Science.gov

Sample records for fast breeder type reactors

  1. Fast Breeder Reactor studies

    SciTech Connect

    Till, C.E.; Chang, Y.I.; Kittel, J.H.; Fauske, H.K.; Lineberry, M.J.; Stevenson, M.G.; Amundson, P.I.; Dance, K.D.

    1980-07-01

    This report is a compilation of Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR) resource documents prepared to provide the technical basis for the US contribution to the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Evaluation. The eight separate parts deal with the alternative fast breeder reactor fuel cycles in terms of energy demand, resource base, technical potential and current status, safety, proliferation resistance, deployment, and nuclear safeguards. An Annex compares the cost of decommissioning light-water and fast breeder reactors. Separate abstracts are included for each of the parts.

  2. Fast breeder reactor protection system

    DOEpatents

    van Erp, J.B.

    1973-10-01

    Reactor protection is provided for a liquid-metal-fast breeder reactor core by measuring the coolant outflow temperature from each of the subassemblies of the core. The outputs of the temperature sensors from a subassembly region of the core containing a plurality of subassemblies are combined in a logic circuit which develops a scram alarm if a predetermined number of the sensors indicate an over temperature condition. The coolant outflow from a single subassembly can be mixed with the coolant outflow from adjacent subassemblies prior to the temperature sensing to increase the sensitivity of the protection system to a single subassembly failure. Coherence between the sensors can be required to discriminate against noise signals. (Official Gazette)

  3. Universal Fast Breeder Reactor Subassembly Counter manual

    SciTech Connect

    Menlove, H.O.; Eccleston, G.W.; Swansen, J.E.; Goris, P.; Abedin-Zadeh, R.; Ramalho, A.

    1984-08-01

    A neutron coincidence counter has been designed for the measurement of fast breeder reactor fuel assemblies. This assay system can accommodate the full range of geometries and masses found in fast breeder subassemblies under IAEA safeguards. The system's high-performance capability accommodates high plutonium loadings of up to 16 kg. This manual describes the system and its operation and gives performance and calibration parameters for typical applications.

  4. Fast Breeder Reactors in Sweden: Vision and Reality.

    PubMed

    Fjaestad, Maja

    2015-01-01

    The fast breeder is a type of nuclear reactor that aroused much attention in the 1950s and '60s. Its ability to produce more nuclear fuel than it consumes offered promises of cheap and reliable energy. Sweden had advanced plans for a nuclear breeder program, but canceled them in the middle of the 1970s with the rise of nuclear skepticism. The article investigates the nuclear breeder as a technological vision. The nuclear breeder reactor is an example of a technological future that did not meet its industrial expectations. But that does not change the fact that the breeder was an influential technology. Decisions about the contemporary reactors were taken with the idea that in a foreseeable future they would be replaced with the efficient breeder. The article argues that general themes in the history of the breeder reactor can deepen our understanding of the mechanisms behind technological change.

  5. The materials of fast breeder reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olander, Donald R.

    1980-02-01

    The most difficult problems affecting commercialization of the liquid-metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) concern the behavior of its materials of construction in the thermal and irradiation environment in which the device must operate. The responses which these conditions provoke in the fuel, cladding, and core structures depend upon complex interactions of many physical and chemical processes.

  6. Safety design of prototype fast breeder reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Bhoje, S.B.; Chetal, S.C.; Singh, Om Pal

    2004-07-01

    The basic design and safety design of Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) is presented. Design aspects covered include safety classification, seismic categorization, design basis conditions, design safety limits, core physics, core monitoring, shutdown system, decay heat removal system, protection against sodium leaks and tube leaks in steam generator, plant layout, radiation protection, event analysis, beyond design basis accidents, integrity of primary containment, reactor containment building and design pressure resulting from core disruptive accident. The measures provided in the design represent a robust case of the safety of the reactor. (authors)

  7. Mechanical properties of irradiated fast breeder reactor cladding and ducts

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, G.D.; Hunter, C.W.

    1983-02-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are being used for various core components in Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactors. Twenty percent cold worked Type 316 stainless steel is being used for both fuel pin cladding and ducts in the Fast Flux Test Facility. Safe and reliable operation of breeder reactors requires a characterization of the effects of fast neutron irradiation and environment on the mechanical properties of the cladding and duct material. Nearly 1400 tests have been conducted on unirradiated and irradiated cladding and duct samples under conditions relevant to reactor operational and transient events. Six different types of tests conducted on cladding and duct samples are described and the effects of irradiation on the properties are discussed.

  8. COUPLED FAST-THERMAL POWER BREEDER REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Avery, R.

    1961-07-18

    A nuclear reactor having a region operating predominantly on fast neutrons and another region operating predominantly on slow neutrons is described. The fast region is a plutonium core and the slow region is a natural uranium blanket around the core. Both of these regions are free of moderator. A moderating reflector surrounds the uranium blanket. The moderating material and thickness of the reflector are selected so that fissions in the uranium blanket make a substantial contribution to the reactivity of the reactor.

  9. MOLTEN PLUTONIUM FUELED FAST BREEDER REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Kiehn, R.M.; King, L.D.P.; Peterson, R.E.; Swickard, E.O. Jr.

    1962-06-26

    A description is given of a nuclear fast reactor fueled with molten plutonium containing about 20 kg of plutonium in a tantalum container, cooled by circulating liquid sodium at about 600 to 650 deg C, having a large negative temperature coefficient of reactivity, and control rods and movable reflector for criticality control. (AEC)

  10. Designing a SCADA system simulator for fast breeder reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nugraha, E.; Abdullah, A. G.; Hakim, D. L.

    2016-04-01

    SCADA (Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition) system simulator is a Human Machine Interface-based software that is able to visualize the process of a plant. This study describes the results of the process of designing a SCADA system simulator that aims to facilitate the operator in monitoring, controlling, handling the alarm, accessing historical data and historical trend in Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) type Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR). This research used simulation to simulate NPP type FBR Kalpakkam in India. This simulator was developed using Wonderware Intouch software 10 and is equipped with main menu, plant overview, area graphics, control display, set point display, alarm system, real-time trending, historical trending and security system. This simulator can properly simulate the principle of energy flow and energy conversion process on NPP type FBR. This SCADA system simulator can be used as training media for NPP type FBR prospective operators.

  11. Steam generator for liquid metal fast breeder reactor

    DOEpatents

    Gillett, James E.; Garner, Daniel C.; Wineman, Arthur L.; Robey, Robert M.

    1985-01-01

    Improvements in the design of internal components of J-shaped steam generators for liquid metal fast breeder reactors. Complex design improvements have been made to the internals of J-shaped steam generators which improvements are intended to reduce tube vibration, tube jamming, flow problems in the upper portion of the steam generator, manufacturing complexities in tube spacer attachments, thermal stripping potentials and difficulties in the weld fabrication of certain components.

  12. Fast breeder reactor fuel pins: Revision 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    This standard establishes the requirements for fuel pins to be used in FBR fuel assemblies. Fuel pins consist of mixed uranium-plutonium oxide fuel pellets clad with Type 316 stainless steel or other purchaser specified alloy steel.

  13. Optimization of fast breeder reactors employing innovative liquid metal coolants

    SciTech Connect

    Pilarski, Stevan

    2007-07-01

    In this paper we propose a comparative assessment of fast breeder reactor core concepts employing Pb, Pb- Mg and Pb-{sup 7}Li as primary coolants and oxide and nitride fuels. Starting from a common reference core to make the comparison relevant, each coolant candidate is associated to an optimized design that takes into account its specific physical properties. For each core, we perform a neutronic analysis and an assessment of its safety potential. In comparison with the case of Pb, the use of Pb-Mg and Pb-{sup 7}Li increases the void reactivity effect. On the other hand, the breeding gain also increases, and the Doppler effect is enhanced, leading to a favorable behaviour concerning safety. (author)

  14. Safety and core design of large liquid-metal cooled fast breeder reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qvist, Staffan Alexander

    In light of the scientific evidence for changes in the climate caused by greenhouse-gas emissions from human activities, the world is in ever more desperate need of new, inexhaustible, safe and clean primary energy sources. A viable solution to this problem is the widespread adoption of nuclear breeder reactor technology. Innovative breeder reactor concepts using liquid-metal coolants such as sodium or lead will be able to utilize the waste produced by the current light water reactor fuel cycle to power the entire world for several centuries to come. Breed & burn (B&B) type fast reactor cores can unlock the energy potential of readily available fertile material such as depleted uranium without the need for chemical reprocessing. Using B&B technology, nuclear waste generation, uranium mining needs and proliferation concerns can be greatly reduced, and after a transitional period, enrichment facilities may no longer be needed. In this dissertation, new passively operating safety systems for fast reactors cores are presented. New analysis and optimization methods for B&B core design have been developed, along with a comprehensive computer code that couples neutronics, thermal-hydraulics and structural mechanics and enables a completely automated and optimized fast reactor core design process. In addition, an experiment that expands the knowledge-base of corrosion issues of lead-based coolants in nuclear reactors was designed and built. The motivation behind the work presented in this thesis is to help facilitate the widespread adoption of safe and efficient fast reactor technology.

  15. Helium Leak Detection of Vessels in Fuel Transfer Cell (FTC) of Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, N. G.

    2012-11-01

    Bharatiya Nabhikiya Vidyut Nigam (BHAVINI) is engaged in construction of 500MW Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) at Kalpak am, Chennai. In this very important and prestigious national programme Special Product Division (SPD) of M/s Kay Bouvet Engg.pvt. ltd. (M/s KBEPL) Satara is contributing in a major way by supplying many important sub-assemblies like- Under Water trolley (UWT), Airlocks (PAL, EAL) Container and Storage Rack (CSR) Vessels in Fuel Transfer Cell (FTC) etc for PFBR. SPD of KBEPL caters to the requirements of Government departments like - Department of Atomic Energy (DAE), BARC, Defense, and Government undertakings like NPCIL, BHAVINI, BHEL etc. and other precision Heavy Engg. Industries. SPD is equipped with large size Horizontal Boring Machines, Vertical Boring Machines, Planno milling, Vertical Turret Lathe (VTL) & Radial drilling Machine, different types of welding machines etc. PFBR is 500 MWE sodium cooled pool type reactor in which energy is produced by fissions of mixed oxides of Uranium and Plutonium pellets by fast neutrons and it also breeds uranium by conversion of thorium, put along with fuel rod in the reactor. In the long run, the breeder reactor produces more fuel then it consumes. India has taken the lead to go ahead with Fast Breeder Reactor Programme to produce electricity primarily because India has large reserve of Thorium. To use Thorium as further fuel in future, thorium has to be converted in Uranium by PFBR Technology.

  16. Comparative assessment of nuclear fuel cycles. Light-water reactor once-through, classical fast breeder reactor, and symbiotic fast breeder reactor cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Hardie, R.W.; Barrett, R.J.; Freiwald, J.G.

    1980-06-01

    The object of the Alternative Nuclear Fuel Cycle Study is to perform comparative assessments of nuclear power systems. There are two important features of this study. First, this evaluation attempts to encompass the complete, integrated fuel cycle from mining of uranium ore to disposal of waste rather than isolated components. Second, it compares several aspects of each cycle - energy use, economics, technological status, proliferation, public safety, and commercial potential - instead of concentrating on one or two assessment areas. This report presents assessment results for three fuel cycles. These are the light-water reactor once-through cycle, the fast breeder reactor on the classical plutonium cycle, and the fast breeder reactor on a symbiotic cycle using plutonium and /sup 233/U as fissile fuels. The report also contains a description of the methodology used in this assessment. Subsequent reports will present results for additional fuel cycles.

  17. Alloys for a liquid metal fast breeder reactor

    DOEpatents

    Rowcliffe, Arthur F.; Bleiberg, Melvin L.; Diamond, Sidney; Bajaj, Ram

    1979-01-01

    An essentially gamma-prime precipitation-hardened iron-chromium-nickel alloy has been designed with emphasis on minimum nickel and chromium contents to reduce the swelling tendencies of these alloys when used in liquid metal fast breeder reactors. The precipitation-hardening components have been designed for phase stability and such residual elements as silicon and boron, also have been selected to minimize swelling. Using the properties of these alloys in one design would result in an increased breeding ratio over 20% cold worked stainless steel, a reference material, of 1.239 to 1.310 and a reduced doubling time from 15.8 to 11.4 years. The gross stoichiometry of the alloying composition comprises from about 0.04% to about 0.06% carbon, from about 0.05% to about 1.0% silicon, up to about 0.1% zirconium, up to about 0.5% vanadium, from about 24% to about 31% nickel, from 8% to about 11% chromium, from about 1.7% to about 3.5% titanium, from about 1.0% to about 1.8% aluminum, from about 0.9% to about 3.7% molybdenum, from about 0.04% to about 0.8% boron, and the balance iron with incidental impurities.

  18. The Case Against the Fast Breeder Reactor: An Anti-Nuclear Establishment View.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovins, Amory B.

    1973-01-01

    Environmentalists lobby points out that hazards which may result from mistakes in proposed fast breeder reactor for additional energy can be detrimental for mankind. Such projects must be carefully planned and cautiously executed. (PS)

  19. Heat resistant reduced activation 12% Cr steel of 16Cr12W2VTaB type-advanced structural material for fusion and fast breeder power reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioltukhovskiy, A. G.; Leonteva-Smirnova, M. V.; Solonin, M. I.; Chernov, V. M.; Golovanov, V. N.; Shamardin, V. K.; Bulanova, T. M.; Povstyanko, A. V.; Fedoseev, A. E.

    2002-12-01

    Heat resistant 12% Cr steels of the 16Cr12W2VTaB type (12Cr-2W-V-Ta-B-0.16C) provide a reduced activation material that can be used as a structural material for fusion and fast breeder reactors. The composition under study meets scientific and engineering requirements and has an optimal base element composition to provide a δ-ferrite content of no more than 20%. It also has a minimum quantity of low melting impurity elements and non-metallic inclusions. Short-term tensile properties for the steel tested to 700 °C are provided after the standard heat treatment (normalization, temper). Rupture strength and creep properties for the steel depending on the initial heat treatment conditions are also given. The microstructural stability of the 16Cr12W2VTaB type steel at temperatures up to 650 °C is predicted to be good, and the properties of the steel after irradiation in BOR-60 are demonstrated.

  20. Simulation and Design of an Automatic Controller for a Fast Breeder Nuclear Reactor Power Plant.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    BREEDER REACTORS, *REACTOR CONTROL, *REACTOR REACTIVITY, COMPUTER PROGRAMMING, NEUTRON TRANSPORT THEORY, REACTOR FUELS, REACTOR FUEL CLADDING , HEAT TRANSFER, COMPUTER PROGRAMS, LOGIC CIRCUITS, THESES.

  1. A FAST BREEDER REACTOR SPENT FUEL MEASUREMENTS PROGRAM FOR BN-350 REACTOR

    SciTech Connect

    P. STAPLES; J. HALBIG; ET AL

    1999-04-01

    A project to verify the fissile content of fast breeder reactor spent nuclear fuel is underway in the Republic of Kasakhstan. There are a variety of assembly types with different irradiation histories and profiles in the reactor that require a variety of measurement and analysis procedures. These procedures will be discussed and compared as will the general process that has been designed to resolve any potential measurement discrepancies. The underwater counter is part of a system that is designed to assist the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in maintaining continuity of knowledge from the time of measurement until the measured item is placed in a welded container with a unique identification. In addition to satisfying IAEA requirements for the spent nuclear fuel, this measurement program is able to satisfy some of the measurement requirements for the Kasakhstan Atomic Energy Agency concerning the repackaging of the spent nuclear fuel into a standard canister. The project is currently operational in a mode requiring the IAEA's continuous presence.

  2. Experimental studies of U-Pu-Zr fast reactor fuel pins in EBR-II (Experimental Breeder Reactor)

    SciTech Connect

    Pahl, R.G.; Porter, D.L.; Lahm, C.E.; Hofman, G.L.

    1988-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is a generic reactor concept under development by Argonne National Laboratory. Much of the technology for the IFR is being demonstrated at the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) on the Department of Energy site near Idaho Falls, Idaho. The IFR concept relies on four technical features to achieve breakthroughs in nuclear power economics and safety: (1) a pool-type reactor configuration, (2) liquid sodium cooling, (3) metallic fuel, and (4) an integral fuel cycle with on-site reprocessing. The purpose of this paper will be to summarize our latest results of irradiation testing uranium-plutonium-zirconium (U-Pu-Zr) fuel in the EBR-II. 10 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Corrosion-resistant fuel cladding allow for liquid metal fast breeder reactors

    DOEpatents

    Brehm, Jr., William F.; Colburn, Richard P.

    1982-01-01

    An aluminide coating for a fuel cladding tube for LMFBRs (liquid metal fast breeder reactors) such as those using liquid sodium as a heat transfer agent. The coating comprises a mixture of nickel-aluminum intermetallic phases and presents good corrosion resistance to liquid sodium at temperatures up to 700.degree. C. while additionally presenting a barrier to outward diffusion of .sup.54 Mn.

  4. Nuclear Engineering Computer Modules, Thermal-Hydraulics, TH-2: Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reihman, Thomas C.

    This learning module is concerned with the temperature field, the heat transfer rates, and the coolant pressure drop in typical liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) fuel assemblies. As in all of the modules of this series, emphasis is placed on developing the theory and demonstrating the use with a simplified model. The heart of the module is…

  5. Water storage of liquid-metal fast-breeder-reactor fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Meacham, S.A.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a general overview of a concept proposed for receiving and storing liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) spent fuel. This work was done as part of the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The CFRP has as its major objective the development of technology for reprocessing advanced nuclear reactor fuels. The program plans that research and development will be carried through to a sufficient scale, using irradiated spent fuel under plant operating conditions, to establish a basis for confident projection of reprocessing capability to support a breeder industry.

  6. Method of locating a leaking fuel element in a fast breeder power reactor

    DOEpatents

    Honekamp, John R.; Fryer, Richard M.

    1978-01-01

    Leaking fuel elements in a fast reactor are identified by measuring the ratio of .sup.134 Xe to .sup.133 Xe in the reactor cover gas following detection of a fuel element leak, this ratio being indicative of the power and burnup of the failed fuel element. This procedure can be used to identify leaking fuel elements in a power breeder reactor while continuing operation of the reactor since the ratio measured is that of the gases stored in the plenum of the failed fuel element. Thus, use of a cleanup system for the cover gas makes it possible to identify sequentially a multiplicity of leaking fuel elements without shutting the reactor down.

  7. Cold Trap Dismantling and Sodium Removal at a Fast Breeder Reactor - 12327

    SciTech Connect

    Graf, A.; Petrick, H.; Stutz, U.; Hosking, P.

    2012-07-01

    The first German prototype Fast Breeder Nuclear Reactor (KNK) is currently being dismantled after being the only operating Fast Breeder-type reactor in Germany. As this reactor type used sodium as a coolant in its primary and secondary circuit, seven cold traps containing various amounts of partially activated sodium needed to be disposed of as part of the dismantling. The resulting combined difficulties of radioactive contamination and high chemical reactivity were handled by treating the cold traps differently depending on their size and the amount of sodium contained inside. Six small cold traps were processed onsite by cutting them up into small parts using a band saw under a protective atmosphere. The sodium was then converted to sodium hydroxide by using water. The remaining large cold trap could not be handled in the same way due to its dimensions (2.9 m x 1.1 m) and the declared amount of sodium inside (1,700 kg). It was therefore manually dismantled inside a large box filled with a protective atmosphere, while the resulting pieces were packaged for later burning in a special facility. The experiences gained by KNK during this process may be advantageous for future dismantling projects in similar sodium-cooled reactors worldwide. The dismantling of a prototype fast breeder reactor provides the challenge not only to dismantle radioactive materials but also to handle sodium-contaminated or sodium-containing components. The treatment of sodium requires additional equipment and installations to ensure a safe handling. Since it is not permitted to bring sodium into a repository, all sodium has to be neutralized either through a controlled reaction with water or by incinerating. The resulting components can be disposed of as normal radioactive waste with no further conditions. The handling of sodium needs skilled and experienced workers to minimize the inherent risks. And the example of the disposal of the large KNK cold trap shows the interaction with others and

  8. Measurements of thermal-hydraulic parameters in liquid-metal-cooled fast-breeder reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Sackett, J.I.

    1983-01-01

    This paper discusses instrumentation for liquid-metal-cooled fast breeder reactors (LMFBR's). Included is instrumentation to measure sodium flow, pressure, temperature, acoustic noise, sodium purity, and leakage. The paper identifies the overall instrumentation requirements for LMFBR's and those aspects of instrumentation which are unique or of special concern to LMFBR systems. It also gives an overview of the status of instrument design and performance.

  9. Control rod heterogeneity effects in liquid-metal fast breeder reactors: Method developments and experimental validation

    SciTech Connect

    Carta, M.; Granget, G.; Palmiotti, G.; Salvatores, M.; Soule, R.

    1988-11-01

    The control rod worth assessment in a large liquid-metal fast breeder reactor is strongly dependent on the actual arrangement of the absorber pins inside the control rod subassemblies. The so-called heterogeneity effects (i.e., the effects on the rod reactivity of the actual rod internal geometry versus homogenization of the absorber atoms over all the subassembly volume) have been evaluated, using explicit and variational methods to derive appropriate cross sections. An experimental program performed at the MASURCA facility has been used to validate these methods.

  10. Pattern recognition techniques applied to acoustic detection of liquid-metal fast breeder reactor cooling defects

    SciTech Connect

    Brunet, M.; Dubuisson, B.

    1983-08-01

    In the event of a partial or total blockage of a liquid-metal fast breeder reactor core subassembly, a boiling zone may be created. Acoustic signals from such a zone could provide a means of early detection of accident conditions. A three-step method, based on pattern recognition techniques, is described and used to analyze data from three experiments that simulate core cooling fault conditions. This method is shown to be capable of detecting the abnormal situation in each of the experiments analyzed.

  11. Review of ORNL-TSF shielding experiments for the gas-cooled Fast Breeder Reactor Program

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, L.S.; Ingersoll, D.T.; Muckenthaler, F.J.; Slater, C.O.

    1982-01-01

    During the period between 1975 and 1980 a series of experiments was performed at the ORNL Tower Shielding Facility in support of the shield design for a 300-MW(e) Gas Cooled Fast Breeder Demonstration Plant. This report reviews the experiments and calculations, which included studies of: (1) neutron streaming in the helium coolant passageways in the GCFR core; (2) the effectiveness of the shield designed to protect the reactor grid plate from radiation damage; (3) the adequacy of the radial shield in protecting the PCRV (prestressed concrete reactor vessel) from radiation damage; (4) neutron streaming between abutting sections of the radial shield; and (5) the effectiveness of the exit shield in reducing the neutron fluxes in the upper plenum region of the reactor.

  12. Conjugate heat transfer analysis of multiple enclosures in prototype fast breeder reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Velusamy, K.; Balaubramanian, V.; Vaidyanathan, G.; Chetal, S.C.

    1995-09-01

    Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) is a 500 MWe sodium cooled reactor under design. The main vessel of the reactor serves as the primary boundary. It is surrounded by a safety vessel which in turn is surrounded by biological shield. The gaps between them are filled with nitrogen. Knowledge of temperature distribution prevailing under various operating conditions is essential for the assessment of structural integrity. Due to the presence of cover gas over sodium free level within the main vessel, there are sharp gradients in temperatures. Also cover gas height reduces during station blackout conditions due to sodium level rise in main vessel caused by temperature rise. This paper describes the model used to analyse the natural convection in nitrogen, conduction in structures and radiation interaction among them. Results obtained from parametric studies for PFBR are also presented.

  13. Diversion analysis and safeguards measures for liquid metal fast breeder reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Persiani, P.J.

    1981-10-01

    The general objective of the study is to perform a diversion analysis and an assessment of the available safeguards methods and systems for verifying inventory and flow of nuclear material in accessible and inaccessible areas of liquid-metal fast breeder reactor, LMFBR, systems. The study focuses primarily on the assembly-handling operations, assembly storage facilities, and reactor operations facilities relating to existing and/or near-term planned experimental, demonstration and prototypal reactor plants. The safeguards systems and methods presented are considered to be feasible for development and for implementation within the resource limitation of the IAEA and are considered to be consistent with the objectives, requirements, and constraints of the IAEA as outlined in the IAEA documents INFCIRC/153 and INFCIRC/66-Rev-2.

  14. Level monitoring system with pulsating sensor—Application to online level monitoring of dashpots in a fast breeder reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malathi, N.; Sahoo, P.; Ananthanarayanan, R.; Murali, N.

    2015-02-01

    An innovative continuous type liquid level monitoring system constructed by using a new class of sensor, viz., pulsating sensor, is presented. This device is of industrial grade and it is exclusively used for level monitoring of any non conducting liquid. This instrument of unique design is suitable for high resolution online monitoring of oil level in dashpots of a sodium-cooled fast breeder reactor. The sensing probe is of capacitance type robust probe consisting of a number of rectangular mirror polished stainless steel (SS-304) plates separated with uniform gaps. The performance of this novel instrument has been thoroughly investigated. The precision, sensitivity, response time, and the lowest detection limit in measurement using this device are <0.01 mm, ˜100 Hz/mm, ˜1 s, and ˜0.03 mm, respectively. The influence of temperature on liquid level is studied and the temperature compensation is provided in the instrument. The instrument qualified all recommended tests, such as environmental, electromagnetic interference and electromagnetic compatibility, and seismic tests prior to its deployment in nuclear reactor. With the evolution of this level measurement approach, it is possible to provide dashpot oil level sensors in fast breeder reactor for the first time for continuous measurement of oil level in dashpots of Control & Safety Rod Drive Mechanism during reactor operation.

  15. Level monitoring system with pulsating sensor—Application to online level monitoring of dashpots in a fast breeder reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Malathi, N.; Sahoo, P. Ananthanarayanan, R.; Murali, N.

    2015-02-15

    An innovative continuous type liquid level monitoring system constructed by using a new class of sensor, viz., pulsating sensor, is presented. This device is of industrial grade and it is exclusively used for level monitoring of any non conducting liquid. This instrument of unique design is suitable for high resolution online monitoring of oil level in dashpots of a sodium-cooled fast breeder reactor. The sensing probe is of capacitance type robust probe consisting of a number of rectangular mirror polished stainless steel (SS-304) plates separated with uniform gaps. The performance of this novel instrument has been thoroughly investigated. The precision, sensitivity, response time, and the lowest detection limit in measurement using this device are <0.01 mm, ∼100 Hz/mm, ∼1 s, and ∼0.03 mm, respectively. The influence of temperature on liquid level is studied and the temperature compensation is provided in the instrument. The instrument qualified all recommended tests, such as environmental, electromagnetic interference and electromagnetic compatibility, and seismic tests prior to its deployment in nuclear reactor. With the evolution of this level measurement approach, it is possible to provide dashpot oil level sensors in fast breeder reactor for the first time for continuous measurement of oil level in dashpots of Control and Safety Rod Drive Mechanism during reactor operation.

  16. Level monitoring system with pulsating sensor--application to online level monitoring of dashpots in a fast breeder reactor.

    PubMed

    Malathi, N; Sahoo, P; Ananthanarayanan, R; Murali, N

    2015-02-01

    An innovative continuous type liquid level monitoring system constructed by using a new class of sensor, viz., pulsating sensor, is presented. This device is of industrial grade and it is exclusively used for level monitoring of any non conducting liquid. This instrument of unique design is suitable for high resolution online monitoring of oil level in dashpots of a sodium-cooled fast breeder reactor. The sensing probe is of capacitance type robust probe consisting of a number of rectangular mirror polished stainless steel (SS-304) plates separated with uniform gaps. The performance of this novel instrument has been thoroughly investigated. The precision, sensitivity, response time, and the lowest detection limit in measurement using this device are <0.01 mm, ∼100 Hz/mm, ∼1 s, and ∼0.03 mm, respectively. The influence of temperature on liquid level is studied and the temperature compensation is provided in the instrument. The instrument qualified all recommended tests, such as environmental, electromagnetic interference and electromagnetic compatibility, and seismic tests prior to its deployment in nuclear reactor. With the evolution of this level measurement approach, it is possible to provide dashpot oil level sensors in fast breeder reactor for the first time for continuous measurement of oil level in dashpots of Control & Safety Rod Drive Mechanism during reactor operation.

  17. Theory, design, and operation of liquid metal fast breeder reactors, including operational health physics

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, S.R.

    1985-10-01

    A comprehensive evaluation was conducted of the radiation protection practices and programs at prototype LMFBRs with long operational experience. Installations evaluated were the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), Richland, Washington; Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II), Idaho Falls, Idaho; Prototype Fast Reactor (PFR) Dounreay, Scotland; Phenix, Marcoule, France; and Kompakte Natriumgekuhlte Kernreak Toranlange (KNK II), Karlsruhe, Federal Republic of Germany. The evaluation included external and internal exposure control, respiratory protection procedures, radiation surveillance practices, radioactive waste management, and engineering controls for confining radiation contamination. The theory, design, and operating experience at LMFBRs is described. Aspects of LMFBR health physics different from the LWR experience in the United States are identified. Suggestions are made for modifications to the NRC Standard Review Plan based on the differences.

  18. The Potential of Different Concepts of Fast Breeder Reactor for the French Fleet Renewal

    SciTech Connect

    Massara, Simone; Tetart, Philippe; Lecarpentier, David; Garzenne, Claude; Mourogov, Alexandre

    2006-07-01

    The performances of different concepts of Fast Breeder Reactor (Na-cooled, He-cooled and Pb-cooled FBR) for the current French fleet renewal are analyzed in the framework of a transition scenario to a 100% FBR fleet at the end of the 21. century. Firstly, the modeling of these three FBR types by means of a semi-analytical approach in TIRELIRE - STRATEGIE, the EDF fuel cycle simulation code, is presented, together with some validation elements against ERANOS, the French reference code system for neutronic FBR analysis (CEA). Afterwards, performances comparisons are made in terms of maximum deployable power, natural uranium consumption and waste production. The results show that the FBR maximum deployable capacity, independently from the FBR technology, is highly sensitive to the fuel cycle options, like the spent nuclear fuel cooling time or the Minor Actinides management strategy. Thus, some of the key parameters defining the dynamic of FBR deployment are highlighted, to inform the orientation of R and D in the development and optimization of these systems. (authors)

  19. Optimization of a variable flow allocation scheme in heterogeneous liquid-metal fast breeder reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Tzanos, C.P.

    1981-12-01

    Maximum cladding temperatures in heterogeneous liquid-metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBRs) can be reduced if the flow allocation between core and blanket assemblies is continuously varied during burnup. An analytical model has been developed that optimizes the time variation of the flow such that the reduction in maximum cladding temperatures is maximized. In addition, the concept of continuously varying the flow allocation between core and blanket assemblies has been evaluated for different fuel management schemes in a low sodium void reactivity 3000-MW heterogeneous LMFBR. This evaluation shows that the reduction in maximum cladding midwall temperatures is small ( about 10/sup 0/C) if the reactor is partially refueled at the end of each burnup cycle (cycle length of one year), and this reduction is increased to 20/sup 0/C if a straight burn fuel scheme is used with a core and internal blanket fuel residence time of two years.

  20. Development of variable width ribbon heating elements for liquid metal and gas-cooled fast breeder reactor fuel rod simulators

    SciTech Connect

    McCulloch, R.W.; Lovell, R.T.; Post, D.W.; Snyder, S.D.

    1980-01-01

    Variable width ribbon heating elements have been fabricated which provide a chopped cosine, variable heat flux profile for fuel rod simulators used in test loops by the Breeder Reactor Program Thermal Hydraulic Out-of-Reactor Safety test facility and the Gas-Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor Core Flow Test Loop. Thermal, mechanical, and electrical design considerations result in the derivation of an analytical expression for the ribbon contours. From this, the ribbons are machined and wound on numerically controlled equipment. Postprocessing and inspection results in a wound, variable width ribbon with the precise dimensional, electrical, and mechanical properties needed for use in fuel pin simulators.

  1. Experimental studies of U-Pu-Zr fast reactor fuel pins in the Experimental Breeder Reactor 2

    SciTech Connect

    Pahl, R.G.; Porter, D.L.; Lahm, C.E. ); Hofman, G.L. )

    1990-07-01

    Argonne National Laboratory's Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept has been under demonstration in the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) since February 1985. Irradiation tests of U-Zr and U-Pu-Zr fuel pins to {gt}15 at. pct burnup have demonstrated their viability as driver fuel prototypes in innovative design liquid metal reactors. A number of technically challenging irradiation effects have been observed and are now under study. Microstructural changes in the fuel are dominated early in exposure by grain boundary cavitation and fission gas bubble growth, producing large amounts of swelling. Irradiation creep and swelling of the austenitic (D9) and martensitic (HT-9) candidate cladding alloys have been measured and correlate well with property modeling efforts. Chemical interaction between the fuel and cladding alloys has been characterized to assess the magnitude of cladding wastage during steady-state irradiation. Significant interdiffusion of the uranium and zirconium occurs producing metallurgically distinct zones in the fuel.

  2. Plant control of a fast breeder reactor cooled by supercritical light water

    SciTech Connect

    Nakatsuka, T.; Oka, Y.; Koshizuka, S.

    1997-12-01

    Supercritical water does not exhibit a change of phase. The plant system of the supercritical water cooled reactor is the once-through, direct-cycle where the steam-water separator and coolant recirculation systems are eliminated. It is different from those of BWR and PWR. The reactor is sensitive to the perturbations of the feedwater flow rate, since the whole core coolant driven by the feedwater pumps flows to the turbines. The axial coolant density change is larger than that of a BWR. Pressure control by the feedwater like the supercritical fossil-fired power plant (FPP) is not appropriate because the change of feedwater flow rate largely affects the core power through the coolant density feedback. It is necessary to analyze the controllability of the plant against coolant flow and pressure perturbations for assessing the technical feasibility of the reactor. The plant behaviors of a fast breeder reactor cooled by supercritical water (SCFBR) are analyzed for three principal perturbations: the change of the control rod position, the feedwater flow rate and the turbine control valve opening. Based on the step responses to the perturbations, the plant control system is designed: the pressure is controlled by the turbine control valves, the main steam temperature is controlled by the feedwater flow rate and the core power is controlled by the control rods. Parameters of the control system are selected by the test calculations to satisfy both fast convergence and stability criteria. The plant behaviors with the designed plant control system are stable against the perturbations. The reactor cooled by supercritical light water is controllable with the plant control system designed here. 7 refs., 11 figs., 6 tabs.

  3. NUCLEAR REACTOR FUEL-BREEDER FUEL ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Currier, E.L. Jr.; Nicklas, J.H.

    1962-08-14

    A fuel-breeder fuel element was developed for a nuclear reactor wherein discrete particles of fissionable material are dispersed in a matrix of fertile breeder material. The fuel element combines the advantages of a dispersion type and a breeder-type. (AEC)

  4. Analysis of the conceptual shielding design for the upflow Gas-Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, C.O.; Reed, D.A.; Cramer, S.N.; Emmett, M.B.; Tomlinson, E.T.

    1981-01-01

    Conceptual Shielding Configuration III for the Gas-Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor (GCFR) was analyzed by performing global calculations of neutron and gamma-ray fluences and correcting the results as appropriate with bias factors from localized calculations. Included among the localized calculations were the radial and axial cell streaming calculations, plus extensive preliminary calculations and three final confirmation calculations of the plenum flow-through shields. The global calculations were performed on the GCFR mid-level and the lower and upper plenum regions. Calculated activities were examined with respect to the design constraint, if any, imposed on the particular activity. The spatial distributions of several activities of interest were examined with the aid of isoplots (i.e., symbols are used to describe a surface on which the activity level is everywhere the same). In general the results showed that most activities were below the respective design constraints. Only the total neutron fluence in the core barrel appeared to be marginal with the present reactor design. Since similar results were obtained for an earlier design, it has been proposed that the core barrel be cooled with inlet plenum gas to maintain it at a temperature low enough that it can withstand a higher fluence limit. Radiation levels in the prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV) and liner appeared to be sufficiently below the design constraint that expected results from the Radial Shield Heterogeneity Experiment should not force any levels above the design constraint. A list was also made of a number of issues which should be examined before completion of the final shielding design.

  5. Diversion analysis and safeguards measures for liquid-metal fast-breeder reactors. Paper IAEA-SM-260/6

    SciTech Connect

    Persiani, P.J.; Ermakov, S.V.

    1982-01-01

    The objective of the study is to perform a diversion analysis and an assessment of the available safeguards methods and systems for verifying inventory and flow of nuclear material in accessible and inaccessible areas of liquid-metal fast breeder reactor, LMFBR, systems. The study focuses primarily on the assembly-handling operations, assembly storage facilities, and reactor operations facilities relating to experimental, demonstration and prototypal reactor plants. The safeguards systems and methods presented are considered to be feasible for development and implementation within the resource limitation of the IAEA and are considered to be consistent with the objectives, requirements, and constraints of the IAEA documents INFCIRC/153 and INFCIRC/66-Rev-2.

  6. Multiple lead seal assembly for a liquid-metal-cooled fast-breeder nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Hutter, Ernest; Pardini, John A.

    1977-03-15

    A reusable multiple lead seal assembly provides leak-free passage of stainless-steel-clad instrument leads through the cover on the primary tank of a liquid-metal-cooled fast-breeder nuclear reactor. The seal isolates radioactive argon cover gas and sodium vapor within the primary tank from the exterior atmosphere and permits reuse of the assembly and the stainless-steel-clad instrument leads. Leads are placed in flutes in a seal body, and a seal shell is then placed around the seal body. Circumferential channels in the body and inner surface of the shell are contiguous and together form a conduit which intersects each of the flutes, placing them in communication with a port through the wall of the seal shell. Liquid silicone rubber sealant is injected into the flutes through the port and conduit; the sealant fills the space in the flutes not occupied by the leads themselves and dries to a rubbery hardness. A nut, threaded onto a portion of the seal body not covered by the seal shell, jacks the body out of the shell and shears the sealant without damage to the body, shell, or leads. The leads may then be removed from the body. The sheared sealant is cleaned from the body, leads, and shell and the assembly may then be reused with the same or different leads.

  7. Experiments on liquid-metal fast breeder reactor aerosol source terms after severe accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Berthoud, G.; Longest, A.W.; Wright, A.L.; Schutz, W.P.

    1988-05-01

    In the extremely unlikely event of a liquid-metal fast breeder reactor core disruptive accident, expanding core material or sodium vapor inside the sodium pool may cause leaks in the vessel head and transport of radioactive material, mostly aerosols, in one large bubble or several smaller bubbles under energetic conditions to the cover gas and through leaks to the inner containment (''instantaneous source term''). Out-of-pile experiments on bubble expansion from a pressurized source inside a liquid (water or sodium) and related phenomena like heat transfer, condensation, entrainment, rise, and aerosol transport were carried out in France and the United States and are continuing in the Federal Republic of Germany. Parameters and results of these experiments are described and discussed, mainly concerning the aerosol problem. It appears that several mechanisms exist for a very efficient removal of particles from the bubble. Retention factors larger than 10,000 were found in most cases. In addition, a short survey is given of French and German experiments on fuel and fission product release from evaporating or burning sodium pools (delayed source term).

  8. Effect of yttrium additions on void swelling in Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor candidate cladding alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Hopson, R.D.

    1981-10-01

    Candidate Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor cladding alloys AL1 (Fe-26% Ni-9% Cr) and AL2 (Fe-35% Ni-12% Cr) without and with the addition of 0.1% yttrium were bombarded by 4 MeV/sup 56/Fe/sup 2 +/ ions without and with simultaneous bombardment by 0.4 MeV /sup 4/He/sup +/ ions. These bombardments were conducted at various irradiation temperatures to determine the effect of yttrium on void swelling. The addition of yttrium decreased peak swelling for 4 MeV /sup 56/Fe/sup 2 +/ ion bombarded AL1 and AL2 by 28% and 20%, respectively. In all cases where similar sample comparisons were made (i.e., undoped with undoped and doped with doped) and where bombardment conditions were similar (i.e., single with single beam and dual with dual beam), AL1 showed less peak swelling than did AL2. Simultaneously implanting helium during heavy-ion bombardment increased peak swelling in undoped and doped AL1 by factors of 2.3 and 2.6, respectively.

  9. Probabilistic risk analysis of HCDA scenarios in a pool-type breeder reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Page, R.J.; Mueller, C.J.; Rothman, A.B.; Chasanov, M.; Sevy, R.; Marchaterre, J.F.; Froehle, P.J.; Pedersen, D.R.; Farhadieh, R.

    1985-01-01

    One potential design for the future generation of nuclear reactors is that of the breeder reactor. As with present-day reactors there is the necessity for demonstrating that such a reactor will be operable with very small risk to the public. As a result, a probabilistic risk analysis (PRA) will be a valuable tool in the design of future nuclear plants. This paper presents a risk analysis performed to evaluate hypothetical core disruptive accidents (HCDAs) in a large, pool-type LMFBR, and how it was used to evaluate the reduction in risk brought about by the addition of various safety-related design options. It was shown that the base design met the NRC risk guidelines with some margin, and that a design option featuring emergency cooling of the reactor vessel greatly reduced the risk.

  10. Advanced In-Service Inspection Approaches Applied to the Phenix Fast Breeder Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Guidez, J.; Martin, L.; Dupraz, R.

    2006-07-01

    The safety upgrading of the Phenix plant undertaken between 1994 and 1997 involved a vast inspection programme of the reactor, the external storage drum and the secondary sodium circuits in order to meet the requirements of the defence-in-depth safety approach. The three lines of defence were analysed for every safety related component: demonstration of the quality of design and construction, appropriate in-service inspection and controlling the consequences of an accident. The in-service reactor block inspection programme consisted in controlling the core support structures and the high-temperature elements. Despite the fact that limited consideration had been given to inspection constraints during the design stage of the reactor in the 1960's, as compared to more recent reactor projects such as the European Fast Reactor (EFR), all the core support line elements were able to be inspected. The three following main operations are described: Ultrasonic inspection of the upper hangers of the main vessel, using small transducers able to withstand temperatures of 130 deg. C, Inspection of the conical shell supporting the core dia-grid. A specific ultrasonic method and a special implementation technique were used to control the under sodium structure welds, located up to several meters away from the scan surface. Remote inspection of the hot pool structures, particularly the core cover plug after partial sodium drainage of the reactor vessel. Other inspections are also summarized: control of secondary sodium circuit piping, intermediate heat exchangers, primary sodium pumps, steam generator units and external storage drum. The pool type reactor concept, developed in France since the 1960's, presents several favourable safety and operational features. The feedback from the Phenix plant also shows real potential for in-service inspection. The design of future generation IV sodium fast reactors will benefit from the experience acquired from the Phenix plant. (authors)

  11. Fast Reactor Fuel Type and Reactor Safety Performance

    SciTech Connect

    R. Wigeland; J. Cahalan

    2009-09-01

    Fast Reactor Fuel Type and Reactor Safety Performance R. Wigeland , Idaho National Laboratory J. Cahalan, Argonne National Laboratory The sodium-cooled fast neutron reactor is currently being evaluated for the efficient transmutation of the highly-hazardous, long-lived, transuranic elements that are present in spent nuclear fuel. One of the fundamental choices that will be made is the selection of the fuel type for the fast reactor, whether oxide, metal, carbide, nitride, etc. It is likely that a decision on the fuel type will need to be made before many of the related technologies and facilities can be selected, from fuel fabrication to spent fuel reprocessing. A decision on fuel type should consider all impacts on the fast reactor system, including safety. Past work has demonstrated that the choice of fuel type may have a significant impact on the severity of consequences arising from accidents, especially for severe accidents of low probability. In this paper, the response of sodium-cooled fast reactors is discussed for both oxide and metal fuel types, highlighting the similarities and differences in reactor response and accident consequences. Any fast reactor facility must be designed to be able to successfully prevent, mitigate, or accommodate all consequences of potential events, including accidents. This is typically accomplished by using multiple barriers to the release of radiation, including the cladding on the fuel, the intact primary cooling system, and most visibly the reactor containment building. More recently, this has also included the use of ‘inherent safety’ concepts to reduce or eliminate the potential for serious damage in some cases. Past experience with oxide and metal fuel has demonstrated that both fuel types are suitable for use as fuel in a sodium-cooled fast reactor. However, safety analyses for these two fuel types have also shown that there can be substantial differences in accident consequences due to the neutronic and

  12. Analysis of Sodium Fire in the Containment Building of Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor Under the Scenario of Core Disruptive Accident

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, P.M.; Kasinathan, N.; Kannan, S.E.

    2006-07-01

    The potential for sodium release to reactor containment building from reactor assembly during Core Disruptive Accident (CDA) in Fast Breeder Reactors (FBR) is an important safety issue with reference to the structural integrity of Reactor Containment Building (RCB). For Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR), the estimated sodium release under a CDA of 100 MJ energy release is 350 kg. The ejected sodium reacts easily with air in RCB and causes temperature and pressure rise in the RCB. For estimating the severe thermal consequences in RCB, different modes of sodium fires like pool and spray fires were analyzed by using SOFIRE -- II and NACOM sodium fire computer codes. Effects of important parameters like amount of sodium, area of pool, containment air volume and oxygen concentration have been investigated. A peak pressure rise of 7.32 kPa is predicted by SOFIRE II code for 350 kg sodium pool fire in 86,000 m{sup 3} RCB volume. Under sodium release as spray followed by unburnt sodium as pool fire mode analysis, the estimated pressure rise is 5.85 kPa in the RCB. In the mode of instantaneous combustion of sodium, the estimated peak pressure rise is 13 kPa. (authors)

  13. Evaluation of the Initial Isothermal Physics Measurements at the Fast Flux Test Facility, a Prototypic Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess

    2010-03-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) was a 400-MWt, sodium-cooled, low-pressure, high-temperature, fast-neutron flux, nuclear fission reactor plant designed for the irradiation testing of nuclear reactor fuels and materials for the development of liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBRs). The FFTF was fueled with plutonium-uranium mixed oxide (MOX) and reflected by Inconel-600. Westinghouse Hanford Company operated the FFTF as part of the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL) for the U.S. Department of Energy on the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. Although the FFTF was a testing facility not specifically designed to breed fuel or produce electricity, it did provide valuable information for LMFBR projects and base technology programs in the areas of plant system and component design, component fabrication, prototype testing, and site construction. The major objectives of the FFTF were to provide a strong, disciplined engineering base for the LMFBR program, provide fast flux testing for other U.S. programs, and contribute to the development of a viable self-sustaining competitive U.S. LMFBR industry. During its ten years of operation, the FFTF acted as a national research facility to test advanced nuclear fuels, materials, components, systems, nuclear power plant operating and maintenance procedures, and active and passive reactor safety technologies; it also produced a large number of isotopes for medical and industrial users, generated tritium for the U.S. fusion research program, and participated in cooperative, international research work. Prior to the implementation of the reactor characterization program, a series of isothermal physics measurements were performed; this acceptance testing program consisted of a series of control rod worths, critical rod positions, subcriticality measurements, maximum reactivity addition rates, shutdown margins, excess reactivity, and isothermal temperature coefficient reactivity. The results of these

  14. Evaluation of high plutonia (44% PuO 2) MOX as a fuel for fast breeder test reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, A. K.; Khan, K. B.; Panakkal, Jose; Kamath, H. S.; Banerjee, S.

    2009-03-01

    Uranium plutonium mixed oxide (MOX) containing up to 30% plutonia is the conventional fuel for liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactor (LMFBR). Use of high plutonia (>30%) MOX fuel in LMFBR had been of interest but not pursued. Of late, it has regained importance for faster disposition of plutonium and also for making compact fast reactors. Some of the issues of high plutonia MOX fuels which are of concern are its chemical compatibility with liquid sodium coolant, dimensional stability and low thermal conductivity. Available literature information for MOX fuel is limited to a plutonium content of 30%. Thermodynamic assessment of mixed oxide fuels indicate that with increasing plutonia oxygen potential of the fuel increases and the fuel become more prone to chemical attack by liquid sodium coolant in case of a clad breach. In the present investigation, some of these issues of MOX fuel have been studied to evaluate this fuel for its use in fast reactor. Extensive work on the out-of-pile thermo-physical properties and fuel-coolant chemical compatibility under different simulated reactor conditions has been carried out. Results of these studies were compared with the available literature information on low plutonia MOX fuel and critically analyzed to predict in reactor behaviour of this fuel containing 44% PuO 2. The results of these out-of-pile studies have been very encouraging and helped in arriving at a suitable and achievable fuel specification for utilization of this fuel in fast breeder test reactor (FBTR). As a first step of test pin irradiation programme in FBTR, eight subassemblies of the MOX fuel are undergoing irradiation in FBTR.

  15. Development of fast breeder reactor fuel reprocessing technology at the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation

    SciTech Connect

    Kawata, T.; Takeda, H.; Togashi, A.; Hayashi, S. . Tokai Works); Stradley, J.G. )

    1991-01-01

    For the past two decades, a broad range of research development (R D) programs to establish fast breeder reactor (FBR) system and its associated fuel cycle technology have been pursued by the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC). Developmental activities for FBR fuel reprocessing technology have been primarily conducted at PNC Tokai Works where many important R D facilities for nuclear fuel cycle are located. These include cold and uranium tests for process equipment development in the Engineering Demonstration Facilities (EDF)-I and II, and laboratory-scale hot tests in the Chemical Processing Facility (CPF) where fuel dissolution and solvent extraction characteristics are being investigated with irradiated FBR fuel pins whose burn-up ranges up to 100,000 MWd/t. An extensive effort has also been made at EDF-III to develop advanced remote technology which enables to increase plant availability and to decrease radiation exposures to the workers in future reprocessing plants. The PNC and the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) entered into the joint collaboration in which the US shares the R Ds to support FBR fuel reprocessing program at the PNC. Several important R Ds on advanced process equipment such as a rotary dissolver and a centrifugal contactor system are in progress in a joint effort with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP). In order to facilitate hot testing on advanced processes and equipment, the design of a new engineering-scale hot test facility is now in progress aiming at the start of hot operation in late 90's. 31 refs., 2 tabs.

  16. Assessment of the performance potential of the martensitic alloy HT-9 for liquid-metal fast-breeder-reactor applications

    SciTech Connect

    Straalsund, J.L.; Gelles, D.S.

    1983-05-01

    Martensitic stainless steels appear to provide attractive alternatives to austenitic stainless steels for liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBR). The United States National Cladding/Duct (NCD) Materials Development Program has selected Sandvik alloy HT-9 (12CrMoW) as one of six prime candidate alloys for advanced in-core structural materials having very high peak burnup capabilities. The NCD program, since 1974, has been accumulating engineering data for HT-9. Properties include swelling, irradiation creep and microstructure as a function of fluence, postirradiation mechanical properties, thermal creep, sodium compatibility and hardware fabrication technology. Tests results are presented.

  17. Localized corrosion studies on materials proposed for a safety-grade sodium-to- air decay-heat removal system for fast breeder reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamachi Mudali, U.; Khatak, H. S.; Dayal, R. K.; Gnanamoorthy, J. B.

    1993-02-01

    The present investigation was carried out to assess the localized corrosion resistance of materials proposed for the construction of the safety-grade sodium-to-air decay-heat removal system for fast breeder reactors. The materials, such as Alloy 800,9Cr-lMo steel, and type 316LN stainless steel, in different microstructural conditions were assessed for pitting and stress-corrosion cracking resistances in a chloride medium. The results indicated that 9Cr-lMo steel in the normalized and tempered condition can be considered for the above application from the standpoint of corrosion resistance.

  18. Localized corrosion studies on materials proposed for a safety-grade sodium-to-air decay-heat removal system for fast breeder reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Mudali, U.K.; Khatak, H.S.; Dayal, R.K.; Gnanamoorthy, J.B. )

    1993-02-01

    The present investigation was carried out to assess the localized corrosion resistance of materials proposed for the construction of the safety-grade sodium-to-air decay-heat removal system for fast breeder reactors. The materials, such as Alloy 800, 9Cr-1 Mo steel, and type 316LN stainless steel, in different microstructural conditions were assessed for pitting and stress-corrosion cracking resistances in a chloride medium. The results indicated that 9Cr-1Mo steel in the normalized and tempered condition can be considered for the above application from the standpoint of corrosion resistance.

  19. Study of safeguards system on dry reprocessing for fast breeder reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Li, T. K.; Burr, Tom; Menlove, Howard O.; Thomas, K. E.; Fukushima, M.; Hori, M.

    2002-01-01

    A 'Feasibility Study on the Commercialized Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR) Cycle System' is underway at Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC). Concepts to commercialize the FBR fuel cycle are being created together with their necessary research and development (R&D) tasks. 'Dry,' non-aqueous, processes are candidates for FBR fuel reprocessing. Dry reprocessing technology takes advantage of proliferation barriers, due to the lower decontamination factors achievable by the simple pyrochemical processes proposed. The concentration o f highly radioactive impurities and non-fissile materials in products from a dry reprocess is generally significantly larger than the normal aqueous (Purex) process. However, the safeguards of dry reprocesses have not been widely analyzed. In 2000, JNC and Los Alamos National Laboratoiy (LANL) initiated a joint research program to study the safeguards aspects of dry reprocessing. In this study, the safeguardability of the three options: metal electrorefining, oxide electrowinning, and fluoride volatility processes, are assessed. FBR spent fuels are decladded and powdered into mixed oxides (MOX) at the Head-End process either by oxidation-reduction reactions (metal electrorefining and fluoride volatility) or mechanically (oxide electrowinning). At the oxide electrowinning process, the spent MOX he1 powder is transferred to chloride in molten salt and nuclear materials are extracted onto cathode as oxides. For metal electrorefining process, on the other hand, the MOX fuel is converted to chloride in molten salt, and nuclear materials are extracted onto cathode as a metal fomi. At lhe fluoride volatility process, the MOX fuel powder is converted to U&/PuF6 (gaseous form) in a fluidized bed; plutonium and uranium fluorides are separated by volatilization properties and then are converted to oxides. Since the conceptual design of a dry reprocessing plant is incomplete, the operational mode, vessel capacities, residence times, and campaigns

  20. Superphenix: Is the fast breeder dream over -- or over yonder?

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    A detailed history of France`s Superphenix commercial fast breeder reactor project is presented. Important project milestones are discussed from the project`s conception in 1971 to its current status. Recommendations of the Castaing Commission on the project and future plans for use of the reactor are outlined. In addition, world wide fast breeder projects are listed and discussed.

  1. Microstructure analysis for chemical interaction between cesium and SUS 316 steel in fast breeder reactor application

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, K.; Fukumoto, K. I.; Oshima, T.; Tanigaki, T.; Masayoshi, U.

    2012-07-01

    In this study the corrosion products on a surface after cesium corrosion examination at 650 deg. C for 100 hrs were characterized by TEM observation around the corroded area on the surface in order to understand the corrosion mechanism of cesium fission product for cladding materials in fast reactor. The experimental results suggest the main corrosion mechanism occurred in the process of the separation of cesium chromate and metal (Fe, Ni). The main reaction of corrosion process was considered to be equation, 2Cs + 7/2 O{sub 2} + 2Cr {yields} Cs{sub 2}Cr{sub 2}O{sub 7}(L). (authors)

  2. Light-Water Breeder Reactor

    DOEpatents

    Beaudoin, B. R.; Cohen, J. D.; Jones, D. H.; Marier, Jr, L. J.; Raab, H. F.

    1972-06-20

    Described is a light-water-moderated and -cooled nuclear breeder reactor of the seed-blanket type characterized by core modules comprising loosely packed blanket zones enriched with fissile fuel and axial zoning in the seed and blanket regions within each core module. Reactivity control over lifetime is achieved by axial displacement of movable seed zones without the use of poison rods in the embodiment illustrated. The seed is further characterized by a hydrogen-to-uranium-233 atom ratio in the range 10 to 200 and a uranium-233-to-thorium-232 atom ratio ranging from 0.012 to 0.200. The seed occupies from 10 to 35 percent of the core volume in the form of one or more individual islands or annuli. (NSA 26: 55130)

  3. Optimization of a heterogeneous fast breeder reactor core with improved behavior during unprotected transients

    SciTech Connect

    Poumerouly, S.; Schmitt, D.; Massara, S.; Maliverney, B.

    2012-07-01

    Innovative Sodium-cooled Fast Reactors (SFRs) are currently being investigated by CEA, AREVA and EDF in the framework of a joint French collaboration, and the construction of a GEN IV prototype, ASTRID (Advanced Sodium Technical Reactor for Industrial Demonstration), is scheduled in the years 2020. Significant improvements are expected so as to improve the reactor safety: the goal is to achieve a robust safety demonstration of the mastering of the consequences of a Core Disruptive Accident (CDA), whether by means of prevention or mitigation features. In this framework, an innovative design was proposed by CEA in 2010. It aims at strongly reducing the sodium void effect, thereby improving the core behavior during unprotected loss of coolant transients. This design is strongly heterogeneous and includes, amongst others, a fertile plate, a sodium plenum associated with a B{sub 4}C upper blanket and a stepwise modulation of the fissile height of the core (onwards referred to as the 'diabolo shape'). In this paper, studies which were entirely carried out at EDF are presented: the full potential of this heterogeneous concept is thoroughly investigated using the SDDS methodology. (authors)

  4. Deterministic and Monte Carlo Neutron Transport Calculations of the Dounreay Fast Breeder Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Ziver, A. Kemal; Shahdatullah, Sabu; Eaton, Matthew D.; Oliviera, Cassiano R.E. de; Ackroyd, Ron T.; Umpleby, Adrian P.; Pain, Christopher C.; Goddard, Antony J. H.; Fitzpatrick, James

    2004-12-15

    A homogenized whole-reactor cylindrical model of the Dounreay Fast Reactor has been constructed using both deterministic and Monte Carlo codes to determine neutron flux distributions inside the core and at various out-of-core components. The principal aim is to predict neutron-induced activation levels using both methods and make comparisons against the measured thermal reaction rates. Neutron transport calculations have been performed for a fixed source using a spatially lumped fission neutron distribution, which has been derived from measurements. The deterministic code used is based on the finite element approximation to the multigroup second-order even-parity neutron transport equation, which is implemented in the EVENT code. The Monte Carlo solutions were obtained using the MCNP4C code, in which neutron cross sections are represented in pointwise (or continuous) form. We have compared neutron spectra at various locations not only to show differences between using multigroup deterministic and continuous energy (point nuclear data) Monte Carlo methods but also to assess neutron-induced activation levels calculated using the spectra obtained from both methods. Results were also compared against experiments that were carried out to determine neutron-induced reaction rates. To determine activation levels, we employed the European Activation Code System FISPACT. We have found that the neutron spectra calculated at various in-core and out-of-core components show some differences, which mainly reflect the use of multigroup and point energy nuclear data libraries and methods employed, but these differences have not resulted in large errors on the calculated activation levels of materials that are important (such as steel components) for decommissioning studies of the reactor. The agreement of calculated reaction rates of thermal neutron detectors such as the {sup 55}Mn(n,{gamma}){sup 56}Mn against measurements was satisfactory.

  5. Development of a neutronics calculation method for designing commercial type Japanese sodium-cooled fast reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, T.; Shimazu, Y.; Hibi, K.; Fujimura, K.

    2012-07-01

    Under the R and D project to improve the modeling accuracy for the design of fast breeder reactors the authors are developing a neutronics calculation method for designing a large commercial type sodium- cooled fast reactor. The calculation method is established by taking into account the special features of the reactor such as the use of annular fuel pellet, inner duct tube in large fuel assemblies, large core. The Verification and Validation, and Uncertainty Qualification (V and V and UQ) of the calculation method is being performed by using measured data from the prototype FBR Monju. The results of this project will be used in the design and analysis of the commercial type demonstration FBR, known as the Japanese Sodium fast Reactor (JSFR). (authors)

  6. Breeder Reactors, Understanding the Atom Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Walter, III; Turner, Stanley E.

    The theory of breeder reactors in relationship to a discussion of fission is presented. Different kinds of reactors are characterized by the cooling fluids used, such as liquid metal, gas, and molten salt. The historical development of breeder reactors over the past twenty-five years includes specific examples of reactors. The location and a brief…

  7. POWER BREEDER REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Monson, H.O.

    1960-11-22

    An arrangement is offered for preventing or minimizing the contraction due to temperature rise, of a reactor core comprising vertical fuel rods in sodium. Temperature rise of the fuel rods would normally make them move closer together by inward bowing, with a resultant undesired increase in reactivity. According to the present invention, assemblies of the fuel rods are laterally restrained at the lower ends of their lower blanket sections and just above the middle of the fuel sections proper of the rods, and thus the fuel sections move apart, rather than together, with increase in temperature.

  8. Development of variable-width ribbon heating elements for liquid-metal and gas-cooled fast breeder reactor fuel-pin simulators

    SciTech Connect

    McCulloch, R.W.; Post, D.W.; Lovell, R.T.; Snyder, S.D.

    1981-04-01

    Variable-width ribbon heating elements that provide a chopped-cosine variable heat flux profile have been fabricated for fuel pin simulators used in test loops by the Breeder Reactor Program Thermal-Hydraulic Out-of-Reactor Safety test facility and the Gas-Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor-Core Flow Test Loop. Thermal, mechanical, and electrical design considerations are used to derive an analytical expression that precisely describes ribbon contour in terms of the major fabrication parameters. These parameters are used to generate numerical control tapes that control ribbon cutting and winding machines. Infrared scanning techniques are developed to determine the optimum transient thermal profile of the coils and relate this profile to that generated by the coils in completed fuel pin simulators.

  9. Simulation of Radioactive Corrosion Product in Primary Cooling System of Japanese Sodium-Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matuo, Youichirou; Miyahara, Shinya; Izumi, Yoshinobu

    Radioactive Corrosion Product (CP) is a main cause of personal radiation exposure during maintenance with no breached fuel in fast breeder reactor (FBR) plants. The most important CP is 54Mn and 60Co. In order to establish techniques of radiation dose estimation for radiation workers in radiation-controlled areas of the FBR, the PSYCHE (Program SYstem for Corrosion Hazard Evaluation) code was developed. We add the Particle Model to the conventional PSYCHE analytical model. In this paper, we performed calculation of CP transfer in JOYO using an improved calculation code in which the Particle Model was added to the PSYCHE. The C/E (calculated / experimentally observed) value for CP deposition was improved through use of this improved PSYCHE incorporating the Particle Model. Moreover, among the percentage of total radioactive deposition accounted for by CP in particle form, 54Mn was estimated to constitute approximately 20 % and 60Co approximately 40 % in the cold-leg region. These calculation results are consistent with the measured results for the actual cold-leg piping in the JOYO.

  10. Some computations in planning reconstitution of a 500-MW(electric) fast breeder reactor (metallic) fuel by electrorefining

    SciTech Connect

    Nawada, H.P.; Bhat, N.P.; Balasubramanian, G.R.

    1996-04-01

    To compare and evaluate various fuel cycle options for a 500-MW(electric) fast breeder reactor, the electrorefining process has been examined for reprocessing spent fuel. Making use of an improved thermochemical model, optimum process conditions for electrorefining have been worked out. These conditions are the following: capacity of the electrorefining cell, number of cells, batch size, feed adjustments, sequential operations for recovery of uranium and co-recovery of uranium and plutonium, number of cycles, and time frame to meet the refueling schedule. The spent fuel is envisaged to undergo reprocessing in three campaigns: (a) the inner core campaign, (b) the outer core campaign, and (c) the blanket and the leftover campaign. Feed adjustments are done by mixing either the spent inner core or the outer core fuels with the blankets. Three product streams with required fuel composition for direct refabrication of the inner core, the outer core, and the blanket fuel subassemblies, respectively, are obtained by certain sequential electrorefiing operations. These calculations made for a mixed-oxide fuel core can be easily extended to the metallic core.

  11. Parametric studies on heterogeneous cores for fast breeder reactors: The Pre-Racine and Racine experimental programs

    SciTech Connect

    Humbert, G.; Kappler, F.; Martini, M.; Norvez, G.; Rimpault, G.; Ruelle, B.; Scholtyssek, W.; Stanculescu, A.

    1984-07-01

    The Pre-Racine and Racine experimental programs, which have been performed on the Masurca critical assembly at Cadarache since 1976, were designed for the study of the neutron physics characteristics of heterogeneous fast reactor cores. Geometrically simple configurations were chosen in which parameters, being typical for heterogeneous cores, were varied in a systematic manner while the basic fissile composition was kept the same. Measurements were made especially of the critical mass, the distributions of reaction rates and the spectral indices, the reactivity of sodium voiding, and control rod worths. Analyses were made independently by Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) and DEBENE using their own calculational techniques and cross sections. No bias for core heterogeneity was found on critical mass predictions. The CEA calculations for void reactivities are consistent in heterogeneous and homogeneous configurations. For the calculation of local parameters, e.g., reaction rates and spectral indices, more sophisticated methods must be applied in heterogeneous cores, as transport effects also become more important in fissile zones with increasing fertile volume fraction. It was found at CEA that the ratio of the calculated reactivity of a central control rod to the experimental value does not change with the core size or with the presence of internal breeder zones.

  12. A study of passive safety features by utilizing intra-subassembly-equipped self-actuated shutdown mechanism for future large fast breeder reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Uto, N.; Niwa, H.; Ieda, Y.; Satoh, K.

    1996-08-01

    Passive prevention of core disruptive accidents (CDAs) is desired in terms of enhancement of safety for future fast breeder reactors. In addition, mitigation of CDA`s consequences should be required because mitigation measures have a potential of applying to all accidents, while prevention measures are prepared for specific accident initiators. In this paper, the Intra-Subassembly-equipped Self-Actuated Shutdown System (IS-SASS) , which is considered effective on passive prevention and mitigation of CDAs, is described. The IS-SASS is introduced in a fuel subassembly and consists of absorber materials at the top of the active core and an inner duct through which molten fuel can be excluded out of the core. The determination of the appropriate number of the IS-SASS units, their arrangement in the core and their suitable structure are found to be suited to prevention and mitigation of CDAs for liquid metal-cooled large fast breeder reactors.

  13. Materials accounting in a fast-breeder-reactor fuels-reprocessing facility: optimal allocation of measurement uncertainties

    SciTech Connect

    Dayem, H.A.; Ostenak, C.A.; Gutmacher, R.G.; Kern, E.A.; Markin, J.T.; Martinez, D.P.; Thomas, C.C. Jr.

    1982-07-01

    This report describes the conceptual design of a materials accounting system for the feed preparation and chemical separations processes of a fast breeder reactor spent-fuel reprocessing facility. For the proposed accounting system, optimization techniques are used to calculate instrument measurement uncertainties that meet four different accounting performance goals while minimizing the total development cost of instrument systems. We identify instruments that require development to meet performance goals and measurement uncertainty components that dominate the materials balance variance. Materials accounting in the feed preparation process is complicated by large in-process inventories and spent-fuel assembly inputs that are difficult to measure. To meet 8 kg of plutonium abrupt and 40 kg of plutonium protracted loss-detection goals, materials accounting in the chemical separations process requires: process tank volume and concentration measurements having a precision less than or equal to 1%; accountability and plutonium sample tank volume measurements having a precision less than or equal to 0.3%, a shortterm correlated error less than or equal to 0.04%, and a long-term correlated error less than or equal to 0.04%; and accountability and plutonium sample tank concentration measurements having a precision less than or equal to 0.4%, a short-term correlated error less than or equal to 0.1%, and a long-term correlated error less than or equal to 0.05%. The effects of process design on materials accounting are identified. Major areas of concern include the voloxidizer, the continuous dissolver, and the accountability tank.

  14. Investigations on natural circulation in reactor models and shutdown heat removal systems for LMFBRs (liquid metal fast breeder reactors)

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffmann, H.; Weinberg, D.; Marten, K. ); Ieda, Yoshiaki )

    1989-11-01

    For sodium-cooled pool-type reactors, studies have been undertaken to remove the decay heat by natural convection alone, as in the case of failure of all power supplies. For this purpose, four immersion coolers (ICs), two each installed at a 180-deg circumferential position with respect to the others, are arranged within the reactor tank. They are connected with natural-drift air coolers through independent intermediate circuits. The primary sodium in the tank as well as the secondary sodium in the intermediate loop circulate by natural convection. The general functioning of this passive shutdown decay heat removal (DHR) system is demonstrated in 1:20 and 1:5 scale test models using water as a simulant fluid for sodium. The model design is based on the thermohydraulics similarity criteria. In the RAMONA three-dimensional 1:20 scale model, experiments were carried out to clarify the steady-state in-vessel thermohydraulics for different parameter combinations (core power, radial power distribution across the core, DHR by 2 or 4 ICs in operation, above-core structure geometry and position, different IC designs). For all mentioned parameters, temperatures and their fluctuations were measured and used to indicate isotherms and lines of identical temperature fluctuations. The flow patterns were observed visually. The experiments were recalculated by an updated version of the single-phase three-dimensional thermohydraulics code COMMIX.

  15. Thermal-performance study of liquid metal fast breeder reactor insulation

    SciTech Connect

    Shiu, Kelvin K.

    1980-09-01

    Three types of metallic thermal insulation were investigated analytically and experimentally: multilayer reflective plates, multilayer honeycomb composite, and multilayer screens. Each type was subjected to evacuated and nonevacuated conditions, where thermal measurements were made to determine thermal-physical characteristics. A variation of the separation distance between adjacent reflective plates of multilayer reflective plates and multilayer screen insulation was also experimentally studied to reveal its significance. One configuration of the multilayer screen insulation was further selected to be examined in sodium and sodium oxide environments. The emissivity of Type 304 stainless steel used in comprising the insulation was measured by employing infrared technology. A comprehensive model was developed to describe the different proposed types of thermal insulation. Various modes of heat transfer inherent in each type of insulation were addressed and their relative importance compared. Provision was also made in the model to allow accurate simulation of possible sodium and sodium oxide contamination of the insulation. The thermal-radiation contribution to heat transfer in the temperature range of interest for LMFBR's was found to be moderate, and the suppression of natural convection within the insulation was vital in preserving its insulating properties. Experimental data were compared with the model and other published results. Moreover, the three proposed test samples were assessed and compared under various conditions as viable LMFBR thermal insulations.

  16. AB INITIO STUDY OF ADVANCED METALLIC NUCLEAR FUELS FOR FAST BREEDER REACTORS

    SciTech Connect

    Landa, A; Soderlind, P; Grabowski, B; Turchi, P A; Ruban, A V; Vitos, L

    2012-04-23

    Density-functional formalism is applied to study the ground state properties of {gamma}-U-Zr and {gamma}-U-Mo solid solutions. Calculated heats of formation are compared with CALPHAD assessments. We discuss how the heat of formation in both alloys correlates with the charge transfer between the alloy components. The decomposition curves for {gamma}-based U-Zr and U-Mo solid solutions are derived from Ising-type Monte Carlo simulations. We explore the idea of stabilization of the {delta}-UZr{sub 2} compound against the {alpha}-Zr (hcp) structure due to increase of Zr d-band occupancy by the addition of U to Zr. We discuss how the specific behavior of the electronic density of states in the vicinity of the Fermi level promotes the stabilization of the U{sub 2}Mo compound. The mechanism of possible Am redistribution in the U-Zr and U-Mo fuels is also discussed.

  17. Fast Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, S.; Pisanti, O.

    The following sections are included: * Elementary Considerations * The Integral Equation to the Neutron Distribution * The Critical Size for a Fast Reactor * Supercritical Reactors * Problems and Exercises

  18. Thermal baffle for fast-breeder reacton

    DOEpatents

    Rylatt, John A.

    1977-01-01

    A liquid-metal-cooled fast-breeder reactor includes a bridge structure for separating hot outlet coolant from relatively cool inlet coolant consisting of an annular stainless steel baffle plate extending between the core barrel surrounding the core and the thermal liner associated with the reactor vessel and resting on ledges thereon, there being inner and outer circumferential webs on the lower surface of the baffle plate and radial webs extending between the circumferential webs, a stainless steel insulating plate completely covering the upper surface of the baffle plate and flex seals between the baffle plate and the ledges on which the baffle plate rests to prevent coolant from washing through the gaps therebetween. The baffle plate is keyed to the core barrel for movement therewith and floating with respect to the thermal liner and reactor vessel.

  19. Light-water breeder reactors: preliminary safety and environmental information document. Volume III

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    Information is presented concerning prebreeder and breeder reactors based on light-water-breeder (LWBR) Type 1 modules; light-water backfit prebreeder supplying advanced breeder; light-water backfit prebreeder/seed-blanket breeder system; and light-water backfit low-gain converter using medium-enrichment uranium, supplying a light-water backfit high-gain converter.

  20. Experimental Breeder Reactor I Preservation Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Julie Braun

    2006-10-01

    Experimental Breeder Reactor I (EBR I) is a National Historic Landmark located at the Idaho National Laboratory, a Department of Energy laboratory in southeastern Idaho. The facility is significant for its association and contributions to the development of nuclear reactor testing and development. This Plan includes a structural assessment of the interior and exterior of the EBR I Reactor Building from a preservation, rather than an engineering stand point and recommendations for maintenance to ensure its continued protection.

  1. Structural materials for breeder reactor cores and coolant circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Diercks, D.R.

    1984-02-01

    The structural components of principal interest in LMFBR cores and cooling circuits include the reactor vessel, primary and secondary piping, intermediate heat exchanger (IHX), and steam generator. Load-bearing components inside the vessel, among these the fuel cladding and duct, are also included. The operating conditions present in a fast-breeder nuclear reactor impose a number of requirements on the mechanical, physical, and neutronic properties of the materials used to construct these components.

  2. Study on laser welding of fuel clad tubes and end plugs made of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel for metallic fuel of Fast Breeder Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harinath, Y. V.; Gopal, K. A.; Murugan, S.; Albert, S. K.

    2013-04-01

    A procedure for Pulsed Laser Beam Welding (PLBW) has been developed for fabrication of fuel pins made of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel for metallic fuel proposed to be used in future in India's Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR) programme. Initial welding trials of the samples were carried out with different average power using Nd-YAG based PLBW process. After analyzing the welds, average power for the weld was optimized for the required depth of penetration and weld quality. Subsequently, keeping the average power constant, the effect of various other welding parameters like laser peak power, pulse frequency, pulse duration and energy per pulse on weld joint integrity were studied and a procedure that would ensure welds of acceptable quality with required depth of penetration, minimum size of fusion zone and Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) were finalized. This procedure is also found to reduce the volume fraction delta-ferrite in the fusion zone.

  3. Development of a Fast Breeder Reactor Fuel Bundle-Duct Interaction Analysis Code - BAMBOO: Analysis Model and Validation by the Out-of-Pile Compression Test

    SciTech Connect

    Uwaba, Tomoyuki; Tanaka, Kosuke

    2001-10-15

    To analyze the wire-wrapped fast breeder reactor (FBR) fuel pin bundle deformation under bundle-duct interaction (BDI) conditions, the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute has developed the BAMBOO computer code. A three-dimensional beam element model is used in this code to calculate fuel pin bowing and cladding oval distortion, which are the dominant deformation mechanisms in a fuel pin bundle. In this work, the property of the cladding oval distortion considering the wire-pitch was evaluated experimentally and introduced in the code analysis.The BAMBOO code was validated in this study by using an out-of-pile bundle compression testing apparatus and comparing these results with the code results. It is concluded that BAMBOO reasonably predicts the pin-to-duct clearances in the compression tests by treating the cladding oval distortion as the suppression mechanism to BDI.

  4. Time constants and feedback transfer functions of EBR-II (Experimental Breeder Reactor) subassembly types

    SciTech Connect

    Grimm, K.N.; Meneghetti, D.

    1986-09-01

    Time constants, feedback reactivity transfer functions and power coefficients are calculated for stereotypical subassemblies in the EBR-II reactor. These quantities are calculated from nodal reactivities obtained from a reactor kinetic code analysis for a step change in power. Due to the multiplicity of eigenvalues, there are several time constants for each nodal position in a subassembly. Compared with these calculated values are analytically derived values for the initial node of a given channel.

  5. Shutdown and Closure of the Experimental Breeder Reactor - II

    SciTech Connect

    Michelbacher, John A.; Baily, Carl E.; Baird, Daniel K.; Henslee, S. Paul; Knight, Collin J.; Rosenberg, Kenneth E.

    2002-07-01

    The Department of Energy mandated the termination of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) Program, effective October 1, 1994. To comply with this decision, Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) prepared a plan providing detailed requirements to maintain the Experimental Breeder Reactor - II (EBR-II) in a radiologically and industrially safe condition, including removal of all irradiated fuel assemblies from the reactor plant, and removal and stabilization of the primary and secondary sodium, a liquid metal used to transfer heat within the reactor plant. The EBR-II is a pool-type reactor. The primary system contained approximately 325 m{sup 3} (86,000 gallons) of sodium and the secondary system contained 50 m{sup 3} (13,000 gallons). In order to properly dispose of the sodium in compliance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), a facility was built to react the sodium to a solid sodium hydroxide monolith for burial as a low level waste in a land disposal facility. Deactivation of a liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) presents unique concerns. Residual amounts of sodium remaining in circuits and components must be passivated, inerted, or removed to preclude future concerns with sodium-air reactions that could generate potentially explosive mixtures of hydrogen and leave corrosive compounds. The passivation process being implemented utilizes a moist carbon dioxide gas that generates a passive layer of sodium carbonate/sodium bicarbonate over any quantities of residual sodium. Tests being conducted will determine the maximum depths of sodium that can be reacted using this method, defining the amount that must be dealt with later to achieve RCRA clean closure. Deactivation of the EBR-II complex is on schedule for a March, 2002, completion. Each system associated with EBR-II has an associated lay-up plan defining the system end state, as well as instructions for achieving the lay-up condition. A goal of system-by-system lay-up is to minimize

  6. Accelerator breeders: will they replace liquid metal fast breeders

    SciTech Connect

    Grand, P.; Powell, J.R.; Steinberg, M.; Takahashi, H.

    1983-06-01

    Investigation of accelerator breeders at Brookhaven National Laboratory indicate that the AB-LWR fuel cycle is economically competitive with the LMFBR fuel cycle. The same can be said about the accelerator breeder-High Temperature Gas Reactor symbiosis. This system appears to be very competitive with the added real advantage of superior safety and proliferation resistance. This discussion would be incomplete if the real competitor to accelerator breeding was not mentioned, namely Fusion Hybrid Breeding (FHB). Fusion Hybrid Breeding is a nearer option than pure fusion, as the breakeven Q value requirements are much more modest. Fusion Hybrid Breeding, if successful and practical, has the potential for highly efficient fissile fuel breeding, leading to cheaper fuel. The system, however, has yet to be demonstrated scientifically and to be shown commercially feasible. This is in contrast with the AB system which is an extension of proven, state-of-the-art technology with implementation possible within twenty years. 25 references, 4 figures, 5 tables.

  7. Oxidation of SUS-316 stainless steel for fast breeder reactor fuel cladding under oxygen pressure controlled by Ni/NiO oxygen buffer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Minoru; Furuya, Hirotaka; Sugisaki, Masayasu

    1985-09-01

    Oxidation of SUS-316 stainless steel for a fast breeder reactor fuel cladding was examined in the temperature range of 843-1010 K under the oxygen pressure of 1017 t - 10 t-13 Pa hy use of an experimental technique of a Ni/NiO oxygen buffer. The formation of the duplex oxide layer, i.e. an outer Fe 3O 4 layer and an inner (Fe, Cr, Ni)-spinel layer, was observed and the oxidation kinetics was found to obey the parabolic rate law. The oxygen pressure and temperature dependence of the parabolic rate constant kp( PO2, T) was determined as follows: kp( PO2, T)/ kg2 · m-1 · s-1 = 0.170( PO2/ Pa) 0.141exp[-114 × 10 3/( RT/ J)]. On the basis of the oxidation kinetics and the metallographic information, the outward diffusion of Fe in the outer oxide layer was assigned to be the rate-determining process.

  8. Preliminary study on nano- and micro-composite sol-gel based alumina coatings on structural components of lead-bismuth eutectic cooled fast breeder reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Peng; Kasada, Ryuta

    2011-02-01

    In order to protect the structural components of lead-bismuth eutectic cooled fast breeder reactors from liquid metal corrosion, Al 2O 3 nano- and micro-composite coatings were developed using an improved sol-gel process, which includes dipping specimens in a sol-gel solution dispersed with fine α-Al 2O 3 powders prepared by mechanical milling. Accelerated corrosion tests were conducted on coated specimens in liquid lead-bismuth eutectic at 500 °C under dynamic conditions. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses revealed that the coatings are composed of α-Al 2O 3 and they are about 10 μm thick. After the corrosion tests, no spallation occurred on the coatings, and neither Pb nor Bi penetrated into the coatings, which indicates that the coatings possess an enhanced dynamic LBE corrosion resistance to lead-bismuth eutectic corrosion. The nano-structured composite particles integrated into the coatings play an important role in achieving such superior lead-bismuth eutectic corrosion resistance.

  9. Development of a Fast Breeder Reactor Fuel Bundle Deformation Analysis Code - BAMBOO: Development of a Pin Dispersion Model and Verification by the Out-of-Pile Compression Test

    SciTech Connect

    Uwaba, Tomoyuki; Ito, Masahiro; Ukai, Shigeharu

    2004-02-15

    To analyze the wire-wrapped fast breeder reactor fuel pin bundle deformation under bundle/duct interaction conditions, the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute has developed the BAMBOO computer code. This code uses the three-dimensional beam element to calculate fuel pin bowing and cladding oval distortion as the primary deformation mechanisms in a fuel pin bundle. The pin dispersion, which is disarrangement of pins in a bundle and would occur during irradiation, was modeled in this code to evaluate its effect on bundle deformation. By applying the contact analysis method commonly used in the finite element method, this model considers the contact conditions at various axial positions as well as the nodal points and can analyze the irregular arrangement of fuel pins with the deviation of the wire configuration.The dispersion model was introduced in the BAMBOO code and verified by using the results of the out-of-pile compression test of the bundle, where the dispersion was caused by the deviation of the wire position. And the effect of the dispersion on the bundle deformation was evaluated based on the analysis results of the code.

  10. RELAP5/MOD3 Analysis of Transient Steam-Generator Behavior During Turbine Trip Test of a Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor MONJU

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshihisa Shindo; Hiroshi Endo; Tomoko Ishizu; Kazuo Haga

    2006-07-01

    In order to develop a thermal-hydraulic model of the steam-generator (SG) to simulate transient phenomena in the sodium cooled fast breeder reactor (FBR) MONJU, Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization (JNES) verified the SG model using the RELAP5/MOD3 code against the results of the turbine trip test at a 40% power load of MONJU. The modeling by using RELAP5 was considered to explain the significant observed behaviors of the pressure and the temperature of the EV steam outlet, and the temperature of water supply distributing piping till 600 seconds after the turbine trip. The analysis results of these behaviors showed good agreement with the test results based on results of parameter study as the blow efficiency (release coef.) and heat transferred from the helical coil region to the down-comer (temperature heating down-comer tubes). It was found that the RELAP5/MOD3 code with a two-fluids model can predict well the physical situation: the gas-phase of steam generated by the decompression boiling moves upward in the down-comer tubes accompanied by the enthalpy increase of the water supply chambers; and that the pressure change of a 'shoulder' like shape is induced by the mass balance between the steam mass generated in the down-comer tubes and the steam mass blown from the SG. The applicability of RELAP5/MOD3 to SG modeling was confirmed by simulating the actual FBR system. (authors)

  11. Summary of the radiological assessment of the fuel cycle for a thorium-uranium carbide-fueled fast breeder reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Tennery, V.J.; Bomar, E.S.; Bond, W.D.; Meyer, H.R.; Morse, L.E.; Till, J.E.; Yalcintas, M.G.

    1980-01-01

    A large fraction of the potential fuel for nuclear power reactors employing fissionable materials exists as ores of thorium. In addition, certain characteristics of a fuel system based on breeding of the fissionable isotope {sup 233}U from thorium offer the possibility of a greater resistance to the diversion of fissionable material for the fabrication of nuclear weapons. This report consolidates into a single source the principal content of two previous reports which assess the radiological environmental impact of mining and milling of thorium ore and of the reprocessing and refabrication of spent FBR thorium-uranium carbide fuel.

  12. The Effects of Yttrium Additions on Void Swelling in Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Candidate Cladding Alloys.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-04-28

    Candidate LMFBR cladding and duct alloys Fe-26%Ni-9%Cr 1(here designated ALl) and Fe-35%Ni-12%Cr (AL2) are among those being con- sidered for use in... LMFBR candidate cladding alloys ALl and AL2 were conducted 56 2+ by use of 4 MeV Fe ions. The simultaneous implantation of 0.4 MeV 4He+ ions was also...additions on void swelling in liquid metal fast reeder reactorcandidate cladding alloys CP-Cichard D. /Hopson 0HQDA, M-ILPRCEN (DA-PC-OPP-E) 200

  13. Gas core reactors for actinide transmutation and breeder applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clement, J. D.; Rust, J. H.

    1978-01-01

    This work consists of design power plant studies for four types of reactor systems: uranium plasma core breeder, uranium plasma core actinide transmuter, UF6 breeder and UF6 actinide transmuter. The plasma core systems can be coupled to MHD generators to obtain high efficiency electrical power generation. A 1074 MWt UF6 breeder reactor was designed with a breeding ratio of 1.002 to guard against diversion of fuel. Using molten salt technology and a superheated steam cycle, an efficiency of 39.2% was obtained for the plant and the U233 inventory in the core and heat exchangers was limited to 105 Kg. It was found that the UF6 reactor can produce high fluxes (10 to the 14th power n/sq cm-sec) necessary for efficient burnup of actinide. However, the buildup of fissile isotopes posed severe heat transfer problems. Therefore, the flux in the actinide region must be decreased with time. Consequently, only beginning-of-life conditions were considered for the power plant design. A 577 MWt UF6 actinide transmutation reactor power plant was designed to operate with 39.3% efficiency and 102 Kg of U233 in the core and heat exchanger for beginning-of-life conditions.

  14. Analysis of UF6 breeder reactor power plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clement, J. D.; Rust, J. H.

    1976-01-01

    Gaseous UF6 fueled breeder reactor design and technical applications of such concepts are summarized. Special attention was given to application in nuclear power plants and to reactor efficiency and safety factors.

  15. A simple calculation of control assembly effectiveness in a liquid-metal fast breeder reactor by a transport-diffusion equivalence method

    SciTech Connect

    Benoist, P. ); Carta, M. ); Palmiotti, G. ); Salvatores, M. )

    1989-11-01

    A method to calculate the effectiveness of the control assembly in a fast neutron reactor is proposed. For each type of heterogeneous assembly (control or follower), a polar parameter, taking into account the assembly absorption and the axial leakage of neutrons inside the assembly, is defined. In a similar way, a bipolar parameter, taking into account the reaction of the assembly to a transverse flux gradient, is also defined. These two parameters, deduced from transport theory, are used to determine the absorption cross section and the diffusion coefficient of an equivalent homogeneous control or follower assembly. These new parameters are introduced in a one-group diffusion code, calculating the reactor as a whole with any number of control and follower assemblies. An approximate generalization to multigroup theory is proposed. Numerical comparisons show that this equivalent diffusion method gives results that are much closer to transport results than those obtained by the classical diffusion theory.

  16. Breeding nuclear fuels with accelerators: replacement for breeder reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Grand, P.; Takahashi, H.

    1984-01-01

    One application of high energy particle accelerators has been, and still is, the production of nuclear fuel for the nuclear energy industry; tantalizing because it would create a whole new industry. This approach to producing fissile from fertile material was first considered in the early 1950's in the context of the nuclear weapons program. A considerable development effort was expended before discovery of uranium ore in New Mexico put an end to the project. Later, US commitment to the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactors (LMFBR) killed any further interest in pursuing accelerator breeder technology. Interest in the application of accelerators to breed nuclear fuels, and possibly burn nuclear wastes, revived in the late 1970's, when the LMFBR came under attack during the Carter administration. This period gave the opportunity to revisit the concept in view of the present state of the technology. This evaluation and the extensive calculational modeling of target designs that have been carried out are promising. In fact, a nuclear fuel cycle of Light Water Reactors and Accelerator Breeders is competitive to that of the LMFBR. At this time, however, the relative abundance of uranium reserves vs electricity demand and projected growth rate render this study purely academic. It will be for the next generation of accelerator builders to demonstate the competitiveness of this technology versus that of other nuclear fuel cycles, such as LMFBR's or Fusion Hybrid systems. 22 references, 1 figure, 5 tables.

  17. Seismic responses of a pool-type fast reactor with different core support designs

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Ting-shu; Seidensticker, R.W. )

    1989-01-01

    In designing the core support system for a pool-type fast reactor, there are many issues which must be considered in order to achieve an optimum and balanced design. These issues include safety, reliability, as well as costs. Several design options are possible to support the reactor core. Different core support options yield different frequency ranges and responses. Seismic responses of a large pool-type fast reactor incorporated with different core support designs have been investigated. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  18. Impact of Solid Breeder Materials on Tritium Breeding in a Hybrid Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Übeyli, Mustafa

    2006-06-01

    Tritium breeding ratio (TBR) is one of the important parameters in design of a Deuterium-Tritium (DT) driven hybrid reactor. Therefore, selection of tritium breeder materials to be used in the blanket is very crucial. In this study, tritium breeding potential of the solid breeders, namely, or in a (DT) fusion driven hybrid reactor fuelled with or was investigated. For this purpose in addition to these solid breeders, different types of liquid breeders, namely natural lithium, Flibe, Flinabe and were used to examine the tritium breeding behavior of liquid-solid breeder couple combinations. Numerical calculations were carried out by using Scale 4.3. According to numerical results, the blanket with fuel using natural lithium as coolant and as solid breeder had the highest TBR value.

  19. Overall plant concept for a tank-type fast reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaki, Hideo; Davies, S.M.; Goodman, L.

    1984-01-01

    Japanese nuclear industries are expressing interest in the merits of the tank-type FBR as a large plant (demonstration) after JOYO (experimental, in operation) and MONJU (prototype, under construction). In response to this growing interest in a tank-type FBR demonstration plant, Hitachi has initiated a conceptual study of a 1000 MWe tank plant concept in collaboration with GE and Bechtel. Key objectives of this study have been: to select reliable and competitive tank plant concepts, with emphases on a seismic-resistant and compact tank reactor system;to select reliable shutdown heat removal system;and to identify R and D items needed for early 1990s construction. Design goals were defined as follows: capital costs must be less than twice, and as close as practical to 1.5 those of equivalent LWR plants;earthquake resistant structures to meet stringent Japanese seismic conditions must be as simple and reliable as practical;safety must be maintained at LWR-equivalent risks;and R and D needs must be limited to minimum cost for the limited time allowed. This paper summarizes the overall plant concepts with some selected topics, whereas detailed descriptions of the reactor assembly and the layout design are found in separate papers.

  20. Water cooled breeder program summary report (LWBR (Light Water Breeder Reactor) development program)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-10-01

    The purpose of the Department of Energy Water Cooled Breeder Program was to demonstrate pratical breeding in a uranium-233/thorium fueled core while producing electrical energy in a commercial water reactor generating station. A demonstration Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) was successfully operated for more than 29,000 effective full power hours in the Shippingport Atomic Power Station. The reactor operated with an availability factor of 76% and had a gross electrical output of 2,128,943,470 kilowatt hours. Following operation, the expended core was examined and no evidence of any fuel element defects was found. Nondestructive assay of 524 fuel rods determined that 1.39 percent more fissile fuel was present at the end of core life than at the beginning, proving that breeding had occurred. This demonstrates the existence of a vast source of electrical energy using plentiful domestic thorium potentially capable of supplying the entire national need for many centuries. To build on the successful design and operation of the Shippingport Breeder Core and to provide the technology to implement this concept, several reactor designs of large breeders and prebreeders were developed for commercial-sized plants of 900--1000 Mw(e) net. This report summarizes the Water Cooled Breeder Program from its inception in 1965 to its completion in 1987. Four hundred thirty-six technical reports are referenced which document the work conducted as part of this program. This work demonstrated that the Light Water Breeder Reactor is a viable alternative as a PWR replacement in the next generation of nuclear reactors. This transition would only require a minimum of change in design and fabrication of the reactor and operation of the plant.

  1. Deployment Scenario of Heavy Water Cooled Thorium Breeder Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Mardiansah, Deby; Takaki, Naoyuki

    2010-06-22

    Deployment scenario of heavy water cooled thorium breeder reactor has been studied. We have assumed to use plutonium and thorium oxide fuel in water cooled reactor to produce {sup 233}U which will be used in thorium breeder reactor. The objective is to analysis the potential of water cooled Th-Pu reactor for replacing all of current LWRs especially in Japan. In this paper, the standard Pressurize Water Reactor (PWR) has been designed to produce 3423 MWt; (i) Th-Pu PWR, (ii) Th-Pu HWR (MFR = 1.0) and (iii) Th-Pu HWR (MFR 1.2). The properties and performance of the core were investigated by using cell and core calculation code. Th-Pu PWR or HWR produces {sup 233}U to introduce thorium breeder reactor. The result showed that to replace all (60 GWe) LWR by thorium breeder reactor within a period of one century, Th-Pu oxide fueled PWR has insufficient capability to produce necessary amount of {sup 233}U and Th-Pu oxide fueled HWR has almost enough potential to produce {sup 233}U but shows positive void reactivity coefficient.

  2. ORNL breeder reactor safety quarterly technical progress report, July-September 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Fontana, M H; Wantland, J L

    1981-01-01

    Six tasks are reported upon: THORS (Thermal-Hydraulic Out-of-Reactor Safety) program, environmental assessment of alternate FBR fuels, model evaluation of breeder reactor radioactivity releases, nuclear safety information center activities, breeder reactor reliability data analysis center activities, and central data base for breeder reactor safety codes. (DLC)

  3. Accident analysis of heavy water cooled thorium breeder reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Yulianti, Yanti; Su’ud, Zaki; Takaki, Naoyuki

    2015-04-16

    Thorium has lately attracted considerable attention because it is accumulating as a by-product of large scale rare earth mining. The objective of research is to analyze transient behavior of a heavy water cooled thorium breeder that is designed by Tokai University and Tokyo Institute of Technology. That is oxide fueled, PWR type reactor with heavy water as primary coolant. An example of the optimized core has relatively small moderator to fuel volume ratio (MFR) of 0.6 and the characteristics of the core are burn-up of 67 GWd/t, breeding ratio of 1.08, burn-up reactivity loss during cycles of < 0.2% dk/k, and negative coolant reactivity coefficient. One of the nuclear reactor accidents types examined here is Unprotected Transient over Power (UTOP) due to withdrawing of the control rod that result in the positive reactivity insertion so that the reactor power will increase rapidly. Another accident type is Unprotected Loss of Flow (ULOF) that caused by failure of coolant pumps. To analyze the reactor accidents, neutron distribution calculation in the nuclear reactor is the most important factor. The best expression for the neutron distribution is the Boltzmann transport equation. However, solving this equation is very difficult so that the space-time diffusion equation is commonly used. Usually, space-time diffusion equation is solved by employing a point kinetics approach. However, this approach is less accurate for a spatially heterogeneous nuclear reactor and the nuclear reactor with quite large reactivity input. Direct method is therefore used to solve space-time diffusion equation which consider spatial factor in detail during nuclear reactor accident simulation. Set of equations that obtained from full implicit finite-difference method is solved by using iterative methods. The indication of UTOP accident is decreasing macroscopic absorption cross-section that results large external reactivity, and ULOF accident is indicated by decreasing coolant flow. The

  4. Accident analysis of heavy water cooled thorium breeder reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yulianti, Yanti; Su'ud, Zaki; Takaki, Naoyuki

    2015-04-01

    Thorium has lately attracted considerable attention because it is accumulating as a by-product of large scale rare earth mining. The objective of research is to analyze transient behavior of a heavy water cooled thorium breeder that is designed by Tokai University and Tokyo Institute of Technology. That is oxide fueled, PWR type reactor with heavy water as primary coolant. An example of the optimized core has relatively small moderator to fuel volume ratio (MFR) of 0.6 and the characteristics of the core are burn-up of 67 GWd/t, breeding ratio of 1.08, burn-up reactivity loss during cycles of < 0.2% dk/k, and negative coolant reactivity coefficient. One of the nuclear reactor accidents types examined here is Unprotected Transient over Power (UTOP) due to withdrawing of the control rod that result in the positive reactivity insertion so that the reactor power will increase rapidly. Another accident type is Unprotected Loss of Flow (ULOF) that caused by failure of coolant pumps. To analyze the reactor accidents, neutron distribution calculation in the nuclear reactor is the most important factor. The best expression for the neutron distribution is the Boltzmann transport equation. However, solving this equation is very difficult so that the space-time diffusion equation is commonly used. Usually, space-time diffusion equation is solved by employing a point kinetics approach. However, this approach is less accurate for a spatially heterogeneous nuclear reactor and the nuclear reactor with quite large reactivity input. Direct method is therefore used to solve space-time diffusion equation which consider spatial factor in detail during nuclear reactor accident simulation. Set of equations that obtained from full implicit finite-difference method is solved by using iterative methods. The indication of UTOP accident is decreasing macroscopic absorption cross-section that results large external reactivity, and ULOF accident is indicated by decreasing coolant flow. The

  5. BREEDER: a microcomputer program for financial analysis of a large-scale prototype breeder reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Giese, R.F.

    1984-04-01

    This report describes a microcomputer-based, single-project financial analysis program: BREEDER. BREEDER is a user-friendly model designed to facilitate frequent and rapid analyses of the financial implications associated with alternative design and financing strategies for electric generating plants and large-scale prototype breeder (LSPB) reactors in particular. The model has proved to be a useful tool in establishing cost goals for LSPB reactors. The program is available on floppy disks for use on an IBM personal computer (or IBM look-a-like) running under PC-DOS or a Kaypro II transportable computer running under CP/M (and many other CP/M machines). The report documents version 1.5 of BREEDER and contains a user's guide. The report also includes a general overview of BREEDER, a summary of hardware requirements, a definition of all required program inputs, a description of all algorithms used in performing the construction-period and operation-period analyses, and a summary of all available reports. The appendixes contain a complete source-code listing, a cross-reference table, a sample interactive session, several sample runs, and additional documentation of the net-equity program option.

  6. Light-water breeder reactor (LWBR Development Program)

    DOEpatents

    Beaudoin, B.R.; Cohen, J.D.; Jones, D.H.; Marier, L.J. Jr.; Raab, H.F.

    1972-06-20

    Described is a light-water-moderated and -cooled nuclear breeder reactor of the seed-blanket type characterized by core modules comprising loosely packed blanket zones enriched with fissile fuel and axial zoning in the seed and blanket regions within each core module. Reactivity control over lifetime is achieved by axial displacement of movable seed zones without the use of poison rods in the embodiment illustrated. The seed is further characterized by a hydrogen-to-uranium-233 atom ratio in the range 10 to 200 and a uranium-233-to-thorium-232 atom ratio ranging from 0.012 to 0.200. The seed occupies from 10 to 35 percent of the core volume in the form of one or more individual islands or annuli. (NSA 26: 55130)

  7. Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant Project: construction schedule

    SciTech Connect

    Purcell, W.J.; Martin, E.M.; Shivley, J.M.

    1982-01-01

    The construction schedule for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant and its evolution are described. The initial schedule basis, changes necessitated by the evaluation of the overall plant design, and constructability improvements that have been effected to assure adherence to the schedule are presented. The schedule structure and hierarchy are discussed, as are tools used to define, develop, and evaluate the schedule.

  8. Nuclear breeder reactor fuel element with silicon carbide getter

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, David W.; Karnesky, Richard A.

    1987-01-01

    An improved cesium getter 28 is provided in a breeder reactor fuel element or pin in the form of an extended surface area, low density element formed in one embodiment as a helically wound foil 30 located with silicon carbide, and located at the upper end of the fertile material upper blanket 20.

  9. Fission-suppressed hybrid reactor: the fusion breeder

    SciTech Connect

    Moir, R.W.; Lee, J.D.; Coops, M.S.

    1982-12-01

    Results of a conceptual design study of a /sup 233/U-producing fusion breeder are presented. The majority of the study was devoted to conceptual design and evaluation of a fission-suppressed blanket and to fuel cycle issues such as fuel reprocessing, fuel handling, and fuel management. Studies in the areas of fusion engineering, reactor safety, and economics were also performed.

  10. Homogeneous fast-flux isotope-production reactor

    DOEpatents

    Cawley, W.E.; Omberg, R.P.

    1982-08-19

    A method is described for producing tritium in a liquid metal fast breeder reactor. Lithium target material is dissolved in the liquid metal coolant in order to facilitate the production and removal of tritium.

  11. Fuel Summary Report: Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor - Rev. 2

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, Gail Lynn; Mc Cardell, Richard Keith; Illum, Douglas Brent

    2002-09-01

    The Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) was developed by Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory to demonstrate the potential of a water-cooled, thorium oxide fuel cycle breeder reactor. The LWBR core operated from 1977-82 without major incident. The fuel and fuel components suffered minimal damage during operation, and the reactor testing was deemed successful. Extensive destructive and nondestructive postirradiation examinations confirmed that the fuel was in good condition with minimal amounts of cladding deformities and fuel pellet cracks. Fuel was placed in wet storage upon arrival at the Expended Core Facility, then dried and sent to the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center for underground dry storage. It is likely that the fuel remains in good condition at its current underground dry storage location at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. Reports show no indication of damage to the core associated with shipping, loading, or storage.

  12. Feasibility study on the thorium fueled boiling water breeder reactor

    SciTech Connect

    PetrusTakaki, N.

    2012-07-01

    The feasibility of (Th,U)O 2 fueled, boiling water breeder reactor based on conventional BWR technology has been studied. In order to determine the potential use of water cooled thorium reactor as a competitive breeder, this study evaluated criticality, breeding and void reactivity coefficient in response to changes made in MFR and fissile enrichments. The result of the study shows that while using light water as moderator, low moderator to fuel volume ratio (MFR=0.5), it was possible to breed fissile fuel in negative void reactivity condition. However the burnup value was lower than the value of the current LWR. On the other hand, heavy water cooled reactor shows relatively wider feasible breeding region, which lead into possibility of designing a core having better neutronic and economic performance than light water with negative void reactivity coefficient. (authors)

  13. Instrumentation and control improvements at Experimental Breeder Reactor II

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, L.J.; Planchon, H.P.

    1993-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe instrumentation and control (I&C) system improvements at Experimental Breeder Reactor 11 (EBR-11). The improvements are focused on three objectives; to keep the reactor and balance of plant (BOP) I&C systems at a high level of reliability, to provide diagnostic systems that can provide accurate information needed for analysis of fuel performance, and to provide systems that will be prototypic of I&C systems of the next generation of liquid metal reactor (LMR) plants.

  14. Instrumentation and control improvements at Experimental Breeder Reactor II

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, L.J.; Planchon, H.P.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe instrumentation and control (I C) system improvements at Experimental Breeder Reactor 11 (EBR-11). The improvements are focused on three objectives; to keep the reactor and balance of plant (BOP) I C systems at a high level of reliability, to provide diagnostic systems that can provide accurate information needed for analysis of fuel performance, and to provide systems that will be prototypic of I C systems of the next generation of liquid metal reactor (LMR) plants.

  15. Advanced Safeguards Approaches for New Fast Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Durst, Philip C.; Therios, Ike; Bean, Robert; Dougan, A.; Boyer, Brian; Wallace, Rick L.; Ehinger, Michael H.; Kovacic, Don N.; Tolk, K.

    2007-12-15

    This third report in the series reviews possible safeguards approaches for new fast reactors in general, and the ABR in particular. Fast-neutron spectrum reactors have been used since the early 1960s on an experimental and developmental level, generally with fertile blanket fuels to “breed” nuclear fuel such as plutonium. Whether the reactor is designed to breed plutonium, or transmute and “burn” actinides depends mainly on the design of the reactor neutron reflector and the whether the blanket fuel is “fertile” or suitable for transmutation. However, the safeguards issues are very similar, since they pertain mainly to the receipt, shipment and storage of fresh and spent plutonium and actinide-bearing “TRU”-fuel. For these reasons, the design of existing fast reactors and details concerning how they have been safeguarded were studied in developing advanced safeguards approaches for the new fast reactors. In this regard, the design of the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II “EBR-II” at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) was of interest, because it was designed as a collocated fast reactor with a pyrometallurgical reprocessing and fuel fabrication line – a design option being considered for the ABR. Similarly, the design of the Fast Flux Facility (FFTF) on the Hanford Site was studied, because it was a successful prototype fast reactor that ran for two decades to evaluate fuels and the design for commercial-scale fast reactors.

  16. A comparison of radioactive waste from first generation fusion reactors and fast fission reactors with actinide recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, M.; Kazimi, M.S.

    1991-04-01

    Limitations of the fission fuel resources will presumably mandate the replacement of thermal fission reactors by fast fission reactors that operate on a self-sufficient closed fuel cycle. This replacement might take place within the next one hundred years, so the direct competitors of fusion reactors will be fission reactors of the latter rather than the former type. Also, fast fission reactors, in contrast to thermal fission reactors, have the potential for transmuting long-lived actinides into short-lived fission products. The associated reduction of the long-term activation of radioactive waste due to actinides makes the comparison of radioactive waste from fast fission reactors to that from fusion reactors more rewarding than the comparison of radioactive waste from thermal fission reactors to that from fusion reactors. Radioactive waste from an experimental and a commercial fast fission reactor and an experimental and a commercial fusion reactor has been characterized. The fast fission reactors chosen for this study were the Experimental Breeder Reactor 2 and the Integral Fast Reactor. The fusion reactors chosen for this study were the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and a Reduced Activation Ferrite Helium Tokamak. The comparison of radioactive waste parameters shows that radioactive waste from the experimental fast fission reactor may be less hazardous than that from the experimental fusion reactor. Inclusion of the actinides would reverse this conclusion only in the long-term. Radioactive waste from the commercial fusion reactor may always be less hazardous than that from the commercial fast fission reactor, irrespective of the inclusion or exclusion of the actinides. The fusion waste would even be far less hazardous, if advanced structural materials, like silicon carbide or vanadium alloy, were employed.

  17. Mechanical design of a light water breeder reactor

    DOEpatents

    Fauth, Jr., William L.; Jones, Daniel S.; Kolsun, George J.; Erbes, John G.; Brennan, John J.; Weissburg, James A.; Sharbaugh, John E.

    1976-01-01

    In a light water reactor system using the thorium-232 -- uranium-233 fuel system in a seed-blanket modular core configuration having the modules arranged in a symmetrical array surrounded by a reflector blanket region, the seed regions are disposed for a longitudinal movement between the fixed or stationary blanket region which surrounds each seed region. Control of the reactor is obtained by moving the inner seed region thus changing the geometry of the reactor, and thereby changing the leakage of neutrons from the relatively small seed region into the blanket region. The mechanical design of the Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) core includes means for axially positioning of movable fuel assemblies to achieve the neutron economy required of a breeder reactor, a structure necessary to adequately support the fuel modules without imposing penalties on the breeding capability, a structure necessary to support fuel rods in a closely packed array and a structure necessary to direct and control the flow of coolant to regions in the core in accordance with the heat transfer requirements.

  18. Fast neutron nuclear reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Cabrillat, M. Th.; Lions, N.

    1985-01-08

    The invention relates to a fast neutron nuclear reactor of the integrated type comprising a cylindrical inner vessel. The inner vessel comprises two concentric ferrules and the connection between the hot collector defined within this vessel and the inlet port of the exchangers is brought about by a hot structure forming a heat baffle and supported by the inner ferrule and by a cold structure surrounding the hot structure, supported by the outer ferrule and sealingly connected to the exchanger. Application to the generation of electric power in nuclear power stations.

  19. Preliminary Study of Gas Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor with Heterogen Percentage of Uranium–Plutonium Carbide based fuel and 300 MWt Power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clief Pattipawaej, Sandro; Su’ud, Zaki

    2017-01-01

    A preliminary design study of GFR with helium gas-cooled has been performed. In this study used natural uranium and plutonium results LWR waste as fuel. Fuel with a small percentage of plutonium are arranged on the inside of the core area, and the fuel with a greater percentage set on the outside of the core area. The configuration of such fuel is deliberately set to increase breeding in this part of the central core and reduce the leakage of neutrons on the outer side of the core, in order to get long-lived reactor with a small reactivity. Configuration of fuel as it is also useful to generate a peak power reactors with relatively low in both the direction of axial or radial. Optimization has been done to fuel fraction 45.0% was found that the reactor may be operating in more than 10 year time with excess reactivity less than 1%.

  20. Civilian nuclear power on the drawing board: the development of Experimental Breeder Reactor-II.

    SciTech Connect

    Westfall, C.

    2003-02-20

    On September 28, 2001 a symposium was held at Argonne National Laboratory as part of the festivities to mark the 100th birthday of Enrico Fermi. The symposium celebrated Fermi's ''contribution to the development of nuclear power'' and focused on one particular ''line of development'' resulting from Fermi's interest in power reactors: Argonne's fast reactor program. Symposium participants made many references to the ways in which the program was linked to Fermi, who led the team which created the world's first self-sustaining nuclear chain reaction. For example, one presentation featured an April, 1944 memo that described a meeting attended by Fermi and others. The memo came from the time when research on plutonium and the nuclear chain reaction at Chicago's WWII Metallurgical Laboratory was nearing its end. Even as other parts of the Manhattan Engineering Project were building on this effort to create the bombs that would end the war, Fermi and his colleagues were taking the first steps to plan the use of nuclear energy in the postwar era. After noting that Fermi ''viewed the use of [nuclear] power for the heating of cities with sympathy,'' the group outlined several power reactor designs. In the course of discussion, Fermi and his colleagues took the first steps in conjuring the vision that would later be brought to life with Experimental Breeder Reactor I (EBR-I) and Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II), the celebrated achievements of the Argonne fast reactor program. Group members considered various schemes for a breeder reactor in which the relatively abundant U-238 would be placed near a core of fissionable material. The reactor would be a fast reactor; that is, neutrons would not be moderated, as were most wartime reactors. Thus, the large number of neutrons emitted in fast neutron fission would hit the U-238 and create ''extra'' fissionable material, that is, more than ''invested,'' and at the same time produce power. The group identified the problem of

  1. SVBR-100 module-type fast reactor of the IV generation for regional power industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zrodnikov, A. V.; Toshinsky, G. I.; Komlev, O. G.; Stepanov, V. S.; Klimov, N. N.

    2011-08-01

    In the report the following is presented: basic conceptual provisions of the innovative nuclear power technology (NPT) based on modular fast reactors (FR) SVBR-100, summarized results of calculations of the reactor, analysis of the opportunities of multi-purpose application of such reactor facilities (RF) including export potentials with due account of nonproliferation requirements. The most important features of the proposed NPT analyzed in the report are as follows: (1) integral (monoblock) arrangement of the primary circuit equipment with entire elimination of the primary circuit pipelines and valves that considerably reduces the construction and assembly works period and coupling with high boiling point of lead-bismuth coolant (LBC) deterministically eliminates accidents of the LOCA type, (2) option for 100 MWe power and dimensions of the reactor provide: on the one hand, an opportunity to transport the reactor monoblock in factory-readiness by railway as well as other kinds of transport, on the other hand, core breeding ratio (CBR) exceeds 1 while MOX-fuel is used. The preferable area of application of RF SVBR-100 is regional and small power requiring power-units of electric power in a range of (100-600) MW, which could be used for cogeneration-based district heating while locating them nearby cities as well as for generation of electric power in a mode of load tracking in the regions with low network systems.

  2. The Integral Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y.I.

    1988-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is an innovative liquid metal reactor concept being developed at Argonne National Laboratory. It seeks to specifically exploit the inherent properties of liquid metal cooling and metallic fuel in a way that leads to substantial improvements in the characteristics of the complete reactor system. This paper describes the key features and potential advantages of the IFR concept, with emphasis on its safety characteristics. 3 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Fuel Summary Report: Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Illum, D.B.; Olson, G.L.; McCardell, R.K.

    1999-01-01

    The Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) was a small water cooled, U-233/Th-232 cycle breeder reactor developed by the Pittsburgh Naval Reactors to improve utilization of the nation's nuclear fuel resources in light water reactors. The LWBR was operated at Shippingport Atomic Power Station (APS), which was a Department of Energy (DOE) (formerly Atomic Energy Commission)-owned reactor plant. Shippingport APS was the first large-scale, central-station nuclear power plant in the United States and the first plant of such size in the world operated solely to produce electric power. The Shippingport LWBR was operated successfully from 1977 to 1982 at the APS. During the five years of operation, the LWBR generated more than 29,000 effective full power hours (EFPH) of energy. After final shutdown, the 39 core modules of the LWBR were shipped to the Expended Core Facility (ECF) at Naval Reactors Facility at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). At ECF, 12 of the 39 modules were dismantled and about 1000 of more than 17,000 rods were removed from the modules of proof-of-breeding and fuel performance testing. Some of the removed rods were kept at ECF, some were sent to Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) in Idaho and some to ANL-East in Chicago for a variety of physical, chemical and radiological examinations. All rods and rod sections remaining after the experiments were shipped back to ECF, where modules and loose rods were repackaged in liners for dry storage. In a series of shipments, the liners were transported from ECF to Idaho Nuclear Technology Engineering Center (INTEC), formerly the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). The 47 liners containing the fully-rodded and partially-derodded core modules, the loose rods, and the rod scraps, are now stored in underground dry wells at CPP-749.

  4. Statement of the Executive Committee of the Scientists' Institute for Public Information--Comments on the Breeder Reactor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment, 1975

    1975-01-01

    Inheritance of the Atomic Energy Commission's Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program by the Energy Research and Development Administration has caused much concern among members of the Scientists' Institute for Public Information (SIPI). SIPI members are concerned about the inadequacy and economic…

  5. Statement of the Executive Committee of the Scientists' Institute for Public Information--Comments on the Breeder Reactor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment, 1975

    1975-01-01

    Inheritance of the Atomic Energy Commission's Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program by the Energy Research and Development Administration has caused much concern among members of the Scientists' Institute for Public Information (SIPI). SIPI members are concerned about the inadequacy and economic…

  6. The Integral Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Till, C.E.; Chang, Y.I. ); Lineberry, M.J. )

    1990-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory, since 1984, has been developing the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). This paper will describe the way in which this new reactor concept came about; the technical, public acceptance, and environmental issues that are addressed by the IFR; the technical progress that has been made; and our expectations for this program in the near term. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  7. Irradiation behavior of experimental Mark-II Experimental Breeder Reactor II driver fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Hofman, G.L.

    1980-01-01

    Prototypic driver-fuel elements using metallic fuel and stainless-steel cladding, designed to achieve a high burnup, were tested in the Experimental Breeder Reactor II. The irradiation results showed that burnup of up to 10 at.% can be attained without cladding failure and that cladding deformation can be kept to acceptable values if Type 316 stainless steel is used as the cladding material.

  8. Recommended practices in elevated temperature design: A compendium of breeder reactor experiences (1970-1986): An overview

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, B.C.; Cooper, W.L. Jr.; Dhalla, A.K.

    1987-09-01

    Significant experiences have been accumulated in the establishment of design methods and criteria applicable to the design of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) components. The Subcommittee of the Elevated Temperature Design under the Pressure Vessel Research Council (PVRC) has undertaken to collect, on an international basis, design experience gained, and the lessons learned, to provide guidelines for next generation advanced reactor designs. This paper shall present an overview and describe the highlights of the work.

  9. UF6 breeder reactor power plants for electric power generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, J. H.; Clement, J. D.; Hohl, F.

    1976-01-01

    The reactor concept analyzed is a U-233F6 core surrounded by a molten salt (Li(7)F, BeF2, ThF4) blanket. Nuclear survey calculations were carried out for both spherical and cylindrical geometries. Thermodynamic cycle calculations were performed for a variety of Rankine cycles. A conceptual design is presented along with a system layout for a 1000 MW stationary power plant. Advantages of the gas core breeder reactor (GCBR) are as follows: (1) high efficiency; (2) simplified on-line reprocessing; (3) inherent safety considerations; (4) high breeding ratio; (5) possibility of burning all or most of the long-lived nuclear waste actinides; and (6) possibility of extrapolating the technology to higher temperatures and MHD direct conversion.

  10. UF6 breeder reactor power plants for electric power generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, J. H.; Clement, J. D.; Hohl, F.

    1976-01-01

    The reactor concept analyzed is a U-233F6 core surrounded by a molten salt (Li(7)F, BeF2, ThF4) blanket. Nuclear survey calculations were carried out for both spherical and cylindrical geometries. Thermodynamic cycle calculations were performed for a variety of Rankine cycles. A conceptual design is presented along with a system layout for a 1000 MW stationary power plant. Advantages of the gas core breeder reactor (GCBR) are as follows: (1) high efficiency; (2) simplified on-line reprocessing; (3) inherent safety considerations; (4) high breeding ratio; (5) possibility of burning all or most of the long-lived nuclear waste actinides; and (6) possibility of extrapolating the technology to higher temperatures and MHD direct conversion.

  11. EBR-2 (Experimental Breeder Reactor-2) containment seismic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gale, J.G.; Lehto, W.K.

    1990-01-01

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor-2 (EBR-2) is a liquid metal reactor located at the Argonne National Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho. At the time the EBR-2 was designed and constructed, there were no engineering society or federal guide lines specifically directed toward the seismic design of reactor containment structures; hence, static analysis techniques were used in the design. With the increased focus on safety of reactor and fuel reprocessing facilities, Argonne has initiated a program to analyze its existing facilities for seismic integrity using current Department of Energy guidelines and industry consensus standards. A seismic analysis of the EBR-2 containment building has been performed using finite-element analysis techniques. The containment building is essentially a vertical right cylindrical steel shell with heads on both ends. The structure is unique in that the interior of the steel shell is lined with reinforced concrete. The actual containment function of the building is served by the steel shell; whereas the function of the concrete liner is to serve as a missile shield and a thermal insulating shield to protect the steel containment shell from internally generated missiles and fires. Model development and structural evaluation of the EBR-2 containment building are discussed in this paper. 7 refs., 8 figs.

  12. Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactors: a bibliography

    SciTech Connect

    Raleigh, H.D.

    1980-11-01

    This bibliogralphy includes 5465 selected citations on LMFBR development. The citations were compiled from the DOE Energy Data Base covering the period January 1978 (EDB File No. 78R1087) through August 1980 (EDB File No. 80C79142). The references are to reports from the Department of Energy and its contractors, reports from other government or private organizations, and journal articles, books, conference papers, and monographs from US originators. Report citations are arranged alphanumerically by report number; nonreport literature citations are arranged chronologically. Corporate, Personal Author, Subject, and Report Number Indexes are provided in Volume 2.

  13. Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactors: a bibliography

    SciTech Connect

    Raleigh, H.D.

    1980-11-01

    This bibliography includes 5465 selected citations on LMFBR development. The citations were compiled from the DOE Energy Data Base covering the period January 1978 (EDB File No. 78R1087) through August 1980 (EDB File No. 80C79142). The references are to reports from the Department of Energy and its contractors, reports from other government or private organizations, and journal articles, books, conference papers, and monographs from US originators. Report citations are arranged alphanumerically by report number; nonreport literature citations are arranged chronologically. Corporate, Personal Author, Subject, and Report Number Indexes are provided in Volume 2.

  14. Integral Fast Reactor concept

    SciTech Connect

    Till, C.E.; Chang, Y.I.

    1986-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is an innovative LMR concept, being developed at Argonne National Laboratory, that fully exploits the inherent properties of liquid metal cooling and metallic fuel to achieve breakthroughs in economics and inherent safety. This paper describes key features and potential advantages of the IFR concept, technology development status, fuel cycle economics potential, and future development path.

  15. Nonlinear, inelastic fast reactor subassembly interaction analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, W.H.; Bard, F.E.

    1983-01-01

    Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) core structural design is complicated by the trade-offs associated with keeping the subassemblies closely packed for the neutronic considerations and accommodating the volumetric changes associated with irradiation swelling. The environmental variation across the reactor core results in temperature and neutron flux gradients across the subassemblies which in turn cause the subassemblies to bow as well as dilate and grow volumetrically. These deformations in a tightly packed reactor core cause the subassemblies to interact and can potentially result in excessive withdrawal loads during the refueling operations. ABADAN, a general purpose, nonlinear, inelastic, multi-dimensional finite element structural analysis computer code, was developed for the express purpose of solving large nonlinear problems as typified by the above interaction problems. For the subassembly interaction problem ABADAN has been applied to the solution of an interacting radial row of Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) fuel assemblies.

  16. Irradiation behavior of metallic fast reactor fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Pahl, R.G.; Porter, D.L.; Crawford, D.C.; Walters, L.C.

    1991-01-01

    Metallic fuels were the first fuels chosen for liquid metal cooled fast reactors (LMR's). In the late 1960's world-wide interest turned toward ceramic LMR fuels before the full potential of metallic fuel was realized. However, during the 1970's the performance limitations of metallic fuel were resolved in order to achieve a high plant factor at the Argonne National Laboratory's Experimental Breeder Reactor II. The 1980's spawned renewed interest in metallic fuel when the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept emerged at Argonne National Laboratory. A fuel performance demonstration program was put into place to obtain the data needed for the eventual licensing of metallic fuel. This paper will summarize the results of the irradiation program carried out since 1985.

  17. Fast quench reactor method

    SciTech Connect

    Detering, B.A.; Donaldson, A.D.; Fincke, J.R.; Kong, P.C.; Berry, R.A.

    1999-08-10

    A fast quench reaction includes a reactor chamber having a high temperature heating means such as a plasma torch at its inlet and a means of rapidly expanding a reactant stream, such as a restrictive convergent-divergent nozzle at its outlet end. Metal halide reactants are injected into the reactor chamber. Reducing gas is added at different stages in the process to form a desired end product and prevent back reactions. The resulting heated gaseous stream is then rapidly cooled by expansion of the gaseous stream. 8 figs.

  18. Fast quench reactor method

    DOEpatents

    Detering, B.A.; Donaldson, A.D.; Fincke, J.R.; Kong, P.C.; Berry, R.A.

    1999-08-10

    A fast quench reaction includes a reactor chamber having a high temperature heating means such as a plasma torch at its inlet and a means of rapidly expanding a reactant stream, such as a restrictive convergent-divergent nozzle at its outlet end. Metal halide reactants are injected into the reactor chamber. Reducing gas is added at different stages in the process to form a desired end product and prevent back reactions. The resulting heated gaseous stream is then rapidly cooled by expansion of the gaseous stream. 8 figs.

  19. Fast quench reactor method

    DOEpatents

    Detering, Brent A.; Donaldson, Alan D.; Fincke, James R.; Kong, Peter C.; Berry, Ray A.

    1999-01-01

    A fast quench reaction includes a reactor chamber having a high temperature heating means such as a plasma torch at its inlet and a means of rapidly expanding a reactant stream, such as a restrictive convergent-divergent nozzle at its outlet end. Metal halide reactants are injected into the reactor chamber. Reducing gas is added at different stages in the process to form a desired end product and prevent back reactions. The resulting heated gaseous stream is then rapidly cooled by expansion of the gaseous stream.

  20. Integral fast reactor safety features

    SciTech Connect

    Cahalan, J.E.; Kramer, J.M.; Marchaterre, J.F.; Mueller, C.J.; Pedersen, D.R.; Sevy, R.H.; Wade, D.C.; Wei, T.Y.C.

    1988-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is an advanced liquid-metal-cooled reactor concept being developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The two major goals of the IFR development effort are improved economics and enhanced safety. In addition to liquid metal cooling, the principal design features that distinguish the IFR are: (1) a pool-type primary system, (2) an advanced ternary alloy metallic fuel, and (3) an integral fuel cycle with on-site fuel reprocessing and fabrication. This paper focuses on the technical aspects of the improved safety margins available in the IFR concept. This increased level of safety is made possible by (1) the liquid metal (sodium) coolant and pool-type primary system layout, which together facilitate passive decay heat removal, and (2) a sodium-bonded metallic fuel pin design with thermal and neutronic properties that provide passive core responses which control and mitigate the consequences of reactor accidents.

  1. Decommissioning of Experimental Breeder Reactor - II Complex, Post Sodium Draining

    SciTech Connect

    J. A. Michelbacher; S. Paul Henslee; Collin J. Knight; Steven R. sherman

    2005-09-01

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor - II (EBR-II) was shutdown in September 1994 as mandated by the United States Department of Energy. This sodium-cooled reactor had been in service since 1964. The bulk sodium was drained from the primary and secondary systems and processed. Residual sodium remaining in the systems after draining was converted into sodium bicarbonate using humid carbon dioxide. This technique was tested at Argonne National Laboratory in Illinois under controlled conditions, then demonstrated on a larger scale by treating residual sodium within the EBR-II secondary cooling system, followed by the primary tank. This process, terminated in 2002, was used to place a layer of sodium bicarbonate over all exposed surfaces of sodium. Treatment of the remaining EBR-II sodium is governed by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The Idaho Department of Environmental Quality issued a RCRA Operating Permit in 2002, mandating that all hazardous materials be removed from EBR-II within a 10 year period, with the ability to extend the permit and treatment period for another 10 years. A preliminary plan has been formulated to remove the remaining sodium and NaK from the primary and secondary systems using moist carbon dioxide, steam and nitrogen, and a water flush. The moist carbon dioxide treatment was resumed in May 2004. As of August 2005, approximately 60% of the residual sodium within the EBR-II primary tank had been treated. This process will continue through the end of 2005, when it is forecast that the process will become increasingly ineffective. At that time, subsequent treatment processes will be planned and initiated. It should be noted that the processes and anticipated costs associated with these processes are preliminary. Detailed engineering has not been performed, and approval for these methods has not been obtained from the regulator or the sponsors.

  2. Installation of the Light-Water Breeder Reactor at the Shippingport Atomic Power Station (LWBR Development Program)

    SciTech Connect

    Massimino, R.J.; Williams, D.A.

    1983-05-01

    This report summarizes the refueling operations performed to install a Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) core into the existing pressurized water reactor vessel at the Shippingport Atomic Power Station. Detailed descriptions of the major installation operations (e.g., primary system preconditioning, fuel installation, pressure boundary seal welding) are included as appendices to this report; these operations are of technical interest to any reactor servicing operation, whether the reactor is a breeder or a conventional light water non-breeder core.

  3. FAST NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Snell, A.H.

    1957-12-01

    This patent relates to a reactor and process for carrying out a controlled fast neutron chain reaction. A cubical reactive mass, weighing at least 920 metric tons, of uranium metal containing predominantly U/sup 238/ and having a U/sup 235/ content of at least 7.63% is assembled and the maximum neutron reproduction ratio is limited to not substantially over 1.01 by insertion and removal of a varying amount of boron, the reactive mass being substantially freed of moderator.

  4. Experimental Study on Flow Optimization in Upper Plenum of Reactor Vessel for a Compact Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Nobuyuki; Hayashi, Kenji; Kamide, Hideki; Itoh, Masami; Sekine, Tadashi

    2005-11-15

    An innovative sodium-cooled fast reactor has been investigated in a feasibility study of fast breeder reactor cycle systems in Japan. A compact reactor vessel and a column-type upper inner structure with a radial slit for an arm of a fuel-handling machine (FHM) are adopted. Dipped plates are set in the reactor vessel below the free surface to prevent gas entrainment. We performed a one-tenth-scaled model water experiment for the upper plenum of the reactor vessel. Gas entrainment was not observed in the experiment under the same velocity condition as the reactor. Three vortex cavitations were observed near the hot-leg inlet. A vertical rib on the reactor vessel wall was set to restrict the rotating flow near the hot leg. The vortex cavitation between the reactor vessel wall and the hot leg was suppressed by the rib under the same cavitation factor condition as in the reactor. The cylindrical plug was installed through the hole in the dipped plates for the FHM to reduce the flow toward the free surface. It was effective when the plug was submerged into the middle height in the upper plenum. This combination of two components had a possibility to optimize the flow in the compact reactor vessel.

  5. The search for advanced remote technology in fast reactor reprocessing

    SciTech Connect

    Burch, W.D.; Herndon, J.N.; Stradley, J.G. )

    1990-01-01

    Research and development in fast reactor reprocessing has been under way [approximately] 20 yr in several countries. During the past decade, France and the United Kingdom have developed active programs in breeder reprocessing. Actual fuels from their demonstration reactors have been reprocessed in small-scale facilities. Early US work in breeder reprocessing was carried out at the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) facilities with the early metal fuels, and interest has renewed recently in metal fuels. A major, comprehensive program, focused on oxide fuels, has been carried out in the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) since 1974. The Federal Republic of Germany (FRG) and Japan have also carried out development programs in breeder reprocessing, and Japan appears committed to major demonstration of breeder reactors and their fuel cycles. While much of the effort in these programs addressed process chemistry and process hardware, a significant element of many of these programs, particularly the CFRP, has been on advancements in facility concepts and remote maintenance features. This paper focuses on the search for improved facility concepts and better maintenance systems in the CFRP, and, in turn, on how developments at ORNL have influenced the technology elsewhere.

  6. Comparison of Processes of Transmutation of Long-Lived Actinides in Different Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Bergelson, B.R.; Gerasimov, A.S.; Kiselev, G.V.; Tikhomirov, G.V.

    2002-07-01

    Efficiency of transmutation of actinides was compared for different types of reactors-transmuters: light water VVER-1000 type reactor, fast breeder BN-600 and Super-Phenix type reactors, as well as high-flux subcritical ADS-800 type facility. Feed with minor actinides extracted from the reactor of VVER-1000 type was supposed. (authors)

  7. Frequency response testing at Experimental Breeder Reactor II using discrete-level periodic signals

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, W.D.; Larson, H.A. . Coll. of Engineering); Dean, E.M. )

    1990-01-01

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor 2 (EBR-2) reactivity-to-power frequency-response function was measured with pseudo-random, discrete-level, periodic signals. The reactor power deviation was small with insignificant perturbation of normal operation and in-place irradiation experiments. Comparison of results with measured rod oscillator data and with theoretical predictions show good agreement. Moreover, measures of input signal quality (autocorrelation function and energy spectra) confirm the ability to enable this type of frequency response determination at EBR-2. Measurements were made with the pseudo-random binary sequence, quadratic residue binary sequence, pseudo-random ternary sequence, and the multifrequency binary sequence. 10 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Nuclear breeder reactor fuel element with axial tandem stacking and getter

    DOEpatents

    Gibby, Ronald L.; Lawrence, Leo A.; Woodley, Robert E.; Wilson, Charles N.; Weber, Edward T.; Johnson, Carl E.

    1981-01-01

    A breeder reactor fuel element having a tandem arrangement of fissile and fertile fuel with a getter for fission product cesium disposed between the fissile and fertile sections. The getter is effective at reactor operating temperatures to isolate the cesium generated by the fissile material from reacting with the fertile fuel section.

  9. Progress in the development of metallic fuel in fast reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Seidel, B.R.; Walters, L.C.

    1988-01-01

    Renewed interest has developed in metallic fuel for fast reactors as a result of Argonne National Laboratory's integral fast reactor (IFR) concept. This concept involves a novel approach to fuel-cycle closure that is based on metal reprocessing and injection-casting fabrication. This paper delves into recent developments associated with the performance of metallic fuels. In February of 1985, three full assemblies of advanced metallic fuel were placed in the core of the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II). The 61-pin assemblies each contained an identical complement of metallic fuel of three compositions: U-10 Zr, U-8 Pu-10 Zr, and U-19 Pu-10 Zr. The pins were clad with the austenitic D9, had linear power rating of 15 kW/ft, and achieved peak cladding temperatures of 600{degree}C. The burnup achieved to date on these pins is 14 at.% burnup without any failures, and the irradiation continues. These lead assemblies have demonstrated that metallic fuels have the potential of being competitive with any existing fuel type in terms of steady-state performance.

  10. Liquid metal reactor deactivation as applied to the experimental breeder reactor - II.

    SciTech Connect

    Earle, O. K.; Michelbacher, J. A.; Pfannenstiel, D. F.; Wells, P. B.

    1999-05-28

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) at Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) was shutdown in September, 1994. This sodium cooled reactor had been in service since 1964, and by the US Department of Energy (DOE) mandate, was to be placed in an industrially and radiologically safe condition for ultimate decommissioning. The deactivation of a liquid metal reactor presents unique concerns. The first major task associated with the project was the removal of all fueled assemblies. In addition, sodium must be drained from systems and processed for ultimate disposal. Residual quantities of sodium remaining in systems must be deactivated or inerted to preclude future hazards associated with pyrophoricity and generation of potentially explosive hydrogen gas. A Sodium Process Facility (SPF) was designed and constructed to react the elemental sodium from the EBR-II primary and secondary systems to sodium hydroxide for disposal. This facility has a design capacity to allow the reaction of the complete inventory of sodium at ANL-W in less than two years. Additional quantities of sodium from the Fermi-1 reactor are also being treated at the SPF.

  11. Fast reactors and nuclear nonproliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Avrorin, E.N.; Rachkov, V.I.; Chebeskov, A.N.

    2013-07-01

    Problems are discussed with regard to nuclear fuel cycle resistance in fast reactors to nuclear proliferation risk due to the potential for use in military programs of the knowledge, technologies and materials gained from peaceful nuclear power applications. Advantages are addressed for fast reactors in the creation of a more reliable mode of nonproliferation in the closed nuclear fuel cycle in comparison with the existing fully open and partially closed fuel cycles of thermal reactors. Advantages and shortcomings are also discussed from the point of view of nonproliferation from the start with fast reactors using plutonium of thermal reactor spent fuel and enriched uranium fuel to the gradual transition using their own plutonium as fuel. (authors)

  12. Fast quench reactor and method

    DOEpatents

    Detering, B.A.; Donaldson, A.D.; Fincke, J.R.; Kong, P.C.

    1998-05-12

    A fast quench reactor includes a reactor chamber having a high temperature heating means such as a plasma torch at its inlet and a restrictive convergent-divergent nozzle at its outlet end. Reactants are injected into the reactor chamber. The resulting heated gaseous stream is then rapidly cooled by passage through the nozzle. This ``freezes`` the desired end product(s) in the heated equilibrium reaction stage. 7 figs.

  13. Potential of duplex fuel in prebreeder, breeder, and power reactor designs: tests and analyses (AWBA Development Program)

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, T.L.; Brennan, J.J.; Duncombe, E.; Schneider, M.J.; Johnson, R.G.R.

    1982-09-01

    Dual region fuel pellets, called duplex pellets, are comprised of an outer annular region of relatively high uranium fuel enrichment and a center pellet of fertile material with no enrichment. UO/sub 2/ and ThO/sub 2/ are the fissile and fertile materials of interest. Both prebreeders and breeders are discussed as are the performance advantages of duplex pellets over solid pellets in these two pressurized water reactor types. Advantages of duplex pellets for commercial reactor fuel rods are also discussed. Both irradiation test data and analytical results are used in comparisons. Manufacturing of duplex fuel is discussed.

  14. Lithium ceramics as the solid breeder material in fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Hollenberg, G. W.; Reuther, T. C.; Johnson, C. E.

    1982-03-01

    Fusion blanket designs have for almost a decade considered the use of a solid breeder relying on available data and assumed performance. The conclusion from these studies is that acceptable neutronic and thermal hydraulic performance can be achieved. In the future, it will be necessary to establish that a particular material can tolerate the thermal and irradiation environment of the fusion blanket while still providing the required functions of tritium recovery, power production and neutron shielding.

  15. The search for advanced remote technology in fast reactor reprocessing

    SciTech Connect

    Burch, W.D.; Herndon, J.N.; Stradley, J.G.

    1990-01-01

    Research and development in fast reactor reprocessing has been under way about 20 years in several countries throughout the world. During the past decade in France and the United Kingdom, active development programs have been carried out in breeder reprocessing. Actual fuels from their demonstration reactors have been reprocessed in small-scale facilities. Early US work in breeder reprocessing was carried out at the EBR-II facilities with the early metal fuels, and interest has renewed recently in metal fuels. A major, comprehensive program, focused on oxide fuels, has been carried out in the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) since 1974. Germany and Japan have also carried out development programs in breeder reprocessing, and Japan appears committed to major demonstration of breeder reactors and their fuel cycles. While much of the effort in all of these programs addressed process chemistry and process hardware, a significant element of many of these programs, particularly the CFRP, has been on advancements in facility concepts and remote maintenance features. This paper will focus principally on the search for improved facility concepts and better maintenance systems in the CFRP and, in turn, on how developments at ORNL have influenced the technology elsewhere.

  16. Prototype oxide breeder tests in the Fast Flux Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Pitner, A.L.; Gneiting, B.C.; Baker, R.B.; Hecht, S.L. )

    1994-03-01

    Four prototype irradiation tests were conducted in the Fast Flux Test Facility to investigate the performance of a 2-yr mixed-oxide fuel system using titanium-stabilized stainless steel cladding and duct material for application in a commercial-scale liquid-metal reactor plant. Three of the tests were irradiated to the point of cladding breach to establish the lifetime capability of this fuel design. Details of the fuel element design, irradiation condition and exposure, and postirradiation measurement are presented. Comparisons between measured and calculated behavior showed basically good agreement. A conservative failure analysis of the 676-fuel-pin data set from the four test assemblies indicated a 99.9% reliability for a peak burnup capability of 90 MW[center dot]/kg metal.

  17. Atoms in Appalachia. Historical report on the Clinch River Breeder Reactor site

    SciTech Connect

    Schaffer, D

    1982-01-01

    The background information concerning the acquisition of the land for siting the Clinch River Breeder Reactor is presented. Historical information is also presented concerning the land acquisition for the Oak Ridge facilities known as the Manhattan Project during World War II.

  18. Recommendations concerning models and parameters best suited to breeder reactor environmental radiological assessments

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, C.W.; Baes, C.F. III; Dunning, D.E. Jr.

    1980-05-01

    Recommendations are presented concerning the models and parameters best suited for assessing the impact of radionuclide releases to the environment by breeder reactor facilities. These recommendations are based on the model and parameter evaluations performed during this project to date. Seven different areas are covered in separate sections.

  19. Fast quench reactor and method

    DOEpatents

    Detering, Brent A.; Donaldson, Alan D.; Fincke, James R.; Kong, Peter C.

    2002-01-01

    A fast quench reaction includes a reactor chamber having a high temperature heating means such as a plasma torch at its inlet and a restrictive convergent-divergent nozzle at its outlet end. Reactants are injected into the reactor chamber. The resulting heated gaseous stream is then rapidly cooled by passage through the nozzle. This "freezes" the desired end product(s) in the heated equilibrium reaction stage.

  20. Fast quench reactor and method

    DOEpatents

    Detering, Brent A.; Donaldson, Alan D.; Fincke, James R.; Kong, Peter C.

    1998-01-01

    A fast quench reaction includes a reactor chamber having a high temperature heating means such as a plasma torch at its inlet and a restrictive convergent-divergent nozzle at its outlet end. Reactants are injected into the reactor chamber. The resulting heated gaseous stream is then rapidly cooled by passage through the nozzle. This "freezes" the desired end product(s) in the heated equilibrium reaction stage.

  1. Fast quench reactor and method

    DOEpatents

    Detering, Brent A.; Donaldson, Alan D.; Fincke, James R.; Kong, Peter C.

    2002-09-24

    A fast quench reaction includes a reactor chamber having a high temperature heating means such as a plasma torch at its inlet and a restrictive convergent-divergent nozzle at its outlet end. Reactants are injected into the reactor chamber. The resulting heated gaseous stream is then rapidly cooled by passage through the nozzle. This "freezes" the desired end product(s) in the heated equilibrium reaction stage.

  2. The development of a cavitation free sodium pump for the breeder reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Baladi, J.Y.; Nyilas, C.P.

    1986-12-01

    The sodium pumps for a liquid metal fast breeder reactor must be designed for exceptionally high reliability and long life. The principal adverse factor which tends to limit the primary pump life is cavitation which becomes potentially severe under off-design flow conditions caused by the requirement of two loop operations which resulted in a large operating flow range. This problem prompted an extensive study which included experimental investigations of scaled down and full size pumps. The investigations involved visual observations, acoustic signature recordings, and physical characteristic measurements of the model and full size impellers. The blade configuration of the model was modified several times. After each modification intensive testing was conducted with feedback to established design criteria. The results obtained from the final configuration showed excellent cavitation performance. This configuration was then machined on the full scale impeller and tested. The results confirmed acceptable performance in the entire range of operating conditions. This paper describes the test facilities erected for this study, discusses the experimental techniques employed, and presents the experimental techniques employed, and presents a sample of the experimental results.

  3. Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant Project. Summary edition. 1980 technical progress report, October 1979-September 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    This technical progress report on the CRBRP Project describes the objectives, design decisions, and major accomplishments achieved in the planning, organizing, design, and execution of the Project during the period October 1, 1979, through September 30, 1980. It is a summary of the 1980 CRBRP Technical Progress Report, which was prepared by the Advanced Reactors Division of Westinghouse Electric Corporation, the Lead Reactor Manufacturer for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant Project, in fulfillment of contract requirements with the United States Department of Energy. It includes inputs from the CRBRP Architect-Engineer (Burns and Roe, Inc.), from the Constructor (Stone and Webster Engineering Corporation), and from the supporting Reactor Manufacturers (Atomics International Division of the Energy Systems Group of Rockwell International Corporation, the Advanced Reactor Systems Department of General Electric Company, and the Advanced Reactors Division of Westinghouse Electric Corporation).

  4. Heterogeneous Transmutation Sodium Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    S. E. Bays

    2007-09-01

    The threshold-fission (fertile) nature of Am-241 is used to destroy this minor actinide by capitalizing upon neutron capture instead of fission within a sodium fast reactor. This neutron-capture and its subsequent decay chain leads to the breeding of even neutron number plutonium isotopes. A slightly moderated target design is proposed for breeding plutonium in an axial blanket located above the active “fast reactor” driver fuel region. A parametric study on the core height and fuel pin diameter-to-pitch ratio is used to explore the reactor and fuel cycle aspects of this design. This study resulted in both non-flattened and flattened core geometries. Both of these designs demonstrated a high capacity for removing americium from the fuel cycle. A reactivity coefficient analysis revealed that this heterogeneous design will have comparable safety aspects to a homogeneous reactor of comparable size. A mass balance analysis revealed that the heterogeneous design may reduce the number of fast reactors needed to close the current once-through light water reactor fuel cycle.

  5. Integral Fast Reactor concept inherent safety features

    SciTech Connect

    Marchaterre, J.F.; Sevy, R.H.; Cahalan, J.E.

    1986-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is an innovative liquid-metal-cooled reactor concept being developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The two major goals of the IFR development effort are improved economics and enhanced safety. The design features that together fulfill these goals are: (1) a liquid metal (sodium) coolant, (2) a pool-type reactor primary system configuration, (3) an advanced ternary alloy metallic fuel, and (4) an integral fuel cycle. This paper reviews the design features that contribute to the safety margins inherent to the IFR concept. Special emphasis is placed on the ability of the IFR design to accommodate anticipated transients without scram (ATWS).

  6. Integral fast reactor concept inherent safety features

    SciTech Connect

    Marchaterre, J.F.; Sevy, R.H.; Cahalan, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is an innovative liquid-metal-cooled reactor concept being developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The two major goals of the IFT development effort are improved economics and enhanced safety. The design features that together fulfill these goals are: 1) a liquid metal (sodium) coolant, 2) a pool-type reactor primary system configuration, 3) an advanced ternary alloy metallic fuel, and 4) an integral fuel cycle. This paper reviews the design features that contribute to the safety margins inherent to the IFR concept. Special emphasis is placed on the ability of the IFR design to accommodate anticipated transients without scram (ATWS).

  7. FUEL-BREEDER FUEL ELEMENT FOR NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Abbott, W.E.; Balent, R.

    1958-09-16

    A fuel element design to facilitate breeding reactor fuel is described. The fuel element is comprised of a coatainer, a central core of fertile material in the container, a first bonding material surrounding the core, a sheet of fissionable material immediately surrounding the first bonding material, and a second bonding material surrounding the fissionable material and being in coniact with said container.

  8. CORAL: a stepping stone for establishing the Indian fast reactor fuel reprocessing technology

    SciTech Connect

    Venkataraman, M.; Natarajan, R.; Raj, Baldev

    2007-07-01

    The reprocessing of spent fuel from Fast Breeder Test Reactor (FBTR) has been successfully demonstrated in the pilot plant, CORAL (COmpact Reprocessing facility for Advanced fuels in Lead shielded cell). Since commissioning in 2003, spent mixed carbide fuel from FBTR of different burnups and varying cooling period, have been reprocessed in this facility. Reprocessing of the spent fuel with a maximum burnup of 100 GWd/t has been successfully carried out so far. The feed backs from these campaigns with progressively increasing specific activities, have been useful in establishing a viable process flowsheet for reprocessing the Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) spent fuel. Also, the design of various equipments and processes for the future plants, which are either under design for construction, namely, the Demonstration Fast Reactor Fuel Reprocessing Plant (DFRP) and the Fast reactor fuel Reprocessing Plant (FRP) could be finalized. (authors)

  9. End-of-life nondestructive examination of Light Water Breeder Reactor fuel rods (LWBR Development Program)

    SciTech Connect

    Gorscak, D.A.; Campbell, W.R.; Clayton, J.C.

    1987-10-01

    In-bundle and out-of-bundle (single rod) nondestructive examinations of Light Water Breeder Reactor fuel rods were performed. In-bundle examinations included visual examination and measurement of rod bow, rod-to-rod gaps, and rod removal forces. Out-of-bundle examinations included rod visuals and measurement of fuel rod length, diameter and ovality, cladding oxide and crud thickness, support grid induced cladding wear mark depth and volume, and fuel rod free hanging bow. The out-of-bundle examination also included ultrasonic inspection for cladding defects, neutron radiography for pellet integrity and plenum gap measurements, and gamma scans for instack axial gap screening and binary fuel stack length measurements. The measurements confirmed design predictions of fuel rod performance and provided evidence of excellent fuel rod performance for operation of Light Water Breeder Reactor to 29,047 effective full power hours (EFPH).

  10. Power and power-to-flow reactivity transfer functions in EBR-II (Experimental Breeder Reactor II) fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Grimm, K.N.; Meneghetti, D. )

    1989-11-01

    Reactivity transfer functions are important in determining the reactivity history during a power transient. Overall nodal transfer functions have been calculated for different subassembly types in the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II). Steady-state calculations for temperature changes and, hence, reactivities for power changes have been separated into power and power-to-flow-dependent terms. Axial nodal transfer functions separated into power and power-to-flow-dependent components are reported in this paper for a typical EBR-II fuel pin. This provides an improved understanding of the time dependence of these components in transient situations.

  11. Conceptual design of the Clinch River Breeder Reactor spent-fuel shipping cask

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, R B; Diggs, J M

    1982-04-01

    Details of a baseline conceptual design of a spent fuel shipping cask for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) are presented including an assessment of shielding, structural, thermal, fabrication and cask/plant interfacing problems. A basis for continued cask development and for new technological development is established. Alternates to the baseline design are briefly presented. Estimates of development schedules, cask utilization and cost schedules, and of personnel dose commitments during CRBR in-plant handling of the cask are also presented.

  12. End-of-life destructive examination of light water breeder reactor fuel rods (LWBR Development Program)

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, K.D.

    1987-10-01

    Destructive examination of 12 representative Light Water Breeder Reactor fuel rods was performed following successful operation in the Shippingport Atomic Power Station for 29,047 effective full power hours, about five years. Light Water Breeder Reactor fuel rods were unique in that the thorium oxide and uranium-233 oxide fuel was contained within Zircaloy-4 cladding. Destructive examinations included analysis of released fission gas; chemical analysis of the fuel to determine depletion, iodine, and cesium levels; chemical analysis of the cladding to determine hydrogen, iodine, and cesium levels; metallographic examination of the cladding, fuel, and other rod components to determine microstructural features and cladding corrosion features; and tensile testing of the irradiated cladding to determine mechanical strength. The examinations confirmed that Light Water Breeder Reactor fuel rod performance was excellent. No evidence of fuel rod failure was observed, and the fuel operating temperature was low (below 2580/sup 0/F at which an increased percentage of fission gas is released). 21 refs., 80 figs., 20 tabs.

  13. Status of EC solid breeder blanket designs and R&D for DEMO fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Dalle Donne, M.; Anziedi, L.A.; Kwast, H.

    1994-12-31

    In the framework of the European Community Fusion Technology Program four blanket concepts for a DEMO reactor are being investigated. DEMO is the next step after ITER. It should ensure tritium self-sufficiency and operate at coolant temperatures high enough to have a reasonable plant efficiency. Further requirements have been specified for the four concepts, namely an average neutron wall load of 2.2 MW/m{sup 2}, a blanket lifetime of 20000 hours and the capability of the blanket segment to withstand the forces caused by a rapid distribution of the plasma current (20 MA to zero in 20 ms), so that after the disruption the segment can still allow a comparison of the various options, in view of reducing this number to two in 1995 and to design and develop modules and articles representative of the chosen blankets to be tested in ITER. The present paper deals with two solid breeder concepts. They have many features in common: both use high pressure helium as coolant and helium to purge the tritium from the breeder material, martensitic steel as structural material and beryllium as neutron multiplier. The configuration of the two blankets are however different: in the B.I.T. (Breeder Inside Tube) concept the breeder material is LiAlO{sub 2} or LiZrO{sub 3} in the form of annular pellets contained in tubes surrounded by beryllium blocks, the coolant helium being outside the tubes, whereas in the B.O.T. (Breeder out of Tube) the breeder and multiplier material are Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} and beryllium pebbles forming a mixed bed placed outside the tubes containing the coolant helium.

  14. Flexible Conversion Ratio Fast Reactor Systems Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Neil Todreas; Pavel Hejzlar

    2008-06-30

    Conceptual designs of lead-cooled and liquid salt-cooled fast flexible conversion ratio reactors were developed. Both concepts have cores reated at 2400 MWt placed in a large-pool-type vessel with dual-free level, which also contains four intermediate heat exchanges coupling a primary coolant to a compact and efficient supercritical CO2 Brayton cycle power conversion system. Decay heat is removed passively using an enhanced Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System and a Passive Secondary Auxiliary Cooling System. The most important findings were that (1) it is feasible to design the lead-cooled and salt-cooled reactor with the flexible conversion ratio (CR) in the range of CR=0 and CR=1 n a manner that achieves inherent reactor shutdown in unprotected accidents, (2) the salt-cooled reactor requires Lithium thermal Expansion Modules to overcme the inherent salt coolant's large positive coolant temperature reactivity coefficient, (3) the preferable salt for fast spectrum high power density cores is NaCl-Kcl-MgCl2 as opposed to fluoride salts due to its better themal-hydraulic and neutronic characteristics, and (4) both reactor, but attain power density 3 times smaller than that of the sodium-cooled reactor.

  15. Transport of breeder reactor-fire-generated sodium oxide aerosols for building-wake-dominated meteorology

    SciTech Connect

    Fields, D.E.; Cooper, A.C.; Miller, C.W.

    1987-02-01

    This report describes the methodology used and results obtained in efforts to estimate the sodium aerosol concentrations at air intake ports of a liquid-metal cooled, fast-breeder nuclear reactor. An earlier version of this methodology has been previously discussed (Fields and Miller, 1985). A range of wind speeds from 2 to 10 m/s is assumed, and an effort is made to include building wake effects which, in many cases, dominate the dispersal of aerosols near buildings. For relatively small release rates, on the order of 1 to 10 kg/s, the plume rise is small and estimates of aerosol concentrations are derived using the methodology of Wilson and Britter (1982), which describes releases from surface vents. For release rates on the order of 100 kg/s much higher release velocities are expected, and plume rise is considered. An effective increase in release height is computed using the Split-H methodology with a parameterization suggested by Ramsdell (1983), and the release source strength is transformed to rooftop level. Evaluation of the acute release aerosol concentration is then based on the methodology for releases from a surface release of this transformed source strength. For a horizontal release, a methodology is developed to chart the plume path as a function of release and site meteorology parameters. Results described herein must be regarded as maximum aerosol concentrations, based on models derived from generic wind tunnel studies. More accurate and site-specific results may be obtained through wind tunnel simulations and through simulating emissions from release points other than those assumed here.

  16. Heterogeneous Recycling in Fast Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Forget, Benoit; Pope, Michael; Piet, Steven J.; Driscoll, Michael

    2012-07-30

    Current sodium fast reactor (SFR) designs have avoided the use of depleted uranium blankets over concerns of creating weapons grade plutonium. While reducing proliferation risks, this restrains the reactor design space considerably. This project will analyze various blanket and transmutation target configurations that could broaden the design space while still addressing the non-proliferation issues. The blanket designs will be assessed based on the transmutation efficiency of key minor actinide (MA) isotopes and also on mitigation of associated proliferation risks. This study will also evaluate SFR core performance under different scenarios in which depleted uranium blankets are modified to include minor actinides with or without moderators (e.g. BeO, MgO, B4C, and hydrides). This will be done in an effort to increase the sustainability of the reactor and increase its power density while still offering a proliferation resistant design with the capability of burning MA waste produced from light water reactors (LWRs). Researchers will also analyze the use of recycled (as opposed to depleted) uranium in the blankets. The various designs will compare MA transmutation efficiency, plutonium breeding characteristics, proliferation risk, shutdown margins and reactivity coefficients with a current reference sodium fast reactor design employing homogeneous recycling. The team will also evaluate the out-of-core accumulation and/or burn-down rates of MAs and plutonium isotopes on a cycle-by-cycle basis. This cycle-by-cycle information will be produced in a format readily usable by the fuel cycle systems analysis code, VISION, for assessment of the sustainability of the deployment scenarios.

  17. Gas-cooled fast reactor program. Progress report, January 1, 1980-June 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Kasten, P.R.

    1981-09-01

    Since the national Gas-Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor Program has been terminated, this document is the last progress report until reinstatement. It is divided into three sections: Core Flow Test Loop, GCFR shielding and physics, and GCFR pressure vessel and closure studies. (DLC)

  18. Fabrication Technological Development of the Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Alloy MA957 for Fast Reactor Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, Margaret L.; Gelles, David S.; Lobsinger, Ralph J.; Johnson, Gerald D.; Brown, W. F.; Paxton, Michael M.; Puigh, Raymond J.; Eiholzer, Cheryl R.; Martinez, C.; Blotter, M. A.

    2000-02-28

    A significant amount of effort has been devoted to determining the properties and understanding the behavior of the alloy MA957 to define its potential usefulness as a cladding material in the fast breeder reactor program. The numerous characterization and fabrication studies that were conducted are documented in this report.

  19. Implementation of multivariable control techniques with application to Experimental Breeder Reactor II

    SciTech Connect

    Berkan, R.C. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering); Upadhyaya, B.R.; Kisner, R.A. )

    1990-06-01

    After several successful applications to aerospace industry, the modern control theory methods have recently attracted many control engineers from other engineering disciplines. For advanced nuclear reactors, the modern control theory may provide major advantages in safety, availability, and economic aspects. This report is intended to illustrate the feasibility of applying the linear quadratic Gaussian (LQG) compensator in nuclear reactor applications. The LQG design is compared with the existing classical control schemes. Both approaches are tested using the Experimental Breeder Reactor 2 (EBR-2) as the system. The experiments are performed using a mathematical model of the EBR-2 plant. Despite the fact that the controller and plant models do not include all known physical constraints, the results are encouraging. This preliminary study provides an informative, introductory picture for future considerations of using modern control theory methods in nuclear industry. 10 refs., 25 figs.

  20. Special topics reports for the reference tandem mirror fusion breeder. Volume 2. Reactor safety assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Maya, I.; Hoot, C.G.; Wong, C.P.C.; Schultz, K.R.; Garner, J.K.; Bradbury, S.J.; Steele, W.G.; Berwald, D.H.

    1984-09-01

    The safety features of the reference fission suppressed fusion breeder reactor are presented. These include redundancy and overcapacity in primary coolant system components to minimize failure probability, an improved valve location logic to provide for failed component isolation, and double-walled coolant piping and steel guard vessel protection to further limit the extent of any leak. In addition to the primary coolant and decay heat removal system, reactor safety systems also include an independent shield cooling system, the module safety/fuel transfer coolant system, an auxiliary first wall cooling system, a psssive dump tank cooling system based on the use of heat pipes, and several lithium fire suppression systems. Safety system specifications are justified based on the results of thermal analysis, event tree construction, consequence calculations, and risk analysis. The result is a reactor design concept with an acceptably low probability of a major radioactivity release. Dose consequences of maximum credible accidents appear to be below 10CFR100 regulatory limits.

  1. Advances by the Integral Fast Reactor Program

    SciTech Connect

    Lineberry, M.J.; Pedersen, D.R.; Walters, L.C.; Cahalan, J.E.

    1991-01-01

    The advances by the Integral Fast Reactor Program at Argonne National Laboratory are the subject of this paper. The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is an advanced liquid-metal-cooled reactor concept being developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The advances stressed in the paper include fuel irradiation performance, improved passive safety, and the development of a prototype fuel cycle facility. 14 refs.

  2. Thermohydraulic model experiments on the transition from forced to natural circulation for pool-type fast reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffmann, H.; Marten, K.; Weinberg, D. )

    1992-09-01

    In this paper, thermohydraulic studies on the transition from forced to natural convection are carried out using the 1:20 scale RAMONA three-dimensional reactor model with water as the simulant fluid. In the investigations, a scram from 40% load operation of a fast reactor is simulated. The core mass flows and the core as well as the hot plenum temperatures are measured as a function of time for various core power levels, coastdown curves of the primary- and secondary-side pumps, and for various delay times for the start of the immersion coolers after a scram. These parameters influence the onset of the natural circulation in the reactor tank. The main result is that the longer the intermediate heat exchanger coolability is ensured and the later the immersion coolers start to operate, the higher is the natural-circulation flow and, hence, the lower are the core temperatures.

  3. Integral fast reactor concept. [Pool type; metal fuel; integral fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y.I.; Marchaterre, J.F.; Sevy, R.H.

    1984-01-01

    Key features of the IFR consist of a pool-type plant arrangement, a metal fuel-based core design, and an integral fuel cycle with colocated fuel cycle facility. Both the basic concept and the technology base have been demonstrated through actual integral cycle operation in EBR-II. This paper discusses the inherent safety characteristics of the IFR concept. (DLC)

  4. Proceedings of the NEACRP/IAEA Specialists meeting on the international comparison calculation of a large sodium-cooled fast breeder reactor at Argonne National Laboratory on February 7-9, 1978

    SciTech Connect

    LeSage, L.G.; McKnight, R.D.; Wade, D.C.; Freese, K.E.; Collins, P.J.

    1980-08-01

    The results of an international comparison calculation of a large (1250 MWe) LMFBR benchmark model are presented and discussed. Eight reactor configurations were calculated. Parameters included with the comparison were: eigenvalue, k/sub infinity/, neutron balance data, breeding reaction rate ratios, reactivity worths, central control rod worth, regional sodium void reactivity, core Doppler and effective delayed neutron fraction. Ten countries participated in the comparison, and sixteen solutions were contributed. The discussion focuses on the variation in parameter values, the degree of consistency among the various parameters and solutions, and the identification of unexpected results. The results are displayed and discussed both by individual participants and by groupings of participants (e.g., results from adjusted data sets versus non-adjusted data sets).

  5. Bimodal space nuclear power system with fast reactor and Topaz II-type single-cell TFE

    SciTech Connect

    Ponomarev-Stepnoi, N.N.; Usov, V.A.; Ogloblin, B.G.; Shalaev, A.I.; Klimov, A.V.; Kirillov, E.Y.; Shumov, D.P.; Radchenko, I.S.; Nicolaev, Y.V.

    1996-03-01

    The paper deals with characteristics and conceptual studies of a bimodal space thermionic system with a fast reactor and single-cell TFEs which is designed to operate in two modes: rated power mode providing power supply to space vehicle-mounted systems with energy consumption level of 10{endash}80 kW(e) and forced thermal propulsion mode with thrust of 2200 N. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Fast pulse nonthermal plasma reactor

    DOEpatents

    Rosocha, Louis A.

    2005-06-14

    A fast pulsed nonthermal plasma reactor includes a discharge cell and a charging assembly electrically connected thereto. The charging assembly provides plural high voltage pulses to the discharge cell. Each pulse has a rise time between one and ten nanoseconds and a duration of three to twenty nanoseconds. The pulses create nonthermal plasma discharge within the discharge cell. Accordingly, the nonthermal plasma discharge can be used to remove pollutants from gases or break the gases into smaller molecules so that they can be more efficiently combusted.

  7. Research Program of a Super Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Oka, Yoshiaki; Ishiwatari, Yuki; Liu, Jie; Terai, Takayuki; Nagasaki, Shinya; Muroya, Yusa; Abe, Hiroaki; Akiba, Masato; Akimoto, Hajime; Okumura, Keisuke; Akasaka, Naoaki; GOTO, Shoji

    2006-07-01

    Research program of a supercritical-pressure light water cooled fast reactor (Super Fast Reactor) is funded by MEXT (Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology) in December 2005 as one of the research programs of Japanese NERI (Nuclear Energy Research Initiative). It consists of three programs. (1) development of Super Fast Reactor concept; (2) thermal-hydraulic experiments; (3) material developments. The purpose of the concept development is to pursue the advantage of high power density of fast reactor over thermal reactors to achieve economic competitiveness of fast reactor for its deployment without waiting for exhausting uranium resources. Design goal is not breeding, but maximizing reactor power by using plutonium from spent LWR fuel. MOX will be the fuel of the Super Fast Reactor. Thermal-hydraulic experiments will be conducted with HCFC22 (Hydro chlorofluorocarbons) heat transfer loop of Kyushu University and supercritical water loop at JAEA. Heat transfer data including effect of grid spacers will be taken. The critical flow and condensation of supercritical fluid will be studied. The materials research includes the development and testing of austenitic stainless steel cladding from the experience of PNC1520 for LMFBR. Material for thermal insulation will be tested. SCWR (Supercritical-Water Cooled Reactor) of GIF (Generation-4 International Forum) includes both thermal and fast reactors. The research of the Super Fast Reactor will enhance SCWR research and the data base. The research period will be until March 2010. (authors)

  8. Wireless, in-vessel neutron monitor for initial core-loading of advanced breeder reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delorenzo, J. T.; Kennedy, E. J.; Blalock, T. V.; Rochelle, J. M.; Chiles, M. M.; Valentine, K. H.

    1981-01-01

    An experimental wireless, in-vessel neutron monitor was developed to measure the reactivity of an advanced breeder reactor as the core is loaded for the first time to preclude an accidental critically incident. The environment is liquid sodium at a temperature of approx. 220 C, with negligible gamma or neutron radiation. With ultrasonic transmission of neutron data, no fundamental limitation was observed after tests at 230 C for 2000 h. The neutron sensitivity was approx. 1 count/s-nv, and the potential data transmission rate was approx. 10,000 counts/s.

  9. Comparison of oxide- and metal-core behavior during CRBRP (Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant) station blackout

    SciTech Connect

    Polkinghorne, S T; Atkinson, S A

    1986-01-01

    A resurrected concept that could significantly improve the inherently safe response of Liquid-Metal cooled Reactors (LMRs) during severe undercooling transients is the use of metallic fuel. Analytical studies have been reported on for the transient behavior of metal-fuel cores in innovative, inherently safe LMR designs. This paper reports on an analysis done, instead, for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) design with the only innovative change being the incorporation of a metal-fuel core. The SSC-L code was used to simulate a protected station blackout accident in the CRBRP with a 943 MWt Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) metal-fuel core. The results, compared with those for the oxide-fueled CRBRP, show that the margin to boiling is greater for the IFR core. However, the cooldown transient is more severe due to the faster thermal response time of metallic fuel. Some additional calculations to assess possible LMR design improvements (reduced primary system pressure losses, extended flow coastdown) are also discussed. 8 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. CALIOP: a multichannel design code for gas-cooled fast reactors. Code description and user's guide

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, W.I.

    1980-10-01

    CALIOP is a design code for fluid-cooled reactors composed of parallel fuel tubes in hexagonal or cylindrical ducts. It may be used with gaseous or liquid coolants. It has been used chiefly for design of a helium-cooled fast breeder reactor and has built-in cross section information to permit calculations of fuel loading, breeding ratio, and doubling time. Optional cross-section input allows the code to be used with moderated cores and with other fuels.

  11. Current status of experimental breeder reactor-II [EBR-II] shutdown planning

    SciTech Connect

    McDermott, M. D.; Griffin, C. D.; Michelbacher, J. A.; Earle, O. K.

    2000-05-08

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor--II (EBR-II) at Argonne National Laboratory--West (ANL-W) in Idaho, was shutdown in September, 1994 as mandated by the US Department of Energy. This sodium cooled reactor had been in service since 1964, and was to be placed in an industrially and radiologically safe condition for ultimate decommissioning. The deactivation of a liquid metal reactor presents unique concerns. The first major task associated with the project was the removal of all fueled assemblies. In addition, sodium must be drained from systems and processed for ultimate disposal. Residual quantities of sodium remaining in systems must be deactivated or inerted to preclude future hazards associated with pyrophoricity and generation of potentially explosive hydrogen gas. A Sodium Process Facility was designed and constructed to react the elemental sodium from the EBR-II primary and secondary systems to sodium hydroxide for disposal. This facility has a design capacity to allow the reaction of the complete inventory of sodium at ANL-W in less than two years. Additional quantities of sodium from the Fermi-1 reactor are also being treated at the Sodium Process Facility. The sodium environment and the EBR-II configuration, combined with the radiation and contamination associated with thirty years of reactor operation, posed problems specific to liquid metal reactor deactivation. The methods being developed and implemented at EBR-II can be applied to other similar situations in the US and abroad.

  12. Simulation of decay heat removal by natural convection in a pool type fast reactor model-ramona-with coupled 1D/2D thermal hydraulic code system

    SciTech Connect

    Kasinathan, N.; Rajakumar, A.; Vaidyanathan, G.; Chetal, S.C.

    1995-09-01

    Post shutdown decay heat removal is an important safety requirement in any nuclear system. In order to improve the reliability of this function, Liquid metal (sodium) cooled fast breeder reactors (LMFBR) are equipped with redundant hot pool dipped immersion coolers connected to natural draught air cooled heat exchangers through intermediate sodium circuits. During decay heat removal, flow through the core, immersion cooler primary side and in the intermediate sodium circuits are also through natural convection. In order to establish the viability and validate computer codes used in making predictions, a 1:20 scale experimental model called RAMONA with water as coolant has been built and experimental simulation of decay heat removal situation has been performed at KfK Karlsruhe. Results of two such experiments have been compiled and published as benchmarks. This paper brings out the results of the numerical simulation of one of the benchmark case through a 1D/2D coupled code system, DHDYN-1D/THYC-2D and the salient features of the comparisons. Brief description of the formulations of the codes are also included.

  13. Gas-cooled fast reactor fuel fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fielding, Randall; Meyer, Mitch; Jue, Jan-Fong; Gan, Jian

    2007-09-01

    The gas-cooled fast reactor is a high temperature helium-cooled Generation IV reactor concept. Operating parameters for this type of reactor are well beyond those of current fuels so a novel fuel must be developed. One fuel concept calls for UC particles dispersed throughout an SiC matrix. This study examines a hybrid reaction bonding process as a possible fabrication route for this fuel. Processing parameters are also optimized. The process combines carbon and SiC powders and a carbon yielding polymer. In order to obtain dense reaction bonded SiC samples the porosity to carbon ratio in the preform must be large enough to accommodate SiC formation from the carbon present in the sample, however too much porosity reduces mechanical integrity which leads to poor infiltration properties. The porosity must also be of a suitable size to allow silicon transport throughout the sample but keep residual silicon to a minimum.

  14. Gas-Fast Reactor Fuel Fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Randall Fielding; Mitchell Meyer; Ramprashad Prabhakaran; Jim Miller; Sean McDeavitt

    2005-11-01

    The gas-cooled fast reactor is a high temperature helium cooled Generation IV reactor concept. Operating parameters for this type of reactor are well beyond those of current fuels so a novel fuel must be developed. One fuel concept calls for UC particles dispersed throughout a SiC matrix. This study examines a hybrid reaction bonding process as a possible fabrication route for this fuel. Processing parameters are also optimized. The process combines carbon and SiC powders and a carbon yielding polymer. In order to obtain dense reaction bonded SiC samples the porosity to carbon ratio in the preform must be large enough to accommodate SiC formation from the carbon present in the sample, however too much porosity reduces mechanical integrity which leads to poor infiltration properties . The porosity must also be of a suitable size to allow silicon transport throughout the sample but keep residual silicon to a minimum.

  15. Low-order dynamic modeling of the Experimental Breeder Reactor II

    SciTech Connect

    Berkan, R.C. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering); Upadhyaya, B.R.; Kisner, R.A. )

    1990-07-01

    This report describes the development of a low-order, linear model of the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II), including the primary system, intermediate heat exchanger, and steam generator subsystems. The linear model is developed to represent full-power steady state dynamics for low-level perturbations. Transient simulations are performed using model building and simulation capabilities of the computer software Matrix{sub x}. The inherently safe characteristics of the EBR-II are verified through the simulation studies. The results presented in this report also indicate an agreement between the linear model and the actual dynamics of the plant for several transients. Such models play a major role in the learning and in the improvement of nuclear reactor dynamics for control and signal validation studies. This research and development is sponsored by the Advanced Controls Program in the Instrumentation and Controls Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. 17 refs., 67 figs., 15 tabs.

  16. Shippingport operations with the Light Water Breeder Reactor core. (LWBR Development Program)

    SciTech Connect

    Budd, W.A.

    1986-03-01

    This report describes the operation of the Shippingport Atomic Power Station during the LWBR (Light Water Breeder Reactor) Core lifetime. It also summarizes the plant-oriented operations during the period preceding LWBR startup, which include the defueling of The Pressurized Water Reactor Core 2 (PWR-2) and the installation of the LWBR Core, and the operations associated with the defueling of LWBR. The intent of this report is to examine LWBR experience in retrospect and present pertinent and significant aspects of LWBR operations that relate primarily to the nuclear portion of the Station. The nonnuclear portion of the Station is discussed only as it relates to overall plant operation or to unusual problems which result from the use of conventional equipment in radioactive environments. 30 refs., 69 figs., 27 tabs.

  17. Thermohydraulic model experiments and calculations on the transition from forced to natural circulation for pool-type fast reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffmann, H.; Marten, K.; Weinberg, D.; Kamide, H.

    1990-01-01

    After a reactor scram, the decay heat removal (DHR) is of decisive importance for the safety of the plant. A fully passive DHR system based on natural circulation alone is independent of any power source. The DHE system consists of immersion coolers (ICs) installed in the hot plenum and connected to air coolers, each via intermediate circuits. During the postscram phase, the decay heat is to be removed by natural circulation from the core into the hot plenum and via the ICs and intermediate loops to the air coolers. The function of this DHR system is investigated and demonstrated in model tests with a geometry similar to the reactor, though on a different scale RAMONA is such a three-dimensional model set up on a 1:20 scale. It is operated with water. The steady-state tests for natural-circulation DHR operations have been conducted over a wide range of operational and geometric parameters. To study the transition from nominal to DHR conditions, experiments were defined to investigate the onset of natural circulation in the postscram phase (transient tests). The experiments were analyzed using the one-dimensional LEDHER code. LEDHER is a network analysis code for the long-term DHR of a fast reactor developed at Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation in Japan. The results of the experiments and conclusions are summarized.

  18. Instrumentation, Monitoring and NDE for New Fast Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, Leonard J.; Doctor, Steven R.; Bunch, Kyle J.; Good, Morris S.; Waltar, Alan E.

    2007-07-28

    The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) has been proposed as a viable system in which to close the fuel cycle in a manner consistent with markedly expanding the global role of nuclear power while significantly reducing proliferation risks. A key part of this system relies on the development of actinide transmutation, which can only be effectively accomplished in a fast-spectrum reactor. The fundamental physics for fast reactors is well established. However, to achieve higher standards of safety and reliability, operate with longer intervals between outages, and achieve high operating capacity factors, new instrumentation and on-line monitoring capabilities will be required--during both fabrication and operation. Since the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) and Experimental Breeder Reactor – II (EBR-II) reactors were operational in the USA, there have been major advances in instrumentation, not the least being the move to digital systems. Some specific capabilities have been developed outside the USA, but new or at least re-established capabilities will be required. In many cases the only available information is in reports and papers. New and improved sensors and instrumentation will be required. Advanced instrumentation has been developed for high-temperature/high-flux conditions in some cases, but most of the original researchers and manufacturers are retired or no longer in business.

  19. Review of uncertainty estimates associated with models for assessing the impact of breeder reactor radioactivity releases

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, C.; Little, C.A.

    1982-08-01

    The purpose is to summarize estimates based on currently available data of the uncertainty associated with radiological assessment models. The models being examined herein are those recommended previously for use in breeder reactor assessments. Uncertainty estimates are presented for models of atmospheric and hydrologic transport, terrestrial and aquatic food-chain bioaccumulation, and internal and external dosimetry. Both long-term and short-term release conditions are discussed. The uncertainty estimates presented in this report indicate that, for many sites, generic models and representative parameter values may be used to calculate doses from annual average radionuclide releases when these calculated doses are on the order of one-tenth or less of a relevant dose limit. For short-term, accidental releases, especially those from breeder reactors located in sites dominated by complex terrain and/or coastal meteorology, the uncertainty in the dose calculations may be much larger than an order of magnitude. As a result, it may be necessary to incorporate site-specific information into the dose calculation under these circumstances to reduce this uncertainty. However, even using site-specific information, natural variability and the uncertainties in the dose conversion factor will likely result in an overall uncertainty of greater than an order of magnitude for predictions of dose or concentration in environmental media following shortterm releases.

  20. Fission energy: The integral fast reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Yoon I.

    1989-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is an innovative reactor concept being developed at Argonne National Laboratory as a such next- generation reactor concept. The IFR concept has a number of specific technical advantages that collectively address the potential difficulties facing the expansion of nuclear power deployment. In particular, the IFR concept can meet all three fundamental requirements needed in a next-generation reactor as discussed below. This document discusses these requirements.

  1. Passive compact molten salt reactor (PCMSR), modular thermal breeder reactor with totally passive safety system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harto, Andang Widi

    2012-06-01

    Design Study Passive Compact Molten Salt Reactor (PCMSR) with totally passive safety system has been performed. The term of Compact in the PCMSR name means that the reactor system is designed to have relatively small volume per unit power output by using modular and integral concept. In term of modular, the reactor system consists of three modules, i.e. reactor module, turbine module and fuel management module. The reactor module is an integral design that consists of reactor, primary and intermediate heat exchangers and passive post shutdown cooling system. The turbine module is an integral design of a multi heating, multi cooling, regenerative gas turbine. The fuel management module consists of all equipments related to fuel preparation, fuel reprocessing and radioactive handling. The preliminary calculations show that the PCMSR has negative temperature and void reactivity coefficient, passive shutdown characteristic related to fuel pump failure and possibility of using natural circulation for post shutdown cooling system.

  2. Passive compact molten salt reactor (PCMSR), modular thermal breeder reactor with totally passive safety system

    SciTech Connect

    Harto, Andang Widi

    2012-06-06

    Design Study Passive Compact Molten Salt Reactor (PCMSR) with totally passive safety system has been performed. The term of Compact in the PCMSR name means that the reactor system is designed to have relatively small volume per unit power output by using modular and integral concept. In term of modular, the reactor system consists of three modules, i.e. reactor module, turbine module and fuel management module. The reactor module is an integral design that consists of reactor, primary and intermediate heat exchangers and passive post shutdown cooling system. The turbine module is an integral design of a multi heating, multi cooling, regenerative gas turbine. The fuel management module consists of all equipments related to fuel preparation, fuel reprocessing and radioactive handling. The preliminary calculations show that the PCMSR has negative temperature and void reactivity coefficient, passive shutdown characteristic related to fuel pump failure and possibility of using natural circulation for post shutdown cooling system.

  3. Integral fast reactor safety tests M2 and M3 in TREAT

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, W.R.; Lo, R.K.; Wright, A.E.; Bauer, T.H.; Stanford, G.S.; Morman, J.A.

    1985-11-01

    Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT) tests M2 and M3 were performed to obtain information on two key fuel behavior characteristics of transient overpower conditions in metal-fueled fast reactors: the margin to cladding breach and the axial self-extrusion of fuel within intact cladding. Cladding breach depends on penetration of a fuel/cladding eutectic into the cladding as well as on internal pin pressure. Driving forces for fuel extrusion are fission gas, liquid sodium, and volatile fission products trapped within the fuel. Significant fuel extrusion prior to cladding breach would be an important factor in the case for benign termination of unprotected overpower events in a fast reactor. These preliminary tests in the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) program were done on uranium-5% fissium Experimental Breeder Reactor II Mark-II driver fuel pins having an active fuel column length of 34 cm.

  4. Tritium trapping in silicon carbide in contact with solid breeder under high flux isotope reactor irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    H. Katsui; Y. Katoh; A. Hasegawa; M. Shimada; Y. Hatano; T. Hinoki; S. Nogami; T. Tanaka; S. Nagata; T. Shikama

    2013-11-01

    The trapping of tritium in silicon carbide (SiC) injected from ceramic breeding materials was examined via tritium measurements using imaging plate (IP) techniques. Monolithic SiC in contact with ternary lithium oxide (lithium titanate and lithium aluminate) as a ceramic breeder was irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA. The distribution of photo-stimulated luminescence (PSL) of tritium in SiC was successfully obtained, which separated the contribution of 14C ß-rays to the PSL. The tritium incident from ceramic breeders was retained in the vicinity of the SiC surface even after irradiation at 1073 K over the duration of ~3000 h, while trapping of tritium was not observed in the bulk region. The PSL intensity near the SiC surface in contact with lithium titanate was higher than that obtained with lithium aluminate. The amount of the incident tritium and/or the formation of a Li2SiO3 phase on SiC due to the reaction with lithium aluminate under irradiation likely were responsible for this observation.

  5. Comments on a plan for obtaining private financing for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    1983-08-22

    This review compares the latest CRBR financing plan, released to the Congress on August 1, 1983, with the private financing framework established by Department of Energy and Breeder Reactor Corporation task force reports in March 1983. We discussed these documents and our interpretation of the documents with DOE officials and members of the BRC task force. We also discussed them with representatives of one of the investment banking firms that participated in formulating the plan. We did not solicit DOE's review and comments on a draft of this report because of the short time frame involved in conducting our work. This is also in keeping with the agreement reached regarding agency comments on our May 12, 1983, report. We have discussed the report's contents with managers of the project in an effort to include DOE's views and ensure the report's accuracy.

  6. Recommendations concerning research and model evaluation needs to support breeder reactor environmental radiological assessments

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, C. W.; Dunning, Jr., D. E.; Etnier, E. L.; Kocher, D. C.; McDowell-Boyer, L. M.; Meyer, H. R.; Rohwer, P. S.

    1980-12-01

    Purpose of this report is to present recommendations concerning needs for model evaluations, environmental research, and biomedical research to support breeder reactor environmental radiological assessments. More data are needed to specify dry deposition velocities and to validate plume depletion models. More atmospheric dispersion data are required to characterize flow near buildings, in complex terrain, and for travel distances at 100 km or more. Field data are needed for terrestrial food chain transport models, especially those used to assess the impact of acute radionuclide releases. Efforts are needed to develop models for the estimation of dose from external exposure to photons from a finite, elevated plume resulting from an acute radionuclide release to the atmosphere. Estimates of doses to man from internally deposited radionuclides require scrutiny. Further study of tritium is needed to determine its dependence on dose and dose rate and to specify the relative toxicity of various physiochemical forms of tritium in the environment.

  7. Primary disassembly of Light Water Breeder Reactor modules for core evaluation (LWBR Development Program)

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberger, R.J.; Miller, E.L.

    1987-10-01

    After successfully operating for 29,047 effective full power hours, the Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) core was defueled prior to total decommissioning of the Shippingport Atomic Power Station. All nuclear fuel and much of the reactor internal hardware was removed from the reactor vessel. Non-fuel components were prepared for shipment to disposal sites, and the fuel assemblies were partially disassembled and shipped to the Expended Core Facility (ECF) in Idaho. At ECF, the fuel modules underwent further disassembly to provide fuel rods for nondestructive testing to establish the core's breeding efficiency and to provide core components for examinations to assess their performance characteristics. This report presents a basic description of the processes and equipment used to disassemble LWBR fuel modules for subsequent proof-of-breeding (POB) and core examination operations. Included are discussions of module handling fixtures and equipment, the underwater milling machine and bandsaw assemblies, and the associated design and operation of this equipment for LWBR fuel module disassembly.

  8. High Temperature Ultrasonic Transducers for In-Service Inspection of Liquid Metal Fast Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Posakony, Gerald J.; Harris, Robert V.; Baldwin, David L.; Jones, Anthony M.; Bond, Leonard J.

    2011-12-31

    In-service inspection of liquid metal (sodium) fast reactors requires the use of ultrasonic transducers capable of operating at high temperatures (>200°C), high gamma radiation fields, and the chemically reactive liquid sodium environment. In the early- to mid-1970s, the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission supported development of high-temperature, submersible single-element transducers, used for scanning and under-sodium imaging in the Fast Flux Test Facility and the Clinch River Breeder Reactor. Current work is building on this technology to develop the next generation of high-temperature linear ultrasonic transducer arrays for under-sodium viewing and in-service inspections.

  9. Fast-acting nuclear reactor control device

    DOEpatents

    Kotlyar, Oleg M.; West, Phillip B.

    1993-01-01

    A fast-acting nuclear reactor control device for moving and positioning a fety control rod to desired positions within the core of the reactor between a run position in which the safety control rod is outside the reactor core, and a shutdown position in which the rod is fully inserted in the reactor core. The device employs a hydraulic pump/motor, an electric gear motor, and solenoid valve to drive the safety control rod into the reactor core through the entire stroke of the safety control rod. An overrunning clutch allows the safety control rod to freely travel toward a safe position in the event of a partial drive system failure.

  10. Recycle of LWR (Light Water Reactor) actinides to an IFR (Integral Fast Reactor)

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, R.D.; Ackerman, J.P.; Johnson, G.K.; Mulcahey, T.P.; Poa, D.S.

    1991-01-01

    A large quantity of actinide elements is present in irradiated Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel that is stored throughout the world. Because of the high fission-to-capture ratio for the transuranium (TRU) elements with the high-energy neutrons in the metal-fueled Integral Fast Reactor (IFR), that reactor can consume these elements effectively. The stored fuel represents a valuable resource for an expanding application of fast power reactors. In addition, removal of the TRU elements from the spent LWR fuel has the potential for increasing the capacity of a high-level waste facility by reducing the heat loads and increasing the margin of safety in meeting licensing requirements. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is developing a pyrochemical process, which is compatible with the IFR fuel cycle, for the recovery of TRU elements from LWR fuel. The proposed product is a metallic actinide ingot, which can be introduced into the electrorefining step of the IFR process. The major objective of the LWR fuel recovery process is high TRU element recovery, with decontamination a secondary issue, because fission product removal is accomplished in the IFR process. The extensive pyrochemical processing studies of the 1960s and 1970s provide a basis for the design of possible processes. Two processes were selected for laboratory-scale investigation. One is based on the Salt Transport Process studied at ANL for mixed-oxide fast reactor fuel, and the other is based on the blanket processing studies done for ANL's second Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR-2). This paper discusses the two processes and is a status report on the experimental studies. 5 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Advanced automation concepts applied to Experimental Breeder Reactor-II startup

    SciTech Connect

    Berkan, R.C.; Upadhyaya, B.R.; Bywater, R.L. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering); Kisner, R.A. )

    1991-08-01

    The major objective of this work is to demonstrate through simulations that advanced liquid-metal reactor plants can be operated from low power by computer control. Development of an automatic control system with this objective will help resolve specific issues and provide proof through demonstration that automatic control for plant startup is feasible. This paper presents an advanced control system design for startup of the Experimental Breeder Reactor-2 (EBR-2) located at Idaho Falls, Idaho. The design incorporates recent methods in nonlinear control with advanced diagnostics techniques such as neural networks to form an integrated architecture. The preliminary evaluations are obtained in a simulated environment by a low-order, valid nonlinear model. Within the framework of phase 1 research, the design includes an inverse dynamics controller, a fuzzy controller, and an artificial neural network controller. These three nonlinear control modules are designed to follow the EBR-2 startup trajectories in a multi-input/output regime. They are coordinated by a supervisory routine to yield a fault-tolerant, parallel operation. The control system operates in three modes: manual, semiautomatic, and fully automatic control. The simulation results of the EBR-2 startup transients proved the effectiveness of the advanced concepts. The work presented in this paper is a preliminary feasibility analysis and does not constitute a final design of an automated startup control system for EBR-2. 14 refs., 43 figs.

  12. A fast and flexible reactor physics model for simulating neutron spectra and depletion in fast reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recktenwald, Geoff; Deinert, Mark

    2010-03-01

    Determining the time dependent concentration of isotopes within a nuclear reactor core is central to the analysis of nuclear fuel cycles. We present a fast, flexible tool for determining the time dependent neutron spectrum within fast reactors. The code (VBUDS: visualization, burnup, depletion and spectra) uses a two region, multigroup collision probability model to simulate the energy dependent neutron flux and tracks the buildup and burnout of 24 actinides, as well as fission products. While originally developed for LWR simulations, the model is shown to produce fast reactor spectra that show high degree of fidelity to available fast reactor benchmarks.

  13. A next-generation reactor concept: The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR)

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y.I.

    1992-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is an advanced liquid metal reactor concept being developed at Argonne National Laboratory as reactor technology for the 21st century. It seeks to specifically exploit the inherent properties of liquid metal cooling and metallic fuel in a way that leads to substantial improvements in the characteristics of the complete reactor system, in particular passive safety and waste management. The IFR concept consists of four technical features: (1) liquid sodium cooling, (2) pool-type reactor configuration, (3) metallic fuel, and (4) fuel cycle closure based on pyroprocessing.

  14. A next-generation reactor concept: The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR)

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y.I.

    1992-07-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is an advanced liquid metal reactor concept being developed at Argonne National Laboratory as reactor technology for the 21st century. It seeks to specifically exploit the inherent properties of liquid metal cooling and metallic fuel in a way that leads to substantial improvements in the characteristics of the complete reactor system, in particular passive safety and waste management. The IFR concept consists of four technical features: (1) liquid sodium cooling, (2) pool-type reactor configuration, (3) metallic fuel, and (4) fuel cycle closure based on pyroprocessing.

  15. Fusion breeder

    SciTech Connect

    Moir, R.W.

    1982-04-20

    The fusion breeder is a fusion reactor designed with special blankets to maximize the transmutation by 14 MeV neutrons of uranium-238 to plutonium or thorium to uranium-233 for use as a fuel for fission reactors. Breeding fissile fuels has not been a goal of the US fusion energy program. This paper suggests it is time for a policy change to make the fusion breeder a goal of the US fusion program and the US nuclear energy program. The purpose of this paper is to suggest this policy change be made and tell why it should be made, and to outline specific research and development goals so that the fusion breeder will be developed in time to meet fissile fuel needs.

  16. Fusion breeder

    SciTech Connect

    Moir, R.W.

    1982-02-22

    The fusion breeder is a fusion reactor designed with special blankets to maximize the transmutation by 14 MeV neutrons of uranium-238 to plutonium or thorium to uranium-233 for use as a fuel for fission reactors. Breeding fissile fuels has not been a goal of the US fusion energy program. This paper suggests it is time for a policy change to make the fusion breeder a goal of the US fusion program and the US nuclear energy program. The purpose of this paper is to suggest this policy change be made and tell why it should be made, and to outline specific research and development goals so that the fusion breeder will be developed in time to meet fissile fuel needs.

  17. Completion of Experimental Breeder Reactor-II Sodium Processing at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    McDermott, Mary D.; Griffin, Charles D.; Baird, Daniel K.; Baily, Carl E.; Michelbacher, John A.; Rosenberg, Kenneth E.; Henslee, S. Paul

    2002-07-01

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor - II (EBR-II) at Argonne National Laboratory - West (ANL-W) was shutdown in September 1994 as mandated by the United States Department of Energy. Located in eastern Idaho, this sodium-cooled reactor had been in service since 1964, and was a test facility for fuels development, materials irradiation, system and control theory tests, and hardware development. The EBR-II termination activities began in October 1994, with the reactor being maintained in an industrially and radiologically safe condition for decommissioning. With the shutdown of EBR-II, its sodium coolant became a waste necessitating its reaction to a disposal form. A Sodium Process Facility (SPF), designed to convert sodium to 50 wt% sodium hydroxide, existed at the ANL-W site, but had never been operated. The SPF was upgraded to current standards and codes, and then modified in 1998 to convert the sodium to 70 wt% sodium hydroxide, a substance that solidifies at 65 deg. C (150 deg. F) and is acceptable for burial as low level radioactive waste in Idaho. In December 1998, the SPF began operations. Working with sodium and highly concentrated sodium hydroxide presented some unique operating and maintenance conditions. Several lessons were learned throughout the operating period. Processing of the 330 m{sup 3} (87,000 gallons) of EBR-II primary sodium, 50 m{sup 3} (13,000 gallons) of EBR-II secondary sodium, and 290 m{sup 3} (77,000 gallons) of Fermi-1 primary sodium was successfully completed in March 2001, ahead of schedule and within budget. (authors)

  18. Modelling of tritium transport in a pin-type solid breeder blanket

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.; Ghoniem, N.M.

    1986-02-01

    This study supplements a larger study of a solid breeder blanket design featuring lithium ceramic pins. This aspect of the study looks at tritium transport, release, and inventory within this blanket design. Li/sub 2/O and ..gamma..-LiAlO/sub 2/ are the two primary candidates for ceramic solid breeders. ..gamma..-LiAlO/sub 2/ was chosen for this blanket design due to its higher structural stability. Analysis of tritium behavior in solid breeder blankets is of great importance due to its impact on several critical issues: the generation of an adequate amount of fusion fuel, the safety-related issue of keeping radioactive blanket inventories as low as possible, and the release, purge, and economical processing of the bred tritium without undue contamination of the coolant and other reactor structures.

  19. Coated ceramic breeder materials

    DOEpatents

    Tam, Shiu-Wing; Johnson, Carl E.

    1987-01-01

    A breeder material for use in a breeder blanket of a nuclear reactor is disclosed. The breeder material comprises a core material of lithium containing ceramic particles which has been coated with a neutron multiplier such as Be or BeO, which coating has a higher thermal conductivity than the core material.

  20. Coated ceramic breeder materials

    DOEpatents

    Tam, Shiu-Wing; Johnson, Carl E.

    1987-04-07

    A breeder material for use in a breeder blanket of a nuclear reactor is disclosed. The breeder material comprises a core material of lithium containing ceramic particles which has been coated with a neutron multiplier such as Be or BeO, which coating has a higher thermal conductivity than the core material.

  1. Stationary Liquid Fuel Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Won Sik; Grandy, Andrew; Boroski, Andrew; Krajtl, Lubomir; Johnson, Terry

    2015-09-30

    For effective burning of hazardous transuranic (TRU) elements of used nuclear fuel, a transformational advanced reactor concept named SLFFR (Stationary Liquid Fuel Fast Reactor) was proposed based on stationary molten metallic fuel. The fuel enters the reactor vessel in a solid form, and then it is heated to molten temperature in a small melting heater. The fuel is contained within a closed, thick container with penetrating coolant channels, and thus it is not mixed with coolant nor flow through the primary heat transfer circuit. The makeup fuel is semi- continuously added to the system, and thus a very small excess reactivity is required. Gaseous fission products are also removed continuously, and a fraction of the fuel is periodically drawn off from the fuel container to a processing facility where non-gaseous mixed fission products and other impurities are removed and then the cleaned fuel is recycled into the fuel container. A reference core design and a preliminary plant system design of a 1000 MWt TRU- burning SLFFR concept were developed using TRU-Ce-Co fuel, Ta-10W fuel container, and sodium coolant. Conservative design approaches were adopted to stay within the current material performance database. Detailed neutronics and thermal-fluidic analyses were performed to develop a reference core design. Region-dependent 33-group cross sections were generated based on the ENDF/B-VII.0 data using the MC2-3 code. Core and fuel cycle analyses were performed in theta-r-z geometries using the DIF3D and REBUS-3 codes. Reactivity coefficients and kinetics parameters were calculated using the VARI3D perturbation theory code. Thermo-fluidic analyses were performed using the ANSYS FLUENT computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. Figure 0.1 shows a schematic radial layout of the reference 1000 MWt SLFFR core, and Table 0.1 summarizes the main design parameters of SLFFR-1000 loop plant. The fuel container is a 2.5 cm thick cylinder with an inner radius of 87.5 cm. The fuel

  2. Ceramics for fusion reactors: The role of the lithium orthosilicate as breeder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carella, Elisabetta; Hernández, Teresa

    2012-11-01

    Lithium-based oxide ceramics are studied as breeder blanket materials for the controlled thermonuclear reactors (CTR). Lithium orthosilicate (Li4SiO4) is one of the most promising candidates because of its lithium concentration (0.54 g/cm3), its high melting temperature (1523 K) and its excellent tritium release behavior. It is reported that the diffusion of tritium is closely related to that of lithium, so it is possible to find an indirect measure of the trend of tritium studying the diffusivity of Li+. In the present work, the synthesis of the Li4SiO4 is carried out by Spray drying followed by pyrolysis. The study of the Li+ ion diffusion on the sintered bodies, is investigated by means of electrical conductivity measurements. The effect of the γ-ray irradiation is evaluated by the impedance spectroscopy method (EIS) from room temperature to 1173 K. The results indicate that the síntesis process employed can produce Li4SiO4 in the form of pebbles, finally the best ion species for the electrical conduction is the Li+ and is shown that the g-irradiation to a dose of 5MGy, facilitate its mobility through the creation of defects, without change in its conduction process.

  3. Removal of Zirconium in Electrometallurgical Treatment of Experimental Breeder Reactor II Spent Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Ahluwalia, Rajesh K.; Hua, Thanh Q.; Geyer, Howard K.

    2001-01-15

    During electrorefining of irradiated, binary U-Zr Experimental Breeder Reactor II fuel, a portion of zirconium is found to dissolve along with uranium. It accumulates in the cadmium pool both as dissolved zirconium and as a zirconium-cadmium intermetallic precipitate. Two electrochemical methods of removing zirconium from the electrorefiner have been evaluated. The first is a three-step method consisting of chemical oxidation of zirconium by CdCl{sub 2} addition, depletion of zirconium from the cadmium pool by electrotransport, and drawdown of zirconium from the LiCl-KCl eutectic salt by using a different electrorefiner configuration. A transport model is employed to determine the cell operating conditions for growing pure zirconium deposits and the throughput rate. The second method eliminates the chemical oxidation step and permits codeposition of uranium and zirconium onto the solid cathode. The transport model is used to assess the level of uranium impurity in the cathode product; an additional step is proposed to reoxidize uranium in the deposit. The two methods are compared from the standpoints of throughput, deposit composition, deposit adherence to a solid cathode mandrel, and the underlying uncertainties. A brief review is given of the related past laboratory work on removal of zirconium from the electrorefiner.

  4. Estimated recurrence frequencies for initiating accident categories associated with the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant design

    SciTech Connect

    Copus, E R

    1982-04-01

    Estimated recurrence frequencies for each of twenty-five generic LMFBR initiating accident categories were quantified using the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) design. These estimates were obtained using simplified systems fault trees and functional event tree models from the Accident Delineation Study Phase I Final Report coupled with order-of-magnitude estimates for the initiator-dependent failure probabilities of the individual CRBRP engineered safety systems. Twelve distinct protected accident categories where SCRAM is assumed to be successful are estimated to occur at a combined rate of 10/sup -3/ times per year while thirteen unprotected accident categories in which SCRAM fails are estimated to occur at a combined rate on the order of 10/sup -5/ times per year. These estimates are thought to be representative despite the fact that human performance factors, maintenance and repair, as well as input common cause uncertainties, were not treated explicitly. The overall results indicate that for the CRBRP design no single accident category appears to be dominant, nor can any be totally eliminated from further investigation in the areas of accident phenomenology for in-core events and post-accident phenomenology for containment.

  5. Final report for the Light Water Breeder Reactor proof-of-breeding analytical support project

    SciTech Connect

    Graczyk, D.G.; Hoh, J.C.; Martino, F.J.; Nelson, R.E.; Osudar, J.; Levitz, N.M.

    1987-05-01

    The technology of breeding /sup 233/U from /sup 232/Th in a light water reactor is being developed and evaluated by the Westinghouse Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory (BAPL) through operation and examination of the Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR). Bettis is determining the end-of-life (EOL) inventory of fissile uranium in the LWBR core by nondestructive assay of a statistical sample comprising approximately 500 EOL fuel rods. This determination is being made with an irradiated-fuel assay gauge based on neutron interrogation and detection of delayed neutrons from each rod. The EOL fissile inventory will be compared with the beginning-of-life fissile loading of the LWBR to determine the extent of breeding. In support of the BAPL proof-of-breeding (POB) effort, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) carried out destructive physical, chemical, and radiometric analyses on 17 EOL LWBR fuel rods that were previously assayed with the nondestructive gauge. The ANL work included measurements on the intact rods; shearing of the rods into pre-designated contiguous segments; separate dissolution of each of the more than 150 segments; and analysis of the dissolver solutions to determine each segment's uranium content, uranium isotopic composition, and loading of selected fission products. This report describes the facilities in which this work was carried out, details operations involved in processing each rod, and presents a comprehensive discussion of uncertainties associated with each result of the ANL measurements. Most operations were carried out remotely in shielded cells. Automated equipment and procedures, controlled by a computer system, provided error-free data acquisition and processing, as well as full replication of operations with each rod. Despite difficulties that arose during processing of a few rod segments, the ANL destructive-assay results satisfied the demanding needs of the parent LWBR-POB program.

  6. BISON and MARMOT Development for Modeling Fast Reactor Fuel Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Gamble, Kyle Allan Lawrence; Williamson, Richard L.; Schwen, Daniel; Zhang, Yongfeng; Novascone, Stephen Rhead; Medvedev, Pavel G.

    2015-09-01

    BISON and MARMOT are two codes under development at the Idaho National Laboratory for engineering scale and lower length scale fuel performance modeling. It is desired to add capabilities for fast reactor applications to these codes. The fast reactor fuel types under consideration are metal (U-Pu-Zr) and oxide (MOX). The cladding types of interest include 316SS, D9, and HT9. The purpose of this report is to outline the proposed plans for code development and provide an overview of the models added to the BISON and MARMOT codes for fast reactor fuel behavior. A brief overview of preliminary discussions on the formation of a bilateral agreement between the Idaho National Laboratory and the National Nuclear Laboratory in the United Kingdom is presented.

  7. The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept

    SciTech Connect

    Till, C.E.; Chang, Y.I.

    1989-01-01

    In addition to maintaining the viability of its present commercial nuclear technology, a principal challenge in the US in the 1990s and beyond will be to regain and maintain a position among the world leadership in advanced reactor research and development. In this paper we'll discuss factors which we believe should today provide the rationale and focus for advanced reactor R and D, and we will then review the status of the major US effort, the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) program.

  8. Finite Element Solution of the Nonlinear Coupled Neutronic-Energy Equations for a Fast Reactor Fuel Cell

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-12-01

    3reeder Reactor ( LMFBR ) it considered. The &nalysis is formulated to model the dynamic response of the reactor fuel subassembly during the initial...transport equations for each region (fuel, clad , and OD , 1473 amn0 OF I Nov i*S V m119I (P ! JA KT ŕ)1 i"’ b 1.4 -CU~MIV CLAtSIIICATO O’F TMIS 069...Metal Fast Breeder Reactor ( LMFBR ) Is Consldered. The analysis is formulated to model the dynamic response of the reactor fuel subassembly during the

  9. Slow clean-up for fast reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Michael

    2008-05-01

    The year 2300 is so distant that one may be forgiven for thinking of it only in terms of science fiction. But this is the year that workers at the Dounreay power station in Northern Scotland - the UK's only centre for research into "fast" nuclear reactors - term as the "end point" by which time the site will be completely clear of radioactive material. More than 180 facilities - including the iconic dome that housed the Dounreay Fast Reactor (DFR) - were built at at the site since it opened in 1959, with almost 50 having been used to handle radioactive material.

  10. On the Criticality Safety of Transuranic Sodium Fast Reactor Fuel Transport Casks

    SciTech Connect

    Samuel Bays; Ayodeji Alajo

    2010-05-01

    This work addresses the neutronic performance and criticality safety issues of transport casks for fuel pertaining to low conversion ratio sodium cooled fast reactors, conventionally known as Advanced Burner Reactors. The criticality of a one, three, seven and 19-assembly cask capacity is presented. Both dry “helium” and flooded “water” filled casks are considered. No credit for fuel burnup or fission products was assumed. As many as possible of the conservatisms used in licensing light water reactor universal transport casks were incorporated into this SFR cask criticality design and analysis. It was found that at 7-assemblies or more, adding moderator to the SFR cask increases criticality margin. Also, removal of MAs from the fuel increases criticality margin of dry casks and takes a slight amount of margin away for wet casks. Assuming credit for borated fuel tube liners, this design analysis suggests that as many as 19 assemblies can be loaded in a cask if limited purely by criticality safety. If no credit for boron is assumed, the cask could possibly hold seven assemblies if low conversion ratio fast reactor grade fuel and not breeder reactor grade fuel is assumed. The analysis showed that there is a need for new cask designs for fast reactors spent fuel transportation. There is a potential of modifying existing transportation cask design as the starting point for fast reactor spent fuel transportation.

  11. Implications of Fast Reactor Transuranic Conversion Ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Steven J. Piet; Edward A. Hoffman; Samuel E. Bays

    2010-11-01

    Theoretically, the transuranic conversion ratio (CR), i.e. the transuranic production divided by transuranic destruction, in a fast reactor can range from near zero to about 1.9, which is the average neutron yield from Pu239 minus 1. In practice, the possible range will be somewhat less. We have studied the implications of transuranic conversion ratio of 0.0 to 1.7 using the fresh and discharge fuel compositions calculated elsewhere. The corresponding fissile breeding ratio ranges from 0.2 to 1.6. The cases below CR=1 (“burners”) do not have blankets; the cases above CR=1 (“breeders”) have breeding blankets. The burnup was allowed to float while holding the maximum fluence to the cladding constant. We graph the fuel burnup and composition change. As a function of transuranic conversion ratio, we calculate and graph the heat, gamma, and neutron emission of fresh fuel; whether the material is “attractive” for direct weapon use using published criteria; the uranium utilization and rate of consumption of natural uranium; and the long-term radiotoxicity after fuel discharge. For context, other cases and analyses are included, primarily once-through light water reactor (LWR) uranium oxide fuel at 51 MWth-day/kg-iHM burnup (UOX-51). For CR<1, the heat, gamma, and neutron emission increase as material is recycled. The uranium utilization is at or below 1%, just as it is in thermal reactors as both types of reactors require continuing fissile support. For CR>1, heat, gamma, and neutron emission decrease with recycling. The uranium utilization exceeds 1%, especially as all the transuranic elements are recycled. exceeds 1%, especially as all the transuranic elements are recycled. At the system equilibrium, heat and gamma vary by somewhat over an order of magnitude as a function of CR. Isotopes that dominate heat and gamma emission are scattered throughout the actinide chain, so the modest impact of CR is unsurprising. Neutron emitters are preferentially found

  12. Fast Spectrum Molten Salt Reactor Options

    SciTech Connect

    Gehin, Jess C; Holcomb, David Eugene; Flanagan, George F; Patton, Bruce W; Howard, Rob L; Harrison, Thomas J

    2011-07-01

    During 2010, fast-spectrum molten-salt reactors (FS-MSRs) were selected as a transformational reactor concept for light-water reactor (LWR)-derived heavy actinide disposition by the Department of Energy-Nuclear Energy Advanced Reactor Concepts (ARC) program and were the subject of a preliminary scoping investigation. Much of the reactor description information presented in this report derives from the preliminary studies performed for the ARC project. This report, however, has a somewhat broader scope-providing a conceptual overview of the characteristics and design options for FS-MSRs. It does not present in-depth evaluation of any FS-MSR particular characteristic, but instead provides an overview of all of the major reactor system technologies and characteristics, including the technology developments since the end of major molten salt reactor (MSR) development efforts in the 1970s. This report first presents a historical overview of the FS-MSR technology and describes the innovative characteristics of an FS-MSR. Next, it provides an overview of possible reactor configurations. The following design features/options and performance considerations are described including: (1) reactor salt options-both chloride and fluoride salts; (2) the impact of changing the carrier salt and actinide concentration on conversion ratio; (3) the conversion ratio; (4) an overview of the fuel salt chemical processing; (5) potential power cycles and hydrogen production options; and (6) overview of the performance characteristics of FS-MSRs, including general comparative metrics with LWRs. The conceptual-level evaluation includes resource sustainability, proliferation resistance, economics, and safety. The report concludes with a description of the work necessary to begin more detailed evaluation of FS-MSRs as a realistic reactor and fuel cycle option.

  13. Advanced methods comparisons of reaction rates in the Purdue Fast Breeder Blanket Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, R.N.; Ott, K.O.

    1988-01-01

    A review of worldwide results revealed that reaction rates in the blanket region are generally underpredicted with the discrepancy increasing with penetration; however, these results vary widely. Experiments in the large uniform Purdue Fast Breeder Blanket Facility (FBBF) blanket yield an accurate quantification of this discrepancy. Using standard production code methods (diffusion theory with 50 group cross sections), a consistent Calculated/Experimental (C/E) drop-off was observed for various reaction rates. A 50% increase in the calculated results at the outer edge of the blanket is necessary for agreement with experiments. The usefulness of refined group constant generation utilizing specialized weighting spectra and transport theory methods in correcting this discrepancy was analyzed. Refined group constants reduce the discrepancy to half that observed using the standard method. The surprising result was that transport methods had no effect on the blanket deviations; thus, transport theory considerations do not constitute or even contribute to an explanation of the blanket discrepancies. The residual blanket C/E drop-off (about half the standard drop-off) using advanced methods must be caused by some approximations which are applied in all current methods. 27 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Cost/performance comparison between pulse columns and centrifugal contactors designed to process Clinch River Breeder Reactor fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Ciucci, J.A. Jr.

    1983-12-01

    A comparison between pulse columns and centrifugal contactors was made to determine which type of equipment was more advantageous for use in the primary decontamination cycle of a remotely operated fuel reprocessing plant. Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) fuel was chosen as the fuel to be processed in the proposed 1 metric tonne/day reprocessing facility. The pulse columns and centrifugal contactors were compared on a performance and total cost basis. From this comparison, either the pulse columns or the centrifugal contactors will be recommended for use in a fuel reprocessing plant built to reprocess CRBR fuel. The reliability, solvent exposure to radiation, required time to reach steady state, and the total costs were the primary areas of concern for the comparison. The pulse column units were determined to be more reliable than the centrifugal contactors. When a centrifugal contactor motor fails, it can be remotely changed in less than one eight hour shift. Pulse columns expose the solvent to approximately five times as much radiation dose as the centrifugal contactor units; however, the proposed solvent recovery system adequately cleans the solvent for either case. The time required for pulse columns to reach steady state is many times longer than the time required for centrifugal contactors to reach steady state. The cost comparison between the two types of contacting equipment resulted in centrifugal contactors costing 85% of the total cost of pulse columns when the contactors were stacked on three levels in the module. If the centrifugal contactors were all positioned on the top level of a module with the unoccupied volume in the module occupied by other equipment, the centrifugal contactors cost is 66% of the total cost of pulse columns. Based on these results, centrifugal contactors are recommended for use in a remotely operated reprocessing plant built to reprocess CRBR fuel.

  15. Sodium fast reactor evaluation: Core materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheon, Jin Sik; Lee, Chan Bock; Lee, Byoung Oon; Raison, J. P.; Mizuno, T.; Delage, F.; Carmack, J.

    2009-07-01

    In the framework of the Generation IV Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR) Program the Advanced Fuel Project has conducted an evaluation of the available fuel systems supporting future sodium cooled fast reactors. In this paper the status of available and developmental materials for SFR core cladding and duct applications is reviewed. To satisfy the Generation IV SFR fuel requirements, an advanced cladding needs to be developed. The candidate cladding materials are austenitic steels, ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steels, and oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels. A large amount of irradiation testing is required, and the compatibility of cladding with TRU-loaded fuel at high temperatures and high burnup must be investigated. The more promising F/M steels (compared to HT9) might be able to meet the dose requirements of over 200 dpa for ducts in the GEN-IV SFR systems.

  16. The impact of spectral effects in fast reactors on data analysis and development of fission-fusion correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, L.R.; Garner, F.A.; Heinisch, H.L.

    1991-11-01

    Models describing the production of freely migrating defects (FMD) during neutron irradiations were applied to materials studies in fast reactors, where neutron spectral effects have been largely ignored. Calculations for the Experimental Breeder Reactor 2 (EBR-2) and the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) show that effects of spectral differences between in-core and out-of-core positions are significantly larger on the basis of freely migrating defects than on the basis of dpa. As an example, data on swelling behavior measured both in-core and out-of-core in EBR-2 show nearly a linear dependence on FMD production but not on dpa.

  17. Occurence and prediction of sigma phase in fuel cladding alloys for breeder reactors. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Anantatmula, R.P.

    1982-01-01

    In sodium-cooled fast reactor systems, fuel cladding materials will be exposed for several thousand hours to liquid sodium. Satisfactory performance of the materials depends in part on the sodium compatibility and phase stability of the materials. This paper mainly deals with the phase stability aspect, with particular emphasis on sigma phase formation of the cladding materials upon extended exposures to liquid sodium. A new method of predicting sigma phase formation is proposed for austenitic stainless steels and predictions are compared with the experimental results on fuel cladding materials. Excellent agreement is obtained between theory and experiment. The new method is different from the empirical methods suggested for superalloys and does not suffer from the same drawbacks. The present method uses the Fe-Cr-Ni ternary phase diagram for predicting the sigma-forming tendencies and exhibits a wide range of applicability to austenitic stainless steels and heat-resistant Fe-Cr-Ni alloys.

  18. Systems design of direct-cycle supercritical-water-cooled fast reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Oka, Yoshiaki; Koshizuka, Seiichi; Jevremovic, Tatjana; Okano, Yashushi

    1995-01-01

    The system design of a direct-cycle supercritical-water-cooled fast reactor is presented. The supercritical water does not exhibit a change of phase. the recirculation system, steam separator, and dryer of a boiling water reactor (BWR) are unnecessary. Roughly speaking, the reactor pressure vessel and control rods are similar to those of a pressurized water reactor, the containment and emergency core cooling system are similar to a BWR, and the balance of plant is similar to a supercritical-pressure fossil-fired power plant (FPP). the electric power of the fast converter is 1,508 MW(electric). The number of coolant loops is only two because of the high coolant enthalpy. Containment volume is much reduced. The thermal efficiency is improved 24% over a BWR. The coolant void reactivity is negative by placing thin zirconium-hydride layers between seeds and blankets. The power costs would be much reduced compared with those of a light water reactor (LWR) and a liquid-metal fast breeder reactor. The concept is based on the huge amount of experience with the water coolant technology of LWRs and FPPs. The oxidation of stainless steel cladding is avoided by adopting a much lower coolant temperature than that of the FPP.

  19. Behavior of 241Am in fast reactor systems - a safeguards perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Beddingfield, David H; Lafleur, Adrienne M

    2009-01-01

    Advanced fuel-cycle developments around the world currently under development are exploring the possibility of disposing of {sup 241}Am from spent fuel recycle processes by burning this material in fast reactors. For safeguards practitioners, this approach could potentially complicate both fresh- and spent-fuel safeguards measurements. The increased ({alpha},n) production in oxide fuels from the {sup 241}Am increases the uncertainty in coincidence assay of Pu in MOX assemblies and will require additional information to make use of totals-based neutron assay of these assemblies. We have studied the behavior of {sup 241}Am-bearing MOX fuel in the fast reactor system and the effect on neutron and gamma-ray source-terms for safeguards measurements. In this paper, we will present the results of simulations of the behavior of {sup 241}Am in a fast breeder reactor system. Because of the increased use of MOX fuel in thermal reactors and advances in fuel-cycle designs aimed at americium disposal in fast reactors, we have undertaken a brief study of the behavior of americium in these systems to better understand the safeguards impacts of these new approaches. In this paper we will examine the behavior of {sup 241}Am in a variety of nuclear systems to provide insight into the safeguards implications of proposed Am disposition schemes.

  20. Risk Management for Sodium Fast Reactors.

    SciTech Connect

    Denman, Matthew R.; Groth, Katrina; Cardoni, Jeffrey N.; Wheeler, Timothy A.

    2015-01-01

    Accident management is an important component to maintaining risk at acceptable levels for all complex systems, such as nuclear power plants. With the introduction of self - correcting, or inherently safe, reactor designs the focus has shifted from management by operators to allowing the syste m's design to manage the accident. While inherently and passively safe designs are laudable, extreme boundary conditions can interfere with the design attributes which facilitate inherent safety , thus resulting in unanticipated and undesirable end states. This report examines an inherently safe and small sodium fast reactor experiencing a beyond design basis seismic event with the intend of exploring two issues : (1) can human intervention either improve or worsen the potential end states and (2) can a Bayes ian Network be constructed to infer the state of the reactor to inform (1). ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The author s would like to acknowledge the U.S. Department of E nergy's Office of Nuclear Energy for funding this research through Work Package SR - 14SN100303 under the Advanced Reactor Concepts program. The authors also acknowledge the PRA teams at A rgonne N ational L aborator y , O ak R idge N ational L aborator y , and I daho N ational L aborator y for their continue d contributions to the advanced reactor PRA mission area.

  1. End-of-life irradiation performance of core structural components in the Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, J.C.; Smith, B.C.

    1991-12-31

    Nondestructive and destructive end-of-life examinations of Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) core structural components were performed following operation in the Shippingport Atomic Power Station for 29,047 effective full power hours. The Shippingport LWBR demonstrated that breeding can be achieved in a light water reactor with thorium and uranium-233 oxide fuel pellets contained in Zircaloy-4 tubes. The purpose of this presentation is to report results of LWBR core structural component examinations that were carried out to assess the effects of irradiation on support structure and to provide a data base for the evaluation of design procedures. The postirradiation nondestructive examinations included visual inspection and, in some cases, dye penetrant testing to assess structural integrity and surface conditions of the components. Destructive metallography was performed to assess cracking, corrosion buildup, and microstructural condition.

  2. Update of cost information contained in a previous GAO report on specific aspects of the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-06-26

    As part of our June 23, 1977, report, the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA)--now part of the Department of Energy (DOE)--provided us with some cost and schedule information for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Project as it related to three different licensing cases. At the time, the administration was attempting to terminate the Clinch River Project. And then, as now, it was a topic of heated debate within the Congress and between the Congress and the executive branch. Consequently, it was against this backdrop that we asked ERDA officials to provide us with specific cost and schedule data for the Clinch River Project, assuming it would be terminated and then restarted about 4 months later, after the Congress had an opportunity to fully consider whether to go ahead with the entire breeder reactor program. At the time, we used the 4-month lapse as an estimate that would provide an indication of the impact the project termination would have on the Clinch River Project's cost and schedule.

  3. The integral fast reactor and its role in a new generation of nuclear power plants, Tokai, Japan, November 19-21, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.R.

    1986-01-01

    This report presents information on the Integral Fast Reactor and its role in the future. Information is presented in the areas of: inherent safety; other virtues of sodium-cooled breeder; and solving LWR fuel cycle problems with IFR technologies. (JDB)

  4. The long-term future for civilian nuclear power generation in France: The case for breeder reactors. Breeder reactors: The physical and physical chemistry parameters, associate material thermodynamics and mechanical engineering: Novelties and issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dautray, Robert

    2011-06-01

    The author firstly gives a summary overview of the knowledge base acquired since the first breeder reactors became operational in the 1950s. "Neutronics", thermal phenomena, reactor core cooling, various coolants used and envisioned for this function, fuel fabrication from separated materials, main equipment (pumps, valves, taps, waste cock, safety circuits, heat exchange units, etc.) have now attained maturity, sufficient to implement sodium cooling circuits. Notwithstanding, the use of metallic sodium still raises certain severe questions in terms of safe handling (i.e. inflammability) and other important security considerations. The structural components, both inside the reactor core and outside (i.e. heat exchange devices) are undergoing in-depth research so as to last longer. The fuel cycle, notably the refabrication of fuel elements and fertile elements, the case of transuranic elements, etc., call for studies into radiation induced phenomena, chemistry separation, separate or otherwise treatments for materials that have different radioactive, physical, thermodynamical, chemical and biological properties. The concerns that surround the definitive disposal of certain radioactive wastes could be qualitatively improved with respect to the pressurized water reactors (PWRs) in service today. Lastly, the author notes that breeder reactors eliminate the need for an isotope separation facility, and this constitutes a significant contribution to contain nuclear proliferation. Among the priorities for a fully operational system (power station - the fuel cycle - operation-maintenance - the spent fuel pool and its cooling system-emergency cooling system-emergency electric power-transportation movements-equipment handling - final disposal of radioactive matter, independent safety barriers), the author includes materials (fabrication of targets, an irradiation and inspection instrument), the chemistry of all sorting processes, equipment "refabrication" or rehabilitation

  5. Fast Reactor Alternative Studies: Effects of Transuranic Groupings on Metal and Oxide Sodium Fast Reactor Designs

    SciTech Connect

    R. Ferrer; M. Asgari; S. Bays; B. Forget

    2007-09-01

    A 1000 MWth commercial-scale Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR) design with a conversion ratio (CR) of 0.50 was selected in this study to perform perturbations on the external feed coming from Light Water Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel (LWR SNF) and separation groupings in the reprocessing scheme. A secondary SFR design with a higher conversion ratio (CR=0.75) was also analyzed as a possible alternative, although no perturbations were applied to this model.

  6. Fast critical experiment data for space reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, P.J.; McFarlane, H.F.; Olsen, D.N.; Atkinson, C.A.; Ross, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    Data from a number of previous critical experiments exist that are relevant to the design concepts being considered for SP-100 and MMW space reactors. Although substantial improvements in experiment techniques have since made some of the measured quantities somewhat suspect, the basic criticality data are still useful in most cases. However, the old experiments require recalculation with modern computational methods and nuclear cross section data before they can be applied to today's designs. Recently, we have calculated about 20 fast benchmark critical experiments with the latest ENDF/B data and modern transport codes. These calculations were undertaken as a part of the planning process for a new series of benchmark experiments aimed at supporting preliminary designs of SP-100 and MMW space reactors.

  7. Fuel systems for compact fast space reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, C.M.; Dutt, D.S.; Karnesky, R.A.

    1983-12-01

    About 200 refractory metal clad ceramic fuel pins have been irradiated in thermal reactors under the 1200 K to 1550 K cladding temperature conditions of primary relevance to space reactors. This paper reviews performance with respect to fissile atom density, operating temperatures, fuel swelling, fission gas release, fuel-cladding compatibility, and consequences of failure. It was concluded that UO/sub 2/ and UN fuels show approximately equal performance potential and that UC fuel has lesser potential. W/Re alloys have performed quite well as cladding materials, and Ta, Nb, and Mo/Re alloys, in conjunction with W diffusion barriers, show good promise. Significant issues to be addressed in the future include high burnup swelling of UN, effects of UO/sub 2/-Li coolant reaction in the event of fuel pin failure, and development of an irradiation performance data base with prototypically configured fuel pins irradiated in a fast neutron flux.

  8. Integral Fast Reactor fuel pin processor

    SciTech Connect

    Levinskas, D.

    1993-03-01

    This report discusses the pin processor which receives metal alloy pins cast from recycled Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuel and prepares them for assembly into new IFR fuel elements. Either full length as-cast or precut pins are fed to the machine from a magazine, cut if necessary, and measured for length, weight, diameter and deviation from straightness. Accepted pins are loaded into cladding jackets located in a magazine, while rejects and cutting scraps are separated into trays. The magazines, trays, and the individual modules that perform the different machine functions are assembled and removed using remote manipulators and master-slaves.

  9. Integral Fast Reactor fuel pin processor

    SciTech Connect

    Levinskas, D.

    1993-01-01

    This report discusses the pin processor which receives metal alloy pins cast from recycled Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuel and prepares them for assembly into new IFR fuel elements. Either full length as-cast or precut pins are fed to the machine from a magazine, cut if necessary, and measured for length, weight, diameter and deviation from straightness. Accepted pins are loaded into cladding jackets located in a magazine, while rejects and cutting scraps are separated into trays. The magazines, trays, and the individual modules that perform the different machine functions are assembled and removed using remote manipulators and master-slaves.

  10. Actinide management with commercial fast reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Ohki, Shigeo

    2015-12-31

    The capability of plutonium-breeding and minor-actinide (MA) transmutation in the Japanese commercial sodium-cooled fast reactor offers one of practical solutions for obtaining sustainable energy resources as well as reducing radioactive toxicity and inventory. The reference core design meets the requirement of flexible breeding ratio from 1.03 to 1.2. The MA transmutation amount has been evaluated as 50-100 kg/GW{sub e}y if the MA content in fresh fuel is 3-5 wt%, where about 30-40% of initial MA can be transmuted in the discharged fuel.

  11. Actinide management with commercial fast reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohki, Shigeo

    2015-12-01

    The capability of plutonium-breeding and minor-actinide (MA) transmutation in the Japanese commercial sodium-cooled fast reactor offers one of practical solutions for obtaining sustainable energy resources as well as reducing radioactive toxicity and inventory. The reference core design meets the requirement of flexible breeding ratio from 1.03 to 1.2. The MA transmutation amount has been evaluated as 50-100 kg/GWey if the MA content in fresh fuel is 3-5 wt%, where about 30-40% of initial MA can be transmuted in the discharged fuel.

  12. Time dependent non-extinction probability for fast burst reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregson, Michael W.

    Sandia National Laboratories has successfully operated fast burst reactors over the past four decades. Fast burst reactors refer to a type of reactor that is able to achieve intense neutron pulses in very short periods of time using fissile material. Typically these systems are comprised of enriched metallic uranium fuel. During operation of a fast burst reactor, a phenomena known as a pre-initiation has been known to take place. A pre-initiation occurs when the neutron population exceeds some fiducial prior to achieving the final reactivity state in a pulse operation. Reactivity is determined from the physical configuration of the reactor and governs the average neutron population behavior. The purpose of this study is to examine the probability of initiation (or the pre-initiation probability) for a fast burst type of system, with emphasis on the Sandia Pulse Reactor-III (SPR-III) for physics parameters. The magnitude of the pre-initiation problem for SPR-III was examined to establish the magnitude of the phenomena. This work focuses on developing and numerically solving an equation that describes the nonextinction probability in a prompt critical assembly when the population is so low that it deviates from the average behavior. A zero dimensional (0-D) model is derived to describe the neutron non-extinction probability in a system where the reactivity is changing as a function of time. Analytical solutions to the model are provided where solutions could be found. Numerical solutions were obtained for a variety of cases applicable to fast burst reactor operation. Use of 0-D Monte Carlo techniques is also presented as a means to examine the low population stochastic behavior and for comparison to the deterministic solution. The 1-D time dependent equation for slab geometry was evaluated to highlight the importance of neutron leakage. The non-extinction probability equation was solved using a modified form of the standard fixed point iteration method. Other

  13. Supercritical CO2 direct cycle Gas Fast Reactor (SC-GFR) concept.

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Steven Alan; Parma, Edward J., Jr.; Suo-Anttila, Ahti Jorma; Al Rashdan, Ahmad; Tsvetkov, Pavel Valeryevich; Vernon, Milton E.; Fleming, Darryn D.; Rochau, Gary Eugene

    2011-05-01

    This report describes the supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) direct cycle gas fast reactor (SC-GFR) concept. The SC-GFR reactor concept was developed to determine the feasibility of a right size reactor (RSR) type concept using S-CO{sub 2} as the working fluid in a direct cycle fast reactor. Scoping analyses were performed for a 200 to 400 MWth reactor and an S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle. Although a significant amount of work is still required, this type of reactor concept maintains some potentially significant advantages over ideal gas-cooled systems and liquid metal-cooled systems. The analyses presented in this report show that a relatively small long-life reactor core could be developed that maintains decay heat removal by natural circulation. The concept is based largely on the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) commercial power plants operated in the United Kingdom and other GFR concepts.

  14. A resting bottom sodium cooled fast reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Costes, D.

    2012-07-01

    This follows ICAPP 2011 paper 11059 'Fast Reactor with a Cold Bottom Vessel', on sodium cooled reactor vessels in thermal gradient, resting on soil. Sodium is frozen on vessel bottom plate, temperature increasing to the top. The vault cover rests on the safety vessel, the core diagrid welded to a toric collector forms a slab, supported by skirts resting on the bottom plate. Intermediate exchangers and pumps, fixed on the cover, plunge on the collector. At the vessel top, a skirt hanging from the cover plunges into sodium, leaving a thin circular slit partially filled by sodium covered by argon, providing leak-tightness and allowing vessel dilatation, as well as a radial relative holding due to sodium inertia. No 'air conditioning' at 400 deg. C is needed as for hanging vessels, and this allows a large economy. The sodium volume below the slab contains isolating refractory elements, stopping a hypothetical corium flow. The small gas volume around the vessel limits any LOCA. The liner cooling system of the concrete safety vessel may contribute to reactor cooling. The cold resting bottom vessel, proposed by the author for many years, could avoid the complete visual inspection required for hanging vessels. However, a double vessel, containing support skirts, would allow introduction of inspecting devices. Stress limiting thermal gradient is obtained by filling secondary sodium in the intermediate space. (authors)

  15. PLUTONIUM METALLIC FUELS FOR FAST REACTORS

    SciTech Connect

    STAN, MARIUS; HECKER, SIEGFRIED S.

    2007-02-07

    Early interest in metallic plutonium fuels for fast reactors led to much research on plutonium alloy systems including binary solid solutions with the addition of aluminum, gallium, or zirconium and low-melting eutectic alloys with iron and nickel or cobalt. There was also interest in ternaries of these elements with plutonium and cerium. The solid solution and eutectic alloys have most unusual properties, including negative thermal expansion in some solid-solution alloys and the highest viscosity known for liquid metals in the Pu-Fe system. Although metallic fuels have many potential advantages over ceramic fuels, the early attempts were unsuccessful because these fuels suffered from high swelling rates during burn up and high smearing densities. The liquid metal fuels experienced excessive corrosion. Subsequent work on higher-melting U-PuZr metallic fuels was much more promising. In light of the recent rebirth of interest in fast reactors, we review some of the key properties of the early fuels and discuss the challenges presented by the ternary alloys.

  16. Computerized operating procedures for shearing and dissolution of segments from LWBR (Light Water Breeder Reactor) fuel rods

    SciTech Connect

    Osudar, J.; Deeken, P.G.; Graczyk, D.G.; Fagan, J.E.; Martino, F.J.; Parks, J.E.; Levitz, N.M.; Kessie, R.W.; Leddin, J.M.

    1987-05-01

    This report presents two detailed computerized operating procedures developed to assist and control the shearing and dissolution of irradiated fuel rods. The procedures were employed in the destructive analysis of end-of-life fuel rods from the Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) that was designed by the Westinghouse Electric Corporation Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory. Seventeen entire fuel rods from the end-of-life core of the LWBR were sheared into 169 precisely characterized segments, and more than 150 of these segments were dissolved during execution of the LWBR Proof-of-Breeding (LWBR-POB) Analytical Support Project at Argonne National Laboratory. The procedures illustrate our approaches to process monitoring, data reduction, and quality assurance during the LWBR-POB work.

  17. Modeling and analysis of the unprotected loss-of-flow accident in the Clinch River Breeder Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, E.E.; Dunn, F.E.; Simms, R.; Gruber, E.E.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of fission-gas-driven fuel compaction on the energetics resulting from a loss-of-flow accident was estimated with the aid of the SAS3D accident analysis code. The analysis was carried out as part of the Clinch River Breeder Reactor licensing process. The TREAT tests L6, L7, and R8 were analyzed to assist in the modeling of fuel motion and the effects of plenum fission-gas release on coolant and clad dynamics. Special, conservative modeling was introduced to evaluate the effect of fission-gas pressure on the motion of the upper fuel pin segment following disruption. For the nominal sodium-void worth, fission-gas-driven fuel compaction did not adversely affect the outcome of the transient. When uncertainties in the sodium-void worth were considered, however, it was found that if fuel compaction occurs, loss-of-flow driven transient overpower phenomenology could not be precluded.

  18. A US perspective on fast reactor fuel fabrication technology and experience part I: metal fuels and assembly design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkes, Douglas E.; Fielding, Randall S.; Porter, Douglas L.; Crawford, Douglas C.; Meyer, Mitchell K.

    2009-06-01

    This paper is part I of a review focusing on the United States experience with metallic fast reactor fuel fabrication and assembly design for the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) and the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). Experience with metal fuel fabrication in the United States is extensive, including over 60 years of research conducted by the government, national laboratories, industry, and academia. This experience has culminated in a considerable amount of research that resulted in significant improvements to the technologies employed to fabricate metallic fast reactor fuel. This part of the review documents the current state of fuel fabrication technologies for metallic fuels, some of the challenges faced by previous researchers, and how these were overcome. Knowledge gained from reviewing previous investigations will aid both researchers and policy makers in forming future decisions relating to nuclear fuel fabrication technologies.

  19. LFR "Lead-Cooled Fast Reactor"

    SciTech Connect

    Cinotti, L; Fazio, C; Knebel, J; Monti, S; Abderrahim, H A; Smith, C; Suh, K

    2006-05-11

    The main purpose of this paper is to present the current status of development of the Lead-cooled Fast Reactor (LFR) in Generation IV (GEN IV), including the European contribution, to identify needed R&D and to present the corresponding GEN IV International Forum (GIF) R&D plan [1] to support the future development and deployment of lead-cooled fast reactors. The approach of the GIF plan is to consider the research priorities of each member country in proposing an integrated, coordinated R&D program to achieve common objectives, while avoiding duplication of effort. The integrated plan recognizes two principal technology tracks: (1) a small, transportable system of 10-100 MWe size that features a very long refuelling interval, and (2) a larger-sized system rated at about 600 MWe, intended for central station power generation. This paper provides some details of the important European contributions to the development of the LFR. Sixteen European organizations have, in fact, taken the initiative to present to the European Commission the proposal for a Specific Targeted Research and Training Project (STREP) devoted to the development of a European Lead-cooled System, known as the ELSY project; two additional organizations from the US and Korea have joined the project. Consequently, ELSY will constitute the reference system for the large lead-cooled reactor of GEN IV. The ELSY project aims to demonstrate the feasibility of designing a competitive and safe fast power reactor based on simple technical engineered features that achieves all of the GEN IV goals and gives assurance of investment protection. As far as new technology development is concerned, only a limited amount of R&D will be conducted in the initial phase of the ELSY project since the first priority is to define the design guidelines before launching a larger and expensive specific R&D program. In addition, the ELSY project is expected to benefit greatly from ongoing lead and lead-alloy technology

  20. Validation Work to Support the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Calculational Burnup Methodology Using Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) Spent Fuel Assay Data

    SciTech Connect

    J. W. Sterbentz

    1999-08-01

    Six uranium isotopes and fourteen fission product isotopes were calculated on a mass basis at end-of-life (EOL) conditions for three fuel rods from different Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) measurements. The three fuel rods evaluated here were taken from an LWBR seed module, a standard blanket module, and a reflector (Type IV) module. The calculated results were derived using a depletion methodology previously employed to evaluate many of the radionuclide inventories for spent nuclear fuels at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The primary goal of the calculational task was to further support the validation of this particular calculational methodology and its application to diverse reactor types and fuels. Result comparisons between the calculated and measured mass concentrations in the three rods indicate good agreement for the three major uranium isotopes (U-233, U-234, U-235) with differences of less than 20%. For the seed and standard blanket rod, the U-233 and U-234 differences were within 5% of the measured values (these two isotopes alone represent greater than 97% of the EOL total uranium mass). For the major krypton and xenon fission product isotopes, differences of less than 20% and less than 30% were observed, respectively. In general, good agreement was obtained for nearly all the measured isotopes. For these isotopes exhibiting significant differences, possible explanations are discussed in terms of measurement uncertainty, complex transmutations, etc.

  1. Building on knowledge base of sodium cooled fast spectrum reactors to develop materials technology for fusion reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raj, Baldev; Rao, K. Bhanu Sankara

    2009-04-01

    The alloys 316L(N) and Mod. 9Cr-1Mo steel are the major structural materials for fabrication of structural components in sodium cooled fast reactors (SFRs). Various factors influencing the mechanical behaviour of these alloys and different modes of deformation and failure in SFR systems, their analysis and the simulated tests performed on components for assessment of structural integrity and the applicability of RCC-MR code for the design and validation of components are highlighted. The procedures followed for optimal design of die and punch for the near net shape forming of petals of main vessel of 500 MWe prototype fast breeder reactor (PFBR); the safe temperature and strain rate domains established using dynamic materials model for forming of 316L(N) and 9Cr-1Mo steels components by various industrial processes are illustrated. Weldability problems associated with 316L(N) and Mo. 9Cr-1Mo are briefly discussed. The utilization of artificial neural network models for prediction of creep rupture life and delta-ferrite in austenitic stainless steel welds is described. The usage of non-destructive examination techniques in characterization of deformation, fracture and various microstructural features in SFR materials is briefly discussed. Most of the experience gained on SFR systems could be utilized in developing science and technology for fusion reactors. Summary of the current status of knowledge on various aspects of fission and fusion systems with emphasis on cross fertilization of research is presented.

  2. Direct Energy Conversion for Fast Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, N.; Cooper, J.; Vogt, D.; Chapline, G.; Turchi, P.; Barbee Jr., T.; Farmer, J.

    2000-07-01

    Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI), should improve the speed and decrease the cost of developing new TEGs. The system concept to be evaluated is shown in Figure 1. Liquid metal is used to transport heat away from the nuclear heat source and to the TEG. Air or liquid (water or a liquid metal) is used to transport heat away from the cold side of the TEG. Typical reactor coolants include sodium or eutectic mixtures of lead-bismuth. These are coolants that have been used to cool fast neutron reactors. Heat from the liquid metal coolant is rejected through the thermal electric materials, thereby producing electrical power directly. The temperature gradient could extend from as high as 1300 K to 300 K, although fast reactor structural materials (including those used to clad the fuel) currently used limit the high temperature to about 825K.

  3. The Industrial Sodium Cooled Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Samuel E. Bays; Haihua Zhao; Hongbin Zhang

    2009-04-01

    This paper investigates the use of enrichment and moderator zoning methods for optimizing the r-z power distribution within sodium cooled fast reactors. These methods allow overall greater fuel utilization in the core resulting in more fuel being irradiated near the maximum allowed thermal power. The peak-to-average power density was held to 1.18. This core design, in conjunction with a multiple-reheat Brayton power conversion system, has merit for producing an industrial level of electrical output (2400MWth, 1000MWe) from a relatively compact core size. The total core radius, including reflectors and shields, was held to 1.78m. Preliminary safety analysis suggests that positive reactivity insertion resulting from a leak between the sodium primary loop and helium power conversion system can be mitigated using simple gas-liquid centripetal separation strategies in the plant’s primary loop.

  4. Advanced sodium fast reactor accident source terms :

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, Dana Auburn; Clement, Bernard; Denning, Richard; Ohno, Shuji; Zeyen, Roland

    2010-09-01

    An expert opinion elicitation has been used to evaluate phenomena that could affect releases of radionuclides during accidents at sodium-cooled fast reactors. The intent was to identify research needed to develop a mechanistic model of radionuclide release for licensing and risk assessment purposes. Experts from the USA, France, the European Union, and Japan identified phenomena that could affect the release of radionuclides under hypothesized accident conditions. They qualitatively evaluated the importance of these phenomena and the need for additional experimental research. The experts identified seven phenomena that are of high importance and have a high need for additional experimental research: High temperature release of radionuclides from fuel during an energetic event Energetic interactions between molten reactor fuel and sodium coolant and associated transfer of radionuclides from the fuel to the coolant Entrainment of fuel and sodium bond material during the depressurization of a fuel rod with breached cladding Rates of radionuclide leaching from fuel by liquid sodium Surface enrichment of sodium pools by dissolved and suspended radionuclides Thermal decomposition of sodium iodide in the containment atmosphere Reactions of iodine species in the containment to form volatile organic iodides. Other issues of high importance were identified that might merit further research as development of the mechanistic model of radionuclide release progressed.

  5. Spectral Shift Absorbers for Fast Spectrum Space Nuclear Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    King, Jeffrey C.; El-Genk, Mohamed S.

    2005-02-06

    The space nuclear reactors being considered to support the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO-1) mission-1 sometime in the next decade are compact and fast spectrum with void fractions ranging from 20-40%. In order to secure launch approval, it has to be demonstrated that these reactors will remain sufficiently subcritical when submerged in water or wet sand and subsequently flooded with water, following a launch abort accident. The resulting shift in the neutron spectrum towards thermal increases reactivity, potentially making the reactors supercritical. Incorporating 'Spectral Shift Absorbers' (or SSAs), elements such as boron, europium, gadolinium or rhenium, which have significantly higher absorption cross-sections for thermal versus fast neutrons, can offset the reactivity increase. It has always been the assumption that the worst-case submersion accident is with a fully flooded reactor; however, this work shows that, depending on the type and amount of SSA in the reactor, a submerged but unflooded reactor core could be more reactive, raising a safety concern. This condition, referred to as 'reactivity inversion', is investigated for the following SSA elements: boron, boron-10, samarium-149, europium, europium-151, gadolinium, gadolinium-155, gadolinium-157 and rhenium, by varying the ratio of SSA to fissile atoms in the reactor. The effect of placing a coating of SSA material on the outside of the reactor vessel is also investigated. Gadolinium-157 is the most effective SSA material investigated as a core additive, yielding the greatest increase in the safety worth of a submerged space reactor with a comparatively small decrease in excess reactivity. Samarium-149 yields a similar increase in safety worth, but with a much larger decrease in excess reactivity. Natural europium and gadolinium are also promising: however, the decrease in the excess reactivity is greater with europium than with gadolinium. Boron and boron-10 are not particularly attractive as core

  6. Spectral Shift Absorbers for Fast Spectrum Space Nuclear Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Jeffrey C.; El-Genk, Mohamed S.

    2005-02-01

    The space nuclear reactors being considered to support the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO-1) mission-1 sometime in the next decade are compact and fast spectrum with void fractions ranging from 20-40%. In order to secure launch approval, it has to be demonstrated that these reactors will remain sufficiently subcritical when submerged in water or wet sand and subsequently flooded with water, following a launch abort accident. The resulting shift in the neutron spectrum towards thermal increases reactivity, potentially making the reactors supercritical. Incorporating ``Spectral Shift Absorbers'' (or SSAs), elements such as boron, europium, gadolinium or rhenium, which have significantly higher absorption cross-sections for thermal versus fast neutrons, can offset the reactivity increase. It has always been the assumption that the worst-case submersion accident is with a fully flooded reactor; however, this work shows that, depending on the type and amount of SSA in the reactor, a submerged but unflooded reactor core could be more reactive, raising a safety concern. This condition, referred to as ``reactivity inversion'', is investigated for the following SSA elements: boron, boron-10, samarium-149, europium, europium-151, gadolinium, gadolinium-155, gadolinium-157 and rhenium, by varying the ratio of SSA to fissile atoms in the reactor. The effect of placing a coating of SSA material on the outside of the reactor vessel is also investigated. Gadolinium-157 is the most effective SSA material investigated as a core additive, yielding the greatest increase in the safety worth of a submerged space reactor with a comparatively small decrease in excess reactivity. Samarium-149 yields a similar increase in safety worth, but with a much larger decrease in excess reactivity. Natural europium and gadolinium are also promising: however, the decrease in the excess reactivity is greater with europium than with gadolinium. Boron and boron-10 are not particularly attractive as

  7. Enhancement of Irradiation Capability of the Experimental Fast Reactor Joyo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Shigetaka; Serine, Takashi; Aoyama, Takafumi; Suzuki, Soju

    2009-08-01

    The experimental fast reactor Joyo is the first sodium-cooled fast reactor in Japan. One of its primary missions is to perform irradiation tests of fuel and structural materials to support the development of fast reactors. The MK-III high performance core upgrade to enhance the irradiation testing capabilities was completed in 2003. In order to expand Joyo's capabilities for innovative irradiation testing applications, neutron spectrum tailoring, lower irradiation temperature, movable sample devices and fast neutron beam holes are being considered. This program responds to existing irradiation needs and aims to further expand capabilities for a variety of irradiation tests.

  8. Thermal breeder fuel enrichment zoning

    DOEpatents

    Capossela, Harry J.; Dwyer, Joseph R.; Luce, Robert G.; McCoy, Daniel F.; Merriman, Floyd C.

    1992-01-01

    A method and apparatus for improving the performance of a thermal breeder reactor having regions of higher than average moderator concentration are disclosed. The fuel modules of the reactor core contain at least two different types of fuel elements, a high enrichment fuel element and a low enrichment fuel element. The two types of fuel elements are arranged in the fuel module with the low enrichment fuel elements located between the high moderator regions and the high enrichment fuel elements. Preferably, shim rods made of a fertile material are provided in selective regions for controlling the reactivity of the reactor by movement of the shim rods into and out of the reactor core. The moderation of neutrons adjacent the high enrichment fuel elements is preferably minimized as by reducing the spacing of the high enrichment fuel elements and/or using a moderator having a reduced moderating effect.

  9. A fast spectrum dual path flow cermet reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Anghaie, S.; Feller, G.J. ); Peery, S.D.; Parsley, R.C. )

    1993-01-15

    A cermet fueled, dual path fast reactor for space nuclear propulsion applications is conceptually designed. The reactor utilizes an outer annulus core and an inner cylindrical core with radial and axial reflector. The dual path flow minimizes the impact of power peaking near the radial reflector. Basic neutronics and core design aspects of the reactor are discussed. The dual path reactor is integrated into a 25000 lbf thrust nuclear rocket.

  10. Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II): Instrumentation for core surveillance

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, L.J.

    1989-01-01

    EBR-II has operated for 25 years in support of several major programs. During this time period, several of the original, non-replaceable, flow sensors, RDT sensors and thermocouples have failed in the primary system. This has led to the development of new sensors and the use of calculated values using computer models of the plant. It is important for the next generation of LMR reactors to minimize or eliminate the use of non-replaceable sensors. EBR-II is perhaps the best modeled reactor in the world, thanks to a dedicated T-H analysis program. The success of this program relied on excellent measurements of temperature and flow in subassemblies in the core. The instrumented subassemblies of the XX series provided that measurement capability. From this test series, EBR-II calculations showed that the core could withstand a loss-of-flow without scram accident and a loss-of-heat sink without scram accident from full reactor power without core damage. From this, reactor designers can now design with confidence, inherently safe reactors. 11 refs., 8 figs.

  11. EXTENDING SODIUM FAST REACTOR DRIVER FUEL USE TO HIGHER TEMPERATURES

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas L. Porter

    2011-02-01

    Calculations of potential sodium-cooled fast reactor fuel temperatures were performed to estimate the effects of increasing the outlet temperature of a given fast reactor design by increasing pin power, decreasing assembly flow, or increasing inlet temperature. Based upon experience in the U.S., both metal and mixed oxide (MOX) fuel types are discussed in terms of potential performance effects created by the increased operating temperatures. Assembly outlet temperatures of 600, 650 and 700 °C were used as goal temperatures. Fuel/cladding chemical interaction (FCCI) and fuel melting, as well as challenges to the mechanical integrity of the cladding material, were identified as the limiting phenomena. For example, starting with a recent 1000 MWth fast reactor design, raising the outlet temperature to 650 °C through pin power increase increased the MOX centerline temperature to more than 3300 °C and the metal fuel peak cladding temperature to more than 700 °C. These exceeded limitations to fuel performance; fuel melting was limiting for MOX and FCCI for metal fuel. Both could be alleviated by design ‘fixes’, such as using a barrier inside the cladding to minimize FCCI in the metal fuel, or using annular fuel in the case of MOX. Both would also require an advanced cladding material with improved stress rupture properties. While some of these are costly, the benefits of having a high-temperature reactor which can support hydrogen production, or other missions requiring high process heat may make the extra costs justified.

  12. Fast and efficient charge breeding of the Californium rare isotope breeder upgrade electron beam ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostroumov, P. N.; Barcikowski, A.; Dickerson, C. A.; Perry, A.; Pikin, A. I.; Sharamentov, S. I.; Vondrasek, R. C.; Zinkann, G. P.

    2015-08-01

    The Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), developed to breed Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) radioactive beams at Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS), is being tested off-line. A unique property of the EBIS is a combination of short breeding times, high repetition rates, and a large acceptance. Overall, we have implemented many innovative features during the design and construction of the CARIBU EBIS as compared to the existing EBIS breeders. The off-line charge breeding tests are being performed using a surface ionization source that produces singly charged cesium ions. The main goal of the off-line commissioning is to demonstrate stable operation of the EBIS at a 10 Hz repetition rate and a breeding efficiency into single charge state higher than 15%. These goals have been successfully achieved and exceeded. We have measured (20% ± 0.7%) breeding efficiency into the single charge state of 28+ cesium ions with the breeding time of 28 ms. In general, the current CARIBU EBIS operational parameters can provide charge breeding of any ions in the full mass range of periodic table with high efficiency, short breeding times, and sufficiently low charge-to-mass ratio, 1/6.3 for the heaviest masses, for further acceleration in ATLAS. In this paper, we discuss the parameters of the EBIS and the charge breeding results in a pulsed injection mode with repetition rates up to 10 Hz.

  13. Fast and efficient charge breeding of the Californium rare isotope breeder upgrade electron beam ion source.

    PubMed

    Ostroumov, P N; Barcikowski, A; Dickerson, C A; Perry, A; Pikin, A I; Sharamentov, S I; Vondrasek, R C; Zinkann, G P

    2015-08-01

    The Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), developed to breed Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) radioactive beams at Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS), is being tested off-line. A unique property of the EBIS is a combination of short breeding times, high repetition rates, and a large acceptance. Overall, we have implemented many innovative features during the design and construction of the CARIBU EBIS as compared to the existing EBIS breeders. The off-line charge breeding tests are being performed using a surface ionization source that produces singly charged cesium ions. The main goal of the off-line commissioning is to demonstrate stable operation of the EBIS at a 10 Hz repetition rate and a breeding efficiency into single charge state higher than 15%. These goals have been successfully achieved and exceeded. We have measured (20% ± 0.7%) breeding efficiency into the single charge state of 28+ cesium ions with the breeding time of 28 ms. In general, the current CARIBU EBIS operational parameters can provide charge breeding of any ions in the full mass range of periodic table with high efficiency, short breeding times, and sufficiently low charge-to-mass ratio, 1/6.3 for the heaviest masses, for further acceleration in ATLAS. In this paper, we discuss the parameters of the EBIS and the charge breeding results in a pulsed injection mode with repetition rates up to 10 Hz.

  14. Fast and efficient charge breeding of the Californium rare isotope breeder upgrade electron beam ion source

    DOE PAGES

    Ostroumov, P. N.; Barcikowski, A.; Dickerson, C. A.; ...

    2015-08-28

    The Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), developed to breed Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) radioactive beams at Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS), is being tested off-line. A unique property of the EBIS is a combination of short breeding times, high repetition rates, and a large acceptance. Overall, we have implemented many innovative features during the design and construction of the CARIBU EBIS as compared to the existing EBIS breeders. The off-line charge breeding tests are being performed using a surface ionization source that produces singly charged cesium ions. The main goal of the off-line commissioning is to demonstratemore » stable operation of the EBIS at a 10 Hz repetition rate and a breeding efficiency into single charge state higher than 15%. These goals have been successfully achieved and exceeded. We have measured (20% ± 0.7%) breeding efficiency into the single charge state of 28+ cesium ions with the breeding time of 28 ms. In general, the current CARIBU EBIS operational parameters can provide charge breeding of any ions in the full mass range of periodic table with high efficiency, short breeding times, and sufficiently low charge-to-mass ratio, 1/6.3 for the heaviest masses, for further acceleration in ATLAS. In this study, we discuss the parameters of the EBIS and the charge breeding results in a pulsed injection mode with repetition rates up to 10 Hz.« less

  15. Fast and efficient charge breeding of the Californium rare isotope breeder upgrade electron beam ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Ostroumov, P. N. Barcikowski, A.; Dickerson, C. A.; Perry, A.; Sharamentov, S. I.; Vondrasek, R. C.; Zinkann, G. P.; Pikin, A. I.

    2015-08-15

    The Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), developed to breed Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) radioactive beams at Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS), is being tested off-line. A unique property of the EBIS is a combination of short breeding times, high repetition rates, and a large acceptance. Overall, we have implemented many innovative features during the design and construction of the CARIBU EBIS as compared to the existing EBIS breeders. The off-line charge breeding tests are being performed using a surface ionization source that produces singly charged cesium ions. The main goal of the off-line commissioning is to demonstrate stable operation of the EBIS at a 10 Hz repetition rate and a breeding efficiency into single charge state higher than 15%. These goals have been successfully achieved and exceeded. We have measured (20% ± 0.7%) breeding efficiency into the single charge state of 28+ cesium ions with the breeding time of 28 ms. In general, the current CARIBU EBIS operational parameters can provide charge breeding of any ions in the full mass range of periodic table with high efficiency, short breeding times, and sufficiently low charge-to-mass ratio, 1/6.3 for the heaviest masses, for further acceleration in ATLAS. In this paper, we discuss the parameters of the EBIS and the charge breeding results in a pulsed injection mode with repetition rates up to 10 Hz.

  16. Fast and efficient charge breeding of the Californium rare isotope breeder upgrade electron beam ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Ostroumov, P. N.; Barcikowski, A.; Dickerson, C. A.; Perry, A.; Pikin, A. I.; Sharamentov, S. I.; Vondrasek, R. C.; Zinkann, G. P.

    2015-08-28

    The Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), developed to breed Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) radioactive beams at Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS), is being tested off-line. A unique property of the EBIS is a combination of short breeding times, high repetition rates, and a large acceptance. Overall, we have implemented many innovative features during the design and construction of the CARIBU EBIS as compared to the existing EBIS breeders. The off-line charge breeding tests are being performed using a surface ionization source that produces singly charged cesium ions. The main goal of the off-line commissioning is to demonstrate stable operation of the EBIS at a 10 Hz repetition rate and a breeding efficiency into single charge state higher than 15%. These goals have been successfully achieved and exceeded. We have measured (20% ± 0.7%) breeding efficiency into the single charge state of 28+ cesium ions with the breeding time of 28 ms. In general, the current CARIBU EBIS operational parameters can provide charge breeding of any ions in the full mass range of periodic table with high efficiency, short breeding times, and sufficiently low charge-to-mass ratio, 1/6.3 for the heaviest masses, for further acceleration in ATLAS. In this study, we discuss the parameters of the EBIS and the charge breeding results in a pulsed injection mode with repetition rates up to 10 Hz.

  17. Material unaccounted for at the Southwest Experimental Fast Oxide Reactor: The SEFOR MUF

    SciTech Connect

    Higinbotham, W.A.

    1994-11-07

    The U.S. Atomic Energy Commission contracted with the General Electric Company to design, construct, and operate the Southwest Experimental Fast Oxide Reactor (SEFOR) to measure the Doppler effect for fast neutron breeder reactors. It contracted with Nuclear Fuel Services to fabricate the fuel rods for the reactor. When the reactor went critical in May, 1969, it appeared that some of the mixed uranium-plutonium oxide (MOX) fuel rods did not contain the specified quantity of plutonium. The SEFOR operators soon found several fuel rods which appeared to be low in plutonium. The safeguards group at Brookhaven was asked to look into the problem and, if possible, determine how much plutonium was missing from the unirradiated rods and from the larger number which had been slightly irradiated in the reactor. It was decided that the plutonium content of the unirradiated and irradiated rods could be measured relative to a reference rod using a high resolution gamma-ray detector and also by neutron measurements using an auto-correlation circuit recently developed at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). During the next two years, Brookhaven personnel and C.V. Strain of NRL made several trips to the SEFOR reactor. About 250 of the 775 rods were measured by two or more methods, using a sodium-iodide detector, a high-resolution germanium detector, a neutron detector, or the reactor (to measure reactivity). The research team concluded that 4.6 {+-} 0.46 kg of plutonium was missing out of the 433 kg that the rods should have contained. This report describes the SEFOR experiment and the procedures used to determine the material unaccounted for, or MUF.

  18. Mass tracking and material accounting in the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR)

    SciTech Connect

    Orechwa, Y.; Adams, C.H.; White, A.M.

    1991-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is a generic advanced liquid metal cooled reactor concept being developed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). There are a number of technical features of the IFR which contribute to its potential as a next-generation reactor. These are associated with large safety margins with regard to off-normal events involving the heat transport system, and the use of metallic fuel which makes possible the utilization of innovative fuel cycle processes. The latter feature permits fuel cycle closure the compact, low-cost reprocessing facilities, collocated with the reactor plant. These primary features are being demonstrated in the facilities at ANL-West, utilizing Experimental Breeder Reactor 2 and the associated Fuel Cycle Facility (FCF) as an IFR prototype. The demonstration of this IFR prototype includes the design and implementation of the Mass-Tracking System (MTG). In this system, data from the operations of the FCF, including weights and batch-process parameters, are collected and maintained by the MTG running on distributed workstations. The components of the MTG System include: (1) an Oracle database manager with a Fortran interface, (2) a set of MTG Tasks'' which collect, manipulate and report data, (3) a set of MTG Terminal Sessions'' which provide some interactive control of the Tasks, and (4) a set of servers which manage the Tasks and which provide the communications link between the MTG System and Operator Control Stations, which control process equipment and monitoring devices within the FCF.

  19. Conceptual design of laser fusion reactor KOYO-fast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomabechi, K.; Kozaki, Y.; Norimatsu, T.; Reactor Design Committee, Members Of

    2006-06-01

    A conceptual design of the laser fusion reactor KOYO-F based on the fast ignition scheme is reported including the target design, the laser system and the design for chamber. A Yb-YAG ceramic laser operated at 200K is the primary candidate for the compression laser and an OPCPA system is the one for the ignition laser. The chamber is basically a wet wall type but the fire position is vertically off-set to simplify the protection scheme of the ceiling. The target consists of foam insulated, cryogenic DT shells with a LiPb, reentrant guide-cone.

  20. A compact breed and burn fast reactor using spent nuclear fuel blanket

    SciTech Connect

    Hartanto, D.; Kim, Y.

    2012-07-01

    A long-life breed-and-burn (B and B) type fast reactor has been investigated from the neutronics points of view. The B and B reactor has the capability to breed the fissile fuels and use the bred fuel in situ in the same reactor. In this work, feasibility of a compact sodium-cooled B and B fast reactor using spent nuclear fuel as blanket material has been studied. In order to derive a compact B and B fast reactor, a tight fuel lattice and relatively large fuel pin are used to achieve high fuel volume fraction. The core is initially loaded with an LEU (Low Enriched Uranium) fuel and a metallic fuel is used in the core. The Monte Carlo depletion has been performed for the core to see the long-term behavior of the B and B reactor. Several important parameters such as reactivity coefficients, delayed neutron fraction, prompt neutron generation lifetime, fission power, and fast neutron fluence, are analyzed through Monte Carlo reactor analysis. Evolution of the core fuel composition is also analyzed as a function of burnup. Although the long-life small B and B fast reactor is found to be feasible from the neutronics point of view, it is characterized to have several challenging technical issues including a very high fast neutron fluence of the structural materials. (authors)

  1. Sodium fast reactor safety and licensing research plan. Volume II.

    SciTech Connect

    Ludewig, H.; Powers, D. A.; Hewson, John C.; LaChance, Jeffrey L.; Wright, A.; Phillips, J.; Zeyen, R.; Clement, B.; Garner, Frank; Walters, Leon; Wright, Steve; Ott, Larry J.; Suo-Anttila, Ahti Jorma; Denning, Richard; Ohshima, Hiroyuki; Ohno, S.; Miyhara, S.; Yacout, Abdellatif; Farmer, M.; Wade, D.; Grandy, C.; Schmidt, R.; Cahalen, J.; Olivier, Tara Jean; Budnitz, R.; Tobita, Yoshiharu; Serre, Frederic; Natesan, Ken; Carbajo, Juan J.; Jeong, Hae-Yong; Wigeland, Roald; Corradini, Michael; Thomas, Justin; Wei, Tom; Sofu, Tanju; Flanagan, George F.; Bari, R.; Porter D.; Lambert, J.; Hayes, S.; Sackett, J.; Denman, Matthew R.

    2012-05-01

    Expert panels comprised of subject matter experts identified at the U.S. National Laboratories (SNL, ANL, INL, ORNL, LBL, and BNL), universities (University of Wisconsin and Ohio State University), international agencies (IRSN, CEA, JAEA, KAERI, and JRC-IE) and private consultation companies (Radiation Effects Consulting) were assembled to perform a gap analysis for sodium fast reactor licensing. Expert-opinion elicitation was performed to qualitatively assess the current state of sodium fast reactor technologies. Five independent gap analyses were performed resulting in the following topical reports: (1) Accident Initiators and Sequences (i.e., Initiators/Sequences Technology Gap Analysis), (2) Sodium Technology Phenomena (i.e., Advanced Burner Reactor Sodium Technology Gap Analysis), (3) Fuels and Materials (i.e., Sodium Fast Reactor Fuels and Materials: Research Needs), (4) Source Term Characterization (i.e., Advanced Sodium Fast Reactor Accident Source Terms: Research Needs), and (5) Computer Codes and Models (i.e., Sodium Fast Reactor Gaps Analysis of Computer Codes and Models for Accident Analysis and Reactor Safety). Volume II of the Sodium Research Plan consolidates the five gap analysis reports produced by each expert panel, wherein the importance of the identified phenomena and necessities of further experimental research and code development were addressed. The findings from these five reports comprised the basis for the analysis in Sodium Fast Reactor Research Plan Volume I.

  2. Laser fusion driven breeder design study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Berwald, D.H.; Massey, J.V.

    1980-12-01

    The results of the Laser Fusion Breeder Design Study are given. This information primarily relates to the conceptual design of an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) breeder reactor (or fusion-fission hybrid) based upon the HYLIFE liquid metal wall protection concept developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The blanket design for this breeder is optimized to both reduce fissions and maximize the production of fissile fuel for subsequent use in conventional light water reactors (LWRs). When the suppressed fission blanket is compared with its fast fission counterparts, a minimal fission rate in the blanket results in a unique reactor safety advantage for this concept with respect to reduced radioactive inventory and reduced fission product decay afterheat in the event of a loss-of-coolant-accident.

  3. TOKOPS: Tokamak Reactor Operations Study: The influence of reactor operations on the design and performance of tokamaks with solid-breeder blankets: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Conn, R.W.; Ghoniem, N.M.; Firestone, M.A.

    1986-09-01

    Reactor system operation and procedures have a profound impact on the conception and design of power plants. These issues are studied here using a model tokamak system employing a solid-breeder blanket. The model blanket is one which has evolved from the STARFIRE and BCSS studies. The reactor parameters are similar to those characterizing near-term fusion engineering reactors such as INTOR or NET (Next European Tokamak). Plasma startup, burn analysis, and methods for operation at various levels of output power are studied. A critical, and complicating, element is found to be the self-consistent electromagnetic response of the system, including the presence of the blanket and the resulting forces and loadings. Fractional power operation, and the strategy for burn control, is found to vary depending on the scaling law for energy confinement, and an extensive study is reported. Full-power reactor operation is at a neutron wall loading pf 5 MW/m/sup 2/ and a surface heat flux of 1 MW/m/sup 2/. The blanket is a pressurized steel module with bare beryllium rods and low-activation HT-9-(9-C-) clad LiAlO/sub 2/ rods. The helium coolant pressure is 5 MPa, entering the module at 297/sup 0/C and exiting at 550/sup 0/C. The system power output is rated at 1000 MW(e). In this report, we present our findings on various operational scenarios and their impact on system design. We first start with the salient aspects of operational physics. Time-dependent analyses of the blanket and balance of plant are then presented. Separate abstracts are included for each chapter.

  4. Technology Options for a Fast Spectrum Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    D. M. Wachs; R. W. King; I. Y. Glagolenko; Y. Shatilla

    2006-06-01

    Idaho National Laboratory in collaboration with Argonne National Laboratory has evaluated technology options for a new fast spectrum reactor to meet the fast-spectrum irradiation requirements for the USDOE Generation IV (Gen IV) and Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) programs. The US currently has no capability for irradiation testing of large volumes of fuels or materials in a fast-spectrum reactor required to support the development of Gen IV fast reactor systems or to demonstrate actinide burning, a key element of the AFCI program. The technologies evaluated and the process used to select options for a fast irradiation test reactor (FITR) for further evaluation to support these programmatic objectives are outlined in this paper.

  5. Immobilization of Fast Reactor First Cycle Raffinate

    SciTech Connect

    Langley, K. F.; Partridge, B. A.; Wise, M.

    2003-02-26

    This paper describes the results of work to bring forward the timing for the immobilization of first cycle raffinate from reprocessing fuel from the Dounreay Prototype Fast Reactor (PFR). First cycle raffinate is the liquor which contains > 99% of the fission products separated from spent fuel during reprocessing. Approximately 203 m3 of raffinate from the reprocessing of PFR fuel is held in four tanks at the UKAEA's site at Dounreay, Scotland. Two methods of immobilization of this high level waste (HLW) have been considered: vitrification and cementation. Vitrification is the standard industry practice for the immobilization of first cycle raffinate, and many papers have been presented on this technique elsewhere. However, cementation is potentially feasible for immobilizing first cycle raffinate because the heat output is an order of magnitude lower than typical HLW from commercial reprocessing operations such as that at the Sellafield site in Cumbria, England. In fact, it falls within the upper end of the UK definition of intermediate level waste (ILW). Although the decision on which immobilization technique will be employed has yet to be made, initial development work has been undertaken to identify a suitable cementation formulation using inactive simulant of the raffinate. An approach has been made to the waste disposal company Nirex to consider the disposability of the cemented product material. The paper concentrates on the process development work that is being undertaken on cementation to inform the decision making process for selection of the immobilization method.

  6. Automated operator procedure prompting for startup of Experimental Breeder Reactor-2

    SciTech Connect

    Renshaw, A.W.; Ball, S.J.; Ford, C.E.

    1990-11-01

    This report describes the development of an operator procedure prompting aid for startup of a nuclear reactor. This operator aid is a preliminary design for a similar aid that eventually will be used with the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR) presently in the design stage. Two approaches were used to develop this operator procedure prompting aid. One method uses an expert system software shell, and the other method uses database software. The preliminary requirements strongly pointed toward features traditionally associated with both database and expert systems software. Database software usually provides data manipulation flexibility and user interface tools, and expert systems tools offer sophisticated data representation and reasoning capabilities. Both methods, including software and associated hardware, are described in this report. Proposals for future enhancements to improve the expert system approach to procedure prompting and for developing other operator aids are also offered. 25 refs., 14 figs.

  7. Radioactive waste from decommissioning of fast reactors (through the example of BN-800)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybin, A. A.; Momot, O. A.

    2017-01-01

    Estimation of volume of radioactive waste from operating and decommissioning of fast reactors is introduced. Preliminary estimation has shown that the volume of RW from decommissioning of BN-800 is amounted to 63,000 cu. m. Comparison of the amount of liquid radioactive waste derived from operation of different reactor types is performed. Approximate costs of all wastes disposal for complete decommissioning of BN-800 reactor are estimated amounting up to approx. 145 million.

  8. A Fusion Breeder Reactor Based on a Catalyzed D-D Spherical Torus.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-08-08

    cooling and fissile breeding. The need for tritium breeding is eliminated by the use of’ a catalyzed 0-0 fuel cycle. Analysis of this novel reactor...in heavy water which flows through the first wall and blanket providing both cooling and fissile breeding. The need I for tritium breeding is...studies in that: (1) a deuterium fuel cycle is used to eliminate the : need to breed tritium ; (2) a compact tokamak (spherical torus) is used as a

  9. Continuous production of tritium in an isotope-production reactor with a separate circulation system

    DOEpatents

    Cawley, W.E.; Omberg, R.P.

    1982-08-19

    A method is described for producing tritium in a fast breeder reactor cooled with liquid metal. Lithium is allowed to flow through the reactor in separate loops in order to facilitate the production and removal of tritium.

  10. Summary of advanced LMR (Liquid Metal Reactor) evaluations: PRISM (Power Reactor Inherently Safe Module) and SAFR (Sodium Advanced Fast Reactor)

    SciTech Connect

    Van Tuyle, G.J.; Slovik, G.C.; Chan, B.C.; Kennett, R.J.; Cheng, H.S.; Kroeger, P.G. )

    1989-10-01

    In support of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has performed independent analyses of two advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (LMR) concepts. The designs, sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), the Power Reactor Inherently Safe Module (PRISM) (Berglund, 1987) and the Sodium Advanced Fast Reactor (SAFR) (Baumeister, 1987), were developed primarily by General Electric (GE) and Rockwell International (RI), respectively. Technical support was provided to DOE, RI, and GE, by the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), particularly with respect to the characteristics of the metal fuels. There are several examples in both PRISM and SAFR where inherent or passive systems provide for a safe response to off-normal conditions. This is in contrast to the engineered safety systems utilized on current US Light Water Reactor (LWR) designs. One important design inherency in the LMRs is the inherent shutdown'', which refers to the tendency of the reactor to transition to a much lower power level whenever temperatures rise significantly. This type of behavior was demonstrated in a series of unscrammed tests at EBR-II (NED, 1986). The second key design feature is the passive air cooling of the vessel to remove decay heat. These systems, designated RVACS in PRISM and RACS in SAFR, always operate and are believed to be able to prevent core damage in the event that no other means of heat removal is available. 27 refs., 78 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. An Innovative Hybrid Loop-Pool Design for Sodium Cooled Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Haihua Zhao; Hongbin Zhang

    2007-11-01

    The existing sodium cooled fast reactors (SFR) have two types of designs – loop type and pool type. In the loop type design, such as JOYO (Japan) [1] and MONJU (Japan), the primary coolant is circulated through intermediate heat exchangers (IHX) external to the reactor tank. The major advantages of loop design include compactness and easy maintenance. The disadvantage is higher possibility of sodium leakage. In the pool type design such as EBR-II (USA), BN-600M(Russia), Superphénix (France) and European Fast Reactor [2], the reactor core, primary pumps, IHXs and direct reactor auxiliary cooling system (DRACS) heat exchangers (DHX) all are immersed in a pool of sodium coolant within the reactor vessel, making a loss of primary coolant extremely unlikely. However, the pool type design makes primary system large. In the latest ANL’s Advanced Burner Test Reactor (ABTR) design [3], the primary system is configured in a pool-type arrangement. The hot sodium at core outlet temperature in hot pool is separated from the cold sodium at core inlet temperature in cold pool by a single integrated structure called Redan. Redan provides the exchange of the hot sodium from hot pool to cold pool through IHXs. The IHXs were chosen as the traditional tube-shell design. This type of IHXs is large in size and hence large reactor vessel is needed.

  12. Run - Beyond - Cladding - Breach (RBCB) test results for the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) metallic fuels program

    SciTech Connect

    Batte, G.L. ); Hoffman, G.L. )

    1990-01-01

    In 1984 Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) began an aggressive program of research and development based on the concept of a closed system for fast-reactor power generation and on-site fuel reprocessing, exclusively designed around the use of metallic fuel. This is the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). Although the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) has used metallic fuel since its creation 25 yeas ago, in 1985 ANL began a study of the characteristics and behavior of an advanced-design metallic fuel based on uranium-zirconium (U-Zr) and uranium-plutonium-zirconium (U-Pu-Zr) alloys. During the past five years several areas were addressed concerning the performance of this fuel system. In all instances of testing the metallic fuel has demonstrated its ability to perform reliably to high burnups under varying design conditions. This paper will present one area of testing which concerns the fuel system's performance under breach conditions. It is the purpose of this paper to document the observed post-breach behavior of this advanced-design metallic fuel. 2 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Performance of low smeared density sodium-cooled fast reactor metal fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, D. L.; H. J. M. Chichester; Medvedev, P. G.; Hayes, S. L.; Teague, M. C.

    2015-06-17

    An experiment was performed in the Experimental Breeder Rector-II (EBR-II) in the 1990s to show that metallic fast reactor fuel could be used in reactors with a single, once-through core. To prove the long duration, high burnup, high neutron exposure capability an experiment where the fuel pin was designed with a very large fission gas plenum and very low fuel smeared density (SD). The experiment, X496, operated to only 8.3 at. % burnup because the EBR-II reactor was scheduled for shut-down at that time. Many of the examinations of the fuel pins only funded recently with the resurgence of reactor designs using very high-burnup fuel. The results showed that, despite the low smeared density of 59% the fuel swelled radially to contact the cladding, fission gas release appeared to be slightly higher than demonstrated in conventional 75%SD fuel tests and axial growth was about the same as 75% SD fuel. There were axial positions in some of the fuel pins which showed evidence of fuel restructuring and an absence of fission products with low metaling points and gaseous precursors (Cs and Rb). Lastly, a model to investigate whether these areas may have overheated due to a loss of bond sodium indicates that it is a possible explanation for the fuel restructuring and something to be considered for fuel performance modeling of low SD fuel.

  14. Performance of low smeared density sodium-cooled fast reactor metal fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, D. L.; Chichester, H. J. M.; Medvedev, P. G.; Hayes, S. L.; Teague, M. C.

    2015-10-01

    An experiment was performed in the Experimental Breeder Rector-II (EBR-II) in the 1990s to show that metallic fast reactor fuel could be used in reactors with a single, once-through core. To prove the long duration, high burnup, high neutron exposure capability an experiment where the fuel pin was designed with a very large fission gas plenum and very low fuel smeared density (SD). The experiment, X496, operated to only 8.3 at.% burnup because the EBR-II reactor was scheduled for shut-down at that time. Many of the examinations of the fuel pins only funded recently with the resurgence of reactor designs using very high-burnup fuel. The results showed that, despite the low smeared density of 59% the fuel swelled radially to contact the cladding, fission gas release appeared to be slightly higher than demonstrated in conventional 75%SD fuel tests and axial growth was about the same as 75% SD fuel. There were axial positions in some of the fuel pins which showed evidence of fuel restructuring and an absence of fission products with low melting points and gaseous precursors (Cs and Rb). A model to investigate whether these areas may have overheated due to a loss of bond sodium indicates that it is a possible explanation for the fuel restructuring and something to be considered for fuel performance modeling of low SD fuel.

  15. Simulated first operating campaign for the Integral Fast Reactor fuel cycle demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Goff, K.M.; Mariani, R.D.; Benedict, R.W.; Park, K.H.; Ackerman, J.P.

    1993-09-01

    This report discusses the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) which is an innovative liquid-metal-cooled reactor concept that is being developed by Argonne National Laboratory. It takes advantage of the properties of metallic fuel and liquid-metal cooling to offer significant improvements in reactor safety, operation, fuel cycle-economics, environmental protection, and safeguards. Over the next few years, the IFR fuel cycle will be demonstrated at Argonne-West in Idaho. Spent fuel from the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) win be processed in its associated Fuel Cycle Facility (FCF) using a pyrochemical method that employs molten salts and liquid metals in an electrorefining operation. As part of the preparation for the fuel cycle demonstration, a computer code, PYRO, was developed at Argonne to model the electrorefining operation using thermodynamic and empirical data. This code has been used extensively to evaluate various operating strategies for the fuel cycle demonstration. The modeled results from the first operating campaign are presented. This campaign is capable of processing more than enough material to refuel completely the EBR-II core.

  16. Coupled hydro-neutronic calculations for fast burst reactor accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Paternoster, R.; Kimpland, R.; Jaegers, P.; McGhee, J.

    1994-01-01

    Methods are described for determining the fully coupled neutronic/hydrodynamic response of fast burst reactors (FBR) under disruptive accident conditions. Two code systems, PAD (1 -D Lagrangian) and NIKE-PAGOSA (3-D Eulerian) were used to accomplish this. This is in contrast to the typical methodology that computes these responses by either single point kinetics or in a decoupled manner. This methodology is enabled by the use of modem supercomputers (CM-200). Two examples of this capability are presented: an unreflected metal fast burst assembly, and a reflected fast burst assembly typical of the Skua or SPR-III class of fast burst reactor.

  17. Fast Thorium Molten Salt Reactors Started with Plutonium

    SciTech Connect

    Merle-Lucotte, E.; Heuer, D.; Le Brun, C.; Brissot, R.; Liatard, E.; Meplan, O.; Nuttin, A.

    2006-07-01

    One of the pending questions concerning Molten Salt Reactors based on the {sup 232}Th/{sup 233}U fuel cycle is the supply of the fissile matter, and as a consequence the deployment possibilities of a fleet of Molten Salt Reactors, since {sup 233}U does not exist on earth and is not yet produced in the current operating reactors. A solution may consist in producing {sup 233}U in special devices containing Thorium, in Pressurized Water or Fast Neutrons Reactors. Two alternatives to produce {sup 233}U are examined here: directly in standard Molten Salt Reactors started with Plutonium as fissile matter and then operated in the Th/{sup 233}U cycle; or in dedicated Molten Salt Reactors started and fed with Plutonium as fissile matter and Thorium as fertile matter. The idea is to design a critical reactor able to burn the Plutonium and the minor actinides presently produced in PWRs, and consequently to convert this Plutonium into {sup 233}U. A particular reactor configuration is used, called 'unique channel' configuration in which there is no moderator in the core, leading to a quasi fast neutron spectrum, allowing Plutonium to be used as fissile matter. The conversion capacities of such Molten Salt Reactors are excellent. For Molten Salt Reactors only started with Plutonium, the assets of the Thorium fuel cycle turn out to be quickly recovered and the reactor's characteristics turn out to be equivalent to Molten Salt Reactors operated with {sup 233}U only. Using a combination of Molten Salt Reactors started or operated with Plutonium and of Molten Salt Reactors started with {sup 233}U, the deployment capabilities of these reactors fully satisfy the condition of sustainability. (authors)

  18. Effects of dietary supplementation of meat-type quail breeders with guanidinoacetic acid on their reproductive parameters and progeny performance.

    PubMed

    Murakami, A E; Rodrigueiro, R J B; Santos, T C; Ospina-Rojas, I C; Rademacher, M

    2014-09-01

    This study was conducted to assess the effect of dietary supplementation of meat-type quail breeders with guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) on their reproductive parameters and progeny performance. Two hundred forty meat-type quails at 25 wk of age were distributed in a completely randomized design with 5 treatments and 8 replicates of 6 birds each. The treatments consisted of 5 dietary levels of GAA (0.00, 0.06, 0.12, 0.18, and 0.24%). The progenies from quail breeders were housed according to breeder treatments and fed a conventional diet based on corn and soybean meal without GAA supplementation. Dietary GAA levels did not affect (P > 0.05) the productivity of meat-type quail breeders, although the concentration of guanidinic compounds (creatine, GAA, and creatinine) in the eggs from the breeders increased linearly (P < 0.05) according to the increase in dietary GAA levels. The number of spermatozoa present in the vitelline membrane was not affected (P > 0.05) by the treatments, but there was a quadratic effect (P < 0.05) of the levels of GAA on fertility, embryonic mortality, and egg hatchability, with the best results estimated at 0.13, 0.15, and 0.14% GAA, respectively. The creatine levels of the pectoral muscle in newborn quails showed a quadratic effect (P ≤ 0.07), and the dietary GAA level of 0.11% was estimated to maximize the muscular creatine level in the progeny. There was a quadratic effect (P < 0.05) of GAA levels on weight gain and feed conversion of progeny at 35 d of age with an optimization point of 0.14% GAA for these variables. Dietary GAA supplementation of meat-type quail breeders increases the availability of creatine in eggs and muscle of progeny, which results in better reproductive parameters and better postnatal progeny performance. © 2014 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  19. Methods for quantifying uncertainty in fast reactor analyses.

    SciTech Connect

    Fanning, T. H.; Fischer, P. F.

    2008-04-07

    Liquid-metal-cooled fast reactors in the form of sodium-cooled fast reactors have been successfully built and tested in the U.S. and throughout the world. However, no fast reactor has operated in the U.S. for nearly fourteen years. More importantly, the U.S. has not constructed a fast reactor in nearly 30 years. In addition to reestablishing the necessary industrial infrastructure, the development, testing, and licensing of a new, advanced fast reactor concept will likely require a significant base technology program that will rely more heavily on modeling and simulation than has been done in the past. The ability to quantify uncertainty in modeling and simulations will be an important part of any experimental program and can provide added confidence that established design limits and safety margins are appropriate. In addition, there is an increasing demand from the nuclear industry for best-estimate analysis methods to provide confidence bounds along with their results. The ability to quantify uncertainty will be an important component of modeling that is used to support design, testing, and experimental programs. Three avenues of UQ investigation are proposed. Two relatively new approaches are described which can be directly coupled to simulation codes currently being developed under the Advanced Simulation and Modeling program within the Reactor Campaign. A third approach, based on robust Monte Carlo methods, can be used in conjunction with existing reactor analysis codes as a means of verification and validation of the more detailed approaches.

  20. Core loading pattern optimization of thorium fueled heavy water breeder reactor using genetic algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Soewono, C. N.; Takaki, N.

    2012-07-01

    In this work genetic algorithm was proposed to solve fuel loading pattern optimization problem in thorium fueled heavy water reactor. The objective function of optimization was to maximize the conversion ratio and minimize power peaking factor. Those objectives were simultaneously optimized using non-dominated Pareto-based population ranking optimal method. Members of non-dominated population were assigned selection probabilities based on their rankings in a manner similar to Baker's single criterion ranking selection procedure. A selected non-dominated member was bred through simple mutation or one-point crossover process to produce a new member. The genetic algorithm program was developed in FORTRAN 90 while neutronic calculation and analysis was done by COREBN code, a module of core burn-up calculation for SRAC. (authors)

  1. Shipment of the Light Water Breeder Reactor fuel assemblies from the Shippingport Atomic Power Station to the extended core facility (Idaho) (LWBR Development Program)

    SciTech Connect

    Selsley, I.A.

    1987-10-01

    After successfully operating for 29,047 effective full power hours, the Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) core was defueled prior to total decommissioning of the Shippingport Atomic Power Station. All nuclear fuel and much of the reactor internal hardware was removed from the reactor vessel and prepared for shipment to disposal sites or to the Naval Reactors Expended Core Facility in Idaho for testing or further disassembly. Three M-130 shipping containers were modified to accept LWBR seed, blanket, and reflector fuel modules for rail shipment to the Expended Core Facility. Thirty-nine LWBR fuel modules were transferred in 10 shipments. All shipments were completed successfully, without significant problems. Radiation and personnel exposure levels were carefully controlled.

  2. Thermionic fast spectrum reactor-converter on the basis of multi-cell TFE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomarev-Stepnoi, N. N.; Kompaniets, G. V.; Poliakov, D. N.; Stepennov, B. S.; Andreev, P. V.; Zhabotinsky, E. E.; Nikolaev, Yu. V.; Lapochkin, N. V.

    2001-02-01

    Today Russian experts have technological experience in development of in-core thermionic converters for reactors of space nuclear power plants. Such a converter contains nuclear fuel inside and really represents a fuel element of a reactor. Two types of reactors can be considered on the basis of these thermionic fuel elements: with thermal or intermediate neutron spectrum, and with fast neutron spectrum. The first type is characterized by the presence of moderator in core that ensures most economical usage of nuclear fuel. The estimation shows that moderated system is the most effective in the power range of about 5 ... 100 kWe. The power systems of higher level are characterized by larger dimensions due to the presence of moderator. The second type of reactor is considered for higher power levels. This power range is about hundreds kWe. Dimensions of the fast reactor and core configuration are determined by the necessity to ensure the required net output power, on the one hand, and the necessity to ensure critical state on the other hand. In the case of using in-core thermionic fuel elements of the specified design, minimal reactor output power is determined by reactor criticality condition, and maximum reactor power output is determined by specifications and launcher capabilities. In the present paper the effective multiplication factor of a fast spectrum reactor on the basis of a multi-cell TFE developed by ``Lutch'' is considered a function of the total number of TFEs in the reactor. The MCU Monte-Carlo code, developed in Russia (Alekseev, et al., 1991), was used for computations. TFE computational models are placed in the nodes of a uniform triangular lattice and surrounded with pressure vessel and a side reflector. Ordinary fuel pins without thermionic converters were used instead of some TFEs to optimize criticality parameters, dimensions and output power of the reactor. General weight parameters of the reactor are presented in the paper. .

  3. An assessment of liquid-metal centrifugal pumps at three fast reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.S.; Wood, D.H.; Drischler, J.D. )

    1993-10-01

    The results of an analysis using data reports submitted to the Centralized Reliability Data Organization (CREDO) to predict the onset of the wearout life period for large sodium centrifugal pumps is described. For CREDO data collection and analysis purposes, a mechanical pump'' includes the pumping unit, its driver, and the coupling between the two. Statistical data were compiled from event reports received from three fast reactors: the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) and the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) in the US and the JOYO Experimental Fast Reactor operated by the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation of Japan. Cumulative event rates were calculated for the investigated pumps at each facility and for the entire population. For all pumps, the event rate was computed as 34.4 event/million operating hours with 5 and 95% one-sided confidence limits of 26.3 and 44.4 event/million operating hours, respectively. The cumulative event rates for EBR-II, FFTF, and JOYO were computed as 30.0, 32.4, and 40.6 event/million pump operating hours, respectively. Results from EBR-II indicate that there is a definite time-dependent relationship between event rates and pump age; the common event mode at EBR-II is pump binding or seizing due to the buildup of sodium deposits in the vicinity of the lower labyrinth seal. There is no indication from FFTF that the six centrifugal pumps have reached the end of their useful life; these pumps have been event free for their last 40,000 operating hours. Following a 50,000-h even-free operating period at JOYO, bearings in the secondary pumps required additional unscheduled maintenance. However, there is no indication that these pumps have entered into the wearout life period; more data are required to draw any such conclusion.

  4. Simulator platform for fast reactor operation and safety technology demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Vilim, R. B.; Park, Y. S.; Grandy, C.; Belch, H.; Dworzanski, P.; Misterka, J.

    2012-07-30

    A simulator platform for visualization and demonstration of innovative concepts in fast reactor technology is described. The objective is to make more accessible the workings of fast reactor technology innovations and to do so in a human factors environment that uses state-of-the art visualization technologies. In this work the computer codes in use at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for the design of fast reactor systems are being integrated to run on this platform. This includes linking reactor systems codes with mechanical structures codes and using advanced graphics to depict the thermo-hydraulic-structure interactions that give rise to an inherently safe response to upsets. It also includes visualization of mechanical systems operation including advanced concepts that make use of robotics for operations, in-service inspection, and maintenance.

  5. Calculated analysis of experiments in fast neutron reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Davydov, V. K. Kalugina, K. M.; Gomin, E. A.

    2012-12-15

    In this paper, the results of computational simulation of experiments with the MK-I core of the JOYO fast neutron sodium-cooled reactor are presented. The MCU-KS code based on the Monte Carlo method was used for calculations. The research was aimed at additional verification of the MCU-KS code for systems with a fast neutron spectrum.

  6. Sodium technology activities at HEDL in support of fast reactor development and the FFTF

    SciTech Connect

    Atwood, J.M.

    1984-02-27

    Activities of the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory are presented. A brief description of FFTF and some highlights of reactor operations are reviewed. The sodium technology work at HEDL is summarized by discussing several facets of the program and their tie-ins to breeder reactor development.

  7. Integral Fast Reactor: A future source of nuclear energy

    SciTech Connect

    Southon, R.

    1993-09-01

    Argonne National Laboratory is developing a reactor concept that would be an important part of the worlds energy future. This report discusses the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept which provides significant improvements over current generation reactors in reactor safety, plant complexity, nuclear proliferation, and waste generation. Two major facilities, a reactor and a fuel cycle facility, make up the IFR concept. The reactor uses fast neutrons and metal fuel in a sodium coolant at atmospheric pressure that relies on laws of physics to keep it safe. The fuel cycle facility is a hot cell using remote handling techniques for fabricating reactor fuel. The fuel feed stock includes spent fuel from the reactor, and potentially, spent light water reactor fuel and plutonium from weapons. This paper discusses the unique features of the IFR concept and the differences the quality assurance program has from current commercial practices. The IFR concept provides an opportunity to design a quality assurance program that makes use of the best contemporary ideas on management and quality.

  8. Progress reports for Gen IV sodium fast reactor activities FY 2007.

    SciTech Connect

    Cahalan, J. E.; Tentner, A. M.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-10-04

    for prevention of progression into severe accident conditions (prevention of core melting) or for mitigation of severe accident consequences (mitigation of the impact of core melting to protect public health and safety). Because design measures for severe accident prevention and mitigation are beyond the normal design basis, established regulatory guidelines and codes do not provide explicit identification of the design performance requirements for severe accident accommodation. The treatment of severe accidents is one of the key issues of R&D plans for the Gen IV systems in general, and for the Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR) in particular. Despite the lack of an unambiguous definition of safety approach applicable for severe accidents, there is an emerging consensus on the need for their consideration for the design. The US SFR program and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in particular have actively studied the potential scenarios and consequences of Hypothetical Core Disruptive Accidents (HCDA) for SFRs with oxide fuel during the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) and Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) programs in the 70s and 80s. Later, the focus of the US SFR safety R&D activities shifted to the prevention of all HCDAs through passive safety features of the SFRs with metal fuel in the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) program, and the study of severe accident consequences was de-emphasized. The goal of this paper is to provide an overview of the current SFR safety approach and the role of severe accidents in Japan and France, in preparation for an expected and more active collaboration in this area between the US, Japan, and France.

  9. On reactor type comparisons for the next generation of reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Alesso, H.P.; Majumdar, K.C.

    1991-08-22

    In this paper, we present a broad comparison of studies for a selected set of parameters for different nuclear reactor types including the next generation. This serves as an overview of key parameters which provide a semi-quantitative decision basis for selecting nuclear strategies. Out of a number of advanced reactor designs of the LWR type, gas cooled type, and FBR type, currently on the drawing board, the Advanced Light Water Reactors (ALWR) seem to have some edge over other types of the next generation of reactors for the near-term application. This is based on a number of attributes related to the benefit of the vast operating experience with LWRs coupled with an estimated low risk profile, economics of scale, degree of utilization of passive systems, simplification in the plant design and layout, modular fabrication and manufacturing. 32 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  10. Performance of low smeared density sodium-cooled fast reactor metal fuel

    DOE PAGES

    Porter, D. L.; H. J. M. Chichester; Medvedev, P. G.; ...

    2015-06-17

    An experiment was performed in the Experimental Breeder Rector-II (EBR-II) in the 1990s to show that metallic fast reactor fuel could be used in reactors with a single, once-through core. To prove the long duration, high burnup, high neutron exposure capability an experiment where the fuel pin was designed with a very large fission gas plenum and very low fuel smeared density (SD). The experiment, X496, operated to only 8.3 at. % burnup because the EBR-II reactor was scheduled for shut-down at that time. Many of the examinations of the fuel pins only funded recently with the resurgence of reactormore » designs using very high-burnup fuel. The results showed that, despite the low smeared density of 59% the fuel swelled radially to contact the cladding, fission gas release appeared to be slightly higher than demonstrated in conventional 75%SD fuel tests and axial growth was about the same as 75% SD fuel. There were axial positions in some of the fuel pins which showed evidence of fuel restructuring and an absence of fission products with low metaling points and gaseous precursors (Cs and Rb). Lastly, a model to investigate whether these areas may have overheated due to a loss of bond sodium indicates that it is a possible explanation for the fuel restructuring and something to be considered for fuel performance modeling of low SD fuel.« less

  11. Sodium fast reactor fuels and materials : research needs.

    SciTech Connect

    Denman, Matthew R.; Porter, Douglas; Wright, Art; Lambert, John; Hayes, Steven; Natesan, Ken; Ott, Larry J.; Garner, Frank; Walters, Leon; Yacout, Abdellatif

    2011-09-01

    An expert panel was assembled to identify gaps in fuels and materials research prior to licensing sodium cooled fast reactor (SFR) design. The expert panel considered both metal and oxide fuels, various cladding and duct materials, structural materials, fuel performance codes, fabrication capability and records, and transient behavior of fuel types. A methodology was developed to rate the relative importance of phenomena and properties both as to importance to a regulatory body and the maturity of the technology base. The technology base for fuels and cladding was divided into three regimes: information of high maturity under conservative operating conditions, information of low maturity under more aggressive operating conditions, and future design expectations where meager data exist.

  12. Isotope production in fast reactor blankets

    SciTech Connect

    Zvonarev, A.V.; Koloskov, B.V.; Kochetkov, L.A.

    1993-12-31

    At the BR-10 research reactor radioactive isotopes are produced that are required for the production of radiopharmaceuticals and phosphor 32 used for the synthesis of biochemical labelled compounds. A procedure has been developed of uranium target irradiation followed by radiochemical processing aimed at isotope isolation of molybdenum 99, xenon 133 and iodine 131,132,and 133 isotopes mixture. Irradiation is carried out in a special channel of the radial blanket. The production of cobalt 60 at the BN-600 reactor and facilities are also described.

  13. Overview of the fast reactors fuels program. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, E.A.; Cox, C.M.; Hayward, B.R.; Rice, L.H.; Yoshikawa, H.H.

    1980-04-01

    Each nation involved in LMFBR development has its unique energy strategies which consider energy growth projections, uranium resources, capital costs, and plant operational requirements. Common to all of these strategies is a history of fast reactor experience which dates back to the days of the Manhatten Project and includes the CLEMENTINE Reactor, which generated a few watts, LAMPRE, EBR-I, EBR-II, FERMI, SEFOR, FFTF, BR-1, -2, -5, -10, BOR-60, BN-350, BN-600, JOYO, RAPSODIE, Phenix, KNK-II, DFR, and PFR. Fast reactors under design or construction include PEC, CRBR, SuperPhenix, SNR-300, MONJU, and Madras (India). The parallel fuels and materials evolution has fully supported this reactor development. It has involved cermets, molten plutonium alloy, plutonium oxide, uranium metal or alloy, uranium oxide, and mixed uranium-plutonium oxides and carbides.

  14. Catalytic fast pyrolysis of white oak wood in-situ using a bubbling fluidized bed reactor

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Catalytic fast pyrolysis was performed on white oak wood using two zeolite-type catalysts as bed material in a bubbling fluidized bed reactor. The two catalysts chosen, based on a previous screening study, were Ca2+ exchanged Y54 (Ca-Y54) and a proprietary ß-zeolite type catalyst (catalyst M) both ...

  15. Fast pyrolysis of durian (Durio zibethinus L) shell in a drop-type fixed bed reactor: Pyrolysis behavior and product analyses.

    PubMed

    Tan, Y L; Abdullah, A Z; Hameed, B H

    2017-06-23

    Durian shell (DS) was pyrolyzed in a drop-type fixed-bed reactor to study the physicochemical properties of the products. The experiment was carried out with different particle sizes (up to 5mm) and reaction temperatures (250-650°C). The highest bio-oil yield was obtained at 650°C (57.45wt%) with DS size of 1-2mm. The elemental composition and higher heating value of the feedstock, bio-oil (650°C), and bio-char (650°C) were determined and compared. The compositions of product gases were determined via gas chromatography with thermal conductivity detector. The chemical composition of bio-oil was analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The bio-oil produced at lower temperature yields more alcohols, whereas the bio-oil produced at higher temperature contains more aromatics and carbonyls. Bio-oil has potential to be used as liquid fuel or fine chemical precursor after further upgrading. The results further showed the potential of bio-char as a solid fuel. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Examination of fast-reactor fuels and FBR analytical quality-assurance standards and methods. Progress report, October 1-December 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Maraman, W.J.

    1981-03-01

    This project is directed toward the examination and comparison of the effects of neutron irradiation on Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) Program fuel materials. Unirradiated and irradiated materials will be examined as requested by the Reference Fuels System Branch of the Division of Reactor Research and Technology (DRRT). Capabilities have been established and are being expanded for providing conventional preirradiation and postirradiation examinations. Nondestructive tests will be conducted in a hot-cell facility specifically modified for examining irradiated prototype fuel pins at a rate commensurate with schedules established by DRRT.

  17. A fast shutdown system for SRS (Savannah River Site) reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, N.P.

    1990-01-01

    Power has been sharply reduced at Savannah River Site (SRS) reactors in large part to ensure that no bulk boiling occurs during hypothesized loss of coolant accidents. A fast shutdown system is essential to regain much of this lost power. Computations and experiments indicate that a He-3 injection system will serve this function. Instrumented tests of a full system are planned for early 1991 for one of the SRS reactors. 4 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Design Considerations for Economically Competitive Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Hongbin Zhang; Haihua Zhao

    2009-05-01

    The technological viability of sodium cooled fast reactors (SFR) has been established by various experimental and prototype (demonstration) reactors such as EBR-II, FFTF, Phénix, JOYO, BN-600 etc. However, the economic competitiveness of SFR has not been proven yet. The perceived high cost premium of SFRs over LWRs has been the primary impediment to the commercial expansion of SFR technologies. In this paper, cost reduction options are discussed for advanced SFR designs. These include a hybrid loop-pool design to optimize the primary system, multiple reheat and intercooling helium Brayton cycle for the power conversion system and the potential for suppression of intermediate heat transport system. The design options for the fully passive decay heat removal systems are also thoroughly examined. These include direct reactor auxiliary cooling system (DRACS), reactor vessel auxiliary cooling system (RVACS) and the newly proposed pool reactor auxiliary cooling system (PRACS) in the context of the hybrid loop-pool design.

  19. Design of unique pins for irradiation of higher actinides in a fast reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Basmajian, J.A.; Birney, K.R.; Weber, E.T.; Adair, H.L.; Quinby, T.C.; Raman, S.; Butler, J.K.; Bateman, B.C.; Swanson, K.M.

    1982-03-01

    The actinides produced by transmutation reactions in nuclear reactor fuels are a significant factor in nuclear fuel burnup, transportation and reprocessing. Irradiation testing is a primary source of data of this type. A segmented pin design was developed which provides for incorporation of multiple specimens of actinide oxides for irradiation in the UK's Prototype Fast Reactor (PFR) at Dounreay Scotland. Results from irradiation of these pins will extend the basic neutronic and material irradiation behavior data for key actinide isotopes.

  20. Utility industry evaluation of the Sodium Advanced Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Burstein, S. ); DelGeorge, L.O.; Tramm, T.R. ); Gibbons, J.P. ); High, M.D. ); Neils, G.H. ); Pilmer, D.F. ); Tomonto, J.R.

    1990-02-01

    A team of utility industry representatives evaluated the Sodium Advanced Fast Reactor plant design, a current liquid metal reactor design created by an industrial team led by Rockwell International under Department of Energy sponsorship. The utility industry team concluded that the plant design offers several attractive characteristics, especially in the safety arena, as well as preserving the traditional attraction of liquid metal reactors, very high fuel utilization. Specific comments and recommendations are provided as a contribution towards improving an already attractive plant design. 18 refs.

  1. The Integral Fast Reactor: A practical approach to waste management

    SciTech Connect

    Laidler, J.J.

    1993-12-31

    This report discusses development of the method for pyroprocessing of spent fuel from the Integral Fast Reactor (or Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor). The technology demonstration phase, in which recycle will be demonstrated with irradiated fuel from the EBR-II reactor has been reached. Methods for recovering actinides from spent LWR fuel are at an earlier stage of development but appear to be technically feasible at this time, and a large-scale demonstration of this process has begun. The utilization of fully compatible processes for recycling valuable spent fuel materials promises to provide substantial economic incentives for future applications of the pyroprocessing technology.

  2. Advanced reactor development: The LMR integral fast reactor program at Argonne

    SciTech Connect

    Till, C.E.

    1990-01-01

    Reactor technology for the 21st Century must develop with characteristics that can now be seen to be important for the future, quite different from the things when the fundamental materials and design choices for present reactors were made in the 1950s. Argonne National Laboratory, since 1984, has been developing the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). This paper will describe the way in which this new reactor concept came about; the technical, public acceptance, and environmental issues that are addressed by the IFR; the technical progress that has been made; and our expectations for this program in the near term. 3 figs.

  3. Evolution of the liquid metal reactor: The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept

    SciTech Connect

    Till, C.E.; Chang, Y.I.

    1989-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept has been under development at Argonne National Laboratory since 1984. A key feature of the IFR concept is the metallic fuel. Metallic fuel was the original choice in early liquid metal reactor development. Solid technical accomplishments have been accumulating year after year in all aspects of the IFR development program. But as we make technical progress, the ultimate potential offered by the IFR concept as a next generation advanced reactor becomes clearer and clearer. The IFR concept can meet all three fundamental requirements needed in a next generation reactor. This document discusses these requirements: breeding, safety, and waste management. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  4. Review of Transient Testing of Fast Reactor Fuels in the Transient REActor Test Facility (TREAT)

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, C.; Wachs, D.; Carmack, J.; Woolstenhulme, N.

    2017-01-01

    The restart of the Transient REActor Test (TREAT) facility provides a unique opportunity to engage the fast reactor fuels community to reinitiate in-pile experimental safety studies. Historically, the TREAT facility played a critical role in characterizing the behavior of both metal and oxide fast reactor fuels under off-normal conditions, irradiating hundreds of fuel pins to support fast reactor fuel development programs. The resulting test data has provided validation for a multitude of fuel performance and severe accident analysis computer codes. This paper will provide a review of the historical database of TREAT experiments including experiment design, instrumentation, test objectives, and salient findings. Additionally, the paper will provide an introduction to the current and future experiment plans of the U.S. transient testing program at TREAT.

  5. Fuel development for gas-cooled fast reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, M. K.; Fielding, R.; Gan, J.

    2007-09-01

    The Generation IV Gas-cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) concept is proposed to combine the advantages of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (such as efficient direct conversion with a gas turbine and the potential for application of high-temperature process heat), with the sustainability advantages that are possible with a fast-spectrum reactor. The latter include the ability to fission all transuranics and the potential for breeding. The GFR is part of a consistent set of gas-cooled reactors that includes a medium-term Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR)-like concept, or concepts based on the Gas Turbine Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR), and specialized concepts such as the Very High-Temperature Reactor (VHTR), as well as actinide burning concepts [A Technology Roadmap for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems, US DOE Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee and the Generation IV International Forum, December 2002]. To achieve the necessary high power density and the ability to retain fission gas at high temperature, the primary fuel concept proposed for testing in the United States is dispersion coated fuel particles in a ceramic matrix. Alternative fuel concepts considered in the US and internationally include coated particle beds, ceramic clad fuel pins, and novel ceramic 'honeycomb' structures. Both mixed carbide and mixed nitride-based solid solutions are considered as fuel phases.

  6. Fuel Development For Gas-Cooled Fast Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    M. K. Meyer

    2006-06-01

    The Generation IV Gas-cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) concept is proposed to combine the advantages of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (such as efficient direct conversion with a gas turbine and the potential for application of high-temperature process heat), with the sustainability advantages that are possible with a fast-spectrum reactor. The latter include the ability to fission all transuranics and the potential for breeding. The GFR is part of a consistent set of gas-cooled reactors that includes a medium-term Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR)-like concept, or concepts based on the Gas Turbine Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR), and specialized concepts such as the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), as well as actinide burning concepts [ ]. To achieve the necessary high power density and the ability to retain fission gas at high temperature, the primary fuel concept proposed for testing in the United States is a dispersion coated fuel particles in a ceramic matrix. Alternative fuel concepts considered in the U.S. and internationally include coated particle beds, ceramic clad fuel pins, and novel ceramic ‘honeycomb’ structures. Both mixed carbide and mixed nitride-based solid solutions are considered as fuel phases.

  7. Instrumentation, Monitoring and NDE for New Fast Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, Leonard J.; Doctor, Steven; Bunch, Kyle; Good, Morris; Waltar, Alan E.

    2007-07-01

    The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) will require the development of actinide transmutation, which can most effectively be accomplished in a fast-spectrum reactor. To achieve higher standards of safety and reliability, operate with longer intervals between outages, and achieve high operating capacity factors, new instrumentation and on-line monitoring capabilities will be required-- during both fabrication and operation. This paper reports parts of a knowledge capture and technology state-of-the-art assessment for fast-reactor instrumentation and controls, monitoring and diagnostics. (authors)

  8. Lessons learned from applying VIM to fast reactor critical experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, R.W.; McKnight, R.D.; Collins, P.J.

    1995-05-17

    VIM is a continuous energy Monte Carlo code first developed around 1970 for the analysis of plate-type, fast-neutron, zero-power critical assemblies. In most respects, VIM is functionally equivalent to the MCNP code but it has two features that make uniquely suited to the analysis of fast reactor critical experiments: (1) the plate lattice geometry option, which allows efficient description of and neutron tracking in the assembly geometry, and (2) a statistical treatment of neutron cross section data in the unresolved resonance range. Since its inception, VIM`s capabilities have expanded to include numerous features, such as thermal neutron cross sections, photon cross sections, and combinatorial and other geometry options, that have allowed its use in a wide range of neutral-particle transport problems. The earliest validation work at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) focused on the validation of VIM itself. This work showed that, in order for VIM to be a ``rigorous`` tool, extreme detail in the pointwise Monte Carlo libraries was needed, and the required detail was added. The emphasis soon shifted to validating models, methods, data and codes against VIM. Most of this work was done in the context of analyzing critical experiments in zero power reactor (ZPR) assemblies. The purpose of this paper is to present some of the lessons learned from using VIM in ZPR analysis work. This involves such areas as uncovering problems in deterministic methods and models, pitfalls in using Monte Carlo codes, and improving predictions. The numerical illustrations included here were taken from the extensive documentation cited as references.

  9. Current status of the Run-Beyond-Cladding Breach (RBCB) tests for the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). Metallic Fuels Program

    SciTech Connect

    Batte, G.L.; Pahl, R.G.; Hofman, G.L.

    1993-09-01

    This paper describes the results from the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) metallic fuel Run-Beyond-Cladding-Breach (RBCB) experiments conducted in the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II). Included in the report are scoping test results and the data collected from the prototypical tests as well as the exam results and discussion from a naturally occurring breach of one of the lead IFR fuel tests. All results showed a characteristic delayed neutron and fission gas release pattern that readily allows for identification and evaluation of cladding breach events. Also, cladding breaches are very small and do not propagate during extensive post breach operation. Loss of fuel from breached cladding was found to be insignificant. The paper will conclude with a brief description of future RBCB experiments planned for irradiation in EBR-II.

  10. Study on core radius minimization for long life Pb-Bi cooled CANDLE burnup scheme based fast reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Afifah, Maryam Su’ud, Zaki; Miura, Ryosuke; Takaki, Naoyuki; Sekimoto, H.

    2015-09-30

    Fast Breeder Reactor had been interested to be developed over the world because it inexhaustible source energy, one of those is CANDLE reactor which is have strategy in burn-up scheme, need not control roads for control burn-up, have a constant core characteristics during energy production and don’t need fuel shuffling. The calculation was made by basic reactor analysis which use Sodium coolant geometry core parameter as a reference core to study on minimum core reactor radius of CANDLE for long life Pb-Bi cooled, also want to perform pure coolant effect comparison between LBE and sodium in a same geometry design. The result show that the minimum core radius of Lead Bismuth cooled CANDLE is 100 cm and 500 MWth thermal output. Lead-Bismuth coolant for CANDLE reactor enable to reduce much reactor size and have a better void coefficient than Sodium cooled as the most coolant for FBR, then we will have a good point in safety analysis.

  11. Study on core radius minimization for long life Pb-Bi cooled CANDLE burnup scheme based fast reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afifah, Maryam; Miura, Ryosuke; Su'ud, Zaki; Takaki, Naoyuki; Sekimoto, H.

    2015-09-01

    Fast Breeder Reactor had been interested to be developed over the world because it inexhaustible source energy, one of those is CANDLE reactor which is have strategy in burn-up scheme, need not control roads for control burn-up, have a constant core characteristics during energy production and don't need fuel shuffling. The calculation was made by basic reactor analysis which use Sodium coolant geometry core parameter as a reference core to study on minimum core reactor radius of CANDLE for long life Pb-Bi cooled, also want to perform pure coolant effect comparison between LBE and sodium in a same geometry design. The result show that the minimum core radius of Lead Bismuth cooled CANDLE is 100 cm and 500 MWth thermal output. Lead-Bismuth coolant for CANDLE reactor enable to reduce much reactor size and have a better void coefficient than Sodium cooled as the most coolant for FBR, then we will have a good point in safety analysis.

  12. REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Szilard, L.

    1963-09-10

    A breeder reactor is described, including a mass of fissionable material that is less than critical with respect to unmoderated neutrons and greater than critical with respect to neutrons of average energies substantially greater than thermal, a coolant selected from sodium or sodium--potassium alloys, a control liquid selected from lead or lead--bismuth alloys, and means for varying the quantity of control liquid in the reactor. (AEC)

  13. Detailed calculations of minor actinide transmutation in a fast reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, Toshikazu

    2015-12-31

    The transmutation of minor actinides in a fast reactor is investigated by a new method to investigate the transmutation behavior of individual minor actinides. It is found that Np-237 and Am-241 mainly contributes to the transmutation rate though the transmutation behaviors are very different.

  14. Integral Fast Reactor Program. Annual progress report, FY 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y.I.; Walters, L.C.; Laidler, J.J.; Pedersen, D.R.; Wade, D.C.; Lineberry, M.J.

    1994-10-01

    This report summarizes highlights of the technical progress made in the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) Program in FY 1993. Technical accomplishments are presented in the following areas of the IFR technology development activities: (1) metal fuel performance, (2) pyroprocess development, (3) safety experiments and analyses, (4) core design development, (5) fuel cycle demonstration, and (6) LMR technology R and D.

  15. Metallic Fast Reactor Fuel Fabrication for Global Nuclear Energy Partnership

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas E. Burkes; Randall S. Fielding; Douglas L. Porter

    2009-07-01

    Fast reactors are once again being considered for nuclear power generation, in addition to transmutation of long-lived fission products resident in spent nuclear fuels. This re-consideration follows with intense developmental programs for both fuel and reactor design. One of the two leading candidates for next generation fast reactor fuel is metal alloys, resulting primarily from the successes achieved in the 1960s to early 1990s with both the experimental breeding reactor-II and the fast flux test facility. The goal of the current program is to develop and qualify a nuclear fuel system that performs all of the functions of a conventional, fast-spectrum nuclear fuel while destroying recycled actinides, thereby closing the nuclear fuel cycle. In order to meet this goal, the program must develop efficient and safe fuel fabrication processes designed for remote operation. This paper provides an overview of advanced casting processes investigated in the past, and the development of a gaseous diffusion calculation that demonstrates how straightforward process parameter modification can mitigate the loss of volatile minor actinides in the metal alloy melt.

  16. Integral Fast Reactor Program annual progress report, FY 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    This report summarizes highlights of the technical progress made in the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) Program in FY 1991. Technical accomplishments are presented in the following areas of the IFR technology development activities: (1) metal fuel performance, (2) pyroprocess development, (3) safety experiments and analyses, (4) core design development, (5) fuel cycle demonstration, and (6) LMR technology R&D.

  17. Integral Fast Reactor Program annual progress report, FY 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    This report summarizes highlights of the technical progress made in the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) Program in FY 1991. Technical accomplishments are presented in the following areas of the IFR technology development activities: (1) metal fuel performance, (2) pyroprocess development, (3) safety experiments and analyses, (4) core design development, (5) fuel cycle demonstration, and (6) LMR technology R D.

  18. Packed rod neutron shield for fast nuclear reactors

    DOEpatents

    Eck, John E.; Kasberg, Alvin H.

    1978-01-01

    A fast neutron nuclear reactor including a core and a plurality of vertically oriented neutron shield assemblies surrounding the core. Each assembly includes closely packed cylindrical rods within a polygonal metallic duct. The shield assemblies are less susceptible to thermal stresses and are less massive than solid shield assemblies, and are cooled by liquid coolant flow through interstices among the rods and duct.

  19. Integral Fast Reactor Program annual progress report, FY 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y.I.; Walters, L.C.; Laidler, J.J.; Pedersen, D.R.; Wade, D.C.; Lineberry, J.J.

    1994-12-01

    This report summarizes highlights of the technical progress made in the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) Program in FY 1994. Technical accomplishments are presented in the following areas of the IFR technology development activities: metal fuel performance; pyroprocess development; safety experiments and analyses; core design development; fuel cycle demonstration; and LMR technology R&D.

  20. Integral Fast Reactor Program. Annual progress report, FY 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y.I.; Walters, L.C.; Laidler, J.J.; Pedersen, D.R.; Wade, D.C.; Lineberry, M.J.

    1993-06-01

    This report summarizes highlights of the technical progress made in the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) Program in FY 1992. Technical accomplishments are presented in the following areas of the IFR technology development activities: (1) metal fuel performance, (2) pyroprocess development, (3) safety experiments and analyses, (4) core design development, (5) fuel cycle demonstration, and (6) LMR technology R&D.

  1. Fast Reactor Subassembly Design Modifications for Increasing Electricity Generation Efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    R. Wigeland; K. Hamman

    2009-09-01

    Suggested for Track 7: Advances in Reactor Core Design and In-Core Management _____________________________________________________________________________________ Fast Reactor Subassembly Design Modifications for Increasing Electricity Generation Efficiency R. Wigeland and K. Hamman Idaho National Laboratory Given the ability of fast reactors to effectively transmute the transuranic elements as are present in spent nuclear fuel, fast reactors are being considered as one element of future nuclear power systems to enable continued use and growth of nuclear power by limiting high-level waste generation. However, a key issue for fast reactors is higher electricity cost relative to other forms of nuclear energy generation. The economics of the fast reactor are affected by the amount of electric power that can be produced from a reactor, i.e., the thermal efficiency for electricity generation. The present study is examining the potential for fast reactor subassembly design changes to improve the thermal efficiency by increasing the average coolant outlet temperature without increasing peak temperatures within the subassembly, i.e., to make better use of current technology. Sodium-cooled fast reactors operate at temperatures far below the coolant boiling point, so that the maximum coolant outlet temperature is limited by the acceptable peak temperatures for the reactor fuel and cladding. Fast reactor fuel subassemblies have historically been constructed using a large number of small diameter fuel pins contained within a tube of hexagonal cross-section, or hexcan. Due to this design, there is a larger coolant flow area next to the hexcan wall as compared to flow area in the interior of the subassembly. This results in a higher flow rate near the hexcan wall, overcooling the fuel pins next to the wall, and a non-uniform coolant temperature distribution. It has been recognized for many years that this difference in sodium coolant temperature was detrimental to achieving

  2. Fast reactor neutrons for the treatment of superficial carcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, F.M.; Koester, L. ); Auberger, T.; Reuschel, W.; Mayr, M.; Kneschaurek, P.; Breit, A. ); Schraube, H. )

    1992-01-01

    In this paper the fast neutron facility at the Munich Research Reactor (Forschungsreaktor Munchen (FRM)) is briefly described, and data about the beam quality are given. After a listing of the biological experiments performed before and in parallel to the clinical irradiations, the treatment scheme, selection of cases and results of the reactor neutron therapy are reported. More than 80% of patients-all with poor prognosis-show complete remission of the tumor or stoppage of growth for at least several months. Possibilities for a support by boron neutron capture therapy are outlined. Preliminary data of an upgraded thermal-to-fast neutron converter for the planned 20-MW reactor FRM-II are given.

  3. Use of Multi-Purpose Modular Fast Reactors SVBR-75/100 in Market Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Zrodnikov, A.V.; Toshinsky, G.I.; Komlev, O.G.; Dragunov, Yu.G.; Stepanov, V.S.; Klimov, N.N.; Kopytov, I.I.; Krushelnitsky, V.N.

    2006-07-01

    This report presents an innovative nuclear power technology (NPT), based on the use of modular type fast-neutron reactors (FR) (SVBR-75/100) having heavy liquid-metal coolant (HLMC) i.e. eutectic lead-bismuth alloy, which was mastered in Russia for the nuclear submarine (NS) reactors. Reactor SVBR-75/100 possesses inherent self-protection and passive safety properties that allows elimination of many safety systems necessary for traditional type reactors. Use of this NPT makes it possible to eliminate conflicting requirements among safety needs and economic factors, which is particularly found in traditional reactors, to increase considerably the investment attractiveness of nuclear power (NP) based on the use of fast-neutron reactors for the near future, when the cost of natural uranium is low and to assure NP development in the market conditions. On the basis of the factory-fabricated 'standard' reactor modules, it is possible to construct the nuclear power plants (NPP) with different power and purposes. (authors)

  4. Safety characteristics of the integral fast reactor concept

    SciTech Connect

    Marchaterre, J.F.; Cahalan, J.E.; Sevy, R.H.; Wright, A.E.

    1985-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept is an innovative approach to liquid metal reactor design which is being studied by Argonne National Laboratory. Two of the key features of the IFR design are a metal fuel core design, based on the fuel technology developed at EBR-II, and an integral fuel cycle with a colocated fuel cycle facility based on the compact and simplified process steps made possible by the use of metal fuel. The paper presents the safety characteristics of the IFR concept which derive from the use of metal fuel. Liquid metal reactors, because of the low pressure coolant operating far below its boiling point, the natural circulation capability, and high system heat capacities, possess a high degree of inherent safety. The use of metallic fuel allows the reactor designer to further enhance the system capability for passive accommodation of postulated accidents.

  5. Safety characteristics of the integral fast reactor concept

    SciTech Connect

    Marchaterre, J.F.; Cahalan, J.E.; Sevy, R.H.; Wright, A.E.

    1985-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept is an innovative approach to liquid metal reactor design which is being studied by Argonne National Laboratory. Two of the key features of the IFR design are a metal fuel core design, based on the fuel technology developed at EBR-II, and an integral fuel cycle with a co-located fuel cycle facility based on the compact and simplified process steps made possible by the use of the metal fuel. This paper presents the safety characteristics of the IFR concept which derive from the use of metal fuel. Liquid metal reactors, because of the low pressure coolant operating far below its boiling point, the natural circulation capability, and high system heat capacities possess a high degree of inherent safety. The use of metallic fuel allows the reactor designer to further enhance the system capability for passive accommodation of postulated accidents.

  6. CALANDRIA TYPE SODIUM GRAPHITE REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Peterson, R.M.; Mahlmeister, J.E.; Vaughn, N.E.; Sanders, W.J.; Williams, A.C.

    1964-02-11

    A sodium graphite power reactor in which the unclad graphite moderator and fuel elements are contained within a core tank is described. The core tank is submersed in sodium within the reactor vessel. Extending longitudinally through the core thnk are process tubes with fuel elements positioned therein. A bellows sealing means allows axial expansion and construction of the tubes. Within the core tank, a leakage plenum is located below the graphite, and above the graphite is a gas space. A vent line regulates the gas pressure in the space, and another line removes sodium from the plenum. The sodium coolant flows from the lower reactor vessel through the annular space between the fuel elements and process tubes and out into the reactor vessel space above the core tank. From there, the heated coolant is drawn off through an outlet line and sent to the heat exchange. (AEC)

  7. The IAEA international conference on fast reactors and related fuel cycles: highlights and main outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Monti, S.; Toti, A.

    2013-07-01

    The 'International Conference on Fast Reactors and Related Fuel Cycles', which is regularly held every four years, represents the main international event dealing with fast reactors technology and related fuel cycles options. Main topics of the conference were new fast reactor concepts, design and simulation capabilities, safety of fast reactors, fast reactor fuels and innovative fuel cycles, analysis of past experience, fast reactor knowledge management. Particular emphasis was put on safety aspects, considering the current need of developing and harmonizing safety standards for fast reactors at the international level, taking also into account the lessons learned from the accident occurred at the Fukushima- Daiichi nuclear power plant in March 2011. Main advances in the several key areas of technological development were presented through 208 oral presentations during 41 technical sessions which shows the importance taken by fast reactors in the future of nuclear energy.

  8. Liquid-metal fast-breeder reactors: Preliminary safety and environmental information document. Volume VI

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    Information is presented concerning LMFBR design characteristics; uranium-plutonium/uranium recycle homogeneous core; uranium-plutonium/uranium spiked recycle heterogeneous core; uranium-plutonium/uranium spiked recycle homogeneous core; uranium-plutonium/thorium spiked recycle heterogeneous core; uranium-plutonium/thorium spiked recycle homogeneous core; thorium-plutonium/thorium spiked recycle homogeneous core; denatured uranium-233/thorium cycle homogeneous core; safety consideration for the LMFBR; and environmental considerations.

  9. Piping support system for liquid-metal fast-breeder reactor

    DOEpatents

    Brussalis, Jr., William G.

    1984-01-01

    A pipe support consisting of a rigid link pivotally attached to a pipe and an anchor, adapted to generate stress or strain in the link and pipe due to pipe thermal movement, which stress or strain can oppose further pipe movement and generally provides pipe support. The pipe support can be used in multiple combinations with other pipe supports to form a support system. This support system is most useful in applications in which the pipe is normally operated at a constant elevated or depressed temperature such that desired stress or strain can be planned in advance of pipe and support installation. The support system is therefore especially useful in steam stations and in refrigeration equipment.

  10. Mechanical properties test data of Alloy 718 for liquid metal fast breeder reactor applications

    SciTech Connect

    Korth, G.E.

    1983-01-01

    Mechanical property test data are reported for Alloy 718 with two heat treatments: conventional heat treatment (CHT) for base metal and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) heat treatment (IHT) for base and weld metal. Tests were conducted in air from 24 to 704{degree}C and include elastic properties (Young's modulus, shear modulus, Poisson's ratio), tensile properties, creep-rupture properties, fatigue properties, creep-fatigue properties, and Charpy impact behavior. Effects of long term thermal aging at 538, 593, 649, and 704{degree}C for times to 25,000 h are also reported for CHT material (tensile, creep-rupture, fatigue, and Charpy), and IHT material (tensile, and Charpy). 18 refs., 63 figs., 36 tabs.

  11. Tubular gage for a liquid-metal-cooled fast breeder reactor

    DOEpatents

    Hutter, Ernest; Tuma, Leroy A.

    1977-06-14

    Spring-loaded plungers are arranged about a housing for insertion into a polygonal tube, one plunger for each side of the tube. Each plunger has a locking cam and sliding wedge mechanism which can overcome the spring force associated with the plunger and lock it in any position. The wedges are operated by a rod moveable axially in the housing. Several housings with their associated plungers can be stacked. The stack is lowered into the polygonal tube with all of the plungers locked in a fully inward position. When the stack is in the tube, each wedge is moved to release its locking cam, allowing each of the plungers to spring outward against an inner side of the tube. Each housing will thus gage the internal dimensions of the tube at its elevation. The plungers are locked in position, the entire stack is rotated to bring the plungers into the corners described by the intersections of the flat sides, and the stack is removed from the tube whereupon the dimensions across opposite locked plungers may be read by a micrometer.

  12. Development of Inspection and Repair Technology for Heat Exchanger Tubes in Fast Breeder Reactors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    This system will be tested at the mockup facility for heat ex- changer units. This new probe system will demonstrate laser peening for the laser...nishimura.akihiko@jaea.go.jp A prototype probe system with a hybrid optical fiber scope was designed for inspecting and re- pairing heat exchanger tubes in...to remove work- hardened layers. And spot laser welding is used to repair cracks. This system is both a safe and eco- nomical option for the

  13. Progress in reliability of fast reactor operation and new trends to increased inherent safety

    SciTech Connect

    Merk, Bruno; Stanculescu, Alexander; Chellapandi, Perumal; Hill, Robert

    2015-06-01

    The reasons for the renewed interest in fast reactors and an overview of the progress in sodium cooled fast reactor operation in the last ten years are given. The excellent operational performance of sodium cooled fast reactors in this period is highlighted as a sound basis for the development of new fast reactors. The operational performance of the BN-600 is compared and evaluated against the performance of German light water reactors to assess the reliability. The relevance of feedback effects for safe reactor design is described, and a new method for the enhancement of feedback effects in fast reactors is proposed. Experimental reactors demonstrating the inherent safety of advanced sodium cooled fast reactor designs are described and the potential safety improvements resulting from the use of fine distributed moderating material are discussed.

  14. Safeguards operations in the integral fast reactor fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Goff, K.M.; Benedict, R.W.; Brumbach, S.B.; Dickerman, C.E.; Tompot, R.W.

    1994-08-01

    Argonne National Laboratory is currently demonstrating the fuel cycle for the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR), an advanced reactor concept that takes advantage of the properties of metallic fuel and liquid metal cooling to offer significant improvements in reactor safety, operation, fuel-cycle economics, environmental protection, and safeguards. The IFR fuel cycle employs a pyrometallurgical process using molten salts and liquid metals to recover actinides from spent fuel. The safeguards aspects of the fuel cycle demonstration must be approved by the United States Department of Energy, but a further goal of the program is to develop a safeguards system that could gain acceptance from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and International Atomic Energy Agency. This fuel cycle is described with emphasis on aspects that differ from aqueous reprocessing and on its improved safeguardability due to decreased attractiveness and diversion potential of all process streams, including the fuel product.

  15. Measurement and calculation of high-actinide burnup in the prototype fast reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Broadhead, B.L.; Raman, S.; Dickens, J.K. )

    1991-01-01

    An agreement was signed in May 1979 as a part of a long-term cooperative program between the United Kingdom and the US under the liquid-metal fast breeder reactor agreement of 1976. This agreement included an experiment to carry out irradiations of physics specimens of fissile and fertile actinides to improve our knowledge of basic nuclear physics phenomena. Three fuel pins were prepared by the US to contain the actinide physics samples; two of these pins were irradiated at the Dounreay prototype fast reactor (PFR) for a total irradiation of 63 full-power days. The third pin has only recently been removed from the PFT, following an irradiation of > 500 full-power days. Each pin houses 35 capsules containing milligram quantities of actinide oxides of {sup 231}Pa, {sup 230}Th, {sup 232}Th, {sup 233}U, {sup 234}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 236}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 237}Np, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 240}Pu, {sup 241}Pu, {sup 242}Pu, {sup 244}Pu, {sup 241}Am, {sup 243}Am, {sup 243}Cm, {sup 244}Cm, {sup 246}Cm, and {sup 248}Cm. Following the return of the first fuel pin (FP-1) to the United States in May 1984, the actinide samples were prepared for studies of fission product yields, isotopics, and material concentrations. The measurements were repeated for the second fuel pin (FP-2) to remedy several problems encountered in the processing of the FP-1 pin. A brief description of the measured and calculated {sup 137}Cs yields for both FP-1 and FP-2 are included in this paper.

  16. Sensitivity Analysis of Reprocessing Cooling Times on Light Water Reactor and Sodium Fast Reactor Fuel Cycles

    SciTech Connect

    R. M. Ferrer; S. Bays; M. Pope

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to quantify the effects of variations of the Light Water Reactor (LWR) Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) and fast reactor reprocessing cooling time on a Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR) assuming a single-tier fuel cycle scenario. The results from this study show the effects of different cooling times on the SFR’s transuranic (TRU) conversion ratio (CR) and transuranic fuel enrichment. Also, the decay heat, gamma heat and neutron emission of the SFR’s fresh fuel charge were evaluated. A 1000 MWth commercial-scale SFR design was selected as the baseline in this study. Both metal and oxide CR=0.50 SFR designs are investigated.

  17. Effects of electrical field on hatchability performance of eggs from a layer-type breeder.

    PubMed

    Shafey, T M; Al-Batshan, H A; Ghannam, M M

    2007-04-01

    1. Eggs from a layer-type breeder flock (Baladi, King Saud University) between 50 and 63 weeks of age were used in three trials to study the effects of electrical field (EF) during incubation on albumen and yolk heights, incubation temperature, egg weight loss and hatchability traits. The effects of egg size and eggshell characteristics on hatchability traits of eggs incubated under EF were investigated. 2. Eggs were weighed and graded into three weight classes (small, medium, and large). The physical dimensions, eggshell characteristics, and conductance of eggs were examined. The incubator was divided into two compartments for the control and EF treatments. Two aluminium plates were fitted on the inside walls of the EF compartment, face to face, and connected to a step up electric transformer. Eggs were exposed constantly to the EF during the first 18 d of incubation at the level of 30 kV/m, 60 Hz. 3. Egg size influenced the physical dimensions and eggshell characteristics of eggs. Large eggs had higher egg weight, egg surface area, egg volume, eggshell conductance, and eggshell weight and lower yolk weight percentage than medium or small size eggs. Small eggs had lower egg length and higher egg density than large or medium size eggs. Large eggs had higher eggshell thickness than small size eggs. 4. EF incubation of eggs raised incubation temperature by 0.06 degrees C, and increased the percentage of egg weight loss, hatchability, and weight of hatching chicks and reduced the early embryo deaths, and length of incubation by approximately 9.8, 19.6, 1.7, 62.1 and 2.1%, respectively. 5. There was no significant difference between the two incubation treatments in the heights of albumen and yolk of incubated eggs, percentages of late embryo deaths, and pips with live and dead embryos. Hatchability traits were not significantly influenced by egg size. 6. It was concluded that EF incubation of eggs increased hatchability, chick-hatching weight, and reduced the length of

  18. How Small Can Fast-Spectrum Space Reactors Get?

    SciTech Connect

    Hatton, Steven A.; El-Genk, Mohamed S.

    2006-01-20

    Fast neutron spectrum space reactors are an appropriate choice for high thermal powers, but for low powers, they may not satisfy the excess reactivity requirement while remaining sub-critical when immersed in wet sand and flooded with seawater following a launch abort accident. This paper identifies the smallest size fast spectrum, Sectored, Compact Reactor loaded with Single UN fuel pins (SCoRe-S7), which satisfy the requirements of cold clean excess reactivity > $4.00 and remains at least $1.00 subcritical at shutdown and in submersion conditions. Results indicate that increasing the diameter of the SCoRe-S core reduces its active height and the UN fuel enrichment, but increases the Spectrum-Shift Absorber (SSA) of 157GdN additive to the fuel. All SCoRe-S cores also have a 0.1 mm thick 157Gd2O3 SSA coating on the outer surface of the reactor vessel to reduce the effect of the wet sand reflector, while the SSA fuel additive reduces the effect on the criticality of the flooded reactor caused by thermal neutron fission. The active core height decreases from 42.4 cm for the smallest SCoRe-S7 to as much as to 37.4 cm for the largest core of SCoRe-S11. For a 1.8 MWth reactor thermal power the UN fuel specific power decreases from 17.0 in the SCoRe-S7 to 11.5 Wth/kg in the -S11. The corresponding reactor total mass, including the BeO reflector, increases from 440 kg to 512 kg.

  19. How Small Can Fast-Spectrum Space Reactors Get?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatton, Steven A.; El-Genk, Mohamed S.

    2006-01-01

    Fast neutron spectrum space reactors are an appropriate choice for high thermal powers, but for low powers, they may not satisfy the excess reactivity requirement while remaining sub-critical when immersed in wet sand and flooded with seawater following a launch abort accident. This paper identifies the smallest size fast spectrum, Sectored, Compact Reactor loaded with Single UN fuel pins (SCoRe-S7), which satisfy the requirements of cold clean excess reactivity > $4.00 and remains at least $1.00 subcritical at shutdown and in submersion conditions. Results indicate that increasing the diameter of the SCoRe-S core reduces its active height and the UN fuel enrichment, but increases the Spectrum-Shift Absorber (SSA) of 157GdN additive to the fuel. All SCoRe-S cores also have a 0.1 mm thick 157Gd2O3 SSA coating on the outer surface of the reactor vessel to reduce the effect of the wet sand reflector, while the SSA fuel additive reduces the effect on the criticality of the flooded reactor caused by thermal neutron fission. The active core height decreases from 42.4 cm for the smallest SCoRe-S7 to as much as to 37.4 cm for the largest core of SCoRe-S11. For a 1.8 MWth reactor thermal power the UN fuel specific power decreases from 17.0 in the SCoRe-S7 to 11.5 Wth/kg in the -S11. The corresponding reactor total mass, including the BeO reflector, increases from 440 kg to 512 kg.

  20. Computational Neutronics Methods and Transmutation Performance Analyses for Fast Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    R. Ferrer; M. Asgari; S. Bays; B. Forget

    2007-03-01

    The once-through fuel cycle strategy in the United States for the past six decades has resulted in an accumulation of Light Water Reactor (LWR) Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF). This SNF contains considerable amounts of transuranic (TRU) elements that limit the volumetric capacity of the current planned repository strategy. A possible way of maximizing the volumetric utilization of the repository is to separate the TRU from the LWR SNF through a process such as UREX+1a, and convert it into fuel for a fast-spectrum Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR). The key advantage in this scenario is the assumption that recycling of TRU in the ABR (through pyroprocessing or some other approach), along with a low capture-to-fission probability in the fast reactor’s high-energy neutron spectrum, can effectively decrease the decay heat and toxicity of the waste being sent to the repository. The decay heat and toxicity reduction can thus minimize the need for multiple repositories. This report summarizes the work performed by the fuel cycle analysis group at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to establish the specific technical capability for performing fast reactor fuel cycle analysis and its application to a high-priority ABR concept. The high-priority ABR conceptual design selected is a metallic-fueled, 1000 MWth SuperPRISM (S-PRISM)-based ABR with a conversion ratio of 0.5. Results from the analysis showed excellent agreement with reference values. The independent model was subsequently used to study the effects of excluding curium from the transuranic (TRU) external feed coming from the LWR SNF and recycling the curium produced by the fast reactor itself through pyroprocessing. Current studies to be published this year focus on analyzing the effects of different separation strategies as well as heterogeneous TRU target systems.

  1. Analyses of hypothetical FCI's in a fast reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Padilla, A. Jr.; Martin, F.J.; Niccoli, L.G.

    1981-01-01

    Parametric analyses using the SIMMER code were performed to evaluate the potential for a severe recriticality from a pressure-driven recompaction caused by an energetic FCI during the transition phase of a hypothetical accident in a fast reactor. For realistic and reasonable estimates for the assumed accident conditions, a severe recriticality was not predicted. The conditions under which a severe recriticality would be obtained or averted were identified. 10 figures, 2 tables.

  2. U. S. fast reactor materials and structures program

    SciTech Connect

    Harms, W.O.; Purdy, C.M.

    1984-01-01

    The U.S. DOE has sponsored a vigorous breeder reactor materials and structures program for 15 years. Important contributions have resulted from this effort in the areas of design (inelastic rules, verified methods, seismic criteria, mechanical properties data); resolution of licensing issues (technical witnessing, confirmatory testing); construction (fabrication/welding procedures, nondestructive testing techniques); and operation (sodium purification, instrumentation and chemical analysis, radioactivity control, and in-service inspection. The national LMFBR program currently is being restructured. The Materials and Structures Program will focus its efforts in the following areas: (1) removal of anticipated licensing impediments through confirmation of the adequacy of structural design methods and criteria for components containing welds and geometric discontinuities, the generation of mechanical properties for stainless steel castings and weldments, and the evaluation of irradiation effects; (2) qualification of modified 9 Cr-1 Mo steel and tribological coatings for design flexibility; (3) development of improved inelastic design guidelines and procedures; (4) reform of design codes and standards and engineering practices, leading to simpler, less conservative rules and to simplified design analysis methods; and (5) incorporation of information from foreign program.

  3. Three-dimensional finite-element analysis of the cellular convection phenomena in the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant prototype pump

    SciTech Connect

    Silver, A.H.; Lee, J.Y.

    1983-01-01

    Cellular convection was studied rigorously during the development of the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) Program Pumps. This paper presents the development of a three-dimensional finite-element heat transfer model which accounts for the cellular convection phenomena. A buoyancy driven cellular convection flow pattern is introduced in the annulus region between the upper inner structure and the pump tank. Steady-state thermal data were obtained for several test conditions for argon gas pressures up to 93 psig (741 kPa) and sodium operating temperatures to 1000/sup 0/F (811/sup 0/K). Test temperature distributions on the pump tank and inner structure were correlated with numerical results and excellent agreement was obtained.

  4. Computational fluid dynamics modelling of biomass fast pyrolysis in fluidised bed reactors, focusing different kinetic schemes.

    PubMed

    Ranganathan, Panneerselvam; Gu, Sai

    2016-08-01

    The present work concerns with CFD modelling of biomass fast pyrolysis in a fluidised bed reactor. Initially, a study was conducted to understand the hydrodynamics of the fluidised bed reactor by investigating the particle density and size, and gas velocity effect. With the basic understanding of hydrodynamics, the study was further extended to investigate the different kinetic schemes for biomass fast pyrolysis process. The Eulerian-Eulerian approach was used to model the complex multiphase flows in the reactor. The yield of the products from the simulation was compared with the experimental data. A good comparison was obtained between the literature results and CFD simulation. It is also found that CFD prediction with the advanced kinetic scheme is better when compared to other schemes. With the confidence obtained from the CFD models, a parametric study was carried out to study the effect of biomass particle type and size and temperature on the yield of the products.

  5. A summary of sodium-cooled fast reactor development

    SciTech Connect

    Aoto, Kazumi; Dufour, Philippe; Hongyi, Yang; Glatz, Jean Paul; Kim, Yeong-il; Ashurko, Yury; Hill, Robert; Uto, Nariaki

    2014-11-01

    Much of the basic technology for the Sodium-cooled fast Reactor (SFR) has been established through long term development experience with former fast reactor programs, and is being confirmed by the Phénix end-of-life tests in France, the restart of Monju in Japan, the lifetime extension of BN-600 in Russia, and the startup of the China Experimental Fast Reactor in China. Planned startup in 2014 for new SFRs: BN-800 in Russia and PFBR in India, will further enhance the confirmation of the SFR basic technology. Nowadays, the SFR development has advanced to aiming at establishment of the Generation-IV system which is dedicated to sustainable energy generation and actinide management, and several advanced SFR concepts are under development such as PRISM, JSFR, ASTRID, PGSFR, BN-1200, and CFR-600. Generation-IV International Forum is an international collaboration framework where various R&D activities are progressing on design of system and component, safety and operation, advanced fuel, and actinide cycle for the Generation-IV SFR development, and will play a beneficial role of promoting them thorough providing an opportunity to share the past experience and the latest data of design and R&D among countries developing SFR.

  6. Development of alternate extractant systems for fast reactor fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Vasudeva Rao, P.R.; Suresh, A.; Venkatesan, K.A.; Srinivasan, T.G.; Raj, Baldev

    2007-07-01

    Due to the limitations of TBP in processing of high burn-up, Pu-rich fast reactor fuels, there is a need to develop alternate extractants for fast reactor fuel processing. In this context, our Centre has been examining the suitability of alternate tri-alkyl phosphates. Third phase formation in the extraction of Th(IV) by TBP, tri-n-amyl phosphate (TAP) and tri-2-methyl-butyl phosphate (T2MBP) from nitric acid media has been investigated under various conditions to derive conclusions on their application for extraction of Pu at macro levels. The chemical and radiolytic degradation of tri-n-amyl-phosphate (TAP) diluted in normal paraffin hydrocarbon (NPH) in the presence of nitric acid has been investigated by the measurement of plutonium retention in organic phase. The potential application of room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) for reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel has been explored. Extraction of uranium (VI) and palladium (II) from nitric acid medium by commercially available RTIL and tri-n-butyl phosphate solution in RTIL have been studied and the feasibility of electrodeposition of uranium as uranium oxide (UO{sub 2}) and palladium (II) as metallic palladium from the loaded organic phase have been demonstrated. This paper describes results of the above studies and discusses the suitability of the systems for fast reactor fuel reprocessing. (authors)

  7. Reactivity Control Schemes for Fast Spectrum Space Nuclear Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Craft, Aaron E.; King, Jeffrey C.

    2008-01-21

    Several different reactivity control schemes are considered for future space nuclear reactor power systems. Each of these control schemes uses a combination of boron carbide absorbers and/or beryllium oxide reflectors to achieve sufficient reactivity swing to keep the reactor subcritical during launch and to provide sufficient excess reactivity to operate the reactor over its expected 7-15 year lifetime. The size and shape of the control system directly impacts the size and mass of the space reactor's reflector and shadow shield, leading to a tradeoff between reactivity swing and total system mass. This paper presents a trade study of drum, shutter, and petal control schemes based on reactivity swing and mass effects for a representative fast-spectrum, gas-cooled reactor. For each control scheme, the dimensions and composition of the core are constant, and the reflector is sized to provide $5 of cold-clean excess reactivity with each configuration in its most reactive state. The advantages and disadvantages of each configuration are discussed, along with optimization techniques and novel geometric approaches for each scheme.

  8. Vented target elements for use in an isotope-production reactor. [LMFBR

    DOEpatents

    Cawley, W.E.; Omberg, R.P.

    1982-08-19

    A method is described for producing tritium gas in a fast breeder reactor cooled with liquid metal. Lithium target material is placed in pins equipped with vents, and tritium gas is recovered from the coolant.

  9. Fuel pins with both target and fuel pellets in an isotope-production reactor

    DOEpatents

    Cawley, W.E.; Omberg, R.P.

    1982-08-19

    A method is described for producing tritium in a fast breeder reactor cooled with liquid metal. Lithium target pellets are placed in close contact with fissile fuel pellets in order to increase the tritium production rate.

  10. Assemblies with both target and fuel pins in an isotope-production reactor

    DOEpatents

    Cawley, W.E.; Omberg, R.P.

    1982-08-19

    A method is described for producing tritium in a fast breeder reactor cooled with liquid metal. Lithium target material is placed in pins adjacent to fuel pins in order to increase the tritium production rate.

  11. Freeze-casting as a Novel Manufacturing Process for Fast Reactor Fuels. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Wegst, Ulrike G.K.; Allen, Todd; Sridharan, Kumar

    2014-04-07

    Advanced burner reactors are designed to reduce the amount of long-lived radioactive isotopes that need to be disposed of as waste. The input feedstock for creating advanced fuel forms comes from either recycle of used light water reactor fuel or recycle of fuel from a fast burner reactor. Fuel for burner reactors requires novel fuel types based on new materials and designs that can achieve higher performance requirements (higher burn up, higher power, and greater margins to fuel melting) then yet achieved. One promising strategy to improved fuel performance is the manufacture of metal or ceramic scaffolds which are designed to allow for a well-defined placement of the fuel into the host, and this in a manner that permits greater control than that possible in the production of typical CERMET fuels.

  12. Metal hydrides reactors with improved dynamic characteristics for a fast cycling hydrogen compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popeneciu, G.; Coldea, I.; Lupu, D.; Misan, I.; Ardelean, O.

    2009-08-01

    This paper presents an investigation of coupled heat and mass transfer process in metal hydrides hydrogen storage reactors. Hydrogen storage and compression performance of our designed and developed reactors are studied by varying the operating parameters and analyzing the effects of metal hydride bed parameters. The metal alloy selected to characterize the cycling behaviour of reactors is LaNi5, material synthesized and characterized by us in the range 20-80°C. Four types of metal hydride reactors were tested with the aim to provide a fast hydrogen absorption-desorption cycle, able to be thermally cycled at rapid rates. Some new technical solutions have been studied to make a step forward in reducing the duration of the reactors cycle, which combines the effective increase of the thermal conductivity and good permeability to hydrogen gas. Dynamic characteristic of developed fast metal hydride reactors is improved using our novel mixture metal hydride-CA conductive additive due to the increased effective thermal conductivity of the alloy bed. The advanced hydride bed design with high heat transfer capabilities can be thermally cycled at a rapid rate, under 120 seconds, in order to process high hydrogen flow rates.

  13. Plutonium (TRU) transmutation and {sup 233}U production by single-fluid type accelerator molten-salt breeder (AMSB)

    SciTech Connect

    Furukaw, Kazuo; Kato, Yoshio; Chigrinov, Sergey E.

    1995-10-01

    For practical/industrial disposition of Pu(TRU) by accelerator facility, not only physical soundness and safety but also the following technological rationality should be required: (1) few R&D items including radiation damage, heat removal and material compatibility; (2) few operation/maintenance/processing works: (3) few reproduction of radioactivity; (4) effective energy production in parallel. This will be achieved by the new modification of Th-fertilizing Single-Fluid type Accelerator Molten-Salt Breeder (AMSB), by which a global nuclear energy strategy for next century might be prepared.

  14. Prediction of stainless steel activation in experimental breeder reactor 2 (EBR-II) reflector and blanket subassemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Bunde, K.A.

    1996-12-31

    Stainless steel structural components in nuclear reactors become radioactive wastes when no longer useful. Prior to disposal, certain physical attributes must be analyzed. These attributes include structural integrity, chemical stability, and the radioactive material content among others. The focus of this work is the estimation of the radioactive material content of stainless steel wastes from a research reactor operated by Argonne National Laboratory.

  15. Neutron flux spectra and radiation damage parameters for the Russian Bor-60 and SM-2 reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Karasiov, A.V.; Greenwood, L.R.

    1995-04-01

    The objective is to compare neutron irradiation conditions in Russian reactors and similar US facilities. Neutron fluence and spectral information and calculated radiation damage parameters are presented for the BOR-60 (Fast Experimental Reactor - 60 MW) and SM-2 reactors in Russia. Their neutron exposure characteristics are comparable with those of the Experimental Breeder Reactor (ERB-II), the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) in the United States.

  16. Model biases in high-burnup fast reactor simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Touran, N.; Cheatham, J.; Petroski, R.

    2012-07-01

    A new code system called the Advanced Reactor Modeling Interface (ARMI) has been developed that loosely couples multiscale, multiphysics nuclear reactor simulations to provide rapid, user-friendly, high-fidelity full systems analysis. Incorporating neutronic, thermal-hydraulic, safety/transient, fuel performance, core mechanical, and economic analyses, ARMI provides 'one-click' assessments of many multi-disciplined performance metrics and constraints that historically require iterations between many diverse experts. The capabilities of ARMI are implemented in this study to quantify neutronic biases of various modeling approximations typically made in fast reactor analysis at an equilibrium condition, after many repetitive shuffles. Sensitivities at equilibrium that result in very high discharge burnup are considered ( and >20% FIMA), as motivated by the development of the Traveling Wave Reactor. Model approximations discussed include homogenization, neutronic and depletion mesh resolution, thermal-hydraulic coupling, explicit control rod insertion, burnup-dependent cross sections, fission product model, burn chain truncation, and dynamic fuel performance. The sensitivities of these approximations on equilibrium discharge burnup, k{sub eff}, power density, delayed neutron fraction, and coolant temperature coefficient are discussed. (authors)

  17. Fast Pyrolysis of Agricultural Wastes in a Fluidized Bed Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X. H.; Chen, H. P.; Yang, H. P.; Dai, X. M.; Zhang, S. H.

    Solid biomass can be converted into liquid fuel through fast pyrolysis, which is convenient to be stored and transported with potential to be used as a fossil oil substitute. In China, agricultural wastes are the main biomass materials, whose pyrolysis process has not been researched adequately compared to forestry wastes. As the representative agricultural wastes in China, peanut shell and maize stalk were involved in this paper and pine wood sawdust was considered for comparing the different pyrolysis behaviors of agricultural wastes and forestry wastes. Fast pyrolysis experiments were carried out in a bench-scale fluidized-bed reactor. The bio-oil yieldsof peanut shell and maize stalk were obviously lower than that ofpine sawdust. Compared with pine sawdust, the char yields of peanut shell and maize stalk were higher but the heating value of uncondensable gaswas lower. This means that the bio-oil cost will be higher for agricultural wastes if taking the conventional pyrolysis technique. And the characteristic and component analysis resultsof bio-oil revealed that the quality of bio-oil from agricultural wastes, especially maize stalk, was worse than that from pine wood. Therefore, it is important to take some methods to improve the quality of bio-oilfrom agricultural wastes, which should promote the exploitation of Chinese biomass resources through fast pyrolysis in afluidized bed reactor.

  18. METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR IMPROVING PERFORMANCE OF A FAST REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Koch, L.J.

    1959-01-20

    A specific arrangement of the fertile material and fissionable material in the active portion of a fast reactor to achieve improvement in performance and to effectively lower the operating temperatures in the center of the reactor is described. According to this invention a group of fuel elements containing fissionable material are assembled to form a hollow fuel core. Elements containing a fertile material, such as depleted uranium, are inserted into the interior of the fuel core to form a central blanket. Additional elemenis of fertile material are arranged about the fuel core to form outer blankets which in tunn are surrounded by a reflector. This arrangement of fuel core and blankets results in substantial flattening of the flux pattern.

  19. Five Requirements for Nuclear Energy and CANDLE Fast Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2010-06-01

    The Center for Research into Innovative Nuclear Energy Systems (CRINES) was established in order to succeed the COE-INES mission after finishing this program in Tokyo Tech. CRINES considers nuclear energy should satisfy 5 requirements; sustainability as basic energy, solving 3 problems inherent to accidents, radioactive waste and nuclear bomb, and economical acceptance. Characteristics of CANDLE fast reactor are discussed for these requirements. It satisfies 4 requirements; sustainability and solving 3 inherent problems. For the remaining requirement for economy, a high potential to satisfy this requirement is also shown.

  20. Five Requirements for Nuclear Energy and CANDLE Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2010-06-22

    The Center for Research into Innovative Nuclear Energy Systems (CRINES) was established in order to succeed the COE-INES mission after finishing this program in Tokyo Tech. CRINES considers nuclear energy should satisfy 5 requirements; sustainability as basic energy, solving 3 problems inherent to accidents, radioactive waste and nuclear bomb, and economical acceptance. Characteristics of CANDLE fast reactor are discussed for these requirements. It satisfies 4 requirements; sustainability and solving 3 inherent problems. For the remaining requirement for economy, a high potential to satisfy this requirement is also shown.

  1. Fast reactor core concepts to improve transmutation efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimura, Koji; Kawashima, Katsuyuki; Itooka, Satoshi

    2015-12-01

    Fast Reactor (FR) core concepts to improve transmutation efficiency were conducted. A heterogeneous MA loaded core was designed based on the 1000MWe-ABR breakeven core. The heterogeneous MA loaded core with Zr-H loaded moderated targets had a better transmutation performance than the MA homogeneous loaded core. The annular pellet rod design was proposed as one of the possible design options for the MA target. It was shown that using annular pellet MA rods mitigates the self-shielding effect in the moderated target so as to enhance the transmutation rate.

  2. Ferritic steels for sodium-cooled fast reactors: Design principles and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raj, Baldev; Vijayalakshmi, M.

    2010-09-01

    An overview of the current status of development of ferritic steels for emerging fast reactor technologies is presented in this paper. The creep-resistant 9-12Cr ferritic/martensitic steels are classically known for steam generator applications. The excellent void swelling resistance of ferritic steels enabled the identification of their potential for core component applications of fast reactors. Since then, an extensive knowledge base has been generated by identifying the empirical correlations between chemistry of the steels, heat treatment, structure, and properties, in addition to their in-reactor behavior. A few concerns have also been identified which pertain to high-temperature irradiation creep, embrittlement, Type IV cracking in creep-loaded weldments, and hard zone formation in dissimilar joints. The origin of these problems and the methodologies to overcome the limitations are highlighted. Finally, the suitability of the ferritic steels is re-evaluated in the emerging scenario of the fast reactor technology, with a target of achieving better breeding ratio and improved thermal efficiency.

  3. Design and Testing of D.C. Conduction Pump for Sodium Cooled Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Nashine, B.K.; Dash, S.K.; Gurumurthy, K.; Rajan, M.; Vaidyanathan, G.

    2006-07-01

    DC Conduction pump immersed in sodium forms a part of Failed Fuel Location Module (FFLM) of 500 MWe Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) currently under construction. FFLM housed in control plug of the reactor, is used to locate the failed fuel sub-assembly due to clad rupture in the fuel pin. The DC conduction pump sucks the sodium from the top of fuel sub-assemblies through the selector valve and pumps the sodium to hold up for detecting the presence of delayed neutrons. Presence of delayed neutron is the indication of failure in the sampled fuel sub-assembly. The DC Conduction Pump was chosen because of its low voltage operation (2 V) where argon/alumina ceramic can provide required electrical insulation even at operating temperature of 560 deg. C without much complication on the manufacturing front. Sampling of sodium from top of different sub-assemblies is achieved by operation of selector valve in-conjunction with the drive motor. FFLM requires the pump to be immersed in sodium pool at {approx} 560 deg. C located above the fuel sub-assemblies in the reactor. The Pump of 0.36 m{sup 3}/h capacity and developing 1.45 Kg/ cm{sup 2} pressure was designed, manufactured and tested. The DC Conduction Pump has a stainless steel duct filled with liquid sodium, which is to be pumped. The stainless steel duct is kept in magnetic field obtained by means of electromagnet. The electromagnet is made of soft iron and the coil made of copper conductor surrounds the yoke portion of electromagnet. The external DC source of 2000 Amps, 2 Volt is used to send current through sodium placed in the stainless steel duct and the same current is sent through copper coil of electromagnet for producing required magneto motive force, which in turn produces required magnetic field. The interaction of current in sodium (placed in stainless steel duct) and magnetic field produced by the electromagnet in the duct region produces pumping force in the sodium. Electromagnet, copper coil, stainless steel

  4. The development and application of an improved reactor analysis model for fast reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Jia

    Accuracy in neutron cross sections calculation and consistency in reactor physics are fundamental requirements in advanced nuclear reactor design and analysis. The work presented in this dissertation focuses on the development and advanced application of a reactor analysis model with updated cross section libraries that is suitable for online cross section generation for fast reactors. Research has been performed in two areas of interest in reactor physics. The first target of the research is to develop effcient modeling capacity of the 1- D lattice code MICROX-2 for its neutron spectrum calculation based on Collision Probability Method (CPM). Expanded master cross section libraries have been generated based on updated nuclear data and optimized fine-group energy structure to accommodate both thermal and fast reactor spectra as well as to comply with the need for advanced fuel cycle analysis. After verifying the new libraries, the solution methods have been reviewed and updated, including the update of interpolation scheme for resonance self-shielding factors and improvement of spatial self-shielding models for various fuel assembly geometries. The assessment of the updated lattice calculation models has shown that the prediction accuracy of lattice properties represented by the eigenvalue and reaction rate ratios is improved, especially for fast neutron spectrum lattices of which the importance of neutrons in the unresolved energy range is high. The second target of the research is to improve the accuracy of few-group nuclear cross section generation for the reactor core calculation. A 2-D pin-by-pin lattice model has been developed based on embedded CPM within the framework of the Nodal Expansion Method (NEM), which is capable of modeling the heterogeneity of the fuel assembly. Then, an online cross section generation methodology along with discontinuity factors has been developed based on Iterative Diffusion- Diffusion Methodology (IDDM), which can minimize the

  5. Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Analysis of Symbiotic Light-Water Reactor and Fast Burner Reactor Systems

    SciTech Connect

    D. E. Shropshire

    2009-01-01

    The Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Analysis of Symbiotic Light-Water Reactor and Fast Burner Reactor Systems, prepared to support the U.S. Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) systems analysis, provides a technology-oriented baseline system cost comparison between the open fuel cycle and closed fuel cycle systems. The intent is to understand their overall cost trends, cost sensitivities, and trade-offs. This analysis also improves the AFCI Program’s understanding of the cost drivers that will determine nuclear power’s cost competitiveness vis-a-vis other baseload generation systems. The common reactor-related costs consist of capital, operating, and decontamination and decommissioning costs. Fuel cycle costs include front-end (pre-irradiation) and back-end (post-iradiation) costs, as well as costs specifically associated with fuel recycling. This analysis reveals that there are large cost uncertainties associated with all the fuel cycle strategies, and that overall systems (reactor plus fuel cycle) using a closed fuel cycle are about 10% more expensive in terms of electricity generation cost than open cycle systems. The study concludes that further U.S. and joint international-based design studies are needed to reduce the cost uncertainties with respect to fast reactor, fuel separation and fabrication, and waste disposition. The results of this work can help provide insight to the cost-related factors and conditions needed to keep nuclear energy (including closed fuel cycles) economically competitive in the U.S. and worldwide. These results may be updated over time based on new cost information, revised assumptions, and feedback received from additional reviews.

  6. Improved safety fast reactor with “reservoir” for delayed neutrons generating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulikov, G. G.; Apse, V. A.; Shmelev, A. N.; Kulikov, E. G.

    2017-01-01

    The paper considers the possibility to improve safety of fast reactors by using weak neutron absorber with large atomic weight as a material for external neutron reflector and for internal cavity in the reactor core (the neutron “reservoir”) where generation of some additional “delayed” neutron takes place. The effects produced by the external neutron reflector and the internal neutron “reservoir” on kinetic behavior of fast reactors are inter-compared. It is demonstrated that neutron kinetics of fast reactors with such external and internal zones becomes the quieter as compared with neutron kinetics of thermal reactors.

  7. Shape optimization of a sodium cooled fast reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Damien; Allaire, Grégoire; Pantz, Olivier; Pozin, Nicolas

    2014-06-01

    Traditional designs of sodium cooled fast reactors have a positive sodium expansion feedback. During a loss of flow transient without scram, sodium heating and boiling thus insert a positive reactivity and prevents the power from decreasing. Recent studies led at CEA, AREVA and EDF show that cores with complex geometries can feature a very low or even a negative sodium void worth.(1, 2) Usual optimization methods for core conception are based on a parametric description of a given core design(3).(4) New core concepts and shapes can then only be found by hand. Shape optimization methods have proven very efficient in the conception of optimal structures under thermal or mechanical constraints.(5, 6) First studies show that these methods could be applied to sodium cooled core conception.(7) In this paper, a shape optimization method is applied to the conception of a sodium cooled fast reactor core with low sodium void worth. An objective function to be minimized is defined. It includes the reactivity change induced by a 1% sodium density decrease. The optimization variable is a displacement field changing the core geometry from one shape to another. Additionally, a parametric optimization of the plutonium content distribution of the core is made, so as to ensure that the core is kept critical, and that the power shape is flat enough. The final shape obtained must then be adjusted to a get realistic core layout. Its caracteristics can be checked with reference neutronic codes such as ERANOS. Thanks to this method, new shapes of reactor cores could be inferred, and lead to new design ideas.

  8. Ceramic breeder materials

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, C.E.; Kummerer, K.R.; Roth, E.

    1987-01-01

    Ceramic materials are under investigation as potential breeder material in fusion reactors. This paper will review candidate materials with respect to fabrication routes and characterization, properties in as-fabricated and irradiated condition, and experimental results from laboratory and inpile investigations on tritium transport and release. Also discussed are the resources of beryllium, which is being considered as a neutron multiplier. The comparison of ceramic properties that is attempted here aims at the identification of the most-promising material for use in a tritium breeding blanket. 82 refs., 12 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. Determination of fast neutron flux distribution in irradiation sites of the Malaysian Nuclear Agency research reactor.

    PubMed

    Yavar, A R; Sarmani, S B; Wood, A K; Fadzil, S M; Radir, M H; Khoo, K S

    2011-05-01

    Determination of thermal to fast neutron flux ratio (f(fast)) and fast neutron flux (ϕ(fast)) is required for fast neutron reactions, fast neutron activation analysis, and for correcting interference reactions. The f(fast) and subsequently ϕ(fast) were determined using the absolute method. The f(fast) ranged from 48 to 155, and the ϕ(fast) was found in the range 1.03×10(10)-4.89×10(10) n cm(-2) s(-1). These values indicate an acceptable conformity and applicable for installation of the fast neutron facility at the MNA research reactor.

  10. Composite nuclear fuel fabrication methodology for gas fast reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasudevamurthy, Gokul

    An advanced fuel form for use in Gas Fast Reactors (GFR) was investigated. Criteria for the fuel includes operation at high temperature (˜1400°C) and high burnup (˜150 MWD/MTHM) with effective retention of fission products even during transient temperatures exceeding 1600°C. The GFR fuel is expected to contain up to 20% transuranics for a closed fuel cycle. Earlier evaluations of reference fuels for the GFR have included ceramic-ceramic (cercer) dispersion type composite fuels of mixed carbide or nitride microspheres coated with SiC in a SiC matrix. Studies have indicated that ZrC is a potential replacement for SiC on account of its higher melting point, increased fission product corrosion resistance and better chemical stability. The present work investigated natural uranium carbide microspheres in a ZrC matrix instead of SiC. Known issues of minor actinide volatility during traditional fabrication procedures necessitated the investigation of still high temperature but more rapid fabrication techniques to minimize these anticipated losses. In this regard, fabrication of ZrC matrix by combustion synthesis from zirconium and graphite powders was studied. Criteria were established to obtain sufficient matrix density with UC microsphere volume fractions up to 30%. Tests involving production of microspheres by spark erosion method (similar to electrodischarge machining) showed the inability of the method to produce UC microspheres in the desired range of 300 to 1200 mum. A rotating electrode device was developed using a minimum current of 80A and rotating at speeds up to 1500 rpm to fabricate microspheres between 355 and 1200 mum. Using the ZrC process knowledge, UC electrodes were fabricated and studied for use in the rotating electrode device to produce UC microspheres. Fabrication of the cercer composite form was studied using microsphere volume fractions of 10%, 20%, and 30%. The macrostructure of the composite and individual components at various stages were

  11. Reactor Physics Characterization of Transmutation Targeting Options in a Sodium Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Samuel E. Bays

    2007-04-01

    In sodium fast reactor designs, the fuel related inherent negative reactivity feedback is accomplished mainly through parasitic capture in U-238. However for an efficient minor actinide burning system, it is desirable to reduce or eliminate U-238 entirely to suppress further transuranic actinide generation. Consequently, reactivity feedback is accomplished by enhancing axial neutron streaming during a loss of coolant void situation. This is done by flattening “pancake” the active core geometry. Flattening the reactor also increases axial leakage which removes neutrons that could otherwise be used to destroy minor actinides. Therefore, it is important to tailor the neutron spectrum in the core for optimized feedback and minor actinide destruction simultaneously by using minor actinide and fission product targets.

  12. Fabrication technological development of the oxide dispersion strengthened alloy MA957 for fast reactor applications

    SciTech Connect

    ML Hamilton; DS Gelles; RJ Lobsinger; GD Johnson; WF Brown; MM Paxton; RJ Puigh; CR Eiholzer; C Martinez; MA Blotter

    2000-03-27

    A significant amount of effort has been devoted to determining the properties and understanding the behavior of the alloy MA957 to define its potential usefulness as a cladding material, in the fast breeder reactor program. The numerous characterization and fabrication studies that were conducted are documented in this report. The alloy is a ferritic stainless steel developed by International Nickel Company specifically for structural reactor applications. It is strengthened by a very fine, uniformly distributed yttria dispersoid. Its fabrication involves a mechanical alloying process and subsequent extrusion, which ultimately results in a highly elongated grain structure. While the presence of the dispersoid produces a material with excellent strength, the body centered cubic structure inherent to the material coupled with the high aspect ratio that results from processing operations produces some difficulties with ductility. The alloy is very sensitive to variations in a number of processing parameters, and if the high strength is once lost during fabrication, it cannot be recovered. The microstructural evolution of the alloy under irradiation falls into two regimes. Below about 550 C, dislocation development, {alpha}{prime} precipitation and void evolution in the matrix are observed, while above about 550 C damage appears to be restricted to cavity formation within oxide particles. The thermal expansion of the alloy is very similar to that of HT9 up to the temperature where HT9 undergoes a phase transition to austenitic. Pulse magnetic welding of end caps onto MA957 tubing can be accomplished in a manner similar to that in which it is performed on HT9, although the welding parameters appear to be very sensitive to variations in the tubing that result from small changes in fabrication conditions. The tensile and stress rupture behavior of the alloy are acceptable in the unirradiated condition, being comparable to HT9 below about 700 C and exceeding those of HT9

  13. Limitations of eddy current testing in a fast reactor environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tao; Bowler, John R.

    2016-02-01

    The feasibility of using eddy current probes for detecting flaws in fast nuclear reactor structures has been investigated with the aim of detecting defects immersed in electrically conductive coolant including under liquid sodium during standby. For the inspections to be viable, there is a need to use an encapsulated sensor system that can be move into position with the aid of visualization tools. The initial objective being to locate the surface to be investigated using, for example, a combination of electromagnetic sensors and sonar. Here we focus on one feature of the task in which eddy current probe impedance variations due to interaction with the external surface of a tube are evaluated in order to monitor the probe location and orientation during inspection.

  14. Fusion Breeder Program interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Moir, R.; Lee, J.D.; Neef, W.

    1982-06-11

    This interim report for the FY82 Fusion Breeder Program covers work performed during the scoping phase of the study, December, 1981-February 1982. The goals for the FY82 study are the identification and development of a reference blanket concept using the fission suppression concept and the definition of a development plan to further the fusion breeder application. The context of the study is the tandem mirror reactor, but emphasis is placed upon blanket engineering. A tokamak driver and blanket concept will be selected and studied in more detail during FY83.

  15. Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) FY04 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    K. D. Weaver; T. C. Totemeier; D. E. Clark; E. E. Feldman; E. A. Hoffman; R. B. Vilim; T. Y. C. Wei; J. Gan; M. K. Meyer; W. F. Gale; M. J. Driscoll; M. Golay; G. Apostolakis; K. Czerwinski

    2004-09-01

    The gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR) was chosen as one of the Generation IV nuclear reactor systems to be developed based on its excellent potential for sustainability through reduction of the volume and radio toxicity of both its own fuel and other spent nuclear fuel, and for extending/utilizing uranium resources orders of magnitude beyond what the current open fuel cycle can realize. In addition, energy conversion at high thermal efficiency is possible with the current designs being considered, thus increasing the economic benefit of the GFR. However, research and development challenges include the ability to use passive decay heat removal systems during accident conditions, survivability of fuels and in-core materials under extreme temperatures and radiation, and economical and efficient fuel cycle processes. Nevertheless, the GFR was chosen as one of only six Generation IV systems to be pursued based on its ability to meet the Generation IV goals in sustainability, economics, safety and reliability, proliferation resistance and physical protection.

  16. Body composition and reproductive performance at entry into lay of anno 1980 versus anno 2000 broiler breeder females under fast and slow release from feed restriction.

    PubMed

    Eitan, Y; Lipkin, Ehud; Soller, M

    2014-05-01

    During the 1990s, various disturbances arose affecting broiler breeder females at entry into lay. These disturbances were associated with even slight overfeeding during release of feed restriction in this critical maturation period. The present experiment was carried out to gain some insight into the causes of these disturbances by comparing the effect of fast (FF) and slow (SF) release from feed restriction at entry into lay in 2 broiler breeder populations: B1980, representing the genetic level of 1980, and B2000, the genetic level of 2000. Under the FF treatment, B1980 entered lay 19.2 d earlier than B2000; this increased to 37.4 d earlier under SF. The B1980 population entered lay at virtually the same mean age for SF and FF, whereas B2000 entered lay 15.7 d earlier under the FF. Body weight at first egg were 2,621 g for the B1980 and 3,591 g for B2000. Differences in BW at first egg between feeding treatments within lines were minor. As a percentage of BW, ovary, oviduct, and follicle weights were the same for B1980 and B2000; breast weight was 14.9% for B1980 and 21.2% for B2000; abdominal fat pad weight was 5.37% for B1980 and 2.67% for B2000. Follicle weight and absolute difference in weight between successive follicles was greater in B2000 than in B1980. It is concluded that body fat content does not limit entry into lay, and that threshold BW for onset of sexual maturity of broiler breeder hens increased by about 1,000 g between 1980 and 2000, indicating a tight association between juvenile growth rate and threshold BW for onset of sexual maturity. It is also concluded that disturbances at entry into lay due to overfeeding are not due to smaller differences between successive follicles in B2000 compared with B1980. There are hints, however, that overfeeding may contribute to these disturbances by decreasing differences between successive follicles.

  17. Assessment of sensitivity of neutron-physical parameters of fast neutron reactor to purification of reprocessed fuel from minor actinides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherny, V. A.; Kochetkov, L. A.; Nevinitsa, A. I.

    2013-12-01

    The work is devoted to computational investigation of the dependence of basic physical parameters of fast neutron reactors on the degree of purification of plutonium from minor actinides obtained as a result of pyroelectrochemical reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel and used for manufacturing MOX fuel to be reloaded into the reactors mentioned. The investigations have shown that, in order to preserve such important parameters of a BN-800 type reactor as the criticality, the sodium void reactivity effect, the Doppler effect, and the efficiency of safety rods, it is possible to use the reprocessed fuel without separation of minor actinides for refueling (recharging) the core.

  18. FAST FLUX TEST FACILITY (FFTF) A HISTORY OF SAFETY & OPERATIONAL EXCELLENCE

    SciTech Connect

    NIELSEN, D L

    2004-02-26

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) is a 400-megawatt (thermal) sodium-cooled, high temperature, fast neutron flux, loop-type test reactor. The facility was constructed to support development and testing of fuels, materials and equipment for the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor program. FFTF began operation in 1980 and over the next 10 years demonstrated its versatility to perform experiments and missions far beyond the original intent of its designers. The reactor had several distinctive features including its size, flux, core design, extensive instrumentation, and test features that enabled it to simultaneously carry out a significant array of missions while demonstrating its features that contributed to a high level of plant safety and availability. FFTF is currently being deactivated for final closure.

  19. Fast reactor power plant design having heat pipe heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Huebotter, Paul R.; McLennan, George A.

    1985-01-01

    The invention relates to a pool-type fission reactor power plant design having a reactor vessel containing a primary coolant (such as liquid sodium), and a steam expansion device powered by a pressurized water/steam coolant system. Heat pipe means are disposed between the primary and water coolants to complete the heat transfer therebetween. The heat pipes are vertically oriented, penetrating the reactor deck and being directly submerged in the primary coolant. A U-tube or line passes through each heat pipe, extended over most of the length of the heat pipe and having its walls spaced from but closely proximate to and generally facing the surrounding walls of the heat pipe. The water/steam coolant loop includes each U-tube and the steam expansion device. A heat transfer medium (such as mercury) fills each of the heat pipes. The thermal energy from the primary coolant is transferred to the water coolant by isothermal evaporation-condensation of the heat transfer medium between the heat pipe and U-tube walls, the heat transfer medium moving within the heat pipe primarily transversely between these walls.

  20. Fast reactor power plant design having heat pipe heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Huebotter, P.R.; McLennan, G.A.

    1984-08-30

    The invention relates to a pool-type fission reactor power plant design having a reactor vessel containing a primary coolant (such as liquid sodium), and a steam expansion device powered by a pressurized water/steam coolant system. Heat pipe means are disposed between the primary and water coolants to complete the heat transfer therebetween. The heat pipes are vertically oriented, penetrating the reactor deck and being directly submerged in the primary coolant. A U-tube or line passes through each heat pipe, extended over most of the length of the heat pipe and having its walls spaced from but closely proximate to and generally facing the surrounding walls of the heat pipe. The water/steam coolant loop includes each U-tube and the steam expansion device. A heat transfer medium (such as mercury) fills each of the heat pipes. The thermal energy from the primary coolant is transferred to the water coolant by isothermal evaporation-condensation of the heat transfer medium between the heat pipe and U-tube walls, the heat transfer medium moving within the heat pipe primarily transversely between these walls.

  1. Proposed pyrometallurgical process for rapid recycle of discharged fuel materials from the integral fast reactor. [Metal fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Burris, L.; Steindler, M.; Miller, W.

    1984-01-01

    The pool-type Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept developed by Argonne National Laboratory includes on-site recycle of discharged core and blanket fuel materials. The process and fabrication steps will be demonstrated in the EBR-II Fuel Cycle Facility with IFR fuel irradiated in EBR-II and the Fast Flux Test Facility. The proposed process consists of two major steps: a halide slagging step and an electrorefining step. The fuel is maintained in the metallic form to yield directly a metal product sufficiently decontaminated to allow recycle to the reactor as new fuel. The process is further described and available information to support its feasibility is presented.

  2. High conduction neutron absorber to simulate fast reactor environment in an existing test reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Donna Post Guillen; Larry R. Greenwood; James R. Parry

    2014-06-22

    A new metal matrix composite material has been developed to serve as a thermal neutron absorber for testing fast reactor fuels and materials in an existing pressurized water reactor. The performance of this material was evaluated by placing neutron fluence monitors within shrouded and unshrouded holders and irradiating for up to four cycles. The monitor wires were analyzed by gamma and X-ray spectrometry to determine the activities of the activation products. Adjusted neutron fluences were calculated and grouped into three bins—thermal, epithermal, and fast—to evaluate the spectral shift created by the new material. A comparison of shrouded and unshrouded fluence monitors shows a thermal fluence decrease of ~11 % for the shielded monitors. Radioisotope activity and mass for each of the major activation products is given to provide insight into the evolution of thermal absorption cross-section during irradiation. The thermal neutron absorption capability of the composite material appears to diminish at total neutron fluence levels of ~8 × 1025 n/m2. Calculated values for dpa in excess of 2.0 were obtained for two common structural materials (iron and nickel) of interest for future fast flux experiments.

  3. Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) FY05 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    K. D. Weaver; T. Marshall; T. Totemeier; J. Gan; E.E. Feldman; E.A Hoffman; R.F. Kulak; I.U. Therios; C. P. Tzanos; T.Y.C. Wei; L-Y. Cheng; H. Ludewig; J. Jo; R. Nanstad; W. Corwin; V. G. Krishnardula; W. F. Gale; J. W. Fergus; P. Sabharwall; T. Allen

    2005-09-01

    The gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR) was chosen as one of the Generation IV nuclear reactor systems to be developed based on its excellent potential for sustainability through reduction of the volume and radio toxicity of both its own fuel and other spent nuclear fuel, and for extending/utilizing uranium resources orders of magnitude beyond what the current open fuel cycle can realize. In addition, energy conversion at high thermal efficiency is possible with the current designs being considered, thus increasing the economic benefit of the GFR. However, research and development challenges include the ability to use passive decay heat removal systems during accident conditions, survivability of fuels and in-core materials under extreme temperatures and radiation, and economical and efficient fuel cycle processes. Nevertheless, the GFR was chosen as one of only six Generation IV systems to be pursued based on its ability to meet the Generation IV goals in sustainability, economics, safety and reliability, proliferation resistance and physical protection. Current research and development on the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) has focused on the design of safety systems that will remove the decay heat during accident conditions, ion irradiations of candidate ceramic materials, joining studies of oxide dispersion strengthened alloys; and within the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) the fabrication of carbide fuels and ceramic fuel matrix materials, development of non-halide precursor low density and high density ceramic coatings, and neutron irradiation of candidate ceramic fuel matrix and metallic materials. The vast majority of this work has focused on the reference design for the GFR: a helium-cooled, direct power conversion system that will operate with on outlet temperature of 850 C at 7 MPa. In addition to the work being performed in the United States, seven international partners under the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) have identified their interest in

  4. Full-length U-xPu-10Zr (x=0, 8, 19 wt%) Fast Reactor Fuel Test in FFTF

    SciTech Connect

    D. L. Porter; H.C. Tsai

    2012-08-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor-1 (IFR-1) experiment performed in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) was the only U-Pu-10Zr (Pu-0, 8 and 19 wt%) metallic fast reactor test with commercial-length (91.4 cm active fuel column length) conducted to date. With few remaining test reactors there is little opportunity for performing another test with a long active fuel column. The assembly was irradiated to the goal burnup of 10 at.%. The beginning of life (BOL) peak cladding temperature of the hottest pin was 608?C, cooling to 522?C at end of life (EOL). Selected fuel pins were examined non destructively using neutron radiography, precision axial gamma scanning, and both laser and spiral contact cladding profilometry. Destructive exams included plenum gas pressure, volume, and gas composition determinations on a number of pins followed by optical metallography, electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), and alpha and beta gamma autoradiography on a single U-19Pu-10Zr pin. The post-irradiation examinations (PIEs) showed very few differences compared to the short-pin (34.3 cm fuel column) testing performed on fuels of similar composition in Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II). The fuel column grew axially slightly less than observed in the short pins, but with the same pattern of decreasing growth with increasing Pu content. There was a difference in the fuel-cladding chemical interaction (FCCI) in that the maximum cladding penetration by interdiffusion with fuel/fission products did not occur at the top of the fuel column where the cladding temperature is highest, as observed in EBR-II tests. Instead, the more exaggerated fission-rate profile of the FFTF pins resulted in a peak FCCI at ~0.7 X/L axial location along the fuel column. This resulted from a lower production of rare earth fission products higher in the fuel column as well as a much smaller delta-T between fuel center and cladding, and therefore less FCCI, despite the higher cladding temperature. This behavior could

  5. Full-length U-xPu-10Zr (x = 0, 8, 19 wt.%) fast reactor fuel test in FFTF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, D. L.; Tsai, Hanchung

    2012-08-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor-1 (IFR-1) experiment performed in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) was the only U-Pu-10Zr (Pu-0, 8 and 19 wt.%) metallic fast reactor test with commercial-length (91.4-cm active fuel-column length) conducted to date. With few remaining test reactors, there is little opportunity for performing another test with a long active fuel column. The assembly was irradiated to the goal burnup of 10 at.%. The beginning-of-life (BOL) peak cladding temperature of the hottest pin was 608 °C, cooling to 522 °C at end-of-life (EOL). Selected fuel pins were examined non-destructively using neutron radiography, precision axial gamma scanning, and both laser and spiral contact cladding profilometry. Destructive exams included plenum gas pressure, volume, and gas composition determinations on a number of pins followed by optical metallography, electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), and alpha and beta-gamma autoradiography on a single U-19Pu-10Zr pin. The post-irradiation examinations (PIEs) showed very few differences compared to the short-pin (34.3-cm fuel column) testing performed on fuels of similar composition in Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II). The fuel column grew axially slightly less than observed in the short pins, but with the same pattern of decreasing growth with increasing Pu content. There was a difference in the fuel-cladding chemical interaction (FCCI) in that the maximum cladding penetration by interdiffusion with fuel/fission products did not occur at the top of the fuel column where the cladding temperature is highest, as observed in EBR-II tests. Instead, the more exaggerated fission-rate profile of the FFTF pins resulted in a peak FCCI at ˜0.7 X/L axial location along the fuel column. This resulted from a higher production of rare-earth fission products at this location and a higher ΔT between fuel center and cladding than at core center, together providing more rare earths at the cladding and more FCCI. This behavior could

  6. Reactor Materials Program: Mechanical properties of irradiated Types 304 and 304L stainless steel weldment components

    SciTech Connect

    Sindelar, R.L.; Caskey, G.R. Jr.

    1991-12-01

    The vessels (reactor tanks) of the Savannah River Site nuclear production reactors constructed in the 1950`s are comprised of Type 304 stainless steel with Type 308 stainless steel weld filler. Irradiation exposure to the reactor tank sidewalls through reactor operation has caused a change in the mechanical properties of these materials. A database of as-irradiated mechanical properties for site-specific materials and irradiation conditions has been produced for reactor tank structural analyses and to quantify the effects of radiation-induced materials degradation for evaluating reactor service life. The data has been collected from the SRL Reactor Materials Program (RMP) irradiations and testing of archival stainless steel weldment components and from previous SRL programs to measure properties of irradiated reactor Thermal Shield weldments and reactor tank (R-tank) sidewall material. Irradiation programs of the RMP are designed to quantify mechanical properties at tank operating temperatures following irradiation to present and future tank wall maximum exposure conditions. The exposure conditions are characterized in terms of fast neutron fluence (E{sub n} > 0.1 MeV) and displacements per atom (dpa){sup 3}. Tensile properties, Charpy-V notch toughness, and elastic-plastic fracture toughness were measured for base, weld, and weld heat-affected zone (HAZ) weldment components from archival piping specimens following a Screening Irradiation in the University of Buffalo Reactor (UBR) and following a Full-Term Irradiation in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR).

  7. Reactor Materials Program: Mechanical properties of irradiated Types 304 and 304L stainless steel weldment components

    SciTech Connect

    Sindelar, R.L.; Caskey, G.R. Jr.

    1991-12-01

    The vessels (reactor tanks) of the Savannah River Site nuclear production reactors constructed in the 1950's are comprised of Type 304 stainless steel with Type 308 stainless steel weld filler. Irradiation exposure to the reactor tank sidewalls through reactor operation has caused a change in the mechanical properties of these materials. A database of as-irradiated mechanical properties for site-specific materials and irradiation conditions has been produced for reactor tank structural analyses and to quantify the effects of radiation-induced materials degradation for evaluating reactor service life. The data has been collected from the SRL Reactor Materials Program (RMP) irradiations and testing of archival stainless steel weldment components and from previous SRL programs to measure properties of irradiated reactor Thermal Shield weldments and reactor tank (R-tank) sidewall material. Irradiation programs of the RMP are designed to quantify mechanical properties at tank operating temperatures following irradiation to present and future tank wall maximum exposure conditions. The exposure conditions are characterized in terms of fast neutron fluence (E{sub n} > 0.1 MeV) and displacements per atom (dpa){sup 3}. Tensile properties, Charpy-V notch toughness, and elastic-plastic fracture toughness were measured for base, weld, and weld heat-affected zone (HAZ) weldment components from archival piping specimens following a Screening Irradiation in the University of Buffalo Reactor (UBR) and following a Full-Term Irradiation in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR).

  8. Fast Food Combos Make Type A Lunches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stashower, Gloria

    1974-01-01

    Clark County school district in Las Vegas, Nevada, has combination lunches available for high school students that meet Type A nutrition requirements but which resemble the commercial fast food menus teenagers prefer. (MLF)

  9. Thorium Fuel Utilization Analysis on Small Long Life Reactor for Different Coolant Types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Permana, Sidik

    2017-07-01

    A small power reactor and long operation which can be deployed for less population and remote area has been proposed by the IAEA as a small and medium reactor (SMR) program. Beside uranium utilization, it can be used also thorium fuel resources for SMR as a part of optimalization of nuclear fuel as a “partner” fuel with uranium fuel. A small long-life reactor based on thorium fuel cycle for several reactor coolant types and several power output has been evaluated in the present study for 10 years period of reactor operation. Several key parameters are used to evaluate its effect to the reactor performances such as reactor criticality, excess reactivity, reactor burnup achievement and power density profile. Water-cooled types give higher criticality than liquid metal coolants. Liquid metal coolant for fast reactor system gives less criticality especially at beginning of cycle (BOC), which shows liquid metal coolant system obtains almost stable criticality condition. Liquid metal coolants are relatively less excess reactivity to maintain longer reactor operation than water coolants. In addition, liquid metal coolant gives higher achievable burnup than water coolant types as well as higher power density for liquid metal coolants.

  10. Optimized Battery-Type Reactor Primary System Design Utilizing Lead

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Yong H.; Son, Hyoung M.; Lee, Il S.; Suh, Kune Y.

    2006-07-01

    A number of small and medium size reactors are being developed worldwide as well as large electricity generation reactors for co-generation, district heating or desalination. The Seoul National University has started to develop 23 MWth BORIS (Battery Optimized Reactor Integral System) as a multi-purpose reactor. BORIS is an integral-type optimized fast reactor with an ultra long life core. BORIS is being designed to meet the Generation IV nuclear energy system goals of sustainability, safety, reliability and economics. Major features of BORIS include 20 consecutive years of operation without refueling; elimination of an intermediate heat transport loop and main coolant pump; open core without individual subassemblies; inherent negative reactivity feedback; and inherent load following capability. Its one mission is to provide incremental electricity generation to match the needs of developing nations and especially remote communities without major electrical grid connections. BORIS consists of a reactor module, heat exchanger, coolant module, guard vessel, reactor vessel auxiliary cooling system (RVACS), secondary system, containment and the seismic isolation. BORIS is designed to generate 10 MWe with the resulting thermal efficiency of 45 %. BORIS uses lead as the primary system coolant because of the inherent safety of the material. BORIS is coupled with a supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycle as the secondary system to gain a high cycle efficiency in the range of 45 %. The reference core consists of 757 fuel rods without assembly with an active core height of 0.8 m. The BORIS core consists of single enrichment zone composed of a Pu-MA (minor actinides)-U-N fuel and a ferritic-martensitic stainless steel clad. This study is intended to set up appropriate reactor vessel geometry by performing thermal hydraulic analysis on RVACS using computational fluid dynamics codes; to examine the liquid metal coolant behavior along the subchannels; to find out whether the

  11. Fuel Cycle System Analysis Implications of Sodium-Cooled Metal-Fueled Fast Reactor Transuranic Conversion Ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Steven J. Piet; Edward A. Hoffman; Samuel E. Bays; Gretchen E. Matthern; Jacob J. Jacobson; Ryan Clement; David W. Gerts

    2013-03-01

    If advanced fuel cycles are to include a large number of fast reactors (FRs), what should be the transuranic (TRU) conversion ratio (CR)? The nuclear energy era started with the assumption that they should be breeder reactors (CR > 1), but the full range of possible CRs eventually received attention. For example, during the recent U.S. Global Nuclear Energy Partnership program, the proposal was burner reactors (CR < 1). Yet, more recently, Massachusetts Institute of Technology's "Future of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle" proposed CR [approximately] 1. Meanwhile, the French company EDF remains focused on breeders. At least one of the reasons for the differences of approach is different fuel cycle objectives. To clarify matters, this paper analyzes the impact of TRU CR on many parameters relevant to fuel cycle systems and therefore spans a broad range of topic areas. The analyses are based on a FR physics parameter scan of TRU CR from 0 to [approximately]1.8 in a sodium-cooled metal-fueled FR (SMFR), in which the fuel from uranium-oxide-fueled light water reactors (LWRs) is recycled directly to FRs and FRs displace LWRs in the fleet. In this instance, the FRs are sodium cooled and metal fueled. Generally, it is assumed that all TRU elements are recycled, which maximizes uranium ore utilization for a given TRU CR and waste radiotoxicity reduction and is consistent with the assumption of used metal fuel separated by electrochemical means. In these analyses, the fuel burnup was constrained by imposing a neutron fluence limit to fuel cladding to the same constant value. This paper first presents static, time-independent measures of performance for the LWR [right arrow] FR fuel cycle, including mass, heat, gamma emission, radiotoxicity, and the two figures of merit for materials for weapon attractiveness developed by C. Bathke et al. No new fuel cycle will achieve a static equilibrium in the foreseeable future. Therefore, additional analyses are shown with dynamic, time

  12. Breeder design for enhanced performance and safety characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, G J; Atefi, B; Yang, J W; Galperin, A; Segev, M

    1980-01-01

    A fast breeder reactor design has been created which offers a considerably extended fuel cycle and excellent performance characteristics. An example of a core designed to operate on a ten-year fuel cycle is described in some detail. Use of metal fuel along with a moderator such as beryllium oxide dispersed throughout the core provides both design flexibility and safety advantages such as a strong Doppler feedback and limited sodium void reactivity gain. Local power variations are small for the entire cycle; control requirements are also modest, and fuel cycle costs are low.

  13. Low-power lead-cooled fast reactor loaded with MOX-fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitdikov, E. R.; Terekhova, A. M.

    2017-01-01

    Fast reactor for the purpose of implementation of research, education of undergraduate and doctoral students in handling innovative fast reactors and training specialists for atomic research centers and nuclear power plants (BRUTs) was considered. Hard neutron spectrum achieved in the fast reactor with compact core and lead coolant. Possibility of prompt neutron runaway of the reactor is excluded due to the low reactivity margin which is less than the effective fraction of delayed neutrons. The possibility of using MOX fuel in the BRUTs reactor was examined. The effect of Keff growth connected with replacement of natural lead coolant to 208Pb coolant was evaluated. The calculations and reactor core model were performed using the Serpent Monte Carlo code.

  14. A CFD M&S PROCESS FOR FAST REACTOR FUEL ASSEMBLIES

    SciTech Connect

    Kurt D. Hamman; Ray A. Berry

    2008-09-01

    A CFD modeling and simulation process for large-scale problems using an arbitrary fast reactor fuel assembly design was evaluated. Three dimensional flow distributions of sodium for several fast reactor fuel assembly pin spacing configurations were simulated on high performance computers using commercial CFD software. This research focused on 19-pin fuel assembly “benchmark” geometry, similar in design to the Advanced Burner Test Reactor, where each pin is separated by helical wire-wrap spacers. Several two-equation turbulence models including the k-e and SST (Menter) k-? were evaluated. Considerable effort was taken to resolve the momentum boundary layer, so as to eliminate the need for wall functions and reduce computational uncertainty. High performance computers were required to generate the hybrid meshes needed to predict secondary flows created by the wire-wrap spacers; computational meshes ranging from 65 to 85 million elements were common. A general validation methodology was followed, including mesh refinement and comparison of numerical results with empirical correlations. Predictions for velocity, temperature, and pressure distribution are shown. The uncertainty of numerical models, importance of high fidelity experimental data, and the challenges associated with simulating and validating large production-type problems are presented.

  15. Power flattening on modified CANDLE small long life gas-cooled fast reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Monado, Fiber; Su'ud, Zaki; Waris, Abdul; Basar, Khairul; Ariani, Menik; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2014-09-30

    Gas-cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) is one of the candidates of next generation Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) that expected to be operated commercially after 2030. In this research conceptual design study of long life 350 MWt GFR with natural uranium metallic fuel as fuel cycle input has been performed. Modified CANDLE burn-up strategy with first and second regions located near the last region (type B) has been applied. This reactor can be operated for 10 years without refuelling and fuel shuffling. Power peaking reduction is conducted by arranging the core radial direction into three regions with respectively uses fuel volume fraction 62.5%, 64% and 67.5%. The average power density in the modified core is about 82 Watt/cc and the power peaking factor decreased from 4.03 to 3.43.

  16. Power flattening on modified CANDLE small long life gas-cooled fast reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monado, Fiber; Su'ud, Zaki; Waris, Abdul; Basar, Khairul; Ariani, Menik; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2014-09-01

    Gas-cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) is one of the candidates of next generation Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) that expected to be operated commercially after 2030. In this research conceptual design study of long life 350 MWt GFR with natural uranium metallic fuel as fuel cycle input has been performed. Modified CANDLE burn-up strategy with first and second regions located near the last region (type B) has been applied. This reactor can be operated for 10 years without refuelling and fuel shuffling. Power peaking reduction is conducted by arranging the core radial direction into three regions with respectively uses fuel volume fraction 62.5%, 64% and 67.5%. The average power density in the modified core is about 82 Watt/cc and the power peaking factor decreased from 4.03 to 3.43.

  17. Role of fast reactor and its cycle to reduce nuclear waste burden

    SciTech Connect

    Arie, Kazuo; Oomori, Takashi; Okita, Takeshi; Kawashima, Masatoshi; Kotake, Shoji; Fuji-ie, Yoichi

    2013-07-01

    The role of the metal fuel fast reactor with recycling of actinides and the five long-lived fission products based on the concept of the Self-Consistent Nuclear Energy System has been examined by evaluating the reduction of nuclear wastes during the transition period to this reactor system. The evaluation was done in comparison to an LWR once-through case and a conventional actinide recycling oxide fast reactor. As a result, it is quantitatively clarified that a metal fuel fast reactor with actinide and the five long-lived fission products (I{sup 129}, Tc{sup 99}, Zr{sup 93}, Cs{sup 135} and Sn{sup 126}) recycling could play a significant role in reducing the nuclear waste burden including the current LWR wastes. This can be achieved by using a fast neutron spectrum reactor enhanced with metal fuel that brings high capability as a 'waste burner'. (authors)

  18. Effect of Fuel Fraction on Small Modified CANDLE Burn-up Based Gas Cooled Fast Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Ariani, Menik; Su'ud, Zaki; Waris, Abdul; Asiah, Nur; Shafii, M. Ali; Khairurrijal

    2010-12-23

    A conceptual design study of Gas Cooled Fast Reactors with Modified CANDLE Burn-up has been performed. The objective of this research is to get optimal design parameters of such type reactors. The parameters of nuclear design including the critical condition, conversion ratio, and burn-up level were compared. These parameters are calculated by variation in the fuel fraction 47.5% up to 70%. Two dimensional full core multi groups diffusion calculations was performed by CITATION code. Group constant preparations are performed by using SRAC code system with JENDL-3.2 nuclear data library. In this design the reactor cores with cylindrical cell two dimensional R-Z core models are subdivided into several parts with the same volume in the axial directions. The placement of fuel in core arranged so that the result of plutonium from natural uranium can be utilized optimally for 10 years reactor operation. Modified CANDLE burn-up was established successfully in a core radial width 1.4 m. Total thermal power output for reference core is 550 MW. Study on the effect of fuel to coolant ratio shows that effective multiplication factor (k{sub eff}) is in almost linear relations with the change of the fuel volume to coolant ratio.

  19. Effect of Fuel Fraction on Small Modified CANDLE Burn-up Based Gas Cooled Fast Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariani, Menik; Su'ud, Zaki; Waris, Abdul; Khairurrijal, Asiah, Nur; Shafii, M. Ali

    2010-12-01

    A conceptual design study of Gas Cooled Fast Reactors with Modified CANDLE Burn-up has been performed. The objective of this research is to get optimal design parameters of such type reactors. The parameters of nuclear design including the critical condition, conversion ratio, and burn-up level were compared. These parameters are calculated by variation in the fuel fraction 47.5% up to 70%. Two dimensional full core multi groups diffusion calculations was performed by CITATION code. Group constant preparations are performed by using SRAC code system with JENDL-3.2 nuclear data library. In this design the reactor cores with cylindrical cell two dimensional R-Z core models are subdivided into several parts with the same volume in the axial directions. The placement of fuel in core arranged so that the result of plutonium from natural uranium can be utilized optimally for 10 years reactor operation. Modified CANDLE burn-up was established successfully in a core radial width 1.4 m. Total thermal power output for reference core is 550 MW. Study on the effect of fuel to coolant ratio shows that effective multiplication factor (keff) is in almost linear relations with the change of the fuel volume to coolant ratio.

  20. Method of detecting leakage of reactor core components of liquid metal cooled fast reactors

    DOEpatents

    Holt, Fred E.; Cash, Robert J.; Schenter, Robert E.

    1977-01-01

    A method of detecting the failure of a sealed non-fueled core component of a liquid-metal cooled fast reactor having an inert cover gas. A gas mixture is incorporated in the component which includes Xenon-124; under neutron irradiation, Xenon-124 is converted to radioactive Xenon-125. The cover gas is scanned by a radiation detector. The occurrence of 188 Kev gamma radiation and/or other identifying gamma radiation-energy level indicates the presence of Xenon-125 and therefore leakage of a component. Similarly, Xe-126, which transmutes to Xe-127 and Kr-84, which produces Kr-85.sup.m can be used for detection of leakage. Different components are charged with mixtures including different ratios of isotopes other than Xenon-124. On detection of the identifying radiation, the cover gas is subjected to mass spectroscopic analysis to locate the leaking component.

  1. Sodium fast reactor gaps analysis of computer codes and models for accident analysis and reactor safety.

    SciTech Connect

    Carbajo, Juan; Jeong, Hae-Yong; Wigeland, Roald; Corradini, Michael; Schmidt, Rodney Cannon; Thomas, Justin; Wei, Tom; Sofu, Tanju; Ludewig, Hans; Tobita, Yoshiharu; Ohshima, Hiroyuki; Serre, Frederic

    2011-06-01

    This report summarizes the results of an expert-opinion elicitation activity designed to qualitatively assess the status and capabilities of currently available computer codes and models for accident analysis and reactor safety calculations of advanced sodium fast reactors, and identify important gaps. The twelve-member panel consisted of representatives from five U.S. National Laboratories (SNL, ANL, INL, ORNL, and BNL), the University of Wisconsin, the KAERI, the JAEA, and the CEA. The major portion of this elicitation activity occurred during a two-day meeting held on Aug. 10-11, 2010 at Argonne National Laboratory. There were two primary objectives of this work: (1) Identify computer codes currently available for SFR accident analysis and reactor safety calculations; and (2) Assess the status and capability of current US computer codes to adequately model the required accident scenarios and associated phenomena, and identify important gaps. During the review, panel members identified over 60 computer codes that are currently available in the international community to perform different aspects of SFR safety analysis for various event scenarios and accident categories. A brief description of each of these codes together with references (when available) is provided. An adaptation of the Predictive Capability Maturity Model (PCMM) for computational modeling and simulation is described for use in this work. The panel's assessment of the available US codes is presented in the form of nine tables, organized into groups of three for each of three risk categories considered: anticipated operational occurrences (AOOs), design basis accidents (DBA), and beyond design basis accidents (BDBA). A set of summary conclusions are drawn from the results obtained. At the highest level, the panel judged that current US code capabilities are adequate for licensing given reasonable margins, but expressed concern that US code development activities had stagnated and that the

  2. Fuel clad chemical interactions in fast reactor MOX fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viswanathan, R.

    2014-01-01

    Clad corrosion being one of the factors limiting the life of a mixed-oxide fast reactor fuel element pin at high burn-up, some aspects known about the key elements (oxygen, cesium, tellurium, iodine) in the clad-attack are discussed and many Fuel-Clad-Chemical-Interaction (FCCI) models available in the literature are also discussed. Based on its relatively superior predictive ability, the HEDL (Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory) relation is recommended: d/μm = ({0.507 ṡ [B/(at.% fission)] ṡ (T/K-705) ṡ [(O/M)i-1.935]} + 20.5) for (O/M)i ⩽ 1.98. A new model is proposed for (O/M)i ⩾ 1.98: d/μm = [B/(at.% fission)] ṡ (T/K-800)0.5 ṡ [(O/M)i-1.94] ṡ [P/(W cm-1)]0.5. Here, d is the maximum depth of clad attack, B is the burn-up, T is the clad inner surface temperature, (O/M)i is the initial oxygen-to-(uranium + plutonium) ratio, and P is the linear power rating. For fuels with [n(Pu)/n(M = U + Pu)] > 0.25, multiplication factors f are recommended to consider the potential increase in the depth of clad-attack.

  3. A fuel for sub-critical fast reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Moiseenko, V. E.; Chernitskiy, S. V.; Agren, O.; Noack, K.

    2012-06-19

    Along with the problem of the nuclear waste transmutation, the problem of minimization of waste production is of current interest. It is not possible to eliminate production of waste at a nuclear power plant, but, as is shown in this report, it is in principle possible to arrange a fuel composition with no net production of transuranic elements. The idea is to find the transuranic elements composition to which the depleted uranium is continuously supplied during frequent reprocessing, and amount of each other transuranic fuel component remains unchanged in time. For each transuranic component, the balance is achieved by equating burnup and production rates. The production is due to neutron capture by the neighboring lighter isotope and subsequent beta-decay. The burnup includes fission, neutron capture and decays. For the calculations a simplified burnup model which accounts for 9 isotopes of uranium, neptunium, plutonium and americium is used. The calculated fuel composition consists mainly of uranium with minority of plutonium isotopes. Such a fuel, after usage in a sub-critical fast reactor, should be reprocessed. The fission product content increases during burnup, representing a net production of waste, while the transuranic elements and {sup 238}U should be recycled into a new fuel. For such a fuel cycle, the net consumption is only for 238U, and the net waste production is just fission products.

  4. A fuel for sub-critical fast reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moiseenko, V. E.; Chernitskiy, S. V.; Ågren, O.; Noack, K.

    2012-06-01

    Along with the problem of the nuclear waste transmutation, the problem of minimization of waste production is of current interest. It is not possible to eliminate production of waste at a nuclear power plant, but, as is shown in this report, it is in principle possible to arrange a fuel composition with no net production of transuranic elements. The idea is to find the transuranic elements composition to which the depleted uranium is continuously supplied during frequent reprocessing, and amount of each other transuranic fuel component remains unchanged in time. For each transuranic component, the balance is achieved by equating burnup and production rates. The production is due to neutron capture by the neighboring lighter isotope and subsequent beta-decay. The burnup includes fission, neutron capture and decays. For the calculations a simplified burnup model which accounts for 9 isotopes of uranium, neptunium, plutonium and americium is used. The calculated fuel composition consists mainly of uranium with minority of plutonium isotopes. Such a fuel, after usage in a sub-critical fast reactor, should be reprocessed. The fission product content increases during burnup, representing a net production of waste, while the transuranic elements and 238U should be recycled into a new fuel. For such a fuel cycle, the net consumption is only for 238U, and the net waste production is just fission products.

  5. Delayed neutron signal characterization in a fast reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, K.C.; Strain, R.V.

    1980-01-01

    Experimental and analytical techniques have been developed for delayed neutron (DN) signal analysis and characterization that can provide diagnostic information to augment data from cover-gas analyses in the detection and identification of breached elements in an LMFBR. Eleven flow reduction tests have been run in EBR-II to provide base data support for predicting DN signal characteristics during exposed fuel operation. Results from the tests demonstrate the feasibility and practicability of response-analysis techniques for determining the transit time, T/sub tr/, for DN emitters traveling from the core to the detector, and the isotopic holdup time, T/sub h/, of DN precursors in the fuel element. T/sub tr/ has been found to vary with the relative grid location of the DN source, and T/sub h/ is affected by the form of fuel exposed to the coolant as well as the condition of the breach site. These parameters are incorporated into a mathematical formulism that enables one to compute for any exposed-fuel test an equivalent recoil area. This concept provides a basis for comparison of different run-beyond-cladding-breach tests in fast reactors.

  6. Closing nuclear fuel cycle with fast reactors: problems and prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Shadrin, A.; Dvoeglazov, K.; Ivanov, V.

    2013-07-01

    The closed nuclear fuel cycle (CNFC) with fast reactors (FR) is the most promising way of nuclear energetics development because it prevents spent nuclear fuel (SNF) accumulation and minimizes radwaste volume due to minor actinides (MA) transmutation. CNFC with FR requires the elaboration of safety, environmentally acceptable and economically effective methods of treatment of SNF with high burn-up and low cooling time. The up-to-date industrially implemented SNF reprocessing technologies based on hydrometallurgical methods are not suitable for the reprocessing of SNF with high burn-up and low cooling time. The alternative dry methods (such as electrorefining in molten salts or fluoride technologies) applicable for such SNF reprocessing have not found implementation at industrial scale. So the cost of SNF reprocessing by means of dry technologies can hardly be estimated. Another problem of dry technologies is the recovery of fissionable materials pure enough for dense fuel fabrication. A combination of technical solutions performed with hydrometallurgical and dry technologies (pyro-technology) is proposed and it appears to be a promising way for the elaboration of economically, ecologically and socially accepted technology of FR SNF management. This paper deals with discussion of main principle of dry and aqueous operations combination that probably would provide safety and economic efficiency of the FR SNF reprocessing. (authors)

  7. Selection of materials for sodium fast reactor steam generators

    SciTech Connect

    Dubiez-Le Goff, S.; Garnier, S.; Gelineau, O.; Dalle, F.; Blat-Yrieix, M.; Augem, J. M.

    2012-07-01

    Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR) is considered in France as the most mature technology of the different Generation IV systems. In the short-term the designing work is focused on the identification of the potential tracks to demonstrate licensing capability, availability, in-service inspection capability and economical performance. In that frame materials selection for the major components, as the steam generator, is a particularly key point managed within a French Research and Development program launched by AREVA, CEA and EDF. The choice of the material for the steam generator is indeed complex because various aspects shall be considered like mechanical and thermal properties at high temperature, interaction with sodium on one side and water and steam on the other side, resistance to wastage, procurement, fabrication, weldability and ability for inspection and in-situ intervention. The following relevant options are evaluated: the modified 9Cr1Mo ferritic-martensitic grade and the Alloy 800 austenitic grade. The objective of this paper is to assess for both candidates their abilities to reach the current SFR needs regarding material design data, from AFCEN RCC-MRx Code in particular, compatibility with environments and manufacturability. (authors)

  8. Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) Decay Heat Removal Concepts

    SciTech Connect

    K. D. Weaver; L-Y. Cheng; H. Ludewig; J. Jo

    2005-09-01

    Current research and development on the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) has focused on the design of safety systems that will remove the decay heat during accident conditions, ion irradiations of candidate ceramic materials, joining studies of oxide dispersion strengthened alloys; and within the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) the fabrication of carbide fuels and ceramic fuel matrix materials, development of non-halide precursor low density and high density ceramic coatings, and neutron irradiation of candidate ceramic fuel matrix and metallic materials. The vast majority of this work has focused on the reference design for the GFR: a helium-cooled, direct power conversion system that will operate with an outlet temperature of 850ºC at 7 MPa. In addition to the work being performed in the United States, seven international partners under the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) have identified their interest in participating in research related to the development of the GFR. These are Euratom (European Commission), France, Japan, South Africa, South Korea, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom. Of these, Euratom (including the United Kingdom), France, and Japan have active research activities with respect to the GFR. The research includes GFR design and safety, and fuels/in-core materials/fuel cycle projects. This report is a compilation of work performed on decay heat removal systems for a 2400 MWt GFR during this fiscal year (FY05).

  9. Sodium fast reactor safety and licensing research plan. Volume I.

    SciTech Connect

    Sofu, Tanju; LaChance, Jeffrey L.; Bari, R.; Wigeland, Roald; Denman, Matthew R.; Flanagan, George F.

    2012-05-01

    This report proposes potential research priorities for the Department of Energy (DOE) with the intent of improving the licensability of the Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR). In support of this project, five panels were tasked with identifying potential safety-related gaps in available information, data, and models needed to support the licensing of a SFR. The areas examined were sodium technology, accident sequences and initiators, source term characterization, codes and methods, and fuels and materials. It is the intent of this report to utilize a structured and transparent process that incorporates feedback from all interested stakeholders to suggest future funding priorities for the SFR research and development. While numerous gaps were identified, two cross-cutting gaps related to knowledge preservation were agreed upon by all panels and should be addressed in the near future. The first gap is a need to re-evaluate the current procedures for removing the Applied Technology designation from old documents. The second cross-cutting gap is the need for a robust Knowledge Management and Preservation system in all SFR research areas. Closure of these and the other identified gaps will require both a reprioritization of funding within DOE as well as a re-evaluation of existing bureaucratic procedures within the DOE associated with Applied Technology and Knowledge Management.

  10. Fast-reactor-data testing of ENDF/B-V at ORNL

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, R.Q.; Ford, W.E. III; Lucius, J.L.; Webster, C.C.; Marable, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    The Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) is coordinating a program to assess the adequacy of ENDF/B-V cross sections for both fast- and thermal-reactor design applications. A secondary goal is to evaluate cross-section processing codes, cross-section libraries, and radiation-transport codes. Fast reactor data testing (FRDT) goals are accomplished, in part, by comparison of calculated results with documented performance parameters of CSEWG fast reactor benchmarks and with results obtained by other data testers. The purpose of this paper is to describe the results of FRDT at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL).

  11. Coupled neutronics and thermal-hydraulics numerical simulations of a Molten Fast Salt Reactor (MFSR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laureau, A.; Rubiolo, P. R.; Heuer, D.; Merle-Lucotte, E.; Brovchenko, M.

    2014-06-01

    Coupled neutronics and thermalhydraulic numerical analyses of a molten salt fast reactor are presented. These preliminary numerical simulations are carried-out using the Monte Carlo code MCNP and the Computation Fluid Dynamic code OpenFOAM. The main objectives of this analysis performed at steady-reactor conditions are to confirm the acceptability of the current neutronic and thermalhydraulic designs of the reactor, to study the effects of the reactor operating conditions on some of the key MSFR design parameters such as the temperature peaking factor. The effects of the precursor's motion on the reactor safety parameters such as the effective fraction of delayed neutrons have been evaluated.

  12. Fast Transient And Spatially Non-Homogenous Accident Analysis Of Two-Dimensional Cylindrical Nuclear Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Yulianti, Yanti; Su'ud, Zaki; Waris, Abdul; Khotimah, S. N.; Shafii, M. Ali

    2010-12-23

    The research about fast transient and spatially non-homogenous nuclear reactor accident analysis of two-dimensional nuclear reactor has been done. This research is about prediction of reactor behavior is during accident. In the present study, space-time diffusion equation is solved by using direct methods which consider spatial factor in detail during nuclear reactor accident simulation. Set of equations that obtained from full implicit finite-difference discretization method is solved by using iterative methods ADI (Alternating Direct Implicit). The indication of accident is decreasing macroscopic absorption cross-section that results large external reactivity. The power reactor has a peak value before reactor has new balance condition. Changing of temperature reactor produce a negative Doppler feedback reactivity. The reactivity will reduce excess positive reactivity. Temperature reactor during accident is still in below fuel melting point which is in secure condition.

  13. Fusion breeder: its potential role and prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.D.

    1981-01-01

    The fusion breeder is a concept that utilizes 14 MeV neutrons from D + T ..-->.. n(14.1 MeV) + ..cap alpha..(3.5 MeV) fusion reactions to produce more fuel than the tritium (T) needed to sustain the fusion process. This excess fuel production capacity is used to produce fissile material (Pu-239 or U-233) for subsequent use in fission reactors. We are concentrating on a class of blankets we call fission suppressed. The blanket is the region surrounding the fusion plasma in which fusion neutrons interact to produce fuel and heat. The fission-suppressed blanket uses non-fission reactions (mainly (n,2n) or (n,n't)) to generate excess neutrons for the production of net fuel. This is in contrast to the fast fission class of blankets which use (n,fiss) reactions to generate excess neutrons. Fusion reactors with fast fission blankets are commony known as fusion-fission hybrids because they combine fusion and fission in the same device.

  14. The CANDU Reactor System: An Appropriate Technology.

    PubMed

    Robertson, J A

    1978-02-10

    CANDU power reactors are characterized by the combination of heavy water as moderator and pressure tubes to contain the fuel and coolant. Their excellent neutron economy provides the simplicity and low costs of once-through natural-uranium fueling. Future benefits include the prospect of a near-breeder thorium fuel cycle to provide security of fuel supply without the need to develop a new reactor such as the fast breeder. These and other features make the CANDU system an appropriate technology for countries, like Canada, of intermediate economic and industrial capacity.

  15. Control rod drive for reactor shutdown

    DOEpatents

    McKeehan, Ernest R.; Shawver, Bruce M.; Schiro, Donald J.; Taft, William E.

    1976-01-20

    A means for rapidly shutting down or scramming a nuclear reactor, such as a liquid metal-cooled fast breeder reactor, and serves as a backup to the primary shutdown system. The control rod drive consists basically of an in-core assembly, a drive shaft and seal assembly, and a control drive mechanism. The control rod is driven into the core region of the reactor by gravity and hydraulic pressure forces supplied by the reactor coolant, thus assuring that common mode failures will not interfere with or prohibit scramming the reactor when necessary.

  16. Evaluation Method for Core Thermohydraulics during Natural Circulation in Fast Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamide, Hideki; Nagasawa, Kazuyoshi; Kimura, Nobuyuki; Miyakoshi, Hiroyuki

    Decay heat removal using natural circulation is one of significant functions for a reactor. As the decay heat removal system, a direct reactor auxiliary cooling system has been selected in current designs of fast reactors. In this system, cold sodium is provided in an upper plenum of reactor vessel and it covers the reactor core outlet. The cold sodium can penetrate into the gap region between the subassemblies. This gap flow is referred as inter-wrapper flow (IWF). A numerical estimation method for such phenomena was developed, which modeled each subassembly as a rectangular duct with gap region and also the upper plenum. This numerical simulation method was verified by a sodium test and also a water test. We applied this method to the natural circulation in a 600 MWe class fast reactor. The temperature in the core strongly depended on IWF, flow redistribution in the core, and inter-subassembly heat transfer.

  17. Application of ATHLET/DYN3D coupled codes system for fast liquid metal cooled reactor steady state simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, V.; Samokhin, A.; Danicheva, I.; Khrennikov, N.; Bouscuet, J.; Velkov, K.; Pasichnyk, I.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper the approaches used for developing of the BN-800 reactor test model and for validation of coupled neutron-physic and thermohydraulic calculations are described. Coupled codes ATHLET 3.0 (code for thermohydraulic calculations of reactor transients) and DYN3D (3-dimensional code of neutron kinetics) are used for calculations. The main calculation results of reactor steady state condition are provided. 3-D model used for neutron calculations was developed for start reactor BN-800 load. The homogeneous approach is used for description of reactor assemblies. Along with main simplifications, the main reactor BN-800 core zones are described (LEZ, MEZ, HEZ, MOX, blankets). The 3D neutron physics calculations were provided with 28-group library, which is based on estimated nuclear data ENDF/B-7.0. Neutron SCALE code was used for preparation of group constants. Nodalization hydraulic model has boundary conditions by coolant mass-flow rate for core inlet part, by pressure and enthalpy for core outlet part, which can be chosen depending on reactor state. Core inlet and outlet temperatures were chosen according to reactor nominal state. The coolant mass flow rate profiling through the core is based on reactor power distribution. The test thermohydraulic calculations made with using of developed model showed acceptable results in coolant mass flow rate distribution through the reactor core and in axial temperature and pressure distribution. The developed model will be upgraded in future for different transient analysis in metal-cooled fast reactors of BN type including reactivity transients (control rods withdrawal, stop of the main circulation pump, etc.).

  18. THERMAL PERFORMANCE OF A FAST NEUTRON TEST CONCEPT FOR THE ADVANCED TEST REACTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Donna Post Guillen

    2008-06-01

    Since 1967, the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has provided state-of-the-art experimental irradiation testing capability. A unique design is investigated herein for the purpose of providing a fast neutron flux test capability in the ATR. This new test capability could be brought on line in approximately 5 or 6 years, much sooner than a new test reactor could be built, to provide an interim fast-flux test capability in the timeframe before a fast-flux research reactor could be built. The proposed cost for this system is approximately $63M, much less than the cost of a new fast-flux test reactor. A concept has been developed to filter out a large portion of the thermal flux component by using a thermally conductive neutron absorber block. The objective of this study is to determine the feasibility of this experiment cooling concept.

  19. GCFR: The European Union Gas Cooled Fast Reactor Project

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Colin; Peers, Karen; Poette, Christian; Coddington, Paul; Somers, Joe; Van-Goethem, George

    2006-07-01

    In March 2005, the European Commission (EC) initiated a new 4-year Project on Gas Cooled Fast Reactors (GCFR) within its 6. Framework Programme. The EC and more than 10 participating companies, R and D organizations and universities finance the project in equal parts. The project contributes to the Generation IV ambitious goals requiring innovative solutions in terms environmental impact (robust fuel with no significant radioactive release), sustainability (core which is self sustaining and has the flexibility for waste reduction), proliferation resistant fuel cycle and economics (high coolant temperatures leading to increased thermodynamic efficiency). A matrix has been prepared for the Generation IV GFR studies to facilitate sharing the work between the members, which identifies seven combinations of design options. These option studies will lead to a pre-selection of a reference concept and alternatives and the preliminary GFR viability report. The GCFR project, which forms part of the EURATOM contribution to the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) has responsibility for the direct cycle and indirect cycle 600 MW options. In detail, the GCFR project will examine; the GFR (600 MW options) and ETDR, core and system design; GFR and ETDR safety analysis, including the analysis of selected transients; the qualification and benchmarking of the transient analysis codes through a series of benchmark exercises; and a review of candidate fuels and core materials, including their fabrication and irradiation. Education and communication to foster understanding of the growing needs for nuclear power in general and for the technology of the GCFR in particular is specific goal of the EU project. (authors)

  20. The Fast-Flow Discharge Reactor as an Undergraduate Instructional Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Provencher, G. M.

    1981-01-01

    A fast-flow discharge reactor has been used in an analytical chemistry demonstration of gas phase titration, in inorganic preparative chemistry, and in physical chemistry as a "practice" vacuum line, kinetic reactor, and spectroscopic source as well as an undergraduate research tool. (SK)

  1. The Fast-Flow Discharge Reactor as an Undergraduate Instructional Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Provencher, G. M.

    1981-01-01

    A fast-flow discharge reactor has been used in an analytical chemistry demonstration of gas phase titration, in inorganic preparative chemistry, and in physical chemistry as a "practice" vacuum line, kinetic reactor, and spectroscopic source as well as an undergraduate research tool. (SK)

  2. SACRD: a data base for fast reactor safety computer codes, operational procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Forsberg, V.M.; Arwood, J.W.; Greene, N.M.; Raiford, G.B.

    1980-09-01

    SACRD (Safety Analysis Computerized Reactor Data) is a data base of nondesign-related information used in computer codes for fast reactor safety analyses. This document reports the procedures used in SACRD to help assure a reasonable level of integrity of the material contained in the data base. It also serves to document much of the computer software used with the data base.

  3. Irradiation Testing Vehicles for Fast Reactors from Open Test Assemblies to Closed Loops

    SciTech Connect

    Sienicki, James J.; Grandy, Christopher

    2016-12-15

    A review of irradiation testing vehicle approaches and designs that have been incorporated into past Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors (SFRs) or envisioned for incorporation has been carried out. The objective is to understand the essential features of the approaches and designs so that they can inform test vehicle designs for a future U.S. Fast Test Reactor. Fast test reactor designs examined include EBR-II, FFTF, JOYO, BOR-60, PHÉNIX, JHR, and MBIR. Previous designers exhibited great ingenuity in overcoming design and operational challenges especially when the original reactor plant’s mission changed to an irradiation testing mission as in the EBRII reactor plant. The various irradiation testing vehicles can be categorized as: Uninstrumented open assemblies that fit into core locations; Instrumented open test assemblies that fit into special core locations; Self-contained closed loops; and External closed loops. A special emphasis is devoted to closed loops as they are regarded as a very desirable feature of a future U.S. Fast Test Reactor. Closed loops are an important technology for irradiation of fuels and materials in separate controlled environments. The impact of closed loops on the design of fast reactors is also discussed in this report.

  4. Burnup concept for a long-life fast reactor core using MCNPX.

    SciTech Connect

    Holschuh, Thomas Vernon,; Lewis, Tom Goslee,; Parma, Edward J.,

    2013-02-01

    This report describes a reactor design with a burnup concept for a long-life fast reactor core that was evaluated using Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX). The current trend in advanced reactor design is the concept of a small modular reactor (SMR). However, very few of the SMR designs attempt to substantially increase the lifetime of a reactor core, especially without zone loading, fuel reshuffling, or other artificial mechanisms in the core that %E2%80%9Cflatten%E2%80%9D the power profile, including non-uniform cooling, non-uniform moderation, or strategic poison placement. Historically, the limitations of computing capabilities have prevented acceptable margins in the temporal component of the spatial excess reactivity in a reactor design, due primarily to the error in burnup calculations. This research was performed as an initial scoping analysis into the concept of a long-life fast reactor. It can be shown that a long-life fast reactor concept can be modeled using MCNPX to predict burnup and neutronics behavior. The inherent characteristic of this conceptual design is to minimize the change in reactivity over the lifetime of the reactor. This allows the reactor to operate substantially longer at full power than traditional Light Water Reactors (LWRs) or other SMR designs. For the purpose of this study, a single core design was investigated: a relatively small reactor core, yielding a medium amount of power (~200 to 400 MWth). The results of this scoping analysis were successful in providing a preliminary reactor design involving metal U-235/U-238 fuel with HT-9 fuel cladding and sodium coolant at a 20% volume fraction.

  5. Development of Observation Techniques in Reactor Vessel of Experimental Fast Reactor Joyo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takamatsu, Misao; Imaizumi, Kazuyuki; Nagai, Akinori; Sekine, Takashi; Maeda, Yukimoto

    In-Vessel Observations (IVO) techniques for Sodium cooled Fast Reactors (SFRs) are important in confirming its safety and integrity. And several IVO equipments for an SFR are developed. However, in order to secure the reliability of IVO techniques, it was necessary to demonstrate the performance under the actual reactor environment with high temperature, high radiation dose and remained sodium. During the investigation of an incident that occurred with Joyo, IVO using a standard Video Camera (VC) and a Radiation-Resistant Fiberscope (RRF) took place at (1) the top of the Sub-Assemblies (S/As) and the In-Vessel Storage rack (IVS), (2) the bottom face of the Upper Core Structure (UCS). A simple 6 m overhead view of each S/A, through the fuel handling or inspection holes etc, was photographed using a VC for making observations of the top of S/As and IVS. About 650 photographs were required to create a composite photograph of the top of the entire S/As and IVS, and a resolution was estimated to be approximately 1mm. In order to observe the bottom face of the UCS, a Remote Handling Device (RHD) equipped with RRFs (approximately 13 m long) was specifically developed for Joyo with a tip that could be inserted into the 70 mm gap between the top of the S/As and the bottom of the UCS. A total of about 35,000 photographs were needed for the full investigation. Regarding the resolution, the sodium flow regulating grid of 0.8mm in thickness could be discriminated. The performance of IVO equipments under the actual reactor environment was successfully confirmed. And the results provided useful information on incident investigations. In addition, fundamental findings and the experience gained during this study, which included the design of equipment, operating procedures, resolution, lighting adjustments, photograph composition and the durability of the RRF under radiation exposure, provided valuable insights into further improvements and verifications for IVO techniques to

  6. Lessons learned from applying VIM to fast reactor critical experiments, summary

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, R.W.; McKnight, R.D.; Collins, P.J.

    1995-05-17

    VIM is a continuous energy Monte Carlo code first developed around 1970 for the analysis of plate-type, fast-neutron, zero-power critical assemblies. In most respects, VIM is functionally equivalent to the MCNP code but it has two features that make uniquely suited to the analysis of fast reactor critical experiments: (1) the place lattice geometry option, which allows efficient description of and neutron tracking in the assembly geometry, and (2) a statistical treatment of neutron cross section data in the unresolved resonance range. Since its inception, VIM`s capabilities have expanded to include numerous features, such as thermal neutron cross sections, photon cross sections, and combinatorial and other geometry options, that have allowed its use in a wide range of neutral-particle transport problems. The earliest validation work at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) focused on the validation of VIM itself. This work showed that, in order for VIM to be a ``rigomus`` tool, extreme detail in the pointwise Monte Carlo libraries was needed, and the required detail was added. The emphasis soon shifted to validating models, methods, data and codes against VIM. Most of this work was done in the context of analyzing critical experiments in zero power reactor (ZPR) assemblies. The purpose of this paper is to present some of the lessons learned from using VIM in ZPR analysis work.

  7. Evaluation of Homogeneous Options: Effects of Minor Actinide Exclusion from Single and Double Tier Recycle in Sodium Fast Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    R. M. Ferrer; S. Bays; M. Pope

    2008-03-01

    The Systems Analysis Campaign under the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) has requested the fuel cycle analysis group at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to analyze and provide isotopic data for four scenarios in which different strategies for Minor Actinides (MA) management are investigated. A 1000 MWth commercial-scale Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR) design was selected as the baseline in this scenario study. Two transuranic (TRU) conversion ratios, defined as the ratio of the amount of TRU produced over the TRU destroyed in the reactor core, along with different fuel-types were investigated.

  8. Helium-cooled molten-salt fusion breeder

    SciTech Connect

    Moir, R.W.; Lee, J.D.; Fulton, F.J.; Huegel, F.; Neef, W.S. Jr.; Sherwood, A.E.; Berwald, D.H.; Whitley, R.H.; Wong, C.P.C.; Devan, J.H.

    1984-12-01

    We present a new conceptual design for a fusion reactor blanket that is intended to produce fissile material for fission power plants. Fast fission is suppressed by using beryllium instead of uranium to multiply neutrons. Thermal fission is suppressed by minimizing the fissile inventory. The molten-salt breeding medium (LiF + BeF/sub 2/ + ThF/sub 4/) is circulated through the blanket and to the on-line processing system where /sup 233/U and tritium are continuously removed. Helium cools the blanket and the austenitic steel tubes that contain the molten salt. Austenitic steel was chosen because of its ease of fabrication, adequate radiation-damage lifetime, and low corrosion by molten salt. We estimate that a breeder having 3000 MW of fusion power will produce 6500 kg of /sup 233/U per year. This amount is enough to provide makeup for 20 GWe of light-water reactors per year or twice that many high-temperature gas-cooled reactors or Canadian heavy-water reactors. Safety is enhanced because the afterheat is low and blanket materials do not react with air or water. The fusion breeder based on a pre-MARS tandem mirror is estimated to cost $4.9B or 2.35 times a light-water reactor of the same power. The estimated cost of the /sup 233/U produced is $40/g for fusion plants costing 2.35 times that of a light-water reactor if utility owned or $16/g if government owned.

  9. A US perspective on fast reactor fuel fabrication technology and experience. Part II: Ceramic fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkes, Douglas E.; Fielding, Randall S.; Porter, Douglas L.; Meyer, Mitchell K.; Makenas, Bruce J.

    2009-08-01

    This paper is Part II of a review focusing on the United States experience with oxide, carbide, and nitride fast reactor fuel fabrication. Over 60 years of research in fuel fabrication by government, national laboratories, industry, and academia has culminated in a foundation of research and resulted in significant improvements to the technologies employed to fabricate these fuel types. This part of the review documents the current state of fuel fabrication technologies in the United States for each of these fuel types, some of the challenges faced by previous researchers, and how these were overcome. Knowledge gained from reviewing previous investigations will aid both researchers and policy makers in forming future decisions relating to nuclear fuel fabrication technologies.

  10. Preliminary Study of Lead-Oxide Cooled Fast Reactor with Natural Uranium as an Input Fuel with Reactor Shuffling Strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmudah, Rida SN; Su'ud, Zaki

    2017-01-01

    A preliminary study of lead-oxide cooled fast reactor with natural uranium as an input fuel using reactor shuffling strategy has been conducted. In this study, reactor core is divided into four zone with the same volume, each zone use different uranium enrichment. The enrichment number is estimated so that in the end of reactor’s operation, we only need to add natural uranium as the fresh input fuel. This study used UN-PuN as the fuel and lead oxide as the coolant. Several parameter studies have been conducted to determine the most suitable input condition. It is confirmed in this study that with fuel : cladding : coolant ratio of 53 : 10 : 37, and uranium enrichment in the first to the fourth zone of 0%, 6.25%, 7.5% and 8%, respectively, the reactor can operate as long as 20 years of operation with terminal k-eff of 1.0004.

  11. Uranium resources and their implications for fission breeder and fusion hybrid development

    SciTech Connect

    Max, C.E.

    1984-05-15

    Present estimates of uranium resources and reserves in the US and the non-Communist world are reviewed. The resulting implications are considered for two proposed breeder technologies: the liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) and the fusion hybrid reactor. Using both simple arguments and detailed scenarios from the published literature, conditions are explored under which the LMFBR and fusion hybrid could respectively have the most impact, considering both fuel-supply and economic factors. The conclusions emphasize strong potential advantages of the fusion hybrid, due to its inherently large breeding rate. A discussion is presented of proposed US development strategies for the fusion hybrid, which at present is far behind the LMFBR in its practical application and maturity.

  12. Progress and status of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) development program

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Yoon I.

    1992-04-01

    In the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) development program, the entire reactor system -- reactor, fuel cycle, and waste process is being developed and optimized at the same time as a single integral entity. The ALMR reactor plant design is being developed by an industrial team headed by General Electric and is presented in a companion paper. Detailed discussions on the present status of the IFR technology development activities in the areas of fuels, pyroprocessing, safety, core design, and fuel cycle demonstration are presented in the other two companion papers that follows this.

  13. Progress and status of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) development program

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Yoon I.

    1992-01-01

    In the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) development program, the entire reactor system -- reactor, fuel cycle, and waste process is being developed and optimized at the same time as a single integral entity. The ALMR reactor plant design is being developed by an industrial team headed by General Electric and is presented in a companion paper. Detailed discussions on the present status of the IFR technology development activities in the areas of fuels, pyroprocessing, safety, core design, and fuel cycle demonstration are presented in the other two companion papers that follows this.

  14. The prototype fast reactor at Dounreay, Scotland. Process and engineering development for sodium removal

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, A.; Herrick, R.; Gunn, J.; Husband, W.; Smith, M.; Fletcher, B.

    2007-07-01

    Dounreay was home to commercial fast reactor development in the UK. Following the construction and operation of the Dounreay Fast Reactor, a sodium-cooled Prototype Fast Reactor (PFR), was constructed. PFR started operating in 1974, closed in 1994 and is presently being decommissioned. To date the bulk of the sodium has been removed and treated. Due to the design of the existing extraction system however, a sodium pool will remain in the heel of the reactor. To remove this sodium, a pump/camera system was developed, tested and deployed. The Water Vapour Nitrogen (WVN) process has been selected to allow removal of the final sodium residues from the reactor. Due to the design of the reactor and potential for structural damage should Normal WVN (which produces hydrated sodium hydroxide) be used, Low Concentration WVN (LC WVN) has been developed. Pilot scale testing has shown that it is possible treat the reactor within 18 months at a WVN concentration of up to 4% v/v and temperature of 120 deg. C. At present the equipment that will be used to apply LC WVN to the reactor is being developed at the detail design stage. and is expected to be deployed within the next few years. (authors)

  15. The Ongoing Impact of the U.S. Fast Reactor Integral Experiments Program

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess; Michael A. Pope; Harold F. McFarlane

    2012-11-01

    The creation of a large database of integral fast reactor physics experiments advanced nuclear science and technology in ways that were unachievable by less capital intensive and operationally challenging approaches. They enabled the compilation of integral physics benchmark data, validated (or not) analytical methods, and provided assurance of future rector designs The integral experiments performed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) represent decades of research performed to support fast reactor design and our understanding of neutronics behavior and reactor physics measurements. Experiments began in 1955 with the Zero Power Reactor No. 3 (ZPR-3) and terminated with the Zero Power Physics Reactor (ZPPR, originally the Zero Power Plutonium Reactor) in 1990 at the former ANL-West site in Idaho, which is now part of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Two additional critical assemblies, ZPR-6 and ZPR-9, operated at the ANL-East site in Illinois. A total of 128 fast reactor assemblies were constructed with these facilities [1]. The infrastructure and measurement capabilities are too expensive to be replicated in the modern era, making the integral database invaluable as the world pushes ahead with development of liquid metal cooled reactors.

  16. Fuel, Structural Material and Coolant for an Advanced Fast Micro-Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do Nascimento, J. A.; Duimarães, L. N. F.; Ono, S.

    The use of nuclear reactors in space, seabed or other Earth hostile environment in the future is a vision that some Brazilian nuclear researchers share. Currently, the USA, a leader in space exploration, has as long-term objectives the establishment of a permanent Moon base and to launch a manned mission to Mars. A nuclear micro-reactor is the power source chosen to provide energy for life support, electricity for systems, in these missions. A strategy to develop an advanced micro-reactor technologies may consider the current fast reactor technologies as back-up and the development of advanced fuel, structural and coolant materials. The next generation reactors (GEN-IV) for terrestrial applications will operate with high output temperature to allow advanced conversion cycle, such as Brayton, and hydrogen production, among others. The development of an advanced fast micro-reactor may create a synergy between the GEN-IV and space reactor technologies. Considering a set of basic requirements and materials properties this paper discusses the choice of advanced fuel, structural and coolant materials for a fast micro-reactor. The chosen candidate materials are: nitride, oxide as back-up, for fuel, lead, tin and gallium for coolant, ferritic MA-ODS and Mo alloys for core structures. The next step will be the neutronic and burnup evaluation of core concepts with this set of materials.

  17. The effect of the composition of plutonium loaded on the reactivity change and the isotopic composition of fuel produced in a fast reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Blandinskiy, V. Yu.

    2014-12-15

    This paper presents the results of a numerical investigation into burnup and breeding of nuclides in metallic fuel consisting of a mixture of plutonium and depleted uranium in a fast reactor with sodium coolant. The feasibility of using plutonium contained in spent nuclear fuel from domestic thermal reactors and weapons-grade plutonium is discussed. It is shown that the largest production of secondary fuel and the least change in the reactivity over the reactor lifetime can be achieved when employing plutonium contained in spent nuclear fuel from a reactor of the RBMK-1000 type.

  18. The effect of the composition of plutonium loaded on the reactivity change and the isotopic composition of fuel produced in a fast reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blandinskiy, V. Yu.

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents the results of a numerical investigation into burnup and breeding of nuclides in metallic fuel consisting of a mixture of plutonium and depleted uranium in a fast reactor with sodium coolant. The feasibility of using plutonium contained in spent nuclear fuel from domestic thermal reactors and weapons-grade plutonium is discussed. It is shown that the largest production of secondary fuel and the least change in the reactivity over the reactor lifetime can be achieved when employing plutonium contained in spent nuclear fuel from a reactor of the RBMK-1000 type.

  19. The combined hybrid system: A symbiotic thermal reactor/fast reactor system for power generation and radioactive waste toxicity reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Hollaway, W.R.

    1991-08-01

    If there is to be a next generation of nuclear power in the United States, then the four fundamental obstacles confronting nuclear power technology must be overcome: safety, cost, waste management, and proliferation resistance. The Combined Hybrid System (CHS) is proposed as a possible solution to the problems preventing a vigorous resurgence of nuclear power. The CHS combines Thermal Reactors (for operability, safety, and cost) and Integral Fast Reactors (for waste treatment and actinide burning) in a symbiotic large scale system. The CHS addresses the safety and cost issues through the use of advanced reactor designs, the waste management issue through the use of actinide burning, and the proliferation resistance issue through the use of an integral fuel cycle with co-located components. There are nine major components in the Combined Hybrid System linked by nineteen nuclear material mass flow streams. A computer code, CHASM, is used to analyze the mass flow rates CHS, and the reactor support ratio (the ratio of thermal/fast reactors), IFR of the system. The primary advantages of the CHS are its essentially actinide-free high-level radioactive waste, plus improved reactor safety, uranium utilization, and widening of the option base. The primary disadvantages of the CHS are the large capacity of IFRs required (approximately one MW{sub e} IFR capacity for every three MW{sub e} Thermal Reactor) and the novel radioactive waste streams produced by the CHS. The capability of the IFR to burn pure transuranic fuel, a primary assumption of this study, has yet to be proven. The Combined Hybrid System represents an attractive option for future nuclear power development; that disposal of the essentially actinide-free radioactive waste produced by the CHS provides an excellent alternative to the disposal of intact actinide-bearing Light Water Reactor spent fuel (reducing the toxicity based lifetime of the waste from roughly 360,000 years to about 510 years).

  20. Regulatory Technology Development Plan - Sodium Fast Reactor: Mechanistic Source Term – Trial Calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Grabaskas, David; Bucknor, Matthew; Jerden, James; Brunett, Acacia J.; Denman, Matthew; Clark, Andrew; Denning, Richard S.

    2016-10-01

    The potential release of radioactive material during a plant incident, referred to as the source term, is a vital design metric and will be a major focus of advanced reactor licensing. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has stated an expectation for advanced reactor vendors to present a mechanistic assessment of the potential source term in their license applications. The mechanistic source term presents an opportunity for vendors to realistically assess the radiological consequences of an incident, and may allow reduced emergency planning zones and smaller plant sites. However, the development of a mechanistic source term for advanced reactors is not without challenges, as there are often numerous phenomena impacting the transportation and retention of radionuclides. This project sought to evaluate U.S. capabilities regarding the mechanistic assessment of radionuclide release from core damage incidents at metal fueled, pool-type sodium fast reactors (SFRs). The purpose of the analysis was to identify, and prioritize, any gaps regarding computational tools or data necessary for the modeling of radionuclide transport and retention phenomena. To accomplish this task, a parallel-path analysis approach was utilized. One path, led by Argonne and Sandia National Laboratories, sought to perform a mechanistic source term assessment using available codes, data, and models, with the goal to identify gaps in the current knowledge base. The second path, performed by an independent contractor, performed sensitivity analyses to determine the importance of particular radionuclides and transport phenomena in regards to offsite consequences. The results of the two pathways were combined to prioritize gaps in current capabilities.

  1. A revaluation of helium/dpa ratios for fast reactor and thermal reactor data in fission-fusion correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Garner, F.A.; Greenwood, L.R.; Oliver, B.M.

    1996-10-01

    For many years it has been accepted that significant differences exist in the helium/dpa ratios produced in fast reactors and various proposed fusion energy devices. In general, the differences arise from the much larger rate of (n,{alpha}) threshold reactions occurring in fusion devices, reactions which occur for energies {ge} 6 MeV. It now appears, however, that for nickel-containing alloys in fast reactors the difference may not have been as large as was originally anticipated. In stainless steels that have a very long incubation period for swelling, for instance, the average helium concentration over the duration of the transient regime have been demonstrated in an earlier paper to be much larger in the FFTF out-of-core regions than first calculated. The helium/dpa ratios in some experiments conducted near the core edge or just outside of the FFTF core actually increase strongly throughout the irradiation, as {sup 59}Ni slowly forms by transmutation of {sup 58}Ni. This highly exothermic {sup 59}Ni(n,{alpha}) reaction occurs in all fast reactors, but is stronger in the softer spectra of oxide-fueled cores such as FFTF and weaker in the harder spectra of metal-fueled cores such as EBR-II. The formation of {sup 59}Ni also increases strongly in out-of-core unfueled regions where the reactor spectra softens with distance from the core.

  2. RELAP5 Analysis of the Hybrid Loop-Pool Design for Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Hongbin Zhang; Haihua Zhao; Cliff Davis

    2008-06-01

    An innovative hybrid loop-pool design for sodium cooled fast reactors (SFR-Hybrid) has been recently proposed. This design takes advantage of the inherent safety of a pool design and the compactness of a loop design to improve economics and safety of SFRs. In the hybrid loop-pool design, primary loops are formed by connecting the reactor outlet plenum (hot pool), intermediate heat exchangers (IHX), primary pumps and the reactor inlet plenum with pipes. The primary loops are immersed in the cold pool (buffer pool). Passive safety systems -- modular Pool Reactor Auxiliary Cooling Systems (PRACS) – are added to transfer decay heat from the primary system to the buffer pool during loss of forced circulation (LOFC) transients. The primary systems and the buffer pool are thermally coupled by the PRACS, which is composed of PRACS heat exchangers (PHX), fluidic diodes and connecting pipes. Fluidic diodes are simple, passive devices that provide large flow resistance in one direction and small flow resistance in reverse direction. Direct reactor auxiliary cooling system (DRACS) heat exchangers (DHX) are immersed in the cold pool to transfer decay heat to the environment by natural circulation. To prove the design concepts, especially how the passive safety systems behave during transients such as LOFC with scram, a RELAP5-3D model for the hybrid loop-pool design was developed. The simulations were done for both steady-state and transient conditions. This paper presents the details of RELAP5-3D analysis as well as the calculated thermal response during LOFC with scram. The 250 MW thermal power conventional pool type design of GNEP’s Advanced Burner Test Reactor (ABTR) developed by Argonne National Laboratory was used as the reference reactor core and primary loop design. The reactor inlet temperature is 355 °C and the outlet temperature is 510 °C. The core design is the same as that for ABTR. The steady state buffer pool temperature is the same as the reactor inlet

  3. Compact fast analyzer of rotary cuvette type

    DOEpatents

    Thacker, Louis H.

    1976-01-01

    A compact fast analyzer of the rotary cuvette type is provided for simultaneously determining concentrations in a multiplicity of discrete samples using either absorbance or fluorescence measurement techniques. A rigid, generally rectangular frame defines optical passageways for the absorbance and fluorescence measurement systems. The frame also serves as a mounting structure for various optical components as well as for the cuvette rotor mount and drive system. A single light source and photodetector are used in making both absorbance and fluorescence measurements. Rotor removal and insertion are facilitated by a swing-out drive motor and rotor mount. BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The invention relates generally to concentration measuring instruments and more specifically to a compact fast analyzer of the rotary cuvette type which is suitable for making either absorbance or fluorescence measurements. It was made in the course of, or under, a contract with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission.

  4. A Comparison of Fast-Spectrum and Moderated Space Fission Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Poston, David I.

    2005-02-06

    The reactor neutron spectrum is one of the fundamental design choices for any fission reactor, but the implications of using a moderated spectrum are vastly different for space reactors as opposed to terrestrial reactors. In addition, the pros and cons of neutron spectra are significantly different among many of the envisioned space power applications. This paper begins with a discussion of the neutronic differences between fast-spectrum and moderated space reactors. This is followed by a discussion of the pros and cons of fast-spectrum and moderated space reactors separated into three areas--technical risk, performance, and safety/safeguards. A mix of quantitative and qualitative arguments is presented, and some conclusions generally can be made regarding neutron spectrum and space power application. In most cases, a fast-spectrum system appears to be the better alternative (mostly because of simplicity and higher potential operating temperatures); however, in some cases, such as a low-power (<100-kWt) surface reactor, a moderated spectrum could provide a better approach. In all cases, the determination of which spectrum is preferred is a strong function of the metrics provided by the 'customer' - i.e., if a certain level of performance is required, it could provide a different solution than if a certain level of safeguards is required (which in some cases could produce a null solution). The views expressed in this document are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect agreement by the Government.

  5. Fast Reactor Spent Fuel Processing: Experience and Criticality Safety

    SciTech Connect

    Chad Pope

    2007-05-01

    This paper discusses operational and criticality safety experience associated with the Idaho National Laboratory Fuel Conditioning Facility which uses a pyrometallurgical process to treat spent fast reactor metallic fuel. The process is conducted in an inert atmosphere hot cell. The process starts with chopping metallic fuel elements into a basket. The basket is lowered into molten salt (LiCl-KCl) along with a steel mandrel. Active metal fission products, transuranic metals and sodium metal in the spent fuel undergo chemical oxidation and form chlorides. Voltage is applied between the basket, which serves as an anode, and the mandrel, which serves as a cathode, causing metallic uranium in the spent fuel to undergo electro-chemical oxidation thereby forming uranium chloride. Simultaneously at the cathode, uranium chloride undergoes electro-chemical reduction and deposits uranium metal onto the mandrel. The uranium metal and accompanying entrained salt are placed in a distillation furnace where the uranium melts forming an ingot and the entrained salt boils and subsequently condenses in a separate crucible. The uranium ingots are placed in long term storage. During the ten year operating history, over one hundred criticality safety evaluations were prepared. All criticality safety related limits and controls for the entire process are contained in a single document which required over thirty revisions to accommodate the process changes. Operational implementation of the limits and controls includes use of a near real-time computerized tracking system. The tracking system uses an Oracle database coupled with numerous software applications. The computerized tracking system includes direct fuel handler interaction with every movement of material. Improvements to this system during the ten year history include introduction of web based operator interaction, tracking of moderator materials and the development of a plethora database queries to assist in day to day

  6. Yttrium and rare earth stabilized fast reactor metal fuel

    DOEpatents

    Guon, Jerold; Grantham, LeRoy F.; Specht, Eugene R.

    1992-01-01

    To increase the operating temperature of a reactor, the melting point and mechanical properties of the fuel must be increased. For an actinide-rich fuel, yttrium, lanthanum and/or rare earth elements can be added, as stabilizers, to uranium and plutonium and/or a mixture of other actinides to raise the melting point of the fuel and improve its mechanical properties. Since only about 1% of the actinide fuel may be yttrium, lanthanum, or a rare earth element, the neutron penalty is low, the reactor core size can be reduced, the fuel can be burned efficiently, reprocessing requirements are reduced, and the nuclear waste disposal volumes reduced. A further advantage occurs when yttrium, lanthanum, and/or other rare earth elements are exposed to radiation in a reactor, they produce only short half life radioisotopes, which reduce nuclear waste disposal problems through much shorter assured-isolation requirements.

  7. Summary of experimental data for critical arrays of water moderated Fast Test Reactor fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Durst, B.M.; Bierman, S.R.; Clayton, E.D.; Mincey, J.F.; Primm, R.T. III

    1981-05-01

    A research program, funded by the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), was initiated at Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to acquire experimental data on heterogeneous water moderated arrays of Fast Test Reactor (FTR) fuel pins. The objective of this program is to provide critical experiment data for validating calculational techniques used in criticality assessments of reprocessing equipment containing FTR-type fuels. Consequently, the experiments were designed to permit accurate definition in Monte Carlo computer codes currently used in these assessments. Square and triangular pitched lattices of fuel have been constructed under a variety of conditions covering the range from undermoderated to overmoderated arrays. Experiments were conducted composed of arrays which were water reflected, partially concrete reflected, and arrays with interspersed solid neutron absorbers. The absorbers utilized were Boral, and cadmium plates and gadolinium cylindrical rods. Data from non-CFRP sponsored subcritical experiments (previously performed at Hanford) also are included.

  8. Void effect analysis of Pb-208 of fast reactors with modified CANDLE burn-up scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widiawati, Nina; Su'ud, Zaki

    2015-09-01

    Void effect analysis of Pb-208 as coolant of fast reactors with modified candle burn-up scheme has been conducted. Lead cooled fast reactor (LFR) is one of the fourth-generation reactor designs. The reactor is designed with a thermal power output of 500 MWt. Modified CANDLE burn-up scheme allows the reactor to have long life operation by supplying only natural uranium as fuel cycle input. This scheme introducing discrete region, the fuel is initially put in region 1, after one cycle of 10 years of burn up it is shifted to region 2 and region 1 is filled by fresh natural uranium fuel. The reactor is designed for 100 years with 10 regions arranged axially. The results of neutronic calculation showed that the void coefficients ranged from -0.6695443 % at BOC to -0.5273626 % at EOC for 500 MWt reactor. The void coefficients of Pb-208 more negative than Pb-nat. The results showed that the reactors with Pb-208 coolant have better level of safety than Pb-nat.

  9. Void effect analysis of Pb-208 of fast reactors with modified CANDLE burn-up scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Widiawati, Nina Su’ud, Zaki

    2015-09-30

    Void effect analysis of Pb-208 as coolant of fast reactors with modified candle burn-up scheme has been conducted. Lead cooled fast reactor (LFR) is one of the fourth-generation reactor designs. The reactor is designed with a thermal power output of 500 MWt. Modified CANDLE burn-up scheme allows the reactor to have long life operation by supplying only natural uranium as fuel cycle input. This scheme introducing discrete region, the fuel is initially put in region 1, after one cycle of 10 years of burn up it is shifted to region 2 and region 1 is filled by fresh natural uranium fuel. The reactor is designed for 100 years with 10 regions arranged axially. The results of neutronic calculation showed that the void coefficients ranged from −0.6695443 % at BOC to −0.5273626 % at EOC for 500 MWt reactor. The void coefficients of Pb-208 more negative than Pb-nat. The results showed that the reactors with Pb-208 coolant have better level of safety than Pb-nat.

  10. Plutonium partitioning in uranium and plutonium co-recovery system for fast reactor fuel recycling with enhanced nuclear proliferation resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Nakahara, Masaumi; Koma, Yoshikazu; Nakajima, Yasuo

    2013-07-01

    For enhancement of nuclear proliferation resistance, a 'co-processing' method for U and Pu co-recovery was studied. Two concepts, no U scrubbing and no Pu reduction partitioning, were employed to formulate two types of flow sheets by using a calculation code. Their process performance was demonstrated using radioactive solutions derived from an irradiated fast reactor fuel. These experimental results indicated that U and Pu were co-recovered in the U/Pu product, and the Pu content in the U/Pu product increased approximately 2.3 times regardless of using reductant. The proposed no U scrubbing and no Pu reductant flow sheet is applicable to fast reactor fuel reprocessing and enhances its resistance to nuclear proliferation. (authors)

  11. Heat insulating system for a fast reactor shield slab

    DOEpatents

    Kotora, Jr., James; Groh, Edward F.; Kann, William J.; Burelbach, James P.

    1986-01-01

    Improved thermal insulation for a nuclear reactor deck comprising many helical coil springs disposed in generally parallel, side-by-side laterally overlapping or interfitted relationship to one another so as to define a three-dimensional composite having both metal and voids between the metal, and enclosure means for holding the composite to the underside of the deck.

  12. Heat insulating system for a fast reactor shield slab

    DOEpatents

    Kotora Jr., James; Groh, Edward F.; Kann, William J.; Burelbach, James P.

    1986-04-01

    Improved thermal insulation for a nuclear reactor deck comprising many helical coil springs disposed in generally parallel, side-by-side laterally overlapping or interfitted relationship to one another so as to define a three-dimensional composite having both metal and voids between the metal, and enclosure means for holding the composite to the underside of the deck.

  13. Heat insulating system for a fast reactor shield slab

    DOEpatents

    Kotora, J. Jr.; Groh, E.F.; Kann, W.J.; Burelbach, J.P.

    1984-04-10

    Improved thermal insulation for a nuclear reactor deck comprises many helical coil springs disposed in generally parallel, side-by-side laterally overlapping or interfitted relationship to one another so as to define a three-dimensional composite having both metal and voids between the metal, and enclosure means for holding the composite to the underside of the deck.

  14. Yttrium and rare earth stabilized fast reactor metal fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Guon, J.; Grantham, L.F.; Specht, E.R.

    1992-05-12

    This patent describes an improved metal alloy reactor fuel consisting essentially of uranium, plutonium, and at least one element from the group consisting of yttrium, lanthanum, cerium, praseodymium, neodymium, promethium, samarium, europium, gadolinium, terbium, dysprosium, holmium, erbium, thulium, ytterbium and lutetium.

  15. The scheme for evaluation of isotopic composition of fast reactor core in closed nuclear fuel cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saldikov, I. S.; Ternovykh, M. Yu; Fomichenko, P. A.; Gerasimov, A. S.

    2017-01-01

    The PRORYV (i.e. «Breakthrough» in Russian) project is currently under development. Within the framework of this project, fast reactors BN-1200 and BREST-OD-300 should be built to, inter alia, demonstrate possibility of the closed nuclear fuel cycle technologies with plutonium as a main source of power. Russia has a large inventory of plutonium which was accumulated in the result of reprocessing of spent fuel of thermal power reactors and conversion of nuclear weapons. This kind of plutonium will be used for development of initial fuel assemblies for fast reactors. To solve the closed nuclear fuel modeling tasks REPRORYV code was developed. It simulates the mass flow for nuclides in the closed fuel cycle. This paper presents the results of modeling of a closed nuclear fuel cycle, nuclide flows considering the influence of the uncertainty on the outcome of neutron-physical characteristics of the reactor.

  16. Plans for the development of the IFR (Integral Fast Reactor) fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, T.R.

    1986-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is a concept for a self-contained facility in which several sodium-cooled fast reactors of moderate size are located at the same site along with complete fuel-recycle and waste-treatment facilities. After the initial core loading with enriched uranium or plutonium, only natural or depleted uranium is shipped to the plant, and only wastes in final disposal forms are shipped out. The reactors have driver and blanket fuels of uranium-plutonium-zirconium alloys in stainless steel cladding. The use of metal alloy fuels is central to the IFR concept, contributing to the inherent safety of the reactor, the ease of reprocessing, and the relatively low capital and operating costs. Discharged fuels are recovered in a pyrochemical process that consists of two basic steps: an electrolytic process to separate fission products from actinides, and halide slagging to separate plutonium from uranium.

  17. Failed fuel monitoring and surveillance techniques for liquid metal cooled fast reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, J.D.B.; Mikaili, R.; Gross, K.C.; Strain, R.V.; Aoyama, T.; Ukai, S.; Nomura, S.; Nakae, N.

    1995-05-01

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) has been used as a facility for irradiation of LMR fuels and components for thirty years. During this time many tests of experimental fuel were continued to cladding breach in order to study modes of element failure; the methods used to identify such failures are described in a parallel paper. This paper summarizes experience of monitoring the delayed-neutron (DN) and fission-gas (FG) release behavior of a smaller number of elements that continued operation in the run-beyond-cladding-breach (RBCB) mode. The scope of RBCB testing, the methods developed to characterize failures on-line, and examples of DN/FG behavior are described.

  18. Evaluation of isotopic composition of fast reactor core in closed nuclear fuel cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikhomirov, Georgy; Ternovykh, Mikhail; Saldikov, Ivan; Fomichenko, Peter; Gerasimov, Alexander

    2017-09-01

    The strategy of the development of nuclear power in Russia provides for use of fast power reactors in closed nuclear fuel cycle. The PRORYV (i.e. «Breakthrough» in Russian) project is currently under development. Within the framework of this project, fast reactors BN-1200 and BREST-OD-300 should be built to, inter alia, demonstrate possibility of the closed nuclear fuel cycle technologies with plutonium as a main source of energy. Russia has a large inventory of plutonium which was accumulated in the result of reprocessing of spent fuel of thermal power reactors and conversion of nuclear weapons. This kind of plutonium will be used for development of initial fuel assemblies for fast reactors. The closed nuclear fuel cycle concept of the PRORYV assumes self-supplied mode of operation with fuel regeneration by neutron capture reaction in non-enriched uranium, which is used as a raw material. Operating modes of reactors and its characteristics should be chosen so as to provide the self-sufficient mode by using of fissile isotopes while refueling by depleted uranium and to support this state during the entire period of reactor operation. Thus, the actual issue is modeling fuel handling processes. To solve these problems, the code REPRORYV (Recycle for PRORYV) has been developed. It simulates nuclide streams in non-reactor stages of the closed fuel cycle. At the same time various verified codes can be used to evaluate in-core characteristics of a reactor. By using this approach various options for nuclide streams and assess the impact of different plutonium content in the fuel, fuel processing conditions, losses during fuel processing, as well as the impact of initial uncertainties on neutron-physical characteristics of reactor are considered in this study.

  19. Consolidated fuel reprocessing program: Criticality experiments with fast test reactor fuel pins in an organic moderator

    SciTech Connect

    Bierman, S.R.

    1986-12-01

    The results obtained in a series of criticality experiments performed as part of a joint program on criticality data development between the United States Department of Energy and the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation of Japan are presented in this report along with a complete description of the experiments. The experiments involved lattices of Fast Test Reactor (FTR) fuel pins in an organic moderator mixture similar to that used in the solvent extraction stage of fuel reprocessing. The experiments are designed to provide data for direct comparison with previously performed experimental measurements with water moderated lattices of FTR fuel pins. The same lattice arrangements and FTR fuel pin types are used in these organic moderated experimental assemblies as were used in the water moderated experiments. The organic moderator is a mixture of 38 wt % tributylphosphate in a normal paraffin hydrocarbon mixture of C{sub 11}H{sub 24} to C{sub 15}H{sub 32} molecules. Critical sizes of 1054.8, 599.2, 301.8, 199.5 and 165.3 fuel pins were obtained respectively for organic moderated lattices having 0.761 cm, 0.968 cm, 1.242 cm, 1.537 cm and 1.935 cm square lattice pitches as compared to 1046.9, 571.9, 293.9, 199.7 and 165.1 fuel pins for the same lattices water moderated.

  20. Under-sodium viewing technology for improvement of fast-reactor safeguards

    SciTech Connect

    Beddingfield, David H; Gerhart, Jeremy J; Kawakubo, Yoko

    2009-01-01

    The current safeguards approach for fast reactors relies exclusively on maintenance of continuity of knowledge to track the movement of fuel assemblies through these facilities. The remote handling of fuel assemblies, the visual opacity of the liquid metal coolant. and the chemical reactivity of sodium all combine and result in significant limitations on the available options to verify fuel assembly identification numbers or the integrity of these assemblies. These limitations also serve to frustrate attempts to restore the continuity-of-knowledge in instances where the information is under a variety of scenarios. The technology of ultrasonic under-sodium viewing offers new options to the safeguards community for recovering continuity-of-knowledge and applying more traditional item accountancy to fast reactor facilities. We have performed a literature review to investigate the development of under-sodium viewing technologies. In this paper we will summarize our findings and report the state of development of this technology and we will present possible applications to the fast reactor system to improve the existing safeguards approach at these reactors and in future fast reactors.

  1. Neutronic/Thermalhydraulic Coupling Technigues for Sodium Cooled Fast Reactor Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Jean Ragusa; Andrew Siegel; Jean-Michel Ruggieri

    2010-09-28

    The objective of this project was to test new coupling algorithms and enable efficient and scalable multi-physics simulations of advanced nuclear reactors, with considerations regarding the implementation of such algorithms in massively parallel environments. Numerical tests were carried out to verify the proposed approach and the examples included some reactor transients. The project was directly related to the Sodium Fast Reactor program element of the Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Initiative and the Advanced Fuel cycle Initiative, and, supported the requirement of high-fidelity simulation as a mean of achieving the goals of the presidential Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) vision.

  2. Fast-mixed spectrum reactor. Progress report for 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, G.J.; Galperin, A.; Shenoy, S.; Atefi, B.

    1980-10-01

    Reactor physics, fuel cycle, thermal-hydraulics and fuel cycle cost studies have been performed for this concept and are reported. The most serious drawback of previous FMSR designs, namely the level of irradiation damage to the stainless steel of the cladding and duct materials, has been greatly reduced by the new design. The peak fuel burnup level is also reduced. Work continued on earlier FMSR designs, and in particular, the centrally-moderated FMSR. Emphasis was placed on defining the first core and then the total sequence of core histories over the 30-year life of the reactor. It was found possible to define a two-year fuel cycle with limited reactivity swing over the cycle. Fuel cycle cost studies were begun. The results indicate a modest fuel cycle cost advantage for the FMSR, but the basic cost assumptions must be improved for metal fuel. Improved thermal-hydraulic analysis capabilities have greatly improved the understanding of heat transfer behavior.

  3. The performance of ENDF/B-V. 2 nuclear data for fast reactor calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Atkinson, C.A.; Collins, P.J.

    1987-01-01

    Calculations with ENDF/B-V.2 data have been made for twenty-five fast-spectrum integral assemblies covering a wide range of sizes and compositions. Analysis was done by transport codes with refined cross section processing methods and detailed reactor modelling. The predictions of fission rate distributions and control rod worths were emphasized for the more prototypic benchmark cores. The results show considerable improvements in agreement with experiment compared with analysis using ENDF/B-IV data, but it is apparent that significant errors remain for fast reactor design calculations.

  4. Fuel damage during off-normal transients in metal-fueled fast reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, J.M.; Bauer, T.H.

    1990-01-01

    Fuel damage during off-normal transients is a key issue in the safety of fast reactors because the fuel pin cladding provides the primary barrier to the release of radioactive materials. Part of the Safety Task of the Integral Fast Reactor Program is to provide assessments of the damage and margins to failure for metallic fuels over the wide range of transients that must be considered in safety analyses. This paper reviews the current status of the analytical and experimental programs that are providing the bases for these assessments. 13 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Fast-quench reactor for hydrogen and elemental carbon production from natural gas and other hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Detering, Brent A.; Kong, Peter C.

    2006-08-29

    A fast-quench reactor for production of diatomic hydrogen and unsaturated carbons is provided. During the fast quench in the downstream diverging section of the nozzle, such as in a free expansion chamber, the unsaturated hydrocarbons are further decomposed by reheating the reactor gases. More diatomic hydrogen is produced, along with elemental carbon. Other gas may be added at different stages in the process to form a desired end product and prevent back reactions. The product is a substantially clean-burning hydrogen fuel that leaves no greenhouse gas emissions, and elemental carbon that may be used in powder form as a commodity for several processes.

  6. Optimization of Fast Critical Experiments to Reduce Nuclear Data Uncertainties in Support of a Fast Burner Reactor Design Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stover, Tracy E., Jr.

    An optimization technique has been developed to select optimized experimental design specifications to produce data specifically designed to be assimilated to optimize a given reactor concept. Data from the optimized experiment is assimilated to generate posteriori uncertainties on the reactor concept's core attributes from which the design responses are computed. The reactor concept is then optimized with the new data to realize cost savings by reducing margin. The optimization problem iterates until an optimal experiment is found to maximize the savings. A new generation of innovative nuclear reactor designs, in particular fast neutron spectrum recycle reactors, are being considered for the application of closing the nuclear fuel cycle in the future. Safe and economical design of these reactors will require uncertainty reduction in basic nuclear data which are input to the reactor design. These data uncertainty propagate to design responses which in turn require the reactor designer to incorporate additional safety margin into the design, which often increases the cost of the reactor. Therefore basic nuclear data needs to be improved and this is accomplished through experimentation. Considering the high cost of nuclear experiments, it is desired to have an optimized experiment which will provide the data needed for uncertainty reduction such that a reactor design concept can meet its target accuracies or to allow savings to be realized by reducing the margin required due to uncertainty propagated from basic nuclear data. However, this optimization is coupled to the reactor design itself because with improved data the reactor concept can be re-optimized itself. It is thus desired to find the experiment that gives the best optimized reactor design. Methods are first established to model both the reactor concept and the experiment and to efficiently propagate the basic nuclear data uncertainty through these models to outputs. The representativity of the experiment

  7. Example Work Domain Analysis for a Reference Sodium Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hugo, Jacques; Oxstrand, Johanna

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear industry is currently designing and building a new generation of reactors that will include different structural, functional, and environmental aspects, all of which are likely to have a significant impact on the way these plants are operated. In order to meet economic and safety objectives, these new reactors will all use advanced technologies to some extent, including new materials and advanced digital instrumentation and control systems. New technologies will affect not only operational strategies, but will also require a new approach to how functions are allocated to humans or machines to ensure optimal performance. Uncertainty about the effect of large scale changes in plant design will remain until sound technical bases are developed for new operational concepts and strategies. Up-to-date models and guidance are required for the development of operational concepts for complex socio-technical systems. This report describes how the classical Work Domain Analysis method was adapted to develop operational concept frameworks for new plants. This adaptation of the method is better able to deal with the uncertainty and incomplete information typical of first-of-a-kind designs. Practical examples are provided of the systematic application of the method in the operational analysis of sodium-cooled reactors. Insights from this application and its utility are reviewed and arguments for the formal adoption of Work Domain Analysis as a value-added part of the Systems Engineering process are presented.

  8. Regulatory Technology Development Plan - Sodium Fast Reactor. Mechanistic Source Term - Metal Fuel Radionuclide Release

    SciTech Connect

    Grabaskas, David; Bucknor, Matthew; Jerden, James

    2016-02-01

    The development of an accurate and defensible mechanistic source term will be vital for the future licensing efforts of metal fuel, pool-type sodium fast reactors. To assist in the creation of a comprehensive mechanistic source term, the current effort sought to estimate the release fraction of radionuclides from metal fuel pins to the primary sodium coolant during fuel pin failures at a variety of temperature conditions. These release estimates were based on the findings of an extensive literature search, which reviewed past experimentation and reactor fuel damage accidents. Data sources for each radionuclide of interest were reviewed to establish release fractions, along with possible release dependencies, and the corresponding uncertainty levels. Although the current knowledge base is substantial, and radionuclide release fractions were established for the elements deemed important for the determination of offsite consequences following a reactor accident, gaps were found pertaining to several radionuclides. First, there is uncertainty regarding the transport behavior of several radionuclides (iodine, barium, strontium, tellurium, and europium) during metal fuel irradiation to high burnup levels. The migration of these radionuclides within the fuel matrix and bond sodium region can greatly affect their release during pin failure incidents. Post-irradiation examination of existing high burnup metal fuel can likely resolve this knowledge gap. Second, data regarding the radionuclide release from molten high burnup metal fuel in sodium is sparse, which makes the assessment of radionuclide release from fuel melting accidents at high fuel burnup levels difficult. This gap could be addressed through fuel melting experimentation with samples from the existing high burnup metal fuel inventory.

  9. Polonium Issue in Fast Reactor Lead Coolants and One of the Ways of Its Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Khorasanov, G.L.; Ivanov, A.P.; Blokhin, A.I.

    2002-07-01

    One of the main issues in using materials for nuclear facilities is to minimize the production of the most hazardous radionuclides. In the ideal case, all nuclear reactor materials, except a fuel, should be low-activation. The term 'low-activation material' means that this one loses its induced activity in a short time after removal from irradiation. Proposals for building a fusion reactor using low-activation materials are given in Ref.1, 2. For this purpose, low-activation structural materials based on V-Ti-Cr alloys are in the stage of R and D in several countries [3,4]. Another technique to avoid the hazardous activity is in using isotopically enriched materials [5-7]. Although isotopic tailoring option requires tremendous technical efforts and it is too expensive, its application can be first of all assumed for those structural and functional materials which generate very hazardous radionuclides under irradiation. In modern projects of next generation NPPs the preference is given to fast reactors (FRs) with a lead coolant [8]. As it known, the coolant circulating through a FR core is activated, and in the future we should have problems with handling a completed coolant after FR decommissioning or at realization of repair or emergency activities. There, it is desirable to have a low-activation coolant with the low contents of hazardous radionuclides. In papers [9,10] presented at the previous ICONE conferences it was proposed to use lead isotope, Pb-206, as a coolant instead of lead natural, Pb-nat. This paper is devoted to more detailed calculations of accumulating stable bismuth, Bi-209, and polonium radioisotopes, Po-209 (T{sub 1/2}=102 y) and Po-210 (T{sub 1/2}=138 d), in 1 kg of Pb-nat or Pb-206 placed in the core of the BOR-60 type FR. (authors)

  10. Irradiation experiment on fast reactor metal fuels containing minor actinides up to 7 at.% burnup

    SciTech Connect

    Ohta, H.; Yokoo, T.; Ogata, T.; Inoue, T.; Ougier, M.; Glatz, J.P.; Fontaine, B.; Breton, L.

    2007-07-01

    Fast reactor metal fuels containing minor actinides (MAs: Np, Am, Cm) and rare earths (REs) have been irradiated in the fast reactor PHENIX. In this experiment, four types of fuel alloys, U-19Pu-10Zr, U-19Pu-10Zr-2MA-2RE, U-19Pu-10Zr-5MA-5RE and U-19Pu-10Zr-5MA (wt.%), are loaded into part of standard metal fuel stacks. The postirradiation examinations will be conducted at {approx}2.4, {approx}7 and {approx}11 at.% burnup. As for the low-burnup fuel pins, nondestructive postirradiation tests have already been performed and the fuel integrity was confirmed. Furthermore, the irradiation experiment for the intermediate burnup goal of {approx}7 at.% was completed in July 2006. For the irradiation period of 356.63 equivalent full-power days, the neutron flux level remained in the range of 3.5-3.6 x 10{sup 15} n/cm{sup 2}/s at the axial peak position. On the other hand, the maximum linear power of fuel alloys decreased gradually from 305-315 W/cm (beginning of irradiation) to 250-260 W/cm (end of irradiation). The discharged peak burnup was estimated to be 6.59-7.23 at.%. The irradiation behavior of MA-containing metal fuels up to 7 at.% burnup was predicted using the ALFUS code, which was developed for U-Pu-Zr ternary fuel performance analysis. As a result, it was evaluated that the fuel temperature is distributed between {approx}410 deg. C and {approx}645 deg. C at the end of the irradiation experiment. From the stress-strain analysis based on the preliminarily employed cladding irradiation properties and the FCMI stress distribution history, it was predicted that a cladding strain of not more than 0.9% would appear. (authors)

  11. Preliminary Design Study of Medium Sized Gas Cooled Fast Reactor with Natural Uranium as Fuel Cycle Input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meriyanti, Su'ud, Zaki; Rijal, K.; Zuhair, Ferhat, A.; Sekimoto, H.

    2010-06-01

    In this study a fesibility design study of medium sized (1000 MWt) gas cooled fast reactors which can utilize natural uranium as fuel cycle input has been conducted. Gas Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) is among six types of Generation IV Nuclear Power Plants. GFR with its hard neuron spectrum is superior for closed fuel cycle, and its ability to be operated in high temperature (850° C) makes various options of utilizations become possible. To obtain the capability of consuming natural uranium as fuel cycle input, modified CANDLE burn-up scheme[1-6] is adopted this GFR system by dividing the core into 10 parts of equal volume axially. Due to the limitation of thermal hydraulic aspects, the average power density of the proposed design is selected about 70 W/cc. As an optimization results, a design of 1000 MWt reactors which can be operated 10 years without refueling and fuel shuffling and just need natural uranium as fuel cycle input is discussed. The average discharge burn-up is about 280 GWd/ton HM. Enough margin for criticallity was obtained for this reactor.

  12. Special Analysis for the Disposal of the Idaho National Laboratory Unirradiated Light Water Breeder Reactor Rods and Pellets Waste Stream at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    2014-08-31

    The purpose of this special analysis (SA) is to determine if the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Unirradiated Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) Rods and Pellets waste stream (INEL103597TR2, Revision 2) is suitable for disposal by shallow land burial (SLB) at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS). The INL Unirradiated LWBR Rods and Pellets waste stream consists of 24 containers with unirradiated fabricated rods and pellets composed of uranium oxide (UO2) and thorium oxide (ThO2) fuel in zirconium cladding. The INL Unirradiated LWBR Rods and Pellets waste stream requires an SA because the 229Th, 230Th, 232U, 233U, and 234U activity concentrations exceed the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) Action Levels.

  13. Fast wave current drive: Experimental status and reactor prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Ehst, D.A.

    1988-03-01

    The fast wave is one of the two possible wave polarizations which propagate according to the basic theory of cold plasmas. It is distinguished from the other (slow wave) branch by having an electric field vector which is mainly orthogonal to the confining magnetic field of the plasma. The plasma and fast wave qualitatively assume different behavior depending on the frequency range of the launched wave. The high frequency fast wave (HFFW), with a frequency (..omega..2..pi.. )approximately) GHz) much higher than the ion cyclotron frequency (..cap omega../sub i/), suffers electron Landau damping and drives current by supplying parallel momentum to superthermal electrons in a fashion similar to lower hybrid (slow wave) current drive. In the simple theory the HFFW should be superior to the slow wave and can propagate to very high density and temperature without impediment. Experiments, however, have not conclusively shown that HFFW current drive can be achieved at densities above the slow wave current drive limit, possibly due to conversion of the launched fast waves into slow waves by density fluctuations. Alternatively, the low frequency fast wave (LFFW), with frequencies ()approxreverse arrowlt) 100 MHz) only a few times the ion cyclotron frequency, is damped by electron Landau damping and, in a hot plasma ()approxreverse arrowgt) 10 keV), by electron transit time magnetic pumping; current drive is achieved by pushing superthermal electrons, and efficiency is prediocted to be slightly better than for lower hybrid current drive. Most significantly, the slow wave does not propagate in high density plasma when ..omega.. )approximately) ..cap omega../sub i/, so parasitic coupling to the slow wave can be avoided, and no density and temperture limitations are foreseen. Experiments with fast wve current drive invariably find current drive efficiency as good as obtained in lower hybrid experiments at comparable, low temperatures. 45 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  14. Fast reactor: an experimental study of thermohydraulic processes in different operating regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opanasenko, A. N.; Sorokin, A. P.; Zaryugin, D. G.; Trufanov, A. A.

    2017-05-01

    Results of integrated water model studies of temperature fields and a flow pattern of a nonisothermal primary coolant in the elements of the fast neutron reactor (hereinafter, fast reactor) primary circuit with primary sodium in different regimes, such as forced circulation (FC), transition to the reactor cooldown and emergency cooldown with natural coolant convection, are presented. It is shown that, under the influence of lift forces on the nonisothermal coolant flow in the upper chamber at the periphery of its bottom region over the side shields, a stable cold coolant isothermal zone is formed, whose dimensions increase with increase of total water flowrate. An essential and stable coolant temperature stratification is detected in the peripheral area of the upper (hot) chamber over the side shields, in the pressure and cold side chambers, in the elevator baffle, in the cooling system of the reactor vessel, and in the outlet of intermediate and autonomous heat exchangers in different operating regimes. Large gradients and temperature fluctuations are registered at the interface of stratified and recycling formations. In all of the studied cooldown versions, the coolant outlet temperature at the core fuel assembly is decreased and the coolant temperature in the peripheral zone of the upper chamber is increased compared to the FC. High performance of a passive emergency cooldown system of a fast reactor (BN-1200) with submersible autonomous heat exchangers (AHE) is confirmed. Thus, in a normal operation regime, even in case of malfunction of three submersible AHEs, the temperature of the equipment inside the reactor remains within acceptable limits and decay heat removal from the reactor does not exceed safe operation limits. The obtained results can be used both for computer code verification and for approximate estimate of the reactor plant parameters on the similarity criteria basis.

  15. Mechanical properties of types 304 and 316 stainless steel after long-term aging and exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Horak, J.A.; Sikka, V.K.; Raske, D.T.

    1983-01-01

    Because designs for Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) power plants include plant lifetimes to 40 years, an understanding of the mechanical behavior of the structural alloys used is required for times of approx. 2 to 2.5 x 10/sup 5/ h. Most of the alloys used for LMFBR out-of-core structures and components are in a metastable state at the beginning of plant lifetime and evolve to a more stable state and, therefore, microstructure during plant operation. We reviewed mechanical properties and microstructures after prolonged elevated-temperature exposure of types 304 and 316 stainless steel, two alloys used extensively in fast breeder systems. Aging alters properties; in particular, it decreases toughness and tensile ductility, but the properties are still adequate for service. Because stable microstructures have been reached in long-term exposures achieved so far, properties can be expected to remain adequate for service life exposures.

  16. Problems in modeling TF ripple loss of fast alphas from a tokamak reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hively, L.M.

    1987-01-01

    The present status of modeling TF ripple loss of fast alphas from tokamaks is summarized. The modeling issues are discussed, and several new aspects of this problem are described, including gyromotion, radial electric field, and sawtoothing. Existing models predict that TF ripple loss of fast alphas will have a low-to-moderate impact on the design of a tokamak engineering test reactor (ETR). 52 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Fuel supply of nuclear power industry with the introduction of fast reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muraviev, E. V.

    2014-12-01

    The results of studies conducted for the validation of the updated development strategy for nuclear power industry in Russia in the 21st century are presented. Scenarios with different options for the reprocessing of spent fuel of thermal reactors and large-scale growth of nuclear power industry based on fast reactors of inherent safety with a breeding ratio of ˜1 in a closed nuclear fuel cycle are considered. The possibility of enhanced fuel breeding in fast reactors is also taken into account in the analysis. The potential to establish a large-scale nuclear power industry that covers 100% of the increase in electric power requirements in Russia is demonstrated. This power industry may be built by the end of the century through the introduction of fast reactors (replacing thermal ones) with a gross uranium consumption of up to ˜1 million t and the termination of uranium mining even if the reprocessing of spent fuel of thermal reactors is stopped or suffers a long-term delay.

  18. Neutronic Assessment of Transmutation Target Compositions in Heterogeneous Sodium Fast Reactor Geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Samuel E. Bays; Rodolfo M. Ferrer; Michael A. Pope; Benoit Forget; Mehdi Asgari

    2008-02-01

    The sodium fast reactor is under consideration for consuming the transuranic waste in the spent nuclear fuel generated by light water reactors. This work is concerned with specialized target assemblies for an oxide-fueled sodium fast reactor that are designed exclusively for burning the americium and higher mass actinide component of light water reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The associated gamma and neutron radioactivity, as well as thermal heat, associated with decay of these actinides may significantly complicate fuel handling and fabrication of recycled fast reactor fuel. The objective of using targets is to isolate in a smaller number of assemblies these concentrations of higher actinides, thus reducing the volume of fuel having more rigorous handling requirements or a more complicated fabrication process. This is in contrast to homogeneous recycle where all recycled actinides are distributed among all fuel assemblies. Several heterogeneous core geometries were evaluated to determine the fewest target assemblies required to burn these actinides without violating a set of established fuel performance criteria. The DIF3D/REBUS code from Argonne National Laboratory was used to perform the core physics and accompanying fuel cycle calculations in support of this work. Using the REBUS code, each core design was evaluated at the equilibrium cycle condition.

  19. Thermal- and fast-spectrum molten salt reactors for actinide burning and fuel production

    SciTech Connect

    Forsberg, Charles W.

    2007-07-01

    In a molten salt reactor (MSR), the fuel is dissolved in a fluoride salt coolant. The technology was partly developed in the 1950's and 1960's. With changing goals for advanced reactors and new technologies, there is currently a renewed interest in MSRs. The new technologies include (1) Brayton power cycles (rather than steam cycles) that eliminate many of the historical challenges in building MSRs and (2) the conceptual development of several fast-spectrum MSRs that have large negative temperature and void coefficients, a unique safety characteristic not found in solid-fuel fast reactors. Earlier MSRs were thermal-neutron-spectrum reactors. Compared with solid-fueled reactors, MSR systems have lower fissile inventories, no radiation damage constraint on attainable fuel burnup, no spent nuclear fuel, no requirement to fabricate and handle solid fuel, and a single isotopic composition of fuel in the reactor. These and other characteristics may enable MSRs to have potentially unique capabilities and competitive economics for actinide burning and extending fuel resources. The status, unique characteristics, and recent worldwide advances in MSRs are described. (author)

  20. Thermal- and Fast-Spectrum Molten Salt Reactors for Actinide Burning and Fuel Production

    SciTech Connect

    Forsberg, Charles W

    2007-01-01

    In a molten salt reactor (MSR), the fuel is dissolved in a fluoride salt coolant. The technology was partly developed in the 1950s and 1960s. With changing goals for advanced reactors and new technologies, there is currently a renewed interest in MSRs. The new technologies include (1) Brayton power cycles (rather than steam cycles) that eliminate many of the historical challenges in building MSRs and (2) the conceptual development of several fast-spectrum MSRs that have large negative temperature and void coefficients, a unique safety characteristic not found in solid-fuel fast reactors. Earlier MSRs were thermal-neutron-spectrum reactors. Compared with solid-fueled reactors, MSR systems have lower fissile inventories, no radiation damage constraint on attainable fuel burnup, no spent nuclear fuel, no requirement to fabricate and handle solid fuel, and a single isotopic composition of fuel in the reactor. These and other characteristics may enable MSRs to have potentially unique capabilities and competitive economics for actinide burning and extending fuel resources. The status, unique characteristics, and recent worldwide advances in MSRs are described.