Science.gov

Sample records for farm simulation presentation

  1. Adding Complex Terrain and Stable Atmospheric Condition Capability to the Simulator for On/Offshore Wind Farm Applications (SOWFA) (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Churchfield, M. J.

    2013-06-01

    This presentation describes changes made to NREL's OpenFOAM-based wind plant aerodynamics solver so that it can compute the stably stratified atmospheric boundary layer and flow over terrain. Background about the flow solver, the Simulator for Off/Onshore Wind Farm Applications (SOWFA) is given, followed by details of the stable stratification/complex terrain modifications to SOWFA, along with some preliminary results calculations of a stable atmospheric boundary layer and flow over a simple set of hills.

  2. Simulation and optimal control of wind-farm boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, Johan; Goit, Jay

    2014-05-01

    In large wind farms, the effect of turbine wakes, and their interaction leads to a reduction in farm efficiency, with power generated by turbines in a farm being lower than that of a lone-standing turbine by up to 50%. In very large wind farms or `deep arrays', this efficiency loss is related to interaction of the wind farms with the planetary boundary layer, leading to lower wind speeds at turbine level. Moreover, for these cases it has been demonstrated both in simulations and wind-tunnel experiments that the wind-farm energy extraction is dominated by the vertical turbulent transport of kinetic energy from higher regions in the boundary layer towards the turbine level. In the current study, we investigate the use of optimal control techniques combined with Large-Eddy Simulations (LES) of wind-farm boundary layer interaction for the increase of total energy extraction in very large `infinite' wind farms. We consider the individual wind turbines as flow actuators, whose energy extraction can be dynamically regulated in time so as to optimally influence the turbulent flow field, maximizing the wind farm power. For the simulation of wind-farm boundary layers we use large-eddy simulations in combination with actuator-disk and actuator-line representations of wind turbines. Simulations are performed in our in-house pseudo-spectral code SP-Wind that combines Fourier-spectral discretization in horizontal directions with a fourth-order finite-volume approach in the vertical direction. For the optimal control study, we consider the dynamic control of turbine-thrust coefficients in an actuator-disk model. They represent the effect of turbine blades that can actively pitch in time, changing the lift- and drag coefficients of the turbine blades. Optimal model-predictive control (or optimal receding horizon control) is used, where the model simply consists of the full LES equations, and the time horizon is approximately 280 seconds. The optimization is performed using a

  3. Simulations of an Offshore Wind Farm Using Large-Eddy Simulation and a Torque-Controlled Actuator Disc Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creech, Angus; Früh, Wolf-Gerrit; Maguire, A. Eoghan

    2015-05-01

    We present here a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation of Lillgrund offshore wind farm, which is located in the Øresund Strait between Sweden and Denmark. The simulation combines a dynamic representation of wind turbines embedded within a large-eddy simulation CFD solver and uses hr-adaptive meshing to increase or decrease mesh resolution where required. This allows the resolution of both large-scale flow structures around the wind farm, and the local flow conditions at individual turbines; consequently, the response of each turbine to local conditions can be modelled, as well as the resulting evolution of the turbine wakes. This paper provides a detailed description of the turbine model which simulates the interaction between the wind, the turbine rotors, and the turbine generators by calculating the forces on the rotor, the body forces on the air, and instantaneous power output. This model was used to investigate a selection of key wind speeds and directions, investigating cases where a row of turbines would be fully aligned with the wind or at specific angles to the wind. Results shown here include presentations of the spin-up of turbines, the observation of eddies moving through the turbine array, meandering turbine wakes, and an extensive wind farm wake several kilometres in length. The key measurement available for cross-validation with operational wind farm data is the power output from the individual turbines, where the effect of unsteady turbine wakes on the performance of downstream turbines was a main point of interest. The results from the simulations were compared to the performance measurements from the real wind farm to provide a firm quantitative validation of this methodology. Having achieved good agreement between the model results and actual wind farm measurements, the potential of the methodology to provide a tool for further investigations of engineering and atmospheric science problems is outlined.

  4. Simulation of an offshore wind farm using fluid power for centralized electricity generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarquin-Laguna, A.

    2016-09-01

    A centralized approach for electricity generation within a wind farm is explored through the use of fluid power technology. This concept considers a new way of generation, collection and transmission of wind energy inside a wind farm, in which electrical conversion does not occur during any intermediate conversion step before the energy has reached the offshore central platform. A numerical model was developed to capture the relevant physics from the dynamic interaction between different turbines coupled to a common hydraulic network and controller. This paper presents two examples of the time-domain simulation results for an hypothetical hydraulic wind farm subject to turbulent wind conditions. The performance and operational parameters of individual turbines are compared with those of a reference wind farm with conventional technology turbines, using the same wind farm layout and environmental conditions. For the presented case study, results indicate that the individual wind turbines are able to operate within operational limits with the current pressure control concept. Despite the stochastic turbulent wind input and wake effects, the hydraulic wind farm is able to produce electricity with reasonable performance in both below and above rated conditions.

  5. Simulation and analysis of conjunctive use with MODFLOW's farm process

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanson, R.T.; Schmid, W.; Faunt, C.C.; Lockwood, B.

    2010-01-01

    The extension of MODFLOW onto the landscape with the Farm Process (MF-FMP) facilitates fully coupled simulation of the use and movement of water from precipitation, streamflow and runoff, groundwater flow, and consumption by natural and agricultural vegetation throughout the hydrologic system at all times. This allows for more complete analysis of conjunctive use water-resource systems than previously possible with MODFLOW by combining relevant aspects of the landscape with the groundwater and surface water components. This analysis is accomplished using distributed cell-by-cell supply-constrained and demand-driven components across the landscape within " water-balance subregions" comprised of one or more model cells that can represent a single farm, a group of farms, or other hydrologic or geopolitical entities. Simulation of micro-agriculture in the Pajaro Valley and macro-agriculture in the Central Valley are used to demonstrate the utility of MF-FMP. For Pajaro Valley, the simulation of an aquifer storage and recovery system and related coastal water distribution system to supplant coastal pumpage was analyzed subject to climate variations and additional supplemental sources such as local runoff. For the Central Valley, analysis of conjunctive use from different hydrologic settings of northern and southern subregions shows how and when precipitation, surface water, and groundwater are important to conjunctive use. The examples show that through MF-FMP's ability to simulate natural and anthropogenic components of the hydrologic cycle, the distribution and dynamics of supply and demand can be analyzed, understood, and managed. This analysis of conjunctive use would be difficult without embedding them in the simulation and are difficult to estimate a priori. Journal compilation ?? 2010 National Ground Water Association. No claim to original US government works.

  6. Modeling and simulation of offshore wind farm O&M processes

    SciTech Connect

    Joschko, Philip; Widok, Andi H.; Appel, Susanne; Greiner, Saskia; Albers, Henning; Page, Bernd

    2015-04-15

    This paper describes a holistic approach to operation and maintenance (O&M) processes in the domain of offshore wind farm power generation. The acquisition and process visualization is followed by a risk analysis of all relevant processes. Hereafter, a tool was designed, which is able to model the defined processes in a BPMN 2.0 notation, as well as connect and simulate them. Furthermore, the notation was enriched with new elements, representing other relevant factors that were, to date, only displayable with much higher effort. In that regard a variety of more complex situations were integrated, such as for example new process interactions depending on different weather influences, in which case a stochastic weather generator was combined with the business simulation or other wind farm aspects important to the smooth running of the offshore wind farms. In addition, the choices for different methodologies, such as the simulation framework or the business process notation will be presented and elaborated depending on the impact they had on the development of the approach and the software solution. - Highlights: • Analysis of operation and maintenance processes of offshore wind farms • Process modeling with BPMN 2.0 • Domain-specific simulation tool.

  7. Simulation of wake effects between two wind farms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, K. S.; Réthoré, P.-E.; Palma, J.; Hevia, B. G.; Prospathopoulos, J.; Peña, A.; Ott, S.; Schepers, G.; Palomares, A.; van der Laan, M. P.; Volker, P.

    2015-06-01

    SCADA data, recorded on the downstream wind farm, has been used to identify flow cases with visible clustering effects. The inflow condition is derived from a partly undisturbed wind turbine, due to lack of mast measurements. The SCADA data analysis concludes that centre of the deficit for the downstream wind farm with disturbed inflow has a distinct visible maximum deficit zone located only 5-10D downstream from the entrance. This zone, representing 20-30% speed reduction, increases and moves downstream for increasing cluster effect and is not visible outside a flow sector of 20-30°. The eight flow models represented in this benchmark include both RANS models, mesoscale models and engineering models. The flow cases, identified according to the wind speed level and inflow sector, have been simulated and validated with the SCADA results. The model validation concludes that all models more or less are able to predict the location and size of the deficit zone inside the downwind wind farm.

  8. Simulation in neurosurgery: Past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Suri, Ashish; Patra, Devi Prasad; Meena, Rajesh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Neurosurgery is one of the most technically demanding medical professions that warrants a high level of expertise. In the present context of competitive medical practice, high societal expectations regarding quality of patient care and medicolegal and financial constraints, there are fewer opportunities for a trainee to achieve competency in standard neurosurgical, microsurgical, and operative techniques. Practice on simulation models like cadavers has been a trend since antiquity; however, recent development of newer models with their strategic modifications has given simulation education a new dimension. It has allowed trainees to acquire and improve surgical skills and knowledge in specifically fabricated and controlled settings with no risk to real patients. Simulation also offers the opportunity for deliberate practice and repetition unlimited number of times so that psychomotor skills can be automated. There is ever-growing evidence showing the positive impact of simulation on resident training in various areas of health care. Advances in computer technology and imaging, development of sophisticated virtual reality simulators with haptic feedback and the recent addition of three-dimensional printing technology, have opened a wide arena for the development of high-fidelity patient-specific models to complement current neurosurgical training. Simulation training in neurosurgery in India is still elementary since its inception at the All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi. A structured modular training program has been developed which is yet to be implemented at a multi-institutional level. Stringent efforts are needed to establish a uniform resident training curriculum where simulators can be used to complement current neurosurgical training. PMID:27147144

  9. Simulation and study of power quality issues in a fixed speed wind farm substation.

    PubMed

    Magesh, T; Chellamuthu, C

    2015-01-01

    Power quality issues associated with the fixed speed wind farm substation located at Coimbatore district are investigated as the wind generators are tripping frequently. The investigations are carried out using two power quality analyzers, Fluke 435 and Dranetz PX5.8, with one of them connected at group control breaker of the 110 kV feeder and the other at the selected 0.69 kV generator busbar during the period of maximum power generation. From the analysis of the recorded data it is found that sag, swell, and transients are the major events which are responsible for the tripping of the generators. In the present study, simulation models for wind, turbine, shaft, pitch mechanism, induction generator, and grid are developed using DIgSILENT. Using the turbine characteristics, a two-dimensional lookup table is designed to generate a reference pitch angle necessary to simulate the power curve of the passive stall controlled wind turbine. Various scenarios and their effects on the performance of the wind farm are studied and validated with the recorded data and waveforms. The simulation model will be useful for the designers for planning and development of the wind farm before implementation.

  10. Simulation and study of power quality issues in a fixed speed wind farm substation.

    PubMed

    Magesh, T; Chellamuthu, C

    2015-01-01

    Power quality issues associated with the fixed speed wind farm substation located at Coimbatore district are investigated as the wind generators are tripping frequently. The investigations are carried out using two power quality analyzers, Fluke 435 and Dranetz PX5.8, with one of them connected at group control breaker of the 110 kV feeder and the other at the selected 0.69 kV generator busbar during the period of maximum power generation. From the analysis of the recorded data it is found that sag, swell, and transients are the major events which are responsible for the tripping of the generators. In the present study, simulation models for wind, turbine, shaft, pitch mechanism, induction generator, and grid are developed using DIgSILENT. Using the turbine characteristics, a two-dimensional lookup table is designed to generate a reference pitch angle necessary to simulate the power curve of the passive stall controlled wind turbine. Various scenarios and their effects on the performance of the wind farm are studied and validated with the recorded data and waveforms. The simulation model will be useful for the designers for planning and development of the wind farm before implementation. PMID:25950016

  11. Simulation and Study of Power Quality Issues in a Fixed Speed Wind Farm Substation

    PubMed Central

    Magesh, T.; Chellamuthu, C.

    2015-01-01

    Power quality issues associated with the fixed speed wind farm substation located at Coimbatore district are investigated as the wind generators are tripping frequently. The investigations are carried out using two power quality analyzers, Fluke 435 and Dranetz PX5.8, with one of them connected at group control breaker of the 110 kV feeder and the other at the selected 0.69 kV generator busbar during the period of maximum power generation. From the analysis of the recorded data it is found that sag, swell, and transients are the major events which are responsible for the tripping of the generators. In the present study, simulation models for wind, turbine, shaft, pitch mechanism, induction generator, and grid are developed using DIgSILENT. Using the turbine characteristics, a two-dimensional lookup table is designed to generate a reference pitch angle necessary to simulate the power curve of the passive stall controlled wind turbine. Various scenarios and their effects on the performance of the wind farm are studied and validated with the recorded data and waveforms. The simulation model will be useful for the designers for planning and development of the wind farm before implementation. PMID:25950016

  12. X-Ray Detector Simulations - Oral Presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Tina, Adrienne

    2015-08-20

    The free-electron laser at LCLS produces X-Rays that are used in several facilities. This light source is so bright and quick that we are capable of producing movies of objects like proteins. But making these movies would not be possible without a device that can detect the X-Rays and produce images. We need X-Ray cameras. The challenges LCLS faces include the X-Rays’ high repetition rate of 120 Hz, short pulses that can reach 200 femto-seconds, and extreme peak brightness. We need detectors that are compatible with this light source, but before they can be used in the facilities, they must first be characterized. My project was to do just that, by making a computer simulation program. My presentation discusses the individual detectors I simulated, the details of my program, and how my project will help determine which detector is most useful for a specific experiment.

  13. Large eddy simulation of unsteady wind farm behavior using advanced actuator disk models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moens, Maud; Duponcheel, Matthieu; Winckelmans, Gregoire; Chatelain, Philippe

    2014-11-01

    The present project aims at improving the level of fidelity of unsteady wind farm scale simulations through an effort on the representation and the modeling of the rotors. The chosen tool for the simulations is a Fourth Order Finite Difference code, developed at Universite catholique de Louvain; this solver implements Large Eddy Simulation (LES) approaches. The wind turbines are modeled as advanced actuator disks: these disks are coupled with the Blade Element Momentum method (BEM method) and also take into account the turbine dynamics and controller. A special effort is made here to reproduce the specific wake behaviors. Wake decay and expansion are indeed initially governed by vortex instabilities. This is an information that cannot be obtained from the BEM calculations. We thus aim at achieving this by matching the large scales of the actuator disk flow to high fidelity wake simulations produced using a Vortex Particle-Mesh method. It is obtained by adding a controlled excitation at the disk. We apply this tool to the investigation of atmospheric turbulence effects on the power production and on the wake behavior at a wind farm level. A turbulent velocity field is then used as inflow boundary condition for the simulations. We gratefully acknowledge the support of GDF Suez for the fellowship of Mrs Maud Moens.

  14. Effects of stored feed cropping systems and farm size on the profitability of Maine organic dairy farm simulations.

    PubMed

    Hoshide, A K; Halloran, J M; Kersbergen, R J; Griffin, T S; DeFauw, S L; LaGasse, B J; Jain, S

    2011-11-01

    United States organic dairy production has increased to meet the growing demand for organic milk. Despite higher prices received for milk, organic dairy farmers have come under increasing financial stress due to increases in concentrated feed prices over the past few years, which can make up one-third of variable costs. Market demand for milk has also leveled in the last year, resulting in some downward pressure on prices paid to dairy farmers. Organic dairy farmers in the Northeast United States have experimented with growing different forage and grain crops to maximize on-farm production of protein and energy to improve profitability. Three representative organic feed systems were simulated using the integrated farm system model for farms with 30, 120, and 220 milk cows. Increasing intensity of equipment use was represented by organic dairy farms growing only perennial sod (low) to those with corn-based forage systems, which purchase supplemental grain (medium) or which produce and feed soybeans (high). The relative profitability of these 3 organic feed systems was strongly dependent on dairy farm size. From results, we suggest smaller organic dairy farms can be more profitable with perennial sod-based rather than corn-based forage systems due to lower fixed costs from using only equipment associated with perennial forage harvest and storage. The largest farm size was more profitable using a corn-based system due to greater economies of scale for growing soybeans, corn grain, winter cereals, and corn silages. At an intermediate farm size of 120 cows, corn-based forage systems were more profitable if perennial sod was not harvested at optimum quality, corn was grown on better soils, or if milk yield was 10% higher. Delayed harvest decreased the protein and energy content of perennial sod crops, requiring more purchased grain to balance the ration and resulting in lower profits. Corn-based systems were less affected by lower perennial forage quality, as corn silage

  15. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF POLLUTANT TRANSPORT FROM FISH FARMING IN RIVER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran Thi Ngoc, Trieu; Le Song, Giang; Lu, Minjiao

    This paper presented a 3D model for substance transport in river and its application for simulation of pollutant transport in Mekong river due to floating cages-raising. 3D flow-field was solved by logarithmic distributing 2D flow-field of averaged height. Pollutant transport is calculated by solving its full 3D transport equation. The 2D continuum and momentum equations were solved by finite difference method with ADI scheme of Ponce-Yabusaki. The 3D transport equation was solved by finite volume method with ADI scheme of Douglas-Gunn in "sigma" transformed co-ordinate. The model was tested over analytical solution. Some preliminary results of simulation for pollutant transport of Myhoahung floating cages area (Angiang province) are also presented.

  16. New parsimonious simulation methods and tools to assess future food and environmental security of farm populations

    PubMed Central

    Antle, John M.; Stoorvogel, Jetse J.; Valdivia, Roberto O.

    2014-01-01

    This article presents conceptual and empirical foundations for new parsimonious simulation models that are being used to assess future food and environmental security of farm populations. The conceptual framework integrates key features of the biophysical and economic processes on which the farming systems are based. The approach represents a methodological advance by coupling important behavioural processes, for example, self-selection in adaptive responses to technological and environmental change, with aggregate processes, such as changes in market supply and demand conditions or environmental conditions as climate. Suitable biophysical and economic data are a critical limiting factor in modelling these complex systems, particularly for the characterization of out-of-sample counterfactuals in ex ante analyses. Parsimonious, population-based simulation methods are described that exploit available observational, experimental, modelled and expert data. The analysis makes use of a new scenario design concept called representative agricultural pathways. A case study illustrates how these methods can be used to assess food and environmental security. The concluding section addresses generalizations of parametric forms and linkages of regional models to global models. PMID:24535388

  17. Simulations of Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Farms in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hezaveh, Seyed Hossein; Bou-Zeid, Elie; Lohry, Mark; Martinelli, Luigi

    2014-11-01

    Wind power is an abundant and clean source of energy that is increasingly being tapped to reduce the environmental footprint of anthropogenic activities. The vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT) technology is now being revisited due to some important advantages over horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWTS) that are particularly important for farms deployed offshore or in complex terrain. In this talk, we will present the implementation and testing of an actuator line model (ALM) for VAWTs in a large eddy simulation (LES) code for the atmospheric boundary layer, with the aim of optimizing large VAWT wind farm configurations. The force coefficients needed for the ALM are here obtained from blade resolving RANS simulations of individual turbines for each configuration. Comparison to various experimental results show that the model can very successfully reproduce observed wake characteristic. The influence of VAWT design parameters such as solidity, height to radius ratio, and tip speed ratio (TSR) on these wake characteristics, particularly the velocity deficit profile, is then investigated.

  18. New parsimonious simulation methods and tools to assess future food and environmental security of farm populations.

    PubMed

    Antle, John M; Stoorvogel, Jetse J; Valdivia, Roberto O

    2014-04-01

    This article presents conceptual and empirical foundations for new parsimonious simulation models that are being used to assess future food and environmental security of farm populations. The conceptual framework integrates key features of the biophysical and economic processes on which the farming systems are based. The approach represents a methodological advance by coupling important behavioural processes, for example, self-selection in adaptive responses to technological and environmental change, with aggregate processes, such as changes in market supply and demand conditions or environmental conditions as climate. Suitable biophysical and economic data are a critical limiting factor in modelling these complex systems, particularly for the characterization of out-of-sample counterfactuals in ex ante analyses. Parsimonious, population-based simulation methods are described that exploit available observational, experimental, modelled and expert data. The analysis makes use of a new scenario design concept called representative agricultural pathways. A case study illustrates how these methods can be used to assess food and environmental security. The concluding section addresses generalizations of parametric forms and linkages of regional models to global models.

  19. Surface Operations Simulator and Scheduler (SOSS) Presentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Zhifan

    2016-01-01

    NASA - KAIA (Korea Agency for Infrastructure Technology Advancement) - KARI (Korea Aerospace Research Institute) collaboration surface air traffic management research has been ongoing since May 2015. In the first year collaboration, NASA's SOSS software has been transferred to KAIA and KARI teams to provide fast time simulation capability. Incheon International Airport model has been developed for SOSS.

  20. NASA Center for Climate Simulation (NCCS) Presentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, William P.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Center for Climate Simulation (NCCS) offers integrated supercomputing, visualization, and data interaction technologies to enhance NASA's weather and climate prediction capabilities. It serves hundreds of users at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, as well as other NASA centers, laboratories, and universities across the US. Over the past year, NCCS has continued expanding its data-centric computing environment to meet the increasingly data-intensive challenges of climate science. We doubled our Discover supercomputer's peak performance to more than 800 teraflops by adding 7,680 Intel Xeon Sandy Bridge processor-cores and most recently 240 Intel Xeon Phi Many Integrated Core (MIG) co-processors. A supercomputing-class analysis system named Dali gives users rapid access to their data on Discover and high-performance software including the Ultra-scale Visualization Climate Data Analysis Tools (UV-CDAT), with interfaces from user desktops and a 17- by 6-foot visualization wall. NCCS also is exploring highly efficient climate data services and management with a new MapReduce/Hadoop cluster while augmenting its data distribution to the science community. Using NCCS resources, NASA completed its modeling contributions to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCG) Fifth Assessment Report this summer as part of the ongoing Coupled Modellntercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5). Ensembles of simulations run on Discover reached back to the year 1000 to test model accuracy and projected climate change through the year 2300 based on four different scenarios of greenhouse gases, aerosols, and land use. The data resulting from several thousand IPCC/CMIP5 simulations, as well as a variety of other simulation, reanalysis, and observationdatasets, are available to scientists and decision makers through an enhanced NCCS Earth System Grid Federation Gateway. Worldwide downloads have totaled over 110 terabytes of data.

  1. Laboratory simulation of microdiamonds present in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colangeli, L.; Mennella, V.; Stephens, J. R.; Bussoletti, E.

    1994-04-01

    Among various carbonaceous grains which are expected to be present in space, submicron diamond particles have received particular attention recently. Laboratory analyses on fine-grained diamond residues extracted from primitive meteorites suggest that this component is one of the most abundant forms of circumstellar dust preserved in meteoritic samples. In addition, recent infrared spectroscopic observations seem to show a typical signature of diamonds in dense interstellar molecular clouds. Measurements on analog grains synthesized in the laboratory may provide experimental results useful to interpret both astronomical observations and laboratory data on meteoritic diamond residues. Following this line of attack to the problem of interstellar diamond characterization, in the present paper we report the results of systematic analyses performed on three soot samples which have been produced in the laboratory by means of detonation processes. As the explosion products contain a significant fraction of submicron diamond-like grains, we have analyzed the properties of the residues extracted from the soots by means of nitric and perchloic acid treatments. A variety of morphological, Raman and infrared laboratory analyses were performed. The results have been compared with data available in the literature for meteoritic samples to get new hints about the properties expected for diamond grains in the interstellar medium.

  2. Shifted periodic boundary conditions for large-eddy simulation of wind farms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munters, Wim; Meneveau, Charles; Meyers, Johan

    2015-11-01

    In wall-bounded turbulent flow simulations, periodic boundary conditions combined with insufficiently long domains lead to persistent spanwise locking of large-scale turbulent structures. In the context of wind-farm large-eddy simulations, this effect induces artificial spanwise inhomogeneities in the time-averaged local wind conditions as seen by the wind turbines, leading to spurious differences in power prediction between otherwise equivalent columns of wind turbines in a wind farm (a column is defined here as a set of turbines parallel to the mean flow direction). We propose a shifted periodic boundary condition that eliminates this effect without the need for excessive streamwise domain lengths. Instead of straightforwardly reintroducing the velocity from the outlet plane back at the inlet, as in classic periodic boundary conditions, this plane is first shifted in the spanwise direction by a predefined and constant distance. The method is tested based on a set of direct numerical simulations of a turbulent channel flow, and large-eddy simulations of a high Reynolds number rough-wall half-channel flow. Finally, we apply the method in a precursor simulation, generating inlet conditions for a spatially developing wind-farm boundary layer. WM and JM are supported by the ERC (ActiveWindFarms, grant no: 306471). CM acknowledges support by the NSF (grant IIA-1243482, the WINDINSPIRE project).

  3. Simulation of Intra- or transboundary surface-water-rights hierarchies using the farm process for MODFLOW-2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmid, W.; Hanson, R.T.

    2007-01-01

    Water-rights driven surface-water allocations for irrigated agriculture can be simulated using the farm process for MODFLOW-2000. This paper describes and develops a model, which simulates routed surface-water deliveries to farms limited by streamflow, equal-appropriation allotments, or a ranked prior-appropriation system. Simulated diversions account for deliveries to all farms along a canal according to their water-rights ranking and for conveyance losses and gains. Simulated minimum streamflow requirements on diversions help guarantee supplies to senior farms located on downstream diverting canals. Prior appropriation can be applied to individual farms or to groups of farms modeled as "virtual farms" representing irrigation districts, irrigated regions in transboundary settings, or natural vegetation habitats. The integrated approach of jointly simulating canal diversions, surface-water deliveries subject to water-rights constraints, and groundwater allocations is verified on numerical experiments based on a realistic, but hypothetical, system of ranked virtual farms. Results are discussed in light of transboundary water appropriation and demonstrate the approach's suitability for simulating effects of water-rights hierarchies represented by international treaties, interstate stream compacts, intrastate water rights, or ecological requirements. ?? 2007 ASCE.

  4. 2004 Initial Assessments of Closure for the S-SX Tank Farm: Numerical Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z F; Freedman, Vicky L; Waichler, Scott R; White, Mark D

    2004-04-01

    In support of CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc.'s (CHG) preparation of a Field Investigative Report (FIR) for the closure of the Hanford Site Single-Shell Tank (SST) Waste Management Area (WMA) tank farms, a set of numerical simulations of flow and solute transport was executed to investigate different potential contaminant source scenarios that may pose long-term risks to groundwater from the closure of the S-SX Tank Farm. This report documents the simulation of 7 cases (plus two verification) involving two-dimensional cross sections through the S Tank Farm (Tanks S-101, S102, and S-103) and the simulation of one case involving three-dimensional domain of the S Tank Farm. Using a unit release scenario at Tank S-103, three different types of leaks were simulated. These simulations assessed the effect of leaks during retrieval as well as residual wastes and ancillary equipment after closure. Two transported solutes were considered: uranium-238 (U-238) and technetium-99 (Tc 99). To evaluate the effect of sorption on contaminant transport, six different sorption coefficients were simulated for U 238. Overall, simulations results for the S Tank Farm showed that only a small fraction (< 0.4%) of the U-238 with sorption coefficients 0.6 mL/g migrated from the vadose zone in all of the cases. For the conservative solute, Tc-99, results showed that the simulations investigating leaks during retrieval demonstrated the highest peak concentrations and the earliest arrival times due to the high infiltration rate before water was added and surface barriers installed. Residual leaks were investigated with different release rate models, including uniform release, advection-dominated, diffusion-dominated, and saltcake (solubility-controlled) release models. Of the four models, peak concentrations were lowest and arrival times later for the uniform release model due to the lower release rate of the residual tank waste solids; similar high peak concentrations occurred for the advection

  5. Large-eddy simulations of wind farm production and long distance wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, O.; Nilsson, K.; Breton, S.-P.; Ivanell, S.

    2015-06-01

    The future development of offshore wind power will include many wind farms built in the same areas. It is known that wind farms produce long distance wakes, which means that we will see more occasions of farm to farm interaction, namely one wind farm operating in the wake of another wind farm. This study investigates how to perform accurate power predictions on large wind farms and how to assess the long distance wakes generated by these farms. The focus of this paper is the production's and wake's sensitivity to the extension of the grid as well as the turbulence when using Large-eddy simulations (LES) with pregenerated Mann turbulence. The aim is to determine an optimal grid which minimizes blockage effects and ensures constant resolution in the entire wake region at the lowest computational cost. The simulations are first performed in the absence of wind turbines in order to assess how the atmospheric turbulence and wind profile are evolving downstream (up to 12,000 m behind the position where the turbulence is imposed). In the second step, 10 turbines are added in the domain (using an actuator disc method) and their production is analyzed alongside the mean velocities in the domain. The blockage effects are tested using grids with different vertical extents. An equidistant region is used in order to ensure high resolution in the wake region. The importance of covering the entire wake structure inside the equidistant region is analyzed by decreasing the size of this region. In this step, the importance of the lateral size of the Mann turbulence box is also analyzed. In the results it can be seen that the flow is acceptably preserved through the empty domain if a larger turbulence box is used. The relative production is increased (due to blockage effects) for the last turbines using a smaller vertical domain, increased for a lower or narrower equidistant region (due to the smearing of the wake in the stretched area) and decreased when using a smaller turbulence

  6. Simple Exhibits, Effective Learning: Presenting the United Farm Workers' Experience on the World Wide Web.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golodner, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    Describes the design of an online exhibit about the history of the United Farm Workers union that was created on the World Wide Web by the Walter P. Reuther Library/Archives of Labor and Urban History. Discusses Web design, hypertext links, and ease of navigation. (Author/LRW)

  7. A stochastic simulation model for assessment of investments in Precision Dairy Farming technologies: model enhancements and utility demonstration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A previously described stochastic simulation model of a dairy enterprise was modified for improved robustness. This model was developed to evaluate investments in Precision Dairy Farming technologies and was constructed to embody the biological and economic complexities of a dairy farm system within...

  8. Interactive computer simulation of dairy farm systems as a method for making energy management decisions

    SciTech Connect

    Hewett, E.J. III

    1983-01-01

    To facilitate management decisions an analytical model was developed to predict energy and labor requirements and costs for milking and feed handling systems. The Dairy Farm Simulation Model was based on detailed time and motion studies, and energy audits of 21 dairy farms in Michigan. Data included labor hours and energy consumption per month for each operation required for milking and feed handling and charges based on Detroit Edison electrical rate schedules. The result of optimizing the electrical rate charges for simulated milking systems is indicated by the Time-of-Day Rate Schedule which provides the lowest cost to farm operators willing to adjust milking times. Simulation of mobile and stationary feeding systems for six herd sizes includes calculations of capital investment and operating costs in addition to labor and energy cost. Results indicate that mobile systems required a lower investment cost while stationary systems realize lower energy costs. Labor requirements per cow decreased as herd size increased for mobile systems, but remained the same for stationary systems regardless of herd size. The energy required to operate each system, based on the number of oil barrel equivalents, indicates the stationary system required less energy for herd sizes up to and including 150 cows, while mobile systems indicate a lower energy requirement for herd sizes greater than 150 cows. In general, no single system emerged as the best, rather it depended on the operator's personal preference.

  9. Multiscale aeroelastic simulations of large wind farms in the atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitsas, Athanasios; Meyers, Johan

    2016-09-01

    In large wind farms, the turbulence induced by each turbine results in high overall turbulence levels that can be detrimental for downstream wind turbine components. In the current study, we scrutinize structural loads and dynamics, and their correlation to turbulent flow structures by conducting aeroelastic simulations in wind farms. To this end, a pseudospectral large-eddy simulation solver is coupled with a multibody dynamics module in a multiscale framework. The multirate approach leads us naturally to the development of an aeroelastic actuator sector model that represents the wind turbine forces on the flow. This makes it computationally feasible to simulate long time horizons of the two-way coupled aeroelastic system. Hence, it allows us to look at the interaction of the turbine structure with the turbulent boundary layer and the wakes of multiple turbine arrays, and to get estimates of damage equivalent loads and structural loading statistics, as longer time series are available. Results are shown for two typical wind farm layouts, i.e. aligned and staggered, for above-rated flow regimes.

  10. Simulating the Distribution of Individual Livestock Farms and Their Populations in the United States: An Example Using Domestic Swine (Sus scrofa domesticus) Farms

    PubMed Central

    Garza, Sarah J.; Miller, Ryan S.

    2015-01-01

    Livestock distribution in the United States (U.S.) can only be mapped at a county-level or worse resolution. We developed a spatial microsimulation model called the Farm Location and Agricultural Production Simulator (FLAPS) that simulated the distribution and populations of individual livestock farms throughout the conterminous U.S. Using domestic pigs (Sus scrofa domesticus) as an example species, we customized iterative proportional-fitting algorithms for the hierarchical structure of the U.S. Census of Agriculture and imputed unpublished state- or county-level livestock population totals that were redacted to ensure confidentiality. We used a weighted sampling design to collect data on the presence and absence of farms and used them to develop a national-scale distribution model that predicted the distribution of individual farms at a 100 m resolution. We implemented microsimulation algorithms that simulated the populations and locations of individual farms using output from our imputed Census of Agriculture dataset and distribution model. Approximately 19% of county-level pig population totals were unpublished in the 2012 Census of Agriculture and needed to be imputed. Using aerial photography, we confirmed the presence or absence of livestock farms at 10,238 locations and found livestock farms were correlated with open areas, cropland, and roads, and also areas with cooler temperatures and gentler topography. The distribution of swine farms was highly variable, but cross-validation of our distribution model produced an area under the receiver-operating characteristics curve value of 0.78, which indicated good predictive performance. Verification analyses showed FLAPS accurately imputed and simulated Census of Agriculture data based on absolute percent difference values of < 0.01% at the state-to-national scale, 3.26% for the county-to-state scale, and 0.03% for the individual farm-to-county scale. Our output data have many applications for risk management of

  11. Simulating the Distribution of Individual Livestock Farms and Their Populations in the United States: An Example Using Domestic Swine (Sus scrofa domesticus) Farms.

    PubMed

    Burdett, Christopher L; Kraus, Brian R; Garza, Sarah J; Miller, Ryan S; Bjork, Kathe E

    2015-01-01

    Livestock distribution in the United States (U.S.) can only be mapped at a county-level or worse resolution. We developed a spatial microsimulation model called the Farm Location and Agricultural Production Simulator (FLAPS) that simulated the distribution and populations of individual livestock farms throughout the conterminous U.S. Using domestic pigs (Sus scrofa domesticus) as an example species, we customized iterative proportional-fitting algorithms for the hierarchical structure of the U.S. Census of Agriculture and imputed unpublished state- or county-level livestock population totals that were redacted to ensure confidentiality. We used a weighted sampling design to collect data on the presence and absence of farms and used them to develop a national-scale distribution model that predicted the distribution of individual farms at a 100 m resolution. We implemented microsimulation algorithms that simulated the populations and locations of individual farms using output from our imputed Census of Agriculture dataset and distribution model. Approximately 19% of county-level pig population totals were unpublished in the 2012 Census of Agriculture and needed to be imputed. Using aerial photography, we confirmed the presence or absence of livestock farms at 10,238 locations and found livestock farms were correlated with open areas, cropland, and roads, and also areas with cooler temperatures and gentler topography. The distribution of swine farms was highly variable, but cross-validation of our distribution model produced an area under the receiver-operating characteristics curve value of 0.78, which indicated good predictive performance. Verification analyses showed FLAPS accurately imputed and simulated Census of Agriculture data based on absolute percent difference values of < 0.01% at the state-to-national scale, 3.26% for the county-to-state scale, and 0.03% for the individual farm-to-county scale. Our output data have many applications for risk management of

  12. Automated Comparison of Building Energy Simulation Engines (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Polly, B.; Horowitz, S.; Booten, B.; Kruis, N.; Christensen, C.

    2012-08-01

    This presentation describes the BEopt comparative test suite, which is a tool that facilitates the automated comparison of building energy simulation engines. It also demonstrates how the test suite is improving the accuracy of building energy simulation programs. Building energy simulation programs inform energy efficient design for new homes and energy efficient upgrades for existing homes. Stakeholders rely on accurate predictions from simulation programs. Previous research indicates that software tends to over-predict energy usage for poorly-insulated leaky homes. NREL is identifying, investigating, and resolving software inaccuracy issues. Comparative software testing is one method of many that NREL uses to identify potential software issues.

  13. A Farm Management Problem. Student Workbook. AGDEX 810.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cackler, William

    This workbook is intended for use by students taking part in a farm management simulation that has been designed to help them develop competency in both crop and livestock farming. The introductory section presents an overview of the workbook's contents. The remainder of the workbook contains rules for the farm management problem, farm layouts,…

  14. Regional climate model simulations indicate limited climatic impacts by operational and planned European wind farms.

    PubMed

    Vautard, Robert; Thais, Françoise; Tobin, Isabelle; Bréon, François-Marie; Devezeaux de Lavergne, Jean-Guy; Colette, Augustin; Yiou, Pascal; Ruti, Paolo Michele

    2014-01-01

    The rapid development of wind energy has raised concerns about environmental impacts. Temperature changes are found in the vicinity of wind farms and previous simulations have suggested that large-scale wind farms could alter regional climate. However, assessments of the effects of realistic wind power development scenarios at the scale of a continent are missing. Here we simulate the impacts of current and near-future wind energy production according to European Union energy and climate policies. We use a regional climate model describing the interactions between turbines and the atmosphere, and find limited impacts. A statistically significant signal is only found in winter, with changes within ±0.3 °C and within 0-5% for precipitation. It results from the combination of local wind farm effects and changes due to a weak, but robust, anticyclonic-induced circulation over Europe. However, the impacts remain much weaker than the natural climate interannual variability and changes expected from greenhouse gas emissions.

  15. Regional climate model simulations indicate limited climatic impacts by operational and planned European wind farms.

    PubMed

    Vautard, Robert; Thais, Françoise; Tobin, Isabelle; Bréon, François-Marie; Devezeaux de Lavergne, Jean-Guy; Colette, Augustin; Yiou, Pascal; Ruti, Paolo Michele

    2014-01-01

    The rapid development of wind energy has raised concerns about environmental impacts. Temperature changes are found in the vicinity of wind farms and previous simulations have suggested that large-scale wind farms could alter regional climate. However, assessments of the effects of realistic wind power development scenarios at the scale of a continent are missing. Here we simulate the impacts of current and near-future wind energy production according to European Union energy and climate policies. We use a regional climate model describing the interactions between turbines and the atmosphere, and find limited impacts. A statistically significant signal is only found in winter, with changes within ±0.3 °C and within 0-5% for precipitation. It results from the combination of local wind farm effects and changes due to a weak, but robust, anticyclonic-induced circulation over Europe. However, the impacts remain much weaker than the natural climate interannual variability and changes expected from greenhouse gas emissions. PMID:24518587

  16. Regional climate model simulations indicate limited climatic impacts by operational and planned European wind farms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vautard, Robert; Thais, Françoise; Tobin, Isabelle; Bréon, François-Marie; de Lavergne, Jean-Guy Devezeaux; Colette, Augustin; Yiou, Pascal; Ruti, Paolo Michele

    2014-02-01

    The rapid development of wind energy has raised concerns about environmental impacts. Temperature changes are found in the vicinity of wind farms and previous simulations have suggested that large-scale wind farms could alter regional climate. However, assessments of the effects of realistic wind power development scenarios at the scale of a continent are missing. Here we simulate the impacts of current and near-future wind energy production according to European Union energy and climate policies. We use a regional climate model describing the interactions between turbines and the atmosphere, and find limited impacts. A statistically significant signal is only found in winter, with changes within ±0.3 °C and within 0-5% for precipitation. It results from the combination of local wind farm effects and changes due to a weak, but robust, anticyclonic-induced circulation over Europe. However, the impacts remain much weaker than the natural climate interannual variability and changes expected from greenhouse gas emissions.

  17. Simulation of irregular waves in an offshore wind farm with a spectral wave model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponce de León, S.; Bettencourt, J. H.; Kjerstad, N.

    2011-10-01

    A numerical study of irregular waves in the Norwegian continental shelf wind farm (HAVSUL-II) was conducted using 3rd generation spectral wave models. The study was composed of two parts: the study of the effect of a single windmill monopile in the local incoming wave field using an empirical JONSWAP spectrum, and a wave hindcast study in the wind farm area using realistic incoming wave spectra obtained from large scale simulations for the 1991-1992 winter period. In the single windmill monopile study the SWAN wave model was used, while the hindcast study was conducted by successively nesting from a coarse grid using the WAM model up to a high-resolution (56 m) grid covering 26.2 km 2 of the HAVSUL-II windmill farm using the SWAN model. The effect of a single monopile on incident waves with realistic spectra was also studied. In the single windmill study the monopile was represented as a closed circular obstacle and in the hindcast study it was represented as a dry grid point. The results showed that the single windmill monopile creates a shadow zone in the down wave region with lower significant wave height ( Hs) values and a slight increase of Hs in the up wave region. The effects of the windmill monopile on the wave field were found to be dependent on the directional distribution of the incoming wave spectrum and also on the wave diffraction and reflection. The hindcast study showed that the group of windmill monopiles may contribute to the reduction of the wave energy inside the offshore wind farm and that once the waves enter into the offshore wind farm they experience modifications due to the presence of the windmill monopiles, which cause a blocking of the wave energy propagation resulting in an altered distribution of the Hs field.

  18. Simulant Development for Hanford Tank Farms Double Valve Isolation (DVI) Valves Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, Beric E.

    2012-12-21

    Leakage testing of a representative sample of the safety-significant isolation valves for Double Valve Isolation (DVI) in an environment that simulates the abrasive characteristics of the Hanford Tank Farms Waste Transfer System during waste feed delivery to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is to be conducted. The testing will consist of periodic leak performed on the DVI valves after prescribed numbers of valve cycles (open and close) in a simulated environment representative of the abrasive properties of the waste and the Waste Transfer System. The valve operations include exposure to cycling conditions that include gravity drain and flush operation following slurry transfer. The simulant test will establish the performance characteristics and verify compliance with the Documented Safety Analysis. Proper simulant development is essential to ensure that the critical process streams characteristics are represented, National Research Council report “Advice on the Department of Energy's Cleanup Technology Roadmap: Gaps and Bridges”

  19. Electromagnetic Simulation of the Near-Field Distribution around a Wind Farm

    DOE PAGES

    Yang, Shang-Te; Ling, Hao

    2013-01-01

    An efficienmore » t approach to compute the near-field distribution around and within a wind farm under plane wave excitation is proposed. To make the problem computationally tractable, several simplifying assumptions are made based on the geometry problem. By comparing the approximations against full-wave simulations at 500 MHz, it is shown that the assumptions do not introduce significant errors into the resulting near-field distribution. The near fields around a 3 × 3 wind farm are computed using the developed methodology at 150 MHz, 500 MHz, and 3 GHz. Both the multipath interference patterns and the forward shadows are predicted by the proposed method.« less

  20. Field Test Design Simulations of Pore-Water Extraction for the SX Tank Farm

    SciTech Connect

    Truex, Michael J.; Oostrom, Martinus

    2013-09-01

    A proof of principle test of pore water extraction is being performed by Washington River Protection Solutions for the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of River Protection. This test is being conducted to meet the requirements of Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (HFFACO) (Ecology et al. 1989) Milestone M 045-20, and is described in RPP-PLAN-53808, 200 West Area Tank Farms Interim Measures Investigation Work Plan. To support design of this test, numerical simulations were conducted to help define equipment and operational parameters. The modeling effort builds from information collected in laboratory studies and from field characterization information collected at the test site near the Hanford Site 241-SX Tank Farm. Numerical simulations were used to evaluate pore-water extraction performance as a function of the test site properties and for the type of extraction well configuration that can be constructed using the direct-push installation technique. Output of simulations included rates of water and soil-gas production as a function of operational conditions for use in supporting field equipment design. The simulations also investigated the impact of subsurface heterogeneities in sediment properties and moisture distribution on pore-water extraction performance. Phenomena near the extraction well were also investigated because of their importance for pore-water extraction performance.

  1. Farm Living.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcoux, Mary F.

    1990-01-01

    Described are activities using ants. Ant hunting, a list of books on the topic, information, and ant farming are included. The procedures for assembling and maintenance of an ant farm are presented. (KR)

  2. High-resolution computational algorithms for simulating offshore wind turbines and farms: Model development and validation

    SciTech Connect

    Calderer, Antoni; Yang, Xiaolei; Angelidis, Dionysios; Feist, Chris; Guala, Michele; Ruehl, Kelley; Guo, Xin; Boomsma, Aaron; Shen, Lian; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2015-10-30

    The present project involves the development of modeling and analysis design tools for assessing offshore wind turbine technologies. The computational tools developed herein are able to resolve the effects of the coupled interaction of atmospheric turbulence and ocean waves on aerodynamic performance and structural stability and reliability of offshore wind turbines and farms. Laboratory scale experiments have been carried out to derive data sets for validating the computational models.

  3. Simulation of Conjunctive Agricultural Water Use with the new FARM package for MODFLOW-2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, W.; Hanson, R. T.; Maddock, T.

    2004-12-01

    A new Farm Package (FMP) was developed for the U.S. Geological Survey's groundwater modeling program, MODFLOW-2000 (MF2K), to estimate irrigation water allocations from conjunctively used surface and ground water. The FMP package dynamically integrates irrigation water demand, surface and ground-water supply, and return flow from excess irrigation. Routed surface-water delivery is optional, but can be simulated by coupling the FMP package with the Streamflow Routing Package (SFR1). Applying MF2K with the FMP and SFR1 packages facilitates estimating the allocation of surface and ground-water to farms for simulations of historical calibration or future projections directly within MF2K. These simulations also can be useful for assessing water rights issues and operational decisions as well as for non-drought versus drought supply and demand strategies. Estimates of historic pumpage may be particularly useful where well pumpage has not been recorded, such as agivulture in the southwestern United States. Estimates of future pumpage may be facilitated through the use of climate-model predictions to generate forecasts of potential water supply and demand for irrigation. Legal questions such as adjudications and appropriative water rights also could be assessed with simulations that use the FMP package in areas where there is a history of land use but no direct or complete record of water use. Operational decision in irrigation management depends on the ability to estimate conjunctively used surface-water and groundwater allocations just prior to or during the growing season. Conjunctive management of surface and ground-water is especially needed for periods when the proposed water supply is thought to be insufficient to meet the water demand. Simulations with the FMP package offer several choices of drought policy scenarios, such as acreage optimization that facilitates assessing an economically optimal conjunctive management. The FMP package maintains a dual mass balance

  4. Farm simulation: a tool for evaluating the mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions and the adaptation of dairy production to climate change

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Process-level modeling at the farm scale provides a tool for evaluating strategies for both mitigating greenhouse gas emissions and adapting to climate change. The Integrated Farm System Model (IFSM) simulates representative crop, beef or dairy farms over many years of weather to predict performance...

  5. Understanding the Impacts of Soil, Climate, and Farming Practices on Soil Organic Carbon Sequestration: A Simulation Study in Australia.

    PubMed

    Godde, Cécile M; Thorburn, Peter J; Biggs, Jody S; Meier, Elizabeth A

    2016-01-01

    Carbon sequestration in agricultural soils has the capacity to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions, as well as to improve soil biological, physical, and chemical properties. The review of literature pertaining to soil organic carbon (SOC) dynamics within Australian grain farming systems does not enable us to conclude on the best farming practices to increase or maintain SOC for a specific combination of soil and climate. This study aimed to further explore the complex interactions of soil, climate, and farming practices on SOC. We undertook a modeling study with the Agricultural Production Systems sIMulator modeling framework, by combining contrasting Australian soils, climates, and farming practices (crop rotations, and management within rotations, such as fertilization, tillage, and residue management) in a factorial design. This design resulted in the transposition of contrasting soils and climates in our simulations, giving soil-climate combinations that do not occur in the study area to help provide insights into the importance of the climate constraints on SOC. We statistically analyzed the model's outputs to determinate the relative contributions of soil parameters, climate, and farming practices on SOC. The initial SOC content had the largest impact on the value of SOC, followed by the climate and the fertilization practices. These factors explained 66, 18, and 15% of SOC variations, respectively, after 80 years of constant farming practices in the simulation. Tillage and stubble management had the lowest impacts on SOC. This study highlighted the possible negative impact on SOC of a chickpea phase in a wheat-chickpea rotation and the potential positive impact of a cover crop in a sub-tropical climate (QLD, Australia) on SOC. It also showed the complexities in managing to achieve increased SOC, while simultaneously aiming to minimize nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions and nitrate leaching in farming systems. The transposition of contrasting soils and climates in

  6. Understanding the Impacts of Soil, Climate, and Farming Practices on Soil Organic Carbon Sequestration: A Simulation Study in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Godde, Cécile M.; Thorburn, Peter J.; Biggs, Jody S.; Meier, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    Carbon sequestration in agricultural soils has the capacity to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions, as well as to improve soil biological, physical, and chemical properties. The review of literature pertaining to soil organic carbon (SOC) dynamics within Australian grain farming systems does not enable us to conclude on the best farming practices to increase or maintain SOC for a specific combination of soil and climate. This study aimed to further explore the complex interactions of soil, climate, and farming practices on SOC. We undertook a modeling study with the Agricultural Production Systems sIMulator modeling framework, by combining contrasting Australian soils, climates, and farming practices (crop rotations, and management within rotations, such as fertilization, tillage, and residue management) in a factorial design. This design resulted in the transposition of contrasting soils and climates in our simulations, giving soil–climate combinations that do not occur in the study area to help provide insights into the importance of the climate constraints on SOC. We statistically analyzed the model’s outputs to determinate the relative contributions of soil parameters, climate, and farming practices on SOC. The initial SOC content had the largest impact on the value of SOC, followed by the climate and the fertilization practices. These factors explained 66, 18, and 15% of SOC variations, respectively, after 80 years of constant farming practices in the simulation. Tillage and stubble management had the lowest impacts on SOC. This study highlighted the possible negative impact on SOC of a chickpea phase in a wheat–chickpea rotation and the potential positive impact of a cover crop in a sub-tropical climate (QLD, Australia) on SOC. It also showed the complexities in managing to achieve increased SOC, while simultaneously aiming to minimize nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions and nitrate leaching in farming systems. The transposition of contrasting soils and

  7. Understanding the Impacts of Soil, Climate, and Farming Practices on Soil Organic Carbon Sequestration: A Simulation Study in Australia.

    PubMed

    Godde, Cécile M; Thorburn, Peter J; Biggs, Jody S; Meier, Elizabeth A

    2016-01-01

    Carbon sequestration in agricultural soils has the capacity to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions, as well as to improve soil biological, physical, and chemical properties. The review of literature pertaining to soil organic carbon (SOC) dynamics within Australian grain farming systems does not enable us to conclude on the best farming practices to increase or maintain SOC for a specific combination of soil and climate. This study aimed to further explore the complex interactions of soil, climate, and farming practices on SOC. We undertook a modeling study with the Agricultural Production Systems sIMulator modeling framework, by combining contrasting Australian soils, climates, and farming practices (crop rotations, and management within rotations, such as fertilization, tillage, and residue management) in a factorial design. This design resulted in the transposition of contrasting soils and climates in our simulations, giving soil-climate combinations that do not occur in the study area to help provide insights into the importance of the climate constraints on SOC. We statistically analyzed the model's outputs to determinate the relative contributions of soil parameters, climate, and farming practices on SOC. The initial SOC content had the largest impact on the value of SOC, followed by the climate and the fertilization practices. These factors explained 66, 18, and 15% of SOC variations, respectively, after 80 years of constant farming practices in the simulation. Tillage and stubble management had the lowest impacts on SOC. This study highlighted the possible negative impact on SOC of a chickpea phase in a wheat-chickpea rotation and the potential positive impact of a cover crop in a sub-tropical climate (QLD, Australia) on SOC. It also showed the complexities in managing to achieve increased SOC, while simultaneously aiming to minimize nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions and nitrate leaching in farming systems. The transposition of contrasting soils and climates in

  8. Collective phenomena in large-eddy simulations of extended wind farms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Richard; Meneveau, Charles

    2012-11-01

    A major issue with respect to the incorporation of large wind farms in power grids is that their power output strongly fluctuates over time. Understanding these fluctuations, especially its spatio-temporal characteristics, is important for the design of the backup power that must be available. The power fluctuations of the turbines depend on the effect of the wakes, created by a prior row of turbines, on the operation of the turbines, the inter-turbine correlations, and the interaction between the turbines and the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). We analyze the power fluctuations in large eddy simulations of extended wind-parks in the ABL. We consider various aggregates of wind turbines such as the total average power signal, or sub-averages within the wind farm. In particular, we find that the power variations of the total wind park decreases more than one would expect if one assumes the power output of the turbines to be uncorrelated. The non-trivial correlations are due to the interactions between turbines placed down-stream from each other. Surprisingly, the frequency spectra of the total wind-farm output show a decay that follows approximately a -5/3 power-law scaling regime, qualitatively consistent with observations made in field-scale operational wind parks (Apt, 2007). RS is supported by a ``Fellowship for Young Energy Scientists'' (YES!) of the Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (FOM), which is supported by the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO). CM is supported by NSF-CBET 1133800.

  9. Development of an advanced actuator disk model for Large-Eddy Simulation of wind farms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moens, Maud; Duponcheel, Matthieu; Winckelmans, Gregoire; Chatelain, Philippe

    2015-11-01

    This work aims at improving the fidelity of the wind turbine modelling for Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) of wind farms, in order to accurately predict the loads, the production, and the wake dynamics. In those simulations, the wind turbines are accounted for through actuator disks. i.e. a body-force term acting over the regularised disk swept by the rotor. These forces are computed using the Blade Element theory to estimate the normal and tangential components (based on the local simulated flow and the blade characteristics). The local velocities are modified using the Glauert tip-loss factor in order to account for the finite number of blades; the computation of this correction is here improved thanks to a local estimation of the effective upstream velocity at every point of the disk. These advanced actuator disks are implemented in a 4th order finite difference LES solver and are compared to a classical Blade Element Momentum method and to high fidelity wake simulations performed using a Vortex Particle-Mesh method in uniform and turbulent flows.

  10. Pituitary apoplexy presenting as diabetic ketoacidosis: A great simulator?

    PubMed

    Camara-Lemarroy, Carlos R; Infante-Valenzuela, Adrian; Rodriguez-Velver, Karla; Rodriguez-Gutierrez, Rene; Villareal-Velazquez, Hector J

    2016-01-01

    Pituitary apoplexy is a life-threatening illness due to acute infarction of the pituitary gland. The most common symptoms associated with pituitary apoplexy are headache, nausea, vomiting, visual impairment, hypopituitarism, and altered mental status. Diabetic ketoacidosis is a common acute complication of diabetes mellitus and is itself associated with similar symptoms. We present the case of a 38 year old woman, who presented with altered mental status and biochemical alterations suggestive of diabetic ketoacidosis who was found to have a pituitary apoplexy. The low frequency of this condition coupled with an acute and usually dramatic presentation that includes non-specific symptoms makes it a diagnostic challenge. Pituitary apoplexy can simulate a wide range of neurological conditions. PMID:26994379

  11. EVALUATION OF AP-FARM SIMULANT COMPOSITION FOR ROTARY MICROFILTER TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    HUBER HJ

    2011-09-19

    This document identifies the feed composition of a Hanford AP tank farm simulant for rotary microfiltration testing. The composition is based on an Hanford Tank Waste Operations Simulator (HTWOS) model run in combination with Tank Waste Information Network (TWINS) data and mineralogical studies of actual waste solids. The feed simulant is intended to be used in test runs at SRNL. The simulant will be prepared in two parts: (1) A supernate, composed of water-soluble salts and (2) The undissolved (actually, undissolvable) solids. Test slurries with distinct solids concentrations (e.g., 0.5, 5 and 10 wt%) are then prepared as needed. The base for the composition of supernate and solids is the modeled feed sequence for a deployment scenario of the Supplemental Pretreatment units within AP-farm. These units comprise a filtration part, the RMF, and a Cesium-removal part, a Small Column Ion Exchange. The primary use of this simulant is for filtration testing - however, in case that it is also used for ion-exchange tests, the amount of Cs-137 that would need to be added is available in Table 1 and Attachment 3. A modified model run (MMR-049) of the Hanford Tank Waste Operations Simulator (HTWOS) system plan 6 case 3 was performed to identify the feed sequence. Case 3 assumed supplemental treatment besides the low activity waste (LAW) melter with supplemental pretreatment supporting the pretreatment facility. The MMR did not cap the duration of supplemental pretreatment to 15 months, but rather used it throughout the entire treatment mission as an add-on option to the pretreatment facility at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Tank 241-AP-105 (AP-105) was chosen as the feed tank to the filtration unit. Other parameters included a fixed minimum of 0.5 wt% solids in the feed and a maximum Na-concentration of 5M in the supernate. The solids rejection from the filtration unit was set to 99.99% and the maximum allowed amount of solids within tank AP-105 was set

  12. Stochastic Parameter Development for PORFLOW Simulations of the Hanford AX Tank Farm

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, C.K.; Baca, R.G.; Conrad, S.H.; Smith, G.A.; Shyr, L.; Wheeler, T.A.

    1999-01-01

    Parameters have been identified that can be modeled stochastically using PORFLOW and Latin Hypercube Sampling (LHS). These parameters include hydrologic and transport properties in the vadose and saturated zones, as well as source-term parameters and infiltration rates. A number of resources were used to define the parameter distributions, primarily those provided in the Retrieval Performance Evaluation Report (Jacobs, 1998). A linear rank regression was performed on the vadose-zone hydrologic parameters given in Khaleel and Freeman (1995) to determine if correlations existed between pairs of parameters. No strong correlations were found among the vadose-zone hydrologic parameters, and it was recommended that these parameters be sampled independently until future data or analyses reveal a strong correlation or functional relationship between parameters. Other distributions for source-term parameters, infiltration rates, and saturated-zone parameters that are required to stochastically analyze the performance of the AX Tank Farm using LHS/PORFLOW were adapted from distributions and values reported in Jacobs (1998) and other literature sources. Discussions pertaining to the geologic conceptualization, vadose-zone modeling, and saturated-zone modeling of the AX Tank Farm are also presented.

  13. Mechanisms of gas generation from simulated SY tank farm wastes: FY 1995 progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Barefield, E.K.; Boatright, D.; Deshpande, A.; Doctorovich, F.; Liotta, C.L.; Neumann, H.M.; Seymore, S.

    1996-07-01

    The objective of this work is to develop a better understanding of the mechanism of formation of flammable gases in the thermal decomposition of metal complexants such as HEDTA and sodium glycolate in simulated SY tank farm waste mixtures. This report summarizes the results of work done at the Georgia Institute of Technology in fiscal year 1995. Topics discussed are (1) long-term studies of the decomposition of HEDTA in simulated waste mixtures under an argon atmosphere at 90 and 120{degrees}C, including time profiles for disappearance of HEDTA and appearance of products and the quantitative analysis of the kinetic behavior; (2) considerations of hydroxylamine as an intermediate in the production of nitrogen containing gases by HEDTA decomposition; (3) some thoughts on the revision of the global mechanism for thermal decomposition of HEDTA under argon; (4) preliminary long-term studies of the decomposition of HEDTA in simulated waste under an oxygen atmosphere at 120{degrees}C; (5) estimation of the amount of NH{sub 3} in the gas phase above HEDTA reaction mixtures; and (6) further, examination of the interaction of aluminum with nitrite ion using {sup 27}Al NMR spectroscopy. Section 2 of this report describes the work conducted over the last three years at GIT. Section 3 contains a discussion of the kinetic behavior of HEDTA under argon; Section 4 discusses the role of hydroxylamine. Thermal decomposition of HEDTA to ED3A is the subject of Section 5, and decomposition of HEDTA in simulated waste mixtures under oxygen is covered in Section 6. In Section 7 we estimate ammonia in the gas phase; the role of aluminum is discussed in Section 8.

  14. Report on the Oak Ridge sewage sludge land-farming experience. Part 1. Data presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Oakes, T.W.; Braunstein, H.M.; Daniels, K.L.; Ohnesorge, W.F.; Kitchings, J.T.; Alexander, W.A.

    1984-08-01

    Disposal of sludge from the City of Oak Ridge's sewage treatment facility on a 65-acre site on the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Reservation was initiated in November 1983. On March 22, 1984, DOE and the City determined that the sludge contained radioactive materials. Application of sludge on the Reservation was suspended on March 25 and a comprehensive survey and sampling plan was instituted to radiologically characterize the disposal site. By April 1, a radiation walkover survey had been completed on the site and samples of air, water, and soil had been collected to be analyzed for the presence of radionuclides. The mean air dose rate, one meter above the ground surface, was found to be 13 ..mu..R/h with a range from about 8 ..mu..R/h, which is the usual background level in the area, to 21 ..mu..R/h. Concentrations of Cs-137 and Co-60, the principle contaminants in the soil, were essentially below the analytical detection limits in the air and water. About 350 soil samples were collected by extracting cores to a depth of 12 to 15 inches according to a systematic random sampling design. Each core was separated into three sections; the top 3 inches, a middle section, and the bottom 3 inches to represent layers on the site. The majority of the radioactivity was determined to be in the upper 3 inches of soil. A statistical treatment of the analytical results provided an estimate of the total activity at the site, the vertical distribution of the gamma activity, and the areal distribution of the primary radionuclides. A total of 170 mCi of activity was estimated as present in the top 3-inch layer of the 65-acre site, 69% of which was contributed by Co-60 and Cs-137, 23% by U-234 and Sr-90, and 8% by other minor radionuclides. 4 references, 12 figures, 43 tables.

  15. A Descriptive Study of Farm-Related Injuries Presenting to Emergency Departments in North Carolina: 2008-2012.

    PubMed

    Allen, Daniel Landon; Kearney, Gregory D; Higgins, Sheila

    2015-01-01

    Farming is among the most dangerous industries for fatal and nonfatal injuries. A comprehensive agricultural injury surveillance system is absent in North Carolina (NC), and data sets traditionally used to provide estimates of nonfatal farm injuries surveillance in the United States are relatively incomplete. In the absence of a comprehensive farm injury surveillance system, individual local administrative data sources can provide a useful profile of the epidemiology of injuries in a population. The objective of this study was to use emergency department data to help describe the burden of farm-related injuries in NC and explore its usefulness in conducting work-related injury surveillance. Emergency department data from the North Carolina Disease Event Tracking and Epidemiologic Collection Tool (NC DETECT) was utilized to identify farm injury cases. The study sample included all farm injury cases for the period of 2008-2012 that contained International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) E code 919.0 (agricultural machinery) or 849.1 (place of occurrence = farm; this E code excludes farm house and home premises of farm). Results indicated that an average of 459 cases of farm injury occurred annually from 2008 to 2012, with no significant change between years. Among the patients, 79.7% were male, 74.7% were between 18 and 64 years old, and 28.1% had no form of insurance coverage. Injuries were more heavily concentrated in the Piedmont and Coastal Plains regions (41.3% and 42.2%, respectively). Of farm-coded incidents, 73.2% were given injury- or poisoning-related primary diagnosis codes, and of these, the most frequent specific codes were related to open wounds of upper limbs (16.2%), contusions (12.0%), and sprains and strains (9.3%). Some significant relationships between diagnoses and sex, region, and age are also identified. Injuries occurring on a farm have been well documented and constitute a significant public health

  16. Modelling growth variability in longline mussel farms as a function of stocking density and farm design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosland, Rune; Bacher, Cédric; Strand, Øivind; Aure, Jan; Strohmeier, Tore

    2011-11-01

    Mussels ( Mytilus edulis) are commonly cultivated on artificial structures like rafts, poles or longlines to facilitate farming operations. Farm structures and dense mussel populations may result in water flow reduction and seston depletion and thus reduced individual mussel growth and spatial growth variability inside a farm. One of the challenges in mussel farming is thus to scale and configure farms in order to optimise total mussel production and individual mussel quality under different environmental regimes. Here we present a spatially resolved model for simulation of flow reduction, seston depletion and individual mussel growth inside a longline farm based on information about farm configuration (spacing between longlines, farm length and stocking density) and background environmental conditions (current speed, seston concentration and temperature). The model simulations are forced by environmental data from two fjords in south-western Norway and the farm configurations are defined within operational ranges. The simulations demonstrate spatial growth patterns at longlines under environmental settings and farm configurations where flow reduction and seston depletion have significant impacts on individual mussel growth. Longline spacing has a strong impact on the spatial distribution of individual growth, and the spacing is characterised by a threshold value. Below the threshold growth reduction and spatial growth variability increase rapidly as a consequence of reduced water flow and seston supply rate, but increased filtration due to higher mussel densities also contributes to the growth reduction. The spacing threshold is moderated by other farm configuration factors and environmental conditions. Comparisons with seston depletion reported from other farm sites show that the model simulations are within observed ranges. A demonstration is provided on how the model can guide farm configuration with the aim of optimising total farm biomass and individual

  17. SIMULATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE EMISSIONS FROM DAIRY FARMS TO ASSESS GREENHOUSE GAS REDUCTION STRATEGIES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Farming practices can have a large impact on the soil carbon cycle and the resulting net emission of greenhouse gases including carbon dioxide (CO**2), methane and nitrous oxide. Primary sources of CO**2 emission on dairy farms are soil, plant, and animal respiration with smaller contributions from ...

  18. Simulation of Long-Term Carbon and Nitrogen Dynamics in Grassland-Based Dairy Farming Systems to Evaluate Mitigation Strategies for Nutrient Losses.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ghulam Abbas; Groot, Jeroen C J; Shah, Ghulam Mustafa; Lantinga, Egbert A

    2013-01-01

    Many measures have been proposed to mitigate gaseous emissions and other nutrient losses from agroecosystems, which can have large detrimental effects for the quality of soils, water and air, and contribute to eutrophication and global warming. Due to complexities in farm management, biological interactions and emission measurements, most experiments focus on analysis of short-term effects of isolated mitigation practices. Here we present a model that allows simulating long-term effects at the whole-farm level of combined measures related to grassland management, animal housing and manure handling after excretion, during storage and after field application. The model describes the dynamics of pools of organic carbon and nitrogen (N), and of inorganic N, as affected by farm management in grassland-based dairy systems. We assessed the long-term effects of delayed grass mowing, housing type (cubicle and sloping floor barns, resulting in production of slurry and solid cattle manure, respectively), manure additives, contrasting manure storage methods and irrigation after application of covered manure. Simulations demonstrated that individually applied practices often result in compensatory loss pathways. For instance, methods to reduce ammonia emissions during storage like roofing or covering of manure led to larger losses through ammonia volatilization, nitrate leaching or denitrification after application, unless extra measures like irrigation were used. A strategy of combined management practices of delayed mowing and fertilization with solid cattle manure that is treated with zeolite, stored under an impermeable sheet and irrigated after application was effective to increase soil carbon stocks, increase feed self-sufficiency and reduce losses by ammonia volatilization and soil N losses. Although long-term datasets (>25 years) of farm nutrient dynamics and loss flows are not available to validate the model, the model is firmly based on knowledge of processes and

  19. 2003 Initial Assessments of Closure for the C Tank Farm Field Investigation Report (FIR):Numerical Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z. F.; Freedman, Vicky L.; White, Mark D.

    2003-07-15

    In support of CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc.'s (CHG) preparation of a Field Investigative Report (FIR) for the closure of the Hanford Site Single-Shell Tank (SST) Waste Management Area (WMA) tank farms, a set of numerical simulations of flow and solute transport was executed to predict the performance of surface barriers for reducing long-term risks from potential groundwater contamination at the C Farm WMA. This report documents the simulation of 14 cases (and two verification cases) involving two-dimensional cross sections through the C Farm WMA tanks C-103 – C-112. Utilizing a unit release scenario at Tank C-112, four different types of leaks were simulated. These simulations assessed the impact of leakage during retrieval, past leaks, and tank residual wastes and tank ancillary equipment following closure activities. . Two transported solutes were considered: uranium-238 (U-238) and technetium-99 (Tc-99). To evaluate the impact of sorption to the subsurface materials, six different retardation coefficients were simulated for U-238. Overall, simulations results for the C Farm WMA showed that only a small fraction of the U-238 with retardation factors greater than 0.6 migrated from the vadose zone in all of the cases. For the conservative solute, Tc-99, results showed that the simulations investigating leakages during retrieval demonstrated the highest WMA peak concentrations and the earliest arrival times due to the high infiltration rate before the use of surface barriers and the addition of water into the system. Simulations investigating past leaks showed similar peaks and arrival times as the retrieval leak cases. Several different release rates were used to investigate contaminant transport from residual tank wastes. All showed similar peak concentrations and arrival times, except for the lowest initial release rate, which was 1,000 times slower than the highest release rate. Past leaks were also investigated with different release rate models, including

  20. Large-eddy Simulation of Atmospheric Boundary-layer Flow through a Wind Farm Sited on Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamsoddin, Sina; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2015-04-01

    In this work, the performance of a wind farm situated on a hilly terrain is studied using large-eddy simulation and especial attention is paid to the effect of the topography on the wake flow characteristics. To this end, first, boundary-layer flow is simulated over a two-dimensional hill and the corresponding mean and instantaneous flow-field is captured. Subsequently, flow simulation through a wind farm, consisting of five horizontal-axis wind turbines, sited over the same hill in an aligned layout is performed and the resulting flow characteristics are compared with the former case, i.e., the case without wind turbines. To assess the validity of the simulations, the calculated results are compared with the measurements carried out by Tian et al. (2013) in the aerodynamic/atmospheric boundary layer wind tunnel of Iowa State University. The agreement between the simulation and experimental results is good in terms of mean velocity and turbulence intensity profiles at different streamwise positions.

  1. Market Design Simulations with Variable Energy Resources (VERs) (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Ela, E.

    2011-06-01

    Presented at the FERC Technical Conference, 29 June 2011, Washington, D.C. This presentation describes NREL research regarding variable generation resources, operating reserves, unit commitment, economic dispatch, and introduces a new and novel modeling tool called 'FESTIV.'

  2. ON-FARM PRETREATMENT TECHNOLOGIES FOR IMPROVING ENZYMATIC DIGESTIBILITY OF CELLULOSE AND HEMICELLULOSE PRESENT IN PERENNIAL GRASS AND CORN STOVER

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recently, wet storage methods have been proposed for feedstock preservation and on-farm storage of perennial grass and corn stover biomass. The advantages over a dry storage system include lower risk of fire, reduced harvest costs, and improved feedstock susceptibility to enzymatic hydrolysis. We ...

  3. A Three-Dimensional Virtual Simulator for Aircraft Flyover Presentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, Stephen A.; Sullivan, Brenda M.; Sandridge, Christopher A.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a system developed at NASA Langley Research Center to render aircraft flyovers in a virtual reality environment. The present system uses monaural recordings of actual aircraft flyover noise and presents these binaurally using head tracking information. The three-dimensional audio is simultaneously rendered with a visual presentation using a head-mounted display (HMD). The final system will use flyover noise synthesized using data from various analytical and empirical modeling systems. This will permit presentation of flyover noise from candidate low-noise flight operations to subjects for psychoacoustical evaluation.

  4. Carbocyanines in an RNA environment: experiment meets simulation (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boerner, Richard; Steffen, Fabio; Sigel, Roland K. O.

    2016-02-01

    The popularity of carbocyanine dyes in single molecule spectroscopy of nucleic acids is unbroken [1]. Studying the dynamics of large RNA constructs and the binding kinetics such as the exon/intron binding side interaction of the group II intron in S. Cerevisiae [2,3] have motivated a thorough photophysical characterization of the FRET pair Cy3/Cy5 in context of nucleic acids and RNA in particular. We show that Mg2+ as a mediator of RNA-dye interactions enhances the cyanine fluorescence lifetime. The increasing window for depolarization as monitored by time-resolved anisotropy further revealed a dynamic equilibrium between free tumbling and stacking on the RNA backbone, with the stacked conformation preventing photoisomerization [4]. Tracking fluorophore mobility covalently bound to the RNA on an atomistic level by means of molecular dynamics [5] allow to disentangle different types of dye-dye and dye-RNA interactions. Our hybrid approach combining time-correlated single photon counting and computer simulations will benefit the interpretation of absolute distance measurement by smFRET. [1] M.Levitus and S.Ranjit, Q. Rev. Biophys 2011, 44, 123-151. [2] D.Kowerko, S.L.B.König, M.Skilandat, D.Kruschel, M.C.A.S.Hadzic, L.Cardo, R.K.O.Sigel, PNAS 2015, 112, 3403-3408. [3] M. Khier, D. Kowerko, F. Steffen, R. Börner and R.K.O.Sigel, in preparation. [4] F.Steffen, R.K.O. Sigel, R.Börner, in preparation. [5] R.Best, H. Hofmann, D. Nettels, B. Schuler, Biophys J 2015, 11,2721-2731.

  5. Mathematical formulation and numerical simulation of bird flu infection process within a poultry farm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putri, Arrival Rince; Nova, Tertia Delia; Watanabe, M.

    2016-02-01

    Bird flu infection processes within a poultry farm are formulated mathematically. A spatial effect is taken into account for the virus concentration with a diffusive term. An infection process is represented in terms of a traveling wave solutions. For a small removal rate, a singular perturbation analysis lead to existence of traveling wave solutions, that correspond to progressive infection in one direction.

  6. CgWind: A high-order accurate simulation tool for wind turbines and wind farms

    SciTech Connect

    Chand, K K; Henshaw, W D; Lundquist, K A; Singer, M A

    2010-02-22

    CgWind is a high-fidelity large eddy simulation (LES) tool designed to meet the modeling needs of wind turbine and wind park engineers. This tool combines several advanced computational technologies in order to model accurately the complex and dynamic nature of wind energy applications. The composite grid approach provides high-quality structured grids for the efficient implementation of high-order accurate discretizations of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. Composite grids also provide a natural mechanism for modeling bodies in relative motion and complex geometry. Advanced algorithms such as matrix-free multigrid, compact discretizations and approximate factorization will allow CgWind to perform highly resolved calculations efficiently on a wide class of computing resources. Also in development are nonlinear LES subgrid-scale models required to simulate the many interacting scales present in large wind turbine applications. This paper outlines our approach, the current status of CgWind and future development plans.

  7. Development of a network based model to simulate the between-farm transmission of the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Krishna K; Sanchez, Javier; Hurnik, Daniel; Poljak, Zvonimir; Opps, Sheldon; Revie, Crawford W

    2015-11-18

    Contact structure within a population can significantly affect the outcomes of infectious disease spread models. The objective of this study was to develop a network based simulation model for the between-farm spread of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus to assess the impact of contact structure on between-farm transmission of PRRS virus. For these farm level models, a hypothetical population of 500 swine farms following a multistage production system was used. The contact rates between farms were based on a study analyzing movement of pigs in Canada, while disease spread parameters were extracted from published literature. Eighteen distinct scenarios were designed and simulated by varying the mode of transmission (direct versus direct and indirect contact), type of index herd (farrowing, nursery and finishing), and the presumed network structures among swine farms (random, scale-free and small-world). PRRS virus was seeded in a randomly selected farm and 500 iterations of each scenario were simulated for 52 weeks. The median epidemic size by the end of the simulated period and percentage die-out for each scenario, were the key outcomes captured. Scenarios with scale-free network models resulted in the largest epidemic sizes, while scenarios with random and small-world network models resulted in smaller and similar epidemic sizes. Similarly, stochastic die-out percentage was least for scenarios with scale-free networks followed by random and small-world networks. Findings of the study indicated that incorporating network structures among the swine farms had a considerable impact on the spread of PRRS virus, highlighting the importance of understanding and incorporating realistic contact structures when developing infectious disease spread models for similar populations.

  8. Non-hazardous pesticide concentrations in surface waters: An integrated approach simulating application thresholds and resulting farm income effects.

    PubMed

    Bannwarth, M A; Grovermann, C; Schreinemachers, P; Ingwersen, J; Lamers, M; Berger, T; Streck, T

    2016-01-01

    Pesticide application rates are high and increasing in upland agricultural systems in Thailand producing vegetables, fruits and ornamental crops, leading to the pollution of stream water with pesticide residues. The objective of this study was to determine the maximum per hectare application rates of two widely used pesticides that would achieve non-hazardous pesticide concentrations in the stream water and to evaluate how farm household incomes would be affected if farmers complied with these restricted application rates. For this purpose we perform an integrated modeling approach of a hydrological solute transport model (the Soil and Water Assessment Tool, SWAT) and an agent-based farm decision model (Mathematical Programming-based Multi-Agent Systems, MPMAS). SWAT was used to simulate the pesticide fate and behavior. The model was calibrated to a 77 km(2) watershed in northern Thailand. The results show that to stay under a pre-defined eco-toxicological threshold, the current average application of chlorothalonil (0.80 kg/ha) and cypermethrin (0.53 kg/ha) would have to be reduced by 80% and 99%, respectively. The income effect of such reductions was simulated using MPMAS. The results suggest that if farm households complied with the application thresholds then their income would reduce by 17.3% in the case of chlorothalonil and by 38.3% in the case of cypermethrin. Less drastic income effects can be expected if methods of integrated pest management were more widely available. The novelty of this study is to combine two models from distinctive disciplines to evaluate pesticide reduction scenarios based on real-world data from a single study site.

  9. Physical Properties Models for Simulation of Processes to Treat INEEL Tank Farm Waste: Thermodynamic Equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, T.T.; Taylor, D.D.

    2002-07-18

    A status is presented of the development during FY2002 of a database for physical properties models for the simulation of the treatment of Sodium-Bearing Waste (SBW) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. An activity coefficient model is needed for concentrated, aqueous, multi-electrolyte solutions that can be used by process design practitioners. Reasonable first-order estimates of activity coefficients in the relevant media are needed rather than an incremental improvement in theoretical approaches which are not usable by practitioners. A comparison of the Electrolyte Non-Random Two-Liquid (ENRTL) and Pitzer ion-interaction models for the thermodynamic representation of SBW is presented. It is concluded that Pitzer's model is superior to ENRTL in modeling treatment processes for SBW. The applicability of the Pitzer treatment to high concentrations of pertinent species and to the determination of solubilities and chemical equilibria is addressed. Alternate values of Pitzer parameters for HCl, H2SO4, and HNO3 are proposed, applicable up to 16m, and 12m, respectively. Partial validation of the implementation of Pitzer's treatment within the commercial process simulator ASPEN Plus was performed.

  10. Flight simulators. Part 1: Present situation and trends. Part 2: Implications for training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hass, D.; Volk, W.

    1977-01-01

    The present situation and developments in the technology of flight simulators based on digital computers are evaluated from the standpoint of training airline flight crews. Areas covered are minicomputers and their advantages in terms of cost, space and time savings, software data packets, motion simulation, visual simulation and instructor aids. The division of training time between aircraft and simulator training and the possible advantages from increased use of simulators are evaluated.

  11. 2004 Initial Assessments for the T and TX TY Tank Farm Field Investigation Report (FIR): Numerical Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z. F.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Waichler, Scott R.

    2004-09-24

    In support of CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc.’s (CHG) preparation of a Field Investigative Report (FIR) for the Hanford Site Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area (WMA) T and TX-TY, a suite of numerical simulations of flow and solute transport was executed using the STOMP code to predict the performance of surface barriers for reducing long-term risks from potential groundwater contamination at the T and TX-TY WMA. The scope and parametric data for these simulations were defined by a modeling data package provided by CHG. This report documents the simulation involving 2-D cross sections through the T Tank and the TX-TY Tank Farm. Eight cases were carried out for the cross sections to simulate the effects of interim barrier, water line leak, inventory distribution, and surface recharge on water flow and the transport of long-lived radionuclides (i.e., technecium-99 and uranium) and chemicals (i.e., nitrate and chromium For simulations with barriers, it is assumed that an interim barrier is in place by the year 2010. It was also assumed that, for all simulations, as part of tank farm closure, a closure barrier was in place by the year 2040. The modeling considers the estimated inventories of contaminants within the vadose zone and calculates the associated risk. It assumes that no tanks will leak in the future. Initial conditions for contaminant concentration are provided as part of inventory estimates for uranium, technetium-99, nitrate, and chromium. For moisture flow modeling, Neumann boundary conditions are prescribed at the surface with the flux equal to the recharge rate estimate. For transport modeling, a zero flux boundary is prescribed at the surface for uranium, technetium-99, nitrate, and chromium. The western and eastern boundaries are assigned no-flux boundaries for both flow and transport. The water table boundary is prescribed by water table elevations and the unconfined aquifer hydraulic gradient. No-flux boundaries are used for the lower boundary

  12. Steady-State Simulation of Steam Reforming of INEEL Tank Farm Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, T.T.; Taylor, D.D.; Wood, R.A.; Barnes, C.M.

    2002-08-15

    A steady-state model of the Sodium-Bearing Waste steam reforming process at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory has been performed using the commercial ASPEN Plus process simulator. The preliminary process configuration and its representation in ASPEN are described. As assessment of the capability of the model to mechanistically predict product stream compositions was made, and fidelity gaps and opportunities for model enhancement were identified, resulting in the following conclusions: (1) Appreciable benefit is derived from using an activity coefficient model for electrolyte solution thermodynamics rather than assuming ideality (unity assumed for all activity coefficients). The concentrations of fifteen percent of the species present in the primary output stream were changed by more than 50%, relative to Electrolyte NRTL, when ideality was assumed; (2) The current baseline model provides a good start for estimating mass balances and performing integrated process optimization because it contains several key species, uses a mechanistic electrolyte thermodynamic model, and is based on a reasonable process configuration; and (3) Appreciable improvement to model fidelity can be realized by expanding the species list and the list of chemical and phase transformations. A path forward is proposed focusing on the use of an improved electrolyte thermodynamic property method, addition of chemical and phase transformations for key species currently absent from the model, and the combination of RGibbs and Flash blocks to simulate simultaneous phase and chemical equilibria in the off-gas treatment train.

  13. Steady-State Simulation of Steam Reforming of INEEL Tank Farm Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, Todd Travis; Taylor, Dean Dalton; Wood, Richard Arthur; Barnes, Charles Marshall

    2002-08-01

    A steady-state model of the Sodium-Bearing Waste steam reforming process at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory has been performed using the commercial ASPEN Plus process simulator. The preliminary process configuration and its representation in ASPEN are described. As assessment of the capability of the model to mechanistically predict product stream compositions was made, and fidelity gaps and opportunities for model enhancement were identified, resulting in the following conclusions: 1) Appreciable benefit is derived from using an activity coefficient model for electrolyte solution thermodynamics rather than assuming ideality (unity assumed for all activity coefficients). The concentrations of fifteen percent of the species present in the primary output stream were changed by more than 50%, relative to Electrolyte NRTL, when ideality was assumed; 2) The current baseline model provides a good start for estimating mass balances and performing integrated process optimization because it contains several key species, uses a mechanistic electrolyte thermodynamic model, and is based on a reasonable process configuration; and 3) Appreciable improvement to model fidelity can be realized by expanding the species list and the list of chemical and phase transformations. A path forward is proposed focusing on the use of an improved electrolyte thermodynamic property method, addition of chemical and phase transformations for key species currently absent from the model, and the combination of RGibbs and Flash blocks to simulate simultaneous phase and chemical equilibria in the off-gas treatment train.

  14. Coupling the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and Large Eddy Simulations with Actuator Disk Model: predictions of wind farm power production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Cartagena, Edgardo Javier; Santoni, Christian; Ciri, Umberto; Iungo, Giacomo Valerio; Leonardi, Stefano

    2015-11-01

    A large-scale wind farm operating under realistic atmospheric conditions is studied by coupling a meso-scale and micro-scale models. For this purpose, the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) is coupled with an in-house LES solver for wind farms. The code is based on a finite difference scheme, with a Runge-Kutta, fractional step and the Actuator Disk Model. The WRF model has been configured using seven one-way nested domains where the child domain has a mesh size one third of its parent domain. A horizontal resolution of 70 m is used in the innermost domain. A section from the smallest and finest nested domain, 7.5 diameters upwind of the wind farm is used as inlet boundary condition for the LES code. The wind farm consists in six-turbines aligned with the mean wind direction and streamwise spacing of 10 rotor diameters, (D), and 2.75D in the spanwise direction. Three simulations were performed by varying the velocity fluctuations at the inlet: random perturbations, precursor simulation, and recycling perturbation method. Results are compared with a simulation on the same wind farm with an ideal uniform wind speed to assess the importance of the time varying incoming wind velocity. Numerical simulations were performed at TACC (Grant CTS070066). This work was supported by NSF, (Grant IIA-1243482 WINDINSPIRE).

  15. Parameterization of wind farms in COSMO-LM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuetz, E.; Steinfeld, G.; Heinemann, D.; Peinke, J.

    2012-04-01

    In order to examine the impact of wind farms in the meso scale using numerical simulations parameterizations of wind farms were implemented in a mesoscale model. In 2008/2009 the first wind farm in the german exclusive economic zone - Alpha Ventus - was built. Since then more wind farms are erected in the german exclusive economic zone. Wind farms with up to 80 wind turbines and on an area up to 66 square kilometers are planned - partly only few kilometers apart from one another. Such large wind farms influence the properties of the atmospheric boundary layer at the meso scale by a reduction of the wind speed, a enhancement of the turbulent kinetic energy, but also an alternation of the wind direction. Results of models for the calculation of wakes (wake models), idealistic mesoscale studies as well as observations show, that wind farms of this size produce wakes, which can expand up to a few 10 kilometers downstream. Mesoscale models provide the possibility to investigate the impact of such large wind farms on the atmospheric flow in a larger area and also to examine the effect of wind farms under different weather conditions. For the numerical simulation the mesoscale model COSMO-LM is used. Because the wind turbines of the wind farm cannot be displayed individually due to the large mesh-grid size, the effects of the wind turbine in a numerical model have to be described with the help of a parameterization. Different parameterizations, including the interpretation of a wind farm as enhanced surface roughness or as an impuls deficit and turbulence source, respectively, are implemented into COSMO. The impact of the different wind farm parameterizations on the simulation of the atmospheric boundary layer are presented. as well as first tests of idealistic simulations of wind farms are presented. For this purpose idealistic runs as well as a case study were performed.

  16. Simulated impacts of climate change on current farming locations of striped catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus; Sauvage) in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Anh L; Dang, Vinh H; Bosma, Roel H; Verreth, Johan A J; Leemans, Rik; De Silva, Sena S

    2014-12-01

    In Vietnam, culturing striped catfish makes an important contribution to the Mekong Delta's economy. Water level rise during rainy season and salt intrusion during dry season affect the water exchange and quality for this culture. Sea level rise as a consequence of climate change will worsen these influences. In this study, water level rise and salt water intrusion for three sea level rise (SLR) scenarios (i.e., +30, +50, and +75 cm) were simulated. The results showed that at SLR +50, the 3-m-flood level would spread downstream and threaten farms located in AnGiang, DongThap and CanTho provinces. Rising salinity levels for SLR +75 would reduce the window appropriate for the culture in SocTrang and BenTre provinces, and in TienGiang's coastal districts. Next to increasing dikes to reduce the impacts, the most tenable and least disruptive option to the farming community would be to shift to a salinity tolerant strain of catfish.

  17. Simulated impacts of climate change on current farming locations of striped catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus; Sauvage) in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Anh L; Dang, Vinh H; Bosma, Roel H; Verreth, Johan A J; Leemans, Rik; De Silva, Sena S

    2014-12-01

    In Vietnam, culturing striped catfish makes an important contribution to the Mekong Delta's economy. Water level rise during rainy season and salt intrusion during dry season affect the water exchange and quality for this culture. Sea level rise as a consequence of climate change will worsen these influences. In this study, water level rise and salt water intrusion for three sea level rise (SLR) scenarios (i.e., +30, +50, and +75 cm) were simulated. The results showed that at SLR +50, the 3-m-flood level would spread downstream and threaten farms located in AnGiang, DongThap and CanTho provinces. Rising salinity levels for SLR +75 would reduce the window appropriate for the culture in SocTrang and BenTre provinces, and in TienGiang's coastal districts. Next to increasing dikes to reduce the impacts, the most tenable and least disruptive option to the farming community would be to shift to a salinity tolerant strain of catfish. PMID:24715387

  18. Effects of Multiple Simulation Presentation among Students of Different Anxiety Levels in the Learning of Probability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fong, Soon Fook; Por, Fei Ping; Tang, Ai Ling

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of multiple simulation presentation in interactive multimedia are on the achievement of students with different levels of anxiety in the learning of Probability. The interactive multimedia courseware was developed in two different modes, which were Multiple Simulation Presentation (MSP) and…

  19. The Subsistence Agriculture Game: A Simulation of Farming. Instructional Activities Series IA/S-17.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinson, Tom; Harnapp, Vern

    This activity is one of a series of 17 teacher-developed instructional activities for geography at the secondary-grade level described in SO 009 140. Through a simulation, students develop an understanding of subsistence agriculture in Central America and how it is influenced by cultural and physical factors. During four 50-minute class periods,…

  20. Teaching Engineering Statistics with Technology, Group Learning, Contextual Projects, Simulation Models and Student Presentations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romeu, Jorge Luis

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses our teaching approach in graduate level Engineering Statistics. It is based on the use of modern technology, learning groups, contextual projects, simulation models, and statistical and simulation software to entice student motivation. The use of technology to facilitate group projects and presentations, and to generate,…

  1. Full vector (3-D) inflow simulation in natural and wind farm environments using an expanded version of the SNLWIND (Veers) turbulence code

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, N.D.

    1992-11-01

    We have recently expanded the numerical turbulence simulation (SNLWIND) developed by Veers [1] to include all three components of the turbulent wind vector. We have also configured the code to simulate the characteristics of turbulent wind fields upwind and downwind of a large wind farm, as well as over uniform, flat terrain. Veers`s original method only simulates the longitudinal component of the wind in neutral flow. This paper overviews the development of spectral distribution, spatial coherence, and cross correlation models used to expired the SNLWIND code to include the three components of the turbulent wind over a range of atmospheric stabilities. These models are based on extensive measurements of the turbulence characteristics immediately upwind and downwind of a large wind farm in San Gorgonio Pass, California.

  2. Full vector (3-D) inflow simulation in natural and wind farm environments using an expanded version of the SNLWIND (Veers) turbulence code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, N. D.

    1992-11-01

    We have recently expanded the numerical turbulence simulation (SNLWIND) developed by Veers to include all three components of the turbulent wind vector. We have also configured the code to simulate the characteristics of turbulent wind fields upwind and downwind of a large wind farm, as well as over uniform, flat terrain. Veers's original method only simulates the longitudinal component of the wind in neutral flow. This paper overviews the development of spectral distribution, spatial coherence, and cross correlation models used to expired the SNLWIND code to include the three components of the turbulent wind over a range of atmospheric stabilities. These models are based on extensive measurements of the turbulence characteristics immediately upwind and downwind of a large wind farm in San Gorgonio Pass, California.

  3. Simulating nitrogen budgets in complex farming systems using INCA: calibration and scenario analyses for the Kervidy catchment (W. France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durand, P.

    The integrated nitrogen model INCA (Integrated Nitrogen in Catchments) was used to analyse the nitrogen dynamics in a small rural catchment in Western France. The agrosystem studied is very complex, with: extensive use of different organic fertilisers, a variety of crop rotations, a structural excess of nitrogen (i.e. more animal N produced by the intensive farming than the N requirements of the crops and pastures), and nitrate retention in both hydrological stores and riparian zones. The original model features were adapted here to describe this complexity. The calibration results are satisfactory, although the daily variations in stream nitrate are not simulated in detail. Different climate scenarios, based on observed climate records, were tested; all produced a worsening of the pollution in the short term. Scenarios of alternative agricultural practices (reduced fertilisation and catch crops) were also analysed, suggesting that a reduction by 40% of the fertilisation combined with the introduction of catch crops would be necessary to stop the degradation of water quality.

  4. Space-time modelling of the spread of salmon lice between and within Norwegian marine salmon farms.

    PubMed

    Aldrin, Magne; Storvik, Bård; Kristoffersen, Anja Bråthen; Jansen, Peder Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Parasitic salmon lice are potentially harmful to salmonid hosts and farm produced lice pose a threat to wild salmonids. To control salmon lice infections in Norwegian salmonid farming, numbers of lice are regularly counted and lice abundance is reported from all salmonid farms every month. We have developed a stochastic space-time model where monthly lice abundance is modelled simultaneously for all farms. The set of farms is regarded as a network where the degree of contact between farms depends on their seaway distance. The expected lice abundance at each farm is modelled as a function of i) lice abundance in previous months at the same farm, ii) at neighbourhood farms, and iii) other, unspecified sources. In addition, the model includes explanatory variables such as seawater temperature and farm-numbers of fish. The model gives insight into factors that affect salmon lice abundance and contributing sources of infection. New findings in this study were that 66% of the expected salmon lice abundance was attributed to infection within farms, 28% was attributed to infection from neighbourhood farms and 6% to non-specified sources of infection. Furthermore, we present the relative risk of infection between neighbourhood farms as a function of seaway distance, which can be viewed as a between farm transmission kernel for salmon lice. The present modelling framework lays the foundation for development of future scenario simulation tools for examining the spread and abundance of salmon lice on farmed salmonids under different control regimes.

  5. Multi-agent modeling and simulation of farmland use change in the farming-pastoral zone: A case study of Qianjingou Town in Inner Mongolia, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, H.

    2015-12-01

    Farmland is the most basic material conditions for guaranteeing rural livelihoods and national food security, and exploring management strategies that take both of the sustainable rural livelihoods and sustainable farmland use into account has vital significance of theory and practice. Farmland is a complex and self-adaptive system that couples human and natural systems together, and natural factors and social factors that are related to its changing process need to be considered when modeling farmland changing process. This paper takes Qianjingou Town in Inner Mongolia farming-pastoral zone as study area. From the perspective of the relationship between households' livelihoods and farmland use, this study builds the process mechanism of farmland use change based on questionnaires data, and constructs multi-agent simulation model of farmland use change with the help of Eclipse and Repast toolbox. Through simulating the relationship between natural factors (with geographical location) and households' behaviors, this paper systematically simulates households' renting and abandoning farmland behaviors, and truly describes dynamic interactions between households' livelihoods and factors related to farmland use change. These factors include natural factors (net primary productivity, road accessibility, slope and relief amplitude) and social factors (households' family structures, economic development and government policies). In the end, this study scientifically predicts farmland use change trend in the future 30 years. The simulation results show that, the number of abandoned and sublet farmland plots has a gradually increasing trend, the number of non-farm households and pure-outwork households has a remarkable increasing trend, and the number of part-farm households and pure-farm households shows a decreasing trend. Households' livelihoods sustainability in the study area is confronted with increasing pressure, and households' nonfarm employment has an increasing

  6. Adding Complex Terrain and Stable Atmospheric Condition Capability to the OpenFOAM-based Flow Solver of the Simulator for On/Offshore Wind Farm Applications (SOWFA): Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Churchfield, M. J.; Sang, L.; Moriarty, P. J.

    2013-09-01

    This paper describes changes made to NREL's OpenFOAM-based wind plant aerodynamics solver such that it can compute the stably stratified atmospheric boundary layer and flow over terrain. Background about the flow solver, the Simulator for Off/Onshore Wind Farm Applications (SOWFA) is given, followed by details of the stable stratification/complex terrain modifications to SOWFA, along with somepreliminary results calculations of a stable atmospheric boundary layer and flow over a simply set of hills.

  7. Present-day Circum-Antarctic Simulations using the POPSICLES Coupled Ice Sheet-Ocean Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asay-Davis, X.; Martin, D. F.; Price, S. F.; Maltrud, M. E.; Collins, W.

    2014-12-01

    We present POPSICLES simulation results covering the full Antarctic Ice Sheet and the Southern Ocean spanning the period 1990 to 2010. Simulations are performed at 0.1o (~5 km) ocean resolution and with adaptive ice-sheet model resolution as fine as 500 m. We compare time-averaged melt rates below a number of major ice shelves with those reported by Rignot et al. (2013) as well as other recent studies. We also present seasonal variability and decadal trends in submarine melting from several Antarctic regions. Finally, we explore the influence on basal melting and system dynamics resulting from two different choices of climate forcing: a "normal-year" climatology and the CORE v. 2 forcing data (Large and Yeager 2008).POPSICLES couples the POP2x ocean model, a modified version of the Parallel Ocean Program (Smith and Gent, 2002), and the BISICLES ice-sheet model (Cornford et al., 2012). POP2x includes sub-ice-shelf circulation using partial top cells (Losch, 2008) and boundary layer physics following Holland and Jenkins (1999), Jenkins (2001), and Jenkins et al. (2010). Standalone POP2x output compares well with standard ice-ocean test cases (e.g., ISOMIP; Losch, 2008) and other continental-scale simulations and melt-rate observations (Kimura et al., 2013; Rignot et al., 2013). BISICLES makes use of adaptive mesh refinement and a 1st-order accurate momentum balance similar to the L1L2 model of Schoof and Hindmarsh (2009) to accurately model regions of dynamic complexity, such as ice streams, outlet glaciers, and grounding lines. Results of BISICLES simulations have compared favorably to comparable simulations with a Stokes momentum balance in both idealized tests (MISMIP-3D; Pattyn et al., 2013) and realistic configurations (Favier et al. 2014).A companion presentation, "Response of the Antarctic Ice Sheet to ocean forcing using the POPSICLES coupled ice sheet-ocean model" in session C024 covers the ice-sheet response to these melt rates in the coupled simulation

  8. Effects of Training on Recognition of Musical Instruments Presented through Cochlear Implant Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Driscoll, Virginia D.; Oleson, Jacob; Jiang, Dingfeng; Gfeller, Kate

    2009-01-01

    Background The simulation of the CI (cochlear implant) signal presents a degraded representation of each musical instrument, which makes recognition difficult. Purpose To examine the efficiency and effectiveness of three types of training on recognition of musical instruments as presented through simulations of the sounds transmitted through a CI. Research Design Participants were randomly assigned to one of three training conditions: repeated exposure, feedback, and direct instruction. Study Sample Sixty-six adults with normal hearing. Intervention Each participant completed three training sessions per week, over a five-week time period, in which they listened to the CI simulations of eight different musical instruments. Data Collection and Analysis Analyses on percent of instruments identified correctly showed statistically significant differences between recognition accuracy of the three training conditions (p< .01). Results those assigned to the direct instruction group showed the greatest improvement over the five-week training period as well as sustained improvement after training. The feedback group achieved the next highest level of recognition accuracy. The repeated exposure group showed modest improvement during the first three-week time period, but no subsequent improvements. Conclusions These results indicate that different types of training are differentially effective with regard to improving recognition of musical instruments presented through a degraded signal, which has practical implications for the auditory rehabilitation of persons who use cochlear implants. PMID:19927684

  9. ENSO anomalies over the Western United States: present and future patterns in regional climate simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yongxin; Qian, Yun; Duliere, Valerie; Salathe, E.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2012-01-03

    Surface temperature, precipitation, specific humidity and wind anomalies associated with the warm and cold phases of ENSO simulated by WRF and HadRM are examined for the present and future decades. WRF is driven by ECHAM5 and CCSM3, respectively, and HadRM is driven by HadCM3. For the current decades, all simulations show some capability in resolving the observed warm-dry and coolwet teleconnection patterns over the PNW and the Southwest U.S. for warm and cold ENSO. Differences in the regional simulations originate primarily from the respective driving fields. For the future decades, the warm-dry and cool-wet teleconnection patterns in association with ENSO are still represented in ECHAM5-WRF and HadRM. However, there are indications of changes in the ENSO teleconnection patterns for CCSM3-WRF in the future, with wet anomalies dominating in the PNW and the Southwest U.S. for both warm and cold ENSO, in contrast to the canonical patterns of precipitation anomalies. Interaction of anomalous wind flow with local terrain plays a critical role in the generation of anomalous precipitation over the western U.S. Anomalous dry conditions are always associated with anomalous airflow that runs parallel to local mountains and wet conditions with airflow that runs perpendicular to local mountains. Future changes in temperature and precipitation associated with the ENSO events in the regional simulations indicate varying responses depending on the variables examined as well as depending on the phase of ENSO.

  10. Analysis of Present Day and Future OH and Methane Lifetime in the ACCMIP Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voulgarakis, A.; Naik, V.; Lamarque, J. -F.; Shindell, D. T.; Young, P. J.; Prather, M. J.; Wild, O.; Field, R. D.; Bergmann, D.; Cameron-Smith P.; Cionni, I; Collins, W. J.; Dalsoren, S. B.; Doherty, R. M.; Eyring, V.; Faluvegi, G.; Folberth, G. A.; Horowitz, L. W.; Josse, B.; MacKenzie, I. A.; Nagashima, T.; Plummer, D. A.; Righi, M.; Rumbold, S. T.; Strode, S. A.

    2013-01-01

    Results from simulations performed for the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Modeling Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP) are analysed to examine how OH and methane lifetime may change from present day to the future, under different climate and emissions scenarios. Present day (2000) mean tropospheric chemical lifetime derived from the ACCMIP multi-model mean is 9.8+/-1.6 yr (9.3+/-0.9 yr when only including selected models), lower than a recent observationally-based estimate, but with a similar range to previous multi-model estimates. Future model projections are based on the four Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs), and the results also exhibit a large range. Decreases in global methane lifetime of 4.5 +/- 9.1% are simulated for the scenario with lowest radiative forcing by 2100 (RCP 2.6), while increases of 8.5+/-10.4% are simulated for the scenario with highest radiative forcing (RCP 8.5). In this scenario, the key driver of the evolution of OH and methane lifetime is methane itself, since its concentration more than doubles by 2100 and it consumes much of the OH that exists in the troposphere. Stratospheric ozone recovery, which drives tropospheric OH decreases through photolysis modifications, also plays a partial role. In the other scenarios, where methane changes are less drastic, the interplay between various competing drivers leads to smaller and more diverse OH and methane lifetime responses, which are difficult to attribute. For all scenarios, regional OH changes are even more variable, with the most robust feature being the large decreases over the remote oceans in RCP8.5. Through a regression analysis, we suggest that differences in emissions of non-methane volatile organic compounds and in the simulation of photolysis rates may be the main factors causing the differences in simulated present day OH and methane lifetime. Diversity in predicted changes between present day and future OH was found to be associated more strongly with differences in

  11. The Role of Packaging Size on Contamination Rates during Simulated Presentation to a Sterile Field

    PubMed Central

    Trier, Tony; Bello, Nora; Bush, Tamara Reid; Bix, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to assess the impact of package size on the contact between medical devices and non-sterile surfaces (i.e. the hands of the practitioner and the outside of the package) during aseptic presentation to a simulated sterile field. Rationale for this objective stems from the decades-long problem of hospital-acquired infections. This work approaches the problem from a unique perspective, namely packaging size. Design Randomized complete block design with subsampling. Setting Research study conducted at professional conferences for surgical technologists and nursing professionals. Participants Ninety-seven healthcare providers, primarily surgical technologists and nurses. Methods Participants were gloved and asked to present the contents of six pouches of three different sizes to a simulated sterile field. The exterior of pouches and gloves of participants were coated with a simulated contaminant prior to each opening trial. After presentation to the simulated sterile field, the presence of the contaminant on package contents was recorded as indicative of contact with non-sterile surfaces and analyzed in a binary fashion using a generalized linear mixed model. Results Recruited subjects were 26–64 years of age (81 females, 16 males), with 2.5–44 years of professional experience. Results indicated a significant main effect of pouch size on contact rate of package contents (P = 0.0108), whereby larger pouches induced greater rates of contact than smaller pouches (estimates±SEM: 14.7±2.9% vs. 6.0±1.7%, respectively). Discussion and Conclusion This study utilized novel methodologies which simulate contamination in aseptic presentation. Results of this work indicate that increased contamination rates are associated with larger pouches when compared to smaller pouches. The results add to a growing body of research which investigate packaging's role in serving as a pathway for product contamination during aseptic presentation

  12. A new analytical model for wind farm power prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niayifar, Amin; Porte-Agel, Fernando

    2015-04-01

    In this study, a new analytical approach is presented and validated to predict wind farm power production. The new model assumes a Gaussian distribution for the velocity deficit in the wake which has been recently proposed by Bastankhah and Porté-Agel (2014). To estimate the velocity deficit in the wake, this model needs the local wake growth rate parameter which is calculated based on the local turbulence intensity in the wind farm. The interaction of the wakes is modeled by use of the velocity deficit superposition principle. Finally, the power curve is used to estimate the power production from the wind turbines. The wind farm model is compared to large-eddy simulation (LES) data of Horns Rev wind farm for a wide range of wind directions. Reasonable agreement between the proposed analytical model and LES data is obtained. This prediction is substantially better than the one obtained with common wind farm softwares such as WAsP.

  13. Simulation of salinity effects on past, present, and future soil organic carbon stocks.

    PubMed

    Setia, Raj; Smith, Pete; Marschner, Petra; Gottschalk, Pia; Baldock, Jeff; Verma, Vipan; Setia, Deepika; Smith, Jo

    2012-02-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) models are used to predict changes in SOC stocks and carbon dioxide (CO(2)) emissions from soils, and have been successfully validated for non-saline soils. However, SOC models have not been developed to simulate SOC turnover in saline soils. Due to the large extent of salt-affected areas in the world, it is important to correctly predict SOC dynamics in salt-affected soils. To close this knowledge gap, we modified the Rothamsted Carbon Model (RothC) to simulate SOC turnover in salt-affected soils, using data from non-salt-affected and salt-affected soils in two agricultural regions in India (120 soils) and in Australia (160 soils). Recently we developed a decomposition rate modifier based on an incubation study of a subset of these soils. In the present study, we introduce a new method to estimate the past losses of SOC due to salinity and show how salinity affects future SOC stocks on a regional scale. Because salinity decreases decomposition rates, simulations using the decomposition rate modifier for salinity suggest an accumulation of SOC. However, if the plant inputs are also adjusted to reflect reduced plant growth under saline conditions, the simulations show a significant loss of soil carbon in the past due to salinization, with a higher average loss of SOC in Australian soils (55 t C ha(-1)) than in Indian soils (31 t C ha(-1)). There was a significant negative correlation (p < 0.05) between SOC loss and osmotic potential. Simulations of future SOC stocks with the decomposition rate modifier and the plant input modifier indicate a greater decrease in SOC in saline than in non-saline soils under future climate. The simulations of past losses of SOC due to salinity were repeated using either measured charcoal-C or the inert organic matter predicted by the Falloon et al. equation to determine how much deviation from the Falloon et al. equation affects the amount of plant inputs generated by the model for the soils used in this study

  14. Farm Team.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Debra

    2001-01-01

    Describes a Philadelphia high school in which urban students study agricultural sciences to prepare for college and careers. The campus has a complete working farm, and students are exposed to a wide range of agricultural career opportunities while also studying core academic subjects. The school's farm units are real businesses, so students are…

  15. Bittersweet Farms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kay, Bettye Ruth

    1990-01-01

    The article describes Bittersweet Farms, a rural Ohio farm community for autistic adults. The program is based on the rural, extended family community as a model and includes work components (horticulture, animal care, woodworking and carpentry, maintenance, housekeeping, food preparation), recreational activities, community integration, physical…

  16. Using ISSM to Simulate the LIA to Present Ice Margin Change at Upernavik Glacier, Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haubner, K.; Larour, E. Y.; Box, J.; Schlegel, N.; Larsen, S. H.; Kjeldsen, K. K.; Kjaer, K. H.

    2015-12-01

    The possibility for rapid melting of the Greenland ice sheet ranks among the most serious societal climate threats. This project puts the rate of contemporary climate change-driven Greenland ice mass change in a temporal context, by simulating the Greenland ice sheet margin throughout the Holocene and comparing the results with past ice margin positions (e.g. Andresen et al., 2014; Bjørk et al., 2012) and records of glacier activity based on fjord sediment strata (Andresen et al. 2012). Here we show first steps to achieve this goal and model the evolution of the Upernavik Isstrøm, a set of marine-terminating glaciers in Northwest Greenland, during the 20thcentury, using the Ice Sheet System Model (ISSM) (Larour et. al 2012). The simulation runs from 1900, shortly after the Little Ice Age (LIA), to year 2013, initialized using trimline data marking the former extent of the ice sheet and forced by a surface mass balance reconstruction after Box (2013). We address uncertainties in ice front positions and thickness by comparing our simulation output with present ice margin positions in the area. Finally, we investigate the possibility of simulating historic changes at ice sheet margins with this finite element ice sheet model. Andresen, C. S., Kjeldsen, K. K., Harden, B., Nørgaard-Pedersen, N. and Kjær, K. H. 2014. Outlet glacier dynamics and bathymetry at Upernavik Isstrøm and Upernavik Isfjord, North-West Greenland. GEUS Bulletin 31 Andresen, C. S., Straneo, F., Ribergaard, M. H., Bjørk, A. A., Andersen, T.J., Kuijpers, A., Nørgaard-Pedersen, N., Kjær, K. H., Schjøth, F., Weckström, K. and Ahlstrøm, A. P. 2012: Rapid response of Helheim Glacier in Greenland to climate variability over the past century. Nature Geoscience 5 Bjørk, A. A., Kjær, K. H., Korsgaard, N. J., Khan, A., S., Kjeldsen, K. K., Andresen, C. S., Box, J. E., Larsen, N. K. and Funder, S. 2012. Historical aerial photographs uncover eighty years of ice-climate interaction in southeast

  17. Rigorous simulation of OCT image formation using Maxwell's equations in three dimensions (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munro, Peter R. T.; Curatolo, Andrea; Sampson, David D.

    2016-03-01

    Existing models of image formation in optical coherence tomography are based upon the extended Huygens-Fresnel formalism. These models all, to varying degrees, rely on scatterer ensemble averages, rather than deterministic scattering distributions. Whilst the former is sometimes preferable, there are a growing number of applications where the ability to predict image formation based upon deterministic refractive index distributions is of great interest, including, for example, image formation in turbid tissue. A rigorous model based upon three-dimensional solutions of Maxwell's equations offers a number of tantalising opportunities. For example, shedding light on features near or below the resolution of an OCT system and on the impact of phenomena usually described as diffraction, interference and scattering, but which more generally result from light scattering satisfying Maxwell's equations. A rigorous model allows inverse scattering methods to be developed not requiring the first-order Born approximation. Finally, a rigorous model can provide gold standard verification of myriad quantitative techniques currently being developed throughout the field. We have developed the first such model of image formation based upon three-dimensional solutions of Maxwell's equations, which has vastly different properties to models based on two-dimensional solutions. Although we present simulated B-scans, this model is equally applicable to C-scans. This has been made possible by advances in computational techniques and in computational resources routinely available. We will present the main features of our model, comparisons of measured and simulated image formation for phantoms and discuss the future of rigorous modelling in optical coherence tomography research and application.

  18. Low-cost tissue simulating phantoms with tunable, wavelength-dependent scattering properties (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saager, Rolf B.; Quach, Alan; Rowland, Rebecca A.; Baldado, Melissa L.; Ponticorvo, Adrien; Durkin, Anthony J.

    2016-03-01

    Tissue-simulating phantoms provide the opportunity to evaluate the performance of optical and spectroscopic instruments under controlled experimental conditions. Recent efforts have advanced phantom fabrication methods to provide more tissue realistic phantoms, both in terms of a) incorporating absorbing agents that more faithfully mimic in vivo tissue chromophores spanning visible and near infrared regimes and b) accounting for multi-layer tissue structures with distinct optical properties. The spectral scattering properties in these phantoms, however, are typically based only on a single scattering agent, thereby locking the spectral scattering properties to a single particle size distribution. However, in both healthy tissue as well as pathologic tissue, regions of distinct and differentiated scattering may be present. With differing mean size and distribution of scattering objects in these tissue regions, the relative wavelength-dependent scattering spectra may vary. For example, partial thickness burns exhibit significant cellular damage and collagen denaturation that will significantly alter the wavelength-dependent scattering properties resembling large Mie-like scatterer distributions in both visible and near infrared regimes. We present a low-cost method to fabricate silicone tissue-simulating phantoms with tunable scattering spectra properties that span visible and near infrared wavelengths. We use optical polishing agents (white aluminum oxides powders) at various grit sizes to approximate Mie scattering across multiple mean particle sizes. Mean particle sizes used in this study range from 17-3 micron. The optical properties of these phantoms are verified using an integrating sphere in combination with inverse adding-doubling methods. The tolerances of this fabrication method will be discussed.

  19. Multi Dark Lens Simulations: weak lensing light-cones and data base presentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giocoli, Carlo; Jullo, Eric; Metcalf, R. Benton; de la Torre, Sylvain; Yepes, Gustavo; Prada, Francisco; Comparat, Johan; Göttlober, Stefan; Kyplin, Anatoly; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Petkova, Margarita; Shan, Huan Yuan; Tessore, Nicolas

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we present a large data base of weak lensing light cones constructed using different snapshots from the Big MultiDark simulation (BigMDPL). The ray-tracing through different multiple plane has been performed with the GLAMER code accounting both for single source redshifts and for sources distributed along the cosmic time. This first paper presents weak lensing forecasts and results according to the geometry of the VIPERS-W1 and VIPERS-W4 field of view. Additional fields will be available on our data base and new ones can be run upon request. Our data base also contains some tools for lensing analysis. In this paper we present results for convergence power spectra, one point and high order weak lensing statistics useful for forecasts and for cosmological studies. Covariance matrices have also been computed for the different realizations of the W1 and W4 fields. In addition we compute also galaxy-shear and projected density contrasts for different halo masses at two lens redshift according to the CFHTLS source redshift distribution both using stacking and cross-correlation techniques, finding very good agreement.

  20. Definition of sanitary boundaries to prevent ISAv spread between salmon farms in southern Chile based on numerical simulations of currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivares, Gonzalo; Sepúlveda, H. H.; Yannicelli, B.

    2015-06-01

    The infectious Salmon Anemia virus (ISAv) is a pathogen that mainly affects the Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar). It was detected in Norway in 1984 and in June 2007 appeared in Chile, producing a drop of more than 30% in the country's production level. It is expected that with certain regularity, outbreaks will continue to appear in Chile without the need of reintroducing the virus from foreign countries. We present a numerical study of the influence of winds and tides in the dispersion of lagrangian particles to simulate the transport of ISAv in the Aysen region, in southern Chile. This study combines the use of numerical models of the ocean and atmosphere, lagrangian tracking and biological aspects of ISAv infections. As in previous results, a wider dispersion of ISAv was observed during spring tides. Temporal changes in wind significantly modified the transport of viral particles from an infected center. Under similar forcing conditions, the areas of risk associated to culture sites separated by a few kilometers could be very different. Our main results remark the importance of the use of a detailed knowledge of hydrographic and atmospheric circulation in the definition of boundaries for sanitary management areas. We suggest that a methodology similar to the one presented in this study should be considered to define sanitary strategies to minimize the occurrence of native outbreaks of ISAv.

  1. Simulation of present-day precipitation over India using a regional climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurya, Rajesh Kumar Singh; Singh, G. P.

    2016-04-01

    The objective of the present paper is to examine the capability of the regional climate model version 3 (RegCM3) to simulate the annual as well as seasonal precipitation variability over the Indian subcontinent. RegCM3 has been run at 40 km horizontal resolution for the period of 1982-2006 continuously and model results were compared to the observed precipitation datasets of India Meteorological Department (IMD) and CPC Merged Analysis of Precipitation (CMAP). Model evaluation has been done using different statistical methods like mean bias error (MBE), root mean square error, mean percentage error (MPE) and studied the spatial pattern of annual and seasonal variability and trend. Daily precipitation data at 1° × 1° grids of IMD have been used to study observed climatological means (both annual and seasonal), regression trends, interannual and intraseasonal variability over India from 1951 to 2007. The spatial distribution of annual precipitation shows a decreasing trend over west coast of India, central India, hilly region of India and an increasing trend is found over the northwest India, peninsular India and northeast India. The temporal distribution of daily precipitation shows highest rainfall of 18 mm/day in mid July (in composite flood cases only) and 12 mm/day during August (in composite drought cases only). The RegCM3 simulated annual and seasonal precipitation variability is close to the observed IMD and CMAP over all India (AI). During winter and pre-monsoon season, the model has overestimated the mean precipitation while underestimated in summer and post-monsoon season. Overall, annual precipitation showed the deficiency of -22.44 % compared to IMD and -1.41 % compared to CMAP over India. To understand the possible cause of annual and seasonal precipitation biases over India and its six homogeneous regions, the vertical difference (model mines National Centre for Environmental Prediction; NCEP) fields of water vapor mixing ratio (WVMR) and air

  2. Far-infrared and dust properties of present-day galaxies in the EAGLE simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camps, Peter; Trayford, James W.; Baes, Maarten; Theuns, Tom; Schaller, Matthieu; Schaye, Joop

    2016-10-01

    The Evolution and Assembly of GaLaxies and their Environments (EAGLE) cosmological simulations reproduce the observed galaxy stellar mass function and many galaxy properties. In this work, we study the dust-related properties of present-day EAGLE galaxies through mock observations in the far-infrared and submm wavelength ranges obtained with the 3D dust radiative transfer code SKIRT. To prepare an EAGLE galaxy for radiative transfer processing, we derive a diffuse dust distribution from the gas particles and we re-sample the star-forming gas particles and the youngest star particles into star-forming regions that are assigned dedicated emission templates. We select a set of redshift-zero EAGLE galaxies that matches the K-band luminosity distribution of the galaxies in the Herschel Reference Survey (HRS), a volume-limited sample of about 300 normal galaxies in the Local Universe. We find overall agreement of the EAGLE dust scaling relations with those observed in the HRS, such as the dust-to-stellar mass ratio versus stellar mass and versus NUV-r colour relations. A discrepancy in the f250/f350 versus f350/f500 submm colour-colour relation implies that part of the simulated dust is insufficiently heated, likely because of limitations in our sub-grid model for star-forming regions. We also investigate the effect of adjusting the metal-to-dust ratio and the covering factor of the photodissociation regions surrounding the star-forming cores. We are able to constrain the important dust-related parameters in our method, informing the calculation of dust attenuation for EAGLE galaxies in the UV and optical domain.

  3. Computer simulation is an undervalued tool for genetic analysis: a historical view and presentation of SHIMSHON--a Web-based genetic simulation package.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, David A

    2011-01-01

    Computer simulation methods are under-used tools in genetic analysis because simulation approaches have been portrayed as inferior to analytic methods. Even when simulation is used, its advantages are not fully exploited. Here, I present SHIMSHON, our package of genetic simulation programs that have been developed, tested, used for research, and used to generated data for Genetic Analysis Workshops (GAW). These simulation programs, now web-accessible, can be used by anyone to answer questions about designing and analyzing genetic disease studies for locus identification. This work has three foci: (1) the historical context of SHIMSHON's development, suggesting why simulation has not been more widely used so far. (2) Advantages of simulation: computer simulation helps us to understand how genetic analysis methods work. It has advantages for understanding disease inheritance and methods for gene searches. Furthermore, simulation methods can be used to answer fundamental questions that either cannot be answered by analytical approaches or cannot even be defined until the problems are identified and studied, using simulation. (3) I argue that, because simulation was not accepted, there was a failure to grasp the meaning of some simulation-based studies of linkage. This may have contributed to perceived weaknesses in linkage analysis; weaknesses that did not, in fact, exist. PMID:22189467

  4. Measurements in support of wind farm simulations and power forecasts: The Crop/Wind-energy Experiments (CWEX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takle, E. S.; Rajewski, D. A.; Lundquist, J. K.; Gallus, W. A., Jr.; Sharma, A.

    2014-06-01

    The Midwest US currently is experiencing a large build-out of wind turbines in areas where the nocturnal low-level jet (NLLJ) is a prominent and frequently occurring feature. We describe shear characteristics of the NLLJ and their influence on wind power production. Reports of individual turbine power production and concurrent measurements of near-surface thermal stratification are used to turbine wake interactions and turbine interaction with the overlying atmosphere. Progress in forecasting conditions such as wind ramps and shear are discussed. Finally, the pressure perturbation introduced by a line of turbines produces surface flow convergence that may create a vertical velocity and hence a mesoscale influence on cloud formation by a wind farm.

  5. Using a whole farm model to determine the impacts of mating management on the profitability of pasture-based dairy farms.

    PubMed

    Beukes, P C; Burke, C R; Levy, G; Tiddy, R M

    2010-08-01

    An approach to assessing likely impacts of altering reproductive performance on productivity and profitability in pasture-based dairy farms is described. The basis is the development of a whole farm model (WFM) that simulates the entire farm system and holistically links multiple physical performance factors to profitability. The WFM consists of a framework that links a mechanistic cow model, a pasture model, a crop model, management policies and climate. It simulates individual cows and paddocks, and runs on a day time-step. The WFM was upgraded to include reproductive modeling capability using reference tables and empirical equations describing published relationships between cow factors, physiology and mating management. It predicts reproductive status at any time point for individual cows within a modeled herd. The performance of six commercial pasture-based dairy farms was simulated for the period of 12 months beginning 1 June 2005 (05/06 year) to evaluate the accuracy of the model by comparison with actual outcomes. The model predicted most key performance indicators within an acceptable range of error (residual<10% of observed). The evaluated WFM was then used for the six farms to estimate the profitability of changes in farm "set-up" (farm conditions at the start of the farming year on 1 June) and mating management from 05/06 to 06/07 year. Among the six farms simulated, the 4-week calving rate emerged as an important set-up factor influencing profitability, while reproductive performance during natural bull mating was identified as an area with the greatest opportunity for improvement. The WFM presents utility to explore alternative management strategies to predict likely outcomes to proposed changes to a pasture-based farm system. PMID:20510554

  6. Intercomparison of present and future climates simulated by coupled ocean-atmosphere GCMs

    SciTech Connect

    Covey, C; AchutaRao, K M; Lambert, S J

    2000-09-06

    We present an overview of results from the most recent phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP). This phase of CMIP has archived output from both unforced (''control run'') and perturbed (1% per year increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide) simulations by 15 modern coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation models. The models are about equally divided between those employing and those not employing ad hoc flux corrections at the ocean-atmosphere interface. The new generation of non-flux-connected control runs are nearly as stable and agree with observations nearly as well as the flux-corrected models. This development represents significant progress in the state of the art of climate modeling since the Second (1995) Scientific Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC; see Gates et al. 1996). From the increasing-CO{sub 2} runs, we find that differences between different models, while substantial, are not as great as would be expected from earlier assessments that relied on equilibrium climate sensitivity.

  7. Building Energy Simulation Test for Existing Homes (BESTEST-EX) (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Judkoff, R.; Neymark, J.; Polly, B.

    2011-12-01

    This presentation discusses the goals of NREL Analysis Accuracy R&D; BESTEST-EX goals; what BESTEST-EX is; how it works; 'Building Physics' cases; 'Building Physics' reference results; 'utility bill calibration' cases; limitations and potential future work. Goals of NREL Analysis Accuracy R&D are: (1) Provide industry with the tools and technical information needed to improve the accuracy and consistency of analysis methods; (2) Reduce the risks associated with purchasing, financing, and selling energy efficiency upgrades; and (3) Enhance software and input collection methods considering impacts on accuracy, cost, and time of energy assessments. BESTEST-EX Goals are: (1) Test software predictions of retrofit energy savings in existing homes; (2) Ensure building physics calculations and utility bill calibration procedures perform up to a minimum standard; and (3) Quantify impact of uncertainties in input audit data and occupant behavior. BESTEST-EX is a repeatable procedure that tests how well audit software predictions compare to the current state of the art in building energy simulation. There is no direct truth standard. However, reference software have been subjected to validation testing, including comparisons with empirical data.

  8. Present-day climate near the Bunker Cave (Germany): comparison of model simulations to observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langebroek, Petra M.; Werner, Martin; Lohmann, Gerrit

    2010-05-01

    Because of their high temporal resolution and good preservation, speleothem records are often used as indicators for past climatic conditions. During the last years, substantial scientific progress has been made on the interpretation of these proxy records in terms of temperature and precipitation changes. Unfortunately, the link between climatic conditions within the cave (as depicted from the speleothems) to the climate outside the cave is not straightforward for many cave locations. In order to improve this connection, it is important to have accurate speleothems data as well as high-resolution large-scale climate data. In this study we focus on the latter problem. Within the framework of the DAPHNE ("Dated Speleothems Archives of the Paleoenvironment") Project we investigated available climate measurements (stations from the Deutsche Wetterdienst and from the Global Network of Isotopes in Precipitation) in the region surrounding the Bunker Cave, which is located close to Iserlohn in Germany. These measurements are compared, on a larger scale, to reanalysis data (ECMWF-ERA40) and simulation results from an atmospheric general circulation model with isotope diagnostics built into the models hydrological cycle (ECHAM). We used statistical downscaling to establish a connection between the large-scale information and the local climate surrounding the Bunker Cave. Understanding how the local present-day climate above the cave is influenced will largely improve our knowledge of palaeoclimate as derived from the speleothem records.

  9. Wind tunnel investigation on wind turbine wakes and wind farms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iungo, G. V.; Coëffé, J.; Porté-Agel, F.

    2012-04-01

    The interaction between atmospheric boundary layer and wind farms leads to flow modifications, which need to be deeply characterized in order to relate them to wind farm performance. The wake flow produced from a wind farm is the result of a strong interaction between multiple turbine wakes, so that the wind farm configuration turns out to be one of the dominant features to enhance power production. For the present work a wind tunnel investigation was carried out with hot-wire anemometry and velocity measurements performed with multi-hole pressure probes. The tested wind farms consist of miniature three-bladed wind turbine models. Preliminarily, the wake flow generated from a single wind turbine is surveyed, which is characterized by a strong velocity defect lying in proximity of the wind turbine hub height. The wake gradually recovers by moving downstream; the characteristics of the incoming boundary layer and wind turbulence intensity can strongly affect the wake recovery, and thus performance of following wind turbines. An increased turbulence level is typically detected downstream of each wind turbine for heights comparable to the wind turbine blade top-tip. These wake flow fluctuations produce increased fatigue loads on the following wind turbines within a wind farm, which could represent a significant hazard for real wind turbines. Dynamics of vorticity structures present in wind turbine wakes are also investigated; particular attention is paid to the downstream evolution of the tip helicoidal vortices and to oscillations of the hub vortex. The effect of wind farm layout on power production is deeply investigated. Particular emphasis is placed on studying how the flow adjusts as it moves inside the wind farm and can affect the power production. Aligned and staggered wind farm configurations are analysed, also with varying separation distances in the streamwise and spanwise directions. The present experimental results are being used to test and guide the

  10. Farm Simulation: a tool for evaluating the mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions and the adaptation of dairy production to climate change

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Farms both produce greenhouse gas emissions that drive human-induced climate change and are impacted by that climate change. Whole farm and global climate models provide useful tools for studying the benefits and costs of greenhouse gas mitigation and the adaptation of farms to changing climate. The...

  11. Space-time modelling of the spread of pancreas disease (PD) within and between Norwegian marine salmonid farms.

    PubMed

    Aldrin, M; Huseby, R B; Jansen, P A

    2015-09-01

    Infectious diseases are a constant threat to industrialised farming, which is characterised by high densities of farms and farm animals. Several mathematical and statistical models on spatio-temporal dynamics of infectious diseases in various farmed host populations have been developed during the last decades. Here we present a spatio-temporal stochastic model for the spread of a disease between and within aquaculture farms. The spread between farms is divided into several transmission pathways, including (i) distance related spread and (ii) other types of contagious contacts. The within-farm infection dynamics is modelled by a susceptible-infected-recovered (SIR) model. We apply this framework to model the spread of pancreas disease (PD) in salmon farming, using data covering all farms producing salmonids over 9 years in Norway. The motivation for the study was partly to unravel the spatio-temporal dynamics of PD in salmon farming and partly to use the model for scenario simulation of PD control strategies. We find, for example, that within-farm infection dynamics vary with season and we provide estimates of the timing from unobserved infection events to disease outbreaks on farms are detected. The simulations suggest that if a strategy involving culling of infectious cohorts is implemented, the number of detected disease outbreaks per year may be reduced by 57% after the full effect has been reached. We argue that the high detail and coverage of data on salmonid production and disease occurrence should encourage the use of simulation modelling as a means of testing effects of extensive control measures before they are implemented in the salmon farming industry.

  12. Linking on-farm change to catchment response using dynamic simulation modelling: assessing the impacts of farm-scale land management change on catchment-scale phosphorus transport processes and water-quality.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivers, M.; Clarendon, S.

    2012-04-01

    Australian Natural Resource Management and Agri-industry Development agencies have recently invested considerable resources into a number of research and development projects that have investigated the actual and potential economic, social and, particularly, environmental impacts of varying farming activities (with a strong focus on dairies) in a "catchment context". These activities have resulted in the development of a much-improved understanding of the likely impacts of changed farm management practices within the farms and regions in which they were investigated, as well as the development of a number of conceptual models which place dairy farming within this broader catchment context. The project discussed in this paper was charged with the objective of transforming these conceptual models of dairy farm nutrient management and transport processes into a more temporally and spatially dynamic model. This could then be loaded with catchment-specific data and used as a "policy support tool" to allow the Australian dairy industry to examine the potential farm and catchment-scale impacts of varying dairy farm management practices within some key dairy farming regions. This paper describes the series of dynamic models and farm management - land use scenarios which were executed to examine these issues. Models were developed, validated and calibrated for the Peel-Harvey catchment in Western Australia and the Gippsland and Latrobe (a sub-catchment of Gippsland) catchments in Victoria. Scenarios which range from simple, on-farm riparian management, through changes in fertiliser application rates, to gross changes in the land use mosaic were examined and described in terms which included changes to phosphorus (P) loss rates at the farm scale, the relative contributions to catchment P loads from dairying and, ultimately, changes to downstream water quality. A comprehensive suite of scenarios and policy options was examined but, in summary, the results indicate that whilst

  13. Momentum transfer Monte Carlo model for the simulation of laser speckle contrast imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regan, Caitlin; Hayakawa, Carole K.; Choi, Bernard

    2016-03-01

    Laser speckle imaging (LSI) enables measurement of relative blood flow in microvasculature and perfusion in tissues. To determine the impact of tissue optical properties and perfusion dynamics on speckle contrast, we developed a computational simulation of laser speckle contrast imaging. We used a discrete absorption-weighted Monte Carlo simulation to model the transport of light in tissue. We simulated optical excitation of a uniform flat light source and tracked the momentum transfer of photons as they propagated through a simulated tissue geometry. With knowledge of the probability distribution of momentum transfer occurring in various layers of the tissue, we calculated the expected laser speckle contrast arising with coherent excitation using both reflectance and transmission geometries. We simulated light transport in a single homogeneous tissue while independently varying either absorption (.001-100mm^-1), reduced scattering (.1-10mm^-1), or anisotropy (0.05-0.99) over a range of values relevant to blood and commonly imaged tissues. We observed that contrast decreased by 49% with an increase in optical scattering, and observed a 130% increase with absorption (exposure time = 1ms). We also explored how speckle contrast was affected by the depth (0-1mm) and flow speed (0-10mm/s) of a dynamic vascular inclusion. This model of speckle contrast is important to increase our understanding of how parameters such as perfusion dynamics, vessel depth, and tissue optical properties affect laser speckle imaging.

  14. Stability analysis of offshore wind farm and marine current farm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shawon, Mohammad Hasanuzzaman

    Renewable energy has been playing an important role to meet power demand and 'Green Energy' market is getting bigger platform all over the world in the last few years. Due to massive increase in the prices of fossil fuels along with global warming issues, energy harvesting from renewable energy sources has received considerable interest, nowadays, where extensive researches are going on to ensure optimum use of renewable sources. In order to meet the increasing demand of electricity and power, integration of renewable energy is getting highest priorities around the world. Wind is one of the most top growing renewable energy resources and wind power market penetration is expected to reach 3.35 percent by 2013 from its present market of about 240 GW. A wind energy system is the most environmental friendly, cost effective and safe among all renewable energy resources available. Another promising form of renewable energy is ocean energy which covers 70 % of the earth. Ocean energy can be tapped from waves, tides and thermal elements. Offshore Wind farm (OWF) has already become very popular for large scale wind power integration with the onshore grid. Recently, marine current farm (MCF) is also showing good potential to become mainstream energy sources and already successfully commissioned in United Kingdom. However, squirrel cage induction generator (SCIG) has the stability problem similar to synchronous generator especially during fault location to restore the electromagnetic torque. Series dynamic braking resistor (SDBR) has been known as a useful mean to stabilize fixed speed wind generator system. On the other hand, doubly fed induction generator (DFIG) has the capability of coupling the control of active and reactive power and to provide necessary reactive power demand during grid fault conditions. Series dynamic braking resistor (SDBR) can also be employed with DFIG to limit the rotor over current. An integration of wind and tidal energy represents a new

  15. Hard-Copy versus Computer Presentation of the SuperShrink Interview Simulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sussman, Daniel; Lowman, Joseph

    1989-01-01

    Investigates the effects of realism and perceived control on student satisfaction with the SuperShrink interview. Compares active/passive and computer/hardcopy conditions. Findings show students rate the computer versions as more satisfying. Suggests computers are superior to hardcopy simulations of human interactions. (Author/NL)

  16. The Enhancement of Simulation Based Learning Exercises through Formalised Reflection, Focus Groups and Group Presentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mawdesley, M.; Long, G.; Al-jibouri, S.; Scott, D.

    2011-01-01

    Computer based simulations and games can be useful tools in teaching aspects of construction project management that are not easily transmitted through traditional lecture based approaches. However, it can be difficult to quantify their utility and it is essential to ensure that students are achieving the learning outcomes required rather than…

  17. Simulations of present and future climates in the western U.S. with four nested regional climate models

    SciTech Connect

    Duffy, P B; Arritt, R W; Coquard, J; Gutowski, W; Han, J; Iorio, J; Kim, J; Leung, L R; Roads, J; Zeledon, E

    2004-06-15

    We analyze simulations of present and future climates in the western U.S. performed with four regional climate models (RCMs) nested within two global ocean-atmosphere climate models. Our primary goal is to assess the range of regional climate responses to increased greenhouse gases in available RCM simulations. The four RCMs used different geographical domains, different increased greenhouse gas scenarios for future-climate simulations, and (in some cases) different lateral boundary conditions. For simulations of the present climate, we compare RCM results to observations and to results of the GCM that provided lateral boundary conditions to the RCM. For future-climate (increased greenhouse gas) simulations, we compare RCM results to each other and to results of the driving GCMs. When results are spatially averaged over the western U.S., we find that the results of each RCM closely follow those of the driving GCM in the same region, in both present and future climates. In present-climate simulations, the RCMs have biases in spatially-averaged simulated precipitation and near-surface temperature that seem to be very close to those of the driving GCMs. In future-climate simulations, the spatially-averaged RCM-projected responses in precipitation and near-surface temperature are also very close to those of the respective driving GCMs. Precipitation responses predicted by the RCMs are in many regions not statistically significant compared to interannual variability. Where the predicted precipitation responses are statistically significant, they are positive. The models agree that near-surface temperatures will increase, but do not agree on the spatial pattern of this increase. The four RCMs produce very different estimates of water content of snow in the present climate, and of the change in this water content in response to increased greenhouse gases.

  18. Reflectance confocal microscopy of red blood cells: simulation and experiment (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeidan, Adel; Yeheskely-Hayon, Daniella; Minai, Limor; Yelin, Dvir

    2016-03-01

    The properties of red blood cells are a remarkable indicator of the body's physiological condition; their density could indicate anemia or polycythemia, their absorption spectrum correlates with blood oxygenation, and their morphology is highly sensitive to various pathologic states including iron deficiency, ovalocytosis, and sickle cell disease. Therefore, measuring the morphology of red blood cells is important for clinical diagnosis, providing valuable indications on a patient's health. In this work, we simulated the appearance of normal red blood cells under a reflectance confocal microscope and discovered unique relations between the cells' morphological parameters and the resulting characteristic interference patterns. The simulation results showed good agreement with in vitro reflectance confocal images of red blood cells, acquired using spectrally encoded flow cytometry (SEFC) that imaged the cells during linear flow and without artificial staining. By matching the simulated patterns to the SEFC images of the cells, the cells' three-dimensional shapes were evaluated and their volumes were calculated. Potential applications include measurement of the mean corpuscular volume, cell morphological abnormalities, cell stiffness under mechanical stimuli, and the detection of various hematological diseases.

  19. Farm accidents in children.

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, D.; Bishop, C.; Sibert, J. R.

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To examine the problem of accidental injury to children on farms. DESIGN--Prospective county based study of children presenting to accident and emergency departments over 12 months with injuries sustained in a farm setting and nationwide review of fatal childhood farm accidents over the four years April 1986 to March 1990. SETTING--Accident and emergency departments in Aberystwyth, Carmarthen, Haverfordwest, and Llanelli and fatal accidents in England, Scotland, and Wales notified to the Health and Safety Executive register. SUBJECTS--Children aged under 16. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE--Death or injury after farm related accidents. RESULTS--65 accidents were recorded, including 18 fractures. Nine accidents necessitated admission to hospital for a mean of two (range one to four) days. 13 incidents were related to tractors and other machinery; 24 were due to falls. None of these incidents were reported under the statutory notification scheme. 33 deaths were notified, eight related to tractors and allied machinery and 10 related to falling objects. CONCLUSIONS--Although safety is improving, the farm remains a dangerous environment for children. Enforcement of existing safety legislation with significant penalties and targeting of safety education will help reduce accident rates further. PMID:1638192

  20. Modelling Farm Animal Welfare

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Lisa M.; Part, Chérie E.

    2013-01-01

    Simple Summary In this review paper we discuss the different modeling techniques that have been used in animal welfare research to date. We look at what questions they have been used to answer, the advantages and pitfalls of the methods, and how future research can best use these approaches to answer some of the most important upcoming questions in farm animal welfare. Abstract The use of models in the life sciences has greatly expanded in scope and advanced in technique in recent decades. However, the range, type and complexity of models used in farm animal welfare is comparatively poor, despite the great scope for use of modeling in this field of research. In this paper, we review the different modeling approaches used in farm animal welfare science to date, discussing the types of questions they have been used to answer, the merits and problems associated with the method, and possible future applications of each technique. We find that the most frequently published types of model used in farm animal welfare are conceptual and assessment models; two types of model that are frequently (though not exclusively) based on expert opinion. Simulation, optimization, scenario, and systems modeling approaches are rarer in animal welfare, despite being commonly used in other related fields. Finally, common issues such as a lack of quantitative data to parameterize models, and model selection and validation are discussed throughout the review, with possible solutions and alternative approaches suggested. PMID:26487411

  1. Review of numerical methods for simulation of the aortic root: Present and future directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, Hossein; Cartier, Raymond; Mongrain, Rosaire

    2016-05-01

    Heart valvular disease is still one of the main causes of mortality and morbidity in develop countries. Numerical modeling has gained considerable attention in studying hemodynamic conditions associated with valve abnormalities. Simulating the large displacement of the valve in the course of the cardiac cycle needs a well-suited numerical method to capture the natural biomechanical phenomena which happens in the valve. The paper aims to review the principal progress of the numerical approaches for studying the hemodynamic of the aortic valve. In addition, the future directions of the current approaches as well as their potential clinical applications are discussed.

  2. Farming the Sea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, William

    1971-01-01

    Florida has initiated a training program in an entirely new dimension--Sea Farming. Presented is a description of the vocational agriculture program designed to teach propagation, cultivation, harvesting, marketing, and conservation practices related to production of oysters, shrimp, scallops, crabs, and fin fishes. (Editor/GB)

  3. Agriculture Education. Farm Machinery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuttgart Public Schools, AR.

    This curriculum guide is designed for group instruction of secondary agricultural education students enrolled in one or two semester-long courses in farm machinery. The guide presents units of study in the following areas: (1) small gas engines, (2) job opportunities, (3) tractors, (4) engines, (5) hydraulics, (6) electrical system, (7) combine…

  4. Flammable Gas Safety Program: Mechanisms of gas generation from simulated SY Tank Farm wastes. Progress report, FY 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Barefield, E.K.; Boadtright, D.; Deshpande, A.; Doctorovich, F.; Liotta, C.L.; Neumann, H.M.; Seymore, S.

    1995-09-01

    This is the final report for work done at Georgia Tech during Fiscal Year 1994. The objectives of this work were to develop a better understanding of the mechanism of formation of flammable gases in the thermal decomposition of metal complexants, such as HEDTA and sodium glycolate, in simulated SY waste mixtures. This project is a continuation of work begun under earlier contracts with Westinghouse Hanford Co. Three major areas are discussed: development of a reliable analysis for dissolved ammonia, the initiation of long term studies of HEDTA decomposition in stainless steel vessels and product analyses through 3800 h, and further consideration of product analyses and kinetic data reported in FY 1993 for decomposition of HEDTA and sodium glycolate in Teflon-lined glass vessels. A brief exploration was also made of the speciation of aluminum(l1l) in the presence of HEDTA as a function of pH using {sup 27}Al NMR.

  5. Plasma flow and fast particles in a hypervelocity accelerator - A color presentation. [micrometeoroid simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Igenbergs, E. B.; Cour-Palais, B.; Fisher, E.; Stehle, O.

    1975-01-01

    A new concept for particle acceleration for micrometeoroid simulation was developed at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, using a high-density self-luminescent fast plasma flow to accelerate glass beads (with a diameter up to 1.0 mm) to velocities between 15-20 km/sec. After a short introduction to the operation of the hypervelocity range, the eight-converter-camera unit used for the photographs of the plasma flow and the accelerated particles is described. These photographs are obtained with an eight-segment reflecting pyramidal beam splitter. Wratten filters were mounted between the beam splitter and the converter tubes of the cameras. The photographs, which were recorded on black and white film, were used to make the matrices for the dye-color process, which produced the prints shown.

  6. Independent Review of Simulation of Net Infiltration for Present-Day and Potential Future Climates

    SciTech Connect

    Review Panel: Soroosh Sorooshian, Ph.D., Panel Chairperson, University of California, Irvine; Jan M. H. Hendrickx, Ph.D., New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology; Binayak P. Mohanty, Ph.D., Texas A&M University; Scott W. Tyler, Ph.D., University of Nevada, Reno; Tian-Chyi Jim Yeh, Ph.D., University of Arizona -- ORISE Review Facilitators: Robert S. Turner, Ph.D., Technical Review Group Manager, Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education; Brian R. Herndon, Project Manager, Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education; Russ Manning, Technical Writer /Editor, Haselwood Enterprises, Inc.

    2008-08-30

    The DOE Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) tasked Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) with providing an independent expert review of the documented model and prediction results for net infiltration of water into the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain. The specific purpose of the model, as documented in the report MDL-NBS-HS-000023, Rev. 01, is “to provide a spatial representation, including epistemic and aleatory uncertainty, of the predicted mean annual net infiltration at the Yucca Mountain site ...” (p. 1-1) The expert review panel assembled by ORISE concluded that the model report does not provide a technically credible spatial representation of net infiltration at Yucca Mountain. Specifically, the ORISE Review Panel found that: • A critical lack of site-specific meteorological, surface, and subsurface information prevents verification of (i) the net infiltration estimates, (ii) the uncertainty estimates of parameters caused by their spatial variability, and (iii) the assumptions used by the modelers (ranges and distributions) for the characterization of parameters. The paucity of site-specific data used by the modeling team for model implementation and validation is a major deficiency in this effort. • The model does not incorporate at least one potentially important hydrologic process. Subsurface lateral flow is not accounted for by the model, and the assumption that the effect of subsurface lateral flow is negligible is not adequately justified. This issue is especially critical for the wetter climate periods. This omission may be one reason the model results appear to underestimate net infiltration beneath wash environments and therefore imprecisely represent the spatial variability of net infiltration. • While the model uses assumptions consistently, such as uniform soil depths and a constant vegetation rooting depth, such assumptions may not be appropriate for this net infiltration simulation because they

  7. Wind Farm Recommendation Report

    SciTech Connect

    John Reisenauer

    2011-05-01

    On April 21, 2011, an Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Land Use Committee meeting was convened to develop a wind farm recommendation for the Executive Council and a list of proposed actions for proceeding with the recommendation. In terms of land use, the INL Land Use Committee unanimously agrees that Site 6 is the preferred location of the alternatives presented for an INL wind farm. However, further studies and resolution to questions raised (stated in this report) by the INL Land Use Committee are needed for the preferred location. Studies include, but are not limited to, wind viability (6 months), bats (2 years), and the visual impact of the wind farm. In addition, cultural resource surveys and consultation (1 month) and the National Environmental Policy Act process (9 to 12 months) need to be completed. Furthermore, there is no documented evidence of developers expressing interest in constructing a small wind farm on INL, nor a specific list of expectations or concessions for which a developer might expect INL to cover the cost. To date, INL assumes the National Environmental Policy Act activities will be paid for by the Department of Energy and INL (the environmental assessment has only received partial funding). However, other concessions also may be expected by developers such as roads, fencing, power line installation, tie-ins to substations, annual maintenance, snow removal, access control, down-time, and remediation. These types of concessions have not been documented, as a request, from a developer and INL has not identified the short and long-term cost liabilities for such concessions should a developer expect INL to cover these costs. INL has not identified a go-no-go funding level or the priority this Wind Farm Project might have with respect to other nuclear-related projects, should the wind farm remain an unfunded mandate. The Land Use Committee recommends Legal be consulted to determine what, if any, liabilities exist with the Wind Farm Project and

  8. Simulating the Greenland ice sheet under present-day and palaeo constraints including a new discharge parameterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calov, R.; Robinson, A.; Perrette, M.; Ganopolski, A.

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we propose a new sub-grid scale parameterization for the ice discharge into the ocean through outlet glaciers and inspect the role of different observational and palaeo constraints for the choice of an optimal set of model parameters. This parameterization was introduced into the polythermal ice-sheet model SICOPOLIS, which is coupled to the regional climate model of intermediate complexity REMBO. Using the coupled model, we performed large ensemble simulations over the last two glacial cycles by varying two major parameters: a melt parameter in the surface melt scheme of REMBO and a discharge scaling parameter in our parameterization of ice discharge. Our empirical constraints are the present-day Greenland ice sheet surface elevation, the surface mass balance partition (ratio between total ice discharge and total precipitation) and the Eemian interglacial elevation drop relative to present day in the vicinity of the NEEM ice core. We show that the ice discharge parameterization enables us to simulate both the correct ice-sheet shape and mass balance partition at the same time without explicitly resolving the Greenland outlet glaciers. For model verification, we compare the simulated total and sectoral ice discharge with other estimates. For the model versions that are consistent with the range of observational and palaeo constraints, our simulated Greenland ice sheet contribution to Eemian sea-level rise relative to present-day amounts to 1.4 m on average (in the range of 0.6 and 2.5 m).

  9. Optimal control of energy extraction in LES of large wind farms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, Johan; Goit, Jay; Munters, Wim

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the use of optimal control combined with Large-Eddy Simulations (LES) of wind-farm boundary layer interaction for the increase of total energy extraction in very large ``infinite'' wind farms and in finite farms. We consider the individual wind turbines as flow actuators, whose energy extraction can be dynamically regulated in time so as to optimally influence the turbulent flow field, maximizing the wind farm power. For the simulation of wind-farm boundary layers we use large-eddy simulations in combination with an actuator-disk representation of wind turbines. Simulations are performed in our in-house pseudo-spectral code SP-Wind. For the optimal control study, we consider the dynamic control of turbine-thrust coefficients in the actuator-disk model. They represent the effect of turbine blades that can actively pitch in time, changing the lift- and drag coefficients of the turbine blades. In a first infinite wind-farm case, we find that farm power is increases by approximately 16% over one hour of operation. This comes at the cost of a deceleration of the outer layer of the boundary layer. A detailed analysis of energy balances is presented, and a comparison is made between infinite and finite farm cases, for which boundary layer entrainment plays an import role. The authors acknowledge support from the European Research Council (FP7-Ideas, Grant No. 306471). Simulations were performed on the computing infrastructure of the VSC Flemish Supercomputer Center, funded by the Hercules Foundation and the Flemish Govern.

  10. Mineralization of reactive azo dyes present in simulated textile waste water using down flow microaerophilic fixed film bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Balapure, Kshama; Bhatt, Nikhil; Madamwar, Datta

    2015-01-01

    The present research emphasizes on degradation of azo dyes from simulated textile wastewater using down flow microaerophilic fixed film reactor. Degradation of simulated textile wastewater (COD 7200mg/L and dye concentration 300mg/L) was studied in a microaerophilic fixed film reactor using pumice stone as a support material under varying hydraulic retention time (HRT) and organic loading rate (OLR). The intense metabolic activity of the inoculated bacterial consortium in the reactor led to 97.5% COD reduction and 99.5% decolorization of simulated wastewater operated under OLR of 7.2kgCODm(3)/d and 24h of HRT. FTIR, (1)H NMR and GC-MS studies revealed the formation of lower molecular weight aliphatic compounds under 24h of HRT, leading to complete mineralization of simulated wastewater. The detection of oxido-reductive enzyme activities suggested the enzymatic reduction of azo bonds prior to mineralization. Toxicity studies indicated that microbial treatment favors detoxification of simulated wastewater.

  11. Mineralization of reactive azo dyes present in simulated textile waste water using down flow microaerophilic fixed film bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Balapure, Kshama; Bhatt, Nikhil; Madamwar, Datta

    2015-01-01

    The present research emphasizes on degradation of azo dyes from simulated textile wastewater using down flow microaerophilic fixed film reactor. Degradation of simulated textile wastewater (COD 7200mg/L and dye concentration 300mg/L) was studied in a microaerophilic fixed film reactor using pumice stone as a support material under varying hydraulic retention time (HRT) and organic loading rate (OLR). The intense metabolic activity of the inoculated bacterial consortium in the reactor led to 97.5% COD reduction and 99.5% decolorization of simulated wastewater operated under OLR of 7.2kgCODm(3)/d and 24h of HRT. FTIR, (1)H NMR and GC-MS studies revealed the formation of lower molecular weight aliphatic compounds under 24h of HRT, leading to complete mineralization of simulated wastewater. The detection of oxido-reductive enzyme activities suggested the enzymatic reduction of azo bonds prior to mineralization. Toxicity studies indicated that microbial treatment favors detoxification of simulated wastewater. PMID:25459797

  12. Let's put this in perspective: using dynamic simulation modelling to assess the impacts of farm-scale land management change on catchment-scale water quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivers, Mark; Clarendon, Simon; Coles, Neil

    2013-04-01

    Natural Resource Management and Agri-industry development groups in Australia have invested considerable resources into the investigation of the economic, social and, particularly, environmental impacts of varying farming activities in a "catchment context". This research has resulted in the development of a much-improved understanding of the likely impacts of changed management practices at the farm-scale as well as the development of a number of conceptual models which place farming within this broader catchment context. The project discussed in this paper transformed a conceptual model of dairy farm phosphorus (P) management and transport processes into a more temporally and spatially dynamic model. This was then loaded with catchment-specific data and used as a "policy support tool" to allow the Australian dairy industry to examine the potential farm and catchment-scale impacts of varying dairy farm management practices within some key dairy farming regions. Models were developed, validated and calibrated using "STELLA©" dynamic modelling software for three catchments in which dairy is perceived as a significant land use. The models describe P movement and cycling within and through dairy farms in great detail and also estimate P transport through major source, sink and flow sectors of the catchments. A series of scenarios were executed for all three catchments which examined three main "groups" of tests: changes to farm P input rates; implementation of perceived environmental "Best Management Practices" (BMPs), and; changes to land use mosaics. Modifications to actual P input rates into dairy farms (not surprisingly) had a major effect on nutrient transport within and from the farms with a significant rise in nutrient loss rates at all scales with increasing fertiliser use. More surprisingly, however, even extensive environmental BMP implementation did not have marked effects on off-farm nutrient loss rates. On and off-farm riparian management implemented

  13. Modelling one row of Horns Rev wind farm with the Actuator Line Model with coarse resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draper, M.; Guggeri, A.; Usera, G.

    2016-09-01

    Actuator models have been used to represent the presence of wind turbines in a simulation in the past few years. The Actuator Line Model (ALM) has shown to reproduce with reasonable accuracy the wind flow through wind turbines under different operational conditions. Nevertheless, there are not many simulations of wind farms performed with the ALM mainly because of its computational cost. The aim of the present paper is to evaluate the ALM in spatial resolutions coarser than what is generally recommended, also using larger time steps, in a simulation of a real wind farm. To accomplish this, simulations of one row of Horns Rev wind farm are performed, for different wind directions. It is concluded that the ALM is able to capture the main features of the interaction between wind turbines relaxing its resolution requirements. A sensitivity analysis is performed to assess the influence of the smearing factor and the spatial resolution.

  14. Simulation of Net Infiltration for Present-Day and Potential Future Climates

    SciTech Connect

    D. Levitt

    2004-11-09

    The purpose of this model report is to document the infiltration model used to estimate upper-bound, mean, and lower-bound spatially-distributed average annual net infiltration rates for present-day and potential future climates at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Net infiltration is the component of infiltrated precipitation, snowmelt, or surface water run-on that has percolated below the zone of evapotranspiration as defined by the depth of the effective root zone. The estimates of net infiltration are primarily used for defining the upper boundary condition for the site-scale three-dimensional unsaturated zone (UZ) model. The UZ flow model is one of several process models abstracted by the total system performance assessment (TSPA) model used to evaluate performance of the repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The net-infiltration model is important for assessing repository-system performance because output from this model provides the upper boundary condition for the UZ flow model used to generate flow fields; water percolating downward from the UZ will be the principal means by which radionuclides are potentially released to the saturated zone (SZ). The SZ is the principal pathway to the biosphere where the reasonably maximally exposed individual (RMEI) is exposed to radionuclides.

  15. Accounting for the Variation of Driver Aggression in the Simulation of Conventional and Advanced Vehicles (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Neubauer, J.; Wood, E.

    2013-05-01

    This presentation discusses a method of accounting for realistic levels of driver aggression to higher-level vehicle studies, including the impact of variation in real-world driving characteristics (acceleration and speed) on vehicle energy consumption and different powertrains (e.g., conventionally powered vehicles versus electrified drive vehicles [xEVs]). Aggression variation between drivers can increase fuel consumption by more than 50% or decrease it by more than 20% from average. The normalized fuel consumption deviation from average as a function of population percentile was found to be largely insensitive to powertrain. However, the traits of ideal driving behavior are a function of powertrain. In conventional vehicles, kinetic losses dominate rolling resistance and aerodynamic losses. In xEVs with regenerative braking, rolling resistance and aerodynamic losses dominate. The relation of fuel consumption predicted from real-world drive data to that predicted by the industry-standard HWFET, UDDS, LA92, and US06 drive cycles was not consistent across powertrains, and varied broadly from the mean, median, and mode of real-world driving. A drive cycle synthesized by NREL's DRIVE tool accurately and consistently reproduces average real-world for multiple powertrains within 1%, and can be used to calculate the fuel consumption effects of varying levels of driver aggression.

  16. Wind farms production: Control and prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Fouly, Tarek Hussein Mostafa

    Wind energy resources, unlike dispatchable central station generation, produce power dependable on external irregular source and that is the incident wind speed which does not always blow when electricity is needed. This results in the variability, unpredictability, and uncertainty of wind resources. Therefore, the integration of wind facilities to utility electrical grid presents a major challenge to power system operator. Such integration has significant impact on the optimum power flow, transmission congestion, power quality issues, system stability, load dispatch, and economic analysis. Due to the irregular nature of wind power production, accurate prediction represents the major challenge to power system operators. Therefore, in this thesis two novel models are proposed for wind speed and wind power prediction. One proposed model is dedicated to short-term prediction (one-hour ahead) and the other involves medium term prediction (one-day ahead). The accuracy of the proposed models is revealed by comparing their results with the corresponding values of a reference prediction model referred to as the persistent model. Utility grid operation is not only impacted by the uncertainty of the future production of wind farms, but also by the variability of their current production and how the active and reactive power exchange with the grid is controlled. To address this particular task, a control technique for wind turbines, driven by doubly-fed induction generators (DFIGs), is developed to regulate the terminal voltage by equally sharing the generated/absorbed reactive power between the rotor-side and the gridside converters. To highlight the impact of the new developed technique in reducing the power loss in the generator set, an economic analysis is carried out. Moreover, a new aggregated model for wind farms is proposed that accounts for the irregularity of the incident wind distribution throughout the farm layout. Specifically, this model includes the wake effect

  17. FARM : an automated malware analysis environment.

    SciTech Connect

    Van Randwyk, Jamie A.; Lloyd, Levi; Vanderveen, Keith B.; Chiang, Ken

    2008-10-01

    We present the forensic analysis repository for malware (FARM), a system for automating malware analysis. FARM leverages existing dynamic and static analysis tools and is designed in a modular fashion to provide future extensibility. We present our motivations for designing the system and give an overview of the system architecture. We also present several common scenarios that detail uses for FARM as well as illustrate how automated malware analysis saves time. Finally, we discuss future development of this tool.

  18. FARM : an automated malware analysis environment.

    SciTech Connect

    Van Randwyk, Jamie A.; Lloyd, Levi; Vanderveen, Keith B.; Chiang, Ken

    2008-08-01

    We present the forensic analysis repository for malware (FARM), a system for automating malware analysis. FARM leverages existing dynamic and static analysis tools and is designed in a modular fashion to provide future extensibility. We present our motivations for designing the system and give an overview of the system architecture. We also present several common scenarios that detail uses for FARM as well as illustrate how automated malware analysis saves time. Finally, we discuss future development of this tool.

  19. Using Mesoscale Weather Model Output as Boundary Conditions for Atmospheric Large-Eddy Simulations and Wind-Plant Aerodynamic Simulations (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Churchfield, M. J.; Michalakes, J.; Vanderwende, B.; Lee, S.; Sprague, M. A.; Lundquist, J. K.; Moriarty, P. J.

    2013-10-01

    Wind plant aerodynamics are directly affected by the microscale weather, which is directly influenced by the mesoscale weather. Microscale weather refers to processes that occur within the atmospheric boundary layer with the largest scales being a few hundred meters to a few kilometers depending on the atmospheric stability of the boundary layer. Mesoscale weather refers to large weather patterns, such as weather fronts, with the largest scales being hundreds of kilometers wide. Sometimes microscale simulations that capture mesoscale-driven variations (changes in wind speed and direction over time or across the spatial extent of a wind plant) are important in wind plant analysis. In this paper, we present our preliminary work in coupling a mesoscale weather model with a microscale atmospheric large-eddy simulation model. The coupling is one-way beginning with the weather model and ending with a computational fluid dynamics solver using the weather model in coarse large-eddy simulation mode as an intermediary. We simulate one hour of daytime moderately convective microscale development driven by the mesoscale data, which are applied as initial and boundary conditions to the microscale domain, at a site in Iowa. We analyze the time and distance necessary for the smallest resolvable microscales to develop.

  20. Farm Population of the United States: 1976. Current Population Reports: Farm Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banks, Vera J.; And Others

    Prepared cooperatively by the Bureau of the Census and the Economic Research Service of the U.S. DeparLment of Agriculture, this document presents narrative and tabular data on: demographic and social characteristics of the farm population; economic characteristics of the farm population; revision of farm population processing procedures; and…

  1. Simulations of Decadal-scale Climate Change Impacts on Agriculture: Attributing Trends in Regional Corn Yields to Physiological Effects Versus Adjusted Farm Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucharik, C.

    2003-12-01

    A recent study published in Science in early 2003 [by David Lobell and Gregory Asner, Dept. of Global Ecology, Carnegie Inst. of Washington] highlighted that little effort has been put forth to understand the impacts of previous decadal-scale climate changes on row-crop agriculture. The major obstacle to overcome in quantifying crop response to climate changes over large regions is deciphering between changes attributed to climate change versus technology, land-management and other factors. While the Lobell and Asner study concluded that regional temperature trends potentially contributed to corn and soybean yield trends from 1982-1998, a partitioning of the observed increases between direct physiological effects versus farmer management adjustment to climate was not a goal of their study. As part of this study, an agricultural version of the Integrated BIosphere Simulator (Agro-IBIS), was used to investigate how decadal-scale climate changes may have contributed to corn yield trends across the Mississippi Basin from 1948-2001. The primary objective was to investigate the relative contributions of physiological effects and farmer adjustments in planting date and hybrid choice to long-term corn yield trends. The impacts of advancing technology on agriculture were removed from model simulations so that the impact of weather and farm management decisions (e.g., planting date and hybrid choice) could be separated from observed long-term trends in the USDA crop yield record. Scenarios were used that accounted for smart-farmers, where management adjustments (planting date and/or hybrid) were made in response to climate changes, and for business-as-usual-farmers who continued to plant the same hybrids on the same date during the study period. When average, optimum corn planting dates from the 1950s were compared with the 1990s, significant springtime warming in regions of the northern fringes of the cornbelt (e.g., North Dakota, Minnesota) over the past 40 years have

  2. LES of large wind farm during a diurnal cycle: Analysis of Energy and Scalar flux budgets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, V.; Calaf, M.; Parlange, M. B.

    2014-12-01

    With an expanding role of wind energy in satisfying energy demands around the world, wind farms are covering increasingly larger surfaces to the point where interaction between wind farms and the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) might have significant implications. Furthermore, many wind farm sites lie over existing farmland for which water is a precious resource. In this context, a relevant question yet to be fully understood, is whether large wind farms alter near surface temperatures and evaporation rates and if so, by how much. In the present study, Large Eddy Simulation (LES) of a geostrophic wind driven ABL with two active scalars, temperature and specific humidity, in the presence of Coriolis forces with an embedded wind farm are performed. Multiple 'synthetic' diurnal cycles are simulated by imposing a time-varying surface temperature and specific humidity. Wind turbines are modeled using the "actuator disk" approach along with the flexibility to reorient according to varying flow directions. LES is performed using the "pseudo-spectral" approach implying that an infinitely large wind farm is simulated. Comparison of simulations with and without wind farms show clear differences in vertical profiles of horizontal velocity magnitude and direction, turbulent kinetic energy and scalar fluxes. To better understand these differences, a detailed analysis of the constituent terms of budget equations of mean and turbulent kinetic energy and sensible and latent heat fluxes has been performed for different stratification regimes as the ABL evolves during the diurnal cycle. The analyses help explain the effect of wind farms on the characteristics of the low-level jet, depth of the stable boundary layer, formation and growth of the convective boundary layer (CBL) and scalar fluxes at the surface.

  3. Presentation of the first PLM integrated optical simulation software for the design and engineering of optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delacour, Jacques F.; Cuinier, Jean-Luc

    2004-02-01

    The Computer Aided Design, Manufacturing and Engineering world has gradually welcomed simulation tools enabling the modeling of machining, thermal effects, mechanical, dynamic-motion, vibration and acoustic phenomena... but not optical simulation which has evolved independently from the CAD environment. The innovation presented here with SPEOS CAA V5 Based software integrated in CATIA and ENOVIA DMU V5 software from Dassault Systèmes, the premier global PLM solutions provider, is the first optical simulation solution connecting optics to the CAD/CAM/CAE world, and directly impacts and improve the optical design analysis and process. The optical properties are added directly within the software, sharing the same data for mechanical and optical analysis and thus avoiding all the transfer errors. This new approach improves the quality process and allows unlimited detailed mechanical parts used to be used for the simulation. All the geometric transformations and optical properties modifications are done interactively, helping the user to understand the way the photons are propagated in the whole system. New functions available in CATIA/ENOVIA V5 are light emission simulation, light/surface interaction and scattering, light/matter propagation producing optical performance, photometric measurements and stray light analysis. The early integration of optical performances means that a solution can be found faster that will globally fit to all the specifications. This new technology is opening new links with stress effects, thermal effects, mobile and motorized systems, ... during the design of an optical system, giving the ability to evaluate optical performance of any adaptive, opto-mechanical system, projection and display system under virtual environmental conditions (heat, stress,...) that will affect the optical performance.

  4. Alcohol fuel from Ohio farms

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    Brief descriptions of on-farm ethanol production methods including feedstock preparation, cooking, fermentation, and distillation are presented. Safety conditions are described. Investment in on-farm ethanol production facilities and their potential returns are addressed. The market for ethanol and ethanol blends as well as for by-products is encouraging. Legal aspects for permitting and environmental regulations both for Ohio and federal agencies are discussed. (DMC)

  5. Present and Future Surface Climate in the Western U.S. as Simulated by 15 Global Climate Models

    SciTech Connect

    Coquard, J; Duffy, P B; Taylor, K E; Iorio, J P

    2004-08-09

    We analyze results of 15 global climate simulations contributed to the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP). Focusing on the western U.S., we consider both present climate simulations and predicted responses to increasing atmospheric CO{sub 2}. The models vary in their ability to predict the present climate. Over the western U.S., a few models produce a seasonal cycle for spatially-averaged temperature and/or precipitation in good agreement with observational data. Other models tend to overpredict precipitation in the winter or exaggerate the amplitude of the seasonal cycle of temperature. The models also differ in their ability to reproduce the spatial patterns of temperature and precipitation in the U.S. Considering the monthly mean precipitation responses to doubled atmospheric CO{sub 2}, averaged over the western U.S., we find some models predict increases while others predict decreases. The predicted temperature response, on the other hand, is invariably positive over this region; however, for each month, the range of values given by the different models is large compared to the mean model response. We look for possible relationships between the models' temperature and precipitation responses to doubled CO{sub 2} concentration and their ability to simulate some aspects of the present climate. We find that these relationships are weak, at best. The precipitation response over the western U.S. in DJF and the precipitation response over the mid- and tropical latitudes seem to be correlated with the RMS error in simulated present-day precipitation, also calculated over the mid- and tropical latitudes. However, considering only the responses of the models with the smallest RMS errors does not provide a different estimate of the precipitation response to a doubled CO{sub 2} concentration, because even among the most accurate models, the range of model responses is so large. For temperature, we find that models that have smaller RMS errors in present

  6. The impact on the present and future East Asia climate of the land cover changes simulated by dynamic vegetation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boo, Kyung-On; Cho, Mee-Hyun; Martin, Gill; Lee, Johan

    2014-05-01

    Land surface properties are important because of their known impact on the East Asian monsoon circulation. Historical and future changes in land cover changes give influences on the monsoon rainfall and circulation over the Asian summer monsoon region. The dynamic vegetation model, as one of the key process of the Earth System model, simulates the terrestrial biosphere where the fraction of tree and grass species is a function of the local climate state. The potential effect of the simulated land cover distribution needs to be individually evaluated in present and future climate simulations. Since it is reported that the simulated land surface properties could give influence on the systematic biases in monsoon rainfall and add an impact in the future projection via feedback with the dust loading of the atmosphere [Martin and Levine, 2012]. Motivated by the previous study, we investigate the impact of land cover change generated by the interactive terrestrial carbon cycle in the HadGEM2 Earth System configuration over East Asia under present-day and possible future climate condition. Data in this study is HadGEM2-A runs using HadGEM2-ES land cover distribution in Martin and Levine [2012]. In present-day run, over the northern China region to the west of Korea, bare soil increase distinctly in HadGEM2-ES rather than HadGEM2-AO. ES land cover by interactive vegetation model gives influences on JJA rainfall and temperature. There is interaction with model systematic biases in the present-day climate. JJA dry bias is larger when HadGEM2-ES land cover distribution was used for Korea. Dust aerosol effect contributes to the dry bias. As bare soil fraction increases, more emitted dust aerosol has direct effect of negative net downward SW, cooling the land surface, weakening monsoon inflow, inducing dry bias over Korea. In the other hand, over bare soil expanded area, changes in roughness length and soil evaporation, the subsequent latent heat flux changes contribute to

  7. A new analytical model for wind farm power prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niayifar, Amin; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2015-06-01

    In this study, a new analytical approach is presented and validated to predict wind farm power production. The new model is an extension of the recently proposed by Bastankhah and Porté-Agel for a single wake. It assumes a self-similar Gaussian shape of the velocity deficit and satisfies conservation of mass and momentum. To estimate the velocity deficit in the wake, this model needs the local wake growth rate parameter which is calculated based on the local turbulence intensity in the wind farm. The interaction of the wakes is modeled by use of the velocity deficit superposition principle. Finally, the power curve is used to estimate the power production from the wind turbines. The wind farm model is compared to large-eddy simulation (LES) data and measurments of Horns Rev wind farm for a wide range of wind directions. Reasonable agreement between the proposed analytical model, LES data and measurments is obtained. This prediction is also found to be substantially better than the one obtained with a commonly used wind farm wake model.

  8. Stochastic dynamic simulation modeling including multitrait genetics to estimate genetic, technical, and financial consequences of dairy farm reproduction and selection strategies.

    PubMed

    Kaniyamattam, K; Elzo, M A; Cole, J B; De Vries, A

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a daily stochastic dynamic dairy simulation model that included multitrait genetics and to evaluate the effects of reduced genetic models and various reproduction and selection strategies on the genetic, technical, and financial performance of a dairy herd. The 12 correlated genetic traits included in the 2014 lifetime net merit (NM$) index were modeled for each animal. For each animal, a true breeding value (TBV) for each trait was calculated as the average of the sire's and dam's TBV, plus a fraction of the inbreeding and Mendelian sampling variability. Similarly, an environmental component for each trait was calculated and was partitioned into a permanent and a daily (temporary) effect. The combined TBV and environmental effects were converted into the phenotypic performance of each animal. Hence, genetics and phenotypic performances were associated. Estimated breeding values (EBV) were also simulated. Genetic trends for each trait for the service sire were based on expected trends in US Holsteins. Surplus heifers were culled based on various ranking criteria to maintain a herd size of 1,000 milking cows. In the first 8 scenarios, culling of surplus heifers was either random or based on the EBV of NM$. Four different genetic models, depending on the presence or absence of genetic trends or genetic and environmental correlations, or both, were evaluated to measure the effect of excluding multitrait genetics on animal performance. In the last 5 scenarios, the full genetic model was used and culling of surplus heifers was either random or based on the EBV of NM$ or the EBV of milk. Sexed semen use and reliability of the EBV were also varied. Each scenario was simulated for 15yr into the future. Results showed that genetic models without all 12 genetic trends and genetic and environmental correlations provided biased estimates of the genetic, technical, and financial performance of the dairy herd. Average TBV of NM$ of all

  9. Farm Play Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Linda; And Others

    Because many cultures celebrate a harvest time or festival with which many children can identify, this farm preschool curriculum unit is appropriate for a cross-cultural setting. The farm unit is introduced to children through a field trip to a local farm, with children having the opportunity for experiential learning. The farm may be integrated…

  10. Data Farming and Defense Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horne, Gary; Meyer, Ted

    2011-01-01

    .Data farm,ing uses simulation modeling, high performance computing, experimental design and analysis to examine questions of interest with large possibility spaces. This methodology allows for the examination of whole landscapes of potential outcomes and provides the capability of executing enough experiments so that outliers might be captured and examined for insights. It can be used to conduct sensitivity studies, to support validation and verification of models, to iteratively optimize outputs using heuristic search and discovery, and as an aid to decision-makers in understanding complex relationships of factors. In this paper we describe efforts at the Naval Postgraduate School in developing these new and emerging tools. We also discuss data farming in the context of application to questions inherent in military decision-making. The particular application we illustrate here is social network modeling to support the countering of improvised explosive devices.

  11. Evaluation of Present-day Aerosols over China Simulated from the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, H.; Chang, W.

    2014-12-01

    High concentrations of aerosols over China lead to strong radiative forcing that is important for both regional and global climate. To understand the representation of aerosols in China in current global climate models, we evaluate extensively the simulated present-day aerosol concentrations and aerosol optical depth (AOD) over China from the 12 models that participated in Atmospheric Chemistry & Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP), by using ground-based measurements and satellite remote sensing. Ground-based measurements of aerosol concentrations used in this work include those from the China Meteorological Administration (CMA) Atmosphere Watch Network (CAWNET) and the observed fine-mode aerosol concentrations collected from the literature. The ground-based measurements of AOD in China are taken from the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET), the sites with CIMEL sun photometer operated by Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, and from Chinese Sun Hazemeter Network (CSHNET). We find that the ACCMIP models generally underestimate concentrations of all major aerosol species in China. On an annual mean basis, the multi-model mean concentrations of sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, black carbon, and organic carbon are underestimated by 63%, 73%, 54%, 53%, and 59%, respectively. The multi-model mean AOD values show low biases of 20-40% at studied sites in China. The ACCMIP models can reproduce seasonal variation of nitrate but cannot capture well the seasonal variations of other aerosol species. Our analyses indicate that current global models generally underestimate the role of aerosols in China in climate simulations.

  12. General view looking toward the roulette farm cluster from south ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view looking toward the roulette farm cluster from south to north; note the present-day field was an orchard at the time of the battle - Roulette Farm, House, Sharpsburg, Washington County, MD

  13. Present-Day Atmospheric Simulations Using GISS ModelE: Comparison to In Situ, Satellite, and Reanalysis Data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Gavin A.; Ruedy, Reto; Hansen, James E.; Aleinov, Igor; Bell, Nadine; Bauer, Mike; Bauer, Susanne; Cairns, Brian; Canuto, Vittorio; Cheng, Ye; Del Genio, Anthony; Faluvegi, Greg; Friend, Andrew D.; Hall, Tim M.; Hu, Yongyun; Kelley, Max; Kiang, Nancy Y.; Koch, Dorothy; Lacis, Andy A.; Lerner, Jean; Lo, Ken K.; Miller, Ron L.; Nazarenko, Larissa; Oinas, Valdar; Perlwitz, Jan; Perlwitz, Judith; Rind, David; Romanou, Anastasia; Russell, Gary L.; Sato, Makiko; Shindell, Drew T.; Stone, Peter H.; Sun, Shan; Tausnev, Nick; Thresher, Duane; Yao, Mao-Sung

    2006-01-01

    A full description of the ModelE version of the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) atmospheric general circulation model (GCM) and results are presented for present-day climate simulations (ca. 1979). This version is a complete rewrite of previous models incorporating numerous improvements in basic physics, the stratospheric circulation, and forcing fields. Notable changes include the following: the model top is now above the stratopause, the number of vertical layers has increased, a new cloud microphysical scheme is used, vegetation biophysics now incorporates a sensitivity to humidity, atmospheric turbulence is calculated over the whole column, and new land snow and lake schemes are introduced. The performance of the model using three configurations with different horizontal and vertical resolutions is compared to quality-controlled in situ data, remotely sensed and reanalysis products. Overall, significant improvements over previous models are seen, particularly in upper-atmosphere temperatures and winds, cloud heights, precipitation, and sea level pressure. Data model comparisons continue, however, to highlight persistent problems in the marine stratocumulus regions.

  14. Performance of regional climate models in simulations of present-day Irish climate: Implications for constructing future scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, A. M.

    2009-04-01

    Simulations of present-day (1961-1990) climate from 19 regional climate model experiments have been compared to the observed baseline climate for Ireland. These simulations, driven by global climate models, are obtained through the EC PRUDENCE (Prediction of Regional scenarios and Uncertainties for Defining EuropeaN Climate change risks and Effects) project. The ability to represent the statistics of Irish climate has been assessed, both temporally (comparisons of meteorological year, seasonal mean and seasonal variance) and spatially (seasonal covariation and pattern-analysis) for two key meteorological parameters, that of temperature and precipitation. For the average meteorological year (30-year averages of each month), mean temperatures are found to be within 1.5˚ C of observations, except in winter, when temperatures are overestimated by up to 2.5˚ C. Temporal variation is also not well-represented by some models in winter. Conversely, temporal variation in precipitation is most poorly simulated in summer. Seasonal variance is the area in which greatest inter-model variability is shown. Ratio of observed variance to modeled variance ranges from weak (0.5 or less) to very strong (greater than 0.7) in both seasons, and for both parameters. Spatially, temperature is over-estimated throughout Ireland, by up to 4.6˚ C in winter and 2.7˚ C in summer in individual grid cells from some models. Precipitation is found to be both under and over-estimated, with grid cell biases ranging from -2.5 mm/day to 4.2 mm/day in winter and from -1.2 mm/day to 1.8 mm/day in summer. While skill at representing the spatial precipitation pattern is found to be very strong in 16 out of 19 experiments in winter, only 2 of those experiments show the same level of skill in summer. Errors are identified in all individual models, both systematic and random. While using an ensemble average overcomes some of these deficiencies, the optimal approach is to correct systematic errors

  15. Integrated Farm System Model: Reference Manual, Version 2.1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Integrated Farm System Model simulates the major biological and physical processes of a crop, beef, or dairy farm. Crop production, feed use, and the return of manure nutrients back to the land are simulated over each of 25 years of weather. Growth and development of alfalfa, grass, corn, soybea...

  16. A Farm Management Problem. Teacher Guide. AGDEX 810.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cackler, William

    This guide is intended to assist teachers in conducting a farm management simulation that has been designed to help vocational agriculture students acquire competency in both crop and livestock farming. The introductory section includes an overview of the simulation, planning considerations and suggested grading criteria, and a suggested sequence…

  17. Farm Parents' Attitudes Towards Farm Safety Experts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neufeld, Steven J.; Cinnamon, Jennifer L.

    2004-01-01

    Using both qualitative and quantitative data, this article analyzes farm parent's attitudes towards the trustworthiness, usefulness, and use of advice from farm safety experts. The article evaluates four different perspectives on trust in expert: the Validity of Knowledge perspective, the Salient Values Similarity perspective, the Diffusion of…

  18. Farm Safety (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... wheels or blind spots. Because adults who are operating machinery may be unable to see or hear ... a tractor and farm vehicle safety course before operating farm vehicles. Finally, teach older kids how to ...

  19. Monitoring, modeling and mitigating impacts of wind farms on local meteorology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baidya Roy, Somnath; Traiteur, Justin; Kelley, Neil

    2010-05-01

    Wind power is one of the fastest growing sources of energy. Most of the growth is in the industrial sector comprising of large utility-scale wind farms. Recent modeling studies have suggested that such wind farms can significantly affect local and regional weather and climate. In this work, we present observational evidence of the impact of wind farms on near-surface air temperatures. Data from perhaps the only meteorological field campaign in an operational wind farm shows that downwind temperatures are lower during the daytime and higher at night compared to the upwind environment. Corresponding radiosonde profiles at the nearby Edwards Air Force Base WMO meteorological station show that the diurnal environment is unstable while the nocturnal environment is stable during the field campaign. This behavior is consistent with the hypothesis proposed by Baidya Roy et al. (JGR 2004) that states that turbulence generated in the wake of rotors enhance vertical mixing leading to a warming/cooling under positive/negative potential temperature lapse rates. We conducted a set of 306 simulations with the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) to test if regional climate models can capture the thermal effects of wind farms. We represented wind turbines with a subgrid parameterization that assumes rotors to be sinks of momentum and sources of turbulence. The simulated wind farms consistently generated a localized warming/cooling under positive/negative lapse rates as hypothesized. We found that these impacts are inversely correlated with background atmospheric boundary layer turbulence. Thus, if the background turbulence is high due to natural processes, the effects of additional turbulence generated by wind turbine rotors are likely to be small. We propose the following strategies to minimize impacts of wind farms: • Engineering solution: design rotors that generate less turbulence in their wakes. Sensitivity simulations show that these turbines also increase the

  20. A global model simulation of present and future nitrate aerosols and their direct radiative forcing of climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauglustaine, D. A.; Balkanski, Y.; Schulz, M.

    2014-03-01

    The ammonia cycle and nitrate particle formation have been introduced in the LMDz-INCA global model. Both fine nitrate particles formation in the accumulation mode and coarse nitrate forming on existing dust and sea-salt particles are considered. The model simulates distributions of nitrates and related species in agreement with previous studies and observations. The calculated present-day total nitrate direct radiative forcing since the pre-industrial is -0.056 W m-2. This forcing has the same magnitude than the forcing associated with organic carbon particles and represents 18% of the sulfate forcing. Fine particles largely dominate the nitrate forcing representing close to 90% of this value. The model has been used to investigate the future changes in nitrates and direct radiative forcing of climate based on snapshot simulations for the four Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) scenarios and for the 2030, 2050 and 2100 time horizons. Due to a decrease in fossil fuel emissions in the future, the concentrations of most of the species involved in the nitrate-ammonium-sulfate system drop by 2100 except for ammonia which originates from agricultural practices and for which emissions significantly increase in the future. Despite the decrease of nitrate surface levels in Europe and Northern America, the global burden of accumulation mode nitrates increases by up to a factor of 2.6 in 2100. This increase in nitrate in the future arises despite decreasing NOx emissions due to increased availability of ammonia to form ammonium nitrate. The total aerosol direct forcing decreases from its present-day value of -0.234 W m-2 to a range of -0.070 to -0.130 W m-2 in 2100 based on the considered scenario. The direct forcing decreases for all aerosols except for nitrates for which the direct negative forcing increases to a range of -0.060 to -0.115 W m-2 in 2100. Including nitrates in the radiative forcing calculations increases the total direct forcing of aerosols by a

  1. Bringing the Classroom to the Farm.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Robert R.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Describes a study conducted to determine if extension agents could expand their audience through a series of statewide on-farm meetings. The study also sought to determine if the on-farm approach would result in adoption of recommended mastitis control practices. Results are presented and discussed. (CT)

  2. Wind Farm Power System Model Development: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C. P.

    2004-07-01

    In some areas, wind power has reached a level where it begins to impact grid operation and the stability of local utilities. In this paper, the model development for a large wind farm will be presented. Wind farm dynamic behavior and contribution to stability during transmission system faults will be examined.

  3. Climate change and Mediterranean storm tracks: present and future climate simulations of a high-resolution Mediterranean model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatzaki, M.; Flocas, H. A.; Simmonds, I.; Keay, K.; Giannakopoulos, C.; Brikolas, V.; Kouroutzoglou, J.

    2010-09-01

    A number of studies suggest that cyclone activity over both hemispheres has changed over the second half of the 20th century. General features include a reduction in the number of cyclones but with an increase in the number of more intense cyclones; as well as a poleward shift in the tracks. Moreover, these features are expected to be projected in the future under global warming conditions. The assessment of the future changes of the cyclonic activity as imposed by global warming conditions is very important since these cyclones can be associated with extreme precipitation conditions, severe storms and floods. This is more important for the Mediterranean that has been found to be more vulnerable to climate change. The main objective of the current study is to better understand and assess future changes in the main characteristics of cyclonic tracks in the Mediterranean. The climatology of the cyclonic tracks includes temporal and spatial variations of frequency, and dynamic and kinematic parameters, such as intensity, size, propagation velocity, as well as trend analysis. For this purpose, the ENEA high resolution model is employed, based on PROTHEUS system composed of the RegCM atmospheric regional model and the MITgcm ocean model, coupled through the OASIS3 flux coupler. These model data became available through the EU Project CIRCE which aims to perform, for the first time, climate change projections with a realistic representation of the Mediterranean Sea. Two experiments are employed; a) the EH5OM_20C3M present climate simulation, where the lateral boundary conditions for the atmosphere (1951-2000) are taken from the ECHAM5-MPIOM 20c3m global simulation (run3) included in the IPCC-AR4, and b) the EH5OM_A1B scenario simulation, where the IPCC-AR4 ECHAM5-MPIOM SRESA1B global simulation (run3) has been used for the period 2001-2050. The identification and tracking of cyclones is performed with the aid of the Melbourne University algorithm (MS algorithm

  4. North Carolina Farm Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lilley, Stephen; And Others

    Interviews with 725 North Carolina farm operators revealed: the extent of economic, social, and emotional stresses on farm families; perceptions of the future of agriculture; the degree of reliance on off-farm income; financial management practices; and programs needed from the Agricultural Extension Service. Almost 66% viewed their future in…

  5. Energy integrated farm system technical summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Breckenridge, R.P.; Price, D.R.; Sherwood, R.K.; Thompson, W.N.

    1987-03-01

    The Energy Integrated Farm System program was established by the Department of Energy in 1980 in response to the hardship imposed on US farmers by high fuel costs and unreliable fuel supplies. The program investigated the feasibility of integrating energy conservation practices with on-farm energy production to reduce farm energy consumption and make farms more energy self-sufficient. Seven farms located in various geographical regions in the US and Puerto Rico participated in the program. Each of these farms developed an energy integrated farm system project that used a unique combination of energy production and energy conservation methods to supply energy to the farm and reduce the farm's dependence on energy produced from nonrenewable sources such as coal and oil. Methods used at these projects included conservation tillage, solar heating, waste heat recovery, methane digestion, electricity production from biogas, alcohol fuel production, fluidized-bed combustion of crop wastes, and computer-aided conservation irrigation. This report is a summary of the seven technical manuals prepared at the conclusion of the projects. It presents highlights and results, provides an overview of successes and problems, and lists recommendations.

  6. Interactive 3D-PDF Presentations for the Simulation and Quantification of Extended Endoscopic Endonasal Surgical Approaches.

    PubMed

    Mavar-Haramija, Marija; Prats-Galino, Alberto; Méndez, Juan A Juanes; Puigdelívoll-Sánchez, Anna; de Notaris, Matteo

    2015-10-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) model of the skull base was reconstructed from the pre- and post-dissection head CT images and embedded in a Portable Document Format (PDF) file, which can be opened by freely available software and used offline. The CT images were segmented using a specific 3D software platform for biomedical data, and the resulting 3D geometrical models of anatomical structures were used for dual purpose: to simulate the extended endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approaches and to perform the quantitative analysis of the procedures. The analysis consisted of bone removal quantification and the calculation of quantitative parameters (surgical freedom and exposure area) of each procedure. The results are presented in three PDF documents containing JavaScript-based functions. The 3D-PDF files include reconstructions of the nasal structures (nasal septum, vomer, middle turbinates), the bony structures of the anterior skull base and maxillofacial region and partial reconstructions of the optic nerve, the hypoglossal and vidian canals and the internal carotid arteries. Alongside the anatomical model, axial, sagittal and coronal CT images are shown. Interactive 3D presentations were created to explain the surgery and the associated quantification methods step-by-step. The resulting 3D-PDF files allow the user to interact with the model through easily available software, free of charge and in an intuitive manner. The files are available for offline use on a personal computer and no previous specialized knowledge in informatics is required. The documents can be downloaded at http://hdl.handle.net/2445/55224 . PMID:26306875

  7. Modeling of Present-Day Atmosphere and Ocean Non-Tidal De-Aliasing Errors for Future Gravity Mission Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmann-Wolf, I.; Dobslaw, H.; Mayer-Gürr, T.

    2015-12-01

    A realistically perturbed synthetic de-aliasing model consistent with the updated Earth System Model of the European Space Agency (Dobslaw et al., 2015) is now available for the years 1995 -- 2006. The data-set contains realizations of (i) errors at large spatial scales assessed individually for periods between 10 -- 30, 3 -- 10, and 1 -- 3 days, the S1 atmospheric tide, and sub-diurnal periods; (ii) errors at small spatial scales typically not covered by global models of atmosphere and ocean variability; and (iii) errors due to physical processes not represented in currently available de-aliasing products. The error magnitudes for each of the different frequency bands are derived from a small ensemble of four atmospheric and oceanic models. In order to demonstrate the plausibility of the error magnitudes chosen, we perform a variance component estimation based on daily GRACE normal equations from the ITSG-Grace2014 global gravity field series recently published by the University of Graz. All 12 years of the error model are used to calculate empirical error variance-covariance matrices describing the systematic dependencies of the errors both in time and in space individually for five continental and four oceanic regions, and daily GRACE normal equations are subsequently employed to obtain pre-factors for each of those matrices. For the largest spatial scales up to d/o = 40 and periods longer than 24 h, errors prepared for the updated ESM are found to be largely consistent with noise of a similar stochastic character contained in present-day GRACE solutions. Differences and similarities identified for all of the nine regions considered will be discussed in detail during the presentation.Dobslaw, H., I. Bergmann-Wolf, R. Dill, E. Forootan, V. Klemann, J. Kusche, and I. Sasgen (2015), The updated ESA Earth System Model for future gravity mission simulation studies, J. Geod., doi:10.1007/s00190-014-0787-8.

  8. A control-oriented dynamic wind farm flow model: “WFSim”

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boersma, S.; Gebraad, P. M. O.; Vali, M.; Doekemeijer, B. M.; van Wingerden, J. W.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we present and extend the dynamic medium fidelity control-oriented Wind Farm Simulator (WFSim) model. WFSim resolves flow fields in wind farms in a horizontal, two dimensional plane. It is based on the spatially and temporally discretised two dimensional Navier-Stokes equations and the continuity equation and solves for a predefined grid and wind farm topology. The force on the flow field generated by turbines is modelled using actuator disk theory. Sparsity in system matrices is exploited in WFSim, which enables a relatively fast flow field computation. The extensions to WFSim we present in this paper are the inclusion of a wake redirection model, a turbulence model and a linearisation of the nonlinear WFSim model equations. The first is important because it allows us to carry out wake redirection control and simulate situations with an inflow that is misaligned with the rotor plane. The wake redirection model is validated against a theoretical wake centreline known from literature. The second extension makes WFSim more realistic because it accounts for wake recovery. The amount of recovery is validated using a high fidelity simulation model Simulator fOr Wind Farm Applications (SOWFA) for a two turbine test case. Finally, a linearisation is important since it allows the application of more standard analysis, observer and control techniques.

  9. Development and application of process-based simulation models for cotton production: A review of past, present, and future directions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The development and application of cropping system simulation models for cotton production has a long and rich history, beginning in the southeast United States in the 1960's and now expanded to major cotton production regions globally. This paper briefly reviews the history of cotton simulation mo...

  10. The Roots of "Animal Farm".

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaefer, Barbara E.

    The presentation of the book "Animal Farm" by George Orwell to sophomores at East Orange Catholic High School, New Jersey, as a "political document" is discussed. Through research, panel discussions and voluntary comments, the students studied the book in depth comparing it to the power struggle between Stalin and Trotsky in Soviet Russia.…

  11. ANNUAL FARM LABOR REPORT - 1962.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LENHART, MARGOT WAKEMAN

    THE ADMINISTRATION OF THE FARM PLACEMENT SERVICE WHICH INCLUDED ORGANIZATION, STAFF, OFFICES, ASSOCIATES AND ADVISORS, AND MEETINGS WAS PRESENTED. AT THE STATE LEVEL, THERE WAS A RISE IN OVERALL CROP PRODUCTION AND A DECREASE IN TOTAL CROPLAND HARVEST. AT THE LOCAL LEVEL, URBAN ENCROACHMENT CHANGED THE NATURE OF PRODUCTION IN SOME AREAS AND…

  12. A global model simulation of present and future nitrate aerosols and their direct radiative forcing of climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauglustaine, D. A.; Balkanski, Y.; Schulz, M.

    2014-10-01

    The ammonia cycle and nitrate particle formation are introduced into the LMDz-INCA (Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique, version 4 - INteraction with Chemistry and Aerosols, version 3) global model. An important aspect of this new model is that both fine nitrate particle formation in the accumulation mode and coarse nitrate forming on existing dust and sea-salt particles are considered. The model simulates distributions of nitrates and related species in agreement with previous studies and observations. The calculated present-day total nitrate direct radiative forcing since the pre-industrial is -0.056 W m-2. This forcing corresponds to 18% of the sulfate forcing. Fine particles largely dominate the nitrate forcing, representing close to 90% of this value. The model has been used to investigate the future changes in nitrates and direct radiative forcing of climate based on snapshot simulations for the four representative concentration pathway (RCP) scenarios and for the 2030, 2050, and 2100 time horizons. Due to a decrease in fossil fuel emissions in the future, the concentration of most of the species involved in the nitrate-ammonium-sulfate system drop by 2100 except for ammonia, which originates from agricultural practices and for which emissions significantly increase in the future. Despite the decrease of nitrate surface levels in Europe and North America, the global burden of accumulation mode nitrates increases by up to a factor of 2.6 in 2100. This increase in ammonium nitrate in the future arises despite decreasing NOx emissions due to increased availability of ammonia to form ammonium nitrate. The total aerosol direct forcing decreases from its present-day value of -0.234 W m-2 to a range of -0.070 to -0.130 W m-2 in 2100 based on the considered scenario. The direct forcing decreases for all aerosols except for nitrates, for which the direct negative forcing increases to a range of -0.060 to -0.115 W m-2 in 2100. Including nitrates in the radiative

  13. Summary of: Simulating the Value of Concentrating Solar Power with Thermal Energy Storage in a Production Cost Model (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Denholm, P.; Hummon, M.

    2013-02-01

    Concentrating solar power (CSP) deployed with thermal energy storage (TES) provides a dispatchable source of renewable energy. The value of CSP with TES, as with other potential generation resources, needs to be established using traditional utility planning tools. Production cost models, which simulate the operation of grid, are often used to estimate the operational value of different generation mixes. CSP with TES has historically had limited analysis in commercial production simulations. This document describes the implementation of CSP with TES in a commercial production cost model. It also describes the simulation of grid operations with CSP in a test system consisting of two balancing areas located primarily in Colorado.

  14. A Framework for the Comparative Analysis of Farm Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molnar, Joseph J.

    Presenting a model for the comparative analysis of farm organizations, this paper analyzes the farm firm as a complex organization; identifies key structural dimensions of an agricultural production unit; and reviews various organizational perspectives for their utility in understanding and explaining the behavior of farm operations and farm…

  15. Estimating the effect of mastitis on the profitability of Irish dairy farms.

    PubMed

    Geary, U; Lopez-Villalobos, N; Begley, N; McCoy, F; O'Brien, B; O'Grady, L; Shalloo, L

    2012-07-01

    The objective of this paper was to estimate the effect of the costs of mastitis on the profitability of Irish dairy farms as indicated by various ranges of bulk milk somatic cell count (BMSCC). Data were collected from 4 sources and included milk production losses, cases treated, and on-farm practices around mastitis management. The Moorepark Dairy Systems Model, which simulates dairying systems inside the farm gate, was used to carry out the analysis. The cost components of mastitis that affect farm profitability and that were included in the model were milk losses, culling, diagnostic testing, treatment, veterinary attention, discarded milk, and penalties. Farms were grouped by 5 BMSCC thresholds of ≤ 100,000, 100,001-200,000, 200,001-300,000, 300,001-400,000, and > 400,000 cells/mL. The ≤ 100,000 cells/mL threshold was taken as the baseline and the other 4 thresholds were compared relative to this baseline. For a 40-ha farm, the analysis found that as BMSCC increased, milk receipts decreased from €148,843 at a BMSCC <100,000 cells/mL to €138,573 at a BMSCC > 400,000 cells/mL. In addition, as BMSCC increased, livestock receipts increased by 17%, from €43,304 at a BMSCC <100,000 cells/mL to €50,519 at a BMSCC > 400,000 cells/mL. This reflected the higher replacement rates as BMSCC increased and the associated cull cow value. Total farm receipts decreased from €192,147 at the baseline (< 100,000 cells/mL) to €189,091 at a BMSCC > 400,000 cells/mL. Total farm costs increased as BMSCC increased, reflecting treatment, veterinary, diagnostic testing, and replacement heifer costs. At the baseline, total farm costs were €161,085, increasing to €177,343 at a BMSCC > 400,000 cells/mL. Net farm profit decreased as BMSCC increased, from €31,252/yr at the baseline to €11,748/yr at a BMSCC > 400,000 cells/mL. This analysis highlights the impact that mastitis has on the profitability of Irish dairy farms. The analysis presented here can be used to

  16. Development of a bio-relevant dissolution test device simulating mechanical aspects present in the fed stomach.

    PubMed

    Koziolek, Mirko; Görke, Kristin; Neumann, Marco; Garbacz, Grzegorz; Weitschies, Werner

    2014-06-16

    A novel bio-relevant in vitro dissolution device was designed to mimic intragastric conditions after food intake paying particular consideration to mechanical aspects: the Fed Stomach Model (FSM). The FSM represents a fully computer-controlled dynamic flow-through system, in which dosage forms are hosted in so-called gastric vessels. Dosage form movement profiles as well as pressures can be simulated in a physiologically relevant manner. This proof-of-concept study aimed at the investigation of the effects of individual parameters and complex test programs on the drug delivery behavior of diclofenac sodium bilayer extended release tablets. Magnetic marker monitoring experiments demonstrated the applicability of the FSM to simulate intragastric movement velocities of solid oral dosage forms equivalent to in vivo data. Dissolution experiments revealed the relevance of all simulated parameters (i.e. pressure, dosage form movement and pump rate). Moreover, three different test scenarios with test programs specific for fundus, antrum and gastric emptying considered the variability of intragastric transit of solid oral dosage forms after food intake and were confirmed to be reasonable. Dissolution rates were low under conditions specific for fundus owing to low shear stresses. In contrast, higher amounts of the drug were released under high stress conditions simulating antral transit and gastric emptying. Concluding, the FSM can be a valuable tool for bio-relevant dissolution testing due to its potential of precise and reproducible simulation of mechanical parameters characteristic for the fed stomach.

  17. Aquaculture Farm Facility Loss Management System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Hyung-Rim; Park, Byoung-Kwon; Park, Yong-Sung; Lee, Chang-Sup; Choi, Ki-Nam; Park, Chang-Hyun; Jo, Yong-Hyun; Lee, Byung-Ha

    The loss of aquaculture farm facilities occurring from natural disasters of accidents can cause not only property damage but also marine environmental pollution and vessel safety accidents. When aquaculture farm facilities have been lost to sink down to the bottom of the water, those should be picked up through direct searches but it is difficult to find them because they cannot be visually identified and they are in the sea. In this study, a system that can efficiently manage aquaculture farm facility loss using a new technology IP-RFID will be presented. By attaching IP-Tags to aquaculture farm facilities, this technology enables the transmission of facility information and locations to diverse users in real time through the IPs and through this, the efficiency of aquaculture farm facility management and supervision can be improved and marine environmental pollution can be reduced.

  18. Present-day regional climate simulation over Malaysia and western Maritime Continent region using PRECIS forced with ERA40 reanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwan, Meng Sei; Tangang, Fredolin T.; Juneng, Liew

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the performance of the regional climate model, PRECIS, in reproducing the historical seasonal mean climatology over the Malaysian region. The performance of the model in simulating the seasonal climate pattern of the temperature, precipitation and large-scale circulation was reasonably good. The biases of temperature are less than 2 °C in general, while the seasonal cycles match the observed pattern despite some differences in certain regions. However, the biases for precipitation were greater, particularly over the mountainous areas. These biases could be associated with the deficiencies of the model physics, related to the misrepresentation of the land-surface interaction and convective scheme. Furthermore, the model fails to simulate the mean sea-level pressure over the interior part of Borneo with a significant low-pressure centre. A higher magnitude of the moisture convergence and divergence simulated by the model also contributed to the biases of precipitation over Malaysia.

  19. Ranking freshwater fish farms for the risk of pathogen introduction and spread.

    PubMed

    Oidtmann, B C; Crane, C N; Thrush, M A; Hill, B J; Peeler, E J

    2011-12-15

    A semi-quantitative model is presented to rank freshwater rainbow trout farms within a country or region with regards to the risk of becoming infected and spreading a specified pathogen. The model was developed to support a risk-based surveillance scheme for notifiable salmonid pathogens. Routes of pathogen introduction and spread were identified through a process of expert consultation in a series of workshops. The routes were combined into themes (e.g. exposure via water, mechanical transmission). Themes were weighted based on expert opinion. Risk factors for each route were scored and combined into a theme score which was adjusted by the weight. The number of sources and consignments were used to assess introduction via live fish movements onto the farm. Biosecurity measures were scored to assess introduction on fomites. Upstream farms, wild fish and processing plants were included in assessing the likelihood of introduction by water. The scores for each theme were combined to give separate risk scores for introduction and spread. A matrix was used to combine these to give an overall risk score. A case study for viral haemorrhagic septicaemia is presented. Nine farms that represent a range of farming practices of rainbow trout farms in England and Wales are used as worked examples of the model. The model is suited to risk rank freshwater salmonid farms which are declared free of the pathogen(s) under consideration. The score allocated to a farm does not equate to a quantitative probability estimate of the farm to become infected or spread infection. Nevertheless, the method provides a transparent approach to ranking farms with regards to pathogen transmission risks. The output of the model at a regional or national level allows the allocation of surveillance effort to be risk based. It also provides fish farms with information on how they can reduce their risk score by improving biosecurity. The framework of the model can be applied to different production

  20. SIMULATION EXERCISES IN AREA TRAINING. PAPER PRESENTED IN A SYMPOSIUM AT THE 1965 ARMY HUMAN FACTORS RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CONFERENCE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    STEWART, EDWARD C.

    SPECIAL TECHNIQUES AND CONTENT ARE BEING DEVELOPED TO SUPPLEMENT CURRENT AREA TRAINING PROGRAMS. SIMULATION WAS CHOSEN AS THE TECHNIQUE, AND EXERCISES WERE DEVELOPED WHOSE CONTENT EMPHASIZED THE AMERICAN CULTURE AND THE FOREIGN, HOST CULTURE. THESE EVOLVED AS A CONFRONTATION BETWEEN AMERICAN CULTURAL ASSUMPTIONS AND VALUES AND A CONTRASTING SET,…

  1. Spring melt ponds drive Arctic September ice at past, present and future climates in coupled climate simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, David; Feltham, Danny; Rae, Jamie; Flocco, Daniela; Ridley, Jeff; Blockley, Edd

    2016-04-01

    Stand-alone sea ice simulations with a physical based melt pond model reveal a strong correlation between the simulated spring pond fraction and the observed as well as simulated September sea ice extent for the period 1979 to 2014. This is explained by a positive feedback mechanism: more ponds reduce the albedo; a lower albedo causes more melting; more melting increases pond fraction. This feedback process is a potential reason for the acceleration of Arctic sea ice decrease in the last decade and the failure of many climate models (without an implicit pond model) to simulate the observed decrease. We implemented the Los Alamos sea ice model CICE 5 including our physical based melt pond model into the latest version of the Hadley Centre coupled climate model, HadGEM3. The model surface shortwave radiation scheme has been adjusted to account for pond fraction and depth. We performed three 55-year HadGEM3 simulations with constant external forcing for the years 1985, 2010 and 2035. In all three simulations we find a strong correlation between the April/May pond fraction and the September sea ice extent with correlation coefficients R1985 = -0.86, R2010 = -0.83 and R2035 = -0.79. Based on the correlation we can perform forecasts with remarkable skill values of S1985 = 0.50, S2010 = 0.36 and S2035 = 0.40. We calculate the skill as S = 1 - σferr2/ σref2, where σref2 is the variance of the de-trended climatology and σferr2 the forecast error variance. Altogether our three simulations cover a large range of September sea ice extent from maximum values of 8.5 million km2 for the 1985 run down to 1.5 million km2 for the 2035 run. We demonstrate that spring melt ponds are an important driver for summer ice melt and the consequent minimum ice extent for current and future climate conditions.

  2. Farm Health and Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... jobs in the United States. Farms have many health and safety hazards, including Chemicals and pesticides Machinery, ... equipment can also reduce accidents. Occupational Safety and Health Administration

  3. WE-D-BRF-01: FEATURED PRESENTATION - Investigating Particle Track Structures Using Fluorescent Nuclear Track Detectors and Monte Carlo Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Dowdell, S; Paganetti, H; Schuemann, J; Greilich, S; Zimmerman, F; Evans, C

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To report on the efforts funded by the AAPM seed funding grant to develop the basis for fluorescent nuclear track detector (FNTD) based radiobiological experiments in combination with dedicated Monte Carlo simulations (MCS) on the nanometer scale. Methods: Two confocal microscopes were utilized in this study. Two FNTD samples were used to find the optimal microscope settings, one FNTD irradiated with 11.1 MeV/u Gold ions and one irradiated with 428.77 MeV/u Carbon ions. The first sample provided a brightly luminescent central track while the latter is used to test the capabilities to observe secondary electrons. MCS were performed using TOPAS beta9 version, layered on top of Geant4.9.6p02. Two sets of simulations were performed, one with the Geant4-DNA physics list and approximating the FNTDs by water, a second set using the Penelope physics list in a water-approximated FNTD and a aluminum-oxide FNTD. Results: Within the first half of the funding period, we have successfully established readout capabilities of FNTDs at our institute. Due to technical limitations, our microscope setup is significantly different from the approach implemented at the DKFZ, Germany. However, we can clearly reconstruct Carbon tracks in 3D with electron track resolution of 200 nm. A second microscope with superior readout capabilities will be tested in the second half of the funding period, we expect an improvement in signal to background ratio with the same the resolution.We have successfully simulated tracks in FNTDs. The more accurate Geant4-DNA track simulations can be used to reconstruct the track energy from the size and brightness of the observed tracks. Conclusion: We have achieved the goals set in the seed funding proposal: the setup of FNTD readout and simulation capabilities. We will work on improving the readout resolution to validate our MCS track structures down to the nanometer scales.

  4. Visiting People on a Dairy Farm [and] Visiting People on a Dairy Farm: Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Agriculture, Washington, DC. Office of Governmental and Public Affairs.

    These booklets are designed to present an elementary-level unit that describes a visit to a dairy farm. In a narrative format with many black and white photographs, the student booklet explains some typical activities, such as milking and haying, on the Schwartzbeck dairy farm in Maryland. The booklet is divided into seven parts, each of which can…

  5. Atrazine dissipation and its impact on the microbial communities and community level physiological profiles in a microcosm simulating the biomixture of on-farm biopurification system.

    PubMed

    Tortella, G R; Mella-Herrera, R A; Sousa, D Z; Rubilar, O; Acuña, J J; Briceño, G; Diez, M C

    2013-09-15

    The effects of repeated atrazine application (40 mg a.i.kg(-1)) on its degradation, microbial communities and enzyme activities were studied in a peat based biomixture composed by straw, soil and peat in the volumetric proportions of 2:1:1 that can be used in on-farm biopurification system. Atrazine removal efficiency was high (96%, 78% and 96%) after each atrazine application and did not show a lag phase. Microbial enzyme activities were reduced significantly with atrazine application but rapidly recovered. Microbial diversity obtained by BiologEcoplate was similar after the first and second atrazine application. However, an inhibitory effect was observed after the third application. After each atrazine application, culturable fungi were reduced, but rapidly recovered without significant changes in culturable bacteria and actinomycetes compared to the control. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) patterns demonstrated that microbial community structure remained relatively stable in time when compared to the controls. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that after successive ATZ applications, the peat based biomixture had a good degradation capacity. Moreover, microbiological assays demonstrated the robustness of the peat based biomixture from a microbiological point of view to support pesticide degradation.

  6. Effect of farm and simulated laboratory cold environmental conditions on the performance and physiological responses of lactating dairy cows supplemented with bovine somatotropin (BST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, B. A.; Johnson, H. D.; Li, R.; Collier, R. J.

    1990-09-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the effect of bovine somatotropin (BST) supplementation in twelve lactating dairy cows maintained in cold environmental conditions. Six cows were injected daily with 25 mg of BST; the other six were injected with a control vehicle. Cows were maintained under standard dairy management during mid-winter for 30 days. Milk production was recorded twice daily, and blood samples were taken weekly. Animals were then transferred to environmentally controlled chambers and exposed to cycling thermoneutral (15° to 20° C) and cycling cold (-5° to +5° C) temperatures for 10 days in a split-reversal design. Milk production, feed and water intake, body weights and rectal temperatures were monitored. Blood samples were taken on days 1, 3, 5, 8 and 10 of each period and analyzed for plasma triiodothyronine (T3), thyroxine (T4), cortisol, insulin and prolactin. Under farm conditions, BST-treated cows produced 11% more milk than control-treated cows and in environmentally controlled chambers produced 17.4% more milk. No differences due to BST in feed or water intake, body weights or rectal temperatures were found under laboratory conditions. Plasma T3 and insulin increased due to BST treatment while no effect was found on cortisol, prolactin or T4. The results showed that the benefits of BST supplementation in lactating dairy cows were achieved under cold environmental conditions.

  7. How fast is Arctic climate really changing? An insight from recent past, present day and near future coupled model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenigk, Torben; Brodeau, Laurent

    2016-04-01

    Three quasi-equilibrium simulations using constant greenhouse gas forcing corresponding to years 2000, 2015 and 2030 have been performed with the global coupled model EC-Earth in order to analyze recent past and possible near future changes in the Arctic climate. The model simulations indicate an accelerated warming and ice extent reduction in the Arctic in near future conditions compared to the recent past. Both Arctic warming and sea ice reduction are closely linked to the increase of ocean heat transport into the Arctic, particularly through the Barents Sea Opening. Decadal variations of Arctic sea ice extent and ice volume are of the same order of magnitude as the observed ice extent reductions in the last 30 years and are dominated by the variability of the ocean heat transports through the Barents Sea Opening and the Bering Strait. Despite a general warming of mid and high northern latitudes, a substantial cooling is found in the subpolar gyre of the North Atlantic in the near future simulation. This cooling is related to a strong reduction in the AMOC, which is mainly caused by reduced deep water formation in the Labrador Sea. The observed trend towards a more negative phase of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and the observed linkage between autumn Arctic ice variations and NAO are reproduced in our model simulations for selected 30-year periods but are not robust over longer time periods. This indicates that the observed linkages between ice and NAO might not be robust in reality either, and that the observational time period is still too short to reliably separate the trend from the natural variability.

  8. Climate Model Simulation of Present and Future Extreme Events in Latin America and the Caribbean: What Spatial Resolution is Required?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, C. M.; Oglesby, R. J.; Mawalagedara, R.; Mohammad Abadi Kamarei, A.

    2015-12-01

    Latin America and the Caribbean are at risk of extreme climate events, including flooding rains, damaging winds, drought, heat waves, and in high elevation mountainous regions, excessive snowfalls. The causes of these events are numerous - flooding rains and damaging winds are often associated with tropical cyclones, but also can occur, either separately or in tandem, due to smaller, more localized storms. Similarly, heat waves and droughts can be large scale or localized, and frequently occur together (as excessive drying can lead to enhanced heating, while enhanced heating in turn promotes additional drying). Even in the tropics, extreme snow and ice events can have severe consequences due to avalanches, and also impact water resources. Understanding and modeling the climate controls behind these extreme events requires consideration of a range of time and space scales. A common strategy is to use a global climate model (GCM) to simulate the large-scale (~100km) daily atmospheric controls on extreme events. A limited area, high resolution regional climate model (RCM) is then employed to dynamically downscale the results, so as to better incorporate the influence of topography and, secondarily, the nature of the land cover. But what resolution is required to provide the necessary results, i.e., minimize biases due to improper resolution? In conjunction with our partners from participating Latin American and Caribbean nations, we have made an extensive series of simulations, both region-wide and for individual countries, using the WRF regional climate model to downscale output from a variety of GCMs, as well as Reanalyses (as a proxy for observations). The simulations driven by the Reanalyses are used for robust model verification against actual weather station observations. The simulations driven by GCMs are designed to provide projections of future climate, including importantly how the nature and number of extreme events may change through coming decades. Our

  9. Impact of model developments on present and future simulations of permafrost in a global land-surface model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadburn, S. E.; Burke, E. J.; Essery, R. L. H.; Boike, J.; Langer, M.; Heikenfeld, M.; Cox, P. M.; Friedlingstein, P.

    2015-08-01

    There is a large amount of organic carbon stored in permafrost in the northern high latitudes, which may become vulnerable to microbial decomposition under future climate warming. In order to estimate this potential carbon-climate feedback it is necessary to correctly simulate the physical dynamics of permafrost within global Earth system models (ESMs) and to determine the rate at which it will thaw. Additional new processes within JULES, the land-surface scheme of the UK ESM (UKESM), include a representation of organic soils, moss and bedrock and a modification to the snow scheme; the sensitivity of permafrost to these new developments is investigated in this study. The impact of a higher vertical soil resolution and deeper soil column is also considered. Evaluation against a large group of sites shows the annual cycle of soil temperatures is approximately 25 % too large in the standard JULES version, but this error is corrected by the model improvements, in particular by deeper soil, organic soils, moss and the modified snow scheme. A comparison with active layer monitoring sites shows that the active layer is on average just over 1 m too deep in the standard model version, and this bias is reduced by 70 cm in the improved version. Increasing the soil vertical resolution allows the full range of active layer depths to be simulated; by contrast, with a poorly resolved soil at least 50 % of the permafrost area has a maximum thaw depth at the centre of the bottom soil layer. Thus all the model modifications are seen to improve the permafrost simulations. Historical permafrost area corresponds fairly well to observations in all simulations, covering an area between 14 and 19 million km2. Simulations under two future climate scenarios show a reduced sensitivity of permafrost degradation to temperature, with the near-surface permafrost loss per degree of warming reduced from 1.5 million km2 °C-1 in the standard version of JULES to between 1.1 and 1.2 million km2 °C-1

  10. Impact of model developments on present and future simulations of permafrost in a global land-surface model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadburn, S. E.; Burke, E. J.; Essery, R. L. H.; Boike, J.; Langer, M.; Heikenfeld, M.; Cox, P. M.; Friedlingstein, P.

    2015-03-01

    There is a large amount of organic carbon stored in permafrost in the northern high latitudes, which may become vulnerable to microbial decomposition under future climate warming. In order to estimate this potential carbon-climate feedback it is necessary to correctly simulate the physical dynamics of permafrost within global Earth System Models (ESMs) and to determine the rate at which it will thaw. Additional new processes within JULES, the land surface scheme of the UK ESM (UKESM), include a representation of organic soils, moss and bedrock, and a modification to the snow scheme. The impact of a higher vertical soil resolution and deeper soil column is also considered. Evaluation against a large group of sites shows the annual cycle of soil temperatures is approximately 25 % too large in the standard JULES version, but this error is corrected by the model improvements, in particular by deeper soil, organic soils, moss and the modified snow scheme. Comparing with active layer monitoring sites shows that the active layer is on average just over 1 m too deep in the standard model version, and this bias is reduced by 70 cm in the improved version. Increasing the soil vertical resolution allows the full range of active layer depths to be simulated, where by contrast with a poorly resolved soil, at least 50% of the permafrost area has a maximum thaw depth at the centre of the bottom soil layer. Thus all the model modifications are seen to improve the permafrost simulations. Historical permafrost area corresponds fairly well to observations in all simulations, covering an area between 14-19 million km2. Simulations under two future climate scenarios show a reduced sensitivity of permafrost degradation to temperature, with the near-surface permafrost lost per degree of warming reduced from 1.5 million km2 °C-1 in the standard version of JULES to between 1.1 and 1.2 million km2 °C-1 in the new model version. However, the near-surface permafrost area is still projected

  11. Effect of no-till farming on soil water intake

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rainfall simulation and ponded infiltrometer methods were used to investigate the infiltration characteristics of no-till vs. conventional tillage farms. Seven pairs of no-till and conventional till farms under a corn-soybean rotation were selected on soils ranging from sandy loam to silty clay loam...

  12. Stability Augmentation of Wind Farm using Variable Speed Permanent Magnet Synchronous Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosyadi, Marwan; Muyeen, S. M.; Takahashi, Rion; Tamura, Junji

    This paper presents a new control strategy of variable speed permanent magnet wind generator for stability augmentation of wind farm including fixed speed wind turbine with Induction Generator (IG). A new control scheme is developed for two levels back-to-back converters of Permanent Magnet Synchronous Generator (PMSG), by which both active and reactive powers delivered to the grid can be controlled easily. To avoid the converter damage, the DC link protection controller is also proposed in order to protect the dc link circuit during fault condition. To evaluate the control capability of the proposed controllers, simulations are performed on two model systems composed of wind farms connected to an infinite bus. From transient and steady state analyses by using PSCAD/EMTDC, it is concluded that the proposed control scheme is very effective to improve the stability of wind farm for severe network disturbance and randomly fluctuating wind speed.

  13. Evaluation of drag forcing models for vertical axis wind turbine farms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, Brian; Moin, Parviz; Dabiri, John

    2013-11-01

    Vertical axis wind turbines (VAWTs) have the potential to produce more power per unit area than horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWTs) in a wind farm setting (Kinzel et al. J. Turb. [2012]), but further understanding of the flow physics is required to design such farms. In this study we will model a large wind farm of VAWTs as an array of 100 circular cylinders which will allow a comparison with a laboratory experiment (Craig et al. DFD 2013). The geometric complexity and high Reynolds numbers necessitate phenomenological modeling of the interaction of the turbine with the fluid, which is done through point drag models similar to those found in canopy flow simulations (e.g. Dupont et al. J. Fluid Mech. [2010]). We will present a detailed study of the point drag model performance for flow over one cylinder, providing an evaluation of the model's fidelity as it relates to quantities of interest for the VAWT farm. Next we will present results for flow through the cylinder array, emphasizing validation of the model and insight into VAWT wind farm dynamics. We will also discuss the effect of wall modeling on the calculations, as the Reynolds number of the problem requires the application of wall modeling of the turbulent boundary layer above the ground to keep the cost manageable. Brian Pierce acknowledges support from the Stanford Graduate Fellowship.

  14. Biotechnology on the farm

    SciTech Connect

    Tangley, L.

    1986-10-01

    A new genetically engineered growth hormone promises to boost milk yields for dairy farms. Larger milk yields would worsen economic problems facing dairy farmers especially owners of small farms. The conflicts between new technologies and US agricultural policy are discussed here.

  15. Not Your Family Farm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tenopir, Carol; Baker, Gayle; Grogg, Jill E.

    2007-01-01

    The information industry continues to consolidate, just as agribusiness has consolidated and now dominates farming. Both the family farm and the small information company still exist but are becoming rarer in an age of mergers, acquisitions, and increased economies of scale. Small companies distinguish themselves by high quality, special themes,…

  16. Migrant Farm Workers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slesinger, Doris P.; Pfeffer, Max J.

    This paper documents migrant farm workers as being among the most persistently underprivileged groups in American society. Migrant farm workers typically receive low wages from irregular employment and live in poverty with access to only substandard housing and inadequate health care. The lack of economic improvement stems from a number of…

  17. Occupations and the Farm.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewert-Krocker, Laurie

    2001-01-01

    Describes "occupation" as a Montessori term, which the Hershey Montessori Farm School, in Huntsburg, Ohio, has adopted for any task arising from the needs of the farm that then generates a scientific or historic study. Includes lists of occupations pursued during 2000-2001 and samples of record forms students used to manage their work. (Author/KB)

  18. Occupational Hazards of Farming

    PubMed Central

    White, Gill; Cessna, Allan

    1989-01-01

    A number of occupational hazards exist for the farmer and farm worker. They include the hazards of farm machinery, biologic and chemical hazards, and social and environmental stresses. Recognizing of these hazards will help the family physician care for farmers and their families. PMID:21248929

  19. Site-Specific, Climate-Friendly Farming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, D. J.; Brooks, E. S.; Eitel, J.; Huggins, D. R.; Painter, K.; Rupp, R.; Smith, J. L.; Stockle, C.; Vierling, L. A.

    2011-12-01

    Of the four most important atmospheric greenhouse gasses (GHG) enriched through human activities, only nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions are due primarily to agriculture. However, reductions in the application of synthetic N fertilizers could have significant negative consequences for a growing world population given the crucial role that these fertilizers have played in cereal yield increases since WWII. Increasing N use efficiency (NUE) through precision management of agricultural N in space and time will therefore play a central role in the reduction of agricultural N2O emissions. Precision N management requires a greater understanding of the spatio-temporal variability of factors supporting N management decisions such as crop yield, water and N availability, utilization and losses. We present an overview of a large, collaborative, multi-disciplinary project designed to improve our basic understanding of nitrogen (N), carbon (C) and water (H2O) spatio-temporal dynamics for wheat-based cropping systems on complex landscapes, and develop management tools to optimize water- and nitrogen-use efficiency for these systems and landscapes. Major components of this project include: (a) cropping systems experiments addressing nitrogen application rate and seeding density for different landscape positions; (b) GHG flux experiments and monitoring; (c) soil microbial genetics and stable isotope analyses to elucidate biochemical pathways for N2O production; (d) proximal soil sensing for construction of detailed soil maps; (e) LiDAR and optical remote sensing for crop growth monitoring; (f) hydrologic experiments, monitoring, and modeling; (g) refining the CropSyst simulation model to estimate biophysical processes and GHG emissions under a variety of management and climatic scenarios; and (h) linking farm-scale enterprise budgets to simulation modeling in order to provide growers with economically viable site-specific climate-friendly farming guidance.

  20. Off-farm applications of solar energy in agriculture

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, R.E.

    1980-01-01

    Food processing applications make up almost all present off-farm studies of solar energy in agriculture. Research, development and demonstration projects on solar food processing have shown significant progress over the past 3 years. Projects have included computer simulation and mathematical models, hardware and process development for removing moisture from horticultural or animal products, integration of energy conservation with solar energy augmentation in conventional processes, and commercial scale demonstrations. The demonstration projects include solar heated air for drying prunes and raisins, soy beans and onions/garlic; and solar generated steam for orange juice pasteurization. Several new and planned projects hold considerable promise for commerical exploitation in future food processes.

  1. Overview Presentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lytle, John

    2001-01-01

    This report provides an overview presentation of the 2000 NPSS (Numerical Propulsion System Simulation) Review and Planning Meeting. Topics include: 1) a background of the program; 2) 1999 Industry Feedback; 3) FY00 Status, including resource distribution and major accomplishments; 4) FY01 Major Milestones; and 5) Future direction for the program. Specifically, simulation environment/production software and NPSS CORBA Security Development are discussed.

  2. Stochastic dynamic simulation modeling including multitrait genetics to estimate genetic, technical, and financial consequences of dairy farm reproduction and selection strategies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to develop a daily stochastic dynamic dairy simulation model which included multi-trait genetics, and to evaluate the effects of various reproduction and selection strategies on the genetic, technical and financial performance of a dairy herd. The 12 correlated geneti...

  3. Storing snow for the next winter: Two case studies on the application of snow farming.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grünewald, Thomas; Wolfsperger, Fabian

    2016-04-01

    Snow farming is the conservation of snow during the warm half-year. This means that large piles of snow are formed in spring in order to be conserved over the summer season. Well-insulating materials such as chipped wood are added as surface cover to reduce melting. The aim of snow farming is to provide a "snow guaranty" for autumn or early winter - this means that a specific amount of snow will definitively be available, independent of the weather conditions. The conserved snow can then be used as basis for the preparation of winter sports grounds such as cross-country tracks or ski runs. This helps in the organization of early winter season sport events such as World Cup races or to provide appropriate training conditions for athletes. We present a study on two snow farming projects, one in Davos (Switzerland) and one in the Martell valley of South Tyrol. At both places snow farming has been used for several years. For the summer season 2015, we monitored both snow piles in order to assess the amount of snow conserved. High resolution terrestrial laser scanning was performed to measure snow volumes of the piles at the beginning and at the end of the summer period. Results showed that only 20% to 30 % of the snow mass was lost due to ablation. This mass loss was surprisingly low considering the extremely warm and dry summer. In order to identify the most relevant drivers of snow melt we also present simulations with the sophisticated snow cover models SNOWPACK and Alpine3D. The simulations are driven by meteorological input data recorded in the vicinity of the piles and enable a detailed analysis of the relevant processes controlling the energy balance. The models can be applied to optimize settings for snow farming and to examine the suitability of new locations, configurations or cover material for future snow farming projects.

  4. The CDF Central Analysis Farm

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, T.H.; Neubauer, M.; Sfiligoi, I.; Weems, L.; Wurthwein, F.; /UC, San Diego

    2004-01-01

    With Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron well underway, many computing challenges inherent to analyzing large volumes of data produced in particle physics research need to be met. We present the computing model within CDF designed to address the physics needs of the collaboration. Particular emphasis is placed on current development of a large O(1000) processor PC cluster at Fermilab serving as the Central Analysis Farm for CDF. Future plans leading toward distributed computing and GRID within CDF are also discussed.

  5. The Development of a Virtual Farm for Applications in Elementary Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarng, Wernhuar; Chang, Mei-Yu; Ou, Kuo-Liang; Yu, Kein-Fu; Hsieh, Kuen-Rong

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study is to develop a virtual farm for educational applications. Users can play the role of a farmer by planting vegetables and raising poultry on the virtual farm to observe their growth through online learning activities. The virtual farm possesses educational and entertaining functions, and it is designed by simulating the real…

  6. White meat-Green farm: case study of Brinson Farms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Comprehensive on-farm resource utilization and renewable energy generation at the farm scale are not new concepts. However, truly encompassing implementation of these ideals is lacking. Brinson Farms operates 10 commercial broiler houses. The farm generates heat for its houses using biomass boile...

  7. People on the Farm: Corn and Hog Farming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Agriculture, Washington, DC. Office of Governmental and Public Affairs.

    This booklet provides information on corn and hog farming on a small farm through a profile of a farm family. According to the profile, John and Mary Miller and their three children are a comfortable family operating a corn and hog farm in Iowa. John, the principal farmer, uses a variety of skills in management, veterinary science, soil science,…

  8. On-farm biosecurity as perceived by professionals visiting Swedish farms

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background On-farm biosecurity is an important part of disease prevention and control, this applies to live animal contacts as well as indirect contacts e.g. via professionals visiting farms in their work. The objectives of this study were to investigate how professionals visiting animal farms in Sweden in their daily work perceive the on-farm conditions for biosecurity, the factors that influence their own biosecurity routines and what they describe as obstacles for biosecurity. Suggestions for improvements were also asked for. Questionnaires were distributed to professionals visiting farms in their daily work; veterinarians, livestock hauliers, artificial insemination technicians, animal welfare inspectors and cattle hoof trimmers. The sample was a convenience sample, based on accessibility to registers or collaboration with organisations distributing the questionnaire. Respondents were asked about the availability of certain biosecurity conditions related to farm visits, e.g. if facilities for hand washing were available, how important different factors were for their own routines and, through open ended questions, to describe obstacles and suggestions for improvement. Results After data cleaning, there were responses from 368 persons. There was a difference in the proportion of visited farms reported to have certain biosecurity measures in place related to animal species present on the farm. In general, visited pig farms had a higher proportion of biosecurity measures in place, whereas the conditions were poorer on sheep and goat farms and horse farms. There were also differences between the visitor categories; the perceived conditions for biosecurity varied between the groups, e.g. livestock hauliers did not have access to hand washing facilities as often as veterinarians did. In all groups, a majority of the respondents perceived obstacles for on-farm biosecurity, among veterinarians 66% perceived that there were obstacles. Many of the reported obstacles

  9. First comparison of LES of an offshore wind turbine wake with dual-Doppler lidar measurement in the offshore wind farm "alpha ventus"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmer, L.; Trabucchi, D.; Witha, B.; van Dooren, M.; Trujillo, J. J.; Schneemann, J.; Kühn, M.

    2014-12-01

    The planning of offshore wind farms is still tainted with high risks due to unknown power losses and a higher level of fatigue loads due to wake effects. Recently, Large Eddy Simulations (LES) are more and more used for simulating offshore wind turbine wakes as they resolve the atmospheric turbulence as well as the wake turbulence.However, for an application of LES wind fields to assess offshore wind farm flow a proper validation with measured data is necessary.Several methods have been investigated at the University of Oldenburg to compare LES wind fields and lidar measurements. In this study we apply one of these methods to validate wake simulations of a single wake of a 5MW wind turbine in the German offshore wind farm "alpha ventus" with processed dual-Doppler lidar measurements in the same wind farm.The simulations are performed with the LES model PALM, which has been enhanced by two different approaches of actuator models to simulate the wake of single wind turbines and the interaction of wakes in wind farms. Effects of tower and nacelle are regarded as well as simple turbine control mechanisms. The simulations are initialized with comparable atmospheric conditions as during the time of lidar operation by using measurements from the adjacent meteorological mast FINO 1.Plan Position Indicator (PPI) measurements have been performed with two long-range wind lidars installed at different opposing platforms at the border of the wind farm. A Cartesian grid was overlapped to the scanned region and a dual-Doppler algorithm was applied in order to estimate the horizontal stationary wind field on the grid nodes. To our knowledge, the presented study is one of the first validations of LES wake simulations with lidar measurements and first which validates offshore LES wake simulations with 2D lidar data.

  10. Subjective results of a simulator evaluation using synthetic terrain imagery presented on a helmet-mounted display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rate, Christopher R.; Probert, Andrew; Wright, David; Corwin, William H.; Royer, Rick

    1994-06-01

    Combat mission scenarios require pilots to maneuver their aircraft over and around various terrain features at high speeds and low altitudes day, night, or in adverse meteorological conditions. While current systems (e.g., Night Vision Goggles and FLIR) provide some support for the pilot, they are not adequate in many weather conditions. However, the effects of adverse weather can be overcome using the U. S. Defense Mapping Agency's digital terrain elevation database to create a synthetic terrain image (STI). The concept of synthetically derived terrain imagery, projected as background on a Helmet-Mounted Display, was investigated in regards to its utility for enhancing pilot terrain awareness. An initial study using four Lockheed pilots and six USAF pilots was conducted to determine subjective preference of STI formats. A follow-on study, using two preferred formats, evaluated STI in a full-mission simulation environment. Six F-16 pilots completed a half day of training and a one day evaluation. Data was collected on missions involving low level navigation, followed by a laser guided bomb loft or offset roll- in dive bomb attack. Thirteen missions per pilot were completed including bomb runs using LANTIRN without STI. All the runs were at night with either 'poor' or 'good' FLIR conditions over rough or moderately rolling terrain. The evaluation indicated that pilots found STI to be useful and offered real-time support for low level navigation. Some problems still exist (e.g., field of view of HMD), which will be investigated in future studies.

  11. A decision support tool for sustainable planning of urban water systems: presenting the Dynamic Urban Water Simulation Model.

    PubMed

    Willuweit, Lars; O'Sullivan, John J

    2013-12-15

    Population growth, urbanisation and climate change represent significant pressures on urban water resources, requiring water managers to consider a wider array of management options that account for economic, social and environmental factors. The Dynamic Urban Water Simulation Model (DUWSiM) developed in this study links urban water balance concepts with the land use dynamics model MOLAND and the climate model LARS-WG, providing a platform for long term planning of urban water supply and water demand by analysing the effects of urbanisation scenarios and climatic changes on the urban water cycle. Based on potential urbanisation scenarios and their effects on a city's water cycle, DUWSiM provides the functionality for assessing the feasibility of centralised and decentralised water supply and water demand management options based on forecasted water demand, stormwater and wastewater generation, whole life cost and energy and potential for water recycling. DUWSiM has been tested using data from Dublin, the capital of Ireland, and it has been shown that the model is able to satisfactorily predict water demand and stormwater runoff. PMID:24183560

  12. Opportunities and constraints of presently used thermal manikins for thermo-physiological simulation of the human body.

    PubMed

    Psikuta, Agnes; Kuklane, Kalev; Bogdan, Anna; Havenith, George; Annaheim, Simon; Rossi, René M

    2016-03-01

    Combining the strengths of an advanced mathematical model of human physiology and a thermal manikin is a new paradigm for simulating thermal behaviour of humans. However, the forerunners of such adaptive manikins showed some substantial limitations. This project aimed to determine the opportunities and constraints of the existing thermal manikins when dynamically controlled by a mathematical model of human thermal physiology. Four thermal manikins were selected and evaluated for their heat flux measurement uncertainty including lateral heat flows between manikin body parts and the response of each sector to the frequent change of the set-point temperature typical when using a physiological model for control. In general, all evaluated manikins are suitable for coupling with a physiological model with some recommendations for further improvement of manikin dynamic performance. The proposed methodology is useful to improve the performance of the adaptive manikins and help to provide a reliable and versatile tool for the broad research and development domain of clothing, automotive and building engineering.

  13. Opportunities and constraints of presently used thermal manikins for thermo-physiological simulation of the human body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Psikuta, Agnes; Kuklane, Kalev; Bogdan, Anna; Havenith, George; Annaheim, Simon; Rossi, René M.

    2016-03-01

    Combining the strengths of an advanced mathematical model of human physiology and a thermal manikin is a new paradigm for simulating thermal behaviour of humans. However, the forerunners of such adaptive manikins showed some substantial limitations. This project aimed to determine the opportunities and constraints of the existing thermal manikins when dynamically controlled by a mathematical model of human thermal physiology. Four thermal manikins were selected and evaluated for their heat flux measurement uncertainty including lateral heat flows between manikin body parts and the response of each sector to the frequent change of the set-point temperature typical when using a physiological model for control. In general, all evaluated manikins are suitable for coupling with a physiological model with some recommendations for further improvement of manikin dynamic performance. The proposed methodology is useful to improve the performance of the adaptive manikins and help to provide a reliable and versatile tool for the broad research and development domain of clothing, automotive and building engineering.

  14. A decision support tool for sustainable planning of urban water systems: presenting the Dynamic Urban Water Simulation Model.

    PubMed

    Willuweit, Lars; O'Sullivan, John J

    2013-12-15

    Population growth, urbanisation and climate change represent significant pressures on urban water resources, requiring water managers to consider a wider array of management options that account for economic, social and environmental factors. The Dynamic Urban Water Simulation Model (DUWSiM) developed in this study links urban water balance concepts with the land use dynamics model MOLAND and the climate model LARS-WG, providing a platform for long term planning of urban water supply and water demand by analysing the effects of urbanisation scenarios and climatic changes on the urban water cycle. Based on potential urbanisation scenarios and their effects on a city's water cycle, DUWSiM provides the functionality for assessing the feasibility of centralised and decentralised water supply and water demand management options based on forecasted water demand, stormwater and wastewater generation, whole life cost and energy and potential for water recycling. DUWSiM has been tested using data from Dublin, the capital of Ireland, and it has been shown that the model is able to satisfactorily predict water demand and stormwater runoff.

  15. Modeling of present-day atmosphere and ocean non-tidal de-aliasing errors for future gravity mission simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobslaw, Henryk; Bergmann-Wolf, Inga; Forootan, Ehsan; Dahle, Christoph; Mayer-Gürr, Torsten; Kusche, Jürgen; Flechtner, Frank

    2016-05-01

    A realistically perturbed synthetic de-aliasing model consistent with the updated Earth System Model of the European Space Agency is now available over the period 1995-2006. The dataset contains realizations of (1) errors at large spatial scales assessed individually for periods 10-30, 3-10, and 1-3 days, the S1 atmospheric tide, and sub-diurnal periods; (2) errors at small spatial scales typically not covered by global models of atmosphere and ocean variability; and (3) errors due to physical processes not represented in currently available de-aliasing products. The model is provided in two separate sets of Stokes coefficients to allow for a flexible re-scaling of the overall error level to account for potential future improvements in atmosphere and ocean mass variability models. Error magnitudes for the different frequency bands are derived from a small ensemble of four atmospheric and oceanic models. For the largest spatial scales up to d/o = 40 and periods longer than 24 h, those error estimates are approximately confirmed from a variance component estimation based on GRACE daily normal equations. Future mission performance simulations based on the updated Earth System Model and the realistically perturbed de-aliasing model indicate that for GRACE-type missions only moderate reductions of de-aliasing errors can be expected from a second satellite pair in a shifted polar orbit. Substantially more accurate global gravity fields are obtained when a second pair of satellites in an moderately inclined orbit is added, which largely stabilizes the global gravity field solutions due to its rotated sampling sensitivity.

  16. FY 2011 Second Quarter: Demonstration of New Aerosol Measurement Verification Testbed for Present-Day Global Aerosol Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, D

    2011-03-20

    The regional-scale Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model is being used by a DOE Earth System Modeling (ESM) project titled “Improving the Characterization of Clouds, Aerosols and the Cryosphere in Climate Models” to evaluate the performance of atmospheric process modules that treat aerosols and aerosol radiative forcing in the Arctic. We are using a regional-scale modeling framework for three reasons: (1) It is easier to produce a useful comparison to observations with a high resolution model; (2) We can compare the behavior of the CAM parameterization suite with some of the more complex and computationally expensive parameterizations used in WRF; (3) we can explore the behavior of this parameterization suite at high resolution. Climate models like the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) being used within the Community Earth System Model (CESM) will not likely be run at mesoscale spatial resolutions (10–20 km) until 5–10 years from now. The performance of the current suite of physics modules in CAM5 at such resolutions is not known, and current computing resources do not permit high-resolution global simulations to be performed routinely. We are taking advantage of two tools recently developed under PNNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) projects for this activity. The first is the Aerosol Modeling Testbed (Fast et al., 2011b), a new computational framework designed to streamline the process of testing and evaluating aerosol process modules over a range of spatial and temporal scales. The second is the CAM5 suite of physics parameterizations that have been ported into WRF so that their performance and scale dependency can be quantified at mesoscale spatial resolutions (Gustafson et al., 2010; with more publications in preparation).

  17. Numerical Simulations of the Evolution of the CO2 Atmosphere of Mars: 4.53 Ga to the Present

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manning, C. V.; McKay, C. P.; Zahnle, K. J.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we approach four key questions that are central to our understanding of the nature of climate change on Mars: 1. By what mechanism has the evolution of the CO2 atmosphere, dominated at early times by violent process, been guided to the moderate quantities present today? 2.How do obliquity cycles affect the migration of CO2 between the various reservoirs of CO2, and what effect does this have on the bulk atmosphere of the planet in time? 3. Is the geophysical evidence that the last few Myr experienced periods that are substantially wetter than the present attributable to a substantially more massive greenhouse atmosphere? 4. Is the current atmospheric pressure determined primarily by the partial pressure of CO2 in cold (approx. 148 K) ice caps, or is it because disequilibrium water, and hence weathering, ceases at pressures below the triple point of water?

  18. Farm accidents in children.

    PubMed

    Cogbill, T H; Busch, H M; Stiers, G R

    1985-10-01

    During a 6 1/2 year period, 105 children were admitted to the hospital as the result of trauma that occurred on farms. The mechanism of injury was animal related in 42 (40%), tractor or wagon accident in 28 (26%), farm machinery in 21 (20%), fall from farm building in six (6%), and miscellaneous in eight (8%). Injury Severity Score was calculated for each patient. An Injury Severity Score of greater than or equal to 25 was determined for 11 children (11%). Life-threatening injuries, therefore, are frequently the result of childhood activities that take place in agricultural environments. The most common injuries were orthopedic, neurologic, thoracoabdominal, and maxillofacial. There was one death in the series, and only one survivor sustained major long-term disability. Such injuries are managed with optimal outcome in a regional trauma center. Educational programs with an emphasis on prevention and safety measures may reduce the incidence of farm accidents. PMID:4047799

  19. Tifft Farm Nature Preserve.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benjamin, Thomas B.; Gannon, David J.

    1980-01-01

    Described are the creation, development, activities, and programs of Tifft Farm, a 264-acre nature preserve and environmental education center in Buffalo, New York, constructed on a sanitary landfill. (BT)

  20. Transient climate simulations of the deglaciation 21-9 thousand years before present; PMIP4 Core experiment design and boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanovic, Ruza; Gregoire, Lauren; Kageyama, Masa; Roche, Didier; Valdes, Paul; Burke, Andrea; Drummond, Rosemarie; Peltier, W. Richard; Tarasov, Lev

    2016-04-01

    The last deglaciation, which marked the transition between the last glacial and present interglacial periods, was punctuated by a series of rapid (centennial and decadal) climate changes. Numerical climate models are useful for investigating mechanisms that underpin the events, especially now that some of the complex models can be run for multiple millennia. We have set up a Paleoclimate Modelling Intercomparison Project (PMIP) working group to coordinate efforts to run transient simulations of the last deglaciation, and to facilitate the dissemination of expertise between modellers and those engaged with reconstructing the climate of the last 21 thousand years. Here, we present the design of a coordinated Core simulation over the period 21-9 thousand years before present (ka) with time varying orbital forcing, greenhouse gases, ice sheets, and other geographical changes. A choice of two ice sheet reconstructions is given. Additional focussed simulations will also be coordinated on an ad-hoc basis by the working group, for example to investigate the effect of ice sheet and iceberg meltwater, and the uncertainty in other forcings. Some of these focussed simulations will concentrate on shorter durations around specific events to allow the more computationally expensive models to take part. Ivanovic, R. F., Gregoire, L. J., Kageyama, M., Roche, D. M., Valdes, P. J., Burke, A., Drummond, R., Peltier, W. R., and Tarasov, L.: Transient climate simulations of the deglaciation 21-9 thousand years before present; PMIP4 Core experiment design and boundary conditions, Geosci. Model Dev. Discuss., 8, 9045-9102, doi:10.5194/gmdd-8-9045-2015, 2015.

  1. Rainfall simulation experiments and Water Drop Penetration Time measurements shed light on the impact of water repellency on soils under organic farming management in Eastern Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerdà, Artemi; González, Óscar; León, Javier; Jordán, Antonio

    2015-04-01

    Water repellency is a well-know soil property since the research of professor Stefan Helmut Doerr recovered and powered the research developed by professor DeBano (Atanassova and Doerr, 2011; ; Jordán et al., 2011; Bodí et al., 2012; González Peñaloza et al., 2012 Bodí et al., 2013; García Moreno et al., 2013; Jordán et al., 2013; Badía-Villas et al., 2014; Jordán et al., 2013; Jiménez Morillo et al., 2015). However, little is known about the impact of water repellency in surface runoff generation, although usually is accepted that when more soil water repellent is a soil, higher will be the surface runoff discharge (Stoff et al., 2011; Madsen et al., 2011; León et al., 2013; Lozano et al., 2013; Mataix-Solera et al., 2013; Santos et al., 2015). And the impact of the water repellency and then the higher surface wash discharge can trigger high erosion rates (Kröpfl et al., 2013; Mandal and Sharda 2013; Zhao et al., 2013). However these relationships were not demonstrated as the most water repellent soils are the one with high organic contents, and those soils do not have soil losses, probably due to the high infiltration rates due to the macropore flow. Rainfall simulation experiments can shed light in the runoff generation mechanism as they can control the rainfall intensity (Bodí et al., 2012; Iserloh et al., 2012; Iserloh et al., 2013), and inform about the main mechanism of the soil erosion process Cerdà and Jurgensen, 2011; Daugherty et al., 2011; Podwojewski et al., 2011; Dunkerley, 2012; Garel et al., 2012; Jouquet et al., 2012; Kibet et al., 2013; Butzen et al., 2014; Ma et al., 2014; Martínez Murillo et al., 2013). To determine the relationship between surface runoff generated under simulated rainfall (Cerdà, 1988a; 1988b; Cerdà et al., 1998; Ziadat and Taimeh, 2013) with a small rainfall simulator (0.25 m2) and water repellency measurements with the Water Drop Penetration time methods were done (Bodí et al., 2012). The results show that

  2. Quantitative Study of the Present-Day Climate of the Middle Tennessee Elk Watershed Area From Global and Regional Climate Model Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kebede, G.

    2015-12-01

    As part of a wider hydro climatic modeling research, we studied the spatial and temporal variability of precipitation and temperature over the Middle Tennessee Elk watershed and its environs using regional climate model simulations over the past 30 years. Three sets of simulations with the Hadley Center's regional climate model (PRECIS) were carried out for the present day climate (1980-2010) at a resolution of 25km covering the southeastern U.S. These three sets simulations are driven by lateral boundary conditions taken from ERA-Interim reanalysis, and two global climate models (HadCM3 and ECHAM5) respectively. For validation, high resolution observed daily data sets from North American Land-Data Assimilation System (NLDAS) and Climate Research Unit, CRU data are used. Preliminary results show that the spatial distribution of the present-day seasonal mean rainfall and temperature, simulated by PRECIS, are not only consistent with NLDAS and CRU but also captured fine scale spatial structures that are missing in the global model simulations due to their coarse resolution. In addition, the annual cycle and intera-anual variability, particularly that of temperature, are reasonably well reproduced by the PRECIS. When comparing the PRECIS simulations with the driving GCMs, PRECIS is sensitive to the choice of the driving GCM, suggesting a careful selection of driving GCM based on the current climate performance for the use of future climate impact assessment. Quantitative understanding of the climate system and better estimation of the fresh water balance over the Middle Tennessee Elk watershed is a vital corner stone for a sustainable economic growth of the region over the coming decades.

  3. Sustainability evaluation of different systems for sea cucumber ( Apostichopus japonicus) farming based on emergy theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guodong; Dong, Shuanglin; Tian, Xiangli; Gao, Qinfeng; Wang, Fang

    2015-06-01

    Emergy analysis is effective for analyzing ecological economic systems. However, the accuracy of the approach is affected by the diversity of economic level, meteorological and hydrological parameters in different regions. The present study evaluated the economic benefits, environmental impact, and sustainability of indoor, semi-intensive and extensive farming systems of sea cucumber ( Apostichopus japonicus) in the same region. The results showed that A. japonicus indoor farming system was high in input and output (yield) whereas pond extensive farming system was low in input and output. The output/input ratio of indoor farming system was lower than that of pond extensive farming system, and the output/input ratio of semi-intensive farming system fell in between them. The environmental loading ratio of A. japonicus extensive farming system was lower than that of indoor farming system. In addition, the emergy yield and emergy exchange ratios, and emergy sustainability and emergy indexes for sustainable development were higher in extensive farming system than those in indoor farming system. These results indicated that the current extensive farming system exerted fewer negative influences on the environment, made more efficient use of available resources, and met more sustainable development requirements than the indoor farming system. A. japonicus farming systems showed more emergy benefits than fish farming systems. The pond farming systems of A. japonicus exploited more free local environmental resources for production, caused less potential pressure on the local environment, and achieved higher sustainability than indoor farming system.

  4. Mucinous cystadenocarcinoma arising in an ectopic kidney simulating a retroperitoneal dermoid cyst: a rare tumour presenting as a diagnostic dilemma.

    PubMed

    Yadav, R; Kataria, K; Balasundaram, P; Karak, A K

    2013-06-01

    Primary mucinous cystic neoplasms are rare tumours of the kidney, with a very few case reports in the literature. They arise from metaplasia of renal pelvic urothelium. We describe here a 45-year-old male who presented with pain in the abdomen and a lump in the left iliac fossa for two months. Ultrasound and CT scan showed a large, complex, heterogenous mass in the central abdomen and left iliac fossa, suggesting the possibility of dermoid cyst. Excision of the mass showed an enlarged multicystic kidney filled with mucin, destruction of renal parenchyma and a small viable area of grey white tumour. Histopathology revealed a peripherally located mucinous cystadenocarcinoma arising in the background of chronic pyelonephritis and mucinous metaplasia. We report this case for the rarity of the lesion and the associated clinical and radiological diagnostic dilemma.

  5. Spatial distribution of precipitation annual cycles over South Africa in 10 CORDEX regional climate model present-day simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favre, Alice; Philippon, Nathalie; Pohl, Benjamin; Kalognomou, Evangelia-Anna; Lennard, Christopher; Hewitson, Bruce; Nikulin, Grigori; Dosio, Alessandro; Panitz, Hans-Juergen; Cerezo-Mota, Ruth

    2016-03-01

    This study presents an evaluation of the ability of 10 regional climate models (RCMs) participating in the COordinated Regional climate Downscaling Experiment-Africa to reproduce the present-day spatial distribution of annual cycles of precipitation over the South African region and its borders. As found in previous studies, annual mean precipitation is quasi-systematically overestimated by the RCMs over a large part of southern Africa south of about 20°S and more strongly over South Africa. The spatial analysis of precipitation over the studied region shows that in most models the distribution of biases appears to be linked to orography. Wet biases are quasi-systematic in regions with higher elevation with inversely neutral to dry biases particularly in the coastal fringes. This spatial pattern of biases is particularly obvious during summer and specifically at the beginning of the rainy season (November and December) when the wet biases are found to be the strongest across all models. Applying a k-means algorithm, a classification of annual cycles is performed using observed precipitation data, and is compared with those derived from modeled data. It is found that the in-homogeneity of the spatial and temporal distribution of biases tends to impact the modeled seasonality of precipitation. Generally, the pattern of rainfall seasonality in the ensemble mean of the 10 RCMs tends to be shifted to the southwest. This spatial shift is mainly linked to a strong overestimation of convective precipitation at the beginning of the rainy season over the plateau inducing an early annual peak and to an underestimation of stratiform rainfall in winter and spring over southwestern South Africa.

  6. Long Term Manipulations of Intact Microbial Mat Communities in a Greenhouse Collaboratory: Simulating Earth's Present and Past Field Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bebout, Brad; DesMarais, David J.; Discipulo, Mykell; Embaye, Tsegereda; Garcia-Pichel, Ferran; Hogan, Mary; Jahnke, Linda L.; Keller, Richard M.; Miller, Scott R.; Prufert-Bebout, Leslie E.; Fonda, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Photosynthetic microbial mat communities were obtained from marine hypersaline saltern ponds, maintained in a greenhouse facility, and examined for the effects of salinity variations. Because these microbial mats are considered to be useful analogs of equivalent ancient marine communities, they offer insights about evolutionary events during the greater than 3 billion year time interval wherein mats co-evolved with Earth's geosphere and atmosphere. Although photosynthetic mats can be highly dynamic and exhibit extremely high activity, the mats in the present study have been maintained for more than one year with relatively minor changes. The major groups of microorganisms, as assayed using microscopic, genetic, and biomarker methodologies, are essentially the same as those in the original field samples. Field and greenhouse mats were similar with respect to rates of exchange of oxygen and dissolved inorganic carbon across the mat-water interface, both during the day and at night. Field and greenhouse mats exhibited similar rates of efflux of methane and hydrogen. Manipulations of salinity in the water overlying the mats produced changes in the community that strongly resemble those observed in the field. A collaboratory testbed and an array of automated features are being developed to support remote scientific experimentation with the assistance of intelligent software agents. This facility will permit teams of investigators to explore ancient environmental conditions that are rare or absent today but might have influenced the early evolution of these photosynthetic ecosystems.

  7. Certified safe farm: identifying and removing hazards on the farm.

    PubMed

    Rautiainen, R H; Grafft, L J; Kline, A K; Madsen, M D; Lange, J L; Donham, K J

    2010-04-01

    This article describes the development of the Certified Safe Farm (CSF) on-farm safety review tools, characterizes the safety improvements among participating farms during the study period, and evaluates differences in background variables between low and high scoring farms. Average farm review scores on 185 study farms improved from 82 to 96 during the five-year study (0-100 scale, 85 required for CSF certification). A total of 1292 safety improvements were reported at an estimated cost of $650 per farm. A wide range of improvements were made, including adding 9 rollover protective structures (ROPS), 59 power take-off (PTO) master shields, and 207 slow-moving vehicle (SMV) emblems; improving lighting on 72 machines: placing 171 warning decals on machinery; shielding 77 moving parts; locking up 17 chemical storage areas, adding 83 lockout/tagout improvements; and making general housekeeping upgrades in 62 farm buildings. The local, trained farm reviewers and the CSF review process overall were well received by participating farmers. In addition to our earlier findings where higher farm review scores were associated with lower self-reported health outcome costs, we found that those with higher farm work hours, younger age, pork production in confinement, beef production, poultry production, and reported exposure to agrichemicals had higher farm review scores than those who did not have these characteristics. Overall, the farm review process functioned as expected. encouraging physical improvements in the farm environment, and contributing to the multi-faceted CSF intervention program.

  8. Certified safe farm: identifying and removing hazards on the farm.

    PubMed

    Rautiainen, R H; Grafft, L J; Kline, A K; Madsen, M D; Lange, J L; Donham, K J

    2010-04-01

    This article describes the development of the Certified Safe Farm (CSF) on-farm safety review tools, characterizes the safety improvements among participating farms during the study period, and evaluates differences in background variables between low and high scoring farms. Average farm review scores on 185 study farms improved from 82 to 96 during the five-year study (0-100 scale, 85 required for CSF certification). A total of 1292 safety improvements were reported at an estimated cost of $650 per farm. A wide range of improvements were made, including adding 9 rollover protective structures (ROPS), 59 power take-off (PTO) master shields, and 207 slow-moving vehicle (SMV) emblems; improving lighting on 72 machines: placing 171 warning decals on machinery; shielding 77 moving parts; locking up 17 chemical storage areas, adding 83 lockout/tagout improvements; and making general housekeeping upgrades in 62 farm buildings. The local, trained farm reviewers and the CSF review process overall were well received by participating farmers. In addition to our earlier findings where higher farm review scores were associated with lower self-reported health outcome costs, we found that those with higher farm work hours, younger age, pork production in confinement, beef production, poultry production, and reported exposure to agrichemicals had higher farm review scores than those who did not have these characteristics. Overall, the farm review process functioned as expected. encouraging physical improvements in the farm environment, and contributing to the multi-faceted CSF intervention program. PMID:20503809

  9. Rainfall simulation experiments and Water Drop Penetration Time measurements shed light on the impact of water repellency on soils under organic farming management in Eastern Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerdà, Artemi; González, Óscar; León, Javier; Jordán, Antonio

    2015-04-01

    Water repellency is a well-know soil property since the research of professor Stefan Helmut Doerr recovered and powered the research developed by professor DeBano (Atanassova and Doerr, 2011; ; Jordán et al., 2011; Bodí et al., 2012; González Peñaloza et al., 2012 Bodí et al., 2013; García Moreno et al., 2013; Jordán et al., 2013; Badía-Villas et al., 2014; Jordán et al., 2013; Jiménez Morillo et al., 2015). However, little is known about the impact of water repellency in surface runoff generation, although usually is accepted that when more soil water repellent is a soil, higher will be the surface runoff discharge (Stoff et al., 2011; Madsen et al., 2011; León et al., 2013; Lozano et al., 2013; Mataix-Solera et al., 2013; Santos et al., 2015). And the impact of the water repellency and then the higher surface wash discharge can trigger high erosion rates (Kröpfl et al., 2013; Mandal and Sharda 2013; Zhao et al., 2013). However these relationships were not demonstrated as the most water repellent soils are the one with high organic contents, and those soils do not have soil losses, probably due to the high infiltration rates due to the macropore flow. Rainfall simulation experiments can shed light in the runoff generation mechanism as they can control the rainfall intensity (Bodí et al., 2012; Iserloh et al., 2012; Iserloh et al., 2013), and inform about the main mechanism of the soil erosion process Cerdà and Jurgensen, 2011; Daugherty et al., 2011; Podwojewski et al., 2011; Dunkerley, 2012; Garel et al., 2012; Jouquet et al., 2012; Kibet et al., 2013; Butzen et al., 2014; Ma et al., 2014; Martínez Murillo et al., 2013). To determine the relationship between surface runoff generated under simulated rainfall (Cerdà, 1988a; 1988b; Cerdà et al., 1998; Ziadat and Taimeh, 2013) with a small rainfall simulator (0.25 m2) and water repellency measurements with the Water Drop Penetration time methods were done (Bodí et al., 2012). The results show that

  10. Impact Assessment of Existing Vadose Zone Contamination at the Hanford Site SX Tank Farm

    SciTech Connect

    Khaleel, Raziuddin; White, Mark D.; Oostrom, Martinus; Wood, Marcus I.; Mann, Frederick M.; Kristofzski, John G.

    2007-11-01

    The USDOE has initiated an impact assessment of existing vadose zone contamination at the Hanford Site SX tank farm in southeastern Washington State. The assessment followed the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Corrective Action process to address the impacts of past tank waste releases to the vadose zone at the single-shell tank farm. Numerical models were developed that consider the extent of contamination presently within the vadose zone and predict contaminant movement through the vadose zone to groundwater. The transport of representative mobile (technetium-99) and immobile (cesium-137) constituents was evaluated in modeling. The model considered the accelerated movement of moisture around and beneath single-shell tanks that is attributed to bare, gravel surfaces resulting from the construction of the underground storage tanks. Infiltration, possibly nearing 100 mm yr–1, is further amplified in the tank farm because of the umbrella effect created by percolating moisture being diverted by the impermeable, sloping surface of the large, 24-m-diameter, buried tank domes. For both the base case (no-action alternative) simulation and a simulation that considered placement of an interim surface barrier to minimize infiltration, predicted groundwater concentrations for technetium-99 at the SX tank farm boundary were exceedingly high, on the order of 106 pCi L–1. The predicted concentrations are, however, somewhat conservative because of our use of two-dimensional modeling for a three-dimensional problem. A series of simulations were performed, using recharge rates of 50, 30, and 10 mm yr–1, and compared to the base case (100 mm yr–1) results. As expected, lowering meteoric recharge delayed peak arrival times and reduced peak concentrations at the tank farm boundary.

  11. IMPACT ASSESSMENT OF EXISTING VADOSE ZONE CONTAMINATION AT THE HANFORD SITE SX TANK FARM

    SciTech Connect

    KHALEEL R

    2007-11-01

    The USDOE has initiated an impact assessment of existing vadose zone contamination at the Hanford Site SX tank farm in southeastern Washington State. The assessment followed the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Corrective Action process to address the impacts of past tank waste releases to the vadose zone at the single-shell tank farm. Numerical models were developed that consider the extent of contamination presently within the vadose zone and predict contaminant movement through the vadose zone to groundwater. The transport of representative mobile (technetium-99) and immobile (cesium-137) constituents was evaluated in modeling. The model considered the accelerated movement of moisture around and beneath single-shell tanks that is attributed to bare, gravel surfaces resulting from the construction of the underground storage tanks. Infiltration, possibly nearing 100 mm yr{sup -1}, is further amplified in the tank farm because of the umbrella effect created by percolating moisture being diverted by the impermeable, sloping surface of the large, 24-m-diameter, buried tank domes. For both the base case (no-action alternative) simulation and a simulation that considered placement of an interim surface barrier to minimize infiltration, predicted, groundwater concentrations for technetium-99 at the SX tank farm boundary were exceedingly high, on the order of 10{sup 6} pCi L{sup -1}. The predicted concentrations are, however, somewhat conservative because of our use of two-dimensional modeling for a three-dimensional problem. A series of simulations were performed, using recharge rates of 50, 30, and 10 mm yr{sup -1}, and compared to the basecase(100 mm yr{sup -1}) results. As expected, lowering meteoric recharge delayed peak arrival times and reduced peak concentrations at the tank farm boundary.

  12. Transient climate simulations of the deglaciation 21-9 thousand years before present (version 1) - PMIP4 Core experiment design and boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanovic, Ruza F.; Gregoire, Lauren J.; Kageyama, Masa; Roche, Didier M.; Valdes, Paul J.; Burke, Andrea; Drummond, Rosemarie; Peltier, W. Richard; Tarasov, Lev

    2016-07-01

    The last deglaciation, which marked the transition between the last glacial and present interglacial periods, was punctuated by a series of rapid (centennial and decadal) climate changes. Numerical climate models are useful for investigating mechanisms that underpin the climate change events, especially now that some of the complex models can be run for multiple millennia. We have set up a Paleoclimate Modelling Intercomparison Project (PMIP) working group to coordinate efforts to run transient simulations of the last deglaciation, and to facilitate the dissemination of expertise between modellers and those engaged with reconstructing the climate of the last 21 000 years. Here, we present the design of a coordinated Core experiment over the period 21-9 thousand years before present (ka) with time-varying orbital forcing, greenhouse gases, ice sheets and other geographical changes. A choice of two ice sheet reconstructions is given, and we make recommendations for prescribing ice meltwater (or not) in the Core experiment. Additional focussed simulations will also be coordinated on an ad hoc basis by the working group, for example to investigate more thoroughly the effect of ice meltwater on climate system evolution, and to examine the uncertainty in other forcings. Some of these focussed simulations will target shorter durations around specific events in order to understand them in more detail and allow for the more computationally expensive models to take part.

  13. The influence of dynamic vegetation on the present-day simulation and future projections of the South Asian summer monsoon in the HadGEM2 family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, G. M.; Levine, R. C.

    2012-11-01

    Various studies have shown the importance of Earth System feedbacks in the climate system and the necessity of including these in models used for making climate change projections. The HadGEM2 family of Met Office Unified Model configurations combines model components which facilitate the representation of many different processes within the climate system, including atmosphere, ocean and sea ice, and Earth System components including the terrestrial and oceanic carbon cycle and tropospheric chemistry. We examine the climatology of the Asian summer monsoon in present-day simulations and in idealised climate change experiments. Members of the HadGEM2 family are used, with a common physical framework (one of which includes tropospheric chemistry and an interactive terrestrial and oceanic carbon cycle), to investigate whether such components affect the way in which the monsoon changes. We focus particularly on the role of interactive vegetation in the simulations from these model configurations. Using an atmosphere-only HadGEM2 configuration, we investigate how the changes in land cover which result from the interaction between the dynamic vegetation and the model systematic rainfall biases affect the Asian summer monsoon, both in the present-day and in future climate projections. We demonstrate that the response of the dynamic vegetation to biases in regional climate, such as lack of rainfall over tropical dust-producing regions, can affect both the present-day simulation and the response to climate change forcing scenarios.

  14. The influence of dynamic vegetation on the present-day simulation and future projections of the South Asian summer monsoon in the HadGEM2 family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, G. M.; Levine, R. C.

    2012-08-01

    Various studies have shown the importance of Earth System feedbacks in the climate system and the necessity of including these in models used for making climate change projections. The HadGEM2 family of Met Office Unified Model configurations combines model components which facilitate the representation of many different processes within the climate system, including atmosphere, ocean and sea ice, and Earth System components including the terrestrial and oceanic carbon cycle and tropospheric chemistry. We examine the climatology of the Asian summer monsoon in present-day simulations and in idealised climate change experiments in which a quadrupling of CO2 is applied as a step change. Members of the HadGEM2 family are used, with a common physical framework, one of which includes tropospheric chemistry and an interactive terrestrial and oceanic carbon cycle, to investigate whether such components affect the way in which the monsoon changes. We focus particularly on the role of interactive vegetation in the simulations from these model configurations. Using an atmosphere-only HadGEM2 configuration, we investigate how the changes in land cover which result from the interaction between the dynamic vegetation and the model systematic rainfall biases affect the Asian summer monsoon, both in the present-day and in future climate projections. We demonstrate that the response of the dynamic vegetation to biases in regional climate, such as lack of rainfall over tropical dust-producing regions, can affect both the present-day simulation and the response to climate change forcing scenarios.

  15. CPS and the Fermilab farms

    SciTech Connect

    Fausey, M.R.

    1992-06-01

    Cooperative Processes Software (CPS) is a parallel programming toolkit developed at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. It is the most recent product in an evolution of systems aimed at finding a cost-effective solution to the enormous computing requirements in experimental high energy physics. Parallel programs written with CPS are large-grained, which means that the parallelism occurs at the subroutine level, rather than at the traditional single line of code level. This fits the requirements of high energy physics applications, such as event reconstruction, or detector simulations, quite well. It also satisfies the requirements of applications in many other fields. One example is in the pharmaceutical industry. In the field of computational chemistry, the process of drug design may be accelerated with this approach. CPS programs run as a collection of processes distributed over many computers. CPS currently supports a mixture of heterogeneous UNIX-based workstations which communicate over networks with TCP/IR CPS is most suited for jobs with relatively low I/O requirements compared to CPU. The CPS toolkit supports message passing remote subroutine calls, process synchronization, bulk data transfers, and a mechanism called process queues, by which one process can find another which has reached a particular state. The CPS software supports both batch processing and computer center operations. The system is currently running in production mode on two farms of processors at Fermilab. One farm consists of approximately 90 IBM RS/6000 model 320 workstations, and the other has 85 Silicon Graphics 4D/35 workstations. This paper first briefly describes the history of parallel processing at Fermilab which lead to the development of CPS. Then the CPS software and the CPS Batch queueing system are described. Finally, the experiences of using CPS in production on the Fermilab processor farms are described.

  16. The Farm Process Version 2 (FMP2) for MODFLOW-2005 - Modifications and Upgrades to FMP1

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmid, Wolfgang; Hanson, R.T.

    2009-01-01

    The ability to dynamically simulate the integrated supply-and-demand components of irrigated agricultural is needed to thoroughly understand the interrelation between surface water and groundwater flow in areas where the water-use by vegetation is an important component of the water budget. To meet this need, the computer program Farm Process (FMP1) was updated and refined for use with the U.S. Geological Survey's MODFLOW-2005 groundwater-flow model, and is referred to as MF2005-FMP2. The updated program allows the simulation, analysis, and management of nearly all components of human and natural water use. MF2005-FMP2 represents a complete hydrologic model that fully links the movement and use of groundwater, surface water, and imported water for water consumption of irrigated agriculture, but also of urban use, and of natural vegetation. Supply and demand components of water use are analyzed under demand-driven and supply-constrained conditions. From large- to small-scale settings, the MF2005-FMP2 has the unique set of capabilities to simulate and analyze historical, present, and future conditions. MF2005-FMP2 facilitates the analysis of agricultural water use where little data is available for pumpage, land use, or agricultural information. The features presented in this new version of FMP2 along with the linkages to the Streamflow Routing (SFR), Multi-Node Well (MNW), and Unsaturated Zone Flow (UZF) Packages prevents mass loss to an open system and helps to account for 'all of the water everywhere and all of the time'. The first version, FMP1 for MODFLOW-2000, is limited to (a) transpiration uptake from unsaturated root zones, (b) on-farm efficiency defined solely by farm and not by crop type, (c) a simulation of water use and returnflows related only to irrigated agriculture and not also to non-irrigated vegetation, (d) a definition of consumptive use as potential crop evapotranspiration, (e) percolation being instantly recharged to the uppermost active

  17. Farming fit? Dispelling the Australian agrarian myth

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Rural Australians face a higher mental health and lifestyle disease burden (obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease) than their urban counterparts. Our ongoing research reveals that the Australian farming community has even poorer physical and mental health outcomes than rural averages. In particular, farm men and women have high rates of overweightness, obesity, abdominal adiposity, high blood pressure and psychological distress when compared against Australian averages. Within our farming cohort we observed a significant association between psychological distress and obesity, abdominal adiposity and body fat percentage in the farming population. Presentation of hypothesis This paper presents a hypothesis based on preliminary data obtained from an ongoing study that could potentially explain the complex correlation between obesity, psychological distress and physical activity among a farming population. We posit that spasmodic physical activity, changing farm practices and climate variability induce prolonged stress in farmers. This increases systemic cortisol that, in turn, promotes abdominal adiposity and weight gain. Testing the hypothesis The hypothesis will be tested by anthropometric, biochemical and psychological analysis matched against systemic cortisol levels and the physical activity of the subjects. Implications of the hypothesis tested Previous studies indicate that farming populations have elevated rates of psychological distress and high rates of suicide. Australian farmers have recently experienced challenging climatic conditions including prolonged drought, floods and cyclones. Through our interactions and through the media it is not uncommon for farmers to describe the effect of this long-term stress with feelings of 'defeat'. By gaining a greater understanding of the role cortisol and physical activity have on mental and physical health we may positively impact the current rates of psychological distress in farmers. Trial

  18. Long Island Solar Farm

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, R.

    2013-05-01

    The Long Island Solar Farm (LISF) is a remarkable success story, whereby very different interest groups found a way to capitalize on unusual circumstances to develop a mutually beneficial source of renewable energy. The uniqueness of the circumstances that were necessary to develop the Long Island Solar Farm make it very difficult to replicate. The project is, however, an unparalleled resource for solar energy research, which will greatly inform large-scale PV solar development in the East. Lastly, the LISF is a superb model for the process by which the project developed and the innovation and leadership shown by the different players.

  19. Farm Mapping to Assist, Protect, and Prepare Emergency Responders: Farm MAPPER.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Iris; Rollins, Tami; Mahnke, Andrea; Kadolph, Christopher; Minor, Gerald; Keifer, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Responders such as firefighters and emergency medical technicians who respond to farm emergencies often face complex and unknown environments. They may encounter hazards such as fuels, solvents, pesticides, caustics, and exploding gas storage cylinders. Responders may be unaware of dirt roads within the farm that can expedite their arrival at critical sites or snow-covered manure pits that act as hidden hazards. A response to a farm, unless guided by someone familiar with the operation, may present a risk to responders and post a challenge in locating the victim. This project explored the use of a Web-based farm-mapping application optimized for tablets and accessible via easily accessible on-site matrix barcodes, or quick response codes (QR codes), to provide emergency responders with hazard and resource information to agricultural operations. Secured portals were developed for both farmers and responders, allowing both parties to populate and customize farm maps with icons. Data were stored online and linked to QR codes attached to mailbox posts where emergency responders may read them with a mobile device. Mock responses were conducted on dairy farms to test QR code linking efficacy, Web site security, and field usability. Findings from farmer usability tests showed willingness to enter data as well as ease of Web site navigation and data entry even with farmers who had limited computer knowledge. Usability tests with emergency responders showed ease of QR code connectivity to the farm maps and ease of Web site navigation. Further research is needed to improve data security as well as assess the program's applicability to nonfarm environments and integration with existing emergency response systems. The next phases of this project will expand the program for regional and national use, develop QR code-linked, Web-based extrication guidance for farm machinery for victim entrapment rescue, and create QR code-linked online training videos and materials for limited

  20. Huntington II Simulation Program - TAG. Student Workbook, Teacher's Guide, and Resource Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedland, James

    Presented are instructions for the use of "TAG," a model for estimating animal population in a given area. The computer program asks the student to estimate the number of bass in a simulated farm pond using the technique of tagging and recovery. The objective of the simulation is to teach principles for estimating animal populations when they…

  1. Transient climate simulation from the Maunder Minimum to present day using prescribed changes in GHG, total/spectral solar irradiance and ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spangehl, Thomas; Cubasch, Ulrich; Schimanke, Semjon

    A fully coupled AO-GCM including representation of the middle atmosphere is used for tran-sient simulation of climate from 1630 to 2000 AD. For better representation of changes in the UV/visible part of the solar spectrum an improved short-wave radiation scheme is implemented. The model is driven by changes in GHG concentrations, solar activity and volcanic eruptions. Solar variability is introduced via changes in total/spectral solar irradiance (TSI/SSI) and pre-scribed changes in stratospheric ozone. The secular trend in TSI is in the range of 0.1 percent increase from Maunder Minimum to present-day. Volcanic eruptions are represented via abrupt reduction in TSI. With the applied forcings the model does not simulate a clear reduction of the annual Northern Hemisphere (NH) mean near surface temperature during Maunder Minimum. By contrast the Dalton Minimum is characterized by distinct cooling and there is a significant raise of NH mean near surface temperature until the end of the 20th century. Focusing on the North Atlantic/European region the winter mean near surface temperature change pat-tern from Late Maunder Minimum (1675-1715) to present-day (1960-1990) reveals maximum warming over north-eastern Europe and cooling over the western North Atlantic with maxi-mum cooling west of Greenland. These changes can partly be explained by a shift of the NAO towards a more positive phase. The simulated changes in tropospheric circulation are discussed with special emphasize on the role of the solar forcing. Besides the stratospheric solar forcing which may affect NAO variability via downward propagation of the solar signal from the strato-sphere to the troposphere the magnitude of the secular trend in TSI might play a role. For the period from Maunder Minimum to present-day the simulation shows less near surface temper-ature increase especially over arctic regions when compared to simulations performed with the same model including the standard radiation scheme but

  2. Evaluating expansion strategies for startup European Union dairy farm businesses.

    PubMed

    McDonald, R; Shalloo, L; Pierce, K M; Horan, B

    2013-06-01

    A stochastic whole-farm simulation model was used to examine alternative strategies for new entrant dairy farmers to grow and develop dairy farm businesses in the context of European Union (EU) milk quota abolition in 2015. Six alternative strategies were compared: remain static, natural growth expansion, waiting until after EU milk quota abolition to expand, a full-scale expansion strategy without milk quotas and not incurring super levy penalties, a full-scale expansion strategy with milk quotas and incurring super levy penalties, and once-a-day milking until EU milk quota abolition, followed by full-scale expansion. Each discrete whole farm investment strategy was evaluated over a 15-yr period (2013-2027) using multiple financial stability and risk indicators, including overall discounted farm business profitability, net worth change, return on investment, and financial risk. The results of this study indicate that, although associated with increased risk, dairy farm expansion will ensure the future profitability of the farm business. Within the context of EU milk quotas until 2015, the most attractive expansion strategy is to increase cow numbers while avoiding super levy fines using once-a-day milking techniques, increasing to the full capacity of the dairy farm once milk quotas are removed. In contrast, the results also indicate that dairy farms that remain static will experience a significant reduction in farm profitability in the coming year due to production cost inflation. Cash flow deficits were observed during the initial year of expansion and, therefore, rapidly expanding dairy farm businesses require a significant cash reserve to alleviate business risk during the initial year of expansion. The results of this analysis also indicate that dairy farm businesses that expand using lower cost capital investments and avoid milk quota super levy fines significantly reduce the financial risks associated with expansion.

  3. Optimization of wind farm performance using low-order models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabiri, John; Brownstein, Ian

    2015-11-01

    A low order model that captures the dominant flow behaviors in a vertical-axis wind turbine (VAWT) array is used to maximize the power output of wind farms utilizing VAWTs. The leaky Rankine body model (LRB) was shown by Araya et al. (JRSE 2014) to predict the ranking of individual turbine performances in an array to within measurement uncertainty as compared to field data collected from full-scale VAWTs. Further, this model is able to predict array performance with significantly less computational expense than higher fidelity numerical simulations of the flow, making it ideal for use in optimization of wind farm performance. This presentation will explore the ability of the LRB model to rank the relative power output of different wind turbine array configurations as well as the ranking of individual array performance over a variety of wind directions, using various complex configurations tested in the field and simpler configurations tested in a wind tunnel. Results will be presented in which the model is used to determine array fitness in an evolutionary algorithm seeking to find optimal array configurations given a number of turbines, area of available land, and site wind direction profile. Comparison with field measurements will be presented.

  4. Understanding the role of farm dams in the Murray-Darling Basin in Australia through hydrological analysis coupled with stakeholder interviews

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuil, Linda; Winnubst, Madelinde; van Dijk, Albert

    2013-04-01

    Climate predictions suggest that surface water availability in the Murray-Darling Basin (MDB) in Australia is more likely to decline than to increase in the next decades. In 2000, farm dams were first recognized as a significant risk to future flows in the MDB and have since been the subject of hydrological research. This study was conducted to provide insight into the role of farm dams in the Yass catchment, which is a subcatchment of the MDB close to Canberra, in order to indentify obstacles for integrated water management. The role of farm dams was investigated from both a hydrological and social perspective. Model prediction and data inference were used to estimate the impact of farm dams on streamflow. The density of farm dams in the catchment was estimated at 5.7 dams km-2. The impact on the Yass River was simulated to be in the order of 20 percent of mean annual streamflow. To understand why farm dams are used, semi-structured interviews were conducted to capture views and opinions of land holders. Research found that farm dams play a very important role in terms of individuals' water supply, although other systems are also used. Furthermore, land holders are responsible for their own water supply for drinking and agricultural water needs. Water rights are based on a right to rainfall or groundwater that is present on an individual's property. This means that landholders have both a need and a right to collect and store runoff. Current legislation put in place by the New South Wales government to restrict the amount of rain water to be captured does not seem to affect most people. If additional policy to minimize the impact of farm dams on streamflow were to be introduced, this has to be based on well-thought-out arguments based on a long term vision as the interview results indicate that farm dams are deeply embedded in Australian rural culture.

  5. Synthesized Population Databases: A Geospatial Database of US Poultry Farms

    PubMed Central

    Bruhn, Mark C.; Munoz, Breda; Cajka, James; Smith, Gary; Curry, Ross J.; Wagener, Diane K.; Wheaton, William D.

    2013-01-01

    The pervasive and potentially severe economic, social, and public health consequences of infectious disease in farmed animals require that plans be in place for a rapid response. Increasingly, agent-based models are being used to analyze the spread of animal-borne infectious disease outbreaks and derive policy alternatives to control future outbreaks. Although the locations, types, and sizes of animal farms are essential model inputs, no public domain nationwide geospatial database of actual farm locations and characteristics currently exists in the United States. This report describes a novel method to develop a synthetic dataset that replicates the spatial distribution of poultry farms, as well as the type and number of birds raised on them. It combines county-aggregated poultry farm counts, land use/land cover, transportation, business, and topographic data to generate locations in the conterminous United States where poultry farms are likely to be found. Simulation approaches used to evaluate the accuracy of this method when compared to that of a random placement alternative found this method to be superior. The results suggest the viability of adapting this method to simulate other livestock farms of interest to infectious disease researchers. PMID:25364787

  6. Hog Farms in Pennsylvania.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shannon, Patrick

    2003-01-01

    Discusses a community's opinion and reaction to corporate hog farms. Acknowledges the vivid demonstration of literacy in these communities. Considers how these citizens use their literacy as political agents--just like they were taught to do in civics classes in high school--to participate in decisions affecting their lives. Considers the…

  7. FARM LABOR MARKET DEVELOPMENT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Labor, Washington, DC.

    PART ONE OF THE REPORT CONSISTED OF AN ANALYSIS OF TRENDS BETWEEN 1960 AND 1961 IN WAGES OF UNITED STATES FARM WORKERS IN MAJOR AREAS USING MEXICAN NATIONALS. THE DATA WERE DERIVED FROM PREVAILING-WAGE REPORTS RECEIVED BY THE BUREAU OF EMPLOYMENT SECURITY FROM AFFILIATED STATE EMPLOYMENT SECURITY AGENCIES. THE SURVEY RATES WERE USED BY THE…

  8. Cryptosporidiois in farmed animals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The disease, cryptosporidiosis, has been identified in humans and animals in 106 countries and has been attributed to 26 species of Cryptosporidium and several additional genotypes. The specific farmed animals discussed in this chapter include cattle, sheep, goats, water buffaloes, deer, camels, lla...

  9. Farm Business Management, Volume II. Vocational Agricultural Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steward, Jim

    Designed to provide an advanced core of instruction in teaching farm business management, this curriculum guide for year 2 is intended for use as an adult program of instruction for a three-year period together with Farm Business Management I and III. (Volume I is available separately. See note.) The ten instructional units are presented in a…

  10. Content Priorities for Farm Mechanics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knotts, C. Don; Webb, Earl S.

    1974-01-01

    Fifty successful young Texas farmers evaluated agricultural mechanics skills (in the broad areas of farm power and machinery, farm shop, farm electricity, buildings and conveniences, and soil and water management) in terms of their importance. Teachers can use the findings to plan course content relevant to their students' needs. (AJ)

  11. Farm Education at Stony Kill.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parisio, Richard

    1986-01-01

    Describes typical winter farm lessons for students visiting Stony Kill Farm Environmental Education Center located 70 miles north of New York City: butter and corncake making, soil erosion experiments, dissecting and growing seeds. Emphasizes major theme of conservation of farmland from destructive farming practices and careless development. (NEC)

  12. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulation of the efficiency roll-off, emission color, and degradation of organic light-emitting diodes (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coehoorn, Reinder; van Eersel, Harm; Bobbert, Peter A.; Janssen, Rene A. J.

    2015-10-01

    The performance of Organic Light Emitting Diodes (OLEDs) is determined by a complex interplay of the charge transport and excitonic processes in the active layer stack. We have developed a three-dimensional kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) OLED simulation method which includes all these processes in an integral manner. The method employs a physically transparent mechanistic approach, and is based on measurable parameters. All processes can be followed with molecular-scale spatial resolution and with sub-nanosecond time resolution, for any layer structure and any mixture of materials. In the talk, applications to the efficiency roll-off, emission color and lifetime of white and monochrome phosphorescent OLEDs [1,2] are demonstrated, and a comparison with experimental results is given. The simulations show to which extent the triplet-polaron quenching (TPQ) and triplet-triplet-annihilation (TTA) contribute to the roll-off, and how the microscopic parameters describing these processes can be deduced properly from dedicated experiments. Degradation is treated as a result of the (accelerated) conversion of emitter molecules to non-emissive sites upon a triplet-polaron quenching (TPQ) process. The degradation rate, and hence the device lifetime, is shown to depend on the emitter concentration and on the precise type of TPQ process. Results for both single-doped and co-doped OLEDs are presented, revealing that the kMC simulations enable efficient simulation-assisted layer stack development. [1] H. van Eersel et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 105, 143303 (2014). [2] R. Coehoorn et al., Adv. Funct. Mater. (2015), publ. online (DOI: 10.1002/adfm.201402532)

  13. Characteristics of honey bee and non-Apis bee (Hymenoptera) farms in Canada.

    PubMed

    Daly, Z; Melhim, A; Weersink, A

    2012-08-01

    Here, we present a farm-level, Canada-wide analysis of Canadian bee farms in 2006; this article is the first report to distinguish between honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) farms and non-Apis bee (Hymenoptera) farms. Farms are characterized according to bee species, bee stocks, and whether the farm makes 50% or more of gross sales from bee-related activities. Farm characteristics, including bee stocks, gross sales, capital investments, land base, specialization, location, and operator demographics, are reported for the different farm types and sizes. Non-Apis bee farms are revealed to be a nontrivial part of the Canadian bee industry: 21.2% of Canadian bee farms have non-Apis bees and 16.6% have exclusively non-Apis bees. Important differences between honey bee farms and non-Apis bee farms also are found. These differences include the more land-intensive nature of non-Apis bee farms and the finding that non-Apis bee farms have greater diversity in terms of their primary commodity, even at higher bee stock levels.

  14. The profitability of automatic milking on Dutch dairy farms.

    PubMed

    Bijl, R; Kooistra, S R; Hogeveen, H

    2007-01-01

    Several studies have reported on the profitability of automatic milking based on different simulation models, but a data-based study using actual farm data has been lacking. The objective of this study was to analyze the profitability of dairy farms having an automatic milking system (AMS) compared with farms using a conventional milking system (CMS) based on real accounting data. In total, 62 farms (31 using an AMS and 31 using a CMS) were analyzed for the year 2003 in a case control study. Differences between the years 2002 and 2003 also were analyzed by comparing a subgroup of 16 farms with an AMS and 16 farms with a CMS. Matching was based on the time of investment in a milking system (same year), the total milk production per year, and intensity of land use (kg/ha). Results from 2003 showed that the farms with an AMS used, on average, 29% less labor than farms with a CMS. In contrast, farms using a CMS grew faster (37,132 kg of milk quota and 5 dairy cows) than farms with an AMS (-3,756 kg milk quota and 0.5 dairy cows) between 2002 and 2003. Dairy farmers with a CMS had larger (euro7,899) revenues than those with an AMS. However, no difference in the margin on dairy production was detected, partly because of numerically greater (euro6,822) variable costs on CMS farms. Dairy farms were compared financially based on the amount of money that was available for rent, depreciation, interest, labor, and profit (RDILP). The CMS farms had more money (euro15,566) available for RDILP than the AMS farms. This difference was caused by larger fixed costs (excluding labor) for the AMS farms, larger contractor costs (euro6,422), and larger costs for gas, water, and electricity (euro1,549). Differences in costs for contractors and for gas, water, and electricity were statistically significant. When expressed per full-time employee, AMS farms had greater revenues, margins, and gross margins per full-time employee than did CMS farms. This resulted in a substantially greater

  15. The profitability of automatic milking on Dutch dairy farms.

    PubMed

    Bijl, R; Kooistra, S R; Hogeveen, H

    2007-01-01

    Several studies have reported on the profitability of automatic milking based on different simulation models, but a data-based study using actual farm data has been lacking. The objective of this study was to analyze the profitability of dairy farms having an automatic milking system (AMS) compared with farms using a conventional milking system (CMS) based on real accounting data. In total, 62 farms (31 using an AMS and 31 using a CMS) were analyzed for the year 2003 in a case control study. Differences between the years 2002 and 2003 also were analyzed by comparing a subgroup of 16 farms with an AMS and 16 farms with a CMS. Matching was based on the time of investment in a milking system (same year), the total milk production per year, and intensity of land use (kg/ha). Results from 2003 showed that the farms with an AMS used, on average, 29% less labor than farms with a CMS. In contrast, farms using a CMS grew faster (37,132 kg of milk quota and 5 dairy cows) than farms with an AMS (-3,756 kg milk quota and 0.5 dairy cows) between 2002 and 2003. Dairy farmers with a CMS had larger (euro7,899) revenues than those with an AMS. However, no difference in the margin on dairy production was detected, partly because of numerically greater (euro6,822) variable costs on CMS farms. Dairy farms were compared financially based on the amount of money that was available for rent, depreciation, interest, labor, and profit (RDILP). The CMS farms had more money (euro15,566) available for RDILP than the AMS farms. This difference was caused by larger fixed costs (excluding labor) for the AMS farms, larger contractor costs (euro6,422), and larger costs for gas, water, and electricity (euro1,549). Differences in costs for contractors and for gas, water, and electricity were statistically significant. When expressed per full-time employee, AMS farms had greater revenues, margins, and gross margins per full-time employee than did CMS farms. This resulted in a substantially greater

  16. Present and future projections of habitat suitability of the Asian tiger mosquito, a vector of viral pathogens, from global climate simulation.

    PubMed

    Proestos, Y; Christophides, G K; Ergüler, K; Tanarhte, M; Waldock, J; Lelieveld, J

    2015-04-01

    Climate change can influence the transmission of vector-borne diseases (VBDs) through altering the habitat suitability of insect vectors. Here we present global climate model simulations and evaluate the associated uncertainties in view of the main meteorological factors that may affect the distribution of the Asian tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus), which can transmit pathogens that cause chikungunya, dengue fever, yellow fever and various encephalitides. Using a general circulation model at 50 km horizontal resolution to simulate mosquito survival variables including temperature, precipitation and relative humidity, we present both global and regional projections of the habitat suitability up to the middle of the twenty-first century. The model resolution of 50 km allows evaluation against previous projections for Europe and provides a basis for comparative analyses with other regions. Model uncertainties and performance are addressed in light of the recent CMIP5 ensemble climate model simulations for the RCP8.5 concentration pathway and using meteorological re-analysis data (ERA-Interim/ECMWF) for the recent past. Uncertainty ranges associated with the thresholds of meteorological variables that may affect the distribution of Ae. albopictus are diagnosed using fuzzy-logic methodology, notably to assess the influence of selected meteorological criteria and combinations of criteria that influence mosquito habitat suitability. From the climate projections for 2050, and adopting a habitat suitability index larger than 70%, we estimate that approximately 2.4 billion individuals in a land area of nearly 20 million km(2) will potentially be exposed to Ae. albopictus. The synthesis of fuzzy-logic based on mosquito biology and climate change analysis provides new insights into the regional and global spreading of VBDs to support disease control and policy making.

  17. Present and future projections of habitat suitability of the Asian tiger mosquito, a vector of viral pathogens, from global climate simulation

    PubMed Central

    Proestos, Y.; Christophides, G. K.; Ergüler, K.; Tanarhte, M.; Waldock, J.; Lelieveld, J.

    2015-01-01

    Climate change can influence the transmission of vector-borne diseases (VBDs) through altering the habitat suitability of insect vectors. Here we present global climate model simulations and evaluate the associated uncertainties in view of the main meteorological factors that may affect the distribution of the Asian tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus), which can transmit pathogens that cause chikungunya, dengue fever, yellow fever and various encephalitides. Using a general circulation model at 50 km horizontal resolution to simulate mosquito survival variables including temperature, precipitation and relative humidity, we present both global and regional projections of the habitat suitability up to the middle of the twenty-first century. The model resolution of 50 km allows evaluation against previous projections for Europe and provides a basis for comparative analyses with other regions. Model uncertainties and performance are addressed in light of the recent CMIP5 ensemble climate model simulations for the RCP8.5 concentration pathway and using meteorological re-analysis data (ERA-Interim/ECMWF) for the recent past. Uncertainty ranges associated with the thresholds of meteorological variables that may affect the distribution of Ae. albopictus are diagnosed using fuzzy-logic methodology, notably to assess the influence of selected meteorological criteria and combinations of criteria that influence mosquito habitat suitability. From the climate projections for 2050, and adopting a habitat suitability index larger than 70%, we estimate that approximately 2.4 billion individuals in a land area of nearly 20 million km2 will potentially be exposed to Ae. albopictus. The synthesis of fuzzy-logic based on mosquito biology and climate change analysis provides new insights into the regional and global spreading of VBDs to support disease control and policy making. PMID:25688015

  18. Present and future projections of habitat suitability of the Asian tiger mosquito, a vector of viral pathogens, from global climate simulation.

    PubMed

    Proestos, Y; Christophides, G K; Ergüler, K; Tanarhte, M; Waldock, J; Lelieveld, J

    2015-04-01

    Climate change can influence the transmission of vector-borne diseases (VBDs) through altering the habitat suitability of insect vectors. Here we present global climate model simulations and evaluate the associated uncertainties in view of the main meteorological factors that may affect the distribution of the Asian tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus), which can transmit pathogens that cause chikungunya, dengue fever, yellow fever and various encephalitides. Using a general circulation model at 50 km horizontal resolution to simulate mosquito survival variables including temperature, precipitation and relative humidity, we present both global and regional projections of the habitat suitability up to the middle of the twenty-first century. The model resolution of 50 km allows evaluation against previous projections for Europe and provides a basis for comparative analyses with other regions. Model uncertainties and performance are addressed in light of the recent CMIP5 ensemble climate model simulations for the RCP8.5 concentration pathway and using meteorological re-analysis data (ERA-Interim/ECMWF) for the recent past. Uncertainty ranges associated with the thresholds of meteorological variables that may affect the distribution of Ae. albopictus are diagnosed using fuzzy-logic methodology, notably to assess the influence of selected meteorological criteria and combinations of criteria that influence mosquito habitat suitability. From the climate projections for 2050, and adopting a habitat suitability index larger than 70%, we estimate that approximately 2.4 billion individuals in a land area of nearly 20 million km(2) will potentially be exposed to Ae. albopictus. The synthesis of fuzzy-logic based on mosquito biology and climate change analysis provides new insights into the regional and global spreading of VBDs to support disease control and policy making. PMID:25688015

  19. Present and Future Projections of Habitat Suitability of the Asian Tiger Mosquito, a Vector of Viral Pathogens, from Global Climate Simulations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proestos, Y.; Christophides, G.; Erguler, K.; Tanarhte, M.; Waldock, J.; Lelieveld, J.

    2014-12-01

    Climate change can influence the transmission of vector borne diseases (VBDs) through altering the habitat suitability of insect vectors. Here we present global climate model simulations and evaluate the associated uncertainties in view of the main meteorological factors that may affect the distribution of the Asian Tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus), which can transmit pathogens that cause Chikungunya, Dengue fever, yellow fever and various encephalitides. Using a general circulation model (GCM) at 50 km horizontal resolution to simulate mosquito survival variables including temperature, precipitation and relative humidity, we present both global and regional projections of the habitat suitability up to the middle of the 21st century. The model resolution of 50 km allows evaluation against previous projections for Europe and provides a basis for comparative analyses with other regions. Model uncertainties and performance are addressed in light of the recent CMIP5 ensemble climate model simulations for the RCP8.5 concentration pathway and using meteorological re-analysis data (ERA-Interim/ECMWF) for the recent past. Uncertainty ranges associated with the thresholds of meteorological variables that may affect the distribution of Ae. albopictus are diagnosed using fuzzy-logic methodology, notably to assess the influence of selected meteorological criteria and combinations of criteria that influence mosquito habitat suitability. From the climate projections for 2050, and adopting a habitat suitability index larger than 70%, we estimate that about 2.4 billion individuals in a land area of nearly 20 million square kilometres will potentially be exposed to Ae. albopictus. The synthesis of fuzzy-logic based on mosquito biology and climate change analysis provides new insights into the regional and global spreading of VBDs to support disease control and policy making.

  20. Computer Assisted Instruction for Training Farm Equipment Parts Personnel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nechville, Jerry

    1979-01-01

    Describes the training program for farm equipment over-the-counter parts sales which makes use of a parts inventory control simulation supported by a computerized inventory system to develop entry-level competencies. Discusses advantages of the program, such as (1) it is a realistic simulation, and (2) students receive immediate feedback. (LRA)

  1. LES studies of wind farms including wide turbine spacings and comparisons with the CWBL engineering model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Richard; Gayme, Dennice; Meyers, Johan; Meneveau, Charles

    2015-11-01

    We present results from large eddy simulations (LES) of wind farms consisting of tens to hundreds of turbines with respective streamwise and spanwise spacings approaching 35 and 12 turbine diameters. Even in staggered farms where the distance between consecutive turbines in the flow direction is more than 50 turbine diameters, we observe visible wake effects. In aligned farms, the performance of the turbines in the fully developed regime, where the power output as function of the downstream position becomes constant, is shown to primarily depend on the streamwise distance between consecutive turbine rows. However, for other layouts the power production in the fully developed regime mainly depends on the geometrical mean turbine spacing (inverse turbine density). These findings agree very well with predictions from our recently developed coupled wake boundary layer (CWBL) model, which introduces a two way coupling between the wake (Jensen) and top-down model approaches (Stevens et al. JRSE 7, 023115, 2015). To further validate the CWBL model we apply it to the problem of determining the optimal wind turbine thrust coefficient for power maximization over the entire farm. The CWBL model predictions agree very well with recent LES results (Goit & Meyers, JFM 768, 5-50, 2015). FOM Fellowships for Young Energy Scientists (YES!), NSF (IIA 1243482, the WINDINSPIRE project), ERC (FP7-Ideas, 306471).

  2. Effects of Turbine Spacing in Very Large Wind Farms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Søren Juhl; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Mikkelsen, Robert Flemming

    2015-11-01

    The Dynamic Wake Meandering model(DWM) by Larsen et al. (2007) is considered state of the art for modelling the wake behind a wind turbine. DWM assumes a quasi-steady wake deficit transported as a passive tracer by large atmospheric scales. The approach is also applied to wake interaction within wind farms, although certain aspects of the complex wake interaction are not captured, see Churchfield et al. (2014). Recent studies have shown how turbines introduce low frequencies in the wake, which could describe some of the shortcomings. Chamorro et al. (2015) identified three regions of different lengths scales. Iungo et al. (2013) related low frequencies to the hub vortex instability. Okulov et al. (2014) found Strouhal numbers in the far wake stemming from the rotating helical vortex core. Simulations by Andersen et al. (2013) found low frequencies to be inherent in the flow inside an infinite wind farm. LES simulations of large wind farms are performed with full aero-elastic Actuator Lines. The simulations investigate the inherent dynamics inside wind farms in the absence of atmospheric turbulence compared to cases with atmospheric turbulence. Resulting low frequency structures are inherent in wind farms for certain turbine spacings and affect both power production and loads. Funded by Danish Council for Strategic Research (grant 2104-09-067216/DSF), the Nordic Consortium on Optimization and Control of Wind Farms, and EuroTech wind project. The proprietary data for Vestas' NM80 turbine has been used.

  3. Regional variability of the frequency distribution of daily precipitation and the synoptic characteristics of heavy precipitation events in present and future climate simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeAngelis, Anthony M.

    Changes in the characteristics of daily precipitation in response to global warming may have serious impacts on human life and property. An analysis of precipitation in climate models is performed to evaluate how well the models simulate the present climate and how precipitation may change in the future. Models participating in phase 3 and 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP3 and CMIP5) have substantial biases in their simulation of heavy precipitation intensity over parts of North America during the 20th century. Despite these biases, the large-scale atmospheric circulation accompanying heavy precipitation is either simulated realistically or the strength of the circulation is overestimated. The biases are not related to the large-scale flow in a simple way, pointing toward the importance of other model deficiencies, such as coarse horizontal resolution and convective parameterizations, for the accurate simulation of intense precipitation. Although the models may not sufficiently simulate the intensity of precipitation, their realistic portrayal of the large-scale circulation suggests that projections of future precipitation may be reliable. In the CMIP5 ensemble, the distribution of daily precipitation is projected to undergo substantial changes in response to future atmospheric warming. The regional distribution of these changes was investigated, revealing that dry days and days with heavy-extreme precipitation are projected to increase at the expense of light-moderate precipitation over much of the middle and low latitudes. Such projections have serious implications for future impacts from flood and drought events. In other places, changes in the daily precipitation distribution are characterized by a shift toward either wetter or drier conditions in the future, with heavy-extreme precipitation projected to increase in all but the driest subtropical subsidence regions. Further analysis shows that increases in heavy precipitation in midlatitudes

  4. Carbon farming economics: What have we learned?

    PubMed

    Tang, Kai; Kragt, Marit E; Hailu, Atakelty; Ma, Chunbo

    2016-05-01

    This study reviewed 62 economic analyses published between 1995 and 2014 on the economic impacts of policies that incentivise agricultural greenhouse (GHG) mitigation. Typically, biophysical models are used to evaluate the changes in GHG mitigation that result from landholders changing their farm and land management practices. The estimated results of biophysical models are then integrated with economic models to simulate the costs of different policy scenarios to production systems. The cost estimates vary between $3 and $130/t CO2 equivalent in 2012 US dollars, depending on the mitigation strategies, spatial locations, and policy scenarios considered. Most studies assessed the consequences of a single, rather than multiple, mitigation strategies, and few considered the co-benefits of carbon farming. These omissions could challenge the reality and robustness of the studies' results. One of the biggest challenges facing agricultural economists is to assess the full extent of the trade-offs involved in carbon farming. We need to improve our biophysical knowledge about carbon farming co-benefits, predict the economic impacts of employing multiple strategies and policy incentives, and develop the associated integrated models, to estimate the full costs and benefits of agricultural GHG mitigation to farmers and the rest of society. PMID:26921565

  5. Carbon farming economics: What have we learned?

    PubMed

    Tang, Kai; Kragt, Marit E; Hailu, Atakelty; Ma, Chunbo

    2016-05-01

    This study reviewed 62 economic analyses published between 1995 and 2014 on the economic impacts of policies that incentivise agricultural greenhouse (GHG) mitigation. Typically, biophysical models are used to evaluate the changes in GHG mitigation that result from landholders changing their farm and land management practices. The estimated results of biophysical models are then integrated with economic models to simulate the costs of different policy scenarios to production systems. The cost estimates vary between $3 and $130/t CO2 equivalent in 2012 US dollars, depending on the mitigation strategies, spatial locations, and policy scenarios considered. Most studies assessed the consequences of a single, rather than multiple, mitigation strategies, and few considered the co-benefits of carbon farming. These omissions could challenge the reality and robustness of the studies' results. One of the biggest challenges facing agricultural economists is to assess the full extent of the trade-offs involved in carbon farming. We need to improve our biophysical knowledge about carbon farming co-benefits, predict the economic impacts of employing multiple strategies and policy incentives, and develop the associated integrated models, to estimate the full costs and benefits of agricultural GHG mitigation to farmers and the rest of society.

  6. Potential market of wind farm in China

    SciTech Connect

    Pengfei Shi

    1996-12-31

    Wind energy resources are abundant in China, in southeast coast area along with the rapid economic growth, electricity demand has been sharply increased, due to complex terrain detailed assessments are in urgent need. Advanced methodology and computer model should be developed. In this paper the existing wind farms, installed capacity, manufacturers share and projects in the near future are presented. For further development of wind farm in large scale, different ways of local manufacturing wind turbine generators (WTG) are going on. Current policy and barriers are analyzed. 4 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Is experience on a farm an effective approach to understanding animal products and the management of dairy farming?

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Mariko; Osada, Masahiro; Ishioka, Katsumi; Matsubara, Takako; Momota, Yutaka; Yumoto, Norio; Sako, Toshinori; Kamiya, Shinji; Yoshimura, Itaru

    2014-03-01

    The understanding of animal products and dairy farming is important for the promotion of dairy farming. Thus, to examine the effects of farm experience on the understanding of animal products and the management of dairy farming, the interaction between students and dairy cows was investigated in groups of first-year veterinary nursing students in 2011 and 2012 (n = 201). These students included 181 women and 20 men. Nine items about dairy cows were presented in a questionnaire. The survey was performed before and after praxis on the educational farm attached to the authors' university. After praxis on the farm, increases occurred in the number of positive responses to the items involving the price of milk, dairy farming and the taste of milk. For these items, a significant difference (P < 0.05) was found between the scores obtained before and after training. The results of the study suggested that farm experience is useful for improving the understanding of animal products and dairy farming.

  8. Farm level risk factors for fluoroquinolone resistance in E. coli and thermophilic Campylobacter spp. on poultry farms.

    PubMed

    Taylor, N M; Wales, A D; Ridley, A M; Davies, R H

    2016-10-01

    Data on husbandry practices, performance, disease and drug use were collected during a cross-sectional survey of 89 poultry meat farms in England and Wales to provide information on possible risk factors for the occurrence of fluoroquinolone (FQ)-resistant bacteria. Faeces samples were used to classify farms as "affected" or "not affected" by FQ-resistant (FQr) Escherichia coli or Campylobacter spp. Risk factor analysis identified the use of FQ on the farms as having by far the strongest association, among the factors considered, with the occurrence of FQr bacteria. Resistant E. coli and/or Campylobacter spp. were found on 86% of the farms with a history of FQ use. However, a substantial proportion of farms with no history of FQ use also yielded FQr organisms, suggesting that resistant bacteria may transfer between farms. Further analysis suggested that for Campylobacter spp., on-farm hygiene, cleaning and disinfection between batches of birds and wildlife control were of most significance. By contrast, for E. coli biosecurity from external contamination was of particular importance, although the modelling indicated that other factors were likely to be involved. Detailed studies on a small number of sites showed that FQr E. coli can survive routine cleaning and disinfection. It appears difficult to avoid the occurrence of resistant bacteria when FQ are used on a farm, but the present findings provide evidence to support recommendations to reduce the substantial risk of the incidental acquisition of such resistance by farms where FQ are not used. PMID:27171857

  9. Farm level risk factors for fluoroquinolone resistance in E. coli and thermophilic Campylobacter spp. on poultry farms.

    PubMed

    Taylor, N M; Wales, A D; Ridley, A M; Davies, R H

    2016-10-01

    Data on husbandry practices, performance, disease and drug use were collected during a cross-sectional survey of 89 poultry meat farms in England and Wales to provide information on possible risk factors for the occurrence of fluoroquinolone (FQ)-resistant bacteria. Faeces samples were used to classify farms as "affected" or "not affected" by FQ-resistant (FQr) Escherichia coli or Campylobacter spp. Risk factor analysis identified the use of FQ on the farms as having by far the strongest association, among the factors considered, with the occurrence of FQr bacteria. Resistant E. coli and/or Campylobacter spp. were found on 86% of the farms with a history of FQ use. However, a substantial proportion of farms with no history of FQ use also yielded FQr organisms, suggesting that resistant bacteria may transfer between farms. Further analysis suggested that for Campylobacter spp., on-farm hygiene, cleaning and disinfection between batches of birds and wildlife control were of most significance. By contrast, for E. coli biosecurity from external contamination was of particular importance, although the modelling indicated that other factors were likely to be involved. Detailed studies on a small number of sites showed that FQr E. coli can survive routine cleaning and disinfection. It appears difficult to avoid the occurrence of resistant bacteria when FQ are used on a farm, but the present findings provide evidence to support recommendations to reduce the substantial risk of the incidental acquisition of such resistance by farms where FQ are not used.

  10. CALIFORNIA, ANNUAL FARM LABOR REPORT, 1961.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LENHART, MARGOT W.

    STATISTICAL TRENDS AND GOVERNMENT PROGRAMS IN DIFFERENT AREAS TO AID DIFFERENT TYPES OF FARMERS WERE PRESENTED. BETWEEN 1960 AND 1961, CALIFORNIA'S OVERALL CROP PRODUCTION ROSE BY ALMOST ONE PERCENT, WHILE TOTAL ACREAGE HARVESTED AND VALUE OF PRODUCTION DECLINED SLIGHTLY. FARMING UNDERWENT SIGNIFICANT CHANGES IN MANY COMMUNITIES. MORE MACHINES AND…

  11. 29 CFR 780.142 - Practices on a farm not related to farming operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Practices on a farm not related to farming operations. 780... FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT General Scope of Agriculture âsuch Farming Operationsâ-on the Farm § 780.142 Practices on a farm not related to farming operations. Practices performed on a farm in connection...

  12. 29 CFR 780.142 - Practices on a farm not related to farming operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Practices on a farm not related to farming operations. 780... FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT General Scope of Agriculture âsuch Farming Operationsâ-on the Farm § 780.142 Practices on a farm not related to farming operations. Practices performed on a farm in connection...

  13. 29 CFR 780.142 - Practices on a farm not related to farming operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Practices on a farm not related to farming operations. 780... FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT General Scope of Agriculture âsuch Farming Operationsâ-on the Farm § 780.142 Practices on a farm not related to farming operations. Practices performed on a farm in connection...

  14. 29 CFR 780.142 - Practices on a farm not related to farming operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Practices on a farm not related to farming operations. 780... FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT General Scope of Agriculture âsuch Farming Operationsâ-on the Farm § 780.142 Practices on a farm not related to farming operations. Practices performed on a farm in connection...

  15. 29 CFR 780.142 - Practices on a farm not related to farming operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Practices on a farm not related to farming operations. 780... FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT General Scope of Agriculture âsuch Farming Operationsâ-on the Farm § 780.142 Practices on a farm not related to farming operations. Practices performed on a farm in connection...

  16. Automatic milking systems, farm size, and milk production.

    PubMed

    Rotz, C A; Coiner, C U; Soder, K J

    2003-12-01

    Automatic milking systems (AMS) offer relief from the demanding routine of milking. Although many AMS are in use in Europe and a few are used in the United States, the potential benefit for American farms is uncertain. A farm-simulation model was used to determine the long-term, whole-farm effect of implementing AMS on farm sizes of 30 to 270 cows. Highest farm net return to management and unpaid factors was when AMS were used at maximal milking capacity. Adding stalls to increase milking frequency and possibly increase production generally did not improve net return. Compared with new traditional milking systems, the greatest potential economic benefit was a single-stall AMS on a farm size of 60 cows at a moderate milk production level (8600 kg/cow). On other farm sizes using single-stall type robotic units, losses in annual net return of 0 dollars to 300 dollars/cow were projected, with the greatest losses on larger farms and at high milk production (10,900 kg/cow). Systems with one robot serving multiple stalls provided a greater net return than single-stall systems, and this net return was competitive with traditional parlors for 50- to 130-cow farm sizes. The potential benefit of AMS was improved by 100 dollars/cow per year if the AMS increased production an additional 5%. A 20% reduction in initial equipment cost or doubling milking labor cost also improved annual net return of an AMS by up to 100 dollars/cow. Annual net return was reduced by 110 dollars/cow, though, if the economic life of the AMS was reduced by 3 yr for a more rapid depreciation than that normally used with traditional milking systems. Thus, under current assumptions, the economic return for an AMS was similar to that of new parlor systems on smaller farms when the milking capacity of the AMS was well matched to herd size and milk production level.

  17. Consumer beliefs regarding farmed versus wild fish.

    PubMed

    Claret, Anna; Guerrero, Luis; Ginés, Rafael; Grau, Amàlia; Hernández, M Dolores; Aguirre, Enaitz; Peleteiro, José Benito; Fernández-Pato, Carlos; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Carmen

    2014-08-01

    Aquaculture is a food-producing activity, alternative to traditional extractive fishing, which still acts as a reference for most consumers. The main objective of the present paper was to study which consumer beliefs, regarding farmed versus wild fish, hinder the potential development of the aquaculture sector. To achieve this purpose the study was organized into two complementary steps: a qualitative approach (focus groups) aimed at assessing consumer perception about wild and farmed fish and to identify the salient beliefs that differentiate them; and a quantitative approach (survey by means of a questionnaire) to validate the results obtained in the focus group discussions over a representative sample of participants (n = 919). Results showed that participants perceive clear differences between farmed and wild fish. Although no significant differences between both kinds of fish were detected on safety, in general farmed fish was perceived to be less affected by marine pollution, heavy metals and parasites. In the contrary, wild fish was considered to have healthier feeding, to contain fewer antibiotics and to be fresher, healthier, less handled and more natural. Beliefs related to quality were in favour of wild fish, while those related to availability and price were in favour of farmed fish. Significant differences were observed in the perception of both kinds of fish depending on the consumers' objective knowledge about fish, on the level of education, age and gender and on the three segments of consumers identified: "Traditional/Conservative", "Connoisseur", "Open to aquaculture". The results provided could play an important role when planning and designing efficient marketing strategies for promoting farmed fish by adapting the information provided to the perception of each segment of consumers identified by the present study. PMID:24709486

  18. Consumer beliefs regarding farmed versus wild fish.

    PubMed

    Claret, Anna; Guerrero, Luis; Ginés, Rafael; Grau, Amàlia; Hernández, M Dolores; Aguirre, Enaitz; Peleteiro, José Benito; Fernández-Pato, Carlos; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Carmen

    2014-08-01

    Aquaculture is a food-producing activity, alternative to traditional extractive fishing, which still acts as a reference for most consumers. The main objective of the present paper was to study which consumer beliefs, regarding farmed versus wild fish, hinder the potential development of the aquaculture sector. To achieve this purpose the study was organized into two complementary steps: a qualitative approach (focus groups) aimed at assessing consumer perception about wild and farmed fish and to identify the salient beliefs that differentiate them; and a quantitative approach (survey by means of a questionnaire) to validate the results obtained in the focus group discussions over a representative sample of participants (n = 919). Results showed that participants perceive clear differences between farmed and wild fish. Although no significant differences between both kinds of fish were detected on safety, in general farmed fish was perceived to be less affected by marine pollution, heavy metals and parasites. In the contrary, wild fish was considered to have healthier feeding, to contain fewer antibiotics and to be fresher, healthier, less handled and more natural. Beliefs related to quality were in favour of wild fish, while those related to availability and price were in favour of farmed fish. Significant differences were observed in the perception of both kinds of fish depending on the consumers' objective knowledge about fish, on the level of education, age and gender and on the three segments of consumers identified: "Traditional/Conservative", "Connoisseur", "Open to aquaculture". The results provided could play an important role when planning and designing efficient marketing strategies for promoting farmed fish by adapting the information provided to the perception of each segment of consumers identified by the present study.

  19. Farm Work-Related Asthma Among US Primary Farm Operators

    PubMed Central

    Mazurek, Jacek M.; White, Gretchen E.; Rodman, Chad; Schleiff, Patricia L.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of current asthma and the proportion of current asthma that is related to work on the farm among primary farm operators. The 2011 Farm and Ranch Safety Survey data were used to produce estimates and prevalence odds ratios. An estimated 5.1% of farm operators had asthma. Of these, 15.4% had farm work-related asthma. Among operators with farm work-related asthma, 54.8% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 41.8%–68.2%) had an asthma attack in the prior 12 months and 33.3% (95% CI: 21.2%–45.4%) had an asthma attack that occurred while doing farm work. Of those who had an asthma attack that occurred while doing farm work, 65.0% associated their asthma attack with plant/tree materials. This study provides updated information on asthma and the proportion of current asthma that is related to work on the farm and identifies certain groups of farm operators that might benefit from workplace asthma prevention intervention. PMID:25635741

  20. Economic and environmental feasibility of a perennial cow dairy farm.

    PubMed

    Rotz, C A; Zartman, D L; Crandall, K L

    2005-08-01

    More efficient and economical production systems are needed to improve the sustainability of dairy farms. One concept to consider is using perennial cows. Perennial cows are those that maintain a relatively high milk production for >or=2 yr without going through the typical dry period followed by calving. Farm records show that some cows have produced over 20 kg/d after 4 yr of continuous lactation. A farm simulation model was used to evaluate the long-term performance, environmental impact, and economics of a conceptual perennial cow production system on a typical dairy farm in Pennsylvania. Compared with a traditional 100-cow farm with replacement heifers produced on the farm, a perennial herd of 100 cows and purchased replacements provided environmental benefit but sustained a substantial economic loss. However, increasing the perennial herd to 128 cows better utilized the feed produced on the farm. Compared with the traditional 100-cow farm, use of the perennial 128-cow herd reduced supplemental protein and mineral feed purchases by 38%, increased annual milk sales by 21%, reduced nitrogen losses by 17%, maintained a phosphorus balance, and increased annual net return to farm management by 3200 dollars. A traditional 120-cow dairy farm with purchased replacements also used a similar amount of farm-produced feed. Compared with this option, the farm with 128 perennial cows reduced protein and mineral feed purchases by 36%, maintained similar annual milk sales, increased manure production by 7%, reduced N losses by 10%, and increased annual net return by 12,700 dollars. The economic feasibility of the perennial-cow dairy farm was very sensitive to the milk production maintained by the perennial herd and market prices for milk and perennial replacement animals. The analysis was relatively insensitive to the assumed useful life of perennial cows as long as they could be maintained in the herd for at least 3 yr. Thus, a perennial cow production system can improve the

  1. Development of a farm-firm modelling system for evaluation of herbaceous energy crops

    SciTech Connect

    English, B.C.; Alexander, R.R.; Loewen, K.H.; Coady, S.A.; Cole, G.V.; Goodman, W.R. . Dept. of Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology)

    1992-01-01

    A complete analysis is performed to simulate biomass production incorporated into a realistic whole farm situation, including or replacing a typical crop mix. Representative farms are constructed to accommodate such simulation. Four management systems are simulated for each firm, with each simulation depicting a different crop mix and/or use of different farming technologies and production methods. The first simulation was a base farm plan in which the operator would maintain the historical crop mix for the area, participate in all price support programs, and not participate in either a conservative reserve or a biomass production program. In the second simulation, the operator would again maintain the historical crop mix, would not participate in a conservation reserve or biomass production program, and would be ineligible to participate in any price support system. The third simulation introduced the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) and included participation in all price support programs. The fourth simulation introduced a biomass crop production enterprise (switchgrass) as an alternative to enrolling highly erodible cropland in the CRP and allowed participation in price support programs. Simulations were made for three farms, two in West Tennessee and on in South Georgia. Results indicate that erosion is likely to be reduced more by the diversion of cropland to permanent vegetative cover on farms similar to the more highly erodible West Tennessee farms than on the less erodible Tift County, Georgia farm. Equivalent reductions in erosion rates result from entering highly erodible cropland in the CRP and from production of switchgrass as a biomass energy crop. Both switchgrass and CRP farm plans result in decreased net returns from the base plan, although the biomass farm plans are, in general, more profitable than the CRP plans.

  2. Transgenic Farm Animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, Morse B.; Eastridge, Janet S.; Paroczay, Ernest W.

    Conventional science to improve muscle and meat parameters has involved breeding strategies, such as selection of dominant traits or selection of preferred traits by cross breeding, and the use of endogenous and exogenous hormones. Improvements in the quality of food products that enter the market have largely been the result of postharvest intervention strategies. Biotechnology is a more extreme scientific method that offers the potential to improve the quality, yield, and safety of food products by direct genetic manipulation. In the December 13, 2007 issue of the Southeast Farm Press, an article by Roy Roberson pointed out that biotechnology is driving most segments of U.S. farm growth. He indicated that nationwide, the agriculture industry is booming and much of that growth is the result of biotechnology advancements.

  3. Characteristics of Instructors at Farm Safety 4 Just Kids Day Camps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Deborah B.; Claunch, Deborah T.; Cole, Henry P.; Mazur, Joan M.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This paper describes the characteristics of instructors at six farm safety day camps sponsored through local chapters of Farm Safety 4 Just Kids. What are their backgrounds and experience? What motivates them to participate as farm safety instructors? How do they prepare and present their instruction? Design: Data from 69 instructors…

  4. Software for batch farms

    SciTech Connect

    Ian Bird; Bryan Hess; Andy Kowalski

    2000-02-01

    Over the past few years, LSF has become a standard for job management on batch farms. However, there are many instances where it cannot be deployed for a variety of reasons. In large farms the cost may be prohibitive for the set of features actually used; small university groups who wish to clone the farms and software of larger laboratories often have constraints which preclude the use of LSF. This paper discusses a generic interface developed at Jefferson Lab to provide a set of common services to the user, while using any one of a variety of underlying batch management software products. Initially the system provides an interface to LSF and an alternative--Portable Batch System (PBS) developed by NASA and freely available in source form. It is straightforward to extend this to other systems. Such a generic interface allows users to move from one location to another and run their jobs with no modification, and by extension provides a framework for a ''global'' batch system where jobs submitted at one site may be transparently executed at another. The interface also provides additional features not found in the underlying batch software. Being written in Java, the client can be easily installed anywhere and allows for authenticated remote job submission and manipulation, including a web interface. This paper will also discuss the problem of keeping a large batch farm occupied with work without waiting for slow tape access. The use of file caching, pre-staging of files from tape and the interconnection with the batch system will be discussed. As well as automated techniques, the provision of appropriate information to the user to allow optimization should not be overlooked.

  5. Conceptual design report for tank farm restoration and safe operations, project W-314

    SciTech Connect

    Briggs, S.R., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-05-02

    This Conceptual Design Report (CDR) presents the conceptual level design approach that satisfies the established technical requirements for Project W-314, `Tank Farm Restoration and Safe Operations.` The CDR also addresses the initial cost and schedule baselines for performing the proposed Tank Farm infrastructure upgrades. The scope of this project includes capital improvements to Hanford`s existing tank farm facilities(primarily focused on Double- Shell Tank Farms) in the areas of instrumentation/control, tank ventilation, waste transfer, and electrical systems.

  6. Wind farm electrical system

    DOEpatents

    Erdman, William L.; Lettenmaier, Terry M.

    2006-07-04

    An approach to wind farm design using variable speed wind turbines with low pulse number electrical output. The output of multiple wind turbines are aggregated to create a high pulse number electrical output at a point of common coupling with a utility grid network. Power quality at each individual wind turbine falls short of utility standards, but the aggregated output at the point of common coupling is within acceptable tolerances for utility power quality. The approach for aggregating low pulse number electrical output from multiple wind turbines relies upon a pad mounted transformer at each wind turbine that performs phase multiplication on the output of each wind turbine. Phase multiplication converts a modified square wave from the wind turbine into a 6 pulse output. Phase shifting of the 6 pulse output from each wind turbine allows the aggregated output of multiple wind turbines to be a 24 pulse approximation of a sine wave. Additional filtering and VAR control is embedded within the wind farm to take advantage of the wind farm's electrical impedence characteristics to further enhance power quality at the point of common coupling.

  7. Short-term Wind Forecasting at Wind Farms located on Mountainous Terrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkil, Gokhan

    2016-04-01

    Power uncertainty and fluctuations are recognized as major challenges for expanding wind energy. Here we aim at better understanding and characterizing fluctuations in wind power caused by rapid changes in wind resource. By means of Large Eddy Simulations (LES), we expect to gain new knowledge about the sources of spatial and temporal variability of wind fluctuations such as different configurations of wind turbines and complex topography. We will present the recent progress on our LES simulations for a wind farm located near a mountainous terrain. We performed multi-scale simulations using WRF's different Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) parameterizations as well as Large Eddy Simulation (LES). WRF ensembles with different PBL parameterizations showed little spread for wind speed forecasts. LES models improved the forecasts. Statistical error analysis is performed and ramp events are analyzed.

  8. Organochlorine pesticides residues in feed and muscle of farmed Nile tilapia from Brazilian fish farms.

    PubMed

    Botaro, Daniele; Torres, João Paulo Machado; Malm, Olaf; Rebelo, Mauro Freitas; Henkelmann, Bernhard; Schramm, Karl-Werner

    2011-09-01

    Organochlorine pesticide (OCP) concentrations were determined in fish muscle and feed collected from four different fish farms in Brazil. Nile tilapia from two growth stages, juveniles and adults, collected at two intensive tanks farms (IT1 and IT2) and two net cage farms (NC1 and NC2), were analyzed by High Resolution Gas Chromatography/High Resolution Mass Spectrometry. Pesticides were detected in almost all samples, but no samples exceeded international maximum limits for safe fish consumption. ΣDDT was the predominant pesticide in fish muscle, found in all fish samples, and endosulfan was the most predominant pesticide in feed, found in all feed samples. No significant correlation (p>0.05) was observed between the different growth stages and OCP concentrations, although slightly higher OCP concentrations were observed in adults. Among the rearing systems, NC farmed fish presented higher lipid levels and, consequently, higher OCP concentrations than fish from IT farms. Some OCPs (ΣHCH, aldrin, dieldrin and endrin) presented strong positive correlations (p<0.05) between feed and fish muscle concentrations, while others (ΣDDT, mirex, chlordane, ΣHCB and endosulfan) presented no correlation. However, the low levels of the sum of contaminants found in most of the feed samples may explain the low contaminant levels in fish tissue.

  9. Designing the automatic milking farm in a hot climate.

    PubMed

    Halachmi, I

    2004-03-01

    A mathematical simulation model was used to assist 5 farmers in developing design criteria for inclusion of robotic milking systems in each farm situation. The barn layout influences arrivals of cows to the milking robot as well as other cow traffic and must be carefully planned. Each farmer had individual objectives and consequently unique design criteria that determined the optimal solution. Planning factors addressed by simulations on these farms included: 1) optimal cow cooling locations; 2) optimal facility allocation in expanding dairies; 3) concentrate feeder locations and feeding management; 4) number of feeders--based on expected rations; 5) use of a robot in an open cowshed without free stalls; 6) number of robots needed, currently and in the future; 7) eight robots working in harmony; 8) robot locations that allow for expansion; 9) floor space needed in each barn section including maternity and veterinary treatment areas; 10) location of bottlenecks that limit efficiency or expansion; and 11) cow traffic routine as affected by management practices, feed allocation, and farm layout. The simulation allowed farmers to receive a course in managing a "virtual robotic milking farm" before installation of the barn. Therefore, each could be more confident that his future barn would work properly under his unique local conditions and management practices. One farm checked 2 yr after construction achieved an average daily robot utilization of 84%, nearly matching the 85% projected before the barn was built. Important variables considered in the simulations were facility allocation, cow space needed in each farm area, robot utilization, number of cows, milk yield, milk flow rate, feeding method and timing, robot location and orientation, and farm physical layout.

  10. Data-Mining-Based Intelligent Differential Relaying for Transmission Lines Including UPFC and Wind Farms.

    PubMed

    Jena, Manas Kumar; Samantaray, Subhransu Ranjan

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a data-mining-based intelligent differential relaying scheme for transmission lines, including flexible ac transmission system device, such as unified power flow controller (UPFC) and wind farms. Initially, the current and voltage signals are processed through extended Kalman filter phasor measurement unit for phasor estimation, and 21 potential features are computed at both ends of the line. Once the features are extracted at both ends, the corresponding differential features are derived. These differential features are fed to a data-mining model known as decision tree (DT) to provide the final relaying decision. The proposed technique has been extensively tested for single-circuit transmission line, including UPFC and wind farms with in-feed, double-circuit line with UPFC on one line and wind farm as one of the substations with wide variations in operating parameters. The test results obtained from simulation as well as in real-time digital simulator testing indicate that the DT-based intelligent differential relaying scheme is highly reliable and accurate with a response time of 2.25 cycles from the fault inception.

  11. Application of SMES in wind farm to improve voltage stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, J.; Tang, Y. J.; Ren, L.; Li, J. D.; Chen, S. J.

    2008-09-01

    For the wind farms introducing doubly fed induction generators (DFIGs), voltage stability is an essential issue which influences their widely integration into the power grid. This paper proposes the application of superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) in the power system integrated with wind farms. SMES can control the active and reactive power flow, realizing the operation in four quadrants independently. The introducing of SMES can smooth the output power flow of the wind farms, and supply dynamic voltage support. Using MATLAB/SIMULINK, the models of the DFIG, the power grid connected and the SMES are created. Simulation results show that the voltage stability of the power system integrated with wind farms can be improved considerably.

  12. Evaluation of solubility in simulated lung fluid of metals present in the slag from a metallurgical industry to produce metallic zinc.

    PubMed

    Lima, Rosilda M G; Carneiro, Luana G; Afonso, Júlio C; Cunha, Kenya M D

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the solubility parameters (rapid and slow dissolution rates, rapid and slow dissolution fractions) for nickel, cadmium, zinc and manganese compounds present in a pile of slag accumulated under exposure to weathering. This slag was generated by a metallurgical industry that produced zinc and zinc alloys from hemimorphite (Zn(4)(OH)(2)Si(2)O(7).H(2)O) and willemite (Zn(2)SiO(4)) minerals. A static dissolution test in vitro was used to determine the solubility parameters and Gamble's solution was used as the simulated lung fluid (SLF), on a time basis ranging from 10 min to 1 year. The metal concentrations in the slag samples and in the SLF were determined using Particle Induced X-rays Emission (PIXE). There are significant differences in terms of solubility parameters among the metals. The results indicated that the zinc, nickel, cadmium and manganese compounds present in the slag were moderately soluble in the SLF. The rapid dissolution fractions of these metals are associated with their sulfates. In conclusion, this study confirms the harmful effects on the neighboring population of the airborne particles containing these metals that came from the slag.

  13. Mixed crop-livestock systems: an economic and environmental-friendly way of farming?

    PubMed

    Ryschawy, J; Choisis, N; Choisis, J P; Joannon, A; Gibon, A

    2012-10-01

    Intensification and specialisation of agriculture in developed countries enabled productivity to be improved but had detrimental impacts on the environment and threatened the economic viability of a huge number of farms. The combination of livestock and crops, which was very common in the past, is assumed to be a viable alternative to specialised livestock or cropping systems. Mixed crop-livestock systems can improve nutrient cycling while reducing chemical inputs and generate economies of scope at farm level. Most assumptions underlying these views are based on theoretical and experimental evidence. Very few assessments of their environmental and economic advantages have nevertheless been undertaken in real-world farming conditions. In this paper, we present a comparative assessment of the environmental and economic performances of mixed crop-livestock farms v. specialised farms among the farm population of the French 'Coteaux de Gascogne'. In this hilly region, half of the farms currently use a mixed crop-livestock system including beef cattle and cash crops, the remaining farms being specialised in either crops or cattle. Data were collected through an exhaustive survey of farms located in our study area. The economic performances of farming systems were assessed on 48 farms on the basis of (i) overall gross margin, (ii) production costs and (iii) analysis of the sensitivity of gross margins to fluctuations in the price of inputs and outputs. The environmental dimension was analysed through (i) characterisation of farmers' crop management practices, (ii) analysis of farm land use diversity and (iii) nitrogen farm-gate balance. Local mixed crop-livestock farms did not have significantly higher overall gross margins than specialised farms but were less sensitive than dairy and crop farms to fluctuations in the price of inputs and outputs considered. Mixed crop-livestock farms had lower costs than crop farms, while beef farms had the lowest costs as they are grass

  14. Evaluation of organic, conventional and intensive beef farm systems: health, management and animal production.

    PubMed

    Blanco-Penedo, I; López-Alonso, M; Shore, R F; Miranda, M; Castillo, C; Hernández, J; Benedito, J L

    2012-09-01

    The overall aim of the present study was to analyse and compare organic beef cattle farming in Spain with intensive and conventional systems. An on-farm study comparing farm management practices and animal health was carried out. The study also focussed on a slaughterhouse analysis by comparing impacts on the safety and quality of the cattle products. Twenty-four organic and 26 conventional farms were inspected, and farmers responded to a questionnaire that covered all basic data on their husbandry practices, farm management, veterinary treatments and reproductive performance during 2007. Furthermore, data on the hygiene and quality of 244, 2596 and 3021 carcasses of calves from organic, intensive and conventional farms, respectively, were retrieved from the official yearbook (2007) of a slaughterhouse. Differences found between organic and conventional farms across the farm analysis did not substantially reflect differences between both farm types in the predominant diseases that usually occur on beef cattle farms. However, calves reared organically presented fewer condemnations at slaughter compared with intensive and to a lesser extent with conventionally reared calves. Carcass performance also reflected differences between farm type and breed and was not necessarily better in organic farms.

  15. 29 CFR 780.156 - Transportation of farm products from the fields or farm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... on a farm as an incident to or in conjunction with the farming operations of that farmer or that farm...” farming operations are also within section 3(f). These principles have been recognized by the courts...

  16. 29 CFR 780.156 - Transportation of farm products from the fields or farm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... on a farm as an incident to or in conjunction with the farming operations of that farmer or that farm...” farming operations are also within section 3(f). These principles have been recognized by the courts...

  17. Algae Farming in Low Earth Orbit: Past Present and Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, N.

    Algal strains used as a production engine represent a novel example of living mechanical systems with tremendous potential for applications in space. Algae use photosynthesis to create lipids, glycerin, and biomass, with different strains of algae producing different oils. Algae can be grown to produce many types of oils, with low, medium or long hydrocarbon chain lengths. This article examines the history of algae research, as well as its value to astronauts as both a food supplement and as an oxygen production and carbon sequester engine. Consideration is given to ways algae is currently being used and tested in space, followed by a look forward envisioning dynamic living technological systems that can help to sustain our race as we travel the void between stars.

  18. An economic decision-making support system for selection of reproductive management programs on dairy farms.

    PubMed

    Giordano, J O; Fricke, P M; Wiltbank, M C; Cabrera, V E

    2011-12-01

    Because the reproductive performance of lactating dairy cows influences the profitability of dairy operations, predicting the future reproductive and economic performance of dairy herds through decision support systems would be valuable to dairy producers and consultants. In this study, we present a highly adaptable tool created based on a mathematical model combining Markov chain simulation with partial budgeting to obtain the net present value (NPV; $/cow per year) of different reproductive management programs. The growing complexity of reproductive programs used by dairy farms demands that new decision support systems precisely reflect the events that occur on the farm. Therefore, the model requires productive, reproductive, and economic input data used for simulation of farm conditions to account for all factors related to reproductive management that increase costs and generate revenue. The economic performance of 3 different reproductive programs can be simultaneously compared with the current model. A program utilizing 100% visual estrous detection (ED) for artificial insemination (AI) is used as a baseline for comparison with 2 other programs that may include 100% timed AI (TAI) as well as any combination of TAI and ED. A case study is presented in which the model was used to compare 3 different reproductive management strategies (100% ED baseline compared with two 100% TAI options) using data from a commercial farm in Wisconsin. Sensitivity analysis was then used to assess the effect of varying specific reproductive parameters on the NPV. Under the simulated conditions of the case study, the model indicated that the two 100% TAI programs were superior to the 100% ED program and, of the 100% TAI programs, the one with the higher conception rate (CR) for resynchronized AI services was economically superior despite having higher costs and a longer interbreeding interval. A 4% increase in CR for resynchronized AI was sufficient for the inferior 100% TAI to

  19. An economic decision-making support system for selection of reproductive management programs on dairy farms.

    PubMed

    Giordano, J O; Fricke, P M; Wiltbank, M C; Cabrera, V E

    2011-12-01

    Because the reproductive performance of lactating dairy cows influences the profitability of dairy operations, predicting the future reproductive and economic performance of dairy herds through decision support systems would be valuable to dairy producers and consultants. In this study, we present a highly adaptable tool created based on a mathematical model combining Markov chain simulation with partial budgeting to obtain the net present value (NPV; $/cow per year) of different reproductive management programs. The growing complexity of reproductive programs used by dairy farms demands that new decision support systems precisely reflect the events that occur on the farm. Therefore, the model requires productive, reproductive, and economic input data used for simulation of farm conditions to account for all factors related to reproductive management that increase costs and generate revenue. The economic performance of 3 different reproductive programs can be simultaneously compared with the current model. A program utilizing 100% visual estrous detection (ED) for artificial insemination (AI) is used as a baseline for comparison with 2 other programs that may include 100% timed AI (TAI) as well as any combination of TAI and ED. A case study is presented in which the model was used to compare 3 different reproductive management strategies (100% ED baseline compared with two 100% TAI options) using data from a commercial farm in Wisconsin. Sensitivity analysis was then used to assess the effect of varying specific reproductive parameters on the NPV. Under the simulated conditions of the case study, the model indicated that the two 100% TAI programs were superior to the 100% ED program and, of the 100% TAI programs, the one with the higher conception rate (CR) for resynchronized AI services was economically superior despite having higher costs and a longer interbreeding interval. A 4% increase in CR for resynchronized AI was sufficient for the inferior 100% TAI to

  20. Economic and phosphorus-related effects of precision feeding and forage management at a farm scale.

    PubMed

    Ghebremichael, L T; Cerosaletti, P E; Veith, T L; Rotz, C A; Hamlett, J M; Gburek, W J

    2007-08-01

    Structural best management practices were implemented throughout the Cannonsville Reservoir Watershed (CRW) in an effort to reduce P losses to the reservoir. Yet long-term water quality control efforts within CRW are hindered by continuous P build-up in the soils resulting from dairy farm P imports exceeding exports. Addressing the P imbalance problems and maintaining economic viability of the farms requires a system-level redesign of farm management. One possible innovative strategy, precision feed management (PFM), reduces soil-P build-up by limiting feed and fertilizer purchases, and increasing high-quality homegrown forage production. This study applied the integrated farm system model (IFSM) to 2 CRW dairy farms to quantify the benefits of a PFM farm planning strategy in controlling P imbalance problems, and maintaining farm profit-ability and reducing off-farm P losses. The IFSM accurately simulated the 2 farms based on farm data supplied by farm planners; these scenarios were used as the baseline conditions. The IFSM simulations of more accurate feeding of P (based on P required in animal diets) integrated with increased productivity of grass-forage and increased proportion of forage in the diet reduced the P imbalance of 1 farm from 5.3 to 0.5 kg/ ha and from 9.6 to 0.0 kg/ha for the second farm. For both farms, soluble P lost to the environment was reduced by 18%. Feed supplement purchases declined by 7.5 kg/cow per year for dietary mineral P, and by 1.04 and 1.29 t/cow per year for protein concentrates through adoption of the PFM system. Moreover, when a land management practice of converting corn to grass was coupled with the precision feeding of P and improved forage management, IFSM predicted reductions of 5.8 and 9.3 kg/ha of converted land sediment-bound P in erosion loss each year. The model predicted slight purchase increases in corn grain to offset reductions in corn silage production and feeding rates, but no appreciable change in the farm P

  1. Economic and phosphorus-related effects of precision feeding and forage management at a farm scale.

    PubMed

    Ghebremichael, L T; Cerosaletti, P E; Veith, T L; Rotz, C A; Hamlett, J M; Gburek, W J

    2007-08-01

    Structural best management practices were implemented throughout the Cannonsville Reservoir Watershed (CRW) in an effort to reduce P losses to the reservoir. Yet long-term water quality control efforts within CRW are hindered by continuous P build-up in the soils resulting from dairy farm P imports exceeding exports. Addressing the P imbalance problems and maintaining economic viability of the farms requires a system-level redesign of farm management. One possible innovative strategy, precision feed management (PFM), reduces soil-P build-up by limiting feed and fertilizer purchases, and increasing high-quality homegrown forage production. This study applied the integrated farm system model (IFSM) to 2 CRW dairy farms to quantify the benefits of a PFM farm planning strategy in controlling P imbalance problems, and maintaining farm profit-ability and reducing off-farm P losses. The IFSM accurately simulated the 2 farms based on farm data supplied by farm planners; these scenarios were used as the baseline conditions. The IFSM simulations of more accurate feeding of P (based on P required in animal diets) integrated with increased productivity of grass-forage and increased proportion of forage in the diet reduced the P imbalance of 1 farm from 5.3 to 0.5 kg/ ha and from 9.6 to 0.0 kg/ha for the second farm. For both farms, soluble P lost to the environment was reduced by 18%. Feed supplement purchases declined by 7.5 kg/cow per year for dietary mineral P, and by 1.04 and 1.29 t/cow per year for protein concentrates through adoption of the PFM system. Moreover, when a land management practice of converting corn to grass was coupled with the precision feeding of P and improved forage management, IFSM predicted reductions of 5.8 and 9.3 kg/ha of converted land sediment-bound P in erosion loss each year. The model predicted slight purchase increases in corn grain to offset reductions in corn silage production and feeding rates, but no appreciable change in the farm P

  2. Bile Salt Micelles and Phospholipid Vesicles Present in Simulated and Human Intestinal Fluids: Structural Analysis by Flow Field-Flow Fractionation/Multiangle Laser Light Scattering.

    PubMed

    Elvang, Philipp A; Hinna, Askell H; Brouwers, Joachim; Hens, Bart; Augustijns, Patrick; Brandl, Martin

    2016-09-01

    Knowledge about colloidal assemblies present in human intestinal fluids (HIFs), such as bile salt micelles and phospholipid vesicles, is regarded of importance for a better understanding of the in vivo dissolution and absorption behavior of poorly soluble drugs (Biopharmaceutics Classification System class II/IV drugs) because of their drug-solubilizing ability. The characterization of these potential drug-solubilizing compartments is a prerequisite for further studies of the mechanistic interplays between drug molecules and colloidal structures within HIFs. The aim of the present study was to apply asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) in combination with multiangle laser light scattering in an attempt to reveal coexistence of colloidal particles in both artificial and aspirated HIFs and to determine their sizes. Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation/multiangle laser light scattering analysis of the colloidal phase of intestinal fluids allowed for a detailed insight into the whole spectrum of submicron- to micrometer-sized particles. With respect to the simulated intestinal fluids mimicking fasted and fed state (FaSSIF-V1 and FeSSIF-V1, respectively), FaSSIF contained one distinct size fraction of colloidal assemblies, whereas FeSSIF contained 2 fractions of colloidal species with significantly different sizes. These size fractions likely represent (1) mixed taurocholate-phospholipid-micelles, as indicated by a size range up to 70 nm (in diameter) and a strong UV absorption and (2) small phospholipid vesicles of 90-210 nm diameter. In contrast, within the colloidal phase of the fasted state aspirate of a human volunteer, 4 different size fractions were separated from each other in a consistent and reproducible manner. The 2 fractions containing large particles showed mean sizes of approximately 50 and 200 nm, respectively (intensity-weighted mean diameter, Dz), likely representing mixed cholate/phospholipid micelles and phospholipid vesicles

  3. Farm-Size Structure and Off-Farm Income and Employment Generation in the North Central Region.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heady, Earl O.; Sonka, Steven T.

    The relationship between size of farm and the welfare of farm and nonfarm society was examined in terms of total income in the farm sector, the number and size of farms, income per farm, secondary income generation, and consumer food costs using four alternative farm structures: large farm (gross farm sales of at least $40,000); medium farm (gross…

  4. Whole Farm Nutrient Balance Calculator for New York Dairy Farms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soberon, Melanie A.; Ketterings, Quirine M.; Rasmussen, Caroline N.; Czymmek, Karl J.

    2013-01-01

    Nutrient loss and accumulation as well as associated environmental degradation have been a concern for animal agriculture for many decades. Federal and New York (NY) regulations apply to Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations and a comprehensive nutrient management plan (CNMP) is required for regulated farms. The whole farm nutrient mass balance…

  5. Economic Indicators of the Farm Sector. Farm Sector Review, 1985.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Economic Research Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    Farm production rose 6 percent in 1985 due to record high yields in corn, soybeans, cotton, and several other crops. While United States consumption increased slightly, exports of farm products fell 23 percent in value and 19 percent in volume. Net cash income increased 12 percent due to increased output, lower cash expenses, and unusually high…

  6. In Uzbekistan, Is It Farm Management or FARM "Management?"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, James S.; Luery, Andrea

    A broad spectrum of stakeholders in Uzbekistan were interviewed to identify areas in which Winrock International's Farmer-to-Farmer program volunteers could be targeted to help Uzbeks complete the transition to privatized farms. The interviews revealed that Uzbeks have a much broader conception of the "farm" than do people in Western countries and…

  7. Farm Household Survival Strategies and Diversification on Marginal Farms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meert, H.; Van Huylenbroeck, G.; Vernimmen, T.; Bourgeois, M.; van Hecke, E.

    2005-01-01

    On marginal farms, and in agriculture in general, sustainability is largely guaranteed by a broad range of survival strategies, closely interlinked and embedded in the household structure of typical family farms. This paper reports results of a socio-economic study carried out among Belgian farmers, focusing specifically on the opportunities…

  8. Wind Farm Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Curry; Erik Foley; DOE Project Officer - Keith Bennett

    2007-07-11

    Saint Francis University has assessed the Swallow Farm property located in Shade Township, Somerset County, Pennsylvania as a potential wind power development site. Saint Francis worked with McLean Energy Partners to have a 50-meter meteorological tower installed on the property in April 2004 and continues to conduct a meteorological assessment of the site. Results suggest a mean average wind speed at 80 meters of 17 mph with a net capacity factor of 31 - 33%. Approximate electricity generation capacity of the project is 10 megawatts. Also, the University used matching funds provided by the federal government to contract with ABR, Inc. to conduct radar studies of nocturnal migration of birds and bats during the migrations seasons in the Spring and Fall of 2005 with a mean nocturnal flight altitude of 402 meters with less than 5% of targets at altitudes of less than 125 meters. The mean nocturnal passage rate was 166 targets/km/h in the fall and 145 targets/km/h in the spring. Lastly, University faculty and students conducted a nesting bird study May - July 2006. Seventy-three (73) species of birds were observed with 65 determined to be breeding or potentially breeding species; this figure represents approximately 30% of the 214 breeding bird species in Pennsylvania. No officially protected avian species were determined to be nesting at Swallow Farm.

  9. Part-time Farming: Saving the Farm or Saving the Life-style?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barlett, Peggy F.

    1986-01-01

    Study of part-time farmers in a Georgia county examines mobility patterns, economic circumstances, scale of farming, reasons for part-time farming, commitment to farm, household division of labor, and impact of current farm crisis. Finds most part-time farmers obtained stable off-farm jobs, then added farms later in their adult years. (LFL)

  10. Evaluation of the present climate simulated by the regional Eta model driven by the Brazilian Global coupled ocean-atmosphere Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Sin Chan; Lyra, André; Juliano Silva, Adan; Nobre, Paulo

    2013-04-01

    The Eta Model is used operationally by INPE at the Centre for Weather Forecasts and Climate Studies (CPTEC) to produce weather forecasts over South America since 1997 and seasonal climate forecasts since 2002. The model has gone through upgrades along these years and is able to produce decadal integrations to downscale climate projections. Likewise, the INPE global atmospheric model has been coupled to MOM4 ocean model and decadal integrations in the period 1960-2105 was produced and contributed to the CMIP5 dataset. The development of the Brazilian Earth System Model (BESM) has been ongoing parallel to the development of the Brazilian regional earth system model (BESM-R). The objective of this work is to evaluate the regional Eta model nested in the BESM in the present climate simulations, from 1961-1990. The Eta model was configured with 20-km horizontal resolution and 38 layers, in a domain covering all South America. In the lower boundary, sea surface temperature was provided by the BESM and was updated daily during the regional integration, whereas the lateral boundaries were updated every 6 hours with the BESM atmospheric conditions. Continuous 30-year integrations were carried out by the regional model. Large scale circulation pattern at upper and low levels are shown in comparison with the respective BESM flow and evaluated against reanalyses. The regional model shows improvement in the precipitation and temperature pattern over the continent. Seasonal cycle of precipitation and temperature are also shown.

  11. Species-specific patterns of aggregation of wild fish around fish farms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dempster, T.; Sanchez-Jerez, P.; Uglem, I.; Bjørn, P.-A.

    2010-01-01

    Fish-farming structures are widespread in coastal waters and are highly attractive to wild fish. Several studies have estimated that tons to tens of tons of wild fish aggregate around fish farms. These estimates assumed that the majority of wild fish are concentrated immediately beneath farms, although this assumption has never been explicitly tested. We tested the hypothesis that abundances of wild fish would be greatest immediately beneath farms and progressively diminish with distance at 4 full-scale coastal salmon ( Salmo salar) farms in Norway. At each farm, fish were counted with a video-camera system at 5 different distances from the cages (farm = 0 m, 25, 50, 100 and 200 m) throughout the water column on three separate days. Combined across all locations and times, the total abundance of wild fish was 20 times greater at the farm than at the 200 m sampling distance. Saithe ( Pollachius virens) dominated assemblages at all 4 farms and were consistently significantly more abundant at the farm than at the 25-200 m distances. This 'tight aggregation' around farms corresponds to the reliance of saithe on waste feed when they school near farms. In contrast, patterns of distribution of both cod ( Gadus morhua) and poor cod ( Trisopterus minutus) varied among farms, with either highest abundances at the farm or a more even distribution of abundance across all 5 distances sampled. No specific pattern of aggregation was evident for the bottom-dwelling haddock ( Melanogrammus aeglefinus). Our results suggest that the present 100 m no-fishing zone around salmon farms protects the greatest proportion of farm-aggregated saithe and cod from fishing during the daytime. However, whether this reduces their overall susceptibility to fishing requires further research regarding nighttime distribution and movements.

  12. Comparing technical efficiency of farms with an automatic milking system and a conventional milking system.

    PubMed

    Steeneveld, W; Tauer, L W; Hogeveen, H; Oude Lansink, A G J M

    2012-12-01

    other than higher capital costs, the use of AMS rather than a CMS does not affect farm efficiency and that the learning costs to use an AMS are not present as measured by any fall in technical efficiency. PMID:23021754

  13. Comparing technical efficiency of farms with an automatic milking system and a conventional milking system.

    PubMed

    Steeneveld, W; Tauer, L W; Hogeveen, H; Oude Lansink, A G J M

    2012-12-01

    other than higher capital costs, the use of AMS rather than a CMS does not affect farm efficiency and that the learning costs to use an AMS are not present as measured by any fall in technical efficiency.

  14. Real time wind farm emulation using SimWindFarm toolbox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topor, Marcel

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a wind farm emulation solution using an open source Matlab/Simulink toolbox and the National Instruments cRIO platform. This work is based on the Aeolus SimWindFarm (SWF) toolbox models developed at Aalborg university, Denmark. Using the Matlab Simulink models developed in SWF, the modeling code can be exported to a real time model using the NI Veristand model framework and the resulting code is integrated as a hardware in the loop control on the NI 9068 platform.

  15. Visit a Farm? Surely Not!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Bill

    2012-01-01

    Popular myth has it that visiting a farm can be dangerous, but there are only a few occasions when children have become ill during a school visit to a farm. Simple, sensible precautions, including wearing appropriate clothing, such as trousers and wellington boots (if wet) or sensible shoes, and careful hand-washing, are all that is required. The…

  16. Electrocution Hazards on the Farm

    MedlinePlus

    ... by overhead power lines, standby generators, and general operating procedures of electrical systems at the farm work site. Electrocution hazards The ... electricity generated by a farm operation’s emergency power system from entering the ... operating precautions, equipment can come in contact with electrical ...

  17. Food and farm products surveillance

    SciTech Connect

    Poston, T.M.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the radiological analyses performed on food and farm samples collected during 1994. The food and farm sampling design addresses the potential influence of Hanford Site releases. Details of the sampling design and radionuclides analyzed are included in this section.

  18. Hanford Tank Farms Vadose Zone, Addendum to the T Tank Farm Report

    SciTech Connect

    Spatz, Robert

    2000-07-01

    This addendum to the T Tank Farm Report (GJO-99-101-TARA, GJO-HAN-27) published in September 1999 incorporates the results of high-rate and repeat logging activities along with shape factor analysis of the logging incorporates the results of high-rate and repeat logging activities along with shape factor analysis of the logging data. A high-rate logging system was developed and deployed in the T Tank Farm to measure cesium-137 concentration levels in high gamma flux zones where the spectral gamma logging system was unable to collect usable data because of high dead times and detector saturation. This report presents additional data and revised visualizations of subsurface contaminant distribution in the T Tank Farm at the DOE Hanford Site in the state of Washington.

  19. Hanford Tank Farms Vadose Zone Addendum to the S Tank Farm Report

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, A.

    2000-08-01

    This addendum to the S Tank Farm Report (GJO-97-31-TAR, GJO-HAN-17) published in February 1998 incorporates the results of high-rate and repeat logging activities along with shape factor analysis of the logging data. A high-rate logging system was developed and deployed in the S Tank Farm to measure cesium-137 concentration levels in high gamma flux zones where the spectral gamma logging system was unable to collect usable data because of high dead times and detector saturation. This report presents additional data and revised visualizations of subsurface contaminant distribution in the S Tank Farm at the DOE Hanford Site in the state of Washington.

  20. Hanford Tank Farms Vadose Zone, Addendum to the TX Tank Farm Report

    SciTech Connect

    Spatz, R.

    2000-08-01

    This addendum to the TX Tank Farm Report (GJO-97-13-TAR, GJO-HAN-11) published in September 1997 incorporates the results of high-rate and repeat logging activities along with shape factor analysis of the logging data. A high-rate logging system was developed and deployed in the TX Tank Farm to measure cesium-137 concentration levels in high gamma flux zones where the spectral gamma logging system was unable to collect usable data because of high dead times and detector saturation. This report presents additional data and revised visualizations of subsurface contaminant distribution in the TX Tank Farm at the DOE Hanford Site in the state of Washington.

  1. Hanford Tank Farms Vadose Zone, Addendum to the BX Tank Farm Report

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, A.W.

    2000-07-01

    This addendum to the BX Tank Farm Report (GJO-98-40-TARA, GJO-HAN-19) published in August 1998 incorporates the results of high-rate and repeat logging activities along with shape factor analysis of the logging data. A high-rate logging system was developed and deployed in the BX Tank Farm to measure cesium-137 concentration levels in high gamma flux zones where the spectral gamma logging system was unable to collect usable data because of high dead times and detector saturation. This report presents additional data and revised visualizations of subsurface contaminant distribution in the BX Tank Farm at the DOE Hanford Site in the state of Washington.

  2. Hanford Tank Farms Vadose Zone Addendum to the TY Tank Farm Report

    SciTech Connect

    Spatz, Robert

    2000-08-01

    This addendum to the TY Tank Farm Report (GJO-97-30-TAR, GJO-HAN-16) published in January 1998 incorporates the results of high-rate and repeat logging activities along with shape factor analysis of the logging data. A high-rate logging system was developed and deployed in the TY Tank Farm to measure cesium-137 concentration levels in high gamma flux zones where the spectral gamma logging system was unable to collect usable data because of high dead times and detector saturation. This report presents additional data and revised visualizations of subsurface contaminant distribution in the TY Tank Farm at the DOE Hanford Site in the state of Washington.

  3. Trace elements in farmed and wild gilthead seabream, Sparus aurata.

    PubMed

    Minganti, Vincenzo; Drava, Giuliana; De Pellegrini, Rodolfo; Siccardi, Camilla

    2010-11-01

    In the present study, we sought to determine the concentration of several trace elements (total and organic mercury, selenium, cadmium, lead, arsenic, copper, chromium, iron, manganese, molybdenum, vanadium and zinc) in muscle tissue of gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata), an edible finfish species that is widely cultured in the Mediterranean area. The phenomenon of bioaccumulation and bioamplification (especially of mercury) was investigated by comparing farmed fish with wild specimens of the same species. Farmed specimens showed mercury and arsenic concentrations significantly lower than wild specimens, and no relationship was found between mercury concentration and body size. The lower level of methylmercury in farmed fish has important implications for consumer health.

  4. Livestock farming and atmospheric emissions.

    PubMed

    Zicari, Giuseppe; Soardo, Vincenzo; Rivetti, Daniela; Cerrato, Elena; Russo, Domenico

    2013-01-01

    Livestock farming produces atmospheric emissions that may pose a risk to workers and a disturbance to the population. Emissions into the atmosphere produced by livestock farming consist of gases such as ammonia, dust, compounds such as aliphatic hydrocarbons and bio-aerosols formed by microorganisms. Some gases, such as ammonia and hydrogen sulphide, have foul odours and are thus potentially annoying to the population. Gaseous or volatile molecules produced by livestock installations and related activities may have several adverse effects on health and environment. The most significant exposure certainly relates to workers in the confined spaces of farms, rather than to residents in the surrounding areas. In this article we examine potential hazards to farm workers and to the population living in the vicinity of livestock farms, arising from emissions into the atmosphere.

  5. Transient stability enhancement of wind farms using power electronics and facts controllers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadpour, Hossein Ali

    network, and the frequency of the exchanged energy is below the fundamental frequency of the system. This phenomenon may cause severe damage in the wind farm, if not prevented. Therefore, this dissertation deals with the SSR phenomena in a capacitive series compensated wind farm. A DFIG-based wind farm, which is connected to a series compensated transmission line, is considered as a case study. The small-signal stability analysis of the system is presented, and the eigenvalues of the system are obtained. Using both modal analysis and time-domain simulation, it is shown that the system is potentially unstable due to the SSR mode. Then, three different possibilities for the addition of SSR damping controller (SSRDC) are investigated. The SSRDC can be added to (1) gate-controlled series capacitor (GCSC), (2) thyristor-controlled series capacitor (TCSC), or (3) DFIG rotor-side converter (RSC) and grid-side converter (GSC) controllers. The first and second cases are related to the series flexible AC transmission systems (FACTS) family, and the third case uses the DFIG back-to-back converters to damp the SSR. The SSRDC is designed using residue-based analysis and root locus diagrams. Using residue-based analysis, the optimal input control signal (ICS) to the SSRDC is identified that can damp the SSR mode without destabilizing other modes, and using root-locus analysis, the required gain for the SSRDC is determined. Moreover, two methods are discussed in order to estimate the optimum input signal to the SSRDC, without measuring it directly. In this dissertation, MATLAB/Simulink is used as a tool for modeling and design of the SSRDC, and PSCAD/EMTDC is used to perform time-domain simulation in order to verify the design process.

  6. From Bus Stop to Farm Village: The Farm Worker Programme in Zimbabwe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auret, Diana

    This book documents the history, successes, and failures of Save the Children's farmworker program in Zimbabwe, 1981-98. The report explores workers' past and present living and working conditions on commercial farms and describes how the program promoted a progression from workers with a migrant mentality to the building of functional…

  7. Feeding strategy, nitrogen cycling, and profitability of dairy farms.

    PubMed

    Rotz, C A; Satter, L D; Mertens, D R; Muck, R E

    1999-12-01

    On a typical dairy farm today, large amounts of N are imported as feed supplements and fertilizer. If this N is not recycled through crop growth, it can lead to large losses to the atmosphere and ground water. More efficient use of protein feed supplements can potentially reduce the import of N in feeds, excretion of N in manure, and losses to the environment. A simulation study with a dairy farm model (DAFOSYM) illustrated that more efficient feeding and use of protein supplements increased farm profit and reduced N loss from the farm. Compared to soybean meal as the sole protein supplement, use of soybean meal along with a less rumen degradable protein feed reduced volatile N loss by 13 to 34 kg/ha of cropland with a small reduction in N leaching loss (about 1 kg/ha). Using the more expensive but less degradable protein supplement along with soybean meal improved net return by $46 to $69/cow per year, dependent on other management strategies of the farm. Environmental and economic benefits from more efficient supplementation of protein were generally greater with more animals per unit of land, higher milk production, more sandy soils, or a daily manure hauling strategy. Relatively less benefit was obtained when either alfalfa or corn silage was the sole forage on the farm or when relatively high amounts of forage were used in animal rations. PMID:10629833

  8. Quantifying antimicrobial resistance at veal calf farms.

    PubMed

    Bosman, Angela B; Wagenaar, Jaap A; Wagenaar, Jaap; Stegeman, Arjan; Vernooij, Hans; Mevius, Dik

    2012-01-01

    This study was performed to determine a sampling strategy to quantify the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance on veal calf farms, based on the variation in antimicrobial resistance within and between calves on five farms. Faecal samples from 50 healthy calves (10 calves/farm) were collected. From each individual sample and one pooled faecal sample per farm, 90 selected Escherichia coli isolates were tested for their resistance against 25 mg/L amoxicillin, 25 mg/L tetracycline, 0.5 mg/L cefotaxime, 0.125 mg/L ciprofloxacin and 8/152 mg/L trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (tmp/s) by replica plating. From each faecal sample another 10 selected E. coli isolates were tested for their resistance by broth microdilution as a reference. Logistic regression analysis was performed to compare the odds of testing an isolate resistant between both test methods (replica plating vs. broth microdilution) and to evaluate the effect of pooling faecal samples. Bootstrap analysis was used to investigate the precision of the estimated prevalence of resistance to each antimicrobial obtained by several simulated sampling strategies. Replica plating showed similar odds of E. coli isolates tested resistant compared to broth microdilution, except for ciprofloxacin (OR 0.29, p ≤ 0.05). Pooled samples showed in general lower odds of an isolate being resistant compared to individual samples, although these differences were not significant. Bootstrap analysis showed that within each antimicrobial the various compositions of a pooled sample provided consistent estimates for the mean proportion of resistant isolates. Sampling strategies should be based on the variation in resistance among isolates within faecal samples and between faecal samples, which may vary by antimicrobial. In our study, the optimal sampling strategy from the perspective of precision of the estimated levels of resistance and practicality consists of a pooled faecal sample from 20 individual animals, of which 90 isolates are

  9. Farm Hall: The Play

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassidy, David C.

    2013-03-01

    It's July 1945. Germany is in defeat and the atomic bombs are on their way to Japan. Under the direction of Samuel Goudsmit, the Allies are holding some of the top German nuclear scientists-among them Heisenberg, Hahn, and Gerlach-captive in Farm Hall, an English country manor near Cambridge, England. As secret microphones record their conversations, the scientists are unaware of why they are being held or for how long. Thinking themselves far ahead of the Allies, how will they react to the news of the atomic bombs? How will these famous scientists explain to themselves and to the world their failure to achieve even a chain reaction? How will they come to terms with the horror of the Third Reich, their work for such a regime, and their behavior during that period? This one-act play is based upon the transcripts of their conversations as well as the author's historical work on the subject.

  10. Economic efficiency analysis of different strategies to control post-weaning multi-systemic wasting syndrome and porcine circovirus type 2 subclinical infection in 3-weekly batch system farms

    PubMed Central

    Alarcon, Pablo; Rushton, Jonathan; Nathues, Heiko; Wieland, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    The study assessed the economic efficiency of different strategies for the control of post-weaning multi-systemic wasting syndrome (PMWS) and porcine circovirus type 2 subclinical infection (PCV2SI), which have a major economic impact on the pig farming industry worldwide. The control strategies investigated consisted on the combination of up to 5 different control measures. The control measures considered were: (1) PCV2 vaccination of piglets (vac); (2) ensuring age adjusted diet for growers (diets); (3) reduction of stocking density (stock); (4) improvement of biosecurity measures (bios); and (5) total depopulation and repopulation of the farm for the elimination of other major pathogens (DPRP). A model was developed to simulate 5 years production of a pig farm with a 3-weekly batch system and with 100 sows. A PMWS/PCV2SI disease and economic model, based on PMWS severity scores, was linked to the production model in order to assess disease losses. This PMWS severity scores depends on the combination post-weaning mortality, PMWS morbidity in younger pigs and proportion of PCV2 infected pigs observed on farms. The economic analysis investigated eleven different farm scenarios, depending on the number of risk factors present before the intervention. For each strategy, an investment appraisal assessed the extra costs and benefits of reducing a given PMWS severity score to the average score of a slightly affected farm. The net present value obtained for each strategy was then multiplied by the corresponding probability of success to obtain an expected value. A stochastic simulation was performed to account for uncertainty and variability. For moderately affected farms PCV2 vaccination alone was the most cost-efficient strategy, but for highly affected farms it was either PCV2 vaccination alone or in combination with biosecurity measures, with the marginal profitability between ‘vac’ and ‘vac + bios’ being small. Other strategies such as ‘diets’,

  11. Economic efficiency analysis of different strategies to control post-weaning multi-systemic wasting syndrome and porcine circovirus type 2 subclinical infection in 3-weekly batch system farms.

    PubMed

    Alarcon, Pablo; Rushton, Jonathan; Nathues, Heiko; Wieland, Barbara

    2013-06-01

    The study assessed the economic efficiency of different strategies for the control of post-weaning multi-systemic wasting syndrome (PMWS) and porcine circovirus type 2 subclinical infection (PCV2SI), which have a major economic impact on the pig farming industry worldwide. The control strategies investigated consisted on the combination of up to 5 different control measures. The control measures considered were: (1) PCV2 vaccination of piglets (vac); (2) ensuring age adjusted diet for growers (diets); (3) reduction of stocking density (stock); (4) improvement of biosecurity measures (bios); and (5) total depopulation and repopulation of the farm for the elimination of other major pathogens (DPRP). A model was developed to simulate 5 years production of a pig farm with a 3-weekly batch system and with 100 sows. A PMWS/PCV2SI disease and economic model, based on PMWS severity scores, was linked to the production model in order to assess disease losses. This PMWS severity scores depends on the combination post-weaning mortality, PMWS morbidity in younger pigs and proportion of PCV2 infected pigs observed on farms. The economic analysis investigated eleven different farm scenarios, depending on the number of risk factors present before the intervention. For each strategy, an investment appraisal assessed the extra costs and benefits of reducing a given PMWS severity score to the average score of a slightly affected farm. The net present value obtained for each strategy was then multiplied by the corresponding probability of success to obtain an expected value. A stochastic simulation was performed to account for uncertainty and variability. For moderately affected farms PCV2 vaccination alone was the most cost-efficient strategy, but for highly affected farms it was either PCV2 vaccination alone or in combination with biosecurity measures, with the marginal profitability between 'vac' and 'vac+bios' being small. Other strategies such as 'diets', 'vac+diets' and 'bios

  12. Present and future precipitation variability over the East African region using CORDEX simulations (COSMO-CLM) and its relation with circulation patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souverijns, Niels; Thiery, Wim; Demuzere, Matthias; van Lipzig, Nicole

    2015-04-01

    The East African region is highly dependent on precipitation due to its water-fed agricultural system. On the other hand the region experiences a high interannual variability regarding precipitation amounts during several months. Consequently, there is a strong need to predict how precipitation variability will evolve under climate change in this region. This requires a good understanding of the processes that influence this variability. This study tackles this issue via the use of circulation patterns, shown to strongly influence precipitation over the East African region. Changes in (the frequency of) circulation patterns towards the future are therefore the main drivers of changes in precipitation variability. To investigate this issue a classification of the different circulation patterns over the region was executed for a reference period (1981-2010) on ERA Interim data using the COST733class software. Different algorithms are tested and their performance over the study area is evaluated. This results in a weather atlas concerning the circulation patterns and their corresponding precipitation amounts that are currently present over the region. Furthermore, the classification will be executed on the COSMO-CLM CORDEX-Africa evaluation simulation for the same reference period. The model results are evaluated by comparing them with the classification results of the ERA Interim data and observational datasets. To predict how precipitation variability changes towards the future, a classification is also applied on the whole CORDEX-Africa ensemble for a present (1981-2010) and future period (2071-2100) under RCP 8.5. Comparing both classifications makes it possible to detect differences in the frequencies of circulation patterns and in the circulation patterns themselves. Particular attention is paid to the months that show a high interannual variability in precipitation amounts, since changes here are of most importance for the region. Finally, the different drivers

  13. Impact of increasing milk production on whole farm environmental management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increasing herd milk production can provide both economic benefit to the producer and environmental benefit to society. Simulated dairy farms with average annual herd productions from 16,000 to 30,000 lb/cow illustrate that increasing milk yield per cow improves feed efficiency, reduces feed costs a...

  14. Measure to Prevent Inundation in a Fish Farm Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsung, S.; Chang, H.

    2011-12-01

    Many fish farms locate along southern-west shoreline of Taiwan where various high-value fishes are cultivated. However, the terrain elevations are often lower than sea level. Inundation therefore occurred frequently in heavy rainfall events. Insufficient capacity of drainage flumes and extra drained water from fish farms cause flume overflow (Fig.1a). The inundation causes loss of the fish farm owners due to fish escape. To prevent inundation, we numerically study the drainage in the fish area (3.73 square km) of the Xindian drainage flume (4 km), Chiayi County, by the Storm Water Management Model, based on the 25-year period designed rainfall (326 mm total rainfall in 24 hours). In this study, a mitigation measure, pre-drainages in the fish farms, was considered to prevent inundation. The gate at the flume exit was closed to neglect the tide influence. According to the simulations, pre-drainages in the fish farms were operated at a given drained water depth before heavy rainfall events and kept the initial water stage 0 m in the flume which sufficiently provided the extra storage for the rainfall. Fig.1b suggests only 7 cm drained water depth successfully avoided flume overflow. Therefore the measure of the pre-drainage was an effective non-engineering method to prevent inundation. For practical operations, river managers perform pre-drainage simulations based on the forecast rainfall and then determine a pre-drained water depth. The drained water from the fish farms discharges by gravity at low tide and the gate is closed. The simple procedures will effectively prevent the inundation in the fish farms.

  15. The relation between input-output transformation and gastrointestinal nematode infections on dairy farms.

    PubMed

    van der Voort, M; Van Meensel, J; Lauwers, L; Van Huylenbroeck, G; Charlier, J

    2016-02-01

    Efficiency analysis is used for assessing links between technical efficiency (TE) of livestock farms and animal diseases. However, previous studies often do not make the link with the allocation of inputs and mainly present average effects that ignore the often huge differences among farms. In this paper, we studied the relationship between exposure to gastrointestinal (GI) nematode infections, the TE and the input allocation on dairy farms. Although the traditional cost allocative efficiency (CAE) indicator adequately measures how a given input allocation differs from the cost-minimising input allocation, they do not represent the unique input allocation of farms. Similar CAE scores may be obtained for farms with different input allocations. Therefore, we propose an adjusted allocative efficiency index (AAEI) to measure the unique input allocation of farms. Combining this AAEI with the TE score allows determining the unique input-output position of each farm. The method is illustrated by estimating efficiency scores using data envelopment analysis (DEA) on a sample of 152 dairy farms in Flanders for which both accountancy and parasitic monitoring data were available. Three groups of farms with a different input-output position can be distinguished based on cluster analysis: (1) technically inefficient farms, with a relatively low use of concentrates per 100 l milk and a high exposure to infection, (2) farms with an intermediate TE, relatively high use of concentrates per 100 l milk and a low exposure to infection, (3) farms with the highest TE, relatively low roughage use per 100 l milk and a relatively high exposure to infection. Correlation analysis indicates for each group how the level of exposure to GI nematodes is associated or not with improved economic performance. The results suggest that improving both the economic performance and exposure to infection seems only of interest for highly TE farms. The findings indicate that current farm recommendations

  16. The relation between input-output transformation and gastrointestinal nematode infections on dairy farms.

    PubMed

    van der Voort, M; Van Meensel, J; Lauwers, L; Van Huylenbroeck, G; Charlier, J

    2016-02-01

    Efficiency analysis is used for assessing links between technical efficiency (TE) of livestock farms and animal diseases. However, previous studies often do not make the link with the allocation of inputs and mainly present average effects that ignore the often huge differences among farms. In this paper, we studied the relationship between exposure to gastrointestinal (GI) nematode infections, the TE and the input allocation on dairy farms. Although the traditional cost allocative efficiency (CAE) indicator adequately measures how a given input allocation differs from the cost-minimising input allocation, they do not represent the unique input allocation of farms. Similar CAE scores may be obtained for farms with different input allocations. Therefore, we propose an adjusted allocative efficiency index (AAEI) to measure the unique input allocation of farms. Combining this AAEI with the TE score allows determining the unique input-output position of each farm. The method is illustrated by estimating efficiency scores using data envelopment analysis (DEA) on a sample of 152 dairy farms in Flanders for which both accountancy and parasitic monitoring data were available. Three groups of farms with a different input-output position can be distinguished based on cluster analysis: (1) technically inefficient farms, with a relatively low use of concentrates per 100 l milk and a high exposure to infection, (2) farms with an intermediate TE, relatively high use of concentrates per 100 l milk and a low exposure to infection, (3) farms with the highest TE, relatively low roughage use per 100 l milk and a relatively high exposure to infection. Correlation analysis indicates for each group how the level of exposure to GI nematodes is associated or not with improved economic performance. The results suggest that improving both the economic performance and exposure to infection seems only of interest for highly TE farms. The findings indicate that current farm recommendations

  17. The Research of Computer Aided Farm Machinery Designing Method Based on Ergonomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiyin; Li, Xinling; Song, Qiang; Zheng, Ying

    Along with agricultural economy development, the farm machinery product type Increases gradually, the ergonomics question is also getting more and more prominent. The widespread application of computer aided machinery design makes it possible that farm machinery design is intuitive, flexible and convenient. At present, because the developed computer aided ergonomics software has not suitable human body database, which is needed in view of farm machinery design in China, the farm machinery design have deviation in ergonomics analysis. This article puts forward that using the open database interface procedure in CATIA to establish human body database which aims at the farm machinery design, and reading the human body data to ergonomics module of CATIA can product practical application virtual body, using human posture analysis and human activity analysis module to analysis the ergonomics in farm machinery, thus computer aided farm machinery designing method based on engineering can be realized.

  18. Is agritourism eco-friendly? A comparison between agritourisms and other farms in Italy using farm accountancy data network dataset.

    PubMed

    Mastronardi, Luigi; Giaccio, Vincenzo; Giannelli, Agostino; Scardera, Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the results of research regarding the environmental performances of Italian farms with agritourism compared with farms without agritourism. In Italy, agritourism is considered an agricultural activity and can only be performed by a farmer. Moreover, Italian national legislation forces the farmer to dedicate himself mainly to traditional farming, rather than to tourism activities. For this reason, environmental performances have been highlighted by analyzing only features and production systems of the farms. By utilizing the most frequent indicators used in studies regarding sustainability, the authors show how Italian agritourisms tend to develop more environmentally friendly agricultural methods, which have a positive impact on biodiversity, landscape and natural resources. The empirical analysis is based on the Italian FADN (Farm Accountancy Data Network) dataset. The European FADN was created to represent farms' technical and economic operation in the European Union and on which it drafts the agricultural and rural policies. The dichotomous structure of the dependent variable (presence or absence of agritourism at the farm) has a propensity for an assessment method based on Binary Response Model Regression.

  19. Is agritourism eco-friendly? A comparison between agritourisms and other farms in Italy using farm accountancy data network dataset.

    PubMed

    Mastronardi, Luigi; Giaccio, Vincenzo; Giannelli, Agostino; Scardera, Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the results of research regarding the environmental performances of Italian farms with agritourism compared with farms without agritourism. In Italy, agritourism is considered an agricultural activity and can only be performed by a farmer. Moreover, Italian national legislation forces the farmer to dedicate himself mainly to traditional farming, rather than to tourism activities. For this reason, environmental performances have been highlighted by analyzing only features and production systems of the farms. By utilizing the most frequent indicators used in studies regarding sustainability, the authors show how Italian agritourisms tend to develop more environmentally friendly agricultural methods, which have a positive impact on biodiversity, landscape and natural resources. The empirical analysis is based on the Italian FADN (Farm Accountancy Data Network) dataset. The European FADN was created to represent farms' technical and economic operation in the European Union and on which it drafts the agricultural and rural policies. The dichotomous structure of the dependent variable (presence or absence of agritourism at the farm) has a propensity for an assessment method based on Binary Response Model Regression. PMID:26543725

  20. Amplified recruitment pressure of biofouling organisms in commercial salmon farms: potential causes and implications for farm management.

    PubMed

    Bloecher, Nina; Floerl, Oliver; Sunde, Leif Magne

    2015-01-01

    The development of biofouling on finfish aquaculture farms presents challenges for the industry, but the factors underlying nuisance growths are still not well understood. Artificial settlement surfaces were used to examine two possible explanations for high rates of biofouling in Norwegian salmon farms: (1) increased propagule release during net cleaning operations, resulting in elevated recruitment rates; and (2) potential reservoir effects of farm surfaces. The presence of salmon farms was associated with consistently and substantially (up to 49-fold) elevated recruitment rates. Temporal patterns of recruitment were not driven by net cleaning. Resident populations of biofouling organisms were encountered on all submerged farm surfaces. Calculations indicate that a resident population of the hydroid Ectopleura larynx, a major biofouling species, could release between 0.3 × 10(9) and 4.7 × 10(9) larvae per farm annually. Such resident populations could form propagule reservoirs and be one explanation for the elevated recruitment pressure at salmon farms.

  1. Vadose zone characterization project at the Hanford Tank Farms: U Tank Farm Report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office (DOE-GJO) was tasked by the DOE Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) to perform a baseline characterization of the gamma-ray-emitting radionuclides that are distributed in the vadose zone sediments beneath and around the single-shell tanks (SSTs) at the Hanford Site. The intent of this characterization is to determine the nature and extent of the contamination, to identify contamination sources when possible, and to develop a baseline of the contamination distribution that will permit future data comparisons. This characterization work also allows an initial assessment of the impacts of the vadose zone contamination as required by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). This characterization project involves acquiring information regarding vadose zone contamination with borehole geophysical logging methods and documenting that information in a series of reports. This information is presently limited to detection of gamma-emitting radionuclides from both natural and man-made sources. Data from boreholes surrounding each tank are compiled into individual Tank Summary Data Reports. The data from each tank in a tank farm are then compiled and summarized in a Tank Farm Report. This document is the Tank Farm Report for the U Tank Farm. Logging operations used high-purity germanium detection systems to acquire laboratory-quality assays of the gamma-emitting radionuclides in the sediments around and below the tanks. These assays were acquired in 59 boreholes that surround the U Tank Farm tanks. Logging of all boreholes was completed in December 1995, and the last Tank Summary Data Report for the U Tank Farm was issued in September 1996.

  2. Risk-based audit selection of dairy farms.

    PubMed

    van Asseldonk, M A P M; Velthuis, A G J

    2014-02-01

    Dairy farms are audited in the Netherlands on numerous process standards. Each farm is audited once every 2 years. Increasing demands for cost-effectiveness in farm audits can be met by introducing risk-based principles. This implies targeting subpopulations with a higher risk of poor process standards. To select farms for an audit that present higher risks, a statistical analysis was conducted to test the relationship between the outcome of farm audits and bulk milk laboratory results before the audit. The analysis comprised 28,358 farm audits and all conducted laboratory tests of bulk milk samples 12 mo before the audit. The overall outcome of each farm audit was classified as approved or rejected. Laboratory results included somatic cell count (SCC), total bacterial count (TBC), antimicrobial drug residues (ADR), level of butyric acid spores (BAB), freezing point depression (FPD), level of free fatty acids (FFA), and cleanliness of the milk (CLN). The bulk milk laboratory results were significantly related to audit outcomes. Rejected audits are likely to occur on dairy farms with higher mean levels of SCC, TBC, ADR, and BAB. Moreover, in a multivariable model, maxima for TBC, SCC, and FPD as well as standard deviations for TBC and FPD are risk factors for negative audit outcomes. The efficiency curve of a risk-based selection approach, on the basis of the derived regression results, dominated the current random selection approach. To capture 25, 50, or 75% of the population with poor process standards (i.e., audit outcome of rejected), respectively, only 8, 20, or 47% of the population had to be sampled based on a risk-based selection approach. Milk quality information can thus be used to preselect high-risk farms to be audited more frequently. PMID:24290823

  3. Risk-based audit selection of dairy farms.

    PubMed

    van Asseldonk, M A P M; Velthuis, A G J

    2014-02-01

    Dairy farms are audited in the Netherlands on numerous process standards. Each farm is audited once every 2 years. Increasing demands for cost-effectiveness in farm audits can be met by introducing risk-based principles. This implies targeting subpopulations with a higher risk of poor process standards. To select farms for an audit that present higher risks, a statistical analysis was conducted to test the relationship between the outcome of farm audits and bulk milk laboratory results before the audit. The analysis comprised 28,358 farm audits and all conducted laboratory tests of bulk milk samples 12 mo before the audit. The overall outcome of each farm audit was classified as approved or rejected. Laboratory results included somatic cell count (SCC), total bacterial count (TBC), antimicrobial drug residues (ADR), level of butyric acid spores (BAB), freezing point depression (FPD), level of free fatty acids (FFA), and cleanliness of the milk (CLN). The bulk milk laboratory results were significantly related to audit outcomes. Rejected audits are likely to occur on dairy farms with higher mean levels of SCC, TBC, ADR, and BAB. Moreover, in a multivariable model, maxima for TBC, SCC, and FPD as well as standard deviations for TBC and FPD are risk factors for negative audit outcomes. The efficiency curve of a risk-based selection approach, on the basis of the derived regression results, dominated the current random selection approach. To capture 25, 50, or 75% of the population with poor process standards (i.e., audit outcome of rejected), respectively, only 8, 20, or 47% of the population had to be sampled based on a risk-based selection approach. Milk quality information can thus be used to preselect high-risk farms to be audited more frequently.

  4. Wind farm performance in conventionally neutral atmospheric boundary layers with varying inversion strengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allaerts, Dries; Meyers, Johan

    2014-06-01

    In this study we consider large wind farms in a conventionally neutral atmospheric boundary layer. In large wind farms the energy extracted by the turbines is dominated by downward vertical turbulent transport of kinetic energy from the airflow above the farm. However, atmospheric boundary layers are almost always capped by an inversion layer which slows down the entrainment rate and counteracts boundary layer growth. In a suite of large eddy simulations the effect of the strength of the capping inversion on the boundary layer and on the performance of a large wind farm is investigated. For simulations with and without wind turbines the results indicate that the boundary layer growth is effectively limited by the capping inversion and that the entrainment rate depends strongly on the inversion strength. The power output of wind farms is shown to decrease for increasing inversions.

  5. CDF II production farm project

    SciTech Connect

    Baranovski, A.; Benjamin, D.; Cooper, G.; Farrington, S.; Genser, K.; Hou, S.; Hsieh, T.; Kotwal, A.; Lipeles, E.; Murat, P.; Norman, M.; /Fermilab /Duke U. /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /UC, San Diego /Glasgow U. /Frascati

    2006-12-01

    We describe the architecture and discuss our operational experience in running the off-line reconstruction farm of the CDFII experiment. The Linux PC-based farm performs a wide set of tasks,ranging from producing calibrations and primary event reconstruction to large scale ntuple production.The farm control software uses a standard Condor toolkit and the data handling part is based on SAM (Sequential Access via Metadata)software.During its lifetime,the CDFII experiment will integrate a large amount of data (several petabytes)and the data processing chain is one of the key components of the successful physics program of the experiment.

  6. Genetic diversity within and among Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) farmed in marine cages: a proof-of-concept study for the identification of escapees

    PubMed Central

    Glover, K A; Dahle, G; Westgaard, J I; Johansen, T; Knutsen, H; Jørstad, K E

    2010-01-01

    This study presents a molecular genetic characterization of Atlantic cod reared in commercial marine farms. Samples consisted of approximately 47 fish collected from nine cages located on four farms throughout Norway. In addition, 28 farmed escapees were recaptured in the sea (443 fish in total). Nine microsatellite loci and the Pan I gene were analysed, revealing a total of 181 alleles. Each sample contained 43–63% of total allelic variation. Comparing variation with published data for wild cod indicates that lower genetic variation exists within single cages than in wild populations. Significant linkage disequilibrium was observed amongst pairs of loci in all samples, suggesting a low number of contributing parental fish. Global FST was 0.049, and the highest pairwise FST value (pooled loci) was 0.085. For single loci, the Pan I gene was the most diagnostic, displaying a global FST of 0.203. Simulations amongst the samples collected on farms revealed an overall correct self-assignment percentage of 75%, demonstrating a high probability of identifying individuals to their farm of origin. Identification of the 28 escapees revealed a single cage as the most likely source of origin for half of the escapees, whilst the remaining fish were assigned to a mixture of samples, suggesting more than one source of escapees. PMID:20331613

  7. Climate SPHINX: High-resolution present-day and future climate simulations with an improved representation of small-scale variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davini, Paolo; von Hardenberg, Jost; Corti, Susanna; Subramanian, Aneesh; Weisheimer, Antje; Christensen, Hannah; Juricke, Stephan; Palmer, Tim

    2016-04-01

    The PRACE Climate SPHINX project investigates the sensitivity of climate simulations to model resolution and stochastic parameterization. The EC-Earth Earth-System Model is used to explore the impact of stochastic physics in 30-years climate integrations as a function of model resolution (from 80km up to 16km for the atmosphere). The experiments include more than 70 simulations in both a historical scenario (1979-2008) and a climate change projection (2039-2068), using RCP8.5 CMIP5 forcing. A total amount of 20 million core hours will be used at end of the project (March 2016) and about 150 TBytes of post-processed data will be available to the climate community. Preliminary results show a clear improvement in the representation of climate variability over the Euro-Atlantic following resolution increase. More specifically, the well-known atmospheric blocking negative bias over Europe is definitely resolved. High resolution runs also show improved fidelity in representation of tropical variability - such as the MJO and its propagation - over the low resolution simulations. It is shown that including stochastic parameterization in the low resolution runs help to improve some of the aspects of the MJO propagation further. These findings show the importance of representing the impact of small scale processes on the large scale climate variability either explicitly (with high resolution simulations) or stochastically (in low resolution simulations).

  8. A critical evaluation of present-day and future surface ozone as simulated by global chemistry-climate models in the Atmospheric Chemistry & Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnell, J.; Prather, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    In evaluating a future scenario for air quality, one can identify four major causal factors: (1) global emissions that alter atmospheric composition and thence baseline levels of surface ozone (O3); (2) global changes in climate that also alter these baselines (e.g., temperature, water vapor); (3) climate-driven changes in the meteorological regimes of polluted regions that lead to air quality extreme (AQX) episodes; and (4) changes in the efficacy of local emissions to produce pollution within a governance region. While these factors are all part of a coupled system, a model that combines all would be difficult to verify. Thus an assessment approach would be to evaluate each factor separately using observations and an ensemble of models. In this study, we focus on factor (3), evaluating the ability of the models in the Atmospheric Chemistry & Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP) to reproduce the observed present-day climatology (e.g. diurnal/seasonal cycles, AQX episode size) of surface O3 in North America (NA) and Europe (EU). We then characterize future changes within these domains as well as south Asia (SA) for two experiments of RCP8.5 climate, one with O3 precursor emissions representative of the 2100s (RCP8.5) and one representative of the 2000s (Cl2100Em2000). We find that most models simulate the observed climatology well, albeit biased high over the range of each domain's probability distribution (Fig. 1). For RCP8.5, the ensemble mean shows an increase of ~10% in the mean annual maximum daily 8-h average (MDA8) over all domains, with the largest changes in winter months. For Cl2100Em2000, NA shows a small increase (+1%) in annual mean MDA8 while EU and SA show small decreases (-2% and -3%, respectively). Also for RCP8.5, most models show decreases in the mean size (S) and mean duration (D) of AQX episodes in EU (S = -28%, D = -17%) and increases in SA (+54%, +15%). The ensemble mean shows decreases in D (-7%) and increases in S (+21%) in NA

  9. Integrated watershed- and farm-scale modeling framework for targeting critical source areas while maintaining farm economic viability.

    PubMed

    Ghebremichael, Lula T; Veith, Tamie L; Hamlett, James M

    2013-01-15

    Quantitative risk assessments of pollution and data related to the effectiveness of mitigating best management practices (BMPs) are important aspects of nonpoint source pollution control efforts, particularly those driven by specific water quality objectives and by measurable improvement goals, such as the total maximum daily load (TMDL) requirements. Targeting critical source areas (CSAs) that generate disproportionately high pollutant loads within a watershed is a crucial step in successfully controlling nonpoint source pollution. The importance of watershed simulation models in assisting with the quantitative assessments of CSAs of pollution (relative to their magnitudes and extents) and of the effectiveness of associated BMPs has been well recognized. However, due to the distinct disconnect between the hydrological scale in which these models conduct their evaluation and the farm scale at which feasible BMPs are actually selected and implemented, and due to the difficulty and uncertainty involved in transferring watershed model data to farm fields, there are limited practical applications of these tools in the current nonpoint source pollution control efforts by conservation specialists for delineating CSAs and planning targeting measures. There are also limited approaches developed that can assess impacts of CSA-targeted BMPs on farm productivity and profitability together with the assessment of water quality improvements expected from applying these measures. This study developed a modeling framework that integrates farm economics and environmental aspects (such as identification and mitigation of CSAs) through joint use of watershed- and farm-scale models in a closed feedback loop. The integration of models in a closed feedback loop provides a way for environmental changes to be evaluated with regard to the impact on the practical aspects of farm management and economics, adjusted or reformulated as necessary, and revaluated with respect to effectiveness of

  10. Development of a farm-firm modelling system for evaluation of herbaceous energy crops. Final project report

    SciTech Connect

    English, B.C.; Alexander, R.R.; Loewen, K.H.; Coady, S.A.; Cole, G.V.; Goodman, W.R.

    1992-01-01

    A complete analysis is performed to simulate biomass production incorporated into a realistic whole farm situation, including or replacing a typical crop mix. Representative farms are constructed to accommodate such simulation. Four management systems are simulated for each firm, with each simulation depicting a different crop mix and/or use of different farming technologies and production methods. The first simulation was a base farm plan in which the operator would maintain the historical crop mix for the area, participate in all price support programs, and not participate in either a conservative reserve or a biomass production program. In the second simulation, the operator would again maintain the historical crop mix, would not participate in a conservation reserve or biomass production program, and would be ineligible to participate in any price support system. The third simulation introduced the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) and included participation in all price support programs. The fourth simulation introduced a biomass crop production enterprise (switchgrass) as an alternative to enrolling highly erodible cropland in the CRP and allowed participation in price support programs. Simulations were made for three farms, two in West Tennessee and on in South Georgia. Results indicate that erosion is likely to be reduced more by the diversion of cropland to permanent vegetative cover on farms similar to the more highly erodible West Tennessee farms than on the less erodible Tift County, Georgia farm. Equivalent reductions in erosion rates result from entering highly erodible cropland in the CRP and from production of switchgrass as a biomass energy crop. Both switchgrass and CRP farm plans result in decreased net returns from the base plan, although the biomass farm plans are, in general, more profitable than the CRP plans.

  11. Evaluation of 241 AN tank farm flammable gas behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, D.A.

    1994-01-01

    The 241 AN Tank Farm tanks 241-AN-103, -104, and 105 are Flammable Gas Watch List tanks. Characteristics exhibited by these tanks (i.e., surface level drops, pressure increases, and temperature profiles) are similar to those exhibited by tank 241-SY-101, which is also a Watch List tank. Although the characteristics exhibited by tank 241-SY-101 are also present in tanks 241-AN-103, -104, and 105, they are exhibited to a lesser degree in the AN Tank Farm tanks. The 241 AN Tank Farm tanks have only small surface level drops, and the pressure changes that occur are not sufficient to release an amount of gas that would cause the dome space to exceed the lower flammability limit (LFL) for hydrogen. Therefore, additional restrictions are probably unnecessary for working within the 241 AN Tank Farm, either within the dome space of the tanks or in the waste.

  12. Exploring the wakes of large offshore wind farms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emeis, S.; Siedersleben, S.; Lampert, A.; Platis, A.; Bange, J.; Djath, B.; Schulz-Stellenfleth, J.; Neumann, T.

    2016-09-01

    Offshore meteorological characteristics set specific conditions for the operation of offshore wind farms. One specific feature is low turbulence intensity which on the one hand reduces loads on turbines but on the other hand is the reason for much longer turbine and farm wakes than over land. The German Government is presently funding a research project called WIPAFF (Wind PArk Far Field) which heads for the analysis of properties and impacts of offshore wind park far fields. The focus is on the analysis of wind farm wakes, their interaction among each other and their regional climate impact. This is done by in-situ, extensive aircraft and satellite measurements and by operating meso-scale wind field models and an analytical wind farm model.

  13. Organic Farming, Gender, and the Labor Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Alan; Mogyorody, Veronika

    2007-01-01

    This paper seeks to explain variations in gender participation in farm production and decision-making through an analysis of organic farm types, sizes, and orientations. Based on both survey and case study data, the analysis shows that female farmers on vegetable farms and mixed livestock/cash crop farms are more likely to be involved in farm…

  14. 7 CFR 795.16 - Custom farming.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Custom farming. 795.16 Section 795.16 Agriculture... PROVISIONS COMMON TO MORE THAN ONE PROGRAM PAYMENT LIMITATION General § 795.16 Custom farming. (a) Custom farming is the performance of services on a farm such as land preparation, seeding, cultivating,...

  15. 7 CFR 795.16 - Custom farming.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Custom farming. 795.16 Section 795.16 Agriculture... PROVISIONS COMMON TO MORE THAN ONE PROGRAM PAYMENT LIMITATION General § 795.16 Custom farming. (a) Custom farming is the performance of services on a farm such as land preparation, seeding, cultivating,...

  16. 7 CFR 795.16 - Custom farming.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Custom farming. 795.16 Section 795.16 Agriculture... PROVISIONS COMMON TO MORE THAN ONE PROGRAM PAYMENT LIMITATION General § 795.16 Custom farming. (a) Custom farming is the performance of services on a farm such as land preparation, seeding, cultivating,...

  17. 7 CFR 795.16 - Custom farming.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Custom farming. 795.16 Section 795.16 Agriculture... PROVISIONS COMMON TO MORE THAN ONE PROGRAM PAYMENT LIMITATION General § 795.16 Custom farming. (a) Custom farming is the performance of services on a farm such as land preparation, seeding, cultivating,...

  18. 7 CFR 795.16 - Custom farming.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Custom farming. 795.16 Section 795.16 Agriculture... PROVISIONS COMMON TO MORE THAN ONE PROGRAM PAYMENT LIMITATION General § 795.16 Custom farming. (a) Custom farming is the performance of services on a farm such as land preparation, seeding, cultivating,...

  19. Dairying. People on the Farm. [Revised].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Agriculture, Washington, DC. Office of Governmental and Public Affairs.

    This booklet, one in a series about life on modern farms, describes the daily lives of two dairy farm families, the Schwartzbecks and the Bealls of Maryland. Beginning with early morning milking, the booklet traces the farm families through their daily work and community activities, explaining how a modern dairy farm is run. Although this booklet…

  20. 7 CFR 718.201 - Farm constitution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Farm constitution. 718.201 Section 718.201 Agriculture... Reconstitution of Farms, Allotments, Quotas, and Bases § 718.201 Farm constitution. (a) In order to implement... this section. The constitution and identification of land as a farm for the first time and...

  1. 7 CFR 718.201 - Farm constitution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Farm constitution. 718.201 Section 718.201 Agriculture... Reconstitution of Farms, Allotments, Quotas, and Bases § 718.201 Farm constitution. (a) In order to implement... this section. The constitution and identification of land as a farm for the first time and...

  2. 7 CFR 718.201 - Farm constitution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Farm constitution. 718.201 Section 718.201 Agriculture... Reconstitution of Farms, Allotments, Quotas, and Bases § 718.201 Farm constitution. (a) In order to implement... this section. The constitution and identification of land as a farm for the first time and...

  3. 7 CFR 718.201 - Farm constitution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Farm constitution. 718.201 Section 718.201 Agriculture... Reconstitution of Farms, Allotments, Quotas, and Bases § 718.201 Farm constitution. (a) In order to implement... this section. The constitution and identification of land as a farm for the first time and...

  4. House and stable fly (Diptera: Muscidae) seasonal abundance, larval development substrates, and natural parasitism on small equine farms in Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This 1-year study was designed to determine adult fly population levels and development substrates on four small equine farms. Results showed that pest flies were present year-round, but differences existed in population levels among farms and seasons. Fly larvae were not found on two of the farms, ...

  5. Space Farm 7 Belvedere Plantation

    NASA Video Gallery

    A space theme maze and NASA exhibits turned a Virginia farm into an out-of-this-world experience for families and visitors at the Belvedere Plantation in Fredericksburg, Virginia. Belvedere Plantat...

  6. Push-pull farming systems.

    PubMed

    Pickett, John A; Woodcock, Christine M; Midega, Charles A O; Khan, Zeyaur R

    2014-04-01

    Farming systems for pest control, based on the stimulo-deterrent diversionary strategy or push-pull system, have become an important target for sustainable intensification of food production. A prominent example is push-pull developed in sub-Saharan Africa using a combination of companion plants delivering semiochemicals, as plant secondary metabolites, for smallholder farming cereal production, initially against lepidopterous stem borers. Opportunities are being developed for other regions and farming ecosystems. New semiochemical tools and delivery systems, including GM, are being incorporated to exploit further opportunities for mainstream arable farming systems. By delivering the push and pull effects as secondary metabolites, for example, (E)-4,8-dimethyl-1,3,7-nonatriene repelling pests and attracting beneficial insects, problems of high volatility and instability are overcome and compounds are produced when and where required.

  7. A survey on biosecurity and management practices in selected Belgian cattle farms.

    PubMed

    Sarrazin, Steven; Cay, Ann Brigitte; Laureyns, Jozef; Dewulf, Jeroen

    2014-11-01

    The shift from cure towards prevention in veterinary medicine involves the implementation of biosecurity, which includes all measures preventing pathogens from entering a herd and reducing the spread of pathogens within a herd. In Belgium no studies have considered the implementation of biosecurity measures in the daily management of cattle farms. Therefore the aim of the study was to map the current application of biosecurity measures in Belgian cattle farms in the prevention of disease transmission within and between farms. Between March 2011 and April 2013 the data were collected as part of a larger cross-sectional study, conducted to identify risk factors for reinfection with BVDV in cattle herds assumed free from BVDV. Questionnaire data from 33 dairy farms, 16 beef farms and 25 mixed (dairy and beef cattle) farms were analyzed using a combination of a linear scoring system, a categorical principal component analysis and a two-step cluster analysis to differentiate these farms based on their biosecurity levels and visit frequencies. Further enhancement of preventive measures considering external and internal biosecurity was still possible for each farm, as none of the farms obtained an overall high biosecurity level. Three groups of cattle farms were differentiated with a biosecurity level varying from low to high-medium, of which the group with the lowest biosecurity level mainly consisted of mixed farms. Animal-to-animal contacts with cattle from other herds were frequently possible as only 12% of the farmers purchasing cattle quarantined purchased animals at least three weeks and contacts over fences on pasture were possible in 70% of the herds. Basic biosecurity measures such as farm-specific protective clothing and boots were present in the majority of the farms, but they were insufficiently or incorrectly used. Cattle farms were very often visited by professional visitors of which the herd veterinarian, the AI technician and the cattle salesman most

  8. A microscale model for air pollutant dispersion simulation in urban areas: Presentation of the model and performance over a single building

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ning; Du, Yunsong; Miao, Shiguang

    2016-02-01

    A microscale air pollutant dispersion model system is developed for emergency response purposes. The model includes a diagnostic wind field model to simulate the wind field and a random-walk air pollutant dispersion model to simulate the pollutant concentration through consideration of the influence of urban buildings. Numerical experiments are designed to evaluate the model's performance, using CEDVAL (Compilation of Experimental Data for Validation of Microscale Dispersion Models) wind tunnel experiment data, including wind fields and air pollutant dispersion around a single building. The results show that the wind model can reproduce the vortexes triggered by urban buildings and the dispersion model simulates the pollutant concentration around buildings well. Typically, the simulation errors come from the determination of the key zones around a building or building cluster. This model has the potential for multiple applications; for example, the prediction of air pollutant dispersion and the evaluation of environmental impacts in emergency situations; urban planning scenarios; and the assessment of microscale air quality in urban areas.

  9. 29 CFR 780.141 - Practices must relate to farming operations on the particular farm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Practices must relate to farming operations on the... UNDER THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT General Scope of Agriculture âsuch Farming Operationsâ-on the Farm § 780.141 Practices must relate to farming operations on the particular farm. “Practices * * *...

  10. 29 CFR 780.141 - Practices must relate to farming operations on the particular farm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Practices must relate to farming operations on the... UNDER THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT General Scope of Agriculture âsuch Farming Operationsâ-on the Farm § 780.141 Practices must relate to farming operations on the particular farm. “Practices * * *...

  11. 29 CFR 780.141 - Practices must relate to farming operations on the particular farm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Practices must relate to farming operations on the... UNDER THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT General Scope of Agriculture âsuch Farming Operationsâ-on the Farm § 780.141 Practices must relate to farming operations on the particular farm. “Practices * * *...

  12. 29 CFR 780.141 - Practices must relate to farming operations on the particular farm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Practices must relate to farming operations on the... UNDER THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT General Scope of Agriculture âsuch Farming Operationsâ-on the Farm § 780.141 Practices must relate to farming operations on the particular farm. “Practices * * *...

  13. 29 CFR 780.141 - Practices must relate to farming operations on the particular farm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Practices must relate to farming operations on the... UNDER THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT General Scope of Agriculture âsuch Farming Operationsâ-on the Farm § 780.141 Practices must relate to farming operations on the particular farm. “Practices * * *...

  14. Off-Farm Labour Decision of Canadian Farm Operators: Urbanization Effects and Rural Labour Market Linkages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alasia, Alessandro; Weersink, Alfons; Bollman, Ray D.; Cranfield, John

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the factors affecting off-farm labour decisions of census-farm operators has significant implications for rural development and farm income support policy. We examine the off-farm labour decisions of Canadian farm operators using micro-level data from the 2001 Census of Agriculture combined with community level data from the 2001…

  15. Farm Population Trends and Farm Characteristics. Rural Development Research Report No. 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banks, Vera J.

    While total farm population is declining, the number of people living on the farms which produce the bulk of the nation's food and fiber is increasing. The 1970-75 total farm population decline was 13 percent, but the number of people living on farms with annual sales greater than $40,000 increased 76 percent. Such farms account for about 80…

  16. The effect of feed demand on greenhouse gas emissions and farm profitability for organic and conventional dairy farms.

    PubMed

    Kiefer, Lukas; Menzel, Friederike; Bahrs, Enno

    2014-12-01

    The reduction of product-related greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in milk production appears to be necessary. The reduction of emissions on an individual farm might be highly accepted by farm owners if it were accompanied by an increase in profitability. Using life cycle assessments to determine the product carbon footprints (PCF) and farm-level evaluations to record profitability, we explored opportunities for optimization based on analysis of 81 organic and conventional pasture-based dairy farms in southern Germany. The objective of the present study was to detect common determining factors for low PCF and high management incomes (MI) to achieve GHG reductions at the lowest possible operational cost. In our sample, organic farms, which performed economically better than conventional farms, produced PCF that were significantly higher than those produced by conventional farms [1.61 ± 0.29 vs. 1.45 ± 0.28 kg of CO₂ equivalents (CO₂eq) per kg of milk; means ± SD)]. A multiple linear regression analysis of the sample demonstrated that low feed demand per kilogram of milk, high grassland yield, and low forage area requirements per cow are the main factors that decrease PCF. These factors are also useful for improving a farm's profitability in principle. For organic farms, a reduction of feed demand of 100 g/kg of milk resulted in a PCF reduction of 105 g of CO₂eq/kg of milk and an increase in MI of approximately 2.1 euro cents (c)/kg of milk. For conventional farms, a decrease of feed demand of 100 g/kg of milk corresponded to a reduction in PCF of 117 g of CO₂eq/kg of milk and an increase in MI of approximately 3.1 c/kg of milk. Accordingly, farmers could achieve higher profits while reducing GHG emissions. Improved education and training of farmers and consultants regarding GHG mitigation and farm profitability appear to be the best methods of improving efficiency under traditional and organic farming practices.

  17. The effect of feed demand on greenhouse gas emissions and farm profitability for organic and conventional dairy farms.

    PubMed

    Kiefer, Lukas; Menzel, Friederike; Bahrs, Enno

    2014-12-01

    The reduction of product-related greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in milk production appears to be necessary. The reduction of emissions on an individual farm might be highly accepted by farm owners if it were accompanied by an increase in profitability. Using life cycle assessments to determine the product carbon footprints (PCF) and farm-level evaluations to record profitability, we explored opportunities for optimization based on analysis of 81 organic and conventional pasture-based dairy farms in southern Germany. The objective of the present study was to detect common determining factors for low PCF and high management incomes (MI) to achieve GHG reductions at the lowest possible operational cost. In our sample, organic farms, which performed economically better than conventional farms, produced PCF that were significantly higher than those produced by conventional farms [1.61 ± 0.29 vs. 1.45 ± 0.28 kg of CO₂ equivalents (CO₂eq) per kg of milk; means ± SD)]. A multiple linear regression analysis of the sample demonstrated that low feed demand per kilogram of milk, high grassland yield, and low forage area requirements per cow are the main factors that decrease PCF. These factors are also useful for improving a farm's profitability in principle. For organic farms, a reduction of feed demand of 100 g/kg of milk resulted in a PCF reduction of 105 g of CO₂eq/kg of milk and an increase in MI of approximately 2.1 euro cents (c)/kg of milk. For conventional farms, a decrease of feed demand of 100 g/kg of milk corresponded to a reduction in PCF of 117 g of CO₂eq/kg of milk and an increase in MI of approximately 3.1 c/kg of milk. Accordingly, farmers could achieve higher profits while reducing GHG emissions. Improved education and training of farmers and consultants regarding GHG mitigation and farm profitability appear to be the best methods of improving efficiency under traditional and organic farming practices. PMID:25468708

  18. Modelling impacts of offshore wind farms on trophic web: the Courseulles-sur-Mer case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raoux, Aurore; Pezy, Jean-Philippe; Dauvin, Jean-Claude; Tecchio, samuele; Degraer, Steven; Wilhelmsson, Dan; Niquil, Nathalie

    2016-04-01

    The French government is planning the construction of three offshore wind farms in Normandy. These offshore wind farms will integrate into an ecosystem already subject to a growing number of anthropogenic disturbances such as transportation, fishing, sediment deposit, and sediment extraction. The possible effects of this cumulative stressors on ecosystem functioning are still unknown, but they could impact their resilience, making them susceptible to changes from one stable state to another. Understanding the behaviour of these marine coastal complex systems is essential in order to anticipate potential state changes, and to implement conservation actions in a sustainable manner. Currently, there are no global and integrated studies on the effects of construction and exploitation of offshore wind farms. Moreover, approaches are generally focused on the conservation of some species or groups of species. Here, we develop a holistic and integrated view of ecosystem impacts through the use of trophic webs modelling tools. Trophic models describe the interaction between biological compartments at different trophic levels and are based on the quantification of flow of energy and matter in ecosystems. They allow the application of numerical methods for the characterization of emergent properties of the ecosystem, also called Ecological Network Analysis (ENA). These indices have been proposed as ecosystem health indicators as they have been demonstrated to be sensitive to different impacts on marine ecosystems. We present here in detail the strategy for analysing the potential environmental impacts of the construction of the Courseulles-sur-Mer offshore wind farm (Bay of Seine) such as the reef effect through the use of the Ecopath with Ecosim software. Similar Ecopath simulations will be made in the future on the Le Tréport offshore wind farm site. Results will contribute to a better knowledge of the impacts of the offshore wind farms on ecosystems. They also allow to

  19. Wind farms and weather: the predictability of wind farm-induced changes in the downstream atmosphere.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrie, D.; Kirk-Davidoff, D.

    2007-12-01

    The installed wind power capacity worldwide has now exceeded 80 Gigawatts, 12 Gigawatts of which is located in the United States. The size of this capacity is growing at an accelerating rate due to an increasingly reasonable delivery price compared to other energy sources, and improvements in turbine technologies. In light of this growth, we have studied the potential impact that deliberate management of a large wind farm has on both regional climatology and the ability to modify a particular storm's strength and track. We illuminate the extent to which any such changes can be made predictably within a reasonable forecast timeframe. We also distinguish remote anomalies arising from spectral wave generation within the model during the first few time steps from significant anomalies caused by gravity wave propagation away from the wind farm site. Management of a wind farm would be performed in the field by altering the farm's effective roughness length through adjustment of the attitude of the turbine blades with respect to the wind direction. We will also present results that elucidate the dependence of a storm's downstream strength upon both the timing and magnitude of the surface roughness change. This project follows work by Kirk- Davidoff and Keith (2007) that demonstrated a significant extended regional effect on climatology through an alteration of surface roughness over a large area.

  20. Vandose Zone Characterization Project at the Hanford Tank Farms: SX Tank Farm Report

    SciTech Connect

    Brodeur, J.R.; Koizumi, C.J.; Bertsch, J.F.

    1996-09-01

    The SX Tank Farm is located in the southwest portion of the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. This tank farm consists of 15 single-shell tanks (SSTs), each with an individual capacity of 1 million gallons (gal). These tanks currently store high-level nuclear waste that was primarily generated from what was called the oxidation-reduction or {open_quotes}REDOX{close_quotes} process at the S-Plant facility. Ten of the 15 tanks are listed in Hanlon as {open_quotes}assumed leakers{close_quotes} and are known to have leaked various amounts of high-level radioactive liquid to the vadose zone sediment. The current liquid content of each tank varies, but the liquid from known leaking tanks has been removed to the extent possible. In 1994, the U.S. Department of Energy Richland Office (DOE-RL) requested the DOE Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO), Grand Junction, Colorado, to perform a baseline characterization of contamination in the vadose zone at all the SST farms with spectral gamma-ray logging of boreholes surrounding the tanks. The SX Tank Farm geophysical logging was completed, and the results of this baseline characterization are presented in this report.

  1. Numerical study of ocean wave effect on offshore wind farm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Lian; Yang, Di; Meneveau, Charles

    2013-11-01

    Wind power at sea has become increasingly important in renewable energy study. For energy harvesting, winds over oceans have many advantages over winds on land, for example, larger and open surface area, faster wind speed, and more wind resource close to high population regions. On the other hand, the presence of ocean waves introduces complexities to wind turbines. There is a critical need to study the dynamical interactions among marine atmospheric boundary layer, ocean wave field, and floating turbines. In this research, we study offshore wind farm by performing large-eddy simulations for winds coupled with potential-flow-theory based simulations for broadband irregular waves, with the wind turbines represented by an actuator disk model. Our results show that windseas at different development stages result in different sea-surface roughness and have an appreciable effect on wind profile and the energy extraction rate of the turbines. If swells are present, swell-to-wind momentum and energy transfer further changes the wind field to introduce oscillations in as well as modify the mean of the wind power. DY and LS acknowledge the support of NSF-CBET-1341062. CM acknowledges the support of NSF-AGS-1045189 and NSF-OISE-1243482.

  2. Whole-farm models to quantify greenhouse gas emissions and their potential use for linking climate change mitigation and adaptation in temperate grassland ruminant-based farming systems.

    PubMed

    Del Prado, A; Crosson, P; Olesen, J E; Rotz, C A

    2013-06-01

    The farm level is the most appropriate scale for evaluating options for mitigating greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, because the farm represents the unit at which management decisions in livestock production are made. To date, a number of whole farm modelling approaches have been developed to quantify GHG emissions and explore climate change mitigation strategies for livestock systems. This paper analyses the limitations and strengths of the different existing approaches for modelling GHG mitigation by considering basic model structures, approaches for simulating GHG emissions from various farm components and the sensitivity of GHG outputs and mitigation measures to different approaches. Potential challenges for linking existing models with the simulation of impacts and adaptation measures under climate change are explored along with a brief discussion of the effects on other ecosystem services.

  3. Effect of Large Finite-Size Wind Farms and Their Wakes on Atmospheric Boundary Layer Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ka Ling; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    Through the use of large-eddy simulation, the effect of large finite-size wind farms and their wakes on conventionally-neutral atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) dynamics and power extraction is investigated. Specifically, this study focuses on a wind farm that comprises 25 rows of wind turbines, spanning a distance of 10 km. It is shown that large wind farms have a significant effect on internal boundary layer growth both inside and downwind of the wind farms. If the wind farm is large enough, the internal boundary layer interacts with the thermally-stratified free atmosphere above, leading to a modification of the ABL height and power extraction. In addition, it is shown that large wind farms create extensive wakes, which could have an effect on potential downwind wind farms. Specifically, for the case considered here, a power deficit as large as 8% is found at a distance of 10 km downwind from the wind farm. Furthermore, this study compares the wind farm wake dynamics for cases in which the conventionally neutral ABLs are driven by a unidirectional pressure gradient and Coriolis forces.

  4. Dissemination of parasites by animal movements in small ruminant farms.

    PubMed

    Vasileiou, N G C; Fthenakis, G C; Papadopoulos, E

    2015-09-30

    The present paper discusses the spread of parasites by animal movements in small ruminant farms; it focuses in dissemination of parasitic forms that would lead to subsequent infection of sheep or goats. Systems of small ruminant production involve a component of animal movement (e.g., grazing) as part of routine husbandry, which favors spread of parasitic forms; that refers mainly to parasites of the digestive system (nematodes, trematodes, cestodes, protozoa), as well as helminthes of the respiratory system, although dissemination of the various parasitic forms in the environment would not always result to subsequent infection; external parasites may also be disseminated during movements, e.g., to inhabit wooden poles used in fencing. New livestock into a farm constitutes a biosecurity hazard and the most common means to introducing new parasitic pathogens into a farm; in contemporary small ruminant health management, this contributes in dissemination of anthelmintic resistant parasitic strains; other parasitic disease agents (e.g., mange mites, ticks) may also be spread into a farm that way. Often, especially in small scale farming, visits of rams or bucks take place from one farm to another during the mating season; in such cases, ectoparasites (e.g., mange mites) can be disseminated through direct contact of animals, as well other pathogens (e.g., Toxoplasma gondii, Neospora caninum) via the semen. During transportation of sheep/goats, parasitic forms can also spread, as well as during movement of sheep or goats to slaughterhouses, in which case dogs present in these places would contribute to their dissemination. Spread of life forms of various parasites can also occur from animal species present in the environment of sheep or goats; these include animals present within a farm, stray dogs roaming around a farm (e.g., for spread of Multiceps multiceps, Echinococcus granulosus, Taenia hydatigena, N. caninum), cats commanding the environment of a farm (e.g., for

  5. Impacts of Organic Farming on Soil Aggregate Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petticrew, E. L.; Williams, N. D.

    2009-04-01

    Organic farming has expanded rapidly in the UK in recent years, amid increasing concerns for long term environmental and economic sustainability in agricultural systems. Much of the motivation for the shift away from conventional intensive agricultural practices has focused on soil nutrient management. Little attention has been directed toward the relative merits of organic farming for the physical structure of soils, despite aggregate structure and stability being of particular importance to soil erosion potential and sustainable soil quality. In this study, soil samples were collected from four arable sites within a small geographical area, in order to represent (1) an organic farm; (2) a conventional farm that only used artificial fertilizers; (3) a conventional farm that used artificial and cattle slurry fertilizers; and (4) a non-cultivated control site. Samples were analysed for living biomass and total organic content, bulk aggregate size and density distributions, bulk fragmentation fractal dimensions (which represent indices of soil erodibility), aggregate stability under simulated rainfall, and the stability of micro-aggregates that were mobilized in surface runoff generated by simulated rainfall. The relationships between the different soil properties were found to be complex. However, there were some significant differences between the samples, which were related to the different methods (or absence) of agriculture. The non-cultivated soil was determined to have the lowest erodibility and greatest aggregate stability. The conventional soil that was only fertilized by artificial means exhibited the lowest aggregate stability. There were few apparent differences between the organic soil and the conventional soil that received an input of organic fertilizer. The results of the physical analysis reflect the mining and replenishment of organic matter to each soil by the different management practices. This leads to the conclusion that the addition of organic

  6. The Department of Energy's Energy Integrated Farm System program

    SciTech Connect

    Breckenridge, R.P.; Corrigan, M.K.; Thompson, W.N.; Price, D.R.; Bramwell, D.L.

    1988-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) recently completed a program investigating the feasibility of integrating diverse energy production and energy conservation practices to reduce agriculture's dependence on fossil fuels. The Energy Integrated Farm System (EIFS) program was established in 1980 in response to the hardship imposed on US farmers by high fuel costs and unreliable fuel supplies. Seven farms located in various geographical regions of the US and Puerto Rico participated in the program. Each of these farms developed an energy integrated farm system project that used a unique combination of energy production and energy conservation methods to supply energy to the farm and reduce the farm's dependence on energy produced from nonrenewable sources such as coal and oil. Methods used at these projects included conservation tillage, solar heating, waste heat recovery, methane production from the anaerobic digestion of animal manure, electricity production from biogas, alcohol fuel production, fluidized-bed combustion of crop wastes, and computer-aided conservation irrigation. This paper gives a summarized report of the work done at the seven projects. It presents highlights and results, provides an overview of successes and problems and lists recommendations. 12 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Labor Used on U.S. Farms, 1964-1966.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sellers, Walter E., Jr.

    Such factors as type of farm, farm production region, and farm size affect the percentage of farms hiring workers, the number of hours worked by hired workers, the length of the farm workweek, and the hours of labor used per $100 of sales. Labor costs and shortages most directly affected farms that sold $20,000 or more of farm products in 1964 and…

  8. Modelling the interactions between C and N farm balances and GHG emissions from confinement dairy farms in northern Spain.

    PubMed

    Del Prado, A; Mas, K; Pardo, G; Gallejones, P

    2013-11-01

    There is world-wide concern for the contribution of dairy farming to global warming. However, there is still a need to improve the quantification of the C-footprint of dairy farming systems under different production systems and locations since most of the studies (e.g. at farm-scale or using LCA) have been carried out using too simplistic and generalised approaches. A modelling approach integrating existing and new sub-models has been developed and used to simulate the C and N flows and to predict the GHG burden of milk production (from the cradle to the farm gate) from 17 commercial confinement dairy farms in the Basque Country (northern Spain). We studied the relationship between their GHG emissions, and their management and economic performance. Additionally, we explored some of the effects on the GHG results of the modelling methodology choice. The GHG burden values resulting from this study (0.84-2.07 kg CO2-eq kg(-l) milk ECM), although variable, were within the range of values of existing studies. It was evidenced, however, that the methodology choice used for prediction had a large effect on the results. Methane from the rumen and manures, and N2O emissions from soils comprised most of the GHG emissions for milk production. Diet was the strongest factor explaining differences in GHG emissions from milk production. Moreover, the proportion of feed from the total cattle diet that could have directly been used to feed humans (e.g. cereals) was a good indicator to predict the C-footprint of milk. Not only were some other indicators, such as those in relation with farm N use efficiency, good proxies to estimate GHG emissions per ha or per kg milk ECM (C-footprint of milk) but they were also positively linked with farm economic performance.

  9. Analysis of historical gross gamma logging data from BY tank farm

    SciTech Connect

    MYERS, D.A.

    1999-10-13

    Gross gamma ray logs, recorded from January 1975 through mid-year 1994 as part of the Single-Shell Tank Farm Dry Well Surveillance Program, have been reanalyzed for the BY tank farm to locate the presence of mobile radionuclides in the subsurface. This report presents the BY tank farm gross gamma ray data in such a way as to assist others in their study of vadose zone mechanisms.

  10. Analysis of historical gross gamma logging data from TY tank farm

    SciTech Connect

    MYERS, D.A.

    1999-10-19

    Gross gamma ray logs, recorded from January 1975 through mid-year 1994 as part of the Single-Shell Tank Farm Dry Well Surveillance Program, have been reanalyzed for the TY tank farm to locate the presence of mobile radionuclides in the subsurface. This report presents the TY tank farm gross gamma ray data in such a way as to assist others in their study of vadose zone mechanism.

  11. Potential for added value in temperature simulated by high-resolution nested RCMs in present climate and in the climate change signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Luca, Alejandro; de Elía, Ramón; Laprise, René

    2013-01-01

    Regional Climate Models (RCMs) have been developed in the last two decades in order to produce high-resolution climate information by downscaling Atmosphere-Ocean General Circulation Models (AOGCMs) simulations or analyses of observed data. A crucial evaluation of RCMs worth is given by the assessment of the value added compared to the driving data. This evaluation is usually very complex due to the manifold circumstances that can preclude a fair assessment. In order to circumvent these issues, here we limit ourselves to estimating the potential of RCMs to add value over coarse-resolution data. We do this by quantifying the importance of fine-scale RCM-resolved features in the near-surface temperature, but disregarding their skill. The Reynolds decomposition technique is used to separate the variance of the time-varying RCM-simulated temperature field according to the contribution of large and small spatial scales and of stationary and transient processes. The temperature variance is then approximated by the contribution of four terms, two of them associated with coarse-scales (e.g., corresponding to the scales that can be simulated by AOGCMs) and two of them describing the original contribution of RCM simulations. Results show that the potential added value (PAV) emerges almost exclusively in regions characterised by important surface forcings either due to the presence of fine-scale topography or land-water contrasts. Moreover, some of the processes leading to small-scale variability appear to be related with relatively simple mechanisms such as the distinct physical properties of the Earth surface and the general variation of temperature with altitude in the Earth atmosphere. Finally, the article includes some results of the application of the PAV framework to the future temperature change signal due to anthropogenic greenhouse gasses. Here, contrary to previous studies centred on precipitation, findings suggest for surface temperature a relatively low potential

  12. Shrimp Farms, Ecuador

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    In many parts of the world, wetlands are being converted to shrimp ponds in order to farm these crustaceans for food and sale. One example is on the west coast of Ecuador, south of Guayaquil. The 1991 Landsat image on top shows a coastal area where 143 square kilometers of wetlands were converted to shrimp ponds. By the time ASTER acquired the bottom image in 2001, 243 square kilometers had been converted, eliminating 83% of the wetlands. These scenes cover an area of 30 x 31 km, and are centered near 3.4 degrees south latitude and 80.2 degrees west longitude.

    With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

    Size: 30 by 31 kilometers (18.6 by 19.2 miles) Location: 3.4 degrees South latitude, 80.2 degrees West longitude Orientation: North at top Image Data

  13. Commercial crocodile farming in Botswana.

    PubMed

    Dzoma, B M; Sejoe, S; Segwagwe, B V E

    2008-06-01

    A survey-based study was carried out to assess the state of crocodile farming in Botswana. A prepared, structured questionnaire was dispatched to crocodile farmers based on a directory provided by the Fisheries section of the Department of Wildlife and National Parks in the Ministry of Environment, Wildlife and National Parks. The oldest farm was established in 1986. An average of three farms have been in operation since then, all of which obtained their stock from the Okavango and Thamalakane rivers in Botswana. The current stock averages 5,419 animals as follows: breeders 4%, hatchlings 56%, and growers 40%. The average clutch size and average hatchability were 47 eggs/clutch and 67% respectively. Mortality among hatchings and growers averaged 8.3% up to 12 weeks of age. Only one farm encountered some problems with Salmonella and fungal infections of the belly. Raw skins are sold to South Africa as a result of the absence of a tannery. Crocodile farming should be encouraged in Botswana since a good market for crocodile products already exists.

  14. Commercial crocodile farming in Botswana.

    PubMed

    Dzoma, B M; Sejoe, S; Segwagwe, B V E

    2008-06-01

    A survey-based study was carried out to assess the state of crocodile farming in Botswana. A prepared, structured questionnaire was dispatched to crocodile farmers based on a directory provided by the Fisheries section of the Department of Wildlife and National Parks in the Ministry of Environment, Wildlife and National Parks. The oldest farm was established in 1986. An average of three farms have been in operation since then, all of which obtained their stock from the Okavango and Thamalakane rivers in Botswana. The current stock averages 5,419 animals as follows: breeders 4%, hatchlings 56%, and growers 40%. The average clutch size and average hatchability were 47 eggs/clutch and 67% respectively. Mortality among hatchings and growers averaged 8.3% up to 12 weeks of age. Only one farm encountered some problems with Salmonella and fungal infections of the belly. Raw skins are sold to South Africa as a result of the absence of a tannery. Crocodile farming should be encouraged in Botswana since a good market for crocodile products already exists. PMID:18509947

  15. Presentation Timer

    2010-06-23

    Abstract Conferences and Meetings feature many presentations on a tight schedule. The Session Timer system provides an electronic display for showing the remaining time in a presentation. It provides continuous feedback so the speaker can judge the pace throughout a presentation. The timer automates the job so the session chairman does not have to awkwardly interrupt the speaker.

  16. Gross revenue risk in Swiss dairy farming.

    PubMed

    El Benni, N; Finger, R

    2013-02-01

    This study investigated how agricultural policy reforms, including market liberalization and market deregulation, have influenced gross revenue risk of Swiss dairy producers using farm-level panel data between 1990 and 2009. Based on detrended data, variance decomposition was applied to assess how output prices and yields contributed to revenue risk over 3 different periods: the whole period (1990-2009), the first decade (1990-1999), and the second decade (1999-2009). In addition, the effect of expected changes in animal-based support for roughage-consuming cattle and price volatility on revenue risk was evaluated using a simulation model. Prices were the main contributor to revenue risk, even if the importance of yield risk increased over time. Swiss dairy producers can profit from natural hedge but market deregulation and market liberalization have reduced the natural hedge at the farm level. An increase in price volatility would substantially increase revenue risk and would, together with the abandonment of direct payments, reduce the comparative advantage of dairy production for risk-averse decision makers. Depending on other available risk management strategies, price risk management instruments might be a valuable solution for Swiss dairy producers in the future.

  17. Gross revenue risk in Swiss dairy farming.

    PubMed

    El Benni, N; Finger, R

    2013-02-01

    This study investigated how agricultural policy reforms, including market liberalization and market deregulation, have influenced gross revenue risk of Swiss dairy producers using farm-level panel data between 1990 and 2009. Based on detrended data, variance decomposition was applied to assess how output prices and yields contributed to revenue risk over 3 different periods: the whole period (1990-2009), the first decade (1990-1999), and the second decade (1999-2009). In addition, the effect of expected changes in animal-based support for roughage-consuming cattle and price volatility on revenue risk was evaluated using a simulation model. Prices were the main contributor to revenue risk, even if the importance of yield risk increased over time. Swiss dairy producers can profit from natural hedge but market deregulation and market liberalization have reduced the natural hedge at the farm level. An increase in price volatility would substantially increase revenue risk and would, together with the abandonment of direct payments, reduce the comparative advantage of dairy production for risk-averse decision makers. Depending on other available risk management strategies, price risk management instruments might be a valuable solution for Swiss dairy producers in the future. PMID:23219122

  18. Advances in farm animal transgenesis.

    PubMed

    Kues, Wilfried A; Niemann, Heiner

    2011-11-01

    The first transgenic livestock were produced in 1985 by microinjection of foreign DNA into zygotic pronuclei. This was the method of choice for more than 20 years, but more efficient protocols are now available, including somatic cell nuclear transfer and lentiviral transgenesis. Typical applications include carcass composition, lactational performance and wool production, as well as enhanced disease resistance and reduced environmental impact. Transgenic farm animal production for biomedical applications has found broad acceptance. In 2006 the European Medicines Agency (EMA) approved commercialization of the first recombinant pharmaceutical protein, antithrombin, produced in the mammary gland of transgenic goats. As the genome sequencing projects for various farm animal species are completed, it has become feasible to perform precise genetic modifications employing the emerging tools of lentiviral vectors, small interfering ribonucleic acids, meganucleases, zinc finger nucleases and transposons. We anticipate that genetic modification of farm animals will be instrumental in meeting global challenges in agricultural production and will open new horizons in biomedicine.

  19. Farm 2000 and other projects

    SciTech Connect

    Edson, D.V.

    1981-07-20

    Three projects are discussed here: Farm 2000 (a tractorless, energy self-sufficient farm); an energy self-sufficient farm building; and a mobile, three-in-one still, fertilizer spreader and standby generator. The mobile still produces 20 to 25 gallons of 196-proof alcohol per hour, or roughly 50 to 65 gallons per 750 gallons of mash. The diesel powered generator provides electricity for the vacuum pump and for fermentation heat, consuming approximately 2.4 gallons of fuel each hour, and because it can be towed, the by-product can be spread as fertilizer without transferring it to other equipment. This is the invention of Dr. Vladimir Tica, the president of Solar Energy Innovations Corp., Maspeth, NY.

  20. Integrating gene flow, crop biology, and farm management in on-farm conservation of avocado (Persea americana, Lauraceae).

    PubMed

    Birnbaum, Kenneth; Desalle, Rob; Peters, Charles M; Benfey, Philip N

    2003-11-01

    Maintaining crop diversity on farms where cultivars can evolve is a conservation goal, but few tools are available to assess the long-term maintenance of genetic diversity on farms. One important issue for on-farm conservation is gene flow from crops with a narrow genetic base into related populations that are genetically diverse. In a case study of avocado (Persea americana var. americana) in one of its centers of diversity (San Jerónimo, Costa Rica), we used 10 DNA microsatellite markers in a parentage analysis to estimate gene flow from commercialized varieties into a traditional crop population. Five commercialized genotypes comprised nearly 40% of orchard trees, but they contributed only about 14.5% of the gametes to the youngest cohort of trees. Although commercialized varieties and the diverse population were often planted on the same farm, planting patterns appeared to keep the two types of trees separated on small scales, possibly explaining the limited gene flow. In a simulation that combined gene flow estimates, crop biology, and graft tree management, loss of allelic diversity was less than 10% over 150 yr, and selection was effective in retaining desirable alleles in the diverse subpopulation. Simulations also showed that, in addition to gene flow, managing the genetic makeup and life history traits of the invasive commercialized varieties could have a significant impact on genetic diversity in the target population. The results support the feasibility of on-farm crop conservation, but simulations also showed that higher levels of gene flow could lead to severe losses of genetic diversity even if farmers continue to plant diverse varieties. PMID:21653337

  1. Genomic imprinting in farm animals.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xiuchun Cindy

    2014-02-01

    The mouse is the first species in which genomic imprinting was studied. Imprinting research in farm species has lagged behind owing to a lack of sequencing and genetic background information, as well as long generation intervals and high costs in tissue collection. Since the creation of Dolly, the first cloned mammal from an adult sheep, studies on genomic imprinting in domestic species have accelerated because animals from cloning and other assisted reproductive technologies exhibit phenotypes of imprinting disruptions. Although this review focuses on new developments in farm animals, most of the imprinting mechanism information was derived from the mouse.

  2. INDUSTRIAL INJURIES OF FARM WORKERS

    PubMed Central

    LaTourette, Donald P.

    1957-01-01

    Most industrial employees receive physical examinations to evaluate their physical fitness in relation to their work. The farm worker is neglected in this matter, in that he is hired for almost any type of work without physical evaluation. As a result, his accident rate is high. His efficiency at his work is low. His time loss from work because of sickness and accident is high, and the employer pays a very high rate of insurance for the patient's care and his own legal protection. Physical fitness cards should be carried by all farm laborers so that they would be put in properly graded jobs. PMID:13460719

  3. Genomic imprinting in farm animals.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xiuchun Cindy

    2014-02-01

    The mouse is the first species in which genomic imprinting was studied. Imprinting research in farm species has lagged behind owing to a lack of sequencing and genetic background information, as well as long generation intervals and high costs in tissue collection. Since the creation of Dolly, the first cloned mammal from an adult sheep, studies on genomic imprinting in domestic species have accelerated because animals from cloning and other assisted reproductive technologies exhibit phenotypes of imprinting disruptions. Although this review focuses on new developments in farm animals, most of the imprinting mechanism information was derived from the mouse. PMID:25384133

  4. Economic Indicators of the Farm Sector. Farm Sector Review, 1986.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Economic Research Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    This report contains 44 tables and 23 figures, along with narrative summaries, that provide an overall view of the farm sector in the United States in 1986. Some of the findings highlighted in the report are the following: (1) farmers spent less to produce their crops and livestock in 1986; (2) government payments to farmers increased, but prices…

  5. How to Keep 'em Up On the Farm and Farming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorenson, Douglas D.

    1987-01-01

    To counter elementary school children's ignorance about farming, a 1981 Agriculture in the Classroom Task Force recommended that states create their own groups and awareness programs. This article describes cooperative efforts between private and public sector organizations in Arizona, Colorado, Georgia, Iowa, Oregon, and Virginia. An address and…

  6. From subsistance farming to agro-business

    SciTech Connect

    Delfino, M.

    1994-12-31

    A review of the parallel session on Hardware Architectures is presented. Legacy systems from the {open_quotes}subsistance farming{close_quotes} era, where small groups from experiments built or assembled their own loosely-coupled parallel systems must still be maintained, but the major trend is towards a re-birth of the Computer Center, using {open_quotes}agrobusiness{close_quotes} technology, the large scale use of loosely-coupled parallel systems using a high performance network to communicate with storage subsystems.

  7. [Reoccurrence of histomonosis in turkey breeder farm].

    PubMed

    Aka, Johannes; Hauck, Rüdiger; Blankenstein, Petra; Balczulat, Stefanie; Hafez, Hafez Mohamed

    2011-01-01

    Histomonosis is a severe disease caused by the protozoan parasite Histomonas (H.) meleagridis, which can lead to high losses in turkeys. The present report describes the reoccurrence of histomonosis in a turkey breeder farm. The first outbreak occurred in 2005 in 17 weeks old hens, the second in 2009 in 8 weeks old hens. The disease remained restricted in one house and one compartment, respectively. Mortality rose to 26 and 65% respectively within few days in spite of therapy with various compounds. Both flocks had to be euthanized. In both cases H. meleagridis belonging to genotype A was detected. The source of infection remained unclear in both cases. PMID:21309161

  8. Modeling needs assessment for Hanford Tank Farm Operations. Vadose Zone Characterization Project at the Hanford Tank Farms

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    This report presents the results of a modeling-needs assessment conducted for Tank Farm Operations at the Hanford Site. The goal of this project is to integrate geophysical logging and subsurface transport modeling into a broader decision-based framework that will be made available to guide Tank Farm Operations in implementing future modeling studies. In support of this goal, previous subsurface transport modeling studies were reviewed, and stakeholder surveys and interviews were completed (1) to identify regulatory, stakeholder, and Native American concerns and the impacts of these concerns on Tank Farm Operations, (2) to identify technical constraints that impact site characterization and modeling efforts, and (3) to assess how subsurface transport modeling can best be used to support regulatory, stakeholder, Native American, and Tank Farm Operations needs. This report is organized into six sections. Following an introduction, Section 2.0 discusses background issues that relate to Tank Farm Operations. Section 3.0 summarizes the technical approach used to appraise the status of modeling and supporting characterization. Section 4.0 presents a detailed description of how the technical approach was implemented. Section 5.0 identifies findings and observations that relate to implementation of numerical modeling, and Section 6.0 presents recommendations for future activities.

  9. Differential response of fish assemblages to coral reef-based seaweed farming.

    PubMed

    Hehre, E James; Meeuwig, J J

    2015-01-01

    As the global demand for seaweed-derived products drives the expansion of seaweed farming onto shallow coral ecosystems, the effects of farms on fish assemblages remain largely unexplored. Shallow coral reefs provide food and shelter for highly diverse fish assemblages but are increasingly modified by anthropogenic activities. We hypothesized that the introduction of seaweed farms into degraded shallow coral reefs had potential to generate ecological benefits for fish by adding structural complexity and a possible food source. We conducted 210 transects at 14 locations, with sampling stratified across seaweed farms and sites adjacent to and distant from farms. At a seascape scale, locations were classified by their level of exposure to human disturbance. We compared sites where (1) marine protected areas (MPAs) were established, (2) neither MPAs nor blast fishing was present (hence "unprotected"), and (3) blast fishing occurred. We observed 80,186 fish representing 148 species from 38 families. The negative effects of seaweed farms on fish assemblages appeared stronger in the absence of blast fishing and were strongest when MPAs were present, likely reflecting the positive influence of the MPAs on fish within them. Species differentiating fish assemblages with respect to seaweed farming and disturbance were typically small but also included two key target species. The propensity for seaweed farms to increase fish diversity, abundance, and biomass is limited and may reduce MPA benefits. We suggest that careful consideration be given to the placement of seaweed farms relative to MPAs. PMID:25822342

  10. Differential response of fish assemblages to coral reef-based seaweed farming.

    PubMed

    Hehre, E James; Meeuwig, J J

    2015-01-01

    As the global demand for seaweed-derived products drives the expansion of seaweed farming onto shallow coral ecosystems, the effects of farms on fish assemblages remain largely unexplored. Shallow coral reefs provide food and shelter for highly diverse fish assemblages but are increasingly modified by anthropogenic activities. We hypothesized that the introduction of seaweed farms into degraded shallow coral reefs had potential to generate ecological benefits for fish by adding structural complexity and a possible food source. We conducted 210 transects at 14 locations, with sampling stratified across seaweed farms and sites adjacent to and distant from farms. At a seascape scale, locations were classified by their level of exposure to human disturbance. We compared sites where (1) marine protected areas (MPAs) were established, (2) neither MPAs nor blast fishing was present (hence "unprotected"), and (3) blast fishing occurred. We observed 80,186 fish representing 148 species from 38 families. The negative effects of seaweed farms on fish assemblages appeared stronger in the absence of blast fishing and were strongest when MPAs were present, likely reflecting the positive influence of the MPAs on fish within them. Species differentiating fish assemblages with respect to seaweed farming and disturbance were typically small but also included two key target species. The propensity for seaweed farms to increase fish diversity, abundance, and biomass is limited and may reduce MPA benefits. We suggest that careful consideration be given to the placement of seaweed farms relative to MPAs.

  11. Development and testing of a European Union-wide farm-level carbon calculator.

    PubMed

    Tuomisto, Hanna L; De Camillis, Camillo; Leip, Adrian; Nisini, Luigi; Pelletier, Nathan; Haastrup, Palle

    2015-07-01

    Direct greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from agriculture accounted for approximately 10% of total European Union (EU) emissions in 2010. To reduce farming-related GHG emissions, appropriate policy measures and supporting tools for promoting low-C farming practices may be efficacious. This article presents the methodology and testing results of a new EU-wide, farm-level C footprint calculator. The Carbon Calculator quantifies GHG emissions based on international standards and technical specifications on Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) and C footprinting. The tool delivers its results both at the farm level and as allocated to up to 5 main products of the farm. In addition to the quantification of GHG emissions, the calculator proposes mitigation options and sequestration actions that may be suitable for individual farms. The results obtained during a survey made on 54 farms from 8 EU Member States are presented. These farms were selected in view of representing the diversity of farm types across different environmental zones in the EU. The results of the C footprint of products in the data set show wide range of variation between minimum and maximum values. The results of the mitigation actions showed that the tool can help identify practices that can lead to substantial emission reductions. To avoid burden-shifting from climate change to other environmental issues, the future improvements of the tool should include incorporation of other environmental impact categories in place of solely focusing on GHG emissions.

  12. Differential Response of Fish Assemblages to Coral Reef-Based Seaweed Farming

    PubMed Central

    Hehre, E. James; Meeuwig, J. J.

    2015-01-01

    As the global demand for seaweed-derived products drives the expansion of seaweed farming onto shallow coral ecosystems, the effects of farms on fish assemblages remain largely unexplored. Shallow coral reefs provide food and shelter for highly diverse fish assemblages but are increasingly modified by anthropogenic activities. We hypothesized that the introduction of seaweed farms into degraded shallow coral reefs had potential to generate ecological benefits for fish by adding structural complexity and a possible food source. We conducted 210 transects at 14 locations, with sampling stratified across seaweed farms and sites adjacent to and distant from farms. At a seascape scale, locations were classified by their level of exposure to human disturbance. We compared sites where (1) marine protected areas (MPAs) were established, (2) neither MPAs nor blast fishing was present (hence “unprotected”), and (3) blast fishing occurred. We observed 80,186 fish representing 148 species from 38 families. The negative effects of seaweed farms on fish assemblages appeared stronger in the absence of blast fishing and were strongest when MPAs were present, likely reflecting the positive influence of the MPAs on fish within them. Species differentiating fish assemblages with respect to seaweed farming and disturbance were typically small but also included two key target species. The propensity for seaweed farms to increase fish diversity, abundance, and biomass is limited and may reduce MPA benefits. We suggest that careful consideration be given to the placement of seaweed farms relative to MPAs. PMID:25822342

  13. Preparation of floating microspheres for fish farming.

    PubMed

    Nepal, Pushp R; Chun, Myung-Kwan; Choi, Hoo-Kyun

    2007-08-16

    The aim of this study was to develop floating microspheres with practical applications to fish farming. Each microsphere with a central hollow cavity was prepared using a solvent diffusion and evaporation method with Eudragit E100. Various manufacturing parameters were investigated by single factor method. The macrolide antibiotic josamycin was selected as a model drug. The loading efficiency of the drug in the microspheres was 64.7%. In the release study, virtually none of the drug was released into the fresh water whereas the entire drug was released from the josamycin-loaded microspheres into the simulated gastric fluid of rainbow trout (pH 2.7). The buoyancy was excellent with approximately 90% of the microspheres still floating after 24h.

  14. Cancer in migrant and seasonal hired farm workers.

    PubMed

    Mills, Paul K; Dodge, Jennifer; Yang, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Studies of cancer among farm workers are difficult to conduct and interpret given the unique nature of this occupational group. The transitory nature of the work, high levels of poverty, and lack of legal documentation make epidemiologic studies difficult to accomplish. Nevertheless, this workforce in the United States, which numbers as much as 3 million persons, is a high risk population due to exposures to numerous toxic substances, including excessive sunlight, heat, dangerous machinery, fumes, fertilizers, dust, and pesticides. We summarize characteristics of farm workers (i.e., demographics, health care) from the National Agricultural Workers Survey (NAWS) and the California Agricultural Workers Survey (CAWS) and present findings from a series of studies conducted among farm workers in California. The epidemiology literature was reviewed and methods for a unique farm worker union-based epidemiologic study are presented. Farm workers in California and the rest of the United States, many of whom are seasonal and migrant workers are at elevated risk for numerous forms of cancer compared to the general population and specific pesticides may be associated with this altered risk. Elevated risks have been found for lymphomas and prostate, brain, leukemia, cervix, and stomach cancers. PMID:19437276

  15. AX Tank Farm waste retrieval alternatives cost estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Krieg, S.A.

    1998-07-21

    This report presents the estimated costs associated with retrieval of the wastes from the four tanks in AX Tank Farm. The engineering cost estimates developed for this report are based on previous cost data prepared for Project W-320 and the HTI 241-C-106 Heel Retrieval System. The costs presented in this report address only the retrieval of the wastes from the four AX Farm tanks. This includes costs for equipment procurement, fabrication, installation, and operation to retrieve the wastes. The costs to modify the existing plant equipment and systems to support the retrieval equipment are also included. The estimates do not include operational costs associated with pumping the waste out of the waste receiver tank (241-AY-102) between AX Farm retrieval campaigns or transportation, processing, and disposal of the retrieved waste.

  16. Organic farming improves pollination success in strawberries.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Georg K S; Rundlöf, Maj; Smith, Henrik G

    2012-01-01

    Pollination of insect pollinated crops has been found to be correlated to pollinator abundance and diversity. Since organic farming has the potential to mitigate negative effects of agricultural intensification on biodiversity, it may also benefit crop pollination, but direct evidence of this is scant. We evaluated the effect of organic farming on pollination of strawberry plants focusing on (1) if pollination success was higher on organic farms compared to conventional farms, and (2) if there was a time lag from conversion to organic farming until an effect was manifested. We found that pollination success and the proportion of fully pollinated berries were higher on organic compared to conventional farms and this difference was already evident 2-4 years after conversion to organic farming. Our results suggest that conversion to organic farming may rapidly increase pollination success and hence benefit the ecosystem service of crop pollination regarding both yield quantity and quality.

  17. The School Farm--A Practical Facility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puckett, James D.

    1977-01-01

    This description of the development and operation of a school farm, by the William Campbell High School in Virginia, includes suggestions for planning and management of a school farm set up for teaching agricultural principles. (TA)

  18. Using hyperspectral data in precision farming applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Precision farming practices such as variable rate applications of fertilizer and agricultural chemicals require accurate field variability mapping. This chapter investigated the value of hyperspectral remote sensing in providing useful information for five applications of precision farming: (a) Soil...

  19. Entomology: A Bee Farming a Fungus.

    PubMed

    Oldroyd, Benjamin P; Aanen, Duur K

    2015-11-16

    Farming is done not only by humans, but also by some ant, beetle and termite species. With the discovery of a stingless bee farming a fungus that provides benefits to its larvae, bees can be added to this list.

  20. Wake Mitigation Strategies for Optimizing Wind Farm Power Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dilip, Deepu; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    Although wind turbines are designed individually for optimum power production, they are often arranged into groups of closely spaced turbines in a wind farm rather than in isolation. Consequently, most turbines in a wind farm do not operate in unobstructed wind flows, but are affected by the wakes of turbines in front of them. Such wake interference significantly reduces the overall power generation from wind farms and hence, development of effective wake mitigation strategies is critical for improving wind farm efficiency. One approach towards this end is based on the notion that the operation of each turbine in a wind farm at its optimum efficiency might not lead to optimum power generation from the wind farm as a whole. This entails a down regulation of individual turbines from its optimum operating point, which can be achieved through different methods such as pitching the turbine blades, changing the turbine tip speed ratio or yawing of the turbine, to name a few. In this study, large-eddy simulations of a two-turbine arrangement with the second turbine fully in the wake of the first are performed. Different wake mitigation techniques are applied to the upstream turbine, and the effects of these on its wake characteristics are investigated. Results for the combined power from the two turbines for each of these methods are compared to a baseline scenario where no wake mitigation strategies are employed. Analysis of the results shows the potential for improved power production from such wake control methods. It should be noted, however, that the magnitude of the improvement is strongly affected by the level of turbulence in the incoming atmospheric flow.

  1. Information Presentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holden, Kritina; Sandor, A.; Thompson, S. G.; McCann, R. S.; Kaiser, M. K.; Begault, D. R.; Adelstein, B. D.; Beutter, B. R.; Stone, L. S.

    2008-01-01

    The goal of the Information Presentation Directed Research Project (DRP) is to address design questions related to the presentation of information to the crew on flight vehicles, surface landers and habitats, and during extra-vehicular activities (EVA). Designers of displays and controls for exploration missions must be prepared to select the text formats, label styles, alarms, electronic procedure designs, and cursor control devices that provide for optimal crew performance on exploration tasks. The major areas of work, or subtasks, within the Information Presentation DRP are: 1) Controls, 2) Displays, 3) Procedures, and 4) EVA Operations.

  2. Hanford Tank Farms Waste Certification Flow Loop Test Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Bamberger, Judith A.; Meyer, Perry A.; Scott, Paul A.; Adkins, Harold E.; Wells, Beric E.; Blanchard, Jeremy; Denslow, Kayte M.; Greenwood, Margaret S.; Morgen, Gerald P.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.

    2010-01-01

    A future requirement of Hanford Tank Farm operations will involve transfer of wastes from double shell tanks to the Waste Treatment Plant. As the U.S. Department of Energy contractor for Tank Farm Operations, Washington River Protection Solutions anticipates the need to certify that waste transfers comply with contractual requirements. This test plan describes the approach for evaluating several instruments that have potential to detect the onset of flow stratification and critical suspension velocity. The testing will be conducted in an existing pipe loop in Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s facility that is being modified to accommodate the testing of instruments over a range of simulated waste properties and flow conditions. The testing phases, test matrix and types of simulants needed and the range of testing conditions required to evaluate the instruments are described

  3. Information Presentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holden, Kritina L.; Thompson, Shelby G.; Sandor, Aniko; McCann, Robert S.; Kaiser, Mary K.; Adelstein, Barnard D.; Begault, Durand R.; Beutter, Brent R.; Stone, Leland S.; Godfroy, Martine

    2009-01-01

    The goal of the Information Presentation Directed Research Project (DRP) is to address design questions related to the presentation of information to the crew. In addition to addressing display design issues associated with information formatting, style, layout, and interaction, the Information Presentation DRP is also working toward understanding the effects of extreme environments encountered in space travel on information processing. Work is also in progress to refine human factors-based design tools, such as human performance modeling, that will supplement traditional design techniques and help ensure that optimal information design is accomplished in the most cost-efficient manner. The major areas of work, or subtasks, within the Information Presentation DRP for FY10 are: 1) Displays, 2) Controls, 3) Procedures and Fault Management, and 4) Human Performance Modeling. The poster will highlight completed and planned work for each subtask.

  4. Conservation Presentation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friday, Gerald

    2001-01-01

    Introduces a project in which students teach about the importance of recycling and conservation by presenting demonstrations. Includes demonstrations on water, plastic, and other recycling products such as steel. (YDS)

  5. Remembering the past and foreseeing the future while dealing with the present: a comparison of young adult and elderly cohorts on a multitask simulation of occupational activities.

    PubMed

    Guimond, Anik; Braun, Claude M J; Rouleau, Isabelle; Bélanger, Francois; Godbout, Lucie

    2006-01-01

    Thirty-five young adult and 38 elderly cybernauts, matched for education, sex, alcohol consumption, and time/day of computer use were compared on a computerized simulation of professional activities of daily living (ADLs). The program quantified performance in terms of speed and accuracy on four major constructs: (1) planning (a 30-item office party script); (2) prospective memory (injections, sleep, phone); (3) working memory (PASAT, D2, and CES analogs); and (4) retrospective memory. Participants had to organize an office party, self inject insulin and go to bed at requisite times of day, do "office work" at unpredictable times of day, and answer the phone that blinked but did not ring (near threshold stimulus). The elderly were markedly and equally impaired on all four constructs (F = 24.3, p < .000). The elderly were also equally and markedly impaired on slave and central executive systems (c.f. Baddeley's model) and on event-based and time-based prospective memory (c.f. McDaniel's model)-findings arguing against a "frontal" model of cognitive decline. This supports Salthouse's concept of a "general factors" decline in normal aging due to diffuse deterioration of the brain. On the other hand, as expected from previous findings, the balance of omissiveness/commissiveness was significantly increased in the elderly sample's error profile. Furthermore, the balance of speed and accuracy was significantly increased in the elderly. This defines limits of the "general factors" model. The elderly also markedly underused a clock icon which had to be clicked on to get the virtual time of day necessary for integrating all the required actions. Prospective memory explained 11% of the aging variance despite partialing out of the three other constructs, making it appear as a golden standard of sensititivity to normal aging-though perhaps provided it be implemented in a distracting, multitask, strategically demanding context.

  6. Information Presentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holden, K.L.; Boyer, J.L.; Sandor, A.; Thompson, S.G.; McCann, R.S.; Begault, D.R.; Adelstein, B.D.; Beutter, B.R.; Stone, L.S.

    2009-01-01

    The goal of the Information Presentation Directed Research Project (DRP) is to address design questions related to the presentation of information to the crew. The major areas of work, or subtasks, within this DRP are: 1) Displays, 2) Controls, 3) Electronic Procedures and Fault Management, and 4) Human Performance Modeling. This DRP is a collaborative effort between researchers at Johnson Space Center and Ames Research Center.

  7. Viability of the Happy Factor™ targeted selective treatment approach on several sheep farms in Scotland.

    PubMed

    McBean, David; Nath, Mintu; Lambe, Nicola; Morgan-Davies, Claire; Kenyon, Fiona

    2016-03-15

    The aim of this study was to examine the use of Happy Factor™ weight based targeted selective treatment (TST) on several commercial farms in Scotland in combination with findings from a long term trial on a research farm to assess the potential for TST use in varying farming operations as an alternative to the current regimen of whole flock treatment. Lambs on each farm were regularly weighed and climatic conditions and pasture availability measured for inclusion into the Happy Factor™ model to calculate weight targets. Half of the lambs were allocated to TST treatment and any failing to reach the weight target was treated with the anthelmintic of choice on that farm, while the remaining half of each flock was treated with anthelmintic as per normal practice on that farm (routine treatment, RT). The research farm (farm 1) hosted a long term trial using four anthelmintic treatment regimes over 6 years, and data from two regimes are presented here, alongside findings from three further farms: two commercial enterprises (farms 2 and 3) and a research farm operating as a commercial analogue with two breeds (farms 4a and 4b). The effect of TST strategy on lamb productivity and the number of anthelmintic treatments was investigated. There was no evidence (p>0.300) that mean bodyweight or growth rate was different between TST and RT groups on any of the farms and 95% confidence intervals of TST and RT groups generally suggested that TST had negligible unfavourable effects on the average growth of lambs for most of the farms. Growth rates ranged from 97.39 to 189.16g/day reflecting the varied nature of the farms. All commercial farms used significantly less (1.34 RT versus 1.14 TST treatments per animal, p<0.05) anthelmintic in lambs following TST, with a reduction from 1, 1, 1.03 and 1.14 to 0.77, 0.57, 0.82 and 0.81 in the number of treatments per animal for farms 2, 3, 4a and 4b respectively. This study suggests that TST is a viable means of controlling parasitic

  8. Viability of the Happy Factor™ targeted selective treatment approach on several sheep farms in Scotland.

    PubMed

    McBean, David; Nath, Mintu; Lambe, Nicola; Morgan-Davies, Claire; Kenyon, Fiona

    2016-03-15

    The aim of this study was to examine the use of Happy Factor™ weight based targeted selective treatment (TST) on several commercial farms in Scotland in combination with findings from a long term trial on a research farm to assess the potential for TST use in varying farming operations as an alternative to the current regimen of whole flock treatment. Lambs on each farm were regularly weighed and climatic conditions and pasture availability measured for inclusion into the Happy Factor™ model to calculate weight targets. Half of the lambs were allocated to TST treatment and any failing to reach the weight target was treated with the anthelmintic of choice on that farm, while the remaining half of each flock was treated with anthelmintic as per normal practice on that farm (routine treatment, RT). The research farm (farm 1) hosted a long term trial using four anthelmintic treatment regimes over 6 years, and data from two regimes are presented here, alongside findings from three further farms: two commercial enterprises (farms 2 and 3) and a research farm operating as a commercial analogue with two breeds (farms 4a and 4b). The effect of TST strategy on lamb productivity and the number of anthelmintic treatments was investigated. There was no evidence (p>0.300) that mean bodyweight or growth rate was different between TST and RT groups on any of the farms and 95% confidence intervals of TST and RT groups generally suggested that TST had negligible unfavourable effects on the average growth of lambs for most of the farms. Growth rates ranged from 97.39 to 189.16g/day reflecting the varied nature of the farms. All commercial farms used significantly less (1.34 RT versus 1.14 TST treatments per animal, p<0.05) anthelmintic in lambs following TST, with a reduction from 1, 1, 1.03 and 1.14 to 0.77, 0.57, 0.82 and 0.81 in the number of treatments per animal for farms 2, 3, 4a and 4b respectively. This study suggests that TST is a viable means of controlling parasitic

  9. Applied coastal biogeochemical modelling to quantify the environmental impact of fish farm nutrients and inform managers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wild-Allen, Karen; Herzfeld, Mike; Thompson, Peter A.; Rosebrock, Uwe; Parslow, John; Volkman, John K.

    2010-04-01

    A 3D biogeochemical model is validated against regional observations and used to quantify the fluxes and transformations of natural and anthropogenic nutrients in an oligotrophic marine channel and micro-tidal estuary in southern Tasmania. The model reproduces the seasonal cycle of pelagic phytoplankton biomass and dissolved inorganic nutrient concentrations observed in 2002 and is not excessively sensitive to the parameterization of the key biogeochemical processes of phytoplankton light absorption, zooplankton grazing or denitrification. Simulations indicate that in 2002, 66% of total nitrogen influx to the region was supplied from marine sources, 20% from rivers and 14% from salmon farms operating in the region. Fish farm loads of labile dissolved and particulate nitrogen have greatest impact on water quality in summer and autumn when they supply labile nutrient to seasonally depleted surface waters and fuel additional phytoplankton growth. Bays in the northern part of the region are more vulnerable to farm nutrient enrichment due, in part, to the residual northward circulation. It is estimated that in 2002 12% of the region had changed from oligotrophic to mesotrophic status due to salmon farm nutrient enrichment. Analysis of a future scenario simulation with 3 fold increase in farm loads quantified the spatial and temporal impact of farms on water quality and indicated that mesotrophic conditions could extend to 54% of the region. Statistical summaries and visualisation methods were used to communicate model results to stakeholders. Management action has been taken to limit future fish farm loads into the region and implement an environmental monitoring program.

  10. The Rapid Adjustment Farm Program's Influence on Other Farms in the Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simeral, Kenneth D.

    The study investigated the diffusion of innovative farming practices from Rapid Adjustment Farms (RAF) to other farms in southeast Ohio. The RAF program, begun in 1968, introduced new technology and management practices to its participant farmers. After reviewing literature of farming programs' information diffusion, a descriptive survey was made…

  11. Remote sensing for cotton farming

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Application of remote sensing technologies in agriculture began with the use of aerial photography to identify cotton root rot in the late 1920s. From then on, agricultural remote sensing has developed gradually until the introduction of precision farming technologies in the late 1980s and biotechno...

  12. Imagining the ideal dairy farm.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Clarissa S; Hötzel, Maria José; Weary, Daniel M; Robbins, Jesse A; von Keyserlingk, Marina A G

    2016-02-01

    Practices in agriculture can have negative effects on the environment, rural communities, food safety, and animal welfare. Although disagreements are possible about specific issues and potential solutions, it is widely recognized that public input is needed in the development of socially sustainable agriculture systems. The aim of this study was to assess the views of people not affiliated with the dairy industry on what they perceived to be the ideal dairy farm and their associated reasons. Through an online survey, participants were invited to respond to the following open-ended question: "What do you consider to be an ideal dairy farm and why are these characteristics important to you?" Although participants referenced social, economic, and ecological aspects of dairy farming, animal welfare was the primary issue raised. Concern was expressed directly about the quality of life for the animals, and the indirect effect of animal welfare on milk quality. Thus participants appeared to hold an ethic for dairy farming that included concern for the animal, as well as economic, social, and environmental aspects of the dairy system.

  13. Child Rearing on the Farm.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Sam; And Others

    During the second year of a 3-year study involving 112 Iowa farm families, mothers of children aged 4 to 10 years old expressed expectations of independence, responsibility, and hard work from their children during home interviews. The importance of the parent-child relationship together with the lack of sufficient child-rearing research on rural…

  14. Farming. Canada at Work Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Love, Ann; Drake, Jane

    This book is part of the Canada At Work series that introduces children to the people, machines, work and environmental concerns involved in bringing to market the products from important Canadian natural resources. This volume features a year-round look at two kinds of agriculture in Canada. On the vegetable farm, children find out about spring…

  15. Farm Foundation Annual Report, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farm Foundation, Oak Brook, IL.

    The Farm Foundation was established in 1933 as a private agency to help coordinate the work of other public and private groups and agencies to improve agriculture and rural life without taking political positions or supporting specific legislation. An operating rather than a grant-making foundation, the foundation develops national and regional…

  16. EMF Responses in Farm Animals

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Larry E. ); R Matthes, JH Bernhardt, and MH Repacholi

    1999-10-19

    Relatively few studies have been performed investigating the effects of EMF exposure on farm animals. Most of those that have been described in the literature are of surveys of animals living in the vicinity of power transmission lines. Even fewer studies have been conducted in large animals under controlled laboratory conditions. Results generally provide little evidence that electric and/or magnetic fields at environmental levels (under transmission lines up to 1000 kV) affect farm animals. There is limited evidence that cows exposed to EMF may exhibit slight changes in length of estrous cycle, although associated hormones (eg. progesterone) appear to be unaffected. The effects of electric fields on development in swine (some increase in birth defects and malformations) exposed to high strength electric fields were not consistent across generations nor supported by comparable rodent studies. Finally, electrical currents and"stray voltages", parameters associated with EMF, are found on some farms above perception levels. These voltages and currents can produce behavioral changes in farm animals and may impact production or health of the animals.

  17. Imagining the ideal dairy farm.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Clarissa S; Hötzel, Maria José; Weary, Daniel M; Robbins, Jesse A; von Keyserlingk, Marina A G

    2016-02-01

    Practices in agriculture can have negative effects on the environment, rural communities, food safety, and animal welfare. Although disagreements are possible about specific issues and potential solutions, it is widely recognized that public input is needed in the development of socially sustainable agriculture systems. The aim of this study was to assess the views of people not affiliated with the dairy industry on what they perceived to be the ideal dairy farm and their associated reasons. Through an online survey, participants were invited to respond to the following open-ended question: "What do you consider to be an ideal dairy farm and why are these characteristics important to you?" Although participants referenced social, economic, and ecological aspects of dairy farming, animal welfare was the primary issue raised. Concern was expressed directly about the quality of life for the animals, and the indirect effect of animal welfare on milk quality. Thus participants appeared to hold an ethic for dairy farming that included concern for the animal, as well as economic, social, and environmental aspects of the dairy system. PMID:26709190

  18. Farm Women: Challenge to Scholarship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Frances

    1981-01-01

    Assesses current state of knowledge of the multiple roles of farm women as farmers, women, family members, individuals, and members of agricultural organizations; suggests directions for future research; discusses issues in research design. Available from: Rural Sociological Society, 325 Morgan Hall, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37916.…

  19. Culture of the 'aquatic chicken': present concerns and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Coward, K; Little, D C

    2001-02-01

    This is not actually a swimming chicken, but rather a fish that fulfils a similar role for subsistence farmers and can also be farmed on a commercial scale. Like the chicken, the tilapiines are meeting protein needs in an affordable way world-wide. However, present farming strategies are struggling to meet ever-rising consumer demand.

  20. Simulation of the present-day atmospheric ozone, odd nitrogen, chlorine and other species using a coupled 2-D model in isentropic coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, H.; Olaguer, E.; Tung, K. K.

    1991-01-01

    A zonally averaged two-dimensional model for chemical species in the atmosphere (Olaguer et al., 1990), with coupled dynamics, radiation transfer, and chemistry, is used to study the present-day atmospheric ozone, odd nitrogen, chlorine, other species. The model utilizes all zonally averaged physical equations of momentum, energy, and mass and determines self-consistently the advective and diffusive tranasport parameters from the temperature specific to the period of observation. A comparison of the model results with observations showed good agreement.

  1. An integrated, semi-automated approach to thermochemical conversion research for sustainable farming systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An integrated, semi-automated system is presented for the rapid and efficient testing and production of research-scale quantities of biochar. This biochar, produced from agricultural waste materials, can easily be incorporated in future sustainable livestock farming systems. These farming systems wi...

  2. ATMOSPHERIC DISPERSION COEFFICIENTS AND RADIOLOGICAL AND TOXICOLOGICAL EXPOSURE METHODOLOGY FOR USE IN TANK FARMS

    SciTech Connect

    GRIGSBY KM

    2011-04-07

    This report presents the atmospheric dispersion coefficients used in Tank Farms safety analysis. The basis equations for calculating radiological and toxicological exposures are also included. In this revision, the time averaging for toxicological consequence evaluations is clarified based on a review of DOE complex guidance and a review of tank farm chemicals.

  3. Farm-Level Effects of Soil Conservation and Commodity Policy Alternatives: Model and Data Documentation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton, John D.

    This report documents a profit-maximizing linear programming (LP) model of a farm typical of a major corn-soybean producing area in the Southern Michigan-Northern Indiana Drift Plain. Following an introduction, a complete description of the farm is provided. The next section presents the LP model, which is structured to help analyze after-tax…

  4. Parentage analysis and outcrossing patterns in cacao (Theobroma cacao L.) farms in Cameroon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The present study investigates the parentage of farm accessions in Cameroon using data from 12 microsatellite loci. Bayesian analysis suggests that 25.5% of the 400 farm accessions studies are still closely related to the traditinal Amelonado variety called 'German Cocoa' by the farmers. Another 46....

  5. READINESS OF NEW YORK COOPERATIVE EXTENSION TO UNDERTAKE A FARM LABOR PROGRAM. EXTENSION STUDY, NUMBER 16.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ALEXANDER, FRANK D.

    THIS STUDY SOUGHT MAINLY TO DETERMINE THE PRESENT NEW YORK STATE COOPERATIVE EXTENSION INPUT ON FARM LABOR EDUCATION, ESPECIALLY FOR YEAR ROUND FARM LABOR, AND TO ANTICIPATE EXTENSION INPUT FOR THE NEAR FUTURE IN THIS FIELD. QUESTIONNAIRES WERE RETURNED FROM 54 OF THE 56 COUNTIES WITH AGRICULTURAL DIVISIONS, ALL 13 COOPERATIVE EXTENSION…

  6. Directory: New York State Services for Migrant and Seasonal Farm Workers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Interdepartmental Committee on Migrant Labor, Albany.

    A comprehensive directory of New York State services for migrant and seasonal farm workers is presented. Brief program descriptions--as well as the names of managerial personnel, addresses, and phone numbers for the numerous agencies related to migrant or seasonal farm programs--are given for the following: the State Department of Agriculture and…

  7. An Interaction-Based Model of a Social Exchange in the Two-Generation Farm Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballard-Reisch, Deborah S.; Weigel, Daniel J.

    1991-01-01

    Presents a model which blends the family and work spheres into an exchange-based model of family interaction in two-generation farm families. Specific recommendations are made to help rural family practitioners, educators, and Cooperative Extension agents better understand and work with two-generation farm families. (LLL)

  8. Economic Indicators of the Farm Sector. Production and Efficiency Statistics, 1985.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Economic Research Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    This annual report includes major time series that reflect changes in farm production, production inputs, and production efficiency. Time series data are presented for the United States and, in most cases, for 10 farm production regions. The text highlights changes since the previous year or specified time period. In previous reports in this…

  9. Iowa Farm and Rural Life Poll. Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lasley, Paul

    The 1984 Iowa Farm and Rural Life Poll is summarized in this report. Responses from 1,585 randomly selected Iowa farm families showed that respondents opposed relaxing current state laws limiting foreign investors and non-farm corporations' ownership of farmland; had mixed feelings on absentee ownership, changing banking laws to allow banks to…

  10. 25 CFR 700.65 - Farm operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Farm operation. 700.65 Section 700.65 Indians THE OFFICE OF NAVAJO AND HOPI INDIAN RELOCATION COMMISSION OPERATIONS AND RELOCATION PROCEDURES General Policies and Instructions Definitions § 700.65 Farm operation. Farm operation means any activity conducted...

  11. 25 CFR 700.65 - Farm operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Farm operation. 700.65 Section 700.65 Indians THE OFFICE OF NAVAJO AND HOPI INDIAN RELOCATION COMMISSION OPERATIONS AND RELOCATION PROCEDURES General Policies and Instructions Definitions § 700.65 Farm operation. Farm operation means any activity conducted...

  12. 25 CFR 700.65 - Farm operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Farm operation. 700.65 Section 700.65 Indians THE OFFICE OF NAVAJO AND HOPI INDIAN RELOCATION COMMISSION OPERATIONS AND RELOCATION PROCEDURES General Policies and Instructions Definitions § 700.65 Farm operation. Farm operation means any activity conducted...

  13. 25 CFR 700.65 - Farm operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Farm operation. 700.65 Section 700.65 Indians THE OFFICE OF NAVAJO AND HOPI INDIAN RELOCATION COMMISSION OPERATIONS AND RELOCATION PROCEDURES General Policies and Instructions Definitions § 700.65 Farm operation. Farm operation means any activity conducted...

  14. Growing Vegetables. People on the Farm.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Agriculture, Washington, DC. Office of Governmental and Public Affairs.

    This booklet, one in a series about life on modern farms, describes farm operations and some activities in the lives of six vegetable farmers throughout the United States. The booklet visits the tomato growing of Carl Schneider and his partners and the lettuce growing farm of Norman Martella, both in California. It then includes brief accounts of…

  15. Missouri Small Farm Family Program. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enlow, George; And Others

    Records maintained by rural extension designees on the Missouri Small Farm Family Program, (initiated in 1972 by the cooperative extension service to help low income farm families learn to use available resources to improve their quality of life) provided data re: family characteristics, farm improvement progress, and improvement in the quality of…

  16. 12 CFR 619.9140 - Farm Credit bank(s).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Farm Credit bank(s). 619.9140 Section 619.9140 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 619.9140 Farm Credit bank(s). Except as otherwise defined, the term Farm Credit bank(s) includes Farm Credit...

  17. 12 CFR 619.9140 - Farm Credit bank(s).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Farm Credit bank(s). 619.9140 Section 619.9140 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 619.9140 Farm Credit bank(s). Except as otherwise defined, the term Farm Credit bank(s) includes Farm Credit...

  18. 12 CFR 619.9140 - Farm Credit bank(s).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Farm Credit bank(s). 619.9140 Section 619.9140 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 619.9140 Farm Credit bank(s). Except as otherwise defined, the term Farm Credit bank(s) includes Farm Credit...

  19. 12 CFR 619.9140 - Farm Credit bank(s).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Farm Credit bank(s). 619.9140 Section 619.9140 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 619.9140 Farm Credit bank(s). Except as otherwise defined, the term Farm Credit bank(s) includes Farm Credit...

  20. 12 CFR 619.9140 - Farm Credit bank(s).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Farm Credit bank(s). 619.9140 Section 619.9140 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 619.9140 Farm Credit bank(s). Except as otherwise defined, the term Farm Credit bank(s) includes Farm Credit...

  1. Empirical Analysis of Farm Credit Risk under the Structure Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yan, Yan

    2009-01-01

    The study measures farm credit risk by using farm records collected by Farm Business Farm Management (FBFM) during the period 1995-2004. The study addresses the following questions: (1) whether farm's financial position is fully described by the structure model, (2) what are the determinants of farm capital structure under the structure model, (3)…

  2. Bovine tuberculosis in badger (Meles meles) populations in southwest England: an assessment of past, present and possible future control strategies using simulation modelling.

    PubMed

    White, P C; Harris, S

    1995-09-29

    A spatial stochastic simulation model was used to compare the efficacy of different badger control policies and to determine the theoretical requirements for the control of endemic bovine tuberculosis in badger populations in southwest England. Culling-based strategies for controlling endemic disease were compared with strategies employing a yet-to-be-developed oral vaccine which would provide uninfected badgers with immunity to the infection. A comparative assessment was made of the efficacy of previous and proposed culling-based strategies employed by the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food for the control of localized disease, and the potential for an oral vaccine-based strategy for the control of localized disease was examined. For endemic bovine tuberculosis, to achieve a reasonable probability (p > 0.70) of successful control with a strategy involving a single culling operation, a very high proportion of the badger population (> 90%) must be culled. Single vaccination would not be successful in combating endemic disease. However, strategies involving repeated annual vaccination would have a very high probability of eradicating endemic disease, even with a relatively low (40-50%) annual vaccination efficiency. The most successful culling-based strategies for the control of localized disease were the gassing and clean ring strategies. Compared with no control at all, the interim strategy only offered benefits of a lower probability of disease spread and persistence in populations with low disease-free equilibrium group sizes or low initial prevalences of infection. In all other instances the benefits were negligible. The live test strategy will offer an improvement over the interim strategy, but will not be as effective as either the gassing or clean-ring strategies. In addition, it is likely to necessitate the culling of approximately four times as many badgers each year as the interim strategy, and the proportion of those killed that are infected will

  3. Proteomics in farm animals models of human diseases.

    PubMed

    Ceciliani, Fabrizio; Restelli, Laura; Lecchi, Cristina

    2014-10-01

    The need to provide in vivo complex environments to understand human diseases strongly relies on the use of animal models, which traditionally include small rodents and rabbits. It is becoming increasingly evident that the few species utilised to date cannot be regarded as universal. There is a great need for new animal species that are naturally endowed with specific features relevant to human diseases. Farm animals, including pigs, cows, sheep and horses, represent a valid alternative to commonly utilised rodent models. There is an ample scope for the application of proteomic techniques in farm animals, and the establishment of several proteomic maps of plasma and tissue has clearly demonstrated that farm animals provide a disease environment that closely resembles that of human diseases. The present review offers a snapshot of how proteomic techniques have been applied to farm animals to improve their use as biomedical models. Focus will be on specific topics of biomedical research in which farm animal models have been characterised through the application of proteomic techniques.

  4. Farm animal welfare: the five freedoms and the free market.

    PubMed

    Webster, A J

    2001-05-01

    This review addresses the scientific, ethical and economic factors that impact on the welfare of farm animals. Respect for animals within the food chain is considered within the context of an ethical matrix that affords respect according to the principles of wellbeing, autonomy and justice to consumers, farm animals, farmers and the living environment. The welfare of a farm animal depends on its ability to sustain fitness and avoid suffering. The responsibility of the farmer is to make provision for good welfare through good husbandry; he cannot ensure good welfare. Improvements to farm animal welfare can only come about within the context of the forces that drive the free market. In essence, consumers need to afford a greater extrinsic value to farm animals. The costs to farmers of legislation to impose higher animal welfare standards are substantial but the cost to consumers can be very small. The responsibility is therefore on the consumer to convert an expressed desire for higher welfare standards into an effective demand. A promising route to encourage and fulfil this demand is through welfare-based quality assurance schemes with quality control ensured by independent audit. At present, audit protocols are based largely on identification of the elements of good husbandry. Ultimately we need a further independent audit to ensure that the outcome of these perceived elements of good husbandry is, in fact, good animal welfare.

  5. Numerical investigation of wind turbine and wind farm aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvaraj, Suganthi

    A numerical method based on the solution of Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes equations and actuator disk representation of turbine rotor is developed and implemented in the OpenFOAM software suite for aerodynamic analysis of horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWT). The method and the implementation are validated against the 1-D momentum theory, the blade element momentum theory and against experimental data. The model is used for analyzing aerodynamics of a novel dual rotor wind turbine concept and wind farms. Horizontal axis wind turbines suffer from aerodynamic inefficiencies in the blade root region (near the hub) due to several non-aerodynamic constraints (e.g., manufacturing, transportation, cost, etc.). A new dual-rotor wind turbine (DRWT) concept is proposed that aims at mitigating these losses. A DRWT is designed using an existing turbine rotor for the main rotor (Risoe turbine and NREL 5 MW turbine), while the secondary rotor is designed using a high lift to drag ratio airfoil (the DU 96 airfoil from TU Delft). The numerical aerodynamic analysis method developed as a part of this thesis is used to optimize the design. The new DRWT design gives an improvement of about 7% in aerodynamic efficiency over the single rotor turbine. Wind turbines are typically deployed in clusters called wind farms. HAWTs also suffer from aerodynamic losses in a wind farm due to interactions with wind turbine wakes. An interesting mesoscale meteorological phenomenon called "surface flow convergence" believed to be caused by wind turbine arrays is investigated using the numerical method developed here. This phenomenon is believed to be caused by the pressure gradient set up by wind turbines operating in close proximity in a farm. A conceptual/hypothetical wind farm simulation validates the hypothesis that a pressure gradient is setup in wind farms due to turbines and that it can cause flow veering of the order of 10 degrees. Simulations of a real wind farm (Story County) are also

  6. Energy integrated farm system: Millbrook Farm and Cornell University

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    Millbrook Farm, a New York State dairy farm with corn and alfalfa crops, is designed to conserve energy through energy integrated concepts including methane digestion, cogeneration, energy conservation crop practices, and a computer management system. The integrated energy concepts to be demonstrated are: methane generation from cow manure; cogeneration of thermal and electric energy from methane combustion. New York State Electric and Gas Company will accept excess electric power into its grid; energy conservation in crop production through conservation tillage and substitution of manure for nitrogen fertilizers; energy conservation through waste-heat recovery in milk cooling and in recycling of wastewater; and application of microprocessor control systems to control and monitor energy in the methane digester, the cogeneration equipment, and the waste-heat exchangers.

  7. Modelling farm vulnerability to flooding: A step toward vulnerability mitigation policies appraisal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brémond, P.; Abrami, G.; Blanc, C.; Grelot, F.

    2009-04-01

    flood. In the case of farm activities, vulnerability mitigation consists in implementing measures which can be: physical (equipment or electric power system elevation), organizational (emergency or recovery plan) or financial (insurance). These measures aim at decreasing the total damage incurred by farmers in case of flooding. For instance, if equipment is elevated, it will not suffer direct damage such as degradation. As a consequence, equipment will be available to continue production or recovery tasks, thus, avoiding indirect damage such as delays, indebtedness… The effects of these policies on farms, in particular vulnerability mitigation cannot be appraised using current methodologies mainly because they do not consider farm as a whole and focus on direct damage at the land plot scale (loss of yield). Moreover, since vulnerability mitigation policies are quite recent, few examples of implementation exist and no feedback experience can be processed. Meanwhile, decision makers and financial actors require more justification of the efficiency of public fund by economic appraisal of the projects. On the Rhône River, decision makers asked for an economic evaluation of the program of farm vulnerability mitigation they plan to implement. This implies to identify the effects of the measures to mitigate farm vulnerability, and to classify them by comparing their efficacy (avoided damage) and their cost of implementation. In this presentation, we propose and discuss a conceptual model of vulnerability at the farm scale. The modelling, in Unified Modelling Language, enabled to represent the ties between spatial, organizational and temporal dimensions, which are central to understanding of farm vulnerability and resilience to flooding. Through this modelling, we encompass three goals: To improve the comprehension of farm vulnerability and create a framework that allow discussion with experts of different disciplines as well as with local farmers; To identify data which

  8. Influence of Speed Governors of Hydropower Stations on Frequency Stabilization of Fixed-Speed Wind Farm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AL Jowder, Fawzi A. Rahman

    2013-05-01

    This paper uses a small power system, consisting of two hydropower stations and a fixed-speed wind farm as sources of power, to study the influence of type of speed governor of hydropower stations on the frequency stabilization of the fixed-speed wind farm. As an example, two types of speed governors are selected which are (1) mechanical-hydraulic speed governor and (2) electrical-hydraulic speed governor. Rest of the speed governors can be also examined following the same methodology presented in the research. Two transfer functions, which correspond to the two speed governors, are developed for each hydropower station. The overall transfer function of the test power system is developed, and different study cases are presented. The frequency response analysis of the different transfer functions is used to compare the two speed governors based on their ability to stabilize the frequency deviation of the fixed-speed wind resulting from electrical or mechanical disturbances in the power systems. Time-domain simulations under a mechanical disturbance, represented by a wind gust, and an electrical disturbance, represented by three-phase to ground fault, are performed to validate the results of the frequency response analysis.

  9. An array effect of wave energy farm buoys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kweon, Hyuck-Min; Lee, Jung-Lyul

    2012-12-01

    An ocean buoy energy farm is considered for Green energy generation and delivery to small towns along the Korean coast. The present studypresents that the floating buoy-type energy farm appears to be sufficiently feasible fortrapping more energy compared to afixed cylinder duck array. It is also seen from the numerical resultsthat the resonated waves between spaced buoys are further trapped by floating buoy motion.Our numerical study is analyzed by a plane-wave approximation, in which evanescent mode effects are included in a modified mild-slope equation based on the scattering characteristics for a single buoy.

  10. Farm safety education in New York Mennonite schools.

    PubMed

    Carrabba, James; Wyckoff, Sherry; Scribani, Melissa; Jenkins, Paul; May, John

    2012-01-01

    This intervention delivers agricultural safety information to Mennonite youth, grades 1 to 8 in their schools. The purpose is to reduce injuries in the Groffdale Conference, an Old Order Mennonite community in Yates County, New York. The New York Center for Agricultural Medicine and Health (NYCAMH) assisted community members to create an appropriate farm safety presentation for Mennonite children. A vital aspect of this approach is that members of the Old Order community are the educators who are delivering the information in a culturally appropriate manner. As an outside organization, it is unlikely that NYCAMH would have access to this population to directly deliver youth farm safety education.

  11. How do older Australian farming couples construct generativity across the life course?: A narrative exploration.

    PubMed

    Downey, Heather; Threlkeld, Guinever; Warburton, Jeni

    2016-08-01

    Australian farming, predominantly based on a family farming model, reflects a distinct culture and identity within Australia. Generativity can be identified within the longstanding practice of patrilineal generational farm succession. However, the changing social, economic and environmental context facing farmers today, is now threatening the sustainability and viability of the family farming model. The outcome in Australia, as elsewhere, has been a significant decline in the number of farming families and a sharp reduction in the number of young people entering farming. Overall, farmers are increasingly aging on farm in two-person households and without a next generation to follow. In this scenario, the article presents research which aims to explore how older Australian couples construct generativity across their life course. The study draws on constructionist narrative research conducted in the Australian New South Wales Southern Riverina. Generativity, as presented by Erikson (1950) and Kotre (1996), is utilised as a theoretical frame by which to explore the meaning of generational family farming in six couples' stories of navigating later life challenges. Drawing on Gubrium and Holstein's (1998) 'narrative practice' analytic framework, this article examines tensions between couples' jointly constructed narratives and the grand narrative of Australian family farming. A 'narrative practice' approach permits examination of the meaning of experience, coherence, and the ways contexts, as well as stories of the past influence stories told about couples' present and future generative expression. This approach is highly consistent with the rapidly changing farming context where couples may be trying hard to construct a coherent story within a distinct family farming grand narrative under considerable tension. Findings show that in this context, and often in the absence of the next generation, there are visible changes in farming couples' expression of generativity

  12. How do older Australian farming couples construct generativity across the life course?: A narrative exploration.

    PubMed

    Downey, Heather; Threlkeld, Guinever; Warburton, Jeni

    2016-08-01

    Australian farming, predominantly based on a family farming model, reflects a distinct culture and identity within Australia. Generativity can be identified within the longstanding practice of patrilineal generational farm succession. However, the changing social, economic and environmental context facing farmers today, is now threatening the sustainability and viability of the family farming model. The outcome in Australia, as elsewhere, has been a significant decline in the number of farming families and a sharp reduction in the number of young people entering farming. Overall, farmers are increasingly aging on farm in two-person households and without a next generation to follow. In this scenario, the article presents research which aims to explore how older Australian couples construct generativity across their life course. The study draws on constructionist narrative research conducted in the Australian New South Wales Southern Riverina. Generativity, as presented by Erikson (1950) and Kotre (1996), is utilised as a theoretical frame by which to explore the meaning of generational family farming in six couples' stories of navigating later life challenges. Drawing on Gubrium and Holstein's (1998) 'narrative practice' analytic framework, this article examines tensions between couples' jointly constructed narratives and the grand narrative of Australian family farming. A 'narrative practice' approach permits examination of the meaning of experience, coherence, and the ways contexts, as well as stories of the past influence stories told about couples' present and future generative expression. This approach is highly consistent with the rapidly changing farming context where couples may be trying hard to construct a coherent story within a distinct family farming grand narrative under considerable tension. Findings show that in this context, and often in the absence of the next generation, there are visible changes in farming couples' expression of generativity

  13. Record of Decision Tank Farm Soil and INTEC Groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    L. S. Cahn

    2007-05-01

    This decision document presents the selected remedy for Operable Unit (OU) 3-14 tank farm soil and groundwater at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), which is located on the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site. The tank farm was initially evaluated in the OU 3-13 Record of Decision (ROD), and it was determined that additional information was needed to make a final decision. Additional information has been obtained on the nature and extent of contamination in the tank farm and on the impact of groundwater. The selected remedy was chosen in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Liability and Compensation Act of 1980 (CERCLA) (42 USC 9601 et seq.), as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) and the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (40 CFR 300). The selected remedy is intended to be the final action for tank far soil and groundwater at INTEC.

  14. Evaluation of the sustainability of contrasted pig farming systems: economy.

    PubMed

    Ilari-Antoine, E; Bonneau, M; Klauke, T N; Gonzàlez, J; Dourmad, J Y; De Greef, K; Houwers, H W J; Fabrega, E; Zimmer, C; Hviid, M; Van der Oever, B; Edwards, S A

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to present an efficient tool for evaluating the economy part of the sustainability of pig farming systems. The selected tool IDEA was tested on a sample of farms from 15 contrasted systems in Europe. A statistical analysis was carried out to check the capacity of the indicators to illustrate the variability of the population and to analyze which of these indicators contributed the most towards it. The scores obtained for the farms were consistent with the reality of pig production; the variable distribution showed an important variability of the sample. The principal component analysis and cluster analysis separated the sample into five subgroups, in which the six main indicators significantly differed, which underlines the robustness of the tool. The IDEA method was proven to be easily comprehensible, requiring few initial variables and with an efficient benchmarking system; all six indicators contributed to fully describe a varied and contrasted population.

  15. Evaluation of the sustainability of contrasted pig farming systems: economy.

    PubMed

    Ilari-Antoine, E; Bonneau, M; Klauke, T N; Gonzàlez, J; Dourmad, J Y; De Greef, K; Houwers, H W J; Fabrega, E; Zimmer, C; Hviid, M; Van der Oever, B; Edwards, S A

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to present an efficient tool for evaluating the economy part of the sustainability of pig farming systems. The selected tool IDEA was tested on a sample of farms from 15 contrasted systems in Europe. A statistical analysis was carried out to check the capacity of the indicators to illustrate the variability of the population and to analyze which of these indicators contributed the most towards it. The scores obtained for the farms were consistent with the reality of pig production; the variable distribution showed an important variability of the sample. The principal component analysis and cluster analysis separated the sample into five subgroups, in which the six main indicators significantly differed, which underlines the robustness of the tool. The IDEA method was proven to be easily comprehensible, requiring few initial variables and with an efficient benchmarking system; all six indicators contributed to fully describe a varied and contrasted population. PMID:25222654

  16. The efficacy of ivermectin, pyrantel and fenbendazole against Parascaris equorum infection in foals on farms in Australia.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, S K; Woodgate, R G; Gough, S; Heller, J; Sangster, N C; Hughes, K J

    2014-10-15

    This study was performed to estimate the prevalence of patent Parascaris equorum infections and determine the efficacy of ivermectin, pyrantel and fenbendazole against P. equorum infection in foals on farms in southern Australia. Foals aged >3 months on five farms in the south-western slopes region of New South Wales were used. Faeces were collected from each foal and foals with a P. equorum faecal egg count (FEC) of >100 eggs per gram (EPG) were used to measure anthelmintic efficacy using the FEC reduction (FECR) test, after random allocation to a control group or an ivermectin, pyrantel embonate or fenbendazole treatment group. Treatment was administered on day 0 and faeces were collected on day 14 and a FEC was performed. For determination of anthelmintic efficacy, FECRs and lower 95% confidence intervals (LCL) were calculated using previously described methods, based on individual or group FECRs. P. equorum populations were considered susceptible when FECR was >90% and LCL >90%, suspected resistant when FECR was FECR was 80-90% and LCL <90% and resistant when FECR was <80% and LCL <90%. A Poisson distribution quality control method was applied to the data to remove suspected erroneous FECR results. Prevalence of patent P. equorum infection was 58.3% (147/252 foals) and 89 foals on 5 farms were included in the FECR study. Resistance of P. equorum to ≥ 1 anthelmintic was present on all five farms prior to and on four farms after application of the quality control method. Two farms had evidence of multiple drug resistance. Ivermectin was effective and ineffective on two and three farms, respectively. Fenbendazole was effective on two farms, equivocal on one farm and ineffective on one farm. Pyrantel embonate was effective on three farms and ineffective on one farm. These data indicate that anthelmintic-resistant P. equorum populations are present on farms in Australia and multiple drug resistance may occur on individual farms.

  17. Farm Tractor Tune-Up and Service Specifications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryant, J. G.; And Others

    Tune-up and service specifications for 10 major tractor manufacturers are presented in the handbook. In addition, the following tables are included: (1) spark plug heat-range comparisons, (2) freezing protection, (3) pressures for farm tractor tires, (4) use of calcium chloride for liquid weighting, (5) comparisons of American Petroleum Institute…

  18. Life on a Farm during the Great Depression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Musbach, Joan W.

    2001-01-01

    Presents a lesson plan for eighth-grade students where they learn about the Great Depression by studying rural life. Explains that the students explore farm records from June and December 1935 after reading an excerpt about rural life in the 1930s. Includes copies of the ledgers, photographs, and student handouts. (CMK)

  19. Economic Indicators of the Farm Sector. Costs of Production, 1985.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Economic Research Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    This report presents the Economic Research Service's estimates of the costs of producing wheat, feed grains, cotton, and dairy commodities. It includes costs for other farm products that compete with the required commodities, namely rice, peanuts, soybeans, flax, sunflowers, fed cattle, hogs, sheep, and sugar. The report begins by assessing costs…

  20. Employing Youth in Farm Occupations. Special Paper No. 26.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bobbitt, J. Frank; Shapley, Allen E.

    Federal and State of Michigan regulations related to employing youth in farm occupations are presented in the document. Issues such as minimum wage, minimum age, hazardous occupations regulations, and compulsory education requirements are covered as well as a legal definition of agriculture, social security and income tax regulations, and…

  1. Farm nitrogen balances in six European agricultural landscapes - a method for farming system assessment, emission hotspot identification, and mitigation measure evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalgaard, T.; Bienkowski, J. F.; Bleeker, A.; Drouet, J. L.; Durand, P.; Dragosits, U.; Frumau, A.; Hutchings, N. J.; Kedziora, A.; Magliulo, V.; Olesen, J. E.; Theobald, M. R.; Maury, O.; Akkal, N.; Cellier, P.

    2012-07-01

    reducing N emissions from livestock farms. Based on the large differences between the average and the most modern and N-efficient farms, it was concluded that N-surplus reductions of 25-50 % as compared to the present level were realistic in all landscapes. The implemented N-surplus method was thus effective at comparing and synthesizing results on farm N emissions and the potentials of mitigation options, and is recommended for use in combination with other methods for the assessment of landscape N emissions and farm N efficiency, including more detailed N sink and N source hotspot mapping, measurements and modelling.

  2. Risk analysis of tractor overturns on catfish farms.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Walter B; Ibendahl, Gregory A; Myers, Melvin L; Cole, Henry P

    2010-10-01

    Fatal and nonfatal injuries occur on catfish farms as a result of tractor overturns, but these injuries can be greatly mitigated when a tractor is equipped with a rollover protective structure (ROPS) and seatbelt. This study analyzed the proportion of tractors on catfish farms in Mississippi not equipped with ROPS and the cost of retrofitting those tractors with a ROPS and seatbelt as compared to the expected benefits gained from adding the protection. To determine if farmers have the financial incentive to retrofit older tractors, a net present value framework was used because the expected benefits occur over a number of years. The ROPS retrofit is a one-time cost that occurs immediately, and thus the present value does not need to be calculated, i.e., time period 0. According to this study adding ROPS will provide a net benefit of $22,877 in the event of an overturn. When dealing with small farms (<125 acres) where an average tractor is used for approximately twice as many hours compared to an average tractor on large farms, the extra hours worked by a single tractor resulted in total benefits of retrofitting ROPS of $9.45 per year, whereas for large farms the net benefit is $4.70 (=125 acres). Given that the least expensive retrofit is $147, it would take 15.5 years of tractor use on the small farms for the expected benefits to outweigh the cost. Given the large range of costs that could occur due to an overturn, there could be a significant premium for not having ROPS protection. In other words, there likely is a smaller range of costs from an overturn with ROPS than without ROPS because ROPS reduces the more serious incidents. PMID:20954036

  3. Prioritisation of farm scale remediation efforts for reducing losses of nutrients and faecal indicator organisms to waterways: a case study of New Zealand dairy farming.

    PubMed

    Monaghan, R M; de Klein, C A M; Muirhead, R W

    2008-06-01

    The international competitiveness of the New Zealand (NZ) dairy industry is built on low cost clover-based systems and a favourable temperate climate that enables cows to graze pastures mostly all year round. Whilst this grazed pasture farming system is very efficient at producing milk, it has also been identified as a significant source of nutrients (N and P) and faecal bacteria which have contributed to water quality degradation in some rivers and lakes. In response to these concerns, a tool-box of mitigation measures that farmers can apply on farm to reduce environmental emissions has been developed. Here we report the potential reduction in nutrient losses and costs to farm businesses arising from the implementation of individual best management practices (BMPs) within this tool-box. Modelling analysis was carried out for a range of BMPs targeting pollutant source reduction on case-study dairy farms, located in four contrasting catchments. Due to the contrasting physical resources and management systems present in the four dairy catchments evaluated, the effectiveness and costs of BMPs varied. Farm managements that optimised soil Olsen P levels or used nitrification inhibitors were observed to result in win-win outcomes whereby nutrient losses were consistently reduced and farm profitability was increased in three of the four case study farming systems. Other BMPs generally reduced nutrient and faecal bacteria losses but at a small cost to the farm business. Our analysis indicates that there are a range of technological measures that can deliver substantial reductions in nutrient losses to waterways from dairy farms, whilst not increasing or even reducing other environmental impacts (e.g. greenhouse gas emissions and energy use). Their implementation will first require clearly defined environmental goals for the catchment/water body that is to be protected. Secondly, given that the major sources of water pollutants often differed between catchments, it is

  4. Projected integrated farm in Nepal

    SciTech Connect

    Dhital, K.

    1980-01-01

    A proposed integrated crop-livestock agro-processing complex to be based at Janakpur, Nepal is described. This project was proposed by the Agricultural Development Bank and is a small effort towards creating a self-sufficient rural community similar to one reported in China. The plan of the farm aims to achieve the integration of several agricultural, aquacultural, solar energy and biogas energy components with complete recycling of waste. These include biogas plants with associated slurry and storage tanks for operating a 3-kW generator, a 3.7-kW pump, providing domestic cooking, as well as energy to operate a fruit-processing plant. Energy for water heating, crop drying and refrigeration will be supplied by solar energy. Fish, livestock, fruits and vegetables will be produced by the farm.

  5. Branchburg Solar Farm and Carport

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory, John

    2013-10-23

    To meet the goal of becoming a model of green, clean, and efficient consumer of energy, the Township of Branchburg will install of a 250kw solar farm to provide energy for the Township of Branchburg Municipal Building, a 50kw Solar carport to provide power to the Municipal Annex, purchase 3 plug in hybrid-electric vehicles, and install 3 dual-head charging stations.

  6. Interdisciplinary Irrigated Precision Farming Research

    SciTech Connect

    Heermann, D F.; Hoeting, Jennifer A.; Thompson, Sandra ); Duke, H R.; Westfall, D G.; Buchleiter, G W.; Westra, P; Peairs, F B.; Fleming, K

    2001-12-01

    The USDA-Agricultural Research Service and Colorado State University are conducting an inter-disciplinary study that focuses on developing a clearer scientific understanding of the causes of yield variability. Two years of data have been collected from two commercial center pivot irrigated fields (72 and 52 ha). Cooperating farmers manage all farming operations for crop production and provide maps of the maise grown on the fields.

  7. Presence of Neospora caninum specific antibodies in three dairy farms in Georgia and two in Texas.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Ynes R; Torres, Maria P; Mena, Kristina D

    2007-03-31

    Neospora caninum is known to cause abortion in cattle. This study demonstrated the presence of specific IgG to Neospora in milk and serum samples obtained from three dairy farms in Georgia and two in Texas. Samples from four hundred fourteen dairy cows were examined using a western blot assay of which 362 were milk and 87 were serum. Samples with antibodies to Neospora were identified in 32.1% (105/327) of the examined animals in Georgia, whereas in Texas it was identified in 10.3% (9/87). Positive Georgia samples were found in 24.4% from farm A (28/115), 21.6% from farm B (30/139), and 64.4% from farm C (47/73). In Texas, 13.5% (7/52) of animals in farm D and 5.71% (2/35) from farm E also had specific antibodies to Neospora. The number of animals from Georgia dairy farms with antibodies to Neospora was significantly higher than the Texas dairy farms. This may be related to the age of the animals examined in this study (more than 2 years old). Antibodies present in sera had excellent agreement with the antibodies present in milk. Collection of milk samples for serological testing is easier and less invasive than obtaining bovine sera, therefore offering an alternative for animal testing.

  8. Farms and Learning Partnerships in Farming Systems Projects: A Response to the Challenges of Complexity in Agricultural Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Anne; Nettle, Ruth; Paine, Mark; Kabore, Carolyn

    2007-01-01

    Managing the competing interests of productivity growth, environmental concerns, landscape change and societal expectations presents challenges for agricultural industries. Innovation projects supporting knowledge development to address these challenges often involve partnerships with commercial farms, a methodology which promises much but has…

  9. Geothermal eel farm in Slovakia

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, J.W.; Thomka, J.; Sarlinova, K.

    1998-12-01

    Turcianske Teplice, a small town in west-central Slovakia, has written records of using thermal waters since 1281. In 1992, an eel raising farm was started on the outskirts of the town and since 1994, it has been operated by the firm of Janex Slovensko. The farm, using a specialized water recirculation system, raises a species of migrating eels (Anguilla anguilla). A 220-meter deep well at 42 C provides 48 gpm to the facility for heating through a plate heat exchanger. This is the maximum flow permitted, so as not to influence the springs and wells at the spa about 1 km away. For this reason, the flow is monitored carefully by the state. A second geothermal well at 52 C and 1,500 meters deep is used only as an observation well. Cold water, which is heated by the geothermal water, is pumped from wells near the Turiec River 1.8 km away at 8 to 12 C, depending upon the season, for use in the various holding or raising tanks. The operation of the farm is described.

  10. Farm cooperation to improve sustainability.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Hans; Larsén, Karin; Lagerkvist, Carl-Johan; Andersson, Chrisitian; Blad, Fredrik; Samuelsson, Johan; Skargren, Per

    2005-06-01

    In this paper, it is demonstrated that partnership arrangements between farmers might be a way to secure the economic viability of their farms as well as to increase profitability. The article discusses empirical analyses of three different forms of collaboration, with an emphasis on the environmental improvements associated with collaboration. Collaboration between a dairy farm and a crop farm is analyzed in the first case. The results show that potential gains from improved diversification and crop rotation are substantial, and even larger when the collaboration also involves machinery. The second analysis considers external integration between farrowing and finishing-pig operations. Gains from collaboration originate from biological and technical factors, such as improved growth rate of the pigs and better utilization of buildings. Finally, an evaluation of a group of collaborating crop farmers is performed. In this case, the benefits that arise are mainly due to reduced machinery costs and/or gains due to other factors, such as improved crop rotation and managerial/marketing strategies.

  11. Methods of Data Collection, Sample Processing, and Data Analysis for Edge-of-Field, Streamgaging, Subsurface-Tile, and Meteorological Stations at Discovery Farms and Pioneer Farm in Wisconsin, 2001-7

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stuntebeck, Todd D.; Komiskey, Matthew J.; Owens, David W.; Hall, David W.

    2008-01-01

    The University of Wisconsin (UW)-Madison Discovery Farms (Discovery Farms) and UW-Platteville Pioneer Farm (Pioneer Farm) programs were created in 2000 to help Wisconsin farmers meet environmental and economic challenges. As a partner with each program, and in cooperation with the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources and the Sand County Foundation, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Wisconsin Water Science Center (WWSC) installed, maintained, and operated equipment to collect water-quantity and water-quality data from 25 edge-offield, 6 streamgaging, and 5 subsurface-tile stations at 7 Discovery Farms and Pioneer Farm. The farms are located in the southern half of Wisconsin and represent a variety of landscape settings and crop- and animal-production enterprises common to Wisconsin agriculture. Meteorological stations were established at most farms to measure precipitation, wind speed and direction, air and soil temperature (in profile), relative humidity, solar radiation, and soil moisture (in profile). Data collection began in September 2001 and is continuing through the present (2008). This report describes methods used by USGS WWSC personnel to collect, process, and analyze water-quantity, water-quality, and meteorological data for edge-of-field, streamgaging, subsurface-tile, and meteorological stations at Discovery Farms and Pioneer Farm from September 2001 through October 2007. Information presented includes equipment used; event-monitoring and samplecollection procedures; station maintenance; sample handling and processing procedures; water-quantity, waterquality, and precipitation data analyses; and procedures for determining estimated constituent concentrations for unsampled runoff events.

  12. Multiphase Fluid Flow and Multicomponent Reactive Transport at the Hanford SX Tank Farm

    SciTech Connect

    Yabusaki, Steven B.

    2002-03-01

    In the next five years, critical decisions on the future disposition of wastes on the Hanford Site will be made: * barriers to control recharge at the ground surface,* procedures for retrieval and stabilization of tank waste, and* remediation of contaminated sediments.These decisions will be based, in part, on model predictions of contaminant transport in the vadose zone. Our investigation focuses on high-level radioactive waste tanks in the SX Tank Farm in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. The historical SX tank wastes were the hottest, highest pH, highest ionic strength, highest aluminum wastes in Hanford single-shell tanks (SST); 10 of these tanks are confirmed or suspected leakers. Over the last two years, an integrated program of scientific and engineering study has been directed at the SX tank farm, including (1) laboratory experiments on waste-sediment interactions, (2) field experiments on the migration of dense, hypersaline solutions, (3) estimates of historical tank leak source-terms, (4) characterization of hydrostratigraphic units, and (5) physical and chemical analyses of soil samples from the SX tank farm. In this presentation, we describe how these disparate data sets have been used to identify detailed process models and parameterizations that are incorporated into simulators of nonisothermal multiphase fluid flow and multicomponent reactive transport. This modeling framework provides a testbed to systematically assess the appropriateness of the identified process representations in the context of site-specific, field-scale properties, and more importantly, observed historical and contemporary behaviors (e.g., hydrology, chemistry). The ultimate goal is to provide a technically defensible basis for the prediction of long-term contaminant behavior. An important technological issue in the comprehensively detailed modeling approach is addressing the computationally intensive calculations that are required.

  13. Modelling the fate of pesticides in paddy rice-fish pond farming system in Northern Vietnam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamers, M.; Nguyen, N.; Streck, T.

    2012-04-01

    During the last decade rice production in Vietnam has tremendously increased due to the introduction of new high yield, short duration rice varieties and an increased application of pesticides. Since pesticides are toxic by design, there is a natural concern on the possible impacts of their presence in the environment on human health and environment quality. In North Vietnam, lowland and upland rice fields were identified to be a major non-point source of agrochemical pollution to surface and ground water, which are often directly used for domestic purposes. Field measurements, however, are time consuming, costly and logistical demanding. Hence, quantification, forecast and risk assessment studies are hampered by a limited amount of field data. One potential way to cope with this shortcoming is the use of process-based models. In the present study we developed a model for simulating short-term pesticide dynamics in combined paddy rice field - fish pond farming systems under the specific environmental conditions of south-east Asia. Basic approaches and algorithms to describe the key underlying biogeochemical processes were mainly adopted from the literature to assure that the model reflects the current standard of scientific knowledge and commonly accepted theoretical background. The model was calibrated by means of the Gauss-Marquardt-Levenberg algorithm and validated against measured pesticide concentrations (dimethoate and fenitrothion) during spring and summer rice crop season 2008, respectively, of a paddy field - fish pond system typical for northern Vietnam. First simulation results indicate that our model is capable to simulate the fate of pesticides in such paddy - fish pond farming systems. The model efficiency for the period of calibration, for example, was 0.97 and 0.95 for dimethoate and fenitrothion, respectively. For the period of validation, however, the modeling efficiency slightly decreased to 0.96 and 0.81 for dimethoate and fenitrothion

  14. Large scale modelling of salmon lice (Lepeophtheirus salmonis) infection pressure based on lice monitoring data from Norwegian salmonid farms.

    PubMed

    Kristoffersen, Anja B; Jimenez, Daniel; Viljugrein, Hildegunn; Grøntvedt, Randi; Stien, Audun; Jansen, Peder A

    2014-12-01

    Infection by parasitic sea lice is a substantial problem in industrial scale salmon farming. To control the problem, Norwegian salmonid farms are not permitted to exceed a threshold level of infection on their fish, and farms are required to monitor and report lice levels on a weekly basis to ensure compliance with the regulation. In the present study, we combine the monitoring data with a deterministic model for salmon lice population dynamics to estimate farm production of infectious lice stages. Furthermore, we use an empirical estimate of the relative risk of salmon lice transmission between farms, that depend on inter-farm distances, to estimate the external infection pressure at a farm site, i.e. the infection pressure from infective salmon lice of neighbouring farm origin. Finally, we test whether our estimates of infection pressure from neighbouring farms as well as internal within farm infection pressure, predicts subsequent development of infection in cohorts of farmed salmonids in their initial phase of marine production. We find that estimated external infection pressure is a main predictor of salmon lice population dynamics in newly stocked cohorts of salmonids. Our results emphasize the importance of keeping the production of infectious lice stages at low levels within local networks of salmon farms. Our model can easily be implemented for real time estimation of infection pressure at the national scale, utilizing the masses of data generated through the compulsory lice monitoring in salmon farms. The implementation of such a system should give the salmon industry greater predictability with respect to salmon lice infection levels, and aid the decision making process when the development of new farm sites are planned.

  15. Modeling large wind farms in conventionally neutral atmospheric boundary layers under varying initial conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allaerts, Dries; Meyers, Johan

    2014-05-01

    Atmospheric boundary layers (ABL) are frequently capped by an inversion layer limiting the entrainment rate and boundary layer growth. Commonly used analytical models state that the entrainment rate is inversely proportional to the inversion strength. The height of the inversion turns out to be a second important parameter. Conventionally neutral atmospheric boundary layers (CNBL) are ABLs with zero surface heat flux developing against a stratified free atmosphere. In this regime the inversion-filling process is merely driven by the downward heat flux at the inversion base. As a result, CNBLs are strongly dependent on the heating history of the boundary layer and strong inversions will fail to erode during the course of the day. In case of large wind farms, the power output of the farm inside a CNBL will depend on the height and strength of the inversion above the boundary layer. On the other hand, increased turbulence levels induced by wind farms may partially undermine the rigid lid effect of the capping inversion, enhance vertical entrainment of air into the farm, and increase boundary layer growth. A suite of large eddy simulations (LES) is performed to investigate the effect of the capping inversion on the conventionally neutral atmospheric boundary layer and on the wind farm performance under varying initial conditions. For these simulations our in-house pseudo-spectral LES code SP-Wind is used. The wind turbines are modelled using a non-rotating actuator disk method. In the absence of wind farms, we find that a decrease in inversion strength corresponds to a decrease in the geostrophic angle and an increase in entrainment rate and geostrophic drag. Placing the initial inversion base at higher altitudes further reduces the effect of the capping inversion on the boundary layer. The inversion can be fully neglected once it is situated above the equilibrium height that a truly neutral boundary layer would attain under the same external conditions such as

  16. Energy integrated farm system: Mathis Farm and Georgia Institute of Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    Mathis Farm, a dairy farm with corn and soybean crops, is designed to conserve energy through energy integrated concepts including energy-efficient farming practices, methane digestion, irrigation and wastewater management, and efficient use of electrical energy. The integrated energy concepts to be demonstrated are: anaerobic digestion of cattle manure to produce methane for an engine generator to provide electricity for the farm, with waste-heat recovery to produce hot water; use of digester sludge materials as bedding and fertilizer; farm energy audit and subsequent implementation of energy conservation practices; waste management on the farm; and energy conservation crop practices.

  17. [Nitrogen balance in dairy farm: research progress].

    PubMed

    Lü, Chao; Qin, Wen-Xiao; Gao, Teng-Yun; Wang, Xiao-Xiao; Han, Zhi-Guo; Li, Jia

    2013-01-01

    Large dairy farm with intensive management has high stocking density, but generally does not have enough space and normative feces disposal system, resulting in the discharged nitrogen surpassed the environmental carrying capacity of unit area land. Dairy farm is one of the major emission sources of nitrogen discharges in agriculture, where the nitrogen balance has being aroused attention by the experts abroad. The research on the nitrogen flow and nitrogen balance in dairy farm is the basis of the dairy farm nitrogen cycling and management study, as well as the basis for the construction of environmental laws, regulations and policies. The most reliable indicators to evaluate the nitrogen flow and nitrogen balance in dairy farm are nitrogen surplus and nitrogen use efficiency. This paper introduced the concept of nitrogen balance on farm-scale and the nitrogen flow within farm, compared the application scope of nitrogen surplus and nitrogen use efficiency, analyzed the factors affecting the nitrogen balance in dairy farm, and summarized the effective strategies to reduce the nitrogen discharges from dairy farm, aimed to provide references for the nitrogen management of dairy farm in China.

  18. Wind farm power maximization based on a cooperative static game approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jinkyoo; Kwon, Soonduck; Law, Kincho H.

    2013-04-01

    The objective of this study is to improve the cost-effectiveness and production efficiency of wind farms using cooperative control. The key factors in determining the power production and the loading for a wind turbine are the nacelle yaw and blade pitch angles. However, the nacelle and blade angles may adjust the wake direction and intensity in a way that may adversely affect the performance of other wind turbines in the wind farm. Conventional wind-turbine control methods maximize the power production of a single turbine, but can lower the overall wind-farm power efficiency due to wake interference. This paper introduces a cooperative game concept to derive the power production of individual wind turbine so that the total wind-farm power efficiency is optimized. Based on a wake interaction model relating the yaw offset angles and the induction factors of wind turbines to the wind speeds experienced by the wind turbines, an optimization problem is formulated with the objective of maximizing the sum of the power production of a wind farm. A steepest descent algorithm is applied to find the optimal combination of yaw offset angles and the induction factors that increases the total wind farm power production. Numerical simulations show that the cooperative control strategy can increase the power productions in a wind farm.

  19. Wind farms providing secondary frequency regulation: Evaluating the performance of model-based receding horizon control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, Carl R.; Meyers, Johan; Meneveau, Charles; Gayme, Dennice F.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the use of wind farms to provide secondary frequency regulation for a power grid. Our approach uses model-based receding horizon control of a wind farm that is tested using a large eddy simulation (LES) framework. In order to enable real-time implementation, the control actions are computed based on a time-varying one-dimensional wake model. This model describes wake advection and interactions, both of which play an important role in wind farm power production. This controller is implemented in an LES model of an 84-turbine wind farm represented by actuator disk turbine models. Differences between the velocities at each turbine predicted by the wake model and measured in LES are used for closed-loop feedback. The controller is tested on two types of regulation signals, “RegA” and “RegD”, obtained from PJM, an independent system operator in the eastern United States. Composite performance scores, which are used by PJM to qualify plants for regulation, are used to evaluate the performance of the controlled wind farm. Our results demonstrate that the controlled wind farm consistently performs well, passing the qualification threshold for all fastacting RegD signals. For the RegA signal, which changes over slower time scales, the controlled wind farm's average performance surpasses the threshold, but further work is needed to enable the controlled system to achieve qualifying performance all of the time.

  20. Wind farm induced changes in wind speed and surface fluxes over the North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Fabien; van Lipzig, Nicole; Meyers, Johan

    2016-04-01

    Offshore wind farm deployment in the North Sea is foreseen to expand dramatically in the coming years. The strong expansion of offshore wind parks is likely to affect the regional climatology on the North Sea. We assess this impact by conducting a regional climate model simulation over future wind farms built near the German coast. In order to achieve this, the wind farm parameterisation of Fitch et al. 2012, where wind farms are parameterised as elevated sources of turbulent kinetic energy and sinks of momentum ( Blahak et al 2010 and Fitch et al 2012) is implemented in COSMO-CLM at a 1.5 km resolution. As a first step, COSMO-CLM's ability to reproduce wind profiles over the North Sea is evaluated using wind speed data from the FINO1 meteorological mast, toghether with QuikScat scatterometer data, for a time period of 2000-2008. Subsequently, the impact of windfarms on the regional climate over a period of ten years (1999-2008) is assessed. A large scale wind farm can create wakes which depending on the wind direction could affect the power production of a neighbouring farm. Furthermore, wind farms decelerate the flow and create a vertical circulation in the inflow region. As a result, changes in vertical fluxes of moisture are observed. This leads to enhanced low level cloud cover which may trigger changes in precipitation.