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Sample records for fast icrf antenna

  1. First results with 3-strap ICRF antennas in ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobkov, V.; Braun, F.; Dux, R.; Herrmann, A.; Faugel, H.; Fünfgelder, H.; Kallenbach, A.; Neu, R.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Ochoukov, R.; Pütterich, Th.; Tuccilo, A.; Tudisco, O.; Wang, Y.; Yang, Q.; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2016-08-01

    The 3-strap antennas in ASDEX Upgrade allow ICRF operation with low tungsten (W) content in the confined plasma with W-coated antenna limiters. With the 3-strap antenna configuration, the local W impurity source at the antenna is drastically reduced and the core W concentration is similar to that of the boron coated 2-strap antenna at a given ICRF power. Operation of the 3-strap antennas with the power ratio between the central and the outer straps of 1.5:1 and 2:1 is adopted to minimize the ICRF-specific W release.

  2. Design of the ITER ICRF Antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Hancock, D.; Nightingale, M.; Bamber, R.; Dalton, N.; Lister, J.; Porton, M.; Shannon, M.; Wilson, D.; Wooldridge, E.; Winkler, K.

    2011-12-23

    The CYCLE consortium has been designing the ITER ICRF antenna since March 2010, supported by an F4E grant. Following a brief introduction to the consortium, this paper: describes the present status and layout of the design; highlights the key mechanical engineering features; shows the expected impact of cooling and radiation issues on the design and outlines the need for future R and D to support the design process. A key design requirement is the need for the mechanical design and analysis to be consistent with all requirements following from the RF physics and antenna layout optimisation. As such, this paper complements that of Durodie et al.

  3. A new radiation stripline ICRF antenna design for EAST Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, C. M.; Zhao, Y. P.; Wan, B. N.; Li, J.; Zhang, X. J.; Yang, Q. X.; Yuan, S.; Braun, F.; Notedame, J.-M.; Kasahara, H.; Collaboration: ICRF Team on EAST

    2014-02-12

    A new type of toroidal long Radiation Stripline Antenna (RSA) is presented, which can effectively improve antenna radiation, leading in reduction of max voltage on transmission line and decrease of the sensitivity to ELM's of the ICRF system at some frequencies. Based on the new concept, a 4-straps RSA is proposed for EAST device. Using 3-D computing simulator code (HFSS), RF current distribution, S-parameters and electromagnetic field distribution on and near the RSA ICRF antenna are analyzed and compared with present ICRF antenna on EAST.

  4. Modeling of the EAST ICRF antenna with ICANT Code

    SciTech Connect

    Qin Chengming; Zhao Yanping; Colas, L.; Heuraux, S.

    2007-09-28

    A Resonant Double Loop (RDL) antenna for ion-cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) on Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) is under construction. The new antenna is analyzed using the antenna coupling code ICANT which self-consistently determines the surface currents on all antenna parts. In this work, the modeling of the new ICRF antenna using this code is to assess the near-fields in front of the antenna and analysis its coupling capabilities. Moreover, the antenna reactive radiated power computed by ICANT and shows a good agreement with deduced from Transmission Line (TL) theory.

  5. Development of impedance matching technologies for ICRF antenna arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Pinsker, R.I.

    1998-03-01

    All high power ICRF heating systems include devices for matching the input impedance of the antenna array to the generator output impedance. For most types of antennas used, the input impedance is strongly time-dependent on timescales as rapid as 10-4 s, while the rf generators used are capable of producing full power only into a stationary load impedance. Hence, the dynamic response of the matching method is of great practical importance. In this paper, world-wide developments in this field over the past decade are reviewed. These techniques may be divided into several classes. The edge plasma parameters that determine the antenna array`s input impedance may be controlled to maintain a fixed load impedance. The frequency of the rf source can be feedback controlled to compensate for changes in the edge plasma conditions, or fast variable tuning elements in the transmission line between the generator output and the antenna input connections can provide the necessary time-varying impedance transformation. In lossy passive schemes, reflected power due to the time-varying impedance of the antenna array is diverted to a dummy load. Each of these techniques can be applied to a pre-existing antenna system. If a new antenna is to be designed, recent advances allow the antenna array to have the intrinsic property of presenting a constant load to the feeding transmission lines despite the varying load seen by each antenna in the array.

  6. Development of impedance matching technologies for ICRF antenna arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinsker, R. I.

    1998-08-01

    All high-power ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) heating systems include devices for matching the input impedance of the antenna array to the generator output impedance. For most types of antennas used, the input impedance is strongly time dependent on timescales as rapid as 10-4 s, while the radio frequency (RF) generators used are capable of producing full power only into a stationary load impedance. Hence, the dynamic response of the matching method is of great practical importance. In this paper, world-wide developments in this field over the past decade are reviewed. These techniques may be divided into several classes. The edge plasma parameters that determine the antenna array's input impedance may be controlled to maintain a fixed load impedance. The frequency of the RF source can be feedback controlled to compensate for changes in the edge plasma conditions, or fast variable tuning elements in the transmission line between the generator output and the antenna input connections can provide the necessary time-varying impedance transformation. In `lossy passive schemes', reflected power due to the time-varying impedance of the antenna array is diverted to a dummy load. Each of these techniques can be applied to a pre-existing antenna system. If a new antenna is to be designed, recent advances allow the antenna array to have the intrinsic property of presenting a constant load to the feeding transmission lines despite the varying load seen by each antenna in the array.

  7. Assessment of a field-aligned ICRF antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wukitch, S. J.; Brunner, D.; Ennever, P.; Garrett, M. L.; Hubbard, A.; Labombard, B.; Lau, C.; Lin, Y.; Lipschultz, B.; Miller, D.; Ochoukov, R.; Porkolab, M.; Reinke, M. L.; Terry, J. L.

    2014-02-01

    Impurity contamination and localized heat loads associated with ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) antenna operation are among the most challenging issues for ICRF utilization.. Another challenge is maintaining maximum coupled power through plasma variations including edge localized modes (ELMs) and confinement transitions. Here, we report on an experimental assessment of a field aligned (FA) antenna with respect to impurity contamination, impurity sources, RF enhanced heat flux and load tolerance. In addition, we compare the modification of the scrape of layer (SOL) plasma potential of the FA antenna to a conventional, toroidally aligned (TA) antenna, in order to explore the underlying physics governing impurity contamination linked to ICRF heating. The FA antenna is a 4-strap ICRF antenna where the current straps and antenna enclosure sides are perpendicular to and the Faraday screen rods are parallel to the total magnetic field. In principle, alignment with respect to the total magnetic field minimizes integrated E∥ (electric field along a magnetic field line) via symmetry. Consistent with expectations, we observed that the impurity contamination and impurity source at the FA antenna are reduced compared to the TA antenna. In both L and H-mode discharges, the radiated power is 20-30% lower for a FA-antenna heated discharge than a discharge heated with the TA-antennas. Further we observe that the fraction of RF energy deposited upon the antenna is less than 0.4 % of the total injected RF energy in dipole phasing. The total deposited energy increases significantly when the FA antenna is operated in monopole phasing. The FA antenna also exhibits an unexpected load tolerance for ELMs and confinement transitions compared to the TA antennas. However, inconsistent with expectations, we observe RF induced plasma potentials to be nearly identical for FA and TA antennas when operated in dipole phasing. In monopole phasing, the FA antenna has the highest plasma

  8. Assessment of a field-aligned ICRF antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Wukitch, S. J.; Brunner, D.; Ennever, P.; Garrett, M. L.; Hubbard, A.; Labombard, B.; Lau, C.; Lin, Y.; Lipschultz, B.; Miller, D.; Ochoukov, R.; Porkolab, M.; Reinke, M. L.; Terry, J. L.

    2014-02-12

    Impurity contamination and localized heat loads associated with ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) antenna operation are among the most challenging issues for ICRF utilization.. Another challenge is maintaining maximum coupled power through plasma variations including edge localized modes (ELMs) and confinement transitions. Here, we report on an experimental assessment of a field aligned (FA) antenna with respect to impurity contamination, impurity sources, RF enhanced heat flux and load tolerance. In addition, we compare the modification of the scrape of layer (SOL) plasma potential of the FA antenna to a conventional, toroidally aligned (TA) antenna, in order to explore the underlying physics governing impurity contamination linked to ICRF heating. The FA antenna is a 4-strap ICRF antenna where the current straps and antenna enclosure sides are perpendicular to and the Faraday screen rods are parallel to the total magnetic field. In principle, alignment with respect to the total magnetic field minimizes integrated E∥ (electric field along a magnetic field line) via symmetry. Consistent with expectations, we observed that the impurity contamination and impurity source at the FA antenna are reduced compared to the TA antenna. In both L and H-mode discharges, the radiated power is 20–30% lower for a FA-antenna heated discharge than a discharge heated with the TA-antennas. Further we observe that the fraction of RF energy deposited upon the antenna is less than 0.4 % of the total injected RF energy in dipole phasing. The total deposited energy increases significantly when the FA antenna is operated in monopole phasing. The FA antenna also exhibits an unexpected load tolerance for ELMs and confinement transitions compared to the TA antennas. However, inconsistent with expectations, we observe RF induced plasma potentials to be nearly identical for FA and TA antennas when operated in dipole phasing. In monopole phasing, the FA antenna has the highest plasma

  9. ICRF heating on TFTR with the ORNL antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.J.; Gardner, W.L.; Ryan, P.M.; Greene, G.J.; Hosea, J.C.; Wilson, J.R.; Stevens, J.E.

    1989-01-01

    Initial ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) heating experiments on TFTR began in the summer of 1988. Although we were in the commissioning stage for much of the equipment, some plasma coupling measurements were made in the fall. This paper is focused on the results from the Bay L antenna. 3 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Characterization of local heat fluxes around ICRF antennas on JET

    SciTech Connect

    Campergue, A.-L.; Jacquet, P.; Monakhov, I.; Arnoux, G.; Brix, M.; Sirinelli, A.; Milanesio, D.; Colas, L.; Collaboration: JET-EFDA Contributors

    2014-02-12

    When using Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequency (ICRF) heating, enhanced power deposition on Plasma-Facing Components (PFCs) close to the antennas can occur. Experiments have recently been carried out on JET with the new ITER-Like-Wall (ILW) to characterize the heat fluxes on the protection of the JET ICRF antennas, using Infra-Red (IR) thermography measurement. The measured heat flux patterns along the poloidal limiters surrounding powered antennas were compared to predictions from a simple RF sheath rectification model. The RF electric field, parallel to the static magnetic field in front of the antenna, was evaluated using the TOPICA code, integrating a 3D flattened model of the JET A2 antennas. The poloidal density variation in front of the limiters was obtained from the mapping of the Li-beam or edge reflectometry measurements using the flux surface geometry provided by EFIT equilibrium reconstruction. In many cases, this simple model can well explain the position of the maximum heat flux on the different protection limiters and the heat-flux magnitude, confirming that the parallel RF electric field and the electron plasma density in front of the antenna are the main driving parameters for ICRF-induced local heat fluxes.

  11. Taming the ICRF Antenna - Plasma Edge Interaction via Novel Field-Aligned ICRF Antenna on Alcator C-Mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wukitch, S. J.; Lin, Y.; Terry, J.; Hubbard, A.; Mumgaard, R. T.; Reinke, M. L.; the Alcator C-Mod Team

    2016-10-01

    Although ICRF is attractive for bulk plasma heating due to favorable wave propagation, ICRF antenna - edge plasma interaction remains a challenge. Recent experiments reveal that RF-induced potentials in the scrape-off layer and antenna impurity source are dependent on the power ratio between the inner and outer current staps, Pcent/Pout. Using a modified field aligned antenna, the transmission line network connected the center two straps at [0,pi] to one transmitter and the outer two straps another transmitter. This experiment was motivated by positive three strap antenna results from ASDEX-U. With -30 dB decoupling, we scanned Pcent/Pout from zero to greater than 1000. A minimum in the RF enhanced potential and local impurity source is observed for Pcent/Pout greater than 1 and less than 4 with a gradual rise in impurity source for Pcent/Pout greater than 4. This minimum correlates where the image currents in the antenna limiters are expected to be smallest. We also tested antenna operation in [0,0,pi,pi] antenna phasing and found excessive local impurity production despite the antenna being field aligned. This antenna phasing excites low k and potentially have higher coupling. Latest results and analysis will be presented Supported by US DOE Award DE-FC02-99ER54512.

  12. Design of an ICRF plasma thruster antenna by TOPICA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vecchi, Giuseppe; Lancellotti, Vito; Maggiora, Riccardo

    2006-10-01

    A typical RF plasma thruster is comprised of an RF plasma source, an open-ended magnetic confinement device, an RF acceleration unit and a magnetic nozzle. The usual choice for the acceleration is to employ the Ion-Cyclotron resonance frequency (ICRF), a well established technology in fusion experiments for transferring large RF powers to magnetized plasmas. To help design RF thruster ICRF antennas, TOPICA (Torino Polytechnic Ion Cyclotron Antenna) code [1] has been recently extended to handle cylindrically symmetric plasmas. The latter entailed developing a wholly new module of TOPICA charged with the task of solving Maxwell's equations in cylindrical magnetized warm plasmas and yielding the Green's functionY (m,kz), i.e. the relationship at the air-plasma interface between the transverse magnetic and electric fields in the spectral (wavenumber) domain. The approach to the problem of determining the antenna input impedance relies on an integral-equation formulation for the self-consistent evaluation of the current distribution on the conductors. This work reports on TOPICA evolution and presents the design of an RF thruster ICRF antenna. *V. Lancellotti et al., Nucl. Fusion, 46 (2006) S476-S499

  13. Plasma-surface interactions with ICRF antennas and lower hybrid grills in Tore Supra

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J.H.; Hutter, T.; Hogan, J.T.

    1996-10-01

    The edge plasma interactions of the actively cooled radio-frequency heating launchers in Tore Supra- ion-cyclotron range-of-frequencies (ICRF) antennas and lower-hybrid (LH) grills-are studied using infrared video imaging. On the two-strap ICRF antennas, operated in fast-wave electron heating or current drive mode, hot spots with temperatures of 500-900{degrees} C are observed by the end of 2-s power pulses of 2 MW per antenna. The distribution and maximum values of temperature are determined principally by the relative phase of the two antenna straps: dipole (heating) phasing results in significantly less antenna heating than does 90` (current drive) phasing. Transient heat fluxes of 1-20 MW/m{sup 2} are measured on the lateral protection bumpers at ICRF turn-on; these fluxes are primarily a function of plasma and radio frequency (rf) control, and are not simply correlated with the strap phasing or the final surface temperature distributions. The remarkable feature of the lower hybrid edge interaction is the production of beams of heat flux in front of the grills; these beams propagate along the helical magnetic field lines and can deliver fluxes of 5-10 MW/m{sup 2} over areas of several cm{sup 2} to plasma-facing components such as the grill or antenna lateral bumpers. Both the ICRF and LH phenomena appear to result from the acceleration of particles by the near fields of the launchers. Modeling of the heat flux deposition on components and its relation to sputtering processes is presented, and possibilities for controlling these interactions are discussed.

  14. Field-aligned ICRF antenna design for EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wukitch, S. J.; Lin, Y.; Qin, C.; Zhang, X.; Beck, W.; Koert, P.; Zhou, L.

    2015-12-01

    For ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF), a number of physics and technological challenges remain for steady state, toroidal devices. Among the most critical is maintaining good coupling and maximizing the coupled power through plasma variations including edge localized modes (ELMs) and confinement transitions. As pulse length increases, enhanced localized heat loads associated with antenna operation can challenge antenna integrity. In addition, ICRF impurity sources and contamination need to be minimized to enable effective plasma heating. Here, we report on a four strap field aligned (FA) antenna design for the EAST tokamak. A FA antenna is an antenna where the current straps and antenna side enclosure are perpendicular to the total magnetic field while the Faraday screen rods are parallel to the total magnetic field. In C-Mod, a FA antenna has been shown to be inherently load tolerant which allows for robust power delivery to the plasma. Furthermore, the RF enhanced heat flux and antenna impurity source were nearly eliminated. For both L and H-mode discharges, the core impurity contamination is 20-30% lower but not eliminated. The emerging physics understanding is that the local RF impurity sources and RF enhanced heat flux is reduced due to the geometric alignment of the FA antenna while impurity contamination is a result of far field sheaths. An important aspect of antenna design is to identify a core absorption scenario that is characterized by strong single pass absorption for a broad range of target discharges. To maximize power coupling, the antenna spectrum needs to balance the k|| needed for strong single pass absorption and high coupling efficiency through evanescent layer. The latest design for a FA four strap adapted to EAST device is balance between geometrical constraints and physics requirements.

  15. ICRF antenna modeling and simulation. Final report, March 1, 1993--May 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-30

    SAIC has undergone a three year research and development program in support of the DOE Office of Fusion Energy`s (OFE) program in Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF) heating of present, next generation, and future plasma fusion devices. The effort entailed advancing theoretical models and numerical simulation technology of ICRF physics and engineering issues associated predominately with, but not limited to, tokamak Ion Cyclotron Heating (ICH) and fast wave current drive (FWCD). Ion cyclotron heating and current drive is a central element in all current and planned large fusion experiments. In recent years, the variety of uses for ICRF systems has expanded, and includes the following: (1) Heating sufficient to drive plasma to ignition. (a) Second-harmonic T heating. (b) He{sup 3} minority heating. (2) Second-harmonic He{sup 4} heating in H plasma (for non-activated phase). (3) Detailed equilibrium profile control minority heating. (a) Ion minority (He{sup 3}) CD (for profile control on inside of plasma). (b) Ion minority (He{sup 3}) CD (for profile control on outside of plasma). (4) Ion-ion hybrid regime majority ion heating. (5) Electron current drive. (6) Mode conversion to drive current. (7) Deuterium minority heating. (8) Sawtooth instability stabilization. (9) Alpha particle parameter enhancement. (10) The generation of minority tails by ICRF to simulate D-T plasma particle physics in a deuterium plasma. Optimization of ICRF antenna performance for either heating or current drive depends critically on the complex balance and interplay between the plasma physics and the electromechanical system requirements. For example, ITER IC rf designs call for an IC. system frequency range from 20 MHz to 100 MHz. Additionally, antenna designs and operational modes that minimize impurity production and induced sheath formation may degrade current drive efficiency. Such effects have been observed in experiments involving it versus zero antenna phasing.

  16. ICRF antenna matching system with ferrite tuners for the Alcator C-Mod tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y.; Binus, A.; Wukitch, S. J.; Koert, P.; Murray, R.; Pfeiffer, A.

    2015-12-01

    Real-time fast ferrite tuning (FFT) has been successfully implemented on the ICRF antennas on Alcator C-Mod. The former prototypical FFT system on the E-port 2-strap antenna has been upgraded using new ferrite tuners that have been designed specifically for the operational parameters of the Alcator C-Mod ICRF system (˜ 80 MHz). Another similar FFT system, with two ferrite tuners and one fixed-length stub, has been installed on the transmission line of the D-port 2-strap antenna. These two systems share a Linux-server-based real-time controller. These FFT systems are able to achieve and maintain the reflected power to the transmitters to less than 1% in real time during the plasma discharges under almost all plasma conditions, and help ensure reliable high power operation of the antennas. The innovative field-aligned (FA) 4-strap antenna on J-port has been found to have an interesting feature of loading insensitivity vs. plasma conditions. This feature allows us to significantly improve the matching for the FA J-port antenna by installing carefully designed stubs on the two transmission lines. The reduction of the RF voltages in the transmission lines has enabled the FA J-port antenna to deliver 3.7 MW RF power to plasmas out of the 4 MW source power in high performance I-mode plasmas.

  17. Rotated 4-strap ICRF antenna: design and initial results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wukitch, S. J.; Beck, W.; Doody, J.; Garret, M.; Koert, P.; Lin, Y.; Vieira, R.; Terry, J.; The Alcator C-MOD Team

    2011-10-01

    Previously, we have utilized low Z thin films to mitigate impurities related to ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) antenna operation. A new rotated antenna is has been designed and installed to minimize impurity production by imposing symmetry along the total magnetic field line. The antenna is aligned to a 10° field pitch where the typical discharge range is 7-13° in C-Mod. Compared to our standard antennas (0° pitch), the power density (MW/m2) for the rotated antenna is ~50% higher for a given injected power for the rotated antenna due a decrease in available surface area. Due to geometric limitations, two locations have the RF electric field aligned with the total magnetic field and have potential to limit the antenna voltage handling. Initial results from experiments characterizing the power and voltage limits of the antenna will be presented. Using the standard antennas as reference, we will also present results from comparison of antenna impurity characteristics and their impact on the scrape off layer transport. Supported by US DOE award DE-FC02-99ER54512.

  18. Proposal of an Arc Detection Technique Based on RF Measurements for the ITER ICRF Antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Huygen, S.; Dumortier, P.; Durodie, F.; Messiaen, A.; Vervier, M.; Vrancken, M.

    2011-12-23

    RF arc detection is a key operational and safety issue for the ICRF system on ITER. Indeed the high voltages inside the antenna put it at risk of arcing, which could cause substantial damage. This paper describes the various possibilities explored by circuit simulation and the strategy now considered to protect the ITER ICRF antenna from RF arcs.

  19. High Voltage Test-Stand Research Done on ICRF Antenna Elements of the High-Harmonic Fast-Wave System of NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, R. J.; Ahn, J.W.; Bortolon, A.; Brunkhorst, C.; Ellis, R.; Fredd, E.; Greenough, Nevell; Hosea, J.; Kung, C. C.; Miller, D.

    2015-01-01

    The twelve-strap high-harmonic fast-wave (HHFW) antenna on NSTX has exhibited a high-voltage standoff around 25 kV during previous experimental campaigns; this standoff needs to be improved for increased power coupling. During the recent NSTX-U upgrade period, a test-stand was set up with two antenna straps along with Faraday screens for testing purposes. Using a diagnostic suite consisting of a fast camera, a residual gas analyzer, a pressure gage, high-voltage probes, and an infrared camera, several interesting discoveries were made, leading to possible improvements of the antenna RF voltage operation level. First, arcing was observed outside the Faraday shields towards the low-voltage ("grounded") end of the straps (faraday shield box ends); this arcing was successfully eliminated by installing an additional grounding point between the Faraday shield box and the vessel wall. Second, considerable outgassing was observed during the RF pulse and the amount of outgassing was found to decrease with increasing RF power, possibly indicative of multipacting. Finally, infrared camera measurements of heating on the Faraday shield assembly suggest that the return currents on the Faraday shield box are highly localized at the box sides and possibly account for the pressure increase observed. Computations of these RF currents using Microwave Studio show qualitative agreement with the heated regions. New grounding points between the antenna box and the vessel have been implemented in NSTX-U, where future tests will be done to determine if the high-voltage standoff has improved. Further antenna improvements will be sought through future experiments on the test stand.

  20. Design of the Vacuum Feedthrough for the EAST ICRF Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qingxi; Song, Yuntao; Wu, Songtao; Zhao, Yanping

    2011-04-01

    Detailed design of the vacuum feedthrough for the ion cyclotron radio frequency (ICRF) antenna in EAST, along with an electro-analysis and thermal structural analysis, is presented. The electric field, the voltage standing wave ratio (VSWR) and the stresses in the vacuum feedthrough are studied. A method using the rings of oxygen-free copper as the cushion and macro-beam plasma arc welding is applied in the assembly to protect the ceramic from being damaged during welding. The vacuum leak test on the prototype of vacuum feedthrough is introduced.

  1. Theory and Practice in ICRF Antennas for Long Pulse Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Colas, L.; Bremond, S.; Mitteau, R.; Chantant, M.; Goniche, M.; Basiuk, V.; Bosia, G.; Gunn, J.P.

    2005-09-26

    Long plasma discharges on the Tore Supra (TS) tokamak were extended in 2004 towards higher powers and plasma densities by combined Lower Hybrid (LH) and Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF) waves. RF pulses of 20sx8MW and 60sx4MW were produced. TS is equipped with 3 ICRF antennas, whose front faces are ready for CW operation. This paper reports on their behaviour over high power long pulses, as observed with infrared (IR) thermography and calorimetric measurements. Edge parasitic losses, although modest, are concentrated on a small surface and can raise surface temperatures close to operational limits. A complex hot spot pattern was revealed with at least 3 physical processes involved : convected power, electron acceleration in the LH near field, and a RF-specific phenomenon compatible with RF sheaths. LH coupling was also perturbed in the antenna shadow. This was attributed to RF-induced DC ExB0 convection. This motivated sheath modelling in two directions. First, the 2D topology of RF potentials was investigated in relation with the RF current distribution over the antenna, via a Green's function formalism and full-wave calculation using the ICANT code. In front of phased arrays of straps, convective cells were interpreted using the RF current profiles of strip line theory. Another class of convective cells, specific to antenna box corners, was evidenced for the first time. Within 1D sheath models assuming independent flux tubes, RF and rectified DC potentials are proportional. 2D fluid models couple nearby flux tubes via transverse polarisation currents. Unexpectedly this does not necessarily smooth RF potential maps. Peak DC potentials can even be enhanced. The experience gained on TS and the numerical tools are valuable for designing steady state high power antennas for next step devices. General rules to reduce RF potentials as well as concrete design options are discussed.

  2. Density profile sensitivity study of ASDEX Upgrade ICRF Antennas with the TOPICA code

    SciTech Connect

    Krivska, A.; Ceccuzzi, S.; Tuccillo, A. A.; Milanesio, D.; Maggiora, R.; Bobkov, V.; Braun, F.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.

    2011-12-23

    During operation of the ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) ion cyclotron radio frequency (ICRF) system, Tungsten (W)-coated poloidal limiters and structures connected along magnetic field lines to the antenna can be sources of W, which is attributed to sputtering by ions accelerated in radio frequency (RF) sheaths. In order to analyze and optimize the ICRF antenna performance, accurate and efficient simulation tools are necessary. TOPICA code was developed for analysis of ICRF antenna systems with plasma loading conditions modeled with ID FELICE code. This paper presents an initial comparative analysis of two AUG ICRF antennas for a set of model plasma density profiles (with varying density gradient and antenna cut-off distance). The antennas are presently installed in AUG and differ in that one was partially optimized using HFSS code to reduce E{sub ||} near fields. Power transferred to plasma and sheath driving RF potentials are computed.

  3. Electromagnetic simulations of the ASDEX Upgrade ICRF Antenna with the TOPICA code

    SciTech Connect

    Krivska, A.; Milanesio, D.; Bobkov, V.; Braun, F.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.

    2009-11-26

    Accurate and efficient simulation tools are necessary to optimize the ICRF antenna design for a set of operational conditions. The TOPICA code was developed for performance prediction and for the analysis of ICRF antenna systems in the presence of plasma, given realistic antenna geometries. Fully 3D antenna geometries can be adopted in TOPICA, just as in available commercial codes. But while those commercial codes cannot operate with a plasma loading, the TOPICA code correctly accounts for realistic plasma loading conditions, by means of the coupling with 1D FELICE code. This paper presents the evaluation of the electric current distribution on the structure, of the parallel electric field in the region between the straps and the plasma and the computation of sheaths driving RF potentials. Results of TOPICA simulations will help to optimize and re-design the ICRF ASDEX Upgrade antenna in order to reduce tungsten (W) sputtering attributed to the rectified sheath effect during ICRF operation.

  4. Recent experiments on alternative dipole phasing with the JET A2 ICRF antennas

    SciTech Connect

    Lerche, E.; Messiaen, A.; Ongena, J.; Telesca, G.; Van Eester, D.; Weynants, R. R.; Bobkov, V.; Jacquet, P.; Mayoral, M.-L.; Monakhov, I.

    2009-11-26

    Using the JET A2 ICRF antennas, experiments were carried out to assess the performance of three different dipole phasing configurations relevant for the operation of the ICRF antenna in ITER. Three similar discharges with dipole (0{pi}0{pi}), 'symmetric dipole' (0{pi}{pi}0) and 'super dipole' (00{pi}{pi}) phasings were compared. In the 'super dipole' case, higher coupling was confirmed but lower heating efficiency and much stronger plasma wall interaction were observed, as corroborated, respectively, by the analysis of the diamagnetic energy response to the ICRF power steps and by the observation of a considerable temperature rise of the antenna limiters and septa in the 00{pi}{pi} case. These observations were found to be in line with simulations of the ICRF wave absorption and with High Frequency Structure Simulator (HFSS) modelling of the RF fields near the antenna.

  5. ICRF Antenna Characteristics and Comparison with 3-D Code Calculation in the LHD

    SciTech Connect

    Mutoh, T.; Kasahara, H.; Seki, T.; Saito, K.; Kumazawa, R.; Shimpo, F.; Nomura, G.

    2009-11-26

    The plasma coupling characteristics and local heat spots of an ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) antenna in the Large Helical Device (LHD) are compared with the results of 3-D computing simulator code calculation. We studied several dependences of antenna loading resistances with plasma experimentally and observed a clear relation between the maximum injection power and the loading resistance. Realistic three-dimensional configuration of the ICRF antenna was taken into account to simulate the coupling characteristics and the local heat absorption near the ICRF antenna, which has a helically twisted geometry in the LHD. The electromagnetic field distribution and the current distribution on the antenna strap were calculated. We compared the RF absorption distribution on the antenna structure with the temperature rise during steady state operation and found that the temperature rise was well explained by comparing with the model simulation.

  6. Commissioning of the ITER-like ICRF antenna for JET

    SciTech Connect

    Durodie, F.; Dumortier, P.; Huygen, S.; Jachmich, S.; Lerche, E.; Messiaen, A.; Ongena, J; Van Eester, D.; Vrancken, M.; Nightingale, M.; Berger-By, G.; Loarer, T.; Rimini, F.; Castano-Giraldo, C.; Caughman, John B.; Goulding, Richard Howell; Cocilovo, V.; Frigione, D.; Sozzi, C.; Hobrik, J.; Lamalle, Philippe; Nave, M. F. F.

    2009-06-01

    The new JET ion cyclotron resonance frequency (ICRF) ITER-like antenna (ILA), which was assembled during 2006, was commissioned on the JET RF testbed prior to installation on the JET torus. The 4 resonant double loops (RDL) of the ILA were tested at high power at 42 MHz up to 42 kV for 5 s in 10 min intervals. Low power matching studies using a saltwater load placed in front of the ILA have allowed testing and optimizing proposed matching algorithms on single RDLs, paired RDLs and finally on the full array. The upper limit of the frequency range of the ILA appears to be limited to 47 49 MHz due to the effect on the electrical lengths of the connection between the capacitors and the conjugate T point. Capacitor position scans have allowed obtaining the necessary data to confirm the RF model of the RDL which is necessary for the scattering matrix arc detection. The latter is deemed necessary in order to detect arcs at the low impedance conjugate T of the circuit. The antenna was installed onto JET during August 2007 and commissioning on plasma started May 2008. At present the commissioning of the ILA on JET is ongoing in a series of dedicated experimental campaigns.

  7. Simulations of ICRF-fast wave current drive on DIIID

    SciTech Connect

    Ehst, D.A.

    1990-06-01

    Self-consistent calculations of MHD equilibria, generated by fast wave current drive and including the bootstrap effect, were done to guide and anticipate the results of upcoming experiments on the DIIID tokamak. The simulations predict that 2 MW of ICRF power is more than adequate to create several hundred kiloamperes in steady state; the total current increases with the temperature and density of the target plasma. 12 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Estimation of sheath potentials in front of ASDEX upgrade ICRF antenna with SSWICH asymptotic code

    SciTech Connect

    Křivská, A.; Colas, L.; Milanesio, D.

    2015-12-10

    Multi-megawatt Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF) heating became problematic in ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) tokamak after coating of ICRF antenna limiters and other plasma facing components by tungsten. Strong impurity influx was indeed produced at levels of injected power markedly lower than in the previous experiments. It is assumed that the impurity production is mainly driven by parallel component of Radio-Frequency (RF) antenna electric near-field E// that is rectified in sheaths. In this contribution we estimate poloidal distribution of sheath Direct Current (DC) potential in front of the ICRF antenna and simulate its relative variations over the parametric scans performed during experiments, trying to reproduce some of the experimental observations. In addition, relative comparison between two types of AUG ICRF antenna configurations, used for experiments in 2014, has been performed. For this purpose we use the Torino Polytechnic Ion Cyclotron Antenna (TOPICA) code and asymptotic version of the Self-consistent Sheaths and Waves for Ion Cyclotron Heating (SSWICH) code. Further, we investigate correlation between amplitudes of the calculated oscillating sheath voltages and the E// fields computed at the lateral side of the antenna box, in relation with a heuristic antenna design strategy at IPP Garching to mitigate RF sheaths.

  9. Effect on the tritium breeding ratio for a distributed ICRF antenna in a DEMO reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, A.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Fischer, U.; Dies, J.

    2015-12-10

    The paper reports results of MCNP-5 calculations to assess the effect on the Tritium Breeding Ratio (TBR) when integrating a distributed Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF) antenna in the blanket of DEMO fusion power reactor. The calculations consider different parameters such as the ICRF covering ratio and the type of breeding blanket including the Helium Cooled Pebble Bed (HCPB) and the Helium Cooled Lithium Lead (HCLL) concepts. For an antenna with a full toroidal circumference of 360°, located poloidally at 40° with a poloidal extension of 1 m, the reduction of the TBR is −0.349% for the HCPB blanket and −0.532% for the HCLL blanket. The distributed ICRF antenna is thus shown to have only a marginal effect on the TBR of the DEMO reactor.

  10. Rf sheaths and impurity generation by ICRF (ion cyclotron range of frequencies) antennas

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, F.W.

    1988-11-01

    In general, Faraday screen elements in an ICRF antenna are not aligned precisely along the combined toroidal and poloidal magnetic fields. When plasma of density n > 2epsilon/sub 0/V/eg/sup 2/ /approximately/ 10/sup 9/cm/sup -3/ is present in the gap between elements, electron response to the parallel electric field shorts out the electric field over most of the gap, leaving a narrow sheath of positive space charge and intense electric field. Here V denotes the voltage across the gap and g the gap spacing. This intense electric field accelerates ions up to an appreciable fraction of the gap voltage (/approximately/ 1 kV), sufficient to cause physical sputtering of the screen material. Impurities so generated constitute the principal limitation on power density (kW/cm/sup 2/) for ICRF antennas. ICRF antenna and Faraday screen design principles which minimize sputtering are discussed. 24 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Effect on the tritium breeding ratio for a distributed ICRF antenna in a DEMO reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, A.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Fischer, U.; Dies, J.

    2015-12-01

    The paper reports results of MCNP-5 calculations to assess the effect on the Tritium Breeding Ratio (TBR) when integrating a distributed Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF) antenna in the blanket of DEMO fusion power reactor. The calculations consider different parameters such as the ICRF covering ratio and the type of breeding blanket including the Helium Cooled Pebble Bed (HCPB) and the Helium Cooled Lithium Lead (HCLL) concepts. For an antenna with a full toroidal circumference of 360°, located poloidally at 40° with a poloidal extension of 1 m, the reduction of the TBR is -0.349% for the HCPB blanket and -0.532% for the HCLL blanket. The distributed ICRF antenna is thus shown to have only a marginal effect on the TBR of the DEMO reactor.

  12. Coupling Of The JET ICRF Antennas In ELMy H-mode Plasmas With ITER Relevant Plasma-Straps Distance

    SciTech Connect

    Mayoral, M.-L.; Monakhov, I.; Jacquet, P.; Brix, M.; Graham, M.; Erents, K.; Korotkov, A.; Lomas, P.; Mailloux, J.; McDonald, D. C.; Stamp, M.; Walden, A.; Hobirk, J.; Ongena, J.

    2007-09-28

    In ITER, the requirement for the ICRF antenna is to deliver 20 MW in ELMy H-mode plasmas with an averaged antenna - plasma separatrix distance of 14 cm. Two major problems will have to be solved: the very fast change in antenna loading during ELMs and the decrease of the loading when the plasma is pushed far away from the antenna. JET has the capability to combine these conditions and for the first time, experiments were performed in ELMy H-mode at antenna--separatrix distance, referred as ROG, varied from 10 to 14 cm. When ROG was increased, the perturbation caused by ELMs was found to decrease significantly and the loading between ELMs was found to deteriorate to very low values. In order to compensate the latter unwanted effect, different levels of deuterium gas were injected in the edge either from the divertor, the midplane or the top of the tokamak. Using this technique, the loading was increased by up to a factor 6 and up to 8 MW of ICRF power were coupled.

  13. Initial results from a folded waveguide ICRF antenna development project

    SciTech Connect

    Bigelow, T.S.; Cole, M.J.; Fadnek, A.; Carter, M.D.; Fogelman, C.H.; Hoffman, D.J.; Ryan, P.M.; Sparks, D.O.; Taylor, D.J.; Yugo, J.J.; Wilson, J.R.; Bernabei, S.; Kugel, H.

    1997-04-01

    A folded waveguide (FWG) ICRF launcher has been built and preliminary high power tests completed. This project is intended to provide a proof-of-principle test, using a high density plasma load, of the high power density capability and other ITER-relevant advanced features of the FWG. The design is a 12 vane, 57 MHz unit with a quarter-wavelength resonator configuration. This FWG has a 0.31 m square cross section that can be installed with either fast wave or ion-Bernstein wave polarization and can also be retracted behind a vacuum isolation valve. A primary issue to be addressed by this project is the plasma loading and maximum power capability of the FWG. Initial high power tests on the ORNL Radio Frequency Test Facility have been conducted. Modeling of the FWG electromagnetic fields and calculations of loading have been performed as well as an investigation of alternate face plate designs that improve the coupling by allowing greater magnetic field penetration into the plasma. This FWG was originally designed for TFTR or PBX-M and is now being considered for the DIII-D tokamak at GA, the NSTX small aspect ratio device under construction at PPPL and the possible FSX experiment at PPPL. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. Initial results from a folded waveguide ICRF antenna development project

    SciTech Connect

    Bigelow, T.S.; Cole, M.J.; Fadnek, A.

    1997-08-01

    A folded waveguide (FWG) ICRF launcher has been built and preliminary high power tests completed. This project is intended to provide a proof-of-principle test, using a high density plasma load, of the high power density capability and other ITER-relevant advanced features of the FWG. The design is a 12 vane, 57 MHz unit with a quarter-wavelength resonator configuration. This FWG has a 0.31 m square cross section that can be installed with either fast wave or ion-Bernstein wave polarization and can also be retracted behind a vacuum isolation valve. A primary issue to be addressed by this project is the plasma loading and maximum power capability of the FWG. Initial high power tests on the ORNL Radio Frequency Test Facility have been conducted. Modeling of the FWG electromagnetic fields and calculations of loading have been performed as well as an investigation of alternate face plate designs that improve the coupling by allowing greater magnetic field penetration into the plasma. This FWG was originally designed for TFTR or PBX-M and is now being considered for the DIII-D tokamak at GA, the NSTX small aspect ratio device under construction at PPPL and the possible FSX experiment at PPPL.

  15. A folded waveguide ICRF antenna for PBX-M and TFTR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigelow, T. S.; Carter, M. D.; Fogelman, C. H.; Yugo, J. J.; Baity, F. W.; Bell, G. L.; Gardner, W. L.; Goulding, R. H.; Hoffman, D. J.; Ryan, P. M.; Swain, D. W.; Taylor, D. J.; Wilson, R.; Bernabei, S.; Kugel, H.; Ono, M.

    1996-02-01

    The folded waveguide (FWG) antenna is an advanced ICRF launcher under development at ORNL that offers many significant advantages over current-strap type antennas. These features are particularly beneficial for reactor-relevant applications such as ITER and TPX. Previous tests of a development folded waveguide with a low density plasma load have shown a factor of 5 increase in power capability over loop antennas into similar plasma conditions. The performance and reliability of a FWG with an actual tokamak plasma load must now be verified for further acceptance of this concept. A 58 MHz, 4 MW folded waveguide is being designed and built for the PBX-M and TFTR tokamaks at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. This design has a square cross-section that can be installed as either a fast wave (FW) or ion-Bernstein wave (IBW) launcher by 90° rotation. Two new features of the design are: a shorter quarter-wavelength resonator configuration and a rear-feed input power coupling loop. Loading calculations with a standard shorting plate indicate that a launched power level of 4 MW is possible on either machine. Mechanical and disruption force analysis indicates that bolted construction will withstand the disruption loads. An experimental program is planned to characterize the plasma loading, heating effectiveness, power capability, impurity generation and other factors for both FW and IBW cases. High power tests of the new configuration are being performed with a development FWG unit on RFTF at ORNL.

  16. Overview on Experiments On ITER-like Antenna On JET And ICRF Antenna Design For ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Nightingale, M. P. S.; Blackman, T.; Edwards, D.; Fanthome, J.; Graham, M.; Hamlyn-Harris, C.; Hancock, D.; Jacquet, P.; Mayoral, M.-L.; Monakhov, I.; Nicholls, K.; Stork, D.; Whitehurst, A.; Wilson, D.; Wooldridge, E.

    2009-11-26

    Following an overview of the ITER Ion Cyclotron Resonance Frequency (ICRF) system, the JET ITER-like antenna (ILA) will be described. The ILA was designed to test the following ITER issues: (a) reliable operation at power densities of order 8 MW/m{sup 2} at voltages up to 45 kV using a close-packed array of straps; (b) powering through ELMs using an internal (in-vacuum) conjugate-T junction; (c) protection from arcing in a conjugate-T configuration, using both existing and novel systems; and (d) resilience to disruption forces. ITER-relevant results have been achieved: operation at high coupled power density; control of the antenna matching elements in the presence of high inter-strap coupling, use of four conjugate-T systems (as would be used in ITER, should a conjugate-T approach be used); operation with RF voltages on the antenna structures up to 42 kV; achievement of ELM tolerance with a conjugate-T configuration by operating at 3{omega} real impedance at the conjugate-T point; and validation of arc detection systems on conjugate-T configurations in ELMy H-mode plasmas. The impact of these results on the predicted performance and design of the ITER antenna will be reviewed. In particular, the implications of the RF coupling measured on JET will be discussed.

  17. Implementation of the new multichannel X-mode edge density profile reflectometer for the ICRF antenna on ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguiam, D. E.; Silva, A.; Bobkov, V.; Carvalho, P. J.; Carvalho, P. F.; Cavazzana, R.; Conway, G. D.; D'Arcangelo, O.; Fattorini, L.; Faugel, H.; Fernandes, A.; Fünfgelder, H.; Gonçalves, B.; Guimarais, L.; De Masi, G.; Meneses, L.; Noterdaeme, J. M.; Pereira, R. C.; Rocchi, G.; Santos, J. M.; Tuccillo, A. A.; Tudisco, O.

    2016-11-01

    A new multichannel frequency modulated continuous-wave reflectometry diagnostic has been successfully installed and commissioned on ASDEX Upgrade to measure the plasma edge electron density profile evolution in front of the Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF) antenna. The design of the new three-strap ICRF antenna integrates ten pairs (sending and receiving) of microwave reflectometry antennas. The multichannel reflectometer can use three of these to measure the edge electron density profiles up to 2 × 1019 m-3, at different poloidal locations, allowing the direct study of the local plasma layers in front of the ICRF antenna. ICRF power coupling, operational effects, and poloidal variations of the plasma density profile can be consistently studied for the first time. In this work the diagnostic hardware architecture is described and the obtained density profile measurements were used to track outer radial plasma position and plasma shape.

  18. Fast ion generation and bulk plasma heating with three-ion ICRF scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazakov, Ye. O.; Van Eester, D.; Dumont, R.; Ongena, J.; Lerche, E.; Messiaen, A.

    2015-12-01

    Launching electromagnetic waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) is an efficient method of plasma heating, actively employed in most of fusion machines. ICRF has a number of important supplementary applications, including the generation of high-energy ions. In this paper, we discuss a new set of three-ion ICRF scenarios and the prospect of their use as a dedicated tool for fast ion generation in tokamaks and stellarators. A distinct feature of these scenarios is a strong absorption efficiency possible at very low concentrations of resonant minority ions (˜ 1% or even below). Such concentration levels are typical for impurities contaminating fusion plasmas. An alternative ICRF scenario for maximizing the efficiency of bulk D-T ion heating is suggested for JET and ITER tokamaks, which is based on three-ion ICRF heating of intrinsic Beryllium impurities.

  19. Fast ion generation and bulk plasma heating with three-ion ICRF scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Kazakov, Ye. O. Van Eester, D.; Ongena, J.; Lerche, E.; Messiaen, A.

    2015-12-10

    Launching electromagnetic waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) is an efficient method of plasma heating, actively employed in most of fusion machines. ICRF has a number of important supplementary applications, including the generation of high-energy ions. In this paper, we discuss a new set of three-ion ICRF scenarios and the prospect of their use as a dedicated tool for fast ion generation in tokamaks and stellarators. A distinct feature of these scenarios is a strong absorption efficiency possible at very low concentrations of resonant minority ions (∼ 1% or even below). Such concentration levels are typical for impurities contaminating fusion plasmas. An alternative ICRF scenario for maximizing the efficiency of bulk D-T ion heating is suggested for JET and ITER tokamaks, which is based on three-ion ICRF heating of intrinsic Beryllium impurities.

  20. Reduction of RF sheaths potentials by compensation or suppression of parallel RF currents on ICRF antennae

    SciTech Connect

    Mendes, A.; Colas, L.; Vulliez, K.; Argouarch, A.; Milanesio, D.

    2009-11-26

    Radio Frequency (RF) sheaths are suspected to limit the performance of present-day Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF) antennae over long pulses and should be minimized in future Fusion devices. Within the simplest models, RF sheath effects are quantified by the integral V{sub RF} {integral}E{sub ||}{center_dot}dl where the parallel RF field E{sub ||} is linked with the slow wave. On 'long open field lines' with large toroidal extension on both sides of the antenna it was shown that V{sub RF} is excited by parallel RF currents j{sub ||} flowing on the antenna structure. We thus propose two ways to reduce |V{sub RF}| by acting on j{sub ||} on the antenna front face. The first method, more adapted for protruding antennae, consists in avoiding the j{sub ||} circulation on the antenna structure, by slotting the antenna frame on its horizontal edges and by cutting partially the Faraday screen rods. The second method, well suited for recessed antennae, consists in compensating j{sub ||} of opposite signs along long flux tubes, with parallelepiped antennae aligned with tilted flux tubes. The different concepts are assessed numerically on a 2-strap Tore Supra antenna phased [0, {pi}] using near RF fields from the antenna code TOPICA. Simulations stress the need to suppress all current paths for j{sub ||} to reduce substantially |V{sub RF}| over the whole antenna height.

  1. RF-sheath heat flux estimates on Tore Supra and JET ICRF antennae. Extrapolation to ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Colas, L.; Portafaix, C.; Goniche, M.; Jacquet, Ph.

    2009-11-26

    RF-sheath induced heat loads are identified from infrared thermography measurements on Tore Supra ITER-like prototype and JET A2 antennae, and are quantified by fitting thermal calculations. Using a simple scaling law assessed experimentally, the estimated heat fluxes are then extrapolated to the ITER ICRF launcher delivering 20 MW RF power for several plasma scenarios. Parallel heat fluxes up to 6.7 MW/m{sup 2} are expected very locally on ITER antenna front face. The role of edge density on operation is stressed as a trade-off between easy RF coupling and reasonable heat loads. Sources of uncertainty on the results are identified.

  2. Measurements and simulations of ICRF induced plasma convection in front of the 3-strap antennas in ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; ASDEX Upgrade Team; Eurofusion MST1 Team

    2016-10-01

    Plasma heating with waves in the Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequency (ICRF) is one of the standard heating methods in tokamaks. The parallel (to the magnetic field) component of the electric field of the waves enhances the edge plasma potential nonlinearly through radio-frequency-sheath (rf-sheath) rectification. The gradient of this potential across magnetic field drives plasma convection in the Scrape-Off Layer. To reduce the rf-sheath driven close to ICRF antennas, the parallel electric near-field has to be decreased. This can be achieved by minimization of undesired parasitic currents induced in the antenna box by the antenna currents. New antennas with a novel approach to reduce those undesired currents through the proper phase and amplitude of the current in 3-straps have been installed and validated on ASDEX Upgrade. With reflectometers embedded in one 3-strap antenna at different poloidal locations, the density profiles in front of the antenna can be measured in when the antenna is either active or passive. The ICRF induced edge plasma convection in different antenna feeding configurations (different phasing, different power ratio between the central and the side straps) has thus been studied. Also we have carried out comprehensive simulations by running the EMC3EIRENE, RAPLICASOL and SSWICH codes in an iterative and quasi self-consistent way. The steadystate ICRF induced plasma density convection can clearly be reproduced in the models and compared with the ones measured in experiments.

  3. Influence of gas injection location and magnetic perturbations on ICRF antenna performance in ASDEX Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Bobkov, V.; Bilato, R.; Dux, R.; Faugel, H.; Kallenbach, A.; Müller, H. W.; Potzel, S.; Pütterich, Th.; Suttrop, W.; Stepanov, I.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Jacquet, P.; Monakhov, I.; Czarnecka, A.; Collaboration: ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2014-02-12

    In ASDEX Upgrade H-modes with H{sub 98}≈0.95, similar effect of the ICRF antenna loading improvement by local gas injection was observed as previously in L-modes. The antenna loading resistance R{sub a} between and during ELMs can increase by more than 25% after a switch-over from a deuterium rate of 7.5⋅10{sup 21} D/s injected from a toroidally remote location to the same amount of deuterium injected close to an antenna. However, in contrast to L-mode, this effect is small in H-mode when the valve downstream w.r.t. parallel plasma flows is used. In L-mode, a non-linearity of R{sub a} at P{sub ICRP}<30 kW is observed when using the gas valve integrated in antenna. Application of magnetic perturbations (MPs) in H-mode discharges leads to an increase of R{sub a}>30% with no effect of spectrum and phase of MPs on R{sub a} found so far. In the case ELMs are fully mitigated, the antenna loading is higher and steadier. In the case ELMs are not fully mitigated, the value of R{sub a} between ELMs is increased. Looking at the W source modification for the improved loading, the local gas injection is accompanied by decreased values of tungsten (W) influx Γ{sub W} from the limiters and its effective sputtering yield Y{sub w}, with the exception of the locations directly at the antenna gas valve. Application of MPs leads to increase of Γ{sub W} and Y{sub w} for some of the MP phases. With nitrogen seeding in the divertor, ICRF is routinely used to avoid impurity accumulation and that despite enhanced Γ{sub W} and Y{sub W} at the antenna limiters.

  4. Investigation of 'Conjugate T' Load-Resilient ICRF Antenna Systems - Application to the JET ITER-Like and to a Possible ITER ICRF System

    SciTech Connect

    Lamalle, P.U.; Messiaen, A.M.; Dumortier, P.; Durodie, F.; Evrard, M.; Louche, F.; Vervier, M.; Weynants, R.

    2005-09-26

    The paper reports on the radio-frequency (RF) analysis of multiple-short-strap load-resilient ICRF antenna systems, applied to the JET ITER-Like and to a proposed ITER ICRF system. The short radiating straps minimize the antenna voltage and the 'conjugate T' load resilient matching circuit aims at reliable power delivery to ELMy H mode plasmas. The two designs mainly differ by the use of in-vessel matching capacitors for the JET array, whereas the proposed ITER design uses an optimized combination of straps in parallel and ex-vessel matching by means of line stretchers. Asymmetries and mutual coupling between straps strongly influence the performance of such load-resilient circuits and complicate their operation. These effects have been analyzed in detail along two parallel lines of investigation: (i) Detailed RF simulations, in which the input impedance matrix of the ICRF arrays has been computed with a three-dimensional electromagnetic code and incorporated in realistic models of the transmission and matching circuits, (ii) Comprehensive RF measurements on a scaled-down mockup of the proposed ITER antenna. Ongoing work to optimize array performance and to develop practical matching procedures and reliable automatic control of the matching elements is discussed. The main outstanding issues are reliable arc detection and demonstration of a robust array control algorithm.

  5. A multichannel reflectometer for edge density profile measurements at the ICRF antenna in ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tudisco, O.; Silva, A.; Ceccuzzi, S.; D'Arcangelo, O.; Rocchi, G.; Fuenfgelder, H.; Bobkov, V.; Cavazzana, R.; Conway, G. D.; Friesen, J.; Gonçalves, B.; Mancini, A.; Meneses, L.; Noterdaeme, J. M.; Siegl, G.; Simonetto, A.; Tsujii, N.; Tuccillo, A. A.; Vierle, T.; Zammuto, I.; ASDEX Upgrade Team, Ftu Team

    2014-02-01

    A multichannel reflectometer will be built for the new three-straps ICRF antenna of ASDEX Upgrade (AUG), to study the density behavior in front of it. Ten different accesses to the plasma are available for the three reflectometer channels that can be interchanged without breaking the machine vacuum. Frequency is scanned from 40 GHz to 68 GHz, in 10μs, which corresponds to a cut-off density ranging from 1018÷1019m-3 in the Right cut-off of the X-mode propagation, for standard toroidal magnetic field values of AUG.

  6. Accurate design of ICRF antennas for RF plasma thruster acceleration units with TOPICA

    SciTech Connect

    Lancellotti, V.; Maggiora, R.; Vecchi, G.; Milanesio, D.; Meneghini, O.

    2007-09-28

    In recent years electromagnetic (RF) plasma generation and acceleration concepts for plasma-based propulsion systems have received growing interest, inasmuch as they can yield continuous thrust as well as highly controllable and wide-ranging exhaust velocities. The acceleration units mostly adopt the Ion Cyclotron Resonance Frequency (ICRF) - a proven technology in fusion experiments for transferring large RF powers into magnetized plasmas, and also used by the VASIMR propulsion system. In this work we propose and demonstrate the use of TOPICA code to design and optimize the ICRF antenna of a typical acceleration stage. To this end, TOPICA was extended to cope with magnetized cylindricaily-symmetric radially-inhomogeneous warm plasmas, which required coding a new module charged with solving Maxwell's equations within the plasma to obtain the relevant Green's function Y-tilde(m,k{sub z}) in the Fourier domain, i.e. the relation between the transverse magnetic and electric fields at the air-plasma interface. Then, calculating the antenna input impedance - and hence the loading - relies on an integral-equation formulation and subsequent finite-element weighted-residual solution scheme for the self-consistent evaluation of the current density distribution on the conducting bodies and at the air-plasma interface.

  7. Accurate design of ICRF antennas for RF plasma thruster acceleration units with TOPICA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lancellotti, V.; Maggiora, R.; Vecchi, G.; Milanesio, D.; Meneghini, O.

    2007-09-01

    In recent years electromagnetic (RF) plasma generation and acceleration concepts for plasma-based propulsion systems have received growing interest, inasmuch as they can yield continuous thrust as well as highly controllable and wide-ranging exhaust velocities. The acceleration units mostly adopt the Ion Cyclotron Resonance Frequency (ICRF)—a proven technology in fusion experiments for transferring large RF powers into magnetized plasmas, and also used by the VASIMR propulsion system. In this work we propose and demonstrate the use of TOPICA code to design and optimize the ICRF antenna of a typical acceleration stage. To this end, TOPICA was extended to cope with magnetized cylindricaily-symmetric radially-inhomogeneous warm plasmas, which required coding a new module charged with solving Maxwell's equations within the plasma to obtain the relevant Green's function Ỹ(m,kz) in the Fourier domain, i.e. the relation between the transverse magnetic and electric fields at the air-plasma interface. Then, calculating the antenna input impedance—and hence the loading—relies on an integral-equation formulation and subsequent finite-element weighted-residual solution scheme for the self-consistent evaluation of the current density distribution on the conducting bodies and at the air-plasma interface.

  8. Modeling of EAST ICRF antenna performance using the full-wave code TORIC

    SciTech Connect

    Edlund, E. M.; Bonoli, P. T.; Porkolab, M.; Wukitch, S. J.

    2015-12-10

    Access to advanced operating regimes in the EAST tokamak will require a combination of electron-cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH), neutral beam injection (NBI) and ion cyclotron range frequency heating (ICRF), with the addition of lower-hybrid current drive (LHCD) for current profile control. Prior experiments at the EAST tokamak facility have shown relatively weak response of the plasma temperature to application of ICRF heating, with typical coupled power about 2 MW out of 12 MW source. The launched spectrum, at n{sub φ} = 34 for 0-π -0-π phasing and 27 MHz, is largely inaccessible at line-averaged densities of approximately 2 × 10{sup 19} m{sup −3}. However, with variable antenna phasing and frequency, this system has considerable latitude to explore different heating schemes. To develop an ICRF actuator control model, we have used the full-wave code TORIC to explore the physics of ICRF wave propagation in EAST. The results presented from this study use a spectrum analysis using a superposition of n{sub φ} spanning −50 to +50. The low density regime typical of EAST plasmas results in a perpendicular wavelength comparable to the minor radius which results in global cavity resonance effects and eigenmode formation when the single-pass absorption is low. This behavior indicates that improved performance can be attained by lowering the peak of the k{sub ||} spectrum by using π/3 phasing of the 4-strap antenna. Based on prior studies conducted at Alcator C-Mod, this phasing is also expected to have the advantage of nearly divergence-free box currents, which should result in reduced levels of impurity production. Significant enhancements of the loading resistance may be achieved by using low k{sub ||} phasing and a combination of magnetic field and frequency to vary the location of the resonance and mode conversion regions. TORIC calculations indicate that the significant power may be channeled to the electrons and deuterium majority. We expect that

  9. Modeling of EAST ICRF antenna performance using the full-wave code TORIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edlund, E. M.; Bonoli, P. T.; Porkolab, M.; Wukitch, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    Access to advanced operating regimes in the EAST tokamak will require a combination of electron-cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH), neutral beam injection (NBI) and ion cyclotron range frequency heating (ICRF), with the addition of lower-hybrid current drive (LHCD) for current profile control. Prior experiments at the EAST tokamak facility have shown relatively weak response of the plasma temperature to application of ICRF heating, with typical coupled power about 2 MW out of 12 MW source. The launched spectrum, at nφ = 34 for 0-π -0-π phasing and 27 MHz, is largely inaccessible at line-averaged densities of approximately 2 × 1019 m-3. However, with variable antenna phasing and frequency, this system has considerable latitude to explore different heating schemes. To develop an ICRF actuator control model, we have used the full-wave code TORIC to explore the physics of ICRF wave propagation in EAST. The results presented from this study use a spectrum analysis using a superposition of nφ spanning -50 to +50. The low density regime typical of EAST plasmas results in a perpendicular wavelength comparable to the minor radius which results in global cavity resonance effects and eigenmode formation when the single-pass absorption is low. This behavior indicates that improved performance can be attained by lowering the peak of the k|| spectrum by using π/3 phasing of the 4-strap antenna. Based on prior studies conducted at Alcator C-Mod, this phasing is also expected to have the advantage of nearly divergence-free box currents, which should result in reduced levels of impurity production. Significant enhancements of the loading resistance may be achieved by using low k|| phasing and a combination of magnetic field and frequency to vary the location of the resonance and mode conversion regions. TORIC calculations indicate that the significant power may be channeled to the electrons and deuterium majority. We expect that implementation of these recommendations in EAST

  10. Upgrades to the 4-strap ICRF Antenna in Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    G. Schilling; J.C. Hosea; J.R. Wilson; W. Beck; R.L. Boivin; P.T. Bonoli; D. Gwinn; W.E. Lee; E. Nelson-Melby; M. Porkolab; R. Vieira; S.J. Wukitch; and J.A. Goetz

    2001-06-12

    A 4-strap ICRF antenna suitable for plasma heating and current drive has been designed and fabricated for the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. Initial operation in plasma was limited by high metallic impurity injection resulting from front surface arcing between protection tiles and from current straps to Faraday shields. Antenna modifications were made in February 2000, resulting in impurity reduction, but low-heating efficiency was observed when the antenna was operated in its 4-strap rather than a 2-strap configuration. Further modifications were made in July 2000, with the installation of BN plasma-facing tiles and radio- frequency bypassing of the antenna backplane edges and ends to reduce potential leakage coupling to plasma surface modes. Good heating efficiency was now observed in both heating configurations, but coupled power was limited to 2.5 MW in H-mode, 3 MW in L-mode, by plasma-wall interactions. Additional modifications were started in February 2001 and will be completed by this meeting. All the above upgrades and their effect on antenna performance will be presented.

  11. Present Status of the ITER-like ICRF Antenna on JET

    SciTech Connect

    Durodie, F.; Huygen, S.; Lerche, E.; Ongena, J.; Van Eester, D.; Vrancken, M.; Gauthier, M.; Goulding, R.

    2009-11-26

    The commissioning of the ITER-Like ICRF Antenna (ILA) on JET plasmas from May 2008 to April 2009 in various conditions (33, 42 and 47 MHz, L- and H-mode, antenna strap-plasma separatrix distances of {approx}9 to 17 cm) has provided relevant information for future antenna design and operation. The maximum power density achieved was 6.2 MW/m{sup 2} in L-mode with strap to plasma separatrix distance of {approx}9-10 cm at 42 MHz on the lower half of the ILA extrapolating to 8 MW/m{sup 2} if the full generator power had been available. Efficient (trip-free operation) ELM tolerance was obtained both at 33 and 42 MHz on a large range of ELMs with strap voltages up to 42 kV and a maximum power density of 4.1 MW/m{sup 2}. The paper reviews these achievements as well as remaining issues.

  12. Eigenmode analysis of the ITER ICRF antenna plug and electrical solution to the grounding of the antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Louche, F.; Messiaen, A. M.; Dumortier, P.; Durodie, F.; Koch, R.; Lamalle, P. U.

    2009-11-26

    The excitation of resonant modes in the gap between the ITER ICRH antenna plug and the vessel can considerably increase the level of RF currents and voltages on the ITER plug and disturb the radiation characteristic of the array. We report on a study of these modes and a solution to avoid them in the ITER ion cyclotron range of frequencies. From a transmission line approach we show that resonances can be avoided if the distance between the mouth of the line and an added short-circuit is sufficiently small. We therefore propose to position short-circuits at about lm from the antenna mouth, constituted by rows of closely spaced contacts all around the plug. These conclusions are further validated with Microwave Studio simulations. A simplified model of the ITER ICRF array is used for comparing various grounding solutions and it is proved that the solution already inferred from transmission line approximation suppresses the resonances from the frequency domain relevant for ICRH in ITER. The MWS calculations predict that the proposed solution also avoids large RF currents in the blanket modules and in their connectors. Their amplitude barely exceeds 5% of the strap RF currents. This solution avoids perturbation of the antenna array impedance matrix by the coaxial gap.

  13. A Diagnostic for Electric Field Measurements in the Near/Far-Field Regions of ICRF Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, E. H.; Caughman, J. B. O.; Isler, R. C.

    2015-11-01

    The physics mechanisms of wave heating and current drive processes in the bulk hot plasma are generally well identified. However, details of the wave-plasma interaction with a material surface in the cold plasma edge are still not fully understood. The driver behind this interaction is the time-periodic wave electric field and is referred to as the near/far-field depending on the location with respect to the antenna. Various models have been formulated to capture the near/far-field physics but have not been tested experimentally. Thus, a diagnostic capable of measuring the electric field with temporal and 3D-spatial resolution is critical for confidence in the codes used to design next generation ICRF antennas. This research is focused on the development of a laser based spectroscopic technique, Doppler-free saturation spectroscopy (DFSS), and its implementation to study near/far-field physics. Using DFSS the spectra line profile of various electronic transitions are measured and fit to a quantum mechanical model incorporating both magnetic and dynamic electric field operators. The electric field direction and magnitude are extracted from the fit. The experimental setup and planned experiments will be discussed. Additionally, initial measurements of fitted Hδ spectrum under the influence of known electric and magnetic fields will be presented.

  14. Validation of the Electrical Properties of the ITER ICRF Antenna using Reduced-Scale Mock-Ups

    SciTech Connect

    Dumortier, Pierre; Durodie, Frederic; Grine, Djamel; Kyrytsya, Volodymyr; Louche, Fabrice; Messiaen, Andre; Vervier, Michel; Vrancken, Mark

    2011-12-23

    Experimental measurements on reduced-scale mock-ups allow validating the electrical properties and RF numerical optimization of the ITER ICRF antenna. Frequency response in the different regions of the antenna is described and key parameters for performance improvement are given. Coupling is improved by acting on the front-face geometry (strap width, antenna box depth and vertical septa recess). The 4-port junction acts as a frequency filter and together with the service stub performs pre-matching in the whole frequency band. Influence of the Faraday screen on coupling is limited. The effect of voltage limitation on the maximum total radiated power is given. The importance of a good decoupling network and of grounding is emphasized. Finally the control of the antenna wave spectrum is performed by implementing feedback controlled load-resilient matching and decoupling options and control algorithms are tested.

  15. Interaction of ICRF Fields with the Plasma Boundary in AUG and JET and Guidelines for Antenna Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Bobkov, V.; Bilato, R.; Braun, F.; Dux, R.; Giannone, L.; Herrmann, A.; Kallenbach, A.; Mueller, H. W.; Neu, R.; Puetterich, Th.; Rohde, V.; Colas, L.; Goniche, M.; Van Eester, D.; Lerche, E.; Jacquet, P.; Mayoral, M.-L.; Monakhov, I.; Milanesio, D.

    2009-11-26

    W sputtering during ICRF on ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) and temperature rise on JET A2 antenna septa are considered in connection with plasma conditions at the antenna plasma facing components and E{sub parallel} near-fields. Large antenna-plasma clearance, high gas puff and low light impurity content are favorable to reduce W sputtering in AUG. The spatial distribution of spectroscopically measured effective W sputtering yields clearly points to the existence of strong E{sub parallel} fields at the antenna box ('feeder fields') which dominate over the fields in front of the antenna straps. The picture of E{sub parallel} fields, obtained by HFSS code, corroborates the dominant role of E{sub parallel} at the antenna box on the formation of sheath-driving RF voltages for AUG. Large antenna-plasma clearance and low gas puff are favorable to reduce septum temperature of JET A2 antennas. Assuming a linear relation between the septum temperature and the sheath driving RF voltage calculated by HFSS, the changes of the temperature with dipole phasing (00{pi}{pi}, 0{pi}{pi}0 or 0{pi}0{pi}) are well described by the related changes of the RF voltages. Similarly to the AUG antenna, the strongest E{sub parallel} are found at the limiters of the JET A2 antenna for all used dipole phasings and at the septum for the phasings different from 0{pi}0{pi}. A simple general rule can be used to minimize E{sub parallel} at the antenna: image currents can be allowed only at the surfaces which do not intersect magnetic field lines at large angles of incidence. Possible antenna modifications generally rely either on a reduction of the image currents, on their short-circuiting by introducing additional conducting surfaces or on imposing the E{sub parallel} = 0 boundary condition. On the example of AUG antenna, possible options to minimize the sheath driving voltages are presented.

  16. Initial Testing of Optical Arc Detector Inside 285/300 Fast Wave Antenna Box on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Diem, Stephanie J; Fehling, Dan T; Hillis, Donald Lee; Horton, Anthony R; Unterberg, E. A.; Nagy, A.; Pinsker, R.

    2013-01-01

    Locating arcs within the fast wave current drive system is necessary to improve antenna performance and coupling to the plasma. Previously, there had been no way to observe arcs inside the vacuum vessel in an ICRF antenna on DIII-D. A new diagnostic that uses photomultiplier tubes has been installed for the 2012 run campaign on the 285/300 antenna of the fast wave system. The diagnostic has top and bottom views of the back of the four antenna straps and uses narrow-bandpass visible filters to isolate emission lines of copper (577 nm) and deuterium (656.1 nm). This diagnostic is based on the ORNL filterscope system currently in use on multiple devices. The system will be used to guide fast wave antenna conditioning, plasma operation and provide insight into future antenna upgrades on DIII-D.

  17. Measurement of fast minority /sub 3/He/sup + +/ energy distribution during ICRF heating

    DOEpatents

    Post, D.E. Jr.; Grisham, L.R.; Medley, S.S.

    A method and means for measuring the fast /sub 3/He/sup + +/ distribution during /sub 3/He/sup + +/ minority Ion Cyclotron Resonance Frequency (ICRF) heating is disclosed. The present invention involves the use of 10 to 100 keV beams of neutral helium atoms to neutralize the fast /sub 3/He/sup + +/ ions in a heated plasma by double charge exchange (/sub 3/He/sup + +/ + /sub 4/He/sup 0/ ..-->.. /sub 3/He/sup 0/ + /sub 4/He/sup + +/). The neutralized fast /sub 3/He/sup 0/ atoms then escape from the hot plasma confined by a magnetic field and are detected by conventional neutral particle analyzing means. This technique permits the effectiveness of the coupling of the ion cyclotron waves to the /sub 3/He/sup + +/ minority ions to be accurately measured. The present invention is particularly adapted for use in evaluating the effectiveness of the intermediate coupling between the RF heating and the /sub 3/He/sup + +/ in an energetic toroidal plasma.

  18. Quantitative modeling of ICRF antennas with integrated time domain RF sheath and plasma physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smithe, David N.; D'Ippolito, Daniel A.; Myra, James R.

    2014-02-01

    Significant efforts have been made to quantitatively benchmark the sheath sub-grid model used in our time-domain simulations of plasma-immersed antenna near fields, which includes highly detailed three-dimensional geometry, the presence of the slow wave, and the non-linear evolution of the sheath potential. We present both our quantitative benchmarking strategy, and results for the ITER antenna configuration, including detailed maps of electric field, and sheath potential along the entire antenna structure. Our method is based upon a time-domain linear plasma model [1], using the finite-difference electromagnetic Vorpal/Vsim software [2]. This model has been augmented with a non-linear rf-sheath sub-grid model [3], which provides a self-consistent boundary condition for plasma current where it exists in proximity to metallic surfaces. Very early, this algorithm was designed and demonstrated to work on very complicated three-dimensional geometry, derived from CAD or other complex description of actual hardware, including ITER antennas. Initial work with the simulation model has also provided a confirmation of the existence of propagating slow waves [4] in the low density edge region, which can significantly impact the strength of the rf-sheath potential, which is thought to contribute to impurity generation. Our sheath algorithm is based upon per-point lumped-circuit parameters for which we have estimates and general understanding, but which allow for some tuning and fitting. We are now engaged in a careful benchmarking of the algorithm against known analytic models and existing computational techniques [5] to insure that the predictions of rf-sheath voltage are quantitatively consistent and believable, especially where slow waves share in the field with the fast wave. Currently in progress, an addition to the plasma force response accounting for the sheath potential, should enable the modeling of sheath plasma waves, a predicted additional root to the dispersion

  19. Quantitative modeling of ICRF antennas with integrated time domain RF sheath and plasma physics

    SciTech Connect

    Smithe, David N.; D'Ippolito, Daniel A.; Myra, James R.

    2014-02-12

    Significant efforts have been made to quantitatively benchmark the sheath sub-grid model used in our time-domain simulations of plasma-immersed antenna near fields, which includes highly detailed three-dimensional geometry, the presence of the slow wave, and the non-linear evolution of the sheath potential. We present both our quantitative benchmarking strategy, and results for the ITER antenna configuration, including detailed maps of electric field, and sheath potential along the entire antenna structure. Our method is based upon a time-domain linear plasma model, using the finite-difference electromagnetic Vorpal/Vsim software. This model has been augmented with a non-linear rf-sheath sub-grid model, which provides a self-consistent boundary condition for plasma current where it exists in proximity to metallic surfaces. Very early, this algorithm was designed and demonstrated to work on very complicated three-dimensional geometry, derived from CAD or other complex description of actual hardware, including ITER antennas. Initial work with the simulation model has also provided a confirmation of the existence of propagating slow waves in the low density edge region, which can significantly impact the strength of the rf-sheath potential, which is thought to contribute to impurity generation. Our sheath algorithm is based upon per-point lumped-circuit parameters for which we have estimates and general understanding, but which allow for some tuning and fitting. We are now engaged in a careful benchmarking of the algorithm against known analytic models and existing computational techniques to insure that the predictions of rf-sheath voltage are quantitatively consistent and believable, especially where slow waves share in the field with the fast wave. Currently in progress, an addition to the plasma force response accounting for the sheath potential, should enable the modeling of sheath plasma waves, a predicted additional root to the dispersion, existing at the

  20. ICRF-enhanced plasma potentials in the SOL of Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    Ochoukov, R.; Whyte, D. G.; Brunner, D.; LaBombard, B.; Lipschultz, B.; Terry, J. L.; Wukitch, S. J.; D'Ippolito, D. A.; Myra, J. R.

    2014-02-12

    We performed an extensive survey of the plasma potential in the scrape-off layer (SOL) of Ion Cyclotron Range-of Frequencies (ICRF)-heated discharges on Alcator C-Mod. Our results show that plasma potentials are enhanced in the presence of ICRF power and plasma potential values of >100 V are often observed. Such potentials are high enough to induce sputtering of high-Z molybdenum (Mo) plasma facing components by deuterium ions on C-Mod. For comparison, the plasma potential in Ohmic discharges is typically less than 10 V, well below the threshold needed to induce Mo sputtering by deuterium ions. ICRF-enhanced plasma potentials are observed in the SOL regions that both magnetically map and do not map to active ICRF antennas. Regions that magnetically map to active ICRF antennas are accessible to slow waves directly launched by the antennas and these regions experience plasma potential enhancement that is partially consistent with the slow wave rectification mechanism. One of the most defining features of the slow wave rectification is a threshold appearance of significant plasma potentials (>100 V) when the dimensionless rectification parameter Λ{sub −o} is above unity and this trend is observed experimentally. We also observe ICRF-enhanced plasma potentials >100 V in regions that do not magnetically map to the active antennas and, hence, are not accessible for slow waves launched directly by the active antennas. However, unabsorbed fast waves can reach these regions. The general trend that we observe in these 'un-mapped' regions is that the plasma potential scales with the strength of the local RF wave fields with the fast wave polarization and the highest plasma potentials are observed in discharges with the highest levels of unabsorbed ICRF power. Similarly, we find that core Mo levels scale with the level of unabsorbed ICRF power suggesting a link between plasma potentials in the SOL and the strength of the impurity source.

  1. 2D modeling of DC potential structures induced by RF sheaths with transverse currents in front of ICRF antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Faudot, E.; Heuraux, S.; Colas, L.

    2005-09-26

    Understanding DC potential generation in front of ICRF antennas is crucial for long pulse high RF power systems. DC potentials are produced by sheath rectification of these RF potentials. To reach this goal, near RF parallel electric fields have to be computed in 3D and integrated along open magnetic field lines to yield a 2D RF potential map in a transverse plane. DC potentials are produced by sheath rectification of these RF potentials. As RF potentials are spatially inhomogeneous, transverse polarization currents are created, modifying RF and DC maps. Such modifications are quantified on a 'test map' having initially a Gaussian shape and assuming that the map remains Gaussian near its summit,the time behavior of the peak can be estimated analytically in presence of polarization current as a function of its width r0 and amplitude {phi}0 (normalized to a characteristic length for transverse transport and to the local temperature). A 'peaking factor' is built from the DC peak potential normalized to {phi}0, and validated with a 2D fluid code and a 2D PIC code (XOOPIC). In an unexpected way transverse currents can increase this factor. Realistic situations of a Tore Supra antenna are also studied, with self-consistent near fields provided by ICANT code. Basic processes will be detailed and an evaluation of the 'peaking factor' for ITER will be presented for a given configuration.

  2. ICRF antenna modifications and additions for TFTR: Relevance to BPX/ITER projections

    SciTech Connect

    Hosea, J.; Phillips, C.K.; Raftopoulos, S.; Stevens, J.; Wilson, J.R. . Plasma Physics Lab.); Bigelow, T.; Goulding, R.; Hoffman, D. )

    1991-01-01

    The TFTR Bay L and M antennas have been modified to improve their power handling capability. In particular, the Bay L antenna, which exhibited a lower than expected loading resistance, now has a configuration similar to that of Bay M -- slotted walls and septum -- and together with Bay M is expected to support 7 MW operations. The in situ loading enhancement achieved for the Modified Bay L design will serve to quantify models for the coupling effects of slots. Also, comparisons with Bay M loading performance will elucidate wave spectrum and antenna location (relative to in-vessel structures) effects. Two new antennas, with single/double row shields slanted at 6{degree} (along B) are to be added in the near future to augment the power capability to {approximately}12.5 MW. The relevance of the four antenna array features to quantifying BPX/ITER antenna characteristic projections for heating and current drive is discussed. 8 refs., 5 figs.

  3. Radial Broadening of DC potential structures in front of ICRF antennas by transverse exchange of RF currents

    SciTech Connect

    Faudot, E.; Heuraux, S.; Colas, L.; Gunn, J.

    2009-11-26

    Measurements show that the vicinity of powered Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequency (ICRF) antennae is biased positively with respect to its environment. This is attributed to RF-sheaths. The radial penetration of DC potentials into Tokamak SOL determines the power deposition on the walls and especially on the antenna structure, which is a key point for long time clean discharges. Within independent flux tube models of RF-sheath rectification the radial penetration of DC potentials is determined by the skin depth x{sub 0} = c/{omega}{sub pe} for the slow wave. When self-consistent exchanges of transverse RF currents are allowed between neighboring flux tubes, such a structure can be broadened radially up to a characteristic transverse length L. Broadening arises as soon as L>r{sub 0}. A linear modeling gives a first evaluation of the theoretical length L{approx_equal}(L{sub parallel} {rho}{sub ci}/){sup 1/2}. Within the 'flute assumption' it scales with the length L{sub parallel} of open flux tubes and the ion Larmor radius {rho}{sub ci}. This has been confirmed by the SEM code which takes into account non-linear rectifications. Applying our model to several potential maps generated by an ITER antenna, it comes out that L ranges between 1 and 10 cm depending on local L{sub parallel} and on typical ITER plasma parameters. Langmuir probe measurements on Tore Supra suggest that the broadening is lower than predicted by the code, which supposes that currents do not occur all over the parallel magnetic lines but on a fraction of it.

  4. LETTER: An ICRF antenna for the next step tokamak operating in a wide frequency band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatnagar, V. P.; Jacquinot, J.

    1994-06-01

    The flexibility provided by a variety of ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) and current drive (CD) scenarios for ITER requires that the antenna should operate at a number of frequencies spread over a wide frequency range (20-85 MHz). A short circuited strip-line antenna in which a long strap is connected in parallel with a very short section is shown to provide the frequency range of operation required for ITER. The short section acts as a matching element located within the antenna and improves the power coupling capability especially at low frequencies where the plasma coupling is generally poor. The short section also supports the feeder-line central conductor. This means there is no longer a need for a ceramic support in the immediate vicinity of the antenna that will be subjected to a harsh neutron environment in a reactor

  5. Antenna-plasma coupling theory for ICRF heating of large tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Ram, A.; Bers, A.

    1982-03-01

    The coupling characteristics of antenna structure are studied by analyzing a model where a thin current sheet is placed between a fully conducting wall and a sheet of anisotropic conductivity representing the screen. The inhomogeneous plasma in the shadow of the limiter is assumed to extend from the screen onwards away from the antenna. The excitation of the fields inside the plasma are found by analyzing the radiation properties of this current sheet antenna. We assume that the current distribution of the antenna is given and that the fields excited inside the plasma are absorbed in a single pass. In all experiments to-date the cross-sectional plasmas are relatively small so that the rf conductor is a half-loop around the plasma in the poloidal direction. However, for reactor size plasmas this cannot be done and the antenna dimensions will be small compared to the plasma cross-sections. We, thus, assume an antenna of finite poloidal and toroidal extent with dimensions small compared to the plasma minor radius. We further approximate the coupling geometry by a slab model. The x-axis is taken to be along the plasma inhomogeneity, the y-axis along the poloidal direction and the x-axis along the toroidal magnetic field.

  6. Three-Dimensional Electromagnetic Modeling of the ITER ICRF Antenna (External Matching Design)

    SciTech Connect

    Louche, F.; Lamalle, P.U.; Dumortier, P.; Messiaen, A.M.

    2005-09-26

    The present work reports on 3D radio-frequency (RF) analysis of a design for the ITER antenna with the CST Microwave Studio registered software. The four-port junctions which connect the straps in triplets have been analyzed. Non-TEM effects do not play any significant role in the relevant frequency domain, and a well-balanced splitting of current between the straps inside a triplet is achieved. The scattering matrix has also been compared with RF measurements on a scaled antenna mockup, and the agreement is very good. Electric field patterns along the system have been obtained, and the RF optimization of the feeding sections is under way.

  7. Extending fullwave core ICRF simulation to SOL and antenna regions using FEM solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraiwa, S.; Wright, J. C.

    2016-10-01

    A full wave simulation approach to solve a driven RF waves problem including hot core, SOL plasmas and possibly antenna is presented. This approach allows for exploiting advantages of two different way of representing wave field, namely treating spatially dispersive hot conductivity in a spectral solver and handling complicated geometry in SOL/antenna region using an unstructured mesh. Here, we compute a mode set in each region with the RF electric field excitation on the connecting boundary between core and edge regions. A mode corresponding to antenna excitation is also computed. By requiring the continuity of tangential RF electric and magnetic fields, the solution is obtained as unique superposition of these modes. In this work, TORIC core spectral solver is modified to allow for mode excitation, and the edge region of diverted Alcator C-Mod plasma is modeled using COMSOL FEM package. The reconstructed RF field is similar in the core region to TORIC stand-alone simulation. However, it contains higher poloidal modes near the edge and captures a wave bounced and propagating in the poloidal direction near the vacuum-plasma boundary. These features could play an important role when the single power pass absorption is modest. This new capability will enable antenna coupling calculations with a realistic load plasma, including collisional damping in realistic SOL plasma and other loss mechanisms such as RF sheath rectification. USDoE Awards DE-FC02-99ER54512, DE-FC02-01ER54648.

  8. Coupling and matching study of the ICRF antenna for W7-X

    SciTech Connect

    Messiaen, A.; Krivska, A.; Louche, F.; Ongena, J.; Dumortier, P.; Durodie, F.; Van Eester, D.; Vervier, M.

    2014-02-12

    A tight antenna plug consisting in a pair of straps with strong pre-matching covers the first selected frequency band (25-38MHz) for W7-X and provides the toroidal phasings for heating, current drive and wall conditioning. Another plug-in with two short strap triplets is devoted for operation around 76MHz. The antenna coupling to a reference plasma profile is first analyzed by means of the coupling code ANTITER II. It shows the radiation power spectra for the different phasing cases and indicates the problem of the edge power deposition through the Alfven resonance occurring when the operating frequency is lower than the majority cyclotron frequency. Matrices provided by the TOPICA code are used for the matching-decoupling study of the first antenna plug. The large mutual coupling between the 2 straps is counterbalanced by the use of a decoupler. Finally the tunable 5-port junction used to feed in parallel each triplet of the second plug-in is analyzed by means of MWS simulation together with its decoupling-matching system.

  9. Localized bulk electron heating with ICRF mode conversion in the JET tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantsinen, M. J.; Mayoral, M.-L.; Van Eester, D.; Alper, B.; Barnsley, R.; Beaumont, P.; Bucalossi, J.; Coffey, I.; Conroy, S.; de Baar, M.; de Vries, P.; Erents, K.; Figueiredo, A.; Gondhalekar, A.; Gowers, C.; Hellsten, T.; Joffrin, E.; Kiptily, V.; Lamalle, P. U.; Lawson, K.; Lyssoivan, A.; Mailloux, J.; Mantica, P.; Meo, F.; Milani, F.; Monakhov, I.; Murari, A.; Nguyen, F.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Ongena, J.; Petrov, Yu.; Rachlew, E.; Riccardo, V.; Righi, E.; Rimini, F.; Stamp, M.; Tuccillo, A. A.; Zastrow, K.-D.; Zerbini, M.; EFDA contributors, JET

    2004-01-01

    Ion cyclotron resonance frequencies (ICRF) mode conversion has been developed for localized on-axis and off-axis bulk electron heating on the JET tokamak. The fast magnetosonic waves launched from the low-field side ICRF antennas are mode-converted to short-wavelength waves on the high-field side of the 3He ion cyclotron resonance layer in D and 4He plasmas and subsequently damped on the bulk electrons. The resulting electron power deposition, measured using ICRF power modulation, is narrow with a typical full-width at half-maximum of ap30 cm (i.e. about 30% of the minor radius) and the total deposited power to electrons comprises at least up to 80% of the applied ICRF power. The ICRF mode conversion power deposition has been kept constant using 3He bleed throughout the ICRF phase with a typical duration of 4-6 s, i.e. 15-40 energy confinement times. Using waves propagating in the counter-current direction minimizes competing ion damping in the presence of co-injected deuterium beam ions.

  10. ICRF wave field measurements in the presence of scrape off layer turbulence on the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochoukov, R.; Bobkov, V.; Faugel, H.; Fünfgelder, H.; Jacquot, J.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Suárez López, G.

    2016-11-01

    A new array of B-dot probes was installed on ASDEX Upgrade. The purpose of the new diagnostic is to study Ion Cyclotron Range-off Frequencies (ICRF) wave field distributions in the evanescent scrape-off layer (SOL) plasma region on the low field side of ASDEX Upgrade. The vacuum measurements (no gas, BT = 0 T) reveal ICRF wave field measurements consistent with the profiles expected from the newly installed 3-strap ICRF antennas outside the antenna box: the shape of the toroidal distribution of both the amplitude and the phase is the same for the case of only the central straps being active, as for the case of only the side straps being active. These profiles become strongly modified during plasma operations. The modifications can be separated into two types: "Inter-edge localized mode (ELM)" and "During-ELM" periods. The phase distribution of the ICRF wave fields remains well-defined during the Inter-ELM period; however, it becomes more spread out over the entire 360° range during ELMs. The observed modulations cannot be explained by the observed changes in the ICRF power, as monitored in the transmission line. However, they are consistent with ICRF coupling changes introduced by plasma filaments: the plasma density perturbations due to the filaments are high enough to change the nature of the fast ICRF wave field from evanescent to propagating. The coverage of the present diagnostic is being expanded to include both the low field side and the high field side probes. Additionally, a manipulator probe head is being developed to measure ICRF wave field radial profiles across the SOL region.

  11. ICRF Review: From ERASMUS To ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Weynants, R. R.

    2009-11-26

    This is a personal account of how I saw ICRF evolve since 1974, with a presentation that is ordered according to the topics: heating, antenna coupling, impurity generation/mitigation and system technology. The nature of the main issues is each time reviewed, recent findings are incorporated, and it is shown how the ICRF community has been able to react to sometimes rapidly changing demands and is indeed resolutely preparing ITER.

  12. Use of Fast Ion D-Alpha diagnostics for understanding ICRF effects

    SciTech Connect

    Podesta, M.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Liu, D.; Luo, Y.; Ruskov, E.; Bell, R. E.; Fredrickson, E. D.; Hosea, J. C.; Medley, S. S.; Burrell, K. H.; Choi, M.; Pinsker, R. I.; Harvey, R. W.

    2009-11-26

    Combined neutral beam injection and fast wave heating at cyclotron harmonics accelerate deuterium fast ions in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) and in the DIII-D tokamak. Acceleration above the injected energy is evident in fast-ion D-alpha (FIDA) and volume-average neutron data. The FIDA diagnostic measures spatial profiles of the accelerated fast ions. In DIII-D, the acceleration is at a 4th or 5th cyclotron harmonic; the maximum enhancement in the high-energy FIDA signal is 8-10 cm beyond the resonance layer. In NSTX, acceleration is observed at five harmonics (7-11) simultaneously; overall, the profile of accelerated fast ions is much broader than in DIII-D. The energy distribution predicted by the CQL3D Fokker-Planck code agrees fairly well with measurements in DIII-D. However, the predicted profiles differ from experiment, presumably because the current version of CQL3D uses a zero-banana-width model.

  13. Use of Fast Ion D-Alpha diagnostics for understanding ICRF effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podestà, M.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Liu, D.; Luo, Y.; Ruskov, E.; Bell, R. E.; Fredrickson, E. D.; Hosea, J. C.; Medley, S. S.; Burrell, K. H.; Choi, M.; Pinsker, R. I.; Harvey, R. W.

    2009-11-01

    Combined neutral beam injection and fast wave heating at cyclotron harmonics accelerate deuterium fast ions in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) and in the DIII-D tokamak. Acceleration above the injected energy is evident in fast-ion D-alpha (FIDA) and volume-average neutron data. The FIDA diagnostic measures spatial profiles of the accelerated fast ions. In DIII-D, the acceleration is at a 4th or 5th cyclotron harmonic; the maximum enhancement in the high-energy FIDA signal is 8-10 cm beyond the resonance layer. In NSTX, acceleration is observed at five harmonics (7-11) simultaneously; overall, the profile of accelerated fast ions is much broader than in DIII-D. The energy distribution predicted by the CQL3D Fokker-Planck code agrees fairly well with measurements in DIII-D. However, the predicted profiles differ from experiment, presumably because the current version of CQL3D uses a zero-banana-width model.

  14. Use of the TFTR prototype charge exchange neutral analyzer for fast He/sub 3//sup + +/ diagnostics during ICRF heating on PLT

    SciTech Connect

    Medley, S.S.

    1981-07-01

    The Charge Exchange Neutral Analyzer (CENA) for TFTR is designed to measure singly charged ion species of atomic mass A = 1, 2, and 3 simultaneously with up to 75 energy channels per mass and an energy range of 0.5 < AE < 600, where AE is in units of AMU.keV. Plans to test the prototype analyzer on PLT prior to installation on TFTR are discussed. The capability of the analyzer to simultaneously measure singly reionized H, D, and He/sub 3/ charge exchange neutrals makes the analyzer of particular interest for recently proposed fast He/sub 3//sup + +/ diagnostics during ICRF heating on PLT.

  15. Modeling of DC potential structures induced by RF sheaths with transverse currents in front of ICRF antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Faudot, E.; Heuraux, S.; Colas, L.

    2007-09-28

    RF heating is fully dependent on edge plasma conditions and particularly on convection of accelerated particles which can damage ICRH antennas (hot spots and impurity injection). These accelerated particle fluxes born in DC potential structures are induced by sheaths which rectify RF potentials. The potential map in front of antenna is not uniform so that transverse (to magnetic field) RF currents occur and can significantly modify the final DC potential map and thus convective flux distribution. The behavior of rectified potentials is investigated here for f = F{sub ci} and f>F{sub ci}, which was not yet achieved in our last works [1]. Therefore, a 2D fluid modeling including RF sheaths physics (parallel current) coupled with transverse RF currents has been built. The full description of the currents exhibits a maximum for frequencies around Fci, which can be explained by the fact that RF oscillation is capacitive at low frequency and inductive at high frequency. Both effects are present at frequencies around F{sub ci} and the DC peak potential appears for f = F{sub ci}/2. This is due to the rectification of the sinusoidal signal, which doubles the effective RF frequency radiated by the antenna. The theoretical DC peak value is 0.5 time the RF amplitude of the applied potential instead of 1/{pi} without transverse currents. For typical potential structures in front of ICRH antennas (centimetric wide and 1000 Volts peak potential), a factor between 0.4 and 0.45 can be expected according to 2D fiuid code results.

  16. Fast Wave Current Drive Antenna Performance on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayberry, M. J.; Pinsker, R. I.; Petty, C. C.; Chiu, S. C.; Jackson, G. L.; Lippmann, S. I.; Porkolab, M.; Prater, R.; Baity, F. W.; Goulding, R. H.; Hoffman, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    Fast wave current drive (FWCD) experiments at 60 MHz are being performed on the DIII-D tokamak for the first time in high electron temperature, high β target plasmas. A four-element phased-array antenna is used to launch a directional wave spectrum with the peak n∥ value (≂7) optimized for strong single-pass electron absorption due to electron Landau damping. For this experiment, high power FW injection (2 MW) must be accomplished without voltage breakdown in the transmission lines or antenna, and without significant impurity influx. In addition, there is the technological challenge of impedance matching a four-element antenna while maintaining equal currents and the correct phasing (90°) in each of the straps for a directional spectrum. In this paper we describe the performance of the DIII-D FWCD antenna during initial FW electron heating and current drive experiments in terms of these requirements.

  17. Fast wave current drive antenna performance on D3-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayberry, M. J.; Pinsker, R. I.; Petty, C. C.; Chiu, S. C.; Jackson, G. L.; Lippmann, S. I.; Prater, R.; Porkolab, M.

    1991-10-01

    Fast wave current drive (FWCD) experiments at 60 MHz are being performed on the D3-D tokamak for the first time in high electron temperature, high (beta) target plasmas. A four-element phased-array antenna is used to launch a directional wave spectrum with the peak n(sub parallel) value (approximately = 7) optimized for strong single-pass electron absorption due to electron Landau damping. For this experiment, high power FW injection (2 MW) must be accomplished without voltage breakdown in the transmission lines or antenna, and without significant impurity influx. In addition, there is the technological challenge of impedance matching a four-element antenna while maintaining equal currents and the correct phasing (90 degrees) in each of the straps for a directional spectrum. We describe the performance of the D3-D FWCD antenna during initial FW electron heating and current drive experiments in terms of these requirements.

  18. Analysis of ICRF-Accelerated Ions in ASDEX Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Mantsinen, M. J.; Eriksson, L.-G.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.

    2007-09-28

    MHD-induced losses of fast ions with energy in the MeV range have been observed during high-power ICRF heating of hydrogen minority ions in the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak (R{sub 0}{approx_equal}1.65 m, a{approx_equal}0.5 m). ICRF heating and ICRF-driven fast ions in discharges exhibiting fast ion losses due to toroidal Alfven eigenmodes and a new core-localised MHD instability are analysed. It is found that the lost ions are ICRF-accelerated trapped protons with energy in the range of 0.3-1.6 MeV, orbit widths of 20-35 cm, and turning points at r/a>0.5 and at major radii close to the cyclotron resonance {omega} = {omega}{sub cH}(R). The presence of such protons is consistent with ICRF modelling.

  19. One dimensional global and local solution for ICRF heating

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.Y.; Batchelor, D.B.; Jaeger, E.F.; Carter, M.D.

    1995-02-01

    A numerical code GLOSI [Global and Local One-dimensional Solution for Ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) heating] is developed to solve one-dimensional wave equations resulting from the use of radio frequency (RF) waves to heat plasmas. The code uses a finite difference method. Due to its numerical stability, the code can be used to find both global and local solutions when imposed with appropriate boundary conditions. Three types of boundary conditions are introduced to describe wave scattering, antenna wave excitation, and fixed tangential wave magnetic field. The scattering boundary conditions are especially useful for local solutions. The antenna wave excitation boundary conditions can be used to excite fast and slow waves in a plasma. The tangential magnetic field boundary conditions are used to calculate impedance matrices, which describe plasma and antenna coupling and can be used by an antenna code to calculate antenna loading. These three types of boundary conditions can also be combined to describe various physical situations in RF plasma heating. The code also includes plasma thermal effects and calculates collisionless power absorption and kinetic energy flux. The plasma current density is approximated by a second-order Larmor radius expansion, which results in a sixth-order ordinary differential equation.

  20. Hybrid Couplers On The JET ICRF System: Commissioning And First Results on ELMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayoral, M.-L.; Monakhov, I.; Walden, T.; Bobkov, Vl. V.; Blackman, T.; Graham, M.; Mailloux, J.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Nigthingale, M.; Ongena, J.

    2007-09-01

    During the 2004-2005 shutdown, hybrid 3 dB couplers were installed between the A2 ICRF antennas A and B. The goal was to free one of the generators to power the new ITER-like ICRF antenna, but also to use the coupler properties to increase the ICRF power on ELMs. Furthermore, the fast data acquisition system was upgraded in order to monitor the forward and reflected voltage amplitudes with a time resolution up to 4 μs. As expected, the first tests showed that the reflected powers during ELMs was successfully directed to the coupler dummy load instead of the generators and that a clear improvement in the averaged coupled power in the presence of the ELMs could be obtained. However, the existing levels of the VSWR protection against arcs appeared not satisfactory for ELM-tolerant operation and had to be re-assessed. Moreover, evidence of parasitic low-VSWR activity in the vacuum transmission lines was found, emphasizing the importance of developing VSWR independent arc detection systems.

  1. Hybrid Couplers On The JET ICRF System: Commissioning And First Results on ELMs

    SciTech Connect

    Mayoral, M.-L.; Monakhov, I.; Walden, T.; Blackman, T.; Graham, M.; Mailloux, J.; Nigthingale, M.; Ongena, J.

    2007-09-28

    During the 2004-2005 shutdown, hybrid 3 dB couplers were installed between the A2 ICRF antennas A and B. The goal was to free one of the generators to power the new ITER-like ICRF antenna, but also to use the coupler properties to increase the ICRF power on ELMs. Furthermore, the fast data acquisition system was upgraded in order to monitor the forward and reflected voltage amplitudes with a time resolution up to 4 {mu}s. As expected, the first tests showed that the reflected powers during ELMs was successfully directed to the coupler dummy load instead of the generators and that a clear improvement in the averaged coupled power in the presence of the ELMs could be obtained. However, the existing levels of the VSWR protection against arcs appeared not satisfactory for ELM-tolerant operation and had to be re-assessed. Moreover, evidence of parasitic low-VSWR activity in the vacuum transmission lines was found, emphasizing the importance of developing VSWR independent arc detection systems.

  2. Global ICRF system designs for ITER and TPX

    SciTech Connect

    Goulding, R.H.; Hoffman, D.J.; Ryan, P.M.; Durodie, F.

    1995-09-01

    The design of feed networks for ICRF antenna arrays on ITER and TPX are discussed. Features which are present in one or both of the designs include distribution of power to several straps from a single generator, the capability to vary phases of the currents on antenna elements rapidly without the need to rematch, and passive elements which present a nearly constant load to the generators during ELM induced loading transients of a factor of I0 or more. The FDAC (Feedline/Decoupler/Antenna Calculator) network modeling code is described, which allows convenient modeling of the electrical performance of nearly arbitrary ICRF feed networks.

  3. Refinement of the ICRF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Chopo

    2004-01-01

    Since the ICRF was generated in 1995, VLBI modeling and estimation, data quality: source position stability analysis, and supporting observational programs have improved markedly. There are developing and potential applications in the areas of space navigation Earth orientation monitoring and optical astrometry from space that would benefit from a refined ICRF with enhanced accuracy, stability and spatial distribution. The convergence of analysis, focused observations, and astrometric needs should drive the production of a new realization in the next few years.

  4. ICRF stabilization of sawteeth on TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, C.K.; Hosea, J.; Stevens, J.; Wilson, J.R.; Bell, M.; Bitter, M.; Cheng, C.Z.; Darrow, D.; Fredrickson, E.; Hammett, G.W.; Hill, K.; Hsuan, H.; Jassby, D.; McCune, D.; McGuire, K.; Owens, D.K.; Park, H.; Ramsey, A.; Schilling, G.; Schivell, J.; Stratton, B.; Synakowski, E.; Taylor, G.; Towner, H.; White, R.; Zweben, S.; Marmar, E.; Snipes, J.; Terry, J.; Boivin, R.; Phillips, M.W.; Hughes, M.; Bush, C.; Goldfinger, R.; Hoffman, D.; Houlberg, W.; Nagayama, Y.; Smithe, D.N.

    1992-01-01

    Results obtained from experiments utilizing high power ICRF (ion cyclotron range of frequency) heating to stabilize sawtooth oscillations on TFTR are reviewed. The key observations include existence of a minimum ICRF power required to achieve stabilization, a dependence of the stabilization threshold on the relative size of the ICRF power deposition profile to the q=1 volume, and a peaking of the equilibrium pressure and current profiles during sawtooth-free phases of the discharges. In addition, preliminary measurements of the poloidal magnetic field profile indicate that q on axis decreases to a value of 0.55{plus_minus}0.15 after a sawtooth-stabilized period of {approximately}0.5 sec has transpired. The results are discussed in the context of theory, which suggests that the fast ions produced by the ICRF heating suppress sawteeth by stabilizing the m=1 MHD instabilities believed to be the trigger for the sawtooth oscillations. Though qualitative agreement is found between the observations and the theory, further refinement of the theory coupled with more accurate measurements of experimental profiles will be required in order to complete quantitative comparisons.

  5. ICRF stabilization of sawteeth on TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, C.K.; Hosea, J.; Stevens, J.; Wilson, J.R.; Bell, M.; Bitter, M.; Cheng, C.Z.; Darrow, D.; Fredrickson, E.; Hammett, G.W.; Hill, K.; Hsuan, H.; Jassby, D.; McCune, D.; McGuire, K.; Owens, D.K.; Park, H.; Ramsey, A.; Schilling, G.; Schivell, J.; Stratton, B.; Synakowski, E.; Taylor, G.; Towner, H.; White, R.; Zweben, S. . Plasma Physics Lab.); Marmar, E.; Snipes, J.; Terry, J.; Bo

    1992-01-01

    Results obtained from experiments utilizing high power ICRF (ion cyclotron range of frequency) heating to stabilize sawtooth oscillations on TFTR are reviewed. The key observations include existence of a minimum ICRF power required to achieve stabilization, a dependence of the stabilization threshold on the relative size of the ICRF power deposition profile to the q=1 volume, and a peaking of the equilibrium pressure and current profiles during sawtooth-free phases of the discharges. In addition, preliminary measurements of the poloidal magnetic field profile indicate that q on axis decreases to a value of 0.55{plus minus}0.15 after a sawtooth-stabilized period of {approximately}0.5 sec has transpired. The results are discussed in the context of theory, which suggests that the fast ions produced by the ICRF heating suppress sawteeth by stabilizing the m=1 MHD instabilities believed to be the trigger for the sawtooth oscillations. Though qualitative agreement is found between the observations and the theory, further refinement of the theory coupled with more accurate measurements of experimental profiles will be required in order to complete quantitative comparisons.

  6. ICRF heating in JET during initial operations with the ITER-like wall

    SciTech Connect

    Jacquet, P.; Brix, M.; Graham, M.; Mayoral, M.-L.; Meigs, A.; Monakhov, I.; Sirinelli, A.; Brezinsek, S.; Campergue, A-L.; Colas, L.; Czarnecka, A.; Klepper, C. C.; Lerche, E.; Van-Eester, D.; Milanesio, D.; Mlynar, J.; Collaboration: JET-EFDA Contributors

    2014-02-12

    In 2011/12, JET started operation with its new ITER-Like Wall (ILW) made of a tungsten (W) divertor and a beryllium (Be) main chamber wall. The impact of the new wall material on the JET Ion Cyclotron Resonance Frequency (ICRF) operation was assessed and also the properties of JET plasmas heated with ICRF were studied. No substantial change of the antenna coupling resistance was observed with the ILW as compared with the carbon wall. Heat-fluxes on the protecting limiters close the antennas quantified using Infra-Red (IR) thermography (maximum 4.5 MW/m{sup 2} in current drive phasing) are within the wall power load handling capabilities. A simple RF sheath rectification model using the antenna near-fields calculated with the TOPICA code can well reproduce the heat-flux pattern around the antennas. ICRF heating results in larger tungsten and nickel (Ni) contents in the plasma and in a larger core radiation when compared to Neutral Beam Injection (NBI) heating. Some experimental facts indicate that main-chamber W components could be an important impurity source: the divertor W influx deduced from spectroscopy is comparable when using RF or NBI at same power and comparable divertor conditions; the W content is also increased in ICRF-heated limiter plasmas; and Be evaporation in the main chamber results in a strong and long lasting reduction of the impurity level. The ICRF specific high-Z impurity content decreased when operating at higher plasma density and when increasing the hydrogen concentration from 5% to 20%. Despite the higher plasma bulk radiation, ICRF exhibited overall good plasma heating efficiency; The ICRF power can be deposited at plasma centre and the radiation is mainly from the outer part of the plasma. Application of ICRF heating in H-mode plasmas started, and the beneficial effect of ICRF central electron heating to prevent W accumulation in the plasma core could be observed.

  7. Initial operation of high power ICRF system for long pulse in EAST

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, C. M. Zhao, Y. P.; Zhang, X. J.; Wan, B. N.; Gong, X. Z.; Mao, Y. Z.; Yuan, S.; Chen, G.

    2015-12-10

    The ICRF heating system on EAST upgraded by active cooling aims for long pulse operation. In this paper, the main technical features of the ICRF system are described. One of a major challenges for long pulse operation is RF-edge interactions induced impurity production and heat loading. In EAST, ICRF antenna protections and Faraday screen bars damaged due to LH electron beam are found. Preliminary results for the analysis of the interaction between LHCD and ICRF antenna are discussed. Increase of metal impurities in the plasma during RF pulse and in a larger core radiation are also shown. These RF-edge interactions at EAST and some preliminary results for the optimizing RF performance will be presented.

  8. On the Use of EBG in ICRF and LH Launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Guadamuz, S.; Maggiora, R.; Vecchi, G.

    2009-11-26

    High impedance surfaces or electromagnetic band gap (EBG) surfaces have proved themselves to be useful in wireless communications applications due to their unique characteristics such as no propagating surface wave support, no conduction of RF current for a given bandwidth, in-phase electromagnetic reflection and non-inverted image of the electric charge in front of them. These characteristics make possible to design compact antennas achieving better performance in terms of radiation and input impedance. ICRF and LH antennas in plasma experiments can take advantage of using EBG surfaces. One of the main issues in ICRF plasma heating is the low power coupling of the plasma facing antenna. The adoption of EBG surfaces in the ICRF antenna structure and the advantages offered by a predictive designing tool as TOPICA offer the possibility to improve significantly the coupled power to plasma. The adoption of EBG surfaces in the LH waveguides permits to reduce the major dimension of waveguides not affecting drastically the propagation. It is then possible to manufacture more compact LH arrays of waveguides.

  9. Fast wave current drive technology development at ORNL

    SciTech Connect

    Baity, F.W.; Batchelor, D.B.; Goulding, R.H.; Hoffman, D.J.; Jaeger, E.F.; Ryan, P.M.; deGrassie, J.S.; Petty, C.C.; Pinsker, R.I.; Prater, R.

    1993-12-01

    The technology required for fast wave current drive (FWCD) systems is discussed. Experiments are underway on DIII-D, JET, and elsewhere. Antennas for FWCD draw heavily upon the experience gained in the design of ICRF heating systems with the additional requirement of launching a directional wave spectrum. Through collaborations with DIII-D, JET, and Tore Supra rapid progress is being made in the demonstration of the physics and technology of FWCD needed for TPX and ITER.

  10. MW-scale ICRF plasma heating using IGBT switches in a multi-pulse scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Be'ery, I.; Kogan, K.; Seemann, O.

    2015-06-01

    Solid-state silicon switches are cheap and reliable option for 1-10 MHz RF power sources, required for plasma ion cyclotron RF heating (ICRF). The large `on' resistance of MOSFET and similar devices limits their power delivery to a few tens of kW per switch. Low resistivity devices, such as IGBT, suffer from large `off' switching time, which limits their useful frequency range and increases the power dissipated in the switch. Here we demonstrate more than 0.8 MW circulated RF power at 2 MHz using only three high voltage IGBT switches. The circuit uses the fast `on' switching capability of the IGBTs to generate high-Q pulse train. This operation mode also simplifies the measurement of RF coupling between the antenna and the plasma.

  11. Multifrequency and multidirection optimizations of antenna arrays using heuristic algorithms and the multilevel fast multipole algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Önol, Can; Alkış, Sena; Gökçe, Özer; Ergül, Özgür

    2016-07-01

    We consider fast and efficient optimizations of arrays involving three-dimensional antennas with arbitrary shapes and geometries. Heuristic algorithms, particularly genetic algorithms, are used for optimizations, while the required solutions are carried out accurately and efficiently via the multilevel fast multipole algorithm (MLFMA). The superposition principle is employed to reduce the number of MLFMA solutions to the number of array elements per frequency. The developed mechanism is used to optimize arrays for multifrequency and/or multidirection operations, i.e., to find the most suitable set of antenna excitations for desired radiation characteristics simultaneously at different frequencies and/or directions. The capabilities of the optimization environment are demonstrated on arrays of bowtie and Vivaldi antennas.

  12. Power flow estimates during ICRF experiments in VX-10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bengtson, Roger; Sciamma, Ella; Lee, Charles; Chang-Diaz, Franklin; Carrillo, Laurie; Castro-Nieto, Jose; Glover, Tim; Jacobson, Verlin; McCoy, Jim; Squire, Jared; Winter, Scott; Carter, Mark

    2004-11-01

    The VASIMR propulsion concept accelerates ions with ICRF power launched from an antenna on the high field side of the fundamental resonance. We analyze the power flow that goes into accelerating the ions and into electron heating using spectroscopic diagnostics, an interferometer, and a retarding potential analyzer. In particular we will concentrate on measuring the increase in electron temperature. We also measure heat loads on the surrounding walls and structure, with analysis to determine power losses. Results will be compared with calculations.

  13. Parasitic excitation of ion Bernstein waves from a Faraday shielded fast wave loop antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Skiff, F.; Ono, M.; Colestock, P.; Wong, K.L.

    1984-12-01

    Parasitic excitation of ion Bernstein waves is observed from a Faraday shielded fast wave loop antenna in the ion cyclotron frequency range. Local analysis of the Vlasov-Maxwell equations demonstrates the role of plasma density gradient in the coupling process. The effects of plasma density and of parallel wave number on the excitation process are investigated.

  14. Power Compensation for ICRF Heating in EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Gen; Qin, Chengming; Mao, Yuzhou; Zhao, Yanping; Yuan, Shuai; Zhang, Xinjun

    2016-08-01

    The source system covering a working frequency range of 24 MHz to 70 MHz with a total maximum output power of 12 MW has already been fabricated for Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequency (ICRF) heating in EAST from 2012. There are two continuous wave (CW) antennas consisting of four launching elements each fed by a separate 1.5 MW transmitter. Due to the strong mutual coupling among the launching elements, the injection power for launching elements should be imbalance to keep the k‖ (parallel wave number) spectrum of the launcher symmetric for ICRF heating. Cross power induced by the mutual coupling will also induce many significant issues, such as an uncontrollable phase of currents in launching elements, high voltage standing wave ratio (VSWR), and impedance mismatching. It is necessary to develop a power compensation system for antennas to keep the power balance between the feed points. The power balance system consists of two significant parts: a decoupler and phase control. The decoupler helps to achieve ports isolation to make the differential phase controllable and compensate partly cross power. After that, the differential phase of 0 or π will keep the power balance of two feed points completely. The first power compensation system consisting of four decouplers was assembled and tested for the port B antenna at the working frequency of 35 MHz. With the application of the power compensation system, the power balance, phase feedback control, and voltage standing wave ratio (VSWR) had obviously been improved in the 2015 EAST campaign. supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (No. 2015GB101001) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11575237, 11375235, 11375236)

  15. Particle Simulation of ICRF Absorption in VASIMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilin, Andrew; Díaz, Franklin Chang; Squire, Jared; Breizman, Boris; Carter, Mark

    2001-06-01

    We discuss computational challenges in particle simulation of the Ion-Cyclotron Resonance Heating of plasma in the Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR). Mathematical simulation helps to design an ICRF antenna, i.e., maximize absorption of RF power into the plasma in the resonance area. In the ICRF simulation code EMIR, RF fields are expanded in a periodic Fourier sum in the azimuthal coordinate to reduce the three-dimensional problem to a weighted sum over two-dimensional solutions. Absorption is introduced in the cold plasma model by adding an imaginary collision frequency to the RF-driven frequency. The ion trajectories are followed through the static and RF fields using the particle trajectory code VASIMR. The VASIMR and EMIR codes are then iterated until convergence, then the collisional absorption parameter in the EMIR code is adjusted and the iteration is continued until the power deposited by the RF system matches the power absorbed by the ion trajectories in a global sense.

  16. RF-sheath assessment of ICRF Faraday Screens

    SciTech Connect

    Colas, L.

    2007-09-28

    The line-integrated parallel RF electric field {delta}V{sub RF} is studied on 'long field lines' radially in front of an ICRF antenna closed by a Faraday screen (FS). Several issues are addressed analytically and numerically. To what extent is a FS necessary to shield {delta}V{sub RF} in presence of magnetized plasma, depending on strap phasing? How efficient is it as a function of FS misalignment on tilted magnetic field? Can a FS attenuate {delta}V{sub RF} produced on antenna frame?.

  17. Antennas.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-15

    experimentally shown that tae same range properti-; possesses the multiturn helical antenna wita tee contrary ccil/winding. In contr to the spiral with the one...Characteristics off Mul~iturn Cyclindrical Helical Antennas with Counter Winding, by 0. A. Yurtsev ....... 233 U. S. BOARD ON GEOGRAPHIC NAMES TRANSLITERATION...value of load within sufficiently wide limits. Page 68. LEAKY- PIPE ANTENNA WITH TaZ PAS.li EtlITTEPS. Conclusion/output of fundamental principles. Fig

  18. Monte Carlo simulation of ICRF discharge initiation in ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripský, M.; Wauters, T.; Lyssoivan, A.; Křivská, A.; Louche, F.; Van Schoor, M.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.

    2015-12-01

    Discharges produced and sustained by ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) waves in absence of plasma current will be used on ITER for (ion cyclotron-) wall conditioning (ICWC). The here presented simulations aim at ensuring that the ITER ICRH&CD system can be safely employed for ICWC and at finding optimal parameters to initiate the plasma. The 1D Monte Carlo code RFdinity1D3V was developed to simulate ICRF discharge initiation. The code traces the electron motion along one toroidal magnetic field line, accelerated by the RF field in front of the ICRF antenna. Electron collisions in the calculations are handled by a Monte Carlo procedure taking into account their energies and the related electron collision cross sections for collisions with H2, H2+ and H+. The code also includes Coulomb collisions between electrons and ions (e - e, e - H2+ , e - H+). We study the electron multiplication rate as a function of the RF discharge parameters (i) antenna input power (0.1-5MW), and (ii) the neutral pressure (H2) for two antenna phasing (monopole [0000]-phasing and small dipole [0π0π]-phasing). Furthermore, we investigate the electron multiplication rate dependency on the distance from the antenna straps. This radial dependency results from the decreasing electric amplitude and field smoothening with increasing distance from the antenna straps. The numerical plasma breakdown definition used in the code corresponds to the moment when a critical electron density nec for the low hybrid resonance (ω = ωLHR) is reached. This numerical definition was previously found in qualitative agreement with experimental breakdown times obtained from the literature and from experiments on the ASDEX Upgrade and TEXTOR.

  19. A Fast Double Mode Tuner for Antenna Matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, S.; Arnold, W.; Pivit, E.

    1992-01-01

    To match a microwave transmitter to different loading conditions, two networks are presented. Based on a Fast Ferrite Tuner (FFT) a Double Stub Tuner (DST) is developed. The principle function of a FFT, which consists of a stripline partially filled with microwave ferrites, may be described by tunable reactances. The DST consists of two FFTs connected by a transformation line. An advanced development is the Double Mode Tuner (DMT). It uses two different modes, which can be tuned independently by varying DC magnetic field. Thus series and parallel reactances are introduced into a coaxial system and a T-matching network results. Both matching networks can be tuned within 20 ms and handle power levels up to 2 MW. Typical applications are in the frequency range from 25 MHz to 300 MHz with load reflection coefficients from 0.0 to 0.5 at all phases.

  20. Modification of Sawtooth Oscillations with ICRF Waves in the JET Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Mantsinen, M. J.; Alper, B.; Buttery, R.; Howell, D.; Kiptily, V.; Mayoral, M.-L.; Sharapov, S. E.; Coda, S.; Graves, J. P.; Sauter, O.; Eriksson, L.-G.; Lennholm, M.; Ingesson, L. C.; Nabais, F.; Nave, F.

    2007-09-28

    Methods of modifying sawtooth oscillations using waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) in the JET tokamak are presented. Examples of sawtooth stabilization by ICRF-accelerated high-energy ions are shown, including experiments with ICRF-acceleration of {sup 4}He-beam ions to simulate the effects of fusion born alpha particles. With high power ICRF heating in low-density plasmas, fast ion stabilization of sawteeth is lost and a new type of small-period and small-amplitude sawteeth appears. ICRF-induced radial pinch with toroidally asymmetric waves is found to be useful in affecting the radial profile of the ICRF-driven fast ion populations and thereby their influence on sawteeth. Ion cyclotron current drive (ICCD) applied close to the sawtooth inversion radius is effective in modifying the sawtooth period. The latest achievements include the successful application of ICCD to shorten the fast-ion-induced long-period sawteeth and thereby avoid triggering of neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs)

  1. High-power and steady-state operation of ICRF heating in the large helical device

    SciTech Connect

    Mutoh, T. Seki, T.; Saito, K.; Kasahara, H.; Seki, R.; Kamio, S.; Kumazawa, R.; Kubo, S.; Shimozuma, T.; Yoshimura, Y.; Igami, H.; Takahashi, H.; Ii, T.; Makino, R.; Nagaoka, K.; Nomura, G.; Shinya, T.

    2015-12-10

    Recent progress in an ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) heating system and experiment results in a Large Helical Device (LHD) are reported. Three kinds of ICRF antenna pairs were installed in the LHD, and the operation power regimes were extended up to 4.5 MW; also, the steady-state operation was extended for more than 45 min in LHD at a MW power level. We studied ICRF heating physics in heliotron configuration using a Hand Shake type (HAS) antenna, Field Aligned Impedance Transforming (FAIT) antenna, and Poloidal Array (PA) antenna, and established the optimum minority-ion heating scenario in an LHD. The FAIT antenna having a novel impedance transformer inside the vacuum chamber could reduce the VSWR and successfully injected a higher power to plasma. We tested the PA antennas completely removing the Faraday-shield pipes to avoid breakdown and to increase the plasma coupling. The heating performance was almost the same as other antennas; however, the heating efficiency was degraded when the gap between the antenna and plasma surface was large. Using these three kinds of antennas, ICRF heating could contribute to raising the plasma beta with the second- and third-harmonic cyclotron heating mode, and also to raising the ion temperature as discharge cleaning tools. In 2014, steady-state operation plasma with a line-averaged electron density of 1.2 × 10{sup 19} m{sup −3}, ion and electron temperature of 2 keV, and plasma sustainment time of 48 min was achieved with ICH and ECH heating power of 1.2 MW for majority helium with minority hydrogen. In 2015, the higher-power steady-state operation with a heating power of up to 3 MW was tested with higher density of 3 × 10{sup 19} m{sup −3}.

  2. Fast near-field far-field transformation for phaseless and irregular antenna measurement data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnattinger, G.; Lopez, C.; Kılıç, E.; Eibert, T. F.

    2014-11-01

    The characterization of antenna radiation patterns by transformed near-field measurements requires accurate amplitude and phase data. This represents a problem since expensive measurement equipment is required, especially at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths (Isernia et al., 1996). Amplitude-only antenna field measurements are theoretically sufficient for the unique determination of antenna far-fields. Therefore, phaseless techniques are of special interest. However, the required field transformations are extremely challenging, since they are nonlinear and strongly ill-posed. In this work, the amplitude-only or phaseless near-field far-field transformation problem is formulated as a nonlinear optimization problem. The linear radiation operator within the nonlinear formulation is evaluated using the fast irregular antenna field transformation algorithm (FIAFTA). A hybrid solution procedure is described which combines a genetic algorithm with an iterative conjugate gradient (CG) search method. Numerical results prove the efficiency and flexibility of the formulation and it is shown that the algorithm remains stable when the noise level in the measurements is moderate. Nevertheless, regularization techniques might be beneficial to further improve the robustness of the algorithm.

  3. ICRF Specific Plasma Wall Interactions in JET with the ITER-Like Wall

    SciTech Connect

    Bobkov, V.; Arnoux, G.; Brezinsek, S.; Coenen, J. W.; Colas, L.; Clever, M.; Czarnecka, A.; Braun, F.; Dux, R.; Huber, Alexander; Lerche, E.; Maggi, C.; Marcotte, F.; Maslov, M.; Matthews, G.; Mayoral, M.-L.; Meigs, A. G.; Monakhov, I.; Putterich, Th.; Rimini, F.; Rooj, G. Van; Sergienko, G.; Van Eester, D.

    2013-01-01

    A variety of plasma wall interactions (PWIs) during operation of the so-called A2 ICRF antennas is observed in JET with the ITER-like wall. Amongst effects of the PWIs, the W content increase is the most significant, especially at low plasma densities. No increase of W source from the main divertor and entrance of the outer divertor during ICRF compared to NBI phases was found by means of spectroscopic and WI (400.9 nm) imaging diagnostics. In contrary, the W flux there is higher during NBI. Charge exchange neutrals of hydrogen isotopes could be excluded as considerable contributors to the W source. The high W content in ICRF heated limiter discharges suggests the possibility of other W sources than the divertor alone. Dependencies of PWIs to individual ICRF antennas during q95-scans, and intensification of those for the 90 phasing, indicate a link between the PWIs and the antenna near-fields. The PWIs include heat loads and Be sputtering pattern on antenna limiters. Indications of some PWIs at the outer divertor entrance are observed which do not result in higher W flux compared to the NBI phases, but are characterized by small antenna-specific (up to 25% with respect to ohmic phases) bipolar variations of WI emission. The first TOPICA calculations show a particularity of the A2 antennas compared to the ITER antenna, due to the presence of long antenna limiters in the RF image current loop and thus high near-fields across the most part of the JET outer wall.

  4. Design Concepts For A Long Pulse Upgrade For The DIII-D Fast Wave Antenna Array

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, Philip Michael; Baity Jr, F Wallace; Caughman, John B; Goulding, Richard Howell; Hosea, J.; Greenough, Nevell; Nagy, Alex; Pinsker, R.; Rasmussen, David A

    2009-01-01

    A goal in the 5-year plan for the fast wave program on DIII-D is to couple a total of 3.6 MW of RF power into a long pulse, H-mode plasma for central electron heating. The present short-pulse 285/300 antenna array would need to be replaced with one capable of at least 1.2 MW, 10 s operation at 60 MHz into an H-mode (low resistive loading) plasma condition. The primary design under consideration uses a poloidally-segmented strap (3 sections) for reduced strap voltage near the plasma/Faraday screen region. Internal capacitance makes the antenna structure self-resonant at 60 MHz, strongly reducing peak E-fields in the vacuum coax and feed throughs.

  5. Modeling and simulation support for ICRF heating of fusion plasmas. Annual report, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    1990-03-15

    Recent experimental, theoretical and computational results have shown the need and usefulness of a combined approach to the design, analysis and evaluation of ICH antenna configurations. The work at the University of Wisconsin (UW) in particular has shown that much needed information on the vacuum operation of ICH antennas can be obtained by a modest experimental and computational effort. These model experiments at UW and SAIC simulations have shown dramatically the potential for positive impact upon the ICRF program. Results of the UW-SAIC joint ICRF antenna analysis effort have been presented at several international meetings and numerous meetings in the United States. The PPPL bay M antenna has been modeled using the ARGUS code. The results of this effort are shown in Appendix C. SAIC has recently begun a collaboration with the ICRF antenna design and analysis group at ORNL. At present there are two separate projects underway. The first is associated with the simulation of and determination of the effect of adding slots in the antenna septum and side walls. The second project concerns the modeling and simulation of the ORNL folded waveguide (FWG) concept.

  6. Status of the ITER ICRF system design - 'Externally Matched' approach

    SciTech Connect

    Lamalle, P. U.; Dumortier, P.; Durodie, F.; Evrard, M.; Louche, F.; Messiaen, A.; Vervier, M.; Shannon, M.; Borthwick, A.; Chuilon, B.; Nightingale, M.; Goulding, R.; Swain, D.

    2007-09-28

    The design of the ITER ICRF system has been under revision for several years. The paper presents the status of the design proposal based on a 24 strap antenna plug (6 poloidal by 4 toroidal short radiating conductors) in which the straps are passively combined in 8 poloidal triplets by means of 4-port junctions. These triplets are connected in parallel pairwise through matching elements to form 4 load-resilient conjugate-T circuits. All adjustable matching elements are located outside the plug, i.e. in the ITER port cell and in the generator area.

  7. Experimental Study of RF Sheath Formation on a Fast Wave Antenna and Limiter in the LAPD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Michael; Gekelman, Walter; Pribyl, Patrick; van Compernolle, Bart; Carter, Troy

    2015-11-01

    Ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) will be an essential component of heating power in ITER. During ICRH, radio frequency (RF) sheaths may form both at the exciting antenna and further away, e.g. in the divertor region, and may cause wall material sputtering and decreased RF power coupling to the plasma. It is important to do detailed laboratory experiments that fully diagnose the sheaths and wave fields. This is not possible in fusion devices. A new RF system has recently been constructed for performing such studies in the LAPD plasma column (ne ~1012 -1013cm-3 , Te ~ 1 - 10 eV ,B0 ~ 400 - 2000 G , diameter ~ 60cm , length ~ 18 m) . The RF system is capable of pulsing at the 1 Hz rep. rate of the LAPD plasma and operating between 2-6 MHz (1st - 9th harmonic of fci in H) with a power output of 200 kW. First results of this system driving a single-strap fast wave antenna will be presented. Emissive and Langmuir probe measurements in the vicinity of both the antenna and a remote limiter and wave coupling measured by magnetic pickup loops will be presented.

  8. Measurement of the ICRF wave propagation in the internal region of plasmas by using reflectometers on GAMMA10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, T.; Ikezoe, R.; Ichimura, M.; Hirata, M.; Sakamoto, M.; Sumida, S.; Iwamoto, Y.; Jang, S.; Itagaki, J.; Onodera, Y.; Yoshikawa, M.; Kohagura, J.; Shima, Y.; Nakashima, Y.

    2015-11-01

    ICRF waves is one of valuable tools for producing and heating plasmas. On GAMMA10, ions are mainly heated by the ICRF waves with the absorption of the cyclotron resonance layers. ICRF waves of 6.36, 9.9 and 10.3 MHz are normally used to be compatible with the magnetic mirror configuration and damped at the resonance layers of the central cell, east and west anchor cells, respectively. These waves are usually excited by ICRF antennas installed in the central cell and propagate to each resonance layer. It is essential for the ongoing divertor simulation experiments on GAMMA 10 to investigate wave excitation, propagation and absorption. We observe the electron density fluctuations accompanied with the ICRF waves by using microwave reflectometer systems. It is confirmed that the wave of 6.36 MHz is further damped near the resonance layer in the internal region. The waves of 9.9 / 10.3 MHz excited in the east / west anchor cells interferes with the wave from the central cell. The interfered wave is controlled with antenna phasing by the phase difference between both antennas in the central and the anchor cell. The wave intensity measured by reflectometers depends clearly on the phase difference. In this talk, the availability of wave measurement with reflectometers is shown, and the wave propagation in the internal region of plasmas on GAMMA 10 is reported. This work is partly supported by JSPS, Japan (25400531, 15K17797) and by NIFS, Japan (NIFS15KUGM101).

  9. Monte Carlo simulation of initial breakdown phase for magnetised toroidal ICRF discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Tripský, M.; Van Oost, G.; Collaboration: ASDEX Upgrade Team; TEXTOR Team

    2014-02-12

    The radio-frequency (RF) plasma production technique in the ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) attracts growing attention among fusion experts because of its high potential for solving several basic problems of reactor-oriented superconducting fusion machines, such as ICRF wall conditioning in tokamaks and stellarators (T{sub e} = 3−5eV, n{sub e}<10{sup 12}cm{sup −3}), ICRF-assisted tokamak start-up and target plasma production (n{sub e} = 10{sup 13}cm{sup −3}) in stellarators. Plasma initiation by ICRF has been studied intensively using single particle descriptions and basic analytic models. To further improve the present understanding on plasma production employing the vacuum RF field of ICRF antennas in toroidal devices in presence of the toroidal magnetic field, and its parametric dependencies a Monte Carlo code has been developed. The 1D code RFdinity1D describes the motion of electrons, accelerated by the RF field in front of the ICRF antenna, along one toroidal magnetic field line. Dependent on their individual energies and the related electron collision cross sections (ionisation, excitation and dissociation) weighted by a Monte Carlo procedure, an electron avalanche may occur. Breakdown conditions are discussed as function of RF discharge parameters (i) RF vacuum electric field strength, (ii) RF frequency and (iii) neutral pressure (H2). The slope of the exponential density increase, taken as measure for the breakdown speed, shows qualitative agreement to experimental breakdown times as found in literature and experimental data of the ASDEX upgrade and TEXTOR tokamak, and is interpreted by studying the characteristic electron velocity distribution functions.

  10. Benchmarking ICRF simulations for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    R. V. Budny, L. Berry, R. Bilato, P. Bonoli, M. Brambilla, R.J. Dumont, A. Fukuyama, R. Harvey, E.F. Jaeger, E. Lerche, C.K. Phillips, V. Vdovin, J. Wright, and members of the ITPA-IOS

    2010-09-28

    Abstract Benchmarking of full-wave solvers for ICRF simulations is performed using plasma profiles and equilibria obtained from integrated self-consistent modeling predictions of four ITER plasmas. One is for a high performance baseline (5.3 T, 15 MA) DT H-mode plasma. The others are for half-field, half-current plasmas of interest for the pre-activation phase with bulk plasma ion species being either hydrogen or He4. The predicted profiles are used by seven groups to predict the ICRF electromagnetic fields and heating profiles. Approximate agreement is achieved for the predicted heating power partitions for the DT and He4 cases. Profiles of the heating powers and electromagnetic fields are compared.

  11. Potential refinement of the ICRF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chopo

    2005-01-01

    The ICRF analysis and data represented the state of the art in global extragalactic X/S band microwave astrometry in 1995. Similar analysis has been used to extend the ICRF with subsequent data consistent with the original catalog. Since 1995 there have been considerable advances in the geodetic/astrometric VLBI data set and analysis that would significantly improve the systematic errors stability and density of the next realization of the ICRS when the decision is made to take this step. In particular data acquired since 1990 including extensive use of the VLBA are of higher quality and astrometric utility because of changes in instrumentation schedule design and networks as well as specifically astrometric intent. The IVS (International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry) continues a systematic extension of the astrometric data set. Sufficient data distribution exists to select a better set of defining sources. Improvements in troposphere modeling will minimize known systematic astrometric errors while accurate modeling and estimation of station effects from loading and nonlinear motions should permit the reintegration of the celestial and terrestrial reference frames with Earth orientation parameters though a single VLBI solution. The differences between the current ICRF and the potential second realization will be described.

  12. Potential Refinement of the ICRF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chopo

    The ICRF analysis and data represented the state of the art in global extragalactic X/S band microwave astrometry in 1995. Similar analysis has been used to extend the ICRF with subsequent data consistent with the original catalog. Since 1995 there have been considerable advances in the geodetic/astrometric VLBI data set and analysis that would significantly improve the systematic errors stability and density of the next realization of the ICRS when the decision is made to take this step. In particular data acquired since 1990 including extensive use of the VLBA are of higher quality and astrometric utility because of changes in instrumentation schedule design and networks as well as specifically astrometric intent. The IVS (International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry) continues a systematic extension of the astrometric data set. Sufficient data distribution exists to select a better set of defining sources. Improvements in troposphere modeling will minimize known systematic astrometric errors while accurate modeling and estimation of station effects from loading and nonlinear motions should permit the reintegration of the celestial and terrestrial reference frames with Earth orientation parameters though a single VLBI solution. The differences between the current ICRF and the potential second realization will be described

  13. Resonant-cavity ICRF coupler for large tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, F.W.; Kluge, R.F.

    1983-04-01

    A new resonant-cavity ICRF coupler is proposed for large tokamaks. The design features a novel resonant cavity, an rf magnetic-field orientation that effectively radiates fast Alfven waves, matching to 40 ..cap omega.. transmission lines, and an electric-field orientation so that the strongest rf electric fields are orthogonal to the main toroidal magnetic field thereby benefitting from magnetic insulation. As a result, the power handling capability is excellent. For the case of the Big-Dee Doublet III tokamak, a single 35 cm x 50 cm coupler can launch 20 MW of fast Alfven waves. Extrapolation to fusion reactor parameters is straightforward.

  14. Antennae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Atlas Image mosaic, covering 7' x 7' on the sky of the interacting galaxies NGC 4038 and NGC 4039, better known as the Antennae, or Ring Tail galaxies. The two galaxies are engaged in a tug-of-war as they collide. The mutual gravitation between them is working to distort each spiral galaxy's appearance as the two merge. The interaction is evidently impetus for an intense burst of new star formation, as can be seen from the many infrared-bright knots and bright galactic nuclei. Compare the 2MASS view of this system with that obtained by the Hubble Space Telescope in the optical. Many of the same features are seen, although 2MASS is able to peer through much of the dust seen in the galaxies' disks. The galaxy light looks smoother. Also, in the near-infrared the bright knots of star formation are likely highlighted by the light of massive red supergiant stars. The much more extended 'tidal tails,' which give the Antennae their name, are quite faint in the 2MASS image mosaic.

  15. Making ICRF power compatible with a high-Z wall in ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobkov, V.; Aguiam, D.; Bilato, R.; Brezinsek, S.; Colas, L.; Faugel, H.; Fünfgelder, H.; Herrmann, A.; Jacquot, J.; Kallenbach, A.; Milanesio, D.; Maggiora, R.; Neu, R.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Ochoukov, R.; Potzel, S.; Pütterich, T.; Silva, A.; Tierens, W.; Tuccilo, A.; Tudisco, O.; Wang, Y.; Yang, Q.; Zhang, W.; ASDEX Upgrade Team; the EUROfusion MST1 Team

    2017-01-01

    A comparison of the ASDEX Upgrade 3-strap ICRF antenna data with the linear electro-magnetic TOPICA calculations is presented. The comparison substantiates a reduction of the local electric field at the radially protruding plasma-facing elements of the antenna as a relevant approach for minimizing tungsten (W) sputtering in conditions when the slow wave is strongly evanescent. The measured reaction of the time-averaged RF current at the antenna limiters to the antenna feeding variations is less sensitive than predicted by the calculations. This is likely to have been caused by temporal and spatial fluctuations in the 3D plasma density distribution affected by local non-linear interactions. The 3-strap antenna with the W-coated limiters produces drastically less W sputtering compared to the W-coated 2-strap antennas. This is consistent with the non-linear asymptotic SSWICH-SW calculations for RF sheaths.

  16. ICRF Mode Conversion Flow Drive Experiments on Alcator C-Mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y.; Reinke, M. L.; Rice, J. E.; Wukitch, S. J.; Granetz, R.; Greenwald, M.; Hubbard, A. E.; Marmar, E. S.; Podpaly, Y. A.; Porkolab, M.; Tsujii, N.; Wolfe, S.

    2011-12-01

    We have carried out a detailed study of the dependence of ICRF mode conversion flow drive (MCFD) on plasma and RF parameters. The flow drive efficiency is found to depend strongly on the 3He concentration in D(3He) plasmas, a key parameter separating the ICRF minority heating regime and mode conversion regime. At +90 ° antenna phasing (waves in the co-Ip direction) and dipole phasing, the driven flow is in the co-Ip direction, and the change of the rotation velocity increases with both PRF and Ip, and scales unfavorably vs. plasma density and antenna frequency. When MCFD is applied to I-mode plasmas, the plasma rotation increases until the onset of MHD modes triggered by large sawtooth crashes. Very high performance I-mode plasmas with HITER98,y2˜1.4 and Te0˜8 keV have been obtained in these experiments.

  17. Comparison of ICRF and NBI heated plasmas performances in the JET ITER-like wall

    SciTech Connect

    Mayoral, M.-L.; Jacquet, P.; Czarnecka, A.; Mlynar, J.; Neu, R.; Collaboration: JET-EFDA Contributors

    2014-02-12

    During the initial operation of the JET ITER-like wall, particular attention was given to the characterization of the Ion Cyclotron Resonance Frequency (ICRF) heating in this new metallic environment. In this contribution we compare L-modes plasmas heated by ICRF or by Neutral Beam Injection (NBI). ICRF heating as expected led to a much higher centrally peaked power deposition on the electrons and due to the central fast ion population to stronger sawtooth activity. Surprisingly, although a higher bulk radiation was observed during the ICRF phase, the thermal plasma energy was found similar for both cases, showing that a higher radiation inside the separatrix was not incompatible with an efficient central heating scheme. The higher radiation was attributed to the presence Tungsten (W). Tomographic inversion of SXR emissions allowed a precise observation of the sawtooth effect on the radiation pattern. W concentration profiles deconvolved from SXR emission showed the flattening of the profiles due to sawtooth for both heating and the peaking of the profiles in the NBI case only hinting for extra transport effect in the ICRF case.

  18. Impact of localized gas injection on ICRF coupling and SOL parameters in JET-ILW H-mode plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerche, E.; Goniche, M.; Jacquet, P.; Van Eester, D.; Bobkov, V.; Colas, L.; Czarnecka, A.; Brezinsek, S.; Brix, M.; Crombe, K.; Graham, M.; Groth, M.; Monakhov, I.; Mathurin, T.; Matthews, G.; Meneses, L.; Noble, C.; Petrzilka, V.; Rimini, F.; Shaw, A.

    2015-08-01

    Recent JET-ILW [1,2] experiments reiterated the importance of tuning the plasma fuelling in order to optimize ion cyclotron resonance frequency (ICRF) heating in high power H-mode discharges. By fuelling the plasma from gas injection modules (GIMs) located in the mid-plane and on the top of the machine instead of adopting the more standardly used divertor GIMs, a considerable increase of the ICRF antenna coupling resistances was achieved with moderate gas injection rates (<1.5 × 1022 e/s). This effect is explained by an increase of the scrape-off-layer density in front of the antennas when mid-plane and top fuelling is used. By distributing the gas injection to optimize the coupling of all ICRF antenna arrays simultaneously, a substantial increase in the ICRF power capability and reliability was attained. Although similar core/pedestal plasma properties were observed for the different injection cases, the experiments indicate that the RF-induced impurity sources are reduced when switching from divertor to main chamber gas injection.

  19. Progress in controlling ICRF-edge interactions in ASDEX upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Bobkov, Vl. Ochoukov, R.; Bilato, R.; Braun, F.; Carralero, D.; Dux, R.; Faugel, H.; Fünfgelder, H.; Jacquot, J.; Lunt, T.; Potzel, S.; Pütterich, Th.; Jacquet, Ph.; Monakhov, I.; Zhang, W.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Stepanov, I.; Colas, L.; Meyer, O.; Czarnecka, A.; and others

    2015-12-10

    RF measurements during variation of the strap voltage balance of the original 2-strap ICRF antenna in ASDEX Upgrade at constant power are consistent with electromagnetic calculations by HFSS and TOPICA, more so for the latter. RF image current compensation is observed at the antenna limiters in the experiment at a local strap voltage of about half of the value of the remote strap, albeit with a non-negligible uncertainty in phasing. The RF-specific tungsten (W) source at the broad-limiter 2-strap antenna correlates strongly with the RF voltage at the local strap at the locations not connected to opposite side of the antenna along magnetic field lines. The trends of the observed increase of the RF loading with injection of local gas are well described by a combined EMC3-Eirene – FELICE calculations, with the most efficient improvement confirmed for the outer-midplane valves, but underestimated by about 1/3. The corresponding deuterium density tailoring is also likely responsible for the decrease of local W sources observed in the experiment.

  20. Fast terahertz optoelectronic amplitude modulator based on plasmonic metamaterial antenna arrays and graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jessop, David S.; Sol, Christian W. O.; Xiao, Long; Kindness, Stephen J.; Braeuninger-Weimer, Philipp; Lin, Hungyen; Griffiths, Jonathan P.; Ren, Yuan; Kamboj, Varun S.; Hofmann, Stephan; Zeitler, J. Axel; Beere, Harvey E.; Ritchie, David A.; Degl'Innocenti, Riccardo

    2016-02-01

    The growing interest in terahertz (THz) technologies in recent years has seen a wide range of demonstrated applications, spanning from security screening, non-destructive testing, gas sensing, to biomedical imaging and communication. Communication with THz radiation offers the advantage of much higher bandwidths than currently available, in an unallocated spectrum. For this to be realized, optoelectronic components capable of manipulating THz radiation at high speeds and high signal-to-noise ratios must be developed. In this work we demonstrate a room temperature frequency dependent optoelectronic amplitude modulator working at around 2 THz, which incorporates graphene as the tuning medium. The architecture of the modulator is an array of plasmonic dipole antennas surrounded by graphene. By electrostatically doping the graphene via a back gate electrode, the reflection characteristics of the modulator are modified. The modulator is electrically characterized to determine the graphene conductivity and optically characterization, by THz time-domain spectroscopy and a single-mode 2 THz quantum cascade laser, to determine the optical modulation depth and cut-off frequency. A maximum optical modulation depth of ~ 30% is estimated and is found to be most (least) sensitive when the electrical modulation is centered at the point of maximum (minimum) differential resistivity of the graphene. A 3 dB cut-off frequency > 5 MHz, limited only by the area of graphene on the device, is reported. The results agree well with theoretical calculations and numerical simulations, and demonstrate the first steps towards ultra-fast, graphene based THz optoelectronic devices.

  1. Experimental Study of an Advanced Plasma Thruster using ICRF Heating and Magnetic Nozzle Acceleration.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Akira

    2005-10-01

    Electric propulsion (EP) systems utilize plasma technologies and have been developed for years as one of the most promising space propulsion approaches. It is urgently required to develop high-power plasma thrusters for human expeditions to Mars and future space exploration missions. The advanced thruster is demanded to control thrust and specific impulse by adjusting the exhaust plasma density and velocity. In the VASIMR project, a combined system of efficient ion cyclotron heating and optimized magnetic nozzle design is proposed to control the ratio of specific impulse to thrust at constant power[1]. In this system a flowing plasma is heated by ICRF (ion cyclotron range of frequency) waves and the plasma thermal energy is converted to flow energy in a diverging magnetic field nozzle. We have recently performed the first demonstration of ion cyclotron resonance heating and acceleration in a magnetic nozzle by using a fast-flowing plasma with Mach number of nearly unity. Highly ionized plasma is produced by Magneto-Plasma-Dynamic thruster (MPDT). When RF power is launched by a helically-wound antenna, electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves are excited, and plasma thermal energy and ion temperature drastically increase (nearly ten-fold rise) during the RF pulse. The value of resonance magnetic field is affected by the Doppler shift due to the fast-flowing plasma. Dependences of heating efficiency on both plasma density and input RF power will be presented. Ion acceleration along the field line is also observed in a diverging magnetic field nozzle. Perpendicular component (to the magnetic field) of ion energy decreases, whereas parallel component increases along the diverging magnetic field.[1] F.R. Chang Diaz, ``The VASIMR Engine,'' AIAA 2004-0149. AIAA conf. (Reno,2004); Bulletin of APS (46th APS-DPP), NM2A-3, 2004.

  2. Two frequency ICRF heating of D-T plasmas on TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.H.; Majeski, R.; Wilson, J.R.; Hosea, J.C.; Schilling, G.; Stevens, J.; Ho, Y.L.; Raman, S.; Rasmussen, D.A.

    1993-11-01

    Modifications have been made to allow two of the ICRF antennas (bays L and M) on TFTR to operate at either of two frequencies, 43 MHz or 64 MHz. This was accomplished by lengthening the resonant loops feeding the antennas (2{lambda} at 43 MHz, 3{lambda} at 64 MHz) and replacing the conventional quarter wave impedance transformers with a tapered impedance design. The other two antennas (bays K and N) will operate at a fixed frequency, 43 MHz. The two frequency operation allows a combination of {sup 3}He-minority (or T second harmonic) and H-minority heating at full toroidal field on TFIR. Multiple frequency operation may also be useful in direct electron heating and current drive experiments. Other modifications have been made which are expected to permit arbitrary phasing between the current straps on bays M and L. The system design of the antenna, resonant loops and impedance matching system as well as preliminary TFTR results are discussed.

  3. Extending the ICRF to Higher Radio Frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, C. S.; Jones, D. L.; Lanyi, G. E.; Lowe, S. T.; Naudet, C. J.; Resch, G. M.; Steppe, J. A.; Zhang, L. D.; Ulvestad, J. S.; Taylor, G. B.

    2002-01-01

    The ICRF forms the basis for all astrometry including use as the inertial coordinate system for navigating deep space missions. This frame was defined using S/X-band observations over the past 20+ years. In January 2002, the VLBA approved our proposal for observing time to extend the ICRF to K-band (24 GHz) and Q-band (43 GHz). The first step will be observations at K- and Q-bands on a subset of ICRF sources. Eventually, K- and Q-band multi-epoch observations will be used to estimate positions, flux density and source structure for a large fraction of the current S/X-band ICRF source list. This work will benefit the radio astronomy community by extending the VLBA calibrator list at these bands. In the longer term, we would also like to extend the ICRF to Ka-band (32 GHz). A celestial reference frame will be needed at this frequency to support deep space navigation. A navigation demonstration is being considered for NASA's Mars 2005 mission. The initial K- and Q-band work will serve to identify candidate sources at Ka-band for use with that mission.

  4. Mode conversion in three ion species ICRF heating scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y.; Edlund, E.; Ennever, P.; Porkolab, M.; Wright, J.; Wukitch, S.

    2016-10-01

    Three-ion species ICRF heating has been studied on Alcator C-Mod and on JET. It has been shown to heat the plasma and generate energetic particles. In a typical three-ion scenario, the plasma consists of 60-70% D, 30-40% H and a trace level (1% or less) of 3He. This species mixture creates two hybrid resonances (D-3He and 3He-H) in the plasma, in the vicinity of the 3He IC resonance (on both sides). The fast wave can undergo mode conversion (MC) to ion Bernstein waves and ion cyclotron waves at the two hybrid resonances. A phase contrast imaging (PCI) system has been used to measure the RF waves in the three-ion heating experiment. The experimentally measured MC locations and the separating distance between the two MC regions help to determine the concentration of the three species. The PCI signal amplitudes for the RF waves are found to be sensitive to RF and plasma parameters, including PRF, Te, ne and also the species mix concentration. The parameter dependences found in the experiment will be compared with ICRF code simulations. Supported by USDoE Awards DE-FC02-99ER54512 and DE-FG02-94-ER54235.

  5. Extreme ultraviolet proximity lithography for fast, flexible and parallel fabrication of infrared antennas.

    PubMed

    Kunkemöller, Georg; Mass, Tobias W W; Michel, Ann-Katrin U; Kim, Hyun-Su; Brose, Sascha; Danylyuk, Serhiy; Taubner, Thomas; Juschkin, Larissa

    2015-10-05

    We present a method for fabrication of large arrays of nano-antennas using extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) illumination. A discharge-produced plasma source generating EUV radiation around 10.88 nm wavelength is used for the illumination of a photoresist via a mask in a proximity printing setup. The method of metallic nanoantennas fabrication utilizes a bilayer photoresist and employs a lift-off process. The impact of Fresnel-diffraction of EUV light in the mask on a shape of the nanostructures has been investigated. It is shown how by the use of the same rectangular apertures in the transmission mask, antennas of various shapes can be fabricated. Using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, spectra of antennas reflectivity were measured and compared to FDTD simulations demonstrating good agreement.

  6. ICRF heating and transport of deuterium-tritium plasmas in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.H.; Schilling, G.; Stevens, J.E.; Taylor, G.; Wilson, J.R.; Bell, M.G.; Budny, R.V.; Bretz, N.L.; Darrow, D.; Fredrickson, E.

    1995-02-01

    This paper describes results of the first experiments utilizing high-power ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) to heat deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas in reactor-relevant regimes on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). Results from these experiments have demonstrated efficient core, second harmonic, tritium beating of D-T supershot plasmas with tritium concentrations ranging from 6%-40%. Significant direct ion heating on the order of 60% of the input radio frequency (rf) power has been observed. The measured deposition profiles are in good agreement with two-dimensional modeling code predictions. Energy confinement in an rf-heated supershot is at least similar to that without rf, and possibly better in the electron channel. Efficient electron heating via mode conversion of fast waves to ion Bernstein waves (IBW) has been demonstrated in ohmic, deuterium-deuterium and DT-neutral beam injection plasmas with high concentrations of minority {sup 3}He (n{sub 3He}/n{sub e} = 15% - 30%). By changing the {sup 3}He concentration or the toroidal field strength, the location of the mode-conversion radius was varied. The power deposition profile measured with rf power modulation indicated that up to 70% of the power can be deposited on electrons at an off-axis position. Preliminary results with up to 4 MW coupled into the plasma by 90-degree phased antennas showed directional propagation of the mode-converted IBW. Analysis of heat wave propagation showed no strong inward thermal pinch in off-axis heating of an ohmically-heated target plasma in TFTR.

  7. ICRF heating and transport of deuterium-tritium plasmas in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, M.; Batchelor, D.B.; Bush, C.E.

    1994-12-31

    This paper describes results of the first experiments utilizing high-power ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) to heat deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas in reactor-relevant regimes on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). Results from these experiments have demonstrated efficient core, second harmonic, tritium heating of D-T supershot plasmas with tritium concentrations ranging from 6%--40%. Significant direct ion heating on the order of 60% of the input radio frequency (rf) power has been observed. The measured deposition profiles are in good agreement with two-dimensional modeling code predictions. Confinement in an rf-heated supershot is at least similar to that without rf, and possibly better in the electron channel. Efficient electron heating via mode conversion of fast waves to ion Bernstein waves (IBW) has been demonstrated in ohmic, deuterium-deuterium and DT-neutral beam injection plasmas with high concentrations of minority {sup 3}He (n{sub {sup 3}He}/n{sub e} > 10%). By changing the {sup 3}He concentration or the toroidal field strength, the location of the mode-conversion radius was varied. The power deposition profile measured with rf power modulation showed that up to 70% of the power can be deposited on electrons at an off-axis position. Preliminary results with up to 4 MW coupled into the plasma by 90-degree phased antennas showed directional propagation of the mode-converted IBW. Heat wave propagation showed no strong inward thermal pinch in off-axis heating of an ohmically-heated (OH) target plasma in TFIR.

  8. A DEMO relevant fast wave current drive high harmonic antenna exploiting the high impedance technique

    SciTech Connect

    Milanesio, D. Maggiora, R.

    2015-12-10

    Ion Cyclotron (IC) antennas are routinely adopted in most of the existing nuclear fusion experiments, even though their main goal, i.e. to couple high power to the plasma (MW), is often limited by rather severe drawbacks due to high fields on the antenna itself and on the unmatched part of the feeding lines. In addition to the well exploited auxiliary ion heating during the start-up phase, some non-ohmic current drive (CD) at the IC range of frequencies may be explored in view of the DEMO reactor. In this work, we suggest and describe a compact high frequency DEMO relevant antenna, based on the high impedance surfaces concept. High-impedance surfaces are periodic metallic structures (patches) usually displaced on top of a dielectric substrate and grounded by means of vertical posts embedded inside the dielectric, in a mushroom-like shape. These structures present a high impedance, within a given frequency band, such that the image currents are in-phase with the currents of the antenna itself, thus determining a significant efficiency increase. After a general introduction on the properties of high impedance surfaces, we analyze, by means of numerical codes, a dielectric based and a full metal solution optimized to be tested and benchmarked on the FTU experiment fed with generators at 433MHz.

  9. A DEMO relevant fast wave current drive high harmonic antenna exploiting the high impedance technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milanesio, D.; Maggiora, R.

    2015-12-01

    Ion Cyclotron (IC) antennas are routinely adopted in most of the existing nuclear fusion experiments, even though their main goal, i.e. to couple high power to the plasma (MW), is often limited by rather severe drawbacks due to high fields on the antenna itself and on the unmatched part of the feeding lines. In addition to the well exploited auxiliary ion heating during the start-up phase, some non-ohmic current drive (CD) at the IC range of frequencies may be explored in view of the DEMO reactor. In this work, we suggest and describe a compact high frequency DEMO relevant antenna, based on the high impedance surfaces concept. High-impedance surfaces are periodic metallic structures (patches) usually displaced on top of a dielectric substrate and grounded by means of vertical posts embedded inside the dielectric, in a mushroom-like shape. These structures present a high impedance, within a given frequency band, such that the image currents are in-phase with the currents of the antenna itself, thus determining a significant efficiency increase. After a general introduction on the properties of high impedance surfaces, we analyze, by means of numerical codes, a dielectric based and a full metal solution optimized to be tested and benchmarked on the FTU experiment fed with generators at 433MHz.

  10. Recent Developments in High-Harmonic Fast Wave Physics in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    B.P. LeBlanc, R.E. Bell, P. Bonoli, R. Harvey, W.W. Heidbrink, J.C. Hosea, S.M. Kaye, D. Liu, R. Maingi, S.S. Medley, M. Ono, M. Podestà, C.K. Phillips, P.M. Ryan, A.L. Roquemore, G. Taylor, J.R. Wilson and the NSTX Team

    2010-10-06

    Understanding the interaction between ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) fast waves and the fast-ions created by neutral beam injection (NBI) is critical for future devices such as ITER, which rely on a combination ICRF and NBI. Experiments in NSTX which use 30 MHz High-Harmonic Fast-Wave (HHFW) ICRF and NBI heating show a competition between electron heating via Landau damping and transit-time magnetic pumping, and radio-frequency wave acceleration of NBI generated fast ions. Understanding and mitigating some of the power loss mechanisms outside the last closed flux surface (LCFS) has resulted in improved HHFW heating inside the LCFS. Nevertheless a significant fraction of the HHFW power is diverted away from the enclosed plasma. Part of this power is observed locally on the divertor. Experimental observations point toward the radio-frequency (RF) excitation of surface waves, which disperse wave power outside the LCFS, as a leading loss mechanism. Lithium coatings lower the density at the antenna, thereby moving the critical density for perpendicular fast-wave propagation away from the antenna and surrounding material surfaces. Visible and infrared imaging reveal flows of RF power along open field lines into the divertor region. In L-mode -- low average NBI power -- conditions, the fast-ion D-alpha (FIDA) diagnostic measures a near doubling and broadening of the density profile of the upper energetic level of the fast ions concurrent with the presence of HHFW power launched with k// =-8m-1. We are able to heat NBI-induced H-mode plasmas with HHFW. The captured power is expected to be split between absorption by the electrons and absorption by the fast ions, based on TORIC calculation. In the case discussed here the Te increases over the whole profile when ~2MW of HHFW power with antenna k// =13m-1 is applied after the H-mode transition.. But somewhat unexpectedly fast-ion diagnostics do not observe a change between the HHFW heated NBI discharge and the

  11. Experimental pathways to understand and avoid high-Z impurity contamination from ICRF heating in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinke, Matthew

    2016-10-01

    Recent results from Alcator C-Mod and JET demonstrate progress in understanding and mitigating core high-Z impurity contamination linked to ICRF heating in tokamaks with high-Z PFCs. Theory has identified two likely mechanisms: impurity sources due to sputtering enhanced by RF-rectified sheaths and greater cross-field SOL transport due to ExB convective cells. New experiments on Alcator C-Mod and JET demonstrate convective cell transport is likely a sub-dominant effect, despite directly observing ExB flows from rectified RF fields on C-Mod. Trace N2 introduced in the far SOL on field lines connected to and well away from an active ICRF antenna result in similar levels of core nitrogen, indicating local RF-driven transport is weak. This suggests the core high-Z density, nZ,core, is determined by sheath-induced sputtering and RF-independent SOL transport, allowing further reductions through antenna design. ICRF heating on C-Mod uses a unique, field aligned (FAA) and a pair of conventional, toroidally aligned (TAA) antennas. The FAA is designed to reduce rectified voltages relative to the TAA, and the impact of sheath-induced sputtering is explored by observing nZ,core while varying the TAA/FAA heating mix. A reduction of approximately 50% in core high-Z content is seen in L-modes when using the FAA and high-Z sources at the antenna limiter are effectively eliminated, indicating the remaining RF-driven source is away from the limiter. A drop in nZ,core may also be realized by locating the RF antenna on the inboard side where SOL transport aids impurity screening. New C-Mod experiments demonstrate up to a factor of 5 reduction in core nitrogen when N2 is injected on the high-field side as compared to low-field side impurity fueling. Varying the magnetic topology helps to elucidate the SOL transport physics responsible, laying a physics basis for inboard RF antenna placement. This work is supported by U.S. DOE Award DE-FC02-99ER54512, using Alcator C-Mod and carried out

  12. High-Performance Computational Modeling of ICRF Physics and Plasma-Surface Interactions in Alcator C-Mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Thomas; Smithe, David

    2016-10-01

    Inefficiencies and detrimental physical effects may arise in conjunction with ICRF heating of tokamak plasmas. Large wall potential drops, associated with sheath formation near plasma-facing antenna hardware, give rise to high-Z impurity sputtering from plasma-facing components and subsequent radiative cooling. Linear and nonlinear wave excitations in the plasma edge/SOL also dissipate injected RF power and reduce overall antenna efficiency. Recent advances in finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) modeling techniques allow the physics of localized sheath potentials, and associated sputtering events, to be modeled concurrently with the physics of antenna near- and far-field behavior and RF power flow. The new methods enable time-domain modeling of plasma-surface interactions and ICRF physics in realistic experimental configurations at unprecedented spatial resolution. We present results/animations from high-performance (10k-100k core) FDTD/PIC simulations spanning half of Alcator C-Mod at mm-scale resolution, exploring impurity production due to localized sputtering (in response to self-consistent sheath potentials at antenna surfaces) and the physics of parasitic slow wave excitation near the antenna hardware and SOL. Supported by US DoE (Award DE-SC0009501) and the ALCC program.

  13. Initial ICRF heating experiments on the LHD

    SciTech Connect

    Kumazawa, R.; Mutoh, T.; Seki, T.; Shimpo, F.; Nomura, G.; Watari, T.; Ohkubo, K.; Sato, M.; Kubo, S; Shimozuma, T.; Idei, H.; Yoshimura, Y.; Kaneko, O.; Takeiri, Y.; Oka, Y.; Tsumori, K.; Osakabe, M.; Ohyabu, N.; Kawahata, K.; Komori, A.

    1999-09-20

    The final goal of Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequency (ICRF) heating on the Large Helical Device (LHD) is characterized by its high power (up to 12MW) and by steady state operation (30 minutes). Initial ICRF heating experiments were carried out using a pair of loop antemas in the 2nd experimental campaign in 1998. The ICRF heating power was applied to an ECH-produced plasma at an RF power level of 300 kW for 0.2 seconds. An applied frequency of f=25.6 MHz was selected. A cyclotron resonance layer of hydrogen ions was located at the half minor radius during operation at B=1.5 T. A mode conversion layer of a He plasma with a minority of hydrogen ions was located between the magnetic axis and the last closed magnetic flux. The plasma stored energy was observed to increase to twice that of the ECH plasma (P{sub ECH}=300 kW). The plasma stored energy of the ECH target plasma was 11-13 kJ at an average electron density of n{sub e}=8-9x10{sup 18} m{sup -3} and a central electron temperature of T{sub e0}=400 eV. The plasma stored energy increased by 13 kJ with the application of ICRF heating at n{sub e}=7-8x10{sup 18} m{sup -3} and T{sub e0}=700 eV. A strong electron heating via mode conversion was observed at a higher minority ratio of hydrogen ions.

  14. Experiments utilizing ICRF heating on TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, J.R.; Hosea, J.C.; Bell, M.G.; Bitter, M.; Boivin, R.; Fredrickson, E.D.; Greene, G.J.; Hammett, G.W.; Hill, K.W.; Hsuan, H.; Janos, A.C.; Jassby, D.L.; Jobes, F.C.; Johnson, D.W.; Phillips, C.K.; Mansfield, D.K.; McGuire, K.M.; Medley, S.S.; Mueller, D.; Ono, M.; Owens, D.K.; Park, H.K.; Ramsey, A.T.; Schmidt, G.L.; Scott, S.D.; Stevens, J.E.; Stratton, B.C.; Synakowski, E.; Taylor, G.; Ulrickson, M.; Wong, K.L.; Zarns

    1990-01-01

    A variety of experiments have been performed on the TFTR tokamak utilizing ICFR heating. Of special interest has been the insight into plasma performance gained by utilizing a different heating scheme other than the usual NBI. Utilizing ICRF heating allows control over the power deposition profile independent of the plasma fueling profile. In addition, by varying the minority concentration the power split between ion and electron heating can be varied. Confinement has been examined in high recycling gas fueled discharges, low recycling supershot plasmas, and peaked density pellet fueled discharges. Global confinement is found not to be affected by the method or localization of plasma heating, but the calculated local diffusivities vary with the power deposition profile to yield similar local values. In addition, sawtooth stabilization observed with ICRF heating has been investigated and found to occur in qualitative agreement with theory. ICRF sawtooth stabilized discharges exhibit peaked temperature and density profiles and have a safety factor q which appears to fall well below unity on axis. 11 refs., 10 figs.

  15. Observations of neutral beam and ICRF tail ion losses due to Alfven modes in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Darrow, D.S.; Zweben, S.J.; Chang, Z.

    1996-04-01

    Fast ion losses resulting from MHD modes at the Alfven frequency, such as the TAE, have been observed in TFTR. The modes have been driven both by neutral beam ions, at low B{sub T}, and by H-minority ICRF tail ions at higher B{sub T}. The measurements indicate that the loss rate varies linearly with the mode amplitude, and that the fast ion losses during the mode activity can be significant, e.g. up to 10% of the input power is lost in the worst case.

  16. Measurement and simulation of ICRF wave intensity with a recalibrated phase contrast imaging diagnostic on Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    Tsujii, N.; Porkolab, M.; Bonoli, P. T.; Edlund, E. M.; Ennever, P. C.; Lin, Y.; Wright, J. C.; Wukitch, S. J.; Jaeger, E. F.; Green, D. L.; Harvey, R. W.

    2015-12-10

    Waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) are one of the major tools to heat fusion plasmas. Full-wave simulations are essential to predict the wave propagation and absorption quantitatively, and it is important that these codes be validated against actual experimental measurements. In this work, the absolute intensity of the ICRF waves previously measured with a phase contrast imaging diagnostic was recalibrated and compared once more with full-wave predictions. In the earlier work, significant discrepancies were found between the measured and the simulated mode converted wave intensity [N. Tsujii et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 082508]. With the new calibration of the detector array, the measured mode converted wave intensity is now in much better agreement with the full-wave predictions. The agreement is especially good for comparisons performed close to the antenna.

  17. A Fast MoM Solver (GIFFT) for Large Arrays of Microstrip and Cavity-Backed Antennas

    SciTech Connect

    Fasenfest, B J; Capolino, F; Wilton, D

    2005-02-02

    A straightforward numerical analysis of large arrays of arbitrary contour (and possibly missing elements) requires large memory storage and long computation times. Several techniques are currently under development to reduce this cost. One such technique is the GIFFT (Green's function interpolation and FFT) method discussed here that belongs to the class of fast solvers for large structures. This method uses a modification of the standard AIM approach [1] that takes into account the reusability properties of matrices that arise from identical array elements. If the array consists of planar conducting bodies, the array elements are meshed using standard subdomain basis functions, such as the RWG basis. The Green's function is then projected onto a sparse regular grid of separable interpolating polynomials. This grid can then be used in a 2D or 3D FFT to accelerate the matrix-vector product used in an iterative solver [2]. The method has been proven to greatly reduce solve time by speeding up the matrix-vector product computation. The GIFFT approach also reduces fill time and memory requirements, since only the near element interactions need to be calculated exactly. The present work extends GIFFT to layered material Green's functions and multiregion interactions via slots in ground planes. In addition, a preconditioner is implemented to greatly reduce the number of iterations required for a solution. The general scheme of the GIFFT method is reported in [2]; this contribution is limited to presenting new results for array antennas made of slot-excited patches and cavity-backed patch antennas.

  18. Maximization of ICRF power by SOL density tailoring with local gas injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquet, P.; Goniche, M.; Bobkov, V.; Lerche, E.; Pinsker, R. I.; Pitts, R. A.; Zhang, W.; Colas, L.; Hosea, J.; Moriyama, S.; Wang, S.-J.; Wukitch, S.; Zhang, X.; Bilato, R.; Bufferand, H.; Guimarais, L.; Faugel, H.; Hanson, G. R.; Kocan, M.; Monakhov, I.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Petrzilka, V.; Shaw, A.; Stepanov, I.; Sips, A. C. C.; Van Eester, D.; Wauters, T.; JET contributors, the; the ASDEX Upgrade Team; the DIII-D Team; ITPA ‘Integrated Operation Scenarios' members, the; experts

    2016-04-01

    Experiments have been performed under the coordination of the International Tokamak Physics Activity (ITPA) on several tokamaks, including ASDEX Upgrade (AUG), JET and DIII-D, to characterize the increased Ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) antenna loading achieved by optimizing the position of gas injection relative to the RF antennas. On DIII-D, AUG and JET (with the ITER-Like Wall) a 50% increase in the antenna loading was observed when injecting deuterium in ELMy H-mode plasmas using mid-plane inlets close to the powered antennas instead of divertor injection and, with smaller improvement when using gas inlets located at the top of the machine. The gas injection rate required for such improvements (~0.7  ×  1022 el s-1 in AUG, ~1.0  ×  1022 el s-1 in JET) is compatible with the use of this technique to optimize ICRF heating during the development of plasma scenarios and no degradation of confinement was observed when using the mid-plane or top inlets compared with divertor valves. An increase in the scrape-off layer (SOL) density was measured when switching gas injection from divertor to outer mid-plane or top. On JET and DIII-D, the measured SOL density increase when using main chamber puffing is consistent with the antenna coupling resistance increase provided that the distance between the measurement lines of sight and the injection location is taken into account. Optimized gas injection was also found to be beneficial for reducing tungsten (W) sputtering at the AUG antenna limiters, and also to reduce slightly the W and nickel (Ni) content in JET plasmas. Modeling the specific effects of divertor/top/mid-plane injection on the outer mid-plane density was carried out using both the EDGE2D-EIRENE and EMC3-EIRENE plasma boundary code packages; simulations indeed indicate that outer mid-plane gas injection maximizes the density in the mid-plane close to the injection point with qualitative agreement with the AUG SOL density measurements

  19. Fast-wave Power Flow Along SOL Field Lines In NSTX nd The Associated Power Deposition Profile Across The SOL In Front Of The Antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, Roy

    2013-06-21

    Fast-wave heating and current drive efficiencies can be reduced by a number of processes in the vicinity of the antenna and in the scrape off layer (SOL). On NSTX from around 25% to more than 60% of the high-harmonic fast-wave power can be lost to the SOL regions, and a large part of this lost power flows along SOL magnetic field lines and is deposited in bright spirals on the divertor floor and ceiling. We show that field-line mapping matches the location of heat deposition on the lower divertor, albeit with a portion of the heat outside of the predictions. The field-line mapping can then be used to partially reconstruct the profile of lost fast-wave power at the midplane in front of the antenna, and the losses peak close to the last closed flux surface (LCFS) as well as the antenna. This profile suggests a radial standing-wave pattern formed by fast-wave propagation in the SOL, and this hypothesis will be tested on NSTX-U. Advanced RF codes must reproduce these results so that such codes can be used to understand this edge loss and to minimize RF heat deposition and erosion in the divertor region on ITER.

  20. Slow Wave Excitation in the ICRF and HHFW Regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, C. K.; Valeo, E. J.; Hosea, J. C.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Wilson, J. R.; Jaeger, E. F.; Berry, L. A.; Ryan, P. M.; Bonoli, P. T.; Wright, J. C.; Smithe, D. N.

    2011-12-23

    Theoretical considerations and high spatial resolution numerical simulations of radio frequency (rf) wave heating in tokamaks and in spherical toruses (ST) indicate that fast waves launched into tokamaks in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) or into spherical toruses in the high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) regime may excite a short wavelength slow mode inside of the plasma discharge due to the presence of hot electrons that satisfy the condition {omega}

  1. The Second International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Chopo

    2010-01-01

    The ICRF2 catalog was constructed by the IERS/IVS Working Group with oversight by the IAU Working Group. Derived using data from August 1979 through March 2009, it is a great improvement over the original ICRF with 3414 extragalactic radio source positions, a noise floor of 40 microarcsec, and axis stability of 10 microarcsec. Significant refinements were made in the selection of defining sources, modeling, and the integration of CRF, TRF, and EOP. The adoption of the ICRF2 was approved by the IAU in Resolution B3 at the XXVII IAU General Assembly and became effective 1 January 2010.

  2. The ICRF-3: Status, Plans, and Multi-wavelength Progress on the next generation Celestial Reference Frame.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Christopher

    2015-08-01

    ICRF-3 seeks to improve upon the highly successful ICRF-2. Our goals are to improve the precision, spatial and frequency coverage relative to the ICRF-2 by 2018. This date is driven by the desire to create radio frames that are ready for comparison with the Gaia optical frame.Several specific actions are underway. A collaboration to improve at S/X-band precision of the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) Calibrator Survey's ~2200 sources, which are typically 5 times less precise than the rest of the ICRF-2, is bearing fruit and is projected to yield a factor of 3 improvement in precision. S/X-band southern hemisphere precision improvements are underway with observations using southern antennas such as the AuScope, Warkworth, and HartRAO, South Africa.We also seek to improve radio frequency coverage with X/Ka-band and K-band work. An X/Ka frame of 660 sources now has full sky coverage from the addition of a 2nd southern station in Argentina which is strengthening the southern hemisphere in general. The X/Ka-band frame's precision is now comparable to the ICRF-2 for the 530 sources in common. A K-band collaboration has formed with similar coverage and southern precision goals. By the time of this meeting, we expect K-band to complete full sky coverage with south polar cap observations and to improve spatial density north of -30 deg declination with VLBA observations.On the analysis front, special attention is being given to combination techniques both of Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) frames and of multiple data types. Consistency of the Celestial Reference Frame (CRF) with the Terrestrial Reference Frame (TRF) and Earth Oreintation Parameters (EOP) is another area of concern. Comparison of celestial frame solutions from various groups is underway in order to identify and correct systematic errors. We will discuss evidence emerging for 100 µas zonal errors in the ICRF2 in the declination range from 0 to -30 deg.Finally, work is underway to identify and

  3. ICRF mode conversion heating and long-pulse discharges in LHD

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, K.; Mutoh, T.; Kumazawa, R.; Seki, T.; Nakamura, Y.; Ashikawa, N.; Sato, K.; Shoji, M.; Masuzaki, S.; Kasahara, H.; Shimpo, F.; Nomura, G.; Yokota, M.; Takahashi, C.; Komori, A.; Ogawa, H.; Takeuchi, H.

    2007-09-28

    In LHD, long-pulse discharge has been conducted by ICRF minority ion heating. Plasma duration time of 525 seconds was achieved with the heating power of more than 1 MW supported by ECH and NBI. Electron heating by the mode conversion from the fast wave to the ion Bernstein wave was investigated to achieve a longer pulse length with the higher injection power. Plasma was sustained for 88 seconds by the mode conversion heating and ECH. The temperature distribution on divertor plates was less localized than that of minority ion heating.

  4. Simulation of High Power ICRF Wave Heating in the ITER Burning Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeger, E. F.; Berry, L. A.; Barrett, R. F.; D'Azevedo, E. F.

    2007-11-01

    ITER relies on Ion-cyclotron Radio Frequency (ICRF) power to heat the plasma to fusion temperatures. To heat effectively, the waves must couple efficiently to the core plasma. Recent simulations using AORSA [1] on the 120 TF Cray XT-4 (Jaguar) at ORNL show that the waves propagate radially inward and are rapidly absorbed with little heating of the plasma edge. AORSA has achieved 87.5 trillion calculations per second (87.5 teraflops) on Jaguar, which is 73 percent of the system's theoretical peak. Three dimensional visualizations show ``hot spots'' near the antenna surface where the wave amplitude is high. AORSA simulations are also being used to study how to best use ICRF to drive plasma currents for optimizing ITER performance and pulse length. Results for Scenario 4 show a maximum current of 0.54 MA for 20 MW of power at 57 MHz. [1] E.F. Jaeger, L.A. Berry, E. D'Azevedo, et al., Phys. Plasmas. 8, 1573 (2001).

  5. 3D Modeling of Antenna Driven Slow Waves Excited by Antennas Near the Plasma Edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smithe, David; Jenkins, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    Prior work with the 3D finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) plasma and sheath model used to model ICRF antennas in fusion plasmas has highlighted the possibility of slow wave excitation at the very low end of the SOL density range, and thus the prudent need for a slow-time evolution model to treat SOL density modifications due to the RF itself. At higher frequency, the DIII-D helicon antenna has much easier access to a parasitic slow wave excitation, and in this case the Faraday screen provides the dominant means of controlling the content of the launched mode, with antenna end-effects remaining a concern. In both cases, the danger is the same, with the slow-wave propagating into a lower-hybrid resonance layer a short distance ( cm) away from the antenna, which would parasitically absorb power, transferring energy to the SOL edge plasma, primarily through electron-neutral collisions. We will present 3D modeling of antennas at both ICRF and helicon frequencies. We've added a slow-time evolution capability for the SOL plasma density to include ponderomotive force driven rarefaction from the strong fields in the vicinity of the antenna, and show initial application to NSTX antenna geometry and plasma configurations. The model is based on a Scalar Ponderomotive Potential method, using self-consistently computed local field amplitudes from the 3D simulation.

  6. ICRF sawtooth stabilization: Application on TFTR and CIT

    SciTech Connect

    Hosea, J.C.; Phillips, C.K.; Stevens, J.E.; Wilson, J.R.; Bell, M.; Boivin, R.; Cavallo, A.; Colestock, P.; Fredrickson, E.; Hammett, G.; Hsuan, H.; Janos, A.; Jassby, D.; Jobes, F.; McGuire, K.; Mueller, D.; Nagayama, Y.; Owens, K.; Park, H.; Schmidt, G.; Stratton, B.; Taylor, G.; Wong, K.L.; Zweben, S. . Plasma Physics Lab.); Hoffman, D. )

    1991-03-01

    The use of ICRF heating to stabilize the core plasma sawtooth relaxations has been extended to TFTR where such stabilization has been produced at relatively low power in the L Mode regime at moderate density (P{sub RF} = 4 MW, 2.6 MW in helium and deuterium discharges, respectively, for the minority hydrogen ICRF heating regime with {bar n}{sub e}{approx}2.5 {times} 10{sup 13} cm{sup {minus}3}). These results, as in the case of those obtained on JET, are qualitatively consistent with energetic ion stabilization of the m = 1, n = 1 ideal/resistive kink mode. The relevance of sawtooth stabilization to the primary regimes of interest on TFTR -- the high-Q supershot regime and the high density pellet injection regimes -- and on CIT -- the high density ICRF heated regime -- is considered in the context of the present theory and the projected ICRF power deposition characteristics. 35 refs., 11 figs.

  7. Active and fast particle driven Alfvén eigenmodes in Alcator C-Moda)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snipes, J. A.; Basse, N.; Boswell, C.; Edlund, E.; Fasoli, A.; Gorelenkov, N. N.; Granetz, R. S.; Lin, L.; Lin, Y.; Parker, R.; Porkolab, M.; Sears, J.; Sharapov, S.; Tang, V.; Wukitch, S.

    2005-05-01

    Alfvén eigenmodes (AEs) are studied to assess their stability in high density reactor relevant regimes where Ti≈Te and as a diagnostic tool. Stable AEs are excited with active magnetohydrodynamics antennas in the range of the expected AE frequency. Toroidal Alfvén eigenmode (TAE) damping rates between 0.5%<γ/ω<4.5% have been observed in diverted and limited Ohmic plasmas. Unstable AEs are excited with a fast ion tail driven by H minority ion cyclotron radio frequency (ICRF) heating with electron densities in the range of n¯e=0.5-2×1020m-3. Energetic particle modes or TAEs have been observed to decrease in frequency and mode number with time up to a large sawtooth collapse, indicating the role fast particles play in stabilizing sawteeth. In the current rise phase, unstable modes with frequencies that increase rapidly with time are observed with magnetic pick-up coils at the wall and phase contrast imaging density fluctuation measurements in the core. Modeling of these modes constrains the calculated safety factor profile to be very flat or with slightly reversed shear. AEs are found to be more stable for an inboard than for central or outboard ICRF resonances in qualitative agreement with modeling.

  8. Application of Model Based Parameter Estimation for Fast Frequency Response Calculations of Input Characteristics of Cavity-Backed Aperture Antennas Using Hybrid FEM/MoM Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy C. J.

    1998-01-01

    Model Based Parameter Estimation (MBPE) is presented in conjunction with the hybrid Finite Element Method (FEM)/Method of Moments (MoM) technique for fast computation of the input characteristics of cavity-backed aperture antennas over a frequency range. The hybrid FENI/MoM technique is used to form an integro-partial- differential equation to compute the electric field distribution of a cavity-backed aperture antenna. In MBPE, the electric field is expanded in a rational function of two polynomials. The coefficients of the rational function are obtained using the frequency derivatives of the integro-partial-differential equation formed by the hybrid FEM/ MoM technique. Using the rational function approximation, the electric field is obtained over a frequency range. Using the electric field at different frequencies, the input characteristics of the antenna are obtained over a wide frequency range. Numerical results for an open coaxial line, probe-fed coaxial cavity and cavity-backed microstrip patch antennas are presented. Good agreement between MBPE and the solutions over individual frequencies is observed.

  9. High power ICRF experiments on TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, J.R.; Hosea, J.C.; Majeski, R.; Phillips, C.K.; Rogers, J.H.; Schilling, G.; Stevens, J.; Taylor, G. ); Murakami, M.; Rasmussen, D.A. ); TFTR Group

    1994-10-15

    ICRF heating experiments have been conducted in a variety of conditions on the TFTR tokamak. Power levels up to 11.4 MW have been applied. During NBI driven supershot discharges the central electron temperature has been increased from 9 kev to 13 kev via [sup 3]He minority heating with 6 MW of RF power. This temperature increase leads to a 70% increase in the projected alpha energy slowing down time. In gas fueled L-mode discharges the energetic hydrogen minority tail is observed to strongly influence the MHD stability of the discharges. Besides the stabilization of the sawtooth instability previously reported, the destabilization of both the m=1 fishbone and the TAE (toroidal Alfven eigenmode) instabilities have been observed. The TAE instability is accompanied with significant ([similar to]10%) loss of high energy ions and degradation in global confinement time.

  10. Spectral Effects on Fast Wave Core Heating and Current Drive

    SciTech Connect

    C.K. Phillips, R.E. Bell, L.A. Berry, P.T. Bonoli, R.W. Harvey, J.C. Hosea, E.F. Jaeger, B.P. LeBlanc, P.M. Ryan, G. Taylor, E.J. Valeo, J.R. Wilson, J.C. Wright, H. Yuh, and the NSTX Team

    2009-05-11

    Recent results obtained with high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) heating and current drive (CD) on NSTX strongly support the hypothesis that the onset of perpendicular fast wave propagation right at or very near the launcher is a primary cause for a reduction in core heating efficiency at long wavelengths that is also observed in ICRF heating experiments in numerous tokamaks. A dramatic increase in core heating efficiency was first achieved in NSTX L-mode helium majority plasmas when the onset for perpendicular wave propagation was moved away from the antenna and nearby vessel structures. Efficient core heating in deuterium majority L mode and H mode discharges, in which the edge density is typically higher than in comparable helium majority plasmas, was then accomplished by reducing the edge density in front of the launcher with lithium conditioning and avoiding operational points prone to instabilities. These results indicate that careful tailoring of the edge density profiles in ITER should be considered to limit rf power losses to the antenna and plasma facing materials. Finally, in plasmas with reduced rf power losses in the edge regions, the first direct measurements of high harmonic fast wave current drive were obtained with the motional Stark effect (MSE) diagnostic. The location and radial dependence of HHFW CD measured by MSE are in reasonable agreement with predictions from both full wave and ray tracing simulations.

  11. Simulations of NBI-ICRF synergy with the full-wave TORIC package

    SciTech Connect

    Bilato, R.; Brambilla, M.; Horton, L. D.; Maggi, C. F.; Stober, J.

    2009-11-26

    During the combined plasma heating with neutral beam injection (NBI) and waves in the ion cyclotron (IC) range of frequencies, the NBI fast ions are preferentially accelerated by IC waves close to the IC harmonics, as a consequence of finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects. Since the NBI fast ions are expected to have a strong influence on the wave absorption and propagation, we have implemented a NBI source in the quasilinear Fokker-Planck SSFPQL code, interfaced with the toroidal full-wave TORIC solver. In this implementation the NBI ionization sources are obtained from the output of a Monte Carlo code, such as FAFNER. The numerical scheme adopted in the TORIC-SSFPQL package allows to describe very anisotropic sources, such as NBI, and to iterate the solution of Maxwell's equation taking into account selfconsistently the fast ion tails. As a first application, we present modeling of an ASDEX-Upgrade discharge with combined NBI and ICRF heating.

  12. The IAU Division A Working Group on the Third Realization of the ICRF: Background, Goals, Plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaume, Ralph

    2015-08-01

    The XXVIII General Assembly of the IAU (Beijing, 2012) established the Division A Working Group on the Third Realization of the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF). The adopted charter of the ICRF3 Working Group includes a commitment to report on the implementation and execution plans for ICRF3 during the XXIX General Assembly of the IAU along with a targeted completion and presentation of ICRF3 in 2018 to the XXX General Assembly for adoption. This talk will discuss the background, purpose, and overall implementation plan for ICRF3, and motivate the concept, currently under consideration by the ICRF3 Working Group, that future realizations of the ICRF be based on multi-frequency astrometric data, starting with ICRF3.

  13. ICRF Plasma Loading Comparison of Calculations to Measurements in VX-10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Squire, J. P.; Chang-Diaz, F. R.; Ilin, A. V.; Jacobson, V. T.; Glover, T. W.; McCaskill, G. E.; Baity, F. W.; Carter, M. D.; Goulding, R. H.

    2003-10-01

    The VASIMR propulsion concept accelerates ions using ion cyclotron resonance. ICRF power is applied to an antenna on the high field side of the fundamental resonance. The antenna is designed to launch the Ion Cyclotron Wave (ICW) primarily downstream to the resonance in the flowing plasma. Such an antenna has been installed in the VX-10 experiment for low power testing on a flowing helicon discharge with a high degree of ionization. Plasma loading measurements at about 2 MHz are made with a tuned resonant high Q circuit and an HP network analyzer. Measurements with up to 1.5 kW of applied power are also made. Plasma conditions are held constant from shot-to-shot while the tuned frequency is scanned. This scan is repeated for several different parameters, e.g. magnetic field strength, magnetic polarity, discharge species (D2, He and Ar), and plasma density. Results from a reduced order calculation agree well with experiment and illustrate the significance of the Doppler shift. Measured plasma loading as compared to calculation will be presented and discussed.

  14. The Position/Structure Stability of Four ICRF2 Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fomalont, Ed; Johnston, Kenneth; Fey, Alan; Boboltz, Dave; Oyama, Tomoaki; Honma, Mareki

    2010-01-01

    Four compact radio sources in the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF2) catalog were observed using phase referencing with the VLBA at 43, 23, and 8.6-GHz, and with VERA at 23-GHz over a one-year period. The goal was to determine the stability of the radio cores and to assess structure effects associated with positions in the ICRF2. Conclusions are: (1) 43-GHz VLBI high-resolution observations are often needed to determine the location of the radio core. (2) Over the observing period, the relative positions among the four radio cores were constant to 0.02 mas, suggesting that once the true radio core is identified, it remains stationary in the sky to this accuracy. (3) The emission in 0556+238, one of the four sources investigated and one of the 295 ICRF2 defining sources, was dominated by a strong component near the core and moved 0.1 mas during the year. (4) Comparison of the VLBA images at 43, 23, and 8.6-GHz with the ICRF2 positions suggests that the 8-GHz structure is often dominated by a bright non-core component. The measured ICRF2 position can be displaced more than 0.5 mas from the radio core and partake in the motion of the bright jet component.

  15. Correlation between excitation of Alfven modes and degradation of ICRF heating efficiency in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Bernabei, S.; Chang, Z.; Darrow, D.

    1997-05-01

    Alfven modes are excited by energetic ions in TFTR during intense minority ICRF heating. There is a clear threshold in rf power above which the modes are destabilized. The net effect of these modes is the increase of the fast ion losses, with an associated saturation of the ion tail energy and of the efficiency of the heating. Typically, several modes are excited with progressive n-numbers, with frequencies in the neighborhood of 200 kHz. Results suggest that Energetic Particle Modes (EPM), mostly unseen by the Mirnov coils, are generated near the center and are responsible for the ion losses. Stronger global TAE modes, which are destabilized by the stream of displaced fast ions, appear responsible only for minor losses.

  16. Linking the Planetary Ephemerides to the ICRF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folkner, William; Kuchynka, Petr

    2012-08-01

    An extensive campaign of very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) and range measurements of spacecraft in orbit about Mars have been performed by the NASA Deep Space Network since 1999 in order to support increasingly stringent targeting for spacecraft landings at Mars. The measurement campaign has intensified in the last few years leading up to the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) landing on Mars in August 2012. MSL requires that the orbit of Mars with respect to Earth be determined with an accuracy better than 300 meters. As a result of the measurement campaign, the orientation of the orbits of the Earth and Mars with respect to the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) has been determined with an accuracy of 0.1 milli - arcseconds. The distances from the Earth to the Sun are estimated to have uncertainties of a few meters for several centuries about the current epoch. The improved ephemeris of the Earth provides an accurate reference for pulsar timing experiments. The accuracies of the orbits of Mercury, Venus, and Saturn have been recently improved from measurements of the MESSENGER, Venus Express, and Cassini spacecraft respectively. The current planetary observation sets and residuals to fitted ephemerides will be described. The next major improvement in the planetary ephemerides is expected to come with the arrival of the Juno mission at Jupiter in 2016.

  17. Benchmarking ICRF Full-wave Solvers for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    R. V. Budny, L. Berry, R. Bilato, P. Bonoli, M. Brambilla, R. J. Dumont, A. Fukuyama, R. Harvey, E. F. Jaeger, K. Indireshkumar, E. Lerche, D. McCune, C. K. Phillips, V. Vdovin, J. Wright, and members of the ITPA-IOS

    2011-01-06

    Abstract Benchmarking of full-wave solvers for ICRF simulations is performed using plasma profiles and equilibria obtained from integrated self-consistent modeling predictions of four ITER plasmas. One is for a high performance baseline (5.3 T, 15 MA) DT H-mode. The others are for half-field, half-current plasmas of interest for the pre-activation phase with bulk plasma ion species being either hydrogen or He4. The predicted profiles are used by six full-wave solver groups to simulate the ICRF electromagnetic fields and heating, and by three of these groups to simulate the current-drive. Approximate agreement is achieved for the predicted heating power for the DT and He4 cases. Factor of two disagreements are found for the cases with second harmonic He3 heating in bulk H cases. Approximate agreement is achieved simulating the ICRF current drive.

  18. Bulk ion heating with ICRF waves in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Mantsinen, M. J.; Bilato, R.; Bobkov, V. V.; Kappatou, A.; McDermott, R. M.; Odstrčil, T.; Tardini, G.; Bernert, M.; Dux, R.; Maraschek, M.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Ryter, F.; Stober, J.; Nocente, M.; Hellsten, T.; Mantica, P.; Tardocchi, M.; Nielsen, S. K.; Rasmussen, J.; Stejner, M.; and others

    2015-12-10

    Heating with ICRF waves is a well-established method on present-day tokamaks and one of the heating systems foreseen for ITER. However, further work is still needed to test and optimize its performance in fusion devices with metallic high-Z plasma facing components (PFCs) in preparation of ITER and DEMO operation. This is of particular importance for the bulk ion heating capabilities of ICRF waves. Efficient bulk ion heating with the standard ITER ICRF scheme, i.e. the second harmonic heating of tritium with or without {sup 3}He minority, was demonstrated in experiments carried out in deuterium-tritium plasmas on JET and TFTR and is confirmed by ICRF modelling. This paper focuses on recent experiments with {sup 3}He minority heating for bulk ion heating on the ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) tokamak with ITER-relevant all-tungsten PFCs. An increase of 80% in the central ion temperature T{sub i} from 3 to 5.5 keV was achieved when 3 MW of ICRF power tuned to the central {sup 3}He ion cyclotron resonance was added to 4.5 MW of deuterium NBI. The radial gradient of the T{sub i} profile reached locally values up to about 50 keV/m and the normalized logarithmic ion temperature gradients R/LT{sub i} of about 20, which are unusually large for AUG plasmas. The large changes in the T{sub i} profiles were accompanied by significant changes in measured plasma toroidal rotation, plasma impurity profiles and MHD activity, which indicate concomitant changes in plasma properties with the application of ICRF waves. When the {sup 3}He concentration was increased above the optimum range for bulk ion heating, a weaker peaking of the ion temperature profile was observed, in line with theoretical expectations.

  19. Experimental Study of Convective Cells and RF Sheaths Excited by a Fast Wave Antenna in the LAPD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Michael; Gekelman, Walter; Pribyl, Patrick; van Compernolle, Bart; Carter, Troy; van Eester, Dirk; Crombé, Kristel

    2016-10-01

    Ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) will be essential for ITER where it is planned to couple 20 MW to the plasma. During ICRH, radio frequency (RF) sheaths may form on the antenna or farther away, and convective cells are suspected to form adjacent to ICRH antennas, negatively affecting both machine and plasma performance. The LAPD (ne 10 12 - 13cm-3 , Te 1-10 eV, B0 0.4 to 2 kG, diameter 60 cm, length 17m) is an ideal device for performing detailed experiments to fully diagnose these phenomena. A 200 kW RF system capable of pulsing at the 1 Hz. rep. rate of the LAPD and operating from 2 to 2.5 MHz has been constructed to perform such studies. B0 can be adjusted so that this encompasses the 1st to 7th harmonic of fci in H plasmas. Emissive, Mach, Langmuir, and B-field probes measured plasma potential, bulk plasma flows, wave patterns, ne, and Te in 2D planes at various axial locations from the antenna. Plasma potential enhancements of up to 90 V along magnetic field lines connected to the antenna and induced ExB flows consistent in structure with convective cells were observed. Details of these observations along with power scaling of RF sheath voltage and convective cell flows will be presented.

  20. Characterization and performance of a field aligned ion cyclotron range of frequency antenna in Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    Wukitch, S. J.; Garrett, M. L.; Ochoukov, R.; Terry, J. L.; Hubbard, A.; Labombard, B.; Lau, C.; Lin, Y.; Lipschultz, B.; Miller, D.; Reinke, M. L.; Whyte, D.; Collaboration: Alcator C-Mod Team

    2013-05-15

    Ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) heating is expected to provide auxiliary heating for ITER and future fusion reactors where high Z metallic plasma facing components (PFCs) are being considered. Impurity contamination linked to ICRF antenna operation remains a major challenge particularly for devices with high Z metallic PFCs. Here, we report on an experimental investigation to test whether a field aligned (FA) antenna can reduce impurity contamination and impurity sources. We compare the modification of the scrape of layer (SOL) plasma potential of the FA antenna to a conventional, toroidally aligned (TA) antenna, in order to explore the underlying physics governing impurity contamination linked to ICRF heating. The FA antenna is a 4-strap ICRF antenna where the current straps and antenna enclosure sides are perpendicular to the total magnetic field while the Faraday screen rods are parallel to the total magnetic field. In principle, alignment with respect to the total magnetic field minimizes integrated E|| (electric field along a magnetic field line) via symmetry. A finite element method RF antenna model coupled to a cold plasma model verifies that the integrated E|| should be reduced for all antenna phases. Monopole phasing in particular is expected to have the lowest integrated E||. Consistent with expectations, we observed that the impurity contamination and impurity source at the FA antenna are reduced compared to the TA antenna. In both L and H-mode discharges, the radiated power is 20%–30% lower for a FA-antenna heated discharge than a discharge heated with the TA-antennas. However, inconsistent with expectations, we observe RF induced plasma potentials (via gas-puff imaging and emissive probes to be nearly identical for FA and TA antennas when operated in dipole phasing). Moreover, the highest levels of RF-induced plasma potentials are observed using monopole phasing with the FA antenna. Thus, while impurity contamination and sources are indeed

  1. Characterization and performance of a field aligned ion cyclotron range of frequency antenna in Alcator C-Moda)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wukitch, S. J.; Garrett, M. L.; Ochoukov, R.; Terry, J. L.; Hubbard, A.; Labombard, B.; Lau, C.; Lin, Y.; Lipschultz, B.; Miller, D.; Reinke, M. L.; Whyte, D.; Alcator C-Mod Team

    2013-05-01

    Ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) heating is expected to provide auxiliary heating for ITER and future fusion reactors where high Z metallic plasma facing components (PFCs) are being considered. Impurity contamination linked to ICRF antenna operation remains a major challenge particularly for devices with high Z metallic PFCs. Here, we report on an experimental investigation to test whether a field aligned (FA) antenna can reduce impurity contamination and impurity sources. We compare the modification of the scrape of layer (SOL) plasma potential of the FA antenna to a conventional, toroidally aligned (TA) antenna, in order to explore the underlying physics governing impurity contamination linked to ICRF heating. The FA antenna is a 4-strap ICRF antenna where the current straps and antenna enclosure sides are perpendicular to the total magnetic field while the Faraday screen rods are parallel to the total magnetic field. In principle, alignment with respect to the total magnetic field minimizes integrated E|| (electric field along a magnetic field line) via symmetry. A finite element method RF antenna model coupled to a cold plasma model verifies that the integrated E|| should be reduced for all antenna phases. Monopole phasing in particular is expected to have the lowest integrated E||. Consistent with expectations, we observed that the impurity contamination and impurity source at the FA antenna are reduced compared to the TA antenna. In both L and H-mode discharges, the radiated power is 20%-30% lower for a FA-antenna heated discharge than a discharge heated with the TA-antennas. However, inconsistent with expectations, we observe RF induced plasma potentials (via gas-puff imaging and emissive probes to be nearly identical for FA and TA antennas when operated in dipole phasing). Moreover, the highest levels of RF-induced plasma potentials are observed using monopole phasing with the FA antenna. Thus, while impurity contamination and sources are indeed

  2. Control and Data Acquisition System for KSTAR ICRF

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S. J.; Kwak, J. G.

    2009-11-26

    An ICRF discharge cleaning and a plasma heating experiment were performed in KSTAR toka-mak. For an automated operation and the diagnostics of the ICRF system, the ICRF local network was designed and implemented. This internal network provides monitoring, RF protection, remote control and RF diagnostics. All the functions of the control system were realized by customized DSP units. The DSP units were tied by a local network in parallel. For RF diagnostics, a detector based on digital I/Q demodulation technique was fabricated. The I/Q detector collects the RF amplitude and phase at the same time without errors from I/Q imbalance inherent in an analog counterpart. During the first experimental campaign of the KSTAR tokamak, the control system was operated as expected without any major problems such as affecting the tokamak operation. The transmitter was protected from the harmful over-voltage events through a reliable operation of the system. Details of ICRF control system and RF detecting technique with a brief experimental result will be presented.

  3. Modeling of high power ICRF heating experiments on TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, C.K.; Wilson, J.R.; Bell, M.; Fredrickson, E.; Hosea, J.C.; Majeski, R.; Ramsey, A.; Rogers, J.H.; Schilling, G.; Skinner, C.; Stevens, J.E.; Taylor, G.; Wong, K.L. . Plasma Physics Lab.); Khudaleev, A.; Petrov, M.P. ); Murakami, M. )

    1993-01-01

    Over the past two years, ICRF heating experiments have been performed on TFTR in the hydrogen minority heating regime with power levels reaching 11.2 MW in helium-4 majority plasmas and 8.4 MW in deuterium majority plasmas. For these power levels, the minority hydrogen ions, which comprise typically less than 10% of the total electron density, evolve into la very energetic, anisotropic non-Maxwellian distribution. Indeed, the excess perpendicular stored energy in these plasmas associated with the energetic minority tail ions is often as high as 25% of the total stored energy, as inferred from magnetic measurements. Enhanced losses of 0.5 MeV protons consistent with the presence of an energetic hydrogen component have also been observed. In ICRF heating experiments on JET at comparable and higher power levels and with similar parameters, it has been suggested that finite banana width effects have a noticeable effect on the ICRF power deposition. In particular, models indicate that finite orbit width effects lead to a reduction in the total stored energy and of the tail energy in the center of the plasma, relative to that predicted by the zero banana width models. In this paper, detailed comparisons between the calculated ICRF power deposition profiles and experimentally measured quantities will be presented which indicate that significant deviations from the zero banana width models occur even for modest power levels (P[sub rf] [approximately] 6 MW) in the TFTR experiments.

  4. Modeling of high power ICRF heating experiments on TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, C.K.; Wilson, J.R.; Bell, M.; Fredrickson, E.; Hosea, J.C.; Majeski, R.; Ramsey, A.; Rogers, J.H.; Schilling, G.; Skinner, C.; Stevens, J.E.; Taylor, G.; Wong, K.L.; Khudaleev, A.; Petrov, M.P.; Murakami, M.

    1993-04-01

    Over the past two years, ICRF heating experiments have been performed on TFTR in the hydrogen minority heating regime with power levels reaching 11.2 MW in helium-4 majority plasmas and 8.4 MW in deuterium majority plasmas. For these power levels, the minority hydrogen ions, which comprise typically less than 10% of the total electron density, evolve into la very energetic, anisotropic non-Maxwellian distribution. Indeed, the excess perpendicular stored energy in these plasmas associated with the energetic minority tail ions is often as high as 25% of the total stored energy, as inferred from magnetic measurements. Enhanced losses of 0.5 MeV protons consistent with the presence of an energetic hydrogen component have also been observed. In ICRF heating experiments on JET at comparable and higher power levels and with similar parameters, it has been suggested that finite banana width effects have a noticeable effect on the ICRF power deposition. In particular, models indicate that finite orbit width effects lead to a reduction in the total stored energy and of the tail energy in the center of the plasma, relative to that predicted by the zero banana width models. In this paper, detailed comparisons between the calculated ICRF power deposition profiles and experimentally measured quantities will be presented which indicate that significant deviations from the zero banana width models occur even for modest power levels (P{sub rf} {approximately} 6 MW) in the TFTR experiments.

  5. IVS Observation of ICRF2-Gaia Transfer Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Bail, K.; Gipson, J. M.; Gordon, D.; MacMillan, D. S.; Behrend, D.; Thomas, C. C.; Bolotin, S.; Himwich, W. E.; Baver, K. D.; Corey, B. E.; Titus, M.; Bourda, G.; Charlot, P.; Collioud, A.

    2016-03-01

    The second realization of the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF2), which is the current fundamental celestial reference frame adopted by the International Astronomical Union, is based on Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) data at radio frequencies in X band and S band. The European Space Agency’s Gaia mission, launched on 2013 December 19, started routine scientific operations in 2014 July. By scanning the whole sky, it is expected to observe ∼500,000 Quasi Stellar Objects in the optical domain an average of 70 times each during the five years of the mission. This means that, in the future, two extragalactic celestial reference frames, at two different frequency domains, will coexist. It will thus be important to align them very accurately. In 2012, the Laboratoire d’Astrophysique de Bordeaux (LAB) selected 195 sources from ICRF2 that will be observed by Gaia and should be suitable for aligning the radio and optical frames: they are called ICRF2-Gaia transfer sources. The LAB submitted a proposal to the International VLBI Service (IVS) to regularly observe these ICRF2-Gaia transfer sources at the same rate as Gaia observes them in the optical realm, e.g., roughly once a month. We describe our successful effort to implement such a program and report on the results. Most observations of the ICRF2-Gaia transfer sources now occur automatically as part of the IVS source monitoring program, while a subset of 37 sources requires special attention. Beginning in 2013, we scheduled 25 VLBI sessions devoted in whole or in part to measuring these 37 sources. Of the 195 sources, all but one have been successfully observed in the 12 months prior to 2015 September 01. Of the sources, 87 met their observing target of 12 successful sessions per year. The position uncertainties of all of the ICRF2-Gaia transfer sources have improved since the start of this observing program. For a subset of 24 sources whose positions were very poorly known, the uncertainty

  6. 2-dimensional mapping of ICRF-induced scrape-off layer modifications with a retarding field analyser on ASDEX-Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colas, L.; Bobkov, V.; Carralero, D.; Kočan, M.; Müller, H. W.; Manz, P.; Kubič, M.; Gunn, J. P.; Herrmann, A.; Rohde, V.; ASDEX-Upgrade Team

    2014-02-01

    Using a reciprocating Retarding Field Analyser (RFA), Scrape-Off Layer (SOL) modifications were investigated on ASDEX-Upgrade during heating with waves in the Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF), suspected for enhanced impurity production in this all-metal machine. Two quantities involved in the sputtering were measured: the current Islit on a saturated slit plate, proportional to the parallel ion flux and the mean parallel energy t of collected ions, averaged over many RF cycles. Combining multiple RFA reciprocations over a scan of q95 provided 2D poloidal/radial resolution. In the outer SOL a localized RF-perturbed zone was evidenced on the RFA side magnetically connected to an active ICRF antenna. A flat 2D Islit pattern surrounded by steep gradients was observed, correlatively with t exceeding 150eV. The centre of the zone is connected radially slightly behind the leading edge of antenna side limiters, with a radial extension up to ±2cm. The zone is broadest and t is largest near the bottom of the active antenna. This is interpreted as a zone of local plasma biasing via sheath rectification, creating density convection around it. The Islit pattern is qualitatively consistent with simple considerations about E×B particle convection.

  7. Development of Scientific Simulation 3D Full Wave ICRF Code for Stellarators and Heating/CD Scenarios Development

    SciTech Connect

    Vdovin V.L.

    2005-08-15

    In this report we describe theory and 3D full wave code description for the wave excitation, propagation and absorption in 3-dimensional (3D) stellarator equilibrium high beta plasma in ion cyclotron frequency range (ICRF). This theory forms a basis for a 3D code creation, urgently needed for the ICRF heating scenarios development for the operated LHD, constructed W7-X, NCSX and projected CSX3 stellarators, as well for re evaluation of ICRF scenarios in operated tokamaks and in the ITER . The theory solves the 3D Maxwell-Vlasov antenna-plasma-conducting shell boundary value problem in the non-orthogonal flux coordinates ({Psi}, {theta}, {var_phi}), {Psi} being magnetic flux function, {theta} and {var_phi} being the poloidal and toroidal angles, respectively. All basic physics, like wave refraction, reflection and diffraction are self consistently included, along with the fundamental ion and ion minority cyclotron resonances, two ion hybrid resonance, electron Landau and TTMP absorption. Antenna reactive impedance and loading resistance are also calculated and urgently needed for an antenna -generator matching. This is accomplished in a real confining magnetic field being varying in a plasma major radius direction, in toroidal and poloidal directions, through making use of the hot dense plasma wave induced currents with account to the finite Larmor radius effects. We expand the solution in Fourier series over the toroidal ({var_phi}) and poloidal ({theta}) angles and solve resulting ordinary differential equations in a radial like {Psi}-coordinate by finite difference method. The constructed discretization scheme is divergent-free one, thus retaining the basic properties of original equations. The Fourier expansion over the angle coordinates has given to us the possibility to correctly construct the ''parallel'' wave number k{sub //}, and thereby to correctly describe the ICRF waves absorption by a hot plasma. The toroidal harmonics are tightly coupled with each

  8. Use of .sup.3 He.sup.30 + ICRF minority heating to simulate alpha particle heating

    DOEpatents

    Post, Jr., Douglass E.; Hwang, David Q.; Hovey, Jane

    1986-04-22

    Neutron activation due to high levels of neutron production in a first heated deuterium-tritium plasma is substantially reduced by using Ion Cyclotron Resonance Frequency (ICRF) heating of energetic .sup.3 He.sup.++ ions in a second deuterium-.sup.3 He.sup.++ plasma which exhibit an energy distribution and density similar to that of alpha particles in fusion reactor experiments to simulate fusion alpha particle heating in the first plasma. The majority of the fast .sup.3 He.sup.++ ions and their slowing down spectrum can be studied using either a modulated hydrogen beam source for producing excited states of He.sup.+ in combination with spectrometers or double charge exchange with a high energy neutral lithium beam and charged particle detectors at the plasma edge. The maintenance problems thus associated with neutron activation are substantially reduced permitting energetic alpha particle behavior to be studied in near term large fusion experiments.

  9. Measurements of ICRF (ion cyclotron range of frequencies) loading with a ridged waveguide coupler on PLT

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, G.J.; Wilson, J.R.; Colestock, P.L.; Fortgang, C.M.; Hosea, J.C.; Hwang, D.Q.; Nagy, A.

    1987-11-01

    An ICRF ridged waveguide coupler has been installed on PLT for measurements of plasma loading. The coupler was partially filled with TiO/sub 2/ dielectric in order to sufficiently lower the cutoff frequency and utilized a tapered ridge for improved matching. Vacuum field measurements indicated a single propagating mode in the coupler and emphasized the importance of considering the fringing fields at the mouth of the waveguide. Low power experiments were carried out at 72.6 and 95.0 MHz without any external impedance matching network. Plasma loading increased rapidly as the face of the coupler approached the plasma, and, at fixed position, increased with line-averaged plasma density. At the lower frequency, the reflection coefficient exhibited a minimum (<8%) at a particular coupler position. At both frequencies, measurements indicated efficient power coupling to the plasma. Magnetic probe signals showed evidence of dense eigenmodes suggesting excitation of the fast wave. 24 refs., 13 figs.

  10. Fast wave power flow along SOL field lines in NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, R. J.; Bell, R. E.; Diallo, A.; Gerhardt, S.; Hosea, J. C.; Jaworski, M. A.; Leblanc, B. P.; Kramer, G. J.; Phillips, C. K.; Roquemore, L.; Taylor, G.; Wilson, J. R.; Ahn, J.-W.; Gray, T. K.; Green, D. L.; McLean, A.; Maingi, R.; Ryan, P. M.; Jaeger, E. F.; Sabbagh, S.

    2012-10-01

    On NSTX, a major loss of high-harmonic fast wave (HHFW) power can occur along open field lines passing in front of the antenna over the width of the scrape-off layer (SOL). Up to 60% of the RF power can be lost and at least partially deposited in bright spirals on the divertor floor and ceiling [1,2]. The flow of HHFW power from the antenna region to the divertor is mostly aligned along the SOL magnetic field [3], which explains the pattern of heat deposition as measured with infrared (IR) cameras. By tracing field lines from the divertor back to the midplane, the IR data can be used to estimate the profile of HHFW power coupled to SOL field lines. We hypothesize that surface waves are being excited in the SOL, and these results should benchmark advanced simulations of the RF power deposition in the SOL (e.g., [4]). Minimizing this loss is critical optimal high-power long-pulse ICRF heating on ITER while guarding against excessive divertor erosion.[4pt] [1] J.C. Hosea et al., AIP Conf Proceedings 1187 (2009) 105. [0pt] [2] G. Taylor et al., Phys. Plasmas 17 (2010) 056114. [0pt] [3] R.J. Perkins et al., to appear in Phys. Rev. Lett. [0pt] [4] D.L. Green et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107 (2011) 145001.

  11. Analysis And Design Of Antennas Facing Cylindrical Plasma Columns With TOPCYL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guadamuz, S.; Graswinckel, M. F.; Koch, R.; Maggiora, R.; Van De Pol, M.; Vietti, G.; Van Rooij, G.

    2011-12-01

    On recent years TOPICA[1] has shown its capabilities as a designing tool for ICRF antennas on tokamaks, handling both the realistic geometrical detail of the structure as well as a complete description of the plasma region behavior. Now, expanding these capabilities, the TOrino Polythecnic CYLindrical code (TOPCYL) has been added in order to simulate antennas facing cylindrical plasma columns. This feature allows the analysis and design of RF heating systems for applications as VASIMR-like plasma thrusters and plasma-surface-interaction (PSI) experiments. In the present work, the theoretical basis and implementation of TOPCYL is presented, as well as the results obtained on simulating antennas for the ICRF and 2,45 GHz regimes.

  12. VizieR Online Data Catalog: VLBI ICRF2 (Fey+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fey, A. L.; Gordon, D.; Jacobs, C. S.; Ma, C.; Gaume, R. A.; Arias, E. F.; Bianco, G.; Boboltz, D. A.; Bockmann, S.; Bolotin, S.; Charlot, P.; Collioud, A.; Engelhardt, G.; Gipson, J.; Gontier, A.-M.; Heinkelmann, R.; Kurdubov, S.; Lambert, S.; Lytvyn, S.; MacMillan, D. S.; Malkin, Z.; Nothnagel, A.; Ojha, R.; Skurikhina, E.; Sokolova, J.; Souchay, J.; Sovers, O. J.; Tesmer, V.; Titov, O.; Wang, G.; Zharov, V.

    2016-01-01

    We present the second realization of the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF2) at radio wavelengths using nearly 30 years of Very Long Baseline Interferometry observations. The earliest observations used are from 1979 August and the latest are from 2009 March. ICRF2 consists of accurate positions of 295 new "defining" sources and positions of 3119 additional compact radio sources to densify the frame. ICRF2 has more than 5 times as many sources as ICRF1 (Ma et al. 1997, cat. I/251), is roughly 5-6 times more accurate, and is nearly twice as stable in the orientation of its axes. (3 data files).

  13. Simulations of gas puff effects on edge density and ICRF coupling in ASDEX upgrade using EMC3-Eirene

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, W.; Lunt, T.; Bobkov, V.; Coster, D.; Brida, D.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Jacquet, P.; Feng, Y.

    2015-12-10

    Simulations were carried out with the 3D plasma transport code EMC3-EIRENE, to study the deuterium gas (D{sub 2}) puff effects on edge density and the coupling of Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequency (ICRF) power in ASDEX Upgrade. Firstly we simulated an inter-ELM phase of an H-mode discharge with a moderate (1.2 × 10{sup 22} electrons/s) lower divertor gas puff. Then we changed the gas source positions to the mid-plane or top of machine while keeping other conditions the same. Cases with different mid-plane or top gas valves are investigated. Our simulations indicate that compared to lower divertor gas puffing, the mid-plane gas puff can enhance the local density in front of the antennas most effectively, while a rather global (toroidally uniform) but significantly smaller enhancement is found for top gas puffing. Our results show quantitative agreement with the experiments.

  14. Long-Term Variations of the EOP and ICRF2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zharov, Vladimir; Sazhin, Mikhail; Sementsov, Valerian; Sazhina, Olga

    2010-01-01

    We analyzed the time series of the coordinates of the ICRF radio sources. We show that part of the radio sources, including the defining sources, shows a significant apparent motion. The stability of the celestial reference frame is provided by a no-net-rotation condition applied to the defining sources. In our case this condition leads to a rotation of the frame axes with time. We calculated the effect of this rotation on the Earth orientation parameters (EOP). In order to improve the stability of the celestial reference frame we suggest a new method for the selection of the defining sources. The method consists of two criteria: the first one we call cosmological and the second one kinematical. It is shown that a subset of the ICRF sources selected according to cosmological criteria provides the most stable reference frame for the next decade.

  15. Ion radial transport induced by ICRF waves in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L.; Vaclavik, J.; Hammett, G.W.

    1987-05-01

    The wave-induced fluxes of energetic-trapped ions during ICRF heating of tokamak plasmas are calculated using quasilinear equations. A simple single particle model of this transport mechanism is also given. Both a convective flux proportional to k/sub phi/vertical bar E/sub +/vertical bar/sup 2/ and a diffusive flux proportional to k/sub phi//sup 2/vertical bar E/sub +/vertical bar/sup 2/ are found. Here, k/sub phi/ is the toroidal wave number and E/sub +/ is the left-hand polarized wave field. The convective flux may become significant for large k/sub phi/ if the wave spectrum is asymmetric in k/sub phi/. But for the conditions of most previous experiments, these calculations indicate that radial transport driven directly by the ICRF wave is unimportant.

  16. Potential of ion cyclotron resonance frequency current drive via fast waves in DEMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazakov, Ye O.; Van Eester, D.; Wauters, T.; Lerche, E.; Ongena, J.

    2015-02-01

    For the continuous operation of future tokamak-reactors like DEMO, non-inductively driven toroidal plasma current is needed. Bootstrap current, due to the pressure gradient, and current driven by auxiliary heating systems are currently considered as the two main options. This paper addresses the current drive (CD) potential of the ion cyclotron resonance frequency (ICRF) heating system in DEMO-like plasmas. Fast wave CD scenarios are evaluated for both the standard midplane launch and an alternative case of exciting the waves from the top of the machine. Optimal ICRF frequencies and parallel wave numbers are identified to maximize the CD efficiency. Limitations of the high frequency ICRF CD operation are discussed. A simplified analytical method to estimate the fast wave CD efficiency is presented, complemented with the discussion of its dependencies on plasma parameters. The calculated CD efficiency for the ICRF system is shown to be similar to those for the negative neutral beam injection and electron cyclotron resonance heating.

  17. The Position/Structure Stability of Four ICRF2 Sources

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    and may also reflect the motion of the jet component. Future astrometric efforts to determine a more accurate quasar reference frame at 23 and 43 GHz...words: astrometry – quasars : general – radio continuum: galaxies – surveys 1. MOTIVATION FOR THE EXPERIMENT The second realization of the...the ICRF2 catalog ( quasars and galaxies) is dominated by a strong compact radio component (called the radio core) with a size ɘ.1 mas. This radio

  18. Improved simulation of the ICRF waves in the VASIMR plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilin, Andrew V.; Chang Díaz, Franklin R.; Squire, Jared P.; Tarditi, Alfonso G.; Carter, Mark D.

    2004-12-01

    This paper describes the recent developments in the modeling of the ICRF heating process in the VASIMR plasma using the EMIR code. The latest upgrade of the EMIR model involves a calculation of the parallel electric field component with a warm plasma conductivity model and considers the Doppler shift effect. The code now gives a much more accurate and a more physical solution than in the previous version, but requires a more advanced solver.

  19. Observation of Central Toroidal Rotation Induced by ICRF on EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Xiayun; Wang, Fudi; Zhang, Xinjun; Lyu, Bo; Chen, Jun; Li, Yingying; Fu, Jia; Shi, Yuejiang; Yu, Yi; Ye, Minyou; Wan, Baonian

    2016-02-01

    Core plasma rotation of both L-mode and H-mode discharges with ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) minority heating (MH) scheme was measured with a tangential X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer on EAST (Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak). Co-current central impurity toroidal rotation change was observed in ICRF-heated L- and H-mode plasmas. Rotation increment as high as 30 km/s was generated at ∼1.7 MW ICRF power. Scaling results showed similar trend as the Rice scaling but with significant scattering, especially in L-mode plasmas. We varied the plasma current, toroidal field and magnetic configuration individually to study their effect on L-mode plasma rotation, while keeping the other major plasma parameters and heating unchanged during the scanning. It was found that larger plasma current could induce plasma rotation more efficiently. A scan of the toroidal magnetic field indicated that the largest rotation was obtained for on-axis ICRF heating. A comparison between lower-single-null (LSN) and double-null (DN) configurations showed that LSN discharges rendered a larger rotation change for the same power input and plasma parameters. supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (Nos. 2013GB112004 and 2015GB103002), National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11175208, 11305212, 11375235, 11405212 and 11261140328), the Innovative Program of Development Foundation of Hefei Center for Physical Science and Technology (2014FXCX003) and Brain Korea 21 Program for Leading Universities & Students (BK21 PLUS)

  20. High Power RF Transmitters for ICRF Applications on EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Yuzhou; Yuan, Shuai; Zhao, Yanping; Zhang, Xinjun; Chen, Gen; Kumazawa, R.; Cheng, Yan; Wang, Lei; Ju, Songqing; Deng, Xu; Qin, Chengming; Yang, Lei

    2013-03-01

    An Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequency (ICRF) system with a radio frequency (RF) power of 4 × 1.5 MW was developed for the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST). High RF power transmitters were designed as a part of the research and development (R&D) for an ICRF system with long pulse operation at megawatt levels in a frequency range of 25 MHz to 70 MHz. Studies presented in this paper cover the following parts of the high power transmitter: the three staged high power amplifier, which is composed of a 5 kW wideband solid state amplifier, a 100 kW tetrode drive stage amplifier and a 1.5 MW tetrode final stage amplifier, and the DC high voltage power supply (HVPS). Based on engineering design and static examinations, the RF transmitters were tested using a matched dummy load where an RF output power of 1.5 MW was achieved. The transmitters provide 6 MW RF power in primary phase and will reach a level up to 12 MW after a later upgrade. The transmitters performed successfully in stable operations in EAST and HT-7 devices. Up to 1.8 MW of RF power was injected into plasmas in EAST ICRF heating experiments during the 2010 autumn campaign and plasma performance was greatly improved.

  1. Theoretical analysis of the EAST 4-strap ion cyclotron range of frequency antenna with variational theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jia-Hui; Zhang, Xin-Jun; Zhao, Yan-Ping; Qin, Cheng-Ming; Chen, Zhao; Yang, Lei; Wang, Jian-Hua

    2016-08-01

    A variational principle code which can calculate self-consistently currents on the conductors is used to assess the coupling characteristic of the EAST 4-strap ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) antenna. Taking into account two layers of antenna conductors without lateral frame but with slab geometry, the antenna impedances as a function of frequency and the structure of RF field excited inside the plasma in various phasing cases are discussed in this paper. Project supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program, China (Grant No. 2015GB101001) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11375236 and 11375235).

  2. Aircraft antennas/conformal antennas missile antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solbach, Klaus

    1987-04-01

    Three major areas of airborne microwave antennas are examined. The basic system environment for missile telemetry/telecommand and fuze functions is sketched and the basic antenna design together with practical examples are discussed. The principle requirements of modern nose radar flat plate antennas are shown to result from missile/aircraft system requirements. Basic principles of slotted waveguide antenna arrays are sketched and practical antenna designs are discussed. The present early warning system designs are sketched to point out requirements and performance of practical radar warning and jamming antennas (broadband spiral antennas and horn radiators). With respect to newer developments in the ECM scenario, some demonstrated and proposed antenna systems (lens fed arrays, phased array, active array) are discussed.

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The epoch ICRF (Xu+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, M. H.; Wang, G. L.; Zhao, M.

    2014-04-01

    The epoch International Celestial Reference Frame (epoch ICRF) is proposed as a new concept in order to consider the effect of apparent proper motion of the position of a radio source due to acceleration of the spatial origin of the ICRF, the centre of mass of the Solar system. This apparent proper motion has a magnitude of approximately 5.8-microarcsec (μas) per year, and for the 30-year very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observational history these position variations will exceed 100μas. We show that the dipole structure of the apparent proper motions leads to global rotation in the ICRF2 and the main term, the shift of direction of the origin of right ascension, reaches 25μas per century. The 'epoch ICRF' is constructed using epoch positions at J2000.0 and apparent proper motions of radio sources, which are reported here for 295 ICRF2-defining sources. (1 data file).

  4. ICRF heating in reactor grade plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Jacquinot, J.; Bhatnagar, V.P.; Bures, M.; Cottrell, G.A.; Eriksson, L.G.; Sack, C.H.; Start, D.F.H.; Taroni, A. ); Hellsten, T. ); Koch, R. ); Moreau, D. )

    1990-01-01

    Impurity influxes in JET discharges due to ICRH have been reduced to insignificant levels. This has allowed high quality H-modes to be produced with ICRH alone and has enhanced the density limit which is now the same as the NBI limit. Improvement in the deuterium fuel fraction has led to the generation of 100kW of non thermal {sup 3}He-D fusion power. Alpha-particle simulations using MeV ions created by ICRH show classical energy loss and suggest that {alpha}-heating in a reactor will be highly efficient. A clear demonstration of TTMP damping of the fast wave in high beta plasmas has been achieved. A broadband ICRH system is proposed for NET/ITER which will allow fast wave current drive and central ion heating for burn control and ignition. 10 refs., 6 figs.

  5. LHCD and ICRF heating experiments in H-mode plasmas on EAST

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X. J.; Zhao, Y. P.; Wan, B. N.; Ding, B. J.; Xu, G. S.; Gong, X. Z.; Li, J. G.; Lin, Y.; Wukitch, S.; Taylor, G.; Noterdaeme, J. M.; Braun, F.; Magne, R.; Litaudon, X.; Kumazawa, R.; Kasahara, H.; Collaboration: EAST Team

    2014-02-12

    An ICRF system with power up to 6.0 MW and a LHCD system up to 4MW have been applied for heating and current drive experiments on EAST. Intensive lithium wall coating was intensively used to reduce particle recycling and Hydrogen concentration in Deuterium plasma, which is needed for effective ICRF and LHCD power absorption in high density plasmas. Significant progress has been made with ICRF heating and LHW current drive for realizing the H-mode plasma operation in EAST. In 2010, H-mode was generated and sustained by LHCD alone, where lithium coating and gas puffing launcher mouth were applied to improve the LHCD power coupling and penetration into the core plasmas at high density of H-modes. During the last two experimental campaigns, ICRF Heating experiments were carried out at the fixed frequency of 27MHz, achieving effective ions and electrons heating with the H Minority Heating (H-MH) mode, where electrons are predominantly heated by collisions with high energy minority ions. The H-MH mode gave the best plasma performance, and realized H-mode alone in 2012. Combination of ICRF and LHW power injection generated the H-mode plasmas with various ELMy characteristics. The first successful application of the ICRF Heating in the D (He3) plasma was also achieved. The progress on ICRF heating, LHCD experiments and their application in achieving H-mode operation from last two years will be discussed in this report.

  6. SciDAC Center for Simulation of Wave-Plasma Interactions - Iterated Finite-Orbit Monte Carlo Simulations with Full-Wave Fields for Modeling Tokamak ICRF Wave Heating Experiments - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Myunghee; Chan, Vincent S.

    2014-02-28

    This final report describes the work performed under U.S. Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement DE-FC02-08ER54954 for the period April 1, 2011 through March 31, 2013. The goal of this project was to perform iterated finite-orbit Monte Carlo simulations with full-wall fields for modeling tokamak ICRF wave heating experiments. In year 1, the finite-orbit Monte-Carlo code ORBIT-RF and its iteration algorithms with the full-wave code AORSA were improved to enable systematical study of the factors responsible for the discrepancy in the simulated and the measured fast-ion FIDA signals in the DIII-D and NSTX ICRF fast-wave (FW) experiments. In year 2, ORBIT-RF was coupled to the TORIC full-wave code for a comparative study of ORBIT-RF/TORIC and ORBIT-RF/AORSA results in FW experiments.

  7. International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF): mantenimiento y extensión

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, C.; Arias, E. F.; Eubanks, T.; Fey, A. L.; Gontier, A.-M.; Jacobs, C. S.; Sovers, O. J.; Archinal, B. A.; Charlot, P.

    A partir de enero de 1998 el sistema de referencia celeste convencional está representado por el International Celestial Reference System (ICRS) y materializado a través de las coordenadas VLBI del conjunto de radiofuentes extragalácticas que conforman el International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF). La primera realización del ICRF, fue elaborada en 1995 por un grupo de expertos designado por la IAU, la que encomendó al International Earth Rotation Service el mantenimiento del ICRS, del ICRF y del vínculo con marcos de referencia en otras frecuencias. Una primera extensión del ICRF se realizó entre abril y junio de 1999, con el objetivo primario de proveer posiciones de radiofuentes extragalácticas observadas a partir de julio de 1995 y de mejorar las posiciones de las fuentes ``candidatas" con la inclusión de observaciones adicionales. Objetivos secundarios fueron monitorear a las radiofuentes para verificar que siguen siendo adecuadas para realizar al ICRF y mejorar las técnicas de análisis de datos. Como resultado del nuevo análisis se obtuvo una solución a partir de la cual se construyó la primera extensión del ICRF, denominada ICRF - Ext.1. Ella representa al ICRS, sus fuentes de definición se mantienen con las mismas posiciones y errores que en la primera realización del ICRF; las demás radiofuentes tienen coordenadas mejor determinadas que en ICRF; el marco de referencia se densificó con el agregado de 59 nuevas radiofuentes.

  8. Deployable antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Patrick W. (Inventor); Dobbins, Justin A. (Inventor); Lin, Greg Y. (Inventor); Chu, Andrew W. (Inventor); Scully, Robert C. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A deployable antenna and method for using wherein the deployable antenna comprises a collapsible membrane having at least one radiating element for transmitting electromagnetic waves, receiving electromagnetic waves, or both.

  9. User Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jamnejad, Vahraz; Cramer, Paul

    1990-01-01

    The following subject areas are covered: (1) impact of frequency change of user and spacecraft antenna gain and size; (2) basic personal terminal antennas (impact of 20/30 GHz frequency separation; parametric studies - gain, size, weight; gain and figure of merit (G/T); design data for selected antenna concepts; critical technologies and development goals; and recommendations); and (3) user antenna radiation safety concerns.

  10. Joint European Torus results with both fast and lower-hybrid wave consequences for future devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquinot, J.; Bures, M.

    1992-07-01

    Heating and current drive studies were performed during the JET [Phys Fluids B 3, 2209 (1991)] 1990/91 operation using two large systems capable of generating either fast waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) or slow waves at a frequency above the lower-hybrid resonance (LH). The maximum wave power coupled to the torus reached 22 MW for ICRH and 2.4 MW for LH. The results obtained in plasma heating experiments qualify ICRH as a prime candidate for heating reactor grade plasmas. A centrally localized deposition profile in the cyclotron damping regime was demonstrated in a wide range of plasma density resulting in (i) record value nd τE Ti0 ≂ 7.8 × 1020 m-3 sec keV in ``thermal'' conditions Ti = Te ≂ 11 keV at high central densities generated by pellet injection; (ii) large normalized confinement 2.5 ≤ τE/τGoldston≤4. The large values of τE/τGoldston are reached in H-mode discharges (I≤1.5 MA) with large bootstrap current fraction IBS/I ≤ 0.7 ± 0.2; (iii) the highest to date D-3He fusion power (140 kW) generated with 10-14 MW of ICRH in the L-mode regime at the 3He cyclotron frequency. All specific impurity generations have been reduced to negligible levels by proper antenna design and the generic difficulty of wave-plasma coupling has been greatly reduced using feedback loops controlling in real time the antenna circuits and the plasma position. Current drive efficiencies γ=ICDR/P ≂ 0.4 × 1020 m-2 A/W have been reached in 1.5 MA L-mode plasma with zero loop voltage by combining LHCD and ICRH. Fast electrons are driven by LHCD alone to tail temperatures of up to 70 keV. The fast electron density is peaked in the plasma center at lower densities (ne0 ≤ 2.6 × 1019 m-3) and high field (Bφ ˜ 3.1 T). In these conditions, the fast electrons are further accelerated (even at zero loop voltage) to tail temperatures above 150 keV by heating the plasma with ICRF in monopole phasing. Direct electron damping of the fast wave on the

  11. Reconfigurable antenna pattern verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drexler, Jerome P. (Inventor); Becker, Robert C. (Inventor); Meyers, David W. (Inventor); Muldoon, Kelly P. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method of verifying programmable antenna configurations is disclosed. The method comprises selecting a desired antenna configuration from a plurality of antenna configuration patterns, with the selected antenna configuration forming at least one reconfigurable antenna from reconfigurable antenna array elements. The method validates the formation of the selected antenna configuration to determine antenna performance of the at least one reconfigurable antenna.

  12. Plasma-Surface Interactions and RF Antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Thomas; Smithe, D. N.; Beckwith, K.; Davidson, B. D.; Kruger, S. E.; Pankin, A. Y.; Roark, C. M.

    2015-11-01

    Implementation of recently developed finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) modeling techniques on high-performance computing platforms allows RF power flow, and antenna near- and far-field behavior, to be studied in realistic experimental ion-cyclotron resonance heating scenarios at previously inaccessible levels of resolution. We present results and 3D animations of high-performance (10k-100k core) FDTD simulations of Alcator C-Mod's field-aligned ICRF antenna on the Titan supercomputer, considering (a) the physics of slow wave excitation in the immediate vicinity of the antenna hardware and in the scrape-off layer for various edge densities, and (b) sputtering and impurity production, as driven by self-consistent sheath potentials at antenna surfaces. Related research efforts in low-temperature plasma modeling, including the use of proper orthogonal decomposition methods for PIC/fluid modeling and the development of plasma chemistry tools (e.g. a robust and flexible reaction database, principal path reduction analysis capabilities, and improved visualization options), will also be summarized. Supported by U.S. DoE SBIR Phase I/II Award DE-SC0009501 and ALCC/OLCF.

  13. Acceleration of Dense Flowing Plasmas using ICRF Power in the VASIMR Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Squire, Jared P.

    2005-09-01

    ICRF power in the Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR) concept energizes ions (> 100 eV) in a diverging magnetic field to accelerate a dense (˜ 1019 m-3) flowing plasma to velocities useful for space propulsion (˜100 km/s). Theory predicts that an ICRF slow wave launched from the high field side of the resonance will propagate in the magnetic beach to absorb nearly all of the power at the resonance, thus efficiently converting the RF power to ion kinetic energy. The plasma flows through the resonance only once, so the ions are accelerated in a single pass. This process has proven efficient (˜ 70%) with an ICRF power level of 1.5 kW at about 3.6 MHz in the VASIMR experiment, VX-30, using deuterium plasma created by a helicon operating in flowing mode. We have measured ICRF plasma loading up to 2 ohms, consistent with computational predictions made using Oak Ridge National Laboratory's EMIR code. Recent helicon power upgrades (20 kW at 13.56 MHz) have enabled a 5 cm diameter target plasma for ICRF with an ion flux of over 3×10 20 s-1 and a high degree of ionization. This paper summarizes our ICRF results and presents the latest helicon developments in VX-30.

  14. Acceleration of Dense Flowing Plasmas using ICRF Power in the VASIMR Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Squire, Jared P.

    2005-09-26

    ICRF power in the Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR) concept energizes ions (> 100 eV) in a diverging magnetic field to accelerate a dense ({approx} 1019 m-3) flowing plasma to velocities useful for space propulsion ({approx}100 km/s). Theory predicts that an ICRF slow wave launched from the high field side of the resonance will propagate in the magnetic beach to absorb nearly all of the power at the resonance, thus efficiently converting the RF power to ion kinetic energy. The plasma flows through the resonance only once, so the ions are accelerated in a single pass. This process has proven efficient ({approx} 70%) with an ICRF power level of 1.5 kW at about 3.6 MHz in the VASIMR experiment, VX-30, using deuterium plasma created by a helicon operating in flowing mode. We have measured ICRF plasma loading up to 2 ohms, consistent with computational predictions made using Oak Ridge National Laboratory's EMIR code. Recent helicon power upgrades (20 kW at 13.56 MHz) have enabled a 5 cm diameter target plasma for ICRF with an ion flux of over 3x10 20 s-1 and a high degree of ionization. This paper summarizes our ICRF results and presents the latest helicon developments in VX-30.

  15. Modelling of ICRF heating in DEMO with special emphasis on bulk ion heating

    SciTech Connect

    Gallart, Dani; Mantsinen, Mervi; Kazakov, Yevgen

    2015-12-10

    Ion cyclotron resonance frequency (ICRF) heating is one of the auxiliary heating schemes presently envisaged for ITER and DEMO. In this paper we analyse the potential of ICRF waves to heat the fuel ions in DEMO. Our analysis is carried out for the DEMO1 Reference Scenario from October 2013 (B = 6.8 T, I = 18.6 MA, R = 9.25 m, a = 2.64 m) optimized for a maximum pulse length of 2.3 hrs using the ICRF modelling codes PION and TORIC. We focus on second harmonic heating of tritium and fundamental minority heating of {sup 3}He ions (with a few percent of {sup 3}He) in a 50%:50% D-T plasma. The dependence of the ICRF characteristics and the ICRF-accelerated ions on the ICRF and plasma parameters is investigated, giving special attention to the DEMO design point at a core plasma temperature of 30 keV and an electron density of 1.2·10{sup 20} m{sup −3}.

  16. A predictive transport modeling code for ICRF-heated tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, C.K.; Hwang, D.Q. . Plasma Physics Lab.); Houlberg, W.; Attenberger, S.; Tolliver, J.; Hively, L. )

    1992-02-01

    In this report, a detailed description of the physic included in the WHIST/RAZE package as well as a few illustrative examples of the capabilities of the package will be presented. An in depth analysis of ICRF heating experiments using WHIST/RAZE will be discussed in a forthcoming report. A general overview of philosophy behind the structure of the WHIST/RAZE package, a summary of the features of the WHIST code, and a description of the interface to the RAZE subroutines are presented in section 2 of this report. Details of the physics contained in the RAZE code are examined in section 3. Sample results from the package follow in section 4, with concluding remarks and a discussion of possible improvements to the package discussed in section 5.

  17. Role of magnetic field tangency points in ICRF sheath interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Myra, J. R.; D'Ippolito, D. A.; Kohno, H.

    2014-02-12

    ICRF waves can sometimes interact with plasma-facing surfaces in tokamak fusion experiments causing degradation of core heating efficiency, impurity injection and even component damage. While presently available low dimensionality rf sheath models are useful in understanding many features of these interactions, more quantitative modeling will require attention to realistic geometrical details of the boundary plasma and surfaces. In this paper, we explore the situation in which there exists a tangency point of the background magnetic field with a surface. We find that the rf interactions are strongly influenced by the generation and propagation of sheath-plasma waves (SPW) along the surface. It is found that these waves preferentially propagate towards, and accumulate at, a convex tangency point. An analytical theory of SPW propagation is developed to understand these features.

  18. Electrochemically Programmable Plasmonic Antennas.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shi; Zhang, Kai; Yu, Zhiping; Fan, Jonathan A

    2016-07-26

    Plasmonic antennas are building blocks in advanced nano-optical systems due to their ability to tailor optical response based on their geometry. We propose an electrochemical approach to program the optical properties of dipole antennas in a scalable, fast, and energy-efficient manner. These antennas comprise two arms, one serving as an anode and the other a cathode, separated by a solid electrolyte. As a voltage is applied between the antenna arms, a conductive filament either grows or dissolves within the electrolyte, modifying the antenna load. We probe the dynamics of stochastic filament formation and their effects on plasmonic mode programming using a combination of three-dimensional optical and electronic simulations. In particular, we identify device operation regimes in which the charge-transfer plasmon mode can be programmed to be "on" or "off." We also identify, unexpectedly, a strong correlation between DC filament resistance and charge-transfer plasmon mode frequency that is insensitive to the detailed filament morphology. We envision that the scalability of our electrochemical platform can generalize to large-area reconfigurable metamaterials and metasurfaces for on-chip and free-space applications.

  19. Active antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, John F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An antenna, which may be a search coil, is connected to an operational amplifier circuit which provides negative impedances, each of which is in the order of magnitude of the positive impedances which characterize the antenna. The antenna is connected to the inverting input of the operational amplifier; a resistor is connected between the inverting input and the output of the operational amplifier; a capacitor-resistor network, in parallel, is connected between the output and the noninverting input of the operational amplifier; and a resistor is connected from the noninverting input and the circuit common. While this circuit provides a negative resistance and a negative inductance, in series, which appear, looking into the noninverting input of the operational amplifier, in parallel with the antenna, these negative impedances appear in a series loop with the antenna positive impedances, so as to algebraically add. This circuit is tuned by varying the various circuit components so that the negative impedances are very close, but somewhat less, in magnitude, to the antenna impedances. The result is to increase the sensitivity of the antenna by lowering its effective impedance. This, in turn, increases the effective area of the antenna, which may be broadband.

  20. Study of the effects of corrugated wall structures due to blanket modules around ICRH antennas

    SciTech Connect

    Dumortier, Pierre; Louche, Fabrice; Messiaen, André; Vervier, Michel

    2014-02-12

    In future fusion reactors, and in ITER, the first wall will be covered by blanket modules. These blanket modules, whose dimensions are of the order of the ICRF wavelengths, together with the clearance gaps between them will constitute a corrugated structure which will interact with the electromagnetic waves launched by ICRF antennas. The conditions in which the grooves constituted by the clearance gaps between the blanket modules can become resonant are studied. Simple analytical models and numerical simulations show that mushroom type structures (with larger gaps at the back than at the front) can bring down the resonance frequencies, which could lead to large voltages in the gaps between the blanket modules and perturb the RF properties of the antenna if they are in the ICRF operating range. The effect on the wave propagation along the wall structure, which is acting as a spatially periodic (toroidally and poloidally) corrugated structure, and hence constitutes a slow wave structure modifying the wall boundary condition, is examined.

  1. Notch Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Richard Q.

    2004-01-01

    Notch antennas, also known as the tapered slot antenna (TSA), have been the topics of research for decades. TSA has demonstrated multi-octave bandwidth, moderate gain (7 to 10 dB), and symmetric E- and H- plane beam patterns and can be used for many different applications. This chapter summarizes the research activities on notch antennas over the past decade with emphasis on their most recent advances and applications. This chapter begins with some discussions on the designs of single TSA; then follows with detailed discussions of issues associated with TSA designs and performance characteristics. To conclude the chapter, some recent developments in TSA arrays and their applications are highlighted.

  2. Nonlinear Effects in Single-Pass ICRF Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arefiev, A. V.; Breizman, B. N.

    1999-01-01

    The Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR) concept employs Ion Cyclotron Resonant Frequency (ICRF) heating as the main power deposition mechanism. Since the ions accelerate to the full energy in a single pass through the cyclotron resonance, their response to the RF-field will be essentially nonlinear - hence the motivation to amend the commonly used linear approach to the problem. In a collisionless plasma, the energy gain of an accelerated ion is limited by the time the particle spends at the resonance. This time is affected by: (1) incident flow velocity, (2) longitudinal grad B force, (3) ambipolar electric field, and (4) ponderomotive force of the RF-field. Our analysis shows that the grad B force is the dominant factor at low to moderate levels of RF-power. We present nonlinear scaling for the energy gain and the absorption efficiency with RF-power and plasma parameters. We also demonstrate that the nonlinear regime exhibits a steep decrease in the plasma density at the resonance.

  3. Fast ion JET diagnostics: confinement and losses

    SciTech Connect

    Kiptily, V. G.; Pinches, S. D.; Sharapov, S. E.; Syme, D. B.; Cecconello, M.; Darrow, D.; Hill, K.; Goloborod'ko, V.; Yavorskij, V.; Johnson, T.; Murari, A.; Reich, M.; Gorini, G.; Zoita, V.

    2008-03-12

    A study of magnetically confined fast ions in tokamaks plays an important role in burning plasma research. To reach ignition and steady burning of a reactor plasma an adequate confinement of energetic ions produced by NBI heating, accelerated with ICRF and born in fusion reactions is essential to provide efficient heating of the bulk plasma. Thus, investigation of the fast ion behaviour is an immediate task for present-day large machines, such as JET, in order to understand the main mechanisms of slowing down, redistribution and losses, and to develop optimal plasma scenarios. Today's JET has an enhanced suite of fast ion diagnostics both of confined and lost ions that enable to significantly contribute to this important area of research. Fast ion populations of p, d, t, {sup 3}He and {sup 4}He, made with ICRF, NBI, and fusion reactions have been investigated in experiments on JET with sophisticated diagnostics in conventional and shear-reversed plasmas, exploring a wide range of effects. This paper will introduce to the JET fast-ion diagnostic techniques and will give an overview of recent observations. A synergy of the unique diagnostic set was utilised in JET, and studies of the response of fast ions to MHD modes (e.g. tornado modes, sawtooth crashes), fast {sup 3}He-ions behaviour in shear-reversed plasmas are impressive examples of that. Some results on fast ion losses in JET experiments with various levels of the toroidal field ripple will be demonstrated.

  4. Design, performance, and grounding aspects of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor ion cyclotron range of frequencies antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Durodié, F. Dumortier, P.; Vrancken, M.; Messiaen, A.; Huygen, S.; Louche, F.; Van Schoor, M.; Vervier, M.; Winkler, K.

    2014-06-15

    ITER's Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF) system [Lamalle et al., Fusion Eng. Des. 88, 517–520 (2013)] comprises two antenna launchers designed by CYCLE (a consortium of European associations listed in the author affiliations above) on behalf of ITER Organisation (IO), each inserted as a Port Plug (PP) into one of ITER's Vacuum Vessel (VV) ports. Each launcher is an array of 4 toroidal by 6 poloidal RF current straps specified to couple up to 20 MW in total to the plasma in the frequency range of 40 to 55 MHz but limited to a maximum system voltage of 45 kV and limits on RF electric fields depending on their location and direction with respect to, respectively, the torus vacuum and the toroidal magnetic field. A crucial aspect of coupling ICRF power to plasmas is the knowledge of the plasma density profiles in the Scrape-Off Layer (SOL) and the location of the RF current straps with respect to the SOL. The launcher layout and details were optimized and its performance estimated for a worst case SOL provided by the IO. The paper summarizes the estimated performance obtained within the operational parameter space specified by IO. Aspects of the RF grounding of the whole antenna PP to the VV port and the effect of the voids between the PP and the Blanket Shielding Modules (BSM) surrounding the antenna front are discussed. These blanket modules, whose dimensions are of the order of the ICRF wavelengths, together with the clearance gaps between them will constitute a corrugated structure which will interact with the electromagnetic waves launched by ICRF antennas. The conditions in which the grooves constituted by the clearance gaps between the blanket modules can become resonant are studied. Simple analytical models and numerical simulations show that mushroom type structures (with larger gaps at the back than at the front) can bring down the resonance frequencies, which could lead to large voltages in the gaps between the blanket modules and perturb the

  5. Preliminary Clinical Assessment of I.C.R.F. 159 in Acute Leukaemia and Lymphosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Hellmann, K.; Newton, K. A.; Whitmore, D. N.; Hanham, I. W. F.; Bond, Jane V.

    1969-01-01

    I.C.R.F. 159, a new antitumour agent, has been assessed in six patients with acute leukaemia and three with lymphosarcoma. In all but two there was a considerable fall in circulating primitive cells, and in one there was bone-marrow evidence of a partial remission. Severe toxic effects were seen in only one case; they consisted of alopecia and gastroenteritis. It is suggested that I.C.R.F. 159 is worth further examination in all forms of acute leukaemia and lymphosarcoma. PMID:5251696

  6. Statistical comparison of ICRF and NBI heating performance in JET-ILW L-mode plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lerche, E.; Van Eester, D.; Jacquet, Ph.; Mayoral, M.-L.; Graham, M.; Matthews, G.; Monakhov, I.; Rimini, F.; Colas, L.; Czarnecka, A.; Vries, P. de; Collaboration: JET-EFDA Contributors

    2014-02-12

    After the change over from the C-wall to the ITER-like Be/W wall (ILW) in JET, the radiation losses during ICRF heating have increased and are now substantially larger than those observed with NBI at the same power levels, in spite of the similar global plasma energies reached with the two heating systems. A comparison of the NBI and ICRF performances in the JET-ILW experiments, based on a statistical analysis of ∼3000 L-mode discharges, will be presented.

  7. Optical Spectra of Candidate International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) Flat-spectrum Radio Sources. III.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, O.; Pursimo, T.; Johnston, Helen M.; Stanford, Laura M.; Hunstead, Richard W.; Jauncey, David L.; Zenere, Katrina A.

    2017-04-01

    In extending our spectroscopic program, which targets sources drawn from the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) Catalog, we have obtained spectra for ∼160 compact, flat-spectrum radio sources and determined redshifts for 112 quasars and radio galaxies. A further 14 sources with featureless spectra have been classified as BL Lac objects. Spectra were obtained at three telescopes: the 3.58 m European Southern Observatory New Technology Telescope, and the two 8.2 m Gemini telescopes in Hawaii and Chile. While most of the sources are powerful quasars, a significant fraction of radio galaxies is also included from the list of non-defining ICRF radio sources.

  8. Electrical Design of an ICRF System for Ignitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggiora, R.; Vecchi, G.; Riccitelli, M.; Carter, M. D.

    1996-11-01

    A system of 6 antennae is designed for ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) in Ignitor. The coupling properties of each antenna are calculated by using a two-dimensional slab model to obtain the parameters necessary to model the current strap as a trasmission line then using the calculated current profile in a three-dimensional simulation (the codes have been developed at ORNL). The antenna consists of 4 loop (straps) to form a 2×2 poloidal and toroidal phased array; in our proposal each strap is fed by a coaxial cable, an adapter and a RF power generator. The power spectrum of the radiated parallel index is optimized for out-of-phasing in order to obtain a high heating efficiency and a high loading resistance. The predicted loading and "effective" resistance is sufficient for ICRH experiments with 4.0 MW of power injected in the plasma by each antenna as long as the distance between the Faraday shield and plasma separatrix surface is smaller than 4.0 cm. The maximum RF voltage in the system is 50.0 kV which is limited by generator power and coaxial cable dimensions. The development of a self-consistent integral-equation code is presently under way to analyze geometry effects on the antenna performances. Sponsored by ENEA, CNR, and ASP of Italy, and by the US DoE

  9. Advances in High-Harmonic Fast Wave Physics in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Gary

    2009-11-01

    Improved core high-harmonic fast wave (HHFW) heating, particularly at longer wavelengths and during low-density start-up and current ramp-up, has now been obtained by lowering the edge density with lithium conditioning, thereby moving the propagation onset away from the vessel wall. Significant core electron heating of deuterium neutral beam injection (NBI) fuelled H-modes has been observed for the first time over a range of launched wavelengths. The observed broadening of the electron heating profile in H-mode relative to L-mode plasmas is consistent with simulations obtained with ray tracing and full wave models. Newly taken camera images indicate that fast wave interactions can deposit considerable RF energy on the outboard divertor plate, especially at longer wavelengths that begin to propagate closer to the vessel walls. Edge power loss can also arise from HHFW-generated parametric decay instabilities that drive ions in the edge onto direct loss orbits that intersect the wall, and may be the cause for an observed drag on edge toroidal rotation in combined HHFW and NBI discharges. Fast-Ion D-alpha emission clearly shows fast-ion profile broadening in the plasma core that is much greater than predicted by Fokker-Planck modeling when HHFW power is applied to NBI-fuelled plasmas, pointing to the need for a full-orbit treatment in the simulation. Large ELMs have been observed immediately following the termination of RF power, whether the power turn off is programmed or due to antenna arcing. RF power has been successfully applied during large ELMs by setting the source reflection coefficient trip levels to relatively high values -- an approach potentially important for ITER ICRF heating. Plans for an HHFW ELM-resilience upgrade will be presented.

  10. High-performance finite-difference time-domain simulations of C-Mod and ITER RF antennas

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, Thomas G. Smithe, David N.

    2015-12-10

    Finite-difference time-domain methods have, in recent years, developed powerful capabilities for modeling realistic ICRF behavior in fusion plasmas [1, 2, 3, 4]. When coupled with the power of modern high-performance computing platforms, such techniques allow the behavior of antenna near and far fields, and the flow of RF power, to be studied in realistic experimental scenarios at previously inaccessible levels of resolution. In this talk, we present results and 3D animations from high-performance FDTD simulations on the Titan Cray XK7 supercomputer, modeling both Alcator C-Mod’s field-aligned ICRF antenna and the ITER antenna module. Much of this work focuses on scans over edge density, and tailored edge density profiles, to study dispersion and the physics of slow wave excitation in the immediate vicinity of the antenna hardware and SOL. An understanding of the role of the lower-hybrid resonance in low-density scenarios is emerging, and possible implications of this for the NSTX launcher and power balance are also discussed. In addition, we discuss ongoing work centered on using these simulations to estimate sputtering and impurity production, as driven by the self-consistent sheath potentials at antenna surfaces.

  11. High-performance finite-difference time-domain simulations of C-Mod and ITER RF antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Thomas G.; Smithe, David N.

    2015-12-01

    Finite-difference time-domain methods have, in recent years, developed powerful capabilities for modeling realistic ICRF behavior in fusion plasmas [1, 2, 3, 4]. When coupled with the power of modern high-performance computing platforms, such techniques allow the behavior of antenna near and far fields, and the flow of RF power, to be studied in realistic experimental scenarios at previously inaccessible levels of resolution. In this talk, we present results and 3D animations from high-performance FDTD simulations on the Titan Cray XK7 supercomputer, modeling both Alcator C-Mod's field-aligned ICRF antenna and the ITER antenna module. Much of this work focuses on scans over edge density, and tailored edge density profiles, to study dispersion and the physics of slow wave excitation in the immediate vicinity of the antenna hardware and SOL. An understanding of the role of the lower-hybrid resonance in low-density scenarios is emerging, and possible implications of this for the NSTX launcher and power balance are also discussed. In addition, we discuss ongoing work centered on using these simulations to estimate sputtering and impurity production, as driven by the self-consistent sheath potentials at antenna surfaces.

  12. Poloidal variation of high-Z impurity density in Alcator C-Mod ICRF-heated plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinke, Matthew

    2012-10-01

    The poloidal variation of molybdenum density is measured in the core of ICRF-heated Alcator C-Mod plasmas and found to exhibit strong in/out asymmetries. Existing neoclassical parallel impurity transport theory is extended to include the effects of fast-ions and is shown to agree quantitatively with C-Mod measurements. The flux-surface variation of molybdenum is well described by nz(θ)/=1+nz,c cos(θ)+nz,ssin(θ), where -0.2 < nz,c/ < 0.3 and -0.1 < nz,s/ < 0.1 are observed over a wide range of Ohmic, L/I-mode and EDA H-mode plasmas for r/a < 0.9. The in/out asymmetry, nz,c/, is determined by a combination of centrifugal force due to toroidal rotation, leading to low-field side (LFS) accumulation, and poloidal electric fields sustained by magnetic trapping of cyclotron heated minority ions, leading to high field side (HFS) accumulation. While LFS accumulation due to centrifugal effects has been seen on other tokamaks, this represents the first observation of the effect driven entirely by intrinsic rotation. Scans of the D(H) resonance layer are shown to modify the in/out asymmetry by altering the fast-ion temperature anisotropy, T-/T||, and changing the ICRF power density, PRF/ne, either by ramping down the input power or increasing the density is found to reduce HFS accumulation. Observations of up/down asymmetries nz,s/, of molybdenum density are found to disagree with existing theories in the trace limit, nzZ^2/ni 1, in the collisionless main-ion regime. The link between nz(θ) and poloidal rotation, vθ, is emphasized, as both are assumed to be determined by neoclassical parallel impurity transport, and a more rigorous test of theory which includes matching asymmetries and vθ is discussed. The use of the poloidal variation in nz as a diagnostic for Eθ and T-/T|| as well as the impact of nz,c/ on radial transport are also discussed.

  13. ALT-I pump limiter experiments with ICRF heating on TEXTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, W.K.; Goebel, D.M.; Conn, R.W.; Dippel, K.H.; Finken, K.H.; Thomas, G.J.

    1986-05-01

    The ALT-I (Advanced Limiter Test-I) was installed on TEXTOR to benchmark the ability of a pump limiter as an efficient particle collector and to determine the physics of pump limiter operation. Experiments continue to show its capability of removing particles from the plasma edge under different operating conditions. In this paper we report first experimental results using ALT-I in conjunction with high power ICRF heating. The particle removal rate increases as the edge flux and density increase during the ICRF pulse. For a head geometry that collects flux from both electron and ion drift sides, the plasma temperature rise is asymmetric with electron temperature on the electron side increasing more than on the ion side during the ICRF pulse. When ALT-I is the major limiter, the particle fluxes on both sides increase by about the same factor and the particle flux on the ion side is always larger, by a factor of 1.5 to 2 than on the electron side during both ohmic and ICRF periods. The degradation of particle confinement inferred from Langmuir probe measurement is more than a factor of two at a maximum achieved power of 2 MW.

  14. Influence of ICRF 159 and trition WR 1339 on metastases of a rat epithelioma.

    PubMed Central

    Pimm, M. V.; Baldwin, R. W.

    1975-01-01

    ICRF 159 and Triton WR 1339 have been examined for their ability to suppress subcutaneous growth and pulmonary metastases from a transplanted rat epithelioma. Neither compound influenced subcutaneous tumour development or reduced the propensity to metastasize when administered in regimens reported to suppress pulmonary, lymph node or intracerebral metastases in other experimental system. PMID:1156509

  15. Analysis of time series of the EOP and the ICRF source coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zharov, V.; Voronko, N. A.; Shmeleva, N. V.

    2014-12-01

    Software ARIADNA was used for estimation of the Earth orientation parameters (EOP) for period 1984{2012. Simultaneously the time series of the coordinates of the ICRF radio sources were calculated. The least-squares method with constraints is applied. It is shown that most radio sources (including defining sources) are characterized by significant apparent motions.

  16. Search for Suitable ICRF Operation Window for the Shaped H-mode Operation of KSTAR

    SciTech Connect

    Park, B. H.; Kim, J. Y.

    2009-11-26

    KSTAR will try to achieve its 1st shaped H-mode plasma in 2010 campaign. The available power is limited by our plan for auxiliary heating system. Up to 2010, NBI with 1 MW, LHCD 0.5 MW, and ECH with 0.5 MW power will be prepared. To accomplish high beta plasma, TF magnetic field will be reduced to 2 T from rated field of 3.5 T. In this case the ECH contribution to H-mode power threshold requirement is ignorant because the 84 GHz frequency does not meet neither fundamental nor second harmonic resonance in the discharge area. Therefore the ICRF heating should carry out important roll to reach power threshold. The ICRF system of tunable frequency from 30 to 60 MHz will come with 1 MW power in 2010. To maximize the ICRF heating efficiency for H-mode purpose, we try to find suitable condition of ICRF heating parameters through the simulation using by TORIC code. Optimizations of RF frequency, toroidal modes controllable by 4 current straps, and the minority concentration are performed. Possibilities of second harmonic heating of minority and the mode converted heating near resonance layer are also studied.

  17. Stability of the toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes in JT-60U ICRF experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, G.Y.; Cheng, C.Z.; Kimura, H.; Ozeki, T.; Saigusa, M.

    1996-04-01

    It is shown that the stability of toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes (TIE) in JT-60U ICRF experiments is strongly dependent on mode location. This dependence results in sequential excitation of high-n TIE modes as the central safety factor, q, drops in time.

  18. Spinning grating antenna for MMW imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manasson, Vladimir A.; Mino, Robert M.; Sadovnik, Lev S.

    1997-06-01

    MMW Scanning Antenna remains one of the most challenging components in the imaging radar design. Electronically steered antennas require sophisticated fabrication and become prohibitively expensive if a large array is considered. Mechanically scanning antennas typically involve one or more hinged parts (lenses, mirrors or feeds). In operation they experience mechanical acceleration and forces that sharply limit scanning rate. We present test results of a recently developed MMW scanning antenna that is capable of providing a fast linear scan while requiring only continuous constant speed rotation. Two antennas applicable to the aircraft autonomous landing and automotive collision warning systems have been developed. They are characterized by simple design and low fabrication cost. Other antennas modifications based on the evanescent coupling principle are proposed to facilitate various radar functions.

  19. DIRECTIONAL ANTENNA

    DOEpatents

    Bittner, B.J.

    1958-05-20

    A high-frequency directional antenna of the 360 d scaring type is described. The antenna has for its desirable features the reduction in both size and complexity of the mechanism for rotating the antenna through its scanning movement. These advantages result from the rotation of only the driven element, the reflector remaining stationary. The particular antenna structure comprises a refiector formed by a plurality of metallic slats arranged in the configuration of an annular cage having the shape of a zone of revolution. The slats are parallel to each other and are disposed at an angle of 45 d to the axis of the cage. A directional radiator is disposed inside the cage at an angle of 45 d to the axis of the cage in the same direction as the reflecting slats which it faces. As the radiator is rotated, the electromagnetic wave is reflected from the slats facing the radiator and thereafter passes through the cage on the opposite side, since these slats are not parallel with the E vector of the wave.

  20. Influence of mutual coupling between ICRH antenna straps on the load resilience of hybrid couplers

    SciTech Connect

    Lamalle, P. U.; Messiaen, A.

    2007-09-28

    The mutual coupling present between ICRF antenna straps can strongly reduce the performance of quadrature hybrid couplers when used as 'ELM dump' circuits. An analytical study of this effect shows that during resistive ELM-like load perturbations of a matched circuit configuration, the fraction of the reflected power returned to the generator through the hybrid has a lower bound that rapidly increases with the ratio {xi}{approx} (mutual reactance between straps)/(strap input resistance). At very low levels of mutual the reflected power is efficiently diverted to the dummy load. However when {xi} becomes of order 1, which readily occurs at low resistive loading, the load resilience of the quadrature hybrid coupler becomes inhibited. Illustrations based on matching circuit simulations for the JET ITER-like ICRF antenna are presented. The behaviour of the hybrids is found the same with the load resilient 'conjugate T' circuit as in the case of 'classic' tuners. The insertion of decoupling circuits between the tuners and the antenna significantly improves the load resilience.

  1. Influence of mutual coupling between ICRH antenna straps on the load resilience of hybrid couplers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamalle, P. U.; Messiaen, A.

    2007-09-01

    The mutual coupling present between ICRF antenna straps can strongly reduce the performance of quadrature hybrid couplers when used as "ELM dump" circuits. An analytical study of this effect shows that during resistive ELM-like load perturbations of a matched circuit configuration, the fraction of the reflected power returned to the generator through the hybrid has a lower bound that rapidly increases with the ratio ξ˜ (mutual reactance between straps)/(strap input resistance). At very low levels of mutual the reflected power is efficiently diverted to the dummy load. However when ξ becomes of order 1, which readily occurs at low resistive loading, the load resilience of the quadrature hybrid coupler becomes inhibited. Illustrations based on matching circuit simulations for the JET ITER-like ICRF antenna are presented. The behaviour of the hybrids is found the same with the load resilient `conjugate T' circuit as in the case of `classic' tuners. The insertion of decoupling circuits between the tuners and the antenna significantly improves the load resilience.

  2. An algorithm for the analysis of inductive antennas of arbitrary cross-section for heating in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Lehrman, I.S.; Colestock, P.L.

    1986-10-01

    The application of Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequency (ICRF) heating to near ignited plasmas will require launching structures that will be capable of withstanding the harsh plasma environment. The recessed antenna configuration is expected to provide sufficient protection for the structure, but to date no analysis has been done to determine if adequate coupling can be achieved in such a configuration. In this work we present a method for determining the current distribution for the antenna in the direction transverse to current flow and predict antenna loading in the presence of plasma. Antennas of arbitrary cross section are analyzed above ground planes of arbitrary shape. Results from ANDES, the ANtenna DESign code, are presented and compared to experimental results.

  3. Integrated Predictive Models for ICRF-Edge Plasma Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel A. D'Ippolito

    2005-07-20

    The coupling of radiofrequency waves to the edge plasma of a fusion device produces strong nonlinear interactions with the plasma and surrounding material walls which must be controlled in order to protect the antenna and to obtain efficient heating of the core plasma. The goal of the STTR project was to develop the first quantitative numerical simulation of this problem. This report describes the results of the Phase I work by Lodestar and ORNL on this project.

  4. Cell cycle-dependent DNA damage signaling induced by ICRF-193 involves ATM, ATR, CHK2, and BRCA1

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Iha; Avraham, Hava Karsenty . E-mail: havraham@bidmc.harvard.edu

    2006-07-01

    Topoisomerase II is essential for cell proliferation and survival and has been a target of various anticancer drugs. ICRF-193 has long been used as a catalytic inhibitor to study the function of topoisomerase II. Here, we show that ICRF-193 treatment induces DNA damage signaling. Treatment with ICRF-193 induced G2 arrest and DNA damage signaling involving {gamma}-H2AX foci formation and CHK2 phosphorylation. DNA damage by ICRF-193 was further demonstrated by formation of the nuclear foci of 53BP1, NBS1, BRCA1, MDC1, and FANCD2 and increased comet tail moment. The DNA damage signaling induced by ICRF-193 was mediated by ATM and ATR and was restricted to cells in specific cell cycle stages such as S, G2, and mitosis including late and early G1 phases. Downstream signaling of ATM and ATR involved the phosphorylation of CHK2 and BRCA1. Altogether, our results demonstrate that ICRF-193 induces DNA damage signaling in a cell cycle-dependent manner and suggest that topoisomerase II might be essential for the progression of the cell cycle at several stages including DNA decondensation.

  5. Superluminal antenna

    DOEpatents

    Singleton, John; Earley, Lawrence M.; Krawczyk, Frank L.; Potter, James M.; Romero, William P.; Wang, Zhi-Fu

    2017-03-28

    A superluminal antenna element integrates a balun element to better impedance match an input cable or waveguide to a dielectric radiator element, thus preventing stray reflections and consequent undesirable radiation. For example, a dielectric housing material can be used that has a cutout area. A cable can extend into the cutout area. A triangular conductor can function as an impedance transition. An additional cylindrical element functions as a sleeve balun to better impedance match the radiator element to the cable.

  6. Breadboard Signal Processor for Arraying DSN Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jongeling, Andre; Sigman, Elliott; Chandra, Kumar; Trinh, Joseph; Soriano, Melissa; Navarro, Robert; Rogstad, Stephen; Goodhart, Charles; Proctor, Robert; Jourdan, Michael; Rayhrer, Benno

    2008-01-01

    A recently developed breadboard version of an advanced signal processor for arraying many antennas in NASA s Deep Space Network (DSN) can accept inputs in a 500-MHz-wide frequency band from six antennas. The next breadboard version is expected to accept inputs from 16 antennas, and a following developed version is expected to be designed according to an architecture that will be scalable to accept inputs from as many as 400 antennas. These and similar signal processors could also be used for combining multiple wide-band signals in non-DSN applications, including very-long-baseline interferometry and telecommunications. This signal processor performs functions of a wide-band FX correlator and a beam-forming signal combiner. [The term "FX" signifies that the digital samples of two given signals are fast Fourier transformed (F), then the fast Fourier transforms of the two signals are multiplied (X) prior to accumulation.] In this processor, the signals from the various antennas are broken up into channels in the frequency domain (see figure). In each frequency channel, the data from each antenna are correlated against the data from each other antenna; this is done for all antenna baselines (that is, for all antenna pairs). The results of the correlations are used to obtain calibration data to align the antenna signals in both phase and delay. Data from the various antenna frequency channels are also combined and calibration corrections are applied. The frequency-domain data thus combined are then synthesized back to the time domain for passing on to a telemetry receiver

  7. Gaia Data Release 1. Reference frame and optical properties of ICRF sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignard, F.; Klioner, S.; Lindegren, L.; Bastian, U.; Bombrun, A.; Hernández, J.; Hobbs, D.; Lammers, U.; Michalik, D.; Ramos-Lerate, M.; Biermann, M.; Butkevich, A.; Comoretto, G.; Joliet, E.; Holl, B.; Hutton, A.; Parsons, P.; Steidelmüller, H.; Andrei, A.; Bourda, G.; Charlot, P.

    2016-11-01

    Context. As part of the data processing for Gaia Data Release 1 (Gaia DR1) a special astrometric solution was computed, the so-called auxiliary quasar solution. This gives positions for selected extragalactic objects, including radio sources in the second realisation of the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF2) that have optical counterparts bright enough to be observed with Gaia. A subset of these positions was used to align the positional reference frame of Gaia DR1 with the ICRF2. Although the auxiliary quasar solution was important for internal validation and calibration purposes, the resulting positions are in general not published in Gaia DR1. Aims: We describe the properties of the Gaia auxiliary quasar solution for a subset of sources matched to ICRF2, and compare their optical and radio positions at the sub-mas level. Methods: Descriptive statistics are used to characterise the optical data for the ICRF sources and the optical-radio differences. The most discrepant cases are examined using online resources to find possible alternative explanations than a physical optical-radio offset of the quasars. Results: In the auxiliary quasar solution 2191 sources have good optical positions matched to ICRF2 sources with high probability. Their formal standard errors are better than 0.76 milliarcsec (mas) for 50% of the sources and better than 3.35 mas for 90%. Optical magnitudes are obtained in Gaia's unfiltered photometric G band. The Gaia results for these sources are given as a separate table in Gaia DR1. The comparison with the radio positions of the defining sources shows no systematic differences larger than a few tenths of a mas. The fraction of questionable solutions, not readily accounted for by the statistics, is less than 6%. Normalised differences have extended tails requiring case-by-case investigations for around 100 sources, but we have not seen any difference indisputably linked to an optical-radio offset in the sources. Conclusions: With

  8. Plasma heating and generation of energetic ions with novel three-ion ICRF scenarios on Alcator C-Mod and JET tokamak facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazakov, Yevgen

    2016-10-01

    This talk will report the first experimental results of novel three-ion ICRF scenarios (two or more majority ion species and one minority) for plasma heating and generating energetic ions in fusion facilities. The key feature of these scenarios is strong absorption of RF power possible at lower concentrations of minority ions than in two-ion plasmas. Effective plasma heating by injecting a small amount of 3He ions into H-D plasma mixtures with nH /ne 70 % has been successfully demonstrated in Alcator C-Mod and JET tokamaks. In C-Mod, efficient plasma heating was observed for 3He concentrations from 0.4-2%. During the discharges, a strong increase in Alfvén eigenmode activity was found to coincide with the addition of 3He to the H-D plasmas. Even lower 3He concentrations ( 0.2 %) were utilized in recent JET experiments. The potential of the D-(3He) -H scenario for plasma heating and generating MeV-range ions in JET plasmas was confirmed by a set of independent measurements, including stabilization of sawteeth, characteristic γ-ray emission, fast-ion loss detector. Furthermore, toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes with a range of toroidal mode numbers n were detected, which is another indication for the presence of significant population of high-energy 3He ions in a plasma. The discussed mechanism of resonant wave-particle interaction opens up various unexplored opportunities for ICRF system, including new scenarios for plasma heating. Three-ion ICRF scenarios are also relevant for the experimental programme of ITER. The possibility of using intrinsic 9Be impurities as the minority (instead of 3He) was suggested for heating bulk ions in D-T plasmas of JET and ITER, as well as heating trace amounts of 3He and 4He ions in H majority plasmas of ITER. The latest results and simulation comparisons will be presented. On behalf of Alcator C-Mod Team (MIT-PSFC, US) and JET Contributors (Culham, UK). Work supported by the US DOE (C-Mod DE-FC02-99ER54512 and SciDAC DE-FC02-01ER54648

  9. Optical monitoring of extragalactic sources for linking the ICRF and the future Gaia celestial reference frame. I. Variability of ICRF sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taris, F.; Andrei, A.; Klotz, A.; Vachier, F.; Côte, R.; Bouquillon, S.; Souchay, J.; Lambert, S.; Anton, S.; Bourda, G.; Coward, D.

    2013-04-01

    Context. The astrometric mission Gaia of the European Space Agency is scheduled to be launched in 2013. It will provide an astrometric catalog of 500 000 extragalactic sources that could be the basis of a new optical reference frame after the Hipparcos satellite one. On the other hand, the current International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) is based on observations of extragalactic sources at radio wavelength. The astrometric coordinates of sources in these two reference systems will have roughly the same uncertainty. It is then mandatory to observe a set of common targets at both optical and radio wavelengths to link the ICRF with what could be called the Gaia Celestial Reference Frame (GCRF). Aims: The goal of this work is to observe a first set of 70 extragalactic sources at optical wavelengths that could achieve the link with the ICRF. Variations in the light curves of these targets are connected with astrophysical processes that could produce displacements of the optical photocenter. Such displacements, if they exist, are critical in the framework of the link of reference systems. Methods: Four telescopes were used to observe the targets at optical wavelengths. Two of them are located in France, one in Chile, and the last one in Australia. First observations were carried out during one year and a half in the R and V bands. A new method of characterizing the compactness of the targets was applied to the images obtained. Results: This paper presents results for the optical monitoring of extragalactic sources suitable for linking reference systems. We show that a large number of targets in our set are variable at the two observational wavelengths. A short presentation of each object is given, along with some references to earlier photometric studies. A morphological index is defined and applied to the 5000 images obtained during the observation campaign. Conclusions: This work fits into a more general project of astrophotometric and astrophysical studies of

  10. Extending the ICRF to Higher Radio Frequencies: 24 and 43 GHz Astrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, Christopher S.; Charlot, Patrick; Fomalont, Ed B.; Gordon, David; Lanyi, Gabor E.; Ma, Chopo; Naudet, Charles J.; Sovers, Ojars J.; Zhang, Li-Wei D.

    2004-01-01

    We present imaging results and source structure analysis of extragalactic radio sources observed using the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) at 24 GHz and 43 GHz as part of an ongoing NASA, USNO, NRAO and Bordeaux Observatory collaboration to extend the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) to higher radio frequencies. The K/Q-band image database now includes images of 108 sources at 43 GHz (Q-band) and images of 230 sources at 24 GHz (K-band). Preliminary analysis of the observations taken to date shows that the sources are generally more compact as one goes from the ICRF frequency of 8.4 GHz to 24 GHz. This result is consistent with the standard theory of compact extragalactic radio sources and suggests that reference frames defined at these higher radio frequencies will be less susceptible to the effects of intrinsic source structure than those defined at lower frequencies.

  11. Extending the ICRF to Higher Radio Frequencies: Imaging and Source Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boboltz, David A.; Fey, Alan L.; Charlot, Patrick; Fomalont, Edward B.; Lanyi, Gabor E.; Zhang, Li-Wei

    2004-01-01

    We present imaging results and source structure analysis of extragalactic radio sources observed using the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) at 24 GHz and 43 GHz as part of an ongoing NASA, USNO, NRAO and Bordeaux Observatory collaboration to extend the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) to higher radio frequencies. The K/Q-band image database now includes images of 108 sources at 43 GHz (Q-braid) and images of 230 sources at 24 GHz (K-band). Preliminary analysis of the observations taken to date shows that the sources are generally more compact as one goes from the ICRF frequency of 8.4 GHz to 24 GHz. This result is consistent with the standard theory of compact extragalactic radio sources and suggests that reference frames defined at these higher radio frequencies will be less susceptible to the effects of intrinsic source structure than those defined at lower frequencies.

  12. Flexible microstrip antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cano Barrera, Camilo Antonio

    2013-05-01

    Actually the technological community has an interest in developing flexible circuits and antennas with particular characteristics e.g. robust, flexible, lightweight load-bearing, economical and efficient antennas for integrated millimeter wave systems. Microstrip antennas are an excellent solution because those have all the characteristics before mentioned, but they have the problem of being rigid antennas and this makes impossible that those antennas can be use in portable devices. A practical solution is developing flexible microstrip antennas that can be integrated to different devices. One axis of work is the analysis of the electromagnetic field to the microstrip antennas using Bessel function and after generalize for application inflexible microstrip antennas.

  13. Radiation losses in PLT during neutral beam and ICRF heating experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Suckewer, S.; Hinnov, E.; Hwang, D.

    1981-02-01

    Radiation and charge exchange losses in the PLT tokamak are compared for discharges with ohmic heating only (OH), and with additional heating by neutral beams (NB) or RF in the ion cyclotron frequency range (ICRF). Spectroscopic, bolometric and soft x-ray diagnostics were used. The effects of discharge cleaning, vacuum wall gettering, and rate of gas inlet on radiation losses from OH plasmas and the correlation between radiation from plasma core and edge temperatures are discussed.

  14. Steerable optical antennas by selective heating.

    PubMed

    Cuadrado, Alexander; González, Francisco Javier; Alda, Javier

    2014-04-01

    Directional steerability can be obtained for an array of optical antennas through selective heating of the individual elements. Heating changes electrical conductivity of the heated element, which affects the phase of the generated currents. The variation in temperature can be obtained by modifying the biasing point of the individual elements of the array, which would allow fast reconfiguration. The numerical evaluation of the performance of an array of a reduced number of antennas (2 and 3) shows the feasibility of this approach.

  15. Application of the three ion species ICRF scenario to ITER operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, J.; Lin, Y.; Porkolab, M.; Wukitch, S.; Kazakov, Ye. O.; van Eester, D.; Ongena, J.; Jaeger, E. F.

    2016-10-01

    Recent ICRF (ion cyclotron range of frequencies) heating experiments on C-Mod and JET confirm that using a third species as a second minority at fractions of less than a percent, eg D-(3He)-H, can increase heating efficiency and generate very energetic ions on the order of an MeV [Y. Kazakov, invited talk this meeting.] Together with 9Be-(4He)-H scenario, three-ion ICRF schemes are applicable to the pre-activation phase of ITER using trace concentrations of 3He or 4He ( 0.1 %) as a source of energetic ions for confinement studies of pseudo-alphas. During D-T operations, this scheme may be employed to heat intrinsic beryllium impurities for efficient bulk heating. We will briefly review experimental findings on Alcator C-Mod and JET with validated model comparison. Modeling using full wave solvers and Fokker-Planck will be used to determine heating efficiencies ICRF generated ion tail temperatures for ITER. Support from USDoE DOE DE-FC02-01ER54648 (SciDAC Center for Simulation of Wave Plasma Interactions), DE-FC02-99ER54512 (Alcator C-Mod), and DE-FG02-94-ER54235 (Phase Contract Imaging Diagnostic on C-Mod), and EUROfusion Consortium (Grant Number 633053).

  16. On the nonlinear couplings among ICRF waves observed in GAMMA 10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikezoe, R.; Ichimura, M.; Okada, T.; Hirata, M.; Yokoyama, T.; Iwamoto, Y.; Sumida, S.; Takeyama, K.; Jang, S.; Oi, T.; Yoshikawa, M.; Kohagura, J.; Shima, Y.; GAMMA 10 Team

    2014-10-01

    Effective ICRF heating creates high ion-temperature plasma of several kiloelectronvolts and the ion-temperature anisotropy exceeds 10 near the midplane of the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror. In such environment, left-hand polarized Alfven wave becomes unstable overcoming ion-cyclotron damping and so-called Alfven-ion-cyclotron (AIC) wave is spontaneously excited. Density fluctuations associated with AIC waves and ICRF waves for heating have been recently measured by using reflectometers on GAMMA 10. The measured fluctuations show fruitful wave-wave couplings more clearly than magnetic fluctuations measured by pick-up coils at the plasma periphery. The signals showing the axially transported energetic-ion flux and the diamagnetism display apparent effects of such nonlinear couplings on the global energy confinement of GAMMA 10. Bispectral analysis is applied to the density fluctuations and the detailed characteristics of the nonlinear couplings occurring among the AIC waves and ICRF waves for heating in GAMMA 10 are presented. This work is partly supported by a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research from JSPS, Japan (No. 25400531) and by the bidirectional collaborative research programme of the National Institute for Fusion Science, Japan (NIFS14KUGM097).

  17. Adaptive antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, P.

    1987-04-01

    The basic principles of adaptive antennas are outlined in terms of the Wiener-Hopf expression for maximizing signal to noise ratio in an arbitrary noise environment; the analogy with generalized matched filter theory provides a useful aid to understanding. For many applications, there is insufficient information to achieve the above solution and thus non-optimum constrained null steering algorithms are also described, together with a summary of methods for preventing wanted signals being nulled by the adaptive system. The three generic approaches to adaptive weight control are discussed; correlation steepest descent, weight perturbation and direct solutions based on sample matrix conversion. The tradeoffs between hardware complexity and performance in terms of null depth and convergence rate are outlined. The sidelobe cancellor technique is described. Performance variation with jammer power and angular distribution is summarized and the key performance limitations identified. The configuration and performance characteristics of both multiple beam and phase scan array antennas are covered, with a brief discussion of performance factors.

  18. Co-counter asymmetry in fast wave heating and current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Jaeger, E.F.; Carter, M.D.; Berry, L.A.; Batchelor, D.B.; Forest, C.B.; Weitzner, H.

    1997-04-01

    Full wave ICRF coupling models show differences in plasma response when antenna arrays are phase to drive currents and counter to the plasma current. The source of this difference lies in the natural up- sown asymmetry of the antenna`s radiated power spectrum. This asymmetry is due to Hall terms in the wave equation, and occurs even without a poloidal magnetic field. When a poloidal field is included, the up-down asymmetry acquires a toroidal component. The result is that plasma absorption (i.e. antenna loading) is shifted or skewed toward the co-current drive direction, independent of the direction of the magnetic field. When wave are launched to drive current counter the plasma current , electron heating an current profiles are more peaked on axis, and this peaking becomes more pronounce a lower toroidal magnetic fields.

  19. Computer controlled antenna system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raumann, N. A.

    1972-01-01

    The application of small computers using digital techniques for operating the servo and control system of large antennas is discussed. The advantages of the system are described. The techniques were evaluated with a forty foot antenna and the Sigma V computer. Programs have been completed which drive the antenna directly without the need for a servo amplifier, antenna position programmer or a scan generator.

  20. On the Nature of Monster Sawteeth during ICRF Heating

    SciTech Connect

    C.K. Phillips; E.D. Fredrickson; G. Schilling; J.C. Hosea; J.R. Wilson; N.N. Gorelenkov; R. Budny; R. Majeski; S. Bernabei

    1999-05-01

    A correlation between the presence of Energetic Particle Modes and long period sawteeth is explored. The crash of monster sawteeth is explained in terms of the loss of the stabilizing fast particles due to the EPM. High qa discharges, which never develop long period sawteeth, are explained in terms of ion loss due to Toroidal Alfvén Eigenmodes (TAE).

  1. ARISE antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmielewski, Arthur B.; Noca, Muriel; Ulvestad, James

    2000-03-01

    Supermassive black holes are among the most spectacular objects in the Universe, and are laboratories for physics in extreme conditions. Understanding the physics of massive black holes and related phenomena is a primary goal of the ARISE mission. The scientific goals of the mission are described in detail on the ARISE web site http://arise.ipl.nasa.gov and in the ARISE Science Goals document. The following paper, as the title suggests, is not intended to be a comprehensive description of ARISE, but deals only with one aspect of the ARISE mission-the inflatable antenna which is the key element of the ARISE spacecraft. This spacecraft,due to the extensive reliance on inflatables, may be considered as the first generation Gossamer spacecraft

  2. Optical antenna gain. I - Transmitting antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, B. J.; Degnan, J. J.

    1974-01-01

    The gain of centrally obscured optical transmitting antennas is analyzed in detail. The calculations, resulting in near- and far-field antenna gain patterns, assume a circular antenna illuminated by a laser operating in the TEM-00 mode. A simple polynomial equation is derived for matching the incident source distribution to a general antenna configuration for maximum on-axis gain. An interpretation of the resultant gain curves allows a number of auxiliary design curves to be drawn that display the losses in antenna gain due to pointing errors and the cone angle of the beam in the far field as a function of antenna aperture size and its central obscuration. The results are presented in a series of graphs that allow the rapid and accurate evaluation of the antenna gain which may then be substituted into the conventional range equation.

  3. Optical antenna gain. 1: transmitting antennas.

    PubMed

    Klein, B J; Degnan, J J

    1974-09-01

    The gain of centrally obscured optical transmitting antennas is analyzed in detail. The calculations, resulting in near- and far-field antenna gain patterns, assume a circular antenna illuminated by a laser operating in the TEM(00) mode. A simple polynomial equation is derived for matching the incident source distribution to a general antenna configuration for maximum on-axis gain. An interpretation of the resultant gain curves allows a number of auxiliary design curves to be drawn that display the losses in antenna gain due to pointing errors and the cone angle of the beam in the far field as a function of antenna aperture size and its central obscuration. The results are presented in a series of graphs that allow the rapid and accurate evaluation of the antenna gain which may then be substituted into the conventional range equation.

  4. Impulse Testing of Corporate-Fed Patch Array Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, Neil F.

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses a novel method for detecting faults in antenna arrays. The method, termed Impulse Testing, was developed for corporate-fed patch arrays where the element is fed by a probe and is shorted at its center. Impulse Testing was devised to supplement conventional microwave measurements in order to quickly verify antenna integrity. The technique relies on exciting each antenna element in turn with a fast pulse (or impulse) that propagates through the feed network to the output port of the antenna. The resulting impulse response is characteristic of the path through the feed network. Using an oscilloscope, a simple amplitude measurement can be made to detect faults. A circuit model of the antenna elements and feed network was constructed to assess various fault scenarios and determine fault-detection thresholds. The experimental setup and impulse measurements for two patch array antennas are presented. Advantages and limitations of the technique are discussed along with applications to other antenna array topologies

  5. A reconfigurable plasma antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Rajneesh; Bora, Dhiraj

    2010-03-15

    An experiment aimed at investigating the antenna properties of different plasma structures of a plasma column as a reconfigurable plasma antenna, is reported. A 30 cm long plasma column is excited by surface wave, which acts as a plasma antenna. By changing the operating parameters, e.g., working pressure, drive frequency, input power, radius of glass tube, length of plasma column, and argon gas, single plasma antenna (plasma column) can be transformed to multiple small antenna elements (plasma blobs). It is also reported that number, length, and separation between two antenna elements can be controlled by operating parameters. Moreover, experiments are also carried out to study current profile, potential profile, conductivity profile, phase relations, radiation power patterns, etc. of the antenna elements. The effect on directivity with the number of antenna elements is also studied. Findings of the study indicate that entire structure of antenna elements can be treated as a phased array broadside vertical plasma antenna, which produces more directive radiation pattern than the single plasma antenna as well as physical properties and directivity of such antenna can be controlled by operating parameters. The study reveals the advantages of a plasma antenna over the conventional antenna in the sense that different antennas can be formed by tuning the operating parameters.

  6. Fast wave current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Goree, J.; Ono, M.; Colestock, P.; Horton, R.; McNeill, D.; Park, H.

    1985-07-01

    Fast wave current drive is demonstrated in the Princeton ACT-I toroidal device. The fast Alfven wave, in the range of high ion-cyclotron harmonics, produced 40 A of current from 1 kW of rf power coupled into the plasma by fast wave loop antenna. This wave excites a steady current by damping on the energetic tail of the electron distribution function in the same way as lower-hybrid current drive, except that fast wave current drive is appropriate for higher plasma densities.

  7. Analytical formulation of the radiation field of printed antennas in the presence of artificial magnetic superstrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attia, Hussein; Yousefi, Leila; Siddiqui, Omar; Ramahi, Omar M.

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, the cavity model of a microstrip patch antenna in conjunction with the reciprocity theorem is used to develop a fast analytical solution for the radiation field of a microstrip patch antenna loaded with a novel artificial magnetic superstrate and to investigate the effect of the engineered superstrate layer on the directivity and radiation pattern of the printed patch antenna.

  8. Optical Antenna Enhanced Spontaneous Emission in Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messer, Kevin James

    Optical antennas can be used to dramatically increase the rate that semiconductors spontaneously emit photons. While traditional LEDs are limited in bandwidth due to the "slow" rate of spontaneous emission, antenna-enhanced LEDs have the potential to be a fast, efficient, nanoscale light emitter. Traditionally, lasers have dominated LEDs as the emitter in optical interconnects due to a 200x speed advantage of stimulated emission over spontaneous emission. This paradigm may be reversed by coupling LEDs to optical antennas. In fact, antenna enhanced spontaneous emission can be faster than the fastest stimulated emission. Spontaneous emission originates from dipole fluctuations within the emitting material. The size of these fluctuations is much less than the wavelength of light emission, which leads to slow spontaneous emission. Coupling the material to an optical antenna corrects the size mismatch and improves the rate of radiation. An optical antenna circuit model is developed to predict the degree to which spontaneous emission can be enhanced. The circuit model presented in this dissertation shows that enhancement over 1000x is possible while still maintaining greater than 50% efficiency. The circuit model provides insight how to design optical antennas for coupling to dipole sources, for maximum enhancement, and for high efficiency. A method for incorporating the anomalous skin effect, often overlooked in metal optics, is provided. While FDTD/FEM simulations cannot include this effect due to its nonlocal nature, its impact can be examined through the use of the optical antenna circuit model. Analysis of the tradeoff between achieving large spontaneous emission enhancement and maintaining high efficiency leads to an ideal antenna feedgap size of 10nm. Experimental demonstration of spontaneous emission enhancement from InP coupled to an arch-dipole antenna is presented. Photoluminescence measurements show light emission from antenna-coupled InP over bare InP ridges

  9. Study of ICRF wave propagation and plasma coupling efficiency in a linear magnetic mirror device

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, S.Y.

    1991-07-01

    Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequency (ICRF) wave propagation in an inhomogeneous axial magnetic field in a cylindrical plasma-vacuum system has historically been inadequately modelled. Previous works either sacrifice the cylindrical geometry in favor of a simpler slab geometry, concentrate on the resonance region, use a single mode to represent the entire field structure, or examine only radial propagation. This thesis performs both analytical and computational studies to model the ICRF wave-plasma coupling and propagation problem. Experimental analysis is also conducted to compare experimental results with theoretical predictions. Both theoretical as well as experimental analysis are undertaken as part of the thesis. The theoretical studies simulate the propagation of ICRF waves in an axially inhomogeneous magnetic field and in cylindrical geometry. Two theoretical analysis are undertaken - an analytical study and a computational study. The analytical study treats the inhomogeneous magnetic field by transforming the (r,z) coordinate into another coordinate system ({rho},{xi}) that allows the solution of the fields with much simpler boundaries. The plasma fields are then Fourier transformed into two coupled convolution-integral equations which are then differenced and solved for both the perpendicular mode number {alpha} as well as the complete EM fields. The computational study involves a multiple eigenmode computational analysis of the fields that exist within the plasma-vacuum system. The inhomogeneous axial field is treated by dividing the geometry into a series of transverse axial slices and using a constant dielectric tensor in each individual slice. The slices are then connected by longitudinal boundary conditions.

  10. Flexible plasma linear antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jiansen; Wang, Shengzheng; Wu, Huafeng; Liu, Yue; Chang, Yongmeng; Chen, Xinqiang

    2017-02-01

    In this work, we introduce a type of plasma antenna that was fabricated using flexible materials and excited using a 5-20 kHz alternating current (ac) power supply. The results showed that the antenna characteristics, including the impedance, the reflection coefficient (S11), the radiation pattern, and the gain, can be controlled rapidly and easily by varying both the discharge parameters and the antenna shapes. The scope for reconfiguration is greatly enhanced when the antenna shape is changed from a monopole to a helix configuration. Additionally, the antenna polarization can also be adjusted by varying the antenna shapes.

  11. The interaction of the near-field plasma with antennas used in magnetic fusion research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caughman, John

    2015-09-01

    Plasma heating and current drive using antennas in the Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF) are important elements for the success of magnetic fusion. The antennas must operate in a harsh environment, where local plasma densities can be >1018/m3, magnetic fields can range from 0.2-5 Tesla, and antenna operating voltages can be >40 kV. This environment creates operational issues due to the interaction of the near-field of the antenna with the local plasma. In addition to parasitic losses in this plasma region, voltage and current distributions on the antenna structure lead to the formation of high electric fields and RF plasma sheaths, which can lead to enhanced particle and energy fluxes on the antenna and on surfaces intersected by magnetic field lines connected to or passing near the antenna. These issues are being studied using a simple electrode structure and a single-strap antenna on the Prototype Materials Plasma EXperiment (Proto-MPEX) at ORNL, which is a linear plasma device that uses an electron Bernstein wave heated helicon plasma source to create a high-density plasma suitable for use in a plasma-material interaction test stand. Several diagnostics are being used to characterize the near-field interactions, including double-Langmuir probes, a retarding field energy analyzer, and optical emission spectroscopy. The RF electric field is being studied utilizing Dynamic Stark Effect spectroscopy and Doppler-Free Saturation Spectroscopy. Recent experimental results and future plans will be presented. ORNL is managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. DOE under Contract DE-AC-05-00OR22725.

  12. Computer controlled antenna system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raumann, N. A.

    1972-01-01

    Digital techniques are discussed for application to the servo and control systems of large antennas. The tracking loop for an antenna at a STADAN tracking site is illustrated. The augmentation mode is also considered.

  13. Strain powered antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domann, John P.; Carman, Greg P.

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes the creation of strain powered antennas that radiate electromagnetic energy by mechanically vibrating a piezoelectric or piezomagnetic material. A closed form analytic model of electromagnetic radiation from a strain powered electrically small antenna is derived and analyzed. Fundamental scaling laws and the frequency dependence of strain powered antennas are discussed. The radiation efficiency of strain powered electrically small antennas is contrasted with a conventional electric dipole. Analytical results show that operating at the first mechanical resonance produces the most efficient strain powered radiation relative to electric dipole antennas. A resonant analysis is exploited to determine the material property space that produces efficient strain powered antennas. These results show how a properly designed strain powered antenna can radiate more efficiently than an equally sized electric dipole antenna.

  14. Antenna (Selected Articles),

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-10-19

    ANTENNA (Selected Articles),, Englih - pages: 91 Sourc -.- Antenny, Nr.-, 1967_, _p. 4-32, Country of origin:/’(USSR) r / -Translated by: LEO K-ANNER...process, M. S. Neyman formulated the basic requirements for transmitting television antennas, and the principles of their construction, many of which...Subsequently, in 1951, an antenna, basically similar to the antenna in the MTTs, was mounted and put into operation in Kiev (Fig. 1), with the difference that

  15. Space-Frame Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, Steven A.

    2010-01-01

    The space-frame antenna is a conceptual antenna structure that would be lightweight, deployable from compact stowage, and capable of deforming itself to a size, shape, and orientation required for a specific use. The space-frame antenna would be a trusslike structure consisting mostly of a tetrahedral mesh of nodes connected by variable-length struts. The deformation of the antenna to a desired size, shape, and orientation would be effected through coordinated lengthening and shorting of the struts.

  16. Cross resonant optical antenna.

    PubMed

    Biagioni, P; Huang, J S; Duò, L; Finazzi, M; Hecht, B

    2009-06-26

    We propose a novel cross resonant optical antenna consisting of two perpendicular nanosized gold dipole antennas with a common feed gap. We demonstrate that the cross antenna is able to convert propagating fields of any polarization state into correspondingly polarized, localized, and enhanced fields and vice versa. The cross antenna structure therefore opens the road towards the control of light-matter interactions based on polarized light as well as the analysis of polarized fields on the nanometer scale.

  17. Advanced Antenna Measurement Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-18

    9.3 GHz slot array shown in Figure 1 and having a nominal directivity of 23 dB. This antenna was measured on an NSI Planar Near-field Scanner using... sidelobe level ; in essence, the antenna radiation pattern. Antenna pattern measurements have historically been conducted by placing a probe in the far...correction. It was noted in the earlier work that the best calibration antenna is one with a low gain so an open ended waveguide was used. This

  18. Coherently combining antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dybdal, Robert B. (Inventor); Curry, Samuel J. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An apparatus includes antenna elements configured to receive a signal including pseudo-random code, and electronics configured to use the pseudo-random code to determine time delays of signals incident upon the antenna elements and to compensate the signals to coherently combine the antenna elements.

  19. Antenna performance and resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carney, J. J.

    1974-01-01

    The performance of the antenna throughout SL-2, SL-3, and SL-4 was investigated along with the antenna resolution of brightness temperature during flight. The target area selected for the test flights was the Gulf of California, as it offered land/water interface. The coordinate transformations and antenna orientation, flight path simulation, and integration over the radiometric target are discussed.

  20. Automated parametrical antenna modelling for ambient assisted living applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazemzadeh, R.; John, W.; Mathis, W.

    2012-09-01

    In this paper a parametric modeling technique for a fast polynomial extraction of the physically relevant parameters of inductively coupled RFID/NFC (radio frequency identification/near field communication) antennas is presented. The polynomial model equations are obtained by means of a three-step procedure: first, full Partial Element Equivalent Circuit (PEEC) antenna models are determined by means of a number of parametric simulations within the input parameter range of a certain antenna class. Based on these models, the RLC antenna parameters are extracted in a subsequent model reduction step. Employing these parameters, polynomial equations describing the antenna parameter with respect to (w.r.t.) the overall antenna input parameter range are extracted by means of polynomial interpolation and approximation of the change of the polynomials' coefficients. The described approach is compared to the results of a reference PEEC solver with regard to accuracy and computation effort.

  1. Some common problems in geodesy and astrometry after establishment of ICRF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popadyov, V.; Tolchelnikova, S.

    2015-08-01

    After the "revolution in astrometry" on the eve of XXI century radio frame ICRF and triad ICRS were established as the main reference for astronomy and sciences connected to it, e.g. geodesy and gravimetry. During previous years stars were used as reference points and unity of the sciences was achieved by means of using the plumb lines as terrestrial reference. The expansion of this terrestrial frame to vertical lines at many places has been one of the purposes of geodetic measurements. We consider very useful empirical unity of three branches of the one indivisible science should be preserved. Mutual dependence to each other is secured in modern geodesy and gravimetry, and up to now some parameters used or got in geodesy, are common with those used in gravimetry, astronomy and geodynamics. We discuss several problems in connecting geodetic and gravimetric observations with radio observations used for the compilation of the ICRF in order to attract the attention of experts in optical and radio astrometry.

  2. Simulation study of toroidal flow generation by ICRF heating using GNET code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, S.; Itoh, K.; Zheng, L. J.; van Dam, J. W.; Fukuyama, A.

    2010-11-01

    The toroidal flow generation by the ICRF heating is investigated in the tokamak plasma applying GNET code, in which the drift kinetic equation is solved in 5D phase-space. We assume a tokamak plasma similar to the Alcator C-mod plasma as a first step. We obtain a steady state distribution of energetic minority ions and the flux surface averaged toroidal flow is evaluated. It is found that a co-directional toroidal flow is generated outside of the RF wave power absorption region. The dominant part of toroidal flow does not depend on the sign of k. When we change the sign of the toroidal current we obtain a reversal of the toroidal flow velocity, which is consistent with the experimental observations. We consider the toroidal precession motion of energetic tail ions accelerated by the ICRF heating. The magnetic shear and the poloidal magnetic drift increases a net toroidal drift motion during one bounce of banana motion. We estimate the toroidal flow by these toroidal precession motion and the results are compared with the simulation ones.

  3. Trapped electron effects on ICRF Current Drive Predictions in TFTR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, John C.; Phillips, Cynthia K.; Bonoli, Paul T.

    1996-11-01

    Most 2D RF modeling codes use a parameterization^1 of current drive efficiencies to calculate fast wave driven currents. Because this parameterization is derived from a ray--tracing model, there are difficulties in applying it to a spectrum of waves. In addition, one cannot account for multiple resonances and coherency effects between the electrons and the waves. These difficulties may be avoided by a direct calculation of the quasilinear diffusion coefficient in an inhomogenous geometry coupled with a full wave code for the field polarizations. Current profiles are then calculated using the adjoint formulation^2, with the magnetic equilibrium specified consistently in both the adjoint routine and the full wave code. This approach has been implemented in the FISIC code^3. Results are benchmarked by comparing a power deposition calculation from conductivity to one from the quasilinear expression. It is shown that the two expressions agree. We quantify differences seen based upon aspect ratio and elongation. The largest discrepancies are seen in the regime of small aspect ratio, and little loss in accuracy for moderate aspect ratios ~>3. This work supported by DoE contract No. DE--AC02--76--CH03073. ^1 D. A. Ehst and C. F. F. Karney, Nucl. Fusion 31, 1933 (1991). ^2 C. F. F. Karney, Computer Physics Reports 4, 183 (1986). ^3 M. Brambilla and T. Krücken, Nucl. Fusion 28, 1813 (1988).

  4. An optimal antenna motion generation using shortest path planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Moon-Jin; Kwon, Dong-Soo

    2017-03-01

    This paper considers an angular velocity minimization method for a satellite antenna. For high speed transmission of science data, a directional antenna with a two-axis gimbal is generally used. When a satellite passes over a ground station while pointing directly at it, the angular velocity of the satellite antenna can increase rapidly due to the gimbal kinematics. The high angular velocity could exceed the dynamic constraint of the antenna. Furthermore, micro vibration induced by high speed antenna rotation during an imaging operation might cause jitter, which can degrade the satellite image quality. To solve this problem, a minimum-velocity antenna motion generation method is proposed. Boundaries of the azimuth and elevation angles of the antenna within an effective beam width are derived using antenna geometry. A minimum-velocity azimuth profile and elevation profile within the boundaries are generated sequentially using a shortest path planning method. For fast and correct generation of the shortest path, a new algorithm called a string nailing algorithm is proposed. A numerical simulation shows that the antenna profile generated by the shortest path planning has a much lower angular velocity than the profiles generated by previous methods. The proposed string nailing algorithm also spends much less computation time than a search-based shortest path planning algorithm to generate almost the same antenna profiles.

  5. The ALMA antenna procurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanghellini, S.; Zivick, Jeff; Inatani, Junji

    2009-10-01

    Visitors who come to the OSF at regular intervals find a growing population of antennas at various stages of assembly and testing. The long path from the start of the definition of antenna specifications to the start of science operations with the antennas was and still is a formidable endeavor. When completed, ALMA will comprise a 12-meter diameter antennas array, the bilateral interferometer array, of a minimum of fifty antennas and in addition, the ACA (Atacama Compact Array), composed of four 12-meter diameter antennas and twelve 7-meter diameter antennas. Out of the fifty antennas of the bilateral interferometer array, one-half are provided by the North American partners of ALMA, the other half by the European partners. The sixteen antennas that will comprise the ACA are provided by the East Asian Partners of ALMA. Here we review some key points of this challenging process and we provide a brief history and status of the ALMA antennas. Because of the length of the description, we will present this in a series of two articles. In this first part we concentrate mostly on the bilateral antenna procurement. A detailed description of the ACA will be presented in the next newsletter.

  6. JPL antenna technology development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeland, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    Plans for evaluating, designing, fabricating, transporting and deploying cost effective and STS compatible offset wrap rib antennas up to 300 meters in diameter for mobile communications, Earth resources observation, and for the orbiting VLBI are reviewed. The JPL surface measurement system, intended for large mesh deployable antenna applications will be demonstrated and validated as part of the antenna ground based demonstration program. Results of the offset wrap rib deployable antenna technology development will include: (1) high confidence structural designs for antennas up to 100 meters in diameter; (2) high confidence estimates of functional performance and fabrication cost for a wide range of antenna sizes (up to 300 meters in diameter); (3) risk assessment for fabricating the large size antennas; and (4) 55 meter diameter flight quality hardware that can be cost effectively completed toto accommodate a flight experiment and/or application.

  7. Antenna Controller Replacement Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Roger Y.; Morgan, Scott C.; Strain, Martha M.; Rockwell, Stephen T.; Shimizu, Kenneth J.; Tehrani, Barzia J.; Kwok, Jaclyn H.; Tuazon-Wong, Michelle; Valtier, Henry; Nalbandi, Reza; Wert, Michael; Leung, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    The Antenna Controller Replacement (ACR) software accurately points and monitors the Deep Space Network (DSN) 70-m and 34-m high-efficiency (HEF) ground-based antennas that are used to track primarily spacecraft and, periodically, celestial targets. To track a spacecraft, or other targets, the antenna must be accurately pointed at the spacecraft, which can be very far away with very weak signals. ACR s conical scanning capability collects the signal in a circular pattern around the target, calculates the location of the strongest signal, and adjusts the antenna pointing to point directly at the spacecraft. A real-time, closed-loop servo control algorithm performed every 0.02 second allows accurate positioning of the antenna in order to track these distant spacecraft. Additionally, this advanced servo control algorithm provides better antenna pointing performance in windy conditions. The ACR software provides high-level commands that provide a very easy user interface for the DSN operator. The operator only needs to enter two commands to start the antenna and subreflector, and Master Equatorial tracking. The most accurate antenna pointing is accomplished by aligning the antenna to the Master Equatorial, which because of its small size and sheltered location, has the most stable pointing. The antenna has hundreds of digital and analog monitor points. The ACR software provides compact displays to summarize the status of the antenna, subreflector, and the Master Equatorial. The ACR software has two major functions. First, it performs all of the steps required to accurately point the antenna (and subreflector and Master Equatorial) at the spacecraft (or celestial target). This involves controlling the antenna/ subreflector/Master-Equatorial hardware, initiating and monitoring the correct sequence of operations, calculating the position of the spacecraft relative to the antenna, executing the real-time servo control algorithm to maintain the correct position, and

  8. FORTE antenna element and release mechanism design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohweller, David J.; Butler, Thomas A.

    1995-01-01

    The Fast On-Orbit Recording of Transient Events (FORTE) satellite being built by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has as its most prominent feature a large deployable (11 m by 5 m) log periodic antenna to monitor emissions from electrical storms on the Earth. This paper describes the antenna and the design for the long elements and explains the dynamics of their deployment and the damping system employed. It also describes the unique paraffin-actuated reusable tie-down and release mechanism employed in the system.

  9. Automated Antenna Design with Evolutionary Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornby, Gregory S.; Globus, Al; Linden, Derek S.; Lohn, Jason D.

    2006-01-01

    Current methods of designing and optimizing antennas by hand are time and labor intensive, and limit complexity. Evolutionary design techniques can overcome these limitations by searching the design space and automatically finding effective solutions. In recent years, evolutionary algorithms have shown great promise in finding practical solutions in large, poorly understood design spaces. In particular, spacecraft antenna design has proven tractable to evolutionary design techniques. Researchers have been investigating evolutionary antenna design and optimization since the early 1990s, and the field has grown in recent years as computer speed has increased and electromagnetic simulators have improved. Two requirements-compliant antennas, one for ST5 and another for TDRS-C, have been automatically designed by evolutionary algorithms. The ST5 antenna is slated to fly this year, and a TDRS-C phased array element has been fabricated and tested. Such automated evolutionary design is enabled by medium-to-high quality simulators and fast modern computers to evaluate computer-generated designs. Evolutionary algorithms automate cut-and-try engineering, substituting automated search though millions of potential designs for intelligent search by engineers through a much smaller number of designs. For evolutionary design, the engineer chooses the evolutionary technique, parameters and the basic form of the antenna, e.g., single wire for ST5 and crossed-element Yagi for TDRS-C. Evolutionary algorithms then search for optimal configurations in the space defined by the engineer. NASA's Space Technology 5 (ST5) mission will launch three small spacecraft to test innovative concepts and technologies. Advanced evolutionary algorithms were used to automatically design antennas for ST5. The combination of wide beamwidth for a circularly-polarized wave and wide impedance bandwidth made for a challenging antenna design problem. From past experience in designing wire antennas, we chose to

  10. A True Metasurface Antenna

    PubMed Central

    Badawe, Mohamed El; Almoneef, Thamer S.; Ramahi, Omar M.

    2016-01-01

    We present a true metasurface antenna based on electrically-small resonators. The resonators are placed on a flat surface and connected to one feed point using corporate feed. Unlike conventional array antennas where the distance between adjacent antennas is half wavelength to reduce mutual coupling between adjacent antennas, here the distance between the radiating elements is electrically very small to affect good impedance matching of each resonator to its feed. A metasurface antenna measuring 1.2λ × 1.2λ and designed to operate at 3 GHz achieved a gain of 12 dBi. A prototype was fabricated and tested showing good agreement between numerical simulations and experimental results. Through numerical simulation, we show that the metasurface antenna has the ability to provide beam steering by phasing all the resonators appropriately. PMID:26759177

  11. Simulation Study of Toroidal Flow Generation of Minority Ions by Local ICRF Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Sadayoshi; Itoh, Kimitaka; Zheng, Linjin; Van Dam, James W.; Fukuyama, Atsushi

    2015-12-01

    The toroidal flow generation of minority ions by the local ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) heating is investigated in a tokamak plasma by applying the GNET code, which can solve the drift kinetic equation in the 5-D phase space. An asymmetry of velocity distribution function in the parallel direction is found and two types of toroidal averaged flow of minority ions are observed. One is the sheared flow near the RF power absorption region depending on the sign of k||, and the other is the toroidal flow, which is larger than the previous one, independent of the sign of k||. It is found that the k||-sign-independent toroidal flow is generated by the net toroidal motion of energetic tail ions and that the k||-sign-dependent flow is related to the mechanism proposed by Ohkawa [http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.2047629, Phys. Plasmas 12, 094506 (2005)].

  12. Development of a fishbone travelling wave antenna for LHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takase, Y.; Moeller, C. P.; Seki, T.; Takeuchi, N.; Watari, T.; Callis, R.; Ejiri, A.; Ikezi, H.; Kasahara, H.; Kasuya, N.; Kumazawa, R.; Mutoh, T.; Ohkubo, K.; Olstad, R. A.; Saigusa, M.; Saito, K.; Shiraiwa, S.; Taniguchi, T.; Torii, H.; Wada, H.; Yamagishi, K.; Yamamoto, T.

    2004-02-01

    The 'fishbone' fast wave travelling wave antenna was developed for LHD to provide a capability for rotational transform profile control by current drive. The fishbone antenna is equivalent to two combline antennae stacked vertically. The antenna operates around 75 MHz and excites a wavenumber of 14 m-1 when the phase difference between adjacent current straps is 90°. A test of a combline antenna with plasma load on the TST-2 spherical tokamak suggested the possibility that this type of antenna does not need to be installed in the immediate vicinity of the last closed flux surface. Optimization of the design was performed based on measurements on mock-up antennas and model calculations. In the fishbone antenna, controlled excitation of the even mode (with currents in the top and bottom halves of a current strap in the same direction) is necessary. A predominant excitation of the even mode was realized in the LHD fishbone antenna with simulated loading by selecting an appropriate operating frequency.

  13. Subsurface Deployable Antenna Array

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-25

    States Patent No. 6,710,746, issued March 23, 2004, to Anderson et al., discloses an antenna having a reconfigurable length, and a method of...an antenna linear extension and retraction apparatus and method of use for a submersible device. The apparatus includes a body having a cavity... microwave communications while at cruising speed and depth. [0027] It is a still further object of the present invention to provide an antenna array

  14. Some preliminary photometric results of QSOs useful for the link between future Gaia CRF and ICRF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damljanovic, G.; Taris, F.; Boeva, S.

    2015-08-01

    Gaia was launched in December 2013 as cornerstone mission of the European Space Agency (ESA). It is going to map the entire sky (over one billion stars) and more than 500,000 quasars (QSOs); all objects with apparent V band magnitudes in the range 5.6 < V < 20 (Mignard 2014). During its 5-year lifetime it will produce a unique time-domain space survey. The main result will be a dense optical QSO-based Gaia Celestial Reference Frame (Gaia CRF). So, the high accuracy link between future Gaia CRF and International CRF (ICRF) will be of importance. About 90 % of the ICRF sources are not suitable for that link (they are not bright enough in optical domain, they have significant extended radio emission, etc.), but there are other (candidate) sources - weak extragalactic radio sources (ERS) with bright optical counterparts which we need to investigate. Some candidate sources were already imaging by VLBI, and some sources were detected as useful ones on VLBI scales. Also, the astrophysical processes could produce displacements of the optical photocenter of these objects, and because of it the variations of their light curves are important first information to check candidate sources for establishing the link of reference systems. Our observations of 47 candidate objects were carried out more than one year in the B, V and R bands using the D = 0.6 m new telescope at the Astronomical Station Vidojevica (ASV, of Astronomical Observatory in Belgrade, Serbia). Some preliminary photometric results are presented as a part of astrophotometric and astrophysical investigations of ERS in the framework of the reference systems. Also, some photometric results following from the data obtained by using the TJO (Telescopi Juan Oro, D = 0.8 m) in OAdM (Observatori Astronomic del Montsec, Spain) are presented.

  15. SIDON: A simulator of radio-frequency networks. Application to WEST ICRF launchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helou, Walid; Dumortier, Pierre; Durodié, Frédéric; Goniche, Marc; Hillairet, Julien; Mollard, Patrick; Berger-By, Gilles; Bernard, Jean-Michel; Colas, Laurent; Lombard, Gilles; Maggiora, Riccardo; Magne, Roland; Milanesio, Daniele; Moreau, Didier

    2015-12-01

    SIDON (SImulator of raDiO-frequency Networks) is an in-house developed Radio-Frequency (RF) network solver that has been implemented to cross-validate the design of WEST ICRF launchers and simulate their impedance matching algorithm while considering all mutual couplings and asymmetries. In this paper, the authors illustrate the theory of SIDON as well as results of its calculations. The authors have built time-varying plasma scenarios (a sequence of launchers front-faces L-mode and H-mode Z-matrices), where at each time step (1 millisecond here), SIDON solves the RF network. At the same time, when activated, the impedance matching algorithm controls the matching elements (vacuum capacitors) and thus their corresponding S-matrices. Typically a 1-second pulse requires around 10 seconds of computational time on a desktop computer. These tasks can be hardly handled by commercial RF software. This innovative work allows identifying strategies for the launchers future operation while insuring the limitations on the currents, voltages and electric fields, matching and Load-Resilience, as well as the required straps voltage amplitude/phase balance. In this paper, a particular attention is paid to the simulation of the launchers behavior when arcs appear at several locations of their circuits using SIDON calculator. This latter work shall confirm or identify strategies for the arc detection using various RF electrical signals. One shall note that the use of such solvers in not limited to ICRF launchers simulations but can be employed, in principle, to any linear or linearized RF problem.

  16. OPTICAL SPECTRA OF CANDIDATE INTERNATIONAL CELESTIAL REFERENCE FRAME (ICRF) FLAT-SPECTRUM RADIO SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Titov, O.; Stanford, Laura M.; Johnston, Helen M.; Hunstead, Richard W.; Pursimo, T.; Jauncey, David L.; Maslennikov, K.

    2013-07-01

    Continuing our program of spectroscopic observations of International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) sources, we present redshifts for 120 quasars and radio galaxies. Data were obtained with five telescopes: the 3.58 m European Southern Observatory New Technology Telescope, the two 8.2 m Gemini telescopes, the 2.5 m Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT), and the 6.0 m Big Azimuthal Telescope of the Special Astrophysical Observatory in Russia. The targets were selected from the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry candidate International Celestial Reference Catalog which forms part of an observational very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) program to strengthen the celestial reference frame. We obtained spectra of the potential optical counterparts of more than 150 compact flat-spectrum radio sources, and measured redshifts of 120 emission-line objects, together with 19 BL Lac objects. These identifications add significantly to the precise radio-optical frame tie to be undertaken by Gaia, due to be launched in 2013, and to the existing data available for analyzing source proper motions over the celestial sphere. We show that the distribution of redshifts for ICRF sources is consistent with the much larger sample drawn from Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty cm (FIRST) and Sloan Digital Sky Survey, implying that the ultra-compact VLBI sources are not distinguished from the overall radio-loud quasar population. In addition, we obtained NOT spectra for five radio sources from the FIRST and NRAO VLA Sky Survey catalogs, selected on the basis of their red colors, which yielded three quasars with z > 4.

  17. Towards ICRF3:preparing the VLBI frame for future synergy with the Gaia frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charlot, Patrick; Bourda, Géraldine

    2012-08-01

    The European space astrometric mission Gaia to be launched in 2013 will produce a QSO - based celestial reference frame with unprecedented position accuracy and sky density. By the end of the decade, two highly - accurate reference frames will thus cohabit, the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) derived from Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) data and the Gaia optical frame, both with individual source position accuracies below 100 microarcseconds. For consistency be tween optical and radio positions, it will be fundamental to align the two frames with the highest possible accuracy. This is important not only for continuity of celestial frames but also to exploit at best their synergies for astrophysics. The latter includes probing the Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) jets properties and the physics of these objects by comparing the spatial location of the optical and radio emission re gions. The alignment between the VLBI and Gaia frames requires a large number of sources common to the two frames, i.e. radio - loud QSOs with position accurately known from both VLBI and Gaia. This implies that the sources must be brighter than magnitude 18 (so that their Gaia positions may be derived with the highest accuracy) and have compact VLBI structure on milliarcsecond scales (for highly - accurate VLBI positions). In this paper, we review the current source potential for this alignment based on the ICRF2 and an ongoing dedicated VLBI project aimed at finding additional weaker extragalactic radio sources for this purpose. We also stress that these sources must be monitored during the mission (especially their VLBI position stability and structure) in order to control their relevance for the alignment, and present the observations we envision to this end in the framework of the IVS and other VLBI networks.

  18. MASTER TELEVISION ANTENNA SYSTEM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhode Island State Dept. of Education, Providence.

    SPECIFICATIONS FOR THE FURNISHING AND INSTALLATION OF TELEVISION MASTER ANTENNA SYSTEMS FOR SECONDARY AND ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS ARE GIVEN. CONTRACTOR REQUIREMENTS, EQUIPMENT, PERFORMANCE STANDARDS, AND FUNCTIONS ARE DESCRIBED. (MS)

  19. Antenna applications of superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, R. C.

    1991-09-01

    The applicability of superconductors to antennas is examined. Potential implementations that are examined are superdirective arrays; electrically small antennas; tuning and matching of these two; high-gain millimeter-wavelength arrays; and kinetic inductance slow wave structures for array phasers and traveling wave array feeds. It is thought that superdirective arrays and small antennas will not benefit directly, but their tuning/matching networks will undergo major improvements. Miniaturization of antennas will not be aided, but much higher gain millimeter-wave arrays will be realizable. Kinetic inductance slow-wave lines appear advantageous for improved array phasers and time delay, as well as for traveling-wave array feeds.

  20. Turnstile slot antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munson, R. E. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A turnstile slot antenna is disclosed, the antenna being for and integral with a spacecraft having a substantially cylindrical body portion. The antenna comprises a circumferential slot about the periphery of the spacecraft body portion with an annular wave guide cavity defining a radial transmission line disposed within the spacecraft body portion behind and in communication with the circumferential slot. Feed stubs and associated transmission apparatus are provided to excite the annular cavity in quadrature phase such that an omnidirectional, circularly polarized, rotating radiation pattern is generated. The antenna of the instant invention has utility both as a transmitting and receiving device, and ensures continuous telemetry and command coverage with the spacecraft.

  1. Cellular Reflectarray Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanofsky, Robert R.

    2010-01-01

    The cellular reflectarray antenna is intended to replace conventional parabolic reflectors that must be physically aligned with a particular satellite in geostationary orbit. These arrays are designed for specified geographical locations, defined by latitude and longitude, each called a "cell." A particular cell occupies nominally 1,500 square miles (3,885 sq. km), but this varies according to latitude and longitude. The cellular reflectarray antenna designed for a particular cell is simply positioned to align with magnetic North, and the antenna surface is level (parallel to the ground). A given cellular reflectarray antenna will not operate in any other cell.

  2. The single antenna interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Fitch, J.P.

    1990-01-15

    Air and space borne platforms using synthetic aperture radars (SAR) have made interferometric measurements by using either two physical antennas mounted on one air-frame or two passes of one antenna over a scene. In this paper, a new interferometric technique using one pass of a single-antenna SAR system is proposed and demonstrated on data collected by the NASA-JPL AirSAR. Remotely sensed L-band microwave data are used to show the sensitivity of this technique to ocean surface features as well as a baseline for comparison with work by others using two-antenna systems. 7 refs., 3 figs.

  3. MSU Antenna Pattern Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mo, Tsan; Kleespies, Thomas J.; Green, J. Philip

    2000-01-01

    The Microwave Sounding Unit (MSU) antenna pattern data for nine MSU Flight Models (FMs) have been successfully rescued from 22-year old 7-track and 9-track magnetic tapes and cartridges. These antenna pattern data were unpacked into user-friendly ASCII format, and are potentially useful for making antenna pattern corrections to MSU antenna temperatures in retrieving the true brightness temperatures. We also properly interpreted the contents of the data and show how to convert the measured antenna signal amplitude in volts into relative antenna power in dB with proper normalization. It is found that the data are of high quality with a 60-dB drop in the co-polarized antenna patterns from the central peak value to its side-lobe regions at scan angles beyond 30 deg. The unpacked antenna pattern data produced in this study provide a useful database for data users to correct the antenna side-lobe contribution to MSU measurements. All of the data are available to the scientific community on a single CD-ROM.

  4. Recent results for plasma antennas

    SciTech Connect

    Alexeff, Igor; Anderson, Ted; Farshi, Esmaeil; Karnam, Naresh; Pulasani, Nanditha Reddy

    2008-05-15

    Plasma antennas are just as effective as metal antennas. They can transmit, receive, and reflect radio waves just as well as metal antennas. In addition, plasma generated noise does not appear to be a problem.

  5. Scattering and radiation from cylindrically conformal antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempel, Leo Charles

    Microstrip patch antennas offer considerable advantages in terms of weight, aerodynamic drag, cost, flexibility, and observability over more conventional protruding antennas. Two hybrid finite element methods are presented and are used to examine the scattering and radiation behavior of cylindrically conformal patches. In conjunction with a new divergence-free cylindrical shell element, the finite element-boundary integral method is shown to have low computational and memory requirements when compared with competing approaches. This method uses an efficient creeping wave series for the computation of the dyadic Green's function and a uniform surface mesh so that a fast Fourier transform may be used to reduce the computational and memory burden of the method. An alternative finite element-absorbing boundary condition approach incorporates a new conformal vector condition which minimizes the computational domain. The latter method is more flexible than the former because it can incorporate surface coatings and protruding antennas. Guidelines are established for minimal ABC displacement from the aperture. These two hybrid finite element methods are used to study the scattering, radiation, and input impedance of typical conformal antenna arrays. In particular, the effect of curvature and cavity size is examined for both discrete and wraparound antenna arrays.

  6. Experimental Results of Schlicher's Thrusting Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fralick, Gustave C.; Niedra, Janis M.

    2001-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to test the claims by Rex L. Schlicher, et al., (Patent 5,142,86 1) that a certain antenna geometry produces thrust greatly exceeding radiation reaction, when driven by repetitive, fast rise, and relatively slower decay current pulses. In order to test this hypothesis, the antenna was suspended by strings as a 3 in pendulum. Current pulses were fed to the antenna along the suspension path by a very flexible coaxial line constructed from loudspeaker cable and copper braid sheath. When driving the antenna via this cabling, our pulser was capable of sustaining 1200 A pulses at a rate of 30 per second up to a minute. In this way, bursts of pulses could be delivered in synch with the pendulum period in order to build up any motion. However, when using a laser beam passing through a lens attached to the antenna to amplify linear displacement by a factor of at least 25, no correlated motion of the beam spot could be detected on a distant wall. We conclude, in agreement with the momentum theorem of classical electromagnetic theory, that any thrust produced is far below practically useful levels. Hence, within classical electrodynamics, there is little hope of detecting any low level motion that cannot be explained by interactions with surrounding structural steel and the Earth's magnetic field.

  7. Airborne antenna pattern calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagherian, A. B.; Mielke, R. R.

    1983-01-01

    Use of calculation program START and modeling program P 3D to produce radiation patterns of antennas mounted on a space station is discussed. Basic components of two space stations in the early design stage are simulated and radiation patterns for antennas mounted on the modules are presented.

  8. Experiments with Dipole Antennas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2009-01-01

    Employment of a data-acquisition system for data collection and calculations makes experiments with antennas more convenient and less time consuming. The determined directional patterns of the dipole antennas of different lengths are in reasonable agreement with theory. The enhancement of the signal by using a reflector is demonstrated, and a…

  9. Milestones in Broadcasting: Antennas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Media in Education and Development, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Briefly describes the development of antennas in the prebroadcast era (elevated antenna, selectivity to prevent interference between stations, birth of diplex, directional properties, support structures), as well as technological developments used in long-, medium-, and short-wave broadcasting, VHF/FM and television broadcasting, and satellite…

  10. Deformations in VLBI antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, T. A.; Thomsen, P.

    1988-01-01

    A study is presented of deformations in antennas with the emphasis on their influence on VLBI measurements. The GIFTS structural analysis program has been used to model the VLBI antenna in Fairbanks (Alaska). The report identifies key deformations and studies the effect of gravity, wind, and temperature. Estimates of expected deformations are given.

  11. Bidirectional zoom antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, R. F.

    1975-01-01

    Antenna comprises two parabolic cylinders placed orthogoanlly to each other. One cylinder serves as main reflector, and the other as subreflector. Cylinders have telescoping sections to vary antenna beamwidth. Beamwidth can be adjusted in elevation, azimuth, or both. Design has no restriction as to choice of polarization.

  12. Conformal array antenna subsystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1985-04-01

    An antenna subsystem to communicate between Ariane 4 and a data relay satellite was studied, concluding that the original ideas on ring antennas should be corrected due to the wide margin of coverage required in elevation for such antennas, which implies the need of splitting the coverage. Nevertheless, the study of cylindrical and conical conformal arrays was continued in view of their intrinsic interest. Needed coverages with specified gain can be obtained with a set of microstrip circular patch antennas. For the lower stage, a single patch is enough. For geostationary missions, one horizontal array is used, and for heliosynchronous missions two horizontal arrays and a vertical one. The numerical study carried out on omniazimuthal ring antennas shows that a tendency to omnidirectional pattern exists in spite of the directivity of the elementary radiators. A small pointing improvement of the meridian pattern can be obtained by means of conical arrays instead of the cylindrical ones.

  13. Fast wave current drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goree, J.; Ono, M.; Colestock, P.; Horton, R.; McNeill, D.; Park, H.

    1985-07-01

    Experiments on the fast wave in the range of high ion cyclotron harmonics in the ACT-1 device show that current drive is possible with the fast wave just as it is for the lower hybrid wave, except that it is suitable for higher plasma densities. A 140° loop antenna launched the high ion cyclotron harmonic fast wave [ω/Ω=O(10)] into a He+ plasma with ne≂4×1012 cm-3 and B=4.5 kG. Probe and magnetic loop diagnostics and FIR laser scattering confirmed the presence of the fast wave, and the Rogowski loop indicated that the circulating plasma current increased by up to 40A with 1 kW of coupled power, which is comparable to lower hybrid current drive in the same device with the same unidirectional fast electron beam used as the target for the rf. A phased antenna array would be used for FWCD in a tokamak without the E-beam.

  14. TOPICA/TORIC integration for self-consistent antenna and plasma analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggiora, Riccardo; Lancellotti, Vito; Milanesio, Daniele; Kyrytsya, Volodymyr; Vecchi, Giuseppe; Bonoli, Paul T.; Wright, John C.

    2006-10-01

    TOPICA [1] is a numerical suite conceived for prediction and analysis of plasma-facing antennas. It can handle real-life 3D antenna geometries (with housing, Faraday screen, etc.) as well as a realistic plasma model, including measured density and temperature profiles. TORIC [2] solves the finite Larmor radius wave equations in the ICRF regime in arbitrary axisymmetric toroidal plasmas. Due to the approach followed in developing TOPICA (i.e. the formal splitting of the problem in the vacuum region around the antenna and the plasma region inside the toroidal chamber), the code lends itself to handle toroidal plasmas, provided TORIC is run independently to yield the plasma surface admittance tensorsY (m,m',n). The latter enter directly into the integral equations solved by TOPICA, thus allowing a far more accurate plasma description that accounts for curvature effects. TOPICA outputs comprise, among others, the EM fields in front of the plasma: these can in turn be input to TORIC, in order to self-consistently determine the EM field propagation in the plasma. In this work, we report on the theory underlying the TOPICA/TORIC integration and the ongoing evolution of the two codes. [1] V. Lancellotti et al., Nucl. Fusion, 46 (2006) S476 [2] M. Brambilla, Plasma Phys. Contr. Fusion (1999) 41 1

  15. RF current drive antenna. Final report, August 15, 1993--August 14, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Probert, P.H.

    1995-09-01

    This work represents an attempt to solve a fundamental problem with all coupling devices in tokamaks intended to launch waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF), that of excessive voltage levels on the launcher and its feed lines. These voltages can lead to impurity problems in the plasma, and they determine the maximum power that can be coupled to the plasma, since it is when arcs caused by this voltage frequently occur that the power must be reduced. The approach taken is to consider an antenna which is composed of many smaller units, each operating at much lower voltages, stacked on end to provide the equivalent functionality of a conventional launcher. The work described herein involved designing, building, and operating such a launcher in the Phaedrus-T tokamak. The results showed that the antenna worked as expected, reducing the voltage dramatically, while still functioning property, and producing fewer impurity problems and no arcing. A design extrapolating the principles of this idea to reactor-sized tokamaks such as ITER was developed. In addition, a novel decoupling scheme was developed in order to adapt this antenna idea to low frequency current drive schemes.

  16. Investigating antennas as ignition aid for automotive HID lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergner, A.; Engelhardt, M.; Bienholz, S.; Ruhrmann, C.; Hoebing, T.; Groeger, S.; Mentel, J.; Awakowicz, P.

    2015-01-01

    This paper considers the ignition of mercury-free high-intensity discharge (HID) lamps for car headlights. Due to safety reasons, these lamps need to have a fast run-up phase which is ensured, amongst other things, by a high Xe pressure of roughly 15 bar (cold) in the discharge vessel. The high Xe pressure causes an increased ignition voltage compared with former mercury-containing automotive HID lamps or low-pressure lamps used for general-lighting applications. The increase in ignition voltage can be limited if the electric field in front of the electrodes is raised by an uplifting of the electrical conductivity along the outer wall of the inner bulb either by a conductive layer on its surface or by a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) within the outer bulb. This paper considers on the one hand conventional antennas deposited by physical vapour deposition (PVD) and on the other hand a combination of these antennas with a DBD within the outer-bulb operated in 100 mbar Ar as ignition aids. In both cases the antenna potential and antenna width are varied. Additionally, the effects of antenna thickness and antenna material are investigated. The ignition voltage, ignition current and light emission during ignition are measured on a nanosecond timescale. Furthermore, for the very first time, the ignition process is recorded in four consecutive intensified charge-coupled device images using a high-speed camera system with a time resolution in the range of nanoseconds. It was found that antennas strongly reduce the ignition voltage of automotive HID lamps. Active antennas reduce the ignition voltage significantly more than passive antennas, proportional to the conductance of the antenna. Combining conventional antennas with an outer-bulb discharge reduces the ignition voltage from 19 kV without any ignition aid to the intrinsic ignition voltage of the lamp below 10 kV, in the best case.

  17. Fusion Plasma Theory: Task 3, Auxiliary radiofrequency heating of tokamaks. Annual report, November 16, 1991--November 15, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Scharer, J.E.

    1992-12-31

    The research performed under this grant during the past year has been concentrated on the following several key tokamak ICRF (Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies) coupling, heating and current drive issues: Efficient coupling during the L- to H- mode transition by analysis and computer simulation of ICRF antennas; analysis of ICRF cavity-backed coil antenna coupling to plasma edge profiles including fast and ion Bernstein wave coupling for heating and current drive; benchmarking the codes to compare with current JET, D-IIID and ASDEX experimental results and predictions for advanced tokamaks such as BPX and SSAT (Steady-State Advanced Tokamak); ICRF full-wave field solutions, power conservation, heating analyses and minority ion current drive; and the effects of fusion alpha particle or ion tail populations on the ICRF absorption. Research progress, publications, and conference and workshop presentations are summarized in this report.

  18. Fusion Plasma Theory: Task 3, Auxiliary radiofrequency heating of tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Scharer, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    The research performed under this grant during the past year has been concentrated on the following several key tokamak ICRF (Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies) coupling, heating and current drive issues: Efficient coupling during the L- to H- mode transition by analysis and computer simulation of ICRF antennas; analysis of ICRF cavity-backed coil antenna coupling to plasma edge profiles including fast and ion Bernstein wave coupling for heating and current drive; benchmarking the codes to compare with current JET, D-IIID and ASDEX experimental results and predictions for advanced tokamaks such as BPX and SSAT (Steady-State Advanced Tokamak); ICRF full-wave field solutions, power conservation, heating analyses and minority ion current drive; and the effects of fusion alpha particle or ion tail populations on the ICRF absorption. Research progress, publications, and conference and workshop presentations are summarized in this report.

  19. RF MEMS Based Reconfigurable Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.

    2004-01-01

    The presentation will first of all address the advantages of RF MEMS circuit in antenna applications and also the need for electronically reconfigurable antennas. Next, discuss some of the recent examples of RF MEMS based reconfigurable microstrip antennas. Finally, conclude the talk with a summary of MEMS antenna performance.

  20. Antenna Technologies for NASA Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miranda, Felix

    2007-01-01

    This presentation addresses the efforts being performed at GRC to develop antenna technology in support of NASA s Exploration Vision. In particular, the presentation discusses the communications architecture asset-specific data services, as well as wide area coverage, high gain, low mass deployable antennas. Phased array antennas as well as electrically small, lightweight, low power, multifunctional antennas will be also discussed.

  1. Antenna Technologies for NASA Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miranda, Felix A.

    2006-01-01

    This presentation addresses the efforts being performed at GRC to develop antenna technology in support of NASA s Exploration Vision. In particular, the presentation discusses the communications architecture asset-specific data services, as well as wide area coverage, high gain, low mass deployable antennas. Phased array antennas as well as electrically small, lightweight, low power, multifunctional antennas will be also discussed.

  2. Autonomous omnidirectional spacecraft antenna system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, T. H.

    1983-01-01

    The development of a low gain Electronically Switchable Spherical Array Antenna is discussed. This antenna provides roughly 7 dBic gain for receive/transmit operation between user satellites and the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System. When used as a pair, the antenna provides spherical coverage. The antenna was tested in its primary operating modes: directed beam, retrodirective, and Omnidirectional.

  3. X-Antenna: A graphical interface for antenna analysis codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, B. L.; Newman, E. H.; Shamansky, H. T.

    1995-01-01

    This report serves as the user's manual for the X-Antenna code. X-Antenna is intended to simplify the analysis of antennas by giving the user graphical interfaces in which to enter all relevant antenna and analysis code data. Essentially, X-Antenna creates a Motif interface to the user's antenna analysis codes. A command-file allows new antennas and codes to be added to the application. The menu system and graphical interface screens are created dynamically to conform to the data in the command-file. Antenna data can be saved and retrieved from disk. X-Antenna checks all antenna and code values to ensure they are of the correct type, writes an output file, and runs the appropriate antenna analysis code. Volumetric pattern data may be viewed in 3D space with an external viewer run directly from the application. Currently, X-Antenna includes analysis codes for thin wire antennas (dipoles, loops, and helices), rectangular microstrip antennas, and thin slot antennas.

  4. Bifocal dual reflector antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, B. L. J.

    1973-01-01

    A bifocal dual reflector antenna is similar to and has better scan capability than classical cassegrain reflector antenna. The method used in determining the reflector surfaces is a modification of a design method for the dielectric bifocal lens. The three dimensional dual reflector is obtained by first designing an exact (in geometrical optics sense) two-point corrected two dimensional reflector and then rotating it around its axis of symmetry. A point by point technique is used in computing the reflector surfaces. Computed radiation characteristics of the dual reflector are compared with those of a cassegrain reflector. The results confirm that the bifocal antenna has superior performance.

  5. Satellite Antenna Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Through the Technology Affiliates Program at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the ACTS antenna system was transferred from experimental testing status to commercial development with KVH Industries, Inc. The ACTS design enables mobile satellite antennas to remain pointed at the satellite, regardless of the motion or vibration on which it is mounted. KVH's first product based on the ACTS design is a land-mobile satellite antenna system that will enable direct broadcast satellite television aboard moving trucks, recreational vehicles, trains, and buses. Future products could include use in broadcasting, emergency medical and military vehicles.

  6. SAR antenna calibration techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carver, K. R.; Newell, A. C.

    1978-01-01

    Calibration of SAR antennas requires a measurement of gain, elevation and azimuth pattern shape, boresight error, cross-polarization levels, and phase vs. angle and frequency. For spaceborne SAR antennas of SEASAT size operating at C-band or higher, some of these measurements can become extremely difficult using conventional far-field antenna test ranges. Near-field scanning techniques offer an alternative approach and for C-band or X-band SARs, give much improved accuracy and precision as compared to that obtainable with a far-field approach.

  7. SPS antenna pointing control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    The pointing control of a microwave antenna of the Satellite Power System was investigated emphasizing: (1) the SPS antenna pointing error sensing method; (2) a rigid body pointing control design; and (3) approaches for modeling the flexible body characteristics of the solar collector. Accuracy requirements for the antenna pointing control consist of a mechanical pointing control accuracy of three arc-minutes and an electronic phased array pointing accuracy of three arc-seconds. Results based on the factors considered in current analysis, show that the three arc-minute overall pointing control accuracy can be achieved in practice.

  8. NASA technology for large space antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, R. A.; Campbell, T. G.; Freeland, R. E.

    1980-01-01

    Some leading concepts for deployable antennas are described and an assessment of the state of the art in deployable antennas is presented. The advanced sunflower precision antenna, the radial rib antenna and the maypole (hoop/column) antenna, the wrap rib antenna and the parabolic erectable truss antenna are covered. In addition, a discussion on the technology development program for two deployable antenna concepts that are responsive to the antenna mission requirements as defined in the NASA mission model is presented.

  9. Superconducting miniaturized planar antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pischke, A.; Chaloupka, H.; Klein, N.; Splitt, G.

    This contribution reports on experimental as well as theoretical investigations of superconducting 2.4 GHz microstrip antenna. Due to both a new stepped-impedance patch shape and a high permittivity substrate (LaAlO3) the size was reduced to an area of only 6x6 mm. The measured radiation efficiency of antennas fabricated from YBa2Cu3O(7-delta) is at 77 K in the order of 45 and 65 percent for a substrate height of 0.5 mm and 1 mm respectively. In contrast, a copper antenna yields an efficiency of 3 and 6 percent only. Deviations from a linear transmission behavior of the superconducting antenna can be observed at a current density of 500,000 A/sq cm. An increase in frequency bandwidth from 4 MHz to over 9 MHz results from replacing the single-patch structure by a double-patch structure (stacked patches).

  10. CIRCULAR CAVITY SLOT ANTENNA

    DOEpatents

    Kerley, P.L.

    1959-01-01

    A small-size antenna having a doughnut-shaped field pattern and which can act both as an antenna and a resonant circuit is described. The antenna is of the slotted type and comprises a resonant cavity with a center hole. A circular slot is provided in one wall of the cavity concentric with the hole and a radio frequency source is connected across the slot. The pattern and loading of the antenna are adjusted by varying the position and shape of a center element slidably disposed within the hole and projecting from the slotted side of the resonant cavity. The disclosed structure may also be used to propagate the oscillator signal down a transniission line by replacing the center element with one leg of the transmission line in a spaced relation from the walls of the cavity.

  11. Dielectric Covered Planar Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Llombart Juan, Nuria (Inventor); Lee, Choonsup (Inventor); Chattopadhyay, Goutam (Inventor); Gill, John J. (Inventor); Skalare, Anders J. (Inventor); Siegel, Peter H. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An antenna element suitable for integrated arrays at terahertz frequencies is disclosed. The antenna element comprises an extended spherical (e.g. hemispherical) semiconductor lens, e.g. silicon, antenna fed by a leaky wave waveguide feed. The extended spherical lens comprises a substantially spherical lens adjacent a substantially planar lens extension. A couple of TE/TM leaky wave modes are excited in a resonant cavity formed between a ground plane and the substantially planar lens extension by a waveguide block coupled to the ground plane. Due to these modes, the primary feed radiates inside the lens with a directive pattern that illuminates a small sector of the lens. The antenna structure is compatible with known semiconductor fabrication technology and enables production of large format imaging arrays.

  12. A switchable microstrip antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khitrov, Iu. A.

    1992-03-01

    A switchable microstrip antenna is proposed which maintains nondirected radiation in the horizontal plane for all combinations of states of the switched elements. Theoretical and experimental results of studies of the directivity characteristics are presented.

  13. Electrically driven optical antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kern, Johannes; Kullock, René; Prangsma, Jord; Emmerling, Monika; Kamp, Martin; Hecht, Bert

    2015-09-01

    Unlike radiowave antennas, so far optical nanoantennas cannot be fed by electrical generators. Instead, they are driven by light or indirectly via excited discrete states in active materials in their vicinity. Here we demonstrate the direct electrical driving of an in-plane optical antenna by the broadband quantum-shot noise of electrons tunnelling across its feed gap. The spectrum of the emitted photons is determined by the antenna geometry and can be tuned via the applied voltage. Moreover, the direction and polarization of the light emission are controlled by the antenna resonance, which also improves the external quantum efficiency by up to two orders of magnitude. The one-material planar design offers facile integration of electrical and optical circuits and thus represents a new paradigm for interfacing electrons and photons at the nanometre scale, for example for on-chip wireless communication and highly configurable electrically driven subwavelength photon sources.

  14. Antenna pattern study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, Warren

    1988-01-01

    Prediction of antenna radiation patterns has long been an important function in the design of command, communication, and tracking systems for rocket vehicles and spacecraft. An acceptable degree of assurance that a radio link will provide the required quality of data or certainty of correct command execution must be acquired by some means if the system is to be certified as reliable. Two methods have been used to perform this function: (1) Theoretical analysis, based on the known properties of basic antenna element types and their behavior in the presence of conductive structures of simple shape, and (2) Measurement of the patterns on scale models of the spacecraft or rocket vehicle on which the antenna is located. Both of these methods are ordinarily employed in the antenna design process.

  15. Finline Horn Antennas.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-09-01

    is also given to my second reader, Professor H.M. Lee, for his suggestions on the microstrip to coaxial cable transition for the monopulse comparator...consideranly larger radiating aperture, a highly directive radiation pattern can be achieved. This type of antenna is called an electromagnetic horn. 12...receiver modules are required, as in a pnased array or multichannel direction finding system. B. HELAIED WORK 1. likjA-Fiel Aten Tstn Near-iield antenna

  16. On the Hipparcos Link to the ICRF derived from VLA and MERLIN radio astrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hering, R.; Walter, H. G.

    2007-06-01

    Positions and proper motions obtained from observations by the very large array (VLA) and the multi-element radio-linked interferometer network (MERLIN) are used to establish the link of the Hipparcos Celestial Reference Frame (HCRF) to the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF). The VLA and MERLIN data are apparently the latest ones published in the literature. Their mean epoch at around 2001 is about 10 years after the epoch of the Hipparcos catalogue and, therefore, the data are considered suitable to check the Hipparcos link established at epoch 1991.25. The parameters of the link, i.e., the angles of frame orientation and the angular rates of frame rotation, are estimated by fitting these parameters to the differences of the optical and radio positions and proper motions of stars common to the Hipparcos catalogue and the VLA and MERLIN data. Both the estimates of the angles of orientation and the angular rates of rotation show nearly consistent but insignificant results for all samples of stars treated. We conclude that not only the size of the samples of 9 15 stars is too small, but also that the accuracy of the radio positions and, above all, of the radio proper motions is insufficient, the latter being based on early-epoch star positions of low accuracy. The present observational data at epoch 2001 suggest that maintenance of the Hipparcos frame is not feasible at this stage.

  17. Development of plasma sources for ICRF heating experiment in KMAX mirror device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xuan; Liu, Ming; Yi, Hongshen; Lin, Munan; Shi, Peiyun

    2016-10-01

    KMAX, Keda Mirror with AXisymmeticity, is a tandem mirror machine with a length of 10 meters and diameters of 1.2 meters in the central cell and 0.3 meters in the mirror throat. In the past experiments, the plasma was generated by helicon wave launched from the west end. We obtained the blue core mode in argon discharge, however, it cannot provide sufficient plasma for hydrogen discharge, which is at least 1012 cm-3 required for effective ICRF heating. Several attempts have thus been tried or under design to increase the central cell's plasma density: (1) a washer gun with aperture of 1cm has been successfully tested, and a plasma density of 1013 cm-3 was achieved in the west cell near the gun, however, the plasma is only 1011 cm-3 in the central cell possible due to the mirror trapping and/or neutral quenching effect (2) a larger washer gun with aperture of 2.5 cm and a higher power capacitor bank are being assembled in order to generate more plasmas. In addition, how to mitigate the neutrals is under consideration (3) A hot cathode is been designed and will be tested in combination with plasma gun or alone. Preliminary results from those plasma sources will be presented and discussed.

  18. A Global Astrometric Solution for Pan-STARRS Referenced to ICRF2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berghea, C. T.; Makarov, V. V.; Frouard, J.; Hennessy, G. S.; Dorland, B. N.; Veillette, D. R.; Dudik, R. P.; Magnier, E. A.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Denneau, L.; Flewelling, H.; Kaiser, N.; Tonry, J. L.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Sesar, B.

    2016-09-01

    We describe the development and application of a Global Astrometric Solution (GAS) to the problem of Pan-STARRS1 (PS1) astrometry. Current PS1 astrometry is based on differential astrometric measurements using 2MASS reference stars, and thus PS1 astrometry inherits the errors of the 2MASS catalog. The GAS, based on a single, least-squares adjustment to approximately 750 k “grid stars” using over 3000 extragalactic objects as reference objects, avoids this catalog-to-catalog propagation of errors to a great extent. The GAS uses a relatively small number of quasi-stellar objects (QSOs, or distant active galactic nuclei) with very accurate (<1 mas) radio positions, referenced to the ICRF2. These QSOs provide a hard constraint in the global least-squares adjustment. Solving such a system provides absolute astrometry for all of the stars simultaneously. The concept is much cleaner than conventional astrometry but is not easy to perform for large catalogs. In this paper, we describe our method and its application to Pan-STARRS1 data. We show that large-scale systematic errors are easily corrected but our solution residuals for position (˜60 mas) are still larger than expected based on simulations (˜10 mas). We provide a likely explanation for the reason the small-scale residual errors are not corrected in our solution as would be expected.

  19. Electron Temperature Gradient Scale Measurements in ICRF Heated Plasmas at Alcator C-Mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houshmandyar, Saeid; Phillips, Perry E.; Rowan, William L.; Howard, Nathaniel T.; Greenwald, Martin

    2016-10-01

    It is generally believed that the temperature gradient is a driving mechanism for the turbulent transport in hot and magnetically confined plasmas. A feature of many anomalous transport models is the critical threshold value (LC) for the gradient scale length, above which both the turbulence and the heat transport increases. This threshold is also predicted by the recent multi-scale gyrokinetic simulations, which are focused on addressing the electron (and ion) heat transport in tokamaks. Recently, we have established an accurate technique (BT-jog) to directly measure the electron temperature gradient scale length (LTe =Te / ∇T) profile, using a high-spatial resolution radiometer-based electron cyclotron emission (ECE) diagnostic. For the work presented here, electrons are heated by ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) through minority heating in L-mode plasmas at different power levels, TRANSP runs determine the electron heat fluxes and the scale lengths are measured through the BT-jog technique. Furthermore, the experiment is extended for different plasma current and electron densities by which the parametric dependence of LC on magnetic shear, safety factor and density will be investigated. This work is supported by U.S. DoE OFES, under Award No. DE-FG03-96ER-54373.

  20. Effect of collisional heat transfer in ICRF power modulation experiment on ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujii, N.; D'Inca, R.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Bilato, R.; Bobkov, Vl. V.; Brambilla, M.; van Eester, D.; Harvey, R. W.; Jaeger, E. F.; Lerche, E. A.; Schneider, P.; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2014-02-01

    ICRF (ion cyclotron range of frequencies) heating experiments were performed in D-H plasmas at various H concentrations on ASDEX Upgrade. The rf power was modulated to measure the electron power deposition profile from electron temperature modulation. To minimize the contribution from indirect collisional heating and the effect of radial transport, the rf power was modulated at 50 Hz. However, peaking of electron temperature modulation was still observed around the hydrogen cyclotron resonance indicating collisional heating contribution. Time dependent simulation of the hydrogen distribution function was performed for the discharges, using the full-wave code AORSA (E.F. Jaeger, et al., Phys. Plasmas, Vol. 8, page 1573 (2001)) coupled to the Fokker-Planck code CQL3D (R.W. Harvey, et al., Proc. IAEA (1992)). In the present experimental conditions, it was found that modulation of the collisional heating was comparable to that of direct wave damping. Impact of radial transport was also analyzed and found to appreciably smear out the modulation profile and reduce the phase delay.

  1. Optical antenna gain. II - Receiving antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degnan, J. J.; Klein, B. J.

    1974-01-01

    Expressions are developed for the gain of a centrally obscured, circular optical antenna used as the collecting and focusing optics in a laser receiver, involving losses due to (1) incoming light blockage by central obscuration, (2) energy spillover at the detector, and (3) the effect of local oscillator distribution in the case of heterodyne or homodyne detection. Numerical results are presented for direct detection and for three types of local oscillator distribution (uniform, Gaussian, and matched).

  2. Final tests and performances verification of the European ALMA antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchiori, Gianpietro; Rampini, Francesco

    2012-09-01

    The Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) is under erection in Northern Chile. The array consists of a large number (up to 64) of 12 m diameter antennas and a number of smaller antennas, to be operated on the Chajnantor plateau at 5000 m altitude. The antennas will operate up to 950 GHz so that their mechanical performances, in terms of surface accuracy, pointing precision and dimensional stability, are very tight. The AEM consortium constituted by Thales Alenia Space France, Thales Alenia Space Italy, European Industrial Engineering (EIE GROUP), and MT Mechatronics is assembling and testing the 25 antennas. As of today, the first set of antennas have been delivered to ALMA for science. During the test phase with ESO and ALMA, the European antennas have shown excellent performances ensuring the specification requirements widely. The purpose of this paper is to present the different results obtained during the test campaign: surface accuracy, pointing error, fast motion capability and residual delay. Very important was also the test phases that led to the validation of the FE model showing that the antenna is working with a good margin than predicted at design level thanks also to the assembly and integration techniques.

  3. View of Antenna #1 (foreground), and Antenna #2 surface doors. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Antenna #1 (foreground), and Antenna #2 surface doors. Image looking northeast - Titan One Missile Complex 2A, .3 miles west of 129 Road and 1.5 miles north of County Line Road, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  4. Antenna cab interior showing equipment rack and fiberglass antenna panels, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Antenna cab interior showing equipment rack and fiberglass antenna panels, looking southeast. - Western Union Telegraph Company, Jennerstown Relay, Laurel Summit Road off U.S. 30, Laughlintown, Westmoreland County, PA

  5. Antenna cab interior showing waveguide from external parabolic antenna (later ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Antenna cab interior showing waveguide from external parabolic antenna (later addition), looking north. - Western Union Telegraph Company, Jennerstown Relay, Laurel Summit Road off U.S. 30, Laughlintown, Westmoreland County, PA

  6. Antenna cab interior showing equipment rack and fiberglass antenna panels, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Antenna cab interior showing equipment rack and fiberglass antenna panels, looking west. - Western Union Telegraph Company, Jennerstown Relay, Laurel Summit Road off U.S. 30, Laughlintown, Westmoreland County, PA

  7. Experimental realization of a variable index transmission line metamaterial as an acoustic leaky-wave antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naify, Christina J.; Layman, Christopher N.; Martin, Theodore P.; Nicholas, Michael; Calvo, David C.; Orris, Gregory J.

    2013-05-01

    Development and experimental realization of an acoustic leaky wave antenna are presented. The antenna uses a one-dimensional composite right/left hand transmission line approach to tune radiation angle continually from backfire-to-endfire, including broadside, as a function of input frequency. An array of acoustically loaded membranes and open channels form a structure with negative, zero, or positive refractive index, depending on excitation frequency. The fast-wave radiation band of the antenna is determined using acoustic circuit analysis. Based on the designs specified by circuit and finite element analysis, an acoustic leaky wave antenna was fabricated, and the radiation direction measured at discrete frequencies.

  8. Cup Cylindrical Waveguide Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, Roberto J.; Darby, William G.; Kory, Carol L.; Lambert, Kevin M.; Breen, Daniel P.

    2008-01-01

    The cup cylindrical waveguide antenna (CCWA) is a short backfire microwave antenna capable of simultaneously supporting the transmission or reception of two distinct signals having opposite circular polarizations. Short backfire antennas are widely used in mobile/satellite communications, tracking, telemetry, and wireless local area networks because of their compactness and excellent radiation characteristics. A typical prior short backfire antenna contains a half-wavelength dipole excitation element for linear polarization or crossed half-wavelength dipole elements for circular polarization. In order to achieve simultaneous dual circular polarization, it would be necessary to integrate, into the antenna feed structure, a network of hybrid components, which would introduce significant losses. The CCWA embodies an alternate approach that entails relatively low losses and affords the additional advantage of compactness. The CCWA includes a circular cylindrical cup, a circular disk subreflector, and a circular waveguide that serves as the excitation element. The components that make it possible to obtain simultaneous dual circular polarization are integrated into the circular waveguide. These components are a sixpost polarizer and an orthomode transducer (OMT) with two orthogonal coaxial ports. The overall length of the OMT and polarizer (for the nominal middle design frequency of 2.25 GHz) is about 11 in. (approximately equal to 28 cm), whereas the length of a commercially available OMT and polarizer for the same frequency is about 32 in. (approximately equal to 81 cm).

  9. Multiple Reflector Scanning Antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Bing

    Narrow beamwidth antenna systems are important to remote sensing applications and point-to-point communication systems. In many applications the main beam of the antenna radiation pattern must be scannable over a region of space. Scanning by mechanically skewing the entire antenna assembly is difficult and in many situations is unacceptable. Performance during scan is, of course, also very important. Traditional reflector systems employing the well-focused paraboloidal -shaped main reflector accomplish scan by motion of a few feeds, or by phase steering a focal plane feed array. Such scanning systems can experience significant gain loss. Traditional reflecting systems with a spherical main reflector have low aperture efficiency and poor side lobe and cross polarization performance. This dissertation introduces a new approach to the design of scanning spherical reflector systems, in which the performance weaknesses of high cross polarization and high side lobe levels are avoided. Moreover, the low aperture utilization common in spherical reflectors is overcome. As an improvement to this new spherical main reflector configuration, a flat mirror reflector is introduced to minimize the mechanical difficulties to scan the main beam. In addition to the reflector system design, reflector antenna performance evaluation is also important. The temperature resolution issue important for earth observation radiometer antennas is studied, and a new method to evaluate and optimize such temperature resolution is introduced.

  10. Imaging antenna arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutledge, D. B.; Muha, M. S.

    1982-01-01

    Many millimeter and far-infrared imaging systems are limited in sensitivity and speed because they depend on a single scanned element. Because of recent advances in planar detectors such as Schottky diodes, superconducting tunnel junctions, and microbolometers, an attractive approach to this problem is a planar antenna array with integrated detectors. A planar line antenna array and optical system for imaging has been developed. The significant advances are a 'reverse-microscope' optical configuration and a modified bow-tie antenna design. In the 'reverse-microscope' configuration, a lens is attached to the bottom of the substrate containing the antennas. Imaging is done through the substrate. This configuration eliminates the troublesome effects of substrate surface waves. The substrate lens has only a single refracting surface, making possible a virtually aplanatic system, with little spherical aberration or coma. The array is characterized by an optical transfer function that is easily measured. An array with 19 dB crosstalk levels between adjacent antennas has been tested and it was found that the array captured 50 percent of the available power. This imaging system was diffraction limited.

  11. View of antenna tunnel end. Right to Antenna Silo #1, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of antenna tunnel end. Right to Antenna Silo #1, left to Antenna Silo #2 - Titan One Missile Complex 2A, .3 miles west of 129 Road and 1.5 miles north of County Line Road, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  12. View north of the antenna array, note the communications antenna ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View north of the antenna array, note the communications antenna in the middleground - Over-the-Horizon Backscatter Radar Network, Christmas Valley Radar Site Transmit Sector Four Antenna Array, On unnamed road west of Lost Forest Road, Christmas Valley, Lake County, OR

  13. Interaction between high harmonic fast waves and fast ions in NSTX/NSTX-U plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertelli, N.; Valeo, E. J.; Gorelenkova, M.; Green, D. L.; RF SciDAC Team

    2016-10-01

    Fast wave (FW) heating in the ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) has been successfully used to sustain and control the fusion plasma performance, and it will likely play an important role in the ITER experiment. As demonstrated in the NSTX and DIII-D experiments the interactions between fast waves and fast ions can be so strong to significantly modify the fast ion population from neutral beam injection. In fact, it has been recently found in NSTX that FWs can modify and, under certain conditions, even suppress the energetic particle driven instabilities, such as toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes and global Alfvén eigenmodes and fishbones. This paper examines such interactions in NSTX/NSTX-U plasmas by using the recent extension of the RF full-wave code TORIC to include non-Maxwellian ions distribution functions. Particular attention is given to the evolution of the fast ions distribution function w/ and w/o RF. Tests on the RF kick-operator implemented in the Monte-Carlo particle code NUBEAM is also discussed in order to move towards a self consistent evaluation of the RF wave-field and the ion distribution functions in the TRANSP code. Work supported by US DOE Contract DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  14. Hemispheric ultra-wideband antenna.

    SciTech Connect

    Brocato, Robert Wesley

    2006-04-01

    This report begins with a review of reduced size ultra-wideband (UWB) antennas and the peculiar problems that arise when building a UWB antenna. It then gives a description of a new type of UWB antenna that resolves these problems. This antenna, dubbed the hemispheric conical antenna, is similar to a conventional conical antenna in that it uses the same inverted conical conductor over a ground plane, but it also uses a hemispheric dielectric fill in between the conductive cone and the ground plane. The dielectric material creates a fundamentally new antenna which is reduced in size and much more rugged than a standard UWB conical antenna. The creation of finite-difference time domain (FDTD) software tools in spherical coordinates, as described in SAND2004-6577, enabled this technological advance.

  15. Extension of the ICRF for selected areas down to the 16th magnitude - II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camargo, J. I. B.; Ducourant, C.; Teixeira, R.; Le Campion, J.-F.; Rapaport, M.; Benevides-Soares, P.

    2003-10-01

    In this paper we provide a major upgrade of the work presented in \\citet{cam}, aiming at the extension of the ICRF at optical wavelengths in regions of special astronomical interest, using observations from the Bordeaux and Valinhos meridian circles. Along with the new fields, the main differences, when compared to the first release, are: a much larger sky coverage, the replacement of the AC2000 by its upgraded version AC2000.2 as one of the first epoch astrometrical sources, inclusion of Tycho-2 and 2MASS photometry when available, and the correction for a magnitude equation on the Valinhos right ascension system as well. The resulting catalogue contains 678 828 entries with positional external precisions, on both coordinates, ranging from 50-60 mas (V<=13.5) to 70-140 mas (13.5

  16. The ACTS multibeam antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regier, Frank A.

    1992-01-01

    The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) to be launched in 1993 is briefly introduced. Its multibeam antenna, consisting of electrically similar 30 GHz receive and 20 GHz transmit offset Cassegrain systems, both utilizing orthogonal polarizations, is described. Dual polarization is achieved by using one feed assembly for each polarization in conjunction with nested front and back subreflectors, the gridded front subreflector acting as a window for one polarization and a reflector for the other. The antennas produce spot beams with approximately 0.3 degree beamwidth and gains of approximately 50 dbi. High surface accuracy and high edge taper produce low sidelobe levels and high cross-polarization isolation. A brief description is given of several Ka-band components fabricated for ACTS. These include multiflare antenna feedhorns, beam-forming networks utilizing latching ferrite waveguide switches, a 30 GHz HEMT low-noise amplifier and a 20 GHz TWT power amplifier.

  17. The ACTS multibeam antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regier, Frank A.

    1992-06-01

    The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) to be launched in 1993 is briefly introduced. Its multibeam antenna, consisting of electrically similar 30 GHz receive and 20 GHz transmit offset Cassegrain systems, both utilizing orthogonal polarizations, is described. Dual polarization is achieved by using one feed assembly for each polarization in conjunction with nested front and back subreflectors, the gridded front subreflector acting as a window for one polarization and a reflector for the other. The antennas produce spot beams with approximately 0.3 degree beamwidth and gains of approximately 50 dbi. High surface accuracy and high edge taper produce low sidelobe levels and high cross-polarization isolation. A brief description is given of several Ka-band components fabricated for ACTS. These include multiflare antenna feedhorns, beam-forming networks utilizing latching ferrite waveguide switches, a 30 GHz HEMT low-noise amplifier and a 20 GHz TWT power amplifier.

  18. Galileo satellite antenna modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steigenberger, Peter; Dach, Rolf; Prange, Lars; Montenbruck, Oliver

    2015-04-01

    The space segment of the European satellite navigation system Galileo currently consists of six satellites. Four of them belong to the first generation of In-Orbit Validation (IOV) satellites whereas the other two are Full Operational Capability (FOC) satellites. High-precision geodetic applications require detailed knowledge about the actual phase center of the satellite and receiver antenna. The deviation of this actual phase center from a well-defined reference point is described by phase center offsets (PCOs) and phase center variations (PCVs). Unfortunately, no public information is available about the Galileo satellite antenna PCOs and PCVs, neither for the IOV, nor the FOC satellites. Therefore, conventional values for the IOV satellite antenna PCOs have been adopted for the Multi-GNSS experiment (MGEX) of the International GNSS Service (IGS). The effect of the PCVs is currently neglected and no PCOs for the FOC satellites are available yet. To overcome this deficiency in GNSS observation modeling, satellite antenna PCOs and PCVs are estimated for the Galileo IOV satellites based on global GNSS tracking data of the MGEX network and additional stations of the legacy IGS network. Two completely independent solutions are computed with the Bernese and Napeos software packages. The PCO and PCV values of the individual satellites are analyzed and the availability of two different solutions allows for an accuracy assessment. The FOC satellites are built by a different manufacturer and are also equipped with another type of antenna panel compared to the IOV satellites. Signal transmission of the first FOC satellite has started in December 2014 and activation of the second satellite is expected for early 2015. Based on the available observations PCO estimates and, optionally PCVs of the FOC satellites will be presented as well. Finally, the impact of the new antenna model on the precision and accuracy of the Galileo orbit determination is analyzed.

  19. Endfire tapered slot antenna characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaubert, D. H.

    1989-01-01

    Typical configurations and operating characteristics for endfire tapered slot antennas are described. The feed transition modeling and moment method modeling techniques are utilized to predict antenna performance. The radiation pattern and cross polarization properties for the linearly tapered slot antennas are examined. Endfire tapered slot antennas are applicable for wide-band scanning arrays and focal plane arrays for imaging and multiple beam reflector systems.

  20. Twin-Axial Wire Antenna

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-06

    08-2015 Publication Twin-Axial Wire Antenna David A. Tonn Naval Under Warfare Center Division, Newport 1176 Howell St., Code 00L, Bldg 102T...Approved for Public Release Distribution is unlimited Attorney Docket No. 300030 1 of 10 TWIN-AXIAL WIRE ANTENNA STATEMENT OF GOVERNMENT INTEREST...2 of 10 length of the antenna wire . This creates a high pass filter in the antenna and prevents current flow in the VLF/LF bands. [0005] U.S

  1. Ionospheric effects to antenna impedance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bethke, K. H.

    1986-01-01

    The reciprocity between high power satellite antennas and the surrounding plasma are examined. The relevant plasma states for antenna impedance calculations are presented and plasma models, and hydrodynamic and kinetic theory, are discussed. A theory from which a variation in antenna impedance with regard to the radiated power can be calculated for a frequency range well above the plasma resonance frequency is give. The theory can include photo and secondary emission effects in antenna impedance calculations.

  2. Satellite communication antenna technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittra, R. (Editor); Imbriale, W. A. (Editor); Maanders, E. J. (Editor)

    1983-01-01

    A general overview of current technology in the field of communication satellite antennas is presented. Among the topics discussed are: the design of multiple beam systems; frequency reuse; and polarization control of antenna measurements. Consideration is also given to: contour beam synthesis; dual shaped reflector synthesis; beam shaping; and offset reflector design. The applications of the above technologies to present and future generations of communications satellites is considered, with emphasis given to such systems as: the Intelsats; the Defense Satellite Communications System, (DSCS-III); Satellite Business System (SBS), and Comstar.

  3. Furlable spacecraft antenna development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliver, R. E.; Wilson, A. H.

    1972-01-01

    The development of large furlable spacecraft antennas using conical main reflectors is described. Two basic antenna configurations which utilize conical main reflectors have been conceived and are under development. In the conical-Gregorian configuration each ray experiences two reflections in traveling from the feed center to the aperture plane. In the Quadreflex (four reflection) configuration, each ray experiences four reflections, one at each of two subreflector surfaces and two at the main conical reflector surface. The RF gain measurements obtained from 6-ft and 30-in. models of the conical-Gregorian and Quadreflex concepts respectively were sufficiently encouraging to warrant further development of the concepts.

  4. Compact form fitting small antennas using three-dimensional rapid prototyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, Bryan Jon

    Three-dimensional (3D) rapid prototyping holds significant promise for future antenna designs. Many complex designs that would be unmanufacturable or costly are realizable on a 3D printing machine. The ability to create 3D designs of virtually any configuration makes it possible to build compact antennas that can form fit to any space. These antennas build on the concept that small antennas can best reach the ideal operating limit when utilizing the entire 3D space in a sphere surrounding the antenna. Antennas require a combination of dielectric and conductive materials. 3D rapid prototyping is already well advanced for plastics and dielectric materials (with more options coming online). Prototyping with conductive materials has lagged behind; due mainly to their higher melting points, but this is advancing as well. This dissertation focuses on 3D rapid prototyping for antenna design. A 3D antenna made from small cubical cells is optimized for 2.4--3GHz using a genetic algorithm (GA). The antennas are built using 3D printing of plastic covered by conductive paint. The effects of the conductivity of the paint and number of layers on the resonance and gain of the antenna are evaluated. These results demonstrate the feasibility of using 3D rapid prototyping for antenna design. A 3D dipole is also optimized using a GA to function from 510--910MHz. The antenna was built using 3D rapid prototyping from plastic. The 3D antenna was covered with a conductive coating and measured, showing good agreement with simulation. The 3D GA is used to design 3D antennas of random shape to fit inside the empty space in a cell phone case and optimized for cell phone bands 800--900MHz and 1.6--3.7GHz. The research also evaluates methods and materials that can be used to produce 3D antennas. In addition to the flexibility that 3D prototyping brings to antenna design, this paper describes how this new and emerging method for building antennas can provide fast and affordable antennas for

  5. A new B-dot probe-based diagnostic for amplitude, polarization, and wavenumber measurements of ion cyclotron range-of frequency fields on ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochoukov, R.; Bobkov, V.; Faugel, H.; Fünfgelder, H.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.

    2015-11-01

    A new B-dot probe-based diagnostic has been installed on an ASDEX Upgrade tokamak to characterize ion cyclotron range-of frequency (ICRF) wave generation and interaction with magnetized plasma. The diagnostic consists of a field-aligned array of B-dot probes, oriented to measure fast and slow ICRF wave fields and their field-aligned wavenumber (k//) spectrum on the low field side of ASDEX Upgrade. A thorough description of the diagnostic and the supporting electronics is provided. In order to compare the measured dominant wavenumber of the local ICRF fields with the expected spectrum of the launched ICRF waves, in-air near-field measurements were performed on the newly installed 3-strap ICRF antenna to reconstruct the dominant launched toroidal wavenumbers (ktor). Measurements during a strap current phasing scan in tokamak discharges reveal an upshift in k// as strap phasing is moved away from the dipole configuration. This result is the opposite of the ktor trend expected from in-air near-field measurements; however, the near-field based reconstruction routine does not account for the effect of induced radiofrequency (RF) currents in the passive antenna structures. The measured exponential increase in the local ICRF wave field amplitude is in agreement with the upshifted k//, as strap phasing moves away from the dipole configuration. An examination of discharges heated with two ICRF antennas simultaneously reveals the existence of beat waves at 1 kHz, as expected from the difference of the two antennas' operating frequencies. Beats are observed on both the fast and the slow wave probes suggesting that the two waves are coupled outside the active antennas. Although the new diagnostic shows consistent trends between the amplitude and the phase measurements in response to changes applied by the ICRF antennas, the disagreement with the in-air near-field measurements remains. An electromagnetic model is currently under development to address this issue.

  6. Embedded Meta-Material Antennas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-31

    of electronic warfare signal and information processing systems. To realize such systems, the key is to miniaturize antennas that transmit and...single aperture, which can provide significant miniaturization and flexibility to the entire system. To design such miniaturized antennas , new materials...and technologies have to be incorporated. For this purpose, the PI has designed and demonstrated miniaturized antennas by introducing metamaterials

  7. Simulation Results for the New NSTX HHFW Antenna Straps Design by Using Microwave Studio

    SciTech Connect

    Kung, C C; Brunkhorst, C; Greenough, N; Fredd, E; Castano, A; Miller, D; D'Amico, G; Yager, R; Hosea, J; Wilson, J R; Ryan, P

    2009-05-26

    Experimental results have shown that the high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) at 30 MHz can provide substantial plasma heating and current drive for the NSTX spherical tokamak operation. However, the present antenna strap design rarely achieves the design goal of delivering the full transmitter capability of 6 MW to the plasma. In order to deliver more power to the plasma, a new antenna strap design and the associated coaxial line feeds are being constructed. This new antenna strap design features two feedthroughs to replace the old single feed-through design. In the design process, CST Microwave Studio has been used to simulate the entire new antenna strap structure including the enclosure and the Faraday shield. In this paper, the antenna strap model and the simulation results will be discussed in detail. The test results from the new antenna straps with their associated resonant loops will be presented as well.

  8. I-mode Plasmas with Combined ICRF Mode Conversion Flow Drive and Minority Heating on Alcator C-Mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y.; Reinke, M. L.; Rice, J. E.; Wukitch, S. J.; Granetz, R.; Greenwald, M.; Hubbard, A. E.; Marmar, E. S.; Podpaly, Y. A.; Porkolab, M.; Tsujii, N.; Wolfe, S.; Alcator C-Mod Team

    2011-10-01

    High performance I-mode plasmas have been obtained via ICRF mode conversion heating and flow drive, plus ICRF minority heating. The plasmas have reversed magnetic field (Bt0 ~ 5.1 T) and lower-single-null shape. External 3He is puffed to have nHe3/ne ~ 0.1 and the residual H level nH/ne is about 0.05. We use 50 MHz RF power (<=2.5 MW) for D(3He) mode conversion flow drive and heating, and 80 MHz RF power (<=2.5 MW) for D(H) minority heating. The obtained I-mode plasmas have high Te (<=8 keV) and large rotation (<=100 km/s). The rotation profile has a large shear at r/a ~ 0.9, which may help further enhance the plasma confinement. Because of the long slowdown time at high Te and relatively low density, a high energy H tail is generated. The tail also affects the sawtooth oscillation and produces large sawtooth crashes, which also trigger neoclassical tearing modes. The appearance of the NTMs often coincides with a slowdown of plasma rotation. The onset condition of these NTMs is at the low collisionality regime within the criterion established by studies on other tokamaks. Supported by USDoE award DE-FC02-99ER54512.

  9. Community Antenna Television (CATV).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Communications Commission, Washington, DC.

    The number of households hooked up to cable television or community antenna television (CATV) is expanding rapidly, and Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has been developing regulations since 1962 to guide the growth of the industry. By 1965 the FCC had claimed jurisdiction over all CATV systems in the U. S. This jurisdiction was challenged…

  10. Quartz antenna with hollow conductor

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Benabou, Elie

    2002-01-01

    A radio frequency (RF) antenna for plasma ion sources is formed of a hollow metal conductor tube disposed within a glass tube. The hollow metal tubular conductor has an internal flow channel so that there will be no coolant leakage if the outer glass tube of the antenna breaks. A portion of the RF antenna is formed into a coil; the antenna is used for inductively coupling RF power to a plasma in an ion source chamber. The antenna is made by first inserting the metal tube inside the glass tube, and then forming the glass/metal composite tube into the desired coil shape.

  11. How Fast Is Fast?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korn, Abe

    1994-01-01

    Presents an activity that enables students to answer for themselves the question of how fast a body must travel before the nonrelativistic expression must be replaced with the correct relativistic expression by deciding on the accuracy required in describing the kinetic energy of a body. (ZWH)

  12. Ultradirective antenna via transformation optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tichit, P.-H.; Burokur, S. N.; de Lustrac, A.

    2009-05-01

    Spatial coordinate transformation is used as a reliable tool to control electromagnetic fields. In this paper, we derive the permeability and permittivity tensors of a metamaterial able to transform an isotropically radiating source into a compact ultradirective antenna in the microwave domain. We show that the directivity of this antenna is competitive with regard to conventional directive antennas (horn and reflector antennas), besides its dimensions are smaller. Numerical simulations using finite element method are performed to illustrate these properties. A reduction in the electromagnetic material parameters is also proposed for an easy fabrication of this antenna from existing materials. Following that, the design of the proposed antenna using a layered metamaterial is presented. The different layers are all composed of homogeneous and uniaxial anisotropic metamaterials, which can be obtained from simple metal-dielectric structures. When the radiating source is embedded in the layered metamaterial, a highly directive beam is radiated from the antenna.

  13. THE COUPLING AND MUTUAL IMPEDANCE BETWEEN BALANCED WIRE-ARM CONICAL LOG-SPIRAL ANTENNAS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    CONICAL ANTENNAS, *COUPLED ANTENNAS, * HELICAL ANTENNAS, ANTENNA COMPONENTS, ANTENNA RADIATION PATTERNS, COUPLINGS, DESIGN, ELECTRIC CURRENTS...ELECTRIC POTENTIAL, ELECTRICAL IMPEDANCE, MEASUREMENT, POLARIZATION, PROPAGATION, ROTATION, SPIRAL ANTENNAS, THEORY

  14. Interpolation And FFT Of Near-Field Antenna Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatti, Mark S.; Rahmat-Samii, Yahya

    1990-01-01

    Bivariate Lagrange interpolation applied to plane-polar measurement scans. Report discusses recent advances in application of fast-Fourier-transform (FFT) techniques to measurements of near radiation fields of antennas on plane-polar grid. Attention focused mainly on use of such measurements to calculate far radiation fields. Also discussion of use of FFT's in holographic diagnosis of distortions of antenna reflectors. Advantage of scheme, it speeds calculations because it requires fewer data and manipulations of data than other schemes used for this purpose.

  15. Elasto optical antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinet, J.-Y.

    It is shown that elasto optical properties of some transparent media make possible to couple elastic with optical resonators. Large single crystals with high quality factors lead to narrow band resonant antennas, whereas optical fibers lead to wideband antennas. The sensitivities are evaluated. Les propriétés élasto-optiques de certains milieux transparents permettent le couplage entre des résonateurs optiques et élastiques. Il est possible de concevoir des antennes à bande étroite utilisant des monocristaux de grande taille à très faibles pertes acoustiques, et des antennes à large bande utilisant des fibres optiques. On a calculé des ordres de grandeur pour les sensibilités des deux systèmes.

  16. Microsecond switchable thermal antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Abdallah, Philippe Benisty, Henri; Besbes, Mondher

    2014-07-21

    We propose a thermal antenna that can be actively switched on and off at the microsecond scale by means of a phase transition of a metal-insulator material, the vanadium dioxide (VO{sub 2}). This thermal source is made of a periodically patterned tunable VO{sub 2} nanolayer, which support a surface phonon-polariton in the infrared range in their crystalline phase. Using electrodes properly registered with respect to the pattern, the VO{sub 2} phase transition can be locally triggered by ohmic heating so that the surface phonon-polariton can be diffracted by the induced grating, producing a highly directional thermal emission. Conversely, when heating less, the VO{sub 2} layers cool down below the transition temperature, the surface phonon-polariton cannot be diffracted anymore so that thermal emission is inhibited. This switchable antenna could find broad applications in the domain of active thermal coatings or in those of infrared spectroscopy and sensing.

  17. Millimeter Wave Antenna Technology,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-09-30

    development work will be required. Milli- meter wave antennas play a key role in the rationale for millimeter system designs beas ihspatial resolution...results in their popularity for multiple bea applications. In their design, care ust be exercised to minimize reflection losses at the lens surfaces...Alternatively, the radome surface may be treated to repel the water, and rivulet flow results. Since the water is more randomly distribu- ted, the gain loss is

  18. JPL Large Advanced Antenna Station Array Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    In accordance with study requirements, two antennas are described: a 30 meter standard antenna and a 34 meter modified antenna, along with a candidate array configuration for each. Modified antenna trade analyses are summarized, risks analyzed, costs presented, and a final antenna array configuration recommendation made.

  19. 47 CFR 80.863 - Antenna system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Antenna system. 80.863 Section 80.863... Antenna system. (a) An antenna system must be installed which is as nondirectional and as efficient as is... construction of the required antenna must insure operation in time of emergency. (b) If the required antenna...

  20. 47 CFR 80.866 - Spare antenna.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Spare antenna. 80.866 Section 80.866... Spare antenna. A spare transmitting antenna completely assembled for immediate erection must be provided. If the installed transmitting antenna is suspended between supports, this spare antenna must be...

  1. 47 CFR 80.863 - Antenna system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Antenna system. 80.863 Section 80.863... Antenna system. (a) An antenna system must be installed which is as nondirectional and as efficient as is... construction of the required antenna must insure operation in time of emergency. (b) If the required antenna...

  2. 47 CFR 80.866 - Spare antenna.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Spare antenna. 80.866 Section 80.866... Spare antenna. A spare transmitting antenna completely assembled for immediate erection must be provided. If the installed transmitting antenna is suspended between supports, this spare antenna must be...

  3. 47 CFR 80.863 - Antenna system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Antenna system. 80.863 Section 80.863... Antenna system. (a) An antenna system must be installed which is as nondirectional and as efficient as is... construction of the required antenna must insure operation in time of emergency. (b) If the required antenna...

  4. 47 CFR 80.866 - Spare antenna.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Spare antenna. 80.866 Section 80.866... Spare antenna. A spare transmitting antenna completely assembled for immediate erection must be provided. If the installed transmitting antenna is suspended between supports, this spare antenna must be...

  5. 47 CFR 80.863 - Antenna system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Antenna system. 80.863 Section 80.863... Antenna system. (a) An antenna system must be installed which is as nondirectional and as efficient as is... construction of the required antenna must insure operation in time of emergency. (b) If the required antenna...

  6. 47 CFR 80.866 - Spare antenna.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Spare antenna. 80.866 Section 80.866... Spare antenna. A spare transmitting antenna completely assembled for immediate erection must be provided. If the installed transmitting antenna is suspended between supports, this spare antenna must be...

  7. 47 CFR 80.866 - Spare antenna.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Spare antenna. 80.866 Section 80.866... Spare antenna. A spare transmitting antenna completely assembled for immediate erection must be provided. If the installed transmitting antenna is suspended between supports, this spare antenna must be...

  8. 47 CFR 80.863 - Antenna system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Antenna system. 80.863 Section 80.863... Antenna system. (a) An antenna system must be installed which is as nondirectional and as efficient as is... construction of the required antenna must insure operation in time of emergency. (b) If the required antenna...

  9. Tunable Patch Antennas Using Microelectromechanical Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-11

    Tunable Microstrip Patch Antena Using RF MEMS Technology, IEEE Transactions on Antennas and Propagations, Vol. 55, Issue 4, April 2007, pp. 1193...capacitors co-fabricated in the same process. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Microstrip antennas, patch antennas, radio frequency microelectromechanical systems...resonant mode. Keywords: Microstrip antennas, patch antennas, radio frequency microelectromechanical systems, tunable circuits and devices 2

  10. The ACTS multibeam antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regier, Frank A.

    1992-01-01

    The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) to be launched in 1993 introduces several new technologies including a multibeam antenna (MBA) operating at Ka-band. The satellite is introduced briefly, and then the MBA, consisting of electrically similar 30 GHz received and 20 GHz transmit offset Cassegrain systems utilizing orthogonal linear polarizations, is described. Dual polarization is achieved by using one feed assembly for each polarization in conjunction with nested front and back subreflectors, the gridded front subreflector acting as a window for one polarization and a reflector for the other. The antennas produce spot beams with approximately 0.3 deg beamwidth and gains of approximately 50 dbi. High surface accuracy and high edge taper produce low sidelobe levels and high cross-polarization isolation. A brief description is given of several Ka-band components fabricated for ACTS. These include multiflare antenna feedhorns, beam-forming networks utilizing latching ferrite waveguide switches, a 30 GHz high mobility electron transmitter (HEMT) low-noise amplifier and a 20 GHz TWT power amplifier.

  11. Modular antenna design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ribble, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    The mechanical design of a modular antenna concept was developed sufficiently to allow manufacture of a working demonstration model of a module, to predict mass properties, and to make performance estimates for antenna reflectors composed of these modules. The primary features of this concept are: (1) each module is an autonomous structural element which can be attached to adjacent modules through a three point connection; (2) the upper surface is a folding hexagonal truss plate mechanism which serves as the supporting structure for a reflective surface; and (3) the entire truss and surface can be folded into a cylindrical envelope in which all truss elements are essentially parallel. The kinematic studies and engineering demonstration model fully verified the deployment kinematics, stowing philosophy, and deployment sequencing for large antenna modules. It was established that such modules can be stowed in packages as small as 25 cm in diameter, using 1.27 cm diameter structural tubes. The development activity indicates that this deployable modular approach towards building large structures in space will support erection of 450 m apertures for operation up to 3 GHz with a single space shuttle flight.

  12. The ACTS multibeam antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regier, Frank A.

    1992-04-01

    The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) to be launched in 1993 introduces several new technologies including a multibeam antenna (MBA) operating at Ka-band. The satellite is introduced briefly, and then the MBA, consisting of electrically similar 30 GHz received and 20 GHz transmit offset Cassegrain systems utilizing orthogonal linear polarizations, is described. Dual polarization is achieved by using one feed assembly for each polarization in conjunction with nested front and back subreflectors, the gridded front subreflector acting as a window for one polarization and a reflector for the other. The antennas produce spot beams with approximately 0.3 deg beamwidth and gains of approximately 50 dbi. High surface accuracy and high edge taper produce low sidelobe levels and high cross-polarization isolation. A brief description is given of several Ka-band components fabricated for ACTS. These include multiflare antenna feedhorns, beam-forming networks utilizing latching ferrite waveguide switches, a 30 GHz high mobility electron transmitter (HEMT) low-noise amplifier and a 20 GHz TWT power amplifier.

  13. An active antenna for ELF magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, John F.; Spaniol, Craig

    1994-01-01

    The work of Nikola Tesla, especially that directed toward world-wide electrical energy distribution via excitation of the earth-ionosphere cavity resonances, has stimulated interest in the study of these resonances. Not only are they important for their potential use in the transmission of intelligence and electrical power, they are important because they are an integral part of our natural environment. This paper describes the design of a sensitive, untuned, low noise active antenna which is uniquely suited to modern earth-ionosphere cavity resonance measurements employing fast-Fourier transform techniques for near-real-time data analysis. It capitalizes on a little known field-antenna interaction mechanism. Recently, the authors made preliminary measurements of the magnetic fields in the earth-ionosphere cavity. During the course of this study, the problem of designing an optimized ELF magnetic field sensor presented itself. The sensor would have to be small, light weight (for portable use), and capable of detecting the 5-50 Hz picoTesla-level signals generated by the natural excitations of the earth-ionosphere cavity resonances. A review of the literature revealed that past researchers had employed very large search coils, both tuned and untuned. Hill and Bostick, for example, used coils of 30,000 turns wound on high permeability cores of 1.83 m length, weighing 40 kg. Tuned coils are unsuitable for modern fast-Fourier transform data analysis techniques which require a broad spectrum input. 'Untuned' coils connected to high input impedance voltage amplifiers exhibit resonant responses at the resonant frequency determined by the coil inductance and the coil distributed winding capacitance. Also, considered as antennas, they have effective areas equal only to their geometrical areas.

  14. Antenna structure with distributed strip

    DOEpatents

    Rodenbeck, Christopher T.

    2008-10-21

    An antenna comprises electrical conductors arranged to form a radiating element including a folded line configuration and a distributed strip configuration, where the radiating element is in proximity to a ground conductor. The folded line and the distributed strip can be electrically interconnected and substantially coplanar. The ground conductor can be spaced from, and coplanar to, the radiating element, or can alternatively lie in a plane set at an angle to the radiating element. Embodiments of the antenna include conductor patterns formed on a printed wiring board, having a ground plane, spacedly adjacent to and coplanar with the radiating element. Other embodiments of the antenna comprise a ground plane and radiating element on opposed sides of a printed wiring board. Other embodiments of the antenna comprise conductors that can be arranged as free standing "foils". Other embodiments include antennas that are encapsulated into a package containing the antenna.

  15. Antenna structure with distributed strip

    DOEpatents

    Rodenbeck, Christopher T.

    2008-03-18

    An antenna comprises electrical conductors arranged to form a radiating element including a folded line configuration and a distributed strip configuration, where the radiating element is in proximity to a ground conductor. The folded line and the distributed strip can be electrically interconnected and substantially coplanar. The ground conductor can be spaced from, and coplanar to, the radiating element, or can alternatively lie in a plane set at an angle to the radiating element. Embodiments of the antenna include conductor patterns formed on a printed wiring board, having a ground plane, spacedly adjacent to and coplanar with the radiating element. Other embodiments of the antenna comprise a ground plane and radiating element on opposed sides of a printed wiring board. Other embodiments of the antenna comprise conductors that can be arranged as free standing "foils". Other embodiments include antennas that are encapsulated into a package containing the antenna.

  16. A Mars Riometer: Antenna Considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fry, Craig D.

    2001-01-01

    This is the final report on NASA Grant NAG5-9706. This project explored riometer (relative ionospheric opacity meter) antenna designs that would be practical for a Mars surface or balloon mission. The riometer is an important radio science instrument for terrestrial aeronomy investigations. The riometer measures absorption of cosmic radio waves by the overhead ionosphere. Studies have shown the instrument should work well on Mars, which has an appreciable daytime ionosphere. There has been concern that the required radio receiver antenna (with possibly a 10 meter scale size) would be too large or too difficult to deploy on Mars. This study addresses those concerns and presents several antenna designs and deployment options. It is found that a Mars balloon would provide an excellent platform for the riometer antenna. The antenna can be incorporated into the envelope design, allowing self-deployment of the antenna as the balloon inflates.

  17. Efficient Placement of Directional Antennas

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Feng; Kasiviswanathan, Shiva

    2010-09-20

    Directional antenna is an technology for the proliferation of wireless networks. In centralized wireless network, wireless devices communicate through base stations. Directed antennas are placed on base stations and form a backbone of communication. The communication between base stations and wireless devices can be interfered due to a large number of wireless device. Methodically positioning and orienting directed antennas can help to reduce the interference while saving energy. An integer linear programming is developed for siting and directing antennas on multiple base stations, and this formulation can be extended to model non-overlapping channels. Through the integer programming formulation, optimal antenna positions can be used to analyze the performance of directed antennas with different parameters like the number base stations and the number of non-overlapping channels.

  18. Antenna Calibration and Measurement Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rochblatt, David J.; Cortes, Manuel Vazquez

    2012-01-01

    A document describes the Antenna Calibration & Measurement Equipment (ACME) system that will provide the Deep Space Network (DSN) with instrumentation enabling a trained RF engineer at each complex to perform antenna calibration measurements and to generate antenna calibration data. This data includes continuous-scan auto-bore-based data acquisition with all-sky data gathering in support of 4th order pointing model generation requirements. Other data includes antenna subreflector focus, system noise temperature and tipping curves, antenna efficiency, reports system linearity, and instrument calibration. The ACME system design is based on the on-the-fly (OTF) mapping technique and architecture. ACME has contributed to the improved RF performance of the DSN by approximately a factor of two. It improved the pointing performances of the DSN antennas and productivity of its personnel and calibration engineers.

  19. Slotted Antenna with Anisotropic Covering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-06

    08-2015 Publication Slotted Antenna with Anisotropic Covering David A. Tonn et al Naval Under Warfare Center Division, Newport 1176 Howell St...NUWC 300055 Distribution A An antenna includes a tubular, conductive radiator having a longitudinal slot formed therein from a first end of the...conductive radiator to a second end of the conductive radiator. An antenna feed can be joined to the conductive radiator adjacent to and across the slot

  20. Improved Gain Microstrip Patch Antenna

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-06

    08-2015 Publication Improved Gain Microstrip Patch Antenna David A. Tonn Naval Under Warfare Center Division, Newport 1176 Howell St., Code 00L...Distribution A An antenna for mounting on a ground plane includes a dielectric substrate for mounting on the ground plane. A conductive patch...GAIN MICROSTRIP PATCH ANTENNA STATEMENT OF GOVERNMENT INTEREST [0001] The invention described herein may be manufactured and used by or for the

  1. Analysis of rectangular microstrip antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, M. C.; Deshpande, M. D.

    1984-01-01

    The problem of microstrip antennas covered by a dielectric substrate is formulated in terms of coupled integro-differential equations with the current distribution on the conducting patch as an unknown quantity. The Galerkin method is used to solve for the unknown patch current. Using the present formulation, the radiation pattern, the resonant frequency, and the bandwidth of a rectangular microstrip antenna are computed. Design data for a rectangular microstrip antenna are also presented.

  2. Deployable antenna phase A study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, J.; Bernstein, J.; Fischer, G.; Jacobson, G.; Kadar, I.; Marshall, R.; Pflugel, G.; Valentine, J.

    1979-01-01

    Applications for large deployable antennas were re-examined, flight demonstration objectives were defined, the flight article (antenna) was preliminarily designed, and the flight program and ground development program, including the support equipment, were defined for a proposed space transportation system flight experiment to demonstrate a large (50 to 200 meter) deployable antenna system. Tasks described include: (1) performance requirements analysis; (2) system design and definition; (3) orbital operations analysis; and (4) programmatic analysis.

  3. Optical antenna gain. 2: receiving antennas.

    PubMed

    Degnan, J J; Klein, B J

    1974-10-01

    Expressions are derived for the gain of a centrally obscured, circular optical antenna when used as the collecting and focusing optics in a laser receiver which include losses due to (1) blockage of the incoming light by the central obscuration, (2) the spillover of energy at the detector, and (3) the effect of local oscillator distribution in the case of heterodyne or homodyne detection. Numerical results are presented for direct detection and for three types of local oscillator distributions (uniform, Gaussian, and matched) in the case of heterodyne or homodyne detection. The results are presented in several graphs that allow the rapid evaluation of receiver gain for an arbitrary set of telescope and detector parameters. It is found that, for uniform illumination by the LO, the optimum SNR is obtained when the detector radius is approximately 0.74 times the Airy disk radius. The use of an optimized Gaussian (spot size = 0.46 times the Airy disk radius) improves the receiver gain by less than 1 dB. Theuse results are insensitive to the size of the central obscuration.

  4. Secondary pattern computation of an offset reflector antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    Reflector antennas are widely used in communications satellite systems because they provide high gain at low cost. In analyzing reflector antennas the computation of the secondary pattern is the main concern. A computer program for calculating the secondary pattern of an offset reflector has been developed and implemented at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The theoretical foundation for this program is based on the use of geometrical optics to describe the fields from the feed to the reflector surface and to the aperture plane. The resulting aperture field distribution is then transformed to the far-field zone by the fast Fourier transform algorithm. Comparing this technique with other well-known techniques (the geometrical theory of diffraction, physical optics (Jacobi-Bessel), etc.) shows good agreement for large (diameter of 100 lambda or greater) reflector antennas.

  5. Near Field Antenna Measurement System.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-01

    beam pointing accuracy and .6 dB gain accuracy. These antennas are both planar arrays with the X-band antenna scanning with ferrite phase shifters in...AD-A114 125 M[ES AIRCRAFT CO FULLERTON CA F/ 17/9 NEAR FIELD ANTENNA MEASUREMENT SYSTEM. (U) MAR 82 A E HOLLEY DAABO7-7?-C-1 87 UNCLASSIFIED NL...IllIHE El. onhEnoh IIIIhh --h h I~m I I Research and Development Technical Report I DAABO7-77-C-0587-F1 NEAR FIELD ANTENNA I MEASUREMENT SYSTEM I A.E

  6. Project Echo: Antenna Steering System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klahn, R.; Norton, J. A.; Githens, J. A.

    1961-01-01

    The Project Echo communications experiment employed large, steerable,transmitting and receiving antennas at the ground terminals. It was necessary that these highly directional antennas be continuously and accurately pointed at the passing satellite. This paper describes a new type of special purpose data converter for directing narrow-beam communication antennas on the basis of predicted information. The system is capable of converting digital input data into real-time analog voltage commands with a dynamic accuracy of +/- 0.05 degree, which meets the requirements of the present antennas.

  7. Electronic switching spherical array antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stockton, R.

    1978-01-01

    This work was conducted to demonstrate the performance levels attainable with an ESSA (Electronic Switching Spherical Array) antenna by designing and testing an engineering model. The antenna was designed to satisfy general spacecraft environmental requirements and built to provide electronically commandable beam pointing capability throughout a hemisphere. Constant gain and beam shape throughout large volumetric coverage regions are the principle characteristics. The model is intended to be a prototype of a standard communications and data handling antenna for user scientific spacecraft with the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS). Some additional testing was conducted to determine the feasibility of an integrated TDRSS and GPS (Global Positioning System) antenna system.

  8. Optical resonant Archimedean spiral antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Hanqing; Yang, Jing; Zhang, Weiwei; Zhang, Jiasen

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the field enhancement properties of optical resonant Archimedean spiral antennas by using a finite difference time domain method. Due to the spiral structure, the antennas show a circular dichroism in the electric field enhancement, especially for a large turning angle. A large magnetic field enhancement is also obtained with a confinement in the nanometer size. When the turning angle equals π for a linearly polarized incident beam, the polarization of the enhanced field in the spiral antenna can be perpendicular to the incident polarization with a similar enhancement factor to the optical resonant dipole antennas.

  9. Antenna system for MSAT mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karlsson, Ingmar; Patenaude, Yves; Stipelman, Leora

    1988-01-01

    Spar has evaluated and compared several antenna concepts for the North American Mobile Satellite. The paper describes some of the requirements and design considerations for the antennas and demonstrates the performance of antenna concepts that can meet them. Multiple beam reflector antennas are found to give best performance and much of the design effort has gone into the design of the primary feed radiators and beam forming networks to achieve efficient beams with good overlap and flexibility. Helices and cup dipole radiators have been breadboarded as feed element candidates and meausured results are presented. The studies and breadboard activities have made it possible to proceed with a flight program.

  10. An initial measurement of a fast neutral spectrum for ion cyclotron range of frequency heated plasma using two-channel compact neutral particle analyzers in KSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S. H.; Wang, S. J.; Park, M.; Kim, S. K.

    2013-11-01

    The accurate measurement of fast neutral particles from high energy ion tails is very important since it is a measure of ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) or neutral beam (NB) ion heating. In KSTAR, fast neutral measurements have been carried out using a compact neutral particle analyzer based on the silicon photo diode since 2010. As a result, the fast neutral spectrum was observed consistent with the ion temperature, diamagnetic energy, and neutron flux in 2011. However, there was fast neutral count beyond the injected neutral beam energy in NB-only heating. Since it is difficult to expect the count unless the temperature is high enough to diffuse the fast ions beyond the beam energy it was required to identify what it is. During the 2012 campaign, the two-channel diode detectors with and without a particle stopper were used to distinguish fast neutral counts and other counts by a hard X-ray or neutrons. As a result, it was confirmed that the high energy component beyond the beam energy originated from a hard X-ray or neutrons. Finally, it was observed that faster neutrals are generated by ICRF heating and enhanced by electron cyclotron heating compared to NB-only heating.

  11. An initial measurement of a fast neutral spectrum for ion cyclotron range of frequency heated plasma using two-channel compact neutral particle analyzers in KSTAR

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S. H.; Park, M.; Kim, S. K.; Wang, S. J.

    2013-11-15

    The accurate measurement of fast neutral particles from high energy ion tails is very important since it is a measure of ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) or neutral beam (NB) ion heating. In KSTAR, fast neutral measurements have been carried out using a compact neutral particle analyzer based on the silicon photo diode since 2010. As a result, the fast neutral spectrum was observed consistent with the ion temperature, diamagnetic energy, and neutron flux in 2011. However, there was fast neutral count beyond the injected neutral beam energy in NB-only heating. Since it is difficult to expect the count unless the temperature is high enough to diffuse the fast ions beyond the beam energy it was required to identify what it is. During the 2012 campaign, the two-channel diode detectors with and without a particle stopper were used to distinguish fast neutral counts and other counts by a hard X-ray or neutrons. As a result, it was confirmed that the high energy component beyond the beam energy originated from a hard X-ray or neutrons. Finally, it was observed that faster neutrals are generated by ICRF heating and enhanced by electron cyclotron heating compared to NB-only heating.

  12. Impact of Optical Baffle on Antenna Pattern

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, T.; Pogorzelski, R.

    1994-01-01

    One of the major concerns of antenna design for spacecraft applications is the effect of surrounding structures which can reflect and diffract the antenna's radiated energy and cause degradation in the antenna directivity, beam shape, and sidelobe levels.

  13. Large Space Antenna Systems Technology, 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyer, W. J. (Compiler)

    1985-01-01

    Mission applications for large space antenna systems; large space antenna structural systems; materials and structures technology; structural dynamics and control technology, electromagnetics technology, large space antenna systems and the Space Station; and flight test and evaluation were examined.

  14. Ferrite attenuator modulation improves antenna performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooks, J. C.; Larson, S. G.; Shorkley, F. H.; Williams, B. T.

    1970-01-01

    Ferrite attenuator inserted into appropriate waveguide reduces the gain of the antenna element which is causing interference. Modulating the ferrite attenuator to change the antenna gain at the receive frequency permits ground tracking until the antenna is no longer needed.

  15. View of Antenna #1 (foreground), and Antenna #2 surface doors. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Antenna #1 (foreground), and Antenna #2 surface doors. Orientation Target #2 in background. Image looking northeast - Titan One Missile Complex 2A, .3 miles west of 129 Road and 1.5 miles north of County Line Road, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  16. View of Antenna #2 (foreground), and Antenna #1 surface doors. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Antenna #2 (foreground), and Antenna #1 surface doors. Orientation Target #1 in background. Image looking northwest - Titan One Missile Complex 2A, .3 miles west of 129 Road and 1.5 miles north of County Line Road, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  17. Millimeter and submillimeter wave antenna structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rebiez, Gabriel M. (Inventor); Rutledge, David B. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    An integrated circuit antenna structure for transmitting or receiving millimeter and/or submillimeter wave radiation having an antenna relatively unimpaired by the antenna mounting arrangment is disclosed herein. The antenna structure of the present invention includes a horn disposed on a substrate for focusing electromagnetic energy with respect to an antenna. The antenna is suspended relative to the horn to receive or transmit the electromagnetic energy focused thereby.

  18. Microelectromechanical Systems Actuator Based Reconfigurable Printed Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A polarization reconfigurable patch antenna is disclosed. The antenna includes a feed element, a patch antenna element electrically connected to the feed element, and at least one microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) actuator, with a partial connection to the patch antenna element along an edge of the patch antenna element. The polarization of the antenna can be switched between circular polarization and linear polarization through action of the at least one MEMS actuator.

  19. Radiation Pattern and Scattering Properties of Optical Antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zeyan; Messer, Kevin; Yablonovitch, Eli

    When light emitting devices (e.g. LEDs) are coupled with optical antennas of the same resonance frequency, their spontaneous emission rate can be enhanced drastically. The ultimate goal is to have the rate of spontaneous emission faster than the stimulated emission so that the LEDs would be as fast as lasers and enable us to achieve energy efficient interconnects for on-chip communication. In this project, we built multiple optical setups to experimentally measure the far field radiation pattern, light scattering properties and photoluminescence of a series of optical antennas. We also used Lumerical FDTD software to theoretically simulate the structure and found out that the simulated results agree with experimental values. As the longitudinal length increased, the spectrum shifted towards higher wavelengths on the spectrum. Also, by studying the radiation patterns of the optical antennas, we are able to understand their strengths as a function of direction, and how the geometrical shape contribute to the shape of radiation patterns. Understanding the radiation pattern and the scattering spectrum of optical antennas will enable us to design devices with specific requirements on radiational directions and resonance frequencies for optical antennas. This work was funded by National Science Foundation Award ECCS-0939514.

  20. Terahertz antenna electronic chopper

    SciTech Connect

    Sterczewski, L. A. Grzelczak, M. P.; Plinski, E. F.

    2016-01-15

    In this paper, we present an electronic circuit used to bias a photoconductive antenna that generates terahertz radiation. The working principles and the design process for the device are discussed in detail. The noise and shape of the wave measurements for a built device are considered. Furthermore, their impact on a terahertz pulse and its spectra is also examined. The proposed implementation is simple to build, robust and offers a real improvement over THz instrumentation due to the frequency tuning. Additionally, it provides for galvanic isolation and ESD protection.

  1. Patch antenna terahertz photodetectors

    SciTech Connect

    Palaferri, D.; Todorov, Y. Chen, Y. N.; Madeo, J.; Vasanelli, A.; Sirtori, C.; Li, L. H.; Davies, A. G.; Linfield, E. H.

    2015-04-20

    We report on the implementation of 5 THz quantum well photodetector exploiting a patch antenna cavity array. The benefit of our plasmonic architecture on the detector performance is assessed by comparing it with detectors made using the same quantum well absorbing region, but processed into a standard 45° polished facet mesa. Our results demonstrate a clear improvement in responsivity, polarization insensitivity, and background limited performance. Peak detectivities in excess of 5 × 10{sup 12} cmHz{sup 1/2}/W have been obtained, a value comparable with that of the best cryogenic cooled bolometers.

  2. Stabilization of sawteeth with third harmonic deuterium ICRF-accelerated beam in JET plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girardo, Jean-Baptiste; Sharapov, Sergei; Boom, Jurrian; Dumont, Rémi; Eriksson, Jacob; Fitzgerald, Michael; Garbet, Xavier; Hawkes, Nick; Kiptily, Vasily; Lupelli, Ivan; Mantsinen, Mervi; Sarazin, Yanick; Schneider, Mireille

    2016-01-01

    Sawtooth stabilisation by fast ions is investigated in deuterium (D) and D-helium 3 (He3) plasmas of JET heated by deuterium Neutral Beam Injection combined in synergy with Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH) applied on-axis at 3rd beam cyclotron harmonic. A very significant increase in the sawtooth period is observed, caused by the ICRH-acceleration of the beam ions born at 100 keV to the MeV energy range. Four representative sawteeth from four different discharges are compared with Porcelli's model. In two discharges, the sawtooth crash appears to be triggered by core-localized Toroidal Alfvén Eigenmodes inside the q = 1 surface (also called "tornado" modes) which expel the fast ions from within the q = 1 surface, over time scales comparable with the sawtooth period. Two other discharges did not exhibit fast ion-driven instabilities in the plasma core, and no degradation of fast ion confinement was found in both modelling and direct measurements of fast ion profile with the neutron camera. The developed sawtooth scenario without fast ion-driven instabilities in the plasma core is of high interest for the burning plasmas. Possible causes of the sawtooth crashes on JET are discussed.

  3. Stabilization of sawteeth with third harmonic deuterium ICRF-accelerated beam in JET plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Girardo, Jean-Baptiste; Sharapov, Sergei; Fitzgerald, Michael; Hawkes, Nick; Kiptily, Vasily; Lupelli, Ivan; Boom, Jurrian; Dumont, Rémi; Garbet, Xavier; Sarazin, Yanick; Schneider, Mireille; Eriksson, Jacob; Mantsinen, Mervi

    2016-01-15

    Sawtooth stabilisation by fast ions is investigated in deuterium (D) and D-helium 3 (He3) plasmas of JET heated by deuterium Neutral Beam Injection combined in synergy with Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH) applied on-axis at 3rd beam cyclotron harmonic. A very significant increase in the sawtooth period is observed, caused by the ICRH-acceleration of the beam ions born at 100 keV to the MeV energy range. Four representative sawteeth from four different discharges are compared with Porcelli's model. In two discharges, the sawtooth crash appears to be triggered by core-localized Toroidal Alfvén Eigenmodes inside the q = 1 surface (also called “tornado” modes) which expel the fast ions from within the q = 1 surface, over time scales comparable with the sawtooth period. Two other discharges did not exhibit fast ion-driven instabilities in the plasma core, and no degradation of fast ion confinement was found in both modelling and direct measurements of fast ion profile with the neutron camera. The developed sawtooth scenario without fast ion-driven instabilities in the plasma core is of high interest for the burning plasmas. Possible causes of the sawtooth crashes on JET are discussed.

  4. Heat loads from ICRF and LH wave absorption in the SOL: characterization on JET and implications for the ITER-Like Wall

    SciTech Connect

    Colas, L.; Arnoux, G.; Goniche, M.; Jacquet, Ph.; Mayoral, M.-L.; Brix, M.; Fursdon, M.; Graham, M.; Mailloux, J.; Monakhov, I.; Noble, C.; Sirinelli, A.; Riccardo, V.; Vizvary, Z.; Lerche, E.; Ongena, J.; Petrzilka, V.

    2011-12-23

    Heat loads from ICRF and LH wave absorption in the SOL are characterized on JET from the de-convolution of surface temperatures measured by infrared thermography. The spatial localization, quantitative estimates, parametric dependence and physical origin of the observed heat fluxes are documented. Implications of these observations are discussed for the operation of JET with an ITER-Like Wall, featuring Beryllium tiles with reduced power handling capability.

  5. On-Wafer Characterization of Millimeter-Wave Antennas for Wireless Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Lee, Richard Q.

    1998-01-01

    The paper demonstrates a de-embedding technique and a direct on-substrate measurement technique for fast and inexpensive characterization of miniature antennas for wireless applications at millimeter-wave frequencies. The technique is demonstrated by measurements on a tapered slot antenna (TSA). The measured results at Ka-Band frequencies include input impedance, mutual coupling between two TSAs and absolute gain of TSA.

  6. Optical antenna enhanced spontaneous emission

    PubMed Central

    Eggleston, Michael S.; Messer, Kevin; Zhang, Liming; Yablonovitch, Eli; Wu, Ming C.

    2015-01-01

    Atoms and molecules are too small to act as efficient antennas for their own emission wavelengths. By providing an external optical antenna, the balance can be shifted; spontaneous emission could become faster than stimulated emission, which is handicapped by practically achievable pump intensities. In our experiments, InGaAsP nanorods emitting at ∼200 THz optical frequency show a spontaneous emission intensity enhancement of 35× corresponding to a spontaneous emission rate speedup ∼115×, for antenna gap spacing, d = 40 nm. Classical antenna theory predicts ∼2,500× spontaneous emission speedup at d ∼ 10 nm, proportional to 1/d2. Unfortunately, at d < 10 nm, antenna efficiency drops below 50%, owing to optical spreading resistance, exacerbated by the anomalous skin effect (electron surface collisions). Quantum dipole oscillations in the emitter excited state produce an optical ac equivalent circuit current, Io = qω|xo|/d, feeding the antenna-enhanced spontaneous emission, where q|xo| is the dipole matrix element. Despite the quantum-mechanical origin of the drive current, antenna theory makes no reference to the Purcell effect nor to local density of states models. Moreover, plasmonic effects are minor at 200 THz, producing only a small shift of antenna resonance frequency. PMID:25624503

  7. Optical antenna enhanced spontaneous emission.

    PubMed

    Eggleston, Michael S; Messer, Kevin; Zhang, Liming; Yablonovitch, Eli; Wu, Ming C

    2015-02-10

    Atoms and molecules are too small to act as efficient antennas for their own emission wavelengths. By providing an external optical antenna, the balance can be shifted; spontaneous emission could become faster than stimulated emission, which is handicapped by practically achievable pump intensities. In our experiments, InGaAsP nanorods emitting at ∼ 200 THz optical frequency show a spontaneous emission intensity enhancement of 35 × corresponding to a spontaneous emission rate speedup ∼ 115 ×, for antenna gap spacing, d = 40 nm. Classical antenna theory predicts ∼ 2,500 × spontaneous emission speedup at d ∼ 10 nm, proportional to 1/d(2). Unfortunately, at d < 10 nm, antenna efficiency drops below 50%, owing to optical spreading resistance, exacerbated by the anomalous skin effect (electron surface collisions). Quantum dipole oscillations in the emitter excited state produce an optical ac equivalent circuit current, I(o) = qω|x(o)|/d, feeding the antenna-enhanced spontaneous emission, where q|x(o)| is the dipole matrix element. Despite the quantum-mechanical origin of the drive current, antenna theory makes no reference to the Purcell effect nor to local density of states models. Moreover, plasmonic effects are minor at 200 THz, producing only a small shift of antenna resonance frequency.

  8. Emergency-vehicle VHF antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, R. E.; Carlson, A. W.; Lewis, J.

    1977-01-01

    Helical VHF antenna mounts on roof of moving vehicle to communicate with distant stations via earth satellites. Antenna requires no pointing and can provide two-way communication while vehicle moves at high speed. Device has proved extremely successful in electrocardiogram transmission tests between medical services vehicle and hospital emergency room.

  9. Optical antennas as nanoscale resonators.

    PubMed

    Agio, Mario

    2012-02-07

    Recent progress in nanotechnology has enabled us to fabricate sub-wavelength architectures that function as antennas for improving the exchange of optical energy with nanoscale matter. We describe the main features of optical antennas for enhancing quantum emitters and review the designs that increase the spontaneous emission rate by orders of magnitude from the ultraviolet up to the near-infrared spectral range. To further explore how optical antennas may lead to unprecedented regimes of light-matter interactions, we draw a relationship between metal nanoparticles, radio-wave antennas and optical resonators. Our analysis points out how optical antennas may function as nanoscale resonators and how these may offer unique opportunities with respect to state-of-the-art microcavities.

  10. Small high directivity ferrite antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, T. M. B.

    A centimeter-wavelength antenna of millimetric dimensions, which uses the intrinsic angular sensitivity of ferrites, is described, with an emphasis on the modification of the material's permeability. The construction of both the ferrite film lens antenna and the ferrite film cassegrain antenna are detailed; both can be devised in a number of configurations for appropriate beam positioning and rf filtering. The antenna design, discussed primarily in the context of smart missiles, electronic warfare, and satellite systems, presents the possibility of magnetically switching between the transmit and receive modes within the antenna structure itself. Finally, it is noted that for a simple 2-dipole array the angular resolution can be two orders of magnitude higher than with the conventional techniques.

  11. Transcatheter Microwave Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, Dickey G. (Inventor); Carl, James R. (Inventor); Ngo, Phong (Inventor); Raffoul, George W. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A method, simulation, and apparatus are provided that are highly suitable for treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). A catheter is disclosed that includes a small diameter disk loaded monopole antenna surrounded by fusion material having a high heat of fusion and a melting point preferably at or near body temperature. Microwaves from the antenna heat prostatic tissue to promote necrosing of the prostatic tissue that relieves the pressure of the prostatic tissue against the urethra as the body reabsorbs the necrosed or dead tissue. The fusion material keeps the urethra cool by means of the heat of fusion of the fusion material. This prevents damage to the urethra while the prostatic tissue is necrosed. A computer simulation is provided that can be used to predict the resulting temperature profile produced in the prostatic tissue. By changing the various control features of the catheter and method of applying microwave energy a temperature profile can be predicted and produced that is similar to the temperature profile desired for the particular patient.

  12. Soret Fishnet Metalens Antenna

    PubMed Central

    Orazbayev, Bakhtiyar; Beruete, Miguel; Pacheco-Peña, Víctor; Crespo, Gonzalo; Teniente, Jorge; Navarro-Cía, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    At the expense of frequency narrowing, binary amplitude-only diffractive optical elements emulate refractive lenses without the need of large profiles. Unfortunately, they also present larger Fresnel reflection loss than conventional lenses. This is usually tackled by implementing unattractive cumbersome designs. Here we demonstrate that simplicity is not at odds with performance and we show how the fishnet metamaterial can improve the radiation pattern of a Soret lens. The building block of this advanced Soret lens is the fishnet metamaterial operating in the near-zero refractive index regime with one of the edge layers designed with alternating opaque and transparent concentric rings made of subwavelength holes. The hybrid Soret fishnet metalens retains all the merits of classical Soret lenses such as low profile, low cost and ease of manufacturing. It is designed for the W-band of the millimeter-waves range with a subwavelength focal length FL = 1.58 mm (0.5λ0) aiming at a compact antenna or radar systems. The focal properties of the lens along with its radiation characteristics in a lens antenna configuration have been studied numerically and confirmed experimentally, showing a gain improvement of ~2 dB with respect to a fishnet Soret lens without the fishnet metamaterial. PMID:25950243

  13. Adaptive multibeam antenna array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, V. I.

    1984-01-01

    An adaptive multibeam antenna array is considered which will enhance the advantages of a plain one. By providing simultaneous reception of signals from different directions and their sequential processing. The optimization of the array control for maximum interference suppression in the radiation pattern is emphasized. The optimum control is sought with respect to the signal-to-interference power ratio as a genaralized criterion. Sampled useful signals and transmission coefficients are found to be complex-conjugate quantities, assuming compatible formation of beams, so that synphasal equiamplitude addition of signals from all array element is attainable by unique settings of the weight factors. Calculations are simplified by letting the useful signal power in the 1-th beam be approximately equal to the k-th weight factor, before optimizing the weight vector for maximum signal-to-interference ratio. A narrowband interference described by power P and vector V of signal distribution over the array is considered as an example, to demonstrate the algorithm of synthesis. The algorithm, using the Butler matrix, was executed experimentally on a computer for a linear equidistant antenna array of 32 elements with compatible formation of beams.

  14. Using dynamic interferometric synthetic aperature radar (InSAR) to image fast-moving surface waves

    DOEpatents

    Vincent, Paul

    2005-06-28

    A new differential technique and system for imaging dynamic (fast moving) surface waves using Dynamic Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) is introduced. This differential technique and system can sample the fast-moving surface displacement waves from a plurality of moving platform positions in either a repeat-pass single-antenna or a single-pass mode having a single-antenna dual-phase receiver or having dual physically separate antennas, and reconstruct a plurality of phase differentials from a plurality of platform positions to produce a series of desired interferometric images of the fast moving waves.

  15. Microstrip antenna on tunable substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jose, K. A.; Varadan, Vijay K.; Varadan, Vasundara V.; Mohanan, P.

    1995-05-01

    The tunable patch antenna configurations are becoming popular and attractive in many aspects. This was mainly due to the advent of ferrite thin film technology and tunable substrate materials. The integration of monolithic microwave circuits and antennas are becoming easy today. In the development of magnetic tuning of microstrip patch on ferrite substrate is presented by Rainville and Harackewiez. Radiation characteristics of such antennas are presented by Pozer. Band width and radiation characteristics of such tunable antennas are measured and compared. Usually the substrate losses are considered in the analysis and metallization losses are assumed to be ideal. The analysis of magnetic tunable radiator including metallization and ferrite substrate losses are presented. However, all such tuning and integration of circuits and antennas are mainly on ferrite substrate due to magnetic tuning. Recently, Varadan et al. established that the BaxSr1-xTiO3 series ferroelectric materials such as Barium Strontium Titanate (BST) are well suited for microwave phase shifter applications. It could be possible to change the dielectric constant of these materials more than 50% depending on the BST composition, by changing the applied bias voltage. Also, the porosity of BST can be controlled during processing to produce dielectric constants in the range of 15 to 1500, with some trade off in tunability. In this paper, we are presenting the possibility of designing a microstrip patch antenna on such tunable substrate. Such antennas are having the major advantage of electronic tunability and compact size.

  16. L-band orthogonal-mode crossed-slot antenna and VHF crossed-loop antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsson, T.

    1972-01-01

    A low gain, circularly polarized, L-band antenna; a low gain, linealy polarized, L-band antenna; and a low gain, circularly polarized, upper hemisphere, VHF satellite communications antenna intended for airborne applications are described. The text includes impedance and antenna radiation pattern data, along with physical description of the construction of the antennas.

  17. 47 CFR 73.753 - Antenna systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Antenna systems. 73.753 Section 73.753... International Broadcast Stations § 73.753 Antenna systems. All international broadcasting stations shall operate with directional antennas. Such antennas shall be designed and operated so that the radiated power...

  18. 47 CFR 73.1675 - Auxiliary antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Auxiliary antennas. 73.1675 Section 73.1675... Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.1675 Auxiliary antennas. (a)(1) An auxiliary antenna is one that is permanently installed and available for use when the main antenna is out of service...

  19. 47 CFR 73.69 - Antenna monitors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Antenna monitors. 73.69 Section 73.69... Broadcast Stations § 73.69 Antenna monitors. (a) Each station using a directional antenna must have in operation at the transmitter site an FCC authorized antenna monitor. (b) In the event that the...

  20. 47 CFR 73.1675 - Auxiliary antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Auxiliary antennas. 73.1675 Section 73.1675... Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.1675 Auxiliary antennas. (a)(1) An auxiliary antenna is one that is permanently installed and available for use when the main antenna is out of service...

  1. 47 CFR 95.1013 - Antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Antennas. 95.1013 Section 95.1013... SERVICES Low Power Radio Service (LPRS) General Provisions § 95.1013 Antennas. (a) The maximum allowable... this chapter, at the band edges. (b) AMTS stations must employ directional antennas. (c) Antennas...

  2. 47 CFR 73.1680 - Emergency antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Emergency antennas. 73.1680 Section 73.1680... Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.1680 Emergency antennas. (a) An emergency antenna is one that is erected for temporary use after the authorized main and auxiliary antennas are damaged...

  3. 47 CFR 73.1675 - Auxiliary antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Auxiliary antennas. 73.1675 Section 73.1675... Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.1675 Auxiliary antennas. (a)(1) An auxiliary antenna is one that is permanently installed and available for use when the main antenna is out of service...

  4. 47 CFR 73.753 - Antenna systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Antenna systems. 73.753 Section 73.753... International Broadcast Stations § 73.753 Antenna systems. All international broadcasting stations shall operate with directional antennas. Such antennas shall be designed and operated so that the radiated power...

  5. 47 CFR 73.1680 - Emergency antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Emergency antennas. 73.1680 Section 73.1680... Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.1680 Emergency antennas. (a) An emergency antenna is one that is erected for temporary use after the authorized main and auxiliary antennas are damaged...

  6. 47 CFR 95.1213 - Antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Antennas. 95.1213 Section 95.1213... SERVICES Medical Device Radiocommunication Service (MedRadio) § 95.1213 Antennas. No antenna for a MedRadio transmitter shall be configured for permanent outdoor use. In addition, any MedRadio antenna used...

  7. 47 CFR 95.1013 - Antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Antennas. 95.1013 Section 95.1013... SERVICES Low Power Radio Service (LPRS) General Provisions § 95.1013 Antennas. (a) The maximum allowable... this chapter, at the band edges. (b) AMTS stations must employ directional antennas. (c) Antennas...

  8. 47 CFR 73.1680 - Emergency antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Emergency antennas. 73.1680 Section 73.1680... Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.1680 Emergency antennas. (a) An emergency antenna is one that is erected for temporary use after the authorized main and auxiliary antennas are damaged...

  9. 47 CFR 73.69 - Antenna monitors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Antenna monitors. 73.69 Section 73.69... Broadcast Stations § 73.69 Antenna monitors. (a) Each station using a directional antenna must have in operation at the transmitter site an FCC authorized antenna monitor. (b) In the event that the...

  10. 47 CFR 95.1013 - Antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Antennas. 95.1013 Section 95.1013... SERVICES Low Power Radio Service (LPRS) General Provisions § 95.1013 Antennas. (a) The maximum allowable... this chapter, at the band edges. (b) AMTS stations must employ directional antennas. (c) Antennas...

  11. 47 CFR 73.1680 - Emergency antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Emergency antennas. 73.1680 Section 73.1680... Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.1680 Emergency antennas. (a) An emergency antenna is one that is erected for temporary use after the authorized main and auxiliary antennas are damaged...

  12. 47 CFR 95.1013 - Antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Antennas. 95.1013 Section 95.1013... SERVICES Low Power Radio Service (LPRS) General Provisions § 95.1013 Antennas. (a) The maximum allowable... this chapter, at the band edges. (b) AMTS stations must employ directional antennas. (c) Antennas...

  13. 47 CFR 73.510 - Antenna systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Antenna systems. 73.510 Section 73.510... Noncommercial Educational FM Broadcast Stations § 73.510 Antenna systems. (a) All noncommercial educational... § 73.316 concerning antenna systems contained in subpart B of this part. (b) Directional antenna....

  14. 47 CFR 95.1213 - Antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Antennas. 95.1213 Section 95.1213... SERVICES Medical Device Radiocommunication Service (MedRadio) § 95.1213 Antennas. No antenna for a MedRadio transmitter shall be configured for permanent outdoor use. In addition, any MedRadio antenna used...

  15. 47 CFR 73.69 - Antenna monitors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Antenna monitors. 73.69 Section 73.69... Broadcast Stations § 73.69 Antenna monitors. (a) Each station using a directional antenna must have in operation at the transmitter site an FCC authorized antenna monitor. (b) In the event that the...

  16. 47 CFR 73.753 - Antenna systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Antenna systems. 73.753 Section 73.753... International Broadcast Stations § 73.753 Antenna systems. All international broadcasting stations shall operate with directional antennas. Such antennas shall be designed and operated so that the radiated power...

  17. 47 CFR 95.51 - Antenna height.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Antenna height. 95.51 Section 95.51... SERVICES General Mobile Radio Service (GMRS) § 95.51 Antenna height. (a) Certain antenna structures used in... this chapter. (b) The antenna for a small base station or for a small control station must not be...

  18. 47 CFR 73.69 - Antenna monitors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Antenna monitors. 73.69 Section 73.69... Broadcast Stations § 73.69 Antenna monitors. (a) Each station using a directional antenna must have in operation at the transmitter site an FCC authorized antenna monitor. (b) In the event that the...

  19. 47 CFR 73.510 - Antenna systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Antenna systems. 73.510 Section 73.510... Noncommercial Educational FM Broadcast Stations § 73.510 Antenna systems. (a) All noncommercial educational... § 73.316 concerning antenna systems contained in subpart B of this part. (b) Directional antenna....

  20. 47 CFR 73.1680 - Emergency antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Emergency antennas. 73.1680 Section 73.1680... Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.1680 Emergency antennas. (a) An emergency antenna is one that is erected for temporary use after the authorized main and auxiliary antennas are damaged...

  1. 47 CFR 73.1675 - Auxiliary antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Auxiliary antennas. 73.1675 Section 73.1675... Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.1675 Auxiliary antennas. (a)(1) An auxiliary antenna is one that is permanently installed and available for use when the main antenna is out of service...

  2. 47 CFR 95.51 - Antenna height.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Antenna height. 95.51 Section 95.51... SERVICES General Mobile Radio Service (GMRS) § 95.51 Antenna height. (a) Certain antenna structures used in... this chapter. (b) The antenna for a small base station or for a small control station must not be...

  3. 47 CFR 73.753 - Antenna systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Antenna systems. 73.753 Section 73.753... International Broadcast Stations § 73.753 Antenna systems. All international broadcasting stations shall operate with directional antennas. Such antennas shall be designed and operated so that the radiated power...

  4. 47 CFR 95.51 - Antenna height.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Antenna height. 95.51 Section 95.51... SERVICES General Mobile Radio Service (GMRS) § 95.51 Antenna height. (a) Certain antenna structures used in... this chapter. (b) The antenna for a small base station or for a small control station must not be...

  5. 47 CFR 73.753 - Antenna systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Antenna systems. 73.753 Section 73.753... International Broadcast Stations § 73.753 Antenna systems. All international broadcasting stations shall operate with directional antennas. Such antennas shall be designed and operated so that the radiated power...

  6. 47 CFR 73.510 - Antenna systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Antenna systems. 73.510 Section 73.510... Noncommercial Educational FM Broadcast Stations § 73.510 Antenna systems. (a) All noncommercial educational... § 73.316 concerning antenna systems contained in subpart B of this part. (b) Directional antenna....

  7. 47 CFR 95.51 - Antenna height.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Antenna height. 95.51 Section 95.51... SERVICES General Mobile Radio Service (GMRS) § 95.51 Antenna height. (a) Certain antenna structures used in... this chapter. (b) The antenna for a small base station or for a small control station must not be...

  8. 47 CFR 73.1675 - Auxiliary antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Auxiliary antennas. 73.1675 Section 73.1675... Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.1675 Auxiliary antennas. (a)(1) An auxiliary antenna is one that is permanently installed and available for use when the main antenna is out of service...

  9. 47 CFR 95.51 - Antenna height.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Antenna height. 95.51 Section 95.51... SERVICES General Mobile Radio Service (GMRS) § 95.51 Antenna height. (a) Certain antenna structures used in... this chapter. (b) The antenna for a small base station or for a small control station must not be...

  10. 47 CFR 73.69 - Antenna monitors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Antenna monitors. 73.69 Section 73.69... Broadcast Stations § 73.69 Antenna monitors. (a) Each station using a directional antenna must have in operation at the transmitter site an FCC authorized antenna monitor. (b) In the event that the...

  11. 47 CFR 95.1013 - Antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Antennas. 95.1013 Section 95.1013... SERVICES Low Power Radio Service (LPRS) General Provisions § 95.1013 Antennas. (a) The maximum allowable... this chapter, at the band edges. (b) AMTS stations must employ directional antennas. (c) Antennas...

  12. Antenna sunshield membrane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogorad, Alexander (Inventor); Bowman, Jr., Charles K. (Inventor); Meder, Martin G. (Inventor); Dottore, Frank A. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An RF-transparent sunshield membrane covers an antenna reflector such as a parabolic dish. The blanket includes a single dielectric sheet of polyimide film 1/2-mil thick. The surface of the film facing away from the reflector is coated with a transparent electrically conductive coating such as vapor-deposited indium-tin oxide. The surface of the film facing the reflector is reinforced by an adhesively attached polyester or glass mesh, which in turn is coated with a white paint. In a particular embodiment of the invention, polyurethane paint is used. In another embodiment of the invention, a layer of paint primer is applied to the mesh under a silicone paint, and the silicone paint is cured after application for several days at room temperature to enhance adhesion to the primer.

  13. Metal Patch Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, Neil F. (Inventor); Hodges, Richard E. (Inventor); Zawadzki, Mark S. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Disclosed herein is a patch antenna comprises a planar conductive patch attached to a ground plane by a support member, and a probe connector in electrical communication with the conductive patch arranged to conduct electromagnetic energy to or from the conductive patch, wherein the conductive patch is disposed essentially parallel to the ground plane and is separated from the ground plane by a spacing distance; wherein the support member comprises a plurality of sides disposed about a central axis oriented perpendicular to the conductive patch and the ground plane; wherein the conductive patch is solely supported above the ground plane by the support member; and wherein the support member provides electrical communication between the planer conductive patch and the ground plane.

  14. Conical quadreflex antenna analytical study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cramer, P. W., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    A method for evaluating the performance of a four-reflection or quadreflex antenna is reported. Geometrical optics was used initially to determine the ideal feed pattern required to produce uniform illumination on the aperture of the conical reflector and the reverse problem of quickly finding the aperture illumination given an arbitrary feed pattern. The knowledge of the aperture illumination makes it possible to compute the antenna efficiency, which is useful for comparing antenna performance during tradeoff studies. Scattering calculations, using physical optics techniques, were then used to more accurately determine the performance of a specific design.

  15. Smart antennas based on graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Aldrigo, Martino; Dragoman, Mircea; Dragoman, Daniela

    2014-09-21

    We report two configurations of smart graphene antennas, in which either the radiation pattern of the antenna or the backscattering of the periodic metallic arrays is controlled by DC biases that induce metal-insulator reversible transitions of graphene monolayers. Such a transition from a high surface resistance (no bias) to a low surface resistance state (finite bias voltage) causes the radiation pattern of metallic antennas backed with graphene to change dramatically, from omnidirectional to broadside. Moreover, reflectarrays enhance the backscattered field due to the same metal-dielectric transition.

  16. Large inflated-antenna system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinson, W. F.; Keafer, L. S.

    1984-01-01

    It is proposed that for inflatable antenna systems, technology feasibility can be demonstrated and parametric design and scalability (scale factor 10 to 20) can be validated with an experiment using a 16-m-diameter antenna attached to the Shuttle. The antenna configuration consists of a thin film cone and paraboloid held to proper shape by internal pressure and a self-rigidizing torus. The cone and paraboloid would be made using pie-shaped gores with the paraboloid being coated with aluminum to provide reflectivity. The torus would be constructed using an aluminum polyester composite that when inflated would erect to a smooth shell that can withstand loads without internal pressure.

  17. The collinear coaxial array antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brammer, D. J.; Williams, D.

    1981-03-01

    A design of a coaxial vertical antenna proposed in the ARRL antenna handbook is analyzed. A numerical analysis was carried out using the moment method. A variety of antenna configurations in the 160 MHz design frequency are analyzed and current distribution, gain, polar diagrams and impedances are calculated. The analysis is carried out for simple configurations and extended to a case with 16 repeated center sections. The effects of using lossy cable in the construction is also investigated. A defect in the original ARRL design is rectified. An array of an overall length 5.33 wavelengths is shown to have a gain of 10.69 dB.

  18. Moths smell with their antennae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Thomas; Ballard, Matthew; Alexeev, Alexander; Hu, David

    2015-11-01

    Moths are reported to smell each other from over 6 miles away, locating each other with just 200 airborne molecules. In this study, we investigate how the structure of the antennae influences particle capture. We measure the branching patterns of over 40 species of moths, across two orders of magnitude in weight. We find that moth antennae have 3 levels of hierarchy, with dimensions on each level scaling with body size. We perform lattice-Boltzman simulations to determine optimal flow patterns around antennae branches allowing for capture of small particles.

  19. Hollow plasmonic antennas for broadband SERS spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Messina, Gabriele C; Malerba, Mario; Zilio, Pierfrancesco; Miele, Ermanno; Dipalo, Michele; Ferrara, Lorenzo; De Angelis, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    The chemical environment of cells is an extremely complex and multifaceted system that includes many types of proteins, lipids, nucleic acids and various other components. With the final aim of studying these components in detail, we have developed multiband plasmonic antennas, which are suitable for highly sensitive surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and are activated by a wide range of excitation wavelengths. The three-dimensional hollow nanoantennas were produced on an optical resist by a secondary electron lithography approach, generated by fast ion-beam milling on the polymer and then covered with silver in order to obtain plasmonic functionalities. The optical properties of these structures have been studied through finite element analysis simulations that demonstrated the presence of broadband absorption and multiband enhancement due to the unusual geometry of the antennas. The enhancement was confirmed by SERS measurements, which showed a large enhancement of the vibrational features both in the case of resonant excitation and out-of-resonance excitation. Such characteristics indicate that these structures are potential candidates for plasmonic enhancers in multifunctional opto-electronic biosensors.

  20. Ion source with external RF antenna

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Ji, Qing; Wilde, Stephen

    2005-12-13

    A radio frequency (RF) driven plasma ion source has an external RF antenna, i.e. the RF antenna is positioned outside the plasma generating chamber rather than inside. The RF antenna is typically formed of a small diameter metal tube coated with an insulator. An external RF antenna assembly is used to mount the external RF antenna to the ion source. The RF antenna tubing is wound around the external RF antenna assembly to form a coil. The external RF antenna assembly is formed of a material, e.g. quartz, which is essentially transparent to the RF waves. The external RF antenna assembly is attached to and forms a part of the plasma source chamber so that the RF waves emitted by the RF antenna enter into the inside of the plasma chamber and ionize a gas contained therein. The plasma ion source is typically a multi-cusp ion source.

  1. Intense terahertz antenna array with interdigital electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Lei; Shi, Wei; Xu, Ming; Chen, Yong

    2008-12-01

    In this work a powerful terahertz antenna array with interdigital electrodes is fabricated, and the performance of one antenna unit is compared with a conventional resonant dipole antenna. The antenna unit has a better capacity of generating THz wave compared with a conventional resonant dipole antenna at the same bias electrical field and the same laser energy. However only 23 % of THz wave transmitted through the ceramic substrate of antenna array, if there is a hole drilled through ceramic substrate to release the THz wave, the THz amplitude of entire interdigital antenna array with 8 antenna units can be more than 10 times larger than that of resonant dipole antenna. To get this result, the pump beam is focused into a linear beam by a cylindrical lens to trigger the antenna array, and the linear THz wave is focused by a polyethylene lens before it reaches ZnTe crystal.

  2. Measurements of AAFE RADSCAT antenna characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, A. E.; Jones, W. L., Jr.; Jones, A. L.

    1977-01-01

    Antenna characteristics (active and passive) for a modified AAFE-RADSCAT parabolic dish antenna are documented for a variety of antenna configurations. The modified antenna was a replacement for the original unit which was damaged in January 1975. Pattern measurements made at Langley Research Center and Johnson Space Center are presented, with an analysis of the results. Antenna loss measurements are also presented and summarized.

  3. Electrically floating, near vertical incidence, skywave antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Allen A.; Kaser, Timothy G.; Tremblay, Paul A.; Mays, Belva L.

    2014-07-08

    An Electrically Floating, Near Vertical Incidence, Skywave (NVIS) Antenna comprising an antenna element, a floating ground element, and a grounding element. At least part of said floating ground element is positioned between said antenna element and said grounding element. The antenna is separated from the floating ground element and the grounding element by one or more electrical insulators. The floating ground element is separated from said antenna and said grounding element by one or more electrical insulators.

  4. Measurements of helicon antenna coupling in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinsker, R. I.; Moeller, C. P.; Degrassie, J. S.; Petty, C. C.; Anderson, J. P.; Torreblanca, H.; Porkolab, M.; Lau, C.; Watkins, J. G.; Zeng, L.

    2016-10-01

    In preparation for 1-MW-level helicon wave experiments, good coupling efficiency of a low-power 12-element phased-array antenna at 476 MHz has been found in several plasma regimes in the DIII-D tokamak. The antenna, a traveling-wave structure of the `comb-line' type, is designed to excite helicons (fast waves in the LHRF) at a nominal n| | of 3. This structure is a low-power prototype (operating at up to 0.4 kW) of a 30-element structure intended for operation at the 1 MW level, which is in the design stage. The dependence of wave coupling on the antenna/plasma distance was found to fit well with a simple model with one adjustable parameter in stationary regimes. In ELMing H-mode discharges that are calculated to have complete first-pass absorption of the coupled waves, strong coupling is found even between ELMs, which supports the design of the high-power antenna. To facilitate quantitative modeling, SOL density profiles were measured with a profile reflectometer, and the density adjacent to the antenna was measured with a fixed Langmuir probe. Future experiments using the high-power antenna will permit measurement of the non-inductive current drive efficiency using helicon waves in high-beta discharges. Supported by US DOE under DE-FC02-04ER54698, DE-AC05-00OR22725, DE-AC04-94AL85000, DE-FG02-08ER54984.

  5. A Description of the Full Particle Orbit Following SPIRAL Code for Simulating Fast-ion Experiments in Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, G.J.; Budny, R.V.; Bortolon, A.; Fredrickson, E.D.; Fu, G.Y.; Heidbrink, W.W.; Nazikian, R.; Valeo, E.; Van Zeeland, M.A.

    2012-07-27

    The numerical methods used in the full particle-orbit following SPIRAL code are described and a number of physics studies performed with the code are presented to illustrate its capabilities. The SPIRAL code is a test-particle code and is a powerful numerical tool to interpret and plan fast-ion experiments in Tokamaks. Gyro-orbit effects are important for fast ions in low-field machines such as NSTX and to a lesser extent in DIII-D. A number of physics studies are interlaced between the description of the code to illustrate its capabilities. Results on heat loads generated by a localized error-field on the DIII-D wall are compared to measurements. The enhanced Triton losses caused by the same localized error-field are calculated and compared to measured neutron signals. MHD activity such as tearing modes and Toroidicity-induced Alfven Eigenmodes (TAEs) have a profound effect on the fast-ion content of Tokamak plasmas and SPIRAL can calculate the effects of MHD activity on the confined and lost fast-ion population as illustrated for a burst of TAE activity in NSTX. The interaction between Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequency (ICRF) heating and fast ions depends solely on the gyro-motion of the fast ions and is captured exactly in the SPIRAL code. A calculation of ICRF absorption on beam ions in ITER is presented. The effects of high harmonic fast wave heating on the beam-ion slowing-down distribution in NSTX is also studied.

  6. Fast Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, S.; Pisanti, O.

    The following sections are included: * Elementary Considerations * The Integral Equation to the Neutron Distribution * The Critical Size for a Fast Reactor * Supercritical Reactors * Problems and Exercises

  7. The new 34-meter antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pompa, M. F.

    1986-01-01

    The new 34-m high efficiency Azimuth - Elevation antenna configuration, including its features, dynamic characteristics and performance at 8.4-GHz frequencies is described. The current-technology features of this antenna produce a highly reliable configuration by incorporation of a main wheel and track azimuth support, central pintle pivot bearing, close tolerance surface panels and all-welded construction. Also described are basic drive controls that, as slaved to three automatic microprocessors, provide accurate and safe control of the antenna's steering tasks. At this time antenna installations are completed at Goldstone and Canberra and have operationally supported the Voyager - Uranus encounter. A third installation is being constructed currently in Madrid and is scheduled for completion in late 1986.

  8. Inflatable Antennas Support Emergency Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Glenn Research Center awarded Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts to ManTech SRS Technologies, of Newport Beach, California, to develop thin film inflatable antennas for space communication. With additional funding, SRS modified the concepts for ground-based inflatable antennas. GATR (Ground Antenna Transmit and Receive) Technologies, of Huntsville, Alabama, licensed the technology and refined it to become the world s first inflatable antenna certified by the Federal Communications Commission. Capable of providing Internet access, voice over Internet protocol, e-mail, video teleconferencing, broadcast television, and other high-bandwidth communications, the systems have provided communication during the wildfires in California, after Hurricane Katrina in Mississippi, and following the 2010 Haiti earthquake.

  9. Planar microstrip YAGI antenna array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, John

    1993-06-01

    A directional microstrip antenna includes a driven patch surrounded by an isolated reflector and one or more coplanar directors, all separated from a ground plane on the order of 0.1 wavelength or less to provide end fire beam directivity without requiring power dividers or phase shifters. The antenna may be driven at a feed point a distance from the center of the driven patch in accordance with conventional microstrip antenna design practices for H-plane coupled or horizontally polarized signals. The feed point for E-plane coupled or vertically polarized signals is at a greater distance from the center than the first distance. This feed point is also used for one of the feed signals for circularly polarized signals. The phase shift between signals applied to feed points for circularly polarized signals must be greater than the conventionally required 90 degrees and depends upon the antenna configuration.

  10. NASA Antenna Gets its Bearings

    NASA Video Gallery

    The historic "Mars antenna" at NASA's Deep Space Network site in Goldstone, Calif. has finished a major, delicate surgery that lasted seven months. The operation on the giant, 70-meter-wide (230-fo...

  11. Planar microstrip YAGI antenna array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, John (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A directional microstrip antenna includes a driven patch surrounded by an isolated reflector and one or more coplanar directors, all separated from a ground plane on the order of 0.1 wavelength or less to provide end fire beam directivity without requiring power dividers or phase shifters. The antenna may be driven at a feed point a distance from the center of the driven patch in accordance with conventional microstrip antenna design practices for H-plane coupled or horizontally polarized signals. The feed point for E-plane coupled or vertically polarized signals is at a greater distance from the center than the first distance. This feed point is also used for one of the feed signals for circularly polarized signals. The phase shift between signals applied to feed points for circularly polarized signals must be greater than the conventionally required 90 degrees and depends upon the antenna configuration.

  12. Reflection-Zone-Plate Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franke, John M.; Leighty, Bradley D.

    1989-01-01

    Microwave antenna, based on reflection holography, designed and tested. Modified to produce arbitrary beam patterns by controlling relief pattern. Antenna planar or contoured to supporting structure. Low off-axis radar cross section at frequencies removed from operational frequency. Interference pattern produced by spherical wave intersecting plane wave consists of concentric circles similar to Newton's rings. Pattern identical to Fresnel zone plate, which has lens properties. Plane wave incident on hologram, or zone plate, focused to point.

  13. Omnidirectional antenna for radar applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitiello, R.

    The development of an omnidirectional antenna for sidelobe blanking is described. The results of electrical measurements for an S-band and L-band configuration are given. The antenna architecture consists of eight printed radiating elements arranged in a biconical fashion. The single radiating element is a pseudo log periodic microstrip array fed by means of capacitive coupling. Modularity and flexibility are the outstanding characteristics of the design.

  14. Trends in Array Antenna Research,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-06-01

    is written: 81. Ruze, J. (1952) Physical Limitations on Antennas. MIT Research Lab . Electronics Tech. Rept. 248. 82. Miller, C. J. (19G4...MIT Radiation Lab ., Cambridge, MA, Hep 479. Ruze, J. (19f>5) Lateral feed displacement in a paraboloid, IEEE Trans. Antennas Propagation...field effects such U the use of a filter near small diffrating obstacles, and in the presence of fields with pseudo- random phase variations. The

  15. Fin-line horn antenna

    DOEpatents

    Reindel, John

    1990-01-01

    A fin line circuit card containing a fin line slot feeds a dipole antenna ich extends a quarterwave outside the waveguide and provides an energy beam focal point at or near the open end of the waveguide. The dipole antenna thus maintains a wide and nearly constant beamwidth, low VSWR and a circular symmetric radiation pattern for use in electronic warfare direction finding and surveillance applications.

  16. Conformal Antenna Array Design Handbook

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    PLANAR ARRAY PHASE C LbP=IowITH CORRECT CONFORMAL ARRAY PHASE C NbPt NOe OF PhS&. SH-IFT UITSPII- NoP*.GT*1O CONRCLT PHASES ARE USED C TAP19PATTLRN...of Antenna Arrays, Radio Science , Vol. 3, May 1968, pp. 401-522. M. T. Ma, "Theory and Application of Antenna Arrays", Wiley, New York, 1974, Chapter

  17. H-mode characterisation for dominant ECRH and comparison to dominant NBI or ICRF heating at ASDEX Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Sommer, F.; Stober, J.; Angioni, C.; Fable, E.; Bernert, M.; Burckhart,; Bobkov, V.; Fischer, R.; Fuchs, C.; McDermott, R. M.; Suttrop, W.; Viezzer, E.; Collaboration: ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2014-02-12

    At ASDEX Upgrade the ECRH system has been upgraded to provide up to 4 MW of heating power at 140 GHz (or 2.2 MW at 105 GHz). The power at 140 GHz exceeds the minimum H-mode power threshold for typical high I{sub p}, B{sub t} conditions by approximately a factor of two. The upgrade allows H-modes with dominant electron heating and significant electron-ion heat exchange to be studied, i.e. the situation expected in ITER. This paper reports on systematic studies varying the heating mix with NBI, ICRF and ECRH and its effect on pedestal parameters and core transport. The H-mode pedestal is hardly affected by the choice of heating mix, but the ion temperature in the plasma center is found to vary significantly. The ion channel dominates heat transport and ion temperature gradient modes (ITG) are found to be the most unstable microinstability in all the scenarios considered. R/L{sub Ti} at half radius reduces by a factor of two when T{sub e}/T{sub i} increases from 0.9 to 1.5. TGLF modelling of the electron and ion temperature and electron density profiles shows very good agreement with the experimental data when applying a realistic sawtooth model.

  18. Electromagnetic antenna modeling (EAM) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Packer, Malcolm; Powers, Robert; Tsitsopoulos, Paul

    1994-12-01

    The determination of foreign communications capabilities and intent is an important assessment function performed by the USAF National Air Intelligence Center (NAIC). In this context, Rome Laboratory became the NAIC engineering agent for the development of an NAIC requirement for the rapid analysis and evaluation of antenna structures based on often vague to sometimes detailed dimensional information. To this end, the Rome Laboratory sponsored development of the Electromagnetic Antenna Modeling (EAM) System, a state-of-the-art Pascal program with an MS Windows graphical user interface (GUI) pre- and post-processor. Users of NAIC capabilities initiate antenna analysis efforts that range from simple parametric studies to more complex, detailed antenna design and communication-system evaluations. Accordingly, EAM provides a modeling capability 'matched' to the sophistication of the individual analyst, with features appropriate for users ranging from nontechnical analysts to experienced antenna engineers. This capability is particularly valuable in the military-intelligence environment, in which high-speed assessments are required. In particular, EAM meets the specific antenna-analysis requirements of NAIC with a versatile graphical user interface.

  19. Dielectrically Loaded HTS Spiral Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramasamy, J.; Hanna, D.; Vlasov, Y. A.; Larkins, G. L.; Moeckly, B. H.

    2004-06-01

    The objective of this work is to fabricate, test, and study a dielectrically loaded high temperature superconductor (HTS) spiral antenna that would operate in the frequency band of 10 MHz to 200 MHz. The antenna is formed by depositing and patterning a YBa2Cu3O7 (YBCO) thin film on top of 4-inch-diameter sapphire and Yittria Stabilized ZrO2 substrates. The presence of the HTS material guarantees low conductor loss in the antenna. A thick epitaxial layer of strontium titanate (STO) is then deposited on top of the YBCO for high dielectric constant loading. This set-up can be simulated using the Fidelity software routine, a Finite Difference Time Domain based program from Zeland, Inc. We have simulated the performance of this antenna structure, first in free space and then after loading with the dielectric slabs. Important parameters such as feed point impedance and antenna gain are studied for different simulation conditions. The dielectric ensures reduced feed point impedance as well as improvement of the low frequency response of the antenna.

  20. Designing and implementing Multibeam Smart Antennas for high bandwidth UAV communications using FPGAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porcello, J. C.

    Requirements for high bandwidth UAV communications are often necessary in order to move large amounts of mission information to/from Users in real-time. The focus of this paper is antenna beamforming for point-to-point, high bandwidth UAV communications in order to optimize transmit and receive power and support high data throughput communications. Specifically, this paper looks at the design and implementation of Multibeam Smart Antennas to implement antenna beamforming in an aerospace communications environment. The Smart Antenna is contrasted against Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) based beamforming in order to quantify the increase in both computational load and FPGA resources required for multibeam adaptive signal processing in the Smart Antenna. The paper begins with an overall discussion of Smart Antenna design and general beamforming issues in high bandwidth communications. Important design considerations such as processing complexity in a constrained Size, Weight and Power (SWaP) environment are discussed. The focus of the paper is with respect to design and implementation of digital beamforming wideband communications waveforms using FPGAs. A Multibeam Time Delay element is introduced based on Lagrange Interpolation. Design data for Multibeam Smart Antennas in FPGAs is provided in the paper as well as reference circuits for implementation. Finally, an example Multibeam Smart Antenna design is provided based on a Xilinx Virtex-7 FPGA. The Multibeam Smart Antenna example design illustrates the concepts discussed in the paper and provides design insight into Multibeam Smart Antenna implementation from the point of view of implementation complexity, required hardware, and overall system performance gain.

  1. Hybrid antenna sources for radiating high-power impulsive fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchenauer, C. Jerald; Marek, J. Raley

    1995-09-01

    The transmission of impulsive signals through baluns and feed lines, between high-power, fast-risetime pulse generators and impulse-radiating antennas, leads to degraded system performance and increased pulse risetime due to transit-time dispersion, skin and dielectric losses, and electrical breakdown effects. These loss mechanisms are greatly reduced in system designs that eliminate feed lines and baluns by combining the antenna and generator in a single hybrid device that is compact, simple, and robust. This paper describes generators in which the antenna itself is pulse charged to hundreds of kV and subsequently shorted at the feed point by an oil spark switch. These Hertzian generators maintain conical symmetry to within a few millimeters of the feed-point switch, thus providing conditions for launching near-ideal spherical TEM step waves for driving impulse-radiating, focused-aperture antennas. Careful attention to symmetry, optical principles, and precise methods of measurement has yielded subnanosecond pulse risetimes that are more than ten times faster than predictions from spark- switch scaling laws.

  2. NASA technology for large space antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, R. A.; Campbell, T. G.; Freeland, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    Technology developed by NASA in conjunction with industry for potential large, deployable space antennas with applications in communication, radio astronomy and earth observation is reviewed. Concepts for deployable antennas that have been developed to the point of detail design are summarized, including the advanced sunflower precision antenna, the radial rib antenna, the maypole (hoop/column) antenna and the parabolic erectable truss antenna. The assessment of state-of-the-art deployable antenna technology is discussed, and the approach taken by the NASA Large Space Systems Technology (LSST) Program to the development of technology for large space antenna systems is outlined. Finally, the further development of the wrap-rib antenna and the maypole (hoop/column) concept, which meet mission model requirements, to satisfy LSST size and frequency requirements is discussed.

  3. E-Textile Antennas for Space Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, Timothy F.; Fink, Patrick W.; Chu, Andrew W.

    2007-01-01

    The ability to integrate antennas and other radio frequency (RF) devices into wearable systems is increasingly important as wireless voice, video, and data sources become ubiquitous. Consumer applications including mobile computing, communications, and entertainment, as well as military and space applications for integration of biotelemetry, detailed tracking information and status of handheld tools, devices and on-body inventories are driving forces for research into wearable antennas and other e-textile devices. Operational conditions for military and space applications of wireless systems are often such that antennas are a limiting factor in wireless performance. The changing antenna platform, i.e. the dynamic wearer, can detune and alter the radiation characteristics of e-textile antennas, making antenna element selection and design challenging. Antenna designs and systems that offer moderate bandwidth, perform well with flexure, and are electronically reconfigurable are ideally suited to wearable applications. Several antennas, shown in Figure 1, have been created using a NASA-developed process for e-textiles that show promise in being integrated into a robust wireless system for space-based applications. Preliminary characterization of the antennas with flexure indicates that antenna performance can be maintained, and that a combination of antenna design and placement are useful in creating robust designs. Additionally, through utilization of modern smart antenna techniques, even greater flexibility can be achieved since antenna performance can be adjusted in real-time to compensate for the antenna s changing environment.

  4. Mobile antenna development at JPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, J.; Jamnejad, V.; Densmore, A.; Tulintseff, A.; Thomas, R.; Woo, K.

    1993-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), under the sponsorship of NASA, has pioneered the development of land vehicle antennas for commercial mobile satellite communications. Several novel antennas have been developed at L-band frequencies for the Mobile Satellite (MSAT) program initiated about a decade ago. Currently, two types of antennas are being developed at K- and Ka-band frequencies for the ACTS (Advanced Communications Technology Satellite) Mobile Terminal (AMT) project. For the future, several hand-held antenna concepts are proposed for the small terminals of the Ka-band Personal Access Satellite System (PASS). For the L-band MSAT program, a number of omni-directional low-gain antennas, such as the crossed drooping-dipoles, the higher-order-mode circular microstrip patch, the quadrifilar helix, and the wrapped-around microstrip 'mast' array, have been developed for lower data rate communications. Several medium-gain satellite tracking antennas, such as the electronically scanned low-profile phased array, the mechanically steered tilted microstrip array, the mechanically steered low-profile microstrip Yagi array, and the hybrid electronically/mechanically steered low-profile array, have been developed for the MSAT's higher data rate and voice communications. To date, for the L-band vehicle application, JPL has developed the world's lowest-profile phased array (1.8 cm height), as well as the lowest-profile mechanically steered antenna (3.7 cm height). For the 20/30 GHz AMT project, a small mechanically steered elliptical reflector antenna with a gain of 23 dBi has recently been developed to transmit horizontal polarization at 30 GHz and receive vertical polarization at 20 GHz. Its hemispherical radome has a height of 10 cm and a base diameter of 23 cm. In addition to the reflector, a mechanically steered printed MMIC active array is currently being developed to achieve the same electrical requirements with a low profile capability. These AMT antenna developments

  5. Mobile antenna development at JPL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, J.; Jamnejad, V.; Densmore, A.; Tulintseff, A.; Thomas, R.; Woo, K.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), under the sponsorship of NASA, has pioneered the development of land vehicle antennas for commercial mobile satellite communications. Several novel antennas have been developed at L-band frequencies for the Mobile Satellite (MSAT) program initiated about a decade ago. Currently, two types of antennas are being developed at K- and Ka-band frequencies for the ACTS (Advanced Communications Technology Satellite) Mobile Terminal (AMT) project. For the future, several hand-held antenna concepts are proposed for the small terminals of the Ka-band Personal Access Satellite System (PASS). For the L-band MSAT program, a number of omni-directional low-gain antennas, such as the crossed drooping-dipoles, the higher-order-mode circular microstrip patch, the quadrifilar helix, and the wrapped-around microstrip 'mast' array, have been developed for lower data rate communications. Several medium-gain satellite tracking antennas, such as the electronically scanned low-profile phased array, the mechanically steered tilted microstrip array, the mechanically steered low-profile microstrip Yagi array, and the hybrid electronically/mechanically steered low-profile array, have been developed for the MSAT's higher data rate and voice communications. To date, for the L-band vehicle application, JPL has developed the world's lowest-profile phased array (1.8 cm height), as well as the lowest-profile mechanically steered antenna (3.7 cm height). For the 20/30 GHz AMT project, a small mechanically steered elliptical reflector antenna with a gain of 23 dBi has recently been developed to transmit horizontal polarization at 30 GHz and receive vertical polarization at 20 GHz. Its hemispherical radome has a height of 10 cm and a base diameter of 23 cm. In addition to the reflector, a mechanically steered printed MMIC active array is currently being developed to achieve the same electrical requirements with a low profile capability. These AMT antenna developments

  6. Feed Structure For Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Patrick W. (Inventor); Chu, Andrew W. (Inventor); Dobbins, Justin A. (Inventor); Lin, Greg Y. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A novel feed structure, for an antenna having a resonant electric field structure, comprising a patch element, an integrated circuit attached to the patch element, at least one inner conductor electrically connected to and terminating at the integrated circuit on a first end of the at least one inner conductor, wherein the at least one inner conductor extends through and is not electrically connected to the patch element, and wherein the at least one inner conductor is available for electrical connectivity on a second end of the at least one inner conductor, and an outer conductor electrically connected to and terminating at the patch element on a first end of the outer conductor, wherein the outer conductor is available for electrical connectivity on a second end of the outer conductor, and wherein the outer conductor concentrically surrounds the at least one inner conductor from the second end of the at least one inner conductor available for electrical connectivity to the first end of the outer conductor terminating at the patch element.

  7. Wide scanning spherical antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Bing (Inventor); Stutzman, Warren L. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A novel method for calculating the surface shapes for subreflectors in a suboptic assembly of a tri-reflector spherical antenna system is introduced, modeled from a generalization of Galindo-Israel's method of solving partial differential equations to correct for spherical aberration and provide uniform feed to aperture mapping. In a first embodiment, the suboptic assembly moves as a single unit to achieve scan while the main reflector remains stationary. A feed horn is tilted during scan to maintain the illuminated area on the main spherical reflector fixed throughout the scan thereby eliminating the need to oversize the main spherical reflector. In an alternate embodiment, both the main spherical reflector and the suboptic assembly are fixed. A flat mirror is used to create a virtual image of the suboptic assembly. Scan is achieved by rotating the mirror about the spherical center of the main reflector. The feed horn is tilted during scan to maintain the illuminated area on the main spherical reflector fixed throughout the scan.

  8. Low-Cost Phased Array Antenna for Sounding Rockets, Missiles, and Expendable Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullinix, Daniel; Hall, Kenneth; Smith, Bruce; Corbin, Brian

    2012-01-01

    A low-cost beamformer phased array antenna has been developed for expendable launch vehicles, rockets, and missiles. It utilizes a conformal array antenna of ring or individual radiators (design varies depending on application) that is designed to be fed by the recently developed hybrid electrical/mechanical (vendor-supplied) phased array beamformer. The combination of these new array antennas and the hybrid beamformer results in a conformal phased array antenna that has significantly higher gain than traditional omni antennas, and costs an order of magnitude or more less than traditional phased array designs. Existing omnidirectional antennas for sounding rockets, missiles, and expendable launch vehicles (ELVs) do not have sufficient gain to support the required communication data rates via the space network. Missiles and smaller ELVs are often stabilized in flight by a fast (i.e. 4 Hz) roll rate. This fast roll rate, combined with vehicle attitude changes, greatly increases the complexity of the high-gain antenna beam-tracking problem. Phased arrays for larger ELVs with roll control are prohibitively expensive. Prior techniques involved a traditional fully electronic phased array solution, combined with highly complex and very fast inertial measurement unit phased array beamformers. The functional operation of this phased array is substantially different from traditional phased arrays in that it uses a hybrid electrical/mechanical beamformer that creates the relative time delays for steering the antenna beam via a small physical movement of variable delay lines. This movement is controlled via an innovative antenna control unit that accesses an internal measurement unit for vehicle attitude information, computes a beam-pointing angle to the target, then points the beam via a stepper motor controller. The stepper motor on the beamformer controls the beamformer variable delay lines that apply the appropriate time delays to the individual array elements to properly

  9. Magnetic antenna excitation of whistler modes. II. Antenna arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Stenzel, R. L.; Urrutia, J. M.

    2014-12-15

    The excitation of whistler modes from magnetic loop antennas has been investigated experimentally. The field topology of the excited wave driven by a single loop antenna has been measured for different loop orientations with respect to the uniform background field. The fields from two or more antennas at different locations are then created by superposition of the single-loop data. It is shown that an antenna array can produce nearly plane waves which cannot be achieved with single antennas. By applying a phase shift along the array, oblique wave propagation is obtained. This allows a meaningful comparison with plane wave theory. The Gendrin mode and oblique cyclotron resonance are demonstrated. Wave helicity and polarization in space and time are demonstrated and distinguished from the magnetic helicity of the wave field. The superposition of two oblique plane whistler modes produces in a “whistler waveguide” mode whose polarization and helicity properties are explained. The results show that single point measurements cannot properly establish the wave character of wave packets. The laboratory observations are relevant for excitation and detection of whistler modes in space plasmas.

  10. Magnetic antenna excitation of whistler modes. II. Antenna arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenzel, R. L.; Urrutia, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    The excitation of whistler modes from magnetic loop antennas has been investigated experimentally. The field topology of the excited wave driven by a single loop antenna has been measured for different loop orientations with respect to the uniform background field. The fields from two or more antennas at different locations are then created by superposition of the single-loop data. It is shown that an antenna array can produce nearly plane waves which cannot be achieved with single antennas. By applying a phase shift along the array, oblique wave propagation is obtained. This allows a meaningful comparison with plane wave theory. The Gendrin mode and oblique cyclotron resonance are demonstrated. Wave helicity and polarization in space and time are demonstrated and distinguished from the magnetic helicity of the wave field. The superposition of two oblique plane whistler modes produces in a "whistler waveguide" mode whose polarization and helicity properties are explained. The results show that single point measurements cannot properly establish the wave character of wave packets. The laboratory observations are relevant for excitation and detection of whistler modes in space plasmas.

  11. Multilayer Microstrip Slot And Dipole Array Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tulintseff, Ann N.

    1994-01-01

    Multilayer antenna structure contains interleaved linear subarrays of microstrip dipole and slot radiating antenna elements to provide compact, dual-band antenna. Structure also contains associated microstrip transmission lines, plus high-power amplifiers for transmission and low-noise amplifiers for reception. Overall function is to transmit in horizontal polarization at frequency of 29.634 GHz and receive in vertical polarization at 19.914 GHz, in direction 44 degrees from broadside to antenna. Antenna structure is part of apparatus described in "Steerable K/Ka-band Antenna for Land-Mobile Satellite Applications," NPO-18772.

  12. Systems analysis for DSN microwave antenna holography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rochblatt, D. J.

    1989-01-01

    Proposed systems for Deep Space Network (DSN) microwave antenna holography are analyzed. Microwave holography, as applied to antennas, is a technique which utilizes the Fourier Transform relation between the complex far-field radiation pattern of an antenna and the complex aperture field distribution to provide a methodology for the analysis and evaluation of antenna performance. Resulting aperture phase and amplitude distribution data are used to precisely characterize various crucial performance parameters, including panel alignment, subreflector position, antenna aperture illumination, directivity at various frequencies, and gravity deformation. Microwave holographic analysis provides diagnostic capacity as well as being a powerful tool for evaluating antenna design specifications and their corresponding theoretical models.

  13. Microstrip antenna gain enhancement with metamaterial radome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attachi, S.; Saleh, C.; Bouzouad, M.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, a high gain patch antenna using multilayer FSS radome is proposed for millimeter-wave applications. The antenna operating frequency is 43.5 GHz. The antenna/radome system consists of one, two, three, or four layers of metasurfaces placed in the near-field region of a microstrip patch antenna. The antenna/radome system gain is improved by 9 dBi compared to the patch antenna alone, and the radiation pattern half-power beamwidth is reduces to 20° in both E- and H-planes.

  14. Vehicle antenna development for mobile satellite applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, K.

    1988-01-01

    The paper summarizes results of a vehicle antenna program at JPL in support of a developing U.S. mobile satellite services (MSS) designed to provide telephone and data services for the continental United States. Two classes of circularly polarized vehicle antennas have been considered for the MSS: medium-gain, satellite-tracking antennas with 10-12-dBic gain; and low-gain, azimuthally omnidirectional antennas with 3-5-dBic gain. The design and performance of these antennas are described, and the two antennas are shown to have peculiar advantages and disadvantages.

  15. Satellite Communications with NRAO Green Bank Antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, John M.; Ford, H. Alyson; Watts, Galen

    2014-11-01

    The National Radio Astronomy Observatory's Green Bank facility has several medium and large antennas that are available for satellite communications. The 100 meter Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT), the largest and most sensitive antenna on site, is capable of receiving signals at frequencies as high as 86 GHz. In addition to the GBT are the fully operational 43 meter, 20 meter, and 13.7 meter antennas, and three mothballed 26 meter antennas. A transmitter could be fitted to any of these antennas for spacecraft uplinks. We discuss the characteristics of these antennas and possible operational models for future planetary science mission support.

  16. Imaging Antenna Structure For Submillimeter Wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rebeiz, G.; Rutledge, D.

    1990-01-01

    Integrated-circuit antenna structure contains two-dimensional array of antennas and antenna reflectors. In receiving mode, each antenna acts as part of detector for one picture element in millimeter- or submillimeter-wavelength imaging radar system. Millimeter-wave imaging system used to view objects through fog, smoke, or smog with resolution intermediate between microwave and visible-light imaging systems. Antenna elements, supports, and reflectors made by integrated-circuit techniques. Structures fabricated on front and back substrates separately. Substrates then joined. Inexpensive way to provide large number of small antenna elements required for imaging, all mounted rigidly in way that does not degrade operation.

  17. Fast CRCs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    Detecting Codes: General Theory and Their Application in Feedback Communication Systems. Kluwer Academic, 1995. [8] D.E. Knuth , The Art of Computer ... computation . Index Terms—Fast CRC, low-complexity CRC, checksum, error-detection code, Hamming code, period of polynomial, fast software implementation...simulations, and performance analysis of systems and networks. CRC implementation in software is desirable, because many computers do not have hardware

  18. Radiation and scattering from printed antennas on cylindrically conformal platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kempel, Leo C.; Volakis, John L.; Bindiganavale, Sunil

    1994-01-01

    The goal was to develop suitable methods and software for the analysis of antennas on cylindrical coated and uncoated platforms. Specifically, the finite element boundary integral and finite element ABC methods were employed successfully and associated software were developed for the analysis and design of wraparound and discrete cavity-backed arrays situated on cylindrical platforms. This work led to the successful implementation of analysis software for such antennas. Developments which played a role in this respect are the efficient implementation of the 3D Green's function for a metallic cylinder, the incorporation of the fast Fourier transform in computing the matrix-vector products executed in the solver of the finite element-boundary integral system, and the development of a new absorbing boundary condition for terminating the finite element mesh on cylindrical surfaces.

  19. Comparison of evolutionary algorithms for LPDA antenna optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazaridis, Pavlos I.; Tziris, Emmanouil N.; Zaharis, Zaharias D.; Xenos, Thomas D.; Cosmas, John P.; Gallion, Philippe B.; Holmes, Violeta; Glover, Ian A.

    2016-08-01

    A novel approach to broadband log-periodic antenna design is presented, where some of the most powerful evolutionary algorithms are applied and compared for the optimal design of wire log-periodic dipole arrays (LPDA) using Numerical Electromagnetics Code. The target is to achieve an optimal antenna design with respect to maximum gain, gain flatness, front-to-rear ratio (F/R) and standing wave ratio. The parameters of the LPDA optimized are the dipole lengths, the spacing between the dipoles, and the dipole wire diameters. The evolutionary algorithms compared are the Differential Evolution (DE), Particle Swarm (PSO), Taguchi, Invasive Weed (IWO), and Adaptive Invasive Weed Optimization (ADIWO). Superior performance is achieved by the IWO (best results) and PSO (fast convergence) algorithms.

  20. Selective detection of bacterial layers with terahertz plasmonic antennas

    PubMed Central

    Berrier, Audrey; Schaafsma, Martijn C.; Nonglaton, Guillaume; Bergquist, Jonas; Rivas, Jaime Gómez

    2012-01-01

    Current detection and identification of micro-organisms is based on either rather unspecific rapid microscopy or on more accurate but complex and time-consuming procedures. In a medical context, the determination of the bacteria Gram type is of significant interest. The diagnostic of microbial infection often requires the identification of the microbiological agent responsible for the infection, or at least the identification of its family (Gram type), in a matter of minutes. In this work, we propose to use terahertz frequency range antennas for the enhanced selective detection of bacteria types. Several microorganisms are investigated by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy: a fast, contactless and damage-free investigation method to gain information on the presence and the nature of the microorganisms. We demonstrate that plasmonic antennas enhance the detection sensitivity for bacterial layers and allow the selective recognition of the Gram type of the bacteria. PMID:23162730