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Sample records for fast intracellular dynamics

  1. Intracellular Sterol Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Mesmin, Bruno; Maxfield, Frederick R.

    2009-01-01

    We review the cellular mechanisms implicated in cholesterol trafficking and distribution. Recent studies have provided new information about the distribution of sterols within cells, including analysis of its transbilayer distribution. The cholesterol interaction with other lipids and its engagement in various trafficking processes will determine its proper level in a specific membrane; making the cholesterol distribution uneven among the various intracellular organelles. The cholesterol content is important since cholesterol plays an essential role in membranes by controlling their physicochemical properties as well as key cellular events such as signal transduction and protein trafficking. Cholesterol movement between cellular organelles is highly dynamic, and can be achieved by vesicular and non-vesicular processes. Various studies have analyzed the proteins that play a significant role in these processes, giving us new information about the relative importance of these two trafficking pathways in cholesterol transport. Although still poorly characterized in many trafficking routes, several potential sterol transport proteins have been described in detail; as a result, molecular mechanisms for sterol transport among membranes start to be appreciated. PMID:19286471

  2. Anomalous dynamics in intracellular transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinner, Aaron

    2013-03-01

    This talk will describe quantitative analyses of particle tracking data for systems with cytoskeletally associated molecular motors to better understand the motions contributing to intracellular transport and, more generally, means for characterizing systems far from equilibrium. In particular, we have studied the motions of insulin-containing vesicles (granules) in a pancreatic beta cell line. We find subdiffusive behavior with correlations in both space and time. These data can be modeled by subordinating an ergodic random walk process to a non-ergodic one. We relate the dynamics to the underlying microtubule structure by imaging in the presence of the drug vinblastine. Our results provide a simple physical mechanism for how diverse pools of insulin granules and, in turn, biphasic secretion could arise. Time permitting, these dynamics will be compared with those of actomyosin assemblies.

  3. Intracellular guest exchange between dynamic supramolecular hosts.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, Subramani; Fowley, Colin; McCaughan, Bridgeen; Cusido, Janet; Callan, John F; Raymo, Françisco M

    2014-06-04

    Decyl and oligo(ethylene glycol) chains were appended to the same poly(methacrylate) backbone to generate an amphiphilic polymer with a ratio between hydrophobic and hydrophilic segments of 2.5. At concentrations greater than 10 μg mL(-1) in neutral buffer, multiple copies of this particular macromolecule assemble into nanoparticles with a hydrodynamic diameter of 15 nm. In the process of assembling, these nanoparticles can capture anthracene donors and borondipyrromethene acceptors within their hydrophobic interior and permit the transfer of excitation energy with an efficiency of 95%. Energy transfer is observed also if nanocarriers containing exclusively the donors are mixed with nanoparticles preloaded separately with the acceptors in aqueous media. The two sets of supramolecular assemblies exchange their guests with fast kinetics upon mixing to co-localize complementary chromophores within the same nanostructured container and enable energy transfer. After guest exchange, the nanoparticles can cross the membrane of cervical cancer cells and bring the co-entrapped donors and acceptors within the intracellular environment. Alternatively, intracellular energy transfer is also established after sequential cell incubation with nanoparticles containing the donors first and then with nanocarriers preloaded with the acceptors or vice versa. Under these conditions, the nanoparticles exchange their cargo only after internalization and allow energy transfer exclusively within the cell interior. Thus, the dynamic character of such supramolecular containers offers the opportunity to transport independently complementary species inside cells and permit their interaction only within the intracellular space.

  4. Adaptation of fast marching methods to intracellular signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chikando, Aristide C.; Kinser, Jason M.

    2006-02-01

    Imaging of signaling phenomena within the intracellular domain is a well studied field. Signaling is the process by which all living cells communicate with their environment and with each other. In the case of signaling calcium waves, numerous computational models based on solving homogeneous reaction diffusion equations have been developed. Typically, the reaction diffusion approach consists of solving systems of partial differential equations at each update step. The traditional methods used to solve these reaction diffusion equations are very computationally expensive since they must employ small time steps in order to reduce the computational error. The presented research suggests the application of fast marching methods to imaging signaling calcium waves, more specifically fertilization calcium waves, in Xenopus laevis eggs. The fast marching approach provides fast and efficient means of tracking the evolution of monotonically advancing fronts. A model that employs biophysical properties of intracellular calcium signaling, and adapts fast marching methods to tracking the propagation of signaling calcium waves is presented. The developed model is used to reproduce simulation results obtained with reaction diffusion based model. Results obtained with our model agree with both the results obtained with reaction diffusion based models, and confocal microscopy observations during in vivo experiments. The adaptation of fast marching methods to intracellular protein or macromolecule trafficking is also briefly explored.

  5. BDI-modelling of complex intracellular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Jonker, C M; Snoep, J L; Treur, J; Westerhoff, H V; Wijngaards, W C A

    2008-03-07

    A BDI-based continuous-time modelling approach for intracellular dynamics is presented. It is shown how temporalized BDI-models make it possible to model intracellular biochemical processes as decision processes. By abstracting from some of the details of the biochemical pathways, the model achieves understanding in nearly intuitive terms, without losing veracity: classical intentional state properties such as beliefs, desires and intentions are founded in reality through precise biochemical relations. In an extensive example, the complex regulation of Escherichia coli vis-à-vis lactose, glucose and oxygen is simulated as a discrete-state, continuous-time temporal decision manager. Thus a bridge is introduced between two different scientific areas: the area of BDI-modelling and the area of intracellular dynamics.

  6. Intracellular Pressure Dynamics in Blebbing Cells.

    PubMed

    Strychalski, Wanda; Guy, Robert D

    2016-03-08

    Blebs are pressure-driven protrusions that play an important role in cell migration, particularly in three-dimensional environments. A bleb is initiated when the cytoskeleton detaches from the cell membrane, resulting in the pressure-driven flow of cytosol toward the area of detachment and local expansion of the cell membrane. Recent experiments involving blebbing cells have led to conflicting hypotheses regarding the timescale of intracellular pressure propagation. The interpretation of one set of experiments supports a poroelastic model of the cytoplasm that leads to slow pressure equilibration when compared to the timescale of bleb expansion. A different study concludes that pressure equilibrates faster than the timescale of bleb expansion. To address this discrepancy, a dynamic computational model of the cell was developed that includes mechanics of and the interactions among the cytoplasm, the actin cortex, the cell membrane, and the cytoskeleton. The model results quantify the relationship among cytoplasmic rheology, pressure, and bleb expansion dynamics, and provide a more detailed picture of intracellular pressure dynamics. This study shows the elastic response of the cytoplasm relieves pressure and limits bleb size, and that both permeability and elasticity of the cytoplasm determine bleb expansion time. Our model with a poroelastic cytoplasm shows that pressure disturbances from bleb initiation propagate faster than the timescale of bleb expansion and that pressure equilibrates slower than the timescale of bleb expansion. The multiple timescales in intracellular pressure dynamics explain the apparent discrepancy in the interpretation of experimental results.

  7. Intracellular Pressure Dynamics in Blebbing Cells

    PubMed Central

    Strychalski, Wanda; Guy, Robert D.

    2016-01-01

    Blebs are pressure-driven protrusions that play an important role in cell migration, particularly in three-dimensional environments. A bleb is initiated when the cytoskeleton detaches from the cell membrane, resulting in the pressure-driven flow of cytosol toward the area of detachment and local expansion of the cell membrane. Recent experiments involving blebbing cells have led to conflicting hypotheses regarding the timescale of intracellular pressure propagation. The interpretation of one set of experiments supports a poroelastic model of the cytoplasm that leads to slow pressure equilibration when compared to the timescale of bleb expansion. A different study concludes that pressure equilibrates faster than the timescale of bleb expansion. To address this discrepancy, a dynamic computational model of the cell was developed that includes mechanics of and the interactions among the cytoplasm, the actin cortex, the cell membrane, and the cytoskeleton. The model results quantify the relationship among cytoplasmic rheology, pressure, and bleb expansion dynamics, and provide a more detailed picture of intracellular pressure dynamics. This study shows the elastic response of the cytoplasm relieves pressure and limits bleb size, and that both permeability and elasticity of the cytoplasm determine bleb expansion time. Our model with a poroelastic cytoplasm shows that pressure disturbances from bleb initiation propagate faster than the timescale of bleb expansion and that pressure equilibrates slower than the timescale of bleb expansion. The multiple timescales in intracellular pressure dynamics explain the apparent discrepancy in the interpretation of experimental results. PMID:26958893

  8. Dynamics of gradient formation by intracellular shuttling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezhkovskii, Alexander M.; Shvartsman, Stanislav Y.

    2015-08-01

    A number of important cellular functions rely on the formation of intracellular protein concentration gradients. Experimental studies discovered a number of mechanisms for the formation of such gradients. One of the mechanisms relies on the intracellular shuttling of a protein that interconverts between the two states with different diffusivities, under the action of two enzymes, one of which is localized to the plasma membrane, whereas the second is uniformly distributed in the cytoplasm. Recent work reported an analytical solution for the steady state gradient in this mechanism, obtained in the framework of a one-dimensional reaction-diffusion model. Here, we study the dynamics in this model and derive analytical expressions for the Laplace transforms of the time-dependent concentration profiles in terms of elementary transcendental functions. Inverting these transforms numerically, one can obtain time-dependent concentration profiles of the two forms of the protein.

  9. Dynamics of gradient formation by intracellular shuttling

    SciTech Connect

    Berezhkovskii, Alexander M.; Shvartsman, Stanislav Y.

    2015-08-21

    A number of important cellular functions rely on the formation of intracellular protein concentration gradients. Experimental studies discovered a number of mechanisms for the formation of such gradients. One of the mechanisms relies on the intracellular shuttling of a protein that interconverts between the two states with different diffusivities, under the action of two enzymes, one of which is localized to the plasma membrane, whereas the second is uniformly distributed in the cytoplasm. Recent work reported an analytical solution for the steady state gradient in this mechanism, obtained in the framework of a one-dimensional reaction-diffusion model. Here, we study the dynamics in this model and derive analytical expressions for the Laplace transforms of the time-dependent concentration profiles in terms of elementary transcendental functions. Inverting these transforms numerically, one can obtain time-dependent concentration profiles of the two forms of the protein.

  10. Spatiotemporal intracellular calcium dynamics during cardiac alternans

    PubMed Central

    Restrepo, Juan G.; Karma, Alain

    2009-01-01

    Cellular calcium transient alternans are beat-to-beat alternations in the peak cytosolic calcium concentration exhibited by cardiac cells during rapid electrical stimulation or under pathological conditions. Calcium transient alternans promote action potential duration alternans, which have been linked to the onset of life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias. Here we use a recently developed physiologically detailed mathematical model of ventricular myocytes to investigate both stochastic and deterministic aspects of intracellular calcium dynamics during alternans. The model combines a spatially distributed description of intracellular calcium cycling, where a large number of calcium release units are spatially distributed throughout the cell, with a full set of ionic membrane currents. The results demonstrate that ion channel stochasticity at the level of single calcium release units can influence the whole-cell alternans dynamics by causing phase reversals over many beats during fixed frequency pacing close to the alternans bifurcation. They also demonstrate the existence of a wide range of dynamical states. Depending on the sign and magnitude of calcium-voltage coupling, calcium alternans can be spatially synchronized or desynchronized, in or out of phase with action potential duration alternans, and the node separating out-of-phase regions of calcium alternans can be expelled from or trapped inside the cell. This range of states is found to be larger than previously anticipated by including a robust global attractor where calcium alternans can be spatially synchronized but out of phase with action potential duration alternans. The results are explained by a combined theoretical analysis of alternans stability and node motion using general iterative maps of the beat-to-beat dynamics and amplitude equations. PMID:19792040

  11. Buffers and Oscillations in Intracellular Ca2+ Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Falcke, Martin

    2003-01-01

    I model the behavior of intracellular Ca2+ release with high buffer concentrations. The model uses a spatially discrete array of channel clusters. The channel subunit dynamics is a stochastic representation of the DeYoung-Keizer model. The calculations show that the concentration profile of fast buffer around an open channel is more localized than that of slow buffers. Slow buffers allow for release of larger amounts of Ca2+ from the endoplasmic reticulum and hence bind more Ca2+ than fast buffers with the same dissociation constant and concentration. I find oscillation-like behavior for high slow buffer concentration and low Ca2+ content of the endoplasmic reticulum. High concentration of slow buffer leads to oscillation-like behavior by repetitive wave nucleation for high Ca2+ content of the endoplasmic reticulum. Localization of Ca2+ release by slow buffer, as used in experiments, can be reproduced by the modeling approach. PMID:12524263

  12. Intracellular dynamics with the phase microscope Airyscan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tychinsky, Vladimir P.; Perevedentseva, Elena V.; Vyshenskaia, Tatiana V.; Kufal, Georgy E.

    1997-12-01

    Investigation of intracellular dynamics of Allium cepa inner epidermal cells are described. The applicability of the method for quantitative estimation of spatio-temporal phase fluctuations and the effect due to external factors is discussed. The analysis of time-sampled series allows one to detect the regions of various motility in cytoplasm. The intense Fourier-spectra harmonics in 0.2 - 8 Hz interval were observed inside a cell wall and cytoplasm. Regularly spaced 2- to 4-s long batches of 100-ms pulses at cell-wall sites are recorded. The phase-fluctuation intensity decreased and the frequencies of certain harmonics were shifted with lowering temperature. The advantages and specific features of the method are discussed.

  13. Cytoskeletal Network Morphology Regulates Intracellular Transport Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ando, David; Korabel, Nickolay; Huang, Kerwyn Casey; Gopinathan, Ajay

    2015-10-20

    Intracellular transport is essential for maintaining proper cellular function in most eukaryotic cells, with perturbations in active transport resulting in several types of disease. Efficient delivery of critical cargos to specific locations is accomplished through a combination of passive diffusion and active transport by molecular motors that ballistically move along a network of cytoskeletal filaments. Although motor-based transport is known to be necessary to overcome cytoplasmic crowding and the limited range of diffusion within reasonable timescales, the topological features of the cytoskeletal network that regulate transport efficiency and robustness have not been established. Using a continuum diffusion model, we observed that the time required for cellular transport was minimized when the network was localized near the nucleus. In simulations that explicitly incorporated network spatial architectures, total filament mass was the primary driver of network transit times. However, filament traps that redirect cargo back to the nucleus caused large variations in network transport. Filament polarity was more important than filament orientation in reducing average transit times, and transport properties were optimized in networks with intermediate motor on and off rates. Our results provide important insights into the functional constraints on intracellular transport under which cells have evolved cytoskeletal structures, and have potential applications for enhancing reactions in biomimetic systems through rational transport network design.

  14. Cytoskeletal Network Morphology Regulates Intracellular Transport Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Ando, David; Korabel, Nickolay; Huang, Kerwyn Casey; Gopinathan, Ajay

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular transport is essential for maintaining proper cellular function in most eukaryotic cells, with perturbations in active transport resulting in several types of disease. Efficient delivery of critical cargos to specific locations is accomplished through a combination of passive diffusion and active transport by molecular motors that ballistically move along a network of cytoskeletal filaments. Although motor-based transport is known to be necessary to overcome cytoplasmic crowding and the limited range of diffusion within reasonable timescales, the topological features of the cytoskeletal network that regulate transport efficiency and robustness have not been established. Using a continuum diffusion model, we observed that the time required for cellular transport was minimized when the network was localized near the nucleus. In simulations that explicitly incorporated network spatial architectures, total filament mass was the primary driver of network transit times. However, filament traps that redirect cargo back to the nucleus caused large variations in network transport. Filament polarity was more important than filament orientation in reducing average transit times, and transport properties were optimized in networks with intermediate motor on and off rates. Our results provide important insights into the functional constraints on intracellular transport under which cells have evolved cytoskeletal structures, and have potential applications for enhancing reactions in biomimetic systems through rational transport network design. PMID:26488648

  15. Intracellular dynamics of hippocampal place cells during virtual navigation

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Christopher D.; Collman, Forrest; Dombeck, Daniel A.; Tank, David W.

    2009-01-01

    Hippocampal place cells encode spatial information in rate and temporal codes. To examine the mechanisms underlying hippocampal coding, we measured the intracellular dynamics of place cells by combining in vivo whole cell recordings with a virtual reality system. Head-restrained mice, running on a spherical treadmill, interacted with a computer-generated visual environment to perform spatial behaviors. Robust place cell activity was present during movement along a virtual linear track. From whole cell recordings, we identified three subthreshold signatures of place fields: (1) an asymmetric ramp-like depolarization of the baseline membrane potential; (2) an increase in the amplitude of intracellular theta oscillations; and, (3) a phase precession of the intracellular theta oscillation relative to the extracellularly-recorded theta rhythm. These intracellular dynamics underlie the primary features of place cell rate and temporal codes. The virtual reality system developed here will enable new experimental approaches to study the neural circuits underlying navigation. PMID:19829374

  16. Fluorescent acid-fast microscopy for measuring phagocytosis of Mycobacterium avium, Mycobacterium intracellulare, and Mycobacterium scrofulaceum by Tetrahymena pyriformis and their intracellular growth.

    PubMed

    Strahl, E D; Gillaspy, G E; Falkinham, J O

    2001-10-01

    Fluorescent acid-fast microscopy (FAM) was used to enumerate intracellular Mycobacterium avium, Mycobacterium intracellulare, and Mycobacterium scrofulaceum in the ciliated phagocytic protozoan Tetrahymena pyriformis. There was a linear relationship between FAM and colony counts of M. avium cells both from cultures and within protozoa. The Ziehl-Neelsen acid-fast stain could not be used to enumerate intracellular mycobacteria because uninfected protozoa contained acid-fast, bacterium-like particles. Starved, 7-day-old cultures of T. pyriformis transferred into fresh medium readily phagocytized M. avium, M. intracellulare, and M. scrofulaceum. Phagocytosis was rapid and reached a maximum in 30 min. M. avium, M. intracellulare, and M. scrofulaceum grew within T. pyriformis, increasing by factors of 4- to 40-fold after 5 days at 30 degrees C. Intracellular M. avium numbers remained constant over a 25-day period of growth (by transfer) of T. pyriformis. Intracellular M. avium cells also survived protozoan encystment and germination. The growth and viability of T. pyriformis were not affected by mycobacterial infection. The results suggest that free-living phagocytic protozoa may be natural hosts and reservoirs for M. avium, M. intracellulare, and M. scrofulaceum.

  17. Monitoring the intracellular calcium response to a dynamic hypertonic environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiaowen; Yue, Wanqing; Liu, Dandan; Yue, Jianbo; Li, Jiaqian; Sun, Dong; Yang, Mengsu; Wang, Zuankai

    2016-03-01

    The profiling of physiological response of cells to external stimuli at the single cell level is of importance. Traditional approaches to study cell responses are often limited by ensemble measurement, which is challenging to reveal the complex single cell behaviors under a dynamic environment. Here we report the development of a simple microfluidic device to investigate intracellular calcium response to dynamic hypertonic conditions at the single cell level in real-time. Interestingly, a dramatic elevation in the intracellular calcium signaling is found in both suspension cells (human leukemic cell line, HL-60) and adherent cells (lung cancer cell line, A549), which is ascribed to the exposure of cells to the hydrodynamic stress. We also demonstrate that the calcium response exhibits distinct single cell heterogeneity as well as cell-type-dependent responses to the same stimuli. Our study opens up a new tool for tracking cellular activity at the single cell level in real time for high throughput drug screening.

  18. Probing intracellular dynamics in living cells with near-field optics.

    PubMed

    Bui, J D; Zelles, T; Lou, H J; Gallion, V L; Phillips, M I; Tan, W

    1999-07-01

    Near-field optics (NFO) overcomes the diffraction limit of light microscopes and permits visualization of single molecules. However, despite numerous applications of NFO in the physical sciences, there is still a paucity of applications in the neurosciences. In this work, the authors have developed NFO probes to image intracellular dynamic processes in living cells. This is the first time a NFO probe has been inserted inside a living cell to deliver light to a spatially controlled region for optical measurements and to record cellular responses to external stimuli. Two different optical detection systems (CCD camera and avalanche photon detection) were developed to monitor cellular responses to drug administration in two different cell types. NG108-15 neuroblastoma cells and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) were penetrated with NFO probes. Intracellular Ca2+ increases post drug stimulation were detected by NFO probes. The cells were loaded with either fura-2/AM or fluo-3/AM calcium dyes. VSMC were stimulated with angiotensin II, resulting in a precise area of intracellular Ca2+ increase. Different response profiles of Ca2+ increases were observed after ionomycin and bradykinin administration in NG108-15 cells. Responsive heterogeneities due to ionomycin among different cells of the same type were recorded. The results show that NFO probes make possible real-time visualization of intracellular events. With refinement, intracellular NFO probes offer the potential of probing cell function with fast temporal and excellent spatial resolutions.

  19. Probing cytoskeleton dynamics by intracellular particle transport analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Götz, M.; Hodeck, K. F.; Witzel, P.; Nandi, A.; Lindner, B.; Heinrich, D.

    2015-07-01

    All cellular functions arise from the transport of molecules through a heterogeneous, highly dynamic cell interior for intracellular signaling. Here, the impact of intracellular architecture and cytoskeleton dynamics on transport processes is revealed by high-resolution single particle tracking within living cells, in combination with time-resolved local mean squared displacement (I-MSD) analysis. We apply the I-MSD analysis to trajectories of 200 nm silica particles within living cells of Dictyostelium discoideum obtained by high resolution spinning disc confocal microscopy with a frame rate of 100 fps and imaging in one fixed focal plane. We investigate phases of motor-driven active transport and subdiffusion, normal diffusion, as well as superdiffusion with high spatial and temporal resolution. Active directed intracellular motion is attributed to microtubule associated molecular motor driven transport with average absolute velocities of 2.8 μm s-1 for 200 nm diameter particles. Diffusion processes of these particles within wild-type cells are found to exhibit diffusion constants ranging across two orders of magnitude from subdiffusive to superdiffusive behavior. This type of analysis might prove of ample importance for medical applications, like targeted drug treatment of cells by nano-sized carriers or innovative diagnostic assays.

  20. Fast intracellular motion in the living cell by video rate reflection confocal laser scanning microscopy

    PubMed Central

    VESELY, PAVEL; BOYDE, ALAN

    2001-01-01

    Fast intracellular motion (FIM) was first revealed by back scattered light (BSL) imaging in video rate confocal scanning laser microscopy (VRCSLM), beyond the limits of spatial and temporal resolution obtainable with conventional optical microscopy. BSL imaging enabled visualisation of intra and extracellular motion with resolution in space down to 0.2 μm and in time to 1/25th of a second. Mapping the cell space at 0.2 μm×0.2 μm (XY = in instantaneous best focal plane)×0.5 μm (Z = height/depth, optic axis direction) volume steps revealed a communication layer above the known contact layer and an integrated dynamic spatial network (IDSN) towards the cell centre. FIM was originally observed as localised quasichaotic dancing (dithering) or reflecting patches/spots in the cell centre, faster in the darker nuclear space. Later, a second type of FIM was recognised which differed by the presence of a varied proportion of centrifugal and centripetal directional movements and/or jumping of patches/spots in the cell centre and outside the nuclear space. The first type is characteristic for cells in slightly adverse conditions while the second type has so far only been found in eutrophic cells. Temporal speeding up and coarsening of FIM, followed by slowing and eventually cessation at cell death, was found on exposure to strong stressors. It was concluded that the state of FIM provides instantaneous information about individual cell reactions to actual treatment and about cell survival. A putative switch between the first and second type FIM could be considered as an indicator of timing of cellular processes. The significance of FIM for the biology of the cell is seen in the rapid assessment of the condition of an individual live cell investigated by combination of various methods. Requirements for further development of this approach are outlined. PMID:11465857

  1. Cell fate reprogramming by control of intracellular network dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanudo, Jorge G. T.; Albert, Reka

    Identifying control strategies for biological networks is paramount for practical applications that involve reprogramming a cell's fate, such as disease therapeutics and stem cell reprogramming. Although the topic of controlling the dynamics of a system has a long history in control theory, most of this work is not directly applicable to intracellular networks. Here we present a network control method that integrates the structural and functional information available for intracellular networks to predict control targets. Formulated in a logical dynamic scheme, our control method takes advantage of certain function-dependent network components and their relation to steady states in order to identify control targets, which are guaranteed to drive any initial state to the target state with 100% effectiveness and need to be applied only transiently for the system to reach and stay in the desired state. We illustrate our method's potential to find intervention targets for cancer treatment and cell differentiation by applying it to a leukemia signaling network and to the network controlling the differentiation of T cells. We find that the predicted control targets are effective in a broad dynamic framework. Moreover, several of the predicted interventions are supported by experiments. This work was supported by NSF Grant PHY 1205840.

  2. Imaging intracellular RNA distribution and dynamics in living cells.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Sanjay

    2009-05-01

    Powerful methods now allow the imaging of specific mRNAs in living cells. These methods enlist fluorescent proteins to illuminate mRNAs, use labeled oligonucleotide probes and exploit aptamers that render organic dyes fluorescent. The intracellular dynamics of mRNA synthesis, transport and localization can be analyzed at higher temporal resolution with these methods than has been possible with traditional fixed-cell or biochemical approaches. These methods have also been adopted to visualize and track single mRNA molecules in real time. This review explores the promises and limitations of these methods.

  3. Fast internal dynamics in alcohol dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Monkenbusch, M.; Stadler, A. Biehl, R.; Richter, D.; Ollivier, J.; Zamponi, M.

    2015-08-21

    Large-scale domain motions in alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) have been observed previously by neutron spin-echo spectroscopy (NSE). We have extended the investigation on the dynamics of ADH in solution by using high-resolution neutron time-of-flight (TOF) and neutron backscattering (BS) spectroscopy in the incoherent scattering range. The observed hydrogen dynamics were interpreted in terms of three mobility classes, which allowed a simultaneous description of the measured TOF and BS spectra. In addition to the slow global protein diffusion and domain motions observed by NSE, a fast internal process could be identified. Around one third of the protons in ADH participate in the fast localized diffusive motion. The diffusion coefficient of the fast internal motions is around two third of the value of the surrounding D{sub 2}O solvent. It is tempting to associate the fast internal process with solvent exposed amino acid residues with dangling side chains.

  4. Fast internal dynamics in alcohol dehydrogenase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monkenbusch, M.; Stadler, A.; Biehl, R.; Ollivier, J.; Zamponi, M.; Richter, D.

    2015-08-01

    Large-scale domain motions in alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) have been observed previously by neutron spin-echo spectroscopy (NSE). We have extended the investigation on the dynamics of ADH in solution by using high-resolution neutron time-of-flight (TOF) and neutron backscattering (BS) spectroscopy in the incoherent scattering range. The observed hydrogen dynamics were interpreted in terms of three mobility classes, which allowed a simultaneous description of the measured TOF and BS spectra. In addition to the slow global protein diffusion and domain motions observed by NSE, a fast internal process could be identified. Around one third of the protons in ADH participate in the fast localized diffusive motion. The diffusion coefficient of the fast internal motions is around two third of the value of the surrounding D2O solvent. It is tempting to associate the fast internal process with solvent exposed amino acid residues with dangling side chains.

  5. Cell Fate Reprogramming by Control of Intracellular Network Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Zañudo, Jorge G. T.; Albert, Réka

    2015-01-01

    Identifying control strategies for biological networks is paramount for practical applications that involve reprogramming a cell’s fate, such as disease therapeutics and stem cell reprogramming. Here we develop a novel network control framework that integrates the structural and functional information available for intracellular networks to predict control targets. Formulated in a logical dynamic scheme, our approach drives any initial state to the target state with 100% effectiveness and needs to be applied only transiently for the network to reach and stay in the desired state. We illustrate our method’s potential to find intervention targets for cancer treatment and cell differentiation by applying it to a leukemia signaling network and to the network controlling the differentiation of helper T cells. We find that the predicted control targets are effective in a broad dynamic framework. Moreover, several of the predicted interventions are supported by experiments. PMID:25849586

  6. Fast Parallel Computation Of Multibody Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fijany, Amir; Kwan, Gregory L.; Bagherzadeh, Nader

    1996-01-01

    Constraint-force algorithm fast, efficient, parallel-computation algorithm for solving forward dynamics problem of multibody system like robot arm or vehicle. Solves problem in minimum time proportional to log(N) by use of optimal number of processors proportional to N, where N is number of dynamical degrees of freedom: in this sense, constraint-force algorithm both time-optimal and processor-optimal parallel-processing algorithm.

  7. The dynamics of fast metal forming processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirosh, J.; Iddan, D.

    1994-04-01

    THIS WORK PRESENTS a procedure to assess, by an approximate lower bound, the dynamic stress distribution that prevails in the deforming zone during fast forming processes. An objective measure to what is "a fast process" will be determined by the magnitude of three dimensionless groups which characterize dynamic plasticity. The suggested generalization of the lower bound calls for admissible trials of "dynamic stress" solutions for rigid-plastic and, possibly, viscoplastic materials. The analysis becomes a rigorous lower bound as the speed approaches zero. Otherwise, it elevates the true bound with quantified speed-dependent terms associated with the above groups. Applications are demonstrated via examples. Technological limitations imposed by the high speed are indicated. Experimental data and/or numerical solutions are added for comparisons whenever these exist.

  8. Controlling fast chaos in delay dynamical systems.

    PubMed

    Blakely, Jonathan N; Illing, Lucas; Gauthier, Daniel J

    2004-05-14

    We introduce a novel approach for controlling fast chaos in time-delay dynamical systems and use it to control a chaotic photonic device with a characteristic time scale of approximately 12 ns. Our approach is a prescription for how to implement existing chaos-control algorithms in a way that exploits the system's inherent time delay and allows control even in the presence of substantial control-loop latency (the finite time it takes signals to propagate through the components in the controller). This research paves the way for applications exploiting fast control of chaos, such as chaos-based communication schemes and stabilizing the behavior of ultrafast lasers.

  9. Global intracellular slow-wave dynamics of the thalamocortical system.

    PubMed

    Sheroziya, Maxim; Timofeev, Igor

    2014-06-25

    It is widely accepted that corticothalamic neurons recruit the thalamus in slow oscillation, but global slow-wave thalamocortical dynamics have never been experimentally shown. We analyzed intracellular activities of neurons either from different cortical areas or from a variety of specific and nonspecific thalamic nuclei in relation to the phase of global EEG signal in ketamine-xylazine anesthetized mice. We found that, on average, slow-wave active states started off within frontal cortical areas as well as higher-order and intralaminar thalamus (posterior and parafascicular nuclei) simultaneously. Then, the leading edge of active states propagated in the anteroposterior/lateral direction over the cortex at ∼40 mm/s. The latest structure we recorded within the slow-wave cycle was the anterior thalamus, which followed active states of the retrosplenial cortex. Active states from different cortical areas tended to terminate simultaneously. Sensory thalamic ventral posterior medial and lateral geniculate nuclei followed cortical active states with major inhibitory and weak tonic-like "modulator" EPSPs. In these nuclei, sharp-rising, large-amplitude EPSPs ("drivers") were not modulated by cortical slow waves, suggesting their origin in ascending pathways. The thalamic active states in other investigated nuclei were composed of depolarization: some revealing "driver"- and "modulator"-like EPSPs, others showing "modulator"-like EPSPs only. We conclude that sensory thalamic nuclei follow the propagating cortical waves, whereas neurons from higher-order thalamic nuclei display "hub dynamics" and thus may contribute to the generation of cortical slow waves.

  10. Biomechanics and Intracellular Dynamics of Vascular Endothelial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou-Yang, H. Daniel

    2004-03-01

    Understanding the internal mechanical properties of living cells is essential to gain insight to basic cellular functions ranging from cellular signal transduction, intracellular traffics to cell motility. Vascular endothelial cells form a single cell layer that lines all blood vessels and serves to regulate exchanges between the blood stream and the surrounding tissues. Endothelial cells are one of the most studied cell types because of their roles in cardiovascular diseases and the linkage between their growth control and strategies of cancer treatments. This talk reports the application of a novel methodology by which scientists can explore cellular functions and study cytoskeleton dynamics of living cells at the subcellular level with minimal invasion. The methodology is based on the realization that optical tweezers can be used to measure the mechanical properties of the cytoskeleton in the vicinity of organelles and cellular structures. Optical tweezers is a technique based on the physics that dielectric materials, such as silica beads, latex particles or protein aggregates are attracted to and thus trapped at the focal point of a tightly focused laser beam in an aqueous medium. It has been shown that viscoelasticity can be determined from the movements of the trapped object in an oscillating optical tweezers. Applying the oscillating tweezers to intracellular cellular structures, we were able to determine the frequency dependent mechanical properties of the interior of cultured bovine endothelial cells. In contrast to the viscoelastic behavior expected of a network of cytoskelatal proteins, we found unusually large fluctuations in both elastic and loss moduli of the cell interior. More surprisingly, both mechanical moduli showed rhythmic behavior with a periodicity in the range of 20 - 30 seconds in healthy living cells. The rhythm could be altered by drug treatments, and the amplitude of the fluctuations diminished when cells were depleted of nutrients

  11. Fasting and postprandial regulation of the intracellular localization of adiponectin and of adipokines secretion by dietary fat in rats

    PubMed Central

    Olivares-García, V; Torre-Villalvazo, I; Velázquez-Villegas, L; Alemán, G; Lara, N; López-Romero, P; Torres, N; Tovar, A R; Díaz-Villaseñor, A

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objective: Dietary fat sources modulate fasting serum concentration of adipokines, particularly adiponectin. However, previous studies utilized obese animals in which adipose tissue function is severely altered. Thus, the present study aimed to assess the postprandial regulation of adipokine secretion in nonobese rats that consumed high-fat diet (HFD) composed of different types of fat for a short time. Methods: The rats were fed a control diet or a HFD containing coconut, safflower or soybean oil (rich in saturated fatty acid, monounsaturated fatty acid or polyunsaturated fatty acid, respectively) for 21 days. The serum concentrations of adiponectin, leptin, retinol, retinol-binding protein-4 (RBP-4), visfatin and resistin were determined at fasting and after refeeding. Adiponectin multimerization and intracellular localization, as well as the expression of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperones and transcriptional regulators, were evaluated in epididymal white adipose tissue. Results: In HFD-fed rats, serum adiponectin was significantly decreased 30 min after refeeding. With coconut oil, all three multimeric forms were reduced; with safflower oil, only the high-molecular-weight (HMW) and medium-molecular-weight (MMW) forms were decreased; and with soybean oil, only the HMW form was diminished. These reductions were due not to modifications in mRNA abundance or adiponectin multimerization but rather to an increment in intracellular localization at the ER and plasma membrane. Thus, when rats consumed a HFD, the type of dietary fat differentially affected the abundance of endoplasmic reticulum resident protein 44 kDa (ERp44), sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) mRNAs, all of which are involved in the post-translational processing of adiponectin required for its secretion. Leptin, RBP-4, resistin and visfatin serum concentrations did not change during fasting, whereas modest alterations were observed after

  12. Fast dynamic processes of solar radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Tomson, Teolan

    2010-02-15

    This paper studies dynamic processes of fast-alternating solar radiation which are assessed by alternation of clouds. Most attention is devoted to clouds of type Cumulus Humilis, identified through visual recognition and/or a specially constructed automatic sensor. One second sampling period was used. Recorded data series were analyzed with regard to duration of illuminated 'windows' between shadows, their stochastic intervals, fronts and the magnitude of increments of solar irradiance. (author)

  13. Fast Parallel Computation Of Manipulator Inverse Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fijany, Amir; Bejczy, Antal K.

    1991-01-01

    Method for fast parallel computation of inverse dynamics problem, essential for real-time dynamic control and simulation of robot manipulators, undergoing development. Enables exploitation of high degree of parallelism and, achievement of significant computational efficiency, while minimizing various communication and synchronization overheads as well as complexity of required computer architecture. Universal real-time robotic controller and simulator (URRCS) consists of internal host processor and several SIMD processors with ring topology. Architecture modular and expandable: more SIMD processors added to match size of problem. Operate asynchronously and in MIMD fashion.

  14. Fast imaging for mapping dynamic networks.

    PubMed

    LeVan, Pierre; Akin, Burak; Hennig, Jürgen

    2017-08-10

    The development of highly accelerated fMRI acquisition techniques has led to novel possibilities to monitor cerebral activity non-invasively and with unprecedented temporal resolutions. With the emergence of dynamic connectivity and its ability to provide a much richer characterization of brain function compared to static measures, fast fMRI may yet play a crucial role in tracking dynamically varying networks. In spite of the dominance of slow hemodynamic contributions to the BOLD signal, high temporal sampling rates nevertheless improve the measurement of physiological noise, yielding an exceptional sensitivity for the detection of periods of transient connectivity at time scales of a few tens of seconds. There is also evidence that relevant BOLD fluctuations are detectable at high frequencies, implying that the benefits of fast fMRI extend beyond the ability to sample nuisance confounds. Here we review the latest technological advancements that have established fast fMRI as an effective acquisition technique, as well as its current and future implications on the analysis of dynamic networks. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Imaging intracellular protein dynamics by spinning disk confocal microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Stehbens, Samantha; Pemble, Hayley; Murrow, Lindsay; Wittmann, Torsten

    2012-01-01

    The palette of fluorescent proteins has grown exponentially over the last decade, and as a result live imaging of cells expressing fluorescently tagged proteins is becoming more and more main stream. Spinning disk confocal microscopy (SDC) is a high speed optical sectioning technique, and a method of choice to observe and analyze intracellular fluorescent protein dynamics at high spatial and temporal resolution. In an SDC system, a rapidly rotating pinhole disk generates thousands of points of light that scan the specimen simultaneously, which allows direct capture of the confocal image with low noise scientific grade cooled charged-coupled device (CCD) cameras, and can achieve frame rates of up 1000 frames per second. In this chapter we describe important components of a state-of-the-art spinning disk system optimized for live cell microscopy, and provide a rationale for specific design choices. We also give guidelines how other imaging techniques such as total internal reflection (TIRF) microscopy or spatially controlled photoactivation can be coupled with SDC imaging, and provide a short protocol on how to generate cell lines stably expressing fluorescently tagged proteins by lentivirus-mediated transduction. PMID:22264541

  16. Systematic Characterization of Dynamic Parameters of Intracellular Calcium Signals

    PubMed Central

    Mackay, Laurent; Mikolajewicz, Nicholas; Komarova, Svetlana V.; Khadra, Anmar

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic processes, such as intracellular calcium signaling, are hallmark of cellular biology. As real-time imaging modalities become widespread, a need for analytical tools to reliably characterize time-series data without prior knowledge of the nature of the recordings becomes more pressing. The goal of this study is to develop a signal-processing algorithm for MATLAB that autonomously computes the parameters characterizing prominent single transient responses (TR) and/or multi-peaks responses (MPR). The algorithm corrects for signal contamination and decomposes experimental recordings into contributions from drift, TRs, and MPRs. It subsequently provides numerical estimates for the following parameters: time of onset after stimulus application, activation time (time for signal to increase from 10 to 90% of peak), and amplitude of response. It also provides characterization of the (i) TRs by quantifying their area under the curve (AUC), response duration (time between 1/2 amplitude on ascent and descent of the transient), and decay constant of the exponential decay region of the deactivation phase of the response, and (ii) MPRs by quantifying the number of peaks, mean peak magnitude, mean periodicity, standard deviation of periodicity, oscillatory persistence (time between first and last discernable peak), and duty cycle (fraction of period during which system is active) for all the peaks in the signal, as well as coherent oscillations (i.e., deterministic spikes). We demonstrate that the signal detection performance of this algorithm is in agreement with user-mediated detection and that parameter estimates obtained manually and algorithmically are correlated. We then apply this algorithm to study how metabolic acidosis affects purinergic (P2) receptor-mediated calcium signaling in osteoclast precursor cells. Our results reveal that acidosis significantly attenuates the amplitude and AUC calcium responses at high ATP concentrations. Collectively, our data

  17. Fast dynamics in molecules of biological interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faurskov Nielsen, O.; Jacobsen, K. L.; Westh, P.; Radovic, T.; Due Larsen, B.; Christensen, D. H.

    2001-10-01

    Isotopic substitution is used in cw-Raman studies of fast dynamics in molecules of biological interest. Simple liquid amides are considered as model systems for hydrogen bonding in peptides and proteins. Collectivity of amide I modes is studied by resonance energy transfer (RET) and coalescence of bands in mixtures of isotopomers (CBMI). A 1:1 mixture of HC 16OND 2 and HC 18OND 2 shows only one amide I band with a peak maximum between those observed for each of the pure isotopomers. Dilution studies of this mixture in D 2O show that the collective effects disappear in diluted solutions, where two bands are observed, one from each isotopomer. This is confirmed by dilution experiments performed on HC 16OND 2 in D 2O. Raman spectroscopy is a fast experimental technique reflecting the fast molecular dynamics on a picosecond and faster time scale. Future aspects of the collectivity of vibrational modes in peptides and proteins are mentioned. In this context a vibrational coupling between the amide I modes and the bending mode of water may be important. A comparison between low-frequency Raman and thermodynamic studies of water/lysozyme mixtures seems promising in terms of the difference between protein bound water and the formation of water clusters.

  18. Geometrical shock dynamics of fast magnetohydrodynamic shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostert, Wouter; Pullin, Dale I.; Samtaney, Ravi; Wheatley, Vincent

    2016-11-01

    We extend the theory of geometrical shock dynamics (GSD, Whitham 1958), to two-dimensional fast magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) shocks moving in the presence of nonuniform magnetic fields of general orientation and strength. The resulting generalized area-Mach number rule is adapted to MHD shocks moving in two spatial dimensions. A partially-spectral numerical scheme developed from that of Schwendeman (1993) is described. This is applied to the stability of plane MHD fast shocks moving into a quiescent medium containing a uniform magnetic field whose field lines are inclined to the plane-shock normal. In particular, we consider the time taken for an initially planar shock subject to an initial perturbed magnetosonic Mach number distribution, to first form shock-shocks. Supported by KAUST OCRF Award No. URF/1/2162-01.

  19. Global Intracellular Slow-Wave Dynamics of the Thalamocortical System

    PubMed Central

    Sheroziya, Maxim

    2014-01-01

    It is widely accepted that corticothalamic neurons recruit the thalamus in slow oscillation, but global slow-wave thalamocortical dynamics have never been experimentally shown. We analyzed intracellular activities of neurons either from different cortical areas or from a variety of specific and nonspecific thalamic nuclei in relation to the phase of global EEG signal in ketamine-xylazine anesthetized mice. We found that, on average, slow-wave active states started off within frontal cortical areas as well as higher-order and intralaminar thalamus (posterior and parafascicular nuclei) simultaneously. Then, the leading edge of active states propagated in the anteroposterior/lateral direction over the cortex at ∼40 mm/s. The latest structure we recorded within the slow-wave cycle was the anterior thalamus, which followed active states of the retrosplenial cortex. Active states from different cortical areas tended to terminate simultaneously. Sensory thalamic ventral posterior medial and lateral geniculate nuclei followed cortical active states with major inhibitory and weak tonic-like “modulator” EPSPs. In these nuclei, sharp-rising, large-amplitude EPSPs (“drivers”) were not modulated by cortical slow waves, suggesting their origin in ascending pathways. The thalamic active states in other investigated nuclei were composed of depolarization: some revealing “driver”- and “modulator”-like EPSPs, others showing “modulator”-like EPSPs only. We conclude that sensory thalamic nuclei follow the propagating cortical waves, whereas neurons from higher-order thalamic nuclei display “hub dynamics” and thus may contribute to the generation of cortical slow waves. PMID:24966387

  20. A Dynamic Management Method for Fast Manufacturing Resource Reconfiguration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Zhiye

    To fast and optimally reconfigure manufacturing resource, a dynamic management method for fast manufacturing resource reconfiguration based on holon was proposed. In this method, a dynamic management structure for fast manufacturing resource reconfiguration was established based on holon. Moreover, the cooperation relationship among holons for fast manufacturing resource reconfiguration and the manufacturing information cooperation mechanism based on holonic were constructed. Finally, the simulation system of a dynamic management method for fast manufacturing resource reconfiguration was demonstrated and validated by Flexsim software. It has shown the proposed method can dynamically and optimally reconfigure manufacturing resource, and it can effectively improve the efficiency of manufacturing processes.

  1. Monitoring intracellular oxidative events using dynamic spectral unmixing microscopy

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is increasing interest in using live-cell imaging to monitor not just individual intracellular endpoints, but to investigate the interplay between multiple molecular events as they unfold in real time within the cell. A major impediment to simultaneous acquisition of multip...

  2. Dynamic Reorganization of Metabolic Enzymes into Intracellular Bodies

    PubMed Central

    O’Connell, Jeremy D.; Zhao, Alice; Ellington, Andrew D.; Marcotte, Edward M.

    2013-01-01

    Both focused and large-scale cell biological and biochemical studies have revealed that hundreds of metabolic enzymes across diverse organisms form large intracellular bodies. These proteinaceous bodies range in form from fibers and intracellular foci—such as those formed by enzymes of nitrogen and carbon utilization and of nucleotide biosynthesis—to high-density packings inside bacterial microcompartments and eukaryotic microbodies. Although many enzymes clearly form functional mega-assemblies, it is not yet clear for many recently discovered cases whether they represent functional entities, storage bodies, or aggregates. In this article, we survey intracellular protein bodies formed by metabolic enzymes, asking when and why such bodies form and what their formation implies for the functionality—and dysfunctionality—of the enzymes that comprise them. The panoply of intracellular protein bodies also raises interesting questions regarding their evolution and maintenance within cells. We speculate on models for how such structures form in the first place and why they may be inevitable. PMID:23057741

  3. Monitoring intracellular oxidative events using dynamic spectral unmixing microscopy

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is increasing interest in using live-cell imaging to monitor not just individual intracellular endpoints, but to investigate the interplay between multiple molecular events as they unfold in real time within the cell. A major impediment to simultaneous acquisition of multip...

  4. Fast Fourier transform discrete dislocation dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, J. T.; Rollett, A. D.; LeSar, R.

    2016-12-01

    Discrete dislocation dynamics simulations have been generally limited to modeling systems described by isotropic elasticity. Effects of anisotropy on dislocation interactions, which can be quite large, have generally been ignored because of the computational expense involved when including anisotropic elasticity. We present a different formalism of dislocation dynamics in which the dislocations are represented by the deformation tensor, which is a direct measure of the slip in the lattice caused by the dislocations and can be considered as an eigenstrain. The stresses arising from the dislocations are calculated with a fast Fourier transform (FFT) method, from which the forces are determined and the equations of motion are solved. Use of the FFTs means that the stress field is only available at the grid points, which requires some adjustments/regularizations to be made to the representation of the dislocations and the calculation of the force on individual segments, as is discussed hereinafter. A notable advantage of this approach is that there is no computational penalty for including anisotropic elasticity. We review the method and apply it in a simple dislocation dynamics calculation.

  5. Cluster Dynamics: Fast Reactions and Coulomb Explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poth, Lutz; Wisniewski, Eric S.; Welford Castleman, A., Jr.

    2002-07-01

    One of the enduring mysteries of chemistry is exactly what happens during the few femtoseconds it takes for a chemical reaction to transpire. We see what goes in and what comes out, but the in between happens so fast it has proved devilishly hard to study. One promising area of investigation involves the use of clusters—tiny atomic or molecular assemblages with weak bonding. Clusters can be rapidly ionized using laser pulses of very short duration, producing like charges of sufficient intensity and closeness to cause explosive repulsion, called Coulomb explosion. By carefully adjusting the delivery interval between femtosecond-duration laser pulses to clusters, the authors have begun to reveal the secrets of reaction dynamics.

  6. Effect of roscovitine on intracellular calcium dynamics: differential enantioselective responses.

    PubMed

    Tamma, Grazia; Ranieri, Marianna; Di Mise, Annarita; Spirlì, Alessia; Russo, Annamaria; Svelto, Maria; Valenti, Giovanna

    2013-12-02

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) inhibitors have emerged as interesting therapeutic candidates. Of these, (S)-roscovitine has been proposed as potential neuroprotective molecule for stroke while (R)-roscovitine is currently entering phase II clinical trials against cancers and phase I clinical tests against glomerulonephritis. In addition, (R)-roscovitine has been suggested as potential antihypertensive and anti-inflammatory drug. Dysfunction of intracellular calcium balance is a common denominator of these diseases, and the two roscovitine enantiomers (S and R) are known to modulate calcium voltage channel activity differentially. Here, we provide a detailed description of short- and long-term responses of roscovitine on intracellular calcium handling in renal epithelial cells. Short-term exposure to (S)-roscovitine induced a cytosolic calcium peak, which was abolished after stores depletion with cyclopiazonic acid (CPA). Instead, (R)-roscovitine caused a calcium peak followed by a small calcium plateau. Cytosolic calcium response was prevented after stores depletion. Bafilomycin, a selective vacuolar H(+)-ATPase inhibitor, abolished the small calcium plateau. Long-term exposure to (R)-roscovitine significantly reduced the basal calcium level compared to control and (S)-roscovitine treated cells. However, both enantiomers increased calcium accumulation in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Consistently, cells treated with (R)-roscovitine showed a significant increase in SERCA activity, whereas (S)-roscovitine incubation resulted in a reduced PMCA expression. We also found a tonic decreased ability to release calcium from the ER, likely via IP3 signaling, under treatment with (S)- or (R)-roscovitine. Together our data revealed that (S)-roscovitine and (R)-roscovitine exert distinct enantiospecific effects on intracellular calcium signaling in renal epithelial cells. This distinct pharmacological profile can be relevant for roscovitine clinical use.

  7. Multistability and dynamic transitions of intracellular Min protein patterns.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fabai; Halatek, Jacob; Reiter, Matthias; Kingma, Enzo; Frey, Erwin; Dekker, Cees

    2016-06-08

    Cells owe their internal organization to self-organized protein patterns, which originate and adapt to growth and external stimuli via a process that is as complex as it is little understood. Here, we study the emergence, stability, and state transitions of multistable Min protein oscillation patterns in live Escherichia coli bacteria during growth up to defined large dimensions. De novo formation of patterns from homogenous starting conditions is observed and studied both experimentally and in simulations. A new theoretical approach is developed for probing pattern stability under perturbations. Quantitative experiments and simulations show that, once established, Min oscillations tolerate a large degree of intracellular heterogeneity, allowing distinctly different patterns to persist in different cells with the same geometry. Min patterns maintain their axes for hours in experiments, despite imperfections, expansion, and changes in cell shape during continuous cell growth. Transitions between multistable Min patterns are found to be rare events induced by strong intracellular perturbations. The instances of multistability studied here are the combined outcome of boundary growth and strongly nonlinear kinetics, which are characteristic of the reaction-diffusion patterns that pervade biology at many scales. © 2016 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  8. Optical imaging of fast, dynamic neurophysiological function.

    SciTech Connect

    Rector, D. M.; Carter, K. M.; Yao, X.; George, J. S.

    2002-01-01

    Fast evoked responses were imaged from rat dorsal medulla and whisker barrel cortex. To investigate the biophysical mechanisms involved, fast optical responses associated with isolated crustacean nerve stimulation were recorded using birefringence and scattered light. Such studies allow optimization of non-invasive imaging techniques being developed for use in humans.

  9. Dynamics of an HBV/HCV infection model with intracellular delay and cell proliferation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fengqin; Li, Jianquan; Zheng, Chongwu; Wang, Lin

    2017-01-01

    A new mathematical model of hepatitis B/C virus (HBV/HCV) infection which incorporates the proliferation of healthy hepatocyte cells and the latent period of infected hepatocyte cells is proposed and studied. The dynamics is analyzed via Pontryagin's method and a newly proposed alternative geometric stability switch criterion. Sharp conditions ensuring stability of the infection persistent equilibrium are derived by applying Pontryagin's method. Using the intracellular delay as the bifurcation parameter and applying an alternative geometric stability switch criterion, we show that the HBV/HCV infection model undergoes stability switches. Furthermore, numerical simulations illustrate that the intracellular delay can induce complex dynamics such as persistence bubbles and chaos.

  10. Fast, Ultrasensitive Detection of Reactive Oxygen Species Using a Carbon Nanotube Based-Electrocatalytic Intracellular Sensor

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we report a highly sensitive electrocatalytic sensor-cell construct that can electrochemically communicate with the internal environment of immune cells (e.g., macrophages) via the selective monitoring of a particular reactive oxygen species (ROS), hydrogen peroxide. The sensor, which is based on vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes functionalized with an osmium electrocatalyst, enabled the unprecedented detection of a local intracellular “pulse” of ROS on a short second time scale in response to bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide-LPS) stimulation. Our studies have shown that this initial pulse of ROS is dependent on NADPH oxidase (NOX) and toll like receptor 4 (TLR4). The results suggest that bacteria can induce a rapid intracellular pulse of ROS in macrophages that initiates the classical innate immune response of these cells to infection. PMID:26438964

  11. Use of Stable Isotopes to Follow Intracellular Water Dynamics in Living Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kreuzer, Helen W.; Hegg, Eric L.

    2012-01-28

    Despite the importance of water to cell structure and function, intracellular water dynamics are poorly understood. A new method based on isotope ratio measurements has revealed that a substantial portion of the O and H atoms in the intracellular water of rapidly-dividing cultured cells is derived from metabolic activity, and not from environmental water. These findings have led to a dynamic model of intracellular water composition: (1) Intracellular water is composed of water that diffuses in from the extracellular environment and water that is created as a result of metabolic activity. (2) The relative amounts of environmental and metabolic water inside a cell are a function of the cell's metabolic activity. (3) The oxygen and hydrogen isotope ratios of cellular metabolites are a function of those of intracellular water, and therefore reflect the metabolic activity of the cell at the time of biosynthesis. Data from gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria as well as cultured mammalian cells are consistent with the model.

  12. Hydrophilic trans-Cyclooctenylated Noncanonical Amino Acids for Fast Intracellular Protein Labeling.

    PubMed

    Kozma, Eszter; Nikić, Ivana; Varga, Balázs R; Aramburu, Iker Valle; Kang, Jun Hee; Fackler, Oliver T; Lemke, Edward A; Kele, Péter

    2016-08-17

    Introduction of bioorthogonal functionalities (e.g., trans-cyclooctene-TCO) into a protein of interest by site-specific genetic encoding of non-canonical amino acids (ncAAs) creates uniquely targetable platforms for fluorescent labeling schemes in combination with tetrazine-functionalized dyes. However, fluorescent labeling of an intracellular protein is usually compromised by high background, arising from the hydrophobicity of ncAAs; this is typically compensated for by hours-long washout to remove excess ncAAs from the cellular interior. To overcome these problems, we designed, synthesized, and tested new, hydrophilic TCO-ncAAs. One derivative, DOTCO-lysine was genetically incorporated into proteins with good yield. The increased hydrophilicity shortened the excess ncAA washout time from hours to minutes, thus permitting rapid labeling and subsequent fluorescence microscopy.

  13. Fast multipole methods for particle dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Kurzak, J.; Pettitt, B. M.

    2008-01-01

    The growth of simulations of particle systems has been aided by advances in computer speed and algorithms. The adoption of O(N) algorithms to solve N-body simulation problems has been less rapid due to the fact that such scaling was only competitive for relatively large N. Our work seeks to find algorithmic modifications and practical implementations for intermediate values of N in typical use for molecular simulations. This article reviews fast multipole techniques for calculation of electrostatic interactions in molecular systems. The basic mathematics behind fast summations applied to long ranged forces is presented along with advanced techniques for accelerating the solution, including our most recent developments. The computational efficiency of the new methods facilitates both simulations of large systems as well as longer and therefore more realistic simulations of smaller systems. PMID:19194526

  14. Extrinsic periodic information interpolates between monostable and bistable states in intracellular calcium dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ling; Duan, Wei-Long

    2015-06-01

    Extrinsic periodic information including physiological cyclical and circadian replacement would affect inevitably a real cell, in this paper we investigate the effect of extrinsic periodic information on intracellular calcium dynamics by means of second-order algorithm for stochastic simulation colored noises. By simulating time evolutions and stationary probability distribution of intracellular Ca2+ concentrations, the results show: (i) intracellular calcium oscillation between cytosol and calcium store shows synchronous and anti-synchronous oscillation as intensity and frequency of extrinsic periodic information vary; (ii) extrinsic periodic information interpolates stability from bistable state → monostable state → bistable state → monostable state as frequency of extrinsic periodic information increases; (iii) extrinsic periodic information interpolates stability from monostable state → bistable state as intensity of extrinsic periodic information increases.

  15. Intracellular regulation of protein degradation during sepsis is different in fast- and slow-twitch muscle.

    PubMed

    Tiao, G; Lieberman, M; Fischer, J E; Hasselgren, P O

    1997-03-01

    We tested the hypothesis that the difference in the response to sepsis of protein breakdown between fast- and slow-twitch skeletal muscle reflects differential activation of the energy-ubiquitin-dependent proteolytic pathway. In addition, we defined the time course and the tissue specificity of sepsis-induced changes in the expression of the ubiquitin pathway. Sepsis was induced in rats by cecal ligation and puncture; control rats were sham operated. Energy-dependent protein breakdown was measured in incubated extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and soleus muscles. Ubiquitin mRNA levels were determined by Northern blot analysis. Sepsis resulted in increased energy-dependent protein breakdown and upregulated expression of ubiquitin mRNA in the fast-twitch EDL but not in the slow-twitch soleus muscle. The sepsis-induced increase in ubiquitin mRNA levels in the EDL muscle was noticeable before the increase in energy-dependent protein breakdown. Sepsis increased ubiquitin mRNA levels in the diaphragm (a mixed fiber-type muscle) but not in heart, liver, kidney, or intestine, consistent with a tissue-specific regulation of the ubiquitin system during sepsis. The results suggest that the difference in protein breakdown during sepsis between fast- and slow-twitch muscles reflects differential activation of the energy-ubiquitin-dependent proteolytic pathway. The data also suggest that the expression of the ubiquitin pathway is upregulated in a time-dependent fashion during sepsis and that this response is not a generalized phenomenon but is tissue specific.

  16. Microscopy tools for the investigation of intracellular lipid storage and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Daemen, Sabine; van Zandvoort, Marc A M J; Parekh, Sapun H; Hesselink, Matthijs K C

    2016-03-01

    Excess storage of lipids in ectopic tissues, such as skeletal muscle, liver, and heart, seems to associate closely with metabolic abnormalities and cardiac disease. Intracellular lipid storage occurs in lipid droplets, which have gained attention as active organelles in cellular metabolism. Recent developments in high-resolution microscopy and microscopic spectroscopy have opened up new avenues to examine the physiology and biochemistry of intracellular lipids. The aim of this review is to give an overview of recent technical advances in microscopy, and its application for the visualization, identification, and quantification of intracellular lipids, with special focus to lipid droplets. In addition, we attempt to summarize the probes currently available for the visualization of lipids. The continuous development of lipid probes in combination with the rapid development of microscopic techniques can provide new insights in the role and dynamics of intracellular lipids. Moreover, in situ identification of intracellular lipids is now possible and promises to add a new dimensionality to analysis of lipid biochemistry, and its relation to (patho)physiology.

  17. Microscopy tools for the investigation of intracellular lipid storage and dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Daemen, Sabine; van Zandvoort, Marc A.M.J.; Parekh, Sapun H.; Hesselink, Matthijs K.C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Excess storage of lipids in ectopic tissues, such as skeletal muscle, liver, and heart, seems to associate closely with metabolic abnormalities and cardiac disease. Intracellular lipid storage occurs in lipid droplets, which have gained attention as active organelles in cellular metabolism. Recent developments in high-resolution microscopy and microscopic spectroscopy have opened up new avenues to examine the physiology and biochemistry of intracellular lipids. Scope of review The aim of this review is to give an overview of recent technical advances in microscopy, and its application for the visualization, identification, and quantification of intracellular lipids, with special focus to lipid droplets. In addition, we attempt to summarize the probes currently available for the visualization of lipids. Major conclusions The continuous development of lipid probes in combination with the rapid development of microscopic techniques can provide new insights in the role and dynamics of intracellular lipids. Moreover, in situ identification of intracellular lipids is now possible and promises to add a new dimensionality to analysis of lipid biochemistry, and its relation to (patho)physiology. PMID:26977387

  18. A fast and specific method to screen for intracellular amyloid inhibitors using bacterial model systems.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Susanna; Carija, Anita; Muñoz-Torrero, Diego; Ventura, Salvador

    2016-10-04

    The aggregation of a large variety of amyloidogenic proteins is linked to the onset of devastating human disorders. Therefore, there is an urgent need for effective molecules able to modulate the aggregative properties of these polypeptides in their natural environment, in order to prevent, delay or halt the progression of such diseases. On the one hand, the complexity and cost of animal models make them inefficient at early stages of drug discovery, where large chemical libraries are usually screened. On the other hand, in vitro aggregation assays in aqueous solutions hardly reproduce (patho)physiological conditions. In this context, because the formation of insoluble aggregates in bacteria shares mechanistic and functional properties with amyloid self-assembly in higher organisms, they have emerged as a promising system to model aggregation in the cell. Here we show that bacteria provide a powerful and cost-effective system to screen for amyloid inhibitors using fluorescence spectroscopy and flow cytometry, thanks to the ability of the novel red fluorescent ProteoStat dye to detect specifically intracellular amyloid-like aggregates. We validated the approach using the Alzheimer's linked Aβ40 and Aβ42 peptides and tacrine- and huprine-based aggregation inhibitors. Overall, the present method bears the potential to replace classical in vitro anti-aggregation assays.

  19. Fast dynamics for atoms in optical lattices.

    PubMed

    Łącki, Mateusz; Zakrzewski, Jakub

    2013-02-08

    Cold atoms in optical lattices allow for accurate studies of many body dynamics. Rapid time-dependent modifications of optical lattice potentials may result in significant excitations in atomic systems. The dynamics in such a case is frequently quite incompletely described by standard applications of tight-binding models (such as, e.g., Bose-Hubbard model or its extensions) that typically neglect the effect of the dynamics on the transformation between the real space and the tight-binding basis. We illustrate the importance of a proper quantum mechanical description using a multiband extended Bose-Hubbard model with time-dependent Wannier functions. We apply it to situations directly related to experiments.

  20. PERK regulates Gq protein-coupled intracellular Ca(2+) dynamics in primary cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Siying; McGrath, Barbara C; Bai, Yuting; Tang, Xin; Cavener, Douglas R

    2016-10-01

    PERK (EIF2AK3) is an ER-resident eIF2α kinase required for behavioral flexibility and metabotropic glutamate receptor-dependent long-term depression via its translational control. Motivated by the recent discoveries that PERK regulates Ca(2+) dynamics in insulin-secreting β-cells underlying glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, and modulates Ca(2+) signals-dependent working memory, we explored the role of PERK in regulating Gq protein-coupled Ca(2+) dynamics in pyramidal neurons. We found that acute PERK inhibition by the use of a highly specific PERK inhibitor reduced the intracellular Ca(2+) rise stimulated by the activation of acetylcholine, metabotropic glutamate and bradykinin-2 receptors in primary cortical neurons. More specifically, acute PERK inhibition increased IP3 receptor mediated ER Ca(2+) release, but decreased receptor-operated extracellular Ca(2+) influx. Impaired Gq protein-coupled intracellular Ca(2+) rise was also observed in genetic Perk knockout neurons. Taken together, our findings reveal a novel role of PERK in neurons, which is eIF2α-independent, and suggest that the impaired working memory in forebrain-specific Perk knockout mice may stem from altered Gq protein-coupled intracellular Ca(2+) dynamics in cortical pyramidal neurons.

  1. Fast Brillouin Optical Time Domain Analysis for dynamic sensing.

    PubMed

    Peled, Yair; Motil, Avi; Tur, Moshe

    2012-04-09

    A new technique for the fast implementation of Brillouin Optical Time Domain Analysis (BOTDA) is proposed and demonstrated, carrying the classical BOTDA method to the dynamic sensing domain. By using a digital signal generator which enables fast switching among 100 scanning frequencies, we demonstrate a truly distributed and dynamic measurement of a 100 m long fiber with a sampling rate of ~10 kHz, limited only by the fiber length and the frequency granularity. With 10 averages the standard deviation of the measured strain was ~5 µε.

  2. Fast Responding Voltage Regulator and Dynamic VAR Compensator

    SciTech Connect

    Divan, Deepak; Moghe, Rohit; Tholomier, Damien

    2014-12-31

    The objectives of this project were to develop a dynamic VAR compensator (DVC) for voltage regulation through VAR support to demonstrate the ability to achieve greater levels of voltage control on electricity distribution networks, and faster response compared to existing grid technology. The goal of the project was to develop a prototype Fast Dynamic VAR Compensator (Fast DVC) hardware device, and this was achieved. In addition to developing the dynamic VAR compensator device, Varentec in partnership with researchers at North Carolina State University (NCSU) successfully met the objectives to model the potential positive impact of such DVCs on representative power networks. This modeling activity validated the ability of distributed dynamic VAR compensators to provide fast voltage regulation and reactive power control required to respond to grid disturbances under high penetration of fluctuating and intermittent distributed energy resources (DERs) through extensive simulation studies. Specifically the following tasks were set to be accomplished: 1) Development of dynamic VAR compensator to support dynamic voltage variations on the grid through VAR control 2) Extensive testing of the DVC in the lab environment 3) Present the operational DVC device to the DOE at Varentec’s lab 4) Formulation of a detailed specification sheet, unit assembly document, test setup document, unit bring-up plan, and test plan 5) Extensive simulations of the DVC in a system with high PV penetration. Understanding the operation with many DVC on a single distribution system 6) Creation and submittal of quarterly and final reports conveying the design documents, unit performance data, modeling simulation charts and diagrams, and summary explanations of the satisfaction of program goals. This report details the various efforts that led to the development of the Fast DVC as well as the modeling & simulation results. The report begins with the introduction in Section II which outlines the

  3. Intracellular delivery and trafficking dynamics of a lymphoma-targeting antibody-polymer conjugate.

    PubMed

    Berguig, Geoffrey Y; Convertine, Anthony J; Shi, Julie; Palanca-Wessels, Maria Corinna; Duvall, Craig L; Pun, Suzie H; Press, Oliver W; Stayton, Patrick S

    2012-12-03

    Ratiometric fluorescence and cellular fractionation studies were employed to characterize the intracellular trafficking dynamics of antibody-poly(propylacrylic acid) (PPAA) conjugates in CD22+ RAMOS-AW cells. The HD39 monoclonal antibody (mAb) directs CD22-dependent, receptor-mediated uptake in human B-cell lymphoma cells, where it is rapidly trafficked to the lysosomal compartment. To characterize the intracellular-release dynamics of the polymer-mAb conjugates, HD39-streptavidin (HD39/SA) was dual-labeled with pH-insensitive Alexa Fluor 488 and pH-sensitive pHrodo fluorophores. The subcellular pH distribution of the HD39/SA-polymer conjugates was quantified as a function of time by live-cell fluorescence microscopy, and the average intracellular pH value experienced by the conjugates was also characterized as a function of time by flow cytometry. PPAA was shown to alter the intracellular trafficking kinetics strongly relative to HD39/SA alone or HD39/SA conjugates with a control polymer, poly(methacryclic acid) (PMAA). Subcellular trafficking studies revealed that after 6 h, only 11% of the HD39/SA-PPAA conjugates had been trafficked to acidic lysosomal compartments with values at or below pH 5.6. In contrast, the average intracellular pH of HD39/SA alone dropped from 6.7 ± 0.2 at 1 h to 5.6 ± 0.5 after 3 h and 4.7 ± 0.6 after 6 h. Conjugation of the control polymer PMAA to HD39/SA showed an average pH drop similar to that of HD39/SA. Subcellular fractionation studies with tritium-labeled HD39/SA demonstrated that after 6 h, 89% of HD39/SA was associated with endosomes (Rab5+) and lysosomes (Lamp2+), while 45% of HD39/SA-PPAA was translocated to the cytosol (lactate dehydrogenase+). These results demonstrate the endosomal-releasing properties of PPAA with antibody-polymer conjugates and detail their intracellular trafficking dynamics and subcellular compartmental distributions over time.

  4. Switching quantum dynamics for fast stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scaramuzza, Pierre; Ticozzi, Francesco

    2015-06-01

    Control strategies for dissipative preparation of target quantum states, both pure and mixed, and subspaces are obtained by switching between a set of available semigroup generators. We show that the class of problems of interest can be recast, from a control-theoretic perspective, into a switched-stabilization problem for linear dynamics. This is attained by a suitable affine transformation of the coherence-vector representation. In particular, we propose and compare stabilizing time-based and state-based switching rules for entangled state preparation, showing that the latter not only ensure faster convergence with respect to nonswitching methods, but can be designed so that they retain robustness with respect to initialization, as long as the target is a pure state or a subspace.

  5. Fast dynamics of glass-forming glycerol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wuttke, J.; Petry, W.; Coddens, G.; Fujara, F.

    1995-10-01

    The vibrational and relaxational dynamics of glycerol has been measured by incoherent neutron scattering for energy transfers from some 10 μeV to several 10 meV, and for temperatures from 4 to 413 K. On heating towards and above the glass transition, scattering from low-frequency vibrations shows an unspectacular increase that is consistent with ultrasonic data. We propose using the vibrational density of states for calculating the Fourier transformed time correlation function S(q,t) without the cutoff usually imposed by the kinematics of neutron scattering. For high temperatures and low frequencies, structural relaxation is well described by the empirical Kohlrausch law. There is no extended crossover region between vibrations and structural relaxation.

  6. Quantitative measurement of intracellular protein dynamics using photobleaching or photoactivation of fluorescent proteins.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Tomoki; Nagai, Takeharu

    2014-12-01

    Unlike in vitro protein dynamics, intracellular protein dynamics are intricately regulated by protein-protein interactions or interactions between proteins and other cellular components, including nucleic acids, the plasma membrane and the cytoskeleton. Alteration of these dynamics plays a crucial role in physiological phenomena such as gene expression and cell division. Live-cell imaging via microscopy with the inherent properties of fluorescent proteins, i.e. photobleaching and photoconversion, or fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, provides insight into the movement of proteins and their interactions with cellular components. This article reviews techniques based on photo-induced changes in the physicochemical properties of fluorescent proteins to measure protein dynamics inside living cells, and it also discusses the strengths and weaknesses of these techniques. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Role of time delay on intracellular calcium dynamics driven by non-Gaussian noises.

    PubMed

    Duan, Wei-Long; Zeng, Chunhua

    2016-04-28

    Effect of time delay (τ) on intracellular calcium dynamics with non-Gaussian noises in transmission processes of intracellular Ca(2+) is studied by means of second-order stochastic Runge-Kutta type algorithm. By simulating and analyzing time series, normalized autocorrelation function, and characteristic correlation time of cytosolic and calcium store's Ca(2+) concentration, the results exhibit: (i) intracellular calcium dynamics's time coherence disappears and stability strengthens as τ → 0.1s; (ii) for the case of τ < 0.1s, the normalized autocorrelation functions of cytosolic and calcium store's Ca(2+) concentration show damped motion when τ is very short, but they trend to a level line as τ → 0.1s, and for the case of τ > 0.1s, they show different variation as τ increases, the former changes from underdamped motion to a level line, but the latter changes from damped motion to underdamped motion; and (iii) at the moderate value of time delay, reverse resonance occurs both in cytosol and calcium store.

  8. The dynamic range and domain-specific signals of intracellular calcium in photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Szikra, T; Krizaj, D

    2006-08-11

    Vertebrate photoreceptors consist of strictly delimited subcellular domains: the outer segment, ellipsoid, cell body and synaptic terminal, each hosting crucial cellular functions, including phototransduction, oxidative metabolism, gene expression and transmitter release. We used optical imaging to explore the spatiotemporal dynamics of Ca(2+) signaling in non-outer segment regions of rods and cones. Sustained depolarization, designed to emulate photoreceptor activation in the darkness, evoked a standing Ca(2+) gradient in tiger salamander photoreceptors with spatially-averaged intracellular Ca(2+) concentration within synaptic terminals of approximately 2 microM and lower (approximately 750 nM) intracellular calcium concentration in the ellipsoid. Measurements from axotomized cell bodies and isolated ellipsoids showed that Ca(2+) enters the two compartments via both local L-type Ca(2+) channels and diffusion. The results from optical imaging studies were supported by immunostaining analysis. L-type voltage-operated Ca(2+) channels and plasma membrane Ca(2+) ATPases were highly expressed in synaptic terminals with progressively lower expression levels in the cell body and ellipsoid. These results show photoreceptor Ca(2+) homeostasis is controlled in a region-specific manner by direct Ca(2+) entry and diffusion as well as Ca(2+) extrusion. Moreover, quantitative measurement of intracellular calcium concentration levels in different photoreceptor compartments indicates that the dynamic range of Ca(2+) signaling in photoreceptors is approximately 40-fold, from approximately 50 nM in the light to approximately 2 microM in darkness.

  9. THE DYNAMIC RANGE AND DOMAIN-SPECIFIC SIGNALS OF INTRACELLULAR CALCIUM IN PHOTORECEPTORS

    PubMed Central

    SZIKRA, T.; KRIŽAJ, D.

    2007-01-01

    Vertebrate photoreceptors consist of strictly delimited subcellular domains: the outer segment, ellipsoid, cell body and synaptic terminal, each hosting crucial cellular functions, including phototransduction, oxidative metabolism, gene expression and transmitter release. We used optical imaging to explore the spatiotemporal dynamics of Ca2+ signaling in non-outer segment regions of rods and cones. Sustained depolarization, designed to emulate photoreceptor activation in the darkness, evoked a standing Ca2+ gradient in tiger salamander photoreceptors with spatially-averaged intracellular Ca2+ concentration within synaptic terminals of ∼2 μM and lower (∼750 nM) intracellular calcium concentration in the ellipsoid. Measurements from axotomized cell bodies and isolated ellipsoids showed that Ca2+ enters the two compartments via both local L-type Ca2+ channels and diffusion. The results from optical imaging studies were supported by immunostaining analysis. L-type voltage-operated Ca2+ channels and plasma membrane Ca2+ ATPases were highly expressed in synaptic terminals with progressively lower expression levels in the cell body and ellipsoid. These results show photoreceptor Ca2+ homeostasis is controlled in a region-specific manner by direct Ca2+ entry and diffusion as well as Ca2+ extrusion. Moreover, quantitative measurement of intracellular calcium concentration levels in different photoreceptor compartments indicates that the dynamic range of Ca2+ signaling in photoreceptors is approximately 40-fold, from ∼50 nM in the light to ∼2 μM in darkness. PMID:16682126

  10. Bat Dynamics of Female Fast Pitch Softball Batters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Messier, Stephen P.; Owen, Marjorie G.

    1984-01-01

    Female fast pitch softball batters served in an examination of the dynamic characteristics of the bat during the swing through the use of three-dimensional cinematographic analysis techniques. These results were compared with those from previous studies of baseball batting. Findings are listed. (Author/DF)

  11. Bat Dynamics of Female Fast Pitch Softball Batters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Messier, Stephen P.; Owen, Marjorie G.

    1984-01-01

    Female fast pitch softball batters served in an examination of the dynamic characteristics of the bat during the swing through the use of three-dimensional cinematographic analysis techniques. These results were compared with those from previous studies of baseball batting. Findings are listed. (Author/DF)

  12. Quantum dynamics of fast chemical reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Light, J.C.

    1993-12-01

    The aims of this research are to explore, develop, and apply theoretical methods for the evaluation of the dynamics of gas phase collision processes, primarily chemical reactions. The primary theoretical tools developed for this work have been quantum scattering theory, both in time dependent and time independent forms. Over the past several years, the authors have developed and applied methods for the direct quantum evaluation of thermal rate constants, applying these to the evaluation of the hydrogen isotopic exchange reactions, applied wave packet propagation techniques to the dissociation of Rydberg H{sub 3}, incorporated optical potentials into the evaluation of thermal rate constants, evaluated the use of optical potentials for state-to-state reaction probability evaluations, and, most recently, have developed quantum approaches for electronically non-adiabatic reactions which may be applied to simplify calculations of reactive, but electronically adiabatic systems. Evaluation of the thermal rate constants and the dissociation of H{sub 3} were reported last year, and have now been published.

  13. Differential alterations of intracellular [Ca2+] dynamics induced by cocaine and methylphenidate in thalamocortical ventrobasal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Rozas, José L.; Goitia, Belén; Bisagno, Verónica; Urbano, Francisco J.

    2017-01-01

    The ventrobasal (VB) thalamus relay nucleus processes information from rodents’ whiskers, projecting to somatosensory cortex. Cocaine and methylphenidate (MPH) have been described to differentially alter intrinsic properties of, and spontaneous GABAergic input to, VB neurons. Here we studied using bis-fura 2 ratiometric fluorescence the effects of cocaine and MPH on intracellular [Ca2+] dynamics at the soma and dendrites of VB neurons. Cocaine increased baseline fluorescence in VB somatic and dendritic compartments. Peak and areas of fluorescence amplitudes were reduced by cocaine binge treatment in somas and dendrites at different holding potentials. MPH binge treatment did not alter ratiometric fluorescence at either somatic or dendritic levels. These novel cocaine-mediated blunting effects on intracellular [Ca2+] might account for alterations in the capacity of thalamocortical neurons to maintain gamma band oscillations, as well as their ability to integrate synaptic afferents. PMID:28920083

  14. Tight Coupling of Metabolic Oscillations and Intracellular Water Dynamics in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Thoke, Henrik Seir; Tobiesen, Asger; Brewer, Jonathan; Hansen, Per Lyngs; Stock, Roberto P.; Olsen, Lars F.; Bagatolli, Luis A.

    2015-01-01

    We detected very strong coupling between the oscillating concentration of ATP and the dynamics of intracellular water during glycolysis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Our results indicate that: i) dipolar relaxation of intracellular water is heterogeneous within the cell and different from dilute conditions, ii) water dipolar relaxation oscillates with glycolysis and in phase with ATP concentration, iii) this phenomenon is scale-invariant from the subcellular to the ensemble of synchronized cells and, iv) the periodicity of both glycolytic oscillations and dipolar relaxation are equally affected by D2O in a dose-dependent manner. These results offer a new insight into the coupling of an emergent intensive physicochemical property of the cell, i.e. cell-wide water dipolar relaxation, and a central metabolite (ATP) produced by a robustly oscillating metabolic process. PMID:25705902

  15. Change detection in the dynamics of an intracellular protein synthesis model using nonlinear Kalman filtering.

    PubMed

    Rigatos, Gerasimos G; Rigatou, Efthymia G; Djida, Jean Daniel

    2015-10-01

    A method for early diagnosis of parametric changes in intracellular protein synthesis models (e.g. the p53 protein - mdm2 inhibitor model) is developed with the use of a nonlinear Kalman Filtering approach (Derivative-free nonlinear Kalman Filter) and of statistical change detection methods. The intracellular protein synthesis dynamic model is described by a set of coupled nonlinear differential equations. It is shown that such a dynamical system satisfies differential flatness properties and this allows to transform it, through a change of variables (diffeomorphism), to the so-called linear canonical form. For the linearized equivalent of the dynamical system, state estimation can be performed using the Kalman Filter recursion. Moreover, by applying an inverse transformation based on the previous diffeomorphism it becomes also possible to obtain estimates of the state variables of the initial nonlinear model. By comparing the output of the Kalman Filter (which is assumed to correspond to the undistorted dynamical model) with measurements obtained from the monitored protein synthesis system, a sequence of differences (residuals) is obtained. The statistical processing of the residuals with the use of x2 change detection tests, can provide indication within specific confidence intervals about parametric changes in the considered biological system and consequently indications about the appearance of specific diseases (e.g. malignancies).

  16. k-space image correlation to probe the intracellular dynamics of gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouzin, M.; Sironi, L.; Chirico, G.; D'Alfonso, L.; Inverso, D.; Pallavicini, P.; Collini, M.

    2016-04-01

    The collective action of dynein, kinesin and myosin molecular motors is responsible for the intracellular active transport of cargoes, vesicles and organelles along the semi-flexible oriented filaments of the cytoskeleton. The overall mobility of the cargoes upon binding and unbinding to motor proteins can be modeled as an intermittency between Brownian diffusion in the cell cytoplasm and active ballistic excursions along actin filaments or microtubules. Such an intermittent intracellular active transport, exhibited by star-shaped gold nanoparticles (GNSs, Gold Nanostars) upon internalization in HeLa cancer cells, is investigated here by combining live-cell time-lapse confocal reflectance microscopy and the spatio-temporal correlation, in the reciprocal Fourier space, of the acquired image sequences. At first, the analytical theoretical framework for the investigation of a two-state intermittent dynamics is presented for Fourier-space Image Correlation Spectroscopy (kICS). Then simulated kICS correlation functions are employed to evaluate the influence of, and sensitivity to, all the kinetic and dynamic parameters the model involves (the transition rates between the diffusive and the active transport states, the diffusion coefficient and drift velocity of the imaged particles). The optimal procedure for the analysis of the experimental data is outlined and finally exploited to derive whole-cell maps for the parameters underlying the GNSs super-diffusive dynamics. Applied here to the GNSs subcellular trafficking, the proposed kICS analysis can be adopted for the characterization of the intracellular (super-) diffusive dynamics of any fluorescent or scattering biological macromolecule.

  17. Fast receptor-induced formation of glycerophosphoinositol-4-phosphate, a putative novel intracellular messenger in the Ras pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Falasca, M; Carvelli, A; Iurisci, C; Qiu, R G; Symons, M H; Corda, D

    1997-01-01

    Glycerophosphoinositols are phosphoinositide metabolites whose levels are constitutively elevated in Ras-transformed cells. Here, we show that one of these compounds, glycerophosphoinositol-4-phosphate (GroPIns-4-P) responds acutely to the stimulation of the epidermal growth factor receptor, with a fast, massive and transient increase. The mechanism leading to GroPIns-4-P formation involves the activation of phosphoinositide-3 kinase and the small GTP-binding protein Rac, since GroPIns-4-P was neither formed in cells expressing the dominant negative form of Rac nor in cells treated with the phosphoinositide-3 kinase inhibitor wortmannin. GroPIns-4-P has been previously shown to inhibit adenylyl cyclase. Accordingly, epidermal growth factor also decreased the basal, cholera toxin-stimulated, and forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP levels with kinetics similar to those of GroPIns-4-P formation, suggesting that GroPIns-4-P mediates this inhibitory effect. The hormone-induced formation of GroPIns-4-P was detected in several cell lines of various origin, suggesting that GroPIns-4-P is a novel intracellular messenger of the Ras pathway, possibly able to convey information from tyrosine kinase receptors to the cyclic AMP cascade. PMID:9188097

  18. Collisionally induced stochastic dynamics of fast ions in solids

    SciTech Connect

    Burgdoerfer, J.

    1989-01-01

    Recent developments in the theory of excited state formation in collisions of fast highly charged ions with solids are reviewed. We discuss a classical transport theory employing Monte-Carlo sampling of solutions of a microscopic Langevin equation. Dynamical screening by the dielectric medium as well as multiple collisions are incorporated through the drift and stochastic forces in the Langevin equation. The close relationship between the extrinsically stochastic dynamics described by the Langevin and the intrinsic stochasticity in chaotic nonlinear dynamical systems is stressed. Comparison with experimental data and possible modification by quantum corrections are discussed. 49 refs., 11 figs.

  19. Automated single cell microbioreactor for monitoring intracellular dynamics and cell growth in free solution†

    PubMed Central

    Johnson-Chavarria, Eric M.; Agrawal, Utsav; Tanyeri, Melikhan; Kuhlman, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    We report an automated microfluidic-based platform for single cell analysis that allows for cell culture in free solution with the ability to control the cell growth environment. Using this approach, cells are confined by the sole action of gentle fluid flow, thereby enabling non-perturbative analysis of cell growth away from solid boundaries. In addition, the single cell microbioreactor allows for precise and time-dependent control over cell culture media, with the combined ability to observe the dynamics of non-adherent cells over long time scales. As a proof-of-principle demonstration, we used the platform to observe dynamic cell growth, gene expression, and intracellular diffusion of repressor proteins while precisely tuning the cell growth environment. Overall, this microfluidic approach enables the direct observation of cellular dynamics with exquisite control over environmental conditions, which will be useful for quantifying the behaviour of single cells in well-defined media. PMID:24836754

  20. Cycling State that Can Lead to Glassy Dynamics in Intracellular Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, Monika; Burov, Stanislav; Weirich, Kimberly L.; Scholz, Björn J.; Tabei, S. M. Ali; Gardel, Margaret L.; Dinner, Aaron R.

    2016-01-01

    Power-law dwell times have been observed for molecular motors in living cells, but the origins of these trapped states are not known. We introduce a minimal model of motors moving on a two-dimensional network of filaments, and simulations of its dynamics exhibit statistics comparable to those observed experimentally. Analysis of the model trajectories, as well as experimental particle tracking data, reveals a state in which motors cycle unproductively at junctions of three or more filaments. We formulate a master equation for these junction dynamics and show that the time required to escape from this vortexlike state can account for the power-law dwell times. We identify trends in the dynamics with the motor valency for further experimental validation. We demonstrate that these trends exist in individual trajectories of myosin II on an actin network. We discuss how cells could regulate intracellular transport and, in turn, biological function by controlling their cytoskeletal network structures locally.

  1. A cycling state that can lead to glassy dynamics in intracellular transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, Monika; Burov, Stanislav; Weirich, Kimberly L.; Scholz, Bjorn J.; Tabei, S. M. Ali; Gardel, Margaret L.; Dinner, Aaron

    Power-law dwell times have been observed for molecular motors in living cells, but the origins of these trapped states are not known. We introduce a minimal model of motors moving on a two- dimensional network of filaments, and simulations of its dynamics exhibit statistics comparable to those observed experimentally. Analysis of the model trajectories, as well as experimental particle tracking data, reveals a state in which motors cycle unproductively at junctions of three or more filaments. We formulate a master equation for these junction dynamics and show that the time required to escape from this vortex-like state can account for the power-law dwell times. We identify trends in the dynamics with the motor valency for further experimental validation. We demonstrate that these trends exist in individual trajectories of myosin II on an actin network. We discuss how cells could regulate intracellular transport and, in turn, biological function, by controlling their cytoskeletal network structures locally.

  2. Measuring near plasma membrane and global intracellular calcium dynamics in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Shigetomi, Eiji; Khakh, Baljit S

    2009-04-26

    The brain contains glial cells. Astrocytes, a type of glial cell, have long been known to provide a passive supportive role to neurons. However, increasing evidence suggests that astrocytes may also actively participate in brain function through functional interactions with neurons. However, many fundamental aspects of astrocyte biology remain controversial, unclear and/or experimentally unexplored. One important issue is the dynamics of intracellular calcium transients in astrocytes. This is relevant because calcium is well established as an important second messenger and because it has been proposed that astrocyte calcium elevations can trigger the release of transmitters from astrocytes. However, there has not been any detailed or satisfying description of near plasma membrane calcium signaling in astrocytes. Total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy is a powerful tool to analyze physiologically relevant signaling events within about 100 nm of the plasma membrane of live cells. Here, we use TIRF microscopy and describe how to monitor near plasma membrane and global intracellular calcium dynamics almost simultaneously. The further refinement and systematic application of this approach has the potential to inform about the precise details of astrocyte calcium signaling. A detailed understanding of astrocyte calcium dynamics may provide a basis to understand if, how, when and why astrocytes and neurons undergo calcium-dependent functional interactions.

  3. Nanoscale live cell optical imaging of the dynamics of intracellular microvesicles in neural cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sohee; Heo, Chaejeong; Suh, Minah; Lee, Young Hee

    2013-11-01

    Recent advances in biotechnology and imaging technology have provided great opportunities to investigate cellular dynamics. Conventional imaging methods such as transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy are powerful techniques for cellular imaging, even at the nanoscale level. However, these techniques have limitations applications in live cell imaging because of the experimental preparation required, namely cell fixation, and the innately small field of view. In this study, we developed a nanoscale optical imaging (NOI) system that combines a conventional optical microscope with a high resolution dark-field condenser (Cytoviva, Inc.) and halogen illuminator. The NOI system's maximum resolution for live cell imaging is around 100 nm. We utilized NOI to investigate the dynamics of intracellular microvesicles of neural cells without immunocytological analysis. In particular, we studied direct, active random, and moderate random dynamic motions of intracellular microvesicles and visualized lysosomal vesicle changes after treatment of cells with a lysosomal inhibitor (NH4Cl). Our results indicate that the NOI system is a feasible, high-resolution optical imaging system for live small organelles that does not require complicated optics or immunocytological staining processes.

  4. Role of time delay on intracellular calcium dynamics driven by non-Gaussian noises

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Wei-Long; Zeng, Chunhua

    2016-01-01

    Effect of time delay (τ) on intracellular calcium dynamics with non-Gaussian noises in transmission processes of intracellular Ca2+ is studied by means of second-order stochastic Runge-Kutta type algorithm. By simulating and analyzing time series, normalized autocorrelation function, and characteristic correlation time of cytosolic and calcium store’s Ca2+ concentration, the results exhibit: (i) intracellular calcium dynamics’s time coherence disappears and stability strengthens as τ → 0.1s; (ii) for the case of τ < 0.1s, the normalized autocorrelation functions of cytosolic and calcium store’s Ca2+ concentration show damped motion when τ is very short, but they trend to a level line as τ → 0.1s, and for the case of τ > 0.1s, they show different variation as τ increases, the former changes from underdamped motion to a level line, but the latter changes from damped motion to underdamped motion; and (iii) at the moderate value of time delay, reverse resonance occurs both in cytosol and calcium store. PMID:27121687

  5. Impaired Intracellular Ca2+ Dynamics in Live Cardiomyocytes Revealed by Rapid Line Scan Confocal Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plank, David M.; Sussman, Mark A.

    2005-06-01

    Altered intracellular Ca2+ dynamics are characteristically observed in cardiomyocytes from failing hearts. Studies of Ca2+ handling in myocytes predominantly use Fluo-3 AM, a visible light excitable Ca2+ chelating fluorescent dye in conjunction with rapid line-scanning confocal microscopy. However, Fluo-3 AM does not allow for traditional ratiometric determination of intracellular Ca2+ concentration and has required the use of mathematic correction factors with values obtained from separate procedures to convert Fluo-3 AM fluorescence to appropriate Ca2+ concentrations. This study describes methodology to directly measure intracellular Ca2+ levels using inactivated, Fluo-3-AM-loaded cardiomyocytes equilibrated with Ca2+ concentration standards. Titration of Ca2+ concentration exhibits a linear relationship to increasing Fluo-3 AM fluorescence intensity. Images obtained from individual myocyte confocal scans were recorded, average pixel intensity values were calculated, and a plot is generated relating the average pixel intensity to known Ca2+ concentrations. These standard plots can be used to convert transient Ca2+ fluorescence obtained with experimental cells to Ca2+ concentrations by linear regression analysis. Standards are determined on the same microscope used for acquisition of unknown Ca2+ concentrations, simplifying data interpretation and assuring accuracy of conversion values. This procedure eliminates additional equipment, ratiometric imaging, and mathematic correction factors and should be useful to investigators requiring a straightforward method for measuring Ca2+ concentrations in live cells using Ca2+-chelating dyes exhibiting variable fluorescence intensity.

  6. The dynamic systems approach to control and regulation of intracellular networks.

    PubMed

    Wolkenhauer, Olaf; Ullah, Mukhtar; Wellstead, Peter; Cho, Kwang-Hyun

    2005-03-21

    Systems theory and cell biology have enjoyed a long relationship that has received renewed interest in recent years in the context of systems biology. The term 'systems' in systems biology comes from systems theory or dynamic systems theory: systems biology is defined through the application of systems- and signal-oriented approaches for an understanding of inter- and intra-cellular dynamic processes. The aim of the present text is to review the systems and control perspective of dynamic systems. The biologist's conceptual framework for representing the variables of a biochemical reaction network, and for describing their relationships, are pathway maps. A principal goal of systems biology is to turn these static maps into dynamic models, which can provide insight into the temporal evolution of biochemical reaction networks. Towards this end, we review the case for differential equation models as a 'natural' representation of causal entailment in pathways. Block-diagrams, commonly used in the engineering sciences, are introduced and compared to pathway maps. The stimulus-response representation of a molecular system is a necessary condition for an understanding of dynamic interactions among the components that make up a pathway. Using simple examples, we show how biochemical reactions are modelled in the dynamic systems framework and visualized using block-diagrams.

  7. Intracellular Lipid Droplets Contain Dynamic Pools of Sphingomyelin: ADRP Binds Phospholipids with High Affinity

    PubMed Central

    McIntosh, Avery L.; Storey, Stephen M.

    2011-01-01

    During the last several years, intracellular lipid droplets have become the focus of intense study. No longer an inert bystander, the lipid droplet is now known as a dynamic organelle contributing lipids to many cellular events. However, while the dynamics of cholesterol efflux from both the plasma membrane and lipid droplets have been studied, less is known regarding the efflux of sphingomyelin from these membranes. In order to address this issue, sphingomyelin efflux kinetics and binding affinities from different intracellular pools were examined. When compared to the plasma membrane, lipid droplets had a smaller exchangeable sphingomyelin efflux pool and the time required to efflux that pool was significantly shorter. Fluorescence binding assays revealed that proteins in the plasma membrane and lipid droplet pool bound sphingomyelin with high affinity. Further characterization identified adipose differentiation-related protein (ADRP) as one of the sphingomyelin binding proteins in the lipid droplet fraction and revealed that ADRP demonstrated saturable binding to 6-((N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl) amino)-hexanoyl)sphingosyl-phosphocholine (NBD-sphingomyelin) and also 2-(6-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1, 3-diazol-4-yl)amino)hexanoyl-1-hexadecanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (NBD-phosphatidylcholine) with binding affinities in the nanomolar range. Taken together, these results suggest that lipid droplet associated proteins such as ADRP may play a significant role in regulating the intracellular distribution of phospholipids and lipids in general. Overall, insights from the present work suggest new and important roles for lipid droplets and ADRP in phospholipid metabolism. PMID:20473576

  8. Accelerated dynamic EPR imaging using fast acquisition and compressive recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Rizwan; Samouilov, Alexandre; Zweier, Jay L.

    2016-12-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) allows quantitative imaging of tissue redox status, which provides important information about ischemic syndromes, cancer and other pathologies. For continuous wave EPR imaging, however, poor signal-to-noise ratio and low acquisition efficiency limit its ability to image dynamic processes in vivo including tissue redox, where conditions can change rapidly. Here, we present a data acquisition and processing framework that couples fast acquisition with compressive sensing-inspired image recovery to enable EPR-based redox imaging with high spatial and temporal resolutions. The fast acquisition (FA) allows collecting more, albeit noisier, projections in a given scan time. The composite regularization based processing method, called spatio-temporal adaptive recovery (STAR), not only exploits sparsity in multiple representations of the spatio-temporal image but also adaptively adjusts the regularization strength for each representation based on its inherent level of the sparsity. As a result, STAR adjusts to the disparity in the level of sparsity across multiple representations, without introducing any tuning parameter. Our simulation and phantom imaging studies indicate that a combination of fast acquisition and STAR (FASTAR) enables high-fidelity recovery of volumetric image series, with each volumetric image employing less than 10 s of scan. In addition to image fidelity, the time constants derived from FASTAR also match closely to the ground truth even when a small number of projections are used for recovery. This development will enhance the capability of EPR to study fast dynamic processes that cannot be investigated using existing EPR imaging techniques.

  9. Accelerated dynamic EPR imaging using fast acquisition and compressive recovery.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Rizwan; Samouilov, Alexandre; Zweier, Jay L

    2016-12-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) allows quantitative imaging of tissue redox status, which provides important information about ischemic syndromes, cancer and other pathologies. For continuous wave EPR imaging, however, poor signal-to-noise ratio and low acquisition efficiency limit its ability to image dynamic processes in vivo including tissue redox, where conditions can change rapidly. Here, we present a data acquisition and processing framework that couples fast acquisition with compressive sensing-inspired image recovery to enable EPR-based redox imaging with high spatial and temporal resolutions. The fast acquisition (FA) allows collecting more, albeit noisier, projections in a given scan time. The composite regularization based processing method, called spatio-temporal adaptive recovery (STAR), not only exploits sparsity in multiple representations of the spatio-temporal image but also adaptively adjusts the regularization strength for each representation based on its inherent level of the sparsity. As a result, STAR adjusts to the disparity in the level of sparsity across multiple representations, without introducing any tuning parameter. Our simulation and phantom imaging studies indicate that a combination of fast acquisition and STAR (FASTAR) enables high-fidelity recovery of volumetric image series, with each volumetric image employing less than 10 s of scan. In addition to image fidelity, the time constants derived from FASTAR also match closely to the ground truth even when a small number of projections are used for recovery. This development will enhance the capability of EPR to study fast dynamic processes that cannot be investigated using existing EPR imaging techniques.

  10. Effect of Partially Screened Nuclei on Fast-Electron Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesslow, L.; Embréus, O.; Stahl, A.; DuBois, T. C.; Papp, G.; Newton, S. L.; Fülöp, T.

    2017-06-01

    We analyze the dynamics of fast electrons in plasmas containing partially ionized impurity atoms, where the screening effect of bound electrons must be included. We derive analytical expressions for the deflection and slowing-down frequencies, and show that they are increased significantly compared to the results obtained with complete screening, already at subrelativistic electron energies. Furthermore, we show that the modifications to the deflection and slowing down frequencies are of equal importance in describing the runaway current evolution. Our results greatly affect fast-electron dynamics and have important implications, e.g., for the efficacy of mitigation strategies for runaway electrons in tokamak devices, and energy loss during relativistic breakdown in atmospheric discharges.

  11. Tissue architecture and function: dynamic reciprocity via extra- and intra-cellular matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Ren; Boudreau, Aaron; Bissell, Mina J

    2008-12-23

    Mammary gland development, functional differentiation, and homeostasis are orchestrated and sustained by a balance of biochemical and biophysical cues from the organ's microenvironment. The three-dimensional microenvironment of the mammary gland, predominantly 'encoded' by a collaboration between the extracellular matrix (ECM), hormones, and growth factors, sends signals from ECM receptors through the cytoskeletal intracellular matrix to nuclear and chromatin structures resulting in gene expression; the ECM in turn is regulated and remodeled by signals from the nucleus. In this chapter, we discuss how coordinated ECM deposition and remodeling is necessary for mammary gland development, how the ECM provides structural and biochemical cues necessary for tissue-specific function, and the role of the cytoskeleton in mediating the extra - to intracellular dialogue occurring between the nucleus and the microenvironment. When operating normally, the cytoskeletal-mediated dynamic and reciprocal integration of tissue architecture and function directs mammary gland development, tissue polarity, and ultimately, tissue-specific gene expression. Cancer occurs when these dynamic interactions go awry for an extended time.

  12. Single-Molecule Imaging Reveals the Activation Dynamics of Intracellular Protein Smad3 on Cell Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nan; Yang, Yong; He, Kangmin; Zhang, Fayun; Zhao, Libo; Zhou, Wei; Yuan, Jinghe; Liang, Wei; Fang, Xiaohong

    2016-01-01

    Smad3 is an intracellular protein that plays a key role in propagating transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) signals from cell membrane to nucleus. However whether the transient process of Smad3 activation occurs on cell membrane and how it is regulated remains elusive. Using advanced live-cell single-molecule fluorescence microscopy to image and track fluorescent protein-labeled Smad3, we observed and quantified, for the first time, the dynamics of individual Smad3 molecules docking to and activation on the cell membrane. It was found that Smad3 docked to cell membrane in both unstimulated and stimulated cells, but with different diffusion rates and dissociation kinetics. The change in its membrane docking dynamics can be used to study the activation of Smad3. Our results reveal that Smad3 binds with type I TGF-β receptor (TRI) even in unstimulated cells. Its activation is regulated by TRI phosphorylation but independent of receptor endocytosis. This study offers new information on TGF-β/Smad signaling, as well as a new approach to investigate the activation of intracellular signaling proteins for a better understanding of their functions in signal transduction. PMID:27641076

  13. Probing cytoskeletal modulation of passive and active intracellular dynamics using nanobody-functionalized quantum dots

    PubMed Central

    Katrukha, Eugene A.; Mikhaylova, Marina; van Brakel, Hugo X.; van Bergen en Henegouwen, Paul M.; Akhmanova, Anna; Hoogenraad, Casper C.; Kapitein, Lukas C.

    2017-01-01

    The cytoplasm is a highly complex and heterogeneous medium that is structured by the cytoskeleton. How local transport depends on the heterogeneous organization and dynamics of F-actin and microtubules is poorly understood. Here we use a novel delivery and functionalization strategy to utilize quantum dots (QDs) as probes for active and passive intracellular transport. Rapid imaging of non-functionalized QDs reveals two populations with a 100-fold difference in diffusion constant, with the faster fraction increasing upon actin depolymerization. When nanobody-functionalized QDs are targeted to different kinesin motor proteins, their trajectories do not display strong actin-induced transverse displacements, as suggested previously. Only kinesin-1 displays subtle directional fluctuations, because the subset of microtubules used by this motor undergoes prominent undulations. Using actin-targeting agents reveals that F-actin suppresses most microtubule shape remodelling, rather than promoting it. These results demonstrate how the spatial heterogeneity of the cytoskeleton imposes large variations in non-equilibrium intracellular dynamics. PMID:28322225

  14. Single-Molecule Imaging Reveals the Activation Dynamics of Intracellular Protein Smad3 on Cell Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Nan; Yang, Yong; He, Kangmin; Zhang, Fayun; Zhao, Libo; Zhou, Wei; Yuan, Jinghe; Liang, Wei; Fang, Xiaohong

    2016-09-01

    Smad3 is an intracellular protein that plays a key role in propagating transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) signals from cell membrane to nucleus. However whether the transient process of Smad3 activation occurs on cell membrane and how it is regulated remains elusive. Using advanced live-cell single-molecule fluorescence microscopy to image and track fluorescent protein-labeled Smad3, we observed and quantified, for the first time, the dynamics of individual Smad3 molecules docking to and activation on the cell membrane. It was found that Smad3 docked to cell membrane in both unstimulated and stimulated cells, but with different diffusion rates and dissociation kinetics. The change in its membrane docking dynamics can be used to study the activation of Smad3. Our results reveal that Smad3 binds with type I TGF-β receptor (TRI) even in unstimulated cells. Its activation is regulated by TRI phosphorylation but independent of receptor endocytosis. This study offers new information on TGF-β/Smad signaling, as well as a new approach to investigate the activation of intracellular signaling proteins for a better understanding of their functions in signal transduction.

  15. USER-FRIENDLY TOOLS FOR QUANTIFYING THE DYNAMICS OF CELLULAR MORPHOLOGY AND INTRACELLULAR PROTEIN CLUSTERS

    PubMed Central

    Tsygankov, Denis; Chu, Pei-Hsuan; Chen, Hsin; Elston, Timothy C.; Hahn, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the heterogeneous dynamics of cellular processes requires not only tools to visualize molecular behavior, but also versatile approaches to extract and analyze the information contained in live-cell movies of many cells. Automated identification and tracking of cellular features enables thorough and consistent comparative analyses in a high-throughput manner. Here we present tools for two challenging problems in computational image analysis: 1) classification of motion for cells with complex shapes and dynamics, and 2) segmentation of clustered cells and quantification of intracellular protein distributions based on a single fluorescence channel. We describe these methods, and user-friendly software* (MATLAB applications with Graphical User Interfaces) so these tools can be readily applied without an extensive knowledge of computational techniques. PMID:24974040

  16. Fast Surface Dynamics of Metallic Glass Enable Superlatticelike Nanostructure Growth.

    PubMed

    Chen, L; Cao, C R; Shi, J A; Lu, Z; Sun, Y T; Luo, P; Gu, L; Bai, H Y; Pan, M X; Wang, W H

    2017-01-06

    Contrary to the formation of complicated polycrystals induced by general crystallization, a modulated superlatticelike nanostructure, which grows layer by layer from the surface to the interior of a Pd_{40}Ni_{10}Cu_{30}P_{20} metallic glass, is observed via isothermal annealing below the glass transition temperature. The generation of the modulated nanostructure can be solely controlled by the annealing temperature, and it can be understood based on the fast dynamic and liquidlike behavior of the glass surface. The observations have implications for understanding the glassy surface dynamics and pave a way for the controllable fabrication of a unique and sophisticated nanostructure on a glass surface to realize the properties' modification.

  17. Fast Surface Dynamics of Metallic Glass Enable Superlatticelike Nanostructure Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L.; Cao, C. R.; Shi, J. A.; Lu, Z.; Sun, Y. T.; Luo, P.; Gu, L.; Bai, H. Y.; Pan, M. X.; Wang, W. H.

    2017-01-01

    Contrary to the formation of complicated polycrystals induced by general crystallization, a modulated superlatticelike nanostructure, which grows layer by layer from the surface to the interior of a Pd40Ni10Cu30P20 metallic glass, is observed via isothermal annealing below the glass transition temperature. The generation of the modulated nanostructure can be solely controlled by the annealing temperature, and it can be understood based on the fast dynamic and liquidlike behavior of the glass surface. The observations have implications for understanding the glassy surface dynamics and pave a way for the controllable fabrication of a unique and sophisticated nanostructure on a glass surface to realize the properties' modification.

  18. FAST Simulation Tool Containing Methods for Predicting the Dynamic Response of Wind Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Jonkman, Jason

    2015-08-12

    FAST is a simulation tool (computer software) for modeling tlie dynamic response of horizontal-axis wind turbines. FAST employs a combined modal and multibody structural-dynamics formulation in the time domain.

  19. A note on the theory of fast money flow dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, A.; Kieu, T.; Melatos, A.

    2010-08-01

    The gauge theory of arbitrage was introduced by Ilinski in [K. Ilinski, preprint arXiv:hep-th/9710148 (1997)] and applied to fast money flows in [A. Ilinskaia, K. Ilinski, preprint arXiv:cond-mat/9902044 (1999); K. Ilinski, Physics of finance: gauge modelling in non-equilibrium pricing (Wiley, 2001)]. The theory of fast money flow dynamics attempts to model the evolution of currency exchange rates and stock prices on short, e.g. intra-day, time scales. It has been used to explain some of the heuristic trading rules, known as technical analysis, that are used by professional traders in the equity and foreign exchange markets. A critique of some of the underlying assumptions of the gauge theory of arbitrage was presented by Sornette in [D. Sornette, Int. J. Mod. Phys. C 9, 505 (1998)]. In this paper, we present a critique of the theory of fast money flow dynamics, which was not examined by Sornette. We demonstrate that the choice of the input parameters used in [K. Ilinski, Physics of finance: gauge modelling in non-equilibrium pricing (Wiley, 2001)] results in sinusoidal oscillations of the exchange rate, in conflict with the results presented in [K. Ilinski, Physics of finance: gauge modelling in non-equilibrium pricing (Wiley, 2001)]. We also find that the dynamics predicted by the theory are generally unstable in most realistic situations, with the exchange rate tending to zero or infinity exponentially.

  20. Nonlinear Dynamic Modeling of Neuron Action Potential Threshold During Synaptically Driven Broadband Intracellular Activity

    PubMed Central

    Roach, Shane M.; Song, Dong; Berger, Theodore W.

    2012-01-01

    Activity-dependent variation of neuronal thresholds for action potential (AP) generation is one of the key determinants of spike-train temporal-pattern transformations from presynaptic to postsynaptic spike trains. In this study, we model the nonlinear dynamics of the threshold variation during synaptically driven broadband intracellular activity. First, membrane potentials of single CA1 pyramidal cells were recorded under physiologically plausible broadband stimulation conditions. Second, a method was developed to measure AP thresholds from the continuous recordings of membrane potentials. It involves measuring the turning points of APs by analyzing the third-order derivatives of the membrane potentials. Four stimulation paradigms with different temporal patterns were applied to validate this method by comparing the measured AP turning points and the actual AP thresholds estimated with varying stimulation intensities. Results show that the AP turning points provide consistent measurement of the AP thresholds, except for a constant offset. It indicates that 1) the variation of AP turning points represents the nonlinearities of threshold dynamics; and 2) an optimization of the constant offset is required to achieve accurate spike prediction. Third, a nonlinear dynamical third-order Volterra model was built to describe the relations between the threshold dynamics and the AP activities. Results show that the model can predict threshold accurately based on the preceding APs. Finally, the dynamic threshold model was integrated into a previously developed single neuron model and resulted in a 33% improvement in spike prediction. PMID:22156947

  1. Slow Ca2+ dynamics in pharyngeal muscles in Caenorhabditis elegans during fast pumping.

    PubMed

    Shimozono, Satoshi; Fukano, Takashi; Kimura, Koutarou D; Mori, Ikue; Kirino, Yutaka; Miyawaki, Atsushi

    2004-05-01

    The pharyngeal muscles of Caenorhabditis elegans are composed of the corpus, isthmus and terminal bulb from anterior to posterior. These components are excited in a coordinated fashion to facilitate proper feeding through pumping and peristalsis. We analysed the spatiotemporal pattern of intracellular calcium dynamics in the pharyngeal muscles during feeding. We used a new ratiometric fluorescent calcium indicator and a new optical system that allows simultaneous illumination and detection at any two wavelengths. Pumping was observed with fast, repetitive and synchronous spikes in calcium concentrations in the corpus and terminal bulb, indicative of electrical coupling throughout the muscles. The posterior isthmus, however, responded to only one out of several pumping spikes to produce broad calcium transients, leading to peristalsis, the slow and gradual motion needed for efficient swallows. The excitation-calcium coupling may be uniquely modulated in this region at the level of calcium channels on the plasma membrane.

  2. Fast ion dynamics measured by collective Thomson scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bindslev, Henrik

    2001-10-01

    In magnetically confined fusion plasmas, fast ions, from fusion reactions and auxiliary heating, typically carry a third of the total plasma kinetic energy, and even more of the free energy. This free energy must be channelled into heating the bulk plasma, but is also available for driving waves in the plasma, affecting confinement of bulk and fast ions. We know that fast ions can drive Alfvén waves, affect sawteeth and fishbones. In turn all three can redistribute or ejects the fast ions. Wave particle interaction, also the basis of Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH), depends crucially on the phase space distribution of the fast ions. Conversely the effect waves and instabilities have of fast ions will manifest itself in the detail of the fast ion phase space distribution. To explore the dynamics of fast ions and their interaction with the plasma thus begs for measurements of the fast ion distribution resolved in space, time and velocity. This has long been the promise of Collective Thomson Scattering (CTS) [1]. First demonstrated at JET [2]and subsequently at TEXTOR [3], CTS is living up to its promise and is now contributing to the understanding of fast ion dynamics. With the TEXTOR CTS, temporal behaviours of fast ion velocity distributions have been uncovered. The fast ion populations are produced by ICRH and Neutral Beam Injection (NBI). At sawteeth, we see clear variations in the fast ion population, which depend on ion energy, pitch angle and spatial location. Investigating the region just inside the inversion radius, we find that ions with small parallel energy, and with perpendicular energies up to a soft threshold well above thermal, are lost from the high field side near the inversion radius, while more energetic ions in the same pitch angle range remain insensitive to the sawteeth. The sensitive population could include the potato and stagnation orbit particles identified theoretically as being sensitive the sawteeth [4]. Under the same conditions

  3. White dwarf dynamical interactions and fast optical transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Berro, Enrique; Badenes, Carles; Aznar-Siguán, Gabriela; Lorén-Aguilar, Pablo

    2017-07-01

    Recent advances in time-domain astronomy have uncovered a new class of optical transients with time-scales shorter than typical supernovae and a wide range of peak luminosities. Several subtypes have been identified within this broad class, including Ca-rich transients, Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) and fast/bright transients. We examine the predictions from a state-of-the-art grid of three-dimensional simulations of dynamical white dwarf interactions in the context of these fast optical transients. We find that for collisions involving carbon-oxygen or oxygen-neon white dwarfs, the peak luminosities and durations of the light curves in our models are in good agreement with the properties of fast/bright transients. When one of the colliding white dwarfs is made of helium, the properties of the light curves are similar to those of Ca-rich gap transients. The model light curves from our white dwarf collisions are too slow to reproduce those of SNe Ia, and too fast to match any normal or peculiar SNe Ia.

  4. Visualizing live dynamics and ultrastructure of intracellular organelles with preembedding correlative light-electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Polishchuk, Roman S; Polishchuk, Elena V; Luini, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    One of the very effective methods to perform correlative light-electron microscopy (CLEM) is to combine video imaging of live cells with immuno-electron microscopy. This technique can thus provide detailed, high-resolution characterization of dynamic intracellular organelles. The use of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged chimeras allows the movements and/or behavior of intracellular structures in a live cell to be followed, which can then be fixed at the moment of interest. The subsequent immuno-electron microscopy analysis reveals the three-dimensional (3D) architecture of the same structure, together with the precise identification of the GFP-labeled protein pattern. The process resembles taking a high-resolution snapshot of an interesting and/or rare live event. Conceptually, it consists of a switch of wavelengths, from that of photons to that of electrons, with the associated huge gain in resolution. In this respect, CLEM can be considered as the first, and probably one of the most powerful, super-resolution microscopy techniques. This switch, however, requires complex manipulations of the sample. Considering that CLEM is a very valuable but technically challenging and time-consuming method, accurate protocols are needed to simplify the efforts of researchers who are willing to apply this method for their own purposes. Here, we present a detailed description of the preembedding CLEM procedures that explains the know-how and the "tricks of the trade" that are involved in carrying out the crucial steps of CLEM.

  5. Magneto-optical cellular chip model for intracellular orientational-dynamic-activity detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyashita, Y.; Iwasaka, M.; Kurita, S.; Owada, N.

    2012-04-01

    In the present study, a magneto-optical cellular chip model (MoCCM) was developed to detect intracellular dynamics in macromolecules by using magneto-optical effects. For the purpose of cell-measurement under strong static magnetic fields of up to 10 T, we constructed a cellular chip model, which was a thin glass plate with a well for a cell culture. A cell line of osteoblast MC3T3-E1 was incubated in the glass well, and the well, 0.3 mm in depth, was sealed by a cover glass when the MoCCM was set in a fiber optic system. An initial intensity change of the polarized light transmission, which dispersed perpendicular to the cell's attaching surface, was collected for 10 to 60 min, and then magnetic fields were applied parallel and perpendicular to the surface and light direction, respectively. The magnetic birefringence signals that originated from the magnetic orientation of intracellular molecules such as cytoskeletons apparently appeared when the magnetic fields were constant at 10 T. A statistical analysis with 15 experiments confirmed that the cellular components under 10 T magnetic fields caused a stronger alignment, which was transferred into polarizing light intensity that increased more than the case before exposure. Cellular conditions such as generation and cell density affected the magnetic birefringence signals.

  6. Conformational Dynamics of Intracellular Tau Protein Revealed by CD and SAXS.

    PubMed

    Gorantla, Nalini Vijay; Shkumatov, Alexander V; Chinnathambi, Subashchandrabose

    2017-01-01

    A native conformation of a protein is essential for its biological role. In certain conditions, some proteins show non-native conformations, leading to aggregation, which in turn may produce severe pathologies. Such physiological conditions are classified as protein misfolding diseases. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia. Extracellular senile plaques formed by Amyloid β and intracellular aggregates formed by microtubule-associated protein Tau (MAPT) are the hallmarks of AD. Physiological role of MAPT is to maintain the integrity and stability of microtubules, however it tends to self-aggregate forming intracellular paired helical filaments (PHFs) during AD. MAPT is also subjected to various post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation, glycosylation, truncation, and acetylation. Being natively unfolded, MAPT is prone to full characterization at atomic level. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) is often applied in combination with other biophysical methods, like nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), circular dichroism (CD), fluorescence spectroscopy, analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC), or dynamic light scattering (DLS) to characterize natively unfolded systems. Here we describe the practical aspects of MAPT characterization by SAXS and CD in detail as well as outline the inferred structural and functional implications.

  7. Control of Local Intracellular Calcium Concentration with Dynamic-Clamp Controlled 2-Photon Uncaging

    PubMed Central

    Idoux, Erwin; Mertz, Jerome

    2011-01-01

    The variations of the intracellular concentration of calcium ion ([Ca2+]i) are at the heart of intracellular signaling, and their imaging is therefore of enormous interest. However, passive [Ca2+]i imaging provides no control over these variations, meaning that a full exploration of the functional consequences of [Ca2+]i changes is difficult to attain. The tools designed so far to modify [Ca2+]i, even qualitatively, suffer drawbacks that undermine their widespread use. Here, we describe an electro-optical technique to quantitatively set [Ca2+]i, in real time and with sub-cellular resolution, using two-photon Ca2+ uncaging and dynamic-clamp. We experimentally demonstrate, on neurons from acute olfactory bulb slices of Long Evans rats, various capabilities of this technique previously difficult to achieve, such as the independent control of the membrane potential and [Ca2+]i variations, the functional knocking-in of user-defined virtual voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels, and the standardization of [Ca2+]i patterns across different cells. Our goal is to lay the groundwork for this technique and establish it as a new and versatile tool for the study of cell signaling. PMID:22216105

  8. Fast Learning for Big Data Using Dynamic Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alwajeeh, T.; Alharthi, A. F.; Rahmat, R. F.; Budiarto, R.

    2017-04-01

    This paper discusses an approach for fast learning in big data. The proposed approach combines momentum factor and training rate, where the momentum is a dynamic function of the training rate in order to avoid overshoot weight to speed up training time of the back propagation neural network engine. The two factors are adjusted dinamically to assure the fast convergence of the training process. Experiments on 2-bit XOR parity problem were conducted using Matlab and a sigmoid function. Experiments results show that the proposed approach signifcantly performs better compare to the standard back propagation neural network in terms of training time. Both, the maximum training time and the minimum training time are significantly faster than the standard algorithm at error threshold of 10-5.

  9. Dynamic filopodia are required for chemokine-dependent intracellular polarization during guided cell migration in vivo.

    PubMed

    Meyen, Dana; Tarbashevich, Katsiaryna; Banisch, Torsten U; Wittwer, Carolina; Reichman-Fried, Michal; Maugis, Benoît; Grimaldi, Cecilia; Messerschmidt, Esther-Maria; Raz, Erez

    2015-04-15

    Cell migration and polarization is controlled by signals in the environment. Migrating cells typically form filopodia that extend from the cell surface, but the precise function of these structures in cell polarization and guided migration is poorly understood. Using the in vivo model of zebrafish primordial germ cells for studying chemokine-directed single cell migration, we show that filopodia distribution and their dynamics are dictated by the gradient of the chemokine Cxcl12a. By specifically interfering with filopodia formation, we demonstrate for the first time that these protrusions play an important role in cell polarization by Cxcl12a, as manifested by elevation of intracellular pH and Rac1 activity at the cell front. The establishment of this polarity is at the basis of effective cell migration towards the target. Together, we show that filopodia allow the interpretation of the chemotactic gradient in vivo by directing single-cell polarization in response to the guidance cue.

  10. Multiple Model-Informed Open-Loop Control of Uncertain Intracellular Signaling Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Perley, Jeffrey P.; Mikolajczak, Judith; Harrison, Marietta L.; Buzzard, Gregery T.; Rundell, Ann E.

    2014-01-01

    Computational approaches to tune the activation of intracellular signal transduction pathways both predictably and selectively will enable researchers to explore and interrogate cell biology with unprecedented precision. Techniques to control complex nonlinear systems typically involve the application of control theory to a descriptive mathematical model. For cellular processes, however, measurement assays tend to be too time consuming for real-time feedback control and models offer rough approximations of the biological reality, thus limiting their utility when considered in isolation. We overcome these problems by combining nonlinear model predictive control with a novel adaptive weighting algorithm that blends predictions from multiple models to derive a compromise open-loop control sequence. The proposed strategy uses weight maps to inform the controller of the tendency for models to differ in their ability to accurately reproduce the system dynamics under different experimental perturbations (i.e. control inputs). These maps, which characterize the changing model likelihoods over the admissible control input space, are constructed using preexisting experimental data and used to produce a model-based open-loop control framework. In effect, the proposed method designs a sequence of control inputs that force the signaling dynamics along a predefined temporal response without measurement feedback while mitigating the effects of model uncertainty. We demonstrate this technique on the well-known Erk/MAPK signaling pathway in T cells. In silico assessment demonstrates that this approach successfully reduces target tracking error by 52% or better when compared with single model-based controllers and non-adaptive multiple model-based controllers. In vitro implementation of the proposed approach in Jurkat cells confirms a 63% reduction in tracking error when compared with the best of the single-model controllers. This study provides an experimentally

  11. Multiple model-informed open-loop control of uncertain intracellular signaling dynamics.

    PubMed

    Perley, Jeffrey P; Mikolajczak, Judith; Harrison, Marietta L; Buzzard, Gregery T; Rundell, Ann E

    2014-04-01

    Computational approaches to tune the activation of intracellular signal transduction pathways both predictably and selectively will enable researchers to explore and interrogate cell biology with unprecedented precision. Techniques to control complex nonlinear systems typically involve the application of control theory to a descriptive mathematical model. For cellular processes, however, measurement assays tend to be too time consuming for real-time feedback control and models offer rough approximations of the biological reality, thus limiting their utility when considered in isolation. We overcome these problems by combining nonlinear model predictive control with a novel adaptive weighting algorithm that blends predictions from multiple models to derive a compromise open-loop control sequence. The proposed strategy uses weight maps to inform the controller of the tendency for models to differ in their ability to accurately reproduce the system dynamics under different experimental perturbations (i.e. control inputs). These maps, which characterize the changing model likelihoods over the admissible control input space, are constructed using preexisting experimental data and used to produce a model-based open-loop control framework. In effect, the proposed method designs a sequence of control inputs that force the signaling dynamics along a predefined temporal response without measurement feedback while mitigating the effects of model uncertainty. We demonstrate this technique on the well-known Erk/MAPK signaling pathway in T cells. In silico assessment demonstrates that this approach successfully reduces target tracking error by 52% or better when compared with single model-based controllers and non-adaptive multiple model-based controllers. In vitro implementation of the proposed approach in Jurkat cells confirms a 63% reduction in tracking error when compared with the best of the single-model controllers. This study provides an experimentally

  12. Fast-growing species and sustainability (productivity and site dynamics of three fast-growing species)

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, A.N.; Sugur, G.V.

    1992-12-31

    Growth of three fast-growing species, raised in a high rainfall zone (2000-2500 mm per annum) has been compared, and the associated site dynamics studies in the Western Ghat area of Karnataka State. Two fast-growing exotics, Acacia auriculiformis and Castuarina equisitifolia, were planted on degraded, open sites at high planting densities (5000 plants ha{sup {minus}1}), and one native fast-growing species. Dendrocalamus strictus, was planted on a good site under seasonal irrigation and wider spacing (500 plants ha{sup {minus}1}). These were studies at the age of 5 years for their comparative productivity, quantity of litter fall and changes in nutrient and microbial status. Among these species, A. auriculiformis recorded the highest total productivity closely followed by D. strictus. However, the MAI after 5 years indicated a higher productivity for D. strictus, when culm production attained harvestable size. C. equisitifolia was a close third. It was also found that D. strictus produced higher biomass at lower planting densities, under better sites and management. The litter fall and changes in nutrient status indicated the highest efficiency in A. auriculiformis, followed by C. equisitifolia. It was concluded that the higher planting density was the major contributing factor; the values were comparatively low for D. strictus mainly owing to a lower stocking density of plants.

  13. Dynamically controlled energy dissipation for fast magnetic vortex switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badea, R.; Berezovsky, J.

    2017-09-01

    Manipulation of vortex states in magnetic media provides new routes towards information storage and processing technology. The typical slow relaxation times (˜100 ns) of magnetic vortex dynamics may present an obstacle to the realization of these applications. Here, we investigate how a vortex state in a ferromagnetic microdisk can be manipulated in a way that translates the vortex core while enhancing energy dissipation to rapidly damp the vortex dynamics. We use time-resolved differential magneto-optical Kerr effect microscopy to measure the motion of the vortex core in response to applied magnetic fields. We first map out how the vortex core becomes sequentially trapped by pinning sites as it translates across the disk. After applying a fast magnetic field step to translate the vortex from one pinning site to another, we observe long-lived dynamics of the vortex as it settles to the new equilibrium. We then demonstrate how the addition of a short (<10 ns) magnetic field pulse can induce additional energy dissipation, strongly damping the long-lived dynamics. A model of the vortex dynamics using the Thiele equation of motion explains the mechanism behind this effect.

  14. In situ intracellular calcium oscillations in osteocytes in intact mouse long bones under dynamic mechanical loading

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Da; Baik, Andrew D.; Lu, X. Lucas; Zhou, Bin; Lai, Xiaohan; Wang, Liyun; Luo, Erping; Guo, X. Edward

    2014-01-01

    Osteocytes have been hypothesized to be the major mechanosensors in bone. How in situ osteocytes respond to mechanical stimuli is still unclear because of technical difficulties. In vitro studies have shown that osteocytes exhibited unique calcium (Ca2+) oscillations to fluid shear. However, whether this mechanotransduction phenomenon holds for in situ osteocytes embedded within a mineralized bone matrix under dynamic loading remains unknown. Using a novel synchronized loading/imaging technique, we successfully visualized in real time and quantified Ca2+ responses in osteocytes and bone surface cells in situ under controlled dynamic loading on intact mouse tibia. The resultant fluid-induced shear stress on the osteocyte in the lacunocanalicular system (LCS) was also quantified. Osteocytes, but not surface cells, displayed repetitive Ca2+ spikes in response to dynamic loading, with spike frequency and magnitude dependent on load magnitude, tissue strain, and shear stress in the LCS. The Ca2+ oscillations were significantly reduced by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) depletion and P2 purinergic receptor (P2R)/phospholipase C (PLC) inhibition. This study provides direct evidence that osteocytes respond to in situ mechanical loading by Ca2+ oscillations, which are dependent on the P2R/PLC/inositol trisphosphate/ER pathway. This study develops a novel approach in skeletal mechanobiology and also advances our fundamental knowledge of bone mechanotransduction.—Jing, D., Baik, A. D., Lu, X. L., Zhou, B., Lai, X., Wang, L., Luo, E., Guo, X. E. In situ intracellular calcium oscillations in osteocytes in intact mouse long bones under dynamic mechanical loading. PMID:24347610

  15. Fast intracellular dissolution and persistent cellular uptake of silver nanoparticles in CHO-K1 cells: implication for cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiumei; Miclăuş, Teodora; Wang, Liming; Foldbjerg, Rasmus; Sutherland, Duncan S; Autrup, Herman; Chen, Chunying; Beer, Christiane

    2015-03-01

    Toxicity of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) has been reported both in vitro and in vivo. However, the intracellular stability and chemical state of Ag NPs are still not very well studied. In this work, we systematically investigated the cellular uptake pathways, intracellular dissolution and chemical species, and cytotoxicity of Ag NPs (15.9 ± 7.6 nm) in Chinese hamster ovary cell subclone K1 cells, a cell line recommended by the OECD for genotoxicity studies. Quantification of intracellular nanoparticle uptake and ion release was performed through inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) was employed to assess the chemical state of intracellular silver. The toxic potential of Ag NPs and Ag(+) was evaluated by cell viability, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and live-dead cell staining. The results suggest that cellular uptake of Ag NPs involves lipid-raft-mediated endocytosis and energy-independent diffusion. The degradation study shows that Ag NPs taken up into cells dissolved quickly and XANES results directly indicated that the internalized Ag was oxidized to Ag-O- species and then stabilized in silver-sulfur (Ag-S-) bonds within the cells. Subsequent cytotoxicity studies show that Ag NPs decrease cell viability and increase ROS production. Pre-incubation with N-acetyl-L-cysteine, an efficient antioxidant and Ag(+) chelator, diminished the cytotoxicity caused by Ag NPs or Ag(+) exposure. Our study suggests that the cytotoxicity mechanism of Ag NPs is related to the intracellular release of silver ions, followed by their binding to SH-groups, presumably coming from amino acids or proteins, and affecting protein functions and the antioxidant defense system of cells.

  16. Fast and Slow Wetting Dynamics on nanostructured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandyala, Dhiraj; Rahmani, Amir; Cubaud, Thomas; Colosqui, Carlos

    2015-11-01

    This talk will present force-displacement and spontaneous drop spreading measurements on diverse nanostructured surfaces (e.g., mesoporous titania thin films, nanoscale pillared structures, on silica or glass substrates). Experimental measurements are performed for water-air and water-oil systems. The dynamics of wetting observed in these experiments can present remarkable crossovers from fast to slow or arrested dynamics. The emergence of a slow wetting regime is attributed to a multiplicity of metastable equilibrium states induced by nanoscale surface features. The crossover point can be dramatically advanced or delayed by adjusting specific physical parameters (e.g., viscosity of the wetting phases) and geometric properties of the surface nanostructure (e.g., nanopore/pillar radius and separation). Controlling the crossover point to arrested dynamics can effectively modify the degree of contact angle hysteresis and magnitude of liquid adhesion forces observed on surfaces of different materials. This work is supported by a SEED Award from The Office of Brookhaven National Laboratory Affairs at Stony Brook University.

  17. Fast dynamics in glass-forming polymers revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Colmenero, J.; Arbe, A.; Mijangos, C.; Reinecke, H.

    1997-12-31

    The so called fast-dynamics of glass-forming systems as observed by time of flight (TOF) neutron scattering techniques is revisited. TOF-results corresponding to several glass-forming polymers with different chemical microstructure and glass-transition temperature are presented together with the theoretical framework proposed by the authors to interpret these results. The main conclusion is that the TOF-data can be explained in terms of quasiharmonic vibrations and the particular short time behavior of the segmental dynamics. The segmental dynamics display in the very short time range (t {approx} 2 ps) a crossover from a simple exponential behavior towards a non-exponential regime. The first exponential decay, which is controlled by C-C rotational barriers, can be understood as a trace of the behavior of the system in absence of the effects (correlations, cooperativity, memory effects {hor_ellipsis}) which characterize the dense supercooled liquid like state against the normal liquid state. The non-exponential regime at t > 2 ps corresponds to what is usually understood as {alpha} and {beta} relaxations. Some implications of these results are also discussed.

  18. Compressed correlation functions and fast aging dynamics in metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruta, B.; Baldi, G.; Monaco, G.; Chushkin, Y.

    2013-02-01

    We present x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy measurements of the atomic dynamics in a Zr67Ni33 metallic glass, well below its glass transition temperature. We find that the decay of the density fluctuations can be well described by compressed, thus faster than exponential, correlation functions which can be modeled by the well-known Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts function with a shape exponent β larger than one. This parameter is furthermore found to be independent of both waiting time and wave-vector, leading to the possibility to rescale all the correlation functions to a single master curve. The dynamics in the glassy state is additionally characterized by different aging regimes which persist in the deep glassy state. These features seem to be universal in metallic glasses and suggest a nondiffusive nature of the dynamics. This universality is supported by the possibility of describing the fast increase of the structural relaxation time with waiting time using a unique model function, independently of the microscopic details of the system.

  19. Cavitation in confined water: ultra-fast bubble dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, Olivier; Marmottant, Philippe

    2012-02-01

    In the hydraulic vessels of trees, water can be found at negative pressure. This metastable state, corresponding to mechanical tension, is achieved by evaporation through a porous medium. It can be relaxed by cavitation, i.e. the sudden nucleation of vapor bubbles. Harmful for the tree due to the subsequent emboli of sap vessels, cavitation is on the contrary used by ferns to eject spores very swiftly. We will focus here on the dynamics of the cavitation bubble, which is of primary importance to explain the previously cited natural phenomena. We use the recently developed method of artificial tress, using transparent hydrogels as the porous medium. Our experiments, on water confined in micrometric hydrogel cavities, show an extremely fast dynamics: bubbles are nucleated at the microsecond timescale. For cavities larger than 100 microns, the bubble ``rings'' with damped oscillations at MHz frequencies, whereas for smaller cavities the oscillations become overdamped. This rich dynamics can be accounted for by a model we developed, leading to a modified Rayleigh-Plesset equation. Interestingly, this model predicts the impossibility to nucleate bubbles above a critical confinement that depends on liquid negative pressure and corresponds to approximately 100 nm for 20 MPa tensions.

  20. Dynamic Mode Decomposition of Fast Pressure Sensitive Paint Data

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Mohd Y.; Pandey, Anshuman; Gregory, James W.

    2016-01-01

    Fast-response pressure sensitive paint (PSP) is used in this work to measure and analyze the acoustic pressure field in a rectangular cavity. The high spatial resolution and fast frequency response of PSP effectively captures the spatial and temporal detail of surface pressure resulting in the acoustic pressure field. In this work, a high-speed camera is used to generate a continuous time record of the acoustic pressure fluctuations with PSP. Since the level of the acoustic pressure is near the resolution limit of the sensor system, advanced analysis techniques are used to extract the spatial modes of the pressure field. Both dynamic mode decomposition (DMD) and proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) are compared with phase averaging for data analysis. While all three techniques effectively extract the pressure field and reduce the impact of sensor noise, DMD and POD are more robust techniques that can be applied to aperiodic or multi-frequency signals. Furthermore, DMD is better than POD at suppressing noise in particular regions of the spectrum and at effectively separating spectral energy when multiple acoustic excitation frequencies are present. PMID:27294939

  1. Fast-slow climate dynamics and peak global warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seshadri, Ashwin K.

    2017-04-01

    The dynamics of a linear two-box energy balance climate model is analyzed as a fast-slow system, where the atmosphere, land, and near-surface ocean taken together respond within few years to external forcing whereas the deep-ocean responds much more slowly. Solutions to this system are approximated by estimating the system's time-constants using a first-order expansion of the system's eigenvalue problem in a perturbation parameter, which is the ratio of heat capacities of upper and lower boxes. The solution naturally admits an interpretation in terms of a fast response that depends approximately on radiative forcing and a slow response depending on integrals of radiative forcing with respect to time. The slow response is inversely proportional to the "damping-timescale", the timescale with which deep-ocean warming influences global warming. Applications of approximate solutions are discussed: conditions for a warming peak, effects of an individual pulse emission of carbon dioxide (CO2), and metrics for estimating and comparing contributions of different climate forcers to maximum global warming.

  2. Fast stochastic algorithm for simulating evolutionary population dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsimring, Lev; Hasty, Jeff; Mather, William

    2012-02-01

    Evolution and co-evolution of ecological communities are stochastic processes often characterized by vastly different rates of reproduction and mutation and a coexistence of very large and very small sub-populations of co-evolving species. This creates serious difficulties for accurate statistical modeling of evolutionary dynamics. In this talk, we introduce a new exact algorithm for fast fully stochastic simulations of birth/death/mutation processes. It produces a significant speedup compared to the direct stochastic simulation algorithm in a typical case when the total population size is large and the mutation rates are much smaller than birth/death rates. We illustrate the performance of the algorithm on several representative examples: evolution on a smooth fitness landscape, NK model, and stochastic predator-prey system.

  3. Prolonged Intracellular Na+ Dynamics Govern Electrical Activity in Accessory Olfactory Bulb Mitral Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zylbertal, Asaph; Kahan, Anat; Ben-Shaul, Yoram; Yarom, Yosef; Wagner, Shlomo

    2015-01-01

    Persistent activity has been reported in many brain areas and is hypothesized to mediate working memory and emotional brain states and to rely upon network or biophysical feedback. Here, we demonstrate a novel mechanism by which persistent neuronal activity can be generated without feedback, relying instead on the slow removal of Na+ from neurons following bursts of activity. We show that mitral cells in the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB), which plays a major role in mammalian social behavior, may respond to a brief sensory stimulation with persistent firing. By combining electrical recordings, Ca2+ and Na+ imaging, and realistic computational modeling, we explored the mechanisms underlying the persistent activity in AOB mitral cells. We found that the exceptionally slow inward current that underlies this activity is governed by prolonged dynamics of intracellular Na+ ([Na+]i), which affects neuronal electrical activity via several pathways. Specifically, elevated dendritic [Na+]i reverses the Na+-Ca2+ exchanger activity, thus modifying the [Ca2+]i set-point. This process, which relies on ubiquitous membrane mechanisms, is likely to play a role in other neuronal types in various brain regions. PMID:26674618

  4. Modulation of microtubule dynamics by a TIR domain protein from the intracellular pathogen Brucella melitensis.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, Girish K; Harms, Jerome S; Splitter, Gary A

    2011-10-01

    TIR (Toll/interleukin-1 receptor) domain-containing proteins play a crucial role in innate immunity in eukaryotes. Brucella is a highly infectious intracellular bacterium that encodes a TIR domain protein (TcpB) to subvert host innate immune responses to establish a beneficial niche for pathogenesis. TcpB inhibits NF-κB (nuclear factor κB) activation and pro-inflammatory cytokine secretions mediated by TLR (Toll-like receptor) 2 and TLR4. In the present study, we have demonstrated that TcpB modulates microtubule dynamics by acting as a stabilization factor. TcpB increased the rate of nucleation as well as the polymerization phases of microtubule formation in a similar manner to paclitaxel. TcpB could efficiently inhibit nocodazole- or cold-induced microtubule disassembly. Microtubule stabilization by TcpB is attributed to the BB-loop region of the TIR domain, and a point mutation affected the microtubule stabilization as well as the TLR-suppression properties of TcpB.

  5. Redox-responsive micelles self-assembled from dynamic covalent block copolymers for intracellular drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qinglai; Tan, Lianjiang; He, Changyu; Liu, Bingya; Xu, Yuhong; Zhu, Zhenggang; Shao, Zhifeng; Gong, Bing; Shen, Yu-Mei

    2015-04-01

    Redox-responsive micelles self-assembled from dynamic covalent block copolymers with double disulfide linkage in the backbone have been developed successfully. The amphiphilic block copolymers PEG-PLA associated with complementary H-bonding sequences can self-assemble into spherical micelles in aqueous media with sizes from 34 nm to 107 nm with different molar mass of PEG and PLA. Moreover, in vitro drug release analyses indicate that reductive environment can result in triggered drug release profiles. The glutathione (GSH) mediated intracellular drug delivery was investigated against HeLa human cervical carcinoma cell line. Flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy measurements demonstrated that the micelles exhibited faster drug release in glutathione monoester (GSH-OEt) pretreated HeLa cells than that in the nonpretreated cells. Cytotoxicity assay of DOX-loaded micelles indicated the higher cellular proliferation inhibition against 10 mM of GSH-OEt pretreated HeLa cells than that of the nonpretreated ones. These reduction-responsive, biodegradable and biocompatibility micelles could provide a favorable platform to construct excellent drug delivery systems for cancer therapy.

  6. Monitoring Interactions and Dynamics of Endogenous Beta-catenin With Intracellular Nanobodies in Living Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Traenkle, Bjoern; Emele, Felix; Anton, Roman; Poetz, Oliver; Haeussler, Ragna S.; Maier, Julia; Kaiser, Philipp D.; Scholz, Armin M.; Nueske, Stefan; Buchfellner, Andrea; Romer, Tina; Rothbauer, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    β-catenin is the key component of the canonical Wnt pathway and plays a crucial role in a multitude of developmental and homeostatic processes. The different tasks of β-catenin are orchestrated by its subcellular localization and participation in multiprotein complexes. To gain a better understanding of β-catenin's role in living cells we have generated a new set of single domain antibodies, referred to as nanobodies, derived from heavy chain antibodies of camelids. We selected nanobodies recognizing the N-terminal, core or C-terminal domain of β-catenin and applied these new high-affinity binders as capture molecules in sandwich immunoassays and co-immunoprecipitations of endogenous β-catenin complexes. In addition, we engineered intracellularly functional anti-β-catenin chromobodies by combining the binding moieties of the nanobodies with fluorescent proteins. For the first time, we were able to visualize the subcellular localization and nuclear translocation of endogenous β-catenin in living cells using these chromobodies. Moreover, the chromobody signal allowed us to trace the accumulation of diffusible, hypo-phosphorylated β-catenin in response to compound treatment in real time using High Content Imaging. The anti-β-catenin nanobodies and chromobodies characterized in this study are versatile tools that enable a novel and unique approach to monitor the dynamics of subcellular β-catenin in biochemical and cell biological assays. PMID:25595278

  7. Coronin1 Proteins Dictate Rac1 Intracellular Dynamics and Cytoskeletal Output

    PubMed Central

    Ojeda, Virginia; Castro-Castro, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Rac1 regulates lamellipodium formation, myosin II-dependent contractility, and focal adhesions during cell migration. While the spatiotemporal assembly of those processes is well characterized, the signaling mechanisms involved remain obscure. We report here that the cytoskeleton-related Coronin1A and -1B proteins control a myosin II inactivation-dependent step that dictates the intracellular dynamics and cytoskeletal output of active Rac1. This step is signaling-branch specific, since it affects the functional competence of active Rac1 only when forming complexes with downstream ArhGEF7 and Pak proteins in actomyosin-rich structures. The pathway is used by default unless Rac1 is actively rerouted away from the structures by upstream activators and signals from other Rho GTPases. These results indicate that Coronin1 proteins are at the center of a regulatory hub that coordinates Rac1 activation, effector exchange, and the F-actin organization state during cell signaling. Targeting this route could be useful to hamper migration of cancer cells harboring oncogenic RAC1 mutations. PMID:24980436

  8. Dynamic filopodia are required for chemokine-dependent intracellular polarization during guided cell migration in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Meyen, Dana; Tarbashevich, Katsiaryna; Banisch, Torsten U; Wittwer, Carolina; Reichman-Fried, Michal; Maugis, Benoît; Grimaldi, Cecilia; Messerschmidt, Esther-Maria; Raz, Erez

    2015-01-01

    Cell migration and polarization is controlled by signals in the environment. Migrating cells typically form filopodia that extend from the cell surface, but the precise function of these structures in cell polarization and guided migration is poorly understood. Using the in vivo model of zebrafish primordial germ cells for studying chemokine-directed single cell migration, we show that filopodia distribution and their dynamics are dictated by the gradient of the chemokine Cxcl12a. By specifically interfering with filopodia formation, we demonstrate for the first time that these protrusions play an important role in cell polarization by Cxcl12a, as manifested by elevation of intracellular pH and Rac1 activity at the cell front. The establishment of this polarity is at the basis of effective cell migration towards the target. Together, we show that filopodia allow the interpretation of the chemotactic gradient in vivo by directing single-cell polarization in response to the guidance cue. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05279.001 PMID:25875301

  9. Wind turbine control systems: Dynamic model development using system identification and the fast structural dynamics code

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, J.G.; Wright, A.D.; Butterfield, C.P.

    1996-10-01

    Mitigating the effects of damaging wind turbine loads and responses extends the lifetime of the turbine and, consequently, reduces the associated Cost of Energy (COE). Active control of aerodynamic devices is one option for achieving wind turbine load mitigation. Generally speaking, control system design and analysis requires a reasonable dynamic model of {open_quotes}plant,{close_quotes} (i.e., the system being controlled). This paper extends the wind turbine aileron control research, previously conducted at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC), by presenting a more detailed development of the wind turbine dynamic model. In prior research, active aileron control designs were implemented in an existing wind turbine structural dynamics code, FAST (Fatigue, Aerodynamics, Structures, and Turbulence). In this paper, the FAST code is used, in conjunction with system identification, to generate a wind turbine dynamic model for use in active aileron control system design. The FAST code is described and an overview of the system identification technique is presented. An aileron control case study is used to demonstrate this modeling technique. The results of the case study are then used to propose ideas for generalizing this technique for creating dynamic models for other wind turbine control applications.

  10. Design and mechanistic insight into ultrafast calcium indicators for monitoring intracellular calcium dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Helassa, Nordine; Podor, Borbala; Fine, Alan; Török, Katalin

    2016-01-01

    Calmodulin-based genetically encoded fluorescent calcium indicators (GCaMP-s) are powerful tools of imaging calcium dynamics from cells to freely moving animals. High affinity indicators with slow kinetics however distort the temporal profile of calcium transients. Here we report the development of reduced affinity ultrafast variants of GCaMP6s and GCaMP6f. We hypothesized that GCaMP-s have a common kinetic mechanism with a rate-limiting process in the interaction of the RS20 peptide and calcium-calmodulin. Therefore we targeted specific residues in the binding interface by rational design generating improved indicators with GCaMP6fu displaying fluorescence rise and decay times (t1/2) of 1 and 3 ms (37 °C) in vitro, 9 and 22-fold faster than GCaMP6f respectively. In HEK293T cells, GCaMP6fu revealed a 4-fold faster decay of ATP-evoked intracellular calcium transients than GCaMP6f. Stimulation of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons with five action potentials fired at 100 Hz resulted in a single dendritic calcium transient with a 2-fold faster rise and 7-fold faster decay time (t1/2 of 40 ms) than GCaMP6f, indicating that tracking high frequency action potentials may be limited by calcium dynamics. We propose that the design strategy used for generating GCaMP6fu is applicable for the acceleration of the response kinetics of GCaMP-type calcium indicators. PMID:27922063

  11. Measuring intracellular calcium dynamics of HeLa cells exposed to nitric oxide by microplate fluorescence reader

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yimei; Chen, Jiangxu; Yang, Hongqin; Zheng, Liqin; Wang, Yuhua; Li, Hui; Xie, Shusen

    2012-12-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been reported to have the ability to promote or inhibit the proliferation and metastasis of cancer cells. It appears to have an effect on inducing calcium transient, which participates in essential cellular signaling in the physiological and pathological processes. Our work was intended to study the effects of exogenous NO on intracellular calcium dynamics of HeLa cells with Fluo-3, a calcium fluorescent indicator by microplate fluorescence reader. The results showed that after NO donor was injected into the wells, intracellular Ca2+ fluorescence intensity increased significantly compared with that of control group. Furthermore, the calcium transient activated by NO was mainly due to the calcium release from intracellular calcium stores. These would be helpful to further recognize the role of NO involved in cancer cell proliferation and metastasis.

  12. Quantitative imaging of cerebral blood flow velocity and intracellular motility using dynamic light scattering–optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jonghwan; Radhakrishnan, Harsha; Wu, Weicheng; Daneshmand, Ali; Climov, Mihail; Ayata, Cenk; Boas, David A

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a novel optical method for label-free quantitative imaging of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and intracellular motility (IM) in the rodent cerebral cortex. This method is based on a technique that integrates dynamic light scattering (DLS) and optical coherence tomography (OCT), named DLS–OCT. The technique measures both the axial and transverse velocities of CBF, whereas conventional Doppler OCT measures only the axial one. In addition, the technique produces a three-dimensional map of the diffusion coefficient quantifying nontranslational motions. In the DLS–OCT diffusion map, we observed high-diffusion spots, whose locations highly correspond to neuronal cell bodies and whose diffusion coefficient agreed with that of the motion of intracellular organelles reported in vitro in the literature. Therefore, the present method has enabled, for the first time to our knowledge, label-free imaging of the diffusion-like motion of intracellular organelles in vivo. As an example application, we used the method to monitor CBF and IM during a brief ischemic stroke, where we observed an induced persistent reduction in IM despite the recovery of CBF after stroke. This result supports that the IM measured in this study represent the cellular energy metabolism-related active motion of intracellular organelles rather than free diffusion of intracellular macromolecules. PMID:23403378

  13. Fast regional readout CMOS Image Sensor for dynamic MLC tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zin, H.; Harris, E.; Osmond, J.; Evans, P.

    2014-03-01

    Advanced radiotherapy techniques such as volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) require verification of the complex beam delivery including tracking of multileaf collimators (MLC) and monitoring the dose rate. This work explores the feasibility of a prototype Complementary metal-oxide semiconductor Image Sensor (CIS) for tracking these complex treatments by utilising fast, region of interest (ROI) read out functionality. An automatic edge tracking algorithm was used to locate the MLC leaves edges moving at various speeds (from a moving triangle field shape) and imaged with various sensor frame rates. The CIS demonstrates successful edge detection of the dynamic MLC motion within accuracy of 1.0 mm. This demonstrates the feasibility of the sensor to verify treatment delivery involving dynamic MLC up to ~400 frames per second (equivalent to the linac pulse rate), which is superior to any current techniques such as using electronic portal imaging devices (EPID). CIS provides the basis to an essential real-time verification tool, useful in accessing accurate delivery of complex high energy radiation to the tumour and ultimately to achieve better cure rates for cancer patients.

  14. Intracellular dynamics measurements with full field optical coherence tomography suggest hindering effect of actomyosin contractility on organelle transport

    PubMed Central

    Leroux, Charles-Edouard; Bertillot, Fabien; Thouvenin, Olivier; Boccara, Albert-Claude

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular motion can be quantitatively monitored in tissues using coherence-gated microscopic techniques. With full-field optical coherence tomography (FFOCT), the use of high numerical aperture microscope objectives provides a high resolution mapping of intracellular dynamics that are probed with subwavelength sensitivity. In the upper temporal bandwidth that we have used (1-6 Hz) the main contribution to the dynamic signal arises from the overall dynamical, optically heterogeneous cytoplasm. We propose a method to specifically study the impact of actomyosin contractility on the intracellular dynamic signal by performing high throughput, comparative measurements of multicellular aggregates with and without blebbistatin action, a selective inhibitor of class-II myosins that disrupts actomyosin contractile activity. Our results indicate a significant increase in the fraction of the signal that decorrelates within 1 second after inhibition of contractility. This observation mitigates the anticipated importance of actomyosin contractile forces to directly move organelles, but highlights their role in hindering organelle transport via their stiffening effect of the viscoelastic cytoplasm. PMID:27895991

  15. Fast passage dynamic nuclear polarization on rotating solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mentink-Vigier, Frederic; Akbey, Ümit; Hovav, Yonatan; Vega, Shimon; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Feintuch, Akiva

    2012-11-01

    Magic Angle Spinning (MAS) Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) has proven to be a very powerful way to improve the signal to noise ratio of NMR experiments on solids. The experiments have in general been interpreted considering the Solid-Effect (SE) and Cross-Effect (CE) DNP mechanisms while ignoring the influence of sample spinning. In this paper, we show experimental data of MAS-DNP enhancements of 1H and 13C in proline and SH3 protein in glass forming water/glycerol solvent containing TOTAPOL. We also introduce a theoretical model that aims at explaining how the nuclear polarization is built in MAS-DNP experiments. By using Liouville space based simulations to include relaxation on two simple spin models, {electron-nucleus} and {electron-electron-nucleus}, we explain how the basic MAS-SE-DNP and MAS-CE-DNP processes work. The importance of fast energy passages and short level anti-crossing is emphasized and the differences between static DNP and MAS-DNP is explained. During a single rotor cycle the enhancement in the {electron-electron-nucleus} system arises from MAS-CE-DNP involving at least three kinds of two-level fast passages: an electron-electron dipolar anti-crossing, a single quantum electron MW encounter and an anti-crossing at the CE condition inducing nuclear polarization in- or decrements. Numerical, powder-averaged, simulations were performed in order to check the influence of the experimental parameters on the enhancement efficiencies. In particular we show that the spinning frequency dependence of the theoretical MAS-CE-DNP enhancement compares favorably with the experimental 1H and 13C MAS-DNP enhancements of proline and SH3.

  16. Dynamic intracellular delivery of antibiotics via pH-responsive polymersomes.

    PubMed

    Lane, D D; Su, F Y; Chiu, D Y; Srinivasan, S; Wilson, J T; Ratner, D M; Stayton, P S; Convertine, A J

    2015-02-28

    Reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization was employed to prepare a series of copolymers consisting of 2-hdroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (FWavg ~ 950 Da) (O950) with variable comonomer compositions and molecular weights for use as polymeric scaffolds. Reactivity ratios for the monomer pair were determined to be 1.37 and 0.290 respectively. To these scaffolds trithiocarbonate-based RAFT chain transfer agents (CTAs) were grafted using carbodiimide chemistry. The resultant graft chain transfer agents (gCTA) were subsequently employed to polymerize dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA) and (HPMA) between degrees of polymerization (DP) of 25 and 200. Kinetic analysis for the polymerization of DMAEMA targeting a DP of 100 from a 34 arm graft gCTA show linear Mn conversion and pseudo first order rate plots with narrow molecular weight distributions that move toward lower elution volumes with monomer conversion. Đ values for these polymerizations remain low at around 1.20 at monomer conversions as high as 70 %. pH-responsive endosomalytic brushes capable of spontaneously self-assembling into polymersomes were synthesized and a combination of dynamic light scattering (DLS), cryoTEM, and red blood cell hemolysis were employed to evaluate the aqueous solution properties of the polymeric brush as a function of pH. Successful encapsulation of ceftazidime and pH-dependent drug release properties were confirmed by HPLC. Intracellular antibiotic activity of the drug-loaded polymersomes was confirmed in a macrophage coculture model of infection with B. thailandensis and RAW 264.7 cells.

  17. Dynamics of Inorganic Nutrients in Intertidal Sediments: Porewater, Exchangeable, and Intracellular Pools.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Robledo, Emilio; Bohorquez, Julio; Corzo, Alfonso; Jimenez-Arias, Juan L; Papaspyrou, Sokratis

    2016-01-01

    The study of inorganic nutrients dynamics in shallow sediments usually focuses on two main pools: porewater (PW) nutrients and exchangeable (EX) ammonium and phosphate. Recently, it has been found that microphytobenthos (MPB) and other microorganisms can accumulate large amounts of nutrients intracellularly (IC), highlighting the biogeochemical importance of this nutrient pool. Storing nutrients could support the growth of autotrophs when nutrients are not available, and could also provide alternative electron acceptors for dissimilatory processes such as nitrate reduction. Here, we studied the magnitude and relative importance of these three nutrient pools (PW, IC, and EX) and their relation to chlorophylls (used as a proxy for MPB abundance) and organic matter (OM) contents in an intertidal mudflat of Cadiz Bay (Spain). MPB was localized in the first 4 mm of the sediment and showed a clear seasonal pattern; highest chlorophylls content was found during autumn and lowest during spring-summer. The temporal and spatial distribution of nutrients pools and MPB were largely correlated. Ammonium was higher in the IC and EX fractions, representing on average 59 and 37% of the total ammonium pool, respectively. Similarly, phosphate in the IC and EX fractions accounted on average for 40 and 31% of the total phosphate pool, respectively. Nitrate in the PW was low, suggesting low nitrification activity and rapid consumption. Nitrate accumulated in the IC pool during periods of moderate MPB abundance, being up to 66% of the total nitrate pool, whereas it decreased when chlorophyll concentration peaked likely due to a high nitrogen demand. EX-Nitrate accounted for the largest fraction of total sediment nitrate, 66% on average. The distribution of EX-Nitrate was significantly correlated with chlorophyll and OM, which probably indicates a relation of this pool to an increased availability of sites for ionic adsorption. This EX-Nitrate pool could represent an alternative nitrate

  18. Dynamics of Inorganic Nutrients in Intertidal Sediments: Porewater, Exchangeable, and Intracellular Pools

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Robledo, Emilio; Bohorquez, Julio; Corzo, Alfonso; Jimenez-Arias, Juan L.; Papaspyrou, Sokratis

    2016-01-01

    The study of inorganic nutrients dynamics in shallow sediments usually focuses on two main pools: porewater (PW) nutrients and exchangeable (EX) ammonium and phosphate. Recently, it has been found that microphytobenthos (MPB) and other microorganisms can accumulate large amounts of nutrients intracellularly (IC), highlighting the biogeochemical importance of this nutrient pool. Storing nutrients could support the growth of autotrophs when nutrients are not available, and could also provide alternative electron acceptors for dissimilatory processes such as nitrate reduction. Here, we studied the magnitude and relative importance of these three nutrient pools (PW, IC, and EX) and their relation to chlorophylls (used as a proxy for MPB abundance) and organic matter (OM) contents in an intertidal mudflat of Cadiz Bay (Spain). MPB was localized in the first 4 mm of the sediment and showed a clear seasonal pattern; highest chlorophylls content was found during autumn and lowest during spring-summer. The temporal and spatial distribution of nutrients pools and MPB were largely correlated. Ammonium was higher in the IC and EX fractions, representing on average 59 and 37% of the total ammonium pool, respectively. Similarly, phosphate in the IC and EX fractions accounted on average for 40 and 31% of the total phosphate pool, respectively. Nitrate in the PW was low, suggesting low nitrification activity and rapid consumption. Nitrate accumulated in the IC pool during periods of moderate MPB abundance, being up to 66% of the total nitrate pool, whereas it decreased when chlorophyll concentration peaked likely due to a high nitrogen demand. EX-Nitrate accounted for the largest fraction of total sediment nitrate, 66% on average. The distribution of EX-Nitrate was significantly correlated with chlorophyll and OM, which probably indicates a relation of this pool to an increased availability of sites for ionic adsorption. This EX-Nitrate pool could represent an alternative nitrate

  19. Experimental control of instabilities and chaos in fast dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukow, David Wayne

    I investigate experimentally and theoretically the application of control techniques in systems that display temporal instabilities, including chaos, on very short timescales. My study includes two distinct systems: a fast chaotic electronic circuit called the diode resonator, and a compound-cavity semiconductor laser system that exhibits an instability called low-frequency fluctuations. Control of fast unstable systems presents several experimental challenges. It is also a topic of broad interest, since it requires the development of new control techniques, and addresses technologically important devices such as the semiconductor laser. The diode resonator is a well-understood system, and when modified for 10 MHz operation serves as a good testbed for the application of novel control techniques. I develop a new high-speed time-delay feedback control technique that is based on the comparison of the present value of a system variable with a series of its past values. The principles of operation of this technique are studied in both time and frequency domains, as well as possible methods for its implementation. I develop a detailed analog electronic implementation that addresses the experimental needs of rapid processing and faithful reproduction of the feedback signal. This control system successfully stabilizes unstable periodic orbits in the diode resonator, the fastest experimental instability controlled to date. This technique also increases significantly the regions of parameter space in which control is effective, in comparison with previous methods. The improvement is gained by incorporating more information from further in the system's past. I study the dynamics of the external cavity semiconductor laser system in the regime where low-frequency fluctuations occur, seeking to improve our understanding of the system before attempting to control its behavior. This system is not completely understood, as it exhibits extremely complex, high-speed, potentially

  20. High resolution imaging of intracellular dynamics in explanted retinas with dynamic full-field OCT (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thouvenin, Olivier; Boccara, A. Claude; Paques, Michel; Sahel, José-Alain; Fink, Mathias; Grieve, Kate F.

    2017-02-01

    Full-Field Optical Coherence Tomography (FF-OCT) reveals submicrometric morphological details in retinal explants without the use of contrast agents. Notably, in the nerve fiber and ganglion cell layers, FF-OCT images reveal nerve fibers bundles, single axons, capillaries and even some ganglion cell bodies. Dynamic FF-OCT (D-FF-OCT) takes advantage of the temporal evolution of the local FF-OCT signal to reveal a movement-dependent contrast inside tissues. Notably, the D-FF-OCT signal depends on cellular motility and membrane fluctuations. Compared to regular FF-OCT images, the signal from stationary structures such as nerve fibers is reduced, and contrast inside cells is enhanced, revealing many more cells, as well as the position of nuclei, and cell metabolism. We used a multimodal D-FF-OCT and fluorescence microscope to compare and identify the structures observed in both FF-OCT and D-FF-OCT. In the ganglion cell and inner nuclear layers in both macaque and mouse, two different cell sizes could be measured, which correlated well with ganglion and amacrine cell diameters found in the literature for these two species. We could also detect cell bodies of the photoreceptors in the outer nuclear layer. To our knowledge, this is the first time that an OCT technique can reveal these cell bodies. Finally, to investigate post-mortem tissue changes, time series were acquired over periods of 24 hours and cell contrast was plotted in time to monitor the decrease in intracellular activity over time. It is anticipated that dynamic FF-OCT may be used to non-invasively monitor viability and functional changes in the retina.

  1. Fast Simulation of Dynamic Ultrasound Images Using the GPU.

    PubMed

    Storve, Sigurd; Torp, Hans

    2017-10-01

    Simulated ultrasound data is a valuable tool for development and validation of quantitative image analysis methods in echocardiography. Unfortunately, simulation time can become prohibitive for phantoms consisting of a large number of point scatterers. The COLE algorithm by Gao et al. is a fast convolution-based simulator that trades simulation accuracy for improved speed. We present highly efficient parallelized CPU and GPU implementations of the COLE algorithm with an emphasis on dynamic simulations involving moving point scatterers. We argue that it is crucial to minimize the amount of data transfers from the CPU to achieve good performance on the GPU. We achieve this by storing the complete trajectories of the dynamic point scatterers as spline curves in the GPU memory. This leads to good efficiency when simulating sequences consisting of a large number of frames, such as B-mode and tissue Doppler data for a full cardiac cycle. In addition, we propose a phase-based subsample delay technique that efficiently eliminates flickering artifacts seen in B-mode sequences when COLE is used without enough temporal oversampling. To assess the performance, we used a laptop computer and a desktop computer, each equipped with a multicore Intel CPU and an NVIDIA GPU. Running the simulator on a high-end TITAN X GPU, we observed two orders of magnitude speedup compared to the parallel CPU version, three orders of magnitude speedup compared to simulation times reported by Gao et al. in their paper on COLE, and a speedup of 27000 times compared to the multithreaded version of Field II, using numbers reported in a paper by Jensen. We hope that by releasing the simulator as an open-source project we will encourage its use and further development.

  2. Intracellular calcium movements during excitation–contraction coupling in mammalian slow-twitch and fast-twitch muscle fibers

    PubMed Central

    Hollingworth, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    In skeletal muscle fibers, action potentials elicit contractions by releasing calcium ions (Ca2+) from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. Experiments on individual mouse muscle fibers micro-injected with a rapidly responding fluorescent Ca2+ indicator dye reveal that the amount of Ca2+ released is three- to fourfold larger in fast-twitch fibers than in slow-twitch fibers, and the proportion of the released Ca2+ that binds to troponin to activate contraction is substantially smaller. PMID:22450485

  3. Fast method for dynamic thresholding in volume holographic memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Michael S.; Mitkas, Pericles A.

    1998-11-01

    It is essential for parallel optical memory interfaces to incorporate processing that dynamically differentiates between databit values. These thresholding points will vary as a result of system noise -- due to contrast fluctuations, variations in data page composition, reference beam misalignment, etc. To maintain reasonable data integrity it is necessary to select the threshold close to its optimal level. In this paper, a neural network (NN) approach is proposed as a fast method of determining the threshold to meet the required transfer rate. The multi-layered perceptron network can be incorporated as part of a smart photodetector array (SPA). Other methods have suggested performing the operation by means of histogram or by use of statistical information. These approaches fail in that they unnecessarily switch to a 1-D paradigm. In this serial domain, global thresholding is pointless since sequence detection could be applied. The discussed approach is a parallel solution with less overhead than multi-rail encoding. As part of this method, a small set of values are designated as threshold determination data bits; these are interleaved with the information data bits and are used as inputs to the NN. The approach has been tested using both simulated data as well as data obtained from a volume holographic memory system. Results show convergence of the training and an ability to generalize upon untrained data for binary and multi-level gray scale datapage images. Methodologies are discussed for improving the performance by a proper training set selection.

  4. Intracellular Phosphate Dynamics in Muscle Measured by Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy during Hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Lemoine, Sandrine; Fournier, Thomas; Kocevar, Gabriel; Belloi, Amélie; Normand, Gabrielle; Ibarrola, Danielle; Sappey-Marinier, Dominique; Juillard, Laurent

    2016-07-01

    Of the 600-700 mg inorganic phosphate (Pi) removed during a 4-hour hemodialysis session, a maximum of 10% may be extracted from the extracellular space. The origin of the other 90% of removed phosphate is unknown. This study tested the hypothesis that the main source of phosphate removed during hemodialysis is the intracellular compartment. Six binephrectomized pigs each underwent one 3-hour hemodialysis session, during which the extracorporeal circulation blood flow was maintained between 100 and 150 ml/min. To determine in vivo phosphate metabolism, we performed phosphorous ((31)P) magnetic resonance spectroscopy using a 1.5-Tesla system and a surface coil placed over the gluteal muscle region. (31)P magnetic resonance spectra (repetition time =10 s; echo time =0.35 ms) were acquired every 160 seconds before, during, and after dialysis. During the dialysis sessions, plasma phosphate concentrations decreased rapidly (-30.4 %; P=0.003) and then, plateaued before increasing approximately 30 minutes before the end of the sessions; 16 mmol phosphate was removed in each session. When extracellular phosphate levels plateaued, intracellular Pi content increased significantly (11%; P<0.001). Moreover, βATP decreased significantly (P<0.001); however, calcium levels remained balanced. Results of this study show that intracellular Pi is the source of Pi removed during dialysis. The intracellular Pi increase may reflect cellular stress induced by hemodialysis and/or strong intracellular phosphate regulation.

  5. Intracellular Phosphate Dynamics in Muscle Measured by Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy during Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Fournier, Thomas; Kocevar, Gabriel; Belloi, Amélie; Normand, Gabrielle; Ibarrola, Danielle; Sappey-Marinier, Dominique; Juillard, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Of the 600–700 mg inorganic phosphate (Pi) removed during a 4-hour hemodialysis session, a maximum of 10% may be extracted from the extracellular space. The origin of the other 90% of removed phosphate is unknown. This study tested the hypothesis that the main source of phosphate removed during hemodialysis is the intracellular compartment. Six binephrectomized pigs each underwent one 3-hour hemodialysis session, during which the extracorporeal circulation blood flow was maintained between 100 and 150 ml/min. To determine in vivo phosphate metabolism, we performed phosphorous (31P) magnetic resonance spectroscopy using a 1.5-Tesla system and a surface coil placed over the gluteal muscle region. 31P magnetic resonance spectra (repetition time =10 s; echo time =0.35 ms) were acquired every 160 seconds before, during, and after dialysis. During the dialysis sessions, plasma phosphate concentrations decreased rapidly (−30.4 %; P=0.003) and then, plateaued before increasing approximately 30 minutes before the end of the sessions; 16 mmol phosphate was removed in each session. When extracellular phosphate levels plateaued, intracellular Pi content increased significantly (11%; P<0.001). Moreover, βATP decreased significantly (P<0.001); however, calcium levels remained balanced. Results of this study show that intracellular Pi is the source of Pi removed during dialysis. The intracellular Pi increase may reflect cellular stress induced by hemodialysis and/or strong intracellular phosphate regulation. PMID:26561642

  6. CaMKII regulates intracellular Ca²⁺ dynamics in native endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Toussaint, Fanny; Charbel, Chimène; Blanchette, Alexandre; Ledoux, Jonathan

    2015-09-01

    Localized endothelial Ca(2+) signalling, such as Ca(2+) pulsars, can modulate the contractile state of the underlying vascular smooth muscle cell through specific endothelial targets. In addition to K(Ca)3.1 as a target, Ca(2+) pulsars, an IP3R-dependent pulsatile Ca(2+) release from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) could activate a frequency-sensitive Ca(2+)-dependent kinase such as CaMKII. In the absence of extracellular Ca(2+), acetylcholine increased endothelial CaMKII phosphorylation and activation, thereby suggesting CaMKII activation independently of Ca(2+) influx. Herein, a reciprocal relation where CaMKII controls endothelial Ca(2+) dynamics has been investigated in mesenteric arteries. Both CaMKIIα and β isoforms have been identified in endothelial cells and close proximity (<40 nm) suggests their association in heteromultimers. Intracellular Ca(2+) monitoring with high speed confocal microscopy then showed that inhibition of CaMKII with KN-93 significantly increased the population of Ca(2+) pulsars active sites (+89%), suggesting CaMKII as a major regulator of Ca(2+) pulsars in native endothelium. Mechanistic insights were then sought through the elucidation of the impact of CaMKII on ER Ca(2+) store. ER Ca(2+) emptying was accelerated by CaMKII inhibition and ER Ca(2+) content was assessed using ionomycin. Exposure to KN-93 strongly diminished ER Ca(2+) content (-61%) by relieving CaMKII-dependent inhibition of IP3 receptors (IP3R). Moreover, in situ proximity ligation assay suggested CaMKII-IP3R promiscuity, essential condition for a protein-protein interaction. Interestingly, segregation of IP3R within myoendothelial projection (MEP) appears to be isoform-specific. Hence, only IP3R type 1 and type 2 are detected within fenestrations of the internal elastic lamina, sites of MEP, whilst type 3 is absent from these structures. In summary, CaMKII seems to act as a Ca(2+)-sensitive switch of a negative feedback loop regulating endothelial Ca(2

  7. Differentiation of the intracellular structure of slow- versus fast-twitch muscle fibers through evaluation of the dielectric properties of tissue

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, B; Li, J; Bragos, R; Rutkove, S B

    2014-01-01

    Slow-twitch (type 1) skeletal muscle fibers have markedly greater mitochondrial content than fast-twitch (type 2) fibers. Accordingly, we sought to determine whether the dielectric properties of these two fiber types differed, consistent with their distinct intracellular morphologies. The longitudinal and transverse dielectric spectrum of the ex vivo rat soleus (a predominantly type 1 muscle) and the superficial layers of rat gastrocnemius (predominantly type 2) (n = 15) were measured in the 1 kHz–10 MHz frequency range and modeled to a resistivity Cole–Cole function. Major differences were especially apparent in the dielectric spectrum in the 1 to 10 MHz range. Specifically, the gastrocnemius demonstrated a well-defined, higher center frequency than the soleus muscle, whereas the soleus muscle showed a greater difference in the modeled zero and infinite resistivities than the gastrocnemius. These findings are consistent with the fact that soleus tissue has larger and more numerous mitochondria than gastrocnemius. Evaluation of tissue at high frequency could provide a novel approach for assessing intracellular structure in health and disease. PMID:24743385

  8. Differentiation of the intracellular structure of slow- versus fast-twitch muscle fibers through evaluation of the dielectric properties of tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, B.; Li, J.; Bragos, R.; Rutkove, S. B.

    2014-05-01

    Slow-twitch (type 1) skeletal muscle fibers have markedly greater mitochondrial content than fast-twitch (type 2) fibers. Accordingly, we sought to determine whether the dielectric properties of these two fiber types differed, consistent with their distinct intracellular morphologies. The longitudinal and transverse dielectric spectrum of the ex vivo rat soleus (a predominantly type 1 muscle) and the superficial layers of rat gastrocnemius (predominantly type 2) (n = 15) were measured in the 1 kHz-10 MHz frequency range and modeled to a resistivity Cole-Cole function. Major differences were especially apparent in the dielectric spectrum in the 1 to 10 MHz range. Specifically, the gastrocnemius demonstrated a well-defined, higher center frequency than the soleus muscle, whereas the soleus muscle showed a greater difference in the modeled zero and infinite resistivities than the gastrocnemius. These findings are consistent with the fact that soleus tissue has larger and more numerous mitochondria than gastrocnemius. Evaluation of tissue at high frequency could provide a novel approach for assessing intracellular structure in health and disease.

  9. Fast engineering optimization: A novel highly effective control parameterization approach for industrial dynamic processes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ping; Li, Guodong; Liu, Xinggao

    2015-09-01

    Control vector parameterization (CVP) is an important approach of the engineering optimization for the industrial dynamic processes. However, its major defect, the low optimization efficiency caused by calculating the relevant differential equations in the generated nonlinear programming (NLP) problem repeatedly, limits its wide application in the engineering optimization for the industrial dynamic processes. A novel highly effective control parameterization approach, fast-CVP, is first proposed to improve the optimization efficiency for industrial dynamic processes, where the costate gradient formulae is employed and a fast approximate scheme is presented to solve the differential equations in dynamic process simulation. Three well-known engineering optimization benchmark problems of the industrial dynamic processes are demonstrated as illustration. The research results show that the proposed fast approach achieves a fine performance that at least 90% of the computation time can be saved in contrast to the traditional CVP method, which reveals the effectiveness of the proposed fast engineering optimization approach for the industrial dynamic processes.

  10. Dynamic changes in intracellular ROS levels regulate airway basal stem cell homeostasis through Nrf2-dependent Notch signaling.

    PubMed

    Paul, Manash K; Bisht, Bharti; Darmawan, Daphne O; Chiou, Richard; Ha, Vi L; Wallace, William D; Chon, Andrew T; Hegab, Ahmed E; Grogan, Tristan; Elashoff, David A; Alva-Ornelas, Jackelyn A; Gomperts, Brigitte N

    2014-08-07

    Airways are exposed to myriad environmental and damaging agents such as reactive oxygen species (ROS), which also have physiological roles as signaling molecules that regulate stem cell function. However, the functional significance of both steady and dynamically changing ROS levels in different stem cell populations, as well as downstream mechanisms that integrate ROS sensing into decisions regarding stem cell homeostasis, are unclear. Here, we show in mouse and human airway basal stem cells (ABSCs) that intracellular flux from low to moderate ROS levels is required for stem cell self-renewal and proliferation. Changing ROS levels activate Nrf2, which activates the Notch pathway to stimulate ABSC self-renewal and an antioxidant program that scavenges intracellular ROS, returning overall ROS levels to a low state to maintain homeostatic balance. This redox-mediated regulation of lung stem cell function has significant implications for stem cell biology, repair of lung injuries, and diseases such as cancer.

  11. Dynamics of the antibody-T.cruzi competition during Chagas infection: Prognostic relevance of intracellular replication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibona, G. J.; Condat, C. A.; Isasi, S. Cossy

    2005-02-01

    A recently proposed model for the competitive parasite-antibody interactions in Chagas disease is extended by separately describing the parasitic intracellular and extracellular phases. The model solutions faithfully reproduce available population data and yield predictions for parasite-induced cardiac cell damage.

  12. Confinement and dynamics of neutral beam injected fast ions in the MST Reversed Field Pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, D.; Almagri, F.; Anderson, J. K.; den Hartog, D. J.; Nornberg, M. D.; Sarff, J. S.; Waksman, J.; Fiksel, G.; Deichuli, P.; Davydenko, V. I.; Ivanov, A. A.; Polosatkin, S. V.; Stupishin, N.; Andre, R.; McCune, D.

    2010-11-01

    The new 1MW neutral beam injector (97% H, 3% D) on MST provides a good test-bed for study of fast ions in the RFP. Analysis of the D-D fusion neutron flux decay at beam turn-off reveals that the confinement time of the fast ions is at least 10 ms, ten-fold larger than the thermal conferment times for particles and energy in standard stochastic plasmas. Also, the fast ion confinement increases with magnetic field strength. Dependence of fast ion confinement on plasma parameters, beam energy, and injection direction will be characterized and compared with TRANSP simulations. In addition, an advanced neutral particle analyzer and a prototype of fast ion charge exchange spectroscopy are under construction to measure neutralized fast ions and induced Doppler-shifted Hα light, respectively, thereby resolving fast ion density and energy distribution. Initial measurements of fast-ion dynamics during magnetic reconnection events will be presented.

  13. Large scale molecular dynamics simulations of a liquid crystalline droplet with fast multipole implementations

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Z.; Lupo, J.; Patnaik, S.S.; McKenney, A.; Pachter, R.

    1999-07-01

    The Fast Multipole Method (FMM) offers an efficient way (order O(N)) to handle long range electrostatic interactions, thus enabling more realistic molecular dynamics simulations of large molecular systems. The performance of the fast molecular dynamics (FMD) code, a parallel MD code being developed in the group, using the three-dimensional fast multipole method, shows a good speedup. The application to the full atomic-scale molecular dynamics simulation of a liquid crystalline droplet of 4-n-pentyl-4{prime}-cyanobiphenyl (5CB) molecules, of size 35,872 atoms, shows strong surface effects on various orientational order parameters.

  14. NMR Dynamics of Transmembrane and Intracellular Domains of p75NTR in Lipid-Protein Nanodiscs

    PubMed Central

    Mineev, Konstantin S.; Goncharuk, Sergey A.; Kuzmichev, Pavel K.; Vilar, Marçal; Arseniev, Alexander S.

    2015-01-01

    P75NTR is a type I integral membrane protein that plays a key role in neurotrophin signaling. However, structural data for the receptor in various functional states are sparse and controversial. In this work, we studied the spatial structure and mobility of the transmembrane and intracellular parts of p75NTR, incorporated into lipid-protein nanodiscs of various sizes and compositions, by solution NMR spectroscopy. Our data reveal a high level of flexibility and disorder in the juxtamembrane chopper domain of p75NTR, which results in the motions of the receptor death domain being uncoupled from the motions of the transmembrane helix. Moreover, none of the intracellular domains of p75NTR demonstrated a propensity to interact with the membrane or to self-associate under the experimental conditions. The obtained data are discussed in the context of the receptor activation mechanism. PMID:26287629

  15. [Dynamic variance of intracellular metabolic energies under rhythmical control for dissolved oxygen in PHB mixed cultivation].

    PubMed

    Qian, Z W; Tohyama, M; Hua, Q; Shimizu, K

    2001-07-01

    The mixed cultivation using cheaper carbon source-wasted food material contained glucose and lactate at the same time was conducted in 5L fermentor, within which glucose was converted to lactate by L. delbrueckii in anaerobic condition and the lactate was converted to PHB by R. eutropha in aerobic condition. Considering dissolved oxygen concentration may affect the level of intracellular ATP and NADPH of the metabolic pathways for R. eutropha in lactate under autotrophy or heterotrophy, rhythmical oscillated control for DO based on chaos control method was consequently presented. This method was employed to satisfy two strains for opposite oxygen preferences, moreover, excite the intracellular metabolic energy simultaneously. The values examined through spectrophotofluorimetry represented that both ATP and NADPH exhibited fluctuations in accordance with the DO rhythm. By means of this control design, the concentration of PHB can be doubled than the usual under stable DO control.

  16. A simulation and estimation framework for intracellular dynamics and trafficking in video-microscopy and fluorescence imagery.

    PubMed

    Boulanger, Jérôme; Kervrann, Charles; Bouthemy, Patrick

    2009-02-01

    Image sequence analysis in video-microscopy has now gained importance since molecular biology is presently having a profound impact on the way research is being conducted in medicine. However, image processing techniques that are currently used for modeling intracellular dynamics, are still relatively crude and yield imprecise results. Indeed, complex interactions between a large number of small moving particles in a complex scene cannot be easily modeled, limiting the performance of object detection and tracking algorithms. This motivates our present research effort which is to develop a general estimation/simulation framework able to produce image sequences showing small moving spots in interaction, with variable velocities, and corresponding to intracellular dynamics and trafficking in biology. It is now well established that spot/object trajectories can play a role in the analysis of living cell dynamics and simulating realistic image sequences is then of major importance. We demonstrate the potential of the proposed simulation/estimation framework in experiments, and show that this approach can also be used to evaluate the performance of object detection/tracking algorithms in video-microscopy and fluorescence imagery.

  17. Intracellular calcium dynamics permit a Purkinje neuron model to perform toggle and gain computations upon its inputs.

    PubMed

    Forrest, Michael D

    2014-01-01

    Without synaptic input, Purkinje neurons can spontaneously fire in a repeating trimodal pattern that consists of tonic spiking, bursting and quiescence. Climbing fiber input (CF) switches Purkinje neurons out of the trimodal firing pattern and toggles them between a tonic firing and a quiescent state, while setting the gain of their response to Parallel Fiber (PF) input. The basis to this transition is unclear. We investigate it using a biophysical Purkinje cell model under conditions of CF and PF input. The model can replicate these toggle and gain functions, dependent upon a novel account of intracellular calcium dynamics that we hypothesize to be applicable in real Purkinje cells.

  18. A dynamically changing intracellular water network serves as a universal regulator of the cell: the water-governed cycle.

    PubMed

    Szolnoki, Zoltán

    2007-06-01

    The functioning of enzymes and protein folding are well known to be assisted by the surrounding chaperoning water molecules, which are connected to the protein via non-covalent, dynamically changing chemical bonds. A molecular intracellular network of weak non-covalent connections may be presumed to exist in living cells. The roles of such non-covalent networks are examined in terms of a molecular model which postulates a universal enzyme and biochemical mechanism regulating the maintenance of chemical stability in living cells.

  19. Implications of receptor-mediated endocytosis and intracellular trafficking dynamics in the development of antibody drug conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Ritchie, Michael; Tchistiakova, Lioudmila; Scott, Nathan

    2013-01-01

    The use of antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) as a therapeutic platform to treat cancer has recently gained substantial momentum. This therapeutic modality has the potential to increase the efficacy and reduce the systemic toxicity associated with current therapeutic regimens. The efficacy of ADCs, however, relies on the proper exploitation of intracellular sorting dynamics of the antigen as well as the specificity, selectivity and pharmacokinetic properties of the antibody itself. Our understanding of endocytosis and endosomal trafficking of receptors has appreciably increased in recent years, as improvements in the assays used to study these events have resolved many of the molecular mechanisms regulating these processes. As a result, we now have the knowledge necessary to exploit these pathways efficiently to improve the efficacy of antibody-based therapy. This review discusses some recent studies that have explored how endo/lysosomal dynamics can affect the efficacy of engineered therapeutic antibodies, including ADCs. PMID:23221464

  20. Using dynamic interferometric synthetic aperature radar (InSAR) to image fast-moving surface waves

    DOEpatents

    Vincent, Paul

    2005-06-28

    A new differential technique and system for imaging dynamic (fast moving) surface waves using Dynamic Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) is introduced. This differential technique and system can sample the fast-moving surface displacement waves from a plurality of moving platform positions in either a repeat-pass single-antenna or a single-pass mode having a single-antenna dual-phase receiver or having dual physically separate antennas, and reconstruct a plurality of phase differentials from a plurality of platform positions to produce a series of desired interferometric images of the fast moving waves.

  1. Sound-Induced Intracellular Ca2+ Dynamics in the Adult Hearing Cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Dylan K.; Rouse, Stephanie L.

    2016-01-01

    Ca2+ signaling has been implicated in the initial pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying the cochlea's response to acoustic overstimulation. Intracellular Ca2+ signaling (ICS) waves, which occur in glia and retinal cells in response to injury to activate cell regulatory pathways, have been proposed as an early event in cochlear injury. Disruption of ICS activity is thought to underlie Connexin 26-associated hearing loss, the most common genetic form of deafness, and downstream sequelae of ICS wave activity, such as MAP kinase pathway activation, have been implicated in noise-induced hearing loss. However, ICS waves have only been observed in neonatal cochlear cultures and are thought to be quiescent after the onset of hearing. In this study, we employ an acute explant model of an adult, hearing cochlea that retains many in vivo physiologic features to investigate Ca2+ changes in response to sound. We find that both slow monotonic changes in intracellular Ca2+ concentration as well as discrete ICS waves occur with acoustic overstimulation. The ICS waves share many intrinsic features with their better-described neonatal counterparts, including ATP and gap-junction dependence, and propagation velocity and distance. This identification of ICS wave activity in the adult, hearing cochlea thus confirms and characterizes an important early detection mechanism for cochlear trauma and provides a target for interventions for noise-induced and Connexin 26-associated hearing loss. PMID:27959894

  2. Sound-Induced Intracellular Ca2+ Dynamics in the Adult Hearing Cochlea.

    PubMed

    Chan, Dylan K; Rouse, Stephanie L

    2016-01-01

    Ca2+ signaling has been implicated in the initial pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying the cochlea's response to acoustic overstimulation. Intracellular Ca2+ signaling (ICS) waves, which occur in glia and retinal cells in response to injury to activate cell regulatory pathways, have been proposed as an early event in cochlear injury. Disruption of ICS activity is thought to underlie Connexin 26-associated hearing loss, the most common genetic form of deafness, and downstream sequelae of ICS wave activity, such as MAP kinase pathway activation, have been implicated in noise-induced hearing loss. However, ICS waves have only been observed in neonatal cochlear cultures and are thought to be quiescent after the onset of hearing. In this study, we employ an acute explant model of an adult, hearing cochlea that retains many in vivo physiologic features to investigate Ca2+ changes in response to sound. We find that both slow monotonic changes in intracellular Ca2+ concentration as well as discrete ICS waves occur with acoustic overstimulation. The ICS waves share many intrinsic features with their better-described neonatal counterparts, including ATP and gap-junction dependence, and propagation velocity and distance. This identification of ICS wave activity in the adult, hearing cochlea thus confirms and characterizes an important early detection mechanism for cochlear trauma and provides a target for interventions for noise-induced and Connexin 26-associated hearing loss.

  3. Chondrocyte intracellular calcium, cytoskeletal organization, and gene expression responses to dynamic osmotic loading.

    PubMed

    Chao, Pen-Hsiu Grace; West, Alan C; Hung, Clark T

    2006-10-01

    While chondrocytes in articular cartilage experience dynamic stimuli from joint loading activities, few studies have examined the effects of dynamic osmotic loading on their signaling and biosynthetic activities. We hypothesize that dynamic osmotic loading modulates chondrocyte signaling and gene expression differently than static osmotic loading. With the use of a novel microfluidic device developed in our laboratory, dynamic hypotonic loading (-200 mosM) was applied up to 0.1 Hz and chondrocyte calcium signaling, cytoskeleton organization, and gene expression responses were examined. Chondrocytes exhibited decreasing volume and calcium responses with increasing loading frequency. Phalloidin staining showed osmotic loading-induced changes to the actin cytoskeleton in chondrocytes. Real-time PCR analysis revealed a stimulatory effect of dynamic osmotic loading compared with static osmotic loading. These studies illustrate the utility of the microfluidic device in cell signaling investigations, and their potential role in helping to elucidate mechanisms that mediate chondrocyte mechanotransduction to dynamic stimuli.

  4. B-Vitamin Competition: Intracellular and Dissolved B-Vitamins Provide Insight into Marine Microbial Community Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suffridge, C.; Gomez-Consarnau, L.; Qu, P.; Tenenbaum, N.; Fu, F.; Hutchins, D. A.; Sanudo-Wilhelmy, S. A.

    2016-02-01

    The availability of B-vitamins has the ability to directly affect the dynamics of the marine microbial community. Here we show, for the first time, the connection between dissolved and intracellular B-vitamins in a marine environmental community. Two incubation experiments were conducted at a long-term study site (SPOT) in the San Pedro Basin off the coast of Los Angeles, CA. Experiments were conducted in oligotrophic, preupwelling conditions. Due to the 2015 El Niño event, the seasonal upwelling at SPOT did not occur, creating unusually nutrient depleted conditions. Vitamins B1, B7, and B12 were added in addition to macronutrients at concentrations similar to typical SPOT upwelling conditions. Intracellular and dissolved B-vitamin analyses were conducted to determine shifts in cellular B-vitamin requirements as a function of growth rate. We observed a significant bacterioplankton and phytoplankton growth responses with the addition of B-vitamins in a manner that appears to match the enzymatic requirements for these compounds (e.g. B1>B7>B12). Intracellular B-vitamin analysis of T0 samples support this observation, as all four forms of B12 were not detectable within cells, yet multiple forms of B1 and B7 were detected at or near levels previously reported. Treatments with B12 and macronutrients were observed to have the greatest growth rates. This finding, in addition to the apparent lack of intracellular B12 in the initial community, appears to indicate that the initial microbial community was limited by B12. The addition of each vitamin caused a distinct shift in the blooming microbial community. Our results demonstrate that B-vitamins strongly influence not only the growth rate, but also the species composition and species succession of the microbial community as a whole. Large-scale changes to upwelling regimes are predicted in the future ocean; our results indicate that B-vitamins will have a substantial role in controlling microbial community dynamics under

  5. Coordination of Molecular Motors: From in vitro Assays to Intracellular Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Holzbaur, Erika L.F.; Goldman, Yale E.

    2010-01-01

    Summary New technologies have emerged that enable the tracking of molecular motors and their cargos with very high resolution both in vitro and in live cells. Classic in vitro motility assays are being supplemented with assays of increasing complexity that more closely model the cellular environment. In cells, the introduction of probes such as quantum dots allows the high resolution tracking of both motors and vesicular cargos. The “bottom up” enhancement of in vitro assays and the “top down” analysis of motility inside cells are likely to converge over the next few years. Together, these studies are providing new insights into the coordination of motors during intracellular transport. PMID:20102789

  6. Tunable PIE and synchronized gating detections by FastFLIM for quantitative microscopy measurements of fast dynamics of single molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yuansheng; Coskun, Ulas; Ferreon, Allan Chris; Barbieri, Beniamino; Liao, Shih-Chu Jeff

    2016-03-01

    The crosstalk between two fluorescent species causes problems in fluorescence microscopy imaging, especially for quantitative measurements such as co-localization, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET), fluorescence cross correlation spectroscopy (FCCS). In laser scanning confocal microscopy, the lasers can be switched on and off by acousto-optic tunable filters (AOTF) in the microsecond scale for alternative line scanning in order to avoid the crosstalk while minimizing the time delay between two lasers on the same pixel location. In contrast, the pulsed interleaved excitation (PIE) technique synchronizes two pulsed lasers of different wavelengths in the nanosecond scale to enable measuring superfast dynamics of two fluorescent species simultaneously and yet quantitatively without the crosstalk contamination. This feature is critical for many cell biology applications, e.g. accurate determination of stoichiometry in FRET measurements for studying protein-protein interactions or cell signal events, detection of weaker bindings in FCCS by eliminating the false cross correlation due to the crosstalk. The PIE has been used with the time correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) electronics. Here, we describe a novel PIE development using the digital frequency domain (DFD) technique -- FastFLIM, which provides tunable PIE setups and synchronized gating detections, tailored and optimized to specific applications. A few PIE setups by FastFLIM and measurement examples are described. Combined with the sensitivity of Alba and Q2 systems, the PIE allowed us to quantitatively measure the fast dynamics of single molecules.

  7. A Novel Optical Intracellular Imaging Approach for Potassium Dynamics in Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Rimmele, Theresa S.; Chatton, Jean-Yves

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytes fulfill a central role in regulating K+ and glutamate, both released by neurons into the extracellular space during activity. Glial glutamate uptake is a secondary active process that involves the influx of three Na+ ions and one proton and the efflux of one K+ ion. Thus, intracellular K+ concentration ([K+]i) is potentially influenced both by extracellular K+ concentration ([K+]o) fluctuations and glutamate transport in astrocytes. We evaluated the impact of these K+ ion movements on [K+]i in primary mouse astrocytes by microspectrofluorimetry. We established a new noninvasive and reliable approach to monitor and quantify [K+]i using the recently developed K+ sensitive fluorescent indicator Asante Potassium Green-1 (APG-1). An in situ calibration procedure enabled us to estimate the resting [K+]i at 133±1 mM. We first investigated the dependency of [K+]i levels on [K+]o. We found that [K+]i followed [K+]o changes nearly proportionally in the range 3–10 mM, which is consistent with previously reported microelectrode measurements of intracellular K+ concentration changes in astrocytes. We then found that glutamate superfusion caused a reversible drop of [K+]i that depended on the glutamate concentration with an apparent EC50 of 11.1±1.4 µM, corresponding to the affinity of astrocyte glutamate transporters. The amplitude of the [K+]i drop was found to be 2.3±0.1 mM for 200 µM glutamate applications. Overall, this study shows that the fluorescent K+ indicator APG-1 is a powerful new tool for addressing important questions regarding fine [K+]i regulation with excellent spatial resolution. PMID:25275375

  8. Single color fluorescent indicators of protein phosphorylation for multicolor imaging of intracellular signal flow dynamics.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Yasutoshi; Sato, Moritoshi; Umezawa, Yoshio

    2004-10-15

    Existing monitoring methods for protein phosphorylation involved in intracellular signal transduction in vivo are exclusively based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer, which needs the measurement of the change in fluorescence intensities at two wavelengths. Therefore, it is difficult to monitor protein phosphorylation together with other related signaling processes, such as second messengers and protein translocation. To overcome this problem, we developed novel fluorescent indicators, each containing a differently colored (cyan and green) single fluorophore. The present indicator is a tandem fusion protein containing a kinase substrate domain, a circularly permuted fluorescent protein (cpFP), and a phosphorylation recognition domain. The cpFP is obtained by dividing a green fluorescent protein mutant (GFP) at residue 144-145 and linking the carboxy and amino portions thereof with a peptide linker. The substrate domain used in this study is a peptide sequence that is phosphorylated by insulin receptor. Phosphorylation of the substrate domain induces its interaction with the phosphorylation recognition domain, which causes a conformational change in the cpFP and a change in its fluorescence. The cyan and green indicators exhibited 10% decrease and 15% increase, respectively, in their fluorescence intensities upon phosphorylation. Using this cyan indicator and GFP-tagged mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), we found that insulin-induced protein phosphorylation occurred immediately upon the addition of insulin, whereas nuclear translocation of MAPK occurred 7 min later. By tailoring the substrate domains and the phosphorylation recognition domains in these cyan and green indicators, the present approach should be applicable to the in vivo analysis of a broad range of protein phosphorylation processes, together with other intracellular signaling processes.

  9. A novel optical intracellular imaging approach for potassium dynamics in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Rimmele, Theresa S; Chatton, Jean-Yves

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytes fulfill a central role in regulating K+ and glutamate, both released by neurons into the extracellular space during activity. Glial glutamate uptake is a secondary active process that involves the influx of three Na+ ions and one proton and the efflux of one K+ ion. Thus, intracellular K+ concentration ([K+]i) is potentially influenced both by extracellular K+ concentration ([K+]o) fluctuations and glutamate transport in astrocytes. We evaluated the impact of these K+ ion movements on [K+]i in primary mouse astrocytes by microspectrofluorimetry. We established a new noninvasive and reliable approach to monitor and quantify [K+]i using the recently developed K+ sensitive fluorescent indicator Asante Potassium Green-1 (APG-1). An in situ calibration procedure enabled us to estimate the resting [K+]i at 133±1 mM. We first investigated the dependency of [K+]i levels on [K+]o. We found that [K+]i followed [K+]o changes nearly proportionally in the range 3-10 mM, which is consistent with previously reported microelectrode measurements of intracellular K+ concentration changes in astrocytes. We then found that glutamate superfusion caused a reversible drop of [K+]i that depended on the glutamate concentration with an apparent EC50 of 11.1±1.4 µM, corresponding to the affinity of astrocyte glutamate transporters. The amplitude of the [K+]i drop was found to be 2.3±0.1 mM for 200 µM glutamate applications. Overall, this study shows that the fluorescent K+ indicator APG-1 is a powerful new tool for addressing important questions regarding fine [K+]i regulation with excellent spatial resolution.

  10. Extremely Fast Numerical Integration of Ocean Surface Wave Dynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-30

    1) is a natural two-space-dimension extension of the KdV equation . The periodic KP solutions include directional spreading in the wave field: y η...of the nonlinear preprocessor in the new approach for obtaining numerical solutions to nonlinear wave equations . I will now do so, but without many...analytical study and extremely fast numerical integration of the extended nonlinear Schroedinger equation for fully three dimensional wave motion

  11. Compression Dynamics of an Indirect Drive Fast Ignition Target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, R. B.; Hatchett, S. A.; Turner, R. E.; Tanaka, K. A.; Kodama, R.; Soures, J.

    2002-11-01

    We have compared the compression of an indirectly driven cone-in-shell target, a type proposed for the fast ignition concept, with models. The experimental parameters -500 μm diameter plastic shell with 60 μm thick wall were a 1/5 scale realization of a fast ignition target designed for NIF (absorbing 180 kJ for compression and ˜30 kJ for ignition, and yielding ˜30 MJ) [1]. The implosion was backlit with 6.4 keV x-rays, and observed with a framing camera which captured the implosion from ˜2.6 to 3.3 ns after the onset. The collapsing structure was very similar to model predictions except that non-thermal m-band emissions from the hohlraum penetrated the shell and vaporized gold off the reentrant cone. This could be eliminated by changing the hohlraum composition. [1] S. Hatchett, et al., 5th Wkshp on Fast Ignition of Fusion Targets (Satellite Wkshp, 28th EPS Conf. on Contr. Fusion and Plasma Phys.), Madeira, Portugal (2001).

  12. Fast phonon dynamics of a nanomechanical oscillator due to cooperative effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceban, Victor; Longo, Paolo; Macovei, Mihai A.

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the coupled-system dynamics of two-level quantum dots placed on a vibrating nanomechanical resonator. The ensemble of quantum dots exhibits superradiance features which are transferred to the mechanical degrees of freedom representing fast quantum dynamics and enhanced phonon emission in a nanomechanical setup, resembling the superradiance effect.

  13. The genome of the obligate intracellular parasite Trachipleistophora hominis: new insights into microsporidian genome dynamics and reductive evolution.

    PubMed

    Heinz, Eva; Williams, Tom A; Nakjang, Sirintra; Noël, Christophe J; Swan, Daniel C; Goldberg, Alina V; Harris, Simon R; Weinmaier, Thomas; Markert, Stephanie; Becher, Dörte; Bernhardt, Jörg; Dagan, Tal; Hacker, Christian; Lucocq, John M; Schweder, Thomas; Rattei, Thomas; Hall, Neil; Hirt, Robert P; Embley, T Martin

    2012-01-01

    The dynamics of reductive genome evolution for eukaryotes living inside other eukaryotic cells are poorly understood compared to well-studied model systems involving obligate intracellular bacteria. Here we present 8.5 Mb of sequence from the genome of the microsporidian Trachipleistophora hominis, isolated from an HIV/AIDS patient, which is an outgroup to the smaller compacted-genome species that primarily inform ideas of evolutionary mode for these enormously successful obligate intracellular parasites. Our data provide detailed information on the gene content, genome architecture and intergenic regions of a larger microsporidian genome, while comparative analyses allowed us to infer genomic features and metabolism of the common ancestor of the species investigated. Gene length reduction and massive loss of metabolic capacity in the common ancestor was accompanied by the evolution of novel microsporidian-specific protein families, whose conservation among microsporidians, against a background of reductive evolution, suggests they may have important functions in their parasitic lifestyle. The ancestor had already lost many metabolic pathways but retained glycolysis and the pentose phosphate pathway to provide cytosolic ATP and reduced coenzymes, and it had a minimal mitochondrion (mitosome) making Fe-S clusters but not ATP. It possessed bacterial-like nucleotide transport proteins as a key innovation for stealing host-generated ATP, the machinery for RNAi, key elements of the early secretory pathway, canonical eukaryotic as well as microsporidian-specific regulatory elements, a diversity of repetitive and transposable elements, and relatively low average gene density. Microsporidian genome evolution thus appears to have proceeded in at least two major steps: an ancestral remodelling of the proteome upon transition to intracellular parasitism that involved reduction but also selective expansion, followed by a secondary compaction of genome architecture in some, but

  14. The Genome of the Obligate Intracellular Parasite Trachipleistophora hominis: New Insights into Microsporidian Genome Dynamics and Reductive Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Heinz, Eva; Williams, Tom A.; Nakjang, Sirintra; Noël, Christophe J.; Swan, Daniel C.; Goldberg, Alina V.; Harris, Simon R.; Weinmaier, Thomas; Markert, Stephanie; Becher, Dörte; Bernhardt, Jörg; Dagan, Tal; Hacker, Christian; Lucocq, John M.; Schweder, Thomas; Rattei, Thomas; Hall, Neil; Hirt, Robert P.; Embley, T. Martin

    2012-01-01

    The dynamics of reductive genome evolution for eukaryotes living inside other eukaryotic cells are poorly understood compared to well-studied model systems involving obligate intracellular bacteria. Here we present 8.5 Mb of sequence from the genome of the microsporidian Trachipleistophora hominis, isolated from an HIV/AIDS patient, which is an outgroup to the smaller compacted-genome species that primarily inform ideas of evolutionary mode for these enormously successful obligate intracellular parasites. Our data provide detailed information on the gene content, genome architecture and intergenic regions of a larger microsporidian genome, while comparative analyses allowed us to infer genomic features and metabolism of the common ancestor of the species investigated. Gene length reduction and massive loss of metabolic capacity in the common ancestor was accompanied by the evolution of novel microsporidian-specific protein families, whose conservation among microsporidians, against a background of reductive evolution, suggests they may have important functions in their parasitic lifestyle. The ancestor had already lost many metabolic pathways but retained glycolysis and the pentose phosphate pathway to provide cytosolic ATP and reduced coenzymes, and it had a minimal mitochondrion (mitosome) making Fe-S clusters but not ATP. It possessed bacterial-like nucleotide transport proteins as a key innovation for stealing host-generated ATP, the machinery for RNAi, key elements of the early secretory pathway, canonical eukaryotic as well as microsporidian-specific regulatory elements, a diversity of repetitive and transposable elements, and relatively low average gene density. Microsporidian genome evolution thus appears to have proceeded in at least two major steps: an ancestral remodelling of the proteome upon transition to intracellular parasitism that involved reduction but also selective expansion, followed by a secondary compaction of genome architecture in some, but

  15. A fast recursive algorithm for molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, A.; Vaidehi, N.; Rodriguez, G.

    1993-01-01

    The present recursive algorithm for solving molecular systems' dynamical equations of motion employs internal variable models that reduce such simulations' computation time by an order of magnitude, relative to Cartesian models. Extensive use is made of spatial operator methods recently developed for analysis and simulation of the dynamics of multibody systems. A factor-of-450 speedup over the conventional O(N-cubed) algorithm is demonstrated for the case of a polypeptide molecule with 400 residues.

  16. Real Time Monitoring of Intracellular Bile Acid Dynamics Using a Genetically Encoded FRET-based Bile Acid Sensor.

    PubMed

    Van de Wiel, Sandra; Merkx, Maarten; Van de Graaf, Stan

    2016-01-04

    Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) has become a powerful tool for monitoring protein folding, interaction and localization in single cells. Biosensors relying on the principle of FRET have enabled real-time visualization of subcellular signaling events in live cells with high temporal and spatial resolution. Here, we describe the application of a genetically encoded Bile Acid Sensor (BAS) that consists of two fluorophores fused to the farnesoid X receptor ligand binding domain (FXR-LBD), thereby forming a bile acid sensor that can be activated by a large number of bile acids species and other (synthetic) FXR ligands. This sensor can be targeted to different cellular compartments including the nucleus (NucleoBAS) and cytosol (CytoBAS) to measure bile acid concentrations locally. It allows rapid and simple quantitation of cellular bile acid influx, efflux and subcellular distribution of endogenous bile acids without the need for labeling with fluorescent tags or radionuclei. Furthermore, the BAS FRET sensors can be useful for monitoring FXR ligand binding. Finally, we show that this FRET biosensor can be combined with imaging of other spectrally distinct fluorophores. This allows for combined analysis of intracellular bile acid dynamics and i) localization and/or abundance of proteins of interest, or ii) intracellular signaling in a single cell.

  17. Application of Fast Dynamic Allan Variance for the Characterization of FOGs-Based Measurement While Drilling

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lu; Zhang, Chunxi; Gao, Shuang; Wang, Tao; Lin, Tie; Li, Xianmu

    2016-01-01

    The stability of a fiber optic gyroscope (FOG) in measurement while drilling (MWD) could vary with time because of changing temperature, high vibration, and sudden power failure. The dynamic Allan variance (DAVAR) is a sliding version of the Allan variance. It is a practical tool that could represent the non-stationary behavior of the gyroscope signal. Since the normal DAVAR takes too long to deal with long time series, a fast DAVAR algorithm has been developed to accelerate the computation speed. However, both the normal DAVAR algorithm and the fast algorithm become invalid for discontinuous time series. What is worse, the FOG-based MWD underground often keeps working for several days; the gyro data collected aboveground is not only very time-consuming, but also sometimes discontinuous in the timeline. In this article, on the basis of the fast algorithm for DAVAR, we make a further advance in the fast algorithm (improved fast DAVAR) to extend the fast DAVAR to discontinuous time series. The improved fast DAVAR and the normal DAVAR are used to responsively characterize two sets of simulation data. The simulation results show that when the length of the time series is short, the improved fast DAVAR saves 78.93% of calculation time. When the length of the time series is long (6×105 samples), the improved fast DAVAR reduces calculation time by 97.09%. Another set of simulation data with missing data is characterized by the improved fast DAVAR. Its simulation results prove that the improved fast DAVAR could successfully deal with discontinuous data. In the end, a vibration experiment with FOGs-based MWD has been implemented to validate the good performance of the improved fast DAVAR. The results of the experience testify that the improved fast DAVAR not only shortens computation time, but could also analyze discontinuous time series. PMID:27941600

  18. Application of Fast Dynamic Allan Variance for the Characterization of FOGs-Based Measurement While Drilling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Zhang, Chunxi; Gao, Shuang; Wang, Tao; Lin, Tie; Li, Xianmu

    2016-12-07

    The stability of a fiber optic gyroscope (FOG) in measurement while drilling (MWD) could vary with time because of changing temperature, high vibration, and sudden power failure. The dynamic Allan variance (DAVAR) is a sliding version of the Allan variance. It is a practical tool that could represent the non-stationary behavior of the gyroscope signal. Since the normal DAVAR takes too long to deal with long time series, a fast DAVAR algorithm has been developed to accelerate the computation speed. However, both the normal DAVAR algorithm and the fast algorithm become invalid for discontinuous time series. What is worse, the FOG-based MWD underground often keeps working for several days; the gyro data collected aboveground is not only very time-consuming, but also sometimes discontinuous in the timeline. In this article, on the basis of the fast algorithm for DAVAR, we make a further advance in the fast algorithm (improved fast DAVAR) to extend the fast DAVAR to discontinuous time series. The improved fast DAVAR and the normal DAVAR are used to responsively characterize two sets of simulation data. The simulation results show that when the length of the time series is short, the improved fast DAVAR saves 78.93% of calculation time. When the length of the time series is long ( 6 × 10 5 samples), the improved fast DAVAR reduces calculation time by 97.09%. Another set of simulation data with missing data is characterized by the improved fast DAVAR. Its simulation results prove that the improved fast DAVAR could successfully deal with discontinuous data. In the end, a vibration experiment with FOGs-based MWD has been implemented to validate the good performance of the improved fast DAVAR. The results of the experience testify that the improved fast DAVAR not only shortens computation time, but could also analyze discontinuous time series.

  19. Intracellular microlasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humar, Matjaž; Hyun Yun, Seok

    2015-09-01

    Optical microresonators, which confine light within a small cavity, are widely exploited for various applications ranging from the realization of lasers and nonlinear devices to biochemical and optomechanical sensing. Here we use microresonators and suitable optical gain materials inside biological cells to demonstrate various optical functions in vitro including lasing. We explore two distinct types of microresonator—soft and hard—that support whispering-gallery modes. Soft droplets formed by injecting oil or using natural lipid droplets support intracellular laser action. The laser spectra from oil-droplet microlasers can chart cytoplasmic internal stress (˜500 pN μm-2) and its dynamic fluctuations at a sensitivity of 20 pN μm-2 (20 Pa). In a second form, whispering-gallery modes within phagocytized polystyrene beads of different sizes enable individual tagging of thousands of cells easily and, in principle, a much larger number by multiplexing with different dyes.

  20. Dynamics of reductive genome evolution in mitochondria and obligate intracellular microbes.

    PubMed

    Khachane, Amit N; Timmis, Kenneth N; Martins dos Santos, Vítor A P

    2007-02-01

    Reductive evolution in mitochondria and obligate intracellular microbes has led to a significant reduction in their genome size and guanine plus cytosine content (GC). We show that genome shrinkage during reductive evolution in prokaryotes follows an exponential decay pattern and provide a method to predict the extent of this decay on an evolutionary timescale. We validated predictions by comparison with estimated extents of genome reduction known to have occurred in mitochondria and Buchnera aphidicola, through comparative genomics and by drawing on available fossil evidences. The model shows how the mitochondrial ancestor would have quickly shed most of its genome, shortly after its incorporation into the protoeukaryotic cell and prior to codivergence subsequent to the split of eukaryotic lineages. It also predicts that the primary rickettsial parasitic event would have occurred between 180 and 425 million years ago (MYA), an event of relatively recent evolutionary origin considering the fact that Rickettsia and mitochondria evolved from a common alphaproteobacterial ancestor. This suggests that the symbiotic events of Rickettsia and mitochondria originated at different time points. Moreover, our model results predict that the ancestor of Wigglesworthia glossinidia brevipalpis, dated around the time of origin of its symbiotic association with the tsetse fly (50-100 MYA), was likely to have been an endosymbiont itself, thus supporting an earlier proposition that Wigglesworthia, which is currently a maternally inherited primary endosymbiont, evolved from a secondary endosymbiont.

  1. Distinct intracellular Ca(2+) dynamics regulate apical constriction and differentially contribute to neural tube closure.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Makoto; Sato, Masanao; Koyama, Hiroshi; Hara, Yusuke; Hayashi, Kentaro; Yasue, Naoko; Imamura, Hiromi; Fujimori, Toshihiko; Nagai, Takeharu; Campbell, Robert E; Ueno, Naoto

    2017-04-01

    Early in the development of the central nervous system, progenitor cells undergo a shape change, called apical constriction, that triggers the neural plate to form a tubular structure. How apical constriction in the neural plate is controlled and how it contributes to tissue morphogenesis are not fully understood. In this study, we show that intracellular calcium ions (Ca(2+)) are required for Xenopus neural tube formation and that there are two types of Ca(2+)-concentration changes, a single-cell and a multicellular wave-like fluctuation, in the developing neural plate. Quantitative imaging analyses revealed that transient increases in Ca(2+) concentration induced cortical F-actin remodeling, apical constriction and accelerations of the closing movement of the neural plate. We also show that extracellular ATP and N-cadherin (cdh2) participate in the Ca(2+)-induced apical constriction. Furthermore, our mathematical model suggests that the effect of Ca(2+) fluctuations on tissue morphogenesis is independent of fluctuation frequency and that fluctuations affecting individual cells are more efficient than those at the multicellular level. We propose that distinct Ca(2+) signaling patterns differentially modulate apical constriction for efficient epithelial folding and that this mechanism has a broad range of physiological outcomes. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  2. A Bidirectional System for the Dynamic Small Molecule Control of Intracellular Fusion Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kuzin, Alexander P.; Lew, Scott; Seetharaman, Jayaraman; Acton, Thomas B.; Kornhaber, Gregory J.; Xiao, Rong; Montelione, Gaetano Thomas; Tong, Liang; Crews, Craig M.

    2014-01-01

    Small molecule control of intracellular protein levels allows temporal and dose-dependent regulation of protein function. Recently, we developed a method to degrade proteins fused to a mutant dehalogenase (HaloTag2) using small molecule hydrophobic tags (HyTs). Here, we introduce a complementary method to stabilize the same HaloTag2 fusion proteins, resulting in a unified system allowing bidirectional control of cellular protein levels in a temporal and dose-dependent manner. From a small molecule screen, we identified N-(3,5-dichloro-2-ethoxybenzyl)-2H-tetrazol-5-amine as a nanomolar HALoTag2 Stabilizer (HALTS1) that reduces the Hsp70:HaloTag2 interaction, thereby preventing HaloTag2 ubiquitination. Finally, we demonstrate the utility of the HyT/HALTS system in probing the physiological role of therapeutic targets by modulating HaloTag2-fused oncogenic H-Ras, which resulted in either the cessation (HyT) or acceleration (HALTS) of cellular transformation. In sum, we present a general platform to study protein function, whereby any protein of interest fused to HaloTag2 can be either degraded 10-fold or stabilized 5-fold using two corresponding compounds. PMID:23978068

  3. A bidirectional system for the dynamic small molecule control of intracellular fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Neklesa, Taavi K; Noblin, Devin J; Kuzin, Alexander; Lew, Scott; Seetharaman, Jayaraman; Acton, Thomas B; Kornhaber, Gregory; Xiao, Rong; Montelione, Gaetano T; Tong, Liang; Crews, Craig M

    2013-10-18

    Small molecule control of intracellular protein levels allows temporal and dose-dependent regulation of protein function. Recently, we developed a method to degrade proteins fused to a mutant dehalogenase (HaloTag2) using small molecule hydrophobic tags (HyTs). Here, we introduce a complementary method to stabilize the same HaloTag2 fusion proteins, resulting in a unified system allowing bidirectional control of cellular protein levels in a temporal and dose-dependent manner. From a small molecule screen, we identified N-(3,5-dichloro-2-ethoxybenzyl)-2H-tetrazol-5-amine as a nanomolar HALoTag2 Stabilizer (HALTS1) that reduces the Hsp70:HaloTag2 interaction, thereby preventing HaloTag2 ubiquitination. Finally, we demonstrate the utility of the HyT/HALTS system in probing the physiological role of therapeutic targets by modulating HaloTag2-fused oncogenic H-Ras, which resulted in either the cessation (HyT) or acceleration (HALTS) of cellular transformation. In sum, we present a general platform to study protein function, whereby any protein of interest fused to HaloTag2 can be either degraded 10-fold or stabilized 5-fold using two corresponding compounds.

  4. Relationship between L-glutamate-regulated intracellular Na+ dynamics and ATP hydrolysis in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Magistretti, P J; Chatton, J-Y

    2005-01-01

    Glutamate uptake into astrocytes and the resulting increase in intracellular Na+ (Na+(i)) have been identified as a key signal coupling excitatory neuronal activity to increased glucose utilization. Arguments based mostly on mathematical modeling led to the conclusion that physiological concentrations of glutamate more than double astrocytic Na+/K+-ATPase activity, which should proportionally increase its ATP hydrolysis rate. This hypothesis was tested in the present study by fluorescence monitoring of free Mg2+ (Mg2+(i)), a parameter that inversely correlates with ATP levels. Glutamate application measurably increased Mg2+(i) (i.e. decreased ATP), which was reversible after glutamate washout. Na+(i) and ATP changes were then directly compared by simultaneous Na+(i) and Mg2+ imaging. Glutamate increased both parameters with different rates and blocking the Na+/K+-ATPase during the glutamate-evoked Na+(i) response, resulted in a drop of Mg2+(i) levels (i.e. increased ATP). Taken together, this study demonstrates the tight correlation between glutamate transport, Na+ homeostasis and ATP levels in astrocytes.

  5. Simulating fast and slow dynamic effects in power systems

    SciTech Connect

    de Mello, F.P.; Feltes, J.W.; Laskowski, T.F.; Oppel, L.J. )

    1992-07-01

    Electric power systems comprise a nearly infinite number of devices, exhibiting dynamic characteristics in a wide range of bandwidths and with significant nonlinear effects. Historically, the nature of these devices, the robust configuration of the electric power system, and its loading were such that the interaction between devices became relatively unimportant in system performance several seconds after disturbances. Greater utilization of electric plant, through heavier system loadings, interconnections, and increasing use of controls, has at times necessitated predictions of system performance through simulation extending over a time range of tens of seconds to several minutes. The phenomena occurring over this extended time frame has been referred to as long-term dynamics. There are basically two classes of problems involving long-term dynamics. One is the problem of islanding with significant imbalances between load and generation where prime mover action in response to frequency deviations is significant. The other concerns problems of insufficient damping and/or synchronizing power, and voltage collapse.

  6. Nanocluster dynamics in fast rate epitaxy under mesoplasma condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L. W.; Shibuta, Y.; Kambara, M.; Yoshida, T.

    2013-03-01

    The dynamics of Si nano-clusters during epitaxial growth has been investigated with molecular dynamics simulation using the Tersoff potential. Several nm sized Si cluster formed during rapid cooling was found to deform instantaneously upon impingement on a Si(1 0 0) substrate at the same time with the spontaneous ordering of the atomic structure to that of the substrate. Due to the increased fraction of high-energy atoms at the surface, smaller clusters (˜1 nm) are favorable for such a deformation even at lower temperatures. This is the advantage of loosely-bound cluster as growth precursor to attain epitaxy with reduced impact energies.

  7. Dual effects of chlorobutanol on secretory response and intracellular Ca2+ dynamics in isolated pancreatic acini of the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Habara, Y.; Kanno, T.

    1993-01-01

    1. The effects of chlorobutanol, a widely used drug preservative, on exocrine response and intracellular Ca2+ dynamics were examined in isolated pancreatic acini of the rat. 2. Chlorobutanol (1 mg ml-1) markedly inhibited the secretory response to cholecystokinin octapeptide (CCK-8), carbamylcholine chloride (carbachol), or sodium fluoride, a direct G-protein activator. However, chlorobutanol itself induced a maximal release of amylase when the dose was increased to 4 mg ml-1. 3. An oscillatory fluctuation of cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration, [Ca2+]c, induced by 5 pM CCK-8 or 0.3 microM carbachol was totally abolished in the presence of 1 mg ml-1 chlorobutanol. 4. A biphasic change in [Ca2+]c induced by 100 pM CCK-8, a rapid rise followed by a gradual decay, was transformed to an oscillatory fluctuation by the preservative. 5. Chlorobutanol inhibited 13 pM [125I]-CCK-8 or 0.5 nM [3H]-methylscopolamine chloride binding to the acinar cells in a dose-dependent manner. 6. These results indicate that chlorobutanol produces discernible pharmacological effects on the secretory response in rat pancreatic acinar cells through changes in the Ca2+ dynamics. Possible sites of action could be at a binding process of secretagogues to their receptors, at an activation process of a G-protein located in the plasma membrane, or at the processes following G-protein activation. However, the possibility that the preservative may distort the Ca(2+)-transport function of the plasma membrane or the membrane of intracellular organella, especially Ca(2+)-sequestering pools, cannot be excluded. PMID:7689400

  8. The influence of cell growth and enzyme activity changes on intracellular metabolite dynamics in AGE1.HN.AAT cells.

    PubMed

    Rath, Alexander G; Rehberg, Markus; Janke, Robert; Genzel, Yvonne; Scholz, Sebastian; Noll, Thomas; Rose, Thomas; Sandig, Volker; Reichl, Udo

    2014-05-20

    Optimization of bioprocesses with mammalian cells mainly concentrates on cell engineering, cell screening and medium optimization to achieve enhanced cell growth and productivity. For improving cell lines by cell engineering techniques, in-depth understandings of the regulation of metabolism and product formation as well as the resulting demand for the different medium components are needed. In this work, the relationship of cell specific growth and uptake rates and of changes in maximum in vitro enzyme activities with intracellular metabolite pools of glycolysis, pentose phosphate pathway, citric acid cycle and energy metabolism were determined for batch cultivations with AGE1.HN.AAT cells. Results obtained by modeling cell growth and consumption of main substrates showed that the dynamics of intracellular metabolite pools is primarily linked to the dynamics of specific glucose and glutamine uptake rates. By analyzing maximum in vitro enzyme activities we found low activities of pyruvate dehydrogenase and pyruvate carboxylase which suggest a reduced metabolite transfer into the citric acid cycle resulting in lactate release (Warburg effect). Moreover, an increase in the volumetric lactate production rate during the transition from exponential to stationary growth together with a transient accumulation of fructose 1,6-bisphosphate, fructose 1-phosphate and ribose 5-phosphate point toward an upregulation of PK via FBP. Glutaminase activity was about 44-fold lower than activity of glutamine synthetase. This seemed to be sufficient for the supply of intermediates for biosynthesis but might lead to unnecessary dissipation of ATP. Taken together, our results elucidate regulation of metabolic networks of immortalized mammalian cells by changes of metabolite pools over the time course of batch cultivations. Eventually, it enables the use of cell engineering strategies to improve the availability of building blocks for biomass synthesis by increasing glucose as well as

  9. Creatine loading elevates the intracellular phosphorylation potential and alters adaptive responses of rat fast-twitch muscle to chronic low-frequency stimulation.

    PubMed

    Putman, Charles T; Gallo, Maria; Martins, Karen J B; MacLean, Ian M; Jendral, Michelle J; Gordon, Tessa; Syrotuik, Daniel G; Dixon, Walter T

    2015-07-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that elevating the intracellular phosphorylation potential (IPP = [ATP]/[ADP]free) within rat fast-twitch tibialis anterior muscles by creatine (Cr) loading would prevent fast-to-slow fibre transitions induced by chronic low-frequency electrical stimulation (CLFS, 10 Hz, 12 h/day). Creatine-control and creatine-CLFS groups drank a solution of 1% Cr + 5% dextrose, ad libitum, for 10 days before and during 10 days of CLFS; dextrose-control and dextrose-CLFS groups drank 5% dextrose. Cr loading increased total Cr (P < 0.025), phosphocreatine (PCr) (P < 0.003), and the IPP (P < 0.0008) by 34%, 45%, and 64%, respectively. PCr and IPP were 46% (P < 0.002) and 76% (P < 0.02) greater in creatine-CLFS than in dextrose-CLFS. Higher IPP was confirmed by a 58% reduction in phospho-AMP-activated protein kinase α (Thr172) (P < 0.006). In dextrose-CLFS, myosin heavy chain (MyHC) I and IIa transcripts increased 32- and 38-fold (P < 0.006), respectively, whereas MyHC-IIb mRNA decreased by 75% (P < 0.03); the corresponding MyHC-I and MyHC-IIa protein contents increased by 2.0- (P < 0.03) and 2.7-fold (P < 0.05), respectively, and MyHC-IIb decreased by 30% (P < 0.03). In contrast, within creatine-CLFS, MyHC-I and MyHC-IIa mRNA were unchanged and MyHC-IIb mRNA decreased by 75% (P < 0.003); the corresponding MyHC isoform contents were not altered. Oxidative reference enzymes were similarly elevated (P < 0.01) in dextrose-CLFS and creatine-CLFS, but reciprocal reductions in glycolytic reference enzymes occurred only in dextrose-CLFS (P < 0.02). Preservation of the glycolytic potential and greater SERCA2 and parvalbumin contents in creatine-CLFS coincided with prolonged time to peak tension and half-rise time (P < 0.01). These results highlight the IPP as an important physiological regulator of muscle fibre plasticity and demonstrate that training-induced changes typically associated with improvements in muscular endurance or increased power output are

  10. Volumetric imaging of fast biological dynamics in deep tissue via wavefront engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Lingjie; Tang, Jianyong; Cui, Meng

    2016-03-01

    To reveal fast biological dynamics in deep tissue, we combine two wavefront engineering methods that were developed in our laboratory, namely optical phase-locked ultrasound lens (OPLUL) based volumetric imaging and iterative multiphoton adaptive compensation technique (IMPACT). OPLUL is used to generate oscillating defocusing wavefront for fast axial scanning, and IMPACT is used to compensate the wavefront distortions for deep tissue imaging. We show its promising applications in neuroscience and immunology.

  11. Ohm's law in the fast lane: general relatiivistic charge dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meier, D.

    2004-01-01

    Fully relativistic and causal equations for the flow of charge in curved spacetime are derived. It is believed that this is the first set of equations to be published that correctly describes the flow of charge, as well as the evolution of the electromagnetic field, in highly dynamical relativistic environments on timescales much shorter than the collapse time (GM/c3).

  12. Ohm's law in the fast lane: general relatiivistic charge dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meier, D.

    2004-01-01

    Fully relativistic and causal equations for the flow of charge in curved spacetime are derived. It is believed that this is the first set of equations to be published that correctly describes the flow of charge, as well as the evolution of the electromagnetic field, in highly dynamical relativistic environments on timescales much shorter than the collapse time (GM/c3).

  13. Precision and Fast Wavelength Tuning of a Dynamically Phase-Locked Widely-Tunable Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Numata, Kenji; Chen, Jeffrey R.; Wu, Stewart T.

    2012-01-01

    We report a precision and fast wavelength tuning technique demonstrated for a digital-supermode distributed Bragg reflector laser. The laser was dynamically offset-locked to a frequency-stabilized master laser using an optical phase-locked loop, enabling precision fast tuning to and from any frequencies within a 40-GHz tuning range. The offset frequency noise was suppressed to the statically offset-locked level in less than 40 s upon each frequency switch, allowing the laser to retain the absolute frequency stability of the master laser. This technique satisfies stringent requirements for gas sensing lidars and enables other applications that require such well-controlled precision fast tuning.

  14. Nonadiabatic quantum state engineering driven by fast quench dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, Marcela; Sarandy, Marcelo S.; Duzzioni, Eduardo I.; Serra, Roberto M.

    2014-02-01

    There are a number of tasks in quantum information science that exploit nontransitional adiabatic dynamics. Such a dynamics is bounded by the adiabatic theorem, which naturally imposes a speed limit in the evolution of quantum systems. Here, we investigate an approach for quantum state engineering exploiting a shortcut to the adiabatic evolution, which is based on rapid quenches in a continuous-time Hamiltonian evolution. In particular, this procedure is able to provide state preparation faster than the adiabatic brachistochrone. Remarkably, the evolution time in this approach is shown to be ultimately limited by its "thermodynamical cost," provided in terms of the average work rate (average power) of the quench process. We illustrate this result in a scenario that can be experimentally implemented in a nuclear magnetic resonance setup.

  15. Three dimensional MOF-sponge for fast dynamic adsorption.

    PubMed

    Li, Huizeng; Li, Mingzhu; Li, Wenbo; Yang, Qiang; Li, Yanan; Gu, Zhenkun; Song, Yanlin

    2017-02-22

    Nowadays, environmental pollution is a big problem. Metal organic frameworks (MOFs) provide a novel strategy for exhaust gases adsorption and toxic pollutants removal. We proposed a facile and versatile method to prepare a highly efficient three dimensional MOF-sponge by coating MOF crystals on polyurethane sponge surface, mimicking the porous structure of the marine animal, sponge. Owing to combination of the spatial structure of the commercial sponge and the excellent adsorption capacity of MOF coatings, the MOF-sponge possessed good permeability and high dynamic adsorption capacity. Dynamic adsorption ability of the prepared Cu3(BTC)2-sponge was demonstrated by flowing gas-mixtures of NH3/N2 and an aquatic solution of Rhodamine B through it, with a capacity of 101.6 mg g(-1) and 8.8 mg g(-1) for NH3 and Rhodamine B, respectively.

  16. Fast simulation of Brownian dynamics in a crowded environment.

    PubMed

    Smith, Stephen; Grima, Ramon

    2017-01-14

    Brownian dynamics simulations are an increasingly popular tool for understanding spatially extended biochemical reaction systems. Recent improvements in our understanding of the cellular environment show that volume exclusion effects are fundamental to reaction networks inside cells. These systems are frequently studied by incorporating inert hard spheres (crowders) into three-dimensional Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations; however these methods are extremely slow owing to the sheer number of possible collisions between particles. Here we propose a rigorous "crowder-free" method to dramatically increase the simulation speed for crowded biochemical reaction systems by eliminating the need to explicitly simulate the crowders. We consider both the cases where the reactive particles are point particles, and where they themselves occupy a volume. Using simulations of simple chemical reaction networks, we show that the "crowder-free" method is up to three orders of magnitude faster than conventional BD and yet leads to nearly indistinguishable results from the latter.

  17. Suppression of chaos at slow variables by rapidly mixing fast dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramov, R.

    2012-04-01

    One of the key questions about chaotic multiscale systems is how the fast dynamics affects chaos at the slow variables, and, therefore, impacts uncertainty and predictability of the slow dynamics. Here we demonstrate that the linear slow-fast coupling with the total energy conservation property promotes the suppression of chaos at the slow variables through the rapid mixing at the fast variables, both theoretically and through numerical simulations. A suitable mathematical framework is developed, connecting the slow dynamics on the tangent subspaces to the infinite-time linear response of the mean state to a constant external forcing at the fast variables. Additionally, it is shown that the uncoupled dynamics for the slow variables may remain chaotic while the complete multiscale system loses chaos and becomes completely predictable at the slow variables through increasing chaos and turbulence at the fast variables. This result contradicts the common sense intuition, where, naturally, one would think that coupling a slow weakly chaotic system with another much faster and much stronger mixing system would result in general increase of chaos at the slow variables.

  18. Fast parallel algorithms for short-range molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Plimpton, S.

    1993-05-01

    Three parallel algorithms for classical molecular dynamics are presented. The first assigns each processor a subset of atoms; the second assigns each a subset of inter-atomic forces to compute; the third assigns each a fixed spatial region. The algorithms are suitable for molecular dynamics models which can be difficult to parallelize efficiently -- those with short-range forces where the neighbors of each atom change rapidly. They can be implemented on any distributed-memory parallel machine which allows for message-passing of data between independently executing processors. The algorithms are tested on a standard Lennard-Jones benchmark problem for system sizes ranging from 500 to 10,000,000 atoms on three parallel supercomputers, the nCUBE 2, Intel iPSC/860, and Intel Delta. Comparing the results to the fastest reported vectorized Cray Y-MP and C90 algorithm shows that the current generation of parallel machines is competitive with conventional vector supercomputers even for small problems. For large problems, the spatial algorithm achieves parallel efficiencies of 90% and the Intel Delta performs about 30 times faster than a single Y-MP processor and 12 times faster than a single C90 processor. Trade-offs between the three algorithms and guidelines for adapting them to more complex molecular dynamics simulations are also discussed.

  19. Flood Regime Dynamics with Slow-Fast Landscape-Climate Feedbacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perdigão, Rui A. P.; Blöschl, Günter

    2015-04-01

    The dynamical evolution of flood regimes is evaluated in the general case whereby floods interact nonlinearly with coevolving climate and landscape factors at different scales. For that purpose, a spatiotemporal analysis of the dynamic flood response to precipitation changes is conducted and a slow-fast nonlinear dynamical model is built linking flood regime dynamics with climate, landscape and their feedbacks. These involve nonlinear scale interactions, with landform evolution processes taking place at the millennial scale (slow dynamics), and climate adjusting in years to decades (fast dynamics). A dynamic coevolution index is introduced relating spatiotemporal symmetry with relative characteristic celerities, which need to be taken into account in hydrological space-time trading. Coevolution is expressed here by the scale interaction between slow and fast dynamics, represented respectively by spatial and temporal characteristics of the hydroclimate dynamics. The spatiotemporal analysis shows that in general floods are more responsive to spatial (regional) than to temporal (decadal) variability in its dominant controls, except in stable hydroclimatic regions. In fact, on one hand catchments from stable dry lowlands and high wetlands exhibit similarity between spatial and temporal relative rates of change (spatiotemporal symmetry) and low landscape-climate codependence, suggesting they are not coevolving significantly. On the other hand, intermediate, dynamically evolving regions show differences between those sensitivities (symmetry breaks) and higher landscape-climate codependence, in line with undergoing coevolution. The break of symmetry is an emerging behaviour from nonlinear dynamic feedbacks within the hydroclimate system. The dynamical model captures emerging features of the flood regime dynamics and nonlinear landscape-climate feedbacks, supporting the assessment of spatiotemporally asymmetric flood change. Moreover, it informs on the precipitation and

  20. Fast Dynamics of Water Droplets Freezing from the Outside In

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wildeman, Sander; Sterl, Sebastian; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef

    2017-02-01

    A drop of water that freezes from the outside in presents an intriguing problem: the expansion of water upon freezing is incompatible with the self-confinement by a rigid ice shell. Using high-speed imaging we show that this conundrum is resolved through an intermittent fracturing of the brittle ice shell and cavitation in the enclosed liquid, culminating in an explosion of the partially frozen droplet. We propose a basic model to elucidate the interplay between a steady buildup of stresses and their fast release. The model reveals that for millimetric droplets the fragment velocities upon explosion are independent of the droplet size and only depend on material properties (such as the tensile stress of the ice and the bulk modulus of water). For small (submillimetric) droplets, on the other hand, surface tension starts to play a role. In this regime we predict that water droplets with radii below 50 μ m are unlikely to explode at all. We expect our findings to be relevant in the modeling of freezing cloud and rain droplets.

  1. Startle auditory stimuli enhance the performance of fast dynamic contractions.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Del-Olmo, Miguel; Río-Rodríguez, Dan; Iglesias-Soler, Eliseo; Acero, Rafael M

    2014-01-01

    Fast reaction times and the ability to develop a high rate of force development (RFD) are crucial for sports performance. However, little is known regarding the relationship between these parameters. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of auditory stimuli of different intensities on the performance of a concentric bench-press exercise. Concentric bench-presses were performed by thirteen trained subjects in response to three different conditions: a visual stimulus (VS); a visual stimulus accompanied by a non-startle auditory stimulus (AS); and a visual stimulus accompanied by a startle auditory stimulus (SS). Peak RFD, peak velocity, onset movement, movement duration and electromyography from pectoralis and tricep muscles were recorded. The SS condition induced an increase in the RFD and peak velocity and a reduction in the movement onset and duration, in comparison with the VS and AS condition. The onset activation of the pectoralis and tricep muscles was shorter for the SS than for the VS and AS conditions. These findings point out to specific enhancement effects of loud auditory stimulation on the rate of force development. This is of relevance since startle stimuli could be used to explore neural adaptations to resistance training.

  2. Startle Auditory Stimuli Enhance the Performance of Fast Dynamic Contractions

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Del-Olmo, Miguel; Río-Rodríguez, Dan; Iglesias-Soler, Eliseo; Acero, Rafael M.

    2014-01-01

    Fast reaction times and the ability to develop a high rate of force development (RFD) are crucial for sports performance. However, little is known regarding the relationship between these parameters. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of auditory stimuli of different intensities on the performance of a concentric bench-press exercise. Concentric bench-presses were performed by thirteen trained subjects in response to three different conditions: a visual stimulus (VS); a visual stimulus accompanied by a non-startle auditory stimulus (AS); and a visual stimulus accompanied by a startle auditory stimulus (SS). Peak RFD, peak velocity, onset movement, movement duration and electromyography from pectoralis and tricep muscles were recorded. The SS condition induced an increase in the RFD and peak velocity and a reduction in the movement onset and duration, in comparison with the VS and AS condition. The onset activation of the pectoralis and tricep muscles was shorter for the SS than for the VS and AS conditions. These findings point out to specific enhancement effects of loud auditory stimulation on the rate of force development. This is of relevance since startle stimuli could be used to explore neural adaptations to resistance training. PMID:24489967

  3. Fast molecular tracking maps nanoscale dynamics of plasma membrane lipids

    PubMed Central

    Sahl, Steffen J.; Leutenegger, Marcel; Hilbert, Michael; Hell, Stefan W.; Eggeling, Christian

    2010-01-01

    We describe an optical method capable of tracking a single fluorescent molecule with a flexible choice of high spatial accuracy (∼10–20 nm standard deviation or ∼20–40 nm full-width-at-half-maximum) and temporal resolution (< 1 ms). The fluorescence signal during individual passages of fluorescent molecules through a spot of excitation light allows the sequential localization and thus spatio-temporal tracking of the molecule if its fluorescence is collected on at least three separate point detectors arranged in close proximity. We show two-dimensional trajectories of individual, small organic dye labeled lipids diffusing in the plasma membrane of living cells and directly observe transient events of trapping on < 20 nm spatial scales. The trapping is cholesterol-assisted and much more pronounced for a sphingo- than for a phosphoglycero-lipid, with average trapping times of ∼15 ms and < 4 ms, respectively. The results support previous STED nanoscopy measurements and suggest that, at least for nontreated cells, the transient interaction of a single lipid is confined to macromolecular dimensions. Our experimental approach demonstrates that fast molecular movements can be tracked with minimal invasion, which can reveal new important details of cellular nano-organization. PMID:20351247

  4. Fast Distributed Dynamics of Semantic Networks via Social Media.

    PubMed

    Carrillo, Facundo; Cecchi, Guillermo A; Sigman, Mariano; Slezak, Diego Fernández

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of semantic organization using social media, a collective expression of human thought. We propose a novel, time-dependent semantic similarity measure (TSS), based on the social network Twitter. We show that TSS is consistent with static measures of similarity but provides high temporal resolution for the identification of real-world events and induced changes in the distributed structure of semantic relationships across the entire lexicon. Using TSS, we measured the evolution of a concept and its movement along the semantic neighborhood, driven by specific news/events. Finally, we showed that particular events may trigger a temporary reorganization of elements in the semantic network.

  5. Fast Distributed Dynamics of Semantic Networks via Social Media

    PubMed Central

    Carrillo, Facundo; Cecchi, Guillermo A.; Sigman, Mariano; Fernández Slezak, Diego

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of semantic organization using social media, a collective expression of human thought. We propose a novel, time-dependent semantic similarity measure (TSS), based on the social network Twitter. We show that TSS is consistent with static measures of similarity but provides high temporal resolution for the identification of real-world events and induced changes in the distributed structure of semantic relationships across the entire lexicon. Using TSS, we measured the evolution of a concept and its movement along the semantic neighborhood, driven by specific news/events. Finally, we showed that particular events may trigger a temporary reorganization of elements in the semantic network. PMID:26074953

  6. Dendritic diameters affect the spatial variability of intracellular calcium dynamics in computer models

    PubMed Central

    Anwar, Haroon; Roome, Christopher J.; Nedelescu, Hermina; Chen, Weiliang; Kuhn, Bernd; De Schutter, Erik

    2014-01-01

    There is growing interest in understanding calcium dynamics in dendrites, both experimentally and computationally. Many processes influence these dynamics, but in dendrites there is a strong contribution of morphology because the peak calcium levels are strongly determined by the surface to volume ratio (SVR) of each branch, which is inversely related to branch diameter. In this study we explore the predicted variance of dendritic calcium concentrations due to local changes in dendrite diameter and how this is affected by the modeling approach used. We investigate this in a model of dendritic calcium spiking in different reconstructions of cerebellar Purkinje cells and in morphological analysis of neocortical and hippocampal pyramidal neurons. We report that many published models neglect diameter-dependent effects on calcium concentration and show how to implement this correctly in the NEURON simulator, both for phenomenological pool based models and for implementations using radial 1D diffusion. More detailed modeling requires simulation of 3D diffusion and we demonstrate that this does not dissipate the local concentration variance due to changes of dendritic diameter. In many cases 1D diffusion of models of calcium buffering give a good approximation provided an increased morphological resolution is implemented. PMID:25100945

  7. Reduction of intracellular calcium removal rate can explain changes in seizure dynamics: studies in neuronal network models.

    PubMed

    Kudela, Pawel; Franaszczuk, Piotr J; Bergey, Gregory K

    2003-12-01

    Complex partial seizures originating from mesial temporal structures are characterized by relatively short durations of organized rhythmic activity (ORA) of 5-8 Hz, typically lasting less than 60s. Previous investigations into seizure dynamics have revealed that this ORA undergoes a monotonic decline prior to seizure evolution into intermittent bursting and subsequent seizure termination. Large neural network models of simplified single-compartment neurons were employed to address the hypothesis that changes in the free intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) removal rate during network bursting can result in the alterations of rhythmic seizure activity similar to that observed in recordings from humans. Both exponential and linear models of decreasing calcium removal rates resulted in changes in the predominant frequency of network bursting very similar in frequency and time course to those seen in human intracranial recordings. This supports the concept that changes in [Ca2+]i removal can explain this important network behavior, while not excluding alternative hypotheses. Identifying potential mechanisms underlying the dynamic changes seen in epileptogenic activity in large neural networks can provide important insights into seizure evolution and termination. Model neural network ensembles are attractive systems to address these questions that are difficult to investigate in biological preparations.

  8. Dynamics of intracellular polymers in enhanced biological phosphorus removal processes under different organic carbon concentrations.

    PubMed

    Xing, Lizhen; Ren, Li; Tang, Bo; Wu, Guangxue; Guan, Yuntao

    2013-01-01

    Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) may deteriorate or fail during low organic carbon loading periods. Polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs) in EBPR were acclimated under both high and low organic carbon conditions, and then dynamics of polymers in typical cycles, anaerobic conditions with excess organic carbons, and endogenous respiration conditions were examined. After long-term acclimation, it was found that organic loading rates did not affect the yield of PAOs and the applied low organic carbon concentrations were advantageous for the enrichment of PAOs. A low influent organic carbon concentration induced a high production of extracellular carbohydrate. During both anaerobic and aerobic endogenous respirations, when glycogen decreased to around 80 ± 10 mg C per gram of volatile suspended solids, PAOs began to utilize polyphosphate significantly. Regressed by the first-order reaction model, glycogen possessed the highest degradation rate and then was followed by polyphosphate, while biomass decay had the lowest degradation rate.

  9. Dynamics of Intracellular Polymers in Enhanced Biological Phosphorus Removal Processes under Different Organic Carbon Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Lizhen; Ren, Li; Tang, Bo; Guan, Yuntao

    2013-01-01

    Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) may deteriorate or fail during low organic carbon loading periods. Polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs) in EBPR were acclimated under both high and low organic carbon conditions, and then dynamics of polymers in typical cycles, anaerobic conditions with excess organic carbons, and endogenous respiration conditions were examined. After long-term acclimation, it was found that organic loading rates did not affect the yield of PAOs and the applied low organic carbon concentrations were advantageous for the enrichment of PAOs. A low influent organic carbon concentration induced a high production of extracellular carbohydrate. During both anaerobic and aerobic endogenous respirations, when glycogen decreased to around 80 ± 10 mg C per gram of volatile suspended solids, PAOs began to utilize polyphosphate significantly. Regressed by the first-order reaction model, glycogen possessed the highest degradation rate and then was followed by polyphosphate, while biomass decay had the lowest degradation rate. PMID:24381942

  10. Rapid intracellular motility and dynamic membrane events in an Antarctic foraminifer.

    PubMed

    Bowser, S S; DeLaca, T E

    1985-10-01

    Some properties of cytoplasmic transport in a cold-adapted (Antarctic) organism are reported for the first time. Phase-contrast light microscopy of Astrammina rara, an arenaceous foraminiferan protozoan, reveals that the saltatory transport of cytoplasmic granules in reticulopods occurs bidirectionally and at rates up to 7.5-micron/s. Extracellularly attached latex microspheres are rapidly translocated on the reticulopodial surface, thus demonstrating membrane fluidity at low (-1.8 degrees C) ambient temperatures. Rapid extension/withdrawal and branching/fusing of pseudopodia further illustrate dynamic plasma membrane activity at subzero temperatures. Immunofluorescence microscopy with an antibody monospecific for tubulin shows that these pseudopods contain microtubules. The motility of this cold-adapted foraminifer therefore appears fully comparable to the motility of allogromiid foraminifers from temperate waters.

  11. Dynamic speckle-interferometer for intracellular processes analyses at high optical magnification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baharev, A. A.; Vladimirov, A. P.; Malygin, A. S.; Mikhailova, Y. A.; Novoselova, I. A.; Yakin, D. I.; Druzhinin, A. V.

    2015-05-01

    At present work dynamic of biospeckles is used for studying processes occurring in cells which arranged in the one layer. The basis of many diseases is changes in the structural and functional properties of the molecular cells components as caused by the influence of external factors and internal functional disorders. Purpose of work is approbation of speckle-interferometer designed for the analysis of cellular metabolism in individual cells. As a parameter, characterizing the metabolic activity of cells used the value of the correlation coefficient (η) of optical signals proportional to the radiation intensity I, recorded at two points in time t. At 320x magnification for the cell diameter of 20 microns value η can be determined in the area size of 6 microns.

  12. Slowing Down Fast Mapping: Redefining the Dynamics of Word Learning.

    PubMed

    Kucker, Sarah C; McMurray, Bob; Samuelson, Larissa K

    2015-06-01

    In this article, we review literature on word learning and propose a theoretical account of how lexical knowledge and word use emerge and develop over time. We contend that the developing lexical system is built on processes that support children's in-the-moment word usage interacting with processes that create long-term learning. We argue for a new characterization of word learning in which simple mechanisms like association and competition, and the interaction between the two, guide children's selection of referents and word use in the moment. This in turn strengthens and refines the network of relationships in the lexicon, improving referent selection and use in future encounters with words. By integrating in-the-moment word use with long-term learning through simple domain-general mechanisms, this account highlights the dynamic nature of word learning and creates a broader framework for understanding language and cognitive development more generally.

  13. Fast Search for Dynamic Multi-Relational Graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Choudhury, Sutanay; Holder, Larry; Chin, George; Feo, John T.

    2013-06-23

    Acting on time-critical events by processing ever growing social media or news streams is a major technical challenge. Many of these data sources can be modeled as multi-relational graphs. Continuous queries or techniques to search for rare events that typically arise in monitoring applications have been studied extensively for relational databases. This work is dedicated to answer the question that emerges naturally: how can we efficiently execute a continuous query on a dynamic graph? This paper presents an exact subgraph search algorithm that exploits the temporal characteristics of representative queries for online news or social media monitoring. The algorithm is based on a novel data structure called the that leverages the structural and semantic characteristics of the underlying multi-relational graph. The paper concludes with extensive experimentation on several real-world datasets that demonstrates the validity of this approach.

  14. Fast characterization of cheeses by dynamic headspace-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pérès, Christophe; Denoyer, Christian; Tournayre, Pascal; Berdagué, Jean-Louis

    2002-03-15

    This study describes a rapid method to characterize cheeses by analysis of their volatile fraction using dynamic headspace-mass spectrometry. Major factors governing the extraction and concentration of the volatile components were first studied. These components were extracted from the headspace of the cheeses in a stream of helium and concentrated on a Tenax TA trap. They were then desorbed by heating and injected directly into the source of a mass spectrometer via a short deactivated silica transfer line. The mass spectra of the mixture of volatile components were considered as fingerprints of the analyzed substances. Forward stepwise factorial discriminant analysis afforded a limited number of characteristic mass fragments that allowed a good classification of the batches of cheeses studied.

  15. Gas dynamic theory of flight of fast electron flux in plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnik, V. N.

    The one-dimensional flight of a fast electron flux in plasma is investigated taking into account generation and absorption of plasma waves. The transition from the kinetic description to the gas dynamics is made. The closed set of gas dynamic equations for electrons and plasmons is derived and an automodel solution is obtained in the case of instantaneous injection. This solution represents the beam-plasma formation on natural oscillations in the system electrons+plasmons is considered.

  16. High resolution and dynamic imaging of biopersistence and bioreactivity of extra and intracellular MWNTs exposed to microglial cells

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez Carter, Daniel A.; Motskin, Michael; Pienaar, Ilse S.; Chen, Shu; Hu, Sheng; Ruenraroengsak, Pakatip; Ryan, Mary P.; Shaffer, Milo S. P.; Dexter, David T.

    2016-01-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) are increasingly being developed both as neuro-therapeutic drug delivery systems to the brain and as neural scaffolds to drive tissue regeneration across lesion sites. MWNTs with different degrees of acid oxidation may have different bioreactivities and propensities to aggregate in the extracellular environment, and both individualised and aggregated MWNTs may be expected to be found in the brain. Before practical application, it is vital to understand how both aggregates and individual MWNTs will interact with local phagocytic immune cells, the microglia, and ultimately to determine their biopersistence in the brain. The processing of extra- and intracellular MWNTs (both pristine and when acid oxidised) by microglia was characterised across multiple length scales by correlating a range of dynamic, quantitative and multi-scale techniques, including: UV-vis spectroscopy, light microscopy, focussed ion beam scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Dynamic, live cell imaging revealed the ability of microglia to break apart and internalise micron-sized extracellular agglomerates of acid oxidised MWNT, but not pristine MWNTs. The total amount of MWNTs internalised by, or strongly bound to, microglia was quantified as a function of time. Neither the significant uptake of oxidised MWNTs, nor the incomplete uptake of pristine MWNTs affected microglial viability, pro-inflammatory cytokine release or nitric oxide production. However, after 24 hrs exposure to pristine MWNTs, a significant increase in the production of reactive oxygen species was observed. Small aggregates and individualised oxidised MWNTs were present in the cytoplasm and vesicles, including within multilaminar bodies, after 72 hours. Some evidence of morphological damage to oxidised MWNT structure was observed including highly disordered graphitic structures, suggesting possible biodegradation. This work demonstrates the utility of dynamic

  17. Investigation of time-resolved fast electron dynamics in ultra-intense laser-solid interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, James; Robinson, Alex; Rusby, Dean; Wilson, Lucy; Murphy, Chris; Dance, Rachel; Gray, Ross; MacLellan, David; McKenna, Paul; Ridgers, Chris

    2014-10-01

    The study of fast electron transport in laser-solid interactions is crucial for many key applications. Laser-accelerated particle beams will require compact laser systems operating at high repetition rates, hence experimental effort to characterise acceleration processes using femtosecond laser sources is crucial. A thorough understanding of fast-electron acceleration and transport underpins the development of most of these applications, necessitating both temporally and spatially-resolved measurements. Here an overview will be presented of unique fast electron transport results from the Astra Gemini laser (1021 Wcm-2, 40 fs). Using high resolution rear surface optical probing, together with complementary ion acceleration measurements, we have undertaken a study of the earliest stages of fast electron dynamics. How various target and laser parameters directly affected both the electron distribution and subsequent ion acceleration will be detailed, with computational modeling supporting the experimental observations.

  18. Human upright posture control models based on multisensory inputs; in fast and slow dynamics.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Ryosuke; Takakusaki, Kaoru; Ota, Jun; Yozu, Arito; Haga, Nobuhiko

    2016-03-01

    Posture control to maintain an upright stance is one of the most important and basic requirements in the daily life of humans. The sensory inputs involved in posture control include visual and vestibular inputs, as well as proprioceptive and tactile somatosensory inputs. These multisensory inputs are integrated to represent the body state (body schema); this is then utilized in the brain to generate the motion. Changes in the multisensory inputs result in postural alterations (fast dynamics), as well as long-term alterations in multisensory integration and posture control itself (slow dynamics). In this review, we discuss the fast and slow dynamics, with a focus on multisensory integration including an introduction of our study to investigate "internal force control" with multisensory integration-evoked posture alteration. We found that the study of the slow dynamics is lagging compared to that of fast dynamics, such that our understanding of long-term alterations is insufficient to reveal the underlying mechanisms and to propose suitable models. Additional studies investigating slow dynamics are required to expand our knowledge of this area, which would support the physical training and rehabilitation of elderly and impaired persons. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Optical sensors for monitoring dynamic changes of intracellular metabolite levels in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Hou, Bi-Huei; Takanaga, Hitomi; Grossmann, Guido; Chen, Li-Qing; Qu, Xiao-Qing; Jones, Alexander M; Lalonde, Sylvie; Schweissgut, Oliver; Wiechert, Wolfgang; Frommer, Wolf B

    2011-10-27

    Knowledge of the in vivo levels, distribution and flux of ions and metabolites is crucial to our understanding of physiology in both healthy and diseased states. The quantitative analysis of the dynamics of ions and metabolites with subcellular resolution in vivo poses a major challenge for the analysis of metabolic processes. Genetically encoded Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) sensors can be used for real-time in vivo detection of metabolites. FRET sensor proteins, for example, for glucose, can be targeted genetically to any cellular compartment, or even to subdomains (e.g., a membrane surface), by adding signal sequences or fusing the sensors to specific proteins. The sensors can be used for analyses in individual mammalian cells in culture, in tissue slices and in intact organisms. Applications include gene discovery, high-throughput drug screens or systematic analysis of regulatory networks affecting uptake, efflux and metabolism. Quantitative analyses obtained with the help of FRET sensors for glucose or other ions and metabolites provide valuable data for modeling of flux. Here we provide a detailed protocol for monitoring glucose levels in the cytosol of mammalian cell cultures through the use of FRET glucose sensors; moreover, the protocol can be used for other ions and metabolites and for analyses in other organisms, as has been successfully demonstrated in bacteria, yeast and even intact plants. The whole procedure typically takes ∼4 d including seeding and transfection of mammalian cells; the FRET-based analysis of transfected cells takes ∼5 h.

  20. Intracellular dynamics of archaeal FANCM homologue Hef in response to halted DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Lestini, Roxane; Laptenok, Sergey P; Kühn, Joëlle; Hink, Mark A; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire; Liebl, Ursula; Myllykallio, Hannu

    2013-12-01

    Hef is an archaeal member of the DNA repair endonuclease XPF (XPF)/Crossover junction endonuclease MUS81 (MUS81)/Fanconi anemia, complementation group M (FANCM) protein family that in eukaryotes participates in the restart of stalled DNA replication forks. To investigate the physiological roles of Hef in maintaining genome stability in living archaeal cells, we studied the localization of Hef-green fluorescent protein fusions by fluorescence microscopy. Our studies revealed that Haloferax volcanii Hef proteins formed specific localization foci under regular growth conditions, the number of which specifically increased in response to replication arrest. Purification of the full-length Hef protein from its native host revealed that it forms a stable homodimer in solution, with a peculiar elongated configuration. Altogether our data indicate that the shape of Hef, significant physicochemical constraints and/or interactions with DNA limit the apparent cytosolic diffusion of halophilic DNA replication/repair complexes, and demonstrate that Hef proteins are dynamically recruited to archaeal eukaryotic-like chromatin to counteract DNA replication stress. We suggest that the evolutionary conserved function of Hef/FANCM proteins is to enhance replication fork stability by directly interacting with collapsed replication forks.

  1. Dynamic expression and heterogeneous intracellular location of En-1 during late mouse embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Shan-chuan; Chen, Xing-shu; Cai, Qi-yan; Luo, Xue; Chen, Xing-hua; Liu, Jing; Yao, Zhong-xiang

    2010-01-01

    Engrailed-1 (En-1) is a transcription factor involved in the development of the midbrain/hindbrain during mouse early embryogenesis. Although En-1 is expressed from embryogenesis to adulthood, there has been no detailed description of its expression during late mouse embryonic development. Here we report the expression pattern of En-1 in the mouse embryo from E10.5 to the neonatal state. With immunohistochemistry we found that En-1 was expressed in the central nervous system (CNS) from E10.5 to the neonatal state, mostly restricted to the midbrain/hindbrain junction. Outside the CNS, En-1 is dynamically expressed in several neural crest-associated structures including the cranial mesenchyme, the mandibular arches, the vagus nerve, the dorsal root ganglia, the sympathetic ganglia, the somites, the heart and the cloaca. Additionally, we found that in the CNS, most of the En-1 was located in the nuclei, while outside the CNS, En-1 was mainly expressed in the cytoplasm. These findings provided additional evidence that En-1 may be involved in the development of neural crest cells.

  2. The effect of temperature on the coupled slow and fast dynamics of an electrochemical oscillator

    PubMed Central

    Zülke, Alana A.; Varela, Hamilton

    2016-01-01

    The coupling among disparate time-scales is ubiquitous in many chemical and biological systems. We have recently investigated the effect of fast and, long-term, slow dynamics in surface processes underlying some electrocatalytic reactions. Herein we report on the effect of temperature on the coupled slow and fast dynamics of a model system, namely the electro-oxidation of formic acid on platinum studied at five temperatures between 5 and 45 °C. The main result was a turning point found at 25 °C, which clearly defines two regions for the temperature dependency on the overall kinetics. In addition, the long-term evolution allowed us to compare reaction steps related to fast and slow evolutions. Results were discussed in terms of the key role of PtO species, which chemically couple slow and fast dynamics. In summary we were able to: (a) identify the competition between two reaction steps as responsible for the occurrence of two temperature domains; (b) compare the relative activation energies of these two steps; and (c) suggest the role of a given reaction step on the period-increasing set of reactions involved in the oscillatory dynamics. The introduced methodology could be applied to other systems to uncover the temperature dependence of complex chemical networks. PMID:27079514

  3. The effect of temperature on the coupled slow and fast dynamics of an electrochemical oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zülke, Alana A.; Varela, Hamilton

    2016-04-01

    The coupling among disparate time-scales is ubiquitous in many chemical and biological systems. We have recently investigated the effect of fast and, long-term, slow dynamics in surface processes underlying some electrocatalytic reactions. Herein we report on the effect of temperature on the coupled slow and fast dynamics of a model system, namely the electro-oxidation of formic acid on platinum studied at five temperatures between 5 and 45 °C. The main result was a turning point found at 25 °C, which clearly defines two regions for the temperature dependency on the overall kinetics. In addition, the long-term evolution allowed us to compare reaction steps related to fast and slow evolutions. Results were discussed in terms of the key role of PtO species, which chemically couple slow and fast dynamics. In summary we were able to: (a) identify the competition between two reaction steps as responsible for the occurrence of two temperature domains; (b) compare the relative activation energies of these two steps; and (c) suggest the role of a given reaction step on the period-increasing set of reactions involved in the oscillatory dynamics. The introduced methodology could be applied to other systems to uncover the temperature dependence of complex chemical networks.

  4. Fast rendering of forest ecosystems with dynamic global illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, Jay Edward

    Real-time rendering of large-scale, forest ecosystems remains a challenging problem, in that important global illumination effects, such as leaf transparency and inter-object light scattering, are difficult to capture, given tight timing constraints and scenes that typically contain hundreds of millions of primitives. We propose a new lighting model, adapted from a model previously used to light convective clouds and other participating media, together with GPU ray tracing, in order to achieve these global illumination effects while maintaining near real-time performance. The lighting model is based on a lattice-Boltzmann method in which reflectance, transmittance, and absorption parameters are taken from measurements of real plants. The lighting model is solved as a preprocessing step, requires only seconds on a single GPU, and allows dynamic lighting changes at run-time. The ray tracing engine, which runs on one or multiple GPUs, combines multiple acceleration structures to achieve near real-time performance for large, complex scenes. Both the preprocessing step and the ray tracing engine make extensive use of NVIDIA's Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA).

  5. Fast Dynamical Evolution of Hadron Resonance Gas via Hagedorn States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beitel, M.; Gallmeister, K.; Greiner, C.

    2017-01-01

    Hagedorn states (HS) are a tool to model the hadronization process which occurs in the phase transition region between the quark gluon plasma (QGP) and the hadron resonance gas (HRG). These states are believed to appear near the Hagedorn temperature TH which in our understanding equals the critical temperature Tc . A covariantly formulated bootstrap equation is solved to generate the zoo of these particles characterized baryon number B, strangeness S and electric charge Q. These hadron-like resonances are characterized by being very massive and by not being limited to quantum numbers of known hadrons. All hadronic properties like masses, spectral functions etc. are taken from the hadronic transport model Ultra Relativistic Quantum Molecular Dynamics (UrQMD). Decay chains of single Hagedorn states provide a well description of experimentally observed multiplicity ratios of strange and multi-strange particles as the Ξ0- and the Ω--baryon. In addition, the final energy spectra of resulting hadrons show a thermal-like distribution with the characteristic Hagedorn temperature TH . Box calculations including these Hagedorn states are performed. Indeed, the time scales leading to equilibration of the system are drastically reduced down to 2. . . 5 fm/c.

  6. Intracellular Dialysis Disrupts Zn2+ Dynamics and Enables Selective Detection of Zn2+ Influx in Brain Slice Preparations

    PubMed Central

    Aiba, Isamu; West, Adrian K; Sheline, Christian T; Shuttleworth, C. William

    2013-01-01

    We examined the impact of intracellular dialysis on fluorescence detection of neuronal intracellular Zn2+ accumulation. Comparison between two dialysis conditions (standard; 20minutes, brief; 2minutes) by standard whole-cell clamp revealed a high vulnerability of intracellular Zn2+ buffers to intracellular dialysis. Thus low concentrations of zinc-pyrithione generated robust responses in neurons with standard dialysis, but signals were smaller in neurons with short dialysis. Release from oxidation-sensitive Zn2+ pools were reduced by standard dialysis, when compared with responses in neurons with brief dialysis. The dialysis effects were partly reversed by inclusion of recombinant metallothionein-3 in the dialysis solution. These findings suggested that extensive dialysis could be exploited for selective detection of transmembrane Zn2+ influx. Different dialysis conditions were then used to probe responses to synaptic stimulation. Under standard dialysis conditions, synaptic stimuli generated significant FluoZin-3 signals in wild-type (WT) preparations, but responses were almost absent in preparations lacking vesicular Zn2+ (ZnT3-KO). In contrast, under brief dialysis conditions, intracellular Zn2+ transients were very similar in WT and ZnT3-KO preparations. This suggests that both intracellular release and transmembrane flux can contribute to intracellular Zn2+ accumulation after synaptic stimulation. These results demonstrate significant confounds and potential use of intracellular dialysis to investigate intracellular Zn2+ accumulation mechanisms. PMID:23517525

  7. Global fast dynamic terminal sliding mode control for a quadrotor UAV.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Jing-Jing; Zhang, Guo-Bao

    2017-01-01

    A control method based on global fast dynamic terminal sliding mode control (TSMC) technique is proposed to design the flight controller for performing the finite-time position and attitude tracking control of a small quadrotor UAV. Firstly, the dynamic model of the quadrotor is divided into two subsystems, i.e., a fully actuated subsystem and an underactuated subsystem. Secondly, the dynamic flight controllers of the quadrotor are formulated based on global fast dynamic TSMC, which is able to guarantee that the position and velocity tracking errors of all system state variables converge to zero in finite-time. Moreover, the global fast dynamic TSMC is also able to eliminate the chattering phenomenon caused by the switching control action and realize the high precision performance. In addition, the stabilities of two subsystems are demonstrated by Lyapunov theory, respectively. Lastly, the simulation results are given to illustrate the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed control method in the presence of external disturbances. Copyright © 2016 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Dynamic quantification of MHC class I-peptide presentation to CD8+ T cells via intracellular cytokine staining.

    PubMed

    Pang, Ken C; Wei, Joe Q Z; Chen, Weisan

    2006-04-20

    In order to further our basic understanding of antigen processing and presentation as well as to translate that knowledge into clinically effective vaccines and immunotherapies, having appropriate tools to study MHC class I-peptide presentation is highly desirable. Current methods are based upon HPLC fractionation of extracted peptides, monoclonal Ab, multivalent T cell receptors (TCR), T cell hybridomas, TCR transgenic cells, and T cell lines. However, each of these is associated with problems that make them either difficult to apply generally or too insensitive to adequately quantitate antigen presentation. We have developed a method based upon intracellular cytokine staining (ICS) that dynamically and relatively quantitates MHC class I-peptide presentation to CD8+ T cells in a manner that is both widely applicable and highly sensitive. It is well-suited to assess antigen presentation in its early stages, does not require fixation nor labeling of antigen presenting cells (APC), can be used to examine cross-presentation, and is able to directly employ ex vivo T cells which obviates the need for the development and maintenance of T cell lines and hybridomas. Our method represents a simple yet powerful tool that others interested in studying antigen processing and presentation should find of great practical value.

  9. Fast-track extreme event attribution: How fast can we disentangle thermodynamic (forced) and dynamic (internal) contributions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haustein, Karsten; Otto, Friederike; Uhe, Peter; Allen, Myles; Cullen, Heidi

    2016-04-01

    provide sufficient guidance to determine the dynamic contribution to the event on the basis of monthly mean values. No such link can be made (North Atlantic/Western Europe region) for shorter time-scales, unless the observed state of the circulation is taken as reference for the model analysis (e.g. Christidis et al. 2014). We present results from our most recent attribution analysis for the December 2015 UK floods (Storm Desmond and Eva), during which we find a robust teleconnection link between Pacific SSTs and North Atlantic Jetstream anomalies. This is true for both experiments, with forecast and observed SSTs. We propose a fast and simple analysis method based on the comparison of current climatological circulation patterns with actual and natural conditions. Alternative methods are discussed and analysed regarding their potential for fast-track attribution of the role of dynamics. Also, we briefly revisit the issue of internal vs forced dynamic contributions.

  10. Time-resolved measurements of fast electron-sourced sheath dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, J. S.; Murphy, C. D.; Gray, R. J.; MacLellan, D. A.; McKenna, P.; Dance, R. J.; Ridgers, C. P.; Robinson, A. P. L.; Rusby, D.; Wilson, L.

    2013-10-01

    Here we present unique fast electron generation and transport results from a recent experimental campaign on the Astra Gemini laser facility. Using complementary diagnostics a unique picture is presented of the evolution of electron sheath dynamics, and thus electron transport, in the interaction of an ultra-intense, short pulse (40 fs) laser with a solid target. Targets were irradiated at up to (1021W cm - 2), with a chirped optical probe used to spatially and temporally resolve the rear surface target reflectivity. Clear snapshots of rapid ionisation and fast electron transport at the target rear surface were observed for a range of target and laser parameters. As well as providing a valuable insight into fast electron transport at the rear surface the role of fast electron refluxing inside thin targets was also investigated through the use of thin foils and novel targetry. These studies aim to see how the very earliest stages of the fast electron dynamics directly affect both the sheath evolution and ion acceleration at the rear surface.

  11. Fast-updating and nonrepeating Lissajous image reconstruction method for capturing increased dynamic information.

    PubMed

    Hoy, Christopher L; Durr, Nicholas J; Ben-Yakar, Adela

    2011-06-01

    We present a fast-updating Lissajous image reconstruction methodology that uses an increased image frame rate beyond the pattern repeat rate generally used in conventional Lissajous image reconstruction methods. The fast display rate provides increased dynamic information and reduced motion blur, as compared to conventional Lissajous reconstruction, at the cost of single-frame pixel density. Importantly, this method does not discard any information from the conventional Lissajous image reconstruction, and frames from the complete Lissajous pattern can be displayed simultaneously. We present the theoretical background for this image reconstruction methodology along with images and video taken using the algorithm in a custom-built miniaturized multiphoton microscopy system.

  12. Intracellular accumulation dynamics and fate of zinc ions in alveolar epithelial cells exposed to airborne ZnO nanoparticles at the air–liquid interface

    PubMed Central

    Mihai, Cosmin; Chrisler, William B.; Xie, Yumei; Hu, Dehong; Szymanski, Craig J.; Tolic, Ana; Klein, Jessica A.; Smith, Jordan N.; Tarasevich, Barbara J.; Orr, Galya

    2015-01-01

    Airborne nanoparticles (NPs) that enter the respiratory tract are likely to reach the alveolar region. Accumulating observations support a role for zinc oxide (ZnO) NP dissolution in toxicity, but the majority of in-vitro studies were conducted in cells exposed to NPs in growth media, where large doses of dissolved ions are shed into the exposure solution. To determine the precise intracellular accumulation dynamics and fate of zinc ions (Zn2+) shed by airborne NPs in the cellular environment, we exposed alveolar epithelial cells to aerosolized NPs at the air–liquid interface (ALI). Using a fluorescent indicator for Zn2+, together with organelle-specific fluorescent proteins, we quantified Zn2+ in single cells and organelles over time. We found that at the ALI, intracellular Zn2+ values peaked 3 h post exposure and decayed to normal values by 12 h, while in submerged cultures, intracellular Zn2+ values continued to increase over time. The lowest toxic NP dose at the ALI generated peak intracellular Zn2+ values that were nearly three-folds lower than the peak values generated by the lowest toxic dose of NPs in submerged cultures, and eight-folds lower than the peak values generated by the lowest toxic dose of ZnSO4 or Zn2+. At the ALI, the majority of intracellular Zn2+ was found in endosomes and lysosomes as early as 1 h post exposure. In contrast, the majority of intracellular Zn2+ following exposures to ZnSO4 was found in other larger vesicles, with less than 10% in endosomes and lysosomes. Together, our observations indicate that low but critical levels of intracellular Zn2+ have to be reached, concentrated specifically in endosomes and lysosomes, for toxicity to occur, and point to the focal dissolution of the NPs in the cellular environment and the accumulation of the ions specifically in endosomes and lysosomes as the processes underlying the potent toxicity of airborne ZnO NPs. PMID:24289294

  13. Dynamical tunneling versus fast diffusion for a non-convex Hamiltonian.

    PubMed

    Pittman, S M; Tannenbaum, E; Heller, E J

    2016-08-07

    This paper attempts to resolve the issue of the nature of the 0.01-0.1 cm(-1) peak splittings observed in high-resolution IR spectra of polyatomic molecules. One hypothesis is that these splittings are caused by dynamical tunneling, a quantum-mechanical phenomenon whereby energy flows between two disconnected regions of phase-space across dynamical barriers. However, a competing classical mechanism for energy flow is Arnol'd diffusion, which connects different regions of phase-space by a resonance network known as the Arnol'd web. The speed of diffusion is bounded by the Nekhoroshev theorem, which guarantees stability on exponentially long time scales if the Hamiltonian is steep. Here we consider a non-convex Hamiltonian that contains the characteristics of a molecular Hamiltonian, but does not satisfy the Nekhoroshev theorem. The diffusion along the Arnol'd web is expected to be fast for a non-convex Hamiltonian. While fast diffusion is an unlikely competitor for longtime energy flow in molecules, we show how dynamical tunneling dominates compared to fast diffusion in the nearly integrable regime for a non-convex Hamiltonian, as well as present a new kind of dynamical tunneling.

  14. Precision and fast wavelength tuning of a dynamically phase-locked widely-tunable laser.

    PubMed

    Numata, Kenji; Chen, Jeffrey R; Wu, Stewart T

    2012-06-18

    We report a precision and fast wavelength tuning technique demonstrated for a digital-supermode distributed Bragg reflector laser. The laser was dynamically offset-locked to a frequency-stabilized master laser using an optical phase-locked loop, enabling precision fast tuning to and from any frequencies within a ~40-GHz tuning range. The offset frequency noise was suppressed to the statically offset-locked level in less than ~40 μs upon each frequency switch, allowing the laser to retain the absolute frequency stability of the master laser. This technique satisfies stringent requirements for gas sensing lidars and enables other applications that require such well-controlled precision fast tuning.

  15. Intracellular Accumulation of Glycine in Polyphosphate-Accumulating Organisms in Activated Sludge, a Novel Storage Mechanism under Dynamic Anaerobic-Aerobic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Hien Thi Thu; Kristiansen, Rikke; Vestergaard, Mette; Wimmer, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic anaerobic-aerobic feast-famine conditions are applied to wastewater treatment plants to select polyphosphate-accumulating organisms to carry out enhanced biological phosphorus removal. Acetate is a well-known substrate to stimulate this process, and here we show that different amino acids also are suitable substrates, with glycine as the most promising. 13C-labeled glycine and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) were applied to investigate uptake and potential storage products when activated sludge was fed with glycine under anaerobic conditions. Glycine was consumed by the biomass, and the majority was stored intracellularly as free glycine and fermentation products. Subsequently, in the aerobic phase without addition of external substrate, the stored glycine was consumed. The uptake of glycine and oxidation of intracellular metabolites took place along with a release and uptake of orthophosphate, respectively. Fluorescence in situ hybridization combined with microautoradiography using 3H-labeled glycine revealed uncultured actinobacterial Tetrasphaera as a dominant glycine consumer. Experiments with Tetrasphaera elongata as representative of uncultured Tetrasphaera showed that under anaerobic conditions it was able to take up labeled glycine and accumulate this and other labeled metabolites to an intracellular concentration of approximately 4 mM. All components were consumed under subsequent aerobic conditions. Intracellular accumulation of amino acids seems to be a novel storage strategy for polyphosphate-accumulating bacteria under dynamic anaerobic-aerobic feast-famine conditions. PMID:25956769

  16. Structural dynamics of soluble chloride intracellular channel protein CLIC1 examined by amide hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Stoychev, Stoyan H; Nathaniel, Christos; Fanucchi, Sylvia; Brock, Melissa; Li, Sheng; Asmus, Kyle; Woods, Virgil L; Dirr, Heini W

    2009-09-08

    Chloride intracellular channel protein 1 (CLIC1) functions as an anion channel in plasma and nuclear membranes when its soluble monomeric form converts to an integral-membrane form. The transmembrane region of CLIC1 is located in its thioredoxin-like domain 1, but the mechanism whereby the protein converts to its membrane conformation has yet to be determined. Since channel formation in membranes is enhanced at low pH (5 to 5.5), a condition that is found at the surface of membranes, the structural dynamics of soluble CLIC1 was studied at pH 7 and at pH 5.5 in the absence of membranes by amide hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (DXMS). Rapid hydrogen exchange data indicate that CLIC1 displays a similar core structure at these pH values. Domain 1 is less stable than the all-helical domain 2, and, while the structure of domain 1 remains intact, its conformational flexibility is further increased in an acidic environment (pH 5.5). In the absence of membrane, an acidic environment appears to prime the solution structure of CLIC1 by destabilizing domain 1 in order to lower the activation energy barrier for its conversion to the membrane-insertion conformation. The significantly enhanced H/D-exchange rates at pH 5.5 displayed by two segments (peptides 11-31 and 68-82) could be due to the protonation of acidic residues in salt bridges. One of these segments (peptide 11-31) includes part of the transmembrane region which, in the solution structure, consists of helix alpha1. This helix is intrinsically stable and is most likely retained in the membrane conformation. Strand beta2, another element of the transmembrane region, displays a propensity to form a helical structure and has putative N- and C-capping motifs, suggesting that it too most likely forms a helix in a lipid bilayer.

  17. Intracellular proteoglycans.

    PubMed Central

    Kolset, Svein Olav; Prydz, Kristian; Pejler, Gunnar

    2004-01-01

    Proteoglycans (PGs) are proteins with glycosaminoglycan chains, are ubiquitously expressed and have a wide range of functions. PGs in the extracellular matrix and on the cell surface have been the subject of extensive structural and functional studies. Less attention has so far been given to PGs located in intracellular compartments, although several reports suggest that these have biological functions in storage granules, the nucleus and other intracellular organelles. The purpose of this review is, therefore, to present some of these studies and to discuss possible functions linked to PGs located in different intracellular compartments. Reference will be made to publications relevant for the topics we present. It is beyond the scope of this review to cover all publications on PGs in intracellular locations. PMID:14759226

  18. System Dynamics and Control System for a High Bandwidth Rotary Actuator and Fast Tool Servo

    SciTech Connect

    Montesanti, R C; Trumper, D L

    2005-08-05

    This paper explores some of the system dynamics and control issues for a short-stroke rotary actuator that we designed and tested for a new fast tool servo referred to as the 10 kHz rotary fast tool servo. The use of a fast tool servo (FTS) with a diamond turning machine for producing non-axisymmetric or textured surfaces on a workpiece is well known. In a previous paper [1] the authors provide details on the mechanical design and trade-off issues that were considered during the design phase for the fast tool servo. At the heart of that machine is the normal-stress variable reluctance rotary actuator described in more detail in this paper. In addition to producing the torque that is needed for the 10 kHz rotary fast tool servo, the actuator produces a force and is therefore referred to as a hybrid rotary/linear actuator. The actuator uses bias and steering magnetic fluxes for linearizing the torque versus current relationship. Certain types of electric engraving heads use an actuator similar in principle to our hybrid actuator. In the case of the engraving heads, the actuator is used to produce and sustain a resonating mechanical oscillator. This is in sharp contrast to the arbitrary trajectory point-to-point closed-loop control of the tool tip that we demonstrate with our actuator and the 10 kHz FTS. Furthermore, we demonstrate closed-loop control of both the rotary and linear degrees of freedom for our actuator. We provide a brief summary of the demonstrated performance of the 10 kHz rotary fast tool servo, and discuss the magnetic circuit for the actuator and some of the related control issues. Montesanti [2] provides a more detailed and thorough discussion on the 10 kHz rotary fast tool servo, the hybrid actuator, and the pertinent prior art.

  19. Slow and fast dynamics of gain and phase in a quantum dot semiconductor optical amplifier.

    PubMed

    Vallaitis, T; Koos, C; Bonk, R; Freude, W; Laemmlin, M; Meuer, C; Bimberg, D; Leuthold, J

    2008-01-07

    Gain and phase dynamics in InAs/GaAs quantum dot semiconductor optical amplifiers are investigated. It is shown that gain recovery is dominated by fast processes, whereas phase recovery is dominated by slow processes. Relative strengths and time constants of the underlying processes are measured. We find that operation at high bias currents optimizes the performance for nonlinear cross-gain signal processing if a low chirp is required.

  20. Dynamic polarizability of tungsten atoms reconstructed from fast electrical explosion of fine wires in vacuum

    DOE PAGES

    Sarkisov, G. S.; Rosenthal, S. E.; Struve, K. W.

    2016-10-12

    For nanosecond electrical explosion of fine metal wires in vacuum generates calibrated, radially expanded gas cylinders of metal atoms are surrounded by low-density fast expanding plasma corona. Here, a novel integrated-phase technique, based on laser interferometry, provides the dynamic dipole polarizability of metal atoms. This data was previously unavailable for tungsten atoms. Furthermore, an extremely high melting temperature and significant pre-melt electronic emission make these measurements particularly complicated for this refractory metal.

  1. Dynamic polarizability of tungsten atoms reconstructed from fast electrical explosion of fine wires in vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkisov, G. S.; Rosenthal, S. E.; Struve, K. W.

    2016-10-12

    For nanosecond electrical explosion of fine metal wires in vacuum generates calibrated, radially expanded gas cylinders of metal atoms are surrounded by low-density fast expanding plasma corona. Here, a novel integrated-phase technique, based on laser interferometry, provides the dynamic dipole polarizability of metal atoms. This data was previously unavailable for tungsten atoms. Furthermore, an extremely high melting temperature and significant pre-melt electronic emission make these measurements particularly complicated for this refractory metal.

  2. Heterogeneous intracellular trafficking dynamics of brain-derived neurotrophic factor complexes in the neuronal soma revealed by single quantum dot tracking.

    PubMed

    Vermehren-Schmaedick, Anke; Krueger, Wesley; Jacob, Thomas; Ramunno-Johnson, Damien; Balkowiec, Agnieszka; Lidke, Keith A; Vu, Tania Q

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence underscores the importance of ligand-receptor dynamics in shaping cellular signaling. In the nervous system, growth factor-activated Trk receptor trafficking serves to convey biochemical signaling that underlies fundamental neural functions. Focus has been placed on axonal trafficking but little is known about growth factor-activated Trk dynamics in the neuronal soma, particularly at the molecular scale, due in large part to technical hurdles in observing individual growth factor-Trk complexes for long periods of time inside live cells. Quantum dots (QDs) are intensely fluorescent nanoparticles that have been used to study the dynamics of ligand-receptor complexes at the plasma membrane but the value of QDs for investigating ligand-receptor intracellular dynamics has not been well exploited. The current study establishes that QD conjugated brain-derived neurotrophic factor (QD-BDNF) binds to TrkB receptors with high specificity, activates TrkB downstream signaling, and allows single QD tracking capability for long recording durations deep within the soma of live neurons. QD-BDNF complexes undergo internalization, recycling, and intracellular trafficking in the neuronal soma. These trafficking events exhibit little time-synchrony and diverse heterogeneity in underlying dynamics that include phases of sustained rapid motor transport without pause as well as immobility of surprisingly long-lasting duration (several minutes). Moreover, the trajectories formed by dynamic individual BDNF complexes show no apparent end destination; BDNF complexes can be found meandering over long distances of several microns throughout the expanse of the neuronal soma in a circuitous fashion. The complex, heterogeneous nature of neuronal soma trafficking dynamics contrasts the reported linear nature of axonal transport data and calls for models that surpass our generally limited notions of nuclear-directed transport in the soma. QD-ligand probes are poised to provide

  3. Verification and Validation of the New Dynamic Mooring Modules Available in FAST v8

    SciTech Connect

    Wendt, Fabian F.; Andersen, Morten T.; Robertson, Amy N.; Jonkman, Jason M.

    2016-07-01

    The open-source aero-hydro-servo-elastic wind turbine simulation software, FAST v8, was recently coupled to two newly developed mooring dynamics modules: MoorDyn and FEAMooring. MoorDyn is a lumped-mass-based mooring dynamics module developed by the University of Maine, and FEAMooring is a finite-element-based mooring dynamics module developed by Texas A&M University. This paper summarizes the work performed to verify and validate these modules against other mooring models and measured test data to assess their reliability and accuracy. The quality of the fairlead load predictions by the open-source mooring modules MoorDyn and FEAMooring appear to be largely equivalent to what is predicted by the commercial tool OrcaFlex. Both mooring dynamic model predictions agree well with the experimental data, considering the given limitations in the accuracy of the platform hydrodynamic load calculation and the quality of the measurement data.

  4. Verification and Validation of the New Dynamic Mooring Modules Available in FAST v8: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Wendt, Fabian; Robertson, Amy; Jonkman, Jason; Andersen, Morten T.

    2016-08-01

    The open-source aero-hydro-servo-elastic wind turbine simulation software, FAST v8, was recently coupled to two newly developed mooring dynamics modules: MoorDyn and FEAMooring. MoorDyn is a lumped-mass-based mooring dynamics module developed by the University of Maine, and FEAMooring is a finite-element-based mooring dynamics module developed by Texas A&M University. This paper summarizes the work performed to verify and validate these modules against other mooring models and measured test data to assess their reliability and accuracy. The quality of the fairlead load predictions by the open-source mooring modules MoorDyn and FEAMooring appear to be largely equivalent to what is predicted by the commercial tool OrcaFlex. Both mooring dynamic model predictions agree well with the experimental data, considering the given limitations in the accuracy of the platform hydrodynamic load calculation and the quality of the measurement data.

  5. Transcription factor assisted loading and enhancer dynamics dictate the hepatic fasting response

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Ido; Baek, Songjoon; Presman, Diego M.; Paakinaho, Ville; Swinstead, Erin E.; Hager, Gordon L.

    2017-01-01

    Fasting elicits transcriptional programs in hepatocytes leading to glucose and ketone production. This transcriptional program is regulated by many transcription factors (TFs). To understand how this complex network regulates the metabolic response to fasting, we aimed at isolating the enhancers and TFs dictating it. Measuring chromatin accessibility revealed that fasting massively reorganizes liver chromatin, exposing numerous fasting-induced enhancers. By utilizing computational methods in combination with dissecting enhancer features and TF cistromes, we implicated four key TFs regulating the fasting response: glucocorticoid receptor (GR), cAMP responsive element binding protein 1 (CREB1), peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (PPARA), and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein beta (CEBPB). These TFs regulate fuel production by two distinctly operating modules, each controlling a separate metabolic pathway. The gluconeogenic module operates through assisted loading, whereby GR doubles the number of sites occupied by CREB1 as well as enhances CREB1 binding intensity and increases accessibility of CREB1 binding sites. Importantly, this GR-assisted CREB1 binding was enhancer-selective and did not affect all CREB1-bound enhancers. Single-molecule tracking revealed that GR increases the number and DNA residence time of a portion of chromatin-bound CREB1 molecules. These events collectively result in rapid synergistic gene expression and higher hepatic glucose production. Conversely, the ketogenic module operates via a GR-induced TF cascade, whereby PPARA levels are increased following GR activation, facilitating gradual enhancer maturation next to PPARA target genes and delayed ketogenic gene expression. Our findings reveal a complex network of enhancers and TFs that dynamically cooperate to restore homeostasis upon fasting. PMID:28031249

  6. Fast imaging technique to study drop impact dynamics of non-Newtonian fluids.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qin; Peters, Ivo; Wilken, Sam; Brown, Eric; Jaeger, Heinrich

    2014-03-05

    In the field of fluid mechanics, many dynamical processes not only occur over a very short time interval but also require high spatial resolution for detailed observation, scenarios that make it challenging to observe with conventional imaging systems. One of these is the drop impact of liquids, which usually happens within one tenth of millisecond. To tackle this challenge, a fast imaging technique is introduced that combines a high-speed camera (capable of up to one million frames per second) with a macro lens with long working distance to bring the spatial resolution of the image down to 10 µm/pixel. The imaging technique enables precise measurement of relevant fluid dynamic quantities, such as the flow field, the spreading distance and the splashing speed, from analysis of the recorded video. To demonstrate the capabilities of this visualization system, the impact dynamics when droplets of non-Newtonian fluids impinge on a flat hard surface are characterized. Two situations are considered: for oxidized liquid metal droplets we focus on the spreading behavior, and for densely packed suspensions we determine the onset of splashing. More generally, the combination of high temporal and spatial imaging resolution introduced here offers advantages for studying fast dynamics across a wide range of microscale phenomena.

  7. Spontaneous emergence of fast attractor dynamics in a model of developing primary visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Miconi, Thomas; McKinstry, Jeffrey L.; Edelman, Gerald M.

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that neurons in primary sensory cortex arrange into competitive groups, representing stimuli by their joint activity rather than as independent feature analysers. A possible explanation for these results is that sensory cortex implements attractor dynamics, although this proposal remains controversial. Here we report that fast attractor dynamics emerge naturally in a computational model of a patch of primary visual cortex endowed with realistic plasticity (at both feedforward and lateral synapses) and mutual inhibition. When exposed to natural images (but not random pixels), the model spontaneously arranges into competitive groups of reciprocally connected, similarly tuned neurons, while developing realistic, orientation-selective receptive fields. Importantly, the same groups are observed in both stimulus-evoked and spontaneous (stimulus-absent) activity. The resulting network is inhibition-stabilized and exhibits fast, non-persistent attractor dynamics. Our results suggest that realistic plasticity, mutual inhibition and natural stimuli are jointly necessary and sufficient to generate attractor dynamics in primary sensory cortex. PMID:27796298

  8. Calibration of hyperelastic material properties of the human lumbar intervertebral disc under fast dynamic compressive loads.

    PubMed

    Wagnac, Eric; Arnoux, Pierre-Jean; Garo, Anaïs; El-Rich, Marwan; Aubin, Carl-Eric

    2011-10-01

    Under fast dynamic loading conditions (e.g. high-energy impact), the load rate dependency of the intervertebral disc (IVD) material properties may play a crucial role in the biomechanics of spinal trauma. However, most finite element models (FEM) of dynamic spinal trauma uses material properties derived from quasi-static experiments, thus neglecting this load rate dependency. The aim of this study was to identify hyperelastic material properties that ensure a more biofidelic simulation of the IVD under a fast dynamic compressive load. A hyperelastic material law based on a first-order Mooney-Rivlin formulation was implemented in a detailed FEM of a L2-L3 functional spinal unit (FSU) to represent the mechanical behavior of the IVD. Bony structures were modeled using an elasto-plastic Johnson-Cook material law that simulates bone fracture while ligaments were governed by a viscoelastic material law. To mimic experimental studies performed in fast dynamic compression, a compressive loading velocity of 1 m/s was applied to the superior half of L2, while the inferior half of L3 was fixed. An exploratory technique was used to simulate dynamic compression of the FSU using 34 sets of hyperelastic material constants randomly selected using an optimal Latin hypercube algorithm and a set of material constants derived from quasi-static experiments. Selection or rejection of the sets of material constants was based on compressive stiffness and failure parameters criteria measured experimentally. The two simulations performed with calibrated hyperelastic constants resulted in nonlinear load-displacement curves with compressive stiffness (7335 and 7079 N/mm), load (12,488 and 12,473 N), displacement (1.95 and 2.09 mm) and energy at failure (13.5 and 14.7 J) in agreement with experimental results (6551 ± 2017 N/mm, 12,411 ± 829 N, 2.1 ± 0.2 mm and 13.0 ± 1.5 J respectively). The fracture pattern and location also agreed with experimental results. The simulation performed with

  9. Suppression of chaos at slow variables by rapidly mixing fast dynamics through linear energy-preserving coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramov, R. V.

    2011-12-01

    Chaotic multiscale dynamical systems are common in many areas of science, one of the examples being the interaction of the low-frequency dynamics in the atmosphere with the fast turbulent weather dynamics. One of the key questions about chaotic multiscale systems is how the fast dynamics affects chaos at the slow variables, and, therefore, impacts uncertainty and predictability of the slow dynamics. Here we demonstrate that the linear slow-fast coupling with the total energy conservation property promotes the suppression of chaos at the slow variables through the rapid mixing at the fast variables, both theoretically and through numerical simulations. A suitable mathematical framework is developed, connecting the slow dynamics on the tangent subspaces to the infinite-time linear response of the mean state to a constant external forcing at the fast variables. Additionally, it is shown that the uncoupled dynamics for the slow variables may remain chaotic while the complete multiscale system loses chaos and becomes completely predictable at the slow variables through increasing chaos and turbulence at the fast variables. This result contradicts the common sense intuition, where, naturally, one would think that coupling a slow weakly chaotic system with another much faster and much stronger chaotic system would result in general increase of chaos at the slow variables.

  10. Analysis of the Ultra-fast Switching Dynamics in a Hybrid MOSFET/Driver

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, T.; Burkhart, C.; /SLAC

    2011-08-17

    The turn-on dynamics of a power MOSFET during ultra-fast, {approx} ns, switching are discussed in this paper. The testing was performed using a custom hybrid MOSFET/Driver module, which was fabricated by directly assembling die-form components, power MOSFET and drivers, on a printed circuit board. By using die-form components, the hybrid approach substantially reduces parasitic inductance, which facilitates ultra-fast switching. The measured turn on time of the hybrid module with a resistive load is 1.2 ns with an applied voltage of 1000 V and drain current of 33 A. Detailed analysis of the switching waveforms reveals that switching behavior must be interpreted differently in the ultra-fast regime. For example, the gate threshold voltage to turn on the device is observed to increase as the switching time decreases. Further analysis and simulation of MOSFET switching behavior shows that the minimum turn on time scales with the product of the drain-source on resistance and drain-source capacitance, R{sub DS(on)}C{sub OSS}. This information will be useful in power MOSFET selection and gate driver design for ultra-fast switching applications.

  11. Impacts of Antarctic fast dynamics on sea-level projections and coastal flood defense

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Tony E.; Bakker, Alexander M. R.; Keller, Klaus

    2017-09-01

    Strategies to manage the risks posed by future sea-level rise hinge on a sound characterization of the inherent uncertainties. One of the major uncertainties is the possible rapid disintegration of large fractions of the Antarctic ice sheet in response to rising global temperatures. This could potentially lead to several meters of sea-level rise during the next few centuries. Previous studies have typically been silent on two coupled questions: (i) What are probabilistic estimates of this "fast dynamics" contribution to sea-level rise? (ii) What are the implications for strategies to manage coastal flooding risks? Here, we present probabilistic hindcasts and projections of sea-level rise to 2100. The fast dynamics mechanism is approximated by a simple parameterization, designed to allow for a careful quantification of the uncertainty in its contribution to sea-level rise. We estimate that global temperature increases ranging from 1.9 to 3.1{\\deg}C coincide with fast Antarctic disintegration, and these contributions account for sea-level rise of 21-74 centimeters this century (5-95% range, Representative Concentration Pathway 8.5). We use a simple cost-benefit analysis of coastal defense to demonstrate in a didactic exercise how neglecting this mechanism and associated uncertainty can (i) lead to strategies which fall sizably short of protection targets and (ii) increase the expected net costs.

  12. Dynamic polarizability of tungsten atoms reconstructed from fast electrical explosion of fine wires in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkisov, G. S.; Rosenthal, S. E.; Struve, K. W.

    2016-10-01

    Nanosecond electrical explosion of fine metal wires in vacuum generates calibrated, radially expanded gas cylinders of metal atoms surrounded by a low-density fast expanding plasma corona. An integrated-phase technique, based on laser interferometry, provides the dynamic dipole polarizability of metal atoms. These data were previously unavailable for tungsten atoms. An extremely high melting temperature and significant premelt electronic emission make these measurements particularly complicated for this refractory metal. Most attempts to vaporize tungsten wire by electrical current pulse result in the disintegration of the sample into macro- and microfragments. However, application of a very fast-rising current, ˜1 kA /ns , can vaporize a thin 10-15 μm-diameter tungsten wire and generate a calibrated gas-plasma cylinder. Adding a dielectric coating to the wire leads to increased energy deposition to the wire core and a reduction of the surrounding plasma corona. Employing the integrated-phase technique on a fast-exploding coated tungsten wire, we find that the dynamic dipole polarizability of tungsten atoms at a wavelength of 532 nm equals 15 ±1.3 Å3 .

  13. Adaptive Movement Compensation for In Vivo Imaging of Fast Cellular Dynamics within a Moving Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Dufour, Hugues; De Koninck, Paul; De Koninck, Yves; Côté, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    In vivo non-linear optical microscopy has been essential to advance our knowledge of how intact biological systems work. It has been particularly enabling to decipher fast spatiotemporal cellular dynamics in neural networks. The power of the technique stems from its optical sectioning capability that in turn also limits its application to essentially immobile tissue. Only tissue not affected by movement or in which movement can be physically constrained can be imaged fast enough to conduct functional studies at high temporal resolution. Here, we show dynamic two-photon Ca2+ imaging in the spinal cord of a living rat at millisecond time scale, free of motion artifacts using an optical stabilization system. We describe a fast, non-contact adaptive movement compensation approach, applicable to rough and weakly reflective surfaces, allowing real-time functional imaging from intrinsically moving tissue in live animals. The strategy involves enslaving the position of the microscope objective to that of the tissue surface in real-time through optical monitoring and a closed feedback loop. The performance of the system allows for efficient image locking even in conditions of random or irregular movements. PMID:21629702

  14. Dynamics of intracellular ionic concentrations in single living cells using videomicrofluorometry: application to pHi variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viallet, Pierre M.; Yassine, Mohamed; Salmon, Jean-Marie; Vigo, Jean

    1996-01-01

    The intracellular concentration of ions such as H+, Mg2+, Ca2+, is known to monitor the activity of many fundamental enzymes. Furthermore these ions are generally considered as intracellular messengers involved in the transduction of extracellular signals. Recent technological progress, occulting the physicochemical properties of the probe, led to the feeling that accurate data on microvolumes are instantly accessible. Unfortunately fluorescent probes are supposed to fill up conflicting requirements for ionic affinity, absence of fading and intracellular calibration. Such a situation generally precludes the use of the simplest methods of data acquisition and treatment. This paper is based on the use of microspectrofluorometry, resolution of single cell complex fluorescence spectrum, and videomicrofluorometry. The methods of data handling allow us to demonstrate that most of the problems met in intracellular calibration come from the fighting of cells against the modification of the extracellular pH. Using these techniques allows us to restrict the need of comparison between results in cuvettes and intracellular results to the physiological pH range. A consequence of such an approach is that the effect with time of known concentrations of amiloride and nigericin on pHi became accessible. Data is presented allowing us to get information on the behavior of the ionic channels and/or cation/H+ exchangers involved in the pHi regulation. Such a method leads the way to direct investigations and monitoring of the different processes of regulation of the intracellular ionic concentrations in different cell lines at the level of single cells. Using different specific modifiers (activators or blocking agents) and convenient specific fluorescent probes, the efficiency of such pathways is expected to be checked at will. Compared to the patch clamp techniques, the method can be extended to the study of pathways located on the inner cell membranes.

  15. BEAM DYNAMICS ANALYSIS FOR THE ULTRA-FAST KICKER IN CIRCULAR COOLER RING OF JLEIC

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Yulu; Wang, Haipeng; Rimmer, Robert A.; Wang, Shaoheng

    2016-05-01

    An ultra-fast kicker system consisting of four quarter wavelength resonator based deflecting cavities was developed that simultaneously resonates at 10 subharmonic modes of the 476.3MHz bunch repetition frequency. Thus every 10th bunch in the bunch train will experience a transverse kick while all the other bunches are undisturbed. This fast kicker is being developed for the Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) based electron Circular Cooler Ring (CCR) in the proposed Jefferson Lab Electron Ion Collider (JLEIC, previously MEIC). The electron bunches can be reused 10-30 turns thus the beam current in the ERL can be reduced to 1/10 - 1/30 (150mA - 50mA) of the cooling bunch current (1.5A). In this paper, several methods to synthesize such a kicker waveform and the comparison made by the beam dynamics tracking in Elegant will be discussed.

  16. Dynamical programming based turbulence velocimetry for fast visible imaging of tokamak plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Santanu; Zushi, H.; Nishino, N.; Mishra, K.; Onchi, T.; Kuzmin, A.; Nagashima, Y.; Hanada, K.; Nakamura, K.; Idei, H.; Hasegawa, M.; Fujisawa, A.

    2015-03-01

    An orthogonal dynamic programming (ODP) based particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique is developed to measure the time resolved flow field of the fluctuating structures at the plasma edge and scrape off layer (SOL) of tokamaks. This non-intrusive technique can provide two dimensional velocity fields at high spatial and temporal resolution from a fast framing image sequence and hence can provide better insights into plasma flow as compared to conventional probe measurements. Applicability of the technique is tested with simulated image pairs. Finally, it is applied to tangential fast visible images of QUEST plasma to estimate the SOL flow in inboard poloidal null-natural divertor configuration. This technique is also applied to investigate the intricate features of the core of the run-away dominated phase following the injection of a large amount of neutrals in the target Ohmic plasma. Development of the ODP-PIV code and its applicability on actual plasma images is reported.

  17. Imaging Subcellular Dynamics with Fast and Light-Efficient Volumetrically Parallelized Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Kevin M.; Roudot, Philippe; Welf, Erik S.; Pohlkamp, Theresa; Garrelts, Gerard; Herz, Joachim; Fiolka, Reto

    2017-01-01

    In fluorescence microscopy, the serial acquisition of 2D images to form a 3D volume limits the maximum imaging speed. This is particularly evident when imaging adherent cells in a light-sheet fluorescence microscopy format, as their elongated morphologies require ~200 image planes per image volume. Here, by illuminating the specimen with three light-sheets, each independently detected, we present a light-efficient, crosstalk free, and volumetrically parallelized 3D microscopy technique that is optimized for high-speed (up to 14 Hz) subcellular (300 nm lateral, 600 nm axial resolution) imaging of adherent cells. We demonstrate 3D imaging of intracellular processes, including cytoskeletal dynamics in single cell migration and collective wound healing for 1500 and 1000 time points, respectively. Further, we capture rapid biological processes, including trafficking of early endosomes with velocities exceeding 10 microns per second and calcium signaling in primary neurons. PMID:28944279

  18. Towards denoising XMCD movies of fast magnetization dynamics using extended Kalman filter.

    PubMed

    Kopp, M; Harmeling, S; Schütz, G; Schölkopf, B; Fähnle, M

    2015-01-01

    The Kalman filter is a well-established approach to get information on the time-dependent state of a system from noisy observations. It was developed in the context of the Apollo project to see the deviation of the true trajectory of a rocket from the desired trajectory. Afterwards it was applied to many different systems with small numbers of components of the respective state vector (typically about 10). In all cases the equation of motion for the state vector was known exactly. The fast dissipative magnetization dynamics is often investigated by x-ray magnetic circular dichroism movies (XMCD movies), which are often very noisy. In this situation the number of components of the state vector is extremely large (about 10(5)), and the equation of motion for the dissipative magnetization dynamics (especially the values of the material parameters of this equation) is not well known. In the present paper it is shown by theoretical considerations that - nevertheless - there is no principle problem for the use of the Kalman filter to denoise XMCD movies of fast dissipative magnetization dynamics.

  19. A mathematical framework for critical transitions: Bifurcations, fast-slow systems and stochastic dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuehn, Christian

    2011-06-01

    Bifurcations can cause dynamical systems with slowly varying parameters to transition to far-away attractors. The terms “critical transition” or “tipping point” have been used to describe this situation. Critical transitions have been observed in an astonishingly diverse set of applications from ecosystems and climate change to medicine and finance. The main goal of this paper is to give an overview which standard mathematical theories can be applied to critical transitions. We shall focus on early-warning signs that have been suggested to predict critical transitions and point out what mathematical theory can provide in this context. Starting from classical bifurcation theory and incorporating multiple time scale dynamics one can give a detailed analysis of local bifurcations that induce critical transitions. We suggest that the mathematical theory of fast-slow systems provides a natural definition of critical transitions. Since noise often plays a crucial role near critical transitions the next step is to consider stochastic fast-slow systems. The interplay between sample path techniques, partial differential equations and random dynamical systems is highlighted. Each viewpoint provides potential early-warning signs for critical transitions. Since increasing variance has been suggested as an early-warning sign we examine it in the context of normal forms analytically, numerically and geometrically; we also consider autocorrelation numerically. Hence we demonstrate the applicability of early-warning signs for generic models. We end with suggestions for future directions of the theory.

  20. Real-time monitoring the spatiotemporal dynamics of intracellular cGMP in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Held, Kara F; Dostmann, Wolfgang R

    2013-01-01

    Real-time and noninvasive imaging of intracellular second messengers in mammalian cells, while -preserving their in vivo phenotype, requires biosensors of exquisite constitution. Here we provide the methodology for utilizing the single wavelength cGMP-biosensor δ-FlincG in aortic vascular smooth muscle cells.

  1. Numerical continuation of canard orbits in slow-fast dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desroches, M.; Krauskopf, B.; Osinga, H. M.

    2010-03-01

    A trajectory of a system with two clearly separated time scales generally consists of fast segments (or jumps) followed by slow segments where the trajectory follows an attracting part of a slow manifold. The switch back to fast dynamics typically occurs when the trajectory passes a fold with respect to a fast direction. A special role is played by trajectories known as canard orbits, which do not jump at a fold but, instead, follow a repelling slow manifold for some time. We concentrate here on the case of a slow-fast system with two slow and one fast variable, where canard orbits arise geometrically as intersection curves of two-dimensional attracting and repelling slow manifolds. Canard orbits are intimately related to the dynamics near special points known as folded singularities, which in turn have been shown to explain small-amplitude oscillations that can be found as part of so-called mixed-mode oscillations. In this paper we present a numerical method to detect and then follow branches of canard orbits in a system parameter. More specifically, we define well-posed two-point boundary value problems (BVPs) that represent orbit segments on the slow manifolds, and we continue their solution families with the package AUTO. In this way, we are able to deal effectively with the numerical challenge of strong attraction to and strong repulsion from the slow manifolds. Canard orbits are detected as the transverse intersection points of the curves along which attracting and repelling slow manifolds intersect a suitable section (near a folded node). These intersection points correspond to a unique pair of orbits segments, one on the attracting and one on the repelling slow manifold. After concatenation of the respective pairs of orbit segments, all detected canard orbits are represented as solutions of a single BVP, which allows us to continue them in system parameters. We demonstrate with two examples—the self-coupled FitzHugh-Nagumo system and a three

  2. Intracellular accumulation dynamics and fate of zinc ions in alveolar epithelial cells exposed to airborne ZnO nanoparticles at the air–liquid interface

    DOE PAGES

    Mihai, Cosmin; Chrisler, William B.; Xie, Yumei; ...

    2013-12-02

    Airborne nanoparticles (NPs) that enter the respiratory tract are likely to reach the alveolar region. Accumulating observations support a role for zinc oxide (ZnO) NP dissolution in toxicity, but the majority of in vitro studies were conducted in cells exposed to NPs in growth media, where large doses of dissolved ions are shed into the exposure solution. To determine the precise intracellular accumulation dynamics and fate of zinc ions (Zn2+) shed by airborne NPs in the cellular environment, we exposed alveolar epithelial cells to aerosolized NPs at the air-liquid interface (ALI). Using a fluorescent indicator for Zn2+, together with organelle-specificmore » fluorescent proteins, we quantified Zn2+ in single cells and organelles over time. We found that at the ALI, intracellular Zn2+ values peaked 3 h post exposure and decayed to normal values by 12 h, while in submersed cultures, intracellular Zn2+ values continued to increase over time. The lowest toxic NP dose at the ALI generated peak intracellular Zn2+ values that were nearly 3 folds lower than the peak values generated by the lowest toxic dose of NPs in submersed cultures, and 8 folds lower than the peak values generated by the lowest toxic dose of ZnSO4 or Zn2+. At the ALI, the majority of intracellular Zn2+ was found in endosomes and lysosomes as early as 1 h post exposure. In contrast, the majority of intracellular Zn2+ following exposures to ZnSO4 was found in other larger vesicles, with less than 10% in endosomes and lysosomes. In conclusion, together, our observations indicate that low but critical levels of intracellular Zn2+ have to be reached, concentrated specifically in endosomes and lysosomes, for toxicity to occur, and point to the focal dissolution of the NPs in the cellular environment and the accumulation of the ions specifically in endosomes and lysosomes as the processes underlying the potent toxicity of airborne ZnO NPs.« less

  3. Intracellular accumulation dynamics and fate of zinc ions in alveolar epithelial cells exposed to airborne ZnO nanoparticles at the air-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Mihai, Cosmin; Chrisler, William B; Xie, Yumei; Hu, Dehong; Szymanski, Craig J; Tolic, Ana; Klein, Jessica A; Smith, Jordan N; Tarasevich, Barbara J; Orr, Galya

    2015-02-01

    Airborne nanoparticles (NPs) that enter the respiratory tract are likely to reach the alveolar region. Accumulating observations support a role for zinc oxide (ZnO) NP dissolution in toxicity, but the majority of in-vitro studies were conducted in cells exposed to NPs in growth media, where large doses of dissolved ions are shed into the exposure solution. To determine the precise intracellular accumulation dynamics and fate of zinc ions (Zn(2+)) shed by airborne NPs in the cellular environment, we exposed alveolar epithelial cells to aerosolized NPs at the air-liquid interface (ALI). Using a fluorescent indicator for Zn(2+), together with organelle-specific fluorescent proteins, we quantified Zn(2+) in single cells and organelles over time. We found that at the ALI, intracellular Zn(2+) values peaked 3 h post exposure and decayed to normal values by 12 h, while in submerged cultures, intracellular Zn(2+) values continued to increase over time. The lowest toxic NP dose at the ALI generated peak intracellular Zn(2+) values that were nearly three-folds lower than the peak values generated by the lowest toxic dose of NPs in submerged cultures, and eight-folds lower than the peak values generated by the lowest toxic dose of ZnSO4 or Zn(2+). At the ALI, the majority of intracellular Zn(2+) was found in endosomes and lysosomes as early as 1 h post exposure. In contrast, the majority of intracellular Zn(2+) following exposures to ZnSO4 was found in other larger vesicles, with less than 10% in endosomes and lysosomes. Together, our observations indicate that low but critical levels of intracellular Zn(2+) have to be reached, concentrated specifically in endosomes and lysosomes, for toxicity to occur, and point to the focal dissolution of the NPs in the cellular environment and the accumulation of the ions specifically in endosomes and lysosomes as the processes underlying the potent toxicity of airborne ZnO NPs.

  4. Intracellular accumulation dynamics and fate of zinc ions in alveolar epithelial cells exposed to airborne ZnO nanoparticles at the air–liquid interface

    SciTech Connect

    Mihai, Cosmin; Chrisler, William B.; Xie, Yumei; Hu, Dehong; Szymanski, Craig J.; Tolic, Ana; Klein, Jessica A.; Smith, Jordan N.; Tarasevich, Barbara J.; Orr, Galya

    2013-12-02

    Airborne nanoparticles (NPs) that enter the respiratory tract are likely to reach the alveolar region. Accumulating observations support a role for zinc oxide (ZnO) NP dissolution in toxicity, but the majority of in vitro studies were conducted in cells exposed to NPs in growth media, where large doses of dissolved ions are shed into the exposure solution. To determine the precise intracellular accumulation dynamics and fate of zinc ions (Zn2+) shed by airborne NPs in the cellular environment, we exposed alveolar epithelial cells to aerosolized NPs at the air-liquid interface (ALI). Using a fluorescent indicator for Zn2+, together with organelle-specific fluorescent proteins, we quantified Zn2+ in single cells and organelles over time. We found that at the ALI, intracellular Zn2+ values peaked 3 h post exposure and decayed to normal values by 12 h, while in submersed cultures, intracellular Zn2+ values continued to increase over time. The lowest toxic NP dose at the ALI generated peak intracellular Zn2+ values that were nearly 3 folds lower than the peak values generated by the lowest toxic dose of NPs in submersed cultures, and 8 folds lower than the peak values generated by the lowest toxic dose of ZnSO4 or Zn2+. At the ALI, the majority of intracellular Zn2+ was found in endosomes and lysosomes as early as 1 h post exposure. In contrast, the majority of intracellular Zn2+ following exposures to ZnSO4 was found in other larger vesicles, with less than 10% in endosomes and lysosomes. In conclusion, together, our observations indicate that low but critical levels of intracellular Zn2+ have to be reached, concentrated specifically in endosomes and lysosomes, for toxicity to occur, and point to the focal dissolution of the NPs in the cellular environment and the accumulation of the ions specifically in endosomes and lysosomes as the processes

  5. Combined anterograde tracing with biotinylated dextran-amine, retrograde tracing with fast blue and intracellular filling of neurons with lucifer yellow: an electron microscopic method.

    PubMed

    Jorritsma-Byham, B; Witter, M P; Wouterlood, F G

    1994-06-01

    In order to determine the presence of synaptic connectivity between fibres originating from a specific source and neurones with a known morphology and known fibre projection, we have introduced a method for electron microscopy that combines three techniques: retrograde fluorescent tracing, anterograde tracing using biotinylated dextran-amine and intracellular injection of Lucifer Yellow (LY) in lightly fixed brain slices. Neurones in the rat entorhinal cortex that project to the infralimbic cortex and that might be in synaptic contact with fibres originating in the dorsal subiculum served as a model. After surgical application of the tracers and a survival period enabling transport, the brain was fixed and vibratome slices 300 microns thick were prepared in which retrogradely labelled cells were intracellularly injected with LY. This substance and the transported biotinylated dextran-amine were converted into different electron-dense labels. First, LY immunocytochemistry was conducted, then followed by silver-gold enhancement of the immunoprecipitate. Subsequently, the tissue sections were treated with an avidin-biotin-horseradish peroxidase complex and subjected to a diaminobenzidine-peroxide reaction. This protocol resulted in labelling of biotinylated dextran-amine-positive fibres and terminals that could easily be differentiated from the LY-positive neuronal elements and also showed well preserved ultrastructural detail.

  6. Fast optical cooling of a nanomechanical cantilever by a dynamical Stark-shift gate.

    PubMed

    Yan, Leilei; Zhang, Jian-Qi; Zhang, Shuo; Feng, Mang

    2015-10-12

    The efficient cooling of nanomechanical resonators is essential to exploration of quantum properties of the macroscopic or mesoscopic systems. We propose such a laser-cooling scheme for a nanomechanical cantilever, which works even for the low-frequency mechanical mode and under weak cooling lasers. The cantilever is coupled by a diamond nitrogen-vacancy center under a strong magnetic field gradient and the cooling is assisted by a dynamical Stark-shift gate. Our scheme can effectively enhance the desired cooling efficiency by avoiding the off-resonant and undesired carrier transitions, and thereby cool the cantilever down to the vicinity of the vibrational ground state in a fast fashion.

  7. Fast optical cooling of a nanomechanical cantilever by a dynamical Stark-shift gate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Leilei; Zhang, Jian-Qi; Zhang, Shuo; Feng, Mang

    2015-10-01

    The efficient cooling of nanomechanical resonators is essential to exploration of quantum properties of the macroscopic or mesoscopic systems. We propose such a laser-cooling scheme for a nanomechanical cantilever, which works even for the low-frequency mechanical mode and under weak cooling lasers. The cantilever is coupled by a diamond nitrogen-vacancy center under a strong magnetic field gradient and the cooling is assisted by a dynamical Stark-shift gate. Our scheme can effectively enhance the desired cooling efficiency by avoiding the off-resonant and undesired carrier transitions, and thereby cool the cantilever down to the vicinity of the vibrational ground state in a fast fashion.

  8. Dynamics of dust-free cavities behind fast projectiles in a dusty plasma under microgravity conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Caliebe, D.; Arp, O.; Piel, A.

    2011-07-15

    The penetration of a dusty plasma by fast charged projectiles is studied under microgravity conditions. The mass and charge of the projectiles are larger than those of the target particles. A projectile generates a dust-free cavity in its wake, whose shape strongly depends on the projectile velocity. The faster the projectile the more elongated becomes the cavity while its cross-section decreases. The opening time of the cavity is found independent of the projectile velocity. For supersonic projectiles, the dynamics of the cavity can be decomposed into an initial impulse and a subsequent elastic response that can be modeled by a damped harmonic oscillator.

  9. Fast methods incorporating direct elliptic solvers for nonlinear applications in fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, E. D.

    1977-01-01

    Semidirect methods are discussed, their present role, as well as some developments for their application in computational fluid dynamics. A semidirect method is a computational scheme that uses a fast, direct, elliptic solver as the driving algorithm for the iterative solution of finite difference equations. Specific subtopics include: (1) direct Cauchy Riemann solvers for first order elliptic equations; (2) application of the semidirect method to the mixed elliptic hyperbolic problem of steady, inviscid transonic flow; and (3) the treatment of interior conditions, such as those on an airfoil or wing, in semidirect methods.

  10. Ultra-fast dynamic compression technique to study kinetics of phase transformations in Bismuth

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R F; Kane, J O; Eggert, J H; Saculla, M D; Jankowski, A F; Bastea, M; Hicks, D G; Collins, G W

    2007-12-28

    Pre-heated Bi was ramp compressed within 30 ns to a peak stress of {approx}11 GPa to explore structural phase transformation kinetics under dynamic loading conditions. Under these ultra-fast compression time-scales the equilibrium Bi I-II phase boundary is overpressurized by {Delta}P {approx} 0.8 GPa. {Delta}P is observed to increase logarithmically with strain rate, {var_epsilon}, above 10{sup 6} s{sup -1}. Estimates from a kinetics model predict that the Bi I phase is fully transformed within 3 ns.

  11. Role of temperature-dependent spin model parameters in ultra-fast magnetization dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deák, A.; Hinzke, D.; Szunyogh, L.; Nowak, U.

    2017-08-01

    In the spirit of multi-scale modelling magnetization dynamics at elevated temperature is often simulated in terms of a spin model where the model parameters are derived from first principles. While these parameters are mostly assumed temperature-independent and thermal properties arise from spin fluctuations only, other scenarios are also possible. Choosing bcc Fe as an example, we investigate the influence of different kinds of model assumptions on ultra-fast spin dynamics, where following a femtosecond laser pulse, a sample is demagnetized due to a sudden rise of the electron temperature. While different model assumptions do not affect the simulational results qualitatively, their details do depend on the nature of the modelling.

  12. Intracellular ROS

    PubMed Central

    Leshem, Yehoram

    2007-01-01

    Intracellular localization of stress induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) has emerged as an important aspect towards understanding of cellular responses to environmental stimuli. Our recent study published in the PNAS (103:18008–13)1 shows that NaCl-induced ROS appear within endosomes on the way to tonoplast as part of the vacuolar vesicle trafficking. In addition to showing ROS damage to the tonoplast, this finding may shed light upon recently reported aspects of root water relations during salt stress, suggesting a new signaling role for intracellular ROS in Arabidopsis root cells, during salt stress: ROS that are compartmentalized in endosomes are delivered by the vacuolar vesicle trafficking pathway to the tonoplast, resulting in oxidative gating of TIPs water channels. The closure of the tonoplast aquaporins contributes to the observed reduction in root hydraulic conductivity during salt stress. PMID:19704741

  13. A surface ice module for wind turbine dynamic response simulation using FAST

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Bingbin; Karr, Dale G.; Song, Huimin; Sirnivas, Senu

    2016-06-03

    It is a fact that developing offshore wind energy has become more and more serious worldwide in recent years. Many of the promising offshore wind farm locations are in cold regions that may have ice cover during wintertime. The challenge of possible ice loads on offshore wind turbines raises the demand of modeling capacity of dynamic wind turbine response under the joint action of ice, wind, wave, and current. The simulation software FAST is an open source computer-aided engineering (CAE) package maintained by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. In this paper, a new module of FAST for assessing the dynamic response of offshore wind turbines subjected to ice forcing is presented. In the ice module, several models are presented which involve both prescribed forcing and coupled response. For conditions in which the ice forcing is essentially decoupled from the structural response, ice forces are established from existing models for brittle and ductile ice failure. For conditions in which the ice failure and the structural response are coupled, such as lock-in conditions, a rate-dependent ice model is described, which is developed in conjunction with a new modularization framework for FAST. In this paper, analytical ice mechanics models are presented that incorporate ice floe forcing, deformation, and failure. For lower speeds, forces slowly build until the ice strength is reached and ice fails resulting in a quasi-static condition. For intermediate speeds, the ice failure can be coupled with the structural response and resulting in coinciding periods of the ice failure and the structural response. A third regime occurs at high speeds of encounter in which brittle fracturing of the ice feature occurs in a random pattern, which results in a random vibration excitation of the structure. An example wind turbine response is simulated under ice loading of each of the presented models. This module adds to FAST the capabilities for analyzing the response of wind

  14. A surface ice module for wind turbine dynamic response simulation using FAST

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Bingbin; Karr, Dale G.; Song, Huimin; Sirnivas, Senu

    2016-06-03

    It is a fact that developing offshore wind energy has become more and more serious worldwide in recent years. Many of the promising offshore wind farm locations are in cold regions that may have ice cover during wintertime. The challenge of possible ice loads on offshore wind turbines raises the demand of modeling capacity of dynamic wind turbine response under the joint action of ice, wind, wave, and current. The simulation software FAST is an open source computer-aided engineering (CAE) package maintained by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. In this paper, a new module of FAST for assessing the dynamic response of offshore wind turbines subjected to ice forcing is presented. In the ice module, several models are presented which involve both prescribed forcing and coupled response. For conditions in which the ice forcing is essentially decoupled from the structural response, ice forces are established from existing models for brittle and ductile ice failure. For conditions in which the ice failure and the structural response are coupled, such as lock-in conditions, a rate-dependent ice model is described, which is developed in conjunction with a new modularization framework for FAST. In this paper, analytical ice mechanics models are presented that incorporate ice floe forcing, deformation, and failure. For lower speeds, forces slowly build until the ice strength is reached and ice fails resulting in a quasi-static condition. For intermediate speeds, the ice failure can be coupled with the structural response and resulting in coinciding periods of the ice failure and the structural response. A third regime occurs at high speeds of encounter in which brittle fracturing of the ice feature occurs in a random pattern, which results in a random vibration excitation of the structure. An example wind turbine response is simulated under ice loading of each of the presented models. This module adds to FAST the capabilities for analyzing the response of wind

  15. Earthquake signatures from fast slip and dynamic fracture propagation: state of the art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, W. A.; Rowe, C. D.

    2014-12-01

    Earthquakes are dynamic slip events that propagate along fault surfaces, radiating seismic waves. The majority of energy released is expended in heating and breaking of rocks along the fault. The fracture damage is linked to transient stress conditions at the rupture tip which only exist during dynamic slip, while the frictional heating depends on high velocity slip behind the rupture tip to generate heat energy faster than it can be dissipated, causing transient local temperature rise. One might think that extensive damage and alteration would result, creating an unambiguous geological fingerprint, but in fact, there are few unequivocal indicators for past seismic slip. In 1999, the rare fault rock pseudotachylyte (melt formed when frictional heating exceeds the solidus) was the only accepted evidence (Cowan, 1999). Recently, more indicators of fossilized earthquakes have been proposed. We define "evidence of past earthquakes" as evidence of either fast fault slip (at rates that only occur during earthquakes) or evidence of the propagation of dynamic rupture. We first summarize advances made in identifying evidence in the rock record of fast slip. Much of the work during the past 15 years has focused on integrating carefully controlled laboratory friction experiments, and constraints from numerical modeling, with field observations in an attempt to re-create structures observed in fault rocks and then relate these to the specific boundary conditions required to form them in the laboratory. This approach has yielded a number of advances in identifying textures and geochemical signatures diagnostic of fast slip via temperature rises which may not reach the bulk melting temperature of the fault rocks. Next, we focus on damage near the tip of shear ruptures propagating at velocities characteristic of earthquakes, an approach which has received less attention in the geological literature than fast slip but is equally diagnostic. Finally, we try to frame some of the

  16. Effects of fatigue and reduced intracellular pH on segment dynamics in 'isometric' relaxation of frog muscle fibres.

    PubMed Central

    Curtin, N A; Edman, K A

    1989-01-01

    1. Longitudinal movements of marked segments of single fibres from the anterior tibialis muscle were recorded during tetanus and relaxation under isometric (fixed-end) conditions. 2. During relaxation, shortening and lengthening of different segments occurred simultaneously, starting at about the same time as the end of the linear fall of force (shoulder on the force record). 3. Variations in intracellular pH, measured with pH-sensitive microelectrodes, along the length of fibres were not statistically significant, and are unlikely to be responsible for the non-uniform behaviour of different segments. 4. As expected from earlier studies, both fatigue (produced by increasing tetanus duration or decreasing the time between tetani) and intracellular acidification (produced by raised extracellular CO2), reduced the tetanus force and prolonged the linear phase of force decline in relaxation. Each treatment delayed the start and markedly reduced the amount of segment movement in relaxation. 5. Fatigue and intracellular acidification have a smaller effect on force during stretching than on force produced under isometric conditions. This may contribute to making the segments behave in a more uniform way during relaxation under these conditions. 6. Changes in the Ca2+ uptake mechanisms are also discussed as possible causes for the changes in segment behaviour in relaxation. PMID:2600846

  17. The reversibility error method (REM): a new, dynamical fast indicator for planetary dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panichi, Federico; Goździewski, Krzyszof; Turchetti, Giorgio

    2017-06-01

    We describe the reversibility error method (REM) and its applications to planetary dynamics. REM is based on the time-reversibility analysis of the phase-space trajectories of conservative Hamiltonian systems. The round-off errors break the time reversibility and the displacement from the initial condition, occurring when we integrate it forward and backward for the same time interval, is related to the dynamical character of the trajectory. If the motion is chaotic, in the sense of non-zero maximal Lyapunov characteristic exponent (mLCE), then REM increases exponentially with time, as exp λt, while when the motion is regular (quasi-periodic), then REM increases as a power law in time, as tα, where α and λ are real coefficients. We compare the REM with a variant of mLCE, the mean exponential growth factor of nearby orbits. The test set includes the restricted three-body problem and five resonant planetary systems: HD 37124, Kepler-60, Kepler-36, Kepler-29 and Kepler-26. We found a very good agreement between the outcomes of these algorithms. Moreover, the numerical implementation of REM is astonishing simple, and is based on solid theoretical background. The REM requires only a symplectic and time-reversible (symmetric) integrator of the equations of motion. This method is also CPU efficient. It may be particularly useful for the dynamical analysis of multiple planetary systems in the Kepler sample, characterized by low-eccentricity orbits and relatively weak mutual interactions. As an interesting side result, we found a possible stable chaos occurrence in the Kepler-29 planetary system.

  18. Fast and stable redox reactions of MnO₂/CNT hybrid electrodes for dynamically stretchable pseudocapacitors.

    PubMed

    Gu, Taoli; Wei, Bingqing

    2015-07-21

    Pseudocapacitors, which are energy storage devices that take advantage of redox reactions to store electricity, have a different charge storage mechanism compared to lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) and electric double-layer capacitors (EDLCs), and they could realize further gains if they were used as stretchable power sources. The realization of dynamically stretchable pseudocapacitors and understanding of the underlying fundamentals of their mechanical-electrochemical relationship have become indispensable. We report herein the electrochemical performance of dynamically stretchable pseudocapacitors using buckled MnO2/CNT hybrid electrodes. The extremely small relaxation time constant of less than 0.15 s indicates a fast redox reaction at the MnO2/CNT hybrid electrodes, securing a stable electrochemical performance for the dynamically stretchable pseudocapacitors. This finding and the fundamental understanding gained from the pseudo-capacitive behavior coupled with mechanical deformation under a dynamic stretching mode would provide guidance to further improve their overall performance including a higher power density than LIBs, a higher energy density than EDLCs, and a long-life cycling stability. Most importantly, these results will potentially accelerate the applications of stretchable pseudocapacitors for flexible and biomedical electronics.

  19. Fast Dynamic Simulation-Based Small Signal Stability Assessment and Control

    SciTech Connect

    Acharya, Naresh; Baone, Chaitanya; Veda, Santosh; Dai, Jing; Chaudhuri, Nilanjan; Leonardi, Bruno; Sanches-Gasca, Juan; Diao, Ruisheng; Wu, Di; Huang, Zhenyu; Zhang, Yu; Jin, Shuangshuang; Zheng, Bin; Chen, Yousu

    2014-12-31

    Power grid planning and operation decisions are made based on simulation of the dynamic behavior of the system. Enabling substantial energy savings while increasing the reliability of the aging North American power grid through improved utilization of existing transmission assets hinges on the adoption of wide-area measurement systems (WAMS) for power system stabilization. However, adoption of WAMS alone will not suffice if the power system is to reach its full entitlement in stability and reliability. It is necessary to enhance predictability with "faster than real-time" dynamic simulations that will enable the dynamic stability margins, proactive real-time control, and improve grid resiliency to fast time-scale phenomena such as cascading network failures. Present-day dynamic simulations are performed only during offline planning studies, considering only worst case conditions such as summer peak, winter peak days, etc. With widespread deployment of renewable generation, controllable loads, energy storage devices and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles expected in the near future and greater integration of cyber infrastructure (communications, computation and control), monitoring and controlling the dynamic performance of the grid in real-time would become increasingly important. The state-of-the-art dynamic simulation tools have limited computational speed and are not suitable for real-time applications, given the large set of contingency conditions to be evaluated. These tools are optimized for best performance of single-processor computers, but the simulation is still several times slower than real-time due to its computational complexity. With recent significant advances in numerical methods and computational hardware, the expectations have been rising towards more efficient and faster techniques to be implemented in power system simulators. This is a natural expectation, given that the core solution algorithms of most commercial simulators were developed

  20. Fast Dynamical Coupling Enhances Frequency Adaptation of Oscillators for Robotic Locomotion Control

    PubMed Central

    Nachstedt, Timo; Tetzlaff, Christian; Manoonpong, Poramate

    2017-01-01

    Rhythmic neural signals serve as basis of many brain processes, in particular of locomotion control and generation of rhythmic movements. It has been found that specific neural circuits, named central pattern generators (CPGs), are able to autonomously produce such rhythmic activities. In order to tune, shape and coordinate the produced rhythmic activity, CPGs require sensory feedback, i.e., external signals. Nonlinear oscillators are a standard model of CPGs and are used in various robotic applications. A special class of nonlinear oscillators are adaptive frequency oscillators (AFOs). AFOs are able to adapt their frequency toward the frequency of an external periodic signal and to keep this learned frequency once the external signal vanishes. AFOs have been successfully used, for instance, for resonant tuning of robotic locomotion control. However, the choice of parameters for a standard AFO is characterized by a trade-off between the speed of the adaptation and its precision and, additionally, is strongly dependent on the range of frequencies the AFO is confronted with. As a result, AFOs are typically tuned such that they require a comparably long time for their adaptation. To overcome the problem, here, we improve the standard AFO by introducing a novel adaptation mechanism based on dynamical coupling strengths. The dynamical adaptation mechanism enhances both the speed and precision of the frequency adaptation. In contrast to standard AFOs, in this system, the interplay of dynamics on short and long time scales enables fast as well as precise adaptation of the oscillator for a wide range of frequencies. Amongst others, a very natural implementation of this mechanism is in terms of neural networks. The proposed system enables robotic applications which require fast retuning of locomotion control in order to react to environmental changes or conditions. PMID:28377710

  1. Fast dynamics of type I and grassy ELMs in JT-60U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, A.; Oyama, N.; Sakamoto, Y.; Kamada, Y.; Urano, H.; Kamiya, K.; Fujita, T.; Kubo, H.; Aiba, N.; JT-60 Team

    2009-11-01

    In order to understand the physics of the ELM trigger and determine the ELM size, the fast ELM dynamics of type I and grassy ELMs have been studied in JT-60U, using new fast diagnostics with high spatial and temporal resolutions such as a lithium beam probe (Δt ~ 0.5 ms) and a charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (Δt ~ 2.5 ms), which can measure the electron density and the ion temperature, respectively. The evolution of the ion pressure profile in the pedestal region has been evaluated for the first time by detailed edge profile measurements. Then, the dynamics of the density, the ion temperature and the ion pressure in the ELM cycle has been investigated. The co-rotating plasmas are compared with the counter (ctr)-rotating plasmas for the understanding of the toroidal rotation effects. Type I ELMs observed in co-rotating plasmas exhibit a larger and wider ELM affected area (Δnped/nped ~ 30%, radial extent >15 cm) than ctr-rotating plasmas (Δnped/nped ~ 20%, radial extent ~10 cm). Just before a type I ELM crash, the pedestal ion pressure and its maximum gradient in co-rotating plasmas are 20% and 12% higher than those in ctr-rotating plasmas, respectively. It is found that the radial extent of the ion pressure gradient at the pedestal region in co-rotating plasmas is 14% wider than that in ctr-rotating plasmas. The experimental results suggest that the ELM size is connected with the structure of the plasma pressure in the whole pedestal region. As for the dynamics of grassy ELMs, the collapse of density pedestal is smaller (<20%) and narrower (~5 cm) than those of type I ELMs, as observed in the collapse of the electron temperature pedestal. Thus, it is confirmed that both conductive and convective losses due to grassy ELMs are small.

  2. Intracellular carbonic anhydrase activity sensitizes cancer cell pH signaling to dynamic changes in CO2 partial pressure.

    PubMed

    Hulikova, Alzbeta; Aveyard, Nicholas; Harris, Adrian L; Vaughan-Jones, Richard D; Swietach, Pawel

    2014-09-12

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) enzymes catalyze the chemical equilibration among CO2, HCO3(-) and H(+). Intracellular CA (CAi) isoforms are present in certain types of cancer, and growing evidence suggests that low levels correlate with disease severity. However, their physiological role remains unclear. Cancer cell CAi activity, measured as cytoplasmic CO2 hydration rate (kf), ranged from high in colorectal HCT116 (∼2 s(-1)), bladder RT112 and colorectal HT29, moderate in fibrosarcoma HT1080 to negligible (i.e. spontaneous kf = 0.18 s(-1)) in cervical HeLa and breast MDA-MB-468 cells. CAi activity in cells correlated with CAII immunoreactivity and enzymatic activity in membrane-free lysates, suggesting that soluble CAII is an important intracellular isoform. CAi catalysis was not obligatory for supporting acid extrusion by H(+) efflux or HCO3(-) influx, nor for maintaining intracellular pH (pHi) uniformity. However, in the absence of CAi activity, acid loading from a highly alkaline pHi was rate-limited by HCO3(-) supply from spontaneous CO2 hydration. In solid tumors, time-dependence of blood flow can result in fluctuations of CO2 partial pressure (pCO2) that disturb cytoplasmic CO2-HCO3(-)-H(+) equilibrium. In cancer cells with high CAi activity, extracellular pCO2 fluctuations evoked faster and larger pHi oscillations. Functionally, these resulted in larger pH-dependent intracellular [Ca(2+)] oscillations and stronger inhibition of the mTORC1 pathway reported by S6 kinase phosphorylation. In contrast, the pHi of cells with low CAi activity was less responsive to pCO2 fluctuations. Such low pass filtering would "buffer" cancer cell pHi from non-steady-state extracellular pCO2. Thus, CAi activity determines the coupling between pCO2 (a function of tumor perfusion) and pHi (a potent modulator of cancer cell physiology). © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. A surface ice module for wind turbine dynamic response simulation using FAST

    DOE PAGES

    Yu, Bingbin; Karr, Dale G.; Song, Huimin; ...

    2016-06-03

    It is a fact that developing offshore wind energy has become more and more serious worldwide in recent years. Many of the promising offshore wind farm locations are in cold regions that may have ice cover during wintertime. The challenge of possible ice loads on offshore wind turbines raises the demand of modeling capacity of dynamic wind turbine response under the joint action of ice, wind, wave, and current. The simulation software FAST is an open source computer-aided engineering (CAE) package maintained by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. In this paper, a new module of FAST for assessing the dynamicmore » response of offshore wind turbines subjected to ice forcing is presented. In the ice module, several models are presented which involve both prescribed forcing and coupled response. For conditions in which the ice forcing is essentially decoupled from the structural response, ice forces are established from existing models for brittle and ductile ice failure. For conditions in which the ice failure and the structural response are coupled, such as lock-in conditions, a rate-dependent ice model is described, which is developed in conjunction with a new modularization framework for FAST. In this paper, analytical ice mechanics models are presented that incorporate ice floe forcing, deformation, and failure. For lower speeds, forces slowly build until the ice strength is reached and ice fails resulting in a quasi-static condition. For intermediate speeds, the ice failure can be coupled with the structural response and resulting in coinciding periods of the ice failure and the structural response. A third regime occurs at high speeds of encounter in which brittle fracturing of the ice feature occurs in a random pattern, which results in a random vibration excitation of the structure. An example wind turbine response is simulated under ice loading of each of the presented models. This module adds to FAST the capabilities for analyzing the response of wind

  4. A fast dynamic mode of the EF-G-bound ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Munro, James B; Altman, Roger B; Tung, Chang-Shung; Sanbonmatsu, Kevin Y; Blanchard, Scott C

    2010-01-01

    A key intermediate in translocation is an ‘unlocked state' of the pre-translocation ribosome in which the P-site tRNA adopts the P/E hybrid state, the L1 stalk domain closes and ribosomal subunits adopt a ratcheted configuration. Here, through two- and three-colour smFRET imaging from multiple structural perspectives, EF-G is shown to accelerate structural and kinetic pathways in the ribosome, leading to this transition. The EF-G-bound ribosome remains highly dynamic in nature, wherein, the unlocked state is transiently and reversibly formed. The P/E hybrid state is energetically favoured, but exchange with the classical P/P configuration persists; the L1 stalk adopts a fast dynamic mode characterized by rapid cycles of closure and opening. These data support a model in which P/E hybrid state formation, L1 stalk closure and subunit ratcheting are loosely coupled, independent processes that must converge to achieve the unlocked state. The highly dynamic nature of these motions, and their sensitivity to conformational and compositional changes in the ribosome, suggests that regulating the formation of this intermediate may present an effective avenue for translational control. PMID:20033061

  5. Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry analysis of dynamic serotonin reponses to acute escitalopram.

    PubMed

    Wood, Kevin M; Hashemi, Parastoo

    2013-05-15

    The treatment of depression with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, SSRIs, is important to study on a neurochemical level because of the therapeutic variability experienced by many depressed patients. We employed the rapid temporal capabilities of fast scan cyclic voltammetry at carbon fiber microelectrodes to study the effects of a popular SSRI, escitalopram (ESCIT), marketed as Lexapro, on serotonin in mice. We report novel, dynamic serotonin behavior after acute ESCIT doses, characterized by a rapid increase in stimulated serotonin release and a gradual rise in serotonin clearance over 120 min. Dynamic changes after acute SSRI doses may be clinically relevant to the pathology of increased depression or suicidality after onset of antidepressant treatment. Due to the short-term variability of serotonin responses after acute ESCIT, we outline difficulties in creating dose response curves and we suggest effective means to visualize dynamic serotonin changes after SSRIs. Correlating chemical serotonin patterns to clinical findings will allow a finer understanding of SSRI mechanisms, ultimately providing a platform for reducing therapeutic variability.

  6. Fast space-filling molecular graphics using dynamic partitioning among parallel processors.

    PubMed

    Gertner, B J; Whitnell, R M; Wilson, K R

    1991-09-01

    We present a novel algorithm for the efficient generation of high-quality space-filling molecular graphics that is particularly appropriate for the creation of the large number of images needed in the animation of molecular dynamics. Each atom of the molecule is represented by a sphere of an appropriate radius, and the image of the sphere is constructed pixel-by-pixel using a generalization of the lighting model proposed by Porter (Comp. Graphics 1978, 12, 282). The edges of the spheres are antialiased, and intersections between spheres are handled through a simple blending algorithm that provides very smooth edges. We have implemented this algorithm on a multiprocessor computer using a procedure that dynamically repartitions the effort among the processors based on the CPU time used by each processor to create the previous image. This dynamic reallocation among processors automatically maximizes efficiency in the face of both the changing nature of the image from frame to frame and the shifting demands of the other programs running simultaneously on the same processors. We present data showing the efficiency of this multiprocessing algorithm as the number of processors is increased. The combination of the graphics and multiprocessor algorithms allows the fast generation of many high-quality images.

  7. Coupled slow and fast surface dynamics in an electrocatalytic oscillator: Model and simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Nascimento, Melke A.; Nagao, Raphael; Eiswirth, Markus; Varela, Hamilton

    2014-12-21

    The co-existence of disparate time scales is pervasive in many systems. In particular for surface reactions, it has been shown that the long-term evolution of the core oscillator is decisively influenced by slow surface changes, such as progressing deactivation. Here we present an in-depth numerical investigation of the coupled slow and fast surface dynamics in an electrocatalytic oscillator. The model consists of four nonlinear coupled ordinary differential equations, investigated over a wide parameter range. Besides the conventional bifurcation analysis, the system was studied by means of high-resolution period and Lyapunov diagrams. It was observed that the bifurcation diagram changes considerably as the irreversible surface poisoning evolves, and the oscillatory region shrinks. The qualitative dynamics changes accordingly and the chaotic oscillations are dramatically suppressed. Nevertheless, periodic cascades are preserved in a confined region of the resistance vs. voltage diagram. Numerical results are compared to experiments published earlier and the latter reinterpreted. Finally, the comprehensive description of the time-evolution in the period and Lyapunov diagrams suggests further experimental studies correlating the evolution of the system's dynamics with changes of the catalyst structure.

  8. Distributed measurement of dynamic strain based on multi-slope assisted fast BOTDA.

    PubMed

    Ba, Dexin; Wang, Benzhang; Zhou, Dengwang; Yin, Mingjing; Dong, Yongkang; Li, Hui; Lu, Zhiwei; Fan, Zhigang

    2016-05-02

    We propose and demonstrate a dynamic Brillouin optical fiber sensing based on the multi-slope assisted fast Brillouin optical time-domain analysis (F-BOTDA), which enables the measurement of a large strain with real-time data processing. The multi-slope assisted F-BOTDA is realized based on the double-slope demodulation and frequency-agile modulation, which significantly increases the measurement range compared with the single- or double- slope assisted F-BOTDA, while maintaining the advantage of fast data processing and being suitable for real-time on-line monitoring. A maximum strain variation up to 5000με is measured in a 32-m fiber with a spatial resolution of ~1m and a sampling rate of 1kHz. The frequency of the strain is 12.8Hz, which is limited by the rotation rate of the motor used to load the force on the fiber. Furthermore, the influence of the frequency difference between two adjacent probe tones on the measurement error is studied theoretically and experimentally for optimization. For a Brillouin gain spectrum with a 78-MHz width, the optimum frequency difference is ~40MHz. The measurement error of Brillouin frequency shift is less than 3MHz over the whole measurement range (241MHz).

  9. Dynamic measurements at THz frequencies with a fast rotary delay line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerboukha, Hichem; Markov, Andrey; Qu, Hang; Skorobogatiy, Maksim

    2016-02-01

    Fabrication, characterization, and applications of a fast rotary linear optical delay line (FRLODL) for THz time-domain spectroscopy are presented. The FRLODL features two reflective surfaces with spatially separated incoming and outgoing beams. It has been manufactured using CNC machining. A linear dependence of the optical delay on the rotation angle allows a straightforward extraction of the conversion factor between the acquisition time (in ms) and the terahertz pulse time (in ps). The FRLODL has been tested using rotation speeds of up to 48 Hz, corresponding to an acquisition rate of up to 192 Hz with four blades incorporated on the same disk. At high speeds we observe a decrease of the bandwidth due to the limitations of the electronics, in particular, the transimpedance amplifier. An error analysis is performed by experimentally evaluating the signal-to-noise ratio and the dynamic range. With regard to the applications of the FRLODL, we first present observation of the evaporation of liquids, namely water, acetone and methanol. We then demonstrate monitoring of the spray painting process. Finally, detection of fast moving objects at 1 m/s and their thickness characterization are presented.

  10. A water-based fast integrated mobility spectrometer (WFIMS) with enhanced dynamic size range

    DOE PAGES

    Pinterich, Tamara; Spielman, Steven R.; Hering, Susanne; ...

    2017-06-08

    We developed a water-based fast integrated mobility spectrometer (WFIMS) with enhanced dynamic size range. The WFIMS builds on two established technologies: the fast integrated mobility spectrometer and laminar flow water-based condensation methodology. Inside WFIMS, particles of differing electrical mobility are separated in a drift tube and subsequently enlarged through water condensation. Particle size and concentration are measured via digital imaging at a frame rate of 10 Hz. When we measure particles of different mobilities simultaneously, the WFIMS resolves particle diameters ranging from 8 to 580 nm within 1 s or less. The performance of WFIMS was characterized with differential mobilitymore » analyzer (DMA) classified (NH4)2SO2 particles with diameters ranging from 8 to 265 nm. The mean particle diameters measured by WFIMS were found to be in excellent agreement with DMA centroid diameters. Furthermore, detection efficiency of WFIMS was characterized using a condensation particle counter as a reference and is nearly 100% for particles with diameter greater than 8 nm. In general, measured and simulated WFIMS mobility resolutions are in good agreement. But, some deviations are observed at low particle mobilities, likely due to the non-idealities of the WFIMS electric field.« less

  11. Pulsed holographic microscopy as a measurement method of dynamic fracture toughness for fast propagating cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Shinichi; Homma, Hiroomi; Kusaka, Riichiro

    A METHOD OF pulsed holographic microscopy is applied to take instantaneous microscopic photographs of the neighborhoods of crack tips propagating through PMMA or through AISI 4340 steel specimens at a speed of several hundred meters per second. The cracks are in the opening mode. A fast propagating crack is recorded as a hologram at an instant during its propagation. A microscopic photograph of the crack is taken with a conventional microscope to magnify the reconstructed image from the hologram. From the microscopic photograph, crack opening displacement (COD) is measured along the crack in the vicinity of the crack tip. The COD is of the order often to one hundred microns, and in proportion to the square root of the distance from the crack tip. The dynamic fracture toughness KID is obtained using the formula for COD in the singular stress field of a fast propagating crack. Simultaneous KID measurement both through pulsed holographic microscopy and through the caustic method is furthermore carried out with PMMA specimens. The values of KID obtained through pulsed holographic microscopy are in agreement with those through the caustic method. Microcracks accompanied by a main crack are also photographed with the method of pulsed holographic microscopy.

  12. The Caltech experimental investigation of fast 3D non-equilbrium dynamics: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellan, Paul; Shikama, Taiichi; Chai, Kilbyoung; Ha, Bao; Chaplin, Vernon; Kendall, Mark; Moser, Auna; Stenson, Eve; Tobin, Zachary; Zhai, Xiang

    2012-10-01

    The formation and dynamics of writhing, plasma-filled, twisted open magnetic flux tubes is being investigated using pulsed-power laboratory experiments. This work is relevant to solar corona loops, astrophysical jets, spheromak formation, and open field lines in tokamaks and RFP's. MHD forces have been observed to drive fast axial plasma flows into the flux tube from the boundary it intercepts. These flows fill the flux tube with plasma while simultaneously injecting linked frozen-in azimuthal flux; helicity injection is thus associated with mass injection. Recent results include observation of a secondary instability (Rayleigh-Taylor driven by the effective gravity of an exponentially growing kink mode), color-coded plasmas manifesting bidirectional axial flows in a geometry similar to a solar corona loop, and spectroscopic measurements of the internal vector magnetic field. Experiments underway include investigating how an external magnetic field straps down a solar loop, investigation of the details of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, development of a fast EUV movie camera, increasing the jet velocity, excitation of Alfven waves, and investigating 3D magnetic reconnection.

  13. A quantitative FastFUCCI assay defines cell cycle dynamics at a single-cell level.

    PubMed

    Koh, Siang-Boon; Mascalchi, Patrice; Rodriguez, Esther; Lin, Yao; Jodrell, Duncan I; Richards, Frances M; Lyons, Scott K

    2017-01-15

    The fluorescence ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator (FUCCI) is a powerful tool for use in live cells but current FUCCI-based assays have limited throughput in terms of image processing and quantification. Here, we developed a lentiviral system that rapidly introduced FUCCI transgenes into cells by using an all-in-one expression cassette, FastFUCCI. The approach alleviated the need for sequential transduction and characterisation, improving labelling efficiency. We coupled the system to an automated imaging workflow capable of handling large datasets. The integrated assay enabled analyses of single-cell readouts at high spatiotemporal resolution. With the assay, we captured in detail the cell cycle alterations induced by antimitotic agents. We found that treated cells accumulated at G2 or M phase but eventually advanced through mitosis into the next interphase, where the majority of cell death occurred, irrespective of the preceding mitotic phenotype. Some cells appeared viable after mitotic slippage, and a fraction of them subsequently re-entered S phase. Accordingly, we found evidence that targeting the DNA replication origin activity sensitised cells to paclitaxel. In summary, we demonstrate the utility of the FastFUCCI assay for quantifying spatiotemporal dynamics and identify its potential in preclinical drug development. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  14. Metal hydrides reactors with improved dynamic characteristics for a fast cycling hydrogen compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popeneciu, G.; Coldea, I.; Lupu, D.; Misan, I.; Ardelean, O.

    2009-08-01

    This paper presents an investigation of coupled heat and mass transfer process in metal hydrides hydrogen storage reactors. Hydrogen storage and compression performance of our designed and developed reactors are studied by varying the operating parameters and analyzing the effects of metal hydride bed parameters. The metal alloy selected to characterize the cycling behaviour of reactors is LaNi5, material synthesized and characterized by us in the range 20-80°C. Four types of metal hydride reactors were tested with the aim to provide a fast hydrogen absorption-desorption cycle, able to be thermally cycled at rapid rates. Some new technical solutions have been studied to make a step forward in reducing the duration of the reactors cycle, which combines the effective increase of the thermal conductivity and good permeability to hydrogen gas. Dynamic characteristic of developed fast metal hydride reactors is improved using our novel mixture metal hydride-CA conductive additive due to the increased effective thermal conductivity of the alloy bed. The advanced hydride bed design with high heat transfer capabilities can be thermally cycled at a rapid rate, under 120 seconds, in order to process high hydrogen flow rates.

  15. FAST: A multi-processed environment for visualization of computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bancroft, Gordon V.; Merritt, Fergus J.; Plessel, Todd C.; Kelaita, Paul G.; Mccabe, R. Kevin

    1991-01-01

    Three-dimensional, unsteady, multi-zoned fluid dynamics simulations over full scale aircraft are typical of the problems being investigated at NASA Ames' Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) facility on CRAY2 and CRAY-YMP supercomputers. With multiple processor workstations available in the 10-30 Mflop range, we feel that these new developments in scientific computing warrant a new approach to the design and implementation of analysis tools. These larger, more complex problems create a need for new visualization techniques not possible with the existing software or systems available as of this writing. The visualization techniques will change as the supercomputing environment, and hence the scientific methods employed, evolves even further. The Flow Analysis Software Toolkit (FAST), an implementation of a software system for fluid mechanics analysis, is discussed.

  16. Fast and accurate quantum molecular dynamics of dense plasmas across temperature regimes

    DOE PAGES

    Sjostrom, Travis; Daligault, Jerome

    2014-10-10

    Here, we develop and implement a new quantum molecular dynamics approximation that allows fast and accurate simulations of dense plasmas from cold to hot conditions. The method is based on a carefully designed orbital-free implementation of density functional theory. The results for hydrogen and aluminum are in very good agreement with Kohn-Sham (orbital-based) density functional theory and path integral Monte Carlo calculations for microscopic features such as the electron density as well as the equation of state. The present approach does not scale with temperature and hence extends to higher temperatures than is accessible in the Kohn-Sham method and lowermore » temperatures than is accessible by path integral Monte Carlo calculations, while being significantly less computationally expensive than either of those two methods.« less

  17. Size-dependent visible absorption and fast photoluminescence decay dynamics from freestanding strained silicon nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Dhara, Soumen; Giri, Pk

    2011-04-11

    In this article, we report on the visible absorption, photoluminescence (PL), and fast PL decay dynamics from freestanding Si nanocrystals (NCs) that are anisotropically strained. Direct evidence of strain-induced dislocations is shown from high-resolution transmission electron microscopy images. Si NCs with sizes in the range of approximately 5-40 nm show size-dependent visible absorption in the range of 575-722 nm, while NCs of average size <10 nm exhibit strong PL emission at 580-585 nm. The PL decay shows an exponential decay in the nanosecond time scale. The Raman scattering studies show non-monotonic shift of the TO phonon modes as a function of size because of competing effect of strain and phonon confinement. Our studies rule out the influence of defects in the PL emission, and we propose that owing to the combined effect of strain and quantum confinement, the strained Si NCs exhibit direct band gap-like behavior.

  18. A benzyl alcohol derivative of the BDPA radical for fast dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Gómez, J L; Monteagudo, E; Lloveras, V; Parella, T; Veciana, J; Vidal-Gancedo, J

    2015-03-07

    The synthesis, structural characterization and the successful application of a carbon centered radical derived from 1,3-bisdiphenylene-2-phenylallyl (BDPA), its benzyl alcohol derivative (BA-BDPA), as a polarizing agent for Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) are described. The reported BA-BDPA radical meets all the requirements to become a promising candidate for its use in in vivo DNP-NMR experiments: it is soluble in neat [1-(13)C]pyruvic acid, insoluble in the dissolution transfer solvent and is effective as a polarizing agent in fast dissolution DNP-NMR applications, without the need for using glassing agents. Moreover, it enables a simple but effective in-line radical filtration to obtain hyperpolarized solutions of [1-(13)C]pyruvic acid free of radicals that offers a better polarization performance.

  19. Fast and accurate quantum molecular dynamics of dense plasmas across temperature regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Sjostrom, Travis; Daligault, Jerome

    2014-10-10

    Here, we develop and implement a new quantum molecular dynamics approximation that allows fast and accurate simulations of dense plasmas from cold to hot conditions. The method is based on a carefully designed orbital-free implementation of density functional theory. The results for hydrogen and aluminum are in very good agreement with Kohn-Sham (orbital-based) density functional theory and path integral Monte Carlo calculations for microscopic features such as the electron density as well as the equation of state. The present approach does not scale with temperature and hence extends to higher temperatures than is accessible in the Kohn-Sham method and lower temperatures than is accessible by path integral Monte Carlo calculations, while being significantly less computationally expensive than either of those two methods.

  20. Fast optical cooling of a nanomechanical cantilever by a dynamical Stark-shift gate

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Leilei; Zhang, Jian-Qi; Zhang, Shuo; Feng, Mang

    2015-01-01

    The efficient cooling of nanomechanical resonators is essential to exploration of quantum properties of the macroscopic or mesoscopic systems. We propose such a laser-cooling scheme for a nanomechanical cantilever, which works even for the low-frequency mechanical mode and under weak cooling lasers. The cantilever is coupled by a diamond nitrogen-vacancy center under a strong magnetic field gradient and the cooling is assisted by a dynamical Stark-shift gate. Our scheme can effectively enhance the desired cooling efficiency by avoiding the off-resonant and undesired carrier transitions, and thereby cool the cantilever down to the vicinity of the vibrational ground state in a fast fashion. PMID:26455901

  1. Extending the zero-derivative principle for slow-fast dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benoît, Eric; Brøns, Morten; Desroches, Mathieu; Krupa, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Slow-fast systems often possess slow manifolds, that is invariant or locally invariant sub-manifolds on which the dynamics evolves on the slow time scale. For systems with explicit timescale separation, the existence of slow manifolds is due to Fenichel theory, and asymptotic expansions of such manifolds are easily obtained. In this paper, we discuss methods of approximating slow manifolds using the so-called zero-derivative principle. We demonstrate several test functions that work for systems with explicit time scale separation including ones that can be generalized to systems without explicit timescale separation. We also discuss the possible spurious solutions, known as ghosts, as well as treat the Templator system as an example.

  2. Forecasting municipal solid waste generation in a fast-growing urban region with system dynamics modeling.

    PubMed

    Dyson, Brian; Chang, Ni-Bin

    2005-01-01

    Both planning and design of municipal solid waste management systems require accurate prediction of solid waste generation. Yet achieving the anticipated prediction accuracy with regard to the generation trends facing many fast-growing regions is quite challenging. The lack of complete historical records of solid waste quantity and quality due to insufficient budget and unavailable management capacity has resulted in a situation that makes the long-term system planning and/or short-term expansion programs intangible. To effectively handle these problems based on limited data samples, a new analytical approach capable of addressing socioeconomic and environmental situations must be developed and applied for fulfilling the prediction analysis of solid waste generation with reasonable accuracy. This study presents a new approach--system dynamics modeling--for the prediction of solid waste generation in a fast-growing urban area based on a set of limited samples. To address the impact on sustainable development city wide, the practical implementation was assessed by a case study in the city of San Antonio, Texas (USA). This area is becoming one of the fastest-growing regions in North America due to the economic impact of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). The analysis presents various trends of solid waste generation associated with five different solid waste generation models using a system dynamics simulation tool--Stella. Research findings clearly indicate that such a new forecasting approach may cover a variety of possible causative models and track inevitable uncertainties down when traditional statistical least-squares regression methods are unable to handle such issues.

  3. SPH modeling of adhesion in fast dynamics: Application to the Cold Spray process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Profizi, Paul; Combescure, Alain; Ogawa, Kahuziro

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this paper is to show, in a specific case, the importance of modeling adhesive forces when simulating the bouncing of very small particles impacting a substrate at high speed. The implementation of this model into a fast-dynamics SPH code is described. Taking the example of an impacted elastic cylinder, we show that the adhesive forces, which are surface forces, play a significant role only if the particles are sufficiently small. The effect of the choice of the type of interaction law in the cohesive zone is studied and some conclusions on the relevance of the modeling of the adhesive forces for fast-dynamics impacts are drawn. Then, the adhesion model is used to simulate the Cold Spray process. An aluminum particle is projected against a substrate made of the same material at a velocity ranging from 200 to 1000 m ṡs-1. We study the effects of the various modeling assumptions on the final result: bouncing or sticking. Increasingly complex models are considered. At a 200 m ṡs-1 impact velocity, elastic behavior is assumed, the substrate being simply supported at its base and supplied with absorbing boundaries. The same absorbing boundaries are also used for all the other simulations. Then, plasticity is introduced and the impact velocity is increased up to 1000 m ṡs-1. At the highest velocities, the resulting strains are very significant. The calculations show that if the adhesion model is appropriately chosen, it is possible to reproduce the experimental observations: the particles stick to the substrate in a range of impact velocities surrounded by two velocity ranges in which the particles bounce.

  4. Forecasting municipal solid waste generation in a fast-growing urban region with system dynamics modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Dyson, Brian; Chang, N.-B. . E-mail: nchang@even.tamuk.edu

    2005-07-01

    Both planning and design of municipal solid waste management systems require accurate prediction of solid waste generation. Yet achieving the anticipated prediction accuracy with regard to the generation trends facing many fast-growing regions is quite challenging. The lack of complete historical records of solid waste quantity and quality due to insufficient budget and unavailable management capacity has resulted in a situation that makes the long-term system planning and/or short-term expansion programs intangible. To effectively handle these problems based on limited data samples, a new analytical approach capable of addressing socioeconomic and environmental situations must be developed and applied for fulfilling the prediction analysis of solid waste generation with reasonable accuracy. This study presents a new approach - system dynamics modeling - for the prediction of solid waste generation in a fast-growing urban area based on a set of limited samples. To address the impact on sustainable development city wide, the practical implementation was assessed by a case study in the city of San Antonio, Texas (USA). This area is becoming one of the fastest-growing regions in North America due to the economic impact of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). The analysis presents various trends of solid waste generation associated with five different solid waste generation models using a system dynamics simulation tool - Stella[reg]. Research findings clearly indicate that such a new forecasting approach may cover a variety of possible causative models and track inevitable uncertainties down when traditional statistical least-squares regression methods are unable to handle such issues.

  5. Molecular dynamics-based selectivity for Fast-Field-Cycling relaxometry by Overhauser and solid effect dynamic nuclear polarization.

    PubMed

    Neudert, Oliver; Mattea, Carlos; Stapf, Siegfried

    2017-03-01

    In the last decade nuclear spin hyperpolarization methods, especially Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP), have provided unprecedented possibilities for various NMR techniques by increasing the sensitivity by several orders of magnitude. Recently, in-situ DNP-enhanced Fast Field Cycling (FFC) relaxometry was shown to provide appreciable NMR signal enhancements in liquids and viscous systems. In this work, a measurement protocol for DNP-enhanced NMR studies is introduced which enables the selective detection of nuclear spin hyperpolarized by either Overhauser effect or solid effect DNP. Based on field-cycled DNP and relaxation studies it is shown that these methods allow for the independent measurement of polymer and solvent nuclear spins in a concentrated solution of high molecular weight polybutadiene in benzene doped with α,γ-bisdiphenylene-β-phenylallyl radical. Appreciable NMR signal enhancements of about 10-fold were obtained for both constituents. Moreover, qualitative information about the dynamics of the radical and solvent was obtained. Selective DNP-enhanced FFC relaxometry is applied for the measurement of the (1)H nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion of both constituents with improved precision. The introduced method is expected to greatly facilitate NMR studies of complex systems with multiple overlapping signal contributions that cannot be distinguished by standard methods. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Molecular dynamics-based selectivity for Fast-Field-Cycling relaxometry by Overhauser and solid effect dynamic nuclear polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neudert, Oliver; Mattea, Carlos; Stapf, Siegfried

    2017-03-01

    In the last decade nuclear spin hyperpolarization methods, especially Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP), have provided unprecedented possibilities for various NMR techniques by increasing the sensitivity by several orders of magnitude. Recently, in-situ DNP-enhanced Fast Field Cycling (FFC) relaxometry was shown to provide appreciable NMR signal enhancements in liquids and viscous systems. In this work, a measurement protocol for DNP-enhanced NMR studies is introduced which enables the selective detection of nuclear spin hyperpolarized by either Overhauser effect or solid effect DNP. Based on field-cycled DNP and relaxation studies it is shown that these methods allow for the independent measurement of polymer and solvent nuclear spins in a concentrated solution of high molecular weight polybutadiene in benzene doped with α,γ-bisdiphenylene-β-phenylallyl radical. Appreciable NMR signal enhancements of about 10-fold were obtained for both constituents. Moreover, qualitative information about the dynamics of the radical and solvent was obtained. Selective DNP-enhanced FFC relaxometry is applied for the measurement of the 1H nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion of both constituents with improved precision. The introduced method is expected to greatly facilitate NMR studies of complex systems with multiple overlapping signal contributions that cannot be distinguished by standard methods.

  7. Towards fast, rigorous and efficient conformational sampling of biomolecules: Advances in accelerated molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Doshi, Urmi; Hamelberg, Donald

    2015-05-01

    Accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD) has been proven to be a powerful biasing method for enhanced sampling of biomolecular conformations on general-purpose computational platforms. Biologically important long timescale events that are beyond the reach of standard molecular dynamics can be accessed without losing the detailed atomistic description of the system in aMD. Over other biasing methods, aMD offers the advantages of tuning the level of acceleration to access the desired timescale without any advance knowledge of the reaction coordinate. Recent advances in the implementation of aMD and its applications to small peptides and biological macromolecules are reviewed here along with a brief account of all the aMD variants introduced in the last decade. In comparison to the original implementation of aMD, the recent variant in which all the rotatable dihedral angles are accelerated (RaMD) exhibits faster convergence rates and significant improvement in statistical accuracy of retrieved thermodynamic properties. RaMD in conjunction with accelerating diffusive degrees of freedom, i.e. dual boosting, has been rigorously tested for the most difficult conformational sampling problem, protein folding. It has been shown that RaMD with dual boosting is capable of efficiently sampling multiple folding and unfolding events in small fast folding proteins. RaMD with the dual boost approach opens exciting possibilities for sampling multiple timescales in biomolecules. While equilibrium properties can be recovered satisfactorily from aMD-based methods, directly obtaining dynamics and kinetic rates for larger systems presents a future challenge. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Recent developments of molecular dynamics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Fast “Feast/Famine” Cycles for Studying Microbial Physiology Under Dynamic Conditions: A Case Study with Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Suarez-Mendez, Camilo A.; Sousa, Andre; Heijnen, Joseph J.; Wahl, Aljoscha

    2014-01-01

    Microorganisms are constantly exposed to rapidly changing conditions, under natural as well as industrial production scale environments, especially due to large-scale substrate mixing limitations. In this work, we present an experimental approach based on a dynamic feast/famine regime (400 s) that leads to repetitive cycles with moderate changes in substrate availability in an aerobic glucose cultivation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. After a few cycles, the feast/famine produced a stable and repetitive pattern with a reproducible metabolic response in time, thus providing a robust platform for studying the microorganism’s physiology under dynamic conditions. We found that the biomass yield was slightly reduced (−5%) under the feast/famine regime, while the averaged substrate and oxygen consumption as well as the carbon dioxide production rates were comparable. The dynamic response of the intracellular metabolites showed specific differences in comparison to other dynamic experiments (especially stimulus-response experiments, SRE). Remarkably, the frequently reported ATP paradox observed in single pulse experiments was not present during the repetitive perturbations applied here. We found that intracellular dynamic accumulations led to an uncoupling of the substrate uptake rate (up to 9-fold change at 20 s.) Moreover, the dynamic profiles of the intracellular metabolites obtained with the feast/famine suggest the presence of regulatory mechanisms that resulted in a delayed response. With the feast famine setup many cellular states can be measured at high frequency given the feature of reproducible cycles. The feast/famine regime is thus a versatile platform for systems biology approaches, which can help us to identify and investigate metabolite regulations under realistic conditions (e.g., large-scale bioreactors or natural environments). PMID:24957030

  9. Dynamic monitoring of Gi/o-protein-mediated decreases of intracellular cAMP by FRET-based Epac sensors.

    PubMed

    Storch, Ursula; Straub, Julie; Erdogmus, Serap; Gudermann, Thomas; Mederos Y Schnitzler, Michael

    2017-06-01

    Analysis of G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling, in particular of the second messenger cAMP that is tightly controlled by Gs- and Gi/o-proteins, is a central issue in biomedical research. The classical biochemical method to monitor increases in intracellular cAMP concentrations consists of a radioactive multicellular assay, which is well established, highly sensitive, and reproducible, but precludes continuous spatial and temporal assessment of cAMP levels in single living cells. For this purpose, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based Epac cAMP sensors are well suitable. So far, the latter sensors have been employed to monitor Gs-induced cAMP increases and it has remained elusive whether Epac sensors can reliably detect decreased intracellular cAMP levels as well. In this study, we systematically optimize experimental strategies employing FRET-based cAMP sensors to monitor Gi/o-mediated cAMP reductions. FRET experiments with adrenergic α2A or μ opioid receptors and a set of different Epac sensors allowed for time-resolved, valid, and reliable detection of cAMP level decreases upon Gi/o-coupled receptor activation in single living cells, and this effect can be reversed by selective receptor antagonists. Moreover, pre-treatment with forskolin or 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) to artificially increase basal cAMP levels was not required to monitor Gi/o-coupled receptor activation. Thus, using FRET-based cAMP sensors is of major advantage when compared to classical biochemical and multi-cellular assays.

  10. Dynamic relations between fast-food restaurant and body weight status: a longitudinal and multilevel analysis of Chinese adults.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hongwei; Short, Susan E; Liu, Tao

    2013-03-01

    Mixed findings have been reported on the association between Western fast-food restaurants and body weight status. Results vary across study contexts and are sensitive to the samples, measures and methods used. Most studies have failed to examine the temporally dynamic associations between community exposure to fast-food restaurants and weight changes. Bayesian hierarchical regressions are used to model changes in body mass index, waist-to-height ratio (WHtR) and waist-to-hip ratio (WHpR) as a function of changes in Western fast-food restaurants in 216 communities for more than 9000 Chinese adults followed up multiple times between 2000 and 2009. Number of Western fast-food restaurants is positively associated with subsequent increases in WHtR and WHpR among rural population. More fast-food restaurants are positively associated with a future increase in WHpR for urban women. Increased availability of fast food between two waves is related to increased WHtR for urban men over the same period. A past increase in number of fast-food restaurants is associated with subsequent increases in WHtR and WHpR for rural population. The associations between community exposure to Western fast food and weight changes are temporally dynamic rather than static. Improved measures of exposure to community environment are needed to achieve more precise estimates and better understanding of these relationships. In light of the findings in this study and China's rapid economic growth, further investigation and increased public health monitoring is warranted since Western fast food is likely to be more accessible and affordable in the near future.

  11. Dynamic relations between fast-food restaurant and body weight status: a longitudinal and multilevel analysis of Chinese adults

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hongwei; Short, Susan E; Liu, Tao

    2013-01-01

    Background Mixed findings have been reported on the association between Western fast-food restaurants and body weight status. Results vary across study contexts and are sensitive to the samples, measures and methods used. Most studies have failed to examine the temporally dynamic associations between community exposure to fast-food restaurants and weight changes. Methods Bayesian hierarchical regressions are used to model changes in body mass index, waist-to-height ratio (WHtR) and waist-to-hip ratio (WHpR) as a function of changes in Western fast-food restaurants in 216 communities for more than 9000 Chinese adults followed up multiple times between 2000 and 2009. Results Number of Western fast-food restaurants is positively associated with subsequent increases in WHtR and WHpR among rural population. More fast-food restaurants are positively associated with a future increase in WHpR for urban women. Increased availability of fast food between two waves is related to increased WHtR for urban men over the same period. A past increase in number of fast-food restaurants is associated with subsequent increases in WHtR and WHpR for rural population. Conclusions The associations between community exposure to Western fast food and weight changes are temporally dynamic rather than static. Improved measures of exposure to community environment are needed to achieve more precise estimates and better understanding of these relationships. In light of the findings in this study and China’s rapid economic growth, further investigation and increased public health monitoring is warranted since Western fast food is likely to be more accessible and affordable in the near future. PMID:22923769

  12. Two-photon autofluorescence dynamics imaging reveals sensitivity of intracellular NADH concentration and conformation to cell physiology at the single-cell level

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Qianru; Heikal, Ahmed A.

    2009-01-01

    Reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, NADH, is a major electron donor in the oxidative phosphorylation and glycolytic pathways in cells. As a result, there has been recent resurgence in employing intrinsic NADH fluorescence as a natural probe for a range of cellular processes that include apoptosis, cancer pathology, and enzyme kinetics. Here, we report on two-photon fluorescence lifetime and polarization imaging of intrinsic NADH in breast cancer (Hs578T) and normal (Hs578Bst) cells for quantitative analysis of the concentration and conformation (i.e., free-to-enzyme-bound ratios) of this coenzyme. Two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging of intracellular NADH indicates sensitivity to both cell pathology and inhibition of the respiratory chain activities using potassium cyanide (KCN). Using a newly developed noninvasive assay, we estimate the average NADH concentration in cancer cells (168 ± 49 μM) to be ~ 1.8 fold higher than in breast normal cells (99 ± 37 μM). Such analyses indicate changes in energy metabolism and redox reactions in normal breast cells upon inhibition of the respiratory chain activity using KCN. In addition, time-resolved associated anisotropy of cellular autofluorescence indicates population fractions of free (0.18 ± 0.08) and enzyme-bound (0.82 ± 0.08) conformations of intracellular NADH in normal breast cells. These fractions are statistically different from those in breast cancer cells (free: 0.25 ± 0.08; bound: 0.75 ± 0.08). Comparative studies on the binding kinetics of NADH with mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase in solution mimic our findings in living cells. These quantitative studies demonstrate the potential of intracellular NADH dynamics (rather than intensity) imaging for probing mitochondrial anomalies associated with neurodegenerative diseases, cancer, diabetes, and aging. Our approach is also applicable to other metabolic and signaling pathways in living cells, without the need for cell

  13. An integrated dynamic model of ocean mining system and fast simulation of its longitudinal reciprocating motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Yu; Liu, Shao-jun

    2013-04-01

    An integrated dynamic model of China's deep ocean mining system is developed and the fast simulation analysis of its longitudinal reciprocating motion operation processes is achieved. The seafloor tracked miner is built as a three-dimensional single-body model with six-degree-of-freedom. The track-terrain interaction is modeled by partitioning the track-terrain interface into a certain number of mesh elements with three mutually perpendicular forces, including the normal force, the longitudinal shear force and the lateral shear force, acting on the center point of each mesh element. The hydrodynamic force of the miner is considered and applied. By considering the operational safety and collection efficiency, two new mining paths for the miner on the seafloor are proposed, which can be simulated with the established single-body dynamic model of the miner. The pipeline subsystem is built as a three-dimensional multi-body discrete element model, which is divided into rigid elements linked by flexible connectors. The flexible connector without mass is represented by six spring-damper elements. The external hydrodynamic forces of the ocean current from the longitudinal and lateral directions are both considered and modeled based on the Morison formula and applied to the mass center of each corresponding discrete rigid element. The mining ship is simplified and represented by a general kinematic point, whose heave motion induced by the ocean waves and the longitudinal and lateral towing motions are considered and applied. By integrating the single-body dynamic model of the miner and the multi-body discrete element dynamic model of the pipeline, and defining the kinematic equations of the mining ship, the integrated dynamic model of the total deep ocean mining system is formed. The longitudinal reciprocating motion operation modes of the total mining system, which combine the active straight-line and turning motions of the miner and the ship, and the passive towed motions

  14. Petascale molecular dynamics simulation using the fast multipole method on K computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohno, Yousuke; Yokota, Rio; Koyama, Hiroshi; Morimoto, Gentaro; Hasegawa, Aki; Masumoto, Gen; Okimoto, Noriaki; Hirano, Yoshinori; Ibeid, Huda; Narumi, Tetsu; Taiji, Makoto

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, we report all-atom simulations of molecular crowding - a result from the full node simulation on the "K computer", which is a 10-PFLOPS supercomputer in Japan. The capability of this machine enables us to perform simulation of crowded cellular environments, which are more realistic compared to conventional MD simulations where proteins are simulated in isolation. Living cells are "crowded" because macromolecules comprise ∼30% of their molecular weight. Recently, the effects of crowded cellular environments on protein stability have been revealed through in-cell NMR spectroscopy. To measure the performance of the "K computer", we performed all-atom classical molecular dynamics simulations of two systems: target proteins in a solvent, and target proteins in an environment of molecular crowders that mimic the conditions of a living cell. Using the full system, we achieved 4.4 PFLOPS during a 520 million-atom simulation with cutoff of 28 Å. Furthermore, we discuss the performance and scaling of fast multipole methods for molecular dynamics simulations on the "K computer", as well as comparisons with Ewald summation methods.

  15. Fast three-dimensional measurements for dynamic scenes with shiny surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Shijie; Chen, Qian; Zuo, Chao; Asundi, Anand

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a novel fringe projection technique for fast three-dimensional (3-D) shape measurements of moving highly reflective objects. By combining the standard three-step phase-shifting fringe patterns with a digital speckle image, dynamic 3-D reconstructions of shiny surfaces can be efficiently achieved with only four projected patterns. The phase measurement is performed by three-step phase-shifting algorithm as it uses the theoretical minimum number of fringe patterns for phase-shifting profilometry. To avoid the camera saturation, a dual-camera fringe projection system is built to measure shiny objects from two different directions. The erroneous phase obtained from a saturated pixel is corrected by the phase of its corresponding pixel in the other view which is free from the saturation problem. To achieve high measurement accuracy, the corresponding high light intensity areas in cameras are found by sub-pixel matches of the speckle pattern in either view. Benefited from the trifocal tensor constraint, the corresponding points in the two wrapped phase maps can be directly established, and thus, the difficulties in determining the correct fringe order for the discontinuous or isolated surfaces can be effectively bypassed. Experimental results indicate that the proposed method is able to successfully measure highly reflective surfaces for both stationary and dynamic scenes.

  16. Portable low-coherence interferometry for quantitatively imaging fast dynamics with extended field of view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaked, Natan T.; Girshovitz, Pinhas; Frenklach, Irena

    2014-06-01

    We present our recent advances in the development of compact, highly portable and inexpensive wide-field interferometric modules. By a smart design of the interferometric system, including the usage of low-coherence illumination sources and common-path off-axis geometry of the interferometers, spatial and temporal noise levels of the resulting quantitative thickness profile can be sub-nanometric, while processing the phase profile in real time. In addition, due to novel experimentally-implemented multiplexing methods, we can capture low-coherence off-axis interferograms with significantly extended field of view and in faster acquisition rates. Using these techniques, we quantitatively imaged rapid dynamics of live biological cells including sperm cells and unicellular microorganisms. Then, we demonstrated dynamic profiling during lithography processes of microscopic elements, with thicknesses that may vary from several nanometers to hundreds of microns. Finally, we present new algorithms for fast reconstruction (including digital phase unwrapping) of off-axis interferograms, which allow real-time processing in more than video rate on regular single-core computers.

  17. Brillouin optical time domain reflectometry for fast detection of dynamic strain incorporating double-edge technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shangguan, Mingjia; Wang, Chong; Xia, Haiyun; Shentu, Guoliang; Dou, Xiankang; Zhang, Qiang; Pan, Jian-wei

    2017-09-01

    For the first time, to the best of our knowledge, a direct detection Brillouin optical time-domain reflectometry (BOTDR) is demonstrated for fast distributed dynamic strain sensing incorporating double-edge technique, time-division multiplexing technique and upconversion technique. In order to guarantee the robust stability of the system, the double-edge technique is implemented by using a convert single-channel FPI and a fiber-coupled upconversion single-photon detector, incorporating a time-division multiplexing method. The upconversion single-photon detector is adopted to upconvert the backscattering photons from 1548.1 nm to 863 nm, which is subsequently detected by a Silicon avalanche photodiode (Si-APD). In the experiment, dynamic strain disturbance up to 1.9 mε over 1.5 km of a polarization maintaining fiber is detected at a sampling rate of 30 Hz. An accuracy of ± 30 με and spatial resolution of 0.6 m are realized.

  18. Implementation of a fast 16-Bit dynamic clamp using LabVIEW-RT.

    PubMed

    Kullmann, Paul H M; Wheeler, Diek W; Beacom, Joshua; Horn, John P

    2004-01-01

    The dynamic-clamp method provides a powerful electrophysiological tool for creating virtual ionic conductances in living cells and studying their influence on membrane potential. Here we describe G-clamp, a new way to implement a dynamic clamp using the real-time version of the Lab-VIEW programming environment together with a Windows host, an embedded microprocessor that runs a real-time operating system and a multifunction data-acquisition board. The software includes descriptions of a fast voltage-dependent sodium conductance, delayed rectifier, M-type and A-type potassium conductances, and a leak conductance. The system can also read synaptic conductance waveforms from preassembled data files. These virtual conductances can be reliably implemented at speeds < or =43 kHz while simultaneously saving two channels of data with 16-bit precision. G-clamp also includes utilities for measuring current-voltage relations, synaptic strength, and synaptic gain. Taking an approach built on a commercially available software/hardware platform has resulted in a system that is easy to assemble and upgrade. In addition, the graphical programming structure of LabVIEW should make it relatively easy for others to adapt G-clamp for new experimental applications.

  19. Dynamic fast terminal sliding mode control of a shape memory alloy actuated system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marathe, Meeshawn S.; Srinivasan, S. M.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we address the chattering phenomenon which is a common drawback associated with the normal Sliding Mode Control (SMC) law for a basic shape memory alloy (SMA) actuated system. A new method has been proposed to counter this effect by combining the concepts of Fast Terminal SMC and Dynamic controller. A phenomenological model is developed for the SMA which incorporates a piecewise linear hysteresis behavior. This model is used for both open loop as well as closed loop simulations for a linear motion control system. Based on this model, a dynamic terminal sliding mode control law is derived and applied to the system. A normal SMC law with saturation function which is known to reduce chattering is compared with the proposed control law for its effectiveness to curb the issue of chattering versus its ability to faithfully track a desired trajectory. Numerical Simulations indicate that the proposed law is able to reduce the chattering effect sufficiently and at par with the control technique involving saturation function.

  20. Imaging of super-fast dynamics and flow instabilities of superconducting vortices

    DOE PAGES

    Embon, L.; Anahory, Y.; Jelić, Ž. L.; ...

    2017-07-20

    Quantized magnetic vortices driven by electric current determine key electromagnetic properties of superconductors. And while the dynamic behavior of slow vortices has been thoroughly investigated, the physics of ultrafast vortices under strong currents remains largely unexplored. Here, we use a nanoscale scanning superconducting quantum interference device to image vortices penetrating into a superconducting Pb film at rates of tens of GHz and moving with velocities of up to tens of km/s, which are not only much larger than the speed of sound but also exceed the pair-breaking speed limit of superconducting condensate. These experiments reveal formation of mesoscopic vortex channelsmore » which undergo cascades of bifurcations as the current and magnetic field increase. Our numerical simulations predict metamorphosis of fast Abrikosov vortices into mixed Abrikosov-Josephson vortices at even higher velocities. Our work offers an insight into the fundamental physics of dynamic vortex states of superconductors at high current densities, crucial for many applications.« less

  1. Fast and Quantitative T1ρ-weighted Dynamic Glucose Enhanced MRI

    PubMed Central

    Schuenke, Patrick; Paech, Daniel; Koehler, Christina; Windschuh, Johannes; Bachert, Peter; Ladd, Mark E.; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter; Radbruch, Alexander; Zaiss, Moritz

    2017-01-01

    Common medical imaging techniques usually employ contrast agents that are chemically labeled, e.g. with radioisotopes in the case of PET, iodine in the case of CT or paramagnetic metals in the case of MRI to visualize the heterogeneity of the tumor microenvironment. Recently, it was shown that natural unlabeled D-glucose can be used as a nontoxic biodegradable contrast agent in Chemical Exchange sensitive Spin-Lock (CESL) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to detect the glucose uptake and potentially the metabolism of tumors. As an important step to fulfill the clinical needs for practicability, reproducibility and imaging speed we present here a robust and quantitative T1ρ-weighted technique for dynamic glucose enhanced MRI (DGE-MRI) with a temporal resolution of less than 7 seconds. Applied to a brain tumor patient, the new technique provided a distinct DGE contrast between tumor and healthy brain tissue and showed the detailed dynamics of the glucose enhancement after intravenous injection. Development of this fast and quantitative DGE-MRI technique allows for a more detailed analysis of DGE correlations in the future and potentially enables non-invasive diagnosis, staging and monitoring of tumor response to therapy. PMID:28169369

  2. Effects from fast dynamics: the crux for assessing Greenland's centennial mass loss ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuerst, J. J.; Goelzer, H.; Huybrechts, P.

    2011-12-01

    due to the dominant changes in driving stress. If at all, the inclusion of fast dynamics in the full higher-order model serves as a negative feedback mechanism, as it allows for a faster attenuation of the initial perturbation. Faster signal attenuation consequently reduces the response time of the GrIS to initial marginal forcing. Additional perturbation experiments address other dynamic processes serve to assess the range of Greenland's dynamic contribution to future sea level change.

  3. Intracellular kinetics of ATX-S10·Na(II) and its correlation with photochemical reaction dynamics during a pulsed photosensitization process: effect of pulse repetition rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawauchi, Satoko; Sato, Shunichi; Morimoto, Yuji; Kikuchi, Makoto

    2006-01-01

    Although photodynamic therapy with pulsed light excitation has interesting characteristics, its photosensitization mechanism has not been fully elucidated. In this study, we showed that the intracellular kinetics of ATX-S10.Na(II), a lysosomal sensitizer, was closely related to photochemical reaction dynamics during photodynamic treatment of A549 cells with nanosecond pulsed light. Fluorescence microscopy revealed that at high frequencies of 10 and 30 Hz the sensitizer initially localized mainly in lysosomes but that it started to be redistributed to the cytosol in certain ranges of radiant exposures. These ranges were found to coincide with a regime of fluorescence degradation with limited oxygen consumption. On the other hand, at 5 Hz, there was no such a discontinuous behavior in the sensitizer redistribution characteristics throughout the period of irradiation; this was consistent with the fact that no reaction switching was observed. Two possible reasons for the appearance of the regime with limited oxygen consumption are discussed: participation of an oxygen-independent reaction and change in the microenvironment for the sensitizer caused by lysosomal photodamage. The pulse frequency-dependent intracellular kinetics of the sensitizer also explains our previous results showing higher cytotoxicity at 5 Hz than at 10 and 30 Hz.

  4. Intracellular dynamics and fate of polystyrene nanoparticles in A549 Lung epithelial cells monitored by image (cross-) correlation spectroscopy and single particle tracking.

    PubMed

    Deville, Sarah; Penjweini, Rozhin; Smisdom, Nick; Notelaers, Kristof; Nelissen, Inge; Hooyberghs, Jef; Ameloot, Marcel

    2015-10-01

    Novel insights in nanoparticle (NP) uptake routes of cells, their intracellular trafficking and subcellular targeting can be obtained through the investigation of their temporal and spatial behavior. In this work, we present the application of image (cross-) correlation spectroscopy (IC(C)S) and single particle tracking (SPT) to monitor the intracellular dynamics of polystyrene (PS) NPs in the human lung carcinoma A549 cell line. The ensemble kinetic behavior of NPs inside the cell was characterized by temporal and spatiotemporal image correlation spectroscopy (TICS and STICS). Moreover, a more direct interpretation of the diffusion and flow detected in the NP motion was obtained by SPT by monitoring individual NPs. Both techniques demonstrate that the PS NP transport in A549 cells is mainly dependent on microtubule-assisted transport. By applying spatiotemporal image cross-correlation spectroscopy (STICCS), the correlated motions of NPs with the early endosomes, late endosomes and lysosomes are identified. PS NPs were equally distributed among the endolysosomal compartment during the time interval of the experiments. The cotransport of the NPs with the lysosomes is significantly larger compared to the other cell organelles. In the present study we show that the complementarity of ICS-based techniques and SPT enables a consistent elaborate model of the complex behavior of NPs inside biological systems.

  5. Fast analysis of molecular dynamics trajectories with graphics processing units-Radial distribution function histogramming

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, Benjamin G.; Stone, John E.; Kohlmeyer, Axel

    2011-05-01

    The calculation of radial distribution functions (RDFs) from molecular dynamics trajectory data is a common and computationally expensive analysis task. The rate limiting step in the calculation of the RDF is building a histogram of the distance between atom pairs in each trajectory frame. Here we present an implementation of this histogramming scheme for multiple graphics processing units (GPUs). The algorithm features a tiling scheme to maximize the reuse of data at the fastest levels of the GPU's memory hierarchy and dynamic load balancing to allow high performance on heterogeneous configurations of GPUs. Several versions of the RDF algorithm are presented, utilizing the specific hardware features found on different generations of GPUs. We take advantage of larger shared memory and atomic memory operations available on state-of-the-art GPUs to accelerate the code significantly. The use of atomic memory operations allows the fast, limited-capacity on-chip memory to be used much more efficiently, resulting in a fivefold increase in performance compared to the version of the algorithm without atomic operations. The ultimate version of the algorithm running in parallel on four NVIDIA GeForce GTX 480 (Fermi) GPUs was found to be 92 times faster than a multithreaded implementation running on an Intel Xeon 5550 CPU. On this multi-GPU hardware, the RDF between two selections of 1,000,000 atoms each can be calculated in 26.9 s per frame. The multi-GPU RDF algorithms described here are implemented in VMD, a widely used and freely available software package for molecular dynamics visualization and analysis.

  6. Energy efficient low power shared-memory Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) processor with dynamic voltage scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitrio, D.; Singh, J.; Stojcevski, A.

    2005-12-01

    Reduction of power dissipations in CMOS circuits needs to be addressed for portable battery devices. Selection of appropriate transistor library to minimise leakage current, implementation of low power design architectures, power management implementation, and the choice of chip packaging, all have impact on power dissipation and are important considerations in design and implementation of integrated circuits for low power applications. Energy-efficient architecture is highly desirable for battery operated systems, which operates in a wide variation of operating scenarios. Energy-efficient design aims to reconfigure its own architectures to scale down energy consumption depending upon the throughput and quality requirement. An energy efficient system should be able to decide its minimum power requirements by dynamically scaling its own operating frequency, supply voltage or the threshold voltage according to a variety of operating scenarios. The increasing product demand for application specific integrated circuit or processor for independent portable devices has influenced designers to implement dedicated processors with ultra low power requirements. One of these dedicated processors is a Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) processor, which is widely used in signal processing for numerous applications such as, wireless telecommunication and biomedical applications where the demand for extended battery life is extremely high. This paper presents the design and performance analysis of a low power shared memory FFT processor incorporating dynamic voltage scaling. Dynamic voltage scaling enables power supply scaling into various supply voltage levels. The concept behind the proposed solution is that if the speed of the main logic core can be adjusted according to input load or amount of processor's computation "just enough" to meet the requirement. The design was implemented using 0.12 μm ST-Microelectronic 6-metal layer CMOS dual- process technology in Cadence Analogue

  7. Fast Analysis of Molecular Dynamics Trajectories with Graphics Processing Units-Radial Distribution Function Histogramming.

    PubMed

    Levine, Benjamin G; Stone, John E; Kohlmeyer, Axel

    2011-05-01

    The calculation of radial distribution functions (RDFs) from molecular dynamics trajectory data is a common and computationally expensive analysis task. The rate limiting step in the calculation of the RDF is building a histogram of the distance between atom pairs in each trajectory frame. Here we present an implementation of this histogramming scheme for multiple graphics processing units (GPUs). The algorithm features a tiling scheme to maximize the reuse of data at the fastest levels of the GPU's memory hierarchy and dynamic load balancing to allow high performance on heterogeneous configurations of GPUs. Several versions of the RDF algorithm are presented, utilizing the specific hardware features found on different generations of GPUs. We take advantage of larger shared memory and atomic memory operations available on state-of-the-art GPUs to accelerate the code significantly. The use of atomic memory operations allows the fast, limited-capacity on-chip memory to be used much more efficiently, resulting in a fivefold increase in performance compared to the version of the algorithm without atomic operations. The ultimate version of the algorithm running in parallel on four NVIDIA GeForce GTX 480 (Fermi) GPUs was found to be 92 times faster than a multithreaded implementation running on an Intel Xeon 5550 CPU. On this multi-GPU hardware, the RDF between two selections of 1,000,000 atoms each can be calculated in 26.9 seconds per frame. The multi-GPU RDF algorithms described here are implemented in VMD, a widely used and freely available software package for molecular dynamics visualization and analysis.

  8. Diagnostic Value of 3D Fast Low-Angle Shot Dynamic MRI of Breast Papillomas

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Jeong-Ah; Kwak, Jin Young; Jeong, Joon

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the value of breast MRI in analysis of papillomas of the breast. Materials and Methods From 1996 to 2004, 94 patients underwent surgery due to papillomas of the breast. Among them, 21 patients underwent 3D fast low angle shot (FLASH) dynamic breast MRI. Eight masses were palpable and 11 of 21 patients had nipple discharge. Two radiologists indifferently analyzed the location, size of the lesions and shape, margin of the masses, multiplicity and ductal relation. The MRI findings were categorized according to breast imaging reporting and data system (BI-RADS) lexicon. The amount and pattern of enhancement and associated findings were also evaluated according to BI-RADS. We then compared the MRI findings with galactography, mammography and breast ultrasonography (US) and examined histopathologic correlation. Results On breast MRI, the lesion size was 0.4-1.59 cm, and 18 patients showed subareolar location. On 4.25 cm (mean 1.54) dynamic enhanced images, imaging findings showed mass (n = 10), intracystic mass (n = 3), focus (n = 5), ductal enhancement (n = 2), and segmental enhancement (n = 1). In cases of the masses, the shapes of the masses were round (n = 4), lobulated (n = 3), and irregular (n = 6), and margins were circumscribed (n = 6), microlobulated (n = 5), and indistinct (n = 2). The enhancement patterns were homogeneous enhancement (n = 7), heterogeneous (n = 3) or rim enhancement (n = 3). Conclusion The contrast enhanced dynamic breast MRI was highly sensitive for diagnosis of breast papillomas. MRI could play a key role in the pre-operative work-up for multiple papillomas and papillomatosis. PMID:20046427

  9. Fast Analysis of Molecular Dynamics Trajectories with Graphics Processing Units—Radial Distribution Function Histogramming

    PubMed Central

    Stone, John E.; Kohlmeyer, Axel

    2011-01-01

    The calculation of radial distribution functions (RDFs) from molecular dynamics trajectory data is a common and computationally expensive analysis task. The rate limiting step in the calculation of the RDF is building a histogram of the distance between atom pairs in each trajectory frame. Here we present an implementation of this histogramming scheme for multiple graphics processing units (GPUs). The algorithm features a tiling scheme to maximize the reuse of data at the fastest levels of the GPU’s memory hierarchy and dynamic load balancing to allow high performance on heterogeneous configurations of GPUs. Several versions of the RDF algorithm are presented, utilizing the specific hardware features found on different generations of GPUs. We take advantage of larger shared memory and atomic memory operations available on state-of-the-art GPUs to accelerate the code significantly. The use of atomic memory operations allows the fast, limited-capacity on-chip memory to be used much more efficiently, resulting in a fivefold increase in performance compared to the version of the algorithm without atomic operations. The ultimate version of the algorithm running in parallel on four NVIDIA GeForce GTX 480 (Fermi) GPUs was found to be 92 times faster than a multithreaded implementation running on an Intel Xeon 5550 CPU. On this multi-GPU hardware, the RDF between two selections of 1,000,000 atoms each can be calculated in 26.9 seconds per frame. The multi-GPU RDF algorithms described here are implemented in VMD, a widely used and freely available software package for molecular dynamics visualization and analysis. PMID:21547007

  10. Fast computation of statistical uncertainty for spatiotemporal distributions estimated directly from dynamic cone beam SPECT projections

    SciTech Connect

    Reutter, Bryan W.; Gullberg, Grant T.; Huesman, Ronald H.

    2001-04-09

    The estimation of time-activity curves and kinetic model parameters directly from projection data is potentially useful for clinical dynamic single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) studies, particularly in those clinics that have only single-detector systems and thus are not able to perform rapid tomographic acquisitions. Because the radiopharmaceutical distribution changes while the SPECT gantry rotates, projections at different angles come from different tracer distributions. A dynamic image sequence reconstructed from the inconsistent projections acquired by a slowly rotating gantry can contain artifacts that lead to biases in kinetic parameters estimated from time-activity curves generated by overlaying regions of interest on the images. If cone beam collimators are used and the focal point of the collimators always remains in a particular transaxial plane, additional artifacts can arise in other planes reconstructed using insufficient projection samples [1]. If the projection samples truncate the patient's body, this can result in additional image artifacts. To overcome these sources of bias in conventional image based dynamic data analysis, we and others have been investigating the estimation of time-activity curves and kinetic model parameters directly from dynamic SPECT projection data by modeling the spatial and temporal distribution of the radiopharmaceutical throughout the projected field of view [2-8]. In our previous work we developed a computationally efficient method for fully four-dimensional (4-D) direct estimation of spatiotemporal distributions from dynamic SPECT projection data [5], which extended Formiconi's least squares algorithm for reconstructing temporally static distributions [9]. In addition, we studied the biases that result from modeling various orders temporal continuity and using various time samplings [5]. the present work, we address computational issues associated with evaluating the statistical uncertainty of

  11. Conformational landscape of an amyloid intra-cellular domain and Landau-Ginzburg-Wilson paradigm in protein dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Jin; Niemi, Antti J.; He, Jianfeng

    2016-07-01

    The Landau-Ginzburg-Wilson paradigm is proposed as a framework, to investigate the conformational landscape of intrinsically unstructured proteins. A universal Cα-trace Landau free energy is deduced from general symmetry considerations, with the ensuing all-atom structure modeled using publicly available reconstruction programs Pulchra and Scwrl. As an example, the conformational stability of an amyloid precursor protein intra-cellular domain (AICD) is inspected; the reference conformation is the crystallographic structure with code 3DXC in Protein Data Bank (PDB) that describes a heterodimer of AICD and a nuclear multi-domain adaptor protein Fe65. Those conformations of AICD that correspond to local or near-local minima of the Landau free energy are identified. For this, the response of the original 3DXC conformation to variations in the ambient temperature is investigated, using the Glauber algorithm. The conclusion is that in isolation the AICD conformation in 3DXC must be unstable. A family of degenerate conformations that minimise the Landau free energy is identified, and it is proposed that the native state of an isolated AICD is a superposition of these conformations. The results are fully in line with the presumed intrinsically unstructured character of isolated AICD and should provide a basis for a systematic analysis of AICD structure in future NMR experiments.

  12. Conformational landscape of an amyloid intra-cellular domain and Landau-Ginzburg-Wilson paradigm in protein dynamics.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jin; Niemi, Antti J; He, Jianfeng

    2016-07-28

    The Landau-Ginzburg-Wilson paradigm is proposed as a framework, to investigate the conformational landscape of intrinsically unstructured proteins. A universal Cα-trace Landau free energy is deduced from general symmetry considerations, with the ensuing all-atom structure modeled using publicly available reconstruction programs Pulchra and Scwrl. As an example, the conformational stability of an amyloid precursor protein intra-cellular domain (AICD) is inspected; the reference conformation is the crystallographic structure with code 3DXC in Protein Data Bank (PDB) that describes a heterodimer of AICD and a nuclear multi-domain adaptor protein Fe65. Those conformations of AICD that correspond to local or near-local minima of the Landau free energy are identified. For this, the response of the original 3DXC conformation to variations in the ambient temperature is investigated, using the Glauber algorithm. The conclusion is that in isolation the AICD conformation in 3DXC must be unstable. A family of degenerate conformations that minimise the Landau free energy is identified, and it is proposed that the native state of an isolated AICD is a superposition of these conformations. The results are fully in line with the presumed intrinsically unstructured character of isolated AICD and should provide a basis for a systematic analysis of AICD structure in future NMR experiments.

  13. Linearly scaling and almost Hamiltonian dielectric continuum molecular dynamics simulations through fast multipole expansions.

    PubMed

    Lorenzen, Konstantin; Mathias, Gerald; Tavan, Paul

    2015-11-14

    Hamiltonian Dielectric Solvent (HADES) is a recent method [S. Bauer et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 104103 (2014)] which enables atomistic Hamiltonian molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of peptides and proteins in dielectric solvent continua. Such simulations become rapidly impractical for large proteins, because the computational effort of HADES scales quadratically with the number N of atoms. If one tries to achieve linear scaling by applying a fast multipole method (FMM) to the computation of the HADES electrostatics, the Hamiltonian character (conservation of total energy, linear, and angular momenta) may get lost. Here, we show that the Hamiltonian character of HADES can be almost completely preserved, if the structure-adapted fast multipole method (SAMM) as recently redesigned by Lorenzen et al. [J. Chem. Theory Comput. 10, 3244-3259 (2014)] is suitably extended and is chosen as the FMM module. By this extension, the HADES/SAMM forces become exact gradients of the HADES/SAMM energy. Their translational and rotational invariance then guarantees (within the limits of numerical accuracy) the exact conservation of the linear and angular momenta. Also, the total energy is essentially conserved-up to residual algorithmic noise, which is caused by the periodically repeated SAMM interaction list updates. These updates entail very small temporal discontinuities of the force description, because the employed SAMM approximations represent deliberately balanced compromises between accuracy and efficiency. The energy-gradient corrected version of SAMM can also be applied, of course, to MD simulations of all-atom solvent-solute systems enclosed by periodic boundary conditions. However, as we demonstrate in passing, this choice does not offer any serious advantages.

  14. Linearly scaling and almost Hamiltonian dielectric continuum molecular dynamics simulations through fast multipole expansions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenzen, Konstantin; Mathias, Gerald; Tavan, Paul

    2015-11-01

    Hamiltonian Dielectric Solvent (HADES) is a recent method [S. Bauer et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 104103 (2014)] which enables atomistic Hamiltonian molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of peptides and proteins in dielectric solvent continua. Such simulations become rapidly impractical for large proteins, because the computational effort of HADES scales quadratically with the number N of atoms. If one tries to achieve linear scaling by applying a fast multipole method (FMM) to the computation of the HADES electrostatics, the Hamiltonian character (conservation of total energy, linear, and angular momenta) may get lost. Here, we show that the Hamiltonian character of HADES can be almost completely preserved, if the structure-adapted fast multipole method (SAMM) as recently redesigned by Lorenzen et al. [J. Chem. Theory Comput. 10, 3244-3259 (2014)] is suitably extended and is chosen as the FMM module. By this extension, the HADES/SAMM forces become exact gradients of the HADES/SAMM energy. Their translational and rotational invariance then guarantees (within the limits of numerical accuracy) the exact conservation of the linear and angular momenta. Also, the total energy is essentially conserved—up to residual algorithmic noise, which is caused by the periodically repeated SAMM interaction list updates. These updates entail very small temporal discontinuities of the force description, because the employed SAMM approximations represent deliberately balanced compromises between accuracy and efficiency. The energy-gradient corrected version of SAMM can also be applied, of course, to MD simulations of all-atom solvent-solute systems enclosed by periodic boundary conditions. However, as we demonstrate in passing, this choice does not offer any serious advantages.

  15. Partitioning into Colloidal Structures of Fasted State Intestinal Fluid Studied by Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to obtain insights into the structure and molecular interactions of colloidal structures present in fasted state intestinal fluid. Drug partitioning and interaction were studied with a mixed system of the bile salt taurocholate (TCH) and 1,2-dilinoleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DLiPC). Spontaneous aggregation of TCH and DLiPC from unconstrained MD simulations at the united-atom level using the Berger/Gromos54A7 force fields demonstrated that intermolecular hydrogen bonding between TCH molecules was an important factor in determining the overall TCH and DLiPC configuration. In bilayered systems, these intermolecular hydrogen bonds resulted in embedded transmembrane TCH clusters. Free energy simulations using the umbrella sampling technique revealed that the stability of these transmembrane TCH clusters was superior when they consisted of 3 or 4 TCH per bilayer leaflet. All-atom simulations using the Slipids/GAFF force fields showed that the TCH embedded in the bilayer decreased the energy barrier to penetrate the bilayer (ΔGpen) for water, ethanol, and carbamazepine, but not for the more lipophilic felodipine and danazol. This suggests that diffusion of hydrophilic to moderately lipophilic molecules through the bilayer is facilitated by the embedded TCH molecules. However, the effect of embedded TCH on the overall lipid/water partitioning was significant for danazol, indicating that the incorporation of TCH plays a crucial role for the partitioning of lipophilic solutes into e.g. lipidic vesicles existing in fasted state intestinal fluids. To conclude, the MD simulations revealed important intermolecular interactions in lipidic bilayers, both between the bile components themselves and with the drug molecules. PMID:27934534

  16. Contributions of intrinsic membrane dynamics to fast network oscillations with irregular neuronal discharges.

    PubMed

    Geisler, Caroline; Brunel, Nicolas; Wang, Xiao-Jing

    2005-12-01

    During fast oscillations in the local field potential (40-100 Hz gamma, 100-200 Hz sharp-wave ripples) single cortical neurons typically fire irregularly at rates that are much lower than the oscillation frequency. Recent computational studies have provided a mathematical description of such fast oscillations, using the leaky integrate-and-fire (LIF) neuron model. Here, we extend this theoretical framework to populations of more realistic Hodgkin-Huxley-type conductance-based neurons. In a noisy network of GABAergic neurons that are connected randomly and sparsely by chemical synapses, coherent oscillations emerge with a frequency that depends sensitively on the single cell's membrane dynamics. The population frequency can be predicted analytically from the synaptic time constants and the preferred phase of discharge during the oscillatory cycle of a single cell subjected to noisy sinusoidal input. The latter depends significantly on the single cell's membrane properties and can be understood in the context of the simplified exponential integrate-and-fire (EIF) neuron. We find that 200-Hz oscillations can be generated, provided the effective input conductance of single cells is large, so that the single neuron's phase shift is sufficiently small. In a two-population network of excitatory pyramidal cells and inhibitory neurons, recurrent excitation can either decrease or increase the population rhythmic frequency, depending on whether in a neuron the excitatory synaptic current follows or precedes the inhibitory synaptic current in an oscillatory cycle. Detailed single-cell properties have a substantial impact on population oscillations, even though rhythmicity does not originate from pacemaker neurons and is an emergent network phenomenon.

  17. Slow-fast stochastic diffusion dynamics and quasi-stationarity for diploid populations with varying size.

    PubMed

    Coron, Camille

    2016-01-01

    We are interested in the long-time behavior of a diploid population with sexual reproduction and randomly varying population size, characterized by its genotype composition at one bi-allelic locus. The population is modeled by a 3-dimensional birth-and-death process with competition, weak cooperation and Mendelian reproduction. This stochastic process is indexed by a scaling parameter K that goes to infinity, following a large population assumption. When the individual birth and natural death rates are of order K, the sequence of stochastic processes indexed by K converges toward a new slow-fast dynamics with variable population size. We indeed prove the convergence toward 0 of a fast variable giving the deviation of the population from quasi Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, while the sequence of slow variables giving the respective numbers of occurrences of each allele converges toward a 2-dimensional diffusion process that reaches (0,0) almost surely in finite time. The population size and the proportion of a given allele converge toward a Wright-Fisher diffusion with stochastically varying population size and diploid selection. We insist on differences between haploid and diploid populations due to population size stochastic variability. Using a non trivial change of variables, we study the absorption of this diffusion and its long time behavior conditioned on non-extinction. In particular we prove that this diffusion starting from any non-trivial state and conditioned on not hitting (0,0) admits a unique quasi-stationary distribution. We give numerical approximations of this quasi-stationary behavior in three biologically relevant cases: neutrality, overdominance, and separate niches.

  18. Linearly scaling and almost Hamiltonian dielectric continuum molecular dynamics simulations through fast multipole expansions

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenzen, Konstantin; Mathias, Gerald; Tavan, Paul

    2015-11-14

    Hamiltonian Dielectric Solvent (HADES) is a recent method [S. Bauer et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 104103 (2014)] which enables atomistic Hamiltonian molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of peptides and proteins in dielectric solvent continua. Such simulations become rapidly impractical for large proteins, because the computational effort of HADES scales quadratically with the number N of atoms. If one tries to achieve linear scaling by applying a fast multipole method (FMM) to the computation of the HADES electrostatics, the Hamiltonian character (conservation of total energy, linear, and angular momenta) may get lost. Here, we show that the Hamiltonian character of HADES can be almost completely preserved, if the structure-adapted fast multipole method (SAMM) as recently redesigned by Lorenzen et al. [J. Chem. Theory Comput. 10, 3244-3259 (2014)] is suitably extended and is chosen as the FMM module. By this extension, the HADES/SAMM forces become exact gradients of the HADES/SAMM energy. Their translational and rotational invariance then guarantees (within the limits of numerical accuracy) the exact conservation of the linear and angular momenta. Also, the total energy is essentially conserved—up to residual algorithmic noise, which is caused by the periodically repeated SAMM interaction list updates. These updates entail very small temporal discontinuities of the force description, because the employed SAMM approximations represent deliberately balanced compromises between accuracy and efficiency. The energy-gradient corrected version of SAMM can also be applied, of course, to MD simulations of all-atom solvent-solute systems enclosed by periodic boundary conditions. However, as we demonstrate in passing, this choice does not offer any serious advantages.

  19. Single-cell resolution of intracellular T cell Ca(2+) dynamics in response to frequency-based H2O2 stimulation.

    PubMed

    Kniss-James, Ariel S; Rivet, Catherine A; Chingozha, Loice; Lu, Hang; Kemp, Melissa L

    2017-03-01

    Adaptive immune cells, such as T cells, integrate information from their extracellular environment through complex signaling networks with exquisite sensitivity in order to direct decisions on proliferation, apoptosis, and cytokine production. These signaling networks are reliant on the interplay between finely tuned secondary messengers, such as Ca(2+) and H2O2. Frequency response analysis, originally developed in control engineering, is a tool used for discerning complex networks. This analytical technique has been shown to be useful for understanding biological systems and facilitates identification of the dominant behaviour of the system. We probed intracellular Ca(2+) dynamics in the frequency domain to investigate the complex relationship between two second messenger signaling molecules, H2O2 and Ca(2+), during T cell activation with single cell resolution. Single-cell analysis provides a unique platform for interrogating and monitoring cellular processes of interest. We utilized a previously developed microfluidic device to monitor individual T cells through time while applying a dynamic input to reveal a natural frequency of the system at approximately 2.78 mHz stimulation. Although our network was much larger with more unknown connections than previous applications, we are able to derive features from our data, observe forced oscillations associated with specific amplitudes and frequencies of stimuli, and arrive at conclusions about potential transfer function fits as well as the underlying population dynamics.

  20. Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Fast Field Cycling Method for the Selective Study of Molecular Dynamics in Block Copolymers.

    PubMed

    Gizatullin, Bulat; Neudert, Oliver; Stapf, Siegfried; Mattea, Carlos

    2017-09-06

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is one of the most useful methods to increase sensitivity in NMR spectroscopy. It is based on the transfer of magnetization from an electron to the nuclear spin system. Based on previous work that demonstrated the feasibility of integrating DNP with fast field cycling (FFC) relaxometry and the possibility to distinguish between different mechanisms, such as the Overhauser effect (OE) and the solid effect (SE), the first FFC study of the differential relaxation properties of a copolymer is presented. For this purpose, concentrated solutions of the polystyrene-block-polybutadiene-block-polystyrene (SBS) triblock copolymer and the corresponding homopolymers were investigated. T1 -T2 relaxation data are discussed in terms of molecular mobility and the presence of radicals. The DNP selective data indicate a dominant SE contribution to the enhancement of the NMR signal for both blocks of the triblock copolymer and for the homopolymer solutions. The enhancement factors are different for both polymer types and in the copolymer, which is explained by the individual (1) H T1 relaxation times and different electron-nucleus coupling strength. The T1 relaxation dispersion measurements of the SE enhanced signal were performed, which led to improved signal-to-noise ratios that allowed the site-specific separation of relaxation times and their dependence on the Larmor frequency with a higher accuracy. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Plasma Dynamics and VUV Emission in a Fast Hollow Cathode Capillary Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto, Leopoldo; Esaulov, Andrey; Silva, Patricio; Sylvester, Gustavo; Moreno, José; Zambra, Marcelo; Nazarenko, Andrey

    2000-10-01

    Following the world tendency to study the physical mechanisms to obtain laser emission in the VUV to soft X-ray region in table-top device, a fast capillary discharge has been constructed at Comisión Chilena de Energía Nuclear, CCHEN. The device is identical to designed by P. Choi and M. Favre, included an electron beam from the hollow cathode region to provide ionization on the axis (1). The discharge operates in Argon with a cathode pressure of 100-500 mtorr. The system works with differential vacuum, thus the anode pressure is around five times less than the cathode pressure. The radius of capillary is 0.4 mm and the length is 2.5 cm. For an applied voltage of 10 kV a peak current of 5 kA with a rise time of 4.8 ns is obtained (10^12 A/s). MHD simulations in order to study the plasma dynamics an temperature evolution were performed (2). A final radius of 100-200 microns is expected at 8 ns, 2 ns after the peak current with a electron density of 2 x 10^18 cm-3. An electron and ion temperature of 80 and 40 eV respectively are predicted. In addition to usual electrical diagnostics, time-space resolution pinhole images (multipinhole camera with a multichannel plate, four frames, one frame every 4 ns) and time resolved spectra in the region of 10 to 100 nm were performed. Dynamics of plasma compresion was studied from time resolved pinhole images. Detected spectra show that plasma consists of argon ions with ionization potential from ArVI to ArX. This work has been funded by FONDECYT grant 1980187 and a Presidential Chair in Science granted by Chilean government. Authors are thankful to K. Koshelev and P. Antsiferov (ISAN, Troitsk) for fruitful discussions and comments. 1.- P. Choi and M. Favre, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 69, 3118, (1998) 2.- A. Esaulov, P. Sasorov, L. Soto, M. Zambra and J. Sakai, ``Fast Hollow Cathode Capillary Discharge. MHD Simulation''. Submitted for publication.

  2. Computational and experimental single cell biology techniques for the definition of cell type heterogeneity, interplay and intracellular dynamics.

    PubMed

    de Vargas Roditi, Laura; Claassen, Manfred

    2015-08-01

    Novel technological developments enable single cell population profiling with respect to their spatial and molecular setup. These include single cell sequencing, flow cytometry and multiparametric imaging approaches and open unprecedented possibilities to learn about the heterogeneity, dynamics and interplay of the different cell types which constitute tissues and multicellular organisms. Statistical and dynamic systems theory approaches have been applied to quantitatively describe a variety of cellular processes, such as transcription and cell signaling. Machine learning approaches have been developed to define cell types, their mutual relationships, and differentiation hierarchies shaping heterogeneous cell populations, yielding insights into topics such as, for example, immune cell differentiation and tumor cell type composition. This combination of experimental and computational advances has opened perspectives towards learning predictive multi-scale models of heterogeneous cell populations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Dynamic optimization of on-chip polymerase chain reaction by monitoring intracycle fluorescence using fast synchronous detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Sudip; Paul, Debjani; Venkataraman, V.

    2007-01-01

    The authors report on-chip dynamic optimization of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based on a feedback technique utilizing synchronous detection of intracycle fluorescence every 500ms. From a direct measurement of polymerase activity, the authors determine the optimum extension temperature. The authors dynamically optimize PCR in an inductively heated microchip by sensing the saturation of extension in each cycle and applying the feedback. They demonstrate that, even with fast ramp rates, dynamic optimization leads to faster reactions compared to fixed-duration extension protocols for long DNA (>500bp). This optimization scheme uses a fairly universal dye Sybr Green I and can be applied to most PCRs.

  4. A fast cardiac gamma camera with dynamic SPECT capabilities: design, system validation and future potential

    PubMed Central

    Blevis, Ira M.; Tsukerman, Leonid; Shrem, Yigal; Kovalski, Gil; Volokh, Lana

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The goal of this study is to present the Discovery NM 530c (DNM), a cardiac SPECT camera, interfacing multi-pinhole collimators with solid-state modules, aiming at slashing acquisition time without jeopardizing quality. DNM resembles PET since it enables 3-D SPECT without detector motion. We further envision how these novel capabilities may help with current and future challenges of cardiac imaging. Methods DNM sensitivity, spatial resolution (SR) and energy resolution (ER), count rate response, cardiac uniformity and cardiac defect contrast were measured and compared to a dedicated cardiac, dual-head standard SPECT (S-SPECT) camera. Results DNM sensitivity was more than threefold higher while SR was notably better. Significantly, SR was the same for 99mTc and 201Tl. ER was improved on DNM and allowed good separation of 99mTc and 123I spectral peaks. Count rate remained linear on DNM up to 612 kcps, while S-SPECT showed severe dead time limitations. Phantom studies revealed comparable uniformity and defect contrast, notwithstanding significantly shorter acquisition time for the DNM. First patient images, including dynamic SPECT, are also presented. Conclusion DNM is raising the bar for expedition and upgrade of practice. It features high sensitivity as well as improved SR, temporal resolution and ER. It enables reduction of acquisition time and fast protocols. Importantly, it is potentially capable of dynamic 3-D acquisition. The new technology is potentially upgradeable and may become a milestone in the evolution of nuclear cardiology as it assumes its key role in molecular imaging of the heart. PMID:20585775

  5. Utilizing fast multipole expansions for efficient and accurate quantum-classical molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Schwörer, Magnus; Lorenzen, Konstantin; Mathias, Gerald; Tavan, Paul

    2015-03-14

    Recently, a novel approach to hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations has been suggested [Schwörer et al., J. Chem. Phys. 138, 244103 (2013)]. Here, the forces acting on the atoms are calculated by grid-based density functional theory (DFT) for a solute molecule and by a polarizable molecular mechanics (PMM) force field for a large solvent environment composed of several 10{sup 3}-10{sup 5} molecules as negative gradients of a DFT/PMM hybrid Hamiltonian. The electrostatic interactions are efficiently described by a hierarchical fast multipole method (FMM). Adopting recent progress of this FMM technique [Lorenzen et al., J. Chem. Theory Comput. 10, 3244 (2014)], which particularly entails a strictly linear scaling of the computational effort with the system size, and adapting this revised FMM approach to the computation of the interactions between the DFT and PMM fragments of a simulation system, here, we show how one can further enhance the efficiency and accuracy of such DFT/PMM-MD simulations. The resulting gain of total performance, as measured for alanine dipeptide (DFT) embedded in water (PMM) by the product of the gains in efficiency and accuracy, amounts to about one order of magnitude. We also demonstrate that the jointly parallelized implementation of the DFT and PMM-MD parts of the computation enables the efficient use of high-performance computing systems. The associated software is available online.

  6. DCEMRI.jl: a fast, validated, open source toolkit for dynamic contrast enhanced MRI analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xia; Arlinghaus, Lori R.; Yankeelov, Thomas E.; Welch, E. Brian

    2015-01-01

    We present a fast, validated, open-source toolkit for processing dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) data. We validate it against the Quantitative Imaging Biomarkers Alliance (QIBA) Standard and Extended Tofts-Kety phantoms and find near perfect recovery in the absence of noise, with an estimated 10–20× speedup in run time compared to existing tools. To explain the observed trends in the fitting errors, we present an argument about the conditioning of the Jacobian in the limit of small and large parameter values. We also demonstrate its use on an in vivo data set to measure performance on a realistic application. For a 192 × 192 breast image, we achieved run times of <1 s. Finally, we analyze run times scaling with problem size and find that the run time per voxel scales as O(N1.9), where N is the number of time points in the tissue concentration curve. DCEMRI.jl was much faster than any other analysis package tested and produced comparable accuracy, even in the presence of noise. PMID:25922795

  7. Dynamics of local isolated magnetic flux tubes in a fast-rotating stellar atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, W.; Tajima, C.T.; Matsumoto, R. |; Shibata, K.

    1998-01-01

    Dynamics of magnetic flux tubes in the fast rotating stellar atmosphere is studied. We focus on the effects and signatures of the instability of the flux tube emergence influenced by the Coriolis force. We present the result from a linear stability analysis and discuss its possible signatures in the course of the evolution of G-type and M-type stars. We present a three dimensional magnetohydrodynamical simulation of local isolated magnetic flux tubes under a magnetic buoyancy instability in co-rotating Cartesian coordinates. We find that the combination of the buoyancy instability and the Coriolis effect gives rise to a mechanism, to twist the emerging magnetic flux tube into a helical structure. The tilt angle, east-west asymmetry and magnetic helicity of the Twisted flux tubes in the simulations are studied in detail. The linear and nonlinear analyses provide hints as to what kind of pattern of large spots in young M-type main-sequence stars might be observed. We find that young and old G-type stars may have different distributions of spots while M-type stars may always have low latitudes spots. The size of stellar spots may decrease when a star becomes older, due to the decreasing of magnetic field. A qualitative comparison with solar observations is also presented.

  8. Fast relaxation dynamics of the cardiotonic drug milrinone in water solutions.

    PubMed

    el-Kemary, Maged; Organero, Juan Angel; Douhal, Abderrazzak

    2006-06-01

    The fast relaxation dynamics of 1,6-dihydro-2-methyl-6-oxo-3,4'-bipyridine-5-carbonitrile (milrinone, MIR), a cardiotonic drug, has been characterized in water solutions at different pH. In acidic media, a blue emission reflects a charge-transfer state in the cation (C) leading to a more stabilized structure with an emission lifetime of 90 ps. The emission lifetimes of the keto (K) and anion (A) structures are approximately 65 and 310 ps, respectively. Reasons for efficient nonradiative channels are discussed in terms of hydrogen-bonding interactions, intramolecular charge transfer (ICT), and twisting motion. A blue nanosecond-emission observed in almost all the studied pH range is suggested to be due to relaxed K due to an ICT reaction. B3LYP (6-31+G**) calculations showed that, in a water cavity, K is more stable than the enol form by 7 kcal/mol, and the ICT may take place within the pyridone moiety. At the physiological pH, the inotropic K structure is the dominant species (approximately 100%).

  9. Multi-GeV electron radiography for measurements of fast dynamic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrill, F. E.; Fabritius, J.; Mariam, F. G.; Poulson, D.; Simpson, R.; Walstrom, P.; Wilde, C.

    2017-01-01

    Charged particle radiography has been developed in the past decade to provide high-resolution, muti-frame flash radiography of dynamic systems. This development has focused on proton radiography utilizing 11 MeV to 50 GeV protons for a wide range of measurements. Recently, these techniques are being applied to the use of high energy electrons for applications at a future LANL MaRIE facility. At MaRIE Multi-GeV electrons may be used to diagnose small, quickly evolving systems, requiring resolution and frame rates beyond the capability of the existing 800 MeV proton radiography. The electron accelerator proposed for MaRIE will be capable of meeting the fast frame rate and resolution requirements for MaRIE. Because of the light mass of the electrons, bremsstrahlung processes become dominant in the electron interactions within the material being studied. Simulations have been performed to study these interactions, but measurements are required to fully understand the capabilities of this new measurement technique. We present an estimate from simulations of the performance characteristics of this future capability.

  10. DCEMRI.jl: a fast, validated, open source toolkit for dynamic contrast enhanced MRI analysis.

    PubMed

    Smith, David S; Li, Xia; Arlinghaus, Lori R; Yankeelov, Thomas E; Welch, E Brian

    2015-01-01

    We present a fast, validated, open-source toolkit for processing dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) data. We validate it against the Quantitative Imaging Biomarkers Alliance (QIBA) Standard and Extended Tofts-Kety phantoms and find near perfect recovery in the absence of noise, with an estimated 10-20× speedup in run time compared to existing tools. To explain the observed trends in the fitting errors, we present an argument about the conditioning of the Jacobian in the limit of small and large parameter values. We also demonstrate its use on an in vivo data set to measure performance on a realistic application. For a 192 × 192 breast image, we achieved run times of <1 s. Finally, we analyze run times scaling with problem size and find that the run time per voxel scales as O(N (1.9)), where N is the number of time points in the tissue concentration curve. DCEMRI.jl was much faster than any other analysis package tested and produced comparable accuracy, even in the presence of noise.

  11. Utilizing fast multipole expansions for efficient and accurate quantum-classical molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwörer, Magnus; Lorenzen, Konstantin; Mathias, Gerald; Tavan, Paul

    2015-03-01

    Recently, a novel approach to hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations has been suggested [Schwörer et al., J. Chem. Phys. 138, 244103 (2013)]. Here, the forces acting on the atoms are calculated by grid-based density functional theory (DFT) for a solute molecule and by a polarizable molecular mechanics (PMM) force field for a large solvent environment composed of several 103-105 molecules as negative gradients of a DFT/PMM hybrid Hamiltonian. The electrostatic interactions are efficiently described by a hierarchical fast multipole method (FMM). Adopting recent progress of this FMM technique [Lorenzen et al., J. Chem. Theory Comput. 10, 3244 (2014)], which particularly entails a strictly linear scaling of the computational effort with the system size, and adapting this revised FMM approach to the computation of the interactions between the DFT and PMM fragments of a simulation system, here, we show how one can further enhance the efficiency and accuracy of such DFT/PMM-MD simulations. The resulting gain of total performance, as measured for alanine dipeptide (DFT) embedded in water (PMM) by the product of the gains in efficiency and accuracy, amounts to about one order of magnitude. We also demonstrate that the jointly parallelized implementation of the DFT and PMM-MD parts of the computation enables the efficient use of high-performance computing systems. The associated software is available online.

  12. Size-dependent visible absorption and fast photoluminescence decay dynamics from freestanding strained silicon nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we report on the visible absorption, photoluminescence (PL), and fast PL decay dynamics from freestanding Si nanocrystals (NCs) that are anisotropically strained. Direct evidence of strain-induced dislocations is shown from high-resolution transmission electron microscopy images. Si NCs with sizes in the range of approximately 5-40 nm show size-dependent visible absorption in the range of 575-722 nm, while NCs of average size <10 nm exhibit strong PL emission at 580-585 nm. The PL decay shows an exponential decay in the nanosecond time scale. The Raman scattering studies show non-monotonic shift of the TO phonon modes as a function of size because of competing effect of strain and phonon confinement. Our studies rule out the influence of defects in the PL emission, and we propose that owing to the combined effect of strain and quantum confinement, the strained Si NCs exhibit direct band gap-like behavior. PMID:21711845

  13. Fast Polymer Dynamics and Ion Aggregates in a Model Single Ion Conductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soles, Christopher; Tyagi, Madhusan; Peng, Huagen; Kim, Jenny; Runt, Jim

    2014-03-01

    In this presentation we explore the fast dynamics of a polymeric single ion conductor using both the Disc Chopper Spectrometer (DCS; ps time scales) and the High Flux Backscattering Spectrometer (HFBS; ns time scales) at the NIST Center for Neutron Research. The model system studied here is a block copolymer consisting of runs 13 ethylene oxide repeat units separated by an isophthalate group functionalized with a sodium sulfonate salt. In these systems the sulfonate groups are bound as an in-chain anion, leaving the sodium cation as the only mobile ion in the system. We find that the quasielastic neutron scattering spectra across the two spectrometers can be consistently fit with a total of 3 different relaxation processes. The slowest, least mobile of the 3 processes looks purely diffusive and shows a normal thermal activation. The fastest, most mobile process shows strong signs of confinement; the FWHM of the relaxation is almost independent of Q, suggesting a caged type motion, and also shows signs of normal thermal activation. However, the intermediate process falls between the extremes of confinement and free diffusion. The motion is characteristic of jump diffusion with a characteristic residence time and jump length. Furthermore, there is clear evidence of this motion slowing down upon heating, the opposite of normal thermal excitation. This slowing down with upon heating is correlated with the appearance of ionic aggregates in the temperature dependent X-ray scattering measured by the Winey Group.

  14. Dynamics of fast pattern formation in porous silicon by laser interference

    SciTech Connect

    Peláez, Ramón J.; Kuhn, Timo; Afonso, Carmen N.; Vega, Fidel

    2014-10-20

    Patterns are fabricated on 290 nm thick nanostructured porous silicon layers by phase-mask laser interference using single pulses of an excimer laser (193 nm, 20 ns pulse duration). The dynamics of pattern formation is studied by measuring in real time the intensity of the diffraction orders 0 and 1 at 633 nm. The results show that a transient pattern is formed upon melting at intensity maxima sites within a time <30 ns leading to a permanent pattern in a time <100 ns upon solidification at these sites. This fast process is compared to the longer one (>1 μs) upon melting induced by homogeneous beam exposure and related to the different scenario for releasing the heat from hot regions. The diffraction efficiency of the pattern is finally controlled by a combination of laser fluence and initial thickness of the nanostructured porous silicon layer and the present results open perspectives on heat release management upon laser exposure as well as have potential for alternative routes for switching applications.

  15. Atom ejection from a fast-ion track: A molecular-dynamics study

    SciTech Connect

    Urbassek, H.M. ); Kafemann, H. ); Johnson, R.E. )

    1994-01-01

    As a model for atom ejection from fast-ion tracks, molecular-dynamics simulations of a cylindrical track of energized particles are performed. An idealized situation is studied where every atom in a cylindrical track of radius [ital R][sub 0] is energized with energy [ital E][sub 0]. The emission yield [ital Y]([ital E][sub 0],[ital R][sub 0]) shows the existence of two ejection regimes. If the particle energy [ital E][sub 0] is below the sublimation energy [ital U] of the material, a threshold regime is seen in which [ital Y] rises roughly like the third power of [ital E][sub 0]; for high-energy densities [ital E][sub 0][approx gt][ital U], the yield rises much more slowly, roughly linearly. In both cases, ejected particles mostly originate from the track, rather than from its surroundings, and from the first or the first few monolayers. The behavior found is interpreted here in terms of emission due to a pressure-driven jet (linear regime) or due to a pressure pulse (threshold regime). These both behave differently from the often-used thermal-spike sputtering model.

  16. Fast dynamic electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) oxygen imaging using low-rank tensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christodoulou, Anthony G.; Redler, Gage; Clifford, Bryan; Liang, Zhi-Pei; Halpern, Howard J.; Epel, Boris

    2016-09-01

    Hypoxic tumors are resistant to radiotherapy, motivating the development of tools to image local oxygen concentrations. It is generally believed that stable or chronic hypoxia is the source of resistance, but more recent work suggests a role for transient hypoxia. Conventional EPR imaging (EPRI) is capable of imaging tissue pO2in vivo, with high pO2 resolution and 1 mm spatial resolution but low imaging speed (10 min temporal resolution for T1-based pO2 mapping), which makes it difficult to investigate the oxygen changes, e.g., transient hypoxia. Here we describe a new imaging method which accelerates dynamic EPR oxygen imaging, allowing 3D imaging at 2 frames per minute, fast enough to image transient hypoxia at the "speed limit" of observed pO2 change. The method centers on a low-rank tensor model that decouples the tradeoff between imaging speed, spatial coverage/resolution, and number of inversion times (pO2 accuracy). We present a specialized sparse sampling strategy and image reconstruction algorithm for use with this model. The quality and utility of the method is demonstrated in simulations and in vivo experiments in tumor bearing mice.

  17. Dynamic Pore-scale Reservoir-condition Imaging of Reaction in Carbonates Using Synchrotron Fast Tomography.

    PubMed

    Menke, Hannah P; Andrew, Matthew G; Vila-Comamala, Joan; Rau, Christoph; Blunt, Martin J; Bijeljic, Branko

    2017-02-21

    Underground storage permanence is a major concern for carbon capture and storage. Pumping CO2 into carbonate reservoirs has the potential to dissolve geologic seals and allow CO2 to escape. However, the dissolution processes at reservoir conditions are poorly understood. Thus, time-resolved experiments are needed to observe and predict the nature and rate of dissolution at the pore scale. Synchrotron fast tomography is a method of taking high-resolution time-resolved images of complex pore structures much more quickly than traditional µ-CT. The Diamond Lightsource Pink Beam was used to dynamically image dissolution of limestone in the presence of CO2-saturated brine at reservoir conditions. 100 scans were taken at a 6.1 µm resolution over a period of 2 hours. The images were segmented and the porosity and permeability were measured using image analysis and network extraction. Porosity increased uniformly along the length of the sample; however, the rate of increase of both porosity and permeability slowed at later times.

  18. Calibration and Validation of a Spar-Type Floating Offshore Wind Turbine Model using the FAST Dynamic Simulation Tool: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Browning, J. R.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.; Goupee, A. J.

    2012-11-01

    In 2007, the FAST wind turbine simulation tool, developed and maintained by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), was expanded to include capabilities that are suitable for modeling floating offshore wind turbines. In an effort to validate FAST and other offshore wind energy modeling tools, DOE funded the DeepCwind project that tested three prototype floating wind turbines at 1/50th scale in a wave basin, including a semisubmersible, a tension-leg platform, and a spar buoy. This paper describes the use of the results of the spar wave basin tests to calibrate and validate the FAST offshore floating simulation tool, and presents some initial results of simulated dynamic responses of the spar to several combinations of wind and sea states.

  19. Comparison of population dynamics between slow- and fast-growing strains of the rotifer Brachionus calyciflorus pallas in continuous culture.

    PubMed

    Bennett, William N; Boraas, Martin E

    1989-12-01

    The population dynamics of a slow- and a fast-growing strain of the rotifer Brachionus calyciflorus are compared. Rotifers were grown in steady-states, at various specific growth rates (μ), in both two-stage chemostat and turbidostat cultures on the green alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa. Population variables, including specific ingestion (I), loss (L) and filtration (F) rates, yield (Y), production (P) and half-saturation coefficient of growth (K g), were calculated using a growth model based on saturation kinetics. I, L, F and K g were shown to be higher and Y and P lower for the fast-growing strain. Differences between the two strains with regard to these variables may represent tradeoffs associated with the faster potential growth rate. Steady-state relationships between these values and μ for the fast-growing strain, however, deviated from model predictions which suggest a possible shift from carbon to non-carbon growth limitation.

  20. Molecular dynamics and intracellular signaling of the TNF-R1 with the R92Q mutation.

    PubMed

    Agulló, Luis; Malhotra, Sunny; Fissolo, Nicolás; Montalban, Xavier; Comabella, Manuel

    2015-12-15

    The tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, member 1A (TNFRSF1A) gene encodes the TNF-R1, one of the main TNF receptors that mediates its inflammatory actions. In a recent study, serum levels of the soluble TNF-R1 and mRNA levels of the full-length receptor were found to be significantly increased in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients carrying the R92Q mutation. Interestingly, R92Q-mutated patients were younger at disease onset and progressed slower as compared to non-carriers. Building on these previous findings, here we aimed to investigate by means of both in silico and in vitro approaches the mechanisms relating the R92Q substitution with functional changes of the receptor and their potential effects modulating MS disease course. Models of the extracellular domains of the human TNF-R1 and human TNF-R1 carrying the R92Q mutation, alone or bound to TNF, were constructed and submitted to molecular dynamics. TRAF2 and CASP3 mRNA expression levels were determined by real-time PCR in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from 61 MS patients, 9 R92Q carriers and 52 non-carriers (CT and CC genotypes for SNP rs4149584, respectively). Molecular dynamic studies revealed that the R92Q mutation increased the contact area between receptor and TNF (1070 and 1388Å(2) for native and mutated receptor) and decreased the distance between them (28.7 to 27.9Å), while Van der Waals and electrostatic interaction energies were increased. In PBMC from MS patients carrying the R92Q mutation, CASP3 mRNA expression levels were significantly increased compared to non-carriers, whereas a trend was observed for TRAF2. These data suggest that the R92Q mutation gives rise to a stronger interaction between the receptor and its ligand, which results in the potentiation of TNF-mediated pathways. Although further studies are needed, these functional changes may be related with the modulation in disease course reported in MS patients carrying the R92Q mutation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B

  1. 2-color photo bleaching experiments reveal distinct intracellular dynamics of two components of the Hsp90 complex

    SciTech Connect

    Picard, Didier . E-mail: didier.picard@cellbio.unige.ch; Suslova, Elena; Briand, Pierre-Andre

    2006-11-15

    The abundant molecular chaperone Hsp90 functions in association with co-chaperones including p23 to promote the folding and maturation of a subset of cytosolic proteins. 'Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching' (FRAP) experiments showed that the dynamics of p23 in live cells is dictated by Hsp90. Since Hsp90 is present in large excess over p23, the mobility of Hsp90 could conceivably be quite different. To facilitate the analysis and to allow a direct comparison with p23, we developed a 2-color FRAP technique. Two test proteins are expressed as fusion proteins with the two spectrally separable fluorescent proteins mCherry and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). The 2-color FRAP technique is powerful for the concomitant recording of two proteins located in the same area of a cell, two components of the same protein complex, or mutant and wild-type versions of the same protein under identical experimental conditions. 2-color FRAP of Hsp90 and p23 is virtually indistinguishable, consistent with the notion that they are both engaged in a multitude of large protein complexes. However, when Hsp90-p23 complexes are disrupted by the Hsp90 inhibitor geldanamycin, p23 moves by free diffusion while Hsp90 maintains its low mobility because it remains bound in remodeled multicomponent complexes.

  2. Extended Vofire algorithm for fast transient fluid-structure dynamics with liquid-gas flows and interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faucher, Vincent; Kokh, Samuel

    2013-05-01

    The present paper is dedicated to the simulation of liquid-gas flows with interfaces in the framework of fast transient fluid-structure dynamics. The two-fluid interface is modelled as a discontinuity surface in the fluid property. We use an anti-dissipative Finite-Volume discretization strategy for unstructured meshes in order to capture the position of the interface within a thin diffused volume. This allows to control the numerical diffusion of the artificial mixing between components and provide an accurate capture of complex interface motions. This scheme is an extension of the Vofire numerical solver. We propose specific developments in order to handle flows that involved high density ratio between liquid and gas. The resulting scheme capabilities are validated on basic examples and also tested against large scale fluid-structure test derived from the MARA 10 experiment. All simulations are performed using EUROPLEXUS fast transient dynamics software.

  3. Intracellular Oscillations and Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beta, Carsten; Kruse, Karsten

    2017-03-01

    Dynamic processes in living cells are highly organized in space and time. Unraveling the underlying molecular mechanisms of spatiotemporal pattern formation remains one of the outstanding challenges at the interface between physics and biology. A fundamental recurrent pattern found in many different cell types is that of self-sustained oscillations. They are involved in a wide range of cellular functions, including second messenger signaling, gene expression, and cytoskeletal dynamics. Here, we review recent developments in the field of cellular oscillations and focus on cases where concepts from physics have been instrumental for understanding the underlying mechanisms. We consider biochemical and genetic oscillators as well as oscillations that arise from chemo-mechanical coupling. Finally, we highlight recent studies of intracellular waves that have increasingly moved into the focus of this research field.

  4. Attractors of relaxation discrete-time systems with chaotic dynamics on a fast time scale

    SciTech Connect

    Maslennikov, Oleg V.; Nekorkin, Vladimir I.

    2016-07-15

    In this work, a new type of relaxation systems is considered. Their prominent feature is that they comprise two distinct epochs, one is slow regular motion and another is fast chaotic motion. Unlike traditionally studied slow-fast systems that have smooth manifolds of slow motions in the phase space and fast trajectories between them, in this new type one observes, apart the same geometric objects, areas of transient chaos. Alternating periods of slow regular motions and fast chaotic ones as well as transitions between them result in a specific chaotic attractor with chaos on a fast time scale. We formulate basic properties of such attractors in the framework of discrete-time systems and consider several examples. Finally, we provide an important application of such systems, the neuronal electrical activity in the form of chaotic spike-burst oscillations.

  5. Automatic brain tumor extraction from T1-weighted coronal MRI using fast bounding box and dynamic snake.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tao; Mandal, Mrinal

    2012-01-01

    Brain tumor segmentation from MRI data is an important but challenging task. This paper presents an efficient and fully automatic brain tumor segmentation technique. The proposed technique includes a fuzzy C-means (FCM) based preprocessing to enhance the quality of T1-weighted coronal MR images, a fast bounding box (FBB) detection algorithm to locate a rectangle around tumor, and a new dynamic snake using modified Hausdorff distance (MHD) for the final tumor extraction.

  6. Non-Ideal Compressible-Fluid Dynamics of Fast-Response Pressure Probes for Unsteady Flow Measurements in Turbomachinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gori, G.; Molesini, P.; Persico, G.; Guardone, A.

    2017-03-01

    The dynamic response of pressure probes for unsteady flow measurements in turbomachinery is investigated numerically for fluids operating in non-ideal thermodynamic conditions, which are relevant for e.g. Organic Rankine Cycles (ORC) and super-critical CO2 applications. The step response of a fast-response pressure probe is investigated numerically in order to assess the expected time response when operating in the non-ideal fluid regime. Numerical simulations are carried out exploiting the Non-Ideal Compressible Fluid-Dynamics (NICFD) solver embedded in the open-source fluid dynamics code SU2. The computational framework is assessed against available experimental data for air in dilute conditions. Then, polytropic ideal gas (PIG), i.e. constant specific heats, and Peng-Robinson Stryjek-Vera (PRSV) models are applied to simulate the flow field within the probe operating with siloxane fluid octamethyltrisiloxane (MDM). The step responses are found to depend mainly on the speed of sound of the working fluid, indicating that molecular complexity plays a major role in determining the promptness of the measurement devices. According to the PRSV model, non-ideal effects can increase the step response time with respect to the acoustic theory predictions. The fundamental derivative of gas-dynamic is confirmed to be the driving parameter for evaluating non-ideal thermodynamic effects related to the dynamic calibration of fast-response aerodynamic pressure probes.

  7. Characterization of intracellular dynamics of inoculated PrP-res and newly generated PrPSc during early stage prion infection in Neuro2a cells

    PubMed Central

    Yamasaki, Takeshi; Baron, Gerald S; Suzuki, Akio; Hasebe, Rie; Horiuchi, Motohiro

    2014-01-01

    Summary To clarify the cellular mechanisms for the establishment of prion infection, we analyzed the intracellular dynamics of inoculated and newly generated abnormal isoform of prion protein (PrPSc) in Neuro2a cells. Within 24 h after inoculation, the newly generated PrPSc was evident at the plasma membrane, in early endosomes, and in late endosomes, but this PrPSc was barely evident in lysosomes; in contrast, the majority of the inoculated PrPSc was evident in late endosomes and lysosomes. However, during the subsequent 48 h, the newly generated PrPSc increased remarkably in early endosomes and recycling endosomes. Overexpression of wild-type and mutant Rab proteins showed that membrane trafficking along not only the endocytic-recycling pathway but also the endo-lysosomal pathway is involved in de novo PrPSc generation. These results suggest that the trafficking of exogenously introduced PrPSc from the endo-lysosomal pathway to the endocytic-recycling pathway is important for the establishment of prion infection. PMID:24503096

  8. In vivo optical microprobe imaging for intracellular Ca2+ dynamics in response to dopaminergic signaling in deep brain evoked by cocaine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Zhongchi; Pan, Yingtian; Du, Congwu

    2012-02-01

    Ca2+ plays a vital role as second messenger in signal transduction and the intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) change is an important indicator of neuronal activity in the brain, including both cortical and subcortical brain regions. Due to the highly scattering and absorption of brain tissue, it is challenging to optically access the deep brain regions (e.g., striatum at >3mm under the brain surface) and image [Ca2+]i changes with cellular resolutions. Here, we present two micro-probe approaches (i.e., microlens, and micro-prism) integrated with a fluorescence microscope modified to permit imaging of neuronal [Ca2+]i signaling in the striatum using a calcium indicator Rhod2(AM). While a micro-prism probe provides a larger field of view to image neuronal network from cortex to striatum, a microlens probe enables us to track [Ca2+]i dynamic change in individual neurons within the brain. Both techniques are validated by imaging neuronal [Ca2+]i changes in transgenic mice with dopamine receptors (D1R, D2R) expressing EGFP. Our results show that micro-prism images can map the distribution of D1R- and D2R-expressing neurons in various brain regions and characterize their different mean [Ca2+]i changes induced by an intervention (e.g., cocaine administration, 8mg/kg., i.p). In addition, microlens images can characterize the different [Ca2+]i dynamics of D1 and D2 neurons in response to cocaine, including new mechanisms of these two types of neurons in striatum. These findings highlight the power of the optical micro-probe imaging for dissecting the complex cellular and molecular insights of cocaine in vivo.

  9. Calibration and validation of a spar-type floating offshore wind turbine model using the FAST dynamic simulation tool

    DOE PAGES

    Browning, J. R.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.; ...

    2014-12-16

    In this study, high-quality computer simulations are required when designing floating wind turbines because of the complex dynamic responses that are inherent with a high number of degrees of freedom and variable metocean conditions. In 2007, the FAST wind turbine simulation tool, developed and maintained by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), was expanded to include capabilities that are suitable for modeling floating offshore wind turbines. In an effort to validate FAST and other offshore wind energy modeling tools, DOE funded the DeepCwind project that tested three prototype floating wind turbines at 1/50th scale inmore » a wave basin, including a semisubmersible, a tension-leg platform, and a spar buoy. This paper describes the use of the results of the spar wave basin tests to calibrate and validate the FAST offshore floating simulation tool, and presents some initial results of simulated dynamic responses of the spar to several combinations of wind and sea states. Wave basin tests with the spar attached to a scale model of the NREL 5-megawatt reference wind turbine were performed at the Maritime Research Institute Netherlands under the DeepCwind project. This project included free-decay tests, tests with steady or turbulent wind and still water (both periodic and irregular waves with no wind), and combined wind/wave tests. The resulting data from the 1/50th model was scaled using Froude scaling to full size and used to calibrate and validate a full-size simulated model in FAST. Results of the model calibration and validation include successes, subtleties, and limitations of both wave basin testing and FAST modeling capabilities.« less

  10. Calibration and validation of a spar-type floating offshore wind turbine model using the FAST dynamic simulation tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browning, J. R.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.; Goupee, A. J.

    2014-12-01

    High-quality computer simulations are required when designing floating wind turbines because of the complex dynamic responses that are inherent with a high number of degrees of freedom and variable metocean conditions. In 2007, the FAST wind turbine simulation tool, developed and maintained by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), was expanded to include capabilities that are suitable for modeling floating offshore wind turbines. In an effort to validate FAST and other offshore wind energy modeling tools, DOE funded the DeepCwind project that tested three prototype floating wind turbines at 1/50th scale in a wave basin, including a semisubmersible, a tension-leg platform, and a spar buoy. This paper describes the use of the results of the spar wave basin tests to calibrate and validate the FAST offshore floating simulation tool, and presents some initial results of simulated dynamic responses of the spar to several combinations of wind and sea states. Wave basin tests with the spar attached to a scale model of the NREL 5-megawatt reference wind turbine were performed at the Maritime Research Institute Netherlands under the DeepCwind project. This project included free-decay tests, tests with steady or turbulent wind and still water (both periodic and irregular waves with no wind), and combined wind/wave tests. The resulting data from the 1/50th model was scaled using Froude scaling to full size and used to calibrate and validate a full-size simulated model in FAST. Results of the model calibration and validation include successes, subtleties, and limitations of both wave basin testing and FAST modeling capabilities.

  11. Calibration and validation of a spar-type floating offshore wind turbine model using the FAST dynamic simulation tool

    SciTech Connect

    Browning, J. R.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.; Goupee, A. J.

    2014-12-16

    In this study, high-quality computer simulations are required when designing floating wind turbines because of the complex dynamic responses that are inherent with a high number of degrees of freedom and variable metocean conditions. In 2007, the FAST wind turbine simulation tool, developed and maintained by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), was expanded to include capabilities that are suitable for modeling floating offshore wind turbines. In an effort to validate FAST and other offshore wind energy modeling tools, DOE funded the DeepCwind project that tested three prototype floating wind turbines at 1/50th scale in a wave basin, including a semisubmersible, a tension-leg platform, and a spar buoy. This paper describes the use of the results of the spar wave basin tests to calibrate and validate the FAST offshore floating simulation tool, and presents some initial results of simulated dynamic responses of the spar to several combinations of wind and sea states. Wave basin tests with the spar attached to a scale model of the NREL 5-megawatt reference wind turbine were performed at the Maritime Research Institute Netherlands under the DeepCwind project. This project included free-decay tests, tests with steady or turbulent wind and still water (both periodic and irregular waves with no wind), and combined wind/wave tests. The resulting data from the 1/50th model was scaled using Froude scaling to full size and used to calibrate and validate a full-size simulated model in FAST. Results of the model calibration and validation include successes, subtleties, and limitations of both wave basin testing and FAST modeling capabilities.

  12. New Structural-Dynamics Module for Offshore Multimember Substructures within the Wind Turbine Computer-Aided Engineering Tool FAST: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Song, H.; Damiani, R.; Robertson, A.; Jonkman, J.

    2013-08-01

    FAST, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), is a computer-aided engineering (CAE) tool for aero-hydro-servo-elastic analysis of land-based and offshore wind turbines. This paper discusses recent upgrades made to FAST to enable loads simulations of offshore wind turbines with fixed-bottom, multimember support structures (e.g., jackets and tripods, which are commonly used in transitional-depth waters). The main theory and strategies for the implementation of the multimember substructure dynamics module (SubDyn) within the new FAST modularization framework are introduced. SubDyn relies on two main engineering schematizations: 1) a linear frame finite-element beam (LFEB) model and 2) a dynamics system reduction via Craig-Bampton's method. A jacket support structure and an offshore system consisting of a turbine atop a jacket substructure were simulated to test the SubDyn module and to preliminarily assess results against results from a commercial finite-element code.

  13. A Fast Computational Fluid Dynamics Model for the Flow and Heat Transfer Characteristics Analysis of Indoor Substation Rooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, L. W.; Zou, A. X.

    2017-05-01

    In order to find a high efficiency, energy saving structure of the indoor substation room, a novel computational fluid dynamics method is proposed to model its flow and heat transfer characteristics. As an automatic optimization system, the efficient methods for mesh generation and numerical calculation are necessary. The mesh of the whole room including the transformer and its heat transfer fins is created using a structured mesh scheme, and a detection technology is adopted to recognize all the obstacles. In order to improve the numerical efficiency, a fast computational fluid dynamics (FFD) method is adopted to establish the three dimensional dynamic model with heat source. The comparisons between the FFD model and the experimental data show that the FFD can model the flow and heat transfer characteristics of the indoor substation efficiently. By modifying the related parameters in the model, this method can be used in the simulation of other indoor substation rooms to optimize their structure and operation.

  14. Extending the Capabilities of the Mooring Analysis Program: A Survey of Dynamic Mooring Line Theories for Integration into FAST: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Masciola, M.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.

    2014-03-01

    Techniques to model dynamic mooring lines come in various forms. The most widely used models include either a heuristic representation of the physics (such as a Lumped-Mass, LM, system), a Finite-Element Analysis (FEA) discretization of the lines (discretized in space), or a Finite-Difference (FD) model (which is discretized in both space and time). In this paper, we explore the features of the various models, weigh the advantages of each, and propose a plan for implementing one dynamic mooring line model into the open-source Mooring Analysis Program (MAP). MAP is currently used as a module for the FAST offshore wind turbine computer-aided engineering (CAE) tool to model mooring systems quasi-statically, although dynamic mooring capabilities are desired. Based on the exploration in this manuscript, the lumped-mass representation is selected for implementation in MAP based on its simplicity, computational cost, and ability to provide similar physics captured by higher-order models.

  15. Fast, high-fidelity, all-optical and dynamically-controlled polarization gate using room-temperature atomic vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Runbing; Zhu, Chengjie; Deng, L.; Hagley, E. W.

    2014-10-20

    We demonstrate a fast, all-optical polarization gate in a room-temperature atomic medium. Using a Polarization-Selective-Kerr-Phase-Shift (PSKPS) technique, we selectively write a π phase shift to one circularly-polarized component of a linearly-polarized input signal field. The output signal field maintains its original strength but acquires a 90° linear polarization rotation, demonstrating fast, high-fidelity, dynamically-controlled polarization gate operation. The intensity of the polarization-switching field used in this PKSPK-based polarization gate operation is only 2 mW/cm{sup 2}, which would be equivalent to 0.5 nW of light power (λ = 800 nm) confined in a typical commercial photonic hollow-core fiber. This development opens a realm of possibilities for potential future extremely low light level telecommunication and information processing systems.

  16. Fast, high-fidelity, all-optical and dynamically-controlled polarization gate using room-temperature atomic vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Runbing; Zhu, Chengjie; Deng, L.; Hagley, E. W.

    2014-10-01

    We demonstrate a fast, all-optical polarization gate in a room-temperature atomic medium. Using a Polarization-Selective-Kerr-Phase-Shift (PSKPS) technique, we selectively write a π phase shift to one circularly-polarized component of a linearly-polarized input signal field. The output signal field maintains its original strength but acquires a 90° linear polarization rotation, demonstrating fast, high-fidelity, dynamically-controlled polarization gate operation. The intensity of the polarization-switching field used in this PKSPK-based polarization gate operation is only 2 mW/cm2, which would be equivalent to 0.5 nW of light power (λ = 800 nm) confined in a typical commercial photonic hollow-core fiber. This development opens a realm of possibilities for potential future extremely low light level telecommunication and information processing systems.

  17. Dynamics of water solutions of natural polysaccharides by fast field cycling nmr relaxometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prusova, Alena; Conte, Pellegrino; Kucerik, Jiri; de Pasquale, Claudio; Alonzo, Giuseppe

    2010-05-01

    Cryobiology studies the effect of low temperatures on living systems such as microorganisms and plants. In particular, plants growing in cold or frozen environments can survive such extreme conditions due to the cold hardening process. Hardening is a three step process during which, first, translocation of polysaccharides to the plant roots affects water structure in the cell-soil surface. For this reason, increase of cell-membrane permeability and resistance to temperatures from -5°C to -10°C is achieved. In a second step, chemical alteration of cell membrane arises and resistance to temperatures up to -20°C is obtained. The last hardening step consists in the vitrification of the plant tissues which allow plants to survive at temperatures as low as -50°C. Since polysaccharides play a very important role in the initial part of the cold hardening process, it is of paramount importance to study the effect of such natural biopolymers on water structure. Here, we present preliminary data obtained by fast field cycling NMR relaxometry on the effect of hyaluronan (an anionic, non-sulfated glycosaminoglycan) on water structure at different concentrations of the polysaccharide. Although hyaluronan is a polysaccharide found exceptionally in animal, human or bacterial bodies, in the present work it was used as a model "pilot" compound. In fact, it has an unique ability to hold water and it contains both polysaccharide and protein-like acetamido functionalities. For this reason, hyaluronan promotes the future research on other plant biopolymers such as, for instance, starch and other very specific proteins. Results revealed that different water-structure systems surround the molecule of hyaluronan in diluted and semidiluted systems. Namely, at the lowest hyaluronan concentration, three hydration shells can be recognized. The first hydration shell is made by bound water (BW) which is strongly fixed to the hyaluronan surface mainly through electrostatic interactions. A

  18. The Research of Efficiency of Application of Fast Chaoticity Indicators Megno and Omegno in Problems of Asteroid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galushina, T. Yu.; Letner, O. N.

    2016-12-01

    The paper is deal with behavior of fast chaos indicators such as MEGNO (Mean Exponential Growth of Nearby Orbits) and OMEGNO (Orthogonal MEGNO). The comparison of indicators is implemented on the examples of studying dynamics of near-Earth asteroids (99942 Apophis, 3200 Phaethon, 399457 2002 PD43, 2002 VE68, 2013 ND15) and main belt asteroids (1 Ceres, 588 Achilles). OMEGNO showed the best efficiency because it allows not only to divide regular and chaotic motion but also to reveal periodic orbits among regular ones.

  19. A fast and explicit algorithm for simulating the dynamics of small dust grains with smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Daniel J.; Laibe, Guillaume

    2015-07-01

    We describe a simple method for simulating the dynamics of small grains in a dusty gas, relevant to micron-sized grains in the interstellar medium and grains of centimetre size and smaller in protoplanetary discs. The method involves solving one extra diffusion equation for the dust fraction in addition to the usual equations of hydrodynamics. This `diffusion approximation for dust' is valid when the dust stopping time is smaller than the computational timestep. We present a numerical implementation using smoothed particle hydrodynamics that is conservative, accurate and fast. It does not require any implicit timestepping and can be straightforwardly ported into existing 3D codes.

  20. Raster image correlation spectroscopy (RICS) for measuring fast protein dynamics and concentrations with a commercial laser scanning confocal microscope.

    PubMed

    Brown, C M; Dalal, R B; Hebert, B; Digman, M A; Horwitz, A R; Gratton, E

    2008-01-01

    Raster image correlation spectroscopy (RICS) is a new and novel technique for measuring molecular dynamics and concentrations from fluorescence confocal images. The RICS technique extracts information about molecular dynamics and concentrations from images of living cells taken on commercial confocal systems. Here we develop guidelines for performing the RICS analysis on an analogue commercial laser scanning confocal microscope. Guidelines for typical instrument settings, image acquisition settings and analogue detector characterization are presented. Using appropriate instrument/acquisition parameters, diffusion coefficients and concentrations can be determined, even for highly dynamic dye molecules in solution. Standard curves presented herein demonstrate the ability to detect protein concentrations as low as approximately 2 nM. Additionally, cellular measurements give accurate values for the diffusion of paxillin-enhanced-green fluorescent protein (EGFP), an adhesion adaptor molecule, in the cytosol of the cell and also show slower paxillin dynamics near adhesions where paxillin interacts with immobile adhesion components. Methods are presented to account for bright immobile structures within the cell that dominate spatial correlation functions; allowing the extraction of fast protein dynamics within and near these structures. A running average algorithm is also presented to address slow cellular movement or movement of cellular features such as adhesions. Finally, methods to determine protein concentration in the presence of immobile structures within the cell are presented. A table is presented giving guidelines for instrument and imaging setting when performing RICS on the Olympus FV300 confocal and these guidelines are a starting point for performing the analysis on other commercial confocal systems.

  1. Validation of a Fast-Fluid-Dynamics Model for Predicting Distribution of Particles with Low Stokes Number

    SciTech Connect

    Zuo, Wangda; Chen, Qingyan

    2011-06-01

    To design a healthy indoor environment, it is important to study airborne particle distribution indoors. As an intermediate model between multizone models and computational fluid dynamics (CFD), a fast fluid dynamics (FFD) model can be used to provide temporal and spatial information of particle dispersion in real time. This study evaluated the accuracy of the FFD for predicting transportation of particles with low Stokes number in a duct and in a room with mixed convection. The evaluation was to compare the numerical results calculated by the FFD with the corresponding experimental data and the results obtained by the CFD. The comparison showed that the FFD could capture major pattern of particle dispersion, which is missed in models with well-mixed assumptions. Although the FFD was less accurate than the CFD partially due to its simplification in numeric schemes, it was 53 times faster than the CFD.

  2. Gas Dynamics, Characterization, and Calibration of Fast Flow Flight Cascade Impactor Quartz Crystal Microbalances (QCM) for Aerosol Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, J.R.; Thorpe, A. N.; James, C.; Michael, A.; Ware, M.; Senftle, F.; Smith, S.

    1997-01-01

    During recent high altitude flights, we have tested the aerosol section of the fast flow flight cascade impactor quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) on loan to Howard University from NASA. The aerosol mass collected during these flights was disappointingly small. Increasing the flow through the QCM did not correct the problem. It was clear that the instrument was not being operated under proper conditions for aerosol collect ion primarily because the gas dynamics is not well understood. A laboratory study was therefore undertaken using two different fast flow QCM's in an attempt to establish the gas flow characteristics of the aerosol sections and its effect on particle collection, Some tests were made at low temperatures but most of the work reported here was carried out at room temperature. The QCM is a cascade type impactor originally designed by May (1945) and later modified by Anderson (1966) and Mercer et al (1970) for chemical gas analysis. The QCM has been used extensively for collecting and sizing stratospheric aerosol particles. In this paper all flow rates are given or corrected and referred to in terms of air at STP. All of the flow meters were kept at STP. Although there have been several calibration and evaluation studies of moderate flow cascade impactors of less than or equal to 1 L/rein., there is little experimental information on the gas flow characteristics for fast flow rates greater than 1 L/rein.

  3. Computational fluid dynamics modelling of biomass fast pyrolysis in fluidised bed reactors, focusing different kinetic schemes.

    PubMed

    Ranganathan, Panneerselvam; Gu, Sai

    2016-08-01

    The present work concerns with CFD modelling of biomass fast pyrolysis in a fluidised bed reactor. Initially, a study was conducted to understand the hydrodynamics of the fluidised bed reactor by investigating the particle density and size, and gas velocity effect. With the basic understanding of hydrodynamics, the study was further extended to investigate the different kinetic schemes for biomass fast pyrolysis process. The Eulerian-Eulerian approach was used to model the complex multiphase flows in the reactor. The yield of the products from the simulation was compared with the experimental data. A good comparison was obtained between the literature results and CFD simulation. It is also found that CFD prediction with the advanced kinetic scheme is better when compared to other schemes. With the confidence obtained from the CFD models, a parametric study was carried out to study the effect of biomass particle type and size and temperature on the yield of the products.

  4. NMR signal enhancement of >50 000 times in fast dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization.

    PubMed

    Pinto, L F; Marín-Montesinos, I; Lloveras, V; Muñoz-Gómez, J L; Pons, M; Veciana, J; Vidal-Gancedo, J

    2017-03-17

    Herein, we report the synthesis and the study of a novel mixed biradical with BDPA and TEMPO radical units that are covalently bound by an ester group (BDPAesterTEMPO) as a polarizing agent for fast dissolution DNP. The biradical exhibits an extremely high DNP NMR enhancement of >50 000 times, which constitutes one of the largest signal enhancements observed so far, to the best of our knowledge.

  5. Fast continuous energy scan with dynamic coupling of the monochromator and undulator at the DEIMOS beamline.

    PubMed

    Joly, L; Otero, E; Choueikani, F; Marteau, F; Chapuis, L; Ohresser, P

    2014-05-01

    In order to improve the efficiency of X-ray absorption data recording, a fast scan method, the Turboscan, has been developed on the DEIMOS beamline at Synchrotron SOLEIL, consisting of a software-synchronized continuous motion of the monochromator and undulator motors. This process suppresses the time loss when waiting for the motors to reach their target positions, as well as software dead-time, while preserving excellent beam characteristics.

  6. High-definition velocity-space tomography of fast-ion dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salewski, M.; Geiger, B.; Jacobsen, A. S.; Hansen, P. C.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Korsholm, S. B.; Leipold, F.; Madsen, J.; Moseev, D.; Nielsen, S. K.; Nocente, M.; Odstrčil, T.; Rasmussen, J.; Stagner, L.; Stejner, M.; Weiland, M.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2016-10-01

    Velocity-space tomography of the fast-ion distribution function in a fusion plasma is usually a photon-starved tomography method due to limited optical access and signal-to-noise ratio of fast-ion D α (FIDA) spectroscopy as well as the strive for high-resolution images. In high-definition tomography, prior information makes up for this lack of data. We restrict the target velocity space through the measured absence of FIDA light, impose phase-space densities to be non-negative, and encode the known geometry of neutral beam injection (NBI) sources. We further use a numerical simulation as prior information to reconstruct where in velocity space the measurements and the simulation disagree. This alternative approach is demonstrated for four-view as well as for two-view FIDA measurements. The high-definition tomography tools allow us to study fast ions in sawtoothing plasmas and the formation of NBI peaks at full, half and one-third energy by time-resolved tomographic movies.

  7. Evolution of intracellular pathogens.

    PubMed

    Casadevall, Arturo

    2008-01-01

    The evolution of intracellular pathogens is considered in the context of ambiguities in basic definitions and the diversity of host-microbe interactions. Intracellular pathogenesis is a subset of a larger world of host-microbe interactions that includes amoeboid predation and endosymbiotic existence. Intracellular pathogens often reveal genome reduction. Despite the uniqueness of each host-microbe interaction, there are only a few general solutions to the problem of intracellular survival, especially in phagocytic cells. Similarities in intracellular pathogenic strategies between phylogenetically distant microbes suggest convergent evolution. For discerning such patterns, it is useful to consider whether the microbe is acquired from another host or directly from the environment. For environmentally acquired microbes, biotic pressures, such as amoeboid predators, may select for the capacity for virulence. Although often viewed as a specialized adaptation, the capacity for intracellular survival may be widespread among microbes, thus questioning whether the intracellular lifestyle warrants a category of special distinctiveness.

  8. Development and testing of a fast Fourier transform high dynamic-range spectral diagnostics for millimeter wave characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Thoen, D. J.; Bongers, W. A.; Westerhof, E.; Baar, M. R. de; Berg, M. A. van den; Beveren, V. van; Goede, A. P. H.; Graswinckel, M. F.; Schueller, F. C.; Oosterbeek, J. W.; Buerger, A.; Hennen, B. A.

    2009-10-15

    A fast Fourier transform (FFT) based wide range millimeter wave diagnostics for spectral characterization of scattered millimeter waves in plasmas has been successfully brought into operation. The scattered millimeter waves are heterodyne downconverted and directly digitized using a fast analog-digital converter and a compact peripheral component interconnect computer. Frequency spectra are obtained by FFT in the time domain of the intermediate frequency signal. The scattered millimeter waves are generated during high power electron cyclotron resonance heating experiments on the TEXTOR tokamak and demonstrate the performance of the diagnostics and, in particular, the usability of direct digitizing and Fourier transformation of millimeter wave signals. The diagnostics is able to acquire 4 GHz wide spectra of signals in the range of 136-140 GHz. The rate of spectra is tunable and has been tested between 200 000 spectra/s with a frequency resolution of 100 MHz and 120 spectra/s with a frequency resolution of 25 kHz. The respective dynamic ranges are 52 and 88 dB. Major benefits of the new diagnostics are a tunable time and frequency resolution due to postdetection, near-real time processing of the acquired data. This diagnostics has a wider application in astrophysics, earth observation, plasma physics, and molecular spectroscopy for the detection and analysis of millimeter wave radiation, providing high-resolution spectra at high temporal resolution and large dynamic range.

  9. Impedance spectroscopy applied to the fast wounding dynamics of an electrical wound-healing assay in mammalian cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellotti, Mariela I.; Giana, Fabián E.; Bonetto, Fabián J.

    2015-08-01

    Electrical wound-healing assays are often used as a means to study in vitro cell migration and proliferation. In such analysis, a cell monolayer that sits on a small electrode is electrically wounded and its spectral impedance is then continuously measured in order to monitor the healing process. The relatively slow dynamics of the cell healing have been extensively studied, while those of the much faster wounding phase have not yet been investigated. An analysis of the electrical properties of a particular cell type during this phase could give extra information about the changes in the cell membrane due to the application of the wounding current, and could also be useful to optimize the wounding regime for different cell types. The main issue when trying to register information about these dynamics is that the traditional measurement scheme employed in typical wound-healing assays doesn’t allow the simultaneous application of the wounding signal and measurement of the system’s impedance. In this paper, we overcome this limitation by implementing a measurement strategy consisting of cycles of fast alternating low- and high-voltage signals applied on electrodes covered with mammalian cells. This approach is capable of registering the fast impedance changes during the transient regime corresponding to the cell wounding process. Furthermore, these quasi-simultaneous high- and low-voltage measurements can be compared in order to obtain an empirical correlation between both quantities.

  10. Validity of the top-down approach of inverse dynamics analysis in fast and large rotational trunk movements.

    PubMed

    Iino, Yoichi; Kojima, Takeji

    2012-08-01

    This study investigated the validity of the top-down approach of inverse dynamics analysis in fast and large rotational movements of the trunk about three orthogonal axes of the pelvis for nine male collegiate students. The maximum angles of the upper trunk relative to the pelvis were approximately 47°, 49°, 32°, and 55° for lateral bending, flexion, extension, and axial rotation, respectively, with maximum angular velocities of 209°/s, 201°/s, 145°/s, and 288°/s, respectively. The pelvic moments about the axes during the movements were determined using the top-down and bottom-up approaches of inverse dynamics and compared between the two approaches. Three body segment inertial parameter sets were estimated using anthropometric data sets (Ae et al., Biomechanism 11, 1992; De Leva, J Biomech, 1996; Dumas et al., J Biomech, 2007). The root-mean-square errors of the moments and the absolute errors of the peaks of the moments were generally smaller than 10 N·m. The results suggest that the pelvic moment in motions involving fast and large trunk movements can be determined with a certain level of validity using the top-down approach in which the trunk is modeled as two or three rigid-link segments.

  11. Rational design of reversible fluorescent probes for live-cell imaging and quantification of fast glutathione dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umezawa, Keitaro; Yoshida, Masafumi; Kamiya, Mako; Yamasoba, Tatsuya; Urano, Yasuteru

    2017-03-01

    Alterations in glutathione (GSH) homeostasis are associated with a variety of diseases and cellular functions, and therefore, real-time live-cell imaging and quantification of GSH dynamics are important for understanding pathophysiological processes. However, existing fluorescent probes are unsuitable for these purposes due to their irreversible fluorogenic mechanisms or slow reaction rates. In this work, we have successfully overcome these problems by establishing a design strategy inspired by Mayr's work on nucleophilic reaction kinetics. The synthesized probes exhibit concentration-dependent, reversible and rapid absorption/fluorescence changes (t1/2 = 620 ms at [GSH] = 1 mM), as well as appropriate Kd values (1-10 mM: within the range of intracellular GSH concentrations). We also developed FRET-based ratiometric probes, and demonstrated that they are useful for quantifying GSH concentration in various cell types and also for real-time live-cell imaging of GSH dynamics with temporal resolution of seconds.

  12. Rational design of reversible fluorescent probes for live-cell imaging and quantification of fast glutathione dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umezawa, Keitaro; Yoshida, Masafumi; Kamiya, Mako; Yamasoba, Tatsuya; Urano, Yasuteru

    2016-11-01

    Alterations in glutathione (GSH) homeostasis are associated with a variety of diseases and cellular functions, and therefore, real-time live-cell imaging and quantification of GSH dynamics are important for understanding pathophysiological processes. However, existing fluorescent probes are unsuitable for these purposes due to their irreversible fluorogenic mechanisms or slow reaction rates. In this work, we have successfully overcome these problems by establishing a design strategy inspired by Mayr's work on nucleophilic reaction kinetics. The synthesized probes exhibit concentration-dependent, reversible and rapid absorption/fluorescence changes (t1/2 = 620 ms at [GSH] = 1 mM), as well as appropriate Kd values (1-10 mM: within the range of intracellular GSH concentrations). We also developed FRET-based ratiometric probes, and demonstrated that they are useful for quantifying GSH concentration in various cell types and also for real-time live-cell imaging of GSH dynamics with temporal resolution of seconds.

  13. A Fast Algorithm for Massively Parallel, Long-Term, Simulation of Complex Molecular Dynamics Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaramillo-Botero, Andres; Goddard, William A, III; Fijany, Amir

    1997-01-01

    The advances in theory and computing technology over the last decade have led to enormous progress in applying atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) methods to the characterization, prediction, and design of chemical, biological, and material systems,.

  14. A Fast Algorithm for Massively Parallel, Long-Term, Simulation of Complex Molecular Dynamics Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaramillo-Botero, Andres; Goddard, William A, III; Fijany, Amir

    1997-01-01

    The advances in theory and computing technology over the last decade have led to enormous progress in applying atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) methods to the characterization, prediction, and design of chemical, biological, and material systems,.

  15. Structural Dynamics of Soluble Chloride Intracellular Channel Protein CLIC1 Examined by Amide Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry (DXMS)†

    PubMed Central

    Stoychev, Stoyan H.; Nathaniel, Christos; Fanucchi, Sylvia; Brock, Melissa; Li, Sheng; Asmus, Kyle; Woods, Virgil L.; Dirr, Heini W.

    2009-01-01

    Chloride intracellular channel protein 1 (CLIC1) functions as an anion channel in plasma and nuclear membranes when its soluble monomeric form converts to an integral-membrane form. The transmembrane region of CLIC1 is located in its thioredoxin-like domain 1 but the mechanism whereby the protein converts to its membrane conformation has yet to be determined. Since channel formation in membranes is enhanced at low pH (5 to 5.5), a condition that is found at the surface of membranes, the structural dynamics of soluble CLIC1 was studied at pH 7 and at pH 5.5 in the absence of membranes by amide hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (DXMS). Rapid hydrogen exchange data indicate that CLIC1 displays a similar core structure at these pH values. Domain 1 is less stable than the all-helical domain 2 and, while the structure of domain 1 remains intact, its conformational flexibility is further increased in an acidic environment (pH 5.5). In the absence of membrane, an acidic environment appears to prime the solution structure of CLIC1 by destabilising domain 1 in order to lower the activation energy barrier for its conversion to the membrane-insertion conformation. The significantly enhanced H/D-exchange rates at pH 5.5 displayed by two segments (peptides 11-31 and 68-82) could be due to the protonation of acidic residues in salt bridges. One of these segments (peptide 11-31) includes part of the transmembrane region which, in the solution structure, consists of helix α1. This helix is intrinsically stable and is most likely retained in the membrane conformation. Strand β2, another element of the transmembrane region, displays a propensity to form a helical structure and has putative N- and C-capping motifs, suggesting that it too most likely forms a helix in a lipid bilayer. PMID:19650640

  16. Inclusion-localised crystal-plasticity, dynamic porosity, and fast-diffusion pathway generation in zircon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timms, Nicholas E.; Reddy, Steven M.; Fitz Gerald, John D.; Green, Leonard; Muhling, Janet R.

    2012-02-01

    A population of oscillatory zoned, igneous zircon grains in a Javanese andesite contains fluid and mineral inclusions (up to 10 μm across) trapped during zircon growth. Orientation contrast imaging and orientation mapping by electron backscatter diffraction reveal that crystal-plastic deformation overprints growth zoning and has localized around 1-10 μm pores and inclusions. Cumulative crystallographic misorientation of up to 25° around pores and inclusions in zircon is predominantly accommodated by low-angle (<5°) orientation boundaries, with few free dislocations in subgrain interiors. Low-angle boundaries are curved, with multiple orientation segments at the sub-micrometer scale. Misorientation axes associated with the most common boundaries align with the zircon c-axis and are consistent with dislocation creep dominated by <100>(010) slip. A distinctly different population of sub-micron pores is present along subgrain boundaries and their triple junctions. These are interpreted to have formed as a geometric consequence of dislocation interaction during crystal-plasticity. Dislocation creep microstructures are spatially related to differences in cathodoluminescence spectra that indicate variations in the abundance of CL-active rare earth elements. The extent of the modification suggests deformation-related fast-pathway diffusion distances that are over five orders of magnitude greater than expected for volume diffusion. This enhanced diffusion is interpreted to represent a combination of fast-diffusion pathways associated with creep cavitation, dislocations and along low-angle boundaries. These new data indicate that ductile deformation localised around inclusions can provide fast pathways for geochemical exchange. These pathways may provide links to the zircon grain boundary, thus negating the widely held assumption that inclusions in fracture-free zircon are geochemically armoured once they are physically enclosed.

  17. Studying IDP stability and dynamics by fast relaxation imaging in living cells.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Apratim; Prigozhin, Maxim; Gelman, Hannah; Gruebele, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Fast relaxation imaging (FReI) temperature-tunes living cells and applies small temperature jumps to them, to monitor biomolecular stability and kinetics in vivo. The folding or aggregation state of a target protein is monitored by Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). Intrinsically disordered proteins near the structured-unstructured boundary are particularly sensitive to their environment. We describe, using the IDP α-synuclein as an example, how FReI can be used to measure IDP stability and folding inside the cell.

  18. Single shot, temporally and spatially resolved measurements of fast electron dynamics using a chirped optical probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, J. S.; Murphy, C. D.; Booth, N.; Dance, R. J.; Gray, R. J.; MacLellan, D. A.; McKenna, P.; Rusby, D.; Wilson, L.

    2014-03-01

    A new approach to rear surface optical probing is presented that permits multiple, time-resolved 2D measurements to be made during a single, ultra-intense ( > 1018 W cm-2) laser-plasma interaction. The diagnostic is capable of resolving rapid changes in target reflectivity which can be used to infer valuable information on fast electron transport and plasma formation at the target rear surface. Initial results from the Astra-Gemini laser are presented, with rapid radial sheath expansion together with detailed filamentary features being observed to evolve during single shots.

  19. Fast time-reversible algorithms for molecular dynamics of rigid-body systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajima, Yasuhiro; Hiyama, Miyabi; Ogata, Shuji; Kobayashi, Ryo; Tamura, Tomoyuki

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, we present time-reversible simulation algorithms for rigid bodies in the quaternion representation. By advancing a time-reversible algorithm [Y. Kajima, M. Hiyama, S. Ogata, and T. Tamura, J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 80, 114002 (2011), 10.1143/JPSJ.80.114002] that requires iterations in calculating the angular velocity at each time step, we propose two kinds of iteration-free fast time-reversible algorithms. They are easily implemented in codes. The codes are compared with that of existing algorithms through demonstrative simulation of a nanometer-sized water droplet to find their stability of the total energy and computation speeds.

  20. Geometry and dynamics of fast magnetosonic wavefronts near magnetic null points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Núñez, Manuel

    2017-02-01

    The behavior of two-dimensional fast magnetosonic waves in the vicinity of isolated points where the magnetic field vanishes is studied analytically. The geometry of rays and wavefronts is described, and the curvature of both is found using conformal mapping techniques. These results are applied to the formation of shock waves, obtaining that shock formation is guaranteed at a finite time for any initial condition of the perturbation when the wavefront is concave and the rays tend to focus, whereas otherwise shocks occur only for a certain range of initial conditions.

  1. Fast and flexible interpolation via PUM with applications in population dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavoretto, Roberto; De Rossi, Alessandra; Perracchione, Emma

    2016-06-01

    In this paper a new fast and flexible interpolation tool is shown. The Partition of Unity Method (PUM) is performed using Radial Basis Functions (RBFs) as local approximants. In particular, we present a new space-partitioning data structure extremely useful in applications because of its independence from the problem geometry. An application of such algorithm, in the context of wild herbivores in forests, shows that the ecosystem of the considered natural park is in a very delicate situation, for which the animal population could become extinguished. The determination of the so-called sensitivity surfaces, obtained with the new versatile partitioning structure, indicates some possible preventive measures to the park administrators.

  2. Supramolecular nanoreactors for intracellular singlet-oxygen sensitization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaminathan, Subramani; Fowley, Colin; Thapaliya, Ek Raj; McCaughan, Bridgeen; Tang, Sicheng; Fraix, Aurore; Burjor, Captain; Sortino, Salvatore; Callan, John F.; Raymo, Françisco M.

    2015-08-01

    An amphiphilic polymer with multiple decyl and oligo(ethylene glycol) chains attached to a common poly(methacrylate) backbone assembles into nanoscaled particles in aqueous environments. Hydrophobic anthracene and borondipyrromethene (BODIPY) chromophores can be co-encapsulated within the self-assembling nanoparticles and transported across hydrophilic media. The reversible character of the noncovalent bonds, holding the supramolecular containers together, permits the exchange of their components with fast kinetics in aqueous solution. Incubation of cervical cancer (HeLA) cells with a mixture of two sets of nanoparticles, pre-loaded independently with anthracene or BODIPY chromophores, results in guest scrambling first and then transport of co-entrapped species to the intracellular space. Alternatively, incubation of cells with the two sets of nanocarriers in consecutive steps permits the sequential transport of the anthracene and BODIPY chromophores across the plasma membrane and only then allows their co-encapsulation within the same supramolecular containers. Both mechanisms position the two sets of chromophores with complementary spectral overlap in close proximity to enable the efficient transfer of energy intracellularly from the anthracene donors to the BODIPY acceptors. In the presence of iodine substituents on the BODIPY platform, intersystem crossing follows energy transfer. The resulting triplet state can transfer energy further to molecular oxygen with the concomitant production of singlet oxygen to induce cell mortality. Furthermore, the donor can be excited with two near-infrared photons simultaneously to permit the photoinduced generation of singlet oxygen intracellularly under illumination conditions compatible with applications in vivo. Thus, these supramolecular strategies to control the excitation dynamics of multichromophoric assemblies in the intracellular environment can evolve into valuable protocols for photodynamic therapy.An amphiphilic

  3. Modified alternate-day fasting and cardioprotection: relation to adipose tissue dynamics and dietary fat intake.

    PubMed

    Varady, Krista A; Hudak, Carolyn S; Hellerstein, Marc K

    2009-06-01

    The relation between alternate-day fasting (ADF) and cardioprotection remains uncertain. In the present study, we examined the ability of modified ADF, with a low-fat (LF) vs high-fat (HF) background diet, to modulate adipose tissue physiology in a way that may protect against coronary heart disease. In a 4-week study, male C57BL/6 mice were randomized to 1 of 3 groups: (1) ADF-85%-LF (85% energy restriction on fast day, ad libitum fed on feed day, on an LF diet), (2) ADF-85%-HF (same protocol but HF diet), and (3) control (ad libitum fed). Throughout the study, body weight did not differ between ADF and control animals. Proportion of subcutaneous fat increased (P < .01), whereas the proportion of visceral fat decreased (P < .01), in both ADF groups. Triglyceride (TG) synthesis was augmented (P < .05) in subcutaneous fat, but remained unchanged in visceral fat. Adiponectin concentrations were elevated (P < .05), whereas leptin and resistin levels decreased (P < .05). Aortic vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation was reduced (P < .05) by 60% and 76% on the LF and HF diets, respectively. Plasma total cholesterol, TG, and free fatty acid concentrations also decreased (P < .05). In summary, modified ADF regimens alter adipose tissue physiology (ie, body fat distribution, TG metabolism, and adipokines) in a way that may protect against coronary heart disease. These beneficial effects were noted over a wide range of fat intake, suggesting that ADF may be protective even in the presence of HF diets.

  4. Anomalous fast dynamics of adsorbate overlayers near an incommensurate structural transition.

    PubMed

    Granato, Enzo; Ying, S C; Elder, K R; Ala-Nissila, T

    2013-09-20

    We investigate the dynamics of a compressively strained adsorbed layer on a periodic substrate via a simple two-dimensional model that admits striped and hexagonal incommensurate phases. We show that the mass transport is superfast near the striped-hexagonal phase boundary and in the hexagonal phase. For an initial step profile separating a bare substrate region (or "hole") from the rest of a striped incommensurate phase, the superfast domain wall dynamics leads to a bifurcation of the initial step profile into two interfaces or profiles propagating in opposite directions with a hexagonal phase in between. This yields a theoretical understanding of the recent experiments for the Pb/Si(111) system.

  5. Dynamics of the Axial Melt Lens/Dike transition at fast spreading ridges: assimilation and hydrous partial melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    France, L.; Ildefonse, B.; Koepke, J.

    2009-04-01

    Recent detailed field studies performed in the Oman ophiolite on the gabbro/sheeted dike transition, compared to corresponding rocks from the EPR drilled by IODP (Site 1256), constrain a general model for the dynamics of the axial melt lens (AML) present at fast spreading ridges (France et al., 2008). This model implies that the AML/dike transition is a dynamic interface migrating up- and downward, and that the isotropic gabbro horizon on top of the igneous section represents its fossilization. It is also proposed that upward migrations are associated to reheating of the base of the sheeted dike complex and to assimilation processes. Plagiogranitic lithologies are observed close to the truncated base of the dikes and are interpreted to represent frozen melts generated by partial melting of previously hydrothermalized sheeted dikes. Relicts of previously hydrothermalized lithologies are also observed in the fossil melt lens, and are associated to lithologies that have crystallized under high water activities, with clinopyroxene crystallizing before plagioclase, and An-rich plagioclase. To better understand our field data, we performed hydrous partial melting experiments at shallow pressures (0.1 GPa) under slightly oxidizing conditions (NNO oxygen buffer) and water saturated conditions on hydrothermalized sheeted dike sample from the Oman ophiolite. These experiments have been performed between 850°C and 1030°C; two additional experiments in the subsolidus regime were also conducted (750°C and 800°C). Clinopyroxenes formed during incongruent melting at low temperature (<910°C) have compositions that match those from the corresponding natural rocks (reheated base of the sheeted dike and relicts of assimilated lithologies). In particular, the characteristic low TiO2 and Al2O3 contents are reproduced. The experimental melts produced at low temperatures correspond to compositions of typical natural plagiogranites. In natural settings, these silicic liquids would be

  6. The effect of fault segmentation on the dynamics of fast-slipping oceanic transform faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregg, P. M.; Behn, M. D.; Lin, J.; Grove, T. L.; Montési, L. G.

    2007-12-01

    The majority of oceanic transform faults (OTFs) systems along the fast-spreading equatorial East Pacific Rise are segmented into two or more strike-slip fault strands as a result of plate motion reorganization. Fresh basaltic lava sampled from these locations (e.g., the Siqueiros and Garrett OTFs) indicate that active crustal accretion is occurring within these transform systems. New Residual Mantle Bouguer gravity Anomalies (RMBA) calculated along fast-slipping OTFs are found to be more negative than the RMBA values along adjacent ridge segments. One possible explanation for these observations is enhanced magmatic upwelling and crustal accretion at intra- transform spreading centers (ITSC) and within the transform valley of the fast-slipping OTFs. In this study, we examine two end-member 3-D thermal models (constant viscosity rheology versus visco-plastic rheology) to explore mantle flow and melt extraction beneath segmented transform faults. Melt fraction is calculated using the parameterized fractional melting model of Kinzler and Grove (JGR, 1992a, 1992b, and 1993), and the fractional crystallization models of Yang et al. (Cont. Min. Pet., 1996). We evaluate the sensitivity of these models to various parameters including transform fault geometry, mantle potential temperature, and initial mantle composition. Preliminary results for a 100 km-long transform fault, slipping at 100 mm/yr, segmented by a single 10 km-long ITSC indicate that incorporating a visco-plastic rheology results in an approximately 35 percent decrease in the brittle fault area (< 600°C isotherm) compared to a constant viscosity model. Assuming upward melt migration along the base of the lithosphere, we find that crustal production is enhanced at ITSC by 1-1.5 km compared to the adjacent ridge segments. However, crustal thickness variations are sensitive to transform fault geometry and assumptions made about the pooled melt region. For example, if melt migration is not permitted across the

  7. A fast procedure for optimizing dynamic force distribution in multifingered grasping.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yu; Qian, Wen-Han

    2006-12-01

    This correspondence deals with the dynamic force distribution (DFD) problem, i.e., computing the contact forces to equilibrate a dynamic external wrench on the grasped object. The sum of the normal force components is minimized for enhancing safety and saving energy. By this optimality criterion, the DFD problem can be transformed into a linear programming (LP) problem. Its objective function is the inner product of the dynamic external wrench and a vector, and the constraints on the vector, given by a set of linear inequalities, define a polytope. The solution to the LP problem can always be attained at the vertex of the polytope called the solution vertex. We notice that the polytope is determined by the grasp configuration. Along with the direction change of the dynamic external wrench, only the solution vertex moves to an adjacent vertex sequentially, whereas the polytope with all its vertices remains unchanged. Therefore, the polytope and the adjacencies of each vertex can be computed in the offline phase. Then, in the online phase, simply search the adjacencies of the old solution vertex for the new one. Without lost of optimality, such a DFD algorithm runs a thousandfold faster than solving the LP problem by the simplex method in real time.

  8. Modeling of a method of parallel hierarchical transformation for fast recognition of dynamic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timchenko, Leonid I.; Kokryatskaya, Nataliya I.; Shpakovych, Viktoriya V.

    2013-12-01

    Principles necessary to develop a method and computational facilities for the parallel hierarchical transformation based on high-performance GPUs are discussed in the paper. Mathematic models of the parallel hierarchical (PH) network training for the transformation and a PH network training method for recognition of dynamic images are developed.

  9. Fast-scan em with digital image processing for dynamic experiments

    Treesearch

    Charles W. McMillin; Fred C. Billingsley; Robert E. Frazer

    1973-01-01

    The recent introduction of accessory instrumentation capable of display at television scan rates suggests a broadened application for the scanning electron microscope - the direct observation of motion (dynamic events) at magnifactions otherwise unattainable. In one illustrative experiment, the transverse surface of southern pine was observed when subjected to large...

  10. Fast-scan EM with digital image processing for dynamic experiments

    Treesearch

    C.W. McMillin; F.C. Billingsley; R.E. Frazer

    1974-01-01

    The recent introduction of accessory instrumentation capable of display at television scan rates suggests a broadened application for the scanning electron microscope- the direct observation of motion (dynamic events) at magnifications otherwise unattainable. In one illustrative experiment, the transverse surface of southern pine was observed when subjected to large...

  11. Study of dynamical behaviour of the plasma in a dc non-transferred plasma torch using fast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyal, Vidhi; Ravi, G.; Bandyopadhyay, P.; Banerjee, S.; Yugesh, V.; Mukherjee, S.

    2017-03-01

    The dynamical behaviour of the plasma in a dc non-transferred plasma torch is the result of complex interactions between various forces acting on the plasma column. We have studied this behaviour in a novel experiment comprising a low power (˜25 kW) torch and fast imaging diagnostics. The nitrogen gas plasma torch was operated at atmospheric pressure for a wide range of gas flow rates (20-60 lpm) and currents (70-120 A). A strong axial external magnetic field (100-500 G) was introduced and end-on images of the plasma column were captured using a high speed camera of frame rate ˜117 000 fps. The studies have yielded dominant role of external magnetic on the arc root dynamics. The column is clearly distinguishable in three main parts: central plasma, cathode-anode junction, and radial component of column that attaches to the anode. The dynamics of the column, especially the angular rotational speed of the radial part of the column, is analyzed in detail in terms of the forces that act upon it. The nature of the arc root attachment is observed to vary with variation in main experimental parameters, such as current, magnetic field, and flow. Arguments are invoked to explain the observed phenomena and a model of the physical processes is presented to explain the phenomena.

  12. Hybrid stochastic simulation of reaction-diffusion systems with slow and fast dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Strehl, Robert; Ilie, Silvana

    2015-12-21

    In this paper, we present a novel hybrid method to simulate discrete stochastic reaction-diffusion models arising in biochemical signaling pathways. We study moderately stiff systems, for which we can partition each reaction or diffusion channel into either a slow or fast subset, based on its propensity. Numerical approaches missing this distinction are often limited with respect to computational run time or approximation quality. We design an approximate scheme that remedies these pitfalls by using a new blending strategy of the well-established inhomogeneous stochastic simulation algorithm and the tau-leaping simulation method. The advantages of our hybrid simulation algorithm are demonstrated on three benchmarking systems, with special focus on approximation accuracy and efficiency.

  13. Dynamics of the fast component of nano-confined water under electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Omar Diallo, Souleymane; Mamontov, Eugene; Podlesnyak, Andrey A; Ehlers, Georg; Wada, Nobuo; Inagaki, S; Fukushima, Y

    2013-01-01

    We report the diffusion of water molecules confined in the pores of folded silica materials (FSM-12 with average pore diameter of $\\sim$ 16 \\AA), measured by means of quasielastic neutron scattering using the cold neutron chopper spectrometer (CNCS). The goal is to investigate the effect of electric field on the previously observed fast component of nano-confined water. The measurements were taken at temperatures between 220 K and 245 K, and at two electric field values, 0 kV/mm and 2 kV/mm. Similar to the recently observed electric field induced enhancement of the slow translational motion of confined water, there is a an equally important impact of the field on the faster diffusion.

  14. Fast nanoscale addressability of nitrogen-vacancy spins via coupling to a dynamic ferromagnetic vortex.

    PubMed

    Wolf, M S; Badea, R; Berezovsky, J

    2016-06-14

    The core of a ferromagnetic vortex domain creates a strong, localized magnetic field, which can be manipulated on nanosecond timescales, providing a platform for addressing and controlling individual nitrogen-vacancy centre spins in diamond at room temperature, with nanometre-scale resolution. Here, we show that the ferromagnetic vortex can be driven into proximity with a nitrogen-vacancy defect using small applied magnetic fields, inducing significant nitrogen-vacancy spin splitting. We also find that the magnetic field gradient produced by the vortex is sufficient to address spins separated by nanometre-length scales. By applying a microwave-frequency magnetic field, we drive both the vortex and the nitrogen-vacancy spins, resulting in enhanced coherent rotation of the spin state. Finally, we demonstrate that by driving the vortex on fast timescales, sequential addressing and coherent manipulation of spins is possible on ∼100 ns timescales.

  15. Chaos and Variability of Inter-Spike Intervals in Neuronal Models with Slow-Fast Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doi, Shinji; Inoue, Junko

    2011-04-01

    A neuron generates action potentials or spikes in response to electric stimuli, and also produces a train of spikes (periodic oscillation) when a continuous stimulus current is injected. Using the extended Bonhoeffer-van der Pol (BVP) or FitzHugh-Nagumo (FHN) equations, which is a simplified version of the famous Hodgkin-Huxley neuronal model, we show that very slow spiking can appear near the (singular) Hopf bifurcation point in a certain generic situation. The patterns of the extraordinary slow spiking are phenomenologically classified into two types: a regular slow spiking and chaotic slow spiking. The variability of inter-spike intervals (ISI's) and the possible mechanism of slow spiking are discussed under slow-fast decomposition analysis. The noise effects on such variability of ISI's are also examined.

  16. Fast nanoscale addressability of nitrogen-vacancy spins via coupling to a dynamic ferromagnetic vortex

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, M. S.; Badea, R.; Berezovsky, J.

    2016-01-01

    The core of a ferromagnetic vortex domain creates a strong, localized magnetic field, which can be manipulated on nanosecond timescales, providing a platform for addressing and controlling individual nitrogen-vacancy centre spins in diamond at room temperature, with nanometre-scale resolution. Here, we show that the ferromagnetic vortex can be driven into proximity with a nitrogen-vacancy defect using small applied magnetic fields, inducing significant nitrogen-vacancy spin splitting. We also find that the magnetic field gradient produced by the vortex is sufficient to address spins separated by nanometre-length scales. By applying a microwave-frequency magnetic field, we drive both the vortex and the nitrogen-vacancy spins, resulting in enhanced coherent rotation of the spin state. Finally, we demonstrate that by driving the vortex on fast timescales, sequential addressing and coherent manipulation of spins is possible on ∼100 ns timescales. PMID:27296550

  17. Fast nanoscale addressability of nitrogen-vacancy spins via coupling to a dynamic ferromagnetic vortex

    DOE PAGES

    Wolf, M. S.; Badea, R.; Berezovsky, J.

    2016-06-14

    The core of a ferromagnetic vortex domain creates a strong, localized magnetic field, which can be manipulated on nanosecond timescales, providing a platform for addressing and controlling individual nitrogen-vacancy centre spins in diamond at room temperature, with nanometre-scale resolution. Here, we show that the ferromagnetic vortex can be driven into proximity with a nitrogen-vacancy defect using small applied magnetic fields, inducing significant nitrogen-vacancy spin splitting. We also find that the magnetic field gradient produced by the vortex is sufficient to address spins separated by nanometre-length scales. By applying a microwave-frequency magnetic field, we drive both the vortex and the nitrogen-vacancymore » spins, resulting in enhanced coherent rotation of the spin state. Lastly, we demonstrate that by driving the vortex on fast timescales, sequential addressing and coherent manipulation of spins is possible on ~ 100 ns timescales.« less

  18. Fast nanoscale addressability of nitrogen-vacancy spins via coupling to a dynamic ferromagnetic vortex

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, M. S.; Badea, R.; Berezovsky, J.

    2016-06-14

    The core of a ferromagnetic vortex domain creates a strong, localized magnetic field, which can be manipulated on nanosecond timescales, providing a platform for addressing and controlling individual nitrogen-vacancy centre spins in diamond at room temperature, with nanometre-scale resolution. Here, we show that the ferromagnetic vortex can be driven into proximity with a nitrogen-vacancy defect using small applied magnetic fields, inducing significant nitrogen-vacancy spin splitting. We also find that the magnetic field gradient produced by the vortex is sufficient to address spins separated by nanometre-length scales. By applying a microwave-frequency magnetic field, we drive both the vortex and the nitrogen-vacancy spins, resulting in enhanced coherent rotation of the spin state. Lastly, we demonstrate that by driving the vortex on fast timescales, sequential addressing and coherent manipulation of spins is possible on ~ 100 ns timescales.

  19. Fast Dynamic Meshing Method Based on Delaunay Graph and Inverse Distance Weighting Interpolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yibin; Qin, Ning; Zhao, Ning

    2016-06-01

    A novel mesh deformation technique is developed based on the Delaunay graph mapping method and the inverse distance weighting (IDW) interpolation. The algorithm maintains the advantages of the efficiency of Delaunay-graph-mapping mesh deformation while possess the ability for better controlling the near surface mesh quality. The Delaunay graph is used to divide the mesh domain into a number of sub-domains. On each of the sub-domains, the inverse distance weighting interpolation is applied to build a much smaller sized translation matrix between the original mesh and the deformed mesh, resulting a similar efficiency for the mesh deformation as compared to the fast Delaunay graph mapping method. The paper will show how the near-wall mesh quality is controlled and improved by the new method while the computational time is compared with the original Delaunay graph mapping method.

  20. Chronic impact of sulfamethoxazole on acetate utilization kinetics and population dynamics of fast growing microbial culture.

    PubMed

    Kor-Bicakci, G; Pala-Ozkok, I; Rehman, A; Jonas, D; Ubay-Cokgor, E; Orhon, D

    2014-08-01

    The study evaluated the chronic impact of sulfamethoxazole on metabolic activities of fast growing microbial culture. It focused on changes induced on utilization kinetics of acetate and composition of the microbial community. The experiments involved a fill and draw reactor, fed with acetate and continuous sulfamethoxazole dosing of 50 mg/L. The evaluation relied on model evaluation of the oxygen uptake rate profiles, with parallel assessment of microbial community structure by 454-pyrosequencing. Continuous sulfamethoxazole dosing inflicted a retardation effect on acetate utilization in a way commonly interpreted as competitive inhibition, blocked substrate storage and accelerated endogenous respiration. A fraction of acetate was utilized at a much lower rate with partial biodegradation of sulfamethoxazole. Results of pyrosequencing with a replacement mechanism within a richer more diversified microbial culture, through inactivation of vulnerable fractions in favor of species resistant to antibiotic, which made them capable of surviving and competing even with a slower metabolic response. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Dynamics of fast synaptic excitation during trains of stimulation in myenteric neurons of guinea pig ileum

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Jianhua; Galligan, James J.

    2009-01-01

    Fast excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) occur in bursts in the myenteric plexus during evoked motor reflexes in the guinea-pig ileum in vitro. This study used electrophysiological methods to study fEPSPs during stimulus trains to mimic bursts of synaptic activity in vitro. The amplitude of fEPSPs or fast excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) declined (rundown) during stimulus trains at frequencies of 0.5, 5, 10 and 20 Hz. At 0.5 Hz, fEPSP or fEPSC amplitude declined by 50% after the first stimulus but remained constant for the remainder of the train. At 5, 10 and 20 Hz, synaptic responses ran down completely with time constants of 0.35, 0.21 and 0.11 s, respectively. Recovery from rundown occurred with a time constant of 7 seconds. Mecamylamine, a nicotinic cholinergic receptor antagonist, or PPADS, a P2X receptor antagonist, reduced fEPSP amplitude, but they had no effect on rundown. Responses caused by trains of ionophoretically-applied ATP or ACh (to mimic fEPSPs or fEPSCs) did not rundown. Blockade of presynaptic inhibitory muscarinic, adenosine A1, opioid, α2-adrenergic and 5-HT1A receptors or pertussis toxin treatment did not alter rundown. Antidromic action potentials followed a 10 Hz stimulus train. Iberiotoxin (100 nM), which was used to block large conductance calcium activated K+ (BK) channels, did not alter rundown. Iberiotoxin increased fEPSP amplitude and action potential duration. These data suggest that synaptic rundown is not due to: a) action potential failure; b) nicotinic or P2X receptor desensitization; c) presynaptic inhibition mediated by pertussis-toxin sensitive G-proteins, or d) BK+ channel activation. Synaptic rundown is likely due to depletion of a readily releasable pool of neurotransmitter. PMID:15664559

  2. Fast activating voltage- and calcium-dependent potassium (BK) conductance promotes bursting in pituitary cells: a dynamic clamp study

    PubMed Central

    Tabak, Joël; Tomaiuolo, Maurizio; Gonzalez-Iglesias, Arturo E.; Milescu, Lorin S.; Bertram, Richard

    2011-01-01

    The electrical activity pattern of endocrine pituitary cells regulates their basal secretion level. Rat somatotrophs and lactotrophs exhibit spontaneous bursting and have high basal levels of hormone secretion, while gonadotrophs exhibit spontaneous spiking and have low basal hormone secretion. It has been proposed that the difference in electrical activity between bursting somatotrophs and spiking gonadotrophs is due to the presence of large conductance potassium (BK) channels on somatotrophs but not on gonadotrophs. This is one example where the role of an ion channel type may be clearly established. We demonstrate here that BK channels indeed promote bursting activity in pituitary cells. Blocking BK channels in bursting lacto-somatotroph GH4C1 cells changes their firing activity to spiking, while further adding an artificial BK conductance via dynamic clamp restores bursting. Importantly, this burst-promoting effect requires a relatively fast BK activation/deactivation, as predicted by computational models. We also show that adding a fast activating BK conductance to spiking gonadotrophs converts the activity of these cells to bursting. Together, our results suggest that differences in BK channel expression may underlie the differences in electrical activity and basal hormone secretion levels among pituitary cell types and that the rapid rate of BK channel activation is key to its role in burst promotion. PMID:22090511

  3. Adiabatic fast passage application in solid state NMR study of cross relaxation and molecular dynamics in heteronuclear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranowski, M.; Woźniak-Braszak, A.; Jurga, K.

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents the benefits of using fast adiabatic passage for the study of molecular dynamics in the solid state heteronuclear systems in the laboratory frame. A homemade pulse spectrometer operating at the frequency of 30.2 MHz and 28.411 MHz for protons and fluorines, respectively, has been enhanced with microcontroller direct digital synthesizer DDS controller [1-4]. This work briefly describes how to construct a low-cost and easy-to-assemble adiabatic extension set for homemade and commercial spectrometers based on recently very popular Arduino shields. The described set was designed for fast adiabatic generation. Timing and synchronization problems are discussed. The cross-relaxation experiments with different initial states of the two spin systems have been performed. Contrary to our previous work [5] where the steady-state NOE experiments were conducted now proton spins 1H are polarized in the magnetic field B0 while fluorine spins 19F are perturbed by selective saturation for a short time and then the system is allowed to evolve for a period in the absence of a saturating field. The adiabatic passage application leads to a reversal of magnetization of fluorine spins and increases the amplitude of the signal.

  4. Regional distribution and the dynamics of n-decanoyl ghrelin, another acyl-form of ghrelin, upon fasting in rodents.

    PubMed

    Hiejima, Hiroshi; Nishi, Yoshihiro; Hosoda, Hiroshi; Yoh, Junko; Mifune, Hiroharu; Satou, Motoyasu; Sugimoto, Hiroyuki; Chiba, Seiichi; Kawahara, Yukie; Tanaka, Eiichiro; Yoshimatsu, Hironobu; Uchimura, Naohisa; Kangawa, Kenji; Kojima, Masayasu

    2009-08-07

    n-Decanoyl ghrelin (D-ghrelin), a member of ghrelin-derived peptides, is found in plasma and the stomach; however, there have so far been no studies describing its dynamics. A D-ghrelin-specific radioimmunoassay was established to examine the tissue distribution and the kinetics of D-ghrelin in mice. The effect of D-ghrelin on food intake was also examined and compared to n-octanoyl ghrelin (O-ghrelin). D-ghrelin was detected throughout the gastrointestinal tissue and plasma with highest level in the stomach. An immunofluorescent study revealed the co-localization of D- and O-ghrelin in the same stomach cells. Upon fasting, the levels of D-ghrelin in the stomach and plasma significantly increased, while that of O-ghrelin in the stomach declined. D-ghrelin increased the 2 h food consumption in mice as O-ghrelin does. These findings indicate that D-ghrelin is mainly produced in the stomach to work in concert with O-ghrelin. The different kinetics of D- and O-ghrelin in the stomach upon fasting implies the possibility of D-ghrelin-specific bioregulation.

  5. Analysis of the propagation dynamics and Gouy phase of Airy beams using the fast Fresnel transform algorithm.

    PubMed

    Cottrell, Don M; Davis, Jeffrey A; Berg, Cassidy A; Freeman, Christopher Li

    2014-04-01

    There is great interest in Airy beams because they appear to propagate in a curved path. These beams are usually generated by inserting a cubic phase mask onto the input plane of a Fourier transform system. Here, we utilize a fast Fresnel diffraction algorithm to easily derive both the propagation dynamics and the Gouy phase shift for these beams. The trajectories of these beams can be modified by adding additional linear and quadratic phase terms onto the cubic phase mask. Finally, we have rewritten the equations regarding the propagating Airy beams completely in laboratory coordinates for use by experimentalists. Experimental results are included. We expect that these results will be of great importance in applications of Airy beams.

  6. Fast characterization of functionalized silica materials by silicon-29 surface-enhanced NMR spectroscopy using dynamic nuclear polarization.

    PubMed

    Lelli, Moreno; Gajan, David; Lesage, Anne; Caporini, Marc A; Vitzthum, Veronika; Miéville, Pascal; Héroguel, Florent; Rascón, Fernando; Roussey, Arthur; Thieuleux, Chloé; Boualleg, Malika; Veyre, Laurent; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey; Copéret, Christophe; Emsley, Lyndon

    2011-02-23

    We demonstrate fast characterization of the distribution of surface bonding modes and interactions in a series of functionalized materials via surface-enhanced nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy using dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP). Surface-enhanced silicon-29 DNP NMR spectra were obtained by using incipient wetness impregnation of the sample with a solution containing a polarizing radical (TOTAPOL). We identify and compare the bonding topology of functional groups in materials obtained via a sol-gel process and in materials prepared by post-grafting reactions. Furthermore, the remarkable gain in time provided by surface-enhanced silicon-29 DNP NMR spectroscopy (typically on the order of a factor 400) allows the facile acquisition of two-dimensional correlation spectra.

  7. Tunable nonuniform sampling method for fast calculation and intensity modulation in 3D dynamic holographic display.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhao; Liu, Juan; Jia, Jia; Li, Xin; Han, Jian; Hu, Bin; Wang, Yongtian

    2013-08-01

    Heavy computational load of computer-generated hologram (CGH) and imprecise intensity modulation of 3D images are crucial problems in dynamic holographic display. The nonuniform sampling method is proposed to speed up CGH generation and precisely modulate the reconstructed intensities of phase-only CGH. The proposed method can eliminate the redundant information properly, where 70% reduction in the storage amount can be reached when it is combined with the novel lookup table method. Multigrayscale modulation of reconstructed 3D images can be achieved successfully. Numerical simulations and optical experiments are performed, and both are in good agreement. It is believed that the proposed method can be used in 3D dynamic holographic display.

  8. Higgs Discovery: Impact on Composite Dynamics Technicolor & eXtreme Compositeness Thinking Fast and Slow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sannino, Francesco

    I discuss the impact of the discovery of a Higgs-like state on composite dynamics starting by critically examining the reasons in favour of either an elementary or composite nature of this state. Accepting the standard model interpretation I re-address the standard model vacuum stability within a Weyl-consistent computation. I will carefully examine the fundamental reasons why what has been discovered might not be the standard model Higgs. Dynamical electroweak breaking naturally addresses a number of the fundamental issues unsolved by the standard model interpretation. However this paradigm has been challenged by the discovery of a not-so-heavy Higgs-like state. I will therefore review the recent discovery1 that the standard model top-induced radiative corrections naturally reduce the intrinsic non-perturbative mass of the composite Higgs state towards the desired experimental value. Not only we have a natural and testable working framework but we have also suggested specic gauge theories that can realise, at the fundamental level, these minimal models of dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking. These strongly coupled gauge theories are now being heavily investigated via first principle lattice simulations with encouraging results. The new findings show that the recent naive claims made about new strong dynamics at the electroweak scale being disfavoured by the discovery of a not-so-heavy composite Higgs are unwarranted. I will then introduce the more speculative idea of extreme compositeness according to which not only the Higgs sector of the standard model is composite but also quarks and leptons, and provide a toy example in the form of gauge-gauge duality.

  9. Magnetic soft x-ray microscopy-imaging fast spin dynamics inmagnetic nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Peter; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Mesler, Brooke L.; Chao, Weilun; Sakdinawat, Anne E.; Anderson, Erik H.

    2007-06-01

    Magnetic soft X-ray microscopy combines 15nm spatial resolution with 70ps time resolution and elemental sensitivity. Fresnel zone plates are used as X-ray optics and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism serves as magnetic contrast mechanism. Thus scientifically interesting and technologically relevant low dimensional nanomagnetic systems can be imaged at fundamental length and ultrafast time scales in a unique way. Studies include magnetization reversal in magnetic multilayers, nanopatterned systems, vortex dynamics in nanoelements and spin current induced phenomena.

  10. Fast generation of W states of superconducting qubits with multiple Schrödinger dynamics.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yi-Hao; Chen, Ye-Hong; Wu, Qi-Cheng; Huang, Bi-Hua; Song, Jie; Xia, Yan

    2016-11-09

    In this paper, we present a protocol to generate a W state of three superconducting qubits (SQs) by using multiple Schrödinger dynamics. The three SQs are respective embedded in three different coplanar waveguide resonators (CPWRs), which are coupled to a superconducting coupler (SCC) qubit at the center of the setups. With the multiple Schrödinger dynamics, we build a shortcuts to adiabaticity (STA), which greatly accelerates the evolution of the system. The Rabi frequencies of the laser pulses being designed can be expressed by the superpositions of Gaussian functions via the curves fitting, so that they can be realized easily in experiments. What is more, numerical simulation result shows that the protocol is robust against control parameters variations and decoherence mechanisms, such as the dissipations from the CPWRs and the energy relaxation. In addition, the influences of the dephasing are also resisted on account of the accelerating for the dynamics. Thus, the performance of the protocol is much better than that with the conventional adiabatic passage techniques when the dephasing is taken into account. We hope the protocol could be implemented easily in experiments with current technology.

  11. Fast generation of W states of superconducting qubits with multiple Schrödinger dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Yi-Hao; Chen, Ye-Hong; Wu, Qi-Cheng; Huang, Bi-Hua; Song, Jie; Xia, Yan

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present a protocol to generate a W state of three superconducting qubits (SQs) by using multiple Schrödinger dynamics. The three SQs are respective embedded in three different coplanar waveguide resonators (CPWRs), which are coupled to a superconducting coupler (SCC) qubit at the center of the setups. With the multiple Schrödinger dynamics, we build a shortcuts to adiabaticity (STA), which greatly accelerates the evolution of the system. The Rabi frequencies of the laser pulses being designed can be expressed by the superpositions of Gaussian functions via the curves fitting, so that they can be realized easily in experiments. What is more, numerical simulation result shows that the protocol is robust against control parameters variations and decoherence mechanisms, such as the dissipations from the CPWRs and the energy relaxation. In addition, the influences of the dephasing are also resisted on account of the accelerating for the dynamics. Thus, the performance of the protocol is much better than that with the conventional adiabatic passage techniques when the dephasing is taken into account. We hope the protocol could be implemented easily in experiments with current technology. PMID:27827422

  12. Fast Atomic-Scale Chemical Imaging of Crystalline Materials and Dynamic Phase Transformations.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ping; Yuan, Ren Liang; Ihlefeld, Jon F; Spoerke, Erik David; Pan, Wei; Zuo, Jian Min

    2016-04-13

    Atomic-scale phenomena fundamentally influence materials form and function that makes the ability to locally probe and study these processes critical to advancing our understanding and development of materials. Atomic-scale chemical imaging by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) is a powerful approach to investigate solid crystal structures. Inefficient X-ray emission and collection, however, require long acquisition times (typically hundreds of seconds), making the technique incompatible with electron-beam sensitive materials and study of dynamic material phenomena. Here we describe an atomic-scale STEM-EDS chemical imaging technique that decreases the acquisition time to as little as one second, a reduction of more than 100 times. We demonstrate this new approach using LaAlO3 single crystal and study dynamic phase transformation in beam-sensitive Li[Li0.2Ni0.2Mn0.6]O2 (LNMO) lithium ion battery cathode material. By capturing a series of time-lapsed chemical maps, we show for the first time clear atomic-scale evidence of preferred Ni-mobility in LNMO transformation, revealing new kinetic mechanisms. These examples highlight the potential of this approach toward temporal, atomic-scale mapping of crystal structure and chemistry for investigating dynamic material phenomena.

  13. Measuring fast gene dynamics in single cells with time-lapse luminescence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Mazo-Vargas, Anyimilehidi; Park, Heungwon; Aydin, Mert; Buchler, Nicolas E.

    2014-01-01

    Time-lapse fluorescence microscopy is an important tool for measuring in vivo gene dynamics in single cells. However, fluorescent proteins are limited by slow chromophore maturation times and the cellular autofluorescence or phototoxicity that arises from light excitation. An alternative is luciferase, an enzyme that emits photons and is active upon folding. The photon flux per luciferase is significantly lower than that for fluorescent proteins. Thus time-lapse luminescence microscopy has been successfully used to track gene dynamics only in larger organisms and for slower processes, for which more total photons can be collected in one exposure. Here we tested green, yellow, and red beetle luciferases and optimized substrate conditions for in vivo luminescence. By combining time-lapse luminescence microscopy with a microfluidic device, we tracked the dynamics of cell cycle genes in single yeast with subminute exposure times over many generations. Our method was faster and in cells with much smaller volumes than previous work. Fluorescence of an optimized reporter (Venus) lagged luminescence by 15–20 min, which is consistent with its known rate of chromophore maturation in yeast. Our work demonstrates that luciferases are better than fluorescent proteins at faithfully tracking the underlying gene expression. PMID:25232010

  14. Dynamic windowing algorithm for the fast and accurate determination of luminescence lifetimes.

    PubMed

    Collier, Bradley B; McShane, Michael J

    2012-06-05

    An algorithm for the accurate calculation of luminescence lifetimes in near-real-time is described. The dynamic rapid lifetime determination (DRLD) method uses a window-summing technique and dynamically selects the appropriate window width for each lifetime decay such that a large range of lifetimes can be accurately calculated. The selection of window width is based on an optimal range of window-sum ratios. The algorithm was compared to alternative approaches for rapid lifetime determination as well as nonlinear least-squares (NLLS) fitting in both simulated and real experimental conditions. A palladium porphyrin was used as a model luminophore to quantitatively evaluate the algorithm in a dynamic situation, where oxygen concentration was modulated to induce a change in lifetime. Unlike other window-summing techniques, the new algorithm calculates lifetimes that are not significantly different than the slower, traditional NLLS. In addition, the computation time required to calculate the lifetime is 4 orders of magnitude less than NLLS and 2 orders less than other iterative methods. This advance will improve the accuracy of real-time measurements that must be made on samples that are expected to exhibit widely varying lifetimes, such as sensors and biosensors.

  15. [Effects of NaCl stress on photosynthesis characteristics and fast chlorophyll fluorescence induction dynamics of Pistacia chinensis leaves].

    PubMed

    Li, Xu-Xin; Liu, Bing-Xiang; Guo, Zhi-Tao; Chang, Yue-Xia; He, Lei; Chen, Fang; Lu, Bing-She

    2013-09-01

    By using fast chlorophyll fluorescence induction dynamics analysis technique (JIP-test), this paper studied the photosynthesis characteristics and fast chlorophyll fluorescence induction dynamics of 1-year old Pistacia chinensis seedlings under the stress of NaCl at the concentrations 0% (CK), 0.15%, 0.3%, 0.45%, and 0.6%. With the increasing concentration of NaCl, the contents of Chl a, Chl b, and Chl (a+b) in the seedlings leaves decreased, the Chl a/b ratio decreased after an initial increase, and the carotenoid content increased. The net photosynthetic rate (P(n)) and stomatal conductance (g(s)) decreased gradually with increasing NaCl concentration. The decrease of P(n) was mainly attributed to the stomatal limitation when the NaCl concentration was lower than 0.3%, and to the non-stomatal limitation when the NaCl concentration was higher than 0.3%. The trapped energy flux per RC (TR0/CS0), electron transport flux per RC (ET0/CS0), density of RCs (RC/CS0), and yield or flux ratio (psi(0) or phi(E0)) decreased, but the absorption flux per CS (ABS/CS0) and the K phase (W(k)) and J phase (V) in the O-J-I-P chlorophyll fluorescence induction curves increased distinctly, indicating that NaCl stress damaged the leaf oxygen-evolving complex (OEC), donor sides, and PS II reaction centers. When the NaCl concentration reached 0.3%, the maximum photochemical efficiency (F(v)/F(m)) and performance index (PI(ABS)) decreased 17.7% and 36.6%, respectively, as compared with the control.

  16. ADAHELI: exploring the fast, dynamic Sun in the x-ray, optical, and near-infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrilli, Francesco; Soffitta, Paolo; Velli, Marco; Sabatini, Paolo; Bigazzi, Alberto; Bellazzini, Ronaldo; Bellot Rubio, Luis Ramon; Brez, Alessandro; Carbone, Vincenzo; Cauzzi, Gianna; Cavallini, Fabio; Consolini, Giuseppe; Curti, Fabio; Del Moro, Dario; Di Giorgio, Anna Maria; Ermolli, Ilaria; Fabiani, Sergio; Faurobert, Marianne; Feller, Alex; Galsgaard, Klaus; Gburek, Szymon; Giannattasio, Fabio; Giovannelli, Luca; Hirzberger, Johann; Jefferies, Stuart M.; Madjarska, Maria S.; Manni, Fabio; Mazzoni, Alessandro; Muleri, Fabio; Penza, Valentina; Peres, Giovanni; Piazzesi, Roberto; Pieralli, Francesca; Pietropaolo, Ermanno; Pillet, Valentin Martinez; Pinchera, Michele; Reale, Fabio; Romano, Paolo; Romoli, Andrea; Romoli, Marco; Rubini, Alda; Rudawy, Pawel; Sandri, Paolo; Scardigli, Stefano; Spandre, Gloria; Solanki, Sami K.; Stangalini, Marco; Vecchio, Antonio; Zuccarello, Francesca

    2015-10-01

    Advanced Astronomy for Heliophysics Plus (ADAHELI) is a project concept for a small solar and space weather mission with a budget compatible with an European Space Agency (ESA) S-class mission, including launch, and a fast development cycle. ADAHELI was submitted to the European Space Agency by a European-wide consortium of solar physics research institutes in response to the "Call for a small mission opportunity for a launch in 2017," of March 9, 2012. The ADAHELI project builds on the heritage of the former ADAHELI mission, which had successfully completed its phase-A study under the Italian Space Agency 2007 Small Mission Programme, thus proving the soundness and feasibility of its innovative low-budget design. ADAHELI is a solar space mission with two main instruments: ISODY: an imager, based on Fabry-Pérot interferometers, whose design is optimized to the acquisition of highest cadence, long-duration, multiline spectropolarimetric images in the visible/near-infrared region of the solar spectrum. XSPO: an x-ray polarimeter for solar flares in x-rays with energies in the 15 to 35 keV range. ADAHELI is capable of performing observations that cannot be addressed by other currently planned solar space missions, due to their limited telemetry, or by ground-based facilities, due to the problematic effect of the terrestrial atmosphere.

  17. Dynamics of wind bubbles and superbubbles. I - Slow winds and fast winds. II - Analytic theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koo, Bon-Chul; Mckee, Christopher F.

    1992-01-01

    The paper describes the overall evolution of wind-blown bubbles in a uniform medium from the initial, free-expansion stage to the final stage in which the pressure of the ambient medium is significant. The concepts of slow and fast winds, which naturally arise from consideration of radiative losses at the free-expansion stage, are introduced. The evolution of bubbles in a plane-parallel disk, where the density decreases steeply along a vertical direction, is considered. The questions of when a bubble can break out of a thin galactic disk and how they evolve after the breakout are discussed. After breakout, bubbles can evolve into jets. Steady, collimated jets can form only over a limited range of wind luminosity and Mach number; astronomical jets are likely to be unsteady and/or hydromagnetic. The results are applied to the neutral stellar wind in the HH 7-11 region, to the north polar spur, and to the galactic winds in starburst galaxies. The evolution of wind-blown bubbles in a power-law density distribution is investigated. Characteristic evolutionary time scales, as well as the equation of motion for both the swept-up gas and the wind shock in each evolutionary stage are obtained.

  18. Dynamic grazing incidence fast atom diffraction during molecular beam epitaxial growth of GaAs

    SciTech Connect

    Atkinson, P. Eddrief, M.; Etgens, V. H.; Khemliche, H. Debiossac, M.; Mulier, M.; Lalmi, B.; Roncin, P.; Momeni, A.

    2014-07-14

    A Grazing Incidence Fast Atom Diffraction (GIFAD) system has been mounted on a commercial molecular beam epitaxy chamber and used to monitor GaAs growth in real-time. In contrast to the conventionally used Reflection High Energy Electron Diffraction, all the GIFAD diffraction orders oscillate in phase, with the change in intensity related to diffuse scattering at step edges. We show that the scattered intensity integrated over the Laue circle is a robust method to monitor the periodic change in surface roughness during layer-by-layer growth, with oscillation phase and amplitude independent of incidence angle and crystal orientation. When there is a change in surface reconstruction at the start of growth, GIFAD intensity oscillations show that there is a corresponding delay in the onset of layer-by-layer growth. In addition, changes in the relative intensity of different diffraction orders have been observed during growth showing that GIFAD has the potential to provide insight into the preferential adatom attachment sites on the surface reconstruction during growth.

  19. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and dynamics of insulin resistance in denervated slow and fast muscles in vivo.

    PubMed

    Elmendorf, J S; Damrau-Abney, A; Smith, T R; David, T S; Turinsky, J

    1997-04-01

    Regulation of glucose uptake by 1- and 3-day denervated soleus (slow-twitch) and plantaris (fast-twitch) muscles in vivo was investigated. One day after denervation, soleus and plantaris muscles exhibited 62 and 65% decreases in insulin-stimulated 2-deoxyglucose uptake, respectively, compared with corresponding control muscles. At this interval, denervated muscles showed no alterations in insulin receptor binding and activity, amount and activity of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, and amounts of GLUT-1 and GLUT-4. Three days after denervation, there was no increase in 2-deoxyglucose uptake in response to insulin in soleus muscle, whereas plantaris muscle exhibited a 158% increase in basal and an almost normal absolute increment in insulin-stimulated uptake. Despite these differences, denervated soleus and plantaris muscles exhibited comparable decreases in insulin-stimulated activities of the insulin receptor (approximately 40%) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (approximately 50%) and a pronounced decrease in GLUT-4. An increase in GLUT-1 in plantaris, but not soleus, muscle 3 days after denervation is consistent with augmented basal 2-deoxyglucose uptake in plantaris muscle at this interval. These results demonstrate that, in denervated muscles, there is a clear dissociation between insulin-stimulated 2-deoxyglucose uptake and upstream events involved in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake.

  20. Intracellular siRNA delivery dynamics of integrin-targeted, PEGylated chitosan-poly(ethylene imine) hybrid nanoparticles: A mechanistic insight.

    PubMed

    Ragelle, Héloïse; Colombo, Stefano; Pourcelle, Vincent; Vanvarenberg, Kevin; Vandermeulen, Gaëlle; Bouzin, Caroline; Marchand-Brynaert, Jacqueline; Feron, Olivier; Foged, Camilla; Préat, Véronique

    2015-08-10

    Integrin-targeted nanoparticles are promising for the delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA) to tumor cells or tumor endothelium in cancer therapy aiming at silencing genes essential for tumor growth. However, during the process of optimizing and realizing their full potential, it is pertinent to gain a basic mechanistic understanding of the bottlenecks existing for nanoparticle-mediated intracellular delivery. We designed αvβ3 integrin-targeted nanoparticles by coupling arginine-glycine-aspartate (RGD) or RGD peptidomimetic (RGDp) ligands to the surface of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) grafted chitosan-poly(ethylene imine) hybrid nanoparticles. The amount of intracellular siRNA delivered by αvβ3-targeted versus non-targeted nanoparticles was quantified in the human non-small cell lung carcinoma cell line H1299 expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) using a stem-loop reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) approach. Data demonstrated that the internalization of αvβ3-targeted nanoparticles was highly dependent on the surface concentration of the ligand. Above a certain threshold concentration, the use of targeted nanoparticles provided a two-fold increase in the number of siRNA copies/cell, subsequently resulting in as much as 90% silencing of EGFP at well-tolerated carrier concentrations. In contrast, non-targeted nanoparticles mediated low levels of gene silencing, despite relatively high intracellular siRNA concentrations, indicating that these nanoparticles might end up in late endosomes or lysosomes without releasing their cargo to the cell cytoplasm. Thus, the silencing efficiency of the chitosan-based nanoparticles is strongly dependent on the uptake and the intracellular trafficking in H1299 EGFP cells, which is critical information towards a more complete understanding of the delivery mechanism that can facilitate the future design of efficient siRNA delivery systems.

  1. A Fast and Accurate Scheme for Sea Ice Dynamics with a Stochastic Subgrid Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seinen, C.; Khouider, B.

    2016-12-01

    Sea ice physics is a very complex process occurring over a wide range of scales; such as local melting or large scale drift. At the current grid resolution of Global Climate Models (GCMs), we are able to resolve large scale sea ice dynamics but uncertainty remains due to subgrid physics and potential dynamic feedback, especially due to the formation of melt ponds. Recent work in atmospheric science has shown success of Markov Jump stochastic subgrid models in the representation of clouds and convection and their feedback into the large scales. There has been a push to implement these methods in other parts of the Earth System and for the cryosphere in particular but in order to test these methods, efficient and accurate solvers are required for the resolved large scale sea-ice dynamics. We present a second order accurate scheme, in both time and space, for the sea ice momentum equation (SIME) with a Jacobian Free Newton Krylov (JFNK) solver. SIME is a highly nonlinear equation due to sea ice rheology terms appearing in the stress tensor. The most commonly accepted formulation, introduced by Hibler, allows sea-ice to resist significant stresses in compression but significantly less in tension. The relationship also leads to large changes in internal stresses from small changes in velocity fields. These non-linearities have resulted in the use of implicit methods for SIME and a JFNK solver was recently introduced and used to gain efficiency. However, the method used so far is only first order accurate in time. Here we expand the JFNK approach to a Crank-Nicholson discretization of SIME. This fully second order scheme is achieved with no increase in computational cost and will allow efficient testing and development of subgrid stochastic models of sea ice in the near future.

  2. Fast optical cooling of nanomechanical cantilever with the dynamical Zeeman effect.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian-Qi; Zhang, Shuo; Zou, Jin-Hua; Chen, Liang; Yang, Wen; Li, Yong; Feng, Mang

    2013-12-02

    We propose an efficient optical electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) cooling scheme for a cantilever with a nitrogen-vacancy center attached in a non-uniform magnetic field using dynamical Zeeman effect. In our scheme, the Zeeman effect combined with the quantum interference effect enhances the desired cooling transition and suppresses the undesired heating transitions. As a result, the cantilever can be cooled down to nearly the vibrational ground state under realistic experimental conditions within a short time. This efficient optical EIT cooling scheme can be reduced to the typical EIT cooling scheme under special conditions.

  3. Large dynamic light-matter entanglement from driving neither too fast nor too slow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acevedo, O. L.; Quiroga, L.; Rodríguez, F. J.; Johnson, N. F.

    2015-09-01

    A significant problem facing next-generation quantum technologies is how to generate and manipulate macroscopic entanglement in light and matter systems. Here we report a regime of dynamical light-matter behavior in which a giant, system-wide entanglement is generated by varying the light-matter coupling at intermediate velocities. This enhancement is far larger, broader ranged, and more experimentally accessible than that occurring near the quantum phase transition of the same model under adiabatic conditions. By appropriate choices of the coupling within this intermediate regime, the enhanced entanglement can be made to spread system-wide or to reside in each subsystem separately.

  4. Design and testing of magnetorheological valve with fast force response time and great dynamic force range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubík, M.; Macháček, O.; Strecker, Z.; Roupec, J.; Mazůrek, I.

    2017-04-01

    The paper deals with design, simulation and experimental testing of a magnetorheological (MR) valve with short response time. The short response time is achieved by a suitable design of an active zone in combination with use of a ferrite material for magnetic circuit. The magneto-static model and the simplified hydraulic model of the MR valve are examined and experimentally verified. The development the MR valve achieves an average response time 4.1 ms and the maximum dynamic force range of eight.

  5. Fast and Slow Dynamics in a Discotic Liquid Crystal with Regions of Columnar Order and Disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, M. R.; Feng, X.; Macho, V.; Müllen, K.; Spiess, H. W.; Floudas, G.

    2011-12-01

    Aromatic disk-shaped molecules tend to self-organize into a herringbone packing where the disks are inclined at angles ±θ with respect to the axis of the column. In discotic liquid crystals this can introduce defects between stacks of limited length. In a C3-symmetric hexa-peri-hexabenzocoronene, solid-state NMR, x-ray scattering, and rheology identifies such a packing with θ=43° and stacks of about seven disks. Disordered regions containing defects fill the space in between the ordered stacks. Biaxial intra- and intercolumnar dynamics differing by eight decades are identified.

  6. Fast and slow dynamics in a discotic liquid crystal with regions of columnar order and disorder.

    PubMed

    Hansen, M R; Feng, X; Macho, V; Müllen, K; Spiess, H W; Floudas, G

    2011-12-16

    Aromatic disk-shaped molecules tend to self-organize into a herringbone packing where the disks are inclined at angles ±θ with respect to the axis of the column. In discotic liquid crystals this can introduce defects between stacks of limited length. In a C(3)-symmetric hexa-peri-hexabenzocoronene, solid-state NMR, x-ray scattering, and rheology identifies such a packing with θ=43° and stacks of about seven disks. Disordered regions containing defects fill the space in between the ordered stacks. Biaxial intra- and intercolumnar dynamics differing by eight decades are identified.

  7. Fast, Multi-Dimensional and Simultaneous Kymograph-Like Particle Dynamics (SkyPad) Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cadot, Bruno; Gache, Vincent; Gomes, Edgar R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Kymograph analysis is a method widely used by researchers to analyze particle dynamics in one dimensional (1D) trajectories. Results Here we provide a Visual Basic-coded algorithm to use as a Microsoft Excel add-in that automatically analyzes particles in 2D trajectories with all the advantages of kymograph analysis. Conclusions This add-in, which we named SkyPad, leads to significant time saving and higher accuracy of particle analysis. Finally, SkyPad can also be used for 3D trajectories analysis. PMID:24586511

  8. Early Time, Fast Collisional Dynamics of Equilibriating Ions in a Strongly Coupled Ultracold Neutral Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strickler, Trevor; McQuillen, Patrick; Langin, Thomas; Killian, Thomas; Bannasch, Georg; Pohl, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Collision rates in weakly-coupled plasmas are well-described by the Landau-Spitzer formula. In the regime of strong coupling, however, the formula breaks down. This has motivated much theoretical and experimental work to study collision rates in strongly-coupled plasmas. In previous work, we have demonstrated direct measurements of thermalization rates in strongly-coupled ultracold neutral plasmas (UCNPs) created by photoionizing strontium atoms in magneto-optical trap. Our technique used optical pumping to create spin ``tagged'' subpopulations of ions having skewed velocity distributions. With LIF imaging, we measured the equilibration of the skewed velocity profiles to extract ion collision rates. We are now using these techniques to explore the early time dynamics of these skewed ion velocity distributions in the first 100ns after optical pumping. Molecular dynamics simulations of strongly coupled plasmas predict deviations from the exponential decay of average skewed velocity that is expected for weakly coupled plasmas. We use probe laser pulses on the order of 30ns to measure the relaxation of the skewed velocity profiles to test the theoretical predictions. This work was supported by the United States National Science Foun- dation and Department of Energy Partnership in Basic Plasma Science and Engineering (PHY-1102516) and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (FA9550-12-1-0267).

  9. Solvable model for a dynamical quantum phase transition from fast to slow scrambling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Sumilan; Altman, Ehud

    2017-04-01

    We propose an extension of the Sachdev-Ye-Kitaev (SYK) model that exhibits a quantum phase transition from the previously identified non-Fermi-liquid fixed point to a Fermi-liquid-like state, while still allowing an exact solution in a suitable large-N limit. The extended model involves coupling the interacting N -site SYK model to a new set of p N peripheral sites with only quadratic hopping terms between them. The conformal fixed point of the SYK model remains a stable low-energy phase below a critical ratio of peripheral sites p dynamics throughout the non-Fermi-liquid (NFL) phase is characterized by a universal Lyapunov exponent λL→2 π T in the low-temperature limit; however, the temperature scale marking the crossover to the conformal regime vanishes continuously at the critical point pc. The residual entropy at T →0 , nonzero in the NFL, also vanishes continuously at the critical point. For p >pc the quadratic sites effectively screen the SYK dynamics, leading to a quadratic fixed point in the low-temperature and low-frequency limit. The interactions have a perturbative effect in this regime leading to scrambling with Lyapunov exponent λL∝T2 .

  10. Dynamic UltraFast 2D EXchange SpectroscopY (UF-EXSY) of hyperpolarized substrates

    PubMed Central

    Swisher, Christine Leon; Koelsch, Bertram; Sukumar, Subramianam; Sriram, Renuka; Santos, Romelyn Delos; Wang, Zhen Jane; Kurhanewicz, John; Vigneron, Daniel; Larson, Peder

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we present a new ultrafast method for acquiring dynamic 2D EXchange SpectroscopY (EXSY) within a single acquisition. This technique reconstructs two-dimensional EXSY spectra from one-dimensional spectra based on the phase accrual during echo times. The Ultrafast-EXSY acquisition overcomes long acquisition times typically needed to acquire 2D NMR data by utilizing sparsity and phase dependence to dramatically undersample in the indirect time dimension. This allows for the acquisition of the 2D spectrum within a single shot. We have validated this method in simulations and hyperpolarized enzyme assay experiments separating the dehydration of pyruvate and lactate-to-pyruvate conversion. In a renal cell carcinoma cell (RCC) line, bidirectional exchange was observed. This new technique revealed decreased conversion of lactate-to-pyruvate with high expression of monocarboxylate transporter 4 (MCT4), known to correlate with aggressive cancer phenotypes. We also showed feasibility of this technique in vivo in a RCC model where bidirectional exchange was observed for pyruvate–lactate, pyruvate–alanine, and pyruvate–hydrate and were resolved in time. Broadly, the technique is well suited to investigate the dynamics of multiple exchange pathways and applicable to hyperpolarized substrates where chemical exchange has shown great promise across a range of disciplines. PMID:26117655

  11. A compact fast ionization gauge for in situ measurement of high-density neutral flow dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, T. E.; Intrator, T. P.

    2014-04-01

    A compact ionization gauge has been developed to carry out in situ measurements of high density (1020-1022 m-3) neutral gas flow dynamics with high temporal and spatial resolution. Key design aspects are discussed including gauge sensitivity and time response scaling with decreased probe dimensions, high-pressure operation, improved driver circuit bandwidth, and techniques for constructing a miniaturized probe head. Gas adsorption was discovered to significantly alter emission current and gauge sensitivity over timescales of several seconds. This effect must be taken into consideration when making time-resolved, high-density measurements. Over short timescales gauge response was predicted by scaling the sensitivity of a nominal Bayard-Alpert gauge to account for variations in probe dimensions and species-dependent ionization cross-section. Time-resolved neutral density profiles have been acquired in the Magnetized Shock Experiment at Los Alamos National Laboratory, providing data on the initial conditions of the ionization, plasmoid formation, and translation processes. It is shown that the desired density profiles can be achieved using a dynamic gas fill and that density can be scaled independently of the spatial profile.

  12. Fast optimization of binary clusters using a novel dynamic lattice searching method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xia; Cheng, Wen

    2014-09-01

    Global optimization of binary clusters has been a difficult task despite of much effort and many efficient methods. Directing toward two types of elements (i.e., homotop problem) in binary clusters, two classes of virtual dynamic lattices are constructed and a modified dynamic lattice searching (DLS) method, i.e., binary DLS (BDLS) method, is developed. However, it was found that the BDLS can only be utilized for the optimization of binary clusters with small sizes because homotop problem is hard to be solved without atomic exchange operation. Therefore, the iterated local search (ILS) method is adopted to solve homotop problem and an efficient method based on the BDLS method and ILS, named as BDLS-ILS, is presented for global optimization of binary clusters. In order to assess the efficiency of the proposed method, binary Lennard-Jones clusters with up to 100 atoms are investigated. Results show that the method is proved to be efficient. Furthermore, the BDLS-ILS method is also adopted to study the geometrical structures of (AuPd)79 clusters with DFT-fit parameters of Gupta potential.

  13. Fast optimization of binary clusters using a novel dynamic lattice searching method.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xia; Cheng, Wen

    2014-09-28

    Global optimization of binary clusters has been a difficult task despite of much effort and many efficient methods. Directing toward two types of elements (i.e., homotop problem) in binary clusters, two classes of virtual dynamic lattices are constructed and a modified dynamic lattice searching (DLS) method, i.e., binary DLS (BDLS) method, is developed. However, it was found that the BDLS can only be utilized for the optimization of binary clusters with small sizes because homotop problem is hard to be solved without atomic exchange operation. Therefore, the iterated local search (ILS) method is adopted to solve homotop problem and an efficient method based on the BDLS method and ILS, named as BDLS-ILS, is presented for global optimization of binary clusters. In order to assess the efficiency of the proposed method, binary Lennard-Jones clusters with up to 100 atoms are investigated. Results show that the method is proved to be efficient. Furthermore, the BDLS-ILS method is also adopted to study the geometrical structures of (AuPd)79 clusters with DFT-fit parameters of Gupta potential.

  14. Fast optimization of binary clusters using a novel dynamic lattice searching method

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Xia Cheng, Wen

    2014-09-28

    Global optimization of binary clusters has been a difficult task despite of much effort and many efficient methods. Directing toward two types of elements (i.e., homotop problem) in binary clusters, two classes of virtual dynamic lattices are constructed and a modified dynamic lattice searching (DLS) method, i.e., binary DLS (BDLS) method, is developed. However, it was found that the BDLS can only be utilized for the optimization of binary clusters with small sizes because homotop problem is hard to be solved without atomic exchange operation. Therefore, the iterated local search (ILS) method is adopted to solve homotop problem and an efficient method based on the BDLS method and ILS, named as BDLS-ILS, is presented for global optimization of binary clusters. In order to assess the efficiency of the proposed method, binary Lennard-Jones clusters with up to 100 atoms are investigated. Results show that the method is proved to be efficient. Furthermore, the BDLS-ILS method is also adopted to study the geometrical structures of (AuPd){sub 79} clusters with DFT-fit parameters of Gupta potential.

  15. Pharmaceutical evaluation and dynamic vapor sorption studies of fast dissolving intraoral films of Loratadine.

    PubMed

    Arya, Arun; Sharma, Vijay; Pathak, Kamla

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to develop intraoral films (IOFs) of loratadine and to assess the storage conditions by dynamic vapour sorption studies. The excipient selection was guided by drug excipient compatibility studies and the incompatibility of loratadine with dibutylphathalate and Tween20 was confirmed by Electro-spray Ionization Mass Spectrometry. Thus intaroral films were developed using HPMC E-15 LV and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) as lone and mixed film formers to get eighteen formulations (F1- F18) that varied in the type and amount of plasticizer used. Four formulations selected on the basis of pharmacotechnical characteristics were improvised by inclusion of Poloxamer407 that lowered the dissolving time to the tune of 36-55%. Dynamic vapour sorption studies of the improvised films (PF1-PF4) demonstrated an increase of 2% by weight at 50% relative humidity (RH) and 25°C suggesting storage of the films below the stated conditions. In vitro drug release studies in phosphate buffer pH 6.8 demonstrated more than 94% cumulative drug release from the formulations. Analysis of model independent parameters identified PF2 as the best formulation that was nine times superior in its dissolution efficiency to Lorafast tablets(®).

  16. Fast AdaBoost-Based Face Detection System on a Dynamically Coarse Grain Reconfigurable Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Jian; Zhang, Jinguo; Zhu, Min; Yang, Jun; Shi, Longxing

    An AdaBoost-based face detection system is proposed, on a Coarse Grain Reconfigurable Architecture (CGRA) named “REMUS-II”. Our work is quite distinguished from previous ones in three aspects. First, a new hardware-software partition method is proposed and the whole face detection system is divided into several parallel tasks implemented on two Reconfigurable Processing Units (RPU) and one micro Processors Unit (µPU) according to their relationships. These tasks communicate with each other by a mailbox mechanism. Second, a strong classifier is treated as a smallest phase of the detection system, and every phase needs to be executed by these tasks in order. A phase of Haar classifier is dynamically mapped onto a Reconfigurable Cell Array (RCA) only when needed, and it's quite different from traditional Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) methods in which all the classifiers are fabricated statically. Third, optimized data and configuration word pre-fetch mechanisms are employed to improve the whole system performance. Implementation results show that our approach under 200MHz clock rate can process up-to 17 frames per second on VGA size images, and the detection rate is over 95%. Our system consumes 194mW, and the die size of fabricated chip is 23mm2 using TSMC 65nm standard cell based technology. To the best of our knowledge, this work is the first implementation of the cascade Haar classifier algorithm on a dynamically CGRA platform presented in the literature.

  17. Design of Neural Networks for Fast Convergence and Accuracy: Dynamics and Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maghami, Peiman G.; Sparks, Dean W., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    A procedure for the design and training of artificial neural networks, used for rapid and efficient controls and dynamics design and analysis for flexible space systems, has been developed. Artificial neural networks are employed, such that once properly trained, they provide a means of evaluating the impact of design changes rapidly. Specifically, two-layer feedforward neural networks are designed to approximate the functional relationship between the component/spacecraft design changes and measures of its performance or nonlinear dynamics of the system/components. A training algorithm, based on statistical sampling theory, is presented, which guarantees that the trained networks provide a designer-specified degree of accuracy in mapping the functional relationship. Within each iteration of this statistical-based algorithm, a sequential design algorithm is used for the design and training of the feedforward network to provide rapid convergence to the network goals. Here, at each sequence a new network is trained to minimize the error of previous network. The proposed method should work for applications wherein an arbitrary large source of training data can be generated. Two numerical examples are performed on a spacecraft application in order to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed approach.

  18. A dynamic-biased dual-loop-feedback CMOS LDO regulator with fast transient response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Wang; Maomao, Sun

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents a low-dropout regulator (LDO) for portable applications with dual-loop feedback and a dynamic bias circuit. The dual-loop feedback structure is adopted to reduce the output voltage spike and the response time of the LDO. The dynamic bias circuit enhances the slew rate at the gate of the power transistor. In addition, an adaptive miller compensation technique is employed, from which a single pole system is realized and over a 59° phase margin is achieved under the full range of the load current. The proposed LDO has been implemented in a 0.6-μm CMOS process. From the experimental results, the regulator can operate with a minimum dropout voltage of 200 mV at a maximum 300 mA load and IQ of 113 μA. The line regulation and load regulation are improved to 0.1 mV/V and 3.4 μV/mA due to the sufficient loop gain provided by the dual feedback loops. Under a full range load current step, the voltage spikes and the recovery time of the proposed LDO is reduced to 97 mV and 0.142 μs respectively.

  19. AWE-WQ: Fast-Forwarding Molecular Dynamics Using the Accelerated Weighted Ensemble

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A limitation of traditional molecular dynamics (MD) is that reaction rates are difficult to compute. This is due to the rarity of observing transitions between metastable states since high energy barriers trap the system in these states. Recently the weighted ensemble (WE) family of methods have emerged which can flexibly and efficiently sample conformational space without being trapped and allow calculation of unbiased rates. However, while WE can sample correctly and efficiently, a scalable implementation applicable to interesting biomolecular systems is not available. We provide here a GPLv2 implementation called AWE-WQ of a WE algorithm using the master/worker distributed computing WorkQueue (WQ) framework. AWE-WQ is scalable to thousands of nodes and supports dynamic allocation of computer resources, heterogeneous resource usage (such as central processing units (CPU) and graphical processing units (GPUs) concurrently), seamless heterogeneous cluster usage (i.e., campus grids and cloud providers), and support for arbitrary MD codes such as GROMACS, while ensuring that all statistics are unbiased. We applied AWE-WQ to a 34 residue protein which simulated 1.5 ms over 8 months with peak aggregate performance of 1000 ns/h. Comparison was done with a 200 μs simulation collected on a GPU over a similar timespan. The folding and unfolded rates were of comparable accuracy. PMID:25207854

  20. A statistical light scattering approach to separating fast and slow dynamics: application to a model system.

    PubMed

    Barthès, Jennifer; Bulone, Donatella; Manno, Mauro; Martorana, Vincenzo; San Biagio, Pier Luigi

    2007-09-01

    Light scattering is a powerful technique to study the structural and dynamical properties of biomolecular systems or other soft materials such as polymeric solutions and blends or gels. An important application of this technique is the study of the kinetics of formation of supramolecular structures. However, in such cases, the system under study is rapidly changing, and consequently the integration time for each measurement is limited. In order to overcome this difficulty, a statistical approach has been developed based on the analysis of the scattered light intensity distribution (Manno et al. 2006, 2004). Indeed the intensity distribution depends upon the ratio between the integration time of each measurement and the coherence time of scattered radiation. This method has been applied to protein aggregation (Manno et al. 2006) and to sol-gel transition (Manno et al. 2004), to obtain information on the heterogeneity of morphological and dynamical features during such processes. In the present work, we accurately test the validity of this approach by analyzing the statistical properties of the light scattered by a model system: a solution of polystyrene spherical macromolecules of different sizes. Each molecular size is related to a given diffusion coefficient and to a given coherence time of the scattered intensity. The effect of changing the experimental integration time is systematically investigated. A mixture of particles of two different sizes is also analyzed to test the validity and robustness of the model based on the convolution of a gaussian with an exponential distribution.

  1. A compact fast ionization gauge for in situ measurement of high-density neutral flow dynamics.

    PubMed

    Weber, T E; Intrator, T P

    2014-04-01

    A compact ionization gauge has been developed to carry out in situ measurements of high density (10(20)-10(22) m(-3)) neutral gas flow dynamics with high temporal and spatial resolution. Key design aspects are discussed including gauge sensitivity and time response scaling with decreased probe dimensions, high-pressure operation, improved driver circuit bandwidth, and techniques for constructing a miniaturized probe head. Gas adsorption was discovered to significantly alter emission current and gauge sensitivity over timescales of several seconds. This effect must be taken into consideration when making time-resolved, high-density measurements. Over short timescales gauge response was predicted by scaling the sensitivity of a nominal Bayard-Alpert gauge to account for variations in probe dimensions and species-dependent ionization cross-section. Time-resolved neutral density profiles have been acquired in the Magnetized Shock Experiment at Los Alamos National Laboratory, providing data on the initial conditions of the ionization, plasmoid formation, and translation processes. It is shown that the desired density profiles can be achieved using a dynamic gas fill and that density can be scaled independently of the spatial profile.

  2. Dynamic UltraFast 2D EXchange SpectroscopY (UF-EXSY) of hyperpolarized substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leon Swisher, Christine; Koelsch, Bertram; Sukumar, Subramianam; Sriram, Renuka; Santos, Romelyn Delos; Wang, Zhen Jane; Kurhanewicz, John; Vigneron, Daniel; Larson, Peder

    2015-08-01

    In this work, we present a new ultrafast method for acquiring dynamic 2D EXchange SpectroscopY (EXSY) within a single acquisition. This technique reconstructs two-dimensional EXSY spectra from one-dimensional spectra based on the phase accrual during echo times. The Ultrafast-EXSY acquisition overcomes long acquisition times typically needed to acquire 2D NMR data by utilizing sparsity and phase dependence to dramatically undersample in the indirect time dimension. This allows for the acquisition of the 2D spectrum within a single shot. We have validated this method in simulations and hyperpolarized enzyme assay experiments separating the dehydration of pyruvate and lactate-to-pyruvate conversion. In a renal cell carcinoma cell (RCC) line, bidirectional exchange was observed. This new technique revealed decreased conversion of lactate-to-pyruvate with high expression of monocarboxylate transporter 4 (MCT4), known to correlate with aggressive cancer phenotypes. We also showed feasibility of this technique in vivo in a RCC model where bidirectional exchange was observed for pyruvate-lactate, pyruvate-alanine, and pyruvate-hydrate and were resolved in time. Broadly, the technique is well suited to investigate the dynamics of multiple exchange pathways and applicable to hyperpolarized substrates where chemical exchange has shown great promise across a range of disciplines.

  3. Supramolecular nanoreactors for intracellular singlet-oxygen sensitization.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, Subramani; Fowley, Colin; Thapaliya, Ek Raj; McCaughan, Bridgeen; Tang, Sicheng; Fraix, Aurore; Captain, Burjor; Sortino, Salvatore; Callan, John F; Raymo, Françisco M

    2015-09-07

    An amphiphilic polymer with multiple decyl and oligo(ethylene glycol) chains attached to a common poly(methacrylate) backbone assembles into nanoscaled particles in aqueous environments. Hydrophobic anthracene and borondipyrromethene (BODIPY) chromophores can be co-encapsulated within the self-assembling nanoparticles and transported across hydrophilic media. The reversible character of the noncovalent bonds, holding the supramolecular containers together, permits the exchange of their components with fast kinetics in aqueous solution. Incubation of cervical cancer (HeLA) cells with a mixture of two sets of nanoparticles, pre-loaded independently with anthracene or BODIPY chromophores, results in guest scrambling first and then transport of co-entrapped species to the intracellular space. Alternatively, incubation of cells with the two sets of nanocarriers in consecutive steps permits the sequential transport of the anthracene and BODIPY chromophores across the plasma membrane and only then allows their co-encapsulation within the same supramolecular containers. Both mechanisms position the two sets of chromophores with complementary spectral overlap in close proximity to enable the efficient transfer of energy intracellularly from the anthracene donors to the BODIPY acceptors. In the presence of iodine substituents on the BODIPY platform, intersystem crossing follows energy transfer. The resulting triplet state can transfer energy further to molecular oxygen with the concomitant production of singlet oxygen to induce cell mortality. Furthermore, the donor can be excited with two near-infrared photons simultaneously to permit the photoinduced generation of singlet oxygen intracellularly under illumination conditions compatible with applications in vivo. Thus, these supramolecular strategies to control the excitation dynamics of multichromophoric assemblies in the intracellular environment can evolve into valuable protocols for photodynamic therapy.

  4. Evaluation of nonlinear structural dynamic responses using a fast-running spring-mass formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benjamin, A. S.; Altman, B. S.; Gruda, J. D.

    In today's world, accurate finite-element simulations of large nonlinear systems may require meshes composed of hundreds of thousands of degrees of freedom. Even with today's fast computers and the promise of ever-faster ones in the future, central processing unit (CPU) expenditures for such problems could be measured in days. Many contemporary engineering problems, such as those found in risk assessment, probabilistic structural analysis, and structural design optimization, cannot tolerate the cost or turnaround time for such CPU-intensive analyses, because these applications require a large number of cases to be run with different inputs. For many risk assessment applications, analysts would prefer running times to be measurable in minutes. There is therefore a need for approximation methods which can solve such problems far more efficiently than the very detailed methods and yet maintain an acceptable degree of accuracy. For this purpose, we have been working on two methods of approximation: neural networks and spring-mass models. This paper presents our work and results to date for spring-mass modeling and analysis, since we are further along in this area than in the neural network formulation. It describes the physical and numerical models contained in a code we developed called STRESS, which stands for 'Spring-mass Transient Response Evaluation for structural Systems'. The paper also presents results for a demonstration problem, and compares these with results obtained for the same problem using PRONTO3D, a state-of-the-art finite element code which was also developed at Sandia.

  5. Evaluation of nonlinear structural dynamic responses using a fast-running spring-mass formulation

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin, A.S.; Altman, B.S.; Gruda, J.D.

    1995-03-01

    In today`s world, accurate finite-element simulations of large nonlinear systems may require meshes composed of hundreds of thousands of degrees of freedom. Even with today`s fast computers and the promise of ever-faster ones in the future, central processing unit (CPU) expenditures for such problems could be measured in days. Many contemporary engineering problems, such as those found in risk assessment, probabilistic structural analysis, and structural design optimization, cannot tolerate the cost or turnaround time for such CPU-intensive analyses, because these applications require a large number of cases to be run with different inputs. For many risk assessment applications, analysts would prefer running times to be measurable in minutes. There is therefore a need for approximation methods which can solve such problems far more efficiently than the very detailed methods and yet maintain an acceptable degree of accuracy. For this purpose, we have been working on two methods of approximation: neural networks and spring-mass models. This paper presents our work and results to date for spring-mass modeling and analysis, since we are further along in this area than in the neural network formulation. It describes the physical and numerical models contained in a code we developed called STRESS, which stands for ``Spring-mass Transient Response Evaluation for structural Systems``. The paper also presents results for a demonstration problem, and compares these with results obtained for the same problem using PRONTO3D, a state-of-the-art finite element code which was also developed at Sandia.

  6. Dynamic optical absorption characteristics of blood after slow and fast heating.

    PubMed

    Jia, Hao; Chen, Bin; Li, Dong

    2017-04-01

    Laser treatment is the most effective therapy in dermatology for vascular skin disorders, such as port-wine stains (PWS). Changes in heat-induced absorbance in blood must be determined for accurate numerical simulation and implementation of multi-pulse laser therapy for treatment of PWS. Thermally induced absorbance changes in hemoglobin in blood were compared in vitro between slow water bath heating and fast heating irradiated by using sub-millisecond Nd:YAG laser. Blood composition at different temperatures was calculated by comparing blood absorption spectra with those of pure HbO2, Hb, and metHb at room temperature. Blood absorbance to heat energy were categorized into three stages distinguished by metHb and coagulation points, which are the validity and security thresholds of the optimized therapy, respectively. Rapid laser heating can distinctively enhance blood absorbance by photochemically induced strong instability compared with slow heating at a constant temperature. Slow heating facilitates metHb point at 70 °C and coagulation point at 75 °C as the temperature of the water bath increases. However, the temperature at which metHb or coagulation point shifts to higher than 10 °C when pulses and fluence in laser irradiation change. Laser fluence less than 20 J/cm(2) and more than 50 J/cm(2) is unsuitable for laser treatment because of its low probability to coagulate vascular hyperplasia and high probability to damage normal tissues adjacent to target lesions, respectively. Few bubbles formed after mediate fluence is beneficial to minimize adverse side-effects. Considering blood absorbance, temperature evolution, and bubble formation, we recommend 30-40 J/cm(2) and 2-4 Hz frequency as the optimal laser parameters in sub-millisecond Nd:YAG laser.

  7. Faster dynamic imaging of speech with field inhomogeneity corrected spiral fast low angle shot (FLASH) at 3 T.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Bradley P; Conway, Charles A; Bae, Youkyung; Seethamraju, Ravi; Kuehn, David P

    2010-11-01

    To evaluate the impact of magnetic field inhomogeneity correction on achievable imaging speeds for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of articulating oropharyngeal structures during speech and to determine if sufficient acquisition speed is available for visualizing speech structures with real-time MRI. We designed a spiral fast low angle shot (FLASH) sequence that combines several acquisition techniques with an advanced image reconstruction approach that includes magnetic field inhomogeneity correction. A simulation study was performed to examine the interaction between imaging speed, image quality, number of spiral shots, and field inhomogeneity correction. Six volunteer subjects were scanned to demonstrate adequate visualization of articulating structures during simple speech samples. The simulation study confirmed that magnetic field inhomogeneity correction improves the available tradeoff between image quality and speed. Our optimized sequence co-acquires magnetic field maps for image correction and achieves a dynamic imaging rate of 21.4 frames per second, significantly faster than previous studies. Improved visualization of anatomical structures, such as the soft palate, was also seen from the field-corrected reconstructions in data acquired on volunteer subjects producing simple speech samples. Adequate temporal resolution of articulating oropharyngeal structures during speech can be obtained by combining outer volume suppression, multishot spiral imaging, and magnetic field corrected image reconstruction. Correcting for the large, dynamic magnetic field variation in the oropharyngeal cavity improves image quality and allows for higher temporal resolution. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. A High-Speed Vision-Based Sensor for Dynamic Vibration Analysis Using Fast Motion Extraction Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dashan; Guo, Jie; Lei, Xiujun; Zhu, Changan

    2016-01-01

    The development of image sensor and optics enables the application of vision-based techniques to the non-contact dynamic vibration analysis of large-scale structures. As an emerging technology, a vision-based approach allows for remote measuring and does not bring any additional mass to the measuring object compared with traditional contact measurements. In this study, a high-speed vision-based sensor system is developed to extract structure vibration signals in real time. A fast motion extraction algorithm is required for this system because the maximum sampling frequency of the charge-coupled device (CCD) sensor can reach up to 1000 Hz. Two efficient subpixel level motion extraction algorithms, namely the modified Taylor approximation refinement algorithm and the localization refinement algorithm, are integrated into the proposed vision sensor. Quantitative analysis shows that both of the two modified algorithms are at least five times faster than conventional upsampled cross-correlation approaches and achieve satisfactory error performance. The practicability of the developed sensor is evaluated by an experiment in a laboratory environment and a field test. Experimental results indicate that the developed high-speed vision-based sensor system can extract accurate dynamic structure vibration signals by tracking either artificial targets or natural features. PMID:27110784

  9. Hamilton-Jacobi equation for the least-action/least-time dynamical path based on fast marching method.

    PubMed

    Dey, Bijoy K; Janicki, Marek R; Ayers, Paul W

    2004-10-08

    Classical dynamics can be described with Newton's equation of motion or, totally equivalently, using the Hamilton-Jacobi equation. Here, the possibility of using the Hamilton-Jacobi equation to describe chemical reaction dynamics is explored. This requires an efficient computational approach for constructing the physically and chemically relevant solutions to the Hamilton-Jacobi equation; here we solve Hamilton-Jacobi equations on a Cartesian grid using Sethian's fast marching method. Using this method, we can--starting from an arbitrary initial conformation--find reaction paths that minimize the action or the time. The method is demonstrated by computing the mechanism for two different systems: a model system with four different stationary configurations and the H+H(2)-->H(2)+H reaction. Least-time paths (termed brachistochrones in classical mechanics) seem to be a suitable chioce for the reaction coordinate, allowing one to determine the key intermediates and final product of a chemical reaction. For conservative systems the Hamilton-Jacobi equation does not depend on the time, so this approach may be useful for simulating systems where important motions occur on a variety of different time scales.

  10. Nonlinear dynamics of 3D beams of fast magnetosonic waves propagating in the ionospheric and magnetospheric plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belashov, V. Yu.; Belashova, E. S.

    2016-11-01

    On the basis of the model of the three-dimensional (3D) generalized Kadomtsev-Petviashvili equation for magnetic field h = B / B the formation, stability, and dynamics of 3D soliton-like structures, such as the beams of fast magnetosonic (FMS) waves generated in ionospheric and magnetospheric plasma at a low-frequency branch of oscillations when β = 4 πnT/ B 2 ≪ 1 and β > 1, are studied. The study takes into account the highest dispersion correction determined by values of the plasma parameters and the angle θ = ( B, k), which plays a key role in the FMS beam propagation at those angles to the magnetic field that are close to π/2. The stability of multidimensional solutions is studied by an investigation of the Hamiltonian boundness under its deformations on the basis of solving of the corresponding variational problem. The evolution and dynamics of the 3D FMS wave beam are studied by the numerical integration of equations with the use of specially developed methods. The results can be interpreted in terms of the self-focusing phenomenon, as the formation of a stationary beam and the scattering and self-focusing of the solitary beam of FMS waves. These cases were studied with a detailed investigation of all evolutionary stages of the 3D FMS wave beams in the ionospheric and magnetospheric plasma.

  11. Dynamic compressed HRRP generation for random stepped-frequency radar based on complex-valued fast sequential homotopy.

    PubMed

    You, Peng; Liu, Zhen; Wang, Hongqiang; Wei, Xizhang; Li, Xiang

    2014-05-08

    Compressed sensing has been applied to achieve high resolution range profiles (HRRPs) using a stepped-frequency radar. In this new scheme, much fewer pulses are required to recover the target's strong scattering centers, which can greatly reduce the coherent processing interval (CPI) and improve the anti-jamming capability. For practical applications, however, the required number of pulses is difficult to determine in advance and any reduction of the transmitted pulses is attractive. In this paper, a dynamic compressed sensing strategy for HRRP generation is proposed, in which the estimated HRRP is updated with sequentially transmitted and received pulses until the proper stopping rules are satisfied. To efficiently implement the sequential update, a complex-valued fast sequential homotopy (CV-FSH) algorithm is developed based on group sparse recovery. This algorithm performs as an efficient recursive procedure of sparse recovery, thus avoiding solving a new optimization problem from scratch. Furthermore, the proper stopping rules are presented according to the special characteristics of HRRP. Therefore, the optimal number of pulses required in each CPI can be sought adapting to the echo signal. The results using simulated and real data show the effectiveness of the proposed approach and demonstrate that the established dynamic strategy is more suitable for uncooperative targets.

  12. A High-Speed Vision-Based Sensor for Dynamic Vibration Analysis Using Fast Motion Extraction Algorithms.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dashan; Guo, Jie; Lei, Xiujun; Zhu, Changan

    2016-04-22

    The development of image sensor and optics enables the application of vision-based techniques to the non-contact dynamic vibration analysis of large-scale structures. As an emerging technology, a vision-based approach allows for remote measuring and does not bring any additional mass to the measuring object compared with traditional contact measurements. In this study, a high-speed vision-based sensor system is developed to extract structure vibration signals in real time. A fast motion extraction algorithm is required for this system because the maximum sampling frequency of the charge-coupled device (CCD) sensor can reach up to 1000 Hz. Two efficient subpixel level motion extraction algorithms, namely the modified Taylor approximation refinement algorithm and the localization refinement algorithm, are integrated into the proposed vision sensor. Quantitative analysis shows that both of the two modified algorithms are at least five times faster than conventional upsampled cross-correlation approaches and achieve satisfactory error performance. The practicability of the developed sensor is evaluated by an experiment in a laboratory environment and a field test. Experimental results indicate that the developed high-speed vision-based sensor system can extract accurate dynamic structure vibration signals by tracking either artificial targets or natural features.

  13. Fast, Highly-Sensitive, and Wide-Dynamic-Range Interdigitated Capacitor Glucose Biosensor Using Solvatochromic Dye-Containing Sensing Membrane.

    PubMed

    Khan, Md Rajibur Rahaman; Khalilian, Alireza; Kang, Shin-Won

    2016-02-20

    In this paper, we proposed an interdigitated capacitor (IDC)-based glucose biosensor to measure different concentrations of glucose from 1 μM to 1 M. We studied four different types of solvatochromic dyes: Auramine O, Nile red, Rhodamine B, and Reichardt's dye (R-dye). These dyes were individually incorporated into a polymer [polyvinyl chloride (PVC)] and N,N-Dimethylacetamide (DMAC) solution to make the respective dielectric/sensing materials. To the best of our knowledge, we report for the first time an IDC glucose biosensing system utilizing a solvatochromic-dye-containing sensing membrane. These four dielectric or sensing materials were individually placed into the interdigitated electrode (IDE) by spin coating to make four IDC glucose biosensing elements. The proposed IDC glucose biosensor has a high sensing ability over a wide dynamic range and its sensitivity was about 23.32 mV/decade. It also has fast response and recovery times of approximately 7 s and 5 s, respectively, excellent reproducibility with a standard deviation of approximately 0.023, highly stable sensing performance, and real-time monitoring capabilities. The proposed IDC glucose biosensor was compared with an IDC, potentiometric, FET, and fiber-optic glucose sensor with respect to response time, dynamic range width, sensitivity, and linearity. We observed that the designed IDC glucose biosensor offered excellent performance.

  14. Fast, Highly-Sensitive, and Wide-Dynamic-Range Interdigitated Capacitor Glucose Biosensor Using Solvatochromic Dye-Containing Sensing Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Md. Rajibur Rahaman; Khalilian, Alireza; Kang, Shin-Won

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we proposed an interdigitated capacitor (IDC)-based glucose biosensor to measure different concentrations of glucose from 1 μM to 1 M. We studied four different types of solvatochromic dyes: Auramine O, Nile red, Rhodamine B, and Reichardt’s dye (R-dye). These dyes were individually incorporated into a polymer [polyvinyl chloride (PVC)] and N,N-Dimethylacetamide (DMAC) solution to make the respective dielectric/sensing materials. To the best of our knowledge, we report for the first time an IDC glucose biosensing system utilizing a solvatochromic-dye-containing sensing membrane. These four dielectric or sensing materials were individually placed into the interdigitated electrode (IDE) by spin coating to make four IDC glucose biosensing elements. The proposed IDC glucose biosensor has a high sensing ability over a wide dynamic range and its sensitivity was about 23.32 mV/decade. It also has fast response and recovery times of approximately 7 s and 5 s, respectively, excellent reproducibility with a standard deviation of approximately 0.023, highly stable sensing performance, and real-time monitoring capabilities. The proposed IDC glucose biosensor was compared with an IDC, potentiometric, FET, and fiber-optic glucose sensor with respect to response time, dynamic range width, sensitivity, and linearity. We observed that the designed IDC glucose biosensor offered excellent performance. PMID:26907291

  15. Hamilton-Jacobi equation for the least-action/least-time dynamical path based on fast marching method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Bijoy K.; Janicki, Marek R.; Ayers, Paul W.

    2004-10-01

    Classical dynamics can be described with Newton's equation of motion or, totally equivalently, using the Hamilton-Jacobi equation. Here, the possibility of using the Hamilton-Jacobi equation to describe chemical reaction dynamics is explored. This requires an efficient computational approach for constructing the physically and chemically relevant solutions to the Hamilton-Jacobi equation; here we solve Hamilton-Jacobi equations on a Cartesian grid using Sethian's fast marching method [J. A. Sethian, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 93, 1591 (1996)]. Using this method, we can—starting from an arbitrary initial conformation—find reaction paths that minimize the action or the time. The method is demonstrated by computing the mechanism for two different systems: a model system with four different stationary configurations and the H+H2→H2+H reaction. Least-time paths (termed brachistochrones in classical mechanics) seem to be a suitable chioce for the reaction coordinate, allowing one to determine the key intermediates and final product of a chemical reaction. For conservative systems the Hamilton-Jacobi equation does not depend on the time, so this approach may be useful for simulating systems where important motions occur on a variety of different time scales.

  16. Dynamic Compressed HRRP Generation for Random Stepped-Frequency Radar Based on Complex-Valued Fast Sequential Homotopy

    PubMed Central

    You, Peng; Liu, Zhen; Wang, Hongqiang; Wei, Xizhang; Li, Xiang

    2014-01-01

    Compressed sensing has been applied to achieve high resolution range profiles (HRRPs) using a stepped-frequency radar. In this new scheme, much fewer pulses are required to recover the target's strong scattering centers, which can greatly reduce the coherent processing interval (CPI) and improve the anti-jamming capability. For practical applications, however, the required number of pulses is difficult to determine in advance and any reduction of the transmitted pulses is attractive. In this paper, a dynamic compressed sensing strategy for HRRP generation is proposed, in which the estimated HRRP is updated with sequentially transmitted and received pulses until the proper stopping rules are satisfied. To efficiently implement the sequential update, a complex-valued fast sequential homotopy (CV-FSH) algorithm is developed based on group sparse recovery. This algorithm performs as an efficient recursive procedure of sparse recovery, thus avoiding solving a new optimization problem from scratch. Furthermore, the proper stopping rules are presented according to the special characteristics of HRRP. Therefore, the optimal number of pulses required in each CPI can be sought adapting to the echo signal. The results using simulated and real data show the effectiveness of the proposed approach and demonstrate that the established dynamic strategy is more suitable for uncooperative targets. PMID:24815679

  17. A fast parallel Poisson solver on irregular domains applied to beam dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Adelmann, A. Arbenz, P. Ineichen, Y.

    2010-06-20

    We discuss the scalable parallel solution of the Poisson equation within a Particle-In-Cell (PIC) code for the simulation of electron beams in particle accelerators of irregular shape. The problem is discretized by Finite Differences. Depending on the treatment of the Dirichlet boundary the resulting system of equations is symmetric or 'mildly' nonsymmetric positive definite. In all cases, the system is solved by the preconditioned conjugate gradient algorithm with smoothed aggregation (SA) based algebraic multigrid (AMG) preconditioning. We investigate variants of the implementation of SA-AMG that lead to considerable improvements in the execution times. We demonstrate good scalability of the solver on distributed memory parallel processor with up to 2048 processors. We also compare our iterative solver with an FFT-based solver that is more commonly used for applications in beam dynamics.

  18. Measuring fast stochastic displacements of bio-membranes with dynamic optical displacement spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monzel, C.; Schmidt, D.; Kleusch, C.; Kirchenbüchler, D.; Seifert, U.; Smith, A.-S.; Sengupta, K.; Merkel, R.

    2015-10-01

    Stochastic displacements or fluctuations of biological membranes are increasingly recognized as an important aspect of many physiological processes, but hitherto their precise quantification in living cells was limited due to a lack of tools to accurately record them. Here we introduce a novel technique--dynamic optical displacement spectroscopy (DODS), to measure stochastic displacements of membranes with unprecedented combined spatiotemporal resolution of 20 nm and 10 μs. The technique was validated by measuring bending fluctuations of model membranes. DODS was then used to explore the fluctuations in human red blood cells, which showed an ATP-induced enhancement of non-Gaussian behaviour. Plasma membrane fluctuations of human macrophages were quantified to this accuracy for the first time. Stimulation with a cytokine enhanced non-Gaussian contributions to these fluctuations. Simplicity of implementation, and high accuracy make DODS a promising tool for comprehensive understanding of stochastic membrane processes.

  19. Fast direct reconstruction strategy of dynamic fluorescence molecular tomography using graphics processing units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Maomao; Zhang, Jiulou; Cai, Chuangjian; Gao, Yang; Luo, Jianwen

    2016-06-01

    Dynamic fluorescence molecular tomography (DFMT) is a valuable method to evaluate the metabolic process of contrast agents in different organs in vivo, and direct reconstruction methods can improve the temporal resolution of DFMT. However, challenges still remain due to the large time consumption of the direct reconstruction methods. An acceleration strategy using graphics processing units (GPU) is presented. The procedure of conjugate gradient optimization in the direct reconstruction method is programmed using the compute unified device architecture and then accelerated on GPU. Numerical simulations and in vivo experiments are performed to validate the feasibility of the strategy. The results demonstrate that, compared with the traditional method, the proposed strategy can reduce the time consumption by ˜90% without a degradation of quality.

  20. Fast plane wave density functional theory molecular dynamics calculations on multi-GPU machines

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Weile; Fu, Jiyun; Cao, Zongyan; Wang, Long; Chi, Xuebin; Gao, Weiguo; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2013-10-15

    Plane wave pseudopotential (PWP) density functional theory (DFT) calculation is the most widely used method for material simulations, but its absolute speed stagnated due to the inability to use large scale CPU based computers. By a drastic redesign of the algorithm, and moving all the major computation parts into GPU, we have reached a speed of 12 s per molecular dynamics (MD) step for a 512 atom system using 256 GPU cards. This is about 20 times faster than the CPU version of the code regardless of the number of CPU cores used. Our tests and analysis on different GPU platforms and configurations shed lights on the optimal GPU deployments for PWP-DFT calculations. An 1800 step MD simulation is used to study the liquid phase properties of GaInP.

  1. Fast dynamic holographic recording based on conductive ionic metal-alkanoate liquid crystals and smectic glasses.

    PubMed

    Klimusheva, G; Bugaychuk, S; Garbovskiy, Yu; Kolesnyk, O; Mirnaya, T; Ishchenko, A

    2006-01-15

    Recordings of dynamic holograms with microsecond relaxation times under the action of nanosecond laser pulses are obtained in composites on the base of a novel class of liquid crystals (LCs) in ionic metal-alkanoates. Holographic parameters and relaxation characteristics are measured for doped lyotropic ionic LC, for sandwichlike cells (consisting of a dye layer and a layer of the lyotropic ionic LC), and for colored ionic smectic glasses. The structure of the materials is investigated by use of the small-angle x-ray technique. The mechanism of resonance nonlinearity in photosensitive centers and mechanisms of the grating erasure connected with a charge transport in the ionic conductive LC matrix are discussed.

  2. Fast measurement of automotive headlamps based on high dynamic range imaging.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hsien-Huang P; Lee, Yi-Ping; Chang, Shih-Hsin

    2012-10-01

    The headlamp of the automobile is a very important device for the safety of driving in the dark. Therefore, the distribution of the light designed to provide forward and lateral illumination needs to meet the requirements of various regulations. Traditional measurement of the distribution has been based on a point-by-point approach using a goniophotometer. In this paper, an imaging photometer is developed by combining a regular digital camera and a high dynamic range imaging technique to achieve faster and more complete measurement of the entire distribution. The experimental results indicate that errors of the measurements are within 10% of the true values, which is better than the 20% requirements of the industry.

  3. Measuring fast stochastic displacements of bio-membranes with dynamic optical displacement spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Monzel, C; Schmidt, D; Kleusch, C; Kirchenbüchler, D; Seifert, U; Smith, A-S; Sengupta, K; Merkel, R

    2015-10-06

    Stochastic displacements or fluctuations of biological membranes are increasingly recognized as an important aspect of many physiological processes, but hitherto their precise quantification in living cells was limited due to a lack of tools to accurately record them. Here we introduce a novel technique--dynamic optical displacement spectroscopy (DODS), to measure stochastic displacements of membranes with unprecedented combined spatiotemporal resolution of 20 nm and 10 μs. The technique was validated by measuring bending fluctuations of model membranes. DODS was then used to explore the fluctuations in human red blood cells, which showed an ATP-induced enhancement of non-Gaussian behaviour. Plasma membrane fluctuations of human macrophages were quantified to this accuracy for the first time. Stimulation with a cytokine enhanced non-Gaussian contributions to these fluctuations. Simplicity of implementation, and high accuracy make DODS a promising tool for comprehensive understanding of stochastic membrane processes.

  4. Fast recovery of free energy landscapes via diffusion-map-directed molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Preto, Jordane; Clementi, Cecilia

    2014-09-28

    The reaction pathways characterizing macromolecular systems of biological interest are associated with high free energy barriers. Resorting to the standard all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) to explore such critical regions may be inappropriate as the time needed to observe the relevant transitions can be remarkably long. In this paper, we present a new method called Extended Diffusion-Map-directed Molecular Dynamics (extended DM-d-MD) used to enhance the sampling of MD trajectories in such a way as to rapidly cover all important regions of the free energy landscape including deep metastable states and critical transition paths. Moreover, extended DM-d-MD was combined with a reweighting scheme enabling to save on-the-fly information about the Boltzmann distribution. Our algorithm was successfully applied to two systems, alanine dipeptide and alanine-12. Due to the enhanced sampling, the Boltzmann distribution is recovered much faster than in plain MD simulations. For alanine dipeptide, we report a speedup of one order of magnitude with respect to plain MD simulations. For alanine-12, our algorithm allows us to highlight all important unfolded basins in several days of computation when one single misfolded event is barely observable within the same amount of computational time by plain MD simulations. Our method is reaction coordinate free, shows little dependence on the a priori knowledge of the system, and can be implemented in such a way that the biased steps are not computationally expensive with respect to MD simulations thus making our approach well adapted for larger complex systems from which little information is known.

  5. Fast Pairwise Structural RNA Alignments by Pruning of the Dynamical Programming Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Havgaard, Jakob H; Torarinsson, Elfar; Gorodkin, Jan

    2007-01-01

    It has become clear that noncoding RNAs (ncRNA) play important roles in cells, and emerging studies indicate that there might be a large number of unknown ncRNAs in mammalian genomes. There exist computational methods that can be used to search for ncRNAs by comparing sequences from different genomes. One main problem with these methods is their computational complexity, and heuristics are therefore employed. Two heuristics are currently very popular: pre-folding and pre-aligning. However, these heuristics are not ideal, as pre-aligning is dependent on sequence similarity that may not be present and pre-folding ignores the comparative information. Here, pruning of the dynamical programming matrix is presented as an alternative novel heuristic constraint. All subalignments that do not exceed a length-dependent minimum score are discarded as the matrix is filled out, thus giving the advantage of providing the constraints dynamically. This has been included in a new implementation of the FOLDALIGN algorithm for pairwise local or global structural alignment of RNA sequences. It is shown that time and memory requirements are dramatically lowered while overall performance is maintained. Furthermore, a new divide and conquer method is introduced to limit the memory requirement during global alignment and backtrack of local alignment. All branch points in the computed RNA structure are found and used to divide the structure into smaller unbranched segments. Each segment is then realigned and backtracked in a normal fashion. Finally, the FOLDALIGN algorithm has also been updated with a better memory implementation and an improved energy model. With these improvements in the algorithm, the FOLDALIGN software package provides the molecular biologist with an efficient and user-friendly tool for searching for new ncRNAs. The software package is available for download at http://foldalign.ku.dk. PMID:17937495

  6. Dynamics of ultrathin metal films on amorphous substrates under fast thermal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favazza, Christopher; Kalyanaraman, Ramki; Sureshkumar, Radhakrishna

    2007-11-01

    A mathematical model is developed to analyze the growth/decay rate of surface perturbations of an ultrathin metal film on an amorphous substrate (SiO2). The formulation combines the approach of Mullins [W. W. Mullins, J. Appl. Phys. 30, 77 (1959)] for bulk surfaces, in which curvature-driven mass transport and surface deformation can occur by surface/volume diffusion and evaporation-condensation processes, with that of Spencer etal . [B. J. Spencer, P. W. Voorhees, and S. H. Davis, Phys. Rev. Lett. 67, 26 (1991)] to describe solid-state transport in thin films under epitaxial strain. Modifications of the Mullins model to account for thin-film boundary conditions result in qualitatively different dispersion relationships especially in the limit as kho≪1, where k is the wavenumber of the perturbation and ho is the unperturbed film height. The model is applied to study the relative rate of solid-state mass transport as compared to that of liquid phase dewetting in a thin film subjected to a fast thermal pulse. Specifically, we have recently shown that multiple cycles of nanosecond (ns) pulsed laser melting and resolidification of ultrathin metal films on amorphous substrates can lead to the formation of various types of spatially ordered nanostructures [J. Trice, D. Thomas, C. Favazza, R. Sureshkumar, and R. Kalyanaraman, Phys. Rev. B 75, 235439 (2007)]. The pattern formation has been attributed to the dewetting of the thin film by a hydrodynamic instability. In such experiments the film is in the solid state during a substantial fraction of each thermal cycle. However, results of a linear stability analysis based on the aforementioned model suggest that solid-state mass transport has a negligible effect on morphological changes of the surface. Further, a qualitative analysis of the effect of thermoelastic stress, induced by the rapid temperature changes in the film-substrate bilayer, suggests that stress relaxation does not appreciably contribute to surface

  7. Intracellular Parasite Invasion Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibley, L. D.

    2004-04-01

    Intracellular parasites use various strategies to invade cells and to subvert cellular signaling pathways and, thus, to gain a foothold against host defenses. Efficient cell entry, ability to exploit intracellular niches, and persistence make these parasites treacherous pathogens. Most intracellular parasites gain entry via host-mediated processes, but apicomplexans use a system of adhesion-based motility called ``gliding'' to actively penetrate host cells. Actin polymerization-dependent motility facilitates parasite migration across cellular barriers, enables dissemination within tissues, and powers invasion of host cells. Efficient invasion has brought widespread success to this group, which includes Toxoplasma, Plasmodium, and Cryptosporidium.

  8. A Fast Ray-Tracing Using Bounding Spheres and Frustum Rays for Dynamic Scene Rendering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Ken-Ichi; Kaeriyama, Yoshiyuki; Komatsu, Kazuhiko; Egawa, Ryusuke; Ohba, Nobuyuki; Kobayashi, Hiroaki

    Ray tracing is one of the most popular techniques for generating photo-realistic images. Extensive research and development work has made interactive static scene rendering realistic. This paper deals with interactive dynamic scene rendering in which not only the eye point but also the objects in the scene change their 3D locations every frame. In order to realize interactive dynamic scene rendering, RTRPS (Ray Tracing based on Ray Plane and Bounding Sphere), which utilizes the coherency in rays, objects, and grouped-rays, is introduced. RTRPS uses bounding spheres as the spatial data structure which utilizes the coherency in objects. By using bounding spheres, RTRPS can ignore the rotation of moving objects within a sphere, and shorten the update time between frames. RTRPS utilizes the coherency in rays by merging rays into a ray-plane, assuming that the secondary rays and shadow rays are shot through an aligned grid. Since a pair of ray-planes shares an original ray, the intersection for the ray can be completed using the coherency in the ray-planes. Because of the three kinds of coherency, RTRPS can significantly reduce the number of intersection tests for ray tracing. Further acceleration techniques for ray-plane-sphere and ray-triangle intersection are also presented. A parallel projection technique converts a 3D vector inner product operation into a 2D operation and reduces the number of floating point operations. Techniques based on frustum culling and binary-tree structured ray-planes optimize the order of intersection tests between ray-planes and a sphere, resulting in 50% to 90% reduction of intersection tests. Two ray-triangle intersection techniques are also introduced, which are effective when a large number of rays are packed into a ray-plane. Our performance evaluations indicate that RTRPS gives 13 to 392 times speed up in comparison with a ray tracing algorithm without organized rays and spheres. We found out that RTRPS also provides competitive

  9. Investigation of a FAST-OrcaFlex Coupling Module for Integrating Turbine and Mooring Dynamics of Offshore Floating Wind Turbines: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Masciola, M.; Robertson, A.; Jonkman, J.; Driscoll, F.

    2011-10-01

    To enable offshore floating wind turbine design, the following are required: accurate modeling of the wind turbine structural dynamics, aerodynamics, platform hydrodynamics, a mooring system, and control algorithms. Mooring and anchor design can appreciably affect the dynamic response of offshore wind platforms that are subject to environmental loads. From an engineering perspective, system behavior and line loads must be studied well to ensure the overall design is fit for the intended purpose. FAST (Fatigue, Aerodynamics, Structures and Turbulence) is a comprehensive simulation tool used for modeling land-based and offshore wind turbines. In the case of a floating turbine, continuous cable theory is used to emulate mooring line dynamics. Higher modeling fidelity can be gained through the use of finite element mooring theory. This can be achieved through the FASTlink coupling module, which couples FAST with OrcaFlex, a commercial simulation tool used for modeling mooring line dynamics. In this application, FAST is responsible for capturing the aerodynamic loads and flexure of the wind turbine and its tower, and OrcaFlex models the mooring line and hydrodynamic effects below the water surface. This paper investigates the accuracy and stability of the FAST/OrcaFlex coupling operation.