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Sample records for faraday fast track

  1. Fast Faraday Cup With High Bandwidth

    SciTech Connect

    Deibele, Craig E

    2006-03-14

    A circuit card stripline Fast Faraday cup quantitatively measures the picosecond time structure of a charged particle beam. The stripline configuration maintains signal integrity, and stitching of the stripline increases the bandwidth. A calibration procedure ensures the measurement of the absolute charge and time structure of the charged particle beam.

  2. Fast tracking hospital construction.

    PubMed

    Quirk, Andrew

    2013-03-01

    Hospital leaders should consider four factors in determining whether to fast track a hospital construction project: Expectations of project length, quality, and cost. Whether decisions can be made quickly as issues arise. Their own time commitment to the project, as well as that of architects, engineers, construction managers, and others. The extent to which they are willing to share with the design and construction teams how and why decisions are being made.

  3. Fast Track Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The NASA Fast Track Study supports the efforts of a Special Study Group (SSG) made up of members of the Advanced Project Management Class number 23 (APM-23) that met at the Wallops Island Management Education Center from April 28 - May 8, 1996. Members of the Class expressed interest to Mr. Vem Weyers in having an input to the NASA Policy Document (NPD) 7120.4, that will replace NASA Management Institute (NMI) 7120.4, and the NASA Program/Project Management Guide. The APM-23 SSG was tasked with assisting in development of NASA policy on managing Fast Track Projects, defined as small projects under $150 million and completed within three years. 'Me approach of the APM-23 SSG was to gather data on successful projects working in a 'Better, Faster, Cheaper' environment, within and outside of NASA and develop the Fast Track Project section of the NASA Program/Project Management Guide. Fourteen interviews and four other data gathering efforts were conducted by the SSG, and 16 were conducted by Strategic Resources, Inc. (SRI), including five interviews at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and one at the Applied Physics Laboratory (APL). The interviews were compiled and analyzed for techniques and approaches commonly used to meet severe cost and schedule constraints.

  4. Fast Faraday fading of long range satellite signals.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heron, M. L.

    1972-01-01

    20 MHz radio signals have been received during the day from satellite Beacon-B when it was below the optical horizon by using a bank of narrow filters to improve the signal to noise ratio. The Faraday fading rate becomes constant, under these conditions, at a level determined by the plasma frequency just below the F-layer peak. Variations in the Faraday fading rate reveal fluctuations in the electron density near the peak, while the rate of attaining the constant level depends on the shape of the electron density profile.

  5. Faraday-cup-type lost fast ion detector on Heliotron J.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, S; Ogawa, K; Isobe, M; Darrow, D S; Kobayashi, S; Nagasaki, K; Okada, H; Minami, T; Kado, S; Ohshima, S; Weir, G M; Nakamura, Y; Konoshima, S; Kemmochi, N; Ohtani, Y; Mizuuchi, T

    2016-11-01

    A Faraday-cup type lost-fast ion probe (FLIP) has been designed and installed in Heliotron J for the purpose of the studies of interaction between fast ions and MHD instabilities. The FLIP can measure the co-going fast ions whose energy is in the range of 1.7-42.5 keV (proton) and pitch angle of 90(∘)-140(∘), especially for fast ions having the injection energy of neutral beam injection (NBI). The FLIP successfully measured the re-entering passing ions and trapped lost-fast ions caused by fast-ion-driven energetic particle modes in NBI heated plasmas.

  6. Parasitic excitation of ion Bernstein waves from a Faraday shielded fast wave loop antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Skiff, F.; Ono, M.; Colestock, P.; Wong, K.L.

    1984-12-01

    Parasitic excitation of ion Bernstein waves is observed from a Faraday shielded fast wave loop antenna in the ion cyclotron frequency range. Local analysis of the Vlasov-Maxwell equations demonstrates the role of plasma density gradient in the coupling process. The effects of plasma density and of parallel wave number on the excitation process are investigated.

  7. Stripline fast faraday cup for measuring GHz structure of ion beams

    DOEpatents

    Bogaty, John M.

    1992-01-01

    The Stripline Fast Faraday Cup is a device which is used to quantitatively and qualitatively measure gigahertz time structure characteristics of ion beams with energies up to at least 30 Mev per nucleon. A stripline geometry is employed in conjunction with an electrostatic screen and a Faraday cup to provide for analysis of the structural characteristics of an ion beam. The stripline geometry allows for a large reduction in the size of the instrument while the electrostatic screen permits measurements of the properties associated with low speed ion beams.

  8. Fast-Tracking Colostomy Closures.

    PubMed

    Nanavati, Aditya J; Prabhakar, Subramaniam

    2015-12-01

    There have been very few studies on applying fast-track principles to colostomy closures. We believe that outcome may be significantly improved with multimodal interventions in the peri-operative care of patients undergoing this procedure. A retrospective study was carried out comparing patients who had undergone colostomy closures by the fast-track and traditional care protocols at our centre. We intended to analyse peri-operative period and recovery in colostomy closures to confirm that fast-track surgery principles improved outcomes. Twenty-six patients in the fast-track arm and 24 patients in the traditional care arm had undergone colostomy closures. Both groups were comparable in terms of their baseline parameters. Patients in the fast-track group were ambulatory and accepted oral feeding earlier. There was a significant reduction in the duration of stay (4.73 ± 1.43 days vs. 7.21 ± 1.38 days, p = 0.0000). We did not observe a rise in complications or 30-day re-admissions. Fast-track surgery can safely be applied to colostomy closures. It shows earlier ambulation and reduction in length of hospital stay.

  9. Faraday-cup-type lost fast ion detector on Heliotron J

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, S. Kobayashi, S.; Nagasaki, K.; Okada, H.; Minami, T.; Kado, S.; Ohshima, S.; Weir, G. M.; Konoshima, S.; Mizuuchi, T.; Ogawa, K.; Isobe, M.; Darrow, D. S.; Nakamura, Y.; Ohtani, Y.; Kemmochi, N.

    2016-11-15

    A Faraday-cup type lost-fast ion probe (FLIP) has been designed and installed in Heliotron J for the purpose of the studies of interaction between fast ions and MHD instabilities. The FLIP can measure the co-going fast ions whose energy is in the range of 1.7–42.5 keV (proton) and pitch angle of 90{sup ∘}–140{sup ∘}, especially for fast ions having the injection energy of neutral beam injection (NBI). The FLIP successfully measured the re-entering passing ions and trapped lost-fast ions caused by fast-ion-driven energetic particle modes in NBI heated plasmas.

  10. Fast track to 340B.

    PubMed

    Gricius, Robert F; Wong, Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Hospitals that are newly qualified for the 340B Drug Pricing Program may have an opportunity for fast-track approval to participate in the program. Three steps are required to seize this opportunity: Use data analytics to assess current and future percentages of Medicaid utilization and eligibility for federal SSI cash benefits. Determine the feasibility of early cost report filing. Prepare appropriate documentation and undertake the initial enrollment process.

  11. A tracking polarimeter for measuring solar and ionospheric Faraday rotation of signals from deep space probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohlson, J. E.; Levy, G. S.; Stelzried, C. T.

    1974-01-01

    A tracking polarimeter implemented on the 64-m NASA/JPL paraboloid antenna at Goldstone, Calif., is described. Its performance is analyzed and compared with measurements. The system was developed to measure Faraday rotation in the solar corona of the telemetry carrier from the Pioneer VI spacecraft as it was occulted by the sun. It also measures rotation in the earth's ionosphere and is an accurate method of determining spacecraft orientation. The new feature of this system is its use of a pair of quarter-wave plates to allow the synthesis of a rotating feed system, while requiring the rotation of only a single section of waveguide. Since the polarization sensing is done at RF and the receiver operates essentially as a null detector, the system's accuracy is superior to other polarization tracking schemes. In addition, the antenna size and maser preamplifier provide unsurpassed sensitivity. The associated instrumentation used in the Pioneer VI experiment is also described.

  12. Fast track management and control

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, M.D.O.

    1996-12-31

    This paper, one of a group of papers describing the development of BP`s West of Shetland Foinaven field will set-out the challenges experienced in managing a fast-track project from system design through to offshore installation. ABB Seatec Limited (formerly GEC Marconi Oil and Gas) were commissioned to provide a Multiplexed Electro-Hydraulic Subsea Control System designed for deepwater and for installation/retrieval in a hostile environment. The paper will address the projects critical phase, the project controls implemented, the practical working methods used within a Subsea Alliance and those involved in Client Interaction, Concurrent Engineering, Team Coaching, Internal Procedures and Interface Management in order to meet the exacting schedule for First Oil deliveries. The Project is currently proceeding on routine production deliveries to complete the field development requirements.

  13. Adaptive fast interface tracking methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popovic, Jelena; Runborg, Olof

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, we present a fast time adaptive numerical method for interface tracking. The method uses an explicit multiresolution description of the interface, which is represented by wavelet vectors that correspond to the details of the interface on different scale levels. The complexity of standard numerical methods for interface tracking, where the interface is described by N marker points, is O (N / Δt), when a time step Δt is used. The methods that we propose in this paper have O (TOL - 1 / p log ⁡ N + Nlog ⁡ N) computational cost, at least for uniformly smooth problems, where TOL is some given tolerance and p is the order of the time stepping method that is used for time advection of the interface. The adaptive method is robust in the sense that it can handle problems with both smooth and piecewise smooth interfaces (e.g. interfaces with corners) while keeping a low computational cost. We show numerical examples that verify these properties.

  14. Fast sweep-rate plastic Faraday force magnetometer with simultaneous sample temperature measurement.

    PubMed

    Slobinsky, D; Borzi, R A; Mackenzie, A P; Grigera, S A

    2012-12-01

    We present a design for a magnetometer capable of operating at temperatures down to 50 mK and magnetic fields up to 15 T with integrated sample temperature measurement. Our design is based on the concept of a Faraday force magnetometer with a load-sensing variable capacitor. A plastic body allows for fast sweep rates and sample temperature measurement, and the possibility of regulating the initial capacitance simplifies the initial bridge balancing. Under moderate gradient fields of ~1 T/m our prototype performed with a resolution better than 1 × 10(-5) emu. The magnetometer can be operated either in a dc mode, or in an oscillatory mode which allows the determination of the magnetic susceptibility. We present measurements on Dy(2)Ti(2)O(7) and Sr(3)Ru(2)O(7) as an example of its performance.

  15. Fast-track school construction

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, B.M. Jr.

    1997-07-01

    Engineers must provide the best mechanical systems that budget and construction time allow. This school construction project not only successfully balanced these concerns but also addressed indoor air quality issues. The 175,000 sq.ft. Westfield Community School in Community Unit School District 300, Kane County, Ill., was built following a fast-track schedule. Construction began in January 1994 and was completed in August 1996. The building steel and the site utilities were bid and under construction approximately two months before the mechanical, electrical, plumbing, and fire protection work. Westfield Community School houses kindergarten through eighth grade classes. It is an elementary school and middle school that share the same offices, cafeteria, library, multipurpose room, and building services. Three alternatives for the mechanical systems were examined in the initial phase of design for cost and operating characteristics. These were: a central boiler and chiller plant with variable air volume (VAV) distribution and perimeter baseboard radiation; a central boiler and chiller plant with four-pipe distribution supplying hot and chilled water to four-pipe classroom unit ventilators; and a packaged VAV rooftop HVAC unit with gas heating and electric cooling.

  16. Faraday cup with nanosecond response and adjustable impedance for fast electron beam characterization.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jing; Rovey, Joshua L

    2011-07-01

    A movable Faraday cup design with simple structure and adjustable impedance is described in this work. This Faraday cup has external adjustable shunt resistance for self-biased measurement setup and 50 Ω characteristic impedance to match with 50 Ω standard BNC coaxial cable and vacuum feedthroughs for nanosecond-level pulse signal measurements. Adjustable shunt resistance allows self-biased measurements to be quickly acquired to determine the electron energy distribution function. The performance of the Faraday cup is validated by tests of response time and amplitude of output signal. When compared with a reference source, the percent difference of the Faraday cup signal fall time is less than 10% for fall times greater than 10 ns. The percent difference of the Faraday cup signal pulse width is below 6.7% for pulse widths greater than 10 ns. A pseudospark-generated electron beam is used to compare the amplitude of the Faraday cup signal with a calibrated F-70 commercial current transformer. The error of the Faraday cup output amplitude is below 10% for the 4-14 kV tested pseudospark voltages. The main benefit of this Faraday cup is demonstrated by adjusting the external shunt resistance and performing the self-biased method for obtaining the electron energy distribution function. Results from a 4 kV pseudospark discharge indicate a "double-humped" energy distribution.

  17. The Physics of Fast Track

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kibble, Bob

    2007-01-01

    Toys can provide motivational contexts for learning and teaching about physics. A cheap car track provides an almost frictionless environment from which a quantitative study of conservation of energy and circular motion can be made.

  18. The Physics of Fast Track

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kibble, Bob

    2007-01-01

    Toys can provide motivational contexts for learning and teaching about physics. A cheap car track provides an almost frictionless environment from which a quantitative study of conservation of energy and circular motion can be made.

  19. Math on the Fast Track

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Quincy

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author relates how a math-assessment software has allowed his school to track the academic progress of its students. The author relates that in the first year that the software was deployed, schoolwide averages in terms of national standing on the math ITBS rose from the 42nd to 59th percentile. In addition, a significant…

  20. Fast tracking using edge histograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rokita, Przemyslaw

    1997-04-01

    This paper proposes a new algorithm for tracking objects and objects boundaries. This algorithm was developed and applied in a system used for compositing computer generated images and real world video sequences, but can be applied in general in all tracking systems where accuracy and high processing speed are required. The algorithm is based on analysis of histograms obtained by summing along chosen axles pixels of edge segmented images. Edge segmentation is done by spatial convolution using gradient operator. The advantage of such an approach is that it can be performed in real-time using available on the market hardware convolution filters. After edge extraction and histograms computation, respective positions of maximums in edge intensity histograms, in current and previous frame, are compared and matched. Obtained this way information about displacement of histograms maximums, can be directly converted into information about changes of target boundaries positions along chosen axles.

  1. Accelerated Leadership Development: Fast Tracking School Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Earley, Peter; Jones, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    "Accelerated Leadership Development" captures and communicates the lessons learned from successful fast-track leadership programmes in the private and public sector, and provides a model which schools can follow and customize as they plan their own leadership development strategies. As large numbers of headteachers and other senior staff…

  2. Accelerated Leadership Development: Fast Tracking School Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Earley, Peter; Jones, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    "Accelerated Leadership Development" captures and communicates the lessons learned from successful fast-track leadership programmes in the private and public sector, and provides a model which schools can follow and customize as they plan their own leadership development strategies. As large numbers of headteachers and other senior staff…

  3. FATRAS - the ATLAS Fast Track Simulation project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mechnich, Jörg; ATLAS Collaboration

    2011-12-01

    The Monte Carlo simulation of the detector response is an integral component of any analysis performed with data from the LHC experiments. As these simulated data sets must be both large and precise, their production is a CPU-intensive task. ATLAS has developed full and fast detector simulation techniques to achieve this goal within the computing limits of the collaboration. At the current early stages of data-taking, it is necessary to reprocess the Monte Carlo event samples continuously, while integrating adaptations to the simulation modules in order to improve the agreement with data taken by means of the detector itself. FATRAS is a fast track simulation engine which produces a Monte Carlo simulation based on modules and the geometry of the standard ATLAS track reconstruction algorithm. It can be combined with a fast parametrized-response simulation of the calorimeters. This approach shows a high level of agreement with the full simulation, while achieving a relative timing gain of two orders of magnitude. FATRAS was designed to provide a fast feedback cycle for tuning the MC simulation with real data: this includes the material distribution inside the detector, the integration of misalignment and current conditions, as well as calibration at the hit level. We present the updated and calibrated version of FATRAS based on the first LHC data. Extensive comparisons of the fast track simulation with the full simulation and data at 900 GeV are shown.

  4. Fast track pathway for perforated appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Frazee, Richard; Abernathy, Stephen; Davis, Matthew; Isbell, Travis; Regner, Justin; Smith, Randall

    2017-04-01

    Perforated appendicitis is associated with an increased morbidity and length of stay. "Fast track" protocols have demonstrated success in shortening hospitalization without increasing morbidity for a variety of surgical processes. This study evaluates a fast track pathway for perforated appendicitis. In 2013, a treatment pathway for perforated appendicitis was adopted by the Acute Care Surgery Service for patients having surgical management of perforated appendicitis. Interval appendectomy was excluded. Patients were treated initially with intravenous antibiotics and transitioned to oral antibiotics and dismissed when medically stable and tolerating oral intake. A retrospective review of patients managed on the fast track pathway was undertaken to analyze length of stay, morbidity, and readmissions. Thirty-four males and twenty-one females with an average age of 46.8 years underwent laparoscopic appendectomy for perforated appendicitis between January 2013 and December 2014. Pre-existing comorbidities included hypertension 42%, diabetes mellitus 11%, COPD 5% and heart disease 2%. No patient had conversion to open appendectomy. Average length of stay was 2.67 days and ranged from 1 to 12 days (median 2 days). Postoperative morbidity was 20% and included abscess (6 patients), prolonged ileus (3 patients), pneumonia (1 patient), and congestive heart failure (1 patient). Five patients were readmitted for abscess (3 patients), congestive heart failure (1 patient), and pneumonia (1 patient). A fast track pathway for perforated appendicitis produced shorter length of stay and acceptable postoperative morbidity and readmission. This offers the potential for significant cost savings over current national practice patterns. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. 40 CFR 72.82 - Fast-track modifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fast-track modifications. 72.82... (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Permit Revisions § 72.82 Fast-track modifications. The following procedures shall apply to all fast-track modifications. (a) If the Administrator is the permitting authority, the...

  6. 40 CFR 72.82 - Fast-track modifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Fast-track modifications. 72.82... (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Permit Revisions § 72.82 Fast-track modifications. The following procedures shall apply to all fast-track modifications. (a) If the Administrator is the permitting authority, the...

  7. 40 CFR 72.82 - Fast-track modifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fast-track modifications. 72.82... (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Permit Revisions § 72.82 Fast-track modifications. The following procedures shall apply to all fast-track modifications. (a) If the Administrator is the permitting authority, the...

  8. 40 CFR 72.82 - Fast-track modifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fast-track modifications. 72.82... (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Permit Revisions § 72.82 Fast-track modifications. The following procedures shall apply to all fast-track modifications. (a) If the Administrator is the permitting authority, the...

  9. 40 CFR 72.82 - Fast-track modifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Fast-track modifications. 72.82... (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Permit Revisions § 72.82 Fast-track modifications. The following procedures shall apply to all fast-track modifications. (a) If the Administrator is the permitting authority, the...

  10. Design and Construction of a Fast Ion Loss Faraday Cup Array Diagnostic for JET

    SciTech Connect

    D.S. Darrow; S. Bauumel; F.E. Cecil; V. Kiptily; R. Ellis; L. Pedrick; A. Werner

    2004-04-26

    A thin foil Faraday cup array is being built to measure the loss of 3.5 MeV alpha particles and MeV ion cyclotron heating (ICH) tail ions on JET. It will consist of nine detectors spread over five different poloidal locations and three radial positions. They will measure the poloidal distribution and radial scrape off of the losses. The detectors will be comprised of four layers of thin (2.5 micron) Ni foil, giving some resolution of the lost particle energy distribution as different ranges of energies will stop in different layers of the detector. One detector will utilize eight thinner (1.0 micron) foils to obtain a better resolved energy distribution. These detectors will accept particles incident up to 45{sup o} from the normal to the foils.

  11. Detection of nitro-based and peroxide-based explosives by fast polarity-switchable ion mobility spectrometer with ion focusing in vicinity of Faraday detector.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qinghua; Peng, Liying; Jiang, Dandan; Wang, Xin; Wang, Haiyan; Li, Haiyang

    2015-05-29

    Ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) has been widely deployed for on-site detection of explosives. The common nitro-based explosives are usually detected by negative IMS while the emerging peroxide-based explosives are better detected by positive IMS. In this study, a fast polarity-switchable IMS was constructed to detect these two explosive species in a single measurement. As the large traditional Faraday detector would cause a trailing reactant ion peak (RIP), a Faraday detector with ion focusing in vicinity was developed by reducing the detector radius to 3.3 mm and increasing the voltage difference between aperture grid and its front guard ring to 591 V, which could remove trailing peaks from RIP without loss of signal intensity. This fast polarity-switchable IMS with ion focusing in vicinity of Faraday detector was employed to detect a mixture of 10 ng 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and 50 ng hexamethylene triperoxide diamine (HMTD) by polarity-switching, and the result suggested that [TNT-H](-) and [HMTD+H](+) could be detected in a single measurement. Furthermore, the removal of trailing peaks from RIP by the Faraday detector with ion focusing in vicinity also promised the accurate identification of KClO4, KNO3 and S in common inorganic explosives, whose product ion peaks were fairly adjacent to RIP.

  12. Fast Track'' nuclear thermal propulsion concept

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.A.; Zweig, H.R. ); Cooper, M.H.; Wett, J. Jr. )

    1993-01-10

    The objective of the Space Exploration Initiative ( America at the Threshold...,'' 1991) is the exploration of Mars by man in the second decade of the 21st century. The NASA Fast Track'' approach (NASA-LeRC Presentation, 1992) could accelerate the manned exploration of Mars to 2007. NERVA-derived nuclear propulsion represents a viable near-term technology approach to accomplish the accelerated schedule. Key milestones in the progression to the manned Mars mission are (1) demonstration of TRL-6 for the man-rateable system by 1999, (2) a robotic lunar mission by 2000, (3) the first cargo mission to Mars by 2005, and (4) the piloted Mars mission in 2007. The Rocketdyne-Westinghouse concept for nuclear thermal propulsion to achieve these milestones combines the nuclear reactor technology of the Rover/NERVA programs and the state-of-the-art hardware designs from hydrogen-fueled rocket engine successes like the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME).

  13. ``Fast Track'' nuclear thermal propulsion concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Richard A.; Zweig, Herbert R.; Cooper, Martin H.; Wett, Jack

    1993-01-01

    The objective of the Space Exploration Initiative (``America at the Threshold...,'' 1991) is the exploration of Mars by man in the second decade of the 21st century. The NASA ``Fast Track'' approach (NASA-LeRC Presentation, 1992) could accelerate the manned exploration of Mars to 2007. NERVA-derived nuclear propulsion represents a viable near-term technology approach to accomplish the accelerated schedule. Key milestones in the progression to the manned Mars mission are (1) demonstration of TRL-6 for the man-rateable system by 1999, (2) a robotic lunar mission by 2000, (3) the first cargo mission to Mars by 2005, and (4) the piloted Mars mission in 2007. The Rocketdyne-Westinghouse concept for nuclear thermal propulsion to achieve these milestones combines the nuclear reactor technology of the Rover/NERVA programs and the state-of-the-art hardware designs from hydrogen-fueled rocket engine successes like the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME).

  14. Security market reaction to FDA fast track designations.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Christopher W; Zhang, Ying

    2010-01-01

    Pharmaceutical firms can apply for the Food and Drug Administration to 'fast track' research and de velopment on new drugs, accelerating clinical trials and expediting regulatory review required prior to marketing to consumers. We investigate security market reaction to more than 100 fast track designations from 1998 to 2004. Fast track designation appears to enhance investor recognition of firm value. Specifically, fast track designation coincides with abnormal trading volume and excess daily stock returns for sponsoring firms. Institutional ownership and analyst attention also increase. Market response is more pronounced for firms that are smaller, do not yet market products, and have low institutional ownership.

  15. Fast Track: A Language Arts Program for Middle School Gifted

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Jean

    2008-01-01

    "Fast Track" is a pseudonym for an accelerated, advanced language arts program for verbally gifted and high potential students in grades 6-8. The critical thinking model used for "Fast Track" was gleaned from Coalition of Essential Schools founder Ted Sizer's Habits of Mind: significance, evidence, connections, perspective, and supposition, as…

  16. Fast Track: A Language Arts Program for Middle School Gifted

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Jean

    2008-01-01

    "Fast Track" is a pseudonym for an accelerated, advanced language arts program for verbally gifted and high potential students in grades 6-8. The critical thinking model used for "Fast Track" was gleaned from Coalition of Essential Schools founder Ted Sizer's Habits of Mind: significance, evidence, connections, perspective, and supposition, as…

  17. Fast Track Teaching: Beginning the Experiment in Accelerated Leadership Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Churches, Richard; Hutchinson, Geraldine; Jones, Jeff

    2009-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the development of the Fast Track teaching programme and personalised nature of the training and support that has been delivered. Fast Track teacher promotion rates are compared to national statistics demonstrating significant progression for certain groups, particularly women. (Contains 3 tables and 3 figures.)

  18. Fast track surgery accelerates the recovery of postoperative insulin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dong-jie; Zhang, Sheng; He, Wei-ling; Chen, Hua-yun; Cai, Shi-rong; Chen, Chuang-qi; Song, Xin-ming; Cui, Ji; Ma, Jin-Ping; Zhang, Chang-Hua; He, Yu-Long

    2012-09-01

    Few clinical studies or randomized clinical trial results have reported the impact of fast track surgery on postoperative insulin sensitivity. This study aimed to investigate the effects of fast track surgery on postoperative insulin sensitivity in patients undergoing elective open colorectal resection. Controlled, randomized clinical trial was conducted from November 2008 to January 2009 with one-month post-discharge follow-up. Seventy patients with colorectal carcinoma requiring colorectal resection were randomized into two groups: a fast track group (35 cases) and a conventional care group (35 cases). All included patients received elective open colorectal resection with combined tracheal intubation and general anesthesia. Clinical parameters (complication rates, return of gastrointestinal function and postoperative length of stay), stress index and insulin sensitivity were evaluated in both groups perioperatively. Sixty-two patients finally completed the study, 32 cases in the fast-track group and 30 cases in the conventional care group. Our findings revealed a significantly faster recovery of postoperative insulin sensitivity on postoperative day 7 in the fast-track group than that in the conventional care group. We also found a significantly shorter length of postoperative stay and a significantly faster return of gastrointestinal function in patients undergoing fast-track rehabilitation. Fast track surgery accelerates the recovery of postoperative insulin sensitivity in elective surgery for colorectal carcinoma with a shorter length of postoperative hospital stay.

  19. Ultra fast-track extubation in heart transplant surgery patients.

    PubMed

    Kianfar, Amir Abbas; Ahmadi, Zargham Hossein; Mirhossein, Seyed Mohsen; Jamaati, Hamidreza; Kashani, Babak Sharif; Mohajerani, Seyed Amir; Firoozi, Ehsan; Salehi, Farshid; Radmand, Golnar; Hashemian, Seyed Mohammadreza

    2015-01-01

    Heart transplant surgeries using cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) typically requires mechanical ventilation in intensive care units (ICU) in post-operation period. Ultra fast-track extubation (UFE) have been described in patients undergoing various cardiac surgeries. To determine the possibility of ultra-fast-track extubation instead of late extubation in post heart transplant patients. Patients randomly assigned into two groups; Ultra fast-track extubation (UFE) group was defined by extubation inside operating room right after surgery. Late extubation group was defined by patients who were not extubated in operating room and transferred to post operation cardiac care unit (CCU) to extubate. The mean cardiopulmonary bypass time was 136.8 ± 25.7 minutes in ultra-fast extubation and 145.3 ± 29.8 minutes in late extubation patients (P > 0.05). Mechanical ventilation duration (days) was 0 days in ultra-fast and 2.31 ± 1.8 days in late extubation. Length of ICU stay was significantly higher in late extubation group (4.2 ± 1.2 days) than the UFE group (1.72 ± 1.5 days) (P = 0.02). In survival analysis there was no significant difference between ultra-fast and late extubation groups (Log-rank test, P = 0.9). Patients undergoing cardiac transplant could be managed with "ultra-fast-track extubation", without increased morbidity and mortality.

  20. Why Graduate Students Reject the Fast Track

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Mary Ann; Goulden, Marc; Frasch, Karie

    2009-01-01

    The authors recently completed an unparalleled survey, with more than eight thousand doctoral student respondents across the University of California system, and what they heard is worrisome: major research universities may be losing some of the most talented tenure-track academics before they even arrive. In the eyes of many doctoral students,…

  1. Energy Dynamics: A Fast Track Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Stan M.; Hrynyshyn, Alec

    2004-01-01

    Students investigate energy conversions by collaborating to develop a free standing track of plastic tubing through which a ball bearing moves at the fastest possible speed. Friendly competition leads to discussion of what worked and did not work and to the identification and investigation of underlying principles. (Contains 4 charts.)

  2. Low manipulation prevalence following fast-track total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Husted, Henrik; Jørgensen, Christoffer C; Gromov, Kirill; Troelsen, Anders

    2015-02-01

    Postoperative joint stiffness following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) may compromise the outcome and necessitate manipulation. Previous studies have not been in a fast-track setting with optimized pain treatment, early mobilization, and short length of stay (LOS), which may have influenced the prevalence of joint stiffness and subsequent manipulation. We investigated the prevalence of manipulation following fast-track TKA and identified patients at risk of needing manipulation. 3,145 consecutive unselected elective primary unilateral TKA patients operated in 6 departments with well-defined fast-track settings were included in the study. Demographic data, prevalence, type and timing of manipulation, and preoperative and postoperative ROM were recorded prospectively, ensuring complete 1-year follow-up. 70 manipulations were performed within 1 year (2.2%) at a mean of 4 months after index surgery. Younger age and not using walking aids preoperatively were associated with a higher risk of manipulation. LOS ≤ 4 days (as opposed to a longer LOS) was not associated with an increased risk of manipulation. The prevalence of manipulation was lower or comparable to that in most published studies following more conventional pathways. Inherent patient demographics were identified as risk factors for manipulation whereas LOS ≤ 4 days was not. Thus, fast-track TKA does not result in increased risk of manipulation-despite a shorter LOS. Optimized pain treatment and early mobilization may contribute to these favorable results that support the use of fast-track.

  3. Future perspectives and research initiatives in fast-track surgery.

    PubMed

    Kehlet, Henrik

    2006-09-01

    Major surgery is still followed by a risk of morbidity, a need for hospitalisation and convalescence. Fast-track surgery has been introduced as a coordinated effort to combine unimodal evidence-based principles of care into a multi-modal effort to enhance recovery. The aim of this article was to update recent data on fast-track abdominal surgery and outline future strategies for research. The data from fast-track colonic resection support the validity of the concept because pain, ileus, cardiopulmonary function and muscle function were all improved, compared with traditional treatment and with reduced post-operative fatigue and convalescence. Although less data is available, similar positive results may be achieved in other types of major surgery. Current research initiatives include improved multi-modal non-opioid analgesia, rational principles for perioperative fluid management, pharmacological reduction of surgical stress responses and the role of laparoscopic procedures within the fast-track concept. Fast-track surgery has evolved as a valid concept to improve post-operative outcome. Further progress may be expected based upon intensified research within perioperative pathophysiology and a multi-disciplinary collaboration between surgeons, anaesthesiologists and surgical nurses.

  4. Fast Markerless Tracking for Augmented Reality in Planar Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basori, Ahmad Hoirul; Afif, Fadhil Noer; Almazyad, Abdulaziz S.; AbuJabal, Hamza Ali S.; Rehman, Amjad; Alkawaz, Mohammed Hazim

    2015-12-01

    Markerless tracking for augmented reality should not only be accurate but also fast enough to provide a seamless synchronization between real and virtual beings. Current reported methods showed that a vision-based tracking is accurate but requires high computational power. This paper proposes a real-time hybrid-based method for tracking unknown environments in markerless augmented reality. The proposed method provides collaboration of vision-based approach with accelerometers and gyroscopes sensors as camera pose predictor. To align the augmentation relative to camera motion, the tracking method is done by substituting feature-based camera estimation with combination of inertial sensors with complementary filter to provide more dynamic response. The proposed method managed to track unknown environment with faster processing time compared to available feature-based approaches. Moreover, the proposed method can sustain its estimation in a situation where feature-based tracking loses its track. The collaboration of sensor tracking managed to perform the task for about 22.97 FPS, up to five times faster than feature-based tracking method used as comparison. Therefore, the proposed method can be used to track unknown environments without depending on amount of features on scene, while requiring lower computational cost.

  5. Merging Universal and Indicated Prevention Programs: The Fast Track Model

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Fast Track is a multisite, multicomponent preventive intervention for young children at high risk for long-term antisocial behavior. Based on a comprehensive developmental model, this intervention includes a universal-level classroom program plus social-skill training, academic tutoring, parent training, and home visiting to improve competencies and reduce problems in a high-risk group of children selected in kindergarten. The theoretical principles and clinical strategies utilized in the Fast Track Project are described to illustrate the interplay between basic developmental research, the understanding of risk and protective factors, and a research-based model of preventive intervention that integrates universal and indicated models of prevention. PMID:11125779

  6. [Principles of fast track surgery. Multimodal perioperative therapy programme].

    PubMed

    Kehlet, H

    2009-08-01

    Recent evidence has documented that a combination of single-modality evidence-based care principles into a multimodal effort to enhance postoperative recovery (the fast track methodology) has led to enhanced recovery with reduced medical morbidity, need for hospitalisation and convalescence. Nevertheless, general implementation of fast track surgery has been relatively slow despite concomitant economic benefits. Further improvement in postoperative outcome may be obtained by developments within each care principle with a specific focus on minimally invasive surgery, effective multimodal, non-opioid analgesia and pharmacological stress reduction.

  7. Education For All (EFA) - Fast Track Initiative Progress Report 30046

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Bank Education Advisory Service, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Launched in June 2002, the Education For All-Fast Track Initiative (FTI) is a performance-based program focusing on the implementation of sustainable policies in support of universal primary completion (UPC) and the required resource mobilization. During its twenty months of implementation, FTI has delivered on results, which give reason for…

  8. Fast-Track Cleanup at Closing DoD Installations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Fast-Track Cleanup program strives to make parcels available for reuse as quickly as possible by the transfer of uncontaminated or remediated parcels, the lease of contaminated parcels where cleanup is underway, or the 'early transfer' of contaminated property undergoing cleanup.

  9. Fast Track: Elementary School. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2014

    2014-01-01

    "Fast Track" is a comprehensive intervention designed to reduce conduct problems and promote academic, behavioral, and social improvement. The program's components include the "Promoting Alternative THinking Strategies" curriculum, parent groups, parent-child sharing time, child social skills training, home visiting, child…

  10. Fast Track to Success: Top Young Trainers 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freifeld, Lorri

    2012-01-01

    Supercharged. High-performers. Leaders of the pack. This article presents "Training" magazine's 2012 Top Young Trainers--those high-potential training professionals who are on the fast track to success. For the fifth year, "Training" magazine is pleased to recognize the outstanding talents, accomplishments, and leadership exhibited by 40 learning…

  11. Teacher Perspectives on Their Alternative Fast-Track Induction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haim, Orly; Amdur, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the professional challenges and concerns of 30 second career teachers (SCTs) participating in an alternative fast-track induction program during their first year of teaching. Additionally, the study investigated their perspectives of the institutional support provided to them. The main source of data was…

  12. 4D fast tracking for experiments at high luminosity LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neri, N.; Cardini, A.; Calabrese, R.; Fiorini, M.; Luppi, E.; Marconi, U.; Petruzzo, M.

    2016-11-01

    The full exploitation of the physics potential of the high luminosity LHC is a big challenge that requires new instrumentation and innovative solutions. We present here a conceptual design and simulation studies of a fast timing pixel detector with embedded real-time tracking capabilities. The system is conceived to operate at 40 MHz event rate and to reconstruct tracks in real-time, using precise space and time 4D information of the hit, for fast trigger decisions. This work is part of an R&D project aimed at building an innovative tracking detector with superior time (10 ps) and position (10 μm) resolutions to be used in very harsh radiation environments, for the ultimate flavour physics experiment at the high luminosity phase of the LHC.

  13. Fast-track surgery: Toward comprehensive peri-operative care

    PubMed Central

    Nanavati, Aditya J.; Prabhakar, S.

    2014-01-01

    Fast-track surgery is a multimodal approach to patient care using a combination of several evidence-based peri-operative interventions to expedite recovery after surgery. It is an extension of the critical pathway that integrates modalities in surgery, anesthesia, and nutrition, enforces early mobilization and feeding, and emphasizes reduction of the surgical stress response. It entails a great partnership between a surgeon and an anesthesiologist with several other specialists to form a multi-disciplinary team, which may then engage in patient care. The practice of fast-track surgery has yielded excellent results and there has been a significant reduction in hospital stay without a rise in complications or re-admissions. The effective implementation begins with the formulation of a protocol, carrying out each intervention and gathering outcome data. The care of a patient is divided into three phases: Before, during, and after surgery. Each stage needs active participation of few or all the members of the multi-disciplinary team. Other than surgical technique, anesthetic drugs, and techniques form the cornerstone in the ability of the surgeon to carry out a fast-track surgery safely. It is also the role of this team to keep abreast with the latest development in fast-track methodology and make appropriate changes to policy. In the Indian healthcare system, there is a huge benefit that may be achieved by the successful implementation of a fast-track surgery program at an institutional level. The lack of awareness regarding this concept, fear and apprehension regarding its implementation are the main barriers that need to be overcome. PMID:25886214

  14. Fast left ventricle tracking using localized anatomical affine optical flow.

    PubMed

    Queirós, Sandro; Vilaça, João L; Morais, Pedro; Fonseca, Jaime C; D'hooge, Jan; Barbosa, Daniel

    2017-02-16

    In daily clinical cardiology practice, left ventricle (LV) global and regional function assessment is crucial for disease diagnosis, therapy selection and patient follow-up. Currently, this is still a time-consuming task, spending valuable human resources. In this work, a novel fast methodology for automatic LV tracking is proposed based on localized anatomically constrained affine optical flow. This novel method can be combined to previously proposed segmentation frameworks or manually delineated surfaces at an initial frame to obtain fully delineated datasets and, thus, assess both global and regional myocardial function. Its feasibility and accuracy was investigated in three distinct public databases, namely in realistically simulated 3D ultrasound (US), clinical 3D echocardiography and clinical cine cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) images. The method showed accurate tracking results in all databases, proving its applicability and accuracy for myocardial function assessment. Moreover, when combined to previous state-of-the-art segmentation frameworks, it outperformed previous tracking strategies in both 3D US and CMR data, automatically computing relevant cardiac indices with smaller biases and narrower limits of agreement compared to reference indices. Simultaneously, the proposed localized tracking method showed to be suitable for online processing, even for 3D motion assessment. Importantly, although here evaluated for LV tracking only, this novel methodology is applicable for tracking of other target structures with minimal adaptations. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. Nursing role on rapid recovery programmes fast-track.

    PubMed

    Sevillano-Jiménez, Alfonso; Romero-Saldaña, Manuel; Molina-Recio, Guillermo

    2017-07-27

    Rapid recovery (RR) or fast-track programmes are aimed at reducing surgical stress, leading to a reduction in nurse workload, costs and hospital stay, greater patient empowerment, early post-surgical recovery and reduced morbidity and mortality. These new protocols require the coordinated participation of a multidisciplinary team. Based on an integrative review of the literature, this paper aims to define the concept of a RR or fast track programme and show the existing evidence on the implementation of these programmes in nursing. The benefits and low incidence of damage of RR programmes in nursing justify their implementation. The programmes require greater support and diffusion in order to develop, as well as more research to increase the evidence on the effectiveness and efficiency of the protocols. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. A fast numerical integrator for relativistic charged particle tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, Ji

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we report on a fast second-order numerical integrator to solve the Lorentz force equations of a relativistic charged particle in electromagnetic fields. This numerical integrator shows less numerical error than the popular Boris algorithm in tracking the relativistic particle subject to electric and magnetic space-charge fields and requires less number of operations than another recently proposed relativistic integrator.

  17. Fast-track cardiac care for adult cardiac surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Wong, Wai-Tat; Lai, Veronica Kw; Chee, Yee Eot; Lee, Anna

    2016-09-12

    Fast-track cardiac care is a complex intervention involving several components of care during cardiac anaesthesia and in the postoperative period, with the ultimate aim of early extubation after surgery, to reduce length of stay in the intensive care unit and in the hospital. Safe and effective fast-track cardiac care may reduce hospital costs. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2003, updated in 2012 and updated now in 2016. To determine the safety and effectiveness of fast-track cardiac care compared with conventional (not fast-track) care in adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Fast-track cardiac care intervention includes administration of low-dose opioid-based general anaesthesia or use of a time-directed extubation protocol, or both. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2015, Issue 5), MEDLINE (January 2012 to May 2015), Embase (January 2012 to May 2015), the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL; January 2012 to May 2015) and the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) Web of Science (January 2012 to May 2015), along with reference lists of articles, to identify additional trials. We applied no language restrictions. We included all randomized controlled trials of adult cardiac surgical patients (coronary artery bypass grafts, aortic valve replacement, mitral valve replacement) that compared fast-track cardiac care and conventional (not fast-track) care groups. We focused on the following fast-track interventions, which were designed for early extubation after surgery: administration of low-dose opioid-based general anaesthesia during cardiac surgery and use of a time-directed extubation protocol after surgery. The primary outcome was risk of mortality. Secondary outcomes included postoperative complications, reintubation within 24 hours of surgery, time to extubation, length of stay in the intensive care unit and in the hospital, quality of life after surgery and

  18. From the Fast Track to the Fast Lane--To What?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weininger, Otto

    1990-01-01

    Young children are being fast tracked at early age because of pressures from parents, schools, society, and media. One result is troubled teenagers who experience stress of these pressures without having adult means to cope with them. Time spent with parents and in play activities are activities that help children to gain security, happiness, and…

  19. Fast-track cardiac care for adult cardiac surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Fang; Lee, Anna; Chee, Yee Eot

    2012-10-17

    Fast-track cardiac care is a complex intervention involving several components of care during cardiac anaesthesia and in the postoperative period, all with the ultimate aim of early extubation after surgery, to reduce the length of stay in the intensive care unit and in the hospital. Safe and effective fast-track cardiac care may reduce hospital costs. This is an update of a Cochrane review published in 2003. To update the evidence on the safety and effectiveness of fast-track cardiac care compared to conventional (not fast-track) care in adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (2012, Issue 3), MEDLINE (January 1966 to April 2012), EMBASE (January 1980 to April 2012), CINAHL (January 1982 to April 2012), and ISI Web of Science (January 2003 to April 2012). We searched reference lists of articles and contacted experts in the field. All randomized controlled trials of adult cardiac surgical patients (coronary artery bypass grafts, aortic valve replacement, mitral valve replacement) that compared fast-track cardiac care and conventional (not fast-track) care groups were included. We focused on the following fast-track interventions that were designed for early extubation after surgery, administration of low-dose opioid based general anaesthesia during cardiac surgery and the use of a time-directed extubation protocol after surgery. The primary outcome was the risk of mortality. Secondary outcomes included postoperative complications, reintubation within 24 hours of surgery, time to extubation, length of stay in the intensive care unit and in the hospital, quality of life after surgery and hospital costs. Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted the data. Study authors were contacted for additional information. We used a random-effects model and reported relative risk (RR), mean difference (MD) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). Twenty-five trials involving 4118

  20. Fast calibration of electromagnetically tracked oblique-viewing rigid endoscopes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinyang; Rice, Christina E; Shekhar, Raj

    2017-06-16

    The oblique-viewing (i.e., angled) rigid endoscope is a commonly used tool in conventional endoscopic surgeries. The relative rotation between its two moveable parts, the telescope and the camera head, creates a rotation offset between the actual and the projection of an object in the camera image. A calibration method tailored to compensate such offset is needed. We developed a fast calibration method for oblique-viewing rigid endoscopes suitable for clinical use. In contrast to prior approaches based on optical tracking, we used electromagnetic (EM) tracking as the external tracking hardware to improve compactness and practicality. Two EM sensors were mounted on the telescope and the camera head, respectively, with considerations to minimize EM tracking errors. Single-image calibration was incorporated into the method, and a sterilizable plate, laser-marked with the calibration pattern, was also developed. Furthermore, we proposed a general algorithm to estimate the rotation center in the camera image. Formulas for updating the camera matrix in terms of clockwise and counterclockwise rotations were also developed. The proposed calibration method was validated using a conventional [Formula: see text], 5-mm laparoscope. Freehand calibrations were performed using the proposed method, and the calibration time averaged 2 min and 8 s. The calibration accuracy was evaluated in a simulated clinical setting with several surgical tools present in the magnetic field of EM tracking. The root-mean-square re-projection error averaged 4.9 pixel (range 2.4-8.5 pixel, with image resolution of [Formula: see text] for rotation angles ranged from [Formula: see text] to [Formula: see text]. We developed a method for fast and accurate calibration of oblique-viewing rigid endoscopes. The method was also designed to be performed in the operating room and will therefore support clinical translation of many emerging endoscopic computer-assisted surgical systems.

  1. Ultra-Fast Silicon Detectors for 4D tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sola, V.; Arcidiacono, R.; Bellora, A.; Cartiglia, N.; Cenna, F.; Cirio, R.; Durando, S.; Ferrero, M.; Galloway, Z.; Gruey, B.; Freeman, P.; Mashayekhi, M.; Mandurrino, M.; Monaco, V.; Mulargia, R.; Obertino, M. M.; Ravera, F.; Sacchi, R.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Seiden, A.; Spencer, N.; Staiano, A.; Wilder, M.; Woods, N.; Zatserklyaniy, A.

    2017-02-01

    We review the progress toward the development of a novel type of silicon detectors suited for tracking with a picosecond timing resolution, the so called Ultra-Fast Silicon Detectors. The goal is to create a new family of particle detectors merging excellent position and timing resolution with GHz counting capabilities, very low material budget, radiation resistance, fine granularity, low power, insensitivity to magnetic field, and affordability. We aim to achieve concurrent precisions of ~ 10 ps and ~ 10 μm with a 50 μm thick sensor. Ultra-Fast Silicon Detectors are based on the concept of Low-Gain Avalanche Detectors, which are silicon detectors with an internal multiplication mechanism so that they generate a signal which is factor ~ 10 larger than standard silicon detectors.

  2. X-33 Environmental Impact Statement: A Fast Track Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCaleb, Rebecca C.; Holland, Donna L.

    1998-01-01

    NASA is required by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) to prepare an appropriate level environmental analysis for its major projects. Development of the X-33 Technology Demonstrator and its associated flight test program required an environmental impact statement (EIS) under the NEPA. The EIS process is consists of four parts: the "Notice of Intent" to prepare an EIS and scoping; the draft EIS which is distributed for review and comment; the final ETS; and the "Record of Decision." Completion of this process normally takes from 2 - 3 years, depending on the complexity of the proposed action. Many of the agency's newest fast track, technology demonstration programs require NEPA documentation, but cannot sustain the lengthy time requirement between program concept development to implementation. Marshall Space Flight Center, in cooperation with Kennedy Space Center, accomplished the NEPA process for the X-33 Program in 13 months from Notice of Intent to Record of Decision. In addition, the environmental team implemented an extensive public involvement process, conducting a total of 23 public meetings for scoping and draft EIS comment along with numerous informal meetings with public officials, civic organizations, and Native American Indians. This paper will discuss the fast track approach used to successfully accomplish the NEPA process for X-33 on time.

  3. Fast Track intervention effects on youth arrests and delinquency

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the effects of the Fast Track preventive intervention on youth arrests and self-reported delinquent behavior through age 19. High-risk youth randomly assigned to receive a long-term, comprehensive preventive intervention from 1st grade through 10th grade at four sites were compared to high-risk control youth. Findings indicated that random assignment to Fast Track reduced court-recorded juvenile arrest activity based on a severity weighted sum of juvenile arrests. Supplementary analyses revealed an intervention effect on the reduction in the number of court-recorded moderate-severity juvenile arrests, relative to control children. In addition, among youth with higher initial behavioral risk, the intervention reduced the number of high-severity adult arrests relative to the control youth. Survival analyses examining the onset of arrests and delinquent behavior revealed a similar pattern of findings. Intervention decreased the probability of any juvenile arrest among intervention youth not previously arrested. In addition, intervention decreased the probability of a self-reported high-severity offense among youth with no previous self-reported high-severity offense. Intervention effects were also evident on the onset of high-severity court-recorded adult arrests among participants, but these effects varied by site. The current findings suggest that comprehensive preventive intervention can prevent juvenile arrest rates, although the presence and nature of intervention effects differs by outcome. PMID:20577576

  4. Fast regional readout CMOS Image Sensor for dynamic MLC tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zin, H.; Harris, E.; Osmond, J.; Evans, P.

    2014-03-01

    Advanced radiotherapy techniques such as volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) require verification of the complex beam delivery including tracking of multileaf collimators (MLC) and monitoring the dose rate. This work explores the feasibility of a prototype Complementary metal-oxide semiconductor Image Sensor (CIS) for tracking these complex treatments by utilising fast, region of interest (ROI) read out functionality. An automatic edge tracking algorithm was used to locate the MLC leaves edges moving at various speeds (from a moving triangle field shape) and imaged with various sensor frame rates. The CIS demonstrates successful edge detection of the dynamic MLC motion within accuracy of 1.0 mm. This demonstrates the feasibility of the sensor to verify treatment delivery involving dynamic MLC up to ~400 frames per second (equivalent to the linac pulse rate), which is superior to any current techniques such as using electronic portal imaging devices (EPID). CIS provides the basis to an essential real-time verification tool, useful in accessing accurate delivery of complex high energy radiation to the tumour and ultimately to achieve better cure rates for cancer patients.

  5. Fast molecular tracking maps nanoscale dynamics of plasma membrane lipids

    PubMed Central

    Sahl, Steffen J.; Leutenegger, Marcel; Hilbert, Michael; Hell, Stefan W.; Eggeling, Christian

    2010-01-01

    We describe an optical method capable of tracking a single fluorescent molecule with a flexible choice of high spatial accuracy (∼10–20 nm standard deviation or ∼20–40 nm full-width-at-half-maximum) and temporal resolution (< 1 ms). The fluorescence signal during individual passages of fluorescent molecules through a spot of excitation light allows the sequential localization and thus spatio-temporal tracking of the molecule if its fluorescence is collected on at least three separate point detectors arranged in close proximity. We show two-dimensional trajectories of individual, small organic dye labeled lipids diffusing in the plasma membrane of living cells and directly observe transient events of trapping on < 20 nm spatial scales. The trapping is cholesterol-assisted and much more pronounced for a sphingo- than for a phosphoglycero-lipid, with average trapping times of ∼15 ms and < 4 ms, respectively. The results support previous STED nanoscopy measurements and suggest that, at least for nontreated cells, the transient interaction of a single lipid is confined to macromolecular dimensions. Our experimental approach demonstrates that fast molecular movements can be tracked with minimal invasion, which can reveal new important details of cellular nano-organization. PMID:20351247

  6. Fast-Acquisition/Weak-Signal-Tracking GPS Receiver for HEO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wintemitz, Luke; Boegner, Greg; Sirotzky, Steve

    2004-01-01

    A report discusses the technical background and design of the Navigator Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver -- . a radiation-hardened receiver intended for use aboard spacecraft. Navigator is capable of weak signal acquisition and tracking as well as much faster acquisition of strong or weak signals with no a priori knowledge or external aiding. Weak-signal acquisition and tracking enables GPS use in high Earth orbits (HEO), and fast acquisition allows for the receiver to remain without power until needed in any orbit. Signal acquisition and signal tracking are, respectively, the processes of finding and demodulating a signal. Acquisition is the more computationally difficult process. Previous GPS receivers employ the method of sequentially searching the two-dimensional signal parameter space (code phase and Doppler). Navigator exploits properties of the Fourier transform in a massively parallel search for the GPS signal. This method results in far faster acquisition times [in the lab, 12 GPS satellites have been acquired with no a priori knowledge in a Low-Earth-Orbit (LEO) scenario in less than one second]. Modeling has shown that Navigator will be capable of acquiring signals down to 25 dB-Hz, appropriate for HEO missions. Navigator is built using the radiation-hardened ColdFire microprocessor and housing the most computationally intense functions in dedicated field-programmable gate arrays. The high performance of the algorithm and of the receiver as a whole are made possible by optimizing computational efficiency and carefully weighing tradeoffs among the sampling rate, data format, and data-path bit width.

  7. National Diffusion Network's Evaluation of the Fast Track Music System 1992-93.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szymczuk, Michael

    This document reports on an evaluation project to determine the effectiveness of the Fast Track method of instrumental music instruction as applied to beginning band instruction. The Fast Track music system is unique because it simultaneously aids both visual and aural learning by using a book and cassette tape approach to instruction. Traditional…

  8. Financing Access and Participation in Primary Education: Is There a "Fast-Track" for Fragile States?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turrent, Victoria

    2011-01-01

    Despite moves to "fast-track" progress towards universal primary education, few fragile states have been able to access Fast Track Initiative (FTI) funding facilities. Weak systems and capacity have made these countries a high-risk proposition for donor investment. The absence of credible education sector plans has meant that the majority of…

  9. "Fast Track" and "Traditional Path" Coaches: Affordances, Agency and Social Capital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rynne, Steven

    2014-01-01

    A recent development in large-scale coach accreditation (certification) structures has been the "fast tracking" of former elite athletes. Former elite athletes are often exempted from entry-level qualifications and are generally granted access to fast track courses that are shortened versions of the accreditation courses undertaken by…

  10. Fast TracKer: A fast hardware track trigger for the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandini, Carlo; Atlas Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The trigger system at the ATLAS experiment is designed to lower the event rate occurring from the nominal bunch crossing rate of 40 MHz to about 1 kHz for a LHC luminosity of the order of 1034cm-2s-1. To achieve high background rejection while maintaining good efficiency for interesting physics signals, sophisticated algorithms are needed which require an extensive use of tracking information. The Fast TracKer (FTK) trigger system, part of the ATLAS trigger upgrade program, is a highly parallel hardware device designed to perform track-finding at 100 kHz. Modern, powerful Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) form an important part of the system architecture, and the combinatorial problem of pattern recognition is solved by 8000 standard-cell ASICs used to implement an Associative Memory architecture. The availability of the tracking and subsequent vertex information within a short latency ensures robust selections and allows improved trigger performance for the most difficult signatures, such as b-jets and τ leptons.

  11. Semisynthetic photoprotein reporters for tracking fast Ca(2+) transients.

    PubMed

    Malikova, Natalia P; Borgdorff, Aren J; Vysotski, Eugene S

    2015-12-01

    Changes in the intracellular concentration of free ionized calcium ([Ca(2+)]i) control a host of cellular processes as varied as vision, muscle contraction, neuronal signal transmission, proliferation, apoptosis etc. The disturbance in Ca(2+)-signaling causes many severe diseases. To understand the mechanisms underlying the control by calcium and how disorder of this regulation relates to pathological conditions, it is necessary to measure [Ca(2+)]i. The Ca(2+)-regulated photoproteins which are responsible for bioluminescence of marine coelenterates have been successfully used for this purpose over the years. Here we report the results on comparative characterization of bioluminescence properties of aequorin from Aequorea victoria, obelin from Obelia longissima, and clytin from Clytia gregaria charged by native coelenterazine and coelenterazine analogues f, i, and hcp. The comparison of specific bioluminescence activity, stability, emission spectra, stopped-flow kinetics, sensitivity to calcium, and effect of physiological concentrations of Mg(2+) establishes obelin-hcp as an excellent semisynthetic photoprotein to keep track of fast intracellular Ca(2+) transients. The rate of rise of its light signal on a sudden change of [Ca(2+)] is almost 3- and 11-fold higher than those of obelin and aequorin with native coelenterazine, respectively, and 20 times higher than that of the corresponding aequorin-hcp. In addition, obelin-hcp preserves a high specific bioluminescence activity and displays higher Ca(2+)-sensitivity as compared to obelin charged by native coelenterazine and sensitivity to Ca(2+) comparable with those of aequorin-f and aequorin-hcp.

  12. Making an ED fast track exactly that--fast and efficient.

    PubMed

    Guido, Kathy

    2007-01-01

    Medical facilities must streamline their processes if they want to maintain quality care while reducing costs. In 2005, Benedictine Hospital's struggle to operate more productively, efficiently, and profitably dissipated when it streamlined the administrative process of billing patients for chemotherapy treatments. In 2006, it applied similar changes to effectively treat patients while efficiently processing them through its fast track emergency department. Over the last two decades, The Hudson Valley Technology Development Center (HVTDC) has worked primarily with manufacturing- and technology-based companies to help them adopt new business practices in order to grow and to work more efficiently, effectively, and profitably by streamlining daily operations. In recent years, HVTDC has chosen to introduce the long-established and widely proven principles of lean manufacturing to medical facilities.

  13. Ultrafast Faraday Rotation of Slow Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musorin, A. I.; Sharipova, M. I.; Dolgova, T. V.; Inoue, M.; Fedyanin, A. A.

    2016-08-01

    The active control of optical signals in the time domain is what science and technology demand in fast all-optical information processing. Nanostructured materials can modify the group velocity and slow the light down, as the artificial light dispersion emerges. We observe the ultrafast temporal behavior of the Faraday rotation within a single femtosecond laser pulse under conditions of slow light in a one-dimensional magnetophotonic crystal. The Faraday effect changes by 20% over the time of 150 fs. This might be applicable to the fast control of light in high-capacity photonic devices.

  14. Fast-track Rehabilitation Accelerates Recovery After Laparoscopic Colorectal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Dakwar, Anthony; Sivkovits, Krina; Mahajna, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    Background: Fast-track (FT) rehabilitation protocols have been shown to be successful in reducing both hospital stay and postoperative complications, as well as enhancing overall postoperative patient recovery. We are reporting the outcomes of our first group of patients undergoing colorectal surgery following the FT protocol. Patients and Methods: We performed a prospective study of patients, between January 1, 2007 and January 31, 2010, who underwent laparoscopic colorectal resections in accordance with the guidelines of FT rehabilitation protocol. Recovery parameters including time to removal of naso-gastric tube and urinary catheter, time to bowel function and to resume diet, and length of hospital stay were evaluated. Postoperative outcomes, that is, postoperative complications and mortality, reoperations, and readmissions were also studied. Results: A total of 71 patients, 30 women and 41 men, underwent FT rehabilitation for laparoscopic colorectal surgery. The mean age of the patients was 60 ± 16 years. The most common surgical procedures were right hemicolectomy 30% and anterior resection 27%. Liquid and regular diet were initiated on postoperative day 1.2 ± 0.4 and 2.1 ± 0.4, respectively. Overall postoperative morbidity was 8.5%. The mean length of stay was 4.4 ± 1.7 days, with only 3 readmissions. Forty-five patients fulfilled the FT care plan and were discharged on postoperative day 3. No reoperations or mortality were observed. Conclusions: FT rehabilitation results in favorable postoperative outcomes. Our data provides evidence and suggests that FT protocols should be implemented as a reliable method of preparation and recovery for laparoscopic colorectal surgery. PMID:25489207

  15. Fast track for elderly patients: is it feasible for colorectal surgery?

    PubMed

    Compagna, Rita; Aprea, Giovanni; De Rosa, Davide; Gentile, Maurizio; Cestaro, Giovanni; Vigliotti, Gabriele; Bianco, Tommaso; Massa, Guido; Amato, Maurizio; Massa, Salvatore; Amato, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Fast-track program has been applied in several surgical fields. However, currently many surgical patients are elderly over 70 years of age, and discussion about the application of such protocols for elderly patients is inadequate. The present study was designed to consider the safety and feasibility of application of a fast-track program after colorectal surgery in elderly patients. A total of 76 elderly patients with colorectal cancer who underwent laparoscopic colorectal resection were randomly assigned to receive either the fast-track care program (n = 40) or the conventional perioperative care protocol (control group, n = 36). The fast track protocol included no preoperative mechanical bowel irrigation, immediate oral alimentation and earlier postoperative ambulation exercise. The length of postoperative hospital stay, the length of time to regain bowel function and the rate of postoperative complications were compared between the two groups. The length of time to regain bowel function, including the passage of flatus [32 (24-40) h vs 42 (32-52) h], and to start a liquid diet (13 [10-16] h v/s 43 [36-50] h) were significantly shorter in patients receiving the fast track care protocol compared with those receiving the conventional care protocol. A shorter duration of postoperative hospital stay was recorded in patients receiving the fast-track program than in those receiving conventional care [6 (5-7) days v/s 9.5 (7-12) days]. A reduced percentage of patients who developed general complications was also observed in the fast-track group (5.0% v/s 18%). Fast-track after laparoscopic colorectal surgery can be safely applied in carefully selected elderly patients older than age 70 years. The fast-track recovery program resulted in a more rapid postoperative recovery, earlier discharge from hospital and fewer general complications compared with a conventional postoperative protocol. Copyright © 2014 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  16. Faraday rotation measurement method and apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brockman, M. H. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A method and device for measuring Faraday rotation of a received RF signal is described. A simultaneous orthogonal polarization receiver compensates for a 3 db loss due to splitting of a received signal into left circular and right circular polarization channels. The compensation is achieved by RF and modulation arraying utilizing a specific receiver array which also detects and measures Faraday rotation in the presence or absence of spin stabilization effects on a linear polarization vector. Either up-link or down-link measurement of Faraday rotation is possible. Specifically, the Faraday measurement apparatus utilized in conjunction with the specific receiver array provides a means for comparing the phase of a reference signal in the receiver array to the phase of a tracking loop signal related to the incoming signal, and comparing the phase of the reference signal to the phase of the tracking signal shifted in phase by 90 degrees. The averaged and unaveraged signals, are compared, the phase changes between the two signals being related to Faraday rotation.

  17. Fast polarization-state tracking scheme based on radius-directed linear Kalman filter.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yanfu; Cao, Guoliang; Zhong, Kangping; Zhou, Xian; Yao, Yong; Lau, Alan Pak Tao; Lu, Chao

    2015-07-27

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a fast polarization tracking scheme based on radius-directed linear Kalman filter. It has the advantages of fast convergence and is inherently insensitive to phase noise and frequency offset effects. The scheme is experimentally compared to conventional polarization tracking methods on the polarization rotation angular frequency. The results show that better tracking capability with more than one order of magnitude improvement is obtained in the cases of polarization multiplexed QPSK and 16QAM signals. The influences of the filter tuning parameters on tracking performance are also investigated in detail.

  18. 42 CFR 422.626 - Fast-track appeals of service terminations to independent review entities (IREs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Fast-track appeals of service terminations to... ADVANTAGE PROGRAM Grievances, Organization Determinations and Appeals § 422.626 Fast-track appeals of service terminations to independent review entities (IREs). (a) Enrollee's right to a fast-track appeal of...

  19. 42 CFR 422.626 - Fast-track appeals of service terminations to independent review entities (IREs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Fast-track appeals of service terminations to... ADVANTAGE PROGRAM Grievances, Organization Determinations and Appeals § 422.626 Fast-track appeals of service terminations to independent review entities (IREs). (a) Enrollee's right to a fast-track appeal of...

  20. 42 CFR 422.626 - Fast-track appeals of service terminations to independent review entities (IREs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fast-track appeals of service terminations to... Grievances, Organization Determinations and Appeals § 422.626 Fast-track appeals of service terminations to independent review entities (IREs). (a) Enrollee's right to a fast-track appeal of an MA organization's...

  1. 42 CFR 422.626 - Fast-track appeals of service terminations to independent review entities (IREs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fast-track appeals of service terminations to... Grievances, Organization Determinations and Appeals § 422.626 Fast-track appeals of service terminations to independent review entities (IREs). (a) Enrollee's right to a fast-track appeal of an MA organization's...

  2. 42 CFR 422.626 - Fast-track appeals of service terminations to independent review entities (IREs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Fast-track appeals of service terminations to... ADVANTAGE PROGRAM Grievances, Organization Determinations and Appeals § 422.626 Fast-track appeals of service terminations to independent review entities (IREs). (a) Enrollee's right to a fast-track appeal of...

  3. Michael Faraday's Bicentenary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, L. Pearce; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Six articles discuss the work of Michael Faraday, a chemist whose work revolutionized physics and led directly to both classical field and relativity theory. The scientist as a young man, the electromagnetic experiments of Faraday, his search for the gravelectric effect, his work on optical glass, his laboratory notebooks, and his creative use of…

  4. Broadband Faraday isolator.

    PubMed

    Berent, Michał; Rangelov, Andon A; Vitanov, Nikolay V

    2013-01-01

    Driving on an analogy with the technique of composite pulses in quantum physics, we theoretically propose a broadband Faraday rotator and thus a broadband optical isolator, which is composed of sequences of ordinary Faraday rotators and achromatic quarter-wave plates rotated at the predetermined angles.

  5. Michael Faraday's Bicentenary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, L. Pearce; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Six articles discuss the work of Michael Faraday, a chemist whose work revolutionized physics and led directly to both classical field and relativity theory. The scientist as a young man, the electromagnetic experiments of Faraday, his search for the gravelectric effect, his work on optical glass, his laboratory notebooks, and his creative use of…

  6. 77 FR 1697 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Fast Track Generic Clearance for the Collection of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Indian Health Service Agency Information Collection Activities: Fast Track Generic Clearance for the Collection of Qualitative Feedback on Agency Service Delivery: IHS Web Site Customer... on Agency Service Delivery: IHS Web site Customer Service Satisfaction Survey. Abstract: The...

  7. The influence of preoperative risk stratification on fast-tracking patients after pulmonary resection.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Ayesha S; Cerfolio, Robert J

    2008-02-01

    Fast-tracking protocols or postoperative care computerized algorithms have been shown to reduce hospital length of stay and reduce costs; however, not all patients can be fast-tracked. Certain patient characteristics may put patients at increased risk to fail fast-tracking. Additionally some patients have multiple risk factors that have an additive effect that puts them at an even increased risk to fail fast-tracking, and more importantly, to significant morbidity. It is a mistake to force these protocols on all patients because it can lead to increased complications, readmissions, and low patient and family satisfaction. By carefully analyzing surgical results via accurate prospective databases, the types of patients who fail fast-tracking and the reasons they fail can be identified. Once these characteristics are pinpointed, specific changes to the postoperative algorithm can be implemented, and these alterations can lead to improved outcomes. The authors have shown that by using pain pumps instead of epidurals in elderly patients we can improve outcomes and still fast-track octogenarians with minimal morbidity and high-patient satisfaction. We have also shown that the increased use of physical therapy and respiratory treatments (important parts of the care of all patients after pulmonary resection, but a limited resource in most hospitals) may also lead to improved surgical results for those who have low FEV1% and DLco%. Further studies are needed. Although fast-tracking protocols cannot be applied to all, the vast majority of patients who undergo elective pulmonary resection, even those at high risk, can undergo safe, efficient, and cost-saving care via preset postoperative algorithms. When the typical daily events are convened each morning and the planned date of discharge is frequently communicated with the patient and family before surgery and each day in the hospital, most patients can be safely fast-tracked with high satisfaction and outstanding results.

  8. Real time Faraday spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Tommy E.; Struve, Kenneth W.; Colella, Nicholas J.

    1991-01-01

    This invention uses a dipole magnet to bend the path of a charged particle beam. As the deflected particles exit the magnet, they are spatially dispersed in the bend-plane of the magnet according to their respective momenta and pass to a plurality of chambers having Faraday probes positioned therein. Both the current and energy distribution of the particles is then determined by the non-intersecting Faraday probes located along the chambers. The Faraday probes are magnetically isolated from each other by thin metal walls of the chambers, effectively providing real time current-versus-energy particle measurements.

  9. A novel fast target tracking method for UAV aerial image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jianfang, Liu; Hao, Zheng; Jingli, Gao

    2017-06-01

    Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) are able to achieve autonomous flight without drivers, and UAV has been a key tool to extract space data. Therefore, how to detect the trajectories of targets from UAV aerial image sequences is of great importance. Because local features are suitable to detect target tracking, we exploit scaleinvariant feature transform (SIFT) features to describe the interesting keypoints of targets. The main innovation of this paper is to utilize Multiple hypothesis tracking (MHT) algorithm to track an object (target) in a series of image sequences. Particularly, we develop a MHT framework based on a multidimensional assignment formulation and a sliding time window policy. To obtain target tracking from UAV aerial image sequences, three steps should be done, that is, 1) Breaking each track set into tracklet at a specific time, 2) Estimating the association cost of each track set, 3) Merging trajectory fragments to a longer one iteratively. Finally, we collect several UAV aerial image sequences with different target density to construct a dataset, and experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  10. Fast neutron detection with coincidence counting of recoil tracks in CR-39

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lengar, I.; Skvarč, J.; Ilić, R.

    2002-06-01

    Unpredictable background is often the major drawback in the assessment of low fluences of fast neutrons with solid state nuclear track detectors. The problem can be effectively solved by counting coincidence tracks in two detector foils that are in close contact during the irradiation. The detection of fast neutrons performed with a pair of CR-39 detector foils, subsequent chemical etching and evaluation of the etched tracks by an automatic track counting system was studied. After counting, only tracks produced by the same recoil nuclei in the surface layers of both detector foils were taken into account. In this way, the background due to objects that cannot be separated from tracks by an automatic counting system was drastically reduced. Emphasis was given to determining the properties of such a coincidence fast neutron detector based on utilisation of CR-39. The response of the coincidence detector was found to be 3×10 -5 tracks/neutron and is comparable with a detector based on counting tracks in a single foil of CR-39. The lower neutron detection limit was found to be 2×10 4 cm -2 with a counting area of 10 cm 2, and is two orders of magnitude lower than that obtained with a detector based on counting tracks in a single foil of CR-39.

  11. Michael Faraday, media man.

    PubMed

    Fara, Patricia

    2006-03-01

    Michael Faraday was an enthusiastic portrait collector, and he welcomed the invention of photography not only as a possible means of recording observations accurately, but also as a method for advertising science and its practitioners. This article (which is part of the Science in the Industrial Revolution series) shows that like many eminent scientists, Faraday took advantage of the burgeoning Victorian media industry by posing in various roles.

  12. The Fleet Application for Scheduling and Tracking (FAST) Management Website

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marrero-Perez, Radames J.

    2014-01-01

    The FAST application was designed to replace the paper and pen method of checking out and checking in GSA Vehicles at KSC. By innovating from a paper and pen based checkout system to a fully digital one, not only the resources wasted by printing the checkout forms have been reduced, but it also reduces significantly the time that users and fleet managers need to interact with the system as well as improving the record accuracy for each vehicle. The vehicle information is pulled from a centralized database server in the SPSDL. In an attempt to add a new feature to the FAST application, the author of this report (alongside the FAST developers) has been designing and developing the FAST Management Website. The GSA fleet managers had to rely on the FAST developers in order to add new vehicles, edit vehicles and previous transactions, or for generating vehicles reports. By providing an easy-to-use FAST Management Website portal, the GSA fleet managers are now able to easily move vehicles, edit records, and print reports.

  13. Study of hardware implementations of fast tracking algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Z.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dong, J.; Huang, G.; Léonard, A.; Robert, F.; Wang, D.; Yang, Y.

    2017-02-01

    Real-time track reconstruction at high event rates is a major challenge for future experiments in high energy physics. To perform pattern-recognition and track fitting, artificial retina or Hough transformation methods have been introduced in the field which have to be implemented in FPGA firmware. In this note we report on a case study of a possible FPGA hardware implementation approach of the retina algorithm based on a Floating-Point core. Detailed measurements with this algorithm are investigated. Retina performance and capabilities of the FPGA are discussed along with perspectives for further optimization and applications.

  14. Time-driven Activity-based Cost of Fast-Track Total Hip and Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Andreasen, Signe E; Holm, Henriette B; Jørgensen, Mira; Gromov, Kirill; Kjærsgaard-Andersen, Per; Husted, Henrik

    2017-06-01

    Fast-track total hip and knee arthroplasty (THA and TKA) has been shown to reduce the perioperative convalescence resulting in less postoperative morbidity, earlier fulfillment of functional milestones, and shorter hospital stay. As organizational optimization is also part of the fast-track methodology, the result could be a more cost-effective pathway altogether. As THA and TKA are potentially costly procedures and the numbers are increasing in an economical limited environment, the aim of this study is to present baseline detailed economical calculations of fast-track THA and TKA and compare this between 2 departments with different logistical set-ups. Prospective data collection was analyzed using the time-driven activity-based costing method (TDABC) on time consumed by different staff members involved in patient treatment in the perioperative period of fast-track THA and TKA in 2 Danish orthopedic departments with standardized fast-track settings, but different logistical set-ups. Length of stay was median 2 days in both departments. TDABC revealed minor differences in the perioperative settings between departments, but the total cost excluding the prosthesis was similar at USD 2511 and USD 2551, respectively. Fast-track THA and TKA results in similar cost despite differences in the organizational set-up. Compared to cost associated with longer more conventional published pathways, fast-track is cheaper, which on top of the favorable published clinical outcome adds to cost efficiency and the potential for economic savings. Detailed baseline TDABC calculations are provided for comparison and further optimization of cost-benefit effectiveness. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The ATLAS Fast Tracker and Tracking at the High-Luminosity LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilic, N.

    2017-02-01

    The increase in centre-of-mass energy and luminosity of the Large Hadron Collider makes controlling trigger rates with high efficiency challenging. The ATLAS Fast TracKer is a hardware processor built to reconstruct tracks at a rate of up to 100 kHz and provide them to the high level trigger. The tracker reconstructs tracks by matching incoming detector hits with pre-defined track patterns stored in associative memory on custom ASICs. Inner detector hits are fitted to these track patterns using modern FPGAs. This proceeding describe the electronics system used for the massive parallelization performed by the Fast TracKer. An overview of the installation, commissioning and running of the system is given. The ATLAS upgrades planned to enable tracking at the High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider are also discussed.

  16. The first 6 weeks of recovery after primary total hip arthroplasty with fast track

    PubMed Central

    Klapwijk, Lisette C M; Mathijssen, Nina M C; Van Egmond, Jeroen C; Verbeek, Bianca M; Vehmeijer, Stephan B W

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose Fast-track protocols have been introduced worldwide to improve the recovery after total hip arthroplasty (THA). These protocols have reduced the length of hospital stay (LOS), and THA in an outpatient setting is also feasible. However, less is known regarding the first weeks after THA with fast track. We examined patients’ experiences of the first 6 weeks after hospital discharge following inpatient and outpatient THA with fast track. Patients and methods In a prospective cohort study, 100 consecutive patients who underwent THA surgery in a fast-track setting between February 2015 and October 2015 received a diary for 6 weeks. This diary contained various internationally validated questionnaires including HOOS-PS, OHS, EQ-5D, SF-12, and ICOAP. In addition, there were general questions regarding pain, the wound, physiotherapy, and thrombosis prophylaxis injections. Results 94 patients completed the diary, 42 of whom were operated in an outpatient setting. Pain and use of pain medication had gradually decreased during the 6 weeks. Function and quality of life gradually improved. After 6 weeks, 91% of all patients reported better functioning and less pain than preoperatively. Interpretation Fast track improves early functional outcome, and the PROMs reported during the first 6 weeks in this study showed continued improvement. They can be used as a baseline for future studies. The PROMs reported could also serve as a guide for staff and patients alike to modify expectations and therefore possibly improve patient satisfaction. PMID:28079428

  17. The first 6 weeks of recovery after primary total hip arthroplasty with fast track.

    PubMed

    Klapwijk, Lisette C M; Mathijssen, Nina M C; Van Egmond, Jeroen C; Verbeek, Bianca M; Vehmeijer, Stephan B W

    2017-04-01

    Background and purpose - Fast-track protocols have been introduced worldwide to improve the recovery after total hip arthroplasty (THA). These protocols have reduced the length of hospital stay (LOS), and THA in an outpatient setting is also feasible. However, less is known regarding the first weeks after THA with fast track. We examined patients' experiences of the first 6 weeks after hospital discharge following inpatient and outpatient THA with fast track. Patients and methods - In a prospective cohort study, 100 consecutive patients who underwent THA surgery in a fast-track setting between February 2015 and October 2015 received a diary for 6 weeks. This diary contained various internationally validated questionnaires including HOOS-PS, OHS, EQ-5D, SF-12, and ICOAP. In addition, there were general questions regarding pain, the wound, physiotherapy, and thrombosis prophylaxis injections. Results - 94 patients completed the diary, 42 of whom were operated in an outpatient setting. Pain and use of pain medication had gradually decreased during the 6 weeks. Function and quality of life gradually improved. After 6 weeks, 91% of all patients reported better functioning and less pain than preoperatively. Interpretation - Fast track improves early functional outcome, and the PROMs reported during the first 6 weeks in this study showed continued improvement. They can be used as a baseline for future studies. The PROMs reported could also serve as a guide for staff and patients alike to modify expectations and therefore possibly improve patient satisfaction.

  18. Fast and long term lipid droplet tracking with CARS microscopy.

    PubMed

    Jüngst, Christian; Winterhalder, Martin J; Zumbusch, Andreas

    2011-06-01

    Photobleaching of organic fluorophores commonly used in fluorescence microscopy puts a limit to the number of images which can be acquired. Label-free imaging techniques therefore offer advantages both for rapid image acquisition and for long-term observations. CARS microscopy is a label-free imaging technique offering molecule specific contrast. Here we demonstrate that CARS microscopy allows video-rate tracking of intracellular transport of lipid droplets, but also continuous long-term observation of cells over several hours.

  19. Note: Fast neutron efficiency in CR-39 nuclear track detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Cavallaro, S.

    2015-03-15

    CR-39 samples are commonly employed for fast neutron detection in fusion reactors and in inertial confinement fusion experiments. The literature reported efficiencies are strongly depending on experimental conditions and, in some cases, highly dispersed. The present note analyses the dependence of efficiency as a function of various parameters and experimental conditions in both the radiator-assisted and the stand-alone CR-39 configurations. Comparisons of literature experimental data with Monte Carlo calculations and optimized efficiency values are shown and discussed.

  20. Design of a hardware track finder (Fast Tracker) for the ATLAS trigger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavaliere, V.; Adelman, J.; Albicocco, P.; Alison, J.; Ancu, L. S.; Anderson, J.; Andari, N.; Andreani, A.; Andreazza, A.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Asbah, N.; Atkinson, M.; Baines, J.; Barberio, E.; Beccherle, R.; Beretta, M.; Bertolucci, F.; Biesuz, N. V.; Blair, R.; Bogdan, M.; Boveia, A.; Britzger, D.; Bryant, P.; Burghgrave, B.; Calderini, G.; Camplani, A.; Cavasinni, V.; Chakraborty, D.; Chang, P.; Cheng, Y.; Citraro, S.; Citterio, M.; Crescioli, F.; Dawe, N.; Dell'Orso, M.; Donati, S.; Dondero, P.; Drake, G.; Gadomski, S.; Gatta, M.; Gentsos, C.; Giannetti, P.; Gkaitatzis, S.; Gramling, J.; Howarth, J. W.; Iizawa, T.; Ilic, N.; Jiang, Z.; Kaji, T.; Kasten, M.; Kawaguchi, Y.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Klimkovich, T.; Kolb, M.; Kordas, K.; Krizka, K.; Kubota, T.; Lanza, A.; Li, H. L.; Liberali, V.; Lisovyi, M.; Liu, L.; Love, J.; Luciano, P.; Luongo, C.; Magalotti, D.; Maznas, I.; Meroni, C.; Mitani, T.; Nasimi, H.; Negri, A.; Neroutsos, P.; Neubauer, M.; Nikolaidis, S.; Okumura, Y.; Pandini, C.; Petridou, C.; Piendibene, M.; Proudfoot, J.; Rados, P.; Roda, C.; Rossi, E.; Sakurai, Y.; Sampsonidis, D.; Saxon, J.; Schmitt, S.; Schoening, A.; Shochet, M.; Shojaii, S.; Soltveit, H.; Sotiropoulou, C. L.; Stabile, A.; Swiatlowski, M.; Tang, F.; Taylor, P. T.; Testa, M.; Tompkins, L.; Vercesi, V.; Volpi, G.; Wang, R.; Watari, R.; Webster, J.; Wu, X.; Yorita, K.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zeng, J. C.; Zhang, J.; Zou, R.

    2016-02-01

    The use of tracking information at the trigger level in the LHC Run II period is crucial for the trigger and data acquisition system and will be even more so as contemporary collisions that occur at every bunch crossing will increase in Run III. The Fast TracKer is part of the ATLAS trigger upgrade project; it is a hardware processor that will provide every Level-1 accepted event (100 kHz) and within 100μs, full tracking information for tracks with momentum as low as 1 GeV . Providing fast, extensive access to tracking information, with resolution comparable to the offline reconstruction, FTK will help in precise detection of the primary and secondary vertices to ensure robust selections and improve the trigger performance.

  1. Restoring integrity—A grounded theory of coping with a fast track surgery programme

    PubMed Central

    Jørgensen, Lene Bastrup; Fridlund, Bengt

    2016-01-01

    Aims and objectives The aim of this study was to generate a theory conceptualizing and explaining behavioural processes involved in coping in order to identify the predominant coping types and coping type-specific features. Background Patients undergoing fast track procedures do not experience a higher risk of complications, readmission, or mortality. However, such programmes presuppose an increasing degree of patient involvement, placing high educational, physical, and mental demands on the patients. There is a lack of knowledge about how patients understand and cope with fast track programmes. Design The study design used classical grounded theory. Methods The study used a multimodal approach with qualitative and quantitative data sets from 14 patients. Results Four predominant types of coping, with distinct physiological, cognitive, affective, and psychosocial features, existed among patients going through a fast track total hip replacement programme. These patients’ main concern was to restore their physical and psychosocial integrity, which had been compromised by reduced function and mobility in daily life. To restore integrity they economized their mental resources, while striving to fulfil the expectations of the fast track programme. This goal was achieved by being mentally proactive and physically active. Three out of the four predominant types of coping matched the expectations expressed in the fast track programme. The non-matching behaviour was seen among the most nervous patients, who claimed the right to diverge from the programme. Conclusion In theory, four predominant types of coping with distinct physiological, cognitive, affective, and psychosocial features occur among patients going through a fast track total hip arthroplasty programme. PMID:26751199

  2. [A "fast track" to improve management of neovascular age related macular degeneration].

    PubMed

    Krivosic, V; Philippakis, E; Couturier, A; Dupas, B; Erginay, A; Desmettre, T; Streho, M; Bonnin, S; Manne, V; Jouvaud, S; Gualino, V; Durand, D; Tadayoni, R

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate the role of a fast track for management of patients with neovascular age- related macular degeneration (nARMD) treated by intravitreal injection of anti-VEGF. The records of 100 patients in the chronic maintenance phase of intravitreal anti-VEGF followed in the fast track and 63 patients followed in the standard protocol for at least 12 months were retrospectively analyzed. Patients in the fast track underwent visual acuity (VA) testing by ETDRS, optical coherence tomography (OCT) and a physician assessment. The injection was performed the same day whenever possible. The primary endpoint to evaluate patient adherence was the time between the ideal date of visit or injection prescribed by the physician and the actual date of administration. The mean time between the ideal date of visit or injection prescribed by the physician and the actual date of administration was 4.1±7.5 days for the patients followed in the fast track and 5.6±18.7 days for the patients followed in the standard protocol. Mean VA remained stable for the patients followed in the fast track: 20/50 (20/800 to 20/20) at baseline vs. 20/50 (20/800 to 20/16) at the conclusion of follow-up. It dropped from 40/50 at baseline to 20/63 at the conclusion of follow-up for the patients followed in the standard protocol. In the context of a fast track, it was possible to improve the adherence of nARMD patients and maintain their VA gain or stabilization achieved after the induction phase. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Restoring integrity-A grounded theory of coping with a fast track surgery programme.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Lene Bastrup; Fridlund, Bengt

    2016-01-01

    Aims and objectives The aim of this study was to generate a theory conceptualizing and explaining behavioural processes involved in coping in order to identify the predominant coping types and coping type-specific features. Background Patients undergoing fast track procedures do not experience a higher risk of complications, readmission, or mortality. However, such programmes presuppose an increasing degree of patient involvement, placing high educational, physical, and mental demands on the patients. There is a lack of knowledge about how patients understand and cope with fast track programmes. Design The study design used classical grounded theory. Methods The study used a multimodal approach with qualitative and quantitative data sets from 14 patients. Results Four predominant types of coping, with distinct physiological, cognitive, affective, and psychosocial features, existed among patients going through a fast track total hip replacement programme. These patients' main concern was to restore their physical and psychosocial integrity, which had been compromised by reduced function and mobility in daily life. To restore integrity they economized their mental resources, while striving to fulfil the expectations of the fast track programme. This goal was achieved by being mentally proactive and physically active. Three out of the four predominant types of coping matched the expectations expressed in the fast track programme. The non-matching behaviour was seen among the most nervous patients, who claimed the right to diverge from the programme. Conclusion In theory, four predominant types of coping with distinct physiological, cognitive, affective, and psychosocial features occur among patients going through a fast track total hip arthroplasty programme.

  4. Patient experience in fast-track hip and knee arthroplasty--a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Specht, Kirsten; Kjaersgaard-Andersen, Per; Pedersen, Birthe D

    2016-03-01

    To explore the lived experience of patients in fast-track primary unilateral total hip and knee arthroplasty from the first visit at the outpatient clinic until discharge. Fast-track has resulted in increased effectiveness, including faster recovery and shorter length of stay to about two days after hip and knee arthroplasty. However, the patient perspective in fast-track with a median length of stay of less than three days has been less investigated. A qualitative design. A phenomenological-hermeneutic approach was used, inspired by Paul Ricoeur's theory of narrative and interpretation. Eight patients were included. Semi-structured interviews and participant observation were performed. Three themes emerged: dealing with pain; feelings of confidence or uncertainty - the meaning of information; and readiness for discharge. Generally, the patients were resistant to taking analgesics and found it difficult to find out when to take supplementary analgesics; therefore, nursing staff needed enough expertise to take responsibility. Factors that increased patients' confidence: information about fast-track, meeting staff before admission and involving relatives. In contrast, incorrect or conflicting information and a lack of respect for privacy led to uncertainty. In preparing for early discharge, sufficient pain management, feeling well-rested and optimal use of time during hospitalisation were important. The study shows the importance of dealing with pain and getting the right information and support to have confidence in the fast-track programme, to be ready for discharge and to manage postoperatively at home. In fast-track focusing on early discharge, there is an increased need for evidence-based nursing practice, including a qualified judgement of what is best for the patient in certain situations. The knowledge should be gleaned from: research; the patients' expertise, understanding and situation; and nurses' knowledge, skills and experience. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons

  5. Characterization of fast acoustic wave propagation using OFDR with double interrogation and frequency tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabai, Haniel; Eyal, Avishay

    2014-05-01

    A highly sensitive OFDR system capable of detecting and tracking fast acoustic wave propagation is described. The system was tested by dropping a screw (50gr) and a paperclip (<5gr) at one end of an 18m PVC pipe. The sensing fiber detected the wave propagation (v ≍ 1750m/s) along the entire pipe. Fast phase variations due to the impact of the screw led to a transient shift in the frequency of the interrogating light which corrupted the observed response. By tracking the beat frequencies of predefined reflectors and extracting their amplitudes significant improvement in the system's output was obtained.

  6. Relative age and fast tracking of elite major junior ice hockey players.

    PubMed

    Sherar, Lauren B; Bruner, Mark W; Munroe-Chandler, Krista J; Baxter-Jones, Adam D G

    2007-06-01

    Investigations in a variety of chronologically grouped team sports have reported that elite young athletes were more likely born in the early months of the selection year, a phenomenon known as the relative age effect. The present study investigated the birth dates and developmental paths of 238 (15 to 20 years old) Major Junior 'A' hockey players from the Ontario Hockey League to determine if a relative age effect still exists in elite junior hockey and if the path to elite sport was accelerated (i.e., fast tracked). The results identified a relative age effect in elite hockey although it is only apparent among individuals who fast track.

  7. Following Michael Faraday's Footprints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galeano, Javier

    2011-01-01

    Last fall I had the good fortune of receiving financial support to shoot a documentary about Michael Faraday. I took the opportunity to learn more about this great experimentalist and to visit the highlights of places in his life. In this paper, I would like to share a list and description of some of the most remarkable places in London suitable for following Michael Faraday's footprints. There are many other places in Europe of special interest for the physics teacher,2,3 and some useful guides to help us visit places as "scientific travelers,"4,5 but this paper focuses on Michael Faraday and London. I have personally visited most of the places described below and found the experience to be really worthwhile.

  8. Measuring fast-neutron flux by track-etch technique

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    The method covers the measurement of neutron flux by the use of fissionable materials. Fission fragments emitted by the fissionable materials during neutron bombardment penetrate a suitable recording medium, such as plastic, glass, or mica, that is in contact with the fissionable material. Appropriate etching techniques render the path of the fragment in the recording medium visible under an optical microscope. Since measurement of the decay of radioisotopes is not involved in this method, irradiation times are limited only by the maximum number of fission fragment tracks that can be clearly distinguished without pile up: approximately 2 x 10/sup 5//cm/sup 2/. The method includes a discussion of apparatus, reagents and materials, procedure, calculations, precision, and accuracy. (JMT)

  9. A simple backscattering microscope for fast tracking of biological molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowa, Yoshiyuki; Steel, Bradley C.; Berry, Richard M.

    2010-11-01

    Recent developments in techniques for observing single molecules under light microscopes have helped reveal the mechanisms by which molecular machines work. A wide range of markers can be used to detect molecules, from single fluorophores to micron sized markers, depending on the research interest. Here, we present a new and simple objective-type backscattering microscope to track gold nanoparticles with nanometer and microsecond resolution. The total noise of our system in a 55 kHz bandwidth is ˜0.6 nm per axis, sufficient to measure molecular movement. We found our backscattering microscopy to be useful not only for in vitro but also for in vivo experiments because of lower background scattering from cells than in conventional dark-field microscopy. We demonstrate the application of this technique to measuring the motion of a biological rotary molecular motor, the bacterial flagellar motor, in live Escherichia coli cells.

  10. Fast Fluorescence Laser Tracking Microrheometry, I: Instrument Development

    PubMed Central

    Jonas, Maxine; Huang, Hayden; Kamm, Roger D.; So, Peter T. C.

    2008-01-01

    To gain insight into cellular mechanotransduction pathways, we have developed a fluorescence laser tracking microrheometer (FLTM) to measure material rheological features on micrometer length scales using fluorescent microspheres as tracer particles. The statistical analysis of the Brownian motion of a particle quantifies the viscoelastic properties of the probe's environment, parameterized by the frequency-dependent complex shear modulus G*(ω). This FLTM has nanometer spatial resolution over a frequency range extending from 1 Hz to 50 kHz. In this work, we first describe the consecutive stages of instrument design, development, and optimization. We subsequently demonstrate the accuracy of the FLTM by reproducing satisfactorily the known rheological characteristics of purely viscous glycerol solutions and cross-linked polyacrylamide polymer networks. An upcoming companion article will illustrate the use of FLTM in studying the solid-like versus liquid-like rheological properties of fibroblast cytoskeletons in living biological samples. PMID:17965137

  11. Tracking Changing Environments: Innovators Are Fast, but Not Flexible Learners

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Andrea S.; Guez, David; Lermite, Françoise; Patience, Madeleine

    2013-01-01

    Behavioural innovations are increasingly thought to provide a rich source of phenotypic plasticity and evolutionary change. Innovation propensity shows substantial variation across avian taxa and provides an adaptive mechanism by which behaviour is flexibly adjusted to changing environmental conditions. Here, we tested for the first time the prediction that inter-individual variation in innovation propensity is equally a measure of behavioural flexibility. We used Indian mynas, Sturnus tristis, a highly successful worldwide invader. Results revealed that mynas that solved an extractive foraging task more quickly learnt to discriminate between a cue that predicted food, and one that did not more quickly. However, fast innovators were slower to change their behaviour when the significance of the food cues changed. This unexpected finding appears at odds with the well-established view that avian taxa with larger brains relative to their body size, and therefore greater neural processing power, are both faster, and more flexible learners. We speculate that the existence of this relationship across taxa can be reconciled with its absence within species by assuming that fast, innovative learners and non innovative, slow, flexible learners constitute two separate individual strategies, which are both underpinned by enhanced neural processing power. This idea is consistent with the recent proposal that individuals may differ consistently in ‘cognitive style’, differentially trading off speed against accuracy in cognitive tasks. PMID:24391981

  12. Tracking changing environments: innovators are fast, but not flexible learners.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Andrea S; Guez, David; Lermite, Françoise; Patience, Madeleine

    2013-01-01

    Behavioural innovations are increasingly thought to provide a rich source of phenotypic plasticity and evolutionary change. Innovation propensity shows substantial variation across avian taxa and provides an adaptive mechanism by which behaviour is flexibly adjusted to changing environmental conditions. Here, we tested for the first time the prediction that inter-individual variation in innovation propensity is equally a measure of behavioural flexibility. We used Indian mynas, Sturnus tristis, a highly successful worldwide invader. Results revealed that mynas that solved an extractive foraging task more quickly learnt to discriminate between a cue that predicted food, and one that did not more quickly. However, fast innovators were slower to change their behaviour when the significance of the food cues changed. This unexpected finding appears at odds with the well-established view that avian taxa with larger brains relative to their body size, and therefore greater neural processing power, are both faster, and more flexible learners. We speculate that the existence of this relationship across taxa can be reconciled with its absence within species by assuming that fast, innovative learners and non innovative, slow, flexible learners constitute two separate individual strategies, which are both underpinned by enhanced neural processing power. This idea is consistent with the recent proposal that individuals may differ consistently in 'cognitive style', differentially trading off speed against accuracy in cognitive tasks.

  13. Fast Flux Test Facility Asbestos Location Tracking Program

    SciTech Connect

    REYNOLDS, J.A.

    1999-04-13

    Procedure Number HNF-PRO-408, revision 0, paragraph 1.0, ''Purpose,'' and paragraph 2.0, ''Requirements for Facility Management of Asbestos,'' relate building inspection and requirements for documentation of existing asbestos-containing building material (ACBM) per each building assessment. This documentation shall be available to all personnel (including contractor personnel) entering the facility at their request. Corrective action was required by 400 Area Integrated Annual Appraisal/Audit for Fiscal Year 1992 (IAA-92-0007) to provide this notification documentation. No formal method had been developed to communicate the location and nature of ACBM to maintenance personnel in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) 400 Area. The scope of this Data Package Document is to locate and evaluate any ACBM found at FFTF which constitutes a baseline. This includes all buildings within the protected area. These findings are compiled from earlier reports, numerous work packages and engineering evaluations of employee findings.

  14. L1Track: A fast Level 1 track trigger for the ATLAS high luminosity upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerri, Alessandro

    2016-07-01

    With the planned high-luminosity upgrade of the LHC (HL-LHC), the ATLAS detector will see its collision rate increase by approximately a factor of 5 with respect to the current LHC operation. The earliest hardware-based ATLAS trigger stage ("Level 1") will have to provide a higher rejection factor in a more difficult environment: a new improved Level 1 trigger architecture is under study, which includes the possibility of extracting with low latency and high accuracy tracking information in time for the decision taking process. In this context, the feasibility of potential approaches aimed at providing low-latency high-quality tracking at Level 1 is discussed.

  15. Private health insurance in Sweden: Fast-track lanes and the alleged attempts to stop them.

    PubMed

    Lapidus, John

    2017-04-01

    According to the Health and Medical Services Act (1982:763), those who have the greatest need for healthcare shall be given priority. This is being challenged by the rapid emergence of private health insurance which increases the share of private funding and creates fast-track lanes where some people get faster access to healthcare than others. The Stop Law, implemented by a Social Democratic government in 2006, was generally regarded as a way to put an end to the fast-track lanes in Swedish healthcare. Based on a thorough examination of the law and its legislative history - official reports, propositions, comments on official reports - this article argues that the Stop Law was so full of exceptions and loopholes that it did not threaten the existence of fast-track lanes. The same goes for a similar Social Democratic proposal from 2016, which is also examined in the article. Further, the article analyses centre-right wing positions on fast-track lanes in Swedish healthcare. In summary, it is argued that politicians of all stripes have allowed the development to proceed in spite of unanimous support for the idea that Swedish healthcare shall be provided to all on equal terms.

  16. New Medical-School Programs Put Students on a Fast Track to the White Coat

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangan, Katherine

    2009-01-01

    California's lieutenant governor has proposed a fast-track medical school that would shave three years off the training needed to become a physician. It is not the first time such an idea has been offered. The proposal, for a hoped-for medical school at the University of California at Merced, struck some medical educators as both unrealistic and…

  17. "Joined up" Thinking? Unsupported "Fast-Track" Transitions in the Context of Parental Substance Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Sarah; Cunningham-Burley, Sarah; Bancroft, Angus; Backett-Milburn, Kathryn

    2008-01-01

    Recent policy responses to the risks entailed in "fast-track" school-work transitions have targeted careleavers and young people identified as "not in education, employment or training" (NEET). However, this approach has been criticised as diverting attention away from the fragile circumstances of others who may receive little…

  18. Fast Track Randomized Controlled Trial to Prevent Externalizing Psychiatric Disorders: Findings from Grades 3 to 9

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, 2007

    2007-01-01

    Objective: This study tests the efficacy of the Fast Track Program in preventing antisocial behavior and psychiatric disorders among groups varying in initial risk. Method: Schools within four sites (Durham, NC; Nashville, TN; Seattle, WA; and rural central Pennsylvania) were selected as high-risk institutions based on neighborhood crime and…

  19. The Effects of the Fast Track Preventive Intervention on the Development of Conduct Disorder across Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Development, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The impact of the Fast Track intervention on externalizing disorders across childhood was examined. Eight hundred-ninety-one early-starting children (69% male; 51% African American) were randomly assigned by matched sets of schools to intervention or control conditions. The 10-year intervention addressed parent behavior-management, child social…

  20. Alternative Methods for Handling Attrition: An Illustration Using Data From the Fast Track Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, E. Michael; Fang, Grace Y.

    2004-01-01

    Using data from the evaluation of the Fast Track intervention, this article illustrates three methods for handling attrition. Multiple imputation and ignorable maximum likelihood estimation produce estimates that are similar to those based on listwise-deleted data. A panel selection model that allows for selective dropout reveals that highly…

  1. Fast Track Randomized Controlled Trial to Prevent Externalizing Psychiatric Disorders: Findings from Grades 3 to 9

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, 2007

    2007-01-01

    Objective: This study tests the efficacy of the Fast Track Program in preventing antisocial behavior and psychiatric disorders among groups varying in initial risk. Method: Schools within four sites (Durham, NC; Nashville, TN; Seattle, WA; and rural central Pennsylvania) were selected as high-risk institutions based on neighborhood crime and…

  2. Fast Track Initiative: Building a Global Compact for Education. Education Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Human Development Network Education, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This note series is intended to summarize lessons learned and key policy findings on the World Bank's work in education. "Fast Track Initiative" ("FTI") was launched in 2002 as a partnership between donor and developing countries to accelerate progress towards the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) of universal primary education. "FTI" is built on…

  3. New Medical-School Programs Put Students on a Fast Track to the White Coat

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangan, Katherine

    2009-01-01

    California's lieutenant governor has proposed a fast-track medical school that would shave three years off the training needed to become a physician. It is not the first time such an idea has been offered. The proposal, for a hoped-for medical school at the University of California at Merced, struck some medical educators as both unrealistic and…

  4. The Status of Girls' Education in Education for All Fast Track Initiative Partner Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Prema

    2011-01-01

    This viewpoint examines girls' performance in primary education in the countries that joined the Education for All Fast Track Initiative between 2002 and 2008. At the time they joined the initiative, a first group of countries (high performers) had already achieved high and equal enrollment of girls and boys. Significant progress is evident in a…

  5. Optimising fast track care for proximal femoral fracture patients using modified early warning score.

    PubMed

    Ollivere, B; Rollins, K; Brankin, R; Wood, M; Brammar, T J; Wimhurst, J

    2012-05-01

    The care for patients with a proximal femoral fracture has been dramatically overhauled with the introduction of 'fast track' protocols and the British Orthopaedic Association guidance in 2007. Fast track pathways focus on streamlining patient flow through the emergency department where the guidance addresses standards of care. We prospectively examined the impact these protocols have on patient care and propose an alternative 'streamed care' pathway to provide improved medical care within existing resource constraints. Data surrounding the treatment of 156 consecutive patients managed at 4 centres were collated prospectively. Management of patients with a traditional fast track protocol allowed 17% of patients to leave the emergency department with undiagnosed serious medical pathology and 32% with suboptimal fluid resuscitation. A streamed care pathway based on the modified early warning score was developed and employed for 48 further patients as an alternative to the traditional fast track system. The streamed care pathway improved initial care significantly by treating patients according to their physiological parameters on admission. Targeted medical reviews on admission instead of the following day reduced the rates of undiagnosed medical pathology to 2% (p = 0.0068) and inadequate fluid resuscitation to 11% (p < 0.0001). Implementation of a streamed care pathway can allow protocol driven improvement to initial care for patients with a proximal femoral fracture and results in improved access to initial specialist medical care.

  6. Following Michael Faraday's Footprints

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galeano, Javier

    2011-01-01

    Last fall I had the good fortune of receiving financial support to shoot a documentary about Michael Faraday. I took the opportunity to learn more about this great experimentalist and to visit the highlights of places in his life. In this paper, I would like to share a list and description of some of the most remarkable places in London suitable…

  7. Following Michael Faraday's Footprints

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galeano, Javier

    2011-01-01

    Last fall I had the good fortune of receiving financial support to shoot a documentary about Michael Faraday. I took the opportunity to learn more about this great experimentalist and to visit the highlights of places in his life. In this paper, I would like to share a list and description of some of the most remarkable places in London suitable…

  8. SMAP Faraday Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le Vine, David

    2016-01-01

    Faraday rotation is a change in the polarization as signal propagates through the ionosphere. At L-band it is necessary to correct for this change and measurements are made on the spacecraft of the rotation angle. These figures show that there is good agreement between the SMAP measurements (blue) and predictions based on models (red).

  9. Fast Track Extubation In Adult Patients On Pump Open Heart Surgery At A Tertiary Care Hospital.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Mohammad Irfan; Sharif, Hasanat; Hamid, Mohammad; Samad, Khalid; Khan, Fazal Hameed

    2016-01-01

    Fast-track cardiac surgery programs have been established as the standard of cardiac surgical care. Studies have shown that early extubation in elective cardiac surgery patients, including coronary and non-coronary open-heart surgery patients does not increase perioperative morbidity and mortality. The objective of this observational study was to determine the success and failure profile of fast track extubation (FTE) practice in adult open-heart surgical patients. The study was conducted at cardiac operating room and Cardiac Intensive Care Unit (CICU) of a tertiary care hospital for a period of nine months, i.e., from Oct 2014 to June-2015. All on pump elective adult cardiac surgery patients including isolated CABG, isolated Valve replacements, combined procedures and aortic root replacements were enrolled in the study. Standardized anesthetic technique was adopted. Surgical and bypass techniques were tailored according to the procedure. Success of Fast track extubation was defined as extubation within 6 hours of arrival in CICU. A total of 290 patients were recruited. The average age of the patients was 56.3±10.5 years. There were 77.6% male and 22.4% female patients. Overall success rate was 51.9% and failure rate was 48.1%. The peri-operative renal insufficiency, cross clamp time and CICU stay (hours) were significantly lower in success group. Re-intubation rate was 0.74%. The perioperative parameters were significantly better in success group and the safety was also demonstrated in the patients who were fast tracked successfully. To implement the practice in its full capacity and benefit, a fast track protocol needs to be devised to standardize the current practices and to disseminate the strategy among junior anaesthesiologists, perfusionists and nursing staff.

  10. A modified fast-track program for pancreatic surgery: a prospective single-center experience.

    PubMed

    di Sebastiano, Pierluigi; Festa, Leonardina; De Bonis, Antonio; Ciuffreda, Andrea; Valvano, Maria Rosa; Andriulli, Angelo; di Mola, F Francesco

    2011-03-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the impact of a fast-track protocol in a high-volume center for patients with pancreatic disorders. The concept of fast-track surgery allowing accelerated postoperative recovery is accepted in colorectal surgery, but efficacy data are only preliminary for patients undergoing major pancreatic surgery. We aimed to evaluate the impact of a modified fast-track protocol in a high-volume center for patients with pancreatic disorders. Between February 2005 and January 2010, 145 subjects had resective pancreatic surgery and were enrolled in the program. Essential features of the program were no preanaesthetic medication, upper and lower air-warming device, avoidance of excessive i.v. fluids perioperatively, effective control of pain, early reinstitution of oral feeding, and immediate mobilization and restoration of bowel function following surgery. Outcome measures were postoperative complications such as pancreatic fistula, delayed gastric emptying, biliary leak, intra-abdominal abscess, post-pancreatectomy hemorrhage, acute pancreatitis, wound infection, 30-day mortality, postoperative hospital stay, and readmission rates. On average, patients were discharged on postoperative day 10 (range 6-69), with a 30-day readmission rate of 6.2%. Percentage of patients with at least one complication was 38.6%. Pancreatic anastomotic leakage occurred in seven of 101 pancreatico-jejunostomies, and biliary leak in three of 109 biliary jejunostomies. Postoperative hemorrhage occurred in ten (6.9%) patients and wound infection in nine (6.2%) cases. In-hospital mortality was 2.7%. Fast-track parameters, such as normal food and first stool, correlated significantly with early discharge (<0.05). At multivariate analysis, lack of jaundice, and resumption of normal diet by the 5th postoperative day were independent factors of early discharge. Fast-track programs are feasible, easy, and also applicable for patients undergoing a major surgery such as

  11. The yield of colorectal cancer among fast track patients with normocytic and microcytic anaemia.

    PubMed

    Panagiotopoulou, I G; Fitzrol, D; Parker, R A; Kuzhively, J; Luscombe, N; Wells, A D; Menon, M; Bajwa, F M; Watson, M A

    2014-05-01

    We receive fast track referrals on the basis of iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) for patients with normocytic anaemia or for patients with no iron studies. This study examined the yield of colorectal cancer (CRC) among fast track patients to ascertain whether awaiting confirmation of IDA is necessary prior to performing bowel investigations. A review was undertaken of 321 and 930 consecutive fast track referrals from Centre A and Centre B respectively. Contingency tables were analysed using Fisher's exact test. Logistic regression analyses were performed to investigate significant predictors of CRC. Overall, 229 patients were included from Centre A and 689 from Centre B. The odds ratio for microcytic anaemia versus normocytic anaemia in the outcome of CRC was 1.3 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.5-3.9) for Centre A and 1.6 (95% CI: 0.8-3.3) for Centre B. In a logistic regression analysis (Centre B only), no significant difference in CRC rates was seen between microcytic and normocytic anaemia (adjusted odds ratio: 1.9, 95% CI: 0.9-3.9). There was no statistically significant difference in the yield of CRC between microcytic and normocytic anaemia (p=0.515, Fisher's exact test) in patients with anaemia only and no colorectal symptoms. Finally, CRC cases were seen in both microcytic and normocytic groups with or without low ferritin. There is no significant difference in the yield of CRC between fast track patients with microcytic and normocytic anaemia. This study provides insufficient evidence to support awaiting confirmation of IDA in fast track patients with normocytic anaemia prior to requesting bowel investigations.

  12. The yield of colorectal cancer among fast track patients with normocytic and microcytic anaemia

    PubMed Central

    Fitzrol, D; Parker, RA; Kuzhively, J; Luscombe, N; Wells, AD; Menon, M; Bajwa, FM; Watson, MA

    2014-01-01

    Introduction We receive fast track referrals on the basis of iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) for patients with normocytic anaemia or for patients with no iron studies. This study examined the yield of colorectal cancer (CRC) among fast track patients to ascertain whether awaiting confirmation of IDA is necessary prior to performing bowel investigations. Methods A review was undertaken of 321 and 930 consecutive fast track referrals from Centre A and Centre B respectively. Contingency tables were analysed using Fisher’s exact test. Logistic regression analyses were performed to investigate significant predictors of CRC. Results Overall, 229 patients were included from Centre A and 689 from Centre B. The odds ratio for microcytic anaemia versus normocytic anaemia in the outcome of CRC was 1.3 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.5–3.9) for Centre A and 1.6 (95% CI: 0.8–3.3) for Centre B. In a logistic regression analysis (Centre B only), no significant difference in CRC rates was seen between microcytic and normocytic anaemia (adjusted odds ratio: 1.9, 95% CI: 0.9–3.9). There was no statistically significant difference in the yield of CRC between microcytic and normocytic anaemia (p=0.515, Fisher’s exact test) in patients with anaemia only and no colorectal symptoms. Finally, CRC cases were seen in both microcytic and normocytic groups with or without low ferritin. Conclusions There is no significant difference in the yield of CRC between fast track patients with microcytic and normocytic anaemia. This study provides insufficient evidence to support awaiting confirmation of IDA in fast track patients with normocytic anaemia prior to requesting bowel investigations. PMID:24780021

  13. Life in the Fast Track: How States Seek to Balance Incentives and Quality in Alternative Teacher Certification Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Susan Moore; Birkeland, Sarah E.; Peske, Heather G.

    2005-01-01

    The prospect of overseeing the rapid preparation of many participants in fast-track alternative certification programs presents several challenges for state education officials who seek to maintain, or even enhance, the quality of the state's teaching force. This study examined a range of fast-track alternative teacher certification programs in 11…

  14. Fast neutrons detection in CR-39 and DAM-ADC nuclear track detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdalla, A. M.; Ashraf, O.; Rammah, Y. S.; Ashry, A. H.; Eisa, M.; Tsuruta, T.

    2015-03-01

    Fast detection of neutrons in CR-39 and DAM-ADC nuclear track detectors were investigated using new etching conditions. The neutron irradiation is performed using a 5 mCi Am-Be source present at the National Institute of Standards (NIS) of Egypt. Using the new etching condition, irradiated CR-39 samples were etched for 4 h and DAM-ADC samples for 80 min. Suitable analyzing software has been used to analyze experimental data.The dependence of neutrons track density on the neutrons fluence is investigated. When etched under optimum conditions, the relationship between track density and fluence is determined which is found to be linear. Detection efficiency has been represented for both SSNTDs and found to be constant with fluence, which reflects the importance of using CR-39 and DAM-ADC detectors in the field of neutron dosimetry. Linear relationship between track density and effective dose is determined.

  15. Fast and reliable active appearance model search for 3-D face tracking.

    PubMed

    Dornaika, F; Ahlberg, J

    2004-08-01

    This paper addresses the three-dimensional (3-D) tracking of pose and animation of the human face in monocular image sequences using active appearance models. The major problem of the classical appearance-based adaptation is the high computational time resulting from the inclusion of a synthesis step in the iterative optimization. Whenever the dimension of the face space is large, a real-time performance cannot be achieved. In this paper, we aim at designing a fast and stable active appearance model search for 3-D face tracking. The main contribution is a search algorithm whose CPU-time is not dependent on the dimension of the face space. Using this algorithm, we show that both the CPU-time and the likelihood of a nonaccurate tracking are reduced. Experiments evaluating the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm are reported, as well as method comparison and tracking synthetic and real image sequences.

  16. Optimal Local Searching for Fast and Robust Textureless 3D Object Tracking in Highly Cluttered Backgrounds.

    PubMed

    Seo, Byung-Kuk; Park, Jong-Il; Hinterstoisser, Stefan; Ilic, Slobodan

    2013-06-13

    Edge-based tracking is a fast and plausible approach for textureless 3D object tracking, but its robustness is still very challenging in highly cluttered backgrounds due to numerous local minima. To overcome this problem, we propose a novel method for fast and robust textureless 3D object tracking in highly cluttered backgrounds. The proposed method is based on optimal local searching of 3D-2D correspondences between a known 3D object model and 2D scene edges in an image with heavy background clutter. In our searching scheme, searching regions are partitioned into three levels (interior, contour, and exterior) with respect to the previous object region, and confident searching directions are determined by evaluating candidates of correspondences on their region levels; thus, the correspondences are searched among likely candidates in only the confident directions instead of searching through all candidates. To ensure the confident searching direction, we also adopt the region appearance, which is efficiently modeled on a newly defined local space (called a searching bundle). Experimental results and performance evaluations demonstrate that our method fully supports fast and robust textureless 3D object tracking even in highly cluttered backgrounds.

  17. Optimal local searching for fast and robust textureless 3D object tracking in highly cluttered backgrounds.

    PubMed

    Seo, Byung-Kuk; Park, Hanhoon; Park, Jong-Il; Hinterstoisser, Stefan; Ilic, Slobodan

    2014-01-01

    Edge-based tracking is a fast and plausible approach for textureless 3D object tracking, but its robustness is still very challenging in highly cluttered backgrounds due to numerous local minima. To overcome this problem, we propose a novel method for fast and robust textureless 3D object tracking in highly cluttered backgrounds. The proposed method is based on optimal local searching of 3D-2D correspondences between a known 3D object model and 2D scene edges in an image with heavy background clutter. In our searching scheme, searching regions are partitioned into three levels (interior, contour, and exterior) with respect to the previous object region, and confident searching directions are determined by evaluating candidates of correspondences on their region levels; thus, the correspondences are searched among likely candidates in only the confident directions instead of searching through all candidates. To ensure the confident searching direction, we also adopt the region appearance, which is efficiently modeled on a newly defined local space (called a searching bundle). Experimental results and performance evaluations demonstrate that our method fully supports fast and robust textureless 3D object tracking even in highly cluttered backgrounds.

  18. Fast non-iterative calibration of an external motion tracking device

    PubMed Central

    Zahneisen, Benjamin; Lovell-Smith, Chris; Herbst, Michael; Zaitsev, Maxim; Speck, Oliver; Armstrong, Brian; Ernst, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Prospective motion correction of MR scans commonly uses an external device, such as a camera, to track the pose of the organ of interest. However, in order for external tracking data to be translated into the MR scanner reference frame, the pose of the camera relative to the MR scanner must be known accurately. Here, we describe a fast, accurate, non-iterative technique to determine the position of an external tracking device de novo relative to the MR reference frame. Theory and Methods The method relies on imaging a sparse object that allows simultaneous tracking of arbitrary rigid body transformations in the reference frame of the MRI machine and that of the external tracking device. Results Large motions in the MRI reference frame can be measured using a sparse phantom with an accuracy of 0.2 mm, or approximately 1/10 of the voxel size. By using a dual quaternion algorithm to solve the calibration problem, a good camera calibration can be achieved with fewer than 6 measurements. Further refinements can be achieved by applying the method iteratively and using motion correction feedback. Conclusion Independent tracking of a series of movements in two reference frames allows for an analytical solution to the hand-eye-calibration problem for various motion tracking setups in MRI. PMID:23788117

  19. A fast high-resolution track trigger for the H1 experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumann, J.; Baird, A.; Elsen, E.; Fleming, Y. H.; Kolander, M.; Kolya, S.; Meer, D.; Mercer, D.; Newman, P. R.; Sankey, D.; Schoning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Wissing, C.

    2001-08-01

    After 2001, the upgraded ep collider HERA will provide an about five times higher luminosity for the two experiments H1 and ZEUS. To cope with the expected higher event rates, the H1 collaboration is building a track-based trigger system, the Fast Track Trigger (FTT). It will be integrated in the first three levels (L1-L3) of the H1 trigger scheme to provide higher selectivity for events with charged particles. The FTT will allow reconstruction of three-dimensional tracks in the central drift chamber down to 100 MeV/c within the L2 latency of /spl sim/23 /spl mu/s. To reach the necessary momentum resolution of /spl sim/5% (at 1 GeV/c), sophisticated reconstruction algorithms have to be implemented using high-density field-programmable gate arrays and their embedded content addressable memories. The final track parameter optimization will be done using noniterative fits implemented in digital signal processors. While at the first trigger level rough track information will be provided, at L2 tracks with high resolution are available to form trigger decisions on topological and other track-based criteria like multiplicities and momenta. At the third trigger level, a farm of commercial processor boards will be used to compute physics quantities such as invariant masses.

  20. Optimising fast track care for proximal femoral fracture patients using modified early warning score

    PubMed Central

    Ollivere, B

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The care for patients with a proximal femoral fracture has been dramatically overhauled with the introduction of ‘fast track’ protocols and the British Orthopaedic Association guidance in 2007. Fast track pathways focus on streamlining patient flow through the emergency department where the guidance addresses standards of care. We prospectively examined the impact these protocols have on patient care and propose an alternative ‘streamed care’ pathway to provide improved medical care within existing resource constraints. METHODS Data surrounding the treatment of 156 consecutive patients managed at 4 centres were collated prospectively. Management of patients with a traditional fast track protocol allowed 17% of patients to leave the emergency department with undiagnosed serious medical pathology and 32% with suboptimal fluid resuscitation. A streamed care pathway based on the modified early warning score was developed and employed for 48 further patients as an alternative to the traditional fast track system. RESULTS The streamed care pathway improved initial care significantly by treating patients according to their physiological parameters on admission. Targeted medical reviews on admission instead of the following day reduced the rates of undiagnosed medical pathology to 2% (p=0.0068) and inadequate fluid resuscitation to 11% (p<0.0001). CONCLUSIONS Implementation of a streamed care pathway can allow protocol driven improvement to initial care for patients with a proximal femoral fracture and results in improved access to initial specialist medical care. PMID:22613306

  1. Modified Faraday cup

    DOEpatents

    Elmer, J.W.; Teruya, A.T.; O`Brien, D.W.

    1996-09-10

    A tomographic technique for measuring the current density distribution in electron beams using electron beam profile data acquired from a modified Faraday cup to create an image of the current density in high and low power beams is disclosed. The modified Faraday cup includes a narrow slit and is rotated by a stepper motor and can be moved in the x, y and z directions. The beam is swept across the slit perpendicular thereto and controlled by deflection coils, and the slit rotated such that waveforms are taken every few degrees from 0{degree} to 360{degree} and the waveforms are recorded by a digitizing storage oscilloscope. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional images of the current density distribution in the beam can be reconstructed by computer tomography from this information, providing quantitative information about the beam focus and alignment. 12 figs.

  2. Modified Faraday cup

    DOEpatents

    Elmer, John W.; Teruya, Alan T.; O'Brien, Dennis W.

    1996-01-01

    A tomographic technique for measuring the current density distribution in electron beams using electron beam profile data acquired from a modified Faraday cup to create an image of the current density in high and low power beams. The modified Faraday cup includes a narrow slit and is rotated by a stepper motor and can be moved in the x, y and z directions. The beam is swept across the slit perpendicular thereto and controlled by deflection coils, and the slit rotated such that waveforms are taken every few degrees form 0.degree. to 360.degree. and the waveforms are recorded by a digitizing storage oscilloscope. Two-din-tensional and three-dimensional images of the current density distribution in the beam can be reconstructed by computer tomography from this information, providing quantitative information about the beam focus and alignment.

  3. Michael Faraday vs. the Spiritualists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirshfeld, Alan

    2006-12-01

    In the 1850s, renowned physicist Michael Faraday launched a public campaign against pseudoscience and spiritualism, which were rampant in England at the time. Faraday objected especially to claims that electrical or magnetic forces were responsible for paranormal phenomena, such as table-spinning and communication with the dead. Using scientific methods, Faraday unmasked the deceptions of spiritualists, clairvoyants and mediums and also laid bare the credulity of a public ill-educated in science. Despite his efforts, Victorian society's fascination with the paranormal swelled. Faraday's debacle anticipates current controversies about public science education and the interface between science and religion. This episode is one of many described in the new biography, The Electric Life of Michael Faraday (Walker & Co.), which chronicles Faraday's discoveries and his unlikely rise from poverty to the pinnacle of the English science establishment.

  4. How Does the Fast Track Intervention Prevent Adverse Outcomes in Young Adulthood?

    PubMed

    Sorensen, Lucy C; Dodge, Kenneth A

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have shown that childhood interventions can foster improved outcomes in adulthood. Less well understood is precisely how-that is, through which developmental pathways-these interventions work. This study assesses mechanisms by which the Fast Track project (n = 891), a randomized intervention in the early 1990s for high-risk children in four communities (Durham, NC; Nashville, TN; rural PA; and Seattle, WA), reduced delinquency, arrests, and general and mental health service utilization in adolescence through young adulthood (ages 12-20). A decomposition of treatment effects indicates that about a third of Fast Track's impact on later crime outcomes can be accounted for by improvements in social and self-regulation skills during childhood (ages 6-11), such as prosocial behavior, emotion regulation, and problem solving. These skills proved less valuable for the prevention of general and mental health problems. © 2015 The Authors. Child Development © 2015 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  5. A fast quaternion-based orientation optimizer via virtual rotation for human motion tracking.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Keun; Park, Edward J

    2009-05-01

    For real-time ambulatory human motion tracking with low-cost inertial/magnetic sensors, a computationally efficient and robust algorithm for estimating orientation is critical. This paper presents a quaternion-based orientation optimizer for tracking human body motion, using triaxis rate gyro, accelerometer, and magnetometer signals. The proposed optimizer uses a Gauss-Newton (G-N) method for finding the best-fit quaternion. In order to decrease the computing time, the optimizer is formulated using a virtual rotation concept that allows very fast quaternion updates compared to the conventional G-N method. In addition, to guard against the effects of fast body motions and temporary ferromagnetic disturbances, a situational measurement vector selection procedure is adopted in conjunction with the G-N optimizer. The accuracy of orientation estimates is validated experimentally, using arm motion trials.

  6. Preventing Serious Conduct Problems in School-Age Youths: The Fast Track Program

    PubMed Central

    Slough, Nancy M.; McMahon, Robert J.; Bierman, Karen L.; Coie, John D.; Dodge, Kenneth A.; Foster, E. Michael; Greenberg, Mark T.; Lochman, John E.; McMahon, Robert J.; Pinderhughes, Ellen E.

    2009-01-01

    Children with early-starting conduct Problems have a very poor prognosis and exact a high cost to society. The Fast Track project is a multisite, collaborative research project investigating the efficacy of a comprehensive, long-term, multicomponent intervention designed to prevent the development of serious conduct problems in high-risk children. In this article, we (a) provide an overview of the development model that serves as the conceptual foundation for the Fast Track intervention and describe its integration into the intervention model; (b) outline the research design and intervention model, with an emphasis on the elementary school phase of the intervention; and (c) summarize findings to dale concerning intervention outcomes. We then provide a case illustration, and conclude with a discussion of guidelines for practitioners who work with children with conduct problems. PMID:19890487

  7. Developmental Mediation of Genetic Variation in Response to the Fast Track Prevention Program

    PubMed Central

    Albert, Dustin; Belsky, Daniel W.; Crowley, D. Max; Bates, John E.; Pettit, Gregory S.; Lansford, Jennifer E.; Dick, Danielle; Dodge, Kenneth A.

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a developmental analysis of genetic moderation of the effect of the Fast Track intervention on adult externalizing psychopathology. The Fast Track intervention enrolled 891 children at high risk to develop externalizing behavior problems when they were in kindergarten. Half of the enrolled children were randomly assigned to receive 10 years of treatment with a range of services and resources provided to the children and their families and the other half to usual care (controls). We previously showed that the effect of the Fast Track intervention on participants’ risk of externalizing psychopathology at age 25 years was moderated by a variant in the Glucocorticoid Receptor Gene (NR3C1). Children who carried copies of the A-allele of the single-nucleotide polymorphism rs10482672 had the highest risk of externalizing psychopathology if they were in the control arm of the trial and the lowest risk of externalizing psychopathology if they were in the treatment arm. In this study, we test a developmental hypothesis about the origins of this for-better-and-for-worse gene-by-intervention interaction (GxI): That the observed GxI effect on adult psychopathology is mediated by the proximal impact of intervention on childhood externalizing problems and adolescent substance use and delinquency. We analyzed longitudinal data tracking the 270 European-American children in the Fast Track RCT with available genetic information (129 intervention children and 141 control-group peers, 69% male) from kindergarten through age 25 years. Results show that the same pattern of “for-better-and-for-worse” susceptibility to intervention observed at the age-25 follow-up was evident already during childhood. At the elementary school follow-ups and at the middle/high-school follow-ups, rs10482672 predicted better adjustment among children receiving the Fast Track intervention, and worse adjustment among children in the control condition. In turn, these proximal GxI effects

  8. Telemedicine support shortens length of stay after fast-track hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Vesterby, Martin Svoldgaard; Pedersen, Preben Ulrich; Laursen, Malene; Mikkelsen, Søren; Larsen, Jens; Søballe, Kjeld; Jørgensen, Lene Bastrup

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose — Telemedicine could allow patients to be discharged more quickly after surgery and contribute to improve fast-track procedures without compromising quality, patient safety, functionality, anxiety, or other patient-perceived parameters. We investigated whether using telemedicine support (TMS) would permit hospital discharge after 1 day without loss of self-assessed quality of life, loss of functionality, increased anxiety, increased rates of re-admission, or increased rates of complications after hip replacement. Patients and methods — We performed a randomized controlled trial involving 72 Danish patients in 1 region who were referred for elective fast-track total hip replacement between August 2009 and March 2011 (654 were screened for eligibility). Half of the patients received a telemedicine solution connected to their TV. The patients were followed until 1 year after surgery. Results — Length of stay was reduced from 2.1 days (95% CI: 2.0–2.3) to 1.1 day (CI: 0.9–1.4; p < 0.001) with the TMS intervention. Health-related quality of life increased in both groups, but there were no statistically significant differences between groups. There were also no statistically significant differences between groups regarding timed up-and-go test and Oxford hip score at 3-month follow-up. At 12-month follow-up, the rates of complications and re-admissions were similar between the groups, but the number of postoperative hospital contacts was lower in the TMS group. Interpretation — Length of postoperative stay was shortened in patients with the TMS solution, without compromising patient-perceived or clinical parameters in patients undergoing elective fast-track surgery. These results indicate that telemedicine can be of value in fast-track treatment of patients undergoing total hip replacement. PMID:28097941

  9. Implementation and audit of 'Fast-Track Surgery' in gynaecological oncology surgery.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, Verinder S; Lancaster, Letitia; Elliott, David; Brand, Alison H

    2012-08-01

    Fast-track surgery is a multidisciplinary approach to surgery that results in faster recovery from surgery and decreased length of stay (LOS). The aims of this study were as follows: (i) to report on the processes required for the introduction of fast-track surgery to a gynaecological oncology unit and (ii) to report the results of a clinical audit conducted after the protocol's implementation. A fast-track protocol, specific to our unit, was developed after a series of multidisciplinary meetings. The protocol, agreed upon by those involved in the care of women in our unit, was then introduced into clinical practice. An audit was conducted of all women undergoing laparotomy, with known or suspected malignancy. Information on LOS, complication and readmission rates was collected. Descriptive statistics and Poisson regression were used for statistical analysis. The developed protocol involved a multidisciplinary approach to pre-, intra- and postoperative care. The audit included 104 consecutive women over a 6-month period, who were followed for 6 weeks postoperatively. The median LOS was 4 days. The readmission rate was 7% and the complication rate was 19% (1% intraoperative, 4% major and 14% minor). Multivariate analysis revealed that increased duration of surgery and increasing age were predictors of longer LOS. The development of a fast-track protocol is achievable in a gynaecological oncology unit, with input from a multidisciplinary team. Effective implementation of the protocol can result in a short LOS, with acceptable complication and readmission rates when applied non-selectively to gynaecological oncology patients. © 2012 The Authors ANZJOG © 2012 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  10. Setting up a fast-track insulin start clinic for type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Burden, Mary; Byard, Caroline; Gregory, Robert; Khulpateea, Anita; Burden, Andrew

    When people with established type 2 diabetes first need insulin therapy there is often a delay in accessing services. Since the report of the UK Prospective Diabetes Study was published it has been recognised that people with type 2 diabetes have a progressive disease and a need for increasing treatment. The authors set up a fast-track service to enable GPs and practice nurses to refer to a nurse-led service at the diabetes centre.

  11. Fast left ventricle tracking in CMR images using localized anatomical affine optical flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Queirós, Sandro; Vilaça, João. L.; Morais, Pedro; Fonseca, Jaime C.; D'hooge, Jan; Barbosa, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    In daily cardiology practice, assessment of left ventricular (LV) global function using non-invasive imaging remains central for the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with cardiovascular diseases. Despite the different methodologies currently accessible for LV segmentation in cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) images, a fast and complete LV delineation is still limitedly available for routine use. In this study, a localized anatomically constrained affine optical flow method is proposed for fast and automatic LV tracking throughout the full cardiac cycle in short-axis CMR images. Starting from an automatically delineated LV in the end-diastolic frame, the endocardial and epicardial boundaries are propagated by estimating the motion between adjacent cardiac phases using optical flow. In order to reduce the computational burden, the motion is only estimated in an anatomical region of interest around the tracked boundaries and subsequently integrated into a local affine motion model. Such localized estimation enables to capture complex motion patterns, while still being spatially consistent. The method was validated on 45 CMR datasets taken from the 2009 MICCAI LV segmentation challenge. The proposed approach proved to be robust and efficient, with an average distance error of 2.1 mm and a correlation with reference ejection fraction of 0.98 (1.9 +/- 4.5%). Moreover, it showed to be fast, taking 5 seconds for the tracking of a full 4D dataset (30 ms per image). Overall, a novel fast, robust and accurate LV tracking methodology was proposed, enabling accurate assessment of relevant global function cardiac indices, such as volumes and ejection fraction

  12. Transformed Governance and the Education for All-Fast Track Initiative. Policy Brief 2010-02

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gartner, David

    2010-01-01

    The Education for All-Fast Track Initiative (FTI) grew out of the "New Focus on Education for All" communique of the G-8 when Canada hosted the summit in 2002 at Kananaskis. As Canada prepares again to host the G-8, and Korea assumes leadership of the newly-empowered G-20, it is a valuable moment to revisit and re-think the current…

  13. FAST: A fully asynchronous and status-tracking pattern for geoprocessing services orchestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Huayi; You, Lan; Gui, Zhipeng; Gao, Shuang; Li, Zhenqiang; Yu, Jingmin

    2014-09-01

    Geoprocessing service orchestration (GSO) provides a unified and flexible way to implement cross-application, long-lived, and multi-step geoprocessing service workflows by coordinating geoprocessing services collaboratively. Usually, geoprocessing services and geoprocessing service workflows are data and/or computing intensive. The intensity feature may make the execution process of a workflow time-consuming. Since it initials an execution request without blocking other interactions on the client side, an asynchronous mechanism is especially appropriate for GSO workflows. Many critical problems remain to be solved in existing asynchronous patterns for GSO including difficulties in improving performance, status tracking, and clarifying the workflow structure. These problems are a challenge when orchestrating performance efficiency, making statuses instantly available, and constructing clearly structured GSO workflows. A Fully Asynchronous and Status-Tracking (FAST) pattern that adopts asynchronous interactions throughout the whole communication tier of a workflow is proposed for GSO. The proposed FAST pattern includes a mechanism that actively pushes the latest status to clients instantly and economically. An independent proxy was designed to isolate the status tracking logic from the geoprocessing business logic, which assists the formation of a clear GSO workflow structure. A workflow was implemented in the FAST pattern to simulate the flooding process in the Poyang Lake region. Experimental results show that the proposed FAST pattern can efficiently tackle data/computing intensive geoprocessing tasks. The performance of all collaborative partners was improved due to the asynchronous mechanism throughout communication tier. A status-tracking mechanism helps users retrieve the latest running status of a GSO workflow in an efficient and instant way. The clear structure of the GSO workflow lowers the barriers for geospatial domain experts and model designers to

  14. Maintaining Unity - relatives in older patients' fast-track treatment programmes. A grounded theory study.

    PubMed

    Berthelsen, Connie Bøttcher; Lindhardt, Tove; Frederiksen, Kirsten

    2014-12-01

    To generate a substantive grounded theory of relatives' pattern of behaviour in older patients' fast-track treatment programmes during total hip or knee replacement. Fast-track treatment programmes are designed to make total hip and knee replacements more efficient through recovery improvements. The support of relatives during older patients' trajectory is important. However, knowledge is needed on the relatives' pattern of behaviour to strengthen their involvement in fast-track treatment programmes. We used a Glaserian grounded theory approach based on a systematic generation of theory from data to explain the latent pattern of behaviour of relatives. Data were collected from 2010-2011 in orthopaedic wards at two Danish university hospitals and consisted of 14 non-participant observations, 14 postobservational interviews and five interviews. Seven relatives of patients over 70 years of age participated. The constant comparative method was the guiding principle for simultaneous data collection, data analysis and coding, while theoretically sampling and writing memos. Maintaining Unity emerged as the relatives' pattern of behaviour through which they resolved their main concern: preventing the patients from feeling alone. The relatives resolved their main concern through three interchangeable behavioural modes: Protecting Mode, by providing loving and respectful support; Substituting Mode, with practical and cognitive support; and an Adapting Mode, by trying to fit in with the patients' and health professionals' requirements. The substantive theory of Maintaining Unity offers knowledge of relatives' strong desire to provide compassionate and loving support for the older patients during fast-track treatment programmes. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Transformed Governance and the Education for All-Fast Track Initiative. Policy Brief 2010-02

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gartner, David

    2010-01-01

    The Education for All-Fast Track Initiative (FTI) grew out of the "New Focus on Education for All" communique of the G-8 when Canada hosted the summit in 2002 at Kananaskis. As Canada prepares again to host the G-8, and Korea assumes leadership of the newly-empowered G-20, it is a valuable moment to revisit and re-think the current…

  16. Telemedicine support shortens length of stay after fast-track hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Vesterby, Martin Svoldgaard; Pedersen, Preben Ulrich; Laursen, Malene; Mikkelsen, Søren; Larsen, Jens; Søballe, Kjeld; Jørgensen, Lene Bastrup

    2017-02-01

    Background and purpose - Telemedicine could allow patients to be discharged more quickly after surgery and contribute to improve fast-track procedures without compromising quality, patient safety, functionality, anxiety, or other patient-perceived parameters. We investigated whether using telemedicine support (TMS) would permit hospital discharge after 1 day without loss of self-assessed quality of life, loss of functionality, increased anxiety, increased rates of re-admission, or increased rates of complications after hip replacement. Patients and methods - We performed a randomized controlled trial involving 72 Danish patients in 1 region who were referred for elective fast-track total hip replacement between August 2009 and March 2011 (654 were screened for eligibility). Half of the patients received a telemedicine solution connected to their TV. The patients were followed until 1 year after surgery. Results - Length of stay was reduced from 2.1 days (95% CI: 2.0-2.3) to 1.1 day (CI: 0.9-1.4; p < 0.001) with the TMS intervention. Health-related quality of life increased in both groups, but there were no statistically significant differences between groups. There were also no statistically significant differences between groups regarding timed up-and-go test and Oxford hip score at 3-month follow-up. At 12-month follow-up, the rates of complications and re-admissions were similar between the groups, but the number of postoperative hospital contacts was lower in the TMS group. Interpretation - Length of postoperative stay was shortened in patients with the TMS solution, without compromising patient-perceived or clinical parameters in patients undergoing elective fast-track surgery. These results indicate that telemedicine can be of value in fast-track treatment of patients undergoing total hip replacement.

  17. International collaborative project to compare and track the nutritional composition of fast foods

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Chronic diseases are the leading cause of premature death and disability in the world with over-nutrition a primary cause of diet-related ill health. Excess quantities of energy, saturated fat, sugar and salt derived from fast foods contribute importantly to this disease burden. Our objective is to collate and compare nutrient composition data for fast foods as a means of supporting improvements in product formulation. Methods/design Surveys of fast foods will be done in each participating country each year. Information on the nutrient composition for each product will be sought either through direct chemical analysis, from fast food companies, in-store materials or from company websites. Foods will be categorized into major groups for the primary analyses which will compare mean levels of saturated fat, sugar, sodium, energy and serving size at baseline and over time. Countries currently involved include Australia, New Zealand, France, UK, USA, India, Spain, China and Canada, with more anticipated to follow. Discussion This collaborative approach to the collation and sharing of data will enable low-cost tracking of fast food composition around the world. This project represents a significant step forward in the objective and transparent monitoring of industry and government commitments to improve the quality of fast foods. PMID:22838731

  18. A video demonstration of the Li's anastomosis-the key part of the "non-tube no fasting" fast track program for resectable esophageal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yan; Li, Yin; Wang, Zongfei; Sun, Haibo; Zhang, Ruixiang

    2015-07-01

    The main obstacle of fast track surgery for esophagectomy is early oral feeding. The main concern of early oral feeding is the possibility of increasing the incidence of anastomotic leakage. Dr. Yin Li used the Li's anastomosis to ensure oral feeding at will the first day after esophagectomy. This safe and efficient anastomosis method significantly reduced the anastomotic leak rate, the number of post-operative days and stricture. Importantly, the "non-tube no fasting" fast track program for esophageal cancer patients was conducted smoothly with Li's anastomosis. This article was focused on the surgical procedure of Li's anastomosis.

  19. Fast parallel tracking algorithm for the muon detector of the CBM experiment at fair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, A.; Höhne, C.; Kisel, I.; Ososkov, G.

    2010-07-01

    Particle trajectory recognition is an important and challenging task in the Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at the future FAIR accelerator at Darmstadt. The tracking algorithms have to process terabytes of input data produced in particle collisions. Therefore, the speed of the tracking software is extremely important for data analysis. In this contribution, a fast parallel track reconstruction algorithm which uses available features of modern processors is presented. These features comprise a SIMD instruction set (SSE) and multithreading. The first allows one to pack several data items into one register and to operate on all of them in parallel thus achieving more operations per cycle. The second feature enables the routines to exploit all available CPU cores and hardware threads. This parallel version of the tracking algorithm has been compared to the initial serial scalar version which uses a similar approach for tracking. A speed-up factor of 487 was achieved (from 730 to 1.5 ms/event) for a computer with 2 × Intel Core i7 processors at 2.66 GHz.

  20. First results of the silicon telescope using an 'artificial retina' for fast track finding

    SciTech Connect

    Neri, N.; Abba, A.; Caponio, F.; Geraci, A.; Grizzuti, M.; Lusardi, N.; Citterio, M.; Coelli, S.; Fu, J.; Monti, M.; Petruzzo, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Ninci, D.; Piucci, A.; Spinella, F.; Walsh, J.; Cenci, R.; Marino, P.; Morello, M. J.; Stracka, S.; Punzi, G.; Tonelli, D.; Ristori, L.

    2015-07-01

    We present the first results of the prototype of a silicon tracker with trigger capabilities based on a novel approach for fast track finding. The working principle of the 'artificial retina' is inspired by the processing of visual images by the brain and it is based on extensive parallelization of data distribution and pattern recognition. The algorithm has been implemented in commercial FPGAs in three main logic modules: a switch for the routing of the detector hits, a pool of engines for the digital processing of the hits, and a block for the calculation of the track parameters. The architecture is fully pipelined and allows the reconstruction of real-time tracks with a latency less then 100 clock cycles, corresponding to 0.25 microsecond at 400 MHz clock. The silicon telescope consists of 8 layers of single-sided silicon strip detectors with 512 strips each. The detector size is about 10 cm x 10 cm and the strip pitch is 183 μm. The detectors are read out by the Beetle chip, a custom ASICs developed for LHCb, which provides the measurement of the hit position and pulse height of 128 channels. The 'artificial retina' algorithm has been implemented on custom data acquisition boards based on FPGAs Xilinx Kintex 7 lx160. The parameters of the tracks detected are finally transferred to host PC via USB 3.0. The boards manage the read-out ASICs and the sampling of the analog channels. The read-out is performed at 40 MHz on 4 channels for each ASIC that corresponds to a decoding of the telescope information at 1.1 MHz. We report on the first results of the fast tracking device and compare with simulations. (authors)

  1. [Reduction of Treatment Duration in Periprosthetic Infection with a Fast-Track Concept Is Economically Not Feasible].

    PubMed

    Lieb, E; Hanstein, T; Schuerings, M; Trampuz, A; Perka, C

    2015-12-01

    In the two stage revision of periprosthetic joint infection (PJI), the prosthesis-free interval may be reduced to 2-3 weeks (fast-track). This is an innovative approach with clear advantages for both the patient and health insurance stakeholders. The prosthesis-free interval with conventional two-stage PJI slow-track procedures lasts 6-12 weeks. In Germany, the patient spends this time either at home or in a geriatric hospital. This period is mainly used to manage infections. The patient is then readmitted for implantation of the revision prosthesis. This readmission then leads to additional reimbursement, as this is formally a new insurance case. Despite this double payment, the costs for the treatment of such complex diseases are not covered by the German DRG system. If hospitals are to implement the proven fast-track concept, they need to invest in a multidisciplinary medical team. This would be responsible for defining infections, selecting patients, and improving diagnosis and antimicrobial therapy and should thus improve the rates of cure of infections. However, the G-DRG reimbursement system treats the two surgeries as a single case, providing that less than 30 days lies between the two interventions; as a result, the reimbursement is inadequate for patients with the fast-track interval. We analysed the theoretical financial deficit for a hospital and describe the cost-saving potential for payers applying the fast-track interval rather than the slow-track approach in selected PJI patients, using a comprehensive and individualised treatment concept. Our analysis covered thirty-two consecutive patients with infected joint prosthesis (17 hips, 15 knee) admitted to our hospital from January 2011 to December 2012 undergoing a two-stage exchange (ICD-10-GM: T84.5). We excluded patients who underwent only one hospital admission during the analysed time frame or who were admitted to another hospital. Patients treated with joint fusion and patients who died were also

  2. Fast template matching based on grey prediction for real-time object tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Mingming; Hou, Yuanlong; Liu, Rongzhong; Hou, Runmin

    2017-02-01

    Template matching is a basic algorithm for image processing, and real-time is a crucial requirement of object tracking. For real-time tracking, a fast template matching algorithm based on grey prediction is presented, where computation cost can be reduced dramatically by minimizing search range. First, location of the tracked object in the current image is estimated by Grey Model (GM). GM(1,1), which is the basic model of grey prediction, can use some known information to foretell the location. Second, the precise position of the object in the frame is computed by template matching. Herein, Sequential Similarity Detection Algorithm (SSDA) with a self-adaptive threshold is employed to obtain the matching position in the neighborhood of the predicted location. The role of threshold in SSDA is important, as a proper threshold can make template matching fast and accurate. Moreover, a practical weighted strategy is utilized to handle scale and rotation changes of the object, as well as illumination changes. The experimental results show the superior performance of the proposed algorithm over the conventional full-search method, especially in terms of executive time.

  3. Effects of a fast-track area on emergency department performance.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Miquel; Smally, Alan J; Grant, Robert J; Jacobs, Lenworth M

    2006-07-01

    To determine if a fast-track area (FTA) would improve Emergency Department (ED) performance, a historical cohort study was performed in the ED of a tertiary care adult hospital in the United States. Two 1-year consecutive periods, pre fast track area (FTA) opening-from February 1, 2001 to January 31, 2002 and after FTA opening-from February 1, 2002 to January 31, 2003 were studied. Daily values of the following variables were obtained from the ED patient tracking system: 1) To assess ED effectiveness: waiting time to be seen (WT), length of stay (LOS); 2) To assess ED care quality: rate of patients left without being seen (LWBS), mortality, and revisits; 3) To assess determinants of patient homogeneity between periods: daily census, age, acuity index, admission rate and emergent patient rate. For comparisons, the Wilcoxon test and the Student's t-test were used to analyze the data. Results showed that despite an increase in the daily census (difference [diff] 8.71, 95% confidence interval [CI] 6 to 11.41), FTA was associated with a decrease in WT (diff -51 min, 95% CI [-56 to -46]), LOS (diff -28 min, 95% CI [-31 to -23]) and LWBS (diff -4.06, 95% CI [-4.48 to -3.46]), without change in the rates of mortality or revisits. In conclusion, the opening of a FTA improved ED effectiveness, measured by decreased WT and LOS, without deterioration in the quality of care provided, measured by rates of mortality and revisits.

  4. Fast track in colo-rectal surgery. Preliminary experience in a rural hospital

    PubMed Central

    FRONTERA, D.; ARENA, L.; CORSALE, I.; FRANCIOLI, N.; MAMMOLITI, F.; BUCCIANELLI, E.

    2014-01-01

    Background “Fast Track surgery” is a therapeutic program of large application, despite some doubts about its applicability and real validity. Literature review shows that this approach to colo-rectal surgery, particularly video-assisted, can allow a rapid recovery, better performance and a faster postoperative functional autonomy of the work, which can be discharged without cause additional welfare costs; in addition it can be reproducible in different health reality. Purpose To analyze the possibility to apply the Fast Truck protocol in patients undergoing colorectal surgery in a rural hospital and non specialistic Unit of Surgery. Patients and methods We have conducted a prospective, randomized study on 80 patients subjected to colorectal surgery in the last year. Results The protocol was observed in 95% of cases, compliance with the Fast Track was high and general morbidity was limited (7.8%). Conclusion This “aggressive” approach, which has fundamentally altered the usual surgical behavior, seems to allow a mean length of stay significantly lower than in controls (p < 0.05) with positive implications for patients and containment of health care costs, even after discharge (no need for home care in 92% of cases, no early re-admittance to the hospital). Homogeneous protocols are desirable, as well as an increased enrollment, to consolidate these rehabilitation programs in order to provide a reference for all hospitals. PMID:25644732

  5. Infrared image guidance for ground vehicle based on fast wavelet image focusing and tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, Akira; Kobayashi, Nobuaki; Mutoh, Eiichiro; Kumagai, Hideo; Yamada, Hirofumi; Ishii, Hiromitsu

    2009-08-01

    We studied the infrared image guidance for ground vehicle based on the fast wavelet image focusing and tracking. Here we uses the image of the uncooled infrared imager mounted on the two axis gimbal system and the developed new auto focusing algorithm on the Daubechies wavelet transform. The developed new focusing algorithm on the Daubechies wavelet transform processes the result of the high pass filter effect to meet the direct detection of the objects. This new focusing gives us the distance information of the outside world smoothly, and the information of the gimbal system gives us the direction of objects in the outside world to match the sense of the spherical coordinate system. We installed this system on the hand made electric ground vehicle platform powered by 24VDC battery. The electric vehicle equips the rotary encoder units and the inertia rate sensor units to make the correct navigation process. The image tracking also uses the developed newt wavelet focusing within several image processing. The size of the hand made electric ground vehicle platform is about 1m long, 0.75m wide, 1m high, and 50kg weight. We tested the infrared image guidance for ground vehicle based on the new wavelet image focusing and tracking using the electric vehicle indoor and outdoor. The test shows the good results by the developed infrared image guidance for ground vehicle based on the new wavelet image focusing and tracking.

  6. Fast detection of alpha particles in DAM-ADC nuclear track detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rammah, Y. S.; Ashraf, O.; Abdalla, A. M.; Eisa, M.; Ashry, A. H.; Tsuruta, T.

    2015-02-01

    Fast detection of alpha particles in DAM-ADC nuclear track detectors using a new chemical etchant was investigated. 252Cf and 241Am sources were used for irradiating samples of DAM-ADC SSNTDs with fission fragments and alpha particles in air at normal temperature and pressure. A series of experimental chemical etching are carried out using new etching solution (8 ml of 10 N NaOH+ 1 ml CH3OH) at 60 °C to detect alpha particle in short time in DAM-ADC detectors. Suitable analyzing software has been used to analyze experimental data. From fission and alpha track diameters, the value of bulk etching rate is equal to 8.52 μm/h. Both of the sensitivity and etching efficiency were found to vary with the amount of methanol in the etching solution and etching time. The DAM-ADC detectors represent the best efficiency applicable in detectors in the entire range of alpha energies (from 1 to 5 MeV). The activation energies of this etchant have been calculated; track activation energy, ET, has been found to be lower than the bulk activation energy, EB, for the DAM-ADC nuclear track detectors. These results are in more agreement with the previous work.

  7. Atom ejection from a fast-ion track: A molecular-dynamics study

    SciTech Connect

    Urbassek, H.M. ); Kafemann, H. ); Johnson, R.E. )

    1994-01-01

    As a model for atom ejection from fast-ion tracks, molecular-dynamics simulations of a cylindrical track of energized particles are performed. An idealized situation is studied where every atom in a cylindrical track of radius [ital R][sub 0] is energized with energy [ital E][sub 0]. The emission yield [ital Y]([ital E][sub 0],[ital R][sub 0]) shows the existence of two ejection regimes. If the particle energy [ital E][sub 0] is below the sublimation energy [ital U] of the material, a threshold regime is seen in which [ital Y] rises roughly like the third power of [ital E][sub 0]; for high-energy densities [ital E][sub 0][approx gt][ital U], the yield rises much more slowly, roughly linearly. In both cases, ejected particles mostly originate from the track, rather than from its surroundings, and from the first or the first few monolayers. The behavior found is interpreted here in terms of emission due to a pressure-driven jet (linear regime) or due to a pressure pulse (threshold regime). These both behave differently from the often-used thermal-spike sputtering model.

  8. Does BMI influence hospital stay and morbidity after fast-track hip and knee arthroplasty?

    PubMed

    Husted, Henrik; Jørgensen, Christoffer C; Gromov, Kirill; Kehlet, Henrik

    2016-10-01

    Background and purpose - Body mass index (BMI) outside the normal range possibly affects the perioperative morbidity and mortality following total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in traditional care programs. We determined perioperative morbidity and mortality in such patients who were operated with the fast-track methodology and compared the levels with those in patients with normal BMI. Patients and methods - This was a prospective observational study involving 13,730 procedures (7,194 THA and 6,536 TKA operations) performed in a standardized fast-track setting. Complete 90-day follow-up was achieved using national registries and review of medical records. Patients were grouped according to BMI as being underweight, of normal weight, overweight, obese, very obese, and morbidly obese. Results - Median length of stay (LOS) was 2 (IQR: 2-3) days in all BMI groups. 30-day re-admission rates were around 6% for both THA (6.1%) and TKA (5.9%), without any statistically significant differences between BMI groups in univariate analysis (p > 0.4), but there was a trend of a protective effect of overweight for both THA (p = 0.1) and TKA (p = 0.06). 90-day re-admission rates increased to 8.6% for THA and 8.3% for TKA, which was similar among BMI groups, but there was a trend of lower rates in overweight and obese TKA patients (p = 0.08 and p = 0.06, respectively). When we adjusted for preoperative comorbidity, high BMI in THA patients (very obese and morbidly obese patients only) was associated with a LOS of >4 days (p = 0.001), but not with re-admission. No such relationship existed for TKA. Interpretation - A fast-track setting resulted in similar length of hospital stay and re-admission rates regardless of BMI, except for very obese and morbidly obese THA patients.

  9. Fast-track vs. delayed insertion of the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system after early medical abortion - a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Korjamo, Riina; Mentula, Maarit; Heikinheimo, Oskari

    2017-08-05

    To compare levonorgestrel (LNG) 52-mg intrauterine system (IUS) expulsion rates with fast-track (≤3 days) or delayed (2-4 weeks) insertion following mifepristone and misoprostol medical abortion. In this pilot trial, we randomized 108 women at ≤63 days' gestation to fast-track (n=55) or delayed (n=53) insertion. Follow-up visits occurred at 2-4 weeks, 3 months and 1 year. We assessed total and partial expulsion at 3 months and 1 year, adverse effects and bleeding profiles. We had follow-up data at 3 months and 1 year for 41 (74.5%) and 37 (69.8%) women in the fast-track group and 31 (56.4%) and 28 (52.8%) women in the delayed group. By 3 months, expulsion occurred in six (12.5%) women after fast-track and one (2.3%) woman after delayed insertion [risk ratio (RR) 5.50, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.69-43.90]; most (n=5) of these were partial expulsions in the fast-track group. By 1 year, expulsion had occurred in seven (14.6%) and five (11.5%) women in the fast-track and delayed groups, respectively (RR 1.28, 95% CI 0.44-3.75). We found no differences in rates of vacuum aspiration, residual tissue, infection and bleeding or bleeding patterns within 3 months of insertion. Fast-track insertion of the LNG 52-mg IUS after medical abortion is feasible but may result in higher expulsion rates compared to delayed insertion. Due to lack of statistical power and high lost-to-follow-up rates, we were unable to fully address this question. Fast-tract initiation of LNG 52-mg IUS contraception after medical abortion is feasible. It results in higher expulsion rates than delayed insertion but may improve postabortal intrauterine contraception uptake. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. "Fast-Tracking": Ain't No Golden Parachute So Don't Slide off the Rainbow.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newburger, Craig; Butler, Jerry

    Awareness of the corporate cultural phenomenon of fast-tracking, a process whereby executives are advanced within and among organizations, should assist communication students and practicing professionals to become more effective corporate communicators. A critical distinction between self-directed fast-trackers and their corporately-sanctioned…

  11. Impact of a Fast Track in the Emergency Department of Martin Army Community Hospital

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    and a dependent variable a point biseral correlation coefficient can be used. (Polit, 2006). The point biserial correlation coefficient, rpb , ranges...from -1.00 to 1.00 and indicates the strength of the relationship. The formula for rpb is: Fast Track 43 rpb = +Pt r Vb lt’ +df The larger the...2.30, p=0.01 (one-tailed) while showing a weak positive relationship ( rpb =0.01). Compared to the benchmarks determined using the CDC survey data

  12. A steady tracking technology adopted to fast FH/BPSK signal under satellite channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, SuLi; Lou, Zhigang; Wang, XiDuo; Xia, ShuangZhi

    2015-07-01

    In order to survive under the conditions with great jamming and interference, fast frequency hopped signal are employed in satellite communication system. This paper discusses the nonlinear phases induced by the equipment and atmosphere, and their influence on the FFH/BPSK tracking loop. Two methods are developed including compensating phase which is based on channel estimation and compensating Doppler frequency based on velocity normalization. Simulation results for a real circuit with proper parameters shows that the degradation due to the demodulation of frequency-hopped is only a fraction of one dB in an AWGN environment under satellite channel.

  13. Fast Track to the Cloud: Design Patterns for 12-Factor Earth Sciences Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pawloski, Andrew; McLaughlin, Brett; Lynnes, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    As expanding service offerings and decreasing prices make the cloud increasingly attractive to Earth Science applications, there are nontrivial practical considerations which can hinder its meaningful use. In this talk, we will discuss architectural recommendations and lessons learned while working on EOSDIS' cloud efforts, particularly the NASA-compliant General Application Platform (NGAP) and its associated applications. Prominent in our findings is the importance of 12-factor design patterns and the powerful "wins" they enable in the cloud. We will share our strategies for "fast-tracking" applications to the cloud --whether they be legacy, planned for the future, or somewhere in between.

  14. How Does the Fast Track Intervention Prevent Adverse Outcomes in Young Adulthood?

    PubMed Central

    Sorensen, Lucy C.; Dodge, Kenneth A.

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies have shown that childhood interventions can foster improved outcomes in adulthood. Less well understood is precisely how – that is, through which developmental pathways – these interventions work. This study assesses mechanisms by which the Fast Track project (n=891), a randomized intervention in the early 1990s for high-risk children in four communities (Durham, NC; Nashville, TN; rural PA; and Seattle, WA), reduced delinquency, arrests, and health and mental health service utilization in adolescence through young adulthood (ages 12–20). A decomposition of treatment effects indicates that about a third of Fast Track’s impact on later crime outcomes can be accounted for by improvements in social and self-regulation skills during childhood (ages 6–11), such as prosocial behavior, emotion regulation and problem solving. These skills proved less valuable for the prevention of mental and physical health problems. PMID:26670938

  15. A fast algorithm for muon track reconstruction and its application to the ANTARES neutrino telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar, J. A.; Al Samarai, I.; Albert, A.; André, M.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anton, G.; Anvar, S.; Ardid, M.; Assis Jesus, A. C.; Astraatmadja, T.; Aubert, J.-J.; Auer, R.; Baret, B.; Basa, S.; Bazzotti, M.; Bertin, V.; Biagi, S.; Bigongiari, C.; Bogazzi, C.; Bou-Cabo, M.; Bouwhuis, M. C.; Brown, A. M.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Camarena, F.; Capone, A.; Cârloganu, C.; Carminati, G.; Carr, J.; Cecchini, S.; Charvis, Ph.; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Coniglione, R.; Costantini, H.; Cottini, N.; Coyle, P.; Curtil, C.; Decowski, M. P.; Dekeyser, I.; Deschamps, A.; Distefano, C.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Dorosti, Q.; Drouhin, D.; Eberl, T.; Emanuele, U.; Ernenwein, J.-P.; Escoffier, S.; Fehr, F.; Flaminio, V.; Fritsch, U.; Fuda, J.-L.; Galatà, S.; Gay, P.; Giacomelli, G.; Gómez-González, J. P.; Graf, K.; Guillard, G.; Halladjian, G.; Hallewell, G.; van Haren, H.; Heijboer, A. J.; Hello, Y.; Hernández-Rey, J. J.; Herold, B.; Hößl, J.; Hsu, C. C.; de Jong, M.; Kadler, M.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kalekin, O.; Kappes, A.; Katz, U.; Kooijman, P.; Kopper, C.; Kouchner, A.; Kulikovskiy, V.; Lahmann, R.; Lamare, P.; Larosa, G.; Lefèvre, D.; Lim, G.; Lo Presti, D.; Loehner, H.; Loucatos, S.; Lucarelli, F.; Mangano, S.; Marcelin, M.; Margiotta, A.; Martinez-Mora, J. A.; Mazure, A.; Meli, A.; Montaruli, T.; Morganti, M.; Moscoso, L.; Motz, H.; Naumann, C.; Neff, M.; Palioselitis, D.; Păvălaş, G. E.; Payre, P.; Petrovic, J.; Picot-Clemente, N.; Picq, C.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Presani, E.; Racca, C.; Reed, C.; Riccobene, G.; Richardt, C.; Richter, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rujoiu, M.; Russo, G. V.; Salesa, F.; Sapienza, P.; Schöck, F.; Schuller, J.-P.; Shanidze, R.; Simeone, F.; Spiess, A.; Spurio, M.; Steijger, J. J. M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Taiuti, M.; Tamburini, C.; Tasca, L.; Toscano, S.; Vallage, B.; Van Elewyck, V.; Vannoni, G.; Vecchi, M.; Vernin, P.; Wijnker, G.; de Wolf, E.; Yepes, H.; Zaborov, D.; Zornoza, J. D.; Zúñiga, J.

    2011-04-01

    An algorithm is presented, that provides a fast and robust reconstruction of neutrino induced upward-going muons and a discrimination of these events from downward-going atmospheric muon background in data collected by the ANTARES neutrino telescope. The algorithm consists of a hit merging and hit selection procedure followed by fitting steps for a track hypothesis and a point-like light source. It is particularly well-suited for real time applications such as online monitoring and fast triggering of optical follow-up observations for multi-messenger studies. The performance of the algorithm is evaluated with Monte Carlo simulations and various distributions are compared with that obtained in ANTARES data.

  16. A fast single-pixel laser imager for VR/AR headset tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milanović, Veljko; Kasturi, Abhishek; Yang, James; Hu, Frank

    2017-02-01

    In this work we demonstrate a highly flexible laser imaging system for 3D sensing applications such as in tracking of VR/AR headsets, hands and gestures. The system uses a MEMS mirror scan module to transmit low power laser pulses over programmable areas within a field of view and uses a single photodiode to measure the reflected light. User can arbitrarily select the number of pixels to scan over an area and can thus obtain images of target objects at arbitrarily fast rates. The work builds on the previously presented "MEMSEye" laser tracking technology which uses a fast steering MEMS scan module with a modulated laser, and a tuned photosensor to acquire and track a retroreflector-marked object. To track VR/AR headsets, hands and similar objects with multiple markers or no markers at all, a single-point tracking methodology is not sufficient. Cameras could be more appropriate in such multi-point imaging cases but suffer from low frame rates, dependence on ambient lighting, and relatively low resolution when without zooming and panning capability. A hybrid method can address the problem by providing a system with its own light source (laser beam), and with full programmability of the pixel locations and scans such that frame rates of >100 Hz are possible over specific areas of interest. With a modest 1 Mpixel rate of measurement, scanning a sub-region of the field of view with 64 x 64 pixels results in 200Hz update. Multiple such modules can be used to scan and image or track objects with multiple markers and fully obtain their position and attitude in a room with sub-5ms updates. Furthermore the room itself could be imaged and measured with wall markers or in conjunction with a camera for a total 3D scanning solution. Proof of concept demonstrator is presented here with pixel rates of only 30k-50k per second due to limitations of the present prototype electronics, resulting in refresh rates that are significantly lower than possible with the MEMS mirror scan

  17. fsclean: Faraday Synthesis CLEAN imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, M. R.; Ensslin, T. A.

    2015-06-01

    Fsclean produces 3D Faraday spectra using the Faraday synthesis method, transforming directly from multi-frequency visibility data to the Faraday depth-sky plane space. Deconvolution is accomplished using the CLEAN algorithm, and the package includes Clark and Högbom style CLEAN algorithms. Fsclean reads in MeasurementSet visibility data and produces HDF5 formatted images; it handles images and data of arbitrary size, using scratch HDF5 files as buffers for data that is not being immediately processed, and is limited only by available disk space.

  18. Hysteretic Faraday waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Périnet, Nicolas; Falcón, Claudio; Chergui, Jalel; Shin, Seungwon; Juric, Damir

    2016-11-01

    We study with numerical simulations the two-dimensional Faraday waves in two immiscible incompressible fluids when the lower fluid layer is shallow. After the appearance of the well known subharmonic stationary waves, a further instability is observed while the control parameter passes a secondary threshold. A new state then arises, composed of stationary waves with about twice the original pattern amplitude. The bifurcation presents hysteresis: there exists a finite range of the control parameter in which both states are stable. By means of a simple stress balance, we show that a change of the shear stress can explain this hysteresis. Our predictions based on this model are in agreement with our numerical results. Project funded by FONDECYT Grants 1130354, 3140522 and the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF- 2014R1A2A1A11051346). Computations supported by the supercomputing infrastructures of the NLHPC (ECM-02) and GENCI (IDRIS).

  19. Effectiveness of fast-track rehabilitation vs conventional care in laparoscopic colorectal resection for elderly patients: a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Wang, Q; Suo, J; Jiang, J; Wang, C; Zhao, Y-Q; Cao, X

    2012-08-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of fast-track rehabilitation in elderly patients over 65 years of age, following laparoscopic surgery to remove colorectal cancer. A total of 78 elderly patients with colorectal cancer who underwent laparoscopic colorectal resection were randomly assigned to receive either the fast-track care programme (n = 40) or the conventional perioperative care protocol (control group, n = 38). Medical personnel conducting the study were blinded to patients' clinical outcomes prior to statistical analysis. The fast-track protocol included no preoperative mechanical bowel irrigation, immediate oral alimentation and earlier postoperative ambulation exercise. The length of postoperative hospital stay, the length of time to regain bowel function and the rate of postoperative complications were compared between the two groups. The length of time to regain bowel function, including the passage of flatus[31 (26-40) h vs 38 (32-51) h, P = 0.001], to the first bowel movement [55 (48-63) h vs 64 (48-71) h, P = 0.009] and to start a liquid diet (12 [11-16] h vs 47 [35-50] h, P = 0.000) were significantly shorter in patients receiving the fast-track care protocol compared with those receiving the conventional care protocol. A shorter duration of postoperative hospital stay was recorded in patients receiving the fast-track program than in those receiving conventional care (P = 0.0001). A reduced percentage of patients who developed general complications was also observed in the fast-track group (5.0%vs 21.1%, P = 0.045). This randomized controlled trial has shown that in the elderly undergoing laparoscopic colorectal surgery, the fast-track recovery programme resulted in a more rapid postoperative recovery, earlier discharge from hospital and fewer general complications compared with a conventional postoperative protocol. © 2011 The Authors. Colorectal Disease © 2011 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and

  20. "Fast track surgery" in the north-west of Italy: influence on the orientation of surgical practice.

    PubMed

    Pozzi, G; Falcone, A; Sabbatino, F; Solej, M; Nano, M

    2012-06-01

    Fast track surgery is a peri-operative management model, including different strategies to improve patients' convalescence, avoid metabolic alterations, reduce complications, and shorten hospital stay. Prerequisite is coordination between different practitioners (surgeon, anaesthetist, nurse, nutritionist, physiotherapist). The purpose of our investigation is to understand the level of fast track surgery application in Piedmont and to evidence analogies and differences among departments. We projected an investigation proposing, to every surgery department in Piedmont, a multiple-choice questionnaire evaluating the level of fast track surgery peri-operative interventions' application. Data analysis was conducted in two points of view: the transversal one with an overview of answer's percentages, the longitudinal one correlating data through Pearson's index (r). We collected answers by 78 % of balloted departments (38 on 49). Transversal analysis, including the evaluation of percentages of each question, shows that intra-operative period is the most influenced by fast track principles, and that only 12 departments of 38 apply complete protocols. Longitudinal analysis, estimating the whole of each department's answers, demonstrates the absence of statistical significance in the correlation between fast track surgery application and territorial (r = 0.18), economic (r = 0.31), or age (r = 0.06) variables. Influence of fast track surgery is significantly present in our territory, even though it is not fully concretized in protocols. The choice of fast track depends on the instruction, the environment and the sensibility of each surgeon. Knowledge of geographic distribution of departments applying this model can be useful to organize common protocols, starting from more experienced hospitals.

  1. Fast-track program in laparoscopic liver surgery: Theory or fact?

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Pérez, Belinda; Aranda-Narváez, José Manuel; Suárez-Muñoz, Miguel Angel; Eladel-Delfresno, Moises; Fernández-Aguilar, José Luis; Pérez-Daga, Jose Antonio; Pulido-Roa, Ysabel; Santoyo-Santoyo, Julio

    2012-11-27

    To analyze our results after the introduction of a fast-track (FT) program after laparoscopic liver surgery in our Hepatobiliarypancreatic Unit. All patients (43) undergoing laparoscopic liver surgery between March 2004 and March 2010 were included and divided into two consecutive groups: Control group (CG) from March 2004 until December 2006 with traditional perioperative cares (17 patients) and fast-track group (FTG) from January 2007 until March 2010 with FT program cares (26 patients). Primary endpoint was the influence of the program on the postoperative stay, the amount of re-admissions, morbidity and mortality. Secondarily we considered duration of surgery, use of drains, conversion to open surgery, intensive cares needs and transfusion. Both groups were homogeneous in age and sex. No differences in technique, time of surgery or conversion to open surgery were found, but more malignant diseases were operated in the FTG, and then transfusions were higher in FTG. Readmissions and morbidity were similar in both groups, without mortality. Postoperative stay was similar, with a median of 3 for CG vs 2.5 for FTG. However, the 80.8% of patients from FTG left the hospital within the first 3 d after surgery (58.8% for CG). The introduction of a FT program after laparoscopic liver surgery improves the recovery of patients without increasing complications or re-admissions, which leads to a reduction of the stay and costs.

  2. A Fast Track approach to deal with the temporal dimension of crop water footprint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuninetti, Marta; Tamea, Stefania; Laio, Francesco; Ridolfi, Luca

    2017-07-01

    Population growth, socio-economic development and climate changes are placing increasing pressure on water resources. Crop water footprint is a key indicator in the quantification of such pressure. It is determined by crop evapotranspiration and crop yield, which can be highly variable in space and time. While the spatial variability of crop water footprint has been the objective of several investigations, the temporal variability remains poorly studied. In particular, some studies approached this issue by associating the time variability of crop water footprint only to yield changes, while considering evapotranspiration patterns as marginal. Validation of this Fast Track approach has yet to be provided. In this Letter we demonstrate its feasibility through a comprehensive validation, an assessment of its uncertainty, and an example of application. Our results show that the water footprint changes are mainly driven by yield trends, while evapotranspiration plays a minor role. The error due to considering constant evapotranspiration is three times smaller than the uncertainty of the model used to compute the crop water footprint. These results confirm the suitability of the Fast Track approach and enable a simple, yet appropriate, evaluation of time-varying crop water footprint.

  3. Real-Time Robust Tracking for Motion Blur and Fast Motion via Correlation Filters

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lingyun; Luo, Haibo; Hui, Bin; Chang, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Visual tracking has extensive applications in intelligent monitoring and guidance systems. Among state-of-the-art tracking algorithms, Correlation Filter methods perform favorably in robustness, accuracy and speed. However, it also has shortcomings when dealing with pervasive target scale variation, motion blur and fast motion. In this paper we proposed a new real-time robust scheme based on Kernelized Correlation Filter (KCF) to significantly improve performance on motion blur and fast motion. By fusing KCF and STC trackers, our algorithm also solve the estimation of scale variation in many scenarios. We theoretically analyze the problem for CFs towards motions and utilize the point sharpness function of the target patch to evaluate the motion state of target. Then we set up an efficient scheme to handle the motion and scale variation without much time consuming. Our algorithm preserves the properties of KCF besides the ability to handle special scenarios. In the end extensive experimental results on benchmark of VOT datasets show our algorithm performs advantageously competed with the top-rank trackers. PMID:27618046

  4. Faraday anomalous dispersion optical tuners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wanninger, P.; Valdez, E. C.; Shay, T. M.

    1992-01-01

    Common methods for frequency stabilizing diode lasers systems employ gratings, etalons, optical electric double feedback, atomic resonance, and a Faraday cell with low magnetic field. Our method, the Faraday Anomalous Dispersion Optical Transmitter (FADOT) laser locking, is much simpler than other schemes. The FADOT uses commercial laser diodes with no antireflection coatings, an atomic Faraday cell with a single polarizer, and an output coupler to form a compound cavity. This method is vibration insensitive, thermal expansion effects are minimal, and the system has a frequency pull in range of 443.2 GHz (9A). Our technique is based on the Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter. This method has potential applications in optical communication, remote sensing, and pumping laser excited optical filters. We present the first theoretical model for the FADOT and compare the calculations to our experimental results.

  5. Faraday imaging at high temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, L.A.; Reichert, P.

    1997-03-18

    A Faraday filter rejects background light from self-luminous thermal objects, but transmits laser light at the passband wavelength, thus providing an ultra-narrow optical bandpass filter. The filter preserves images so a camera looking through a Faraday filter at a hot target illuminated by a laser will not see the thermal radiation but will see the laser radiation. Faraday filters are useful for monitoring or inspecting the uranium separator chamber in an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process. Other uses include viewing welds, furnaces, plasma jets, combustion chambers, and other high temperature objects. These filters are can be produced at many discrete wavelengths. A Faraday filter consists of a pair of crossed polarizers on either side of a heated vapor cell mounted inside a solenoid. 3 figs.

  6. Faraday imaging at high temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Lloyd A.; Reichert, Patrick

    1997-01-01

    A Faraday filter rejects background light from self-luminous thermal objects, but transmits laser light at the passband wavelength, thus providing an ultra-narrow optical bandpass filter. The filter preserves images so a camera looking through a Faraday filter at a hot target illuminated by a laser will not see the thermal radiation but will see the laser radiation. Faraday filters are useful for monitoring or inspecting the uranium separator chamber in an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process. Other uses include viewing welds, furnaces, plasma jets, combustion chambers, and other high temperature objects. These filters are can be produced at many discrete wavelengths. A Faraday filter consists of a pair of crossed polarizers on either side of a heated vapor cell mounted inside a solenoid.

  7. Faraday anomalous dispersion optical tuners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wanninger, P.; Valdez, E. C.; Shay, T. M.

    1992-01-01

    Common methods for frequency stabilizing diode lasers systems employ gratings, etalons, optical electric double feedback, atomic resonance, and a Faraday cell with low magnetic field. Our method, the Faraday Anomalous Dispersion Optical Transmitter (FADOT) laser locking, is much simpler than other schemes. The FADOT uses commercial laser diodes with no antireflection coatings, an atomic Faraday cell with a single polarizer, and an output coupler to form a compound cavity. This method is vibration insensitive, thermal expansion effects are minimal, and the system has a frequency pull in range of 443.2 GHz (9A). Our technique is based on the Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter. This method has potential applications in optical communication, remote sensing, and pumping laser excited optical filters. We present the first theoretical model for the FADOT and compare the calculations to our experimental results.

  8. Faraday instability of a spherical drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebo Adou, A.; Tuckerman, Laurette; Shin, Seungwon; Chergui, Jalel; Juric, Damir

    2014-11-01

    A liquid drop subjected to an oscillatory radial force comprises a spherical version of the Faraday instability, with a subharmonic response which is half of the forcing frequency. The time-dependent shape of the drop and the velocity field in and around it are calculated using BLUE, a code based on a hybrid Front Tracking/Level-set algorithm for Lagrangian tracking of arbitrarily deformable phase interfaces. We compare this shape with the spherical harmonic selected at onset, calculated by adapting the Floquet stability analysis of Kumar and Tuckerman to a spherical geometry. We interpret the shape in light of theoretical results by Busse, Matthews and others concerning pattern formation in the presence of O(3) symmetry.

  9. Error-Based Observer of a Charge Couple Device Tracking Loop for Fast Steering Mirror

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Tao; Deng, Chao; Yang, Tao; Zhong, Daijun; Ren, Ge; Huang, Yongmei; Fu, Chengyu

    2017-01-01

    The charge couple device (CCD) tracking loop of a fast steering mirror (FSM) is usually used to stabilize line of sight (LOS). High closed-loop bandwidth facilitates good performance. However, low-rate sample and time delay of the CCD greatly limit the high control bandwidth. This paper proposes an error-based observer (EBO) to improve the low-frequency performance of the CCD tracking system. The basic idea is by combining LOS error from the CCD and the controller output to produce the high-gain observer, forwarding into the originally closed-loop control system. This proposed EBO can improve the system both in target tracking and disturbance suppression due to LOS error from the CCD’s sensing of the two signals. From a practical engineering view, the closed-loop stability and robustness of the EBO system are investigated on the condition of gain margin and phase margin of the open-loop transfer function. Two simulations of CCD experiments are provided to verify the benefits of the proposed algorithm. PMID:28264504

  10. A fast seed detection using local geometrical feature for automatic tracking of coronary arteries in CTA.

    PubMed

    Han, Dongjin; Doan, Nam-Thai; Shim, Hackjoon; Jeon, Byunghwan; Lee, Hyunna; Hong, Youngtaek; Chang, Hyuk-Jae

    2014-11-01

    We propose a fast seed detection for automatic tracking of coronary arteries in coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA). To detect vessel regions, Hessian-based filtering is combined with a new local geometric feature that is based on the similarity of the consecutive cross-sections perpendicular to the vessel direction. It is in turn founded on the prior knowledge that a vessel segment is shaped like a cylinder in axial slices. To improve computational efficiency, an axial slice, which contains part of three main coronary arteries, is selected and regions of interest (ROIs) are extracted in the slice. Only for the voxels belonging to the ROIs, the proposed geometric feature is calculated. With the seed points, which are the centroids of the detected vessel regions, and their vessel directions, vessel tracking method can be used for artery extraction. Here a particle filtering-based tracking algorithm is tested. Using 19 clinical CCTA datasets, it is demonstrated that the proposed method detects seed points and can be used for full automatic coronary artery extraction. ROC (receiver operating characteristic) curve analysis shows the advantages of the proposed method. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A new fast scanning system for the measurement of large angle tracks in nuclear emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, A.; Buonaura, A.; Consiglio, L.; D'Ambrosio, N.; De Lellis, G.; Di Crescenzo, A.; Di Marco, N.; Galati, G.; Lauria, A.; Montesi, M. C.; Pupilli, F.; Shchedrina, T.; Tioukov, V.; Vladymyrov, M.

    2015-11-01

    Nuclear emulsions have been widely used in particle physics to identify new particles through the observation of their decays thanks to their unique spatial resolution. Nevertheless, before the advent of automatic scanning systems, the emulsion analysis was very demanding in terms of well trained manpower. Due to this reason, they were gradually replaced by electronic detectors, until the '90s, when automatic microscopes started to be developed in Japan and in Europe. Automatic scanning was essential to conceive large scale emulsion-based neutrino experiments like CHORUS, DONUT and OPERA. Standard scanning systems have been initially designed to recognize tracks within a limited angular acceptance (θ lesssim 30°) where θ is the track angle with respect to a line perpendicular to the emulsion plane. In this paper we describe the implementation of a novel fast automatic scanning system aimed at extending the track recognition to the full angular range and improving the present scanning speed. Indeed, nuclear emulsions do not have any intrinsic limit to detect particle direction. Such improvement opens new perspectives to use nuclear emulsions in several fields in addition to large scale neutrino experiments, like muon radiography, medical applications and dark matter directional detection.

  12. Fast track surgery, a strategy to improve operational efficiency in a high-complexity hospital in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Betancur, Juan David Angel; Montaño, Liliana Marcela Betancur; Jaramillo, André Felipe Espinosa; Delgado, Carlos Enrique Yepes

    2015-01-01

    Fast Track surgery is designed to optimize time in low-complexity procedures, thus improving efficiency in care provision, and preserving patient safety. Before and after intervention study in a surgical setting, with failure mode and effects analysis, identification and prioritization of improvement opportunities, process measurement before the intervention, improvement implementation, practical application, process measurement after the intervention, and surgical time comparisons. With the Fast Track program, 19% of the operating room capacity available was freed per day; before surgical FastTrack implementation, 50% of the procedures started 23 minutes behind schedule. After the Fast Track program was implemented, procedures start 5 minutes ahead of schedule. Anesthesia induction time was reduced by 50%, and skin-to-skin surgical time dropped by 28%. The number of surgical procedures performed in the day increased by 33-50%. There were noincidents or adverse events. Fast Track surgery is a useful strategy for improving operating room efficiency and reducing surgical time. Procedures start on time, with increased timely care, patient and practitioner satisfaction, and lower service costs.

  13. Fast-Track Surgery in Gynaecology and Gynaecologic Oncology: A Review of a Rolling Clinical Audit

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Clinical audit is the process by which clinicians are able to demonstrate to themselves, their patients, hospital administrators, and healthcare financial providers the outcome and safety of their clinical practice. It is a process by which the public can be assured of safety and outcomes. A fast-track surgery program was initiated in January 2008, and this paper represents a rolling clinical audit of the outcomes of that program until the end of June 2012. Three hundred and eighty-nine patients underwent fast track surgical management after having a laparotomy for suspected or confirmed gynaecological cancer. There were no exclusions and the data presented represents the practice and outcomes of all patients referred to a single gynaecological oncologist. The majority of patients were deemed to have complex surgical procedures performed usually through a vertical midline incision. One third of patients had a nonzero performance status, median weight was 68 kilograms, and median BMI was 26.5 with 31% being classified as obese. Median operating time was 2.25 hours, and the median estimated blood loss was 175 mL. Overall the median length of stay (LOS) was 3 days with 95% of patients tolerating early oral feeding. Four percent of patients required readmission, and 0.5% were required to return to the operating room. Whilst the wound infection rate was 2.6%, there were no ureteric, bowel or neurovascular injuries. Overall there were 2 bladder injuries (0.5%), and the incidence of venous thromboembolism was 1%. Subset analysis was also undertaken. Whilst a number of variables were associated with reduced LOS, on multivariate analysis, benign pathology, shorter operating time, and the ability to tolerate early oral feeding were found to be significant. The data and experience presented is the largest and most extensive reported in the literature relating to fast-track surgery in gynaecology and gynaecologic oncology. The public can be reassured of the safety and

  14. Prediction of engine performance and wall erosion due to film cooling for the 'fast track' ablative thrust chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Huu P.

    1994-01-01

    Efforts have been made at the Propulsion Laboratory (MSFC) to design and develop new liquid rocket engines for small-class launch vehicles. Emphasis of the efforts is to reduce the engine development time with the use of conventional designs while meeting engine reliability criteria. Consequently, the engine cost should be reduced. A demonstrative ablative thrust chamber, called 'fast-track', has been built. To support the design of the 'fast-track' thrust chamber, predictions of the wall temperature and ablation erosion rate of the 'fast-track' thrust chamber have been performed using the computational fluid dynamics program REFLEQS (Reactive Flow Equation Solver). The analysis is intended to assess the amount of fuel to be used for film cooling so that the erosion rate of the chamber ablation does not exceed its allowable limit. In addition, the thrust chamber performance loss due to an increase of the film cooling is examined.

  15. On fading probability density functions of fast-tracked and untracked free-space optical communication channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhijun; Liao, Rui

    2011-03-01

    Free-space optical (FSO) communication systems suffer from average power loss and instantaneous power fading due to the atmospheric turbulence. The channel fading probability density function (pdf) is of critical importance for FSO communication system design and evaluation. The performance and reliability of FSO communication systems can be greatly enhanced if fast-tacking devices are employed at the transmitter in order to compensate laser beam wander at the receiver aperture. The fast-tracking method is especially effective when communication distance is long. This paper studies the fading probability density functions of both fast-tracked and untracked FSO communication channels. Large-scale wave-optics simulations are conducted for both tracked and untracked lasers. In the simulations, the Kolmogorov spectrum is adopted, and it is assumed that the outer scale is infinitely large and the inner scale is negligibly small. The fading pdfs of both fast-tracked and untracked FSO channels are obtained from the simulations. Results show that the fast-tracked channel fading can be accurately modeled as gamma-distributed if receiver aperture size is smaller than the coherence radius. An analytical method is given for calculating the untracked fading pdfs of both point-like and finite-size receiver apertures from the fast-tracked fading pdf. For point-like apertures, the analytical method gives pdfs close to the well-known gamma-gamma pdfs if off-axis effects are omitted in the formulation. When off-axis effects are taken into consideration, the untracked pdfs obtained using the analytical method fit the simulation pdfs better than gamma-gamma distributions for point-like apertures, and closely fit the simulation pdfs for finite-size apertures where gamma-gamma pdfs deviate from those of the simulations significantly.

  16. Laparoscopic surgery contributes more to nutritional and immunologic recovery than fast-track care in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dong; Li, Jun; Song, Yongmao; Zhou, Jiaojiao; Sun, Fangfang; Wang, Jianwei; Duan, Yin; Hu, Yeting; Liu, Yue; Wang, Xiaochen; Sun, Lifeng; Wu, Linshan; Ding, Kefeng

    2015-02-04

    Many clinical trials had repeatedly shown that fast-track perioperative care and laparoscopic surgery are both preferred in the treatment of colorectal cancer. But few studies were designed to explore the diverse biochemical impacts of the two counterparts on human immunologic and nutritional status. Ninety-two cases of colorectal cancer patients meeting the inclusion criteria were randomized to four groups: laparoscopy with fast-track treatment (LAFT); open surgery with fast-track treatment (OSFT); laparoscopy with conventional treatment (LAC); open surgery with conventional treatment (OSC). Peripheral blood tests including nutritional factors (albumin, prealbumin, and transferrin), humoral immunologic factors (IgG, IgM, and IgA), and cellular immunologic factors (T and NK cells) were evaluated. Blood samples were collected preoperatively (baseline) and 12 and 96 h after surgery (indicated as POH12 and POH96, respectively). Albumin, transferrin, prealbumin, and IgG levels were the highest in the LAFT group for both POH12 and POH96 time intervals. Repeated measures (two-way ANOVA) indicated that the difference of albumin, transferrin, and IgG level were attributed to surgery type (P < 0.05) and not perioperative treatment (P > 0.05). Only in the laparoscopy-included groups, the relative albumin and IgG levels of POH96 were obviously higher than that of POH12. Laparoscopic surgery accelerated postoperative nutrition and immune levels rising again while fast-track treatment retarded the drop of postoperative nutrition and immune levels. Laparoscopic surgery might play a more important role than fast-track treatment in the earlier postoperative recovery of nutritional and immunologic status. Combined laparoscopic surgery with fast-track treatment provided best postoperative recovery of nutrition and immune status. These results should be further compared with the clinical outcomes of our FTMDT trial (clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01080547).

  17. Health Preemption Behind Closed Doors: Trade Agreements and Fast-Track Authority

    PubMed Central

    Crosbie, Eric; Gonzalez, Mariaelena

    2014-01-01

    Noncommunicable diseases result from consuming unhealthy products, including tobacco, which are promoted by transnational corporations. The tobacco industry uses preemption to block or reverse tobacco control policies. Preemption removes authority from jurisdictions where tobacco companies’ influence is weak and transfers it to jurisdictions where they have an advantage. International trade agreements relocate decisions about tobacco control policy to venues where there is little opportunity for public scrutiny, participation, and debate. Tobacco companies are using these agreements to preempt domestic authority over tobacco policy. Other transnational corporations that profit by promoting unhealthy foods could do the same. “Fast-track authority,” in which Congress cedes ongoing oversight authority to the President, further distances the public from the debate. With international agreements binding governments to prioritize trade over health, transparency and public oversight of the trade negotiation process is necessary to safeguard public health interests. PMID:25033124

  18. Electric eels use high-voltage to track fast-moving prey

    PubMed Central

    Catania, Kenneth C.

    2015-01-01

    Electric eels (Electrophorus electricus) are legendary for their ability to incapacitate fish, humans, and horses with hundreds of volts of electricity. The function of this output as a weapon has been obvious for centuries but its potential role for electroreception has been overlooked. Here it is shown that electric eels use high-voltage simultaneously as a weapon and for precise and rapid electrolocation of fast-moving prey and conductors. Their speed, accuracy, and high-frequency pulse rate are reminiscent of bats using a ‘terminal feeding buzz' to track insects. Eel's exhibit ‘sensory conflict' when mechanosensory and electrosensory cues are separated, striking first toward mechanosensory cues and later toward conductors. Strikes initiated in the absence of conductors are aborted. In addition to providing new insights into the evolution of strongly electric fish and showing electric eels to be far more sophisticated than previously described, these findings reveal a trait with markedly dichotomous functions. PMID:26485580

  19. The Vanderbilt University fast track to IAIMS: transition from planning to implementation.

    PubMed Central

    Stead, W W; Borden, R; Bourne, J; Giuse, D; Giuse, N; Harris, T R; Miller, R A; Olsen, A J

    1996-01-01

    Vanderbilt University Medical Center is implementing an Integrated Advanced Information Management System (IAIMS) using a fast-track approach. The elapsed time between start-up and completion of implementation will be 7.5 years. The Start-Up and Planning phases of the project are complete. The Implementation phase asks one question: How does an organization create an environment that redirects and coordinates a variety of individual activities so that they come together to provide an IAIMS? Four answers to this question are being tested. First, design resources to be "scalable"--i.e., capable of supporting enterprise-wide use. Second, provide information technology planning activities as ongoing core functions that direct local efforts. Third, design core infrastructure resources to be both reusable and expandable at the local level. Fourth, use milestones to measure progress toward selected endpoints to permit early refinement of plans and strategies. PMID:8880678

  20. Health preemption behind closed doors: trade agreements and fast-track authority.

    PubMed

    Crosbie, Eric; Gonzalez, Mariaelena; Glantz, Stanton A

    2014-09-01

    Noncommunicable diseases result from consuming unhealthy products, including tobacco, which are promoted by transnational corporations. The tobacco industry uses preemption to block or reverse tobacco control policies. Preemption removes authority from jurisdictions where tobacco companies' influence is weak and transfers it to jurisdictions where they have an advantage. International trade agreements relocate decisions about tobacco control policy to venues where there is little opportunity for public scrutiny, participation, and debate. Tobacco companies are using these agreements to preempt domestic authority over tobacco policy. Other transnational corporations that profit by promoting unhealthy foods could do the same. "Fast-track authority," in which Congress cedes ongoing oversight authority to the President, further distances the public from the debate. With international agreements binding governments to prioritize trade over health, transparency and public oversight of the trade negotiation process is necessary to safeguard public health interests.

  1. Electric eels use high-voltage to track fast-moving prey.

    PubMed

    Catania, Kenneth C

    2015-10-20

    Electric eels (Electrophorus electricus) are legendary for their ability to incapacitate fish, humans, and horses with hundreds of volts of electricity. The function of this output as a weapon has been obvious for centuries but its potential role for electroreception has been overlooked. Here it is shown that electric eels use high-voltage simultaneously as a weapon and for precise and rapid electrolocation of fast-moving prey and conductors. Their speed, accuracy, and high-frequency pulse rate are reminiscent of bats using a 'terminal feeding buzz' to track insects. Eel's exhibit 'sensory conflict' when mechanosensory and electrosensory cues are separated, striking first toward mechanosensory cues and later toward conductors. Strikes initiated in the absence of conductors are aborted. In addition to providing new insights into the evolution of strongly electric fish and showing electric eels to be far more sophisticated than previously described, these findings reveal a trait with markedly dichotomous functions.

  2. The Effects of the Fast Track Preventive Intervention on the Development of Conduct Disorder Across Childhood

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The impact of the Fast Track intervention on externalizing disorders across childhood was examined. Eight hundred-ninety-one early-starting children (69% male; 51% African American) were randomly assigned by matched sets of schools to intervention or control conditions. The 10-year intervention addressed parent behavior-management, child social cognitive skills, reading, home visiting, mentoring, and classroom curricula. Outcomes included psychiatric diagnoses after grades 3, 6, 9, and 12 for conduct disorder, oppositional defiant disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and any externalizing disorder. Significant interaction effects between intervention and initial risk level indicated that intervention prevented the lifetime prevalence of all diagnoses, but only among those at highest initial risk, suggesting that targeted intervention can prevent externalizing disorders to promote the raising of healthy children. PMID:21291445

  3. Fast Track to the Cloud: Design Patterns for 12-Factor Earth Sciences Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawloski, A. W.; McLaughlin, B. D.; Plofchan, P.; Lynnes, C.

    2016-12-01

    As expanding service offerings and decreasing prices make the cloud increasingly attractive to Earth Science applications, there are nontrivial practical considerations which can hinder its meaningful use. Scientific organizations with large, existing software efforts often face the dilemma of investing in major re-architecting efforts or instead utilizing the cloud suboptimally (sometimes detrimentally). NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) has both sophisticated existing software infrastructure, as well as new initiatives, designed from their inception as cloud applications. In this talk, we will discuss architectural recommendations and lessons learned while working on EOSDIS' cloud efforts, particularly the NASA-compliant General Application Platform (NGAP) and its associated applications. Prominent in our findings is the importance of 12-factor design patterns and the powerful "wins" they enable in the cloud. We will share our strategies for fast-tracking applications to the cloud - whether they be legacy, planned for the future, or somewhere in between.

  4. Initial Impact of the Fast Track Prevention Trial for Conduct Problems: II. Classroom Effects

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of the universal component of the Fast Track prevention model: the PATHS (Promoting Alternative THinking Strategies) curriculum and teacher consultation. This randomized clinical trial involved 198 intervention and 180 comparison classrooms from neighborhoods with greater than average crime in 4 U.S. locations. In the intervention schools, Grade 1 teachers delivered a 57-lesson social competence intervention focused on self-control, emotional awareness, peer relations, and problem solving. Findings indicated significant effects on peer ratings of aggression and hyperactive–disruptive behavior and observer ratings of classroom atmosphere. Quality of implementation predicted variation in assessments of classroom functioning. The results are discussed in terms of both the efficacy of universal, school-based prevention models and the need to examine comprehensive, multiyear programs. PMID:10535231

  5. Fast Three-Dimensional Single-Particle Tracking in Natural Brain Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Sokoll, Stefan; Prokazov, Yury; Hanses, Magnus; Biermann, Barbara; Tönnies, Klaus; Heine, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Observation of molecular dynamics is often biased by the optical very heterogeneous environment of cells and complex tissue. Here, we have designed an algorithm that facilitates molecular dynamic analyses within brain slices. We adjust fast astigmatism-based three-dimensional single-particle tracking techniques to depth-dependent optical aberrations induced by the refractive index mismatch so that they are applicable to complex samples. In contrast to existing techniques, our online calibration method determines the aberration directly from the acquired two-dimensional image stream by exploiting the inherent particle movement and the redundancy introduced by the astigmatism. The method improves the positioning by reducing the systematic errors introduced by the aberrations, and allows correct derivation of the cellular morphology and molecular diffusion parameters in three dimensions independently of the imaging depth. No additional experimental effort for the user is required. Our method will be useful for many imaging configurations, which allow imaging in deep cellular structures. PMID:26445447

  6. Fast cine-magnetic resonance imaging point tracking for prostate cancer radiation therapy planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowling, J.; Dang, K.; Fox, Chris D.; Chandra, S.; Gill, Suki; Kron, T.; Pham, D.; Foroudi, F.

    2014-03-01

    The analysis of intra-fraction organ motion is important for improving the precision of radiation therapy treatment delivery. One method to quantify this motion is for one or more observers to manually identify anatomic points of interest (POIs) on each slice of a cine-MRI sequence. However this is labour intensive and inter- and intra- observer variation can introduce uncertainty. In this paper a fast method for non-rigid registration based point tracking in cine-MRI sagittal and coronal series is described which identifies POIs in 0.98 seconds per sagittal slice and 1.35 seconds per coronal slice. The manual and automatic points were highly correlated (r>0.99, p<0.001) for all organs and the difference generally less than 1mm. For prostate planning peristalsis and rectal gas can result in unpredictable out of plane motion, suggesting the results may require manual verification.

  7. Tracking Down a Fast Instability in the PEP-II LER

    SciTech Connect

    Wienands, U.; Akre, R.; Curry, S.; DeBarger, S.; Decker, F.J.; Ecklund, S.; Fisher, A.S.; Heifets, S.A.; Krasnykh, A.; Kulikov, A.; Novokhatski, A.; Seeman, J.; Sullivan, M.K.; Teytelman, D.; Van Winkle, D.; Yocky, G.; /SLAC

    2007-05-18

    During Run 5, the beam in the PEP-II Low Energy Ring (LER) became affected by a predominantly vertical instability with very fast growth rate of 10...60/ms and varying threshold. The coherent amplitude of the oscillation was limited to approx. 1 mm peak and would damp down over a few tens of turns, however, beam loss set in even as the amplitude signal damped, causing a beam abort. This led to the conclusion that the bunches were actually blowing up. The appearance of a 2{nu}{sub S} line in the spectrum suggested a possible head-tail nature of the instability, although chromaticity was not effective in changing the threshold. The crucial hints in tracking down the cause turned out to be vacuum activity near the rf cavities and observance of signals on the cavity probes of certain rf cavities.

  8. Locational Sensitivity Investigation on PV Hosting Capacity and Fast Track PV Screening

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Fei; Mather, Barry; Ainsworth, Nathan; Gotseff, Peter; Baker, Kyri

    2016-05-05

    A 15% PV penetration threshold is commonly used by utilities to define photovoltaic (PV) screening methods where PV penetration is defined as the ratio of total solar PV capacity on a line section to peak load. However, this method doesn't take into account PV locational impact or feeder characteristics that could strongly change the feeder's capability to host PVs. This paper investigates the impact of PV location and phase connection type on PV hosting capacity, and then proposes a fast-track PV screening approach that leverages various PV hosting capacity metric responding to different PV locations and types. The proposed study could help utilities to evaluate PV interconnection requests and also help increase the PV hosting capacity of distribution feeders without adverse impacts on system voltages.

  9. Perioperative role development: evaluating a fast-track approach to advanced scrub and/or dual role practitioner training.

    PubMed

    Timpany, Michaela D; McAleavy, Janet

    2010-01-01

    This report describes the service evaluation of a newly developed fast-track advanced scrub practitioner (ASP)/dual role training programme. The evaluation examines whether the introduction of new policies and training based on risk assessment have strengthened quality assurance measures and controls which aim to ensure that staff work safely within their scope of practice. A further aim is to establish if the fast-track route is adequately meeting the training and development needs of staff within the organisation and supporting service requirements.

  10. Fast-track bariatric surgery improves perioperative care and logistics compared to conventional care.

    PubMed

    Dogan, Kemal; Kraaij, Linda; Aarts, Edo O; Koehestanie, Parweez; Hammink, Edwin; van Laarhoven, Cees J H M; Aufenacker, Theo J; Janssen, Ignace M C; Berends, Frits J

    2015-01-01

    Due to the increased incidence of morbid obesity, the demand for bariatric surgery is increasing. Therefore, the methods for optimising perioperative care for the improvement of surgical outcome and to increase efficacy are necessary. The aim of this prospective matched cohort study is to objectify the effect of the fast-track surgery (FTS) programme in patients undergoing primary Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass (LRYGB) surgery compared to conventional perioperative care (CPC). This study compared the perioperative outcome data of two groups of 75 consecutive morbid obese patients who underwent a primary LRYGB according to international guidelines in the periods January 2011-April 2011 (CPC group) and April 2012-June 2012 (FTS group). The two groups were matched for age and sex. Primary endpoints were surgery and hospitalisation time, while secondary endpoints were intraoperative medication use and complication rates. Baseline patient characteristics for age, sex, weight and ASA classification were similar (p > 0.05) for CPC and FTS patients. BMI and waist circumference were significantly lower (p < 0.05) in the FTS compared to CPC. The total time from arrival at the operating room to the arrival at the recovery was reduced from 119 to 82 min (p < 0.001). Surgery time was reduced from 80 to 56 min (p < 0.001); mean hospital stay was reduced from 65 to 43 h (p < 0.001). Major complications occurred in 3 versus 4 % in the FTS and CPC, respectively. The introduction of a fast-track programme after primary LRYGB improves short-term recovery and may reduces direct hospital-related resources.

  11. Accelerating D&D at Fernald: The fast track remediation design/bid package

    SciTech Connect

    Houser, S.M.; Albertin, M.F.; Borgman, T.D.; Zebick, W.A.

    1995-01-31

    The Fernald Environmental Management Project is a Department Of Energy (DOE) facility near Cincinnati, Ohio which provided high purity uranium metal products to support United States defense programs. Production operations were halted in 1989 to focus available resources on environmental restoration activities at the facility. Operable Unit 3 (OU3) is the designation given to the production area and production-associated facilities and equipment, including, but not limited to, all above and below ground structures, equipment, and utilities. In late spring of 1994, two decisions were made that established the long range strategy on how remedial designs (RD) and the bidding of remedial actions (RA) are approached for the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the Fernald facilities. The first was to fast track the remediation design and bidding process for the first three D&D packages; and the second was to use standard performance specifications to streamline the decontamination and decommissioning process. This paper describes these strategies, identifies the key elements involved, and discusses the lessons learned that were associated with the approaches. A brief synopsis of these elements follows: (1) A facility complex grouping facilities into blocks of work was used for bid packages. (2) A task force approach involving required functional organizations was used to fast track the design and bidding process. (3) Standard Performance Specifications have been developed for each task to establish minimum acceptable criteria and provide the subcontractor flexibility. This approach also dramatically decreases costs for future D&D packages. (4) A key feature of value engineering has been the use of construction methods and techniques to drive the D&D cost significantly lower. (5) The bid package was structured around a modified IFB approach. This provides the successful bidder the opportunity to incorporate innovative ideas within the performance.

  12. [Cost analysis of the fast track concept in elective colonic surgery].

    PubMed

    Jurowich, C F; Reibetanz, J; Krajinovic, K; Larena-Avellaneda, A; Isbert, C; Oberender, P; Germer, C T; von Rahden, B H A

    2011-06-01

    Fast track (FT) is a modern concept to enhance postoperative recovery after elective surgery. It has been approved during the last years. Beside its medical benefits, fast-track (FT) concepts may provide an economic incentive, although a cost-benefit analysis in the daily clinical routine has not yet been realised. In addition to this an elevated consumption of resources is postulated. In 2007 we prospectively studied the implementation of the FT concept for elective colonic surgery in the daily clinical routine at the Department of General Surgery of Nuremberg Hospital. In a representative subgroup of patients studied, we performed a cost-cost analysis by comparing these patients to a retrospectively analysed group that had been treated in a conventional traditional manner in 2002. 369  patients were included and treated according to the FT concept. Discharge criteria were met at the 4(th) postoperative day in median (SD 3.9  days, minimum  1, maxiumum 29  days). The rate of general postoperative complications was 24.4 % (16 % minor complications) for all patients and 6.6 % in the group of patients who were discharged within 9 postoperative days or less (n=182). With respect to the main FT items, implementation of the FT concept was considered as effective. Cost-cost analyses showed a cost reduction of 32 % in favour of patients treated with the FT concept. This study clearly shows the clinical and economic benefits of the FT concept considering health services research. Therefore further clinical implementation of the FT concept seems beneficial, not only in the view of medical aspects, but also for economic reasons. © Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart ˙ New York.

  13. Studies of the possibility to use Gas Pixel Detector as a fast trigger tracking device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinev, N.; Bashindzhagyan, G.; Korotkova, N.; Romaniouk, A.; Tikhomirov, V.

    2016-02-01

    Gas Pixel Detector (GPD) technology offers new possibilities, which make them very attractive for application in existing and future accelerator experiments and beyond. GPDs combine advantages of silicon and gaseous detectors. They can be produced radiation hard and with low power consumption using relatively cheap technology. Low capacitance of the individual pixel channel allows us to obtain a large signal to noise ratio. Using a time projection method for GPD readout one obtains 3D track image with precise coordinate (31 µm) and angular information (0.40°). This feature would allow us to achieve performance of one GPD layer equal to a few layers of silicon detectors. Implementation of a fast readout and data processing at the front-end level allows one to reconstruct a track segment in less than 1 μs, and to use this information for the first level trigger generation. The relevant algorithms of data acquisition and analysis are described and the results of simulations are presented in this paper.

  14. Detection of a faint fast-moving near-Earth asteroid using the synthetic tracking technique

    SciTech Connect

    Zhai, Chengxing; Shao, Michael; Nemati, Bijan; Werne, Thomas; Zhou, Hanying; Turyshev, Slava G.; Sandhu, Jagmit; Hallinan, Gregg; Harding, Leon K.

    2014-09-01

    We report a detection of a faint near-Earth asteroid (NEA) using our synthetic tracking technique and the CHIMERA instrument on the Palomar 200 inch telescope. With an apparent magnitude of 23 (H = 29, assuming detection at 20 lunar distances), the asteroid was moving at 6.°32 day{sup –1} and was detected at a signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of 15 using 30 s of data taken at a 16.7 Hz frame rate. The detection was confirmed by a second observation 77 minutes later at the same S/N. Because of its high proper motion, the NEA moved 7 arcsec over the 30 s of observation. Synthetic tracking avoided image degradation due to trailing loss that affects conventional techniques relying on 30 s exposures; the trailing loss would have degraded the surface brightness of the NEA image on the CCD down to an approximate magnitude of 25 making the object undetectable. This detection was a result of our 12 hr blind search conducted on the Palomar 200 inch telescope over two nights, scanning twice over six (5.°3 × 0.°046) fields. Detecting only one asteroid is consistent with Harris's estimates for the distribution of the asteroid population, which was used to predict a detection of 1.2 NEAs in the H-magnitude range 28-31 for the two nights. The experimental design, data analysis methods, and algorithms are presented. We also demonstrate milliarcsecond-level astrometry using observations of two known bright asteroids on the same system with synthetic tracking. We conclude by discussing strategies for scheduling observations to detect and characterize small and fast-moving NEAs using the new technique.

  15. Active Faraday optical frequency standard.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Wei; Chen, Jingbiao

    2014-11-01

    We propose the mechanism of an active Faraday optical clock, and experimentally demonstrate an active Faraday optical frequency standard based on narrow bandwidth Faraday atomic filter by the method of velocity-selective optical pumping of cesium vapor. The center frequency of the active Faraday optical frequency standard is determined by the cesium 6 (2)S(1/2) F=4 to 6 (2)P(3/2) F'=4 and 5 crossover transition line. The optical heterodyne beat between two similar independent setups shows that the frequency linewidth reaches 281(23) Hz, which is 1.9×10(4) times smaller than the natural linewidth of the cesium 852-nm transition line. The maximum emitted light power reaches 75 μW. The active Faraday optical frequency standard reported here has advantages of narrow linewidth and reduced cavity pulling, which can readily be extended to other atomic transition lines of alkali and alkaline-earth metal atoms trapped in optical lattices at magic wavelengths, making it useful for new generation of optical atomic clocks.

  16. Fast pattern recognizer for autonomous target recognition and tracking for advanced naval attack missiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hastbacka, Al

    2001-10-01

    A FPR System under development for the Naval Air Warfare Center, China Lake, CA is funded under a SBIR, Phase II contract as an automatic target recognizer and tracker candidate for Navy fast-reaction, subsonic and supersonic, stand-off weapons. The FPR will autonomously detect, identify, correlate, and track complex surface ship and land based targets in hostile, high-clutter environments in real time. The novel FPR system is proven technology that uses an electronic implementation analogous to an optical correlator system, where the Fourier transform of the incoming image is compared against known target images stored as matched filter templates. FPR demonstrations show that unambiguous target identification is achievable in a ninety-five percent fog obscuration for over ninety-percent of target images tested. The FPR technology employs an acoustic dispersive delay line (DDL) to achieve ultra-fast image correlations in 90 microseconds or 11,000 correlations per second. The massively scalable FPR design is capable of achieving processing speeds of an order of magnitude faster using available ASIC technology. Key benefits of the FPR are dramatically reduced power, size, weight, and cost with increased durability, robustness, and performance - which makes the FPR ideal for onboard missile applications.

  17. Constructing Fast Carrier Tracks into Flexible Perovskite Photodetectors To Greatly Improve Responsivity.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoming; Yu, Dejian; Chen, Jun; Wang, Yue; Cao, Fei; Wei, Yi; Wu, Ye; Wang, Lin; Zhu, Ying; Sun, Zhiguo; Ji, Jianping; Shen, Yalong; Sun, Handong; Zeng, Haibo

    2017-02-28

    Intrinsically high mobility and large absorption coefficient endow inorganic halide perovskites (IHPs) with great promise for high-performance photodetectors (PDs), which, however, are being hindered by the low carrier extraction and transport efficiency of the solution assembled films. Here, we report on a general strategy to enhance the perovskite film conductivity that carbon nanotubes (CNTs) conductive nanonets are constructed from to provide fast carrier tracks. Resultantly, the CsPbBr3 nanosheet/CNT composite films exhibit both high light harvesting and high conductivity, such advantages are demonstrated by the high performances of corresponding planar PDs. Specifically, the highest external quantum efficiency (EQE) of 7488% and the highest responsivity of 31.1 A W(-1) under a bias of 10 V among IHP PDs with planar structure are achieved, which are almost 125-fold over the previous best results. Besides, the efficient charge extraction and transport also remarkably contribute to the fast response speed where a rise time of 16 μs is achieved, which is also superior to state-of-the-art IHP PDs. Furthermore, the composite films exhibit impressive flexibility due to the ultrathin 2D and 1D structural characteristic of perovskites and CNTs. By deploying the PD as a point-like detector, we acquire clear images. The results indicate the promising potentials of the perovskite/CNT composites for solution and ambient condition processed flexible devices, and this strategy is general for all kinds of perovskite optoelectronic devices including photodetectors, phototransistors, and even LEDs.

  18. Fast-track extreme event attribution: How fast can we disentangle thermodynamic (forced) and dynamic (internal) contributions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haustein, Karsten; Otto, Friederike; Uhe, Peter; Allen, Myles; Cullen, Heidi

    2016-04-01

    provide sufficient guidance to determine the dynamic contribution to the event on the basis of monthly mean values. No such link can be made (North Atlantic/Western Europe region) for shorter time-scales, unless the observed state of the circulation is taken as reference for the model analysis (e.g. Christidis et al. 2014). We present results from our most recent attribution analysis for the December 2015 UK floods (Storm Desmond and Eva), during which we find a robust teleconnection link between Pacific SSTs and North Atlantic Jetstream anomalies. This is true for both experiments, with forecast and observed SSTs. We propose a fast and simple analysis method based on the comparison of current climatological circulation patterns with actual and natural conditions. Alternative methods are discussed and analysed regarding their potential for fast-track attribution of the role of dynamics. Also, we briefly revisit the issue of internal vs forced dynamic contributions.

  19. Supplemental Interscalene Blockade to General Anesthesia for Shoulder Arthroscopy: Effects on Fast Track Capability, Analgesic Quality, and Lung Function

    PubMed Central

    Zoremba, Martin; Kratz, Thomas; Dette, Frank; Wulf, Hinnerk; Wiesmann, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Background. After shoulder surgery performed in patients with interscalene nerve block (without general anesthesia), fast track capability and postoperative pain management in the PACU are improved compared with general anesthesia alone. However, it is not known if these evidence-based benefits still exist when the interscalene block is combined with general anesthesia. Methods. We retrospectively analyzed a prospective cohort data set of 159 patients undergoing shoulder arthroscopy with general anesthesia alone (n = 60) or combined with an interscalene nerve block catheter (n = 99) for fast track capability time. Moreover, comparisons were made for VAS scores, analgesic consumption in the PACU, pain management, and lung function measurements. Results. The groups did not differ in mean time to fast track capability (22 versus 22 min). Opioid consumption in PACU was significantly less in the interscalene group, who had significantly better VAS scores during PACU stay. Patients receiving interscalene blockade had a significantly impaired lung function postoperatively, although this did not affect postoperative recovery and had no impact on PACU times. Conclusion. The addition of interscalene block to general anesthesia for shoulder arthroscopy did not enhance fast track capability. Pain management and VAS scores were improved in the interscalene nerve block group. PMID:26064898

  20. Supplemental Interscalene Blockade to General Anesthesia for Shoulder Arthroscopy: Effects on Fast Track Capability, Analgesic Quality, and Lung Function.

    PubMed

    Zoremba, Martin; Kratz, Thomas; Dette, Frank; Wulf, Hinnerk; Steinfeldt, Thorsten; Wiesmann, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    After shoulder surgery performed in patients with interscalene nerve block (without general anesthesia), fast track capability and postoperative pain management in the PACU are improved compared with general anesthesia alone. However, it is not known if these evidence-based benefits still exist when the interscalene block is combined with general anesthesia. We retrospectively analyzed a prospective cohort data set of 159 patients undergoing shoulder arthroscopy with general anesthesia alone (n = 60) or combined with an interscalene nerve block catheter (n = 99) for fast track capability time. Moreover, comparisons were made for VAS scores, analgesic consumption in the PACU, pain management, and lung function measurements. The groups did not differ in mean time to fast track capability (22 versus 22 min). Opioid consumption in PACU was significantly less in the interscalene group, who had significantly better VAS scores during PACU stay. Patients receiving interscalene blockade had a significantly impaired lung function postoperatively, although this did not affect postoperative recovery and had no impact on PACU times. The addition of interscalene block to general anesthesia for shoulder arthroscopy did not enhance fast track capability. Pain management and VAS scores were improved in the interscalene nerve block group.

  1. Catalyzing Country Ownership and Aid Effectiveness: Role of the Education for All-Fast Track Initiative Catalytic Fund

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bashir, Sajitha

    2009-01-01

    This article examines the contribution of the Education for All-Fast Track Initiative (EFA-FTI) global partnership in strengthening aid effectiveness in the education sector, and specifically how the implementation modalities of the EFA-FTI Catalytic Fund (CF) have contributed to this strengthening. The empirical findings are based on a review…

  2. Catalyzing Country Ownership and Aid Effectiveness: Role of the Education for All-Fast Track Initiative Catalytic Fund

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bashir, Sajitha

    2009-01-01

    This article examines the contribution of the Education for All-Fast Track Initiative (EFA-FTI) global partnership in strengthening aid effectiveness in the education sector, and specifically how the implementation modalities of the EFA-FTI Catalytic Fund (CF) have contributed to this strengthening. The empirical findings are based on a review…

  3. Building a better Faraday cage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MartinAlfven; Wright, David; skocpol; Rounce, Graham; Richfield, Jon; W, Nick; wheelsonfire

    2015-11-01

    In reply to the physicsworld.com news article “Are Faraday cages less effective than previously thought?” (15 September, http://ow.ly/SfklO), about a study that indicated, based on mathematical modelling, that conducting wire-mesh cages may not be as good at excluding electromagnetic radiation as is commonly assumed.

  4. Faraday's Law and Seawater Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Luca, R.

    2010-01-01

    Using Faraday's law, one can illustrate how an electromotive force generator, directly utilizing seawater motion, works. The conceptual device proposed is rather simple in its components and can be built in any high school or college laboratory. The description of the way in which the device generates an electromotive force can be instructive not…

  5. Faraday's first dynamo: A retrospective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Glenn S.

    2013-12-01

    In the early 1830s, Michael Faraday performed his seminal experimental research on electromagnetic induction, in which he created the first electric dynamo—a machine for continuously converting rotational mechanical energy into electrical energy. His machine was a conducting disc, rotating between the poles of a permanent magnet, with the voltage/current obtained from brushes contacting the disc. In his first dynamo, the magnetic field was asymmetric with respect to the axis of the disc. This is to be contrasted with some of his later symmetric designs, which are the ones almost invariably discussed in textbooks on electromagnetism. In this paper, a theoretical analysis is developed for Faraday's first dynamo. From this analysis, the eddy currents in the disc and the open-circuit voltage for arbitrary positioning of the brushes are determined. The approximate analysis is verified by comparing theoretical results with measurements made on an experimental recreation of the dynamo. Quantitative results from the analysis are used to elucidate Faraday's qualitative observations, from which he learned so much about electromagnetic induction. For the asymmetric design, the eddy currents in the disc dissipate energy that makes the dynamo inefficient, prohibiting its use as a practical generator of electric power. Faraday's experiments with his first dynamo provided valuable insight into electromagnetic induction, and this insight was quickly used by others to design practical generators.

  6. A Mobile Phone Faraday Cage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    French, M. M. J.

    2011-01-01

    A Faraday cage is an interesting physical phenomenon where an electromagnetic wave can be excluded from a volume of space by enclosure with an electrically conducting material. The practical application of this in the classroom is to block the signal to a mobile phone by enclosing it in a metal can. The background of the physics behind this is…

  7. Faraday Cage Protects Against Lightning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jafferis, W.; Hasbrouck, R. T.; Johnson, J. P.

    1992-01-01

    Faraday cage protects electronic and electronically actuated equipment from lightning. Follows standard lightning-protection principles. Whether lightning strikes cage or cables running to equipment, current canceled or minimized in equipment and discharged into ground. Applicable to protection of scientific instruments, computers, radio transmitters and receivers, and power-switching equipment.

  8. A Mobile Phone Faraday Cage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    French, M. M. J.

    2011-01-01

    A Faraday cage is an interesting physical phenomenon where an electromagnetic wave can be excluded from a volume of space by enclosure with an electrically conducting material. The practical application of this in the classroom is to block the signal to a mobile phone by enclosing it in a metal can. The background of the physics behind this is…

  9. Various Paths to Faraday's Law

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redzic, Dragan V.

    2008-01-01

    In a recent note, the author presented a derivation of Faraday's law of electromagnetic induction for a closed filamentary circuit C(t) which is moving at relativistic velocities and also changing its shape as it moves via the magnetic vector potential. Recently, Kholmetskii et al, while correcting an error in an equation, showed that it can be…

  10. Various Paths to Faraday's Law

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redzic, Dragan V.

    2008-01-01

    In a recent note, the author presented a derivation of Faraday's law of electromagnetic induction for a closed filamentary circuit C(t) which is moving at relativistic velocities and also changing its shape as it moves via the magnetic vector potential. Recently, Kholmetskii et al, while correcting an error in an equation, showed that it can be…

  11. Faraday's Law and Seawater Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Luca, R.

    2010-01-01

    Using Faraday's law, one can illustrate how an electromotive force generator, directly utilizing seawater motion, works. The conceptual device proposed is rather simple in its components and can be built in any high school or college laboratory. The description of the way in which the device generates an electromotive force can be instructive not…

  12. Experience with "Fast track" postoperative care after deep brain stimulation surgery.

    PubMed

    Martín, Nuria; Valero, Ricard; Hurtado, Paola; Gracia, Isabel; Fernández, Carla; Rumià, Jordi; Valldeoriola, Francesc; Carrero, Enrique J; Tercero, Francisco Javier; de Riva, Nicolás; Fàbregas, Neus

    A 24-h-stay in the post-anesthesia care unit (PACU) is a common postoperative procedure after deep brain stimulation surgery (DBS). We evaluated the impact of a fast-track (FT) postoperative care protocol. An analysis was performed on all patients who underwent DBS in 2 periods: 2006, overnight monitored care (OMC group), and 2007-2013, FT care (FT group). The study included 19 patients in OMC and 95 patients in FT. Intraoperative complications occurred in 26.3% patients in OMC vs. 35.8% in FT. Post-operatively, one patient in OMC developed hemiparesis, and agitation in 2 patients. In FT, two patients with intraoperative hemiparesis were transferred to the ICU. While on the ward, 3 patients from the FT developed hemiparesis, two of them 48h after the procedure. Thirty eight percent of FT had an MRI scan, while the remaining 62% and all patients of OMC had a CT-scan performed on their transfer to the ward. One patient in OMC had a subthalamic hematoma. Two patients in FT had a pallidal hematoma, and 3 a bleeding along the electrode. A FT discharge protocol is a safe postoperative care after DBS. There are a small percentage of complications after DBS, which mainly occur within the first 6h. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Mass tracking and material accounting in the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR)

    SciTech Connect

    Orechwa, Y.; Adams, C.H.; White, A.M.

    1991-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is a generic advanced liquid metal cooled reactor concept being developed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). There are a number of technical features of the IFR which contribute to its potential as a next-generation reactor. These are associated with large safety margins with regard to off-normal events involving the heat transport system, and the use of metallic fuel which makes possible the utilization of innovative fuel cycle processes. The latter feature permits fuel cycle closure the compact, low-cost reprocessing facilities, collocated with the reactor plant. These primary features are being demonstrated in the facilities at ANL-West, utilizing Experimental Breeder Reactor 2 and the associated Fuel Cycle Facility (FCF) as an IFR prototype. The demonstration of this IFR prototype includes the design and implementation of the Mass-Tracking System (MTG). In this system, data from the operations of the FCF, including weights and batch-process parameters, are collected and maintained by the MTG running on distributed workstations. The components of the MTG System include: (1) an Oracle database manager with a Fortran interface, (2) a set of MTG Tasks'' which collect, manipulate and report data, (3) a set of MTG Terminal Sessions'' which provide some interactive control of the Tasks, and (4) a set of servers which manage the Tasks and which provide the communications link between the MTG System and Operator Control Stations, which control process equipment and monitoring devices within the FCF.

  14. Predictor Variables Associated With Positive Fast Track Outcomes at the End of Third Grade

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Progress has been made in understanding the outcome effects of preventive interventions and treatments designed to reduce children's conduct problems. However, limited research has explored the factors that may affect the degree to which an intervention is likely to benefit particular individuals. This study examines selected child, family, and community baseline characteristics that may predict proximal outcomes from the Fast Track intervention. The primary goal of this study was to examine predictors of outcomes after 3 years of intervention participation, at the end of 3rd grade. Three types of proximal outcomes were examined: parent-rated aggression, teacher-rated oppositional-aggressive behavior, and special education involvement. The relation between 11 risk factors and these 3 outcomes was examined, with separate regression analyses for the intervention and control groups. Moderate evidence of prediction of outcome effects was found, although none of the baseline variables were found to predict all 3 outcomes, and different patterns of prediction emerged for home versus school outcomes. PMID:11930970

  15. [Anxiety in patients undergoing fast-track knee arthroplasty in the light of recent literature].

    PubMed

    Ziętek, Paweł; Ziętek, Joanna; Szczypiór, Karina

    2014-01-01

    The rapid progress in knee implants technology and operational techniques go together with more and more modem medical programs, designed to optimize the patients' care and shorten their stay in hospital. However, this does not guarantee any elimination ofperioperative stress in patients. Anxiety is a negative emotional state arising from stressful circumstances accompanied by activation of the autonomous nervous system. Anxiety causes negative physiological changes, including wound healing, resistance to anesthetic induction, it is associated with an increased perioperative pain and prolong recovery period. The purpose of this work is to present the current state of knowledge on the preoperative anxiety and discuss its impact on pain and other parameters in patients undergoing fast-track arthroplasty of big joints. The work also shows selected issues of anxiety pathomechanism, and actual methods reducing preoperative anxiety in hospitalized patients. The common prevalence of anxiety in patients undergoing surgery induces the attempt to routinely identify patients with higher anxiety, which may be a predictive factor of worse results after TKA. Undertaking widely understood psychological support in these patients before and after the operation could be a favorable element, which would influence thefinal result of the treatment of patients after big joints arthroplasties.

  16. Fast Variable Structure Stochastic Automaton for Discovering and Tracking Spatiotemporal Event Patterns.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junqi; Wang, Yuheng; Wang, Cheng; Zhou, MengChu

    2017-04-05

    Discovering and tracking spatiotemporal event patterns have many applications. For example, in a smart-home project, a set of spatiotemporal pattern learning automata are used to monitor a user's repetitive activities, by which the home's automaticity can be promoted while some of his/her burdens can be reduced. Existing algorithms for spatiotemporal event pattern recognition in dynamic noisy environment are based on fixed structure stochastic automata whose state transition function is fixed and predesigned to guarantee their immunity to noise. However, such design is conservative because it needs continuous and identical feedbacks to converge, thus leading to its very low convergence rate. In many real-life applications, such as ambient assisted living, consecutive nonoccurrences of an elder resident's routine activities should be treated with an alert as quickly as possible. On the other hand, no alert should be output even for some occurrences in order to diminish the effects caused by noise. Clearly, confronting a pattern's change, slow speed and low accuracy may degrade a user's life security. This paper proposes a fast and accurate leaning automaton based on variable structure stochastic automata to satisfy the realistic requirements for both speed and accuracy. Bias toward alert is necessary for elder residents while the existing method can only support the bias toward ``no alert.'' This paper introduces a method to allow bias toward alert or no alert to meet a user's specific bias requirement. Experimental results show its better performance than the state-of-the-art methods.

  17. [Effects of a nutritional intervention in a fast-track program for a colorectal cancer surgery: systematic review].

    PubMed

    Wanden-Berghe, Carmina; Sanz-Valero, Javier; Arroyo-Sebastián, Antonio; Cheikh-Moussa, Kamila; Moya-Forcen, Pedro

    2016-07-19

    Introducción: Preoperative nutritional status (NS) has consequences on postoperative (POSTOP) recovery. Our aim was to systematically review the nutritional interventions (NI) in Fast-Track protocols for colorectal cancer surgery and assess morbidity-mortality and patient´s recovery. Systematic review of scientific literature after consulting bibliographic databases: Medline, The Cochrane Library, Scopus, Embase, Web of Science, Institute for Scientific Information, Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature, The Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature. MeSH Descriptors: "Colorectal Surgery", "Fast-Track", "Perioperative Care", "Nutrition Therapy" and "Enhanced recovery programme". Filters: "Humans", Adult (19+ years) and "Clinical Trial". Variables POSTOP outcomes: bowel recovery (BR), hospital stay (HS), complications and death. Selected studies, 27, had good or excellent methodological quality. From 25 to 597 patients were included. Aged between 16-94 years, men were predominant in 66.6%. NS was evaluated in 13 studies; 7 by Body Mass Index while one by Subjective Global Assessment. One presented POSTOP data. Fast-Track groups had solids, liquids or supplements (SS) in prior 2-8 hours. SS were high in carbohydrates, immune-nutrients and non-residue. Free liquids, solids and SS intake was allowed in POSTOP. Half traditional groups fasted between 3-12 hours and resumed POSTOP food intake progressively. Fast-Track groups had early BR (p < 0.01). Traditional groups had more infections episodes, deaths and a longer HS. Great variability between NI but had a common item; early intake. Although was seen patient's recovery. Future studies with detailed NI characteristics are need. Nutritional status must be assessed for a higher acknowledgement of NI impact.

  18. Comparison of remifentanil and low-dose fentanyl for fast-track cardiac anesthesia: a prospective randomized study.

    PubMed

    Khanykin, Boris; Siddiqi, Rizwan; Jensen, Per F; Bigler, Dennis R; Atroshchenko, Gennady V

    2013-12-01

    Different anesthetic techniques have been used for fast tracking in cardiac anesthesia. Remifentanil, with its unique pharmacokinetic profile, could be an ideal drug for fast tracking. Possible limitations of remifentanil are rapid onset of postoperative pain after discontinuation of the drug infusion, which may increase the risk of an ischemic event. We conducted this randomized study to compare the efficacy of remifentanil versus low doses of fentanyl in fast-track cardiac anesthesia. It has been hypothesized that remifentanil would provide a safe anesthesia with no impact on myocardial function and with positive effects on extubation time and mobilization. We compared the postoperative course of patients, the remifentanil group (RG) and the low-dose fentanyl group (LDFG), in whom remifentanil and low-dose fentanyl, respectively, were used for fast-track cardiac anesthesia. The study was designed as a prospective randomized study. The primary outcomes were changes in the cardiac index and creatine kinase MB fraction (CKMB), extubation times, mobilization times, and lengths of stay in the intensive care unit (ICU) and the hospital. Frequency of myocardial infarction (MI), reoperations due to excessive bleeding, renal impairment, and cerebral complications were registered as well. Seventy-one patients were enrolled in the study, and 7 were excluded due to difficult airway, bleeding, and technical difficulties. The RG comprised 33 patients and the LDFG comprised of 31 patients. There were no differences between the groups in terms of age, Euroscore, types of surgery, extracorporeal circulation, and aortic cross-clamp time. We did not find significant difference in cardiac index, CKMB, extubation times, mobilization times, length of stay in the ICU and in the hospital between the groups. Postoperative complications such as MI, rates of reoperations, renal and cerebral complications and incidence of atrial fibrillation did not show any significant differences

  19. A 4-week wait 'fast-track' sleep service is effective at establishing vocational drivers on continuous positive airway pressure.

    PubMed

    West, Sophie D; Downie, Beatrice; Olds, Gillian; Tomlinson, Mark; Wotton, Claire; Firth, Emma; McMillan, Alison

    2017-10-01

    We sought to establish whether an expedited or 'fast-track' NHS service to diagnose obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) and establish vocational drivers on continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) within 4 weeks of referral was possible. This model is recommended by the OSA Partnership Group. In total, 55 vocational drivers were referred to two sleep services. Assessment showed 73% had moderate or severe OSA on sleep study. Of those commenced on CPAP, review was a mean of 15 days after initiation (range 3-62 days). Median time from referral (or first clinic visit) to review on CPAP was 32 days, showing a 'fast-track' pathway is deliverable. © Royal College of Physicians 2017. All rights reserved.

  20. Traditional healers and the "Fast-Track" HIV response: is success possible without them?

    PubMed

    Leclerc-Madlala, Suzanne; Green, Edward; Hallin, Mary

    2016-07-01

    The rapid scale-up of effective HIV prevention strategies is a central theme of the post-2015 health and development agenda. All major global HIV and AIDS funders have aligned their policies and plans to achieve sharp reductions in new HIV infections and reach epidemic control by 2030. In these "fast-track" plans, increased antiretroviral treatment coverage and the attainment of viral suppression are pivotal, and there is firm recognition of the need for countries to mobilise more domestic resources and build stronger community clinic systems. There is little in these bold plans, however, to suggest that the now 30-year-old call by the World Health Organization (WHO) and other organisations to establish systematic collaborations with the traditional health sector will finally be heeded. In the context of sub-Saharan Africa's HIV epidemic, a significant body of literature demonstrates the critical role that traditional healers can play in improving the success of health programmes, including those for HIV prevention. This paper provides a brief history of collaboration with traditional healers for HIV followed by a description of several successful collaborations and discussion of key elements for success. We argue that the traditional health sector is a major resource that has yet to be sufficiently mobilised against HIV. As we shift from a short-term HIV response to a longer-term and more sustainable response, there is an urgent need to accelerate efforts to leverage and partner with the hundreds of thousands of traditional health practitioners who are already providing health services in communities. Failure to better attune our work to the medical pluralism of communities affected by HIV will continue to hinder HIV programming success and help assure that ambitious post-2015 HIV prevention and control goals are not realised.

  1. Early Outcomes of the New UK Deceased Donor Kidney Fast-track Offering Scheme.

    PubMed

    Callaghan, Chris J; Mumford, Lisa; Pankhurst, Laura; Baker, Richard J; Bradley, J Andrew; Watson, Christopher J E

    2017-06-21

    The UK Kidney Fast-Track Scheme (KFTS) was introduced in 2012 to identify kidneys at high risk of discard and to rapidly facilitate transplantation. A retrospective analysis of kidneys transplanted through the KFTS was undertaken. UK Transplant Registry data were collected on deceased donor kidneys implanted between 1 November 2012 and 30 April 2015 (DBD donors) and 1 March 2013 and 30 April 2015 (DCD donors). Posttransplant outcomes included 1-year eGFR and death-censored graft survival (DCGS). Over the study period, 523 deceased donor kidneys were transplanted through the KFTS and 4,174 via the standard National Kidney Allocation Scheme (NKAS). Kidneys in the KFTS were more likely to be from older, diabetic donors, had a higher frequency of poor ex vivo perfusion, longer cold ischaemic times and were transplanted into older recipients. One-year DCGS of KFTS and NKAS DBD donor kidneys was similar (94% versus 95%; p=0.70), but for DCD donor kidneys DCGS was lower in those allocated via the KFTS (91% versus 95%; p=0.04). Median 1-year eGFR for DBD donor kidneys was lower in those allocated via the KFTS (49 versus 52 mL/min/1.73m; p=0.01), but for DCD kidneys there was no difference (45 versus 48 mL/min/1.73m; p=0.10). Although KFTS kidneys have less favourable donor, graft, and recipient risk factors than NKAS kidneys, short-term graft and patient outcomes are acceptable. National schemes that identify and rapidly offer kidneys at high risk of discard may contribute to minimising the unnecessary discard of organs.

  2. A fusion nuclear science facility for a fast-track path to DEMO

    DOE PAGES

    Garofalo, A. M.; Abdou, M. A.; Canik, John M.; ...

    2014-04-24

    An accelerated fusion energy development program, a fast-track approach, requires proceeding with a nuclear and materials testing program in parallel with research on burning plasmas, ITER. A Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) would address many of the key issues that need to be addressed prior to DEMO, including breeding tritium and completing the fuel cycle, qualifying nuclear materials for high fluence, developing suitable materials for the plasma-boundary interface, and demonstrating power extraction. The Advanced Tokamak (AT) is a strong candidate for an FNSF as a consequence of its mature physics base, capability to address the key issues, and the directmore » relevance to an attractive target power plant. The standard aspect ratio provides space for a solenoid, assuring robust plasma current initiation,and for an inboard blanket, assuring robust tritium breeding ratio (TBR) >1 for FNSF tritium self-sufficiency and building of inventory needed to start up DEMO. An example design point gives a moderate sized Cu-coil device with R/a = 2.7 m/0.77 κ = 2.3, BT= 5.4 T, IP = 6.6 MA, βN = 2.75, Pfus = 127 MW. The modest bootstrap fraction of fBS = 0.55 provides an opportunity to develop steady state with sufficient current drive for adequate control. Lastly, proceeding with a FNSF in parallel with ITER provides a strong basis to begin construction of DEMO upon the achievement of Q ~ 10 in ITER.« less

  3. A fusion nuclear science facility for a fast-track path to DEMO

    SciTech Connect

    Garofalo, A. M.; Abdou, M. A.; Canik, John M.; Chan, Vincent S.; Hyatt, A. W.; Hill, D. N.; Morley, N. B.; Navratil, G. A.; Sawan, M. E.; Taylor, T. S.; Wong, C. P. C.; Wu, W.; Ying, Alice

    2014-04-24

    An accelerated fusion energy development program, a fast-track approach, requires proceeding with a nuclear and materials testing program in parallel with research on burning plasmas, ITER. A Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) would address many of the key issues that need to be addressed prior to DEMO, including breeding tritium and completing the fuel cycle, qualifying nuclear materials for high fluence, developing suitable materials for the plasma-boundary interface, and demonstrating power extraction. The Advanced Tokamak (AT) is a strong candidate for an FNSF as a consequence of its mature physics base, capability to address the key issues, and the direct relevance to an attractive target power plant. The standard aspect ratio provides space for a solenoid, assuring robust plasma current initiation,and for an inboard blanket, assuring robust tritium breeding ratio (TBR) >1 for FNSF tritium self-sufficiency and building of inventory needed to start up DEMO. An example design point gives a moderate sized Cu-coil device with R/a = 2.7 m/0.77 κ = 2.3, BT= 5.4 T, IP = 6.6 MA, βN = 2.75, Pfus = 127 MW. The modest bootstrap fraction of fBS = 0.55 provides an opportunity to develop steady state with sufficient current drive for adequate control. Lastly, proceeding with a FNSF in parallel with ITER provides a strong basis to begin construction of DEMO upon the achievement of Q ~ 10 in ITER.

  4. Fast-track recovery technique applied to primary total hip and knee replacement surgery. Analysis of costs and complications.

    PubMed

    Wilches, C; Sulbarán, J D; Fernández, J E; Gisbert, J M; Bausili, J M; Pelfort, X

    To determine the cost reduction and complication rates of using an enhanced recovery pathway (Fast-track) when compared to traditional recovery in primary total hip replacement (THR) and total knee replacement (TKR), as well as to determine if there were significant differences in complication rates. Retrospective review of 100 primary total arthroplasties using the Fast-track recovery system and another 100 using conventional recovery. Gender, Charlston comorbidity index, ASA score, length of stay and early complications were measured, as well in-hospital complications and those in the first six months, re-admissions and transfusion rates. The total and daily cost of stay was determined and the cost reduction was calculated based on the reduction in the length of stay found between the groups. Both groups where comparable as regards age, gender, ASA score, and Charlston index. The mean reduction in length of stay was 4.5 days for TKR and 2.1 days for THR. The calculated cost reduction was 1266 euros for TKR and 583 euros for THR. There were no statistically significant differences between groups regarding in-hospital complications, transfusion requirements, re-admissions and complication rates in the first six months. There are few publications in the literature reviewed that analyse the cost implications of using fast-track recovery protocols in arthroplasty. Several published series comparing recovery protocols found no significant differences in complication rates either. The use of a fast-track recovery protocol resulted in a significant cost reduction of 1266 euros for the TKR group and 583 for the THR group, without affecting complication rates. Copyright © 2016 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shay, T. M.; Yin, B.; Alvarez, L. S.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filters on infrared and blue transitions of some alkali atoms is calculated. A composite system is designed to further increase the background noise rejection. The measured results of the solar background rejection and image quality through the filter are presented. The results show that the filter may provide high transmission and high background noise rejection with excellent image quality.

  6. Faraday rotation in CMB maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Granados, Beatriz; Battaner, Eduardo; Florido, Estrella

    2016-10-01

    WMAP CMB polarization maps have been used to detect a low signal of Faraday Rotation (FR). If this detection is not interpreted as simple noise, it could be produced: at the last scattering surface (LSS) (z=1100), being primordial, at Reionization (z=10), in the Milky Way. The second interpretation is favoured here. In this case magnetic fields at Reionization with peak values of the order of 10-8 G should produce this observational FR.

  7. Faraday Dispersion Functions of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ideguchi, Shinsuke; Tashiro, Yuichi; Akahori, Takuya; Takahashi, Keitaro; Ryu, Dongsu

    2014-09-01

    The Faraday dispersion function (FDF), which can be derived from an observed polarization spectrum by Faraday rotation measure synthesis, is a profile of polarized emissions as a function of Faraday depth. We study intrinsic FDFs along sight lines through face-on Milky Way like galaxies by means of a sophisticated galactic model incorporating three-dimensional MHD turbulence, and investigate how much information the FDF intrinsically contains. Since the FDF reflects distributions of thermal and cosmic-ray electrons as well as magnetic fields, it has been expected that the FDF could be a new probe to examine internal structures of galaxies. We, however, find that an intrinsic FDF along a sight line through a galaxy is very complicated, depending significantly on actual configurations of turbulence. We perform 800 realizations of turbulence and find no universal shape of the FDF even if we fix the global parameters of the model. We calculate the probability distribution functions of the standard deviation, skewness, and kurtosis of FDFs and compare them for models with different global parameters. Our models predict that the presence of vertical magnetic fields and the large-scale height of cosmic-ray electrons tend to make the standard deviation relatively large. In contrast, the differences in skewness and kurtosis are relatively less significant.

  8. The Implementation of the Fast Track Program: An Example of a Large-Scale Prevention Science Efficacy Trial

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    In 1990, the Fast Track Project was initiated to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of a comprehensive, multicomponent prevention program targeting children at risk for conduct disorders in four demographically diverse American communities (Conduct Problems Prevention Research Group [CPPRG], 1992). Representing a prevention science approach toward community-based preventive intervention, the Fast Track intervention design was based upon the available data base elucidating the epidemiology of risk for conduct disorder and suggesting key causal developmental influences (R. P. Weissberg & M. T. Greenberg, 1998). Critical questions about this approach to prevention center around the extent to which such a science-based program can be effective at (1) engaging community members and stakeholders, (2) maintaining intervention fidelity while responding appropriately to the local norms and needs of communities that vary widely in their demographic and cultural/ethnic composition, and (3) maintaining community engagement in the long-term to support effective and sustainable intervention dissemination. This paper discusses these issues, providing examples from the Fast Track project to illustrate the process of program implementation and the evidence available regarding the success of this science-based program at engaging communities in sustainable and effective ways as partners in prevention programming. PMID:11930968

  9. Fast-track rapid warfarin reversal for elective surgery: extending the efficacy profile to high-risk patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Byrne, T J; Riedel, B; Ismail, H M; Heriot, A; Dauer, R; Westerman, D; Seymour, J F; Kenchington, K; Burbury, K

    2015-11-01

    Periprocedural management of patients on long-term warfarin therapy remains a common and important clinical issue, with little high-quality data to guide this complex process. The current accepted practice is cessation of warfarin five days preoperatively, but this is not without risk and can be complicated, particularly if bridging is required. An alternative method utilising low-dose intravenous vitamin K the day before surgery has been shown previously to be efficacious, safe and convenient in an elective surgical population receiving chronic warfarin therapy. The efficacy and utility of this 'fast-track' warfarin reversal protocol in surgical patients with cancer, who were at high risk of both thromboembolism and bleeding was investigated in a prospective, single-arm study at a dedicated cancer centre. Seventy-one patients underwent 82 episodes of fast-track warfarin reversal (3 mg intravenous vitamin K 18 to 24 hours before surgery). No patient suffered an adverse reaction to intravenous vitamin K, all but one achieved an International Normalized Ratio =1.5 on the day of surgery, and no surgery was deferred. Assays of vitamin K-dependent factor levels pre- and post-vitamin K demonstrated restoration of functional activity to within an acceptable range for surgical haemostasis. While this alternative method requires further validation in a larger prospective randomised study, we have now extended our use of fast-track warfarin reversal using vitamin K to patients with cancer, on the basis of our experience of its safety, convenience, reliability and efficacy.

  10. Deconvolving Current from Faraday Rotation Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen E. Mitchell

    2008-02-01

    In this paper, a unique software program is reported which automatically decodes the Faraday rotation signal into a time-dependent current representation. System parameters, such as the Faraday fiber’s Verdet constant and number of loops in the sensor, are the only user-interface inputs. The central aspect of the algorithm utilizes a short-time Fourier transform, which reveals much of the Faraday rotation measurement’s implicit information necessary for unfolding the dynamic current measurement.

  11. Quantum Faraday Effect in the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, Lídice Cruz; Martínez, Aurora Pérez; Piccinelli, Gabriella; Querts, Elizabeth Rodríguez

    We study the Quantum Faraday rotation starting from the photon self-energy in the presence of a constant magnetic field. The Faraday angle is calculated in the non-degenerate regime and for weak field limit. Two physical scenarios, possibly characterized by these conditions, are the recombination epoch and the jets originated in pulsars. We discuss the resonant behavior that the Faraday angle exhibits in these scenarios and investigate the possibility of detecting cosmic magnetic fields through this resonant mechanism.

  12. Exhausting Attentional Tracking Resources with a Single Fast-Moving Object

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holcombe, Alex O.; Chen, Wei-Ying

    2012-01-01

    Driving on a busy road, eluding a group of predators, or playing a team sport involves keeping track of multiple moving objects. In typical laboratory tasks, the number of visual targets that humans can track is about four. Three types of theories have been advanced to explain this limit. The fixed-limit theory posits a set number of attentional…

  13. Costs and effectiveness of the fast track intervention for antisocial behavior.

    PubMed

    Foster, E Michael

    2010-09-01

    Antisocial behavior is enormously costly to the youth involved, their families, victims, taxpayers and other members of society. These costs are generated by school failure, delinquency and involvement in the juvenile justice system, drug use, health services and other services. For prevention programs to be cost effective, they must reduce these costly behaviors and outcomes. The Fast Track intervention is a 10-year, multi-component prevention program targeting antisocial behavior. The intervention identified children at school entry and provided intervention services over a 10-year period. This study examined the intervention's impact on outcomes affecting societal costs using data through late adolescence. The intervention is being evaluated through a multi-cohort, multi-site, multi-year randomized control trial of program participants and comparable children and youth in similar schools, and that study provides the data for these analyses. Schools within four sites (Durham, NC; Nashville, TN; Seattle, WA; and rural central Pennsylvania) were selected as high-risk based on crime and poverty statistics of the neighborhoods they served. Within each site, schools were divided into multiple sets matched for demographics (size, percentage free/reduced lunch, ethnic composition); one set within each pair was randomly assigned to the intervention and one to the control condition. Within participating schools, high-risk children were identified using a multiple-gating procedure. For each of three annual cohorts, all kindergarteners (9,594 total) in 54 schools were screened for classroom conduct problems by teachers. Those children scoring in the top 40% within cohort and site were then solicited for the next stage of screening for home behavior problems by the parents, and 91% agreed (n = 3,274). The teacher and parent screening scores were then standardized within site and combined into a sum score. These summed scores represented a total severity-of-risk screen score

  14. An All-Digital Fast Tracking Switching Converter with a Programmable Order Loop Controller for Envelope Tracking RF Power Amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Anabtawi, Nijad; Ferzli, Rony; Harmanani, Haidar M

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a step down, switched mode power converter for use in multi-standard envelope tracking radio frequency power amplifiers (RFPA). The converter is based on a programmable order sigma delta modulator that can be configured to operate with either 1(st), 2(nd), 3(rd) or 4(th) order loop filters, eliminating the need for a bulky passive output filter. Output ripple, sideband noise and spectral emission requirements of different wireless standards can be met by configuring the modulator's filter order and converter's sampling frequency. The proposed converter is entirely digital and is implemented in 14nm bulk CMOS process for post layout verification. For an input voltage of 3.3V, the converter's output can be regulated to any voltage level from 0.5V to 2.5V, at a nominal switching frequency of 150MHz. It achieves a maximum efficiency of 94% at 1.5 W output power.

  15. Radiation-hardened fast acquisition/weak signal tracking system and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winternitz, Luke (Inventor); Boegner, Gregory J. (Inventor); Sirotzky, Steve (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A global positioning system (GPS) receiver and method of acquiring and tracking GPS signals comprises an antenna adapted to receive GPS signals; an analog radio frequency device operatively connected to the antenna and adapted to convert the GPS signals from an analog format to a digital format; a plurality of GPS signal tracking correlators operatively connected to the analog RF device; a GPS signal acquisition component operatively connected to the analog RF device and the plurality of GPS signal tracking correlators, wherein the GPS signal acquisition component is adapted to calculate a maximum vector on a databit correlation grid; and a microprocessor operatively connected to the plurality of GPS signal tracking correlators and the GPS signal acquisition component, wherein the microprocessor is adapted to compare the maximum vector with a predetermined correlation threshold to allow the GPS signal to be fully acquired and tracked.

  16. Fast track multi-discipline treatment (FTMDT trial) versus conventional treatment in colorectal cancer--the design of a prospective randomized controlled study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Laparoscopy-assisted surgery, fast-track perioperative treatment are both increasingly used in colorectal cancer treatment, for their short-time benefits of enhanced recovery and short hospital stays. However, the benefits of the integration of the Laparoscopy-assisted surgery, fast-track perioperative treatment, and even with the Xelox chemotherapy, are still unknown. In this study, the three treatments integration is defined as "Fast Track Multi-Discipline Treatment Model" for colorectal cancer and this model extends the benefits to the whole treatment process of colorectal cancer. The main purpose of the study is to explore the feasibility of "Fast Track Multi-Discipline Treatment" model in treatment of colorectal cancer. Methods The trial is a prospective randomized controlled study with 2 × 2 balanced factorial design. Patients eligible for the study will be randomized to 4 groups: (I) Laparoscopic surgery with fast track perioperative treatment and Xelox chemotherapy; (II) Open surgery with fast track perioperative treatment and Xelox chemotherapy; (III) Laparoscopic surgery with conventional perioperative treatment and mFolfox6 chemotherapy; (IV) Open surgery with conventional perioperative treatment and mFolfox6 chemotherapy. The primary endpoint of this study is the hospital stays. The secondary endpoints are the quality of life, chemotherapy related adverse events, surgical complications and hospitalization costs. Totally, 340 patients will be enrolled with 85 patients in each group. Conclusions The study initiates a new treatment model "Fast Track Multi-Discipline Treatment" for colorectal cancer, and will provide feasibility evidence on the new model "Fast Track Multi-Discipline Treatment" for patients with colorectal cancer. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01080547 PMID:22111914

  17. Wave-particle interaction in the Faraday waves.

    PubMed

    Francois, N; Xia, H; Punzmann, H; Shats, M

    2015-10-01

    Wave motion in disordered Faraday waves is analysed in terms of oscillons or quasi-particles. The motion of these oscillons is measured using particle tracking tools and it is compared with the motion of fluid particles on the water surface. Both the real floating particles and the oscillons, representing the collective fluid motion, show Brownian-type dispersion exhibiting ballistic and diffusive mean squared displacement at short and long times, respectively. While the floating particles motion has been previously explained in the context of two-dimensional turbulence driven by Faraday waves, no theoretical description exists for the random walk type motion of oscillons. It is found that the r.m.s velocity ⟨μ̃(osc)⟩(rms) of oscillons is directly related to the turbulent r.m.s. velocity ⟨μ̃⟩(rms) of the fluid particles in a broad range of vertical accelerations. The measured ⟨μ̃(osc)⟩(rms) accurately explains the broadening of the frequency spectra of the surface elevation observed in disordered Faraday waves. These results suggest that 2D turbulence is the driving force behind both the randomization of the oscillons motion and the resulting broadening of the wave frequency spectra. The coupling between wave motion and hydrodynamic turbulence demonstrated here offers new perspectives for predicting complex fluid transport from the knowledge of wave field spectra and vice versa.

  18. Extreme events in Faraday waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punzmann, Horst; Shats, Michael; Xia, Hua

    2014-05-01

    Observations of extreme wave events in the ocean are rare due to their low statistical probability. In the laboratory however, the evolution of extreme wave events can be studied in great detail with high spatial and temporal resolution. The reported surface wave experiments in the short wavelength gravity-capillary range aim to contribute to the understanding of some of the underlying mechanisms for rogue wave generation. In this talk, we report on extreme wave events in parametrically excited Faraday waves. Faraday waves appear if a fluid is accelerated (normal to the fluid surface) above a critical threshold. A variety of novel tools have been deployed to characterize the 2D surface elevation. The results presented show spatio-temporal and statistical data on the surface wave conditions leading up to extreme wave events. The peak in wave amplitude during such an event is shown to exceed six times the standard deviation of the average wave field with significantly increased statistical probability compared to the background wave field [1]. The experiments also show that parametrically excited waves can be viewed as assembles of oscillons [2] (or oscillating solitons) where modulation instability seems to play a crucial role in their formation. More detailed studies on the oscillon dynamics reveal that the onset of an increased probability of extreme wave events correlates with the increase in the oscillons mobility and merger [3]. Reference: 1. Xia H., Maimbourg T., Punzmann H., and Shats M., Oscillon dynamics and rogue wave generation in Faraday surface ripples, Physical Review Letters 109, 114502 (2012) 2. Shats M., Xia H., and Punzmann H., Parametrically excited water surface ripples as ensembles of oscillons, Physical Review Letters 108, 034502 (2012) 3. Shats M., Punzmann H., Xia H., Capillary rogue waves, Physical Review Letters, 104, 104503 (2010)

  19. Faraday screen sputtering on TPX

    SciTech Connect

    Ehst, D.A.

    1994-12-01

    The TPX design stipulates that the ion-cyclotron resonance frequency (ICRF) antenna must have a Faraday screen (FS). The author considers here possible low Z coatings for the screen, as well as sputtering behavior of the Ni and Ti substrates. The theory of rf-induced sputtering has been developed, and he follows those theoretical approaches. The author`s emphasis will be on both impurity generation as a possible source of increased Z{sub eff}, and also on actual erosion-lifetime of the materials under worst case conditions.

  20. Faraday screen sputtering on TPX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehst, D. A.

    1994-12-01

    The TPX design stipulates that the ion-cyclotron resonance frequency (ICRF) antenna must have a Faraday screen (FS). The author considers here possible low Z coatings for the screen, as well as sputtering behavior of the Ni and Ti substrates. The theory of RF-induced sputtering has been developed, and follows those theoretical approaches. The author's emphasis will be on both impurity generation as a possible source of increased Z(sub eff), and also on actual erosion-lifetime of the materials under worst case conditions.

  1. Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shay, T. M.; Yin, B.

    1992-01-01

    The present calculations of the performance of Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filters (FADOF) on IR transitions indicate that such filters may furnish high transmission, narrow-pass bandwidth, and low equivalent noise bandwidth under optimum operating conditions. A FADOF consists of an atomic vapor cell between crossed polarizers that are subject to a dc magnetic field along the optical path; when linearly polarized light travels along the direction of the magnetic field through the dispersive atomic vapor, a polarization rotation occurs. If FADOF conditions are suitably adjusted, a maximum transmission with very narrow bandwidth is obtained.

  2. Faraday and the Philosophical Magazine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberger, P.

    2013-05-01

    Faraday is considered to be one of the greatest scientists of all time. He not only was a meticulous experimentalist, a true experimental wizard, but also a very prolific author. The many important contributions (almost 50) that he published in the Philosophical Magazine make it highly desirable to catalogue his various inventions, 'discoveries' in his own words, in a scientific language so characteristic of the nineteenth century. It is the purpose of this commentary to guide the reader through his achievements in electrochemistry, magnetism, electric and electromagnetic induction, even 'industrial' applications; to enable him to address a present day audience by means of his contributions to the Philosophical Magazine.

  3. Fast and Accurate Cell Tracking by a Novel Optical-Digital Hybrid Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Cisneros, M.; Aviña-Cervantes, J. G.; Pérez-Careta, E.; Ambriz-Colín, F.; Tinoco, Verónica; Ibarra-Manzano, O. G.; Plascencia-Mora, H.; Aguilera-Gómez, E.; Ibarra-Manzano, M. A.; Guzman-Cabrera, R.; Debeir, Olivier; Sánchez-Mondragón, J. J.

    2013-09-01

    An innovative methodology to detect and track cells using microscope images enhanced by optical cross-correlation techniques is proposed in this paper. In order to increase the tracking sensibility, image pre-processing has been implemented as a morphological operator on the microscope image. Results show that the pre-processing process allows for additional frames of cell tracking, therefore increasing its robustness. The proposed methodology can be used in analyzing different problems such as mitosis, cell collisions, and cell overlapping, ultimately designed to identify and treat illnesses and malignancies.

  4. Soliton mode locking by nonlinear Faraday rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Wabnitz, S.; Westin, E.; Frey, R.; Flytzanis, C.

    1996-11-01

    We propose nonlinear Faraday rotation as a mechanism for achieving stable polarization mode locking of a soliton laser. We analyze by perturbation theory and beam-propagation simulations the interplay between bandwidth-limited gain, gain dichroism, and linear and nonlinear Faraday rotation. {copyright} {ital 1996 Optical Society of America.}

  5. Michael Faraday's work on optical glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Frank A. J. L.

    1991-09-01

    This article discusses Faraday's work of the late 1820s to improve optical glass for the joint Royal Society/Board of Longitude Committee set up for this purpose. It points out the importance of this work for some of Faraday's later physical researches.

  6. Active imaging system with Faraday filter

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, James J.

    1993-01-01

    An active imaging system has a low to medium powered laser transmitter and receiver wherein the receiver includes a Faraday filter with an ultranarrow optical bandpass and a bare (nonintensified) CCD camera. The laser is locked in the vicinity of the passband of the Faraday filter. The system has high sensitivity to the laser illumination while eliminating solar background.

  7. Active imaging system with Faraday filter

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, J.J.

    1993-04-13

    An active imaging system has a low to medium powered laser transmitter and receiver wherein the receiver includes a Faraday filter with an ultranarrow optical bandpass and a bare (nonintensified) CCD camera. The laser is locked in the vicinity of the passband of the Faraday filter. The system has high sensitivity to the laser illumination while eliminating solar background.

  8. Lines of Force: Faraday's and Students' Views.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pocovi, M. Cecilia; Finley, Fred

    2002-01-01

    Analyzes how electric and magnetic lines of force were conceived by Faraday and how they are understood by a group of Argentine university students after receiving instruction. Results show that many students possess ideas similar to those of Faraday in that lines of force are conceived as real physical entities responsible for the transmission of…

  9. Faraday current sensor with temperature monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perciante, César D.; Ferrari, José A.

    2005-11-01

    We present a novel optical current sensor based on the Faraday effect that incorporates a temperature monitoring system. The monitoring element is a temperature-dependent birefringent plate placed at the Faraday sensor head. Measurement of the plate retardation permits compensation for the temperature dependence of the Verdet constant. Validation experiments are presented and discussed.

  10. An All-Digital Fast Tracking Switching Converter with a Programmable Order Loop Controller for Envelope Tracking RF Power Amplifiers

    PubMed Central

    Anabtawi, Nijad; Ferzli, Rony; Harmanani, Haidar M.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a step down, switched mode power converter for use in multi-standard envelope tracking radio frequency power amplifiers (RFPA). The converter is based on a programmable order sigma delta modulator that can be configured to operate with either 1st, 2nd, 3rd or 4th order loop filters, eliminating the need for a bulky passive output filter. Output ripple, sideband noise and spectral emission requirements of different wireless standards can be met by configuring the modulator’s filter order and converter’s sampling frequency. The proposed converter is entirely digital and is implemented in 14nm bulk CMOS process for post layout verification. For an input voltage of 3.3V, the converter’s output can be regulated to any voltage level from 0.5V to 2.5V, at a nominal switching frequency of 150MHz. It achieves a maximum efficiency of 94% at 1.5 W output power. PMID:28919657

  11. Faraday-effect polarimeter diagnostic for internal magnetic field fluctuation measurements in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.; Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L.; Finkenthal, D.; Muscatello, C.; Taussig, D.; Boivin, R.

    2016-11-15

    Motivated by the need to measure fast equilibrium temporal dynamics, non-axisymmetric structures, and core magnetic fluctuations (coherent and broadband), a three-chord Faraday-effect polarimeter-interferometer system with fast time response and high phase resolution has recently been installed on the DIII-D tokamak. A novel detection scheme utilizing two probe beams and two detectors for each chord results in reduced phase noise and increased time response [δb ∼ 1G with up to 3 MHz bandwidth]. First measurement results were obtained during the recent DIII-D experimental campaign. Simultaneous Faraday and density measurements have been successfully demonstrated and high-frequency, up to 100 kHz, Faraday-effect perturbations have been observed. Preliminary comparisons with EFIT are used to validate diagnostic performance. Principle of the diagnostic and first experimental results is presented.

  12. Faraday-effect polarimeter diagnostic for internal magnetic field fluctuation measurements in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L.; Finkenthal, D.; Muscatello, C.; Taussig, D.; Boivin, R.

    2016-11-01

    Motivated by the need to measure fast equilibrium temporal dynamics, non-axisymmetric structures, and core magnetic fluctuations (coherent and broadband), a three-chord Faraday-effect polarimeter-interferometer system with fast time response and high phase resolution has recently been installed on the DIII-D tokamak. A novel detection scheme utilizing two probe beams and two detectors for each chord results in reduced phase noise and increased time response [δb ˜ 1G with up to 3 MHz bandwidth]. First measurement results were obtained during the recent DIII-D experimental campaign. Simultaneous Faraday and density measurements have been successfully demonstrated and high-frequency, up to 100 kHz, Faraday-effect perturbations have been observed. Preliminary comparisons with EFIT are used to validate diagnostic performance. Principle of the diagnostic and first experimental results is presented.

  13. Faraday-effect polarimeter diagnostic for internal magnetic field fluctuation measurements in DIII-D.

    PubMed

    Chen, J; Ding, W X; Brower, D L; Finkenthal, D; Muscatello, C; Taussig, D; Boivin, R

    2016-11-01

    Motivated by the need to measure fast equilibrium temporal dynamics, non-axisymmetric structures, and core magnetic fluctuations (coherent and broadband), a three-chord Faraday-effect polarimeter-interferometer system with fast time response and high phase resolution has recently been installed on the DIII-D tokamak. A novel detection scheme utilizing two probe beams and two detectors for each chord results in reduced phase noise and increased time response [δb ∼ 1G with up to 3 MHz bandwidth]. First measurement results were obtained during the recent DIII-D experimental campaign. Simultaneous Faraday and density measurements have been successfully demonstrated and high-frequency, up to 100 kHz, Faraday-effect perturbations have been observed. Preliminary comparisons with EFIT are used to validate diagnostic performance. Principle of the diagnostic and first experimental results is presented.

  14. In vivo cell tracking of mouse embryonic myoblasts and fast fibers during development.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Lucia; Villar, Pedro; Martínez, Lidia; Badia-Careaga, Claudio; Arredondo, Juan J; Cervera, Margarita

    2014-09-01

    Fast and slow TnI are co-expressed in E11.5 embryos, and fast TnI is present from the very beginning of myogenesis. A novel green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter mouse lines (FastTnI/GFP lines) that carry the primary and secondary enhancer elements of the mouse fast troponin I (fast TnI), in which reporter expression correlates precisely with distribution of the endogenous fTnI protein was generated. Using the FastTnI/GFP mouse model, we characterized the early myogenic events in mice, analyzing the migration of GFP+ myoblasts, and the formation of primary and secondary myotubes in transgenic embryos. Interestingly, we found that the two contractile fast and slow isoforms of TnI are expressed during the migration of myoblasts from the somites to the limbs and body wall, suggesting that both participate in these events. Since no sarcomeres are present in myoblasts, we speculate that the function of fast TnI in early myogenesis is, like Myosin and Tropomyosin, to participate in cell movement during the initial myogenic stages. genesis © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. The design and simulated performance of a fast Level 1 track trigger for the ATLAS High Luminosity Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mårtensson, Mikael

    2017-08-01

    The ATLAS experiment at the High Luminosity LHC will face a fivefold increase in the number of interactions per bunch crossing relative to the ongoing Run 2. This will require a proportional improvement in rejection power at the earliest levels of the detector trigger system, while preserving good signal efficiency. One critical aspect of this improvement will be the implementation of precise track reconstruction, through which sharper trigger turn-on curves can be achieved, and b-tagging and tau-tagging techniques can in principle be implemented. The challenge of such a project comes in the development of a fast, custom electronic device integrated in the hardware based first trigger level of the experiment. This article will discuss the requirements, architecture and projected performance of the system in terms of tracking, timing and physics, based on detailed simulations. Studies are carried out using data from the strip subsystem only or both strip and pixel subsystems.

  16. Feasibility and Safety of 2-Day Discharge After Fast-Track Total Hip Arthroplasty: A Chinese Experience.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guojing; Chen, Wanchen; Chen, Wenliang; Tang, Xiaojun; Huang, Yijiang; Zhang, Lei

    2016-08-01

    A fast-track program (FT) can shorten hospital stay after total hip arthroplasty. The aim of this prospective randomized study was to investigate the feasibility and safety of 2-day discharge after fast-track total hip arthroplasty in a Chinese population. A total of 258 selected patients who underwent unilateral primary total hip arthroplasty were enrolled into the final cohort and were randomized into the FT (n = 126) and standard program group (n = 132). In the FT group, the patients received a multidisciplinary FT, whereas the patients in the standard program group only followed a standard care program. After setting restricted discharge criteria, we undertook follow-up evaluations to investigate the length of hospital stay, clinical performance, 30-day and 90-day complications, and 90-day admissions in both groups. A multivariate regression model was used to assess independent predictors of delayed discharge (>2 days). The mean length of stay was reduced from 5.8 to 2.1 days after implementation of our FT (P < .001). Most patients in the FT group (82.5%) were discharged within 2 days postoperatively. However, the complications and readmissions appeared no difference between the two groups. The multivariate regression analysis identified age (P = .041), operative time (P < .001), intraoperative blood loss (P = .026), and total blood loss (P < .001) as the predictive factors for delayed discharge. A 2-day discharge protocol after fast-track total hip arthroplasty can be safe and feasible in selected patients, without increasing the risk of complications and readmissions. Further efforts are needed to shorten operative time and reduce perioperative blood loss and eventually to shorten hospital stay. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Faraday diagnostics for ALT-3

    SciTech Connect

    Oro, David M; Tabaka, Leonard J

    2011-01-13

    ALT-3 and R-Damage are experiments to be executed in collaboration between LANL and VNIIEF personnel. They are planned to be fielded in Sarov, Russia at VNIIEF. Both experiments employ Russian explosively driven pulse-power systems to generate a pulse of electrical current that is used to drive the experiment. The current pulse will be measured with Faraday-rotation fiber-optic loops. Using this well known technique, the change in the current enclosed by the loops is determined by measuring the change in the magnetic field integrated along the fiber-optic loop by detecting the Faraday rotation of linearly polarized light traveling through the fiber. The amount of polarization rotation of the light is related to the integrated magnetic field and therefore the enclosed current (Ampere's law) through the Verdet constant which for the optical-fibers used in this experiment has been determined to within 1 %. The presentation describes how the technique will be employed in the ALT-3 experiment.

  18. Fast TPC Online Tracking on GPUs and Asynchronous Data Processing in the ALICE HLT to facilitate Online Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohr, David; Gorbunov, Sergey; Krzewicki, Mikolaj; Breitner, Timo; Kretz, Matthias; Lindenstruth, Volker

    2015-12-01

    ALICE (A Large Heavy Ion Experiment) is one of the four major experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, which is today the most powerful particle accelerator worldwide. The High Level Trigger (HLT) is an online compute farm of about 200 nodes, which reconstructs events measured by the ALICE detector in real-time. The HLT uses a custom online data-transport framework to distribute data and workload among the compute nodes. ALICE employs several calibration-sensitive subdetectors, e.g. the TPC (Time Projection Chamber). For a precise reconstruction, the HLT has to perform the calibration online. Online- calibration can make certain Offline calibration steps obsolete and can thus speed up Offline analysis. Looking forward to ALICE Run III starting in 2020, online calibration becomes a necessity. The main detector used for track reconstruction is the TPC. Reconstructing the trajectories in the TPC is the most compute-intense step during event reconstruction. Therefore, a fast tracking implementation is of great importance. Reconstructed TPC tracks build the basis for the calibration making a fast online-tracking mandatory. We present several components developed for the ALICE High Level Trigger to perform fast event reconstruction and to provide features required for online calibration. As first topic, we present our TPC tracker, which employs GPUs to speed up the processing, and which bases on a Cellular Automaton and on the Kalman filter. Our TPC tracking algorithm has been successfully used in 2011 and 2012 in the lead-lead and the proton-lead runs. We have improved it to leverage features of newer GPUs and we have ported it to support OpenCL, CUDA, and CPUs with a single common source code. This makes us vendor independent. As second topic, we present framework extensions required for online calibration. The extensions, however, are generic and can be used for other purposes as well. We have extended the framework to support asynchronous compute

  19. Learning local appearances with sparse representation for robust and fast visual tracking.

    PubMed

    Bai, Tianxiang; Li, You-Fu; Zhou, Xiaolong

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, we present a novel appearance model using sparse representation and online dictionary learning techniques for visual tracking. In our approach, the visual appearance is represented by sparse representation, and the online dictionary learning strategy is used to adapt the appearance variations during tracking. We unify the sparse representation and online dictionary learning by defining a sparsity consistency constraint that facilitates the generative and discriminative capabilities of the appearance model. An elastic-net constraint is enforced during the dictionary learning stage to capture the characteristics of the local appearances that are insensitive to partial occlusions. Hence, the target appearance is effectively recovered from the corruptions using the sparse coefficients with respect to the learned sparse bases containing local appearances. In the proposed method, the dictionary is undercomplete and can thus be efficiently implemented for tracking. Moreover, we employ a median absolute deviation based robust similarity metric to eliminate the outliers and evaluate the likelihood between the observations and the model. Finally, we integrate the proposed appearance model with the particle filter framework to form a robust visual tracking algorithm. Experiments on benchmark video sequences show that the proposed appearance model outperforms the other state-of-the-art approaches in tracking performance.

  20. Can Genetics Predict Response to Complex Behavioral Interventions? Evidence from a Genetic Analysis of the Fast Track Randomized Control Trial

    PubMed Central

    Albert, Dustin; Belsky, Daniel W.; Crowley, D. Max; Latendresse, Shawn J.; Aliev, Fazil; Riley, Brien; Sun, Cuie; Dick, Danielle M.; Dodge, Kenneth R.

    2014-01-01

    Early interventions are a preferred method for addressing behavioral problems in high-risk children, but often have only modest effects. Identifying sources of variation in intervention effects can suggest means to improve efficiency. One potential source of such variation is the genome. We conducted a genetic analysis of the Fast Track Randomized Control Trial, a 10-year-long intervention to prevent high-risk kindergarteners from developing adult externalizing problems including substance abuse and antisocial behavior. We tested whether variants of the glucocorticoid receptor gene NR3C1 were associated with differences in response to the Fast Track intervention. We found that in European-American children, a variant of NR3C1 identified by the single-nucleotide polymorphism rs10482672 was associated with increased risk for externalizing psychopathology in control group children and decreased risk for externalizing psychopathology in intervention group children. Variation in NR3C1 measured in this study was not associated with differential intervention response in African-American children. We discuss implications for efforts to prevent externalizing problems in high-risk children and for public policy in the genomic era. PMID:26106668

  1. Can Genetics Predict Response to Complex Behavioral Interventions? Evidence from a Genetic Analysis of the Fast Track Randomized Control Trial.

    PubMed

    Albert, Dustin; Belsky, Daniel W; Crowley, D Max; Latendresse, Shawn J; Aliev, Fazil; Riley, Brien; Sun, Cuie; Dick, Danielle M; Dodge, Kenneth A

    2015-01-01

    Early interventions are a preferred method for addressing behavioral problems in high-risk children, but often have only modest effects. Identifying sources of variation in intervention effects can suggest means to improve efficiency. One potential source of such variation is the genome. We conducted a genetic analysis of the Fast Track randomized control trial, a 10-year-long intervention to prevent high-risk kindergarteners from developing adult externalizing problems including substance abuse and antisocial behavior. We tested whether variants of the glucocorticoid receptor gene NR3C1 were associated with differences in response to the Fast Track intervention. We found that in European-American children, a variant of NR3C1 identified by the single-nucleotide polymorphism rs10482672 was associated with increased risk for externalizing psychopathology in control group children and decreased risk for externalizing psychopathology in intervention group children. Variation in NR3C1 measured in this study was not associated with differential intervention response in African-American children. We discuss implications for efforts to prevent externalizing problems in high-risk children and for public policy in the genomic era.

  2. Fast algorithm for region snake-based segmentation adapted to physical noise models and application to object tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesnaud, Christophe; Refregier, Philippe

    1999-06-01

    Algorithms for object segmentation are crucial in many image processing applications. During past years, active contour models have been widely used for finding the contours of objects. This segmentation strategy is classically edge based in the sense that the snake is driven to fit the maximum of an edge map of the scene. We have recently proposed a region-based snake approach, that can be implemented using a fast algorithm , to segment an object in an image. The algorithms, optimal in the Maximum Likelihood sense, are based on the calculus of the statistics of the inner and the outer regions and can thus be adapted to different kinds of random fields which can describe the input image. In this paper out aim is to study this approach for tracking application in optronic images. We first show the relevance of using a priori information on the statistical laws of the input image in the case of Gaussian statistics which are well adapted to describe optronic images when a whitening preprocessing is used. We will then characterize the performance of the fast algorithm implementation of the used approach and we will apply it to tracking applications. The efficiency of the proposed method will be shown on real image sequences.

  3. Faraday wave lattice as an elastic metamaterial.

    PubMed

    Domino, L; Tarpin, M; Patinet, S; Eddi, A

    2016-05-01

    Metamaterials enable the emergence of novel physical properties due to the existence of an underlying subwavelength structure. Here, we use the Faraday instability to shape the fluid-air interface with a regular pattern. This pattern undergoes an oscillating secondary instability and exhibits spontaneous vibrations that are analogous to transverse elastic waves. By locally forcing these waves, we fully characterize their dispersion relation and show that a Faraday pattern presents an effective shear elasticity. We propose a physical mechanism combining surface tension with the Faraday structured interface that quantitatively predicts the elastic wave phase speed, revealing that the liquid interface behaves as an elastic metamaterial.

  4. Faraday instability in deformable domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pucci, Giuseppe; Ben Amar, Martine; Couder, Yves

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the Faraday instability in floating liquid lenses, as an example of hydrodynamic instability that develops in a domain with flexible boundaries. We show that a mutual adaptation of the instability pattern and the domain shape occurs, as a result of the competition between the wave radiation pressure and the capillary response of the lens border. Two archetypes of behaviour are observed. In the first, stable shapes are obtained experimentally and predicted theoretically as the exact solutions of a Riccati equation, and they result from the equilibrium between wave radiation pressure and capillarity. In the second, the radiation pressure exceeds the capillary response of the lens border and leads to non-equilibrium behaviours, with breaking into smaller domains that have a complex dynamics including spontaneous propagation. The authors are grateful to Université Franco-Italienne (UFI) for financial support.

  5. Faraday rotation system. Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Bauman, L.E.; Wang, W.

    1994-07-01

    The Faraday Rotation System (FRS) is one of the advanced laser-based diagnostics developed at DIAL to provide support for the demonstration of prototype-scale coal-fired combustion magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) electrical power generation. Intended for application in the MHD channel, the system directly measures electron density through a measurement of the induced rotation in the polarization of a far infrared laser beam after passing through the MHD flow along the magnetic field lines. A measurement of the induced polarization ellipticity provides a measure of the electron collision frequency which together with the electron density gives the electron conductivity, a crucial parameter for MHD channel performance. The theory of the measurements, a description of the system, its capabilities, laboratory demonstration measurements on seeded flames with comparison to emission absorption measurements, and the current status of the system are presented in this final report.

  6. Development of a radiation-hardened SRAM with EDAC algorithm for fast readout CMOS pixel sensors for charged particle tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, X.; Li, B.; Chen, N.; Wang, J.; Zheng, R.; Gao, W.; Wei, T.; Gao, D.; Hu, Y.

    2014-08-01

    CMOS pixel sensors (CPS) are attractive for use in the innermost particle detectors for charged particle tracking due to their good trade-off between spatial resolution, material budget, radiation hardness, and readout speed. With the requirements of high readout speed and high radiation hardness to total ionizing dose (TID) for particle tracking, fast readout CPS are composed by integrating a data compression block and two SRAM IP cores. However, the radiation hardness of the SRAM IP cores is not as high as that of the other parts in CPS, and thus the radiation hardness of the whole CPS chip is lowered. Especially, when CPS are migrated into 0.18-μm processes, the single event upset (SEU) effects should be also considered besides TID and single event latchup (SEL) effects. This paper presents a radiation-hardened SRAM with enhanced radiation hardness to SEU. An error detection and correction (EDAC) algorithm and a bit-interleaving storage strategy are adopted in the design. The prototype design has been fabricated in a 0.18-μm process. The area of the new SRAM is increased 1.6 times as compared with a non-radiation-hardened SRAM due to the integration of EDAC algorithm and the adoption of radiation hardened layout. The access time is increased from 5 ns to 8 ns due to the integration of EDAC algorithm. The test results indicate that the design satisfy requirements of CPS for charged particle tracking.

  7. Analysis of Tracking Measuring Method of Focus Cabin of Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical radio Telescope(FAST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Hui; Zhu, Lichun

    2015-08-01

    FAST (Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical radio Telescope) project is one of the Chinese mega-Science Projects to build the largest single dish radio telescope in the world. FAST has three outstanding innovation aspects: in the karst depression which is large to host the 500-meter telescope, an active main reflector correcting for spherical aberration on the ground to achieve a full polarization is being built, the light-weight feed focus cabin in which a parallel robot as a secondary adjustable system to move with high precision is driven by cables and servomechanism plus. The part of main reflector which is illuminated by the feed is continually adjusted to fit the paraboloid of revolution in real time when tracking the radio source. How to get high precise real-time feedback data of moving focus cabin’s position when tracking the source is one of the crucial problems for the astronomical observation.At present 24 steady basis pillars for measurement whose position coordinates are already known, have been built in the construction field of FAST. Total stations will be installed on one of those pillars, and prisms will be installed on focus cabin. The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy and reliability of two measuring method: the space distance intersection calculation method and polar measuring method. The space distance intersection calculation method is only using multiple measuring distances between three pillars and prism and known coordinates of pillars to calculate the prism’s coordinates, the polar measurement is using the measuring distance and angles to get the prism’s coordinate.

  8. The Impact of Standardized Acuity Assessment and a Fast-Track on Length of Stay in Obstetric Triage: A Quality Improvement Study.

    PubMed

    Smithson, David S; Twohey, Rachel; Watts, Nancy; Gratton, Robert J

    To prospectively assess the impact of a standardized 5-category Obstetrical Triage Acuity Scale (OTAS) and a fast-track for lower-acuity patients on patient flow. Length of stay (LOS) data of women presenting to obstetric triage were abstracted from the electronic medical record prior to (July 1, 2011, to March 30, 2012) and following OTAS implementation (April 1 to December 31, 2012). Following computerized simulation modeling, a fast-track for lower acuity women was implemented (January 1, 2013, to February 28, 2014). Prior to OTAS implementation (8085 visits), the median LOS was 105 (interquartile range [IQR] = 52-178) minutes. Following OTAS implementation (8131 visits), the median LOS decreased to 101 (IQR = 49-175) minutes (P = .04). The LOS did not correlate well with acuity. Simulation modeling predicted that a fast-track for OTAS 4 and 5 patients would reduce the LOS. The LOS for lower-acuity patients in the fast-track decreased to 73 (IQR = 40-140) minutes (P = .005). In addition, the overall LOS (12 576 visits) decreased to 98 (IQR = 47-172) minutes (6.9% reduction; P < .001). Standardized assessment of acuity and a fast-track for lower acuity pregnant women decreased the overall LOS and the LOS of lower-acuity patients.

  9. Fast Track Teacher Education: A Review of the Research Literature on "Teach For All" Schemes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McConney, Andrew; Price, Anne; Woods-McConney, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    This review of the research literature was commissioned by the New Zealand Post-Primary Teachers Association (PPTA) Te Wehengarua as a means of informing the decision-making of the Association and its members about the Teach For All (TFA) scheme seeking to prepare teachers for New Zealand's schools. The systematic review is about fast track…

  10. Calibrated Faraday current and magnetic field sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neyer, B. T.; Chang, J.; Lockwood, G. J.; Ruggles, L. E.

    A calibrated optical fiber Faraday rotation current sensor is developed. This sensor has a gigahertz response, is immune to electromagnetic interference, and is constructed entirely of dielectric material. All of these advantages make the sensor ideal for pulsed power measurements.

  11. Michael Faraday's Contributions to Archaeological Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Moshenska, Gabriel

    2015-08-01

    The analysis of ancient artefacts is a long but largely neglected thread within the histories of archaeology and chemistry. This paper examines Michael Faraday's contributions to this nascent field, drawing on his published correspondence and the works of his antiquarian collaborators, and focusing in particular on his analyses of Romano-British and ancient Egyptian artefacts. Faraday examined the materials used in ancient Egyptian mummification, and provided the first proof of the use of lead glazes on Roman ceramics. Beginning with an assessment of Faraday's personal interests and early work on antiquities with Humphry Davy, this paper critically examines the historiography of archaeological chemistry and attempts to place Faraday's work within its institutional, intellectual, and economic contexts.

  12. Faraday Rotation Measurement with the SMAP Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le Vine, D. M.; Abraham, S.

    2016-01-01

    Faraday rotation is an issue that needs to be taken into account in remote sensing of parameters such as soil moisture and ocean salinity at L-band. This is especially important for SMAP because Faraday rotation varies with azimuth around the conical scan. SMAP retrieves Faraday rotation in situ using the ratio of the third and second Stokes parameters, a procedure that was demonstrated successfully by Aquarius. This manuscript reports the performance of this algorithm on SMAP. Over ocean the process works reasonably well and results compare favorably with expected values. But over land, the inhomogeneous nature of the scene results in much noisier, and in some cases unreliable estimates of Faraday rotation.

  13. Active imaging system with Faraday filter

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, J.J.

    1992-12-31

    This invention is comprised of an active imaging system which has a low to medium powered laser transmitter and a receiver wherein the receiver includes a Faraday filter with an ultranarrow optical bandpass and a bare (nonintensified) CCD camera. The laser is locked in the vicinity of the passband of the Faraday filter. The system has high sensitivity to the laser illumination wile eliminating solar background.

  14. A Comparative Study of Postoperative Pulmonary Complications Using Fast Track Regimen and Conservative Analgesic Treatment: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Aghdam, Babak Abri; Golzari, Samad Eslam Jamal; Moghadaszadeh, Majid

    2011-01-01

    Background Postoperative pulmonary complications and pain are important causes of postoperative morbidity following thoracotomy. This study aimed to compare the effects of fast track and conservative treatment regimens on patients undergoing thoracotomy. Materials and Methods In this randomized controlled clinical trial, we recruited 60 patients admitted to the thoracic ICU of Imam Reza Hospital in two matched groups of 30 patients each. Group 1 patients received fast track regimen randomly; whereas, group 2 cases randomly received conservative analgesic regimen after thoracotomy and pulmonary resection. The outcome was determined based on the incidence of pulmonary complications and reduction of post-thoracotomy pain in all patients with forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) <75% predicted value which was measured while the patients were in ICU. The length of ICU stay, thoracotomy pain, morbidity, pulmonary complications and mortality were compared in two groups. Results A total of 60 patients, 45 (75%) males and 15(25%) females with ASA class I-III were recruited in this study. Postoperative pulmonary complications were observed in 5 (16.7%) patients in group 1 versus 17 (56.7%) patients in group 2. There were statistically significant differences in development of postoperative pulmonary complications such as atelectasis and prolonged air leak between both groups (P< 0.001 and P = 0.003). There was also a statistically significant difference in the rate of preoperative FEV1 (p = 0.001) and ASA scoring (p = 0.01) and value of FEV1 < 75% predicted in the two groups. The difference in length of ICU stay in two groups was statistically significant (P= 0.003 and P = 0.017 in FEV1 < 75% group). Four patients in group 1 and 9 patients in group 2 had FEV1reduced to less than 75% of predicted value (p = 0.03). Conclusion Using fast track regimen reduced postoperative pain and incidence of some pulmonary complications significantly when compared to the

  15. A Fully Automated Supraglacial lake area and volume Tracking ("FAST") algorithm: development and application using MODIS imagery of West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Andrew; Arnold, Neil; Banwell, Alison; Willis, Ian

    2017-04-01

    Supraglacial lakes (SGLs) on the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) influence ice dynamics if draining rapidly by hydrofracture, which can occur in under 24 hours. MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data are often used to investigate SGLs, including calculating SGL area changes through time, but no existing work presents a method that tracks changes in individual (and total) SGL volume in MODIS imagery over a melt season. Here, we present such a method. First, we tested three automated approaches to derive SGL areas from MODIS imagery by comparing calculated areas for the Paakitsoq and Store Glacier regions in West Greenland with areas derived from Landsat-8 (LS8) images. Second, we applied a physically-based depth-calculation algorithm to the pixels within the SGL boundaries from the best performing method, and validated the resultant depths with those calculated using the same method applied to LS8 imagery. Our results indicated that SGL areas are most accurately generated using dynamic thresholding of MODIS band 1 (red) with a 0.640 threshold value. Calculated SGL area, depth and volume values from MODIS were closely comparable to those derived from LS8. The best performing area- and depth-detection methods were then incorporated into a Fully Automated SGL Tracking ("FAST") algorithm that tracks individual SGLs between successive MODIS images. It identified 43 (Paakitsoq) and 19 (Store Glacier) rapidly draining SGLs during 2014, representing 21% and 15% of the respective total SGL populations, including some clusters of rapidly draining SGLs. We found no relationship between the water volumes contained within these rapidly draining SGLs and the ice thicknesses beneath them, indicating that a critical water volume linearly related to ice thickness cannot explain the incidence of rapid drainage. The FAST algorithm, which we believe to be the most comprehensive SGL tracking algorithm developed to date, has the potential to investigate statistical

  16. Fast leaf-fitting with generalized underdose/overdose constraints for real-time MLC tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Douglas Sawant, Amit; Ruan, Dan

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: Real-time multileaf collimator (MLC) tracking is a promising approach to the management of intrafractional tumor motion during thoracic and abdominal radiotherapy. MLC tracking is typically performed in two steps: transforming a planned MLC aperture in response to patient motion and refitting the leaves to the newly generated aperture. One of the challenges of this approach is the inability to faithfully reproduce the desired motion-adapted aperture. This work presents an optimization-based framework with which to solve this leaf-fitting problem in real-time. Methods: This optimization framework is designed to facilitate the determination of leaf positions in real-time while accounting for the trade-off between coverage of the PTV and avoidance of organs at risk (OARs). Derived within this framework, an algorithm is presented that can account for general linear transformations of the planned MLC aperture, particularly 3D translations and in-plane rotations. This algorithm, together with algorithms presented in Sawant et al. [“Management of three-dimensional intrafraction motion through real-time DMLC tracking,” Med. Phys. 35, 2050–2061 (2008)] and Ruan and Keall [Presented at the 2011 IEEE Power Engineering and Automation Conference (PEAM) (2011) (unpublished)], was applied to apertures derived from eight lung intensity modulated radiotherapy plans subjected to six-degree-of-freedom motion traces acquired from lung cancer patients using the kilovoltage intrafraction monitoring system developed at the University of Sydney. A quality-of-fit metric was defined, and each algorithm was evaluated in terms of quality-of-fit and computation time. Results: This algorithm is shown to perform leaf-fittings of apertures, each with 80 leaf pairs, in 0.226 ms on average as compared to 0.082 and 64.2 ms for the algorithms of Sawant et al., Ruan, and Keall, respectively. The algorithm shows approximately 12% improvement in quality-of-fit over the Sawant et al

  17. A prospective study to assess the implementation of a fast-track system to meet the two-week target for colorectal cancer in Somerset.

    PubMed

    Davies, R. J.; Ewings, P.; Welbourn, R.; Collins, C.; Kennedy, R.; Royle, C.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This prospective study assesses the introduction of a fast-track referral system for patients with suspected colorectal cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The referral system was initiated in Yeovil District Hospital and Taunton and Somerset Hospital using six screening criteria to select high-risk patients. Data on all high-risk patients from 1 November 1999 to 30 April 2000 was recorded prospectively. Patients with proven colorectal cancer diagnosed between 1 November 1998 and 30 April 1999 have been identified for comparison. RESULTS: There were 158 new cases of colorectal cancer in total (111 elective, 47 emergency). 59 cases of colorectal cancer were diagnosed from 433 fast-track referrals (53% of total elective cases). Median time from referral to diagnosis in the fast-track group was 11 days vs. 32.5 days for nonfast-track elective patients (P < 0.001). Median time from referral to diagnosis for all elective cases was 17 days vs. 38.5 days for patients presenting one year earlier (P < 0.001). 75% of fast-track patients were diagnosed with colorectal cancer within two weeks, compared with 17% of nonfast-track elective patients (P < 0.001). The proportion of emergency admissions was reduced from 40% to 30% (P=0.07) following the introduction of this system. CONCLUSION: Data from the first six months reveal that over half of the elective cases of colorectal cancer were diagnosed within the fast-track system. The median time from referral to diagnosis in these patients was within two weeks and there has been a significant reduction in the time to diagnosis associated with the introduction of this service.

  18. Indirect Effects of the Fast Track Intervention on Conduct Disorder Symptoms and Callous-Unemotional Traits: Distinct Pathways Involving Discipline and Warmth

    PubMed Central

    Pasalich, Dave S.; Witkiewitz, Katie; McMahon, Robert J.; Pinderhughes, Ellen E.

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about intervening processes that explain how prevention programs improve particular youth antisocial outcomes. We examined whether parental harsh discipline and warmth in childhood differentially account for Fast Track intervention effects on conduct disorder (CD) symptoms and callous-unemotional (CU) traits in early adolescence. Participants included 891 high-risk kindergarteners (69% male; 51% African American) from urban and rural United States communities who were randomized into either the Fast Track intervention (n = 445) or non-intervention control (n = 446) groups. The 10-year intervention included parent management training and other services (e.g., social skills training, universal classroom curriculum) targeting various risk factors for the development of conduct problems. Harsh discipline (Grades 1 through 3) and warmth (Grades 1 and 2) were measured using parent responses to vignettes and direct observations of parent-child interaction, respectively. Parents reported on children’s CD symptoms in Grade 6 and CU traits in Grade 7. Results demonstrated indirect effects of the Fast Track intervention on reducing risk for youth antisocial outcomes. That is, Fast Track was associated with lower scores on harsh discipline, which in turn predicted decreased levels of CD symptoms. In addition, Fast Track was associated with higher scores on warmth, which in turn predicted reduced levels of CU traits. Our findings inform developmental and intervention models of youth antisocial behavior by providing evidence for the differential role of harsh discipline and warmth in accounting for indirect effects of Fast Track on CD symptoms versus CU traits, respectively. PMID:26242993

  19. Indirect Effects of the Fast Track Intervention on Conduct Disorder Symptoms and Callous-Unemotional Traits: Distinct Pathways Involving Discipline and Warmth.

    PubMed

    Pasalich, Dave S; Witkiewitz, Katie; McMahon, Robert J; Pinderhughes, Ellen E

    2016-04-01

    Little is known about intervening processes that explain how prevention programs improve particular youth antisocial outcomes. We examined whether parental harsh discipline and warmth in childhood differentially account for Fast Track intervention effects on conduct disorder (CD) symptoms and callous-unemotional (CU) traits in early adolescence. Participants included 891 high-risk kindergarteners (69% male; 51% African American) from urban and rural United States communities who were randomized into either the Fast Track intervention (n = 445) or non-intervention control (n = 446) groups. The 10-year intervention included parent management training and other services (e.g., social skills training, universal classroom curriculum) targeting various risk factors for the development of conduct problems. Harsh discipline (Grades 1 to 3) and warmth (Grades 1 and 2) were measured using parent responses to vignettes and direct observations of parent-child interaction, respectively. Parents reported on children's CD symptoms in Grade 6 and CU traits in Grade 7. Results demonstrated indirect effects of the Fast Track intervention on reducing risk for youth antisocial outcomes. That is, Fast Track was associated with lower scores on harsh discipline, which in turn predicted decreased levels of CD symptoms. In addition, Fast Track was associated with higher scores on warmth, which in turn predicted reduced levels of CU traits. Our findings inform developmental and intervention models of youth antisocial behavior by providing evidence for the differential role of harsh discipline and warmth in accounting for indirect effects of Fast Track on CD symptoms versus CU traits, respectively.

  20. Fast and accurate localization of multiple RF markers for tracking in MRI-guided interventions.

    PubMed

    Galassi, Francesca; Brujic, Djordje; Rea, Marc; Lambert, Nicholas; Desouza, Nandita; Ristic, Mihailo

    2015-02-01

    A new method for 3D localization of N fiducial markers from 1D projections is presented and analysed. It applies to semi-active markers and active markers using a single receiver channel. The novel algorithm computes candidate points using peaks in three optimally selected projections and removes fictitious points by verifying detected peaks in additional projections. Computational complexity was significantly reduced by avoiding cluster analysis, while higher accuracy was achieved by using optimal projections and by applying Gaussian interpolation in peak detection. Computational time, accuracy and robustness were analysed through Monte Carlo simulations and experiments. The method was employed in a prototype MRI guided prostate biopsy system and used in preclinical experiments. The computational time for 6 markers was better than 2 ms, an improvement of up to 100 times, compared to the method by Flask et al. (J Magn Reson Imaging 14(5):617-627, 2001). Experimental maximum localization error was lower than 0.3 mm; standard deviation was 0.06 mm. Targeting error was about 1 mm. Tracking update rate was about 10 Hz. The proposed method is particularly suitable in systems requiring any of the following: high frame rate, tracking of three or more markers, data filtering or interleaving.

  1. Initial Impact of the Fast Track Prevention Trial for Conduct Problems: I. The High-Risk Sample

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Fast Track is a multisite, multicomponent preventive intervention for young children at high risk for long-term antisocial behavior. Based on a comprehensive developmental model intervention included a universal-level classroom program plus social skills training, academic tutoring, parent training, and home visiting to improve competencies and reduce problems in a high-risk group of children selected in kindergarten. At the end of Grade 1, there were moderate positive effects on children's social, emotional, and academic skills; peer interactions and social status; and conduct problems and special-education use. Parents reported less-physical discipline and greater parenting satisfaction/ease of parenting and engaged in more appropriate/consistent discipline, warmth/positive involvement, and involvement with the school. Evidence of differential intervention effects across child gender, race, site, and cohort was minimal. PMID:10535230

  2. Registered Nurse to Bachelor of Science in Nursing: nesting a fast-track to traditional generic program, teachings from nursing education in Burkina Faso.

    PubMed

    Beogo, Idrissa; Liu, Chieh-Yu; Dlamini, Colile P; Gagnon, Marie-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Nursing education has evolved over time to fit societies' increasing care needs. Innovations in nursing education draw thorny debates on potential jeopardy in the quality, safety, and efficacy of nurse graduates. Accelerated nursing education programs have been among landmark strategic changes to address the persistent bedside nurse shortage. Despite the dearth of empirical studies in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), the National School of Public Health of Burkina Faso has developed a State Diploma Nursing (SDN) fast-track program. With innovative features, the program is nested into the traditional SDN program. This study investigates preliminary outcomes of the implemented policy using the initial cohort that went through the program. Comparison of the traditional generic program and the fast-track one is drawn to inform nursing education policy. The study was conducted in the three campuses delivering the SDN program. Data collected from a representative sample included 255 students from the 2006-2009 cohort, after concluding the program. Surveyed students were assessed according to the program entry status. Outcomes were measured using students' academic performance. Besides descriptive analysis, bivariate t-test, F-test, and multivariate ordinary least square regression (OLSR) were employed to determine the comparative pattern between the traditional generic and the newly nested fast-track program. Students' varied statuses (private pre-registration, state pre-registration, private post-registration, and state post-registration) were kept to better outline the findings trend. A fifth (19.6 %) of surveyed students were enrolled in the fast-track stream from which, one third (33.7 %) consisted of post-registered students. Fast-track students comparatively achieved the best academic performance (mean: 73.68/100, SD: 5.52). Multivariate OLSR confirmed that fast-track students performed better (β: 5.559, p < 0.001), and further informed differences between campuses

  3. Evaluation of the influence of pulmonary hypertension in ultra-fast-track anesthesia technique in adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Paulo Sérgio; Cartacho, Márcio Portugal Trindade; de Castro, Casimiro Cardoso; Salgado Filho, Marcello Fonseca; Brandão, Antônio Carlos Aguiar

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the influence of pulmonary hypertension in the ultra-fast-track anesthesia technique in adult cardiac surgery. Methods A retrospective study. They were included 40 patients divided into two groups: GI (without pulmonary hypertension) and GII (with pulmonary hypertension). Based on data obtained by transthoracic echocardiography. We considered as the absence of pulmonary hypertension: a pulmonary artery systolic pressure (sPAP) <36 mmHg, with tricuspid regurgitation velocity <2.8 m/s and no additional echocardiographic signs of PH, and PH as presence: a sPAP >40 mmHg associated with additional echocardiographic signs of PH. It was established as influence of pulmonary hypertension: the impossibility of extubation in the operating room, the increase in the time interval for extubation and reintubation the first 24 hours postoperatively. Univariate and multivariate analyzes were performed when necessary. Considered significant a P value <0.05. Results The GI was composed of 21 patients and GII for 19. All patients (100%) were extubated in the operating room in a medium time interval of 17.58±8.06 min with a median of 18 min in GII and 17 min in GI. PH did not increase the time interval for extubation (P=0.397). It required reintubation of 2 patients in GII (5% of the total), without statistically significant as compared to GI (P=0.488). Conclusion In this study, pulmonary hypertension did not influence on ultra-fast-track anesthesia in adult cardiac surgery. PMID:27163419

  4. The impact of a fast track area on quality and effectiveness outcomes: A Middle Eastern emergency department perspective

    PubMed Central

    Devkaran, Subashnie; Parsons, Howard; Van Dyke, Murray; Drennan, Jonathan; Rajah, Jaishen

    2009-01-01

    Background Emergency department (ED) overcrowding is a ubiquitous problem with serious public health implications. The fast track area is a novel method which aims to reduce waiting time, patient dissatisfaction and morbidity. |The study objective was to determine the impact of a fast track area (FTA) on both effectiveness measures (i.e. waiting times [WT] and length of stay [LOS]) and quality measures (i.e. LWBS rates and mortality rates) in non-urgent patients. The secondary objective was to assess if a FTA negatively impacted on urgent patients entering the ED. Methods The study took place in a 500 bed, urban, tertiary care hospital in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. This was a quasi-experimental, which examined the impact of a FTA on a pre-intervention control group (January 2005) (n = 4,779) versus a post-intervention study group (January 2006) (n = 5,706). Results Mean WTs of Canadian Triage Acuity Scale (CTAS) 4 patients decreased by 22 min (95% CI 21 min to 24 min, P < 0.001). Similarly, mean WTs of CTAS 5 patients decreased by 28 min (95% CI 19 min to 37 min, P < 0.001) post FTA. The mean WTs of urgent patients (CTAS 2/3) were also significantly reduced after the FTA was opened (P < 0.001). The LWBS rate was reduced from 4.7% to 0.7% (95% CI 3.37 to 4.64; P < 0.001). Opening a FTA had no significant impact on mortality rates (P = 0.88). Conclusion The FTA improved ED effectiveness (WTs and LOS) and quality measures (LWBS rates) whereas mortality rate remained unchanged. PMID:19534787

  5. Which patient characteristics influence length of hospital stay after primary total hip arthroplasty in a 'fast-track' setting?

    PubMed

    den Hartog, Y M; Mathijssen, N M C; Hannink, G; Vehmeijer, S B W

    2015-01-01

    After implementation of a 'fast-track' rehabilitation protocol in our hospital, mean length of hospital stay for primary total hip arthroplasty decreased from 4.6 to 2.9 nights for unselected patients. However, despite this reduction there was still a wide range across the patients' hospital duration. The purpose of this study was to identify which specific patient characteristics influence length of stay after successful implementation of a 'fast-track' rehabilitation protocol. A total of 477 patients (317 female and 160 male, mean age 71.0 years; 39.3 to 92.6, mean BMI 27.0 kg/m(2);18.8 to 45.2) who underwent primary total hip arthroplasty between 1 February 2011 and 31 January 2013, were included in this retrospective cohort study. A length of stay greater than the median was considered as an increased duration. Logistic regression analyses were performed to identify potential factors associated with increased durations. Median length of stay was two nights (interquartile range 1), and the mean length of stay 2.9 nights (1 to 75). In all, 266 patients had a length of stay ≤ two nights. Age (odds ratio (OR) 2.46; 95% confidence intervals (CI) 1.72 to 3.51; p < 0.001), living situation (alone vs living together with cohabitants, OR 2.09; 95% CI 1.33 to 3.30; p = 0.002) and approach (anterior approach vs lateral, OR 0.29; 95% CI 0.19 to 0.46; p < 0.001) (posterolateral approach vs lateral, OR 0.24; 95% CI 0.10 to 0.55; p < 0.001) were factors that were significantly associated with increased length of stay in the multivariable logistic regression model.

  6. Pupil fluctuations track fast switching of cortical states during quiet wakefulness

    PubMed Central

    Reimer, Jacob; Froudarakis, Emmanouil; Cadwell, Cathryn R.; Yatsenko, Dimitri; Denfield, George H.; Tolias, Andreas S.

    2014-01-01

    Neural responses are modulated by brain state, which varies with arousal, attention, and behavior. In mice, running and whisking desynchronize the cortex and enhance sensory responses, but the quiescent periods between bouts of exploratory behaviors have not been well-studied. We found that these periods of “quiet wakefulness” were characterized by state fluctuations on a timescale of 1–2 seconds. Small fluctuations in pupil diameter tracked these state transitions in multiple cortical areas. During dilation, the intracellular membrane potential was desynchronized, sensory responses were enhanced, and population activity was less correlated. In contrast, constriction was characterized by increased low-frequency oscillations and higher ensemble correlations. Specific subtypes of cortical interneurons were differentially activated during dilation and constriction, consistent with their participation in the observed state changes. Pupillometry has been used to index attention and mental effort in humans, but the intracellular dynamics and differences in population activity underlying this phenomenon were previously unknown. PMID:25374359

  7. Pupil fluctuations track fast switching of cortical states during quiet wakefulness.

    PubMed

    Reimer, Jacob; Froudarakis, Emmanouil; Cadwell, Cathryn R; Yatsenko, Dimitri; Denfield, George H; Tolias, Andreas S

    2014-10-22

    Neural responses are modulated by brain state, which varies with arousal, attention, and behavior. In mice, running and whisking desynchronize the cortex and enhance sensory responses, but the quiescent periods between bouts of exploratory behaviors have not been well studied. We found that these periods of "quiet wakefulness" were characterized by state fluctuations on a timescale of 1-2 s. Small fluctuations in pupil diameter tracked these state transitions in multiple cortical areas. During dilation, the intracellular membrane potential was desynchronized, sensory responses were enhanced, and population activity was less correlated. In contrast, constriction was characterized by increased low-frequency oscillations and higher ensemble correlations. Specific subtypes of cortical interneurons were differentially activated during dilation and constriction, consistent with their participation in the observed state changes. Pupillometry has been used to index attention and mental effort in humans, but the intracellular dynamics and differences in population activity underlying this phenomenon were previously unknown.

  8. Highly Parallelized Pattern Matching Hardware for Fast Tracking at Hadron Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Citraro, S.; Annovi, A.; Biesuz, N.; Giannetti, P.; Luciano, P.; Nasimi, H.; Piendibene, M.; Sotiropoulou, C.-L.; Volpi, G.

    2016-04-01

    A high-performance “pattern matching” implementation based on the Associative Memory (AM) system is presented. It is designed to solve the real-time hit-to-track association problem for particles produced in high-energy physics experiments at hadron colliders. The processing time of pattern recognition in CPU-based algorithms increases rapidly with the detector occupancy due to the limited computing power and input-output capacity of hardware available on the market. The AM system presented here solves the problem by being able to process even the most complex hadron collider events produced at a rate of 100 kHz with an average latency smaller than 10 μs. The board built for this goal is able to execute 12 petabyte comparisons per second, with peak power consumption below 250 W, uniformly distributed on the large area of the board.

  9. Predictive filtering-based fast reacquisition approach for space-borne acquisition, tracking, and pointing systems.

    PubMed

    Bai, Shuai; Wang, Jianyu; Qiang, Jia; Zhang, Liang; Wang, Juanjuan

    2014-11-03

    We propose a novel approach for recapturing targets as quickly as possible after the space-borne ATP (Acquisition, Tracking, and Pointing) system target loss in free-space laser communication. The approach uses past angular information to predict the target trajectory. An optimized finite memory filter is designed as the prediction algorithm. To obtain optimal prediction performance, the designed filter determines the filter parameters of different curve parts during offline training, and the parameters are adjusted according to the curve characteristics during predictive filtering. Simulation results indicate prediction accuracy above 0.1 degrees within 5 seconds. An experimental system was constructed in the lab to simulate the reacquisition process using a dynamic target and a real ATP system. Experimental results show that, compared with the classical orbit prediction method, this approach can effectively yield shorter acquisition times.

  10. A fast-initializing digital equalizer with on-line tracking for data communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houts, R. C.; Barksdale, W. J.

    1974-01-01

    A theory is developed for a digital equalizer for use in reducing intersymbol interference (ISI) on high speed data communications channels. The equalizer is initialized with a single isolated transmitter pulse, provided the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is not unusually low, then switches to a decision directed, on-line mode of operation that allows tracking of channel variations. Conditions for optimal tap-gain settings are obtained first for a transversal equalizer structure by using a mean squared error (MSE) criterion, a first order gradient algorithm to determine the adjustable equalizer tap-gains, and a sequence of isolated initializing pulses. Since the rate of tap-gain convergence depends on the eigenvalues of a channel output correlation matrix, convergence can be improved by making a linear transformation on to obtain a new correlation matrix.

  11. Adaptive AFM scan speed control for high aspect ratio fast structure tracking.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Ahmad; Schuh, Andreas; Rangelow, Ivo W

    2014-10-01

    Improved imaging rates in Atomic Force Microscopes (AFM) are of high interest for disciplines such as life sciences and failure analysis of semiconductor wafers, where the sample topology shows high aspect ratios. Also, fast imaging is necessary to cover a large surface under investigation in reasonable times. Since AFMs are composed of mechanical components, they are associated with comparably low resonance frequencies that undermine the effort to increase the acquisition rates. In particular, high and steep structures are difficult to follow, which causes the cantilever to temporarily loose contact to or crash into the sample. Here, we report on a novel approach that does not affect the scanner dynamics, but adapts the lateral scanning speed of the scanner. The controller monitors the control error signal and, only when necessary, decreases the scan speed to allow the z-piezo more time to react to changes in the sample's topography. In this case, the overall imaging rate can be significantly increased, because a general scan speed trade-off decision is not needed and smooth areas are scanned fast. In contrast to methods trying to increase the z-piezo bandwidth, our method is a comparably simple approach that can be easily adapted to standard systems.

  12. Adaptive AFM scan speed control for high aspect ratio fast structure tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, Ahmad; Schuh, Andreas; Rangelow, Ivo W.

    2014-10-15

    Improved imaging rates in Atomic Force Microscopes (AFM) are of high interest for disciplines such as life sciences and failure analysis of semiconductor wafers, where the sample topology shows high aspect ratios. Also, fast imaging is necessary to cover a large surface under investigation in reasonable times. Since AFMs are composed of mechanical components, they are associated with comparably low resonance frequencies that undermine the effort to increase the acquisition rates. In particular, high and steep structures are difficult to follow, which causes the cantilever to temporarily loose contact to or crash into the sample. Here, we report on a novel approach that does not affect the scanner dynamics, but adapts the lateral scanning speed of the scanner. The controller monitors the control error signal and, only when necessary, decreases the scan speed to allow the z-piezo more time to react to changes in the sample's topography. In this case, the overall imaging rate can be significantly increased, because a general scan speed trade-off decision is not needed and smooth areas are scanned fast. In contrast to methods trying to increase the z-piezo bandwidth, our method is a comparably simple approach that can be easily adapted to standard systems.

  13. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Plasma agents in bio-decontamination by dc discharges in atmospheric air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machala, Zdenko; Chládeková, Lenka; Pelach, Michal

    2010-06-01

    Bio-decontamination of water and surfaces contaminated by bacteria (Salmonella typhimurium) was investigated in two types of positive dc discharges in atmospheric pressure air, in needle-to-plane geometry: the streamer corona and its transition to a novel regime called transient spark with short high current pulses of limited energy. Both generate a cold non-equilibrium plasma. Electro-spraying of treated water through a needle electrode was applied for the first time and resulted in fast bio-decontamination. Experiments providing separation of various biocidal plasma agents, along with the emission spectra and coupled with oxidation stress measurements in the cell membranes helped to better understand the mechanisms of microbial inactivation. The indirect exposure of contaminated surfaces to neutral active species was almost as efficient as the direct exposure to the plasma, whereas applying only UV radiation from the plasma had no biocidal effects. Radicals and reactive oxygen species were identified as dominant biocidal agents.

  14. Fast noninvasive eye-tracking and eye-gaze determination for biomedical and remote monitoring applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talukder, Ashit; Morookian, John M.; Monacos, Steve P.; Lam, Raymond K.; Lebaw, C.; Bond, A.

    2004-04-01

    Eyetracking is one of the latest technologies that has shown potential in several areas including human-computer interaction for people with and without disabilities, and for noninvasive monitoring, detection, and even diagnosis of physiological and neurological problems in individuals. Current non-invasive eyetracking methods achieve a 30 Hz rate with possibly low accuracy in gaze estimation, that is insufficient for many applications. We propose a new non-invasive visual eyetracking system that is capable of operating at speeds as high as 6-12 KHz. A new CCD video camera and hardware architecture is used, and a novel fast image processing algorithm leverages specific features of the input CCD camera to yield a real-time eyetracking system. A field programmable gate array (FPGA) is used to control the CCD camera and execute the image processing operations. Initial results show the excellent performance of our system under severe head motion and low contrast conditions.

  15. Open LED Illuminator: A Simple and Inexpensive LED Illuminator for Fast Multicolor Particle Tracking in Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Bosse, Jens B.; Tanneti, Nikhila S.; Hogue, Ian B.; Enquist, Lynn W.

    2015-01-01

    Dual-color live cell fluorescence microscopy of fast intracellular trafficking processes, such as axonal transport, requires rapid switching of illumination channels. Typical broad-spectrum sources necessitate the use of mechanical filter switching, which introduces delays between acquisition of different fluorescence channels, impeding the interpretation and quantification of highly dynamic processes. Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs), however, allow modulation of excitation light in microseconds. Here we provide a step-by-step protocol to enable any scientist to build a research-grade LED illuminator for live cell microscopy, even without prior experience with electronics or optics. We quantify and compare components, discuss our design considerations, and demonstrate the performance of our LED illuminator by imaging axonal transport of herpes virus particles with high temporal resolution. PMID:26600461

  16. First results of Faraday-effect polarimeter measurements of internal magnetic fluctuation in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L.

    2016-10-01

    Motivated by the need to measure fast equilibrium temporal dynamics, non-axisymmetric structures and core magnetic fluctuations (coherent and broadband), a 694 GHz Faraday-effect polarimeter has recently been installed on the DIII-D tokamak. A novel detection scheme is utilized, which results in simultaneous integral density measurement, to isolate the magnetic component, along with fast time response (up to 3MHz) and high phase resolution (1 ×10-4 degree2/kHz, equivalent to <1 Gauss at medium to high electron density conditions). Spatial resolution is provided by three radial chords located at z = 0 cm and z = +/- 13.5 cm (z = 0 cm is machine center). Simultaneous Faraday rotation and integral density measurements have been demonstrated in the experimental campaign of 2016, with good agreement with MSE-constrained EFIT. The change of Faraday rotation during sawteeth indicates periodic evolution of current density in the core plasma. Coherent and broadband fluctuations associated with plasma instabilities and turbulence, up to 500 kHz, have been observed on both Faraday rotation and integral density data. Supported by USDOE Grant DE-FC02-04ER54698 and DE-FG03-01ER54615.

  17. Scientists raise alarms about fast tracking of transoceanic canal through Nicaragua.

    PubMed

    Huete-Pérez, Jorge A; Alvarez, Pedro J J; Schnoor, Jerald L; Rittmann, Bruce E; Clayton, Anthony; Acosta, Maria L; Bicudo, Carlos E M; K Arroyo, Mary T; Brett, Michael T; Campos, Victor M; Chaimovich, Hernan; Jimenez-Cisneros, Blanca; Covich, Alan; Lacerda, Luiz D; Maes, Jean-Michel; Miranda, Julio C; Montenegro-Guillén, Salvador; Ortega-Hegg, Manuel; Urquhart, Gerald R; Vammen, Katherine; Zambrano, Luis

    2015-04-07

    Seeking economic growth and job creation to tackle the nation's extreme poverty, the Nicaraguan government awarded a concession to build an interoceanic canal and associated projects to a recently formed Hong Kong based company with no track record or related expertise. This concession was awarded without a bidding process and in advance of any feasibility, socio-economic or environmental impact assessments; construction has begun without this information. The 278 km long interoceanic canal project may result in significant environmental and social impairments. Of particular concern are damage to Lake Cocibolca, a unique freshwater tropical lake and Central America's main freshwater reservoir; damage to regional biodiversity and ecosystems; and socio-economic impacts. Concerned about the possibly irreparable damage to the environment and to native communities, conservationists and the scientific community at large are urging the Nicaraguan government to devise and reveal an action plan to address and mitigate the possible negative repercussions of this interoceanic canal and associated projects. Critical research needs for preparation of a comprehensive benefit-cost analysis for this megaproject are presented.

  18. Fast spacecraft adaptive attitude tracking control through immersion and invariance design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Haowei; Yue, Xiaokui; Li, Peng; Yuan, Jianping

    2017-10-01

    This paper presents a novel non-certainty-equivalence adaptive control method for the attitude tracking control problem of spacecraft with inertia uncertainties. The proposed immersion and invariance (I&I) based adaptation law provides a more direct and flexible approach to circumvent the limitations of the basic I&I method without employing any filter signal. By virtue of the adaptation high-gain equivalence property derived from the proposed adaptive method, the closed-loop adaptive system with a low adaptation gain could recover the high adaptation gain performance of the filter-based I&I method, and the resulting control torque demands during the initial transient has been significantly reduced. A special feature of this method is that the convergence of the parameter estimation error has been observably improved by utilizing an adaptation gain matrix instead of a single adaptation gain value. Numerical simulations are presented to highlight the various benefits of the proposed method compared with the certainty-equivalence-based control method and filter-based I&I control schemes.

  19. The gravitational analog of Faraday's induction law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zile, Daniel; Overduin, James

    2015-04-01

    Michael Faraday, the discoverer of electromagnetic induction, was convinced that there must also be a gravitational analog of this law, and he carried out drop-tower experiments in 1849 to look for the electric current induced in a coil by changes in gravitational flux through the coil. This work, now little remembered, was in some ways the first investigation of what we would now call a unified-field theory. We revisit Faraday's experiments in the light of current knowledge and ask what might be learned if they were to be performed today. We then review the gravitational analog for Faraday's law that arises within the vector (or gravito-electromagnetic) approximation to Einstein's theory of general relativity in the weak-field, low-velocity limit. This law relates spinning masses and induced ``mass currents'' rather than spinning charges and electric currents, but is otherwise remarkably similar to its electromagnetic counterpart. The predicted effects are completely unobservable in everyday settings like those envisioned by Faraday, but are thought to be relevant in astrophysical contexts like the accretion disks around collapsed stars, thus bearing out Faraday's remarkable intuition. Undergraduate student.

  20. Michael Faraday and his contribution to anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Bergman, N A

    1992-10-01

    Michael Faraday (1791-1867) was a protégé of Humphry Davy. He became one of Davy's successors as Professor of Chemistry at the Royal Institution of Great Britain. Of Faraday's many brilliant discoveries in chemistry and physics, probably the best remembered today is his work on electromagnetic induction. Faraday's contribution to introduction of anesthesia was his published announcement in 1818 that inhalation of the vapor of ether produced the same effects on mentation and consciousness as the breathing of nitrous oxide. He most likely became familiar with the central nervous system effects of nitrous oxide through his association with Davy, an avid user of the gas. Sulfuric ether was a common, convenient, cheap, and easily available substance, in contrast to nitrous oxide, which required expensive, cumbersome, and probably not widely available apparatus for its production and administration. The capability for inhaling intoxicating vapors eventually became commonly available with the use of ether instead of the gas. The first surgical anesthetics were a consequence of the resulting student "ether frolics." The 1818 announcement on breathing ether vapor was published anonymously; however, notations in Faraday's handwriting in some of his personal books clearly establish Michael Faraday as the author of this brief communication.

  1. Expanding Support for Education in Fragile States: What Role for the Education for All-Fast Track Initiative? CREATE Pathways to Access. Research Monograph No. 30

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turrent, Victoria

    2009-01-01

    The new international aid architecture was established to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of development aid by emphasising country ownership, alignment with national priorities and the harmonisation of donor processes. These features are evident in the Education for All-Fast Track Initiative [EFA-FTI], a global partnership between donor…

  2. Why "The Best Way of Learning to Coach the Game Is Playing the Game": Conceptualising "Fast-Tracked" High-Performance Coaching Pathways

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackett, Alexander David; Evans, Adam; Piggott, David

    2017-01-01

    At the beginning of the 2013/2014 season in England and Wales, 90 head coaches of the 92 men's national professional football league clubs and 20 of the 22 men's professional rugby union clubs had tenure as a professional elite player in their respective sports. Moreover, Rynne [(2014). "'Fast track' and 'traditional path' coaches:…

  3. [Process optimization in pediatric anesthesia-- fast-track: what is possible: what makes sense?].

    PubMed

    Wöhler, Patrick; Kellermann, Wolfgang

    2012-02-01

    Process optimization offers the opportunity to improve the quality and efficiency of medical care. Various approaches are possible in a pre-, peri- and postoperative care setting: It is almost always possible to prepare the children for surgery on an outpatient basis. This allows for hospital admission the same day or the evening before the procedure. But a schedule needs to be established that includes a certain leeway for admission and preoperative fasting in order to cater for a flexible response to delays or cancelations on the surgical list. An efficient use of theatre time can only be assured if several anesthetists can work in parallel. This applies in particular to complex anesthetic inductions. Sufficient staff and facilities are a prerequisite for this. The use of ultrasound for vascular access and regional anesthesia raises the success rate and saves time. In the postoperative period good analgesia with a fixed therapeutic regime, immediate postoperative feeding and mobilization improve the care. © Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart · New York.

  4. Feature Detection and Curve Fitting Using Fast Walsh Transforms for Shock Tracking: Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.

    2017-01-01

    Walsh functions form an orthonormal basis set consisting of square waves. Square waves make the system well suited for detecting and representing functions with discontinuities. Given a uniform distribution of 2p cells on a one-dimensional element, it has been proven that the inner product of the Walsh Root function for group p with every polynomial of degree < or = (p - 1) across the element is identically zero. It has also been proven that the magnitude and location of a discontinuous jump, as represented by a Heaviside function, are explicitly identified by its Fast Walsh Transform (FWT) coefficients. These two proofs enable an algorithm that quickly provides a Weighted Least Squares fit to distributions across the element that include a discontinuity. The detection of a discontinuity enables analytic relations to locally describe its evolution and provide increased accuracy. Time accurate examples are provided for advection, Burgers equation, and Riemann problems (diaphragm burst) in closed tubes and de Laval nozzles. New algorithms to detect up to two C0 and/or C1 discontinuities within a single element are developed for application to the Riemann problem, in which a contact discontinuity and shock wave form after the diaphragm bursts.

  5. Improvements in fast-response flood modeling: desktop parallel computing and domain tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Judi, David R; Mcpherson, Timothy N; Burian, Steven J

    2009-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly important to have the ability to accurately forecast flooding, as flooding accounts for the most losses due to natural disasters in the world and the United States. Flood inundation modeling has been dominated by one-dimensional approaches. These models are computationally efficient and are considered by many engineers to produce reasonably accurate water surface profiles. However, because the profiles estimated in these models must be superimposed on digital elevation data to create a two-dimensional map, the result may be sensitive to the ability of the elevation data to capture relevant features (e.g. dikes/levees, roads, walls, etc...). Moreover, one-dimensional models do not explicitly represent the complex flow processes present in floodplains and urban environments and because two-dimensional models based on the shallow water equations have significantly greater ability to determine flow velocity and direction, the National Research Council (NRC) has recommended that two-dimensional models be used over one-dimensional models for flood inundation studies. This paper has shown that two-dimensional flood modeling computational time can be greatly reduced through the use of Java multithreading on multi-core computers which effectively provides a means for parallel computing on a desktop computer. In addition, this paper has shown that when desktop parallel computing is coupled with a domain tracking algorithm, significant computation time can be eliminated when computations are completed only on inundated cells. The drastic reduction in computational time shown here enhances the ability of two-dimensional flood inundation models to be used as a near-real time flood forecasting tool, engineering, design tool, or planning tool. Perhaps even of greater significance, the reduction in computation time makes the incorporation of risk and uncertainty/ensemble forecasting more feasible for flood inundation modeling (NRC 2000; Sayers et al

  6. High rate particle tracking and ultra-fast timing with a thin hybrid silicon pixel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorini, M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Carassiti, V.; Ceccucci, A.; Cortina Gil, E.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; Dellacasa, G.; Garbolino, S.; Jarron, P.; Kaplon, J.; Kluge, A.; Marchetto, F.; Mapelli, A.; Martin, E.; Mazza, G.; Morel, M.; Noy, M.; Nuessle, G.; Perktold, L.; Petagna, P.; Petrucci, F.; Poltorak, K.; Riedler, P.; Rivetti, A.; Statera, M.; Velghe, B.

    2013-08-01

    The Gigatracker (GTK) is a hybrid silicon pixel detector designed for the NA62 experiment at CERN. The beam spectrometer, made of three GTK stations, has to sustain high and non-uniform particle rate (∼ 1 GHz in total) and measure momentum and angles of each beam track with a combined time resolution of 150 ps. In order to reduce multiple scattering and hadronic interactions of beam particles, the material budget of a single GTK station has been fixed to 0.5% X0. The expected fluence for 100 days of running is 2 ×1014 1 MeV neq /cm2, comparable to the one foreseen in the inner trackers of LHC detectors during 10 years of operation. To comply with these requirements, an efficient and very low-mass (< 0.15 %X0) cooling system is being constructed, using a novel microchannel cooling silicon plate. Two complementary read-out architectures have been produced as small-scale prototypes: one is based on a Time-over-Threshold circuit followed by a TDC shared by a group of pixels, while the other makes use of a constant-fraction discriminator followed by an on-pixel TDC. The read-out ASICs are produced in 130 nm IBM CMOS technology and will be thinned down to 100 μm or less. An overview of the Gigatracker detector system will be presented. Experimental results from laboratory and beam tests of prototype bump-bonded assemblies will be described as well. These results show a time resolution of about 170 ps for single hits from minimum ionizing particles, using 200 μm thick silicon sensors.

  7. Faraday caustics. Singularities in the Faraday spectrum and their utility as probes of magnetic field properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, M. R.; Junklewitz, H.; Enßlin, T. A.

    2011-11-01

    We describe singularities in the distribution of polarized intensity as a function of Faraday depth (i.e. the Faraday spectrum) caused by line-of-sight (LOS) magnetic field reversals. We call these features Faraday caustics because of their similarity to optical caustics. They appear as sharply peaked and asymmetric profiles in the Faraday spectrum, that have a tail that extends to one side. The direction in which the tail extends depends on the way in which the LOS magnetic field reversal occurs (either changing from oncoming to retreating or vice versa). We describe how Faraday caustics will form three-dimensional surfaces that relate to boundaries between regions where the LOS magnetic field has opposite polarity. We present examples from simulations of the predicted polarized synchrotron emission from the Milky Way. We derive either the probability or luminosity distribution of Faraday caustics produced in a Gaussian magnetic field distribution as a function of their strength, ℱ, and find that for strong Faraday caustics P(ℱ) ∝ ℱ-3. If fully resolved, this distribution is also shown to depend on the Taylor microscale, which relates to the largest scale over which dissipation is important in a turbulent flow.

  8. Faraday waves under time-reversed excitation.

    PubMed

    Pietschmann, Dirk; Stannarius, Ralf; Wagner, Christian; John, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    Do parametrically driven systems distinguish periodic excitations that are time mirrors of each other? Faraday waves in a Newtonian fluid are studied under excitation with superimposed harmonic wave forms. We demonstrate that the threshold parameters for the stability of the ground state are insensitive to a time inversion of the driving function. This is a peculiarity of some dynamic systems. The Faraday system shares this property with standard electroconvection in nematic liquid crystals [J. Heuer et al., Phys. Rev. E 78, 036218 (2008)]. In general, time inversion of the excitation affects the asymptotic stability of a parametrically driven system, even when it is described by linear ordinary differential equations. Obviously, the observed symmetry has to be attributed to the particular structure of the underlying differential equation system. The pattern selection of the Faraday waves above threshold, on the other hand, discriminates between time-mirrored excitation functions.

  9. Mode-locking via dissipative Faraday instability.

    PubMed

    Tarasov, Nikita; Perego, Auro M; Churkin, Dmitry V; Staliunas, Kestutis; Turitsyn, Sergei K

    2016-08-09

    Emergence of coherent structures and patterns at the nonlinear stage of modulation instability of a uniform state is an inherent feature of many biological, physical and engineering systems. There are several well-studied classical modulation instabilities, such as Benjamin-Feir, Turing and Faraday instability, which play a critical role in the self-organization of energy and matter in non-equilibrium physical, chemical and biological systems. Here we experimentally demonstrate the dissipative Faraday instability induced by spatially periodic zig-zag modulation of a dissipative parameter of the system-spectrally dependent losses-achieving generation of temporal patterns and high-harmonic mode-locking in a fibre laser. We demonstrate features of this instability that distinguish it from both the Benjamin-Feir and the purely dispersive Faraday instability. Our results open the possibilities for new designs of mode-locked lasers and can be extended to other fields of physics and engineering.

  10. Calibrated Faraday Current And Magnetic Field Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neyer, B. T.; Chang, J.; Ruggles, L. E.

    1986-01-01

    We have developed a calibrated optical fiber Faraday rotation current sensor. A strong magnetic field in an optical fiber introduces circular birefringence, causing the plane of polarization of light to rotate by an amount proportional to the magnetic field. Faraday loops used in the past were nonlinear due to the stress-induced linear birefringence caused by bending the loop. This linear birefringence interfered with the Faraday rotation, yielding a complicated relationship between the current and detected light signal. We have found a way to overcome the effects of the unwanted linear birefringence and produce a calibrated current waveform. The calibration is limited only by the accurate knowledge of the Verdet constant of the optical fiber. Results of recent experiments as well as planned measurements will be presented.

  11. Mode-locking via dissipative Faraday instability

    PubMed Central

    Tarasov, Nikita; Perego, Auro M.; Churkin, Dmitry V.; Staliunas, Kestutis; Turitsyn, Sergei K.

    2016-01-01

    Emergence of coherent structures and patterns at the nonlinear stage of modulation instability of a uniform state is an inherent feature of many biological, physical and engineering systems. There are several well-studied classical modulation instabilities, such as Benjamin–Feir, Turing and Faraday instability, which play a critical role in the self-organization of energy and matter in non-equilibrium physical, chemical and biological systems. Here we experimentally demonstrate the dissipative Faraday instability induced by spatially periodic zig-zag modulation of a dissipative parameter of the system—spectrally dependent losses—achieving generation of temporal patterns and high-harmonic mode-locking in a fibre laser. We demonstrate features of this instability that distinguish it from both the Benjamin–Feir and the purely dispersive Faraday instability. Our results open the possibilities for new designs of mode-locked lasers and can be extended to other fields of physics and engineering. PMID:27503708

  12. Mode-locking via dissipative Faraday instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, Nikita; Perego, Auro M.; Churkin, Dmitry V.; Staliunas, Kestutis; Turitsyn, Sergei K.

    2016-08-01

    Emergence of coherent structures and patterns at the nonlinear stage of modulation instability of a uniform state is an inherent feature of many biological, physical and engineering systems. There are several well-studied classical modulation instabilities, such as Benjamin-Feir, Turing and Faraday instability, which play a critical role in the self-organization of energy and matter in non-equilibrium physical, chemical and biological systems. Here we experimentally demonstrate the dissipative Faraday instability induced by spatially periodic zig-zag modulation of a dissipative parameter of the system--spectrally dependent losses--achieving generation of temporal patterns and high-harmonic mode-locking in a fibre laser. We demonstrate features of this instability that distinguish it from both the Benjamin-Feir and the purely dispersive Faraday instability. Our results open the possibilities for new designs of mode-locked lasers and can be extended to other fields of physics and engineering.

  13. Faraday polarization fluctuations of satellite beacon signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M. C.; Klobuchar, J. A.

    1988-01-01

    The anisotropic effects of random density irregularities in causing Faraday polarization fluctuations of VHF radio signals are examined, taking both rod-like and sheet-like irregularities into consideration. It is found that the variance of Faraday polarization fluctuations depends on the ratio of perpendicular to parallel correlation lengths. The anisotropic effect of rod-like ionospheric irregularities are shown to be most appreciable for longitudinal propagation. The anisotropic effect of sheet-like ionospheric irregularities, however, is not strongly dependent on the radio propagation angle. During transionospheric propagation at large angles with respect to the geomagnetic field, sheet-like irregularities may cause greater Faraday polarization fluctuations than rod-like irregularities.

  14. Fast, automatic, and accurate catheter reconstruction in HDR brachytherapy using an electromagnetic 3D tracking system

    SciTech Connect

    Poulin, Eric; Racine, Emmanuel; Beaulieu, Luc; Binnekamp, Dirk

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: In high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR-B), current catheter reconstruction protocols are relatively slow and error prone. The purpose of this technical note is to evaluate the accuracy and the robustness of an electromagnetic (EM) tracking system for automated and real-time catheter reconstruction. Methods: For this preclinical study, a total of ten catheters were inserted in gelatin phantoms with different trajectories. Catheters were reconstructed using a 18G biopsy needle, used as an EM stylet and equipped with a miniaturized sensor, and the second generation Aurora{sup ®} Planar Field Generator from Northern Digital Inc. The Aurora EM system provides position and orientation value with precisions of 0.7 mm and 0.2°, respectively. Phantoms were also scanned using a μCT (GE Healthcare) and Philips Big Bore clinical computed tomography (CT) system with a spatial resolution of 89 μm and 2 mm, respectively. Reconstructions using the EM stylet were compared to μCT and CT. To assess the robustness of the EM reconstruction, five catheters were reconstructed twice and compared. Results: Reconstruction time for one catheter was 10 s, leading to a total reconstruction time inferior to 3 min for a typical 17-catheter implant. When compared to the μCT, the mean EM tip identification error was 0.69 ± 0.29 mm while the CT error was 1.08 ± 0.67 mm. The mean 3D distance error was found to be 0.66 ± 0.33 mm and 1.08 ± 0.72 mm for the EM and CT, respectively. EM 3D catheter trajectories were found to be more accurate. A maximum difference of less than 0.6 mm was found between successive EM reconstructions. Conclusions: The EM reconstruction was found to be more accurate and precise than the conventional methods used for catheter reconstruction in HDR-B. This approach can be applied to any type of catheters and applicators.

  15. Rapid determination of Faraday rotation in optical glasses by means of secondary Faraday modulator.

    PubMed

    Sofronie, M; Elisa, M; Sava, B A; Boroica, L; Valeanu, M; Kuncser, V

    2015-05-01

    A rapid high sensitive method for determining the Faraday rotation of optical glasses is proposed. Starting from an experimental setup based on a Faraday rod coupled to a lock-in amplifier in the detection chain, two methodologies were developed for providing reliable results on samples presenting low and large Faraday rotations. The proposed methodologies were critically discussed and compared, via results obtained in transmission geometry, on a new series of aluminophosphate glasses with or without rare-earth doping ions. An example on how the method can be used for a rapid examination of the optical homogeneity of the sample with respect to magneto-optical effects is also provided.

  16. Comparison between two different selective spinal anesthesia techniques in ambulatory knee arthroscopy as fast-track anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Ali Hassan, Hossam Ibrahim Eldesuky

    2015-01-01

    Background: There were several studies using either low dose Bupivacaine as unilateral selective spinal anesthesia (SSA) or low dose lidocaine SSA for ambulatory knee arthroscopy. There were many concerns about high failure rate, complications, and different times to home readiness discharges. Aim of the Study: The study aimed to: (1) Compare the clinical efficacy and side effects of two different techniques of SSA in subarachnoid block for ambulatory knee arthroscopy (2) evaluate the possibility of a shorter stay in post-anesthesia care unit (PACU) or eligibility for fast tracking anesthesia (bypassing PACU) after SSA and numbers of patient bypassed PACU (3) compare the time to ambulate and time to home readiness. Patients and Methods: Prospective, randomized and open study was conducted, including 50 outpatients undergoing knee arthroscopy. Patients allocated into two groups: Bupivacaine group (group B); was injected with 3 mg bupivacaine and 10 ug fentanyl intrathecally in lateral decubitus position and remained for 20 min then supine position. Lidocaine group (group L) was injected with 20 mg lidocaine, plus 25 ug fentanyl intrathecally and immediately keeps in the supine position after injection. The quality and durations of motor and sensory block were compared between groups. Sensory block assessed by pin brick method and motor block assessed by Bromage scale. Time spent in PACU, the time to ambulate, and times to home-readiness were compared. Number of patients bypassed PACU was recorded. Side effects as pain, nausea, vomiting, postdural puncture headache, transient neurological symptoms, retention of urine and pruritus were evaluated and compared after SSA. Results: Bupivacaine group provided unilateral spinal anesthesia with significantly longer duration of both motor and sensory blocks than bilateral spinal of lidocaine group P < 0.001 and P < 0.01 respectively. The upper dermatomal height of sensory block reached was T9 and T8 in groups B and L

  17. Comparison between two different selective spinal anesthesia techniques in ambulatory knee arthroscopy as fast-track anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Ali Hassan, Hossam Ibrahim Eldesuky

    2015-01-01

    There were several studies using either low dose Bupivacaine as unilateral selective spinal anesthesia (SSA) or low dose lidocaine SSA for ambulatory knee arthroscopy. There were many concerns about high failure rate, complications, and different times to home readiness discharges. The study aimed to: (1) Compare the clinical efficacy and side effects of two different techniques of SSA in subarachnoid block for ambulatory knee arthroscopy (2) evaluate the possibility of a shorter stay in post-anesthesia care unit (PACU) or eligibility for fast tracking anesthesia (bypassing PACU) after SSA and numbers of patient bypassed PACU (3) compare the time to ambulate and time to home readiness. Prospective, randomized and open study was conducted, including 50 outpatients undergoing knee arthroscopy. Patients allocated into two groups: Bupivacaine group (group B); was injected with 3 mg bupivacaine and 10 ug fentanyl intrathecally in lateral decubitus position and remained for 20 min then supine position. Lidocaine group (group L) was injected with 20 mg lidocaine, plus 25 ug fentanyl intrathecally and immediately keeps in the supine position after injection. The quality and durations of motor and sensory block were compared between groups. Sensory block assessed by pin brick method and motor block assessed by Bromage scale. Time spent in PACU, the time to ambulate, and times to home-readiness were compared. Number of patients bypassed PACU was recorded. Side effects as pain, nausea, vomiting, postdural puncture headache, transient neurological symptoms, retention of urine and pruritus were evaluated and compared after SSA. Bupivacaine group provided unilateral spinal anesthesia with significantly longer duration of both motor and sensory blocks than bilateral spinal of lidocaine group P < 0.001 and P < 0.01 respectively. The upper dermatomal height of sensory block reached was T9 and T8 in groups B and L respectively. Group B showed more intense motor block than group L

  18. Monitoring Fast-Moving Landslide in the Three Gorges Area By Offset Tracking Method with High-Resolution SAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, M.; Shi, X.; Zhang, L.; Balz, T.

    2014-12-01

    Landslide has long been considered as a major geological hazard with great threats to local residents and social economic developments within the Three Gorges area, China. With the regular operation of Three Gorges Dam since 2009, the reservoir water level undergoes an annual cycle from 145 m in early summer to 175 m in early winter caused by storage and discharge operations. Consequently, many ancient landslides were activated by such large variations of water level. One of typical examples is the famous Shuping landslide located in Zigui County. To reduce the risks of landslide collapse, long-term monitoring of ground surface deformation must be carried out. Terrestrial surveillance like GPS and extensometer have been installed at Shuping in 2003. Although these methods can achieve highly accurate displacement measurements, only sparse points can be observed, which is far from the requirement of monitoring vast reservoir area coverage. For such a vast and inaccessible area, D-InSAR and PS-InSAR can measure long-term and continuous displacement trends. Nevertheless, it has been revealed by several studies that InSAR can hardly retrieve accurate deformation signal on fast-moving landslides such as Shuping. Therefore, we further investigated the feasibility and effectiveness of pixel offset tracking (POT) method to detect fast-moving with high-resolution SAR data. One of the key points is to estimate displacement at each pixel through subpixel-level SAR image matching. In order to tackle the difficulties of using traditional POT technique, the point-like target offset tracking (PTOT) is developed. By making use of point-like targets with stable backscattering behavior over long time span, PTOT method is can achieve more reliable results with accuracies at 1/20 of SAR pixel resolution. More importantly, PTOT method can measure two-dimensional displacements, i.e. in both azimuth and slant range direction, while InSAR can measure displacement only along the line

  19. A potassium Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yin, B.; Shay, T. M.

    1992-01-01

    The characteristics of a potassium Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter operating on the blue and near infrared transitions are calculated. The results show that the filter can be designed to provide high transmission, very narrow pass bandwidth, and low equivalent noise bandwidth. The Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter (FADOF) provides a narrow pass bandwidth (about GHz) optical filter for laser communications, remote sensing, and lidar. The general theoretical model for the FADOF has been established in our previous paper. In this paper, we have identified the optimum operational conditions for a potassium FADOF operating on the blue and infrared transitions. The signal transmission, bandwidth, and equivalent noise bandwidth (ENBW) are also calculated.

  20. School outcomes of aggressive-disruptive children: prediction from kindergarten risk factors and impact of the fast track prevention program.

    PubMed

    Bierman, Karen L; Coie, John; Dodge, Kenneth; Greenberg, Mark; Lochman, John; McMohan, Robert; Pinderhughes, Ellen

    2013-01-01

    A multi-gate screening process identified 891 children with aggressive-disruptive behavior problems at school entry. Fast Track provided a multi-component preventive intervention in the context of a randomized-controlled design. In addition to psychosocial support and skill training for parents and children, the intervention included intensive reading tutoring in first grade, behavioral management consultation with teachers, and the provision of homework support (as needed) through tenth grade. This study examined the impact of the intervention, as well as the impact of the child's initial aggressive-disruptive behaviors and associated school readiness skills (cognitive ability, reading readiness, attention problems) on academic progress and educational placements during elementary school (Grades 1-4) and during the secondary school years (Grades 7-10), as well as high school graduation. Child behavior problems and skills at school entry predicted school difficulties (low grades, grade retention, placement in a self-contained classroom, behavior disorder classification, and failure to graduate). Disappointingly, intervention did not significantly improve these long-term school outcomes. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Rapid and complete hitless defragmentation method using a coherent RX LO with fast wavelength tracking in elastic optical networks.

    PubMed

    Proietti, Roberto; Qin, Chuan; Guan, Binbin; Yin, Yawei; Scott, Ryan P; Yu, Runxiang; Yoo, S J B

    2012-11-19

    This paper demonstrates a rapid and full hitless defragmentation method in elastic optical networks exploiting a new technique for fast wavelength tracking in coherent receivers. This technique can be applied to a single-carrier connection or each of the subcarriers forming a super-channel. A proof-of-concept demonstration shows hitless defragmentation of a 10 Gb/s QPSK single-carrier connection from 1547.75 nm to 1550.1 nm in less than 1 µs. This was obtained using a small (0.625 kB) link-layer transmitter buffer without the need for any additional transponder. We also demonstrated that the proposed defragmentation technique is capable of hopping over an existing connection, i.e. 10 Gb/s OOK at 1548.5 nm, without causing any degradation of its real-time Bit Error Rate (BER) value. The proposed scheme gives advantages in terms of overall network blocking probability reduction up to a factor of 40.

  2. School Outcomes of Aggressive-Disruptive Children: Prediction From Kindergarten Risk Factors and Impact of the Fast Track Prevention Program

    PubMed Central

    Bierman, Karen L.; Coie, John; Dodge, Kenneth; Greenberg, Mark; Lochman, John; McMohan, Robert; Pinderhughes, Ellen

    2013-01-01

    A multi-gate screening process identified 891 children with aggressive-disruptive behavior problems at school entry. Fast Track provided a multi-component preventive intervention in the context of a randomized-controlled design. In addition to psychosocial support and skill training for parents and children, the intervention included intensive reading tutoring in first grade, behavioral management consultation with teachers, and the provision of homework support (as needed) through tenth grade. This study examined the impact of the intervention, as well as the impact of the child's initial aggressive-disruptive behaviors and associated school readiness skills (cognitive ability, reading readiness, attention problems) on academic progress and educational placements during elementary school (Grades 1–4) and during the secondary school years (Grades 7–10), as well as high school graduation. Child behavior problems and skills at school entry predicted school difficulties (low grades, grade retention, placement in a self-contained classroom, behavior disorder classification, and failure to graduate). Disappointingly, intervention did not significantly improve these long-term school outcomes. PMID:23386568

  3. Single-molecule tracking of tau reveals fast kiss-and-hop interaction with microtubules in living neurons.

    PubMed

    Janning, Dennis; Igaev, Maxim; Sündermann, Frederik; Brühmann, Jörg; Beutel, Oliver; Heinisch, Jürgen J; Bakota, Lidia; Piehler, Jacob; Junge, Wolfgang; Brandt, Roland

    2014-11-05

    The microtubule-associated phosphoprotein tau regulates microtubule dynamics and is involved in neurodegenerative diseases collectively called tauopathies. It is generally believed that the vast majority of tau molecules decorate axonal microtubules, thereby stabilizing them. However, it is an open question how tau can regulate microtubule dynamics without impeding microtubule-dependent transport and how tau is also available for interactions other than those with microtubules. Here we address this apparent paradox by fast single-molecule tracking of tau in living neurons and Monte Carlo simulations of tau dynamics. We find that tau dwells on a single microtubule for an unexpectedly short time of ∼40 ms before it hops to the next. This dwell time is 100-fold shorter than previously reported by ensemble measurements. Furthermore, we observed by quantitative imaging using fluorescence decay after photoactivation recordings of photoactivatable GFP-tagged tubulin that, despite this rapid dynamics, tau is capable of regulating the tubulin-microtubule balance. This indicates that tau's dwell time on microtubules is sufficiently long to influence the lifetime of a tubulin subunit in a GTP cap. Our data imply a novel kiss-and-hop mechanism by which tau promotes neuronal microtubule assembly. The rapid kiss-and-hop interaction explains why tau, although binding to microtubules, does not interfere with axonal transport.

  4. Fast-track development of an in vitro 3D lung/immune cell model to study Aspergillus infections.

    PubMed

    Chandorkar, P; Posch, W; Zaderer, V; Blatzer, M; Steger, M; Ammann, C G; Binder, U; Hermann, M; Hörtnagl, P; Lass-Flörl, C; Wilflingseder, D

    2017-09-14

    To study interactions of airborne pathogens, e.g. Aspergillus (A.) fumigatus with upper and lower respiratory tract epithelial and immune cells, we set up a perfused 3D human bronchial and small airway epithelial cell system. Culturing of normal human bronchial or small airway epithelial (NHBE, SAE) cells under air liquid interphase (ALI) and perfusion resulted in a significantly accelerated development of the lung epithelia associated with higher ciliogenesis, cilia movement, mucus-production and improved barrier function compared to growth under static conditions. Following the accelerated differentiation under perfusion, epithelial cells were transferred into static conditions and antigen-presenting cells (APCs) added to study their functionality upon infection with A. fumigatus. Fungi were efficiently sensed by apically applied macrophages or basolaterally adhered dendritic cells (DCs), as illustrated by phagocytosis, maturation and migration characteristics. We illustrate here that perfusion greatly improves differentiation of primary epithelial cells in vitro, which enables fast-track addition of primary immune cells and significant shortening of experimental procedures. Additionally, co-cultured primary DCs and macrophages were fully functional and fulfilled their tasks of sensing and sampling fungal pathogens present at the apical surface of epithelial cells, thereby promoting novel possibilities to study airborne infections under conditions mimicking the in vivo situation.

  5. The Minus Sign in Faraday's Law Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Sullivan, Colm; Hurley, Donal

    2013-01-01

    By introducing the mathematical concept of orientation, the significance of the minus sign in Faraday's law may be made clear to students with some knowledge of vector calculus. For many students, however, the traditional approach of treating the law as a relationship between positive scalars and of relying on Lenz's law to provide the information…

  6. Fiber optic, Faraday rotation current sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Veeser, L.R.; Day, G.W.

    1986-01-01

    At the Second Megagauss Conference in 1979, there were reports of experiments that used the Faraday magneto-optic effect in a glass rod to measure large electric current pulses or magnetic fields. Since then we have seen the development of single-mode optical fibers that can carry polarized light in a closed loop around a current load. A fiber optic Faraday rotation sensor will integrate the flux, instead of sampling it at a discrete point, to get a measurement independent of the current distribution. Early Faraday rotation experiments using optical fibers to measure currents dealt with problems such as fiber birefringence and difficulties in launching light into the tiny fiber cores. We have built on those experiments, working to reduce the effects of shocks and obtaining higher bandwidths, absolute calibration, and computerized recording and data analysis, to develop the Faraday rotation sensors into a routine current diagnostic. For large current pulses we find reduced sensitivity to electromagnetic interference and other backgrounds than for Rogowski loops; often the fiber optic sensors are useful where conductive probes cannot be used at all. In this paper we describe the fiber optic sensors and some practical matters involved in fielding them.

  7. The Minus Sign in Faraday's Law Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Sullivan, Colm; Hurley, Donal

    2013-01-01

    By introducing the mathematical concept of orientation, the significance of the minus sign in Faraday's law may be made clear to students with some knowledge of vector calculus. For many students, however, the traditional approach of treating the law as a relationship between positive scalars and of relying on Lenz's law to provide the information…

  8. Reflections of a Faraday Challenge Day Leader

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sewell, Keira

    2014-01-01

    Keira Sewell has just finished her second year as a Challenge Leader for the Faraday Challenge, a STEM-based scheme run by the Institution of Engineering and Technology. Aimed at 12-13 year-old students, its purpose is to engage students in future careers in engineering. Each year, a new challenge is held in over sixty schools and universities…

  9. QUANTUM ELECTRONIC DEVICES: Cryogenic Faraday isolator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheleznov, D. S.; Zelenogorskii, V. V.; Katin, E. V.; Mukhin, I. B.; Palashov, O. V.; Khazanov, Efim A.

    2010-05-01

    A Faraday isolator is described in which thermal effects are suppressed by cooling down to liquid nitrogen temperatures. The principal scheme, main characteristics and modifications of the isolator are presented. The isolation degree is studied experimentally for the subkilowatt average laser radiation power. It is shown that the isolator can be used at radiation powers up to tens of kilowatts.

  10. Reflections of a Faraday Challenge Day Leader

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sewell, Keira

    2014-01-01

    Keira Sewell has just finished her second year as a Challenge Leader for the Faraday Challenge, a STEM-based scheme run by the Institution of Engineering and Technology. Aimed at 12-13 year-old students, its purpose is to engage students in future careers in engineering. Each year, a new challenge is held in over sixty schools and universities…

  11. Faraday current sensing employing chromatic modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, G. R.; Li, G.; Spencer, J. W.; Aspey, R. A.; Kong, M. G.

    1998-01-01

    Faraday current sensors using a variety of sensing elements have been investigated extensively for their high sensitivity as well as other advantages [G.L. Lewis et al., Proc. IEE Conf. on The Reliability of Transmission and Distribution Equipment, 1995; Y.N. Ning et al., Optics Lett. 16 (1991); C.M.M. van den Tempel, Appl. Optics 32 (1993)]. Concurrently chromatic modulation techniques have been investigated at the University of Liverpool for use with optical fibre sensors of different types [N.A. Pilling, Ph.D. Thesis, 1992; M.M. Murphy, Ph.D. Thesis, 1991] including Faraday current sensing, for overcoming difficulties with non-referenced intensity modulation systems. In this contribution a brief discussion of the scope of chromatically based Faraday current sensing with particular regard to electric power transmission and distribution industries is given. A novel sensor based upon a Faraday glass block in combination with a BSO crystal in the sensing element is described. The sensor takes advantage of the natural gyrotropy of the BSO which conversely has been previously regarded as a disadvantage. The experimental results obtained indicate that this method offers a novel approach to improving system sensitivity. The extension of the approach from a simple bench top demonstrator to real power systems deployment is also discussed.

  12. Evidence of high-frequency/small-scale turbulence in the Cygnus region and anomalous Faraday rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, Mikhail V.

    2017-01-01

    Faraday effect - a common and useful probe of cosmic magnetic fields - is the result of magnetically-induced birefringence in plasmas causing rotation of the polarization plane of a linearly polarized electromagnetic wave. Classically, the rotation angle scales with the wavelength as Δϕ =RMλ2 , where RM is the rotation measure. Although a typical RM in the Milky Way is of the order of a few hundred to a few thousand, a famous Cygnus region shows anomalously small, even negative rotation measures. Moreover, Faraday rotation measurements seem to be inconsistent with the standard λ2-law. We argue that fast micro-turbulence can cause this anomaly. We demonstrate that electromagnetic high-frequency and/or small-scale fluctuations can lead to effective plasma collisionality by scattering electrons over pitch-angle. We show that such quasi-collisionality radically alters Faraday rotation and other radiative transport properties, e.g., absorption, transmission and reflection. Thus, we explain the Cygnus puzzle by anomalous Faraday rotation in a thin ``blanket'' of highly turbulent plasma at the front of an interstellar bubble/shock. Supported by DOE grant DE-SC0016368.

  13. Reduction in the proportion of patients with colorectal cancer presenting as an emergency following the introduction of fast-track flexible sigmoidoscopy: a three-year prospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Davies, R J; Collins, C D; Vickery, C J; Eyre-Brook, I; Welbourn, R

    2004-07-01

    We established a fast-track flexible sigmoidoscopy service to meet the two-week target for colorectal cancer, and have performed a prospective observational study over three years to assess its impact on the proportion of patients with colorectal cancer presenting as an emergency. The fast-track system was established on 1 November 1999 using six screening criteria to select high-risk patients. Data on all high-risk patients referred through the fast-track system and all patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer were recorded prospectively in two time periods: six months before fast-track (1 November 1998 to 30 April 1999, Period 1) and three years following fast-track (1 November 1999 to 31 October 2002, Period 2). In Period 2, 2294 fast-track referrals were received. A total of 635 cases (321 male, 314 female) of colorectal cancer were diagnosed in Period 2 vs. 84 cases (43 male, 41 female) in Period 1. In Period 1, 30 patients with colorectal cancer (35.7% of the total) presented as an emergency vs. 165 patients (25.9%) in Period 2 (P = 0.059, chi(2)test). Introduction of a fast-track service to meet the two-week target has resulted in a trend towards fewer emergency presentations with colorectal cancer.

  14. Fast Tracks to Intelligence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvin, W. H.

    It is often assumed that the evolution of intelligence is inevitable, given the self-organizing seen in dissapative systems and the gradual shaping-up of Darwinism. While compound-interest reasoning suggests that small advantages will eventually triumph, eventually may be a very long time: there are few examples of rapid brain growth, suggesting that "smarter-is-better" is not a potent force for evolution.

  15. On the Fast Track

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selingo, Jeffrey

    2006-01-01

    Northeastern University's continuing-education division is being rejuvenated with market research, faculty involvement, and a non-traditional approach under its new vice president Christopher E. Hopey. The college shifted its emphasis from undergraduates to graduate and certificate programs aimed at working professionals, resulting in a 20 percent…

  16. Navy Fast Track Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dessel, Norm; Mehaffy, George

    This paper discusses the critical shortage of math and science teachers in San Diego public schools and the necessary revision of the teacher preparation process to provide flexibility in expediting entry into the classroom of candidates with strong academic math/science backgrounds. U.S. Navy officers near retirement who have completed degrees in…

  17. Fast Track Reservoir Modeling of Shale Formations in the Appalachian Basin. Application to Lower Huron Shale in Eastern Kentucky

    SciTech Connect

    Grujic, Ognjen; Mohaghegh, Shahab; Bromhal, Grant

    2010-07-01

    In this paper a fast track reservoir modeling and analysis of the Lower Huron Shale in Eastern Kentucky is presented. Unlike conventional reservoir simulation and modeling which is a bottom up approach (geo-cellular model to history matching) this new approach starts by attempting to build a reservoir realization from well production history (Top to Bottom), augmented by core, well-log, well-test and seismic data in order to increase accuracy. This approach requires creation of a large spatial-temporal database that is efficiently handled with state of the art Artificial Intelligence and Data Mining techniques (AI & DM), and therefore it represents an elegant integration of reservoir engineering techniques with Artificial Intelligence and Data Mining. Advantages of this new technique are a) ease of development, b) limited data requirement (as compared to reservoir simulation), and c) speed of analysis. All of the 77 wells used in this study are completed in the Lower Huron Shale and are a part of the Big Sandy Gas field in Eastern Kentucky. Most of the wells have production profiles for more than twenty years. Porosity and thickness data was acquired from the available well logs, while permeability, natural fracture network properties, and fracture aperture data was acquired through a single well history matching process that uses the FRACGEN/NFFLOW simulator package. This technology, known as Top-Down Intelligent Reservoir Modeling, starts with performing conventional reservoir engineering analysis on individual wells such as decline curve analysis and volumetric reserves estimation. Statistical techniques along with information generated from the reservoir engineering analysis contribute to an extensive spatio-temporal database of reservoir behavior. The database is used to develop a cohesive model of the field using fuzzy pattern recognition or similar techniques. The reservoir model is calibrated (history matched) with production history from the most recently

  18. Fast tracking the molecular weight changes of humic substances in coagulation/flocculation processes via fluorescence EEM-PARAFAC.

    PubMed

    Aftab, Bilal; Hur, Jin

    2017-07-01

    The removal of a commercial humic acid (HA) and changes in its chemical composition were examined for coagulation/flocculation (C/F) processes based on jar tests using two different coagulants at a wide range of pH. ZrCl4 showed a better performance in eliminating HA than Al2SO4 with the same removal rates at lower dosages. The highest removal rates were found at a neutral pH range (5.0-6.5). The HA was further decomposed into three different humic-like components (C1, C2, and C3) by excitation emission matrix coupled with parallel factor analysis (EEM-PARAFAC). Although the removal rates of all three components generally followed those of dissolved organic carbon, the relative removals of the individual components depended on the coagulant's doses and the solution pH. The fluorescent components of five ultrafiltered size fractions of the HA revealed that the peak with a longer emission wavelength could be associated with larger sized molecules. The C1/C3 ratios of the size fractions exhibited a significant linear relationship with the logarithmic values of the average molecular weight (MW) measured by size exclusion chromatography, which made it possible to predict the HA MW value changes upon the C/F using EEM-PARAFAC alone. Irrespective of the coagulant types and the pH, larger sized HA molecules were removed to a greater extent than smaller sized fractions. The preferential removal was more pronounced for ZrCl4 versus Al2SO4 and at a neutral pH range. Our study suggests a great potential of EEM-PARAFAC in fast tracking the MW of humic substances in conventional C/F processes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Preoperative prediction of potentially preventable morbidity after fast-track hip and knee arthroplasty: a detailed descriptive cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Morten Aa; Kehlet, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Construction of a simple preoperative risk score for patients in high risk of potentially preventable ‘medical’ complications. Secondary objectives were to construct simple preoperative risk scores for ‘severe medical’, ‘surgical’ and ‘total’ potentially preventable complications. Design Prospective observational study. Setting Elective primary unilateral total hip and knee arthroplasty with prospectively collected preoperative patient characteristics; similar standardised fast-track protocols; evaluation of complications through discharge and medical records; and complete 90 days follow-up through nationwide databases. Participants 8373 consecutive unselected total hip arthroplasty (THA) and knee arthroplasty from January 2010 to November 2012. Results There were 557 procedures (6.4%) followed by potentially preventable complications resulting in hospitalisation >4 days or readmission. Of 22 preoperative characteristics, 7 were associated with 379 (4.2%) potentially preventable ‘medical’ complications. Patients with ≥2 of the following, age ≥80 years, anticoagulant therapy, pulmonary disease, pharmacologically treated psychiatric disorder, anaemia and walking aids, composed 19.1% of the procedures; 55.7% constituted potentially preventable ‘medical’ complications that were mainly falls, mobilisation issues, pneumonias and cardiac arrhythmias. The number needed to be treated for a hypothetical intervention leading to 25% reduction in potentially preventable ‘medical’ complications was 34. THA, use of walking aids and cardiac disease were associated with 189 (2.2%) ‘surgical’ complications, but no clinically relevant preoperative prediction was possible. Conclusions Preoperative identification of patients at high risk of preventable ‘medical’, but not ‘surgical’, complications is statistically possible. However, clinical relevance is limited. Future risk indices should differ between ‘medical’ and

  20. Beyond trend analysis: How a modified breakpoint analysis enhances knowledge of agricultural production after Zimbabwe's fast track land reform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hentze, Konrad; Thonfeld, Frank; Menz, Gunter

    2017-10-01

    In the discourse on land reform assessments, a significant lack of spatial and time-series data has been identified, especially with respect to Zimbabwe's ;Fast-Track Land Reform Programme; (FTLRP). At the same time, interest persists among land use change scientists to evaluate causes of land use change and therefore to increase the explanatory power of remote sensing products. This study recognizes these demands and aims to provide input on both levels: Evaluating the potential of satellite remote sensing time-series to answer questions which evolved after intensive land redistribution efforts in Zimbabwe; and investigating how time-series analysis of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) can be enhanced to provide information on land reform induced land use change. To achieve this, two time-series methods are applied to MODIS NDVI data: Seasonal Trend Analysis (STA) and Breakpoint Analysis for Additive Season and Trend (BFAST). In our first analysis, a link of agricultural productivity trends to different land tenure regimes shows that regional clustering of trends is more dominant than a relationship between tenure and trend with a slightly negative slope for all regimes. We demonstrate that clusters of strong negative and positive productivity trends are results of changing irrigation patterns. To locate emerging and fallow irrigation schemes in semi-arid Zimbabwe, a new multi-method approach is developed which allows to map changes from bimodal seasonal phenological patterns to unimodal and vice versa. With an enhanced breakpoint analysis through the combination of STA and BFAST, we are able to provide a technique that can be applied on large scale to map status and development of highly productive cropping systems, which are key for food production, national export and local employment. We therefore conclude that the combination of existing and accessible time-series analysis methods: is able to achieve both: overcoming demonstrated limitations of

  1. Role of epidural anesthesia in a fast track liver resection protocol for cirrhotic patients - results after three years of practice

    PubMed Central

    Siniscalchi, Antonio; Gamberini, Lorenzo; Bardi, Tommaso; Laici, Cristiana; Gamberini, Elisa; Francorsi, Letizia; Faenza, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the potential benefits and risks of the use of epidural anaesthesia within an enhanced recovery protocol in this specific subpopulation. METHODS A retrospective review was conducted, including all cirrhotic patients who underwent open liver resection between January 2013 and December 2015 at Bologna University Hospital. Patients with an abnormal coagulation profile contraindicating the placement of an epidural catheter were excluded from the analysis. The control group was composed by patients refusing epidural anaesthesia. RESULTS Of the 183 cirrhotic patients undergoing open liver resections, 57 had contraindications to the placement of an epidural catheter; of the remaining 126, 86 patients received general anaesthesia and 40 combined anaesthesia. The two groups presented homogeneous characteristics. Intraoperatively the metabolic data did not differ between the two groups, whilst the epidural group had a lower mean arterial pressure (P = 0.041) and received more colloid infusions (P = 0.007). Postoperative liver and kidney function did not differ significantly. Length of mechanical ventilation (P = 0.003) and hospital stay (P = 0.032) were significantly lower in the epidural group. No complications related to the epidural catheter placement or removal was recorded. CONCLUSION The use of Epidural Anaesthesia within a fast track protocol for cirrhotic patients undergoing liver resections had a positive impact on the patient’s outcomes and comfort as demonstrated by a significantly lower length of mechanical ventilation and hospital stay in the epidural group. The technique appears to be safely manageable in this fragile population even though these results need confirmation in larger studies. PMID:27660677

  2. Implementing a Comprehensive Program for the Prevention of Conduct Problems in Rural Communities: The Fast Track Experience1

    PubMed Central

    Bierman, Karen L.

    2012-01-01

    Childhood conduct problems are predictive of a number of serious long-term difficulties (e.g., school failure, delinquent behavior, and mental health problems), making the design of effective prevention programs a priority. The Fast Track Program is a demonstration project currently underway in four demographically diverse areas of the United States, testing the feasibility and effectiveness of a comprehensive, multicomponent prevention program targeting children at risk for conduct disorders. This paper describes some lessons learned about the implementation of this program in a rural area. Although there are many areas of commonality in terms of program needs, program design, and implementation issues in rural and urban sites, rural areas differ from urban areas along the dimensions of geographical dispersion and regionalism, and community stability and insularity. Rural programs must cover a broad geographical area and must be sensitive to the multiple, small and regional communities that constitute their service area. Small schools, homogeneous populations, traditional values, limited recreational, educational and mental health services, and politically conservative climates are all more likely to emerge as characteristics of rural rather than urban sites (Sherman, 1992). These characteristics may both pose particular challenges to the implementation of prevention programs in rural areas, as well as offer particular benefits. Three aspects of program implementation are described in detail: (a) community entry and program initiation in rural areas, (b) the adaptation of program components and service delivery to meet the needs of rural families and schools, and (c) issues in administrative organization of a broadly dispersed tricounty rural prevention program. PMID:9338956

  3. Pioneer 6: Measurement of Transient Faraday Rotation Phenomena Observed during Solar Occultation.

    PubMed

    Levy, G S; Sato, T; Seidel, B L; Stelzried, C T; Ohlson, J E; Rusch, W V

    1969-10-31

    Pioneer 6, which was launched into orbit around the sun on 16 December 1965, was occulted by the sun in the last half of November 1968. During the period in which the spacecraft was occulted by the solar corona, the S-band telemetry carrier underwent Faraday rotation as a result of this anisotropic plasma. The NASA-Jet Propulsion Laboratory 210-foot (64-meter) antenna of the Deep Space Network at Barstow, California, which was equipped with an automatic polarization tracking system, was used to measure this effect. Three large-scale transient phenomena were observed. The measurement of these phenomena indicated that Faraday rotation on the order of 40 degrees occurred. The duration of each phenomenon was approximately 2 hours. These phenomena appear to be correlated with observations of solar radio bursts with wavelengths in the dekametric region.

  4. Growth, Faraday and inverse Faraday characteristics of Tb2Ti2O7 crystal.

    PubMed

    Guo, Feiyun; Sun, Yilin; Yang, Xiongsheng; Chen, Xin; Zhao, Bin; Zhuang, Naifeng; Chen, Jianzhong

    2016-03-21

    Tb2Ti2O7 (TTO) single crystal with dimensions of 20 × 20 × 16 mm3 was grown by the Czochralski method. Rietveld structure refinement of X-ray diffraction (XRD) data confirms that the compound crystallizes in the cubic system with pyrochlore structure. Transmission spectra, Magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) spectra, Faraday and inverse Faraday characteristics of TTO crystal have been measured and analyzed in detail. The results demonstrate that TTO crystal has high transmittance at 700-1400 nm waveband and a larger Verdat constant than that of TGG reported. Magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) spectra showed that the 4f→4f transitions of Tb3+ have significant contributions to the magneto-optical activity (MOA). In the time-resolved pump-probe spectroscopy, the rotation signals of the probe beam based on the inverse Faraday effect in magneto-optical crystal were observed at zero time delay, the full width at half maximum of the rotation and ellipticity signals can be as fast as ~500 fs, which indicates that TTO crystal can be a promising material for ultrafast all-optical magnetic switching.

  5. Faraday-Michelson system for quantum cryptography.

    PubMed

    Mo, Xiao-Fan; Zhu, Bing; Han, Zheng-Fu; Gui, You-Zhen; Guo, Guang-Can

    2005-10-01

    Quantum key distribution provides unconditional security for communication. Unfortunately, current experimental schemes are not suitable for long-distance fiber transmission because of phase drift or Rayleigh backscattering. In this Letter we present a unidirectional intrinsically stable scheme that is based on Michelson-Faraday interferometers, in which ordinary mirrors are replaced with 90 degree Faraday mirrors. With the scheme, a demonstration setup was built and excellent stability of interference fringe visibility was achieved over a fiber length of 175 km. Through a 125 km long commercial communication fiber cable between Beijing and Tianjin, the key exchange was performed with a quantum bit-error rate of less than 6%, which is to our knowledge the longest reported quantum key distribution experiment under field conditions.

  6. In-vacuum Faraday isolation remote tuning.

    PubMed

    Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Antonucci, F; Aoudia, S; Arun, K G; Astone, P; Ballardin, G; Barone, F; Barsuglia, M; Bauer, Th S; Beker, M G; Bigotta, S; Birindelli, S; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Blom, M; Boccara, C; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bosi, L; Braccini, S; Bradaschia, C; Brillet, A; Brisson; Budzynski, R; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buskulic, D; Cagnoli, G; Calloni, E; Campagna, E; Canuel, B; Carbognani, F; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cesarini, E; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chincarini, A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Colacino, C N; Colas, J; Colla, A; Colombini, M; Corda, C; Corsi, A; Coulon, J-P; Cuoco, E; D'Antonio, S; Dari, A; Dattilo, V; Davier, M; Day, R; De Rosa, R; del Prete, M; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Emilio, M Di Paolo; Di Virgilio, A; Dietz, A; Drago, M; Fafone, V; Ferrante, I; Fidecaro, F; Fiori, I; Flaminio, R; Fournier, J-D; Franc, J; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Freise, A; Gammaitoni, L; Garufi, F; Gemme, G; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Giazotto, A; Gouaty, R; Granata, M; Greverie, C; Guidi, G M; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hild, S; Huet, D; Jaranowski, P; Kowalska, I; Królak, A; La Penna, P; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Li, T G F; Lorenzini, M; Loriette, V; Losurdo, G; Mackowski, J M; Majorana, E; Man, N; Mantovani, M; Marchesoni, F; Marion, F; Marque, J; Martelli, F; Masserot, A; Michel, C; Milano, L; Minenkov, Y; Mohan, M; Moreau, J; Morgado, N; Morgia, A; Mosca, S; Moscatelli, V; Mours, B; Neri, I; Nocera, F; Pagliaroli, G; Palladino, L; Palomba, C; Paoletti, F; Pardi, S; Parisi, M; Pasqualetti, A; Passaquieti, R; Passuello, D; Persichetti, G; Pichot, M; Piergiovanni, F; Pietka, M; Pinard, L; Poggiani, R; Prato, M; Prodi, G A; Punturo, M; Puppo, P; Rabaste, O; Rabeling, D S; Rapagnani, P; Re, V; Regimbau, T; Ricci, F; Robinet, F; Rocchi, A; Rolland, L; Romano, R; Rosińska, D; Ruggi, P; Sassolas, B; Sentenac, D; Sturani, R; Swinkels, B; Toncelli, A; Tonelli, M; Tournefier, E; Travasso, F; Trummer, J; Vajentei, G; van den Brand, J F J; van der Putten, S; Vavoulidis, M; Vedovato, G; Verkindt, D; Vetrano, F; Viceré, A; Vinet, J-Y; Vocca, H; Was, M; Yvert, M

    2010-09-01

    In-vacuum Faraday isolators (FIs) are used in gravitational wave interferometers to prevent the disturbance caused by light reflected back to the input port from the interferometer itself. The efficiency of the optical isolation is becoming more critical with the increase of laser input power. An in-vacuum FI, used in a gravitational wave experiment (Virgo), has a 20 mm clear aperture and is illuminated by an almost 20 W incoming beam, having a diameter of about 5 mm. When going in vacuum at 10(-6) mbar, a degradation of the isolation exceeding 10 dB was observed. A remotely controlled system using a motorized lambda=2 waveplate inserted between the first polarizer and the Faraday rotator has proven its capability to restore the optical isolation to a value close to the one set up in air.

  7. On intracluster Faraday rotation. II - Statistical analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawler, J. M.; Dennison, B.

    1982-01-01

    The comparison of a reliable sample of radio source Faraday rotation measurements seen through rich clusters of galaxies, with sources seen through the outer parts of clusters and therefore having little intracluster Faraday rotation, indicates that the distribution of rotation in the former population is broadened, but only at the 80% level of statistical confidence. Employing a physical model for the intracluster medium in which the square root of magnetic field strength/turbulent cell per gas core radius number ratio equals approximately 0.07 microgauss, a Monte Carlo simulation is able to reproduce the observed broadening. An upper-limit analysis figure of less than 0.20 microgauss for the field strength/turbulent cell ratio, combined with lower limits on field strength imposed by limitations on the Compton-scattered flux, shows that intracluster magnetic fields must be tangled on scales greater than about 20 kpc.

  8. Faraday's first dynamo: An alternate analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redinz, José Arnaldo

    2015-02-01

    The steady-state charge densities, electric potential, and current densities are determined analytically in the case of the first dynamo created by Michael Faraday, which consists of a conducting disk rotating between the poles of an off-axis permanent magnet. The results obtained are compared with another work that considered the same problem using a different approach. We also obtain analytical expressions for the total current on the disk and for the dynamo's electromotive force.

  9. MUSIC for Faraday rotation measure synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrecut, M.

    2013-03-01

    Faraday rotation measure (RM) synthesis requires the recovery of the Faraday dispersion function (FDF) from measurements restricted to limited wavelength ranges, which is an ill-conditioned deconvolution problem. Here, we propose a novel deconvolution method based on an extension of the MUltiple SIgnal Classification (MUSIC) algorithm. The complexity and speed of the method is determined by the eigen-decomposition of the covariance matrix of the observed polarizations. We show numerically that for high to moderate signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) cases the RM-MUSIC method is able to recover the Faraday depth values of closely spaced pairs of thin RM components, even in situations where the peak response of the FDF is outside of the RM range between the two input RM components. This result is particularly important because the standard deconvolution approach based on RM-CLEAN fails systematically in such situations, due to its greedy mechanism used to extract the RM components. For low S/N situations, both the RM-MUSIC and RM-CLEAN methods provide similar results.

  10. Midplane Faraday Rotation: A densitometer for BPX

    SciTech Connect

    Jobes, F.C.; Mansfield, D.K.

    1992-02-01

    The density in a high field, high density tokamak such as BPX can be determined by measuring the Faraday rotation of a 10.6 {mu}m laser directed tangent to the toroidal field. If there is a horizontal array of such beams, then n{sub e}(R) can be readily obtained with a simple Abel version about the center line of the tokamak. For BPX operated at full field and density, the rotation angle would be quite large -- about 75{degrees} per pass. A layout in which a single laser beam is fanned out in the horizontal midplane of the tokamak, with a set of retroreflectors on the far side of the vacuum vessel, would provide good spatial resolution, depending only upon the number of reflectors. With this proposed layout, only one window would be needed. Because the rotation angle is never more than 1 ``fringe,`` the data is always good, and it is also a continuous measurement in time. Faraday rotation is dependent only upon the plasma itself, and thus is not sensitive to vibration of the optical components. Simulations of the expected results show that BPX would be well served even at low densities by a Midplane Faraday Rotation densitometer of {approximately}64 channels. Both TFTR and PBX-M would be suitable test beds for the BPX system.

  11. Midplane Faraday Rotation: A densitometer for BPX

    SciTech Connect

    Jobes, F.C.; Mansfield, D.K.

    1992-02-01

    The density in a high field, high density tokamak such as BPX can be determined by measuring the Faraday rotation of a 10.6 {mu}m laser directed tangent to the toroidal field. If there is a horizontal array of such beams, then n{sub e}(R) can be readily obtained with a simple Abel version about the center line of the tokamak. For BPX operated at full field and density, the rotation angle would be quite large -- about 75{degrees} per pass. A layout in which a single laser beam is fanned out in the horizontal midplane of the tokamak, with a set of retroreflectors on the far side of the vacuum vessel, would provide good spatial resolution, depending only upon the number of reflectors. With this proposed layout, only one window would be needed. Because the rotation angle is never more than 1 fringe,'' the data is always good, and it is also a continuous measurement in time. Faraday rotation is dependent only upon the plasma itself, and thus is not sensitive to vibration of the optical components. Simulations of the expected results show that BPX would be well served even at low densities by a Midplane Faraday Rotation densitometer of {approximately}64 channels. Both TFTR and PBX-M would be suitable test beds for the BPX system.

  12. Two-dimensional Faraday instability with a spatially periodic bottom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perinet, Nicolas; Falcon, Claudio; Shin, Seungwon; Chergui, Jalel; Juric, Damir

    2014-11-01

    We study two-dimensional Faraday waves in a channel with rectangular obstacles on the lower boundary, varying the height and the length of the obstacles as well as the distance separating them to understand their influence on the wave patterns. The analysis is mainly numerical and performed by means of BLUE, a code based on a hybrid Front-Tracking/Level-set algorithm for Lagrangian tracking of arbitrarily deformable phase interfaces. In the absence of obstacles, the bifurcation diagram shows three distinct instabilities: the classical instability that leads to the formation of patterns, the sudden onset of temporal chaos and finally a high jump in the amplitude of the waves, the latter bifurcation showing hysteresis. We show that the presence of obstacles delays the primary threshold, inhibits the secondary instabilities and enriches the dynamics of the interface. In particular, obstacles add a new spatial large-scale stationary mode and harmonics resulting from its interaction with the classical resonant modes. Powered@NLHPC: This research was partially supported by the supercomputing infrastructure of the NLHPC (ECM-02). Nicolas Perinet has received grant from CONICYT - FONDECYT/postdoctoral research Project 3140522.

  13. Transient Ischemic Attack Fast-track and Long-Term Stroke Risk: Role of Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Anticoli, Sabrina; Pezzella, Francesca Romana; Pozzessere, Claudio; Gallelli, Luca; Bravi, Maria Cristina; Caso, Valeria; Siniscalchi, Antonio

    2015-09-01

    fast-track had similar long-term risks of stroke. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The impact of the Medicines Control Council backlog and fast-track review system on access to innovative and new generic and biosimilar medicines of public health importance in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Leng, Henry Martin John; Pollock, Allyson M; Sanders, David

    2016-03-17

    The fast-track registration policy of the South African National Department of Health allows for rapid registration of new medicines of public health importance and of all medicines on the Essential Medicines List, most of which are generics. No limit is placed on the number of generic brands of a medicine that can be submitted for fast-track registration. This, together with resource constraints at the regulator, may delay access to important new medicines, new fixed-dose combinations of critical medicines or affordable versions of biological medicines (biosimilars). One reason for not limiting the number of fast-track generic applications was to promote price competition among generic brands. We found this not to be valid, since market share correlated poorly with price. Generic brands with high market share were, mostly, those that were registered first. We propose that the number of generic brands accepted for fast-tracking be limited to not more than seven per medicine.

  15. Competing Turing and Faraday Instabilities in Longitudinally Modulated Passive Resonators.

    PubMed

    Copie, François; Conforti, Matteo; Kudlinski, Alexandre; Mussot, Arnaud; Trillo, Stefano

    2016-04-08

    We experimentally investigate the interplay of Turing (modulational) and Faraday (parametric) instabilities in a bistable passive nonlinear resonator. The Faraday branch is induced via parametric resonance owing to a periodic modulation of the resonator dispersion. We show that the bistable switching dynamics is dramatically affected by the competition between the two instability mechanisms, which dictates two completely novel scenarios. At low detunings from resonance, switching occurs between the stable stationary lower branch and the Faraday-unstable upper branch, whereas at high detunings we observe the crossover between the Turing and Faraday periodic structures. The results are well explained in terms of the universal Lugiato-Lefever model.

  16. Very large array faraday rotation studies of the coronal plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kooi, Jason Earl

    Knowledge of the coronal magnetic field is crucial for understanding (1) the heating mechanism(s) of the solar corona, (2) the acceleration of the fast solar wind, and (3) the structure and dynamics of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Observation of Faraday rotation (FR) is one of the best remote-sensing techniques for determining plasma properties in the corona and can provide information on the plasma structure of a CME shortly after launch, shedding light on the initiation process. I used the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) to make sensitive Faraday rotation measurements to investigate the general plasma structure of the corona, properties of coronal plasma inhomogeneities and waves, and transients associated with coronal mass ejections. To enhance my measurements of FR transients, I also developed an algorithm in the Common Astronomy Software Applications (CASA) package to mitigate ionospheric Faraday rotation. In August, 2011, I made FR observations at 5.0 and 6.1 GHz of the radio galaxy 3C 228 through the solar corona at heliocentric distances of 4.6-5.0 solar radii using the VLA. Observations at 5.0 GHz permit measurements deeper in the corona than previous VLA observations at 1.4 and 1.7 GHz. These FR observations provided unique information on the magnetic field in this region of the corona. My data on 3C 228 provide two lines of sight (separated by 46 arcseconds, 33,000 km in the corona). I detected three periods during which there appeared to be a difference in the Faraday rotation measure between these two closely spaced lines of sight, which I used to estimate coronal currents; these values (ranging from 2.6 to 4.1 GA) are several orders of magnitude below that which is necessary for significant coronal heating (assuming the Spitzer resistivity). I also used the data to determine upper limits (3.3 and 6.4 rad/m2 along the two lines of sight) on FR fluctuations caused by coronal waves. These upper limits are comparable to and, thus, not inconsistent

  17. How Fast Is Your Body Motion? Determining a Sufficient Frame Rate for an Optical Motion Tracking System Using Passive Markers.

    PubMed

    Song, Min-Ho; Godøy, Rolf Inge

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses how to determine a sufficient frame (sampling) rate for an optical motion tracking system using passive reflective markers. When using passive markers for the optical motion tracking, avoiding identity confusion between the markers becomes a problem as the speed of motion increases, necessitating a higher frame rate to avoid a failure of the motion tracking caused by marker confusions and/or dropouts. Initially, one might believe that the Nyquist-Shannon sampling rate estimated from the assumed maximal temporal variation of a motion (i.e. a sampling rate at least twice that of the maximum motion frequency) could be the complete solution to the problem. However, this paper shows that also the spatial distance between the markers should be taken into account in determining the suitable frame rate of an optical motion tracking with passive markers. In this paper, a frame rate criterion for the optical tracking using passive markers is theoretically derived and also experimentally verified using a high-quality optical motion tracking system. Both the theoretical and the experimental results showed that the minimum frame rate is proportional to the ratio between the maximum speed of the motion and the minimum spacing between markers, and may also be predicted precisely if the proportional constant is known in advance. The inverse of the proportional constant is here defined as the tracking efficiency constant and it can be easily determined with some test measurements. Moreover, this newly defined constant can provide a new way of evaluating the tracking algorithm performance of an optical tracking system.

  18. How Fast Is Your Body Motion? Determining a Sufficient Frame Rate for an Optical Motion Tracking System Using Passive Markers

    PubMed Central

    Song, Min-Ho; Godøy, Rolf Inge

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses how to determine a sufficient frame (sampling) rate for an optical motion tracking system using passive reflective markers. When using passive markers for the optical motion tracking, avoiding identity confusion between the markers becomes a problem as the speed of motion increases, necessitating a higher frame rate to avoid a failure of the motion tracking caused by marker confusions and/or dropouts. Initially, one might believe that the Nyquist-Shannon sampling rate estimated from the assumed maximal temporal variation of a motion (i.e. a sampling rate at least twice that of the maximum motion frequency) could be the complete solution to the problem. However, this paper shows that also the spatial distance between the markers should be taken into account in determining the suitable frame rate of an optical motion tracking with passive markers. In this paper, a frame rate criterion for the optical tracking using passive markers is theoretically derived and also experimentally verified using a high-quality optical motion tracking system. Both the theoretical and the experimental results showed that the minimum frame rate is proportional to the ratio between the maximum speed of the motion and the minimum spacing between markers, and may also be predicted precisely if the proportional constant is known in advance. The inverse of the proportional constant is here defined as the tracking efficiency constant and it can be easily determined with some test measurements. Moreover, this newly defined constant can provide a new way of evaluating the tracking algorithm performance of an optical tracking system. PMID:26967900

  19. A method for fast 3D tracking using tuned fiducial markers and a limited projection reconstruction FISP (LPR-FISP) sequence.

    PubMed

    Flask, C; Elgort, D; Wong, E; Shankaranarayanan, A; Lewin, J; Wendt, M; Duerk, J L

    2001-11-01

    This work demonstrates the feasibility of using wireless, tuned fiducial markers with a limited projection reconstruction-fast imaging with steady-state free precession sequence (LPR-FISP) to accurately obtain tracking information necessary for interactive scan plane selection in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The position and orientation of a rigid interventional device can be uniquely determined from the 3D coordinates of three fiducial markers mounted in a known configuration on the device. Three fiducial markers were tuned to the proton resonant frequency in a 0.2T open MR scanner and mounted to the surface of a cylindrical water phantom. An LPR-FISP sequence was developed to suppress the water phantom signal while preserving that of the fiducial markers through a nonselective low-tip-angle excitation and a dephaser gradient applied prior to data acquisition. A localization algorithm was developed to accurately calculate the 3D coordinates of the fiducial markers using four LPR-FISP projections in two orthogonal scan planes. The sequence repetition time (TR = 21 msec) and the limited projection set resulted in fast LPR-FISP coordinate acquisition times of approximately 170 msec with an accuracy (max error) of 3 mm on a 0.2T MR system. This fast, accurate tracking method provides the fundamental technology for interactive MRI scan plane definition for rigid interventional devices without the need for stereotactic cameras or reference frames. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Direct hospital costs of total laparoscopic hysterectomy compared with fast-track open hysterectomy at a tertiary hospital: a retrospective case-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Rhou, Yoon J J; Pather, Selvan; Loadsman, John A; Campbell, Neil; Philp, Shannon; Carter, Jonathan

    2015-12-01

    To assess the direct intraoperative and postoperative costs in women undergoing total laparoscopic hysterectomy and fast-track open hysterectomy. A retrospective review of the direct hospital-related costs in a matched cohort of women undergoing total laparoscopic hysterectomy (TLH) and fast-track open hysterectomy (FTOH) at a tertiary hospital. All costs were calculated, including the cost of advanced high-energy laparoscopic devices. The effect of the learning curve on cost in laparoscopic hysterectomy was also assessed, as was the hospital case-weighted cost, which was compared with the actual cost. Fifty women were included in each arm of the study. TLH had a higher intraoperative cost, but a lower postoperative cost than FTOH (AUD$3877 vs AUD$2776 P < 0.001, AUD$3965 vs AUD$6233 P < 0.001). The total cost of TLH was not different from FTOH (AUD$7842 vs AUD$9009 P = 0.068) and after a learning curve; TLH cost less than FTOH (AUD$6797 vs AUD$8647, P < 0.001). The use of high-energy devices did not impact on the cost benefit of TLH, and hospital case-weight-based funding correlated poorly with actual cost. Despite the use of fast-track recovery protocols, the cost of TLH is no different to FTOH and after a learning curve is cheaper than open hysterectomy. Judicious use of advanced energy devices does not impact on the cost, and hospital case-weight-based funding model in our hospital is inaccurate when compared to directly calculated hospital costs. © 2013 The Authors ANZJOG © 2013 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  1. Benefits of ultra-fast-track anesthesia in left ventricular assist device implantation: a retrospective, propensity score matched cohort study of a four-year single center experience.

    PubMed

    Zayat, Rashad; Menon, Ares K; Goetzenich, Andreas; Schaelte, Gereon; Autschbach, Ruediger; Stoppe, Christian; Simon, Tim-Philipp; Tewarie, Lachmandath; Moza, Ajay

    2017-02-08

    The use of left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) has gained significant importance for treatment of end-stage heart failure. Fast-track procedures are well established in cardiac surgery, whereas knowledge of their benefits after LVAD implantation is sparse. We hypothesized that ultra-fast-track anesthesia (UFTA) with in-theater extubation or at a maximum of 4 h. after surgery is feasible in Interagency Registry for Mechanically Assisted Circulatory Support (INTERMACS) level 3 and 4 patients and might prevent postoperative complications. From March, 2010 to March, 2012, 53 LVADs (50 Heart Mate II and 3 Heart Ware) were implanted in patients in our department. UFTA was successfully performed (LVAD ultra ) in 13 patients. After propensity score matching, we compared the LVAD ultra group with a matched group (LVAD match ) receiving conventional anesthesia management. Patients in the LVAD ultra group had significantly lower incidences of pneumonia (p = 0.031), delirium (p = 0.031) and right ventricular failure (RVF) (p = 0.031). They showed a significantly higher cardiac index in the first 12 h. (p = 0.017); a significantly lower central venous pressure during the first 24 h. postoperatively (p = 0.005) and a significantly shorter intensive care unit (ICU) stay (p = 0.016). Kaplan-Meier analysis after four years of follow-up showed no significant difference in survival. In this pilot study, we demonstrated the feasibility of ultra-fast-track anesthesia in LVAD implantation in selected patients with INTERMACS level 3-4. Patients had a lower incidence of postoperative complications, better hemodynamic performance, shorter length of ICU stay and lower incidence of RVF after UFTA. Prospective randomized investigations should examine the preservation of right ventricular function in larger numbers and identify appropriate selection criteria.

  2. What Is Required to End the AIDS Epidemic as a Public Health Threat by 2030? The Cost and Impact of the Fast-Track Approach

    PubMed Central

    Stover, John; Bollinger, Lori; Izazola, Jose Antonio; Loures, Luiz; DeLay, Paul; Ghys, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    In 2011 a new Investment Framework was proposed that described how the scale-up of key HIV interventions could dramatically reduce new HIV infections and AIDS-related deaths in low and middle income countries by 2015. This framework included ambitious coverage goals for prevention and treatment services for 2015, resulting in a reduction of new HIV infections by more than half, in line with the goals of the declaration of the UN High Level Meeting in June 2011. However, the approach suggested a leveling in the number of new infections at about 1 million annually—far from the UNAIDS goal of ending AIDS by 2030. In response, UNAIDS has developed the Fast-Track approach that is intended to provide a roadmap to the actions required to achieve this goal. The Fast-Track approach is predicated on a rapid scale-up of focused, effective prevention and treatment services over the next 5 years and then maintaining a high level of programme implementation until 2030. Fast-Track aims to reduce new infections and AIDS-related deaths by 90% from 2010 to 2030 and proposes a set of biomedical, behavioral and enabling intervention targets for 2020 and 2030 to achieve that goal, including the rapid scale-up initiative for antiretroviral treatment known as 90-90-90. Compared to a counterfactual scenario of constant coverage for all services at early-2015 levels, the Fast-Track approach would avert 18 million HIV infections and 11 million deaths from 2016 to 2030 globally. This paper describes the analysis that produced these targets and the estimated resources needed to achieve them in low- and middle-income countries. It indicates that it is possible to achieve these goals with a significant push to achieve rapid scale-up of key interventions between now and 2020. The annual resources required from all sources would rise to US$7.4Bn in low-income countries, US$8.2Bn in lower middle-income countries and US$10.5Bn in upper-middle-income-countries by 2020 before declining

  3. Observation of Phillips's spectrum in Faraday waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, Gustavo; Falcon, Claudio

    2016-11-01

    We consider the problem of wave turbulence generated by singularities from an experimental point of view. We study a system of Faraday waves interacting with waves generated by a wave-maker driven with a random forcing. We measure the temporal fluctuations of the surface wave amplitude at a given location and we show that for a wide range of forcing parameters the surface height displays a power-law spectra that greatly differs from the one predicted by the WT theory. In the capillary region the power spectrum turns out to be proportional to f-5, which we believe is due to singularities moving across the system. Proyecto Postdoctorado Fondecyt Nro 3160032.

  4. The performance of the γ-ray tracking array GRETINA for γ-ray spectroscopy with fast beams of rare isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisshaar, D.; Bazin, D.; Bender, P. C.; Campbell, C. M.; Recchia, F.; Bader, V.; Baugher, T.; Belarge, J.; Carpenter, M. P.; Crawford, H. L.; Cromaz, M.; Elman, B.; Fallon, P.; Forney, A.; Gade, A.; Harker, J.; Kobayashi, N.; Langer, C.; Lauritsen, T.; Lee, I. Y.; Lemasson, A.; Longfellow, B.; Lunderberg, E.; Macchiavelli, A. O.; Miki, K.; Momiyama, S.; Noji, S.; Radford, D. C.; Scott, M.; Sethi, J.; Stroberg, S. R.; Sullivan, C.; Titus, R.; Wiens, A.; Williams, S.; Wimmer, K.; Zhu, S.

    2017-03-01

    The γ-ray tracking array GRETINA was coupled to the S800 magnetic spectrometer for spectroscopy with fast beams of rare isotopes at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory on the campus of Michigan State University. We describe the technical details of this powerful setup and report on GRETINA's performance achieved with source and in-beam measurements. The γ-ray multiplicity encountered in experiments with fast beams is usually low, allowing for a simplified and efficient treatment of the data in the γ-ray analysis in terms of Doppler reconstruction and spectral quality. The results reported in this work were obtained from GRETINA consisting of 8 detector modules hosting four high-purity germanium crystals each. Currently, GRETINA consists of 10 detector modules.

  5. The performance of the γ-ray tracking array GRETINA for γ-ray spectroscopy with fast beams of rare isotopes

    DOE PAGES

    Weisshaar, D.; Bazin, D.; Bender, P. C.; ...

    2016-12-03

    The gamma-ray tracking array GRETINA was coupled to the S800 magnetic spectrometer for spectroscopy with fast beams of rare isotopes at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory on the campus of Michigan State University. We describe the technical details of this powerful setup and report on GRETINA's performance achieved with source and in-beam measurements. The gamma-ray multiplicity encountered in experiments with fast beams is usually low, allowing for a simplified and efficient treatment of the data in the gamma-ray analysis in terms of Doppler reconstruction and spectral quality. Finally, the results reported in this work were obtained from GRETINA consisting ofmore » 8 detector modules hosting four high-purity germanium crystals each. Currently, GRETINA consists of 10 detector modules.« less

  6. The performance of the γ-ray tracking array GRETINA for γ-ray spectroscopy with fast beams of rare isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Weisshaar, D.; Bazin, D.; Bender, P. C.; Campbell, C. M.; Recchia, F.; Bader, V.; Baugher, T.; Belarge, J.; Carpenter, M. P.; Crawford, H. L.; Cromaz, M.; Elman, B.; Fallon, P.; Forney, A.; Gade, A.; Harker, J.; Kobayashi, N.; Langer, C.; Lauritsen, T.; Lee, I. Y.; Lemasson, A.; Longfellow, B.; Lunderberg, E.; Macchiavelli, A. O.; Miki, K.; Momiyama, S.; Noji, S.; Radford, D. C.; Scott, M.; Sethi, J.; Stroberg, S. R.; Sullivan, C.; Titus, R.; Wiens, A.; Williams, S.; Wimmer, K.; Zhu, S.

    2016-12-03

    The gamma-ray tracking array GRETINA was coupled to the S800 magnetic spectrometer for spectroscopy with fast beams of rare isotopes at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory on the campus of Michigan State University. We describe the technical details of this powerful setup and report on GRETINA's performance achieved with source and in-beam measurements. The gamma-ray multiplicity encountered in experiments with fast beams is usually low, allowing for a simplified and efficient treatment of the data in the gamma-ray analysis in terms of Doppler reconstruction and spectral quality. Finally, the results reported in this work were obtained from GRETINA consisting of 8 detector modules hosting four high-purity germanium crystals each. Currently, GRETINA consists of 10 detector modules.

  7. Rethinking Faraday's Law for Teaching Motional Electromotive Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuza, Kristina; Guisasola, Jenaro; Michelini, Marisa; Santi, Lorenzo

    2012-01-01

    This study shows physicists' discussions on the meaning of Faraday's law where situations involving extended conductors or moving contact points are particularly troublesome. We raise questions to test students' difficulties in applying Faraday's law in motional electromotive force phenomena. We suggest the benefit of analysing these phenomena…

  8. Rethinking Faraday's Law for Teaching Motional Electromotive Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuza, Kristina; Guisasola, Jenaro; Michelini, Marisa; Santi, Lorenzo

    2012-01-01

    This study shows physicists' discussions on the meaning of Faraday's law where situations involving extended conductors or moving contact points are particularly troublesome. We raise questions to test students' difficulties in applying Faraday's law in motional electromotive force phenomena. We suggest the benefit of analysing these phenomena…

  9. A note on random excitation of nonlinear Faraday waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, John

    2004-06-01

    The evolution equations for weakly nonlinear Faraday waves in a cylinder that is subjected to a narrow-band, random acceleration are constructed and shown to be isomorphic to Repetto and Galletta's ["Finite amplitude Faraday waves induced by random forcing," Phys. Fluids 14, 4284 (2002)] results for the two-dimensional problem, which, therefore, are applicable to laboratory experiments in circular cylinders.

  10. Faraday isolator based on TSAG crystal for high power lasers.

    PubMed

    Mironov, E A; Palashov, O V

    2014-09-22

    A Faraday isolator based on a new magneto-optical medium, TSAG (terbium scandium aluminum garnet) crystal, has been constructed and investigated experimentally. The device provides an isolation ratio of more than 30 dB at 500 W laser power. It is shown that this medium can be used in Faraday isolators for kilowatt-level laser powers.

  11. Fast and accurate calibration of an X-ray imager to an electromagnetic tracking system for interventional cardiac procedures.

    PubMed

    Lang, Andrew; Stanton, Douglas; Parthasarathy, Vijay; Jain, Ameet

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease affects millions of Americans each year. Interventional guidance systems are being developed as treatment options for some of the more delicate procedures, including targeted stem cell therapy. As advanced systems for such types of interventional guidance are being developed, electromagnetic (EM) tracking is coming in demand to perform navigation. To use this EM tracking technology, a calibration is necessary to register the tracker to the imaging system. In this paper we investigate the calibration of an X-ray imaging system to EM tracking. Two specially designed calibration phantoms have been designed for this purpose, each having a rigidly attached EM sensor. From a clinical usability point-of-view, we propose to divide this calibration problem into two steps: i) in initial calibration of the EM sensor to the phantom design using an EM tracked needle to trace out grooves in the phantom surface and ii) segmentation from X-ray images and 3D reconstruction of beads embedded in the phantom in a known geometric pattern. Combining these two steps yields and X-ray-to-EM calibration accuracy of less than 1 mm when overlaying an EM tracked needle on X-ray images.

  12. Searching for Faraday rotation in cosmic microwave background polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Granados, B.; Battaner, E.; Florido, E.

    2016-08-01

    We use the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) 9th-year foreground reduced data at 33, 41 and 61 GHz to derive a Faraday rotation at map and at angular power spectrum levels taking into account their observational errors. A processing mask provided by WMAP is used to avoid contamination from the disc of our Galaxy and local spurs. We have found a Faraday rotation component at both, map and power spectrum levels. The lack of correlation of the Faraday rotation with Galactic Faraday rotation, synchrotron and dust polarization from our Galaxy or with cosmic microwave background anisotropies or lensing suggests that it could be originated at reionization (ℓ ≲ 12). Even if the detected Faraday rotation signal is weak, the present study could contribute to establish magnetic fields strengths of B0 ˜ 10-8 G at reionization.

  13. Laser-Based Faraday-Effect Measurement of Magnetic Fluctuations and Fluctuation-Induced Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, L.; Brower, D. L.; Ding, W. X.; Sarff, J. S.

    2013-10-01

    A multichord far-infrared laser-based Faraday-effect polarimetry diagnostic has been well developed on MST. Combined polarimetry-interferometry capability permits simultaneous measurement of internal structure of density and magnetic field with fast time response (~ 4 μs) and low phase noise (< 0 .01°) . With this diagnostic, the impact on toroidal current profile from a tangentially injected neutral beam is directly measured, allowing evaluation of non-inductive current drive. In addition, 0 .05° Faraday-effect fluctuations associated with global tearing modes are resolved with an uncertainty below 0 .01° . For physics investigations, these Faraday-effect fluctuations are complicated by contributions from both density and magnetic fluctuations. In our analysis, the local density fluctuations are obtained by inverting the line-integrated interferometry data after resolving the mode helicity through correlation techniques. The local magnetic fluctuations are then reconstructed using a parameterized fit of the polarimetry data, accounting for both the density and magnetic contributions. For the same mode, density and radial magnetic fluctuations exhibit very different spatial structure. In this process, their relative phase is also determined, thereby allowing the determination of magnetic-fluctuation-induced transport. Work supported by US DoE.

  14. Ballistic and diffusive dynamics in a two-dimensional ideal gas of macroscopic chaotic Faraday waves.

    PubMed

    Welch, Kyle J; Hastings-Hauss, Isaac; Parthasarathy, Raghuveer; Corwin, Eric I

    2014-04-01

    We have constructed a macroscopic driven system of chaotic Faraday waves whose statistical mechanics, we find, are surprisingly simple, mimicking those of a thermal gas. We use real-time tracking of a single floating probe, energy equipartition, and the Stokes-Einstein relation to define and measure a pseudotemperature and diffusion constant and then self-consistently determine a coefficient of viscous friction for a test particle in this pseudothermal gas. Because of its simplicity, this system can serve as a model for direct experimental investigation of nonequilibrium statistical mechanics, much as the ideal gas epitomizes equilibrium statistical mechanics.

  15. Analytical balance-based Faraday magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riminucci, Alberto; Uhlarz, Marc; De Santis, Roberto; Herrmannsdörfer, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    We introduce a Faraday magnetometer based on an analytical balance in which we were able to apply magnetic fields up to 0.14 T. We calibrated it with a 1 mm Ni sphere previously characterized in a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. The proposed magnetometer reached a theoretical sensitivity of 3 × 10-8 A m2. We demonstrated its operation on magnetic composite scaffolds made of poly(ɛ-caprolactone)/iron-doped hydroxyapatite. To confirm the validity of the method, we measured the same scaffold properties in a SQUID magnetometer. The agreement between the two measurements was within 5% at 0.127 T and 12% at 24 mT. With the addition, for a small cost, of a permanent magnet and computer controlled linear translators, we were thus able to assemble a Faraday magnetometer based on an analytical balance, which is a virtually ubiquitous instrument. This will make simple but effective magnetometry easily accessible to most laboratories, in particular, to life sciences ones, which are increasingly interested in magnetic materials.

  16. Faraday Cup Detector Array with Electronic Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheidemann, Adi A.; Schumacher, Frank. J.; Darling, Robert B.; Isakharov, Arthur; Jones, Patrick

    2000-03-01

    A position sensitive Faraday cup detector array [FCDA] for ion beam detection has been developed. The FCDA is combined with an electronic multiplexing unit that allows collecting and integrating the charge deposited in the array and simultaneously reading out the same. The interface allows a duty cycle of > 98% for the position sensitive read-out, thus monitoring the entire array simultaneously. The multiplexing is achieved by collecting the charge with large number of small, and electronically de-coupled Faraday cups. The device measures absolute ion currents, has a wide dynamic range from 0.2 picoA to 2 microA, and a cross talk of less than 750:1. Read-out speeds ranging from 37 Hz to 117 kHz have been demonstrated. The low cross talk of the FCDA originates from an effective electronic de-coupling of the cups and a gray-code driven MUX-cascade as interface. The integration of the interface with the detector array on a printed circuit board allows further, reducing the number of feedthroughs that are necessary to monitor the array to six. Detector pitch sizes from 150 mm to 2.1mm haven been realized. A linear system composed of 256 elements and a square arrangement with 64 elements will be discussed.

  17. Computational simulation of Faraday probe measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boerner, Jeremiah J.

    Electric propulsion devices, including ion thrusters and Hall thrusters, are becoming increasingly popular for long duration space missions. Ground-based experimental testing of such devices is performed in vacuum chambers, which develop an unavoidable background gas due to pumping limitations and facility leakage. Besides directly altering the operating environment, the background gas may indirectly affect the performance of immersed plasma probe diagnostics. This work focuses on computational modeling research conducted to evaluate the performance of a current-collecting Faraday probe. Initial findings from one dimensional analytical models of plasma sheaths are used as reference cases for subsequent modeling. A two dimensional, axisymmetric, hybrid electron fluid and Particle In Cell computational code is used for extensive simulation of the plasma flow around a representative Faraday probe geometry. The hybrid fluid PIC code is used to simulate a range of inflowing plasma conditions, from a simple ion beam consistent with one dimensional models to a multiple component plasma representative of a low-power Hall thruster plume. These simulations produce profiles of plasma properties and simulated current measurements at the probe surface. Interpretation of the simulation results leads to recommendations for probe design and experimental techniques. Significant contributions of this work include the development and use of two new non-neutral detailed electron fluid models and the recent incorporation of multi grid capabilities.

  18. Correcting ionospheric Faraday rotation for ASKAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Sullivan, Shane; Gaensler, Bryan; Landecker, Tom L.; Willis, Tony

    2012-10-01

    Next-generation polarisation surveys, such as the POSSUM survey on ASKAP, aim to measure weak, statistical, cosmological effects associated with weak magnetic fields, and so will require unprecedented accuracy and stability for measuring polarisation vectors and their Faraday rotation measures (RMs). Ionospheric Faraday rotation (IFR) corrupts polarization observations and cannot be ignored at mid to low frequencies. In aperture-synthesis polarimetry IFR rotates individual visibilities and leads to a loss of coherence and accuracy of polarization angle determination. Through the POSSUM survey science team we have been involved in developing detailed ionospheric prediction software (POSSUM memos #10a,b) that will be used to correct the observed visibilities on ASKAP before imaging to obtain sufficiently accurate polarization and RM data. To provide a stringent test of this software, we propose a continuous 24 hr observing block using the 1.1-3.1 GHz band to monitor the variations caused by the time-variable ionosphere in the polarization angle and RM of a strongly polarized calibrator source, PKS B1903-802. We request a total of 96 hrs (4 x 24 hrs) to monitor the changes in the ionosphere every 3 to 6 months until BETA/ASKAP-12 is taking reliable polarization data.

  19. Faraday diagnostics for R-damage

    SciTech Connect

    Oro, David M; Tabaka, Leonard J

    2011-01-13

    ALT-3 and R-Damage are experiments to be executed in collaboration between LANL and VNIIEF personnel. They are planned to be fielded in Sarov, Russia at VNIIEF. Both experiments employ Russian explosively driven pulse-power systems to generate a pulse of electrical current that is used to drive the experiment. The current pulse will be measured with Faraday-rotation fiber-optic loops. Using this well known technique, the change in the current enclosed by the loops is determined by measuring the change in the magnetic field integrated along the fiber-optic loop by detecting the Faraday rotation of linearly polarized light traveling through the fiber. The amount of polarization rotation of the light is related to the integrated magnetic field and therefore the enclosed current (Ampere's law) through the Verdet constant which for the optical-fibers used in this experiment has been determined to within 1 %. The presentation describes how the technique will be employed in the R-Damage experiment.

  20. Micro-position sensor using faraday effect

    DOEpatents

    McElfresh, Michael; Lucas, Matthew; Silveira, Joseph P.; Groves, Scott E.

    2007-02-27

    A micro-position sensor and sensing system using the Faraday Effect. The sensor uses a permanent magnet to provide a magnetic field, and a magneto-optic material positioned in the magnetic field for rotating the plane of polarization of polarized light transmitted through the magneto-optic material. The magnet is independently movable relative to the magneto-optic material so as to rotate the plane of polarization of the polarized light as a function of the relative position of the magnet. In this manner, the position of the magnet relative to the magneto-optic material may be determined from the rotated polarized light. The sensing system also includes a light source, such as a laser or LED, for producing polarized light, and an optical fiber which is connected to the light source and to the magneto-optic material at a sensing end of the optical fiber. Processing electronics, such as a polarimeter, are also provided for determining the Faraday rotation of the plane of polarization of the back-reflected polarized light to determine the position of the magnet relative to the sensing end of the optical fiber.

  1. Faraday rotation measure synthesis of UGC 10288

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamieneski, Patrick; Wang, Q. Daniel; Pare, Dylan; Sullivan, Kendall

    2017-01-01

    Faraday rotation measure synthesis is a powerful tool that has been employed in the past decade when studying line-of-sight magnetic fields of galactic and extragalactic sources. Rotation measures, which are sensitive to the strength and direction of fields in an intervening medium between the source and observer, were classically determined by assuming a single, uniform Faraday-rotating medium. Rotation measure synthesis, on the other hand, is a more robust method that allows for probing a more complicated scenario. We will outline results from a study of magnetic field structure in the disk and halo of edge-on galaxy UGC 10288, using 6 cm and 20 cm observations from CHANG-ES (Continuum Halos in Nearby Galaxies - an EVLA Survey). The presence of a strongly polarized complex background source situated perpendicular to the foreground disk allows for an investigation of the disk-halo magnetic fields of UGC 10288. In particular, we present evidence of magnetic field reversals above the plane of the disk. This finding is not easily explained solely by the prevailing α-Ω dynamo mechanism. Rather, a field reversal may be indicative of different parities of the poloidal field components for the individual disk and halo mechanisms.

  2. Midplane Faraday rotation: A tokamak densitometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jobes, F. C.

    1995-01-01

    The density in a tokamak can be determined by measuring the Faraday rotation of a laser directed tangent to the toroidal field. If there is a horizontal array of such beams, then ne(R) can be readily obtained with a simple Abel inversion about the center line of the tokamak. For a large machine, such as ITER, TPX, or JT-60, a 10.6 μm laser would be appropriate. If the machine operated at a full field of 10-50 T m and a peak density of 2.5×1020/m3, the rotation angle would be quite large—about 15°-75° per pass. An elegant measurement system can be made up from a single laser beam diffracted off a moving grating to form a fan of ˜10 probe beams. With the addition of a few optical components to the system, the return beams can be recombined and sent to a single detector. In the detector there is a separate frequency component for both the right and left hand component of each ray. These can be separated electronically to provide a reference and probe signal for each ray; the difference in phase between the two signals is twice the Faraday rotation angle.

  3. Wave - fluid particle interaction in the Faraday waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francois, Nicolas; Xia, Hua; Punzmann, Horst; Shats, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Faraday waves are parametrically excited perturbations that appear on a liquid surface when the latter is vertically vibrated. Recently it has been discovered that: 1) such wave field can be described as a disordered lattice made of localised oscillating excitations, termed oscillons, 2) the horizontal motion of fluid particles on the water surface reproduces in detail the motion of fluid in two-dimensional turbulence. Here we report experimental measurements of the motion of both entities using Particle Image Velocimetry and Particle Tracking Velocimetry techniques. Those techniques allow to measure Lagrangian and Eulerian features of the oscillon motion and compare them with those of the fluid motion. A strong coupling is uncovered between the erratic motion of the waves and the turbulent agitation of the fluid particles. Both motions show Brownian-type dispersion and the r.m.s velocity of oscillons is directly related to the r.m.s. velocity of the fluid particles in a broad range of vertical accelerations. These results offer new perspectives for predicting surface fluid transport from the knowledge of the wave fields and vice versa. In particular, the broadening of the wave spectra at high wave amplitude can be predicted if the 2D turbulence energy is known. This work was supported by the Australian Research Council's Discovery Projects funding scheme (DP150103468 and DP160100863). NF acknowledges support by the Australian Research Council's DECRA Award (DE160100742).

  4. Adaptive welding of fillet welds using a fast seam-tracking sensor in combination with a standard industrial robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pischetsrieder, Alexandra

    1996-08-01

    In laser welding, problems often arise from the accuracy required by the laser process, particularly where joints have narrow tolerance limits, e.g. with a fillet weld at an overlap joint. In a number of applications seam-tracking sensors can improve this situation. They are able to detect and follow the joint geometry autonomously. In addition to the tolerances, a varying gap between the parts to weld can cause welding flaws. To solve the problems caused by the height of the gap a functionality for adaptive welding can be integrated into the tracking sensor, rendering possible a determined influence on process parameters. Functional dependencies between the height of the gap and the welding parameters are presented in this paper. To further enhance the accuracy of path tracking the dynamic behavior of the system is investigated. With the integration of these dependencies into the tracking sensor, an algorithm for adaptive welding has been obtained, which takes another step towards the raise of profitability of laser installations by a simplified weld seam preparation and an enhanced stability of the welding process.

  5. Tracking the speech signal--time-locked MEG signals during perception of ultra-fast and moderately fast speech in blind and in sighted listeners.

    PubMed

    Hertrich, Ingo; Dietrich, Susanne; Ackermann, Hermann

    2013-01-01

    Blind people can learn to understand speech at ultra-high syllable rates (ca. 20 syllables/s), a capability associated with hemodynamic activation of the central-visual system. To further elucidate the neural mechanisms underlying this skill, magnetoencephalographic (MEG) measurements during listening to sentence utterances were cross-correlated with time courses derived from the speech signal (envelope, syllable onsets and pitch periodicity) to capture phase-locked MEG components (14 blind, 12 sighted subjects; speech rate=8 or 16 syllables/s, pre-defined source regions: auditory and visual cortex, inferior frontal gyrus). Blind individuals showed stronger phase locking in auditory cortex than sighted controls, and right-hemisphere visual cortex activity correlated with syllable onsets in case of ultra-fast speech. Furthermore, inferior-frontal MEG components time-locked to pitch periodicity displayed opposite lateralization effects in sighted (towards right hemisphere) and blind subjects (left). Thus, ultra-fast speech comprehension in blind individuals appears associated with changes in early signal-related processing mechanisms both within and outside the central-auditory terrain. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Faraday waves, streaming flow, and relaxation oscillations in nearly circular containers.

    PubMed

    Higuera, M; Porter, J; Knobloch, E

    2008-03-01

    Faraday waves near onset in an elliptical container are described by a third-order system of ordinary differential equations with characteristic slow-fast structure. These equations describe the interaction of standing waves with a weakly damped streaming flow driven by Reynolds stresses in boundary layers at the free surface and the rigid walls, and capture the proliferation with decreasing damping of periodic and nonperiodic relaxation oscillations observed near onset in previous simulations. These structures are the result of slow drift through symmetry-related Hopf bifurcations.

  7. Tracking and Pointing of Target by a Bifocal Relay Mirror Spacecraft Using Attitude Control and Fast Steering Mirrors Tilting

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-08-01

    proposed for the tracking and pointing of the target of the Bifocal Relay Mirror. The attitude control system consists of reaction wheels , star trackers and...nautics, Inc. with permission. T Transmitter portion of the spacecraft w Reaction wheel m Mirror rel Relative B Acronyms BRM Bifocal Relay Mirror...tem are respectively OR and OS . The other bodies considered in the dynamic model are: • four reaction wheels mounted in tetrahedral configuration on

  8. Fast, Label-Free Tracking of Single Viruses and Weakly Scattering Nanoparticles in a Nanofluidic Optical Fiber.

    PubMed

    Faez, Sanli; Lahini, Yoav; Weidlich, Stefan; Garmann, Rees F; Wondraczek, Katrin; Zeisberger, Matthias; Schmidt, Markus A; Orrit, Michel; Manoharan, Vinothan N

    2015-12-22

    High-speed tracking of single particles is a gateway to understanding physical, chemical, and biological processes at the nanoscale. It is also a major experimental challenge, particularly for small, nanometer-scale particles. Although methods such as confocal or fluorescence microscopy offer both high spatial resolution and high signal-to-background ratios, the fluorescence emission lifetime limits the measurement speed, while photobleaching and thermal diffusion limit the duration of measurements. Here we present a tracking method based on elastic light scattering that enables long-duration measurements of nanoparticle dynamics at rates of thousands of frames per second. We contain the particles within a single-mode silica fiber having a subwavelength, nanofluidic channel and illuminate them using the fiber's strongly confined optical mode. The diffusing particles in this cylindrical geometry are continuously illuminated inside the collection focal plane. We show that the method can track unlabeled dielectric particles as small as 20 nm as well as individual cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV) virions-26 nm in size and 4.6 megadaltons in mass-at rates of over 3 kHz for durations of tens of seconds. Our setup is easily incorporated into common optical microscopes and extends their detection range to nanometer-scale particles and macromolecules. The ease-of-use and performance of this technique support its potential for widespread applications in medical diagnostics and micro total analysis systems.

  9. Faraday effect in Sn2P2S6 crystals.

    PubMed

    Krupych, Oleh; Adamenko, Dmytro; Mys, Oksana; Grabar, Aleksandr; Vlokh, Rostyslav

    2008-11-10

    We have revealed a large Faraday rotation in tin thiohypodiphosphate (Sn(2)P(2)S(6)) crystals, which makes this material promising for magneto-optics. The effective Faraday tensor component and the Verdet constant for the direction of the optic axis have been determined by measuring the pure Faraday rotation in Sn(2)P(2)S(6) crystals with both the single-ray and small-angular polarimetric methods at the normal conditions and a wavelength of 632.8 nm. The effective Verdet constant is found to be equal to 115 rad/T x m.

  10. Miniature modified Faraday cup for micro electron beams

    DOEpatents

    Teruya, Alan T.; Elmer, John W.; Palmer, Todd A.; Walton, Chris C.

    2008-05-27

    A micro beam Faraday cup assembly includes a refractory metal layer with an odd number of thin, radially positioned traces in this refractory metal layer. Some of the radially positioned traces are located at the edge of the micro modified Faraday cup body and some of the radially positioned traces are located in the central portion of the micro modified Faraday cup body. Each set of traces is connected to a separate data acquisition channel to form multiple independent diagnostic networks. The data obtained from the two diagnostic networks are combined and inputted into a computed tomography algorithm to reconstruct the beam shape, size, and power density distribution.

  11. The RSC Faraday prize lecture of 1989 on platinum.

    PubMed

    Thomas, John Meurig

    2017-08-25

    In 1861, Michael Faraday gave one of his last Friday Evening Discourses at the Royal Institution of Great Britain, London, on platinum, which he described as "this beautiful, magnificent and valuable metal". More than a hundred and twenty years later (in 1989), the author re-enacted, at the Royal Institution, many of the demonstrations that Faraday carried out in his memorable Discourse. This article outlines many of Faraday's views on, and experiments with, platinum. It also describes the continuing importance and utilization of platinum, both as perceived in 1989 and from present perspectives.

  12. Template analysis of a Faraday disk dynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moroz, I. M.

    2008-12-01

    In a recent paper Moroz [1] returned to a nonlinear three-dimensional model of dynamo action for a self-exciting Faraday disk dynamo introduced by Hide et al. [2]. Since only two examples of chaotic behaviour were shown in [2], Moroz [1] performed a more extensive analysis of the dynamo model, producing a selection of bifurcation transition diagrams, including those encompassing the two examples of chaotic behaviour in [2]. Unstable periodic orbits were extracted and presented in [1], but no attempt was made to identify the underlying chaotic attractor. We rectify that here. Illustrating the procedure with one of the cases considered in [1], we use some of the unstable periodic orbits to identify a possible template for the chaotic attractor, using ideas from topology [3]. In particular, we investigate how the template is affected by changes in bifurcation parameter.

  13. Current measurement by Faraday effect on GEPOPU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    N, Correa; H, Chuaqui; E, Wyndham; F, Veloso; J, Valenzuela; M, Favre; H, Bhuyan

    2014-05-01

    The design and calibration of an optical current sensor using BK7 glass is presented. The current sensor is based on the polarization rotation by Faraday effect. GEPOPU is a pulsed power generator, double transit time 120ns, 1.5 Ohm impedance, coaxial geometry, where Z pinch experiment are performed. The measurements were performed at the Optics and Plasma Physics Laboratory of Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile. The verdet constant for two different optical materials was obtained using He-Ne laser. The values obtained are within the experimental error bars of measurements published in the literature (less than 15% difference). Two different sensor geometries were tried. We present the preliminary results for one of the geometries. The values obtained for the current agree within the measurement error with those obtained by means of a Spice simulation of the generator. Signal traces obtained are completely noise free.

  14. A fast-track anaemia clinic in the Emergency Department: feasibility and efficacy of intravenous iron administration for treating sub-acute iron deficiency anaemia

    PubMed Central

    Quintana-Díaz, Manuel; Fabra-Cadenas, Sara; Gómez-Ramírez, Susana; Martínez-Virto, Ana; García-Erce, José A.; Muñoz, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Background Clinically significant anaemia, requiring red blood cell transfusions, is frequently observed in Emergency Departments (ED). To optimise blood product use, we developed a clinical protocol for the management of iron-deficiency anaemia in a fast-track anaemia clinic within the ED. Materials and methods From November 2010 to January 2014, patients presenting with sub-acute, moderate-to-severe anaemia (haemoglobin [Hb] <11 g/dL) and confirmed or suspected iron deficiency were referred to the fast-track anaemia clinic. Those with absolute or functional iron deficiency were given intravenous (IV) ferric carboxymaltose 500–1,000 mg/week and were reassessed 4 weeks after receiving the total iron dose. The primary study outcome was the haematological response (Hb≥12 g/dL and/or Hb increment ≥2 g/dL). Changes in blood and iron parameters, transfusion rates and IV iron-related adverse drug effects were secondary outcomes. Results Two hundred and two anaemic patients with iron deficiency (150 women/52 men; mean age, 64 years) were managed in the fast-track anaemia clinic, and received a median IV iron dose of 1,500 mg (1,000–2,000 mg). Gastro-intestinal (44%) or gynaecological (26%) bleeding was the most frequent cause of the anaemia. At follow-up (183 patients), the mean Hb increment was 3.9±2.2 g/dL; 84% of patients were classified as responders and blood and iron parameters normalised in 90%. During follow-up, 35 (17%) patients needed transfusions (2 [range: 1–3] units per patient) because they had low Hb levels, symptoms of anaemia and/or were at risk. Eight mild and one moderate, self-limited adverse drug effects were witnessed. Discussion Our data support the feasibility of a clinical protocol for management of sub-acute anaemia with IV iron in the ED. IV iron was efficacious, safe and well tolerated. Early management of anaemia will improve the use of blood products in the ED. PMID:26674819

  15. One-Piece Faraday Generator: A Paradoxical Experiment from 1851

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crooks, M. J.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Describes an experiment based on Faraday's one-piece generator, where the rotating disk is replaced by a cylindrical permanent magnet. Explains the apparent paradox that an observer in an inertial frame could measure his absolute velocity. (GA)

  16. Faraday effect based optical fiber current sensor for tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Aerssens, M.; Gusarov, A.; Brichard, B.; Massaut, V.; Megret, P.; Wuilpart, M.

    2011-07-01

    Fiber optical current sensor (FOCS) is a technique considered to be compatible with the ITER nuclear environment. FOCS principle is based on the magneto-optic Faraday effect that produces non-reciprocal circular birefringence when a magnetic field is applied in the propagation direction of the light beam. The magnetic field or the electrical current is deduced from the modification of the state of polarization of light. The linear birefringence of the fiber related with non-perfect manufacturing, temperature changes or stress constitute a parasitic effect that reduces the precision and sensitivity of FOCS. A two-pass optical scheme with a Faraday mirror at the end has been proposed to compensate the influence of linear birefringence. In this paper we perform a Stokes analysis of the two-pass optical scheme to highlight the fact that the linear birefringence is not compensated perfectly by the Faraday mirror when non-reciprocal birefringence such as Faraday effect is also present. (authors)

  17. Faraday effect in hybrid magneto-plasmonic photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Caballero, B; García-Martín, A; Cuevas, J C

    2015-08-24

    We present a theoretical study of the Faraday effect in hybrid magneto-plasmonic crystals that consist of Au-Co-Au perforated membranes with a periodic array of sub-wavelength holes. We show that in these hybrid systems the interplay between the extraordinary optical transmission and the magneto-optical activity leads to a resonant enhancement of the Faraday rotation, as compared to purely ferromagnetic membranes. In particular, we determine the geometrical parameters for which this enhancement is optimized and show that the inclusion of a noble metal like Au dramatically increases the Faraday rotation over a broad bandwidth. Moreover, we show that the analysis of the Faraday rotation in these periodically perforated membranes provides a further insight into the origin of the extraordinary optical transmission.

  18. The Faraday effect of natural and artificial ferritins.

    PubMed

    Koralewski, M; Kłos, J W; Baranowski, M; Mitróová, Z; Kopčanský, P; Melníková, L; Okuda, M; Schwarzacher, W

    2012-09-07

    Measurements of the Faraday rotation at room temperature over the light wavelength range of 300-680 nm for horse spleen ferritin (HSF), magnetoferritin with different loading factors (LFs) and nanoscale magnetite and Fe(2)O(3) suspensions are reported. The Faraday rotation and the magnetization of the materials studied present similar magnetic field dependences and are characteristic of a superparamagnetic system. The dependence of the Faraday rotation on the magnetic field is described, excluding HSF and Fe(2)O(3), by a Langevin function with a log-normal distribution of the particle size allowing the core diameters of the substances studied to be calculated. It was found that the specific Verdet constant depends linearly on the LF. Differences in the Faraday rotation spectra and their magnetic field dependences allow discrimination between magnetoferritin with maghemite and magnetite cores which can be very useful in biomedicine.

  19. The Faraday effect of natural and artificial ferritins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koralewski, M.; Kłos, J. W.; Baranowski, M.; Mitróová, Z.; Kopčanský, P.; Melníková, L.; Okuda, M.; Schwarzacher, W.

    2012-09-01

    Measurements of the Faraday rotation at room temperature over the light wavelength range of 300-680 nm for horse spleen ferritin (HSF), magnetoferritin with different loading factors (LFs) and nanoscale magnetite and Fe2O3 suspensions are reported. The Faraday rotation and the magnetization of the materials studied present similar magnetic field dependences and are characteristic of a superparamagnetic system. The dependence of the Faraday rotation on the magnetic field is described, excluding HSF and Fe2O3, by a Langevin function with a log-normal distribution of the particle size allowing the core diameters of the substances studied to be calculated. It was found that the specific Verdet constant depends linearly on the LF. Differences in the Faraday rotation spectra and their magnetic field dependences allow discrimination between magnetoferritin with maghemite and magnetite cores which can be very useful in biomedicine.

  20. Fast ion conductivity in strained defect-fluorite structure created by ion tracks in Gd2Ti2O7

    PubMed Central

    Aidhy, Dilpuneet S.; Sachan, Ritesh; Zarkadoula, Eva; Pakarinen, Olli; Chisholm, Matthew F.; Zhang, Yanwen; Weber, William J.

    2015-01-01

    The structure and ion-conducting properties of the defect-fluorite ring structure formed around amorphous ion-tracks by swift heavy ion irradiation of Gd2Ti2O7 pyrochlore are investigated. High angle annular dark field imaging complemented with ion-track molecular dynamics simulations show that the atoms in the ring structure are disordered, and have relatively larger cation-cation interspacing than in the bulk pyrochlore, illustrating the presence of tensile strain in the ring region. Density functional theory calculations show that the non-equilibrium defect-fluorite structure can be stabilized by tensile strain. The pyrochlore to defect-fluorite structure transformation in the ring region is predicted to be induced by recrystallization during a melt-quench process and stabilized by tensile strain. Static pair-potential calculations show that planar tensile strain lowers oxygen vacancy migration barriers in pyrochlores, in agreement with recent studies on fluorite and perovskite materials. In view of these results, it is suggested that strain engineering could be simultaneously used to stabilize the defect-fluorite structure and gain control over its high ion-conducting properties. PMID:26555848

  1. Fast ion conductivity in strained defect-fluorite structure created by ion tracks in Gd2Ti2O7

    DOE PAGES

    Aidhy, Dilpuneet S.; Sachan, Ritesh; Zarkadoula, Eva; ...

    2015-11-10

    The structure and ion-conducting properties of the defect-fluorite ring structure formed around amorphous ion-tracks by swift heavy ion irradiation of Gd2Ti2O7 pyrochlore are investigated. High angle annular dark field imaging complemented with ion-track molecular dynamics simulations show that the atoms in the ring structure are disordered, and have relatively larger cation-cation interspacing than in the bulk pyrochlore, illustrating the presence of tensile strain in the ring region. Density functional theory calculations show that the non-equilibrium defect-fluorite structure can be stabilized by tensile strain. The pyrochlore to defect-fluorite structure transformation in the ring region is predicted to be induced by recrystallizationmore » during a melt-quench process and stabilized by tensile strain. Static pair-potential calculations show that planar tensile strain lowers oxygen vacancy migration barriers in pyrochlores, in agreement with recent studies on fluorite and perovskite materials. Lastly, in view of these results, it is suggested that strain engineering could be simultaneously used to stabilize the defect-fluorite structure and gain control over its high ion-conducting properties.« less

  2. New Fast Fall Detection Method Based on Spatio-Temporal Context Tracking of Head by Using Depth Images

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lei; Ren, Yanyun; Hu, Huosheng; Tian, Bo

    2015-01-01

    In order to deal with the problem of projection occurring in fall detection with two-dimensional (2D) grey or color images, this paper proposed a robust fall detection method based on spatio-temporal context tracking over three-dimensional (3D) depth images that are captured by the Kinect sensor. In the pre-processing procedure, the parameters of the Single-Gauss-Model (SGM) are estimated and the coefficients of the floor plane equation are extracted from the background images. Once human subject appears in the scene, the silhouette is extracted by SGM and the foreground coefficient of ellipses is used to determine the head position. The dense spatio-temporal context (STC) algorithm is then applied to track the head position and the distance from the head to floor plane is calculated in every following frame of the depth image. When the distance is lower than an adaptive threshold, the centroid height of the human will be used as the second judgment criteria to decide whether a fall incident happened. Lastly, four groups of experiments with different falling directions are performed. Experimental results show that the proposed method can detect fall incidents that occurred in different orientations, and they only need a low computation complexity. PMID:26378540

  3. Fast ion conductivity in strained defect-fluorite structure created by ion tracks in Gd2Ti2O7.

    PubMed

    Aidhy, Dilpuneet S; Sachan, Ritesh; Zarkadoula, Eva; Pakarinen, Olli; Chisholm, Matthew F; Zhang, Yanwen; Weber, William J

    2015-11-10

    The structure and ion-conducting properties of the defect-fluorite ring structure formed around amorphous ion-tracks by swift heavy ion irradiation of Gd2Ti2O7 pyrochlore are investigated. High angle annular dark field imaging complemented with ion-track molecular dynamics simulations show that the atoms in the ring structure are disordered, and have relatively larger cation-cation interspacing than in the bulk pyrochlore, illustrating the presence of tensile strain in the ring region. Density functional theory calculations show that the non-equilibrium defect-fluorite structure can be stabilized by tensile strain. The pyrochlore to defect-fluorite structure transformation in the ring region is predicted to be induced by recrystallization during a melt-quench process and stabilized by tensile strain. Static pair-potential calculations show that planar tensile strain lowers oxygen vacancy migration barriers in pyrochlores, in agreement with recent studies on fluorite and perovskite materials. In view of these results, it is suggested that strain engineering could be simultaneously used to stabilize the defect-fluorite structure and gain control over its high ion-conducting properties.

  4. Fast tracking of wind speed with a differential absorption LiDAR system: first results of an experimental campaign at Stromboli volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parracino, Stefano; Santoro, Simone; Maio, Giovanni; Nuvoli, Marcello; Aiuppa, Alessandro; Fiorani, Luca

    2017-04-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) is considered a precursor gas of volcanic eruptions by volcanologists. Monitoring the anomalous release of this parameter, we can retrieve useful information for the mitigation of volcanic hazards, such as for air traffic security. From a dataset collected during the Stromboli volcano field campaign, an assessment of the wind speed, in both horizontal and vertical paths, performing a fast tracking of this parameter was retrieved. This was determined with a newly designed shot-per-shot differential absorption LiDAR system operated in the near-infrared spectral region due to the simultaneous reconstruction of CO2 concentrations and wind speeds, using the same sample of LiDAR returns. A correlation method was used for the wind speed retrieval in which the transport of the spatial inhomogeneities of the aerosol backscattering coefficient, along the optical path of the system, was analyzed.

  5. Vibration immunity for a triangular Faraday current sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Norman E.; Jackson, David A.

    1996-10-01

    We demonstrate a common-mode rejection scheme for a bulk- optic triangular Faraday current sensor that can eliminate optical noise induced by fiber-link vibration. The noise floor before applying common rejection was about 30 dB for a 100A Faraday signal and transceiver vibration levels of approximately 30 g. This was reduced to about 60 dB for the same vibration levels. The sensor's exploitation of Ampere's circuital law is also demonstrated.

  6. Safety profile of fast-track extubation in pediatric congenital heart disease surgery patients in a tertiary care hospital of a developing country: An observational prospective study.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Mohammad Irfan; Hamid, Mohammad; Minai, Fauzia; Wali, Amina Rehmat; Anwar-Ul-Haq; Aman-Ullah, Muneer; Ahsan, Khalid

    2014-07-01

    Early extubation after cardiac operations is an important aspect of fast-track cardiac anesthesia. In order to reduce or eliminate the adverse effects of prolonged ventilation in pediatric congenital heart disease (CHD) surgical patients, the concept of early extubation has been analyzed at our tertiary care hospital. The current study was carried out to record the data to validate the importance and safety of fast-track extubation (FTE) with evidence. A total of 71 patients, including male and female aged 6 months to 18 years belonging to risk adjustment for congenital heart surgery-1 category 1, 2, and 3 were included in this study. All patients were anesthetized with a standardized technique and surgery performed by the same surgeon. At the end of operation, the included patients were assessed for FTE and standard extubation criteria were used for decision making. Of the total 71 patients included in the study, 26 patients (36.62%) were extubated in the operating room, 29 (40.85%) were extubated within 6 h of arrival in cardiovascular intensive care unit and 16 (22.54%) were unable to get extubated within 6 h due to multiple reasons. Hence, overall success rate was 77.47%. The reasons for delayed extubation were significant bleeding in 5 (31.3%) cases, hemodynamic instability (low cardiac output syndrome) in 4 (25%) cases, respiratory complication in 2 (12.5%), bleeding plus hemodynamic instability in 2 (12.5) cases, hemodynamic instability, and respiratory complication in 2 (12.5%) cases and triad of hemodynamic instability, bleeding and respiratory complication in 1 (6.5%) case. There was no reintubation in the FTE cases. On the basis of the current study results, it is recommended to use FTE in pediatric CHD surgical patients safely with multidisciplinary approach.

  7. Methylprednisolone reduces pain and decreases knee swelling in the first 24 h after fast-track unicompartmental knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Rytter, Søren; Stilling, Maiken; Munk, Stig; Hansen, Torben Bæk

    2017-01-01

    Unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) results in less operative trauma and faster patient recovery than after a conventional total knee arthroplasty. Despite an increased focus on multimodal analgesic strategies, there is still a substantial level of patient-reported pain in the early postsurgical period after UKA. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effect of a single preoperative dose of systemic methylprednisolone on postsurgical pain after fast-track UKA. Seventy-two patients in two consecutive series undergoing unilateral UKA were included in a prospective cohort study. The patients (n = 35) in the treatment group received a single preoperative dose of systemic methylprednisolone 125 mg, whereas the control group (n = 37) did not. Outcome measures were postsurgical pain at rest and during walking, consumption of opioids for pain rescue, knee swelling and knee range of motion, and complications. In the first 24 h after surgery, the treatment group had less pain at rest (p < 0.001) and during walking (p < 0.001) and less consumption of opioids (p = 0.01) in comparison with the control group. Furthermore, the treatment group had 2.2 cm less knee swelling (p = 0.02) in the first post-operative day, and better knee extension (p = 0.004), whereas knee flexion was similar (n.s.) between groups. No serious complications were associated with the treatment. Addition of a single preoperative dose of 125 mg systemic methylprednisolone to a multimodal analgesic regime significantly reduced postsurgical pain and opioid consumption and decreased knee swelling in the first 24 h after fast-track UKA. Therapeutic study, Level II.

  8. Simultaneous three-dimensional tracking of individual signals from multi-trap optical tweezers using fast and accurate photodiode detection.

    PubMed

    Ott, Dino; Nader, S; Reihani, S; Oddershede, Lene B

    2014-09-22

    Multiple-beam optical traps facilitate advanced trapping geometries and exciting discoveries. However, the increased manipulation capabilities come at the price of more challenging position and force detection. Due to unrivaled bandwidth and resolution, photodiode based detection is preferred over camera based detection in most single/dual-beam optical traps assays. However, it has not been trivial to implement photodiode based detection for multiple-beam optical traps. Here, we present a simple and efficient method based on spatial filtering for parallel photodiode detection of multiple traps. The technique enables fast and accurate 3D force and distance detection of multiple objects simultaneously manipulated by multiple-beam optical tweezers.

  9. Faraday rotation due to excitation of magnetoplasmons in graphene microribbons.

    PubMed

    Tymchenko, Mykhailo; Nikitin, Alexey Yu; Martín-Moreno, Luis

    2013-11-26

    A single graphene sheet, when subjected to a perpendicular static magnetic field, provides a Faraday rotation that, per atomic layer, greatly surpasses that of any other known material. In continuous graphene, Faraday rotation originates from the cyclotron resonance of massless carriers, which allows dynamical tuning through either external electrostatic or magneto-static setting. Furthermore, the rotation direction can be controlled by changing the sign of the carriers in graphene, which can be done by means of an external electric field. However, despite these tuning possibilities, the requirement of large magnetic fields hinders the application of the Faraday effect in real devices, especially for frequencies higher than a few terahertz. In this work we demonstrate that large Faraday rotation can be achieved in arrays of graphene microribbons, through the excitation of the magnetoplasmons of individual ribbons, at larger frequencies than those dictated by the cyclotron resonance. In this way, for a given magnetic field and chemical potential, structuring graphene periodically can produce large Faraday rotation at larger frequencies than what would occur in a continuous graphene sheet. Alternatively, at a given frequency, graphene ribbons produce large Faraday rotation at much smaller magnetic fields than in continuous graphene.

  10. Reconstruction of the geometry of volcanic vents by trajectory tracking of fast ejecta - the case of the Eyjafjallajökull 2010 eruption (Iceland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dürig, Tobias; Gudmundsson, Magnus T.; Dellino, Pierfrancesco

    2015-05-01

    Two methods are introduced to estimate the depth of origin of ejecta trajectories (depth to magma level in conduit) and the diameter of a conduit in an erupting crater, using analysis of videos from the Eyjafjallajökull 2010 eruption to evaluate their applicability. Both methods rely on the identification of straight, initial trajectories of fast ejecta, observed near the crater rims before they are appreciably bent by air drag and gravity. In the first method, through tracking these straight trajectories and identifying a cut-off angle, the inner diameter and the depth level of the vent can be constrained. In the second method, the intersection point of straight trajectories from individual pulses is used to determine the maximum possible depth from which the tracked ejecta originated and the width of the region from which the pulses emanated. The two methods give nearly identical results on the depth to magma level in the crater of Eyjafjallajökull on 8 to 10 May of 51 ± 7 m. The inner vent diameter, at the level of origin of the pulses and ejecta, is found to have been 8 to 15 m. These methods open up the possibility to feed (near) real-time monitoring systems with otherwise inaccessible information about vent geometry during an ongoing eruption and help defining important eruption source parameters.

  11. Fluctuation dynamos and their Faraday rotation signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, Pallavi; Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2013-03-01

    Turbulence is ubiquitous in many astrophysical systems like galaxies, galaxy clusters and possibly even the filaments in the intergalactic medium. We study fluctuation dynamo action in turbulent systems focusing on one observational signature, the random Faraday rotation measure (RM) from radio emission of background sources seen through the intermittent magnetic field generated by such a dynamo. We simulate the fluctuation dynamo in periodic boxes up to resolutions of 5123, with varying fluid and magnetic Reynolds numbers, and measure the resulting random RMs. We show that even though the magnetic field generated is intermittent, it still allows for contributions to the RM to be significant. When the dynamo saturates, the rms value of RM is of the order of 40-50 per cent of the value expected in a model where fields of strength Brms uniformly fill cells of the largest turbulent eddy but are randomly oriented from one cell to another. This level of RM dispersion is obtained across different values of magnetic Reynolds number and Prandtl number explored. We also use the random RMs to probe the structure of the generated fields to distinguish the contribution from intense and diffuse field regions. We find that the strong field regions (say with B > 2Brms) contribute only of the order of 15-20 per cent to the RM. Thus, rare structures do not dominate the RM; rather, the general `sea' of volume filling fluctuating fields are the dominant contributors. We also show that the magnetic integral scale, Lint, which is directly related to the RM dispersion, increases in all the runs, as Lorentz forces become important to saturate the dynamo. It appears that due to the ordering effect of the Lorentz forces, Lint of the saturated field tends to a modest fraction, 1/2-1/3 of the integral scale of the velocity field, for all our runs. These results are then applied to discuss the Faraday rotation signatures of fluctuation dynamo generated fields in young galaxies, galaxy

  12. Testing Ionospheric Faraday Rotation Corrections in CASA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kooi, Jason E.; Moellenbrock, George

    2015-04-01

    The Earth’s ionosphere introduces direction- and time-dependent effects over a range of physical and temporal scales and so is a major source for unmodeled phase offsets for low frequency radioastronomical observations. Ionospheric effects are often the limiting factor to making sensitive radioastronomical measurements to probe the solar corona or coronal mass ejections at low frequencies (< 5 GHz). It has become common practice to use global ionospheric models derived from the Global Positioning System (GPS) to provide a means of externally calibrating low frequency data. We have developed a new calibration algorithm in the Common Astronomy Software Applications (CASA) package. CASA, which was developed to meet the data post-processing needs of next generation telescopes such as the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA), did not previously have the capability to mitigate ionospheric effects. This algorithm uses GPS-based global ionosphere maps to mitigate the first and second order ionospheric effects (dispersion delay and Faraday rotation, respectively). We investigated several data centers as potential sources for global ionospheric models and chose the International Global Navigation Satellite System Service data product because data from other sources are generally too sparse to use without additional interpolation schemes. This implementation of ionospheric corrections in CASA has been tested on several sets of VLA observations and all of them showed a significant reduction of the dispersion delay. In order to rigorously test CASA’s ability to mitigate ionospheric Faraday rotation, we made VLA full-polarization observations of the standard VLA phase calibrators J0359+5057 and J0423+4150 in August 2014, using L band (1 - 2 GHz), S band (2 - 4 GHz), and C band (4 - 6 GHz) frequencies in the D array configuration. The observations were 4 hours in duration, beginning near local sunrise. In this paper, we give a general description of how these corrections are

  13. Linear diffusion into a Faraday cage.

    SciTech Connect

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Lin, Yau Tang; Merewether, Kimball O.; Chen, Kenneth C.

    2011-11-01

    Linear lightning diffusion into a Faraday cage is studied. An early-time integral valid for large ratios of enclosure size to enclosure thickness and small relative permeability ({mu}/{mu}{sub 0} {le} 10) is used for this study. Existing solutions for nearby lightning impulse responses of electrically thick-wall enclosures are refined and extended to calculate the nearby lightning magnetic field (H) and time-derivative magnetic field (HDOT) inside enclosures of varying thickness caused by a decaying exponential excitation. For a direct strike scenario, the early-time integral for a worst-case line source outside the enclosure caused by an impulse is simplified and numerically integrated to give the interior H and HDOT at the location closest to the source as well as a function of distance from the source. H and HDOT enclosure response functions for decaying exponentials are considered for an enclosure wall of any thickness. Simple formulas are derived to provide a description of enclosure interior H and HDOT as well. Direct strike voltage and current bounds for a single-turn optimally-coupled loop for all three waveforms are also given.

  14. Resonant inverse Faraday effect in nanorings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshelev, K. L.; Kachorovskii, V. Yu.; Titov, M.

    2015-12-01

    A circularly polarized light can induce a dissipationless dc current in a quantum nanoring which is responsible for a resonant helicity-driven contribution to magnetic moment. This current is not suppressed by thermal averaging despite its quantum nature. We refer to this phenomenon as the quantum resonant inverse Faraday effect. For weak electromagnetic field, when the characteristic coupling energy is small compared to the energy level spacing, we predict narrow resonances in the circulating current and, consequently, in the magnetic moment of the ring. For strong fields, the resonances merge into a wide peak with a width determined by the spectral curvature. We further demonstrate that weak short-range disorder splits the resonances and induces additional particularly sharp and high resonant peaks in dc current and magnetization. In contrast, long-range disorder leads to a chaotic behavior of the system in the vicinity of the separatrix that divides the phase space of the system into regions with dynamically localized and delocalized states.

  15. Multifrequency control of Faraday wave patterns.

    PubMed

    Topaz, Chad M; Porter, Jeff; Silber, Mary

    2004-12-01

    We show how pattern formation in Faraday waves may be manipulated by varying the harmonic content of the periodic forcing function. Our approach relies on the crucial influence of resonant triad interactions coupling pairs of critical standing wave modes with damped, spatiotemporally resonant modes. Under the assumption of weak damping and forcing, we perform a symmetry-based analysis that reveals the damped modes most relevant for pattern selection, and how the strength of the corresponding triad interactions depends on the forcing frequencies, amplitudes, and phases. In many cases, the further assumption of Hamiltonian structure in the inviscid limit determines whether the given triad interaction has an enhancing or suppressing effect on related patterns. Surprisingly, even for forcing functions with arbitrarily many frequency components, there are at most five frequencies that affect each of the important triad interactions at leading order. The relative phases of those forcing components play a key role, sometimes making the difference between an enhancing and suppressing effect. In numerical examples, we examine the validity of our results for larger values of the damping and forcing. Finally, we apply our findings to one-dimensional periodic patterns obtained with impulsive forcing and to two-dimensional superlattice patterns and quasipatterns obtained with multifrequency forcing.

  16. High sensitivity Faraday rotation spectrometer for hydroxyl radical detection at 2.8 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, W.; Wysocki, G.; Chen, W.; Zhang, W.

    2012-11-01

    A distributed feedback diode laser based Faraday rotation spectroscopy (FRS) instrument was developed for detection of hydroxyl free radical (OH) at 2.8 μm. Fast wavelength sweeping method was implemented and the instrument performances were compared with point-by-point wavelength tuning method. The fast sweeping operation mode showed the same short-term minimum detection limit and improved immunity to baseline drift. The effects of strong diamagnetic H2O vapor absorption on FRS detection of paramagnetic OH were investigated. We demonstrated that in the case of strong H2O vapor absorption, the magnitude of the FRS signal for OH might be affected due to changes in the received optical power. The effects of higher laser intensity on the FRS detection sensitivity were also studied experimentally.

  17. The Interactions between Global Education Initiatives and National Education Policy and Planning Processes: A Comparative Case Study of the Education For All Fast Track Initiative in Rwanda and Ethiopia. CREATE Pathways to Access. Research Monograph No. 67

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bermingham, Desmond

    2011-01-01

    The Education for All Fast Track Initiative (FTI) was launched by the World Bank in 2002 as a global initiative to help low income countries accelerate progress towards the MDG target of universal primary education by 2015. Over the past decade, the FTI has expanded to become one of the most important initiatives to emerge out of the Dakar World…

  18. Tracking the time course of action priming on object recognition: evidence for fast and slow influences of action on perception.

    PubMed

    Kiefer, Markus; Sim, Eun-Jin; Helbig, Hannah; Graf, Markus

    2011-08-01

    Perception and action are classically thought to be supported by functionally and neuroanatomically distinct mechanisms. However, recent behavioral studies using an action priming paradigm challenged this view and showed that action representations can facilitate object recognition. This study determined whether action representations influence object recognition during early visual processing stages, that is, within the first 150 msec. To this end, the time course of brain activation underlying such action priming effects was examined by recording ERPs. Subjects were sequentially presented with two manipulable objects (e.g., tools), which had to be named. In the congruent condition, both objects afforded similar actions, whereas dissimilar actions were afforded in the incongruent condition. In order to test the influence of the prime modality on action priming, the first object (prime) was presented either as picture or as word. We found an ERP effect of action priming over the central scalp as early as 100 msec after target onset for pictorial, but not for verbal primes. A later action priming effect on the N400 ERP component known to index semantic integration processes was obtained for both picture and word primes. The early effect was generated in a fronto-parietal motor network, whereas the late effect reflected activity in anterior temporal areas. The present results indicate that action priming influences object recognition through both fast and slow pathways: Action priming affects rapid visuomotor processes only when elicited by pictorial prime stimuli. However, it also modulates comparably slow conceptual integration processes independent of the prime modality.

  19. Line-of-sight kinematics and corrections for fast-steering mirrors used in precision pointing and tracking systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilkert, J. M.; Kanga, Gavin; Kinnear, K.

    2014-06-01

    Fast steering mirrors, or FSMs, have been used for several decades to enhance or augment the performance of electrooptical imaging and beam-steering systems in applications such as astronomy, laser communications and military targeting and surveillance systems. FSMs are high-precision, high-bandwidth electro-mechanical mechanisms used to deflect a mirror over a small angular displacement relative to the base it is mounted on which is typically a stabilized gimbal or other primary pointing device. Although the equations describing the line-of-sight kinematics derive entirely from the simple plane-mirror law of reflection, they are non-linear and axis-coupled and these effects increase as the FSM angular displacement increases. These inherent non-linearities and axis-coupling effects can contribute to pointing errors in certain modes of operation. The relevant kinematic equations presented in this paper can be used to assess the magnitude of the errors for a given application and make corrections as necessary.

  20. Faraday instability in a near-critical fluid under weightlessness.

    PubMed

    Gandikota, G; Chatain, D; Amiroudine, S; Lyubimova, T; Beysens, D

    2014-01-01

    Experiments on near-critical hydrogen have been conducted under magnetic compensation of gravity to investigate the Faraday instability that arises at the liquid-vapor interface under zero-gravity conditions. We investigated such instability in the absence of stabilizing gravity. Under such conditions, vibration orients the interface and can destabilize it. The experiments confirm the existence of Faraday waves and demonstrate a transition from a square to a line pattern close to the critical point. They also show a transition very close to the critical point from Faraday to periodic layering of the vapor-liquid interface perpendicular to vibration. It was seen that the Faraday wave instability is favored when the liquid-vapor density difference is large enough (fluid far from the critical point), whereas periodic layering predominates for small difference in the liquid and vapor densities (close to the critical point). It was observed for the Faraday wave instability that the wavelength of the instability decreases as one approaches the critical point. The experimental results demonstrate good agreement to the dispersion relation for zero gravity except for temperatures very close to the critical point where a transition from a square pattern to a line pattern is detected, similarly to what is observed under 1g conditions.

  1. Anomalous Faraday rotation in the ISM/ICM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, Mikhail V.

    2016-10-01

    Faraday effect is a common and useful way to deduce cosmic magnetic fields in the interstellar and intracluster media (ISM and ICM). Faraday rotation is the result of magnetically-induced birefringence in a dielectric medium causing a linearly polarized wave to suffer a rotation of its polarization axis as it traverses such a medium. However, the standard λ2-law of the rotation angle may not hold in strongly turbulent plasmas. Electromagnetic high-frequency and/or small-scale fluctuations may lead to effective collisionality with the pitch-angle diffusion coefficient being an effective ``quasi-collision'' frequency. Recently, we showed that quasi-collisionality may radically alter radiative transport properties of plasmas, such as absorption, transmission and reflection and other effects, which can be very important in laboratory and astrophysical plasmas. Here we briefly discuss the quasi-collisional generalization of the classical Faraday effect, which is drastically modified and can even become negative. Furthermore, we explore the origin of the long-known anomaly of Faraday rotation in a famous Cygnus regions. We argue that the anomaly can be due to the anomalous Faraday rotation in a thin ``blanket'' of turbulent plasma at the front of an interstellar bubble/shock. Supported by KU CLAS and DOE Grant ID0000225143 (07/01/16).

  2. The Potential for Characterizing the Heliosphere and Disturbances with LOFAR Faraday Rotation Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salah, J. E.; Kasper, J. C.; Oberoi, D.; Lonsdale, C.; Lazarus, A. J.; Bird, M. K.

    2003-12-01

    A linearly polarized radio wave propagating along a magnetic field line may be represented as a combination of two components with right and left-hand circular polarizations. In a magnetized plasma such as the heliosphere these two circular polarizations experience different indices of refraction, leading to a phase lag between the two components. This phase lag results in Faraday Rotation - an overall rotation of the angle of the original linearly polarized wave. The extent of Faraday Rotation is proportional to the component of the magnetic field along the direction of propagation, the electron number density, and the square of the wavelength of the radiation. Faraday Rotation may be used to probe the three-dimensional electron number density and magnetic field topology of both the background heliosphere and of transients such as coronal mass ejections (CMEs). It is particularly interesting to note that the rotation is proportional to the total electron number density, in contrast to the signals from Interplanetary Scintillation (IPS), which are only a function of density fluctuations. Prior work in this topic typically involves monitoring variation in the polarization of either extragalactic sources or of transmitted telemetry from spacecraft such as Helios. These observations have been successfully used to study turbulence and propagating transients in the inner heliosphere. We have begun a study of the potential for the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) to characterize both the background heliosphere and transients. LOFAR is a possible aperture synthesis radio interferometer for the 10-240 MHz range consisting of hundreds of thousands of individual receivers. The array will operate as a fully digitally steered instrument, in which the signals from the antennae may be combined to simultaneously image multiple regions in the sky. Among the factors which make LOFAR appealing to Faraday Rotation studies are the large wavelengths of the observations, the high sensitivity

  3. Laplace's equation and Faraday's lines of force

    SciTech Connect

    Narasimhan, T.N.

    2007-06-01

    Boundary-value problems involve two dependent variables: a potential function, and a stream function. They can be approached in two mutually independent ways. The first, introduced by Laplace, involves spatial gradients at a point. Inspired by Faraday, Maxwell introduced the other, visualizing the flow domain as a collection of flow tubes and isopotential surfaces. Boundary-value problems intrinsically entail coupled treatment (or, equivalently, optimization) of potential and stream functions Historically, potential theory avoided the cumbersome optimization task through ingenious techniques such as conformal mapping and Green's functions. Laplace's point-based approach, and Maxwell's global approach, each provides its own unique insights into boundary-value problems. Commonly, Laplace's equation is solved either algebraically, or with approximate numerical methods. Maxwell's geometry-based approach opens up novel possibilities of direct optimization, providing an independent logical basis for numerical models, rather than treating them as approximate solvers of the differential equation. Whereas points, gradients, and Darcy's law are central to posing problems on the basis of Laplace's approach, flow tubes, potential differences, and the mathematical form of Ohm's law are central to posing them in natural coordinates oriented along flow paths. Besides being of philosophical interest, optimization algorithms can provide advantages that complement the power of classical numerical models. In the spirit of Maxwell, who eloquently spoke for a balance between abstract mathematical symbolism and observable attributes of concrete objects, this paper is an examination of the central ideas of the two approaches, and a reflection on how Maxwell's integral visualization may be practically put to use in a world of digital computers.

  4. Versatile, high-sensitivity faraday cup array for ion implanters

    DOEpatents

    Musket, Ronald G.; Patterson, Robert G.

    2003-01-01

    An improved Faraday cup array for determining the dose of ions delivered to a substrate during ion implantation and for monitoring the uniformity of the dose delivered to the substrate. The improved Faraday cup array incorporates a variable size ion beam aperture by changing only an insertable plate that defines the aperture without changing the position of the Faraday cups which are positioned for the operation of the largest ion beam aperture. The design enables the dose sensitivity range, typically 10.sup.11 -10.sup.18 ions/cm.sup.2 to be extended to below 10.sup.6 ions/cm.sup.2. The insertable plate/aperture arrangement is structurally simple and enables scaling to aperture areas between <1 cm.sup.2 and >750 cm.sup.2, and enables ultra-high vacuum (UHV) applications by incorporation of UHV-compatible materials.

  5. Faraday tomography with LOFAR: new probe of the interstellar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, M. I. R.; Jelić, V.; Ferrière, K.; Boulanger, F.

    2016-12-01

    Magnetic fields are a key constituent of the interstellar medium of our Galaxy. However, their exact role in the Galactic ecosystem is still poorly understood since we do not yet have a complete view of its structure in the Galaxy. This is about to change with the Faraday tomography technique, which allows us to derive the magnetic field in separate regions along the line of sight. We first describe the principle of Faraday tomography and illustrate the power of this novel technique with some of the latest results from the LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR). We present preliminary results of our LOFAR project, aimed at investigating the origin of the filamentary-like structures revealed by Faraday tomography observations.

  6. Fabry-Perot enhanced Faraday rotation in graphene.

    PubMed

    Ubrig, Nicolas; Crassee, Iris; Levallois, Julien; Nedoliuk, Ievgeniia O; Fromm, Felix; Kaiser, Michl; Seyller, Thomas; Kuzmenko, Alexey B

    2013-10-21

    We demonstrate that giant Faraday rotation in graphene in the terahertz range due to the cyclotron resonance is further increased by constructive Fabry-Perot interference in the supporting substrate. Simultaneously, an enhanced total transmission is achieved, making this effect doubly advantageous for graphene-based magneto-optical applications. As an example, we present far-infrared spectra of epitaxial multilayer graphene grown on the C-face of 6H-SiC, where the interference fringes are spectrally resolved and a Faraday rotation up to 0.15 radians (9°) is attained. Further, we discuss and compare other ways to increase the Faraday rotation using the principle of an optical cavity.

  7. Fabry-Perot enhanced Faraday rotation in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ubrig, Nicolas; Crassee, Iris; Levallois, Julien; Nedoliuk, Ievgeniia O.; Fromm, Felix; Kaiser, Michl; Seyller, Thomas; Kuzmenko, Alexey B.

    2013-10-01

    We demonstrate that giant Faraday rotation in graphene in the terahertz range due to the cyclotron resonance is further increased by constructive Fabry-Perot interference in the supporting substrate. Simultaneously, an enhanced total transmission is achieved, making this effect doubly advantageous for graphene-based magneto-optical applications. As an example, we present far-infrared spectra of epitaxial multilayer graphene grown on the C-face of 6H-SiC, where the interference fringes are spectrally resolved and a Faraday rotation up to 0.15 radians (9{\\deg}) is attained. Further, we discuss and compare other ways to increase the Faraday rotation using the principle of an optical cavity.

  8. Evaluation of Plume Divergence and Facility Effects on Far-Field Faraday Probe Current Density Profiles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    elevated background pressure, compared nude Faraday probe designs, and evaluated design modifications to minimize uncertainty due to charge exchange...evaluated Faraday probe design and facility background pressure on collected ion current. A comparison of two nude Faraday probe designs concluded...140.5 Plasma potential in the region surrounding a nude Faraday probe has been measured to study the possibility of probe bias voltage acting as a

  9. Multi-chord Faraday-Effect measurements of fluctuations in C-Mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergerson, William; Xu, P.; Brower, D. L.; Ding, W. X.; Irby, J. H.

    2012-10-01

    Three chords measuring the Faraday effect are operated routinely across all machine conditions in C-mod and allow for internal measurements of the equilibrium poloidal magnetic field. Absolute error attributed to stray magnetic field effects is below 0.5 degree and noise related to contamination from the lower hybrid and ion cyclotron radio frequency systems are not observed. Tests indicate there is no measurable signal contamination from the toroidal magnetic field due to the Cotton-Mouton effect or misalignment. Polarization sensitivity of the wire mesh beamsplitters requires system calibration which is achieved using a rotating half-wave plate. Individual channels can be modified to measure the Cotton-Mouton effect directly and yield a line integrated density measurement without ``fringe skips.'' Fluctuations on the Faraday signal associated with sawteeth, tearing modes, the quasi-coherent mode, broadband turbulence, and fast particle driven modes are observed at frequencies up to 1 MHz. Efforts are underway to differentiate between density and magnetic fluctuations in the polarimetry measurement via cross correlation techniques and combined density measurements. This work supported by DOE contract DE-FG02-01ER54615 and DE-FC02-99ER54512-CMOD.

  10. Faraday-Effect Polarimeter-Interferometer System for current density measurement on EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haiqing; Jie, Yinxian; Ding, Weixing; Brower, David Lyn; Zou, Zhiyong; Li, Weiming; Qian, Jinping; Yang, Yao; Zeng, Long; Lan, Ting; Li, Gongshun; Hu, Liqun; Wan, Baonian

    2014-10-01

    A multichannel far-infrared laser-based POlarimeter-INTerferometer (POINT) system utilizing the three-wave technique is under development for current density and electron density profile measurements in the EAST tokamak. Novel molybdenum retro-reflectors are mounted in the inside wall for the double-pass optical arrangement. A Digital Phase Detector with 250 kHz bandwidth, which will provide real-time Faraday rotation angle and density phase shift output, have been developed for use on the POINT system. System time response (~1 microsecond) and phase resolution (<0.1°) allows resolution of fast equilibrium changes associated with MHD events. Initial calibration indicates the electron line-integrated density resolution is less than 5 × 1016 m-2 (~2°), and the Faraday rotation angle rms phase noise is <0.1°. Initial results of POINT system will be presented. This work is supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Program of China Contract No. 2012GB101002. This work is partly supported by the US D.O.E. Contract DESC0010469.

  11. Scientific Verification of Faraday Rotation Modulators: Detection of Diffuse Polarized Galactic Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moyerman, S.; Bierman, E.; Ade, P. A. R.; Aiken, R.; Barkats, D.; Bischoff, C.; Bock, J. J.; Chiang, H. C.; Dowell, C. D.; Duband, L.; hide

    2012-01-01

    The design and performance of a wide bandwidth linear polarization-modulator based on the Faraday effect is described. Faraday Rotation Modulators (FRMs) are solid-state polarization switches that are capable of modulation up to approx 10 kHz. Six FRMs were utilized during the 2006 observing season in the Background Imaging of Cosmic Extragalactic Polarization (BICEP) experiment; three FRMs were used at each of BICEP fs 100 and 150 GHz frequency bands. The technology was verified through high signal-to-noise detection of Galactic polarization using two of the six FRMs during four observing runs in 2006. The features exhibit strong agreement with BICEP fs measurements of the Galaxy using non-FRM pixels and with the Galactic polarization models. This marks the first detection of high signal-to-noise mm-wave celestial polarization using fast, active optical modulation. The performance of the FRMs during periods when they were not modulated was also analyzed and compared to results from BICEP fs 43 pixels without FRMs.

  12. Faraday Rotation Distributions from Stellar Magnetism in Wind-blown Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignace, R.; Pingel, N. M.

    2013-03-01

    Faraday rotation is a valuable tool for detecting magnetic fields. Here, the technique is considered in relation to wind-blown bubbles. In the context of spherical winds with azimuthal or split monopole stellar magnetic field geometries, we derive maps of the distribution of position angle (P.A.) rotation of linearly polarized radiation across projected bubbles. We show that the morphology of maps for split monopole fields are distinct from those produced by the toroidal field topology; however, the toroidal case is the one most likely to be detectable because of its slower decline in field strength with distance from the star. We also consider the important case of a bubble with a spherical sub-volume that is field-free to approximate crudely a "swept-up" wind interaction between a fast wind (or possibly a supernova ejecta shell) overtaking a slower magnetized wind from a prior state of stellar evolution. With an azimuthal field, the resultant P.A. map displays two arc-like features of opposite rotation measure, similar to observations of the supernova remnant G296.5+10.0. We illustrate how P.A. maps can be used to disentangle Faraday rotation contributions made by the interstellar medium versus the bubble. Although our models involve simplifying assumptions, their consideration leads to a number of general robust conclusions for use in the analysis of radio mapping data sets.

  13. Evaluation of ion collection area in Faraday probes.

    PubMed

    Brown, Daniel L; Gallimore, Alec D

    2010-06-01

    A Faraday probe with three concentric rings was designed and fabricated to assess the effect of gap width and collector diameter in a systematic study of the diagnostic ion collection area. The nested Faraday probe consisted of two concentric collector rings and an outer guard ring, which enabled simultaneous current density measurements on the inner and outer collectors. Two versions of the outer collector were fabricated to create gaps of 0.5 and 1.5 mm between the rings. Distribution of current density in the plume of a low-power Hall thruster ion source was measured in azimuthal sweeps at constant radius from 8 to 20 thruster diameters downstream of the exit plane with variation in facility background pressure. A new analytical technique is proposed to account for ions collected in the gap between the Faraday probe collector and guard ring. This method is shown to exhibit excellent agreement between all nested Faraday probe configurations, and to reduce the magnitude of integrated ion beam current to levels consistent with Hall thruster performance analyses. The technique is further studied by varying the guard ring bias potential with a fixed collector bias potential, thereby controlling ion collection in the gap. Results are in agreement with predictions based on the proposed analytical technique. The method is applied to a past study comparing the measured ion current density profiles of two Faraday probe designs. These findings provide new insight into the nature of ion collection in Faraday probe diagnostics, and lead to improved accuracy with a significant reduction in measurement uncertainty.

  14. An assessment of the lifetime of Faraday shield elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caughman, J. B. O., II; Ruzic, D. N.; Hoffman, D. J.; Langley, R. A.; Lewis, M. B.; Ryan, P. M.

    The interaction of plasma with RF fields from an ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) antenna has been studied to estimate the amount of Faraday shield erosion expected in normal ICRF heating operation. Plasma parameters and ion energies have been measured in the near field of an antenna and used in a model to estimate the erosion rate of the Faraday shield surface. Experiments were conducted on the RF Test Facility, a magnetic mirror device at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, using a single-strap resonant loop antenna with a two-tier Faraday shield. The outer tier, facing the plasma, was layered with graphite tiles. The antenna was operated at currents and voltages within 50 percent of those expected in tokamaks. The time-varying floating potential was measured with a capacitively coupled probe, and the time-averaged floating potential, electron temperature, and electron density were measured with a Langmuir probe. Ion energies were measured with a gridded energy analyzer located below the antenna, and samples of silicon were placed on the Faraday shield surface to estimate the incident ion energy. The capacitive probe measurements show that the RF floating potential follows the magnetic field pattern of the antenna, indicating that the electromagnetic fields are responsible for the potential formation. Plasma parameters and ion energies have been correlated with the antenna current and used in a computational model of the plasma sheath to predict the amount of erosion expected from the Faraday shield elements exposed to plasma. Predictions of light ion sputtering of candidate Faraday shield materials are presented.

  15. An assessment of the lifetime of Faraday shield elements

    SciTech Connect

    Caughman, J.B.O. II; Ruzic, D.N. ); Hoffman, D.J.; Langley, R.A.; Lewis, M.B.; Ryan, P.M. )

    1990-01-01

    The interaction of plasma with rf fields from an ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) antenna has been studied to estimate the amount of Faraday shield erosion expected in normal ICRF heating operation. Plasma parameters and ion energies have been measured in the near field of an antenna and used in a model to estimate the erosion rate of the Faraday shield surface. Experiments were conducted on the RF Test Facility, a magnetic mirror device at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, using a single-strap resonant loop antenna with a two-tier Faraday shield. The outer tier, facing the plasma, was layered with graphite tiles. The antenna was operated at currents and voltages within 50% of those expected in tokamaks. The time-varying floating potential was measured with a capacitively coupled probe, and the time-averaged floating potential, electron temperature, and electron density were measured with a Langmuir probe. Ion energies were measured with a gridded energy analyser located below the antenna, and samples of silicon were placed on the Faraday shield surface to estimate the incident ion energy. The capacitive probe measurements show that the rf floating potential follows the magnetic field pattern of the antenna, indicating that the electromagnetic fields are responsible for the potential formation. Plasma parameters and ion energies have been correlated with the antenna current and used in a computational model of the plasma sheath to predict the amount of erosion expected from the Faraday shield elements exposed to plasma. Predictions of light ion sputtering of candidate Faraday shield materials are presented.

  16. The fast track to canonical Wnt signaling in MC3T3-E1 cells protected by substance P against serum deprivation-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jianguo; Nie, Jiping; Fu, Su; Liu, Song; Wu, Jianqun; Cui, Liang; Zhang, Yongtao; Yu, Bin

    2017-01-01

    The canonical Wnt pathway is vital to bone physiology by increasing bone mass through elevated osteoblast survival. Although investigated extensively in stem cells, its role in osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells has not been completely determined. To explore how this pathway is regulated by different conditions, we assessed the anti-apoptotic effects of substance P on the canonical Wnt pathway in MC3T3-E1 cells by treating cells with serum deprivation or serum starving with "substance P," a neuropeptide demonstrated to promote bone growth and stimulate Wnt signaling. The results showed that serum deprivation both induced apoptosis and activated Wnt signal transduction while substance P further stimulated the Wnt pathway via the NK-1 receptor but protected the cells from apoptotic death. Fast-tracking of Wnt signaling by substance P was also noted. These results indicate that nutritional deprivation and substance P synergistically activated the canonical Wnt pathway, a finding that helps to reveal the role of Wnt signaling in bone physiology affected by nutritional deprivation and neuropeptide substance P.

  17. Fast intra-operative non-linear registration of 3D-CT to tracked, selected 2D-ultrasound slices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olesch, Janine; Beuthien, Björn; Heldmann, Stefan; Papenberg, Nils; Fischer, Bernd

    2011-03-01

    In navigated liver surgery it is an important task to align intra-operative data to pre-operative planning data. This work describes a method to register pre-operative 3D-CT-data to tracked intra-operative 2D US-slices. Instead of reconstructing a 3D-volume out of the two-dimensional US-slice sequence we directly apply the registration scheme to the 2D-slices. The advantage of this approach is manyfold. We circumvent the time consuming compounding process, we use only known information, and the complexity of the scheme reduces drastically. As the liver is a non-rigid organ, we apply non-linear techniques to take care of deformations occurring during the intervention. During the surgery, computing time is a crucial issue. As the complexity of the scheme is proportional to the number of acquired slices, we devise a scheme which starts out by selecting a few "key-slices" to be used in the non-linear registration scheme. This step is followed by multi-level/multi-scale strategies and fast optimization techniques. In this abstract we briefly describe the new method and show first convincing results.

  18. Relationship between self-reported pain sensitivity and pain after total knee arthroplasty: a prospective study of 71 patients 8 weeks after a standardized fast-track program

    PubMed Central

    Valeberg, Berit T; Høvik, Lise H; Gjeilo, Kari H

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose This was a prospective cohort study assessing data from 71 adult patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA) following a standardized fast-track program between January and July 2013. The objective was to examine the relationship between self-rated pain sensitivity, as measured by the Pain Sensitivity Questionnaire (PSQ), and postoperative pain after TKA. Methods The baseline questionnaires, PSQ and Brief Pain Inventory, were given to the patients for self-administration at the presurgical evaluation (1–2 weeks prior to surgery). The follow-up questionnaire, Brief Pain Inventory, was administered at the first follow-up, 8 weeks after surgery. Results A statistically significant association was found between average preoperative pain and average pain 8 weeks after surgery (P=0.001). The PSQ-minor was statistically significantly associated with average pain only for patients younger than 70 years (P=0.03). Interpretation This is the first study to examine the relationship between pain sensitivity measured by PSQ and postoperative pain in patients after TKA. We found that a lower score on the PSQ-minor was statistically significantly associated with patients’ pain 8 weeks after TKA surgery, but only for younger patients. Further research is needed to explore whether the PSQ could be a useful screening tool for patients’ pain sensitivity in clinical settings. PMID:27660489

  19. All-Fiber Optical Faraday Mirror Using 56-wt%-Terbium-Doped Fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, L.; Jiang, S.; Marciante, J.R.

    2010-06-22

    An all-fiber optical Faraday mirror that consists of a fiber Faraday rotator and a fiber Bragg grating is demonstrated. The fiber Faraday rotator uses a 21-cm-long section of 56-wt%-terbium-doped silicate fiber. The polarization state of the reflected light is rotated 89 degrees +/- 2 degrees with a 16-dB polarization extinction ratio.

  20. Compensation of thermally induced polarisation distortions in Faraday isolators

    SciTech Connect

    Khazanov, E A

    1999-01-31

    Two new Faraday isolator designs are proposed. They make it possible to compensate partly for the depolarisation of radiation which occurs in magneto-optical elements because of the photoelastic effect caused by heating associated with the absorption of laser radiation. Analytic and numerical comparisons of the new and traditional designs demonstrate a significant (by orders of magnitude) increase in the isolation ratio of the new isolators. The results obtained indicate that it should be possible to construct a Faraday isolator with the isolation ratio of 30 dB for laser radiation with an average power of several kilowatts. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  1. Microscopic Faraday rotation measurement system using pulsed magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Egami, Shigeki; Watarai, Hitoshi

    2009-09-01

    Microscopic Faraday rotation measurement system using a pulsed magnetic field has been constructed, which can be applied to micron sized diamagnetic and paramagnetic materials. A pulsed magnetic coil could generate a maximum magnetic flux density of about 12 T. The performance of the microscopic Faraday rotation apparatus was demonstrated by the measurement of the Verdet constant V of a polystyrene particle, after the calibration of the pulsed magnetic flux density using a glass plate as a standard material. Also, the magneto-optical rotation dispersion of some diamagnetic substances have been measured and analyzed with V=alambda(-2)+b. The values of a and b were compared to their magnetic susceptibilities.

  2. Earth-based observations of Faraday rotation in radio bursts from Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, J. A.; Ferree, Thomas C.; Wang, Joe

    1989-01-01

    New observations have been made of Faraday rotation in decameter-wavelength radio bursts from the planet Jupiter. Data obtained during six Io-B storms clearly indicate that an appreciable fraction of the observed Faraday rotation occurs in the Jovian magnetosphere. All of the Faraday rotation observed during a single Io-A storm can be accounted for by earth's ionosphere. Measurements of the Faraday effect in Io-B emissions indicate that the source is in Jupiter's northern magnetic hemisphere. Observations of the Faraday effect in Io-C emissions are proposed to determine its location as well.

  3. Faraday, Dickens and Science Education in Victorian Britain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melville, Wayne; Allingham, Philip V.

    2011-01-01

    The achievements of Michael Faraday in the fields of electricity and electrochemistry have led some to describe him as the greatest experimental scientist in history. Charles Dickens was the creative genius behind some of the most memorable characters in literature. In this article, we share an historical account of how the collaboration of these…

  4. Faraday signature of magnetic helicity from reduced depolarization

    SciTech Connect

    Brandenburg, Axel; Stepanov, Rodion

    2014-05-10

    Using one-dimensional models, we show that a helical magnetic field with an appropriate sign of helicity can compensate the Faraday depolarization resulting from the superposition of Faraday-rotated polarization planes from a spatially extended source. For radio emission from a helical magnetic field, the polarization as a function of the square of the wavelength becomes asymmetric with respect to zero. Mathematically speaking, the resulting emission occurs then either at observable or at unobservable (imaginary) wavelengths. We demonstrate that rotation measure (RM) synthesis allows for the reconstruction of the underlying Faraday dispersion function in the former case, but not in the latter. The presence of positive magnetic helicity can thus be detected by observing positive RM in highly polarized regions in the sky and negative RM in weakly polarized regions. Conversely, negative magnetic helicity can be detected by observing negative RM in highly polarized regions and positive RM in weakly polarized regions. The simultaneous presence of two magnetic constituents with opposite signs of helicity is shown to possess signatures that can be quantified through polarization peaks at specific wavelengths and the gradient of the phase of the Faraday dispersion function. Similar polarization peaks can tentatively also be identified for the bi-helical magnetic fields that are generated self-consistently by a dynamo from helically forced turbulence, even though the magnetic energy spectrum is then continuous. Finally, we discuss the possibility of detecting magnetic fields with helical and non-helical properties in external galaxies using the Square Kilometre Array.

  5. Michael Faraday: Prince of lecturers in Victorian England

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Boon Leong; Lim, Jeanette B. S.

    2001-01-01

    In this note, we focus on Faraday as a lecturer/teacher. We trace his development as a lecturer/teacher and highlight his approaches in popular-science lecturing and in teaching chemistry to military cadets. We appraise his success and conclude with an account of his poignant last lecture.

  6. Professor Henry, Mr. Faraday, and the Hunt for Electromagnetic Induction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyer, Albert E.

    1997-04-01

    On different sides of the Atlantic but about the same time, Michael Faraday and Joseph Henry announced success in a quest that had preoccupied the scientific community for a decade: coaxing electricity from magnetism. "Mutual induction," what Faraday and Henry had identified in the early 1830s, would turn out to be not only a foundational concept in the physics of electricity and magnetism but also the principle behind the technology of electrical transformers and generators--two mainstays of industrialization. Although Faraday's breakthrough in London and Henry's in Albany might appear to be classic examples of "independent discovery," they were not. The two natural philosophers shared a similar orientation toward their research and, moreover, a distinctive laboratory instrument: Henry's new, powerful electromagnet. Thus, the story of Henry's and Faraday's search for induction illuminates not only the workings of Victorian science but also the crucial part that an instrument--the unadorned hardware--can play in scientific inquiry. Albert Moyer takes this story from his biography of Joseph Henry that Smithsonian Institution Press is about to publish in commemoration of the 200th anniversary of Henry's birth. The biography focuses on Henry's early and middle years, 1797-1847, from his emergence as America's foremost physical scientist to his election as the Smithsonian Institution's first director.

  7. Theoretical model for a Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yin, B.; Shay, T. M.

    1991-01-01

    A model for the Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter is presented. The model predicts a bandwidth of 0.6 GHz and a transmission peak of 0.98 for a filter operating on the Cs (D2) line. The model includes hyperfine effects and is valid for arbitrary magnetic fields.

  8. Concluding remarks: Faraday Discussion on chemistry in the urban atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Jimenez, Jose L

    2016-07-18

    This article summarises the Concluding remarks from the Faraday Discussion on Chemistry in the Urban Atmosphere. The following themes are addressed: (a) new results that inform our understanding of the evolving sources and composition of the urban atmosphere ("News"); (b) results that identify gaps in our understanding that necessitate further work ("Gaps");

  9. High-power Faraday isolators based on TAG ceramics.

    PubMed

    Zheleznov, Dmitry; Starobor, Aleksey; Palashov, Oleg; Chen, Chong; Zhou, Shengming

    2014-02-10

    The Faraday isolator based on a new magneto-optical medium--TAG (terbium aluminum garnet) ceramics was implemented and investigated experimentally. The magneto-optical element was temperature-stabilized using water cooling. The device provides a stable isolation ratio of 38 dB at 300 W laser power. Estimates show high performance of the device at a kilowatt laser power.

  10. Faraday's Investigation of Electromagnetic Induction. Experiment No. 21.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devons, Samuel

    This paper focuses on Michael Faraday's experimental research in electricity in the 1830's. Historical notes related to his work are included as well as experiments, his objectives, and illustrations of equipment for the experiments. Examples from his diary are given so that students can attempt to emulate his honest and systematic manner of…

  11. Faraday, Dickens and Science Education in Victorian Britain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melville, Wayne; Allingham, Philip V.

    2011-01-01

    The achievements of Michael Faraday in the fields of electricity and electrochemistry have led some to describe him as the greatest experimental scientist in history. Charles Dickens was the creative genius behind some of the most memorable characters in literature. In this article, we share an historical account of how the collaboration of these…

  12. VLA Measurements of Faraday Rotation through Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kooi, Jason E.; Fischer, Patrick D.; Buffo, Jacob J.; Spangler, Steven R.

    2017-04-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are large-scale eruptions of plasma from the Sun, which play an important role in space weather. Faraday rotation is the rotation of the plane of polarization that results when a linearly polarized signal passes through a magnetized plasma such as a CME. Faraday rotation is proportional to the path integral through the plasma of the electron density and the line-of-sight component of the magnetic field. Faraday-rotation observations of a source near the Sun can provide information on the plasma structure of a CME shortly after launch. We report on simultaneous white-light and radio observations made of three CMEs in August 2012. We made sensitive Very Large Array (VLA) full-polarization observations using 1 - 2 GHz frequencies of a constellation of radio sources through the solar corona at heliocentric distances that ranged from 6 - 15 R_{⊙}. Two sources (0842+1835 and 0900+1832) were occulted by a single CME, and one source (0843+1547) was occulted by two CMEs. In addition to our radioastronomical observations, which represent one of the first active hunts for CME Faraday rotation since Bird et al. ( Solar Phys., 98, 341, 1985) and the first active hunt using the VLA, we obtained white-light coronagraph images from the Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) C3 instrument to determine the Thomson-scattering brightness [BT], providing a means to independently estimate the plasma density and determine its contribution to the observed Faraday rotation. A constant-density force-free flux rope embedded in the background corona was used to model the effects of the CMEs on BT and Faraday rotation. The plasma densities (6 - 22×103 cm^{-3}) and axial magnetic-field strengths (2 - 12 mG) inferred from our models are consistent with the modeling work of Liu et al. ( Astrophys. J., 665, 1439, 2007) and Jensen and Russell ( Geophys. Res. Lett., 35, L02103, 2008), as well as previous CME Faraday-rotation observations by Bird et al

  13. Fast Track Communication: Magnetic QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, C.

    2008-12-01

    A non-Hermitian form of quantum electrodynamics (QED) is presented which describes interacting Dirac monopoles. The theory is related by a canonical transformation to a model proposed by Milton. As in Hermitian QED an Abelian gauge potential is coupled to a four-component fermion. Under proper Lorentz transformations and time reversal, the fermion field transforms like a Dirac spinor but has a non-standard parity transformation. This implements the property that magnetic charge, unlike electric charge, is parity odd. A consequence of the non-Hermiticity is that there is an attractive force between identical charged particles, at least in the weakly coupled regime. This effect can be understood even at the classical level; a simple calculation of the force between classical Dirac monopoles is presented which shows that like charge monopoles attract and opposite charges repel.

  14. Thromboembolic and major bleeding events in relation to perioperative bridging of vitamin K antagonists in 649 fast-track total hip and knee arthroplasties

    PubMed Central

    Jørgensen, Christoffer C; Kehlet, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    Background — The benefit of preoperative bridging in surgical patients with continuous anticoagulant therapy is debatable, and drawing of meaningful conclusions may have been limited by mixed procedures with different thromboembolic and bleeding risks in most published studies. Patients and methods — This was an observational cohort treatment study in consecutive primary unilateral total hip and knee arthroplasty patients between January 2010 and November 2013 in 8 Danish fast-track departments. Data were collected prospectively on preoperative comorbidity and anticoagulants in patients with preoperative vitamin K antagonist (VKA) treatment. We performed 30-day follow-up on in-hospital complications and re-admissions through the Danish National Patient Registry and patient records. Results — Of 13,375 procedures, 649 (4.7%) were in VKA patients with a mean age of 73 (SD 9) years and a median length of stay of 3 days (IQR: 2–4). Preoperative bridging was used in 430 (67%), while 215 (33%) were paused. Of 4 arterial thromboembolic events (ATEs) (0.6%), 2 were in paused patients and 2 were in bridged patients (p = 0.6). Of 3 venous thromboembolic events (VTEs) (0.5%), 2 were in paused patients and 1 was in a bridged patient (p = 0.3). Of 8 major bleedings (MBs) (1.2%), 1 was in a paused patient and 7 were in bridged patients (p = 0.3), 5 of whom received therapeutic bridging. Similar results were found in a propensity-matched cohort. Interpretation — In contrast to recent studies in mixed surgical procedures, no statistically significant differences in ATE, VTE, or MB were found between preoperative bridging and pausation of VKA patients. However, the higher number of thromboembolic events in paused patients and the higher number of major bleedings in bridged patients warrant more extensive investigation. PMID:27759465

  15. Impact of restrictive intravenous fluid replacement and combined epidural analgesia on perioperative volume balance and renal function within a Fast Track program.

    PubMed

    Hübner, Martin; Schäfer, Markus; Demartines, Nicolas; Müller, Sven; Maurer, Konrad; Baulig, Werner; Clavien, Pierre A; Zalunardo, Marco P

    2012-03-01

    Key factors of Fast Track (FT) programs are fluid restriction and epidural analgesia (EDA). We aimed to challenge the preconception that the combination of fluid restriction and EDA might induce hypotension and renal dysfunction. A recent randomized trial (NCT00556790) showed reduced complications after colectomy in FT patients compared with standard care (SC). Patients with an effective EDA were compared with regard to hemodynamics and renal function. 61/76 FT patients and 59/75 patients in the SC group had an effective EDA. Both groups were comparable regarding demographics and surgery-related characteristics. FT patients received significantly less i.v. fluids intraoperatively (1900 mL [range 1100-4100] versus 2900 mL [1600-5900], P < 0.0001) and postoperatively (700 mL [400-1500] versus 2300 mL [1800-3800], P < 0.0001). Intraoperatively, 30 FT compared with 19 SC patients needed colloids or vasopressors, but this was statistically not significant (P = 0.066). Postoperative requirements were low in both groups (3 versus 5 patients; P = 0.487). Pre- and postoperative values for creatinine, hematocrit, sodium, and potassium were similar, and no patient developed renal dysfunction in either group. Only one of 82 patients having an EDA without a bladder catheter had urinary retention. Overall, FT patients had fewer postoperative complications (6 versus 20 patients; P = 0.002) and a shorter median hospital stay (5 [2-30] versus 9 d [6-30]; P< 0.0001) compared with the SC group. Fluid restriction and EDA in FT programs are not associated with clinically relevant hemodynamic instability or renal dysfunction. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Implementing a comprehensive program for the prevention of conduct problems in rural communities: the Fast Track experience. The Conduct Problems Prevention Research Group.

    PubMed

    Bierman, K L

    1997-08-01

    Childhood conduct problems are predictive of a number of serious long-term difficulties (e.g., school failure, delinquent behavior, and mental health problems), making the design of effective prevention programs a priority. The Fast Track Program is a demonstration project currently underway in four demographically diverse areas of the United States, testing the feasibility and effectiveness of a comprehensive, multicomponent prevention program targeting children at risk for conduct disorders. This paper describes some lessons learned about the implementation of this program in a rural area. Although there are many areas of commonality in terms of program needs, program design, and implementation issues in rural and urban sites, rural areas differ from urban areas along the dimensions of geographical dispersion and regionalism, and community stability and insularity. Rural programs must cover a broad geographical area and must be sensitive to the multiple, small and regional communities that constitute their service area. Small schools, homogeneous populations, traditional values, limited recreational, educational and mental health services, and politically conservative climates are all more likely to emerge as characteristics of rural rather than urban sites (Sherman, 1992). These characteristics may both pose particular challenges to the implementation of prevention programs in rural areas, as well as offer particular benefits. Three aspects of program implementation are described in detail: (a) community entry and program initiation in rural areas, (b) the adaptation of program components and service delivery to meet the needs of rural families and schools, and (c) issues in administrative organization of a broadly dispersed tricounty rural prevention program.

  17. A fast-track anaemia clinic in the Emergency Department: cost-analysis of intravenous iron administration for treating iron-deficiency anaemia

    PubMed Central

    Quintana-Díaz, Manuel; Muñoz-Romo, Raúl; Gómez-Ramírez, Susana; Pavía, José; Borobia, Alberto M.; García-Erce, José A.; Muñoz, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Background A fast-track anaemia clinic (FTAC) for the management of moderate-to-severe iron-deficiency anaemia (IDA) was established in our Emergency Department in 2010. In this FTAC, the replacement of packed red cell transfusion by ferric carboxymaltose administration was proven to be safe and effective. The aim of this study was a cost-analysis of IDA management in the FTAC, comparing this management with the previous standard care pathway consisting of packed red cell transfusion, if needed, and referral to outpatient specialised care. Materials and methods A cost study was performed for patients with IDA who were at risk of requiring transfusion (haemoglobin <9 g/dL) but did not require hospitalisation. Total IDA treatment costs in the FTAC were compared to those theoretically incurred if these patients had been managed using the standard care pathway. In addition, a sensitivity analysis considering variations of up to ±30% in ferric carboxymaltose and packed red cell acquisition costs was performed (49 possible scenarios). Results Between 2012 and 2015, 238 IDA patients were treated in the FTAC. The average treatment cost was € 594±337/patient in the FTAC group and € 672±301/patient in the standard care pathway group, with a saving of € 78±28/patient (95% CI, 22–133; p<0.001). The sensitivity analysis showed that IDA treatment costs in the FTAC (€ 480–722/patient), compared with those of the standard care pathway (€ 550–794/patient), resulted in significant cost-savings for all studied scenarios (€ 51–104/patient; p<0.005). Discussion The administration of ferric carboxymaltose for IDA management in a FTAC may be cost-saving compared with the standard care pathway. PMID:28151394

  18. A multicentre comparison of a fast track or conventional postoperative protocol following laparoscopic or open elective surgery for colorectal cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Esteban, F; Cerdan, F J; Garcia-Alonso, M; Sanz-Lopez, R; Arroyo, A; Ramirez, J M; Moreno, C; Morales, R; Navarro, A; Fuentes, M

    2014-02-01

    The introduction of multimodal or fast track (FT) rehabilitation and laparoscopy in colorectal surgery has improved patient recovery and shortened hospital stay (HS). This study aimed to determine the influence of laparoscopic or open surgery on the postoperative recovery of colorectal cancer patients having a conventional care (CC) or FT protocol in the postoperative period. A multicentre prospective study was controlled with a retrospective group. The prospective group included 300 patients having elective colorectal resection for cancer. The retrospective control group included 201 patients with the same characteristics who were treated before the introduction of the programme. The patients were divided into four groups including laparoscopy + FT, open surgery + FT, laparoscopy + CC, and open surgery + CC. The primary end-points were HS and morbidity. Secondary end-points included mortality and reoperation rates. The overall median HS was 7 days. The median HS for laparoscopy + FT was 5 days, open + FT 6 days, laparoscopy + CC 9 days and open + CC 10 days (P < 0.001). In the regression model the laparoscopy + FT group had the greatest reduction in HS (P < 0.001). A significant reduction in HS was observed in the laparoscopy + FT group compared with laparoscopy + CC (P < 0.001). The overall patient morbidity was 30.6%. The logistic regression model adjusted for propensity score showed no statistically significant differences between the study groups regarding all other end-points. Colorectal cancer patients who underwent laparoscopic surgery within a multimodal rehabilitation protocol experienced the shortest HS and the lowest morbidity. Colorectal Disease © 2013 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  19. TNF-α concentrations in pre-operative synovial fluid for predicting early post-operative function and pain after fast-track total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Zietek, Pawel; Dziedziejko, Violetta; Safranow, Krzysztof; Zietek, Joanna; Stępień-Słodkowska, Marta; Bialecka, Monika; Zietek, Maciej; Kotrych, Daniel; Kamiński, Adam; Kowalska, Aleksandra

    2016-12-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) helps regulate neuroinflammation and anxiety and could conceivable predict early post-operative pain and function after fast-track total knee arthroplasty (TKA). In patients with severe osteoarthritic knees undergoing TKA, we assessed: the correlations between pre-operative concentrations of TNF-α in synovial fluid; pre- and six-week post-operative knee function and pain; pre- and post-operative anxiety; pre- and post-operative synovial fluid concentrations of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP); age and body mass index (BMI). Of 100 enrolled patients, 78 had evaluable TNF-α data, and 58 had evaluable COMP data. Pre-operative TNF-α concentrations were inversely correlated with post-operative pain scores during walking (rS=-0.26, P=0.03) and with change of pain at rest during six weeks after TKA (rs=-0.28, P=0.03) and were directly correlated with a higher post-operative Knee Society score (KSS) (rS=0.43, P<0.001) and with greater increases in this score during six weeks after TKA (rS=0.33, P=0.001). Mean TNF-α concentrations were higher in the 39 patients reporting any pre-operative pain at rest than in 36 patients reporting no pre-operative pain (P=0.015) and were the only independent predictor of pre-operative pain at rest (OR=13, P=0.02). Independent predictors of better post-operative knee function were higher log-transformed TNF-α concentrations (β=0.38, P=0.002) and male sex (β=0.28, P=0.02). High levels of pre-operative TNF-α concentrations could be used as an independent predictor of better knee function at six weeks of follow-up. In patients with lower pre-operative TNF-α concentrations, post-operative pain management may improve the early outcome of the operated joint. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. CRADA Final Report, 2011S003, Faraday Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Faraday Technologies

    2012-12-12

    This Phase I SBIR program addressed the need for an improved manufacturing process for electropolishing niobium RF superconducting cavities for the International Linear Collider (ILC). The ILC is a proposed particle accelerator that will be used to gain a deeper understanding of the forces of energy and matter by colliding beams of electrons and positrons at nearly the speed of light. The energy required for this to happen will be achieved through the use of advanced superconducting technology, specifically ~16,000 RF superconducting cavities operating at near absolute zero. The RF superconductor cavities will be fabricated from highly pure Nb, which has an extremely low surface resistance at 2 Kelvin when compared to other materials. To take full advantage of the superconducting properties of the Nb cavities, the inner surface must be a) polished to a microscale roughness < 0.1 µm with removal of at least 100 µm of material, and b) cleaned to be free of impurities that would degrade performance of the ILC. State-of-the-art polishing uses either chemical polishing or electropolishing, both of which require hydrofluoric acid to achieve breakdown of the strong passive film on the surface. In this Phase I program, Faraday worked with its collaborators at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) to demonstrate the feasibility of an electropolishing process for pure niobium, utilizing an environmentally benign alternative to chemical or electrochemical polishing electrolytes containing hydrofluoric acid. Faraday utilized a 31 wt% aqueous sulfuric acid solution (devoid of hydrofluoric acid) in conjunction with the FARADAYICSM Process, which uses pulse/pulse reverse fields for electropolishing, to demonstrate the ability to electropolish niobium to the desired surface finish. The anticipated benefits of the FARADAYICSM Electropolishing process will be a simpler, safer, and less expensive method capable of surface finishing high purity niobium cavities

  1. A Faraday effect position sensor for interventional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Bock, M; Umathum, R; Sikora, J; Brenner, S; Aguor, E N; Semmler, W

    2006-02-21

    An optical sensor is presented which determines the position and one degree of orientation within a magnetic resonance tomograph. The sensor utilizes the Faraday effect to measure the local magnetic field, which is modulated by switching additional linear magnetic fields, the gradients. Existing methods for instrument localization during an interventional MR procedure often use electrically conducting structures at the instruments that can heat up excessively during MRI and are thus a significant danger for the patient. The proposed optical Faraday effect position sensor consists of non-magnetic and electrically non-conducting components only so that heating is avoided and the sensor could be applied safely even within the human body. With a non-magnetic prototype set-up, experiments were performed to demonstrate the possibility of measuring both the localization and the orientation in a magnetic resonance tomograph. In a 30 mT m(-1) gradient field, a localization uncertainty of 1.5 cm could be achieved.

  2. Todd, Faraday and the electrical basis of brain activity.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Edward

    2007-10-01

    The origins of our understanding of brain electricity and electrical discharges in epilepsy can be traced to Robert Bentley Todd (1809-60). Todd was influenced by his contemporary in London, Michael Faraday (1791-1867), who in the 1830 s and 1840 s was laying the foundations of our modern understanding of electromagnetism. Todd's concept of nervous polarity, generated in nerve vesicles and transmitted in nerve fibres (neurons in later terminology), was confirmed a century later by the Nobel Prize-winning work of Hodgkin and Huxley, who demonstrated the ionic basis of neuro-transmission, involving the same ions which had had been discovered by Faraday's mentor, Sir Humphry Davy (1778-1829).

  3. Intracavity Faraday modulation spectroscopy (INFAMOS): A tool for radical detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gianella, Michele; Pinto, Tomas H. P.; Wu, Xia; Ritchie, Grant A. D.

    2017-08-01

    We present the intra-cavity Faraday modulation spectroscopy technique, whereby optical feedback cavity-enhanced spectroscopy is coupled with Faraday modulation spectroscopy to greatly enhance the interaction path length of a laser beam with a paramagnetic sample in a magnetic field. We describe a first prototype based upon a cw quantum cascade laser targeting a selection of fundamental rovibrational R-branch transitions of nitric oxide (1890 cm-1), consisting of a linear cavity (finesse F =6300 ) and a water-cooled solenoid. We demonstrate a minimum detectable Verdet constant of Vmin=4.7 ×10-14 rad cm-1 G-1 H z-1/2 (at SNR = 1), corresponding to a single-pass rotation angle of 1.6 ×10-10 rad Hz-1/2 and a limit of detection of 0.21 ppbv Hz-1/2 NO.

  4. Oscillon dynamics and rogue wave generation in Faraday surface ripples.

    PubMed

    Xia, H; Maimbourg, T; Punzmann, H; Shats, M

    2012-09-14

    We report new experimental results which suggest that the generation of extreme wave events in the Faraday surface ripples is related to the increase in the horizontal mobility of oscillating solitons (oscillons). The analysis of the oscillon trajectories in a horizontal plane shows that at higher vertical acceleration, oscillons move chaotically, merge and form enclosed areas on the water surface. The probability of the formation of such craters, which precede large wave events, increases with the increase in horizontal mobility.

  5. Improved method for Faraday current sensor data processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, José A.; Perciante, César D.; Lagos, Alejandro; Frins, Erna M.

    2001-11-01

    There are several practical problems that have made difficult the prompt application of Faraday current sensors in industrial environments. Two of them are the multiplicative noise generated by mechanical vibrations and the normalization of the output signal. In this paper we propose a logarithmical processing and a posterior bandpass filtering of the sensor data in order to solve simultaneously both issues. Experimental results demonstrating the viability of the procedure and a comparison with standard processing methods are presented.

  6. Triangular-shaped bulk optic glass Faraday current sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Beatrice C.; Ning, Yanong N.; Jackson, David A.

    1993-03-01

    A new triangular topology for a bulk optic Faraday current sensor is presented with a demonstrated resolution of 20 mA/(root)Hz over a measurement range from 1 to 3000 A. The sensitivity of the system was 2.35 X 10-5 rad/A. This sensor is relatively easy to fabricate and overcome problems encountered using current sensors based upon bulk optic 'square' configurations and all fiber systems.

  7. A new approach for miniaturization of multiple faraday cup collectors.

    SciTech Connect

    Banar, J. C.; Chamberlin, E. P.; Poths, J.; Perrin, R. E.; Chastagner, P.

    2002-01-01

    The mass spectrometry section in CST-7 has been working for several years on a novel so0lution to overcome the size and placement restrictions of multiple Faraday cup collectors. Use of simultaneous collection of multiple isotopes both increases precision in the isotopic measurements and shortens the data collection time. Our application is for the measurement of the isotopic composition of Xe, ionized in a source that produces a large (10{sup -11} amp) but variable ion beam.

  8. A desktop Faraday rotation instrument in the ultraviolet.

    PubMed

    Ström, Valter; Rao, K V

    2008-02-01

    A simple versatile desktop instrument for the measurement of Faraday rotation in the ultraviolet range has been designed and constructed. A high pressure short arc mercury lamp is used for the light source. By using interference filter for mercury, the desired wavelength of the available lines for mercury (e.g., 365, 405, and 436 nm) is selected. Our instrument measures hysteresis loops in magnetic fields up to 900 kAm within a few minutes. With a light beam intensity monitor, the detrimental effect from fluctuations in the light source has been virtually eliminated. The instrument can operate at photocurrents from the picoampere regime and above with a Faraday rotation sensitivity of around 1 millideg. By incorporating a higher order Taylor expansion approach, we improve the linearity of the Faraday rotation to transmitted light relationship by two orders of magnitude. The electronics is custom designed analog type, rendering relaxed dynamic requirements for the analog-to-digital converter. The design is fully protected from ambient light which makes operation with the equipment in darkness superfluous; neither does it need any optical table. The data acquisition and operation of the instrument are fully supported by a LABVIEW program. Measurements on a magnetite thin film and on microscope cover glass are given as examples for the performance and sensitivity of the equipment.

  9. A desktop Faraday rotation instrument in the ultraviolet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ström, Valter; Rao, K. V.

    2008-02-01

    A simple versatile desktop instrument for the measurement of Faraday rotation in the ultraviolet range has been designed and constructed. A high pressure short arc mercury lamp is used for the light source. By using interference filter for mercury, the desired wavelength of the available lines for mercury (e.g., 365, 405, and 436 nm) is selected. Our instrument measures hysteresis loops in magnetic fields up to 900 kA/m within a few minutes. With a light beam intensity monitor, the detrimental effect from fluctuations in the light source has been virtually eliminated. The instrument can operate at photocurrents from the picoampere regime and above with a Faraday rotation sensitivity of around 1 millideg. By incorporating a higher order Taylor expansion approach, we improve the linearity of the Faraday rotation to transmitted light relationship by two orders of magnitude. The electronics is custom designed analog type, rendering relaxed dynamic requirements for the analog-to-digital converter. The design is fully protected from ambient light which makes operation with the equipment in darkness superfluous; neither does it need any optical table. The data acquisition and operation of the instrument are fully supported by a LABVIEW program. Measurements on a magnetite thin film and on microscope cover glass are given as examples for the performance and sensitivity of the equipment.

  10. Development and first experimental tests of Faraday cup array.

    PubMed

    Prokůpek, J; Kaufman, J; Margarone, D; Krůs, M; Velyhan, A; Krása, J; Burris-Mog, T; Busold, S; Deppert, O; Cowan, T E; Korn, G

    2014-01-01

    A new type of Faraday cup, capable of detecting high energy charged particles produced in a high intensity laser-matter interaction environment, has recently been developed and demonstrated as a real-time detector based on the time-of-flight technique. An array of these Faraday cups was designed and constructed to cover different observation angles with respect to the target normal direction. Thus, it allows reconstruction of the spatial distribution of ion current density in the subcritical plasma region and the ability to visualise its time evolution through time-of-flight measurements, which cannot be achieved with standard laser optical interferometry. This is a unique method for two-dimensional visualisation of ion currents from laser-generated plasmas. A technical description of the new type of Faraday cup is introduced along with an ad hoc data analysis procedure. Experimental results obtained during campaigns at the Petawatt High-Energy Laser for Heavy Ion Experiments (GSI, Darmstadt) and at the Prague Asterix Laser System (AS CR) are presented. Advantages and limitations of the used diagnostic system are discussed.

  11. Effects of interband transitions on Faraday rotation in metallic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wysin, G M; Chikan, Viktor; Young, Nathan; Dani, Raj Kumar

    2013-08-14

    The Faraday rotation in metallic nanoparticles is considered based on a quantum model for the dielectric function ϵ(ω) in the presence of a DC magnetic field B. We focus on effects in ϵ(ω) due to interband transitions (IBTs), which are important in the blue and ultraviolet for noble metals used in plasmonics. The dielectric function is found using the perturbation of the electron density matrix due to the optical field of the incident electromagnetic radiation. The calculation is applied to transitions between two bands (d and p, for example) separated by a gap, as one finds in gold at the L-point of the Fermi surface. The result of the DC magnetic field is a shift in the effective optical frequency causing IBTs by ±μBB/ħ, where opposite signs are associated with left/right circular polarizations. The Faraday rotation for a dilute solution of 17 nm diameter gold nanoparticles is measured and compared with both the IBT theory and a simpler Drude model for the bound electron response. Effects of the plasmon resonance mode on Faraday rotation in nanoparticles are also discussed.

  12. Toward instructional design principles: Inducing Faraday's law with contrasting cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Eric; Wieman, Carl E.

    2016-06-01

    Although physics education research (PER) has improved instructional practices, there are not agreed upon principles for designing effective instructional materials. Here, we illustrate how close comparison of instructional materials could support the development of such principles. Specifically, in discussion sections of a large, introductory physics course, a pair of studies compare two instructional strategies for teaching a physics concept: having students (i) explain a set of contrasting cases or (ii) apply and build on previously learned concepts. We compare these strategies for the teaching of Faraday's law, showing that explaining a set of related contrasting cases not only improves student performance on Faraday's law questions over building on a previously learned concept (i.e., Lorentz force), but also prepares students to better learn subsequent topics, such as Lenz's law. These differences persist to the final exam. We argue that early exposure to contrasting cases better focuses student attention on a key feature related to both concepts: change in magnetic flux. Importantly, the benefits of contrasting cases for both learning and enjoyment are enhanced for students who did not first attend a Faraday's law lecture, consistent with previous research suggesting that being told a solution can circumvent the benefits of its discovery. These studies illustrate an experimental approach for understanding how the structure of activities affects learning and performance outcomes, a first step toward design principles for effective instructional materials.

  13. Effects of Faraday Rotation Observed in Filter Magnetograph Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagyard, Mona J.; Adams, Mitzi L.; Smith, J. E.; West, Edward A.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we analyze the effects of Faraday rotation on the azimuth of the transverse magnetic field from observations taken with the Marshall Space Flight Center's vector magnetograph for a simple sunspot observed on June 9, 1985. Vector magnetograms were obtained over the wavelength interval of 170 mA redward of line center of the Fe I 5250.22 A spectral line to 170 mA to the blue, in steps of 10 mA. These data were analyzed to produce the variation of the azimuth as a function of wavelength at each pixel over the field of vi ew of the sunspot. At selected locations in the sunspot, curves of the observed variation of azimuth with wavelength were compared with model calculations for the amount of Faraday rotation of the azimuth. From these comparisons we derived the amount of rotation as functions of bo th the magnitude and inclination of the sunspot's field and deduced the ranges of these field values for which Faraday rotation presents a significant problem in observations taken near the center of a spectral line.

  14. Todd, Faraday, and the electrical basis of brain activity.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Edward H

    2004-09-01

    Robert Bentley Todd (1809-60) was the UK's first eminent neurologist and neuroscientist. An anatomist, physiologist, and clinical scientist with an interest in the nervous system, he was the first to confirm the electrical basis of brain activity in the 1840s. He was influenced by his contemporary, Michael Faraday at the Royal Institution, and by two colleagues at King's College, John Daniell and Charles Wheatstone, who were also working at the cutting edge of electrical science. Todd conceived of nervous polarity (force) generated in nervous centres and compared this with the polar force of voltaic electricity developed in the galvanic battery. He brilliantly foresaw each nerve vesicle (cell) and its related fibres (ie, neuron) as a distinct apparatus for the development and transmission of nervous polarity. Epilepsy was the result of periodic unnatural development of nervous force leading to the "disruptive discharge" described by Faraday. Faraday, who studied animal electricity in the Gymnotus (electric eel), and Todd saw nervous polarity as a higher form of interchangeable energy.

  15. Effects of Faraday Rotation Observed in Filter Magnetograph Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagyard, Mona J.; Adams, Mitzi L.; Smith, J. E.; West, Edward A.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we analyze the effects of Faraday rotation on the azimuth of the transverse magnetic field from observations taken with the Marshall Space Flight Center's vector magnetograph for a simple sunspot observed on June 9, 1985. Vector magnetograms were obtained over the wavelength interval of 170 mA redward of line center of the Fe I 5250.22 A spectral line to 170 mA to the blue, in steps of 10 mA. These data were analyzed to produce the variation of the azimuth as a function of wavelength at each pixel over the field of vi ew of the sunspot. At selected locations in the sunspot, curves of the observed variation of azimuth with wavelength were compared with model calculations for the amount of Faraday rotation of the azimuth. From these comparisons we derived the amount of rotation as functions of bo th the magnitude and inclination of the sunspot's field and deduced the ranges of these field values for which Faraday rotation presents a significant problem in observations taken near the center of a spectral line.

  16. Analyzing Extragalactic Magnetic Fields Using Faraday Rotation Measure Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pare, Dylan; Wang, Q. Daniel; Kamieneski, Patrick; Sullivan, Kendall

    2017-01-01

    Extragalactic magnetic fields are a poorly understood element of galaxies that are likely to play an important role in galaxy formation and evolution. Until recently, however, there was no way to observe these fields to a high level of detail, making it difficult to map the spatial distribution of these fields to any high degree of accuracy. Fortunately, a new technique known as Faraday Rotation Measure Synthesis allows for a more precise analysis of galactic magnetism. This technique uses the observed Faraday rotation of polarized emission from background sources to map the magnetic field of a foreground galaxy. This Faraday rotation occurs when the polarized emission encounters ionized, magnetized gas within the galaxy, causing the emission to be rotated by an amount proportional the magnetic field subjected to the ionized gas. Working as part of CHANG-ES (Continuum HAlos in Nearby Galaxies - an EVLA Survey), we have applied this technique in order to learn about the distribution of magnetic fields in the disks and halos of edge-on spiral galaxies. We will present maps of the galactic magnetic fields of CHANG-ES galaxies using this technique, indicating the potential of this technique in successfully mapping these distant fields.

  17. Model of fractionalization of Faraday lines in compact electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geraedts, Scott D.; Motrunich, Olexei I.

    2014-12-01

    Motivated by ideas of fractionalization and intrinsic topological order in bosonic models with short-range interactions, we consider similar phenomena in formal lattice gauge theory models. Specifically, we show that a compact quantum electrodynamics (CQED) can have, besides the familiar Coulomb and confined phases, additional unusual confined phases where excitations are quantum lines carrying fractions of the elementary unit of electric field strength. We construct a model that has N -tupled monopole condensation and realizes 1 /N fractionalization of the quantum Faraday lines. This phase has another excitation which is a ZN quantum surface in spatial dimensions five and higher, but can be viewed as a quantum line or a quantum particle in four or three spatial dimensions, respectively. These excitations have statistical interactions with the fractionalized Faraday lines; for example, in three spatial dimensions, the particle excitation picks up a Berry phase of ei 2 π /N when going around the fractionalized Faraday line excitation. We demonstrate the existence of this phase by Monte Carlo simulations in (3+1) space-time dimensions.

  18. Faraday rotation data analysis with least-squares elliptical fitting

    SciTech Connect

    White, Adam D.; McHale, G. Brent; Goerz, David A.; Speer, Ron D.

    2010-10-15

    A method of analyzing Faraday rotation data from pulsed magnetic field measurements is described. The method uses direct least-squares elliptical fitting to measured data. The least-squares fit conic parameters are used to rotate, translate, and rescale the measured data. Interpretation of the transformed data provides improved accuracy and time-resolution characteristics compared with many existing methods of analyzing Faraday rotation data. The method is especially useful when linear birefringence is present at the input or output of the sensing medium, or when the relative angle of the polarizers used in analysis is not aligned with precision; under these circumstances the method is shown to return the analytically correct input signal. The method may be pertinent to other applications where analysis of Lissajous figures is required, such as the velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR) diagnostics. The entire algorithm is fully automated and requires no user interaction. An example of algorithm execution is shown, using data from a fiber-based Faraday rotation sensor on a capacitive discharge experiment.

  19. Midplane Faraday rotation: A densitometer for large tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jobes, F. C.; Mansfield, D. K.

    1992-10-01

    The density in a large tokamak such as International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), or any of the proposed future US machines, can be determined by measuring the Faraday rotation of a 10.6 μm laser directed tangent to the toroidal field. If there is a horizontal array of such beams, then ne(R) can be readily obtained with a simple Abel inversion about the center line of the tokamak. For a large machine, operated at a full field of 30 T m and a density of 2×1020/m3, the rotation angle would be quite large-about 60° for two passes. A layout in which a single laser beam is fanned out in the horizontal midplane of the tokamak, with a set of retroreflectors on the far side of the vacuum vessel, would provide good spatial resolution, depending only upon the number of reflectors. With this proposed layout, only one window would be needed. Because the rotation angle is never more than 1 ``fringe,'' the data is always good, and it is also a continuous measurement in time. Faraday rotation is dependent only upon the plasma itself, and thus is not sensitive to vibration of the optical components. Simulations of the expected results show that ITER, or any large tokamak, existing or proposed, would be well served even at low densities by a midplane Faraday rotation densitometer of ˜64 channels.

  20. Faraday rotation dispersion microscopy imaging of diamagnetic and chiral liquids with pulsed magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Suwa, Masayori; Nakano, Yusuke; Tsukahara, Satoshi; Watarai, Hitoshi

    2013-05-21

    We have constructed an experimental setup for Faraday rotation dispersion imaging and demonstrated the performance of a novel imaging principle. By using a pulsed magnetic field and a polarized light synchronized to the magnetic field, quantitative Faraday rotation images of diamagnetic organic liquids in glass capillaries were observed. Nonaromatic hydrocarbons, benzene derivatives, and naphthalene derivatives were clearly distinguished by the Faraday rotation images due to the difference in Verdet constants. From the wavelength dispersion of the Faraday rotation images in the visible region, it was found that the resonance wavelength in the UV region, which was estimated based on the Faraday B-term, could be used as characteristic parameters for the imaging of the liquids. Furthermore, simultaneous acquisition of Faraday rotation image and natural optical rotation image was demonstrated for chiral organic liquids.