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Sample records for family-based candidate gene

  1. A family-based association study identified CYP17 as a candidate gene for obesity susceptibility in Caucasians.

    PubMed

    Yan, H; Guo, Y; Yang, T-L; Zhao, L-J; Deng, H-W

    2012-08-06

    The cytochrome P450c17α gene (CYP17) encodes a key biosynthesis enzyme of estrogen, which is critical in regulating adipogenesis and adipocyte development in humans. We therefore hypothesized that CYP17 is a candidate gene for predicting obesity. In order to test this hypothesis, we performed a family-based association test to investigate the relationship between the CYP17 gene and obesity phenotypes in a large sample comprising 1873 subjects from 405 Caucasian nuclear families of European origin recruited by the Osteoporosis Research Center of Creighton University, USA. Both single SNPs and haplotypes were tested for associations with obesity-related phenotypes, including body mass index (BMI) and fat mass. We identified three SNPs to be significantly associated with BMI, including rs3740397, rs6163, and rs619824. We further characterized the linkage disequilibrium structure for CYP17 and found that the whole CYP17 gene was located in a single-linkage disequilibrium block. This block was observed to be significantly associated with BMI. A major haplotype in this block was significantly associated with both BMI and fat mass. In conclusion, we suggest that the CYP17 gene has an effect on obesity in the Caucasian population. Further independent studies will be needed to confirm our findings.

  2. A Family-Based Association Analysis and Meta-Analysis of the Reading Disabilities Candidate Gene DYX1C1

    PubMed Central

    Tran, C.; Gagnon, F.; Wigg, K.G.; Feng, Y.; Gomez, L.; Cate-Carter, T.D.; Kerr, E.N.; Field, L.L.; Kaplan, B.J.; Lovett, M.W.; Barr, C.L.

    2017-01-01

    Reading disabilities (RD) have a significant genetic basis and have shown linkage to multiple regions including chromosome 15q. Dyslexia susceptibility 1 candidate gene 1 (DYX1C1) on chromosome 15q21 was originally proposed as a candidate gene with two potentially functional polymorphisms at the −3G/A and 1249G/T positions showing association with RD. However, subsequent studies have yielded mixed results. We performed a literature review and meta-analysis of the −3G/A and 1249G/T polymorphisms, including new unpublished data from two family-based samples. Ten markers in DYX1C1 were genotyped in the two independently ascertained samples. Single marker and −3G/A:1249G/T haplotype analyses were performed for RD in both samples, and quantitative trait analyses using standardized reading-related measures was performed in one of the samples. For the meta-analysis, we used a random-effects model to summarize studies that tested for association between −3G/A or 1249G/T and RD. No significant association was found between the DYX1C1 SNPs and RD or any of the reading-related measures tested after correction for the number of tests performed. The previously reported risk haplotype (−3A:1249T) was not biased in transmission. A total of 9 and 10 study samples were included in the meta-analysis of the −3G/A and 1249G/T polymorphisms, respectively. Neither polymorphism reached statistical significance, but the heterogeneity for the 1249G/T polymorphism was high. The results of this study do not provide evidence for association between the putatively functional SNPs −3G/A and 1249G/T and RD. PMID:23341075

  3. Pilot study for family-based association analysis of schizophrenia in a Korean population: Analysis for candidate genes positionally on chromosome 18q21.

    PubMed

    Cho, Min Jung; Lee, Byung Dae; Kim, Choongrak

    2015-09-01

    Schizophrenia is the most devastating mental illness that causes severe deterioration in social and occupational functioning. This is a pilot study for family-based association analysis of schizophrenia in a Korean population to search candidate genes functionally relevant and positionally on chromosome 18. We have recruited 27 probands (with psychosis) with their parents and siblings whenever possible. We analyzed 20 SNPs (Single Nucleotide Polymorphism) of seven neuronal genes in chromosome 18 for DNA samples that was checked for the data quality and genotype error. For testing of association, we performed family-based association tests analyses with each individual SNP, using the phenotype of psychosis. And then, we performed family-based association tests haplotype analyses with each individual SNP, using the phenotype of psychosis. Finally, we performed linkage disequilibrium analyses for the phenotype of schizophrenia. We found one significant SNPs of one neuronal gene in chromosome 18 (P value < 0.05) for the qualitative phenotype of psychosis (rs1893490:MAPK4). We also found significant haplotypes of four SNPs in mitogen-activated protein kinase 4 (MAPK4) gene of chromosome 18 (P value < 0.1) for the phenotype of psychosis (rs1893490-rs3892158-rs3752088-rs3794899). Two SNPS within the MAPK4 gene (rs3794899, rs3794901), plus SNPs within the malic enzyme 2 (rs685533, rs12277), and SMAD4 genes (rs8096092, rs2298617) were in strong linkage disequilibrium with each other (D' > 0.60). The present findings provide convergent evidence (fine mapping of a chromosomal locus 18q21 associated with schizophrenia) suggesting that a specific MAPK4 could be a candidate gene for causing a spectrum of schizophrenia phenotype. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  4. Candidate genes involved in cardiovascular risk factors by a family-based association study on the island of Kosrae, Federated States of Micronesia.

    PubMed

    Han, Zhihua; Heath, Simon C; Shmulewitz, Dvora; Li, Wentian; Auerbach, Steve B; Blundell, Maude L; Lehner, Thomas; Ott, Jurg; Stoffel, Markus; Friedman, Jeffrey M; Breslow, Jan L

    2002-07-01

    Altered plasma levels of lipids and lipoproteins, obesity, hypertension, and diabetes are major risk factors for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. To identify genes that affect these traits and disorders, we looked for association between markers in candidate genes (apolipoprotein AII (apo AII), apolipoprotein AI-CIII-AIV gene cluster (apo AI-CIII-AIV), apolipoprotein E (apo E), cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP), cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7a), hepatic lipase (HL), and microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP)) and known risk factors (triglycerides (Tg), total cholesterol (TC), apolipoprotein AI (apo AI), apolipoprotein AII (apo AII), apolipoprotein B (apo B), body mass index (BMI), blood pressure (BP), leptin, and fasting blood sugar (FBS) levels.) A total of 1,102 individuals from the Pacific island of Kosrae were genotyped for the following markers: Apo AII/MspI, Apo CIII/SstI, Apo AI/XmnI, Apo E/HhaI, CETP/TaqIB, CYP7a/BsaI, HL/DraI, and MTP/HhpI. After testing for population stratification, family-based association analysis was carried out. Novel associations found were: 1) the apo AII/MspI with apo AI and BP levels, 2) the CYP7a/BsaI with apo AI and BMI levels. We also confirmed the following associations: 1) the apo AII/MspI with Tg level; 2) the apo CIII/SstI with Tg, TC, and apo B levels; 3) the Apo E/HhaI E2, E3, and E4 alleles with TC, apo AI, and apo B levels; and 4) the CETP/TaqIB with apo AI level. We further confirmed the connection between the apo AII gene and Tg level by a nonparametric linkage analysis. We therefore conclude that many of these candidate genes may play a significant role in susceptibility to heart disease.

  5. Case-control and family-based association studies of candidate genes in autistic disorder and its endophenotypes: TPH2 and GLO1

    PubMed Central

    Sacco, Roberto; Papaleo, Veruska; Hager, Jorg; Rousseau, Francis; Moessner, Rainald; Militerni, Roberto; Bravaccio, Carmela; Trillo, Simona; Schneider, Cindy; Melmed, Raun; Elia, Maurizio; Curatolo, Paolo; Manzi, Barbara; Pascucci, Tiziana; Puglisi-Allegra, Stefano; Reichelt, Karl-Ludvig; Persico, Antonio M

    2007-01-01

    Background The TPH2 gene encodes the enzyme responsible for serotonin (5-HT) synthesis in the Central Nervous System (CNS). Stereotypic and repetitive behaviors are influenced by 5-HT, and initial studies report an association of TPH2 alleles with childhood-onset obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and with autism. GLO1 encodes glyoxalase I, the enzyme which detoxifies α-oxoaldehydes such as methylglyoxal in all living cells. The A111E GLO1 protein variant, encoded by SNP C419A, was identifed in autopsied autistic brains and proposed to act as an autism susceptibility factor. Hyperserotoninemia, macrocephaly, and peptiduria represent some of the best-characterized endophenotypes in autism research. Methods Family-based and case-control association studies were performed on clinical samples drawn from 312 simplex and 29 multiplex families including 371 non-syndromic autistic patients and 156 unaffected siblings, as well as on 171 controls. TPH2 SNPs rs4570625 and rs4565946 were genotyped using the TaqMan assay; GLO1 SNP C419A was genotyped by PCR and allele-specific restriction digest. Family-based association analyses were performed by TDT and FBAT, case-control by χ2, endophenotypic analyses for 5-HT blood levels, cranial circumference and urinary peptide excretion rates by ANOVA and FBAT. Results TPH2 alleles and haplotypes are not significantly associated in our sample with autism (rs4570625: TDT P = 0.27, and FBAT P = 0.35; rs4565946: TDT P = 0.45, and FBAT P = 0.55; haplotype P = 0.84), with any endophenotype, or with the presence/absence of prominent repetitive and stereotyped behaviors (motor stereotypies: P = 0.81 and 0.84, verbal stereotypies: P = 0.38 and 0.73 for rs4570625 and rs4565946, respectively). Also GLO1 alleles display no association with autism (191 patients vs 171 controls, P = 0.36; TDT P = 0.79, and FBAT P = 0.37), but unaffected siblings seemingly carry a protective gene variant marked by the A419 allele (TDT P < 0.05; patients vs

  6. A case-control association study and family-based expression analysis of the bipolar disorder candidate gene PI4K2B.

    PubMed

    Houlihan, Lorna M; Christoforou, Andrea; Arbuckle, Margaret I; Torrance, Helen S; Anderson, Susan M; Muir, Walter J; Porteous, David J; Blackwood, Douglas H; Evans, Kathryn L

    2009-12-01

    Bipolar disorder, schizophrenia and recurrent major depression are complex psychiatric illnesses with a substantial, yet unknown genetic component. Linkage of bipolar disorder and recurrent major depression with markers on chromosome 4p15-p16 has been identified in a large Scottish family and three smaller families. Analysis of haplotypes in the four chromosome 4p-linked families, identified two regions, each shared by three of the four families, which are also supported by a case-control association study. The candidate gene phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase type-II beta (PI4K2B) lies within one of these regions. PI4K2B is a strong functional candidate as it is a member of the phosphatidylinositol pathway, which is targeted by lithium for therapeutic effect in bipolar disorder. Two approaches were undertaken to test the PI4K2B candidate gene as a susceptibility factor for psychiatric illness. First, a case-control association study, using tagging SNPs from the PI4K2B genomic region, in bipolar disorder (n=368), schizophrenia (n=386) and controls (n=458) showed association with a two-marker haplotype in schizophrenia but not bipolar disorder (rs10939038 and rs17408391, global P=0.005, permuted global P=0.039). Second, expression studies at the allele-specific mRNA and protein level using lymphoblastoid cell lines from members of the large Scottish family, which showed linkage to 4p15-p16 in bipolar disorder and recurrent major depression, showed no difference in expression differences between affected and non-affected family members. There is no evidence to suggest that PI4K2B is contributing to bipolar disorder in this family but a role for this gene in schizophrenia has not been excluded.

  7. A Comprehensive Family-Based Replication Study of Schizophrenia Genes

    PubMed Central

    Aberg, Karolina A.; Liu, Youfang; Bukszár, Jozsef; McClay, Joseph L.; Khachane, Amit N.; Andreassen, Ole A.; Blackwood, Douglas; Corvin, Aiden; Djurovic, Srdjan; Gurling, Hugh; Ophoff, Roel; Pato, Carlos N.; Pato, Michele T.; Riley, Brien; Webb, Todd; Kendler, Kenneth; O’Donovan, Mick; Craddock, Nick; Kirov, George; Owen, Mike; Rujescu, Dan; St Clair, David; Werge, Thomas; Hultman, Christina M.; Delisi, Lynn E.; Sullivan, Patrick; van den Oord, Edwin J.

    2017-01-01

    Importance Schizophrenia (SCZ) is a devastating psychiatric condition. Identifying the specific genetic variants and pathways that increase susceptibility to SCZ is critical to improve disease understanding and address the urgent need for new drug targets. Objective To identify SCZ susceptibility genes. Design We integrated results from a meta-analysis of 18 genome-wide association studies (GWAS) involving 1 085 772 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 6 databases that showed significant informativeness for SCZ. The 9380 most promising SNPs were then specifically genotyped in an independent family-based replication study that, after quality control, consisted of 8107 SNPs. Setting Linkage meta-analysis, brain transcriptome meta-analysis, candidate gene database, OMIM, relevant mouse studies, and expression quantitative trait locus databases. Patients We included 11 185 cases and 10 768 control subjects from 6 databases and, after quality control 6298 individuals (including 3286 cases) from 1811 nuclear families. Main Outcomes and Measures Case-control status for SCZ. Results Replication results showed a highly significant enrichment of SNPs with small P values. Of the SNPs with replication values of P<.01, the proportion of SNPs that had the same direction of effects as in the GWAS meta-analysis was 89% in the combined ancestry group (sign test, P<2.20×10−16) and 93% in subjects of European ancestry only (P<2.20×10−16). Our results supported the major histocompatibility complex region showing a 3.7-fold overall enrichment of replication values of P<.01 in subjects from European ancestry. We replicated SNPs in TCF4 (P=2.53×10−10) and NOTCH4 (P=3.16×10−7) that are among the most robust SCZ findings. More novel findings included POM121L2 (P=3.51×10−7), AS3MT (P=9.01×10−7), CNNM2 (P=6.07×10−7), and NT5C2 (P=4.09×10−7). To explore the many small effects, we performed pathway analyses. The most significant pathways involved neuronal function

  8. Candidate gene prioritization with Endeavour.

    PubMed

    Tranchevent, Léon-Charles; Ardeshirdavani, Amin; ElShal, Sarah; Alcaide, Daniel; Aerts, Jan; Auboeuf, Didier; Moreau, Yves

    2016-07-08

    Genomic studies and high-throughput experiments often produce large lists of candidate genes among which only a small fraction are truly relevant to the disease, phenotype or biological process of interest. Gene prioritization tackles this problem by ranking candidate genes by profiling candidates across multiple genomic data sources and integrating this heterogeneous information into a global ranking. We describe an extended version of our gene prioritization method, Endeavour, now available for six species and integrating 75 data sources. The performance (Area Under the Curve) of Endeavour on cross-validation benchmarks using 'gold standard' gene sets varies from 88% (for human phenotypes) to 95% (for worm gene function). In addition, we have also validated our approach using a time-stamped benchmark derived from the Human Phenotype Ontology, which provides a setting close to prospective validation. With this benchmark, using 3854 novel gene-phenotype associations, we observe a performance of 82%. Altogether, our results indicate that this extended version of Endeavour efficiently prioritizes candidate genes. The Endeavour web server is freely available at https://endeavour.esat.kuleuven.be/.

  9. Gene-based segregation method for identifying rare variants in family-based sequencing studies.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Dandi; Lange, Christoph; Laird, Nan M; Won, Sungho; Hersh, Craig P; Morrow, Jarrett; Hobbs, Brian D; Lutz, Sharon M; Ruczinski, Ingo; Beaty, Terri H; Silverman, Edwin K; Cho, Michael H

    2017-02-13

    Whole-exome sequencing using family data has identified rare coding variants in Mendelian diseases or complex diseases with Mendelian subtypes, using filters based on variant novelty, functionality, and segregation with the phenotype within families. However, formal statistical approaches are limited. We propose a gene-based segregation test (GESE) that quantifies the uncertainty of the filtering approach. It is constructed using the probability of segregation events under the null hypothesis of Mendelian transmission. This test takes into account different degrees of relatedness in families, the number of functional rare variants in the gene, and their minor allele frequencies in the corresponding population. In addition, a weighted version of this test allows incorporating additional subject phenotypes to improve statistical power. We show via simulations that the GESE and weighted GESE tests maintain appropriate type I error rate, and have greater power than several commonly used region-based methods. We apply our method to whole-exome sequencing data from 49 extended pedigrees with severe, early-onset chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in the Boston Early-Onset COPD study (BEOCOPD) and identify several promising candidate genes. Our proposed methods show great potential for identifying rare coding variants of large effect and high penetrance for family-based sequencing data. The proposed tests are implemented in an R package that is available on CRAN (https://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/GESE/).

  10. Association of the ROBO1 gene with reading disabilities in a family-based analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tran, C.; Wigg, K. G.; Zhang, K.; Cate-Carter, T. D.; Kerr, E.; Field, L. L.; Kaplan, B. J.; Lovett, M. W.; Barr, C. L.

    2016-01-01

    Linkage studies have identified a locus on chromosome 3 as reading disabilities (RD) and speech and sound disorder (SSD) susceptibility region, with both RD and SSD sharing similar phonological processing and phonological memory difficulties. One gene in this region, roundabout homolog 1 (ROBO1), has been indicated as a RD candidate and has shown significant association with measures of phonological memory in a population-based sample. In this study, we conducted a family-based association analysis using two independent samples collected in Toronto and Calgary, Canada. Using the two samples, we tested for association between ROBO1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and RD, along with quantitative measures for reading, spelling and phonological memory. One SNP, rs331142, which was selected based on its correlation with ROBO1 expression in brain tissue, was found to be significantly associated with RD in the Toronto sample with over transmission of the minor C allele (P = 0.001), correlated with low expression. This SNP is located ~200 bp from a putative enhancer and results for a marker within the enhancer, rs12495133, showed evidence for association with the same allele in both the Toronto and Calgary samples (P = 0.005 and P = 0.007). These results support previous associations between ROBO1 and RD, as well as correlation with low gene expression, suggesting a possible mechanism of risk conferred by this gene. PMID:24612512

  11. SNPing away at candidate genes.

    PubMed

    Suchard, M A; Bailey, J N; Elashoff, D A; Sinsheimer, J S

    2001-01-01

    We develop regression methodology to identify subsets of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within candidate genes related to quantitative traits and apply our methods to the simulated Genetic Analysis Workshop (GAW) 12 data set. In the data set we find 694 SNP loci with minimum allele frequencies of at least 0.01. We assume an additive casual model between these SNPs and all five quantitative traits. After initial screening using one-way analysis of variance, we employ a computationally efficient, simulated annealing algorithm to select among all possible subsets of SNP loci, using a generalization of Mallows' Cp as our optimality criterion. The simple transition kernel we develop evaluates new subsets in O(1), by requiring just three arithmetic operations to calculate the proposed RSS based on the Gauss-Jordan pivot. We identify an SNP loci located at 6-5782 related to traits 2 and 3 and several sites on gene 2 related to trait 5 using a subsample of 1,000 individuals and the full data set (n = 8,250) for comparison.

  12. Family-based Gene-by-Environment Interaction Studies: Revelations and Remedies

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Min; Umbach, David M.; Weinberg, Clarice R.

    2011-01-01

    Bias can arise in case-control studies of genotype effects if the underlying population is structured (genetically stratified or admixed). Nuclear-family-based studies enjoy robustness against such bias, provided that inference conditions properly on the parents. Investigators have extended family-based methods to study gene-by-environment interactions, regarding such extensions as retaining robustness. We demonstrate via simulations that, if population structure involves the exposure, nuclear-family-based analyses of gene-by-exposure interaction remain vulnerable to inflated Type I error rates through subtle dependencies that investigators have failed to appreciate. Motivated by the Two Sister Study, an ongoing study of families affected by young-onset breast cancer, we consider a design that supplements the case-parents design with a sibling who is not genotyped but provides exposure data. If, in the population at large, inheritance is Mendelian and genotypes do not influence propensity for exposure, then this four-person (or tetrad) structure permits the study of genetic effects, exposure effects, and genotype-by-exposure interactions. We show for a dichotomous exposure that, when exposure of an unaffected sibling is available, a modification to the analysis of case-sib or tetrad data re-establishes robustness for tests of multiplicative gene-by-environment interaction. We also use simulations to assess the power for detecting interaction across a range of scenarios, designs and analytic methods. PMID:21490534

  13. Family-based gene-by-environment interaction studies: revelations and remedies.

    PubMed

    Shi, Min; Umbach, David M; Weinberg, Clarice R

    2011-05-01

    Bias can arise in case-control studies of genotype effects if the underlying population is structured (genetically stratified or admixed). Nuclear-family-based studies enjoy robustness against such bias, provided that inference conditions properly on the parents. Investigators have extended family-based methods to study gene-by-environment interactions, regarding such extensions as retaining robustness. We demonstrate via simulations that, if population structure involves the exposure, nuclear-family-based analyses of gene-by-exposure interaction remain vulnerable to inflated Type I error rates through subtle dependencies that investigators have failed to appreciate. Motivated by the Two Sister Study, an ongoing study of families affected by young-onset breast cancer, we consider a design that supplements the case-parents design with a sibling who is not genotyped but provides exposure data. If, in the population at large, inheritance is Mendelian and genotypes do not influence propensity for exposure, then this 4-person (or tetrad) structure permits the study of genetic effects, exposure effects, and genotype-by-exposure interactions. We show for a dichotomous exposure that, when exposure of an unaffected sibling is available, a modification to the analysis of case-sib or tetrad data re-establishes robustness for tests of multiplicative gene-by-environment interaction. We also use simulations to assess the power for detecting interaction across a range of scenarios, designs, and analytic methods.

  14. Candidate Genes in Ocular Dominance Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Rietman, M. Liset; Sommeijer, J.-P.; Levelt, Christiaan N.; Heimel, J. Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Many studies have been devoted to the identification of genes involved in experience-dependent plasticity in the visual cortex. To discover new candidate genes, we have reexamined data from one such study on ocular dominance (OD) plasticity in recombinant inbred BXD mouse strains. We have correlated the level of plasticity with the gene expression data in the neocortex that have become available for these same strains. We propose that genes with a high correlation are likely to play a role in OD plasticity. We have tested this hypothesis for genes whose inactivation is known to affect OD plasticity. The expression levels of these genes indeed correlated with OD plasticity if their levels showed strong differences between the BXD strains. To narrow down our candidate list of correlated genes, we have selected only those genes that were previously found to be regulated by visual experience and associated with pathways implicated in OD plasticity. This resulted in a list of 32 candidate genes. The list contained unproven, but not unexpected candidates such as the genes for IGF-1, NCAM1, NOGO-A, the gamma2 subunit of the GABA(A) receptor, acetylcholine esterase, and the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase A. This demonstrates the viability of our approach. More interestingly, the following novel candidate genes were identified: Akap7, Akt1, Camk2d, Cckbr, Cd44, Crim1, Ctdsp2, Dnajc5, Gnai1, Itpka, Mapk8, Nbea, Nfatc3, Nlk, Npy5r, Phf21a, Phip, Ppm1l, Ppp1r1b, Rbbp4, Slc1a3, Slit2, Socs2, Spock3, St8sia1, Zfp207. Whether all these novel candidates indeed function in OD plasticity remains to be established, but possible roles of some of them are discussed in the article. PMID:22347157

  15. Evaluating Historical Candidate Genes for Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, Martilias; Werge, Thomas; Sklar, Pamela; Owen, Michael J.; Ophoff, Roel; O’Donovan, Michael; Corvin, Aiden; Cichon, Sven; Sullivan, Patrick F

    2015-01-01

    Prior to the genome-wide association era, candidate gene studies were a major approach in schizophrenia genetics. In this invited review, we consider the current status of 25 historical candidate genes for schizophrenia (e.g., COMT, DISC1, DTNBP1, and NRG1). The initial study for 24 of these genes explicitly evaluated common variant hypotheses about schizophrenia. Our evaluation included a meta-analysis of the candidate gene literature, incorporation of the results of the largest genomic study yet published for schizophrenia, ratings from informed researchers who have published on these genes, and ratings from 24 schizophrenia geneticists. On the basis of current empirical evidence and mostly consensual assessments of informed opinion, it appears that the historical candidate gene literature did not yield clear insights into the genetic basis of schizophrenia. A likely reason why historical candidate gene studies did not achieve their primary aims is inadequate statistical power. However, the considerable efforts embodied in these early studies unquestionably set the stage for current successes in genomic approaches to schizophrenia. PMID:25754081

  16. Evaluating historical candidate genes for schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Farrell, M S; Werge, T; Sklar, P; Owen, M J; Ophoff, R A; O'Donovan, M C; Corvin, A; Cichon, S; Sullivan, P F

    2015-05-01

    Prior to the genome-wide association era, candidate gene studies were a major approach in schizophrenia genetics. In this invited review, we consider the current status of 25 historical candidate genes for schizophrenia (for example, COMT, DISC1, DTNBP1 and NRG1). The initial study for 24 of these genes explicitly evaluated common variant hypotheses about schizophrenia. Our evaluation included a meta-analysis of the candidate gene literature, incorporation of the results of the largest genomic study yet published for schizophrenia, ratings from informed researchers who have published on these genes, and ratings from 24 schizophrenia geneticists. On the basis of current empirical evidence and mostly consensual assessments of informed opinion, it appears that the historical candidate gene literature did not yield clear insights into the genetic basis of schizophrenia. A likely reason why historical candidate gene studies did not achieve their primary aims is inadequate statistical power. However, the considerable efforts embodied in these early studies unquestionably set the stage for current successes in genomic approaches to schizophrenia.

  17. Candidate-gene criteria for clinical reporting: diagnostic exome sequencing identifies altered candidate genes among 8% of patients with undiagnosed diseases

    PubMed Central

    Farwell Hagman, Kelly D.; Shinde, Deepali N.; Mroske, Cameron; Smith, Erica; Radtke, Kelly; Shahmirzadi, Layla; El-Khechen, Dima; Powis, Zöe; Chao, Elizabeth C.; Alcaraz, Wendy A.; Helbig, Katherine L.; Sajan, Samin A.; Rossi, Mari; Lu, Hsiao-Mei; Huether, Robert; Li, Shuwei; Wu, Sitao; Nuñes, Mark E.; Tang, Sha

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Diagnostic exome sequencing (DES) is now a commonly ordered test for individuals with undiagnosed genetic disorders. In addition to providing a diagnosis for characterized diseases, exome sequencing has the capacity to uncover novel candidate genes for disease. Methods: Family-based DES included analysis of both characterized and novel genetic etiologies. To evaluate candidate genes for disease in the clinical setting, we developed a systematic, rule-based classification schema. Results: Testing identified a candidate gene among 7.7% (72/934) of patients referred for DES; 37 (4.0%) and 35 (3.7%) of the genes received evidence scores of “candidate” and “suspected candidate,” respectively. A total of 71 independent candidate genes were reported among the 72 patients, and 38% (27/71) were subsequently corroborated in the peer-reviewed literature. This rate of corroboration increased to 51.9% (27/52) among patients whose gene was reported at least 12 months previously. Conclusions: Herein, we provide transparent, comprehensive, and standardized scoring criteria for the clinical reporting of candidate genes. These results demonstrate that DES is an integral tool for genetic diagnosis, especially for elucidating the molecular basis for both characterized and novel candidate genetic etiologies. Gene discoveries also advance the understanding of normal human biology and more common diseases. Genet Med 19 2, 224–235. PMID:27513193

  18. Phenoscape: Identifying Candidate Genes for Evolutionary Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Edmunds, Richard C.; Su, Baofeng; Balhoff, James P.; Eames, B. Frank; Dahdul, Wasila M.; Lapp, Hilmar; Lundberg, John G.; Vision, Todd J.; Dunham, Rex A.; Mabee, Paula M.; Westerfield, Monte

    2016-01-01

    Phenotypes resulting from mutations in genetic model organisms can help reveal candidate genes for evolutionarily important phenotypic changes in related taxa. Although testing candidate gene hypotheses experimentally in nonmodel organisms is typically difficult, ontology-driven information systems can help generate testable hypotheses about developmental processes in experimentally tractable organisms. Here, we tested candidate gene hypotheses suggested by expert use of the Phenoscape Knowledgebase, specifically looking for genes that are candidates responsible for evolutionarily interesting phenotypes in the ostariophysan fishes that bear resemblance to mutant phenotypes in zebrafish. For this, we searched ZFIN for genetic perturbations that result in either loss of basihyal element or loss of scales phenotypes, because these are the ancestral phenotypes observed in catfishes (Siluriformes). We tested the identified candidate genes by examining their endogenous expression patterns in the channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus. The experimental results were consistent with the hypotheses that these features evolved through disruption in developmental pathways at, or upstream of, brpf1 and eda/edar for the ancestral losses of basihyal element and scales, respectively. These results demonstrate that ontological annotations of the phenotypic effects of genetic alterations in model organisms, when aggregated within a knowledgebase, can be used effectively to generate testable, and useful, hypotheses about evolutionary changes in morphology. PMID:26500251

  19. A family-based association study of the HTR1B gene in eating disorders.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Sandra; Camarena, Beatriz; González, Laura; Caballero, Alejandro; Flores, Griselda; Aguilar, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    To explore the association of three polymorphisms of the serotonin receptor 1Dβ gene (HTR1B) in the etiology of eating disorders and their relationship with clinical characteristics. We analyzed the G861C, A-161T, and A1180G polymorphisms of the HTR1B gene through a family-based association test (FBAT) in 245 nuclear families. The sample was stratified into anorexia nervosa (AN) spectrum and bulimia nervosa (BN) spectrum. In addition, we performed a quantitative FBAT analysis of anxiety severity, depression severity, and Yale-Brown-Cornell Eating Disorders Scale (YBC-EDS) in the AN and BN-spectrum groups. FBAT analysis of the A-161T polymorphism found preferential transmission of allele A-161 in the overall sample. This association was stronger when the sample was stratified by spectrums, showing transmission disequilibrium between the A-161 allele and BN spectrum (z = 2.871, p = 0.004). Quantitative trait analysis showed an association between severity of anxiety symptoms and the C861 allele in AN-spectrum participants (z = 2.871, p = 0.004). We found no associations on analysis of depression severity or preoccupation and ritual scores in AN or BN-spectrum participants. Our preliminary findings suggest a role of the HTR1B gene in susceptibility to development of BN subtypes. Furthermore, this gene might have an impact on the severity of anxiety in AN-spectrum patients.

  20. FARVATX: Family-Based Rare Variant Association Test for X-Linked Genes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sungkyoung; Lee, Sungyoung; Qiao, Dandi; Hardin, Megan; Cho, Michael H; Silverman, Edwin K; Park, Taesung; Won, Sungho

    2016-09-01

    Although the X chromosome has many genes that are functionally related to human diseases, the complicated biological properties of the X chromosome have prevented efficient genetic association analyses, and only a few significantly associated X-linked variants have been reported for complex traits. For instance, dosage compensation of X-linked genes is often achieved via the inactivation of one allele in each X-linked variant in females; however, some X-linked variants can escape this X chromosome inactivation. Efficient genetic analyses cannot be conducted without prior knowledge about the gene expression process of X-linked variants, and misspecified information can lead to power loss. In this report, we propose new statistical methods for rare X-linked variant genetic association analysis of dichotomous phenotypes with family-based samples. The proposed methods are computationally efficient and can complete X-linked analyses within a few hours. Simulation studies demonstrate the statistical efficiency of the proposed methods, which were then applied to rare-variant association analysis of the X chromosome in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Some promising significant X-linked genes were identified, illustrating the practical importance of the proposed methods. © 2016 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  1. Harnessing gene expression networks to prioritize candidate epileptic encephalopathy genes.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Karen L; Lukic, Vesna; Thorne, Natalie P; Berkovic, Samuel F; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Bahlo, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    We apply a novel gene expression network analysis to a cohort of 182 recently reported candidate Epileptic Encephalopathy genes to identify those most likely to be true Epileptic Encephalopathy genes. These candidate genes were identified as having single variants of likely pathogenic significance discovered in a large-scale massively parallel sequencing study. Candidate Epileptic Encephalopathy genes were prioritized according to their co-expression with 29 known Epileptic Encephalopathy genes. We utilized developing brain and adult brain gene expression data from the Allen Human Brain Atlas (AHBA) and compared this to data from Celsius: a large, heterogeneous gene expression data warehouse. We show replicable prioritization results using these three independent gene expression resources, two of which are brain-specific, with small sample size, and the third derived from a heterogeneous collection of tissues with large sample size. Of the nineteen genes that we predicted with the highest likelihood to be true Epileptic Encephalopathy genes, two (GNAO1 and GRIN2B) have recently been independently reported and confirmed. We compare our results to those produced by an established in silico prioritization approach called Endeavour, and finally present gene expression networks for the known and candidate Epileptic Encephalopathy genes. This highlights sub-networks of gene expression, particularly in the network derived from the adult AHBA gene expression dataset. These networks give clues to the likely biological interactions between Epileptic Encephalopathy genes, potentially highlighting underlying mechanisms and avenues for therapeutic targets.

  2. Harnessing Gene Expression Networks to Prioritize Candidate Epileptic Encephalopathy Genes

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, Karen L.; Lukic, Vesna; Thorne, Natalie P.; Berkovic, Samuel F.; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Bahlo, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    We apply a novel gene expression network analysis to a cohort of 182 recently reported candidate Epileptic Encephalopathy genes to identify those most likely to be true Epileptic Encephalopathy genes. These candidate genes were identified as having single variants of likely pathogenic significance discovered in a large-scale massively parallel sequencing study. Candidate Epileptic Encephalopathy genes were prioritized according to their co-expression with 29 known Epileptic Encephalopathy genes. We utilized developing brain and adult brain gene expression data from the Allen Human Brain Atlas (AHBA) and compared this to data from Celsius: a large, heterogeneous gene expression data warehouse. We show replicable prioritization results using these three independent gene expression resources, two of which are brain-specific, with small sample size, and the third derived from a heterogeneous collection of tissues with large sample size. Of the nineteen genes that we predicted with the highest likelihood to be true Epileptic Encephalopathy genes, two (GNAO1 and GRIN2B) have recently been independently reported and confirmed. We compare our results to those produced by an established in silico prioritization approach called Endeavour, and finally present gene expression networks for the known and candidate Epileptic Encephalopathy genes. This highlights sub-networks of gene expression, particularly in the network derived from the adult AHBA gene expression dataset. These networks give clues to the likely biological interactions between Epileptic Encephalopathy genes, potentially highlighting underlying mechanisms and avenues for therapeutic targets. PMID:25014031

  3. Candidate diseases for prenatal gene therapy.

    PubMed

    David, Anna L; Waddington, Simon N

    2012-01-01

    Prenatal gene therapy aims to deliver genes to cells and tissues early in prenatal life, allowing correction of a genetic defect, before irreparable tissue damage has occurred. In contrast to postnatal gene therapy, prenatal application may target genes to a large population of stem cells, and the smaller fetal size allows a higher vector to target cell ratio to be achieved. Early gestation delivery may allow the development of immune tolerance to the transgenic protein, which would facilitate postnatal repeat vector administration if needed. Moreover, early delivery would avoid anti-vector immune responses which are often acquired in postnatal life. The NIH Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee considered that a candidate disease for prenatal gene therapy should pose serious morbidity and mortality risks to the fetus or neonate, and not have any effective postnatal treatment. Prenatal gene therapy would therefore be appropriate for life-threatening disorders, in which prenatal gene delivery maintains a clear advantage over cell transplantation or postnatal gene therapy. If deemed safer and more efficacious, prenatal gene therapy may be applicable for nonlethal conditions if adult gene transfer is unlikely to be of benefit. Many candidate diseases will be inherited congenital disorders such as thalassaemia or lysosomal storage disorders. However, obstetric conditions such as fetal growth restriction may also be treated using a targeted gene therapy approach. In each disease, the condition must be diagnosed prenatally, either via antenatal screening and prenatal diagnosis, for example, in the case of hemophilias, or by ultrasound assessment of the fetus, for example, congenital diaphragmatic hernia. In this chapter, we describe some examples of the candidate diseases and discuss how a prenatal gene therapy approach might work.

  4. Population-Specific Haplotype Association of the Postsynaptic Density Gene DLG4 with Schizophrenia, in Family-Based Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    Balan, Shabeesh; Yamada, Kazuo; Hattori, Eiji; Iwayama, Yoshimi; Toyota, Tomoko; Ohnishi, Tetsuo; Maekawa, Motoko; Toyoshima, Manabu; Iwata, Yasuhide; Suzuki, Katsuaki; Kikuchi, Mitsuru; Yoshikawa, Takeo

    2013-01-01

    The post-synaptic density (PSD) of glutamatergic synapses harbors a multitude of proteins critical for maintaining synaptic dynamics. Alteration of protein expression levels in this matrix is a marked phenomenon of neuropsychiatric disorders including schizophrenia, where cognitive functions are impaired. To investigate the genetic relationship of genes expressed in the PSD with schizophrenia, a family-based association analysis of genetic variants in PSD genes such as DLG4, DLG1, PICK1 and MDM2, was performed, using Japanese samples (124 pedigrees, n = 376 subjects). Results showed a significant association of the rs17203281 variant from the DLG4 gene, with preferential transmission of the C allele (p = 0.02), although significance disappeared after correction for multiple testing. Replication analysis of this variant, found no association in a Chinese schizophrenia cohort (293 pedigrees, n = 1163 subjects) or in a Japanese case-control sample (n = 4182 subjects). The DLG4 expression levels between postmortem brain samples from schizophrenia patients showed no significant changes from controls. Interestingly, a five marker haplotype in DLG4, involving rs2242449, rs17203281, rs390200, rs222853 and rs222837, was enriched in a population specific manner, where the sequences A-C-C-C-A and G-C-C-C-A accumulated in Japanese (p = 0.0009) and Chinese (p = 0.0007) schizophrenia pedigree samples, respectively. However, this could not be replicated in case-control samples. None of the variants in other examined candidate genes showed any significant association in these samples. The current study highlights a putative role for DLG4 in schizophrenia pathogenesis, evidenced by haplotype association, and warrants further dense screening for variants within these haplotypes. PMID:23936182

  5. Family-based association study of early growth response gene 3 with child bipolar I disorder.

    PubMed

    Gallitano, Amelia L; Tillman, Rebecca; Dinu, Valentin; Geller, Barbara

    2012-05-01

    The risk for relapse of child bipolar I disorder (BP-I) is highly correlated with environmental factors. Immediate early genes of the early growth response (EGR) gene family are activated at high levels in the brain in response to environmental events, including stress, and mediate numerous neurobiological processes that have been associated with mental illness risk. The objective of this study is to evaluate whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in EGR genes are associated with the risk to develop child bipolar I disorder. To investigate whether EGR genes may influence susceptibility to child bipolar I disorder (BP-I), we used Family Based Association Tests to examine whether SNPs in each of the EGR genes were associated with illness in 49 families. Two SNPs in EGR3 displayed nominally significant associations with child BP-I (p=0.027 and p=0.028); though neither was statistically significant following correction for multiple comparisons. Haplotype association analysis indicated that these SNPs are in linkage disequilibrium (LD). None of the SNPs tested in EGR1, EGR2, or EGR4 was associated with child BP-I. This study was limited by small sample size, which resulted in it being underpowered to detect a significant association after correction for multiple comparisons. Our study revealed a preliminary finding suggesting that EGR3, a gene that translates environmental stimuli into long-term changes in the brain, warrants further investigation for association with risk for child BP-I disorder in a larger sample. Such studies may help reveal mechanisms by which environment can interact with genetic predisposition to influence this severe mental illness. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Alcoholism and alternative splicing of candidate genes.

    PubMed

    Sasabe, Toshikazu; Ishiura, Shoichi

    2010-04-01

    Gene expression studies have shown that expression patterns of several genes have changed during the development of alcoholism. Gene expression is regulated not only at the level of transcription but also through alternative splicing of pre-mRNA. In this review, we discuss some of the evidence suggesting that alternative splicing of candidate genes such as DRD2 (encoding dopamine D2 receptor) may form the basis of the mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology of alcoholism. These reports suggest that aberrant expression of splice variants affects alcohol sensitivities, and alcohol consumption also regulates alternative splicing. Thus, investigations of alternative splicing are essential for understanding the molecular events underlying the development of alcoholism.

  7. Mining biological databases for candidate disease genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Terry A.; Scheetz, Todd; Webster, Gregg L.; Casavant, Thomas L.

    2001-07-01

    The publicly-funded effort to sequence the complete nucleotide sequence of the human genome, the Human Genome Project (HGP), has currently produced more than 93% of the 3 billion nucleotides of the human genome into a preliminary `draft' format. In addition, several valuable sources of information have been developed as direct and indirect results of the HGP. These include the sequencing of model organisms (rat, mouse, fly, and others), gene discovery projects (ESTs and full-length), and new technologies such as expression analysis and resources (micro-arrays or gene chips). These resources are invaluable for the researchers identifying the functional genes of the genome that transcribe and translate into the transcriptome and proteome, both of which potentially contain orders of magnitude more complexity than the genome itself. Preliminary analyses of this data identified approximately 30,000 - 40,000 human `genes.' However, the bulk of the effort still remains -- to identify the functional and structural elements contained within the transcriptome and proteome, and to associate function in the transcriptome and proteome to genes. A fortuitous consequence of the HGP is the existence of hundreds of databases containing biological information that may contain relevant data pertaining to the identification of disease-causing genes. The task of mining these databases for information on candidate genes is a commercial application of enormous potential. We are developing a system to acquire and mine data from specific databases to aid our efforts to identify disease genes. A high speed cluster of Linux of workstations is used to analyze sequence and perform distributed sequence alignments as part of our data mining and processing. This system has been used to mine GeneMap99 sequences within specific genomic intervals to identify potential candidate disease genes associated with Bardet-Biedle Syndrome (BBS).

  8. Polymorphisms of BDNF Gene and Autism Spectrum Disorders: Family Based Association Study with Korean Trios

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Hee Jeong; Yang, So Young; Cho, In Hee; Park, Mira

    2014-01-01

    Objective Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are a group of early childhood-onset neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by deficits in social interaction and language skills, and repetitive behaviors. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a critical role in the differentiation of normal neuronal cells during embryonic and postnatal neuronal development through its neurotrophic effects. Methods In this study, we performed a family-based association test (FBAT) between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; rs6265, rs11030101, rs7103411, and rs7103873) or haplotypes in the BDNF gene and affection status or several quantitative traits characterized by ADI-R with151 Korean trios, including a child diagnosed as ASDs. Results While no significant association was found between SNPs or haplotypes and the ASDs disease status, a quantitative transmission disequilibrium test (QTDT) by using quantitative traits identified associations of the SNPs (rs6265 and rs11030101) with a domain score for "Restricted, Repetitive and Stereotyped patterns of behavior" (C domain), especially at the subdomain scores for "encompassing preoccupation or circumscribed pattern of interest" (C1) (rs6265A allele, dominant model, p-value=0.019; rs11030101 A allele, additive model, p-value=0.015) and "preoccupations with part of objects or non-functional elements of material" (C4) (rs11030101 A allele, additive model, p-value=0.015) within the ADI-R diagnostic algorithm. In addition, significant associations were also identified between the haplotypes and these quantitative traits (C1, p-value=0.016; C4, p-value=0.012). Conclusion We conclude that BDNF gene polymorphisms have a possible role in the pathogenesis of ASDs. PMID:25110506

  9. Multilocus family-based association analysis of seven candidate polymorphisms with essential hypertension in an african-derived semi-isolated brazilian population.

    PubMed

    Kimura, L; Angeli, C B; Auricchio, M T B M; Fernandes, G R; Pereira, A C; Vicente, J P; Pereira, T V; Mingroni-Netto, R C

    2012-01-01

    Background. It has been widely suggested that analyses considering multilocus effects would be crucial to characterize the relationship between gene variability and essential hypertension (EH). Objective. To test for the presence of multilocus effects between/among seven polymorphisms (six genes) on blood pressure-related traits in African-derived semi-isolated Brazilian populations (quilombos). Methods. Analyses were carried out using a family-based design in a sample of 652 participants (97 families). Seven variants were investigated: ACE (rs1799752), AGT (rs669), ADD2 (rs3755351), NOS3 (rs1799983), GNB3 (rs5441 and rs5443), and GRK4 (rs1801058). Sensitivity analyses were further performed under a case-control design with unrelated participants only. Results. None of the investigated variants were associated individually with both systolic and diastolic BP levels (SBP and DBP, respectively) or EH (as a binary outcome). Multifactor dimensionality reduction-based techniques revealed a marginal association of the combined effect of both GNB3 variants on DBP levels in a family-based design (P = 0.040), whereas a putative NOS3-GRK4 interaction also in relation to DBP levels was observed in the case-control design only (P = 0.004). Conclusion. Our results provide limited support for the hypothesis of multilocus effects between/among the studied variants on blood pressure in quilombos. Further larger studies are needed to validate our findings.

  10. Multilocus Family-Based Association Analysis of Seven Candidate Polymorphisms with Essential Hypertension in an African-Derived Semi-Isolated Brazilian Population

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, L.; Angeli, C. B.; Auricchio, M. T. B. M.; Fernandes, G. R.; Pereira, A. C.; Vicente, J. P.; Pereira, T. V.; Mingroni-Netto, R. C.

    2012-01-01

    Background. It has been widely suggested that analyses considering multilocus effects would be crucial to characterize the relationship between gene variability and essential hypertension (EH). Objective. To test for the presence of multilocus effects between/among seven polymorphisms (six genes) on blood pressure-related traits in African-derived semi-isolated Brazilian populations (quilombos). Methods. Analyses were carried out using a family-based design in a sample of 652 participants (97 families). Seven variants were investigated: ACE (rs1799752), AGT (rs669), ADD2 (rs3755351), NOS3 (rs1799983), GNB3 (rs5441 and rs5443), and GRK4 (rs1801058). Sensitivity analyses were further performed under a case-control design with unrelated participants only. Results. None of the investigated variants were associated individually with both systolic and diastolic BP levels (SBP and DBP, respectively) or EH (as a binary outcome). Multifactor dimensionality reduction-based techniques revealed a marginal association of the combined effect of both GNB3 variants on DBP levels in a family-based design (P = 0.040), whereas a putative NOS3-GRK4 interaction also in relation to DBP levels was observed in the case-control design only (P = 0.004). Conclusion. Our results provide limited support for the hypothesis of multilocus effects between/among the studied variants on blood pressure in quilombos. Further larger studies are needed to validate our findings. PMID:23056922

  11. Deletions and candidate genes in Williams syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Perez Jurado, L.A.; Peoples, R.; Francke, U.

    1994-09-01

    Hemizygosity at the elastin locus (ELN) on chromosome 7q11.23 has recently been reported in several familial and sporadic cases of the developmental disorder, Williams syndrome (WS). Because the deletion is greater than the span of the ELN gene, a contiguous gene deletion syndrome has been suggested as the probable molecular basis for this condition. Thus far, neither the size of the deletion(s), nor other genes within it are known. We have analyzed samples from 27 sporadic WS patients by genotyping two multiallelic ELN intragenic polymorphisms, detectable by PCR amplification, and by Southern blotting for ELN gene dosage. Twenty four patients were hemizygous at the ELN locus while 3 showed no deletion or detectable rearrangement. Genotype studies on parental DNA were informative in 12 of the deletions. All 12 were due to de novo events, 8 in the maternal and 4 in the paternal chromosome. In an attempt to identify genes involved in WS we are also using a candidate gene approach. Delayed clearance of an exogenous calcium load with normal or slightly increased calcitonin levels in serum has been documented in WS patients suggesting a defective calcitonin action or calcium sensing function. The calcitonin receptor (CTR) gene is, therefore, a good candidate since CTR has a dual role as a hormonal receptor for calcitonin and an extracellular calcium sensor. We have mapped the CTR gene to chromosome 7q21.1 by PCR-SSCA of somatic cell hybrids and FISH analysis. Using two color FISH with probes for ELN and CTR, both loci are located on 7q at a distance of {approximately}10 Mb, CTR being telomeric. Our CTR probe does not detect any genomic abnormality by FISH or Southern blot in the patients` samples analyzed. We have identified a diallelic polymorphism in the CTR cDNA and are currently testing the hypothesis of an impaired CTR expression as responsible for some of the clinical features of WS by analysing the CTR transcripts by RT-PCR.

  12. DOCK4 and CEACAM21 as novel schizophrenia candidate genes in the Jewish population.

    PubMed

    Alkelai, Anna; Lupoli, Sara; Greenbaum, Lior; Kohn, Yoav; Kanyas-Sarner, Kyra; Ben-Asher, Edna; Lancet, Doron; Macciardi, Fabio; Lerer, Bernard

    2012-05-01

    It is well accepted that schizophrenia has a strong genetic component. Several genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of schizophrenia have been published in recent years; most of them population based with a case-control design. Nevertheless, identifying the specific genetic variants which contribute to susceptibility to the disorder remains a challenging task. A family-based GWAS strategy may be helpful in the identification of schizophrenia susceptibility genes since it is protected against population stratification, enables better accounting for genotyping errors and is more sensitive for identification of rare variants which have a very low frequency in the general population. In this project we implemented a family-based GWAS of schizophrenia in a sample of 107 Jewish-Israeli families. We found one genome-wide significant association in the intron of the DOCK4 gene (rs2074127, p value=1.134×10⁻⁷) and six additional nominally significant association signals with p<1×10⁻⁵. One of the top single nucleotide polymorphisms (p<1×10⁻⁵) which is located in the predicted intron of the CEACAM21 gene was significantly replicated in independent family-based sample of Arab-Israeli origin (rs4803480: p value=0.002; combined p value=9.61×10⁻⁸), surviving correction for multiple testing. Both DOCK4 and CEACAM21 are biologically reasonable candidate genes for schizophrenia although generalizability of the association of DOCK4 with schizophrenia should be investigated in further studies. In addition, gene-wide significant associations were found within three schizophrenia candidate genes: PGBD1, RELN and PRODH, replicating previously reported associations. By application of a family-based strategy to GWAS, our study revealed new schizophrenia susceptibility loci in the Jewish-Israeli population.

  13. CRISPLD2: a novel NSCLP candidate gene.

    PubMed

    Chiquet, Brett T; Lidral, Andrew C; Stal, Samuel; Mulliken, John B; Moreno, Lina M; Arcos-Burgos, Mauricio; Arco-Burgos, Mauricio; Valencia-Ramirez, Consuelo; Blanton, Susan H; Hecht, Jacqueline T

    2007-09-15

    Non-syndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (NSCLP) results from the complex interaction between genes and environmental factors. Candidate gene analysis and genome scans have been employed to identify the genes contributing to NSCLP. In this study, we evaluated the 16q24.1 chromosomal region, which has been identified by multiple genome scans as an NSCLP region of interest. Two candidate genes were found in the region: interferon regulatory factor 8 (IRF8) and cysteine-rich secretory protein LCCL domain containing 2 (CRISPLD2). Initially, Caucasian and Hispanic NSCLP multiplex families and simplex parent-child trios were genotyped for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in both IRF8 and CRISPLD2. CRISPLD2 was subsequently genotyped in a data set comprised of NSCLP families from Colombia, South America. Linkage disequilibrium analysis identified a significant association between CRISPLD2 and NSCLP in both our Caucasian and Hispanic NSCLP cohorts. SNP rs1546124 and haplotypes between rs1546124 and either rs4783099 or rs16974880 were significant in the Caucasian multiplex population (P=0.01, P=0.002 and P=0.001, respectively). An altered transmission of CRISPLD2 SNPs rs8061351 (P=0.02) and rs2326398 (P=0.06) was detected in the Hispanic population. No association was found between CRISPLD2 and our Colombian population or IRF8 and NSCLP. In situ hybridization showed that CRISPLD2 is expressed in the mandible, palate and nasopharynx regions during craniofacial development at E13.5-E17.5, respectively. Altogether, these data suggest that genetic variation in CRISPLD2 has a role in the etiology of NSCLP.

  14. CRISPLD2: a novel NSCLP candidate gene

    PubMed Central

    Chiquet, Brett T.; Lidral, Andrew C.; Stal, Samuel; Mulliken, John B.; Moreno, Lina M.; Arco-Burgos, Mauricio; Valencia-Ramirez, Consuelo; Blanton, Susan H.; Hecht, Jacqueline T.

    2013-01-01

    Non-syndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (NSCLP) results from the complex interaction between genes and environmental factors. Candidate gene analysis and genome scans have been employed to identify the genes contributing to NSCLP. In this study, we evaluated the 16q24.1 chromosomal region, which has been identified by multiple genome scans as an NSCLP region of interest. Two candidate genes were found in the region: interferon regulatory factor 8 (IRF8) and cysteine-rich secretory protein LCCL domain containing 2 (CRISPLD2). Initially, Caucasian and Hispanic NSCLP multiplex families and simplex parent–child trios were genotyped for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in both IRF8 and CRISPLD2. CRISPLD2 was subsequently genotyped in a data set comprised of NSCLP families from Colombia, South America. Linkage disequilibrium analysis identified a significant association between CRISPLD2 and NSCLP in both our Caucasian and Hispanic NSCLP cohorts. SNP rs1546124 and haplotypes between rs1546124 and either rs4783099 or rs16974880 were significant in the Caucasian multiplex population (P = 0.01, P = 0.002 and P = 0.001, respectively). An altered transmission of CRISPLD2 SNPs rs8061351 (P = 0.02) and rs2326398 (P = 0.06) was detected in the Hispanic population. No association was found between CRISPLD2 and our Colombian population or IRF8 and NSCLP. In situ hybridization showed that CRISPLD2 is expressed in the mandible, palate and nasopharynx regions during craniofacial development at E13.5–E17.5, respectively. Altogether, these data suggest that genetic variation in CRISPLD2 has a role in the etiology of NSCLP. PMID:17616516

  15. CANDID: A flexible method for prioritizing candidate genes for complex human traits

    PubMed Central

    Hutz, Janna E.; Kraja, Aldi T.; McLeod, Howard L.; Province, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Genomewide studies and localized candidate gene approaches have become everyday study designs for identifying polymorphisms in genes that influence complex human traits. Yet, in general, the number of significant findings and the need to focus in smaller regions require a prioritization of genes for further study. Some candidate gene identification algorithms have been proposed in recent years to attempt to streamline this prioritization, but many suffer from limitations imposed by the source data or are difficult to use and understand. CANDID is a prioritization algorithm designed to produce impartial, accurate rankings of candidate genes that influence complex human traits. CANDID can use information from publications, protein domain descriptions, cross-species conservation measures, gene expression profiles, and protein-protein interactions in its analysis. Additionally, users may supplement these data sources with results from linkage, association and other studies. CANDID was tested on well-known complex trait genes using data from the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database. Additionally, CANDID was evaluated in a modeled gene discovery environment, where it ranked genes whose trait associations were published after CANDID’s databases were compiled. In all settings, CANDID exhibited high sensitivity and specificity, indicating an improvement upon previously published algorithms. Its accuracy and ease of use make CANDID a highly useful tool in study design and analysis for complex human traits. PMID:18613097

  16. IBD Candidate Genes and Intestinal Barrier Regulation

    PubMed Central

    McCole, Declan F.

    2015-01-01

    Technological advances in the large scale analysis of human genetics have generated profound insights into possible genetic contributions to chronic diseases including the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. To date, 163 distinct genetic risk loci have been associated with either Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis, with a substantial degree of genetic overlap between these 2 conditions. Although many risk variants show a reproducible correlation with disease, individual gene associations only affect a subset of patients, and the functional contribution(s) of these risk variants to the onset of IBD is largely undetermined. Although studies in twins have demonstrated that the development of IBD is not mediated solely by genetic risk, it is nevertheless important to elucidate the functional consequences of risk variants for gene function in relevant cell types known to regulate key physiological processes that are compromised in IBD. This article will discuss IBD candidate genes that are known to be, or are suspected of being, involved in regulating the intestinal epithelial barrier and several of the physiological processes presided over by this dynamic and versatile layer of cells. This will include assembly and regulation of tight junctions, cell adhesion and polarity, mucus and glycoprotein regulation, bacterial sensing, membrane transport, epithelial differentiation, and restitution. PMID:25215613

  17. Candidate genes for oral-facial clefts in Guatemalan families.

    PubMed

    Neiswanger, Katherine; Deleyiannis, Frederic W B; Avila, Joseph R; Cooper, Margaret E; Brandon, Carla A; Vieira, Alexandre R; Noorchashm, Negin; Weinberg, Seth M; Bardi, Kathleen M; Murray, Jeffrey C; Marazita, Mary L

    2006-05-01

    Nonsyndromic cleft lip +/- cleft palate (CL/P) is a complex trait of unknown etiology. Most genetic studies of CL/P define affection status in a way that ignores subtle subclinical manifestations, resulting in a potential loss of statistical power. This study investigated 10 candidate genes in 155 individuals from 25 Guatemalan CL/P families. High-resolution ultrasound images of the orbicularis oris (OO) muscle were obtained. CL/P was present in 28 family members; an additional 10 had subcutaneous OO muscle defects. Family-based association studies were performed for both narrow (CL/P only) and broad (CL/P plus OO muscle defects) definitions of affection status. PVRL1 was significantly associated under both definitions (P = 0.04, narrow; P = 0.02, broad). Association with JAG2 improved from P = 0.09 under the narrow definition to P = 0.04 under the broad definition. Broadening the oral-facial cleft phenotype to include subclinical variants may improve power in genetic studies.

  18. On improving the credibility of candidate gene studies: A review of candidate gene studies published in Emotion.

    PubMed

    Okbay, Aysu; Rietveld, Cornelius A

    2015-08-01

    The discovery of genetic variants associated with psychological traits deepens our knowledge about causes and consequences of individual differences. In psychology, the standard approach to identify these variants is the "candidate gene study." In a candidate gene study, a limited set of genetic variants is selected based on their hypothesized or known biological function, and these variants are tested for association with the psychological trait of interest. The successful replication of published candidate gene studies, however, is alarmingly scarce. In this article we describe the challenges to successfully identifying genetic associations, and review the candidate gene studies published in Emotion. We conclude that the implementation of 4 methodological guidelines developed by the Behavior Genetics Association for evaluating candidate gene studies will help to increase the credibility of candidate gene study findings.

  19. GeneTIER: prioritization of candidate disease genes using tissue-specific gene expression profiles.

    PubMed

    Antanaviciute, Agne; Daly, Catherine; Crinnion, Laura A; Markham, Alexander F; Watson, Christopher M; Bonthron, David T; Carr, Ian M

    2015-08-15

    In attempts to determine the genetic causes of human disease, researchers are often faced with a large number of candidate genes. Linkage studies can point to a genomic region containing hundreds of genes, while the high-throughput sequencing approach will often identify a great number of non-synonymous genetic variants. Since systematic experimental verification of each such candidate gene is not feasible, a method is needed to decide which genes are worth investigating further. Computational gene prioritization presents itself as a solution to this problem, systematically analyzing and sorting each gene from the most to least likely to be the disease-causing gene, in a fraction of the time it would take a researcher to perform such queries manually. Here, we present Gene TIssue Expression Ranker (GeneTIER), a new web-based application for candidate gene prioritization. GeneTIER replaces knowledge-based inference traditionally used in candidate disease gene prioritization applications with experimental data from tissue-specific gene expression datasets and thus largely overcomes the bias toward the better characterized genes/diseases that commonly afflict other methods. We show that our approach is capable of accurate candidate gene prioritization and illustrate its strengths and weaknesses using case study examples. Freely available on the web at http://dna.leeds.ac.uk/GeneTIER/. umaan@leeds.ac.uk Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  20. GeneTIER: prioritization of candidate disease genes using tissue-specific gene expression profiles

    PubMed Central

    Antanaviciute, Agne; Daly, Catherine; Crinnion, Laura A.; Markham, Alexander F.; Watson, Christopher M.; Bonthron, David T.; Carr, Ian M.

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: In attempts to determine the genetic causes of human disease, researchers are often faced with a large number of candidate genes. Linkage studies can point to a genomic region containing hundreds of genes, while the high-throughput sequencing approach will often identify a great number of non-synonymous genetic variants. Since systematic experimental verification of each such candidate gene is not feasible, a method is needed to decide which genes are worth investigating further. Computational gene prioritization presents itself as a solution to this problem, systematically analyzing and sorting each gene from the most to least likely to be the disease-causing gene, in a fraction of the time it would take a researcher to perform such queries manually. Results: Here, we present Gene TIssue Expression Ranker (GeneTIER), a new web-based application for candidate gene prioritization. GeneTIER replaces knowledge-based inference traditionally used in candidate disease gene prioritization applications with experimental data from tissue-specific gene expression datasets and thus largely overcomes the bias toward the better characterized genes/diseases that commonly afflict other methods. We show that our approach is capable of accurate candidate gene prioritization and illustrate its strengths and weaknesses using case study examples. Availability and Implementation: Freely available on the web at http://dna.leeds.ac.uk/GeneTIER/. Contact: umaan@leeds.ac.uk Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25861967

  1. The epithelial sodium channel γ-subunit gene and blood pressure: family based association, renal gene expression, and physiological analyses.

    PubMed

    Büsst, Cara J; Bloomer, Lisa D S; Scurrah, Katrina J; Ellis, Justine A; Barnes, Timothy A; Charchar, Fadi J; Braund, Peter; Hopkins, Paul N; Samani, Nilesh J; Hunt, Steven C; Tomaszewski, Maciej; Harrap, Stephen B

    2011-12-01

    Variants in the gene encoding the γ-subunit of the epithelial sodium channel (SCNN1G) are associated with both Mendelian and quantitative effects on blood pressure. Here, in 4 cohorts of 1611 white European families composed of a total of 8199 individuals, we undertook staged testing of candidate single-nucleotide polymorphisms for SCNN1G (supplemented with imputation based on data from the 1000 Genomes Project) followed by a meta-analysis in all of the families of the strongest candidate. We also examined relationships between the genotypes and relevant intermediate renal phenotypes, as well as expression of SCNN1G in human kidneys. We found that an intronic single-nucleotide polymorphism of SCNN1G (rs13331086) was significantly associated with age-, sex-, and body mass index-adjusted blood pressure in each of the 4 populations (P<0.05). In an inverse variance-weighted meta-analysis of this single-nucleotide polymorphism in all 4 of the populations, each additional minor allele copy was associated with a 1-mm Hg increase in systolic blood pressure and 0.52-mm Hg increase in diastolic blood pressure (SE=0.33, P=0.002 for systolic blood pressure; SE=0.21, P=0.011 for diastolic blood pressure). The same allele was also associated with higher 12-hour overnight urinary potassium excretion (P=0.04), consistent with increased epithelial sodium channel activity. Renal samples from hypertensive subjects showed a nonsignificant (P=0.07) 1.7-fold higher expression of SCNN1G compared with normotensive controls. These data provide genetic and phenotypic evidence in support of a role for a common genetic variant of SCNN1G in blood pressure determination.

  2. Population- and Family-Based Studies Associate the "MTHFR" Gene with Idiopathic Autism in Simplex Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Xudong; Solehdin, Fatima; Cohen, Ira L.; Gonzalez, Maripaz G.; Jenkins, Edmund C.; Lewis, M. E. Suzanne; Holden, Jeanette J. A.

    2011-01-01

    Two methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene ("MTHFR") functional polymorphisms were studied in 205 North American simplex (SPX) and 307 multiplex (MPX) families having one or more children with an autism spectrum disorder. Case-control comparisons revealed a significantly higher frequency of the low-activity 677T allele, higher prevalence of the…

  3. Population- and Family-Based Studies Associate the "MTHFR" Gene with Idiopathic Autism in Simplex Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Xudong; Solehdin, Fatima; Cohen, Ira L.; Gonzalez, Maripaz G.; Jenkins, Edmund C.; Lewis, M. E. Suzanne; Holden, Jeanette J. A.

    2011-01-01

    Two methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene ("MTHFR") functional polymorphisms were studied in 205 North American simplex (SPX) and 307 multiplex (MPX) families having one or more children with an autism spectrum disorder. Case-control comparisons revealed a significantly higher frequency of the low-activity 677T allele, higher prevalence of the…

  4. Testing gene-environment interactions in family-based association studies using trait-based ascertained samples

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weiming; Langefeld, Carl D.; Grunwald, Gary K.; Fingerlin, Tasha E.

    2014-01-01

    The study of gene-environment interactions is an increasingly important aspect of genetic epidemiological investigation. Historically, it has been difficult to study gene-environment interactions using a family-based design for quantitative traits or when parent-offspring trios were incomplete. The QBAT-I[1] provides researchers a tool to estimate and test for a gene-environment interaction in families of arbitrary structure that are sampled without regard to the phenotype of interest, but is vulnerable to inflated type I error if families are ascertained based on the phenotype. In this study, we verified the potential for type I error of the QBAT-I when applied to samples ascertained on a trait of interest. The magnitude of the inflation increases as the main genetic effect increases and as the ascertainment becomes more extreme. We propose an ascertainment-corrected score test that allows use of the QBAT-I to test for gene-environment interactions in ascertained samples. Our results indicate that the score test and an ad-hoc method we propose can often restore the nominal type I error rate, and in cases where complete restoration is not possible, dramatically reduce the inflation of the type I error rate in ascertained samples. PMID:23922213

  5. Testing gene-environment interactions in family-based association studies using trait-based ascertained samples.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiming; Langefeld, Carl D; Grunwald, Gary K; Fingerlin, Tasha E

    2014-01-30

    The study of gene-environment interactions is an increasingly important aspect of genetic epidemiological investigation. Historically, it has been difficult to study gene-environment interactions using a family-based design for quantitative traits or when parent-offspring trios were incomplete. The QBAT-I provides researchers a tool to estimate and test for a gene-environment interaction in families of arbitrary structure that are sampled without regard to the phenotype of interest, but is vulnerable to inflated type I error if families are ascertained on the basis of the phenotype. In this study, we verified the potential for type I error of the QBAT-I when applied to samples ascertained on a trait of interest. The magnitude of the inflation increases as the main genetic effect increases and as the ascertainment becomes more extreme. We propose an ascertainment-corrected score test that allows the use of the QBAT-I to test for gene-environment interactions in ascertained samples. Our results indicate that the score test and an ad hoc method we propose can often restore the nominal type I error rate, and in cases where complete restoration is not possible, dramatically reduce the inflation of the type I error rate in ascertained samples. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Molecular Characterization and Sex Distribution of Chemosensory Receptor Gene Family Based on Transcriptome Analysis of Scaeva pyrastri

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao-Ming; Zhu, Xiu-Yun; He, Peng; Xu, Lu; Sun, Liang; Chen, Li; Wang, Zhi-Qiang; Deng, Dao-Gui

    2016-01-01

    Chemosensory receptors play key roles in insect behavior. Thus, genes encoding these receptors have great potential for use in integrated pest management. The hover fly Scaeva pyrastri (L.) is an important pollinating insect and a natural enemy of aphids, mainly distributed in the Palearctic and Nearctic regions. However, a systematic identification of their chemosensory receptor genes in the antennae has not been reported. In the present study, we assembled the antennal transcriptome of S. pyrastri by using Illumina sequencing technology. Analysis of the transcriptome data identified 60 candidate chemosensory genes, including 38 for odorant receptors (ORs), 16 for ionotropic receptors (IRs), and 6 for gustatory receptors (GRs). The numbers are similar to those of other Diptera species, suggesting that we were able to successfully identify S. pyrastri chemosensory genes. We analyzed the expression patterns of all genes by using reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR), and found that some genes exhibited sex-biased or sex-specific expression. These candidate chemosensory genes and their tissue expression profiles provide information for further studies aimed at fully understanding the molecular basis behind chemoreception-related behaviors in S. pyrastri. PMID:27171401

  7. Common variations in the FTO gene and obesity in Thais: a family-based study.

    PubMed

    Chuenta, Wanida; Phonrat, Benjaluck; Tungtrongchitr, Anchalee; Limwongse, Chanin; Chongviriyaphan, Nalinee; Santiprabhob, Jeerunda; Tungtrongchitr, Rungsunn

    2015-03-01

    Several studies have revealed the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the first intron of fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO) gene and obesity. To date, more than 100 SNPs in the FTO gene have been identified in various populations. Nevertheless, this association has not yet been confirmed in Thai populations. The aim of this study was to investigate whether FTO variants are associated with obesity in Thais. We analyzed ten variants in the FTO gene (rs9939609, rs9926289, rs8050136, rs9930501, rs9930506, rs9940646, rs9940128, rs1421085, rs17817449, and rs8043757) in 12 families (83 persons); composed of 12 proband cases and 71 associated family members. All participants were genotyped using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method and DNA sequencing assay. We found significant associations between three SNPs located in the first intron of FTO gene (rs1421085, rs17817449, and rs8043757) and obesity. The odds ratios were 2.82 (95% CI, 1.16-6.90, p=0.02) for rs1421085 and rs17817449, and 3.15 (95% CI, 1.28-7.76, p=0.01) for rs8043757. Strong linkage disequilibrium among ten SNPs was observed (D'>0.8). Haplotype analysis (combination of rs1421085 (T/C), rs17817449 (T/G), and rs8043757 (A/T)) showed that the CGT haplotype is associated with an increased risk of obesity (OR, 2.42; 95% CI, 1.18-4.97; p=0.018) when compared to the reference haplotype (TTA). The SNPs rs1421085, rs17817449 and rs8043757 in the first intron of the FTO gene are associated with increasing risk of obesity in Thais. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Integrative Data Mining Highlights Candidate Genes for Monogenic Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Neto, Osorio Abath; Tassy, Olivier; Biancalana, Valérie; Zanoteli, Edmar; Pourquié, Olivier; Laporte, Jocelyn

    2014-01-01

    Inherited myopathies are a heterogeneous group of disabling disorders with still barely understood pathological mechanisms. Around 40% of afflicted patients remain without a molecular diagnosis after exclusion of known genes. The advent of high-throughput sequencing has opened avenues to the discovery of new implicated genes, but a working list of prioritized candidate genes is necessary to deal with the complexity of analyzing large-scale sequencing data. Here we used an integrative data mining strategy to analyze the genetic network linked to myopathies, derive specific signatures for inherited myopathy and related disorders, and identify and rank candidate genes for these groups. Training sets of genes were selected after literature review and used in Manteia, a public web-based data mining system, to extract disease group signatures in the form of enriched descriptor terms, which include functional annotation, human and mouse phenotypes, as well as biological pathways and protein interactions. These specific signatures were then used as an input to mine and rank candidate genes, followed by filtration against skeletal muscle expression and association with known diseases. Signatures and identified candidate genes highlight both potential common pathological mechanisms and allelic disease groups. Recent discoveries of gene associations to diseases, like B3GALNT2, GMPPB and B3GNT1 to congenital muscular dystrophies, were prioritized in the ranked lists, suggesting a posteriori validation of our approach and predictions. We show an example of how the ranked lists can be used to help analyze high-throughput sequencing data to identify candidate genes, and highlight the best candidate genes matching genomic regions linked to myopathies without known causative genes. This strategy can be automatized to generate fresh candidate gene lists, which help cope with database annotation updates as new knowledge is incorporated. PMID:25353622

  9. Association Analysis Suggests SOD2 as a Newly Identified Candidate Gene Associated With Leprosy Susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Geovana Brotto; Salomão, Heloisa; Francio, Angela Schneider; Fava, Vinícius Medeiros; Werneck, Renata Iani; Mira, Marcelo Távora

    2016-08-01

    Genetic studies have identified several genes and genomic regions contributing to the control of host susceptibility to leprosy. Here, we test variants of the positional and functional candidate gene SOD2 for association with leprosy in 2 independent population samples. Family-based analysis revealed an association between leprosy and allele G of marker rs295340 (P = .042) and borderline evidence of an association between leprosy and alleles C and A of markers rs4880 (P = .077) and rs5746136 (P = .071), respectively. Findings were validated in an independent case-control sample for markers rs295340 (P = .049) and rs4880 (P = .038). These results suggest SOD2 as a newly identified gene conferring susceptibility to leprosy. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Science review: searching for gene candidates in acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Grigoryev, Dmitry N; Finigan, James H; Hassoun, Paul; Garcia, Joe G N

    2004-12-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a complex and devastating illness, often occurring within the setting of sepsis, and carries an annual mortality rate of 30-50%. Although the genetic basis of ALI has not been fully established, an increasing body of evidence suggests that genetic predisposition contributes to disease susceptibility and severity. Significant difficulty exists, however, in defining the exact nature of these genetic factors, including large phenotypic variance, incomplete penetrance, complex gene-environment interactions, and strong potential for locus heterogeneity. We utilized the candidate gene approach and an ortholog gene database to provide relevant gene ontologies and insights into the genetic basis of ALI. We employed a Medline search of selected basic and clinical studies in the English literature and studies sponsored by the HopGene National Institutes of Health sponsored Program in Genomic Applications. Extensive gene expression profiling studies in animal models of ALI (rat, murine, canine), as well as in humans, were performed to identify potential candidate genes http://www.hopkins-genomics.org/. We identified a number of candidate genes for ALI, with blood coagulation and inflammation gene ontologies being the most highly represented. The candidate gene approach coupled with extensive gene profiling and novel bioinformatics approaches is a valuable way to identify genes that are involved in ALI.

  11. A candidate gene study of canine joint diseases.

    PubMed

    Clements, Dylan N; Short, Andrea D; Barnes, Annette; Kennedy, Lorna J; Ferguson, John F; Butterworth, Steven J; Fitzpatrick, Noel; Pead, Matthew; Bennett, David; Innes, John F; Carter, Stuart D; Ollier, William E R

    2010-01-01

    Canine osteoarthritis (OA) commonly occurs in association with articular diseases, such as hip dysplasia (HD), elbow dysplasia (ED), or cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CCLR). We hypothesized that a common genomic risk for the development of canine joint disease and canine OA would be identified by evaluating the allele frequencies of candidate gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in dogs with OA associated with different articular diseases when compared with a general population of breed-matched dogs. DNA was extracted from blood samples obtained from Labrador Retrievers and Golden Retrievers surgically treated for ED, HD, and CCLR and confirmed to have radiographic evidence of OA. One hundred and thirteen SNPs in 20 candidate genes were genotyped. No significant associations were identified for SNPs or haplotypes in the candidate genes for the diseases evaluated. The candidate gene approach for the study of genetic association is unlikely to be successful for complex canine diseases such as OA without prior trait mapping evaluation.

  12. Association of interleukin-10 gene promoter polymorphism in spontaneous abortions: a family-based triad study.

    PubMed

    Vidyadhari, M; Sujatha, M; Krupa, P; Jyothy, A; Nallari, Pratibha; Venkateshwari, A

    2015-12-01

    The present study is a triad study designed to determine the co-relation of IL-10 -819C/T promoter polymorphism with the risk of spontaneous abortions. A total of 50 families with spontaneous abortions and 60 families with medically terminated pregnancies were considered for the present study. Fetal tissue of less than 20 weeks of gestation along with peripheral blood from all the couples was collected in this study. A standard amplification refractory mutation system-polymerase chain reaction was carried out to determine the IL 10 genotype in all the subjects. Odd's ratio and their respective 95% confidence intervals were used to determine the strength of association between IL-10 promoter gene polymorphism and spontaneous abortions. The study revealed a statistically significant association of IL-10 -819C/T polymorphism between the two family groups among fetuses (p=0.0000003) and mothers (p=0.0000001). No significant difference was observed in the genotype distribution of IL-10 among fathers. An increased frequency of TT genotype and T allele was observed in spontaneously aborted fetuses and their mothers compared to respective controls. In conclusion, IL-10 C -819T gene promoter polymorphism may act as a major genetic regulator in the etiology of spontaneous abortions.

  13. A direct molecular link between the autism candidate gene RORa and the schizophrenia candidate MIR137

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devanna, Paolo; Vernes, Sonja C.

    2014-02-01

    Retinoic acid-related orphan receptor alpha gene (RORa) and the microRNA MIR137 have both recently been identified as novel candidate genes for neuropsychiatric disorders. RORa encodes a ligand-dependent orphan nuclear receptor that acts as a transcriptional regulator and miR-137 is a brain enriched small non-coding RNA that interacts with gene transcripts to control protein levels. Given the mounting evidence for RORa in autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and MIR137 in schizophrenia and ASD, we investigated if there was a functional biological relationship between these two genes. Herein, we demonstrate that miR-137 targets the 3'UTR of RORa in a site specific manner. We also provide further support for MIR137 as an autism candidate by showing that a large number of previously implicated autism genes are also putatively targeted by miR-137. This work supports the role of MIR137 as an ASD candidate and demonstrates a direct biological link between these previously unrelated autism candidate genes.

  14. Integrative literature and data mining to rank disease candidate genes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chao; Zhu, Cheng; Jegga, Anil G

    2014-01-01

    While the genomics-derived discoveries promise benefits to basic research and health care, the speed and affordability of sequencing following recent technological advances has further aggravated the data deluge. Seamless integration of the ever-increasing clinical, genomic, and experimental data and efficient mining for knowledge extraction, delivering actionable insight and generating testable hypotheses are therefore critical for the needs of biomedical research. For instance, high-throughput techniques are frequently applied to detect disease candidate genes. Experimental validation of these candidates however is both time-consuming and expensive. Hence, several computational approaches based on literature and data mining have been developed to identify the most promising candidates for follow-up studies. Based on "guilt by association" principle, most of these methods use prior knowledge about a disease of interest to discover and rank novel candidate genes. In this chapter, we provide a brief overview of recent advances made in literature- and data-mining-based approaches for candidate gene prioritization. As a case study, we focus on a Web-based computational approach that uses integrated heterogeneous data sources including gene-literature associations for ranking disease candidate genes and explain how to run typical queries using this system.

  15. Sequence diversity in 36 candidate genes for cardiovascular disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Cambien, F; Poirier, O; Nicaud, V; Herrmann, S M; Mallet, C; Ricard, S; Behague, I; Hallet, V; Blanc, H; Loukaci, V; Thillet, J; Evans, A; Ruidavets, J B; Arveiler, D; Luc, G; Tiret, L

    1999-01-01

    Two strategies involving whole-genome association studies have been proposed for the identification of genes involved in complex diseases. The first one seeks to characterize all common variants of human genes and to test their association with disease. The second one seeks to develop dense maps of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and to detect susceptibility genes through linkage disequilibrium. We performed a molecular screening of the coding and/or flanking regions of 36 candidate genes for cardiovascular diseases. All polymorphisms identified by this screening were further genotyped in 750 subjects of European descent. In the whole set of genes, the lengths explored spanned 53.8 kb in the 5' regions, 68.4 kb in exonic regions, and 13 kb in the 3' regions. The strength of linkage disequilibrium within candidate regions suggests that genomewide maps of SNPs might be efficient ways to identify new disease-susceptibility genes, provided that the maps are sufficiently dense. However, the relatively large number of polymorphisms within coding and regulatory regions of candidate genes raises the possibility that several of them might be functional and that the pattern of genotype-phenotype association might be more complex than initially envisaged, as actually has been observed in some well-characterized genes. These results argue in favor of both genomewide association studies and detailed studies of the overall sequence variation of candidate genes, as complementary approaches. PMID:10364531

  16. ENU mutagenesis in mice identifies candidate genes for hypogonadism.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Jeffrey; Hurley, Lisa A; Harris, Rebecca M; Finlayson, Courtney; Tong, Minghan; Fisher, Lisa A; Moran, Jennifer L; Beier, David R; Mason, Christopher; Jameson, J Larry

    2012-06-01

    Genome-wide mutagenesis was performed in mice to identify candidate genes for male infertility, for which the predominant causes remain idiopathic. Mice were mutagenized using N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU), bred, and screened for phenotypes associated with the male urogenital system. Fifteen heritable lines were isolated and chromosomal loci were assigned using low-density genome-wide SNP arrays. Ten of the 15 lines were pursued further using higher-resolution SNP analysis to narrow the candidate gene regions. Exon sequencing of candidate genes identified mutations in mice with cystic kidneys (Bicc1), cryptorchidism (Rxfp2), restricted germ cell deficiency (Plk4), and severe germ cell deficiency (Prdm9). In two other lines with severe hypogonadism, candidate sequencing failed to identify mutations, suggesting defects in genes with previously undocumented roles in gonadal function. These genomic intervals were sequenced in their entirety and a candidate mutation was identified in SnrpE in one of the two lines. The line harboring the SnrpE variant retains substantial spermatogenesis despite small testis size, an unusual phenotype. In addition to the reproductive defects, heritable phenotypes were observed in mice with ataxia (Myo5a), tremors (Pmp22), growth retardation (unknown gene), and hydrocephalus (unknown gene). These results demonstrate that the ENU screen is an effective tool for identifying potential causes of male infertility.

  17. Candidate Genes for Cannabis Use Disorders: Findings, Challenges and Directions

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Arpana; Lynskey, Michael T.

    2009-01-01

    Aim Twin studies have shown that cannabis use disorders (abuse/dependence) are highly heritable. This review aims to: (i) review existing linkage studies of cannabis use disorders and (ii) review gene association studies, to identify potential candidate genes, including those that have been tested for composite substance use disorders, and (iii) to highlight challenges in the genomic study of cannabis use disorders. Methods Peer-reviewed linkage and candidate gene association studies are reviewed. Results Four linkage studies are reviewed: results from these have homed in on regions on chromosomes 1, 3, 4, 9, 14, 17 and 18, which harbor candidates of predicted biological relevance, such as monoglyceride lipase (MGL) on chromosome 3, but also novel genes, including ELTD1 (EGF, latrophilin and seven transmembrane domain containing 1) on chromosome 1. Gene association studies are presented for (a) genes posited to have specific influences on cannabis use disorders: CNR1, CB2, FAAH, MGL, TRPV1 and GPR55 and (b) genes from various neurotransmitter systems that are likely to exert a non-specific influence on risk of cannabis use disorders e.g. GABRA2, DRD2 and OPRM1. Conclusions There are challenges associated with (i) understanding biological complexity underlying cannabis use disorders (including the need to study gene-gene and gene-environment interactions), (ii) using diagnostic versus quantitative phenotypes, (iii) delineating which stage of cannabis involvement (e.g. use vs. misuse) genes influence and (iv) problems of sample ascertainment. PMID:19335651

  18. Genetic influences on smoking: candidate genes.

    PubMed Central

    Rossing, M A

    1998-01-01

    Twin studies consistently indicate important genetic influences on multiple aspects of smoking behavior, including both initiation and cessation; however, knowledge regarding the role of specific genes is extremely limited. Habit-forming actions of nicotine appear to be triggered primarily at nicotinic receptors on the cell bodies of dopaminergic neurons in the mesolimbic "reward" system of the brain, a region implicated in addiction to other substances including cocaine, opiates, and alcohol. Important aspects of the dopaminergic pathway include synthesis of dopamine in dopaminergic neurons, release of dopamine by presynaptic neurons, receptor activation of postsynaptic neurons, dopamine re-uptake by presynaptic neurons, and metabolism of released dopamine. Research examining the role of allelic variation in genes involved in these functions is being actively pursued with respect to addictive behavior as well as personality traits and psycho- and neuropathologic conditions and has implications for smoking research. In addition, genetic differences in nicotinic receptors or nicotine metabolism might reasonably be hypothesized to play a role in smoking addiction. A role of dopaminergic or other genes in smoking cessation is of particular potential importance, as research in this area may lead to the identification of subgroups of individuals for whom pharmacologic cessation aids may be most effective. PMID:9647893

  19. Analysis of candidate genes for macular telangiectasia type 2

    PubMed Central

    Parmalee, Nancy L.; Schubert, Carl; Merriam, Joanna E.; Allikmets, Kaija; Bird, Alan C.; Gillies, Mark C.; Peto, Tunde; Figueroa, Maria; Friedlander, Martin; Fruttiger, Marcus; Greenwood, John; Moss, Stephen E.; Smith, Lois E.H.; Toomes, Carmel; Inglehearn, Chris F.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To find the gene(s) responsible for macular telangiectasia type 2 (MacTel) by a candidate-gene screening approach. Methods Candidate genes were selected based on the following criteria: those known to cause or be associated with diseases with phenotypes similar to MacTel, genes with known function in the retinal vasculature or macular pigment transport, genes that emerged from expression microarray data from mouse models designed to mimic MacTel phenotype characteristics, and genes expressed in the retina that are also related to diabetes or hypertension, which have increased prevalence in MacTel patients. Probands from eight families with at least two affected individuals were screened by direct sequencing of 27 candidate genes. Identified nonsynonymous variants were analyzed to determine whether they co-segregate with the disease in families. Allele frequencies were determined by TaqMan analysis of the large MacTel and control cohorts. Results We identified 23 nonsynonymous variants in 27 candidate genes in at least one proband. Of these, eight were known single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with allele frequencies of >0.05; these variants were excluded from further analyses. Three previously unidentified missense variants, three missense variants with reported disease association, and five rare variants were analyzed for segregation and/or allele frequencies. No variant fulfilled the criteria of being causal for MacTel. A missense mutation, p.Pro33Ser in frizzled homolog (Drosophila) 4 (FZD4), previously suggested as a disease-causing variant in familial exudative vitreoretinopathy, was determined to be a rare benign polymorphism. Conclusions We have ruled out the exons and flanking intronic regions in 27 candidate genes as harboring causal mutations for MacTel. PMID:21179236

  20. The Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Gene Confers Susceptibility to Bipolar Disorder: Evidence from a Family-Based Association Study

    PubMed Central

    Neves-Pereira, Maria; Mundo, Emanuela; Muglia, Pierandrea; King, Nicole; Macciardi, Fabio; Kennedy, James L.

    2002-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BP) is a severe psychiatric disease, with a strong genetic component, that affects 1% of the population worldwide and is characterized by recurrent episodes of mania and depression. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of mood disorders, and the aim of the present study was to test for the presence of linkage disequilibrium between two polymorphisms in the BDNF gene and BP in 283 nuclear families. Family-based association test (FBAT) results for the dinucleotide repeat (GT)N polymorphism at position −1040 bp showed that allele A3 was preferentially transmitted to the affected individuals (Z=2.035 and P=.042). FBAT results for the val66met SNP showed a significant association for allele G (Z=3.415 and P=.00064). Transmission/disequilibrium test (TDT) haplotype analysis showed a significant result for the 3-G allele combination (P=.000394), suggesting that a DNA variant in the vicinity of the BDNF locus confers susceptibility to BP. Given that there is no direct evidence that either of the polymorphisms we examined alters function, it is unlikely that the actual risk-conferring allele is from these two sites. Rather, the causative site is likely nearby and in linkage disequilibrium with the 3-G haplotype that we have identified. PMID:12161822

  1. Association of candidate genes with antisocial drug dependence in adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Corley, Robin P.; Zeiger, Joanna S.; Crowley, Thomas; Ehringer, Marissa A.; Hewitt, John K.; Hopfer, Christian J.; Lessem, Jeffrey; McQueen, Matthew B.; Rhee, Soo Hyun; Smolen, Andrew; Stallings, Michael C.; Young, Susan E.; Krauter, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    The Colorado Center for Antisocial Drug Dependence (CADD) is using several research designs and strategies in its study of the genetic basis for antisocial drug dependence in adolescents. This study reports Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) association results from a Targeted Gene Assay (SNP chip) of 231 Caucasian male probands in treatment with antisocial drug dependence and a matched set of community controls. The SNP chip was designed to assay 1500 SNPs distributed across 50 candidate genes that have had associations with substance use disorders and conduct disorder. There was an average gene-wide inter-SNP interval of 3000 base pairs. After eliminating SNPs with poor signals and low minor allele frequencies, 60 nominally significant associations were found among the remaining 1073 SNPs in 18 of 49 candidate genes. Although none of the SNPs achieved genome-wide association significance levels (defined as p < .000001), two genes probed with multiple SNPs (OPRM1 and CHRNA2) emerged as plausible candidates for a role in antisocial drug dependence after gene-based permutation tests. The custom-designed SNP chip served as an effective and flexible platform for rapid interrogation of a large number of plausible candidate genes. PMID:18384978

  2. Association of candidate gene polymorphisms with clinical subtypes of preterm birth in a Latin American population.

    PubMed

    Gimenez, Lucas G; Momany, Allison M; Poletta, Fernando A; Krupitzki, Hugo B; Gili, Juan A; Busch, Tamara D; Saleme, Cesar; Cosentino, Viviana R; Pawluk, Mariela S; Campaña, Hebe; Gadow, Enrique C; Murray, Jeffrey C; Lopez-Camelo, Jorge S

    2017-09-01

    BackgroundPreterm birth (PTB) is the leading cause of neonatal mortality and morbidity. PTB is often classified according to clinical presentation as follows: idiopathic (PTB-I), preterm premature rupture of membranes (PTB-PPROM), and medically induced (PTB-M). The aim of this study was to evaluate the associations between specific candidate genes and clinical subtypes of PTB.MethodsTwenty-four single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped in 18 candidate genes in 709 infant triads. Of them, 243 were PTB-I, 256 were PTB-PPROM, and 210 were PTB-M. These data were analyzed with a Family-Based Association.ResultsPTB was nominally associated with rs2272365 in PON1, rs883319 in KCNN3, rs4458044 in CRHR1, and rs610277 in F3. Regarding clinical subtypes analysis, three SNPs were associated with PTB-I (rs2272365 in PON1, rs10178458 in COL4A3, and rs4458044 in CRHR1), rs610277 in F3 was associated with PTB-PPROM, and rs883319 in KCNN3 and rs610277 in F3 were associated with PTB-M.ConclusionOur study identified polymorphisms potentially associated with specific clinical subtypes of PTB in this Latin American population. These results could suggest a specific role of such genes in the mechanisms involved in each clinical subtype. Further studies are required to confirm our results and to determine the role of these genes in the pathophysiology of clinical subtypes.

  3. Screening of three Usher syndrome type II candidate genes

    SciTech Connect

    Bloemker, B.K.; Swaroop, A.; Kimberling, W.J.

    1994-09-01

    Usher syndrome type II (US2) is an autosomal recessive disorder that results in blindness due to retinitis pigmentosa and congenital hearing loss. The disease affects approximately 1 in 20,000 individuals in the general population and is responsible for over 50% of all cases of deafness with blindness. The underlying US2 defect is unknown. The US2 gene has been localized to the 1q41 region of chromosome 1 by linkage studies. Three genes previously localized to 1q were analyzed to assess their candidacy as the US2 gene. These were evaluated by PCR assays using DNA from a YAC contig spanning the US2 region on chromosome 1. The first gene evaluated was the human choroideremia-like gene (hCHML), which had been mapped to chromosome 1q. The sequence on 1q is a homologue of the human choroideremia gene on chromosome X. Choroideremia is a degenerative disorder causing ocular pathology similar to that observed in US2 patients. Therefore, hCHML is a candidate for the US2 gene. Two cDNAs (A and B) from an enriched human retinal pigment epithelium library have been mapped to 1q41 by in situ hybridization. Both cDNAs are considered good candidates. The hCHML and cDNA A were ruled out as candidates for the US2 gene based on negative results from PCR assays performed on YACs spanning the US2 region. cDNA B could not be ruled out as a candidate for the US2 gene by these assays. Answers to many clinical questions regarding US2 will only be resolved after the gene is identified and characterized. Eventually, understanding the function and expression of the US2 gene will provide a basis for the development of therapy.

  4. Integrating human omics data to prioritize candidate genes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The identification of genes involved in human complex diseases remains a great challenge in computational systems biology. Although methods have been developed to use disease phenotypic similarities with a protein-protein interaction network for the prioritization of candidate genes, other valuable omics data sources have been largely overlooked in these methods. Methods With this understanding, we proposed a method called BRIDGE to prioritize candidate genes by integrating disease phenotypic similarities with such omics data as protein-protein interactions, gene sequence similarities, gene expression patterns, gene ontology annotations, and gene pathway memberships. BRIDGE utilizes a multiple regression model with lasso penalty to automatically weight different data sources and is capable of discovering genes associated with diseases whose genetic bases are completely unknown. Results We conducted large-scale cross-validation experiments and demonstrated that more than 60% known disease genes can be ranked top one by BRIDGE in simulated linkage intervals, suggesting the superior performance of this method. We further performed two comprehensive case studies by applying BRIDGE to predict novel genes and transcriptional networks involved in obesity and type II diabetes. Conclusion The proposed method provides an effective and scalable way for integrating multi omics data to infer disease genes. Further applications of BRIDGE will be benefit to providing novel disease genes and underlying mechanisms of human diseases. PMID:24344781

  5. Identification of genes from the Treacher Collins candidate region

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, M.; Dixon, J.; Edwards, S. |

    1994-09-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCOF1) is an autosomal dominant disorder of craniofacial development. The TCOF1 locus has previously been mapped to chromosome 5q32-33. The candidate gene region has been defined as being between two flanking markers, ribosomal protein S14 (RPS14) and Annexin 6 (ANX6), by analyzing recombination events in affected individuals. It is estimated that the distance between these flanking markers is 500 kb by three separate analysis methods: (1) radiation hybrid mapping; (2) genetic linkage; and (3) YAC contig analysis. A cosmid contig which spans the candidate gene region for TCOF1 has been constructed by screening the Los Alamos National Laboratory flow-sorted chromosome 5 cosmid library. Cosmids were obtained by using a combination of probes generated from YAC end clones, Alu-PCR fragments from YACs, and asymmetric PCR fragments from both T7 and T3 cosmid ends. Exon amplifications, the selection of genomic coding sequences based upon the presence of functional splice acceptor and donor sites, was used to identify potential exon sequences. Sequences found to be conserved between species were then used to screen cDNA libraries in order to identify candidate genes. To date, four different cDNAs have been isolated from this region and are being analyzed as potential candidate genes for TCOF1. These include the genes encoding plasma glutathione peroxidase (GPX3), heparin sulfate sulfotransferase (HSST), a gene with homology to the ETS family of proteins and one which shows no homology to any known genes. Work is also in progress to identify and characterize additional cDNAs from the candidate gene region.

  6. Oligonucleotide conjugates - Candidates for gene silencing therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Gooding, Matt; Malhotra, Meenakshi; Evans, James C; Darcy, Raphael; O'Driscoll, Caitriona M

    2016-10-01

    The potential therapeutic and diagnostic applications of oligonucleotides (ONs) have attracted great attention in recent years. The capability of ONs to selectively inhibit target genes through antisense and RNA interference mechanisms, without causing un-intended sideeffects has led them to be investigated for various biomedical applications, especially for the treatment of viral diseases and cancer. In recent years, many researchers have focused on enhancing the stability and target specificity of ONs by encapsulating/complexing them with polymers or lipid chains to formulate nanoparticles/nanocomplexes/micelles. Also, chemical modification of nucleic acids has emerged as an alternative to impart stability to ONs against nucleases and other degrading enzymes and proteins found in blood. In addition to chemically modifying the nucleic acids directly, another strategy that has emerged, involves conjugating polymers/peptide/aptamers/antibodies/proteins, preferably to the sense strand (3'end) of siRNAs. Conjugation to the siRNA not only enhances the stability and targeting specificity of the siRNA, but also allows for the development of self-administering siRNA formulations, with a much smaller size than what is usually observed for nanoparticle (∼200nm). This review concentrates mainly on approaches and studies involving ON-conjugates for biomedical applications.

  7. Identification of a Candidate Gene for Astigmatism

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Margarida C.; Hysi, Pirro G.; Verhoeven, Virginie J. M.; Macgregor, Stuart; Hewitt, Alex W.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Cumberland, Phillippa; Vingerling, Johannes R.; Young, Terri L.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Oostra, Ben; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Rahi, Jugnoo S.; Mackey, David A.; Klaver, Caroline C. W.; Andrew, Toby; Hammond, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Astigmatism is a common refractive error that reduces vision, where the curvature and refractive power of the cornea in one meridian are less than those of the perpendicular axis. It is a complex trait likely to be influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. Twin studies of astigmatism have found approximately 60% of phenotypic variance is explained by genetic factors. This study aimed to identify susceptibility loci for astigmatism. Methods. We performed a meta-analysis of seven genome-wide association studies that included 22,100 individuals of European descent, where astigmatism was defined as the number of diopters of cylinder prescription, using fixed effect inverse variance-weighted methods. Results. A susceptibility locus was identified with lead single nucleotide polymorphism rs3771395 on chromosome 2p13.3 (meta-analysis, P = 1.97 × 10−7) in the VAX2 gene. VAX2 plays an important role in the development of the dorsoventral axis of the eye. Animal studies have shown a gradient in astigmatism along the vertical plane, with corresponding changes in refraction, particularly in the ventral field. Conclusions. This finding advances the understanding of refractive error, and provides new potential pathways to be evaluated with regard to the development of astigmatism. PMID:23322567

  8. SEMG1 may be the candidate gene for idiopathic asthenozoospermia.

    PubMed

    Yu, Q; Zhou, Q; Wei, Q; Li, J; Feng, C; Mao, X

    2014-03-01

    Asthenozoospermia (AZS) is a major cause of male infertility, aetiology of which is reported to be related with gene mutation or deletion. However, studies on candidate genes for AZS are very scarce. In this study, we examined the gene expression profiles of asthenozoosperm. Gene expression profile analyses with microarray on spermatozoa specimens from 12 asthenozoosperm patients and 12 age-matched volunteers were performed; data analysis was performed with bioinformatics tools. Data analysis revealed that 1265 and 262 genes were significantly (P < 0.05) and differently expressed (≥2-fold) between groups performed with GeneSpring and BRB-ArrayTools respectively. Of these differently expressed genes, 71 were identified as molecular signatures of asthenozoosperm, of which most involved in primary metabolic process and cellular metabolic process. Molecular signatures were filtered performed with NextBio, 21 genes were identified to be specially expressed in asthenozoosperm. We used Finding Associated Concepts with Text Analysis to match the specially expressed genes against the MEDLINE database and found SEMG1 and PGAP1 were related to male fertility. Validation of the microarray data of SEMG1 was carried out using real-time PCR. Our study demonstrated that SEMG1 was significantly changed in asthenozoosperm, which could be the candidate gene for the development of diagnostic marker and provided the opportunity to further illustrate the biological mechanisms of asthenozoosperm.

  9. Sleeping Beauty mouse models identify candidate genes involved in gliomagenesis.

    PubMed

    Vyazunova, Irina; Maklakova, Vilena I; Berman, Samuel; De, Ishani; Steffen, Megan D; Hong, Won; Lincoln, Hayley; Morrissy, A Sorana; Taylor, Michael D; Akagi, Keiko; Brennan, Cameron W; Rodriguez, Fausto J; Collier, Lara S

    2014-01-01

    Genomic studies of human high-grade gliomas have discovered known and candidate tumor drivers. Studies in both cell culture and mouse models have complemented these approaches and have identified additional genes and processes important for gliomagenesis. Previously, we found that mobilization of Sleeping Beauty transposons in mice ubiquitously throughout the body from the Rosa26 locus led to gliomagenesis with low penetrance. Here we report the characterization of mice in which transposons are mobilized in the Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP) compartment. Glioma formation in these mice did not occur on an otherwise wild-type genetic background, but rare gliomas were observed when mobilization occurred in a p19Arf heterozygous background. Through cloning insertions from additional gliomas generated by transposon mobilization in the Rosa26 compartment, several candidate glioma genes were identified. Comparisons to genetic, epigenetic and mRNA expression data from human gliomas implicates several of these genes as tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes in human glioblastoma.

  10. Genomic loci and candidate genes underlying inflammatory nociception

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Harsha K.; Hain, Heather; Quock, Raymond M.; Philip, Vivek M.; Chesler, Elissa J.; Belknap, John K.; Lariviere, William R.

    2011-01-01

    Heritable genetic factors contribute significantly to inflammatory nociception. To determine candidate genes underlying inflammatory nociception, the current study used a mouse model of abdominal inflammatory pain. BXD recombinant inbred (RI) mouse strains were administered the intraperitoneal (IP) acetic acid test and genome-wide quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping was performed on the mean number of abdominal contraction and extension movements in three distinct groups of BXD RI mouse strains in two separate experiments. Combined mapping results detected two QTLs on chromosomes (Chr) 3 and 10 across experiments and groups of mice; an additional sex-specific QTL was detected on Chr 16. The results replicate previous findings of a significant QTL, Nociq2, on distal Chr 10 for formalin-induced inflammatory nociception and will aid in identification of the underlying candidate genes. Comparisons of sensitivity to IP acetic acid in BXD RI mouse strains with microarray mRNA transcript expression profiles in specific brain areas detected covarying expression of candidate genes that are also found in the detected QTL confidence intervals. The results indicate that common and distinct genetic mechanisms underlie heritable sensitivity to diverse inflammatory insults, and provide a discrete set of high priority candidate genes to investigate further in rodents and human association studies. PMID:21195549

  11. Candidate genes for individual recognition in Polistes fuscatus paper wasps.

    PubMed

    Berens, A J; Tibbetts, E A; Toth, A L

    2016-02-01

    Few animals are known to individually recognize conspecifics, i.e. learn and recall unique individuals during subsequent encounters, and nearly all are social vertebrates. Remarkably, the social paper wasp Polistes fuscatus has recently been discovered to possess this ability, which is useful for remembering identities during competitive social interactions. We analyzed brain gene expression in staged encounters between pairs of individuals to explore potential mechanisms underlying wasps' ability to recall familiar individuals using real-time qRT-PCR. We identified four candidate genes (IP3K, IP3R, Nckx30C and Su(var)2-10) that were down-regulated in the presence of familiar individuals compared to single wasps and pairs of wasps meeting for the first time. These candidate genes are related to calcium signaling, therefore, we treated wasps with lithium chloride, a pharmacological agent that inhibits calcium signaling in neurons. This treatment decreased aggression in paper wasps, but did not affect expression of genes related to calcium signaling. The results suggest calcium signaling differences may be related to individual memory recall in wasps, and we present four promising candidate genes for future study. These data suggest genes associated with dominance behavior may be co-opted for individual recognition, but further work is needed to establish a causal association with the behavior.

  12. The prediction of candidate genes for cervix related cancer through gene ontology and graph theoretical approach.

    PubMed

    Hindumathi, V; Kranthi, T; Rao, S B; Manimaran, P

    2014-06-01

    With rapidly changing technology, prediction of candidate genes has become an indispensable task in recent years mainly in the field of biological research. The empirical methods for candidate gene prioritization that succors to explore the potential pathway between genetic determinants and complex diseases are highly cumbersome and labor intensive. In such a scenario predicting potential targets for a disease state through in silico approaches are of researcher's interest. The prodigious availability of protein interaction data coupled with gene annotation renders an ease in the accurate determination of disease specific candidate genes. In our work we have prioritized the cervix related cancer candidate genes by employing Csaba Ortutay and his co-workers approach of identifying the candidate genes through graph theoretical centrality measures and gene ontology. With the advantage of the human protein interaction data, cervical cancer gene sets and the ontological terms, we were able to predict 15 novel candidates for cervical carcinogenesis. The disease relevance of the anticipated candidate genes was corroborated through a literature survey. Also the presence of the drugs for these candidates was detected through Therapeutic Target Database (TTD) and DrugMap Central (DMC) which affirms that they may be endowed as potential drug targets for cervical cancer.

  13. Variation in the Lysyl Oxidase (LOX) Gene Is Associated with Keratoconus in Family-Based and Case-Control Studies

    PubMed Central

    Bykhovskaya, Yelena; Li, Xiaohui; Epifantseva, Irina; Haritunians, Talin; Siscovick, David; Aldave, Anthony; Szczotka-Flynn, Loretta; Iyengar, Sudha K.; Taylor, Kent D.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Rabinowitz, Yaron S

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Keratoconus is a bilateral noninflammatory progressive corneal disorder with complex genetic inheritance and a common cause for cornea transplantation in young adults. A genomewide linkage scan in keratoconus families identified a locus at 5q23.2, overlapping the gene coding for the lysyl oxidase (LOX). LOX encodes an enzyme responsible for collagen cross-linking in a variety of tissues including the cornea. Corneal collagen cross-linking with long-wave ultraviolet light and riboflavin is a promising new treatment for keratoconus. To determine whether LOX is a genetic determinant of the pathogenesis of keratoconus, we analyzed association results of LOX polymorphisms in two independent case-control samples and in keratoconus families. Methods. Association results were analyzed of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the LOX gene from a Genome-Wide Association Study (GWAS) investigation in two independent panels of patients with keratoconus and controls and in keratoconus families. Results. Evidence of association was found at SNPs rs10519694 and rs2956540 located in intron 4 of LOX in the GWAS discovery case-control panel with P values of 2.3 × 10−3 and 7 × 10−3, respectively. The same two SNPs were found to be associated with keratoconus by family-based association testing with P values of 2.7 × 10−3 and 7.7 × 10−4, respectively. Meta P values of 4.0 × 10−5 and 4.0 × 10−7 were calculated for SNPs rs10519694 and rs2956540 by analyzing case-control and family samples simultaneously. Sequencing of LOX exons in a subset of keratoconus patients identified two polymorphisms, rs1800449 and rs2288393, located in LOX transcripts I and II, associated with keratoconus in case-control and family samples with a meta P value of 0.02. Conclusions. Results provided strong genetic evidence that LOX variants lead to increased susceptibility to developing of keratoconus. PMID:22661479

  14. Identification of Candidate Genes for Dyslexia Susceptibility on Chromosome 18

    PubMed Central

    Scerri, Thomas S.; Paracchini, Silvia; Morris, Andrew; MacPhie, I. Laurence; Talcott, Joel; Stein, John; Smith, Shelley D.; Pennington, Bruce F.; Olson, Richard K.; DeFries, John C.; Monaco, Anthony P.

    2010-01-01

    Background Six independent studies have identified linkage to chromosome 18 for developmental dyslexia or general reading ability. Until now, no candidate genes have been identified to explain this linkage. Here, we set out to identify the gene(s) conferring susceptibility by a two stage strategy of linkage and association analysis. Methodology/Principal Findings Linkage analysis: 264 UK families and 155 US families each containing at least one child diagnosed with dyslexia were genotyped with a dense set of microsatellite markers on chromosome 18. Association analysis: Using a discovery sample of 187 UK families, nearly 3000 SNPs were genotyped across the chromosome 18 dyslexia susceptibility candidate region. Following association analysis, the top ranking SNPs were then genotyped in the remaining samples. The linkage analysis revealed a broad signal that spans approximately 40 Mb from 18p11.2 to 18q12.2. Following the association analysis and subsequent replication attempts, we observed consistent association with the same SNPs in three genes; melanocortin 5 receptor (MC5R), dymeclin (DYM) and neural precursor cell expressed, developmentally down-regulated 4-like (NEDD4L). Conclusions Along with already published biological evidence, MC5R, DYM and NEDD4L make attractive candidates for dyslexia susceptibility genes. However, further replication and functional studies are still required. PMID:21060895

  15. Identification of candidate genes for dyslexia susceptibility on chromosome 18.

    PubMed

    Scerri, Thomas S; Paracchini, Silvia; Morris, Andrew; MacPhie, I Laurence; Talcott, Joel; Stein, John; Smith, Shelley D; Pennington, Bruce F; Olson, Richard K; DeFries, John C; Monaco, Anthony P; Richardson, Alex J

    2010-10-28

    Six independent studies have identified linkage to chromosome 18 for developmental dyslexia or general reading ability. Until now, no candidate genes have been identified to explain this linkage. Here, we set out to identify the gene(s) conferring susceptibility by a two stage strategy of linkage and association analysis. Linkage analysis: 264 UK families and 155 US families each containing at least one child diagnosed with dyslexia were genotyped with a dense set of microsatellite markers on chromosome 18. Association analysis: Using a discovery sample of 187 UK families, nearly 3000 SNPs were genotyped across the chromosome 18 dyslexia susceptibility candidate region. Following association analysis, the top ranking SNPs were then genotyped in the remaining samples. The linkage analysis revealed a broad signal that spans approximately 40 Mb from 18p11.2 to 18q12.2. Following the association analysis and subsequent replication attempts, we observed consistent association with the same SNPs in three genes; melanocortin 5 receptor (MC5R), dymeclin (DYM) and neural precursor cell expressed, developmentally down-regulated 4-like (NEDD4L). Along with already published biological evidence, MC5R, DYM and NEDD4L make attractive candidates for dyslexia susceptibility genes. However, further replication and functional studies are still required.

  16. Candidate olfaction genes identified within the Helicoverpa armigera Antennal Transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Gu, Shaohua; Zhang, Yongjun; Guo, Yuyuan; Wang, Guirong

    2012-01-01

    Antennal olfaction is extremely important for insect survival, mediating key behaviors such as host preference, mate choice, and oviposition site selection. Multiple antennal proteins are involved in olfactory signal transduction pathways. Of these, odorant receptors (ORs) and ionotropic receptors (IRs) confer specificity on olfactory sensory neuron responses. In this study, we identified the olfactory gene repertoire of the economically important agricultural pest moth, Helicoverpa armigera, by assembling the adult male and female antennal transcriptomes. Within the male and female antennal transcriptomes we identified a total of 47 OR candidate genes containing 6 pheromone receptor candidates. Additionally, 12 IR genes as well as 26 odorant-binding proteins and 12 chemosensory proteins were annotated. Our results allow a systematic functional analysis across much of conventional ORs repertoire and newly reported IRs mediating the key olfaction-mediated behaviors of H. armigera.

  17. The cavefish genome reveals candidate genes for eye loss

    PubMed Central

    McGaugh, Suzanne E.; Gross, Joshua B.; Aken, Bronwen; Blin, Maryline; Borowsky, Richard; Chalopin, Domitille; Hinaux, Hélène; Jeffery, William R.; Keene, Alex; Ma, Li; Minx, Patrick; Murphy, Daniel; O’Quin, Kelly E.; Rétaux, Sylvie; Rohner, Nicolas; Searle, Steve M. J.; Stahl, Bethany A.; Tabin, Cliff; Volff, Jean-Nicolas; Yoshizawa, Masato; Warren, Wesley C.

    2014-01-01

    Natural populations subjected to strong environmental selection pressures offer a window into the genetic underpinnings of evolutionary change. Cavefish populations, Astyanax mexicanus (Teleostei: Characiphysi), exhibit repeated, independent evolution for a variety of traits including eye degeneration, pigment loss, increased size and number of taste buds and mechanosensory organs, and shifts in many behavioural traits. Surface and cave forms are interfertile making this system amenable to genetic interrogation; however, lack of a reference genome has hampered efforts to identify genes responsible for changes in cave forms of A. mexicanus. Here we present the first de novo genome assembly for Astyanax mexicanus cavefish, contrast repeat elements to other teleost genomes, identify candidate genes underlying quantitative trait loci (QTL), and assay these candidate genes for potential functional and expression differences. We expect the cavefish genome to advance understanding of the evolutionary process, as well as, analogous human disease including retinal dysfunction. PMID:25329095

  18. Candidate chemosensory genes in the Stemborer Sesamia nonagrioides.

    PubMed

    Glaser, Nicolas; Gallot, Aurore; Legeai, Fabrice; Montagné, Nicolas; Poivet, Erwan; Harry, Myriam; Calatayud, Paul-André; Jacquin-Joly, Emmanuelle

    2013-01-01

    The stemborer Sesamia nonagrioides is an important pest of maize in the Mediterranean Basin. Like other moths, this noctuid uses its chemosensory system to efficiently interact with its environment. However, very little is known on the molecular mechanisms that underlie chemosensation in this species. Here, we used next-generation sequencing (454 and Illumina) on different tissues from adult and larvae, including chemosensory organs and female ovipositors, to describe the chemosensory transcriptome of S. nonagrioides and identify key molecular components of the pheromone production and detection systems. We identified a total of 68 candidate chemosensory genes in this species, including 31 candidate binding-proteins and 23 chemosensory receptors. In particular, we retrieved the three co-receptors Orco, IR25a and IR8a necessary for chemosensory receptor functioning. Focusing on the pheromonal communication system, we identified a new pheromone-binding protein in this species, four candidate pheromone receptors and 12 carboxylesterases as candidate acetate degrading enzymes. In addition, we identified enzymes putatively involved in S. nonagrioides pheromone biosynthesis, including a ∆11-desaturase and different acetyltransferases and reductases. RNAseq analyses and RT-PCR were combined to profile gene expression in different tissues. This study constitutes the first large scale description of chemosensory genes in S. nonagrioides.

  19. Candidate Chemosensory Genes in the Stemborer Sesamia nonagrioides

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, Nicolas; Gallot, Aurore; Legeai, Fabrice; Montagné, Nicolas; Poivet, Erwan; Harry, Myriam; Calatayud, Paul-André; Jacquin-Joly, Emmanuelle

    2013-01-01

    The stemborer Sesamia nonagrioides is an important pest of maize in the Mediterranean Basin. Like other moths, this noctuid uses its chemosensory system to efficiently interact with its environment. However, very little is known on the molecular mechanisms that underlie chemosensation in this species. Here, we used next-generation sequencing (454 and Illumina) on different tissues from adult and larvae, including chemosensory organs and female ovipositors, to describe the chemosensory transcriptome of S. nonagrioides and identify key molecular components of the pheromone production and detection systems. We identified a total of 68 candidate chemosensory genes in this species, including 31 candidate binding-proteins and 23 chemosensory receptors. In particular, we retrieved the three co-receptors Orco, IR25a and IR8a necessary for chemosensory receptor functioning. Focusing on the pheromonal communication system, we identified a new pheromone-binding protein in this species, four candidate pheromone receptors and 12 carboxylesterases as candidate acetate degrading enzymes. In addition, we identified enzymes putatively involved in S. nonagrioides pheromone biosynthesis, including a ∆11-desaturase and different acetyltransferases and reductases. RNAseq analyses and RT-PCR were combined to profile gene expression in different tissues. This study constitutes the first large scale description of chemosensory genes in S. nonagrioides. PMID:23781142

  20. Family-based association study of DRD4 gene in methylphenidate-responded Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder.

    PubMed

    Leung, Patrick Wing-Leung; Chan, Janice Ka Yan; Chen, Lu Hua; Lee, Chi Chiu; Hung, Se Fong; Ho, Ting Pong; Tang, Chun Pan; Moyzis, Robert K; Swanson, James M

    2017-01-01

    The 48-basepair (48-bp) variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) polymorphism in exon 3 of the dopamine receptor D4 gene (DRD4) is implicated in the etiology of attention-deficit/ hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). In particular, ADHD in European-ancestry population is associated with an increased prevalence of the 7-repeat (7R) allele of the exon 3 VNTR. However, it is intriguing to note that the 7R allele has been found to be of very low prevalence in the Chinese general population. In a previous case-control study, our research team had found that the 7R allele was similarly absent in Chinese ADHD children in Hong Kong. Instead, there was an increased prevalence of the 2R allele in Chinese ADHD children. Interestingly, in Asian samples, the 2R allele had been found to be an evolutionary derivative of the 7R allele with equivalent biochemical functionality. So, the finding of an association between ADHD and 2R allele in Chinese population does not exactly contradict the original 7R allele finding in European-ancestry population. However, given the potential pitfall of population stratification in the previous case-control design, this current study tested the 2R allele and ADHD association using a methodologically more rigorous family-based approach on 33 Chinese ADHD probands who had favorable clinical responses to stimulant medication (methylphenidate). Haplotype Relative Risk (HRR) analysis and Transmission Disequilibrium Test (TDT) both showed a significant preferential transmission of the 2R allele from the biological parents to ADHD probands (pone-tailed = 0.038, OR = 2.04; pone-tailed = 0.048, OR = 2.29, respectively). A second hypothesis speculates that it is the deviation, including 7R and 2R alleles, from the conserved ancestral 4R allele which confers risk to ADHD. Thus, a preferential transmission of non-4R alleles, against the 4R allele, from biological parents to their ADHD probands is predicted. Both HRR analysis and TDT confirmed such prediction (pone

  1. Family-based association study of DRD4 gene in methylphenidate-responded Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Patrick Wing-leung; Chan, Janice Ka Yan; Chen, Lu Hua; Lee, Chi Chiu; Hung, Se Fong; Ho, Ting Pong; Tang, Chun Pan; Moyzis, Robert K.; Swanson, James M.

    2017-01-01

    The 48-basepair (48-bp) variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) polymorphism in exon 3 of the dopamine receptor D4 gene (DRD4) is implicated in the etiology of attention-deficit/ hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). In particular, ADHD in European-ancestry population is associated with an increased prevalence of the 7-repeat (7R) allele of the exon 3 VNTR. However, it is intriguing to note that the 7R allele has been found to be of very low prevalence in the Chinese general population. In a previous case-control study, our research team had found that the 7R allele was similarly absent in Chinese ADHD children in Hong Kong. Instead, there was an increased prevalence of the 2R allele in Chinese ADHD children. Interestingly, in Asian samples, the 2R allele had been found to be an evolutionary derivative of the 7R allele with equivalent biochemical functionality. So, the finding of an association between ADHD and 2R allele in Chinese population does not exactly contradict the original 7R allele finding in European-ancestry population. However, given the potential pitfall of population stratification in the previous case-control design, this current study tested the 2R allele and ADHD association using a methodologically more rigorous family-based approach on 33 Chinese ADHD probands who had favorable clinical responses to stimulant medication (methylphenidate). Haplotype Relative Risk (HRR) analysis and Transmission Disequilibrium Test (TDT) both showed a significant preferential transmission of the 2R allele from the biological parents to ADHD probands (pone-tailed = 0.038, OR = 2.04; pone-tailed = 0.048, OR = 2.29, respectively). A second hypothesis speculates that it is the deviation, including 7R and 2R alleles, from the conserved ancestral 4R allele which confers risk to ADHD. Thus, a preferential transmission of non-4R alleles, against the 4R allele, from biological parents to their ADHD probands is predicted. Both HRR analysis and TDT confirmed such prediction (pone

  2. Candidate genes of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: current evidence and research

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wei; Wang, Yaping

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a group of common and lethal forms of idiopathic interstitial pulmonary disease. IPF is characterized by a progressive decline in lung function with a median survival of 2–3 years after diagnosis. Although the pathogenesis of the disease remains unknown, genetic predisposition could play a causal role in IPF. A set of genes have been identified as candidate genes of IPF in the past 20 years. However, the recent technological advances that allow for the analysis of millions of polymorphisms in different subjects have deepened the understanding of the genetic complexity of IPF susceptibility. Genome-wide association studies and whole-genome sequencing continue to reveal the genetic loci associated with IPF risk. In this review, we describe candidate genes on the basis of their functions and aim to gain a better understanding of the genetic basis of IPF. The discovered candidate genes may help to clarify pivotal aspects in the diagnosis, prognosis, and therapies of IPF. PMID:26893575

  3. Candidate gene polymorphisms for behavioural adaptations during urbanization in blackbirds.

    PubMed

    Mueller, J C; Partecke, J; Hatchwell, B J; Gaston, K J; Evans, K L

    2013-07-01

    Successful urban colonization by formerly rural species represents an ideal situation in which to study adaptation to novel environments. We address this issue using candidate genes for behavioural traits that are expected to play a role in such colonization events. We identified and genotyped 16 polymorphisms in candidate genes for circadian rhythms, harm avoidance and migratory and exploratory behaviour in 12 paired urban and rural populations of the blackbird Turdus merula across the Western Palaearctic. An exonic microsatellite in the SERT gene, a candidate gene for harm avoidance behaviour, exhibited a highly significant association with habitat type in an analysis conducted across all populations. Genetic divergence at this locus was consistent in 10 of the 12 population pairs; this contrasts with previously reported stochastic genetic divergence between these populations at random markers. Our results indicate that behavioural traits related to harm avoidance and associated with the SERT polymorphism experience selection pressures during most blackbird urbanization events. These events thus appear to be influenced by homogeneous adaptive processes in addition to previously reported demographic founder events.

  4. Ranking Candidate Disease Genes from Gene Expression and Protein Interaction: A Katz-Centrality Based Approach

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jing; Yang, Ting-Hong; Huang, Yongxu; Holme, Petter

    2011-01-01

    Many diseases have complex genetic causes, where a set of alleles can affect the propensity of getting the disease. The identification of such disease genes is important to understand the mechanistic and evolutionary aspects of pathogenesis, improve diagnosis and treatment of the disease, and aid in drug discovery. Current genetic studies typically identify chromosomal regions associated specific diseases. But picking out an unknown disease gene from hundreds of candidates located on the same genomic interval is still challenging. In this study, we propose an approach to prioritize candidate genes by integrating data of gene expression level, protein-protein interaction strength and known disease genes. Our method is based only on two, simple, biologically motivated assumptions—that a gene is a good disease-gene candidate if it is differentially expressed in cases and controls, or that it is close to other disease-gene candidates in its protein interaction network. We tested our method on 40 diseases in 58 gene expression datasets of the NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus database. On these datasets our method is able to predict unknown disease genes as well as identifying pleiotropic genes involved in the physiological cellular processes of many diseases. Our study not only provides an effective algorithm for prioritizing candidate disease genes but is also a way to discover phenotypic interdependency, cooccurrence and shared pathophysiology between different disorders. PMID:21912686

  5. Ranking candidate disease genes from gene expression and protein interaction: a Katz-centrality based approach.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Yang, Ting-Hong; Huang, Yongxu; Holme, Petter

    2011-01-01

    Many diseases have complex genetic causes, where a set of alleles can affect the propensity of getting the disease. The identification of such disease genes is important to understand the mechanistic and evolutionary aspects of pathogenesis, improve diagnosis and treatment of the disease, and aid in drug discovery. Current genetic studies typically identify chromosomal regions associated specific diseases. But picking out an unknown disease gene from hundreds of candidates located on the same genomic interval is still challenging. In this study, we propose an approach to prioritize candidate genes by integrating data of gene expression level, protein-protein interaction strength and known disease genes. Our method is based only on two, simple, biologically motivated assumptions--that a gene is a good disease-gene candidate if it is differentially expressed in cases and controls, or that it is close to other disease-gene candidates in its protein interaction network. We tested our method on 40 diseases in 58 gene expression datasets of the NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus database. On these datasets our method is able to predict unknown disease genes as well as identifying pleiotropic genes involved in the physiological cellular processes of many diseases. Our study not only provides an effective algorithm for prioritizing candidate disease genes but is also a way to discover phenotypic interdependency, cooccurrence and shared pathophysiology between different disorders.

  6. Screening for mutations in candidate genes for hypospadias.

    PubMed

    Nordenskjöld, A; Friedman, E; Tapper-Persson, M; Söderhäll, C; Leviav, A; Svensson, J; Anvret, M

    1999-01-01

    Hypospadias. a condition with a frontally placed urethral orifice on the penis, is the most common malformation in males. During fetal development several components are necessary for normal male genital development. Testosterone and dihydrotestosterone act via the androgen receptor but a defective receptor function results in different degrees of genital malformations. Testosterone-5alpha-reductase converts testosterone to dihydrotestosterone, which is crucial for normal differentiation, and a total lack of this enzyme results, in syndromes with hypospadias. The Wilms' tumour 1 (WT1) gene is expressed in the fetal gonad and genital malformations can occur due to WT1 gene mutations. These genes are therefore strong candidate genes for hypospadias. We have analysed 35 boys with hypopadias and one girl diagnosed as with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome, using exon by exon polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of the AR, WTI and 5alpha-reductase genes and screened for point mutations and performed subsequent DNA sequencing. No mutations in any of these genes were found in the 26 patients with isolated hypospadias. Two patients with severe hypospadias with cryptorchidism were found to carry mutations in the androgen receptor gene. Also the girl with clinically diagnosed complete androgen insensitivity was found to be homozygous for a splice mutation in the 5alpha-reductase gene. In summary, mutations in the WT1, AR and 5alpha-reductase genes are not common causes of isolated hypospadias.

  7. The Genetics of Reading Disabilities: From Phenotypes to Candidate Genes

    PubMed Central

    Raskind, Wendy H.; Peter, Beate; Richards, Todd; Eckert, Mark M.; Berninger, Virginia W.

    2013-01-01

    This article provides an overview of (a) issues in definition and diagnosis of specific reading disabilities at the behavioral level that may occur in different constellations of developmental and phenotypic profiles (patterns); (b) rapidly expanding research on genetic heterogeneity and gene candidates for dyslexia and other reading disabilities; (c) emerging research on gene-brain relationships; and (d) current understanding of epigenetic mechanisms whereby environmental events may alter behavioral expression of genetic variations. A glossary of genetic terms (denoted by bold font) is provided for readers not familiar with the technical terms. PMID:23308072

  8. Candidate genes and potential targets for therapeutics in Wilms' tumour.

    PubMed

    Blackmore, Christopher; Coppes, Max J; Narendran, Aru

    2010-09-01

    Wilms' tumour (WT) is the most common malignant renal tumour of childhood. During the past two decades or so, molecular studies carried out on biopsy specimens and tumour-derived cell lines have identified a multitude of chromosomal and epigenetic alterations in WT. In addition, a significant amount of evidence has been gathered to identify the genes and signalling pathways that play a defining role in its genesis, growth, survival and treatment responsiveness. As such, these molecules and mechanisms constitute potential targets for novel therapeutic strategies for refractory WT. In this report we aim to review some of the many candidate genes and intersecting pathways that underlie the complexities of WT biology.

  9. Analysis of reelin as a candidate gene for autism.

    PubMed

    Bonora, E; Beyer, K S; Lamb, J A; Parr, J R; Klauck, S M; Benner, A; Paolucci, M; Abbott, A; Ragoussis, I; Poustka, A; Bailey, A J; Monaco, A P

    2003-10-01

    Genetic studies indicate that chromosome 7q is likely to contain an autism susceptibility locus (AUTS1). We have followed a positional candidate gene approach to identify relevant gene(s) and report here the analysis of reelin (RELN), a gene located under our peak of linkage. Screening RELN for DNA changes identified novel missense variants absent in a large control group; however, the low frequency of these mutations does not explain the relatively strong linkage results on 7q. Furthermore, analysis of a previously reported triplet repeat polymorphism and intragenic single nucleotide polymorphisms, using the transmission disequilibrium test, provided no evidence for association with autism in IMGSAC and German singleton families. The analysis of RELN suggests that it probably does not play a major role in autism aetiology, although further analysis of several missense mutations is warranted in additional affected individuals.

  10. Prioritizing disease candidate genes by a gene interconnectedness-based approach.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chia-Lang; Huang, Yen-Hua; Hsu, Chien-Ting; Yang, Ueng-Cheng

    2011-11-30

    Genome-wide disease-gene finding approaches may sometimes provide us with a long list of candidate genes. Since using pure experimental approaches to verify all candidates could be expensive, a number of network-based methods have been developed to prioritize candidates. Such tools usually have a set of parameters pre-trained using available network data. This means that re-training network-based tools may be required when existing biological networks are updated or when networks from different sources are to be tried. We developed a parameter-free method, interconnectedness (ICN), to rank candidate genes by assessing the closeness of them to known disease genes in a network. ICN was tested using 1,993 known disease-gene associations and achieved a success rate of ~44% using a protein-protein interaction network under a test scenario of simulated linkage analysis. This performance is comparable with those of other well-known methods and ICN outperforms other methods when a candidate disease gene is not directly linked to known disease genes in a network. Interestingly, we show that a combined scoring strategy could enable ICN to achieve an even better performance (~50%) than other methods used alone. ICN, a user-friendly method, can well complement other network-based methods in the context of prioritizing candidate disease genes.

  11. Evaluation of common genetic variants in 82 candidate genes as risk factors for neural tube defects

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Neural tube defects (NTDs) are common birth defects (~1 in 1000 pregnancies in the US and Europe) that have complex origins, including environmental and genetic factors. A low level of maternal folate is one well-established risk factor, with maternal periconceptional folic acid supplementation reducing the occurrence of NTD pregnancies by 50-70%. Gene variants in the folate metabolic pathway (e.g., MTHFR rs1801133 (677 C > T) and MTHFD1 rs2236225 (R653Q)) have been found to increase NTD risk. We hypothesized that variants in additional folate/B12 pathway genes contribute to NTD risk. Methods A tagSNP approach was used to screen common variation in 82 candidate genes selected from the folate/B12 pathway and NTD mouse models. We initially genotyped polymorphisms in 320 Irish triads (NTD cases and their parents), including 301 cases and 341 Irish controls to perform case–control and family based association tests. Significantly associated polymorphisms were genotyped in a secondary set of 250 families that included 229 cases and 658 controls. The combined results for 1441 SNPs were used in a joint analysis to test for case and maternal effects. Results Nearly 70 SNPs in 30 genes were found to be associated with NTDs at the p < 0.01 level. The ten strongest association signals (p-value range: 0.0003–0.0023) were found in nine genes (MFTC, CDKN2A, ADA, PEMT, CUBN, GART, DNMT3A, MTHFD1 and T (Brachyury)) and included the known NTD risk factor MTHFD1 R653Q (rs2236225). The single strongest signal was observed in a new candidate, MFTC rs17803441 (OR = 1.61 [1.23-2.08], p = 0.0003 for the minor allele). Though nominally significant, these associations did not remain significant after correction for multiple hypothesis testing. Conclusions To our knowledge, with respect to sample size and scope of evaluation of candidate polymorphisms, this is the largest NTD genetic association study reported to date. The scale of the study and the

  12. Candidate Gene Association Mapping of Arabidopsis Flowering Time

    PubMed Central

    Ehrenreich, Ian M.; Hanzawa, Yoshie; Chou, Lucy; Roe, Judith L.; Kover, Paula X.; Purugganan, Michael D.

    2009-01-01

    The pathways responsible for flowering time in Arabidopsis thaliana comprise one of the best characterized genetic networks in plants. We harness this extensive molecular genetic knowledge to identify potential flowering time quantitative trait genes (QTGs) through candidate gene association mapping using 51 flowering time loci. We genotyped common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at these genes in 275 A. thaliana accessions that were also phenotyped for flowering time and rosette leaf number in long and short days. Using structured association techniques, we find that haplotype-tagging SNPs in 27 flowering time genes show significant associations in various trait/environment combinations. After correction for multiple testing, between 2 and 10 genes remain significantly associated with flowering time, with CO arguably possessing the most promising associations. We also genotyped a subset of these flowering time gene SNPs in an independent recombinant inbred line population derived from the intercrossing of 19 accessions. Approximately one-third of significant polymorphisms that were associated with flowering time in the accessions and genotyped in the outbred population were replicated in both mapping populations, including SNPs at the CO, FLC, VIN3, PHYD, and GA1 loci, and coding region deletions at the FRI gene. We conservatively estimate that ∼4–14% of known flowering time genes may harbor common alleles that contribute to natural variation in this life history trait. PMID:19581446

  13. Multiregional gene expression profiling identifies MRPS6 as a possible candidate gene for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Papapetropoulos, Spiridon; Ffrench-Mullen, Jarlath; McCorquodale, Donald; Qin, Yujing; Pablo, John; Mash, Deborah C

    2006-01-01

    Combining large-scale gene expression approaches and bioinformatics may provide insights into the molecular variability of biological processes underlying neurodegeneration. To identify novel candidate genes and mechanisms, we conducted a multiregional gene expression analysis in postmortem brain. Gene arrays were performed utilizing Affymetrix HG U133 Plus 2.0 gene chips. Brain specimens from 21 different brain regions were taken from Parkinson's disease (PD) (n = 22) and normal aged (n = 23) brain donors. The rationale for conducting a multiregional survey of gene expression changes was based on the assumption that if a gene is changed in more than one brain region, it may be a higher probability candidate gene compared to genes that are changed in a single region. Although no gene was significantly changed in all of the 21 brain regions surveyed, we identified 11 candidate genes whose pattern of expression was regulated in at least 18 out of 21 regions. The expression of a gene encoding the mitochondria ribosomal protein S6 (MRPS6) had the highest combined mean fold change and topped the list of regulated genes. The analysis revealed other genes related to apoptosis, cell signaling, and cell cycle that may be of importance to disease pathophysiology. High throughput gene expression is an emerging technology for molecular target discovery in neurological and psychiatric disorders. The top gene reported here is the nuclear encoded MRPS6, a building block of the human mitoribosome of the oxidative phosphorylation system (OXPHOS). Impairments in mitochondrial OXPHOS have been linked to the pathogenesis of PD.

  14. Identification of candidate genes for devil facial tumour disease tumourigenesis.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Robyn L; Zhang, Yiru; Schöning, Jennifer P; Deakin, Janine E

    2017-08-18

    Devil facial tumour (DFT) disease, a transmissible cancer where the infectious agent is the tumour itself, has caused a dramatic decrease in Tasmanian devil numbers in the wild. The purpose of this study was to take a candidate gene/pathway approach to identify potentially perturbed genes or pathways in DFT. A fusion of chromosome 1 and X is posited as the initial event leading to the development of DFT, with the rearranged chromosome 1 material now stably maintained as the tumour spreads through the population. This hypothesis makes chromosome 1 a prime chromosome on which to search for mutations involved in tumourigenesis. As DFT1 has a Schwann cell origin, we selected genes commonly implicated in tumour pathways in human nerve cancers, or cancers more generally, to determine whether they were rearranged in DFT1, and mapped them using molecular cytogenetics. Many cancer-related genes were rearranged, such as the region containing the tumour suppressor NF2 and a copy gain for ERBB3, a member of the epidermal growth factor receptor family of receptor tyrosine kinases implicated in proliferation and invasion of tumours in humans. Our mapping results have provided strong candidates not previously detected by sequencing DFT1 genomes.

  15. Sleeping Beauty Mouse Models Identify Candidate Genes Involved in Gliomagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Vyazunova, Irina; Maklakova, Vilena I.; Berman, Samuel; De, Ishani; Steffen, Megan D.; Hong, Won; Lincoln, Hayley; Morrissy, A. Sorana; Taylor, Michael D.; Akagi, Keiko; Brennan, Cameron W.; Rodriguez, Fausto J.; Collier, Lara S.

    2014-01-01

    Genomic studies of human high-grade gliomas have discovered known and candidate tumor drivers. Studies in both cell culture and mouse models have complemented these approaches and have identified additional genes and processes important for gliomagenesis. Previously, we found that mobilization of Sleeping Beauty transposons in mice ubiquitously throughout the body from the Rosa26 locus led to gliomagenesis with low penetrance. Here we report the characterization of mice in which transposons are mobilized in the Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP) compartment. Glioma formation in these mice did not occur on an otherwise wild-type genetic background, but rare gliomas were observed when mobilization occurred in a p19Arf heterozygous background. Through cloning insertions from additional gliomas generated by transposon mobilization in the Rosa26 compartment, several candidate glioma genes were identified. Comparisons to genetic, epigenetic and mRNA expression data from human gliomas implicates several of these genes as tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes in human glioblastoma. PMID:25423036

  16. Single nucleotide polymorphism identification in candidate gene systems of obesity.

    PubMed

    Irizarry, K; Hu, G; Wong, M L; Licinio, J; Lee, C J

    2001-01-01

    We have constructed a large panel of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) identified in 68 candidate genes for obesity. Our panel combines novel SNP identification methods based on EST data, with public SNP data from largescale genomic sequencing, to produce a total of 218 SNPs in the coding regions of obesity candidate genes, 178 SNPs in untranslated regions, and over 1000 intronic SNPs. These include new non-conservative amino acid changes in thyroid receptor beta, esterase D, acid phosphatase 1. Our data show evidence of negative selection among these polymorphisms implying functional impacts of the non-conservative mutations. Comparison of overlap between SNPs identified independently from EST data vs genomic sequencing indicate that together they may constitute about one half of the actual total number of amino acid polymorphisms in these genes that are common in the human population (defined here as a population allele frequency above 5%). We have analyzed our polymorphism panel to construct a database of detailed information about their location in the gene structure and effect on protein coding, available on the web at http://www.bioinformat ics.ucla.edu/snp/obesity. We believe this panel can serve as a valuable new resource for genetic and pharmacogenomic studies of the causes of obesity.

  17. Engineering of glucosinolate biosynthesis: candidate gene identification and validation.

    PubMed

    Møldrup, Morten E; Salomonsen, Bo; Halkier, Barbara A

    2012-01-01

    The diverse biological roles of glucosinolates as plant defense metabolites and anticancer compounds have spurred a strong interest in their biosynthetic pathways. Since the completion of the Arabidopsis genome, functional genomics approaches have enabled significant progress on the elucidation of glucosinolate biosynthesis, although in planta validation of candidate gene function often is hampered by time-consuming generation of knockout and overexpression lines in Arabidopsis. To better exploit the increasing amount of data available from genomic sequencing, microarray database and RNAseq, time-efficient methods for identification and validation of candidate genes are needed. This chapter covers the methodology we are using for gene discovery in glucosinolate engineering, namely, guilt-by-association-based in silico methods and fast proof-of-function screens by transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. Moreover, the lessons learned in the rapid, transient tobacco system are readily translated to our robust, versatile yeast expression platform, where additional genes critical for large-scale microbial production of glucosinolates can be identified. We anticipate that the methodology presented here will be beneficial to elucidate and engineer other plant biosynthetic pathways.

  18. Combining Genotype, Phenotype, and Environment to Infer Potential Candidate Genes.

    PubMed

    Talbot, Benoit; Chen, Ting-Wen; Zimmerman, Shawna; Joost, Stéphane; Eckert, Andrew J; Crow, Taylor M; Semizer-Cuming, Devrim; Seshadri, Chitra; Manel, Stéphanie

    2017-03-01

    Population genomic analysis can be an important tool in understanding local adaptation. Identification of potential adaptive loci in such analyses is usually based on the survey of a large genomic dataset in combination with environmental variables. Phenotypic data are less commonly incorporated into such studies, although combining a genome scan analysis with a phenotypic trait analysis can greatly improve the insights obtained from each analysis individually. Here, we aimed to identify loci potentially involved in adaptation to climate in 283 Loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) samples from throughout the species' range in the southeastern United States. We analyzed associations between phenotypic, molecular, and environmental variables from datasets of 3082 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) loci and 3 categories of phenotypic traits (gene expression, metabolites, and whole-plant traits). We found only 6 SNP loci that displayed potential signals of local adaptation. Five of the 6 identified SNPs are linked to gene expression traits for lignin development, and 1 is linked with whole-plant traits. We subsequently compared the 6 candidate genes with environmental variables and found a high correlation in only 3 of them (R2 > 0.2). Our study highlights the need for a combination of genotypes, phenotypes, and environmental variables, and for an appropriate sampling scheme and study design, to improve confidence in the identification of potential candidate genes. © The American Genetic Association 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Candidate Gene Studies in Hypodontia Suggest Role for FGF3

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Alexandre R.; D’Souza, Rena N.; Mues, Gabriele; Deeley, Kathleen; Hsin, Hong-Yuan; Küchler, Erika C.; Meira, Raquel; Patir, Asli; Tannure, Patricia N.; Lips, Andrea; Costa, Marcelo C.; Granjeiro, Jose M.; Seymen, Figen; Modesto, Adriana

    2013-01-01

    The majority of tooth agenesis cases are mild (hypodontia) and typically not associated with the gene mutations linked to oligodontia. From this, we hypothesize that most cases of tooth agenesis fit a polygenic mode of inheritance, where several genes with small effects cause a variety of varying phenotypes. In this study, we looked at 18 not typically studied genes in this condition, to ascertain their contribution to hypodontia. Our study subjects consisted of 167 patients with hypodontia and their parents from two cohorts (one from Brazil and one from Turkey). An additional 465 DNA samples (93 cases with hypodontia and 372 controls without family history for tooth agenesis or oral clefts) from Brazil were also available for this study. 93 single nucleotide polymorphisms that maximally represent the linkage disequilibrium structure of the genes for the 18 genes were selected and genotyped using Taqman chemistry. Chi-square was used to test if genotype distributions were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, and 24 markers that were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and had allele frequencies higher than 5% in a panel of 50 CEPH samples were further tested. Association between hypodontia and genetic variants was tested with the transmission disequilibrium test within the program Family-Based Association Test (FBAT) and by using chi-square and Fisher’s exact tests. Alpha at a level of 0.05 was used to report results. Results suggest possible associations between several genes and hypodontia in the three populations. In the Turkish cohort (n=51 parent-affected child trios) the most significant results were as follows: FGF3 rs1893047, p=0.08; GLI3 rs929387, p=0.03; GLI3 haplotype rs929387-rs846266, p=0.002; and PAX9 rs2073242, p=0.03. In the Brazilian cohort (n=116 parent-affected child trios), the results were as follows: DLX1 rs788173, p=0.07; FGF3 rs12574452, p=0.03; GLI2 rs1992901, p=0.03; and PITX2 rs2595110, p=0.01. The second Brazilian cohort also suggested that FGF3

  20. Characterizations of 9p21 candidate genes in familial melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, G.J.; Flores, J.F.; Glendening, J.M.

    1994-09-01

    We have previously collected and characterized 16 melanoma families for the inheritance of a familial melanoma predisposition gene on 9p21. Clear evidence for genetic linkage has been detected in 8 of these families with the 9p21 markers D9S126 and 1FNA, while linkage of the remaining families to this region is less certain. A candidate for the 9p21 familial melanoma gene, the cyclin kinase inhibitor gene p16 (also known as the multiple tumor suppressor 1 (MTS1) gene), has been recently indentified. Notably, a nonsense mutation within the p16 gene has been detected in the lymphoblastoid cell line DNA from a dysplastic nevus syndrome (DNS), or familial melanoma, patient. The p16 gene is also known to be frequently deleted or mutated in a variety of tumor cell lines (including melanoma) and resides within a region that has been defined as harboring the 9p21 melanoma predisposition locus. This region is delineated on the distal side by the marker D9S736 (which resides just distal to the p16 gene) and extends in a proximal direction to the marker D9S171. Overall, the entire distance between these two loci is estimated at 3-5Mb. Preliminary analysis of our two largest 9p21-linked melanoma kindreds (by direct sequencing of PCR products) has not yet revealed mutations within the coding region of the p16 gene. Others have reported that 8/11 unrelated 9p21-linked melanoma families do not appear to carry p16 mutations; thus the possibility exists that p16 is not a melanoma susceptibility gene per se, although it appears to play some role in melanoma tumor progression. Our melanoma kindred DNAs are currently being analyzed by SSCP using primers that amplify exons of other candidate genes from the 9p21 region implicated in familial melanoma. These novel genes reside within a distinct critical region of homozygous loss in melanoma which is located >2 Mb from the p16 gene on 9p21.

  1. Identification of candidate genes in osteoporosis by integrated microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, J J; Wang, B Q; Fei, Q; Yang, Y; Li, D

    2016-12-01

    . Li, B. Q. Wang, Q. Fei, Y. Yang, D. Li. Identification of candidate genes in osteoporosis by integrated microarray analysis. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:594-601. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.512.BJR-2016-0073.R1. © 2016 Fei et al.

  2. Identifying candidate driver genes by integrative ovarian cancer genomics data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xinguo; Lu, Jibo

    2017-08-01

    Integrative analysis of molecular mechanics underlying cancer can distinguish interactions that cannot be revealed based on one kind of data for the appropriate diagnosis and treatment of cancer patients. Tumor samples exhibit heterogeneity in omics data, such as somatic mutations, Copy Number Variations CNVs), gene expression profiles and so on. In this paper we combined gene co-expression modules and mutation modulators separately in tumor patients to obtain the candidate driver genes for resistant and sensitive tumor from the heterogeneous data. The final list of modulators identified are well known in biological processes associated with ovarian cancer, such as CCL17, CACTIN, CCL16, CCL22, APOB, KDF1, CCL11, HNF1B, LRG1, MED1 and so on, which can help to facilitate the discovery of biomarkers, molecular diagnostics, and drug discovery.

  3. Polymorphisms of candidate genes in Slovak autistic patients.

    PubMed

    Kelemenova, Silvia; Schmidtova, Eva; Ficek, Andrej; Celec, Peter; Kubranska, Aneta; Ostatnikova, Daniela

    2010-08-01

    Autism is one of the most genetically influenced neuropsychiatric disorders. However, its detailed genetic basis is far from being clear. Genome-wide association studies have revealed a number of candidate genes, mostly related to synaptogenesis and various neuroendocrine pathways. In our study we have focused on oxytocin (OT), oxytocin receptor (OXTR), GABA receptor gamma 3 (GABRG3), neuroligin (NLGN4X), and reelin (RELN). After signed consent, 90 autistic boys and 85 healthy controls were enrolled in the study. Polymorphisms of OT (rs2740204), OXTR (rs2228485), GABRG3 (rs28431127), and NLGN4X (rs5916338) were analyzed using restriction fragment length polymorphism. (GGC)n STR polymorphism in the 5' UTR of the RELN gene was genotyped using fragment analysis. The only significant association in autistic boys in Slovakia was found with higher number of GGC repeats in the RELN gene (P=0.001) potentially explaining lower RELN levels in blood and brain of autistic patients.

  4. Candidate Genes for Nonsyndromic Cleft Palate Detected by Exome Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Hoebel, A K; Drichel, D; van de Vorst, M; Böhmer, A C; Sivalingam, S; Ishorst, N; Klamt, J; Gölz, L; Alblas, M; Maaser, A; Keppler, K; Zink, A M; Dixon, M J; Dixon, J; Hemprich, A; Kruse, T; Graf, I; Dunsche, A; Schmidt, G; Daratsianos, N; Nowak, S; Aldhorae, K A; Nöthen, M M; Knapp, M; Thiele, H; Gilissen, C; Reutter, H; Hoischen, A; Mangold, E; Ludwig, K U

    2017-10-01

    Nonsyndromic cleft palate only (nsCPO) is a facial malformation that has a livebirth prevalence of 1 in 2,500. Research suggests that the etiology of nsCPO is multifactorial, with a clear genetic component. To date, genome-wide association studies have identified only 1 conclusive common variant for nsCPO, that is, a missense variant in the gene grainyhead-like-3 ( GRHL3). Thus, the underlying genetic causes of nsCPO remain largely unknown. The present study aimed at identifying rare variants that might contribute to nsCPO risk, via whole-exome sequencing (WES), in multiply affected Central European nsCPO pedigrees. WES was performed in 2 affected first-degree relatives from each family. Variants shared between both individuals were analyzed for their potential deleterious nature and a low frequency in the general population. Genes carrying promising variants were annotated for 1) reported associations with facial development, 2) multiple occurrence of variants, and 3) expression in mouse embryonic palatal shelves. This strategy resulted in the identification of a set of 26 candidate genes that were resequenced in 132 independent nsCPO cases and 623 independent controls of 2 different ethnicities, using molecular inversion probes. No rare loss-of-function mutation was identified in either WES or resequencing step. However, we identified 2 or more missense variants predicted to be deleterious in each of 3 genes ( ACACB, PTPRS, MIB1) in individuals from independent families. In addition, the analyses identified a novel variant in GRHL3 in 1 patient and a variant in CREBBP in 2 siblings. Both genes underlie different syndromic forms of CPO. A plausible hypothesis is that the apparently nonsyndromic clefts in these 3 patients might represent hypomorphic forms of the respective syndromes. In summary, the present study identified rare variants that might contribute to nsCPO risk and suggests candidate genes for further investigation.

  5. Candidate Gene-Environment Interaction Research: Reflections and Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Dick, Danielle M.; Agrawal, Arpana; Keller, Matthew C.; Adkins, Amy; Aliev, Fazil; Monroe, Scott; Hewitt, John K.; Kendler, Kenneth S.; Sher, Kenneth J.

    2014-01-01

    Studying how genetic predispositions come together with environmental factors to contribute to complex behavioral outcomes has great potential for advancing our understanding of the development of psychopathology. It represents a clear theoretical advance over studying these factors in isolation. However, research at the intersection of multiple fields creates many challenges. We review several reasons why the rapidly expanding candidate gene-environment interaction (cGxE) literature should be considered with a degree of caution. We discuss lessons learned about candidate gene main effects from the evolving genetics literature and how these inform the study of cGxE. We review the importance of the measurement of the gene and environment of interest in cGxE studies. We discuss statistical concerns with modeling cGxE that are frequently overlooked. And we review other challenges that have likely contributed to the cGxE literature being difficult to interpret, including low power and publication bias. Many of these issues are similar to other concerns about research integrity (e.g., high false positive rates) that have received increasing attention in the social sciences. We provide recommendations for rigorous research practices for cGxE studies that we believe will advance its potential to contribute more robustly to the understanding of complex behavioral phenotypes. PMID:25620996

  6. Identification of candidate genes for phenolics accumulation in tomato fruit.

    PubMed

    Di Matteo, Antonio; Ruggieri, Valentino; Sacco, Adriana; Rigano, Maria Manuela; Carriero, Filomena; Bolger, Anthony; Fernie, Alisdair R; Frusciante, Luigi; Barone, Amalia

    2013-05-01

    Phenolics are antioxidants present in tomato fruit that confer healthy benefits and exhibit crucial roles for plant metabolism and response to environmental stimuli. An approach based on two genomics platforms was undertaken to identify candidate genes associated to higher phenolics content in tomato fruit. A comparative transcriptomic analysis between the S. pennellii Introgression Line 7-3, which produced an average higher level of fruit phenolics, and the cultivated variety M82, revealed that their differences are attributed to genes involved in phenolics accumulation into the vacuole. The up-regulation of genes coding for one MATE-transporter, one vacuolar sorting protein and three GSTs supported this hypothesis. The observed balancing effect between two ethylene responsive factors (ERF1 and ERF4) was also hypothesized to drive the transcriptional regulation of these transport genes. In order to confirm such model a TILLING platform was explored. A mutant was isolated harbouring a point mutation in the ERF1 cds that affects the protein sequence and its expected function. Fruits of the mutant exhibited a significant reduced level of phenolics than the control variety. Changes in the expression of genes involved in sequestration of phenolics in vacuole also supported the hypothesized key-role of ERF1 in orchestrating these genes.

  7. Candidate Genes for Inherited Autism Susceptibility in the Lebanese Population

    PubMed Central

    Kourtian, Silva; Soueid, Jihane; Makhoul, Nadine J.; Guisso, Dikran Richard; Chahrour, Maria; Boustany, Rose-Mary N.

    2017-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is characterized by ritualistic-repetitive behaviors and impaired verbal/non-verbal communication. Many ASD susceptibility genes implicated in neuronal pathways/brain development have been identified. The Lebanese population is ideal for uncovering recessive genes because of shared ancestry and a high rate of consanguineous marriages. Aims here are to analyze for published ASD genes and uncover novel inherited ASD susceptibility genes specific to the Lebanese. We recruited 36 ASD families (ASD: 37, unaffected parents: 36, unaffected siblings: 33) and 100 unaffected Lebanese controls. Cytogenetics 2.7 M Microarrays/CytoScan™ HD arrays allowed mapping of homozygous regions of the genome. The CNTNAP2 gene was screened by Sanger sequencing. Homozygosity mapping uncovered DPP4, TRHR, and MLF1 as novel candidate susceptibility genes for ASD in the Lebanese. Sequencing of hot spot exons in CNTNAP2 led to discovery of a 5 bp insertion in 23/37 ASD patients. This mutation was present in unaffected family members and unaffected Lebanese controls. Although a slight increase in number was observed in ASD patients and family members compared to controls, there were no significant differences in allele frequencies between affecteds and controls (C/TTCTG: γ2 value = 0.014; p = 0.904). The CNTNAP2 polymorphism identified in this population, hence, is not linked to the ASD phenotype. PMID:28358038

  8. ANX7, a candidate tumor suppressor gene for prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Meera; Bubendorf, Lukas; Srikantan, Vasantha; Fossom, Linda; Nolan, Lisa; Glasman, Mirta; Leighton, Ximena; Fehrle, Wilfred; Pittaluga, Stefania; Raffeld, Mark; Koivisto, Pasi; Willi, Niels; Gasser, Thomas C.; Kononen, Juha; Sauter, Guido; Kallioniemi, Olli P.; Srivastava, Shiv; Pollard, Harvey B.

    2001-01-01

    The ANX7 gene is located on human chromosome 10q21, a site long hypothesized to harbor a tumor suppressor gene(s) (TSG) associated with prostate and other cancers. To test whether ANX7 might be a candidate TSG, we examined the ANX7-dependent suppression of human tumor cell growth, stage-specific ANX7 expression in 301 prostate specimens on a prostate tissue microarray, and loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of microsatellite markers at or near the ANX7 locus. Here we report that human tumor cell proliferation and colony formation are markedly reduced when the wild-type ANX7 gene is transfected into two prostate tumor cell lines, LNCaP and DU145. Consistently, analysis of ANX7 protein expression in human prostate tumor microarrays reveals a significantly higher rate of loss of ANX7 expression in metastatic and local recurrences of hormone refractory prostate cancer as compared with primary tumors (P = 0.0001). Using four microsatellite markers at or near the ANX7 locus, and laser capture microdissected tumor cells, 35% of the 20 primary prostate tumors show LOH. The microsatellite marker closest to the ANX7 locus showed the highest rate of LOH, including one homozygous deletion. We conclude that the ANX7 gene exhibits many biological and genetic properties expected of a TSG and may play a role in prostate cancer progression. PMID:11287641

  9. Candidate genes for antidepressant response to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Lotrich, Francis E; Pollock, Bruce G

    2005-01-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) can safely and successfully treat major depression, although a substantial number of patients benefit only partially or not at all from treatment. Genetic polymorphisms may play a major role in determining the response to SSRI treatment. Nonetheless, it is likely that efficacy is determined by multiple genes, with individual genetic polymorphisms having a limited effect size. Initial studies have identified the promoter polymorphism in the gene coding for the serotonin reuptake transporter as moderating efficacy for several SSRIs. The goal of this review is to suggest additional plausible polymorphisms that may be involved in antidepressant efficacy. These include genes affecting intracellular transductional cascades; neuronal growth factors; stress-related hormones, such as corticotropin-releasing hormone and glucocorticoid receptors; ion channels and synaptic efficacy; and adaptations of monoaminergic pathways. Association analyses to examine these candidate genes may facilitate identification of patients for targeted alternative therapies. Determining which genes are involved may also assist in identifying future, novel treatments. PMID:18568127

  10. Partial replication of two rumination-related candidate gene studies.

    PubMed

    Van Hulle, Carol A; Clifford, Sierra; Moore, Mollie N; Lemery-Chalfant, Kathryn; Goldsmith, H Hill

    2017-08-01

    Two recent papers associated candidate genes with brooding rumination, a possible cognitive endophenotype for depression, in children ages 8-14 years. Stone et al. reported that BDNF val66met polymorphism predicted brooding in adolescence. Woody et al. reported that children carrying at least one copy of a CRHR1 TAT haplotype reported less brooding than their peers in the presence of maternal depression. We attempted to replicate and extend these findings in a sample of twins aged 12-16 years. We analyzed the BDNF val66met (rs6265) polymorphism and two (rs242924 and rs7209436) out of three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that Woody et al. used to create a CRHR1 haplotype. We controlled for maternal history of depression and clustering within families. Unlike Stone et al., we found higher brooding among BDNF Met carriers. This main effect was qualified by an interaction with pubertal status, with the effect driven by more physically mature participants. Similar to Woody et al., we found an interaction between CRHR1 SNPs and maternal depression, with the homozygous minor genotype acting as a protective factor against brooding in the presence of maternal depression. Findings provide partial support for the influence of candidate genes in two environmentally sensitive systems on brooding.

  11. Candidate Genes and Mechanisms for 2-Methoxyestradiol-Mediated Vasoprotection

    PubMed Central

    Barchiesi, Federica; Lucchinetti, Eliana; Zaugg, Michael; Ogunshola, Omolara O; Wright, Matthew; Meyer, Markus; Rosselli, Marinella; Schaufelberger, Sara; Gillespie, Delbert G; Jackson, Edwin K; Dubey, Raghvendra K

    2010-01-01

    Methoxyestradiol (2-ME; estradiol metabolite) inhibits vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) growth and protects against atherosclerosis and vascular injury; however, the mechanisms by which 2-ME induces these actions remain obscure. To assess the impact of 2-ME on biochemical pathways regulating VSMC biology, we employed high-density oligonucleotide microarrays to identify differentially expressed genes in cultured human female aortic VSMCs treated with 2-ME acutely (4hrs) or long-term (30hrs). Both single gene analysis and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) revealed 2-ME-induced down-regulation of genes involved in mitotic spindle assembly and function in VSMCs. Also GSEA analysis identified effects of 2-ME on genes regulating cell-cycle progression, cell migration/adhesion, vasorelaxation, inflammation and cholesterol metabolism. Transcriptional changes were associated with changes in protein expression including inhibition of cyclin-D1, cyclin-B1, cdk6, cdk4, tubulin polymerization and cholesterol and steroid synthesis and up-regulation of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and matrix metalloproteinase-1. Microarray data suggested that 2-ME may activate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) in VSMCs, and 2-ME has structural similarities with rosiglitazone (PPARγ agonist). However, our finding of weak activation and lack of binding of 2-ME to PPARs suggests that 2-ME may modulate PPAR-associated genes via indirect mechanisms, potentially involving COX-2. Indeed the anti-mitogenic effects of 2-ME at concentrations that do not inhibit tubulin polymerization were blocked by the PPAR antagonist GW9662 and COX-2 inhibitor NS398. Finally, we demonstrated that 2-ME inhibited hypoxia-inducible factor-1α. Identification of candidate genes that are positively or negatively regulated by 2-ME provides important leads to investigate and better understand the mechanisms by which 2-ME induces its vasoprotective actions. PMID:20921434

  12. Identification of candidate genes in osteoporosis by integrated microarray analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, J. J.; Wang, B. Q.; Yang, Y.; Li, D.

    2016-01-01

    bone formation. Cite this article: J. J. Li, B. Q. Wang, Q. Fei, Y. Yang, D. Li. Identification of candidate genes in osteoporosis by integrated microarray analysis. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:594–601. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.512.BJR-2016-0073.R1. PMID:27908864

  13. Candidate gene polymorphisms and their association with hypertension in Malays.

    PubMed

    Ghazali, Dzuzaini M; Rehman, Asia; Rahman, Abdul Rashid A

    2008-02-01

    Knowledge of candidate gene polymorphisms in a population is useful for a variety of gene-disease association studies, particularly for some complex traits. A single nucleotide variant of the angiotensinogene gene (AGT M235T) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene (eNOS G894T) have been associated with hypertension. A cross-sectional study consisting of 200 hypertensives and 198 age- and sex-matched controls was conducted. Subjects involved in this study were pure Malay for 3 generations. The AGT M235T and eNOS G894T polymorphisms were determined by PCR-RFLP method. The distribution of M235T genotype in the population was 3.5% for MM, 30.4% for MT and 66.1% for TT. No significant difference was observed in genotype (chi(2)=1.30, p=0.52) and allele (chi(2)=0.87, p=0.35) frequencies among the 2 study group. In contrast, the distribution of genotypes for G894T was 74.1% for GG, 24.6% for GT and 1.3% for TT, respectively. Similarly, no significant difference was observed in genotype (chi(2)=0.94, p=0.33) and allele (chi(2)=0.60, p=0.44) frequencies between both study groups. The AGT M235T and eNOS G894T polymorphisms are unlikely to play an important role in the pathogenesis of hypertension in Malays.

  14. Direct analysis of candidate genes in impulsive behaviours.

    PubMed

    Goldman, D; Lappalainen, J; Ozaki, N

    1996-01-01

    Antisocial behaviour is both heterogeneous and the product of interacting genetic and environmental factors acting at different levels of causation. Heritability studies show that individual differences in predisposition to antisocial behaviour are transmitted vertically in families by genetic mechanisms. Owing to aetiological heterogeneity and complexity, study of a variety of other behavioural phenotypes may shed more light on the antecedents of antisocial behaviour than direct studies on antisocial behaviour. Identification of genetic vulnerability factors would clarify mechanisms of vulnerability and the role of the environment. Direct gene analysis and genetic linkage analysis have identified structural variants in genes involved in neurotransmitter function, and some progress has been made towards relating these genetic variants to antisocial personality and other behaviours. Thyroid hormone receptor variants can cause attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and a monoamine oxidase A variant leads to aggressive behaviour in one family. Direct gene analyses have revealed non-conservative amino acid substitutions and structural variants (generally rare) at DRD2, DRD3 and DRD4 dopamine receptors and 5-HT1A, 5-HT2A, 5-HT2C and 5-HT7 serotonin receptors. The stage is set to identify the phenotypic significance of these as well as genetic variants at other loci which may be relevant as candidate genes for antisocial behaviour and related behavioural differences.

  15. Investigation of two candidate genes for Hailey-Hailey disease

    SciTech Connect

    Peluso, A.M.; Ikeda, S.; Bonifas, J.M.

    1994-09-01

    Hailey-Hailey disease (familial benign chronic pemphigus) is an autosomal dominant skin disease characterized by impaired keratinocyte cohesion and consequent blister formation. Recently we have used linkage to map the gene for this disease to a region of chromosome 3q between D3S1589 and D3S1316. The maximum combined two point lod score in four families studied was 14.60 at {theta} = 0 at the D3S1290 microsatellite repeat. Several genes have been mapped to chromosome 3q21-24, including cellular retinol binding protein (RBP1) and rhodopsin (RHO). Using microsatellite repeat for RHO we have found a recombinant with the RHO gene and Hailey-Hailey disease in one patient. Because of the profound effects of retinoids on epidermal differentiation, RBP1 could be considered as a possible candidate gene. We have amplified genomic DNA from patients from 14 individual families with Hailey-Hailey disease and 10 different control samples for each of the 4 exons of RBP1. Thus far, SSCP analysis has failed to detect different banding patterns in patients versus controls. We are now attempting to extend this RBP1 analysis and are collecting new families to use linkage analysis to narrow this still rather large (approximately 14 cM) interval.

  16. Candidate gene studies in hypodontia suggest role for FGF3.

    PubMed

    Vieira, A R; D'Souza, R N; Mues, G; Deeley, K; Hsin, H-Y; Küchler, E C; Meira, R; Patir, A; Tannure, P N; Lips, A; Costa, M C; Granjeiro, J M; Seymen, F; Modesto, A

    2013-12-01

    The majority of tooth agenesis cases are mild (hypodontia) and typically not associated with the gene mutations linked to oligodontia. From this, we hypothesise that most cases of tooth agenesis fit a polygenic mode of inheritance, where several genes with small effects cause a variety of varying phenotypes. In this study, we looked at 18 not typically studied genes in this condition, to ascertain their contribution to hypodontia. Our study subjects consisted of 167 patients with hypodontia and their parents from two cohorts (one from Brazil and one from Turkey). An additional 465 DNA samples (93 cases with hypodontia and 372 controls without family history for tooth agenesis or oral clefts) from Brazil were also available for this study. Ninety-three single nucleotide polymorphisms that maximally represent the linkage disequilibrium structure of the genes for the 18 genes were selected and genotyped using Taqman chemistry. Chi square was used to test if genotype distributions were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, and 24 markers that were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and had allele frequencies higher than 5 % in a panel of 50 CEPH samples were further tested. Association between hypodontia and genetic variants was tested with the transmission disequilibrium test within the programme Family-Based Association Test (FBAT) and by using Chi square and Fisher's exact tests. Alpha at a level of 0.05 was used to report results. Results suggest possible associations between several genes and hypodontia in the three populations. In the Turkish cohort (n = 51 parent-affected child trios) the most significant results were as follows: FGF3 rs1893047, p = 0.08; GLI3 rs929387, p = 0.03; GLI3 haplotype rs929387-rs846266, p = 0.002; and PAX9 rs2073242, p = 0.03. In the Brazilian cohort (n = 116 parent-affected child trios), the results were as follows: DLX1 rs788173, p = 0.07; FGF3 rs12574452, p = 0.03; GLI2 rs1992901, p = 0.03; and PITX2 rs2595110, p = 0

  17. A Systems Genetics Approach Implicates USF1, FADS3, and Other Causal Candidate Genes for Familial Combined Hyperlipidemia

    PubMed Central

    Plaisier, Christopher L.; Horvath, Steve; Huertas-Vazquez, Adriana; Cruz-Bautista, Ivette; Herrera, Miguel F.; Tusie-Luna, Teresa; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos; Pajukanta, Päivi

    2009-01-01

    We hypothesized that a common SNP in the 3' untranslated region of the upstream transcription factor 1 (USF1), rs3737787, may affect lipid traits by influencing gene expression levels, and we investigated this possibility utilizing the Mexican population, which has a high predisposition to dyslipidemia. We first associated rs3737787 genotypes in Mexican Familial Combined Hyperlipidemia (FCHL) case/control fat biopsies, with global expression patterns. To identify sets of co-expressed genes co-regulated by similar factors such as transcription factors, genetic variants, or environmental effects, we utilized weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA). Through WGCNA in the Mexican FCHL fat biopsies we identified two significant Triglyceride (TG)-associated co-expression modules. One of these modules was also associated with FCHL, the other FCHL component traits, and rs3737787 genotypes. This USF1-regulated FCHL-associated (URFA) module was enriched for genes involved in lipid metabolic processes. Using systems genetics procedures we identified 18 causal candidate genes in the URFA module. The FCHL causal candidate gene fatty acid desaturase 3 (FADS3) was associated with TGs in a recent Caucasian genome-wide significant association study and we replicated this association in Mexican FCHL families. Based on a USF1-regulated FCHL-associated co-expression module and SNP rs3737787, we identify a set of causal candidate genes for FCHL-related traits. We then provide evidence from two independent datasets supporting FADS3 as a causal gene for FCHL and elevated TGs in Mexicans. PMID:19750004

  18. Direct interplay between two candidate genes in FSHD muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Ferri, Giulia; Huichalaf, Claudia H; Caccia, Roberta; Gabellini, Davide

    2015-03-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is one of the most common neuromuscular disorders. The major form of the disease (FSHD1) is linked to decrease in copy number of a 3.3-kb tandem repeated macrosatellite (D4Z4), located on chromosome 4q35. D4Z4 deletion alters chromatin structure of the locus leading to aberrant expression of nearby 4q35 genes. Given the high variability in disease onset and progression, multiple factors could contribute to the pathogenesis of FSHD. Among the FSHD candidate genes are double homeobox 4 (DUX4), encoded by the most telomeric D4Z4 unit, and FSHD region gene 1 (FRG1). DUX4 is a sequence-specific transcription factor. Here, we located putative DUX4 binding sites in the human FRG1 genomic area and we show specific DUX4 association to these regions. We found also that ectopically expressed DUX4 up-regulates the endogenous human FRG1 gene in healthy muscle cells, while DUX4 knockdown leads to a decrease in FRG1 expression in FSHD muscle cells. Moreover, DUX4 binds directly and specifically to its binding site located in the human FRG1 gene and transactivates constructs containing FRG1 genomic regions. Intriguingly, the mouse Frg1 genomic area lacks DUX4 binding sites and DUX4 is unable to activate the endogenous mouse Frg1 gene providing a possible explanation for the lack of muscle phenotype in DUX4 transgenic mice. Altogether, our results demonstrate that FRG1 is a direct DUX4 transcriptional target uncovering a novel regulatory circuit contributing to FSHD.

  19. Direct interplay between two candidate genes in FSHD muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Ferri, Giulia; Huichalaf, Claudia H.; Caccia, Roberta; Gabellini, Davide

    2015-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is one of the most common neuromuscular disorders. The major form of the disease (FSHD1) is linked to decrease in copy number of a 3.3-kb tandem repeated macrosatellite (D4Z4), located on chromosome 4q35. D4Z4 deletion alters chromatin structure of the locus leading to aberrant expression of nearby 4q35 genes. Given the high variability in disease onset and progression, multiple factors could contribute to the pathogenesis of FSHD. Among the FSHD candidate genes are double homeobox 4 (DUX4), encoded by the most telomeric D4Z4 unit, and FSHD region gene 1 (FRG1). DUX4 is a sequence-specific transcription factor. Here, we located putative DUX4 binding sites in the human FRG1 genomic area and we show specific DUX4 association to these regions. We found also that ectopically expressed DUX4 up-regulates the endogenous human FRG1 gene in healthy muscle cells, while DUX4 knockdown leads to a decrease in FRG1 expression in FSHD muscle cells. Moreover, DUX4 binds directly and specifically to its binding site located in the human FRG1 gene and transactivates constructs containing FRG1 genomic regions. Intriguingly, the mouse Frg1 genomic area lacks DUX4 binding sites and DUX4 is unable to activate the endogenous mouse Frg1 gene providing a possible explanation for the lack of muscle phenotype in DUX4 transgenic mice. Altogether, our results demonstrate that FRG1 is a direct DUX4 transcriptional target uncovering a novel regulatory circuit contributing to FSHD. PMID:25326393

  20. Novel Primary Immunodeficiency Candidate Genes Predicted by the Human Gene Connectome

    PubMed Central

    Itan, Yuval; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Germline genetic mutations underlie various primary immunodeficiency (PID) diseases. Patients with rare PID diseases (like most non-PID patients and healthy individuals) carry, on average, 20,000 rare and common coding variants detected by high-throughput sequencing. It is thus a major challenge to select only a few candidate disease-causing variants for experimental testing. One of the tools commonly used in the pipeline for estimating a potential PID-candidate gene is to test whether the specific gene is included in the list of genes that were already experimentally validated as PID-causing in previous studies. However, this approach is limited because it cannot detect the PID-causing mutation(s) in the many PID patients carrying causal mutations of as yet unidentified PID-causing genes. In this study, we expanded in silico the list of potential PID-causing candidate genes from 229 to 3,110. We first identified the top 1% of human genes predicted by the human genes connectome to be biologically close to the 229 known PID genes. We then further narrowed down the list of genes by retaining only the most biologically relevant genes, with functionally enriched gene ontology biological categories similar to those for the known PID genes. We validated this prediction by showing that 17 of the 21 novel PID genes published since the last IUIS classification fall into this group of 3,110 genes (p < 10−7). The resulting new extended list of 3,110 predicted PID genes should be useful for the discovery of novel PID genes in patients. PMID:25883595

  1. Novel primary immunodeficiency candidate genes predicted by the human gene connectome.

    PubMed

    Itan, Yuval; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Germline genetic mutations underlie various primary immunodeficiency (PID) diseases. Patients with rare PID diseases (like most non-PID patients and healthy individuals) carry, on average, 20,000 rare and common coding variants detected by high-throughput sequencing. It is thus a major challenge to select only a few candidate disease-causing variants for experimental testing. One of the tools commonly used in the pipeline for estimating a potential PID-candidate gene is to test whether the specific gene is included in the list of genes that were already experimentally validated as PID-causing in previous studies. However, this approach is limited because it cannot detect the PID-causing mutation(s) in the many PID patients carrying causal mutations of as yet unidentified PID-causing genes. In this study, we expanded in silico the list of potential PID-causing candidate genes from 229 to 3,110. We first identified the top 1% of human genes predicted by the human genes connectome to be biologically close to the 229 known PID genes. We then further narrowed down the list of genes by retaining only the most biologically relevant genes, with functionally enriched gene ontology biological categories similar to those for the known PID genes. We validated this prediction by showing that 17 of the 21 novel PID genes published since the last IUIS classification fall into this group of 3,110 genes (p < 10(-7)). The resulting new extended list of 3,110 predicted PID genes should be useful for the discovery of novel PID genes in patients.

  2. Machine Learning-Based Gene Prioritization Identifies Novel Candidate Risk Genes for Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Isakov, Ofer; Dotan, Iris; Ben-Shachar, Shay

    2017-09-01

    The inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) are chronic inflammatory disorders, associated with genetic, immunologic, and environmental factors. Although hundreds of genes are implicated in IBD etiology, it is likely that additional genes play a role in the disease process. We developed a machine learning-based gene prioritization method to identify novel IBD-risk genes. Known IBD genes were collected from genome-wide association studies and annotated with expression and pathway information. Using these genes, a model was trained to identify IBD-risk genes. A comprehensive list of 16,390 genes was then scored and classified. Immune and inflammatory responses, as well as pathways such as cell adhesion, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, and sulfur metabolism were identified to be related to IBD. Scores predicted for IBD genes were significantly higher than those for non-IBD genes (P < 10). There was a significant association between the score and having an IBD publication (P < 10). Overall, 347 genes had a high prediction score (>0.8). A literature review of the genes, excluding those used to train the model, identified 67 genes without any publication concerning IBD. These genes represent novel candidate IBD-risk genes, which can be targeted in future studies. Our method successfully differentiated IBD-risk genes from non-IBD genes by using information from expression data and a multitude of gene annotations. Crucial features were defined, and we were able to detect novel candidate risk genes for IBD. These findings may help detect new IBD-risk genes and improve the understanding of IBD pathogenesis.

  3. An evolutionary screen highlights canonical and noncanonical candidate antiviral genes within the primate TRIM gene family.

    PubMed

    Malfavon-Borja, Ray; Sawyer, Sara L; Wu, Lily I; Emerman, Michael; Malik, Harmit S

    2013-01-01

    Recurrent viral pressure has acted on host-encoded antiviral genes during primate and mammalian evolution. This selective pressure has resulted in dramatic episodes of adaptation in host antiviral genes, often detected via positive selection. These evolutionary signatures of adaptation have the potential to highlight previously unrecognized antiviral genes (also called restriction factors). Although the TRIM multigene family is recognized for encoding several bona fide restriction factors (e.g., TRIM5alpha), most members of this expansive gene family remain uncharacterized. Here, we investigated the TRIM multigene family for signatures of positive selection to identify novel candidate antiviral genes. Our analysis reveals previously undocumented signatures of positive selection in 17 TRIM genes, 10 of which represent novel candidate restriction factors. These include the unusual TRIM52 gene, which has evolved under strong positive selection despite its encoded protein lacking a putative viral recognition (B30.2) domain. We show that TRIM52 arose via gene duplication from the TRIM41 gene. Both TRIM52 and TRIM41 have dramatically expanded RING domains compared with the rest of the TRIM multigene family, yet this domain has evolved under positive selection only in primate TRIM52, suggesting that it represents a novel host-virus interaction interface. Our evolutionary-based screen not only documents positive selection in known TRIM restriction factors but also highlights candidate novel restriction factors, providing insight into the interfaces of host-pathogen interactions mediated by the TRIM multigene family.

  4. Influence of DAOA and RGS4 genes on the risk for psychotic disorders and their associated executive dysfunctions: A family-based study.

    PubMed

    Soler, J; Miret, S; Lázaro, L; Parellada, M; Martín, M; Lera-Miguel, S; Rosa, A; de Castro-Catala, M; Cuesta, M J; Fañanás, L; Krebs, M O; Fatjó-Vilas, M

    2016-02-01

    Glutamatergic neurotransmission dysfunction has classically been related to the aetiology of psychotic disorders. A substantial polygenic component shared across these disorders has been reported and molecular genetics studies have associated glutamatergic-related genes, such as d-amino acid oxidase activator (DAOA) and regulator of G-protein signalling 4 (RGS4) with the risk for psychotic disorders. Our aims were to examine: (i) the relationship between DAOA and RGS4 and the risk for psychotic disorders using a family-based association approach, and (ii) whether variations in these genes are associated with differences in patients' cognitive performance. The sample comprised 753 subjects (222 patients with psychotic disorders and 531 first-degree relatives). Six SNPs in DAOA and 5 SNPs in RGS4 were genotyped. Executive cognitive performance was assessed with Trail Making Test B (TMT-B) and Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST). Genetic association analyses were conducted with PLINK, using the transmission disequilibrium test (TDT) for the family-based study and linear regression for cognitive performance analyses. The haplotype GAGACT at DAOA was under-transmitted to patients (P=0.0008), indicating its association with these disorders. With regards to cognitive performance, the DAOA haplotype GAGGCT was associated with worse scores in TMT-B (P=0.018) in SZ patients only. RGS4 analyses did not report significant results. Our findings suggest that the DAOA gene may contribute to the risk for psychotic disorders and that this gene may play a role as a modulator of executive function, probably through the dysregulation of the glutamatergic signalling. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Length of Selection Around Candidate Genes for Artificial Selection During Domestication and Crop Improvement in Maize

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Genomic screens for artificial selection have been successful in identifying candidate genes for agronomic traits in maize (Zea mays L). However, the validity of the candidates identified requires that selection sweeps are very short, only containing the candidate gene with the nearest neighboring g...

  6. Resequencing candidate genes implicates rare variants in asthma susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Torgerson, Dara G; Capurso, Daniel; Mathias, Rasika A; Graves, Penelope E; Hernandez, Ryan D; Beaty, Terri H; Bleecker, Eugene R; Raby, Benjamin A; Meyers, Deborah A; Barnes, Kathleen C; Weiss, Scott T; Martinez, Fernando D; Nicolae, Dan L; Ober, Carole

    2012-02-10

    Common variation in over 100 genes has been implicated in the risk of developing asthma, but the contribution of rare variants to asthma susceptibility remains largely unexplored. We selected nine genes that showed the strongest signatures of weak purifying selection from among 53 candidate asthma-associated genes, and we sequenced the coding exons and flanking noncoding regions in 450 asthmatic cases and 515 nonasthmatic controls. We observed an overall excess of p values <0.05 (p = 0.02), and rare variants in four genes (AGT, DPP10, IKBKAP, and IL12RB1) contributed to asthma susceptibility among African Americans. Rare variants in IL12RB1 were also associated with asthma susceptibility among European Americans, despite the fact that the majority of rare variants in IL12RB1 were specific to either one of the populations. The combined evidence of association with rare noncoding variants in IL12RB1 remained significant (p = 3.7 × 10(-4)) after correcting for multiple testing. Overall, the contribution of rare variants to asthma susceptibility was predominantly due to noncoding variants in sequences flanking the exons, although nonsynonymous rare variants in DPP10 and in IL12RB1 were associated with asthma in African Americans and European Americans, respectively. This study provides evidence that rare variants contribute to asthma susceptibility. Additional studies are required for testing whether prioritizing genes for resequencing on the basis of signatures of purifying selection is an efficient means of identifying novel rare variants that contribute to complex disease. Copyright © 2012 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Resequencing Candidate Genes Implicates Rare Variants in Asthma Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Torgerson, Dara G.; Capurso, Daniel; Mathias, Rasika A.; Graves, Penelope E.; Hernandez, Ryan D.; Beaty, Terri H.; Bleecker, Eugene R.; Raby, Benjamin A.; Meyers, Deborah A.; Barnes, Kathleen C.; Weiss, Scott T.; Martinez, Fernando D.; Nicolae, Dan L.; Ober, Carole

    2012-01-01

    Common variation in over 100 genes has been implicated in the risk of developing asthma, but the contribution of rare variants to asthma susceptibility remains largely unexplored. We selected nine genes that showed the strongest signatures of weak purifying selection from among 53 candidate asthma-associated genes, and we sequenced the coding exons and flanking noncoding regions in 450 asthmatic cases and 515 nonasthmatic controls. We observed an overall excess of p values <0.05 (p = 0.02), and rare variants in four genes (AGT, DPP10, IKBKAP, and IL12RB1) contributed to asthma susceptibility among African Americans. Rare variants in IL12RB1 were also associated with asthma susceptibility among European Americans, despite the fact that the majority of rare variants in IL12RB1 were specific to either one of the populations. The combined evidence of association with rare noncoding variants in IL12RB1 remained significant (p = 3.7 × 10−4) after correcting for multiple testing. Overall, the contribution of rare variants to asthma susceptibility was predominantly due to noncoding variants in sequences flanking the exons, although nonsynonymous rare variants in DPP10 and in IL12RB1 were associated with asthma in African Americans and European Americans, respectively. This study provides evidence that rare variants contribute to asthma susceptibility. Additional studies are required for testing whether prioritizing genes for resequencing on the basis of signatures of purifying selection is an efficient means of identifying novel rare variants that contribute to complex disease. PMID:22325360

  8. Achromatopsia as a potential candidate for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Pang, Ji-Jing; Alexander, John; Lei, Bo; Deng, Wentao; Zhang, Keqing; Li, Qiuhong; Chang, Bo; Hauswirth, William W

    2010-01-01

    Achromatopsia is an autosomal recessive retinal disease involving loss of cone function that afflicts approximately 1 in 30,000 individuals. Patients with achromatopsia usually have visual acuities lower than 20/200 because of the central vision loss, photophobia, complete color blindness and reduced cone-mediated electroretinographic (ERG) amplitudes. Mutations in three genes have been found to be the primary causes of achromatopsia, including CNGB3 (beta subunit of the cone cyclic nucleotide-gated cation channel), CNGA3 (alpha subunit of the cone cyclic nucleotide-gated cation channel), and GNAT2 (cone specific alpha subunit of transducin). Naturally occurring mouse models with mutations in Cnga3 (cpfl5 mice) and Gnat2 (cpfl3 mice) were discovered at The Jackson Laboratory. A natural occurring canine model with CNGB3 mutations has also been found. These animal models have many of the central phenotypic features of the corresponding human diseases. Using adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene therapy, we and others show that cone function can be restored in all three models. These data suggest that human achromatopsia may be a good candidate for corrective gene therapy.

  9. A yeast functional screen predicts new candidate ALS disease genes

    PubMed Central

    Couthouis, Julien; Hart, Michael P.; Shorter, James; DeJesus-Hernandez, Mariely; Erion, Renske; Oristano, Rachel; Liu, Annie X.; Ramos, Daniel; Jethava, Niti; Hosangadi, Divya; Epstein, James; Chiang, Ashley; Diaz, Zamia; Nakaya, Tadashi; Ibrahim, Fadia; Kim, Hyung-Jun; Solski, Jennifer A.; Williams, Kelly L.; Mojsilovic-Petrovic, Jelena; Ingre, Caroline; Boylan, Kevin; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Clay-Falcone, Dana; Elman, Lauren; McCluskey, Leo; Greene, Robert; Kalb, Robert G.; Lee, Virginia M.-Y.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Ludolph, Albert; Robberecht, Wim; Andersen, Peter M.; Nicholson, Garth A.; Blair, Ian P.; King, Oliver D.; Bonini, Nancy M.; Van Deerlin, Vivianna; Rademakers, Rosa; Mourelatos, Zissimos; Gitler, Aaron D.

    2011-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating and universally fatal neurodegenerative disease. Mutations in two related RNA-binding proteins, TDP-43 and FUS, that harbor prion-like domains, cause some forms of ALS. There are at least 213 human proteins harboring RNA recognition motifs, including FUS and TDP-43, raising the possibility that additional RNA-binding proteins might contribute to ALS pathogenesis. We performed a systematic survey of these proteins to find additional candidates similar to TDP-43 and FUS, followed by bioinformatics to predict prion-like domains in a subset of them. We sequenced one of these genes, TAF15, in patients with ALS and identified missense variants, which were absent in a large number of healthy controls. These disease-associated variants of TAF15 caused formation of cytoplasmic foci when expressed in primary cultures of spinal cord neurons. Very similar to TDP-43 and FUS, TAF15 aggregated in vitro and conferred neurodegeneration in Drosophila, with the ALS-linked variants having a more severe effect than wild type. Immunohistochemistry of postmortem spinal cord tissue revealed mislocalization of TAF15 in motor neurons of patients with ALS. We propose that aggregation-prone RNA-binding proteins might contribute very broadly to ALS pathogenesis and the genes identified in our yeast functional screen, coupled with prion-like domain prediction analysis, now provide a powerful resource to facilitate ALS disease gene discovery. PMID:22065782

  10. Identification of genes and candidate agents associated with pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bao-sheng; Liu, Zhen; Sun, Shao-long; Zhao, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a malignant neoplasm originating from transformed cells arising in tissues forming the pancreas. A major challenge in current cancer research is biological interpretation of complexity of cancer somatic mutation profiles. It has been suggested that several molecular alterations may play important roles in pancreatic carcinogenesis. In this study, by using the GSE28735 affymetrix microarray data accessible from Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database, we identified differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between paired pancreatic cancer tissues and adjacent nontumor tissues, followed the protein-protein interaction of the DEGs. Our study identified thousands of DEGs involved in regulation of cell cycle and apoptosis in progression of pancreatic cancer. Sp1 was predicted to be the major regulator by transcription factors analysis. From the protein-protein interaction networks, we found that Tk1 might play an important role in the progression of pancreatic cancer. Finally, we predicted candidate agents, including tomatidine and nialamide, which may be used as drugs to treat pancreatic cancer. In conclusion, our data provide a comprehensive bioinformatics analysis of genes and pathways which may be involved in the progression of pancreatic cancer.

  11. Achromatopsia as a Potential Candidate for Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Ji-jing; Alexander, John; Lei, Bo; Deng, Wentao; Zhang, Keqing; Li, Qiuhong; Chang, Bo; Hauswirth, William W.

    2013-01-01

    Achromatopsia is an autosomal recessive retinal disease involving loss of cone function that afflicts approximately 1 in 30,000 individuals. Patients with achromatopsia usually have visual acuities lower than 20/200 because of the central vision loss, photophobia, complete color blindness and reduced cone-mediated electroretinographic (ERG) amplitudes. Mutations in three genes have been found to be the primary causes of achromatopsia, including CNGB3 (beta subunit of the cone cyclic nucleotide-gated cation channel), CNGA3 (alpha subunit of the cone cyclic nucleotide-gated cation channel), and GNAT2 (cone specific alpha subunit of transducin). Naturally occurring mouse models with mutations in Cnga3 (cpfl5 mice) and Gnat2 (cpfl3 mice) were discovered at The Jackson Laboratory. A natural occurring canine model with CNGB3 mutations has also been found. These animal models have many of the central phenotypic features of the corresponding human diseases. Using adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene therapy, we and others show that cone function can be restored in all three models. These data suggest that human achromatopsia may be a good candidate for corrective gene therapy. PMID:20238068

  12. Computational selection and prioritization of candidate genes for Fetal Alcohol Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lombard, Zané; Tiffin, Nicki; Hofmann, Oliver; Bajic, Vladimir B; Hide, Winston; Ramsay, Michèle

    2007-01-01

    Background Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) is a serious global health problem and is observed at high frequencies in certain South African communities. Although in utero alcohol exposure is the primary trigger, there is evidence for genetic- and other susceptibility factors in FAS development. No genome-wide association or linkage studies have been performed for FAS, making computational selection and -prioritization of candidate disease genes an attractive approach. Results 10174 Candidate genes were initially selected from the whole genome using a previously described method, which selects candidate genes according to their expression in disease-affected tissues. Hereafter candidates were prioritized for experimental investigation by investigating criteria pertinent to FAS and binary filtering. 29 Criteria were assessed by mining various database sources to populate criteria-specific gene lists. Candidate genes were then prioritized for experimental investigation using a binary system that assessed the criteria gene lists against the candidate list, and candidate genes were scored accordingly. A group of 87 genes was prioritized as candidates and for future experimental validation. The validity of the binary prioritization method was assessed by investigating the protein-protein interactions, functional enrichment and common promoter element binding sites of the top-ranked genes. Conclusion This analysis highlighted a list of strong candidate genes from the TGF-β, MAPK and Hedgehog signalling pathways, which are all integral to fetal development and potential targets for alcohol's teratogenic effect. We conclude that this novel bioinformatics approach effectively prioritizes credible candidate genes for further experimental analysis. PMID:17961254

  13. Comparison of 2 models for gene-environment interactions: an example of simulated gene-medication interactions on systolic blood pressure in family-based data.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Rhodes, Lindsay; Hodonsky, Chani J; Graff, Mariaelisa; Love, Shelly-Ann M; Howard, Annie Green; Seyerle, Amanda A; Avery, Christy L; Chittoor, Geetha; Franceschini, Nora; Voruganti, V Saroja; Young, Kristin; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; North, Kari E; Justice, Anne E

    2016-01-01

    Nearly half of adults in the United States who are diagnosed with hypertension use blood-pressure-lowering medications. Yet there is a large interindividual variability in the response to these medications. Two complementary gene-environment interaction methods have been published and incorporated into publicly available software packages to examine interaction effects, including whether genetic variants modify the association between medication use and blood pressure. The first approach uses a gene-environment interaction term to measure the change in outcome when both the genetic marker and medication are present (the "interaction model"). The second approach tests for effect-size differences between strata of an environmental exposure (the "med-diff" approach). However, no studies have quantitatively compared how these methods perform with respect to 1 or 2 degree of freedom (DF) tests or in family-based data sets. We evaluated these 2 approaches using simulated genotype-medication response interactions at 3 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across a range of minor allele frequencies (MAFs 0.1-5.4 %) using the Genetic Analysis Workshop 19 family sample. The estimated interaction effect sizes were on average larger in the interaction model approach compared to the med-diff approach. The true positive proportion was higher for the med-diff approach for SNPs less than 1 % MAF, but higher for the interaction model when common variants were evaluated (MAF >5 %). The interaction model produced lower false-positive proportions than expected (5 %) across a range of MAFs for both the 1DF and 2DF tests. In contrast, the med-diff approach produced higher but stable false-positive proportions around 5 % across MAFs for both tests. Although the 1DF tests both performed similarly for common variants, the interaction model estimated true interaction effects with less bias and higher true positive proportions than the med-diff approach. However, if rare variation (MAF

  14. Slitrks as emerging candidate genes involved in neuropsychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Proenca, Catia C.; Gao, Kate P.; Shmelkov, Sergey V.; Rafii, Shahin; Lee, Francis S.

    2011-01-01

    Slitrks are a family of structurally-related transmembrane proteins belonging to the leucine-rich repeat (LRR) superfamily. Six family members exist (Slitrk1–Slitrk6), and all are highly expressed in the central nervous system (CNS). Slitrks have been implicated in mediating basic neuronal processes ranging from neurite outgrowth and dendritic elaboration to neuronal survival. Recent studies in humans and genetic mouse models have led to the identification of Slitrks as candidate genes that may be involved in the development of neuropsychiatric conditions such as obsessive compulsive spectrum disorders and schizophrenia. While these system level approaches have suggested that Slitrks play prominent roles in CNS development, key questions remain regarding the molecular mechanisms through which Slitrks mediate neuronal signaling and connectivity. PMID:21315458

  15. Candidate egg case silk genes for the spider Argiope argentata from differential gene expression analyses.

    PubMed

    Chaw, R C; Arensburger, P; Clarke, T H; Ayoub, N A; Hayashi, C Y

    2016-12-01

    Orb-web weaving spiders produce a variety of task-specific silks from specialized silk glands. The genetics underlying the synthesis of specific silk types are largely unknown, and transcriptome analysis could be a powerful approach for identifying candidate genes. However, de novo assembly and expression profiling of silk glands with RNA-sequencing (RNAseq) are problematic because the few known gene transcripts for silk proteins are extremely long and highly repetitive. To identify candidate genes for tubuliform (egg case) silk synthesis by the orb-weaver Argiope argentata (Araneidae), we estimated transcript abundance using two sequencing methods: RNAseq reads from throughout the length of mRNA molecules, and 3' digital gene expression reads from the 3' region of mRNA molecules. Both analyses identified similar sets of genes as differentially expressed when comparing tubuliform and nonsilk gland tissue. However, incompletely assembled silk gene transcripts were identified as differentially expressed because of RNAseq read alignments to highly repetitive regions, confounding interpretation of RNAseq results. Homologues of egg case silk protein (ECP) genes were upregulated in tubuliform glands. This discovery is the first description of ECP homologues in an araneid. We also propose additional candidate genes involved in synthesis of tubuliform or other silk types. © 2016 The Authors. Insect Molecular Biology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Royal Entomological Society.

  16. Walking on multiple disease-gene networks to prioritize candidate genes.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Rui

    2015-06-01

    Uncovering causal genes for human inherited diseases, as the primary step toward understanding the pathogenesis of these diseases, requires a combined analysis of genetic and genomic data. Although bioinformatics methods have been designed to prioritize candidate genes resulting from genetic linkage analysis or association studies, the coverage of both diseases and genes in existing methods is quite limited, thereby preventing the scan of causal genes for a significant proportion of diseases at the whole-genome level. To overcome this limitation, we propose a method named pgWalk to prioritize candidate genes by integrating multiple phenomic and genomic data. We derive three types of phenotype similarities among 7719 diseases and nine types of functional similarities among 20327 genes. Based on a pair of phenotype and gene similarities, we construct a disease-gene network and then simulate the process that a random walker wanders on such a heterogeneous network to quantify the strength of association between a candidate gene and a query disease. A weighted version of the Fisher's method with dependent correction is adopted to integrate 27 scores obtained in this way, and a final q-value is calibrated for prioritizing candidate genes. A series of validation experiments are conducted to demonstrate the superior performance of this approach. We further show the effectiveness of this method in exome sequencing studies of autism and epileptic encephalopathies. An online service and the standalone software of pgWalk can be found at http://bioinfo.au.tsinghua.edu.cn/jianglab/pgwalk. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Journal of Molecular Cell Biology, IBCB, SIBS, CAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Development and application of microsatellites in candidate genes related to wood properties in the Chinese white poplar (Populus tomentosa Carr.).

    PubMed

    Du, Qingzhang; Gong, Chenrui; Pan, Wei; Zhang, Deqiang

    2013-02-01

    Gene-derived simple sequence repeats (genic SSRs), also known as functional markers, are often preferred over random genomic markers because they represent variation in gene coding and/or regulatory regions. We characterized 544 genic SSR loci derived from 138 candidate genes involved in wood formation, distributed throughout the genome of Populus tomentosa, a key ecological and cultivated wood production species. Of these SSRs, three-quarters were located in the promoter or intron regions, and dinucleotide (59.7%) and trinucleotide repeat motifs (26.5%) predominated. By screening 15 wild P. tomentosa ecotypes, we identified 188 polymorphic genic SSRs with 861 alleles, 2-7 alleles for each marker. Transferability analysis of 30 random genic SSRs, testing whether these SSRs work in 26 genotypes of five genus Populus sections (outgroup, Salix matsudana), showed that 72% of the SSRs could be amplified in Turanga and 100% could be amplified in Leuce. Based on genotyping of these 26 genotypes, a neighbour-joining analysis showed the expected six phylogenetic groupings. In silico analysis of SSR variation in 220 sequences that are homologous between P. tomentosa and Populus trichocarpa suggested that genic SSR variations between relatives were predominantly affected by repeat motif variations or flanking sequence mutations. Inheritance tests and single-marker associations demonstrated the power of genic SSRs in family-based linkage mapping and candidate gene-based association studies, as well as marker-assisted selection and comparative genomic studies of P. tomentosa and related species.

  18. Screening of candidate genes for primary open angle glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ting; Xie, Lin; Ye, Jian; Liu, Yuewuyang

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) is one of the leading causes of irreversible blindness in the world. To make progress in understanding POAG, it is necessary to identify more POAG-causing genes. Methods Using haplotype analysis, we found that mutational region is located on chromosome 2 in two families. Furthermore, we screened 11 candidate genes on chromosome 2 by protein–protein interaction (PPI) analysis, including mutS homolog 6 (MSH6), mutS homolog 2 (MSH2), v-rel reticuloendotheliosis viral oncogene homolog (REL), endothelial PAS domain protein 1 (EPAS1), vaccinia related kinase 2 (VRK2), F-box protein 11 (FBXO11), EGF containing fibulin-like extracellular matrix protein 1 (EFEMP1), reticulon 4 (RTN4), RAB1A, member RAS oncogene family (RAB1A), ARP2 actin-related protein 2 homolog (ACTR2), and calmodulin 2 (phosphorylase kinase, delta; CALM2). These 11 genes are all predicted to be related to trabecular meshwork changes and progressive loss of retinal ganglion cells in POAG patients. Results According to our study, FBXO11 and VRK2 may interact with tumor protein p53 to regulate mitochondrial membrane permeability, mitochondrial membrane organization, and apoptosis. MSH2 is responsible for repairing DNA mismatches and RTN4 is for neuronal regeneration. Therefore, they are supposed to play a negative role in cellular process in POAG. CALM2 may be involved in retinal ganglion cell death and oxidative damage to cell communication. Conclusions The results demonstrate that the genes above may be associated with pathogenesis of POAG. PMID:22876139

  19. Isolation and characterization of genes from the SMA candidate region

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, T.G.; Ta, D.; Wasmuth, J.J.

    1994-09-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive disorder affecting alpha motor neutrons. SMA has been mapped to 5q12-13, between the genetic markers D5S435 and 38.3. The distance between these markers, which are closest on the opposite sides of the SMA locus, is {approximately}750 kb. An extensive physical map of this region has been constructed by radiation hybrid (RH) mapping and YAC contig assembly. Further analysis of the YAC contig of the SMA region revealed many deletions and duplications within the YACs. The extensive rearrangements in these YACs makes it very difficult to use them to construct a cosmid contig. The YACs and cosmids isolated thus far have been used to isolate expressed sequences using the method of exon amplification. Putative exons were then used to screen various cDNA libraries to isolate the corresponding cDNAs. Genomic sequences that cross-hybridize very strongly to many of the cDNAs are present in two different regions of chromosome 5, in the SMA region and in 5p13-14. These duplications appear to represent genes and partially processed psuedogenes in one or both of the regions and it has been difficult to determine which of the two loci is the functional gene. Other cDNAs located exclusively in the SMA region have also been found. From the two classes of cDNAs (duplicated or single copy), there are four that are good candidates for the disease gene. These include a cDNA that shows homology to a chicken neuronal specific myosin heavy chain gene, an expressed variant of promelanin concentrating hormone, k-cadherin and a glutathion-S-transferase Mu class protein. We are isolating the full length transcripts for each of these and will use them in DGGE and SSCP gel analysis of SMA patients.

  20. Association of candidate genes with drought tolerance traits in diverse perennial ryegrass accessions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Drought is a major environmental stress limiting growth of perennial grasses in temperate regions. Plant drought tolerance is a complex trait that is controlled by multiple genes. Candidate gene association mapping provides a powerful tool for dissection of complex traits. Candidate gene association...

  1. Association of candidate genes with drought tolerance traits in diverse perennial ryegrass accessions

    Treesearch

    Xiaoqing Yu; Guihua Bai; Shuwei Liu; Na Luo; Ying Wang; Douglas S. Richmond; Paula M. Pijut; Scott A. Jackson; Jianming Yu; Yiwei. Jiang

    2013-01-01

    Drought is a major environmental stress limiting growth of perennial grasses in temperate regions. Plant drought tolerance is a complex trait that is controlled by multiple genes. Candidate gene association mapping provides a powerful tool for dissection of complex traits. Candidate gene association mapping of drought tolerance traits was conducted in 192 diverse...

  2. Association analysis of the monoamine oxidase A gene in bipolar affective disorder by using family-based internal controls

    SciTech Connect

    Noethen, M.M.; Eggermann, K.; Propping, P.

    1995-10-01

    It is well accepted that association studies are a major tool in investigating the contribution of single genes to the development of diseases that do not follow simple Mendelian inheritance pattern (so-called complex traits). Such major psychiatric diseases as bipolar affective disorder and schizophrenia clearly fall into this category of diseases. 7 refs., 1 tab.

  3. Family-based association study of ZNF533, DOCK4 and IMMP2L gene polymorphisms linked to autism in a northeastern Chinese Han population*

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Shuang; Wang, Xue-lai; Zou, Ming-yang; Wang, Han; Zhou, Xue; Sun, Cai-hong; Xia, Wei; Wu, Li-jie; Fujisawa, Takashi X.; Tomoda, Akemi

    2014-01-01

    Objective: A study in a Caucasian population has identified two single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in ZNF533, one in DOCK4, and two in IMMP2L, which were all significantly associated with autism. They are located in AUTS1 and AUTS5, which have been identified as autism susceptibility loci in several genome-wide screens. The present study aimed to investigate whether ZNF533, DOCK4, and IMMP2L genes are also associated with autism in a northeastern Chinese Han population. Methods: We performed a similar association study using families with three individuals (one autistic child and two unaffected parents). A family-based transmission disequilibrium test (TDT) was used to analyze the results. Results: There were significant associations between autism and the two SNPs of ZNF533 gene (rs11885327: χ 2=4.5200, P=0.0335; rs1964081: χ 2=4.2610, P=0.0390) and the SNP of DOCK4 gene (rs2217262: χ 2=5.3430, P=0.0208). Conclusions: Our data suggest that ZNF533 and DOCK4 genes are linked to a predisposition to autism in the northeastern Chinese Han population. PMID:24599690

  4. Family-based association study of ZNF533, DOCK4 and IMMP2L gene polymorphisms linked to autism in a northeastern Chinese Han population.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shuang; Wang, Xue-lai; Zou, Ming-yang; Wang, Han; Zhou, Xue; Sun, Cai-hong; Xia, Wei; Wu, Li-jie; Fujisawa, Takashi X; Tomoda, Akemi

    2014-03-01

    A study in a Caucasian population has identified two single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in ZNF533, one in DOCK4, and two in IMMP2L, which were all significantly associated with autism. They are located in AUTS1 and AUTS5, which have been identified as autism susceptibility loci in several genome-wide screens. The present study aimed to investigate whether ZNF533, DOCK4, and IMMP2L genes are also associated with autism in a northeastern Chinese Han population. We performed a similar association study using families with three individuals (one autistic child and two unaffected parents). A family-based transmission disequilibrium test (TDT) was used to analyze the results. There were significant associations between autism and the two SNPs of ZNF533 gene (rs11885327: χ(2)=4.5200, P=0.0335; rs1964081: χ(2)=4.2610, P=0.0390) and the SNP of DOCK4 gene (rs2217262: χ(2)=5.3430, P=0.0208). Our data suggest that ZNF533 and DOCK4 genes are linked to a predisposition to autism in the northeastern Chinese Han population.

  5. Integrated analysis of gene expression and methylation profiles of 48 candidate genes in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Li, Zibo; Heng, Jianfu; Yan, Jinhua; Guo, Xinwu; Tang, Lili; Chen, Ming; Peng, Limin; Wu, Yepeng; Wang, Shouman; Xiao, Zhi; Deng, Zhongping; Dai, Lizhong; Wang, Jun

    2016-11-01

    Gene-specific methylation and expression have shown biological and clinical importance for breast cancer diagnosis and prognosis. Integrated analysis of gene methylation and gene expression may identify genes associated with biology mechanism and clinical outcome of breast cancer and aid in clinical management. Using high-throughput microfluidic quantitative PCR, we analyzed the expression profiles of 48 candidate genes in 96 Chinese breast cancer patients and investigated their correlation with gene methylation and associations with breast cancer clinical parameters. Breast cancer-specific gene expression alternation was found in 25 genes with significant expression difference between paired tumor and normal tissues. A total of 9 genes (CCND2, EGFR, GSTP1, PGR, PTGS2, RECK, SOX17, TNFRSF10D, and WIF1) showed significant negative correlation between methylation and gene expression, which were validated in the TCGA database. Total 23 genes (ACADL, APC, BRCA2, CADM1, CAV1, CCND2, CST6, EGFR, ESR2, GSTP1, ICAM5, NPY, PGR, PTGS2, RECK, RUNX3, SFRP1, SOX17, SYK, TGFBR2, TNFRSF10D, WIF1, and WRN) annotated with potential TFBSs in the promoter regions showed negative correlation between methylation and expression. In logistics regression analysis, 31 of the 48 genes showed improved performance in disease prediction with combination of methylation and expression coefficient. Our results demonstrated the complex correlation and the possible regulatory mechanisms between DNA methylation and gene expression. Integration analysis of methylation and expression of candidate genes could improve performance in breast cancer prediction. These findings would contribute to molecular characterization and identification of biomarkers for potential clinical applications.

  6. Family-based linkage and association mapping reveals novel genes affecting Plum pox virus infection in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Pagny, Gaëlle; Paulstephenraj, Pauline S; Poque, Sylvain; Sicard, Ophélie; Cosson, Patrick; Eyquard, Jean-Philippe; Caballero, Mélodie; Chague, Aurélie; Gourdon, Germain; Negrel, Lise; Candresse, Thierry; Mariette, Stéphanie; Decroocq, Véronique

    2012-11-01

    Sharka is a devastating viral disease caused by the Plum pox virus (PPV) in stone fruit trees and few sources of resistance are known in its natural hosts. Since any knowledge gained from Arabidopsis on plant virus susceptibility factors is likely to be transferable to crop species, Arabidopsis's natural variation was searched for host factors essential for PPV infection. To locate regions of the genome associated with susceptibility to PPV, linkage analysis was performed on six biparental populations as well as on multiparental lines. To refine quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping, a genome-wide association analysis was carried out using 147 Arabidopsis accessions. Evidence was found for linkage on chromosomes 1, 3 and 5 with restriction of PPV long-distance movement. The most relevant signals occurred within a region at the bottom of chromosome 3, which comprises seven RTM3-like TRAF domain-containing genes. Since the resistance mechanism analyzed here is recessive and the rtm3 knockout mutant is susceptible to PPV infection, it suggests that other gene(s) present in the small identified region encompassing RTM3 are necessary for PPV long-distance movement. In consequence, we report here the occurrence of host factor(s) that are indispensable for virus long-distance movement. © 2012 INRA. New Phytologist © 2012 New Phytologist Trust.

  7. Identification of candidate genes in the spinal muscular atrophy gene region

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, T.A.; Wang, C.H.; Vitale, E.

    1994-09-01

    The SMA disease gene region on chromosome 5q13 has been characterized by the presence of low copy repeat element DNA and concomitant genomic instability. The identification of candidate genes has been complicated by the low-copy repeat sequences which include coding and non-coding DNA. To circumvent this problem, we have focused on the identification and characterization of exonic DNA sequence isolated from YAC-derived bacteriophage subclones. Contrary to hybridization-based protocols which identify all closely homologous genes, exons isolated in this manner are known to map the disease gene region. Exon trapping was limited to an approximately 400 kb {open_quotes}minimum genetic region{close_quotes} defined by recombination mapping. Approximately six new genes have been identified by this method. One of the candidate genes is expressed predominantly in muscle and demonstrates sequence homology with known translational regulatory proteins. Physical mapping places the gene within the minimal genetic region and adjacent to a region characterized with genomic instability. We will report our progress in the identification of disease-specific mutations in this gene based upon comparison of normal and SMA cDNA sequence, amplification and sequencing of SMA DNA samples, and RT-PCR sequencing studies.

  8. Network Candidate Genes in Breeding for Drought Tolerant Crops

    PubMed Central

    Krannich, Christoph Tim; Maletzki, Lisa; Kurowsky, Christina; Horn, Renate

    2015-01-01

    Climate change leading to increased periods of low water availability as well as increasing demands for food in the coming years makes breeding for drought tolerant crops a high priority. Plants have developed diverse strategies and mechanisms to survive drought stress. However, most of these represent drought escape or avoidance strategies like early flowering or low stomatal conductance that are not applicable in breeding for crops with high yields under drought conditions. Even though a great deal of research is ongoing, especially in cereals, in this regard, not all mechanisms involved in drought tolerance are yet understood. The identification of candidate genes for drought tolerance that have a high potential to be used for breeding drought tolerant crops represents a challenge. Breeding for drought tolerant crops has to focus on acceptable yields under water-limited conditions and not on survival. However, as more and more knowledge about the complex networks and the cross talk during drought is available, more options are revealed. In addition, it has to be considered that conditioning a crop for drought tolerance might require the production of metabolites and might cost the plants energy and resources that cannot be used in terms of yield. Recent research indicates that yield penalty exists and efficient breeding for drought tolerant crops with acceptable yields under well-watered and drought conditions might require uncoupling yield penalty from drought tolerance. PMID:26193269

  9. Network Candidate Genes in Breeding for Drought Tolerant Crops.

    PubMed

    Krannich, Christoph Tim; Maletzki, Lisa; Kurowsky, Christina; Horn, Renate

    2015-07-17

    Climate change leading to increased periods of low water availability as well as increasing demands for food in the coming years makes breeding for drought tolerant crops a high priority. Plants have developed diverse strategies and mechanisms to survive drought stress. However, most of these represent drought escape or avoidance strategies like early flowering or low stomatal conductance that are not applicable in breeding for crops with high yields under drought conditions. Even though a great deal of research is ongoing, especially in cereals, in this regard, not all mechanisms involved in drought tolerance are yet understood. The identification of candidate genes for drought tolerance that have a high potential to be used for breeding drought tolerant crops represents a challenge. Breeding for drought tolerant crops has to focus on acceptable yields under water-limited conditions and not on survival. However, as more and more knowledge about the complex networks and the cross talk during drought is available, more options are revealed. In addition, it has to be considered that conditioning a crop for drought tolerance might require the production of metabolites and might cost the plants energy and resources that cannot be used in terms of yield. Recent research indicates that yield penalty exists and efficient breeding for drought tolerant crops with acceptable yields under well-watered and drought conditions might require uncoupling yield penalty from drought tolerance.

  10. Family-based study of the association of the dopamine D2 receptor gene (DRD2) with habitual smoking.

    PubMed

    Bierut, L J; Rice, J P; Edenberg, H J; Goate, A; Foroud, T; Cloninger, C R; Begleiter, H; Conneally, P M; Crowe, R R; Hesselbrock, V; Li, T K; Nurnberger, J I; Porjesz, B; Schuckit, M A; Reich, T

    2000-02-14

    A recent study showed an association between the dopamine D2 receptor gene (DRD2) and smoking. The purpose of this study was to determine if the familial transmission of smoking is linked to variation at the DRD2 locus in a genetically informative sample. Subjects were identified in alcohol treatment centers and their relatives were recruited for study. All subjects were interviewed to assess alcohol dependence, smoking habits, and psychiatric disorders. Two polymorphisms within the DRD2 gene were analyzed, including the TaqIA polymorphism. The sample consisted of 138 nuclear families with at least one offspring with habitual smoking, and analysis was by the transmission disequilibrium test (TDT), which avoids problems due to population stratification. There was no significant difference in the frequency between DRD2 alleles transmitted and not transmitted to habitual smokers. There also was no evidence for unequal transmission of DRD2 alleles for the phenotypes "ever smoker" or comorbid alcohol dependence and habitual smoking. This study does not support linkage of the DRD2 with smoking.

  11. Integration of text- and data-mining using ontologies successfully selects disease gene candidates.

    PubMed

    Tiffin, Nicki; Kelso, Janet F; Powell, Alan R; Pan, Hong; Bajic, Vladimir B; Hide, Winston A

    2005-01-01

    Genome-wide techniques such as microarray analysis, Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SAGE), Massively Parallel Signature Sequencing (MPSS), linkage analysis and association studies are used extensively in the search for genes that cause diseases, and often identify many hundreds of candidate disease genes. Selection of the most probable of these candidate disease genes for further empirical analysis is a significant challenge. Additionally, identifying the genes that cause complex diseases is problematic due to low penetrance of multiple contributing genes. Here, we describe a novel bioinformatic approach that selects candidate disease genes according to their expression profiles. We use the eVOC anatomical ontology to integrate text-mining of biomedical literature and data-mining of available human gene expression data. To demonstrate that our method is successful and widely applicable, we apply it to a database of 417 candidate genes containing 17 known disease genes. We successfully select the known disease gene for 15 out of 17 diseases and reduce the candidate gene set to 63.3% (+/-18.8%) of its original size. This approach facilitates direct association between genomic data describing gene expression and information from biomedical texts describing disease phenotype, and successfully prioritizes candidate genes according to their expression in disease-affected tissues.

  12. Whole Exome Sequencing of Distant Relatives in Multiplex Families Implicates Rare Variants in Candidate Genes for Oral Clefts

    PubMed Central

    Bureau, Alexandre; Parker, Margaret M.; Ruczinski, Ingo; Taub, Margaret A.; Marazita, Mary L.; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Mangold, Elisabeth; Noethen, Markus M.; Ludwig, Kirsten U.; Hetmanski, Jacqueline B.; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E.; Cropp, Cheryl D.; Li, Qing; Szymczak, Silke; Albacha-Hejazi, Hasan; Alqosayer, Khalid; Field, L. Leigh; Wu-Chou, Yah-Huei; Doheny, Kimberly F.; Ling, Hua; Scott, Alan F.; Beaty, Terri H.

    2014-01-01

    A dozen genes/regions have been confirmed as genetic risk factors for oral clefts in human association and linkage studies, and animal models argue even more genes may be involved. Genomic sequencing studies should identify specific causal variants and may reveal additional genes as influencing risk to oral clefts, which have a complex and heterogeneous etiology. We conducted a whole exome sequencing (WES) study to search for potentially causal variants using affected relatives drawn from multiplex cleft families. Two or three affected second, third, and higher degree relatives from 55 multiplex families were sequenced. We examined rare single nucleotide variants (SNVs) shared by affected relatives in 348 recognized candidate genes. Exact probabilities that affected relatives would share these rare variants were calculated, given pedigree structures, and corrected for the number of variants tested. Five novel and potentially damaging SNVs shared by affected distant relatives were found and confirmed by Sanger sequencing. One damaging SNV in CDH1, shared by three affected second cousins from a single family, attained statistical significance (P = 0.02 after correcting for multiple tests). Family-based designs such as the one used in this WES study offer important advantages for identifying genes likely to be causing complex and heterogeneous disorders. PMID:24793288

  13. Candidate genes for drought tolerance and improved productivity in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Vinod, M S; Sharma, Naveen; Manjunath, K; Kanbar, Adnan; Prakash, N B; Shashidhar, H E

    2006-03-01

    Candidate genes are sequenced genes of known biological action involved in the development or physiology of a trait. Twenty-one putative candidate genes were designed after an exhaustive search in the public databases along with an elaborate literature survey for candidate gene products and/or regulatory sequences associated with enhanced drought resistance. The downloaded sequences were then used to design primers considering the flanking sequences as well. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) performed on 10 diverse cultivars that involved Japonica, Indica and local accessions, revealed 12 polymorphic candidate genes. Seven polymorphic candidate genes were then utilized to genotype 148 individuals of CT9993 x IR62266 doubled haploid (DH) mapping population. The segregation data were tested for deviation from the expected Mendelian ratio (1:1) using a Chi-square test (less than 1%). Based on this, four candidate genes were assessed to be significant and the remaining three, as non-significant. All the significant candidate genes were biased towards CT9993, the female parent in the DH mapping population. Single-marker analysis strongly associated (less than 1%) them to different traits under both well-watered and low-moisture stress conditions. Two candidate genes, EXP15 and EXP13, were found to be associated with root number and silicon content in the stem respectively, under both well-watered and low-moisture stress conditions.

  14. Candidate Luminal B Breast Cancer Genes Identified by Genome, Gene Expression and DNA Methylation Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Addou-Klouche, Lynda; Finetti, Pascal; Saade, Marie-Rose; Manai, Marwa; Carbuccia, Nadine; Bekhouche, Ismahane; Letessier, Anne; Charafe-Jauffret, Emmanuelle; Jacquemier, Jocelyne; Spicuglia, Salvatore; de The, Hugues; Viens, Patrice; Bertucci, François; Birnbaum, Daniel; Chaffanet, Max

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancers (BCs) of the luminal B subtype are estrogen receptor-positive (ER+), highly proliferative, resistant to standard therapies and have a poor prognosis. To better understand this subtype we compared DNA copy number aberrations (CNAs), DNA promoter methylation, gene expression profiles, and somatic mutations in nine selected genes, in 32 luminal B tumors with those observed in 156 BCs of the other molecular subtypes. Frequent CNAs included 8p11-p12 and 11q13.1-q13.2 amplifications, 7q11.22-q34, 8q21.12-q24.23, 12p12.3-p13.1, 12q13.11-q24.11, 14q21.1-q23.1, 17q11.1-q25.1, 20q11.23-q13.33 gains and 6q14.1-q24.2, 9p21.3-p24,3, 9q21.2, 18p11.31-p11.32 losses. A total of 237 and 101 luminal B-specific candidate oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) presented a deregulated expression in relation with their CNAs, including 11 genes previously reported associated with endocrine resistance. Interestingly, 88% of the potential TSGs are located within chromosome arm 6q, and seven candidate oncogenes are potential therapeutic targets. A total of 100 candidate oncogenes were validated in a public series of 5,765 BCs and the overexpression of 67 of these was associated with poor survival in luminal tumors. Twenty-four genes presented a deregulated expression in relation with a high DNA methylation level. FOXO3, PIK3CA and TP53 were the most frequent mutated genes among the nine tested. In a meta-analysis of next-generation sequencing data in 875 BCs, KCNB2 mutations were associated with luminal B cases while candidate TSGs MDN1 (6q15) and UTRN (6q24), were mutated in this subtype. In conclusion, we have reported luminal B candidate genes that may play a role in the development and/or hormone resistance of this aggressive subtype. PMID:24416132

  15. Candidate luminal B breast cancer genes identified by genome, gene expression and DNA methylation profiling.

    PubMed

    Cornen, Stéphanie; Guille, Arnaud; Adélaïde, José; Addou-Klouche, Lynda; Finetti, Pascal; Saade, Marie-Rose; Manai, Marwa; Carbuccia, Nadine; Bekhouche, Ismahane; Letessier, Anne; Raynaud, Stéphane; Charafe-Jauffret, Emmanuelle; Jacquemier, Jocelyne; Spicuglia, Salvatore; de The, Hugues; Viens, Patrice; Bertucci, François; Birnbaum, Daniel; Chaffanet, Max

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancers (BCs) of the luminal B subtype are estrogen receptor-positive (ER+), highly proliferative, resistant to standard therapies and have a poor prognosis. To better understand this subtype we compared DNA copy number aberrations (CNAs), DNA promoter methylation, gene expression profiles, and somatic mutations in nine selected genes, in 32 luminal B tumors with those observed in 156 BCs of the other molecular subtypes. Frequent CNAs included 8p11-p12 and 11q13.1-q13.2 amplifications, 7q11.22-q34, 8q21.12-q24.23, 12p12.3-p13.1, 12q13.11-q24.11, 14q21.1-q23.1, 17q11.1-q25.1, 20q11.23-q13.33 gains and 6q14.1-q24.2, 9p21.3-p24,3, 9q21.2, 18p11.31-p11.32 losses. A total of 237 and 101 luminal B-specific candidate oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) presented a deregulated expression in relation with their CNAs, including 11 genes previously reported associated with endocrine resistance. Interestingly, 88% of the potential TSGs are located within chromosome arm 6q, and seven candidate oncogenes are potential therapeutic targets. A total of 100 candidate oncogenes were validated in a public series of 5,765 BCs and the overexpression of 67 of these was associated with poor survival in luminal tumors. Twenty-four genes presented a deregulated expression in relation with a high DNA methylation level. FOXO3, PIK3CA and TP53 were the most frequent mutated genes among the nine tested. In a meta-analysis of next-generation sequencing data in 875 BCs, KCNB2 mutations were associated with luminal B cases while candidate TSGs MDN1 (6q15) and UTRN (6q24), were mutated in this subtype. In conclusion, we have reported luminal B candidate genes that may play a role in the development and/or hormone resistance of this aggressive subtype.

  16. Candidate Gene Analyses of Skeletal Variation in Malocclusion.

    PubMed

    da Fontoura, C S G; Miller, S F; Wehby, G L; Amendt, B A; Holton, N E; Southard, T E; Allareddy, V; Moreno Uribe, L M

    2015-07-01

    This study evaluated associations between craniofacial candidate genes and skeletal variation in patients with malocclusion. Lateral cephalometric radiographs of 269 untreated adults with skeletal classes I, II, and III malocclusion were digitized with 14 landmarks. Two-dimensional coordinates were analyzed using Procrustes fit and principal component (PC) analysis to generate continuous malocclusion phenotypes. Skeletal class classifications (I, II, or III) were used as a categorical phenotype. Individuals were genotyped for 198 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 71 craniofacial genes and loci. Phenotype-genotype associations were tested via multivariate linear regression for continuous phenotypes and multinomial logistic regression for skeletal malocclusion class. PC analysis resulted in 4 principal components (PCs) explaining 69% of the total skeletal facial variation. PC1 explained 32.7% of the variation and depicted vertical discrepancies ranging from skeletal deep to open bites. PC1 was associated with a SNP near PAX5 (P = 0.01). PC2 explained 21.7% and captured horizontal maxillomandibular discrepancies. PC2 was associated with SNPs upstream of SNAI3 (P = 0.0002) and MYO1H (P = 0.006). PC3 explained 8.2% and captured variation in ramus height, body length, and anterior cranial base orientation. PC3 was associated with TWIST1 (P = 0.000076). Finally, PC4 explained 6.6% and detected variation in condylar inclination as well as symphysis projection. PC4 was associated with PAX7 (P = 0.007). Furthermore, skeletal class II risk increased relative to class I with the minor alleles of SNPs in FGFR2 (odds ratio [OR] = 2.1, P = 0.004) and declined with SNPs in EDN1 (OR = 0.5, P = 0.007). Conversely, skeletal class III risk increased versus class I with SNPs in FGFR2 (OR 2.2, P = 0.005) and COL1A1 (OR = 2.1, P = 0.008) and declined with SNPs in TBX5 (OR = 0.5, P = 0.014). PAX5, SNAI3, MYO1H, TWIST1, and PAX7 are associated with craniofacial skeletal variation

  17. Candidate Gene Analyses of Skeletal Variation in Malocclusion

    PubMed Central

    da Fontoura, C.S.G.; Miller, S.F.; Wehby, G.L.; Amendt, B.A.; Holton, N.E.; Southard, T.E.; Allareddy, V.

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated associations between craniofacial candidate genes and skeletal variation in patients with malocclusion. Lateral cephalometric radiographs of 269 untreated adults with skeletal classes I, II, and III malocclusion were digitized with 14 landmarks. Two-dimensional coordinates were analyzed using Procrustes fit and principal component (PC) analysis to generate continuous malocclusion phenotypes. Skeletal class classifications (I, II, or III) were used as a categorical phenotype. Individuals were genotyped for 198 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 71 craniofacial genes and loci. Phenotype-genotype associations were tested via multivariate linear regression for continuous phenotypes and multinomial logistic regression for skeletal malocclusion class. PC analysis resulted in 4 principal components (PCs) explaining 69% of the total skeletal facial variation. PC1 explained 32.7% of the variation and depicted vertical discrepancies ranging from skeletal deep to open bites. PC1 was associated with a SNP near PAX5 (P = 0.01). PC2 explained 21.7% and captured horizontal maxillomandibular discrepancies. PC2 was associated with SNPs upstream of SNAI3 (P = 0.0002) and MYO1H (P = 0.006). PC3 explained 8.2% and captured variation in ramus height, body length, and anterior cranial base orientation. PC3 was associated with TWIST1 (P = 0.000076). Finally, PC4 explained 6.6% and detected variation in condylar inclination as well as symphysis projection. PC4 was associated with PAX7 (P = 0.007). Furthermore, skeletal class II risk increased relative to class I with the minor alleles of SNPs in FGFR2 (odds ratio [OR] = 2.1, P = 0.004) and declined with SNPs in EDN1 (OR = 0.5, P = 0.007). Conversely, skeletal class III risk increased versus class I with SNPs in FGFR2 (OR 2.2, P = 0.005) and COL1A1 (OR = 2.1, P = 0.008) and declined with SNPs in TBX5 (OR = 0.5, P = 0.014). PAX5, SNAI3, MYO1H, TWIST1, and PAX7 are associated with craniofacial skeletal variation

  18. Differential Gene Expression Reveals Candidate Genes for Drought Stress Response in Abies alba (Pinaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Ziegenhagen, Birgit; Liepelt, Sascha

    2015-01-01

    Increasing drought periods as a result of global climate change pose a threat to many tree species by possibly outpacing their adaptive capabilities. Revealing the genetic basis of drought stress response is therefore implemental for future conservation strategies and risk assessment. Access to informative genomic regions is however challenging, especially for conifers, partially due to their large genomes, which puts constraints on the feasibility of whole genome scans. Candidate genes offer a valuable tool to reduce the complexity of the analysis and the amount of sequencing work and costs. For this study we combined an improved drought stress phenotyping of needles via a novel terahertz water monitoring technique with Massive Analysis of cDNA Ends to identify candidate genes for drought stress response in European silver fir (Abies alba Mill.). A pooled cDNA library was constructed from the cotyledons of six drought stressed and six well-watered silver fir seedlings, respectively. Differential expression analyses of these libraries revealed 296 candidate genes for drought stress response in silver fir (247 up- and 49 down-regulated) of which a subset was validated by RT-qPCR of the twelve individual cotyledons. A majority of these genes code for currently uncharacterized proteins and hint on new genomic resources to be explored in conifers. Furthermore, we could show that some traditional reference genes from model plant species (GAPDH and eIF4A2) are not suitable for differential analysis and we propose a new reference gene, TPC1, for drought stress expression profiling in needles of conifer seedlings. PMID:25924061

  19. Differential Gene Expression Reveals Candidate Genes for Drought Stress Response in Abies alba (Pinaceae).

    PubMed

    Behringer, David; Zimmermann, Heike; Ziegenhagen, Birgit; Liepelt, Sascha

    2015-01-01

    Increasing drought periods as a result of global climate change pose a threat to many tree species by possibly outpacing their adaptive capabilities. Revealing the genetic basis of drought stress response is therefore implemental for future conservation strategies and risk assessment. Access to informative genomic regions is however challenging, especially for conifers, partially due to their large genomes, which puts constraints on the feasibility of whole genome scans. Candidate genes offer a valuable tool to reduce the complexity of the analysis and the amount of sequencing work and costs. For this study we combined an improved drought stress phenotyping of needles via a novel terahertz water monitoring technique with Massive Analysis of cDNA Ends to identify candidate genes for drought stress response in European silver fir (Abies alba Mill.). A pooled cDNA library was constructed from the cotyledons of six drought stressed and six well-watered silver fir seedlings, respectively. Differential expression analyses of these libraries revealed 296 candidate genes for drought stress response in silver fir (247 up- and 49 down-regulated) of which a subset was validated by RT-qPCR of the twelve individual cotyledons. A majority of these genes code for currently uncharacterized proteins and hint on new genomic resources to be explored in conifers. Furthermore, we could show that some traditional reference genes from model plant species (GAPDH and eIF4A2) are not suitable for differential analysis and we propose a new reference gene, TPC1, for drought stress expression profiling in needles of conifer seedlings.

  20. Rare variant detection using family-based sequencing analysis.

    PubMed

    Peng, Gang; Fan, Yu; Palculict, Timothy B; Shen, Peidong; Ruteshouser, E Cristy; Chi, Aung-Kyaw; Davis, Ronald W; Huff, Vicki; Scharfe, Curt; Wang, Wenyi

    2013-03-05

    Next-generation sequencing is revolutionizing genomic analysis, but this analysis can be compromised by high rates of missing true variants. To develop a robust statistical method capable of identifying variants that would otherwise not be called, we conducted sequence data simulations and both whole-genome and targeted sequencing data analysis of 28 families. Our method (Family-Based Sequencing Program, FamSeq) integrates Mendelian transmission information and raw sequencing reads. Sequence analysis using FamSeq reduced the number of false negative variants by 14-33% as assessed by HapMap sample genotype confirmation. In a large family affected with Wilms tumor, 84% of variants uniquely identified by FamSeq were confirmed by Sanger sequencing. In children with early-onset neurodevelopmental disorders from 26 families, de novo variant calls in disease candidate genes were corrected by FamSeq as mendelian variants, and the number of uniquely identified variants in affected individuals increased proportionally as additional family members were included in the analysis. To gain insight into maximizing variant detection, we studied factors impacting actual improvements of family-based calling, including pedigree structure, allele frequency (common vs. rare variants), prior settings of minor allele frequency, sequence signal-to-noise ratio, and coverage depth (∼20× to >200×). These data will help guide the design, analysis, and interpretation of family-based sequencing studies to improve the ability to identify new disease-associated genes.

  1. Hypothesis-Driven Candidate Genes for Schizophrenia Compared to Genome-Wide Association Results

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Ann L.; Kim, Yunjung; Sklar, Pamela; O’Donovan, Michael C.; Sullivan, Patrick F.

    2014-01-01

    Background Candidate gene studies have been a key approach to the genetics of schizophrenia. Results of these studies have been confusing and no genes have been unequivocally implicated. The hypothesis-driven candidate gene literature can be appraised via comparison with the results of genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Methods We described the characteristics of hypothesis-driven candidate gene studies from SZGene, and used pathway analysis to compare hypothesis-driven candidate genes with GWAS results from the International Schizophrenia Consortium (ISC). Results SZGene contained 732 autosomal genes evaluated in 1,374 studies. These genes had poor statistical power to detect genetic effects typical for human diseases, assessed only 3.7% of genes in the genome, and had low marker densities per gene. Most genes were assessed once or twice (76.9%), providing minimal ability to evaluate consensus across studies. The ISC had power of 89% to detect a genetic effect typical for common human diseases and assessed 79% of known autosomal common genetic variation. Pathway analyses did not reveal enrichment of smaller ISC p-values in hypothesis-driven candidate genes nor did a comprehensive evaluation of meta-hypotheses driving candidate gene selection (schizophrenia as a disease of the synapse or neurodevelopment). The most studied hypothesis-driven candidate genes had no notable ISC results (COMT, DRD3, DRD2, HTR2A, NRG1, BDNF, DTNBP1, and SLC6A4). Conclusions We did not find support for the idea that the hypothesis-driven candidate genes studied in the literature were enriched for common variation involved in the etiology of schizophrenia. Larger samples are required definitively to evaluate this conclusion. PMID:21854684

  2. Candidate genes and molecular markers associated with heat tolerance in colonial Bentgrass.

    PubMed

    Jespersen, David; Belanger, Faith C; Huang, Bingru

    2017-01-01

    Elevated temperature is a major abiotic stress limiting the growth of cool-season grasses during the summer months. The objectives of this study were to determine the genetic variation in the expression patterns of selected genes involved in several major metabolic pathways regulating heat tolerance for two genotypes contrasting in heat tolerance to confirm their status as potential candidate genes, and to identify PCR-based markers associated with candidate genes related to heat tolerance in a colonial (Agrostis capillaris L.) x creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera L.) hybrid backcross population. Plants were subjected to heat stress in controlled-environmental growth chambers for phenotypic evaluation and determination of genetic variation in candidate gene expression. Molecular markers were developed for genes involved in protein degradation (cysteine protease), antioxidant defense (catalase and glutathione-S-transferase), energy metabolism (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase), cell expansion (expansin), and stress protection (heat shock proteins HSP26, HSP70, and HSP101). Kruskal-Wallis analysis, a commonly used non-parametric test used to compare population individuals with or without the gene marker, found the physiological traits of chlorophyll content, electrolyte leakage, normalized difference vegetative index, and turf quality were associated with all candidate gene markers with the exception of HSP101. Differential gene expression was frequently found for the tested candidate genes. The development of candidate gene markers for important heat tolerance genes may allow for the development of new cultivars with increased abiotic stress tolerance using marker-assisted selection.

  3. Candidate genes and molecular markers associated with heat tolerance in colonial Bentgrass

    PubMed Central

    Jespersen, David; Belanger, Faith C.; Huang, Bingru

    2017-01-01

    Elevated temperature is a major abiotic stress limiting the growth of cool-season grasses during the summer months. The objectives of this study were to determine the genetic variation in the expression patterns of selected genes involved in several major metabolic pathways regulating heat tolerance for two genotypes contrasting in heat tolerance to confirm their status as potential candidate genes, and to identify PCR-based markers associated with candidate genes related to heat tolerance in a colonial (Agrostis capillaris L.) x creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera L.) hybrid backcross population. Plants were subjected to heat stress in controlled-environmental growth chambers for phenotypic evaluation and determination of genetic variation in candidate gene expression. Molecular markers were developed for genes involved in protein degradation (cysteine protease), antioxidant defense (catalase and glutathione-S-transferase), energy metabolism (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase), cell expansion (expansin), and stress protection (heat shock proteins HSP26, HSP70, and HSP101). Kruskal-Wallis analysis, a commonly used non-parametric test used to compare population individuals with or without the gene marker, found the physiological traits of chlorophyll content, electrolyte leakage, normalized difference vegetative index, and turf quality were associated with all candidate gene markers with the exception of HSP101. Differential gene expression was frequently found for the tested candidate genes. The development of candidate gene markers for important heat tolerance genes may allow for the development of new cultivars with increased abiotic stress tolerance using marker-assisted selection. PMID:28187136

  4. Novel Gene and Network Associations Found for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Using Case-Control and Family-Based Studies in Multiethnic Populations.

    PubMed

    Nakka, Priyanka; Archer, Natalie P; Xu, Heng; Lupo, Philip J; Raphael, Benjamin J; Yang, Jun J; Ramachandran, Sohini

    2017-10-01

    Background: Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common childhood cancer, suggesting that germline variants influence ALL risk. Although multiple genome-wide association (GWA) studies have identified variants predisposing children to ALL, it remains unclear whether genetic heterogeneity affects ALL susceptibility and how interactions within and among genes containing ALL-associated variants influence ALL risk.Methods: Here, we jointly analyzed two published datasets of case-control GWA summary statistics along with germline data from ALL case-parent trios. We used the gene-level association method PEGASUS to identify genes with multiple variants associated with ALL. We then used PEGASUS gene scores as input to the network analysis algorithm HotNet2 to characterize the genomic architecture of ALL.Results: Using PEGASUS, we confirmed associations previously observed at genes such as ARID5B, IKZF1, CDKN2A/2B, and PIP4K2A, and we identified novel candidate gene associations. Using HotNet2, we uncovered significant gene subnetworks that may underlie inherited ALL risk: a subnetwork involved in B-cell differentiation containing the ALL-associated gene CEBPE, and a subnetwork of homeobox genes, including MEIS1Conclusions: Gene and network analysis uncovered loci associated with ALL that are missed by GWA studies, such as MEIS1 Furthermore, ALL-associated loci do not appear to interact directly with each other to influence ALL risk, and instead appear to influence leukemogenesis through multiple, complex pathways.Impact: We present a new pipeline for post hoc analysis of association studies that yields new insight into the etiology of ALL and can be applied in future studies to shed light on the genomic underpinnings of cancer. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(10); 1531-9. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  5. Identification of candidate genes for drought tolerance by whole-genome resequencing in maize

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Drought stress is one of the major limiting factors for maize production. With the availability of maize B73 reference genome and whole-genome resequencing of 15 maize inbreds, common variants (CV) and clustering analyses were applied to identify non-synonymous SNPs (nsSNPs) and corresponding candidate genes for drought tolerance. Results A total of 524 nsSNPs that were associated with 271 candidate genes involved in plant hormone regulation, carbohydrate and sugar metabolism, signaling molecules regulation, redox reaction and acclimation of photosynthesis to environment were detected by CV and cluster analyses. Most of the nsSNPs identified were clustered in bin 1.07 region that harbored six previously reported QTL with relatively high phenotypic variation explained for drought tolerance. Genes Ontology (GO) analysis of candidate genes revealed that there were 35 GO terms related to biotic stimulus and membrane-bounded organelle, showing significant differences between the candidate genes and the reference B73 background. Changes of expression level in these candidate genes for drought tolerance were detected using RNA sequencing for fertilized ovary, basal leaf meristem tissue and roots collected under drought stressed and well-watered conditions. The results indicated that 70% of candidate genes showed significantly expression changes under two water treatments and our strategies for mining candidate genes are feasible and relatively efficient. Conclusions Our results successfully revealed candidate nsSNPs and associated genes for drought tolerance by comparative sequence analysis of 16 maize inbred lines. Both methods we applied were proved to be efficient for identifying candidate genes for complex traits through the next-generation sequencing technologies (NGS). These selected genes will not only facilitate understanding of genetic basis of drought stress response, but also accelerate genetic improvement through marker-assisted selection in maize

  6. Using Association Mapping in Teosinte to Investigate the Function of Maize Selection-Candidate Genes

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Allison L.; Zhao, Qiong; McMullen, Michael D.; Doebley, John F.

    2009-01-01

    Background Large-scale screens of the maize genome identified 48 genes that show the putative signature of artificial selection during maize domestication or improvement. These selection-candidate genes may act as quantitative trait loci (QTL) that control the phenotypic differences between maize and its progenitor, teosinte. The selection-candidate genes appear to be located closer in the genome to domestication QTL than expected by chance. Methods and Findings As a step toward defining the traits controlled by these genes, we performed phenotype-genotype association mapping in teosinte for 32 of the 48 plus three other selection-candidate genes. Our analyses assayed 32 phenotypic traits, many of which were altered during maize domestication or improvement. We observed several significant associations between SNPs in the selection-candidate genes and trait variation in teosinte. These included two associations that surpassed the Bonferroni correction and five instances where a gene significantly associated with the same trait in both of our association mapping panels. Despite these significant associations, when compared as a group the selection-candidate genes performed no better than randomly chosen genes. Conclusions Our results suggest association analyses can be helpful for identifying traits under the control of selection-candidate genes. Indeed, we present evidence for new functions for several selection-candidate genes. However, with the current set of selection-candidate genes and our association mapping strategy, we found very few significant associations overall and no more than we would have found with randomly chosen genes. We discuss possible reasons that a large number of significant genotype-phenotype associations were not discovered. PMID:20011044

  7. Genes associated with genotype-specific DNA methylation in squamous cell carcinoma as candidate drug targets

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Aberrant DNA methylation is often associated with cancers. Thus, screening genes with cancer-associated aberrant DNA methylation is a useful method to identify candidate cancer-causing genes. Aberrant DNA methylation is also genotype dependent. Thus, the selection of genes with genotype-specific aberrant DNA methylation in cancers is potentially important for tailor-made medicine. The selected genes are important candidate drug targets. Results The recently proposed principal component analysis based selection of genes with aberrant DNA methylation was applied to genotype and DNA methylation patterns in squamous cell carcinoma measured using single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays. SNPs that are frequently found in cancers are usually highly methylated, and the genes that were selected using this method were reported previously to be related to cancers. Thus, genes with genotype-specific DNA methylation patterns will be good therapeutic candidates. The tertiary structures of the proteins encoded by the selected genes were successfully inferred using two profile-based protein structure servers, FAMS and Phyre2. Candidate drugs for three of these proteins, tyrosine kinase receptor (ALK), EGLN3 protein, and NUAK family SNF1-like kinase 1 (NUAK1), were identified by ChooseLD. Conclusions We detected genes with genotype-specific DNA methylation in squamous cell carcinoma that are candidate drug targets. Using in silico drug discovery, we successfully identified several candidate drugs for the ALK, EGLN3 and NUAK1 genes that displayed genotype-specific DNA methylation. PMID:24565165

  8. Search for sarcoidosis candidate genes by integration of data from genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic studies.

    PubMed

    Maver, Ales; Medica, Igor; Peterlin, Borut

    2009-12-01

    The search for gene candidates in multifactorial diseases such as sarcoidosis can be based on the integration of linkage association data, gene expression data, and protein profile data from genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic studies, respectively. In this study we performed a literature-based search for studies reporting such data, followed by integration of collected information. Different databases were examined--Medline, HugGE Navigator, ArrayExpress and Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO). Candidate genes were defined as genes which were reported in at least 2 different types of omics studies. Genes previously investigated in sarcoidosis were excluded from further analyses. We identified 177 genes associated with sarcoidosis as potential new candidate genes. Subsequently, 9 gene candidates identified to overlap in 2 different types of studies (genomic, transcriptomic and/or proteomic) were consistently reported in at least 3 studies: SERPINB1, FABP4, S100A8, HBEGF, IL7R, LRIG1, PTPN23, DPM2 and NUP214. These genes are involved in regulation of immune response, cellular proliferation, apoptosis, inhibition of protease activity, lipid metabolism. Exact biological functions of HBEGF, LRIG1, PTPN23, DPM2 and NUP214 remain to be completely elucidated. We propose 9 candidate genes: SERPINB1, FABP4, S100A8, HBEGF, IL7R, LRIG1, PTPN23, DPM2 and NUP214, as genes with high potential for association with sarcoidosis.

  9. Exclusion of the PAX2 gene as a candidate gene for Crouzon craniofacial dysostosis

    SciTech Connect

    Preston, R.A.; Gorry, M.C.; Warman, M.

    1994-09-01

    Crouzon craniofacial dysostosis (CFD, MIM 123500) is an abnormality of craniofacial development characterized by premature craniosynostosis, maxillary hypoplasia, and shallow orbits. We have mapped the CFD gene locus using a candidate gene approach to a 7 centiMorgan region on chromosome 10q in three CFD families. A maximal multipoint LOD score of 12.33 was achieved for a locus 2 cM distal to the microsatellite marker D10S209. A comparison of several physical, cytogenetic, and linkage maps revealed that the cytogenetic bands, 10q25-q26, most likely contain this CFD locus. The PAX2 gene, which has been mapped near another marker which in turn has been mapped to 10q25, was analyzed as a candidate gene. PAX2 was chosen for analysis because mutations in other members of the PAX gene family have been identified with human craniofacial abnormalities (e.g. Waardenburg syndrome). A YAC contig, consisting of 5 overlapping groups and composed of 11 YACs that spans the entire 7 cM region, was assembled for PAX2 analyses. None of these YACs supported PAX2-specific amplification using primer sets for both the second and third PAX2 exons. Control amplifications for YAC vector sequences produced robust amplifications in all cases. In addition, SSCP analyses of amplification products generated from the second and third PAX2 exons and the 3{prime} untranslated region of the PAX2 gene from both affected and unaffected family members in two of the kindreds failed to reveal any polymorphisms. Although it remains theoretically possible, due to artifacts in the YAC contigs, it is unlikely that PAX2 is the CFD gene.

  10. High throughput in vivo functional validation of candidate congenital heart disease genes in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jun-Yi; Fu, Yulong; Nettleton, Margaret; Richman, Adam; Han, Zhe

    2017-01-20

    Genomic sequencing has implicated large numbers of genes and de novo mutations as potential disease risk factors. A high throughput in vivo model system is needed to validate gene associations with pathology. We developed a Drosophila-based functional system to screen candidate disease genes identified from Congenital Heart Disease (CHD) patients. 134 genes were tested in the Drosophila heart using RNAi-based gene silencing. Quantitative analyses of multiple cardiac phenotypes demonstrated essential structural, functional, and developmental roles for more than 70 genes, including a subgroup encoding histone H3K4 modifying proteins. We also demonstrated the use of Drosophila to evaluate cardiac phenotypes resulting from specific, patient-derived alleles of candidate disease genes. We describe the first high throughput in vivo validation system to screen candidate disease genes identified from patients. This approach has the potential to facilitate development of precision medicine approaches for CHD and other diseases associated with genetic factors.

  11. Robust and Comprehensive Analysis of 20 Osteoporosis Candidate Genes by Very High-Density Single-Nucleotide Polymorphism Screen Among 405 White Nuclear Families Identified Significant Association and Gene–Gene Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Dong-Hai; Shen, Hui; Zhao, Lan-Juan; Xiao, Peng; Yang, Tie-Lin; Guo, Yan; Wang, Wei; Guo, Yan-Fang; Liu, Yong-Jun; Recker, Robert R; Deng, Hong-Wen

    2007-01-01

    Many “novel” osteoporosis candidate genes have been proposed in recent years. To advance our knowledge of their roles in osteoporosis, we screened 20 such genes using a set of high-density SNPs in a large family-based study. Our efforts led to the prioritization of those osteoporosis genes and the detection of gene–gene interactions. Introduction We performed large-scale family-based association analyses of 20 novel osteoporosis candidate genes using 277 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for the quantitative trait BMD variation and the qualitative trait osteoporosis (OP) at three clinically important skeletal sites: spine, hip, and ultradistal radius (UD). Materials and Methods One thousand eight hundred seventy-three subjects from 405 white nuclear families were genotyped and analyzed with an average density of one SNP per 4 kb across the 20 genes. We conducted association analyses by SNP- and haplotype-based family-based association test (FBAT) and performed gene–gene interaction analyses using multianalytic approaches such as multifactor-dimensionality reduction (MDR) and conditional logistic regression. Results and Conclusions We detected four genes (DBP, LRP5, CYP17, and RANK) that showed highly suggestive associations (10,000-permutation derived empirical global p ≤ 0.01) with spine BMD/OP; four genes (CYP19, RANK, RANKL, and CYP17) highly suggestive for hip BMD/OP; and four genes (CYP19, BMP2, RANK, and TNFR2) highly suggestive for UD BMD/OP. The associations between BMP2 with UD BMD and those between RANK with OP at the spine, hip, and UD also met the experiment-wide stringent criterion (empirical global p ≤ 0.0007). Sex-stratified analyses further showed that some of the significant associations in the total sample were driven by either male or female subjects. In addition, we identified and validated a two-locus gene–gene interaction model involving GCR and ESR2, for which prior biological evidence exists. Our results suggested the

  12. Gene expression analysis of endometrium reveals progesterone resistance and candidate susceptibility genes in women with endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Burney, Richard O; Talbi, Said; Hamilton, Amy E; Vo, Kim Chi; Nyegaard, Mette; Nezhat, Camran R; Lessey, Bruce A; Giudice, Linda C

    2007-08-01

    The identification of molecular differences in the endometrium of women with endometriosis is an important step toward understanding the pathogenesis of this condition and toward developing novel strategies for the treatment of associated infertility and pain. In this study, we conducted global gene expression analysis of endometrium from women with and without moderate/severe stage endometriosis and compared the gene expression signatures across various phases of the menstrual cycle. The transcriptome analysis revealed molecular dysregulation of the proliferative-to-secretory transition in endometrium of women with endometriosis. Paralleled gene expression analysis of endometrial specimens obtained during the early secretory phase demonstrated a signature of enhanced cellular survival and persistent expression of genes involved in DNA synthesis and cellular mitosis in the setting of endometriosis. Comparative gene expression analysis of progesterone-regulated genes in secretory phase endometrium confirmed the observation of attenuated progesterone response. Additionally, interesting candidate susceptibility genes were identified that may be associated with this disorder, including FOXO1A, MIG6, and CYP26A1. Collectively these findings provide a framework for further investigations on causality and mechanisms underlying attenuated progesterone response in endometrium of women with endometriosis.

  13. Utilizing Gene Tree Variation to Identify Candidate Effector Genes in Zymoseptoria tritici.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Megan C; McGinness, Lachlan; Hane, James K; Williams, Angela H; Milgate, Andrew; Solomon, Peter S

    2016-04-07

    Zymoseptoria tritici is a host-specific, necrotrophic pathogen of wheat. Infection by Z. tritici is characterized by its extended latent period, which typically lasts 2 wks, and is followed by extensive host cell death, and rapid proliferation of fungal biomass. This work characterizes the level of genomic variation in 13 isolates, for which we have measured virulence on 11 wheat cultivars with differential resistance genes. Between the reference isolate, IPO323, and the 13 Australian isolates we identified over 800,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms, of which ∼10% had an effect on the coding regions of the genome. Furthermore, we identified over 1700 probable presence/absence polymorphisms in genes across the Australian isolates using de novo assembly. Finally, we developed a gene tree sorting method that quickly identifies groups of isolates within a single gene alignment whose sequence haplotypes correspond with virulence scores on a single wheat cultivar. Using this method, we have identified < 100 candidate effector genes whose gene sequence correlates with virulence toward a wheat cultivar carrying a major resistance gene.

  14. A small number of candidate gene SNPs reveal continental ancestry in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    KODAMAN, NURI; ALDRICH, MELINDA C.; SMITH, JEFFREY R.; SIGNORELLO, LISA B.; BRADLEY, KEVIN; BREYER, JOAN; COHEN, SARAH S.; LONG, JIRONG; CAI, QIUYIN; GILES, JUSTIN; BUSH, WILLIAM S.; BLOT, WILLIAM J.; MATTHEWS, CHARLES E.; WILLIAMS, SCOTT M.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Using genetic data from an obesity candidate gene study of self-reported African Americans and European Americans, we investigated the number of Ancestry Informative Markers (AIMs) and candidate gene SNPs necessary to infer continental ancestry. Proportions of African and European ancestry were assessed with STRUCTURE (K=2), using 276 AIMs. These reference values were compared to estimates derived using 120, 60, 30, and 15 SNP subsets randomly chosen from the 276 AIMs and from 1144 SNPs in 44 candidate genes. All subsets generated estimates of ancestry consistent with the reference estimates, with mean correlations greater than 0.99 for all subsets of AIMs, and mean correlations of 0.99±0.003; 0.98± 0.01; 0.93±0.03; and 0.81± 0.11 for subsets of 120, 60, 30, and 15 candidate gene SNPs, respectively. Among African Americans, the median absolute difference from reference African ancestry values ranged from 0.01 to 0.03 for the four AIMs subsets and from 0.03 to 0.09 for the four candidate gene SNP subsets. Furthermore, YRI/CEU Fst values provided a metric to predict the performance of candidate gene SNPs. Our results demonstrate that a small number of SNPs randomly selected from candidate genes can be used to estimate admixture proportions in African Americans reliably. PMID:23278390

  15. A small number of candidate gene SNPs reveal continental ancestry in African Americans.

    PubMed

    Kodaman, Nuri; Aldrich, Melinda C; Smith, Jeffrey R; Signorello, Lisa B; Bradley, Kevin; Breyer, Joan; Cohen, Sarah S; Long, Jirong; Cai, Qiuyin; Giles, Justin; Bush, William S; Blot, William J; Matthews, Charles E; Williams, Scott M

    2013-01-01

    Using genetic data from an obesity candidate gene study of self-reported African Americans and European Americans, we investigated the number of Ancestry Informative Markers (AIMs) and candidate gene SNPs necessary to infer continental ancestry. Proportions of African and European ancestry were assessed with STRUCTURE (K = 2), using 276 AIMs. These reference values were compared to estimates derived using 120, 60, 30, and 15 SNP subsets randomly chosen from the 276 AIMs and from 1144 SNPs in 44 candidate genes. All subsets generated estimates of ancestry consistent with the reference estimates, with mean correlations greater than 0.99 for all subsets of AIMs, and mean correlations of 0.99 ± 0.003; 0.98 ± 0.01; 0.93 ± 0.03; and 0.81 ± 0.11 for subsets of 120, 60, 30, and 15 candidate gene SNPs, respectively. Among African Americans, the median absolute difference from reference African ancestry values ranged from 0.01 to 0.03 for the four AIMs subsets and from 0.03 to 0.09 for the four candidate gene SNP subsets. Furthermore, YRI/CEU Fst values provided a metric to predict the performance of candidate gene SNPs. Our results demonstrate that a small number of SNPs randomly selected from candidate genes can be used to estimate admixture proportions in African Americans reliably. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/University College London.

  16. Mapping of Candidate Genes Involved in Bud Dormancy and Flowering Time in Sweet Cherry (Prunus avium).

    PubMed

    Castède, Sophie; Campoy, José Antonio; Le Dantec, Loïck; Quero-García, José; Barreneche, Teresa; Wenden, Bénédicte; Dirlewanger, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    The timing of flowering in perennial plants is crucial for their survival in temperate climates and is regulated by the duration of bud dormancy. Bud dormancy release and bud break depend on the perception of cumulative chilling during endodormancy and heat during the bud development. The objectives of this work were to identify candidate genes involved in dormancy and flowering processes in sweet cherry, their mapping in two mapping progenies 'Regina' × 'Garnet' and 'Regina' × 'Lapins', and to select those candidate genes which co-localized with quantitative trait loci (QTLs) associated with temperature requirements for bud dormancy release and flowering. Based on available data on flowering processes in various species, a list of 79 candidate genes was established. The peach and sweet cherry orthologs were identified and primers were designed to amplify sweet cherry candidate gene fragments. Based on the amplified sequences of the three parents of the mapping progenies, SNPs segregations in the progenies were identified. Thirty five candidate genes were genetically mapped in at least one of the two progenies and all were in silico mapped. Co-localization between candidate genes and QTLs associated with temperature requirements and flowering date were identified for the first time in sweet cherry. The allelic composition of the candidate genes located in the major QTL for heat requirements and flowering date located on linkage group 4 have a significant effect on these two traits indicating their potential use for breeding programs in sweet cherry to select new varieties adapted to putative future climatic conditions.

  17. Gene expression profiling of lobular carcinoma in situ reveals candidate precursor genes for invasion.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Victor P; Morrogh, Mary; Qin, Li-Xuan; Olvera, Narciso; Giri, Dilip; Muhsen, Shirin; Sakr, Rita A; Schizas, Michail; Ng, Charlotte K Y; Arroyo, Crispinita D; Brogi, Edi; Viale, Agnes; Morrow, Monica; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; King, Tari A

    2015-04-01

    Lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) is both a risk indicator and non-obligate precursor of invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC). We sought to characterize the transcriptomic features of LCIS and ILC, with a focus on the identification of intrinsic molecular subtypes of LCIS and the changes involved in the progression from normal breast epithelium to LCIS and ILC. Fresh-frozen classic LCIS, classic ILC, and normal breast epithelium (N) from women undergoing prophylactic or therapeutic mastectomy were prospectively collected, laser-capture microdissected, and subjected to gene expression profiling using Affymetrix HG-U133A 2.0 microarrays. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of 40 LCIS samples identified 2 clusters of LCIS distinguished by 6431 probe sets (p < 0.001). Genes identifying the clusters included proliferation genes and other genes related to cancer canonical pathways such as TGF beta signaling, p53 signaling, actin cytoskeleton, apoptosis and Wnt-Signaling pathway. A supervised analysis to identify differentially expressed genes (p < 0.001) between normal epithelium, LCIS, and ILC, using 23 patient-matched triplets of N, LCIS, and ILC, identified 169 candidate precursor genes, which likely play a role in LCIS progression, including PIK3R1, GOLM1, and GPR137B. These potential precursor genes map significantly more frequently to 1q and 16q, regions frequently targeted by gene copy number alterations in LCIS and ILC. Here we demonstrate that classic LCIS is a heterogeneous disease at the transcriptomic level and identify potential precursor genes in lobular carcinogenesis. Understanding the molecular heterogeneity of LCIS and the potential role of these potential precursor genes may help personalize the therapy of patients with LCIS. Copyright © 2014 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. A novel candidate disease genes prioritization method based on module partition and rank fusion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xing; Yan, Gui-Ying; Liao, Xiao-Ping

    2010-08-01

    Identifying disease genes is very important not only for better understanding of gene function and biological process but also for human medical improvement. Many computational methods have been proposed based on the similarity between all known disease genes (seed genes) and candidate genes in the entire gene interaction network. Under the hypothesis that potential disease-related genes should be near the seed genes in the network and only the seed genes that are located in the same module with the candidate genes will contribute to disease genes prediction, three modularized candidate disease gene prioritization algorithms (MCDGPAs) are proposed to identify disease-related genes. MCDGPA is divided into three steps: module partition, genes prioritization in each disease-associated module, and rank fusion for the global ranking. When applied to the prostate cancer and breast cancer network, MCDGPA significantly improves previous algorithms in terms of cross-validation and disease-related genes prediction. In addition, the improvement is robust to the selection of gene prioritization methods when implementing prioritization in each disease-associated module and module partition algorithms when implementing network partition. In this sense MCDGPA is a general framework that allows integrating many previous gene prioritization methods and improving predictive accuracy.

  19. Database of cattle candidate genes and genetic markers for milk production and mastitis

    PubMed Central

    Ogorevc, J; Kunej, T; Razpet, A; Dovc, P

    2009-01-01

    A cattle database of candidate genes and genetic markers for milk production and mastitis has been developed to provide an integrated research tool incorporating different types of information supporting a genomic approach to study lactation, udder development and health. The database contains 943 genes and genetic markers involved in mammary gland development and function, representing candidates for further functional studies. The candidate loci were drawn on a genetic map to reveal positional overlaps. For identification of candidate loci, data from seven different research approaches were exploited: (i) gene knockouts or transgenes in mice that result in specific phenotypes associated with mammary gland (143 loci); (ii) cattle QTL for milk production (344) and mastitis related traits (71); (iii) loci with sequence variations that show specific allele-phenotype interactions associated with milk production (24) or mastitis (10) in cattle; (iv) genes with expression profiles associated with milk production (207) or mastitis (107) in cattle or mouse; (v) cattle milk protein genes that exist in different genetic variants (9); (vi) miRNAs expressed in bovine mammary gland (32) and (vii) epigenetically regulated cattle genes associated with mammary gland function (1). Fourty-four genes found by multiple independent analyses were suggested as the most promising candidates and were further in silico analysed for expression levels in lactating mammary gland, genetic variability and top biological functions in functional networks. A miRNA target search for mammary gland expressed miRNAs identified 359 putative binding sites in 3′UTRs of candidate genes. PMID:19508288

  20. Degrees of separation as a statistical tool for evaluating candidate genes.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Ronald M; Pettersson, Mats E

    2014-12-01

    Selection of candidate genes is an important step in the exploration of complex genetic architecture. The number of gene networks available is increasing and these can provide information to help with candidate gene selection. It is currently common to use the degree of connectedness in gene networks as validation in Genome Wide Association (GWA) and Quantitative Trait Locus (QTL) mapping studies. However, it can cause misleading results if not validated properly. Here we present a method and tool for validating the gene pairs from GWA studies given the context of the network they co-occur in. It ensures that proposed interactions and gene associations are not statistical artefacts inherent to the specific gene network architecture. The CandidateBacon package provides an easy and efficient method to calculate the average degree of separation (DoS) between pairs of genes to currently available gene networks. We show how these empirical estimates of average connectedness are used to validate candidate gene pairs. Validation of interacting genes by comparing their connectedness with the average connectedness in the gene network will provide support for said interactions by utilising the growing amount of gene network information available. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Prediction of Candidate Primary Immunodeficiency Disease Genes Using a Support Vector Machine Learning Approach

    PubMed Central

    Keerthikumar, Shivakumar; Bhadra, Sahely; Kandasamy, Kumaran; Raju, Rajesh; Ramachandra, Y.L.; Bhattacharyya, Chiranjib; Imai, Kohsuke; Ohara, Osamu; Mohan, Sujatha; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2009-01-01

    Screening and early identification of primary immunodeficiency disease (PID) genes is a major challenge for physicians. Many resources have catalogued molecular alterations in known PID genes along with their associated clinical and immunological phenotypes. However, these resources do not assist in identifying candidate PID genes. We have recently developed a platform designated Resource of Asian PDIs, which hosts information pertaining to molecular alterations, protein–protein interaction networks, mouse studies and microarray gene expression profiling of all known PID genes. Using this resource as a discovery tool, we describe the development of an algorithm for prediction of candidate PID genes. Using a support vector machine learning approach, we have predicted 1442 candidate PID genes using 69 binary features of 148 known PID genes and 3162 non-PID genes as a training data set. The power of this approach is illustrated by the fact that six of the predicted genes have recently been experimentally confirmed to be PID genes. The remaining genes in this predicted data set represent attractive candidates for testing in patients where the etiology cannot be ascribed to any of the known PID genes. PMID:19801557

  2. Identification of Candidate B-Lymphoma Genes by Cross-Species Gene Expression Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Tompkins, Van S.; Han, Seong-Su; Olivier, Alicia; Syrbu, Sergei; Bair, Thomas; Button, Anna; Jacobus, Laura; Wang, Zebin; Lifton, Samuel; Raychaudhuri, Pradip; Morse, Herbert C.; Weiner, George; Link, Brian; Smith, Brian J.; Janz, Siegfried

    2013-01-01

    Comparative genome-wide expression profiling of malignant tumor counterparts across the human-mouse species barrier has a successful track record as a gene discovery tool in liver, breast, lung, prostate and other cancers, but has been largely neglected in studies on neoplasms of mature B-lymphocytes such as diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and Burkitt lymphoma (BL). We used global gene expression profiles of DLBCL-like tumors that arose spontaneously in Myc-transgenic C57BL/6 mice as a phylogenetically conserved filter for analyzing the human DLBCL transcriptome. The human and mouse lymphomas were found to have 60 concordantly deregulated genes in common, including 8 genes that Cox hazard regression analysis associated with overall survival in a published landmark dataset of DLBCL. Genetic network analysis of the 60 genes followed by biological validation studies indicate FOXM1 as a candidate DLBCL and BL gene, supporting a number of studies contending that FOXM1 is a therapeutic target in mature B cell tumors. Our findings demonstrate the value of the “mouse filter” for genomic studies of human B-lineage neoplasms for which a vast knowledge base already exists. PMID:24130802

  3. Localization of a new autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa gene on chromosome 17p screeningof candidate genes

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, J.; Goliath, R.; Shugart, Y.Y.

    1994-09-01

    A new gene locus for autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (ADRP) on 17p has been identified in a large South African (SA) family consisting of 28 living affected individuals in 4 successive generations. This is the first ADRP gene to be reported from SA. The human recoverin (RCVN) gene, which codes for a retinal-specific protein important in recovery to the dark state after visual excitation, has been mapped to 17p13.1 and was considered as a prime candidate gene for the disorder in this family. Mutation screening (using 8 different electrophoretic conditions to resolve heteroduplexes and SSCPs) did not produce any evidence of RCVN being involved in the pathogenesis of ADRP in this SA family. In addition, a mobility shift detected within exon 1 of the RCVN gene did not track with the ADRP phenotype. RP patients from 77 SA families and 30 normal individuals are being examined to establish the frequency of this polymorphism in the SA population. Highly polymorphic markers from 17p13 are now being sought in order to establish the minimum region containing this novel ADRP-SA gene. Two additional recently described retinal-expressed cDNAs, guanylyl cyclase and pigment epithelium-derived factor, which map to 17p13.1, will be tested for tight linkage to ADRP-SA.

  4. Identification of oral cancer related candidate genes by integrating protein-protein interactions, gene ontology, pathway analysis and immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ravindra; Samal, Sabindra K; Routray, Samapika; Dash, Rupesh; Dixit, Anshuman

    2017-05-30

    In the recent years, bioinformatics methods have been reported with a high degree of success for candidate gene identification. In this milieu, we have used an integrated bioinformatics approach assimilating information from gene ontologies (GO), protein-protein interaction (PPI) and network analysis to predict candidate genes related to oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). A total of 40973 PPIs were considered for 4704 cancer-related genes to construct human cancer gene network (HCGN). The importance of each node was measured in HCGN by ten different centrality measures. We have shown that the top ranking genes are related to a significantly higher number of diseases as compared to other genes in HCGN. A total of 39 candidate oral cancer target genes were predicted by combining top ranked genes and the genes corresponding to significantly enriched oral cancer related GO terms. Initial verification using literature and available experimental data indicated that 29 genes were related with OSCC. A detailed pathway analysis led us to propose a role for the selected candidate genes in the invasion and metastasis in OSCC. We further validated our predictions using immunohistochemistry (IHC) and found that the gene FLNA was upregulated while the genes ARRB1 and HTT were downregulated in the OSCC tissue samples.

  5. Evolution of Disease Response Genes in Loblolly Pine: Insights from Candidate Genes

    PubMed Central

    González-Martínez, Santiago C.; Langley, Charles H.; Neale, David B.

    2010-01-01

    Background Host-pathogen interactions that may lead to a competitive co-evolution of virulence and resistance mechanisms present an attractive system to study molecular evolution because strong, recent (or even current) selective pressure is expected at many genomic loci. However, it is unclear whether these selective forces would act to preserve existing diversity, promote novel diversity, or reduce linked neutral diversity during rapid fixation of advantageous alleles. In plants, the lack of adaptive immunity places a larger burden on genetic diversity to ensure survival of plant populations. This burden is even greater if the generation time of the plant is much longer than the generation time of the pathogen. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we present nucleotide polymorphism and substitution data for 41 candidate genes from the long-lived forest tree loblolly pine, selected primarily for their prospective influences on host-pathogen interactions. This dataset is analyzed together with 15 drought-tolerance and 13 wood-quality genes from previous studies. A wide range of neutrality tests were performed and tested against expectations from realistic demographic models. Conclusions/Significance Collectively, our analyses found that axr (auxin response factor), caf1 (chromatin assembly factor) and gatabp1 (gata binding protein 1) candidate genes carry patterns consistent with directional selection and erd3 (early response to drought 3) displays patterns suggestive of a selective sweep, both of which are consistent with the arm-race model of disease response evolution. Furthermore, we have identified patterns consistent with diversifying selection at erf1-like (ethylene responsive factor 1), ccoaoemt (caffeoyl-CoA-O-methyltransferase), cyp450-like (cytochrome p450-like) and pr4.3 (pathogen response 4.3), expected under the trench-warfare evolution model. Finally, a drought-tolerance candidate related to the plant cell wall, lp5, displayed patterns consistent

  6. Fine Mapping and Candidate Gene Analysis of the Tiller Suppression Gene ts1 in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lei; Meng, Fen; He, Yonggang; Zhu, Menghao; Shen, Yanhao; Zhang, Zhihong

    2017-01-01

    Tiller number is one of the key factors that influences rice plant type and yield components. In this study, an EMS-induced rice tiller suppression mutant ts1 was characterized. Morphological and histological observations revealed that, in the ts1 plants, the tiller buds were abnormally formed and therefore cannot outgrow into tillers. With an F2 population derived from a cross between ts1 and an indica cultivar Wushansimiao, a major gene, tiller suppression 1 (ts1) was fine-mapped to a 108.5 kb genomic region between markers ID8378 and SSR6884 on the short arm of rice chromosome 2. Candidate gene analysis identified nineteen putative genes. Among them, ORF4 (LOC_Os02g01610) is a PPR gene which harbored a point mutation c.+733/C→T in ts1 mutant plants. A co-dominant SNP marker cd-733C/T was subsequently developed and the SNP assay demonstrated that the point mutation co-segregated with tiller suppression phenotype. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that the expression level of ORF4 in ts1 plants was significantly lower than that in their wild plants, and the expression of rice tillering regulators MOC1 and HTD1 was also significantly decreased in ts1 plants. Our data indicated that ORF4 was a strong candidate gene for ts1 and ts1 might play a role in regulating rice tillering through MOC1 and HTD1 associated pathway. The results above provide a basis for further functional characterization of ts1 and will shed light on molecular mechanism of rice tillering. The informative SNP marker cd-733C/T will facilitate marker-assisted selection of ts1 in rice plant type breeding. PMID:28107441

  7. Genetic mapping of thirteen drought tolerance candidate genes in wheat (T. aestivum)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Drought is a severe abiotic stress that affects wheat production worldwide. In order to identify candidate genes for tolerance to water stress in wheat, sequences of 11 genes that have function of drought tolerance in other plant species were used to identify the wheat ortholog genes via homology se...

  8. Rare CNVs in Suicide Attempt include Schizophrenia-Associated Loci and Neurodevelopmental Genes: A Pilot Genome-Wide and Family-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Wasserman, Jerzy; Wasserman, Danuta

    2016-01-01

    Suicidal behavior (SB) has a complex etiology involving genes and environment. One of the genetic components in SB could be copy number variations (CNVs), as CNVs are implicated in neurodevelopmental disorders. However, a recently published genome-wide and case-control study did not observe any significant role of CNVs in SB. Here we complemented these initial observations by instead using a family-based trio-sample that is robust to control biases, having severe suicide attempt (SA) in offspring as main outcome (n = 660 trios). We first tested for CNV associations on the genome-wide Illumina 1M SNP-array by using FBAT-CNV methodology, which allows for evaluating CNVs without reliance on CNV calling algorithms, analogous to a common SNP-based GWAS. We observed association of certain T-cell receptor markers, but this likely reflected inter-individual variation in somatic rearrangements rather than association with SA outcome. Next, we used the PennCNV software to call 385 putative rare (<1%) and large (>100 kb) CNVs, observed in n = 225 SA offspring. Nine SA offspring had rare CNV calls in a set of previously schizophrenia-associated loci, indicating the importance of such CNVs in certain SA subjects. Several additional, very large (>1MB) sized CNV calls in 15 other SA offspring also spanned pathogenic regions or other neural genes of interest. Overall, 45 SA had CNVs enriched for 65 medically relevant genes previously shown to be affected by CNVs, which were characterized by a neurodevelopmental biology. A neurodevelopmental implication was partly congruent with our previous SNP-based GWAS, but follow-up analysis here indicated that carriers of rare CNVs had a decreased burden of common SNP risk-alleles compared to non-carriers. In conclusion, while CNVs did not show genome-wide association by the FBAT-CNV methodology, our preliminary observations indicate rare pathogenic CNVs affecting neurodevelopmental functions in a subset of SA, who were distinct from SA

  9. Looking into flowering time in almond (Prunus dulcis (Mill) D. A. Webb): the candidate gene approach.

    PubMed

    Silva, C; Garcia-Mas, J; Sánchez, A M; Arús, P; Oliveira, M M

    2005-03-01

    Blooming time is one of the most important agronomic traits in almond. Biochemical and molecular events underlying flowering regulation must be understood before methods to stimulate late flowering can be developed. Attempts to elucidate the genetic control of this process have led to the identification of a major gene (Lb) and quantitative trait loci (QTLs) linked to observed phenotypic differences, but although this gene and these QTLs have been placed on the Prunus reference genetic map, their sequences and specific functions remain unknown. The aim of our investigation was to associate these loci with known genes using a candidate gene approach. Two almond cDNAs and eight Prunus expressed sequence tags were selected as candidate genes (CGs) since their sequences were highly identical to those of flowering regulatory genes characterized in other species. The CGs were amplified from both parental lines of the mapping population using specific primers. Sequence comparison revealed DNA polymorphisms between the parental lines, mainly of the single nucleotide type. Polymorphisms were used to develop co-dominant cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence markers or length polymorphisms based on insertion/deletion events for mapping the candidate genes on the Prunus reference map. Ten candidate genes were assigned to six linkage groups in the Prunus genome. The positions of two of these were compatible with the regions where two QTLs for blooming time were detected. One additional candidate was localized close to the position of the Evergrowing gene, which determines a non-deciduous behaviour in peach.

  10. The HLA-B gene and Hashimoto disease in Han Chinese children: a case-control and family-based study.

    PubMed

    Huang, C-Y; Chang, T-Y; Chu, C-C; Lo, F-S; Ting, W-H; Lin, C-H; Wu, Y-L; Chu, S-Y; Chang, S-C; Chen, W-F; Lin, C-L; Lin, W-S; Lee, Y-J

    2012-11-01

    Hashimoto disease (HD) is an autoimmune thyroid disease resulting from complex interactions between genetic and environmental factors. The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) gene has been established to be involved in the susceptibility to HD. We aim to investigate the associations between HLA-B alleles and Han Chinese children with HD by both case-control and family-based studies. A total of 108 unrelated children with HD, 380 unrelated healthy controls, 58 trios of affected patients and their parents, and 75 trios of unaffected siblings and their parents were recruited. HLA-B genotyping was performed by polymerase chain reaction and detected with a sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes system. We found that B*46:01 allele (OR = 2.31, 95% CI 1.60-3.34, P(c) = 9.99 × 10(-5)) and carrier (OR = 3.28, 95% CI 2.10-5.11, P(c) = 1.35 × 10(-6)) were associated with HD risk. Transmission/disequilibrium test further confirmed an overtransmission of the B*46:01 (OR 2.55, 95% CI 1.36-6.10, P = 6.5 × 10(-3)). The findings were similar in females when stratified by gender. In conclusion, our results clearly identify that HLA-B*46:01 confers susceptibility to HD in Han Chinese children. Further studies with larger children cohort are required to confirm the role of B*46:01 in the development of HD. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  11. Investigation of a Possible Role for the Histidine Decarboxylase Gene in Tourette Syndrome in the Chinese Han Population: A Family-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Meixin; Xu, Longqiang; Li, Qiang; Zhang, Ru; Zhang, Xin; Liu, Shiguo

    2016-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a polygenic neuropsychiatric disease. Previous studies have indicated that dysregulation in the histaminergic system may play a crucial role in disease onset. In this study, we investigated the role of the histidine decarboxylase gene (HDC) in TS susceptibility in the Chinese Han population. After genotyping 241 TS nuclear families trios, we analyzed three tag HDC single nucleotide polymorphisms (rs854150, rs854151, and rs854157) in a family-based study using the transmission disequilibrium test (TDT) and haplotype relative risk (HRR). TDT showed no over-transmission in these SNPs across the HDC region (for rs854150: χ2 = 0.472, P = 0.537, OR = 1.097, 95%CI = 0.738–1.630; for rs854151: χ2 = 0.043, P = 0.889, OR = 1.145, 95%CI = 0.767–1.709; for rs854157:χ2 = 0.984, P = 0.367, OR = 1.020, 95%CI = 0.508–2.049). HRR also showed the same tendency (for rs854150: χ2 = 0.211, P = 0.646, OR = 1.088, 95%CI = 0.759–1.559; for rs854151: χ2 = 0.134, P = 0.714, OR = 0.935, 95%CI = 0.653–1.339; for rs854157:χ2 = 0.841, P = 0.359, OR = 1.206, 95%CI = 0.808–1.799). Additionally, the haplotype-based haplotype relative risk showed a negative association. Although these findings indicate an unlikely association between HDC and TS in the Chinese Han population, a potential role for HDC cannot be ruled out in TS etiology. Future research should investigate this more thoroughly using different populations and larger samples. PMID:27529419

  12. Gene defect in hypodontia: exclusion of EGF, EGFR, and FGF-3 as candidate genes.

    PubMed

    Arte, S; Nieminen, P; Pirinen, S; Thesleff, I; Peltonen, L

    1996-06-01

    Hypodontia, congenital absence of one or a few permanent teeth without any systemic disorders, is regarded as an autosomally inherited dominant condition with varying expression and incomplete penetrance. Many studies have reported that the prevalence of hypodontia varies from 5% to 10% among European and Asian populations. The teeth most often missing are second premolars, upper lateral incisors, and lower central incisors. Consequently, we call this trait incisor-premolar hypodontia. Peg-shaped or strongly mesio-distally reduced upper lateral incisors demonstrate variation in the expression of the trait. The gene or genes causing incisorpremolar hypodontia are not known. We have begun the genetic mapping of hypodontia by using linkage analyses in seven Finnish three-generation families with 77 individuals, 31 affected with incisor-premolar hypodontia. As the first step, we studied the possibility of linkage between hypodontia and some candidate genes which have been suggested to have important functions during tooth development. Here we report the exclusion of EGF, EGFR, and FGF-3 loci as possible sites for gene mutation causing incisor-premolar hypodontia in our family material. Because of the close location of the FGF-3 and FGF-4 genes, the results also suggest the exclusion of the FGF-4 locus.

  13. Epidermal growth factor gene is a newly identified candidate gene for gout

    PubMed Central

    Han, Lin; Cao, Chunwei; Jia, Zhaotong; Liu, Shiguo; Liu, Zhen; Xin, Ruosai; Wang, Can; Li, Xinde; Ren, Wei; Wang, Xuefeng; Li, Changgui

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome 4q25 has been identified as a genomic region associated with gout. However, the associations of gout with the genes in this region have not yet been confirmed. Here, we performed two-stage analysis to determine whether variations in candidate genes in the 4q25 region are associated with gout in a male Chinese Han population. We first evaluated 96 tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in eight inflammatory/immune pathway- or glucose/lipid metabolism-related genes in the 4q25 region in 480 male gout patients and 480 controls. The SNP rs12504538, located in the elongation of very-long-chain-fatty-acid-like family member 6 gene (Elovl6), was found to be associated with gout susceptibility (Padjusted = 0.00595). In the second stage of analysis, we performed fine mapping analysis of 93 tag SNPs in Elovl6 and in the epidermal growth factor gene (EGF) and its flanking regions in 1017 male patients gout and 1897 healthy male controls. We observed a significant association between the T allele of EGF rs2298999 and gout (odds ratio = 0.77, 95% confidence interval = 0.67–0.88, Padjusted = 6.42 × 10−3). These results provide the first evidence for an association between the EGF rs2298999 C/T polymorphism and gout. Our findings should be validated in additional populations. PMID:27506295

  14. Defining a new candidate gene for amelogenesis imperfecta: from molecular genetics to biochemistry.

    PubMed

    Urzúa, Blanca; Ortega-Pinto, Ana; Morales-Bozo, Irene; Rojas-Alcayaga, Gonzalo; Cifuentes, Víctor

    2011-02-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta is a group of genetic conditions that affect the structure and clinical appearance of tooth enamel. The types (hypoplastic, hypocalcified, and hypomature) are correlated with defects in different stages of the process of enamel synthesis. Autosomal dominant, recessive, and X-linked types have been previously described. These disorders are considered clinically and genetically heterogeneous in etiology, involving a variety of genes, such as AMELX, ENAM, DLX3, FAM83H, MMP-20, KLK4, and WDR72. The mutations identified within these causal genes explain less than half of all cases of amelogenesis imperfecta. Most of the candidate and causal genes currently identified encode proteins involved in enamel synthesis. We think it is necessary to refocus the search for candidate genes using biochemical processes. This review provides theoretical evidence that the human SLC4A4 gene (sodium bicarbonate cotransporter) may be a new candidate gene.

  15. Additional candidates to conventional genes susceptible for lung cancer and changing trend in Japan.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Isao; Sugita, Minoru; Matsuki, Hideaki; Billah, Syed Muhammad Baqui; Watanabe, Tetsu

    2010-06-01

    The polymorphism of CYP1A1*2A or CYP1A1*2B, and the linkage of CYP1A1*2A, CYP1A1*2B, GSTM1 and GSTT1 polymorphisms have been established as susceptible genes or gene-gene interactions of tobacco-related lung cancer. New candidate genes susceptible for lung cancer such as NQO1 (NAD(P)H:quinine oxidoreductase), NAT2 (N-acetyltransferase 2), and several others have been reported. In the present review we focus on new candidate genes susceptible for lung cancer, then examine all Japanese references by meta-analysis on susceptible genes over the past 20 years, and discuss whether new candidates and changing trend in Japan could be caused by environmental change.

  16. Candidate genes for limiting cholestatic intestinal injury identified by gene expression profiling

    PubMed Central

    Alaish, Samuel M; Timmons, Jennifer; Smith, Alexis; Buzza, Marguerite S; Murphy, Ebony; Zhao, Aiping; Sun, Yezhou; Turner, Douglas J; Shea-Donahue, Terez; Antalis, Toni M; Cross, Alan; Dorsey, Susan G

    2013-01-01

    The lack of bile flow from the liver into the intestine can have devastating complications including hepatic failure, sepsis, and even death. This pathologic condition known as cholestasis can result from etiologies as diverse as total parenteral nutrition (TPN), hepatitis, and pancreatic cancer. The intestinal injury associated with cholestasis has been shown to result in decreased intestinal resistance, increased bacterial translocation, and increased endotoxemia. Anecdotal clinical evidence suggests a genetic predisposition to exaggerated injury. Recent animal research on two different strains of inbred mice demonstrating different rates of bacterial translocation with different mortality rates supports this premise. In this study, a microarray analysis of intestinal tissue following common bile duct ligation (CBDL) performed under general anesthesia on these same two strains of inbred mice was done with the goal of identifying the potential molecular mechanistic pathways responsible. Over 500 genes were increased more than 2.0-fold following CBDL. The most promising candidate genes included major urinary proteins (MUPs), serine protease-1-inhibitor (Serpina1a), and lipocalin-2 (LCN-2). Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) validated the microarray results for these candidate genes. In an in vitro experiment using differentiated intestinal epithelial cells, inhibition of MUP-1 by siRNA resulted in increased intestinal epithelial cell permeability. Diverse novel mechanisms involving the growth hormone pathway, the acute phase response, and the innate immune response are thus potential avenues for limiting cholestatic intestinal injury. Changes in gene expression were at times found to be not only due to the CBDL but also due to the murine strain. Should further studies in cholestatic patients demonstrate interindividual variability similar to what we have shown in mice, then a “personalized medicine” approach to cholestatic patients may become

  17. Mining for novel candidate clock genes in the circadian regulatory network.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, Anuprabha; Herzel, Hanspeter; Ananthasubramaniam, Bharath

    2015-11-14

    Most physiological processes in mammals are temporally regulated by means of a master circadian clock in the brain and peripheral oscillators in most other tissues. A transcriptional-translation feedback network of clock genes produces near 24 h oscillations in clock gene and protein expression. Here, we aim to identify novel additions to the clock network using a meta-analysis of public chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq), proteomics and protein-protein interaction data starting from a published list of 1000 genes with robust transcriptional rhythms and circadian phenotypes of knockdowns. We identified 20 candidate genes including nine known clock genes that received significantly high scores and were also robust to the relative weights assigned to different data types. Our scoring was consistent with the original ranking of the 1000 genes, but also provided novel complementary insights. Candidate genes were enriched for genes expressed in a circadian manner in multiple tissues with regulation driven mainly by transcription factors BMAL1 and REV-ERB α,β. Moreover, peak transcription of candidate genes was remarkably consistent across tissues. While peaks of the 1000 genes were distributed uniformly throughout the day, candidate gene peaks were strongly concentrated around dusk. Finally, we showed that binding of specific transcription factors to a gene promoter was predictive of peak transcription at a certain time of day and discuss combinatorial phase regulation. Combining complementary publicly-available data targeting different levels of regulation within the circadian network, we filtered the original list and found 11 novel robust candidate clock genes. Using the criteria of circadian proteomic expression, circadian expression in multiple tissues and independent gene knockdown data, we propose six genes (Por, Mtss1, Dgat2, Pim3, Ppp1r3b, Upp2) involved in metabolism and cancer for further experimental investigation. The availability of

  18. A Flexible Approach for Highly Multiplexed Candidate Gene Targeted Resequencing

    PubMed Central

    Natsoulis, Georges; Bell, John M.; Xu, Hua; Buenrostro, Jason D.; Ordonez, Heather; Grimes, Susan; Newburger, Daniel; Jensen, Michael; Zahn, Jacob M.; Zhang, Nancy; Ji, Hanlee P.

    2011-01-01

    We have developed an integrated strategy for targeted resequencing and analysis of gene subsets from the human exome for variants. Our capture technology is geared towards resequencing gene subsets substantially larger than can be done efficiently with simplex or multiplex PCR but smaller in scale than exome sequencing. We describe all the steps from the initial capture assay to single nucleotide variant (SNV) discovery. The capture methodology uses in-solution 80-mer oligonucleotides. To provide optimal flexibility in choosing human gene targets, we designed an in silico set of oligonucleotides, the Human OligoExome, that covers the gene exons annotated by the Consensus Coding Sequencing Project (CCDS). This resource is openly available as an Internet accessible database where one can download capture oligonucleotides sequences for any CCDS gene and design custom capture assays. Using this resource, we demonstrated the flexibility of this assay by custom designing capture assays ranging from 10 to over 100 gene targets with total capture sizes from over 100 Kilobases to nearly one Megabase. We established a method to reduce capture variability and incorporated indexing schemes to increase sample throughput. Our approach has multiple applications that include but are not limited to population targeted resequencing studies of specific gene subsets, validation of variants discovered in whole genome sequencing surveys and possible diagnostic analysis of disease gene subsets. We also present a cost analysis demonstrating its cost-effectiveness for large population studies. PMID:21738606

  19. Quantitative DNA Methylation Analysis of Candidate Genes in Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Erin M.; Riggs, Bridget M.; Delmas, Amber L.; Koch, Abby; Hakam, Ardeshir; Brown, Kevin D.

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant DNA methylation has been observed in cervical cancer; however, most studies have used non-quantitative approaches to measure DNA methylation. The objective of this study was to quantify methylation within a select panel of genes previously identified as targets for epigenetic silencing in cervical cancer and to identify genes with elevated methylation that can distinguish cancer from normal cervical tissues. We identified 49 women with invasive squamous cell cancer of the cervix and 22 women with normal cytology specimens. Bisulfite-modified genomic DNA was amplified and quantitative pyrosequencing completed for 10 genes (APC, CCNA, CDH1, CDH13, WIF1, TIMP3, DAPK1, RARB, FHIT, and SLIT2). A Methylation Index was calculated as the mean percent methylation across all CpG sites analyzed per gene (~4-9 CpG site) per sequence. A binary cut-point was defined at >15% methylation. Sensitivity, specificity and area under ROC curve (AUC) of methylation in individual genes or a panel was examined. The median methylation index was significantly higher in cases compared to controls in 8 genes, whereas there was no difference in median methylation for 2 genes. Compared to HPV and age, the combination of DNA methylation level of DAPK1, SLIT2, WIF1 and RARB with HPV and age significantly improved the AUC from 0.79 to 0.99 (95% CI: 0.97–1.00, p-value = 0.003). Pyrosequencing analysis confirmed that several genes are common targets for aberrant methylation in cervical cancer and DNA methylation level of four genes appears to increase specificity to identify cancer compared to HPV detection alone. Alterations in DNA methylation of specific genes in cervical cancers, such as DAPK1, RARB, WIF1, and SLIT2, may also occur early in cervical carcinogenesis and should be evaluated. PMID:25826459

  20. Gene-gene interaction between tuberculosis candidate genes in a South African population.

    PubMed

    de Wit, Erika; van der Merwe, Lize; van Helden, Paul D; Hoal, Eileen G

    2011-02-01

    In a complex disease such as tuberculosis (TB) it is increasingly evident that gene-gene interactions play a far more important role in an individual's susceptibility to develop the disease than single polymorphisms on their own, as one gene can enhance or hinder the expression of another gene. Gene-gene interaction analysis is a new approach to elucidate susceptibility to TB. The possibility of gene-gene interactions was assessed, focusing on 11 polymorphisms in nine genes (DC-SIGN, IFN-γ, IFNGR1, IL-8, IL-1Ra, MBL, NRAMP1, RANTES, and SP-D) that have been associated with TB, some repeatedly. An optimal model, which best describes and predicts TB case-control status, was constructed. Significant interactions were detected between eight pairs of variants. The models fitted the observed data extremely well, with p < 0.0001 for all eight models. A highly significant interaction was detected between INFGR1 and NRAMP1, which is not surprising because macrophage activation is greatly enhanced by IFN-γ and IFN-γ response elements that are present in the human NRAMP1 promoter region, providing further evidence for their interaction. This study enabled us to test the theory that disease outcome may be due to interaction of several gene effects. With eight instances of statistically significant gene-gene interactions, the importance of epistasis is clearly identifiable in this study. Methods for studying gene-gene interactions are based on a multilocus and multigene approach, consistent with the nature of complex-trait diseases, and may provide the paradigm for future genetic studies of TB.

  1. Prioritization of candidate disease genes by topological similarity between disease and protein diffusion profiles.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jie; Qin, Yufang; Liu, Taigang; Wang, Jun; Zheng, Xiaoqi

    2013-01-01

    Identification of gene-phenotype relationships is a fundamental challenge in human health clinic. Based on the observation that genes causing the same or similar phenotypes tend to correlate with each other in the protein-protein interaction network, a lot of network-based approaches were proposed based on different underlying models. A recent comparative study showed that diffusion-based methods achieve the state-of-the-art predictive performance. In this paper, a new diffusion-based method was proposed to prioritize candidate disease genes. Diffusion profile of a disease was defined as the stationary distribution of candidate genes given a random walk with restart where similarities between phenotypes are incorporated. Then, candidate disease genes are prioritized by comparing their diffusion profiles with that of the disease. Finally, the effectiveness of our method was demonstrated through the leave-one-out cross-validation against control genes from artificial linkage intervals and randomly chosen genes. Comparative study showed that our method achieves improved performance compared to some classical diffusion-based methods. To further illustrate our method, we used our algorithm to predict new causing genes of 16 multifactorial diseases including Prostate cancer and Alzheimer's disease, and the top predictions were in good consistent with literature reports. Our study indicates that integration of multiple information sources, especially the phenotype similarity profile data, and introduction of global similarity measure between disease and gene diffusion profiles are helpful for prioritizing candidate disease genes. Programs and data are available upon request.

  2. Gene expression differences between Noccaea caerulescens ecotypes help to identify candidate genes for metal phytoremediation.

    PubMed

    Halimaa, Pauliina; Lin, Ya-Fen; Ahonen, Viivi H; Blande, Daniel; Clemens, Stephan; Gyenesei, Attila; Häikiö, Elina; Kärenlampi, Sirpa O; Laiho, Asta; Aarts, Mark G M; Pursiheimo, Juha-Pekka; Schat, Henk; Schmidt, Holger; Tuomainen, Marjo H; Tervahauta, Arja I

    2014-03-18

    Populations of Noccaea caerulescens show tremendous differences in their capacity to hyperaccumulate and hypertolerate metals. To explore the differences that could contribute to these traits, we undertook SOLiD high-throughput sequencing of the root transcriptomes of three phenotypically well-characterized N. caerulescens accessions, i.e., Ganges, La Calamine, and Monte Prinzera. Genes with possible contribution to zinc, cadmium, and nickel hyperaccumulation and hypertolerance were predicted. The most significant differences between the accessions were related to metal ion (di-, trivalent inorganic cation) transmembrane transporter activity, iron and calcium ion binding, (inorganic) anion transmembrane transporter activity, and antioxidant activity. Analysis of correlation between the expression profile of each gene and the metal-related characteristics of the accessions disclosed both previously characterized (HMA4, HMA3) and new candidate genes (e.g., for nickel IRT1, ZIP10, and PDF2.3) as possible contributors to the hyperaccumulation/tolerance phenotype. A number of unknown Noccaea-specific transcripts also showed correlation with Zn(2+), Cd(2+), or Ni(2+) hyperaccumulation/tolerance. This study shows that N. caerulescens populations have evolved great diversity in the expression of metal-related genes, facilitating adaptation to various metalliferous soils. The information will be helpful in the development of improved plants for metal phytoremediation.

  3. Candidate gene analysis and exome sequencing confirm LBX1 as a susceptibility gene for idiopathic scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Grauers, Anna; Wang, Jingwen; Einarsdottir, Elisabet; Simony, Ane; Danielsson, Aina; Åkesson, Kristina; Ohlin, Acke; Halldin, Klas; Grabowski, Pawel; Tenne, Max; Laivuori, Hannele; Dahlman, Ingrid; Andersen, Mikkel; Christensen, Steen Bach; Karlsson, Magnus K; Jiao, Hong; Kere, Juha; Gerdhem, Paul

    2015-10-01

    Idiopathic scoliosis is a spinal deformity affecting approximately 3% of otherwise healthy children or adolescents. The etiology is still largely unknown but has an important genetic component. Genome-wide association studies have identified a number of common genetic variants that are significantly associated with idiopathic scoliosis in Asian and Caucasian populations, rs11190870 close to the LBX1 gene being the most replicated finding. The aim of the present study was to investigate the genetics of idiopathic scoliosis in a Scandinavian cohort by performing a candidate gene study of four variants previously shown to be associated with idiopathic scoliosis and exome sequencing of idiopathic scoliosis patients with a severe phenotype to identify possible novel scoliosis risk variants. This was a case control study. A total of 1,739 patients with idiopathic scoliosis and 1,812 controls were included. The outcome measure was idiopathic scoliosis. The variants rs10510181, rs11190870, rs12946942, and rs6570507 were genotyped in 1,739 patients with idiopathic scoliosis and 1,812 controls. Exome sequencing was performed on pooled samples from 100 surgically treated idiopathic scoliosis patients. Novel or rare missense, nonsense, or splice site variants were selected for individual genotyping in the 1,739 cases and 1,812 controls. In addition, the 5'UTR, noncoding exon and promoter regions of LBX1, not covered by exome sequencing, were Sanger sequenced in the 100 pooled samples. Of the four candidate genes, an intergenic variant, rs11190870, downstream of the LBX1 gene, showed a highly significant association to idiopathic scoliosis in 1,739 cases and 1,812 controls (p=7.0×10(-18)). We identified 20 novel variants by exome sequencing after filtration and an initial genotyping validation. However, we could not verify any association to idiopathic scoliosis in the large cohort of 1,739 cases and 1,812 controls. We did not find any variants in the 5'UTR, noncoding exon and

  4. Integrative strategies to identify candidate genes in rodent models of human alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Treadwell, Julie A

    2006-01-01

    The search for genes underlying alcohol-related behaviours in rodent models of human alcoholism has been ongoing for many years with only limited success. Recently, new strategies that integrate several of the traditional approaches have provided new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying ethanol's actions in the brain. We have used alcohol-preferring C57BL/6J (B6) and alcohol-avoiding DBA/2J (D2) genetic strains of mice in an integrative strategy combining high-throughput gene expression screening, genetic segregation analysis, and mapping to previously published quantitative trait loci to uncover candidate genes for the ethanol-preference phenotype. In our study, 2 genes, retinaldehyde binding protein 1 (Rlbp1) and syntaxin 12 (Stx12), were found to be strong candidates for ethanol preference. Such experimental approaches have the power and the potential to greatly speed up the laborious process of identifying candidate genes for the animal models of human alcoholism.

  5. Isolation and characterization of the human CDX1 gene: A candidate gene for diastrophic dysplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Bonner, C.; Loftus, S.; Wasmuth, J.J.

    1994-09-01

    Diastrophic dysplasia is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by short stature, dislocation of the joints, spinal deformities and malformation of the hands and feet. Multipoint linkage analysis places the diastrophic dysplasia (DTD) locus in 5q31-5q34. Linkage disequilibrium mapping places the DTD locus near CSFIR in the direction of PDGFRB (which is tandem to CSFIR). This same study tentatively placed PDGFRB and DTD proximal to CSFIR. Our results, as well as recently reported work from other laboratories, suggest that PDGFRB (and possibly DTD) is distal rather than proximal to CSFIR. We have constructed a cosmid contig covering approximately 200 kb of the region containing CSFIR. Several exons have been {open_quotes}trapped{close_quotes} from these cosmids using exon amplification. One of these exons was trapped from a cosmid isolated from a walk from PDGFRB, approximately 80 kb from CSFIR. This exon was sequenced and was determined to be 89% identical to the nucleotide sequence of exon two of the murine CDX1 gene (100% amino acid identity). The exon was used to isolate the human CDX gene. Sequence analysis of the human CDX1 gene indicates a very high degree of homology to the murine gene. CDX1 is a caudal type homeobox gene expressed during gastrulation. In the mouse, expression during gastrulation begins in the primitive streak and subsequently localizes to the ectodermal and mesodermal cells of the primitive streak, neural tube, somites, and limb buds. Later in gastrulation, CDX1 expression becomes most prominent in the mesoderm of the forelimbs, and, to a lesser extent, the hindlimbs. CDX1 is an intriguing candidate gene for diastrophic dysplasia. We are currently screening DNA from affected individuals and hope to shortly determine whether CDX1 is involved in this disorder.

  6. Evaluating the ovarian cancer gonadotropin hypothesis: A candidate gene study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Alice W.; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Stram, Douglas A.; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Plisiecka-Halasa, Joanna; Spiewankiewicz, Beata; Myers, Emily J.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Fasching, Peter A.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Ekici, Arif B.; Hein, Alexander; Vergote, Ignace; Van Nieuwenhuysen, Els; Lambrechts, Diether; Wicklund, Kristine G.; Eilber, Ursula; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara; Odunsi, Kunle; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Shvetsov, Yurii B.; Thompson, Pamela J.; Goodman, Marc T.; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Dörk, Thilo; Hillemanns, Peter; Dürst, Matthias; Runnebaum, Ingo B.; Bogdanova, Natalia; Pelttari, Liisa M.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Leminen, Arto; Edwards, Robert P.; Kelley, Joseph L.; Harter, Philipp; Schwaab, Ira; Heitz, Florian; du Bois, Andreas; Orsulic, Sandra; Lester, Jenny; Walsh, Christine; Karlan, Beth Y.; Hogdall, Estrid; Kjaer, Susanne K.; Jensen, Allan; Vierkant, Robert A.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Goode, Ellen L.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Southey, Melissa C.; Giles, Graham G.; Bruinsma, Fiona; Wu, Xifeng; Hildebrandt, Michelle A.T.; Lu, Karen; Liang, Dong; Bisogna, Maria; Levine, Douglas A.; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Iversen, Edwin S.; Berchuck, Andrew; Terry, Kathryn L.; Cramer, Daniel W.; Tworoger, Shelley S.; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Olson, Sara H.; Orlow, Irene; Bandera, Elisa V.; Bjorge, Line; Tangen, Ingvild L.; Salvesen, Helga B.; Krakstad, Camilla; Massuger, Leon F.A.G.; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Aben, Katja K.H.; van Altena, Anne M.; Bean, Yukie; Pejovic, Tanja; Kellar, Melissa; Le, Nhu D.; Cook, Linda S.; Kelemen, Linda E.; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Lubinski, Jan; Gronwald, Jacek; Cybulski, Cezary; Jakubowska, Anna; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Brinton, Louise A.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Yang, Hannah; Nedergaard, Lotte; Lundvall, Lene; Hogdall, Claus; Song, Honglin; Campbell, Ian G.; Eccles, Diana; Glasspool, Rosalind; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Carty, Karen; Paul, James; McNeish, Iain A.; Sieh, Weiva; McGuire, Valerie; Rothstein, Joseph H.; Whittemore, Alice S.; McLaughlin, John R.; Risch, Harvey A.; Phelan, Catherine M.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Menon, Usha; Ramus, Susan J.; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Harrington, Patricia; Pike, Malcolm C.; Modugno, Francesmary; Rossing, Mary Anne; Ness, Roberta B.; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Stram, Daniel O.; Wu, Anna H.; Pearce, Celeste Leigh

    2016-01-01

    Objective Ovarian cancer is a hormone-related disease with a strong genetic basis. However, none of its high-penetrance susceptibility genes and GWAS-identified variants to date are known to be involved in hormonal pathways. Given the hypothesized etiologic role of gonadotropins, an assessment of how variability in genes involved in the gonadotropin signaling pathway impacts disease risk is warranted. Methods Genetic data from 41 ovarian cancer study sites were pooled and unconditional logistic regression was used to evaluate whether any of the 2185 SNPs from 11 gonadotropin signaling pathway genes was associated with ovarian cancer risk. A burden test using the admixture likelihood (AML) method was also used to evaluate gene-level associations. Results We did not find any genome-wide significant associations between individual SNPs and ovarian cancer risk. However, there was some suggestion of gene-level associations for four gonadotropin signaling pathway genes: INHBB (p = 0.045, mucinous), LHCGR (p = 0.046, high-grade serous), GNRH (p = 0.041, high-grade serous), and FSHB (p = 0.036, overall invasive). There was also suggestive evidence for INHA (p = 0.060, overall invasive). Conclusions Ovarian cancer studies have limited sample numbers, thus fewer genome-wide susceptibility alleles, with only modest associations, have been identified relative to breast and prostate cancers. We have evaluated the majority of ovarian cancer studies with biological samples, to our knowledge, leaving no opportunity for replication. Using both our understanding of biology and powerful gene-level tests, we have identified four putative ovarian cancer loci near INHBB, LHCGR, GNRH, and FSHB that warrant a second look if larger sample sizes and denser genotype chips become available. PMID:25528498

  7. Evaluating the ovarian cancer gonadotropin hypothesis: a candidate gene study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Alice W; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Doherty, Jennifer A; Stram, Douglas A; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Plisiecka-Halasa, Joanna; Spiewankiewicz, Beata; Myers, Emily J; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Fasching, Peter A; Beckmann, Matthias W; Ekici, Arif B; Hein, Alexander; Vergote, Ignace; Van Nieuwenhuysen, Els; Lambrechts, Diether; Wicklund, Kristine G; Eilber, Ursula; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara; Odunsi, Kunle; Moysich, Kirsten B; Shvetsov, Yurii B; Thompson, Pamela J; Goodman, Marc T; Wilkens, Lynne R; Dörk, Thilo; Hillemanns, Peter; Dürst, Matthias; Runnebaum, Ingo B; Bogdanova, Natalia; Pelttari, Liisa M; Nevanlinna, Heli; Leminen, Arto; Edwards, Robert P; Kelley, Joseph L; Harter, Philipp; Schwaab, Ira; Heitz, Florian; du Bois, Andreas; Orsulic, Sandra; Lester, Jenny; Walsh, Christine; Karlan, Beth Y; Hogdall, Estrid; Kjaer, Susanne K; Jensen, Allan; Vierkant, Robert A; Cunningham, Julie M; Goode, Ellen L; Fridley, Brooke L; Southey, Melissa C; Giles, Graham G; Bruinsma, Fiona; Wu, Xifeng; Hildebrandt, Michelle A T; Lu, Karen; Liang, Dong; Bisogna, Maria; Levine, Douglas A; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Iversen, Edwin S; Berchuck, Andrew; Terry, Kathryn L; Cramer, Daniel W; Tworoger, Shelley S; Poole, Elizabeth M; Olson, Sara H; Orlow, Irene; Bandera, Elisa V; Bjorge, Line; Tangen, Ingvild L; Salvesen, Helga B; Krakstad, Camilla; Massuger, Leon F A G; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Aben, Katja K H; van Altena, Anne M; Bean, Yukie; Pejovic, Tanja; Kellar, Melissa; Le, Nhu D; Cook, Linda S; Kelemen, Linda E; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Lubinski, Jan; Gronwald, Jacek; Cybulski, Cezary; Jakubowska, Anna; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Brinton, Louise A; Lissowska, Jolanta; Yang, Hannah; Nedergaard, Lotte; Lundvall, Lene; Hogdall, Claus; Song, Honglin; Campbell, Ian G; Eccles, Diana; Glasspool, Rosalind; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Carty, Karen; Paul, James; McNeish, Iain A; Sieh, Weiva; McGuire, Valerie; Rothstein, Joseph H; Whittemore, Alice S; McLaughlin, John R; Risch, Harvey A; Phelan, Catherine M; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Menon, Usha; Ramus, Susan J; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Harrington, Patricia; Pike, Malcolm C; Modugno, Francesmary; Rossing, Mary Anne; Ness, Roberta B; Pharoah, Paul D P; Stram, Daniel O; Wu, Anna H; Pearce, Celeste Leigh

    2015-03-01

    Ovarian cancer is a hormone-related disease with a strong genetic basis. However, none of its high-penetrance susceptibility genes and GWAS-identified variants to date are known to be involved in hormonal pathways. Given the hypothesized etiologic role of gonadotropins, an assessment of how variability in genes involved in the gonadotropin signaling pathway impacts disease risk is warranted. Genetic data from 41 ovarian cancer study sites were pooled and unconditional logistic regression was used to evaluate whether any of the 2185 SNPs from 11 gonadotropin signaling pathway genes was associated with ovarian cancer risk. A burden test using the admixture likelihood (AML) method was also used to evaluate gene-level associations. We did not find any genome-wide significant associations between individual SNPs and ovarian cancer risk. However, there was some suggestion of gene-level associations for four gonadotropin signaling pathway genes: INHBB (p=0.045, mucinous), LHCGR (p=0.046, high-grade serous), GNRH (p=0.041, high-grade serous), and FSHB (p=0.036, overall invasive). There was also suggestive evidence for INHA (p=0.060, overall invasive). Ovarian cancer studies have limited sample numbers, thus fewer genome-wide susceptibility alleles, with only modest associations, have been identified relative to breast and prostate cancers. We have evaluated the majority of ovarian cancer studies with biological samples, to our knowledge, leaving no opportunity for replication. Using both our understanding of biology and powerful gene-level tests, we have identified four putative ovarian cancer loci near INHBB, LHCGR, GNRH, and FSHB that warrant a second look if larger sample sizes and denser genotype chips become available. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Developing integrated crop knowledge networks to advance candidate gene discovery.

    PubMed

    Hassani-Pak, Keywan; Castellote, Martin; Esch, Maria; Hindle, Matthew; Lysenko, Artem; Taubert, Jan; Rawlings, Christopher

    2016-12-01

    The chances of raising crop productivity to enhance global food security would be greatly improved if we had a complete understanding of all the biological mechanisms that underpinned traits such as crop yield, disease resistance or nutrient and water use efficiency. With more crop genomes emerging all the time, we are nearer having the basic information, at the gene-level, to begin assembling crop gene catalogues and using data from other plant species to understand how the genes function and how their interactions govern crop development and physiology. Unfortunately, the task of creating such a complete knowledge base of gene functions, interaction networks and trait biology is technically challenging because the relevant data are dispersed in myriad databases in a variety of data formats with variable quality and coverage. In this paper we present a general approach for building genome-scale knowledge networks that provide a unified representation of heterogeneous but interconnected datasets to enable effective knowledge mining and gene discovery. We describe the datasets and outline the methods, workflows and tools that we have developed for creating and visualising these networks for the major crop species, wheat and barley. We present the global characteristics of such knowledge networks and with an example linking a seed size phenotype to a barley WRKY transcription factor orthologous to TTG2 from Arabidopsis, we illustrate the value of integrated data in biological knowledge discovery. The software we have developed (www.ondex.org) and the knowledge resources (http://knetminer.rothamsted.ac.uk) we have created are all open-source and provide a first step towards systematic and evidence-based gene discovery in order to facilitate crop improvement.

  9. X-Linked Candidate Genes for a Ciliopathy-Like Disorder.

    PubMed

    Pavey, Ashleigh R; Vilboux, Thierry; Babcock, Holly E; Ahronovich, Margot; Solomon, Benjamin D

    2016-04-01

    The ability to interrogate the genome via chromosomal microarray and sequencing-based technologies has accelerated the ability to rapidly and accurately define etiologies as well as new candidate genes related to genetic conditions. We describe a male patient with a lethal presentation of a multiple congenital anomaly syndrome that appeared consistent with a ciliopathy phenotype. The patient was found to have a novel maternally inherited 1.9-Mb X chromosome deletion including 4 known genes. Presently, the biological functions of these genes are not well delineated. However, at least one of these genes may be a promising candidate gene for this pattern of anomalies based on the function of related genes and information from publicly available copy number variant databases of control and affected individuals. These genes would bear further scrutiny in larger cohorts of patients with similar phenotypes.

  10. Candidate gene analysis: severe intraventricular hemorrhage in inborn preterm neonates.

    PubMed

    Adén, Ulrika; Lin, Aiping; Carlo, Waldemar; Leviton, Alan; Murray, Jeffrey C; Hallman, Mikko; Lifton, Richard P; Zhang, Heping; Ment, Laura R

    2013-11-01

    Intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) is a disorder of complex etiology. We analyzed genotypes for 7 genes from 224 inborn preterm neonates treated with antenatal steroids and grade 3-4 IVH and 389 matched controls. Only methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase was more prevalent in cases of IVH, emphasizing the need for more comprehensive genetic strategies. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Genotype relative risks: Methods for design and analysis of candidate-gene association studies

    SciTech Connect

    Shaid, D.J.; Sommer, S.S. )

    1993-11-01

    Design and analysis methods are presented for studying the association of a candidate gene with a disease by using parental data in place of nonrelated controls. This alternating design eliminates spurious differences in allele frequencies between cases and nonrelated controls resulting from different ethnic origins and population stratification for these two groups. The authors present analysis methods which are based on two genetic relative risks: (1) the relative risk of disease for homozygotes with two copies of the candidate gene versus homozygotes without the candidate gene and (2) the relative risk for heterozygotes with one copy of the candidate gene versus homozygotes without the candidate gene. In addition to estimating the magnitude of these relative risks, likelihood methods allow specific hypotheses to be tested, namely, a test for overall association of the candidate gene with disease, as well as specific genetic hypotheses, such as dominant or recessive inheritance. Two likelihood methods are presented: (1) a likelihood method appropriate when Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium holds and (2) a likelihood method in which the authors condition on parental genotype data when Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium does not hold. The results for the relative efficiency of these two methods suggest that the conditional approach may at times be preferable, even when equilibrium holds. Sample-size and power calculations are presented for a multitiered design. Tier 1 detects the presence of an abnormal sequence for a postulated candidate gene among a small group of cases. Tier 2 tests for association of the abnormal variant with disease, such as by the likelihood methods presented. Tier 3 confirms positive results from tier 2. Results indicate that required sample sizes are smaller when expression of disease is recessive, rather than dominant, and that, for recessive disease and large relative risks, necessary sample sizes may be feasible. 19 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Mapping of Candidate Genes Involved in Bud Dormancy and Flowering Time in Sweet Cherry (Prunus avium)

    PubMed Central

    Le Dantec, Loïck; Quero-García, José; Barreneche, Teresa; Wenden, Bénédicte; Dirlewanger, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    The timing of flowering in perennial plants is crucial for their survival in temperate climates and is regulated by the duration of bud dormancy. Bud dormancy release and bud break depend on the perception of cumulative chilling during endodormancy and heat during the bud development. The objectives of this work were to identify candidate genes involved in dormancy and flowering processes in sweet cherry, their mapping in two mapping progenies ‘Regina’ × ‘Garnet’ and ‘Regina’ × ‘Lapins’, and to select those candidate genes which co-localized with quantitative trait loci (QTLs) associated with temperature requirements for bud dormancy release and flowering. Based on available data on flowering processes in various species, a list of 79 candidate genes was established. The peach and sweet cherry orthologs were identified and primers were designed to amplify sweet cherry candidate gene fragments. Based on the amplified sequences of the three parents of the mapping progenies, SNPs segregations in the progenies were identified. Thirty five candidate genes were genetically mapped in at least one of the two progenies and all were in silico mapped. Co-localization between candidate genes and QTLs associated with temperature requirements and flowering date were identified for the first time in sweet cherry. The allelic composition of the candidate genes located in the major QTL for heat requirements and flowering date located on linkage group 4 have a significant effect on these two traits indicating their potential use for breeding programs in sweet cherry to select new varieties adapted to putative future climatic conditions. PMID:26587668

  13. Identification of Methylmercury Tolerance Gene Candidates in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Mahapatra, Cecon T.; Bond, Jeffrey; Rand, David M.; Rand, Matthew D.

    2010-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a ubiquitous environmental contaminant that preferentially targets the developing nervous system. Variable outcomes of prenatal MeHg exposure within a population point to a genetic component that regulates MeHg toxicity. We therefore sought to identify fundamental MeHg tolerance genes using the Drosophila model for genetic and molecular dissection of a MeHg tolerance trait. We observe autosomal dominance in a MeHg tolerance trait (development on MeHg food) in both wild-derived and laboratory-selected MeHg-tolerant strains of flies. We performed whole-genome transcript profiling of larval brains of tolerant (laboratory selected) and nontolerant (control) strains in the presence and absence of MeHg stress. Pairwise transcriptome comparisons of four conditions (+/−selection and +/−MeHg) identified a “down-down-up” expression signature, whereby MeHg alone and selection alone resulted in a greater number of downregulated transcripts, and the combination of selection + MeHg resulted in a greater number of upregulated transcripts. Functional annotation cluster analyses showed enrichment for monooxygenases/oxidoreductases, which include cytochrome P450 (CYP) family members. Among the 10 CYPs upregulated with selection + MeHg in tolerant strains, CYP6g1, previously identified as the dichlorodiphenyl trichloroethane resistance allele in flies, was the most highly expressed and responsive to MeHg. Among all the genes, Turandot A (TotA), an immune pathway–regulated humoral response gene, showed the greatest upregulation with selection + MeHg. Neural-specific transgenic overexpression of TotA enhanced MeHg tolerance during pupal development. Identification of TotA and CYP genes as MeHg tolerance genes is an inroad to investigating the conserved function of immune signaling and phase I metabolism pathways in MeHg toxicity and tolerance in higher organisms. PMID:20375079

  14. Identification of methylmercury tolerance gene candidates in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Mahapatra, Cecon T; Bond, Jeffrey; Rand, David M; Rand, Matthew D

    2010-07-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a ubiquitous environmental contaminant that preferentially targets the developing nervous system. Variable outcomes of prenatal MeHg exposure within a population point to a genetic component that regulates MeHg toxicity. We therefore sought to identify fundamental MeHg tolerance genes using the Drosophila model for genetic and molecular dissection of a MeHg tolerance trait. We observe autosomal dominance in a MeHg tolerance trait (development on MeHg food) in both wild-derived and laboratory-selected MeHg-tolerant strains of flies. We performed whole-genome transcript profiling of larval brains of tolerant (laboratory selected) and nontolerant (control) strains in the presence and absence of MeHg stress. Pairwise transcriptome comparisons of four conditions (+/-selection and +/-MeHg) identified a "down-down-up" expression signature, whereby MeHg alone and selection alone resulted in a greater number of downregulated transcripts, and the combination of selection + MeHg resulted in a greater number of upregulated transcripts. Functional annotation cluster analyses showed enrichment for monooxygenases/oxidoreductases, which include cytochrome P450 (CYP) family members. Among the 10 CYPs upregulated with selection + MeHg in tolerant strains, CYP6g1, previously identified as the dichlorodiphenyl trichloroethane resistance allele in flies, was the most highly expressed and responsive to MeHg. Among all the genes, Turandot A (TotA), an immune pathway-regulated humoral response gene, showed the greatest upregulation with selection + MeHg. Neural-specific transgenic overexpression of TotA enhanced MeHg tolerance during pupal development. Identification of TotA and CYP genes as MeHg tolerance genes is an inroad to investigating the conserved function of immune signaling and phase I metabolism pathways in MeHg toxicity and tolerance in higher organisms.

  15. Characterizing gene-gene interactions in a statistical epistasis network of twelve candidate genes for obesity.

    PubMed

    De, Rishika; Hu, Ting; Moore, Jason H; Gilbert-Diamond, Diane

    2015-01-01

    Recent findings have reemphasized the importance of epistasis, or gene-gene interactions, as a contributing factor to the unexplained heritability of obesity. Network-based methods such as statistical epistasis networks (SEN), present an intuitive framework to address the computational challenge of studying pairwise interactions between thousands of genetic variants. In this study, we aimed to analyze pairwise interactions that are associated with Body Mass Index (BMI) between SNPs from twelve genes robustly associated with obesity (BDNF, ETV5, FAIM2, FTO, GNPDA2, KCTD15, MC4R, MTCH2, NEGR1, SEC16B, SH2B1, and TMEM18). We used information gain measures to identify all SNP-SNP interactions among and between these genes that were related to obesity (BMI > 30 kg/m(2)) within the Framingham Heart Study Cohort; interactions exceeding a certain threshold were used to build an SEN. We also quantified whether interactions tend to occur more between SNPs from the same gene (dyadicity) or between SNPs from different genes (heterophilicity). We identified a highly connected SEN of 709 SNPs and 1241 SNP-SNP interactions. Combining the SEN framework with dyadicity and heterophilicity analyses, we found 1 dyadic gene (TMEM18, P-value = 0.047) and 3 heterophilic genes (KCTD15, P-value = 0.045; SH2B1, P-value = 0.003; and TMEM18, P-value = 0.001). We also identified a lncRNA SNP (rs4358154) as a key node within the SEN using multiple network measures. This study presents an analytical framework to characterize the global landscape of genetic interactions from genome-wide arrays and also to discover nodes of potential biological significance within the identified network.

  16. Identification of candidate genes encoding an LDL-C QTL in baboons[S

    PubMed Central

    Karere, Genesio M.; Glenn, Jeremy P.; Birnbaum, Shifra; Hafizi, Sussan; Rainwater, David L.; Mahaney, Michael C.; VandeBerg, John L.; Cox, Laura A.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in developed countries, and dyslipidemia is a major risk factor for CVD. We previously identified a cluster of quantitative trait loci (QTL) on baboon chromosome 11 for multiple, related quantitative traits for serum LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C). Here we report differentially regulated hepatic genes encoding an LDL-C QTL that influences LDL-C levels in baboons. We performed hepatic whole-genome expression profiling for LDL-C-discordant baboons fed a high-cholesterol, high-fat (HCHF) diet for seven weeks. We detected expression of 117 genes within the QTL 2-LOD support interval. Three genes were differentially expressed in low LDL-C responders and 8 in high LDL-C responders in response to a HCHF diet. Seven genes (ACVR1B, CALCOCO1, DGKA, ERBB3, KRT73, MYL6B, TENC1) showed discordant expression between low and high LDL-C responders. To prioritize candidate genes, we integrated miRNA and mRNA expression profiles using network tools and found that four candidates (ACVR1B, DGKA, ERBB3, TENC1) were miRNA targets and that the miRNAs were inversely expressed to the target genes. Candidate gene expression was validated using QRT-PCR and Western blotting. This study reveals candidate genes that influence variation in LDL-C in baboons and potential genetic mechanisms for further investigation. PMID:23596326

  17. Test for positional candidate genes for body composition on pig chromosome 6

    PubMed Central

    Cristina, Óvilo; Oliver, Angels; Noguera, José Luis; Clop, Alex; Barragán, Carmen; Varona, Luis; Rodríguez, Carmen; Toro, Miguel; Sánchez, Armand; Pérez-Enciso, Miguel; Silió, Luis

    2002-01-01

    One QTL affecting backfat thickness (BF), intramuscular fat content (IMF) and eye muscle area (MA) was previously localized on porcine chromosome 6 in an F2 cross between Iberian and Landrace pigs. This work was done to study the effect of two positional candidate genes on these traits: H-FABP and LEPR genes. The QTL mapping analysis was repeated with a regression method using genotypes for seven microsatellites and two PCR-RFLPs in the H-FABP and LEPR genes. H-FABP and LEPR genes were located at 85.4 and 107 cM respectively, by linkage analysis. The effects of the candidate gene polymorphisms were analyzed in two ways. When an animal model was fitted, both genes showed significant effects on fatness traits, the H-FABP polymorphism showed significant effects on IMF and MA, and the LEPR polymorphism on BF and IMF. But when the candidate gene effect was included in a QTL regression analysis these associations were not observed, suggesting that they must not be the causal mutations responsible for the effects found. Differences in the results of both analyses showed the inadequacy of the animal model approach for the evaluation of positional candidate genes in populations with linkage disequilibrium, when the probabilities of the parental origin of the QTL alleles are not included in the model. PMID:12270105

  18. SNP discovery in candidate adaptive genes using exon capture in a free-ranging alpine ungulate

    Treesearch

    Gretchen H. Roffler; Stephen J. Amish; Seth Smith; Ted Cosart; Marty Kardos; Michael K. Schwartz; Gordon Luikart

    2016-01-01

    Identification of genes underlying genomic signatures of natural selection is key to understanding adaptation to local conditions. We used targeted resequencing to identify SNP markers in 5321 candidate adaptive genes associated with known immunological, metabolic and growth functions in ovids and other ungulates. We selectively targeted 8161 exons in protein-coding...

  19. Gene-gene interactions among genetic variants from obesity candidate genes for nonobese and obese populations in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Eugene; Pei, Dee; Huang, Yi-Jen; Hsieh, Chang-Hsun; Wu, Lawrence Shih-Hsin

    2009-08-01

    Recent studies indicate that obesity may play a key role in modulating genetic predispositions to type 2 diabetes (T2D). This study examines the main effects of both single-locus and multilocus interactions among genetic variants in Taiwanese obese and nonobese individuals to test the hypothesis that obesity-related genes may contribute to the etiology of T2D independently and/or through such complex interactions. We genotyped 11 single nucleotide polymorphisms for 10 obesity candidate genes including adrenergic beta-2-receptor surface, adrenergic beta-3-receptor surface, angiotensinogen, fat mass and obesity associated gene, guanine nucleotide binding protein beta polypeptide 3 (GNB3), interleukin 6 receptor, proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 1 (PCSK1), uncoupling protein 1, uncoupling protein 2, and uncoupling protein 3. There were 389 patients diagnosed with T2D and 186 age- and sex-matched controls. Single-locus analyses showed significant main effects of the GNB3 and PCSK1 genes on the risk of T2D among the nonobese group (p = 0.002 and 0.047, respectively). Further, interactions involving GNB3 and PCSK1 were suggested among the nonobese population using the generalized multifactor dimensionality reduction method (p = 0.001). In addition, interactions among angiotensinogen, fat mass and obesity associated gene, GNB3, and uncoupling protein 3 genes were found in a significant four-locus generalized multifactor dimensionality reduction model among the obese population (p = 0.001). The results suggest that the single nucleotide polymorphisms from the obesity candidate genes may contribute to the risk of T2D independently and/or in an interactive manner according to the presence or absence of obesity.

  20. A candidate gene for choanal atresia in alpaca.

    PubMed

    Reed, Kent M; Bauer, Miranda M; Mendoza, Kristelle M; Armién, Aníbal G

    2010-03-01

    Choanal atresia (CA) is a common nasal craniofacial malformation in New World domestic camelids (alpaca and llama). CA results from abnormal development of the nasal passages and is especially debilitating to newborn crias. CA in camelids shares many of the clinical manifestations of a similar condition in humans (CHARGE syndrome). Herein we report on the regulatory gene CHD7 of alpaca, whose homologue in humans is most frequently associated with CHARGE. Sequence of the CHD7 coding region was obtained from a non-affected cria. The complete coding region was 9003 bp, corresponding to a translated amino acid sequence of 3000 aa. Additional genomic sequences corresponding to a significant portion of the CHD7 gene were identified and assembled from the 2x alpaca whole genome sequence, providing confirmatory sequence for much of the CHD7 coding region. The alpaca CHD7 mRNA sequence was 97.9% similar to the human sequence, with the greatest sequence difference being an insertion in exon 38 that results in a polyalanine repeat (A12). Polymorphism in this repeat was tested for association with CA in alpaca by cloning and sequencing the repeat from both affected and non-affected individuals. Variation in length of the poly-A repeat was not associated with CA. Complete sequencing of the CHD7 gene will be necessary to determine whether other mutations in CHD7 are the cause of CA in camelids.

  1. Parkinson's disease candidate gene prioritization based on expression profile of midbrain dopaminergic neurons

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Parkinson's disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder. The pathological hallmark of the disease is degeneration of midbrain dopaminergic neurons. Genetic association studies have linked 13 human chromosomal loci to Parkinson's disease. Identification of gene(s), as part of the etiology of Parkinson's disease, within the large number of genes residing in these loci can be achieved through several approaches, including screening methods, and considering appropriate criteria. Since several of the indentified Parkinson's disease genes are expressed in substantia nigra pars compact of the midbrain, expression within the neurons of this area could be a suitable criterion to limit the number of candidates and identify PD genes. Methods In this work we have used the combination of findings from six rodent transcriptome analysis studies on the gene expression profile of midbrain dopaminergic neurons and the PARK loci in OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) database, to identify new candidate genes for Parkinson's disease. Results Merging the two datasets, we identified 20 genes within PARK loci, 7 of which are located in an orphan Parkinson's disease locus and one, which had been identified as a disease gene. In addition to identifying a set of candidates for further genetic association studies, these results show that the criteria of expression in midbrain dopaminergic neurons may be used to narrow down the number of genes in PARK loci for such studies. PMID:20716345

  2. Overview of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) candidate pathogen recognition genes reveals important Solanum R locus dynamics.

    PubMed

    Andolfo, G; Sanseverino, W; Rombauts, S; Van de Peer, Y; Bradeen, J M; Carputo, D; Frusciante, L; Ercolano, M R

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the genome-wide spatial arrangement of R loci, a complete catalogue of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) and potato (Solanum tuberosum) nucleotide-binding site (NBS) NBS, receptor-like protein (RLP) and receptor-like kinase (RLK) gene repertories was generated. Candidate pathogen recognition genes were characterized with respect to structural diversity, phylogenetic relationships and chromosomal distribution. NBS genes frequently occur in clusters of related gene copies that also include RLP or RLK genes. This scenario is compatible with the existence of selective pressures optimizing coordinated transcription. A number of duplication events associated with lineage-specific evolution were discovered. These findings suggest that different evolutionary mechanisms shaped pathogen recognition gene cluster architecture to expand and to modulate the defence repertoire. Analysis of pathogen recognition gene clusters associated with documented resistance function allowed the identification of adaptive divergence events and the reconstruction of the evolution history of these loci. Differences in candidate pathogen recognition gene number and organization were found between tomato and potato. Most candidate pathogen recognition gene orthologues were distributed at less than perfectly matching positions, suggesting an ongoing lineage-specific rearrangement. Indeed, a local expansion of Toll/Interleukin-1 receptor (TIR)-NBS-leucine-rich repeat (LRR) (TNL) genes in the potato genome was evident. Taken together, these findings have implications for improved understanding of the mechanisms of molecular adaptive selection at Solanum R loci. © 2012 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2012 New Phytologist Trust.

  3. A putative greigite-type magnetosome gene cluster from the candidate phylum Latescibacteria.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei; Pan, Yongxin

    2015-04-01

    The intracellular biomineralization of magnetite and/or greigite magnetosomes in magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) is strictly controlled by a group of conserved genes, termed magnetosome genes, which are organized as clusters (or islands) in MTB genomes. So far, all reported MTB are affiliated within the Proteobacteria phylum, the Nitrospirae phylum and the candidate division OP3. Here, we report the discovery of a putative magnetosome gene cluster structure from the draft genome of an uncultivated bacterium belonging to the candidate phylum Latescibacteria (formerly candidate division WS3) recently recovered by Rinke and colleagues, which contains 10 genes with homology to magnetosome mam genes of magnetotactic Proteobacteria and Nitrospirae. Moreover, these genes are phylogenetically closely related to greigite-type magnetosome genes that were only found from the Deltaproteobacteria MTB before, suggesting that the greigite genes may originate earlier than previously imagined. These findings indicate that some members of Latescibacteria may be capable of forming greigite magnetosomes, and thus may play previously unrecognized roles in environmental iron and sulfur cycles. The conserved genomic structure of magnetosome gene cluster in Latescibacteria phylum supports the hypothesis of horizontal transfer of these genes among distantly related bacterial groups in nature.

  4. Prioritization of candidate disease genes by enlarging the seed set and fusing information of the network topology and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shao-Wu; Shao, Dong-Dong; Zhang, Song-Yao; Wang, Yi-Bin

    2014-06-01

    The identification of disease genes is very important not only to provide greater understanding of gene function and cellular mechanisms which drive human disease, but also to enhance human disease diagnosis and treatment. Recently, high-throughput techniques have been applied to detect dozens or even hundreds of candidate genes. However, experimental approaches to validate the many candidates are usually time-consuming, tedious and expensive, and sometimes lack reproducibility. Therefore, numerous theoretical and computational methods (e.g. network-based approaches) have been developed to prioritize candidate disease genes. Many network-based approaches implicitly utilize the observation that genes causing the same or similar diseases tend to correlate with each other in gene-protein relationship networks. Of these network approaches, the random walk with restart algorithm (RWR) is considered to be a state-of-the-art approach. To further improve the performance of RWR, we propose a novel method named ESFSC to identify disease-related genes, by enlarging the seed set according to the centrality of disease genes in a network and fusing information of the protein-protein interaction (PPI) network topological similarity and the gene expression correlation. The ESFSC algorithm restarts at all of the nodes in the seed set consisting of the known disease genes and their k-nearest neighbor nodes, then walks in the global network separately guided by the similarity transition matrix constructed with PPI network topological similarity properties and the correlational transition matrix constructed with the gene expression profiles. As a result, all the genes in the network are ranked by weighted fusing the above results of the RWR guided by two types of transition matrices. Comprehensive simulation results of the 10 diseases with 97 known disease genes collected from the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database show that ESFSC outperforms existing methods for

  5. Identifying Novel Candidate Genes Related to Apoptosis from a Protein-Protein Interaction Network

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Baoman; Yuan, Fei; Kong, Xiangyin; Hu, Lan-Dian; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis is the process of programmed cell death (PCD) that occurs in multicellular organisms. This process of normal cell death is required to maintain the balance of homeostasis. In addition, some diseases, such as obesity, cancer, and neurodegenerative diseases, can be cured through apoptosis, which produces few side effects. An effective comprehension of the mechanisms underlying apoptosis will be helpful to prevent and treat some diseases. The identification of genes related to apoptosis is essential to uncover its underlying mechanisms. In this study, a computational method was proposed to identify novel candidate genes related to apoptosis. First, protein-protein interaction information was used to construct a weighted graph. Second, a shortest path algorithm was applied to the graph to search for new candidate genes. Finally, the obtained genes were filtered by a permutation test. As a result, 26 genes were obtained, and we discuss their likelihood of being novel apoptosis-related genes by collecting evidence from published literature. PMID:26543496

  6. A potato skin SSH library yields new candidate genes for suberin biosynthesis and periderm formation.

    PubMed

    Soler, Marçal; Serra, Olga; Fluch, Silvia; Molinas, Marisa; Figueras, Mercè

    2011-05-01

    Potato (Solanum tuberosum) tubers are underground storage organs covered by the skin or periderm, a suberized layer that protects inner flesh from dehydration and pathogens. Understanding the molecular processes associated with periderm formation is of great importance for a better knowledge of this protective tissue and for improving the storage life of tubers. Here, to isolate new candidate genes for potato periderm, a suppression subtractive hybridization library from potato skin was performed. This library yielded a comprehensive list of 108 candidate genes that were manually sorted in functional categories according to the main cellular and metabolic processes in periderm. As expected, the list contains Suberin and wax genes, including some genes with a demonstrated role in the biosynthesis of these cell wall aliphatic compounds. Moreover, Regulation and Stress and defence genes are highly abundant in the library in general agreement with previous potato skin proteomic studies. The putative function of the genes in periderm is discussed.

  7. Bioinformatics-Based Identification of Candidate Genes from QTLs Associated with Cell Wall Traits in Populus

    SciTech Connect

    Ranjan, Priya; Yin, Tongming; Zhang, Xinye; Kalluri, Udaya C; Yang, Xiaohan; Jawdy, Sara; Tuskan, Gerald A

    2009-11-01

    Quantitative trait locus (QTL) studies are an integral part of plant research and are used to characterize the genetic basis of phenotypic variation observed in structured populations and inform marker-assisted breeding efforts. These QTL intervals can span large physical regions on a chromosome comprising hundreds of genes, thereby hampering candidate gene identification. Genome history, evolution, and expression evidence can be used to narrow the genes in the interval to a smaller list that is manageable for detailed downstream functional genomics characterization. Our primary motivation for the present study was to address the need for a research methodology that identifies candidate genes within a broad QTL interval. Here we present a bioinformatics-based approach for subdividing candidate genes within QTL intervals into alternate groups of high probability candidates. Application of this approach in the context of studying cell wall traits, specifically lignin content and S/G ratios of stem and root in Populus plants, resulted in manageable sets of genes of both known and putative cell wall biosynthetic function. These results provide a roadmap for future experimental work leading to identification of new genes controlling cell wall recalcitrance and, ultimately, in the utility of plant biomass as an energy feedstock.

  8. Integration of QTL and bioinformatic tools to identify candidate genes for triglycerides in mice.

    PubMed

    Leduc, Magalie S; Hageman, Rachael S; Verdugo, Ricardo A; Tsaih, Shirng-Wern; Walsh, Kenneth; Churchill, Gary A; Paigen, Beverly

    2011-09-01

    To identify genetic loci influencing lipid levels, we performed quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis between inbred mouse strains MRL/MpJ and SM/J, measuring triglyceride levels at 8 weeks of age in F2 mice fed a chow diet. We identified one significant QTL on chromosome (Chr) 15 and three suggestive QTL on Chrs 2, 7, and 17. We also carried out microarray analysis on the livers of parental strains of 282 F2 mice and used these data to find cis-regulated expression QTL. We then narrowed the list of candidate genes under significant QTL using a "toolbox" of bioinformatic resources, including haplotype analysis; parental strain comparison for gene expression differences and nonsynonymous coding single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP); cis-regulated eQTL in livers of F2 mice; correlation between gene expression and phenotype; and conditioning of expression on the phenotype. We suggest Slc25a7 as a candidate gene for the Chr 7 QTL and, based on expression differences, five genes (Polr3 h, Cyp2d22, Cyp2d26, Tspo, and Ttll12) as candidate genes for Chr 15 QTL. This study shows how bioinformatics can be used effectively to reduce candidate gene lists for QTL related to complex traits.

  9. Quantitative expression of candidate genes affecting eggshell color.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Chuanwei; Li, Zesheng; Yang, Ning; Ning, Zhonghua

    2014-05-01

    There are three pigments that affect the color of an eggshell: protoporphyrin, biliverdin and biliverdin-zinc chelate. Protoporphyrin is the main pigment in brown and light-brown eggshells, whereas very little protoporphyrin is found in white eggshells. Eggshell protoporphyrin is derived from the heme formation in birds. Coproporphyrinogen III oxidase (CPOX) and ferrochelatase (FECH) represent rate-limiting enzymes for the heme-biosynthetic pathway. Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), feline leukemia virus receptor (FLVCR), and heme-responsive gene-1 (HRG1) serve as primary transporters for both protoporphyrinogen and heme. Finally, four organic anion transporting polypeptide family members (including solute carrier organic anion transporter family, SLCO1C1, SLCO1A2, SLCO1B3 and LOC418189) may affect pigment transport within eggshells. Here we measured gene expression levels in key tissues of egg-producing hens. We analyzed three different types of hens that generated distinct eggshell colors: white, pink or brown. Our data revealed three ways in which eggshell color was genetically influenced. First, high-level expression of CPOX generated more protoporphyrinogen and a brown eggshell color. In contrast, high expression of FECH likely converted more protoporphyrinogen into heme, reduced protoporphyrinogen levels within the eggshell and generated a light color. Second, heme transporters also affected eggshell color. High-level expression of BCRP, HRG1 and FLVCR were associated with brown, white and generally lighter eggshell colors, respectively. Finally, protoporphyrin precipitation also affected eggshell color, as high expression of both SLCO1A2 and SLCO1C1 were associated with brown eggshell color. As such, we have identified seven genes in which expression levels in different tissues were associated with eggshell color. © 2014 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  10. Association study of 83 candidate genes for bipolar disorder in chromosome 6q selected using an evidence-based prioritization algorithm.

    PubMed

    Bigdeli, T Bernard; Maher, Brion S; Zhao, Zhongming; Sun, Jingchun; Medeiros, Helena; Akula, Nirmala; McMahon, Francis J; Carvalho, Celia; Ferreira, Susana R; Azevedo, Maria H; Knowles, James A; Pato, Michele T; Pato, Carlos N; Fanous, Ayman H

    2013-12-01

    Prior genome-scans of bipolar disorder have revealed chromosome 6q22 as a promising candidate region. However, linkage disequilibrium (LD) mapping studies have yet to identify replicated susceptibility loci. We analyzed 1,422 LD-tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 83 genes to test single-marker and locus-wide evidence of association with bipolar disorder in the NIMH Genetics Initiative bipolar pedigrees and the Portuguese Island Collection (PIC) (N = 1,093 in 528 informative pairs). Both studies previously demonstrated significant evidence of linkage to 6q. SNPs were genotyped using an Illumina iSelect genotyping array which employs the Infinium assay. Evidence of single-marker association was assessed using the generalized disequilibrium test (GDT). Empirical estimates of gene-wide significance were obtained by permutation (via 100,000 gene-dropping simulations) of Fisher's combined test of P-values for each locus. No single variant yielded significant experiment-wide evidence of association, for either the combined sample or in each subsample. Our gene-dropping simulations identified nominally significant gene-wide associations with multiple loci, of which NT5DC1 in the NIMH subsample and CCNC in the PIC were the strongest candidates. However, no one gene consistently exceeded empirical significance criteria in both independent samples or survived Bonferroni correction for the number of genes tested. Using a gene-based approach to family-based association, we identified gene-wide associations with several genes, though no single locus was significantly associated with bipolar disorder in both cohorts. This suggests that chromosome 6q may harbor multiple susceptibility loci or that complex patterns of LD in this region may confound approaches based on common SNPs. Published 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. Published 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the

  11. An extensive candidate gene approach to speciation: diversity, divergence and linkage disequilibrium in candidate pigmentation genes across the European crow hybrid zone.

    PubMed

    Poelstra, J W; Ellegren, H; Wolf, J B W

    2013-12-01

    Colouration patterns have an important role in adaptation and speciation. The European crow system, in which all-black carrion crows and grey-coated hooded crows meet in a narrow hybrid zone, is a prominent example. The marked phenotypic difference is maintained by assortative mating in the absence of neutral genetic divergence, suggesting the presence of few pigmentation genes of major effect. We made use of the rich phenotypic and genetic resources in mammals and identified a comprehensive panel of 95 candidate pigmentation genes for birds. Based on functional annotation, we chose a subset of the most promising 37 candidates, for which we developed a marker system that demonstrably works across the avian phylogeny. In total, we sequenced 107 amplicons (∼3 loci per gene, totalling 60 kb) in population samples of crows (n=23 for each taxon). Tajima's D, Fu's FS, DHEW and HKA (Hudson-Kreitman-Aguade) statistics revealed several amplicons that deviated from neutrality; however, none of these showed significantly elevated differentiation between the two taxa. Hence, colour divergence in this system may be mediated by uncharacterized pigmentation genes or regulatory regions outside genes. Alternatively, the observed high population recombination rate (4Ner∼0.03), with overall linkage disequilibrium dropping rapidly within the order of few 100 bp, may compromise the power to detect causal loci with nearby markers. Our results add to the debate as to the utility of candidate gene approaches in relation to genomic features and the genetic architecture of the phenotypic trait in question.

  12. An extensive candidate gene approach to speciation: diversity, divergence and linkage disequilibrium in candidate pigmentation genes across the European crow hybrid zone

    PubMed Central

    Poelstra, J W; Ellegren, H; Wolf, J B W

    2013-01-01

    Colouration patterns have an important role in adaptation and speciation. The European crow system, in which all-black carrion crows and grey-coated hooded crows meet in a narrow hybrid zone, is a prominent example. The marked phenotypic difference is maintained by assortative mating in the absence of neutral genetic divergence, suggesting the presence of few pigmentation genes of major effect. We made use of the rich phenotypic and genetic resources in mammals and identified a comprehensive panel of 95 candidate pigmentation genes for birds. Based on functional annotation, we chose a subset of the most promising 37 candidates, for which we developed a marker system that demonstrably works across the avian phylogeny. In total, we sequenced 107 amplicons (∼3 loci per gene, totalling 60 kb) in population samples of crows (n=23 for each taxon). Tajima's D, Fu's FS, DHEW and HKA (Hudson–Kreitman–Aguade) statistics revealed several amplicons that deviated from neutrality; however, none of these showed significantly elevated differentiation between the two taxa. Hence, colour divergence in this system may be mediated by uncharacterized pigmentation genes or regulatory regions outside genes. Alternatively, the observed high population recombination rate (4Ner∼0.03), with overall linkage disequilibrium dropping rapidly within the order of few 100 bp, may compromise the power to detect causal loci with nearby markers. Our results add to the debate as to the utility of candidate gene approaches in relation to genomic features and the genetic architecture of the phenotypic trait in question. PMID:23881172

  13. Defining the autism minimum candidate gene region on chromosome 7.

    PubMed

    Hutcheson, Holli B; Bradford, Y; Folstein, S E; Gardiner, M B; Santangelo, S L; Sutcliffe, J S; Haines, J L

    2003-02-01

    Previous genetic and cytogenetic studies provide evidence that points to one or more autism susceptibility genes residing on chromosome 7q (AUTS1, 115-149 cM on the Marshfield map). However, further localization using linkage analysis has proven difficult. To overcome this problem, we examined the Collaborative Linkage Study of Autism (CLSA) data-set to identify only the families potentially linked to chromosome 7. Out of 94, 47 families were identified and 17 markers were used to generate chromosomal haplotypes. We performed recombination breakpoint analysis to determine if any portion of the chromosome was predominately shared across families. The most commonly shared region spanned a 6 cM interval between D7S501 and D7S2847. Additional markers at 1 cM intervals within this region were genotyped and association and recombination breakpoint analysis was again performed. Although no significant allelic association was found, the recombination breakpoint data points to a shared region between D7S496-D7S2418 (120-123 cM) encompassing about 4.5 Mb of genomic DNA containing over 50 genes. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Integrating genes and phenotype: a wheat-Arabidopsis-rice glycosyltransferase database for candidate gene analyses.

    PubMed

    Sado, Pierre-Etienne; Tessier, Dominique; Vasseur, Marc; Elmorjani, Khalil; Guillon, Fabienne; Saulnier, Luc

    2009-02-01

    Glycosyltransferases (GTs) constitute a very large multi-gene superfamily, containing several thousand members identified in sequenced organisms especially in plants. GTs are key enzymes involved in various biological processes such as cell wall formation, storage polysaccharides biosynthesis, and glycosylation of various metabolites. GTs have been identified in rice (Oryza sativa) and Arabidopsis thaliana, but their precise function has been demonstrated biochemically for only a few. In this work we have established a repertoire of virtually all the wheat (Triticum aestivum) GT sequences, using the large publicly available banks of expressed sequences. Based on sequence similarity with Arabidopsis and rice GTs compiled in the carbohydrate active enzyme database (CAZY), we have identified and classified these wheat sequences. The results were used to feed a searchable database available on the web ( http://wwwappli.nantes.inra.fr:8180/GTIDB ) that can be used for initiating an exhaustive candidate gene survey in wheat applied to a particular biological process. This is illustrated through the identification of GT families which are expressed during cell wall formation in wheat grain maturation.

  15. Convergent functional genomics in addiction research - a translational approach to study candidate genes and gene networks.

    PubMed

    Spanagel, Rainer

    2013-01-01

    Convergent functional genomics (CFG) is a translational methodology that integrates in a Bayesian fashion multiple lines of evidence from studies in human and animal models to get a better understanding of the genetics of a disease or pathological behavior. Here the integration of data sets that derive from forward genetics in animals and genetic association studies including genome wide association studies (GWAS) in humans is described for addictive behavior. The aim of forward genetics in animals and association studies in humans is to identify mutations (e.g. SNPs) that produce a certain phenotype; i.e. "from phenotype to genotype". Most powerful in terms of forward genetics is combined quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis and gene expression profiling in recombinant inbreed rodent lines or genetically selected animals for a specific phenotype, e.g. high vs. low drug consumption. By Bayesian scoring genomic information from forward genetics in animals is then combined with human GWAS data on a similar addiction-relevant phenotype. This integrative approach generates a robust candidate gene list that has to be functionally validated by means of reverse genetics in animals; i.e. "from genotype to phenotype". It is proposed that studying addiction relevant phenotypes and endophenotypes by this CFG approach will allow a better determination of the genetics of addictive behavior.

  16. The complete spectrum of yeast chromosome instability genes identifies candidate CIN cancer genes and functional roles for ASTRA complex components.

    PubMed

    Stirling, Peter C; Bloom, Michelle S; Solanki-Patil, Tejomayee; Smith, Stephanie; Sipahimalani, Payal; Li, Zhijian; Kofoed, Megan; Ben-Aroya, Shay; Myung, Kyungjae; Hieter, Philip

    2011-04-01

    Chromosome instability (CIN) is observed in most solid tumors and is linked to somatic mutations in genome integrity maintenance genes. The spectrum of mutations that cause CIN is only partly known and it is not possible to predict a priori all pathways whose disruption might lead to CIN. To address this issue, we generated a catalogue of CIN genes and pathways by screening ∼ 2,000 reduction-of-function alleles for 90% of essential genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Integrating this with published CIN phenotypes for other yeast genes generated a systematic CIN gene dataset comprised of 692 genes. Enriched gene ontology terms defined cellular CIN pathways that, together with sequence orthologs, created a list of human CIN candidate genes, which we cross-referenced to published somatic mutation databases revealing hundreds of mutated CIN candidate genes. Characterization of some poorly characterized CIN genes revealed short telomeres in mutants of the ASTRA/TTT components TTI1 and ASA1. High-throughput phenotypic profiling links ASA1 to TTT (Tel2-Tti1-Tti2) complex function and to TORC1 signaling via Tor1p stability, consistent with the role of TTT in PI3-kinase related kinase biogenesis. The comprehensive CIN gene list presented here in principle comprises all conserved eukaryotic genome integrity pathways. Deriving human CIN candidate genes from the list allows direct cross-referencing with tumor mutational data and thus candidate mutations potentially driving CIN in tumors. Overall, the CIN gene spectrum reveals new chromosome biology and will help us to understand CIN phenotypes in human disease.

  17. The Complete Spectrum of Yeast Chromosome Instability Genes Identifies Candidate CIN Cancer Genes and Functional Roles for ASTRA Complex Components

    PubMed Central

    Stirling, Peter C.; Bloom, Michelle S.; Solanki-Patil, Tejomayee; Smith, Stephanie; Sipahimalani, Payal; Li, Zhijian; Kofoed, Megan; Ben-Aroya, Shay; Myung, Kyungjae; Hieter, Philip

    2011-01-01

    Chromosome instability (CIN) is observed in most solid tumors and is linked to somatic mutations in genome integrity maintenance genes. The spectrum of mutations that cause CIN is only partly known and it is not possible to predict a priori all pathways whose disruption might lead to CIN. To address this issue, we generated a catalogue of CIN genes and pathways by screening ∼2,000 reduction-of-function alleles for 90% of essential genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Integrating this with published CIN phenotypes for other yeast genes generated a systematic CIN gene dataset comprised of 692 genes. Enriched gene ontology terms defined cellular CIN pathways that, together with sequence orthologs, created a list of human CIN candidate genes, which we cross-referenced to published somatic mutation databases revealing hundreds of mutated CIN candidate genes. Characterization of some poorly characterized CIN genes revealed short telomeres in mutants of the ASTRA/TTT components TTI1 and ASA1. High-throughput phenotypic profiling links ASA1 to TTT (Tel2-Tti1-Tti2) complex function and to TORC1 signaling via Tor1p stability, consistent with the role of TTT in PI3-kinase related kinase biogenesis. The comprehensive CIN gene list presented here in principle comprises all conserved eukaryotic genome integrity pathways. Deriving human CIN candidate genes from the list allows direct cross-referencing with tumor mutational data and thus candidate mutations potentially driving CIN in tumors. Overall, the CIN gene spectrum reveals new chromosome biology and will help us to understand CIN phenotypes in human disease. PMID:21552543

  18. Replication of type 2 diabetes candidate genes variations in three geographically unrelated Indian population groups.

    PubMed

    Ali, Shafat; Chopra, Rupali; Manvati, Siddharth; Singh, Yoginder Pal; Kaul, Nabodita; Behura, Anita; Mahajan, Ankit; Sehajpal, Prabodh; Gupta, Subash; Dhar, Manoj K; Chainy, Gagan B N; Bhanwer, Amarjit S; Sharma, Swarkar; Bamezai, Rameshwar N K

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a syndrome of multiple metabolic disorders and is genetically heterogeneous. India comprises one of the largest global populations with highest number of reported type 2 diabetes cases. However, limited information about T2D associated loci is available for Indian populations. It is, therefore, pertinent to evaluate the previously associated candidates as well as identify novel genetic variations in Indian populations to understand the extent of genetic heterogeneity. We chose to do a cost effective high-throughput mass-array genotyping and studied the candidate gene variations associated with T2D in literature. In this case-control candidate genes association study, 91 SNPs from 55 candidate genes have been analyzed in three geographically independent population groups from India. We report the genetic variants in five candidate genes: TCF7L2, HHEX, ENPP1, IDE and FTO, are significantly associated (after Bonferroni correction, p<5.5E-04) with T2D susceptibility in combined population. Interestingly, SNP rs7903146 of the TCF7L2 gene passed the genome wide significance threshold (combined P value = 2.05E-08) in the studied populations. We also observed the association of rs7903146 with blood glucose (fasting and postprandial) levels, supporting the role of TCF7L2 gene in blood glucose homeostasis. Further, we noted that the moderate risk provided by the independently associated loci in combined population with Odds Ratio (OR)<1.38 increased to OR = 2.44, (95%CI = 1.67-3.59) when the risk providing genotypes of TCF7L2, HHEX, ENPP1 and FTO genes were combined, suggesting the importance of gene-gene interactions evaluation in complex disorders like T2D.

  19. Replication of Type 2 Diabetes Candidate Genes Variations in Three Geographically Unrelated Indian Population Groups

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Shafat; Chopra, Rupali; Manvati, Siddharth; Mahajan, Ankit; Sehajpal, Prabodh; Gupta, Subash; Dhar, Manoj K.; Chainy, Gagan B. N.; Bhanwer, Amarjit S.; Sharma, Swarkar; Bamezai, Rameshwar N. K.

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a syndrome of multiple metabolic disorders and is genetically heterogeneous. India comprises one of the largest global populations with highest number of reported type 2 diabetes cases. However, limited information about T2D associated loci is available for Indian populations. It is, therefore, pertinent to evaluate the previously associated candidates as well as identify novel genetic variations in Indian populations to understand the extent of genetic heterogeneity. We chose to do a cost effective high-throughput mass-array genotyping and studied the candidate gene variations associated with T2D in literature. In this case-control candidate genes association study, 91 SNPs from 55 candidate genes have been analyzed in three geographically independent population groups from India. We report the genetic variants in five candidate genes: TCF7L2, HHEX, ENPP1, IDE and FTO, are significantly associated (after Bonferroni correction, p<5.5E−04) with T2D susceptibility in combined population. Interestingly, SNP rs7903146 of the TCF7L2 gene passed the genome wide significance threshold (combined P value = 2.05E−08) in the studied populations. We also observed the association of rs7903146 with blood glucose (fasting and postprandial) levels, supporting the role of TCF7L2 gene in blood glucose homeostasis. Further, we noted that the moderate risk provided by the independently associated loci in combined population with Odds Ratio (OR)<1.38 increased to OR = 2.44, (95%CI = 1.67–3.59) when the risk providing genotypes of TCF7L2, HHEX, ENPP1 and FTO genes were combined, suggesting the importance of gene-gene interactions evaluation in complex disorders like T2D. PMID:23527042

  20. Allele diversity for abiotic stress responsive candidate genes in chickpea reference set using gene based SNP markers

    PubMed Central

    Roorkiwal, Manish; Nayak, Spurthi N.; Thudi, Mahendar; Upadhyaya, Hari D.; Brunel, Dominique; Mournet, Pierre; This, Dominique; Sharma, Prakash C.; Varshney, Rajeev K.

    2014-01-01

    Chickpea is an important food legume crop for the semi-arid regions, however, its productivity is adversely affected by various biotic and abiotic stresses. Identification of candidate genes associated with abiotic stress response will help breeding efforts aiming to enhance its productivity. With this objective, 10 abiotic stress responsive candidate genes were selected on the basis of prior knowledge of this complex trait. These 10 genes were subjected to allele specific sequencing across a chickpea reference set comprising 300 genotypes including 211 genotypes of chickpea mini core collection. A total of 1.3 Mbp sequence data were generated. Multiple sequence alignment (MSA) revealed 79 SNPs and 41 indels in nine genes while the CAP2 gene was found to be conserved across all the genotypes. Among 10 candidate genes, the maximum number of SNPs (34) was observed in abscisic acid stress and ripening (ASR) gene including 22 transitions, 11 transversions and one tri-allelic SNP. Nucleotide diversity varied from 0.0004 to 0.0029 while polymorphism information content (PIC) values ranged from 0.01 (AKIN gene) to 0.43 (CAP2 promoter). Haplotype analysis revealed that alleles were represented by more than two haplotype blocks, except alleles of the CAP2 and sucrose synthase (SuSy) gene, where only one haplotype was identified. These genes can be used for association analysis and if validated, may be useful for enhancing abiotic stress, including drought tolerance, through molecular breeding. PMID:24926299

  1. Allele diversity for abiotic stress responsive candidate genes in chickpea reference set using gene based SNP markers.

    PubMed

    Roorkiwal, Manish; Nayak, Spurthi N; Thudi, Mahendar; Upadhyaya, Hari D; Brunel, Dominique; Mournet, Pierre; This, Dominique; Sharma, Prakash C; Varshney, Rajeev K

    2014-01-01

    Chickpea is an important food legume crop for the semi-arid regions, however, its productivity is adversely affected by various biotic and abiotic stresses. Identification of candidate genes associated with abiotic stress response will help breeding efforts aiming to enhance its productivity. With this objective, 10 abiotic stress responsive candidate genes were selected on the basis of prior knowledge of this complex trait. These 10 genes were subjected to allele specific sequencing across a chickpea reference set comprising 300 genotypes including 211 genotypes of chickpea mini core collection. A total of 1.3 Mbp sequence data were generated. Multiple sequence alignment (MSA) revealed 79 SNPs and 41 indels in nine genes while the CAP2 gene was found to be conserved across all the genotypes. Among 10 candidate genes, the maximum number of SNPs (34) was observed in abscisic acid stress and ripening (ASR) gene including 22 transitions, 11 transversions and one tri-allelic SNP. Nucleotide diversity varied from 0.0004 to 0.0029 while polymorphism information content (PIC) values ranged from 0.01 (AKIN gene) to 0.43 (CAP2 promoter). Haplotype analysis revealed that alleles were represented by more than two haplotype blocks, except alleles of the CAP2 and sucrose synthase (SuSy) gene, where only one haplotype was identified. These genes can be used for association analysis and if validated, may be useful for enhancing abiotic stress, including drought tolerance, through molecular breeding.

  2. Update of the G2D tool for prioritization of gene candidates to inherited diseases

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Iratxeta, Carolina; Bork, Peer; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A.

    2007-01-01

    G2D (genes to diseases) is a web resource for prioritizing genes as candidates for inherited diseases. It uses three algorithms based on different prioritization strategies. The input to the server is the genomic region where the user is looking for the disease-causing mutation, plus an additional piece of information depending on the algorithm used. This information can either be the disease phenotype (described as an online Mendelian inheritance in man (OMIM) identifier), one or several genes known or suspected to be associated with the disease (defined by their Entrez Gene identifiers), or a second genomic region that has been linked as well to the disease. In the latter case, the tool uses known or predicted interactions between genes in the two regions extracted from the STRING database. The output in every case is an ordered list of candidate genes in the region of interest. For the first two of the three methods, the candidate genes are first retrieved through sequence homology search, then scored accordingly to the corresponding method. This means that some of them will correspond to well-known characterized genes, and others will overlap with predicted genes, thus providing a wider analysis. G2D is publicly available at http://www.ogic.ca/projects/g2d_2/ PMID:17478516

  3. HybridRanker: Integrating network topology and biomedical knowledge to prioritize cancer candidate genes.

    PubMed

    Razaghi-Moghadam, Zahra; Abdollahi, Razieh; Goliaei, Sama; Ebrahimi, Morteza

    2016-12-01

    In the past few years, many researches have been conducted on identifying and prioritizing disease-related genes with the goal of achieving significant improvements in treatment and drug discovery. Both experimental and computational approaches have been exploited in recent studies to explore disease-susceptible genes. The experimental methods for identification of these genes are usually time-consuming and expensive. As a result, a substantial number of these studies have shown interest in utilizing computational techniques, commonly known as gene prioritization methods. From a conceptual point of view, these methods combine various sources of information about a particular disease of interest and then use it to discover and prioritize candidate disease genes. In this paper, we propose a gene prioritization method (HybridRanker), which exploits network topological features, as well as several biomedical data sources to identify candidate disease genes. In this approach, the genes are characterized using both local and global features of a protein-protein interaction (PPI) network. Furthermore, to obtain improved results for a particular disease of interest, HybridRanker incorporates data from diseases with similar symptoms and also from its comorbid diseases. We applied this new approach to identify and prioritize candidate disease genes of colorectal cancer (CRC) and the efficiency of HybridRanker was confirmed by leave-one-out cross-validation test. Moreover, in comparison with several well-known prioritization methods, HybridRanker shows higher performance in terms of different criteria.

  4. Exclusion of eleven candidate genes for ocular melanosis in cairn terriers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ocular melanosis of Cairn terrier dogs is an inherited defect characterized by progressive pigmentation of both eyes which can result in glaucoma and blindness. Pedigree analysis suggests the trait has an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. We selected 11 potential candidate genes and used an exclusion analysis approach to investigate the likelihood that one of the candidate gene loci contained the Cairn terrier-ocular melanosis locus. Results Two polymorphic loci were identified within or close to each candidate gene. Genotyping of at least 10 ocular melanosis Cairn terriers for each marker showed that there was no single shared allele for either of the two polymorphic markers identified in ASIP, COMT, GPNMB, GSK3B, LYST, MC1R, MITF, SILV, TYR, TYRP1,and TYRP2. This is strong evidence to exclude each locus as the site of the ocular melanosis mutation (probability of a false exclusion calculated for each gene ranged from 1.59 × 10-4 to 1 × 10-9). Conclusions None of the 11 potential candidate genes selected are likely to be the gene locus for ocular melanosis in Cairn terriers. PMID:23448350

  5. Exclusion of eleven candidate genes for ocular melanosis in Cairn terriers.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Paige A; Bartoe, Joshua T; Quinones, Celeste R; Venta, Patrick J; Petersen-Jones, Simon M

    2013-03-01

    Ocular melanosis of Cairn terrier dogs is an inherited defect characterized by progressive pigmentation of both eyes which can result in glaucoma and blindness. Pedigree analysis suggests the trait has an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. We selected 11 potential candidate genes and used an exclusion analysis approach to investigate the likelihood that one of the candidate gene loci contained the Cairn terrier-ocular melanosis locus. Two polymorphic loci were identified within or close to each candidate gene. Genotyping of at least 10 ocular melanosis Cairn terriers for each marker showed that there was no single shared allele for either of the two polymorphic markers identified in ASIP, COMT, GPNMB, GSK3B, LYST, MC1R, MITF, SILV, TYR, TYRP1,and TYRP2. This is strong evidence to exclude each locus as the site of the ocular melanosis mutation (probability of a false exclusion calculated for each gene ranged from 1.59 × 10-4 to 1 × 10-9). None of the 11 potential candidate genes selected are likely to be the gene locus for ocular melanosis in Cairn terriers.

  6. Development of New Candidate Gene and EST-Based Molecular Markers for Gossypium Species

    PubMed Central

    Buyyarapu, Ramesh; Kantety, Ramesh V.; Yu, John Z.; Saha, Sukumar; Sharma, Govind C.

    2011-01-01

    New source of molecular markers accelerate the efforts in improving cotton fiber traits and aid in developing high-density integrated genetic maps. We developed new markers based on candidate genes and G. arboreum EST sequences that were used for polymorphism detection followed by genetic and physical mapping. Nineteen gene-based markers were surveyed for polymorphism detection in 26 Gossypium species. Cluster analysis generated a phylogenetic tree with four major sub-clusters for 23 species while three species branched out individually. CAP method enhanced the rate of polymorphism of candidate gene-based markers between G. hirsutum and G. barbadense. Two hundred A-genome based SSR markers were designed after datamining of G. arboreum EST sequences (Mississippi Gossypium arboreum   EST-SSR: MGAES). Over 70% of MGAES markers successfully produced amplicons while 65 of them demonstrated polymorphism between the parents of G. hirsutum and G. barbadense RIL population and formed 14 linkage groups. Chromosomal localization of both candidate gene-based and MGAES markers was assisted by euploid and hypoaneuploid CS-B analysis. Gene-based and MGAES markers were highly informative as they were designed from candidate genes and fiber transcriptome with a potential to be integrated into the existing cotton genetic and physical maps. PMID:22315588

  7. LOD score exclusion analyses for candidate genes using random population samples.

    PubMed

    Deng, H W; Li, J; Recker, R R

    2001-05-01

    While extensive analyses have been conducted to test for, no formal analyses have been conducted to test against, the importance of candidate genes with random population samples. We develop a LOD score approach for exclusion analyses of candidate genes with random population samples. Under this approach, specific genetic effects and inheritance models at candidate genes can be analysed and if a LOD score is < or = - 2.0, the locus can be excluded from having an effect larger than that specified. Computer simulations show that, with sample sizes often employed in association studies, this approach has high power to exclude a gene from having moderate genetic effects. In contrast to regular association analyses, population admixture will not affect the robustness of our analyses; in fact, it renders our analyses more conservative and thus any significant exclusion result is robust. Our exclusion analysis complements association analysis for candidate genes in random population samples and is parallel to the exclusion mapping analyses that may be conducted in linkage analyses with pedigrees or relative pairs. The usefulness of the approach is demonstrated by an application to test the importance of vitamin D receptor and estrogen receptor genes underlying the differential risk to osteoporotic fractures.

  8. Identification of candidate lung cancer susceptibility genes in mouse using oligonucleotide arrays

    PubMed Central

    Lemon, W; Bernert, H; Sun, H; Wang, Y; You, M

    2002-01-01

    We applied microarray gene expression profiling to lungs from mouse strains having variable susceptibility to lung tumour development as a means to identify, within known quantitative trait loci (QTLs), candidate genes responsible for susceptibility or resistance to lung cancer. At least eight chromosomal regions of mice have been mapped and verified to be linked with lung tumour susceptibility or resistance. In this study, high density oligonucleotide arrays were used to measure the relative expression levels of >36 000 genes and ESTs in lung tissues of A/J, BALB/cJ, SM/J, C3H/HeJ, and C57BL/6J mice. A number of differentially expressed genes were found in each of the lung cancer susceptibility QTLs. Bioinformatic analysis of the differentially expressed genes located within QTLs produced 28 susceptibility candidates and 22 resistance candidates. These candidates may be extremely helpful in the ultimate identification of the precise genes responsible for lung tumour susceptibility or resistance in mice and, through follow up, humans. Complete data sets are available at http://thinker.med.ohio-state.edu. PMID:12205107

  9. Development of New Candidate Gene and EST-Based Molecular Markers for Gossypium Species.

    PubMed

    Buyyarapu, Ramesh; Kantety, Ramesh V; Yu, John Z; Saha, Sukumar; Sharma, Govind C

    2011-01-01

    New source of molecular markers accelerate the efforts in improving cotton fiber traits and aid in developing high-density integrated genetic maps. We developed new markers based on candidate genes and G. arboreum EST sequences that were used for polymorphism detection followed by genetic and physical mapping. Nineteen gene-based markers were surveyed for polymorphism detection in 26 Gossypium species. Cluster analysis generated a phylogenetic tree with four major sub-clusters for 23 species while three species branched out individually. CAP method enhanced the rate of polymorphism of candidate gene-based markers between G. hirsutum and G. barbadense. Two hundred A-genome based SSR markers were designed after datamining of G. arboreum EST sequences (Mississippi Gossypium arboreum  EST-SSR: MGAES). Over 70% of MGAES markers successfully produced amplicons while 65 of them demonstrated polymorphism between the parents of G. hirsutum and G. barbadense RIL population and formed 14 linkage groups. Chromosomal localization of both candidate gene-based and MGAES markers was assisted by euploid and hypoaneuploid CS-B analysis. Gene-based and MGAES markers were highly informative as they were designed from candidate genes and fiber transcriptome with a potential to be integrated into the existing cotton genetic and physical maps.

  10. Gene Duplication and Gene Expression Changes Play a Role in the Evolution of Candidate Pollen Feeding Genes in Heliconius Butterflies.

    PubMed

    Smith, Gilbert; Macias-Muñoz, Aide; Briscoe, Adriana D

    2016-09-02

    Heliconius possess a unique ability among butterflies to feed on pollen. Pollen feeding significantly extends their lifespan, and is thought to have been important to the diversification of the genus. We used RNA sequencing to examine feeding-related gene expression in the mouthparts of four species of Heliconius and one nonpollen feeding species, Eueides isabella We hypothesized that genes involved in morphology and protein metabolism might be upregulated in Heliconius because they have longer proboscides than Eueides, and because pollen contains more protein than nectar. Using de novo transcriptome assemblies, we tested these hypotheses by comparing gene expression in mouthparts against antennae and legs. We first looked for genes upregulated in mouthparts across all five species and discovered several hundred genes, many of which had functional annotations involving metabolism of proteins (cocoonase), lipids, and carbohydrates. We then looked specifically within Heliconius where we found eleven common upregulated genes with roles in morphology (CPR cuticle proteins), behavior (takeout-like), and metabolism (luciferase-like). Closer examination of these candidates revealed that cocoonase underwent several duplications along the lineage leading to heliconiine butterflies, including two Heliconius-specific duplications. Luciferase-like genes also underwent duplication within lepidopterans, and upregulation in Heliconius mouthparts. Reverse-transcription PCR confirmed that three cocoonases, a peptidase, and one luciferase-like gene are expressed in the proboscis with little to no expression in labial palps and salivary glands. Our results suggest pollen feeding, like other dietary specializations, was likely facilitated by adaptive expansions of preexisting genes-and that the butterfly proboscis is involved in digestive enzyme production.

  11. A computational framework for the prioritization of disease-gene candidates.

    PubMed

    Browne, Fiona; Wang, Haiying; Zheng, Huiru

    2015-01-01

    The identification of genes and uncovering the role they play in diseases is an important and complex challenge. Genome-wide linkage and association studies have made advancements in identifying genetic variants that underpin human disease. An important challenge now is to identify meaningful disease-associated genes from a long list of candidate genes implicated by these analyses. The application of gene prioritization can enhance our understanding of disease mechanisms and aid in the discovery of drug targets. The integration of protein-protein interaction networks along with disease datasets and contextual information is an important tool in unraveling the molecular basis of diseases. In this paper we propose a computational pipeline for the prioritization of disease-gene candidates. Diverse heterogeneous data including: gene-expression, protein-protein interaction network, ontology-based similarity and topological measures and tissue-specific are integrated. The pipeline was applied to prioritize Alzheimer's Disease (AD) genes, whereby a list of 32 prioritized genes was generated. This approach correctly identified key AD susceptible genes: PSEN1 and TRAF1. Biological process enrichment analysis revealed the prioritized genes are modulated in AD pathogenesis including: regulation of neurogenesis and generation of neurons. Relatively high predictive performance (AUC: 0.70) was observed when classifying AD and normal gene expression profiles from individuals using leave-one-out cross validation. This work provides a foundation for future investigation of diverse heterogeneous data integration for disease-gene prioritization.

  12. Elevated transcription factor specificity protein 1 in autistic brains alters the expression of autism candidate genes.

    PubMed

    Thanseem, Ismail; Anitha, Ayyappan; Nakamura, Kazuhiko; Suda, Shiro; Iwata, Keiko; Matsuzaki, Hideo; Ohtsubo, Masafumi; Ueki, Takatoshi; Katayama, Taiichi; Iwata, Yasuhide; Suzuki, Katsuaki; Minoshima, Shinsei; Mori, Norio

    2012-03-01

    Profound changes in gene expression can result from abnormalities in the concentrations of sequence-specific transcription factors like specificity protein 1 (Sp1). Specificity protein 1 binding sites have been reported in the promoter regions of several genes implicated in autism. We hypothesize that dysfunction of Sp1 could affect the expression of multiple autism candidate genes, contributing to the heterogeneity of autism. We assessed any alterations in the expression of Sp1 and that of autism candidate genes in the postmortem brain (anterior cingulate gyrus [ACG], motor cortex, and thalamus) of autism patients (n = 8) compared with healthy control subjects (n = 13). Alterations in the expression of candidate genes upon Sp1/DNA binding inhibition with mithramycin and Sp1 silencing by RNAi were studied in SK-N-SH neuronal cells. We observed elevated expression of Sp1 in ACG of autism patients (p = .010). We also observed altered expression of several autism candidate genes. GABRB3, RELN, and HTR2A showed reduced expression, whereas CD38, ITGB3, MAOA, MECP2, OXTR, and PTEN showed elevated expression in autism. In SK-N-SH cells, OXTR, PTEN, and RELN showed reduced expression upon Sp1/DNA binding inhibition and Sp1 silencing. The RNA integrity number was not available for any of the samples. Transcription factor Sp1 is dysfunctional in the ACG of autistic brain. Consequently, the expression of potential autism candidate genes regulated by Sp1, especially OXTR and PTEN, could be affected. The diverse downstream pathways mediated by the Sp1-regulated genes, along with the environmental and intracellular signal-related regulation of Sp1, could explain the complex phenotypes associated with autism.

  13. Identifying candidate disease genes using a trace norm constrained bipartite raking model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Cheng H; Koyejo, Oluwasanmi; Ghosh, Joydeep

    2013-01-01

    Computational prediction of genes that play roles in human diseases remains an important but challenging task. In this work, we formulate candidate gene prediction as a bipartite ranking problem combining a task-wise ordered observation model with a latent multitask regression function using the matrix-variate Gaussian process (MV-GP). We then use a trace-norm constrained variational inference approach to obtain the bipartite ranking model variables and the parameters of the underlying multitask regression model. We use this model to predict candidate genes from two gene-disease association data sets and show that our model outperforms current state-of-the-art methods. Finally, we demonstrate the practical utility of our method by successfully recovering well characterized gene-disease associations hidden in our training data.

  14. Candidate genes for obesity-susceptibility show enriched association within a large genome-wide association study for BMI

    PubMed Central

    Vimaleswaran, Karani S.; Tachmazidou, Ioanna; Zhao, Jing Hua; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Dudbridge, Frank; Loos, Ruth J.F.

    2012-01-01

    Before the advent of genome-wide association studies (GWASs), hundreds of candidate genes for obesity-susceptibility had been identified through a variety of approaches. We examined whether those obesity candidate genes are enriched for associations with body mass index (BMI) compared with non-candidate genes by using data from a large-scale GWAS. A thorough literature search identified 547 candidate genes for obesity-susceptibility based on evidence from animal studies, Mendelian syndromes, linkage studies, genetic association studies and expression studies. Genomic regions were defined to include the genes ±10 kb of flanking sequence around candidate and non-candidate genes. We used summary statistics publicly available from the discovery stage of the genome-wide meta-analysis for BMI performed by the genetic investigation of anthropometric traits consortium in 123 564 individuals. Hypergeometric, rank tail-strength and gene-set enrichment analysis tests were used to test for the enrichment of association in candidate compared with non-candidate genes. The hypergeometric test of enrichment was not significant at the 5% P-value quantile (P = 0.35), but was nominally significant at the 25% quantile (P = 0.015). The rank tail-strength and gene-set enrichment tests were nominally significant for the full set of genes and borderline significant for the subset without SNPs at P < 10−7. Taken together, the observed evidence for enrichment suggests that the candidate gene approach retains some value. However, the degree of enrichment is small despite the extensive number of candidate genes and the large sample size. Studies that focus on candidate genes have only slightly increased chances of detecting associations, and are likely to miss many true effects in non-candidate genes, at least for obesity-related traits. PMID:22791748

  15. High throughput in vivo functional validation of candidate congenital heart disease genes in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jun-yi; Fu, Yulong; Nettleton, Margaret; Richman, Adam; Han, Zhe

    2017-01-01

    Genomic sequencing has implicated large numbers of genes and de novo mutations as potential disease risk factors. A high throughput in vivo model system is needed to validate gene associations with pathology. We developed a Drosophila-based functional system to screen candidate disease genes identified from Congenital Heart Disease (CHD) patients. 134 genes were tested in the Drosophila heart using RNAi-based gene silencing. Quantitative analyses of multiple cardiac phenotypes demonstrated essential structural, functional, and developmental roles for more than 70 genes, including a subgroup encoding histone H3K4 modifying proteins. We also demonstrated the use of Drosophila to evaluate cardiac phenotypes resulting from specific, patient-derived alleles of candidate disease genes. We describe the first high throughput in vivo validation system to screen candidate disease genes identified from patients. This approach has the potential to facilitate development of precision medicine approaches for CHD and other diseases associated with genetic factors. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22617.001 PMID:28084990

  16. The landscape of candidate driver genes differs between male and female breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Ida; Ringnér, Markus; Hedenfalk, Ingrid

    2013-01-01

    The rapidly growing collection of diverse genome-scale data from multiple tumor types sheds light on various aspects of the underlying tumor biology. With the objective to identify genes of importance for breast tumorigenesis in men and to enable comparisons with genes important for breast cancer development in women, we applied the computational framework COpy Number and EXpression In Cancer (CONEXIC) to detect candidate driver genes among all altered passenger genes. Unique to this approach is that each driver gene is associated with several gene modules that are believed to be altered by the driver. Thirty candidate drivers were found in the male breast cancers and 67 in the female breast cancers. We identified many known drivers of breast cancer and other types of cancer, in the female dataset (e.g. GATA3, CCNE1, GRB7, CDK4). In contrast, only three known cancer genes were found among male breast cancers; MAP2K4, LHP, and ZNF217. Many of the candidate drivers identified are known to be involved in processes associated with tumorigenesis, including proliferation, invasion and differentiation. One of the modules identified in male breast cancer was regulated by THY1, a gene involved in invasion and related to epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Furthermore, men with THY1 positive breast cancers had significantly inferior survival. THY1 may thus be a promising novel prognostic marker for male breast cancer. Another module identified among male breast cancers, regulated by SPAG5, was closely associated with proliferation. Our data indicate that male and female breast cancers display highly different landscapes of candidate driver genes, as only a few genes were found in common between the two. Consequently, the pathobiology of male breast cancer may differ from that of female breast cancer and can be associated with differences in prognosis; men diagnosed with breast cancer may consequently require different management and treatment strategies than women.

  17. Gene Duplication and Gene Expression Changes Play a Role in the Evolution of Candidate Pollen Feeding Genes in Heliconius Butterflies

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Gilbert; Macias-Muñoz, Aide; Briscoe, Adriana D.

    2016-01-01

    Heliconius possess a unique ability among butterflies to feed on pollen. Pollen feeding significantly extends their lifespan, and is thought to have been important to the diversification of the genus. We used RNA sequencing to examine feeding-related gene expression in the mouthparts of four species of Heliconius and one nonpollen feeding species, Eueides isabella. We hypothesized that genes involved in morphology and protein metabolism might be upregulated in Heliconius because they have longer proboscides than Eueides, and because pollen contains more protein than nectar. Using de novo transcriptome assemblies, we tested these hypotheses by comparing gene expression in mouthparts against antennae and legs. We first looked for genes upregulated in mouthparts across all five species and discovered several hundred genes, many of which had functional annotations involving metabolism of proteins (cocoonase), lipids, and carbohydrates. We then looked specifically within Heliconius where we found eleven common upregulated genes with roles in morphology (CPR cuticle proteins), behavior (takeout-like), and metabolism (luciferase-like). Closer examination of these candidates revealed that cocoonase underwent several duplications along the lineage leading to heliconiine butterflies, including two Heliconius-specific duplications. Luciferase-like genes also underwent duplication within lepidopterans, and upregulation in Heliconius mouthparts. Reverse-transcription PCR confirmed that three cocoonases, a peptidase, and one luciferase-like gene are expressed in the proboscis with little to no expression in labial palps and salivary glands. Our results suggest pollen feeding, like other dietary specializations, was likely facilitated by adaptive expansions of preexisting genes—and that the butterfly proboscis is involved in digestive enzyme production. PMID:27553646

  18. Family-Based Genetic Association for Molar-Incisor Hypomineralization.

    PubMed

    Jeremias, Fabiano; Pierri, Ricardo A G; Souza, Juliana F; Fragelli, Camila Maria B; Restrepo, Manuel; Finoti, Livia S; Bussaneli, Diego G; Cordeiro, Rita C L; Secolin, Rodrigo; Maurer-Morelli, Claudia V; Scarel-Caminaga, Raquel M; Santos-Pinto, Lourdes

    2016-01-01

    Despite some evidence of genetic and environmental factors on molar-incisor hypomineralization (MIH), its aetiology remains unclear. This family-based genetic association study aimed more comprehensively to investigate the genetic carriage potentially involved in MIH development. DNA was obtained from buccal cells of 391 individuals who were birth family members of 101 Brazilian nuclear families. Sixty-three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were investigated in 21 candidate genes related to amelogenesis using the TaqMan™ OpenArray™ Genotyping platform. All SNPs were genotyped in 165 birth family members unaffected by MIH, 96 with unknown MIH status and 130 affected individuals (50.7% with severe MIH). Association analysis was performed by the transmission/disequilibrium test (TDT), and statistical results were corrected using the false discovery rate. Significant results were obtained for SNPs rs7821494 (FAM83H gene, OR = 3.7; 95% CI = 1.75-7.78), rs34367704 (AMBN gene, OR = 2.7; 95% CI = 1.16-6.58), rs3789334 (BMP2 gene, OR = 2.9; 95% CI = 1.34-6.35), rs6099486 (BMP7 gene, OR = 2.2; 95% CI = 1.14-4.38), rs762642 (BMP4 gene, OR = 2.3; 95% CI = 1.38-3.65), rs7664896 (ENAM gene, OR = 2.1; 95% CI = 1.19-3.51), rs1711399 (MMP20 gene, OR = 0.4; 95% CI = 0.20-0.72), rs1711423 (MMP20 gene, OR = 2.1; 95% CI = 1.18-3.61), rs2278163 (DLX3 gene, OR = 2.8; 95% CI = 1.26-6.41), rs6996321 (FGFR1 gene, OR = 2.7; 95% CI = 1.20-5.88), and rs5979395 (AMELX gene, OR = 11.7; 95% CI = 1.63-84.74). Through this family-based association study, we concluded that variations in genes related to amelogenesis were associated with the susceptibility to develop MIH. This result is in agreement with the multifactorial idea of the MIH aetiology, but further studies are necessary to investigate more thoroughly the factors that could influence MIH.

  19. Third chromosome candidate genes for conspecific sperm precedence between D. simulans and D. mauritiana

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Male - female incompatibilities can be critical in keeping species as separate and discrete units. Premating incompatibilities and postzygotic hybrid sterility/inviability have been widely studied as isolating barriers between species. In recent years, a number of studies have brought attention to postmating prezygotic barriers arising from male - male competition and male - female interactions. Yet little is known about the genetic basis of postmating prezygotic isolation barriers between species. Results Using D. simulans lines with mapped introgressions of D. mauritiana into their third chromosome, we find at least two D. mauritiana introgressions causing male breakdown in competitive paternity success. Eighty one genes within the mapped introgressed regions were identified as broad-sense candidates on the basis of male reproductive tract expression and male-related function. The list of candidates was narrowed down to five genes based on differences in male reproductive tract expression between D. simulans and D. mauritiana. Another ten genes were confirmed as candidates using evidence of adaptive gene coding sequence diversification in the D. simulans and/or D. mauritiana lineage. Our results show a complex genetic basis for conspecific sperm precedence, with evidence of gene interactions between at least two third chromosome loci. Pleiotropy is also evident from correlation between conspecific sperm precedence and female induced fecundity and the identification of candidate genes that might exert an effect through genetic conflict and immunity. Conclusions We identified at least two loci responsible for conspecific sperm precedence. A third of candidate genes within these two loci are located in the 89B cytogenetic position, highlighting a possible major role for this chromosome position during the evolution of species specific adaptations to postmating prezygotic reproductive challenges. PMID:20388218

  20. Third chromosome candidate genes for conspecific sperm precedence between D. simulans and D. mauritiana.

    PubMed

    Levesque, Lisa; Brouwers, Barb; Sundararajan, Vignesh; Civetta, Alberto

    2010-04-13

    Male - female incompatibilities can be critical in keeping species as separate and discrete units. Premating incompatibilities and postzygotic hybrid sterility/inviability have been widely studied as isolating barriers between species. In recent years, a number of studies have brought attention to postmating prezygotic barriers arising from male - male competition and male - female interactions. Yet little is known about the genetic basis of postmating prezygotic isolation barriers between species. Using D. simulans lines with mapped introgressions of D. mauritiana into their third chromosome, we find at least two D. mauritiana introgressions causing male breakdown in competitive paternity success. Eighty one genes within the mapped introgressed regions were identified as broad-sense candidates on the basis of male reproductive tract expression and male-related function. The list of candidates was narrowed down to five genes based on differences in male reproductive tract expression between D. simulans and D. mauritiana. Another ten genes were confirmed as candidates using evidence of adaptive gene coding sequence diversification in the D. simulans and/or D. mauritiana lineage. Our results show a complex genetic basis for conspecific sperm precedence, with evidence of gene interactions between at least two third chromosome loci. Pleiotropy is also evident from correlation between conspecific sperm precedence and female induced fecundity and the identification of candidate genes that might exert an effect through genetic conflict and immunity. We identified at least two loci responsible for conspecific sperm precedence. A third of candidate genes within these two loci are located in the 89B cytogenetic position, highlighting a possible major role for this chromosome position during the evolution of species specific adaptations to postmating prezygotic reproductive challenges.

  1. Identification of candidate genes and mutations in QTL regions for immune responses in chicken.

    PubMed

    Siwek, M; Slawinska, A; Rydzanicz, M; Wesoly, J; Fraszczak, M; Suchocki, T; Skiba, J; Skiba, K; Szyda, J

    2015-06-01

    There are two categories of immune responses - innate and adaptive immunity - both having polygenic backgrounds and a significant environmental component. In our study, adaptive immunity was represented by the specific antibody response toward keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH); innate immunity was represented by natural antibodies toward lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and lipoteichoic acid (LTA). Defining genetic bases of immune responses leads from defining quantitative trait loci (QTL) toward a single mutation responsible for variation in the phenotypic trait. The goal of the reported study was to define candidate genes and mutations for the immune traits of interest in chicken by performing an association study of SNPs located in candidate genes defined in QTL regions. Candidate genes and SNPs in QTL regions were selected in silico. SNP association was based on a custom SNP panel, GoldenGate genotyping assay (Illumina) and two statistical models: random mixed model and CAR score. The most significant SNP for immune response toward KLH was located in the JMJD6 gene located on GGA18. Four SNPs in candidate genes FOXJ1 (GGA18), EPHB1 (GGA9), PTGER4 (GGAZ) and PRKCB (GGA14) showed association with natural antibodies for LPS. A single SNP in ITGB4 (GGA18) was associated with natural antibodies for LTA. All associated SNPs mentioned above showed additive effects.

  2. Poor replication of candidate genes for major depressive disorder using genome-wide association data.

    PubMed

    Bosker, F J; Hartman, C A; Nolte, I M; Prins, B P; Terpstra, P; Posthuma, D; van Veen, T; Willemsen, G; DeRijk, R H; de Geus, E J; Hoogendijk, W J; Sullivan, P F; Penninx, B W; Boomsma, D I; Snieder, H; Nolen, W A

    2011-05-01

    Data from the Genetic Association Information Network (GAIN) genome-wide association study (GWAS) in major depressive disorder (MDD) were used to explore previously reported candidate gene and single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) associations in MDD. A systematic literature search of candidate genes associated with MDD in case-control studies was performed before the results of the GAIN MDD study became available. Measured and imputed candidate SNPs and genes were tested in the GAIN MDD study encompassing 1738 cases and 1802 controls. Imputation was used to increase the number of SNPs from the GWAS and to improve coverage of SNPs in the candidate genes selected. Tests were carried out for individual SNPs and the entire gene using different statistical approaches, with permutation analysis as the final arbiter. In all, 78 papers reporting on 57 genes were identified, from which 92 SNPs could be mapped. In the GAIN MDD study, two SNPs were associated with MDD: C5orf20 (rs12520799; P=0.038; odds ratio (OR) AT=1.10, 95% CI 0.95-1.29; OR TT=1.21, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.01-1.47) and NPY (rs16139; P=0.034; OR C allele=0.73, 95% CI 0.55-0.97), constituting a direct replication of previously identified SNPs. At the gene level, TNF (rs76917; OR T=1.35, 95% CI 1.13-1.63; P=0.0034) was identified as the only gene for which the association with MDD remained significant after correction for multiple testing. For SLC6A2 (norepinephrine transporter (NET)) significantly more SNPs (19 out of 100; P=0.039) than expected were associated while accounting for the linkage disequilibrium (LD) structure. Thus, we found support for involvement in MDD for only four genes. However, given the number of candidate SNPs and genes that were tested, even these significant may well be false positives. The poor replication may point to publication bias and false-positive findings in previous candidate gene studies, and may also be related to heterogeneity of the MDD phenotype as well as

  3. Biological processes, properties and molecular wiring diagrams of candidate low-penetrance breast cancer susceptibility genes

    PubMed Central

    Bonifaci, Núria; Berenguer, Antoni; Díez, Javier; Reina, Oscar; Medina, Ignacio; Dopazo, Joaquín; Moreno, Víctor; Pujana, Miguel Angel

    2008-01-01

    Background Recent advances in whole-genome association studies (WGASs) for human cancer risk are beginning to provide the part lists of low-penetrance susceptibility genes. However, statistical analysis in these studies is complicated by the vast number of genetic variants examined and the weak effects observed, as a result of which constraints must be incorporated into the study design and analytical approach. In this scenario, biological attributes beyond the adjusted statistics generally receive little attention and, more importantly, the fundamental biological characteristics of low-penetrance susceptibility genes have yet to be determined. Methods We applied an integrative approach for identifying candidate low-penetrance breast cancer susceptibility genes, their characteristics and molecular networks through the analysis of diverse sources of biological evidence. Results First, examination of the distribution of Gene Ontology terms in ordered WGAS results identified asymmetrical distribution of Cell Communication and Cell Death processes linked to risk. Second, analysis of 11 different types of molecular or functional relationships in genomic and proteomic data sets defined the "omic" properties of candidate genes: i/ differential expression in tumors relative to normal tissue; ii/ somatic genomic copy number changes correlating with gene expression levels; iii/ differentially expressed across age at diagnosis; and iv/ expression changes after BRCA1 perturbation. Finally, network modeling of the effects of variants on germline gene expression showed higher connectivity than expected by chance between novel candidates and with known susceptibility genes, which supports functional relationships and provides mechanistic hypotheses of risk. Conclusion This study proposes that cell communication and cell death are major biological processes perturbed in risk of breast cancer conferred by low-penetrance variants, and defines the common omic properties, molecular

  4. Candidate innate immune system gene expression in the ecological model Daphnia

    PubMed Central

    Decaestecker, Ellen; Labbé, Pierrick; Ellegaard, Kirsten; Allen, Judith E.; Little, Tom J.

    2011-01-01

    The last ten years have witnessed increasing interest in host–pathogen interactions involving invertebrate hosts. The invertebrate innate immune system is now relatively well characterised, but in a limited range of genetic model organisms and under a limited number of conditions. Immune systems have been little studied under real-world scenarios of environmental variation and parasitism. Thus, we have investigated expression of candidate innate immune system genes in the water flea Daphnia, a model organism for ecological genetics, and whose capacity for clonal reproduction facilitates an exceptionally rigorous control of exposure dose or the study of responses at many time points. A unique characteristic of the particular Daphnia clones and pathogen strain combinations used presently is that they have been shown to be involved in specific host–pathogen coevolutionary interactions in the wild. We choose five genes, which are strong candidates to be involved in Daphnia–pathogen interactions, given that they have been shown to code for immune effectors in related organisms. Differential expression of these genes was quantified by qRT-PCR following exposure to the bacterial pathogen Pasteuria ramosa. Constitutive expression levels differed between host genotypes, and some genes appeared to show correlated expression. However, none of the genes appeared to show a major modification of expression level in response to Pasteuria exposure. By applying knowledge from related genetic model organisms (e.g. Drosophila) to models for the study of evolutionary ecology and coevolution (i.e. Daphnia), the candidate gene approach is temptingly efficient. However, our results show that detection of only weak patterns is likely if one chooses target genes for study based on previously identified genome sequences by comparison to homologues from other related organisms. Future work on the Daphnia–Pasteuria system will need to balance a candidate gene approach with more

  5. Identification of candidate cancer-causing genes in mouse brain tumors by retroviral tagging

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Fredrik K.; Brodd, Josefin; Eklöf, Charlotta; Ferletta, Maria; Hesselager, Göran; Tiger, Carl-Fredrik; Uhrbom, Lene; Westermark, Bengt

    2004-01-01

    Murine retroviruses may cause malignant tumors in mice by insertional mutagenesis of host genes. The use of retroviral tagging as a means of identifying cancer-causing genes has, however, almost entirely been restricted to hematopoietic tumors. The aim of this study was to develop a system allowing for the retroviral tagging of candidate genes in malignant brain tumors. Mouse gliomas were induced by a recombinant Moloney murine leukemia virus encoding platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) B-chain. The underlying idea was that tumors evolve through a combination of PDGF-mediated autocrine growth stimulation and insertional mutagenesis of genes that cooperate with PDGF in gliomagenesis. Common insertion sites (loci that were tagged in more than one tumor) were identified by cloning and sequencing retroviral flanking segments, followed by blast searches of mouse genome databases. A number of candidate brain tumor loci (Btls) were identified. Several of these Btls correspond to known tumor-causing genes; these findings strongly support the underlying idea of our experimental approach. Other Btls harbor genes with a hitherto unproven role in transformation or oncogenesis. Our findings indicate that retroviral tagging with a growth factor-encoding virus may be a powerful means of identifying candidate tumor-causing genes in nonhematopoietic tumors. PMID:15273287

  6. Candidate gene study of eight GABAA receptor subunits in panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Crowe, R R; Wang, Z; Noyes, R; Albrecht, B E; Darlison, M G; Bailey, M E; Johnson, K J; Zoëga, T

    1997-08-01

    gamma-Aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptor subunit genes are candidate genes for panic disorder. Benzodiazepine agonists acting at this receptor can suppress panic attacks, and both inverse agonists and antagonists can precipitate them. The human GABAA receptor subtypes are composed of various combinations of 13 subunits, each encoded by a unique gene. The authors tested eight of these subunits in a candidate gene linkage study of panic disorder. In 21 U.S. and five Icelandic multiplex pedigrees of panic disorder, 104 individuals had DSM-III-R panic disorder (the narrowly defined affected phenotype) and 134 had either this diagnosis or subsyndromal panic disorder characterized by panic attacks that failed to meet either the criterion of attack frequency or the number of criterion symptoms necessary for a definite diagnosis (the broadly defined affected phenotype). The authors conducted lod score linkage analyses with both phenotypes using both a dominant and a recessive model of inheritance for the following loci: GABRA1-GABRA5 (alpha 1-alpha 5), GABRB1 (beta 1), GABRB3 (beta 3), and GABRG2 (gamma 2). The results failed to support the hypothesis that any of these genes cause panic disorder in a majority of the pedigrees. Within the limitations of the candidate gene linkage method, panic disorder does not appear to be caused by mutation in any of the eight GABAA receptor genes tested.

  7. [Screening cold-acclimation differential expression candidate genes in the brain of common carp (Cyprinus carpio)].

    PubMed

    Xu, Li-Hua; Chang, Yu-Mei; Liu, Chun-Lei; Liang, Li-Qun; Liu, Jin-Liang; Chi, Bing-Jie

    2011-03-01

    In this study, 26 candidate genes were quantified and normalized in the brain cDNA of common carp (Cyprinus carpio) at 23°C and 6°C using double-standard curve method of real-time quantitative PCR. The results showed that five candidates up-regulated in the samples at 6°C (P<0.01) and quantified 2.11, 13.9, 2.52, 7.38, and 1.83 times more than in the samples at 23°C, respectively. Gene function searching indicated that the protein products of these five candidates were elongation of very long chain fatty acids protein, Acyl-CoA desaturase, Transcription initiation factor IIB, Myo-inositol- 1-phosphate synthase, and Blood-brain barrier HT7 antigen individually. Moreover, seven down-regulated candidates were also identified in the same samples at 6°C (P>0.05), and their expression levels were decreased by 21.8%, 25.9%, 16.6%, 23.7%, 15.8%, 16.3%, and 42.5%, respectively, in comparison with the samples at 23°C. These seven down-regulated candidates mainly participated in the inhibition of glycolysis, improvement of cell apoptosis, and intervention of synapse remodeling based on the results of function searching. The five cold-induced genes identified in this study will be used as important elements for fish with cold sensitive through transgenic technology in future.

  8. Fine mapping and candidate gene analysis of the floury endosperm gene, FLO(a), in rice.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Yongli; Lee, Song-I; Piao, Rihua; Jiang, Wenzhu; Ham, Tae-Ho; Chin, Joong-Hyoun; Piao, Zhongze; Han, Longzhi; Kang, Si-Yong; Koh, Hee-Jong

    2010-02-28

    In addition to its role as an energy source for plants, animals and humans, starch is also an environmentally friendly alternative to fossil fuels. In rice, the eating and cooking quality of the grain is determined by its starch properties. The floury endosperm of rice has been explored as an agronomical trait in breeding and genetics studies. In the present study, we characterized a floury endosperm mutant, flo(a), derived from treatment of Oryza sativa ssp. japonica cultivar Hwacheong with MNU. The innermost endosperm of the flo(a) mutant exhibited floury characteristics while the outer layer of the endosperm appeared normal. Starch granules in the flo(a) mutant formed a loosely-packed crystalline structure and X-ray diffraction revealed that the overall crystallinity of the starch was decreased compared to wild-type. The FLO(a) gene was isolated via a map-based cloning approach and predicted to encode the tetratricopeptide repeat domain-containing protein, OsTPR. Three mutant alleles contain a nucleotide substitution that generated one stop codon or one splice site, respectively, which presumably disrupts the interaction of the functionally conserved TPR motifs. Taken together, our map-based cloning approach pinpointed an OsTPR as a strong candidate of FLO(a), and the proteins that contain TPR motifs might play a significant role in rice starch biosynthetic pathways.

  9. Haplotype Association Mapping Identifies a Candidate Gene Region in Mice Infected With Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Nicole V; Ahn, Sun Hee; Deshmukh, Hitesh; Levin, Mikhail K; Nelson, Charlotte L; Scott, William K; Allen, Andrew; Fowler, Vance G; Cowell, Lindsay G

    2012-06-01

    Exposure to Staphylococcus aureus has a variety of outcomes, from asymptomatic colonization to fatal infection. Strong evidence suggests that host genetics play an important role in susceptibility, but the specific host genetic factors involved are not known. The availability of genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data for inbred Mus musculus strains means that haplotype association mapping can be used to identify candidate susceptibility genes. We applied haplotype association mapping to Perlegen SNP data and kidney bacterial counts from Staphylococcus aureus-infected mice from 13 inbred strains and detected an associated block on chromosome 7. Strong experimental evidence supports the result: a separate study demonstrated the presence of a susceptibility locus on chromosome 7 using consomic mice. The associated block contains no genes, but lies within the gene cluster of the 26-member extended kallikrein gene family, whose members have well-recognized roles in the generation of antimicrobial peptides and the regulation of inflammation. Efficient mixed-model association (EMMA) testing of all SNPs with two alleles and located within the gene cluster boundaries finds two significant associations: one of the three polymorphisms defining the associated block and one in the gene closest to the block, Klk1b11. In addition, we find that 7 of the 26 kallikrein genes are differentially expressed between susceptible and resistant mice, including the Klk1b11 gene. These genes represent a promising set of candidate genes influencing susceptibility to Staphylococcus aureus.

  10. Genome-wide association and linkage study in the Amish detects a novel candidate late-onset Alzheimer disease gene.

    PubMed

    Cummings, Anna C; Jiang, Lan; Velez Edwards, Digna R; McCauley, Jacob L; Laux, Renee; McFarland, Lynne L; Fuzzell, Denise; Knebusch, Clare; Caywood, Laura; Reinhart-Mercer, Lori; Nations, Laura; Gilbert, John R; Konidari, Ioanna; Tramontana, Michael; Cuccaro, Michael L; Scott, William K; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Haines, Jonathan L

    2012-09-01

    To identify novel late-onset Alzheimer disease (LOAD) risk genes, we have analysed Amish populations of Ohio and Indiana. We performed genome-wide SNP linkage and association studies on 798 individuals (109 with LOAD). We tested association using the Modified Quasi-Likelihood Score test and also performed two-point and multipoint linkage analyses. We found that LOAD was significantly associated with APOE (P= 9.0 × 10-6) in all our ascertainment regions except for the Adams County, Indiana, community (P= 0.55). Genome-wide, the most strongly associated SNP was rs12361953 (P= 7.92 × 10-7). A very strong, genome-wide significant multipoint peak [recessive heterogeneity multipoint LOD (HLOD) = 6.14, dominant HLOD = 6.05] was detected on 2p12. Three additional loci with multipoint HLOD scores >3 were detected on 3q26, 9q31 and 18p11. Converging linkage and association results, the most significantly associated SNP under the 2p12 peak was at rs2974151 (P= 1.29 × 10-4). This SNP is located in CTNNA2, which encodes catenin alpha 2, a neuronal-specific catenin known to have function in the developing brain. These results identify CTNNA2 as a novel candidate LOAD gene, and implicate three other regions of the genome as novel LOAD loci. These results underscore the utility of using family-based linkage and association analyses in isolated populations to identify novel loci for traits with complex genetic architecture. © 2012 The Authors Annals of Human Genetics © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/University College London.

  11. Genome-wide association and linkage study in the Amish detects a novel candidate late-onset Alzheimer disease gene

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, Anna C.; Jiang, Lan; Velez Edwards, Digna R.; McCauley, Jacob L.; Laux, Renee; McFarland, Lynne L.; Fuzzell, Denise; Knebusch, Clare; Caywood, Laura; Reinhart-Mercer, Lori; Nations, Laura; Gilbert, John R.; Konidari, Ioanna; Tramontana, Michael; Cuccaro, Michael L.; Scott, William K.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Haines, Jonathan L.

    2012-01-01

    Summary To identify novel late-onset Alzheimer disease (LOAD) risk genes, we have analyzed Amish populations of Ohio and Indiana. We performed genome-wide SNP linkage and association studies on 798 individuals (109 with LOAD). We tested association using the Modified Quasi-Likelihood Score (MQLS) test and also performed two-point and multipoint linkage analyses. We found that LOAD was significantly associated with APOE (P=9.0×10-6) in all our ascertainment regions except for the Adams County, Indiana, community (P=0.55). Genome-wide, the most strongly associated SNP was rs12361953 (P=7.92×10-7). A very strong, genome-wide significant multipoint peak (recessive HLOD=6.14, dominant HLOD=6.05) was detected on 2p12. Three additional loci with multipoint HLOD scores >3 were detected on 3q26, 9q31, and 18p11. Converging linkage and association results, the most significantly associated SNP under the 2p12 peak was at rs2974151 (P=1.29×10-4). This SNP is located in CTNNA2, which encodes catenin alpha 2, a neuronal-specific catenin known to have function in the developing brain. These results identify CTNNA2 as a novel candidate LOAD gene, and implicate three other regions of the genome as novel LOAD loci. These results underscore the utility of using family-based linkage and association analysis in isolated populations to identify novel loci for traits with complex genetic architecture. PMID:22881374

  12. Nucleotide diversity and linkage disequilibrium in 11 expressed resistance candidate genes in Lolium perenne

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Yongzhong; Frei, Uschi; Schejbel, Britt; Asp, Torben; Lübberstedt, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Background Association analysis is an alternative way for QTL mapping in ryegrass. So far, knowledge on nucleotide diversity and linkage disequilibrium in ryegrass is lacking, which is essential for the efficiency of association analyses. Results 11 expressed disease resistance candidate (R) genes including 6 nucleotide binding site and leucine rich repeat (NBS-LRR) like genes and 5 non-NBS-LRR genes were analyzed for nucleotide diversity. For each of the genes about 1 kb genomic fragments were isolated from 20 heterozygous genotypes in ryegrass. The number of haplotypes per gene ranged from 9 to 27. On average, one single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was present per 33 bp between two randomly sampled sequences for the 11 genes. NBS-LRR like gene fragments showed a high degree of nucleotide diversity, with one SNP every 22 bp between two randomly sampled sequences. NBS-LRR like gene fragments showed very high non-synonymous mutation rates, leading to altered amino acid sequences. Particularly LRR regions showed very high diversity with on average one SNP every 10 bp between two sequences. In contrast, non-NBS LRR resistance candidate genes showed a lower degree of nucleotide diversity, with one SNP every 112 bp. 78% of haplotypes occurred at low frequency (<5%) within the collection of 20 genotypes. Low intragenic LD was detected for most R genes, and rapid LD decay within 500 bp was detected. Conclusion Substantial LD decay was found within a distance of 500 bp for most resistance candidate genes in this study. Hence, LD based association analysis is feasible and promising for QTL fine mapping of resistance traits in ryegrass. PMID:17683574

  13. Population Stratification in the Candidate Gene Study: Fatal Threat or Red Herring?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchison, Kent E.; Stallings, Michael; McGeary, John; Bryan, Angela

    2004-01-01

    Advances in molecular genetics have provided behavioral scientists with a means of investigating the influence of genetic factors on human behavior. Unfortunately, recent candidate gene studies have produced inconsistent results, and a frequent scapegoat for the lack of replication across studies is the threat of population stratification. This…

  14. Population Stratification in the Candidate Gene Study: Fatal Threat or Red Herring?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchison, Kent E.; Stallings, Michael; McGeary, John; Bryan, Angela

    2004-01-01

    Advances in molecular genetics have provided behavioral scientists with a means of investigating the influence of genetic factors on human behavior. Unfortunately, recent candidate gene studies have produced inconsistent results, and a frequent scapegoat for the lack of replication across studies is the threat of population stratification. This…

  15. A Candidate Gene Analysis of Methylphenidate Response in Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGough, James J.; McCracken, James T.; Loo, Sandra K.; Manganiello, Marc; Leung, Michael C.; Tietjens, Jeremy R.; Trinh, Thao; Baweja, Shilpa; Suddath, Robert; Smalley, Susan L.; Hellemann, Gerhard; Sugar, Catherine A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This study examines the potential role of candidate genes in moderating treatment effects of methylphenidate (MPH) in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Method: Eighty-two subjects with ADHD aged 6 to 17 years participated in a prospective, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multiple-dose, crossover titration trial of…

  16. Candidate gene association mapping for winter survival and spring regrowth in perennial ryegrass

    Treesearch

    Xiaoqing Yu; Paula M. Pijut; Stephen Byrne; Torben Asp; Guihua Bai; Yiwei. Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) is a widely cultivated cool-season grass species because of its high quality for forage and turf. Susceptibility to freezing damage limits its further use in temperate zones. The objective of this study was to identify candidate genes significantly associated with winter survival and spring regrowth in a global...

  17. Candidate fire blight resistance genes in Malus identified with the use of genomic tools and approaches

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The goal of this research is to utilize current advances in Rosaceae genomics to identify DNA markers for use in marker-assisted selection of durable resistance to fire blight. Candidate fire blight resistance genes were selected and ranked based upon differential expression after inoculation with ...

  18. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in candidate genes related to daughter pregnancy rate in Holstein cows

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    ABSTRACT: Previously, a candidate gene approach identified 40 SNPs associated with daughter pregnancy rate (DPR) in dairy bulls. We evaluated 39 of these SNPs for relationship to DPR in a separate population of Holstein cows grouped on their predicted transmitting ability for DPR: <= -1 (n=1266) a...

  19. A Candidate Gene Analysis of Methylphenidate Response in Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGough, James J.; McCracken, James T.; Loo, Sandra K.; Manganiello, Marc; Leung, Michael C.; Tietjens, Jeremy R.; Trinh, Thao; Baweja, Shilpa; Suddath, Robert; Smalley, Susan L.; Hellemann, Gerhard; Sugar, Catherine A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This study examines the potential role of candidate genes in moderating treatment effects of methylphenidate (MPH) in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Method: Eighty-two subjects with ADHD aged 6 to 17 years participated in a prospective, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multiple-dose, crossover titration trial of…

  20. Development of new candidate gene and EST-based molecular markers for Gossypium species

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    New source of molecular markers accelerates the efforts in improving cotton fiber traits and aid in developing high-density integrated genetic maps. We developed new markers based on candidate genes and G. arboreum expressed sequence tag (EST) sequences, and validated them through amplification, ge...

  1. Candidate gene association mapping for winter survival and spring regrowth in perennial ryegrass

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) is a widely cultivated cool-season grass species because of its high quality for forage and turf. Susceptibility to freezing damage limits its further use in temperate zones. The objective of this study was to identify candidate genes significantly associated w...

  2. Examination of Candidate Genes in Language Disorder: A Model of Genetic Association for Treatment Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haines, Jonathan; Camarata, Stephen

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to provide a model for studying genetic association of response to intervention in child language disorders. In addition to a theoretical overview and review of different approaches to studying candidate genes, a specific methodology for completing this type of analysis is presented. The goal of the analysis is to…

  3. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease candidate gene prioritization based on metabolic networks and functional information.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinyan; Li, Wan; Zhang, Yihua; Feng, Yuyan; Zhao, Xilei; He, Yuehan; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Lina

    2017-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a multi-factor disease, in which metabolic disturbances played important roles. In this paper, functional information was integrated into a COPD-related metabolic network to assess similarity between genes. Then a gene prioritization method was applied to the COPD-related metabolic network to prioritize COPD candidate genes. The gene prioritization method was superior to ToppGene and ToppNet in both literature validation and functional enrichment analysis. Top-ranked genes prioritized from the metabolic perspective with functional information could promote the better understanding about the molecular mechanism of this disease. Top 100 genes might be potential markers for diagnostic and effective therapies.

  4. Discovery and functional prioritization of Parkinson's disease candidate genes from large-scale whole exome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Iris E; Ye, Hui; Heetveld, Sasja; Lechler, Marie C; Michels, Helen; Seinstra, Renée I; Lubbe, Steven J; Drouet, Valérie; Lesage, Suzanne; Majounie, Elisa; Gibbs, J Raphael; Nalls, Mike A; Ryten, Mina; Botia, Juan A; Vandrovcova, Jana; Simon-Sanchez, Javier; Castillo-Lizardo, Melissa; Rizzu, Patrizia; Blauwendraat, Cornelis; Chouhan, Amit K; Li, Yarong; Yogi, Puja; Amin, Najaf; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Morris, Huw R; Brice, Alexis; Singleton, Andrew B; David, Della C; Nollen, Ellen A; Jain, Shushant; Shulman, Joshua M; Heutink, Peter

    2017-01-30

    Whole-exome sequencing (WES) has been successful in identifying genes that cause familial Parkinson's disease (PD). However, until now this approach has not been deployed to study large cohorts of unrelated participants. To discover rare PD susceptibility variants, we performed WES in 1148 unrelated cases and 503 control participants. Candidate genes were subsequently validated for functions relevant to PD based on parallel RNA-interference (RNAi) screens in human cell culture and Drosophila and C. elegans models. Assuming autosomal recessive inheritance, we identify 27 genes that have homozygous or compound heterozygous loss-of-function variants in PD cases. Definitive replication and confirmation of these findings were hindered by potential heterogeneity and by the rarity of the implicated alleles. We therefore looked for potential genetic interactions with established PD mechanisms. Following RNAi-mediated knockdown, 15 of the genes modulated mitochondrial dynamics in human neuronal cultures and four candidates enhanced α-synuclein-induced neurodegeneration in Drosophila. Based on complementary analyses in independent human datasets, five functionally validated genes-GPATCH2L, UHRF1BP1L, PTPRH, ARSB, and VPS13C-also showed evidence consistent with genetic replication. By integrating human genetic and functional evidence, we identify several PD susceptibility gene candidates for further investigation. Our approach highlights a powerful experimental strategy with broad applicability for future studies of disorders with complex genetic etiologies.

  5. Association of candidate genes with drought tolerance traits in diverse perennial ryegrass accessions

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yiwei

    2013-01-01

    Drought is a major environmental stress limiting growth of perennial grasses in temperate regions. Plant drought tolerance is a complex trait that is controlled by multiple genes. Candidate gene association mapping provides a powerful tool for dissection of complex traits. Candidate gene association mapping of drought tolerance traits was conducted in 192 diverse perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) accessions from 43 countries. The panel showed significant variations in leaf wilting, leaf water content, canopy and air temperature difference, and chlorophyll fluorescence under well-watered and drought conditions across six environments. Analysis of 109 simple sequence repeat markers revealed five population structures in the mapping panel. A total of 2520 expression-based sequence readings were obtained for a set of candidate genes involved in antioxidant metabolism, dehydration, water movement across membranes, and signal transduction, from which 346 single nucleotide polymorphisms were identified. Significant associations were identified between a putative LpLEA3 encoding late embryogenesis abundant group 3 protein and a putative LpFeSOD encoding iron superoxide dismutase and leaf water content, as well as between a putative LpCyt Cu-ZnSOD encoding cytosolic copper-zinc superoxide dismutase and chlorophyll fluorescence under drought conditions. Four of these identified significantly associated single nucleotide polymorphisms from these three genes were also translated to amino acid substitutions in different genotypes. These results indicate that allelic variation in these genes may affect whole-plant response to drought stress in perennial ryegrass. PMID:23386684

  6. SRGAP1 Is a Candidate Gene for Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    He, Huiling; Bronisz, Agnieszka; Liyanarachchi, Sandya; Nagy, Rebecca; Li, Wei; Huang, Yungui; Akagi, Keiko; Saji, Motoyasu; Kula, Dorota; Wojcicka, Anna; Sebastian, Nikhil; Wen, Bernard; Puch, Zbigniew; Kalemba, Michal; Stachlewska, Elzbieta; Czetwertynska, Malgorzata; Dlugosinska, Joanna; Dymecka, Kinga; Ploski, Rafal; Krawczyk, Marek; Morrison, Patrick J.; Ringel, Matthew D.; Kloos, Richard T.; Jazdzewski, Krystian; Symer, David E.; Vieland, Veronica J.; Ostrowski, Michael; Jarząb, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Background: Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) shows high heritability, yet efforts to find predisposing genes have been largely negative. Objectives: The objective of this study was to identify susceptibility genes for PTC. Methods: A genome-wide linkage analysis was performed in 38 families. Targeted association study and screening were performed in 2 large cohorts of PTC patients and controls. Candidate DNA variants were tested in functional studies. Results: Linkage analysis and association studies identified the Slit-Robo Rho GTPase activating protein 1 gene (SRGAP1) in the linkage peak as a candidate gene. Two missense variants, Q149H and A275T, localized in the Fes/CIP4 homology domain segregated with the disease in 1 family each. One missense variant, R617C, located in the RhoGAP domain occurred in 1 family. Biochemical assays demonstrated that the ability to inactivate CDC42, a key function of SRGAP1, was severely impaired by the Q149H and R617C variants. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that SRGAP1 is a candidate gene in PTC susceptibility. SRGAP1 is likely a low-penetrant gene, possibly of a modifier type. PMID:23539728

  7. Genome-Wide Association Analyses Point to Candidate Genes for Electric Shock Avoidance in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Appel, Mirjam; Scholz, Claus-Jürgen; Müller, Tobias; Dittrich, Marcus; König, Christian; Bockstaller, Marie; Oguz, Tuba; Khalili, Afshin; Antwi-Adjei, Emmanuel; Schauer, Tamas; Margulies, Carla; Tanimoto, Hiromu; Yarali, Ayse

    2015-01-01

    Electric shock is a common stimulus for nociception-research and the most widely used reinforcement in aversive associative learning experiments. Yet, nothing is known about the mechanisms it recruits at the periphery. To help fill this gap, we undertook a genome-wide association analysis using 38 inbred Drosophila melanogaster strains, which avoided shock to varying extents. We identified 514 genes whose expression levels and/ or sequences co-varied with shock avoidance scores. We independently scrutinized 14 of these genes using mutants, validating the effect of 7 of them on shock avoidance. This emphasizes the value of our candidate gene list as a guide for follow-up research. In addition, by integrating our association results with external protein-protein interaction data we obtained a shock avoidance-associated network of 38 genes. Both this network and the original candidate list contained a substantial number of genes that affect mechanosensory bristles, which are hair-like organs distributed across the fly’s body. These results may point to a potential role for mechanosensory bristles in shock sensation. Thus, we not only provide a first list of candidate genes for shock avoidance, but also point to an interesting new hypothesis on nociceptive mechanisms. PMID:25992709

  8. X chromosome-linked Kallmann syndrome: stop mutations validate the candidate gene.

    PubMed Central

    Hardelin, J P; Levilliers, J; del Castillo, I; Cohen-Salmon, M; Legouis, R; Blanchard, S; Compain, S; Bouloux, P; Kirk, J; Moraine, C

    1992-01-01

    Kallmann syndrome represents the association of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism with anosmia. This syndrome is from a defect in the embryonic migratory pathway of gonadotropin-releasing hormone synthesizing neurons and olfactory axons. A candidate gene for the X chromosome-linked form of the syndrome was recently isolated by using a positional cloning strategy based on deletion mapping in the Xp22.3 region. With the PCR, two exons of this candidate gene were amplified on the genomic DNAs from 18 unrelated patients affected with the X chromosome-linked Kallmann syndrome. Three different base transitions--all leading to a stop codon--and one single-base deletion responsible for a frameshift were identified. We thus conclude that the candidate gene is the actual KAL gene responsible for the X chromosome-linked Kallmann syndrome. Furthermore, unilateral renal aplasia in two unrelated patients carrying a stop mutation indicates that the KAL gene is itself responsible for this Kallmann syndrome-associated anomaly. The gene is, therefore, also involved in kidney organogenesis. Additional neurologic symptoms in Kallmann patients are also discussed. PMID:1518845

  9. Molecular Evolution of Candidate Genes for Crop-Related Traits in Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.)

    PubMed Central

    Mandel, Jennifer R.; McAssey, Edward V.; Nambeesan, Savithri; Garcia-Navarro, Elena; Burke, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Evolutionary analyses aimed at detecting the molecular signature of selection during crop domestication and/or improvement can be used to identify genes or genomic regions of likely agronomic importance. Here, we describe the DNA sequence-based characterization of a pool of candidate genes for crop-related traits in sunflower. These genes, which were identified based on homology to genes of known effect in other study systems, were initially sequenced from a panel of improved lines. All genes that exhibited a paucity of sequence diversity, consistent with the possible effects of selection during the evolution of cultivated sunflower, were then sequenced from a panel of wild sunflower accessions an outgroup. These data enabled formal tests for the effects of selection in shaping sequence diversity at these loci. When selection was detected, we further sequenced these genes from a panel of primitive landraces, thereby allowing us to investigate the likely timing of selection (i.e., domestication vs. improvement). We ultimately identified seven genes that exhibited the signature of positive selection during either domestication or improvement. Genetic mapping of a subset of these genes revealed co-localization between candidates for genes involved in the determination of flowering time, seed germination, plant growth/development, and branching and QTL that were previously identified for these traits in cultivated × wild sunflower mapping populations. PMID:24914686

  10. Isolation and characterization of candidate genes of the 5q13 region in spinal muscular atrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Lefebvre, S.; Reboullet, S.; Benichou, B.

    1994-09-01

    Based on a fine genetic and physical map of the region deleted in spinal muscular atrophy, we defined the smallest rearrangements encompassing the SMA gene. This interval is entirely contained in the 903D1 YAC clone. Several approaches to identify candidate genes were applied, including the search for interspecies conservation, exon trapping amplification and direct cDNA selection. Combining these strategies, six different cDNA molecules mapping to the YAC contig were isolated. Four cDNA molecules were isolated using the exon trapping system. They map to chromosome 5p and to more than one locus within the 5q13 region. They are homologous to each other and share sequence homology with the {beta}-glucuronidase gene. Based on interspecies conservation, a fifth candidate gene was identified. Sequence analyses of the cDNAs revealed no homologies with any other described genes. This gene mapped to two loci within the 5q13 region. Two other cDNA molecules isolated by direct cDNA selection are also under investigation. Complete characterization and fine physical mapping of those genes with respect to the physical interval defined by the deletions of the SMA region will allow the identification of the disease gene (or genes).

  11. Molecular evolution of candidate genes for crop-related traits in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.).

    PubMed

    Mandel, Jennifer R; McAssey, Edward V; Nambeesan, Savithri; Garcia-Navarro, Elena; Burke, John M

    2014-01-01

    Evolutionary analyses aimed at detecting the molecular signature of selection during crop domestication and/or improvement can be used to identify genes or genomic regions of likely agronomic importance. Here, we describe the DNA sequence-based characterization of a pool of candidate genes for crop-related traits in sunflower. These genes, which were identified based on homology to genes of known effect in other study systems, were initially sequenced from a panel of improved lines. All genes that exhibited a paucity of sequence diversity, consistent with the possible effects of selection during the evolution of cultivated sunflower, were then sequenced from a panel of wild sunflower accessions an outgroup. These data enabled formal tests for the effects of selection in shaping sequence diversity at these loci. When selection was detected, we further sequenced these genes from a panel of primitive landraces, thereby allowing us to investigate the likely timing of selection (i.e., domestication vs. improvement). We ultimately identified seven genes that exhibited the signature of positive selection during either domestication or improvement. Genetic mapping of a subset of these genes revealed co-localization between candidates for genes involved in the determination of flowering time, seed germination, plant growth/development, and branching and QTL that were previously identified for these traits in cultivated × wild sunflower mapping populations.

  12. Diversification of the ant odorant receptor gene family and positive selection on candidate cuticular hydrocarbon receptors.

    PubMed

    Engsontia, Patamarerk; Sangket, Unitsa; Robertson, Hugh M; Satasook, Chutamas

    2015-08-27

    Chemical communication plays important roles in the social behavior of ants making them one of the most successful groups of animals on earth. However, the molecular evolutionary process responsible for their chemosensory adaptation is still elusive. Recent advances in genomic studies have led to the identification of large odorant receptor (Or) gene repertoires from ant genomes providing fruitful materials for molecular evolution analysis. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that diversification of this gene family is involved in olfactory adaptation of each species. We annotated the Or genes from the genome sequences of two leaf-cutter ants, Acromyrmex echinatior and Atta cephalotes (385 and 376 putative functional genes, respectively). These were used, together with Or genes from Camponotus floridanus, Harpegnathos saltator, Pogonomyrmex barbatus, Linepithema humile, Cerapachys biroi, Solenopsis invicta and Apis mellifera, in molecular evolution analysis. Like the Or family in other insects, ant Or genes evolve by the birth-and-death model of gene family evolution. Large gene family expansions involving tandem gene duplications, and gene gains outnumbering losses, are observed. Codon analysis of genes in lineage-specific expansion clades revealed signatures of positive selection on the candidate cuticular hydrocarbon receptor genes (9-exon subfamily) of Cerapachys biroi, Camponotus floridanus, Acromyrmex echinatior and Atta cephalotes. Positively selected amino acid positions are primarily in transmembrane domains 3 and 6, which are hypothesized to contribute to the odor-binding pocket, presumably mediating changing ligand specificity. This study provides support for the hypothesis that some ant lineage-specific Or genes have evolved under positive selection. Newly duplicated genes particularly in the candidate cuticular hydrocarbon receptor clade that have evolved under positive selection may contribute to the highly sophisticated lineage

  13. Identification of novel candidate genes for follicle selection in the broiler breeder ovary

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Broiler breeders fed ad libitum are characterised by multiple ovulation, which leads to poor shell quality and egg production. Multiple ovulation is controlled by food restriction in commercial flocks. However, the level of food restriction raises welfare concerns, including that of severe hunger. Reducing the rate of multiple ovulation by genetic selection would facilitate progress towards developing a growth profile for optimum animal welfare. Results The study utilised 3 models of ovarian follicle development; laying hens fed ad libitum (experiment 2) and broiler breeders fed ad libitum or a restricted diet (experiments 1 & 3). This allowed us to investigate gene candidates for follicular development by comparing normal, abnormal and “controlled” follicle hierarchies at different stages of development. Several candidate genes for multiple ovulation were identified by combining microarray analysis of restricted vs. ad libitum feeding, literature searches and QPCR expression profiling throughout follicle development. Three candidate genes were confirmed by QPCR as showing significant differential expression between restricted and ad libitum feeding: FSHR, GDF9 and PDGFRL. PDGFRL, a candidate for steroidogenesis, showed significantly up-regulated expression in 6–8 mm follicles of ad libitum fed broiler breeders (P = 0.016), the period at which follicle recruitment occurs. Conclusions Gene candidates have been identified and evidence provided to support a possible role in regulation of ovarian function and follicle number. Further characterisation of these genes will be required to assess their potential for inclusion into breeding programmes to improve the regulation of follicle selection and reduce the need for feed restriction. PMID:22992265

  14. SNP detection using RNA-sequences of candidate genes associated with puberty in cattle.

    PubMed

    Dias, M M; Cánovas, A; Mantilla-Rojas, C; Riley, D G; Luna-Nevarez, P; Coleman, S J; Speidel, S E; Enns, R M; Islas-Trejo, A; Medrano, J F; Moore, S S; Fortes, M R S; Nguyen, L T; Venus, B; Diaz, I S D P; Souza, F R P; Fonseca, L F S; Baldi, F; Albuquerque, L G; Thomas, M G; Oliveira, H N

    2017-03-22

    Fertility traits, such as heifer pregnancy, are economically important in cattle production systems, and are therefore, used in genetic selection programs. The aim of this study was to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) using RNA-sequencing (RNA-Seq) data from ovary, uterus, endometrium, pituitary gland, hypothalamus, liver, longissimus dorsi muscle, and adipose tissue in 62 candidate genes associated with heifer puberty in cattle. RNA-Seq reads were assembled to the bovine reference genome (UMD 3.1.1) and analyzed in five cattle breeds; Brangus, Brahman, Nellore, Angus, and Holstein. Two approaches used the Brangus data for SNP discovery 1) pooling all samples, and 2) within each individual sample. These approaches revealed 1157 SNPs. These were compared with those identified in the pooled samples of the other breeds. Overall, 172 SNPs within 13 genes (CPNE5, FAM19A4, FOXN4, KLF1, LOC777593, MGC157266, NEBL, NRXN3, PEPT-1, PPP3CA, SCG5, TSG101, and TSHR) were concordant in the five breeds. Using Ensembl's Variant Effector Predictor, we determined that 12% of SNPs were in exons (71% synonymous, 29% nonsynonymous), 1% were in untranslated regions (UTRs), 86% were in introns, and 1% were in intergenic regions. Since these SNPs were discovered in RNA, the variants were predicted to be within exons or UTRs. Overall, 160 novel transcripts in 42 candidate genes and five novel genes overlapping five candidate genes were observed. In conclusion, 1157 SNPs were identified in 62 candidate genes associated with puberty in Brangus cattle, of which, 172 were concordant in the five cattle breeds. Novel transcripts and genes were also identified.

  15. The Candidate Cancer Gene Database: a database of cancer driver genes from forward genetic screens in mice.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Kenneth L; Nyre, Erik T; Abrahante, Juan; Ho, Yen-Yi; Isaksson Vogel, Rachel; Starr, Timothy K

    2015-01-01

    Identification of cancer driver gene mutations is crucial for advancing cancer therapeutics. Due to the overwhelming number of passenger mutations in the human tumor genome, it is difficult to pinpoint causative driver genes. Using transposon mutagenesis in mice many laboratories have conducted forward genetic screens and identified thousands of candidate driver genes that are highly relevant to human cancer. Unfortunately, this information is difficult to access and utilize because it is scattered across multiple publications using different mouse genome builds and strength metrics. To improve access to these findings and facilitate meta-analyses, we developed the Candidate Cancer Gene Database (CCGD, http://ccgd-starrlab.oit.umn.edu/). The CCGD is a manually curated database containing a unified description of all identified candidate driver genes and the genomic location of transposon common insertion sites (CISs) from all currently published transposon-based screens. To demonstrate relevance to human cancer, we performed a modified gene set enrichment analysis using KEGG pathways and show that human cancer pathways are highly enriched in the database. We also used hierarchical clustering to identify pathways enriched in blood cancers compared to solid cancers. The CCGD is a novel resource available to scientists interested in the identification of genetic drivers of cancer. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  16. Identification of candidates for human disease genes using large-scale PCR mapping of gene-based STSs

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, R.; Stevens, T.J.; Wilcox, A.S.

    1994-09-01

    We have developed a strategy for the rapid identification of possible human disease/syndrome genes. Using this procedure we found candidates for 45 human disease/syndrome genes from the first 200 genes mapped. New human genes are identified through automated single-pass sequencing into the 3{prime} untranslated (3{prime}UT) regions of human cDNAs. Primers derived from the 3{prime}UT region sequences, representing gene-based STSs, are used for PCR analyses of the CEPH megabase YAC DNA pools. With this approach {approximately}18,000 megabase YACs can be screened and a single YAC identified using only 52 PCR reactions. The YAC localization in conjunction with other mapping approaches, such as PCR mapping to chromosomes by means of somatic hybrids, allows mapping to chromosomal band locations. In this manner, each gene can be associated with its own STS which in turn specifies both a corresponding genomic clone and a specific location in the genome. These locations can be compared to purported locations of disease genes listed in Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man. Using our current collection of >3,000 human brain cDNA sequences as a resource, we have carried out a proof of principle study in which {approximately}200 cDNAs were mapped to YACs within a few months. Appropriate scale up of this strategy could permit mapping of most human genes and identification of many candidate disease genes over the next few years.

  17. Expression of candidate genes for residual feed intake in Angus cattle.

    PubMed

    Al-Husseini, W; Gondro, C; Quinn, K; Herd, R M; Gibson, J P; Chen, Y

    2014-02-01

    Residual feed intake (RFI) has been adopted in Australia for the purpose of genetic improvement in feed efficiency in beef cattle. RFI is the difference between the observed feed intake of an animal and the predicted feed intake based on its size and growth rate over a test period. Gene expression of eight candidate genes (AHSG, GHR, GSTM1, INHBA, PCDH19, S100A10, SERPINI2 and SOD3), previously identified as differentially expressed between divergent lines of high- and low-RFI animals, was measured in an unselected population of 60 steers from the Angus Society Elite Progeny Test Program using quantitative real-time PCR. Results showed that the levels of gene expression were significantly correlated with RFI. The genes explain around 33.2% of the phenotypic variance in RFI, and prediction equations using the expression data are reasonably accurate estimators of RFI. The association of these genes with economically important traits, such as other feed efficiency-related traits and fat, growth and carcass traits, was investigated as well. The expression of these candidate genes was significantly correlated with feed conversion ratio and daily feed intake, which are highly associated with RFI, suggesting a functional role for these genes in modulating feed utilisation. The expression of these genes did not show any association with average daily gain, eye muscle area and carcass composition. © 2013 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  18. Changes in gene expression linked with adult reproductive diapause in a northern malt fly species: a candidate gene microarray study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Insect diapause is an important biological process which involves many life-history parameters important for survival and reproductive fitness at both individual and population level. Drosophila montana, a species of D. virilis group, has a profound photoperiodic reproductive diapause that enables the adult flies to survive through the harsh winter conditions of high latitudes and altitudes. We created a custom-made microarray for D. montana with 101 genes known to affect traits important in diapause, photoperiodism, reproductive behaviour, circadian clock and stress tolerance in model Drosophila species. This array gave us a chance to filter out genes showing expression changes during photoperiodic reproductive diapause in a species adapted to live in northern latitudes with high seasonal changes in environmental conditions. Results Comparisons among diapausing, reproducing and young D. montana females revealed expression changes in 24 genes on microarray; for example in comparison between diapausing and reproducing females one gene (Drosophila cold acclimation gene, Dca) showed up-regulation and 15 genes showed down-regulation in diapausing females. Down-regulation of seven of these genes was specific to diapause state while in five genes the expression changes were linked with the age of the females rather than with their reproductive status. Also, qRT-PCR experiments confirmed couch potato (cpo) gene to be involved in diapause of D. montana. Conclusions A candidate gene microarray proved to offer a practical and cost-effective way to trace genes that are likely to play an important role in photoperiodic reproductive diapause and further in adaptation to seasonally varying environmental conditions. The present study revealed two genes, Dca and cpo, whose role in photoperiodic diapause in D. montana is worth of studying in more details. Also, further studies using the candidate gene microarray with more specific experimental designs and target tissues

  19. Photoreceptor dysplasia (pd) in miniature schnauzer dogs: evaluation of candidate genes by molecular genetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Q; Baldwin, V J; Acland, G M; Parshall, C J; Haskel, J; Aguirre, G D; Ray, K

    1999-01-01

    Photoreceptor dysplasia (pd) is one of a group of at least six distinct autosomal and one X-linked retinal disorders identified in dogs which are collectively known as progressive retinal atrophy (PRA). It is an early onset retinal disease identified in miniature schnauzer dogs, and pedigree analysis and breeding studies have established autosomal recessive inheritance of the disease. Using a gene-based approach, a number of retina-expressed genes, including some members of the phototransduction pathway, have been causally implicated in retinal diseases of humans and other animals. Here we examined seven such potential candidate genes (opsin, RDS/peripherin, ROM1, rod cGMP-gated cation channel alpha-subunit, and three subunits of transducin) for their causal association with the pd locus by testing segregation of intragenic markers with the disease locus, or, in the absence of informative polymorphisms, sequencing of the coding regions of the genes. Based on these results, we have conclusively excluded four photoreceptor-specific genes as candidates for pd by linkage analysis. For three other photoreceptor-specific genes, we did not find any mutation in the coding sequences of the genes and have excluded them provisionally. Formal exclusion would require investigation of the levels of expression of the candidate genes in pd-affected dogs relative to age-matched controls. At present we are building suitable informative pedigrees for the disease locus with a sufficient number of meiosis to be useful for genomewide screening. This should identify markers linked to the disease locus and eventually permit progress toward the identification of the photoreceptor dysplasia gene and the disease-causing mutation.

  20. Differential susceptibility to effects of maternal sensitivity? A study of candidate plasticity genes.

    PubMed

    Belsky, Jay; Newman, Daniel A; Widaman, Keith F; Rodkin, Phil; Pluess, Michael; Fraley, R Chris; Berry, Daniel; Helm, Jonathan L; Roisman, Glenn I

    2015-08-01

    Here we tested whether there was genetic moderation of effects of early maternal sensitivity on social-emotional and cognitive-linguistic development from early childhood onward and whether any detected Gene × Environment interaction effects proved consistent with differential-susceptibility or diathesis-stress models of Person × Environment interaction (N = 695). Two new approaches for evaluating models were employed with 12 candidate genes. Whereas maternal sensitivity proved to be a consistent predictor of child functioning across the primary-school years, candidate genes did not show many main effects, nor did they tend to interact with maternal sensitivity/insensitivity. These findings suggest that the developmental benefits of early sensitive mothering and the costs of insensitive mothering look more similar than different across genetically different children in the current sample. Although acknowledgement of this result is important, it is equally important that the generally null Gene × Environment results reported here not be overgeneralized to other samples, other predictors, other outcomes, and other candidate genes.

  1. Bayesian GWAS and network analysis revealed new candidate genes for number of teats in pigs.

    PubMed

    Verardo, L L; Silva, F F; Varona, L; Resende, M D V; Bastiaansen, J W M; Lopes, P S; Guimarães, S E F

    2015-02-01

    The genetic improvement of reproductive traits such as the number of teats is essential to the success of the pig industry. As opposite to most SNP association studies that consider continuous phenotypes under Gaussian assumptions, this trait is characterized as a discrete variable, which could potentially follow other distributions, such as the Poisson. Therefore, in order to access the complexity of a counting random regression considering all SNPs simultaneously as covariate under a GWAS modeling, the Bayesian inference tools become necessary. Currently, another point that deserves to be highlighted in GWAS is the genetic dissection of complex phenotypes through candidate genes network derived from significant SNPs. We present a full Bayesian treatment of SNP association analysis for number of teats assuming alternatively Gaussian and Poisson distributions for this trait. Under this framework, significant SNP effects were identified by hypothesis tests using 95% highest posterior density intervals. These SNPs were used to construct associated candidate genes network aiming to explain the genetic mechanism behind this reproductive trait. The Bayesian model comparisons based on deviance posterior distribution indicated the superiority of Gaussian model. In general, our results suggest the presence of 19 significant SNPs, which mapped 13 genes. Besides, we predicted gene interactions through networks that are consistent with the mammals known breast biology (e.g., development of prolactin receptor signaling, and cell proliferation), captured known regulation binding sites, and provided candidate genes for that trait (e.g., TINAGL1 and ICK).

  2. Characterising functionally important and ecologically meaningful genetic diversity using a candidate gene approach.

    PubMed

    Piertney, Stuart B; Webster, Lucy M I

    2010-04-01

    Over the past two decades the fields of molecular ecology and population genetics have been dominated by the use of putatively neutral DNA markers, primarily to resolve spatio-temporal patterns of genetic variation to inform our understanding of population structure, gene flow and pedigree. Recent emphasis in comparative functional genomics, however, has fuelled a resurgence of interest in functionally important genetic variation that underpins phenotypic traits of adaptive or ecological significance. It may prove a major challenge to transfer genomics information from classical model species to examine functional diversity in non-model species in natural populations, but already multiple gene-targeted candidate loci with major effect on phenotype and fitness have been identified. Here we briefly describe some of the research strategies used for isolating and characterising functional genetic diversity at candidate gene-targeted loci, and illustrate the efficacy of some of these approaches using our own studies on red grouse (Lagopus lagopus scoticus). We then review how candidate gene markers have been used to: (1) quantify genetic diversity among populations to identify those depauperate in genetic diversity and requiring specific management action; (2) identify the strength and mode of selection operating on individuals within natural populations; and (3) understand direct mechanistic links between allelic variation at single genes and variance in individual fitness.

  3. Candidate Gene Sequencing of LHX2, HESX1, and SOX2 in a Large Schizencephaly Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Mellado, Cecilia; Poduri, Annapurna; Gleason, Danielle; Elhosary, Princess C; Barry, Brenda J; Partlow, Jennifer N; Chang, Bernard S; Shaw, Gary M; Barkovich, A James; Walsh, Christopher A

    2010-01-01

    Schizencephaly is a malformation of cortical development characterized by gray matter-lined clefts in the cerebral cortex and a range of neurological presentations. In some cases, there are features of septo-optic dysplasia concurrently with schizencephaly. The etiologies of both schizencephaly and septo-optic dysplasia are thought to be heterogeneous, but there is evidence that at least some cases have genetic origin. We hypothesized that these disorders may be caused by mutations in three candidate genes: LHX2, a gene with an important cortical patterning role, and HESX1 and SOX2, genes that have been associated with septo-optic dysplasia. We sequenced a large cohort of patients with schizencephaly, some with features of septo-optic dysplasia, for mutations in these genes. No pathogenic mutations were observed, suggesting that other genes or non-genetic factors influencing genes critical to brain development must be responsible for schizencephaly. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:20949537

  4. Genomic analysis reveals MATH gene(s) as candidate(s) for Plum pox virus (PPV) resistance in apricot (Prunus armeniaca L.).

    PubMed

    Zuriaga, Elena; Soriano, José Miguel; Zhebentyayeva, Tetyana; Romero, Carlos; Dardick, Chris; Cañizares, Joaquín; Badenes, Maria Luisa

    2013-09-01

    Sharka disease, caused by Plum pox virus (PPV), is the most important viral disease affecting Prunus species. A major PPV resistance locus (PPVres) has been mapped to the upper part of apricot (Prunus armeniaca) linkage group 1. In this study, a physical map of the PPVres locus in the PPV-resistant cultivar 'Goldrich' was constructed. Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones belonging to the resistant haplotype contig were sequenced using 454/GS-FLX Titanium technology. Concurrently, the whole genome of seven apricot varieties (three PPV-resistant and four PPV-susceptible) and two PPV-susceptible apricot relatives (P. sibirica var. davidiana and P. mume) were obtained using the Illumina-HiSeq2000 platform. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the mapped interval, recorded from alignments against the peach genome, allowed us to narrow down the PPVres locus to a region of ∼196 kb. Searches for polymorphisms linked in coupling with the resistance led to the identification of 68 variants within 23 predicted transcripts according to peach genome annotation. Candidate resistance genes were ranked combining data from variant calling and predicted functions inferred from sequence homology. Together, the results suggest that members of a cluster of meprin and TRAF-C homology domain (MATHd)-containing proteins are the most likely candidate genes for PPV resistance in apricot. Interestingly, MATHd proteins are hypothesized to control long-distance movement (LDM) of potyviruses in Arabidopsis, and restriction for LDM is also a major component of PPV resistance in apricot. Although the PPV resistance gene(s) remains to be unambiguously identified, these results pave the way to the determination of the underlying mechanism and to the development of more accurate breeding strategies. © 2013 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  5. Candidate gene associated with a mutation causing recessive polycystic kidney disease in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Moyer, J.H.; Lee-Tischler, M.J.; Kwon, H.Y.; Schrick, J.J. ); Avner, E.D.; Sweeney, W.E. ); Godfrey, V.L.; Cacheiro, N.L.A.; Woychik, R.P. ); Wilkinson, J.E. )

    1994-05-27

    A line of transgenic mice was generated that contains an insertional mutation causing a phenotype similar to human autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease. Homozygotes displayed a complex phenotype that included bilateral polycystic kidneys and an unusual liver lesion. The mutant locus was cloned and characterized through use of the transgene as a molecular marker. Additionally, a candidate polycystic kidney disease (PKD) gene was identified whose structure and expression are directly associated with the mutant locus. A complementary DNA derived from this gene predicted a peptide containing a motif that was originally identified in several genes involved in cell cycle control.

  6. QTLs and candidate genes for desiccation and abscisic acid content in maize kernels

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Kernel moisture at harvest is an important trait since a low value is required to prevent unexpected early germination and ensure seed preservation. It is also well known that early germination occurs in viviparous mutants, which are impaired in abscisic acid (ABA) biosynthesis. To provide some insight into the genetic determinism of kernel desiccation in maize, quantitative trait loci (QTLs) were detected for traits related to kernel moisture and ABA content in both embryo and endosperm during kernel desiccation. In parallel, the expression and mapping of genes involved in kernel desiccation and ABA biosynthesis, were examined to detect candidate genes. Results The use of an intermated recombinant inbred line population allowed for precise QTL mapping. For 29 traits examined in an unreplicated time course trial of days after pollination, a total of 78 QTLs were detected, 43 being related to kernel desiccation, 15 to kernel weight and 20 to ABA content. Multi QTL models explained 35 to 50% of the phenotypic variation for traits related to water status, indicating a large genetic control amenable to breeding. Ten of the 20 loci controlling ABA content colocated with previously detected QTLs controlling water status and ABA content in water stressed leaves. Mapping of candidate genes associated with kernel desiccation and ABA biosynthesis revealed several colocations between genes with putative functions and QTLs. Parallel investigation via RT-PCR experiments showed that the expression patterns of the ABA-responsive Rab17 and Rab28 genes as well as the late embryogenesis abundant Emb5 and aquaporin genes were related to desiccation rate and parental allele effect. Database searches led to the identification and mapping of two zeaxanthin epoxidase (ZEP) and five novel 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase (NCED) related genes, both gene families being involved in ABA biosynthesis. The expression of these genes appeared independent in the embryo and endosperm

  7. Candidate gene associated with a mutation causing recessive polycystic kidney disease in mice.

    PubMed

    Moyer, J H; Lee-Tischler, M J; Kwon, H Y; Schrick, J J; Avner, E D; Sweeney, W E; Godfrey, V L; Cacheiro, N L; Wilkinson, J E; Woychik, R P

    1994-05-27

    A line of transgenic mice was generated that contains an insertional mutation causing a phenotype similar to human autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease. Homozygotes displayed a complex phenotype that included bilateral polycystic kidneys and an unusual liver lesion. The mutant locus was cloned and characterized through use of the transgene as a molecular marker. Additionally, a candidate polycystic kidney disease (PKD) gene was identified whose structure and expression are directly associated with the mutant locus. A complementary DNA derived from this gene predicted a peptide containing a motif that was originally identified in several genes involved in cell cycle control.

  8. Testing candidate genes for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in fruit flies using a high throughput assay for complex behavior.

    PubMed

    Rohde, Palle Duun; Madsen, Lisbeth Strøm; Neumann Arvidson, Sandra Marie; Loeschcke, Volker; Demontis, Ditte; Kristensen, Torsten Nygaard

    2016-01-02

    Fruit flies are important model organisms for functional testing of candidate genes in multiple disciplines, including the study of human diseases. Here we use a high-throughput locomotor activity assay to test the response on activity behavior of gene disruption in Drosophila melanogaster. The aim was to investigate the impact of disruption of 14 candidate genes for human attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) on fly behavior. By obtaining a range of correlated measures describing the space of variables for behavioral activity we show, that some mutants display similar phenotypic responses, and furthermore, that the genes disrupted in those mutants had common molecular functions; namely processes related to cGMP activity, cation channels and serotonin receptors. All but one of the candidate genes resulted in aberrant behavioral activity, suggesting involvement of these genes in behavioral activity in fruit flies. Results provide additional support for the investigated genes being risk candidate genes for ADHD in humans.

  9. A novel bioinformatics approach identifies candidate genes for the synthesis and feruloylation of arabinoxylan.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Rowan A C; Dupree, Paul; Shewry, Peter R

    2007-05-01

    Arabinoxylans (AXs) are major components of graminaceous plant cell walls, including those in the grain and straw of economically important cereals. Despite some recent advances in identifying the genes encoding biosynthetic enzymes for a number of other plant cell wall polysaccharides, the genes encoding enzymes of the final stages of AX synthesis have not been identified. We have therefore adopted a novel bioinformatics approach based on estimation of differential expression of orthologous genes between taxonomic divisions of species. Over 3 million public domain cereal and dicot expressed sequence tags were mapped onto the complete sets of rice (Oryza sativa) and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) genes, respectively. It was assumed that genes in cereals involved in AX biosynthesis would be expressed at high levels and that their orthologs in dicotyledonous plants would be expressed at much lower levels. Considering all rice genes encoding putative glycosyl transferases (GTs) predicted to be integral membrane proteins, genes in the GT43, GT47, and GT61 families emerged as much the strongest candidates. When the search was widened to all other rice or Arabidopsis genes predicted to encode integral membrane proteins, cereal genes in Pfam family PF02458 emerged as candidates for the feruloylation of AX. Our analysis, known activities, and recent findings elsewhere are most consistent with genes in the GT43 families encoding beta-1,4-xylan synthases, genes in the GT47 family encoding xylan alpha-1,2- or alpha-1,3-arabinosyl transferases, and genes in the GT61 family encoding feruloyl-AX beta-1,2-xylosyl transferases.

  10. A Cross-Disorder Method to Identify Novel Candidate Genes for Developmental Brain Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Mantilla, Andrea J.; Moreno-De-Luca, Andres; Ledbetter, David H.; Martin, Christa Lese

    2017-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Developmental brain disorders are a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorders characterized by high heritability. Specific highly penetrant genetic causes can often be shared by a subset of individuals with different phenotypic features, and recent advances in genome sequencing have allowed the rapid and cost-effective identification of many of these pathogenic variants. OBJECTIVES To identify novel candidate genes for developmental brain disorders and provide additional evidence of previously implicated genes. DATA SOURCES The PubMed database was searched for studies published from March 28,2003, through May 7,2015, with large cohorts of individuals with developmental brain disorders. DATA EXTRACTION AND SYNTHESIS A tiered, multilevel data-integration approach was used, which intersects (1) whole-genome data from structural and sequence pathogenic loss-of-function (pLOF) variants, (2) phenotype data from 6 apparently distinct disorders (intellectual disability, autism, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and epilepsy), and (3) additional data from largescale studies, smaller cohorts, and case reports focusing on specific candidate genes. All candidate genes were ranked into 4 tiers based on the strength of evidence as follows: tier 1, genes with 3 or more de novo pathogenic loss-of-function variants; tier 2, genes with 2 de novo pathogenic loss-of-function variants; tier 3, genes with 1 de novo pathogenic loss-of-function variant; and tier 4, genes with only inherited (or unknown inheritance) pathogenic loss-of-function variants. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Development of a comprehensive knowledge base of candidate genes related to developmental brain disorders. Genes were prioritized based on the inheritance pattern and total number of pathogenic loss-of-function variants identified amongst unrelated individuals with any one of six developmental brain disorders. STUDY SELECTION A combination of

  11. Physiological and molecular characterization of drought responses and identification of candidate tolerance genes in cassava

    PubMed Central

    Turyagyenda, Laban F.; Kizito, Elizabeth B.; Ferguson, Morag; Baguma, Yona; Agaba, Morris; Harvey, Jagger J. W.; Osiru, David S. O.

    2013-01-01

    Cassava is an important root crop to resource-poor farmers in marginal areas, where its production faces drought stress constraints. Given the difficulties associated with cassava breeding, a molecular understanding of drought tolerance in cassava will help in the identification of markers for use in marker-assisted selection and genes for transgenic improvement of drought tolerance. This study was carried out to identify candidate drought-tolerance genes and expression-based markers of drought stress in cassava. One drought-tolerant (improved variety) and one drought-susceptible (farmer-preferred) cassava landrace were grown in the glasshouse under well-watered and water-stressed conditions. Their morphological, physiological and molecular responses to drought were characterized. Morphological and physiological measurements indicate that the tolerance of the improved variety is based on drought avoidance, through reduction of water loss via partial stomatal closure. Ten genes that have previously been biologically validated as conferring or being associated with drought tolerance in other plant species were confirmed as being drought responsive in cassava. Four genes (MeALDH, MeZFP, MeMSD and MeRD28) were identified as candidate cassava drought-tolerance genes, as they were exclusively up-regulated in the drought-tolerant genotype to comparable levels known to confer drought tolerance in other species. Based on these genes, we hypothesize that the basis of the tolerance at the cellular level is probably through mitigation of the oxidative burst and osmotic adjustment. This study provides an initial characterization of the molecular response of cassava to drought stress resembling field conditions. The drought-responsive genes can now be used as expression-based markers of drought stress tolerance in cassava, and the candidate tolerance genes tested in the context of breeding (as possible quantitative trait loci) and engineering drought tolerance in transgenics

  12. Molecular evolution of candidate male reproductive genes in the brown algal model Ectocarpus.

    PubMed

    Lipinska, Agnieszka P; Van Damme, Els J M; De Clerck, Olivier

    2016-01-05

    Evolutionary studies of genes that mediate recognition between sperm and egg contribute to our understanding of reproductive isolation and speciation. Surface receptors involved in fertilization are targets of sexual selection, reinforcement, and other evolutionary forces including positive selection. This observation was made across different lineages of the eukaryotic tree from land plants to mammals, and is particularly evident in free-spawning animals. Here we use the brown algal model species Ectocarpus (Phaeophyceae) to investigate the evolution of candidate gamete recognition proteins in a distant major phylogenetic group of eukaryotes. Male gamete specific genes were identified by comparing transcriptome data covering different stages of the Ectocarpus life cycle and screened for characteristics expected from gamete recognition receptors. Selected genes were sequenced in a representative number of strains from distant geographical locations and varying stages of reproductive isolation, to search for signatures of adaptive evolution. One of the genes (Esi0130_0068) showed evidence of selective pressure. Interestingly, that gene displayed domain similarities to the receptor for egg jelly (REJ) protein involved in sperm-egg recognition in sea urchins. We have identified a male gamete specific gene with similarity to known gamete recognition receptors and signatures of adaptation. Altogether, this gene could contribute to gamete interaction during reproduction as well as reproductive isolation in Ectocarpus and is therefore a good candidate for further functional evaluation.

  13. Evolutionary conservation of candidate osmoregulation genes in plant phloem sap-feeding insects.

    PubMed

    Jing, X; White, T A; Luan, J; Jiao, C; Fei, Z; Douglas, A E

    2016-06-01

    The high osmotic pressure generated by sugars in plant phloem sap is reduced in phloem-feeding aphids by sugar transformations and facilitated water flux in the gut. The genes mediating these osmoregulatory functions have been identified and validated empirically in the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum: sucrase 1 (SUC1), a sucrase in glycoside hydrolase family 13 (GH13), and aquaporin 1 (AQP1), a member of the Drosophila integral protein (DRIP) family of aquaporins. Here, we describe molecular analysis of GH13 and AQP genes in phloem-feeding representatives of the four phloem-feeding groups: aphids (Myzus persicae), coccids (Planococcus citri), psyllids (Diaphorina citri, Bactericera cockerelli) and whiteflies (Bemisia tabaci MEAM1 and MED). A single candidate GH13-SUC gene and DRIP-AQP gene were identified in the genome/transcriptome of most insects tested by the criteria of sequence motif and gene expression in the gut. Exceptionally, the psyllid Ba. cockerelli transcriptome included a gut-expressed Pyrocoelia rufa integral protein (PRIP)-AQP, but has no DRIP-AQP transcripts, suggesting that PRIP-AQP is recruited for osmoregulatory function in this insect. This study indicates that phylogenetically related SUC and AQP genes may generally mediate osmoregulatory functions in these diverse phloem-feeding insects, and provides candidate genes for empirical validation and development as targets for osmotic disruption of pest species. © 2016 The Authors. Insect Molecular Biology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of The Royal Entomological Society.

  14. Candidate genes for the progression of malignant gliomas identified by microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Bozinov, Oliver; Köhler, Sylvia; Samans, Birgit; Benes, Ludwig; Miller, Dorothea; Ritter, Markus; Sure, Ulrich; Bertalanffy, Helmut

    2008-01-01

    Malignant astrocytomas of World Health Organization (WHO) grade III or IV have a reduced median survival time, and possible pathways have been described for the progression of anaplastic astrocytomas and glioblastomas, but the molecular basis of malignant astrocytoma progression is still poorly understood. Microarray analysis provides the chance to accelerate studies by comparison of the expression of thousands of genes in these tumours and consequently identify targeting genes. We compared the transcriptional profile of 4,608 genes in tumours of 15 patients including 6 anaplastic astrocytomas (WHO grade III) and 9 glioblastomas (WHO grade IV) using microarray analysis. The microarray data were corroborated by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis of two selected genes. We identified 166 gene alterations with a fold change of 2 and higher whose mRNA levels differed (absolute value of the t statistic of 1.96) between the two malignant glioma groups. Further analyses confirmed same transcription directions for Olig2 and IL-13Ralpha2 in anaplastic astrocytomas as compared to glioblastomas. Microarray analyses with a close binary question reveal numerous interesting candidate genes, which need further histochemical testing after selection for confirmation. IL-13Ralpha2 and Olig2 have been identified and confirmed to be interesting candidate genes whose differential expression likely plays a role in malignant progression of astrocytomas.

  15. Phytoremediation of chromium using Salix species: cloning ESTs and candidate genes involved in the Cr response.

    PubMed

    Quaggiotti, Silvia; Barcaccia, Gianni; Schiavon, Michela; Nicolé, Silvia; Galla, Giulio; Rossignolo, Virginia; Soattin, Marica; Malagoli, Mario

    2007-11-01

    In this research a differential display based on the detection of cDNA-AFLP markers was used to identify candidate genes potentially involved in the regulation of the response to chromium in four different willow species (Salix alba, Salix eleagnos, Salix fragilis and Salix matsudana) chosen on the basis of their suitability in phytoremediation techniques. Our approach enabled the assay of a large set of mRNA-related fragments and increased the reliability of amplification-based transcriptome analysis. The vast majority of transcript-derived fragments were shared among samples within species and thus attributable to constitutively expressed genes. However, a number of differentially expressed mRNAs were scored in each species and a total of 68 transcripts displaying an altered expression in response to Cr were isolated and sequenced. Public database querying revealed that 44.1% and 4.4% of the cloned ESTs score significant similarity with genes encoding proteins having known or putative function, or with genes coding for unknown proteins, respectively, whereas the remaining 51.5% did not retrieve any homology. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis of seven candidate genes fully confirmed the expression patterns obtained by cDNA-AFLP. Our results indicate the existence of common mechanisms of gene regulation in response to Cr, pathogen attack and senescence-mediated programmed cell death, and suggest a role for the genes isolated in the cross-talk of the signaling pathways governing the adaptation to biotic and abiotic stresses.

  16. Family-Based Association Study of Pulmonary Function in a Population in Northeast Asia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun-Jin; Lee, Mi Kyeong; Gombojav, Bayasgalan; Kwon, Hyouk-Soo; Park, Daniel S.; Kim, Hyung-Lae; Min, Kyung-Up; Sung, Joohon; Seo, Jeong-Sun; Kim, Jong-Il

    2015-01-01

    The spirometric measurement of pulmonary function by measuring the forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) is a heritable trait that reflects the physiological condition of the lung and airways. Genome-wide linkage and association studies have identified a number of genes and genetic loci associated with pulmonary function. However, limited numbers of studies have been reported for Asian populations. In this study, we aimed to investigate genetic evidence of pulmonary function in a population in northeast Asia. We conducted a family-based association test with 706 GENDISCAN study participants from 72 Mongolian families to determine candidate genetic determinants of pulmonary function. For the replication, we chose seven candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from the 5 loci, and tested 1062 SNPs for association with FEV1 from 2,729 subjects of the Korea Healthy Twin study. We identified TMEM132C as a potential candidate gene at 12q24.3, which is a previously reported locus of asthma and spirometric indices. We also found two adjacent candidate genes (UNC93A and TTLL2) in the 6q27 region, which has been previously identified as a pulmonary function locus in the Framingham cohort study. Our findings suggest that novel candidate genes (TMEM132C, UNC93A and TTLL2) in two different regions are associated with pulmonary function in a population in northeast Asia. PMID:26430897

  17. No Association between Personality and Candidate Gene Polymorphisms in a Wild Bird Population.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Hannah A; Hajduk, Gabriela K; Durieux, Gillian; Burke, Terry; Dugdale, Hannah L

    2015-01-01

    Consistency of between-individual differences in behaviour or personality is a phenomenon in populations that can have ecological consequences and evolutionary potential. One way that behaviour can evolve is to have a genetic basis. Identifying the molecular genetic basis of personality could therefore provide insight into how and why such variation is maintained, particularly in natural populations. Previously identified candidate genes for personality in birds include the dopamine receptor D4 (DRD4), and serotonin transporter (SERT). Studies of wild bird populations have shown that exploratory and bold behaviours are associated with polymorphisms in both DRD4 and SERT. Here we tested for polymorphisms in DRD4 and SERT in the Seychelles warbler (Acrocephalus sechellensis) population on Cousin Island, Seychelles, and then investigated correlations between personality and polymorphisms in these genes. We found no genetic variation in DRD4, but identified four polymorphisms in SERT that clustered into five haplotypes. There was no correlation between bold or exploratory behaviours and SERT polymorphisms/haplotypes. The null result was not due to lack of power, and indicates that there was no association between these behaviours and variation in the candidate genes tested in this population. These null findings provide important data to facilitate representative future meta-analyses on candidate personality genes.

  18. Genome-Wide Association Implicates Candidate Genes Conferring Resistance to Maize Rough Dwarf Disease in Maize.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gengshen; Wang, Xiaoming; Hao, Junjie; Yan, Jianbing; Ding, Junqiang

    2015-01-01

    Maize rough dwarf disease (MRDD) is a destructive viral disease in China, which results in 20-30% of the maize yield losses in affected areas and even as high as 100% in severely infected fields. Understanding the genetic basis of resistance will provide important insights for maize breeding program. In this study, a diverse maize population comprising of 527 inbred lines was evaluated in four environments and a genome-wide association study (GWAS) was undertaken with over 556000 SNP markers. Fifteen candidate genes associated with MRDD resistance were identified, including ten genes with annotated protein encoding functions. The homologous of nine candidate genes were predicted to relate to plant defense in different species based on published results. Significant correlation (R2 = 0.79) between the MRDD severity and the number of resistance alleles was observed. Consequently, we have broadened the resistant germplasm to MRDD and identified a number of resistance alleles by GWAS. The results in present study also imply the candidate genes in defense pathway play an important role in resistance to MRDD in maize.

  19. A novel approach of homozygous haplotype sharing identifies candidate genes in autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Casey, Jillian P; Magalhaes, Tiago; Conroy, Judith M; Regan, Regina; Shah, Naisha; Anney, Richard; Shields, Denis C; Abrahams, Brett S; Almeida, Joana; Bacchelli, Elena; Bailey, Anthony J; Baird, Gillian; Battaglia, Agatino; Berney, Tom; Bolshakova, Nadia; Bolton, Patrick F; Bourgeron, Thomas; Brennan, Sean; Cali, Phil; Correia, Catarina; Corsello, Christina; Coutanche, Marc; Dawson, Geraldine; de Jonge, Maretha; Delorme, Richard; Duketis, Eftichia; Duque, Frederico; Estes, Annette; Farrar, Penny; Fernandez, Bridget A; Folstein, Susan E; Foley, Suzanne; Fombonne, Eric; Freitag, Christine M; Gilbert, John; Gillberg, Christopher; Glessner, Joseph T; Green, Jonathan; Guter, Stephen J; Hakonarson, Hakon; Holt, Richard; Hughes, Gillian; Hus, Vanessa; Igliozzi, Roberta; Kim, Cecilia; Klauck, Sabine M; Kolevzon, Alexander; Lamb, Janine A; Leboyer, Marion; Le Couteur, Ann; Leventhal, Bennett L; Lord, Catherine; Lund, Sabata C; Maestrini, Elena; Mantoulan, Carine; Marshall, Christian R; McConachie, Helen; McDougle, Christopher J; McGrath, Jane; McMahon, William M; Merikangas, Alison; Miller, Judith; Minopoli, Fiorella; Mirza, Ghazala K; Munson, Jeff; Nelson, Stanley F; Nygren, Gudrun; Oliveira, Guiomar; Pagnamenta, Alistair T; Papanikolaou, Katerina; Parr, Jeremy R; Parrini, Barbara; Pickles, Andrew; Pinto, Dalila; Piven, Joseph; Posey, David J; Poustka, Annemarie; Poustka, Fritz; Ragoussis, Jiannis; Roge, Bernadette; Rutter, Michael L; Sequeira, Ana F; Soorya, Latha; Sousa, Inês; Sykes, Nuala; Stoppioni, Vera; Tancredi, Raffaella; Tauber, Maïté; Thompson, Ann P; Thomson, Susanne; Tsiantis, John; Van Engeland, Herman; Vincent, John B; Volkmar, Fred; Vorstman, Jacob A S; Wallace, Simon; Wang, Kai; Wassink, Thomas H; White, Kathy; Wing, Kirsty; Wittemeyer, Kerstin; Yaspan, Brian L; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Betancur, Catalina; Buxbaum, Joseph D; Cantor, Rita M; Cook, Edwin H; Coon, Hilary; Cuccaro, Michael L; Geschwind, Daniel H; Haines, Jonathan L; Hallmayer, Joachim; Monaco, Anthony P; Nurnberger, John I; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Schellenberg, Gerard D; Scherer, Stephen W; Sutcliffe, James S; Szatmari, Peter; Vieland, Veronica J; Wijsman, Ellen M; Green, Andrew; Gill, Michael; Gallagher, Louise; Vicente, Astrid; Ennis, Sean

    2012-04-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a highly heritable disorder of complex and heterogeneous aetiology. It is primarily characterized by altered cognitive ability including impaired language and communication skills and fundamental deficits in social reciprocity. Despite some notable successes in neuropsychiatric genetics, overall, the high heritability of ASD (~90%) remains poorly explained by common genetic risk variants. However, recent studies suggest that rare genomic variation, in particular copy number variation, may account for a significant proportion of the genetic basis of ASD. We present a large scale analysis to identify candidate genes which may contain low-frequency recessive variation contributing to ASD while taking into account the potential contribution of population differences to the genetic heterogeneity of ASD. Our strategy, homozygous haplotype (HH) mapping, aims to detect homozygous segments of identical haplotype structure that are shared at a higher frequency amongst ASD patients compared to parental controls. The analysis was performed on 1,402 Autism Genome Project trios genotyped for 1 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We identified 25 known and 1,218 novel ASD candidate genes in the discovery analysis including CADM2, ABHD14A, CHRFAM7A, GRIK2, GRM3, EPHA3, FGF10, KCND2, PDZK1, IMMP2L and FOXP2. Furthermore, 10 of the previously reported ASD genes and 300 of the novel candidates identified in the discovery analysis were replicated in an independent sample of 1,182 trios. Our results demonstrate that regions of HH are significantly enriched for previously reported ASD candidate genes and the observed association is independent of gene size (odds ratio 2.10). Our findings highlight the applicability of HH mapping in complex disorders such as ASD and offer an alternative approach to the analysis of genome-wide association data.

  20. Longevity candidate genes and their association with personality traits in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Luciano, Michelle; Lopez, Lorna M.; de Moor, Marleen H.M.; Harris, Sarah E.; Davies, Gail; Nutile, Teresa; Krueger, Robert F.; Esko, Tõnu; Schlessinger, David; Toshiko, Tanaka; Derringer, Jaime L.; Realo, Anu; Hansell, Narelle K.; Pergadia, Michele L.; Pesonen, Anu-Katriina; Sanna, Serena; Terracciano, Antonio; Madden, Pamela A.F.; Penninx, Brenda; Spinhoven, Philip; Hartman, Catherine; Oostra, Ben A.; Janssens, A. Cecile J.W.; Eriksson, Johan G; Starr, John M.; Cannas, Alessandra; Ferrucci, Luigi; Metspalu, Andres; Wright, Margeret J.; Heath, Andrew C.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Bierut, Laura J.; Raikkonen, Katri; Martin, Nicholas G.; Ciullo, Marina; Rujescu, Dan; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Deary, Ian J.

    2013-01-01

    Human longevity and personality traits are both heritable and are consistently linked at the phenotypic level. We test the hypothesis that candidate genes influencing longevity in lower organisms are associated with variance in the five major dimensions of human personality (measured by the NEO-FFI and IPIP inventories) plus related mood states of anxiety and depression. Seventy single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in six brain expressed, longevity candidate genes (AFG3L2, FRAP1, MAT1A, MAT2A, SYNJ1 and SYNJ2) were typed in over one thousand 70-year old participants from the Lothian Birth Cohort of 1936 (LBC1936). No SNPs were associated with the personality and psychological distress traits at a Bonferroni corrected level of significance (p < 0.0002), but there was an over-representation of nominally significant (p < 0.05) SNPs in the synaptojanin-2 (SYNJ2) gene associated with agreeableness and symptoms of depression. Eight SNPs which showed nominally significant association across personality measurement instruments were tested in an extremely large replication sample of 17 106 participants. SNP rs350292, in SYNJ2, was significant: the minor allele was associated with an average decrease in NEO agreeableness scale scores of 0.25 points, and 0.67 points in the restricted analysis of elderly cohorts (most aged > 60 years). Because we selected a specific set of longevity genes based on functional genomics findings, further research on other longevity gene candidates is warranted to discover whether they are relevant candidates for personality and psychological distress traits. PMID:22213687

  1. Longevity candidate genes and their association with personality traits in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Luciano, Michelle; Lopez, Lorna M; de Moor, Marleen H M; Harris, Sarah E; Davies, Gail; Nutile, Teresa; Krueger, Robert F; Esko, Tõnu; Schlessinger, David; Toshiko, Tanaka; Derringer, Jaime L; Realo, Anu; Hansell, Narelle K; Pergadia, Michele L; Pesonen, Anu-Katriina; Sanna, Serena; Terracciano, Antonio; Madden, Pamela A F; Penninx, Brenda; Spinhoven, Philip; Hartman, Catherina A; Oostra, Ben A; Janssens, A Cecile J W; Eriksson, Johan G; Starr, John M; Cannas, Alessandra; Ferrucci, Luigi; Metspalu, Andres; Wright, Margeret J; Heath, Andrew C; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Bierut, Laura J; Raikkonen, Katri; Martin, Nicholas G; Ciullo, Marina; Rujescu, Dan; Boomsma, Dorret I; Deary, Ian J

    2012-03-01

    Human longevity and personality traits are both heritable and are consistently linked at the phenotypic level. We test the hypothesis that candidate genes influencing longevity in lower organisms are associated with variance in the five major dimensions of human personality (measured by the NEO-FFI and IPIP inventories) plus related mood states of anxiety and depression. Seventy single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in six brain expressed, longevity candidate genes (AFG3L2, FRAP1, MAT1A, MAT2A, SYNJ1, and SYNJ2) were typed in over 1,000 70-year old participants from the Lothian Birth Cohort of 1936 (LBC1936). No SNPs were associated with the personality and psychological distress traits at a Bonferroni corrected level of significance (P < 0.0002), but there was an over-representation of nominally significant (P < 0.05) SNPs in the synaptojanin-2 (SYNJ2) gene associated with agreeableness and symptoms of depression. Eight SNPs which showed nominally significant association across personality measurement instruments were tested in an extremely large replication sample of 17,106 participants. SNP rs350292, in SYNJ2, was significant: the minor allele was associated with an average decrease in NEO agreeableness scale scores of 0.25 points, and 0.67 points in the restricted analysis of elderly cohorts (most aged >60 years). Because we selected a specific set of longevity genes based on functional genomics findings, further research on other longevity gene candidates is warranted to discover whether they are relevant candidates for personality and psychological distress traits. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Linkage and candidate gene studies of autism spectrum disorders in European populations

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Richard; Barnby, Gabrielle; Maestrini, Elena; Bacchelli, Elena; Brocklebank, Denise; Sousa, Inês; Mulder, Erik J; Kantojärvi, Katri; Järvelä, Irma; Klauck, Sabine M; Poustka, Fritz; Bailey, Anthony J; Monaco, Anthony P

    2010-01-01

    Over the past decade, research on the genetic variants underlying susceptibility to autism and autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) has focused on linkage and candidate gene studies. This research has implicated various chromosomal loci and genes. Candidate gene studies have proven to be particularly intractable, with many studies failing to replicate previously reported associations. In this paper, we investigate previously implicated genomic regions for a role in ASD susceptibility, using four cohorts of European ancestry. Initially, a 384 SNP Illumina GoldenGate array was used to examine linkage at six previously implicated loci. We identify linkage approaching genome-wide suggestive levels on chromosome 2 (rs2885116, MLOD=1.89). Association analysis showed significant associations in MKL2 with ASD (rs756472, P=4.31 × 10−5) and between SND1 and strict autism (rs1881084, P=7.76 × 10−5) in the Finnish and Northern Dutch populations, respectively. Subsequently, we used a second 384 SNP Illumina GoldenGate array to examine the association in seven candidate genes, and evidence for association was found in RELN (rs362780, P=0.00165). Further increasing the sample size strengthened the association with RELN (rs362780, P=0.001) and produced a second significant result in GRIK2 (rs2518261, P=0.008). Our results strengthen the case for a more detailed study of the role of RELN and GRIK2 in autism susceptibility, as well as identifying two new potential candidate genes, MKL2 and SND1. PMID:20442744

  3. The effects of polymorphisms in 7 candidate genes on resistance to Salmonella Enteritidis in native chickens.

    PubMed

    Tohidi, R; Idris, I B; Malar Panandam, J; Hair Bejo, M

    2013-04-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis infection is a common concern in poultry production for its negative effects on growth as well as food safety for humans. Identification of molecular markers that are linked to resistance to Salmonella Enteritidis may lead to appropriate solutions to control Salmonella infection in chickens. This study investigated the association of candidate genes with resistance to Salmonella Enteritidis in young chickens. Two native breeds of Malaysian chickens, namely, Village Chickens and Red Junglefowl, were evaluated for bacterial colonization after Salmonella Enteritidis inoculation. Seven candidate genes were selected on the basis of their physiological role in immune response, as determined by prior studies in other genetic lines: natural resistance-associated protein 1 (NRAMP1), transforming growth factor β3 (TGFβ3), transforming growth factor β4 (TGFβ4), inhibitor of apoptosis protein 1 (IAP1), caspase 1 (CASP1), lipopolysaccharide-induced tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α factor (LITAF), and TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL). Polymerase chain reaction-RFLP was used to identify polymorphisms in the candidate genes; all genes exhibited polymorphisms in at least one breed. The NRAMP1-SacI polymorphism correlated with the differences in Salmonella Enteritidis load in the cecum (P = 0.002) and spleen (P = 0.01) of Village Chickens. Polymorphisms in the restriction sites of TGFβ3-BsrI, TGFβ4-MboII, and TRAIL-StyI were associated with Salmonella Enteritidis burden in the cecum, spleen, and liver of Village Chickens and Red Junglefowl (P < 0.05). These results indicate that the NRAMP1, TGFβ3, TGFβ4, and TRAIL genes are potential candidates for use in selection programs for increasing genetic resistance against Salmonella Enteritidis in native Malaysian chickens.

  4. QTL Mapping and Candidate Gene Analysis of Telomere Length Control Factors in Maize (Zea mays L.)

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Amber N.; Lauter, Nick; Vera, Daniel L.; McLaughlin-Large, Karen A.; Steele, Tace M.; Fredette, Natalie C.; Bass, Hank W.

    2011-01-01

    Telomere length is a quantitative trait important for many cellular functions. Failure to regulate telomere length contributes to genomic instability, cellular senescence, cancer, and apoptosis in humans, but the functional significance of telomere regulation in plants is much less well understood. To gain a better understanding of telomere biology in plants, we used quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping to identify genetic elements that control telomere length variation in maize (Zea mays L.). For this purpose, we measured the median and mean telomere lengths from 178 recombinant inbred lines of the IBM mapping population and found multiple regions that collectively accounted for 33–38% of the variation in telomere length. Two-way analysis of variance revealed interaction between the quantitative trait loci at genetic bin positions 2.09 and 5.04. Candidate genes within these and other significant QTL intervals, along with select genes known a priori to regulate telomere length, were tested for correlations between expression levels and telomere length in the IBM population and diverse inbred lines by quantitative real-time PCR. A slight but significant positive correlation between expression levels and telomere length was observed for many of the candidate genes, but Ibp2 was a notable exception, showing instead a negative correlation. A rad51-like protein (TEL-MD_5.04) was strongly supported as a candidate gene by several lines of evidence. Our results highlight the value of QTL mapping plus candidate gene expression analysis in a genetically diverse model system for telomere research. PMID:22384354

  5. Candidate genes within a 143 kb region of the flower sex locus in Vitis.

    PubMed

    Fechter, Iris; Hausmann, Ludger; Daum, Margrit; Sörensen, Thomas Rosleff; Viehöver, Prisca; Weisshaar, Bernd; Töpfer, Reinhard

    2012-03-01

    Wild Vitis species are dioecious plants, while the cultivated counterpart, Vitis vinifera subspec. vinifera, generally shows hermaphroditic flowers. In Vitis the genetic determinants of flower sex have previously been mapped to a region on chromosome 2. In a combined strategy of map-based cloning and the use of the publicly available grapevine reference genome sequence, the structure of the grapevine flower sex locus has been elucidated with the subsequent identification of candidate genes which might be involved in the development of the different flower sex types. In a fine mapping approach, the sex locus in grapevine was narrowed down using a population derived from a cross of a genotype with a Vitis vinifera background ('Schiava Grossa' × 'Riesling') with the male rootstock cv. 'Börner' (V. riparia × V. cinerea). A physical map of 143 kb was established from BAC clones spanning the 0.5 cM region defined by the closest flanking recombination break points. Sequencing and gene annotation of the entire region revealed several candidate genes with a potential impact on flower sex formation. One of the presumed candidate genes, an adenine phosphoribosyltransferase, was analysed in more detail. The results led to the development of a marker for the presence or absence of the female alleles, while the male and hermaphroditic alleles are still to be differentiated. The impact of other candidate genes is discussed, especially with regard to plant hormone actions. The markers developed will permit the selection of female breeding lines which do not require laborious emasculation thus considerably simplifying grapevine breeding. The genetic finger prints displayed that our cultivated grapevines frequently carry a female allele while homozygous hermaphrodites are rare.

  6. PiNGO: a Cytoscape plugin to find candidate genes in biological networks.

    PubMed

    Smoot, Michael; Ono, Keiichiro; Ideker, Trey; Maere, Steven

    2011-04-01

    PiNGO is a tool to screen biological networks for candidate genes, i.e. genes predicted to be involved in a biological process of interest. The user can narrow the search to genes with particular known functions or exclude genes belonging to particular functional classes. PiNGO provides support for a wide range of organisms and Gene Ontology classification schemes, and it can easily be customized for other organisms and functional classifications. PiNGO is implemented as a plugin for Cytoscape, a popular network visualization platform. PiNGO is distributed as an open-source Java package under the GNU General Public License (http://www.gnu.org/), and can be downloaded via the Cytoscape plugin manager. A detailed user guide and tutorial are available on the PiNGO website (http://www.psb.ugent.be/esb/PiNGO.

  7. Candidate Gene Polymorphisms and their Association with Glycogen Content in the Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas

    PubMed Central

    She, Zhicai; Li, Li; Qi, Haigang; Song, Kai; Que, Huayong; Zhang, Guofan

    2015-01-01

    Background The Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas is an important cultivated shellfish that is rich in nutrients. It contains high levels of glycogen, which is of high nutritional value. To investigate the genetic basis of this high glycogen content and its variation, we conducted a candidate gene association analysis using a wild population, and confirmed our results using an independent population, via targeted gene resequencing and mRNA expression analysis. Results We validated 295 SNPs in the 90 candidate genes surveyed for association with glycogen content, 86 of were ultimately genotyped in all 144 experimental individuals from Jiaonan (JN). In addition, 732 SNPs were genotyped via targeted gene resequencing. Two SNPs (Cg_SNP_TY202 and Cg_SNP_3021) in Cg_GD1 (glycogen debranching enzyme) and one SNP (Cg_SNP_4) in Cg_GP1 (glycogen phosphorylase) were identified as being associated with glycogen content. The glycogen content of individuals with genotypes TT and TC in Cg_SNP_TY202 was higher than that of individuals with genotype CC. The transcript abundance of both glycogen-associated genes was differentially expressed in high glycogen content and low glycogen content individuals. Conclusions This study identified three polymorphisms in two genes associated with oyster glycogen content, via candidate gene association analysis. The transcript abundance differences in Cg_GD1 and Cg_GP1 between low- and the high-glycogen content individuals suggests that it is possible that transcript regulation is mediated by variations of Cg_SNP_TY202, Cg_SNP_3021, and Cg_SNP_4. These findings will not only provide insights into the genetic basis of oyster quality, but also promote research into the molecular breeding of oysters. PMID:25951187

  8. Exome sequencing of Pakistani consanguineous families identifies 30 novel candidate genes for recessive intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Riazuddin, S; Hussain, M; Razzaq, A; Iqbal, Z; Shahzad, M; Polla, D L; Song, Y; van Beusekom, E; Khan, A A; Tomas-Roca, L; Rashid, M; Zahoor, M Y; Wissink-Lindhout, W M; Basra, M A R; Ansar, M; Agha, Z; van Heeswijk, K; Rasheed, F; Van de Vorst, M; Veltman, J A; Gilissen, C; Akram, J; Kleefstra, T; Assir, M Z; Grozeva, D; Carss, K; Raymond, F L; O'Connor, T D; Riazuddin, S A; Khan, S N; Ahmed, Z M; de Brouwer, A P M; van Bokhoven, H; Riazuddin, S

    2016-07-26

    Intellectual disability (ID) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder, affecting 1-3% of the general population. Although research into the genetic causes of ID has recently gained momentum, identification of pathogenic mutations that cause autosomal recessive ID (ARID) has lagged behind, predominantly due to non-availability of sizeable families. Here we present the results of exome sequencing in 121 large consanguineous Pakistani ID families. In 60 families, we identified homozygous or compound heterozygous DNA variants in a single gene, 30 affecting reported ID genes and 30 affecting novel candidate ID genes. Potential pathogenicity of these alleles was supported by co-segregation with the phenotype, low frequency in control populations and the application of stringent bioinformatics analyses. In another eight families segregation of multiple pathogenic variants was observed, affecting 19 genes that were either known or are novel candidates for ID. Transcriptome profiles of normal human brain tissues showed that the novel candidate ID genes formed a network significantly enriched for transcriptional co-expression (P<0.0001) in the frontal cortex during fetal development and in the temporal-parietal and sub-cortex during infancy through adulthood. In addition, proteins encoded by 12 novel ID genes directly interact with previously reported ID proteins in six known pathways essential for cognitive function (P<0.0001). These results suggest that disruptions of temporal parietal and sub-cortical neurogenesis during infancy are critical to the pathophysiology of ID. These findings further expand the existing repertoire of genes involved in ARID, and provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms and the transcriptome map of ID.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 26 July 2016; doi:10.1038/mp.2016.109.

  9. Identification of candidate genes for dissecting complex branch number trait in chickpea.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Deepak; Upadhyaya, Hari D; Das, Shouvik; Kumar, Vinod; Gowda, C L L; Sharma, Shivali; Tyagi, Akhilesh K; Parida, Swarup K

    2016-04-01

    The present study exploited integrated genomics-assisted breeding strategy for genetic dissection of complex branch number quantitative trait in chickpea. Candidate gene-based association analysis in a branch number association panel was performed by utilizing the genotyping data of 401 SNP allelic variants mined from 27 known cloned branch number gene orthologs of chickpea. The genome-wide association study (GWAS) integrating both genome-wide GBS- (4556 SNPs) and candidate gene-based genotyping information of 4957 SNPs in a structured population of 60 sequenced desi and kabuli accessions (with 350-400 kb LD decay), detected 11 significant genomic loci (genes) associated (41% combined PVE) with branch number in chickpea. Of these, seven branch number-associated genes were further validated successfully in two inter (ICC 4958 × ICC 17160)- and intra (ICC 12299 × ICC 8261)-specific mapping populations. The axillary meristem and shoot apical meristem-specific expression, including differential up- and down-regulation (4-5 fold) of the validated seven branch number-associated genes especially in high branch number as compared to the low branch number-containing parental accessions and homozygous individuals of two aforesaid mapping populations was apparent. Collectively, this combinatorial genomic approach delineated diverse naturally occurring novel functional SNP allelic variants in seven potential known/candidate genes [PIN1 (PIN-FORMED protein 1), TB1 (teosinte branched 1), BA1/LAX1 (BARREN STALK1/LIKE AUXIN1), GRAS8 (gibberellic acid insensitive/GAI, Repressor of ga13/RGA and Scarecrow8/SCR8), ERF (ethylene-responsive element-binding factor), MAX2 (more axillary growth 2) and lipase] governing chickpea branch number. The useful information generated from this study have potential to expedite marker-assisted genetic enhancement by developing high-yielding cultivars with more number of productive (pods and seeds) branches in chickpea.

  10. Identification of candidate genes in rice for resistance to sheath blight disease by whole genome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Silva, James; Scheffler, Brian; Sanabria, Yamid; De Guzman, Christian; Galam, Dominique; Farmer, Andrew; Woodward, Jimmy; May, Gregory; Oard, James

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in whole genome sequencing (WGS) have allowed identification of genes for disease susceptibility in humans. The objective of our research was to exploit whole genome sequences of 13 rice (Oryza sativa L.) inbred lines to identify non-synonymous SNPs (nsSNPs) and candidate genes for resistance to sheath blight, a disease of worldwide significance. WGS by the Illumina GA IIx platform produced an average 5× coverage with ~700 K variants detected per line when compared to the Nipponbare reference genome. Two filtering strategies were developed to identify nsSNPs between two groups of known resistant and susceptible lines. A total of 333 nsSNPs detected in the resistant lines were absent in the susceptible group. Selected variants associated with resistance were found in 11 of 12 chromosomes. More than 200 genes with selected nsSNPs were assigned to 42 categories based on gene family/gene ontology. Several candidate genes belonged to families reported in previous studies, and three new regions with novel candidates were also identified. A subset of 24 nsSNPs detected in 23 genes was selected for further study. Individual alleles of the 24 nsSNPs were evaluated by PCR whose presence or absence corresponded to known resistant or susceptible phenotypes of nine additional lines. Sanger sequencing confirmed presence of 12 selected nsSNPs in two lines. "Resistant" nsSNP alleles were detected in two accessions of O. nivara that suggests sources for resistance occur in additional Oryza sp. Results from this study provide a foundation for future basic research and marker-assisted breeding of rice for sheath blight resistance.

  11. Identification of Microdeletions in Candidate Genes for Cleft Lip and/or Palate

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Min; Mostowska, Adrianna; Jugessur, Astanand; Johnson, Marla K.; Mansilla, Maria Adela; Christensen, Kaare; Lie, Rolv T.; Wilcox, Allen J.; Murray, Jeffrey C.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Genome-wide association studies are now used routinely to identify genes implicated in complex traits. The panels used for such analyses can detect single nucleotide polymorphisms and copy number variants, both of which may help to identify small deleted regions of the genome that may contribute to a particular disease METHODS We performed a candidate gene analysis involving 1221 SNPs in 333 candidate genes for orofacial clefting using 2823 samples from 725 two- and three-generation families with a proband with clefts of the lip and/or palate. We used SNP genotyping, DNA sequencing, high-resolution DNA microarray analysis and long-range PCR to confirm and characterize the deletion events RESULTS This dataset had a high duplicate reproducibility rate (99.98%), high Mendelian consistency rate (99.93%), and low missing data rate (0.55%), which provided a powerful opportunity for deletion detection. Apparent Mendelian inconsistencies between parents and child suggested deletion events in 15 individuals in 11 genomic regions. We confirmed deletions involving CYP1B1, FGF10, SP8, SUMO1, TBX1, TFAP2A, and UGT7A1, including both de novo and familial cases. Deletions of SUMO1, TBX1, and TFAP2A are likely to be etiologic CONCLUSIONS These deletions suggest the potential roles of genes or regulatory elements contained within deleted regions in the etiology of clefting. Our analysis took advantage of genotypes from a candidate-gene-based SNP survey and proved to be an efficient analytical approach to interrogate genes potentially involved in clefting. This can serve as a model to find genes playing a role in complex traits in general. PMID:19137569

  12. Transcriptomic Analysis Using Olive Varieties and Breeding Progenies Identifies Candidate Genes Involved in Plant Architecture.

    PubMed

    González-Plaza, Juan J; Ortiz-Martín, Inmaculada; Muñoz-Mérida, Antonio; García-López, Carmen; Sánchez-Sevilla, José F; Luque, Francisco; Trelles, Oswaldo; Bejarano, Eduardo R; De La Rosa, Raúl; Valpuesta, Victoriano; Beuzón, Carmen R

    2016-01-01

    Plant architecture is a critical trait in fruit crops that can significantly influence yield, pruning, planting density and harvesting. Little is known about how plant architecture is genetically determined in olive, were most of the existing varieties are traditional with an architecture poorly suited for modern growing and harvesting systems. In the present study, we have carried out microarray analysis of meristematic tissue to compare expression profiles of olive varieties displaying differences in architecture, as well as seedlings from their cross pooled on the basis of their sharing architecture-related phenotypes. The microarray used, previously developed by our group has already been applied to identify candidates genes involved in regulating juvenile to adult transition in the shoot apex of seedlings. Varieties with distinct architecture phenotypes and individuals from segregating progenies displaying opposite architecture features were used to link phenotype to expression. Here, we identify 2252 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) associated to differences in plant architecture. Microarray results were validated by quantitative RT-PCR carried out on genes with functional annotation likely related to plant architecture. Twelve of these genes were further analyzed in individual seedlings of the corresponding pool. We also examined Arabidopsis mutants in putative orthologs of these targeted candidate genes, finding altered architecture for most of them. This supports a functional conservation between species and potential biological relevance of the candidate genes identified. This study is the first to identify genes associated to plant architecture in olive, and the results obtained could be of great help in future programs aimed at selecting phenotypes adapted to modern cultivation practices in this species.

  13. In silico identification of genetically attenuated vaccine candidate genes for Plasmodium liver stage.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Hirdesh; Frischknecht, Friedrich; Mair, Gunnar R; Gomes, James

    2015-12-01

    Genetically attenuated parasites (GAPs) that lack genes essential for the liver stage of the malaria parasite, and therefore cause developmental arrest, have been developed as live vaccines in rodent malaria models and recently been tested in humans. The genes targeted for deletion were often identified by trial and error. Here we present a systematic gene - protein and transcript - expression analyses of several Plasmodium species with the aim to identify candidate genes for the generation of novel GAPs. With a lack of liver stage expression data for human malaria parasites, we used data available for liver stage development of Plasmodium yoelii, a rodent malaria model, to identify proteins expressed in the liver stage but absent from blood stage parasites. An orthology-based search was then employed to identify orthologous proteins in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum resulting in a total of 310 genes expressed in the liver stage but lacking evidence of protein expression in blood stage parasites. Among these 310 possible GAP candidates, we further studied Plasmodium liver stage proteins by phyletic distribution and functional domain analyses and shortlisted twenty GAP-candidates; these are: fabB/F, fabI, arp, 3 genes encoding subunits of the PDH complex, dnaJ, urm1, rS5, ancp, mcp, arh, gk, lisp2, valS, palm, and four conserved Plasmodium proteins of unknown function. Parasites lacking one or several of these genes might yield new attenuated malaria parasites for experimental vaccination studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Transcriptomic Analysis Using Olive Varieties and Breeding Progenies Identifies Candidate Genes Involved in Plant Architecture

    PubMed Central

    González-Plaza, Juan J.; Ortiz-Martín, Inmaculada; Muñoz-Mérida, Antonio; García-López, Carmen; Sánchez-Sevilla, José F.; Luque, Francisco; Trelles, Oswaldo; Bejarano, Eduardo R.; De La Rosa, Raúl; Valpuesta, Victoriano; Beuzón, Carmen R.

    2016-01-01

    Plant architecture is a critical trait in fruit crops that can significantly influence yield, pruning, planting density and harvesting. Little is known about how plant architecture is genetically determined in olive, were most of the existing varieties are traditional with an architecture poorly suited for modern growing and harvesting systems. In the present study, we have carried out microarray analysis of meristematic tissue to compare expression profiles of olive varieties displaying differences in architecture, as well as seedlings from their cross pooled on the basis of their sharing architecture-related phenotypes. The microarray used, previously developed by our group has already been applied to identify candidates genes involved in regulating juvenile to adult transition in the shoot apex of seedlings. Varieties with distinct architecture phenotypes and individuals from segregating progenies displaying opposite architecture features were used to link phenotype to expression. Here, we identify 2252 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) associated to differences in plant architecture. Microarray results were validated by quantitative RT-PCR carried out on genes with functional annotation likely related to plant architecture. Twelve of these genes were further analyzed in individual seedlings of the corresponding pool. We also examined Arabidopsis mutants in putative orthologs of these targeted candidate genes, finding altered architecture for most of them. This supports a functional conservation between species and potential biological relevance of the candidate genes identified. This study is the first to identify genes associated to plant architecture in olive, and the results obtained could be of great help in future programs aimed at selecting phenotypes adapted to modern cultivation practices in this species. PMID:26973682

  15. Identifying candidate genes for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and obesity through gene expression profiling in multiple tissues or cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Junhui; Meng, Yuhuan; Zhou, Jinghui; Zhuo, Min; Ling, Fei; Zhang, Yu; Du, Hongli; Wang, Xiaoning

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) and obesity have become increasingly prevalent in recent years. Recent studies have focused on identifying causal variations or candidate genes for obesity and T2DM via analysis of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) within a single tissue. T2DM and obesity are affected by comprehensive sets of genes in multiple tissues. In the current study, gene expression levels in multiple human tissues from GEO datasets were analyzed, and 21 candidate genes displaying high percentages of differential expression were filtered out. Specifically, DENND1B, LYN, MRPL30, POC1B, PRKCB, RP4-655J12.3, HIBADH, and TMBIM4 were identified from the T2DM-control study, and BCAT1, BMP2K, CSRNP2, MYNN, NCKAP5L, SAP30BP, SLC35B4, SP1, BAP1, GRB14, HSP90AB1, ITGA5, and TOMM5 were identified from the obesity-control study. The majority of these genes are known to be involved in T2DM and obesity. Therefore, analysis of gene expression in various tissues using GEO datasets may be an effective and feasible method to determine novel or causal genes associated with T2DM and obesity.

  16. Identification of Candidate Genes in Scleroderma-Related Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Grigoryev, DN; Mathai, SC; Fisher, MR; Girgis, RE; Zaiman, AL; Housten-Harris, T; Cheadle, C; Gao, L; Hummers, LK; Champion, HC; Garcia, JGN; Wigley, FM; Tuder, RM; Barnes, KC; Hassoun, PM

    2008-01-01

    We hypothesize that pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH)-associated genes identified by expression profiling of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) can also be identified in PBMCs from scleroderma patients with PAH (PAH-SSc). Gene expression profiles of PBMCs collected from IPAH (n=9), PAH-SSc (n=10) patients and healthy controls (n=5) were generated using HG_U133A_2.0 GeneChips and processed by RMA/GCOS_1.4/SAM_1.21 data analysis pipeline. Disease severity in consecutive patients was assessed by functional status and hemodynamic measurements. The expression profiles were analyzed using PAH severity-stratification, and identified candidate genes were validated with real time PCR (rtPCR). Transcriptomics of PBMCs from IPAH patients was highly comparable with that of PMBCs from PAH-SSc patients. The PBMC gene expression patterns significantly correlate with right atrium pressure (RA) and cardiac index (CI), known predictors of survival in PAH. Array stratification by RA and CI identified 364 PAH-associated candidate genes. Gene ontology analysis revealed significant (Zscore > 1.96) alterations in angiogenesis genes according to PAH severity: MMP9 and VEGF were significantly upregulated in mild as compared to severe PAH and healthy controls, as confirmed by rtPCR. These data demonstrate that PBMCs from patients with PAH-SSc carry distinct transcriptional expression. Furthermore, our findings suggest an association between angiogenesis-related gene expression and severity of PAH in PAH-SSc patients. Deciphering the role of genes involved in vascular remodeling and PAH development may reveal new treatment targets for this devastating disorder. PMID:18355767

  17. Exomic sequencing of immune-related genes reveals novel candidate variants associated with alopecia universalis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seungbok; Paik, Seung Hwan; Kim, Hyun-Jin; Ryu, Hyeong Ho; Cha, Soeun; Jo, Seong Jin; Eun, Hee Chul; Seo, Jeong-Sun; Kim, Jong-Il; Kwon, Oh Sang

    2013-01-01

    Alopecia areata (AA) is a common autoimmune disorder mostly presented as round patches of hair loss and subclassified into alopecia totalis/alopecia universalis (AT/AU) based on the area of alopecia. Although AA is relatively common, only 5% of AA patients progress to AT/AU, which affect the whole scalp and whole body respectively. To determine genetic determinants of this orphan disease, we undertook whole-exome sequencing of 6 samples from AU patients, and 26 variants in immune-related genes were selected as candidates. When an additional 14 AU samples were genotyped for these candidates, 6 of them remained at the level of significance in comparison with 155 Asian controls (p<1.92×10(-3)). Linkage disequilibrium was observed between some of the most significant SNPs, including rs41559420 of HLA-DRB5 (p<0.001, OR 44.57) and rs28362679 of BTNL2 (p<0.001, OR 30.21). While BTNL2 was reported as a general susceptibility gene of AA previously, HLA-DRB5 has not been implicated in AA. In addition, we found several genetic variants in novel genes (HLA-DMB, TLR1, and PMS2) and discovered an additional locus on HLA-A, a known susceptibility gene of AA. This study provides further evidence for the association of previously reported genes with AA and novel findings such as HLA-DRB5, which might represent a hidden culprit gene for AU.

  18. Association study of proposed candidate genes/regions in a population of Spanish asthmatics.

    PubMed

    Soriano, J B; de Cid, R; Estivill, X; Antó, J M; Sunyer, J; Otero, D; Roca, J; Rodríguez-Roisín, R; Morell, F; Rodrigo, M J; Ercilla, G; Beaty, T H; Lázaro, C

    2000-01-01

    A number of genes/regions have recently been reported to be linked to asthma or its related phenotypes (i.e. atopy and bronchial hyperresponsiveness), by genetic linkage and allele-sharing methods. We have performed a case-control study comparing the allelic distribution of nine microsatellite markers and two genetic variants in a group of patients attended at emergency room departments because of an acute attack of asthma with respect to an external healthy population of controls. A total of 146 asthmatic subjects and 50 population controls from Barcelona, Spain, were genotyped for nine microsatellite markers from some asthma/atopy candidate genes/regions: the beta-subunit of the high-affinity IgE receptor (Fc epsilonRI-beta) located on chromosome 11; the 5q31-32 candidate region; the T-cell receptor genes, TCR-alpha on chromosome 14 and TCR-beta on chromosome 7. Two genetic variants of the beta-subunit of the high-affinity IgE receptor (Fc epsilonRI-beta) gene were also analyzed. None of the asthmatic or control individuals carried the Ile181Leu variant. There were no significant differences between asthmatic and control subjects neither for the polymorphic markers nor for the other variant of the beta-subunit of the high-affinity IgE receptor (Fc epsilonRI-beta) gene. No association could be observed in this sample of Spanish asthmatics with the genes/regions studied.

  19. Identification of CAD candidate genes in GWAS loci and their expression in vascular cells[S

    PubMed Central

    Erbilgin, Ayca; Civelek, Mete; Romanoski, Casey E.; Pan, Calvin; Hagopian, Raffi; Berliner, Judith A.; Lusis, Aldons J.

    2013-01-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 35 loci that significantly associate with coronary artery disease (CAD) susceptibility. The majority of the genes represented in these loci have not previously been studied in the context of atherosclerosis. To characterize the roles of these candidate genes in the vessel wall, we determined their expression levels in endothelial, smooth muscle, and macrophage cells isolated from healthy, prelesioned, and lesioned mouse aortas. We also performed expression quantitative locus (eQTL) mapping of these genes in human endothelial cells under control and proatherogenic conditions. Of the 57 genes studied, 31 were differentially expressed in one or more cell types in disease state in mice, and the expression levels of 8 were significantly associated with the CAD SNPs in human cells, 7 of which were also differentially expressed in mice. By integrating human and mouse results, we predict that PPAP2B, GALNT4, MAPKAPK5, TCTN1, SRR, SNF8, and ICAM1 play a causal role in the susceptibility to atherosclerosis through a role in the vasculature. Additionally, we highlight the genetic complexity of a subset of CAD loci through the differential expression of multiple candidate genes per locus and the involvement of genes that lie outside linkage disequilibrium blocks. PMID:23667179

  20. Analysis of gene expression in the nervous system identifies key genes and novel candidates for health and disease.

    PubMed

    Carpanini, Sarah M; Wishart, Thomas M; Gillingwater, Thomas H; Manson, Jean C; Summers, Kim M

    2017-04-01

    The incidence of neurodegenerative diseases in the developed world has risen over the last century, concomitant with an increase in average human lifespan. A major challenge is therefore to identify genes that control neuronal health and viability with a view to enhancing neuronal health during ageing and reducing the burden of neurodegeneration. Analysis of gene expression data has recently been used to infer gene functions for a range of tissues from co-expression networks. We have now applied this approach to transcriptomic datasets from the mammalian nervous system available in the public domain. We have defined the genes critical for influencing neuronal health and disease in different neurological cell types and brain regions. The functional contribution of genes in each co-expression cluster was validated using human disease and knockout mouse phenotypes, pathways and gene ontology term annotation. Additionally a number of poorly annotated genes were implicated by this approach in nervous system function. Exploiting gene expression data available in the public domain allowed us to validate key nervous system genes and, importantly, to identify additional genes with minimal functional annotation but with the same expression pattern. These genes are thus novel candidates for a role in neurological health and disease and could now be further investigated to confirm their function and regulation during ageing and neurodegeneration.

  1. Identification of candidate genes related to calanolide biosynthesis by transcriptome sequencing of Calophyllum brasiliense (Calophyllaceae).

    PubMed

    Gómez-Robledo, Hilda-Beatriz; Cruz-Sosa, Francisco; Bernabé-Antonio, Antonio; Guerrero-Analco, Antonio; Olivares-Romero, José Luis; Alonso-Sánchez, Alexandro; Villafán, Emanuel; Ibarra-Laclette, Enrique

    2016-08-15

    Calophyllum brasiliense is highlighted as an important resource of calanolides, which are dipyranocoumarins that inhibit the reverse transcriptase of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 RT). Despite having great medicinal importance, enzymes involved in calanolide, biosynthesis and the pathway itself, are still largely unknown. Additionally, no genomic resources exist for this plant species. In this work, we first analyzed the transcriptome of C. brasiliense leaves, stem, and roots using a RNA-seq strategy, which provided a dataset for functional gene mining. According to the structures of the calanolides, putative biosynthetic pathways were proposed. Finally, candidate unigenes in the transcriptome dataset, potentially involved in umbelliferone and calanolide (angular pyranocoumarin) biosynthetic pathways, were screened using mainly homology-based BLAST and phylogenetic analyses. The unigene dataset that was generated in this study provides an important resource for further molecular studies of C. brasiliense, especially for functional analysis of candidate genes involved in the biosynthetic pathways of linear and angular pyranocoumarins.

  2. Validation of candidate genes associated with cardiovascular risk factors in psychiatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Windemuth, Andreas; de Leon, Jose; Goethe, John W.; Schwartz, Harold I.; Woolley, Stephen; Susce, Margaret; Kocherla, Mohan; Bogaard, Kali; Holford, Theodore R.; Seip, Richard L.; Ruaño, Gualberto

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify genetic variants predictive of cardiovascular risk factors in a psychiatric population treated with second generation antipsychotics (SGA). 924 patients undergoing treatment for severe mental illness at four US hospitals were genotyped at 1.2 million single nucleotide polymorphisms. Patients were assessed for fasting serum lipid (low density lipoprotein cholesterol [LDLc], high density lipoprotein cholesterol [HDLc], and triglycerides) and obesity phenotypes (body mass index, BMI). Thirteen candidate genes from previous studies of the same phenotypes in non-psychiatric populations were tested for association. We confirmed 8 of the 13 candidate genes at the 95% confidence level. An increased genetic effect size was observed for triglycerides in the psychiatric population compared to that in the cardiovascular population. PMID:21851846

  3. Validation of candidate genes associated with cardiovascular risk factors in psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Windemuth, Andreas; de Leon, Jose; Goethe, John W; Schwartz, Harold I; Woolley, Stephen; Susce, Margaret; Kocherla, Mohan; Bogaard, Kali; Holford, Theodore R; Seip, Richard L; Ruaño, Gualberto

    2012-03-30

    The purpose of this study was to identify genetic variants predictive of cardiovascular risk factors in a psychiatric population treated with second generation antipsychotics (SGA). 924 patients undergoing treatment for severe mental illness at four US hospitals were genotyped at 1.2 million single nucleotide polymorphisms. Patients were assessed for fasting serum lipid (low density lipoprotein cholesterol [LDLc], high density lipoprotein cholesterol [HDLc], and triglycerides) and obesity phenotypes (body mass index, BMI). Thirteen candidate genes from previous studies of the same phenotypes in non-psychiatric populations were tested for association. We confirmed 8 of the 13 candidate genes at the 95% confidence level. An increased genetic effect size was observed for triglycerides in the psychiatric population compared to that in the cardiovascular population.

  4. Genetic and expression analysis of cattle identifies candidate genes in pathways responding to Trypanosoma congolense infection

    PubMed Central

    Noyes, Harry; Brass, Andy; Obara, Isaiah; Anderson, Susan; Archibald, Alan L.; Bradley, Dan G.; Fisher, Paul; Freeman, Abigail; Gibson, John; Gicheru, Michael; Hall, Laurence; Hanotte, Olivier; Hulme, Helen; McKeever, Declan; Murray, Caitriona; Oh, Sung Jung; Tate, Catriona; Smith, Ken; Tapio, Miika; Wambugu, John; Williams, Diana J.; Agaba, Morris; Kemp, Stephen J.

    2011-01-01

    African bovine trypanosomiasis caused by Trypanosoma sp., is a major constraint on cattle productivity in sub-Saharan Africa. Some African Bos taurus breeds are highly tolerant of infection, but the potentially more productive Bos indicus zebu breeds are much more susceptible. Zebu cattle are well adapted for plowing and haulage, and increasing their tolerance of trypanosomiasis could have a major impact on crop cultivation as well as dairy and beef production. We used three strategies to obtain short lists of candidate genes within QTL that were previously shown to regulate response to infection. We analyzed the transcriptomes of trypanotolerant N'Dama and susceptible Boran cattle after infection with Trypanosoma congolense. We sequenced EST libraries from these two breeds to identify polymorphisms that might underlie previously identified quantitative trait loci (QTL), and we assessed QTL regions and candidate loci for evidence of selective sweeps. The scan of the EST sequences identified a previously undescribed polymorphism in ARHGAP15 in the Bta2 trypanotolerance QTL. The polymorphism affects gene function in vitro and could contribute to the observed differences in expression of the MAPK pathway in vivo. The expression data showed that TLR and MAPK pathways responded to infection, and the former contained TICAM1, which is within a QTL on Bta7. Genetic analyses showed that selective sweeps had occurred at TICAM1 and ARHGAP15 loci in African taurine cattle, making them strong candidates for the genes underlying the QTL. Candidate QTL genes were identified in other QTL by their expression profile and the pathways in which they participate. PMID:21593421

  5. Genetic heritability of ischemic stroke and the contribution of previously reported candidate gene and genomewide associations.

    PubMed

    Bevan, Steve; Traylor, Matthew; Adib-Samii, Poneh; Malik, Rainer; Paul, Nicola L M; Jackson, Caroline; Farrall, Martin; Rothwell, Peter M; Sudlow, Cathie; Dichgans, Martin; Markus, Hugh S

    2012-12-01

    The contribution of genetics to stroke risk, and whether this differs for different stroke subtypes, remainsuncertain. Genomewide complex trait analysis allows heritability to be assessed from genomewide association study (GWAS) data. Previous candidate gene studies have identified many associations with stoke but whether these are important requires replication in large independent data sets. GWAS data sets provide a powerful resource to perform replication studies. We applied genomewide complex trait analysis to a GWAS data set of 3752 ischemic strokes and 5972 controls and determined heritability for all ischemic stroke and the most common subtypes: large-vessel disease, small-vessel disease, and cardioembolic stroke. By systematic review we identified previous candidate gene and GWAS associations with stroke and previous GWAS associations with related cardiovascular phenotypes (myocardial infarction, atrial fibrillation, and carotid intima-media thickness). Fifty associations were identified. For all ischemic stroke, heritability was 37.9%. Heritability varied markedly by stroke subtype being 40.3% for large-vessel disease and 32.6% for cardioembolic but lower for small-vessel disease (16.1%). No previously reported candidate gene was significant after rigorous correction for multiple testing. In contrast, 3 loci from related cardiovascular GWAS studies were significant: PHACTR1 in large-vessel disease (P=2.63e(-6)), PITX2 in cardioembolic stroke (P=4.78e(-8)), and ZFHX3 in cardioembolic stroke (P=5.50e(-7)). There is substantial heritability for ischemic stroke, but this varies for different stroke subtypes. Previous candidate gene associations contribute little to this heritability, but GWAS studies in related cardiovascular phenotypes are identifying robust associations. The heritability data, and data from GWAS, suggest detecting additional associations will depend on careful stroke subtyping.

  6. Mapping and Expression of Candidate Genes for Development Rate in Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Hale, Matthew C; Colletti, John A; Gahr, Scott A; Scardina, Julie; Thrower, Frank P; Harmon, Matthew; Carter, Megan; Phillips, Ruth B; Thorgaard, Gary H; Rexroad, Caird E; Nichols, Krista M

    2014-01-01

    Development rate has important implications for individual fitness and physiology. In salmonid fishes, development rate correlates with many traits later in life, including life-history diversity, growth, and age and size at sexual maturation. In rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), a quantitative trait locus for embryonic development rate has been detected on chromosome 5 across populations. However, few candidate genes have been identified within this region. In this study, we use gene mapping, gene expression, and quantitative genetic methods to further identify the genetic basis of embryonic developmental rate in O. mykiss Among the genes located in the region of the major development rate quantitative trait locus (GHR1, Clock1a, Myd118-1, and their paralogs), all were expressed early in embryonic development (fertilization through hatch), but none were differentially expressed between individuals with the fast- or slow-developing alleles for a major embryonic development rate quantitative trait locus. In a follow-up study of migratory and resident rainbow trout from natural populations in Alaska, we found significant additive variation in development rate and, moreover, found associations between development rate and allelic variation in all 3 candidate genes within the quantitative trait locus for embryonic development. The mapping of these genes to this region and associations in multiple populations provide positional candidates for further study of their roles in growth, development, and life-history diversity in this model salmonid. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Genetic Association 2014. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  7. SNP discovery in candidate adaptive genes using exon capture in a free-ranging alpine ungulate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roffler, Gretchen H.; Amish, Stephen J.; Smith, Seth; Cosart, Ted F.; Kardos, Marty; Schwartz, Michael K.; Luikart, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    Identification of genes underlying genomic signatures of natural selection is key to understanding adaptation to local conditions. We used targeted resequencing to identify SNP markers in 5321 candidate adaptive genes associated with known immunological, metabolic and growth functions in ovids and other ungulates. We selectively targeted 8161 exons in protein-coding and nearby 5′ and 3′ untranslated regions of chosen candidate genes. Targeted sequences were taken from bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) exon capture data and directly from the domestic sheep genome (Ovis aries v. 3; oviAri3). The bighorn sheep sequences used in the Dall's sheep (Ovis dalli dalli) exon capture aligned to 2350 genes on the oviAri3 genome with an average of 2 exons each. We developed a microfluidic qPCR-based SNP chip to genotype 476 Dall's sheep from locations across their range and test for patterns of selection. Using multiple corroborating approaches (lositan and bayescan), we detected 28 SNP loci potentially under selection. We additionally identified candidate loci significantly associated with latitude, longitude, precipitation and temperature, suggesting local environmental adaptation. The three methods demonstrated consistent support for natural selection on nine genes with immune and disease-regulating functions (e.g. Ovar-DRA, APC, BATF2, MAGEB18), cell regulation signalling pathways (e.g. KRIT1, PI3K, ORRC3), and respiratory health (CYSLTR1). Characterizing adaptive allele distributions from novel genetic techniques will facilitate investigation of the influence of environmental variation on local adaptation of a northern alpine ungulate throughout its range. This research demonstrated the utility of exon capture for gene-targeted SNP discovery and subsequent SNP chip genotyping using low-quality samples in a nonmodel species.

  8. Transcriptome and Proteome Data Reveal Candidate Genes for Pollinator Attraction in Sexually Deceptive Orchids

    PubMed Central

    Sedeek, Khalid E. M.; Qi, Weihong; Schauer, Monica A.; Gupta, Alok K.; Poveda, Lucy; Xu, Shuqing; Liu, Zhong-Jian; Grossniklaus, Ueli; Schiestl, Florian P.; Schlüter, Philipp M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Sexually deceptive orchids of the genus Ophrys mimic the mating signals of their pollinator females to attract males as pollinators. This mode of pollination is highly specific and leads to strong reproductive isolation between species. This study aims to identify candidate genes responsible for pollinator attraction and reproductive isolation between three closely related species, O. exaltata, O. sphegodes and O. garganica. Floral traits such as odour, colour and morphology are necessary for successful pollinator attraction. In particular, different odour hydrocarbon profiles have been linked to differences in specific pollinator attraction among these species. Therefore, the identification of genes involved in these traits is important for understanding the molecular basis of pollinator attraction by sexually deceptive orchids. Results We have created floral reference transcriptomes and proteomes for these three Ophrys species using a combination of next-generation sequencing (454 and Solexa), Sanger sequencing, and shotgun proteomics (tandem mass spectrometry). In total, 121 917 unique transcripts and 3531 proteins were identified. This represents the first orchid proteome and transcriptome from the orchid subfamily Orchidoideae. Proteome data revealed proteins corresponding to 2644 transcripts and 887 proteins not observed in the transcriptome. Candidate genes for hydrocarbon and anthocyanin biosynthesis were represented by 156 and 61 unique transcripts in 20 and 7 genes classes, respectively. Moreover, transcription factors putatively involved in the regulation of flower odour, colour and morphology were annotated, including Myb, MADS and TCP factors. Conclusion Our comprehensive data set generated by combining transcriptome and proteome technologies allowed identification of candidate genes for pollinator attraction and reproductive isolation among sexually deceptive orchids. This includes genes for hydrocarbon and anthocyanin biosynthesis and

  9. Exome sequencing identifies potential novel candidate genes in patients with unexplained colorectal adenomatous polyposis.

    PubMed

    Spier, Isabel; Kerick, Martin; Drichel, Dmitriy; Horpaopan, Sukanya; Altmüller, Janine; Laner, Andreas; Holzapfel, Stefanie; Peters, Sophia; Adam, Ronja; Zhao, Bixiao; Becker, Tim; Lifton, Richard P; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Perner, Sven; Thiele, Holger; Nöthen, Markus M; Hoffmann, Per; Timmermann, Bernd; Schweiger, Michal R; Aretz, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    In up to 30% of patients with colorectal adenomatous polyposis, no germline mutation in the known genes APC, causing familial adenomatous polyposis, MUTYH, causing MUTYH-associated polyposis, and POLE or POLD1, causing Polymerase-Proofreading-associated polyposis can be identified, although a hereditary etiology is likely. To uncover new causative genes, exome sequencing was performed using DNA from leukocytes and a total of 12 colorectal adenomas from seven unrelated patients with unexplained sporadic adenomatous polyposis. For data analysis and variant filtering, an established bioinformatics pipeline including in-house tools was applied. Variants were filtered for rare truncating point mutations and copy-number variants assuming a dominant, recessive, or tumor suppressor model of inheritance. Subsequently, targeted sequence analysis of the most promising candidate genes was performed in a validation cohort of 191 unrelated patients. All relevant variants were validated by Sanger sequencing. The analysis of exome sequencing data resulted in the identification of rare loss-of-function germline mutations in three promising candidate genes (DSC2, PIEZO1, ZSWIM7). In the validation cohort, further variants predicted to be pathogenic were identified in DSC2 and PIEZO1. According to the somatic mutation spectra, the adenomas in this patient cohort follow the classical pathways of colorectal tumorigenesis. The present study identified three candidate genes which might represent rare causes for a predisposition to colorectal adenoma formation. Especially PIEZO1 (FAM38A) and ZSWIM7 (SWS1) warrant further exploration. To evaluate the clinical relevance of these genes, investigation of larger patient cohorts and functional studies are required.

  10. Population, Epidemiological, and Functional Genetics of Gastric Cancer Candidate Genes in Peruvians with Predominant Amerindian Ancestry.

    PubMed

    Zamudio, Roxana; Pereira, Latife; Rocha, Carolina D; Berg, Douglas E; Muniz-Queiroz, Thaís; Sant Anna, Hanaisa P; Cabrera, Lilia; Combe, Juan M; Herrera, Phabiola; Jahuira, Martha H; Leão, Felipe B; Lyon, Fernanda; Prado, William A; Rodrigues, Maíra R; Rodrigues-Soares, Fernanda; Santolalla, Meddly L; Zolini, Camila; Silva, Aristóbolo M; Gilman, Robert H; Tarazona-Santos, Eduardo; Kehdy, Fernanda S G

    2016-01-01

    Gastric adenocarcinoma is associated with chronic infection by Helicobacter pylori and with the host inflammatory response triggered by it, with substantial inter-person variation in the immune response profile due to host genetic factors. To investigate the diversity of the proinflammatory genes IL8, its receptors and PTGS2 in Amerindians; to test whether candidate SNPs in these genes are associated with gastric cancer in an admixed population with high Amerindian ancestry from Lima, Peru; and to assess whether an IL8RB promoter-derived haplotype affects gene expression. We performed a Sanger-resequencing population survey, a candidate-gene association study (220 cases, 288 controls) and meta-analyses. We also performed an in vitro validation by a reporter gene assay of IL8RB promoter. The diversity of the promoter of studied genes in Native Americans is similar to Europeans. Although an association between candidate SNPs and gastric cancer was not found in Peruvians, trend in our data is consistent with meta-analyses results that suggest PTGS2-rs689466-A is associated with H. pylori-associated gastric cancer in East Asia. IL8RB promoter-derived haplotype (rs3890158-A/rs4674258-T), common in Peruvians, was up-regulated by TNF-α unlike the ancestral haplotype (rs3890158-G/rs4674258-C). Bioinformatics analysis suggests that this effect stemmed from creation of a binding site for the FOXO3 transcription factor by rs3890158G>A. Our updated meta-analysis reinforces the role of PTGS2-rs689466-A in gastric cancer in Asians, although more studies that control for ancestry are necessary to clarify its role in Latin Americans. Finally, we suggest that IL8RB-rs3890158G>A is a cis-regulatory SNP.

  11. RNA-Seq Analysis Reveals Candidate Genes for Ontogenic Resistance in Malus-Venturia Pathosystem

    PubMed Central

    Gusberti, Michele; Gessler, Cesare; Broggini, Giovanni A. L.

    2013-01-01

    Ontogenic scab resistance in apple leaves and fruits is a horizontal resistance against the plant pathogen Venturia inaequalis and is expressed as a decrease in disease symptoms and incidence with the ageing of the leaves. Several studies at the biochemical level tried to unveil the nature of this resistance; however, no conclusive results were reported. We decided therefore to investigate the genetic origin of this phenomenon by performing a full quantitative transcriptome sequencing and comparison of young (susceptible) and old (ontogenic resistant) leaves, infected or not with the pathogen. Two time points at 72 and 96 hours post-inoculation were chosen for RNA sampling and sequencing. Comparison between the different conditions (young and old leaves, inoculated or not) should allow the identification of differentially expressed genes which may represent different induced plant defence reactions leading to ontogenic resistance or may be the cause of a constitutive (uninoculated with the pathogen) shift toward resistance in old leaves. Differentially expressed genes were then characterised for their function by homology to A. thaliana and other plant genes, particularly looking for genes involved in pathways already suspected of appertaining to ontogenic resistance in apple or other hosts, or to plant defence mechanisms in general. In this work, five candidate genes putatively involved in the ontogenic resistance of apple were identified: a gene encoding an “enhanced disease susceptibility 1 protein” was found to be down-regulated in both uninoculated and inoculated old leaves at 96 hpi, while the other four genes encoding proteins (metallothionein3-like protein, lipoxygenase, lipid transfer protein, and a peroxidase 3) were found to be constitutively up-regulated in inoculated and uninoculated old leaves. The modulation of the five candidate genes has been validated using the real-time quantitative PCR. Thus, ontogenic resistance may be the result of the

  12. Differences in candidate gene association between European ancestry and African American asthmatic children.

    PubMed

    Baye, Tesfaye M; Butsch Kovacic, Melinda; Biagini Myers, Jocelyn M; Martin, Lisa J; Lindsey, Mark; Patterson, Tia L; He, Hua; Ericksen, Mark B; Gupta, Jayanta; Tsoras, Anna M; Lindsley, Andrew; Rothenberg, Marc E; Wills-Karp, Marsha; Eissa, N Tony; Borish, Larry; Khurana Hershey, Gurjit K

    2011-02-28

    Candidate gene case-control studies have identified several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are associated with asthma susceptibility. Most of these studies have been restricted to evaluations of specific SNPs within a single gene and within populations from European ancestry. Recently, there is increasing interest in understanding racial differences in genetic risk associated with childhood asthma. Our aim was to compare association patterns of asthma candidate genes between children of European and African ancestry. Using a custom-designed Illumina SNP array, we genotyped 1,485 children within the Greater Cincinnati Pediatric Clinic Repository and Cincinnati Genomic Control Cohort for 259 SNPs in 28 genes and evaluated their associations with asthma. We identified 14 SNPs located in 6 genes that were significantly associated (p-values <0.05) with childhood asthma in African Americans. Among Caucasians, 13 SNPs in 5 genes were associated with childhood asthma. Two SNPs in IL4 were associated with asthma in both races (p-values <0.05). Gene-gene interaction studies identified race specific sets of genes that best discriminate between asthmatic children and non-allergic controls. We identified IL4 as having a role in asthma susceptibility in both African American and Caucasian children. However, while IL4 SNPs were associated with asthma in asthmatic children with European and African ancestry, the relative contributions of the most replicated asthma-associated SNPs varied by ancestry. These data provides valuable insights into the pathways that may predispose to asthma in individuals with European vs. African ancestry.

  13. Differences in Candidate Gene Association between European Ancestry and African American Asthmatic Children

    PubMed Central

    Baye, Tesfaye M.; Butsch Kovacic, Melinda; Biagini Myers, Jocelyn M.; Martin, Lisa J.; Lindsey, Mark; Patterson, Tia L.; He, Hua; Ericksen, Mark B.; Gupta, Jayanta; Tsoras, Anna M.; Lindsley, Andrew; Rothenberg, Marc E.; Wills-Karp, Marsha; Eissa, N. Tony; Borish, Larry; Khurana Hershey, Gurjit K.

    2011-01-01

    Background Candidate gene case-control studies have identified several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are associated with asthma susceptibility. Most of these studies have been restricted to evaluations of specific SNPs within a single gene and within populations from European ancestry. Recently, there is increasing interest in understanding racial differences in genetic risk associated with childhood asthma. Our aim was to compare association patterns of asthma candidate genes between children of European and African ancestry. Methodology/Principal Findings Using a custom-designed Illumina SNP array, we genotyped 1,485 children within the Greater Cincinnati Pediatric Clinic Repository and Cincinnati Genomic Control Cohort for 259 SNPs in 28 genes and evaluated their associations with asthma. We identified 14 SNPs located in 6 genes that were significantly associated (p-values <0.05) with childhood asthma in African Americans. Among Caucasians, 13 SNPs in 5 genes were associated with childhood asthma. Two SNPs in IL4 were associated with asthma in both races (p-values <0.05). Gene-gene interaction studies identified race specific sets of genes that best discriminate between asthmatic children and non-allergic controls. Conclusions/Significance We identified IL4 as having a role in asthma susceptibility in both African American and Caucasian children. However, while IL4 SNPs were associated with asthma in asthmatic children with European and African ancestry, the relative contributions of the most replicated asthma-associated SNPs varied by ancestry. These data provides valuable insights into the pathways that may predispose to asthma in individuals with European vs. African ancestry. PMID:21387019

  14. Selection of Candidate Reference Genes for Gene Expression Analysis in Kentucky Bluegrass (Poa pratensis L.) under Abiotic Stress.

    PubMed

    Niu, Kuiju; Shi, Yi; Ma, Huiling

    2017-01-01

    Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis L.) belong to Gramineae and is widely used in lawns, golf courses, landscapes, and sport fields as a prominent cool-season grass. Gene expression patterns during different stages of plant development can provide clues toward the understanding of its biological functions. The selection and validation of reference genes are the first steps in any real-time quantitative PCR gene expression study. Therefore, suitable reference genes are necessary for obtaining reliable results in real-time quantitative PCR analyses of Kentucky bluegrass. In the present study, 9 candidate reference genes were chosen, and their expression stability in the leaves and roots of Kentucky bluegrass under different stresses (drought, salt, heat, and cold) were evaluated using the GeNorm, NormFinder, BestKeeper, and RefFinder programs. The results showed that the expression stability of the candidate reference genes was dependent on the experimental conditions. The combination of SAM with GAPDH was the most stable in leaves under salt stress and cold stress, while TUB combined with ACT or GAPDH was stable in roots under salt or cold stress, respectively. ACT and SAM maintained stable expression in drought-treated leaves, and GAPDH combined with ACT was stable in drought-treated roots. SAM and TUB exhibited stable expression in heat-treated leaves. ACT and RPL were stable in heat-treated roots. In addition, the expression patterns of PpFEH in response to drought and cold stress were used to confirm the reliability of the selected reference genes, indicating that the use of an inappropriate reference gene as the internal control will cause erroneous results. This work is the first study on the expression stability of reference genes in Kentucky bluegrass and will be particularly useful in the selection of stress-tolerance genes and the identification of the molecular mechanisms conferring stress tolerance in this species.

  15. Fine mapping and candidate gene analysis of the dominant glandless gene Gl 2 (e) in cotton (Gossypium spp.).

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hailiang; Lu, Cairui; Yu, John Z; Zou, Changsong; Zhang, Youping; Wang, Qiaolian; Huang, Juan; Feng, Xiaoxu; Jiang, Pengfei; Yang, Wencui; Song, Guoli

    2016-07-01

    Dominant glandless gene Gl 2 (e) was fine-mapped to a 15 kb region containing one candidate gene encoding an MYC transcription factor, sequence and expression level of the gene were analyzed. Cottonseed product is an excellent source of oil and protein. However, this nutrition source is greatly limited in utilization by the toxic gossypol in pigment glands. It is reported that the Gl 2 (e) gene could effectively inhibit the formation of the pigment glands. Here, three F2 populations were constructed using two pairs of near isogenic lines (NILs), which differ nearly only by the gland trait, for fine mapping of Gl 2 (e) . DNA markers were identified from recently developed cotton genome sequence. The Gl 2 (e) gene was located within a 15-kb genomic interval between two markers CS2 and CS4 on chromosome 12. Only one gene was identified in the genomic interval as the candidate for Gl 2 (e) which encodes a family member of MYC transcription factor with 475-amino acids. Unexpectedly, the results of expression analysis indicated that the MYC gene expresses in glanded lines while almost does not express in glandless lines. These results suggest that the MYC gene probably serves as a vital positive regulator in the organogenesis pathway of pigment gland, and low expression of this gene will not launch the downstream pathway of pigment gland formation. This is the first pigment gland-related gene identification in cotton and will facilitate the research on glandless trait, cotton MYC proteins and low-gossypol cotton breeding.

  16. Selection of Candidate Reference Genes for Gene Expression Analysis in Kentucky Bluegrass (Poa pratensis L.) under Abiotic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Kuiju; Shi, Yi; Ma, Huiling

    2017-01-01

    Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis L.) belong to Gramineae and is widely used in lawns, golf courses, landscapes, and sport fields as a prominent cool-season grass. Gene expression patterns during different stages of plant development can provide clues toward the understanding of its biological functions. The selection and validation of reference genes are the first steps in any real-time quantitative PCR gene expression study. Therefore, suitable reference genes are necessary for obtaining reliable results in real-time quantitative PCR analyses of Kentucky bluegrass. In the present study, 9 candidate reference genes were chosen, and their expression stability in the leaves and roots of Kentucky bluegrass under different stresses (drought, salt, heat, and cold) were evaluated using the GeNorm, NormFinder, BestKeeper, and RefFinder programs. The results showed that the expression stability of the candidate reference genes was dependent on the experimental conditions. The combination of SAM with GAPDH was the most stable in leaves under salt stress and cold stress, while TUB combined with ACT or GAPDH was stable in roots under salt or cold stress, respectively. ACT and SAM maintained stable expression in drought-treated leaves, and GAPDH combined with ACT was stable in drought-treated roots. SAM and TUB exhibited stable expression in heat-treated leaves. ACT and RPL were stable in heat-treated roots. In addition, the expression patterns of PpFEH in response to drought and cold stress were used to confirm the reliability of the selected reference genes, indicating that the use of an inappropriate reference gene as the internal control will cause erroneous results. This work is the first study on the expression stability of reference genes in Kentucky bluegrass and will be particularly useful in the selection of stress-tolerance genes and the identification of the molecular mechanisms conferring stress tolerance in this species. PMID:28261247

  17. Candidate gene association studies in syndromic and non-syndromic cleft lip and palate

    SciTech Connect

    Daack-Hirsch, S.; Basart, A.; Frischmeyer, P.

    1994-09-01

    Using ongoing case ascertainment through a birth defects registry, we have collected 219 nuclear families with non-syndromic cleft lip and/or palate and 111 families with a collection of syndromic forms. Syndromic cases include 24 with recognized forms and 72 with unrecognized syndromes. Candidate gene studies as well as genome-wide searches for evidence of microdeletions and isodisomy are currently being carried out. Candidate gene association studies, to date, have made use of PCR-based polymorphisms for TGFA, MSX1, CLPG13 (a CA repeat associated with a human homologue of a locus that results in craniofacial dysmorphogenesis in the mouse) and an STRP found in a Van der Woude syndrome microdeletion. Control tetranucleotide repeats, which insure that population-based differences are not responsible for any observed associations, are also tested. Studies of the syndromic cases have included the same list of candidate genes searching for evidence of microdeletions and a genome-wide search using tri- and tetranucleotide polymorphic markers to search for isodisomy or structural rearrangements. Significant associations have previously been identified for TGFA, and, in this report, identified for MSX1 and nonsyndromic cleft palate only (p = 0.04, uncorrected). Preliminary results of the genome-wide scan for isodisomy has returned no true positives and there has been no evidence for microdeletion cases.

  18. The pharmacogenetic control of antiplatelet response: candidate genes and CYP2C19.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yao; Lewis, Joshua P; Hulot, Jean-Sébastien; Scott, Stuart A

    2015-01-01

    Aspirin, clopidogrel, prasugrel and ticagrelor are antiplatelet agents for the prevention of ischemic events in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS), percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and other indications. Variability in response is observed to different degrees with these agents, which can translate to increased risks for adverse cardiovascular events. As such, potential pharmacogenetic determinants of antiplatelet pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and clinical outcomes have been actively studied. This article provides an overview of the available antiplatelet pharmacogenetics literature. Evidence supporting the significance of candidate genes and their potential influence on antiplatelet response and clinical outcomes are summarized and evaluated. Additional focus is directed at CYP2C19 and clopidogrel response, including the availability of clinical testing and genotype-directed antiplatelet therapy. The reported aspirin response candidate genes have not been adequately replicated and few candidate genes have thus far been implicated in prasugrel or ticagrelor response. However, abundant data support the clinical validity of CYP2C19 and clopidogrel response variability among ACS/PCI patients. Although limited prospective trial data are available to support the utility of routine CYP2C19 testing, the increased risks for reduced clopidogrel efficacy among ACS/PCI patients that carry CYP2C19 loss-of-function alleles should be considered when genotype results are available.

  19. The Pharmacogenetic Control of Antiplatelet Response: Candidate Genes and CYP2C19

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yao; Lewis, Joshua P.; Hulot, Jean-Sébastien; Scott, Stuart A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Aspirin, clopidogrel, prasugrel and ticagrelor are antiplatelet agents for the prevention of ischemic events in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS), percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), and other indications. Variability in response is observed to different degrees with these agents, which can translate to increased risks for adverse cardiovascular events. As such, potential pharmacogenetic determinants of antiplatelet pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and clinical outcomes have been actively studied. Areas covered This article provides an overview of the available antiplatelet pharmacogenetics literature. Evidence supporting the significance of candidate genes and their potential influence on antiplatelet response and clinical outcomes are summarized and evaluated. Additional focus is directed at CYP2C19 and clopidogrel response, including the availability of clinical testing and genotype-directed antiplatelet therapy. Expert opinion The reported aspirin response candidate genes have not been adequately replicated and few candidate genes have thus far been implicated in prasugrel or ticagrelor response. However, abundant data supports the clinical validity of CYP2C19 and clopidogrel response variability among ACS/PCI patients. Although limited prospective trial data are available to support the utility of routine CYP2C19 testing, the increased risks for reduced clopidogrel efficacy among ACS/PCI patients that carry CYP2C19 loss-of-function alleles should be considered when genotype results are available. PMID:26173871

  20. Candidate Gene Studies of a Promising Intermediate Phenotype: Failure to Replicate

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Amy B; de Wit, Harriet; Palmer, Abraham A

    2013-01-01

    Many candidate gene studies use ‘intermediate phenotypes' instead of disease diagnoses. It has been proposed that intermediate phenotypes have simpler genetic architectures such that individual alleles account for a larger percentage of trait variance. This implies that smaller samples can be used to identify genetic associations. Pharmacogenomic drug challenge studies may be an especially promising class of intermediate phenotype. We previously conducted a series of 12 candidate gene analyses of acute subjective and physiological responses to amphetamine in 99–162 healthy human volunteers (ADORA2A, SLC6A3, BDNF, SLC6A4, CSNK1E, SLC6A2, DRD2, FAAH, COMT, OPRM1). Here, we report our attempt to replicate these findings in over 200 additional participants ascertained using identical methodology. We were unable to replicate any of our previous findings. These results raise critical issues related to non-replication of candidate gene studies, such as power, sample size, multiple testing within and between studies, publication bias and the expectation that true allelic effect sizes are similar to those reported in genome-wide association studies. Many of these factors may have contributed to our failure to replicate our previous findings. Our results should instill caution in those considering similarly designed studies. PMID:23303064

  1. Comparison of statistics for candidate-gene association studies using cases and parents

    SciTech Connect

    Schaid, D.J.; Sommer, S.S. )

    1994-08-01

    Studies of association between candidate genes and disease can be designed to use cases with disease, and in place of nonrelated controls, their parents. The advantage of this design is the elimination of spurious differences due to ethnic differences between cases and nonrelated controls. However, several statistical methods of analysis have been proposed in the literature, and the choice of analysis is not always clear. The authors review some of the statistical methods currently developed and present two new statistical methods aimed at specific genetic hypotheses of dominance and recessivity of the candidate gene. These new methods can be more powerful than other current methods, as demonstrated by simulations. The basis of these new statistical methods is a likelihood approach. The advantage of the likelihood framework is that regression models can be developed to assess genotype-environment interactions, as well as the relative contribution that alleles at the candidate-gene locus make to the relative risk (RR) of disease. This latter development allows testing of (1) whether interactions between alleles exist, on the scale of log RR, and (2) whether alleles originating from the mother or father of a case impart different risks, i.e., genomic imprinting. 13 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Effect of candidate gene polymorphisms on reproductive traits in a Large White pig population.

    PubMed

    Sato, Shuji; Kikuchi, Takashi; Uemoto, Yoshinobu; Mikawa, Satoshi; Suzuki, Keiichi

    2016-12-01

    The objective of this study was to test for association of candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with sow prolificacy reproductive traits, such as litter size, ovulation rate and lifetime performance, in gilts of a Large White pig population. Preliminary research on 25 animals selected from the high- and low-performance groups of 347 animals with case-control studies indicated that seven genes were associated with total number of piglets born (TNB). Six of the seven genes were associated with reproductive traits, including TNB, number of piglets born alive (NBA) and average weight of piglet weaning (AWW). A MBL2 SNP was significantly associated with TNB and NBA in first parity. A CFB SNP was associated with TNB in first parity. An ACE SNP was associated with TNB in first and second parities. An EGF polymorphism was associated with TNB, NBA and AWW in second parity. A KCNC2 polymorphism was significantly associated with TNB and NBA in second parity. A SLC22A5 SNP was associated with TNB and NBA in second parity. Six candidate SNPs were associated with TNB; the only exception was a PRKAG3 polymorphism. A candidate gene approach enables some of these polymorphisms to be used in genetic improvement programs based on marker-assisted selection. © 2016 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  3. Clinically relevant known and candidate genes for obesity and their overlap with human infertility and reproduction.

    PubMed

    Butler, Merlin G; McGuire, Austen; Manzardo, Ann M

    2015-04-01

    Obesity is a growing public health concern now reaching epidemic status worldwide for children and adults due to multiple problems impacting on energy intake and expenditure with influences on human reproduction and infertility. A positive family history and genetic factors are known to play a role in obesity by influencing eating behavior, weight and level of physical activity and also contributing to human reproduction and infertility. Recent advances in genetic technology have led to discoveries of new susceptibility genes for obesity and causation of infertility. The goal of our study was to provide an update of clinically relevant candidate and known genes for obesity and infertility using high resolution chromosome ideograms with gene symbols and tabular form. We used computer-based internet websites including PubMed to search for combinations of key words such as obesity, body mass index, infertility, reproduction, azoospermia, endometriosis, diminished ovarian reserve, estrogen along with genetics, gene mutations or variants to identify evidence for development of a master list of recognized obesity genes in humans and those involved with infertility and reproduction. Gene symbols for known and candidate genes for obesity were plotted on high resolution chromosome ideograms at the 850 band level. Both infertility and obesity genes were listed separately in alphabetical order in tabular form and those highlighted when involved with both conditions. By searching the medical literature and computer generated websites for key words, we found documented evidence for 370 genes playing a role in obesity and 153 genes for human reproduction or infertility. The obesity genes primarily affected common pathways in lipid metabolism, deposition or transport, eating behavior and food selection, physical activity or energy expenditure. Twenty-one of the obesity genes were also associated with human infertility and reproduction. Gene symbols were plotted on high resolution

  4. Discovery of new candidate genes related to brain development using protein interaction information.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Chu, Chen; Kong, Xiangyin; Huang, Tao; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Human brain development is a dramatic process composed of a series of complex and fine-tuned spatiotemporal gene expressions. A good comprehension of this process can assist us in developing the potential of our brain. However, we have only limited knowledge about the genes and gene functions that are involved in this biological process. Therefore, a substantial demand remains to discover new brain development-related genes and identify their biological functions. In this study, we aimed to discover new brain-development related genes by building a computational method. We referred to a series of computational methods used to discover new disease-related genes and developed a similar method. In this method, the shortest path algorithm was executed on a weighted graph that was constructed using protein-protein interactions. New candidate genes fell on at least one of the shortest paths connecting two known genes that are related to brain development. A randomization test was then adopted to filter positive discoveries. Of the final identified genes, several have been reported to be associated with brain development, indicating the effectiveness of the method, whereas several of the others may have potential roles in brain development.

  5. New candidate genes for heat resistance in Drosophila melanogaster are regulated by HSF.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Louise Toft; Nielsen, Morten Muhlig; Loeschcke, Volker

    2008-01-01

    The cellular heat stress response is well studied in Drosophila in respect to the role of heat shock proteins (Hsp). Hsps are molecular chaperones, highly expressed during and after exposure to numerous stress types. Hsps are all regulated by a common transcription factor, the heat shock factor (HSF), and it is known that HSF is controlling other, so far uncharacterised, heat-responsive genes. In this study, we investigate whether novel candidate genes for heat resistance, identified by microarray experiments, are regulated by HSF. The microarray experiments recently identified several strongly upregulated genes in response to a short, non-lethal heat treatment in Drosophila melanogaster. To test whether or not a subset of these genes are HSF-induced, we studied 11 currently unannotated genes using quantitative polymerase chain reaction on HSF mutant flies with a non-functional HSF at elevated temperatures. We found indication of HSF regulation in most of the studied genes, suggesting a role of these unknown genes in heat tolerance. Surprisingly, some of the genes seemed to be upregulated independent of HSF function. The high induction in response to heat, which mimics the expression profile of Hsps, implies a role in the cellular heat response of these genes as well.

  6. Positive selection of candidate tumor-suppressor genes by subtractive hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.W.; Tomasetto, C.; Sager, R. )

    1991-04-01

    A positive selection system designed to identify and recover candidate tumor-suppressor genes is described. The system compares mRNA expression of genes from normal and tumor-derived human mammary epithelial cells grown in a special medium that supports similar growth rates of the two cell types. mRNAs uniquely expressed in normal cells are recovered as cDNAs after subtraction with mRNA from tumor cells. Seven different clones, from 0.6 to 4.8 kilobases in transcript size and including both rare and abundant transcripts, were recovered in the first 23 clones analyzed. Among the isolated clones were genes encoding the gap-junction protein connexin 26, two different keratins, and glutathione-S-transferase {pi}, as well as an unknown gene in the S100 family of small calcium-binding proteins. In principle, tumor-suppressor genes include two classes: class I, in which loss of function results from mutation or deletion of DNA and class II, in which loss of function is from a regulatory block to expression. A class II suppressor gene is assumed to be regulated by a different suppressor gene that lost its function by mutation or deletion. Both classes of tumor-suppressor genes may provide valuable proteins with clinical applications in cancer diagnosis or therapy. Class II suppressors may be especially useful because the normal genes are present and their reexpression may be inducible by drugs or other treatments.

  7. Gene expression profiles of putative biomarker candidates in Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis-infected cattle.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun-Eui; Shin, Min-Kyoung; Park, Hong-Tae; Jung, Myunghwan; Cho, Yong Il; Yoo, Han Sang

    2016-06-01

    This study was conducted to analyze the gene expression of prognostic potential biomarker candidates using the whole blood of cattle naturally infected with ITALIC! Mycobacterium aviumsubsp. ITALIC! paratuberculosis(MAP). We conducted real-time PCR to evaluate 23 potential biomarker candidates. Experimental animals were divided into four groups based on fecal MAP PCR and serum ELISA. Seven ( ITALIC! KLRB1, ITALIC! HGF, ITALIC! MPO, ITALIC! LTF, ITALIC! SERPINE1, ITALIC! S100A8and ITALIC! S100A9) genes were up-regulated in fecal MAP-positive cattle and three ( ITALIC! KLRB1, ITALIC! MPOand ITALIC! S100A9) were up-regulated in MAP-seropositive cattle relative to uninfected cattle. In subclinically infected animals, 17 genes ( ITALIC! TFRC, ITALIC! S100A8, ITALIC! S100A9, ITALIC! MPO, ITALIC! GBP6, ITALIC! LTF, ITALIC! KLRB1, ITALIC! SERPINE1, ITALIC! PIGR, ITALIC! IL-10, ITALIC! CXCR3, ITALIC! CD14, ITALIC! MMP9, ITALIC! ELANE, ITALIC! CHI3L1, ITALIC! HPand ITALIC! HGF) were up-regulated compared with the control group. Moreover, six genes ( ITALIC! CXCR3, ITALIC! HP, ITALIC! HGF, ITALIC! LTF, ITALIC! TFRCand ITALIC! GBP6) showed significant differences between experimental groups. Taken together, our data suggest that six genes ( ITALIC! LTF, ITALIC! HGF, ITALIC! HP, ITALIC! CXCR3, ITALIC! GBP6and ITALIC! TFRC) played essential roles in the immune response to MAP during the subclinical stage and therefore might be useful as prognostic biomarkers.

  8. Early embryonic failure: Expression and imprinted status of candidate genes on human chromosome 21

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, L.S.; Bennett, P.R.; Moore, G.E.

    1994-09-01

    Two cases of maternal uniparental (hetero)disomy for human chromosome 21 (mUPD21) have been identified in a systematic search for UPD in 23 cases of early embryonic failure (EEF). Bi-parental origin of the other chromosome pairs was confirmed using specific VNTR probes or dinucleotide repeat analysis. Both maternally and paternally derived isochromosomes 21q have previously been identified in two individuals with normal phenotypes. Full UPD21 has a different mechanism of origin than uniparental isochromosome 21q and its effect on imprinted genes and phenotypic outcome will therefore not necessarily be the same. EEF associated with mUPD21 suggests that developmentally important genes on HSA 21 may be imprinted such that they are only expressed from either the maternally or paternally derived alleles. We have searched for monoallelic expression of candidate genes on HSA 21 in human pregnancy (CBS, IFNAR, COL6A1) using intragenic DNA polymorphisms. These genes were chosen either because their murine homologues lie in imprinted regions or because they are potentially important in embryogenesis. Once imprinted candidate genes have been identified, their methylation status and expression in normal, early embryonic failure and uniparental disomy 21 pregnancies will be studied. At the same time, a larger number of cases of EEF are being examined to further investigate the incidence of UPD21 in this group.

  9. Extent of differential allelic expression of candidate breast cancer genes is similar in blood and breast.

    PubMed

    Maia, Ana-Teresa; Spiteri, Inmaculada; Lee, Alvin J X; O'Reilly, Martin; Jones, Linda; Caldas, Carlos; Ponder, Bruce A J

    2009-01-01

    Normal gene expression variation is thought to play a central role in inter-individual variation and susceptibility to disease. Regulatory polymorphisms in cis-acting elements result in the unequal expression of alleles. Differential allelic expression (DAE) in heterozygote individuals could be used to develop a new approach to discover regulatory breast cancer susceptibility loci. As access to large numbers of fresh breast tissue to perform such studies is difficult, a suitable surrogate test tissue must be identified for future studies. We measured differential allelic expression of 12 candidate genes possibly related to breast cancer susceptibility (BRCA1, BRCA2, C1qA, CCND3, EMSY, GPX1, GPX4, MLH3, MTHFR, NBS1, TP53 and TRXR2) in breast tissue (n = 40) and fresh blood (n = 170) of healthy individuals and EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid cells (n = 19). Differential allelic expression ratios were determined by Taqman assay. Ratio distributions were compared using t-test and Wilcoxon rank sum test, for mean ratios and variances respectively. We show that differential allelic expression is common among these 12 candidate genes and is comparable between breast and blood (fresh and transformed lymphoblasts) in a significant proportion of them. We found that eight out of nine genes with DAE in breast and fresh blood were comparable, as were 10 out of 11 genes between breast and transformed lymphoblasts. Our findings support the use of differential allelic expression in blood as a surrogate for breast tissue in future studies on predisposition to breast cancer.

  10. Biological pathways, candidate genes and molecular markers associated with quality-of-life domains: an update

    PubMed Central

    Sprangers, Mirjam A.G.; Thong, Melissa S.Y.; Bartels, Meike; Barsevick, Andrea; Ordoñana, Juan; Shi, Qiuling; Wang, Xin Shelley; Klepstad, Pål; Wierenga, Eddy A.; Singh, Jasvinder A.; Sloan, Jeff A.

    2014-01-01

    Background There is compelling evidence of a genetic foundation of patient-reported QOL. Given the rapid development of substantial scientific advances in this area of research, the current paper updates and extends reviews published in 2010. Objectives The objective is to provide an updated overview of the biological pathways, candidate genes and molecular markers involved in fatigue, pain, negative (depressed mood) and positive (well-being/happiness) emotional functioning, social functioning, and overall QOL. Methods We followed a purposeful search algorithm of existing literature to capture empirical papers investigating the relationship between biological pathways and molecular markers and the identified QOL domains. Results Multiple major pathways are involved in each QOL domain. The inflammatory pathway has the strongest evidence as a controlling mechanism underlying fatigue. Inflammation and neurotransmission are key processes involved in pain perception and the COMT gene is associated with multiple sorts of pain. The neurotransmitter and neuroplasticity theories have the strongest evidence for their relationship with depression. Oxytocin-related genes and genes involved in the serotonergic and dopaminergic pathways play a role in social functioning. Inflammatory pathways, via cytokines, also play an important role in overall QOL. Conclusions Whereas the current findings need future experiments and replication efforts, they will provide researchers supportive background information when embarking on studies relating candidate genes and/or molecular markers to QOL domains. The ultimate goal of this area of research is to enhance patients’ QOL. PMID:24604075

  11. Functional Annotation, Genome Organization and Phylogeny of the Grapevine (Vitis vinifera) Terpene Synthase Gene Family Based on Genome Assembly, FLcDNA Cloning, and Enzyme Assays

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Terpenoids are among the most important constituents of grape flavour and wine bouquet, and serve as useful metabolite markers in viticulture and enology. Based on the initial 8-fold sequencing of a nearly homozygous Pinot noir inbred line, 89 putative terpenoid synthase genes (VvTPS) were predicted by in silico analysis of the grapevine (Vitis vinifera) genome assembly [1]. The finding of this very large VvTPS family, combined with the importance of terpenoid metabolism for the organoleptic properties of grapevine berries and finished wines, prompted a detailed examination of this gene family at the genomic level as well as an investigation into VvTPS biochemical functions. Results We present findings from the analysis of the up-dated 12-fold sequencing and assembly of the grapevine genome that place the number of predicted VvTPS genes at 69 putatively functional VvTPS, 20 partial VvTPS, and 63 VvTPS probable pseudogenes. Gene discovery and annotation included information about gene architecture and chromosomal location. A dense cluster of 45 VvTPS is localized on chromosome 18. Extensive FLcDNA cloning, gene synthesis, and protein expression enabled functional characterization of 39 VvTPS; this is the largest number of functionally characterized TPS for any species reported to date. Of these enzymes, 23 have unique functions and/or phylogenetic locations within the plant TPS gene family. Phylogenetic analyses of the TPS gene family showed that while most VvTPS form species-specific gene clusters, there are several examples of gene orthology with TPS of other plant species, representing perhaps more ancient VvTPS, which have maintained functions independent of speciation. Conclusions The highly expanded VvTPS gene family underpins the prominence of terpenoid metabolism in grapevine. We provide a detailed experimental functional annotation of 39 members of this important gene family in grapevine and comprehensive information about gene structure and

  12. Quantitative transcription dynamic analysis reveals candidate genes and key regulators for ethanol tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ma, Menggen; Liu, Lewis Z

    2010-06-10

    Derived from our lignocellulosic conversion inhibitor-tolerant yeast, we generated an ethanol-tolerant strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae NRRL Y-50316 by enforced evolutionary adaptation. Using a newly developed robust mRNA reference and a master equation unifying gene expression data analyses, we investigated comparative quantitative transcription dynamics of 175 genes selected from previous studies for an ethanol-tolerant yeast and its closely related parental strain. A highly fitted master equation was established and applied for quantitative gene expression analyses using pathway-based qRT-PCR array assays. The ethanol-tolerant Y-50316 displayed significantly enriched background of mRNA abundance for at least 35 genes without ethanol challenge compared with its parental strain Y-50049. Under the ethanol challenge, the tolerant Y-50316 responded in consistent expressions over time for numerous genes belonging to groups of heat shock proteins, trehalose metabolism, glycolysis, pentose phosphate pathway, fatty acid metabolism, amino acid biosynthesis, pleiotropic drug resistance gene family and transcription factors. The parental strain showed repressed expressions for many genes and was unable to withstand the ethanol stress and establish a viable culture and fermentation. The distinct expression dynamics between the two strains and their close association with cell growth, viability and ethanol fermentation profiles distinguished the tolerance-response from the stress-response in yeast under the ethanol challenge. At least 82 genes were identified as candidate and key genes for ethanol-tolerance and subsequent fermentation under the stress. Among which, 36 genes were newly recognized by the present study. Most of the ethanol-tolerance candidate genes were found to share protein binding motifs of transcription factors Msn4p/Msn2p, Yap1p, Hsf1p and Pdr1p/Pdr3p. Enriched background of transcription abundance and enhanced expressions of ethanol-tolerance genes

  13. Quantitative transcription dynamic analysis reveals candidate genes and key regulators for ethanol tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Derived from our lignocellulosic conversion inhibitor-tolerant yeast, we generated an ethanol-tolerant strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae NRRL Y-50316 by enforced evolutionary adaptation. Using a newly developed robust mRNA reference and a master equation unifying gene expression data analyses, we investigated comparative quantitative transcription dynamics of 175 genes selected from previous studies for an ethanol-tolerant yeast and its closely related parental strain. Results A highly fitted master equation was established and applied for quantitative gene expression analyses using pathway-based qRT-PCR array assays. The ethanol-tolerant Y-50316 displayed significantly enriched background of mRNA abundance for at least 35 genes without ethanol challenge compared with its parental strain Y-50049. Under the ethanol challenge, the tolerant Y-50316 responded in consistent expressions over time for numerous genes belonging to groups of heat shock proteins, trehalose metabolism, glycolysis, pentose phosphate pathway, fatty acid metabolism, amino acid biosynthesis, pleiotropic drug resistance gene family and transcription factors. The parental strain showed repressed expressions for many genes and was unable to withstand the ethanol stress and establish a viable culture and fermentation. The distinct expression dynamics between the two strains and their close association with cell growth, viability and ethanol fermentation profiles distinguished the tolerance-response from the stress-response in yeast under the ethanol challenge. At least 82 genes were identified as candidate and key genes for ethanol-tolerance and subsequent fermentation under the stress. Among which, 36 genes were newly recognized by the present study. Most of the ethanol-tolerance candidate genes were found to share protein binding motifs of transcription factors Msn4p/Msn2p, Yap1p, Hsf1p and Pdr1p/Pdr3p. Conclusion Enriched background of transcription abundance and enhanced expressions of

  14. Effect of polymorphisms in candidate genes on reproduction traits in Finnish pig populations.

    PubMed

    Sironen, A I; Uimari, P; Serenius, T; Mote, B; Rothschild, M; Vilkki, J

    2010-03-01

    Reproduction traits play an important role in economically viable piglet production and are closely related to the quality and length of the productive life of the sow. A increased removal rate of young sows is undesirable not only because of the associated financial penalties incurred, but also because of ethical concerns. Candidate genes and gene pathways have been identified for fertility in model species, and recent studies have provided evidence that polymorphisms within these genes are associated with reproduction traits in American Yorkshire/Large White and Landrace populations. In this study we evaluated the impact of single polymorphisms (n = 7) in 7 candidate genes on reproductive efficiency in Finnish Yorkshire (n = 280) and Landrace (n = 271) populations: IGFBP1, IGFBP2, IGFBP3, IGFBP5, CPTIA (carnitine O-palmitoyltransferase I), COX2 (PG-endoperoxide synthase 2, also known as cyclooxygenase-2), and SLC22A5 [organic cation/carnitine transporter 2 (solute carrier family member I), OCTN2]. In the Finnish Yorkshire population, only 4 of the analyzed markers were polymorphic. Significant effects on farrowing time were detected from the Yorkshire data, with polymorphisms within the genes CPT1A [a (allele substitution effect of allele A) = 2.97 d for age at first farrowing)], IGFBP3 (a = 0.54 d for farrowing interval of parities >1), and IGFBP5 (a = 3.22, 1.27, and 0.85 d for age at first farrowing and farrowing interval in the first and later parities, respectively). For the Landrace population, 6 markers were polymorphic, and significant effects were detected for traits affecting litter size. The polymorphism within the COX2 gene had an additive effect of 0.3 piglets for litter size in parities >1, and the IGFBP1 gene had an additive effect of 0.21, 0.26, and 0.11 piglets for litter size in the first parity, parities >1, and stillborn in parities >1, respectively. The additive effect of the SNP within the IGFBP2 gene was 0.16, 0.09, and 0.09 piglets for

  15. Fetal DNA methylation of autism spectrum disorders candidate genes: association with spontaneous preterm birth.

    PubMed

    Behnia, Fara; Parets, Sasha E; Kechichian, Talar; Yin, Huaizhi; Dutta, Eryn H; Saade, George R; Smith, Alicia K; Menon, Ramkumar

    2015-04-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is associated with preterm birth (PTB), although the reason underlying this relationship is still unclear. Our objective was to examine DNA methylation patterns of 4 ASD candidate genes in human fetal membranes from spontaneous PTB and uncomplicated term birth. A literature search for genes that have been implicated in ASD yielded 14 candidate genes (OXTR, SHANK3, BCL2, RORA, EN2, RELN, MECP2, AUTS2, NLGN3, NRXN1, SLC6A4, UBE3A, GABA, AFF2) that were epigenetically modified in relation to ASD. DNA methylation in fetal leukocyte DNA in 4 of these genes (OXTR, SHANK3, BCL2, and RORA) was associated with PTB in a previous study. This study evaluated DNA methylation, transcription (reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction), and translation patterns (immunostaining and Western blot) in fetal membrane from term labor (n = 14), term not in labor (TNIL; n = 29), and spontaneous preterm birth (PTB; n = 27). Statistical analysis was performed with analysis of variance; a probability value of < .05 was significant. Higher methylation of the OXTR promoter was seen in fetal membranes from PTB, compared with term labor or TNIL. No other gene showed any methylation differences among groups. Expression of OXTR was not different among groups, but the 70 kDa OXTR protein was seen only in PTB, and immunostaining was more intense in PTB amniocytes than term labor or TNIL. Among the 4 genes that were studied, fetal membranes from PTB demonstrate differences in OXTR methylation and regulation and expression, which suggest that epigenetic alteration of this gene in fetal membrane may likely be indicating an in utero programing of this gene and serve as a surrogate in a subset of PTB. The usefulness of OXTR hypermethylation as a surrogate for a link to ASD should be further evaluated in longitudinal and in vitro studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The genetic basis of quality of life in healthy Swedish women: a candidate gene approach.

    PubMed

    Schoormans, Dounya; Li, Jingmei; Darabi, Hatef; Brandberg, Yvonne; Sprangers, Mirjam A G; Eriksson, Mikael; Zwinderman, Koos H; Hall, Per

    2015-01-01

    Quality of life (QoL) is an increasingly important parameter in clinical practice as it predicts mortality and poor health outcomes. It is hypothesized that one may have a genetic predisposition for QoL. We therefore related 139 candidate genes, selected through a literature search, to QoL in healthy females. In 5,142 healthy females, background characteristics (i.e. demographic, clinical, lifestyle, and psychological factors) were assessed. QoL was measured by the EORTC QLQ-C30, which consists of 15 domains. For all women genotype information was available. For each candidate gene, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified based on their functional (n = 2,663) and physical annotation (n = 10,649). SNPs were related to each QoL-domain, while controlling for background characteristics and population stratification. Finally, gene-based analyses were performed relating the combined effect of 10,649 SNPs (selected based on physical annotation) for each gene, to QoL using the statistical software package VEGAS. Overall, we found no relation between genetic variations (SNPs and genes) and 14 out of 15 QoL-domains. The strongest association was found between cognitive functioning and the top SNP rs1468951 (p = 1.21E-05) in the GSTZ1 gene. Furthermore, results of the gene-based test showed that the combined effect of 11 SNPs within the GSTZ1 gene is significantly associated with cognitive functioning (p = 2.60E-05). If validated, the involvement of GSTZ1 in cognitive functioning underscores its heritability which is likely the result of differences in the dopamine pathway, as GSTZ1 contributes to the equilibrium between dopamine and its neurotoxic metabolites via the glutathione redox cycle.

  17. Methylation profiling of 48 candidate genes in tumor and matched normal tissues from breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Li, Zibo; Guo, Xinwu; Wu, Yepeng; Li, Shengyun; Yan, Jinhua; Peng, Limin; Xiao, Zhi; Wang, Shouman; Deng, Zhongping; Dai, Lizhong; Yi, Wenjun; Xia, Kun; Tang, Lili; Wang, Jun

    2015-02-01

    Gene-specific methylation alterations in breast cancer have been suggested to occur early in tumorigenesis and have the potential to be used for early detection and prevention. The continuous increase in worldwide breast cancer incidences emphasizes the urgent need for identification of methylation biomarkers for early cancer detection and patient stratification. Using microfluidic PCR-based target enrichment and next-generation bisulfite sequencing technology, we analyzed methylation status of 48 candidate genes in paired tumor and normal tissues from 180 Chinese breast cancer patients. Analysis of the sequencing results showed 37 genes differentially methylated between tumor and matched normal tissues. Breast cancer samples with different clinicopathologic characteristics demonstrated distinct profiles of gene methylation. The methylation levels were significantly different between breast cancer subtypes, with basal-like and luminal B tumors having the lowest and the highest methylation levels, respectively. Six genes (ACADL, ADAMTSL1, CAV1, NPY, PTGS2, and RUNX3) showed significant differential methylation among the 4 breast cancer subtypes and also between the ER +/ER- tumors. Using unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis, we identified a panel of 13 hypermethylated genes as candidate biomarkers that performed a high level of efficiency for cancer prediction. These 13 genes included CST6, DBC1, EGFR, GREM1, GSTP1, IGFBP3, PDGFRB, PPM1E, SFRP1, SFRP2, SOX17, TNFRSF10D, and WRN. Our results provide evidence that well-defined DNA methylation profiles enable breast cancer prediction and patient stratification. The novel gene panel might be a valuable biomarker for early detection of breast cancer.

  18. The Genetic Basis of Quality of Life in Healthy Swedish Women: A Candidate Gene Approach

    PubMed Central

    Schoormans, Dounya; Li, Jingmei; Darabi, Hatef; Brandberg, Yvonne; Sprangers, Mirjam A. G.; Eriksson, Mikael; Zwinderman, Koos H.; Hall, Per

    2015-01-01

    Background Quality of life (QoL) is an increasingly important parameter in clinical practice as it predicts mortality and poor health outcomes. It is hypothesized that one may have a genetic predisposition for QoL. We therefore related 139 candidate genes, selected through a literature search, to QoL in healthy females. Methods In 5,142 healthy females, background characteristics (i.e. demographic, clinical, lifestyle, and psychological factors) were assessed. QoL was measured by the EORTC QLQ-C30, which consists of 15 domains. For all women genotype information was available. For each candidate gene, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified based on their functional (n = 2,663) and physical annotation (n = 10,649). SNPs were related to each QoL-domain, while controlling for background characteristics and population stratification. Finally, gene-based analyses were performed relating the combined effect of 10,649 SNPs (selected based on physical annotation) for each gene, to QoL using the statistical software package VEGAS. Results Overall, we found no relation between genetic variations (SNPs and genes) and 14 out of 15 QoL-domains. The strongest association was found between cognitive functioning and the top SNP rs1468951 (p = 1.21E-05) in the GSTZ1 gene. Furthermore, results of the gene-based test showed that the combined effect of 11 SNPs within the GSTZ1 gene is significantly associated with cognitive functioning (p = 2.60E-05). Conclusion If validated, the involvement of GSTZ1 in cognitive functioning underscores its heritability which is likely the result of differences in the dopamine pathway, as GSTZ1 contributes to the equilibrium between dopamine and its neurotoxic metabolites via the glutathione redox cycle. PMID:25675377

  19. Testing the effects of FSHD candidate gene expression in vertebrate muscle development.

    PubMed

    Wuebbles, Ryan D; Long, Steven W; Hanel, Meredith L; Jones, Peter L

    2010-03-28

    The genetic lesion leading to facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is a dominant deletion at the 4q35 locus. The generally accepted disease model involves an epigenetic dysregulation in the region resulting in the upregulation of one or more proximal genes whose overexpression specifically affects skeletal muscle. However, multiple FSHD candidate genes have been proposed without clear consensus. Using Xenopus laevis as a model for vertebrate development our lab has studied the effects of overexpression of the FSHD candidate gene ortholog, frg1 (FSHD region gene 1), showing that increased levels of frg1 systemically led specifically to an abnormal musculature and increased angiogenesis, the two most prominent clinical features of FSHD. Here we studied the overexpression effects of three other promising FSHD candidate genes, DUX4, DUX4c, and PITX1 using the same model system and methods for direct comparison. Expression of even very low levels of either DUX4 or pitx1 early in development led to massive cellular loss and severely abnormal development. These abnormalities were not muscle specific. In contrast, elevated levels of DUX4c resulted in no detectable adverse affects on muscle and DUX4c levels did not alter the expression of myogenic regulators. This data supports a model for DUX4 and PITX1 in FSHD only as pro-apoptotic factors if their expression in FSHD is confined to cells within the myogenic pathway; neither could account for the vascular pathology prevalent in FSHD. Taken together, increased frg1 expression alone leads to a phenotype that most closely resembles the pathophysiology observed in FSHD patients.

  20. Comprehensive expression analysis of FSHD candidate genes at the mRNA and protein level.

    PubMed

    Klooster, Rinse; Straasheijm, Kirsten; Shah, Bharati; Sowden, Janet; Frants, Rune; Thornton, Charles; Tawil, Rabi; van der Maarel, Silvère

    2009-12-01

    In facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) the majority of patients carry a D4Z4 macrosatellite repeat contraction in the subtelomere of chromosome 4q. Several disease mechanisms have been proposed to explain how repeat contraction causes muscular dystrophy. All proposed mechanisms foresee a change from a closed to a more open chromatin structure followed by loss of control over expression of genes in or proximal to D4Z4. Initially, a distance and residual repeat size-dependent upregulation of the candidate genes FRG2, FRG1 and ANT1 was observed, but most successive expression studies failed to support transcriptional upregulation of 4qter genes. Moreover, chromatin studies do not provide evidence for a cis-spreading mechanism operating at 4qter in FSHD. In part, this inconsistency may be explained by differences in the techniques used, and the use of RNA samples obtained from different muscle groups. The aim of this study is to comprehensively and uniformly study the expression of the FSHD candidate genes FRG1, FRG2, CRYM, ANT1, ALP, PITX1 and LRP2BP at the RNA and protein level in identically processed primary myoblasts, myotubes and quadriceps muscle. Expression was compared between samples obtained from FSHD patients and normal controls with samples from myotonic dystrophy type 1 patients as disease controls. No consistent changes in RNA or protein expression levels were observed between the samples. The one exception was a selective increase in FRG2 mRNA expression in FSHD myotubes. This study provides further evidence that there is no demonstrable consistent, large magnitude, overexpression of any of the FSHD candidate genes.

  1. Natural Genetic Variation and Candidate Genes for Morphological Traits in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Carreira, Valeria Paula; Mensch, Julián; Hasson, Esteban; Fanara, Juan José

    2016-01-01

    Body size is a complex character associated to several fitness related traits that vary within and between species as a consequence of environmental and genetic factors. Latitudinal and altitudinal clines for different morphological traits have been described in several species of Drosophila and previous work identified genomic regions associated with such variation in D. melanogaster. However, the genetic factors that orchestrate morphological variation have been barely studied. Here, our main objective was to investigate genetic variation for different morphological traits associated to the second chromosome in natural populations of D. melanogaster along latitudinal and altitudinal gradients in Argentina. Our results revealed weak clinal signals and a strong population effect on morphological variation. Moreover, most pairwise comparisons between populations were significant. Our study also showed important within-population genetic variation, which must be associated to the second chromosome, as the lines are otherwise genetically identical. Next, we examined the contribution of different candidate genes to natural variation for these traits. We performed quantitative complementation tests using a battery of lines bearing mutated alleles at candidate genes located in the second chromosome and six second chromosome substitution lines derived from natural populations which exhibited divergent phenotypes. Results of complementation tests revealed that natural variation at all candidate genes studied, invected, Fasciclin 3, toucan, Reticulon-like1, jing and CG14478, affects the studied characters, suggesting that they are Quantitative Trait Genes for morphological traits. Finally, the phenotypic patterns observed suggest that different alleles of each gene might contribute to natural variation for morphological traits. However, non-additive effects cannot be ruled out, as wild-derived strains differ at myriads of second chromosome loci that may interact

  2. Natural Genetic Variation and Candidate Genes for Morphological Traits in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Carreira, Valeria Paula; Mensch, Julián; Hasson, Esteban; Fanara, Juan José

    2016-01-01

    Body size is a complex character associated to several fitness related traits that vary within and between species as a consequence of environmental and genetic factors. Latitudinal and altitudinal clines for different morphological traits have been described in several species of Drosophila and previous work identified genomic regions associated with such variation in D. melanogaster. However, the genetic factors that orchestrate morphological variation have been barely studied. Here, our main objective was to investigate genetic variation for different morphological traits associated to the second chromosome in natural populations of D. melanogaster along latitudinal and altitudinal gradients in Argentina. Our results revealed weak clinal signals and a strong population effect on morphological variation. Moreover, most pairwise comparisons between populations were significant. Our study also showed important within-population genetic variation, which must be associated to the second chromosome, as the lines are otherwise genetically identical. Next, we examined the contribution of different candidate genes to natural variation for these traits. We performed quantitative complementation tests using a battery of lines bearing mutated alleles at candidate genes located in the second chromosome and six second chromosome substitution lines derived from natural populations which exhibited divergent phenotypes. Results of complementation tests revealed that natural variation at all candidate genes studied, invected, Fasciclin 3, toucan, Reticulon-like1, jing and CG14478, affects the studied characters, suggesting that they are Quantitative Trait Genes for morphological traits. Finally, the phenotypic patterns observed suggest that different alleles of each gene might contribute to natural variation for morphological traits. However, non-additive effects cannot be ruled out, as wild-derived strains differ at myriads of second chromosome loci that may interact

  3. Identification of a strawberry flavor gene candidate using an integrated genetic-genomic-analytical chemistry approach

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There is interest in improving the flavor of commercial strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) varieties. Fruit flavor is shaped by combinations of sugars, acids and volatile compounds. Many efforts seek to use genomics-based strategies to identify genes controlling flavor, and then designing durable molecular markers to follow these genes in breeding populations. In this report, fruit from two cultivars, varying for presence-absence of volatile compounds, along with segregating progeny, were analyzed using GC/MS and RNAseq. Expression data were bulked in silico according to presence/absence of a given volatile compound, in this case γ-decalactone, a compound conferring a peach flavor note to fruits. Results Computationally sorting reads in segregating progeny based on γ-decalactone presence eliminated transcripts not directly relevant to the volatile, revealing transcripts possibly imparting quantitative contributions. One candidate encodes an omega-6 fatty acid desaturase, an enzyme known to participate in lactone production in fungi, noted here as FaFAD1. This candidate was induced by ripening, was detected in certain harvests, and correlated with γ-decalactone presence. The FaFAD1 gene is present in every genotype where γ-decalactone has been detected, and it was invariably missing in non-producers. A functional, PCR-based molecular marker was developed that cosegregates with the phenotype in F1 and BC1 populations, as well as in many other cultivars and wild Fragaria accessions. Conclusions Genetic, genomic and analytical chemistry techniques were combined to identify FaFAD1, a gene likely controlling a key flavor volatile in strawberry. The same data may now be re-sorted based on presence/absence of any other volatile to identify other flavor-affecting candidates, leading to rapid generation of gene-specific markers. PMID:24742080

  4. Identification of a strawberry flavor gene candidate using an integrated genetic-genomic-analytical chemistry approach.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Alan H; Pillet, Jeremy; Plotto, Anne; Bai, Jinhe; Whitaker, Vance M; Folta, Kevin M

    2014-04-17

    There is interest in improving the flavor of commercial strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) varieties. Fruit flavor is shaped by combinations of sugars, acids and volatile compounds. Many efforts seek to use genomics-based strategies to identify genes controlling flavor, and then designing durable molecular markers to follow these genes in breeding populations. In this report, fruit from two cultivars, varying for presence-absence of volatile compounds, along with segregating progeny, were analyzed using GC/MS and RNAseq. Expression data were bulked in silico according to presence/absence of a given volatile compound, in this case γ-decalactone, a compound conferring a peach flavor note to fruits. Computationally sorting reads in segregating progeny based on γ-decalactone presence eliminated transcripts not directly relevant to the volatile, revealing transcripts possibly imparting quantitative contributions. One candidate encodes an omega-6 fatty acid desaturase, an enzyme known to participate in lactone production in fungi, noted here as FaFAD1. This candidate was induced by ripening, was detected in certain harvests, and correlated with γ-decalactone presence. The FaFAD1 gene is present in every genotype where γ-decalactone has been detected, and it was invariably missing in non-producers. A functional, PCR-based molecular marker was developed that cosegregates with the phenotype in F1 and BC1 populations, as well as in many other cultivars and wild Fragaria accessions. Genetic, genomic and analytical chemistry techniques were combined to identify FaFAD1, a gene likely controlling a key flavor volatile in strawberry. The same data may now be re-sorted based on presence/absence of any other volatile to identify other flavor-affecting candidates, leading to rapid generation of gene-specific markers.

  5. Identification of candidate genes affecting Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol biosynthesis in Cannabis sativa

    PubMed Central

    Marks, M. David; Tian, Li; Wenger, Jonathan P.; Omburo, Stephanie N.; Soto-Fuentes, Wilfredo; He, Ji; Gang, David R.; Weiblen, George D.; Dixon, Richard A.

    2009-01-01

    RNA isolated from the glands of a Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA)-producing strain of Cannabis sativa was used to generate a cDNA library containing over 100 000 expressed sequence tags (ESTs). Sequencing of over 2000 clones from the library resulted in the identification of over 1000 unigenes. Candidate genes for almost every step in the biochemical pathways leading from primary metabolites to THCA were identified. Quantitative PCR analysis suggested that many of the pathway genes are preferentially expressed in the glands. Hexanoyl-CoA, one of the metabolites required for THCA synthesis, could be made via either de novo fatty acids synthesis or via the breakdown of existing lipids. qPCR analysis supported the de novo pathway. Many of the ESTs encode transcription factors and two putative MYB genes were identified that were preferentially expressed in glands. Given the similarity of the Cannabis MYB genes to those in other species with known functions, these Cannabis MYBs may play roles in regulating gland development and THCA synthesis. Three candidates for the polyketide synthase (PKS) gene responsible for the first committed step in the pathway to THCA were characterized in more detail. One of these was identical to a previously reported chalcone synthase (CHS) and was found to have CHS activity. All three could use malonyl-CoA and hexanoyl-CoA as substrates, including the CHS, but reaction conditions were not identified that allowed for the production of olivetolic acid (the proposed product of the PKS activity needed for THCA synthesis). One of the PKS candidates was highly and specifically expressed in glands (relative to whole leaves) and, on the basis of these expression data, it is proposed to be the most likely PKS responsible for olivetolic acid synthesis in Cannabis glands. PMID:19581347

  6. Identification of candidate genes affecting Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol biosynthesis in Cannabis sativa.

    PubMed

    Marks, M David; Tian, Li; Wenger, Jonathan P; Omburo, Stephanie N; Soto-Fuentes, Wilfredo; He, Ji; Gang, David R; Weiblen, George D; Dixon, Richard A

    2009-01-01

    RNA isolated from the glands of a Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA)-producing strain of Cannabis sativa was used to generate a cDNA library containing over 100 000 expressed sequence tags (ESTs). Sequencing of over 2000 clones from the library resulted in the identification of over 1000 unigenes. Candidate genes for almost every step in the biochemical pathways leading from primary metabolites to THCA were identified. Quantitative PCR analysis suggested that many of the pathway genes are preferentially expressed in the glands. Hexanoyl-CoA, one of the metabolites required for THCA synthesis, could be made via either de novo fatty acids synthesis or via the breakdown of existing lipids. qPCR analysis supported the de novo pathway. Many of the ESTs encode transcription factors and two putative MYB genes were identified that were preferentially expressed in glands. Given the similarity of the Cannabis MYB genes to those in other species with known functions, these Cannabis MYBs may play roles in regulating gland development and THCA synthesis. Three candidates for the polyketide synthase (PKS) gene responsible for the first committed step in the pathway to THCA were characterized in more detail. One of these was identical to a previously reported chalcone synthase (CHS) and was found to have CHS activity. All three could use malonyl-CoA and hexanoyl-CoA as substrates, including the CHS, but reaction conditions were not identified that allowed for the production of olivetolic acid (the proposed product of the PKS activity needed for THCA synthesis). One of the PKS candidates was highly and specifically expressed in glands (relative to whole leaves) and, on the basis of these expression data, it is proposed to be the most likely PKS responsible for olivetolic acid synthesis in Cannabis glands.

  7. Bioinformatic identification of candidate genes induced by trichostatin A in BGC-823 gastric cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yunlong; Zhang, Lisha; Yang, Chunfa; Li, Riheng; Shang, Longbin; Zou, Xiaoming

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify the candidate genes induced by trichostatin A (TSA) in BGC-823 gastric cancer (GC) cells and to explore the possible inhibition mechanism of TSA in GC. Gene expression data were obtained through chip detection, and differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between GC cells treated with TSA and untreated GC cells (control group) were identified. Gene ontology analysis of the DEGs was performed using the database for annotation, visualization and integrated discovery. Then sub-pathway enrichment analysis was performed and a microRNA (miRNA) regulatory network was constructed. We selected 76 DEGs, among which 43 were downregulated genes and 33 were upregulated genes. By sub-pathway enrichment analysis of the DEGs, the propanoate metabolism pathway was selected as the sub-pathway. By constructing a miRNA regulatory network, we identified that DKK1 and KLF13 were the top hub nodes. The propanoate metabolism pathway and the genes DKK1 and KLF13 may play significant roles in the inhibition of GC induced by TSA. These genes may be potential therapeutic targets for GC. However, further experiments are still required to confirm our results. PMID:28356958

  8. SZGR 2.0: a one-stop shop of schizophrenia candidate genes.

    PubMed

    Jia, Peilin; Han, Guangchun; Zhao, Junfei; Lu, Pinyi; Zhao, Zhongming

    2017-01-04

    SZGR 2.0 is a comprehensive resource of candidate variants and genes for schizophrenia, covering genetic, epigenetic, transcriptomic, translational and many other types of evidence. By systematic review and curation of multiple lines of evidence, we included almost all variants and genes that have ever been reported to be associated with schizophrenia. In particular, we collected ∼4200 common variants reported in genome-wide association studies, ∼1000 de novo mutations discovered by large-scale sequencing of family samples, 215 genes spanning rare and replication copy number variations, 99 genes overlapping with linkage regions, 240 differentially expressed genes, 4651 differentially methylated genes and 49 genes as antipsychotic drug targets. To facilitate interpretation, we included various functional annotation data, especially brain eQTL, methylation QTL, brain expression featured in deep categorization of brain areas and developmental stages and brain-specific promoter and enhancer annotations. Furthermore, we conducted cross-study, cross-data type and integrative analyses of the multidimensional data deposited in SZGR 2.0, and made the data and results available through a user-friendly interface. In summary, SZGR 2.0 provides a one-stop shop of schizophrenia variants and genes and their function and regulation, providing an important resource in the schizophrenia and other mental disease community. SZGR 2.0 is available at https://bioinfo.uth.edu/SZGR/.

  9. SZGR 2.0: a one-stop shop of schizophrenia candidate genes

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Peilin; Han, Guangchun; Zhao, Junfei; Lu, Pinyi; Zhao, Zhongming

    2017-01-01

    SZGR 2.0 is a comprehensive resource of candidate variants and genes for schizophrenia, covering genetic, epigenetic, transcriptomic, translational and many other types of evidence. By systematic review and curation of multiple lines of evidence, we included almost all variants and genes that have ever been reported to be associated with schizophrenia. In particular, we collected ∼4200 common variants reported in genome-wide association studies, ∼1000 de novo mutations discovered by large-scale sequencing of family samples, 215 genes spanning rare and replication copy number variations, 99 genes overlapping with linkage regions, 240 differentially expressed genes, 4651 differentially methylated genes and 49 genes as antipsychotic drug targets. To facilitate interpretation, we included various functional annotation data, especially brain eQTL, methylation QTL, brain expression featured in deep categorization of brain areas and developmental stages and brain-specific promoter and enhancer annotations. Furthermore, we conducted cross-study, cross-data type and integrative analyses of the multidimensional data deposited in SZGR 2.0, and made the data and results available through a user-friendly interface. In summary, SZGR 2.0 provides a one-stop shop of schizophrenia variants and genes and their function and regulation, providing an important resource in the schizophrenia and other mental disease community. SZGR 2.0 is available at https://bioinfo.uth.edu/SZGR/. PMID:27733502

  10. A comprehensive candidate gene approach identifies genetic variation associated with osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Osteosarcoma (OS) is a bone malignancy which occurs primarily in adolescents. Since it occurs during a period of rapid growth, genes important in bone formation and growth are plausible modifiers of risk. Genes involved in DNA repair and ribosomal function may contribute to OS pathogenesis, because they maintain the integrity of critical cellular processes. We evaluated these hypotheses in an OS association study of genes from growth/hormone, bone formation, DNA repair, and ribosomal pathways. Methods We evaluated 4836 tag-SNPs across 255 candidate genes in 96 OS cases and 1426 controls. Logistic regression models were used to estimate the odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results Twelve SNPs in growth or DNA repair genes were significantly associated with OS after Bonferroni correction. Four SNPs in the DNA repair gene FANCM (ORs 1.9-2.0, P = 0.003-0.004) and 2 SNPs downstream of the growth hormone gene GH1 (OR 1.6, P = 0.002; OR 0.5, P = 0.0009) were significantly associated with OS. One SNP in the region of each of the following genes was significant: MDM2, MPG, FGF2, FGFR3, GNRH2, and IGF1. Conclusions Our results suggest that several SNPs in biologically plausible pathways are associated with OS. Larger studies are required to confirm our findings. PMID:21619704

  11. Transcriptome Analysis of Hamelia patens (Rubiaceae) Anthers Reveals Candidate Genes for Tapetum and Pollen Wall Development

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Lin; Twell, David; Kuang, Yanfeng; Liao, Jingping; Zhou, Xianqiang

    2017-01-01

    Studies of the anther transcriptome on non-model plants without a known genome are surprisingly scarce. RNA-Seq and digital gene expression (DGE) profiling provides a comprehensive approach to identify candidate genes contributing to developmental processes in non-model species. Here we built a transcriptome library of developing anthers of Hamelia patens and analyzed DGE profiles from each stage to identify genes that regulate tapetum and pollen development. In total 7,720 putative differentially expressed genes across four anther stages were identified. The number of putative stage-specific genes was: 776 at microspore mother cell stage, 807 at tetrad stage, 322 at uninucleate microspore stage, and the highest number (1,864) at bicellular pollen stage. GO enrichment analysis revealed 243 differentially expressed and 108 stage-specific genes that are potentially related to tapetum development, sporopollenin synthesis, and pollen wall. The number of expressed genes, their function and expression profiles were all significantly correlated with anther developmental processes. Overall comparisons of anther and pollen transcriptomes with those of rice and Arabidopsis together with the expression profiles of homologs of known anther-expressed genes, revealed conserved patterns and also divergence. The divergence may reflect taxon-specific differences in gene expression, the use RNA-seq as a more sensitive methodology, variation in tissue composition and sampling strategies. Given the lack of genomic sequence, this study succeeded in assigning putative identity to a significant proportion of anther-expressed genes and genes relevant to tapetum and pollen development in H. patens. The anther transcriptome revealed a molecular distinction between developmental stages, serving as a resource to unravel the functions of genes involved in anther development in H. patens and informing the analysis of other members of the Rubiaceae. PMID:28119704

  12. Characterization of candidate genes in inflammatory bowel disease–associated risk loci

    PubMed Central

    Peloquin, Joanna M.; Sartor, R. Balfour; Newberry, Rodney D.; McGovern, Dermot P.; Yajnik, Vijay; Lira, Sergio A.

    2016-01-01

    GWAS have linked SNPs to risk of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but a systematic characterization of disease-associated genes has been lacking. Prior studies utilized microarrays that did not capture many genes encoded within risk loci or defined expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) using peripheral blood, which is not the target tissue in IBD. To address these gaps, we sought to characterize the expression of IBD-associated risk genes in disease-relevant tissues and in the setting of active IBD. Terminal ileal (TI) and colonic mucosal tissues were obtained from patients with Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis and from healthy controls. We developed a NanoString code set to profile 678 genes within IBD risk loci. A subset of patients and controls were genotyped for IBD-associated risk SNPs. Analyses included differential expression and variance analysis, weighted gene coexpression network analysis, and eQTL analysis. We identified 116 genes that discriminate between healthy TI and colon samples and uncovered patterns in variance of gene expression that highlight heterogeneity of disease. We identified 107 coexpressed gene pairs for which transcriptional regulation is either conserved or reversed in an inflammation-independent or -dependent manner. We demonstrate that on average approximately 60% of disease-associated genes are differentially expressed in inflamed tissue. Last, we identified eQTLs with either genotype-only effects on expression or an interaction effect between genotype and inflammation. Our data reinforce tissue specificity of expression in disease-associated candidate genes, highlight genes and gene pairs that are regulated in disease-relevant tissue and inflammation, and provide a foundation to advance the understanding of IBD pathogenesis. PMID:27668286

  13. Gallus gallus orthologous to human alpha-dystroglycanopathies candidate genes: Gene expression and characterization during chicken embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo-Lahuerta, Adriana; de Luis, Oscar; Gómez-Esquer, Francisco; Cruces, Jesús; Coloma, Antonio

    2016-09-23

    Alpha-dystroglycanopathies are a heterogenic group of human rare diseases that have in common defects of α-dystroglycan O-glycosylation. These congenital disorders share common features as muscular dystrophy, malformations on central nervous system and more rarely altered ocular development, as well as mutations on a set of candidate genes involved on those syndromes. Severity of the syndromes is variable, appearing Walker-Warburg as the most severe where mutations at protein O-mannosyl transferases POMT1 and POMT2 genes are frequently described. When studying the lack of MmPomt1 in mouse embryonic development, as a murine model of Walker-Warburg syndrome, MmPomt1 null phenotype was lethal because Reitchert's membrane fails during embryonic development. Here, we report gene expression from Gallus gallus orthologous genes to human candidates on alpha-dystroglycanopathies POMT1, POMT2, POMGnT1, FKTN, FKRP and LARGE, making special emphasis in expression and localization of GgPomt1. Results obtained by quantitative RT-PCR, western-blot and immunochemistry revealed close gene expression patterns among human and chicken at key tissues affected during development when suffering an alpha-dystroglycanopathy, leading us to stand chicken as a useful animal model for molecular characterization of glycosyltransferases involved in the O-glycosylation of α-Dystroglycan and its role in embryonic development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Polymorphisms of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS3) gene in preeclampsia: a candidate-gene association study.

    PubMed

    Zdoukopoulos, Nikos; Doxani, Chrysa; Messinis, Ioannis E; Stefanidis, Ioannis; Zintzaras, Elias

    2011-11-03

    The endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene (NOS3) has been proposed as a candidate gene for preeclampsia. However, studies so far have produced conflicting results. This study examines the specific role of variants and haplotypes of the NOS3 gene in a population of Caucasian origin. We examined the association of three common variants of the NOS3 gene (4b/a, T-786C and G894T) and their haplotypes in a case-control sample of 102 patients with preeclampsia and 176 women with a history of uncomplicated pregnancies. Genotyping for the NOS3 variants was performed and odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were obtained to evaluate the association between NOS3 polymorphisms and preeclampsia. The single locus analysis for the three variants using various genetic models and a model-free approach revealed no significant association in relation to clinical status. The analysis of haplotypes also showed lack of significant association. Given the limitations of the candidate-gene approach in investigating complex traits, the evidence of our study does not support the major contributory role of these common NOS3 variants in preeclampsia. Future larger studies may help in elucidating the genetics of preeclampsia further.

  15. Evaluation of SLC11A1 as an inflammatory bowel disease candidate gene

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Nigel PS; Eichenberger, Maurice R; Colliver, Daniel W; Lewis, Robert K; Cobbs, Gary A; Petras, Robert E; Galandiuk, Susan

    2005-01-01

    Background Significant evidence suggests that a promoter polymorphism withinthe gene SLC11A1 is involved in susceptibility to both autoimmune and infectious disorders. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether SLC11A1 has a role in the susceptibility to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) by characterizing a promoter polymorphism within the gene and two short tandem repeat (STR) markers in genetic proximity to SLC11A1. Methods The studied population consisted of 484 Caucasians with IBD, 144 population controls, and 348 non-IBD-affected first-degree relatives of IBD patients. IBD subjects were re-categorized at the sub-disease phenotypic level to characterize possible SLC11A1 genotype-phenotype correlations. Polymorphic markers were amplified from germline DNA and typed using gel electrophoresis. Genotype-phenotype correlations were defined using case-control, haplotype, and family-based association studies. Results This study did not provide compelling evidence for SLC11A1 disease association; most significantly, there was no apparent evidence of SLC11A1 promoter allele association in the studied Crohn's disease population. Conclusion Our results therefore refute previous studies that have shown SLC11A1 promoter polymorphisms are involved in susceptibility to this form of IBD. PMID:15757519

  16. Gene-level integrated metric of negative selection (GIMS) prioritizes candidate genes for nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sampson, Matthew G; Gillies, Christopher E; Ju, Wenjun; Kretzler, Matthias; Kang, Hyun Min

    2013-01-01

    Nephrotic syndrome (NS) gene discovery efforts are now occurring in small kindreds and cohorts of sporadic cases. Power to identify causal variants in these groups beyond a statistical significance threshold is challenging due to small sample size and/or lack of family information. There is a need to develop novel methods to identify NS-associated variants. One way to determine putative functional relevance of a gene is to measure its strength of negative selection, as variants in genes under strong negative selection are more likely to be deleterious. We created a gene-level, integrated metric of negative selection (GIMS) score for 20,079 genes by combining multiple comparative genomics and population genetics measures. To understand the utility of GIMS for NS gene discovery, we examined this score in a diverse set of NS-relevant gene sets. These included genes known to cause monogenic forms of NS in humans as well as genes expressed in the cells of the glomerulus and, particularly, the podocyte. We found strong negative selection in the following NS-relevant gene sets: (1) autosomal-dominant Mendelian focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) genes (p = 0.03 compared to reference), (2) glomerular expressed genes (p = 4×10(-23)), and (3) predicted podocyte genes (p = 3×10(-9)). Eight genes causing autosomal dominant forms of FSGS had a stronger combined score of negative selection and podocyte enrichment as compared to all other genes (p = 1 x 10(-3)). As a whole, recessive FSGS genes were not enriched for negative selection. Thus, we also created a transcript-level, integrated metric of negative selection (TIMS) to quantify negative selection on an isoform level. These revealed transcripts of known autosomal recessive disease-causing genes that were nonetheless under strong selection. We suggest that a filtering strategy that includes measuring negative selection on a gene or isoform level could aid in identifying NS-related genes. Our GIMS and TIMS scores are

  17. Gene-level Integrated Metric of negative Selection (GIMS) Prioritizes Candidate Genes for Nephrotic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sampson, Matthew G.; Gillies, Christopher E.; Ju, Wenjun; Kretzler, Matthias; Kang, Hyun Min

    2013-01-01

    Nephrotic syndrome (NS) gene discovery efforts are now occurring in small kindreds and cohorts of sporadic cases. Power to identify causal variants in these groups beyond a statistical significance threshold is challenging due to small sample size and/or lack of family information. There is a need to develop novel methods to identify NS-associated variants. One way to determine putative functional relevance of a gene is to measure its strength of negative selection, as variants in genes under strong negative selection are more likely to be deleterious. We created a gene-level, integrated metric of negative selection (GIMS) score for 20,079 genes by combining multiple comparative genomics and population genetics measures. To understand the utility of GIMS for NS gene discovery, we examined this score in a diverse set of NS-relevant gene sets. These included genes known to cause monogenic forms of NS in humans as well as genes expressed in the cells of the glomerulus and, particularly, the podocyte. We found strong negative selection in the following NS-relevant gene sets: (1) autosomal-dominant Mendelian focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) genes (p= 0.03 compared to reference), (2) glomerular expressed genes (p = 4×10-23), and (3) predicted podocyte genes (p = 3×10-9). Eight genes causing autosomal dominant forms of FSGS had a stronger combined score of negative selection and podocyte enrichment as compared to all other genes (p=1 x 10-3). As a whole, recessive FSGS genes were not enriched for negative selection. Thus, we also created a transcript-level, integrated metric of negative selection (TIMS) to quantify negative selection on an isoform level. These revealed transcripts of known autosomal recessive disease-causing genes that were nonetheless under strong selection. We suggest that a filtering strategy that includes measuring negative selection on a gene or isoform level could aid in identifying NS-related genes. Our GIMS and TIMS scores are available

  18. Complex repetitive arrangements of gene sequence in the candidate region of the spinal muscular atrophy gene in 5q13

    SciTech Connect

    Theodosiou, A.M.; Nesbit, A.M.; Daniels, R.J.; Campbell, L.; Francis, M.J.; Christodoulou, Z.; Morrison, K.E.; Davies, K.E. |

    1994-12-01

    Childhood-onset proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a heritable neurological disorder, which has been mapped by genetic linkage analysis to chromosome 5q13, in the interval between markers D5S435 and D5S557. Here, we present gene sequences that have been isolated from this interval, several of which show sequence homologies to exons of {beta}-glucuronidase. These gene sequences are repeated several times across the candidate region and are also present on chromosome 5p. The arrangement of these repetitive gene motifs is polymorphic between individuals. The high degree of variability observed may have some influence on the expression of the genes in the region. Since SMA is not inherited as a classical autosomal recessive disease, novel genomic rearrangements arising from aberrant recombination events between the complex repeats may be associated with the phenotype observed.

  19. Chromosome 22q12.1 microdeletions: confirmation of the MN1 gene as a candidate gene for cleft palate

    PubMed Central

    Breckpot, Jeroen; Anderlid, Britt-Marie; Alanay, Yasemin; Blyth, Moira; Brahimi, Afane; Duban-Bedu, Bénédicte; Gozé, Odile; Firth, Helen; Yakicier, Mustafa Cengiz; Hens, Greet; Rayyan, Maissa; Legius, Eric; Vermeesch, Joris Robert; Devriendt, Koen

    2016-01-01

    We report on seven novel patients with a submicroscopic 22q12 deletion. The common phenotype constitutes a contiguous gene deletion syndrome on chromosome 22q12.1q12.2, featuring NF2-related schwannoma of the vestibular nerve, corpus callosum agenesis and palatal defects. Combining our results with the literature, eight patients are recorded with palatal defects in association with haploinsufficiency of 22q12.1, including the MN1 gene. These observations, together with the mouse expression data and the finding of craniofacial malformations including cleft palate in a Mn1-knockout mouse model, suggest that this gene is a candidate gene for cleft palate in humans. PMID:25944382

  20. Candidate Gene Discovery Procedure after Follow-Up Confirmatory Analyses of Candidate Regions of Interests for Alzheimer’s Disease in the NIMH Sibling Dataset

    PubMed Central

    Baye, Tesfaye M.; Perry, Rodney T.; Wiener, Howard W.; Chen, Zuomin; Harrell, Lindy E.; Go, Rodney C. P.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this research was to develop a procedure to identify candidate genes under linkage peaks confirmed in a follow-up of candidate regions of interests (CRIs) identified in our original genome scan in the NIMH Alzheimer’s diseases (AD) Initiative families (Blacker et al. [1]). There were six CRIs identified that met the threshold of multipoint lod score (MLS) of ≥ 2.0 from the original scan. The most significant peak (MLS = 7.7) was at 19q13, which was attributed to APOE. The remaining CRIs with ‘suggestive’ evidence for linkage were identified at 9q22, 6q27, 14q22, 11q25, and 3p26. We have followed up and narrowed the 9q22 CRI signal using simple tandem repeat (STR) markers (Perry et al. [2]). In this confirmatory project, we have followed up the 6q27, 14q22, 11q25, and 3p26 CRIs with a total of 24 additional flanking STRs, reducing the mean interval marker distance (MID) in each CRI, and substantially increase in the information content (IC). The linkage signals at 6q27, 14q22 and 11q25 remain ‘suggestive’, indicating that these CRIs are promising and worthy of detailed fine mapping and assessment of candidate genes associated with AD. We have developed a bioinformatics approach for identifying candidate genes in these confirmed regions based on the Gene Ontology terms that are annotated and enriched among the systematic meta-analyzed genes, confirmed by at least three case-control samples, and cataloged in the “AlzGene database” as potential Alzheimer disease susceptibility genes (http://www.alzgene.org). PMID:18688078