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Sample records for fanconi anemia complementation

  1. Identification of the Fanconi anemia complementation group I gene, FANCI.

    PubMed

    Dorsman, Josephine C; Levitus, Marieke; Rockx, Davy; Rooimans, Martin A; Oostra, Anneke B; Haitjema, Anneke; Bakker, Sietske T; Steltenpool, Jûrgen; Schuler, Dezsö; Mohan, Sheila; Schindler, Detlev; Arwert, Fré; Pals, Gerard; Mathew, Christopher G; Waisfisz, Quinten; de Winter, Johan P; Joenje, Hans

    2007-01-01

    To identify the gene underlying Fanconi anemia (FA) complementation group I we studied informative FA-I families by a genome-wide linkage analysis, which resulted in 4 candidate regions together encompassing 351 genes. Candidates were selected via bioinformatics and data mining on the basis of their resemblance to other FA genes/proteins acting in the FA pathway, such as: degree of evolutionary conservation, presence of nuclear localization signals and pattern of tissue-dependent expression. We found a candidate, KIAA1794 on chromosome 15q25-26, to be mutated in 8 affected individuals previously assigned to complementation group I. Western blots of endogenous FANCI indicated that functionally active KIAA1794 protein is lacking in FA-I individuals. Knock-down of KIAA1794 expression by siRNA in HeLa cells caused excessive chromosomal breakage induced by mitomycin C, a hallmark of FA cells. Furthermore, phenotypic reversion of a patient-derived cell line was associated with a secondary genetic alteration at the KIAA1794 locus. These data add up to two conclusions. First, KIAA1794 is a FA gene. Second, this gene is identical to FANCI, since the patient cell lines found mutated in this study included the reference cell line for group I, EUFA592.

  2. Fanconi Anemia Research Fund

    MedlinePlus

    ... Support Publications Fundraising News What is the Fanconi Anemia Research Fund? Fanconi anemia is an inherited disease that can lead to ... population. Lynn and Dave Frohnmayer started the Fanconi Anemia Research Fund, in 1989 to find effective treatments ...

  3. Fanconi anemia complementation group FANCD2 protein serine 331 phosphorylation is important for fanconi anemia pathway function and BRCA2 interaction.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Gang; Wilson, James B; Chen, Xiaoyong; Krause, Diane S; Xiao, Yuxuan; Jones, Nigel J; Kupfer, Gary M

    2009-11-15

    Fanconi anemia is a cancer-prone inherited bone marrow failure and cancer susceptibility syndrome with at least 13 complementation groups (FANCA, FANCB, FANCC, FANCD1, FANCD2, FANCE, FANCF, FANCG, FANCI, FANCJ, FANCL, FANCM, and FANCN). Our laboratory has previously described several regulatory phosphorylation events for core complex member proteins FANCG and FANCA by phosphorylation. In this study, we report a novel phosphorylation site serine 331 (S331) of FANCD2, the pivotal downstream player of the Fanconi anemia pathway. Phosphorylation of S331 is important for its DNA damage-inducible monoubiquitylation, resistance to DNA cross-linkers, and in vivo interaction with FANCD1/BRCA2. A phosphomimetic mutation at S331 restores all of these phenotypes to wild-type. In vitro and in vivo experiments show that phosphorylation of S331 is mediated by CHK1, the S-phase checkpoint kinase implicated in the Fanconi anemia DNA repair pathway.

  4. A human ortholog of archaeal DNA repair protein Hef is defective in Fanconi anemia complementation group M.

    PubMed

    Meetei, Amom Ruhikanta; Medhurst, Annette L; Ling, Chen; Xue, Yutong; Singh, Thiyam Ramsing; Bier, Patrick; Steltenpool, Jurgen; Stone, Stacie; Dokal, Inderjeet; Mathew, Christopher G; Hoatlin, Maureen; Joenje, Hans; de Winter, Johan P; Wang, Weidong

    2005-09-01

    Fanconi anemia is a genetic disease characterized by genomic instability and cancer predisposition. Nine genes involved in Fanconi anemia have been identified; their products participate in a DNA damage-response network involving BRCA1 and BRCA2 (refs. 2,3). We previously purified a Fanconi anemia core complex containing the FANCL ubiquitin ligase and six other Fanconi anemia-associated proteins. Each protein in this complex is essential for monoubiquitination of FANCD2, a key reaction in the Fanconi anemia DNA damage-response pathway. Here we show that another component of this complex, FAAP250, is mutant in individuals with Fanconi anemia of a new complementation group (FA-M). FAAP250 or FANCM has sequence similarity to known DNA-repair proteins, including archaeal Hef, yeast MPH1 and human ERCC4 or XPF. FANCM can dissociate DNA triplex, possibly owing to its ability to translocate on duplex DNA. FANCM is essential for monoubiquitination of FANCD2 and becomes hyperphosphorylated in response to DNA damage. Our data suggest an evolutionary link between Fanconi anemia-associated proteins and DNA repair; FANCM may act as an engine that translocates the Fanconi anemia core complex along DNA.

  5. Living with Fanconi Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Fanconi Anemia Improvements in blood and marrow stem cell transplants ... November 1, 2011 Twitter Facebook YouTube Google+ SITE INDEX ACCESSIBILITY PRIVACY STATEMENT FOIA NO FEAR ACT OIG ...

  6. Complementation of a Fanconi anemia group A cell line by UbA{sup 52}

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, R.E.; Heina, J.A.; Jakobs, P.M.

    1994-09-01

    Cells from patients with Fanconi anemia (FA) display chromosomal instability and increased sensitivity to mitomycin C (MMC) and diepoxybutane (DEB) relative to normal cells. Several genes act in this pathway of DNA damage processing based upon four known complementation groups in FA. We have made a cDNA expression library in a vector with a G418 selectable marker to identify FA genes other than the FA-C group. Approximately 1 x 10{sup 6} independent cDNA clones were isolated with an average cDNA size of 1.5 kb. Five cell lines resistant to MMC and DEB were isolated from 6 x 10{sup 6} G418-resistant transfectants from 65 individual transfections of the FA-A fibroblast line GM6914. The isolated cell lines also showed normal chromosome stability. The same cDNA (600 bp) was recovered from three independent cell lines by PCR using flanking sequence primers. The gene has sequence identity with a known gene, the ubiquitin fusion gene, UbA{sub 52}. Interestingly, each of the cDNAs were inserted in antisense orientation relative to the cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter as determined by sequencing and PCR using UbA{sub 52}-specific internal primers. Southern blot analysis indicated the cell lines had distinct chromosomal insertion sites. Mutation analysis by chemical cleavage showed no reading frame mutations, indicating that UbA{sub 52} is not the FA-A gene. Re-transfection with the UbA{sub 52} gene in antisense gave complementation for MMC, DEB and chromosome stability to varying degrees. Re-transfection of the antisense construct with the CMV promotor removed or with a sense construct did not alter the MMC sensitivity. We conclude that the antisense UbA{sub 52} gene has a non-specific effect, perhaps acting by altering the cell cycle or susceptibility to apoptosis.

  7. Fanconi anemia: current management.

    PubMed

    Kook, Hoon

    2005-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an autosomal recessive chromosomal instability disorder, characterized by congenital anomalies, defective hematopoiesis and a high risk of developing acute myeloid leukemia and certain solid tumors. All racial and ethnic groups are at risk, and at least 11 complementation groups have been identified and the genes defective in eight of these have been identified (FANCA, C, D2, E, F, G, L and BRCA2). FA-A is the most common complementation group, accounting for approximately 65% of all affected individuals. The gold-standard screening test for FA is based on the characteristic hypersensitivity of FA cells to the crosslinking agents, such as mitomicin C or diepoxybutane. Recent progress has been made in identifying the genes bearing pathogenetically relevant mutations, but slower progress has been made in defining the precise functions of the proteins in normal cells, in part because that the proteins are multifunctional. Molecular studies have established that a common pathway exist, both between the FA proteins and other proteins involved in DNA repair such as NBS1, ATM, BRCA1 and BRCA2. Stem cell transplantation (SCT) is the only option for establishing normal hematopoiesis. To reduce undue toxicities due to inherent hypersensitivity, nonmyeloablative conditioning for transplants has been advocated. This review summarizes the general clinical and hematologic features and the current management of FA. Fanconi anemia (FA) is the commonest type of inherited bone marrow failure syndrome with the birth incidence of around three per million. The inheritance pattern is autosomal recessive with the estimated heterozygote frequency being one in 300 in Europe and the US.

  8. The Simple Chordate Ciona intestinalis Has a Reduced Complement of Genes Associated with Fanconi Anemia.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Edward C; Azzinaro, Paul A; Vierra, David A; Howlett, Niall G; Irvine, Steven Q

    2016-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a human genetic disease characterized by congenital defects, bone marrow failure, and increased cancer risk. FA is associated with mutation in one of 24 genes. The protein products of these genes function cooperatively in the FA pathway to orchestrate the repair of DNA interstrand cross-links. Few model organisms exist for the study of FA. Seeking a model organism with a simpler version of the FA pathway, we searched the genome of the simple chordate Ciona intestinalis for homologs of the human FA-associated proteins. BLAST searches, sequence alignments, hydropathy comparisons, maximum likelihood phylogenetic analysis, and structural modeling were used to infer the likelihood of homology between C. intestinalis and human FA proteins. Our analysis indicates that C. intestinalis indeed has a simpler and potentially functional FA pathway. The C. intestinalis genome was searched for candidates for homology to 24 human FA and FA-associated proteins. Support was found for the existence of homologs for 13 of these 24 human genes in C. intestinalis. Members of each of the three commonly recognized FA gene functional groups were found. In group I, we identified homologs of FANCE, FANCL, FANCM, and UBE2T/FANCT. Both members of group II, FANCD2 and FANCI, have homologs in C. intestinalis. In group III, we found evidence for homologs of FANCJ, FANCO, FANCQ/ERCC4, FANCR/RAD51, and FANCS/BRCA1, as well as the FA-associated proteins ERCC1 and FAN1. Evidence was very weak for the existence of homologs in C. intestinalis for any other recognized FA genes. This work supports the notion that C. intestinalis, as a close relative of vertebrates, but having a much reduced complement of FA genes, offers a means of studying the function of certain FA proteins in a simpler pathway than that of vertebrate cells.

  9. The Simple Chordate Ciona intestinalis Has a Reduced Complement of Genes Associated with Fanconi Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Edward C.; Azzinaro, Paul A.; Vierra, David A.; Howlett, Niall G.; Irvine, Steven Q.

    2016-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a human genetic disease characterized by congenital defects, bone marrow failure, and increased cancer risk. FA is associated with mutation in one of 24 genes. The protein products of these genes function cooperatively in the FA pathway to orchestrate the repair of DNA interstrand cross-links. Few model organisms exist for the study of FA. Seeking a model organism with a simpler version of the FA pathway, we searched the genome of the simple chordate Ciona intestinalis for homologs of the human FA-associated proteins. BLAST searches, sequence alignments, hydropathy comparisons, maximum likelihood phylogenetic analysis, and structural modeling were used to infer the likelihood of homology between C. intestinalis and human FA proteins. Our analysis indicates that C. intestinalis indeed has a simpler and potentially functional FA pathway. The C. intestinalis genome was searched for candidates for homology to 24 human FA and FA-associated proteins. Support was found for the existence of homologs for 13 of these 24 human genes in C. intestinalis. Members of each of the three commonly recognized FA gene functional groups were found. In group I, we identified homologs of FANCE, FANCL, FANCM, and UBE2T/FANCT. Both members of group II, FANCD2 and FANCI, have homologs in C. intestinalis. In group III, we found evidence for homologs of FANCJ, FANCO, FANCQ/ERCC4, FANCR/RAD51, and FANCS/BRCA1, as well as the FA-associated proteins ERCC1 and FAN1. Evidence was very weak for the existence of homologs in C. intestinalis for any other recognized FA genes. This work supports the notion that C. intestinalis, as a close relative of vertebrates, but having a much reduced complement of FA genes, offers a means of studying the function of certain FA proteins in a simpler pathway than that of vertebrate cells. PMID:27279728

  10. Fanconi anemia complementation group A cells are hypersensitive to chromium(VI)-induced toxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Vilcheck, Susan K; O'Brien, Travis J; Pritchard, Daryl E; Ha, Linan; Ceryak, Susan; Fornsaglio, Jamie L; Patierno, Steven R

    2002-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by diverse developmental abnormalities, progressive bone marrow failure, and a markedly increased incidence of malignancy. FA cells are hypersensitive to DNA cross-linking agents, suggesting a general defect in the repair of DNA cross-links. Some forms of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] are implicated as respiratory carcinogens and induce several types of DNA lesions, including ternary DNA-Cr-DNA interstrand cross-links (Cr-DDC). We hypothesized that human FA complementation group A (FA-A) cells would be hypersensitive to Cr(VI) and Cr(VI)-induced apoptosis. Using phosphatidylserine translocation and caspase-3 activation, human FA-A fibroblasts were found to be markedly hypersensitive to chromium-induced apoptosis compared with CRL-1634 cells, which are normal human foreskin fibroblasts (CRL). The clonogenicity of FA-A cells was also significantly decreased compared with CRL cells after Cr(VI) treatment. There was no significant difference in either Cr(VI) uptake or Cr-DNA adduct formation between FA-A and CRL cells. These results show that FA-A cells are hypersensitive to Cr(VI) and Cr-induced apoptosis and that this hypersensitivity is not due to increased Cr(VI) uptake or increased Cr-DNA adduct formation. The results also suggest that Cr-DDC may be proapoptotic lesions. These results are the first to show that FA cells are hypersensitive to an environmentally relevant DNA cross-linking agent. PMID:12426130

  11. How Is Fanconi Anemia Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Fanconi Anemia Diagnosed? People who have Fanconi anemia (FA) are born with the disorder. They may ... questions about: Any personal or family history of anemia Any surgeries you’ve had related to the ...

  12. How Is Fanconi Anemia Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Fanconi Anemia Treated? Doctors decide how to treat Fanconi anemia (FA) based on a person's age and how ... Long-term treatments for FA can: Cure the anemia. Damaged bone marrow cells are replaced with healthy ...

  13. Impaired FANCD2 monoubiquitination and hypersensitivity to camptothecin uniquely characterize Fanconi anemia complementation group M.

    PubMed

    Singh, Thiyam Ramsing; Bakker, Sietske T; Agarwal, Sheba; Jansen, Michael; Grassman, Elke; Godthelp, Barbara C; Ali, Abdullah Mahmood; Du, Chang-hu; Rooimans, Martin A; Fan, Qiang; Wahengbam, Kebola; Steltenpool, Jurgen; Andreassen, Paul R; Williams, David A; Joenje, Hans; de Winter, Johan P; Meetei, Amom Ruhikanta

    2009-07-02

    FANCM is a component of the Fanconi anemia (FA) core complex and one FA patient (EUFA867) with biallelic mutations in FANCM has been described. Strikingly, we found that EUFA867 also carries biallelic mutations in FANCA. After correcting the FANCA defect in EUFA867 lymphoblasts, a "clean" FA-M cell line was generated. These cells were hypersensitive to mitomycin C, but unlike cells defective in other core complex members, FANCM(-/-) cells were proficient in monoubiquitinating FANCD2 and were sensitive to the topoisomerase inhibitor camptothecin, a feature shared only with the FA subtype D1 and N. In addition, FANCM(-/-) cells were sensitive to UV light. FANCM and a C-terminal deletion mutant rescued the cross-linker sensitivity of FANCM(-/-) cells, whereas a FANCM ATPase mutant did not. Because both mutants restored the formation of FANCD2 foci, we conclude that FANCM functions in an FA core complex-dependent and -independent manner.

  14. Epithelial cancer in Fanconi anemia complementation group D2 (Fancd2) knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Houghtaling, Scott; Timmers, Cynthia; Noll, Meenakshi; Finegold, Milton J; Jones, Stephen N; Meyn, M Stephen; Grompe, Markus

    2003-08-15

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetic disorder characterized by hypersensitivity to DNA damage, bone marrow failure, congenital defects, and cancer. To further investigate the in vivo function of the FA pathway, mice with a targeted deletion in the distally acting FA gene Fancd2 were created. Similar to human FA patients and other FA mouse models, Fancd2 mutant mice exhibited cellular sensitivity to DNA interstrand cross-links and germ cell loss. In addition, chromosome mispairing was seen in male meiosis. However, Fancd2 mutant mice also displayed phenotypes not observed in other mice with disruptions of proximal FA genes. These include microphthalmia, perinatal lethality, and epithelial cancers, similar to mice with Brca2/Fancd1 hypomorphic mutations. These additional phenotypes were not caused by defects in the ATM-mediated S-phase checkpoint, which was intact in primary Fancd2 mutant fibroblasts. The phenotypic overlap between Fancd2-null and Brca2/Fancd1 hypomorphic mice is consistent with a common function for both proteins in the same pathway, regulating genomic stability.

  15. Homozygosity mapping of Fanconi anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Gschwend, M.; Botstein, D.; Kruglyak, L.

    1994-09-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare, recessive, genetically heterogeneous disease characterized by progressive insufficiency of the bone marrow and increased cellular sensitivity to DNA crosslinking agents. Complementation tests among different FA cells have indicated the presence of at least 4 FA-causing genes. One of the genes, FACC, was identified by functional complementation but appears unlikely to account for many phenotypically indistinguishable FA caes. We have begun a linkage study of FA using {open_quotes}homozygosity mapping{close_quotes}, a method that involves genotyping with DNA markers on affected individuals whose parents are related. Because FA is a rare recessive disease, it is most likely that probands are homozygous by descent at the disease locus and, therefore, at nearby DNA markers. Although the probability that any given marker will be homozygous in an inbred individual is high, given markers with moderate heterozygosities, the chance that two unrelated inbred individuals will be homozygous at the same marker is considerably lower. By locating overlapping regions of homozygosity between different families we hope to identify genes that cause FA. Sixteen consanguineous non-FACC FA families from the International Fanconi Anemia Registry at Rockefeller University are under study. An efficient algorithm for data analysis was developed and incorporated into software that can quickly compute exact multipoint lod scores using all markers on an entire chromosome. At the time of this writing, 171 of 229 microsatellite markers spaced at 20 cM intervals across the genome have been analyzed.

  16. Genetics Home Reference: Fanconi anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... increased risk of developing a cancer of blood-forming cells in the bone marrow called acute myeloid ... PubMed or Free article on PubMed Central Kitao H, Takata M. Fanconi anemia: a disorder defective in ...

  17. Advances in the understanding of Fanconi Anemia Complementation Group D2 Protein (FANCD2) in human cancer.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yihang; Zhang, Jun; Yu, Herbert; Fei, Peiwen

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare human genetic disease, resulting from dysfunction in any of 17 known complementation proteins: FANC-A, B, C, D1, D2, E, F, G, I, J, L, M, N, O, P, Q & S, and other unknowns. Besides the severe bone marrow failure, an extremely high incidence of cancer as well as many other clinic symptoms associated with FA patients, FA cells are known of insufficiency in homologous recombination, DNA mismatch repair, nucleotide excision repair, translesion DNA synthesis, and other molecular defects, leading to genome instability. Those similar molecular and cellular/tissue features show that all FA proteins function in one common signaling pathway, namely, the FA pathway. The monoubiquitination of FANCD2 is the central step of the FA pathway activation upon DNA damage or during DNA replication. The molecular functions of FANCD2 emerge as a very attractive filed of investigation in cancer research. Herein, we review the recent progresses in FANCD2 functions at these rapidly progressed aspects.

  18. A novel ubiquitin ligase is deficient in Fanconi anemia.

    PubMed

    Meetei, Amom Ruhikanta; de Winter, Johan P; Medhurst, Annette L; Wallisch, Michael; Waisfisz, Quinten; van de Vrugt, Henri J; Oostra, Anneke B; Yan, Zhijiang; Ling, Chen; Bishop, Colin E; Hoatlin, Maureen E; Joenje, Hans; Wang, Weidong

    2003-10-01

    Fanconi anemia is a recessively inherited disease characterized by congenital defects, bone marrow failure and cancer susceptibility. Cells from individuals with Fanconi anemia are highly sensitive to DNA-crosslinking drugs, such as mitomycin C (MMC). Fanconi anemia proteins function in a DNA damage response pathway involving breast cancer susceptibility gene products, BRCA1 and BRCA2 (refs. 1,2). A key step in this pathway is monoubiquitination of FANCD2, resulting in the redistribution of FANCD2 to nuclear foci containing BRCA1 (ref. 3). The underlying mechanism is unclear because the five Fanconi anemia proteins known to be required for this ubiquitination have no recognizable ubiquitin ligase motifs. Here we report a new component of a Fanconi anemia protein complex, called PHF9, which possesses E3 ubiquitin ligase activity in vitro and is essential for FANCD2 monoubiquitination in vivo. Because PHF9 is defective in a cell line derived from an individual with Fanconi anemia, we conclude that PHF9 (also called FANCL) represents a novel Fanconi anemia complementation group (FA-L). Our data suggest that PHF9 has a crucial role in the Fanconi anemia pathway as the likely catalytic subunit required for monoubiquitination of FANCD2.

  19. Cytokine overproduction and crosslinker hypersensitivity are unlinked in Fanconi anemia macrophages.

    PubMed

    Garbati, Michael R; Hays, Laura E; Rathbun, R Keaney; Jillette, Nathaniel; Chin, Kathy; Al-Dhalimy, Muhsen; Agarwal, Anupriya; Newell, Amy E Hanlon; Olson, Susan B; Bagby, Grover C

    2016-03-01

    The Fanconi anemia proteins participate in a canonical pathway that repairs cross-linking agent-induced DNA damage. Cells with inactivated Fanconi anemia genes are universally hypersensitive to such agents. Fanconi anemia-deficient hematopoietic stem cells are also hypersensitive to inflammatory cytokines, and, as importantly, Fanconi anemia macrophages overproduce such cytokines in response to TLR4 and TLR7/8 agonists. We questioned whether TLR-induced DNA damage is the primary cause of aberrantly regulated cytokine production in Fanconi anemia macrophages by quantifying TLR agonist-induced TNF-α production, DNA strand breaks, crosslinker-induced chromosomal breakage, and Fanconi anemia core complex function in Fanconi anemia complementation group C-deficient human and murine macrophages. Although both M1 and M2 polarized Fanconi anemia cells were predictably hypersensitive to mitomycin C, only M1 macrophages overproduced TNF-α in response to TLR-activating signals. DNA damaging agents alone did not induce TNF-α production in the absence of TLR agonists in wild-type or Fanconi anemia macrophages, and mitomycin C did not enhance TLR responses in either normal or Fanconi anemia cells. TLR4 and TLR7/8 activation induced cytokine overproduction in Fanconi anemia macrophages. Also, although TLR4 activation was associated with induced double strand breaks, TLR7/8 activation was not. That DNA strand breaks and chromosome breaks are neither necessary nor sufficient to account for the overproduction of inflammatory cytokines by Fanconi anemia cells suggests that noncanonical anti-inflammatory functions of Fanconi anemia complementation group C contribute to the aberrant macrophage phenotype and suggests that suppression of macrophage/TLR hyperreactivity might prevent cytokine-induced stem cell attrition in Fanconi anemia.

  20. Heterozygosity for p53 (Trp53+/-) accelerates epithelial tumor formation in fanconi anemia complementation group D2 (Fancd2) knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Houghtaling, Scott; Granville, Laura; Akkari, Yassmine; Torimaru, Yumi; Olson, Susan; Finegold, Milton; Grompe, Markus

    2005-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by progressive bone marrow failure and an increased susceptibility to cancer. FA is genetically heterogeneous, consisting of at least 11 complementation groups, FA-A through L, including FA-D1 (BRCA2) and D2. We have previously reported an increased incidence of epithelial tumors in Fancd2 knockout mice. To further investigate the role of the FA pathway in tumor prevention, Fancd2 mutant mice were crossed to mice with a null mutation in the tumor suppressor gene, Trp53. The tumor spectrum in Fancd2(-/-)/Trp53(+/-) mice included sarcomas expected in Trp53 heterozygotes, as well as mammary and lung adenocarcinomas that occur rarely in Trp53 heterozygotes. These tumors occurred earlier than in Fancd2(-/-) control mice. Therefore, the Fancd2(-/-)/Trp53(+/-) mice represent an improved model for the study of adenocarcinoma in FA. In addition, it was found that Fancd2(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts but not Fancd2(-/-)/Trp53(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts arrest following DNA damage. Therefore, Trp53 is required for the S phase checkpoint activation observed in Fancd2 mutant cells. Fancd2(-/-)/Trp53(-/-) cells showed an increase in aneuploidy and had multiple gross chromosomal rearrangements.

  1. Fanconi anemia complementation group D2 (FANCD2) functions independently of BRCA2- and RAD51-associated homologous recombination in response to DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Akihiro; Zdzienicka, Malgorzata Z; Chen, Junjie; Couch, Fergus J

    2005-04-15

    The BRCA2 breast cancer tumor suppressor is involved in the repair of double strand breaks and broken replication forks by homologous recombination through its interaction with DNA repair protein Rad51. Cells defective in BRCA2.FANCD1 are extremely sensitive to mitomycin C (MMC) similarly to cells deficient in any of the Fanconi anemia (FA) complementation group proteins (FANC). These observations suggest that the FA pathway and the BRCA2 and Rad51 repair pathway may be linked, although a functional connection between these pathways in DNA damage signaling remains to be determined. Here, we systematically investigated the interaction between these pathways. We show that in response to DNA damage, BRCA2-dependent Rad51 nuclear focus formation was normal in the absence of FANCD2 and that FANCD2 nuclear focus formation and mono-ubiquitination appeared normal in BRCA2-deficient cells. We report that the absence of BRCA2 substantially reduced homologous recombination repair of DNA breaks, whereas the absence of FANCD2 had little effect. Furthermore, we established that depletion of BRCA2 or Rad51 had a greater effect on cell survival in response to MMC than depletion of FANCD2 and that depletion of BRCA2 in FANCD2 mutant cells further sensitized these cells to MMC. Our results suggest that FANCD2 mediates double strand DNA break repair independently of Rad51-associated homologous recombination.

  2. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Fanconi Anemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Fanconi Anemia? Major Signs and Symptoms Your doctor may suspect ... sisters also should be tested for the disorder. Anemia The most common symptom of all types of ...

  3. A male newborn with VACTERL association and Fanconi anemia with a FANCB deletion detected by array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH).

    PubMed

    Umaña, Luis A; Magoulas, Pilar; Bi, Weimin; Bacino, Carlos A

    2011-12-01

    We report on a male newborn with multiple congenital abnormalities consistent with the diagnosis of VACTERL association (vertebral, anal, cardiac, tracheo-esophageal fistula, renal, and limb anomalies), who had Fanconi anemia (complementation group B) recognized by the detection of a deletion in chromosome Xp22.2 using an oligonucleotide array. The diagnosis of Fanconi anemia was confirmed by increased chromosomal breakage abnormalities observed in cultured cells that were treated with cross-linking agents. This is the first report in the literature of Fanconi anemia complementation group B detected by oligonucleotide array testing postnatally.

  4. Effects of ionizing radiation on cells from Fanconi's anemia patients

    SciTech Connect

    Duckworth-Rysiecki, G.; Taylor, A.M.

    1985-01-01

    The lymphocytes from some Fanconi's anemia patients appeared to be more radiosensitive than normal as measured by the number of X-ray-(or bleomycin-) induced chromosome aberrations seen following G2 treatment. Fibroblasts from the same patients, however, all showed the same degree of colony survival as normals following exposure to gamma-rays (Do, 1.13 +/- 0.072 (S.E.) Gy and 1.14 +/- 0.077 Gy for Fanconi's anemia and normal fibroblasts, respectively). The lack of increased radiosensitivity in Fanconi's fibroblasts was also observed by the same degree of inhibition of DNA synthesis as seen in normals following gamma-irradiation. The results show clearly that there is no increase in radiosensitivity common to all cell types from Fanconi's patients, although an apparent increase in chromosomal radiosensitivity may be seen in the lymphocytes from an occasional patient.

  5. Mutation analysis of the Fanconi Anemia Gene FACC

    SciTech Connect

    Verlander, P.C.; Lin, J.D.; Udono, M.U.; Zhang, Q.; Auerbach, A.D. ); Gibson, R.A.; Mathew, C.G. )

    1994-04-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetically heterogeneous autosomal recessive disorder characterized by a unique hypersensitivity of cells to DNA cross-linking agents; a gene for complementation group C (FACC) has recently been cloned. The authors have amplified FACC exons with their flanking intron sequences from genomic DNA from 174 racially and ethnically diverse families in the International Fanconi Anemia Registry and have screened for mutations by using SSCP analysis. They have identified eight different variants in 32 families; three were detected in exon 1, one in exon 4, one in intron 4, two in exon 6, and one in exon 14. Two of the eight variants, in seven families, did not segregate with the disease allele in multiplex families, suggesting that these variants represented benign polymorphisms. Disease-associated mutations in FACC were detected in a total of 25 (14.4%) of 174 families screened. The most frequent mutations were IVS4 + 4 A [yields] T (intron 4; 12 families) and 322delG (exon 1; 9 families). Other, less common mutations include Q13X in exon 1, R185X and D195V in exon 6, and L554P in exon 14. The polymorphisms were S26F in exon 1 and G139E in exon 4. All patients in the study with 322delG, Q13X, R185X, and D195V are of northern or eastern European or southern Italian ancestry, and 18 of 19 have a mild form of the disease, while the 2 patients with L554P, both from the same family, have a severe phenotype. All 19 patients with IVS4 + 4 A [yields] T have Jewish ancestry and have a severe phenotype. 19 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  6. UBE2W interacts with FANCL and regulates the monoubiquitination of Fanconi anemia protein FANCD2.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yingying; Zhou, Xiaowei; Zhao, Lixia; Li, Chao; Zhu, Hengqi; Xu, Long; Shan, Liran; Liao, Xiang; Guo, Zekun; Huang, Peitang

    2011-02-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare cancer-predisposing genetic disease mostly caused by improper regulation of the monoubiquitination of Fanconi anemia complementation group D2 (FANCD2). Genetic studies have indicated that ubiquitin conjugating enzyme UBE2T and HHR6 could regulate FANCD2 monoubiquitination through distinct mechanisms. However, the exact regulation mechanisms of FANCD2 monoubiquitination in response to different DNA damages remain unclear. Here we report that UBE2W, a new ubiquitin conjugating enzyme, could regulate FANCD2 monoubiquitination by mechanisms different from UBE2T or HHR6. Indeed, UBE2W exhibits ubiquitin conjugating enzyme activity and catalyzes the monoubiquitination of PHD domain of Fanconi anemia complementation group L (FANCL) in vitro. UBE2W binds to FANCL, and the PHD domain is both necessary and sufficient for this interaction in mammalian cells. In addition, over-expression of UBE2W in cells promotes the monoubiquitination of FANCD2 and down-regulated UBE2W markedly reduces the UV irradiation-induced but not MMC-induced FANCD2 monoubiquitination. These results indicate that UBE2W regulates FANCD2 monoubiquitination by mechanisms different from UBE2T and HRR6. It may provide an additional regulatory step in the activation of the FA pathway.

  7. De Novo Chromosome Copy Number Variation in Fanconi Anemia-Associated Hematopoietic Defects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-01

    in Fanconi Anemia -Associated Hematopoietic Defects " PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Niall George Howlett, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION...Number Variation in Fanconi Anemia -Associated 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Hematopoietic Defects 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0318 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...the molecular mechanism(s) by which FANCD2 performs this key function. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Fanconi anemia , Copy number variation, Monoclonal cell

  8. Anesthesia for a patient with Fanconi anemia for developmental dislocation of the hip: a case report.

    PubMed

    Dogan, Zafer; Yildiz, Huseyin; Coskuner, Ismail; Uzel, Murat; Garipardic, Mesut

    2014-01-01

    Fanconi anemia is a rare autosomal recessive inherited bone marrow failure syndrome with congenital and hematological abnormalities. Literature regarding the anesthetic management in these patients is limited. A management of a developmental dislocation of the hip was described in a patient with fanconi anemia. Because of the heterogeneous nature, a patient with fanconi anemia should be established thorough preoperative evaluation in order to diagnose on clinical features. In conclusion, we preferred caudal anesthesia in this patient with fanconi anemia without thrombocytopenia, because of avoiding from N2O, reducing amount of anesthetic, existing microcephaly, hypothyroidism and elevated liver enzymes, providing postoperative analgesia, and reducing amount of analgesic used postoperatively.

  9. Fanconi anemia with concurrent thumb polydactyly and dorsal dimelia: a case report with discussion of embryology.

    PubMed

    Al-Qattan, M M

    2013-01-01

    Fanconi anemia is known to be associated with radial ray deficiency (thumb and radius hypoplasia), and its embryological basis remains to be poorly understood. We describe a rare case of Fanconi anemia with concurrent thumb polydactyly and dorsal dimelia. The embryological basis of limb abnormalities in Fanconi anemia patients is thought to be based on the complex interactions between the apical ectodermal ridge (where Fanconi anemia genes are expressed) and both the mesoderm (where Spalt-like 4 (SALL4) and Sonic hedgehog (SHH) are located and which are responsible for radial ray deficiency, thumb polydactyly, and triphalangism) and the dorsoventral axis (an error in that axis leads to dorsal dimelia).

  10. Disruption of mouse Slx4, a regulator of structure-specific nucleases, phenocopies Fanconi anemia.

    PubMed

    Crossan, Gerry P; van der Weyden, Louise; Rosado, Ivan V; Langevin, Frederic; Gaillard, Pierre-Henri L; McIntyre, Rebecca E; Gallagher, Ferdia; Kettunen, Mikko I; Lewis, David Y; Brindle, Kevin; Arends, Mark J; Adams, David J; Patel, Ketan J

    2011-02-01

    The evolutionarily conserved SLX4 protein, a key regulator of nucleases, is critical for DNA damage response. SLX4 nuclease complexes mediate repair during replication and can also resolve Holliday junctions formed during homologous recombination. Here we describe the phenotype of the Btbd12 knockout mouse, the mouse ortholog of SLX4, which recapitulates many key features of the human genetic illness Fanconi anemia. Btbd12-deficient animals are born at sub-Mendelian ratios, have greatly reduced fertility, are developmentally compromised and are prone to blood cytopenias. Btbd12(-/-) cells prematurely senesce, spontaneously accumulate damaged chromosomes and are particularly sensitive to DNA crosslinking agents. Genetic complementation reveals a crucial requirement for Btbd12 (also known as Slx4) to interact with the structure-specific endonuclease Xpf-Ercc1 to promote crosslink repair. The Btbd12 knockout mouse therefore establishes a disease model for Fanconi anemia and genetically links a regulator of nuclease incision complexes to the Fanconi anemia DNA crosslink repair pathway.

  11. The deubiquitinating enzyme USP1 regulates the Fanconi anemia pathway.

    PubMed

    Nijman, Sebastian M B; Huang, Tony T; Dirac, Annette M G; Brummelkamp, Thijn R; Kerkhoven, Ron M; D'Andrea, Alan D; Bernards, René

    2005-02-04

    Protein ubiquitination and deubiquitination are dynamic processes implicated in the regulation of numerous cellular pathways. Monoubiquitination of the Fanconi anemia (FA) protein FANCD2 appears to be critical in the repair of DNA damage because many of the proteins that are mutated in FA are required for FANCD2 ubiquitination. By screening a gene family RNAi library, we identify the deubiquitinating enzyme USP1 as a novel component of the Fanconi anemia pathway. Inhibition of USP1 leads to hyperaccumulation of monoubiquitinated FANCD2. Furthermore, USP1 physically associates with FANCD2, and the proteins colocalize in chromatin after DNA damage. Finally, analysis of crosslinker-induced chromosomal aberrations in USP1 knockdown cells suggests a role in DNA repair. We propose that USP1 deubiquitinates FANCD2 when cells exit S phase or recommence cycling after a DNA damage insult and may play a critical role in the FA pathway by recycling FANCD2.

  12. Successful Treatment of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Complicated by Fanconi Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Koji; Suzuki, Eiichiro; Yokoyama, Masayuki; Inoue, Masanori; Wakamatsu, Toru; Saito, Tomoko; Kusakabe, Yuko; Ogasawara, Sadahisa; Ooka, Yoshihiko; Tawada, Akinobu; Nagao, Yuhei; Nakaseko, Chiaki; Chiba, Tetsuhiro

    2017-01-01

    A 42-year-old woman with liver tumors was referred to our hospital. Her condition was complicated by Fanconi anemia, and she had undergone total laryngectomy 8 years ago. On admission, contrast-enhanced computed tomography revealed hypervascular tumors in the right hepatic lobe. Ultrasound-guided tumor biopsy revealed that the tumor comprised moderately differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma. Although the patient exhibited preserved liver function (Child-Pugh A), complete blood count revealed severe pancytopenia. Eventually, the tumor was successfully treated by transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE). Both platelet transfusion and systemic administration of antibiotics were performed. She was discharged 35 days after TAE. PMID:28203135

  13. Linkage analysis of the Fanconi anemia gene FACC with chromosome 9q markers

    SciTech Connect

    Auerbach, A.D.; Shin, H.T.; Kaporis, A.G.

    1994-09-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetically heterogeneous syndrome, with at least four different complementation groups as determined by cell fusion studies. The gene for complementation group C, FACC, has been cloned and mapped to chromosome 9q22.3 by in situ hybridization, while linkage analysis has supported the placement of another gene on chromosome 20q. We have analyzed five microsatellite markers and one RFLP on chromosome 9q in a panel of FA families from the International Fanconi Anemia Registry (IFAR) in order to place FACC on the genetic map. Polymorphisms were typed in 308 individuals from 51 families. FACC is tightly linked to both D9S151 [{Theta}{sub max}=0.025, Z{sub max}=7.75] and to D9S196 [{Theta}{sub max}=0.041, Z{sub max}=7.89]; multipoint analysis is in progress. We are currently screening a YAC clone that contains the entire FACC gene for additional microsatellite markers suitable for haplotype analysis of FA families.

  14. A simple diagnostic test for Fanconi anemia by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Miglierina, R; Le Coniat, M; Berger, R

    1991-03-01

    A simple diagnostic test for Fanconi anemia (FA) by flow cytometry is proposed. It is based on the cell cycle disturbances of FA cells and their sensitisation by alkylating agents. Following PHA-stimulation of whole blood cell cultures in the presence or absence of nitrogen mustard, the accumulation of cells in G2/M phase was measured. A sharp increase of cells in G2/M was observed in cultures from FA patients when nitrogen mustard was added. This increase allows one to distinguish FA patients from patients with anemias of other origin, healthy controls, and FA heterozygotes, as effectively as chromosome breakage studies. The rapidity of the test and its reliability as demonstrated on the ten FA patients studied, will make the diagnosis of FA easier in centers without cytogenetic laboratory facilities.

  15. Mechanism of Ubiquitination and Deubiquitination in the Fanconi Anemia Pathway.

    PubMed

    van Twest, Sylvie; Murphy, Vincent J; Hodson, Charlotte; Tan, Winnie; Swuec, Paolo; O'Rourke, Julienne J; Heierhorst, Jörg; Crismani, Wayne; Deans, Andrew J

    2017-01-19

    Monoubiquitination and deubiquitination of FANCD2:FANCI heterodimer is central to DNA repair in a pathway that is defective in the cancer predisposition syndrome Fanconi anemia (FA). The "FA core complex" contains the RING-E3 ligase FANCL and seven other essential proteins that are mutated in various FA subtypes. Here, we purified recombinant FA core complex to reveal the function of these other proteins. The complex contains two spatially separate FANCL molecules that are dimerized by FANCB and FAAP100. FANCC and FANCE act as substrate receptors and restrict monoubiquitination to the FANCD2:FANCI heterodimer in only a DNA-bound form. FANCA and FANCG are dispensable for maximal in vitro ubiquitination. Finally, we show that the reversal of this reaction by the USP1:UAF1 deubiquitinase only occurs when DNA is disengaged. Our work reveals the mechanistic basis for temporal and spatial control of FANCD2:FANCI monoubiquitination that is critical for chemotherapy responses and prevention of Fanconi anemia.

  16. Endocrine Disorders in Fanconi Anemia: Recommendations for Screening and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kanakatti Shankar, Roopa; Giri, Neelam; Hollenberg, Anthony N.; Rutter, Meilan M.; Nathan, Brandon; Lodish, Maya; Alter, Blanche P.; Stratakis, Constantine A.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Endocrine problems are common in patients with Fanconi anemia (FA). About 80% of children and adults with FA have at least one endocrine abnormality, including short stature, GH deficiency, abnormal glucose or insulin metabolism, dyslipidemia, hypothyroidism, pubertal delay, hypogonadism, or impaired fertility. The goal of this report is to provide an overview of endocrine abnormalities and guidelines for routine screening and treatment to allow early diagnosis and timely intervention. Evidence Acquisition: This work is based on a comprehensive literature review, including relevant articles published between 1971 and 2014, and proceedings of a Consensus Conference held by the Fanconi Anemia Research Fund in 2013. Evidence Synthesis: The panel of experts collected published evidence and discussed its relevance to reflect current information about the endocrine care of children and adults with FA before the Consensus Conference and through subsequent deliberations that led to the consensus. Conclusions: Individuals with FA should be routinely screened for endocrine abnormalities, including evaluation of growth; glucose, insulin, and lipid metabolism; thyroid function; puberty; gonadal function; and bone mineral metabolism. Inclusion of an endocrinologist as part of the multidisciplinary patient care team is key to providing comprehensive care for patients with FA. PMID:25575015

  17. The antitumor agent doxorubicin binds to Fanconi anemia group F protein.

    PubMed

    Kusayanagi, Tomoe; Tsukuda, Senko; Shimura, Satomi; Manita, Daisuke; Iwakiri, Kanako; Kamisuki, Shinji; Takakusagi, Yoichi; Takeuchi, Toshifumi; Kuramochi, Kouji; Nakazaki, Atsuo; Sakaguchi, Kengo; Kobayashi, Susumu; Sugawara, Fumio

    2012-11-01

    Doxorubicin, a commonly used cancer chemotherapy agent, elicits several potent biological effects, including synergistic-antitumor activity in combination with cisplatin. However, the mechanism of this synergism remains obscure. Here, we employed an improved T7 phage display screening method to identify Fanconi anemia group F protein (FANCF) as a doxorubicin-binding protein. The FANCF-doxorubicin interaction was confirmed by pull-down assay and SPR analysis. FANCF is a component of the Fanconi anemia complex, which monoubiquitinates D2 protein of Fanconi anemia group as a cellular response against DNA cross-linkers such as cisplatin. We observed that the monoubiquitination was inhibited by doxorubicin treatment.

  18. Stem Cell Gene Therapy for Fanconi Anemia: Report from the 1st International Fanconi Anemia Gene Therapy Working Group Meeting

    PubMed Central

    Tolar, Jakub; Adair, Jennifer E; Antoniou, Michael; Bartholomae, Cynthia C; Becker, Pamela S; Blazar, Bruce R; Bueren, Juan; Carroll, Thomas; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina; Clapp, D Wade; Dalgleish, Robert; Galy, Anne; Gaspar, H Bobby; Hanenberg, Helmut; Von Kalle, Christof; Kiem, Hans-Peter; Lindeman, Dirk; Naldini, Luigi; Navarro, Susana; Renella, Raffaele; Rio, Paula; Sevilla, Julián; Schmidt, Manfred; Verhoeyen, Els; Wagner, John E; Williams, David A; Thrasher, Adrian J

    2011-01-01

    Survival rates after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for Fanconi anemia (FA) have increased dramatically since 2000. However, the use of autologous stem cell gene therapy, whereby the patient's own blood stem cells are modified to express the wild-type gene product, could potentially avoid the early and late complications of allogeneic HCT. Over the last decades, gene therapy has experienced a high degree of optimism interrupted by periods of diminished expectation. Optimism stems from recent examples of successful gene correction in several congenital immunodeficiencies, whereas diminished expectations come from the realization that gene therapy will not be free of side effects. The goal of the 1st International Fanconi Anemia Gene Therapy Working Group Meeting was to determine the optimal strategy for moving stem cell gene therapy into clinical trials for individuals with FA. To this end, key investigators examined vector design, transduction method, criteria for large-scale clinical-grade vector manufacture, hematopoietic cell preparation, and eligibility criteria for FA patients most likely to benefit. The report summarizes the roadmap for the development of gene therapy for FA. PMID:21540837

  19. Pregnancy after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in a Fanconi anemia patient

    PubMed Central

    Atashkhoei, Simin; Fakhari, Solmaz; Bilehjani, Eissa; Farzin, Haleh

    2017-01-01

    Pregnancy in patients with Fanconi anemia (FA) is rare. However, there are reports of successful pregnancy in Fanconi patients after bone marrow transplantation (BMT, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation). We describe the case of a term pregnant woman with FA who was treated with BMT 2 years earlier. She underwent successful delivery with cesarean section using spinal anesthesia without any complications. PMID:28138266

  20. Fanconi's Anemia Effect or Sickle Cell Anemia Effect: That is the Question.

    PubMed

    Unal, Sule; Chui, David H K; Gumruk, Fatma

    2015-01-01

    A 16-year-old boy who was diagnosed to have sickle cell anemia was referred to our center. The parental consanguinity, growth retardation and dysmorphic features prompted a search for possible Fanconi's Anemia (FA). The diepoxybutane (DEB) test was positive, confirming FA. The interaction of both diseases might account for his relatively mild phenotype in terms of both sickle cell anemia (or Hb S, HBB: c.20A > T) and FA. The high Hb F level that might be related to concomitant FA, may have caused a milder phenotype of sickle cell anemia, whereas nitric oxide (NO) depletion as a consequence of sickle cell anemia, may have caused a delay in the bone marrow failure of FA.

  1. RAD18-mediated ubiquitination of PCNA activates the Fanconi anemia DNA repair network.

    PubMed

    Geng, Liyi; Huntoon, Catherine J; Karnitz, Larry M

    2010-10-18

    The Fanconi anemia (FA) network is important for the repair of interstrand DNA cross-links. A key event in FA pathway activation is the monoubiquitylation of the FA complementation group I (FANCI)-FANCD2 (ID) complex by FA complementation group L (FANCL), an E3 ubiquitin ligase. In this study, we show that RAD18, another DNA damage-activated E3 ubiquitin ligase, also participates in ID complex activation by ubiquitylating proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) on Lys164, an event required for the recruitment of FANCL to chromatin. We also found that monoubiquitylated PCNA stimulates FANCL-catalyzed FANCD2 and FANCI monoubiquitylation. Collectively, these experiments identify RAD18-mediated PCNA monoubiquitination as a central hub for the mobilization of the FA pathway by promoting FANCL-mediated FANCD2 monoubiquitylation.

  2. Defective FANCI binding by a fanconi anemia-related FANCD2 mutant.

    PubMed

    Sato, Koichi; Ishiai, Masamichi; Takata, Minoru; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2014-01-01

    FANCD2 is a product of one of the genes associated with Fanconi anemia (FA), a rare recessive disease characterized by bone marrow failure, skeletal malformations, developmental defects, and cancer predisposition. FANCD2 forms a complex with FANCI (ID complex) and is monoubiquitinated, which facilitates the downstream interstrand crosslink (ICL) repair steps, such as ICL unhooking and nucleolytic end resection. In the present study, we focused on the chicken FANCD2 (cFANCD2) mutant harboring the Leu234 to Arg (L234R) substitution. cFANCD2 L234R corresponds to the human FANCD2 L231R mutation identified in an FA patient. We found that cFANCD2 L234R did not complement the defective ICL repair in FANCD2-/- DT40 cells. Purified cFANCD2 L234R did not bind to chicken FANCI, and its monoubiquitination was significantly deficient, probably due to the abnormal ID complex formation. In addition, the histone chaperone activity of cFANCD2 L234R was also defective. These findings may explain some aspects of Fanconi anemia pathogenesis by a FANCD2 missense mutation.

  3. Role of Complement in Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Berentsen, Sigbjørn

    2015-01-01

    Summary The classification of autoimmune hemolytic anemias and the complement system are reviewed. In autoimmune hemolytic anemia of the warm antibody type, complement-mediated cell lysis is clinically relevant in a proportion of the patients but is hardly essential for hemolysis in most patients. Cold antibody-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemias (primary cold agglutinin disease, secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) are entirely complement-mediated disorders. In cold agglutinin disease, efficient therapies have been developed in order to target the pathogenic B-cell clone, but complement modulation remains promising in some clinical situations. No established therapy exists for secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria, and the possibility of therapeutic complement inhibition is interesting. Currently, complement modulation is not clinically documented in any autoimmune hemolytic anemia. The most relevant candidate drugs and possible target levels of action are discussed. PMID:26696798

  4. Role of Complement in Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Berentsen, Sigbjørn

    2015-09-01

    The classification of autoimmune hemolytic anemias and the complement system are reviewed. In autoimmune hemolytic anemia of the warm antibody type, complement-mediated cell lysis is clinically relevant in a proportion of the patients but is hardly essential for hemolysis in most patients. Cold antibody-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemias (primary cold agglutinin disease, secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) are entirely complement-mediated disorders. In cold agglutinin disease, efficient therapies have been developed in order to target the pathogenic B-cell clone, but complement modulation remains promising in some clinical situations. No established therapy exists for secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria, and the possibility of therapeutic complement inhibition is interesting. Currently, complement modulation is not clinically documented in any autoimmune hemolytic anemia. The most relevant candidate drugs and possible target levels of action are discussed.

  5. Novel FANCI mutations in Fanconi anemia with VACTERL association.

    PubMed

    Savage, Sharon A; Ballew, Bari J; Giri, Neelam; Chandrasekharappa, Settara C; Ameziane, Najim; de Winter, Johan; Alter, Blanche P

    2016-02-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an inherited bone marrow failure syndrome caused by mutations in DNA repair genes; some of these patients may have features of the VACTERL association. Autosomal recessive mutations in FANCI are a rare cause of FA. We identified FANCI mutations by next generation sequencing in three patients in our FA cohort among several whose mutated gene was unknown. Four of the six mutations are novel and all mutations are likely deleterious to protein function. There are now 16 reported cases of FA due to FANCI of whom 7 have at least 3 features of the VACTERL association (44%). This suggests that the VACTERL association in patients with FA may be seen in patients with FANCI mutations more often than previously recognized.

  6. Impaired mitophagy in Fanconi anemia is dependent on mitochondrial fission

    PubMed Central

    Barvalia, Maunish; Wu, Yu Jun; Loja, Tomáš; Boon, Huat Bay; Lleonart, Matilde E.; Verma, Rama S; Krejci, Lumir; Lyakhovich, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare genetic disorder associated with bone-marrow failure, genome instability and cancer predisposition. Recently, we and others have demonstrated dysfunctional mitochondria with morphological alterations in FA cells accompanied by high reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. Mitochondrial morphology is regulated by continuous fusion and fission events and the misbalance between these two is often accompanied by autophagy. Here, we provide evidence of impaired autophagy in FA. We demonstrate that FA cells have increased number of autophagic (presumably mitophagic) events and accumulate dysfunctional mitochondria due to an impaired ability to degrade them. Moreover, mitochondrial fission accompanied by oxidative stress (OS) is a prerequisite condition for mitophagy in FA and blocking this pathway may release autophagic machinery to clear dysfunctional mitochondria. PMID:27517150

  7. Modularized functions of the Fanconi anemia core complex.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yaling; Leung, Justin W C; Lowery, Megan; Matsushita, Nobuko; Wang, Yucai; Shen, Xi; Huong, Do; Takata, Minoru; Chen, Junjie; Li, Lei

    2014-06-26

    The Fanconi anemia (FA) core complex provides the essential E3 ligase function for spatially defined FANCD2 ubiquitination and FA pathway activation. Of the seven FA gene products forming the core complex, FANCL possesses a RING domain with demonstrated E3 ligase activity. The other six components do not have clearly defined roles. Through epistasis analyses, we identify three functional modules in the FA core complex: a catalytic module consisting of FANCL, FANCB, and FAAP100 is absolutely required for the E3 ligase function, and the FANCA-FANCG-FAAP20 and the FANCC-FANCE-FANCF modules provide nonredundant and ancillary functions that help the catalytic module bind chromatin or sites of DNA damage. Disruption of the catalytic module causes complete loss of the core complex function, whereas loss of any ancillary module component does not. Our work reveals the roles of several FA gene products with previously undefined functions and a modularized assembly of the FA core complex.

  8. Use Massive Parallel Sequencing and Exome Capture Technology to Sequence the Exome of Fanconi Anemia Children and Their Patents

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-11-21

    Fanconi Anemia; Autosomal or Sex Linked Recessive Genetic Disease; Bone Marrow Hematopoiesis Failure, Multiple Congenital Abnormalities, and Susceptibility to Neoplastic Diseases.; Hematopoiesis Maintainance.

  9. A Biochemical Approach to Understanding the Fanconi Anemia Pathway-Regulated Nucleases in Genome Maintenance for Preventing Bone Marrow Failure and Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    the Fanconi Anemia Pathway- Regulated Nucleases in Genome Maintenance for Preventing Bone Marrow Failure and Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...GRANT NUMBER 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A Biochemical Approach to Understanding the Fanconi Anemia Pathway-Regulated Nucleases in Genome Maintenance for...Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Fanconi anemia is the most prevalent inherited BMF syndromes, caused by mutations in

  10. Comprehensive Analysis of Pathogenic Deletion Variants in Fanconi Anemia Genes

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Elizabeth K.; Kamat, Aparna; Lach, Francis P.; Donovan, Frank X.; Kimble, Danielle C.; Narisu, Narisu; Sanborn, Erica; Boulad, Farid; Davies, Stella M.; Gillio, Alfred P.; Harris, Richard E.; MacMillan, Margaret L.; Wagner, John E.; Smogorzewska, Agata; Auerbach, Arleen D.; Ostrander, Elaine A.; Chandrasekharappa, Settara C.

    2014-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare recessive disease resulting from mutations in one of at least 16 different genes. Mutation types and phenotypic manifestations of FA are highly heterogeneous and influence the clinical management of the disease. We analyzed 202 FA families for large deletions, using high-resolution Comparative Genome Hybridization arrays (arrayCGH), Single Nucleotide Polymorphism arrays (SNParrays) and DNA sequencing. We found pathogenic deletions in 88 FANCA, seven FANCC, two FANCD2, and one FANCB families. We find 35% of FA families carry large deletions, accounting for 18% of all FA pathogenic variants. Cloning and sequencing across the deletion breakpoints revealed that 52 FANCA deletion ends, and one FANCC deletion end extended beyond the gene boundaries, potentially affecting neighboring genes with phenotypic consequences. Seventy-five percent of the FANCA deletions are Alu-Alu mediated, predominantly by AluY elements, and appear to be caused by Non-Allelic Homologous Recombination. Individual Alu hotspots were identified. Defining the haplotypes of four FANCA deletions shared by multiple families revealed that three share a common ancestry. Knowing the exact molecular changes that lead to the disease may be critical for a better understanding of the FA phenotype, and to gain insight into the mechanisms driving these pathogenic deletion variants. PMID:25168418

  11. The fanconi anemia pathway limits human papillomavirus replication.

    PubMed

    Hoskins, Elizabeth E; Morreale, Richard J; Werner, Stephen P; Higginbotham, Jennifer M; Laimins, Laimonis A; Lambert, Paul F; Brown, Darron R; Gillison, Maura L; Nuovo, Gerard J; Witte, David P; Kim, Mi-Ok; Davies, Stella M; Mehta, Parinda A; Butsch Kovacic, Melinda; Wikenheiser-Brokamp, Kathryn A; Wells, Susanne I

    2012-08-01

    High-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) deregulate epidermal differentiation and cause anogenital and head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs). The E7 gene is considered the predominant viral oncogene and drives proliferation and genome instability. While the implementation of routine screens has greatly reduced the incidence of cervical cancers which are almost exclusively HPV positive, the proportion of HPV-positive head and neck SCCs is on the rise. High levels of HPV oncogene expression and genome load are linked to disease progression, but genetic risk factors that regulate oncogene abundance and/or genome amplification remain poorly understood. Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genome instability syndrome characterized at least in part by extreme susceptibility to SCCs. FA results from mutations in one of 15 genes in the FA pathway, whose protein products assemble in the nucleus and play important roles in DNA damage repair. We report here that loss of FA pathway components FANCA and FANCD2 stimulates E7 protein accumulation in human keratinocytes and causes increased epithelial proliferation and basal cell layer expansion in the HPV-positive epidermis. Additionally, FANCD2 loss stimulates HPV genome amplification in differentiating cells, demonstrating that the intact FA pathway functions to restrict the HPV life cycle. These findings raise the possibility that FA genes suppress HPV infection and disease and suggest possible mechanism(s) for reported associations of HPV with an FA cohort in Brazil and for allelic variation of FA genes with HPV persistence in the general population.

  12. Biallelic inactivation of REV7 is associated with Fanconi anemia

    PubMed Central

    Masliah-Planchon, Julien; Clairmont, Connor; Rousseau, Alix; Ceccaldi, Raphael; Dubois d’Enghien, Catherine; Bluteau, Olivier; Cuccuini, Wendy; Gachet, Stéphanie; Peffault de Latour, Régis; Leblanc, Thierry; Socié, Gérard; Baruchel, André; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; D’Andrea, Alan D.

    2016-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a recessive genetic disease characterized by congenital abnormalities, chromosome instability, progressive bone marrow failure (BMF), and a strong predisposition to cancer. Twenty FA genes have been identified, and the FANC proteins they encode cooperate in a common pathway that regulates DNA crosslink repair and replication fork stability. We identified a child with severe BMF who harbored biallelic inactivating mutations of the translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) gene REV7 (also known as MAD2L2), which encodes the mutant REV7 protein REV7-V85E. Patient-derived cells demonstrated an extended FA phenotype, which included increased chromosome breaks and G2/M accumulation upon exposure to DNA crosslinking agents, γH2AX and 53BP1 foci accumulation, and enhanced p53/p21 activation relative to cells derived from healthy patients. Expression of WT REV7 restored normal cellular and functional phenotypes in the patient’s cells, and CRISPR/Cas9 inactivation of REV7 in a non-FA human cell line produced an FA phenotype. Finally, silencing Rev7 in primary hematopoietic cells impaired progenitor function, suggesting that the DNA repair defect underlies the development of BMF in FA. Taken together, our genetic and functional analyses identified REV7 as a previously undescribed FA gene, which we term FANCV. PMID:27500492

  13. Alternative donor hematopoietic cell transplantation for Fanconi anemia.

    PubMed

    MacMillan, Margaret L; DeFor, Todd E; Young, Jo-Anne H; Dusenbery, Kathryn E; Blazar, Bruce R; Slungaard, Arne; Zierhut, Heather; Weisdorf, Daniel J; Wagner, John E

    2015-06-11

    Historically, alternative donor hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for Fanconi anemia (FA) patients resulted in excessive morbidity and mortality. To improve outcomes, we made sequential changes to the HCT conditioning regimen. A total of 130 FA patients (median age, 9.0 years; range, 1-48) underwent alternative donor HCT at the University of Minnesota between 1995 and 2012. All patients received cyclophosphamide (CY), single fraction total body irradiation (TBI), and antithymocyte globulin (ATG) with or without fludarabine (FLU), followed by T-cell-depleted bone marrow or unmanipulated umbilical cord blood transplantation. The addition of FLU enhanced engraftment 3-fold. The incidence of grades 2-4 acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease was 20% and 10%, respectively. Severe toxicity was highest in patients >10 years of age or those with a history of opportunistic infections or transfusions before HCT. Mortality was lowest in patients without a history of opportunistic infection or transfusions and who received conditioning with TBI 300 cGy, CY, FLU, and ATG. These patients had a probability of survival of 94% at 5 years. Alternative donor HCT is now associated with excellent survival for patients without prior opportunistic infections or transfusions and should be considered for all FA patients after the onset of marrow failure. These studies were registered at http://www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00005898, NCT00167206, and NCT00352976.

  14. Alternative donor hematopoietic cell transplantation for Fanconi anemia

    PubMed Central

    DeFor, Todd E.; Young, Jo-Anne H.; Dusenbery, Kathryn E.; Blazar, Bruce R.; Slungaard, Arne; Zierhut, Heather; Weisdorf, Daniel J.; Wagner, John E.

    2015-01-01

    Historically, alternative donor hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for Fanconi anemia (FA) patients resulted in excessive morbidity and mortality. To improve outcomes, we made sequential changes to the HCT conditioning regimen. A total of 130 FA patients (median age, 9.0 years; range, 1-48) underwent alternative donor HCT at the University of Minnesota between 1995 and 2012. All patients received cyclophosphamide (CY), single fraction total body irradiation (TBI), and antithymocyte globulin (ATG) with or without fludarabine (FLU), followed by T-cell–depleted bone marrow or unmanipulated umbilical cord blood transplantation. The addition of FLU enhanced engraftment 3-fold. The incidence of grades 2-4 acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease was 20% and 10%, respectively. Severe toxicity was highest in patients >10 years of age or those with a history of opportunistic infections or transfusions before HCT. Mortality was lowest in patients without a history of opportunistic infection or transfusions and who received conditioning with TBI 300 cGy, CY, FLU, and ATG. These patients had a probability of survival of 94% at 5 years. Alternative donor HCT is now associated with excellent survival for patients without prior opportunistic infections or transfusions and should be considered for all FA patients after the onset of marrow failure. These studies were registered at http://www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00005898, NCT00167206, and NCT00352976. PMID:25824692

  15. Targeted gene therapy and cell reprogramming in Fanconi anemia

    PubMed Central

    Rio, Paula; Baños, Rocio; Lombardo, Angelo; Quintana-Bustamante, Oscar; Alvarez, Lara; Garate, Zita; Genovese, Pietro; Almarza, Elena; Valeri, Antonio; Díez, Begoña; Navarro, Susana; Torres, Yaima; Trujillo, Juan P; Murillas, Rodolfo; Segovia, Jose C; Samper, Enrique; Surralles, Jordi; Gregory, Philip D; Holmes, Michael C; Naldini, Luigi; Bueren, Juan A

    2014-01-01

    Gene targeting is progressively becoming a realistic therapeutic alternative in clinics. It is unknown, however, whether this technology will be suitable for the treatment of DNA repair deficiency syndromes such as Fanconi anemia (FA), with defects in homology-directed DNA repair. In this study, we used zinc finger nucleases and integrase-defective lentiviral vectors to demonstrate for the first time that FANCA can be efficiently and specifically targeted into the AAVS1 safe harbor locus in fibroblasts from FA-A patients. Strikingly, up to 40% of FA fibroblasts showed gene targeting 42 days after gene editing. Given the low number of hematopoietic precursors in the bone marrow of FA patients, gene-edited FA fibroblasts were then reprogrammed and re-differentiated toward the hematopoietic lineage. Analyses of gene-edited FA-iPSCs confirmed the specific integration of FANCA in the AAVS1 locus in all tested clones. Moreover, the hematopoietic differentiation of these iPSCs efficiently generated disease-free hematopoietic progenitors. Taken together, our results demonstrate for the first time the feasibility of correcting the phenotype of a DNA repair deficiency syndrome using gene-targeting and cell reprogramming strategies. PMID:24859981

  16. Molecular analysis of Fanconi anemia: the experience of the Bone Marrow Failure Study Group of the Italian Association of Pediatric Onco-Hematology

    PubMed Central

    De Rocco, Daniela; Bottega, Roberta; Cappelli, Enrico; Cavani, Simona; Criscuolo, Maria; Nicchia, Elena; Corsolini, Fabio; Greco, Chiara; Borriello, Adriana; Svahn, Johanna; Pillon, Marta; Mecucci, Cristina; Casazza, Gabriella; Verzegnassi, Federico; Cugno, Chiara; Locasciulli, Anna; Farruggia, Piero; Longoni, Daniela; Ramenghi, Ugo; Barberi, Walter; Tucci, Fabio; Perrotta, Silverio; Grammatico, Paola; Hanenberg, Helmut; Della Ragione, Fulvio; Dufour, Carlo; Savoia, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Fanconi anemia is an inherited disease characterized by congenital malformations, pancytopenia, cancer predisposition, and sensitivity to cross-linking agents. The molecular diagnosis of Fanconi anemia is relatively complex for several aspects including genetic heterogeneity with mutations in at least 16 different genes. In this paper, we report the mutations identified in 100 unrelated probands enrolled into the National Network of the Italian Association of Pediatric Hematoly and Oncology. In approximately half of these cases, mutational screening was carried out after retroviral complementation analyses or protein analysis. In the other half, the analysis was performed on the most frequently mutated genes or using a next generation sequencing approach. We identified 108 distinct variants of the FANCA, FANCG, FANCC, FANCD2, and FANCB genes in 85, 9, 3, 2, and 1 families, respectively. Despite the relatively high number of private mutations, 45 of which are novel Fanconi anemia alleles, 26% of the FANCA alleles are due to 5 distinct mutations. Most of the mutations are large genomic deletions and nonsense or frameshift mutations, although we identified a series of missense mutations, whose pathogenetic role was not always certain. The molecular diagnosis of Fanconi anemia is still a tiered procedure that requires identifying candidate genes to avoid useless sequencing. Introduction of next generation sequencing strategies will greatly improve the diagnostic process, allowing a rapid analysis of all the genes. PMID:24584348

  17. Structure of the FANCI-FANCD2 Complex: Insights into the Fanconi Anemia DNA Repair Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Joo, Woo; Xu, Guozhou; Persky, Nicole S.; Smogorzewska, Agata; Rudge, Derek G.; Buzovetsky, Olga; Elledge, Stephen J.; Pavletich, Nikola P.

    2011-08-29

    Fanconi anemia is a cancer predisposition syndrome caused by defects in the repair of DNA interstrand cross-links (ICLs). Central to this pathway is the Fanconi anemia I-Fanconi anemia D2 (FANCI-FANCD2) (ID) complex, which is activated by DNA damage-induced phosphorylation and monoubiquitination. The 3.4 angstrom crystal structure of the {approx}300 kilodalton ID complex reveals that monoubiquitination and regulatory phosphorylation sites map to the I-D interface, suggesting that they occur on monomeric proteins or an opened-up complex and that they may serve to stabilize I-D heterodimerization. The 7.8 angstrom electron-density map of FANCI-DNA crystals and in vitro data show that each protein has binding sites for both single- and double-stranded DNA, suggesting that the ID complex recognizes DNA structures that result from the encounter of replication forks with an ICL.

  18. Structure of the FANCI-FANCD2 Complex: Insights into the Fanconi Anemia DNA Repair Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    W Joo; G Xu; n Persky; A Smogorzewska; D Rudge; O Buzovetsky; S Elledge; N Pavletich

    2011-12-31

    Fanconi anemia is a cancer predisposition syndrome caused by defects in the repair of DNA interstrand cross-links (ICLs). Central to this pathway is the Fanconi anemia I-Fanconi anemia D2 (FANCI-FANCD2) (ID) complex, which is activated by DNA damage-induced phosphorylation and monoubiquitination. The 3.4 angstrom crystal structure of the {approx}300 kilodalton ID complex reveals that monoubiquitination and regulatory phosphorylation sites map to the I-D interface, suggesting that they occur on monomeric proteins or an opened-up complex and that they may serve to stabilize I-D heterodimerization. The 7.8 angstrom electron-density map of FANCI-DNA crystals and in vitro data show that each protein has binding sites for both single- and double-stranded DNA, suggesting that the ID complex recognizes DNA structures that result from the encounter of replication forks with an ICL.

  19. Structure of the FANCI-FANCD2 complex: insights into the Fanconi anemia DNA repair pathway.

    PubMed

    Joo, Woo; Xu, Guozhou; Persky, Nicole S; Smogorzewska, Agata; Rudge, Derek G; Buzovetsky, Olga; Elledge, Stephen J; Pavletich, Nikola P

    2011-07-15

    Fanconi anemia is a cancer predisposition syndrome caused by defects in the repair of DNA interstrand cross-links (ICLs). Central to this pathway is the Fanconi anemia I-Fanconi anemia D2 (FANCI-FANCD2) (ID) complex, which is activated by DNA damage-induced phosphorylation and monoubiquitination. The 3.4 angstrom crystal structure of the ~300 kilodalton ID complex reveals that monoubiquitination and regulatory phosphorylation sites map to the I-D interface, suggesting that they occur on monomeric proteins or an opened-up complex and that they may serve to stabilize I-D heterodimerization. The 7.8 angstrom electron-density map of FANCI-DNA crystals and in vitro data show that each protein has binding sites for both single- and double-stranded DNA, suggesting that the ID complex recognizes DNA structures that result from the encounter of replication forks with an ICL.

  20. The Fanconi anemia pathway promotes replication-dependent DNA interstrand cross-link repair.

    PubMed

    Knipscheer, Puck; Räschle, Markus; Smogorzewska, Agata; Enoiu, Milica; Ho, The Vinh; Schärer, Orlando D; Elledge, Stephen J; Walter, Johannes C

    2009-12-18

    Fanconi anemia is a human cancer predisposition syndrome caused by mutations in 13 Fanc genes. The disorder is characterized by genomic instability and cellular hypersensitivity to chemicals that generate DNA interstrand cross-links (ICLs). A central event in the activation of the Fanconi anemia pathway is the mono-ubiquitylation of the FANCI-FANCD2 complex, but how this complex confers ICL resistance remains enigmatic. Using a cell-free system, we showed that FANCI-FANCD2 is required for replication-coupled ICL repair in S phase. Removal of FANCD2 from extracts inhibits both nucleolytic incisions near the ICL and translesion DNA synthesis past the lesion. Reversal of these defects requires ubiquitylated FANCI-FANCD2. Our results show that multiple steps of the essential S-phase ICL repair mechanism fail when the Fanconi anemia pathway is compromised.

  1. Identification of de Novo Fanconi Anemia in Younger Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-13

    Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Fanconi Anemia; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  2. FANCJ Helicase Operates in the Fanconi Anemia DNA Repair Pathway and the Response to Replicational Stress

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yuliang; Brosh, Robert M.

    2009-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by multiple congenital anomalies, progressive bone marrow failure, and high cancer risk. Cells from FA patients exhibit spontaneous chromosomal instability and hypersensitivity to DNA interstrand cross-linking (ICL) agents. Although the precise mechanistic details of the FA/BRCA pathway of ICL-repair are not well understood, progress has been made in the identification of the FA proteins that are required for the pathway. Among the 13 FA complementation groups from which all the FA genes have been cloned, only a few of the FA proteins are predicted to have direct roles in DNA metabolism. One of the more recently identified FA proteins, shown to be responsible for complementation of the FA complementation group J, is the BRCA1 Associated C-terminal Helicase (BACH1, designated FANCJ), originally identified as a protein associated with breast cancer. FANCJ has been proposed to function downstream of FANCD2 monoubiquitination, a critical event in the FA pathway. Evidence supports a role for FANCJ in a homologous recombination (HR) pathway of double strand break (DSB) repair. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge in terms of FANCJ functions through its enzymatic activities and protein interactions. The molecular roles of FANCJ in DNA repair and the response to replicational stress will be discussed. PMID:19519404

  3. The Fanconi anemia DNA repair pathway: structural and functional insights into a complex disorder.

    PubMed

    Walden, Helen; Deans, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in any of at least sixteen FANC genes (FANCA-Q) cause Fanconi anemia, a disorder characterized by sensitivity to DNA interstrand crosslinking agents. The clinical features of cytopenia, developmental defects, and tumor predisposition are similar in each group, suggesting that the gene products participate in a common pathway. The Fanconi anemia DNA repair pathway consists of an anchor complex that recognizes damage caused by interstrand crosslinks, a multisubunit ubiquitin ligase that monoubiquitinates two substrates, and several downstream repair proteins including nucleases and homologous recombination enzymes. We review progress in the use of structural and biochemical approaches to understanding how each FANC protein functions in this pathway.

  4. Stem Cell Genetic Therapy for Fanconi Anemia - A New Hope.

    PubMed

    Hanenberg, Helmut; Roellecke, Katharina; Wiek, Constanze

    2017-01-09

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare inherited DNA disorder clinically characterized by congenital malformations, progressive bone marrow failure, and cancer susceptibility. Due to a strong survival advantage of spontaneously corrected 'normal' hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in a few patients, FA is considered a model disorder for genetic correction of autologous stem cells, where genetically corrected stem cells and their progeny have a strong in vivo selective advantage, ultimately leading to normal hematopoiesis. Despite these apparently ideal circumstances, three HSC gene therapy trials with gammaretroviral vectors (stage I) designed to cure the hematological manifestation of FA failed completely to provide long-term clinical benefits for patients, predominantly due to the combination of insufficient gene transfer technologies and incompletely understood FA HSC pathobiology. Currently, FA gene therapy is in stage II where, based on an improved understanding of the cellular defects in FA HSCs, consequently adapted transduction protocols are being used in two phase I/II trials for in vitro genetic correction of FANCA-deficient hematopoietic stem cells. These results are eagerly awaited. However, independent from the outcome of these studies, technologies are already available that seem highly attractive for testing in FA. In stage III, this would ultimately include targeted in vivo correction of autologous HSCs by overexpression of nonintegrating lentiviral vectors with scaffold/matrix attachment region elements using specific envelopes as pseudotypes. Although currently still challenging, in a few years in vivo genome editing approaches will be readily available in stage IV, in which the delivery of the editing machinery/complex is targeted to the autologous FA HSCs by the nonintegrating lentiviral vectors established in stage III. Even low levels of corrected stem cells will then quickly repopulate the entire hematopoiesis of the patient. We therefore are sanguine

  5. Massively parallel sequencing, aCGH, and RNA-Seq technologies provide a comprehensive molecular diagnosis of Fanconi anemia.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekharappa, Settara C; Lach, Francis P; Kimble, Danielle C; Kamat, Aparna; Teer, Jamie K; Donovan, Frank X; Flynn, Elizabeth; Sen, Shurjo K; Thongthip, Supawat; Sanborn, Erica; Smogorzewska, Agata; Auerbach, Arleen D; Ostrander, Elaine A

    2013-05-30

    Current methods for detecting mutations in Fanconi anemia (FA)-suspected patients are inefficient and often miss mutations. We have applied recent advances in DNA sequencing and genomic capture to the diagnosis of FA. Specifically, we used custom molecular inversion probes or TruSeq-enrichment oligos to capture and sequence FA and related genes, including introns, from 27 samples from the International Fanconi Anemia Registry at The Rockefeller University. DNA sequencing was complemented with custom array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) and RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis. aCGH identified deletions/duplications in 4 different FA genes. RNA-seq analysis revealed lack of allele specific expression associated with a deletion and splicing defects caused by missense, synonymous, and deep-in-intron variants. The combination of TruSeq-targeted capture, aCGH, and RNA-seq enabled us to identify the complementation group and biallelic germline mutations in all 27 families: FANCA (7), FANCB (3), FANCC (3), FANCD1 (1), FANCD2 (3), FANCF (2), FANCG (2), FANCI (1), FANCJ (2), and FANCL (3). FANCC mutations are often the cause of FA in patients of Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) ancestry, and we identified 2 novel FANCC mutations in 2 patients of AJ ancestry. We describe here a strategy for efficient molecular diagnosis of FA.

  6. Increased radiosensitivity of a subpopulation of T-lymphocyte progenitors from patients with Fanconi's anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Knox, S.J.; Wilson, F.D.; Greenberg, B.R.; Shifrine, M.; Rosenblatt, L.S.; Reeves, J.D.; Misra, H.

    1981-06-01

    In vitro radiation survival of peripheral blood T lymphocytes was studied in 15 clinically normal adults and 4 patients with Fanconi's anemia. Tritiated thymidine incorporation in a whole blood lymphocyte stimulation test (LST) and a newly developed whole blood T-lymphocyte colony assay were used to measure lymphocyte blastogenesis and colony formation in response to phytohemagglutinin (PHA) or concanavalin-A (Con-A) stimulation. Lymphocyte colony formation was found to be consistently more sensitive than the LST for detection of low-level radiation effects using both normal cells and lymphocytes from Fanconi's anemia patients. Lymphocytes from patients with Fanconi's anemia were significantly more sensitive to in vitro x irradiation than lymphocytes from clinically normal individuals as measured by their ability to divide when stimulated by PHA in the LST and colony formation assay. No significant difference in the radiosensitivity of the Con-A response was observed between the two groups. The PHA-responsive T-lymphocyte subpopulation in Fanconi's anemia patients appears to be intrinsically defective. The nature of this defect, significance in the disease process, and relevancy of these findings to the establishment of radiation protection standards are discussed.

  7. Increased radiosensitivity of a subpopulation ot T-lymphocyte progenitors from patients with Fanconi's anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Knox, S.J.; Wilson, F.D.; Greenberg, B.R.; Shifrine, M.; Rosenblatt, L.S.; Reeves, J.D.; Misra, H.

    1981-06-01

    In vitro radiation survival of peripheral blood T lymphocytes was studied in 15 clinically normal adults and 4 patients with Fanconi's anemia. Tritiated thymidine incorporation in a whole blood lymphocyte stimulation test (LST) and a newly developed whole blood T-lymphocyte colony assay were used to measure lymphocyte blastogenesis and colony formation in response to phytohemagglutinin (PHA) or concanavalin-A (Con-A) stimulation. Lymphocyte colony formation was found to be consistently more sensitive than the LST for detection of low-level radiation effects using both normal cells and lymphocytes from Fanconi's anemia patients. Lymphocytes from patients with Fanconi's anemia were significantly more sensitive to in vitro x-irradiation than lymphocytes from clinically normal individuals as measured by their ability to divide when stimulated by PHA in the LST (patients, D37 . 198 R; normals, D37 . 309 R, p . 0.057) and colony formation assay (patients, D37 . 53 R; normals, D37 . 109 R, p . 0.016). No significant difference in the radiosensitivity of the Con-A response was observed between the two groups. The PHA-responsive T-lymphocyte subpopulation in Fanconi's anemia patients appears to be intrinsically defective. The nature of this defect, significance in the disease process, and relevancy of these findings to the establishment of radiation protection standards are discussed.

  8. The Fanconi anemia ortholog FANCM ensures ordered homologous recombination in both somatic and meiotic cells in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Knoll, Alexander; Higgins, James D; Seeliger, Katharina; Reha, Sarah J; Dangel, Natalie J; Bauknecht, Markus; Schröpfer, Susan; Franklin, F Christopher H; Puchta, Holger

    2012-04-01

    The human hereditary disease Fanconi anemia leads to severe symptoms, including developmental defects and breakdown of the hematopoietic system. It is caused by single mutations in the FANC genes, one of which encodes the DNA translocase FANCM (for Fanconi anemia complementation group M), which is required for the repair of DNA interstrand cross-links to ensure replication progression. We identified a homolog of FANCM in Arabidopsis thaliana that is not directly involved in the repair of DNA lesions but suppresses spontaneous somatic homologous recombination via a RecQ helicase (At-RECQ4A)-independent pathway. In addition, it is required for double-strand break-induced homologous recombination. The fertility of At-fancm mutant plants is compromised. Evidence suggests that during meiosis At-FANCM acts as antirecombinase to suppress ectopic recombination-dependent chromosome interactions, but this activity is antagonized by the ZMM pathway to enable the formation of interference-sensitive crossovers and chromosome synapsis. Surprisingly, mutation of At-FANCM overcomes the sterility phenotype of an At-MutS homolog4 mutant by apparently rescuing a proportion of crossover-designated recombination intermediates via a route that is likely At-MMS and UV sensitive81 dependent. However, this is insufficient to ensure the formation of an obligate crossover. Thus, At-FANCM is not only a safeguard for genome stability in somatic cells but is an important factor in the control of meiotic crossover formation.

  9. The genomic organization of the Fanconi anemia group A (FAA) gene

    SciTech Connect

    Ianzano, L.; Centra, M.; Savino, M.

    1997-05-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetically heterogeneous disease involving at least five genes on the basis of complementation analysis (FAA to FAE). The FAA gene has been recently isolated by two independent approaches, positional and functional cloning. In the present study we describe the genomic structure of the FAA gene. The gene contains 43 exons spanning approximately 80 kb as determined by the alignment of four cosmids and the fine localization of the first and the last exons in restriction fragments of these clones. Exons range from 34 to 188 bp. All but three of the splice sites were consistent with the ag-gt rule. We also describe three alternative splicing events in cDNA clones that result in the loss of exon 37, a 23-bp deletion at the 5{prime} end of exon 41. Sequence analysis of the 5{prime} region upstream of the putative transcription start site showed no obvious TATA and CAAT boxes, but did show a GC-rich region, typical of housekeeping genes. Knowledge of the structure of the FAA gene will provide an invaluable resource for the discovery of mutations in the gene that accounts for about 60-66% of FA patients. 24 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Oxidative stress-related mechanisms are associated with xenobiotics exerting excess toxicity to Fanconi anemia cells.

    PubMed Central

    Pagano, Giovanni; Manini, Paola; Bagchi, Debasis

    2003-01-01

    An extensive body of evidence has demonstrated the sensitivity of Fanconi anemia (FA) cells to redox-active xenobiotics, such as mitomycin C, diepoxybutane, cisplatin, and 8-methoxypsoralen plus ultraviolet irradiation, with toxicity mechanisms that are consistent with a deficiency of FA cells in coping with oxidative stress. A recent study has reported on excess sensitivity of FA complementation A group cells to chromium VI [Cr(VI)] toxicity, by postulating that a deficiency in Cr-DNA cross-link removal by FA cells and formation of Cr(VI)-associated cross-links may be the mechanism of Cr(VI)-induced cytotoxicity. However, the report failed to demonstrate any enhanced Cr uptake or, especially, any increase in Cr-DNA adducts. Thus, well-established findings on Cr(VI)-induced oxidative stress may explain excess sensitivity of FA cells to Cr(VI) in terms of its inability to cope with the Cr(VI)-induced prooxidant state. PMID:14594617

  11. Direct inhibition of TNF-α promoter activity by Fanconi anemia protein FANCD2.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Nobuko; Endo, Yujiro; Sato, Koichi; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi; Yamashita, Takayuki; Takata, Minoru; Yanagi, Shigeru

    2011-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA), an inherited disease, is associated with progressive bone marrow failure, predisposition to cancer, and genomic instability. Genes corresponding to 15 identified FA complementation groups have been cloned, and each gene product functions in the response to DNA damage induced by cross-linking agents and/or in protection against genome instability. Interestingly, overproduction of inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and aberrant activation of NF-κB-dependent transcriptional activity have been observed in FA cells. Here we demonstrated that FANCD2 protein inhibits NF-κB activity in its monoubiquitination-dependent manner. Furthermore, we detected a specific association between FANCD2 and an NF-κB consensus element in the TNF-α promoter by electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay. Therefore, we propose FANCD2 deficiency promotes transcriptional activity of the TNF-α promoter and induces overproduction of TNF-which then sustains prolonged inflammatory responses. These results also suggest that artificial modulation of TNFα production could be a promising therapeutic approach to FA.

  12. Modeling Fanconi Anemia pathogenesis and therapeutics using integration-free patient-derived iPSCs

    PubMed Central

    Montserrat, Nuria; Tarantino, Carolina; Gu, Ying; Yi, Fei; Xu, Xiuling; Zhang, Weiqi; Ruiz, Sergio; Plongthongkum, Nongluk; Zhang, Kun; Masuda, Shigeo; Nivet, Emmanuel; Tsunekawa, Yuji; Soligalla, Rupa Devi; Goebl, April; Aizawa, Emi; Kim, Na Young; Kim, Jessica; Dubova, Ilir; Li, Ying; Ren, Ruotong; Benner, Chris; del Sol, Antonio; Bueren, Juan; Trujillo, Juan Pablo; Surralles, Jordi; Cappelli, Enrico; Dufour, Carlo; Esteban, Concepcion Rodriguez; Belmonte, Juan Carlos Izpisua

    2014-01-01

    Fanconi Anemia (FA) is a recessive disorder characterized by genomic instability, congenital abnormalities, cancer predisposition and bone marrow failure. However, the pathogenesis of FA is not fully understood partly due to the limitations of current disease models. Here, we derive integration-free induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from an FA patient without genetic complementation and report in situ gene correction in FA-iPSCs as well as the generation of isogenic FANCA deficient human embryonic stem cell (ESC) lines. FA cellular phenotypes are recapitulated in iPSCs/ESCs and their adult stem/progenitor cell derivatives. By using isogenic pathogenic mutation-free controls as well as cellular and genomic tools, our model serves to facilitate the discovery of novel disease features. We validate our model as a drug-screening platform by identifying several compounds that improve hematopoietic differentiation of FA-iPSCs. These compounds are also able to rescue the hematopoietic phenotype of FA-patient bone marrow cells. PMID:24999918

  13. FANCM of the Fanconi anemia core complex is required for both monoubiquitination and DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Xue, Yutong; Li, Yongjiang; Guo, Rong; Ling, Chen; Wang, Weidong

    2008-06-01

    In response to DNA damage, the Fanconi anemia (FA) core complex functions as a signaling machine for monoubiquitination of FANCD2 and FANCI. It remains unclear whether this complex can also participate in subsequent DNA repair. We have shown previously that the FANCM constituent of the complex contains a highly conserved helicase domain and an associated ATP-dependent DNA translocase activity. Here we show that FANCM also possesses an ATP-independent binding activity and an ATP-dependent bi-directional branch-point translocation activity on a synthetic four-way junction DNA, which mimics intermediates generated during homologous recombination or at stalled replication forks. Using an siRNA-based complementation system, we found that the ATP-dependent activities of FANCM are required for cellular resistance to a DNA-crosslinking drug, mitomycin C, but not for the monoubiquitination of FANCD2 and FANCI. In contrast, monoubiquitination requires the entire helicase domain of FANCM, which has both ATP dependent and independent activities. These data are consistent with participation of FANCM and its associated FA core complex in the FA pathway at both signaling through monoubiquitination and the ensuing DNA repair.

  14. Perspective: A defined role for multiple Fanconi anemia gene products in DNA damage associated ubiquitination.

    PubMed

    Tan, Winnie; Deans, Andrew J

    2017-03-15

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an inherited blood disorder that causes bone marrow failure and high predisposition to cancers. The FA pathway guards the cells' genome stability by orchestrating the repair of interstrand crosslink during S phase of the cell cycle, preventing chromosomal instability that is a key event in the bone marrow failure syndrome. Central to FA pathway is loss of mono-ubiquitinated forms of the Fanconi proteins FANCI and FANCD2, a process that is normally mediated by a "core complex" of seven other Fanconi proteins. Each protein when mutated can cause FA. The FA core complex catalyzed reaction is critical for signalling DNA crosslink damage, such as that induced by chemotherapies. We present a perspective on the current understanding of FANCI and FANCD2 monoubiquitination-mediated DNA repair. Our recent biochemical reconstitution of the monoubiquitination (and deubiquitination) reactions creates a paradigm for understanding FA. Further biochemical analysis will create new opportunities to address the leukemic phenotype of FA patients.

  15. FANCI phosphorylation functions as a molecular switch to turn on the Fanconi anemia pathway.

    PubMed

    Ishiai, Masamichi; Kitao, Hiroyuki; Smogorzewska, Agata; Tomida, Junya; Kinomura, Aiko; Uchida, Emi; Saberi, Alihossein; Kinoshita, Eiji; Kinoshita-Kikuta, Emiko; Koike, Tohru; Tashiro, Satoshi; Elledge, Stephen J; Takata, Minoru

    2008-11-01

    In response to DNA damage or replication fork stress, the Fanconi anemia pathway is activated, leading to monoubiquitination of FANCD2 and FANCI and their colocalization in foci. Here we show that, in the chicken DT40 cell system, multiple alanine-substitution mutations in six conserved and clustered Ser/Thr-Gln motifs of FANCI largely abrogate monoubiquitination and focus formation of both FANCI and FANCD2, resulting in loss of DNA repair function. Conversely, FANCI carrying phosphomimic mutations on the same six residues induces constitutive monoubiquitination and focus formation of FANCI and FANCD2, and protects against cell killing and chromosome breakage by DNA interstrand cross-linking agents. We propose that the multiple phosphorylation of FANCI serves as a molecular switch in activation of the Fanconi anemia pathway. Mutational analysis of putative phosphorylation sites in human FANCI indicates that this switch is evolutionarily conserved.

  16. Dental Perspective of Rare Disease of Fanconi Anemia: Case Report with Review

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Mridula; Bhushan, Urvashi; Goswami, Manoj

    2016-01-01

    Fanconi anemia is an extremely rare genetic disease characterized by chromosomal instability that induces congenital alterations in individuals. It causes defective hemopoiesis ultimately leading to bone marrow failure. Patients are susceptible to recurrent infections and increased risk of hemorrhage, as well as delayed and poor wound healing. Herein, we report a case of Fanconi anemia in which various classical signs of the disease were present. The patient has been on regular follow-up since three and a half years for management of dental problems. The different aspects of this rare disorder are discussed with emphasis on oral manifestations and their influence on the general health of affected patients. Due to an increased susceptibility to developing cancers in this specific population, it is imperative for pediatric dentists to know about the common oral manifestations and potentially cancerous lesions, in order to make an early diagnosis and provide comprehensive care and maintenance of oral health in affected individuals. PMID:27013901

  17. BRCA1 Regulation of Fanconi Anemia Proteins in DNA Damage Repair

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-01

    Fanconi Anemia (FA) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder. It has been shown that BRCA1 regulates one of FA proteins, called FANCD2 , by a process...that BRCA1 ubiquitination of FANCD2 is affected by association with the FANCA protein complex and by association with DNA damage when embedded in...chromatin. Specific aims are that (1) does BRCA1 monoubiquitinate FANCD2 in vivo using purified ubiquitination factors? (2) Do embedding FA proteins in

  18. BRCA1 Regulation of Fanconi Anemia Proteins in DNA Damage Repair

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    damage. Fanconi Anemia (FA) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder. It has been shown that BRCA1 regulates one of FA proteins, called FANCD2 , by a...hypothesize that BRCAI ubiquitination of FANCD2 is affected by association with the FANdA protein complex and by association with DNA damage when embedded in...chromatin. Specific aims are that (1) does BRCA1 monoubiquitinate FANCD2 in vivo using purified ubiquitination factors? (2) Do embedding FA proteins

  19. FANCI is a second monoubiquitinated member of the Fanconi anemia pathway.

    PubMed

    Sims, Ashley E; Spiteri, Elizabeth; Sims, Robert J; Arita, Adriana G; Lach, Francis P; Landers, Thomas; Wurm, Melanie; Freund, Marcel; Neveling, Kornelia; Hanenberg, Helmut; Auerbach, Arleen D; Huang, Tony T

    2007-06-01

    Activation of the Fanconi anemia (FA) DNA damage-response pathway results in the monoubiquitination of FANCD2, which is regulated by the nuclear FA core ubiquitin ligase complex. A FANCD2 protein sequence-based homology search facilitated the discovery of FANCI, a second monoubiquitinated component of the FA pathway. Biallelic mutations in the gene coding for this protein were found in cells from four FA patients, including an FA-I reference cell line.

  20. Targeted disruption of the murine Facc gene: Towards the establishment of a mouse model for Fanconi anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, M.; Auerbach, W.; Buchwald, M.

    1994-09-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by bone marrow failure, congenital malformations and predisposition to malignancies. The gene responsible for the defect in FA group C has been cloned and designated the Fanconi Anemia Complementation Group C gene (FACC). A murine cDNA for this gene (Facc) was also cloned. Here we report our progress in the establishment of a mouse model for FA. The mouse Facc cDNA was used as probe to screen a genomic library of mouse strain 129. More than twenty positive clones were isolated. Three of them were mapped and found to be overlapping clones, encompassing the genomic region from exon 8 to the end of the 3{prime} UTR of the mouse cDNA. A targeting vector was constructed using the most 5{prime} mouse genomic sequence available. The end result of the homologous recombination is that exon 8 is deleted and the neo gene is inserted. The last exon, exon 14, is essential for the complementing function of the FACC gene product; the disruption in the middle of the murine Facc gene should render this locus biologically inactive. This targeting vector was linearized and electroporated into R1 embryonic stem (ES) cells which were derived from the 129 mouse. Of 102 clones screened, 19 positive cell lines were identified. Four targeted cell lines have been used to produce chimeric mice. 129-derived ES cells were aggregated ex vivo into the morulas derived from CD1 mice and then implanted into foster mothers. 22 chimeras have been obtained. Moderately and strongly chimeric mice have been bred to test for germline transmission. Progeny with the expected coat color derived from 2 chimeras are currently being examined to confirm transmission of the targeted allele.

  1. Primary Ovarian Insufficiency Induced by Fanconi Anemia E Mutation in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Chun; Begum, Khurshida; Overbeek, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    In most cases of primary ovarian insufficiency (POI), the cause of the depletion of ovarian follicles is unknown. Fanconi anemia (FA) proteins are known to play important roles in follicular development. Using random insertional mutagenesis with a lentiviral transgene, we identified a family with reduced fertility in the homozygous transgenic mice. We identified the integration site and found that the lentivirus had integrated into intron 8 of the Fanconi E gene (Fance). By RT-PCR and in situ hybridization, we found that Fance transcript levels were significantly reduced. The Fance homozygous mutant mice were assayed for changes in ovarian development, follicle numbers and estrous cycle. Ovarian dysplasias and a severe lack of follicles were seen in the mutant mice. In addition, the estrous cycle was disrupted in adult females. Our results suggest that POI has been induced by the Fance mutation in this new mouse model. PMID:26939056

  2. Twenty years of the Italian Fanconi Anemia Registry: where we stand and what remains to be learned

    PubMed Central

    Risitano, Antonio M.; Marotta, Serena; Calzone, Rita; Grimaldi, Francesco; Zatterale, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    The natural history of Fanconi anemia remains hard to establish because of its rarity and its heterogeneous clinical presentation; since 1994, the Italian Fanconi Anemia Registry has collected clinical, epidemiological and genetic data of Italian Fanconi Anemia patients. This registry includes 180 patients with a confirmed diagnosis of Fanconi anemia who have either been enrolled prospectively, at diagnosis, or later on. After enrollment, follow-up data were periodically collected to assess the clinical course, possible complications and long-term survival; the median follow up was 15.6 years. The main goal of the study was to describe the natural history of Fanconi anemia, focusing on the following variables: family history, disease presentation, development of hematological manifestations, development of malignancies, occurrence of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and survival. Typical morphological and/or hematological abnormalities and/or growth retardation were the most common manifestations at diagnosis; the majority of patients (77%) exhibited hematological abnormalities at the initial presentation, and almost all (96%) eventually developed hematological manifestations. More than half of the patients (57%) underwent a bone-marrow transplant. The occurrence of cancer was quite rare at diagnosis, whereas the cumulative incidence of malignancies at 10, 20 and 30 years was 5%, 8% and 22%, respectively, for hematological cancers and 1%, 15% and 32%, respectively, for solid tumors. Overall survival at 10, 20 and 30 years were 88%, 56% and 37%, respectively; the main causes of death were cancer, complications of the hematological presentation and complications of transplantation. These data clearly confirm the detrimental outcome of Fanconi anemia, with no major improvement in the past decades. PMID:26635036

  3. FANCD2 Western blot as a diagnostic tool for Brazilian patients with Fanconi anemia.

    PubMed

    Pilonetto, D V; Pereira, N F; Bitencourt, M A; Magdalena, N I R; Vieira, E R; Veiga, L B A; Cavalli, I J; Ribeiro, R C; Pasquini, R

    2009-03-01

    Fanconi anemia is a rare hereditary disease showing genetic heterogeneity due to a variety of mutations in genes involved in DNA repair pathways, which may lead to different clinical manifestations. Phenotypic variability makes diagnosis difficult based only on clinical manifestations, therefore laboratory tests are necessary. New advances in molecular pathogenesis of this disease led researchers to develop a diagnostic test based on Western blot for FANCD2. The objective of the present study was to determine the efficacy of this method for the diagnosis of 84 Brazilian patients with Fanconi anemia, all of whom tested positive for the diepoxybutane test, and 98 healthy controls. The FANCD2 monoubiquitinated isoform (FANCDS+/FANCD2L-) was not detected in 77 patients (91.7%). In 2 patients (2.4%), there was an absence of both the monoubiquitinated and the non-ubiquitinated proteins (FANCD2S-/FANCD2L-) and 5 patients (5.9%) had both isoforms (FANCD2S+/FANCD2L+). This last phenotype suggests downstream subtypes or mosaicism. All controls were diepoxybutane negative and were also negative on the FANCD2 Western blot. The Western blot for FANCD2 presented a sensitivity of 94% (79/84) and specificity of 100% (98/98). This method was confirmed as an efficient approach to screen Brazilian patients with deleterious mutations on FANCD2 (FANCD2S-/FANCD2L-) or other upstream genes of the FA/BRCA pathway (FANCDS+/FANCD2L-), to confirm the chromosome breakage test and to classify patients according to the level of FA/BRCA pathway defects. However, patients showing both FANCD2 isoforms (FANCD2S+/FANCD2L+) require additional studies to confirm mutations on downstream Fanconi anemia genes or the presence of mosaicism.

  4. Advances in the understanding of the Fanconi anemia tumor suppressor pathway.

    PubMed

    Pickering, Anna; Zhang, Jun; Panneerselvam, Jayabal; Fei, Peiwen

    2013-12-01

    Extremely high cancer incidence in Fanconi anemia (FA) patients has long suggested that the FA signaling pathway is a tumor suppressor pathway. Indeed, our recent findings, for the first time, indicate that the FA pathway plays a significant role in suppressing the development of non-FA human cancer. Also our studies on FA group D2 protein (FANCD2) have, among the first, documented the crosstalks between the FA and Rad6/Rad18 (HHR6) pathways upon DNA damage. In this review, we will discuss how our studies enhance the understanding of the FA tumor suppressor pathway.

  5. Gene therapy in the treatment of Fanconi anemia, a progressive bone marrow failure syndrome.

    PubMed

    Williams, David A; Croop, James; Kelly, Patrick

    2005-10-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetic disease characterized by progressive, fatal bone marrow failure, congenital anomalies and predisposition to cancer. Although stem cell transplantation is therapeutic, human leukocyte antigen-identical sibling donors are available to a minority of patients. In murine models and human cells in vitro, gene transfer corrects the FA cellular phenotype of chromosomal breakage in response to DNA-damaging agents, suggesting therapeutic use of gene transfer is possible. However, disease-specific characteristics make application of viral vector technology difficult. Multiple studies are currently underway to develop a gene therapy approach for treating this disease, including phase I trials.

  6. Hypomorphic mutations in the gene encoding a key Fanconi anemia protein, FANCD2, sustain a significant group of FA-D2 patients with severe phenotype.

    PubMed

    Kalb, Reinhard; Neveling, Kornelia; Hoehn, Holger; Schneider, Hildegard; Linka, Yvonne; Batish, Sat Dev; Hunt, Curtis; Berwick, Marianne; Callen, Elsa; Surralles, Jordi; Casado, Jose A; Bueren, Juan; Dasi, Angeles; Soulier, Jean; Gluckman, Eliane; Zwaan, C Michel; van Spaendonk, Rosalina; Pals, Gerard; de Winter, Johan P; Joenje, Hans; Grompe, Markus; Auerbach, Arleen D; Hanenberg, Helmut; Schindler, Detlev

    2007-05-01

    FANCD2 is an evolutionarily conserved Fanconi anemia (FA) gene that plays a key role in DNA double-strand-type damage responses. Using complementation assays and immunoblotting, a consortium of American and European groups assigned 29 patients with FA from 23 families and 4 additional unrelated patients to complementation group FA-D2. This amounts to 3%-6% of FA-affected patients registered in various data sets. Malformations are frequent in FA-D2 patients, and hematological manifestations appear earlier and progress more rapidly when compared with all other patients combined (FA-non-D2) in the International Fanconi Anemia Registry. FANCD2 is flanked by two pseudogenes. Mutation analysis revealed the expected total of 66 mutated alleles, 34 of which result in aberrant splicing patterns. Many mutations are recurrent and have ethnic associations and shared allelic haplotypes. There were no biallelic null mutations; residual FANCD2 protein of both isotypes was observed in all available patient cell lines. These analyses suggest that, unlike the knockout mouse model, total absence of FANCD2 does not exist in FA-D2 patients, because of constraints on viable combinations of FANCD2 mutations. Although hypomorphic mutations arie involved, clinically, these patients have a relatively severe form of FA.

  7. Deficiency of UBE2T, the E2 Ubiquitin Ligase Necessary for FANCD2 and FANCI Ubiquitination, Causes FA-T Subtype of Fanconi Anemia.

    PubMed

    Rickman, Kimberly A; Lach, Francis P; Abhyankar, Avinash; Donovan, Frank X; Sanborn, Erica M; Kennedy, Jennifer A; Sougnez, Carrie; Gabriel, Stacey B; Elemento, Olivier; Chandrasekharappa, Settara C; Schindler, Detlev; Auerbach, Arleen D; Smogorzewska, Agata

    2015-07-07

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare bone marrow failure and cancer predisposition syndrome resulting from pathogenic mutations in genes encoding proteins participating in the repair of DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs). Mutations in 17 genes (FANCA-FANCS) have been identified in FA patients, defining 17 complementation groups. Here, we describe an individual presenting with typical FA features who is deficient for the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme (E2), UBE2T. UBE2T is known to interact with FANCL, the E3 ubiquitin-ligase component of the multiprotein FA core complex, and is necessary for the monoubiquitination of FANCD2 and FANCI. Proband fibroblasts do not display FANCD2 and FANCI monoubiquitination, do not form FANCD2 foci following treatment with mitomycin C, and are hypersensitive to crosslinking agents. These cellular defects are complemented by expression of wild-type UBE2T, demonstrating that deficiency of the protein UBE2T can lead to Fanconi anemia. UBE2T gene gains an alias of FANCT.

  8. Defective homing is associated with altered Cdc42 activity in cells from patients with Fanconi anemia group A

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoling; Shang, Xun; Guo, Fukun; Murphy, Kim; Kirby, Michelle; Kelly, Patrick; Reeves, Lilith; Smith, Franklin O.; Williams, David A.

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies showed that Fanconi anemia (FA) murine stem cells have defective reconstitution after bone marrow (BM) transplantation. The mechanism underlying this defect is not known. Here, we report defective homing of FA patient BM progenitors transplanted into mouse models. Using cells from patients carrying mutations in FA complementation group A (FA-A), we show that when transplanted into nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency (NOD/SCID) recipient mice, FA-A BM cells exhibited impaired homing activity. FA-A cells also showed defects in both cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion. Complementation of FA-A deficiency by reexpression of FANCA readily restored adhesion of FA-A cells. A significant decrease in the activity of the Rho GTPase Cdc42 was found associated with these defective functions in patient-derived cells, and expression of a constitutively active Cdc42 mutant was able to rescue the adhesion defect of FA-A cells. These results provide the first evidence that FA proteins influence human BM progenitor homing and adhesion via the small GTPase Cdc42-regulated signaling pathway. PMID:18565850

  9. Interstitial lung disease in an adult with Fanconi anemia: Clues to the pathogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinstein, W.S.; Wenger, S.L.; Hoffman, R.M.

    1997-03-31

    We have studied a 38-year-old man with a prior diagnosis of Holt-Oram syndrome, who presented with diabetes mellitus. He had recently taken prednisone for idiopathic interstitial lung disease and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole for sinusitis. Thrombocytopenia progressed to pancytopenia. The patient had skeletal, cardiac, renal, cutaneous, endocrine, hepatic, neurologic, and hematologic manifestations of Fanconi anemia (FA). Chest radiographs showed increased interstitial markings at age 25, dyspnea began in his late 20s, and he stopped smoking at age 32. At age 38, computerized tomography showed bilateral upper lobe fibrosis, lower lobe honeycombing, and bronchiectasis. Pulmonary function tests, compromised at age 29, showed a moderately severe obstructive and restrictive pattern by age 38. Serum alpha-1 antitrypsin level was 224 (normal 85-213) mg/dL and PI phenotype was M1. Karyotype was 46,X-Y with a marked increase in chromosome aberrations induced in vitro by diepoxybutane. The early onset and degree of pulmonary disease in this patient cannot be fully explained by environmental or known genetic causes. The International Fanconi Anemia Registry (IFAR) contains no example of a similar pulmonary presentation. Gene-environment (ecogenetic) interactions in FA seem evident in the final phenotype. The pathogenic mechanism of lung involvement in FA may relate to oxidative injury and cytokine anomalies. 49 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Fanconi Anemia Gene Editing by the CRISPR/Cas9 System

    PubMed Central

    Osborn, Mark J.; Gabriel, Richard; Webber, Beau R.; DeFeo, Anthony P.; McElroy, Amber N.; Jarjour, Jordan; Starker, Colby G.; Wagner, John E.; Joung, J. Keith; Voytas, Daniel F.; von Kalle, Christof; Schmidt, Manfred; Blazar, Bruce R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Genome engineering with designer nucleases is a rapidly progressing field, and the ability to correct human gene mutations in situ is highly desirable. We employed fibroblasts derived from a patient with Fanconi anemia as a model to test the ability of the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/Cas9 nuclease system to mediate gene correction. We show that the Cas9 nuclease and nickase each resulted in gene correction, but the nickase, because of its ability to preferentially mediate homology-directed repair, resulted in a higher frequency of corrected clonal isolates. To assess the off-target effects, we used both a predictive software platform to identify intragenic sequences of homology as well as a genome-wide screen utilizing linear amplification-mediated PCR. We observed no off-target activity and show RNA-guided endonuclease candidate sites that do not possess low sequence complexity function in a highly specific manner. Collectively, we provide proof of principle for precision genome editing in Fanconi anemia, a DNA repair-deficient human disorder. PMID:25545896

  11. Fanconi anemia D2 protein confers chemoresistance in response to the anticancer agent, irofulven.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yutian; Wiltshire, Timothy; Senft, Jamie; Wenger, Sharon L; Reed, Eddie; Wang, Weixin

    2006-12-01

    The Fanconi anemia-BRCA pathway of genes are frequently mutated or epigenetically repressed in human cancer. The proteins of this pathway play pivotal roles in DNA damage signaling and repair. Irofulven is one of a new class of anticancer agents that are analogues of mushroom-derived illudin toxins. Preclinical studies and clinical trials have shown that irofulven is effective against several tumor cell types. The exact nature of irofulven-induced DNA damage is not completely understood. Previously, we have shown that irofulven activates ATM and its targets, NBS1, SMC1, CHK2, and p53. In this study, we hypothesize that irofulven induces DNA double-strand breaks and FANCD2 may play an important role in modulating cellular responses and chemosensitivity in response to irofulven treatment. By using cells that are proficient or deficient for FANCD2, ATR, or ATM, we showed that irofulven induces FANCD2 monoubiquitination and nuclear foci formation. ATR is important in mediating irofulven-induced FANCD2 monoubiquitination. Furthermore, we showed that FANCD2 plays a critical role in maintaining chromosome integrity and modulating chemosensitivity in response to irofulven-induced DNA damage. Therefore, this study suggests that it might be clinically significant to target irofulven therapy to cancers defective for proteins of the Fanconi anemia-BRCA pathway.

  12. Targeting the Fanconi anemia/BRCA pathway circumvents drug resistance in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Yarde, Danielle N; Oliveira, Vasco; Mathews, Linda; Wang, Xingyu; Villagra, Alejandro; Boulware, David; Shain, Kenneth H; Hazlehurst, Lori A; Alsina, Melissa; Chen, Dung-Tsa; Beg, Amer A; Dalton, William S

    2009-12-15

    The Fanconi anemia/BRCA (FA/BRCA) DNA damage repair pathway plays a pivotal role in the cellular response to replicative stress induced by DNA alkylating agents and greatly influences drug response in cancer treatment. We recently reported that FA/BRCA genes are overexpressed and causative for drug resistance in human melphalan-resistant multiple myeloma cell lines. However, the transcriptional regulation of the FA/BRCA pathway is not understood. In this report, we describe for the first time a novel function of the NF-kappaB subunits, RelB/p50, as transcriptional activators of the FA/BRCA pathway. Specifically, our findings point to constitutive phosphorylation of IkappaB kinase alpha and subsequent alterations in FANCD2 expression and function as underlying events leading to melphalan resistance in repeatedly exposed multiple myeloma cells. Inhibiting NF-kappaB by small interfering RNA, blocking the IkappaB kinase complex with BMS-345541, or using the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib drastically reduced FA/BRCA gene expression and FANCD2 protein expression in myeloma cells, resulting in diminished DNA damage repair and enhanced melphalan sensitivity. Importantly, we also found that bortezomib decreases FA/BRCA gene expression in multiple myeloma patients. These results show for the first time that NF-kappaB transcriptionally regulates the FA/BRCA pathway and provide evidence for targeting Fanconi anemia-mediated DNA repair to enhance chemotherapeutic response and circumvent drug resistance in myeloma patients.

  13. XPF-ERCC1 participates in the Fanconi anemia pathway of cross-link repair.

    PubMed

    Bhagwat, Nikhil; Olsen, Anna L; Wang, Anderson T; Hanada, Katsuhiro; Stuckert, Patricia; Kanaar, Roland; D'Andrea, Alan; Niedernhofer, Laura J; McHugh, Peter J

    2009-12-01

    Interstrand cross-links (ICLs) prevent DNA strand separation and, therefore, transcription and replication, making them extremely cytotoxic. The precise mechanism by which ICLs are removed from mammalian genomes largely remains elusive. Genetic evidence implicates ATR, the Fanconi anemia proteins, proteins required for homologous recombination, translesion synthesis, and at least two endonucleases, MUS81-EME1 and XPF-ERCC1. ICLs cause replication-dependent DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), and MUS81-EME1 facilitates DSB formation. The subsequent repair of these DSBs occurs via homologous recombination after the ICL is unhooked by XPF-ERCC1. Here, we examined the effect of the loss of either nuclease on FANCD2 monoubiquitination to determine if the nucleolytic processing of ICLs is required for the activation of the Fanconi anemia pathway. FANCD2 was monoubiquitinated in Mus81(-/-), Ercc1(-/-), and XPF-deficient human, mouse, and hamster cells exposed to cross-linking agents. However, the monoubiquitinated form of FANCD2 persisted longer in XPF-ERCC1-deficient cells than in wild-type cells. Moreover, the levels of chromatin-bound FANCD2 were dramatically reduced and the number of ICL-induced FANCD2 foci significantly lower in XPF-ERCC1-deficient cells. These data demonstrate that the unhooking of an ICL by XPF-ERCC1 is necessary for the stable localization of FANCD2 to the chromatin and subsequent homologous recombination-mediated DSB repair.

  14. The Fanconi anemia proteins FANCD2 and FANCJ interact and regulate each other's chromatin localization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoyong; Wilson, James B; McChesney, Patricia; Williams, Stacy A; Kwon, Youngho; Longerich, Simonne; Marriott, Andrew S; Sung, Patrick; Jones, Nigel J; Kupfer, Gary M

    2014-09-12

    Fanconi anemia is a genetic disease resulting in bone marrow failure, birth defects, and cancer that is thought to encompass a defect in maintenance of genomic stability. Mutations in 16 genes (FANCA, B, C, D1, D2, E, F, G, I, J, L, M, N, O, P, and Q) have been identified in patients, with the Fanconi anemia subtype J (FA-J) resulting from homozygous mutations in the FANCJ gene. Here, we describe the direct interaction of FANCD2 with FANCJ. We demonstrate the interaction of FANCD2 and FANCJ in vivo and in vitro by immunoprecipitation in crude cell lysates and from fractions after gel filtration and with baculovirally expressed proteins. Mutation of the monoubiquitination site of FANCD2 (K561R) preserves interaction with FANCJ constitutively in a manner that impedes proper chromatin localization of FANCJ. FANCJ is necessary for FANCD2 chromatin loading and focus formation in response to mitomycin C treatment. Our results suggest not only that FANCD2 regulates FANCJ chromatin localization but also that FANCJ is necessary for efficient loading of FANCD2 onto chromatin following DNA damage caused by mitomycin C treatment.

  15. The Fanconi Anemia BRCA Pathway as a Predictor of Benefit from Bevacizumab in a Large Phase 3 Clinical Trial in Ovarian Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0421 TITLE: The Fanconi Anemia BRCA Pathway as a Predictor of Benefit from Bevacizumab in a Large Phase III Clinical...DATES COVERED 30Sep2013 - 29Sep2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-13-1-0421 The Fanconi Anemia BRCA Pathway as a Predictor of...another upfront clinical trial GOG262. We found that germline or somatic mutations in the BRCA-Fanconi anemia pathway was significantly associated with

  16. Malfunction of Nuclease ERCC1-XPF Results in Diverse Clinical Manifestations and Causes Cockayne Syndrome, Xeroderma Pigmentosum, and Fanconi Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Kashiyama, Kazuya; Nakazawa, Yuka; Pilz, Daniela T.; Guo, Chaowan; Shimada, Mayuko; Sasaki, Kensaku; Fawcett, Heather; Wing, Jonathan F.; Lewin, Susan O.; Carr, Lucinda; Li, Tao-Sheng; Yoshiura, Koh-ichiro; Utani, Atsushi; Hirano, Akiyoshi; Yamashita, Shunichi; Greenblatt, Danielle; Nardo, Tiziana; Stefanini, Miria; McGibbon, David; Sarkany, Robert; Fassihi, Hiva; Takahashi, Yoshito; Nagayama, Yuji; Mitsutake, Norisato; Lehmann, Alan R.; Ogi, Tomoo

    2013-01-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a genetic disorder characterized by developmental abnormalities and photodermatosis resulting from the lack of transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair, which is responsible for the removal of photodamage from actively transcribed genes. To date, all identified causative mutations for CS have been in the two known CS-associated genes, ERCC8 (CSA) and ERCC6 (CSB). For the rare combined xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and CS phenotype, all identified mutations are in three of the XP-associated genes, ERCC3 (XPB), ERCC2 (XPD), and ERCC5 (XPG). In a previous report, we identified several CS cases who did not have mutations in any of these genes. In this paper, we describe three CS individuals deficient in ERCC1 or ERCC4 (XPF). Remarkably, one of these individuals with XP complementation group F (XP-F) had clinical features of three different DNA-repair disorders—CS, XP, and Fanconi anemia (FA). Our results, together with those from Bogliolo et al., who describe XPF alterations resulting in FA alone, indicate a multifunctional role for XPF. PMID:23623389

  17. Malfunction of nuclease ERCC1-XPF results in diverse clinical manifestations and causes Cockayne syndrome, xeroderma pigmentosum, and Fanconi anemia.

    PubMed

    Kashiyama, Kazuya; Nakazawa, Yuka; Pilz, Daniela T; Guo, Chaowan; Shimada, Mayuko; Sasaki, Kensaku; Fawcett, Heather; Wing, Jonathan F; Lewin, Susan O; Carr, Lucinda; Li, Tao-Sheng; Yoshiura, Koh-ichiro; Utani, Atsushi; Hirano, Akiyoshi; Yamashita, Shunichi; Greenblatt, Danielle; Nardo, Tiziana; Stefanini, Miria; McGibbon, David; Sarkany, Robert; Fassihi, Hiva; Takahashi, Yoshito; Nagayama, Yuji; Mitsutake, Norisato; Lehmann, Alan R; Ogi, Tomoo

    2013-05-02

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a genetic disorder characterized by developmental abnormalities and photodermatosis resulting from the lack of transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair, which is responsible for the removal of photodamage from actively transcribed genes. To date, all identified causative mutations for CS have been in the two known CS-associated genes, ERCC8 (CSA) and ERCC6 (CSB). For the rare combined xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and CS phenotype, all identified mutations are in three of the XP-associated genes, ERCC3 (XPB), ERCC2 (XPD), and ERCC5 (XPG). In a previous report, we identified several CS cases who did not have mutations in any of these genes. In this paper, we describe three CS individuals deficient in ERCC1 or ERCC4 (XPF). Remarkably, one of these individuals with XP complementation group F (XP-F) had clinical features of three different DNA-repair disorders--CS, XP, and Fanconi anemia (FA). Our results, together with those from Bogliolo et al., who describe XPF alterations resulting in FA alone, indicate a multifunctional role for XPF.

  18. The vertebrate Hef ortholog is a component of the Fanconi anemia tumor-suppressor pathway.

    PubMed

    Mosedale, Georgina; Niedzwiedz, Wojciech; Alpi, Arno; Perrina, Franco; Pereira-Leal, Jose B; Johnson, Mark; Langevin, Frederic; Pace, Paul; Patel, Ketan J

    2005-09-01

    The helicase-associated endonuclease for fork-structured DNA (Hef) is an archaeabacterial protein that processes blocked replication forks. Here we have isolated the vertebrate Hef ortholog and investigated its molecular function. Disruption of this gene in chicken DT40 cells results in genomic instability and sensitivity to DNA cross-links. The similarity of this phenotype to that of cells lacking the Fanconi anemia-related (FA) tumor-suppressor genes led us to investigate whether Hef functions in this pathway. Indeed, we found a genetic interaction between the FANCC and Hef genes. In addition, Hef is a component of the FA nuclear protein complex that facilitates its DNA damage-inducible chromatin localization and the monoubiquitination of the FA protein FANCD2. Notably, Hef interacts directly with DNA structures that are intermediates in DNA replication. This discovery sheds light on the origins, regulation and molecular function of the FA tumor-suppressor pathway in the maintenance of genome stability.

  19. How SUMOylation Fine-Tunes the Fanconi Anemia DNA Repair Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Kate E.; Huang, Tony T.

    2016-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare human genetic disorder characterized by developmental defects, bone marrow failure and cancer predisposition, primarily due to a deficiency in the repair of DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs). ICL repair through the FA DNA repair pathway is a complicated multi-step process, involving at least 19 FANC proteins and coordination of multiple DNA repair activities, including homologous recombination, nucleotide excision repair and translesion synthesis (TLS). SUMOylation is a critical regulator of several DNA repair pathways, however, the role of this modification in controlling the FA pathway is poorly understood. Here, we summarize recent advances in the fine-tuning of the FA pathway by small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO)-targeted ubiquitin ligases (STUbLs) and other SUMO-related interactions, and discuss the implications of these findings in the design of novel therapeutics for alleviating FA-associated condition, including cancer. PMID:27148358

  20. Evaluation of resveratrol and N-acetylcysteine for cancer chemoprevention in a Fanconi anemia murine model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing-Shuo; Marquez-Loza, Laura; Sheehan, Andrea M; Watanabe-Smith, Kevin; Eaton, Laura; Benedetti, Eric; Major, Angela; Schubert, Kathryn; Deater, Matthew; Joseph, Eric; Grompe, Markus

    2014-04-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) patients suffer from progressive bone marrow failure and often develop cancers. Previous studies showed that antioxidants tempol and resveratrol (RV) delayed tumor onset and reduced hematologic defects in FA murine models, respectively. Here we tested whether antioxidants N-acetylcysteine (NAC) or RV could delay cancer in tumor prone Fancd2(-/-) /Trp53(+/-) mice. Unlike tempol, neither compound had any significant chemopreventive effect in this model. We conclude that not all anti-oxidants are chemopreventive in FA. In addition, when given to Fancd2(-/-) mice, NAC helped maintain Fancd2(-/-) KSL cells in quiescence while tempol did not. The mechanisms behind the different actions of these antioxidants await further investigation.

  1. The Fanconi anemia ID2 complex: dueling saxes at the crossroads.

    PubMed

    Boisvert, Rebecca A; Howlett, Niall G

    2014-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare recessive genetic disease characterized by congenital abnormalities, bone marrow failure and heightened cancer susceptibility in early adulthood. FA is caused by biallelic germ-line mutation of any one of 16 genes. While several functions for the FA proteins have been ascribed, the prevailing hypothesis is that the FA proteins function cooperatively in the FA-BRCA pathway to repair damaged DNA. A pivotal step in the activation of the FA-BRCA pathway is the monoubiquitination of the FANCD2 and FANCI proteins. Despite their importance for DNA repair, the domain structure, regulation, and function of FANCD2 and FANCI remain poorly understood. In this review, we provide an overview of our current understanding of FANCD2 and FANCI, with an emphasis on their posttranslational modification and common and unique functions.

  2. Ubiquitin-SUMO circuitry controls activated fanconi anemia ID complex dosage in response to DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Gibbs-Seymour, Ian; Oka, Yasuyoshi; Rajendra, Eeson; Weinert, Brian T; Passmore, Lori A; Patel, Ketan J; Olsen, Jesper V; Choudhary, Chunaram; Bekker-Jensen, Simon; Mailand, Niels

    2015-01-08

    We show that central components of the Fanconi anemia (FA) DNA repair pathway, the tumor suppressor proteins FANCI and FANCD2 (the ID complex), are SUMOylated in response to replication fork stalling. The ID complex is SUMOylated in a manner that depends on the ATR kinase, the FA ubiquitin ligase core complex, and the SUMO E3 ligases PIAS1/PIAS4 and is antagonized by the SUMO protease SENP6. SUMOylation of the ID complex drives substrate selectivity by triggering its polyubiquitylation by the SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase RNF4 to promote its removal from sites of DNA damage via the DVC1-p97 ubiquitin segregase complex. Deregulation of ID complex SUMOylation compromises cell survival following replication stress. Our results uncover a regulatory role for SUMOylation in the FA pathway, and we propose that ubiquitin-SUMO signaling circuitry is a mechanism that contributes to the balance of activated ID complex dosage at sites of DNA damage.

  3. Ku70 corrupts DNA repair in the absence of the Fanconi anemia pathway.

    PubMed

    Pace, Paul; Mosedale, Georgina; Hodskinson, Michael R; Rosado, Ivan V; Sivasubramaniam, Meera; Patel, Ketan J

    2010-07-09

    A conserved DNA repair response is defective in the human genetic illness Fanconi anemia (FA). Mutation of some FA genes impairs homologous recombination and error-prone DNA repair, rendering FA cells sensitive to DNA cross-linking agents. We found a genetic interaction between the FA gene FANCC and the nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) factor Ku70. Disruption of both FANCC and Ku70 suppresses sensitivity to cross-linking agents, diminishes chromosome breaks, and reverses defective homologous recombination. Ku70 binds directly to free DNA ends, committing them to NHEJ repair. We show that purified FANCD2, a downstream effector of the FA pathway, might antagonize Ku70 activity by modifying such DNA substrates. These results reveal a function for the FA pathway in processing DNA ends, thereby diverting double-strand break repair away from abortive NHEJ and toward homologous recombination.

  4. FANCJ suppresses microsatellite instability and lymphomagenesis independent of the Fanconi anemia pathway.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Kenichiro; Borel, Valerie; Adelman, Carrie A; Schindler, Detlev; Boulton, Simon J

    2015-12-15

    Microsatellites are short tandem repeat sequences that are highly prone to expansion/contraction due to their propensity to form non-B-form DNA structures, which hinder DNA polymerases and provoke template slippage. Although error correction by mismatch repair plays a key role in preventing microsatellite instability (MSI), which is a hallmark of Lynch syndrome, activities must also exist that unwind secondary structures to facilitate replication fidelity. Here, we report that Fancj helicase-deficient mice, while phenotypically resembling Fanconi anemia (FA), are also hypersensitive to replication inhibitors and predisposed to lymphoma. Whereas metabolism of G4-DNA structures is largely unaffected in Fancj(-/-) mice, high levels of spontaneous MSI occur, which is exacerbated by replication inhibition. In contrast, MSI is not observed in Fancd2(-/-) mice but is prevalent in human FA-J patients. Together, these data implicate FANCJ as a key factor required to counteract MSI, which is functionally distinct from its role in the FA pathway.

  5. Fanconi anemia: a model disease for studies on human genetics and advanced therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Bogliolo, Massimo; Surrallés, Jordi

    2015-08-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is characterized by bone marrow failure, malformations, and chromosome fragility. We review the recent discovery of FA genes and efforts to develop genetic therapies for FA in the last five years. Because current data exclude FANCM as an FA gene, 15 genes remain bona fide FA genes and three (FANCO, FANCR and FANCS) cause an FA like syndrome. Monoallelic mutations in 6 FA associated genes (FANCD1, FANCJ, FANCM, FANCN, FANCO and FANCS) predispose to breast and ovarian cancer. The products of all these genes are involved in the repair of stalled DNA replication forks by unhooking DNA interstrand cross-links and promoting homologous recombination. The genetic characterization of patients with FA is essential for developing therapies, including hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from a savior sibling donor after embryo selection, gene therapy, or genome editing using genetic recombination or engineered nucleases. Newly acquired knowledge about FA promises to provide therapeutic strategies in the near future.

  6. X ray sensitivity of diploid skin fibroblasts from patients with Fanconi's anemia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kale, Ranjini

    1989-01-01

    Experiments were performed on Fanconi's anemia and normal human fibroblast cell lines growing in culture in an attempt to correlate cell cycle kinetics with genomic damage and determine their bearing on the mechanism of chromosome aberration induction. FA fibroblasts showed a significantly increased susceptibility to chromosomal breakage by x rays in the G2 phase of the cell cycle. No such response was observed in fibroblasts irradiated in the G0 phase. The observed increases in achromatic lesions and in chromatid deletions in FA cells as compared with normal cells appear to indicate that FA cells are deficient in strand break repair and also possibly in base damage excision repair. Experiments are now in progress to further elucidate the mechanisms involved.

  7. Preleukemia in Fanconi's anemia: hematopoietic cell multinuclearity, membrane duplication, and dysgranulogenesis.

    PubMed

    Barton, J C; Parmley, R T; Carroll, A J; Huang, S T; Goodnough, L T; Findley, H W; Ragab, A H

    1987-04-01

    A 25-year-old male had Fanconi's anemia characterized by small stature, the onset of pancytopenia in the first decade of life, a high spontaneous breakage rate of the chromosomes, and the development of acute myeloblastic leukemia. In the preleukemic phase, marrow erythroblasts were multinucleated, and had duplicated nuclear and cytoplasmic membranes with frequent nuclear pockets and cytoplasmic vacuoles, respectively. All neutrophilic and eosinophilic granulocytes had severe quantitative and qualitative defects of granulogenesis; autophagy and nuclear pockets were also observed in the majority of granulocytic cells. Platelets had decreased granulation and extremely dilated canaliculi. Decreased titration scores with anti-I and anti-i were observed with the patient's erythrocytes and those of his clinically normal mother. The unusual morphologic and serologic findings in this patient appear to have resulted from a membrane abnormality affecting the cells of several hematopoietic lines and their organelles.

  8. Recent discoveries in the molecular pathogenesis of the inherited bone marrow failure syndrome Fanconi anemia.

    PubMed

    Mamrak, Nicholas E; Shimamura, Akiko; Howlett, Niall G

    2016-10-13

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare autosomal and X-linked genetic disease characterized by congenital abnormalities, progressive bone marrow failure (BMF), and increased cancer risk during early adulthood. The median lifespan for FA patients is approximately 33years. The proteins encoded by the FA genes function together in the FA-BRCA pathway to repair DNA damage and to maintain genome stability. Within the past two years, five new FA genes have been identified-RAD51/FANCR, BRCA1/FANCS, UBE2T/FANCT, XRCC2/FANCU, and REV7/FANCV-bringing the total number of disease-causing genes to 21. This review summarizes the discovery of these new FA genes and describes how these proteins integrate into the FA-BRCA pathway to maintain genome stability and critically prevent early-onset BMF and cancer.

  9. Dearth and Delayed Maturation of Testicular Germ Cells in Fanconi Anemia E Mutant Male Mice

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Chun; Begum, Khurshida; Jordan, Philip W.; He, Yan; Overbeek, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    After using a self-inactivating lentivirus for non-targeted insertional mutagenesis in mice, we identified a transgenic family with a recessive mutation that resulted in reduced fertility in homozygous transgenic mice. The lentiviral integration site was amplified by inverse PCR. Sequencing revealed that integration had occurred in intron 8 of the mouse Fance gene, which encodes the Fanconi anemia E (Fance) protein. Fanconi anemia (FA) proteins play pivotal roles in cellular responses to DNA damage and Fance acts as a molecular bridge between the FA core complex and Fancd2. To investigate the reduced fertility in the mutant males, we analyzed postnatal development of testicular germ cells. At one week after birth, most tubules in the mutant testes contained few or no germ cells. Over the next 2–3 weeks, germ cells accumulated in a limited number of tubules, so that some tubules contained germ cells around the full periphery of the tubule. Once sufficient numbers of germ cells had accumulated, they began to undergo the later stages of spermatogenesis. Immunoassays revealed that the Fancd2 protein accumulated around the periphery of the nucleus in normal developing spermatocytes, but we did not detect a similar localization of Fancd2 in the Fance mutant testes. Our assays indicate that although Fance mutant males are germ cell deficient at birth, the extant germ cells can proliferate and, if they reach a threshold density, can differentiate into mature sperm. Analogous to previous studies of FA genes in mice, our results show that the Fance protein plays an important, but not absolutely essential, role in the initial developmental expansion of the male germ line. PMID:27486799

  10. Fanconi anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... count ( CBC ) Developmental tests Drugs added to a blood sample to check for damage to chromosomes Hand x-ray and other imaging studies ( CT scan , MRI ) Hearing test HLA tissue typing (to find matching bone-marrow donors) Ultrasound of ...

  11. Fanconi anemia in brothers initially diagnosed with VACTERL association with hydrocephalus, and subsequently with Baller-Gerold syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Rossbach, H.C.; Granan, N.H.; Rossi, A.R.; Barbosa, J.L.

    1996-01-02

    Two brothers with presumed Baller-Gerold syndrome, one of whom was previously diagnosed with the association of vertebral, cardiac, renal, limb anomalies, anal atresia, tracheo-esophageal fistula (VACTERL) association with hydrocephalus, were evaluated for chromosome breakage because of severe thrombo cytopenia in one of them. Spontaneous and clastogen-induced breakage was markedly increased in both patients as compared to control individuals. Clinical manifestations and chromosome breakage, consistent with Fanconi anemia, in patients with a prior diagnosis of either Baller-Gerold syndrome, reported earlier in one other patient, or with VACTERL association with hydrocephalus, recently reported in 3 patients, underline the clinical heterogeneity of Fanconi anemia and raise the question of whether these syndromes are distinct disorders or phenotypic variations of the same disease. 12 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Late effects in patients with Fanconi anemia following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from alternative donors

    PubMed Central

    Anur, Praveen; Friedman, Danielle N; Sklar, Charles; Oeffinger, Kevin; Castiel, Mercedes; Kearney, Julia; Singh, Bhuvanesh; Prockop, Susan E; Kernan, Nancy A; Scaradavou, Andromachi; Kobos, Rachel; Curran, Kevin; Ruggiero, Julianne; Zakak, Nicole; O’Reilly, Richard J; Boulad, Farid

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is curative for hematological manifestations of Fanconi anemia (FA). We performed a retrospective analysis of 22 patients with FA and aplastic anemia, myelodysplastic syndrome or acute myelogenous leukemia who underwent a HSCT at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and survived at least one year post-HSCT. Patients underwent either a total body irradiation (TBI) (N=18) or busulfan (N=4) based cytoreduction followed by T-cell depleted transplants from alternative donors. Twenty patients were alive at time of study with a 5 and 10 year overall survival of 100% and 84% and no evidence of chronic GVHD. Among the 18 patients receiving a TBI-based regimen, 11 (61%) had persistent hemochromatosis, four (22%) developed hypothyroidism, seven (39%) had insulin resistance and five (27%) developed hypertriglyceridemia after transplant. Eleven of 16 evaluable patients (68%), receiving TBI, developed gonadal dysfunction. Two patients who received a TBI-based regimen died of squamous cell carcinoma. One patient developed hemochromatosis, hypothyroidism, and gonadal dysfunction after Busulfan-based cytoreduction. TBI appears to be a risk factor for malignant and endocrine late effects in the FA host. Multidisciplinary follow-up of patients with FA (including cancer screening) is essential for early detection and management of late complications, and improving long-term outcomes. PMID:26999465

  13. Elevated levels of STAT1 in Fanconi anemia group A lymphoblasts correlate with the cells’ sensitivity to DNA interstrand crosslinking drugs

    PubMed Central

    Prieto-Remón, Inés; Sánchez-Carrera, Dámaso; López-Duarte, Mónica; Richard, Carlos; Pipaón, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Progressive bone marrow failure starting in the first decade of life is one of the main characteristics of Fanconi anemia. Along with the bone marrow failure, this pathology is characterized by congenital malformations, endocrine dysfunction and an extraordinary predisposition to develop cancer. The fact that hematopoietic progenitor cells from subjects with Fanconi anemia are sensitive to both DNA-interstrand crosslinking agents and inflammatory cytokines, which are aberrantly overproduced in these patients, has led to different explanations for the causes of the bone marrow failure. We analyzed STAT1 expression in lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from patients with Fanconi anemia group A and correlated this with aspects of the Fanconi anemia phenotype such as sensitivity to genotoxic agents or to inhibitory cytokines. We provide evidence of overexpression of STAT1 in FANCA-deficient cells which has both transcriptional and post-translational components, and is related to the constitutive activation of ERK in Fanconi anemia group A cells, since it can be reverted by treatment with U0126. STAT1 phosphorylation was not defective in the lymphoblasts, so these cells accumulated higher levels of active STAT1 in response to interferon gamma, probably in relation to their greater sensitivity to this cytokine. On the other hand, inhibition of STAT1 by genetic or chemical means reverted the hypersensitivity of Fanconi anemia group A lymphoblasts to DNA interstrand crosslinking agents. Our data provide an explanation for the mixed sensitivity of Fanconi anemia group A cells to both genotoxic stress and inflammatory cytokines and indicate new targets for the treatment of bone marrow failure in these patients. PMID:23585528

  14. Correction of both spontaneous and DEB-induced chromosome instability in Fanconi anemia FA-C cells by FACC cDNA

    SciTech Connect

    Stavropoulos, D.J.; Tomkins, D.J.; Allingham-Hawkins, D.J.; Buchwald, M.

    1994-09-01

    Cells from all four Fanconi anemia complementation groups show hypersensitivity to cell-killing by mitomycin C (MMC), diepoxybutane (DEB) and other DNA cross-linking agents, and increased spontaneous and DEB-induced chromosome aberrations (CA). The extent of these phenotypes varies between lymphoblastoid cell lines from different complementation groups. Our data showed that the difference in MMC hypersensitivity and DEB-CA was not always coupled. While 230N (FA-B) had higher DEB-induced CA/cell than 536N (FA-C) (7.42 vs. 4.46 respectively), that latter was much more sensitive to cell-killing by MMC (dose at 10% survival, D{sub 10}: 5.2 vs. 1.2 ng/ml respectively). Strathdes et al. (1992) cloned a cDNA Fanconi anemia complementation group C (FACC) which complemented the hypersensitivity to MMC and DEB cell-killing of FA-C cells (536N) but not cells from the other three complementation groups. The present study was initiated to determine whether chromosome instability in 536N is also complemented by the FACC (FAC3) cDNA. The pREP4-FAC3 vector was transfected into 536N and transfectants selected with hygromycin B. The DEB D{sub 10} of 536N (1.0 {mu}M) was corrected to the control level (16.2 {mu}M for 3TO) by FACC (15.1 {mu}M for 536N-FACC), as previously demonstrated. Chromosome instability (cab, cse, ctb, cte) was determined without and with 0.1 {mu}g/ml DEB treatment. Spontaneous CA of 536N (0.30 aberrations/cell) was corrected to the control level (0.04 for 3TO) by FACC (0.06 for 536N-FACC). Similarly, the DEB-induced CA was corrected (2.74 for 536N vs. 0.06 and 0.02 for 3TO and 536N-FACC respectively). Thus, at least for FA complementation group C, hypersensitivity to cell-killing and chromosome instability are not dissociated and are most likely caused by the same gene defect.

  15. Therapeutic complement inhibition in complement-mediated hemolytic anemias: Past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Risitano, Antonio M; Marotta, Serena

    2016-06-01

    The introduction in the clinic of anti-complement agents represented a major achievement which gave to physicians a novel etiologic treatment for different human diseases. Indeed, the first anti-complement agent eculizumab has changed the treatment paradigm of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH), dramatically impacting its severe clinical course. In addition, eculizumab is the first agent approved for atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (aHUS), a life-threatening inherited thrombotic microangiopathy. Nevertheless, such remarkable milestone in medicine has brought to the fore additional challenges for the scientific community. Indeed, the list of complement-mediated anemias is not limited to PNH and aHUS, and other human diseases can be considered for anti-complement treatment. They include other thrombotic microangiopathies, as well as some antibody-mediated hemolytic anemias. Furthermore, more than ten years of experience with eculizumab led to a better understanding of the individual steps of the complement cascade involved in the pathophysiology of different human diseases. Based on this, new unmet clinical needs are emerging; a number of different strategies are currently under development to improve current anti-complement treatment, trying to address these specific clinical needs. They include: (i) alternative anti-C5 agents, which may improve the heaviness of eculizumab treatment; (ii) broad-spectrum anti-C3 agents, which may improve the efficacy of anti-C5 treatment by intercepting the complement cascade upstream (i.e., preventing C3-mediated extravascular hemolysis in PNH); (iii) targeted inhibitors of selective complement activating pathways, which may prevent early pathogenic events of specific human diseases (e.g., anti-classical pathway for antibody-mediated anemias, or anti-alternative pathway for PNH and aHUS). Here we briefly summarize the status of art of current and future complement inhibition for different complement-mediated anemias

  16. The Fanconi anemia associated protein FAAP24 uses two substrate specific binding surfaces for DNA recognition.

    PubMed

    Wienk, Hans; Slootweg, Jack C; Speerstra, Sietske; Kaptein, Robert; Boelens, Rolf; Folkers, Gert E

    2013-07-01

    To maintain the integrity of the genome, multiple DNA repair systems exist to repair damaged DNA. Recognition of altered DNA, including bulky adducts, pyrimidine dimers and interstrand crosslinks (ICL), partially depends on proteins containing helix-hairpin-helix (HhH) domains. To understand how ICL is specifically recognized by the Fanconi anemia proteins FANCM and FAAP24, we determined the structure of the HhH domain of FAAP24. Although it resembles other HhH domains, the FAAP24 domain contains a canonical hairpin motif followed by distorted motif. The HhH domain can bind various DNA substrates; using nuclear magnetic resonance titration experiments, we demonstrate that the canonical HhH motif is required for double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) binding, whereas the unstructured N-terminus can interact with single-stranded DNA. Both DNA binding surfaces are used for binding to ICL-like single/double-strand junction-containing DNA substrates. A structural model for FAAP24 bound to dsDNA has been made based on homology with the translesion polymerase iota. Site-directed mutagenesis, sequence conservation and charge distribution support the dsDNA-binding model. Analogous to other HhH domain-containing proteins, we suggest that multiple FAAP24 regions together contribute to binding to single/double-strand junction, which could contribute to specificity in ICL DNA recognition.

  17. Programmable Bio-Nano-Chip based Cytologic Testing of Oral Potentially Malignant Disorders in Fanconi Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Floriano, Pierre; Abram, Tim; Taylor, Leander; Le, Cathy; Talavera, Humberto; Nguyen, Michael; Raja, Rameez; Gillenwater, Ann; McDevitt, John; Vigneswaran, Nadarajah

    2015-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is caused by mutations of DNA repair genes. The risk of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) among FA patients is 800-folds higher than in the general population. Early detection of OSCC, preferably at it precursor stage is critical in FA patients to improve their survival. In an ongoing clinical trial, we are evaluating the effectiveness of the programmable bio-nano-chip (p-BNC)-based oral cytology test in diagnosing oral potentially malignant disorders (OPMD) in non-FA patients. We used this test to compare the cytomorphometric and molecular biomarkers in OSCC cell lines derived from FA patients and non-FA patients and brush biopsy samples of a FA patient’s OPMD and normal mucosa of healthy volunteers. Our data showed that expression patterns of molecular biomarkers were not notably different between sporadic and FA OSCC cell lines. The p-BNC assay revealed significant differences in cytometric parameters and biomarker MCM2 expression between cytobrush samples of the FA patient and cytobrush samples of normal oral mucosa obtained from healthy volunteers. Microscopic examination of the FA patient’s OPMD confirmed the presence of dysplasia. Our pilot data suggests that p-BNC brush biopsy test recognizes dysplastic oral epithelial cells in a brush biopsy sample of a FA patient. PMID:25662766

  18. BRCA/Fanconi anemia pathway implicates chemoresistance to gemcitabine in biliary tract cancer.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Shinsuke; Kobayashi, Shogo; Nagano, Hiroaki; Tomokuni, Akira; Tomimaru, Yoshito; Asaoka, Tadafumi; Hama, Naoki; Wada, Hiroshi; Kawamoto, Koichi; Marubashi, Shigeru; Eguchi, Hidetoshi; Doki, Yuichiro; Mori, Masaki

    2015-05-01

    The BRCA/Fanconi anemia (FA) pathway plays a key role in the repair of DNA double strand breaks. We focused on this pathway to clarify chemoresistance mechanisms in biliary tract cancer (BTC). We also investigated changes in the CD24(+)/44(+) population that may be involved in chemoresistance, as this population likely includes cancer stem cells. We used three BTC cell lines to establish gemcitabine (GEM)-resistant (GR) cells and evaluated the expression of BRCA/FA pathway components, chemoresistance, and the effect of BRCA/FA pathway inhibition on the CD24(+)/44(+) population. FANCD2 and CD24 expression were evaluated in 108 resected BTC specimens. GR cells highly expressed the BRCA/FA components. The BRCA/FA pathway was upregulated by GEM and cisplatin (CDDP) exposure. Inhibition using siRNA and RAD51 inhibitor sensitized GR cells to GEM or CDDP. The CD24(+)/44(+) population was increased in GR and parent BTC cells treated with GEM or CDDP and highly expressed BRCA/FA genes. FANCD2 was related to CD24 expression in resected BTC specimens. Inhibition of the BRCA/FA pathway under GEM reduced the CD24(+)/44(+) population in MzChA1-GR cells. Thus, high expression of the BRCA/FA pathway is one mechanism of chemoresistance against GEM and/or CDDP and is related to the CD24(+)/44(+) population in BTC.

  19. Structural analysis of human FANCL, the E3 ligase in the Fanconi anemia pathway.

    PubMed

    Hodson, Charlotte; Cole, Ambrose R; Lewis, Laurence P C; Miles, Jennifer A; Purkiss, Andrew; Walden, Helen

    2011-09-16

    The Fanconi anemia (FA) pathway is essential for the repair of DNA interstrand cross-links. At the heart of this pathway is the monoubiquitination of the FANCI-FANCD2 (ID) complex by the multiprotein "core complex" containing the E3 ubiquitin ligase FANCL. Vertebrate organisms have the eight-protein core complex, whereas invertebrates apparently do not. We report here the structure of the central domain of human FANCL in comparison with the recently solved Drosophila melanogaster FANCL. Our data represent the first structural detail into the catalytic core of the human system and reveal that the central fold of FANCL is conserved between species. However, there are macromolecular differences between the FANCL proteins that may account for the apparent distinctions in core complex requirements between the vertebrate and invertebrate FA pathways. In addition, we characterize the binding of human FANCL with its partners, Ube2t, FANCD2, and FANCI. Mutational analysis reveals which residues are required for substrate binding, and we also show the domain required for E2 binding.

  20. Ubiquitin-like protein UBL5 promotes the functional integrity of the Fanconi anemia pathway.

    PubMed

    Oka, Yasuyoshi; Bekker-Jensen, Simon; Mailand, Niels

    2015-05-12

    Ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like proteins (UBLs) function in a wide array of cellular processes. UBL5 is an atypical UBL that does not form covalent conjugates with cellular proteins and which has a known role in modulating pre-mRNA splicing. Here, we report an unexpected involvement of human UBL5 in promoting the function of the Fanconi anemia (FA) pathway for repair of DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs), mediated by a specific interaction with the central FA pathway component FANCI. UBL5-deficient cells display spliceosome-independent reduction of FANCI protein stability, defective FANCI function in response to DNA damage and hypersensitivity to ICLs. By mapping the sequence determinants underlying UBL5-FANCI binding, we generated separation-of-function mutants to demonstrate that key aspects of FA pathway function, including FANCI-FANCD2 heterodimerization, FANCD2 and FANCI monoubiquitylation and maintenance of chromosome stability after ICLs, are compromised when the UBL5-FANCI interaction is selectively inhibited by mutations in either protein. Together, our findings establish UBL5 as a factor that promotes the functionality of the FA DNA repair pathway.

  1. Co-opting the Fanconi anemia genomic stability pathway enables herpesvirus DNA synthesis and productive growth.

    PubMed

    Karttunen, Heidi; Savas, Jeffrey N; McKinney, Caleb; Chen, Yu-Hung; Yates, John R; Hukkanen, Veijo; Huang, Tony T; Mohr, Ian

    2014-07-03

    DNA damage associated with viral DNA synthesis can result in double-strand breaks that threaten genome integrity and must be repaired. Here, we establish that the cellular Fanconi anemia (FA) genomic stability pathway is exploited by herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) to promote viral DNA synthesis and enable its productive growth. Potent FA pathway activation in HSV-1-infected cells resulted in monoubiquitination of FA effector proteins FANCI and FANCD2 (FANCI-D2) and required the viral DNA polymerase. FANCD2 relocalized to viral replication compartments, and FANCI-D2 interacted with a multisubunit complex containing the virus-encoded single-stranded DNA-binding protein ICP8. Significantly, whereas HSV-1 productive growth was impaired in monoubiquitination-defective FA cells, this restriction was partially surmounted by antagonizing the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK), a critical enzyme required for nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ). This identifies the FA-pathway as a cellular factor required for herpesvirus productive growth and suggests that FA-mediated suppression of NHEJ is a fundamental step in the viral life cycle.

  2. Fanconi anemia proteins FANCD2 and FANCI exhibit different DNA damage responses during S-phase.

    PubMed

    Sareen, Archana; Chaudhury, Indrajit; Adams, Nicole; Sobeck, Alexandra

    2012-09-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) pathway members, FANCD2 and FANCI, contribute to the repair of replication-stalling DNA lesions. FA pathway activation relies on phosphorylation of FANCI by the ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related (ATR) kinase, followed by monoubiquitination of FANCD2 and FANCI by the FA core complex. FANCD2 and FANCI are thought to form a functional heterodimer during DNA repair, but it is unclear how dimer formation is regulated or what the functions of the FANCD2-FANCI complex versus the monomeric proteins are. We show that the FANCD2-FANCI complex forms independently of ATR and FA core complex, and represents the inactive form of both proteins. DNA damage-induced FA pathway activation triggers dissociation of FANCD2 from FANCI. Dissociation coincides with FANCD2 monoubiquitination, which significantly precedes monoubiquitination of FANCI; moreover, monoubiquitination responses of FANCD2 and FANCI exhibit distinct DNA substrate specificities. A phosphodead FANCI mutant fails to dissociate from FANCD2, whereas phosphomimetic FANCI cannot interact with FANCD2, indicating that FANCI phosphorylation is the molecular trigger for FANCD2-FANCI dissociation. Following dissociation, FANCD2 binds replicating chromatin prior to-and independently of-FANCI. Moreover, the concentration of chromatin-bound FANCD2 exceeds that of FANCI throughout replication. Our results suggest that FANCD2 and FANCI function separately at consecutive steps during DNA repair in S-phase.

  3. Activation of the Fanconi anemia/BRCA pathway at low doses of ionization radiation.

    PubMed

    Bosch, Pau Castillo; Bogliolo, Massimo; Surrallés, Jordi

    2015-11-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare, clinically heterogeneous autosomal recessive or X-linked genetic disease characterized by chromosome fragility, congenital malformations and cancer susceptibility. FA patients are usually radiosensitive when exposed to radiotherapy but the role of the FA in response to ionizing radiation (IR) is controversial. Here we have investigated IR-induced activation of the FA pathway by systematically analyzing monoubiquitination of the central protein FANCD2 and subsequent recruitment to stalled replication forks in primary fibroblasts. We developed an immunolabelling method to simultaneously visualize IR-induced FANCD2 and γH2AX foci in S-phase. We observed FANCD2 foci formation in a subset of IR-induced γH2AX foci in S-phase cells. This was observed at doses of IR ranging from 0.1 to 5.0Gy in a dose dependent non-threshold fashion. Our results indicate that minimum doses of IR can produce replication fork stalling and FA pathway activation during S-phase in primary cells.

  4. The PTEN phosphatase functions cooperatively with the Fanconi anemia proteins in DNA crosslink repair

    PubMed Central

    Vuono, Elizabeth A.; Mukherjee, Ananda; Vierra, David A.; Adroved, Morganne M.; Hodson, Charlotte; Deans, Andrew J.; Howlett, Niall G.

    2016-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetic disease characterized by bone marrow failure and increased cancer risk. The FA proteins function primarily in DNA interstrand crosslink (ICL) repair. Here, we have examined the role of the PTEN phosphatase in this process. We have established that PTEN-deficient cells, like FA cells, exhibit increased cytotoxicity, chromosome structural aberrations, and error-prone mutagenic DNA repair following exposure to ICL-inducing agents. The increased ICL sensitivity of PTEN-deficient cells is caused, in part, by elevated PLK1 kinase-mediated phosphorylation of FANCM, constitutive FANCM polyubiquitination and degradation, and the consequent inefficient assembly of the FA core complex, FANCD2, and FANCI into DNA repair foci. We also establish that PTEN function in ICL repair is dependent on its protein phosphatase activity and ability to be SUMOylated, yet is independent of its lipid phosphatase activity. Finally, via epistasis analysis, we demonstrate that PTEN and FANCD2 function cooperatively in ICL repair. PMID:27819275

  5. Significance of the Fanconi anemia FANCD2 protein in sporadic and metastatic human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Rudland, Philip S; Platt-Higgins, Angela M; Davies, Lowri M; de Silva Rudland, Suzete; Wilson, James B; Aladwani, Abdulaziz; Winstanley, John H R; Barraclough, Dong L; Barraclough, Roger; West, Christopher R; Jones, Nigel J

    2010-06-01

    FANCD2, a pivotal protein in the Fanconi anemia and BRCA pathway/network, is monoubiquitylated in the nucleus in response to DNA damage. This study examines the subcellular location and relationship with prognostic factors and patient survival of FANCD2 in breast cancer. Antibodies to FANCD2 were used to immunocytochemically stain 16 benign and 20 malignant breast specimens as well as 314 primary breast carcinomas to assess its association with subcellular compartment and prognostic factors using Fisher's Exact test or with patient survival over 20 years using Wilcoxon-Gehan statistics. Immunoreactive FANCD2 was found in the nucleus and cytoplasm of all 16 benign tissues, but nuclear staining was lost from a significant 19/20 malignant carcinomas (P < 0.0001). Antibodies to FANCD2 stained the cytoplasm of 196 primary carcinomas, leaving 118 as negatively stained. Negative cytoplasmic staining was significantly associated with positive staining for the metastasis-inducing proteins S100A4, S100P, osteopontin, and AGR2 (P < or = 0.002). Survival of patients with FANCD2-negative carcinomas was significantly worse (P < 0.0001) than those with positively stained carcinomas, and only 4% were alive at the census date. Multivariate regression analysis identified negative staining for cytoplasmic FANCD2 as the most significant indicator of patient death (P = 0.001). Thus FANCD2's cytoplasmic loss in the primary carcinomas may allow the selection of cells overexpressing proteins that can induce metastases before surgery.

  6. The Fanconi anemia protein FANCM is controlled by FANCD2 and the ATR/ATM pathways.

    PubMed

    Sobeck, Alexandra; Stone, Stacie; Landais, Igor; de Graaf, Bendert; Hoatlin, Maureen E

    2009-09-18

    Genomic stability requires a functional Fanconi anemia (FA) pathway composed of an upstream "core complex" (FA proteins A/B/C/E/F/G/L/M) that mediates monoubiquitination of the downstream targets FANCD2 and FANCI. Unique among FA core complex members, FANCM has processing activities toward replication-associated DNA structures, suggesting a vital role for FANCM during replication. Using Xenopus egg extracts, we analyzed the functions of FANCM in replication and the DNA damage response. xFANCM binds chromatin in a replication-dependent manner and is phosphorylated in response to DNA damage structures. Chromatin binding and DNA damage-induced phosphorylation of xFANCM are mediated in part by the downstream FA pathway protein FANCD2. Moreover, phosphorylation and chromatin recruitment of FANCM is regulated by two mayor players in the DNA damage response: the cell cycle checkpoint kinases ATR and ATM. Our results indicate that functions of FANCM are controlled by FA- and non-FA pathways in the DNA damage response.

  7. Physical and functional crosstalk between Fanconi anemia core components and the GINS replication complex.

    PubMed

    Tumini, Emanuela; Plevani, Paolo; Muzi-Falconi, Marco; Marini, Federica

    2011-02-07

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an inherited disease characterized by bone marrow failure, increased cancer risk and hypersensitivity to DNA cross-linking agents, implying a role for this pathway in the maintenance of genomic stability. The central player of the FA pathway is the multi-subunit E3 ubiquitin ligase complex activated through a replication- and DNA damage-dependent mechanism. A consequence of the activation of the complex is the monoubiquitylation of FANCD2 and FANCI, late term effectors in the maintenance of genome integrity. The details regarding the coordination of the FA-dependent response and the DNA replication process are still mostly unknown. We found, by yeast two-hybrid assay and co-immunoprecipitation in human cells, that the core complex subunit FANCF physically interacts with PSF2, a member of the GINS complex essential for both the initiation and elongation steps of DNA replication. In HeLa cells depleted for PSF2, we observed a decreased binding to chromatin of the FA core complex, suggesting that the GINS complex may have a role in either loading or stabilizing the FA core complex onto chromatin. Consistently, GINS and core complex bind chromatin contemporarily upon origin firing and PSF2 depletion sensitizes cells to DNA cross-linking agents. However, depletion of PSF2 is not sufficient to reduce monoubiquitylation of FANCD2 or its localization to nuclear foci following DNA damage. Our results suggest a novel crosstalk between DNA replication and the FA pathway.

  8. Regulation of Fanconi anemia protein FANCD2 monoubiquitination by miR-302.

    PubMed

    Suresh, Bharathi; Kumar, A Madhan; Jeong, Hoe-Su; Cho, Youl-Hee; Ramakrishna, Suresh; Kim, Kye-Seong

    2015-10-16

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a recessively inherited multigene disease characterized by congenital defects, progressive bone marrow failure, and heightened cancer susceptibility. Monoubiquitination of the FA pathway member FANCD2 contributes to the repair of replication stalling DNA lesions. However, cellular regulation of FANCD2 monoubiquitination remains poorly understood. In the present study, we identified the miR-302 cluster as a potential regulator of FANCD2 by bioinformatics analysis. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are the major posttranscriptional regulators of a wide variety of biological processes, and have been implicated in a number of diseases. Expression of the exogenous miR-302 cluster (without miR-367) reduced FANCD2 monoubiquitination and nuclear foci formation. Furthermore, miR-302 cells showed extensive chromosomal breakage upon MMC treatment when compared to mock control cells. Taken together, our results suggest that overexpression of miR-302 plays a critical role in the regulation of FANCD2 monoubiquitination, resulting in characteristic defects in DNA repair within cells.

  9. Regulation of the Fanconi anemia pathway by a SUMO-like delivery network.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kailin; Moldovan, George-Lucian; Vinciguerra, Patrizia; Murai, Junko; Takeda, Shunichi; D'Andrea, Alan D

    2011-09-01

    The USP1/UAF1 complex deubiquitinates the Fanconi anemia protein FANCD2, thereby promoting homologous recombination and DNA cross-link repair. How USP1/UAF1 is targeted to the FANCD2/FANCI heterodimer has remained unknown. Here we show that UAF1 contains a tandem repeat of SUMO-like domains in its C terminus (SLD1 and SLD2). SLD2 binds directly to a SUMO-like domain-interacting motif (SIM) on FANCI. Deletion of the SLD2 sequence of UAF1 or mutation of the SIM on FANCI disrupts UAF1/FANCI binding and inhibits FANCD2 deubiquitination and DNA repair. The USP1/UAF1 complex also deubiquitinates PCNA-Ub, and deubiquitination requires the PCNA-binding protein hELG1. The SLD2 sequence of UAF1 binds to a SIM on hELG1, thus targeting the USP1/UAF1 complex to its PCNA-Ub substrate. We propose that the regulated targeting of USP1/UAF1 to its DNA repair substrates, FANCD2-Ub and PCNA-Ub, by SLD-SIM interactions coordinates homologous recombination and translesion DNA synthesis.

  10. ATR-ATRIP kinase complex triggers activation of the Fanconi anemia DNA repair pathway.

    PubMed

    Shigechi, Tomoko; Tomida, Junya; Sato, Koichi; Kobayashi, Masahiko; Eykelenboom, John K; Pessina, Fabio; Zhang, Yanbin; Uchida, Emi; Ishiai, Masamichi; Lowndes, Noel F; Yamamoto, Kenichi; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Takata, Minoru

    2012-03-01

    ATR kinase activates the S-phase checkpoint when replication forks stall at sites of DNA damage. This event also causes phosphorylation of the Fanconi anemia (FA) protein FANCI, triggering its monoubiquitination of the key DNA repair factor FANCD2 by the FA core E3 ligase complex, thereby promoting this central pathway of DNA repair which permits replication to be restarted. However, the interplay between ATR and the FA pathway has been unclear. In this study, we present evidence that their action is directly linked, gaining insights into this relationship in a DT40 mutant cell line that is conditionally deficient in the critical ATR-binding partner protein ATRIP. Using this system, we showed that ATRIP was crucial for DNA damage-induced FANCD2 monoubiquitination and FANCI phosphorylation. ATR kinase phosphorylated recombinant FANCI protein in vitro, which was facilitated by the presence of FANCD2. Mechanistic investigations revealed that the RPA region but not the TopBP1 region of ATRIP was required for FANCD2 monoubiquitination, whereas Chk1 phosphorylation relied upon both domains. Together, our findings identify ATR as the kinase responsible for activating the FA pathway of DNA repair.

  11. Fanconi anemia pathway regulates convergent transcription-induced cell death at trinucleotide repeats in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Nimrat; Lin, Yunfu; Wilson, John H.

    2016-01-01

    Almost 20 incurable neurodegenerative disorders are caused by trinucleotide repeat (TNR) expansion beyond a certain threshold, with disease time of onset and severity positively correlating with repeat length. Typically, long TNRs display a bias toward further expansion and repeats continue to expand not only during germline transmissions from parents to offspring, but also remain highly unstable in somatic tissues of patients. Hence, understanding TNR instability mechanisms sheds light on underlying disease pathology. Recently, we showed that activated ATR is the major signal for convergent-transcription-induced cell death at CAG repeats and is regulated by the mismatch repair (MMR) pathway. Additionally, components of other DNA repair pathways such as transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair (TC-NER) and R-loop resolution by RNaseH reduce cell death. Because activated ATR signals the Fanconi anemia (FA) pathway of interstrand crosslink DNA repair, we asked whether the FA pathway also modulates convergent-transcription-induced cell death at expanded CAG repeats. We show here that siRNA knockdown of FA components—FANCI, FANCJ, FANCM, FANCA, and FANCD2—decreases cell death, suggesting that FA proteins, like MMR proteins, are activators of cell death during convergent transcription. PMID:27595121

  12. Co-opting the Fanconi Anemia Genomic Stability Pathway Enables Herpesvirus DNA Synthesis and Productive Growth

    PubMed Central

    Karttunen, Heidi; Savas, Jeffrey N.; McKinney, Caleb; Chen, Yu-Hung; Yates, John R.; Hukkanen, Veijo; Huang, Tony T.; Mohr, Ian

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY DNA damage associated with viral DNA synthesis can result in double strand breaks that threaten genome integrity and must be repaired. Here, we establish that the cellular Fanconi Anemia (FA) genomic stability pathway is exploited by HSV1 to promote viral DNA synthesis and enable its productive growth. Potent FA pathway activation in HSV1-infected cells resulted in monoubiquitination of FA effector proteins, FANCI and FANCD2 (FANCI-D2) and required the viral DNA polymerase. FANCD2 relocalized to viral replication compartments and FANCI-D2 interacted with a multi-subunit complex containing the virus-encoded single-stranded DNA-binding protein ICP8. Significantly, while HSV1 productive growth was impaired in monoubiquitination-defective FA patient cells, this restriction was partially surmounted by antagonizing the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK), a critical enzyme required for non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). This identifies the FA-pathway as a new cellular factor required for herpesvirus productive growth and suggests that FA-mediated suppression of NHEJ is a fundamental step in the viral lifecycle. PMID:24954902

  13. Hypomutability in Fanconi anemia cells is associated with increased deletion frequency at the HPRT locus

    SciTech Connect

    Papadopoulo, D.; Guillouf, C.; Moustacchi, E. ); Mohrenweiser, H. )

    1990-11-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an inherited human disorder associated with a predisposition to cancer and characterized by anomalies in the processing of DNA cross-links and certain monoadducts. The authors reported previously that the frequency of psoralen-photoinduced mutations at the HPRT locus is lower in FA cells than in normal cells. This hypomutability is shown here to be associated with an increased frequency of deletions in the HPRT gene when either a mixture of cross-links and monoadducts or monoadducts alone are induced. Molecular analysis of mutants in the HPRT gene was carried out. In normal cells the majority of spontaneous and induced mutants are point mutations whereas in FA deletion mutations predominate. In that case a majority of mutants were found to lack individual exons or small clusters of exons whereas in normal cells large (complete or major gene loss) and small deletions are almost equally represented. Thus they propose that the FA defect lies in a mutagenic pathway that, in normal cells, involves by passing lesions and subsequent gap filling by a recombinational process during replication.

  14. The Fanconi Anemia Pathway Protects Genome Integrity from R-loops.

    PubMed

    García-Rubio, María L; Pérez-Calero, Carmen; Barroso, Sonia I; Tumini, Emanuela; Herrera-Moyano, Emilia; Rosado, Iván V; Aguilera, Andrés

    2015-11-01

    Co-transcriptional RNA-DNA hybrids (R loops) cause genome instability. To prevent harmful R loop accumulation, cells have evolved specific eukaryotic factors, one being the BRCA2 double-strand break repair protein. As BRCA2 also protects stalled replication forks and is the FANCD1 member of the Fanconi Anemia (FA) pathway, we investigated the FA role in R loop-dependent genome instability. Using human and murine cells defective in FANCD2 or FANCA and primary bone marrow cells from FANCD2 deficient mice, we show that the FA pathway removes R loops, and that many DNA breaks accumulated in FA cells are R loop-dependent. Importantly, FANCD2 foci in untreated and MMC-treated cells are largely R loop dependent, suggesting that the FA functions at R loop-containing sites. We conclude that co-transcriptional R loops and R loop-mediated DNA damage greatly contribute to genome instability and that one major function of the FA pathway is to protect cells from R loops.

  15. Hypersensitivities for acetaldehyde and other agents among cancer cells null for clinically relevant Fanconi anemia genes.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Soma; Sur, Surojit; Yerram, Sashidhar R; Rago, Carlo; Bhunia, Anil K; Hossain, M Zulfiquer; Paun, Bogdan C; Ren, Yunzhao R; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A; Azad, Nilofer A; Kern, Scott E

    2014-01-01

    Large-magnitude numerical distinctions (>10-fold) among drug responses of genetically contrasting cancers were crucial for guiding the development of some targeted therapies. Similar strategies brought epidemiological clues and prevention goals for genetic diseases. Such numerical guides, however, were incomplete or low magnitude for Fanconi anemia pathway (FANC) gene mutations relevant to cancer in FANC-mutation carriers (heterozygotes). We generated a four-gene FANC-null cancer panel, including the engineering of new PALB2/FANCN-null cancer cells by homologous recombination. A characteristic matching of FANCC-null, FANCG-null, BRCA2/FANCD1-null, and PALB2/FANCN-null phenotypes was confirmed by uniform tumor regression on single-dose cross-linker therapy in mice and by shared chemical hypersensitivities to various inter-strand cross-linking agents and γ-radiation in vitro. Some compounds, however, had contrasting magnitudes of sensitivity; a strikingly high (19- to 22-fold) hypersensitivity was seen among PALB2-null and BRCA2-null cells for the ethanol metabolite, acetaldehyde, associated with widespread chromosomal breakage at a concentration not producing breaks in parental cells. Because FANC-defective cancer cells can share or differ in their chemical sensitivities, patterns of selective hypersensitivity hold implications for the evolutionary understanding of this pathway. Clinical decisions for cancer-relevant prevention and management of FANC-mutation carriers could be modified by expanded studies of high-magnitude sensitivities.

  16. The Fanconi anemia DNA damage repair pathway in the spotlight for germline predisposition to colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Esteban-Jurado, Clara; Franch-Expósito, Sebastià; Muñoz, Jenifer; Ocaña, Teresa; Carballal, Sabela; López-Cerón, Maria; Cuatrecasas, Miriam; Vila-Casadesús, Maria; Lozano, Juan José; Serra, Enric; Beltran, Sergi; Brea-Fernández, Alejandro; Ruiz-Ponte, Clara; Castells, Antoni; Bujanda, Luis; Garre, Pilar; Caldés, Trinidad; Cubiella, Joaquín; Balaguer, Francesc; Castellví-Bel, Sergi

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common neoplasms in the world. Fanconi anemia (FA) is a very rare genetic disease causing bone marrow failure, congenital growth abnormalities and cancer predisposition. The comprehensive FA DNA damage repair pathway requires the collaboration of 53 proteins and it is necessary to restore genome integrity by efficiently repairing damaged DNA. A link between FA genes in breast and ovarian cancer germline predisposition has been previously suggested. We selected 74 CRC patients from 40 unrelated Spanish families with strong CRC aggregation compatible with an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance and without mutations in known hereditary CRC genes and performed germline DNA whole-exome sequencing with the aim of finding new candidate germline predisposition variants. After sequencing and data analysis, variant prioritization selected only those very rare alterations, producing a putative loss of function and located in genes with a role compatible with cancer. We detected an enrichment for variants in FA DNA damage repair pathway genes in our familial CRC cohort as 6 families carried heterozygous, rare, potentially pathogenic variants located in BRCA2/FANCD1, BRIP1/FANCJ, FANCC, FANCE and REV3L/POLZ. In conclusion, the FA DNA damage repair pathway may play an important role in the inherited predisposition to CRC. PMID:27165003

  17. Plasma ultrafiltrates from Fanconi Anemia patients induces chromosomal breakages in donor lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Emerit, I.; Levy, A.; Pagano, G.

    1994-09-01

    The present study investigated the occurrence, if any, of transferable clastogenic activity in the plasma from Fanconi Anemia (FA) patients and their families. A total of 13 FA homozygotes, 25 parents, and 12 siblings were studied for their: (a) spontaneous and DEB-induced chromosomal instability, and (b) induction of chromosomal breaks in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) from healthy donors, following exposure to plasma ultrafiltrates from FA subjects, their parents or siblings. Plasma was ultrafiltered through membranes with a cutoff at 10,000 daltons (YM 10 Amicon) and 0.25 ml-aliquote added to PBL from 14 healthy donors. DEB test provided FA confirmatory diagnosis. The occurrence of clastogenic factors (CF) was evident in all FA patients, except for one. In two out of three patients, who died during this study, very high CF levels were observed. Clastogenic activity was significantly higher in male than in female patients (p<0.05). No correlation was observed between CF data and spontaneous or DEB-induced chromosomal instability. Ultrafiltrates from parents and siblings showed less CF than FA homozygotes; however, concentration by ultrafiltration through YM 2 (3x to 5x) led to excess clastogenic activity. The control plasmas were lacking CF even after an 8x concentration. The present data suggest that CF formation in the plasma of FA patients is consistent with an in vivo prooxident state in FA.

  18. Sonic Hedgehog, VACTERL, and Fanconi anemia: Pathogenetic connections and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Lubinsky, Mark

    2015-11-01

    Three systems with VACTERL association findings- mutations of the Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) signaling pathway in mice, murine adriamycin teratogenicity, and human Fanconi anemia (FA) pathway mutations, may all involve a similar mechanism. SHH is up-regulated in irradiated cells, and DNA breaks common with radiation damage in the adriamycin and FA systems are plausible signals for such effects, which would affect development. Since FA related DNA breakage occurs throughout life, SHH disturbances may account for later FA related findings involving hematopoietic and malignancy issues. In support, androgen, a standard treatment for FA hematologic failure, down-regulates SHH, and common FA malignancies such as squamous cell carcinomas and acute myeloid leukemia have been linked to enhanced SHH function. This suggests that interventions lowering SHH levels may be useful therapeutically. Also supporting a connection between pre- and post- natal findings, the frequency and number of VACTERL anomalies with FA correlate with the severity and onset of hematopoietic and malignancy issues. In FA, radial anomalies are the most common of these defects, followed by renal findings, while vertebral and gastrointestinal anomalies are relatively uncommon, a pattern that differs from observations of the VACTERL association. Genes with more severe effects also show a greatly increased incidence of brain abnormalities, and a paucity of such findings with other FA genes suggests that brain development is relatively refractory to SHH related effects, accounting for the rarity of such findings with the association.

  19. Lentiviral-mediated Genetic Correction of Hematopoietic and Mesenchymal Progenitor Cells From Fanconi Anemia Patients.

    PubMed

    Jacome, Ariana; Navarro, Susana; Río, Paula; Yañez, Rosa M; González-Murillo, Africa; Luz Lozano, M; Lamana, Maria Luisa; Sevilla, Julian; Olive, Teresa; Diaz-Heredia, Cristina; Badell, Isabel; Estella, Jesus; Madero, Luis; Guenechea, Guillermo; Casado, José; Segovia, Jose C; Bueren, Juan A

    2009-06-01

    Previous clinical trials based on the genetic correction of purified CD34(+) cells with γ-retroviral vectors have demonstrated clinical efficacy in different monogenic diseases, including X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency, adenosine deaminase deficient severe combined immunodeficiency and chronic granulomatous disease. Similar protocols, however, failed to engraft Fanconi anemia (FA) patients with genetically corrected cells. In this study, we first aimed to correlate the hematological status of 27 FA patients with CD34(+) cell values determined in their bone marrow (BM). Strikingly, no correlation between these parameters was observed, although good correlations were obtained when numbers of colony-forming cells (CFCs) were considered. Based on these results, and because purified FA CD34(+) cells might have suboptimal repopulating properties, we investigated the possibility of genetically correcting unselected BM samples from FA patients. Our data show that the lentiviral transduction of unselected FA BM cells mediates an efficient phenotypic correction of hematopoietic progenitor cells and also of CD34(-) mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), with a reported role in hematopoietic engraftment. Our results suggest that gene therapy protocols appropriate for the treatment of different monogenic diseases may not be adequate for stem cell diseases like FA. We propose a new approach for the gene therapy of FA based on the rapid transduction of unselected hematopoietic grafts with lentiviral vectors (LVs).

  20. Lentiviral-mediated genetic correction of hematopoietic and mesenchymal progenitor cells from Fanconi anemia patients.

    PubMed

    Jacome, Ariana; Navarro, Susana; Río, Paula; Yañez, Rosa M; González-Murillo, Africa; Lozano, M Luz; Lamana, Maria Luisa; Sevilla, Julian; Olive, Teresa; Diaz-Heredia, Cristina; Badell, Isabel; Estella, Jesus; Madero, Luis; Guenechea, Guillermo; Casado, José; Segovia, Jose C; Bueren, Juan A

    2009-06-01

    Previous clinical trials based on the genetic correction of purified CD34(+) cells with gamma-retroviral vectors have demonstrated clinical efficacy in different monogenic diseases, including X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency, adenosine deaminase deficient severe combined immunodeficiency and chronic granulomatous disease. Similar protocols, however, failed to engraft Fanconi anemia (FA) patients with genetically corrected cells. In this study, we first aimed to correlate the hematological status of 27 FA patients with CD34(+) cell values determined in their bone marrow (BM). Strikingly, no correlation between these parameters was observed, although good correlations were obtained when numbers of colony-forming cells (CFCs) were considered. Based on these results, and because purified FA CD34(+) cells might have suboptimal repopulating properties, we investigated the possibility of genetically correcting unselected BM samples from FA patients. Our data show that the lentiviral transduction of unselected FA BM cells mediates an efficient phenotypic correction of hematopoietic progenitor cells and also of CD34(-) mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), with a reported role in hematopoietic engraftment. Our results suggest that gene therapy protocols appropriate for the treatment of different monogenic diseases may not be adequate for stem cell diseases like FA. We propose a new approach for the gene therapy of FA based on the rapid transduction of unselected hematopoietic grafts with lentiviral vectors (LVs).

  1. Lentiviral-mediated Genetic Correction of Hematopoietic and Mesenchymal Progenitor Cells From Fanconi Anemia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jacome, Ariana; Navarro, Susana; Río, Paula; Yañez, Rosa M; González-Murillo, Africa; Luz Lozano, M; Lamana, Maria Luisa; Sevilla, Julian; Olive, Teresa; Diaz-Heredia, Cristina; Badell, Isabel; Estella, Jesus; Madero, Luis; Guenechea, Guillermo; Casado, José; Segovia, Jose C; Bueren, Juan A

    2009-01-01

    Previous clinical trials based on the genetic correction of purified CD34+ cells with γ-retroviral vectors have demonstrated clinical efficacy in different monogenic diseases, including X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency, adenosine deaminase deficient severe combined immunodeficiency and chronic granulomatous disease. Similar protocols, however, failed to engraft Fanconi anemia (FA) patients with genetically corrected cells. In this study, we first aimed to correlate the hematological status of 27 FA patients with CD34+ cell values determined in their bone marrow (BM). Strikingly, no correlation between these parameters was observed, although good correlations were obtained when numbers of colony-forming cells (CFCs) were considered. Based on these results, and because purified FA CD34+ cells might have suboptimal repopulating properties, we investigated the possibility of genetically correcting unselected BM samples from FA patients. Our data show that the lentiviral transduction of unselected FA BM cells mediates an efficient phenotypic correction of hematopoietic progenitor cells and also of CD34− mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), with a reported role in hematopoietic engraftment. Our results suggest that gene therapy protocols appropriate for the treatment of different monogenic diseases may not be adequate for stem cell diseases like FA. We propose a new approach for the gene therapy of FA based on the rapid transduction of unselected hematopoietic grafts with lentiviral vectors (LVs). PMID:19277017

  2. Hypoxic Stress Facilitates Acute Activation and Chronic Down-Regulation of Fanconi Anemia Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Scanlon, Susan E.; Glazer, Peter M.

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia induces genomic instability through replication stress and dysregulation of vital DNA repair pathways. The Fanconi anemia (FA) proteins, FANCD2 and FANCI, are key members of a DNA repair pathway that responds to replicative stress, suggesting that they undergo regulation by hypoxic conditions. Here acute hypoxic stress activates the FA pathway via ubiquitination of FANCD2 and FANCI in an ATR-dependent manner. In addition, the presence of an intact FA pathway is required for preventing hypoxia-induced DNA damage measurable by the comet assay, limiting the accumulation of γH2AX (a marker of DNA damage or stalled replication), and protecting cells from hypoxia-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, prolonged hypoxia induces transcriptional repression of FANCD2 in a manner analogous to the hypoxic down-regulation of BRCA1 and RAD51. Thus, hypoxia-induced FA pathway activation plays a key role in maintaining genome integrity and cell survival, while FA protein down-regulation with prolonged hypoxia contributes to genomic instability. PMID:24688021

  3. Second allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for Patients with Fanconi anemia and Bone Marrow Failure

    PubMed Central

    Ayas, Mouhab; Eapen, Mary; Le-Rademacher, Jennifer; Carreras, Jeanette; Abdel-Azim, Hisham; Alter, Blanche P.; Anderlini, Paolo; Battiwalla, Minoo; Bierings, Marc; Buchbinder, David K.; Bonfim, Carmem; Camitta, Bruce M.; Fasth, Anders L.; Gale, Robert Peter; Lee, Michelle A.; Lund, Troy C.; Myers, Kasiani C.; Olsson, Richard F.; Page, Kristin M.; Prestidge, Tim D.; Radhi, Mohamed; Shah, Ami J.; Schultz, Kirk R.; Wirk, Baldeep; Wagner, John E.; Deeg, H. Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Second allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is the only salvage option for those for develop graft failure after their first HCT. Data on outcomes after second HCT in Fanconi anemia (FA) are scarce. We report outcomes after second allogeneic HCT for FA (n=81). The indication for second HCT was graft failure after the first HCT. Transplants occurred between 1990 and 2012. The timing of second transplantation predicted subsequent graft failure and survival. Graft failure was high when the second transplant occurred less than 3 months from the first. The 3-month probability of graft failure was 69% when the interval between first and second transplant was less than 3 months compared to 23% when the interval was longer (p<0.001). Consequently, survival rates were substantially lower when the interval between first and second transplant was less than 3 months, 23% at 1-year compared to 58%, when the interval was longer (p=0.001). The corresponding 5-year probabilities of survival were 16% and 45%, respectively (p=0.006). Taken together, these data suggest that fewer than half of FA patients undergoing a second HCT for graft failure are long-term survivors. There is an urgent need to develop strategies to lower graft failure after first HCT. PMID:26116087

  4. The Fanconi Anemia Pathway Protects Genome Integrity from R-loops

    PubMed Central

    García-Rubio, María L.; Pérez-Calero, Carmen; Barroso, Sonia I.; Tumini, Emanuela; Herrera-Moyano, Emilia; Rosado, Iván V.; Aguilera, Andrés

    2015-01-01

    Co-transcriptional RNA-DNA hybrids (R loops) cause genome instability. To prevent harmful R loop accumulation, cells have evolved specific eukaryotic factors, one being the BRCA2 double-strand break repair protein. As BRCA2 also protects stalled replication forks and is the FANCD1 member of the Fanconi Anemia (FA) pathway, we investigated the FA role in R loop-dependent genome instability. Using human and murine cells defective in FANCD2 or FANCA and primary bone marrow cells from FANCD2 deficient mice, we show that the FA pathway removes R loops, and that many DNA breaks accumulated in FA cells are R loop-dependent. Importantly, FANCD2 foci in untreated and MMC-treated cells are largely R loop dependent, suggesting that the FA functions at R loop-containing sites. We conclude that co-transcriptional R loops and R loop-mediated DNA damage greatly contribute to genome instability and that one major function of the FA pathway is to protect cells from R loops. PMID:26584049

  5. Fanconi anemia proteins FANCD2 and FANCI exhibit different DNA damage responses during S-phase

    PubMed Central

    Sareen, Archana; Chaudhury, Indrajit; Adams, Nicole; Sobeck, Alexandra

    2012-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) pathway members, FANCD2 and FANCI, contribute to the repair of replication-stalling DNA lesions. FA pathway activation relies on phosphorylation of FANCI by the ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related (ATR) kinase, followed by monoubiquitination of FANCD2 and FANCI by the FA core complex. FANCD2 and FANCI are thought to form a functional heterodimer during DNA repair, but it is unclear how dimer formation is regulated or what the functions of the FANCD2–FANCI complex versus the monomeric proteins are. We show that the FANCD2–FANCI complex forms independently of ATR and FA core complex, and represents the inactive form of both proteins. DNA damage-induced FA pathway activation triggers dissociation of FANCD2 from FANCI. Dissociation coincides with FANCD2 monoubiquitination, which significantly precedes monoubiquitination of FANCI; moreover, monoubiquitination responses of FANCD2 and FANCI exhibit distinct DNA substrate specificities. A phosphodead FANCI mutant fails to dissociate from FANCD2, whereas phosphomimetic FANCI cannot interact with FANCD2, indicating that FANCI phosphorylation is the molecular trigger for FANCD2–FANCI dissociation. Following dissociation, FANCD2 binds replicating chromatin prior to—and independently of—FANCI. Moreover, the concentration of chromatin-bound FANCD2 exceeds that of FANCI throughout replication. Our results suggest that FANCD2 and FANCI function separately at consecutive steps during DNA repair in S-phase. PMID:22753026

  6. FAAP100 is essential for activation of the Fanconi anemia-associated DNA damage response pathway.

    PubMed

    Ling, Chen; Ishiai, Masamichi; Ali, Abdullah Mahmood; Medhurst, Annette L; Neveling, Kornelia; Kalb, Reinhard; Yan, Zhijiang; Xue, Yutong; Oostra, Anneke B; Auerbach, Arleen D; Hoatlin, Maureen E; Schindler, Detlev; Joenje, Hans; de Winter, Johan P; Takata, Minoru; Meetei, Amom Ruhikanta; Wang, Weidong

    2007-04-18

    The Fanconi anemia (FA) core complex plays a central role in the DNA damage response network involving breast cancer susceptibility gene products, BRCA1 and BRCA2. The complex consists of eight FA proteins, including a ubiquitin ligase (FANCL) and a DNA translocase (FANCM), and is essential for monoubiquitination of FANCD2 in response to DNA damage. Here, we report a novel component of this complex, termed FAAP100, which is essential for the stability of the core complex and directly interacts with FANCB and FANCL to form a stable subcomplex. Formation of this subcomplex protects each component from proteolytic degradation and also allows their coregulation by FANCA and FANCM during nuclear localization. Using siRNA depletion and gene knockout techniques, we show that FAAP100-deficient cells display hallmark features of FA cells, including defective FANCD2 monoubiquitination, hypersensitivity to DNA crosslinking agents, and genomic instability. Our study identifies FAAP100 as a new critical component of the FA-BRCA DNA damage response network.

  7. Identification of FAAP24, a Fanconi anemia core complex protein that interacts with FANCM.

    PubMed

    Ciccia, Alberto; Ling, Chen; Coulthard, Rachel; Yan, Zhijiang; Xue, Yutong; Meetei, Amom Ruhikanta; Laghmani, El Houari; Joenje, Hans; McDonald, Neil; de Winter, Johan P; Wang, Weidong; West, Stephen C

    2007-02-09

    The Fanconi anemia (FA) core complex plays a crucial role in a DNA damage response network with BRCA1 and BRCA2. How this complex interacts with damaged DNA is unknown, as only the FA core protein FANCM (the homolog of an archaeal helicase/nuclease known as HEF) exhibits DNA binding activity. Here, we describe the identification of FAAP24, a protein that targets FANCM to structures that mimic intermediates formed during the replication/repair of damaged DNA. FAAP24 shares homology with the XPF family of flap/fork endonucleases, associates with the C-terminal region of FANCM, and is a component of the FA core complex. FAAP24 is required for normal levels of FANCD2 monoubiquitylation following DNA damage. Depletion of FAAP24 by siRNA results in cellular hypersensitivity to DNA crosslinking agents and chromosomal instability. Our data indicate that the FANCM/FAAP24 complex may play a key role in recruitment of the FA core complex to damaged DNA.

  8. Gender-related differences in the oxidant state of cells in Fanconi anemia heterozygotes.

    PubMed

    Petrovic, Sandra; Leskovac, Andreja; Kotur-Stevuljevic, Jelena; Joksic, Jelena; Guc-Scekic, Marija; Vujic, Dragana; Joksic, Gordana

    2011-07-01

    Abstract Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare cancer-prone genetic disorder characterized by progressive bone marrow failure, chromosomal instability and redox abnormalities. There is much biochemical and genetic data, which strongly suggest that FA cells experience increased oxidative stress. The present study was designed to elucidate if differences in oxidant state exist between control, idiopathic bone marrow failure (idBMF) and FA cells, and to analyze oxidant state of cells in FA heterozygous carriers as well. The results of the present study confirm an in vivo prooxidant state of FA cells and clearly indicate that FA patients can be distinguished from idBMF patients based on the oxidant state of cells. Female carriers of FA mutation also exhibited hallmarks of an in vivo prooxidant state behaving in a similar manner as FA patients. On the other hand, the oxidant state of cells in FA male carriers and idBMF families failed to show any significant difference vs. controls. We demonstrate that the altered oxidant state influences susceptibility of cells to apoptosis in both FA patients and female carriers. The results highlight the need for further research of the possible role of mitochondrial inheritance in the pathogenesis of FA.

  9. Bone mineral density in children with Fanconi anemia after hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Petryk, Anna; Polgreen, Lynda E.; Barnum, Jessie L.; Zhang, Lei; Hodges, James S.; Baker, K. Scott; Wagner, John E.; Steinberger, Julia; MacMillan, Margaret L.

    2015-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an inherited DNA repair disorder associated with short stature and bone marrow failure usually requiring hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT). While low bone mineral density (BMD) has been reported in leukemia patients after HCT, little is known about BMD in FA children after HCT (FA HCT). This study's goals were to compare BMD in FA HCT to BMD in healthy controls, and in children who received HCT for hematologic malignancy (Cancer HCT), and to test for associations between BMD and risk factors for bone loss. This cross-sectional study included 20 FA HCT, 13 Cancer HCT, and 90 healthy controls, age-matched and <18 years old at evaluation. BMD Z-scores for total body (TBMD) and lumbar spine (LBMD) were measured by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry and adjusted for height-forage Z-score (HAZ). FA HCT had lower mean TBMDHAZ Z-score (by 0.8 SD) and higher fraction with Z-score ≤ −1 than healthy controls (42% vs. 11%). No LBMD deficits were detected. FA HCT and Cancer HCT groups did not differ significantly in TBMD or LBMD Z-scores. In FA HCT patients, lower BMI and lower percent fat were associated with lower BMD. This study highlights the importance of monitoring BMD to optimize bone health in FA patients. PMID:25591848

  10. Bone mineral density in children with fanconi anemia after hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Petryk, Anna; Polgreen, Lynda E; Barnum, Jessie L; Zhang, Lei; Hodges, James S; Baker, K Scott; Wagner, John E; Steinberger, Julia; MacMillan, Margaret L

    2015-05-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an inherited DNA repair disorder associated with short stature and bone marrow failure, usually requiring hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Although low bone mineral density (BMD) has been reported in leukemia patients after HCT, little is known about BMD in FA children after HCT (FA HCT). This study's goals were to compare BMD in FA HCT to BMD in healthy controls and in children who received HCT for hematologic malignancy (cancer HCT), and to test for associations between BMD and risk factors for bone loss. This cross-sectional study included 20 FA HCT, 13 cancer HCT, and 90 healthy controls, age-matched and <18 years old at evaluation. BMD Z-scores for total body (TBMD) and lumbar spine (LBMD) were measured by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry and adjusted for height-for-age Z-score (HAZ). FA HCT had lower mean TBMDHAZ Z-score (by .8 SD) and higher fraction with Z-score ≤ -1 than healthy controls (42% versus 11%). No LBMD deficits were detected. FA HCT and cancer HCT groups did not differ significantly in TBMD or LBMD Z-scores. In FA HCT patients, lower body mass index and lower percent fat were associated with lower BMD. This study highlights the importance of monitoring BMD to optimize bone health in FA patients.

  11. Endocrinopathies, Bone Health, and Insulin Resistance in Patients with Fanconi Anemia after Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Barnum, Jessie L; Petryk, Anna; Zhang, Lei; DeFor, Todd E; Baker, K Scott; Steinberger, Julia; Nathan, Brandon; Wagner, John E; MacMillan, Margaret L

    2016-08-01

    A number of endocrinopathies have been described after hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), but data are limited in patients with Fanconi anemia (FA). We report several endocrine-based disorders in a cohort of 44 patients with FA after HCT compared with both 74 patients who received HCT for hematologic malignancies and with 275 healthy controls. Endocrinopathies assessed included hypothyroidism, hypogonadism, short stature, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, abnormalities in body composition, and bone health. Most (86%) patients with FA had at least 1 endocrinopathy, with 11% having 3 or more. Hypothyroidism was seen in 57%, hypogonadism in 27%, short stature in 50%, and reduced total body and lumbar spine bone mineral density (BMD) (height adjusted Z-score < -1) in 57% and 21%, respectively. Vitamin D deficiency was seen in 71%. Short stature was associated with younger age at HCT and gonadal failure was associated with older age at HCT. Insulin resistance was associated with increased percent fat mass and increased android/gynoid ratio by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Hypothyroidism, short stature, and reduced total body BMD were more prevalent in patients with FA compared with patients with hematologic malignancies. We recommend an assessment before transplantation and close follow-up afterwards to ensure proper clinical management. Future studies should continue to explore the impact of HCT on endocrinopathies in FA patients.

  12. Targeting the Fanconi Anemia/BRCA Pathway Circumvents Drug Resistance in Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Yarde, Danielle N.; Oliveira, Vasco; Mathews, Linda; Wang, Xingyu; Villagra, Alejandro; Boulware, David; Shain, Kenneth H.; Hazlehurst, Lori A.; Alsina, Melissa; Chen, Dung-Tsa; Beg, Amer A.; Dalton, William S.

    2015-01-01

    The Fanconi Anemia (FA)/BRCA DNA damage repair pathway plays a pivotal role in the cellular response to replicative stress induced by DNA alkylating agents and greatly influences drug response in cancer treatment. We recently reported that FA/BRCA genes are overexpressed and causative for drug resistance in human melphalan-resistant multiple myeloma (MM) cell lines. However, the transcriptional regulation of the FA/BRCA pathway is not understood. In this report, we describe for the first time a novel function of the NF-κB subunits, RelB/p50, as transcriptional activators of the FA/BRCA pathway. Specifically, our findings point to constitutive phosphorylation of IκB Kinase IKKα and subsequent alterations in FANCD2 expression and function as underlying events leading to melphalan resistance in repeatedly exposed MM cells. Inhibiting NF-κB by siRNA, blocking the IKK complex with BMS-345541, or using the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib drastically reduced FA/BRCA gene expression and FANCD2 protein expression in myeloma cells, resulting in diminished DNA damage repair and enhanced melphalan sensitivity. Importantly, we also found that bortezomib decreases FA/BRCA gene expression in multiple myeloma patients. These results show for the first time that NF-κB transcriptionally regulates the FA/BRCA pathway, and provide evidence for targeting FA-mediated DNA repair to enhance chemotherapeutic response and circumvent drug resistance in myeloma patients. PMID:19934314

  13. Fanconi Syndrome Secondary to Deferasirox in Diamond-Blackfan Anemia: Case Series and Recommendations for Early Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Papneja, Koyelle; Bhatt, Mihir D; Kirby-Allen, Melanie; Arora, Steven; Wiernikowski, John T; Athale, Uma H

    2016-08-01

    Deferasirox is an oral iron chelator used to treat patients with transfusion-related iron overload. We report, from two institutions, two children with Diamond-Blackfan anemia who developed Fanconi syndrome secondary to deferasirox administration, along with a review of the literature. The current recommendation for the laboratory monitoring of patients receiving deferasirox does not include serum electrolytes or urine analysis. Thus, despite routine clinic visits and bloodwork, these two patients presented with life-threatening electrolyte abnormalities requiring hospitalization. Hence, we propose the inclusion of serum electrolytes and urine analysis as part of routine monitoring to facilitate the early diagnosis of Fanconi syndrome in the context of high doses of deferasirox therapy.

  14. Evidence for a founder effect for the IVS4 +4 A{r_arrow}T mutation in the Fanconi anemia gene FACC in a Jewish population

    SciTech Connect

    Verlander, P.C.; Kaporis, A.G.; Qian, L.

    1994-09-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetically heterogeneous autosomal recessive disorder defined by hypersensitivity of cells to DNA cross-linking agents; a gene for complementation group C(FACC) has been cloned. Two common mutations, IVS4 +4 A{r_arrow}T and 322delG, and several rare mutations have recently been reported in affected individuals. We now report the development of amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS) assays for rapid, non-radioactive detection of these known mutations in FACC. Primer pairs specific for variant sequences were designed, with the 3{prime} terminal base of one primer matching the variant base. PCR products are separated by electrophoresis on 2.5% agarose gels; mutations are indicated by the presence of a band of a specific size. These ARMS assays can be multiplexed to allow screening for all known mutations in two PCR reactions. We have used these assays for detection of FACC mutations in affected individuals in the International Fanconi Anemia Registry (IFAR), and for carrier detection FACC families. IVS4 +4 A{r_arrow}T is the only FACC mutation found in Jewish FA patients and their families, of both Ashkenazi and Sephardic ancestry. This mutation was not found in any affected individual of non-Jewish origin. In addition, DNA samples from 1596 healthy Jewish individuals primarily of Ashkenazi ancestry were supplied to us by Dor Yeshorim. These samples, ascertained for carrier screening for Tay Sachs, cystic fibrosis, and other genetic diseases with a high frequency in the religious Jewish community served by this organization, were tested for both IVS4 +4 A{r_arrow}T and 322delG mutations; seventeen IVS4 +4 A{r_arrow}T are of Sephardic Jewish ancestry. We hypothesize that IVS4 +4 A{r_arrow}T is a very old mutation, predating the divergence of the Ashkenazi and Sephardic populations. Haplotype analysis with microsatellite markers is in progress.

  15. Irreversible repression of DNA synthesis in Fanconi anemia cells is alleviated by the product of a novel cyclin-related gene.

    PubMed Central

    Digweed, M; Günthert, U; Schneider, R; Seyschab, H; Friedl, R; Sperling, K

    1995-01-01

    Primary fibroblasts from patients with the genetic disease Fanconi anemia, which are hypersensitive to cross-linking agents, were used to screen a cDNA library for sequences involved in their abnormal cellular response to a cross-linking challenge. By using library partition and microinjection of in vitro-transcribed RNA, a cDNA clone, pSPHAR (S-phase response), which is able to correct the permanent repression of semiconservative DNA synthesis rates characteristic of these cells, was isolated. Wild-type SPHAR mRNA is expressed in all fibroblasts so far analyzed, including those of Fanconi anemia patients. Correction of the abnormal response in these cells appears therefore to be due to overexpression after cDNA transfer rather than to genetic complementation. The cDNA contains an open reading frame coding for a polypeptide of 7.5 kDa. Rabbit antiserum directed against a SPHAR peptide detects a protein of 7.9 kDa in Western blots (immunoblots) of whole-cell extracts from proliferating, but not resting, fibroblasts. The deduced amino acid sequence of SPHAR contains a motif found in the cyclins, and it is proposed that SPHAR acts within the injected cell by interfering with the cyclin-controlled maintenance of S phase. In agreement with this proposal, normal cells transfected with an antisense SPHAR expression vector have a significantly reduced rate of DNA synthesis during S phase and a prolonged G2 phase, reflecting the need for postreplicative DNA processing before entry into mitosis. PMID:7799938

  16. Cancer stem cells are enriched in Fanconi anemia head and neck squamous cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    WU, JEAN; MU, QINGSHAN; THIVIYANATHAN, VARATHARASA; ANNAPRAGADA, ANANTH; VIGNESWARAN, NADARAJAH

    2014-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) patients have an increased risk of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) at a higher rate with no apparent risk factors. HNSCC of FA patients is an aggressive tumor characterized by multifocal origin, early metastases and frequent recurrences. Given that cancer stem cells (CSC) drive tumorigenesis, tumor recurrence and metastasis, in this study, we characterized the CSC population in FA and sporadic HNSCC. The Aldefluor assay was used to characterize and isolate CSC with high aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity (ALDHpos) in cell lines derived from FA and sporadic HNSCC. Isolated ALDHpos and ALDHneg cells were examined for the expression of stemness genes using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) array. Tumor cell-derived FA and sporadic HNSCC were examined for their ability to form tumorspheres in vitro. Stem-like cell population in FA and sporadic HNSCC in human and mouse xenograft tumors were evaluated using ALDH isoform 1 (ALDH1) immunohistochemistry. FA-HNSCC cell lines harbor a greater proportion of ALDHpos cells (15–31%) compared to sporadic HNSCC (10%). Expression of Nanog, Oct-3/4 and Stella, molecular markers of undifferentiated embryonic stem (ES) cells were detected in the ALDHpos FA-HNSCC cells and not in the ALDHneg cells. FA-HNSCC cell lines revealed enhanced in vitro tumorsphere formation compared to sporadic HNSCC cells. A higher percentage of ALDH1pos tumor cells are noted in the human and mouse xenograft tumors of FA-HNSCC compared to sporadic HNSCC tumors. FA-HNSCC are highly enriched for CSC and may serve as a model to develop CSC-targeted therapies for HNSCC. PMID:25340704

  17. A case report and literature review of Fanconi Anemia (FA) diagnosed by genetic testing.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Ponnumony John; Margaret, Priya; Rajendran, Ramya; Ramalingam, Revathy; Menezes, Godfred A; Shirley, Alph S; Lee, Seung Jun; Seong, Moon-Woo; Park, Sung Sup; Seol, Dodam; Seo, Soo Hyun

    2015-05-08

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetically heterogeneous rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by congenital malformations, hematological problems and predisposition to malignancies. The genes that have been found to be mutated in FA patients are called FANC. To date 16 distinct FANC genes have been reported. Among these, mutations in FANCA are the most frequent among FA patients worldwide which account for 60- 65%. In this study, a nine years old male child was brought to our hospital one year ago for opinion and advice. He was the third child born to consanguineous parents. The mutation analyses were performed for proband, parents, elder sibling and the relatives [maternal aunt and maternal aunt's son (cousin)]. Molecular genetic testing [targeted next-generation sequencing (MiSeq, Illumina method)] was performed by mutation analysis in 15 genes involved. Entire coding exons and their flanking regions of the genes were analysed. Sanger sequencing [(ABI 3730 analyzer by Applied Biosystems)] was performed using primers specific for 43 coding exons of the FANCA gene. A novel splice site mutation, c.3066 + 1G > T, (IVS31 + 1G > T), homozygote was detected by sequencing in the patient. The above sequence variant was identified in heterozygous state in his parents. Further, the above sequence variant was not identified in other family members (elder sibling, maternal aunt and cousin). It is concluded that genetic study should be done if possible in all the cases of suspected FA, including siblings, parents and close blood relatives. It will help us to plan appropriate treatment and also to select suitable donor for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and to plan for genetic counseling. In addition to the case report, the main focus of this manuscript was to review literature on role of FANCA gene in FA since large number of FANCA mutations and polymorphisms have been identified.

  18. Defining the molecular interface that connects the Fanconi anemia protein FANCM to the Bloom syndrome dissolvasome.

    PubMed

    Hoadley, Kelly A; Xue, Yutong; Ling, Chen; Takata, Minoru; Wang, Weidong; Keck, James L

    2012-03-20

    The RMI subcomplex (RMI1/RMI2) functions with the BLM helicase and topoisomerase IIIα in a complex called the "dissolvasome," which separates double-Holliday junction DNA structures that can arise during DNA repair. This activity suppresses potentially harmful sister chromatid exchange (SCE) events in wild-type cells but not in cells derived from Bloom syndrome patients with inactivating BLM mutations. The RMI subcomplex also associates with FANCM, a component of the Fanconi anemia (FA) core complex that is important for repair of stalled DNA replication forks. The RMI/FANCM interface appears to help coordinate dissolvasome and FA core complex activities, but its precise role remains poorly understood. Here, we define the structure of the RMI/FANCM interface and investigate its roles in coordinating cellular DNA-repair activities. The X-ray crystal structure of the RMI core complex bound to a well-conserved peptide from FANCM shows that FANCM binds to both RMI proteins through a hydrophobic "knobs-into-holes" packing arrangement. The RMI/FANCM interface is shown to be critical for interaction between the components of the dissolvasome and the FA core complex. FANCM variants that substitute alanine for key interface residues strongly destabilize the complex in solution and lead to increased SCE levels in cells that are similar to those observed in blm- or fancm-deficient cells. This study provides a molecular view of the RMI/FANCM complex and highlights a key interface utilized in coordinating the activities of two critical eukaryotic DNA-damage repair machines.

  19. Molecular Cytogenetic Approach to Characterize Novel and Cryptic Chromosome Abnormalities in Childhood Myeloid Malignances of Fanconi Anemia.

    PubMed

    Borges, Maria L R; Capela de Matos, Roberto R; Amaral, Bethânia D A Silva; Soares-Ventura, Eliane M; Leite, Edinalva P; Silva, Mariluze O D; Cornélio, Maria T M Nogueira; Silva, Maria L M; Liehr, Thomas; Marques-Salles, Terezinha D J

    2017-03-01

    Myeloid malignancies can be either primary or secondary, whether or not a specific cause can be determined. Fanconi anemia (FA), a rare constitutional bone marrow failure, usually presents an increased possibility of clonal evolution, due to the increase in chromosomal instability, TP53 activation, and cell death. The evolution of FA may include aplastic anemia by the progressive failure of the bone marrow and myelod neoplasias, such as acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome. Chromosome abnormalities, particularly of chromosomes, 1, 3, and 7, during the aplastic phase of the disease are predictive of evolution to acute myeloid leukemia/myelodysplastic syndrome. Cytogenetic studies are indispensable to characterize chromosome abnormalities, and thus an important part of the clinical management, and for planning of therapeutic interventions. Here, clinical data and outcomes of 4 FA, 3 of them with myeloid malignances and 1 asymptomatic, and detailed characterization of their chromosome abnormalities using cytogenetics techniques are described.

  20. Disseminated Medulloblastoma in a Child with Germline BRCA2 6174delT Mutation and without Fanconi Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jingying; Margol, Ashley Sloane; Shukla, Anju; Ren, Xiuhai; Finlay, Jonathan L.; Krieger, Mark D.; Gilles, Floyd H.; Couch, Fergus J.; Aziz, Meraj; Fung, Eric T.; Asgharzadeh, Shahab; Barrett, Michael T.; Erdreich-Epstein, Anat

    2015-01-01

    Medulloblastoma, the most common malignant brain tumor in children, occurs with increased frequency in individuals with Fanconi anemia who have biallelic germline mutations in BRCA2. We describe an 8-year-old child who had disseminated anaplastic medulloblastoma and a deleterious heterozygous BRCA2 6174delT germline mutation. Molecular profiling was consistent with Group 4 medulloblastoma. The posterior fossa mass was resected and the patient received intensive chemotherapy and craniospinal irradiation. Despite this, the patient succumbed to a second recurrence of his medulloblastoma, which presented 8 months after diagnosis as malignant pleural and peritoneal effusions. Continuous medulloblastoma cell lines were isolated from the original tumor (CHLA-01-MED) and the malignant pleural effusion (CHLA-01R-MED). Here, we provide their analyses, including in vitro and in vivo growth, drug sensitivity, comparative genomic hybridization, and next generation sequencing analysis. In addition to the BRCA2 6174delT, the medulloblastoma cells had amplification of MYC, deletion at Xp11.2, and isochromosome 17, but no structural variations or overexpression of GFI1 or GFI1B. To our knowledge, this is the first pair of diagnosis/recurrence medulloblastoma cell lines, the only medulloblastoma cell lines with BRCA2 6174delT described to date, and the first reported case of a child with medulloblastoma associated with a germline BRCA2 6174delT who did not also have Fanconi anemia. PMID:26380221

  1. GS-nitroxide (JP4-039)-mediated radioprotection of human Fanconi anemia cell lines.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Mark E; Kim, Hyun; Berhane, Hebist; Epperly, Michael W; Franicola, Darcy; Zhang, Xichen; Houghton, Frank; Shields, Donna; Wang, Hong; Bakkenist, Christopher J; Frantz, Marie-Celine; Forbeck, Erin M; Goff, Julie P; Wipf, Peter; Greenberger, Joel S

    2011-11-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an inherited disorder characterized by defective DNA repair and cellular sensitivity to DNA crosslinking agents. Clinically, FA is associated with high risk for marrow failure, leukemia and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Radiosensitivity in FA patients compromises the use of total-body irradiation for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and radiation therapy for HNSCC. A radioprotector for the surrounding tissue would therefore be very valuable during radiotherapy for HNSCC. Clonogenic radiation survival curves were determined for pre- or postirradiation treatment with the parent nitroxide Tempol or JP4-039 in cells of four FA patient-derived cell lines and two transgene-corrected subclonal lines. FancG(-/-) (PD326) and FancD2(-/-) (PD20F) patient lines were more sensitive to the DNA crosslinking agent mitomycin C (MMC) than their transgene-restored subclonal cell lines (both P < 0.0001). FancD2(-/-) cells were more radiosensitive than the transgene restored subclonal cell line (ñ = 2.0 ± 0.7 and 4.7 ± 2.2, respectively, P = 0.03). In contrast, FancG(-/-) cells were radioresistant relative to the transgene-restored subclonal cell line (ñ = 9.4 ± 1.5 and 2.2 ± 05, respectively, P = 0.001). DNA strand breaks measured by the comet assay correlated with radiosensitivity. Cell lines from a Fanc-C and Fanc-A patients showed radiosensitivity similar to that of Fanc-D2(-/-) cells. A fluorophore-tagged JP4-039 (BODIPY-FL) analog targeted the mitochondria of the cell lines. Preirradiation or postirradiation treatment with JP4-039 at a lower concentration than Tempol significantly increased the radioresistance and stabilized the antioxidant stores of all cell lines. Tempol increased the toxicity of MMC in FancD2(-/-) cells. These data provide support for the potential clinical use of JP4-039 for normal tissue radioprotection during chemoradiotherapy in FA patients.

  2. GS-Nitroxide (JP4-039)-Mediated Radioprotection of Human Fanconi Anemia Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, Mark E.; Kim, Hyun; Berhane, Hebist; Epperly, Michael W.; Franicola, Darcy; Zhang, Xichen; Houghton, Frank; Shields, Donna; Wang, Hong; Bakkenist, Christopher J.; Frantz, Marie-Celine; Forbeck, Erin M.; Goff, Julie P.; Wipf, Peter; Greenberger, Joel S.

    2011-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an inherited disorder characterized by defective DNA repair and cellular sensitivity to DNA crosslinking agents. Clinically, FA is associated with high risk for marrow failure, leukemia and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Radiosensitivity in FA patients compromises the use of total-body irradiation for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and radiation therapy for HNSCC. A radioprotector for the surrounding tissue would therefore be very valuable during radiotherapy for HNSCC. Clonogenic radiation survival curves were determined for pre- or postirradiation treatment with the parent nitroxide Tempol or JP4-039 in cells of four FA patient-derived cell lines and two transgene-corrected subclonal lines. FancG–/– (PD326) and FancD2–/– (PD20F) patient lines were more sensitive to the DNA crosslinking agent mitomycin C (MMC) than their transgene-restored subclonal cell lines (both P < 0.0001). FancD2–/– cells were more radiosensitive than the transgene restored subclonal cell line (ñ = 2.0 ± 0.7 and 4.7 ± 2.2, respectively, P = 0.03). In contrast, FancG–/– cells were radioresistant relative to the transgene-restored subclonal cell line (ñ = 9.4 ± 1.5 and 2.2 ± 05, respectively, P = 0.001). DNA strand breaks measured by the comet assay correlated with radiosensitivity. Cell lines from a Fanc-C and Fanc-A patients showed radiosensitivity similar to that of Fanc-D2–/– cells. A fluorophore-tagged JP4-039 (BODIPY-FL) analog targeted the mitochondria of the cell lines. Preirradiation or postirradiation treatment with JP4-039 at a lower concentration than Tempol significantly increased the radioresistance and stabilized the antioxidant stores of all cell lines. Tempol increased the toxicity of MMC in FancD2–/– cells. These data provide support for the potential clinical use of JP4-039 for normal tissue radioprotection during chemoradiotherapy in FA patients. PMID:21939290

  3. A High-Throughput Screening Strategy to Identify Protein-Protein Interaction Inhibitors That Block the Fanconi Anemia DNA Repair Pathway.

    PubMed

    Voter, Andrew F; Manthei, Kelly A; Keck, James L

    2016-07-01

    Induction of the Fanconi anemia (FA) DNA repair pathway is a common mechanism by which tumors evolve resistance to DNA crosslinking chemotherapies. Proper execution of the FA pathway requires interaction between the FA complementation group M protein (FANCM) and the RecQ-mediated genome instability protein (RMI) complex, and mutations that disrupt FANCM/RMI interactions sensitize cells to DNA crosslinking agents. Inhibitors that block FANCM/RMI complex formation could be useful therapeutics for resensitizing tumors that have acquired chemotherapeutic resistance. To identify such inhibitors, we have developed and validated high-throughput fluorescence polarization and proximity assays that are sensitive to inhibitors that disrupt interactions between the RMI complex and its binding site on FANCM (a peptide referred to as MM2). A pilot screen of 74,807 small molecules was performed using the fluorescence polarization assay. Hits from the primary screen were further tested using the proximity assay, and an orthogonal proximity assay was used to assess inhibitor selectivity. Direct physical interaction between the RMI complex and the most selective inhibitor identified through the screening process was measured by surface plasmon resonance and isothermal titration calorimetry. Observation of direct binding by this small molecule validates the screening protocol.

  4. Molecular analysis by electron microscopy of the removal of psoralen-photoinduced DNA cross-links in normal and Fanconi's anemia fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Rousset, S.; Nocentini, S.; Revet, B.; Moustacchi, E. )

    1990-04-15

    The induction and fate of psoralen-photoinduced DNA interstrand cross-links in the genome of Fanconi's anemia (FA) fibroblasts of complementation groups A and B, and of normal human fibroblasts, were investigated by quantitative analysis of totally denatured DNA fragments visualized by electron microscopy. 8-Methoxypsoralen (5 x 10(-5) M) interstrand cross-links were induced as a function of the near ultraviolet light dose. With time of postexposure incubation, a fraction of interstrand cross-links disappeared in all cell lines. However, 24 h after treatment, this removal was significantly lower in the two FA group A cell lines examined (34-39%) than in the FA group B and normal cell lines (43-53 and 47-57%, respectively). These data indicate that FA cells are at least able to recognize and incise interstrand cross-links, as normal cells do, although group A cells seem somewhat hampered in this process. This is in accord with data obtained on the same cell lines using another biochemical assay. Since the fate of cross-links in FA constituted a controversial matter, it is important to stress that two different methodologies applied to genetically well defined cell lines led to the same conclusions.

  5. A distinct replication fork protection pathway connects Fanconi anemia tumor suppressors to RAD51-BRCA1/2.

    PubMed

    Schlacher, Katharina; Wu, Hong; Jasin, Maria

    2012-07-10

    Genes mutated in patients with Fanconi anemia (FA) interact with the DNA repair genes BRCA1 and BRCA2/FANCD1 to suppress tumorigenesis, but the molecular functions ascribed to them cannot fully explain all of their cellular roles. Here, we show a repair-independent requirement for FA genes, including FANCD2, and BRCA1 in protecting stalled replication forks from degradation. Fork protection is surprisingly rescued in FANCD2-deficient cells by elevated RAD51 levels or stabilized RAD51 filaments. Moreover, FANCD2-mediated fork protection is epistatic with RAD51 functions, revealing an unanticipated fork protection pathway that connects FA genes to RAD51 and the BRCA1/2 breast cancer suppressors. Collective results imply a unified molecular mechanism for repair-independent functions of FA, RAD51, and BRCA1/2 proteins in preventing genomic instability and suppressing tumorigenesis.

  6. Involvement of Fanconi anemia genes FANCD2 and FANCF in the molecular basis of drug resistance in leukemia.

    PubMed

    Yao, Chenjiao; Du, Wei; Chen, Haibiug; Xiao, Sheng; Huang, Lihua; Chen, Fang-Ping

    2015-06-01

    The Fanconi anemia (FA)‑associated proteins FANCF and FANCD2 are important components of the FA pathway of DNA crosslink repair. FANCF and FANCD2 have been found to be involved in drug‑resistant multiple myeloma, ovarian cancer, non‑small‑cell lung cancer, and head and neck cancer. However, it is unclear whether these two genes participate in adriamycin (ADR)‑resistant leukemia. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to investigate FANCF and FANCD2 expression in drug‑resistant and drug‑sensitive leukemia cells. Western blot analysis revealed enhanced FANCF expression and monoubiquitination of FANCD2 in ADR‑resistant cells. Additionally, it was observed that drug‑resistant cells had reduced DNA damage compared with drug‑sensitive cells. The results of this study indicate that the FA pathway may confer leukemia resistance to ADR via enhanced DNA interstrand crosslink repair.

  7. UHRF1 is a sensor for DNA interstrand crosslinks and recruits FANCD2 to initiate the Fanconi anemia pathway.

    PubMed

    Liang, Chih-Chao; Zhan, Bao; Yoshikawa, Yasunaga; Haas, Wilhelm; Gygi, Steven P; Cohn, Martin A

    2015-03-31

    The Fanconi anemia (FA) pathway is critical for the cellular response to toxic DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs). Using a biochemical purification strategy, we identified UHRF1 as a protein that specifically interacts with ICLs in vitro and in vivo. Reduction of cellular levels of UHRF1 by RNAi attenuates the FA pathway and sensitizes cells to mitomycin C. Knockdown cells display a drastic reduction in FANCD2 foci formation. Using live-cell imaging, we observe that UHRF1 is rapidly recruited to chromatin in response to DNA crosslinking agents and that this recruitment both precedes and is required for the recruitment of FANCD2 to ICLs. Based on these results, we describe a mechanism of ICL sensing and propose that UHRF1 is a critical factor that binds to ICLs. In turn, this binding is necessary for the subsequent recruitment of FANCD2, which allows the DNA repair process to initiate.

  8. Role of Fanconi Anemia FANCG in Preventing Double-Strand Breakage and Chromosomal Rearrangement during DNA Replication

    SciTech Connect

    Tebbs, R S; Hinz, J M; Yamada, N A; Wilson, J B; Jones, N J; Salazar, E P; Thomas, C B; Jones, I M; Thompson, L H

    2003-10-04

    The Fanconi anemia (FA) proteins overlap with those of homologous recombination through FANCD1/BRCA2, but the biochemical functions of other FA proteins are unknown. By constructing and characterizing a null fancg mutant of hamster CHO cells, we present several new insights for FA. The fancg cells show a broad sensitivity to genotoxic agents, not supporting the conventional concept of sensitivity to only DNA crosslinking agents. The aprt mutation rate is normal, but hprt mutations are reduced, which we ascribe to the lethality of large deletions. CAD and dhfr gene amplification rates are increased, implying excess chromosomal breakage during DNA replication, and suggesting amplification as a contributing factor to cancer-proneness in FA patients. In S-phase cells, both spontaneous and mutagen-induced Rad51 nuclear foci are elevated. These results support a model in which FancG protein helps to prevent collapse of replication forks by allowing translesion synthesis or lesion bypass through homologous recombination.

  9. In-vivo assessment of DNA ligation efficiency and fidelity in cells from patients with Fanconi's anemia and other cancer-prone hereditary disorders.

    PubMed

    Rünger, T M; Sobotta, P; Dekant, B; Möller, K; Bauer, C; Kraemer, K H

    1993-04-01

    We developed a host cell DNA ligation assay, in which we transfected linearized plasmid pZ189 into human lymphoblasts or fibroblasts in order to assess the efficiency and accuracy of DNA ligation within these host cells. We used cell lines from patients with Fanconi's anemia and other chromosome breakage or instability syndromes (Bloom's syndrome, ataxia telangiectasia, Werner's syndrome). With the Fanconi's anemia lymphoblast line GM8010 we did not find a reduced, but a slightly hypermutable DNA ligation. Mutation analysis revealed a unique 7.9-12.5-fold increase in insertions or complex mutations. With cells from the other chromosome breakage/instability syndromes we also found a hypermutable and/or reduced DNA ligation. An impaired DNA ligation might be a common molecular mechanism of genetic instability in these disorders.

  10. Cells Deficient in the Fanconi Anemia Protein FANCD2 are Hypersensitive to the Cytotoxicity and DNA Damage Induced by Coffee and Caffeic Acid.

    PubMed

    Burgos-Morón, Estefanía; Calderón-Montaño, José Manuel; Orta, Manuel Luis; Guillén-Mancina, Emilio; Mateos, Santiago; López-Lázaro, Miguel

    2016-07-08

    Epidemiological studies have found a positive association between coffee consumption and a lower risk of cardiovascular disorders, some cancers, diabetes, Parkinson and Alzheimer disease. Coffee consumption, however, has also been linked to an increased risk of developing some types of cancer, including bladder cancer in adults and leukemia in children of mothers who drink coffee during pregnancy. Since cancer is driven by the accumulation of DNA alterations, the ability of the coffee constituent caffeic acid to induce DNA damage in cells may play a role in the carcinogenic potential of this beverage. This carcinogenic potential may be exacerbated in cells with DNA repair defects. People with the genetic disease Fanconi Anemia have DNA repair deficiencies and are predisposed to several cancers, particularly acute myeloid leukemia. Defects in the DNA repair protein Fanconi Anemia D2 (FANCD2) also play an important role in the development of a variety of cancers (e.g., bladder cancer) in people without this genetic disease. This communication shows that cells deficient in FANCD2 are hypersensitive to the cytotoxicity (clonogenic assay) and DNA damage (γ-H2AX and 53BP1 focus assay) induced by caffeic acid and by a commercial lyophilized coffee extract. These data suggest that people with Fanconi Anemia, or healthy people who develop sporadic mutations in FANCD2, may be hypersensitive to the carcinogenic activity of coffee.

  11. Cells Deficient in the Fanconi Anemia Protein FANCD2 are Hypersensitive to the Cytotoxicity and DNA Damage Induced by Coffee and Caffeic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Burgos-Morón, Estefanía; Calderón-Montaño, José Manuel; Orta, Manuel Luis; Guillén-Mancina, Emilio; Mateos, Santiago; López-Lázaro, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have found a positive association between coffee consumption and a lower risk of cardiovascular disorders, some cancers, diabetes, Parkinson and Alzheimer disease. Coffee consumption, however, has also been linked to an increased risk of developing some types of cancer, including bladder cancer in adults and leukemia in children of mothers who drink coffee during pregnancy. Since cancer is driven by the accumulation of DNA alterations, the ability of the coffee constituent caffeic acid to induce DNA damage in cells may play a role in the carcinogenic potential of this beverage. This carcinogenic potential may be exacerbated in cells with DNA repair defects. People with the genetic disease Fanconi Anemia have DNA repair deficiencies and are predisposed to several cancers, particularly acute myeloid leukemia. Defects in the DNA repair protein Fanconi Anemia D2 (FANCD2) also play an important role in the development of a variety of cancers (e.g., bladder cancer) in people without this genetic disease. This communication shows that cells deficient in FANCD2 are hypersensitive to the cytotoxicity (clonogenic assay) and DNA damage (γ-H2AX and 53BP1 focus assay) induced by caffeic acid and by a commercial lyophilized coffee extract. These data suggest that people with Fanconi Anemia, or healthy people who develop sporadic mutations in FANCD2, may be hypersensitive to the carcinogenic activity of coffee. PMID:27399778

  12. Radiologic differences between bone marrow stromal and hematopoietic progenitor cell lines from Fanconi Anemia (Fancd2(-/-)) mice.

    PubMed

    Berhane, Hebist; Epperly, Michael W; Goff, Julie; Kalash, Ronny; Cao, Shaonan; Franicola, Darcy; Zhang, Xichen; Shields, Donna; Houghton, Frank; Wang, Hong; Wipf, Peter; Parmar, Kalindi; Greenberger, Joel S

    2014-01-01

    FancD2 plays a central role in the human Fanconi anemia DNA damage response (DDR) pathway. Fancd2(-/-) mice exhibit many features of human Fanconi anemia including cellular DNA repair defects. Whether the DNA repair defect in Fancd2(-/-) mice results in radiologic changes in all cell lineages is unknown. We measured stress of hematopoiesis in long-term marrow cultures and radiosensitivity in clonogenic survival curves, as well as comet tail intensity, total antioxidant stores and radiation-induced gene expression in hematopoietic progenitor compared to bone marrow stromal cell lines. We further evaluated radioprotection by a mitochondrial-targeted antioxidant GS-nitroxide, JP4-039. Hematopoiesis longevity in Fancd2(-/-) mouse long-term marrow cultures was diminished and bone marrow stromal cell lines were radiosensitive compared to Fancd2(+/+) stromal cells (Fancd2(-/-) D0 = 1.4 ± 0.1 Gy, ñ = 5.0 ± 0.6 vs. Fancd2(+/+) D0 = 1.6 ± 0.1 Gy, ñ = 6.7 ± 1.6), P = 0.0124 for D0 and P = 0.0023 for ñ, respectively). In contrast, Fancd2(-/-) IL-3-dependent hematopoietic progenitor cells were radioresistant (D0 = 1.71 ± 0.04 Gy and ñ = 5.07 ± 0.52) compared to Fancd2(+/+) (D0 = 1.39 ± 0.09 Gy and ñ = 2.31 ± 0.85, P = 0.001 for D0). CFU-GM from freshly explanted Fancd2(-/-) marrow was also radioresistant. Consistent with radiosensitivity, irradiated Fancd2(-/-) stromal cells had higher DNA damage by comet tail intensity assay compared to Fancd2(+/+) cells (P < 0.0001), slower DNA damage recovery, lower baseline total antioxidant capacity, enhanced radiation-induced depletion of antioxidants, and increased CDKN1A-p21 gene transcripts and protein. Consistent with radioresistance, Fancd2(-/-) IL-3-dependent hematopoietic cells had higher baseline and post irradiation total antioxidant capacity. While, there was no detectable alteration of radiation-induced cell cycle arrest with Fancd2(-/-) stromal cells, hematopoietic progenitor cells showed reduced G2/M cell cycle

  13. Disrupted Signaling through the Fanconi Anemia Pathway Leads to Dysfunctional Hematopoietic Stem Cell Biology: Underlying Mechanisms and Potential Therapeutic Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Geiselhart, Anja; Lier, Amelie; Walter, Dagmar; Milsom, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is the most common inherited bone marrow failure syndrome. FA patients suffer to varying degrees from a heterogeneous range of developmental defects and, in addition, have an increased likelihood of developing cancer. Almost all FA patients develop a severe, progressive bone marrow failure syndrome, which impacts upon the production of all hematopoietic lineages and, hence, is thought to be driven by a defect at the level of the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC). This hypothesis would also correlate with the very high incidence of MDS and AML that is observed in FA patients. In this paper, we discuss the evidence that supports the role of dysfunctional HSC biology in driving the etiology of the disease. Furthermore, we consider the different model systems currently available to study the biology of cells defective in the FA signaling pathway and how they are informative in terms of identifying the physiologic mediators of HSC depletion and dissecting their putative mechanism of action. Finally, we ask whether the insights gained using such disease models can be translated into potential novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of the hematologic disorders in FA patients. PMID:22675615

  14. A simplified approach to improve the efficiency and safety of ex vivo hematopoietic gene therapy in fanconi anemia patients.

    PubMed

    Jacome, A; Navarro, S; Casado, J A; Rio, P; Madero, L; Estella, J; Sevilla, J; Badell, I; Ortega, J J; Olivé, T; Hanenberg, H; Segovia, J C; Bueren, J A

    2006-02-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an inherited DNA repair disorder characterized by genetic instability of cells lacking a functional FA/BRCA pathway. Previous studies have shown that in vitro stimulation of bone marrow cells (BMCs) from FA mice promotes apoptosis, reduces the reconstitution ability of the stem cells, and induces myelodysplasia and myeloid leukemia upon reinfusion of the cells. This suggests the convenience of adapting standard protocols of gene therapy to FA. Here we show that the reserve of BM progenitors in FA patients is generally below 20% of normal values. Because this reduced reserve could activate the cycling of BM progenitors, we developed a simplified protocol to transduce BMCs from FA patients with gammaretroviral vectors. We demonstrate that a short in vitro manipulation (12-24 hr) of fresh mononuclear BMCs is sufficient to transduce 42% of hematopoietic progenitors from FA-A patients, in the absence of in vitro prestimulation. When FANCA-expressing vectors were used, this simple procedure reversed the phenotype of the BM progenitors from these patients. We propose that our approach will be more efficient and safer compared with standard gene therapy protocols for FA.

  15. Forkhead transcription factor FoxF1 interacts with Fanconi anemia protein complexes to promote DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Arun; Ustiyan, Vladimir; Zhang, Yufang; Kalin, Tanya V; Kalinichenko, Vladimir V

    2016-01-12

    Forkhead box F1 (Foxf1) transcription factor is an important regulator of embryonic development but its role in tumor cells remains incompletely understood. While 16 proteins were characterized in Fanconi anemia (FA) core complex, its interactions with cellular transcriptional machinery remain poorly characterized. Here, we identified FoxF1 protein as a novel interacting partner of the FA complex proteins. Using multiple human and mouse tumor cell lines and Foxf1+/- mice we demonstrated that FoxF1 physically binds to and increases stability of FA proteins. FoxF1 co-localizes with FANCD2 in DNA repair foci in cultured cells and tumor tissues obtained from cisplatin-treated mice. In response to DNA damage, FoxF1-deficient tumor cells showed significantly reduced FANCD2 monoubiquitination and FANCM phosphorylation, resulting in impaired formation of DNA repair foci. FoxF1 knockdown caused chromosomal instability, nuclear abnormalities, and increased tumor cell death in response to DNA-damaging agents. Overexpression of FoxF1 in DNA-damaged cells improved stability of FA proteins, decreased chromosomal and nuclear aberrations, restored formation of DNA repair foci and prevented cell death after DNA damage. These findings demonstrate that FoxF1 is a key component of FA complexes and a critical mediator of DNA damage response in tumor cells.

  16. Regulation of the Fanconi anemia pathway by a CUE ubiquitin-binding domain in the FANCD2 protein.

    PubMed

    Rego, Meghan A; Kolling, Frederick W; Vuono, Elizabeth A; Mauro, Maurizio; Howlett, Niall G

    2012-09-06

    The Fanconi anemia (FA)-BRCA pathway is critical for the repair of DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs) and the maintenance of chromosome stability. A key step in FA-BRCA pathway activation is the covalent attachment of monoubiquitin to FANCD2 and FANCI. Monoubiquitinated FANCD2 and FANCI localize in chromatin-associated nuclear foci where they interact with several well-characterized DNA repair proteins. Importantly, very little is known about the structure, function, and regulation of FANCD2. Herein, we describe the identification and characterization of a CUE (coupling of ubiquitin conjugation to endoplasmic reticulum degradation) ubiquitin-binding domain (UBD) in FANCD2, and demonstrate that the CUE domain mediates noncovalent binding to ubiquitin in vitro. We show that although mutation of the CUE domain destabilizes FANCD2, the protein remains competent for DNA damage-inducible monoubiquitination and phosphorylation. Importantly, we demonstrate that the CUE domain is required for interaction with FANCI, retention of monoubiquitinated FANCD2, and FANCI in chromatin, and for efficient ICL repair. Our results suggest a model by which heterodimerization of monoubiquitinated FANCD2 and FANCI in chromatin is mediated in part through a noncovalent interaction between the FANCD2 CUE domain and monoubiquitin covalently attached to FANCI, and that this interaction shields monoubiquitinated FANCD2 from polyubiquitination and proteasomal degradation.

  17. A ubiquitin-binding protein, FAAP20, links RNF8-mediated ubiquitination to the Fanconi anemia DNA repair network.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhijiang; Guo, Rong; Paramasivam, Manikandan; Shen, Weiping; Ling, Chen; Fox, David; Wang, Yucai; Oostra, Anneke B; Kuehl, Julia; Lee, Duck-Yeon; Takata, Minoru; Hoatlin, Maureen E; Schindler, Detlev; Joenje, Hans; de Winter, Johan P; Li, Lei; Seidman, Michael M; Wang, Weidong

    2012-07-13

    The Fanconi anemia (FA) protein network is necessary for repair of DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs), but its control mechanism remains unclear. Here we show that the network is regulated by a ubiquitin signaling cascade initiated by RNF8 and its partner, UBC13, and mediated by FAAP20, a component of the FA core complex. FAAP20 preferentially binds the ubiquitin product of RNF8-UBC13, and this ubiquitin-binding activity and RNF8-UBC13 are both required for recruitment of FAAP20 to ICLs. Both RNF8 and FAAP20 are required for recruitment of FA core complex and FANCD2 to ICLs, whereas RNF168 can modulate efficiency of the recruitment. RNF8 and FAAP20 are needed for efficient FANCD2 monoubiquitination, a key step of the FA network; RNF8 and the FA core complex work in the same pathway to promote cellular resistance to ICLs. Thus, the RNF8-FAAP20 ubiquitin cascade is critical for recruiting FA core complex to ICLs and for normal function of the FA network.

  18. Fanconi Anemia Mesenchymal Stromal Cells-Derived Glycerophospholipids Skew Hematopoietic Stem Cell Differentiation Through Toll-Like Receptor Signaling.

    PubMed

    Amarachintha, Surya; Sertorio, Mathieu; Wilson, Andrew; Li, Xiaoli; Pang, Qishen

    2015-11-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) patients develop bone marrow (BM) failure or leukemia. One standard care for these devastating complications is hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. We identified a group of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs)-derived metabolites, glycerophospholipids, and their endogenous inhibitor, 5-(tetradecyloxy)-2-furoic acid (TOFA), as regulators of donor hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. We provided two pieces of evidence that TOFA could improve hematopoiesis-supporting function of FA MSCs: (a) limiting-dilution cobblestone area-forming cell assay revealed that TOFA significantly increased cobblestone colonies in Fanca-/- or Fancd2-/- cocultures compared to untreated cocultures. (b) Competitive repopulating assay using output cells collected from cocultures showed that TOFA greatly alleviated the abnormal expansion of the donor myeloid (CD45.2+Gr1+Mac1+) compartment in both peripheral blood and BM of recipient mice transplanted with cells from Fanca-/- or Fancd2-/- cocultures. Furthermore, mechanistic studies identified Tlr4 signaling as the responsible pathway mediating the effect of glycerophospholipids. Thus, targeting glycerophospholipid biosynthesis in FA MSCs could be a therapeutic strategy to improve hematopoiesis and stem cell transplantation.

  19. Crosstalk between BRCA-Fanconi anemia and mismatch repair pathways prevents MSH2-dependent aberrant DNA damage responses.

    PubMed

    Peng, Min; Xie, Jenny; Ucher, Anna; Stavnezer, Janet; Cantor, Sharon B

    2014-08-01

    Several proteins in the BRCA-Fanconi anemia (FA) pathway, such as FANCJ, BRCA1, and FANCD2, interact with mismatch repair (MMR) pathway factors, but the significance of this link remains unknown. Unlike the BRCA-FA pathway, the MMR pathway is not essential for cells to survive toxic DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs), although MMR proteins bind ICLs and other DNA structures that form at stalled replication forks. We hypothesized that MMR proteins corrupt ICL repair in cells that lack crosstalk between BRCA-FA and MMR pathways. Here, we show that ICL sensitivity of cells lacking the interaction between FANCJ and the MMR protein MLH1 is suppressed by depletion of the upstream mismatch recognition factor MSH2. MSH2 depletion suppresses an aberrant DNA damage response, restores cell cycle progression, and promotes ICL resistance through a Rad18-dependent mechanism. MSH2 depletion also suppresses ICL sensitivity in cells deficient for BRCA1 or FANCD2, but not FANCA. Rescue by Msh2 loss was confirmed in Fancd2-null primary mouse cells. Thus, we propose that regulation of MSH2-dependent DNA damage response underlies the importance of interactions between BRCA-FA and MMR pathways.

  20. Histone H2AX and Fanconi anemia FANCD2 function in the same pathway to maintain chromosome stability.

    PubMed

    Bogliolo, Massimo; Lyakhovich, Alex; Callén, Elsa; Castellà, Maria; Cappelli, Enrico; Ramírez, María J; Creus, Amadeu; Marcos, Ricard; Kalb, Reinhard; Neveling, Kornelia; Schindler, Detlev; Surrallés, Jordi

    2007-03-07

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a chromosome fragility syndrome characterized by bone marrow failure and cancer susceptibility. The central FA protein FANCD2 is known to relocate to chromatin upon DNA damage in a poorly understood process. Here, we have induced subnuclear accumulation of DNA damage to prove that histone H2AX is a novel component of the FA/BRCA pathway in response to stalled replication forks. Analyses of cells from H2AX knockout mice or expressing a nonphosphorylable H2AX (H2AX(S136A/S139A)) indicate that phosphorylated H2AX (gammaH2AX) is required for recruiting FANCD2 to chromatin at stalled replication forks. FANCD2 binding to gammaH2AX is BRCA1-dependent and cells deficient or depleted of H2AX show an FA-like phenotype, including an excess of chromatid-type chromosomal aberrations and hypersensitivity to MMC. This MMC hypersensitivity of H2AX-deficient cells is not further increased by depleting FANCD2, indicating that H2AX and FANCD2 function in the same pathway in response to DNA damage-induced replication blockage. Consequently, histone H2AX is functionally connected to the FA/BRCA pathway to resolve stalled replication forks and prevent chromosome instability.

  1. Elucidation of the Fanconi Anemia Protein Network in Meiosis and Its Function in the Regulation of Histone Modifications.

    PubMed

    Alavattam, Kris G; Kato, Yasuko; Sin, Ho-Su; Maezawa, So; Kowalski, Ian J; Zhang, Fan; Pang, Qishen; Andreassen, Paul R; Namekawa, Satoshi H

    2016-10-18

    Precise epigenetic regulation of the sex chromosomes is vital for the male germline. Here, we analyze meiosis in eight mouse models deficient for various DNA damage response (DDR) factors, including Fanconi anemia (FA) proteins. We reveal a network of FA and DDR proteins in which FA core factors FANCA, FANCB, and FANCC are essential for FANCD2 foci formation, whereas BRCA1 (FANCS), MDC1, and RNF8 are required for BRCA2 (FANCD1) and SLX4 (FANCP) accumulation on the sex chromosomes during meiosis. In addition, FA proteins modulate distinct histone marks on the sex chromosomes: FA core proteins and FANCD2 regulate H3K9 methylation, while FANCD2 and RNF8 function together to regulate H3K4 methylation independently of FA core proteins. Our data suggest that RNF8 integrates the FA-BRCA pathway. Taken together, our study reveals distinct functions for FA proteins and illuminates the male sex chromosomes as a model to dissect the function of the FA-BRCA pathway.

  2. Aurora A kinase is required for activation of the Fanconi anemia/BRCA pathway upon DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Chun, Min Jeong; Hwang, Soo Kyung; Kim, Hyoun Geun; Goh, Sung-Ho; Kim, Sunshin; Lee, Chang-Hun

    2016-07-01

    Previous studies have linked the DNA damage response to mitotic progression machinery. Mitotic kinases, such as Aurora A kinase and Polo-like kinase, are involved in the phosphorylation of cell cycle regulators in response to DNA damage. Here, we investigated the potential involvement of Aurora A kinase in the activation of the Fanconi anemia (FA)/BRCA pathway, which participates in cellular response to DNA interstrand cross-link lesions (ICL). Initially, we detected interactions between Aurora A kinase and FANCA protein, one of the components of the FA nuclear core complex. Silencing of Aurora A kinase led to inhibition of monoubiquitination of FANCD2 and formation of nuclear foci, the final consequences of FA/BRCA pathway activation upon ICL induction. An in vitro kinase assay revealed that Aurora A kinase phosphorylates S165 of FANCA. Moreover, this phosphorylation event was induced by the treatment with mitomycin C (MMC), an ICL-inducing agent. In cells overexpressing S165A mutant FANCA, monoubiquitination of FANCD2 and nuclear foci formation was impaired and cellular sensitivity to MMC was enhanced. These results suggest that S165 phosphorylation by Aurora A kinase is required for proper activation of the FA/BRCA pathway in response to DNA damage.

  3. Forkhead transcription factor FoxF1 interacts with Fanconi anemia protein complexes to promote DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan, Arun; Ustiyan, Vladimir; Zhang, Yufang; Kalin, Tanya V.; Kalinichenko, Vladimir V.

    2016-01-01

    Forkhead box F1 (Foxf1) transcription factor is an important regulator of embryonic development but its role in tumor cells remains incompletely understood. While 16 proteins were characterized in Fanconi anemia (FA) core complex, its interactions with cellular transcriptional machinery remain poorly characterized. Here, we identified FoxF1 protein as a novel interacting partner of the FA complex proteins. Using multiple human and mouse tumor cell lines and Foxf1+/− mice we demonstrated that FoxF1 physically binds to and increases stability of FA proteins. FoxF1 co-localizes with FANCD2 in DNA repair foci in cultured cells and tumor tissues obtained from cisplatin-treated mice. In response to DNA damage, FoxF1-deficient tumor cells showed significantly reduced FANCD2 monoubiquitination and FANCM phosphorylation, resulting in impaired formation of DNA repair foci. FoxF1 knockdown caused chromosomal instability, nuclear abnormalities, and increased tumor cell death in response to DNA-damaging agents. Overexpression of FoxF1 in DNA-damaged cells improved stability of FA proteins, decreased chromosomal and nuclear aberrations, restored formation of DNA repair foci and prevented cell death after DNA damage. These findings demonstrate that FoxF1 is a key component of FA complexes and a critical mediator of DNA damage response in tumor cells. PMID:26625197

  4. Upregulated LINE-1 Activity in the Fanconi Anemia Cancer Susceptibility Syndrome Leads to Spontaneous Pro-inflammatory Cytokine Production.

    PubMed

    Brégnard, Christelle; Guerra, Jessica; Déjardin, Stéphanie; Passalacqua, Frank; Benkirane, Monsef; Laguette, Nadine

    2016-06-01

    Fanconi Anemia (FA) is a genetic disorder characterized by elevated cancer susceptibility and pro-inflammatory cytokine production. Using SLX4(FANCP) deficiency as a working model, we questioned the trigger for chronic inflammation in FA. We found that absence of SLX4 caused cytoplasmic DNA accumulation, including sequences deriving from active Long INterspersed Element-1 (LINE-1), triggering the cGAS-STING pathway to elicit interferon (IFN) expression. In agreement, absence of SLX4 leads to upregulated LINE-1 retrotransposition. Importantly, similar results were obtained with the FANCD2 upstream activator of SLX4. Furthermore, treatment of FA cells with the Tenofovir reverse transcriptase inhibitor (RTi), that prevents endogenous retrotransposition, decreased both accumulation of cytoplasmic DNA and pro-inflammatory signaling. Collectively, our data suggest a contribution of endogenous RT activities to the generation of immunogenic cytoplasmic nucleic acids responsible for inflammation in FA. The additional observation that RTi decreased pro-inflammatory cytokine production induced by DNA replication stress-inducing drugs further demonstrates the contribution of endogenous RTs to sustaining chronic inflammation. Altogether, our data open perspectives in the prevention of adverse effects of chronic inflammation in tumorigenesis.

  5. Aplastic Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Aplastic anemia is a rare but serious blood disorder. If you have it, your bone marrow doesn't make ... blood cells. There are different types, including Fanconi anemia. Causes include Toxic substances, such as pesticides, arsenic, ...

  6. Low-Dose Total-Body Irradiation and Fludarabine Phosphate Followed by Unrelated Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Fanconi Anemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-16

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Fanconi Anemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  7. Maternal serum alpha-fetoprotein levels are normal in Fanconi anemia: Can it be a lack of postnatal inhibition of AFP gene resulting in the elevation?

    PubMed

    Aslan, Deniz; Karabacak, Recep Onur; Aslan, Oner Deniz

    2017-04-01

    We investigated the feasibility of using serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) levels as a screening test for prenatal diagnosis of Fanconi anemia (FA). Serial measurements in maternal serum were recorded. Parents, both heterozygous for FA, had declined prenatal molecular testing. The infant was born with no somatic abnormalities, and FA was confirmed by postnatal molecular analysis. Maternal serum AFP levels during each trimester of pregnancy were normal indicating that these levels cannot be used as a screening test in prenatal diagnosis. Three-year follow-up after birth showed constantly elevated serum levels in the patient from the start, suggesting a lack of postnatal inhibition on AFP gene.

  8. Genomic instability in mice is greater in Fanconi anemia caused by deficiency of Fancd2 than Fancg.

    PubMed

    Reliene, Ramune; Yamamoto, Mitsuko L; Rao, P Nagesh; Schiestl, Robert H

    2010-12-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) results from mutations in the FANC genes and is characterized by bone marrow failure, birth defects, and a high incidence of cancer. FANCG is a part of the FA core complex that is responsible for monoubiquitination of FANCD2 and FANCI. The precise role of the FA pathway is not well understood, although it may be involved in homologous recombination (HR), nonhomologous end joining, and translesion synthesis (TLS). Fancd2(-/-) mice have a more severe phenotype than Fancg(-/-), and other FA core complex-deficient mice, although both Fancg and Fancd2 belong to the same FA pathway. We hypothesized that Fancd2 deficiency results in a more severe phenotype because Fancd2 also has a FA pathway-independent function in the maintenance of genomic integrity. To test this hypothesis, we determined the level of DNA damage and genomic instability in Fancd2(-/-), Fancg(-/-), and wild-type controls. Fancd2(-/-) mice displayed a higher magnitude of chromosomal breakage and micronucleus formation than the wild-type or Fancg(-/-) mice. Also, DNA strand breaks were increased in Fancd2(-/-) but not in Fancg(-/-) mice. In addition, Fancd2(-/-) mice displayed an elevated frequency of DNA deletions, resulting from HR at the endogenous p(un) locus. In contrast, in Fancg(-/-) mice, the frequency of DNA deletions was decreased. Thus, Fancd2 but not Fancg deficiency results in elevated chromosomal/DNA breakage and permanent genome rearrangements. This provides evidence that Fancd2 plays an additional role in the maintenance of genomic stability than Fancg, which might explain the higher predisposition to cancer seen in the Fancd2(-/-) mice.

  9. Preventing over-resection by DNA2 helicase/nuclease suppresses repair defects in Fanconi anemia cells.

    PubMed

    Karanja, Kenneth K; Lee, Eu Han; Hendrickson, Eric A; Campbell, Judith L

    2014-01-01

    FANCD2 is required for the repair of DNA damage by the FA (Fanconi anemia) pathway, and, consequently, FANCD2-deficient cells are sensitive to compounds such as cisplatin and formaldehyde that induce DNA:DNA and DNA:protein crosslinks, respectively. The DNA2 helicase/nuclease is required for RNA/DNA flap removal from Okazaki fragments during DNA replication and for the resection of DSBs (double-strand breaks) during HDR (homology-directed repair) of replication stress-induced damage. A knockdown of DNA2 renders normal cells as sensitive to cisplatin (in the absence of EXO1) and to formaldehyde (even in the presence of EXO1) as FANCD2(-/-) cells. Surprisingly, however, the depletion of DNA2 in FANCD2-deficient cells rescues the sensitivity of FANCD2(-/-) cells to cisplatin and formaldehyde. We previously showed that the resection activity of DNA2 acts downstream of FANCD2 to insure HDR of the DSBs arising when replication forks encounter ICL (interstrand crosslink) damage. The suppression of FANCD2(-/-) by DNA2 knockdowns suggests that DNA2 and FANCD2 also have antagonistic roles: in the absence of FANCD2, DNA2 somehow corrupts repair. To demonstrate that DNA2 is deleterious to crosslink repair, we used psoralen-induced ICL damage to trigger the repair of a site-specific crosslink in a GFP reporter and observed that "over-resection" can account for reduced repair. Our work demonstrates that excessive resection can lead to genome instability and shows that strict regulatory processes have evolved to inhibit resection nucleases. The suppression of FANCD2(-/-) phenotypes by DNA2 depletion may have implications for FA therapies and for the use of ICL-inducing agents in chemotherapy.

  10. FANCD2, FANCJ and BRCA2 cooperate to promote replication fork recovery independently of the Fanconi Anemia core complex.

    PubMed

    Raghunandan, Maya; Chaudhury, Indrajit; Kelich, Stephanie L; Hanenberg, Helmut; Sobeck, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    Fanconi Anemia (FA) is an inherited multi-gene cancer predisposition syndrome that is characterized on the cellular level by a hypersensitivity to DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs). To repair these lesions, the FA pathway proteins are thought to act in a linear hierarchy: Following ICL detection, an upstream FA core complex monoubiquitinates the central FA pathway members FANCD2 and FANCI, followed by their recruitment to chromatin. Chromatin-bound monoubiquitinated FANCD2 and FANCI subsequently coordinate DNA repair factors including the downstream FA pathway members FANCJ and FANCD1/BRCA2 to repair the DNA ICL. Importantly, we recently showed that FANCD2 has additional independent roles: it binds chromatin and acts in concert with the BLM helicase complex to promote the restart of aphidicolin (APH)-stalled replication forks, while suppressing the firing of new replication origins. Here, we show that FANCD2 fulfills these roles independently of the FA core complex-mediated monoubiquitination step. Following APH treatment, nonubiquitinated FANCD2 accumulates on chromatin, recruits the BLM complex, and promotes robust replication fork recovery regardless of the absence or presence of a functional FA core complex. In contrast, the downstream FA pathway members FANCJ and BRCA2 share FANCD2's role in replication fork restart and the suppression of new origin firing. Our results support a non-linear FA pathway model at stalled replication forks, where the nonubiquitinated FANCD2 isoform - in concert with FANCJ and BRCA2 - fulfills a specific function in promoting efficient replication fork recovery independently of the FA core complex.

  11. Rad18 E3 ubiquitin ligase activity mediates Fanconi anemia pathway activation and cell survival following DNA Topoisomerase 1 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Palle, Komaraiah; Vaziri, Cyrus

    2011-05-15

    Camptothecin (CPT) and related chemotherapeutic drugs induce formation of DNA Topoisomerase I (Top1) covalent or cleavage complexes (Top1ccs) that block leading-strand DNA synthesis and elicit DNA Double Stranded Breaks (DSB) during S phase. The Fanconi Anemia (FA) pathway is implicated in tolerance of CPT-induced DNA damage yet the mechanism of FA pathway activation by Top1 poisons has not been studied. We show here that the FA core complex protein FANCA and monoubiquitinated FANCD2 (an effector of the FA pathway) are rapidly mobilized to chromatin in response to CPT treatment in several human cancer cell lines and untransformed primary human dermal fibroblasts. FANCD2 depletion using siRNA leads to impaired recovery from CPT-induced inhibition or DNA synthesis, persistence of γH2AX (a DSB marker) and reduced cell survival following CPT treatment. The E3 ubiquitin ligase Rad18 is necessary for CPT-induced recruitment of FANCA and FANCD2 to chromatin. Moreover, Rad18-depletion recapitulates the DNA synthesis and survival defects of FANCD2-deficiency in CPT-treated cells. It is well-established that Rad18 promotes FA pathway activation and DNA damage tolerance in response to bulky DNA lesions via a mechanism involving PCNA monoubiquitination. In contrast, PCNA monoubiquitination is not involved in Rad18-mediated FA pathway activation or cell survival following acquisition of CPT-induced DSB. Moreover, while Rad18 is implicated in recombinational repair of DSB via an E3 ligase-independent mechanism, we demonstrate that Rad18 E3 ligase activity is essential for appropriate FA pathway activation and DNA damage tolerance after CPT treatment. Taken together, our results define a novel pathway of Rad18-dependent DSB repair that is dissociable from known Rad18-mediated DNA repair mechanisms based on its independence from PCNA ubiquitination and requirement for E3 ligase activity.

  12. EGFR-activating mutations correlate with a Fanconi anemia-like cellular phenotype that includes PARP inhibitor sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Pfäffle, Heike N; Wang, Meng; Gheorghiu, Liliana; Ferraiolo, Natalie; Greninger, Patricia; Borgmann, Kerstin; Settleman, Jeffrey; Benes, Cyril H; Sequist, Lecia V; Zou, Lee; Willers, Henning

    2013-10-15

    In patients with lung cancer whose tumors harbor activating mutations in the EGF receptor (EGFR), increased responses to platinum-based chemotherapies are seen compared with wild-type cancers. However, the mechanisms underlying this association have remained elusive. Here, we describe a cellular phenotype of cross-linker sensitivity in a subset of EGFR-mutant lung cancer cell lines that is reminiscent of the defects seen in cells impaired in the Fanconi anemia pathway, including a pronounced G2-M cell-cycle arrest and chromosomal radial formation. We identified a defect downstream of FANCD2 at the level of recruitment of FAN1 nuclease and DNA interstrand cross-link (ICL) unhooking. The effect of EGFR mutation was epistatic with FANCD2. Consistent with the known role of FANCD2 in promoting RAD51 foci formation and homologous recombination repair (HRR), EGFR-mutant cells also exhibited an impaired RAD51 foci response to ICLs, but not to DNA double-strand breaks. EGFR kinase inhibition affected RAD51 foci formation neither in EGFR-mutant nor wild-type cells. In contrast, EGFR depletion or overexpression of mutant EGFR in wild-type cells suppressed RAD51 foci, suggesting an EGFR kinase-independent regulation of DNA repair. Interestingly, EGFR-mutant cells treated with the PARP inhibitor olaparib also displayed decreased FAN1 foci induction, coupled with a putative block in a late HRR step. As a result, EGFR-mutant lung cancer cells exhibited olaparib sensitivity in vitro and in vivo. Our findings provide insight into the mechanisms of cisplatin and PARP inhibitor sensitivity of EGFR-mutant cells, yielding potential therapeutic opportunities for further treatment individualization in this genetically defined subset of lung cancer.

  13. Regulation of the activation of the Fanconi anemia pathway by the p21 cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Rego, M A; Harney, J A; Mauro, M; Shen, M; Howlett, N G

    2012-01-19

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare disease characterized by congenital defects, progressive bone marrow failure and heightened cancer susceptibility. The FA proteins, BRCA1 and FANCD1/BRCA2 function cooperatively in the FA-BRCA pathway to repair damaged DNA. Activation of the FA-BRCA pathway occurs via the monoubiquitination of the FANCD2 and FANCI proteins, targeting these proteins to discrete nuclear foci where they function in DNA repair. The cellular regulation of FANCD2/I monoubiquitination, however, remains poorly understood. In this study, we have examined the roles of the p53 tumor suppressor protein, as well as its downstream target, the p21(Cip1/Waf1) cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, in the regulation of the activation of the FA-BRCA pathway. We demonstrate that, in contrast to p53, p21 has a major role in the regulation of the activation of the FA-BRCA pathway: p21 promotes S-phase and DNA damage-inducible FANCD2/I monoubiquitination and nuclear foci formation. Several lines of evidence establish that this effect is not a consequence of a defective G1-S checkpoint or altered cell-cycle progression in the absence of p21. Instead, we demonstrate that p21 is required for the transcriptional repression of the USP1 deubiquitinating enzyme upon exposure to DNA-damaging agents. In the absence of p21, persistent USP1 expression precludes the DNA damage-inducible accumulation of monoubiquitinated FANCD2 and FANCI. Consequently, p21(-/-) cells exhibit increased levels of mitomycin C-inducible complex chromosomal aberrations and elevated γH2AX nuclear foci formation. Our results demonstrate that p21 has a critical role in the regulation of the activation of the FA-BRCA pathway and suggest a broader role for p21 in the orchestration of DNA repair processes following exposure to DNA crosslinking agents.

  14. Preventing over-resection by DNA2 helicase/nuclease suppresses repair defects in Fanconi anemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Karanja, Kenneth K; Lee, Eu Han; Hendrickson, Eric A; Campbell, Judith L

    2014-01-01

    FANCD2 is required for the repair of DNA damage by the FA (Fanconi anemia) pathway, and, consequently, FANCD2-deficient cells are sensitive to compounds such as cisplatin and formaldehyde that induce DNA:DNA and DNA:protein crosslinks, respectively. The DNA2 helicase/nuclease is required for RNA/DNA flap removal from Okazaki fragments during DNA replication and for the resection of DSBs (double-strand breaks) during HDR (homology-directed repair) of replication stress-induced damage. A knockdown of DNA2 renders normal cells as sensitive to cisplatin (in the absence of EXO1) and to formaldehyde (even in the presence of EXO1) as FANCD2−/− cells. Surprisingly, however, the depletion of DNA2 in FANCD2-deficient cells rescues the sensitivity of FANCD2−/− cells to cisplatin and formaldehyde. We previously showed that the resection activity of DNA2 acts downstream of FANCD2 to insure HDR of the DSBs arising when replication forks encounter ICL (interstrand crosslink) damage. The suppression of FANCD2−/− by DNA2 knockdowns suggests that DNA2 and FANCD2 also have antagonistic roles: in the absence of FANCD2, DNA2 somehow corrupts repair. To demonstrate that DNA2 is deleterious to crosslink repair, we used psoralen-induced ICL damage to trigger the repair of a site-specific crosslink in a GFP reporter and observed that “over-resection” can account for reduced repair. Our work demonstrates that excessive resection can lead to genome instability and shows that strict regulatory processes have evolved to inhibit resection nucleases. The suppression of FANCD2−/− phenotypes by DNA2 depletion may have implications for FA therapies and for the use of ICL-inducing agents in chemotherapy. PMID:24626199

  15. Hydroxyurea induces chromosomal damage in G2 and enhances the clastogenic effect of mitomycin C in Fanconi anemia cells.

    PubMed

    Molina, Bertha; Marchetti, Francesco; Gómez, Laura; Ramos, Sandra; Torres, Leda; Ortiz, Rocio; Altamirano-Lozano, Mario; Carnevale, Alessandra; Frias, Sara

    2015-06-01

    Fanconi's anemia (FA) is a recessive disease; 16 genes are currently recognized in FA. FA proteins participate in the FA/BRCA pathway that plays a crucial role in the repair of DNA damage induced by crosslinking compounds. Hydroxyurea (HU) is an agent that induces replicative stress by inhibiting ribonucleotide reductase (RNR), which synthesizes deoxyribonucleotide triphosphates (dNTPs) necessary for DNA replication and repair. HU is known to activate the FA pathway; however, its clastogenic effects are not well characterized. We have investigated the effects of HU treatment alone or in sequential combination with mitomycin-C (MMC) on FA patient-derived lymphoblastoid cell lines from groups FA-A, B, C, D1/BRCA2, and E and on lymphocytes from two unclassified FA patients. All FA cells showed a significant increase (P < 0.05) in chromosomal aberrations following treatment with HU during the last 3 h before mitosis. Furthermore, when FA cells previously exposed to MMC were treated with HU, we observed an increase of MMC-induced DNA damage that was characterized by high occurrence of DNA breaks and a reduction in rejoined chromosomal aberrations. These findings show that exposure to HU during G2 induces chromosomal aberrations by a mechanism that is independent of its well-known role in replication fork stalling during S-phase and that HU interfered mainly with the rejoining process of DNA damage. We suggest that impaired oxidative stress response, lack of an adequate amount of dNTPs for DNA repair due to RNR inhibition, and interference with cell cycle control checkpoints underlie the clastogenic activity of HU in FA cells. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 56:457-467, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Analysis of the pattern of expression of the Fanconi anemia group C (Facc) gene during murine development

    SciTech Connect

    Krasnoshtein, F.; Buchwald, M.

    1994-09-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by a variety of congenital and skeletal malformations, progressive pancytopanenia and predisposition to malignancies. FA cells display chromosomal instability and hypersensitivity to DNA-damaging agents. Both the human and the corresponding murine cDNAs have been cloned in our lab. Here we describe the expression of Facc during mouse development, using mRNA in situ hybridization. Our aim is to obtain clues on the possible function of the Facc gene product during development that may help elucidate basic defect(s) in FA. In addition, knowledge of the exact pattern of Facc expression will assist in interpreting the phenotypes of mutant mice, currently being developed. In embryos the gene is diffusely expressed over the entire embryo, with higher hybridization levels in the mesenchyme and in both upper and lower extremities. Specific expression of Facc is seen in the perichondrium and marrow of long bones of hind limbs/hip; long bones of front limbs/shoulder region; developing digits of front and hind paws; and ribs. The signal is also detected in the following regions: cranial/frontal; facial/periorbital and maxillary/mandibular, hair follicles, diaphragm and lung. In addition, generalized Facc expression is seen during these embryonic stages. The pattern of Facc expression is consistent with the known skeletal abnormalities in FA patients, which include radial ray deformities, metacarpal hypoplasia, and abnormalities of lower limbs, ribs, head and face. The signal in the lung is consistent with the lung lobe absence and abnormal pulmonary drainage that have been detected in some FA patients. The sloped forehead and microcephaly in FA patients may have some association with the signal seen in the frontal region of the mouse cranium. Taken together, our results suggest that Facc is directly involved in the development of various embryonic tissues, particularly bone.

  17. Founder haplotype analysis of Fanconi anemia in the Korean population finds common ancestral haplotypes for a FANCG variant.

    PubMed

    Park, Joonhong; Kim, Myungshin; Jang, Woori; Chae, Hyojin; Kim, Yonggoo; Chung, Nack-Gyun; Lee, Jae-Wook; Cho, Bin; Jeong, Dae-Chul; Park, In Yang; Park, Mi Sun

    2015-05-01

    A common ancestral haplotype is strongly suggested in the Korean and Japanese patients with Fanconi anemia (FA), because common mutations have been frequently found: c.2546delC and c.3720_3724delAAACA of FANCA; c.307+1G>C, c.1066C>T, and c.1589_1591delATA of FANCG. Our aim in this study was to investigate the origin of these common mutations of FANCA and FANCG. We genotyped 13 FA patients consisting of five FA-A patients and eight FA-G patients from the Korean FA population. Microsatellite markers used for haplotype analysis included four CA repeat markers which are closely linked with FANCA and eight CA repeat markers which are contiguous with FANCG. As a result, Korean FA-A patients carrying c.2546delC or c.3720_3724delAAACA did not share the same haplotypes. However, three unique haplotypes carrying c.307+1G>C, c.1066C > T, or c.1589_1591delATA, that consisted of eight polymorphic loci covering a flanking region were strongly associated with Korean FA-G, consistent with founder haplotypes reported previously in the Japanese FA-G population. Our finding confirmed the common ancestral haplotypes on the origins of the East Asian FA-G patients, which will improve our understanding of the molecular population genetics of FA-G. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the association between disease-linked mutations and common ancestral haplotypes in the Korean FA population.

  18. Genetic inactivation of the Fanconi anemia gene FANCC identified in the hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HuH-7 confers sensitivity towards DNA-interstrand crosslinking agents

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Inactivation of the Fanconi anemia (FA) pathway through defects in one of 13 FA genes occurs at low frequency in various solid cancer entities among the general population. As FA pathway inactivation confers a distinct hypersensitivity towards DNA interstrand-crosslinking (ICL)-agents, FA defects represent rational targets for individualized therapeutic strategies. Except for pancreatic cancer, however, the prevalence of FA defects in gastrointestinal (GI) tumors has not yet been systematically explored. Results A panel of GI cancer cell lines was screened for FA pathway inactivation applying FANCD2 monoubiquitination and FANCD2/RAD51 nuclear focus formation and a newly identified FA pathway-deficient cell line was functionally characterized. The hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) line HuH-7 was defective in FANCD2 monoubiquitination and FANCD2 nuclear focus formation but proficient in RAD51 focus formation. Gene complementation studies revealed that this proximal FA pathway inactivation was attributable to defective FANCC function in HuH-7 cells. Accordingly, a homozygous inactivating FANCC nonsense mutation (c.553C > T, p.R185X) was identified in HuH-7, resulting in partial transcriptional skipping of exon 6 and leading to the classic cellular FA hypersensitivity phenotype; HuH-7 cells exhibited a strongly reduced proliferation rate and a pronounced G2 cell cycle arrest at distinctly lower concentrations of ICL-agents than a panel of non-isogenic, FA pathway-proficient HCC cell lines. Upon retroviral transduction of HuH-7 cells with FANCC cDNA, FA pathway functions were restored and ICL-hypersensitivity abrogated. Analyses of 18 surgical HCC specimens yielded no further examples for genetic or epigenetic inactivation of FANCC, FANCF, or FANCG in HCC, suggesting a low prevalence of proximal FA pathway inactivation in this tumor type. Conclusions As the majority of HCC are chemoresistant, assessment of FA pathway function in HCC could identify small

  19. De Novo Chromosome Copy Number Variation in Fanconi Anemia-Associated Hematopoietic Defects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    We have confirmed re-expression of FANCA, FANCD2 , and FANCG in the FA-A + FANCA, FA-D2 + FANCD2 , and FA-G + FANCG cells, respectively. We have also...confirmed restoration of FANCD2 and FANCI monoubiquitination and functional complementation of the FA-A + FANCA and FA-D2 + FANCD2 cells. In...de novo CNVs Task 1. Correction of FA-A, FA-C, and FA-D2 hTERT cells with pLenti6.2/V5-FANCA, -FANCC, and FANCD2 , respectively. Sub-task 1

  20. What Causes Aplastic Anemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... to aplastic anemia. Examples include Fanconi anemia , Shwachman-Diamond syndrome, dyskeratosis (DIS-ker-ah-TO-sis) congenita, and Diamond-Blackfan anemia. Rate This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video ...

  1. Lung Cancer Cell Line Screen Links Fanconi Anemia/BRCA Pathway Defects to Increased Relative Biological Effectiveness of Proton Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Qi; Ghosh, Priyanjali; Magpayo, Nicole; Testa, Mauro; Tang, Shikui; Gheorghiu, Liliana; Biggs, Peter; Paganetti, Harald; Efstathiou, Jason A.; Lu, Hsiao-Ming; Held, Kathryn D.; Willers, Henning

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: Growing knowledge of genomic heterogeneity in cancer, especially when it results in altered DNA damage responses, requires re-examination of the generic relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of 1.1 of protons. Methods and Materials: For determination of cellular radiosensitivity, we irradiated 17 lung cancer cell lines at the mid-spread-out Bragg peak of a clinical proton beam (linear energy transfer, 2.5 keV/μm). For comparison, 250-kVp X rays and {sup 137}Cs γ-rays were used. To estimate the RBE of protons relative to {sup 60}Co (Co60eq), we assigned an RBE(Co60Eq) of 1.1 to X rays to correct the physical dose measured. Standard DNA repair foci assays were used to monitor damage responses. FANCD2 was depleted using RNA interference. Results: Five lung cancer cell lines (29.4%) exhibited reduced clonogenic survival after proton irradiation compared with X-irradiation with the same physical doses. This was confirmed in a 3-dimensional sphere assay. Corresponding proton RBE(Co60Eq) estimates were statistically significantly different from 1.1 (P≤.05): 1.31 to 1.77 (for a survival fraction of 0.5). In 3 of these lines, increased RBE was correlated with alterations in the Fanconi anemia (FA)/BRCA pathway of DNA repair. In Calu-6 cells, the data pointed toward an FA pathway defect, leading to a previously unreported persistence of proton-induced RAD51 foci. The FA/BRCA-defective cells displayed a 25% increase in the size of subnuclear 53BP1 foci 18 hours after proton irradiation. Conclusions: Our cell line screen has revealed variations in proton RBE that are partly due to FA/BRCA pathway defects, suggesting that the use of a generic RBE for cancers should be revisited. We propose that functional biomarkers, such as size of residual 53BP1 foci, may be used to identify cancers with increased sensitivity to proton radiation.

  2. Fanconi anemia A is a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling molecule required for gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) transduction of the GnRH receptor.

    PubMed

    Larder, Rachel; Karali, Dimitra; Nelson, Nancy; Brown, Pamela

    2006-12-01

    GnRH binds its cognate G protein-coupled GnRH receptor (GnRHR) located on pituitary gonadotropes and drives expression of gonadotropin hormones. There are two gonadotropin hormones, comprised of a common alpha- and hormone-specific beta-subunit, which are required for gonadal function. Recently we identified that Fanconi anemia a (Fanca), a DNA damage repair gene, is differentially expressed within the LbetaT2 gonadotrope cell line in response to stimulation with GnRH. FANCA is mutated in more than 60% of cases of Fanconi anemia (FA), a rare genetically heterogeneous autosomal recessive disorder characterized by bone marrow failure, endocrine tissue cancer susceptibility, and infertility. Here we show that induction of FANCA protein is mediated by the GnRHR and that the protein constitutively adopts a nucleocytoplasmic intracellular distribution pattern. Using inhibitors to block nuclear import and export and a GnRHR antagonist, we demonstrated that GnRH induces nuclear accumulation of FANCA and green fluorescent protein (GFP)-FANCA before exporting back to the cytoplasm using the nuclear export receptor CRM1. Using FANCA point mutations that locate GFP-FANCA to the cytoplasm (H1110P) or functionally uncouple GFP-FANCA (Q1128E) from the wild-type nucleocytoplasmic distribution pattern, we demonstrated that wild-type FANCA was required for GnRH-induced activation of gonadotrope cell markers. Cotransfection of H1110P and Q1128E blocked GnRH activation of the alphaGsu and GnRHR but not the beta-subunit gene promoters. We conclude that nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of FANCA is required for GnRH transduction of the alphaGSU and GnRHR gene promoters and propose that FANCA functions as a GnRH-induced signal transducer.

  3. Repair pathways independent of the Fanconi anemia nuclear core complex play a predominant role in mitigating formaldehyde-induced DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Noda, Taichi; Takahashi, Akihisa; Kondo, Natsuko; Mori, Eiichiro; Okamoto, Noritomo; Nakagawa, Yosuke; Ohnishi, Ken; Zdzienicka, Malgorzata Z.; Thompson, Larry H.; Helleday, Thomas; Asada, Hideo; and others

    2011-01-07

    The role of the Fanconi anemia (FA) repair pathway for DNA damage induced by formaldehyde was examined in the work described here. The following cell types were used: mouse embryonic fibroblast cell lines FANCA{sup -/-}, FANCC{sup -/-}, FANCA{sup -/-}C{sup -/-}, FANCD2{sup -/-} and their parental cells, the Chinese hamster cell lines FANCD1 mutant (mt), FANCGmt, their revertant cells, and the corresponding wild-type (wt) cells. Cell survival rates were determined with colony formation assays after formaldehyde treatment. DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) were detected with an immunocytochemical {gamma}H2AX-staining assay. Although the sensitivity of FANCA{sup -/-}, FANCC{sup -/-} and FANCA{sup -/-}C{sup -/-} cells to formaldehyde was comparable to that of proficient cells, FANCD1mt, FANCGmt and FANCD2{sup -/-} cells were more sensitive to formaldehyde than the corresponding proficient cells. It was found that homologous recombination (HR) repair was induced by formaldehyde. In addition, {gamma}H2AX foci in FANCD1mt cells persisted for longer times than in FANCD1wt cells. These findings suggest that formaldehyde-induced DSBs are repaired by HR through the FA repair pathway which is independent of the FA nuclear core complex. -- Research highlights: {yields} We examined to clarify the repair pathways of formaldehyde-induced DNA damage. Formaldehyde induces DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). {yields} DSBs are repaired through the Fanconi anemia (FA) repair pathway. {yields} This pathway is independent of the FA nuclear core complex. {yields} We also found that homologous recombination repair was induced by formaldehyde.

  4. Alcohol metabolism in human cells causes DNA damage and activates the Fanconi anemia – breast cancer susceptibility (FA-BRCA) DNA damage response network

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Jessy; Balbo, Silvia; Crabb, David; Brooks, P.J.

    2011-01-01

    Background We recently reported that exposure of human cells in vitro to acetaldehyde resulted in activation of the Fanconi anemia-breast cancer associated (FA-BRCA) DNA damage response network. Methods To determine whether intracellular generation of acetaldehyde from ethanol metabolism can cause DNA damage and activate the FA-BRCA network, we engineered HeLa cells to metabolize alcohol by expression of human alcohol dehydrogenase 1B. Results Incubation of HeLa-ADH1B cells with ethanol (20 mM) resulted in acetaldehyde accumulation in the media which was prevented by co-incubation with 4-methyl pyrazole (4-MP), a specific inhibitor of ADH. Ethanol treatment of HeLa-ADH1B cells produced a 4-fold increase in the acetaldehyde-DNA adduct, N2-ethylidene-dGuo, and also resulted in activation of the Fanconi anemia -breast cancer susceptibility (FA-BRCA) DNA damage response network, as indicated by a monoubiquitination of FANCD2, and phosphorylation of BRCA1. Ser 1524 was identified as one site of BRCA1 phosphorylation. The increased levels of DNA adducts, FANCD2 monoubiquitination, and BRCA1 phosphorylation were all blocked by 4-MP, indicating that acetaldehyde, rather than ethanol itself, was responsible for all three responses. Importantly, the ethanol concentration we used is within the range that can be attained in the human body during social drinking. Conclusions Our results indicate that intracellular metabolism of ethanol to acetaldehyde results in DNA damage which activates the FA-BRCA DNA damage response network. PMID:21919919

  5. What Is Fanconi Anemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... much more likely than others to develop cancerous solid tumors. The risk of solid tumors increases with age in people who have ... to FA are bone marrow failure, leukemia, and solid tumors. Advances in care and treatment have improved ...

  6. A novel role for Fanconi anemia (FA) pathway effector protein FANCD2 in cell cycle progression of untransformed primary human cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Ihn Young; Barkley, Laura R; Day, Tovah A; Weiss, Robert S; Vaziri, Cyrus

    2010-06-15

    Fanconi Anemia (FA) is a cancer-susceptibility syndrome characterized by cellular sensitivity to DNA inter-strand cross-link (ICL)-inducing agents. The Fanconia Anemia D2 (FANCD2) protein is implicated in repair of various forms of DNA damage including ICLs. Studies with replicating extracts from Xenopus eggs indicate a role for FANCD2 in processing and repair of DNA replication-associated double stranded breaks (DSB). We have investigated the role of FANCD2 in cell cycle progression of cultured human cells. Similar to Xenopus cell-free extracts, we show that chromatin association of FANCD2 in human cells is coupled to ongoing DNA replication. siRNA depletion experiments demonstrate that FANCD2 is necessary for efficient DNA synthesis. However, in contrast with Xenopus extracts, FANCD2-deficiency does not elicit a DNA damage response, and does not affect the elongation phase of DNA synthesis, suggesting that FANCD2 is dispensable for repair of replication-associated DNA damage. Using synchronized cultures of primary untransformed human dermal fibroblasts we demonstrate that FANCD2 is necessary for efficient initiation of DNA synthesis. Taken together, our results suggest a novel role for the FA pathway in regulation of DNA synthesis and cell cycle progression. Inefficient DNA replication may contribute to the genome instability and cancer-propensity of FA patients.

  7. Loss of Dependence on Continued Expression of the Human Papillomavirus 16 E7 Oncogene in Cervical Cancers and Precancerous Lesions Arising in Fanconi Anemia Pathway-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Park, Soyeong; Park, Jung Wook; Pitot, Henry C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT   Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare genetic disorder caused by defects in DNA damage repair. FA patients often develop squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) at sites where high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are known to cause cancer, including the cervix. However, SCCs found in human FA patients are often HPV negative, even though the majority of female FA patients with anogenital cancers had preexisting HPV-positive dysplasia. We hypothesize that HPVs contribute to the development of SCCs in FA patients but that the continued expression of HPV oncogenes is not required for the maintenance of the cancer state because FA deficiency leads to an accumulation of mutations in cellular genes that render the cancer no longer dependent upon viral oncogenes. We tested this hypothesis, making use of Bi-L E7 transgenic mice in which we temporally controlled expression of HPV16 E7, the dominant viral oncogene in HPV-associated cancers. As seen before, the persistence of cervical neoplastic disease was highly dependent upon the continued expression of HPV16 E7 in FA-sufficient mice. However, in mice with FA deficiency, cervical cancers persisted in a large fraction of the mice after HPV16 E7 expression was turned off, indicating that these cancers had escaped from their dependency on E7. Furthermore, the severity of precancerous lesions also failed to be reduced significantly in the mice with FA deficiency upon turning off expression of E7. These findings confirm our hypothesis and may explain the fact that, while FA patients have a high frequency of infections by HPVs and HPV-induced precancerous lesions, the cancers are frequently HPV negative. Importance   Fanconi anemia (FA) patients are at high risk for developing squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) at sites where high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) frequently cause cancer. Yet these SCCs are often HPV negative. FA patients have a genetic defect in their capacity to repair damaged DNA. HPV oncogenes cause an

  8. Mutational analysis of FANCL, FANCM and the recently identified FANCI suggests that among the 13 known Fanconi Anemia genes, only FANCD1/BRCA2 plays a major role in high-risk breast cancer predisposition.

    PubMed

    García, María J; Fernández, Victoria; Osorio, Ana; Barroso, Alicia; Fernández, Fernando; Urioste, Miguel; Benítez, Javier

    2009-11-01

    Fanconi Anemia (FA) is a rare recessive syndrome characterized by cellular hypersensitivity to DNA-cross-linking agents. To date, 13 FA complementation groups have been described and all 13 genes associated to each of these groups have been currently identified. Three of the known FA genes are also high-risk (FANCD1/BRCA2) or moderate-risk (FANCN/PALB2 and FANCJ/BRIP1) breast cancer susceptibility genes, which makes all members of the FA pathway particularly attractive breast cancer candidate genes. Most FA genes have been screened for mutations in breast cancer families negative for BRCA1/2 mutations but the role of FANCL, FANCM and the recently identified FANCI has not been evaluated to date. This fact and novel data sustaining greater functional relevance of the three genes within the FA pathway prompted us to scrutinize all coding sequences and splicing sites of FANCI, FANCL and FANCM in 95 BRCA1/2-negative index cases from Spanish high-risk breast cancer families. We identified 68 sequence variants of which 24 were coding and 44 non-coding. Six exonic and 26 non-coding variants had not been described previously. None of the coding changes caused clearly pathogenic changes and computational analysis of all non-described intronic variants did not revealed major impact in splicing. With the present study, all known FA genes have been evaluated within the context of breast cancer high-risk predisposition. Our results rule out a major role of FANCI, FANCL and FANCM in familial breast cancer susceptibility, suggesting that among the 13 known FA genes, only FANCD1/BRCA2 plays a major role in high-risk breast cancer predisposition.

  9. Histone chaperone activity of Fanconi anemia proteins, FANCD2 and FANCI, is required for DNA crosslink repair.

    PubMed

    Sato, Koichi; Ishiai, Masamichi; Toda, Kazue; Furukoshi, Satoshi; Osakabe, Akihisa; Tachiwana, Hiroaki; Takizawa, Yoshimasa; Kagawa, Wataru; Kitao, Hiroyuki; Dohmae, Naoshi; Obuse, Chikashi; Kimura, Hiroshi; Takata, Minoru; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2012-08-29

    Fanconi anaemia (FA) is a rare hereditary disorder characterized by genomic instability and cancer susceptibility. A key FA protein, FANCD2, is targeted to chromatin with its partner, FANCI, and plays a critical role in DNA crosslink repair. However, the molecular function of chromatin-bound FANCD2-FANCI is still poorly understood. In the present study, we found that FANCD2 possesses nucleosome-assembly activity in vitro. The mobility of histone H3 was reduced in FANCD2-knockdown cells following treatment with an interstrand DNA crosslinker, mitomycin C. Furthermore, cells harbouring FANCD2 mutations that were defective in nucleosome assembly displayed impaired survival upon cisplatin treatment. Although FANCI by itself lacked nucleosome-assembly activity, it significantly stimulated FANCD2-mediated nucleosome assembly. These observations suggest that FANCD2-FANCI may regulate chromatin dynamics during DNA repair.

  10. The Fanconi anemia/BRCA pathway is involved in DNA interstrand cross-link repair of adriamycin-resistant leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Yao, Chenjiao; Du, Wei; Chen, Haibing; Xiao, Sheng; Huang, Lihua; Chen, Fangping

    2015-03-01

    The Fanconi anemia/BRCA (FA/BRCA) pathway plays a vital role in DNA damage repair induced by DNA cross-linking agents and is closely related to drug response in cancer treatment. Here we demonstrate that the FA/BRCA pathway contributes to acquired drug resistance in adriamycin (ADR)-resistant leukemia cell lines, and disruption of this pathway partially reverses the drug resistance. We observed that ADR-resistant cells have reduced DNA interstrand cross-links (ICL) compared with ADR-sensitive cells. Western blot studies demonstrated enhanced FA protein expression in ADR-resistant cells. Using siRNA to knock down FANCF in K562/R drug-resistant cells showed increases in sensitivity to ADR and ADR-induced DNA damage, and demonstrated a direct relationship between the FA/BRCA pathway and drug sensitivity. Overexpression of FANCF in K562 drug-sensitive cells partially reproduced the drug-resistant phenotype. These results show that the FA/BRCA pathway is involved in acquired ADR resistance of leukemia cells. The FA/BRCA pathway may be a new target to reverse ADR resistance in leukemia treatment.

  11. Factors Influencing the Decision-Making Process and Long-Term Interpersonal Outcomes for Parents Who Undergo Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis for Fanconi Anemia: a Qualitative Investigation.

    PubMed

    Haude, K; McCarthy Veach, P; LeRoy, B; Zierhut, H

    2016-11-17

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is characterized by congenital malformations, progressive bone marrow failure, and predisposition to malignancy. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is used to treat FA, and best results are attained with sibling donors who are human leukocyte antigen (HLA) identical matches. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) offers parents of an affected child the opportunity to have an unaffected child who is an HLA match. While some research has investigated parents' experiences during the PGD process, no published studies specifically address factors influencing their decision-making process and long-term interpersonal outcomes. The aims of this study are to: (1) examine parents' expectations and the influence of media, bioethics, and religion on their decision to undergo PGD; (2) examine parents' social support and emotional experiences during their PGD process; and (3) characterize long-term effects of PGD on relationship dynamics (partner, family, friends), others' attitudes, and parental regret. Nine parents participated in semi-structured interviews. Thematic analysis revealed their decision to use PGD was variously influenced by media, bioethics, and religion, in particular, affecting parents' initial confidence levels. Moreover, the PGD process was emotionally complex, with parents desiring varying amounts and types of support from different sources at different times. Parents reported others' attitudes towards them were similar or no different than before PGD. Parental regret regarding PGD was negligible. Results of this study will promote optimization of long-term care for FA families.

  12. The nuclease hSNM1B/Apollo is linked to the Fanconi anemia pathway via its interaction with FANCP/SLX4.

    PubMed

    Salewsky, Bastian; Schmiester, Maren; Schindler, Detlev; Digweed, Martin; Demuth, Ilja

    2012-11-15

    The recessive genetic disorder Fanconi anemia (FA) is clinically characterized by congenital defects, bone marrow failure and an increased incidence of cancer. Cells derived from FA patients exhibit hypersensitivity to DNA interstrand crosslink (ICL)-inducing agents. We have earlier reported a similar cellular phenotype for human cells depleted of hSNM1B/Apollo (siRNA). In fact, hSNM1B/Apollo has a dual role in the DNA damage response and in generation and maintenance of telomeres, the latter function involving interaction with the shelterin protein TRF2. Here we find that ectopically expressed hSNM1B/Apollo co-immunoprecipitates with SLX4, a protein recently identified as a new FA protein, FANCP, and known to interact with several structure-specific nucleases. As shown by immunofluorescence analysis, FANCP/SLX4 depletion (siRNA) resulted in a significant reduction of hSNM1B/Apollo nuclear foci, supporting the functional relevance of this new protein interaction. Interestingly, as an additional consequence of FANCP/SLX4 depletion, we found a reduction of cellular TRF2, in line with its telomere-related function. Finally, analysis of human cells following double knockdown of hSNM1B/Apollo and FANCP/SLX4 indicated that they function epistatically. These findings further substantiate the role of hSNM1B/Apollo in a downstream step of the FA pathway during the repair of DNA ICLs.

  13. The carboxyl terminus of FANCE recruits FANCD2 to the Fanconi Anemia (FA) E3 ligase complex to promote the FA DNA repair pathway.

    PubMed

    Polito, David; Cukras, Scott; Wang, Xiaozhe; Spence, Paige; Moreau, Lisa; D'Andrea, Alan D; Kee, Younghoon

    2014-03-07

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genome instability syndrome characterized by bone marrow failure and cellular hypersensitivity to DNA cross-linking agents. In response to DNA damage, the FA pathway is activated through the cooperation of 16 FA proteins. A central player in the pathway is a multisubunit E3 ubiquitin ligase complex or the FA core complex, which monoubiquitinates its substrates FANCD2 and FANCI. FANCE, a subunit of the FA core complex, plays an essential role by promoting the integrity of the complex and by directly recognizing FANCD2. To delineate its role in substrate ubiquitination from the core complex assembly, we analyzed a series of mutations within FANCE. We report that a phenylalanine located at the highly conserved extreme C terminus, referred to as Phe-522, is a critical residue for mediating the monoubiquitination of the FANCD2-FANCI complex. Using the FANCE mutant that specifically disrupts the FANCE-FANCD2 interaction as a tool, we found that the interaction-deficient mutant conferred cellular sensitivity in reconstituted FANCE-deficient cells to a similar degree as FANCE null cells, suggesting the significance of the FANCE-FANCD2 interaction in promoting cisplatin resistance. Intriguingly, ectopic expression of the FANCE C terminus fragment alone in FA normal cells disrupts DNA repair, consolidating the importance of the FANCE-FANCD2 interaction in the DNA cross-link repair.

  14. HPV-16 E7 reveals a link between DNA replication stress, fanconi anemia D2 protein, and alternative lengthening of telomere-associated promyelocytic leukemia bodies.

    PubMed

    Spardy, Nicole; Duensing, Anette; Hoskins, Elizabeth E; Wells, Susanne I; Duensing, Stefan

    2008-12-01

    Expression of the high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV-16) E7 oncoprotein extends the life span of primary human keratinocytes and partially restores telomere length in the absence of telomerase. The molecular basis of this activity is incompletely understood. Here, we show that HPV-16 E7 induces an increased formation of alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT)-associated promyelocytic leukemia bodies (APBs) in early passage primary human keratinocytes as well as HPV-negative tumor cells. This activity was found to require sequences of HPV-16 E7 involved in degradation of the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein as well as regions in the COOH terminus. HPV-16 E7-induced APBs contained ssDNA and several proteins that are involved in the response to DNA replication stress, most notably the Fanconi anemia D2 protein (FANCD2) as well as BRCA2 and MUS81. In line with these results, we found that FANCD2-containing APBs form in an ATR-dependent manner in HPV-16 E7-expressing cells. To directly show a role of FANCD2 in ALT, we provide evidence that knockdown of FANCD2 rapidly causes telomere dysfunction in cells that rely on ALT to maintain telomeres. Taken together, our results suggest a novel link between replication stress and recombination-based telomere maintenance that may play a role in HPV-16 E7-mediated extension of host cell life span and immortalization.

  15. Functional interaction between the Fanconi Anemia D2 protein and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) via a conserved putative PCNA interaction motif.

    PubMed

    Howlett, Niall G; Harney, Julie A; Rego, Meghan A; Kolling, Frederick W; Glover, Thomas W

    2009-10-16

    Fanconi Anemia (FA) is a rare recessive disease characterized by congenital abnormalities, bone marrow failure, and cancer susceptibility. The FA proteins and the familial breast cancer susceptibility gene products, BRCA1 and FANCD1/BRCA2, function cooperatively in the FA-BRCA pathway to repair damaged DNA and to prevent cellular transformation. Activation of this pathway occurs via the mono-ubiquitination of the FANCD2 protein, targeting it to nuclear foci where it co-localizes with FANCD1/BRCA2, RAD51, and PCNA. The regulation of the mono-ubiquitination of FANCD2, as well as its function in DNA repair remain poorly understood. In this study, we have further characterized the interaction between the FANCD2 and PCNA proteins. We have identified a highly conserved, putative FANCD2 PCNA interaction motif (PIP-box), and demonstrate that mutation of this motif disrupts FANCD2-PCNA binding and precludes the mono-ubiquitination of FANCD2. Consequently, the FANCD2 PIP-box mutant protein fails to correct the mitomycin C hypersensitivity of FA-D2 patient cells. Our results suggest that PCNA may function as a molecular platform to facilitate the mono-ubiquitination of FANCD2 and activation of the FA-BRCA pathway.

  16. UBE2T, the Fanconi anemia core complex, and FANCD2 are recruited independently to chromatin: a basis for the regulation of FANCD2 monoubiquitination.

    PubMed

    Alpi, Arno; Langevin, Frederic; Mosedale, Georgina; Machida, Yuichi J; Dutta, Anindya; Patel, Ketan J

    2007-12-01

    The Fanconi anemia (FA) nuclear core complex and the E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme UBE2T are required for the S phase and DNA damage-restricted monoubiquitination of FANCD2. This constitutes a key step in the FA tumor suppressor pathway, and much attention has been focused on the regulation at this point. Here, we address the importance of the assembly of the FA core complex and the subcellular localization of UBE2T in the regulation of FANCD2 monoubiquitination. We establish three points. First, the stable assembly of the FA core complex can be dissociated of its ability to function as an E3 ubiquitin ligase. Second, the actual E3 ligase activity is not determined by the assembly of the FA core complex but rather by its DNA damage-induced localization to chromatin. Finally, UBE2T and FANCD2 access this subcellular fraction independently of the FA core complex. FANCD2 monoubiquitination is therefore not regulated by multiprotein complex assembly but by the formation of an active E2/E3 holoenzyme on chromatin.

  17. FANCC, FANCE, and FANCD2 form a ternary complex essential to the integrity of the Fanconi anemia DNA damage response pathway.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Susan M; Alon, Noa; Buchwald, Manuel

    2005-10-28

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetically heterogeneous disorder characterized by bone marrow failure, cancer predisposition, and increased cellular sensitivity to DNA-cross-linking agents. The products of seven of the nine identified FA genes participate in a protein complex required for monoubiquitination of the FANCD2 protein. Direct interaction of the FANCE protein with both fellow FA complex component FANCC and the downstream FANCD2 protein has been observed in the yeast two-hybrid system. Here, we demonstrate the ability of FANCE to mediate the interaction between FANCC and FANCD2 in the yeast three-hybrid system and confirm the FANCE-mediated association of FANCC with FANCD2 in human cells. A yeast two-hybrid system-based screen was devised to identify randomly mutagenized FANCE proteins capable of interaction with FANCC but not with FANCD2. Exogenous expression of these mutants in an FA-E cell line and subsequent evaluation of FANCD2 monoubiquitination and DNA cross-linker sensitivity indicated a critical role for the FANCE/FANCD2 interaction in maintaining FA pathway integrity. Three-hybrid experiments also demonstrated the ability of FANCE to mediate the interaction between FA core complex components FANCC and FANCF, indicating an additional role for FANCE in complex assembly. Thus, FANCE is shown to be a key mediator of protein interactions both in the architecture of the FA protein complex and in the connection of complex components to the putative downstream targets of complex activity.

  18. ΔNp63 activates the Fanconi anemia DNA repair pathway and limits the efficacy of cisplatin treatment in squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bretz, Anne Catherine; Gittler, Miriam P; Charles, Joël P; Gremke, Niklas; Eckhardt, Ines; Mernberger, Marco; Mandic, Robert; Thomale, Jürgen; Nist, Andrea; Wanzel, Michael; Stiewe, Thorsten

    2016-04-20

    TP63, a member of the p53 gene family gene, encodes the ΔNp63 protein and is one of the most frequently amplified genes in squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) of the head and neck (HNSCC) and lungs (LUSC). Using an epiallelic series of siRNAs with intrinsically different knockdown abilities, we show that the complete loss of ΔNp63 strongly impaired cell proliferation, whereas partial ΔNp63 depletion rendered cells hypersensitive to cisplatin accompanied by an accumulation of DNA damage. Expression profiling revealed wide-spread transcriptional regulation of DNA repair genes and in particular Fanconi anemia (FA) pathway components such as FANCD2 and RAD18 - known to be crucial for the repair of cisplatin-induced interstrand crosslinks. In SCC patients ΔNp63 levels significantly correlate with FANCD2 and RAD18 expression confirming ΔNp63 as a key activator of the FA pathway in vivo Mechanistically, ΔNp63 bound an upstream enhancer of FANCD2 inactive in primary keratinocytes but aberrantly activated by ΔNp63 in SCC. Consistently, depletion of FANCD2 sensitized to cisplatin similar to depletion of ΔNp63. Together, our results demonstrate that ΔNp63 directly activates the FA pathway in SCC and limits the efficacy of cisplatin treatment. Targeting ΔNp63 therefore would not only inhibit SCC proliferation but also sensitize tumors to chemotherapy.

  19. The Fanconi anemia pathway controls oncogenic response in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells by regulating PRMT5-mediated p53 arginine methylation

    PubMed Central

    Du, Wei; Amarachintha, Surya; Erden, Ozlem; Wilson, Andrew; Pang, Qishen

    2016-01-01

    The Fanconi anemia (FA) pathway is involved in DNA damage and other cellular stress responses. We have investigated the role of the FA pathway in oncogenic stress response by employing an in vivo stress-response model expressing the Gadd45β-luciferase transgene. Using two inducible models of oncogenic activation (LSL-K-rasG12D and MycER), we show that hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) from mice deficient for the FA core complex components Fanca or Fancc exhibit aberrant short-lived response to oncogenic insults. Mechanistic studies reveal that FA deficiency in HSPCs impairs oncogenic stress-induced G1 cell-cycle checkpoint, resulting from a compromised K-rasG12D-induced arginine methylation of p53 mediated by the protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5). Furthermore, forced expression of PRMT5 in HSPCs from LSL-K-rasG12D/CreER-Fanca−/− mice prolongs oncogenic response and delays leukemia development in recipient mice. Our study defines an arginine methylation-dependent FA-p53 interplay that controls oncogenic stress response. PMID:27507053

  20. Hyper-active non-homologous end joining selects for synthetic lethality resistant and pathological Fanconi anemia hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Du, Wei; Amarachintha, Surya; Wilson, Andrew F.; Pang, Qishen

    2016-01-01

    The prominent role of Fanconi anemia (FA) proteins involves homologous recombination (HR) repair. Poly[ADP-ribose] polymerase1 (PARP1) functions in multiple cellular processes including DNA repair and PARP inhibition is an emerging targeted therapy for cancer patients deficient in HR. Here we show that PARP1 activation in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) in response to genotoxic or oxidative stress attenuates HSPC exhaustion. Mechanistically, PARP1 controls the balance between HR and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) in double strand break (DSB) repair by preventing excessive NHEJ. Disruption of the FA core complex skews PARP1 function in DSB repair and led to hyper-active NHEJ in Fanca−/− or Fancc−/− HSPCs. Re-expression of PARP1 rescues the hyper-active NHEJ phenotype in Brca1−/−Parp1−/− but less effective in Fanca−/−Parp1−/− cells. Inhibition of NHEJ prevents myeloid/erythroid pathologies associated with synthetic lethality. Our results suggest that hyper-active NHEJ may select for “synthetic lethality” resistant and pathological HSPCs. PMID:26916217

  1. The Fanconi Anemia DNA Repair Pathway Is Regulated by an Interaction between Ubiquitin and the E2-like Fold Domain of FANCL.

    PubMed

    Miles, Jennifer A; Frost, Mark G; Carroll, Eilis; Rowe, Michelle L; Howard, Mark J; Sidhu, Ateesh; Chaugule, Viduth K; Alpi, Arno F; Walden, Helen

    2015-08-21

    The Fanconi Anemia (FA) DNA repair pathway is essential for the recognition and repair of DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICL). Inefficient repair of these ICL can lead to leukemia and bone marrow failure. A critical step in the pathway is the monoubiquitination of FANCD2 by the RING E3 ligase FANCL. FANCL comprises 3 domains, a RING domain that interacts with E2 conjugating enzymes, a central domain required for substrate interaction, and an N-terminal E2-like fold (ELF) domain. The ELF domain is found in all FANCL homologues, yet the function of the domain remains unknown. We report here that the ELF domain of FANCL is required to mediate a non-covalent interaction between FANCL and ubiquitin. The interaction involves the canonical Ile44 patch on ubiquitin, and a functionally conserved patch on FANCL. We show that the interaction is not necessary for the recognition of the core complex, it does not enhance the interaction between FANCL and Ube2T, and is not required for FANCD2 monoubiquitination in vitro. However, we demonstrate that the ELF domain is required to promote efficient DNA damage-induced FANCD2 monoubiquitination in vertebrate cells, suggesting an important function of ubiquitin binding by FANCL in vivo.

  2. Risk of head and neck squamous cell cancer and death in patients with Fanconi anemia who did and did not receive transplants.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Philip S; Socié, Gerard; Alter, Blanche P; Gluckman, Eliane

    2005-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplant (SCT) is currently the only therapy that can restore normal hematopoiesis in patients with Fanconi anemia (FA). Patients with FA have a high baseline risk of squamous cell cancers (SCCs) of the head, neck, and esophagus, and SCT conditioning may increase SCC incidence. We evaluated the risks of SCC and death in 145 patients with FA in the North American Survey (NAS) cohort who did not receive transplants, and 117 patients with FA in the Hôpital Saint Louis (SLH) cohort who did receive transplants. The age-specific hazard of SCC was 4.4-fold higher in patients who received transplants than in those who did not (P = .003), and SCCs occurred at significantly younger ages in the former (respective medians, 18 and 33 years, P = .004). Survival after SCC was similarly poor in both cohorts (P = .135, median, 13 months). The hazard of SCC increased at a greater than linear rate, to 4.4% per year by age 40 in NAS and 4.7% per year by 10 years after transplant in SLH. In SLH, the hazard of non-SCC death was biphasic, declining significantly (P = .004) from 7.1% per month during the first 6 months after transplant to 0.13% per month (1.6% per year) after the first year. Acute and chronic graft-versus-host diseases were significant SCC risk factors. Adverse event rates in these cohorts provide historical control rates to assess emerging therapies for FA.

  3. Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... anemia, iron deficiency, iron deficiency anemia, iron supplementation, kidney disease, low blood iron, low iron, normocytic anemia, nutrition, pregnancy, Procrit, red blood cell deficiency, rheumatoid arthritis, thyroiditis ...

  4. Monoubiquitinated Fanconi anemia D2 (FANCD2-Ub) is required for BCR-ABL1 kinase-induced leukemogenesis.

    PubMed

    Koptyra, M; Stoklosa, T; Hoser, G; Glodkowska-Mrowka, E; Seferynska, I; Klejman, A; Blasiak, J; Skorski, T

    2011-08-01

    Fanconi D2 (FANCD2) is monoubiquitinated on K561 (FANCD2-Ub) in response to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) to stimulate repair of these potentially lethal DNA lesions. FANCD2-Ub was upregulated in CD34+ chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cells and in BCR-ABL1 kinase-positive cell lines in response to elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and DNA cross-linking agent mitomycin C. Downregulation of FANCD2 and inhibition of FANCD2-Ub reduced the clonogenic potential of CD34+ CML cells and delayed BCR-ABL1 leukemogenesis in mice. Retarded proliferation of BCR-ABL1 positive FANCD2-/- leukemia cells could be rescued by FANCD2 expression. BCR-ABL1 positive FANCD2-/- cells accumulated more ROS-induced DSBs in comparison with BCR-ABL1 positive FANCD2+/+ cells. Antioxidants diminished the number of DSBs and enhanced proliferation of BCR-ABL1 positive FANCD2-/- cells. Expression of wild-type FANCD2 and FANCD2(S222A) phosphorylation-defective mutant (deficient in stimulation of intra-S phase checkpoint, but proficient in DSB repair), but not FANCD2(K561R) monoubiquitination-defective mutant (proficient in stimulation of intra-S phase checkpoint, but deficient in DSB repair) reduced the number of DSBs and facilitated proliferation of BCR-ABL1 positive FANCD2-/- cells. We hypothesize that FANCD2-Ub has an important role in BCR-ABL1 leukemogenesis because of its ability to facilitate the repair of numerous ROS-induced DSBs.

  5. A cross-linker-sensitive myeloid leukemia cell line from a 2-year-old boy with severe Fanconi anemia and biallelic FANCD1/BRCA2 mutations.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Stefan; Fergusson, William D; Oostra, Anneke B; Medhurst, Annette L; Waisfisz, Quinten; de Winter, Johan P; Chen, Fei; Carr, Trevor F; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Clancy, Tara; Green, Mike; Barber, Lisa; Eden, Osborn B; Will, Andrew M; Joenje, Hans; Taylor, G Malcolm

    2005-04-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by congenital and developmental abnormalities, hypersensitivity to DNA cross-linking agents such as mitomycin C (MMC), and strong predisposition to acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In this article, we describe clinical and molecular findings in a boy with a severe FA phenotype who developed AML by the age of 2. Although he lacked a strong family history of cancer, he was subsequently shown to carry biallelic mutations in the FANCD1/BRCA2 gene. These included an IVS7 splice-site mutation, which is strongly associated with early AML in homozygous or compound heterozygous carrier status in FA-D1 patients. Myeloid leukemia cells from this patient have been maintained in culture for more than 1 year and have been designated as the SB1690CB cell line. Growth of SB1690CB is dependent on granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor or interleukin-3. This cell line has retained its MMC sensitivity and has undergone further spontaneous changes in the spectrum of cytogenetic aberrations compared with the primary leukemia. This is the second AML cell line derived from an FA-D1 patient and the first proof that malignant clones arising in FA patients can retain inherited MMC sensitivity. As FA-derived malignancies are normally not very responsive to treatment, this implies there are important mechanisms of acquiring correction of the cellular FA phenotype that would explain the poor chemoresponsiveness observed in FA-associated malignancies and might also play a role in the initiation and progression of cancer in the general population.

  6. AluY-mediated germline deletion, duplication and somatic stem cell reversion in UBE2T defines a new subtype of Fanconi anemia.

    PubMed

    Virts, Elizabeth L; Jankowska, Anna; Mackay, Craig; Glaas, Marcel F; Wiek, Constanze; Kelich, Stephanie L; Lottmann, Nadine; Kennedy, Felicia M; Marchal, Christophe; Lehnert, Erik; Scharf, Rüdiger E; Dufour, Carlo; Lanciotti, Marina; Farruggia, Piero; Santoro, Alessandra; Savasan, Süreyya; Scheckenbach, Kathrin; Schipper, Jörg; Wagenmann, Martin; Lewis, Todd; Leffak, Michael; Farlow, Janice L; Foroud, Tatiana M; Honisch, Ellen; Niederacher, Dieter; Chakraborty, Sujata C; Vance, Gail H; Pruss, Dmitry; Timms, Kirsten M; Lanchbury, Jerry S; Alpi, Arno F; Hanenberg, Helmut

    2015-09-15

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare inherited disorder clinically characterized by congenital malformations, progressive bone marrow failure and cancer susceptibility. At the cellular level, FA is associated with hypersensitivity to DNA-crosslinking genotoxins. Eight of 17 known FA genes assemble the FA E3 ligase complex, which catalyzes monoubiquitination of FANCD2 and is essential for replicative DNA crosslink repair. Here, we identify the first FA patient with biallelic germline mutations in the ubiquitin E2 conjugase UBE2T. Both mutations were aluY-mediated: a paternal deletion and maternal duplication of exons 2-6. These loss-of-function mutations in UBE2T induced a cellular phenotype similar to biallelic defects in early FA genes with the absence of FANCD2 monoubiquitination. The maternal duplication produced a mutant mRNA that could encode a functional protein but was degraded by nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. In the patient's hematopoietic stem cells, the maternal allele with the duplication of exons 2-6 spontaneously reverted to a wild-type allele by monoallelic recombination at the duplicated aluY repeat, thereby preventing bone marrow failure. Analysis of germline DNA of 814 normal individuals and 850 breast cancer patients for deletion or duplication of UBE2T exons 2-6 identified the deletion in only two controls, suggesting aluY-mediated recombinations within the UBE2T locus are rare and not associated with an increased breast cancer risk. Finally, a loss-of-function germline mutation in UBE2T was detected in a high-risk breast cancer patient with wild-type BRCA1/2. Cumulatively, we identified UBE2T as a bona fide FA gene (FANCT) that also may be a rare cancer susceptibility gene.

  7. Crosstalk between Translesion Synthesis, Fanconi Anemia Network, and Homologous Recombination Repair Pathways in Interstrand DNA Crosslink Repair and Development of Chemoresistance

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, Brittany; Saadat, Nadia; Myung, Brian; Shekhar, Malathy PV

    2014-01-01

    Bifunctional alkylating and platinum based drugs are chemotherapeutic agents used to treat cancer. These agents induce DNA adducts via formation of intrastrand or interstrand (ICL) DNA crosslinks, and DNA lesions of the ICL type are particularly toxic as they block DNA replication and/or DNA transcription. However, the therapeutic efficacies of these drugs are frequently limited due to the cancer cell’s enhanced ability to repair and tolerate these toxic DNA lesions. This ability to tolerate and survive the DNA damage is accomplished by a set of specialized low fidelity DNA polymerases called translesion synthesis (TLS) polymerases since high fidelity DNA polymerases are unable to replicate the damaged DNA template. TLS is a crucial initial step in ICL repair as it synthesizes DNA across the lesion thus preparing the damaged DNA template for repair by the homologous recombination (HR) pathway and Fanconi anemia (FA) network, processes critical for ICL repair. Here we review the molecular features and functional roles of TLS polymerases, discuss the collaborative interactions and cross-regulation of the TLS DNA damage tolerance pathway, the FA network and the BRCA-dependent HRR pathway, and the impact of TLS hyperactivation on development of chemoresistance. Finally, since TLS hyperactivation results from overexpression of Rad6/Rad18 ubiquitinating enzymes (fundamental components of the TLS pathway), increased PCNA ubiquitination, and/or increased recruitment of TLS polymerases, the potential benefits of selectively targeting critical components of the TLS pathway for enhancing anti-cancer therapeutic efficacy and curtailing chemotherapy-induced mutagenesis are also discussed. PMID:25795124

  8. Novel function of the Fanconi anemia group J or RECQ1 helicase to disrupt protein-DNA complexes in a replication protein A-stimulated manner.

    PubMed

    Sommers, Joshua A; Banerjee, Taraswi; Hinds, Twila; Wan, Bingbing; Wold, Marc S; Lei, Ming; Brosh, Robert M

    2014-07-18

    Understanding how cellular machinery deals with chromosomal genome complexity is an important question because protein bound to DNA may affect various cellular processes of nucleic acid metabolism. DNA helicases are at the forefront of such processes, yet there is only limited knowledge how they remodel protein-DNA complexes and how these mechanisms are regulated. We have determined that representative human RecQ and Fe-S cluster DNA helicases are potently blocked by a protein-DNA interaction. The Fanconi anemia group J (FANCJ) helicase partners with the single-stranded DNA-binding protein replication protein A (RPA) to displace BamHI-E111A bound to duplex DNA in a specific manner. Protein displacement was dependent on the ATPase-driven function of the helicase and unique properties of RPA. Further biochemical studies demonstrated that the shelterin proteins TRF1 and TRF2, which preferentially bind the telomeric repeat found at chromosome ends, effectively block FANCJ from unwinding the forked duplex telomeric substrate. RPA, but not the Escherichia coli single-stranded DNA-binding protein or shelterin factor Pot1, stimulated FANCJ ejection of TRF1 from the telomeric DNA substrate. FANCJ was also able to displace TRF2 from the telomeric substrate in an RPA-dependent manner. The stimulation of helicase-catalyzed protein displacement is also observed with the DNA helicase RECQ1, suggesting a conserved functional interaction of RPA-interacting helicases. These findings suggest that partnerships between RPA and interacting human DNA helicases may greatly enhance their ability to dislodge proteins bound to duplex DNA, an activity that is likely to be highly relevant to their biological roles in DNA metabolism.

  9. Impaired TIP60-mediated H4K16 acetylation accounts for the aberrant chromatin accumulation of 53BP1 and RAP80 in Fanconi anemia pathway-deficient cells.

    PubMed

    Renaud, Emilie; Barascu, Aurelia; Rosselli, Filippo

    2016-01-29

    To rescue collapsed replication forks cells utilize homologous recombination (HR)-mediated mechanisms to avoid the induction of gross chromosomal abnormalities that would be generated by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). Using DNA interstrand crosslinks as a replication barrier, we investigated how the Fanconi anemia (FA) pathway promotes HR at stalled replication forks. FA pathway inactivation results in Fanconi anemia, which is associated with a predisposition to cancer. FANCD2 monoubiquitination and assembly in subnuclear foci appear to be involved in TIP60 relocalization to the chromatin to acetylates histone H4K16 and prevents the binding of 53BP1 to its docking site, H4K20Me2. Thus, FA pathway loss-of-function results in accumulation of 53BP1, RIF1 and RAP80 at damaged chromatin, which impair DNA resection at stalled replication fork-associated DNA breaks and impede HR. Consequently, DNA repair in FA cells proceeds through the NHEJ pathway, which is likely responsible for the accumulation of chromosome abnormalities. We demonstrate that the inhibition of NHEJ or deacetylase activity rescue HR in FA cells.

  10. The conserved Fanconi anemia nuclease Fan1 and the SUMO E3 ligase Pli1 act in two novel Pso2-independent pathways of DNA interstrand crosslink repair in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Fontebasso, Y.; Etheridge, T.J.; Oliver, A.W.; Murray, J.M.; Carr, A.M.

    2013-01-01

    DNA interstrand cross-links (ICLs) represent a physical barrier to the progression of cellular machinery involved in DNA metabolism. Thus, this type of adduct represents a serious threat to genomic stability and as such, several DNA repair pathways have evolved in both higher and lower eukaryotes to identify this type of damage and restore the integrity of the genetic material. Human cells possess a specialized ICL-repair system, the Fanconi anemia (FA) pathway. Conversely yeasts rely on the concerted action of several DNA repair systems. Recent work in higher eukaryotes identified and characterized a novel conserved FA component, FAN1 (Fanconi anemia-associated nuclease 1, or FANCD2/FANCI-associated nuclease 1). In this study, we characterize Fan1 in the yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Using standard genetics, we demonstrate that Fan1 is a key component of a previously unidentified ICL-resolution pathway. Using high-throughput synthetic genetic arrays, we also demonstrate the existence of a third pathway of ICL repair, dependent on the SUMO E3 ligase Pli1. Finally, using sequence-threaded homology models, we predict and validate key residues essential for Fan1 activity in ICL repair. PMID:24192486

  11. Complement deposition in autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a footprint for difficult-to-detect IgM autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Meulenbroek, Elisabeth M; de Haas, Masja; Brouwer, Conny; Folman, Claudia; Zeerleder, Sacha S; Wouters, Diana

    2015-11-01

    In autoimmune hemolytic anemia autoantibodies against erythrocytes lead to increased clearance of the erythrocytes, which in turn results in a potentially fatal hemolytic anemia. Depending on whether IgG or IgM antibodies are involved, response to therapy is different. Proper identification of the isotype of the anti-erythrocyte autoantibodies is, therefore, crucial. However, detection of IgM autoantibodies can be challenging. We, therefore, set out to improve the detection of anti-erythrocyte IgM. Direct detection using a flow cytometry-based approach did not yield satisfactory improvements. Next, we analyzed whether the presence of complement C3 on a patient's erythrocytes could be used for indirect detection of anti-erythrocyte IgM. To this end, we fractionated patients' sera by size exclusion chromatography and tested which fractions yielded complement deposition on erythrocytes. Strikingly, we found that all patients with C3 on their erythrocytes according to standard diagnostic tests had an IgM anti-erythrocyte component that could activate complement, even if no such autoantibody had been detected with any other test. This also included all tested patients with only IgG and C3 on their erythrocytes, who would previously have been classified as having an IgG-only mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Depleting patients' sera of either IgG or IgM and testing the remaining complement activation confirmed this result. In conclusion, complement activation in autoimmune hemolytic anemia is mostly IgM-mediated and the presence of covalent C3 on patients' erythrocytes can be taken as a footprint of the presence of anti-erythrocyte IgM. Based on this finding, we propose a diagnostic workflow that will aid in choosing the optimal treatment strategy.

  12. Red Blood Cell Destruction in Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia: Role of Complement and Potential New Targets for Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Berentsen, Sigbjørn

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a collective term for several diseases characterized by autoantibody-initiated destruction of red blood cells (RBCs). Exact subclassification is essential. We provide a review of the respective types of AIHA with emphasis on mechanisms of RBC destruction, focusing in particular on complement involvement. Complement activation plays a definitive but limited role in warm-antibody AIHA (w-AIHA), whereas primary cold agglutinin disease (CAD), secondary cold agglutinin syndrome (CAS), and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria (PCH) are entirely complement-dependent disorders. The details of complement involvement differ among these subtypes. The theoretical background for therapeutic complement inhibition in selected patients is very strong in CAD, CAS, and PCH but more limited in w-AIHA. The optimal target complement component for inhibition is assumed to be important and highly dependent on the type of AIHA. Complement modulation is currently not an evidence-based therapy modality in any AIHA, but a number of experimental and preclinical studies are in progress and a few clinical observations have been reported. Clinical studies of new complement inhibitors are probably not far ahead. PMID:25705656

  13. Red blood cell destruction in autoimmune hemolytic anemia: role of complement and potential new targets for therapy.

    PubMed

    Berentsen, Sigbjørn; Sundic, Tatjana

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a collective term for several diseases characterized by autoantibody-initiated destruction of red blood cells (RBCs). Exact subclassification is essential. We provide a review of the respective types of AIHA with emphasis on mechanisms of RBC destruction, focusing in particular on complement involvement. Complement activation plays a definitive but limited role in warm-antibody AIHA (w-AIHA), whereas primary cold agglutinin disease (CAD), secondary cold agglutinin syndrome (CAS), and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria (PCH) are entirely complement-dependent disorders. The details of complement involvement differ among these subtypes. The theoretical background for therapeutic complement inhibition in selected patients is very strong in CAD, CAS, and PCH but more limited in w-AIHA. The optimal target complement component for inhibition is assumed to be important and highly dependent on the type of AIHA. Complement modulation is currently not an evidence-based therapy modality in any AIHA, but a number of experimental and preclinical studies are in progress and a few clinical observations have been reported. Clinical studies of new complement inhibitors are probably not far ahead.

  14. Anemias.

    PubMed

    Broadway-Duren, Jacqueline B; Klaassen, Hillary

    2013-12-01

    Anemias continue to present a challenge to the health care profession. Anemia is defined as a reduction in one or more of the RBC indices. Patients presenting with a mild form of anemia may be asymptomatic; however, in more serious cases the anemia can become life threatening. In many cases the clinical presentation also reflects the underlying cause. Anemia may be attributed to various causes, whereas autoimmune RBC destruction may be attributed to intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Laboratory tests are essential in facilitating early detection and differentiation of anemia.

  15. Complement

    MedlinePlus

    ... fungal infections and some parasitic infections such as malaria . Normal Results Total blood complement level: 41 to ... Glomerulonephritis Hepatitis Hereditary angioedema Kidney transplant Lupus nephritis Malaria Protein in diet Rheumatoid arthritis Septicemia Shock Systemic ...

  16. Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... also be iron deficient due to poor absorption. Vitamin-deficiency anemia may result from low levels of vitamin ... foods can help you avoid both iron-and vitamin-deficiency anemia. Foods to include in your diet include ...

  17. Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... problems) Long-term (chronic) diseases such as chronic kidney disease, cancer, ulcerative colitis, or rheumatoid arthritis Some forms of anemia, such as thalassemia or sickle cell anemia, which can be inherited Pregnancy Problems with bone marrow such as lymphoma, leukemia, ...

  18. Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    If you have anemia, your blood does not carry enough oxygen to the rest of your body. The most common cause of anemia is not having enough ... rich protein that gives the red color to blood. It carries oxygen from the lungs to the ...

  19. Amelioration of radiation-induced oral cavity mucositis and distant bone marrow suppression in fanconi anemia Fancd2-/- (FVB/N) mice by intraoral GS-nitroxide JP4-039.

    PubMed

    Berhane, Hebist; Shinde, Ashwin; Kalash, Ronny; Xu, Karen; Epperly, Michael W; Goff, Julie; Franicola, Darcy; Zhang, Xichen; Dixon, Tracy; Shields, Donna; Wang, Hong; Wipf, Peter; Li, Song; Gao, Xiang; Greenberger, Joel S

    2014-07-01

    The altered DNA damage response pathway in patients with Fanconi anemia (FA) may increase the toxicity of clinical radiotherapy. We quantitated oral cavity mucositis in irradiated Fanconi anemia Fancd2(-/-) mice, comparing this to Fancd2(+/-) and Fancd2(+/+) mice, and we measured distant bone marrow suppression and quantitated the effect of the intraoral radioprotector GS-nitroxide, JP4-039 in F15 emulsion. We found that FA mice were more susceptible to radiation injury and that protection from radiation injury by JP4-039/F15 was observed at all radiation doses. Adult 10-12-week-old mice, of FVB/N background Fancd2(-/-), Fancd2(+/-) and Fancd2(+/+) were head and neck irradiated with 24, 26, 28 or 30 Gy (large fraction sizes typical of stereotactic radiosurgery treatments) and subgroups received intraoral JP4-039 (0.4 mg/mouse in 100 μL F15 liposome emulsion) preirradiation. On day 2 or 5 postirradiation, mice were sacrificed, tongue tissue and femur marrow were excised for quantitation of radiation-induced stress response, inflammatory and antioxidant gene transcripts, histopathology and assay for femur marrow colony-forming hematopoietic progenitor cells. Fancd2(-/-) mice had a significantly higher percentage of oral mucosal ulceration at day 5 after 26 Gy irradiation (59.4 ± 8.2%) compared to control Fancd2(+/+) mice (21.7 ± 2.9%, P = 0.0063). After 24 Gy irradiation, Fancd2(-/-) mice had a higher oral cavity percentage of tongue ulceration compared to Fancd2(+/+) mice irradiated with higher doses of 26 Gy (P = 0.0123). Baseline and postirradiation oral cavity gene transcripts were altered in Fancd2(-/-) mice compared to Fancd2(+/+) controls. Fancd2(-/-) mice had decreased baseline femur marrow CFU-GM, BFUe and CFU-GEMM, which further decreased after 24 or 26 Gy head and neck irradiation. These changes were not seen in head- and neck-irradiated Fancd2(+/+) mice. In radiosensitive Fancd2(-/-) mice, biomarkers of both local oral cavity and distant marrow

  20. Replication of chicken anemia virus (CAV) requires apoptin and is complemented by VP3 of human torque teno virus (TTV).

    PubMed

    Prasetyo, Afiono Agung; Kamahora, Toshio; Kuroishi, Ayumu; Murakami, Kyoko; Hino, Shigeo

    2009-03-01

    To test requirement for apoptin in the replication of chicken anemia virus (CAV), an apoptin-knockout clone, pCAV/Ap(-), was constructed. DNA replication was completely abolished in cells transfected with replicative form of CAV/Ap(-). A reverse mutant competent in apoptin production regained the full level of DNA replication. DNA replication and virus-like particle (VLP) production of CAV/Ap(-) was fully complemented by supplementation of the wild-type apoptin. The virus yield of a point mutant, CAV/ApT(108)I, was 1/40 that of the wild type, even though its DNA replication level was full. The infectious titer of CAV was fully complemented by supplementing apoptin. Progeny virus was free from reverse mutation for T(108)I. To localize the domain within apoptin molecule inevitable for CAV replication, apoptin-mutant expressing plasmids, pAp1, pAp2, pAp3, and pAp4, were constructed by deleting amino acids 10-36, 31-59, 59-88 and 80-112, respectively. While Ap1 and Ap2 were preferentially localized in nuclei, Ap3 and Ap4 were mainly present in cytoplasm. Although complementation capacity of Ap3 and Ap4 was 1/10 of the wild type, neither of them completely lost its activity. VP3 of TTV did fully complement the DNA replication and VLP of CAV/Ap(-). These data suggest that apoptin is inevitable not only for DNA replication but also VLP of CAV. The common feature of apoptin and TTV-VP3 presented another evidence for close relatedness of CAV and TTV.

  1. Analysis of 133 meioses places the genes for nevoid basal cell carcinoma (gorlin) syndrome and fanconi anemia group C in a 2.6-cM interval and contributes to the fine map of 9q22.3

    SciTech Connect

    Farndon, P.A.; Hardy, C.; Kilpatrick, M.W.

    1994-09-15

    Four disease genes (NBCCS, ESS1, XPAC, FACC) map to 9q22.3-q31. A fine map of this region was produced by linkage and haplotype analysis using 12 DNA markers. The gene for nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS, Gorlin) has an important role in congenital malformations and carcinogenesis. Phase-known recombinants in a study of 133 meioses place NBCCS between (D9S12/D9S151) and D9S176. Haplotype analysis in a two-generation family suggests that NBCCS lies in a smaller interval of 2.6 cM centromeric to D9S287. These flanking markers will be useful clinically for gene tracking. Recombinants also map FACC (Fanconi anemia, group C) to the same region, between (D9S12/D9S151) and D9S287. The recombination rate between (D9S12/D9S151) and D9S53 in males is 8.3% and 13.2% in females, giving a sex-specific male:female ratio of 1:1.6 and a sex-averaged map distance of 10.4 cM. No double recombinants were detected, in agreement with the apparently complete level of interference predicted from the male chiasmata map. 19 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  2. The Fanconi family adds a fraternal twin.

    PubMed

    Grompe, Markus; van de Vrugt, Henri

    2007-05-01

    The Fanconi anemia (FA) pathway plays an important role in DNA repair. In a recent issue of Cell, Smogorzewska et al. (2007) now demonstrate that FANCD2 has a paralog, FANCI. FANCI and FANCD2 form the "ID" complex that loads onto chromatin after DNA damage. Like FANCD2, monoubiquitination of FANCI requires the FA core complex. Importantly, FANCI and FANCD2 monoubiquitination is co-dependent, suggesting a novel mechanism in ubiquitin conjugation.

  3. Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adults Making Your Wishes Known Home & Community Home › Aging & Health A to Z › Anemia Font size A A A Print Share Glossary Basic Facts & Information Causes & Symptoms Diagnosis & Tests Care & Treatment Lifestyle & Management Other Resources Caregiving How ...

  4. Knockdown of μ-calpain in Fanconi Anemia, FA-A, cells by siRNA Restores αII Spectrin levels and Corrects Chromosomal Instability and Defective DNA Interstrand Cross-link Repair†

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Pan; Sridharan, Deepa; Lambert, Muriel W.

    2010-01-01

    We have previously shown that there is a deficiency in the structural protein, nonerythroid α spectrin (αIISp), in cells from patients with Fanconi anemia (FA). These studies indicate that this deficiency is due to reduced stability of αIISp and correlates with decreased repair of DNA interstrand cross-links and chromosomal instability in FA cells. An important factor in the stability of αIISp is its susceptibility to cleavage by the protease, μ-calpain. We hypothesized that increased μ-calpain cleavage of αIISp in FA cells leads to increased breakdown of αIISp and that knocking-down expression of μ-calpain in FA cells should restore levels of αIISp and correct a number of the phenotypic defects observed. The results showed that there is increased μ-calpain activity in FA-A, FA-C, FA-D2, FA-F and FA-G cells which could account for the deficiency in αIISp in these FA cells. Protein interaction studies indicated that FANCA and FANCG bind directly to μ-calpain. We hypothesize that this binding may lead to inhibition of μ-calpain activity in normal cells. Knocking-down μ-calpain by siRNA in FA-A cells restored levels of αIISp to normal and reversed a number of the cellular deficiencies in these cells. It corrected the DNA repair defect and the chromosomal instability observed after exposure to a DNA interstrand cross-linking agent. These studies indicated that FA proteins may play an important role in maintaining stability of αIISp in the cell by regulating its cleavage by μ-calpain. Thus by reducing breakdown of αIISp in FA cells, it may be possible to reverse a number of the cellular deficiencies observed in this disorder. PMID:20518497

  5. Diagnosis of Fanconi's anemia by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Miglierina, R; Le Coniat, M; Gendron, M; Berger, R

    1990-01-01

    FA is a progressive bone marrow aplasia genetically transmitted by a recessive autosomal gene or genes. In our laboratory, cytogenetic diagnosis is based on evaluation of the chromosomal breakage of mitotic cell derived from patient blood-cell cultures and sensitized by nitrogen mustard (NM). We have observed, in parallel with this test, fluctuations of the cell cycle of PHA- stimulated peripheral blood lymphocytes from FA patients as compared with controls. FA cells treated with NM show a dramatic and significant increase in G2/M phase after 72 hr in vitro culture, compared with untreated or control cells (normal controls and non-FA patients). This test is rapid and simple, as it consists in staining cells with a DNA dye (propidium iodide), followed by a flow cytometry analysis of the cell cycle phases. Our results in twelve patients are correlated with the cytogenetic results.

  6. [The Fanconi-Bickel syndrome].

    PubMed

    Velásquez, L; Portillo, V H; Sanjinés, R; Gamboa, J D; Feria-Kaiser, C; Valencia, P

    1991-04-01

    This is a case of a 15-month-old child suffering from Fanconi-Bickel syndrome, characterized with Fanconi syndrome manifestations (glycosuria, amino aciduria and phosphaturia), and the build-up of glycogen in the liver in a similar manner as seen in cases of glycogenesis type Ia. Due to the presence of liver glycogenosis, the patient also has a tendency towards hypoglycemia, ketonuria, hypercholesterolemia and hypertriglyceridemia. The glycogenosis seen in the patients with the Fanconi-Bickel syndrome, does not depend on a defect in the activity of the glucose-6-phosphatase enzyme, but in fact is due to a defect in the transporter which mobilizes glucose and galactose in the liver and in the basolateral membrane of the proximal tubule of the kidney.

  7. The Role of Fanconi/BRCA DNA Repair Pathway in Epithelial Ovarian Carcinogenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    linking agents, including cisplatin . In fact, increased chromosomal breakage in response to DNA cross-linkers (mitomycin C and diepoxybutane) is the...BRCA pathway in cisplatin -sensitive ovarian tumors. Nat Med 9, 568-574 (2003). 14 Wang, Z., Li, M., Lu, S., Zhang, Y. & Wang, H. Promoter...management of ovarian cancer. Ann Oncol, 22 Suppl 8, viii5. D’ANDREA, A.D. (2003). The Fanconi Anemia/BRCA signaling pathway: disruption in cisplatin

  8. Post-irradiation phosphorylation of structural maintenance chromosome 1 (SMC1) is independent of the Fanconi protein pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Nahas, Shareef A.; Lai, C.-H.; Gatti, Richard A. . E-mail: rgatti@mednet.ucla.edu

    2005-03-15

    Purpose: To confirm the sensitivity of cells from patients with Fanconi anemia (FA) to ionizing radiation, and to determine whether the phosphorylation of structural maintenance chromosome 1 (SMC1) was associated with radiosensitivity, as it is in other DNA repair disorders. Methods and materials: Using lymphoblastoid cell lines from FA patients before and after exposure to ionizing radiation, the colony survival assay, radioresistant DNA synthesis, and SMC1 phosphorylation were measured. FA lymphoblastoid cell lines that had been transfected with the wild-type FANC gene were used as controls. Results: Cells from FA patients of six complementation groups were radiosensitive. Despite this, SMC1 phosphorylation was normal in each case; radioresistant DNA synthesis, a measure of S phase checkpoint integrity, was defective in FANCD2 lymphoblastoid cell lines and was corrected in FANCD2 + D2 cells. Conclusions: The data indicate that the FANC pathway proteins play a major role in the cellular responses to ionizing radiation, but not in SMC1 phosphorylation or in the S phase checkpoint of FANCD2-deficient cells. Thus, SMC1 activation is not a common denominator of radiosensitivity, as has been suggested by radiation responses of cells from ataxia-telangiectasia, Nijmegen breakage syndrome, or Mre11 deficiency patients.

  9. Unusual Anemias.

    PubMed

    Daughety, Molly Maddock; DeLoughery, Thomas G

    2017-03-01

    Many processes lead to anemia. This review covers anemias that are less commonly encountered in the United States. These anemias include hemoglobin defects like thalassemia, bone marrow failure syndromes like aplastic anemia and pure red cell aplasia, and hemolytic processes such as paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria. The pathogenesis, diagnostic workup, and treatment of these rare anemias are reviewed.

  10. Hemolytic anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Anemia - hemolytic ... bones that helps form all blood cells. Hemolytic anemia occurs when the bone marrow isn't making ... destroyed. There are several possible causes of hemolytic anemia. Red blood cells may be destroyed due to: ...

  11. Hemolytic Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Hemolytic Anemia? Hemolytic anemia (HEE-moh-lit-ick uh-NEE-me-uh) ... blood cells to replace them. However, in hemolytic anemia, the bone marrow can't make red blood ...

  12. Impaired function of Fanconi anemia type C-deficient macrophages.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Ballman, Kimberly; Li, Deqiang; Khan, Shehnaz; Derr-Yellin, Ethel; Shou, Weinian; Haneline, Laura S

    2012-02-01

    FA is a genetic disorder characterized by BM failure, developmental defects, and cancer predisposition. Previous studies suggest that FA patients exhibit alterations in immunologic function. However, it is unclear whether the defects are immune cell-autonomous or secondary to leukopenia from evolving BM failure. Given the central role that macrophages have in the innate immune response, inflammation resolution, and antigen presentation for acquired immunity, we examined whether macrophages from Fancc-/- mice exhibit impaired function. Peritoneal inflammation induced by LPS or sodium periodate resulted in reduced monocyte/macrophage recruitment in Fancc-/- mice compared with WT controls. Fancc-/- mice also had decreased inflammatory monocytes mobilized into the peripheral blood after LPS treatment compared with controls. Furthermore, Fancc-/- peritoneal macrophages displayed cell-autonomous defects in function, including impaired adhesion to FN or endothelial cells, reduced chemoattractant-mediated migration, and decreased phagocytosis. Moreover, dysregulated F-actin rearrangement was detected in Fancc-/- macrophages after adhesion to FN, which was consistent with an observed reduction in RhoA-GTP levels. Importantly, these data suggest that impaired cytoskeletal rearrangements in Fancc-/- macrophages may be the common mechanism responsible for cell-autonomous defects detected in vitro, as well as altered monocyte/macrophage trafficking in vivo.

  13. Warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Naik, Rakhi

    2015-06-01

    Warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is defined as the destruction of circulating red blood cells (RBCs) in the setting of anti-RBC autoantibodies that optimally react at 37°C. The pathophysiology of disease involves phagocytosis of autoantibody-coated RBCs in the spleen and complement-mediated hemolysis. Thus far, treatment is aimed at decreasing autoantibody production with immunosuppression or reducing phagocytosis of affected cells in the spleen. The role of complement inhibitors in warm AIHA has not been explored. This article addresses the diagnosis, etiology, and treatment of warm AIHA and highlights the role of complement in disease pathology.

  14. Sundanese Complementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurniawan, Eri

    2013-01-01

    The focus of this thesis is the description and analysis of clausal complementation in Sundanese, an Austronesian language spoken in Indonesia. The thesis examined a range of clausal complement types in Sundanese, which consists of (i) "yen/(wi)rehna" "that" complements, (ii) "pikeun" "for" complements,…

  15. Anemia Due to Excessive Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... Anemia Due to Excessive Bleeding Iron Deficiency Anemia Vitamin Deficiency Anemia Anemia of Chronic Disease Aplastic Anemia Autoimmune ... Anemia Due to Excessive Bleeding Iron Deficiency Anemia Vitamin Deficiency Anemia Anemia of Chronic Disease Aplastic Anemia Autoimmune ...

  16. Pernicious anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... physical exam. Tests that may be done include: Bone marrow examination (only needed if diagnosis is unclear) ... Alternative Names Macrocytic achylic anemia; Congenital pernicious anemia; Juvenile ... Review Date 2/1/2016 ...

  17. Complement inhibitors to treat IgM-mediated autoimmune hemolysis

    PubMed Central

    Wouters, Diana; Zeerleder, Sacha

    2015-01-01

    Complement activation in autoimmune hemolytic anemia may exacerbate extravascular hemolysis and may occasionally result in intravascular hemolysis. IgM autoantibodies as characteristically found in cold autoantibody autoimmune hemolytic anemia, in cold agglutinin disease but also in a considerable percentage of patients with warm autoantibodies are very likely to activate complement in vivo. Therapy of IgM-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemia mainly aims to decrease autoantibody production. However, most of these treatments require time to become effective and will not stop immediate ongoing complement-mediated hemolysis nor prevent hemolysis of transfused red blood cells. Therefore pharmacological inhibition of the complement system might be a suitable approach to halt or at least attenuate ongoing hemolysis and improve the recovery of red blood cell transfusion in autoimmune hemolytic anemia. In recent years, several complement inhibitors have become available in the clinic, some of them with proven efficacy in autoimmune hemolytic anemia. In the present review, we give a short introduction on the pathogenesis of autoimmune hemolytic anemia, followed by an overview on the complement system with a special focus on its regulation. Finally, we will discuss complement inhibitors with regard to their potential efficacy to halt or attenuate hemolysis in complement-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemia. PMID:26521297

  18. Pregnancy Complications: Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Close X Home > Complications & Loss > Pregnancy complications > Anemia Anemia E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... anemia at a prenatal care visit . What causes anemia? Usually, a woman becomes anemic (has anemia) because ...

  19. Rheumatoid anemia.

    PubMed

    Masson, Charles

    2011-03-01

    Rheumatoid anemia is a typical example of anemia of chronic disease. It differs from other forms of anemia, such as iron deficiency anemia or iatrogenic anemia. Rheumatoid anemia is normochromic, normocytic or, less often, microcytic, aregenerative, and accompanied with thrombocytosis. Serum transferrin levels are normal or low, transferrin saturation is decreased, serum ferritin levels are normal or high, the soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) is not increased (a distinguishing feature with iron deficiency anemia), and the sTfR/log ferritin ratio is lower than 1. This review discusses the prevalence and impact of rheumatoid anemia based on a review of the literature. Iron metabolism, absorption, diffusion, storage, and use by the bone marrow are described using published data on transferrin, ferritin, and hepcidin. Hepcidin is now recognized as a key factor in rheumatoid anemia, in conjunction with the cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6). Hepcidin is a hormone that lowers serum iron levels and regulates iron transport across membranes, preventing iron from exiting the enterocytes, macrophages, and hepatocytes. In addition, hepcidin inhibits intestinal iron absorption and iron release from macrophages and hepatocytes. The action of hepcidin is mediated by binding to the iron exporter ferroportin. Hepcidin expression in the liver is dependent on the protein hemojuvelin. Inflammation leads to increased hepcidin production via IL-6, whereas iron deficiency and factors associated with increased erythropoiesis (hypoxia, bleeding, hemolysis, dyserythropoiesis) suppress the production of hepcidin. Data from oncology studies and the effects of recombinant human IL-6 support a causal link between IL-6 production and the development of anemia in patients with chronic disease. IL-6 diminishes the proportion of nucleated erythroid cells in the bone marrow and lowers the serum iron level, and these abnormalities can be corrected by administering an IL-6 antagonist. IL-6 stimulates

  20. Types of Hemolytic Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Types of Hemolytic Anemia There are many types of hemolytic anemia. The ... the condition, but you develop it. Inherited Hemolytic Anemias With inherited hemolytic anemias, one or more of ...

  1. What Causes Anemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Anemia? The three main causes of anemia are: Blood ... the blood and can lead to anemia. Aplastic Anemia Some infants are born without the ability to ...

  2. Anemia (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Anemia KidsHealth > For Teens > Anemia Print A A A ... Getting Enough Iron en español Anemia What Is Anemia? Lots of teens are tired. With all the ...

  3. What Is Aplastic Anemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Aplastic Anemia? Aplastic anemia (a-PLAS-tik uh-NEE-me-uh) is ... heart, heart failure , infections, and bleeding. Severe aplastic anemia can even cause death. Overview Aplastic anemia is ...

  4. Hypocholesterolemia in chronic anemias with increased erythropoietic activity.

    PubMed

    Shalev, Hanna; Kapelushnik, Joseph; Moser, Asher; Knobler, Hilla; Tamary, Hannah

    2007-03-01

    Hypocholesterolemia of unknown etiology has been previously described in various chronic anemias. Few small studies also suggested that those patients have a lower incidence of atherosclerotic events. The aim of our study was to determine the extent of hypocholesterolemia in various types of anemias. We studied 59 patients with chronic anemias associated with high-erythropoietic activity (thalassemia intermedia, congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type I, congenital spherocytosis), 8 patients with low-erythropoietic activity anemias (acquired aplastic anemia, Fanconi anemia, and Diamond Blackfan anemia), and 20 healthy controls. Mean serum cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, triglycerides, hemoglobin, serum ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor (STR), and serum erythropoietin levels were determined in each patient. All patients with chronic anemia and increased erythropoietic activity had hypocholesterolemia, whereas none of those with low erythropoietic activity was hypocholesterolemic. Mean serum cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, and LDL cholesterol levels were found to be significantly lower in the high-erythropoietic activity group (80+/-19 mg/dl; 31+/-10 mg/dl; 35+/-14 mg/dl, respectively) compared with the control group (P<0.001; 0.001; 0.001, respectively) and the low-erythropoietic activity group (P<0.001; 0.001; 0.01, respectively). Significant inverse correlation (R2=0.507) was observed between serum cholesterol and STR levels, which in the absence of iron deficiency reflect bone marrow activity. Taken together, our results imply that hypocholesterolemia accompanies anemias with high-erythropoietic activity. We suggest that the high-erythropoitic activity-associated hypocholesterolemia is due to increased cholesterol requirements by the proliferating erythoid cells. Further studies are needed to elucidate the exact mechanism and the possible clinical consequences of this phenomenon.

  5. Aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Usuki, Kensuke

    Treatments of aplastic anemia are comprised of supportive therapy and aplastic anemia-specific therapy aimed at restoring hematopoiesis. Supportive therapies include transfusion, G-CSF, and the administration of iron chelation agents, as well as dealing specifically with individual symptoms. Aplastic anemia-specific treatments given with the aim of achieving hematopoietic recovery include immunosuppressive therapy, allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and anabolic hormone therapy. Although transplantation provides complete recovery of hematopoiesis (cure), there is a risk of death due to transplant-related complications. The most effective immunosuppressive therapy is a combination of anti-thymocyte globulin and cyclosporine. This treatment is also effective against the secondary, drug-induced and hepatitis-associated forms of aplastic anemia. In the management of aplastic anemia, a treatment is selected from among these options depending on the disease severity and the age of the individual case. The thrombopoietin receptor agonist eltrombopag appears to be effective and to provide tri-lineage recovery of hematopoiesis in some cases. Indications for its use are expected to expand in Japan.

  6. Gestational anemia.

    PubMed

    Wahed, F; Latif, S A; Nessa, A; Bhuiyan, M R; Hossain, M B; Akther, A; Mahmud, M M

    2010-07-01

    Gestational anemia is a common public health problem in our country. Most anemia during pregnancy results from an increased need for iron as her body is making more blood. Often dietary supplementation does not provide enough iron to meet the extra needs. Also the growing baby takes all the iron it needs from mother, regardless of how much iron is stored in mother's blood. Gestational Anemia contributed significantly to maternal morbidity and mortality, IUGR, preterm delivery and perinatal morbidity and mortality. A high proportion of women in both industrialized and developing countries become anemic during pregnancy. The most important cause of gestational anemia due to iron deficiency, because high iron requirements during pregnancy are not easily fulfilled by dietary intake. Adequate iron stores can help a pregnant women replace lost red blood cells. So, iron supplementation is strongly recommended for all pregnant women in developing countries. Oral iron intake is the treatment of choice and almost all pregnant women can be treated effectively with oral iron preparation during their pregnancy period.

  7. Wissler–Fanconi syndrome and related diagnoses: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Albustani, Mustafa Q; Howard, Robert F

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Wissler–Fanconi syndrome is a rare rheumatic syndrome that was first described during the 1940s in Europe. Since then, many papers have been written that cover all aspects of this syndrome, most of which are in French and German language, with only a very few in English (none of them recent). We report here a case that fulfils the criteria for Wissler–Fanconi syndrome. Under the more general descriptive umbrella of Wissler–Fanconi syndrome, our patient also fulfils the Modified Jones criteria, and the 2010 American College of Rheumatology/European League Against Rheumatism (ACR/EULAR) classification criteria for rheumatoid arthritis, and was interpreted by other internists and another rheumatologist as fulfilling the Yamaguchi criteria for adult onset Still’s disease. Case presentation A middle-aged female presented to the emergency department with shortness of breath and chest pain associated with fever, polyarthritis, and had a chronic polymorphic rash on the back and lower extremities. Blood analysis showed highly elevated inflammatory markers and rheumatoid factor. After ruling out other possible deferential diagnoses and reviewing the medical literature, the patient was diagnosed with Wissler–Fanconi syndrome. A combination of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and steroids achieved complete remission. Conclusion This case report highlights the important differential diagnosis that may be included under the nomenclature of Wissler–Fanconi syndrome (subsepsis hyperergica). Features of Wissler–Fanconi syndrome can be found in a differential diagnosis that includes true sepsis, acute rheumatic fever, rheumatoid arthritis, and adult onset Still’s disease. PMID:27843372

  8. [Sideroblastic anemias].

    PubMed

    Matthes, T

    2006-01-01

    Sideroblastic anemias are a heterogenous group of disorders characterized by the presence of sideroblasts in the bone marrow aspirate. Current classification schemes distinguish between diseases of the heme synthesis pathway and diseases of other mitochondrial pathways which can either be of primary origin (defects in mitochondrial DNA) or of secondary origin (defects in nuclear DNA). Although several distinct hereditary forms exist, sideroblastic anemias are most frequently acquired diseases and belong to the group of myelodysplastic syndromes with the propensity to develop into overt leukemia. Treatment is mainly supportive (vitamins, blood transfusions, cytokines) and only rarely are bone marrow transplantations performed. The molecular defects of a few hereditary forms have already been elucidated, but the genes involved in the acquired forms are still largely unknown.

  9. Vitamin Deficiency Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Vitamin deficiency anemia Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Vitamin deficiency anemia is a lack of healthy red blood ... normal amounts of certain vitamins. Vitamins linked to vitamin deficiency anemia include folate, vitamin B-12 and vitamin ...

  10. Cooley's Anemia Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... role in their lives. Welcome to the Cooley's Anemia Foundation Website The Cooley's Anemia Foundation is dedicated to serving people afflicted with ... major form of this genetic blood disease, Cooley's anemia/thalassemia major. Our mission is advancing the treatment ...

  11. Living with Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Anemia Often, you can treat and control anemia. If ... by an inherited or chronic disease or trauma. Anemia and Children/Teens Infants and young children have ...

  12. Anemia and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Advocacy Toolkit Home For Patients Blood Disorders Anemia Anemia and Pregnancy Your body goes through significant changes ... becoming anemic. back to top Is Pregnancy-Related Anemia Preventable? Good nutrition is the best way to ...

  13. Folate-deficiency anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000551.htm Folate-deficiency anemia To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Folate-deficiency anemia is a decrease in red blood cells (anemia) ...

  14. Anemia (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... a drug or toxin. Anemia From Destruction of Red Blood Cells When the body destroys red blood cells (a ... but can affect all races. continue Anemia From Red Blood Cell Loss Blood loss can cause anemia — whether from ...

  15. Sickle cell anemia - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - sickle cell anemia ... The following organizations are good resources for information on sickle cell anemia : American Sickle Cell Anemia Association -- www.ascaa.org National Heart, Blood, and Lung Institute -- www. ...

  16. Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heart Disease Mineral & Bone Disorder Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease What is anemia? Anemia is a condition ... they should. How is anemia related to chronic kidney disease? Anemia commonly occurs in people with chronic ...

  17. p53 downregulates the Fanconi anaemia DNA repair pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jaber, Sara; Toufektchan, Eléonore; Lejour, Vincent; Bardot, Boris; Toledo, Franck

    2016-01-01

    Germline mutations affecting telomere maintenance or DNA repair may, respectively, cause dyskeratosis congenita or Fanconi anaemia, two clinically related bone marrow failure syndromes. Mice expressing p53Δ31, a mutant p53 lacking the C terminus, model dyskeratosis congenita. Accordingly, the increased p53 activity in p53Δ31/Δ31 fibroblasts correlated with a decreased expression of 4 genes implicated in telomere syndromes. Here we show that these cells exhibit decreased mRNA levels for additional genes contributing to telomere metabolism, but also, surprisingly, for 12 genes mutated in Fanconi anaemia. Furthermore, p53Δ31/Δ31 fibroblasts exhibit a reduced capacity to repair DNA interstrand crosslinks, a typical feature of Fanconi anaemia cells. Importantly, the p53-dependent downregulation of Fanc genes is largely conserved in human cells. Defective DNA repair is known to activate p53, but our results indicate that, conversely, an increased p53 activity may attenuate the Fanconi anaemia DNA repair pathway, defining a positive regulatory feedback loop. PMID:27033104

  18. [Refractory anemias].

    PubMed

    Efira, A; Azerad, M-A

    2013-09-01

    Refractory anemia, also known as myelodysplastic syndromes, forms a group of clonal diseases characterized by cytopenias with mostly rich bone marrow. Preferentially reaching an older population, the prognosis depends on both comorbidities and characteristics of the disease, which have been grouped into a score established in 1997 ("IPSS = International Prognostic Scoring System") and revised in 2012 ("R-IPSS = Revised IPSS"). Overall survival and risk of transformation into acute nonlymphoblastic leukemia can now be estimated fairly accurately. Based on these characteristics, the treatment will be mainly supportive or will use several new molecules: growth factors, lenalidomide, 5-azacitidine, etc. A minority of patients may also benefit from allogeneic BMT or sometimes immunosuppressive therapy.

  19. [Differential diagnosis of anemias].

    PubMed

    Szerafin, László; Jakó, János

    2005-02-13

    The authors describe the factors influencing of normal hemoglobin level, pathogenetic and morphological classification of anemias and the possibilities to distinguish their different types. They highlight features of iron deficiency anemia and anemia of chronic diseases. They summarise in tables the basis of laboratory diagnosis and possibility of identification of different types of anemias.

  20. Nutritional anemias.

    PubMed

    Hoffbrand, A V; Herbert, V

    1999-10-01

    Folate, vitamin B12, and iron are the subjects of active biochemical and molecular research so that further understanding of their metabolism in health and in a wide variety of Inherited and acquired diseases can be achieved. The roles of folate and vitamin B12 in cardiovascular and neurologic diseases and in neural tube defects (NTDs) will be further explored in the next decade. The effects of prophylactic therapy and of food fortification with the vitamins on these diseases remain to be established. Iron deficiency is a public health problem in all countries and prevention or treatment, particularly in children in developing countries, are major goals. The increased recent understanding of iron metabolism and absorption may clarify the etiology of diseases of iron metabolism and of dietary iron overload. Improved iron chelation therapy for transfusion-dependent patients with refractory anemias will continue to be actively researched over the next decades.

  1. Ifosfamide-induced Fanconi syndrome with diabetes insipidus.

    PubMed

    Leem, Ah Young; Kim, Han Sang; Yoo, Byung Woo; Kang, Beo Deul; Kim, Min Hwan; Rha, Sun Young; Kim, Hyo Song

    2014-03-01

    Ifosfamide-induced Fanconi syndrome is a rare complication that typically occurs in young patients due to a cumulative dose of ifosfamide > 40-60 g/m(2), a reduction in kidney mass, or concurrent cisplatin treatment. It is usually characterized by severe and fatal progression accompanied by type II proximal renal tubular dysfunction, as evidenced by glycosuria, proteinuria, electrolyte loss, and metabolic acidosis. Diabetes insipidus is also a rare complication of ifosfamide-induced renal disease. We herein describe a case involving a 61-year-old man who developed ifosfamide-induced Fanconi syndrome accompanied by diabetes insipidus only a few days after the first round of chemotherapy. He had no known risk factors. In addition, we briefly review the mechanisms and possible therapeutic options for this condition based on other cases in the literature. Patients who receive ifosfamide must be closely monitored for renal impairment to avoid this rare but fatal complication.

  2. Anemia in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, Kari M; Ingardia, Charles J; Borgida, Adam F

    2013-06-01

    Hemodynamic changes occur in pregnancy to prepare for expected blood loss at delivery. Physiologic anemia occurs in pregnancy because plasma volume increases more quickly than red cell mass. Anemia is most commonly classified as microcytic, normocytic, or macrocytic. Iron deficiency anemia accounts for 75% of all anemias in pregnancy. Oral iron supplementation is the recommended treatment of iron deficiency anemia in pregnancy. Parenteral iron and erythropoietin can also be used in severe or refractory cases. Outcomes and treatments for other forms of inherited and acquired anemias in pregnancy vary by disease, and include nutritional supplementation, corticosteroids, supportive transfusions, and splenectomy.

  3. Anemia in thyroid diseases.

    PubMed

    Szczepanek-Parulska, Ewelina; Hernik, Aleksandra; Ruchała, Marek

    2017-03-28

    Anemia is a frequent, although often underestimated, clinical condition accompanying thyroid diseases. In spite of the fact that anemia and thyroid dysfunction often occur simultaneously, the causative relationship between these two disorders remains ambiguous. Thyroid hormones stimulate erythrocytes precursors proliferation directly, as well as via erythropoietin production enhancement, whereas iron-deficient anemia negatively influences thyroid hormonal status. Thus, different forms of anemia might emerge in the course of thyroid dysfunction. In fact, normocytic anemia is most common, while macrocytic or microcytic anemia occur less frequently. Anemia in hypothyroidism might result from bone marrow depression, decreased erythropoietin production, comorbid diseases, or concomitant iron, vitamin B12 or folate deficiency. Altered iron metabolism and oxidative stress may contribute to anemia in hyperthyroidism. The risk of anemia in autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) may be posed by pernicious anemia and atrophic gastritis, celiac disease, autoimmune hemolytic syndrome, or rheumatic disorders. The simultaneous occurrence of anemia and thyroid disease, as well as their close relation, make the diseases an important clinical problem. The aim of the study is to provide a comprehensive review summarizing data on the prevalence, potential mechanisms, and therapy of anemia in the course of thyroid diseases from the clinical and pathogenetic perspective. Thyroid dysfunction and autoimmune thyroid disease should be considered in differential diagnosis of treatment-resistant or refractory anemia, as well as in case of increased red blood cell distribution width (RDW). Of note is that the presence of AITD itself, independently from thyroid hormonal status, might affect hemoglobin level.

  4. Anemia in older persons.

    PubMed

    Bross, Michael H; Soch, Kathleen; Smith-Knuppel, Teresa

    2010-09-01

    Anemia in older persons is commonly overlooked despite mounting evidence that low hemoglobin levels are a significant marker of physiologic decline. Using the World Health Organization definition of anemia (hemoglobin level less than 13 g per dL [130 g per L] in men and less than 12 g per dL [120 g per L] in women), more than 10 percent of persons older than 65 years are anemic. The prevalence increases with age, approaching 50 percent in chronically ill patients living in nursing homes. There is increasing evidence that even mild anemia is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Anemia warrants evaluation in all older persons, except those at the end of life or who decline interventions. About one third of persons have anemia secondary to a nutritional deficiency, one third have anemia caused by chronic inflammation or chronic kidney disease, and one third have unexplained anemia. Nutritional anemia is effectively treated with vitamin or iron replacement. Iron deficiency anemia often is caused by gastrointestinal bleeding and requires further investigation in most patients. Anemia of chronic inflammation or chronic kidney disease may respond to treatment of the underlying disease and selective use of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents. The treatment of unexplained anemia is difficult, and there is little evidence that treatment decreases morbidity and mortality, or improves quality of life. Occasionally, anemia may be caused by less common but potentially treatable conditions, such as autoimmune hemolytic anemia, malignancy, or myelodysplastic syndrome.

  5. Bilineal Acute Leukemia Associated With Fanconi Syndrome: The First Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Miri-Aliabad, Ghasem; Sadat-Hosseini, Maryam; Dorgalaleh, Akbar

    2016-01-01

    Fanconi syndrome is a metabolic disorder involving dysfunction of the renal proximal tubules, resulting in excessive urinary excretion of several metabolites. Various factors may lead to Fanconi syndrome, as it may be a genetic disease with primary or secondary etiologies, or may be acquired. In this study, we report a unique case of Fanconi syndrome with development of a relatively rare acute leukemia, a condition that has not been reported before. The case was an 8-year-old boy with familial occurrence of Fanconi syndrome, presenting with pallor, asthenia, recurrent infections, growth failure, and a variety of biochemical and hematological abnormalities. After physical examination, radiographic studies, and comprehensive laboratory analyses, Fanconi syndrome associated with bilineal acute leukemia, of myeloid and T-lymphoid lineages, was diagnosed. PMID:27617066

  6. Congenital spherocytic anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... returns to normal. Possible Complications Complications may include: Gallstones Much lower red blood cell production (aplastic crisis) ... Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 14. Read More Anemia Gallstones Hemolytic anemia Review Date 2/1/2016 Updated ...

  7. [Common anemias in neonatology].

    PubMed

    Humbert, J; Wacker, P

    1999-01-28

    We describe the four most common groups of neonatal anemia and their treatments, with particular emphasis on erythropoietin therapy. The hemolytic anemias include the ABO incompatibility (much more frequent, nowadays, than the Rh incompatibility, which has nearly disappeared following the use of anti-D immunoglobulin in postpartum Rh-negative mothers), hereditary spherocytosis and G-6-PD deficiency. Among hypoplastic anemias, that caused by Parvovirus B19 predominates, by far, over Diamond-Blackfan anemia, alpha-thalassemia and the rare sideroblastic anemias. "Hemorrhagic" anemias occur during twin-to-twin transfusions, or during feto-maternal transfusions. Finally, the multifactorial anemia of prematurity develops principally as a result of the rapid expansion of the blood volume in this group of patients. Erythropoietin therapy, often at doses much higher than those used in the adult, should be seriously considered in most cases of non-hypoplastic neonatal anemias, to minimise maximally the use of transfusions.

  8. How Is Anemia Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood cells. Chelation (ke-LAY-shun) therapy for lead poisoning. Chelation therapy is used mainly in children. This ... iron-deficiency anemia are at increased risk of lead poisoning. Procedures If your anemia is severe, your doctor ...

  9. What Is Anemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information for the Public » Health Topics » Anemia Explore Anemia What Is... Other Names Causes Who Is at Risk Signs & Symptoms Diagnosis Treatments Prevention Living With Clinical Trials Links Related ...

  10. Sickle Cell Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Sickle cell anemia is a disease in which your body produces abnormally shaped red blood cells. The cells are shaped like ... normal, round red blood cells. This leads to anemia. The sickle cells also get stuck in blood ...

  11. Sickle cell anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Anemia - sickle cell; Hemoglobin SS disease (Hb SS); Sickle cell disease ... Sickle cell anemia is caused by an abnormal type of hemoglobin called hemoglobin S. Hemoglobin is a protein inside red blood cells ...

  12. The Anemias of Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichner, Edward R.

    1986-01-01

    Diagnosing anemia in athletes is complicated because athletes normally have a pseudoanemia that needs no treatment. Athletes, however, can develop anemia from iron deficiency or footstrike hemolysis, which require diagnosis and treatment. (Author/MT)

  13. Anemia in the Newborn

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Caregivers Help Themselves Additional Content Medical News Anemia in the Newborn By Arthur E. Kopelman, MD, ... Prematurity (ROP) Necrotizing Enterocolitis (NEC) Jaundice in Newborns Anemia in the Newborn Polycythemia in the Newborn Thyroid ...

  14. Myeloma and pernicious anemia.

    PubMed

    Perillie, P E

    1978-01-01

    Four cases of pernicious anemia developing in association with multiple myeloma are described. The description now of 14 cases demonstrating the association of these two disorders suggest a causative relationship. These observations, in addition to the previously well-documented increased coincidence of pernicious anemia and benign monoclonal gammopathy and pernicious anemia and hypoglobulinemia, suggest that screening for vitamine B12 deficiency in patients with gammopathies and for protein abnormalities in patients with pernicious anemia is indicated.

  15. FANCD2-controlled chromatin access of the Fanconi-associated nuclease FAN1 is crucial for the recovery of stalled replication forks.

    PubMed

    Chaudhury, Indrajit; Stroik, Daniel R; Sobeck, Alexandra

    2014-11-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a cancer predisposition syndrome characterized by cellular hypersensitivity to DNA interstrand cross-links (ICLs). Within the FA pathway, an upstream core complex monoubiquitinates and recruits the FANCD2 protein to ICLs on chromatin. Ensuing DNA repair involves the Fanconi-associated nuclease 1 (FAN1), which interacts selectively with monoubiquitinated FANCD2 (FANCD2(Ub)) at ICLs. Importantly, FANCD2 has additional independent functions: it binds chromatin and coordinates the restart of aphidicolin (APH)-stalled replication forks in concert with the BLM helicase, while protecting forks from nucleolytic degradation by MRE11. We identified FAN1 as a new crucial replication fork recovery factor. FAN1 joins the BLM-FANCD2 complex following APH-mediated fork stalling in a manner dependent on MRE11 and FANCD2, followed by FAN1 nuclease-mediated fork restart. Surprisingly, APH-induced activation and chromatin recruitment of FAN1 occur independently of the FA core complex or the FAN1 UBZ domain, indicating that the FANCD2(Ub) isoform is dispensable for functional FANCD2-FAN1 cross talk during stalled fork recovery. In the absence of FANCD2, MRE11 exonuclease-promoted access of FAN1 to stalled forks results in severe FAN1-mediated nucleolytic degradation of nascent DNA strands. Thus, FAN1 nuclease activity at stalled replication forks requires tight regulation: too little inhibits fork restart, whereas too much causes fork degradation.

  16. Fanconi anemia D2 protein is an apoptotic target mediated by caspases.

    PubMed

    Park, Su-Jung; Beck, Brian D; Saadatzadeh, M Reza; Haneline, Laura S; Clapp, D Wade; Lee, Suk-Hee

    2011-09-01

    FANCD2, a key factor in the FANC-BRCA1 pathway is monoubiquitinated and targeted to discrete nuclear foci following DNA damage. Since monoubiquitination of FANCD2 is a crucial indicator for cellular response to DNA damage, we monitored the fate of FANCD2 and its monoubiquitination following DNA damage. Disappearance of FANCD2 protein was induced following DNA damage in a dose-dependent manner, which correlated with degradation of BRCA1 and poly-ADP ribose polymerase (PARP), known targets for caspase-mediated apoptosis. Disappearance of FANCD2 was not affected by a proteasome inhibitor but was blocked by a caspase inhibitor. DNA damage-induced disappearance of FANCD2 was also observed in cells lacking FANCA, suggesting that disappearance of FANCD2 does not depend on FANC-BRCA1 pathway and FANCD2 monoubiquitination. In keeping with this, cells treated with TNF-α, an apoptotic stimulus without causing any DNA damage, also induced disappearance of FANCD2 without monoubiquitination. Together, our data suggest that FANCD2 is a target for caspase-mediated apoptotic pathway, which may be an early indicator for apoptotic cell death.

  17. De Novo Chromosome Copy Number Variation in Fanconi Anemia-Associated Hematopoietic Defects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-01

    Correction of FA-A, FA-C, and FA-D2 hTERT cells with pLenti6.2/V5-FANCA, -FANCC, and FANCD2 , respectively. Sub-task 1. Selection and expansion of clonal...populations Sub-task 2. Mitomycin C cytotoxicity and clastogenicity assays, assessment of FANCD2 mono- ubiquitination status via immunoblotting and...a restoration of DNA damage-inducible FANCD2 monoubiquitination in these cells, compared with mutant FA-A hTERT cells (Figure 1). In addition, we

  18. Born for a Noble Cause?--A Case Study on Fanconi Anemia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elwess, Nancy L.; Butterfield, Savanna R.; Charles, Amanda; DeVeaugh, Maxine C.; Lu, Gloria J.; Shafqat, Hira; Watts, Andrew

    2005-01-01

    The fictional case study presented here is not based on one case, but is actually based on several cases. College students enrolled in a bioethics course for non-majors wrote it. The case entails the thought processes and decision-making involved in order to save one child suffering from a genetic disorder by producing another child, a "designer…

  19. [Inherited aplastic anemias].

    PubMed

    Esteves, A C; Freitas, O; Almeida, T; Rosado, L

    2010-08-01

    The inherited aplastic anaemias are a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by bone marrow failure, frequent association with one or more somatic anomalies and increased risk of cancer. They are rare disorders, usually diagnosed at paediatric age, and have significant premature mortality. The authors report 11 cases of inherited aplastic anaemias, 8 of Fanconi's anaemia and 3 of Dyskeratosis congenita. These cases were diagnosed in the last 14 years in the Dona Estefânia Hospital.

  20. Penicillin-induced immunohemolytic anemia associated with circulating immune complexes.

    PubMed

    Funicella, T; Weinger, R S; Moake, J L; Spruell, M; Rossen, R D

    1977-01-01

    Eleven days after administration of multiple penicillin analogs, a 55-year-old female developed a Coombs-positive hemolytic anemia. The patient's erythrocytes were coated with IgG, complement components (C4/C3) and her serum contained elevated 125I-Clq binding activity (a measure of the presence of immune complexes). Her serum, in the presence of fresh complement and penicillin, induced complement sensitization of normal erythrocytes. Immune complex-mediated complement activation and the haptene type of erythrocyte sensitization accounted for accelerated red blood cell destruction in this patient.

  1. [Iron dysregulation and anemias].

    PubMed

    Ikuta, Katsuya

    2015-10-01

    Most iron in the body is utilized as a component of hemoglobin that delivers oxygen to the entire body. Under normal conditions, the iron balance is tightly regulated. However, iron dysregulation does occasionally occur; total iron content reductions cause iron deficiency anemia and overexpression of the iron regulatory peptide hepcidin disturbs iron utilization resulting in anemia of chronic disease. Conversely, the presence of anemia may ultimately lead to iron overload; for example, thalassemia, a common hereditary anemia worldwide, often requires transfusion, but long-term transfusions cause iron accumulation that leads to organ damage and other poor outcomes. On the other hand, there is a possibility that iron overload itself can cause anemia; iron chelation therapy for the post-transfusion iron overload observed in myelodysplastic syndrome or aplastic anemia improves dependency on transfusions in some cases. These observations reflect the extremely close relationship between anemias and iron metabolism.

  2. Recurrent aphthous ulcers in Fanconi's anaemia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Otan, Feyza; Açikgöz, Gokhan; Sakallioglu, Umur; Ozkan, Burcu

    2004-05-01

    Fanconi's anaemia (FA) is an autosomal recessive disorder that is clinically characterized by aplastic anaemia, congenital malformations of the renal, cardiac, skeletal and skin structures, and an increased predisposition to malignancies. Patients with FA often present with bleeding and infection, which are symptoms related to thrombocytopenia and neutropenia. There are few reports of the oral manifestations of FA. We describe oral aphthous ulcerations in two siblings with FA. There was a rapid improvement and healing of ulcers after blood transfusions and increased haemoglobin levels. This may support the role of severe anaemia in oral ulcerations.

  3. Hypokalemic paralysis secondary to tenofovir induced fanconi syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ramteke, Vishal V.; Deshpande, Rushi V.; Srivastava, Om; Wagh, Adinath

    2015-01-01

    Tenofovir induced fanconi syndrome (FS) presenting as hypokalemic paralysis is an extremely rare complication in patients on anti-retroviral therapy. We report a 50-year-old male with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome on tenofovir-based anti-retroviral therapy who presented with acute onset quadriparesis. On evaluation, he was found to have hypokalemia with hypophosphatemia, glucosuria and proteinuria suggesting FS. He regained normal power in limbs over next 12 h following correction of hypokalemia. Ours would be the second reported case in India. PMID:26692618

  4. Transient renal Fanconi syndrome in a Chihuahua exposed to Chinese chicken jerky treats.

    PubMed

    Hooijberg, E H; Furman, E; Leidinger, J; Brandstetter, D; Hochleithner, C; Sewell, A C; Leidinger, E; Giger, U

    2015-01-01

    Transient Fanconi syndrome without azotemia was diagnosed in a dog and was associated with ingestion of Chinese chicken jerky treats. Fanconi syndrome is a proximal renal tubular defect and a diagnosis was made based upon severe glucosuria with normoglycemia, and severe generalized aminoaciduria. The clinical signs of polyuria and polydipsia as well as the massive urinary metabolic abnormalities resolved after jerky treat withdrawal. While frequently seen in North America and Australia, this is the first report of jerky treat induced Fanconi syndrome in continental Europe. Clinicians should be aware of this potential intoxication and be vigilant for a history of jerky treat consumption in a dog with glucosuria.

  5. Fanconi anaemia and the repair of Watson and Crick DNA crosslinks.

    PubMed

    Kottemann, Molly C; Smogorzewska, Agata

    2013-01-17

    The function of Fanconi anaemia proteins is to maintain genomic stability. Their main role is in the repair of DNA interstrand crosslinks, which, by covalently binding the Watson and the Crick strands of DNA, impede replication and transcription. Inappropriate repair of interstrand crosslinks causes genomic instability, leading to cancer; conversely, the toxicity of crosslinking agents makes them a powerful chemotherapeutic. Fanconi anaemia proteins can promote stem-cell function, prevent tumorigenesis, stabilize replication forks and inhibit inaccurate repair. Recent advances have identified endogenous aldehydes as possible culprits of DNA damage that may induce the phenotypes seen in patients with Fanconi anaemia.

  6. Anemia, fatigue and aging.

    PubMed

    Balducci, L

    2010-12-01

    Aging is associated with increased incidence and prevalence of both cancer and anemia. Cancer and aging may conspire in making anemia more frequent and more severe. This article reviews the causes and the consequences of anemia in the older individual. The most common causes include chronic inflammation that is a typical manifestation of aging, iron deficiency that may be due to chronic hemorrhage, malabsorption and Helicobacter pylori infection, cobalamin deficiency from malabsorption and renal insufficiency. Other causes of anemia whose prevalence is not well established include myelodysplasia, copper deficiency, hypothyroidism, and sarcopenia. Anemia is associated with increased risk of mortality, functional dependence, dementia, falls, and chemotherapy-related toxicity. When correcting the anemia of older cancer patients one should remember that the erythropoietic stimulating agents (ESA) may stimulate cancer growth and cause thrombosis. These products may be safe when given exclusively to patients receiving chemotherapy and when the hemoglobin levels are maintained below 12 g/dL.

  7. [Fatigue and anemia].

    PubMed

    Ivanova, K; Zeller, A

    2009-12-02

    We herein report on an 80-year old male patient with a history of muscle weakness, fatigue and weight loss since several months. Because of a pathologic synacthen test in combination with decreased levels of ACTH, we diagnosed a secondary chronic adrenal insufficiency. Because of a normochromic, normocytic, and hypo-proliferative anemia, bone marrow puncture was performed, showing an anemia of chronic disease. We initiated hydrocortisone and anemia and patients' symptoms were fully reconstituted.

  8. How Is Pernicious Anemia Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Pernicious Anemia Treated? Doctors treat pernicious anemia by replacing the missing vitamin B12 in the body. People who have pernicious anemia may need lifelong treatment. The goals of treating ...

  9. How Is Aplastic Anemia Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Aplastic Anemia Treated? Treatments for aplastic anemia include blood transfusions , blood and marrow stem cell ... a transplant. Removing a known cause of aplastic anemia, such as exposure to a toxin, also may ...

  10. Sickle Cell Anemia (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Can You Do to Stay Well? en español Anemia falciforme What Is Sickle Cell Disease? Sickle cell ... about 10 to 20 days. This usually causes anemia . Anemia is what happens when the body's number ...

  11. Congenital Hemolytic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Haley, Kristina

    2017-03-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) destruction can be secondary to intrinsic disorders of the RBC or to extrinsic causes. In the congenital hemolytic anemias, intrinsic RBC enzyme, RBC membrane, and hemoglobin disorders result in hemolysis. The typical clinical presentation is a patient with pallor, anemia, jaundice, and often splenomegaly. The laboratory features include anemia, hyperbilirubinemia, and reticulocytosis. For some congenital hemolytic anemias, splenectomy is curative. However, in other diseases, avoidance of drugs and toxins is the best therapy. Supportive care with transfusions are also mainstays of therapy. Chronic hemolysis often results in the formation of gallstones, and cholecystectomy is often indicated.

  12. Inborn anemias in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, S.E.; Barker, J.E.; Russell, E.S.

    1981-06-01

    hereditary anemias of mice have been the chief objects of investigation. At present under study are four macrocytic anemias, five hemolytic anemias, nonhemolytic microcytic anemia, transitory siderocytic anemia, sex-linked iron-transport anemia, an ..cap alpha..-thalassemia, and a new target-cell anemia. Each of these blood dyscrasias is caused by the action of a unique mutant gene, which determines the structure of different intracellular molecules, and thus controls a different metabolic process. Thus our wide range of different hereditary anemias has considerable potential for uncovering many different aspects of hemopoietic homeostatic mechanisms in the mouse. Each anemia is studied through: (a) characterization of peripheral blood values, (b) determinations of radiosensitivity under a variety of conditions, (c) measurements of iron metabolism and heme synthesis, (d) histological and biochemical study of blood-forming tissue, (e) functional tests of the stem cell component, (f) examination of responses to erythroid stimuli, and (g) transplantation of tissue between individuals of differently affected genotypes.

  13. Anemia of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Nemeth, Elizabeta; Ganz, Tomas

    2014-08-01

    Anemia of inflammation (AI, also called anemia of chronic disease) is a common, typically normocytic, normochromic anemia that is caused by an underlying inflammatory disease. It is diagnosed when serum iron concentrations are low despite adequate iron stores, as evidenced by serum ferritin that is not low. In the setting of inflammation, it may be difficult to differentiate AI from iron deficiency anemia, and the 2 conditions may coexist. Treatment should focus on the underlying disease. Recent advances in molecular understanding of AI are stimulating the development of new pathophysiologically targeted experimental therapies.

  14. Complement in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Vignesh, Pandiarajan; Rawat, Amit; Sharma, Madhubala; Singh, Surjit

    2017-02-01

    The complement system is an ancient and evolutionary conserved element of the innate immune mechanism. It comprises of more than 20 serum proteins most of which are synthesized in the liver. These proteins are synthesized as inactive precursor proteins which are activated by appropriate stimuli. The activated forms of these proteins act as proteases and cleave other components successively in amplification pathways leading to exponential generation of final effectors. Three major pathways of complement pathways have been described, namely the classical, alternative and lectin pathways which are activated by different stimuli. However, all the 3 pathways converge on Complement C3. Cleavage of C3 and C5 successively leads to the production of the membrane attack complex which is final common effector. Excessive and uncontrolled activation of the complement has been implicated in the host of autoimmune diseases. But the complement has also been bemusedly described as the proverbial "double edged sword". On one hand, complement is the final effector of tissue injury in autoimmune diseases and on the other, deficiencies of some components of the complement can result in autoimmune diseases. Currently available tools such as enzyme based immunoassays for functional assessment of complement pathways, flow cytometry, next generation sequencing and proteomics-based approaches provide an exciting opportunity to study this ancient yet mysterious element of innate immunity.

  15. Targeting complement in therapy.

    PubMed

    Kirschfink, M

    2001-04-01

    With increasing evidence that complement activation significantly contributes to the pathogenesis of a large number of inflammatory diseases, strategies that interfere with its deleterious action have become a major focus in pharmacological research. Endogenous soluble complement inhibitors (C1 inhibitor, recombinant soluble complement receptor 1, antibodies) blocking key proteins of the cascade reaction, neutralizing the action of the complement-derived anaphylatoxin C5a, or interfering with complement receptor 3 (CR3, CD18/11b)-mediated adhesion of inflammatory cells to the vascular endothelium have successfully been tested in various animal models over the past years. Promising results consequently led to clinical trials. Furthermore, incorporation of membrane-bound complement regulators (decay-accelerating factor (CD55), membrane co-factor protein (CD46), CD59) in transgenic animals has provided a major step forward in protecting xenografts from hyperacute rejection. At the same time, the poor contribution of complement to the antitumor response, which is caused by multiple resistance mechanisms that hamper the efficacy of antibody-based tumor therapy, is increasingly recognized and requires pharmacologic intervention. First attempts have now been made to interfere with the resistance mechanisms, thereby improving complement-mediated tumor cell destruction.

  16. Fifth Cooley's anemia symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Bank, A.; Anderson, W.F.; Zaino, E.C.

    1985-01-01

    This book discusses the topics presented at the symposium on the subject of 'Thalassemia'. Sickle cell anemia is also briefly discussed. The aspects discussed are chromosomal defects of anemias particularly globin synthesis, and the role of messenger RNA and other chromosomes.

  17. [Hemolytic anemias in adults].

    PubMed

    Müller, A; Zimmermann, R; Krause, S W

    2011-11-01

    The erythrocyte lifespan in haemolytic anemia is shortened while erythropoesis is increased. Important labaratory findings are increased reticulocytes, LDH, indirect bilirubin and a decreased haptoglobin level. The most important diagnostic tool for further work up of hemolytic anemia is the direct antiglobulin test (DAT, Coombs test) to differentiate autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) from other causes. Another important group are fragmentation syndroms (hemolytic uremic syndrome and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura). In these forms of haemolytic anemia fragmented red blood cells can be found in the blood smear together with thrombocytopenia. A severe problem in paroxysmal nocturnal hematuria is the incidence of thrombosis. The following review describes the most important forms of hemolytic anemia in the adult and the diagnostic and therapeutic strategies.

  18. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia in a child with Fanconi's anaemia.

    PubMed

    Mushtaq, Naureen; Wali, Rabia; Fadoo, Zehra; Saleem, Ali Faisal

    2012-07-01

    Fanconi anaemia (FA) is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder with progressive bone marrow failure, associated congenital malformation and solid and haematological malignancies. Acute myeloid leukemia is the commonest haematological malignancy followed by myelodysplastic syndrome in children with FA. FA transformed into acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a rare phenomenon and one of the rarest haematological malignancies associated with this disorder. We are reporting a 13 years old girl with FA and positive chromosomal breakage. She required regular blood product transfusion. She was planned for haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) but the sibling-matched donor was found to have chromosomal breaks as well. Later on, her peripheral smear showed blast cell. Bone marrow showed pre-B ALL. She was started on chemotherapy but died shortly due to complications of the treatment. For this rare condition conservative management is indeed essential, however, safe and appropriate chemotherapy regimen is needed.

  19. Evaluation of Macrocytic Anemias.

    PubMed

    Green, Ralph; Dwyre, Denis M

    2015-10-01

    Macrocytic anemia, defined as a mean cell volume (MCV) ≥100 fL in adults, has a narrow differential diagnosis that requires evaluation of the peripheral blood smear as well as additional laboratory testing taken in conjunction with clinical information that includes patient history and physical examination findings. This review is an update on the approach to a patient with macrocytic anemia with attention paid to the differentiation of megaloblastic and non-megaloblastic macrocytic anemias. Critical to the determination of the diagnosis is the judicious use of laboratory testing and the evaluation of those findings in conjunction with the patient medical, surgical, and medication history.

  20. Living with Aplastic Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood and bone marrow diseases, such as aplastic anemia. // Non Object? Updated: August 22, 2012 Twitter Facebook YouTube Google+ SITE INDEX ACCESSIBILITY PRIVACY STATEMENT FOIA NO FEAR ACT OIG ...

  1. Anemia and heart failure.

    PubMed

    O'Meara, Eileen; Murphy, Clare; McMurray, John J V

    2004-12-01

    Over the past few years, anemia has emerged as a powerful independent predictor of adverse outcomes in chronic heart failure (CHF). It affects up to 50% of patients with CHF, depending on the definition of anemia used and on the population studied. Even small reductions in hemoglobin are associated with worse outcome. However, the causes of anemia in CHF remain unclear, although impairment of renal function and inflammatory cytokines are proposed mechanisms. Both may act through impairment of the synthesis or action of erythropoietin. Preliminary studies have demonstrated improvement in symptoms, exercise tolerance, quality of life, and reductions in hospitalizations when patients with severe CHF were treated with erythropoietin. The benefits and the potential risks of such therapies will be further addressed in upcoming larger randomized trials. The recent interest in anemia reflects a new perspective in heart failure therapy, focusing on non-cardiovascular comorbidities.

  2. Your Guide to Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... essential compounds. It also helps regulate your body temperature, fights infection, and gets rid of waste products. ... Some AIHA antibodies become active only in warm temperatures; others only in cold temperatures. – Alloimmune hemolytic anemia. ...

  3. Management of renal anemia.

    PubMed

    Peco-Antic, Amira

    2005-01-01

    Normochromic normocytic anemia is common in children with chronic renal failure (CRF) when their glomerular filtration rate is below 35 ml/min/1.73 m2 BSA, but it may develop earlier in some forms of renal disease. An inadequate erythropoiesis due to insufficient erythropoietin synthesis in the kidneys is the main cause of renal anemia. Other reasons include reduced red blood cell lifespan, chronic blood loss, iron deficiency, inhibitors of erythropoiesis, and malnutrition. The presence of anemia contributes to many of the symptoms of uremia, including decreased appetite, decreased energy, poor cardiac function, and poor school performance. Therefore, correction of anemia dramatically improves the life of the child with CRF. Presently, the goal of anemia management is to maintain hematocrit concentrations at 33% to 36% and a hemoglobin concentration of at least 11 g/L. This can be accomplished by intravenous or subcutaneous administration of recombinant erythropoietin (rHuEPO, 100-300 U/kg/week) and iron preparations. If adequate iron stores cannot be maintained with oral therapy (2-3, max 6 mg/kg/day), intravenous iron should be administered. In order to optimize anemia management in children with CRF, future research should be concentrated on the normalization of hemoglobin early in the course of CRF, and the long-term effects on the child's development.

  4. [Heart failure and anemia].

    PubMed

    Reda, S; Motloch, L J; Hoppe, U C

    2013-09-01

    Chronic heart failure has an age-dependent prevalence of 2% and is therefore one of the most frequent diseases in western societies. A reduced hemoglobin concentration according to the definition of the World Health Organization is a common comorbidity affecting more than half of all heart failure patients. Elderly patients, patients suffering from renal impairment and women are more likely to develop anemia but a definitive etiology of anemia is only identified in the minority of cases. Anemia is associated with a poor clinical status and a greater risk of hospitalization and is a predictive factor for increased mortality. The incidence of anemia appears to increase with a poorer functional class. Intravenous iron therapy improves the exercise capacity in patients with systolic heart failure and iron deficiency and is currently being recommended for patients with persistent symptoms despite optimal medical and device therapy. However, erythropoietin-stimulating agents as a treatment for anemia in chronic heart failure have failed to improve clinical outcome in a large randomized trial. In patients with heart failure but with maintained ejection fraction, anemia is also associated with a poor prognosis. Specific therapeutic recommendations for these patients are still not available.

  5. How Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia Treated? Treatment for iron-deficiency anemia will depend ... may be advised. Treatments for Severe Iron-Deficiency Anemia Blood Transfusion If your iron-deficiency anemia is ...

  6. Anemia of Inflammation and Chronic Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Anemia of Inflammation and Chronic Disease National Hematologic Diseases Information Service What is anemia? Anemia is a condition in which a person has ... also cause low blood iron levels. People with anemia may feel tired because their blood does not ...

  7. Who Is at Risk for Anemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trials Links Related Topics Aplastic Anemia Hemolytic Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Pernicious Anemia Sickle Cell Disease Send ... develop during pregnancy due to low levels of iron and folic acid (folate) and changes in the ...

  8. Reduced FANCD2 influences spontaneous SCE and RAD51 foci formation in uveal melanoma and Fanconi anaemia.

    PubMed

    Gravells, P; Hoh, L; Solovieva, S; Patil, A; Dudziec, E; Rennie, I G; Sisley, K; Bryant, H E

    2013-11-14

    Uveal melanoma (UM) is unique among cancers in displaying reduced endogenous levels of sister chromatid exchange (SCE). Here we demonstrate that FANCD2 expression is reduced in UM and that ectopic expression of FANCD2 increased SCE. Similarly, FANCD2-deficient fibroblasts (PD20) derived from Fanconi anaemia patients displayed reduced spontaneous SCE formation relative to their FANCD2-complemented counterparts, suggesting that this observation is not specific to UM. In addition, spontaneous RAD51 foci were reduced in UM and PD20 cells compared with FANCD2-proficient cells. This is consistent with a model where spontaneous SCEs are the end product of endogenous recombination events and implicates FANCD2 in the promotion of recombination-mediated repair of endogenous DNA damage and in SCE formation during normal DNA replication. In both UM and PD20 cells, low SCE was reversed by inhibiting DNA-PKcs (DNA-dependent protein kinase, catalytic subunit). Finally, we demonstrate that both PD20 and UM are sensitive to acetaldehyde, supporting a role for FANCD2 in repair of lesions induced by such endogenous metabolites. Together, these data suggest FANCD2 may promote spontaneous SCE by influencing which double-strand break repair pathway predominates during normal S-phase progression.

  9. Tenofovir-induced Fanconi syndrome in chronic hepatitis B monoinfected patients that reverted after tenofovir withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Viganò, Mauro; Brocchieri, Alessandra; Spinetti, Angiola; Zaltron, Serena; Mangia, Giampaolo; Facchetti, Floriana; Fugazza, Alessandro; Castelli, Francesco; Colombo, Massimo; Lampertico, Pietro

    2014-12-01

    Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) is a nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitor widely used to treat patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Despite the excellent safety records of this regimen, a few cases of acute renal failure and Fanconi syndrome have been reported among HIV patients exposed to TDF. In the HBV monoinfection scenario, only two cases of TDF-associated Fanconi syndrome have been reported thus far. Here, we describe two additional patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) who developed a TDF-induced Fanconi syndrome that reverted after TDF withdrawal and had viral replication fully suppressed upon switching to entecavir (ETV). Though the overall risk of TDF associated severe renal toxicity in HBV patients appears to be negligible, both glomerular and tubular function should be monitored in patients exposed to TDF, especially when other renal risk factors or a history of previous exposure to adefovir dipivoxil (ADV) are present.

  10. Outline of Hungarian Complementation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szamosi, Michael

    This study presents a preliminary analysis of Hungarian complement constructions and the syntactic operations needed to account for them. The expository framework (and the implicit framework of the research itself) is based upon that of Rosenbaum (1967). The aim of the paper is to arrive at a rough picture of the kinds of structures and syntactic…

  11. Verbal Complementizers in Arabic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmed, Hossam Eldin Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    A class of Modern Standard Arabic complementizers known as "'?inna' and its sisters" demonstrate unique case and word order restrictions. While CPs in Arabic allow both Subject-Verb (SV) and Verb-Subject (VS) word order and their subjects show nominative morphology, CPs introduced by "?inna" ban a verb from directly following…

  12. Drug-induced Fanconi syndrome associated with fumaric acid esters treatment for psoriasis: a case series

    PubMed Central

    Balak, Deepak M.W.; Bouwes Bavinck, Jan Nico; de Vries, Aiko P.J.; Hartman, Jenny; Neumann, Hendrik A. Martino; Zietse, Robert; Thio, Hok Bing

    2016-01-01

    Background Fumaric acid esters (FAEs), an oral immunomodulating treatment for psoriasis and multiple sclerosis, have been anecdotally associated with proximal renal tubular dysfunction due to a drug-induced Fanconi syndrome. Few data are available on clinical outcomes of FAE-induced Fanconi syndrome. Methods Descriptive case series with two cases of Fanconi syndrome associated with FAE treatment diagnosed at two Dutch university nephrology departments, three cases reported at the Dutch and German national pharmacovigilance databases and six previously reported cases. Results All 11 cases involved female patients with psoriasis. The median age at the time of onset was 38 years [interquartile range (IQR) 37–46]. Patients received long-term FAEs treatment with a median treatment duration of 60 months (IQR 28–111). Laboratory tests were typically significant for low serum levels of phosphate and uric acid, while urinalysis showed glycosuria and proteinuria. Eight (73%) patients had developed a hypophosphataemic osteomalacia and three (27%) had pathological bone fractures. All patients discontinued FAEs, while four (36%) patients were treated with supplementation of phosphate and/or vitamin D. Five (45%) patients had persisting symptoms despite FAEs discontinuation. Conclusions FAEs treatment can cause drug-induced Fanconi syndrome, but the association has been reported infrequently. Female patients with psoriasis treated long term with FAEs seem to be particularly at risk. Physicians treating patients with FAEs should be vigilant and monitor for the potential occurrence of Fanconi syndrome. Measurement of the urinary albumin:total protein ratio is a suggested screening tool for tubular proteinuria in Fanconi syndrome. PMID:26798466

  13. Fanconi's syndrome and nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in an adult treated with ifosfamide.

    PubMed

    Ingemi, Amanda I; Bota, Vasile M; Peguero, Anyeri; Charpentier, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    Fanconi's syndrome is a serious condition characterized by type II proximal renal tubular dysfunction, with urinary loss of glucose, amino acids, phosphate, bicarbonate, and potassium. Ifosfamide-induced Fanconi's syndrome is reported in about 1.4-5% of children being treated for solid tumors, yet only a few cases have been reported in adults. We describe a 54-year-old man who came to the hospital with symptoms of neutropenic fever 4 days after his fourth cycle of ifosfamide and doxorubicin treatment for recurrent sarcoma with metastases to the lung. During admission, he was noted to have severe renal tubular dysfunction; ifosfamide-induced nephrogenic diabetes insipidus and Fanconi's syndrome were suspected. He received supportive therapy that resulted in incomplete resolution of signs and symptoms. The patient was discharged after a 5-day hospital stay when his white blood cell count increased from 0.1-2.5 × 10(3) /mm(3) and his fever had resolved. Use of the Naranjo adverse drug reaction probability scale indicated a probable relationship (score of 7) between the patient's development of diabetes insipidus and Fanconi's syndrome and his use of ifosfamide. This dual diagnosis of diabetes insipidus and Fanconi's syndrome in an adult makes this case unusual, as well as therapeutically challenging. We conducted a review of the existing literature regarding ifosfamide-induced Fanconi's syndrome and describe the proposed mechanisms and therapeutic options. This case suggests that patients treated with ifosfamide should be monitored closely for renal function to identify, and perhaps prevent, these rare adverse events. Preliminary animal models show promise for adding N-acetylcysteine to ifosfamide treatment, but more research is necessary before using this drug as a therapeutic option.

  14. Unraveling the Fanconi anaemia-DNA repair connection through DNA helicase and translocase activities

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L H

    2005-08-16

    How the Fanconi anaemia (FA) chromosome stability pathway functions to cope with interstrand crosslinks and other DNA lesions has been elusive, even after FANCD1 proved to be BRCA2, a partner of Rad51 in homologous recombination. The identification and characterization of two new Fanconi proteins having helicase motifs, FANCM and FANCJ/BRIP1/BACH1, implicates the FANC nuclear core complex as a participant in recognizing or processing damaged DNA, and the BRIP1 helicase as acting independently of this complex.

  15. Could Anemia Cause Hearing Loss?

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_162793.html Could Anemia Cause Hearing Loss? Iron deficiency might keep ear cells from getting oxygen ... HealthDay News) -- Hearing loss may be linked to iron deficiency anemia -- a combination of low levels of ...

  16. Aplastic Anemia & MDS International Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Menu Donate I'm Like You. "The Aplastic Anemia and MDS International Foundation is helping patients like ... cope with bone marrow failure disease." Diseases Aplastic Anemia Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDS) Paroxysmal Nocturnal Hemoglobinuria (PNH) Related ...

  17. Mechanisms of anemia in CKD.

    PubMed

    Babitt, Jodie L; Lin, Herbert Y

    2012-10-01

    Anemia is a common feature of CKD associated with poor outcomes. The current management of patients with anemia in CKD is controversial, with recent clinical trials demonstrating increased morbidity and mortality related to erythropoiesis stimulating agents. Here, we examine recent insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying anemia of CKD. These insights hold promise for the development of new diagnostic tests and therapies that directly target the pathophysiologic processes underlying this form of anemia.

  18. [Autoimmune hemolytic anemia in children].

    PubMed

    Becheur, M; Bouslama, B; Slama, H; Toumi, N E H

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a rare condition in children which differs from the adult form. It is defined by immune-mediated destruction of red blood cells caused by autoantibodies. Characteristics of the autoantibodies are responsible for the various clinical entities. Classifications of autoimmune hemolytic anemia include warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia, cold autoimmune hemolytic anemia, and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria. For each classification, this review discusses the epidemiology, etiology, clinical presentation, laboratory evaluation, and treatment options.

  19. Complements do not lie.

    PubMed

    Robert, Stefanie Christina; Forbes, Suzanne Helen; Soleimanian, Surusch; Hadley, Julia S

    2011-12-13

    A 74-year-old patient presented with constitutional symptoms and was found to have acute kidney injury. He was known to have a prosthetic aortic valve. He was febrile with splenomegaly and vasculitic lesions on both hands. Nephritic screen revealed strongly positive cytoplasmic-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (c-ANCA). Differential diagnosis thus included a small vessel vasculitis or infective endocarditis. Transoesophageal echocardiography demonstrated no vegetations and serial blood cultures were negative. Immunosuppression for presumed granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegeners granulomatosis) was therefore instituted. The patient deteriorated, requiring multi-organ support. Renal biopsy showed a proliferative glomerulopathy and complements were low. Atypical screen for culture negative endocarditis revealed a strongly positive IgG-antibody titre against Bartonella henselae. Immunosuppression was discontinued and treatment for chronic Bartonellosis commenced. The patient made a remarkable recovery. His renal function quickly returned to normal, and ANCA titres and complements normalised. He was discharged home after completing a 6 week course of antibiotic therapy.

  20. Complements do not lie

    PubMed Central

    Robert, Stefanie Christina; Forbes, Suzanne Helen; Soleimanian, Surusch; Hadley, Julia S

    2011-01-01

    A 74-year-old patient presented with constitutional symptoms and was found to have acute kidney injury. He was known to have a prosthetic aortic valve. He was febrile with splenomegaly and vasculitic lesions on both hands. Nephritic screen revealed strongly positive cytoplasmic-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (c-ANCA). Differential diagnosis thus included a small vessel vasculitis or infective endocarditis. Transoesophageal echocardiography demonstrated no vegetations and serial blood cultures were negative. Immunosuppression for presumed granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegeners granulomatosis) was therefore instituted. The patient deteriorated, requiring multi-organ support. Renal biopsy showed a proliferative glomerulopathy and complements were low. Atypical screen for culture negative endocarditis revealed a strongly positive IgG-antibody titre against Bartonella henselae. Immunosuppression was discontinued and treatment for chronic Bartonellosis commenced. The patient made a remarkable recovery. His renal function quickly returned to normal, and ANCA titres and complements normalised. He was discharged home after completing a 6 week course of antibiotic therapy. PMID:22674942

  1. Complements do not lie.

    PubMed

    Robert, Stefanie Christina; Forbes, Suzanne Helen; Soleimanian, Surusch; Hadley, Julia S

    2011-12-01

    A 74-year-old patient presented with constitutional symptoms and was found to have acute kidney injury. He was known to have a prosthetic aortic valve. He was febrile with splenomegaly and vasculitic lesions on both hands. Nephritic screen revealed strongly positive cytoplasmic-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (c-ANCA). Differential diagnosis thus included a small vessel vasculitis or infective endocarditis. Transoesophageal echocardiography demonstrated no vegetations and serial blood cultures were negative. Immunosuppression for presumed granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegeners granulomatosis) was therefore instituted. The patient deteriorated, requiring multi-organ support. Renal biopsy showed a proliferative glomerulopathy and complements were low. Atypical screen for culture negative endocarditis revealed a strongly positive IgG-antibody titre against Bartonella henselae. Immunosuppression was discontinued and treatment for chronic Bartonellosis commenced. The patient made a remarkable recovery. His renal function quickly returned to normal, and ANCA titres and complements normalised. He was discharged home after completing a 6 week course of antibiotic therapy.

  2. IXO: The Instrument Complement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nousek, John A.; IWG, IXO

    2009-01-01

    The International X-ray Observatory (IXO) has recently been created as a mission concept by a joint team of NASA, ESA and JAXA scientists, based on the previous Constellation-X and XEUS concepts. Definition of the IXO instruments is still under evolution, but the core instrument complement will include a Wide Field X-ray Imager, an X-ray Calorimeter / Narrow Field X-ray Imager, and an X-ray Grating Spectrometer. Other, modest additional instruments (such as a hard X-ray capability, a polarimeter, and a high time resolution detector) will also be considered. We present the current status of the IXO instrument complement and offer the opportunity for discussion of ideas relevant to the IXO mission concept process.

  3. Nutritional anemias and the elderly.

    PubMed

    Carmel, Ralph

    2008-10-01

    Nutritional anemias are important because they are easily reversed and because their underlying causes, most often unrelated to dietary intake, require individualized assessment. Iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) usually results from iron losses accompanying chronic bleeding, including loss to intestinal parasites, or from gastric disorders or malabsorption in the elderly. Cobalamin-deficiency anemia, the only nutritional anemia with predilection for the elderly, nearly always stems from failure of intrinsic factor (IF)-related absorption. Folate-deficiency anemia, the only nutritional anemia usually caused by poor intake, has nearly disappeared in countries that fortify food with folic acid. Copper-deficiency anemia, which usually results from malabsorptive disorders or from medical or nutritional interventions that provide inadequate copper or excess zinc, is uncommon but increasingly recognized. The prevalences of nutritional anemias, which are not always distinguished from non-anemic deficiency, are uncertain. The mean corpuscular volume (MCV) provides an essential diagnostic tool leading to judicious matching of relevant biochemical changes with relevant anemia. Nutritional anemias usually feature abnormal MCV, whereas the predominant anemias in the aged, especially the anemias of chronic disease/chronic inflammation (ACD/ACI), of renal failure, and of unknown causes, are typically normocytic.

  4. Vitamin B12 deficiency anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... body tissues. There are many types of anemia. Vitamin B12 deficiency anemia is a low red blood cell count ... anemia often do well with treatment. Long-term vitamin B12 deficiency can cause nerve damage. This may be permanent ...

  5. How Is Aplastic Anemia Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Aplastic Anemia Diagnosed? Your doctor will diagnose aplastic anemia based on your medical and family histories, a ... your primary care doctor thinks you have aplastic anemia, he or she may refer you to a ...

  6. Anemia: Evaluation and Diagnostic Tests.

    PubMed

    Cascio, Michael J; DeLoughery, Thomas G

    2017-03-01

    Anemia is among the most common medical problems and clinical and laboratory evaluation need to be approached logically. The complete blood count with red cell indices offers clues to diagnosis. Many anemias have characteristic red cell morphology. The reticulocyte count serves as a useful screen for hemolysis or blood loss. Testing for specific causes of the anemia is performed. Occasionally, examination of the bone marrow is required for diagnosis. Molecular testing is increasingly being use to aid the diagnostic process. This article reviews diagnostic tests for anemia and suggests a rational approach to determining the etiology of a patient's anemia.

  7. Anemia of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Roy, Cindy N

    2010-01-01

    Inflammation arising from various etiologies, including infection, autoimmune disorders, chronic diseases, and aging, can promote anemia. The anemia of inflammation (AI) is most often normocytic and normochromic and is usually mild. Characteristic changes in systemic iron handling, erythrocyte production, and erythrocyte life span all contribute to AI. The preferred treatment is directed at the underlying disease. However, when the inflammatory insult is intractable, or the cause has not been diagnosed, there are limited options for treatment of AI. Because anemia is a comorbid condition that is associated with poor outcomes in various chronic disease states, understanding its pathogenesis and developing new tools for its treatment should remain a priority. Hepcidin antimicrobial peptide has taken center stage in recent years as a potent modulator of iron availability. As the technology for quantitative hepcidin analysis improves, hepcidin's role in various disease states is also being revealed. Recent insights concerning the regulatory pathways that modify hepcidin expression have identified novel targets for drug development. As the field advances with such therapeutics, the analysis of the impact of normalized hemoglobin on disease outcomes will confirm whether anemia is a reversible independent contributor to the morbidity and mortality associated with inflammatory diseases.

  8. How Is Anemia Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... parts of your blood. The test checks your hemoglobin and hematocrit (hee-MAT-oh-crit) levels. Hemoglobin is the iron-rich protein in red blood ... up in your blood. A low level of hemoglobin or hematocrit is a sign of anemia. The ...

  9. Anemia and School Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bobonis, Gustavo J.; Miguel, Edward; Puri-Sharma, Charu

    2006-01-01

    Anemia is among the most widespread health problems for children in developing countries. This paper evaluates the impact of a randomized health intervention delivering iron supplementation and deworming drugs to Indian preschool children. At baseline, 69 percent were anemic and 30 percent had intestinal worm infections. Weight increased among…

  10. Sickle Cell Anemia Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christy, Steven C.

    Presents sources for the acquisition of medical, social, psychological, educational, and practical knowledge of sickle cell anemia. The materials listed are designed to help parents, educators, and public service workers. Materials include journal articles, films, brochures, slides, and fact sheets. The usual bibliographic information is given.…

  11. Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Liebman, Howard A; Weitz, Ilene C

    2017-03-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is an acquired autoimmune disorder resulting in the production of antibodies directed against red blood cell antigens causing shortened erythrocyte survival. The disorders can present as a primary disorder (idiopathic) or secondary to other autoimmune disorders, malignancies, or infections. Treatment involves immune modulation with corticosteroids and other agents.

  12. How to approach chronic anemia.

    PubMed

    Koury, Mark J; Rhodes, Melissa

    2012-01-01

    We present herein an approach to diagnosing the cause of chronic anemia based on a patient's history and complete blood cell count (CBC). Four patterns that are encountered frequently in CBCs associated with chronic anemias are considered: (1) anemia with abnormal platelet and/or leukocyte counts, (2) anemia with increased reticulocyte counts, (3) life-long history of chronic anemia, and (4) anemia with inappropriately low reticulocytes. The pathophysiologic bases for some chronic anemias with low reticulocyte production are reviewed in terms of the bone marrow (BM) events that reduce normal rates of erythropoiesis. These events include: apoptosis of erythroid progenitor and precursor cells by intrinsic and extrinsic factors, development of macrocytosis when erythroblast DNA replication is impaired, and development of microcytosis due to heme-regulated eIF2α kinase inhibition of protein synthesis in iron-deficient or thalassemic erythroblasts.

  13. Association of aplastic anaemia and Fanconi's disease with HLA-DRB1 alleles.

    PubMed

    Yari, F; Sobhani, M; Vaziri, M Z; Bagheri, N; Sabaghi, F; Talebian, A

    2008-12-01

    One of the most fascinating areas of research within the field of histocompatibility at present time concerns an observation that a major human histocompatibility system, human leucocyte antigen (HLA), is deeply involved in the development of a great number of diseases. Major histocompatibility complex is the most polymorphic system in the genome of different species. Recognition of HLA alleles could be useful in transplantation and disease studies. Genetic construct of HLA DRB1 was studied in Iranian normal populations and patients with aplastic anaemia and Fanconi's disease. DNA was extracted from the whole blood of 466 normal, 35 aplastic anaemia and 10 Fanconi's individuals. Then DRB1 gene polymorphism was studied by polymerase chain reaction-sequence-specific primer method. The HLA DRB1 gene analysis showed increase of DRB1*07 in aplastic anaemia patients compared to normal population (P = 0.02). According to this study, the frequency of DRB1*07 in normal individuals was 8.3, and in aplastic anaemia patients, 15.7%. Additionally, the frequency of DRB1*04 in normal, aplastic anaemia and Fanconi's individuals was 10, 5.7 and 20%, respectively. Our results of investigation showed correlation between some HLA alleles with the studied diseases. We reported the frequency of various DR types in aplastic and Fanconi's patients. This study could imply the possible role of HLA-DRB1*07 in the incidence of aplastic anaemia. Moreover, the frequency of DRB1*04, DRB1*03 and DRB1*15 alleles showed intermediate correlation with Fanconi's anaemia.

  14. Sjögren's syndrome complicated with Fanconi syndrome and Hashimoto's thyroiditis: Case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Shi, Mingmin; Chen, Lei

    2016-06-01

    We report a unique case of Sjögren's syndrome complicated with Fanconi syndrome and Hashimoto's thyroiditis in a 53-year-old Chinese woman, initially found to have proteinuria, fatigue and multiple old costal fractures. Distal tubular dysfunction is the most common renal damage in Sjögren's syndrome, while Fanconi syndrome (which is caused by proximal tubular dysfunction) and Hypothyroidism are rare complications of Sjögren's syndrome.

  15. Anemia in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Giannini, S; Martes, C

    2006-09-01

    Anemia is a frequent extraenteric complication of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis). A systematic review of the literature shows that the overall prevalence of anemia ranges from 8.8% to 73.7% but differs whether in a setting of Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis. A disabling complication of IBD, anemia worsens the patient's general condition and quality of life, and increases hospitalization rates. Different factors, including vitamin B12 and folic acid deficiency, bone marrow suppression secondary to drug therapy, autoimmune hemolytic anemia and the coexistence of myelodysplastic syndromes are involved in the pathogenesis of anemia in IBD. The main types of anemia in IBD are iron deficiency anemia and anemia accompanying chronic diseases. Correct diagnostic definition of anemia is a fundamental step in guiding the choice of therapeutic options, since the co-presence of different pathogenetic factors may sometimes require a more complex treatment plan. A review of anemia in IBD, its pathogenetic features, epidemiology, diagnosis and therapy based on evidence from recent studies is the focus of this article.

  16. Complementing Gender Analysis Methods.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anant

    2016-01-01

    The existing gender analysis frameworks start with a premise that men and women are equal and should be treated equally. These frameworks give emphasis on equal distribution of resources between men and women and believe that this will bring equality which is not always true. Despite equal distribution of resources, women tend to suffer and experience discrimination in many areas of their lives such as the power to control resources within social relationships, and the need for emotional security and reproductive rights within interpersonal relationships. These frameworks believe that patriarchy as an institution plays an important role in women's oppression, exploitation, and it is a barrier in their empowerment and rights. Thus, some think that by ensuring equal distribution of resources and empowering women economically, institutions like patriarchy can be challenged. These frameworks are based on proposed equality principle which puts men and women in competing roles. Thus, the real equality will never be achieved. Contrary to the existing gender analysis frameworks, the Complementing Gender Analysis framework proposed by the author provides a new approach toward gender analysis which not only recognizes the role of economic empowerment and equal distribution of resources but suggests to incorporate the concept and role of social capital, equity, and doing gender in gender analysis which is based on perceived equity principle, putting men and women in complementing roles that may lead to equality. In this article the author reviews the mainstream gender theories in development from the viewpoint of the complementary roles of gender. This alternative view is argued based on existing literature and an anecdote of observations made by the author. While criticizing the equality theory, the author offers equity theory in resolving the gender conflict by using the concept of social and psychological capital.

  17. Resveratrol improves ifosfamide-induced Fanconi syndrome in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Sehirli, Ozer; Sakarcan, Abdullah; Velioglu-Oguenc, Ayliz; Cetinel, Sule; Gedik, Nursal; Yegen, Berrak C.; Sener, Goeksel . E-mail: gsener@marmara.edu.tr

    2007-07-01

    Regarding the mechanisms of ifosfamide (IFO)-induced urinary toxicity, several hypotheses have been put forward, among which oxidative stress and depletion of glutathione are suggested. This investigation elucidates the role of free radicals in IFO-induced toxicity and the protection by resveratrol, a natural phytoalexin. Wistar albino rats were injected intraperioneally with saline (0.9% NaCl; control), saline + resveratrol (RVT; 10 mg/kg/day), ifosfamide (IFO; 50 mg/kg/day) or IFO + RVT for 5 days. Urine was collected for 24 h during the 5th day, and at the 120th h after the first injections, animals were killed by decapitation and trunk blood was collected. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity, total antioxidant capacity (AOC) and pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-{alpha}, IL-{beta} and IL-6 were assayed in plasma samples. Kidney and bladder tissues were obtained for biochemical and histological analysis. Formation of reactive oxygen species in the tissue samples was monitored by using chemiluminescence (CL) technique with luminol and lucigenin probes. The results demonstrated that IFO induced a Fanconi syndrome characterized by increased urinary sodium, phosphate, glucose and protein, along with increased serum creatinine and urea levels. On the other hand, RVT markedly ameliorated the severity of renal dysfunction induced by IFO. Furthermore IFO caused a significant decrease in plasma AOC, which was accompanied with significant increases in the levels of the pro-inflammatory mediators and LDH activity, while RVT treatment reversed all these biochemical indices. In the saline-treated IFO group, glutathione levels were decreased significantly, while the malondialdehyde levels, myeloperoxidase activity and collagen content were increased in both tissues, which were in parallel with the increases in CL values. In the RVT-treated IFO group, all of these oxidant responses were prevented significantly. Our results suggest that IFO causes oxidative damage in the renal

  18. Significance of bone-marrow scintigraphy in aplastic anemia: concise communication. [/sup 99m/Tc-sulfur colloid; /sup 111/In-transferrin

    SciTech Connect

    Najean, Y.; Le Danvic, M.; Le Mercier, N.; Pecking, A.; Colonna, P.; Rain, J.D.

    1980-03-01

    Tc-99m colloid and In-111 transferrin were used in a semiquantitative scintigraphic study of bone-marrow activity in 76 patients with aplastic anemia, the majority of which were severe cases. The results are compared with other known prognostic parameters and with a predictive index formulated from a prior multiparametric analysis performed in 352 cases. In 47 cases parallel abnormality of Tc and In uptakes was noted and was well correlated with other prognostic factors. Indium uptake is apparently a good indicator of the severity of aplasia; extension of active erythroid tissue, demonstrated with this method, is correlated with prognosis. In nine cases, excessive in uptake is explained by dyserythropoiesis associated with granulo- and thrombocytopenia (Fanconi's anemia in most cases). In 20 of our patients, TcSC uptake was excessive compared with that of In and with other prognostic factors. Statistically, this phenomenon carries an unfavorable prognosis but its physiological meaning remains to be defined.

  19. [Anemia in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Maerevoet, M; Sattar, L; Bron, D; Gulbis, B; Pepersack, T

    2014-09-01

    Anaemia is a problem that affects almost 10% over 65 years and 20% over 85 years. There is no physiological anaemia in the elderly. Any anaemia expresses the existence of a pathological process, regardless of its severity. Anaemia in the elderly is always associated with a poor prognosis that is in terms of mortality, morbidity and risk of fragility. The diagnostic approach to anemia in the elderly is the same as in younger individual. There are many causes of anaemia; anaemia balance is a complex diagnostic process. Most anaemias are due to a deficiency, chronic inflammation or comorbidity. However, in the elderly, the etiology of anaemia is often multifactorial. In a number of cases remain unexplained anaemia. In a number of cases, anemia remain unexplained. Treatment of anaemia is the treatment of the cause, but specific therapeutic aspects to the elderly should be considered, as among other martial substitution or use of erythropoietin (EPO).

  20. Complement inhibition in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Pio, Ruben; Ajona, Daniel; Lambris, John D

    2013-02-01

    For decades, complement has been recognized as an effector arm of the immune system that contributes to the destruction of tumor cells. In fact, many therapeutic strategies have been proposed that are based on the intensification of complement-mediated responses against tumors. However, recent studies have challenged this paradigm by demonstrating a tumor-promoting role for complement. Cancer cells seem to be able to establish a convenient balance between complement activation and inhibition, taking advantage of complement initiation without suffering its deleterious effects. Complement activation may support chronic inflammation, promote an immunosuppressive microenvironment, induce angiogenesis, and activate cancer-related signaling pathways. In this context, inhibition of complement activation would be a therapeutic option for treating cancer. This concept is relatively new and deserves closer attention. In this article, we summarize the mechanisms of complement activation on cancer cells, the cancer-promoting effect of complement initiation, and the rationale behind the use of complement inhibition as a therapeutic strategy against cancer.

  1. [Anemia: guidelines comparison].

    PubMed

    Del Vecchio, Lucia

    2009-01-01

    The development of recombinant human erythropoietin and its introduction into the market in the late 1980s has significantly improved the quality of life of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and reduced the need for blood transfusions. Starting from a cautious target, a progressive increase in the recommended hemoglobin levels has been observed over the years, in parallel with an increase in the obtained levels. This trend has gone together with the publication of findings of observational studies showing a relationship between the increase in hemoglobin levels and a reduction in the mortality risk, with the conduction of clinical trials testing the effects of complete anemia correction, and with the compilation of guidelines on anemia control in CKD patients by scientific societies and organizations. In the last two years, evidence of a possible increase in the mortality risk in those patients who were randomized to high hemoglobin levels has resulted in a decrease in the upper limit of the recommended Hb target to be obtained with erythropoietin stimulating agents (ESA), and consequently in a narrowing of the target range. Comparison of guidelines on anemia control in CKD patients is an interesting starting point to discuss single recommendations, strengthen their importance, or suggest new topics of research to fill up important gaps in knowledge.

  2. [Nutritional anemias in elderly patients].

    PubMed

    Serraj, Khalid; Federici, Laure; Kaltenbach, Georges; Andrès, Emmanuel

    2008-09-01

    Nutritional deficiencies cause one third of the cases of anemia in the elderly. The urgency of anemia management in elderly patients depends on tolerance and repercussions, rather than only on the hemoglobin level. Iron, vitamin B12 and folate are the most common deficiencies, and their levels should be tested. Chronic gastrointestinal bleeding is the principal cause of iron-deficiency anemia. Management is based on supplementation combined with effective etiological treatment.

  3. Genetics Home Reference: Diamond-Blackfan anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Diamond-Blackfan anemia Diamond-Blackfan anemia Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Diamond-Blackfan anemia is a disorder of the bone ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Blood Breastfeeding FAQs: How Much and How Often Vegan Food Guide Vegetarianism Anemia Word! Anemia Vitamins About ... Vegetarian Blood Coping With Common Period Problems Anemia Vegan Food Guide Vitamins and Minerals Contact Us Print ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Iron-Deficiency Anemia KidsHealth > For Parents > Iron-Deficiency Anemia Print A ... common nutritional deficiency in children. About Iron-Deficiency Anemia Every red blood cell in the body contains ...

  6. Iron Deficiency Anemia in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Breymann, Christian

    2015-10-01

    Anemia is a common problem in obstetrics and perinatal care. Any hemoglobin below 10.5 g/dL can be regarded as true anemia regardless of gestational age. Reasons for anemia in pregnancy are mainly nutritional deficiencies, parasitic and bacterial diseases, and inborn red blood cell disorders such as thalassemias. The main cause of anemia in obstetrics is iron deficiency, which has a worldwide prevalence between estimated 20%-80% and consists of a primarily female population. Stages of iron deficiency are depletion of iron stores, iron-deficient erythropoiesis without anemia, and iron deficiency anemia, the most pronounced form of iron deficiency. Pregnancy anemia can be aggravated by various conditions such as uterine or placental bleedings, gastrointestinal bleedings, and peripartum blood loss. In addition to the general consequences of anemia, there are specific risks during pregnancy for the mother and the fetus such as intrauterine growth retardation, prematurity, feto-placental miss ratio, and higher risk for peripartum blood transfusion. Besides the importance of prophylaxis of iron deficiency, the main therapy options for the treatment of pregnancy anemia are oral iron and intravenous iron preparations.

  7. [Iron deficiency anemia and anemia of chronic disorders].

    PubMed

    Metzgeroth, G; Hastka, J

    2015-09-01

    Hypochromic-microcytic anemias are characterized by a hemoglobin deficiency of the erythrocytes. The main reason for the insufficient hemoglobin synthesis is, with exception of thalassemia and a few other rare conditions, primarily a disorder of iron metabolism. Differential diagnostic considerations are focused on iron deficiency anemia, with approximately 80% the most common form of anemia worldwide. Iron deficiency anemia shows a particularly high prevalence in developing countries, but is also in industrialized Western countries the most common cause of anemia. Infants, toddlers, premenopausal or pregnant women, and elderly people are at particularly high risk of iron deficiency anemia. The most important differential diagnosis for iron deficiency anemia is the anemia of chronic disorders (ACD). This anemia is caused by a disturbance of iron utilization (functional iron deficiency), in which iron absorption and iron release, as a nonspecific defense mechanism, is blocked to restrict iron availability for the inflammatory process but also withhold iron from the erythropoiesis. ACD is not rare, but plays a significant role in hospitalized patients and in the elderly. The differentiation between ACD and iron deficiency anemia is highly important from a clinical point of view, due to different types of further management. The cause for iron deficiency should be clarified in each case, whereas the etiology for ACD is often obvious. The standard treatment of iron deficiency anemia is oral iron supplementation. Intravenous iron application is reserved for problem patients. The best treatment for ACD is the elimination of the underlying chronic disorder. In case of persistent ACD, red blood cell transfusions, erythropoietin, and intravenous iron are used therapeutically.

  8. [Diagnosis and treatment of hemolytic anemia].

    PubMed

    Kamesaki, Toyomi

    2015-10-01

    Hemolytic anemia is defined as anemia due to a reduction of the RBC lifespan to less than the normal range of approximately 120 days. Patients with anemia and jaundice are often suspected to have hemolysis. Herein, different causes of hemolysis and the diagnostic algorithm are reviewed. Currently, there is no generic treatment for hemolytic anemia. Appropriate management of a patient with hemolytic anemia requires determination of the underlying cause. Treatments for the different causes of hemolytic anemia are also reviewed.

  9. Complement System in Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pandya, Pankita H.

    2014-01-01

    In addition to its established contribution to innate immunity, recent studies have suggested novel roles for the complement system in the development of various lung diseases. Several studies have demonstrated that complement may serve as a key link between innate and adaptive immunity in a variety of pulmonary conditions. However, the specific contributions of complement to lung diseases based on innate and adaptive immunity are just beginning to emerge. Elucidating the role of complement-mediated immune regulation in these diseases will help to identify new targets for therapeutic interventions. PMID:24901241

  10. Pathologic Femoral Neck Fracture Due to Fanconi Syndrome Induced by Adefovir Dipivoxil Therapy for Hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yoon-Suk; Kim, Byung-Kook; Lee, Ho-Jae

    2016-01-01

    In Fanconi syndrome, hypophosphatemic osteomalacia is caused by proximal renal tubule dysfunction which leads to impaired reabsorption of amino acids, glucose, urate, and phosphate. We present a rare case of a 43-year-old Korean male who was found to have insufficiency stress fracture of the femoral neck secondary to osteomalacia due to Fanconi syndrome. He had been receiving low-dose adefovir dipivoxil (ADV, 10 mg/day) for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B virus infection for 7 years and he subsequently developed severe hypophosphatemia and proximal renal tubule dysfunction. The incomplete femoral neck fracture was fixed with multiple cannulated screws to prevent further displacement of the initial fracture. After cessation of ADV and correction of hypophosphatemia with oral phosphorus supplementation, the patient's clinical symptoms, such as bone pain, muscle weakness, and laboratory findings improved. PMID:27247753

  11. Successful treatment of proximal renal tubular acidosis and Fanconi syndrome with vitamin D replacement.

    PubMed

    Ali, Syed Ahsan; Tariq, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    Proximal renal tubular acidosis (RTA), also known as Type II RTA, is characterized by a defect in the ability to reabsorb bicarbonate (HCO 3 ) in the proximal tubule. It is usually associated with generalized dysfunction of the proximal tubule as part of Fanconi syndrome. Very few case reports in the literature support Vitamin D deficiency as a cause of proximal RTA. We present a case of a young female who presented with proximal RTA and Fanconi syndrome and excellently responded to Vitamin D replacement. Thus, work-up for the etiology of proximal RTA should include Vitamin D levels since replacement of this vitamin in those who are deficient can lead to cure of such patients.

  12. Disseminated intravascular coagulation due to IgM-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Bleakly, N Teresa; Fontaine, Magali J; Pate, Lisa L; Sutherland, Scott M; Jeng, Michael

    2011-08-01

    Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) due to red cell hemolysis has been previously attributed to transfusion-related hemolytic reactions, but not to autoimmune hemolytic anemia. We report a case of DIC in a child with complement-fixing IgM-mediated cold-agglutinin autoimmune hemolysis, which resulted in arterial thrombosis and gangrene of the upper and lower extremities.

  13. Hypophosphataemic osteomalacia due to de Toni-Debre-Fanconi syndrome in a 19-year old girl.

    PubMed

    Tsilchorozidou, Tasoula; Yovos, John G

    2005-01-01

    Osteomalacia associated with adult onset Fanconi syndrome is thought to result from hypophosphataemia due to renal phosphate loss and relative 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 deficiency. In this disorder, the impaired renal phosphate uptake occurs as part of a generalized tubular defect in association with other features such as bicarbonuria, glycosuria and aminoaciduria. Fanconi syndrome is either hereditary--juvenile form--or is associated with various acquired or heritable diseases. In adults, the disease is similar to the juvenile form, but osteomalacia is a prominent feature. We report a sporadic, adult onset, hypophosphataemia in a 19-year old female patient who presented after puberty complaining of bone and joint pain and difficulty in walking following a minor fall. Radiological examination revealed numerous bilateral fractures of the ribs and pelvis while biochemical investigations showed combination of high phosphate clearance, low serum bicarbonate, glycosuria and glycinuria. Known causes of acquired renal tubular dysfunction were ruled out. The patient was diagnosed as having idiopathic Fanconi syndrome and started on vitamin D3 (Alfacalcidol 1 mg/day) and oral phosphorus (Joulie Solution, 1.5 g/day), which led to resolution of symptoms and an increase in serum phosphate (from 0,54 to 0,71 mmol/l) within few months following the initiation of therapy. However, radiological re-examination showed no signs of fracture healing.

  14. Nouns, Verbs and NP Complements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Platt, J. T.

    This paper investigates restrictions on three types of noun-phrase complements (gerundive, infinitive, clause) in English and seeks to point out some parallels between the occurrence of these three types in object positions. The author first presents a list of verbs which may be followed by noun-phrase complements; he then considers the occurrence…

  15. Complement in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Maria V; Sim, Robert B

    2011-09-16

    The complement system consists of about 35-40 proteins and glycoproteins present in blood plasma or on cell surfaces. Its main biological function is to recognise "foreign" particles and macromolecules, and to promote their elimination either by opsonisation or lysis. Although historically complement has been studied as a system for immune defence against bacteria, it has an important homeostatic role in which it recognises damaged or altered "self" components. Thus complement has major roles in both immune defence against microorganisms, and in clearance of damaged or "used" host components. Since complement proteins opsonise or lyse cells, complement can damage healthy host cells and tissues. The system is regulated by many endogenous regulatory proteins. Regulation is sometimes imperfect and both too much and too little complement activation is associated with many diseases. Excessive or inappropriate activation can cause tissue damage in diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, age-related macular degeneration (AMD), multiple sclerosis, ischemia-reperfusion injury (e.g. ischemic stroke). Insufficient complement activity is associated with susceptibility to infection (mainly bacterial) and development of autoimmune disease, like SLE (systemic lupus erythematosus).

  16. Complement Evasion by Pathogenic Leptospira.

    PubMed

    Fraga, Tatiana Rodrigues; Isaac, Lourdes; Barbosa, Angela Silva

    2016-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a neglected infectious disease caused by spirochetes from the genus Leptospira. Pathogenic microorganisms, notably those which reach the blood circulation such as Leptospira, have evolved multiple strategies to escape the host complement system, which is important for innate and acquired immunity. Leptospira avoid complement-mediated killing through: (i) recruitment of host complement regulators; (ii) acquisition of host proteases that cleave complement proteins on the bacterial surface; and, (iii) secretion of proteases that inactivate complement proteins in the Leptospira surroundings. The recruitment of host soluble complement regulatory proteins includes the acquisition of Factor H (FH) and FH-like-1 (alternative pathway), C4b-binding protein (C4BP) (classical and lectin pathways), and vitronectin (Vn) (terminal pathway). Once bound to the leptospiral surface, FH and C4BP retain cofactor activity of Factor I in the cleavage of C3b and C4b, respectively. Vn acquisition by leptospires may result in terminal pathway inhibition by blocking C9 polymerization. The second evasion mechanism lies in plasminogen (PLG) binding to the leptospiral surface. In the presence of host activators, PLG is converted to enzymatically active plasmin, which is able to degrade C3b, C4b, and C5 at the surface of the pathogen. A third strategy used by leptospires to escape from complement system is the active secretion of proteases. Pathogenic, but not saprophytic leptospires, are able to secrete metalloproteases that cleave C3 (central complement molecule), Factor B (alternative pathway), and C4 and C2 (classical and lectin pathways). The purpose of this review is to fully explore these complement evasion mechanisms, which act together to favor Leptospira survival and multiplication in the host.

  17. Complement Evasion by Pathogenic Leptospira

    PubMed Central

    Fraga, Tatiana Rodrigues; Isaac, Lourdes; Barbosa, Angela Silva

    2016-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a neglected infectious disease caused by spirochetes from the genus Leptospira. Pathogenic microorganisms, notably those which reach the blood circulation such as Leptospira, have evolved multiple strategies to escape the host complement system, which is important for innate and acquired immunity. Leptospira avoid complement-mediated killing through: (i) recruitment of host complement regulators; (ii) acquisition of host proteases that cleave complement proteins on the bacterial surface; and, (iii) secretion of proteases that inactivate complement proteins in the Leptospira surroundings. The recruitment of host soluble complement regulatory proteins includes the acquisition of Factor H (FH) and FH-like-1 (alternative pathway), C4b-binding protein (C4BP) (classical and lectin pathways), and vitronectin (Vn) (terminal pathway). Once bound to the leptospiral surface, FH and C4BP retain cofactor activity of Factor I in the cleavage of C3b and C4b, respectively. Vn acquisition by leptospires may result in terminal pathway inhibition by blocking C9 polymerization. The second evasion mechanism lies in plasminogen (PLG) binding to the leptospiral surface. In the presence of host activators, PLG is converted to enzymatically active plasmin, which is able to degrade C3b, C4b, and C5 at the surface of the pathogen. A third strategy used by leptospires to escape from complement system is the active secretion of proteases. Pathogenic, but not saprophytic leptospires, are able to secrete metalloproteases that cleave C3 (central complement molecule), Factor B (alternative pathway), and C4 and C2 (classical and lectin pathways). The purpose of this review is to fully explore these complement evasion mechanisms, which act together to favor Leptospira survival and multiplication in the host. PMID:28066433

  18. Anemia for the Primary Care Physician.

    PubMed

    Powell, Darryl J; Achebe, Maureen Okam

    2016-12-01

    Anemia denotes a reduced red blood cell (RBC) mass from any cause. The causes of anemia are numerous and due to decreased (or abnormal) erythropoesis, shortened RBC life span, or blood loss. The most common etiology of anemia is iron deficiency. A judicious work up of anemia includes evaluating the reticulocyte count and peripheral smear. The severity of illness of a patient with anemia is determined by the degree of anemia and the seriousness of the underlying disorder. Management of patients with hereditary and hemolytic anemias should involve a hematologist.

  19. Anemia and iron deficiency in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Gunawardena, Shanti; Dunlap, Mark E

    2012-12-01

    Anemia is a common comorbidity in heart failure (HF), and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. However, it remains unclear whether anemia is merely a marker of poor prognosis or whether anemia itself confers risk. The pathogenesis of anemia in HF is multifactorial. Iron deficiency also confers risk in HF, either with or without associated anemia, and treatment of iron deficiency improves the functional status of patients with HF. An ongoing large clinical trial studying the use of darbepoetin-alfa in patients with anemia and systolic HF is expected to provide information that should improve our understanding of anemia in HF.

  20. Severe autoimmune hemolytic anemia with renal neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Emily C; Parikh, Sahil P; Bhattacharyya, Nishith

    2014-02-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a type of hemolytic anemia characterized by autoantibodies directed against red blood cells shortening their survival. When autoimmune hemolytic anemia is secondary to a paraneoplastic process, severe anemia can occur leading to significant morbidity and even mortality. Here we discuss the literature and present the case of a child with autoimmune hemolytic anemia from a paraneoplastic syndrome secondary to a renal tumor.

  1. Genetics of the complement system.

    PubMed Central

    Lachmann, P

    1975-01-01

    The complement system, unlike the coagulation system, was largely characterized by in-vitro techniques which did not make use of genetically deficient plasmas. The existence of the genetically deficient plasmas. The existence of the genetically deficient subjects therefore has served largely to increase our knowledge of the in-vivo role of complement. At the present time its clearest role is in the resistance to infection; obviously in the case of C3 deficiency and bacterial infection and possibly more subtly in the case of deficiency of the early active complement components and low virulence organisms. There is so far no evidence that genetic complement deficiency interferes with antibody formation or with the generation of tolerance as has been suggested in the pas (Azar et al, 1968; Dukor and Hartmann, 1973). PMID:768477

  2. Complement Activation Alters Platelet Function

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    mice and mice transfused with Syk inhibitor-treated platelets . Platelet lodging was remarkably decreased in lungs of mice transfused with Syk...AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0523 TITLE: Complement Activation Alters Platelet ...30September2012–29September2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Complement Activation Alters Platelet Function 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0523 5b. GRANT NUMBER

  3. New Insights in the Pathogenesis of Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Barcellini, Wilma

    2015-01-01

    Summary Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is caused by the increased destruction of red blood cells (RBCs) by anti-RBC autoantibodies with or without complement activation. RBC destruction may occur both by a direct lysis through the sequential activation of the final components of the complement cascade (membrane attack complex), or by antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). The pathogenic role of autoantibodies depends on their class (the most frequent are IgG and IgM), subclass, thermal amplitude (warm and cold forms),as well as affinity and efficiency in activating complement. Several cytokines and cytotoxic mechanisms (CD8+ T and natural killer cells) are further involved in RBC destruction. Moreover, activated macrophages carrying Fc receptors may recognize and phagocyte erythrocytes opsonized by autoantibodies and complement. Direct complement-mediated lysis takes place mainly in the circulations and liver, whereas ADCC, cytotoxicity, and phagocytosis occur preferentially in the spleen and lymphoid organs. The degree of intravascular hemolysis is 10-fold greater than extravascular one. Finally, the efficacy of the erythroblastic compensatory response can greatly influence the clinical picture of AIHA. The interplay and relative burden of all these pathogenic mechanisms give reason for the great clinical heterogeneity of AIHAs, from fully compensated to rapidly evolving fatal cases. PMID:26696796

  4. Methods for Quantitative Detection of Antibody-induced Complement Activation on Red Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Meulenbroek, Elisabeth M.; Wouters, Diana; Zeerleder, Sacha

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies against red blood cells (RBCs) can lead to complement activation resulting in an accelerated clearance via complement receptors in the liver (extravascular hemolysis) or leading to intravascular lysis of RBCs. Alloantibodies (e.g. ABO) or autoantibodies to RBC antigens (as seen in autoimmune hemolytic anemia, AIHA) leading to complement activation are potentially harmful and can be - especially when leading to intravascular lysis - fatal1. Currently, complement activation due to (auto)-antibodies on RBCs is assessed in vitro by using the Coombs test reflecting complement deposition on RBC or by a nonquantitative hemolytic assay reflecting RBC lysis1-4. However, to assess the efficacy of complement inhibitors, it is mandatory to have quantitative techniques. Here we describe two such techniques. First, an assay to detect C3 and C4 deposition on red blood cells that is induced by antibodies in patient serum is presented. For this, FACS analysis is used with fluorescently labeled anti-C3 or anti-C4 antibodies. Next, a quantitative hemolytic assay is described. In this assay, complement-mediated hemolysis induced by patient serum is measured making use of spectrophotometric detection of the released hemoglobin. Both of these assays are very reproducible and quantitative, facilitating studies of antibody-induced complement activation. PMID:24514151

  5. Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    De Falco, Luigia; Sanchez, Mayka; Silvestri, Laura; Kannengiesser, Caroline; Muckenthaler, Martina U.; Iolascon, Achille; Gouya, Laurent; Camaschella, Clara; Beaumont, Carole

    2013-01-01

    Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia is a hereditary recessive anemia due to a defect in the TMPRSS6 gene encoding Matriptase-2. This protein is a transmembrane serine protease that plays an essential role in down-regulating hepcidin, the key regulator of iron homeostasis. Hallmarks of this disease are microcytic hypochromic anemia, low transferrin saturation and normal/high serum hepcidin values. The anemia appears in the post-natal period, although in some cases it is only diagnosed in adulthood. The disease is refractory to oral iron treatment but shows a slow response to intravenous iron injections and partial correction of the anemia. To date, 40 different Matriptase-2 mutations have been reported, affecting all the functional domains of the large ectodomain of the protein. In vitro experiments on transfected cells suggest that Matriptase-2 cleaves Hemojuvelin, a major regulator of hepcidin expression and that this function is altered in this genetic form of anemia. In contrast to the low/undetectable hepcidin levels observed in acquired iron deficiency, in patients with Matriptase-2 deficiency, serum hepcidin is inappropriately high for the low iron status and accounts for the absent/delayed response to oral iron treatment. A challenge for the clinicians and pediatricians is the recognition of the disorder among iron deficiency and other microcytic anemias commonly found in pediatric patients. The current treatment of iron refractory iron deficiency anemia is based on parenteral iron administration; in the future, manipulation of the hepcidin pathway with the aim of suppressing it might become an alternative therapeutic approach. PMID:23729726

  6. Sexuality and sickle cell anemia

    PubMed Central

    Côbo, Viviane de Almeida; Chapadeiro, Cibele Alves; Ribeiro, João Batista; Moraes-Souza, Helio; Martins, Paulo Roberto Juliano

    2013-01-01

    Background Sickle cell disease, the most common hereditary blood disease in the world, is the result of an atypical hemoglobin called S (Hb S) which, when homozygous (Hb SS) is the cause of sickle cell anemia. Changes of puberty, correlated with a delayed growth spurt, begin late in both male and female sickle cell anemia individuals with repercussions on sexuality and reproduction. The objectives of this exploratory and descriptive study were to characterize the development of sexuality in adults with sickle cell anemia by investigating the patient's perception of their sex life, as well as the information they had and needed on this subject. Methods Twenty male and female sickle cell anemia patients treated at the Hemocentro Regional de Uberaba (UFTM) with ages between 19 and 47 years old were enrolled. A socioeconomic questionnaire and a semi-structured interview on sexuality, reproduction and genetic counseling were applied. Results This study shows that the sickle cell anemia patients lacked information on sexuality especially about the risks of pregnancy and the possible inheritance of the disease by their children. Moreover, the sexual life of the patients was impaired due to pain as well as discrimination and negative feelings experienced in close relationships. Conclusion The health care of sickle cell anemia patients should take into account not only the clinical aspects of the disease, but also psychosocial aspects by providing counseling on sexuality, reproduction and genetics, in order to give this population the possibility of a better quality of life. PMID:23741184

  7. [Pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of anemia].

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Keiya

    2008-03-01

    Anemia can result from deficient erythropoiesis [aplastic anemia, myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), iron deficiency anemia, anemia of chronic disease (ACD), thalassemia, megaloblastic anemia, chronic renal failure, hematological malignancies, etc.], excessive RBC destruction [hereditary spherocytosis, inherited enzyme deficiency, hemoglobinopathies, autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA), paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH), etc.], and blood loss. Based on the measured red cell size(MCV), anemia is classified as microcytic, normocytic, or macrocytic. Iron parameters (serum iron, serum ferritin, etc.), reticulocyte count, bone marrow examination, Coombs test, serum vitamin B12 level, and Ham test are also useful in the differential diagnosis of anemia. Novel treatment of anemia includes lenalidomide for 5q(-)MDS, azacitidine for high-risk MDS, and eculizumab for PNH. Oral iron chelator(deferasirox) developed for the treatment of transfusional iron overload is also very useful for the management of patients with bone marrow failure syndromes.

  8. Adefovir dipivoxil-induced Fanconi syndrome and its predictive factors: A study of 28 cases

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yong; Pan, Fan; Wang, Yingchao; Chen, Ziqian; Lin, Chun; Yao, Lvfeng; Zhang, Xin; Zhou, Rui; Pan, Chen

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify monitoring and prevention measures as well as predictive factors for early detection of renal toxicity associated with long-term administration of adefovir dipivoxil in order to avoid progression to Fanconi syndrome. Clinical data of 28 patients with Fanconi syndrome caused by long-term administration of adefovir dipivoxil for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection were collected pre-and post-administration for analysis. Patients presented with fatigue, progressive systemic pain in multiple bones and joints, as well as difficulty in walking and pathological fractures in a number of severe cases. Laboratory examinations revealed hypophosphatemia, elevated serum cystatin C (Cys-C), elevated serum creatinine (SCr), reduced glomerular filtration rate (GFR), positive urinary protein, erythrocytes and glucose, as well as osteoporosis. In consequence, adefovir dipivoxil administration was stopped, and patients received concentrated divitamins, sodium phosphate syrup and calcitriol. Symptoms and abnormalities in laboratory examinations were significantly improved in all patients after 2–6 months. Therefore, serum phosphate, SCr, routine urine parameters, Cys-C and GFR should be monitored regularly in chronic HBV patients treated with adefovir dipivoxil. The following factors were identified as predictive of kidney damage and Fanconi syndrome: Age ≥40 years, living in rural areas, previous renal toxicity, estimated GFR (eGFR) <90 ml/min/1.73 m2, hypertension, diabetes, cirrhosis and duration of adefovir dipivoxil treatment exceeding 24 months. The present results indicate that timely termination of adefovir dipivoxil treatment and replacement with other antiviral agents is critical once renal impairment appears, and that it is necessary to change to other antiviral agents and prolong the interval of administration according to the eGFR level. PMID:28123560

  9. Adefovir dipivoxil-induced Fanconi syndrome and its predictive factors: A study of 28 cases.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yong; Pan, Fan; Wang, Yingchao; Chen, Ziqian; Lin, Chun; Yao, Lvfeng; Zhang, Xin; Zhou, Rui; Pan, Chen

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify monitoring and prevention measures as well as predictive factors for early detection of renal toxicity associated with long-term administration of adefovir dipivoxil in order to avoid progression to Fanconi syndrome. Clinical data of 28 patients with Fanconi syndrome caused by long-term administration of adefovir dipivoxil for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection were collected pre-and post-administration for analysis. Patients presented with fatigue, progressive systemic pain in multiple bones and joints, as well as difficulty in walking and pathological fractures in a number of severe cases. Laboratory examinations revealed hypophosphatemia, elevated serum cystatin C (Cys-C), elevated serum creatinine (SCr), reduced glomerular filtration rate (GFR), positive urinary protein, erythrocytes and glucose, as well as osteoporosis. In consequence, adefovir dipivoxil administration was stopped, and patients received concentrated divitamins, sodium phosphate syrup and calcitriol. Symptoms and abnormalities in laboratory examinations were significantly improved in all patients after 2-6 months. Therefore, serum phosphate, SCr, routine urine parameters, Cys-C and GFR should be monitored regularly in chronic HBV patients treated with adefovir dipivoxil. The following factors were identified as predictive of kidney damage and Fanconi syndrome: Age ≥40 years, living in rural areas, previous renal toxicity, estimated GFR (eGFR) <90 ml/min/1.73 m(2), hypertension, diabetes, cirrhosis and duration of adefovir dipivoxil treatment exceeding 24 months. The present results indicate that timely termination of adefovir dipivoxil treatment and replacement with other antiviral agents is critical once renal impairment appears, and that it is necessary to change to other antiviral agents and prolong the interval of administration according to the eGFR level.

  10. Mycoplasma polysaccharide protects against complement

    PubMed Central

    Bolland, Jeffrey R.; Simmons, Warren L.; Daubenspeck, James M.

    2012-01-01

    Although they lack a cell wall, mycoplasmas do possess a glycocalyx. The interactions between the glycocalyx, mycoplasmal surface proteins and host complement were explored using the murine pathogen Mycoplasma pulmonis as a model. It was previously shown that the length of the tandem repeat region of the surface lipoprotein Vsa is associated with susceptibility to complement-mediated killing. Cells producing a long Vsa containing about 40 repeats are resistant to complement, whereas strains that produce a short Vsa of five or fewer repeats are susceptible. We show here that the length of the Vsa protein modulates the affinity of the M. pulmonis EPS-I polysaccharide for the mycoplasma cell surface, with more EPS-I being associated with mycoplasmas producing a short Vsa protein. An examination of mutants that lack EPS-I revealed that planktonic mycoplasmas were highly susceptible to complement killing even when the Vsa protein was long, demonstrating that both EPS-I and Vsa length contribute to resistance. In contrast, the mycoplasmas were resistant to complement even in the absence of EPS-I when the cells were encased in a biofilm. PMID:22504437

  11. Severe hypophosphatemic osteomalacia with Fanconi syndrome, renal tubular acidosis, vitamin D deficiency and primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Bando, Hironori; Hashimoto, Naoko; Hirota, Yushi; Sakaguchi, Kazuhiko; Hisa, Itoko; Inoue, Yoshifumi; Imanishi, Yasuo; Seino, Susumu; Kaji, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    A 49-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital for back pain with marked thoracic and extremity deformities leading to bed-rest for three years. She was diagnosed with hypophosphatemic osteomalacia based on her symptoms, X-ray and bone scintigram, high serum alkaline phosphatase level, and low serum levels of both phosphorus and 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D(3) with inhibition of phosphorus reabsorption. Fanconi syndrome with renal tubular acidosis, vitamin D deficiency and primary biliary cirrhosis were related to the pathogenesis of osteomalacia in this case. Several causal diseases may be concomitantly responsible for acceleration of the severity of osteomalacia in this patient.

  12. Carnitine deficiency and oxidative stress provoke cardiotoxicity in an ifosfamide-induced Fanconi Syndrome rat model

    PubMed Central

    Darweesh, Amal Q; Fatani, Amal J

    2010-01-01

    In addition to hemorrhagic cystitis, Fanconi Syndrome is a serious clinical side effect during ifosfamide (IFO) therapy. Fanconi syndrome is a generalized dysfunction of the proximal tubule which is characterized by excessive urinary excretion of glucose, phosphate, bicarbonate, amino acids and other solutes excreted by this segment of the nephron including L-carnitine. Carnitine is essential cofactor for β-oxidation of long-chain fatty acids in the myocardium. IFO therapy is associated with increased urinary carnitine excretion with subsequent secondary deficiency of the molecule. Cardiac abnormalities in IFO-treated cancer patients were reported as isolated clinical cases. This study examined whether carnitine deficiency and oxidative stress, secondary to Fanconi Syndrome, provoke IFO-induced cardiomyopathy as well as exploring if carnitine supplementation using Propionyl-L-carnitine (PLC) could offer protection against this toxicity. In the current study, an animal model of carnitine deficiency was developed in rats by D-carnitine-mildronate treatment Adult male Wistar albino rats were assigned to one of six treatment groups: the first three groups were injected intraperitoneally with normal saline, D-carnitine (DC, 250 mg/kg/day) combined with mildronate (MD, 200 mg/kg/day) and PLC (250 mg/kg/day), respectively, for 10 successive days. The 4th, 5th and 6th groups were injected with the same doses of normal saline, DC-MD and PLC, respectively for 5 successive days before and 5 days concomitant with IFO (50 mg/kg/day). IFO significantly increased serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), urinary carnitine excretion and clearance, creatine phosphokinase isoenzyme (CK-MB), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), intramitochondrial acetyl-CoA/CoA-SH and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) in cardiac tissues and significantly decreased adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and total carnitine and reduced glutathione (GSH) content in cardiac tissues. In carnitine

  13. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Anemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Anemia? The most common symptom of anemia is fatigue ( ... mild symptoms or none at all. Complications of Anemia Some people who have anemia may have arrhythmias ( ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... refractory iron deficiency anemia iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Close All Description Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia is one of many types of anemia , which ...

  15. Acquired aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Keohane, Elaine M

    2004-01-01

    Acquired aplastic anemia (AA) is a disorder characterized by a profound deficit of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, bone marrow hypocellularity, and peripheral blood pancytopenia. It primarily affects children, young adults, and those over 60 years of age. The majority of cases are idiopathic; however, idiosyncratic reactions to some drugs, chemicals, and viruses have been implicated in its etiology. An autoimmune T-cell reaction likely causes the stem cell depletion, but the precise mechanism, as well as the eliciting and target antigens, is unknown. Symptoms vary from severe life-threatening cytopenias to moderate or non-severe disease that does not require transfusion support. The peripheral blood typically exhibits pancytopenia, reticulocytopenia, and normocytic or macrocytic erythrocytes. The bone marrow is hypocellular and may exhibit dysplasia of the erythrocyte precursors. First line treatment for severe AA consists of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in young patients with HLA identical siblings, while immunosuppression therapy is used for older patients and for those of any age who lack a HLA matched donor. Patients with AA have an increased risk of developing paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), or acute leukemia. Further elucidation of the pathophysiology of this disease will result in a better understanding of the interrelationship among AA, PNH, and MDS, and may lead to novel targeted therapies.

  16. Anti-Complement Treatment in Paroxysmal Nocturnal Hemoglobinuria: Where we Stand and Where we are Going

    PubMed Central

    Risitano, Antonio M

    2014-01-01

    Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is a clonal, non-malignant, hematological disorder characterized by the expansion of hematopoietic stem cells and progeny mature blood cells which are deficient in some surface proteins, including the two complement regulators CD55 and CD59. PNH is the paradigm of diseases implying complement dysregulation as main pathogenic mechanism; in fact, PNH erythrocytes are uncapable to modulate on their surface physiologic complement activation, which eventually leads to the typical clinical hallmark of PNH – the chronic complement-mediated intravascular anemia. Indeed, due to the lack of CD55 complement is continuously activated on erythrocyte surface, which subsequently enables the terminal lytic complement because of the lack of CD59, finally resulting in erythrocyte lysis. The availability of eculizumab as the first complement inhibitor for clinical use renewed the interest for this rare hematological disease. Indeed, in the last decad the anti-C5 monoclonal antibody has proven effective for the treatment of PNH, resulting in a sustained control of complement-mediated intravascular hemolysis, with a remarkable clinical benefit. Anti-complement treatment allowed transfusion independence in at least half of PNH patients receiving eculizumab, with adequate control of all hemolysis-associated symptoms even in almost all remaining patients. In addition, the risk of thromboembolic events – an other clinical hallmark of PNH, which significantly affects prognosis and survival – seems substantially reduced on eculizumab treatment, apparently resulting in improved survival. Even with all these remarkable effects, eculizumab treatment does not result in hemoglobin normalization, and most patients remain anemic. It has been demonstrated that this is due to persistent activation of the early phases of complement activation (upstream the C5), leading to complement-mediated extravascular hemolysis. Ongoing researches are focusing on

  17. Classification of anemia for gastroenterologists

    PubMed Central

    Moreno Chulilla, Jose Antonio; Romero Colás, Maria Soledad; Gutiérrez Martín, Martín

    2009-01-01

    Most anemia is related to the digestive system by dietary deficiency, malabsorption, or chronic bleeding. We review the World Health Organization definition of anemia, its morphological classification (microcytic, macrocytic and normocytic) and pathogenic classification (regenerative and hypo regenerative), and integration of these classifications. Interpretation of laboratory tests is included, from the simplest (blood count, routine biochemistry) to the more specific (iron metabolism, vitamin B12, folic acid, reticulocytes, erythropoietin, bone marrow examination and Schilling test). In the text and various algorithms, we propose a hierarchical and logical way to reach a diagnosis as quickly as possible, by properly managing the medical interview, physical examination, appropriate laboratory tests, bone marrow examination, and other complementary tests. The prevalence is emphasized in all sections so that the gastroenterologist can direct the diagnosis to the most common diseases, although the tables also include rare diseases. Digestive diseases potentially causing anemia have been studied in preference, but other causes of anemia have been included in the text and tables. Primitive hematological diseases that cause anemia are only listed, but are not discussed in depth. The last section is dedicated to simplifying all items discussed above, using practical rules to guide diagnosis and medical care with the greatest economy of resources and time. PMID:19787825

  18. Improvisation: A Complement to Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ronald, Green A.

    2006-01-01

    With the growth of standardized assessment benchmarks in both the public and private paradigms, testing performance matters to institutions more than ever. In an attempt to take as many hindering variables out of this process, such as test anxiety, socioeconomic influences, and latency in cognition, Improvisation: A Complement to Curriculum seeks…

  19. Role of complement in xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Mollnes, Tom Eirik; Fiane, A E

    2002-01-01

    The xenotransplantation research is driven by the increasing gap between the number of patients with end-stage organ failure on waiting lists for transplantation and the supply of allografts. The lack of success in developing suitable artificial organs for permanent treatment of organ failure has further strengthened the need for xenotransplantation research. Pigs are now generally accepted to be the source animal of choice. Transplantation of pig organs to humans faces several barriers which have to be overcome before it comes to clinical application: (1) anatomical and physiological conditions; (2) immunological rejection mechanisms; (3) molecular compatibility between signal molecules of the two species; (4) risk of transmission of microorganisms, particularly pig endogenous retroviruses; and (5) legal and ethical aspects both with respect to the animal and the recipient. Here we will focus on the role of the complement system in the rejection of immediately vascularized pig-to-primate xenografts. The hyperacute rejection occurring within minutes after transplantation is mediated by binding of natural antibodies to the Galalpha(l-3)Gal epitope on the endothelial cells with subsequent complement activation. Whereas inhibition of complement activation protects against hyperacute rejection, the role of complement in the later rejection phases is less clarified.

  20. Sentential Complementation--An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nuessel, Frank H., Jr.

    A review of traditional and transformational studies on the phenomenon of sentential complementation (noun clauses) reveals many areas of agreement. Although some adherents of generative grammar may have occasionally obscured this aspect because of the offensive nature of their criticism of other modes of analysis, it is seen that, in several…

  1. Special Issues for People with Aplastic Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... aplastic anemia and are pregnant or want to get pregnant, find an aplastic anemia specialist and an obstetrician (OB) who specializes in high-risk births. Every person and every pregnancy is different. Make sure you ...

  2. Anemia caused by low iron - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... deficiency in children can also be related to lead poisoning . Symptoms Mild anemia may have no symptoms. As ... Elsevier; 2016:chap 455. Read More Anemia Hemoglobin Lead poisoning Review Date 2/11/2016 Updated by: Todd ...

  3. Drug-induced immune hemolytic anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Immune hemolytic anemia secondary to drugs; Anemia - immune hemolytic - secondary to drugs ... In some cases, a drug can cause the immune system to mistake your own red blood cells for foreign substances. The body responds by making ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: congenital dyserythropoietic anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions CDA congenital dyserythropoietic anemia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... PDF Open All Close All Description Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia ( CDA ) is an inherited blood disorder that affects ...

  5. FastStats: Anemia or Iron Deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button NCHS Home Anemia or Iron Deficiency Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... visits Number of visits to emergency departments with anemia as the primary hospital discharge diagnosis: 146,000 ...

  6. Correlation between hepcidin level and renal anemia.

    PubMed

    Yang, L-N; Zhang, P; Tang, F; Wang, G; Li, F-E

    2014-09-12

    Anemia in patients with chronic renal insufficiency (CRI) is related to the chronic inflammatory state, low iron absorption rate, and low utilization rate. As a key protein for iron metabolism, hepcidin plays an important role in CRI anemia. The study aimed to determine the correlation between hepcidin level and renal anemia. Ninety CRI anemia patients treated in our hospital from February 2012 to December 2012 were enrolled in the study to compare with a healthy control group of 40 cases by measuring the hepcidin level and analyzing the correlation between hepcidin level and CRI anemia. The hepcidin level was significantly higher in the CRI anemia group than the control group; there was a positive correlation between hepcidin level and serum ferritin as well as IL-6 level. Hepcidin level was significantly related to degree of anemia, indicating that an increase in hepcidin level will result in anemia.

  7. Oral carnitine therapy in children with cystinosis and renal Fanconi syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Gahl, W.A.; Bernardini, I.; Dalakas, M.; Rizzo, W.B.; Harper, G.S.; Hoeg, J.M.; Hurko, O.; Bernar, J.

    1988-02-01

    11 children with either cystinosis or Lowe's syndrome had a reduced content of plasma and muscle carnitine due to renal Fanconi syndrome. After treatment with oral L-carnitine, 100 mg/kg per d divided every 6 h, plasma carnitine concentrations became normal in all subjects within 2 d. Initial plasma free fatty acid concentrations, inversely related to free carnitine concentrations, were reduced after 7-20 mo of carnitine therapy. Muscle lipid accumulation, which varied directly with duration of carnitine deficiency (r = 0.73), improved significantly in three of seven rebiopsied patients after carnitine therapy. One Lowe's syndrome patient achieved a normal muscle carnitine level after therapy. Muscle carnitine levels remained low in all cystinosis patients, even though cystinotic muscle cells in culture took up L-(/sup 3/H)carnitine normally. The half-life of plasma carnitine for cystinotic children given a single oral dose approximated 6.3 h; 14% of ingested L-carnitine was excreted within 24 h. Studies in a uremic patient with cystinosis showed that her plasma carnitine was in equilibrium with some larger compartment and may have been maintained by release of carnitine from the muscle during dialysis. Because oral L-carnitine corrects plasma carnitine deficiency, lowers plasma free fatty acid concentrations, and reverses muscle lipid accumulation in some patients, its use as therapy in renal Fanconi syndrome should be considered. However, its efficacy in restoring muscle carnitine to normal, and the optimal dosage regimen, have yet to be determined.

  8. La maladie de Fanconi: à propos d'une nouvelle observation

    PubMed Central

    Es-Seddiki, Anass; Ayyad, Anass; Messouadi, Sahar; Amrani, Rim

    2015-01-01

    La maladie de Fanconi ou l'anémie de Fanconi (AF) est une maladie génétique rare à transmission autosomique récessive. Elle est marquée par une hétérogénéité phénotypique. Certains symptômes et notamment la triade classique faite d'une petite taille, d'un syndrome malformatif varié et parfois discret et d'une insuffisance médullaire d'apparition précoce, doivent faire évoquer le diagnostic. Nous rapportons le cas d'un enfant âgé de sept ans, suivi et traité pour une luxation congénitale des hanches, qui présentait une pancytopénie avec à l'examen clinique on note un faciès dysmorphique triangulaire, une duplication du pouce droit, une surélévation de l’épaule gauche et un retard staturo-pondéral. PMID:26213593

  9. Dent–Wrong disease and other rare causes of the Fanconi syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Solano, Alejandro; Lew, Susie Q; Ing, Todd S.

    2014-01-01

    Dent–Wrong disease, an X-linked recessive disorder of the proximal tubules, presents with hypercalciuria, nephrocalcinosis, nephrolithiasis, renal insufficiency, low-molecular-weight proteinuria, rickets and/or osteomalacia. Dent and Friedman initially characterized the disorder in 1964 following studies of two patients with rickets who presented with hypercalciuria, hyperphosphaturia, proteinuria and aminoaciduria. Since then, extensive investigation identified two genetic mutations (CLCN5 and OCRL1) to be associated with Dent–Wrong disease. Clinical features supported by laboratory findings consistent with proximal tubule dysfunction help diagnose Dent–Wrong disease. Genetic analysis supports the diagnosis; however, these two genes can be normal in a small subset of patients. The differential diagnosis includes other forms of the Fanconi syndrome, which can be hereditary or acquired (e.g. those related to exposure to exogenous substances). Treatment is supportive with special attention to the prevention of nephrolithiasis and treatment of hypercalciuria. We review the rare forms of Fanconi syndrome with special attention to Dent–Wrong disease. PMID:25852908

  10. Membrane permeability as a cause of transport defects in experimental Fanconi syndrome. A new hypothesis.

    PubMed Central

    Bergeron, M; Dubord, L; Hausser, C; Schwab, C

    1976-01-01

    The injection of sodium maleate (200-400 mg/kg) into rats produces aminoaciduria along with glycosuria and phosphaturia, resembling the Fanconi syndrome. This experimental model was studied by means of microinjections into proximal convoluted tubules of the kidney, stop-flow diuresis, and microperfusion of single nephrons. Our results show that, in maleate-treated rats, competition between amino acids or related structures (L-proline, L-OH-proline, and glycine) possesses the same characteristics, and net influx of amino acids appear normal at the proximal nephron. Data obtained by classical stop-flow techniques and single nephron microperfusions also indicate a normal entry of labeled amino acids (L-lysine, glycine, L-valine, L-proline, L-cystine), and 3-0-methyl-D-[3H]glucose and [32P]phosphate from the luminal side of the proximal tubule cell. However, the efflux of molecules from the cell appears enhanced throughout the proximal and distal tubule; molecules that exit at this site are excreted directly into the urine. Our results suggest that the phosphaturia, aminoaciduria, and glycosuria of the experimental Fanconi syndrome can be explained by a modification of the cell membrane permeability (increased efflux) at distal sites of the nephron rather than by a modification of the membrane transport (decreased influx) at the proximal sites, as is currently accepted. Our data also stress the importance of efflux phenomena in membrane transport. PMID:1262464

  11. Structural insights on complement activation.

    PubMed

    Alcorlo, Martín; López-Perrote, Andrés; Delgado, Sandra; Yébenes, Hugo; Subías, Marta; Rodríguez-Gallego, César; Rodríguez de Córdoba, Santiago; Llorca, Oscar

    2015-10-01

    The proteolytic cleavage of C3 to generate C3b is the central and most important step in the activation of complement, a major component of innate immunity. The comparison of the crystal structures of C3 and C3b illustrates large conformational changes during the transition from C3 to C3b. Exposure of a reactive thio-ester group allows C3b to bind covalently to surfaces such as pathogens or apoptotic cellular debris. The displacement of the thio-ester-containing domain (TED) exposes hidden surfaces that mediate the interaction with complement factor B to assemble the C3-convertase of the alternative pathway (AP). In addition, the displacement of the TED and its interaction with the macroglobulin 1 (MG1) domain generates an extended surface in C3b where the complement regulators factor H (FH), decay accelerating factor (DAF), membrane cofactor protein (MCP) and complement receptor 1 (CR1) can bind, mediating accelerated decay of the AP C3-convertase and proteolytic inactivation of C3b. In the last few years, evidence has accumulated revealing that the structure of C3b in solution is significantly more flexible than anticipated. We review our current knowledge on C3b structural flexibility to propose a general model where the TED can display a collection of conformations around the MG ring, as well as a few specialized positions where the TED is held in one of several fixed locations. Importantly, this conformational heterogeneity in C3b impacts complement regulation by affecting the interaction with regulators.

  12. Inborn anemias in mice. Comprehensive progress report, 1 August 1979-1 June 1982, to accompany twenty-seventh renewal proposal

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, S.E.; Russell, E.S.; Barker, J.E.

    1982-07-01

    Hereditary anemias of mice have been investigated including four macrocytic anemias, three hemolytic anemias, nonhemolytic microcytic anemia, transitory siderocytic anemia, sex-linked iron-transport anemia, an ..cap alpha..-thalassemia, and a new target-cell anemia. Each of these blood dyscrasias is caused by the action of a unique mutant gene, which determines the structure of different intracellular molecules controlling a different metabolic process. Thus the wide range of different hereditary anemias has considerable potential for uncovering many different aspects of hemopoietic homeostatic mechanisms in the mouse and by extension to man from an understanding of mammalian mechanisms utilized in the control of erythropoiesis. Each of the different anemias is studied through: (a) biochemical and biophysical characterization of peripheral blood cells; (b) determinations of cellular and organismic radiosensitivity under a variety of conditions; (c) measurements of iron metabolism and heme biosynthesis; (d) morphological and biochemical study of blood-forming tissue; (e) functional tests of the stem cell component; (f) examination of responses to erythroid stimuli and inhibitors; and (g) physiological complementation analysis via transplantation of tissue between individuals of differently affected genotypes.

  13. Optimal management of pernicious anemia

    PubMed Central

    Andres, Emmanuel; Serraj, Khalid

    2012-01-01

    Pernicious anemia (also known as Biermer’s disease) is an autoimmune atrophic gastritis, predominantly of the fundus, and is responsible for a deficiency in vitamin B12 (cobalamin) due to its malabsorption. Its prevalence is 0.1% in the general population and 1.9% in subjects over the age of 60 years. Pernicious anemia represents 20%–50% of the causes of vitamin B12 deficiency in adults. Given its polymorphism and broad spectrum of clinical manifestations, pernicious anemia is a great pretender. Its diagnosis must therefore be evoked and considered in the presence of neurological and hematological manifestations of undetermined origin. Biologically, it is characterized by the presence of anti-intrinsic factor antibodies. Treatment is based on the administration of parenteral vitamin B12, although other routes of administration (eg, oral) are currently under study. In the present update, these various aspects are discussed with special emphasis on data of interest to the clinician. PMID:23028239

  14. (Inborn anemias of mice): Terminal progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, S.E.

    1987-01-01

    Mutations located at 11 different chromosomal locations in the mouse all affecting hemopoiesis have been studied. These include: Hertwig's anemia (an), W-anemias (W, W/sup v/, W/sup 17J/ to W/sup 41J/), Steel anemias (Sl, Sl/sup d/, etc.), Normoblastic anemia (nb), Jaundiced (ja), Spherocytic anemias (sph, sph/sup ha/), sph/sup 2J/, sph/sup 2BC/, Flexed-tail anemia (f), Microcytic anemia (mk), Sex-linked anemia (Sla), Alpha thallasemia (Hba/sup th/), and a hypochromic anemia associated with low transferrin levels (hpx). Our findings indicate that the erythroid defect in W-anemias stem from an intrinsic defect in the erythroid progenitor cells, and that all other erythroid hemostatic mechanisms are fully functional. Hertwig's anemia (an) is affected in a similar fashion. However, in the case of Steel anemias, the erythroid progenitors are repressed, but when transplanted to appropriate recipients were found to be fully functional. 70 refs., 4 tabs.

  15. Hereditary sideroblastic anemia: pathophysiology and gene mutations.

    PubMed

    Harigae, Hideo; Furuyama, Kazumichi

    2010-10-01

    Sideroblastic anemia is characterized by anemia with the emergence of ring sideroblasts in the bone marrow. Ring sideroblasts are erythroblasts characterized by iron accumulation in perinuclear mitochondria due to impaired iron utilization. There are two forms of sideroblastic anemia, i.e., inherited and acquired sideroblastic anemia. Inherited sideroblastic anemia is a rare and heterogeneous disease caused by mutations of genes involved in heme biosynthesis, iron-sulfur (Fe-S) cluster biogenesis, or Fe-S cluster transport, and mitochondrial metabolism. The most common inherited sideroblastic anemia is X-linked sideroblastic anemia (XLSA) caused by mutations of the erythroid-specific δ-aminolevulinate synthase gene (ALAS2), which is the first enzyme of heme biosynthesis in erythroid cells. Sideroblastic anemia due to SLC25A38 gene mutations, which is a mitochondrial transporter, is the next most common inherited sideroblastic anemia. Other forms of inherited sideroblastic anemia are very rare, and accompanied by impaired function of organs other than hematopoietic tissue, such as the nervous system, muscle, or exocrine glands due to impaired mitochondrial metabolism. Moreover, there are still significant numbers of cases with genetically undefined inherited sideroblastic anemia. Molecular analysis of these cases will contribute not only to the development of effective treatment, but also to the understanding of mitochondrial iron metabolism.

  16. Erythema nodosum and pernicious anemia.

    PubMed

    Milman, Perry J; Goldenberg, Steven P; Scheinfeld, Noah; Pereira, Frederick A

    2013-07-14

    Erythema nodosum (EN) often presents as a sudden onset of tender, erythematous, subcutaneous nodules on the legs and ankles. Although rare, pernicious anemia may be related to vitamin B12 deficiency. Discussion of this association in the context of a particular patient is presented.

  17. Cooley's Anemia: A Psychosocial Directory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Washington, DC.

    The directory is intended to aid patients and their families who are coping with the genetic disorder of Cooley's anemia. A brief review of the disease covers background, genetics, symptoms, effect on the patient, treatment, and current research. The next section looks at psychosocial needs at various times (time of diagnosis, infancy and toddler…

  18. Management of Iron Deficiency Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez, Kristine; Kulnigg-Dabsch, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    Anemia affects one-fourth of the world’s population, and iron deficiency is the predominant cause. Anemia is associated with chronic fatigue, impaired cognitive function, and diminished well-being. Patients with iron deficiency anemia of unknown etiology are frequently referred to a gastroenterologist because in the majority of cases the condition has a gastrointestinal origin. Proper management improves quality of life, alleviates the symptoms of iron deficiency, and reduces the need for blood transfusions. Treatment options include oral and intravenous iron therapy; however, the efficacy of oral iron is limited in certain gastrointestinal conditions, such as inflammatory bowel disease, celiac disease, and autoimmune gastritis. This article provides a critical summary of the diagnosis and treatment of iron deficiency anemia. In addition, it includes a management algorithm that can help the clinician determine which patients are in need of further gastrointestinal evaluation. This facilitates the identification and treatment of the underlying condition and avoids the unnecessary use of invasive methods and their associated risks. PMID:27099596

  19. Acquired aplastic anemia in children.

    PubMed

    Hartung, Helge D; Olson, Timothy S; Bessler, Monica

    2013-12-01

    This article provides a practice-based and concise review of the etiology, diagnosis, and management of acquired aplastic anemia in children. Bone marrow transplantation, immunosuppressive therapy, and supportive care are discussed in detail. The aim is to provide the clinician with a better understanding of the disease and to offer guidelines for the management of children with this uncommon yet serious disorder.

  20. [Hemolytic anemias and vitamin B12 deficieny].

    PubMed

    Dietzfelbinger, Hermann; Hubmann, Max

    2015-08-01

    Hemolytic anemias consist of corpuscular, immun-hemolytic and toxic hemolytic anemias. Within the group of corpuscular hemolytic anemias, except for the paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH), all symptoms are caused by underlying heredetiary disorders within the red blood cell membran (hereditary spherocytosis), deficiencies of red cell enzymes (G6PDH- and pyrovatkinase deficiency) or disorders in the hemoglobin molecule (thalassaemia and sickle cell disease). Immune-hemolytic anemias are acquired hemolytic anemias and hemolysis is caused by auto- or allo-antibodies which are directed against red blood cell antigens. They are classified as warm, cold, mixed type or drug-induced hemolytic anemia. Therapy consists of glucocorticoids and other immunsuppressive drugs. Pernicious anemia is the most important vitamin B12 deficiency disorder. Diagnosis relies on cobalamin deficiency and antibodies to intrinsic factor. The management should focus on a possibly life-long replacement treatment with cobalamin.

  1. [Anemia as a surgical risk factor].

    PubMed

    Moral García, Victoria; Ángeles Gil de Bernabé Sala, M; Nadia Diana, Kinast; Pericas, Bartolomé Cantallops; Nebot, Alexia Galindo

    2013-07-01

    Perioperative anemia is common in patients undergoing surgery and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality and a decreased quality of life. The main causes of anemia in the perioperative context are iron deficiency and chronic inflammation. Anemia can be aggravated by blood loss during surgery, and is most commonly treated with allogeneic transfusion. Moreover, blood transfusions are not without risks, once again increasing patient morbidity and mortality. Given these concerns, we propose to review the pathophysiology of anemia in the surgical environment, as well as its treatment through the consumption of iron-rich foods and by oral or intravenous iron therapy (iron sucrose and iron carboxymaltose). In chronic inflammatory anemia, we use erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (erythropoietin alpha) and, in cases of mixed anemia, the combination of both treatments. The objective is always to reduce the need for perioperative transfusions and speed the recovery from postoperative anemia, as well as decrease the patient morbidity and mortality rate.

  2. The Complement System and Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Regal, Jean F.; Gilbert, Jeffrey S.; Burwick, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    Adverse pregnancy outcomes significantly contribute to morbidity and mortality for mother and child, with lifelong health consequences for both. The innate and adaptive immune system must be regulated to insure survival of the feta allograft, and the complement system is no exception. An intact complement system optimizes placental development and function and is essential to maintain host defense and fetal survival. Complement regulation is apparent at the placental interface from early pregnancy with some degree of complement activation occurring normally throughout gestation. However, a number of pregnancy complications including early pregnancy loss, fetal growth restriction, hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and preterm birth are associated with excessive or misdirected complement activation, and are more frequent in women with inherited or acquired complement system disorders or complement gene mutations. Clinical studies employing complement biomarkers in plasma and urine implicate dysregulated complement activation in components of each of the adverse pregnancy outcomes. In addition, mechanistic studies in rat and mouse models of adverse pregnancy outcomes address the complement pathways or activation products of importance and allow critical analysis of the pathophysiology. Targeted complement therapeutics are already in use to control adverse pregnancy outcomes in select situations. A clearer understanding of the role of the complement system in both normal pregnancy and complicated or failed pregnancy will allow a rational approach to future therapeutic strategies for manipulating complement with the goal of mitigating adverse pregnancy outcomes, preserving host defense, and improving long term outcomes for both mother and child. PMID:25802092

  3. A YAC contig spanning the nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, Fanconi anaemia group C, and xeroderma pigmentosum group A loci on chromosome 9q

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, D.J.; Reis, A.

    1994-09-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS, Gorlin syndrome) is an autosomal dominant disorder, characterized primarily by multiple basal cell carcinomas, epithelium-lined jaw cysts, and palmar and plantar pits, as well as various other features. Loss of heterozygosity studies and linkage analysis have mapped the NBCCS gene to chromosome 9q and suggested that it is a tumor suppressor. The apparent sensitivity of NBCCS patients to UV and X-irradiation raises the possibility of hypersensitivity to DNA-damaging reagents or defective DNA repair being etiological in the disorder. The recent mapping of the Fanconi anaemia group C (FACC) and xeroderma pigmentosum complementing group A (XPAC) genes to the same region on 9q has led us to begin the molecular dissection of the 9q22-q31 region. PCR analysis of the presence or absence of 10 microsatellite markers and exons 3 and 4 of the XPAC and FACC genes, respectively, allowed us to order 12 YACs into an overlapping contig and to order the markers as follows: D9S151/D9S12P1-D9S12P2-D9S197-D9S196-D9S280-FACC-D9S287/XPAC-D9S180-D9S6-D9S176. Sizing of the YACs has provided an initial estimate of the size of the NBCCS candidate region between D9S12 and D9S180 to be less than 1.65 Mb. 45 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  4. Fanconi Syndrome Associated with Hyponatremia in Two Patients with Legionella Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Ryuge, Akihiro; Ito, Yasuhiko; Yamakawa, Taishi; Tanaka, Hitoshi; Yasui, Hirotoshi; Mashimo, Shuko; Watanabe, Kenshi; Nomura, Rie; Suganuma, Nobukazu; Maruyama, Shoichi

    2016-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a cause of community-acquired pneumonia that is reported to induce electrolyte disorders, including hyponatremia, hypokalemia, and hypophosphatemia. We herein report two Japanese men with Legionella pneumonia and hyponatremia and hypophosphatemia. These findings were associated with an elevation of urinary low-molecular-weight tubular protein, including urinary β2-microglobulin, N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase, the fractional excretion of phosphate and uric acid, and the presence of glycosuria and panaminoaciduria, suggesting that their electrolyte disorders had been caused by Fanconi syndrome. In these two cases, hyponatremia was probably due to salt wasting. Electrolyte disorders caused by Legionella pneumonia are corrected by treatment of the primary disease and fluid administration. PMID:27904113

  5. Genetics Home Reference: complement component 8 deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... the membranes surrounding the brain and spinal cord (meningitis). Although meningitis can be life-threatening, individuals with complement component ... leaves affected individuals prone to recurrent episodes of meningitis. Learn more about the genes associated with complement ...

  6. Complement fixation test to C. burnetii

    MedlinePlus

    ... ency/article/003520.htm Complement fixation test to C burnetii To use the sharing features on this ... JavaScript. The complement fixation test to Coxiella burnetii ( C burnetti ) is a blood test that checks for ...

  7. Epidemiology of anemia in older adults.

    PubMed

    Patel, Kushang V

    2008-10-01

    Anemia is a common, multifactorial condition among older adults. The World Health Organization (WHO) definition of anemia (hemoglobin concentration <12 g/dL in women and <13 g/dL in men) is most often used in epidemiologic studies of older adults. More than 10% of community-dwelling adults age 65 years and older has WHO-defined anemia. After age 50 years, prevalence of anemia increases with advancing age and exceeds 20% in those 85 years and older. In nursing homes, anemia is present in 48% to 63% of residents. Incidence of anemia in older adults is not well characterized. Among older adults with anemia, approximately one third have evidence of iron, folate, and/or vitamin B(12) deficiency, another third have renal insufficiency and/or chronic inflammation, and the remaining third have anemia that is unexplained. Several studies demonstrate that anemia is associated with poorer survival in older adults. This review details the distribution and consequences of anemia in older adults and identifies future epidemiologic research needs.

  8. An Integrated Theory of Complement Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sag, Ivan A.; Pollard, Carl

    1991-01-01

    Presents an integrated theory of the syntactic and semantic representation of complements where the unexpressed subjects of the embedded verb-phrase complement are subject to certain interpretation restrictions. It is argued that the grammar of English controlled complements can be derived from the interaction of semantically based principles of…

  9. [Anemia in peritoneal dialysis patients].

    PubMed

    Lausević, Mirjana; Nesić, Vidosava; Jovanović, Natasa; Stojimirović, Biljana

    2006-01-01

    A normocytic normochromic anemia is one of the first signs of renal failure. Since anemia increases morbidity and mortality, its elimination is one of the essential objectives of the treatment. Human recombinant erythropoietin (rHuEPO) has changed the therapeutical approach to anemia. The aim of the present study was to compare efficacy of anemia correction in peritoneal dialysis patients depending on treatment and dialysis modality. The study is the retrospective analysis of 64 patients who presented to our Clinic in 2003. Eighteen (28.13%) patients were treated with rHuEPO, 14 (28%) underwent continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD), 2 (100%)--automated peritoneal dialysis (APD) and 2 (33.3%)--intermittent peritoneal dialysis (IPD). Mean hemoglobin level was 98.6 +/- 17.82 g/l in patients treated with rHuEPO versus 98.81 +/- 15.14 g/l in patients without rHuEPO treatment. Erythropoietin requirements were 3392.85 +/- 1211.77 IU/week All patients received iron supplementation during rHuEPO therapy. Mean serum ferritin levels were 463.41 +/- 360 ug/l. Transferrin saturation (TSAT) was 0.35 +/- 0.16%. No difference of serum iron and TSAT levels was found between CAPD and IPD patients. The degree of anemia significantly differed between CAPD and IPD patients. A total of 17.11% of PD patients were given blood transfusions, most frequently during the first three months after the onset of dialysis. Our conclusion is that the number of patients receiving rHuEPO should be increased, as 50% of our patients should be substituted, while only 28% are being treated. As 50% of patients receiving rHuEPO failed to reach target Hgb levels, higher EPO doses should be considered. Iron stores should be continuously monitored, particularly in patients receiving rHuEPO, since iron deficiency is an important problem for patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis, especially during erythropoietin therapy. Oral iron supplementation is satisfactory in the majority of patients, and iron

  10. Coexistence of megaloblastic anemia and iron deficiency anemia in a young woman with chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shih-Hsiang; Hung, Chia-Sui; Yang, Chao-Ping; Lo, Fu-Sung; Hsu, Hsun-Hui

    2006-10-01

    Pernicious anemia is a megaloblastic anemia caused by vitamin B12 deficiency, and is the end-stage of autoimmune gastritis that typically affects persons older than 60 years. It is the most common cause of vitamin B12 deficiency. Pernicious anemia can also be diagnosed concurrently with other autoimmune diseases. We report the occurrence of megaloblastic anemia in a 22-year-old woman with chronic autoimmune thyroiditis for 10.5 years. Recently, she presented with microcytic anemia, and iron deficiency anemia was diagnosed initially. After administration of ferrous sulfate, macrocytic anemia was revealed and vitamin B12 deficiency was detected. Pernicious anemia was highly suspected because of the endoscopic finding of atrophic gastritis, and high titer of antigastric parietal cell antibody, as well as elevated serum gastrin level. After intramuscular injections of hydroxycobalamine 100 microg daily for 10 days, and monthly later, her blood counts returned to normal.

  11. Musculoskeletal manifestations of chronic anemias.

    PubMed

    Martinoli, Carlo; Bacigalupo, Lorenzo; Forni, Gian Luca; Balocco, Manuela; Garlaschi, Giacomo; Tagliafico, Alberto

    2011-07-01

    This article provides an overview of the current use of diagnostic imaging modalities in the evaluation of a heterogeneous group of disorders causing chronic anemias by impaired blood cell production (inherited bone marrow failure syndromes of childhood, aplastic anemia and myelodysplastic syndromes, β-thalassemia) or increased blood cell destruction (sickle cell disease). During the course of these disorders, various musculoskeletal abnormalities can be encountered, including marrow hyperplasia, reversion of yellow marrow to red marrow, growth disturbances, and, occasionally, extramedullary hematopoiesis. Diagnostic imaging may help the clinician to identify specific complications related to either the disease (e.g., bone infarction and acute osteomyelitis in sickle cell disease) or transfusion (e.g., iron overload due to increased hemolysis) and iron chelation (e.g., desferrioxamine-related dysplastic bone changes and deferiprone-related degenerative arthritis) treatments. In this field, magnetic resonance imaging plays a pivotal role because of its high tissue contrast that enables early assessment of bone marrow changes before they become apparent on plain films or computed tomography or metabolic changes occur on bone scintigraphy or positron emission tomography scan. Overall, familiarity with the range of radiological appearances in chronic anemias is important to diagnose complications and establish appropriate therapy.

  12. [Anemia in chronic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Amador-Medina, Lauro Fabián

    2014-01-01

    Anemia is almost unavoidable in the last stages of chronic kidney disease. It is defined as a condition where hemoglobin concentration is below 2 standard deviations from the mean hemoglobin level of the general population, corrected for age and sex (typically, hemoglobin < 13 g/dL in adults and 12 g/dL in women). Although the cause is multi-factorial, the most known is inadequate erythropoietin production. Anemia has been associated with poor prognosis in patients with several conditions such as cancer, chronic kidney disease and congestive heart failure. Treatment with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents, such as erythropoietin, is a logical strategy that has enabled clinical improvement and reduced transfusion requirements for the patients; however, total correction of anemia with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents has demonstrated an increase in the risk of mortality or cardiovascular complications associated with these agents. In randomized trials, the achievement of normal or nearly normal hemoglobin levels is not associated with improved survival and reduced cardiovascular risk; however the ideal hemoglobin level with the use of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents seems to be problematic. More information is needed in order to obtain definite conclusions; in the meantime, using the lowest possible dose of erythropoietin seems to be the most prudent approach.

  13. The Semantics of Complementation in English: A Cognitive Semantic Account of Two English Complement Constructions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Michael B.

    2009-01-01

    Studies on complementation in English and other languages have traditionally focused on syntactic issues, most notably on the constituent structures of different complement types. As a result, they have neglected the role of meaning in the choice of different complements. This paper investigates the semantics of complementation within the…

  14. Meningococcal disease and the complement system

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Lisa A; Ram, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    Despite considerable advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis of meningococcal disease, this infection remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality globally. The role of the complement system in innate immune defenses against invasive meningococcal disease is well established. Individuals deficient in components of the alternative and terminal complement pathways are highly predisposed to invasive, often recurrent meningococcal infections. Genome-wide analysis studies also point to a central role for complement in disease pathogenesis. Here we review the pathophysiologic events pertinent to the complement system that accompany meningococcal sepsis in humans. Meningococci use several often redundant mechanisms to evade killing by human complement. Capsular polysaccharide and lipooligosaccharide glycan composition play critical roles in complement evasion. Some of the newly described protein vaccine antigens interact with complement components and have sparked considerable research interest. PMID:24104403

  15. Anemia and transfusion in the neonate.

    PubMed

    Colombatti, Raffaella; Sainati, Laura; Trevisanuto, Daniele

    2016-02-01

    Neonatal anemia is a frequent occurrence in neonatal intensive care units. Red blood cell transfusion criteria in case of blood loss are clearly defined but optimal hemoglobin or hematocrit thresholds of transfusion for anemia due to decreased production or increased destruction are less evident. This review focuses on the causes of anemia in the newborn period and the most recent evidence-based treatment options, including transfusion and erythropoiesis-stimulating agents.

  16. Anemia and iron deficiency in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Gil, Victor M; Ferreira, Jorge S

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure is a common problem and a major cause of mortality, morbidity and impaired quality of life. Anemia is a frequent comorbidity in heart failure and further worsens prognosis and disability. Regardless of anemia status, iron deficiency is a common and usually unidentified problem in patients with heart failure. This article reviews the mechanisms, impact on outcomes and treatment of anemia and iron deficiency in patients with heart failure.

  17. Characterize RAP80, a Potential Tumor Suppressor Gene

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-01

    Fanconi anemia complementation group D2 ( FANCD2 ). However, RAP80 foci still form normally after irradiation in FANCD2 -deficient cells (fig. S7...encoding HSJ1A and Ubi-GST, respectively; and A. D’Andrea for providing FANCD2 -deficient and FANCD2 -reconstituted cells. This work was supported by grants

  18. Megaloblastic Anemias: Nutritional and Other Causes.

    PubMed

    Green, Ralph; Datta Mitra, Ananya

    2017-03-01

    Vitamin B12 and folate deficiencies are major causes of megaloblastic anemia. Causes of B12 deficiency include pernicious anemia, gastric surgery, intestinal disorders, dietary deficiency, and inherited disorders of B12 transport or absorption. The prevalence of folate deficiency has decreased because of folate fortification, but deficiency still occurs from malabsorption and increased demand. Other causes include drugs and inborn metabolic errors. Clinical features of megaloblastic anemia include anemia, cytopenias, jaundice, and megaloblastic marrow morphology. Neurologic symptoms occur in B12 deficiency, but not in folate deficiency. Management includes identifying any deficiency, establishing its cause, and replenishing B12 or folate parenterally or orally.

  19. Severe Aplastic Anemia Associated With Eosinophilic Fasciitis

    PubMed Central

    de Masson, Adèle; de Latour, Régis Peffault; Benhamou, Ygal; Moluçon-Chabrot, Cécile; Bay, Jacques-Olivier; Laquerrière, Annie; Picquenot, Jean-Michel; Michonneau, David; Leguy-Seguin, Vanessa; Rybojad, Michel; Bonnotte, Bernard; Jardin, Fabrice; Lévesque, Hervé; Bagot, Martine; Socié, Gérard

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Diffuse eosinophilic fasciitis (Shulman disease) is a rare sclerodermiform syndrome that, in most cases, resolves spontaneously or after corticosteroid therapy. It has been associated with hematologic disorders, such as aplastic anemia. The clinical features and long-term outcomes of patients with eosinophilic fasciitis and associated aplastic anemia have been poorly described. We report the cases of 4 patients with eosinophilic fasciitis and associated severe aplastic anemia. For 3 of these patients, aplastic anemia was refractory to conventional immunosuppressive therapy with antithymocyte globulin and cyclosporine. One of the patients received rituximab as a second-line therapy with significant efficacy for both the skin and hematologic symptoms. To our knowledge, this report is the first to describe rituximab used to treat eosinophilic fasciitis with associated aplastic anemia. In a literature review, we identified 19 additional cases of eosinophilic fasciitis and aplastic anemia. Compared to patients with isolated eosinophilic fasciitis, patients with eosinophilic fasciitis and associated aplastic anemia were more likely to be men (70%) and older (mean age, 56 yr; range, 18–71 yr). Corticosteroid-containing regimens improved skin symptoms in 5 (42%) of 12 cases but were ineffective in the treatment of associated aplastic anemia in all but 1 case. Aplastic anemia was profound in 13 cases (57%) and was the cause of death in 8 cases (35%). Only 5 patients (22%) achieved long-term remission (allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: n = 2; cyclosporine-containing regimen: n = 2; high-dose corticosteroid-based regimen: n = 1). PMID:23429351

  20. Anemia in children and adolescents with hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Chu, J Y; Monteleone, J A; Peden, V H; Graviss, E R; Vernava, A M

    1981-11-01

    In a review of 17 adolescents and children (excluding newborns) with definite clinical signs, symptoms, and laboratory findings of hypothyroidism, 11 patients (65%) had anemia. The mean corpuscular volume (MCV) of the red blood cells was either macrocytic or normocytic. The hemoglobin did not correlate with the serum thyroxine level. Anemia occurred only in those patients with heights below the third percentile, but there was no similar correlation with weights. Of the 10 patients who had radiographs for bone age, all showed severe delay (47 to 103 months) and had heights below the third percentile. Nine of these patients were anemic, but the severity of the anemia did not correlate with the delay in bone age. Neither microcytic anemia nor pernicious anemia, noted in many adult hypothyroid patients, was found in the children and adolescents with hypothyroidism studied here. The "uncomplicated" anemia secondary to hypothyroidism responded to thyroid replacement therapy alone. Anemia can be the most prominent feature of hypothyroidism. In patients with mild to moderate anemia of unknown origin, especially those with fall-off in linear growth and increased MCV, hypothyroidism should be considered in the differential diagnosis of the anemia.

  1. [Anemia in patients with rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Wahle, M

    2012-12-01

    One of the most frequent extra-articular organ manifestations in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is anemia. As anemia in RA patients may result in severe symptoms and aggravation of other disease manifestations (e.g. arteriosclerosis), the influence on the course of RA is profound. However, the importance of anemia in RA patients is frequently underestimated. The etiology of anemia in RA is complex. Anemia of inflammation (AI) and iron deficiency anemia, alone or in combination are the most frequent forms of anemia in RA. Changes in iron metabolism are the leading causes of anemia in RA patients and mainly induced by the altered synthesis and function of hepcidin and ferroportin. Hepcidin, a peptide produced in the liver and immunocompetent cells, impairs the expression of ferroportin on iron-secreting cells, thus reducing iron bioavailability. The typical changes of iron metabolism and hepcidin synthesis in RA are induced by proinflammatory cytokines, primarily interleukin-6. Hence, the treatment of RA with cytokine antagonists has significant therapeutic implications on anemia in the context of inflammation and impaired iron metabolism.

  2. Anemia in the frail, elderly patient

    PubMed Central

    Röhrig, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Anemia and frailty are two common findings in geriatric patients and have been shown to be associated with poor outcomes in this patient group. Recent studies have contributed to the growing evidence of a possible association with the age-related chronic inflammatory status known as “inflammaging”. These findings do not only give a better insight into the pathogenesis of anemia in frailty, but also offer new treatment options. The present article focuses on this assumed association between anemia, frailty, and inflammaging and summarizes current management options for anemia in frail patients. PMID:27051279

  3. Fanconi syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... BF, St Geme JW, Schor NF. Electrolyte and acid-base disorders. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St Geme ... Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 18. Seifter JL. Acid-base disorders. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's ...

  4. Complement Activation and Inhibition in Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Cazander, Gwendolyn; Jukema, Gerrolt N.; Nibbering, Peter H.

    2012-01-01

    Complement activation is needed to restore tissue injury; however, inappropriate activation of complement, as seen in chronic wounds can cause cell death and enhance inflammation, thus contributing to further injury and impaired wound healing. Therefore, attenuation of complement activation by specific inhibitors is considered as an innovative wound care strategy. Currently, the effects of several complement inhibitors, for example, the C3 inhibitor compstatin and several C1 and C5 inhibitors, are under investigation in patients with complement-mediated diseases. Although (pre)clinical research into the effects of these complement inhibitors on wound healing is limited, available data indicate that reduction of complement activation can improve wound healing. Moreover, medicine may take advantage of safe and effective agents that are produced by various microorganisms, symbionts, for example, medicinal maggots, and plants to attenuate complement activation. To conclude, for the development of new wound care strategies, (pre)clinical studies into the roles of complement and the effects of application of complement inhibitors in wound healing are required. PMID:23346185

  5. Subversion of complement by hematophagous parasites

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Hélène; Skelly, Patrick; Zipfel, Peter F.; Losson, Bertrand; Vanderplasschen, Alain

    2008-01-01

    The complement system is a crucial part of innate and adaptive immunity which exerts a significant evolutionary pressure on pathogens. It has selected for those pathogens, mainly micro-organisms but also parasites, that have evolved countermeasures. The characterization of how pathogens evade complement attack is a rapidly developing field of current research. In recent years, multiple complement evasion strategies have been characterized. In this review, we focus on complement escape mechanisms expressed by hematophagous parasites, a heterogeneous group of metazoan parasites that share the property of ingesting the whole blood of their host. Complement inhibition is crucial for parasite survival within the host tissue or to facilitate blood feeding. Finally, complement inhibition by hematophagous parasites may also contribute to their success as pathogen vectors. PMID:18762211

  6. 9 CFR 311.34 - Anemia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Anemia. 311.34 Section 311.34 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.34 Anemia. Carcasses...

  7. 9 CFR 311.34 - Anemia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Anemia. 311.34 Section 311.34 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.34 Anemia. Carcasses...

  8. 9 CFR 311.34 - Anemia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Anemia. 311.34 Section 311.34 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.34 Anemia. Carcasses...

  9. 9 CFR 311.34 - Anemia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Anemia. 311.34 Section 311.34 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.34 Anemia. Carcasses...

  10. Duodenal Amyloidosis Masquerading as Iron Deficiency Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Hurairah, Abu

    2016-01-01

    The present study is a unique illustration of duodenal amyloidosis initially manifesting with iron deficiency anemia. It underscores the importance of clinical suspicion of amyloidosis while performing upper gastrointestinal endoscopy with a biopsy to establish the definite diagnosis in patients with unexplained iron deficiency anemia. PMID:27625911

  11. 9 CFR 311.34 - Anemia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Anemia. 311.34 Section 311.34 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.34 Anemia. Carcasses...

  12. The Student with Sickle Cell Anemia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tetrault, Sylvia M.

    1981-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia is the most common and severe of inherited chronic blood disorders. In the United States, sickle cell anemia is most common among the Black population. Among the most commonly occurring symptoms are: an enlarged spleen, episodes of severe pain, easily contracted infections, skin ulcers, and frequent urination. (JN)

  13. Preoperative anemia and postoperative outcomes after hepatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Tohme, Samer; Varley, Patrick R.; Landsittel, Douglas P.; Chidi, Alexis P.; Tsung, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Background Preoperative anaemia is associated with adverse outcomes after surgery but outcomes after liver surgery specifically are not well established. We aimed to analyze the incidence of and effects of preoperative anemia on morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing liver resection. Methods All elective hepatectomies performed for the period 2005–2012 recorded in the American College of Surgeons' National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP) database were evaluated. We obtained anonymized data for 30-day mortality and major morbidity (one or more major complication), demographics, and preoperative and perioperative risk factors. We used multivariable logistic regression models to assess the adjusted effect of anemia, which was defined as (hematocrit <39% in men, <36% in women), on postoperative outcomes. Results We obtained data for 12,987 patients, of whom 4260 (32.8%) had preoperative anemia. Patients with preoperative anemia experienced higher postoperative major morbidity and mortality rates compared to those without anemia. After adjustment for predefined variables, preoperative anemia was an independent risk factor for postoperative major morbidity (adjusted OR 1.21, 1.09–1.33). After adjustment, there was no significant difference in postoperative mortality for patients with or without preoperative anemia (adjusted OR 0.88, 0.66–1.16). Conclusion Preoperative anemia is independently associated with an increased risk of major morbidity in patients undergoing hepatectomy. Therefore, it is crucial to readdress preoperative blood management in anemic patients prior to hepatectomy. PMID:27017165

  14. Serum complement and immunoconglutinin in malnutrition.

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, R K

    1975-01-01

    Serum haemolytic complement activity and C3 were significantly decreased in 35 malnourished children. The changes were more pronounced in those with infection. Electrophoretically altered forms of complement C were detected in 14. There was an inverse correlation between C3 levels and immunoconglutinin titres. Nutritional rehabilitation and eradication of infection reversed the abnormalities. It is suggested that reduced complement function in malnutrition is the combined result of impaired synthesis, complement activation in vivo, and changes in plasma volume, and that it may contribute to an increased susceptibility to infection in undernourished individuals. PMID:807166

  15. Anemias excluding cobalamin and folate deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Dublis, Stephanie; Shah, Shefali; Nand, Sucha; Anderes, Elise

    2014-01-01

    Anemias are one of the commonest maladies affecting humans. They result from either a failure of production by the bone marrow (hypoproliferative), or from premature destruction or loss (hyperproliferative) of red cells. Hypoproliferative anemias typically result from deficiencies of essential nutrients, stem cell abnormalities or deficiency, and infiltrative processes of the bone marrow. In the hyperproliferative forms, the bone marrow function is normal and anemia results from bleeding or shortened erythrocyte lifespan due to hemoglobinopathies, red cell enzyme disorders, membrane defects, or external factors such as antibodies, trauma, or heat injury. The etiology of anemia is frequently obvious, but when obscure, a systematic diagnostic approach frequently yields the answer. It is important to realize that anemias are usually a consequence of another disease process, which must be identified. Without correction of the underlying disease process, the treatment is likely to fail.

  16. [Anemia in candidates for heart surgery].

    PubMed

    Yanes Vidal, G J

    2015-06-01

    Heart surgery patients have a high prevalence of anemia. Its etiology is multifactorial, and iron deficiency is one of the most common correctable causes. Anemia is an independent risk factor for postsurgical morbidity and mortality. It also predisposes patients to a greater need for transfusions, which increases the associated complications and the use of resources. The etiological diagnosis of anemia is no different from that of other surgical procedures, but the time available for correcting it before surgery is shorter. Studies have been conducted on therapeutic regimens with iron deficiency replenishment with total dose and erythropoiesis-stimulating agents, which enable the rapid correction of anemia and reduce transfusion requirements. There is considerable variability in terms of dosage, adverse effects, administration time and routes, drug combinations and results. New studies are needed to investigate the most ideal regimens for correcting anemia in these patients.

  17. Infectious diseases associated with complement deficiencies.

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, J E; Densen, P

    1991-01-01

    The complement system consists of both plasma and membrane proteins. The former influence the inflammatory response, immune modulation, and host defense. The latter are complement receptors, which mediate the cellular effects of complement activation, and regulatory proteins, which protect host cells from complement-mediated injury. Complement activation occurs via either the classical or the alternative pathway, which converge at the level of C3 and share a sequence of terminal components. Four aspects of the complement cascade are critical to its function and regulation: (i) activation of the classical pathway, (ii) activation of the alternative pathway, (iii) C3 convertase formation and C3 deposition, and (iv) membrane attack complex assembly and insertion. In general, mechanisms evolved by pathogenic microbes to resist the effects of complement are targeted to these four steps. Because individual complement proteins subserve unique functional activities and are activated in a sequential manner, complement deficiency states are associated with predictable defects in complement-dependent functions. These deficiency states can be grouped by which of the above four mechanisms they disrupt. They are distinguished by unique epidemiologic, clinical, and microbiologic features and are most prevalent in patients with certain rheumatologic and infectious diseases. Ethnic background and the incidence of infection are important cofactors determining this prevalence. Although complement undoubtedly plays a role in host defense against many microbial pathogens, it appears most important in protection against encapsulated bacteria, especially Neisseria meningitidis but also Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and, to a lesser extent, Neisseria gonorrhoeae. The availability of effective polysaccharide vaccines and antibiotics provides an immunologic and chemotherapeutic rationale for preventing and treating infection in patients with these deficiencies. PMID

  18. Epigenetic Alterations in Fanconi Anaemia: Role in Pathophysiology and Therapeutic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Belo, Hélio; Silva, Gabriela; Cardoso, Bruno A.; Porto, Beatriz; Minguillon, Jordi; Barbot, José; Coutinho, Jorge; Casado, Jose A.; Benedito, Manuela; Saturnino, Hema; Costa, Emília; Bueren, Juan A.; Surralles, Jordi; Almeida, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Fanconi anaemia (FA) is an inherited disorder characterized by chromosomal instability. The phenotype is variable, which raises the possibility that it may be affected by other factors, such as epigenetic modifications. These play an important role in oncogenesis and may be pharmacologically manipulated. Our aim was to explore whether the epigenetic profiles in FA differ from non-FA individuals and whether these could be manipulated to alter the disease phenotype. We compared expression of epigenetic genes and DNA methylation profile of tumour suppressor genes between FA and normal samples. FA samples exhibited decreased expression levels of genes involved in epigenetic regulation and hypomethylation in the promoter regions of tumour suppressor genes. Treatment of FA cells with histone deacetylase inhibitor Vorinostat increased the expression of DNM3Tβ and reduced the levels of CIITA and HDAC9, PAK1, USP16, all involved in different aspects of epigenetic and immune regulation. Given the ability of Vorinostat to modulate epigenetic genes in FA patients, we investigated its functional effects on the FA phenotype. This was assessed by incubating FA cells with Vorinostat and quantifying chromosomal breaks induced by DNA cross-linking agents. Treatment of FA cells with Vorinostat resulted in a significant reduction of aberrant cells (81% on average). Our results suggest that epigenetic mechanisms may play a role in oncogenesis in FA. Epigenetic agents may be helpful in improving the phenotype of FA patients, potentially reducing tumour incidence in this population. PMID:26466379

  19. A novel Fanconi anaemia subtype associated with a dominant-negative mutation in RAD51

    PubMed Central

    Ameziane, Najim; May, Patrick; Haitjema, Anneke; van de Vrugt, Henri J.; van Rossum-Fikkert, Sari E.; Ristic, Dejan; Williams, Gareth J.; Balk, Jesper; Rockx, Davy; Li, Hong; Rooimans, Martin A.; Oostra, Anneke B.; Velleuer, Eunike; Dietrich, Ralf; Bleijerveld, Onno B.; Maarten Altelaar, A. F.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Joenje, Hans; Glusman, Gustavo; Roach, Jared; Hood, Leroy; Galas, David; Wyman, Claire; Balling, Rudi; den Dunnen, Johan; de Winter, Johan P.; Kanaar, Roland; Gelinas, Richard; Dorsman, Josephine C.

    2015-01-01

    Fanconi anaemia (FA) is a hereditary disease featuring hypersensitivity to DNA cross-linker-induced chromosomal instability in association with developmental abnormalities, bone marrow failure and a strong predisposition to cancer. A total of 17 FA disease genes have been reported, all of which act in a recessive mode of inheritance. Here we report on a de novo g.41022153G>A; p.Ala293Thr (NM_002875) missense mutation in one allele of the homologous recombination DNA repair gene RAD51 in an FA-like patient. This heterozygous mutation causes a novel FA subtype, ‘FA-R', which appears to be the first subtype of FA caused by a dominant-negative mutation. The patient, who features microcephaly and mental retardation, has reached adulthood without the typical bone marrow failure and paediatric cancers. Together with the recent reports on RAD51-associated congenital mirror movement disorders, our results point to an important role for RAD51-mediated homologous recombination in neurodevelopment, in addition to DNA repair and cancer susceptibility. PMID:26681308

  20. Treatment of autoimmune hemolytic anemias.

    PubMed

    Zanella, Alberto; Barcellini, Wilma

    2014-10-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a relatively uncommon disorder caused by autoantibodies directed against self red blood cells. It can be idiopathic or secondary, and classified as warm, cold (cold hemagglutinin disease (CAD) and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) or mixed, according to the thermal range of the autoantibody. AIHA may develop gradually, or have a fulminant onset with life-threatening anemia. The treatment of AIHA is still not evidence-based. The first-line therapy for warm AIHA are corticosteroids, which are effective in 70-85% of patients and should be slowly tapered over a time period of 6-12 months. For refractory/relapsed cases, the current sequence of second-line therapy is splenectomy (effective approx. in 2 out of 3 cases but with a presumed cure rate of up to 20%), rituximab (effective in approx. 80-90% of cases), and thereafter any of the immunosuppressive drugs (azathioprine, cyclophosphamide, cyclosporin, mycophenolate mofetil). Additional therapies are intravenous immunoglobulins, danazol, plasma-exchange, and alemtuzumab and high-dose cyclophosphamide as last resort option. As the experience with rituximab evolves, it is likely that this drug will be located at an earlier point in therapy of warm AIHA, before more toxic immunosuppressants, and in place of splenectomy in some cases. In CAD, rituximab is now recommended as first-line treatment.

  1. Anemia of Chronic Disease and Iron Deficiency Anemia in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Murawska, Natalia; Fabisiak, Adam; Fichna, Jakub

    2016-05-01

    Anemia coexists with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in up to two-thirds of patients, significantly impairing quality of life. The most common types of anemia in patients with IBD are iron deficiency anemia and anemia of chronic disease, which often overlap. In most cases, available laboratory tests allow successful diagnosis of iron deficiency, where difficulties appear, recently established indices such as soluble transferrin-ferritin ratio or percentage of hypochromic red cells are used. In this review, we discuss the management of the most common types of anemia in respect of the latest available data. Thus, we provide the mechanisms underlying pathophysiology of these entities; furthermore, we discuss the role of hepcidin in developing anemia in IBD. Next, we present the treatment options for each type of anemia and highlight the importance of individual choice of action. We also focus on newly developed intravenous iron preparations and novel, promising drug candidates targeting hepcidin. Concurrently, we talk about difficulties in differentiating between the true and functional iron deficiency, and discuss tools facilitating the process. Finally, we emphasize the importance of proper diagnosis and treatment of anemia in IBD. We conclude that management of anemia in patients with IBD is tricky, and appropriate screening of patients regarding anemia is substantial.

  2. Review on complement analysis method and the roles of glycosaminoglycans in the complement system.

    PubMed

    Li, Lian; Li, Yan; Ijaz, Muhammad; Shahbaz, Muhammad; Lian, Qianqian; Wang, Fengshan

    2015-12-10

    Complement system is composed of over 30 proteins and it plays important roles in self-defence and inflammation. There are three activation pathways, including classical pathway, alternative pathway and lectin pathway, in complement system, and they are associated with many diseases such as osteoarthritis and age-related macular degeneration. Modulation of the complement system may be a promising strategy in the treatment of related diseases. Glycosaminoglycans are anionic linear polysaccharides without branches. They are one kind of multi-functional macromolecules which have great potential in regulating complement system. This review is organized around two aspects between the introduction of complement system and the interaction of glycosaminoglycans with complement system. Three complement activation pathways and the biological significance were introduced first. Then functional analysis methods were compared to provide a strategy for potential glycosaminoglycans screen. Finally, the roles of glycosaminoglycans played in the complement system were summed up.

  3. Complement associated pathogenic mechanisms in myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Tüzün, Erdem; Christadoss, Premkumar

    2013-07-01

    The complement system is profoundly involved in the pathogenesis of acetylcholine receptor (AChR) antibody (Ab) related myasthenia gravis (MG) and its animal model experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG). The most characteristic finding of muscle pathology in both MG and EAMG is the abundance of IgG and complement deposits at the nerve-muscle junction (NMJ), suggesting that AChR-Ab induces muscle weakness by complement pathway activation and consequent membrane attack complex (MAC) formation. This assumption has been supported with EAMG resistance of complement factor C3 knockout (KO), C4 KO and C5 deficient mice and amelioration of EAMG symptoms following treatment with complement inhibitors such as cobra venom factor, soluble complement receptor 1, anti-C1q, anti-C5 and anti-C6 Abs. Moreover, the complement inhibitor decay accelerating factor (DAF) KO mice exhibit increased susceptibility to EAMG. These findings have brought forward improvisation of novel therapy methods based on inhibition of classical and common complement pathways in MG treatment.

  4. The role of complement in AMD.

    PubMed

    Zipfel, Peter F; Lauer, Nadine; Skerka, Christine

    2010-01-01

    Age related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common form of blindness in the western world and genetic variations of several complement genes, including the complement regulator Factor H, the central complement component C3, Factor B, C2, and also Factor I confer a risk for the disease. However deletion of a chromosomal segment in the Factor H gene cluster on human chromosome 1, which results in the deficiency of the terminal pathway regulator CFHR1, and of the putative complement regulator CFHR3 has a protective effect for development of AMD. The Factor H gene encodes two proteins Factor H and FHL1 which are derived from alternatively processed transcripts. In particular a sequence variation at position 402 of both Factor H and FHL1 is associated with a risk for AMD. A tyrosine residue at position 402 represents the protective and a histidine residue the risk variant. AMD is considered a chronic inflammatory disease, which can be caused by defective and inappropriate regulation of the continuously activated alternative complement pathway. This activation generates complement effector products and inflammatory mediators that stimulate further inflammatory reactions. Defective regulation can lead to formation of immune deposits, drusen and ultimately translate into damage of retinal pigment epithelial cells, rupture of the interface between these epithelial cells and the Bruch's membrane and vision loss. Here we describe the role of complement in the retina and summarize the current concept how defective or inappropriate local complement control contributes to inflammation and the pathophysiology of AMD.

  5. Progress and Trends in Complement Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Ricklin, Daniel; Lambris, John D.

    2012-01-01

    The past few years have proven to be a highly successful and exciting period for the field of complement-directed drug discovery and development. Driven by promising experiences with the first marketed complement drugs, increased knowledge about the involvement of complement in health and disease, and improvements in structural and analytical techniques as well as animal models of disease, the field has seen a surge in creative approaches to therapeutically intervene at various stages of the cascade. An impressive panel of compounds that show promise in clinical trials is meanwhile being lined up in the pipelines of both small biotechnology and big pharmaceutical companies. Yet with this new focus on complement-targeted therapeutics, important questions concerning target selection, point and length of intervention, safety, and drug delivery emerge. In view of the diversity of the clinical disorders involving abnormal complement activity or regulation, which include both acute and chronic diseases and affect a wide range of organs, diverse yet specifically tailored therapeutic approaches may be needed to shift complement back into balance. This chapter highlights the key changes in the field that shape our current perception of complement-targeted drugs and provides a brief overview of recent strategies and emerging trends. Selected examples of complement-related diseases and inhibitor classes are highlighted to illustrate the diversity and creativity in field. PMID:22990692

  6. Complement System Part II: Role in Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Merle, Nicolas S.; Noe, Remi; Halbwachs-Mecarelli, Lise; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Veronique; Roumenina, Lubka T.

    2015-01-01

    The complement system has been considered for a long time as a simple lytic cascade, aimed to kill bacteria infecting the host organism. Nowadays, this vision has changed and it is well accepted that complement is a complex innate immune surveillance system, playing a key role in host homeostasis, inflammation, and in the defense against pathogens. This review discusses recent advances in the understanding of the role of complement in physiology and pathology. It starts with a description of complement contribution to the normal physiology (homeostasis) of a healthy organism, including the silent clearance of apoptotic cells and maintenance of cell survival. In pathology, complement can be a friend or a foe. It acts as a friend in the defense against pathogens, by inducing opsonization and a direct killing by C5b–9 membrane attack complex and by triggering inflammatory responses with the anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a. Opsonization plays also a major role in the mounting of an adaptive immune response, involving antigen presenting cells, T-, and B-lymphocytes. Nevertheless, it can be also an enemy, when pathogens hijack complement regulators to protect themselves from the immune system. Inadequate complement activation becomes a disease cause, as in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, C3 glomerulopathies, and systemic lupus erythematosus. Age-related macular degeneration and cancer will be described as examples showing that complement contributes to a large variety of conditions, far exceeding the classical examples of diseases associated with complement deficiencies. Finally, we discuss complement as a therapeutic target. PMID:26074922

  7. Genetic diagnosis for congenital hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Ohga, Shouichi

    Congenital hemolytic anemia is a group of monogenic diseases presenting with anemia due to increased destruction of circulating erythrocytes. The etiology of inherited anemia accounts for germline mutations of the responsible genes coding for the structural components of erythrocytes and extra-erythrocytes. The erythrocyte abnormalities are classified into three major disorders of red cell membrane defects, hemoglobinopathies, and red cell enzymopathies. The extra-erythrocyte abnormalities, typified by consumption coagulopathy and intravascular hemolysis, include Upshaw-Schulman syndrome and atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. The clinical manifestations of congenital hemolytic anemia are anemia, jaundice, cholelithiasis and splenomegaly, while the onset mode and severity are both variable. Genetic overlapping of red cell membrane protein disorders, and distinct frequency and mutation spectra differing among races make it difficult to understand this disease entity. On the other hand, genetic modifiers for the phenotype of β-globin diseases provide useful information for selecting the optimal treatment and for long-term management. Recently, next generation sequencing techniques have enabled us to determine the novel causative genes in patients with undiagnosed hemolytic anemias. We herein review the concept and strategy for genetic diagnosis of inherited hemolytic anemias.

  8. Erythropoietic stress and anemia in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Singh, Dhruv K; Winocour, Peter; Farrington, Ken

    2009-04-01

    Anemia is one of the world's most common preventable conditions, yet it is often overlooked, especially in people with diabetes mellitus. Diabetes-related chronic hyperglycemia can lead to a hypoxic environment in the renal interstitium, which results in impaired production of erythropoietin by the peritubular fibroblasts and subsequent anemia. Anemia in patients with diabetes mellitus might contribute to the pathogenesis and progression of cardiovascular disease and aggravate diabetic nephropathy and retinopathy. Anemia occurs earlier in patients with diabetic renal disease than in nondiabetic individuals with chronic kidney disease. Although erythropoietin has been used to treat renal anemia for nearly two decades, debate persists over the optimal target hemoglobin level. Most guidelines recommend that hemoglobin levels be maintained between 105g/l and 125g/l. The suggested role of anemia correction--to prevent the progression of left ventricular hypertrophy in patients with diabetes mellitus--is yet to be established. However, an emphasis on regular screening for anemia, alongside that for other diabetes-related complications, might help to delay the progression of vascular complications in these patients.

  9. [Sideropenic anemia in infants and toddlers].

    PubMed

    Jakovljević, G; Votava-Raić, A; Tjesić-Drinković, D; Rajić, L; Femenić-Kes, R; Konja, J; Goluza, I; Bilić, E; Leskovar, V

    2001-01-01

    Iron-deficiency anemia is the most common anemia in infants. In the routine pediatric care this problem is encountered every day. Numerous factors in infancy (low birth weight, rapid growth, insufficient nutrition) are involved in the development of iron-deficiency anemia, and they must be considered when establishing diagnosis, counselling parents, and prescribing oral iron preparations. Data on 119 patients aged up to two years treated in the Division of Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Pediatric Department, University Hospital Centre Zagreb Salata between 1994 and 1999, were analyzed. We were prompted to do so because of great frequency of iron-deficiency anemia as one of associated diagnoses, and unfortunately often the only diagnosis requiring hospitalization. Out of 119 patients with iron-deficiency anemia, nine (7.7%) patients (four premature newborns and three from twin pregnancy) had to receive transfusion of erythrocyte concentrate due to very bad general condition and low red blood count, accompanied by clinical signs of anemic hypoxia. We also analyzed prenatal and perinatal history, socioeconomic living conditions of these children, i.e. their nutrition, and if they had previously received oral iron preparations. Some of the results, such as inadequate alimentation with flour, as well as insufficient prophylaxis of iron deficiency, which were found in most cases of severe anemia, point to the need of paying greater attention to this problem, better parents education, and more adequate screening for iron deficiency anemia.

  10. Inborn anemias in mice: (Annual report, 1981-1982)

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, S.E.

    1982-07-19

    Hereditary anemias of mice are the chief objects of investigation, specificially four macrocytic anemias, 3 types of hemolytic anemia, nonhemolytic microcytic anemia, transitory siderocytic anemia, sex-linked iron-transport anemia, the autoimmune hemolytic anemia of NZB mice, an ..cap alpha..-thalassemia and a new hypochromic anemia with hemochromatosis. New types of anemia may be analyzed as new mutations appear. Three new mutations have been identified during the past 18 months. These anemias are studied through characterization of peripheral blood values, determinations of radiosensitivity under a variety of conditions, measurements of iron metabolism and heme synthesis, study of normal and abnormal erythrocyte membrane proteins, histological and biochemical characterization of blood-forming tissue, functional tests of the stem-cell component, examination of responses to erythroid stimuli, and transplantation of tissue and parabiosis between individuals of differently affected genotypes. 31 refs.

  11. Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... body gets more iron than it needs? Iron overload happens when too much iron builds up in ... heart, and pancreas. Many problems can cause iron overload. Most people with hemochromatosis inherit it from their ...

  12. Proximal tubular dysfunction associated with tenofovir and didanosine causing Fanconi syndrome and diabetes insipidus: a report of 3 cases.

    PubMed

    Irizarry-Alvarado, Joan M; Dwyer, Jamie P; Brumble, Lisa M; Alvarez, Salvador; Mendez, Julio C

    2009-03-01

    We report 3 cases of patients with HIV/AIDS in whom Fanconi syndrome and nephrogenic diabetes insipidus developed secondary to use of an antiretroviral regimen containing tenofovir disoproxil fumarate and didanosine. These patients presented with a history of polydipsia, polyuria, weight loss, anorexia, and wasting. Interestingly, 1 patient was not taking protease inhibitors. This response is a well-documented yet uncommon complication of tenofovir use in the HIV population. We recommend continued monitoring for renal toxicity when using NRTI combination of tenofovir and didanosine.

  13. Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA).

    PubMed

    Heeney, Matthew M; Finberg, Karin E

    2014-08-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is a common global problem whose etiology is typically attributed to acquired inadequate dietary intake and/or chronic blood loss. However, in several kindreds multiple family members are affected with iron deficiency anemia that is unresponsive to oral iron supplementation and only partially responsive to parenteral iron therapy. The discovery that many of these cases harbor mutations in the TMPRSS6 gene led to the recognition that they represent a single clinical entity: iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA). This article reviews clinical features of IRIDA, recent genetic studies, and insights this disorder provides into the regulation of systemic iron homeostasis.

  14. Protrusio acetabuli in sickle-cell anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, S.; Apple, J.S.; Baber, C.; Putman, C.E.; Rosse, W.F.

    1984-04-01

    Of 155 adults with sickle-cell anemia (SS, SC), radiographs of the pelvis or hip demonstrated protrusio acetabuli on at least one side in 14 (3 men and 11 women), as indicated by projection of the acetabular line medial to the ilio-ischial line. All 14 patients had bone changes attributable to sickle-cell anemia, including marrow hyperplasia and osteonecrosis; however, the severity of femoral or acetabular osteonecrosis did not appear directly related to the protrusion. The authors conclude that sickle-cell anemia can predispose to development of protrusio acetabuli.

  15. The Clinical Pictures of Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Packman, Charles H.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is characterized by shortened red blood cell survival and a positive Coombs test. The responsible autoantibodies may be either warm reactive or cold reactive. The rate of hemolysis and the severity of the anemia may vary from mild to severe and life-threatening. Diagnosis is made in the laboratory by the findings of anemia, reticulocytosis, a positive Coombs test, and specific serologic tests. The prognosis is generally good but renal failure and death sometimes occur, especially in cases mediated by drugs. PMID:26696800

  16. Investigation of nonpoikilocytic normochromic normocytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Ward, P C

    1979-03-01

    When the mean corpuscular volume is normal in an anemic patient, examination of a blood smear becomes of paramount importance. When the RBCs are normochronic, normocytic, and nonpoikilocytic, the reticulocyte count determines the line of investigation. When the count is increased, either hemorrhage or hemolysis is present. When the count is not increased (ie, normal or low), the differential diagnosis includes anemias due to iron deficiency, chronic disease, renal disease, hemodilution, marrow infiltration, and marrow failure (aplastic anemia). Some morphologic clues to cause other than those pertaining to RBC morphology are discussed and illustrated. A working approach to the investigation of nonpoikilocytic normochromic normocytic anemia is suggested.

  17. Anemia and iron deficiency in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Arora, Natasha P; Ghali, Jalal K

    2014-04-01

    Anemia is a common comorbidity in patients with heart failure (HF) and is associated with poor prognosis. Iron deficiency, with or without anemia, confers increased risk of mortality and morbidity. Along with the altered iron metabolism in HF patients, inflammation creates challenges in the interpretation of laboratory parameters used to diagnose anemia in HF. Since the RED-HF trial failed to demonstrate any benefit from the use of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) on mortality or morbidity in HF patients, ESAs are no longer considered a treatment option, although intravenous iron has potential as therapy for anemic and nonanemic HF patients.

  18. Properdin in Complement Activation and Tissue Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lesher, AM; B, Nilsson; Song, W-C

    2013-01-01

    The plasma protein properdin is the only known positive regulator of complement activation. Although regarded as an initiator of the alternative pathway of complement activation at the time of its discovery more than a half century ago, the role and mechanism of action of properdin in the complement cascade has undergone significant conceptual evolution since then. Despite the long history of research on properdin, however, new insight and unexpected findings on the role of properdin in complement activation, pathogen infection and host tissue injury are still being revealed by ongoing investigations. In this article, we provide a brief review on recent studies that shed new light on properdin biology, focusing on the following three topics: 1) its role as a pattern recognition molecule to direct and trigger complement activation, 2) its context-dependent requirement in complement activation on foreign and host cell surfaces, and 3) its involvement in alternative pathway complement-mediated immune disorders and considerations of properdin as a potential therapeutic target in human diseases. PMID:23816404

  19. [A simple algorithm for anemia].

    PubMed

    Egyed, Miklós

    2014-03-09

    The author presents a novel algorithm for anaemia based on the erythrocyte haemoglobin content. The scheme is based on the aberrations of erythropoiesis and not on the pathophysiology of anaemia. The hemoglobin content of one erytrocyte is between 28-35 picogram. Any disturbance in hemoglobin synthesis can lead to a lower than 28 picogram hemoglobin content of the erythrocyte which will lead to hypochromic anaemia. In contrary, disturbances of nucleic acid metabolism will result in a hemoglobin content greater than 36 picogram, and this will result in hyperchromic anaemia. Normochromic anemia, characterised by hemoglobin content of erythrocytes between 28 and 35 picogram, is the result of alteration in the proliferation of erythropoeisis. Based on these three categories of anaemia, a unique system can be constructed, which can be used as a model for basic laboratory investigations and work-up of anaemic patients.

  20. Sideroblastic anemias: variations on imprecision in diagnostic criteria, proposal for an extended classification of sideroblastic anemias.

    PubMed

    Koc, S; Harris, J W

    1998-01-01

    Sideroblastic anemias are caused by a diversity of hereditary, congenital, or acquired disorders. Criteria used in describing sideroblastic anemias vary widely among standard medical textbooks and even so have been imprecisely applied in the literature. Recent discoveries concerning the basic pathophysiologic mechanisms involving the molecular biology of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA, erythroid ALA synthase (ALAS-2), and iron transport have made the classification of sideroblastic anemias very complex. We recommend a more precise evaluation and documentation of the components that characterize the sideroblastic abnormality and propose an extended classification of the sideroblastic anemias.

  1. Infections Revealing Complement Deficiency in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Audemard-Verger, A.; Descloux, E.; Ponard, D.; Deroux, A.; Fantin, B.; Fieschi, C.; John, M.; Bouldouyre, A.; Karkowsi, L.; Moulis, G.; Auvinet, H.; Valla, F.; Lechiche, C.; Davido, B.; Martinot, M.; Biron, C.; Lucht, F.; Asseray, N.; Froissart, A.; Buzelé, R.; Perlat, A.; Boutboul, D.; Fremeaux-Bacchi, V.; Isnard, S.; Bienvenu, B.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Complement system is a part of innate immunity, its main function is to protect human from bacterial infection. As genetic disorders, complement deficiencies are often diagnosed in pediatric population. However, complement deficiencies can also be revealed in adults but have been poorly investigated. Herein, we describe a case series of infections revealing complement deficiency in adults to study clinical spectrum and management of complement deficiencies. A nationwide retrospective study was conducted in French university and general hospitals in departments of internal medicine, infectious diseases enrolling patients older than 15 years old who had presented at least one infection leading to a complement deficiency diagnosis. Forty-one patients included between 2002 and 2015 in 19 different departments were enrolled in this study. The male-to-female ratio was 1.3 and the mean age at diagnosis was 28 ± 14 (15–67) years. The main clinical feature was Neisseria meningitidis meningitis 75% (n = 31/41) often involving rare serotype: Y (n = 9) and W 135 (n = 7). The main complement deficiency observed was the common final pathway deficiency 83% (n = 34/41). Half of the cohort displayed severe sepsis or septic shock at diagnosis (n = 22/41) but no patient died. No patient had family history of complement deficiency. The mean follow-up was 1.15 ± 1.95 (0.1–10) years. Half of the patients had already suffered from at least one infection before diagnosis of complement deficiency: meningitis (n = 13), pneumonia (n = 4), fulminans purpura (n = 1), or recurrent otitis (n = 1). Near one-third (n = 10/39) had received prophylactic antibiotics (cotrimoxazole or penicillin) after diagnosis of complement deficiency. The vaccination coverage rate, at the end of the follow-up, for N meningitidis, Streptococcus pneumonia, and Haemophilius influenzae were, respectively, 90% (n = 33/37), 47% (n = 17/36), and 35

  2. CD46: the 'multitasker' of complement proteins.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Hidekazu; Fara, Antonella Francesca; Dasgupta, Prokar; Kemper, Claudia

    2013-12-01

    Complement is undeniably quintessential for innate immunity by detecting and eliminating infectious microorganisms. Recent work, however, highlights an equally profound impact of complement on the induction and regulation of a wide range of immune cells. In particular, the complement regulator CD46 emerges as a key sensor of immune activation and a vital modulator of adaptive immunity. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of CD46-mediated signalling events and their functional consequences on immune-competent cells with a specific focus on those in CD4(+) T cells. We will also discuss the promises and challenges that potential therapeutic modulation of CD46 may hold and pose.

  3. [Anemias in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Budnevsky, A V; Esaulenko, I E; Ovsyannikov, E S; Zhusina, Yu G

    2016-01-01

    According to different studies, anemia occurs in 8--33% of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The paper describes the most important various causes of anemia in COPD, such as systemic inflammation and endocrine disorders, the use of some medications (theophylline, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors), frequent COPD exacerbations, and long-term oxygen therapy. Lower hemoglobin levels in COPD patients are accompanied by increased shortness of breath, reduced exercise tolerance, and lower quality of life. Furthermore, some investigations have shown that anemia is an independent predictor of death in patients with COPD. In spite of the fact that anemia may be successfully in these patients, the evidence suggesting the importance of its impact on the prognosis of COPD is limited.

  4. Anemia: progress in molecular mechanisms and therapies.

    PubMed

    Sankaran, Vijay G; Weiss, Mitchell J

    2015-03-01

    Anemia is a major source of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Here we review recent insights into how red blood cells (RBCs) are produced, the pathogenic mechanisms underlying various forms of anemia, and novel therapies derived from these findings. It is likely that these new insights, mainly arising from basic scientific studies, will contribute immensely to both the understanding of frequently debilitating forms of anemia and the ability to treat affected patients. Major worldwide diseases that are likely to benefit from new advances include the hemoglobinopathies (β-thalassemia and sickle cell disease); rare genetic disorders of RBC production; and anemias associated with chronic kidney disease, inflammation, and cancer. Promising new approaches to treatment include drugs that target recently defined pathways in RBC production, iron metabolism, and fetal globin-family gene expression, as well as gene therapies that use improved viral vectors and newly developed genome editing technologies.

  5. [Equine infectious anemia--a review].

    PubMed

    Haas, Ludwig

    2014-01-01

    This article combines essential facts of equine infectious anemia. Beside etiology and epidemiology, emphasis is put on the clinical course and laboratory diagnosis. Finally, control measures and prophylactic issues are discussed.

  6. Darbepoetin alfa for anemia with myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Seastone, David J; Gerds, Aaron T

    2015-04-01

    The myelodysplastic syndromes are characterized by refractory cytopenias that lead to symptomatic anemia, bleeding, and increased risk for infections. For almost two decades, the use of darbepoetin and other erythropoietin stimulating agents to treat symptomatic anemia in lower-risk myelodysplastic syndromes has been a standard of care. This practice is supported by numerous Phase I/II studies and one Phase III study demonstrating the benefit of using erythropoietin stimulating agents alone, or in combination with granulocyte colony stimulating factor, for treatment of symptomatic anemia with the goal of decreasing red blood cell transfusion requirements. This review summarizes the published experience regarding the use of erythropoietin stimulating agents, with a special focus on darbepoetin, in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome and symptomatic anemia.

  7. Anemia of Inflammation and Chronic Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... AI/ACD may also be advised to take vitamin B12 and folic acid supplements. A person should talk ... and Nutrition People with anemia caused by iron, vitamin B12, or folic acid deficiencies are usually advised to ...

  8. Mycoplasma salivarium as a Dominant Coloniser of Fanconi Anaemia Associated Oral Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Henrich, Birgit; Rumming, Madis; Sczyrba, Alexander; Velleuer, Eunike; Dietrich, Ralf; Gerlach, Wolfgang; Gombert, Michael; Rahn, Sebastian; Stoye, Jens; Borkhardt, Arndt; Fischer, Ute

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasma salivarium belongs to the class of the smallest self-replicating Tenericutes and is predominantly found in the oral cavity of humans. In general it is considered as a non-pathogenic commensal. However, some reports point to an association with human diseases. M. salivarium was found e.g. as causative agent of a submasseteric abscess, in necrotic dental pulp, in brain abscess and clogged biliary stent. Here we describe the detection of M. salivarium on the surface of a squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue of a patient with Fanconi anaemia (FA). FA is an inherited bone marrow failure syndrome based on defective DNA-repair that increases the risk of carcinomas especially oral squamous cell carcinoma. Employing high coverage, massive parallel Roche/454-next-generation-sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons we analysed the oral microbiome of this FA patient in comparison to that of an FA patient with a benign leukoplakia and five healthy individuals. The microbiota of the FA patient with leukoplakia correlated well with that of the healthy controls. A dominance of Streptococcus, Veillonella and Neisseria species was typically observed. In contrast, the microbiome of the cancer bearing FA patient was dominated by Pseudomonas aeruginosa at the healthy sites, which changed to a predominance of 98% M. salivarium on the tumour surface. Quantification of the mycoplasma load in five healthy, two tumour- and two leukoplakia-FA patients by TaqMan-PCR confirmed the prevalence of M. salivarium at the tumour sites. These new findings suggest that this mycoplasma species with its reduced coding capacity found ideal breeding grounds at the tumour sites. Interestingly, the oral cavity of all FA patients and especially samples at the tumour sites were in addition positive for Candida albicans. It remains to be elucidated in further studies whether M. salivarium can be used as a predictive biomarker for tumour development in these patients. PMID:24642836

  9. [Anemia in obstetrics and gynecological surgery].

    PubMed

    Gredilla Díaz, E

    2015-06-01

    Iron deficiency is more common in women due to uterine bleeding, which affects them throughout their fertile life. Additionally, iron needs increase physiologically during pregnancy and breastfeeding. Pregnant women therefore constitute one of the risk groups for iron deficiency. During the postpartum period, iron deficiency is the most common cause of anemia. Longer hospital stays and greater susceptibility to infections are potential consequences of postpartum anemia.

  10. Autocrine Effects of Tumor-Derived Complement

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Min Soon; Vasquez, Hernan G.; Rupaimoole, Rajesha; Pradeep, Sunila; Wu, Sherry; Zand, Behrouz; Han, Hee-Dong; Rodriguez-Aguayo, Cristian; Bottsford-Miller, Justin; Huang, Jie; Miyake, Takahito; Choi, Hyun-Jin; Dalton, Heather J.; Ivan, Cristina; Baggerly, Keith; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel; Sood, Anil K.; Afshar-Kharghan, Vahid

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY We describe a role for the complement system in enhancing cancer growth. Cancer cells secrete complement proteins that stimulate tumor growth upon activation. Complement promotes tumor growth via a direct autocrine effect that is partially independent of tumor-infiltrating cytotoxic T cells. Activated C5aR and C3aR signal through the PI3K/AKT pathway in cancer cells, and silencing the PI3K or AKT gene in cancer cells eliminates the progrowth effects of C5aR and C3aR stimulation. In patients with ovarian or lung cancer, higher tumoral C3 or C5aR mRNA levels were associated with decreased overall survival. These data identify a role for tumor-derived complement proteins in promoting tumor growth, and they therefore have substantial clinical and therapeutic implications. PMID:24613353

  11. Regulation of humoral immunity by complement.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Michael C; Isenman, David E

    2012-08-24

    The complement system of innate immunity is important in regulating humoral immunity largely through the complement receptor CR2, which forms a coreceptor on B cells during antigen-induced activation. However, CR2 also retains antigens on follicular dendritic cells (FDCs). Display of antigen on FDCs is critical for clonal selection and affinity maturation of activated B cells. This review will discuss the role of complement in adaptive immunity in general with a focus on the interplay between CR2-associated antigen on B cells with CR2 expressed on FDCs. This latter interaction provides an opportunity for memory B cells to sample antigen over prolonged periods. The cocrystal structure of CR2 with its ligand C3d provides insight into how the complement system regulates access of antigen by B cells with implications for therapeutic manipulations to modulate aberrant B cell responses in the case of autoimmunity.

  12. On complements of coradicals of finite groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedernikov, V. A.; Sorokina, M. M.

    2016-06-01

    Let F be an ω-local Fitting formation, and G a finite group that can be represented in the form of a product of n subnormal subgroups whose F-coradicals are ω-soluble, and whose Sylow p-subgroups are abelian for any p\\inω. It is established that there exist ω-complements of the F-coradical of G. New theorems on the existence of complements of coradicals of a group are obtained as corollaries. For an ω-local formation F, conditions are established for the existence of complements and ω-complements of the F-coradical of a group in any of its extensions. Bibliography: 21 titles.

  13. Complement activation by a B cell superantigen.

    PubMed

    Kozlowski, L M; Soulika, A M; Silverman, G J; Lambris, J D; Levinson, A I

    1996-08-01

    Staphylococcal protein A (SpA), acting as a B cell superantigen, binds to the Fab region of human VH3+ Igs. Using SpA abrogated of its IgG Fc binding activity (Mod SpA) as a model B cell superantigen, we determined whether such an interaction causes complement activation. Addition of Mod SpA to human serum led to complement consumption and the generation of C3a. To determine whether this complement activation 1) was due to an interaction between VH3+ Igs and the Fab binding site of SpA and 2) proceeded via the classical complement pathway, we tested a panel of monoclonal IgM proteins for the ability to hind C1q following interaction with SpA. C1q binding was restricted to SpA-reactive, VH3+ IgM proteins. To formally determine whether the binding of SpA to the reactive VH3+ IgM proteins led to complement activation, we reconstituted the serum from a hypogammaglobulinemic patient with monoclonal IgM proteins and measured complement consumption and C3a generation following the addition of Mod SpA. We observed complement consumption and C3a production only in Mod SpA-treated serum reconstituted with a VH3+, SpA-binding, IgM protein. Taken together, these results provide compelling evidence that the interaction of the Fab binding site of SpA and VH3+ Igs can lead to complement activation via the classical pathway. This novel interaction may have significant implications for the in vivo properties of a B cell superantigen.

  14. Advancements in anemias related to chronic conditions.

    PubMed

    Guidi, Gian Cesare; Lechi Santonastaso, Clara

    2010-09-01

    Anemia of chronic disease (ACD), the most frequent anemia among hospitalized patients, occurs in chronic inflammatory disorders, such as chronic infections, cancer and autoimmune diseases. Different causes contribute to ACD including diversion of iron traffic, diminished erythropoiesis, blunted response to erythropoietin, erythrophagocytosis, hematologic malignancies and solid tumors. A particular case of ACD is represented by anemia of chronic kidney disease (CKD). ACD is characterized by hyposideremia and altered iron transport. Cytokines are implicated in the ACD by reducing erythropoiesis and increasing iron sequestration in the reticuloendothelial system. The regulation of iron absorption across the epithelium of the proximal small intestine is essential for maintaining body iron concentrations within a physiologically defined range. Hepcidin controls cellular iron efflux by binding to the iron export protein ferroportin, causing ferroportin to be phosphorylated and degraded in lysosomes. Finally, hepcidin inhibits iron release from the reticulo-endothelial system. Increased expression of hepcidin leads to decreased iron absorption and iron deficient anemia. Hepcidin, therefore, is a negative regulator of iron transport in plasma. Causes of anemia in patients with CKD are multifactorial, but the most well-known cause is inadequate erythropoietin production. In these patients, anemia increases the risk of either cardiovascular disease or renal failure.

  15. Iron deficiency anemia in celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Hugh James

    2015-08-21

    Iron is an important micronutrient that may be depleted in celiac disease. Iron deficiency and anemia may complicate well-established celiac disease, but may also be the presenting clinical feature in the absence of diarrhea or weight loss. If iron deficiency anemia occurs, it should be thoroughly evaluated, even if celiac disease has been defined since other superimposed causes of iron deficiency anemia may be present. Most often, impaired duodenal mucosal uptake of iron is evident since surface absorptive area in the duodenum is reduced, in large part, because celiac disease is an immune-mediated disorder largely focused in the proximal small intestinal mucosa. Some studies have also suggested that blood loss may occur in celiac disease, sometimes from superimposed small intestinal disorders, including ulceration or neoplastic diseases, particularly lymphoma. In addition, other associated gastric or colonic disorders may be responsible for blood loss. Rarely, an immune-mediated hemolytic disorder with increased urine iron loss may occur that may respond to a gluten-free diet. Reduced expression of different regulatory proteins critical in iron uptake has also been defined in the presence and absence of anemia. Finally, other rare causes of microcytic anemia may occur in celiac disease, including a sideroblastic form of anemia reported to have responded to a gluten-free diet.

  16. Iron deficiency anemia in celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Hugh James

    2015-01-01

    Iron is an important micronutrient that may be depleted in celiac disease. Iron deficiency and anemia may complicate well-established celiac disease, but may also be the presenting clinical feature in the absence of diarrhea or weight loss. If iron deficiency anemia occurs, it should be thoroughly evaluated, even if celiac disease has been defined since other superimposed causes of iron deficiency anemia may be present. Most often, impaired duodenal mucosal uptake of iron is evident since surface absorptive area in the duodenum is reduced, in large part, because celiac disease is an immune-mediated disorder largely focused in the proximal small intestinal mucosa. Some studies have also suggested that blood loss may occur in celiac disease, sometimes from superimposed small intestinal disorders, including ulceration or neoplastic diseases, particularly lymphoma. In addition, other associated gastric or colonic disorders may be responsible for blood loss. Rarely, an immune-mediated hemolytic disorder with increased urine iron loss may occur that may respond to a gluten-free diet. Reduced expression of different regulatory proteins critical in iron uptake has also been defined in the presence and absence of anemia. Finally, other rare causes of microcytic anemia may occur in celiac disease, including a sideroblastic form of anemia reported to have responded to a gluten-free diet. PMID:26309349

  17. Mitochondrial iron metabolism and sideroblastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Sheftel, Alex D; Richardson, Des R; Prchal, Josef; Ponka, Prem

    2009-01-01

    Sideroblastic anemias are a heterogeneous group of disorders, characterized by mitochondrial iron overload in developing red blood cells. The unifying characteristic of all sideroblastic anemias is the ring sideroblast, which is a pathological erythroid precursor containing excessive deposits of non-heme iron in mitochondria with perinuclear distribution creating a ring appearance. Sideroblastic anemias may be hereditary or acquired. Hereditary sideroblastic anemias are caused by defects in genes present on the X chromosome (mutations in the ALAS2, ABCB7, or GRLX5 gene), genes on autosomal chromosomes, or mitochondrial genes. Acquired sideroblastic anemias are either primary (refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts, RARS, representing one subtype of the myelodysplastic syndrome) or secondary due to some drugs, toxins, copper deficiency, or chronic neoplastic disease. The pathogenesis of mitochondrial iron loading in developing erythroblasts is diverse. Ring sideroblasts can develop as a result of a heme synthesis defect in erythroblasts (ALAS2 mutations), a defect in iron-sulfur cluster assembly, iron-sulfur protein precursor release from mitochondria (ABCB7 mutations), or by a defect in intracellular iron metabolism in erythroid cells (e.g. RARS).

  18. Mouse Models of Anemia of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Airie; Rivera, Seth; Shprung, Dana; Limbrick, Donald; Gabayan, Victoria; Nemeth, Elizabeta; Ganz, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    Anemia of cancer (AC) may contribute to cancer-related fatigue and impair quality of life. Improved understanding of the pathogenesis of AC could facilitate better treatment, but animal models to study AC are lacking. We characterized four syngeneic C57BL/6 mouse cancers that cause AC. Mice with two different rapidly-growing metastatic lung cancers developed the characteristic findings of anemia of inflammation (AI), with dramatically different degrees of anemia. Mice with rapidly-growing metastatic melanoma also developed a severe anemia by 14 days, with hematologic and inflammatory parameters similar to AI. Mice with a slow-growing peritoneal ovarian cancer developed an iron-deficiency anemia, likely secondary to chronically impaired nutrition and bleeding into the peritoneal cavity. Of the four models, hepcidin mRNA levels were increased only in the milder lung cancer model. Unlike in our model of systemic inflammation induced by heat-killed Brucella abortus, ablation of hepcidin in the ovarian cancer and the milder lung cancer mouse models did not affect the severity of anemia. Hepcidin-independent mechanisms play an important role in these murine models of AC. PMID:24681760

  19. Renal Infiltration by Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma as a Rare Cause of Fanconi's Syndrome: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Saadat, Shoab; Mahmud, Syed Nayer; Qureshi, Asim

    2016-11-30

    We report the case of a 16-year-old female patient with a known history of coeliac disease, who presented with the complaints of diarrhea, vomiting and generalized body weakness. On examination, she was found to have dehydration, decreased power in all her limbs, cervical lymphadenopathy and hepatosplenomegaly. Investigations showed severe hypokalemia, hyponatremia, hypomagnesemia, hypoglycemia and mildly enlarged kidneys on ultrasonography. Biopsy of the duodenum confirmed the flare up of coeliac disease, while cervical lymph node biopsy was positive for atypical lymphoid infiltrate and a morphology suggestive of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The immune profile performed on this sample confirmed the presence of activated/non-germinal center type of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL), which was morphologically aggressive in type. The bone marrow biopsy was hypocellular and was negative for any infiltration. The patient was suspected to have developed infiltration of one or both kidneys leading to a rare presentation of Fanconi's syndrome. She was given first dose of rituximab on the 14th day of her admission. Unfortunately, she developed cardiopulmonary arrest and expired on the next day. We recommend screening for a possible renal involvement in patients with DLBCL and in patients with unusually deranged serum electrolytes as seen in Fanconi's syndrome. Renal biopsy is considered the gold standard modality for diagnosis and if possible, an earlier sample in a patient with newly developed acute kidney injury can save future complications.

  20. Downregulation of Oxidative and Nitrosative Apoptotic Signaling by L-Carnitine in Ifosfamide-Induced Fanconi Syndrome Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Sayed-Ahmed, Mohamed M.; Hafez, Mohamed M.; Aldelemy, Meshan Lafi; Aleisa, Abdulaziz M.; Al-Rejaie, Salem S.; Al-Hosaini, Khaled A.; Al-Harbi, Naif O.; Al-Harbi, Mohamed M.; Al-Shabanah, Othman A.

    2012-01-01

    It is well documented that ifosfamide (IFO) therapy is associated with sever nephropathy in the form of Fanconi syndrome. Although oxidative stress has been reported as a major player in IFO-induced Fanconi syndrome, no mechanism for this effect has been ascertained. Therefore, this study has been initiated to investigate, on gene expression level, the mechanism of IFO-induce nephrotoxicity and those whereby carnitine supplementation attenuates this serious side effect of IFO. To achieve the ultimate goals of this study, adult male rats were assigned to one of four treatment groups, namely, control, L-carnitine, IFO, and IFO plus L-carnitine. Administration of IFO for 5 days significantly increased serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), and total nitrate/nitrite (NOx) production in kidney tissues. In addition, IFO significantly increased mRNA expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), caspase-9, and caspase-3 and significantly decreased expression of glutathione peroxides (GPx), catalase (CAT), and Bcl2 in kidney tissues. Administration of L-carnitine to IFO-treated rats resulted in a complete reversal of the all biochemical and gene expression changes, induced by IFO, to the control values. Data from this study suggest that L-carnitine prevents the development of IFO-induced nephrotoxicity via downregulation of oxidative and nitrosative apoptotic signaling in kidney tissues. PMID:23213347