserved BCNT protein family

    PubMed Central

    Messina, Giovanni; Atterrato, Maria Teresa; Fanti, Laura; Giordano, Ennio; Dimitri, Patrizio

    2016-01-01

    The Bucentaur (BCNT) protein family is widely distributed in eukaryotes and is characterized by a highly conserved C-terminal domain. This family was identified two decades ago in ruminants, but its role(s) remained largely unknown. Investigating cellular functions and mechanism of action of BCNT proteins is challenging, because they have been implicated in human craniofacial development. Recently, we found that YETI, the D. melanogaster BCNT, is a chromatin factor that participates to H2A.V deposition. Here we report the effects of in vivo expression of CFDP1, the human BCNT protein, in Drosophila melanogaster. We show that CFDP1, similarly to YETI, binds to chromatin and its expression results in a wide range of abnormalities highly reminiscent of those observed in Yeti null mutants. This indicates that CFDP1 expressed in flies behaves in a dominant negative fashion disrupting the YETI function. Moreover, GST pull-down provides evidence indicating that 1) both YETI and CFDP1 undergo homodimerization and 2) YETI and CFDP1 physically interact each other by forming inactive heterodimers that would trigger the observed dominant-negative effect. Overall, our findings highlight unanticipated evidences suggesting that homodimerization mediated by the BCNT domain is integral to the chromatin functions of BCNT proteins. PMID:27151176

  14. Mutation analysis of the gene encoding Bruton`s tyrosine kinase in a family with a sporadic case of X-linked agammaglobulinemia reveals three female carriers

    SciTech Connect

    Hagemann, T.L.; Kwan, Sau-Ping; Assa`ad, A.H.

    1995-11-06

    Bruton`s tyrosine kinase (Btk) has been identified as the protein responsible for the primary immunodeficiency X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA). We and others have cloned the gene for Btk and recently reported the genomic organization. Nineteen exons were positioned within the 37 kb gene. With the sequence data derived from our genomic map, we have designed a PCR based assay to directly identify mutations of the Btk gene in germline DNA of patients with XLA. In this report, the assay was used to analyze a family with a sporadic case of XLA to determine if other female relatives carry the disease. A four base-pair deletion was found in the DNA of the affected boy and was further traced through three generations. With the direct identification of the mutations responsible for XLA, we can now diagnose conclusively the disease and identify the immunologically normal female carriers. This same technique can easily be applied to prenatal diagnosis in families where the mutation can be identified. 34 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Characterization of five subgroups of the sieve element occlusion gene family in Glycine max reveals genes encoding non-forisome P-proteins, forisomes and forisome tails.

    PubMed

    Zielonka, Sascia; Ernst, Antonia M; Hawat, Susan; Twyman, Richard M; Prüfer, Dirk; Noll, Gundula A

    2014-09-01

    P-proteins are structural phloem proteins discussed to be involved in the rapid sealing of injured sieve elements. P-proteins are found in all dicotyledonous and some monocotyledonous plants, but additional crystalloid P-proteins, known as forisomes, have evolved solely in the Fabaceae. Both types are encoded by members of the sieve element occlusion (SEO) gene family, which comprises seven phylogenetic subgroups. The Fabaceae-specific subgroup 1 contains genes encoding forisome subunits in e.g. Medicago truncatula, Vicia faba, Dipteryx panamensis and Canavalia gladiata whereas basal subgroup 5 encodes P-proteins in Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco) and Arabidopsis thaliana. The function of remaining subgroups is still unknown. We chose Glycine max (soybean) as a model to investigate SEO proteins representing different subgroups in one species. We isolated native P-proteins to determine the SEO protein composition and analyzed the expression pattern, localization and structure of the G. max SEO proteins representing five of the subgroups. We found that subgroup 1 GmSEO genes encode forisome subunits, a member of subgroup 5 encodes a non-forisome P-protein and subgroup 2 GmSEO genes encode the components of forisome tails, which are present in a restricted selection of Fabaceaen species. We therefore present the first molecular characterization of a Fabaceae non-forisome P-protein and the first evidence that forisome tails are encoded by a phylogenetically-distinct branch of the SEO gene family.

  16. Importance of gene duplication in the evolution of genomic imprinting revealed by molecular evolutionary analysis of the type I MADS-box gene family in Arabidopsis species.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Takanori; Kawabe, Akira

    2013-01-01

    The pattern of molecular evolution of imprinted genes is controversial and the entire picture is still to be unveiled. Recently, a relationship between the formation of imprinted genes and gene duplication was reported in genome-wide survey of imprinted genes in Arabidopsis thaliana. Because gene duplications influence the molecular evolution of the duplicated gene family, it is necessary to investigate both the pattern of molecular evolution and the possible relationship between gene duplication and genomic imprinting for a better understanding of evolutionary aspects of imprinted genes. In this study, we investigated the evolutionary changes of type I MADS-box genes that include imprinted genes by using relative species of Arabidopsis thaliana (two subspecies of A. lyrata and three subspecies of A. halleri). A duplicated gene family enables us to compare DNA sequences between imprinted genes and its homologs. We found an increased number of gene duplications within species in clades containing the imprinted genes, further supporting the hypothesis that local gene duplication is one of the driving forces for the formation of imprinted genes. Moreover, data obtained by phylogenetic analysis suggested "rapid evolution" of not only imprinted genes but also its closely related orthologous genes, which implies the effect of gene duplication on molecular evolution of imprinted genes.

  17. Evolutionary dynamics and biogeography of Musaceae reveal a correlation between the diversification of the banana family and the geological and climatic history of Southeast Asia.

    PubMed

    Janssens, Steven B; Vandelook, Filip; De Langhe, Edmond; Verstraete, Brecht; Smets, Erik; Vandenhouwe, Ines; Swennen, Rony

    2016-06-01

    Tropical Southeast Asia, which harbors most of the Musaceae biodiversity, is one of the most species-rich regions in the world. Its high degree of endemism is shaped by the region's tectonic and climatic history, with large differences between northern Indo-Burma and the Malayan Archipelago. Here, we aim to find a link between the diversification and biogeography of Musaceae and geological history of the Southeast Asian subcontinent. The Musaceae family (including five Ensete, 45 Musa and one Musella species) was dated using a large phylogenetic framework encompassing 163 species from all Zingiberales families. Evolutionary patterns within Musaceae were inferred using ancestral area reconstruction and diversification rate analyses. All three Musaceae genera - Ensete, Musa and Musella - originated in northern Indo-Burma during the early Eocene. Musa species dispersed from 'northwest to southeast' into Southeast Asia with only few back-dispersals towards northern Indo-Burma. Musaceae colonization events of the Malayan Archipelago subcontinent are clearly linked to the geological and climatic history of the region. Musa species were only able to colonize the region east of Wallace's line after the availability of emergent land from the late Miocene onwards.

  18. Genetic diversity among Frankia strains nodulating members of the family Casuarinaceae in Australia revealed by PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis with crushed root nodules.

    PubMed

    Rouvier, C; Prin, Y; Reddell, P; Normand, P; Simonet, P

    1996-03-01

    DNA extracted directly from nodules was used to assess the genetic diversity of Frankia strains symbiotically associated with two species of the genus Casuarina and two of the genus Allocasuarina naturally occurring in northeastern Australia. DNA from field-collected nodules or extracted from reference cultures of Casuarina-infective Frankia strains was used as the template in PCRs with primers targeting two DNA regions, one in the ribosomal operon and the other in the nif operon. PCR products were then analyzed by using a set of restriction endonucleases. Five distinct genetic groups were recognized on the basis of these restriction patterns. These groups were consistently associated with the host species from which the nodules originated. All isolated reference strains had similar patterns and were assigned to group 1 along with six of the eight unisolated Frankia strains from Casuarina equisetifolia in Australia. Group 2 consisted of two unisolated Frankia strains from C. equisetifolia, whereas groups 3 to 5 comprised all unisolated strains from Casuarina cunninghamiana, Allocasuarina torulosa, and Allocasuarina littoralis, respectively. These results demonstrate that, contrary to the results of previous molecular studies of isolated strains, there is genetic diversity among Frankia strains that infect members of the family Casuarinacaeae. The apparent high homogeneity of Frankia strains in these previous studies probably relates to the single host species from which the strains were obtained and the origin of these strains from areas outside the natural geographic range of members of the family Casuarinaceae, where genetic diversity could be lower than in Australia.

  19. A comparative metagenome survey of the fecal microbiota of a breast- and a plant-fed Asian elephant reveals an unexpectedly high diversity of glycoside hydrolase family enzymes.

    PubMed

    Ilmberger, Nele; Güllert, Simon; Dannenberg, Joana; Rabausch, Ulrich; Torres, Jeremy; Wemheuer, Bernd; Alawi, Malik; Poehlein, Anja; Chow, Jennifer; Turaev, Dimitrij; Rattei, Thomas; Schmeisser, Christel; Salomon, Jesper; Olsen, Peter B; Daniel, Rolf; Grundhoff, Adam; Borchert, Martin S; Streit, Wolfgang R

    2014-01-01

    A phylogenetic and metagenomic study of elephant feces samples (derived from a three-weeks-old and a six-years-old Asian elephant) was conducted in order to describe the microbiota inhabiting this large land-living animal. The microbial diversity was examined via 16S rRNA gene analysis. We generated more than 44,000 GS-FLX+454 reads for each animal. For the baby elephant, 380 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were identified at 97% sequence identity level; in the six-years-old animal, close to 3,000 OTUs were identified, suggesting high microbial diversity in the older animal. In both animals most OTUs belonged to Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes. Additionally, for the baby elephant a high number of Proteobacteria was detected. A metagenomic sequencing approach using Illumina technology resulted in the generation of 1.1 Gbp assembled DNA in contigs with a maximum size of 0.6 Mbp. A KEGG pathway analysis suggested high metabolic diversity regarding the use of polymers and aromatic and non-aromatic compounds. In line with the high phylogenetic diversity, a surprising and not previously described biodiversity of glycoside hydrolase (GH) genes was found. Enzymes of 84 GH families were detected. Polysaccharide utilization loci (PULs), which are found in Bacteroidetes, were highly abundant in the dataset; some of these comprised cellulase genes. Furthermore the highest coverage for GH5 and GH9 family enzymes was detected for Bacteroidetes, suggesting that bacteria of this phylum are mainly responsible for the degradation of cellulose in the Asian elephant. Altogether, this study delivers insight into the biomass conversion by one of the largest plant-fed and land-living animals.

  20. A proteomic approach reveals transient association of reticulocalbin-3, a novel member of the CREC family, with the precursor of subtilisin-like proprotein convertase, PACE4.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Akihiko; Kikuchi, Yayoi; Sato, Yukimi; Koide, Shizuyo; Yuasa, Keizo; Nagahama, Masami; Matsuda, Yoshiko

    2006-05-15

    SPCs (subtilisin-like proprotein convertases) are a family of seven structurally related serine endoproteases that are involved in the proteolytic activation of proproteins. In an effort to examine the substrate protein for PACE4 (paired basic amino-acid-cleaving enzyme-4), an SPC, a potent protein inhibitor of PACE4, an alpha1-antitrypsin RVRR (Arg-Val-Arg-Arg) variant, was expressed in GH4C1 cells. Ectopic expression of the RVRR variant caused accumulation of the 48 kDa protein in cells. Sequence analysis indicates that the 48 kDa protein is a putative Ca2+-binding protein, RCN-3 (reticulocalbin-3), which had previously been predicted by bioinformatic analysis of cDNA from the human hypothalamus. RCN-3 is a member of the CREC (Cab45/reticulocalbin/ERC45/calumenin) family of multiple EF-hand Ca2+-binding proteins localized to the secretory pathway. The most interesting feature of the RCN-3 sequence is the presence of five Arg-Xaa-Xaa-Arg motifs, which represents the target sequence of SPCs. Biosynthetic studies showed that RCN-3 is transiently associated with proPACE4, but not with mature PACE4. Inhibition of PACE4 maturation by a Ca2+ ionophore resulted in accumulation of the proPACE4-RCN-3 complex in cells. Furthermore, autoactivation and secretion of PACE4 was increased upon co-expression with RCN-3. Our findings suggest that selective and transient association of RCN-3 with the precursor of PACE4 plays an important role in the biosynthesis of PACE4.

  1. The characterization of the soybean polygalacturonase-inhibiting proteins (Pgip) gene family reveals that a single member is responsible for the activity detected in soybean tissues.

    PubMed

    D'Ovidio, R; Roberti, S; Di Giovanni, M; Capodicasa, C; Melaragni, M; Sella, L; Tosi, P; Favaron, F

    2006-08-01

    Polygalacturonase-inhibiting proteins (PGIPs) are leucine-rich repeat (LRR) proteins that inhibit fungal endopolygalacturonases (PGs). They are encoded by multigene families whose members show functional redundancy and subfunctionalization for recognition of fungal PGs. In order to expand the information on the structure and functional features of legume PGIP, we have isolated and characterized four members of the soybean Pgip gene family and determined the properties of the encoded protein products. Sequence analysis showed that these genes form two clusters: one cluster of about 5 kbp containing Gmpgip1 and Gmpgip2, and the other containing Gmpgip3 and Gmpgip4 within a 60 kb fragment of a separate BAC clone. Sequence diversification of the four members resides mainly in the xxLxLxx region that includes residues forming the beta-sheet B1. When compared with other legume Pgip genes, Gmpgip3 groups with the bean genes Pvpgip1 and Pvpgip2, suggesting that these genes are closer to the ancestral gene. At the protein level, only GmPGIP3 shows the capability to inhibit fungal PGs. The spectrum of inhibition of GmPGIP3 against eight different fungal PGs mirrors that of the PGIP purified from soybean tissues and is similar to that of the bean PvPGIP2, one of the most efficient inhibitors so far characterized. We also report that the four Gmpgip genes are differentially regulated after wounding or during infection with the fungal pathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. Following fungal infection Gmpgip3 is up regulated promptly, while Gmpgip2 is delayed.

  2. Transcriptome Profile Reveals that Pu-Erh Tea Represses the Expression of Vitellogenin Family to Reduce Fat Accumulation in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ru-Yue; Hao, Junjun; Ding, Yi-Hong; Che, Yan-Yun; Zou, Xiao-Ju; Liang, Bin

    2016-10-17

    Due to misbalanced energy surplus and expenditure, obesity has become a common chronic disorder that is highly associated with many metabolic diseases. Pu-erh tea, a traditional Chinese beverage, has been believed to have numerous health benefits, such as anti-obesity. However, the underlying mechanisms of its anti-obesity effect are yet to be understood. Here, we take the advantages of transcriptional profile by RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) to view the global gene expression of Pu-erh tea. The model organism Caenorhabditis elegans was treated with different concentrations of Pu-erh tea water extract (PTE, 0 g/mL, 0.025 g/mL, and 0.05 g/mL). Compared with the control, PTE indeed decreases lipid droplets size and fat accumulation. The high-throughput RNA-Sequence technique detected 18073 and 18105 genes expressed in 0.025 g/mL and 0.05 g/mL PTE treated groups, respectively. Interestingly, the expression of the vitellogenin family (vit-1, vit-2, vit-3, vit-4 and vit-5) was significantly decreased by PTE, which was validated by qPCR analysis. Furthermore, vit-1(ok2616), vit-3(ok2348) and vit-5(ok3239) mutants are insensitive to PTE triggered fat reduction. In conclusion, our transcriptional profile by RNA-Sequence suggests that Pu-erh tea lowers the fat accumulation primarily through repression of the expression of vit(vitellogenin) family, in addition to our previously reported (sterol regulatory element binding protein) SREBP-SCD (stearoyl-CoA desaturase) axis.

  3. Phylogenic analysis revealed an expanded C₂H₂-homeobox subfamily and expression profiles of C₂H₂ zinc finger gene family in Verticillium dahliae.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Dianguang; Wang, Yonglin; Deng, Chenglin; Hu, Ruowen; Tian, Chengming

    2015-05-15

    C2H2 zinc finger (CZF) proteins are a major class of transcription factors that play crucial roles in fungal growth, development, various stress responses, and virulence. Little genome-wide data is available regarding the roles of CZF proteins in Verticillium dahliae, a destructive pathogen that causes vascular wilt disease in more than 200 plant species. We identified a total of 79 typical CZF genes in V. dahliae. Comparative analysis revealed that four plant pathogenic fungi, V. dahliae, Fusarium oxysporum, Magnaporthe oryzae, and Botrytis cinerea, have comparable numbers of predicted CZF genes with similar characteristics. Phylogenetic analysis identified a C2H2-homeobox subfamily in V. dahliae containing seven genes with similar gene structures. V. dahliae and F. oxysporum (Hypocreomycetidae) have more genes of this subfamily than M. oryzae (Sordariomycetidae) and B. cinerea (Leotiomycetes). Furthermore, gene-expression analysis of the smoke tree wilt fungus V. dahliae strain XS11 using digital gene-expression profiling and RT-qPCR revealed that a number of CZF genes were differentially expressed during microsclerotia formation, nutritional starvation, and simulated in planta conditions. Furthermore, the expression profiles revealed that some CZF genes were overrepresented during multiple stages, indicating that they might play diverse roles. Our results provide useful information concerning the functions of CZF genes in microsclerotia formation, nutritional stress responses, and pathogenicity in V. dahliae, and form a basis for future functional studies of these genes.

  4. Hyperactivity of the default-mode network in first-episode, drug-naive schizophrenia at rest revealed by family-based case-control and traditional case-control designs.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wenbin; Liu, Feng; Chen, Jindong; Wu, Renrong; Li, Lehua; Zhang, Zhikun; Chen, Huafu; Zhao, Jingping

    2017-03-01

    Abnormal regional activity and functional connectivity of the default-mode network (DMN) have been reported in schizophrenia. However, previous studies may have been biased by unmatched case-control design. To limit such bias, the present study used both the family-based case-control design and the traditional case-control design to investigate abnormal regional activity of the DMN in patients with schizophrenia at rest.Twenty-eight first-episode, drug-naive patients with schizophrenia, 28 age-, sex-matched unaffected siblings of the patients (family-based controls, FBC), and 40 healthy controls (HC) underwent resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scans. The group-independent component analysis and fractional amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (fALFF) methods were used to analyze the data.Patients with schizophrenia show increased fALFF in an overlapped region of the right superior medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) relative to the FBC and the HC. Compared with the HC, the patients and the FBC exhibit increased fALFF in an overlapped region of the left posterior cingulate cortex/precuneus (PCC/PCu). Furthermore, the z values of the 2 overlapped regions can separate the patients from the FBC/HC, and separate the patients/FBC from the HC with relatively high sensitivity and specificity.Both the family-based case-control and traditional case-control designs reveal hyperactivity of the DMN in first-episode, drug-naive patients with paranoid schizophrenia, which highlights the importance of the DMN in the neurobiology of schizophrenia. Family-based case-control design can limit the confounding effects of environmental factors in schizophrenia. Combination of the family-based case-control and traditional case-control designs may be a viable option for the neuroimaging studies.

  5. Hyperactivity of the default-mode network in first-episode, drug-naive schizophrenia at rest revealed by family-based case–control and traditional case–control designs

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wenbin; Liu, Feng; Chen, Jindong; Wu, Renrong; Li, Lehua; Zhang, Zhikun; Chen, Huafu; Zhao, Jingping

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Abnormal regional activity and functional connectivity of the default-mode network (DMN) have been reported in schizophrenia. However, previous studies may have been biased by unmatched case–control design. To limit such bias, the present study used both the family-based case–control design and the traditional case–control design to investigate abnormal regional activity of the DMN in patients with schizophrenia at rest. Twenty-eight first-episode, drug-naive patients with schizophrenia, 28 age-, sex-matched unaffected siblings of the patients (family-based controls, FBC), and 40 healthy controls (HC) underwent resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scans. The group-independent component analysis and fractional amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (fALFF) methods were used to analyze the data. Patients with schizophrenia show increased fALFF in an overlapped region of the right superior medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) relative to the FBC and the HC. Compared with the HC, the patients and the FBC exhibit increased fALFF in an overlapped region of the left posterior cingulate cortex/precuneus (PCC/PCu). Furthermore, the z values of the 2 overlapped regions can separate the patients from the FBC/HC, and separate the patients/FBC from the HC with relatively high sensitivity and specificity. Both the family-based case–control and traditional case–control designs reveal hyperactivity of the DMN in first-episode, drug-naive patients with paranoid schizophrenia, which highlights the importance of the DMN in the neurobiology of schizophrenia. Family-based case–control design can limit the confounding effects of environmental factors in schizophrenia. Combination of the family-based case–control and traditional case–control designs may be a viable option for the neuroimaging studies. PMID:28353559

  6. Genome-Wide Analysis of the Fasciclin-Like Arabinogalactan Protein Gene Family Reveals Differential Expression Patterns, Localization, and Salt Stress Response in Populus

    PubMed Central

    Zang, Lina; Zheng, Tangchun; Chu, Yanguang; Ding, Changjun; Zhang, Weixi; Huang, Qinjun; Su, Xiaohua

    2015-01-01

    Fasciclin-like arabinogalactan proteins (FLAs) are a subclass of arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs) involved in plant growth, development and response to abiotic stress. Although many studies have been performed to identify molecular functions of individual family members, little information is available on genome-wide identification and characterization of FLAs in the genus Populus. Based on genome-wide analysis, we have identified 35 Populus FLAs which were distributed on 16 chromosomes and phylogenetically clustered into four major groups. Gene structure and motif composition were relatively conserved in each group. All the members contained N-terminal signal peptide, 23 of which included predicted glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) modification sites and were anchored to plasma membranes. Subcellular localization analysis showed that PtrFLA2/20/26 were localized in cell membrane and cytoplasm of protoplasts from Populus stem-differentiating xylem. The Ka/Ks ratios showed that purifying selection has played a leading role in the long-term evolutionary period which greatly maintained the function of this family. The expression profiles showed that 32 PtrFLAs were differentially expressed in four tissues at four seasons based on publicly available microarray data. 18 FLAs were further verified with qRT-PCR in different tissues, which indicated that PtrFLA1/2/3/7/11/12/20/21/22/24/26/30 were significantly expressed in male and female flowers, suggesting close correlations with the reproductive development. In addition, PtrFLA1/9/10/11/17/21/23/24/26/28 were highly expressed in the stems and differentiating xylem, which may be involved in stem development. To determine salt response of FLAs, qRT-PCR was performed to analyze the expression of 18 genes under salinity stress across two time points. Results demonstrated that all the 18 FLAs were expressed in root tissues; especially, PtrFLA2/12/20/21/24/30 were significantly induced at different time points. In summary

  7. Crystal Structures of Type-II Inositol Polyphosphate 5-Phosphatase INPP5B with Synthetic Inositol Polyphosphate Surrogates Reveal New Mechanistic Insights for the Inositol 5-Phosphatase Family.

    PubMed

    Mills, Stephen J; Silvander, Camilla; Cozier, Gyles; Trésaugues, Lionel; Nordlund, Pär; Potter, Barry V L

    2016-03-08

    The inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatase INPP5B hydrolyzes the 5-phosphate group from water- and lipid-soluble signaling messengers. Two synthetic benzene and biphenyl polyphosphates (BzP/BiPhPs), simplified surrogates of inositol phosphates and phospholipid headgroups, were identified by thermodynamic studies as potent INPP5B ligands. The X-ray structure of the complex between INPP5B and biphenyl 3,3',4,4',5,5'-hexakisphosphate [BiPh(3,3',4,4',5,5')P6, IC50 5.5 μM] was determined at 2.89 Å resolution. One inhibitor pole locates in the phospholipid headgroup binding site and the second solvent-exposed ring binds to the His-Tag of another INPP5B molecule, while a molecule of inorganic phosphate is also present in the active site. Benzene 1,2,3-trisphosphate [Bz(1,2,3)P3] [one ring of BiPh(3,3',4,4',5,5')P6] inhibits INPP5B ca. 6-fold less potently. Co-crystallization with benzene 1,2,4,5-tetrakisphosphate [Bz(1,2,4,5)P4, IC50 = 6.3 μM] yielded a structure refined at 2.9 Å resolution. Conserved residues among the 5-phosphatase family mediate interactions with Bz(1,2,4,5)P4 and BiPh(3,3',4,4',5,5')P6 similar to those with the polar groups present in positions 1, 4, 5, and 6 on the inositol ring of the substrate. 5-Phosphatase specificity most likely resides in the variable zone located close to the 2- and 3-positions of the inositol ring, offering insights to inhibitor design. We propose that the inorganic phosphate present in the INPP5B-BiPh(3,3',4,4',5,5')P6 complex mimics the postcleavage substrate 5-phosphate released by INPP5B in the catalytic site, allowing elucidation of two new key features in the catalytic mechanism proposed for the family of phosphoinositide 5-phosphatases: first, the involvement of the conserved Arg-451 in the interaction with the 5-phosphate and second, identification of the water molecule that initiates 5-phosphate hydrolysis. Our model also has implications for the proposed "moving metal" mechanism.

  8. Familial Dysautonomia (FD) Human Embryonic Stem Cell Derived PNS Neurons Reveal that Synaptic Vesicular and Neuronal Transport Genes Are Directly or Indirectly Affected by IKBKAP Downregulation

    PubMed Central

    Kantor, Gal; Cheishvili, David; Even, Aviel; Birger, Anastasya; Turetsky, Tikva; Gil, Yaniv; Even-Ram, Sharona; Aizenman, Einat; Bashir, Nibal; Maayan, Channa; Razin, Aharon; Reubinoff, Benjamim E.; Weil, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    A splicing mutation in the IKBKAP gene causes Familial Dysautonomia (FD), affecting the IKAP protein expression levels and proper development and function of the peripheral nervous system (PNS). Here we found new molecular insights for the IKAP role and the impact of the FD mutation in the human PNS lineage by using a novel and unique human embryonic stem cell (hESC) line homozygous to the FD mutation originated by pre implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) analysis. We found that IKBKAP downregulation during PNS differentiation affects normal migration in FD-hESC derived neural crest cells (NCC) while at later stages the PNS neurons show reduced intracellular colocalization between vesicular proteins and IKAP. Comparative wide transcriptome analysis of FD and WT hESC-derived neurons together with the analysis of human brains from FD and WT 12 weeks old embryos and experimental validation of the results confirmed that synaptic vesicular and neuronal transport genes are directly or indirectly affected by IKBKAP downregulation in FD neurons. Moreover we show that kinetin (a drug that corrects IKBKAP alternative splicing) promotes the recovery of IKAP expression and these IKAP functional associated genes identified in the study. Altogether, these results support the view that IKAP might be a vesicular like protein that might be involved in neuronal transport in hESC derived PNS neurons. This function seems to be mostly affected in FD-hESC derived PNS neurons probably reflecting some PNS neuronal dysfunction observed in FD. PMID:26437462

  9. Analysis of the Fam181 gene family during mouse development reveals distinct strain-specific expression patterns, suggesting a role in nervous system development and function.

    PubMed

    Marks, Matthias; Pennimpede, Tracie; Lange, Lisette; Grote, Phillip; Herrmann, Bernhard G; Wittler, Lars

    2016-01-10

    During somitogenesis differential gene expression can be observed for so-called cyclic genes, which display expression changes with a periodicity of 120min in the mouse. In screens to identify novel cyclic genes in murine embryos, Fam181b was predicted to be an oscillating gene in the presomitic mesoderm (psm). This gene, and its closely related paralog Fam181a, belong to the thus far uncharacterized Fam181 gene family. Here we describe the expression of Fam181b and Fam181a during murine embryonic development. In addition, we confirm oscillation of Fam181b in the psm in-phase with targets of, and regulated by, Notch signaling. Fam181b expression in the psm, as well as in the lateral plate mesoderm, was found to be affected by genetic background. We show that Fam181a and b exhibit partially overlapping mRNA expression patterns, and encode for proteins containing highly-conserved motifs, which predominantly localize to the nucleus. A Fam181b loss-of-function model was generated and found to result in no obvious phenotype.

  10. A Bioinformatics Analysis Reveals a Group of MocR Bacterial Transcriptional Regulators Linked to a Family of Genes Coding for Membrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Milano, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    The MocR bacterial transcriptional regulators are characterized by an N-terminal domain, 60 residues long on average, possessing the winged-helix-turn-helix (wHTH) architecture responsible for DNA recognition and binding, linked to a large C-terminal domain (350 residues on average) that is homologous to fold type-I pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP) dependent enzymes like aspartate aminotransferase (AAT). These regulators are involved in the expression of genes taking part in several metabolic pathways directly or indirectly connected to PLP chemistry, many of which are still uncharacterized. A bioinformatics analysis is here reported that studied the features of a distinct group of MocR regulators predicted to be functionally linked to a family of homologous genes coding for integral membrane proteins of unknown function. This group occurs mainly in the Actinobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria phyla. An analysis of the multiple sequence alignments of their wHTH and AAT domains suggested the presence of specificity-determining positions (SDPs). Mapping of SDPs onto a homology model of the AAT domain hinted at possible structural/functional roles in effector recognition. Likewise, SDPs in wHTH domain suggested the basis of specificity of Transcription Factor Binding Site recognition. The results reported represent a framework for rational design of experiments and for bioinformatics analysis of other MocR subgroups. PMID:27446613

  11. Phylogenetic and transcriptomic analyses reveal the evolution of bioluminescence and light detection in marine deep-sea shrimps of the family Oplophoridae (Crustacea: Decapoda).

    PubMed

    Wong, Juliet M; Pérez-Moreno, Jorge L; Chan, Tin-Yam; Frank, Tamara M; Bracken-Grissom, Heather D

    2015-02-01

    Bioluminescence is essential to the survival of many organisms, particularly in the deep sea where light is limited. Shrimp of the family Oplophoridae exhibit a remarkable mechanism of bioluminescence in the form of a secretion used for predatory defense. Three of the ten genera possess an additional mode of bioluminescence in the form of light-emitting organs called photophores. Phylogenetic analyses can be useful for tracing the evolution of bioluminescence, however, the few studies that have attempted to reconcile the relationships within Oplophoridae have generated trees with low-resolution. We present the most comprehensive phylogeny of Oplophoridae to date, with 90% genera coverage using seven genes (mitochondrial and nuclear) across 30 oplophorid species. We use our resulting topology to trace the evolution of bioluminescence within Oplophoridae. Previous studies have suggested that oplophorid visual systems may be tuned to differentiate the separate modes of bioluminescence. While all oplophorid shrimp possess a visual pigment sensitive to blue-green light, only those bearing photophores have an additional pigment sensitive to near-ultraviolet light. We attempt to characterize opsins, visual pigment proteins essential to light detection, in two photophore-bearing species (Systellaspis debilis and Oplophorus gracilirostris) and make inferences regarding their function and evolutionary significance.

  12. Familial Dysautonomia (FD) Human Embryonic Stem Cell Derived PNS Neurons Reveal that Synaptic Vesicular and Neuronal Transport Genes Are Directly or Indirectly Affected by IKBKAP Downregulation.

    PubMed

    Lefler, Sharon; Cohen, Malkiel A; Kantor, Gal; Cheishvili, David; Even, Aviel; Birger, Anastasya; Turetsky, Tikva; Gil, Yaniv; Even-Ram, Sharona; Aizenman, Einat; Bashir, Nibal; Maayan, Channa; Razin, Aharon; Reubinoff, Benjamim E; Weil, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    A splicing mutation in the IKBKAP gene causes Familial Dysautonomia (FD), affecting the IKAP protein expression levels and proper development and function of the peripheral nervous system (PNS). Here we found new molecular insights for the IKAP role and the impact of the FD mutation in the human PNS lineage by using a novel and unique human embryonic stem cell (hESC) line homozygous to the FD mutation originated by pre implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) analysis. We found that IKBKAP downregulation during PNS differentiation affects normal migration in FD-hESC derived neural crest cells (NCC) while at later stages the PNS neurons show reduced intracellular colocalization between vesicular proteins and IKAP. Comparative wide transcriptome analysis of FD and WT hESC-derived neurons together with the analysis of human brains from FD and WT 12 weeks old embryos and experimental validation of the results confirmed that synaptic vesicular and neuronal transport genes are directly or indirectly affected by IKBKAP downregulation in FD neurons. Moreover we show that kinetin (a drug that corrects IKBKAP alternative splicing) promotes the recovery of IKAP expression and these IKAP functional associated genes identified in the study. Altogether, these results support the view that IKAP might be a vesicular like protein that might be involved in neuronal transport in hESC derived PNS neurons. This function seems to be mostly affected in FD-hESC derived PNS neurons probably reflecting some PNS neuronal dysfunction observed in FD.

  13. Comparative analysis of the Dicer-like gene family reveals loss of miR162 target site in SmDCL1 from Salvia miltiorrhiza

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Fenjuan; Qiu, Deyou; Lu, Shanfa

    2015-01-01

    DCL1, the core component for miRNA biogenesis, is itself regulated by miR162 in Arabidopsis. MiRNA-mediated feedback regulation of AtDCL1 is important to maintain the proper level of DCL1 transcripts. However, it is unknown whether the miRNA-mediated regulation of DCL1 is conserved among plants. We analyzed the SmDCL gene family in Salvia miltiorrhiza, an emerging model plant for Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) studies, using a comprehensive approach integrating genome-wide prediction, molecular cloning, gene expression profiling, and posttranscriptional regulation analysis. A total of five SmDCLs were identified. Comparative analysis of SmDCLs and AtDCLs showed an apparent enlargement of SmDCL introns in S. miltiorrhiza. The absence of miR162 in S. miltiorrhiza and the loss of miR162 target site in SmDCL1 were unexpectedly found. Further analysis showed that the miR162 target site was not present in DCL1 from ancient plants and was gained during plant evolution. The gained miR162 target site might be lost in a few modern plants through nucleotide mutations. Our results provide evidence for the gain and loss of miR162 and its target sites in Dicer-like genes during evolution. The data is useful for understanding the evolution of miRNA-mediated feedback regulation of DCLs in plants. PMID:25970825

  14. Computational diagnosis of protein conformational diseases: short molecular dynamics simulations reveal a fast unfolding of r-LDL mutants that cause familial hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Cuesta-López, S; Falo, F; Sancho, J

    2007-01-01

    The molecular basis of conformational diseases frequently resides in mutant proteins constituting a subset of the vast mutational space. While the subtleties of protein structure point to molecular dynamics (MD) techniques as promising tools for an efficient exploration of such a space, the average size of proteins and the time scale of unfolding events make this goal difficult with present computational capabilities. We show here, nevertheless, that an efficient approach is already feasible for modular proteins. Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is a conformational disease linked to mutations in the gene encoding the low density lipoprotein receptor. A high percentage of these mutations has been found in the seven small modular binding repeats of the receptor. Taking advantage of its small size, we have performed an in depth MD study of the fifth binding repeat. Fast unfolding dynamics have been observed in the absence of a structural bound calcium ion, which agrees with its reported essential role in the stability of the module. In addition, several mutations detected in FH patients have been analyzed, starting from the native conformation. Our results indicate that in contrast with the wild type protein and an innocuous control mutant, disease-related mutants experience, in short simulation times (2-8 ns), gross departures from the native state that lead to unfolded conformations and, in some cases, to binding site desorganization deriving in calcium release. Computational diagnosis of mutations leading to conformational diseases seems thus feasible, at least for small or modular pathogenic proteins.

  15. Molecular determinants of substrate specificity revealed by the structure of Clostridium thermocellum arabinofuranosidase 43A from glycosyl hydrolase family 43 subfamily 16.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Arun; Ahmed, Shadab; Sharma, Kedar; Gupta, Vikas; Bule, Pedro; Alves, Victor D; Fontes, Carlos M G A; Najmudin, Shabir

    2016-12-01

    The recent division of the large glycoside hydrolase family 43 (GH43) into subfamilies offers a renewed opportunity to develop structure-function studies aimed at clarifying the molecular determinants of substrate specificity in carbohydrate-degrading enzymes. α-L-Arabinofuranosidases (EC 3.2.1.55) remove arabinose side chains from heteropolysaccharides such as xylan and arabinan. However, there is some evidence suggesting that arabinofuranosidases are substrate-specific, being unable to display a debranching activity on different polysaccharides. Here, the structure of Clostridium thermocellum arabinofuranosidase 43A (CtAbf43A), which has been shown to act in the removal of arabinose side chains from arabinoxylan but not from pectic arabinan, is reported. CtAbf43A belongs to GH43 subfamily 16, the members of which have a restricted capacity to attack xylans. The crystal structure of CtAbf43A comprises a five-bladed β-propeller fold typical of GH43 enzymes. CtAbf43A displays a highly compact architecture compatible with its high thermostability. Analysis of CtAbf43A along with the other member of GH43 subfamily 16 with known structure, the Bacillus subtilis arabinofuranosidase BsAXH-m2,3, suggests that the specificity of subfamily 16 for arabinoxylan is conferred by a long surface substrate-binding cleft that is complementary to the xylan backbone. The lack of a curved-shaped carbohydrate-interacting platform precludes GH43 subfamily 16 enzymes from interacting with the nonlinear arabinan scaffold and therefore from deconstructing this polysaccharide.

  16. A yeast model reveals biochemical severity associated with each of three variant alleles of galactose-1P uridylyltransferase segregating in a single family.

    PubMed

    Chhay, J S; Openo, K K; Eaton, J S; Gentile, M; Fridovich-Keil, J L

    2008-02-01

    Classic galactosaemia is a potentially lethal inborn error of metabolism that results from profound impairment of galactose-1P uridylyltransferase (GALT). Like many autosomal recessive disorders, classic galactosaemia demonstrates marked allelic heterogeneity; many if not most patients are compound heterozygotes. Owing in part to the fact that most GALT mutations are never observed in patients in the homozygous state, in part to concerns of possible allelic interaction, and in part to the broad range of GALT activity levels associated with the affected, carrier, and control states, definition of the specific functional consequence of individual variant GALT alleles from studies of clinical samples alone can be a challenging task. To overcome this problem we previously developed and applied a null-background yeast system to enable functional analyses of human GALT alleles expressed individually or in defined pairs. We report here the application of this system to characterize three distinct variant alleles of GALT identified within a single family. Of these alleles, one carried a missense mutation (K285N) that has previously been reported and characterized, one carried a nonsense mutation (R204X) that has previously been reported but not characterized, and the third carried a missense substitution (T268N) that was novel. Our studies reported here reconfirm the profound nature of the K285N mutation, demonstrate that the R204X mutation severely compromises both expression and function of human GALT, and finally implicate T268N as one of a very small number of naturally occurring rare but neutral missense polymorphisms in human GALT.

  17. The crystal structure of ferritin from Chlorobium tepidum reveals a new conformation of the 4-fold channel for this protein family.

    PubMed

    Arenas-Salinas, Mauricio; Townsend, Philip D; Brito, Christian; Marquez, Valeria; Marabolli, Vanessa; Gonzalez-Nilo, Fernando; Matias, Cata; Watt, Richard K; López-Castro, Juan D; Domínguez-Vera, José; Pohl, Ehmke; Yévenes, Alejandro

    2014-11-01

    Ferritins are ubiquitous iron-storage proteins found in all kingdoms of life. They share a common architecture made of 24 subunits of five α-helices. The recombinant Chlorobium tepidum ferritin (rCtFtn) is a structurally interesting protein since sequence alignments with other ferritins show that this protein has a significantly extended C-terminus, which possesses 12 histidine residues as well as several aspartate and glutamic acid residues that are potential metal ion binding residues. We show that the macromolecular assembly of rCtFtn exhibits a cage-like hollow shell consisting of 24 monomers that are related by 4-3-2 symmetry; similar to the assembly of other ferritins. In all ferritins of known structure the short fifth α-helix adopts an acute angle with respect to the four-helix bundle. However, the crystal structure of the rCtFtn presented here shows that this helix adopts a new conformation defining a new assembly of the 4-fold channel of rCtFtn. This conformation allows the arrangement of the C-terminal region into the inner cavity of the protein shell. Furthermore, two Fe(III) ions were found in each ferroxidase center of rCtFtn, with an average FeA-FeB distance of 3 Å; corresponding to a diferric μ-oxo/hydroxo species. This is the first ferritin crystal structure with an isolated di-iron center in an iron-storage ferritin. The crystal structure of rCtFtn and the biochemical results presented here, suggests that rCtFtn presents similar biochemical properties reported for other members of this protein family albeit with distinct structural plasticity.

  18. Structural comparison of AP endonucleases from the exonuclease III family reveals new amino acid residues in human AP endonuclease 1 that are involved in incision of damaged DNA.

    PubMed

    Redrejo-Rodríguez, Modesto; Vigouroux, Armelle; Mursalimov, Aibek; Grin, Inga; Alili, Doria; Koshenov, Zhanat; Akishev, Zhiger; Maksimenko, Andrei; Bissenbaev, Amangeldy K; Matkarimov, Bakhyt T; Saparbaev, Murat; Ishchenko, Alexander A; Moréra, Solange

    2016-01-01

    Oxidatively damaged DNA bases are substrates for two overlapping repair pathways: DNA glycosylase-initiated base excision repair (BER) and apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease-initiated nucleotide incision repair (NIR). In the BER pathway, an AP endonuclease cleaves DNA at AP sites and 3'-blocking moieties generated by DNA glycosylases, whereas in the NIR pathway, the same AP endonuclease incises DNA 5' to an oxidized base. The majority of characterized AP endonucleases possess classic BER activities, and approximately a half of them can also have a NIR activity. At present, the molecular mechanism underlying DNA substrate specificity of AP endonucleases remains unclear mainly due to the absence of a published structure of the enzyme in complex with a damaged base. To identify critical residues involved in the NIR function, we performed biochemical and structural characterization of Bacillus subtilis AP endonuclease ExoA and compared its crystal structure with the structures of other AP endonucleases: Escherichia coli exonuclease III (Xth), human APE1, and archaeal Mth212. We found conserved amino acid residues in the NIR-specific enzymes APE1, Mth212, and ExoA. Four of these positions were studied by means of point mutations in APE1: we applied substitution with the corresponding residue found in NIR-deficient E. coli Xth (Y128H, N174Q, G231S, and T268D). The APE1-T268D mutant showed a drastically decreased NIR activity and an inverted Mg(2+) dependence of the AP site cleavage activity, which is in line with the presence of an aspartic residue at the equivalent position among other known NIR-deficient AP endonucleases. Taken together, these data show that NIR is an evolutionarily conserved function in the Xth family of AP endonucleases.

  19. Visualization of a substrate-induced productive conformation of the catalytic triad of the Neisseria meningitidis peptidoglycan O-acetylesterase reveals mechanistic conservation in SGNH esterase family members

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Allison H.; Veyrier, Frédéric J.; Bonis, Mathilde; Michaud, Yann; Raynal, Bertrand; Taha, Muhamed-Kheir; White, Stephen W.; Haouz, Ahmed; Boneca, Ivo G.

    2014-01-01

    Peptidoglycan O-acetylesterase (Ape1), which is required for host survival in Neisseria sp., belongs to the diverse SGNH hydrolase superfamily, which includes important viral and bacterial virulence factors. Here, multi-domain crystal structures of Ape1 with an SGNH catalytic domain and a newly identified putative peptidoglycan-detection module are reported. Enzyme catalysis was performed in Ape1 crystals and key catalytic intermediates along the SGNH esterase hydrolysis reaction pathway were visualized, revealing a substrate-induced productive conformation of the catalytic triad, a mechanistic detail that has not previously been observed. This substrate-induced productive conformation of the catalytic triad shifts the established dogma on these enzymes, generating valuable insight into the structure-based design of drugs targeting the SGNH esterase superfamily. PMID:25286847

  20. PHD finger of the SUMO ligase Siz/PIAS family in rice reveals specific binding for methylated histone H3 at lysine 4 and arginine 2.

    PubMed

    Shindo, Heisaburo; Suzuki, Rintaro; Tsuchiya, Wataru; Taichi, Misako; Nishiuchi, Yuji; Yamazaki, Toshimasa

    2012-06-21

    We determined the three-dimensional structure of the PHD finger of the rice Siz/PIAS-type SUMO ligase, OsSiz1, by NMR spectroscopy and investigated binding ability for a variety of methylated histone H3 tails, showing that OsSiz1-PHD primarily recognizes dimethylated Arg2 of the histone H3 and that methylations at Arg2 and Lys4 reveal synergy effect on binding to OsSiz1-PHD. The K4 cage of OsSiz1-PHD for trimethylated Lys4 of H3K4me3 was similar to that of the BPTF-PHD finger, while the R2 pocket for Arg2 was different. It is intriguing that the PHD module of Siz/PIAS plays an important role, with collaboration with the DNA binding domain SAP, in gene regulation through SUMOylation of a variety of effectors associated with the methylated arginine-riched chromatin domains.

  1. Phylogeographic Analyses of Submesophotic Snappers Etelis coruscans and Etelis “marshi” (Family Lutjanidae) Reveal Concordant Genetic Structure across the Hawaiian Archipelago

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Kimberly R.; Moriwake, Virginia N.; Wilcox, Christie; Grau, E. Gordon; Kelley, Christopher; Pyle, Richard L.; Bowen, Brian W.

    2014-01-01

    The Hawaiian Archipelago has become a natural laboratory for understanding genetic connectivity in marine organisms as a result of the large number of population genetics studies that have been conducted across this island chain for a wide taxonomic range of organisms. However, population genetic studies have been conducted for only two species occurring in the mesophotic or submesophotic zones (30+m) in this archipelago. To gain a greater understanding of genetic connectivity in these deepwater habitats, we investigated the genetic structure of two submesophotic fish species (occurring ∼200–360 m) in this archipelago. We surveyed 16 locations across the archipelago for submesophotic snappers Etelis coruscans (N = 787) and E. “marshi” (formerly E. carbunculus; N = 770) with 436–490 bp of mtDNA cytochrome b and 10–11 microsatellite loci. Phylogeographic analyses reveal no geographic structuring of mtDNA lineages and recent coalescence times that are typical of shallow reef fauna. Population genetic analyses reveal no overall structure across most of the archipelago, a pattern also typical of dispersive shallow fishes. However some sites in the mid-archipelago (Raita Bank to French Frigate Shoals) had significant population differentiation. This pattern of no structure between ends of the Hawaiian range, and significant structure in the middle, was previously observed in a submesophotic snapper (Pristipomoides filamentosus) and a submesophotic grouper (Hyporthodus quernus). Three of these four species also have elevated genetic diversity in the mid-archipelago. Biophysical larval dispersal models from previous studies indicate that this elevated diversity may result from larval supplement from Johnston Atoll, ∼800 km southwest of Hawaii. In this case the boundaries of stocks for fishery management cannot be defined simply in terms of geography, and fishery management in Hawaii may need to incorporate external larval supply into management plans

  2. Metabolic engineering of raffinose-family oligosaccharides in the phloem reveals alterations in carbon partitioning and enhances resistance to green peach aphid

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Te; Lahiri, Ipsita; Singh, Vijay; Louis, Joe; Shah, Jyoti; Ayre, Brian G.

    2013-01-01

    Many plants employ energized loading strategies to accumulate osmotically-active solutes into the phloem of source organs to accentuate the hydrostatic pressure gradients that drive the flow of water, nutrients and signals from source to sinks. Proton-coupled symport of sugars from the apoplasm into the phloem symplasm is the best studied phloem-loading mechanism. As an alternative, numerous species use a polymer trapping mechanism to load through symplasm: sucrose enters the phloem through specialized plasmodesmata and is converted to raffinose-family oligosaccharides (RFOs) which accumulate because of their larger size. In this study, metabolic engineering was used to generate RFOs at the inception of the translocation stream of Arabidopsis thaliana, which loads from the apoplasm and transports predominantly sucrose, and the fate of the sugars throughout the plant determined. Three genes, GALACTINOL SYNTHASE, RAFFINOSE SYNTHASE and STACHYOSE SYNTHASE, were expressed from promoters specific to the companion cells of minor veins. Two transgenic lines homozygous for all three genes (GRS63 and GRS47) were selected for further analysis. Three-week-old plants of both lines had RFO levels approaching 50% of total soluble sugar. RFOs were also identified in exudates from excised leaves of transgenic plants whereas levels were negligible in exudates from wild type (WT) leaves. Differences in starch accumulation between WT and GRS63 and GRS47 lines were not observed. Similarly, there were no differences in vegetative growth between WT and engineered plants, but the latter flowered slightly earlier. Finally, since the sugar composition of the translocation stream appeared altered, we tested for an impact on green peach aphid (Myzus persicae Sulzer) feeding. When given a choice between WT and transgenic plants, green peach aphids preferred settling on the WT plants. Furthermore, green peach aphid fecundity was lower on the transgenic plants compared to the WT plants. When

  3. Interspecies and Intraspecies Analysis of Trehalose Contents and the Biosynthesis Pathway Gene Family Reveals Crucial Roles of Trehalose in Osmotic-Stress Tolerance in Cassava

    PubMed Central

    Han, Bingying; Fu, Lili; Zhang, Dan; He, Xiuquan; Chen, Qiang; Peng, Ming; Zhang, Jiaming

    2016-01-01

    normal conditions. MeTPS1 was then transformed into tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana). Results indicated that transgenic tobacco lines accumulated significant level of trehalose and possessed improved drought stress tolerance. In conclusion, cassava accumulated significantly high amount of trehalose under normal conditions due to multiplied trehalose biosynthesis gene families and constant expression of the active MeTPS1 gene. High levels of trehalose subsequently contributed to high drought stress tolerance. PMID:27420056

  4. Interspecies and Intraspecies Analysis of Trehalose Contents and the Biosynthesis Pathway Gene Family Reveals Crucial Roles of Trehalose in Osmotic-Stress Tolerance in Cassava.

    PubMed

    Han, Bingying; Fu, Lili; Zhang, Dan; He, Xiuquan; Chen, Qiang; Peng, Ming; Zhang, Jiaming

    2016-07-13

    conditions. MeTPS1 was then transformed into tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana). Results indicated that transgenic tobacco lines accumulated significant level of trehalose and possessed improved drought stress tolerance. In conclusion, cassava accumulated significantly high amount of trehalose under normal conditions due to multiplied trehalose biosynthesis gene families and constant expression of the active MeTPS1 gene. High levels of trehalose subsequently contributed to high drought stress tolerance.

  5. Cloning and sequencing of the kedarcidin biosynthetic gene cluster from Streptoalloteichus sp. ATCC 53650 revealing new insights into biosynthesis of the enediyne family of antitumor antibiotics†

    PubMed Central

    Lohman, Jeremy R.; Huang, Sheng-Xiong; Horsman, Geoffrey P.; Dilfer, Paul E.; Huang, Tingting; Chen, Yihua; Wendt-Pienkowski, Evelyn; Shen, Ben

    2013-01-01

    Enediyne natural product biosynthesis is characterized by a convergence of multiple pathways, generating unique peripheral moieties that are appended onto the distinctive enediyne core. Kedarcidin (KED) possesses two unique peripheral moieties, a (R)-2-aza-3-chloro-β-tyrosine and an iso-propoxy-bearing 2-naphthonate moiety, as well as two deoxysugars. The appendage pattern of these peripheral moieties to the enediyne core in KED differs from the other enediynes studied to date with respect to stereochemical configuration. To investigate the biosynthesis of these moieties and expand our understanding of enediyne core formation, the biosynthetic gene cluster for KED was cloned from Streptoalloteichus sp. ATCC 53650 and sequenced. Bioinformatics analysis of the ked cluster revealed the presence of the conserved genes encoding for enediyne core biosynthesis, type I and type II polyketide synthase loci likely responsible for 2-aza-L-tyrosine and 3,6,8-trihydroxy-2-naphthonate formation, and enzymes known for deoxysugar biosynthesis. Genes homologous to those responsible for the biosynthesis, activation, and coupling of the L-tyrosine-derived moieties from C-1027 and maduropeptin and of the naphthonate moiety from neocarzinostatin are present in the ked cluster, supporting 2-aza-L-tyrosine and 3,6,8-trihydroxy-2-naphthoic acid as precursors, respectively, for the (R)-2-aza-3-chloro-β-tyrosine and the 2-naphthonate moieties in KED biosynthesis. PMID:23360970

  6. Genus-Wide Comparative Genome Analyses of Colletotrichum Species Reveal Specific Gene Family Losses and Gains during Adaptation to Specific Infection Lifestyles

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Pamela; Narusaka, Mari; Kumakura, Naoyoshi; Tsushima, Ayako; Takano, Yoshitaka; Narusaka, Yoshihiro; Shirasu, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Members from Colletotrichum genus adopt a diverse range of lifestyles during infection of plants and represent a group of agriculturally devastating pathogens. In this study, we present the draft genome of Colletotrichum incanum from the spaethianum clade of Colletotrichum and the comparative analyses with five other Colletotrichum species from distinct lineages. We show that the C. incanum strain, originally isolated from Japanese daikon radish, is able to infect both eudicot plants, such as certain ecotypes of the eudicot Arabidopsis, and monocot plants, such as lily. Being closely related to Colletotrichum species both in the graminicola clade, whose members are restricted strictly to monocot hosts, and to the destructivum clade, whose members are mostly associated with dicot infections, C. incanum provides an interesting model system for comparative genomics to study how fungal pathogens adapt to monocot and dicot hosts. Genus-wide comparative genome analyses reveal that Colletotrichum species have tailored profiles of their carbohydrate-degrading enzymes according to their infection lifestyles. In addition, we show evidence that positive selection acting on secreted and nuclear localized proteins that are highly conserved may be important in adaptation to specific hosts or ecological niches. PMID:27189990

  7. Complete Proteomic-Based Enzyme Reaction and Inhibition Kinetics Reveal How Monolignol Biosynthetic Enzyme Families Affect Metabolic Flux and Lignin in Populus trichocarpa[W

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jack P.; Naik, Punith P.; Chen, Hsi-Chuan; Shi, Rui; Lin, Chien-Yuan; Liu, Jie; Shuford, Christopher M.; Li, Quanzi; Sun, Ying-Hsuan; Tunlaya-Anukit, Sermsawat; Williams, Cranos M.; Muddiman, David C.; Ducoste, Joel J.; Sederoff, Ronald R.; Chiang, Vincent L.

    2014-01-01

    We established a predictive kinetic metabolic-flux model for the 21 enzymes and 24 metabolites of the monolignol biosynthetic pathway using Populus trichocarpa secondary differentiating xylem. To establish this model, a comprehensive study was performed to obtain the reaction and inhibition kinetic parameters of all 21 enzymes based on functional recombinant proteins. A total of 104 Michaelis-Menten kinetic parameters and 85 inhibition kinetic parameters were derived from these enzymes. Through mass spectrometry, we obtained the absolute quantities of all 21 pathway enzymes in the secondary differentiating xylem. This extensive experimental data set, generated from a single tissue specialized in wood formation, was used to construct the predictive kinetic metabolic-flux model to provide a comprehensive mathematical description of the monolignol biosynthetic pathway. The model was validated using experimental data from transgenic P. trichocarpa plants. The model predicts how pathway enzymes affect lignin content and composition, explains a long-standing paradox regarding the regulation of monolignol subunit ratios in lignin, and reveals novel mechanisms involved in the regulation of lignin biosynthesis. This model provides an explanation of the effects of genetic and transgenic perturbations of the monolignol biosynthetic pathway in flowering plants. PMID:24619611

  8. A New Family of Membrane Electron Transporters and Its Substrates, Including a New Cell Envelope Peroxiredoxin, Reveal a Broadened Reductive Capacity of the Oxidative Bacterial Cell Envelope

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Seung-Hyun; Parsonage, Derek; Thurston, Casey; Dutton, Rachel J.; Poole, Leslie B.; Collet, Jean-Francois; Beckwith, Jon

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Escherichia coli membrane protein DsbD functions as an electron hub that dispatches electrons received from the cytoplasmic thioredoxin system to periplasmic oxidoreductases involved in protein disulfide isomerization, cytochrome c biogenesis, and sulfenic acid reduction. Here, we describe a new class of DsbD proteins, named ScsB, whose members are found in proteobacteria and Chlamydia. ScsB has a domain organization similar to that of DsbD, but its amino-terminal domain differs significantly. In DsbD, this domain directly interacts with substrates to reduce them, which suggests that ScsB acts on a different array of substrates. Using Caulobacter crescentus as a model organism, we searched for the substrates of ScsB. We discovered that ScsB provides electrons to the first peroxide reduction pathway identified in the bacterial cell envelope. The reduction pathway comprises a thioredoxin-like protein, TlpA, and a peroxiredoxin, PprX. We show that PprX is a thiol-dependent peroxidase that efficiently reduces both hydrogen peroxide and organic peroxides. Moreover, we identified two additional proteins that depend on ScsB for reduction, a peroxiredoxin-like protein, PrxL, and a novel protein disulfide isomerase, ScsC. Altogether, our results reveal that the array of proteins involved in reductive pathways in the oxidative cell envelope is significantly broader than was previously thought. Moreover, the identification of a new periplasmic peroxiredoxin indicates that in some bacteria, it is important to directly scavenge peroxides in the cell envelope even before they reach the cytoplasm. PMID:22493033

  9. Functional and evolutionary analysis of flatfish gonadotropin receptors reveals cladal- and lineage-level divergence of the teleost glycoprotein receptor family.

    PubMed

    Chauvigné, François; Tingaud-Sequeira, Angèle; Agulleiro, María J; Calusinska, Magdalena; Gómez, Ana; Finn, Roderick Nigel; Cerdà, Joan

    2010-06-01

    Pituitary gonadotropins, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), and luteinizing hormone (LH) act via their cognate glycoprotein hormone receptors (GpHRs), FSH receptor (FSHR), and LH/choriogonadotropin receptor (LHCGR) to regulate gonad physiology. Here, we show that the flatfish Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis) expresses functional isoforms of fshr and lhcgr, but the genomic origin, ligand activation, and tissue distribution of the receptor transcripts are more complex than expected. By integrating the molecular phylogeny of GpHRs with the syntenic loci of vertebrate orthologs, and by subsequently characterizing the physical maps with the phylogeny of flanking genes, we found that vertebrate GpHRs have undergone a divergent evolution. In Teleostei, fshr genes have a common descent and can be classified as fshra, whereas lhcgrb genes exist as alternatively coded genes even in closely related species. Structural analyses of the receptors revealed that Fshra has an elongated ligand-binding domain, containing an extra leucine-rich repeat that specifically arose in the Acanthomorpha because of exon duplication. Ectopic expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes demonstrated that sole Fshra responded to piscine Fsh and Lh, whereas Lhcgrba was preferentially activated by its cognate hormone. The expression pattern of sole fshra and lhcgrba in gonads during the reproductive cycle was consistent with earlier observations wherein Fshra regulates ovarian growth and spermatogenesis and Lhcgrb triggers gamete maturation, respectively. However, contrary to observations in other teleosts, fshra was localized exclusively in Sertoli cells of the testis, whereas lhcgrba was expressed in Leydig cells as well as in spermatids. These results demonstrate the presence of alternatively coded lhcgr isoforms (lhcgrba and lhcgrbb) in teleosts and suggest a role of the lhcgrba receptor in the differentiation of spermatids into spermatozoa in Senegalese sole.

  10. Analysis of Leigh syndrome mutations in the yeast SURF1 homolog reveals a new member of the cytochrome oxidase assembly factor family.

    PubMed

    Bestwick, Megan; Jeong, Mi-Young; Khalimonchuk, Oleh; Kim, Hyung; Winge, Dennis R

    2010-09-01

    Three missense SURF1 mutations identified in patients with Leigh syndrome (LS) were evaluated in the yeast homolog Shy1 protein. Introduction of two of the Leigh mutations, F(249)T and Y(344)D, in Shy1 failed to significantly attenuate the function of Shy1 in cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) biogenesis as seen with the human mutations. In contrast, a G(137)E substitution in Shy1 results in a nonfunctional protein conferring a CcO deficiency. The G(137)E Shy1 mutant phenocopied shy1Delta cells in impaired Cox1 hemylation and low mitochondrial copper. A genetic screen for allele-specific suppressors of the G(137)E Shy1 mutant revealed Coa2, Cox10, and a novel factor designated Coa4. Coa2 and Cox10 are previously characterized CcO assembly factors. Coa4 is a twin CX(9)C motif mitochondrial protein localized in the intermembrane space and associated with the inner membrane. Cells lacking Coa4 are depressed in CcO activity but show no impairment in Cox1 maturation or formation of the Shy1-stabilized Cox1 assembly intermediate. To glean insights into the functional role of Coa4 in CcO biogenesis, an unbiased suppressor screen of coa4Delta cells was conducted. Respiratory function of coa4Delta cells was restored by the overexpression of CYC1 encoding cytochrome c. Cyc1 is known to be important at an ill-defined step in the assembly and/or stability of CcO. This new link to Coa4 may begin to further elucidate the role of Cyc1 in CcO biogenesis.

  11. Structures of the first representatives of Pfam family PF06684 (DUF1185) reveal a novel variant of the Bacillus chorismate mutase fold and suggest a role in amino-acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Bakolitsa, Constantina; Kumar, Abhinav; Jin, Kevin K; McMullan, Daniel; Krishna, S Sri; Miller, Mitchell D; Abdubek, Polat; Acosta, Claire; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L; Burra, Prasad; Carlton, Dennis; Chen, Connie; Chiu, Hsiu Ju; Clayton, Thomas; Das, Debanu; Deller, Marc C; Duan, Lian; Elias, Ylva; Ellrott, Kyle; Ernst, Dustin; Farr, Carol L; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grant, Joanna C; Grzechnik, Anna; Grzechnik, Slawomir K; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Johnson, Hope A; Klock, Heath E; Knuth, Mark W; Kozbial, Piotr; Marciano, David; Morse, Andrew T; Murphy, Kevin D; Nigoghossian, Edward; Nopakun, Amanda; Okach, Linda; Paulsen, Jessica; Puckett, Christina; Reyes, Ron; Rife, Christopher L; Sefcovic, Natasha; Tien, Henry J; Trame, Christine B; Trout, Christina V; van den Bedem, Henry; Weekes, Dana; White, Aprilfawn; Xu, Qingping; Hodgson, Keith O; Wooley, John; Elsliger, Marc Andre; Deacon, Ashley M; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A; Wilson, Ian A

    2010-10-01

    The crystal structures of BB2672 and SPO0826 were determined to resolutions of 1.7 and 2.1 Å by single-wavelength anomalous dispersion and multiple-wavelength anomalous dispersion, respectively, using the semi-automated high-throughput pipeline of the Joint Center for Structural Genomics (JCSG) as part of the NIGMS Protein Structure Initiative (PSI). These proteins are the first structural representatives of the PF06684 (DUF1185) Pfam family. Structural analysis revealed that both structures adopt a variant of the Bacillus chorismate mutase fold (BCM). The biological unit of both proteins is a hexamer and analysis of homologs indicates that the oligomer interface residues are highly conserved. The conformation of the critical regions for oligomerization appears to be dependent on pH or salt concentration, suggesting that this protein might be subject to environmental regulation. Structural similarities to BCM and genome-context analysis suggest a function in amino-acid synthesis.

  12. Family Resilience: Israeli Mothers' Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Orna; Slonim, Iris; Finzi, Ricky; Leichtentritt, Ronit D.

    2002-01-01

    Study reveals components underlying the concept of family resilience based on the perceptions of Israeli women. Five components of family resilience were identified (1) interpersonal relations; (2) ability to share painful feelings; (3) flexibility among family members; (4) connectedness; and (5) family values. Components have practical…

  13. Family Diversity and School Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindner, Barbara

    This paper focuses on the mismatch between the diversity of American families and the structure of the schools. An examination of the history of the family reveals that the family of the past was very different from the idealized versions popularized in the media. Data concerning divorce, single-parent families, intergenerational interaction,…

  14. Structure of the first representative of Pfam family PF04016 (DUF364) reveals enolase and Rossmann-like folds that combine to form a unique active site with a possible role in heavy-metal chelation

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Mitchell D.; Aravind, L.; Bakolitsa, Constantina; Rife, Christopher L.; Carlton, Dennis; Abdubek, Polat; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Clayton, Thomas; Deller, Marc C.; Duan, Lian; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grant, Joanna C.; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Kozbial, Piotr; Krishna, S. Sri; Kumar, Abhinav; Marciano, David; McMullan, Daniel; Morse, Andrew T.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Okach, Linda; Reyes, Ron; van den Bedem, Henry; Weekes, Dana; Xu, Qingping; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Elsliger, Marc-André; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2010-01-01

    The crystal structure of Dhaf4260 from Desulfitobacterium hafniense DCB-2 was determined by single-wavelength anomalous diffraction (SAD) to a resolution of 2.01 Å using the semi-automated high-throughput pipeline of the Joint Center for Structural Genomics (JCSG) as part of the NIGMS Protein Structure Initiative (PSI). This protein structure is the first representative of the PF04016 (DUF364) Pfam family and reveals a novel combination of two well known domains (an enolase N-terminal-like fold followed by a Rossmann-like domain). Structural and bioinformatic analyses reveal partial similarities to Rossmann-like methyltransferases, with residues from the enolase-like fold combining to form a unique active site that is likely to be involved in the condensation or hydrolysis of molecules implicated in the synthesis of flavins, pterins or other siderophores. The genome context of Dhaf4260 and homologs additionally supports a role in heavy-metal chelation. PMID:20944207

  15. Getting a High-Speed Family Connection: Associations between Family Media Use and Family Connection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padilla-Walker, Laura M.; Coyne, Sarah M.; Fraser, Ashley M.

    2012-01-01

    The way families have used the media has substantially changed over the past decade. Within the framework of family systems theory, this paper examines the relations between family media use and family connection in a sample of 453 adolescents (mean age of child = 14.32 years, SD = 0.98, 52% female) and their parents. Results revealed that cell…

  16. Family Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    Tests and Procedures Family therapy By Mayo Clinic Staff Family therapy is a type of psychological counseling (psychotherapy) that helps family members improve communication and resolve conflicts. Family therapy is usually provided ...

  17. Family Life

    MedlinePlus

    ... With Family and Friends > Family Life Request Permissions Family Life Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , ... your outlook on the future. Friends and adult family members The effects of cancer on your relationships ...

  18. Prospective mutation screening of three common deafness genes in a large Taiwanese Cohort with idiopathic bilateral sensorineural hearing impairment reveals a difference in the results between families from hospitals and those from rehabilitation facilities.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chen-Chi; Chen, Pei-Jer; Chiu, Yu-Hsun; Lu, Ying-Chang; Wu, Ming-Chueh; Hsu, Chuan-Jen

    2008-01-01

    Accurate epidemiological data on common deafness genes are essential to improve the efficiency and to reduce the cost of molecular diagnosis. They may depend on several factors, including a clear delineation of the source of patients being studied. In the present study, we hypothesize that patients with idiopathic sensorineural hearing loss recruited from different sources might reveal discrepancies in the epidemiological results of genetic screening, because patients from different sources might demonstrate distinct clinical or audiologic features and thus result in biased selection of subjects. To elucidate the relative importance of common deafness genes in Taiwanese and to verify our hypothesis, we conducted a prospective project screening mutations in GJB2, SLC26A4 and mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene in a total of 420 Taiwanese families with idiopathic bilateral sensorineural hearing loss, of which 325 families were recruited from hospitals and 95 from hearing rehabilitation facilities. Allele frequencies of common mutations in these three genes and distributions of the corresponding genotypes were then compared between the two groups. The allele frequencies of mutations in SLC26A4, GJB2 and mitochondrial 12S rRNA in the probands of the 420 families were 14.4, 21.7 and 3.8%, respectively. The allele frequency of SLC26A4 mutations in the hospital group was significantly higher than that in the rehabilitation facility group (16.2 vs. 8.4%, chi(2)-test, p < 0.05), whereas no difference in the frequencies of GJB2 mutations and mitochondrial 12S rRNA mutations was found between the two groups. Distributions of probands classified by SLC26A4 genotypes were also different between the two groups (chi(2)-test, p < 0.05). Accordingly, a discrepancy in the genetic screening results might exist between different sources of idiopathic hearing-impaired patients. Further analysis of audiological results and construction of a logistic regression model showed that different

  19. Structures of the first representatives of Pfam family PF06684 (DUF1185) reveal a novel variant of the Bacillus chorismate mutase fold and suggest a role in amino-acid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Bakolitsa, Constantina; Kumar, Abhinav; Jin, Kevin K.; McMullan, Daniel; Krishna, S. Sri; Miller, Mitchell D.; Abdubek, Polat; Acosta, Claire; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Burra, Prasad; Carlton, Dennis; Chen, Connie; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Clayton, Thomas; Das, Debanu; Deller, Marc C.; Duan, Lian; Elias, Ylva; Ellrott, Kyle; Ernst, Dustin; Farr, Carol L.; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grant, Joanna C.; Grzechnik, Anna; Grzechnik, Slawomir K.; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Johnson, Hope A.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Kozbial, Piotr; Marciano, David; Morse, Andrew T.; Murphy, Kevin D.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Nopakun, Amanda; Okach, Linda; Paulsen, Jessica; Puckett, Christina; Reyes, Ron; Rife, Christopher L.; Sefcovic, Natasha; Tien, Henry J.; Trame, Christine B.; Trout, Christina V.; van den Bedem, Henry; Weekes, Dana; White, Aprilfawn; Xu, Qingping; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Elsliger, Marc-Andre; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2010-01-01

    The crystal structures of BB2672 and SPO0826 were determined to resolutions of 1.7 and 2.1 Å by single-wavelength anomalous dispersion and multiple-wavelength anomalous dispersion, respectively, using the semi-automated high-throughput pipeline of the Joint Center for Structural Genomics (JCSG) as part of the NIGMS Protein Structure Initiative (PSI). These proteins are the first structural representatives of the PF06684 (DUF1185) Pfam family. Structural analysis revealed that both structures adopt a variant of the Bacillus chorismate mutase fold (BCM). The biological unit of both proteins is a hexamer and analysis of homologs indicates that the oligomer interface residues are highly conserved. The conformation of the critical regions for oligomerization appears to be dependent on pH or salt concentration, suggesting that this protein might be subject to environmental regulation. Structural similarities to BCM and genome-context analysis suggest a function in amino-acid synthesis. PMID:20944209

  20. Family Folklore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kotkin, Amy J.; Baker, Holly C.

    1977-01-01

    Discusses the Family Folklore Program of the Smithsonian Institution's annual Festival of American Folklife, in which the whole family can be involved in tracing family history through story telling, photographs, etc. (MS)

  1. Familial hypertriglyceridemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000397.htm Familial hypertriglyceridemia To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Familial hypertriglyceridemia is a common disorder passed down through families. ...

  2. Family History

    MedlinePlus

    Your family history includes health information about you and your close relatives. Families have many factors in common, including their genes, ... as heart disease, stroke, and cancer. Having a family member with a disease raises your risk, but ...

  3. Family Arguments

    MedlinePlus

    ... Spread the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Adoption & Foster Care ... Life Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Family Arguments Page Content Article Body We seem to ...

  4. Indicators of Familial Alcoholism in Children's Kinetic Family Drawings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, Elizabeth S.; Kaiser, Donna H.

    2001-01-01

    Attempts to delineate indicators in children's depictions of family that suggest the presence of parental alcoholism. Kinetic Family Drawings from two groups of children were collected. Statistical analysis revealed two of six items of the evaluation - depiction of isolation of self and isolation of other family members - were significantly higher…

  5. Family Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holloway, John H.

    2004-01-01

    Research indicates that family literacy programs can provide opportunities for educational success for parents and children. The benefits reaped by the children in family literacy workshops are presented.

  6. Muslim families and family therapy.

    PubMed

    Daneshpour, M

    1998-07-01

    Muslim immigrant families living in the United States may well come to the attention of mental health professionals. This article examines the applicability of the Anglo-American models of family therapy to Muslim immigrant families. The most significant differences in value systems between the Muslim and Anglo-American cultures is Muslim families' preference for greater connectedness, a less flexible and more hierarchical family structure, and an implicit communication style. Systemic thinking, which deals with the pattern of relationships, is valid for all families regardless of cultural differences. However, the preferred directions of change for Muslim families need to be integrated into the assessment and goals for family therapy.

  7. Family Privilege

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seita, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Family privilege is defined as "strengths and supports gained through primary caring relationships." A generation ago, the typical family included two parents and a bevy of kids living under one roof. Now, every variation of blended caregiving qualifies as family. But over the long arc of human history, a real family was a…

  8. Family functioning in lesbian families created by donor insemination.

    PubMed

    Vanfraussen, Katrien; Ponjaert-Kristoffersen, Ingrid; Brewaeys, Anne

    2003-01-01

    The quantitative and qualitative data of this study on family functioning in lesbian donor insemination families reveal that according to both parents and children, the quality of children's relationship with the social mother is comparable to that with the biological mother. Unlike fathers in heterosexual families, the lesbian social mother is as much involved in child activities as is the biological mother. Furthermore, the lesbian social mother has as much authority as does the father in heterosexual families.

  9. Muslim Families and Family Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daneshpour, Manijeh

    1998-01-01

    Examines the applicability of the Anglo-American models of family therapy to Muslim immigrant families. The differences in value systems are the Muslim families' preferences for greater connectedness, a less flexible and more hierarchical family structure, and an implicit communication style. Suggests that directions for change for Muslims need to…

  10. Family Violence and Family Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Carol P.

    1991-01-01

    The acronym IDEALS summarizes family physicians' obligations when violence is suspected: to identify family violence; document injuries; educate families and ensure safety for victims; access resources and coordinate care; co-operate in the legal process; and provide support for families. Failure to respond reflects personal and professional experience and attitudes, fear of legal involvement, and lack of knowledge. Risks of intervention include physician burnout, physician overfunctioning, escalation of violence, and family disruption. PMID:21228987

  11. Family Violence

    MedlinePlus

    ... Deployment & Transition Home » Health & Wellness » Family Violence Family Violence Recognize the warning signs . Know how to report. ... Love Every Day Making Relationships Work National Domestic Violence Hotline Signs of Child Abuse INSTALLATION PROGRAM DIRECTORY ...

  12. Family Involvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liontos, Lynn Balster

    1992-01-01

    Family involvement in schools will work only when perceived as an enlarged concept focusing on all children, including those from at-risk families. Each publication reviewed here is specifically concerned with family involvement strategies concerned with all children or targeted at primarily high risk students. Susan McAllister Swap looks at three…

  13. Family Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wieck, Colleen, Ed.; McBride, Marijo, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    This "Feature Issue" of the quarterly journal "Impact" presents 19 brief articles on family support systems in the United States for persons with developmental disabilities and their families. Emphasis is on provisions of Public Law 99-457. Articles include: "Family Support in the United States: Setting a Course for the…

  14. Italian families and family interventions.

    PubMed

    Casacchia, Massimo; Roncone, Rita

    2014-06-01

    In Italy, as in many countries, relatives are closely involved in caring for persons with physical and mental disorders. The Italian scenario lends itself to routine involvement of family members in psychiatric treatment because, despite becoming smaller and smaller, Italian families keep close ties, and men and women do not leave the parental home until relatively late. The authors describe the impact of international family psychosocial research on the Italian mental health services (MHSs) and the main psychosocial interventions currently in use, including family psychoeducational interventions and the "Milan family therapy approach." They also highlight the contribution Italian researchers have given to the study of important variables in integrated mental disorder care, such as family burden of care, relatives' attitudes, family functioning, and satisfaction with the MHSs. Finally, they discuss the difficulties of implementing and disseminating family interventions within the Italian MHS, despite the growing evidence of their effectiveness.

  15. Using Family Reconstruction Techniques with Families in Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheras, Peter L.

    An examination of the technique of Family Reconstruction employed by Satir and others attempting to establish an appreciation of the client's personhood through the understanding of their parents' personhood is presented. In addition, the feeling of continuity with the family and the facilitation of integration is explored to further reveal the…

  16. Revealing Rembrandt

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    The power and significance of artwork in shaping human cognition is self-evident. The starting point for our empirical investigations is the view that the task of neuroscience is to integrate itself with other forms of knowledge, rather than to seek to supplant them. In our recent work, we examined a particular aspect of the appreciation of artwork using present-day functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Our results emphasized the continuity between viewing artwork and other human cognitive activities. We also showed that appreciation of a particular aspect of artwork, namely authenticity, depends upon the co-ordinated activity between the brain regions involved in multiple decision making and those responsible for processing visual information. The findings about brain function probably have no specific consequences for understanding how people respond to the art of Rembrandt in comparison with their response to other artworks. However, the use of images of Rembrandt's portraits, his most intimate and personal works, clearly had a significant impact upon our viewers, even though they have been spatially confined to the interior of an MRI scanner at the time of viewing. Neuroscientific studies of humans viewing artwork have the capacity to reveal the diversity of human cognitive responses that may be induced by external advice or context as people view artwork in a variety of frameworks and settings. PMID:24795552

  17. Roles within the Family

    MedlinePlus

    ... Family Life Family Life Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Media Work & Play Getting Involved in Your Community ... AAP Find a Pediatrician Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Adoption & Foster Care Communication & Discipline Types of Families ...

  18. Improving Family Communications

    MedlinePlus

    ... Family Life Family Life Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Media Work & Play Getting Involved in Your Community ... AAP Find a Pediatrician Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Adoption & Foster Care Communication & Discipline Types of Families ...

  19. Genetic analysis in a patient presenting with meningioma and familial isolated pituitary adenoma (FIPA) reveals selective involvement of the R81X mutation of the AIP gene in the pathogenesis of the pituitary tumor.

    PubMed

    Guaraldi, Federica; Corazzini, Valentina; Gallia, Gary L; Grottoli, Silvia; Stals, Karen; Dalantaeva, Nadezhda; Frohman, Lawrence A; Korbonits, Márta; Salvatori, Roberto

    2012-12-01

    Familial isolated pituitary adenoma (FIPA), defined as the occurrence of at least two cases of pituitary adenoma in a family that does not exhibit features of syndromic diseases, such as Carney complex or Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 1 or 4, is a rare autosomal dominant disease with low penetrance. About 20 % of the families with FIPA harbor inactivating mutation in aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein gene (AIP) associated with loss of heterozygosity of the same genetic locus (11q13) in the tumor. Rarely different types of extra-pituitary tumors have been described in the setting of AIP mutation-positive FIPA. We present the case of a patient who was diagnosed with acromegaly due to the AIP mutation c.241C>T (p.R81X) at the age of 34 years, and treated by transsphenoidal surgery. At the age of 43 years she was diagnosed with a meningioma, and at age 46 had recurrence of the somatotropinoma. Genetic studies demonstrated loss of the normal allele (by sequencing and microsatellite analysis) in DNA from the pituitary adenoma but not from the meningioma, suggesting a selective involvement of AIP mutation in the pathogenesis of the pituitary adenoma, and a casual association with the meningioma. Further investigations are required to define the exact role of AIP in non-pituitary tumorigenesis.

  20. Family Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naturescope, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Focuses on various aspects of mammal family life ranging from ways different species are born to how different mammals are raised. Learning activities include making butter from cream, creating birth announcements for mammals, and playing a password game on family life. (ML)

  1. Family Reunification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wulczyn, Fred

    2004-01-01

    Reunifying children placed in foster care with their birth parents is a primary goal of the child welfare system. Yet, relatively little is known about the reunification process. This article analyzes new data on trends in family reunification and discovers: (1) Although most children still exit foster care through family reunification, exit…

  2. Family Empowerment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinclair, Mary F., Ed.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    This feature issue of IMPACT focuses on the empowerment of families with a member who has a developmental disability. It presents strategies and models for a collaborative, respectful approach to service provision, and presents the experiences of families in seeking support and assistance. Feature articles include "Two Generations of…

  3. Family Workshops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Dave; Rees-Jones, Tanny

    1978-01-01

    A Family Workshop is an informal, multidisciplined educational program for adults and children, organized by a team of teachers. This article discusses the Lavender Hill Family Workshop, one of many, which attempts to provide education in various subject areas for adults and for children while also integrating both objectives in order to educate…

  4. Family, Extended

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patton, Jessica Rae

    2006-01-01

    Parents are a child's first and most influential teacher. People hear this truism often, yet nowhere has the author seen it more taken to heart than at Tower Street Elementary School. The school's efforts to form a true partnership with students' families--from involving families in the first day of school, to the principal making home visits, to…

  5. Family Potyviridae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The International Committee on the Taxonomy of Viruses potyvirus study group has revised the description of the family Potyviridae for inclusion in the ICTV 9th report. Characteristic features of each genus within the family is presented. Revised criteria for demarcation and nomenclature of viral sp...

  6. Role of Non-coding Regulatory RNA in the Virulence of Human Pathogenic Vibrios.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Reytor, Diliana; Plaza, Nicolás; Espejo, Romilio T; Navarrete, Paola; Bastías, Roberto; Garcia, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    In recent decades, the identification of small non-coding RNAs in bacteria has revealed an important regulatory mechanism of gene expression involved in the response to environmental signals and to the control of virulence. In the family Vibrionaceae, which includes several human and animal pathogens, small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) are closely related to important processes including metabolism, quorum sensing, virulence, and fitness. Studies conducted in silico and experiments using microarrays and high-throughput RNA sequencing have led to the discovery of an unexpected number of sRNAs in Vibrios. The present review discusses the most relevant reports regarding the mechanisms of action of sRNAs and their implications in the virulence of the main human pathogens in the family Vibrionaceae: Vibrio parahaemolyticus, V. vulnificus and V. cholerae.

  7. Role of Non-coding Regulatory RNA in the Virulence of Human Pathogenic Vibrios

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Reytor, Diliana; Plaza, Nicolás; Espejo, Romilio T.; Navarrete, Paola; Bastías, Roberto; Garcia, Katherine

    2017-01-01

    In recent decades, the identification of small non-coding RNAs in bacteria has revealed an important regulatory mechanism of gene expression involved in the response to environmental signals and to the control of virulence. In the family Vibrionaceae, which includes several human and animal pathogens, small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) are closely related to important processes including metabolism, quorum sensing, virulence, and fitness. Studies conducted in silico and experiments using microarrays and high-throughput RNA sequencing have led to the discovery of an unexpected number of sRNAs in Vibrios. The present review discusses the most relevant reports regarding the mechanisms of action of sRNAs and their implications in the virulence of the main human pathogens in the family Vibrionaceae: Vibrio parahaemolyticus, V. vulnificus and V. cholerae. PMID:28123382

  8. Family Health and Family Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Health Organization, Copenhagen (Denmark). Regional Office for Europe.

    This document is made up of a selection of some of the papers distributed to participants in courses on "Family Health and Family Planning" which have been organized each year since 1973 by the International Children's Center and the World Health Organization Regional Office for Europe. Six courses, held between 1973 and 1978, brought together a…

  9. Whole genome sequencing and analysis reveal insights into the genetic structure, diversity and evolutionary relatedness of luxI and luxR homologs in bacteria belonging to the Sphingomonadaceae family

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Han Ming; Gan, Huan You; Ahmad, Nurul H.; Aziz, Nazrin A.; Hudson, André O.; Savka, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Here we report the draft genomes and annotation of four N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL)-producing members from the family Sphingomonadaceae. Comparative genomic analyses of 62 Sphingomonadaceae genomes were performed to gain insights into the distribution of the canonical luxI/R-type quorum sensing (QS) network within this family. Forty genomes contained at least one luxR homolog while the genome of Sphingobium yanoikuyae B1 contained seven Open Reading Frames (ORFs) that have significant homology to that of luxR. Thirty-three genomes contained at least one luxI homolog while the genomes of Sphingobium sp. SYK6, Sphingobium japonicum, and Sphingobium lactosutens contained four luxI. Using phylogenetic analysis, the sphingomonad LuxR homologs formed five distinct clades with two minor clades located near the plant associated bacteria (PAB) LuxR solo clade. This work for the first time shows that 13 Sphingobium and one Sphingomonas genome(s) contain three convergently oriented genes composed of two tandem luxR genes proximal to one luxI (luxR-luxR-luxI). Interestingly, luxI solos were identified in two Sphingobium species and may represent species that contribute to AHL-based QS system by contributing AHL molecules but are unable to perceive AHLs as signals. This work provides the most comprehensive description of the luxI/R circuitry and genome-based taxonomical description of the available sphingomonad genomes to date indicating that the presence of luxR solos and luxI solos are not an uncommon feature in members of the Sphingomonadaceae family. PMID:25621282

  10. SAP family proteins.

    PubMed

    Fujita, A; Kurachi, Y

    2000-03-05

    Thus far, five members including Dlg, SAP97/hDlg, SAP90/PSD-95, SAP102, and PSD-93/chapsyn110 which belong to SAP family have been identified. Recent studies have revealed that these proteins play important roles in the localization and function of glutamate receptors and K(+) channels. Although most of them have been reported to be localized to the synapse, only one member, SAP97, is expressed also in the epithelial cells. In this review, we have summarized structural characters of SAP family proteins and discuss their functions in neurons and epithelial cells.

  11. Asteroid families

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesvorný, David; Bottke, William F.; Vokrouhlický, David; Morbidelli, Alessandro; Jedicke, Robert

    An asteroid family is a group of asteroids with similar orbits and spectra that was produced by a collisional breakup of a large parent body. To identify asteroid families, researchers look for clusters of asteroid positions in the space of proper orbital elements. These elements, being more constant over time than osculating orbital elements, provide a dynamical criterion of whether a group of bodies has a common ancestor. More than fifty asteroid families have been identified to date. Their analysis produced several important insights into the physics of large scale collisions, dynamical processes affecting small bodies in the Solar System, and surface and interior properties of asteroids.

  12. Expression profiling reveals Spot 42 small RNA as a key regulator in the central metabolism of Aliivibrio salmonicida

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Spot 42 was discovered in Escherichia coli nearly 40 years ago as an abundant, small and unstable RNA. Its biological role has remained obscure until recently, and is today implicated in having broader roles in the central and secondary metabolism. Spot 42 is encoded by the spf gene. The gene is ubiquitous in the Vibrionaceae family of gamma-proteobacteria. One member of this family, Aliivibrio salmonicida, causes cold-water vibriosis in farmed Atlantic salmon. Its genome encodes Spot 42 with 84% identity to E. coli Spot 42. Results We generated a A. salmonicida spf deletion mutant. We then used microarray and Northern blot analyses to monitor global effects on the transcriptome in order to provide insights into the biological roles of Spot 42 in this bacterium. In the presence of glucose, we found a surprisingly large number of ≥ 2X differentially expressed genes, and several major cellular processes were affected. A gene encoding a pirin-like protein showed an on/off expression pattern in the presence/absence of Spot 42, which suggests that Spot 42 plays a key regulatory role in the central metabolism by regulating the switch between fermentation and respiration. Interestingly, we discovered an sRNA named VSsrna24, which is encoded immediately downstream of spf. This new sRNA has an expression pattern opposite to that of Spot 42, and its expression is repressed by glucose. Conclusions We hypothesize that Spot 42 plays a key role in the central metabolism, in part by regulating the pyruvat dehydrogenase enzyme complex via pirin. PMID:22272603

  13. Phylogenetic relationships of Acheilognathidae (Cypriniformes: Cyprinoidea) as revealed from evidence of both nuclear and mitochondrial gene sequence variation: evidence for necessary taxonomic revision in the family and the identification of cryptic species.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Hao; Li, Fan; Shao, Kwang-Tsao; Lin, Yeong-Shin; Morosawa, Takahiro; Kim, Sungmin; Koo, Hyeyoung; Kim, Won; Lee, Jae-Seong; He, Shunping; Smith, Carl; Reichard, Martin; Miya, Masaki; Sado, Tetsuya; Uehara, Kazuhiko; Lavoué, Sébastien; Chen, Wei-Jen; Mayden, Richard L

    2014-12-01

    Bitterlings are relatively small cypriniform species and extremely interesting evolutionarily due to their unusual reproductive behaviors and their coevolutionary relationships with freshwater mussels. As a group, they have attracted a great deal of attention in biological studies. Understanding the origin and evolution of their mating system demands a well-corroborated hypothesis of their evolutionary relationships. In this study, we provide the most comprehensive phylogenetic reconstruction of species relationships of the group based on partitioned maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods using DNA sequence variation of nuclear and mitochondrial genes on 41 species, several subspecies and three undescribed species. Our findings support the monophyly of the Acheilognathidae. Two of the three currently recognized genera are not monophyletic and the family can be subdivided into six clades. These clades are further regarded as genera based on both their phylogenetic relationships and a reappraisal of morphological characters. We present a revised classification for the Acheilognathidae with five genera/lineages: Rhodeus, Acheilognathus (new constitution), Tanakia (new constitution), Paratanakia gen. nov., and Pseudorhodeus gen. nov. and an unnamed clade containing five species currently referred to as "Acheilognathus". Gene trees of several bitterling species indicate that the taxa are not monophyletic. This result highlights a potentially dramatic underestimation of species diversity in this family. Using our new phylogenetic framework, we discuss the evolution of the Acheilognathidae relative to classification, taxonomy and biogeography.

  14. Familial dysautonomia

    MedlinePlus

    Riley-Day syndrome; FD; Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy - type III (HSAN III); Autonomic crises - familial dysautonomia ... PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 107. Sarnat HB. Autonomic neuropathies. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St. Geme JW, ...

  15. Unusual families.

    PubMed

    Golombok, Susan

    2005-03-01

    The introduction of assisted reproduction has led to unusual forms of procreation. This article describes the social consequences of lesbian motherhood and of families headed by single heterosexual mothers.

  16. Family dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Hayaki, Chie; Anno, Kozo; Shibata, Mao; Iwaki, Rie; Kawata, Hiroshi; Sudo, Nobuyuki; Hosoi, Masako

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Previous studies have shown differences in the psychosocial factors related to chronic localized pain (CLP) and chronic widespread pain (CWP). However, no studies have done an evaluation of differences between CLP and CWP from the viewpoint of family functioning. We did a cross-sectional study in a tertiary care setting to investigate possible differences in the relation of CWP and CLP to family functioning. Patients with CLP (N = 126) or CWP (N = 75) were assessed for family functioning by the Family Assessment Device (FAD) and a comparison was done. Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate associations of family functioning subscales with pain status (CWP vs CLP), controlling for demographic variables, pain variables; pain duration, pain ratings, pain disability, and psychological factors; depression, anxiety, and catastrophizing. The odds ratios (ORs) for the presence of CWP were calculated. Compared to patients with CLP, patients with CWP showed a lower functional status for Roles and Affective Involvement. The ORs for CWP were significantly higher in lower functioning Roles (OR: 2.38, 95% CI: 1.21–4.65) and Affective Involvement (OR: 2.86, 95% CI: 1.56–5.24) after adjusting for demographic variables. The significant association of CWP to Roles and Affective Involvement remained after controlling for the pain variables and psychological factors. This study shows that the families of patients with CWP have poorer family functioning than those with CLP. Our findings suggest that early identification and interventions for the family dysfunction of chronic pain patients are important to the treatment and prevention of CWP. PMID:27930535

  17. Acculturation gaps in Vietnamese immigrant families: Impact on family relationships

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Joyce; Birman, Dina

    2009-01-01

    Vietnamese immigrants in the United States face acculturation challenges involving the individual, family, and community. Experts suggest that immigrant family members acculturate at different rates resulting in an acculturation gap, which negatively influences family adjustment. In this study we examined the degree and patterns of acculturation differences between 104 first generation immigrant Vietnamese adolescents and their parents, and whether acculturation gap affected family relationships. Operationalizing the “gap” as both absolute value of differences in acculturation and interactions of parent and adolescent acculturation levels, we examined the impact of such gaps in Vietnamese and American language, identity, and behavioral acculturation on family relationships. Results revealed that family cohesion and satisfaction were predicted by gaps in Vietnamese identity acculturation, but not by gaps in other acculturation domains. PMID:20161537

  18. Severe Lower Limb Ischemia by Massive Arterial Thrombosis Revealing an Acute Myeloid Leukemia Needing for Leg Amputation: Clinical and Emotional Aspects Related to the Communication with the Patient and His Family

    PubMed Central

    Taormina, Calogero; Mosa, Clara; Di Marco, Floriana; Valentino, Fabrizio; Trizzino, Angela; Guadagna, Paola; Talarico, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Large vessel thrombosis is a very rare clinical presentation of acute leukemia, generally associated with coagulopathy, usually characteristic of acute promyelocytic leukemia. A 13- year-old boy with a previously undiagnosed acute myeloid leukemia was referred to our hospital with acute ischemia of the right lower limb due to occlusion of the right external iliac artery, treated with emergency double surgical thromboembolectomy and chemotherapy. The thrombotic complication resulted in leg amputation. Now the boy is well in complete remission, with a good social integration and quality of life, 30 months after completing treatment. The report highlights the crucial role of early diagnosis and subsequent chemotherapy in avoiding amputation. We particularly focused critical and emotional aspects related to the communication about the leg amputation with the patient and his family. PMID:28058104

  19. Genetic recombination at the human RH locus: A family study of the red-cell Evans phenotype reveals a transfer of exons 2-6 from the RHD to the RHCE gene

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, C.H.; Chen, Y.; Reid, M.; Ghosh, S.

    1996-10-01

    The human RH locus appears to consist of two structural genes, D and CE, which map on the short arm p34-36 of chromosome 1 and specify a most complex system of blood-group genetic polymorphisms. Here we describe a family study of the Evans (also known as {open_quotes}D..{open_quotes}) phenotype, a codominant trait associated with both qualitative and quantitative changes in D-antigen expression. A cataract-causing mutation was also inherited in this family and was apparently cotransmitted with Evans, suggesting a chromosomal linkage of these two otherwise unrelated traits. Southern blot analysis and allele-specific PCR showed the linkage of Evans with a SphI RFLP marker and the presence of a hybrid gene in the RH locus. To delineate the pattern of gene expression, the composition and structure of Rh-polypeptide transcripts were characterized by reverse transcriptase-PCR and nucleotide sequencing. This resulted in the identification of a novel Rh transcript expressed only in the Evans-positive erythroid cells. Sequence analysis showed that the transcript maintained a normal open reading frame but occurred as a CE-D-CE composite in which exons 2-6 of the CE gene were replaced by the homologous counterpart of the D gene. This hybrid gene was predicted to encode a CE-D-CE fusion protein whose surface expression correlates with the Evans phenotype. The mode and consequence of such a recombination event suggest the occurrence, in the RH locus, of a segmental DNA transfer via the mechanism of gene conversion. 31 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Family welfare.

    PubMed

    Sinha, N K

    1992-01-01

    Between 1901-1921, India gained 12.9 million people because mortality remained high. The death rate fell between 1921-1951, but birth rates remained the same. Therefore 110 million people were added--2 times the population increase between 1891-1921. Between 1951-1981, the population increased to 324 million. Socioeconomic development was responsible for most of the downward trend in the birth rate during the 20th century. Even though large families were the norm in early India, religious leaders encouraged small family size. The 1st government family planning clinics in the world opened in Mysore and Bangalore in 1930. Right before Independence, the Bhore Committee made recommendations to reduce population growth such as increasing the age of marriage for girls. Since 1951 there has been a change in measures and policies geared towards population growth with each of the 7 5-Year Plans because policy makers applied what they learned from each previous plan. The 1st 5-Year Plan emphasized the need to understand what factors contribute to population growth. It also integrated family planning services into health services of hospitals and health centers. The government was over zealous in its implementation of the sterilization program (2nd 5-Year Plan, 1956-1961), however, which hurt family planning programs for many years. As of early 1992, sterilization, especially tubectomy, remained the most popular family planning method, however. The 7th 5-Year Plan changed its target of reaching a Net Reproductive Rate of 1 by 2001 to 2006-2011. It set a goal of 100% immunization coverage by 1990 but it did not occur. In 1986, the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare planned to make free contraceptives available in urban and rural areas and to involve voluntary organizations. The government needs to instill measures to increase women's status, women's literacy, and age of marriage as well as to eliminate poverty, ensure old age security, and ensure child survival and

  1. Female families' experiences of caring for persons with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Eriko; Takataya, Kumiko; Kamizawa, Naotoshi; Sakai, Ikue; Yamazaki, Yoko

    2013-04-01

    The caring experiences of female families of persons with schizophrenia were described through exploring the families' descriptions of their experiences. Focus group interviews were conducted with 11 family caregivers. According to content analysis, the experiences revealed five major themes: early family experiences, family perceptions of illness and relatives with schizophrenia, family burden and suffering, family attitudes toward relatives with schizophrenia, and family thoughts about society and mental health resources. Also, the families had strength to overcome considerable adversity. It is needed for professionals to listen to family caregivers' narratives carefully and improve the support by focusing on accepting their experiences and histories with persons with schizophrenia.

  2. KIN241: a gene involved in cell morphogenesis in Paramecium tetraurelia reveals a novel protein family of cyclophilin-RNA interacting proteins (CRIPs) conserved from fission yeast to man.

    PubMed

    Krzywicka, A; Beisson, J; Keller, A M; Cohen, J; Jerka-Dziadosz, M; Klotz, C

    2001-10-01

    In this study, we report cloning, by functional complementation of the KIN241 gene involved in Paramecium cell morphogenesis, cortical organization and nuclear reorganization. This gene is predicted to encode a protein of a novel type, comprising a cyclophilin-type, peptidyl-prolyl isomerase domain, an RNA recognition motif, followed by a region rich in glutamate and lysine (EK domain) and a C-terminal string of serines. As homologues of this protein are present in the genomes of Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster, Arabidopsis thaliana and Homo sapiens, the Kin241p predicted sequence defines a new family of proteins that we propose to call 'CRIP', for cyclophilin-RNA interacting protein. We demonstrate that, in Paramecium, Kin241p is localized in the nucleus and that deletion of some nuclear localization signals (NLSs) decreases transport of the protein into the nucleus. No Kin241-1 protein is present in mutant cells, suggesting that the C-terminal serine-rich region is responsible for protein stability.

  3. Ecology and Population Structure of Vibrionaceae in the Coastal Ocean

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-01

    determines the allele frequency within the patch. Gut microbiota are a unique assembly of 21 populations (Eckburg et al., 2005; Gao et al., 2007; Pei et al...et al., 2006). Microbiota of Animals Bacteria are attached to nearly all animal surfaces that are exposed to the environment and play important roles...in the health of the organism. Bacteria are particularly abundant in the gut , where nutrients are concentrated and conditions are fairly stable

  4. Elucidation of exo-beta-D-glucosaminidase activity of a family 9 glycoside hydrolase (PBPRA0520) from Photobacterium profundum SS9.

    PubMed

    Honda, Yuji; Shimaya, Nozomi; Ishisaki, Kana; Ebihara, Mitsuru; Taniguchi, Hajime

    2011-04-01

    A glycoside hydrolase (GH) gene from Photobacterium profundum SS9 (PBPRA0520) belonging to GH family 9 was expressed in Escherichia coli. The protein was expressed with the intact N-terminal sequence, suggesting that it is an intracellular enzyme. The recombinant protein showed hydrolytic activity toward chitobiose [(GlcN)(2)] and cellobiose (CG(2)) in various disaccharides. This protein also released 4-nitrophenol (PNP) from both 4-nitrophenyl-β-D-glucosaminide (GlcN-PNP) and 4-nitrophenyl-β-D-glucoside (Glc-PNP). The hydrolytic pattern observed in chitooligosaccharides and cellooligosaccharides suggested that the reaction proceeded from the nonreducing end in an exo-type manner. Time-dependent (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis of the anomeric form of the enzymatic reaction products indicated that the protein is an inverting enzyme. k(cat)/K(m) of (GlcN)(2) hydrolysis was 14 times greater than that of CG(2) hydrolysis. These results suggested that the protein is an exo-β-D-glucosaminidase (EC 3.2.1.165) rather than a glucan 1,4-β-D-glucosidase (EC 3.2.1.74). Based on the results, we suggest that the function of conserved GH9 proteins in the chitin catabolic operon is to cleave a (GlcN)(2)-phosphate derivative by hydrolysis during intracellular chitooligosaccharide catabolism in Vibrionaceae.

  5. Family Hypnotherapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Araoz, Daniel L.; Negley-Parker, Esther

    1985-01-01

    A therapeutic model to help families activate experiential and right hemispheric functioning through hypnosis is presented in detail, together with a clinical illustration. Different situations in which this model is effective are mentioned and one such set of circumstances is described. (Author)

  6. Small Families

    MedlinePlus

    ... more emphasis on careers for women, more effective methods of contraception, and the rising cost of rearing and educating children. There are some very clear benefits to having a small family; Each child receives more parental attention and educational advantages, which generally raise her self- ...

  7. Serving Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Link, Geoffrey; Beggs, Marjorie; Seiderman, Ethel

    Parent Services Project (PSP), the first comprehensive program of resources and mental health activities for parents offered at child care centers in the San Francisco Bay Area (California), has expanded to centers in six states, serving over 19,000 families. This report describes the program's history, aims, and achievements, along with specific…

  8. Family Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorgen, Carol, Ed.

    1979-01-01

    This quarterly publication, issued by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), contains articles dealing with family violence and alcohol abuse, children of alcoholic parents, training programs for counselors, and confidentiality of client records. The three articles on alcohol abuse suggest that: (1) there is a clear…

  9. Family Disruptions

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Returns Do you or your spouse frequently travel on business? These can be disruptive times for your child and for the family as ... these out-of-town trips. Spend as much time as it takes to explain where you are ... before and during your travels. You need to acknowledge and accept her feelings: " ...

  10. FAMILY TYMOVIRIDAE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This article provides a brief review of the taxonomic structure, virion properties, genome organization and replication strategy, antigenic properties, and biological properties of viruses in the family Tymoviridae. Criteria for demarcation of genus and species are provided. A brief review of each...

  11. FAMILY LAUXANIIDAE.

    PubMed

    Silva, Vera Cristina

    2016-06-14

    An updated Catalogue of the Lauxaniidae of Colombia is presented. This acalyptratae family is poorly known in Colombia, with only 36 described species in 33 genera. This paper expands the distribution of 24 species to Colombia. At total, 63 species are reported here for Colombia.

  12. Cold adaptation of zinc metalloproteases in the thermolysin family from deep sea and arctic sea ice bacteria revealed by catalytic and structural properties and molecular dynamics: new insights into relationship between conformational flexibility and hydrogen bonding.

    PubMed

    Xie, Bin-Bin; Bian, Fei; Chen, Xiu-Lan; He, Hai-Lun; Guo, Jun; Gao, Xiang; Zeng, Yin-Xin; Chen, Bo; Zhou, Bai-Cheng; Zhang, Yu-Zhong

    2009-04-03

    Increased conformational flexibility is the prevailing explanation for the high catalytic efficiency of cold-adapted enzymes at low temperatures. However, less is known about the structural determinants of flexibility. We reported two novel cold-adapted zinc metalloproteases in the thermolysin family, vibriolysin MCP-02 from a deep sea bacterium and vibriolysin E495 from an Arctic sea ice bacterium, and compared them with their mesophilic homolog, pseudolysin from a terrestrial bacterium. Their catalytic efficiencies, k(cat)/K(m) (10-40 degrees C), followed the order pseudolysin < MCP-02 < E495 with a ratio of approximately 1:2:4. MCP-02 and E495 have the same optimal temperature (T(opt), 57 degrees C, 5 degrees C lower than pseudolysin) and apparent melting temperature (T(m) = 64 degrees C, approximately 10 degrees C lower than pseudolysin). Structural analysis showed that the slightly lower stabilities resulted from a decrease in the number of salt bridges. Fluorescence quenching experiments and molecular dynamics simulations showed that the flexibilities of the proteins were pseudolysin < MCP-02 < E495, suggesting that optimization of flexibility is a strategy for cold adaptation. Molecular dynamics results showed that the ordinal increase in flexibility from pseudolysin to MCP-02 and E495, especially the increase from MCP-02 to E495, mainly resulted from the decrease of hydrogen-bond stability in the dynamic structure, which was due to the increase in asparagine, serine, and threonine residues. Finally, a model for the cold adaptation of MCP-02 and E495 was proposed. This is the first report of the optimization of hydrogen-bonding dynamics as a strategy for cold adaptation and provides new insights into the structural basis underlying conformational flexibility.

  13. Multigene families in African swine fever virus: family 505.

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, J M; Yañez, R J; Pan, R; Rodriguez, J F; Salas, M L; Viñuela, E

    1994-01-01

    Sequencing of restriction fragment EcoRI A-SalI C of African swine fever virus has revealed the existence of a multigene family, designated family 505 because of the average number of amino acids in the proteins, composed of seven homologous and tandemly arranged genes. All the genes of family 505 are expressed during infection. Primer extension analysis showed that transcription is initiated a short distance (3 to 62 nucleotides) from the start codon of the corresponding open reading frame. The proteins of family 505 showed similarity to those of family 360 from African swine fever virus. In particular, a striking conservation of three regions at the amino terminus of the polypeptides was observed. Images PMID:8139051

  14. Family Therapy and Disturbed Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuk, Gerald H., Ed.; Boszormenyi-Nagy, Ivan, Ed.

    Presented at a conference at which authors represented major theoretical positions in the field, most of the papers use family therapy as an important source of observations or ideas, or as a means to pinpoint methodological problems. Papers are grouped in sections as follows: four which introduce the reader to the field of specialization, provide…

  15. Seven New Complete Plastome Sequences Reveal Rampant Independent Loss of the ndh Gene Family across Orchids and Associated Instability of the Inverted Repeat/Small Single-Copy Region Boundaries

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Michael J.; Neubig, Kurt M.; Williams, Norris H.; Whitten, W. Mark; Kim, Joo-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Earlier research has revealed that the ndh loci have been pseudogenized, truncated, or deleted from most orchid plastomes sequenced to date, including in all available plastomes of the two most species-rich subfamilies, Orchidoideae and Epidendroideae. This study sought to resolve deeper-level phylogenetic relationships among major orchid groups and to refine the history of gene loss in the ndh loci across orchids. The complete plastomes of seven orchids, Oncidium sphacelatum (Epidendroideae), Masdevallia coccinea (Epidendroideae), Sobralia callosa (Epidendroideae), Sobralia aff. bouchei (Epidendroideae), Elleanthus sodiroi (Epidendroideae), Paphiopedilum armeniacum (Cypripedioideae), and Phragmipedium longifolium (Cypripedioideae) were sequenced and analyzed in conjunction with all other available orchid and monocot plastomes. Most ndh loci were found to be pseudogenized or lost in Oncidium, Paphiopedilum and Phragmipedium, but surprisingly, all ndh loci were found to retain full, intact reading frames in Sobralia, Elleanthus and Masdevallia. Character mapping suggests that the ndh genes were present in the common ancestor of orchids but have experienced independent, significant losses at least eight times across four subfamilies. In addition, ndhF gene loss was correlated with shifts in the position of the junction of the inverted repeat (IR) and small single-copy (SSC) regions. The Orchidaceae have unprecedented levels of homoplasy in ndh gene presence/absence, which may be correlated in part with the unusual life history of orchids. These results also suggest that ndhF plays a role in IR/SSC junction stability. PMID:26558895

  16. Seven New Complete Plastome Sequences Reveal Rampant Independent Loss of the ndh Gene Family across Orchids and Associated Instability of the Inverted Repeat/Small Single-Copy Region Boundaries.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyoung Tae; Kim, Jung Sung; Moore, Michael J; Neubig, Kurt M; Williams, Norris H; Whitten, W Mark; Kim, Joo-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Earlier research has revealed that the ndh loci have been pseudogenized, truncated, or deleted from most orchid plastomes sequenced to date, including in all available plastomes of the two most species-rich subfamilies, Orchidoideae and Epidendroideae. This study sought to resolve deeper-level phylogenetic relationships among major orchid groups and to refine the history of gene loss in the ndh loci across orchids. The complete plastomes of seven orchids, Oncidium sphacelatum (Epidendroideae), Masdevallia coccinea (Epidendroideae), Sobralia callosa (Epidendroideae), Sobralia aff. bouchei (Epidendroideae), Elleanthus sodiroi (Epidendroideae), Paphiopedilum armeniacum (Cypripedioideae), and Phragmipedium longifolium (Cypripedioideae) were sequenced and analyzed in conjunction with all other available orchid and monocot plastomes. Most ndh loci were found to be pseudogenized or lost in Oncidium, Paphiopedilum and Phragmipedium, but surprisingly, all ndh loci were found to retain full, intact reading frames in Sobralia, Elleanthus and Masdevallia. Character mapping suggests that the ndh genes were present in the common ancestor of orchids but have experienced independent, significant losses at least eight times across four subfamilies. In addition, ndhF gene loss was correlated with shifts in the position of the junction of the inverted repeat (IR) and small single-copy (SSC) regions. The Orchidaceae have unprecedented levels of homoplasy in ndh gene presence/absence, which may be correlated in part with the unusual life history of orchids. These results also suggest that ndhF plays a role in IR/SSC junction stability.

  17. Adolescents’ Perceptions of Family Belonging in Stepfamilies

    PubMed Central

    King, Valarie; Boyd, Lisa M.; Thorsen, Maggie L.

    2015-01-01

    Prior research has established that adolescents’ perceptions of family belonging are associated with a range of well-being indicators and that adolescents in stepfamilies report lower levels of family belonging than adolescents in two-biological-parent families. Yet, we know little regarding what factors are associated with adolescents’ perceptions of family belonging in stepfamilies. Guided by family systems theory, the authors addressed this issue by using nationally representative data (Add Health) to examine the associations between family characteristics and adolescents’ perceptions of family belonging in stepfather families (N = 2,085). Results from structural equation models revealed that both the perceived quality of the stepfather–adolescent relationship, and in particular the perceived quality of the mother–adolescent relationship, were the factors most strongly associated with feelings of family belonging. PMID:26166845

  18. Family Centers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-30

    quality service delivery to meet the needs of the DoD personnel and their families, in accordance with DoD Directive 1342.17 (reference (a)). 4...facility, and program standards. f. Develop and forward to ASD(FM&P), for review and approval, a comprehensive evaluation system to measure the...of future services and the continuation, expansion, or termination of others. (3) Service-wide measurement criteria for monitoring and evaluating the

  19. Familial Hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Bouhairie, Victoria Enchia; Goldberg, Anne Carol

    2015-01-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia is a common, inherited disorder of cholesterol metabolism that leads to early cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. It is underdiagnosed and undertreated. Statins, ezetimibe, bile acid sequestrants, niacin, lomitapide, mipomersen and LDL apheresis are treatments that can lower LDL cholesterol levels. Early treatment can lead to substantial reduction of cardiovascular events and death in patients with FH. It is important to increase awareness of this disorder in physicians and patients in order to reduce the burden of this disorder. PMID:25939291

  20. Familial Gigantiform Cementoma

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Chunyue; Wang, Hongwei; He, Guang; Qin, Xingjun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Familial gigantiform cementoma is an exceedingly rare but distinct subtype of cemento-osseous-fibrous lesion. Undocumented radiographic changes and related bone metabolism disorder are herein hypothesized and discussed. We present an adolescent case with recurrent familial gigantiform cementoma who received surgical intervention in our hospital. Apart from typical multiquadrant and expansile abnormalies involving both jaws, he also suffered from several times of fractures in lower extremity. Furthermore, radiographic examinations of calvaria, pelvis, femoris, tibia, and fibula all revealed radiolucent areas signifying diffuse osteopenic bone losses. Some of his consanguineous relatives bore the same burden of fractures during pubertal period. Considering these polyostotic conditions, a correlation of congenital bone metabolism disorder in cases with familial gigantiform cementoma, named “calcium steal disorder,” was thus proposed. Familial gigantiform cementoma is closely associated with “calcium steal disorder.” Whole-body dual-energy absorptiometry should be considered as a routine examination for fracture-related risk prediction. PMID:26945411

  1. Gender and the Work-Family Interface: Exploring Differences across the Family Life Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinengo, Giuseppe; Jacob, Jenet I.; Hill, E. Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    This study examines gender differences in the work-family interface across six family life stages using a global sample of IBM employees in 79 countries (N = 41,813). Family life stage was constructed using the age of respondent and age of youngest child. Results revealed that having young children at home was the critical catalyst for gender…

  2. The Families of Lesbian and Gay Men: A New Frontier in Family Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Katherine R.; Demo, David H.

    1995-01-01

    A review of 8,000 articles in family research journals revealed that research on lesbian and gay families is limited and that studies that do exist have been problematized and their diversity has been overlooked. Challenges the neglect of this population in family studies, and discusses theoretical implications. (JPS)

  3. Family Lessons and Funds of Knowledge: College-Going Paths in Mexican American Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiyama, Judy Marquez

    2011-01-01

    Families are crucial in the development of a college-going culture in the home. This qualitative study illustrates that Mexican American families are no exception. Using a multiple case study design, this study explored the funds of knowledge present in Mexican American families. Findings from this study reveal how daily educational practices,…

  4. Family Matters: An Investigation of Family Coursework in School Counseling Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joe, J. Richelle; Harris, Pamela N.

    2016-01-01

    School counselors are expected to form collaborative relationships with the families of students. Yet, school counselors have limited knowledge about families to form these partnerships, as a descriptive content analysis of the family coursework requirements in CACREP-accredited school counseling programs in the southern region revealed that most…

  5. Adolescent Sexuality: Disentangling the Effects of Family Structure and Family Content.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Erin Calhoun; Friel, Lisa V.

    2001-01-01

    Growing up in single parent, step parent, cohabiting, or lesbian families has been suggested to have negative effects on adolescent sexual behavior. However, analysis reveals that family structure does not significantly influence adolescents' sexual initiation. Rather, family context-more specifically the mother-child relationship-is associated…

  6. Family Relational Values in the Parent-Adolescent Relationship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edgar-Smith, Susan E.; Wozniak, Robert H.

    2010-01-01

    This study measured the relational family values system of upper-middle-class mothers, fathers, and adolescents in the United States. Results revealed that participants shared common family values that mainly reflected the importance of individualism, equality in family relationships, family member interdependence, and parental guidance. Parent…

  7. Families Speak to Early Childhood Teachers: Impressions and Expectations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Suzanne B.; Dykes, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Investigators interviewed 54 families of children with disabilities ages seven through nine to examine the expectations that families of young children hold for their child's teacher. Responses themes were examined to determine if a pattern existed between families of different groups of children. Results reveal many families expressed true…

  8. Familial influences on adolescent smoking.

    PubMed

    Avenevoli, Shelli; Merikangas, Kathleen Ries

    2003-05-01

    The family unit is the primary source of transmission of basic social, cultural, genetic, and biological factors that may underlie individual differences in smoking. Existing information on the role of familial factors in tobacco use is characterized by two separate, but somewhat overlapping, lines of research: genetic epidemiological studies and risk-factor research. The present paper summarizes and evaluates studies assessing the association between adolescent smoking and parent and sibling smoking behaviors. A review of 87 studies reveals that methods are limited by a lack of standardized instruments, failure to measure important confounding and mediating factors, reliance on cross-sectional designs and the use of inconsistent definitions of tobacco-related behavior and assessment procedures. Moreover, there are no systematic family studies of the acquisition and continuation of smoking that have employed contemporary methodological standards for examining familial aggregation of tobacco behaviors among adolescents. Findings across studies show weak and inconsistent associations between parent and adolescent smoking; inconsistent findings may be attributed to methodological issues or associated factors that may complicate the relation between parent and adolescent smoking. Sibling and peer smoking show greater associations with adolescent smoking. Suggestions for future research include contemporary family studies that delineate meaningful phenotypes of tobacco use and prospective work on the later stages of tobacco use and the timing of the influence and valence of parent and family factors. Integration of the risk factor approach within the family study design may enrich both approaches to elucidate familial influences on smoking.

  9. Work, Family and Community Support as Predictors of Work-Family Conflict: A Study of Low-Income Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griggs, Tracy Lambert; Casper, Wendy J.; Eby, Lillian T.

    2013-01-01

    This study examines relationships between support from work, family and community domains with time- and strain-based work-family conflict in a sample of low-income workers. Results reveal significant within-domain and cross-domain relationships between support from all three life domains with work--family conflict. With respect to family support,…

  10. Intergenerational continuity in high conflict family environments

    PubMed Central

    Rothenberg, W. Andrew; Hussong, Andrea M.; Chassin, Laurie

    2016-01-01

    In the current study, we examined continuity in conflict across generations and explored potential mediators and moderators that could explain this continuity. We followed 246 targets from adolescence to adulthood and examined family conflict as reported by multiple reporters in targets' family of origin and current families. Results showed that conflict in the current family was strongly correlated with that of the family of origin in women but not in men. Continuity in family conflict across generations was mediated by patterns of elevated adolescent externalizing behavior in members of the second generation (G2). Additionally, analyses revealed an interaction between both G2 partners' externalizing behavior such that if one partner in the G2 family demonstrated high levels of externalizing behavior, elevated levels of family conflict resulted. Potential explanations and implications of these findings are considered. PMID:26018605

  11. [A case report of familial AVM].

    PubMed

    Wajima, Daisuke; Takeshima, Yasuhiro; Tamura, Kentaro; Motoyama, Yasushi; Hirabayashi, Hidehiro; Nakase, Hiroyuki

    2010-07-01

    Genetic analysis of the familials of patients with arteriovenous malformation (AVM) has a significant potential to reveal the etiology of this disease, although neither the detailed etiology nor pathogenesis of AVM has been fully elucidated to date. While a history of AVM is apparent in 2% of stroke patients, familial occurrence of AVM is very rare. We describe an interesting familial case of AVM. This also represents a rare pattern of familial occurrence in that patients are not likely hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). There is a possibility that such familial AVMs are associated with unknown genes other than HHT genes.

  12. Multigene families in African swine fever virus: family 360.

    PubMed Central

    González, A; Calvo, V; Almazán, F; Almendral, J M; Ramírez, J C; de la Vega, I; Blasco, R; Viñuela, E

    1990-01-01

    A group of cross-hybridizing DNA segments contained within the restriction fragments RK', RL, RJ, and RD' of African swine fever virus DNA were mapped and sequenced. Analysis of these sequences revealed the presence of a family of homologous open reading frames in regions close to the DNA ends. The whole family is composed of six open reading frames with an average length of 360 coding triplets (multigene family 360), four of which are located in the left part of the genome and two of which are in the right terminal EcoRI fragment. In close proximity to the right terminal inverted repeat, we found an additional small open reading frame which was homologous to the 5'-terminal portion of the other open reading frames, suggesting that most of that open reading frame has been deleted. These repeated sequences account for the previously described inverted internal repetitions (J.M. Sogo, J.M. Almendral, A. Talavera, and E. Viñuela, Virology 133:271-275, 1984). Most of the genes of multigene family 360 are transcribed in African swine fever virus-infected cells. A comparison of the predicted protein sequences of family 360 indicated that several residues are conserved, suggesting that an overall structure is maintained for every member of the family. The transcription direction of each open reading frame, as well as the evolutionary relationships among the genes, suggests that the family originated by gene duplication and translocation of sequences between the DNA ends. Images PMID:2325203

  13. Integrating Family Resilience and Family Stress Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Joan M.

    2002-01-01

    The construct, family resilience, is defined differently by practitioners and researchers. This study tries to clarify the concept of family resilience. The foundation is family stress and coping theory, particularly the stress models that emphasize adaptation processes in families exposed to major adversities. (JDM)

  14. The Family Hero in Black Alcoholism Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brisbane, Francis L.

    1989-01-01

    Uses data from 20 case studies of Black adult female children of alcoholic parents to discuss Family Hero role often assumed by oldest or only female child in Black alcoholism families. Explains how female-dominated survival role of Family Hero in Black families is significantly more related to racial and cultural factors than numbers alone may…

  15. Positive Family Functioning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sussman, Marvin B.

    The persistence of the nuclear family as the primary social unit in the United States and most all other societies, especially complex ones, is a fact. Values shape the definition of family, especially the "good family," and the "great debate" of this period on family failure, family corruption and the family's near demise originates in…

  16. A family empowerment program for families having children with thalassemia, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Wacharasin, Chintana; Phaktoop, Maneerat; Sananreangsak, Siriyupa

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this quasi-experimental design study was to examine the effectiveness of a family empowerment program (FEP) on family functioning and empowerment among 56 families having children with thalassemia. The 26 families in the experimental group received the FEP and usual care, while 30 families in the control group received usual care. Data collection occurred through family functioning and empowerment questionnaires. Between-group differences were tested with t-tests and analysis of variance. The result revealed that family caregivers who participated in the FEP had significantly increased family functioning and empowerment scores over time. The FEP can be used as a powerful intervention for assisting families and children with thalassemia and the education of health professionals.

  17. Psychoanalysis: a dysfunctional family?

    PubMed

    Grosskurth, P

    1998-01-01

    The discussion opens with an account of the author's mother's bizarre family in which a strong, charismatic grandmother maintained absolute control over her large family by encouraging a neurotic dependence in them through daily reports of their complaints. Getting interested in psychoanalysis in an effort to understand the dynamics of this dysfunctional family, the author, a biographer, turned to the study of Melanie Klein, becoming entranced by her ideas. Her research also revealed how Klein had discouraged her followers from developing ideas that diverged in any way from her own. Her portrait of the pioneer analyst provoked intense indignation. A similar pattern of absolute loyalty to his person and theories was to be found in Freud's Secret Committee, formed primarily as a means of getting rid of Jung who had been showing disturbing signs of independence. When Ferenczi and Rank began to pursue independent lines of enquiry in their work, they too were though to be undermining the foundations of classical psychoanalysis. Finally, the author concludes that though there have been sorry incidents in psychoanalysis, we should be mature enough to accept both the contributions of the early pioneers and the realizations that new ideas must be permitted to evolve.

  18. Family Orientation in Family Medicine Training

    PubMed Central

    Talbot, Yves R.; Tannenbaum, David

    1990-01-01

    Teaching about the family has become an important part of the family medicine curriculum. The family orientation index, a 39-item questionnaire, was designed to evaluate the family orientation of services and care provided as well as the teaching and research. The questionnaire was distributed to 55 program directors at 16 Canadian universities. The response rate was 84%. The results indicate that the family orientation of services is less than optimal. PMID:21233938

  19. Instance testing of the family history ontology.

    PubMed

    Peace, Jane; Brennan, Patricia Flatley; Brennan, Patti

    2008-11-06

    The Family History Ontology formalizes nursing conceptualization about family and family history. Traditional methods of instance testing were applied to evaluate the completeness of the ontology and demonstrated favorable domain coverage. Testing also revealed a need for a new category of instance test results, "by inference", for data that can be represented through the use of inference rules associated with the ontology rather than requiring direct manual entry.

  20. Family ties: constructing family time in low-income families.

    PubMed

    Tubbs, Carolyn Y; Roy, Kevin M; Burton, Linda M

    2005-03-01

    "Family time" is reflected in the process of building and fortifying family relationships. Whereas such time, free of obligatory work, school, and family maintenance activities, is purchased by many families using discretionary income, we explore how low-income mothers make time for and give meaning to focused engagement and relationship development with their children within time constraints idiosyncratic to being poor and relying on welfare. Longitudinal ethnographic data from 61 low-income African American, European American, and Latina American mothers were analyzed to understand how mothers construct family time during daily activities such as talking, play, and meals. We also identify unique cultural factors that shape family time for low-income families, such as changing temporal orientations, centrality of television time, and emotional burdens due to poverty. Implications for family therapy are also discussed.

  1. Familial hyperargininaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Terheggen, H G; Lowenthal, A; Lavinha, F; Colombo, J P

    1975-01-01

    A third case of hyperargininaemia occurring in one family was studied from birth. In cord blood serum arginine concentration was only slightly raised, but arginase activity in red blood cell haemolysates was very low. In the urine on day 2 a typical cystinuria pattern was present. Arginine concentration in serum increased to 158 mumol/100 ml on the 41st day of life. Later determinations of the arginase activity in peripheral blood showed values below the sensitivity of the method. Blood ammonia was consistently high, and cystinuria was present. The enzymatic defect was further displayed by intravenous loading tests with arginine. Serum urea values were predominantly normal or near the lower limit of normal, suggesting the presence of other metabolic pathways of urea synthesis. In urine there was no excretion of guanidinosuccinic acid, while the excretion of other monosubstituted guanidine derivatives was increased, pointing to a connexion with hyperargininaemia. Owing to parental attitude, a low protein diet (1-5 g/kg) was introduced only late. The infant developed severe mental retardation, athetosis, and spasticity. PMID:1124944

  2. The Life Cycle of the Japanese Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumagai, Fumie

    1984-01-01

    Analyzes the existing Japanese population data, focusing on changes in the timing of events in a family life cycle of Japanese women. Analysis revealed that the overall pattern of the family career of Japanese women today closely resembles that of their American and Canadian counterparts. (LLL)

  3. The Family Dynamics of Intellectual Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zajonc, R. B.

    2001-01-01

    Birth order effects on intellectual performance show both positive and negative results. Considers the intellectual aspects of siblings' changing environments, explaining that birth order and family size effects depend crucially on the age at which children are tested. Within-family data conceal patterns of aggregate effects that are revealed by…

  4. Adults raised as children in lesbian families.

    PubMed

    Tasker, F; Golombok, S

    1995-04-01

    A longitudinal study of 25 young adults from lesbian families and 21 raised by heterosexual single mothers revealed that those raised by lesbian mothers functioned well in adulthood in terms of psychological well-being and of family identity and relationships. The commonly held assumption that lesbian mothers will have lesbian daughters and gay sons was not supported by the findings.

  5. Family and family therapy in Russia.

    PubMed

    Bebtschuk, Marina; Smirnova, Daria; Khayretdinov, Oleg

    2012-04-01

    This article represents the information about family and family therapy in the context of culture, traditions and contemporary changes of social situations in Russia. The legislation of family rights are mentioned within items about marriage and family in the Constitution, Civil Code and Family Code of the Russian Federation which has changed during recent years. The definition of family and description of family structure are given through the prism of the current demographic situation, dynamics of statistics of marriage and divorce rates, mental disorders, disabilities and such phenomena as social abandonment. The actual curriculum, teaching of family therapy and its disadvantages, system of continuous education, supervision and initiatives of the Institute of Integrative Family Therapy in improvement of preparing of specialists who can provide qualified psychosocial assistance for the family according to the actual needs of society are noted. The directions of state and private practice of family counselling and therapy both for psychiatric patients and medical patients, for adults and children in a family systemic approach are highlighted with an indication of the spectrum of techniques and methods used by Russian professionals. The main obstacles and perspectives of development of family therapy in Russia are summarized.

  6. Family Therapy and Ideology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernal, Guillermo; Ysern, Eduardo

    1986-01-01

    Argues that the family and the enterprise of family therapy are social systems and under the influence of the ideology particular to a given society. The strategic family therapy treatment of a family with a drug-addicted member serves as an example to clarify the ideological themes of contemporary family therapy. (Author/BL)

  7. Effects of family connection and family individuation.

    PubMed

    Bell, Linda G; Bell, David C

    2009-09-01

    This prospective longitudinal study explores the differential effects of family connection and family individuation measured during adolescence on later midlife well-being. Home interviews were held in the 1970s with 99 families of 245 adolescents. Connection and individuation in the family system were measured by self-report, a projective exercise, and coding of taped family interactions. Twenty-five years later, telephone interviews were conducted with 54 men and 120 women (representing 82 families) who had been adolescents in the 1970s interviews. Family connection (measured during adolescence) was associated with self-acceptance and positive relationships at midlife partially mediated by marriage. Family individuation (measured during adolescence) was associated with personal autonomy at midlife.

  8. All in the Family: Work-Family Enrichment and Crossover Among Farm Couples.

    PubMed

    Sprung, Justin M; Jex, Steve M

    2016-04-21

    This study expands upon the contextualization of the work-family interface by examining positive work-family experiences within the farming industry. Both individual and crossover effects were examined among a sample of 217 married farm couples. Results demonstrated multiple significant relationships between self-reported attitudes, work-family enrichment, and health outcomes. In addition, crossover effects reveal the importance of individual attitudes (husband work engagement and wife farm satisfaction) for spousal work-family enrichment and health outcomes. Furthermore, individual work-family enrichment was positively related to spousal psychological health and negatively related to spousal physical symptoms. Many of these findings remained significant after controlling for work-family conflict. Overall, our results suggest the potential beneficial impact of the integrated work-family dynamic associated with the farming profession for positive work-family experiences. Implications of these findings, as well as directions for future research, are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record

  9. Hegemony in the Roma family.

    PubMed

    Mrhálek, Tomáš; Lidová, Lenka; Kajanová, Alena

    2015-01-01

    This article is intended to describe the current hegemonic masculinity within the Roma family structure in the Czech Republic, with regard to changes related to developments in the majority society and the current socioeconomic situation of the Roma. The theoretical context of this article is based on the paradigm of masculine hegemony as it exists and has existed in the Roma families. Data for the study came from semi-structured interviews with 30 Roma females and 30 Roma males living as couples, in three Czech cities. The main finding reveals a dichotomy between the traditional roles of Roma women, i.e. care for the family and the household, and the present functions, i.e. contributing to the family income through social benefits. We observed a decline in the traditional role of Roma men, who were often unemployed. We related the change in the roles of men to the "non-functionality of the men", contributing to the emerging potential for emancipation of Roma women. However, the traditional patriarchal Roma family is structured such that men are given the main decision making powers, which has slowed changes in marginalized Roma families. Additionally, social pressures against women as well as socially conditioned pressures that act to preserve hegemonic masculinity, have largely prevented the realization of the potential for emancipation of Roma women, or if a woman tries to leave her non-functioning husband.

  10. Revealing a Child's Pathology: Physicians' Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scelles, Regine; Aubert-Godard, Anne; Gargiulo, Marcela; Avant, Monique; Gortais, Jean

    2010-01-01

    In this study, 12 physicians and 12 care-givers were interviewed using semi-structured interviews. We explored physicians' experiences when they revealed a diagnosis. We also tried to understand which family members the physician was thinking of, with whom they identified themselves, and their first choice of the person to whom they prefer to…

  11. Revamping Family Preservation Services for Native Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Heather; Unrau, Yvonne A.; Manyfingers, Brenda

    2001-01-01

    Examines the philosophy and program structures of family preservation services (FPS) in the context of providing services to Native American families with child welfare issues. Explores Native cultural concepts of family, child rearing, time, and spirituality. Outlines cross-cultural training needs for FPS workers related to cultural awareness,…

  12. Family Capital: Implications for Interventions with Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belcher, John R.; Peckuonis, Edward V.; Deforge, Bruce R.

    2011-01-01

    Social capital has been extensively discussed in the literature as building blocks that individuals and communities utilize to leverage system resources. Similarly, some families also create capital, which can enable members of the family, such as children, to successfully negotiate the outside world. Families in poverty confront serious…

  13. Evaluations of family by youth: do they vary as a function of family structure, gender, and birth order?

    PubMed

    Parish, T S

    1990-01-01

    In the present study, 334 youths evaluated their families by responding to the Personal Attribute Inventory for Children. An analysis of variance revealed no significant main effects due to respondents' birth order or gender, but did find a significant main effect due to family structure and a significant two-way interaction effect between respondents' family structure and gender. Specifically, males from divorced remarried families and females from divorced nonremarried families were found to evaluate their respective families significantly more negatively than did their counterparts from other familial configurations. Implications of these findings are discussed.

  14. Choosing a Family Doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the whole family. Family doctors create caring relationships with patients and their families. They really get ... questions.Remember, it takes time to build a relationship with your doctor. Last Updated: May 2014 This ...

  15. Family Activities for Fitness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grosse, Susan J.

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses how families can increase family togetherness and improve physical fitness. The author provides easy ways to implement family friendly activities for improving and maintaining physical health. These activities include: walking, backyard games, and fitness challenges.

  16. Familial Pulmonary Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Training Home Conditions Familial Pulmonary Fibrosis Familial Pulmonary Fibrosis Make an Appointment Find a Doctor Ask a ... members within the same family have Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF) or any other form of Idiopathic Interstitial ...

  17. National Military Family Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... have good news and bad news for military families. MORE Military Families Brace for What’s Next In Syria President Trump ordered an airstrike in Syria leaving military families wondering what's next. More April is the Month ...

  18. Normal Functioning Family

    MedlinePlus

    ... Spread the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Adoption & Foster Care ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Normal Functioning Family Page Content Article Body Is there any way ...

  19. Shared vision promotes family firm performance.

    PubMed

    Neff, John E

    2015-01-01

    A clear picture of the influential drivers of private family firm performance has proven to be an elusive target. The unique characteristics of private family owned firms necessitate a broader, non-financial approach to reveal firm performance drivers. This research study sought to specify and evaluate the themes that distinguish successful family firms from less successful family firms. In addition, this study explored the possibility that these themes collectively form an effective organizational culture that improves longer-term firm performance. At an organizational level of analysis, research findings identified four significant variables: Shared Vision (PNS), Role Clarity (RCL), Confidence in Management (CON), and Professional Networking (OLN) that positively impacted family firm financial performance. Shared Vision exhibited the strongest positive influence among the significant factors. In addition, Family Functionality (APGAR), the functional integrity of the family itself, exhibited a significant supporting role. Taken together, the variables collectively represent an effective family business culture (EFBC) that positively impacted the long-term financial sustainability of family owned firms. The index of effective family business culture also exhibited potential as a predictive non-financial model of family firm performance.

  20. Shared vision promotes family firm performance

    PubMed Central

    Neff, John E.

    2015-01-01

    A clear picture of the influential drivers of private family firm performance has proven to be an elusive target. The unique characteristics of private family owned firms necessitate a broader, non-financial approach to reveal firm performance drivers. This research study sought to specify and evaluate the themes that distinguish successful family firms from less successful family firms. In addition, this study explored the possibility that these themes collectively form an effective organizational culture that improves longer-term firm performance. At an organizational level of analysis, research findings identified four significant variables: Shared Vision (PNS), Role Clarity (RCL), Confidence in Management (CON), and Professional Networking (OLN) that positively impacted family firm financial performance. Shared Vision exhibited the strongest positive influence among the significant factors. In addition, Family Functionality (APGAR), the functional integrity of the family itself, exhibited a significant supporting role. Taken together, the variables collectively represent an effective family business culture (EFBC) that positively impacted the long-term financial sustainability of family owned firms. The index of effective family business culture also exhibited potential as a predictive non-financial model of family firm performance. PMID:26042075

  1. The Impact of Family Life Events and Changes on the Health of a Chronically Ill Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Joan M.; McCubbin, Hamilton I.

    1983-01-01

    Examined the relationship between family stress and changes in health of a child with cystic fibrosis. Data from parents (N=100) and clinic records revealed that a decline in pulmonary functioning was associated with family life changes, especially in family development and relationships, family management and decisions, and family finances.…

  2. Familial mesothelioma: a report of two families

    SciTech Connect

    Hammar, S.P.; Bockus, D.; Remington, F.; Freidman, S.; LaZerte, G.

    1989-02-01

    Five reports of familial mesothelioma in which mesotheliomas occurred in two or more family members have been recorded in the medical literature. In this report, we describe two examples of familial mesothelioma. In one family, three brothers who worked in the asbestos insulation industry developed mesothelioma. In the second family, the father, who was occupationally exposed to asbestos, died from a tubulopapillary peritoneal mesothelioma 11 years before his son died from an identical histologic type of peritoneal mesothelioma. Our report, as with those previously recorded, suggests that genetic factors may be important in the genesis of some mesotheliomas.

  3. Anticipation in familial leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Horwitz, M.; Jarvik, G.P.; Goode, E.L.

    1996-11-01

    Anticipation refers to worsening severity or earlier age at onset with each generation for an inherited disease and primarily has been described for neurodegenerative illnesses resulting from expansion of trinucleotide repeats. We have tested for evidence of anticipation in familial leukemia. Of 49 affected individuals in nine families transmitting autosomal dominant acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), the mean age at onset is 57 years in the grandparental generation, 32 years in the parental generation, and 13 years in the youngest generation (P < .001). Of 21 parent-child pairs with AML, 19 show younger ages at onset in the child and demonstrate a mean decline in age at onset of 28 years (P < .001). Of 18 affected individuals from seven pedigrees with autosomal dominant chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), the mean age at onset in the parental generation is 66 years versus 51 years in the youngest generation (P = .008). Of nine parent-child pairs with CLL, eight show younger ages at onset in the child and reveal a mean decline in age at onset of 21 years (P = .001). Inspection of rare pedigrees transmitting acute lymphocytic leukemia, chronic myelogenous leukemia, multiple types of leukemia, and lymphoma is also compatible with anticipation. Sampling bias is unlikely to explain these findings. This suggests that dynamic mutation of unstable DNA sequence repeats could be a common mechanism of inherited hematopoietic malignancy with implications for the role of somatic mutation in the more frequent sporadic cases. We speculate on three possible candidate genes for familial leukemia with anticipation: a locus on 21q22.1-22.2, CBL2 on 11q23.3, and CBFB or a nearby gene on 16q22. 55 refs., 4 figs.

  4. Living My Family's Story

    PubMed Central

    Underhill, Meghan L.; Lally, Robin M.; Kiviniemi, Marc T.; Murekeyisoni, Christine; Dickerson, Suzanne S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Based on known or suggested genetic risk factors, a growing number of women now live with knowledge of a potential cancer diagnosis that may never occur. Given this, it is important to understand the meaning of living with high risk for hereditary breast cancer. Objective The objective of the study was to explore how women at high risk for hereditary breast cancer (1) form self-identity, (2) apply self-care strategies toward risk, and (3) describe the meaning of care through a high-risk breast program. Methods Interpretive hermeneutic phenomenology guided the qualitative research method. Women at high risk for hereditary breast cancer were recruited from a high-risk breast program. Open-ended interview questions focused on experiences living as women managing high risk for breast cancer. Consistent with hermeneutic methodology, the principal investigator led a team to analyze the interview transcripts. Results Twenty women participated in in-depth interviews. Analysis revealed that women describe their own identity based on their family story and grieve over actual and potential familial loss. This experience influences self-care strategies, including seeking care from hereditary breast cancer risk experts for early detection and prevention, as well as maintaining a connection for early treatment “when” diagnosis occurs. Conclusions Healthy women living with high risk for hereditary breast cancer are living within the context of their family cancer story, which influences how they define themselves and engage in self-care. Implications for Practice Findings present important practical, research, and policy information regarding health promotion, psychosocial assessment, and support for women living with this risk. PMID:22544165

  5. The Adams family.

    PubMed

    Douven, Igor; Verbrugge, Sara

    2010-12-01

    According to Adams's Thesis, the acceptability of an indicative conditional sentence goes by the conditional probability of its consequent given its antecedent. We test, for the first time, whether this thesis is descriptively correct and show that it is not; in particular, we show that it yields the wrong predictions for people's judgments of the acceptability of important subclasses of the class of inferential conditionals. Experimental results are presented that reveal an interaction effect between, on the one hand, the type of inferential connection between a conditional's antecedent and its consequent and, on the other, the judged acceptability of the conditional in relation to the conditional probability of its consequent given its antecedent. Specifically, these results suggest a family of theses, each pertaining to a different type of conditional, about how conditionals relate to the relevant conditional probabilities.

  6. Familial Mediterranean Fever

    MedlinePlus

    Diseases and Conditions Familial Mediterranean fever By Mayo Clinic Staff Familial Mediterranean fever is an inflammatory disorder that causes recurrent fevers and painful inflammation of your abdomen, ...

  7. Familial apolipoprotein E deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, E J; Gregg, R E; Ghiselli, G; Forte, T M; Ordovas, J M; Zech, L A; Brewer, H B

    1986-01-01

    A unique kindred with premature cardiovascular disease, tubo-eruptive xanthomas, and type III hyperlipoproteinemia (HLP) associated with familial apolipoprotein (apo) E deficiency was examined. Homozygotes (n = 4) had marked increases in cholesterol-rich very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) and intermediate density lipoproteins (IDL), which could be effectively lowered with diet and medication (niacin, clofibrate). Homozygotes had only trace amounts of plasma apoE, and accumulations of apoB-48 and apoA-IV in VLDL, IDL, and low density lipoproteins. Radioiodinated VLDL apoB and apoE kinetic studies revealed that the homozygous proband had markedly retarded fractional catabolism of VLDL apoB-100, apoB-48 and plasma apoE, as well as an extremely low apoE synthesis rate as compared to normals. Obligate heterozygotes (n = 10) generally had normal plasma lipids and mean plasma apoE concentrations that were 42% of normal. The data indicate that homozygous familial apoE deficiency is a cause of type III HLP, is associated with markedly decreased apoE production, and that apoE is essential for the normal catabolism of triglyceride-rich lipoprotein constituents. Images PMID:3771793

  8. Strengthening Family Practices for Latino Families

    PubMed Central

    Chartier, Karen G.; Negroni, Lirio K.; Hesselbrock, Michie N.

    2010-01-01

    The study examined the effectiveness of a culturally-adapted Strengthening Families Program (SFP) for Latinos to reduce risks for alcohol and drug use in children. Latino families, predominantly Puerto Rican, with a 9–12 year old child and a parent(s) with a substance abuse problem participated in the study. Pre- and post-tests were conducted with each family. Parental stress, parent-child dysfunctional relations, and child behavior problems were reduced in the families receiving the intervention; family hardiness and family attachment were improved. Findings contribute to the validation of the SFP with Latinos, and can be used to inform social work practice with Puerto Rican families. PMID:20871785

  9. Family Patterns of Gender Role Attitudes

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Jaime; Bun, Lam Chun; McHale, Susan M.

    2012-01-01

    Study goals were to identify family patterns of gender role attitudes, to examine the conditions under which these patterns emerged, and to assess the implications of gender attitude patterns for family conflict. Participants were mothers, fathers, and first- and second-born adolescents from 358 White, working and middle-class US families. Results of cluster analysis revealed three gender role attitude patterns: egalitarian parents and children, traditional parents and children, and a divergent pattern, with parents more traditional and children more egalitarian. Mixed-model ANOVAs indicated that these family patterns were related to socioeconomic status, parents' time spent in gendered household tasks and with children, and the gender constellation of the sibling dyad. The traditional family group reported the most family conflict. PMID:22308059

  10. Family Patterns of Gender Role Attitudes.

    PubMed

    Marks, Jaime; Bun, Lam Chun; McHale, Susan M

    2009-08-01

    Study goals were to identify family patterns of gender role attitudes, to examine the conditions under which these patterns emerged, and to assess the implications of gender attitude patterns for family conflict. Participants were mothers, fathers, and first- and second-born adolescents from 358 White, working and middle-class US families. Results of cluster analysis revealed three gender role attitude patterns: egalitarian parents and children, traditional parents and children, and a divergent pattern, with parents more traditional and children more egalitarian. Mixed-model ANOVAs indicated that these family patterns were related to socioeconomic status, parents' time spent in gendered household tasks and with children, and the gender constellation of the sibling dyad. The traditional family group reported the most family conflict.

  11. The child with repeated injuries—a family problem

    PubMed Central

    Husband, Peter

    1975-01-01

    Recurrent injuries in children should be regarded as a symptom complex rather than a diagnosis of `accident proneness'. Investigation, which may include much listening will often reveal a family with emotional problems. The family doctor who can see the family as a whole is often best placed to offer or co-ordinate help. PMID:1159649

  12. Affective Interchange in Families with a Schizophrenic Son.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angermeyer, Matthias C.; And Others

    Sixty half-hour family discussions generated by the "revealed differences technique" were analyzed to determine the emotional intensity and quality (friendliness/attacking) of messages between individuals in families with schizophrenic and "normal" sons. Thirty families in each situation (schizophrenic/normal) were matched for comparison. Both…

  13. Complex Intervention: A Family's Story of Loss, Struggle, and Perseverance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Njoroge, Wanjiku F. M.

    2015-01-01

    This article reveals the complicated relationships among culture, family, trauma, and service delivery for immigrant families. The author describes a family who first came into contact with the service delivery system referred by the pediatrician, whose practice was an important point of entry for the early childhood work that followed. The family…

  14. Father Influences on Employed Mothers' Work-Family Balance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fagan, Jay; Press, Julie

    2008-01-01

    This study employed the ecological systems perspective and gender ideology theory to examine the influence of fathers' paid work-family crossover and family involvement on self-reports of work-family balance by employed mothers with children under the age of 13 (N = 179). Multiple regression analyses revealed that fathers' crossover factors had a…

  15. Spiritual Coping: A Gateway to Enhancing Family Communication During Cancer Treatment.

    PubMed

    Prouty, Anne M; Fischer, Judith; Purdom, Ann; Cobos, Everardo; Helmeke, Karen B

    2016-02-01

    The researchers examined the spiritual coping, family communication, and family functioning of 95 participants in 34 families by an online survey. Multilevel linear regression was used to test whether individuals' and families' higher endorsement of more use of spiritual coping strategies to deal with a member's cancer would be associated with higher scores on family communication and family functioning, and whether better communication would also be associated with higher family functioning scores. Results revealed that spiritual coping was positively associated with family communication, and family communication was positively associated with healthier family functioning. The researchers provide suggestions for further research.

  16. Familial ankyloglossia (tongue-tie).

    PubMed

    Klockars, Tuomas

    2007-08-01

    Ankyloglossia (tongue-tie) is a congenital anomaly with a prevalence of 4-5% and characterized by an abnormally short lingual frenulum. For unknown reasons the abnormality seems to be more common in males. The pathogenesis of ankyloglossia is not known. The author reports a family with isolated ankyloglossia inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. The identification of the defective gene(s) causing ankyloglossia might reveal novel information on the craniofacial embryogenesis and its disorders.

  17. Familism, family environment, and suicide attempts among Latina youth.

    PubMed

    Peña, Juan B; Kuhlberg, Jill A; Zayas, Luis H; Baumann, Ana A; Gulbas, Lauren; Hausmann-Stabile, Carolina; Nolle, Allyson P

    2011-06-01

    In this study, we examined the relationship between familism and family environment type as well as the relationship between family environment type and suicide attempts among Latina youth. Latina teen attempters (n = 109) and nonattempters (n = 107) were recruited from the New York City area. Latent class analysis revealed three family environment types: tight-knit, intermediate-knit, and loose-knit. Tight-knit families (high cohesion and low conflict) were significantly less likely to have teens who attempted suicide as compared with intermediate-knit families or loose-knit families. Moreover, familism increased the odds of being in a tight-knit family versus a loose-knit family and the odds of being in a tight-knit family versus a intermediate-knit. The results suggest that familism may protect against suicide behavior among Latinas via its influence on family environment.

  18. Genome sequencing reveals unique mutations in characteristic metabolic pathways and the transfer of virulence genes between V. mimicus and V. cholerae.

    PubMed

    Wang, Duochun; Wang, Haiyin; Zhou, Yanyan; Zhang, Qiuxiang; Zhang, Fanfei; Du, Pengcheng; Wang, Shujing; Chen, Chen; Kan, Biao

    2011-01-01

    Vibrio mimicus, the species most similar to V. cholerae, is a microbe present in the natural environmental and sometimes causes diarrhea and internal infections in humans. It shows similar phenotypes to V. cholerae but differs in some biochemical characteristics. The molecular mechanisms underlying the differences in biochemical metabolism between V. mimicus and V. cholerae are currently unclear. Several V. mimicus isolates have been found that carry cholera toxin genes (ctxAB) and cause cholera-like diarrhea in humans. Here, the genome of the V. mimicus isolate SX-4, which carries an intact CTX element, was sequenced and annotated. Analysis of its genome, together with those of other Vibrio species, revealed extensive differences within the Vibrionaceae. Common mutations in gene clusters involved in three biochemical metabolism pathways that are used for discrimination between V. mimicus and V. cholerae were found in V. mimicus strains. We also constructed detailed genomic structures and evolution maps for the general types of genomic drift associated with pathogenic characters in polysaccharides, CTX elements and toxin co-regulated pilus (TCP) gene clusters. Overall, the whole-genome sequencing of the V. mimicus strain carrying the cholera toxin gene provides detailed information for understanding genomic differences among Vibrio spp. V. mimicus has a large number of diverse gene and nucleotide differences from its nearest neighbor, V. cholerae. The observed mutations in the characteristic metabolism pathways may indicate different adaptations to different niches for these species and may be caused by ancient events in evolution before the divergence of V. cholerae and V. mimicus. Horizontal transfers of virulence-related genes from an uncommon clone of V. cholerae, rather than the seventh pandemic strains, have generated the pathogenic V. mimicus strain carrying cholera toxin genes.

  19. The Changing Family Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernard van Leer Foundation Newsletter, 1993

    1993-01-01

    This newsletter issue contains feature articles and short reports on how and why family structures are undergoing substantial change in many parts of the world. These articles include: (1) "The Changing Family Structure," a review of how families are changing and why; (2) "Peru: Families in the Andes"; (3) "Thailand:…

  20. The Family in Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunlop, Jean D.

    This paper describes Laurelhurst Manor's family treatment program to help families affected by chemical dependency, a 7-month program which treats family members from the perspective of developmental stages and family roles. The center, located in Portland, Oregon, is a 40-bed, free-standing facility having a 20-bed adolescent unit and a 20-bed…

  1. Black Families. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAdoo, Harriette Pipes, Ed.

    The chapters of this collection explore the experiences of black families in the United States and Africa, today and in the past. They are: (1) "African American Families: A Historical Note" (John Hope Franklin); (2) "African American Families and Family Values" (Niara Sudarkasa); (3) "Old-Time Religion: Benches Can't Say…

  2. Family Participation in Policymaking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caplan, Elizabeth, Ed.; Blankenship, Kelly, Ed.; McManus, Marilyn, Ed.

    1998-01-01

    This bulletin focuses on family participation in mental health policymaking and highlights state efforts to increase family involvement. Articles include: (1) "Promoting Family Member Involvement in Children's Mental Health Policy Making Bodies," which describes how different states are promoting family member involvement in various statutory and…

  3. Families in Transition .

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bundy, Michael L., Ed.; Gumaer, James, Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Focuses on disrupted families and the role of the school counselor in helping children adjust. Describes characteristics of healthy families, and discusses the transition to the blended family, effects of divorce groups on children's classroom behavior, counseling children in stepfamilies, single-parent families, and parenting strengths of single…

  4. Many Ignore Fire Safety at Home, Survey Reveals

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162699.html Many Ignore Fire Safety at Home, Survey Reveals Holiday activities can ... dangerous time of year, but many families ignore fire and burn safety tips, a new survey finds. ...

  5. Systematic review of family functioning in families of children and adolescents with chronic pain

    PubMed Central

    Lewandowski, Amy S.; Palermo, Tonya M.; Stinson, Jennifer; Handley, Susannah; Chambers, Christine T.

    2010-01-01

    Disturbances in family functioning have been identified in youth with chronic pain and are associated with worse child physical and psychological functioning. Assessment measures of family functioning used in research and clinical settings vary. This systematic review summarizes studies investigating relationships among family functioning, pain and pain-related disability in youth with chronic pain. Sixteen articles were reviewed. All studies were cross-sectional, seven utilized between-group comparisons (chronic pain versus healthy/control) and twelve examined within-group associations among family functioning, pain and/or pain-related disability. Studies represented youth with various pain conditions (e.g., headache, abdominal pain, fibromyalgia) aged 6 – 20 years. Findings revealed group differences in family functioning between children with chronic pain and healthy controls in five of seven studies. Significant associations emerged among family variables and pain-related disability in six of nine studies with worse family functioning associated with greater child disability; relationships between family functioning and children’s pain were less consistent. Different patterns of results emerged depending on family functioning measure used. Overall, findings showed that families of children with chronic pain generally have poorer family functioning than healthy populations, and that pain-related disability is more consistently related to family functioning than pain intensity. PMID:21055709

  6. Nontraditional family romance.

    PubMed

    Corbett, K

    2001-07-01

    Family stories lie at the heart of psychoanalytic developmental theory and psychoanalytic clinical technique, but whose family? Increasingly, lesbian and gay families, multiparent families, and single-parent families are relying on modern reproductive technologies to form families. The contemplation of these nontraditional families and the vicissitudes of contemporary reproduction lead to an unknowing of what families are, including the ways in which psychoanalysts configure the family within developmental theory. This article focuses on the stories that families tell in order to account for their formation--stories that include narratives about parental union, parental sexuality, and conception. The author addresses three constructs that inform family stories and that require rethinking in light of the category crises posed by and for the nontraditional family: (1) normative logic, (2) family reverie and the construction of a family romance, and (3) the primal scene. These constructs are examined in tandem with detailed clinical material taken from the psychotherapy of a seven-year-old boy and his two mothers.

  7. The Family Relationships Grid: Measuring Family Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copeland, Anne P.; And Others

    This study examined the Family Relationships Grid (FRG), a new measure of family structure that evaluates alliances, identification, isolation, and the relative strength of sibling and marital relationships. Subjects were 52 female and 35 male adolescents who were recruited through a university course and who each had at least one sibling.…

  8. Putting the "family" back into family therapy.

    PubMed

    Breunlin, Douglas C; Jacobsen, Elizabeth

    2014-09-01

    In this article, we examine the field of family therapy by drawing a distinction between two forms of practice: Whole Family Therapy (WFT), defined as treating the whole family, and Relational Family Therapy (RFT), defined as working with a subsystem of the family or an individual while retaining a systemic lens. Our thesis is that the practice of WFT has been in decline for some time and steps must be taken to keep it from becoming a defunct practice. We consider the trajectory of WFT and RFT throughout the development of family therapy through reference to the people, the literature, training, and practice patterns associated with family therapy. We remind the reader of the many benefits of WFT and suggest that today WFT is likely to be practiced in conjunction with RFT and individual therapy. Since training of family therapists today is largely located in degree-granting programs, we identify constraints to including WFT in such programs. We conclude by offering suggestions that can enhance a program's ability to train students in WFT.

  9. Strengthening Family Practices for Latino Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chartier, Karen G.; Negroni, Lirio K.; Hesselbrock, Michie N.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of a culturally adapted Strengthening Families Program (SFP) for Latinos to reduce risks for alcohol and drug use in children. Latino families, predominantly Puerto Rican, with a 9- to 12-year-old child and a parent(s) with a substance abuse problem participated in the study. Pre- and post-tests were conducted…

  10. Family Therapy for the "Truncated" Nuclear Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuk, Gerald H.

    1980-01-01

    The truncated nuclear family consists of a two-generation group in which conflict has produced a polarization of values. The single-parent family is at special risk. Go-between process enables the therapist to depolarize sharply conflicted values and reduce pathogenic relating. (Author)

  11. How Are Preferences Revealed?

    PubMed Central

    Beshears, John; Choi, James J.; Laibson, David; Madrian, Brigitte C.

    2009-01-01

    Revealed preferences are tastes that rationalize an economic agent’s observed actions. Normative preferences represent the agent’s actual interests. It sometimes makes sense to assume that revealed preferences are identical to normative preferences. But there are many cases where this assumption is violated. We identify five factors that increase the likelihood of a disparity between revealed preferences and normative preferences: passive choice, complexity, limited personal experience, third-party marketing, and intertemporal choice. We then discuss six approaches that jointly contribute to the identification of normative preferences: structural estimation, active decisions, asymptotic choice, aggregated revealed preferences, reported preferences, and informed preferences. Each of these approaches uses consumer behavior to infer some property of normative preferences without equating revealed and normative preferences. We illustrate these issues with evidence from savings and investment outcomes. PMID:24761048

  12. Invest in Family*

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nilesh; De Sousa, Avinash

    2015-01-01

    The family is an integral part of one's life. It is very essential that every individual employed or unemployed invests time therein. The family is a source of support and growth for an individual, and the lack of family support or loneliness may be a causative factor in the genesis of psychiatric disorders, especially depression. In India, family plays a paramount role when it comes to mental health of the individual. Tips on how one should invest time in one's family along with the role of a family in one's personal and social structure are discussed. PMID:25838732

  13. Familial aggregation analysis of gene expressions

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Shao-Qi; Xu, Liang-De; Zhang, Guang-Mei; Li, Xia; Li, Lin; Shen, Gong-Qing; Jiang, Yang; Yang, Yue-Ying; Gong, Bin-Sheng; Jiang, Wei; Zhang, Fan; Xiao, Yun; Wang, Qing K

    2007-01-01

    Traditional studies of familial aggregation are aimed at defining the genetic (and non-genetic) causes of a disease from physiological or clinical traits. However, there has been little attempt to use genome-wide gene expressions, the direct phenotypic measures of genes, as the traits to investigate several extended issues regarding the distributions of familially aggregated genes on chromosomes or in functions. In this study we conducted a genome-wide familial aggregation analysis by using the in vitro cell gene expressions of 3300 human autosome genes (Problem 1 data provided to Genetic Analysis Workshop 15) in order to answer three basic genetics questions. First, we investigated how gene expressions aggregate among different types (degrees) of relative pairs. Second, we conducted a bioinformatics analysis of highly familially aggregated genes to see how they are distributed on chromosomes. Third, we performed a gene ontology enrichment test of familially aggregated genes to find evidence to support their functional consensus. The results indicated that 1) gene expressions did aggregate in families, especially between sibs. Of 3300 human genes analyzed, there were a total of 1105 genes with one or more significant (empirical p < 0.05) familial correlation; 2) there were several genomic hot spots where highly familially aggregated genes (e.g., the chromosome 6 HLA genes cluster) were clustered; 3) as we expected, gene ontology enrichment tests revealed that the 1105 genes were aggregating not only in families but also in functional categories. PMID:18466548

  14. [Biochemical studies on familial neuroblastoma].

    PubMed

    Plöchl, E

    1978-01-01

    According to the two-mutation model of neuroblastoma several investigations were performed in order to find the gene carrier in a family with familial neuroblastoma. The results of these former studies are as follows: 1. Neither chromosomal analyses of the peripheral blood nor the examinations of catecholamines nor of cystathionine in the urine could mark the first step to neuroblastoma. 2. Since cystathioniuria was not only seen in blood-relations but also in relatives by marriage and since vitamin B6 deficiency was revealed, cystathioninuria was interpreted as secondary to vitamin B6 deficiency. In this study the normal values of cystathioninuria and vitamin B6 supply were examined. Furthermore the effect of oral vitamin B6 loading on cystathioninuria and oxaluria in familial neuroblastoma was investigated and the vitamin B6 supply in the neighbours of the family was analysed. The results permitted the following conclusions: 1. In 46 of 58 children and adults cystathioninuria was found in an immeasurable range by column chromatography. Only in 12 persons it could be measured quantitatively. With the exception of 6 explanable elevations no value exceeded 20 mumol/24 hr. These results show that the acceptance of the limiting value of 20 mumol/24 hr for increased cystathioninuria is justified. 2. Vitamine B6 deficiency was found in two of 7 patients. In one child this could be explained by the underlying disease. This finding supports the suggestion that vitamine B6 deficiency can relative frequently observed. 3. The examinations of cystathioninuria and oxaluria before and after loading with vitamine B6 showed different results. Whereas oxaluria decreased after loading cystathioninuria was not surely influenced. 4. The neighbours of the members with familial neuroblastoma showed mostly a reduced vitamine B6 supply. This fact could be an indication of exogenous reason of vitamine B6 deficiency in familial neuroblastoma.

  15. Assessing Postpartum Family Functioning

    PubMed Central

    Midmer, Deana; Talbot, Yves

    1988-01-01

    The birth of a child requires adaptation and reorganization within the family system in order to accommodate the new family member and to allow the family to continue in its psychosocial development. Knowledge of the normative and transitional changes required at this stage of family life will enhance family practitioners' understanding of some of the common concerns and complaints related to them by various family members during the postpartum period. The Family FIRO model represents a helpful conceptual framework to increase the family physician's understanding of the issues of inclusion, control, and intimacy that are highlighted during the transition to parenthood. The authors briefly present this model and discuss its application to postpartum adjustment and its implications for health-care professionals. PMID:21253238

  16. Unique Family Living Situations

    MedlinePlus

    ... if the family home changes for reasons of divorce, death, or economics? Factors, such as shifting between ... blending families when a parent remarries after a divorce or death of a spouse, or moving in ...

  17. Government and the Family

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mondale, Walter F.

    1975-01-01

    In order to deal successfully with the changes and pressures placed upon families, article considered the extent government policies are helping or hurting families, and what kind of support services are available. (Author/RK)

  18. Family Caregiver Alliance

    MedlinePlus

    ... on your schedule. Look for our launch soon! FAMILY CARE NAVIGATOR ─ Click on Your State AL AK ... Group) Smart Patients Caregivers Community In partnership with Family Caregiver Alliance Learn more Caregiver Research Caregivers exhibit ...

  19. Family Violence: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center on Child Abuse and Neglect (DHHS/OHDS), Washington, DC.

    Family violence is a widespread problem; research has shown multiple factors are associated with family violence. Types of family violence include spouse abuse; elder abuse and neglect; child abuse and neglect; parent abuse; and sibling abuse. There are three types of spouse abuse: physical abuse, sexual violence, and psychological/emotional…

  20. Fatherhood and Family Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goetz, Kathy, Ed.

    1996-01-01

    On the assumption that fathers have been relatively absent from family support programs, this publication of the Family Resource Coalition addresses the role of fathers in family support programs, examines the impact of fathers on their children, and describes programs involving fathers successfully. Articles include: (1) "What's Behind the…

  1. Changing Family Forms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seibert, M. Therese; Willetts, Marion C.

    2000-01-01

    Explores the definition of family. Considers three facets of the contemporary family measured by U.S. Census statistics: (1) marriage and divorce trends; (2) declining fertility; and (3) the rise in single-headed families. Addresses the societal changes (economic, cultural, legal, and technological) that have influenced the changes in family…

  2. Launching Family Message Journals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wollman-Bonilla, Julie

    This lesson introduces Family Message Journals, a tool for encouraging family involvement and supporting writing to reflect and learn. First and second graders are led into composing through demonstration, guided writing, and finally independent writing of messages that they will bring home for family to read and write a reply. During the three…

  3. The Family Leukemia Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollitt, Eleanor

    1976-01-01

    An association of families of children with leukemia, the Family Leukemia Association (FLA), was recently established in Toronto. This paper discusses (a) philosophy of the FLA; (b) formative years of this organization; (c) problems encountered by leukemic children and their families; and (d) the FLA's past and future educational and social…

  4. Families in Transition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Britton, Patti O., Ed.; McGee, Michael, Ed.

    1987-01-01

    This issue of "Emphasis" deals with families in transition, providing some model programs for the new family and some historical perspectives on how families have developed over time. Articles include: (1) "Nostalgia on the Right" (Nancy Theriot); (2) "Heart to Heart" (Nancy Harrington-MacLennan); (3) "The Media Get the Message" (Janet Alyn); (4)…

  5. Family Planning & Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Planned Parenthood Federation, London (England).

    This publication is an International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) annotated bibliography of books and articles concerned with family planning and literacy. The subject is divided into four major listings: (1) Literacy; (2) Education; (3) Literacy and Family Planning; and (4) Functional Literacy/Family Planning Projects and Programs.…

  6. Books in the Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swinger, Alice K.

    1989-01-01

    Opportunities for parents to encourage reading in the family are noted and ways to enhance the reading experience are discussed, including writing letters to book characters, singing combined with reading aloud, supplementing school subjects with enjoyable reading, sharing books at family gatherings, and using family experiences for book…

  7. Family Customs and Traditions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacGregor, Cynthia

    Recognizing the importance of maintaining open communication with immediate and extended family members, this book provides a compilation of ideas for family traditions and customs that are grounded in compassion and human kindness. The traditions were gathered from families in the United States and Canada who responded to advertisements in…

  8. Familial lipoprotein lipase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... for anyone with a family history of this disease. Prevention There is no known prevention for this rare, inherited disorder. Awareness of risks may allow early detection. Following a very low-fat diet can improve the ... Type I hyperlipoproteinemia; Familial chylomicronemia; Familial ...

  9. Year of the Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Agriculture, 1994

    1994-01-01

    This special issue focuses on problems and challenges confronting the California family and on research and extension efforts to provide at least partial answers. Research briefs by staff include "Challenges Confront the California Family" (state trends in poverty, divorce, single-parent families, child abuse, delinquency, teen births,…

  10. Individual and Family Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Jean; Simpson, Elizabeth

    This curriculum guide, in working paper form, for a semester-long three-credit course in individual and family development is one of nine technical core courses in an associate degree consumer/family manager program. The course studies individual and family development through the life cycle. Emphasis is on the relationship of basic needs to the…

  11. Treatment of violent families.

    PubMed Central

    Bell, C. C.; Chance-Hill, G.

    1991-01-01

    Family violence is responsible for a significant proportion of homicides, a major cause of premature deaths in African-Americans. This article reviews the prevalence of family violence and explores associated risk factors. Principles and tips of treatment, along with a cognitive framework to guide the actual therapy, are outlined. Finally, issues of preventing family violence are discussed. PMID:2038079

  12. Strengthening America's Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvarado, Rose; Kumpfer, Karol

    2000-01-01

    Improving parenting practices and the family environment is the most effective, enduring strategy for combating juvenile delinquency. Describes the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention's Strengthening America's Families Initiative. Highlights several family-focused prevention programs identified as exemplary, explaining how they…

  13. A story of family.

    PubMed

    Condon, Barbara Backer

    2010-07-01

    The author of this column gives a vivid description of Parse's humanbecoming family model as lived in community. The story of M'Barek (Mark), who was imprisoned for 18 years, draws readers to a new understanding of family and community. Through the process of storytelling, Parse's essences of family are discussed.

  14. Work and Family Variables, Entrepreneurial Career Success, and Psychological Well-Being.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parasuraman, Saroj; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Responses from 111 entrepreneurs revealed that work characteristics/pressures influence work more than family commitment; parental demands and partner support influence family more than work commitment. Women devote more time to family and men to work. Autonomy enables entrepreneurs to minimize the intrusion of family on work. (SK)

  15. Family practice in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Ozsahin, Akatli Kursad

    2014-03-01

    The national project 'Transformation in Health' was started in 2005 to provide expert primary care by family physicians, and decrease expenses in Turkey. The number of family physicians was far below the need, so public physicians were promoted to family physician status after a 10-day intensive course. The government declared some satisfactory results, but privately paid family physicians were not accepted into the system. Furthermore, the government stopped paying for their services from private settings. Some family physicians became unemployed as the major payer for all forms of medical care in Turkey denied their services. The process showed it's value in time. Nevertheless, family physicians should be the core of this transformation as family medicine is an academic and a scientific discipline and a primary care-oriented specialty with its own specific educational content, research and base of evidence, which cannot be achieved through standard medical education.

  16. Multiplex families with epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Afawi, Zaid; Oliver, Karen L.; Kivity, Sara; Mazarib, Aziz; Blatt, Ilan; Neufeld, Miriam Y.; Helbig, Katherine L.; Goldberg-Stern, Hadassa; Misk, Adel J.; Straussberg, Rachel; Walid, Simri; Mahajnah, Muhammad; Lerman-Sagie, Tally; Ben-Zeev, Bruria; Kahana, Esther; Masalha, Rafik; Kramer, Uri; Ekstein, Dana; Shorer, Zamir; Wallace, Robyn H.; Mangelsdorf, Marie; MacPherson, James N.; Carvill, Gemma L.; Mefford, Heather C.; Jackson, Graeme D.; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Bahlo, Melanie; Gecz, Jozef; Heron, Sarah E.; Corbett, Mark; Mulley, John C.; Dibbens, Leanne M.; Korczyn, Amos D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the clinical syndromes and inheritance patterns of multiplex families with epilepsy toward the ultimate aim of uncovering the underlying molecular genetic basis. Methods: Following the referral of families with 2 or more relatives with epilepsy, individuals were classified into epilepsy syndromes. Families were classified into syndromes where at least 2 family members had a specific diagnosis. Pedigrees were analyzed and molecular genetic studies were performed as appropriate. Results: A total of 211 families were ascertained over an 11-year period in Israel. A total of 169 were classified into broad familial epilepsy syndrome groups: 61 generalized, 22 focal, 24 febrile seizure syndromes, 33 special syndromes, and 29 mixed. A total of 42 families remained unclassified. Pathogenic variants were identified in 49/211 families (23%). The majority were found in established epilepsy genes (e.g., SCN1A, KCNQ2, CSTB), but in 11 families, this cohort contributed to the initial discovery (e.g., KCNT1, PCDH19, TBC1D24). We expand the phenotypic spectrum of established epilepsy genes by reporting a familial LAMC3 homozygous variant, where the predominant phenotype was epilepsy with myoclonic-atonic seizures, and a pathogenic SCN1A variant in a family where in 5 siblings the phenotype was broadly consistent with Dravet syndrome, a disorder that usually occurs sporadically. Conclusion: A total of 80% of families were successfully classified, with pathogenic variants identified in 23%. The successful characterization of familial electroclinical and inheritance patterns has highlighted the value of studying multiplex families and their contribution towards uncovering the genetic basis of the epilepsies. PMID:26802095

  17. Familial hypogonadotropic hypogonadism with alopecia.

    PubMed Central

    Slti, I S; Salem, Z

    1979-01-01

    In one family several male and female members had hypogonadism and frontoparietal alopecia, whereas other members with normal sexual development had normal scalp hair. Clinical and laboratory evaluation of three affected young men (two brothers and their cousin) revealed that the hypogonadism was the result of decreased serum concentrations of follicle stimulating and luteinizing hormones. There was no evidence of a deficiency of any other pituitary hormone. Long-term treatment of the three patients with human chorionic gonadotropin resulted in an increase in the serum testosterone concentration, the appearance of male secondary sex characteristics and an increase in the size of the external genitalia. Images FIG. 2 FIG. 4 PMID:466617

  18. Opening Doors: Understanding School and Family Influences on Family Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlisle, Erin; Stanley, Lindsey; Kemple, Kristen Mary

    2005-01-01

    Family involvement in schooling can benefit young children, teachers, and families. Family involvement in schools can be influenced by both school-related and family-related factors. School-related factors include teachers' attitudes toward families, and school and teacher expectations. Family-related factors include ethnicity, prior school…

  19. 24 CFR 982.515 - Family share: Family responsibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Family share: Family responsibility... Assistance Payment § 982.515 Family share: Family responsibility. (a) The family share is calculated by subtracting the amount of the housing assistance payment from the gross rent. (b) The family rent to owner...

  20. 24 CFR 982.515 - Family share: Family responsibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Family share: Family responsibility... Assistance Payment § 982.515 Family share: Family responsibility. (a) The family share is calculated by subtracting the amount of the housing assistance payment from the gross rent. (b) The family rent to owner...

  1. Extended family medicine training

    PubMed Central

    Slade, Steve; Ross, Shelley; Lawrence, Kathrine; Archibald, Douglas; Mackay, Maria Palacios; Oandasan, Ivy F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To examine trends in family medicine training at a time when substantial pedagogic change is under way, focusing on factors that relate to extended family medicine training. Design Aggregate-level secondary data analysis based on the Canadian Post-MD Education Registry. Setting Canada. Participants All Canadian citizens and permanent residents who were registered in postgraduate family medicine training programs within Canadian faculties of medicine from 1995 to 2013. Main outcome measures Number and proportion of family medicine residents exiting 2-year and extended (third-year and above) family medicine training programs, as well as the types and numbers of extended training programs offered in 2015. Results The proportion of family medicine trainees pursuing extended training almost doubled during the study period, going from 10.9% in 1995 to 21.1% in 2013. Men and Canadian medical graduates were more likely to take extended family medicine training. Among the 5 most recent family medicine exit cohorts (from 2009 to 2013), 25.9% of men completed extended training programs compared with 18.3% of women, and 23.1% of Canadian medical graduates completed extended training compared with 13.6% of international medical graduates. Family medicine programs vary substantially with respect to the proportion of their trainees who undertake extended training, ranging from a low of 12.3% to a high of 35.1% among trainees exiting from 2011 to 2013. Conclusion New initiatives, such as the Triple C Competency-based Curriculum, CanMEDS–Family Medicine, and Certificates of Added Competence, have emerged as part of family medicine education and credentialing. In acknowledgment of the potential effect of these initiatives, it is important that future research examine how pedagogic change and, in particular, extended training shapes the care family physicians offer their patients. As part of that research it will be important to measure the breadth and uptake of

  2. Family dynamics and family psychotherapy of psychosomatic.

    PubMed

    Wirsching, M; Stierlin, H

    1979-01-01

    Family therapy of psychosomatic disorders is oftern difficult and comparable to the therapy of psychotic patients. Nonetheless, the results published today by authors such as Minuchin and Selvini and our own experiences are promising indeed. We have found that what seemed to be a deep-rooted psychic structure changed rapidly and enduringly if the relationship field changed. Amelioration of symptoms is in many cases easily attained if they are understood in their function within a relational system. Also, we regard the system or family approach as a chance for medical practice. The general practioner who usually deals with family systems has, in our view, an ideal position to bring about change if he uses his authority and trust properly. He has to obtain a positive, not pathology-oriented view and should use family and social resources in spite of engaging in an often fruitless and endless contact with the designated patient, which only serves to maintain and even to increase the homeostatic lock of the family system.

  3. Creating a family health history

    MedlinePlus

    Family health history; Create a family health history; Family medical history ... Many factors affect your health. These include your: Genes Diet and exercise habits Environment Family members tend to share certain behaviors, genetic traits, and habits. ...

  4. Introduction to special section of the Journal of Family Psychology, advances in mixed methods in family psychology: integrative and applied solutions for family science.

    PubMed

    Weisner, Thomas S; Fiese, Barbara H

    2011-12-01

    Mixed methods in family psychology refer to the systematic integration of qualitative and quantitative techniques to represent family processes and settings. Over the past decade, significant advances have been made in study design, analytic strategies, and technological support (such as software) that allow for the integration of quantitative and qualitative methods and for making appropriate inferences from mixed methods. This special section of the Journal of Family Psychology illustrates how mixed methods may be used to advance knowledge in family science through identifying important cultural differences in family structure, beliefs, and practices, and revealing patterns of family relationships to generate new measurement paradigms and inform clinical practice. Guidance is offered to advance mixed methods research in family psychology through sound principles of peer review.

  5. Multiple familial trichoepithelioma: confirmation via dermoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Navarrete-Dechent, Cristián; Bajaj, Shirin; Marghoob, Ashfaq A.; González, Sergio; Muñoz, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Trichoepitheliomas are uncommon benign adnexal neoplasms that originate from the hair follicles. Multiple familial trichoepithelioma constitute an autosomal dominant disease characterized by the appearance of multiple flesh-colored, symmetrical papules, tumors and/or nodules in the central face and occasionally on the scalp. Although clinical diagnosis is usually straightforward in light of the family history and naked-eye examination, dermoscopy may aid in its confirmation. Dermoscopy of each papule revealed in-focus arborizing vessels, multiple milia-like cysts and rosettes amidst a whitish background. In a patient with multiple facial papules revealing a dermoscopic appearance described above, the diagnosis of sporadic or familial multiple trichoepithelioma should be considered. PMID:27648384

  6. Advancing family psychology.

    PubMed

    Fiese, Barbara H

    2016-02-01

    To realize the broad and complex nature of the field of family psychology, I have slightly revised the mission statement of the Journal of Family Psychology (JFP) to capture contemporary scholarship in family psychology and to advance systems perspectives in this top-tier scientific journal. Over the next 6 years, I hope that authors will consider JFP as an outlet for their best work in the following areas: (1) JFP addresses societal challenges faced by families today; (2) JFP publishes important studies on what makes couple and family relationships work; (3) JFP is a leader in publishing reports that use cutting-edge sophisticated approaches to research design and data analysis; and (4) JFP imparts knowledge about effective therapy and prevention programs relevant to couples and families. The journal is also expanding its publication rate to eight issues per year.

  7. Fields of Toil: A Migrant Family's Journey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valle, Isabel

    Journalist Isabel Valle lived and traveled for 1 year with the family of Raul and Maria Elena Martinez, migrant farmworkers who make their permanent home in south Texas. Her reports appeared every Sunday in the Walla Walla Union-Bulletin's award-winning series "Fields of Toil." This book compiles those weekly reports, which reveal the…

  8. Social Justice Leadership and Family Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeMatthews, David E.; Edwards, D. Brent, Jr.; Rincones, Rodolfo

    2016-01-01

    Research Approach: This in-depth qualitative case study explores one school leader's enactment of social justice leadership in an elementary school in Ciudad Juárez, Mexico. Analysis of interviews and observations revealed how this leader adapted her leadership to prioritize the severe needs of families and students in one of the world's most…

  9. Methadone Maintenance: The Addict's Family Recreated.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartzman, John; Bokos, Peter

    1979-01-01

    A study of four methadone clinics, the addicts treated at these clinics, and their families, reveals basic dissonances in treatment ideology and professional-paraprofessional relationships which, combined with the addict's particular mode of functioning, make significant change in his behavior improbable. (Author)

  10. Some Family Antecedents of Severe Shyness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilmartin, Brian G.

    1985-01-01

    Comparison of 100 older and 200 younger love-shy men to 200 nonshy men revealed that love-shys were more likely to have grown up without sisters or as only children, and to have come from homes characterized by disharmony, verbal abuse, and isolation from kin family networks. (Author/NRB)

  11. State of family planning.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Courtney A; Traxler, Sarah

    2015-06-01

    Family planning and reproductive health services are uniquely impacted by policy and politics in the United States. Recent years have witnessed an unprecedented number of abortion restrictions, and research funding has decreased in related areas. Despite this, both the science and the implementation of improved family planning and abortion methods have progressed in the past decade. This article reviews the current state of family planning, as well as technologies and patient care opportunities for the future.

  12. The Growth of a Family

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, June C.; Biringer, Anne

    1991-01-01

    Caring for a family during pregnancy and birth is an ideal opportunity for family physicians to assess family functioning and help the family adjust to the birth of a new child. Stress and support systems can influence the course of pregnancy, including obstetric and perinatal outcomes. A family-centered approach can help patients during this critical stage of family development. PMID:21229107

  13. Familial leukemia and inherited chromosomal aberration.

    PubMed

    Cervenka, J; Anderson, R S; Nesbit, M E; Krivit, W

    1977-06-15

    This communication contributes a family with 12 cases of cancer and two cases of leukemia. Chromosomal analysis was performed on three occasions, 9 months apart. In unaffected first-degree relatives, we have demonstrated high frequency of tetraradial figures: in parents, 1:243 mitoses, and in all first degree relatives, 1:328 mitoses. The rate of chromosomal breakage was moderately elevated in comparison with carefully matched controls, mainly in father (6.17), mother (4.01) and one sister (4.07). G-banded and C-banded karyotypes revealed no structural chromosomal abnormality in relatives of leukemic children. This family is one of five leukemic families investigated. Analogous methods of chromosomal analysis have been employed in all, but chromatid exchange figures and elevated chromosomal breakage were detected only in the presently reported pedigree. It has been postulated that in this family there exists a possible relation between increased incidence of chromatid exchange figures and increased tendency to leukemia.

  14. The Hoffmeister asteroid family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carruba, V.; Novaković, B.; Aljbaae, S.

    2017-03-01

    The Hoffmeister family is a C-type group located in the central main belt. Dynamically, it is important because of its interaction with the ν1C nodal secular resonance with Ceres, which significantly increases the dispersion in inclination of family members at a lower semimajor axis. As an effect, the distribution of inclination values of the Hoffmeister family at a semimajor axis lower than its centre is significantly leptokurtic, and this can be used to set constraints on the terminal ejection velocity field of the family at the time it was produced. By performing an analysis of the time behaviour of the kurtosis of the vW component of the ejection velocity field [γ2(vW)], as obtained from Gauss' equations, for different fictitious Hoffmeister families with different values of the ejection velocity field, we were able to exclude that the Hoffmeister family should be older than 335 Myr. Constraints from the currently observed inclination distribution of the Hoffmeister family suggest that its terminal ejection velocity parameter VEJ should be lower than 25 m s-1. Results of a Yarko-YORP Monte Carlo method to family dating, combined with other constraints from inclinations and γ2(vW), indicate that the Hoffmeister family should be 220^{+60}_{-40} Myr old, with an ejection parameter VEJ = 20 ± 5 m s-1.

  15. [Nuclear families in Turkey].

    PubMed

    Unalan, T

    1988-01-01

    This study examines the household or family types in Turkey in 1983, especially nuclear families. Nuclear families constitute 61.6% of all households in Turkey, and the majority of them are in the West and the Central regions. The highest % of nuclear families was found in the Mediterranean regions, and the lowest in the Black Sea region. Among all nuclear families, 87% of them consist of husband, wife and children, whereas 13% of them have only husband and wife. Nuclear families without children are common in urban areas and in the West while nuclear families with children are mostly found in rural areas and in the East and the Black Sea regions. Nuclear families with 3 or more children constitute 32% of all nuclear households in the West. On the other hand, the corresponding % is 73 for the Eastern region. As a result, it is concluded that nuclear families have significant regional and residential differentiations and households with the same formation in a developed and a less developed region should have different social, economic, and cultural characteristics.

  16. Family Sense of Coherence and Family Adaptation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antonovsky, Aaron; Sourani, Talma

    1988-01-01

    Administered family Sense of Coherence (SOC) scale to 60 married Israeli males who were disabled by injury or illness and to their spouses. Data provide strong support for hypothesis that strength of SOC would be associated with adaptation, and showed considerable degree of consensus among spouses. (Author/NB)

  17. The Rafita asteroid family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aljbaae, S.; Carruba, V.; Masiero, J. R.; Domingos, R. C.; Huaman, M.

    2017-01-01

    The Rafita asteroid family is an S-type group located in the middle main belt, on the right side of the 3J:-1A mean-motion resonance. The proximity of this resonance to the family left side in semi-major axis caused many former family members to be lost. As a consequence, the family shape in the (a, 1/D) domain is quite asymmetrical, with a preponderance of objects on the right side of the distribution. The Rafita family is also characterized by a leptokurtic distribution in inclination, which allows the use of methods of family age estimation recently introduced for other leptokurtic families such as Astrid, Hansa, Gallia, and Barcelona. In this work we propose a new method based on the behavior of an asymmetry coefficient function of the distribution in the (a, 1/D) plane to date incomplete asteroid families such as Rafita. By monitoring the time behavior of this coefficient for asteroids simulating the initial conditions at the time of the family formation, we were able to estimate that the Rafita family should have an age of 490 ± 200 Myr, in good agreement with results from independent methods such as Monte Carlo simulations of Yarkovsky and Yorp dynamical induced evolution and the time behaviour of the kurtosis of the sin (i) distribution. Asteroids from the Rafita family can reach orbits similar to 8% of the currently known near Earth objects. ≃1% of the simulated objects are present in NEO-space during the final 10 Myr of the simulation, and thus would be comparable to objects in the present-day NEO population.

  18. Strengthening Families: Exploring the Impacts of Family Camp Experiences on Family Functioning and Parenting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garst, Barry A.; Baughman, Sarah; Franz, Nancy K.; Seidel, Richard W.

    2013-01-01

    Research suggests that family camp experiences can enhance family relationships. Families often participate in family camp experiences for a vacation, as part of a therapeutic and/or intervention strategy, or to gain general enrichment or engagement. To better understand the impacts of family camp experiences on family functioning, a mixed-methods…

  19. Smooth School Transitions: Tips for Military Families

    MedlinePlus

    ... Family Life Family Life Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Media Work & Play Getting Involved in Your Community ... AAP Find a Pediatrician Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Adoption & Foster Care Communication & Discipline Types of Families ...

  20. Family Environment and Social Development in Gifted Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olszewski-Kubilius, Paula; Lee, Seon-Young; Thomson, Dana

    2014-01-01

    Involving more than 1,500 academically gifted students and their parents, this study examined relationships between family environment and social competence of gifted students. Results from an online survey revealed that our gifted students rated their families as cohesive and flexible with high levels of satisfaction and communication among…

  1. Familism, Family Environment, and Suicide Attempts among Latina Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pena, Juan B.; Kuhlberg, Jill A.; Zayas, Luis H.; Baumann, Ana A.; Gulbas, Lauren; Hausmann-Stabile, Carolina; Nolle, Allyson P.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we examined the relationship between familism and family environment type as well as the relationship between family environment type and suicide attempts among Latina youth. Latina teen attempters (n = 109) and nonattempters (n = 107) were recruited from the New York City area. Latent class analysis revealed three family…

  2. Results Not Typical: One Latino Family's Experiences in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jimenez-Silva, Margarita; Jimenez Hernandez, Norma V.; Luevanos, Ruth; Jimenez, Dulcemonica; Jimenez, Abel, Jr.

    2009-01-01

    In this narrative, five adult siblings bring their voices together to tell the stories of their interwoven college experiences--how they influenced, supported, and relied on one another and other family members. As the stories unfold, they reveal the strengths of the familial ties that provide meaning and purpose to the college experience, the…

  3. The Good Daughter Dilemma: Latinas Managing Family and School Demands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espinoza, Roberta

    2010-01-01

    This study documents strategies employed by Latina doctoral graduate students to balance family relationships with the demands of school to maintain their status of a "good daughter". In-depth interviews reveal some women integrate family and school by explaining the demands placed on them to enlist support while others keep their two social…

  4. Children's Use of Retreats in Family Child Care Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinberger, Nanci

    2006-01-01

    The use of retreat spaces by 65 children in 9 family child care homes was assessed in this study. Family child care providers used daily diaries to collect information about children's retreat frequency and associated behavior. The findings revealed that nearly half of the children used informal, readily available retreats during the research…

  5. Narrative Family Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, William M.; Keenan, Robert

    1997-01-01

    States that narrative family therapy is informed by social constructionism and postmodern worldviews, and is a relatively significant departure from mainstream psychotherapy. Discusses the use of narrative family therapy. Uses the story of Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden as an example. (MKA)

  6. Families, Risk, and Competence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Michael, Ed.; Feiring, Candice, Ed.

    The problems of studying families arise from the difficulty in studying systems in which there are multiple elements interacting with each other and with the child. This book attests to the growing sophistication of the conceptualization and measurement techniques for understanding family processes. Chapters in the first part of the book,…

  7. Workshops on Family Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galvin, Kathleen M.

    Intended to help speech communication professionals become involved in developing, implementing, and evaluating marital or family enrichment programs, this booklet discusses the theory and practice of using marital enrichment programs to increase family harmony. The first section contains an overview of selected enrichment programs, as well as…

  8. Changing Families, Changing Workplaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bianchi, Suzanne M.

    2011-01-01

    American families and workplaces have both changed dramatically over the past half-century. Paid work by women has increased sharply, as has family instability. Education-related inequality in work hours and income has grown. These changes, says Suzanne Bianchi, pose differing work-life issues for parents at different points along the income…

  9. Education and the Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Leonard, Ed.

    This book is the report of the Family Ties Commission, which was established by the Association of Teacher Educators to study the relationship between home and school. Following the preface and two introductory essays, "Education and My Family" (K.B. O'Rourke as told to E. Johnson) and "Preparing for Successful Children" (B. Clawson), the book is…

  10. The Working Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boethius, Monica

    1984-01-01

    The working family is today by far the most common family type in Sweden. However, just over 50 percent of the children of working parents have access to day care. Because Swedish income tax policy is based on the concept that all adults will support themselves and does not take into account the number of persons supported on an income, one parent…

  11. Employers, Families and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Partnership for Family Involvement in Education (ED), Washington, DC.

    Family involvement in education is good for business, critical to children's school achievement, and important in creating strong and vibrant communities. This report discusses the role of businesses and employers in helping partners and family members be more involved in children's learning. Throughout the report, programs at specific companies…

  12. America's Family Time Famine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattox, Jr., William R.

    1990-01-01

    Parents spend increasingly less time with their children because of the pressures of dual careers and single parenthood. Economic pressures and social values have affected sharing of family time. Studies show both parents and children consider spending time together the most important element in improving family life. (BC)

  13. Family Science Night

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Holly; Alderman, Helen Christine

    2016-01-01

    The goal of the Family Science Night (FSN) described in this article was to involve culturally and linguistically diverse families in school life so that students would be more vocal, successful, and interactive in science class. The project would also demonstrate to the students that their teacher valued their input in the classroom. The setting…

  14. Therapy for Family Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosmann, Michael R.

    A family therapy model, based on a conceptualization of the family as a behavioral system whose members interact adaptively so that an optimal level of functioning is maintained within the system, is described. The divergent roots of this conceptualization are discussed briefly, as are the treatment approaches based on it. The author's model,…

  15. Patent Family Databases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmons, Edlyn S.

    1985-01-01

    Reports on retrieval of patent information online and includes definition of patent family, basic and equivalent patents, "parents and children" applications, designated states, patent family databases--International Patent Documentation Center, World Patents Index, APIPAT (American Petroleum Institute), CLAIMS (IFI/Plenum). A table…

  16. Democratization of the Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Ulrich

    1997-01-01

    Discusses several issues related to a modern approach in the interpretation of civil freedom and its relationship to the notion of family. First, presents some definitions and distinctions regarding the sociology of political freedom, which it suggests should become the sociology of citizenship. Then, applies those ideas to families, particularly…

  17. Marriage or Family Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haley, Jay

    1984-01-01

    Reviews the differences between family therapy and marriage counseling in terms of professional organization, theory, and practice. Suggests that training in marriage therapy does not appear adequate for family therapy. The goal of the therapy field should be more consensus in theory and a single profession of therapists. (JAC)

  18. Measuring Family Dynamics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunce, Joseph T.; Priesmeyer, Marydeth L.

    1985-01-01

    Investigated dimensions of family dynamics via test construction and cross validation, with a developmental sample (N=93) and a validity generalization sample (N=65). Developed two scales that correlated significantly with perceptions of family stability and quality in the developmental and validity generalization samples. (BH)

  19. Family Support and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Lou Ann

    2013-01-01

    Family involvement is essential to the developmental outcome of infants born into Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). In this article, evidence has been presented on the parent's perspective of having an infant in the NICU and the context of family. Key points to an educational assessment are also reviewed. Throughout, the parent's concerns and…

  20. Black Families. Interdisciplinary Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheatham, Harold E., Ed.; Stewart, James B., Ed.

    Since the early 1960s, the black family has been characterized as pathological. This six-part collection of 18 research studies presents alternative approaches to understanding the special characteristics of black families. Part I, "Theoretical and Methodological Perspectives," comprises a comparison of the pioneering work of W. E. B. Du…