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Sample records for fast kinetic ligands

  1. Fast protein folding kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Gelman, Hannah; Gruebele, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Fast folding proteins have been a major focus of computational and experimental study because they are accessible to both techniques: they are small and fast enough to be reasonably simulated with current computational power, but have dynamics slow enough to be observed with specially developed experimental techniques. This coupled study of fast folding proteins has provided insight into the mechanisms which allow some proteins to find their native conformation well less than 1 ms and has uncovered examples of theoretically predicted phenomena such as downhill folding. The study of fast folders also informs our understanding of even “slow” folding processes: fast folders are small, relatively simple protein domains and the principles that govern their folding also govern the folding of more complex systems. This review summarizes the major theoretical and experimental techniques used to study fast folding proteins and provides an overview of the major findings of fast folding research. Finally, we examine the themes that have emerged from studying fast folders and briefly summarize their application to protein folding in general as well as some work that is left to do. PMID:24641816

  2. On fast reactor kinetics studies

    SciTech Connect

    Seleznev, E. F.; Belov, A. A.; Matveenko, I. P.; Zhukov, A. M.; Raskach, K. F.

    2012-07-01

    The results and the program of fast reactor core time and space kinetics experiments performed and planned to be performed at the IPPE critical facility is presented. The TIMER code was taken as computation support of the experimental work, which allows transient equations to be solved in 3-D geometry with multi-group diffusion approximation. The number of delayed neutron groups varies from 6 to 8. The code implements the solution of both transient neutron transfer problems: a direct one, where neutron flux density and its derivatives, such as reactor power, etc, are determined at each time step, and an inverse one for the point kinetics equation form, where such a parameter as reactivity is determined with a well-known reactor power time variation function. (authors)

  3. Fast, Approximate Kinetics of RNA Folding

    PubMed Central

    Senter, Evan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In this article, we introduce the software suite Hermes, which provides fast, novel algorithms for RNA secondary structure kinetics. Using the fast Fourier transform to efficiently compute the Boltzmann probability that a secondary structure S of a given RNA sequence has base pair distance x (resp. y) from reference structure A (resp. B), Hermes computes the exact kinetics of folding from A to B in this coarse-grained model. In particular, Hermes computes the mean first passage time from the transition probability matrix by using matrix inversion, and also computes the equilibrium time from the rate matrix by using spectral decomposition. Due to the model granularity and the speed of Hermes, it is capable of determining secondary structure refolding kinetics for large RNA sequences, beyond the range of other methods. Comparative benchmarking of Hermes with other methods indicates that Hermes provides refolding kinetics of accuracy suitable for use in the computational design of RNA, an important area of synthetic biology. Source code and documentation for Hermes are available. PMID:25684201

  4. (S)-5-(p-Nitrobenzyl)-PCTA, a Promising Bifunctional Ligand with Advantageous Metal Ion Complexation Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Tircsó, Gyula; Benyó, Enikő Tircsóné; Suh, Eul Hyun; Jurek, Paul; Kiefer, Garry E.; Sherry, A. Dean; Kovács, Zoltán

    2009-01-01

    A bifunctional version of PCTA (3,6,9,15-tetraazabicyclo[9.3.1]pentadeca-1(15),11,13-triene-3,6,9,-triacetic acid) that exhibits fast complexation kinetics with the trivalent lanthanide(III) ions was synthesized in reasonable yields starting from N, N′, N″-tristosyl-(S)-2-(p-nitrobenzyl)-diethylenetriamine. pH-potentiometric studies showed that the basicities of p-nitrobenzyl-PCTA and the parent ligand PCTA were similar. The stability of M(NO2-Bn-PCTA) (M = Mg2+, Ca2+, Cu2+, Zn2+) complexes was similar to that of the corresponding PCTA complexes while the stability of Ln3+ complexes of the bifunctional ligand is somewhat lower than that of PCTA chelates. The rate of complex formation of Ln(NO2-Bn-PCTA) complexes was found to be quite similar to that of PCTA, a ligand known to exhibit the fastest formation rates among all lanthanide macrocyclic ligand complexes studied to date. The acid catalyzed decomplexation kinetic studies of the selected Ln(NO2-Bn-PCTA) complexes showed that the kinetic inertness of the complexes was comparable to that of Ln(DOTA) chelates making the bifunctional ligand NO2-Bn-PCTA suitable for labeling biological vectors with radioisotopes for nuclear medicine applications. PMID:19220012

  5. Exchange Kinetics of a Hydrophobic Ligand Binding Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughn, Jeff; Stone, Martin

    2002-03-01

    Conformational fluctuations of proteins are thought to be important for determining the functional roles in biological activity. In some cases, the rates of these conformational changes may be directly correlated to, for example, the rates of catalysis or ligand binding. We are studying the role of conformational fluctuations in the binding of small volatile hydrophobic pheromones by the mouse major urinary proteins (MUPs). Communication among mice occurs, in part, with the MUP-1 protein. This urinary protein binds pheromones as a way to increase the longevity of the pheromone in an extracellular environment. Of interest is that the crystal structure of MUP-1 with a pheromone ligand shows the ligand to be completely occluded from the solvent with no obvious pathway to enter or exit. This suggests that conformational exchange of the protein may be required for ligand binding and release to occur. We hypothesize that the rate of conformational exchange may be a limiting factor determining the rate of ligand association and dissociation. By careful measurement of the on- and off-rates of ligand binding and the rates of conformational changes of the protein, a more defined picture of the interplay between protein structure and function can be obtained. To this end, heteronuclear saturation transfer, ^15N-exchange and ^15N dynamics experiments have been employed to probe the kinetics of ligand binding to MUP-1.

  6. Time-dynamic imaging of individual cell ligand binding kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, David; Chung, Johnson

    1997-05-01

    Ligand-binding assays are commonly applied to large numbers of cells in culture; the binding parameters derived from such assays reflect the ensemble average behavior of many cells. Equilibrium binding assays of epidermal growth factor (EGF) binding to the EGF receptor (EGFR) indicate that the EGFR exhibits two affinity states for EGF, one low affinity with Kd about 10 nM and one high affinity with Kd < 1 nM. Bulk binding studies cannot determined if such multiple ligand binding classes are due to cell population heterogeneity or are due to heterogeneity at the individual cell level. Here is described a technique based on single cell imaging of fluorescein-EGF (f-EGF) binding to individual human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells that demonstrates that both classes of EGFR are found on all A431 cells, that the time course of f-EGF binding to individual cells shows two kinetic on-rates and two off-rates, that cell-to-cell heterogeneity of EGF binding is significant and that ligand binding kinetics vary across an individual cell. Contributions of cell autofluorescence photobleaching and f- EGF photobleaching in the measurement of fluorescent ligand binding are shown to be significant.

  7. Terephthalamide-containing ligands: fast removal of iron from transferrin.

    PubMed

    Abergel, Rebecca J; Raymond, Kenneth N

    2008-02-01

    The mechanism and effectiveness of iron removal from transferrin by three series of new potential therapeutic iron sequestering agents have been analyzed with regard to the structures of the chelators. All compounds are hexadentate ligands composed of a systematically varied combination of methyl-3,2-hydroxypyridinone (Me-3,2-HOPO) and 2,3-dihydroxyterephthalamide (TAM) binding units linked to a polyamine scaffold through amide linkers; each series is based on a specific backbone: tris(2-aminoethyl)amine, spermidine, or 5-LIO(TAM), where 5-LIO is 2-(2-aminoethoxy)ethylamine. Rates of iron removal from transferrin were determined spectrophotometrically for the ten ligands, which all efficiently acquire ferric ion from diferric transferrin with a hyperbolic dependence on ligand concentration (saturation kinetics). The effect of the two iron-binding subunits Me-3,2-HOPO and TAM and of the scaffold structures on iron removal ability is discussed. At the low concentrations corresponding to therapeutic dose, TAM-containing ligands exhibit the fastest rates of iron removal, which correlates with their high affinity for ferric ion and suggests the insertion of such binding units into future therapeutic chelating agents. In addition, urea polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was used to measure the individual microscopic rates of iron removal from the three iron-bound transferrin species (diferric transferrin, N-terminal monoferric transferrin, C-terminal monoferric transferrin) by the representative chelators 5-LIO(Me-3,2-HOPO)(2)(TAM) and 5-LIO(TAMmeg)(2)(TAM), where TAMmeg is 2,3-dihydroxy-1-(methoxyethylcarbamoyl)terephthalamide. Both ligands show preferential removal from the C-terminal site of the iron-binding protein. However, cooperative effects between the two binding sites differ with the chelator. Replacement of hydroxypyridinone moieties by terephthalamide groups renders the N-terminal site more accessible to the ligand and may represent an advantage for iron

  8. Solvent fluctuations in hydrophobic cavity–ligand binding kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Setny, Piotr; Baron, Riccardo; Michael Kekenes-Huskey, Peter; McCammon, J. Andrew; Dzubiella, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    Water plays a crucial part in virtually all protein–ligand binding processes in and out of equilibrium. Here, we investigate the role of water in the binding kinetics of a ligand to a prototypical hydrophobic pocket by explicit-water molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and implicit diffusional approaches. The concave pocket in the unbound state exhibits wet/dry hydration oscillations whose magnitude and time scale are significantly amplified by the approaching ligand. In turn, the ligand’s stochastic motion intimately couples to the slow hydration fluctuations, leading to a sixfold-enhanced friction in the vicinity of the pocket entrance. The increased friction considerably decelerates association in the otherwise barrierless system, indicating the importance of molecular-scale hydrodynamic effects in cavity–ligand binding arising due to capillary fluctuations. We derive and analyze the diffusivity profile and show that the mean first passage time distribution from the MD simulation can be accurately reproduced by a standard Brownian dynamics simulation if the appropriate position-dependent friction profile is included. However, long-time decays in the water–ligand (random) force autocorrelation demonstrate violation of the Markovian assumption, challenging standard diffusive approaches for rate prediction. Remarkably, the static friction profile derived from the force correlations strongly resembles the profile derived on the Markovian assumption apart from a simple shift in space, which can be rationalized by a time–space retardation in the ligand’s downhill dynamics toward the pocket. The observed spatiotemporal hydrodynamic coupling may be of biological importance providing the time needed for conformational receptor–ligand adjustments, typical of the induced-fit paradigm. PMID:23297241

  9. Accuracy and precision of protein-ligand interaction kinetics determined from chemical shift titrations.

    PubMed

    Markin, Craig J; Spyracopoulos, Leo

    2012-12-01

    NMR-monitored chemical shift titrations for the study of weak protein-ligand interactions represent a rich source of information regarding thermodynamic parameters such as dissociation constants (K ( D )) in the micro- to millimolar range, populations for the free and ligand-bound states, and the kinetics of interconversion between states, which are typically within the fast exchange regime on the NMR timescale. We recently developed two chemical shift titration methods wherein co-variation of the total protein and ligand concentrations gives increased precision for the K ( D ) value of a 1:1 protein-ligand interaction (Markin and Spyracopoulos in J Biomol NMR 53: 125-138, 2012). In this study, we demonstrate that classical line shape analysis applied to a single set of (1)H-(15)N 2D HSQC NMR spectra acquired using precise protein-ligand chemical shift titration methods we developed, produces accurate and precise kinetic parameters such as the off-rate (k ( off )). For experimentally determined kinetics in the fast exchange regime on the NMR timescale, k ( off ) ~ 3,000 s(-1) in this work, the accuracy of classical line shape analysis was determined to be better than 5 % by conducting quantum mechanical NMR simulations of the chemical shift titration methods with the magnetic resonance toolkit GAMMA. Using Monte Carlo simulations, the experimental precision for k ( off ) from line shape analysis of NMR spectra was determined to be 13 %, in agreement with the theoretical precision of 12 % from line shape analysis of the GAMMA simulations in the presence of noise and protein concentration errors. In addition, GAMMA simulations were employed to demonstrate that line shape analysis has the potential to provide reasonably accurate and precise k ( off ) values over a wide range, from 100 to 15,000 s(-1). The validity of line shape analysis for k ( off ) values approaching intermediate exchange (~100 s(-1)), may be facilitated by more accurate K ( D ) measurements

  10. Kinetics of fast island decay on Ag(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Morgenstern, Karina; Rosenfeld, Georg; Comsa, George; Sorensen, Mads R.; Hammer, Bjork; Laegsgaard, Erik; Besenbacher, Flemming

    2001-01-15

    The kinetics of fast island decay on Ag(111) close to steps has been studied in scanning tunneling microscopy experiments and atomistic total energy calculations. We show that a breakdown of the step-edge barrier is not sufficient to explain the decay rates observed during fast decay events. From the interplay between experiments and theory, we instead propose that fast decay originates from concerted diffusion processes, which bypass the detachment barrier of atoms from kinks and step sites.

  11. Fast kinetics of calcium dissociation from calsequestrin.

    PubMed

    Beltrán, Marianela; Barrientos, Genaro; Hidalgo, Cecilia

    2006-01-01

    We measured the kinetics of calcium dissociation from calsequestrin in solution or forming part of isolated junctional sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes by mixing calsequestrin equilibrated with calcium with calcium-free solutions in a stopped-flow system. In parallel, we measured the kinetics of the intrinsic fluorescence changes that take place following calcium dissociation from calsequestrin. We found that at 25 degrees C calcium dissociation was 10-fold faster for calsequestrin attached to junctional membranes (k = 109 s(-1)) than in solution. These results imply that calcium dissociation from calsequestrin in vivo is not rate limiting during excitation-contraction coupling. In addition, we found that the intrinsic fluorescence decrease for calsequestrin in solution or forming part of junctional membranes was significantly slower than the rates of calcium dissociation. The kinetics of intrinsic fluorescence changes had two components for calsequestrin associated to junctional membranes and only one for calsequestrin in solution; the faster component was 8-fold faster (k = 54.1 s(-1)) than the slower component (k = 6.9 s(-1)), which had the same k value as for calsequestrin in solution. These combined results suggest that the presence of calsequestrin at high concentrations in a restricted space, such as when bound to the junctional membrane, accelerates calcium dissociation and the resulting structural changes, presumably as a result of cooperative molecular interactions. PMID:17106581

  12. Kinetic isotope effects for fast deuterium and proton exchange rates

    PubMed Central

    Mammoli, Daniele; Kadeřávek, Pavel; Pelupessy, Philippe; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2016-01-01

    By monitoring the effect of deuterium decoupling on the decay of transverse 15N magnetization in D–15N spin pairs during multiple-refocusing echo sequences, we have determined fast D–D exchange rates k D and compared them with fast H–H exchange rates k H in tryptophan to determine the kinetic isotope effect as a function of pH and temperature. PMID:27009684

  13. Quantitative Imaging in Laboratory: Fast Kinetics and Fluorescence Quenching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cumberbatch, Tanya; Hanley, Quentin S.

    2007-01-01

    The process of quantitative imaging, which is very commonly used in laboratory, is shown to be very useful for studying the fast kinetics and fluorescence quenching of many experiments. The imaging technique is extremely cheap and hence can be used in many absorption and luminescence experiments.

  14. Binding kinetics differentiates functional antagonism of orexin-2 receptor ligands

    PubMed Central

    Mould, R; Brown, J; Marshall, FH; Langmead, CJ

    2014-01-01

    Orexin receptor antagonism represents a novel approach for the treatment of insomnia that directly targets sleep/wake regulation. Several such compounds have entered into clinical development, including the dual orexin receptor antagonists, suvorexant and almorexant. In this study, we have used equilibrium and kinetic binding studies with the orexin-2 (OX2) selective antagonist radioligand, [3H]-EMPA, to profile several orexin receptor antagonists. Furthermore, selected compounds were studied in cell-based assays of inositol phosphate accumulation and ERK-1/2 phosphorylation in CHO cells stably expressing the OX2 receptor that employ different agonist incubation times (30 and 5 min, respectively). EMPA, suvorexant, almorexant and TCS-OX-29 all bind to the OX2 receptor with moderate to high affinity (pKI values ≥ 7.5), whereas the primarily OX1 selective antagonists SB-334867 and SB-408124 displayed low affinity (pKI values ca. 6). Competition kinetic analysis showed that the compounds displayed a range of dissociation rates from very fast (TCS-OX2-29, koff = 0.22 min−1) to very slow (almorexant, koff = 0.005 min−1). Notably, there was a clear correlation between association rate and affinity. In the cell-based assays, fast-offset antagonists EMPA and TCS-OX2-29 displayed surmountable antagonism of orexin-A agonist activity. However, both suvorexant and particularly almorexant cause concentration-dependent depression in the maximal orexin-A response, a profile that is more evident with a shorter agonist incubation time. Analysis according to a hemi-equilibrium model suggests that antagonist dissociation is slower in a cellular system than in membrane binding; under these conditions, almorexant effectively acts as a pseudo-irreversible antagonist. Linked ArticlesThis article is part of a themed section on Orexin Receptors. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-2 PMID:23692283

  15. Fast kinetics of calcium signaling and sensor design.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shen; Reddish, Florence; Zhuo, You; Yang, Jenny J

    2015-08-01

    Fast calcium signaling is regulated by numerous calcium channels exhibiting high spatiotemporal profiles which are currently measured by fluorescent calcium sensors. There is still a strong need to improve the kinetics of genetically encoded calcium indicators (sensors) to capture calcium dynamics in the millisecond time frame. In this review, we summarize several major fast calcium signaling pathways and discuss the recent developments and application of genetically encoded calcium indicators to detect these pathways. A new class of genetically encoded calcium indicators designed with site-directed mutagenesis on the surface of beta-barrel fluorescent proteins to form a pentagonal bipyramidal-like calcium binding domain dramatically accelerates calcium binding kinetics. Furthermore, novel genetically encoded calcium indicators with significantly increased fluorescent lifetime change are advantageous in deep-field imaging with high light-scattering and notable morphology change.

  16. Fast algorithm for calculating chemical kinetics in turbulent reacting flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhakrishnan, K.; Pratt, D. T.

    1986-01-01

    This paper addresses the need for a fast batch chemistry solver to perform the kinetics part of a split operator formulation of turbulent reacting flows, with special attention focused on the solution of the ordinary differential equations governing a homogeneous gas-phase chemical reaction. For this purpose, a two-part predictor-corrector algorithm which incorporates an exponentially fitted trapezoidal method was developed. The algorithm performs filtering of ill-posed initial conditions, automatic step-size selection, and automatic selection of Jacobi-Newton or Newton-Raphson iteration for convergence to achieve maximum computational efficiency while observing a prescribed error tolerance. The new algorithm, termed CREK1D (combustion reaction kinetics, one-dimensional), compared favorably with the code LSODE when tested on two representative problems drawn from combustion kinetics, and is faster than LSODE.

  17. The Added Value of Assessing Ligand-Receptor Binding Kinetics in Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dong; Heitman, Laura H; IJzerman, Adriaan P

    2016-09-01

    In the past decade drug research community has started to appreciate the indispensable role of ligand-receptor binding kinetics (BK) in drug discovery. Next to the classical equilibrium-based drug evaluation process with affinity and potency values as outcomes, kinetic investigation of the ligand-receptor interaction can aid compound triage in the hit-to-lead campaign and provide additional information to understand the molecular mechanism of drug action. Translational models incorporating BK are emerging as well, which represent powerful tools for the prediction of in vivo effects. In this viewpoint we will summarize some recent findings and discuss and emphasize the added value of ligand-receptor binding kinetics in drug research. PMID:27660682

  18. Comparison of the kinetics of different Markov models for ligand binding under varying conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Martini, Johannes W. R.; Habeck, Michael

    2015-03-07

    We recently derived a Markov model for macromolecular ligand binding dynamics from few physical assumptions and showed that its stationary distribution is the grand canonical ensemble [J. W. R. Martini, M. Habeck, and M. Schlather, J. Math. Chem. 52, 665 (2014)]. The transition probabilities of the proposed Markov process define a particular Glauber dynamics and have some similarity to the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm. Here, we illustrate that this model is the stochastic analog of (pseudo) rate equations and the corresponding system of differential equations. Moreover, it can be viewed as a limiting case of general stochastic simulations of chemical kinetics. Thus, the model links stochastic and deterministic approaches as well as kinetics and equilibrium described by the grand canonical ensemble. We demonstrate that the family of transition matrices of our model, parameterized by temperature and ligand activity, generates ligand binding kinetics that respond to changes in these parameters in a qualitatively similar way as experimentally observed kinetics. In contrast, neither the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm nor the Glauber heat bath reflects changes in the external conditions correctly. Both converge rapidly to the stationary distribution, which is advantageous when the major interest is in the equilibrium state, but fail to describe the kinetics of ligand binding realistically. To simulate cellular processes that involve the reversible stochastic binding of multiple factors, our pseudo rate equation model should therefore be preferred to the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm and the Glauber heat bath, if the stationary distribution is not of only interest.

  19. Rational ligand design for the arylation of hindered primary amines guided by reaction progress kinetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Castillo, Paula; Blackmond, Donna G; Buchwald, Stephen L

    2015-03-01

    We report the Pd-catalyzed arylation of very hindered α,α,α-trisubstituted primary amines. Kinetics-based mechanistic analysis and rational design have led to the development of two biarylphosphine ligands that allow the transformation to proceed with excellent efficiency. The process was effective in coupling a wide range of functionalized aryl and heteroaryl halides under mild conditions.

  20. Kinetic Studies of the Coordination of Mono- and Ditopic Ligands with First Row Transition Metal Ions.

    PubMed

    Munzert, Stefanie Martina; Schwarz, Guntram; Kurth, Dirk G

    2016-03-01

    The reactions of the ditopic ligand 1,4-bis(2,2':6',2″-terpyridin-4'-yl)benzene (1) as well as the monotopic ligands 4'-phenyl-2,2':6',2″-terpyridine (2) and 2,2':6',2″-terpyridine (3) with Fe(2+), Co(2+), and Ni(2+) in solution are studied. While the reaction of 1 with Fe(2+), Co(2+), and Ni(2+) results in metallo-supramolecular coordination polyelectrolytes (MEPEs), ligands 2 and 3 give mononuclear complexes. All compounds are analyzed by UV/vis and fluorescence spectroscopy. Fluorescence spectroscopy indicates that protonation as well as coordination to Zn(2+) leads to an enhanced fluorescence of the terpyridine ligands. In contrast, Fe(2+), Co(2+), or Ni(2+) quench the fluorescence of the ligands. The kinetics of the reactions are studied by stopped-flow fluorescence spectroscopy. Analysis of the measured data is presented and the full kinetic rate laws for the coordination of the terpyridine ligands 1, 2, and 3 to Fe(2+), Co(2+), and Ni(2+) are presented. The coordination occurs within a few seconds, and the rate constant increases in the order Ni(2+) < Co(2+) < Fe(2+). With the rate constants at hand, the polymer growth of Ni-MEPE is computed.

  1. Simple and fast screening of G-quadruplex ligands with electrochemical detection system.

    PubMed

    Fan, Qiongxuan; Li, Chao; Tao, Yaqin; Mao, Xiaoxia; Li, Genxi

    2016-11-01

    Small molecules that may facilitate and stabilize the formation of G-quadruplexes can be used for cancer treatments, because the G-quadruplex structure can inhibit the activity of telomerase, an enzyme over-expressed in many cancer cells. Therefore, there is considerable interest in developing a simple and high-performance method for screening small molecules binding to G-quadruplex. Here, we have designed a simple electrochemical approach to screen such ligands based on the fact that the formation and stabilization of G-quadruplex by ligand may inhibit electron transfer of redox species to electrode surface. As a proof-of-concept study, two types of classical G-quadruplex ligands, TMPyP4 and BRACO-19, are studied in this work, which demonstrates that this method is fast and robust and it may be applied to screen G-quadruplex ligands for anticancer drugs testing and design in the future. PMID:27591598

  2. Simple and fast screening of G-quadruplex ligands with electrochemical detection system.

    PubMed

    Fan, Qiongxuan; Li, Chao; Tao, Yaqin; Mao, Xiaoxia; Li, Genxi

    2016-11-01

    Small molecules that may facilitate and stabilize the formation of G-quadruplexes can be used for cancer treatments, because the G-quadruplex structure can inhibit the activity of telomerase, an enzyme over-expressed in many cancer cells. Therefore, there is considerable interest in developing a simple and high-performance method for screening small molecules binding to G-quadruplex. Here, we have designed a simple electrochemical approach to screen such ligands based on the fact that the formation and stabilization of G-quadruplex by ligand may inhibit electron transfer of redox species to electrode surface. As a proof-of-concept study, two types of classical G-quadruplex ligands, TMPyP4 and BRACO-19, are studied in this work, which demonstrates that this method is fast and robust and it may be applied to screen G-quadruplex ligands for anticancer drugs testing and design in the future.

  3. Kinetics of Fast Atoms in the Terrestrial Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kharchenko, Vasili A.; Dalgarno, A.; Mellott, Mary (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This report summarizes our investigations performed under NASA Grant NAG5-8058. The three-year research supported by the Geospace Sciences SR&T program (Ionospheric, Thermospheric, and Mesospheric Physics) has been designed to investigate fluxes of energetic oxygen and nitrogen atoms in the terrestrial thermosphere. Fast atoms are produced due to absorption of the solar radiation and due to coupling between the ionosphere and the neutral thermospheric gas. We have investigated the impact of hot oxygen and nitrogen atoms on the thermal balance, chemistry and radiation properties of the terrestrial thermosphere. Our calculations have been focused on the accurate quantitative description of the thermalization of O and N energetic atoms in collisions with atom and molecules of the ambient neutral gas. Upward fluxes of oxygen and nitrogen atoms, the rate of atmospheric heating by hot oxygen atoms, and the energy input into translational and rotational-vibrational degrees of atmospheric molecules have been evaluated. Altitude profiles of hot oxygen and nitrogen atoms have been analyzed and compared with available observational data. Energetic oxygen atoms in the terrestrial atmosphere have been investigated for decades, but insufficient information on the kinetics of fast atmospheric atoms has been a main obstacle for the interpretation of observational data and modeling of the hot geocorona. The recent development of accurate computational methods of the collisional kinetics is seen as an important step in the quantitative description of hot atoms in the thermosphere. Modeling of relaxation processes in the terrestrial atmosphere has incorporated data of recent observations, and theoretical predictions have been tested by new laboratory measurements.

  4. Thermodynamic, kinetic and structural studies on the mixed ligand complexes of palladium(II) with tridentate and monodentate ligands.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Zoltán; Fábián, István; Bényei, Attila; Sóvágó, Imre

    2003-03-01

    Stability constants of the complexes formed in the reaction of [Pd(bpma)](2+) [bpma=bis(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)amine] with monodentate nitrogen and thioether ligands including uridine, MeUH, cytidine, MeC, EtGH, AcHis, AcHm, AcLys and AcMet were determined by potentiometric method. The coordination chemistry of [Pd(bpma)](2+) shows a significant similarity to that of [Pd(terpy)](2+), but it is different from [Pd(dien)](2+). The formation of hydroxo and dinuclear complexes is especially enhanced in the case of [Pd(bpma)](2+) and [Pd(terpy)](2+), but the affinity of palladium(II) ions for the coordination of thioether residues is reduced in the presence of pyridine nitrogen atoms. Stopped-flow kinetic measurements reveal that the substitution reactions of the thioether ligand AcMet are much faster than those of the N-donor cytidine. The presence of the two pyridyl residues significantly enhances the kinetic reactivity of [Pd(bpma)](2+) as compared to that of [Pd(dien)](2+). The Pd-S(thioether) bonded species can be important intermediates in multicomponent systems, but the equilibrium state is characterised by the formation of Pd-N bonded species. The complex [Pd(bpma)NO(3)]NO(3) has been prepared in solid state and its structure was elucidated by single crystal X-ray diffraction method. PMID:12628710

  5. Kinetic method for differentiating mechanisms for ligand exchange reactions: application to test for substrate channeling in glycolysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, X M; Gutfreund, H; Chock, P B

    1992-02-25

    We have derived analytical expressions for the kinetics of the two mechanisms involved in ligand substitution reactions. These mechanisms are (i) a dissociative mechanism in which the leaving ligand is first dissociated prior to the binding of the incoming ligand and (ii) an associative mechanism where a ternary complex is formed between the incoming ligand and the complex containing the leaving ligand. The equations obtained provide the theoretical basis for differentiating these two mechanisms on the basis of their kinetic patterns of the displacement reactions. Analysis of these equations shows that an associative mechanism can only generate an increasing kinetic pattern for the observed pseudo-first-ordered rate constants as a function of increasing concentration of the incoming ligand and plateaus, in most cases, at a value higher than the off-rate constant of the leaving ligand. However, a dissociative mechanism can generate either an increasing or a decreasing (kapp decreases with increasing concentrations of the incoming ligand) kinetic pattern, depending on the magnitudes of the individual rate constants involved, and, in either case, it will plateau at kapp equal to the koff of the leaving ligand. Therefore, the decreasing kinetic pattern is a hallmark for a dissociative mechanism. This general method was used to settle the dispute of whether NADH is transferred directly via the enzyme-enzyme complex between glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPDH; EC 1.1.1.8) and L-lactate dehydrogenase (LDH; EC 1.1.1.27).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1536852

  6. Photoperturbation-relaxation approach to the kinetics of cooperative ligand binding by heme proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Schuresko, D.D.

    1983-05-01

    A small perturbation technique for measuring the ligand photodissociation and recombination kinetics of heme proteins has been developed. The Photodissociation Perturbation Relaxation (PPR) method involves perturbing the photodissociation rates of ligand-heme systems maintained at photointensity-dependent, nonequilibrium photostationary states. The theoretical and experimental datails of the PPR method are presented herein. A formalism for computing PPR amplitudes and time constants for complex reaction mechanisms for the eigenvectors and eigenvalues of the appropriate linear rate equations is derived; a FORTRAN code embodying this formalism is presented. PPR kinetics measurements obtained for the carbon monoxide derivatives of sperm whale myoglobin and human hemoglobin are presented. CO-hemoglobin combination rate constants and photodissociation quantum efficiencies, determined via fitting model-derived relaxation eigenmodes to PPR transients are presented.

  7. Modeling the kinetics of cell membrane spreading on substrates with ligand density gradient.

    PubMed

    Sarvestani, Alireza S; Jabbari, Esmaiel

    2008-01-01

    An analytical model is developed for the effect of surface gradient in ligand density on the adhesion kinetics of a curved elastic membrane with mobile receptors. The displacement and speed of spreading at the edge of adhesion zone as well as the density profile of receptors along the membrane are predicted as a function of time. According to results, in the diffusion-controlled regime, the front edge displacement of adhesion zone and the rate of membrane spreading decreased with increasing the ligand density in a certain direction. Furthermore, the displacement of the edge of the adhesion zone did not scale with the square root of time, as observed on substrates with uniform ligand density. PMID:18082168

  8. Protein conformational plasticity and complex ligand-binding kinetics explored by atomistic simulations and Markov models

    PubMed Central

    Plattner, Nuria; Noé, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the structural mechanisms of protein–ligand binding and their dependence on protein sequence and conformation is of fundamental importance for biomedical research. Here we investigate the interplay of conformational change and ligand-binding kinetics for the serine protease Trypsin and its competitive inhibitor Benzamidine with an extensive set of 150 μs molecular dynamics simulation data, analysed using a Markov state model. Seven metastable conformations with different binding pocket structures are found that interconvert at timescales of tens of microseconds. These conformations differ in their substrate-binding affinities and binding/dissociation rates. For each metastable state, corresponding solved structures of Trypsin mutants or similar serine proteases are contained in the protein data bank. Thus, our wild-type simulations explore a space of conformations that can be individually stabilized by adding ligands or making suitable changes in protein sequence. These findings provide direct evidence of conformational plasticity in receptors. PMID:26134632

  9. Binding kinetics of membrane-anchored receptors and ligands: Molecular dynamics simulations and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jinglei; Xu, Guang-Kui; Lipowsky, Reinhard; Weikl, Thomas R.

    2015-12-01

    The adhesion of biological membranes is mediated by the binding of membrane-anchored receptor and ligand proteins. Central questions are how the binding kinetics of these proteins is affected by the membranes and by the membrane anchoring of the proteins. In this article, we (i) present detailed data for the binding of membrane-anchored proteins from coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations and (ii) provide a theory that describes how the binding kinetics depends on the average separation and thermal roughness of the adhering membranes and on the anchoring, lengths, and length variations of the proteins. An important element of our theory is the tilt of bound receptor-ligand complexes and transition-state complexes relative to the membrane normals. This tilt results from an interplay of the anchoring energy and rotational entropy of the complexes and facilitates the formation of receptor-ligand bonds at membrane separations smaller than the preferred separation for binding. In our simulations, we have considered both lipid-anchored and transmembrane receptor and ligand proteins. We find that the binding equilibrium constant and binding on-rate constant of lipid-anchored proteins are considerably smaller than the binding constant and on-rate constant of rigid transmembrane proteins with identical binding domains.

  10. Binding kinetics of membrane-anchored receptors and ligands: Molecular dynamics simulations and theory.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jinglei; Xu, Guang-Kui; Lipowsky, Reinhard; Weikl, Thomas R

    2015-12-28

    The adhesion of biological membranes is mediated by the binding of membrane-anchored receptor and ligand proteins. Central questions are how the binding kinetics of these proteins is affected by the membranes and by the membrane anchoring of the proteins. In this article, we (i) present detailed data for the binding of membrane-anchored proteins from coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations and (ii) provide a theory that describes how the binding kinetics depends on the average separation and thermal roughness of the adhering membranes and on the anchoring, lengths, and length variations of the proteins. An important element of our theory is the tilt of bound receptor-ligand complexes and transition-state complexes relative to the membrane normals. This tilt results from an interplay of the anchoring energy and rotational entropy of the complexes and facilitates the formation of receptor-ligand bonds at membrane separations smaller than the preferred separation for binding. In our simulations, we have considered both lipid-anchored and transmembrane receptor and ligand proteins. We find that the binding equilibrium constant and binding on-rate constant of lipid-anchored proteins are considerably smaller than the binding constant and on-rate constant of rigid transmembrane proteins with identical binding domains.

  11. Gompertz kinetics model of fast chemical neurotransmission currents.

    PubMed

    Easton, Dexter M

    2005-10-01

    At a chemical synapse, transmitter molecules ejected from presynaptic terminal(s) bind reversibly with postsynaptic receptors and trigger an increase in channel conductance to specific ions. This paper describes a simple but accurate predictive model for the time course of the synaptic conductance transient, based on Gompertz kinetics. In the model, two simple exponential decay terms set the rates of development and decline of transmitter action. The first, r, triggering conductance activation, is surrogate for the decelerated rate of growth of conductance, G. The second, r', responsible for Y, deactivation of the conductance, is surrogate for the decelerated rate of decline of transmitter action. Therefore, the differential equation for the net conductance change, g, triggered by the transmitter is dg/dt=g(r-r'). The solution of that equation yields the product of G(t), representing activation, and Y(t), which defines the proportional decline (deactivation) of the current. The model fits, over their full-time course, published records of macroscopic ionic current associated with fast chemical transmission. The Gompertz model is a convenient and accurate method for routine analysis and comparison of records of synaptic current and putative transmitter time course. A Gompertz fit requiring only three independent rate constants plus initial current appears indistinguishable from a Markov fit using seven rate constants.

  12. Measuring two-dimensional receptor-ligand binding kinetics by micropipette.

    PubMed

    Chesla, S E; Selvaraj, P; Zhu, C

    1998-09-01

    We report a novel method for measuring forward and reverse kinetic rate constants, kf0 and kr0, for the binding of individual receptors and ligands anchored to apposing surfaces in cell adhesion. Not only does the method examine adhesion between a single pair of cells; it also probes predominantly a single receptor-ligand bond. The idea is to quantify the dependence of adhesion probability on contact duration and densities of the receptors and ligands. The experiment was an extension of existing micropipette protocols. The analysis was based on analytical solutions to the probabilistic formulation of kinetics for small systems. This method was applied to examine the interaction between Fc gamma receptor IIIA (CD16A) expressed on Chinese hamster ovary cell transfectants and immunoglobulin G (IgG) of either human or rabbit origin coated on human erythrocytes, which were found to follow a monovalent biomolecular binding mechanism. The measured rate constants are Ackf0 = (2.6 +/- 0.32) x 10(-7) micron 4 s-1 and kr0 = (0.37 +/- 0.055) s-1 for the CD16A-hIgG interaction and Ackf0 = (5.7 +/- 0.31) X 10(-7) micron 4 s-1 and kr0 = (0.20 +/- 0.042) s-1 for the CD16A-rIgG interaction, respectively, where Ac is the contact area, estimated to be a few percent of 3 micron 2.

  13. Fast O2 Binding at Dicopper Complexes Containing Schiff-Base Dinucleating Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Company, Anna; Gómez, Laura; Mas-Ballesté, Rubén; Korendovych, Ivan V.; Ribas, Xavi; Poater, Albert; Parella, Teodor; Fontrodona, Xavier; Benet-Buchholz, Jordi; Solà, Miquel; Que, Lawrence; Rybak-Akimova, Elena; Costas, Miquel

    2008-01-01

    A new family of dicopper(I) complexes [CuI2RL](X)2, (R = H, 1X, R = tBu, 2X and R = NO2, 3X, X = CF3SO3, ClO4, SbF6 or BArF, BArF = [B{3,5-(CF3)2-C6H3}4]−), where RL is a Schiff-base ligand containing two tridentate binding sites linked by a xylyl spacer have been prepared, characterized, and their reaction with O2 studied. The complexes were designed with the aim of reproducing structural aspects of the active site of type 3 dicopper proteins; they contain two three-coordinate copper sites and a rather flexible podand ligand backbone. The solid state structures of 1ClO4, 2CF3SO3, 2ClO4 and 3BArF·CH3CN have been established by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. 1ClO4 adopts a polymeric structure in solution while 2CF3SO3, 2ClO4 and 3BArF·CH3CN are monomeric. The complexes have been studied in solution by means of 1H and 19F NMR spectroscopy, which put forward the presence of dynamic processes in solution. 1-3BArF and 1-3CF3SO3 in acetone react rapidly with O2 to generate metaestable [CuIII2(μ-O)2(RL)]2+ 1-3(O2) and [CuIII2(μ-O)2(CF3SO3)(RL)]+ 1-3(O2)(CF3SO3) species, respectively that have been characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy and resonance Raman analysis. Instead, reaction of 1-3BArF with O2 in CH2Cl2 results in intermolecular O2 binding. DFT methods have been used to study the chemical identities and structural parameters of the O2 adducts, and the relative stability of the CuIII2(μ-O)2 form with respect to the CuII2(μ-η2: η2-peroxo) isomer. The reaction of 1X, X = CF3SO3 and BArF with O2 in acetone has been studied by stopped-flow exhibiting an unexpected very fast reaction rate (k = 3.82(4) × 103 M−1s−1, ΔH‡ = 4.9 ± 0.5 kJ·mol−1, ΔS‡ = −148 ± 5 J·K−1·mol−1), nearly three orders of magnitude faster than in the parent [CuI2(m-XYLMeAN)]2+. Thermal decomposition of 1-3(O2) does not result in aromatic hydroxylation. The mechanism and kinetics of O2 binding to 1X (X = CF3SO3 and BArF) is discussed and compared with those

  14. Ligand-dominated temperature dependence of agglomeration kinetics and morphology in alkyl-thiol-coated gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Born, Philip; Kraus, Tobias

    2013-06-01

    The stability of nanoparticle suspensions and the details of their agglomeration depend on the interactions between particles. We study this relationship in gold nanoparticles stabilized with different alkyl thiols in heptane. Temperature-dependent interactions were inferred from small-angle x-ray scattering, agglomeration kinetics from dynamic light scattering, and agglomerate morphologies from transmission electron microscopy. We find that the particles precipitate at temperatures below the melting temperatures of the dry ligands. Agglomerates grow with rates that depend on the temperature: Around precipitation temperature, globular agglomerates form slowly, while at lower temperatures, fibrilar agglomerates form rapidly. All agglomerates contain random dense packings rather than crystalline superlattices. We conclude that ligand-ligand and ligand-solvent interactions of the individual particles dominate suspension stability and agglomeration kinetics. The microscopic packing is dominated by interactions between the ligands of different nanoparticles.

  15. Slow VO2 off-kinetics in skeletal muscle is associated with fast PCr off-kinetics--and inversely.

    PubMed

    Korzeniewski, Bernard; Zoladz, Jerzy A

    2013-09-01

    The computer model of the bioenergetic system in skeletal muscle, developed previously, was used to study the effect of the characteristic decay time of the parallel activation of oxidative phosphorylation [τ(OFF)] during muscle recovery on the muscle oxygen consumption rate (Vo2) and phosphocreatine (PCr) work-to-rest transition (off)-kinetics and on the relationship between the Vo2 and PCr rest-to-work transition (on)- and off-kinetics in moderate and heavy exercise. An increase in τ(OFF) slows down the initial phase of the muscle Vo2 off-kinetics and accelerates the PCr off-kinetics. As a result, the relationship between the initial phase of the Vo2 off-kinetics (lasting approximately 3-60 s in computer simulations) and the PCr off-kinetics is inverse: the slower the former, the faster the latter. A faster initial phase of the Vo2 off-kinetics is associated with a slower late phase of the Vo2 off-kinetics, and as a result, the integral of Vo2 above baseline during recovery, representing the oxygen debt, is identical in all cases [values of τ(OFF)] for a given PCr decrease. Depending on τ(OFF), the muscle Vo2 on-kinetics was either equally fast or slower than the Vo2 off-kinetics in moderate exercise and always slower in heavy exercise. PCr on-kinetics was always faster than PCr off-kinetics. This study clearly demonstrates that τ(OFF) has a pronounced impact on the mutual relations between the muscle Vo2 and PCr on- and off-kinetics.

  16. Measuring Receptor–Ligand Binding Kinetics on Cell Surfaces: From Adhesion Frequency to Thermal Fluctuation Methods

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; Zarnitsyna, Veronika I.; Sarangapani, Krishna K.; Huang, Jun; Zhu, Cheng

    2009-01-01

    Interactions between surface-anchored receptors and ligands mediate cell–cell and cell–environment communications in many biological processes. Molecular interactions across two apposing cell membrane are governed by two-dimensional (2D) kinetics, which are physically distinct from and biologically more relevant than three-dimensional (3D) kinetics with at least one interacting molecular species in the fluid phase. Here we review two assays for measuring 2D binding kinetics: the adhesion frequency assay and the thermal fluctuation assay. The former measures the binding frequency as a function of contact duration and extracts the force-free 2D kinetics parameters by nonlinearly fitting the data with a probabilistic model. The latter detects bond formation/dissociation by monitoring the reduction/resumption of thermal fluctuations of a force sensor. Both assays are mechanically based and operate at the level of mostly single molecular interaction, which requires ultrasensitive force techniques. Characterization of one such technique, the biomembrane force probe, is presented. PMID:19890486

  17. Force-Mediated Kinetics of Single P-Selectin/Ligand Complexes Observed by Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, Jurgen; Katopodis, Andreas G.; Kolbinger, Frank; Anselmetti, Dario

    1998-10-01

    Leukocytes roll along the endothelium of postcapillary venules in response to inflammatory signals. Rolling under the hydrodynamic drag forces of blood flow is mediated by the interaction between selectins and their ligands across the leukocyte and endothelial cell surfaces. Here we present force-spectroscopy experiments on single complexes of P-selectin and P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 by atomic force microscopy to determine the intrinsic molecular properties of this dynamic adhesion process. By modeling intermolecular and intramolecular forces as well as the adhesion probability in atomic force microscopy experiments we gain information on rupture forces, elasticity, and kinetics of the P-selectin/P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 interaction. The complexes are able to withstand forces up to 165 pN and show a chain-like elasticity with a molecular spring constant of 5.3 pN nm-1 and a persistence length of 0.35 nm. The dissociation constant (off-rate) varies over three orders of magnitude from 0.02 s-1 under zero force up to 15 s-1 under external applied forces. Rupture force and lifetime of the complexes are not constant, but directly depend on the applied force per unit time, which is a product of the intrinsic molecular elasticity and the external pulling velocity. The high strength of binding combined with force-dependent rate constants and high molecular elasticity are tailored to support physiological leukocyte rolling.

  18. Roles of cell and microvillus deformation and receptor-ligand binding kinetics in cell rolling.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Parag; Jadhav, Sameer; Eggleton, Charles D; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos

    2008-10-01

    Polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) recruitment to sites of inflammation is initiated by selectin-mediated PMN tethering and rolling on activated endothelium under flow. Cell rolling is modulated by bulk cell deformation (mesoscale), microvillus deformability (microscale), and receptor-ligand binding kinetics (nanoscale). Selectin-ligand bonds exhibit a catch-slip bond behavior, and their dissociation is governed not only by the force but also by the force history. Whereas previous theoretical models have studied the significance of these three "length scales" in isolation, how their interplay affects cell rolling has yet to be resolved. We therefore developed a three-dimensional computational model that integrates the aforementioned length scales to delineate their relative contributions to PMN rolling. Our simulations predict that the catch-slip bond behavior and to a lesser extent bulk cell deformation are responsible for the shear threshold phenomenon. Cells bearing deformable rather than rigid microvilli roll slower only at high P-selectin site densities and elevated levels of shear (>or=400 s(-1)). The more compliant cells (membrane stiffness=1.2 dyn/cm) rolled slower than cells with a membrane stiffness of 3.0 dyn/cm at shear rates >50 s(-1). In summary, our model demonstrates that cell rolling over a ligand-coated surface is a highly coordinated process characterized by a complex interplay between forces acting on three distinct length scales.

  19. Thermodynamic, kinetic and structural studies on the ternary palladium(II) complexes of thioether ligands.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Z; Fábián, I; Sóvágó, I

    2000-04-01

    Potentiometric, calorimetric, NMR and stopped-flow kinetic studies were performed on the palladium(II) complexes of thioether and/or nitrogen donor ligands. The ternary systems always contained a tridentate ligand (dien, terpy and dianions of dipeptides, GlyGly, GlyAla and GlyMet) and a monodentate thioether (AcMet). The stability constants of thioether complexes were obtained by indirect potentiometric measurements using uridine as a competitive ligand. The thermodynamic parameters revealed that selectivity of palladium(II) for thioether binding can be significantly influenced by the other donor atoms around the metal ion. [Pd(terpy)]2+ and [Pd(GlyMet)] had the lowest affinity for thioether binding and it was explained by steric and electronic effects. Ternary complexes of nitrogen donors have higher thermodynamic stability constants than the thioether complexes, but rate constants of the substitution reactions revealed that formation of thioether complexes is the faster reaction. As a consequence, the thermodynamic equilibrium state of a multicomponent system is characterized by the coordination of N-donors, which are formed via the existence of thioether-bonded intermediates. PMID:10830857

  20. Scaling of Kinetic Instability Induced Fast Ion Losses in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    E.D. Fredrickson; D. Darrow; S. Medley; J. Menard; H. Park; L. Roquemore; D. Stutman; K. Tritz; S. Kubota; K.C. Lee

    2005-06-24

    During neutral beam injection (NBI) in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX), a wide variety of fast ion driven instabilities is excited by the large ratio of fast ion velocity to Alfven velocity, together with the relatively high fast ion beta, beta(sub)f. The fast ion instabilities have frequencies ranging from a few kilohertz to the ion cyclotron frequency. The modes can be divided roughly into three categories, starting with Energetic Particle Modes (EPM) in the lowest frequency range (0 to 120 kHz), the Toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes (TAE) in the intermediate frequency range (50 to 200 kHz) and the Compressional and Global Alfven Eigenmodes (CAE and GAE, respectively) from approximately equal to 300 kHz up to the ion cyclotron frequency. Each of these categories of modes exhibits a wide range of behavior, including quasi-continuous oscillation, bursting, chirping and, except for the lower frequency range, turbulence.

  1. Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Kinetic Measurements to Estimate and Predict Protein-Ligand Residence Times.

    PubMed

    Mollica, Luca; Theret, Isabelle; Antoine, Mathias; Perron-Sierra, Françoise; Charton, Yves; Fourquez, Jean-Marie; Wierzbicki, Michel; Boutin, Jean A; Ferry, Gilles; Decherchi, Sergio; Bottegoni, Giovanni; Ducrot, Pierre; Cavalli, Andrea

    2016-08-11

    Ligand-target residence time is emerging as a key drug discovery parameter because it can reliably predict drug efficacy in vivo. Experimental approaches to binding and unbinding kinetics are nowadays available, but we still lack reliable computational tools for predicting kinetics and residence time. Most attempts have been based on brute-force molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, which are CPU-demanding and not yet particularly accurate. We recently reported a new scaled-MD-based protocol, which showed potential for residence time prediction in drug discovery. Here, we further challenged our procedure's predictive ability by applying our methodology to a series of glucokinase activators that could be useful for treating type 2 diabetes mellitus. We combined scaled MD with experimental kinetics measurements and X-ray crystallography, promptly checking the protocol's reliability by directly comparing computational predictions and experimental measures. The good agreement highlights the potential of our scaled-MD-based approach as an innovative method for computationally estimating and predicting drug residence times. PMID:27391254

  2. Effect of divalent cations on the kinetics of Fe(III) complexation by organic ligands in natural waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Manabu; Rose, Andrew L.; Waite, T. David; Omura, Tatsuo

    2008-03-01

    We have investigated the kinetics of Fe(III) complexation by several organic ligands including fulvic acid, citrate and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). Particular attention was given to examination of the effect of competitive divalent cations (Me: Ca 2+ and Mg 2+) at concentrations typical of seawater on the complexation rate. All experiments were conducted in 0.5 M NaCl solution buffered with 2 mM bicarbonate at pH 8.0 in the absence and presence of Me (25 μM-250 mM). The rate constants of complex formation determined by using the competitive ligand (5-sulfosalicylic acid) method combined with visible spectrophotometry ranged from 3.3 × 10 4 to 3.2 × 10 6 M -1 s -1. The mechanism of complexation was then examined based on a kinetic model. When EDTA was used as a ligand, Me at concentrations comparable to the ligand markedly retarded the rate of iron complex formation due to the predominance of an adjunctive pathway (where iron-ligand complex is formed via direct association of iron to Me-ligand complex). In contrast, the competing effect of Me on iron complexation by citrate and fulvic acid was observed only when the Me concentration was in excess of the ligand by more than a factor of 10-1000. The kinetic model suggests that iron complexation by fulvic acid occurs predominantly via a disjunctive pathway (where iron complexation by ligand occurs after dissociation of Me from Me-ligand complex) at concentrations of divalent cations and natural organic matter typical of natural waters including seawater and freshwater.

  3. Cyclam Derivatives with a Bis(phosphinate) or a Phosphinato-Phosphonate Pendant Arm: Ligands for Fast and Efficient Copper(II) Complexation for Nuclear Medical Applications.

    PubMed

    David, Tomáš; Kubíček, Vojtěch; Gutten, Ondrej; Lubal, Přemysl; Kotek, Jan; Pietzsch, Hans-Jürgen; Rulíšek, Lubomír; Hermann, Petr

    2015-12-21

    Cyclam derivatives bearing one geminal bis(phosphinic acid), -CH2PO2HCH2PO2H2 (H2L(1)), or phosphinic-phosphonic acid, -CH2PO2HCH2PO3H2 (H3L(2)), pendant arm were synthesized and studied as potential copper(II) chelators for nuclear medical applications. The ligands showed good selectivity for copper(II) over zinc(II) and nickel(II) ions (log KCuL = 25.8 and 27.7 for H2L(1) and H3L(2), respectively). Kinetic study revealed an unusual three-step complex formation mechanism. The initial equilibrium step leads to out-of-cage complexes with Cu(2+) bound by the phosphorus-containing pendant arm. These species quickly rearrange to an in-cage complex with cyclam conformation II, which isomerizes to another in-cage complex with cyclam conformation I. The first in-cage complex is quantitatively formed in seconds (pH ≈5, 25 °C, Cu:L = 1:1, cM ≈ 1 mM). At pH >12, I isomers undergo nitrogen atom inversion, leading to III isomers; the structure of the III-[Cu(HL(2))] complex in the solid state was confirmed by X-ray diffraction analysis. In an alkaline solution, interconversion of the I and III isomers is mutual, leading to the same equilibrium isomeric mixture; such behavior has been observed here for the first time for copper(II) complexes of cyclam derivatives. Quantum-chemical calculations showed small energetic differences between the isomeric complexes of H3L(2) compared with analogous data for isomeric complexes of cyclam derivatives with one or two methylphosphonic acid pendant arm(s). Acid-assisted dissociation proved the kinetic inertness of the complexes. Preliminary radiolabeling of H2L(1) and H3L(2) with (64)Cu was fast and efficient, even at room temperature, giving specific activities of around 70 GBq of (64)Cu per 1 μmol of the ligand (pH 6.2, 10 min, ca. 90 equiv of the ligand). These specific activities were much higher than those of H3nota and H4dota complexes prepared under identical conditions. The rare combination of simple ligand synthesis, very

  4. Fast algorithms for combustion kinetics calculations: A comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhakrishnan, K.

    1984-01-01

    To identify the fastest algorithm currently available for the numerical integration of chemical kinetic rate equations, several algorithms were examined. Findings to date are summarized. The algorithms examined include two general-purpose codes EPISODE and LSODE and three special-purpose (for chemical kinetic calculations) codes CHEMEQ, CRK1D, and GCKP84. In addition, an explicit Runge-Kutta-Merson differential equation solver (IMSL Routine DASCRU) is used to illustrate the problems associated with integrating chemical kinetic rate equations by a classical method. Algorithms were applied to two test problems drawn from combustion kinetics. These problems included all three combustion regimes: induction, heat release and equilibration. Variations of the temperature and species mole fraction are given with time for test problems 1 and 2, respectively. Both test problems were integrated over a time interval of 1 ms in order to obtain near-equilibration of all species and temperature. Of the codes examined in this study, only CREK1D and GCDP84 were written explicitly for integrating exothermic, non-isothermal combustion rate equations. These therefore have built-in procedures for calculating the temperature.

  5. Kinetic models for historical processes of fast invasion and aggression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aristov, Vladimir V.; Ilyin, Oleg V.

    2015-04-01

    In the last few decades many investigations have been devoted to theoretical models in new areas concerning description of different biological, sociological, and historical processes. In the present paper we suggest a model of the Nazi Germany invasion of Poland, France, and the USSR based on kinetic theory. We simulate this process with the Cauchy boundary problem for two-element kinetic equations. The solution of the problem is given in the form of a traveling wave. The propagation velocity of a front line depends on the quotient between initial forces concentrations. Moreover it is obtained that the general solution of the model can be expressed in terms of quadratures and elementary functions. Finally it is shown that the front-line velocities agree with the historical data.

  6. Kinetic consequences of introducing a proximal selenocysteine ligand into cytochrome P450cam.

    PubMed

    Vandemeulebroucke, An; Aldag, Caroline; Stiebritz, Martin T; Reiher, Markus; Hilvert, Donald

    2015-11-10

    The structural, electronic, and catalytic properties of cytochrome P450cam are subtly altered when the cysteine that coordinates to the heme iron is replaced with a selenocysteine. To map the effects of the sulfur-to-selenium substitution on the individual steps of the catalytic cycle, we conducted a comparative kinetic analysis of the selenoenzyme and its cysteine counterpart. Our results show that the more electron-donating selenolate ligand has only negligible effects on substrate, product, and oxygen binding, electron transfer, catalytic turnover, and coupling efficiency. Off-pathway reduction of oxygen to give superoxide is the only step significantly affected by the mutation. Incorporation of selenium accelerates this uncoupling reaction approximately 50-fold compared to sulfur, but because the second electron transfer step is much faster, the impact on overall catalytic turnover is minimal. Density functional theory calculations with pure and hybrid functionals suggest that superoxide formation is governed by a delicate interplay of spin distribution, spin state, and structural effects. In light of the remarkably similar electronic structures and energies calculated for the sulfur- and selenium-containing enzymes, the ability of the heavier atom to enhance the rate of spin crossover may account for the experimental observations. Because the selenoenzyme closely mimics wild-type P450cam, even at the level of individual steps in the reaction cycle, selenium represents a unique mechanistic probe for analyzing the role of the proximal ligand and spin crossovers in P450 chemistry. PMID:26460790

  7. Kinetic consequences of introducing a proximal selenocysteine ligand into cytochrome P450cam.

    PubMed

    Vandemeulebroucke, An; Aldag, Caroline; Stiebritz, Martin T; Reiher, Markus; Hilvert, Donald

    2015-11-10

    The structural, electronic, and catalytic properties of cytochrome P450cam are subtly altered when the cysteine that coordinates to the heme iron is replaced with a selenocysteine. To map the effects of the sulfur-to-selenium substitution on the individual steps of the catalytic cycle, we conducted a comparative kinetic analysis of the selenoenzyme and its cysteine counterpart. Our results show that the more electron-donating selenolate ligand has only negligible effects on substrate, product, and oxygen binding, electron transfer, catalytic turnover, and coupling efficiency. Off-pathway reduction of oxygen to give superoxide is the only step significantly affected by the mutation. Incorporation of selenium accelerates this uncoupling reaction approximately 50-fold compared to sulfur, but because the second electron transfer step is much faster, the impact on overall catalytic turnover is minimal. Density functional theory calculations with pure and hybrid functionals suggest that superoxide formation is governed by a delicate interplay of spin distribution, spin state, and structural effects. In light of the remarkably similar electronic structures and energies calculated for the sulfur- and selenium-containing enzymes, the ability of the heavier atom to enhance the rate of spin crossover may account for the experimental observations. Because the selenoenzyme closely mimics wild-type P450cam, even at the level of individual steps in the reaction cycle, selenium represents a unique mechanistic probe for analyzing the role of the proximal ligand and spin crossovers in P450 chemistry.

  8. Role of water and steric constraints in the kinetics of cavity–ligand unbinding

    PubMed Central

    Tiwary, Pratyush; Mondal, Jagannath; Morrone, Joseph A.; Berne, B. J.

    2015-01-01

    A key factor influencing a drug’s efficacy is its residence time in the binding pocket of the host protein. Using atomistic computer simulation to predict this residence time and the associated dissociation process is a desirable but extremely difficult task due to the long timescales involved. This gets further complicated by the presence of biophysical factors such as steric and solvation effects. In this work, we perform molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the unbinding of a popular prototypical hydrophobic cavity–ligand system using a metadynamics-based approach that allows direct assessment of kinetic pathways and parameters. When constrained to move in an axial manner, the unbinding time is found to be on the order of 4,000 s. In accordance with previous studies, we find that the cavity must pass through a region of sharp wetting transition manifested by sudden and high fluctuations in solvent density. When we remove the steric constraints on ligand, the unbinding happens predominantly by an alternate pathway, where the unbinding becomes 20 times faster, and the sharp wetting transition instead becomes continuous. We validate the unbinding timescales from metadynamics through a Poisson analysis, and by comparison through detailed balance to binding timescale estimates from unbiased MD. This work demonstrates that enhanced sampling can be used to perform explicit solvent MD studies at timescales previously unattainable, to our knowledge, obtaining direct and reliable pictures of the underlying physiochemical factors including free energies and rate constants. PMID:26371312

  9. Effect of ionic strength on ligand exchange kinetics between a mononuclear ferric citrate complex and siderophore desferrioxamine B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Hiroaki; Fujii, Manabu; Masago, Yoshifumi; Waite, T. David; Omura, Tatsuo

    2015-04-01

    The effect of ionic strength (I) on the ligand exchange reaction between a mononuclear ferric citrate complex and the siderophore, desferrioxamine B (DFB), was examined in the NaCl concentration range of 0.01-0.5 M, particularly focusing on the kinetics and mechanism of ligand exchange under environmentally relevant conditions. Overall ligand exchange rate constants were determined by spectrophotometrically measuring the time course of ferrioxamine B formation at a water temperature of 25 °C, pH 8.0, and citrate/Fe molar ratios of 500-5000. The overall ligand exchange rate decreased by 2-11-fold (depending on the citrate/Fe molar ratios) as I increased from approximately 0.01 to 0.5 M. In particular, a relatively large decrease was observed at lower I (<0.1 M). A ligand exchange model describing the effect of I on the ligand exchange rate via disjunctive and adjunctive pathways was developed by considering the pseudo-equilibration of ferric citrate complexes and subsequent ferrioxamine formation on the basis of the Eigen-Wilkins metal-ligand complexation theory. The model and experimental data consistently suggest that the adjunctive pathway (i.e., direct association of DFB with ferric mono- and di-citrate complexes following dissociation of citrate from the parent complexes) dominates in ferrioxamine formation under the experimental conditions used. The model also predicts that the higher rate of ligand exchange at lower I is associated with the decrease in the ferric dicitrate complex stability because of the relatively high electrical repulsion between ferric monocitrate and free citrate at lower I (note that the reactivity of ferric dicitrate with DFB is smaller than that for the monocitrate complex). Overall, the findings of this study contribute to the understanding of the potential effect of I on ligand exchange kinetics in natural waters and provide fundamental knowledge on iron transformation and bioavailability.

  10. Quantitative determination of the ligand content in Benzamidine Sepharose 4 Fast Flow media with ion-pair chromatography.

    PubMed

    Gustavsson, Jan; Färenmark, Johan; Johansson, Bo-Lennart

    2005-04-01

    A quantitative hydrochloric acid hydrolysis-HPLC method was developed for the analysis of the ligand content of Benzamidine Sepharose 4 Fast Flow media. The method requires about 100 mg of dried sample and simple reaction vials can be utilised. Release of the ligand (p-aminobenzamidine) from the base matrix (Sepharose 4 Fast Flow) was obtained after hydrolysis for 180min at 70 degrees C in concentrated hydrochloric acid. When Benzamidine Sepharose 4 Fast Flow media were treated this way p-aminobenzoic acid and p-aminobenzamidine were the only products released from the ligand. A chromatographic system based on ion-pair reversed phase separation was used to quantify these ligand products. The mobile phase was made acidic enough to make p-aminobenzoic acid and p-aminobenzamidine positively charged in order to make ion-pair formation with hexanesulfonic acid possible. The relative standard deviation of th e method was below 2% and no systematic errors could be detected when the results were compared to an independent method based on elemental analysis (nitrogen). The new HPLC method was used to analyse ligand densities in the range of 2-20 micromol/ml medium. PMID:15861793

  11. Effect of Global ATGL Knockout on Murine Fasting Glucose Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Margarida; Nunes, Patricia; Mendes, Vera M.; Manadas, Bruno; Heerschap, Arend; Jones, John G.

    2015-01-01

    Mice deficient in adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL−/−) present elevated ectopic lipid levels but are paradoxically glucose-tolerant. Measurement of endogenous glucose production (EGP) and Cori cycle activity provide insights into the maintenance of glycemic control in these animals. These parameters were determined in 7 wild-type (ATGL+/−) and 6 ATGL−/− mice by a primed-infusion of [U-13C6]glucose followed by LC-MS/MS targeted mass-isotopomer analysis of blood glucose. EGP was quantified by isotope dilution of [U-13C6]glucose while Cori cycling was estimated by analysis of glucose triose 13C-isotopomers. Fasting plasma free fatty-acids were significantly lower in ATGL−/− versus control mice (0.43 ± 0.05 mM versus 0.73 ± 0.11 mM, P < 0.05). Six-hour fasting EGP rates were identical for both ATGL−/− and control mice (79 ± 11 versus 71 ± 7 μmol/kg/min, resp.). Peripheral glucose metabolism was dominated by Cori cycling (80 ± 2% and 82 ± 7% of glucose disposal for ATGL−/− and control mice, resp.) indicating that peripheral glucose oxidation was not significantly upregulated in ATGL−/− mice under these conditions. The glucose 13C-isotopomer distributions in both ATGL−/− and control mice were consistent with extensive hepatic pyruvate recycling. This suggests that gluconeogenic outflow from the Krebs cycle was also well compensated in ATGL−/− mice. PMID:26236747

  12. Combination of isothermal titration calorimetry and time-resolved luminescence for high affinity antibody-ligand interaction thermodynamics and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Aweda, Tolulope A; Meares, Claude F

    2012-02-01

    For experiments using synthetic ligands as probes for biological experiments, it is useful to determine the specificity and affinity of the ligands for their receptors. As ligands with higher affinities are developed (K(A)>10(8)M(-1); K(D)<10(-8)M), a new challenge arises: to measure these values accurately. Isothermal titration calorimetry measures heat produced or consumed during ligand binding, and also provides the equilibrium binding constant. However, as normally practiced, its range is limited. Displacement titration, where a competing weaker ligand is used to lower the apparent affinity of the stronger ligand, can be used to determine the binding affinity as well as the complete thermodynamic data for ligand-antibody complexes with very high affinity. These equilibrium data have been combined with kinetic measurements to yield the rate constants as well. We describe this methodology, using as an example antibody 2D12.5, which captures yttrium S-2-(4-aminobenzyl)-1, 4, 7, 10-tetraazacyclododecanetetraacetate.

  13. Fast Monte Carlo, slow protein kinetics and perfect loop closure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wedemeyer, William Joseph

    This thesis presents experimental studies of proteins and computational methods which may help in simulations of proteins. The experimental chapters focus on the folding and unfolding of bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A. Methods are developed for tracking the cis-trans isomerization of individual prolines under folding and unfolding conditions, and for identifying critical folding structures by assessing the effects of individual incorrect X-Pro isomers on the conformational folding. The major β-hairpin region is identified as more critical than the C-terminal hydrophobic core. Site- directed mutagenesis of three nearby tyrosines to phenylalanine indicates that tyrosyl hydrogen bonds are essential to rapid conformational folding. Another experimental chapter presents an analytic solution of the kinetics of competitive binding, which is applied to estimating the association and dissociation rate constants of hirudin and thrombin. An extension of this method is proposed to obtain kinetic rate constants for the conformational folding and unfolding of individual parts of a protein. The analytic solution is found to be roughly one-hundred-fold more efficient than the best numerical integrators. The theoretical chapters present methods potentially useful in protein simulations. The loop closure problem is solved geometrically, allowing the protein to be broken into segments which move quasi-independently. Two bootstrap Monte Carlo methods are developed for sampling functions that are characterized by high anisotropy, e.g. long, narrow valleys. Two chapters are devoted to smoothing methods; the first develops a method for exploiting smoothing to evaluate the energy in order N (not N2) time, while the second examines the limitations of one smoothing method, the Diffusion Equation Method, and suggests improvements to its smoothing transformation and reversing procedure. One chapter develops a highly optimized simulation package for lattice heteropolymers by careful choice

  14. Fast and slow activation kinetics of voltage-gated sodium channels in molluscan neurons.

    PubMed

    Gilly, W F; Gillette, R; McFarlane, M

    1997-05-01

    Whole cell patch-clamp recordings of Na current (I(Na)) were made under identical experimental conditions from isolated neurons from cephalopod (Loligo, Octopus) and gastropod (Aplysia, Pleurobranchaea, Doriopsilla) species to compare properties of activation gating. Voltage dependence of peak Na conductance (gNa) is very similar in all cases, but activation kinetics in the gastropod neurons studied are markedly slower. Kinetic differences are very pronounced only over the voltage range spanned by the gNa-voltage relation. At positive and negative extremes of voltage, activation and deactivation kinetics of I(Na) are practically indistinguishable in all species studied. Voltage-dependent rate constants underlying activation of the slow type of Na channel found in gastropods thus appear to be much more voltage dependent than are the equivalent rates in the universally fast type of channel that predominates in cephalopods. Voltage dependence of inactivation kinetics shows a similar pattern and is representative of activation kinetics for the two types of Na channels. Neurons with fast Na channels can thus make much more rapid adjustments in the number of open Na channels at physiologically relevant voltages than would be possible with only slow Na channels. This capability appears to be an adaptation that is highly evolved in cephalopods, which are well known for their high-speed swimming behaviors. Similarities in slow and fast Na channel subtypes in molluscan and mammalian neurons are discussed. PMID:9163364

  15. An instrument to measure fast gas phase radical kinetics at high temperatures and pressures.

    PubMed

    Stone, Daniel; Blitz, Mark; Ingham, Trevor; Onel, Lavinia; Medeiros, Diogo J; Seakins, Paul W

    2016-05-01

    Fast radical reactions are central to the chemistry of planetary atmospheres and combustion systems. Laser-induced fluorescence is a highly sensitive and selective technique that can be used to monitor a number of radical species in kinetics experiments, but is typically limited to low pressure systems owing to quenching of fluorescent states at higher pressures. The design and characterisation of an instrument are reported using laser-induced fluorescence detection to monitor fast radical kinetics (up to 25 000 s(-1)) at high temperatures and pressures by sampling from a high pressure reaction region to a low pressure detection region. Kinetics have been characterised at temperatures reaching 740 K and pressures up to 2 atm, with expected maximum operational conditions of up to ∼900 K and ∼5 atm. The distance between the point of sampling from the high pressure region and the point of probing within the low pressure region is critical to the measurement of fast kinetics. The instrumentation described in this work can be applied to the measurement of kinetics relevant to atmospheric and combustion chemistry. PMID:27250442

  16. Fasting and postprandial phenylalanine and leucine kinetics in liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Tessari, P; Inchiostro, S; Barazzoni, R; Zanetti, M; Orlando, R; Biolo, G; Sergi, G; Pino, A; Tiengo, A

    1994-07-01

    To investigate body protein turnover and the pathogenesis of increased concentration of plasma phenylalanine in liver cirrhosis, we have studied phenylalanine and leucine kinetics in cirrhotic (diabetic and nondiabetic) patients, and in normal subjects, both in the postabsorptive state and during a mixed meal, using combined intravenous and oral isotope infusions. Postabsorptive phenylalanine concentration and whole body rate of appearance (Ra) were approximately 40% greater (P < 0.05) in patients than in controls. Leucine concentrations were comparable, but intracellular leucine Ra was also increased (P < 0.05), suggesting increased whole body protein breakdown. Postprandial phenylalanine Ra was also greater (P < 0.05) in the patients. This difference was due to a diminished fractional splanchnic uptake of the dietary phenylalanine (approximately 40% lower in the cirrhotics vs. controls, P < or = 0.05). Postprandial leucine Ra was also increased in the patients, but splanchnic uptake of dietary leucine was normal. Thus both increased body protein breakdown and decreased splanchnic extraction of dietary phenylalanine can account for the increased phenylalanine concentrations in liver cirrhosis.

  17. Correlating RANK ligand/RANK binding kinetics with osteoclast formation and function.

    PubMed

    Warren, Julia T; Zou, Wei; Decker, Corinne E; Rohatgi, Nidhi; Nelson, Christopher A; Fremont, Daved H; Teitelbaum, Steven L

    2015-11-01

    The interaction between Receptor Activator of NF-κB Ligand (RANKL) and its receptor RANK is essential for the differentiation and bone resorbing capacity of the osteoclast. Osteoprotegerin (OPG), a soluble homodimer, acts as a decoy receptor for RANKL and thus inhibits osteoclastogenesis. An imbalance in the RANKL/RANK/OPG axis, with decreased OPG and/or increased RANKL, is associated with diseases that favor bone loss, including osteoporosis. Recently, we established a yeast surface display system and screened libraries of randomly mutated RANKL proteins to identify mutations that abolish binding to OPG while preserving recognition of RANK. These efforts yielded several RANKL variants possessing substantially higher affinity for RANK compared to their wild-type (WT) counterpart. Using recombinant RANKL mutant proteins, we find those with increased affinity for RANK produce more robust signaling in osteoclast lineage cells and have greater osteoclastogenic potential. Our results are the first to document gain of function RANKL mutations. They indicate that the physiological RANKL/RANK interaction is not optimized for maximal signaling and function, perhaps reflecting the need to maintain receptor specificity within the tumor necrosis factor superfamily (TNFSF). Instead, we find, a biphasic relationship exists between RANKL/RANK affinity and osteoclastogenic capacity. In our panel of RANKL variants, this relationship is driven entirely by manipulation of the kinetic off-rate. Our structure-based and yeast surface display-derived insights into manipulating this critical signaling axis may aid in the design of novel anti-resorptive therapies as well as provide a paradigm for design of other receptor-specific TNF superfamily ligand variants. PMID:25864714

  18. The pH dependence of heme pocket hydration and ligand rebinding kinetics in photodissociated carbonmonoxymyoglobin.

    PubMed

    Esquerra, Raymond M; Jensen, Russell A; Bhaskaran, Shyam; Pillsbury, Marlisa L; Mendoza, Juan L; Lintner, Benjamin W; Kliger, David S; Goldbeck, Robert A

    2008-05-16

    We monitored the occupancy of a functionally important non-coordinated water molecule in the distal heme pocket of sperm whale myoglobin over the pH range 4.3-9.4. Water occupancy was assessed by using time-resolved spectroscopy to detect the perturbation of the heme visible band absorption spectrum caused by water entry after CO photodissociation ( Goldbeck, R. A., Bhaskaran, S., Ortega, C., Mendoza, J. L., Olson, J. S., Soman, J., Kliger, D. S., and Esquerra, R. M. (2006) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 103, 1254-1259 ). We found that the water occupancy observed during the time interval between ligand photolysis and diffusive recombination decreased by nearly 20% as the pH was lowered below 6. This decrease accounted for most of the concomitant increase in the observed CO bimolecular recombination rate constant, as the lower water occupancy presented a smaller kinetic barrier to CO entry into the pocket at lower pH. These results were consistent with a model in which the distal histidine, which stabilizes the water molecule within the distal pocket by accepting a hydrogen bond, tends to swing out of the pocket upon protonation and destabilize the water occupancy at low pH. Extrapolation of this model to lower pH suggests that the additional increase in ligand association rate constant observed previously in stopped-flow studies at pH 3 may also be due in part to reduced distal water occupancy concomitant with further His64 protonation and coupled protein conformational change.

  19. Kinetics of protein-ligand unbinding via smoothed potential molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mollica, Luca; Decherchi, Sergio; Zia, Syeda Rehana; Gaspari, Roberto; Cavalli, Andrea; Rocchia, Walter

    2015-06-01

    Drug discovery is expensive and high-risk. Its main reasons of failure are lack of efficacy and toxicity of a drug candidate. Binding affinity for the biological target has been usually considered one of the most relevant figures of merit to judge a drug candidate along with bioavailability, selectivity and metabolic properties, which could depend on off-target interactions. Nevertheless, affinity does not always satisfactorily correlate with in vivo drug efficacy. It is indeed becoming increasingly evident that the time a drug spends in contact with its target (aka residence time) can be a more reliable figure of merit. Experimental kinetic measurements are operatively limited by the cost and the time needed to synthesize compounds to be tested, to express and purify the target, and to setup the assays. We present here a simple and efficient molecular-dynamics-based computational approach to prioritize compounds according to their residence time. We devised a multiple-replica scaled molecular dynamics protocol with suitably defined harmonic restraints to accelerate the unbinding events while preserving the native fold. Ligands are ranked according to the mean observed scaled unbinding time. The approach, trivially parallel and easily implementable, was validated against experimental information available on biological systems of pharmacological relevance.

  20. New insights into the kinetic target-guided synthesis of protein ligands.

    PubMed

    Oueis, Emilia; Sabot, Cyrille; Renard, Pierre-Yves

    2015-08-01

    The kinetic target-guided synthesis (KTGS) strategy is an unconventional discovery approach that takes advantage of the presence of the biological target itself in order to irreversibly assemble the best inhibitors from an array of building blocks. This strategy has grown over the last two decades notably after the introduction of the in situ click chemistry concept by Sharpless and colleagues in the early 2000s based on the use of the Huisgen cycloaddition between terminal alkynes and azides. KTGS is a captivating area of research offering an unprecedented and powerful strategy to probe the macromolecular complexity and dynamics of biological targets. After a brief introduction listing all chemical ligation reactions reported to date in KTGS, this review focuses on the last five years' progress to expand the repertoire of the click or "click-like" tool box targeting proteins, as well as to overcome limitations arising in particular from false negatives, i.e. potent ligands that are not formed, or formed in undetectable trace amounts. Furthermore, we wish to analyze the new twists and novelties described in some of these applications in order to better understand the conditions that govern this strategy and the extent to which it can be developed and generalized for a more efficient process. PMID:26144842

  1. The use of kinetic modelling as a fast way to screen thermal endurance of space materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, M.; Heltzel, S.; Semprimoschnig, C.; Garcia Martin, G.

    2003-09-01

    Currently planned missions of ESA (European Space Agency) to the inner part of the solar system will require the use of materials at an extreme radiation and temperature environment. A major concern regarding the selection of these materials is the thermal behaviour and the thermal stability. In this paper two kinetic models, the one following the ASTM E 1641 and ASTM E 1877 standards and the other following the Model Free Kinetics (MFK) approach, are presented. These models allow an easy and fast way to screen the thermal endurance of organic materials by running Thermo Gravimetric Analyses (TGA) temperature scans.

  2. Ultra-fast dynamic compression technique to study kinetics of phase transformations in Bismuth

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R F; Kane, J O; Eggert, J H; Saculla, M D; Jankowski, A F; Bastea, M; Hicks, D G; Collins, G W

    2007-12-28

    Pre-heated Bi was ramp compressed within 30 ns to a peak stress of {approx}11 GPa to explore structural phase transformation kinetics under dynamic loading conditions. Under these ultra-fast compression time-scales the equilibrium Bi I-II phase boundary is overpressurized by {Delta}P {approx} 0.8 GPa. {Delta}P is observed to increase logarithmically with strain rate, {var_epsilon}, above 10{sup 6} s{sup -1}. Estimates from a kinetics model predict that the Bi I phase is fully transformed within 3 ns.

  3. Synthesis of IAN-type N,N-Ligands via Dynamic Kinetic Asymmetric Buchwald-Hartwig Amination.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-López, Pedro; Ros, Abel; Romero-Arenas, Antonio; Iglesias-Sigüenza, Javier; Fernández, Rosario; Lassaletta, José M

    2016-09-21

    The Pd(0)-catalyzed coupling of racemic heterobiaryl bromides, triflates, or nonaflates with aryl/alkyl primary amines using QUINAP as the ligand provides the corresponding axially chiral heterobiaryl amines with excellent yields and enantioselectivities. Reactivity and structural studies of neutral and cationic oxidative addition intermediates support a dynamic kinetic asymmetric amination mechanism based on the labilization of the stereogenic axis in the latter and suggest that coordination of the amine to the Pd center is the stereodetermining step. PMID:27595166

  4. Global solution for a kinetic chemotaxis model with internal dynamics and its fast adaptation limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Jie

    2015-12-01

    A nonlinear kinetic chemotaxis model with internal dynamics incorporating signal transduction and adaptation is considered. This paper is concerned with: (i) the global solution for this model, and, (ii) its fast adaptation limit to Othmer-Dunbar-Alt type model. This limit gives some insight to the molecular origin of the chemotaxis behaviour. First, by using the Schauder fixed point theorem, the global existence of weak solution is proved based on detailed a priori estimates, under quite general assumptions. However, the Schauder theorem does not provide uniqueness, so additional analysis is required to be developed for uniqueness. Next, the fast adaptation limit of this model is derived by extracting a weak convergence subsequence in measure space. For this limit, the first difficulty is to show the concentration effect on the internal state. Another difficulty is the strong compactness argument on the chemical potential, which is essential for passing the nonlinear kinetic equation to the weak limit.

  5. Computational fluid dynamics modelling of biomass fast pyrolysis in fluidised bed reactors, focusing different kinetic schemes.

    PubMed

    Ranganathan, Panneerselvam; Gu, Sai

    2016-08-01

    The present work concerns with CFD modelling of biomass fast pyrolysis in a fluidised bed reactor. Initially, a study was conducted to understand the hydrodynamics of the fluidised bed reactor by investigating the particle density and size, and gas velocity effect. With the basic understanding of hydrodynamics, the study was further extended to investigate the different kinetic schemes for biomass fast pyrolysis process. The Eulerian-Eulerian approach was used to model the complex multiphase flows in the reactor. The yield of the products from the simulation was compared with the experimental data. A good comparison was obtained between the literature results and CFD simulation. It is also found that CFD prediction with the advanced kinetic scheme is better when compared to other schemes. With the confidence obtained from the CFD models, a parametric study was carried out to study the effect of biomass particle type and size and temperature on the yield of the products.

  6. Kinetic mechanisms of inhibitor binding: relevance to the fast-acting slow-binding paradigm.

    PubMed Central

    Falk, S; Oulianova, N; Berteloot, A

    1999-01-01

    Although phlorizin inhibition of Na+-glucose cotransport occurs within a few seconds, 3H-phlorizin binding to the sodium-coupled glucose transport protein(s) requires several minutes to reach equilibrium (the fast-acting slow-binding paradigm). Using kinetic models of arbitrary dimension that can be reduced to a two-state diagram according to Cha's formalism, we show that three basic mechanisms of inhibitor binding can be identified whereby the inhibitor binding step either (A) represents, (B) precedes, or (C) follows the rate-limiting step in a binding reaction. We demonstrate that each of mechanisms A-C is associated with a set of unique kinetic properties, and that the time scale over which one may expect to observe mechanism C is conditioned by the turnover number of the catalytic cycle. In contrast, mechanisms A and B may be relevant to either fast-acting or slow-binding inhibitors. However, slow-binding inhibition according to mechanism A may not be compatible with a fast-acting behavior on the steady-state time scale of a few seconds. We conclude that the recruitment hypothesis (mechanism C) cannot account for slow phlorizin binding to the sodium-coupled glucose transport protein(s), and that mechanism B is the only alternative that may explain the fast-acting slow-binding paradigm. PMID:10388748

  7. Kinetics and computational studies of ligand migration in nitrophorin 7 and its Δ1-3 mutant.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Ana; Allegri, Alessandro; Bidon-Chanal, Axel; Knipp, Markus; Roitberg, Adrian E; Abbruzzetti, Stefania; Viappiani, Cristiano; Luque, F Javier

    2013-09-01

    Nitrophorins (NPs) are nitric oxide (NO)-carrying heme proteins found in the saliva of the blood-sucking insect Rhodnius prolixus. Though NP7 exhibits a large sequence resemblance with other NPs, two major differential features are the ability to interact with negatively charged cell surfaces and the presence of a specific N-terminus composed of three extra residues (Leu1-Pro2-Gly3). The aim of this study is to examine the influence of the N-terminus on the ligand binding, and the topological features of inner cavities in closed and open states of NP7, which can be associated to the protein structure at low and high pH, respectively. Laser flash photolysis measurements of the CO rebinding kinetics to NP7 and its variant NP7(Δ1-3), which lacks the three extra residues at the N-terminus, exhibit a similar pattern and support the existence of a common kinetic mechanism for ligand migration and binding. This is supported by the existence of a common topology of inner cavities, which consists of two docking sites in the heme pocket and a secondary site at the back of the protein. The ligand exchange between these cavities is facilitated by an additional site, which can be transiently occupied by the ligand in NP7, although it is absent in NP4. These features provide a basis to explain the enhanced internal gas hosting capacity found experimentally in NP7 and the absence of ligand rebinding from secondary sites in NP4. The current data allow us to speculate that the processes of docking to cell surfaces and NO release may be interconnected in NP7, thereby efficiently releasing NO into a target cell. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Oxygen Binding and Sensing Proteins.

  8. Effect of carboxylic and thiol ligands (oxalate, cysteine) on the kinetics of desorption of Hg(II) from kaolinite

    SciTech Connect

    Senevirathna, W. U.; Zhang, Hong; Gu, Baohua

    2010-01-01

    Sorption and desorption of Hg(II) on clay minerals can impact the biogeochemical cycle and bio-uptake of Hg in the environment. We studied the kinetics of the desorption of Hg(II) from kaolinite as affected by oxalate and cysteine, representing the ligands with carboxylic and thiol groups of different affinities for Hg(II). The effects of pH (3, 5, and 7), ligand concentration (0.25 and 1.0 mM), and temperature (15 C, 25 C, and 35 C) on the Hg(II) desorption were investigated through desorption kinetics. Our study showed that the Hg(II) desorption was pH dependent. In the absence of any organic ligand, >90% of the previously adsorbed Hg(II) desorbed at pH 3 within 2 h, compared to <10% at pH 7. Similar results were observed in the presence of oxalate, showing that it hardly affected the Hg(II) desorption. Cysteine inhibited the Hg(II) desorption significantly at all the pH tested, especially in the first 80 min with the desorption less than 20%, but the inhibition of the desorption appeared to be less prominent afterwards. The effect of the ligand concentration on the Hg(II) desorption was small, especially in the presence of oxalate. The effect of temperature on the Hg(II) desorption was nearly insignificant. The effect of the organic acids on the Hg(II) sorption and desorption is explained by the formation of the ternary surface complexes involving the mineral, ligand, and Hg(II). The competition for Hg(II) between the cysteine molecules adsorbed on the particle surfaces and in the solution phase probably can also affect the Hg(II) desorption.

  9. Kinetics of Hg(II) exchange between organic ligands, goethite, and natural organic matter studied with an enriched stable isotope approach.

    PubMed

    Jiskra, Martin; Saile, Damian; Wiederhold, Jan G; Bourdon, Bernard; Björn, Erik; Kretzschmar, Ruben

    2014-11-18

    The mobility and bioavailability of toxic Hg(II) in the environment strongly depends on its interactions with natural organic matter (NOM) and mineral surfaces. Using an enriched stable isotope approach, we investigated the exchange of Hg(II) between dissolved species (inorganically complexed or cysteine-, EDTA-, or NOM-bound) and solid-bound Hg(II) (carboxyl-/thiol-resin or goethite) over 30 days under constant conditions (pH, Hg and ligand concentrations). The Hg(II)-exchange was initially fast, followed by a slower phase, and depended on the properties of the dissolved ligands and sorbents. The results were described by a kinetic model allowing the simultaneous determination of adsorption and desorption rate coefficients. The time scales required to reach equilibrium with the carboxyl-resin varied greatly from 1.2 days for Hg(OH)2 to 16 days for Hg(II)-cysteine complexes and approximately 250 days for EDTA-bound Hg(II). Other experiments could not be described by an equilibrium model, suggesting that a significant fraction of total-bound Hg was present in a non-exchangeable form (thiol-resin and NOM: 53-58%; goethite: 22-29%). Based on the slow and incomplete exchange of Hg(II) described in this study, we suggest that kinetic effects must be considered to a greater extent in the assessment of the fate of Hg in the environment and the design of experimental studies, for example, for stability constant determination or metal isotope fractionation during sorption.

  10. Nanosecond Pulse Discharges and Fast Ionization Wave Discharges: Fundamental Kinetic Processes and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamovich, Igor

    2011-10-01

    Over the last two decades, nanosecond pulse discharges and Fast Ionization Wave (FIW) discharges have been studied extensively, both theoretically and experimentally. Current interest in characterization of these discharges is driven mainly by their potential for applications such as plasma chemical fuel reforming, plasma-assisted combustion, high-speed flow control, pumping of electric discharge excited lasers, and generation of high-energy electrons. A unique capability of FIW discharges to generate significant ionization and high concentrations of excited species at high pressures and over large distances, before ionization instabilities have time to develop, is very attractive for these applications. Recent advances in laser optical diagnostics offer an opportunity of making non-intrusive, spatially and time-resolved measurements of electron density and electric field distributions in high-speed ionization wave discharges, on nanosecond time scale. Insight into FIW formation and propagation dynamics also requires development of predictive kinetic models, and their experimental validation. Although numerical kinetic models may incorporate detailed kinetics of charged and neutral species in the propagating ionization wave front (including non-local electron kinetics), analytic models are also attractive due to their capability of elucidating fundamental trends of discharge development. The talk gives an overview of recent progress in experimental characterization and kinetic modeling of nanosecond pulse and fast ionization wave discharges in nitrogen and air over a wide range of pulse repetition rates, 0.1-40 kHz. FIW discharge plasmas sustained at high pulse repetition rates are diffuse and volume filling, with most of the power coupled to the plasma behind the wave, at E/N = 200-300 Td and energy loading of 1-2 meV/molecule/pulse. The results demonstrate significant potential of large volume, diffuse, high pulse repetition rate FIW discharges for novel plasma

  11. Fast and sensitive optical toxicity bioassay based on dual wavelength analysis of bacterial ferricyanide reduction kinetics.

    PubMed

    Pujol-Vila, F; Vigués, N; Díaz-González, M; Muñoz-Berbel, X; Mas, J

    2015-05-15

    Global urban and industrial growth, with the associated environmental contamination, is promoting the development of rapid and inexpensive general toxicity methods. Current microbial methodologies for general toxicity determination rely on either bioluminescent bacteria and specific medium solution (i.e. Microtox(®)) or low sensitivity and diffusion limited protocols (i.e. amperometric microbial respirometry). In this work, fast and sensitive optical toxicity bioassay based on dual wavelength analysis of bacterial ferricyanide reduction kinetics is presented, using Escherichia coli as a bacterial model. Ferricyanide reduction kinetic analysis (variation of ferricyanide absorption with time), much more sensitive than single absorbance measurements, allowed for direct and fast toxicity determination without pre-incubation steps (assay time=10 min) and minimizing biomass interference. Dual wavelength analysis at 405 (ferricyanide and biomass) and 550 nm (biomass), allowed for ferricyanide monitoring without interference of biomass scattering. On the other hand, refractive index (RI) matching with saccharose reduced bacterial light scattering around 50%, expanding the analytical linear range in the determination of absorbent molecules. With this method, different toxicants such as metals and organic compounds were analyzed with good sensitivities. Half maximal effective concentrations (EC50) obtained after 10 min bioassay, 2.9, 1.0, 0.7 and 18.3 mg L(-1) for copper, zinc, acetic acid and 2-phenylethanol respectively, were in agreement with previously reported values for longer bioassays (around 60 min). This method represents a promising alternative for fast and sensitive water toxicity monitoring, opening the possibility of quick in situ analysis.

  12. Fast electron energy deposition in a magnetized plasma: Kinetic theory and particle-in-cell simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Robiche, J.; Rax, J.-M.; Bonnaud, G.; Gremillet, L.

    2010-03-15

    The collisional dynamics of a relativistic electron jet in a magnetized plasma are investigated within the framework of kinetic theory. The relativistic Fokker-Planck equation describing slowing down, pitch angle scattering, and cyclotron rotation is derived and solved. Based on the solution of this Fokker-Planck equation, an analytical formula for the root mean square spot size transverse to the magnetic field is derived and this result predicts a reduction in radial transport. Some comparisons with particle-in-cell simulation are made and confirm striking agreement between the theory and the simulation. For fast electron with 1 MeV typical kinetic energy interacting with a solid density hydrogen plasma, the energy deposition density in the transverse direction increases by a factor 2 for magnetic field of the order of 1 T. Along the magnetic field, the energy deposition profile is unaltered compared with the field-free case.

  13. Nonlinear interaction of kinetic Alfven wave with fast magnetosonic wave and turbulent spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Modi, K. V.; Sharma, R. P.

    2013-03-15

    In the present paper, authors have investigated nonlinear interaction of kinetic Alfven wave (KAW) and fast magnetosonic wave for intermediate {beta}-plasma (m{sub e}/m{sub i} Much-Less-Than {beta} Much-Less-Than 1). Authors have developed the set of dimensionless equations in the presence of ponderomotive nonlinearity due to KAW in the dynamics of fast magnetosonic wave. Numerical simulation has been carried out to study the effect of nonlinear coupling and resulting turbulent/power spectrum for the different angles of propagation of fast magnetosonic wave applicable to solar wind at 1 AU. The localization of KAW has been found which becomes more complex as the angle of propagation of fast magnetosonic wave decreases. Results also reveal the steepening of power spectrum as the angle of propagation decreases which can be responsible for heating and acceleration of plasma particles in solar wind. Relevance of the obtained result is pointed out with observation received by Cluster spacecraft for the solar wind 1 AU.

  14. Cascade ultrafiltration and competing ligand exchange for kinetic speciation of aluminium, iron, and nickel in fresh water.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Nouri M; Murimboh, John D; Sekaly, Amina L R; Mandal, Rupasri; Chakrabarti, Chuni L; Grégoire, D Conrad

    2006-04-01

    Kinetic speciation of nickel, aluminium, and iron in fresh water has been investigated by cascade ultrafiltration followed by competing ligand exchange of the ultrafiltered fractions. Graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry was used to measure the kinetics of metal complex dissociation. Dissolved metal species were fractionated by cascade ultrafiltration. Metal speciation in each ultrafiltered fraction was then characterized as free metal ions, "labile" metal complexes (with dissociation rate constants >/=10(-3) s(-1)), "slowly labile" metal complexes (with dissociation rate constants >10(-6) s(-1)), and "inert" metal complexes (with dissociation rate constants <10(-6) s(-1)). The experimental results were compared with the predictions of a computer-based equilibrium speciation model, the Windermere humic aqueous model (WHAM) V. Cascade ultrafiltration coupled with kinetic speciation of the metal species in each molecular weight cut-off (MWCO) fraction provided a more comprehensive picture and insight into the physical and the chemical characteristics of the metal species than either ultrafiltration or measurement of dissociation kinetics alone.

  15. Effects of protein-ligand interactions on hydrogen/deuterium exchange kinetics: canonical and noncanonical scenarios.

    PubMed

    Sowole, Modupeola A; Konermann, Lars

    2014-07-01

    Hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) methods are widely used for monitoring protein-ligand interactions. This approach relies on the fact that ligand binding can modulate the extent of protein structural fluctuations that transiently disrupt hydrogen bonds and expose backbone amides to the solvent. It is commonly observed that ligand binding causes a reduction of HDX rates. This reduction can be restricted to elements adjacent to the binding site, but other regions can be affected as well. Qualitatively, ligand-induced HDX protection can be rationalized on the basis of two-state models that equate structural dynamics with global unfolding/refolding. Unfortunately, such models tend to be unrealistic because the dynamics of native proteins are dominated by subglobal transitions and local fluctuations. Ligand binding lowers the ground-state free energy. It is not obvious why this should necessarily be accompanied by a depletion of excited-state occupancies, which would be required for a reduction of HDX rates. Here, we propose a framework that implies that ligand binding can either slow or accelerate amide deuteration throughout the protein. These scenarios are referred to as "type 1" and "type 2", respectively. Evidence for type 1 binding is abundant in the literature, whereas the viability of type 2 interactions is less clear. Using HDX mass spectrometry (MS), we demonstrate that the oxygenation of hemoglobin (Hb) provides a dramatic example of a type 2 scenario. The observed behavior is consistent with cooperative T → R switching, where part of the intrinsic O2 binding energy is reinvested for destabilization of the ground state. This destabilization increases the Boltzmann occupancy of unfolded conformers, thereby enhancing HDX rates. Surprisingly, O2 binding to myoglobin (Mb) also induces elevated HDX rates. These Mb data reveal that type 2 behavior is not limited to cooperative multisubunit systems. Although enhanced protection from deuteration is widely

  16. High-speed gas chromatography in doping control: fast-GC and fast-GC/MS determination of beta-adrenoceptor ligands and diuretics.

    PubMed

    Brunelli, Claudio; Bicchi, Carlo; Di Stilo, Antonella; Salomone, Alberto; Vincenti, Marco

    2006-12-01

    In official doping controls, about 300 drugs and metabolites have to be screened for each sample. Moreover, the number of determinations to be routinely processed increases continuously as the number of both samples and potential illicit drugs keeps growing. As a consequence, increasingly specific, sensitive, and, above all, fast methods for doping controls are needed. The present study presents an efficient fast-GC/MS approach to the routine screening of two different classes of doping agents, namely beta-adrenoceptor ligands and diuretics (belonging to the S3, P2, and S5 groups of the WADA list of prohibited substances). Narrow bore columns (100 mm id) of different lengths and coated with apolar stationary phases were successfully used to separate the derivatized analytes; preliminary experiments (results not shown) showed better performances with OV-1701 for the separation of beta-adrenoceptor ligands. On the same stationary phase some diuretics required too high a temperature or a long isothermal time for elution, in which case a DB1-MS column was preferred. Two methods of sample preparation, derivatization, and analysis were used on aqueous standard mixtures of, respectively, (i) eight beta-adrenoceptor ligands, including five beta-antagonists (acebutolol, alprenolol, atenolol, metoprolol, pindolol) and three beta2-agonists (salbutamol, clenbuterol, terbutaline) and (ii) seventeen diuretic drugs (acetazolamide, althiazide, bendroflumethiazide, bumethanide, canrenone, chlorothiazide, chlortalidone, clopamide, ethacrinic acid, furosemide, hydrochlorothiazide, hydroflumethiazide, indapamide, indomethacine, spironolactone, triamterene, trichloromethiazide) and one masking agent (probenecid). The mixture of beta-adrenoceptor ligand derivatives was efficiently separated in about 5.6 min, while the one of 18 diuretics and masking agents required less than 5 min for analysis. Limits of detection were from 1 microg/L for pindolol, ethacrinic acid, furosemide

  17. Ligand-interaction kinetics of the pheromone- binding protein from the gypsy moth, L. dispar: insights into the mechanism of binding and release.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yongmei; Pace, Tamara C S; Castillo, Carlos; Bohne, Cornelia; O'Neill, Melanie A; Plettner, Erika

    2009-02-27

    The pheromone-binding proteins (PBPs), which exist at a high concentration in the sensillum lymph surrounding olfactory neurons, are proposed to be important in pheromone detection and discrimination in insects. Here, we present a systematic study of PBP-ligand interaction kinetics. We find that PBP2, from the gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar, associates and dissociates slowly with its biofunctional ligands, (+)- and (-)-disparlure. Tryptophan anisotropy measurements detect PBP multimers in solution as well as an increase in the multimeric state of the protein upon long exposure to ligand. We propose a kinetic model that includes monomer/multimer equilibria and a two-step binding process: (1) external binding of the pheromone assisted by the C terminus of PBP2, and (2) slow embedding of the pheromone into the internal pocket. This experimentally derived model sheds light on the potential biological function and mechanism of PBPs as ligand scavengers.

  18. Characterization of Kinetic Binding Properties of Unlabeled Ligands via a Preincubation Endpoint Binding Approach.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Yuji; Ogawa, Kazumasa; Nakayama, Masaharu

    2016-08-01

    The dissociation rates of unlabeled drugs have been well studied by kinetic binding analyses. Since kinetic assays are laborious, we developed a simple method to determine the kinetic binding parameters of unlabeled competitors by a preincubation endpoint assay. The probe binding after preincubation of a competitor can be described by a single equation as a function of time. Simulations using the equation revealed the degree of IC50 change induced by preincubation of a competitor depended on the dissociation rate koff of the competitor but not on the association rate kon To validate the model, an in vitro binding assay was performed using a smoothened receptor (SMO) and [(3)H]TAK-441, a SMO antagonist. The equilibrium dissociation constants (KI) and koff of SMO antagonists determined by globally fitting the model to the concentration-response curves obtained with and without 24 h preincubation correlated well with those determined by other methods. This approach could be useful for early-stage optimization of drug candidates by enabling determination of binding kinetics in a high-throughput manner because it does not require kinetic measurements, an intermediate washout step during the reaction, or prior determination of competitors' KI values. PMID:27270099

  19. A ligand-specific kinetic switch regulates glucocorticoid receptor trafficking and function

    PubMed Central

    Trebble, Peter J.; Woolven, James M.; Saunders, Ken A.; Simpson, Karen D.; Farrow, Stuart N.; Matthews, Laura C.; Ray, David W.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The ubiquitously expressed glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is a major drug target for inflammatory disease, but issues of specificity and target tissue sensitivity remain. We now identify high potency, non-steroidal GR ligands, GSK47867A and GSK47869A, which induce a novel conformation of the GR ligand-binding domain (LBD) and augment the efficacy of cellular action. Despite their high potency, GSK47867A and GSK47869A both induce surprisingly slow GR nuclear translocation, followed by prolonged nuclear GR retention, and transcriptional activity following washout. We reveal that GSK47867A and GSK47869A specifically alter the GR LBD structure at the HSP90-binding site. The alteration in the HSP90-binding site was accompanied by resistance to HSP90 antagonism, with persisting transactivation seen after geldanamycin treatment. Taken together, our studies reveal a new mechanism governing GR intracellular trafficking regulated by ligand binding that relies on a specific surface charge patch within the LBD. This conformational change permits extended GR action, probably because of altered GR–HSP90 interaction. This chemical series may offer anti-inflammatory drugs with prolonged duration of action due to altered pharmacodynamics rather than altered pharmacokinetics. PMID:23687373

  20. Binding conformation and kinetics of two pheromone-binding proteins from the Gypsy moth Lymantria dispar with biological and nonbiological ligands.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yongmei; Tang, Hao; Bohne, Cornelia; Plettner, Erika

    2010-02-01

    Pheromone-binding proteins (PBPs) in insects can bind various substances and selectively deliver the message of a signal molecule to the downstream components of the olfactory system. This can be achieved either through a ligand-specific conformational change of the C-terminal peptide of the PBP or by selectively binding/releasing the ligand. PBP may also act as a scavenger to protect the sensory neurons from saturating at high ligand doses. We have compared two PBPs from the gypsy moth (PBP1 and PBP2) and their truncated forms (TPBPs), which lack the C-terminal peptide, in this study. Stopped-flow kinetics with N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine (NPN) have revealed a diffusion-controlled collisional step, between PBP and NPN, after which the NPN relocates into a hydrophobic environment. This work supports the hypothesis that binding between PBPs and ligands occurs stepwise. With the method of tryptophan fluorescence quenching, we have shown different local conformational changes around Trp 37, induced by different ligands, manifested in changes of both the steric and electronic environment around the residue. Importantly, we have noticed a significant difference in the changes induced by the biological ligand (the pheromone) and nonbiological ligands. Therefore, we hypothesize that PBP may serve a different function in each kinetic step, displaying a unique P.L conformation.

  1. On the Upscaling of Reaction-Transport Processes in Porous Media with Fast Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Kechagi, P.; Tsimpanogiannis, I.; Yortsos, Y.C.; Lichtner, P.

    2001-01-09

    This report is organized as follows: Provide a brief review of the upscaling constraints of the type (2) for a typical diffusion-reaction system. In this an analogy with two-phase flow in porous media was drawn. Then, using the methodology of QW a problem at the unit cell for the computation of the effective mass transfer coefficient, in processes where local thermodynamic equilibrium applies was derived. This problem is found to be different than in QW, as it depends on the gradients of the macroscale variable, and can be cast in terms of an eigenvalue problem. Two simple, examples, one involving advection-dissolution and another involving drying in a pore network, was presented to illustrate the coupling between scales and to show the quantitative effect in case this coupling was neglected. Finally, similar ideas and an illustrative example was applied to reaction-diffusion systems with fast kinetics, where an equilibrium state is approached.

  2. Chronic impact of sulfamethoxazole on acetate utilization kinetics and population dynamics of fast growing microbial culture.

    PubMed

    Kor-Bicakci, G; Pala-Ozkok, I; Rehman, A; Jonas, D; Ubay-Cokgor, E; Orhon, D

    2014-08-01

    The study evaluated the chronic impact of sulfamethoxazole on metabolic activities of fast growing microbial culture. It focused on changes induced on utilization kinetics of acetate and composition of the microbial community. The experiments involved a fill and draw reactor, fed with acetate and continuous sulfamethoxazole dosing of 50 mg/L. The evaluation relied on model evaluation of the oxygen uptake rate profiles, with parallel assessment of microbial community structure by 454-pyrosequencing. Continuous sulfamethoxazole dosing inflicted a retardation effect on acetate utilization in a way commonly interpreted as competitive inhibition, blocked substrate storage and accelerated endogenous respiration. A fraction of acetate was utilized at a much lower rate with partial biodegradation of sulfamethoxazole. Results of pyrosequencing with a replacement mechanism within a richer more diversified microbial culture, through inactivation of vulnerable fractions in favor of species resistant to antibiotic, which made them capable of surviving and competing even with a slower metabolic response.

  3. Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Ligand Binding to Vitamin B-12a: A Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweigart, D. A.

    1975-01-01

    Describes an open-ended experiment involving a bioinorganic system that provides the student a direct link between thermodynamics and kinetics. It utilizes a rapid reaction technique and requires one to clearly understand the relationship of experimental observable (absorbance) to a mechanism. (GS)

  4. A quantitative kinetic model for the fast and isothermal hydrothermal liquefaction of Nannochloropsis sp.

    PubMed

    Hietala, David C; Faeth, Julia L; Savage, Phillip E

    2016-08-01

    Hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) is a technology for converting algal biomass into biocrude oil and high-value products. To elucidate the underlying kinetics for this process, we conducted isothermal and non-isothermal reactions over a broad range of holding times (10s-60min), temperatures (100-400°C), and average heating rates (110-350°Cmin(-1)). Biocrude reached high yields (⩾37wt%) within 2min for heat-source set-point temperatures of 350°C or higher. We developed a microalgal HTL kinetic model valid from 10s to 60min, including significantly shorter timescales (10s-10min) than any previous model. The model predicts that up to 46wt% biocrude yields are achievable at 400°C and 1min, reaffirming the utility of short holding times and "fast" HTL. We highlight potential trade-offs between maximizing biocrude quantity and facilitating aqueous phase recovery, which may improve biocrude quality. PMID:27128195

  5. A quantitative kinetic model for the fast and isothermal hydrothermal liquefaction of Nannochloropsis sp.

    PubMed

    Hietala, David C; Faeth, Julia L; Savage, Phillip E

    2016-08-01

    Hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) is a technology for converting algal biomass into biocrude oil and high-value products. To elucidate the underlying kinetics for this process, we conducted isothermal and non-isothermal reactions over a broad range of holding times (10s-60min), temperatures (100-400°C), and average heating rates (110-350°Cmin(-1)). Biocrude reached high yields (⩾37wt%) within 2min for heat-source set-point temperatures of 350°C or higher. We developed a microalgal HTL kinetic model valid from 10s to 60min, including significantly shorter timescales (10s-10min) than any previous model. The model predicts that up to 46wt% biocrude yields are achievable at 400°C and 1min, reaffirming the utility of short holding times and "fast" HTL. We highlight potential trade-offs between maximizing biocrude quantity and facilitating aqueous phase recovery, which may improve biocrude quality.

  6. Kinetic modeling of solid yields formation in the fast pyrolysis of mahogany wood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijayanti, W.; Sasongko, M. N.

    2016-03-01

    There have been many research of biomass pyrolysis not only in heat transfer point of view but also in chemical reaction point of view. In the present study, the rate of reaction (kinetic rate) formation of solid yield was calculated by varying the pyrolysis temperature that gives a chance of 250 °C, 350 °C, 450 °C, 500 °C, 600 °C, 700 °C, until 800°C with heating rate around 700 °C/hour. The heating rate used was the fast pyrolysis in which the heating rate for heating furnaces takes place quickly. Pyrolysis was accomplished by direct pyrolysis process in which each process was conducted at the certain pyrolysis temperature variation that took over 3 hours. Biomass used was mahogany wood, while the inert gas used to hold in order to avoid combustion was nitrogen gas. The decreasing of solid yields formation obtained was used to calculate the kinetic rate of the pyrolysis process. It was calculated by using the similar Arrhenius equation that considering the temperature changes during the process and the decreasing mass of solid yield formation occurred. The kinetic rate results showed the decomposition of biomass occurs tended in two stages, namely a stage of water evaporation and degradation of biomass solid yield coal followed by a stage of constant formation. The decomposition is expressed by the magnitude of the rate of reaction at 25˚C-517˚C temperature range with a reaction rate constant k1 = 2151.67 exp (-2141/Tp). While at pyrolysis temperatures above 517˚C, the reaction rate constant is expressed with k2 = 32.20 exp (-127.8 / Tp).

  7. Effect of Fluorescently Labeling Protein Probes on Kinetics of Protein-Ligand Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Y.S.; Landry, J.P.; Fei, Y.Y.; Luo, J.T.; Wang, X.B.; Lam, K.S.

    2009-01-01

    We studied the effect of fluorescently labeling proteins on protein-ligand reactions. Un-labeled ligands (streptavidin-binding peptides and rabbit immunoglobulin G (IgG) as antigen targets) are immobilized on epoxy-functionalized glass slides. Unlabeled and Cy3-labeled protein probes from the same batch (streptavidin and goat antibodies) subsequently react with the surface-immobilized targets. By monitoring in situ the surface mass density change using an oblique-incidence reflectivity difference scanning microscope (a label-free detector), we measured kon and koff for streptavidin-peptide reactions and antibody-antigen reaction. We found that (1) equilibrium dissociation constants, defined as KD = koff/kon, for streptavidin-peptide reactions increases by a factor of 3 ~ 4 when the solution-phase streptavidin is labeled with Cy3 dye; and (2) KD for reactions of solution-phase goat anti-rabbit antibodies with rabbit IgG targets also change significantly when the goat antibodies are labeled with Cy3 dye. PMID:18991423

  8. Effect of fluorescently labeling protein probes on kinetics of protein-ligand reactions.

    PubMed

    Sun, Y S; Landry, J P; Fei, Y Y; Zhu, X D; Luo, J T; Wang, X B; Lam, K S

    2008-12-01

    We studied the effect of fluorescently labeling proteins on protein-ligand reactions. Unlabeled ligands (streptavidin-binding peptides and rabbit immunoglobulin G (IgG) as antigen targets) are immobilized on epoxy-functionalized glass slides. Unlabeled and Cy3-labeled protein probes from the same batch (streptavidin and goat antibodies) subsequently react with the surface-immobilized targets. By monitoring in situ the surface mass density change using an oblique-incidence reflectivity difference scanning microscope (a label-free detector), we measured k(on) and k(off) for streptavidin-peptide reactions and antibody-antigen reaction. We found that (1) equilibrium dissociation constants, defined as K(D) = k(off)/k(on), for streptavidin-peptide reactions increases by a factor of 3-4 when the solution-phase streptavidin is labeled with Cy3 dye and (2) K(D) for reactions of solution-phase goat anti-rabbit antibodies with rabbit IgG targets also change significantly when the goat antibodies are labeled with Cy3 dye. PMID:18991423

  9. Scintillation proximity assay (SPA) as a new approach to determine a ligand's kinetic profile. A case in point for the adenosine A1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Xia, Lizi; de Vries, Henk; IJzerman, Ad P; Heitman, Laura H

    2016-03-01

    Scintillation proximity assay (SPA) is a radio-isotopic technology format used to measure a wide range of biological interactions, including drug-target binding affinity studies. The assay is homogeneous in nature, as it relies on a "mix and measure" format. It does not involve a filtration step to separate bound from free ligand as is the case in a traditional receptor-binding assay. For G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), it has been shown that optimal binding kinetics, next to a high affinity of a ligand, can result in more desirable pharmacological profiles. However, traditional techniques to assess kinetic parameters tend to be cumbersome and laborious. We thus aimed to evaluate whether SPA can be an alternative platform for real-time receptor-binding kinetic measurements on GPCRs. To do so, we first validated the SPA technology for equilibrium binding studies on a prototypic class A GPCR, the human adenosine A1 receptor (hA1R). Differently to classic kinetic studies, the SPA technology allowed us to study binding kinetic processes almost real time, which is impossible in the filtration assay. To demonstrate the reliability of this technology for kinetic purposes, we performed the so-called competition association experiments. The association and dissociation rate constants (k on and k off) of unlabeled hA1R ligands were reliably and quickly determined and agreed very well with the same parameters from a traditional filtration assay performed simultaneously. In conclusion, SPA is a very promising technique to determine the kinetic profile of the drug-target interaction. Its robustness and potential for high-throughput may render this technology a preferred choice for further kinetic studies.

  10. Scintillation proximity assay (SPA) as a new approach to determine a ligand's kinetic profile. A case in point for the adenosine A1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Xia, Lizi; de Vries, Henk; IJzerman, Ad P; Heitman, Laura H

    2016-03-01

    Scintillation proximity assay (SPA) is a radio-isotopic technology format used to measure a wide range of biological interactions, including drug-target binding affinity studies. The assay is homogeneous in nature, as it relies on a "mix and measure" format. It does not involve a filtration step to separate bound from free ligand as is the case in a traditional receptor-binding assay. For G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), it has been shown that optimal binding kinetics, next to a high affinity of a ligand, can result in more desirable pharmacological profiles. However, traditional techniques to assess kinetic parameters tend to be cumbersome and laborious. We thus aimed to evaluate whether SPA can be an alternative platform for real-time receptor-binding kinetic measurements on GPCRs. To do so, we first validated the SPA technology for equilibrium binding studies on a prototypic class A GPCR, the human adenosine A1 receptor (hA1R). Differently to classic kinetic studies, the SPA technology allowed us to study binding kinetic processes almost real time, which is impossible in the filtration assay. To demonstrate the reliability of this technology for kinetic purposes, we performed the so-called competition association experiments. The association and dissociation rate constants (k on and k off) of unlabeled hA1R ligands were reliably and quickly determined and agreed very well with the same parameters from a traditional filtration assay performed simultaneously. In conclusion, SPA is a very promising technique to determine the kinetic profile of the drug-target interaction. Its robustness and potential for high-throughput may render this technology a preferred choice for further kinetic studies. PMID:26647040

  11. Kinetics of brucite dissolution at 25°C in the presence of organic and inorganic ligands and divalent metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokrovsky, Oleg S.; Schott, Jacques; Castillo, Alain

    2005-02-01

    Brucite (Mg(OH) 2) dissolution rate was measured at 25°C in a mixed-flow reactor at various pH (5 to 11) and ionic strengths (0.01 to 0.03 M) as a function of the concentration of 15 organic and 5 inorganic ligands and 8 divalent metals. At neutral and weakly alkaline pH, the dissolution is promoted by the addition of the following ligands ranked by decreasing effectiveness: EDTA ≥ H 2PO 4- > catechol ≥ HCO 3- > ascorbate > citrate > oxalate > acetate ˜ lactate and it is inhibited by boric acid. At pH >10.5, it decreases in the presence of PO 43-, CO 32-, F -, oxine, salicylate, lactate, acetate, 4-hydroxybenzoate, SO 42- and B(OH) 4- with orthophosphate and borate being the strongest and the weakest inhibitor, respectively. Xylose (up to 0.1 M), glycine (up to 0.05 M), formate (up to 0.3 M) and fulvic and humic acids (up to 40 mg/L DOC) have no effect on brucite dissolution kinetics. Fluorine inhibits dissolution both in neutral and alkaline solutions. From F sorption experiments in batch and flow-through reactors and the analysis of reacted surfaces using X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), it is shown that fluorine adsorption is followed by its incorporation in brucite lattice likely via isomorphic substitution with OH. The effect of eight divalent metals (Sr, Ba, Ca, Pb, Mn, Fe, Co and Ni) studied at pH 4.9 and 0.01 M concentration revealed brucite dissolution rates to be correlated with the water molecule exchange rates in the first hydration sphere of the corresponding cation. The effect of investigated ligands on brucite dissolution rate can be modelled within the framework of the surface coordination approach taking into account the adsorption of ligands on dissolution-active sites and the molecular structure of the surface complexes they form. The higher the value of the ligand sorption constant, the stronger will be its catalyzing or inhibiting effect. As for Fe and Al oxides, bi- or multidentate mononuclear surface complexes, that labilize Mg

  12. Migration kinetics of primary aromatic amines from polyamide kitchenware: Easy and fast screening procedure using fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Sanllorente, S; Sarabia, L A; Ortiz, M C

    2016-11-01

    Primary aromatic amines, PAAs, and their derivatives constitute a health risk and control of their migration from food contact materials is the subject of permanent attention by the authorities. 25.1% of notifications made by Rapid Alert System for Food and Feed in the European Union between 2010 and 2015 concerned PAAs, polyamide cooking utensils being a common source. It is thus useful to have fast and efficient analytical methods for their control. In this work a non-separative, easy, fast and inexpensive spectrofluorimetric method based on the second order calibration of excitation-emission fluorescence matrices (EEMs) was proposed for the determination of aniline (ANL), 2,4-diaminotoluene (2,4-TDA) and 4,4'-methylenedianiline (4,4'-MDA) in polyamide cooking utensils. The procedure made it possible to identify unequivocally each analyte. Trilinearity of the data tensor guarantees the uniqueness of the solution obtained through parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC), so the factors of the decomposition match up with the analytes. The three analytes were unequivocally identified by the correlation between the pure spectra and the PARAFAC excitation and emission spectral loadings. The recovery percentages found were, 82.6%, 112.7% and 84.4% for ANL, 2,4-TDA and 4,4'-MDA respectively. The proposed method was applied to carry out a migration test from polyamide cooking utensils, using a 3% (w/v) acetic acid in aqueous solution as food simulant. Detectable levels of 4,4'-MDA were found in food simulant from some of the investigated cooking utensils. Finally, a kinetic model for the migration of 4,4'-MDA has been fitted to experimental data obtained in the migration test. Thanks to the selectivity of PARAFAC calibration, which greatly simplifies sample treatment avoiding the use of toxic solvents, the developed method follows most green analytical chemistry principles. PMID:27591586

  13. Migration kinetics of primary aromatic amines from polyamide kitchenware: Easy and fast screening procedure using fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Sanllorente, S; Sarabia, L A; Ortiz, M C

    2016-11-01

    Primary aromatic amines, PAAs, and their derivatives constitute a health risk and control of their migration from food contact materials is the subject of permanent attention by the authorities. 25.1% of notifications made by Rapid Alert System for Food and Feed in the European Union between 2010 and 2015 concerned PAAs, polyamide cooking utensils being a common source. It is thus useful to have fast and efficient analytical methods for their control. In this work a non-separative, easy, fast and inexpensive spectrofluorimetric method based on the second order calibration of excitation-emission fluorescence matrices (EEMs) was proposed for the determination of aniline (ANL), 2,4-diaminotoluene (2,4-TDA) and 4,4'-methylenedianiline (4,4'-MDA) in polyamide cooking utensils. The procedure made it possible to identify unequivocally each analyte. Trilinearity of the data tensor guarantees the uniqueness of the solution obtained through parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC), so the factors of the decomposition match up with the analytes. The three analytes were unequivocally identified by the correlation between the pure spectra and the PARAFAC excitation and emission spectral loadings. The recovery percentages found were, 82.6%, 112.7% and 84.4% for ANL, 2,4-TDA and 4,4'-MDA respectively. The proposed method was applied to carry out a migration test from polyamide cooking utensils, using a 3% (w/v) acetic acid in aqueous solution as food simulant. Detectable levels of 4,4'-MDA were found in food simulant from some of the investigated cooking utensils. Finally, a kinetic model for the migration of 4,4'-MDA has been fitted to experimental data obtained in the migration test. Thanks to the selectivity of PARAFAC calibration, which greatly simplifies sample treatment avoiding the use of toxic solvents, the developed method follows most green analytical chemistry principles.

  14. Basic residue at position 14 is not required for fast assembly and disassembly kinetics in neural cadherin.

    PubMed

    Vunnam, Nagamani; Hammer, Nathan I; Pedigo, Susan

    2015-01-27

    In spite of their structural similarities, epithelial (E-) and neural (N-) cadherin are expressed at different types of synapses and differ significantly in their dimerization kinetics. Recent studies proposed a transient intermediate in E-cadherin as the key requirement for rapid disassembly kinetics of the adhesive dimer. This E-cadherin intermediate comprises four intermolecular ionic and H-bonding interactions between adhesive partners. These interactions are not preserved in N-cadherin except for a basic residue at the 14th position, which could stabilize the intermediate through either H-bonding or ionic interactions with the partner protomer. To investigate the origin of the rapid dimerization kinetics of N-cadherin in the presence of calcium, studies reported here systematically test the role of ionic and H-bonding interactions in dimerization kinetics using R14S, R14A, and R14E mutants of N-cadherin. Analytical size-exclusion chromatographic and bead aggregation studies showed two primary results. First, N-cadherin/R14S and N-cadherin/R14A mutants showed fast assembly and disassembly kinetics in the calcium-saturated state similar to that of wild-type N-cadherin. These results indicate that the fast disassembly of the calcium-saturated dimer of N-cadherin does not require a basic residue at the 14th position. Second, the dimerization kinetics of N-cadherin/R14E were slow in the calcium-saturated state, indicating that negative charge destabilizes the intermediate state. Taken together, these results indicate that the basic residue at the 14th position does not promote rapid dimerization kinetics but that an acidic amino acid in that position significantly impairs dimerization kinetics.

  15. Kinetic and spectral properties of isovaleryl-CoA dehydrogenase and interaction with ligands.

    PubMed

    Mohsen, Al-Walid A; Vockley, Jerry

    2015-01-01

    Isovaleryl-CoA dehydrogenase (IVD) catalyzes the conversion of isovaleryl-CoA to 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA and the transfer of electrons to the electron transfer flavoprotein (ETF). Recombinant human IVD purifies with bound CoA-persulfide. A modified purification protocol was developed to isolate IVD without bound CoA-persulfide and to protect the protein thiols from oxidation. The CoA-persulfide-free IVD specific activity was 112.5 μmol porcine ETF min(-)(1) mg(-)(1), which was ∼20-fold higher than that of its CoA-persulfide bound form. The Km and catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) for isovaleryl-CoA were 1.0 μM and 4.3 × 10(6) M(-1) s(-1) per monomer, respectively, and its Km for ETF was 2.0 μM. Anaerobic titration of isovaleryl-CoA into an IVD solution resulted in a stable blue complex with increased absorbance at 310 nm, decreased absorbance at 373 and 447 nm, and the appearance of the charge transfer complex band at 584 nm. The apparent dissociation constant (KDapp) determined spectrally for isovaleryl-CoA was 0.54 μM. Isovaleryl-CoA, acetoacetyl-CoA, methylenecyclopropyl-acetyl-CoA, and ETF induced CD spectral changes at the 250-500 nm region while isobutyryl-CoA did not, suggesting conformational changes occur at the flavin ring that are ligand specific. Replacement of the IVD Trp166 with a Phe did not block IVD interaction with ETF, indicating that its indole ring is not essential for electron transfer to ETF. A twelve amino acid synthetic peptide that matches the sequence of the ETF docking peptide competitively inhibited the enzyme reaction when ETF was used as the electron acceptor with a Ki of 1.5 mM.

  16. Kinetic and Spectral Properties of Isovaleryl-CoA Dehydrogenase and Interaction with Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Mohsen, Al-Walid A.; Vockley, Jerry

    2014-01-01

    Isovaleryl-CoA dehydrogenase (IVD) catalyzes the conversion of isovaleryl-CoA to 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA and the transfer of electrons to the electron transfer flavoprotein (ETF). Recombinant human IVD purifies with bound CoA-persulfide. A modified purification protocol was developed to isolate IVD without bound CoA-persulfide and to protect the protein thiols from oxidation. The CoA-persulfide-free IVD specific activity was 112.5 µmol porcine ETF•min−1•mg−1, which was ~20-fold higher than that of its CoA-persulfide bound form. The Km and catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) for isovaleryl-CoA were 1.0 µM and 4.3 × 106•M−1•sec−1 per monomer, respectively, and its Km for ETF was 2.0 µM. Anaerobic titration of isovaleryl-CoA into an IVD solution resulted in a stable blue complex with increased absorbance at 310 nm, decreased absorbance at 373 and 447 nm, and the appearance of the charge transfer complex band at 584 nm. The apparent dissociation constant (KD app) determined spectrally for isovaleryl-CoA was 0.54 µM. Isovaleryl-CoA, acetoacetyl-CoA, methylenecyclopropylacetyl-CoA, and ETF induced CD spectral changes at the 250–500 nm region while isobutyryl-CoA did not, suggesting conformational changes occur at the flavin ring that are ligand specific. Replacement of the IVD Trp166 with a Phe did not block IVD interaction with ETF, indicating that its indole ring is not essential for electron transfer to ETF. A twelve amino acid synthetic peptide that matches the sequence of the ETF docking peptide competitively inhibited the enzyme reaction when ETF was used as the electron acceptor with a Ki of 1.5 mM. PMID:25450250

  17. Predicting properties of gas and solid streams by intrinsic kinetics of fast pyrolysis of wood

    DOE PAGES

    Klinger, Jordan; Bar-Ziv, Ezra; Shonnard, David; Westover, Tyler; Emerson, Rachel

    2015-12-12

    Pyrolysis has the potential to create a biocrude oil from biomass sources that can be used as fuel or as feedstock for subsequent upgrading to hydrocarbon fuels or other chemicals. The product distribution/composition, however, is linked to the biomass source. This work investigates the products formed from pyrolysis of woody biomass with a previously developed chemical kinetics model. Different woody feedstocks reported in prior literature are placed on a common basis (moisture, ash, fixed carbon free) and normalized by initial elemental composition through ultimate analysis. Observed product distributions over the full devolatilization range are explored, reconstructed by the model, andmore » verified with independent experimental data collected with a microwave-assisted pyrolysis system. These trends include production of permanent gas (CO, CO2), char, and condensable (oil, water) species. Elementary compositions of these streams are also investigated. As a result, close agreement between literature data, model predictions, and independent experimental data indicate that the proposed model/method is able to predict the ideal distribution from fast pyrolysis given reaction temperature, residence time, and feedstock composition.« less

  18. Predicting properties of gas and solid streams by intrinsic kinetics of fast pyrolysis of wood

    SciTech Connect

    Klinger, Jordan; Bar-Ziv, Ezra; Shonnard, David; Westover, Tyler; Emerson, Rachel

    2015-12-12

    Pyrolysis has the potential to create a biocrude oil from biomass sources that can be used as fuel or as feedstock for subsequent upgrading to hydrocarbon fuels or other chemicals. The product distribution/composition, however, is linked to the biomass source. This work investigates the products formed from pyrolysis of woody biomass with a previously developed chemical kinetics model. Different woody feedstocks reported in prior literature are placed on a common basis (moisture, ash, fixed carbon free) and normalized by initial elemental composition through ultimate analysis. Observed product distributions over the full devolatilization range are explored, reconstructed by the model, and verified with independent experimental data collected with a microwave-assisted pyrolysis system. These trends include production of permanent gas (CO, CO2), char, and condensable (oil, water) species. Elementary compositions of these streams are also investigated. As a result, close agreement between literature data, model predictions, and independent experimental data indicate that the proposed model/method is able to predict the ideal distribution from fast pyrolysis given reaction temperature, residence time, and feedstock composition.

  19. EPSP synthase: binding studies using isothermal titration microcalorimetry and equilibrium dialysis and their implications for ligand recognition and kinetic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ream, J E; Yuen, H K; Frazier, R B; Sikorski, J A

    1992-06-23

    Isothermal titration calorimetry measurements are reported which give important new binding constant (Kd) information for various substrate and inhibitor complexes of Escherichia coli EPSP synthase (EPSPS). The validity of this technique was first verified by determining Kd's for the known binary complex with the substrate, shikimate 3-phosphate (S3P), as well as the herbicidal ternary complex with S3P and glyphosate (EPSPS.S3P.glyphosate). The observed Kd's agreed very well with those from previous independently determined kinetic and fluorescence binding measurements. Further applications unequivocally demonstrate for the first time a fairly tight interaction between phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) and free enzyme (Kd = 390 microM) as well as a correspondingly weak affinity for glyphosate (Kd = 12 mM) alone with enzyme. The formation of the EPSPS.PEP binary complex was independently corroborated using equilibrium dialysis. These results strongly suggest that S3P synergizes glyphosate binding much more effectively than it does PEP binding. These observations add important new evidence to support the hypothesis that glyphosate acts as a transition-state analogue of PEP. However, the formation of a catalytically productive PEP binary complex is inconsistent with the previously reported compulsory binding order process required for catalysis and has led to new studies which completely revise the overall EPSPS kinetic mechanism. A previously postulated ternary complex between S3P and inorganic phosphate (EPSPS.S3P.Pi, Kd = 4 mM) was also detected for the first time. Quantitative binding enthalpies and entropies were also determined for each ligand complex from the microcalorimetry data. These values demonstrate a clear difference in thermodynamic parameters for recognition at the S3P site versus those observed for the PEP, Pi, and glyphosate sites.

  20. Saturation-Transfer Difference (STD) NMR: A Simple and Fast Method for Ligand Screening and Characterization of Protein Binding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viegas, Aldino; Manso, Joao; Nobrega, Franklin L.; Cabrita, Eurico J.

    2011-01-01

    Saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR has emerged as one of the most popular ligand-based NMR techniques for the study of protein-ligand interactions. The success of this technique is a consequence of its robustness and the fact that it is focused on the signals of the ligand, without any need of processing NMR information about the receptor…

  1. Diniobium inverted sandwich complexes with μ-η6:η6-arene ligands: synthesis, kinetics of formation, and electronic structure.

    PubMed

    Gianetti, Thomas L; Nocton, Grégory; Minasian, Stefan G; Tomson, Neil C; Kilcoyne, A L David; Kozimor, Stosh A; Shuh, David K; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Bergman, Robert G; Arnold, John

    2013-02-27

    Monometallic niobium arene complexes [Nb(BDI)(N(t)Bu)(R-C(6)H(5))] (2a: R = H and 2b: R = Me, BDI = N,N'-diisopropylbenzene-β-diketiminate) were synthesized and found to undergo slow conversion into the diniobium inverted arene sandwich complexes [[(BDI)Nb(N(t)Bu)](2)(μ-RC(6)H(5))] (7a: R = H and 7b: R = Me) in solution. The kinetics of this reaction were followed by (1)H NMR spectroscopy and are in agreement with a dissociative mechanism. Compounds 7a-b showed a lack of reactivity toward small molecules, even at elevated temperatures, which is unusual in the chemistry of inverted sandwich complexes. However, protonation of the BDI ligands occurred readily on treatment with [H(OEt(2))][B(C(6)F(5))(4)], resulting in the monoprotonated cationic inverted sandwich complex 8 [[(BDI(#))Nb(N(t)Bu)][(BDI)Nb(N(t)Bu)](μ-C(6)H(5))][B(C(6)F(5))(4)] and the dicationic complex 9 [[(BDI(#))Nb(N(t)Bu)](2)(μ-RC(6)H(5))][B(C(6)F(5))(4)](2) (BDI(#) = (ArNC(Me))(2)CH(2)). NMR, UV-vis, and X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopies were used to characterize this unique series of diamagnetic molecules as a means of determining how best to describe the Nb-arene interactions. The X-ray crystal structures, UV-vis spectra, arene (1)H NMR chemical shifts, and large J(CH) coupling constants provide evidence for donation of electron density from the Nb d-orbitals into the antibonding π system of the arene ligands. However, Nb L(3,2)-edge XANES spectra and the lack of sp(3) hybridization of the arene carbons indicate that the Nb → arene donation is not accompanied by an increase in Nb formal oxidation state and suggests that 4d(2) electronic configurations are appropriate to describe the Nb atoms in all four complexes.

  2. Effects of organic ligands and temperature variations on the kinetics of olivine carbonation and the formation of associated secondary phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sissmann, O.; Daval, D.; Martinez, I.; Brunet, F.; Verlaguet, A.; Pinquier, Y.; Guyot, F. J.

    2011-12-01

    The slow dissolution kinetics of Mg-rich silicates has become a critical issue for the geologic CO2 sequestration in basic rocks. Previous batch carbonation studies on San Carlos olivine [1] performed in CO2 saturated water (at 90°C and P CO2 = 280 bar) have focused on the role that secondary phases, such as amorphous silica layers (SiO2 (am)), have on the transport of reactants from and to the reactive surfaces. The fluid composition remained roughly constant over the duration of the experiment, close to saturation with respect to amorphous silica and with a [Mg2+]/[SiO2 (aq)] ratio close to stoechiometric release, suggesting a passivation of the olivine surface by the silica layer. In order to accelerate the dissolution process, organic ligands such as citrate and acetate were added to the solutions and tested at 1M and 0.1M concentrations in similar batch experiments. An intrinsic increase of the dissolution rate of olivine was expected [2], [3] prior to the formation of a passivating silica layer. Preliminary results confirm this idea since Mg was released in non-stoechimoetric proportions with respect to SiO2 (aq) (found to be in equilibrium with SiO2 (am)). Similarly, a slight increase of temperature (from 90°C to 120°C) accelerated the reaction kinetics as well, possibly impacting the textural properties of SiO2 (am). Current TEM investigations are directed to confirming a possible link between the observed increase of the rate and textural properties of secondary phases. In addition, because carbonate minerals have a retrograde solubility, thermodynamical modelling suggests that this temperature increase should allow the fluid to reach saturation with respect to carbonates before reaching saturation with respect to SiO2 (am). Enough Mg can therefore be released to initiate the formation of carbonates before the silica precipitates and passivates the olivine surface. [1] Daval et al (2011), Chemical Geology, v.284, p.193-209 [2] Grandstaff, D.E. (1986) In

  3. Dependence of cancer cell adhesion kinetics on integrin ligand surface density measured by a high-throughput label-free resonant waveguide grating biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orgovan, Norbert; Peter, Beatrix; Bősze, Szilvia; Ramsden, Jeremy J.; Szabó, Bálint; Horvath, Robert

    2014-02-01

    A novel high-throughput label-free resonant waveguide grating (RWG) imager biosensor, the Epic® BenchTop (BT), was utilized to determine the dependence of cell spreading kinetics on the average surface density (vRGD) of integrin ligand RGD-motifs. vRGD was tuned over four orders of magnitude by co-adsorbing the biologically inactive PLL-g-PEG and the RGD-functionalized PLL-g-PEG-RGD synthetic copolymers from their mixed solutions onto the sensor surface. Using highly adherent human cervical tumor (HeLa) cells as a model system, cell adhesion kinetic data of unprecedented quality were obtained. Spreading kinetics were fitted with the logistic equation to obtain the spreading rate constant (r) and the maximum biosensor response (Δλmax), which is assumed to be directly proportional to the maximum spread contact area (Amax). r was found to be independent of the surface density of integrin ligands. In contrast, Δλmax increased with increasing RGD surface density until saturation at high densities. Interpreting the latter behavior with a simple kinetic mass action model, a 2D dissociation constant of 1753 +/- 243 μm-2 (corresponding to a 3D dissociation constant of ~30 μM) was obtained for the binding between RGD-specific integrins embedded in the cell membrane and PLL-g-PEG-RGD. All of these results were obtained completely noninvasively without using any labels.

  4. Kinetic identification of protein ligands in a 51,200 small-molecule library using microarrays and a label-free ellipsometric scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, James P.; Proudian, Andrew P.; Malovichko, Galina; Zhu, Xiangdong

    2013-02-01

    Drug discovery begins by identifying protein-small molecule binding pairs. Afterwards, binding kinetics and biofunctional assays are performed, to reduce candidates for further development. High-throughput screening, typically employing fluorescence, is widely used to find protein ligands in small-molecule libraries, but is rarely used for binding kinetics measurement because: (1) attaching fluorophores to proteins can alter kinetics and (2) most label-free technologies for kinetics measurement are inherently low-throughput and consume expensive sensing surfaces. We addressed this need with polarization-modulated ellipsometric scanning microscopes, called oblique-incidence reflectivity difference (OI-RD). Label-free ligand screening and kinetics measurement are performed simultaneously on small-molecule microarrays printed on relatively inexpensive isocyanate-functionalized glass slides. As a microarray is reacted, an OI-RD microscope tracks the change in surface-bound macromolecule density in real-time at every spot. We report progress applying OI-RD to screen purified proteins and virus particles against a 51,200-compound library from the National Cancer Institute. Four microarrays, each containing 12,800 library compounds, are installed in four flow cells in an automated OI-RD microscope. The slides are reacted serially, each giving 12,800 binding curves with ~30 sec time resolution. The entire library is kinetically screened against a single probe in ~14 hours and multiple probes can be reacted sequentially under automation. Real-time binding detection identifies both high-affinity and low-affinity (transient binding) interactions; fluorescence endpoint images miss the latter. OI-RD and microarrays together is a powerful high-throughput tool for early stage drug discovery and development. The platform also has great potential for downstream steps such as in vitro inhibition assays.

  5. Structural basis for a hand-like site in the calcium sensor CatchER with fast kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ying; Reddish, Florence; Tang, Shen; Zhuo, You; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Yang, Jenny J.; Weber, Irene T.

    2013-12-01

    High-resolution crystal structures of the designed calcium sensor CatchER revealed snapshots of calcium and gadolinium ions binding within the designed site in agreement with its fast kinetics. Calcium ions, which are important signaling molecules, can be detected in the endoplasmic reticulum by an engineered mutant of green fluorescent protein (GFP) designated CatchER with a fast off-rate. High resolution (1.78–1.20 Å) crystal structures were analyzed for CatchER in the apo form and in complexes with calcium or gadolinium to probe the binding site for metal ions. While CatchER exhibits a 1:1 binding stoichiometry in solution, two positions were observed for each of the metal ions bound within the hand-like site formed by the carboxylate side chains of the mutated residues S147E, S202D, Q204E, F223E and T225E that may be responsible for its fast kinetic properties. Comparison of the structures of CatchER, wild-type GFP and enhanced GFP confirmed that different conformations of Thr203 and Glu222 are associated with the two forms of Tyr66 of the chromophore which are responsible for the absorbance wavelengths of the different proteins. Calcium binding to CatchER may shift the equilibrium for conformational population of the Glu222 side chain and lead to further changes in its optical properties.

  6. Probing the mechanism of purine nucleoside phosphorylase by steady-state kinetic studies and ligand binding characterization determined by fluorimetric titrations.

    PubMed

    Wielgus-Kutrowska, Beata; Bzowska, Agnieszka

    2006-05-01

    Reversible reaction catalyzed by trimeric purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) from Cellulomonas sp. with typical and non-typical substrates, including product inhibition patterns of both reaction directions, and interactions of the enzyme with bisubstrate analogue inhibitors, were investigated by the steady-state kinetic methods and fluorimetric titrations. The ligand chromophores exist most probably as neutral species, and not N(1)-H monoanions, in the complex with PNP, as shown by determination of inhibition constants vs. pH. This supports the mechanism in which hydrogen bond interaction of N(1)-H with Glu204 is crucial in the catalytic process. Stoichiometry of ligand binding, with possible exception of hypoxanthine, is three molecules per enzyme trimer. Kinetic experiments show that in principle the Michaelis-Menten model could not properly describe the reaction. However, this model seems to hold for certain experimental conditions. Data presented here are supported by earlier findings obtained by means of fluorimetric titrations and protective effects of ligands on thermal inactivation of the enzyme. All results are consistent with the following mechanism for trimeric PNPs: (i) random binding of substrates, (ii) potent binding and slow release of some reaction products leading to the circumstances that the chemical step is not the slowest one and that rapid-equilibrium assumptions do not hold, (iii) a dual role of phosphate--a substrate and also a reaction modifier.

  7. Physiologic growth hormone replacement improves fasting lipid kinetics in patients with HIV lipodystrophy syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    HIV lipodystrophy syndrome (HLS) is characterized by accelerated lipolysis, inadequate fat oxidation, increased hepatic reesterification, and a high frequency of growth hormone deficiency (GHD). The effect of growth hormone (GH) replacement on these lipid kinetic abnormalities is unknown. We aimed ...

  8. Compartmental analysis of (11C)flumazenil kinetics for the estimation of ligand transport rate and receptor distribution using positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Koeppe, R.A.; Holthoff, V.A.; Frey, K.A.; Kilbourn, M.R.; Kuhl, D.E. )

    1991-09-01

    The in vivo kinetic behavior of (11C)flumazenil ((11C)FMZ), a non-subtype-specific central benzodiazepine antagonist, is characterized using compartmental analysis with the aim of producing an optimized data acquisition protocol and tracer kinetic model configuration for the assessment of (11C)FMZ binding to benzodiazepine receptors (BZRs) in human brain. The approach presented is simple, requiring only a single radioligand injection. Dynamic positron emission tomography data were acquired on 18 normal volunteers using a 60- to 90-min sequence of scans and were analyzed with model configurations that included a three-compartment, four-parameter model, a three-compartment, three-parameter model, with a fixed value for free plus nonspecific binding; and a two-compartment, two-parameter model. Statistical analysis indicated that a four-parameter model did not yield significantly better fits than a three-parameter model. Goodness of fit was improved for three- versus two-parameter configurations in regions with low receptor density, but not in regions with moderate to high receptor density. Thus, a two-compartment, two-parameter configuration was found to adequately describe the kinetic behavior of (11C)FMZ in human brain, with stable estimates of the model parameters obtainable from as little as 20-30 min of data. Pixel-by-pixel analysis yields functional images of transport rate (K1) and ligand distribution volume (DV), and thus provides independent estimates of ligand delivery and BZR binding.

  9. Integrated kinetic simulation of laser-plasma interactions, fast-electron generation, and transport in fast ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Kemp, A. J.; Cohen, B. I.; Divol, L.

    2010-05-15

    We present new results on the physics of short-pulse laser-matter interaction of kilojoule-picosecond pulses at full spatial and temporal scale using a new approach that combines a three-dimensional collisional electromagnetic particle-in-cell code with a magnetohydrodynamic-hybrid model of high-density plasma. In the latter, collisions damp out plasma waves, and an Ohm's law with electron inertia effects neglected determines the electric field. In addition to yielding orders of magnitude in speed-up while avoiding numerical instabilities, this allows us to model the whole problem in a single unified framework: the laser-plasma interaction at subcritical densities, energy deposition at relativistic critical densities, and fast- electron transport in solid densities. Key questions such as the multipicosecond temporal evolution of the laser energy conversion into hot electrons, the impact of return currents on the laser-plasma interaction, and the effect of self-generated electric and magnetic fields on electron transport will be addressed. We will report applications to current experiments.

  10. Integrated Kinetic Simulation of Laser-Plasma Interactions, Fast-Electron Generation and Transport in Fast Ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Kemp, A; Cohen, B; Divol, L

    2009-11-16

    We present new results on the physics of short-pulse laser-matter interaction of kilojoule-picosecond pulses at full spatial and temporal scale, using a new approach that combines a 3D collisional electromagnetic Particle-in-Cell code with an MHD-hybrid model of high-density plasma. In the latter, collisions damp out plasma waves, and an Ohm's law with electron inertia effects neglected determines the electric field. In addition to yielding orders of magnitude in speed-up while avoiding numerical instabilities, this allows us to model the whole problem in a single unified framework: the laser-plasma interaction at sub-critical densities, energy deposition at relativistic critical densities, and fast-electron transport in solid densities. Key questions such as the multi-picosecond temporal evolution of the laser energy conversion into hot electrons, the impact of return currents on the laser-plasma interaction, and the effect of self-generated electric and magnetic fields on electron transport will be addressed. We will report applications to current experiments.

  11. Effects of fasting and semistarvation on the kinetics of active and passive sugar absorption across the small intestine in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Debnam, E S; Levin, R J

    1975-01-01

    The effects of dietary restriction on the kinetics of absorption in vivo of glucose, galactose and alpha-methyl glucoside were assessed by electrical and chemical methods in the rat jejunum. 2. The 'apparent Km', maximum absorption or Vmax (mu-mole/10 cm. 15 min) and maximum potential difference (p.d.max) were obtained for the jejunal electrogenic active transfer mechanism from the transfer p.d.s and the chemical absorption data corrected for diffusion using various graphical kinetic plots. 3. Fasting for 3 days greatly decreased the 'apparent Kms', obtained from electrical or chemical data, for all the sugars but had no effect on those for L-valine or L-methionine. Semistarvation caused a less pronounced reduction of the 'apparent Kms' for the sugars. The dietary-induced change in 'apparent Km' for glucose was also observed in the fasted hamster. One interpretation of these changes is that the affinity of the carriers for sugars increases during dietary restriction; the greater the level of restriction the greater the increase. 4. Fasting and semistarvation caused large reductions in the Vmax. These reductions were correlated with a reduced enterocyte population estimated by changes in enterocyte column size. 5. The reduction in the Vmax for galactose was mainly accounted for by the decrease in enterocyte population. In the case of glucose, other factors such as reduced enterocyte metabolism or changes in the carriers must be involved to explain the discrepancy between the large decrease in Vmax and the enterocyte column size. 6. Fasting and semi-starvation had complex, differential actions on the p.d.max for glucose, galactose and alpha-methyl glucoside. These changes did not correlate with those observed in the Vmax measured chemically. 7. A standard diet obtained from two commercial sources was found to differ greatly in its effect on the electrogenic transfer system for alpha-methyl glucoside but had no effect on those for galactose and glucose. PMID:1206572

  12. Site specific ligand substitution in cubane-type Mo3FeS(4)(4+) clusters: kinetics and mechanism of reaction and isolation of mixed ligand Cl/SPh complexes.

    PubMed

    Algarra, Andrés G; Basallote, Manuel G; Fernandez-Trujillo, M J; Llusar, Rosa; Pino-Chamorro, Jose A; Sorribes, Ivan; Vicent, Cristian

    2010-04-21

    The synthesis, crystal structure and solution characterization of the cubane-type [Mo(3)(FeCl)S(4)(dmpe)(3)Cl(3)] (1) (dmpe = 1,2-bis(dimethylphophane-ethane)) cluster are reported and the ligand substitution processes of chloride by thiophenolate investigated. The kinetics and the intimate mechanism of these substitutions reveal that compound 1 undergoes a number of Fe and Mo site specific ligand substitution reactions in acetonitrile solutions. In particular, PhS(-) coordination at the tetrahedral Fe site proceeds in a single resolved kinetic step whereas such substitutions at the Mo sites proceed more slowly. The effect of the presence of acids in the reaction media is also investigated and reveals that an acid excess hinders substitution reactions both at the Fe and Mo sites; however, an acid-promoted solvolysis of the Fe-Cl bonds is observed. Electrospray ionization (ESI) and tandem (ESI-MS/MS) mass spectrometry allow the identification of all the reaction intermediates proposed on the basis of stopped-flow measurements. The distinctive site specific reactivity made it possible to isolate two new clusters of the Mo(3)FeS(4)(4+) family featuring mixed chlorine/thiophenolate ligands, namely Mo(3)S(4)(FeSPh)(dmpe)(3)Cl(3) (2) and [Mo(3)S(4)(FeSPh)(dmpe)(3)(SPh)(3)] (3). A detailed computational study has also been carried out to understand the details of the mechanism of substitution at the M-Cl (M = Mo and Fe) bonds as well as the solvolysis at the Fe-Cl sites, with particular emphasis on the role of acids on the substitution process. The results of the calculations are in agreement with the experimental observations, thus justifying the non-existence of an accelerating effect of acids on the thiophenolate substitution reaction, which differs from previous proposals for the Fe(4)S(4) and MoFe(3)S(4) clusters and some related compounds.

  13. A Simple and Fast Kinetic Assay for the Determination of Fructan Exohydrolase Activity in Perennial Ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.).

    PubMed

    Gasperl, Anna; Morvan-Bertrand, Annette; Prud'homme, Marie-Pascale; van der Graaff, Eric; Roitsch, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Despite the fact that fructans are the main constituent of water-soluble carbohydrates in forage grasses and cereal crops of temperate climates, little knowledge is available on the regulation of the enzymes involved in fructan metabolism. The analysis of enzyme activities involved in this process has been hampered by the low affinity of the fructan enzymes for sucrose and fructans used as fructosyl donor. Further, the analysis of fructan composition and enzyme activities is restricted to specialized labs with access to suited HPLC equipment and appropriate fructan standards. The degradation of fructan polymers with high degree of polymerization (DP) by fructan exohydrolases (FEHs) to fructosyloligomers is important to liberate energy in the form of fructan, but also under conditions where the generation of low DP polymers is required. Based on published protocols employing enzyme coupled endpoint reactions in single cuvettes, we developed a simple and fast kinetic 1-FEH assay. This assay can be performed in multi-well plate format using plate readers to determine the activity of 1-FEH against 1-kestotriose, resulting in a significant time reduction. Kinetic assays allow an optimal and more precise determination of enzyme activities compared to endpoint assays, and enable to check the quality of any reaction with respect to linearity of the assay. The enzyme coupled kinetic 1-FEH assay was validated in a case study showing the expected increase in 1-FEH activity during cold treatment. This assay is cost effective and could be performed by any lab with access to a plate reader suited for kinetic measurements and readings at 340 nm, and is highly suited to assess temporal changes and relative differences in 1-FEH activities. Thus, this enzyme coupled kinetic 1-FEH assay is of high importance both to the field of basic fructan research and plant breeding.

  14. A Simple and Fast Kinetic Assay for the Determination of Fructan Exohydrolase Activity in Perennial Ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.)

    PubMed Central

    Gasperl, Anna; Morvan-Bertrand, Annette; Prud’homme, Marie-Pascale; Roitsch, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Despite the fact that fructans are the main constituent of water-soluble carbohydrates in forage grasses and cereal crops of temperate climates, little knowledge is available on the regulation of the enzymes involved in fructan metabolism. The analysis of enzyme activities involved in this process has been hampered by the low affinity of the fructan enzymes for sucrose and fructans used as fructosyl donor. Further, the analysis of fructan composition and enzyme activities is restricted to specialized labs with access to suited HPLC equipment and appropriate fructan standards. The degradation of fructan polymers with high degree of polymerization (DP) by fructan exohydrolases (FEHs) to fructosyloligomers is important to liberate energy in the form of fructan, but also under conditions where the generation of low DP polymers is required. Based on published protocols employing enzyme coupled endpoint reactions in single cuvettes, we developed a simple and fast kinetic 1-FEH assay. This assay can be performed in multi-well plate format using plate readers to determine the activity of 1-FEH against 1-kestotriose, resulting in a significant time reduction. Kinetic assays allow an optimal and more precise determination of enzyme activities compared to endpoint assays, and enable to check the quality of any reaction with respect to linearity of the assay. The enzyme coupled kinetic 1-FEH assay was validated in a case study showing the expected increase in 1-FEH activity during cold treatment. This assay is cost effective and could be performed by any lab with access to a plate reader suited for kinetic measurements and readings at 340 nm, and is highly suited to assess temporal changes and relative differences in 1-FEH activities. Thus, this enzyme coupled kinetic 1-FEH assay is of high importance both to the field of basic fructan research and plant breeding. PMID:26734049

  15. Kinetics of ligand binding to receptor immobilized in a polymer matrix, as detected with an evanescent wave biosensor. I. A computer simulation of the influence of mass transport.

    PubMed Central

    Schuck, P

    1996-01-01

    The influence of mass transport on ligand binding to receptor immobilized in a polymer matrix, as detected with an evanescent wave biosensor, was investigated. A one-dimensional computer model for the mass transport of ligand between the bulk solution and the polymer gel and within the gel was employed, and the influence of the diffusion coefficient, the partition coefficient, the thickness of the matrix, and the distribution of immobilized receptor were studied for a variety of conditions. Under conditions that may apply to many published experimental studies, diffusion within the matrix was found to decrease the overall ligand transport significantly. For relatively slow reactions, small spatial gradients of free and bound ligand in the gel are found, whereas for relatively rapid reactions strong inhomogeneities of ligand within the gel occur before establishment of equilibrium. Several types of deviations from ideal pseudo-first-order binding progress curves are described that resemble those of published experimental data. Extremely transport limited reactions can in some cases be fitted with apparently ideal binding progress curves, although with apparent reaction rates that are much lower than the true reaction rates. Nevertheless, the ratio of the apparent rate constants can be semiquantitatively consistent with the true equilibrium constant. Apparently "cooperative" binding can result from high chemical on rates at high receptor saturation. Dissociation in the presence of transport limitation was found to be well described empirically by a single or a double exponential, with both apparent rate constants considerably lower than the intrinsic chemical rate constant. Transport limitations in the gel can introduce many generally unknown factors into the binding progress curve. The simulations suggest that unexpected deviations from ideal binding progress curves may be due to highly transport influenced binding kinetics. The use of a thinner polymer matrix could

  16. Unchanged content of oxidative enzymes in fast-twitch muscle fibers and kinetics after intensified training in trained cyclists

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Peter M; Gunnarsson, Thomas P; Thomassen, Martin; Wilkerson, Daryl P; Nielsen, Jens Jung; Bangsbo, Jens

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined if high intensity training (HIT) could increase the expression of oxidative enzymes in fast-twitch muscle fibers causing a faster oxygen uptake () response during intense (INT), but not moderate (MOD), exercise and reduce the slow component and muscle metabolic perturbation during INT. Pulmonary kinetics was determined in eight trained male cyclists (-max: 59 ± 4 (means ± SD) mL min−1 kg−1) during MOD (205 ± 12 W ∼65% -max) and INT (286 ± 17 W ∼85% -max) exercise before and after a 7-week HIT period (30-sec sprints and 4-min intervals) with a 50% reduction in volume. Both before and after HIT the content in fast-twitch fibers of CS (P < 0.05) and COX-4 (P < 0.01) was lower, whereas PFK was higher (P < 0.001) than in slow-twitch fibers. Content of CS, COX-4, and PFK in homogenate and fast-twitch fibers was unchanged with HIT. Maximal activity (μmol g DW−1 min−1) of CS (56 ± 8 post-HIT vs. 59 ± 10 pre-HIT), HAD (27 ± 6 vs. 29 ± 3) and PFK (340 ± 69 vs. 318 ± 105) and the capillary to fiber ratio (2.30 ± 0.16 vs. 2.38 ± 0.20) was unaltered following HIT. kinetics was unchanged with HIT and the speed of the primary response did not differ between MOD and INT. Muscle creatine phosphate was lower (42 ± 15 vs. 66 ± 17 mmol kg DW−1) and muscle lactate was higher (40 ± 18 vs. 14 ± 5 mmol kg DW−1) at 6 min of INT (P < 0.05) after compared to before HIT. A period of intensified training with a volume reduction did not increase the content of oxidative enzymes in fast-twitch fibers, and did not change kinetics. PMID:26152692

  17. Development of a Fast Microfluidic Mixer for Studies of Protein Folding KineticsFinal Report Cover Page

    SciTech Connect

    Bakajin, O

    2005-02-10

    We designed and fabricated mixing devices that will help us elucidate the mechanisms of protein folding through measurements of folding reaction rates. These devices can be used in studying of other biological systems and are compatible with various spectroscopic observation methods. The project involved development of fabrication processes and setup of a laboratory for assembly and characterization of microfluidic devices, as well as measurements of protein folding kinetics. We produced three variants of the mixer: (1) The ultra fast mixer for Foerster Resonance Energy Transfer measurements (described by Anal. Chem. Article UCRL-JRNL-206676) and MicroTAS Conference Proceedings article (UCRL-JC-153057 ) included in the report; (2) The ultra fast mixer for UV measurements (described by the poster presented at MicroTAS conference (UCRL-POST-207476) included in the report); and (3) The mixer for single molecule measurements (described by the Science article UCRL-JC-153057) included in the report. In these mixers, the channels are narrow, ranging from a few to hundreds of {micro}m, so that the flow is laminar and all of the mixing is achieved through diffusion. Our goal is to develop robust microfluidic mixer with at least 100 times lower consumption rate, shorter dead time and time resolution than commercially available mixers that would be compatible with most commonly used spectroscopic methods. We are also developing mixers that can be used in combination with single molecule spectroscopy. The mixers are used to study kinetics of fast protein folding reactions using bulk fluorescence and single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer techniques. Capabilities for microfluidic have been developed at BSNL that will be useful for studies of interactions of DNA with proteins and other projects such as the single molecule detector for detection of low concentration of toxins.

  18. Kinetic spectroscopy of heme hydration and ligand binding in myoglobin and isolated hemoglobin chains: an optical window into heme pocket water dynamics.

    PubMed

    Esquerra, Raymond M; López-Peña, Ignacio; Tipgunlakant, Pooncharas; Birukou, Ivan; Nguyen, Rosa L; Soman, Jayashree; Olson, John S; Kliger, David S; Goldbeck, Robert A

    2010-09-21

    The entry of a water molecule into the distal heme pocket of pentacoordinate heme proteins such as myoglobin and the alpha,beta chains of hemoglobin can be detected by time-resolved spectroscopy in the heme visible bands after photolysis of the CO complex. Reviewing the evidence from spectrokinetic studies of Mb variants, we find that this optical method measures the occupancy of non(heme)coordinated water in the distal pocket, n(w), with high fidelity. This evidence further suggests that perturbation of the kinetic barrier presented by distal pocket water is often the dominant mechanism by which active site mutations affect the bimolecular rate constant for CO binding. Water entry into the heme pockets of isolated hemoglobin subunits was detected by optical methods. Internal hydration is higher in the native alpha chains than in the beta chains, in agreement with previous crystallographic results for the subunits within Hb tetramers. The kinetic parameters obtained from modeling of the water entry and ligand rebinding in Mb mutants and native Hb chains are consistent with an inverse dependence of the bimolecular association rate constant on the water occupancy factor. This correlation suggests that water and ligand mutually exclude one another from the distal pockets of both types of hemoglobin chains and myoglobin.

  19. Crystal structure of Clostridium thermocellum ribose-5-phosphate isomerase B reveals properties critical for fast enzyme kinetics.

    PubMed

    Jung, Junho; Kim, Jin-Kwang; Yeom, Soo-Jin; Ahn, Yeh-Jin; Oh, Deok-Kun; Kang, Lin-Woo

    2011-04-01

    Ribose-5-phosphate isomerase (Rpi) catalyzes the conversion of D-ribose 5-phosphate (R5P) to D-ribulose 5-phosphate, which is an important step in the non-oxidative pathway of the pentose phosphate pathway and the Calvin cycle of photosynthesis. Recently, Rpis have been used to produce valuable rare sugars for industrial purposes. Of the Rpis, D-ribose-5-phosphate isomerase B from Clostridium thermocellum (CtRpi) has the fastest reactions kinetics. While Thermotoga maritime Rpi (TmRpi) has the same substrate specificity as CtRpi, the overall activity of CtRpi is approximately 200-fold higher than that of TmRpi. To understand the structural basis of these kinetic differences, we determined the crystal structures, at 2.1-Å resolution or higher, of CtRpi alone and bound to its substrates, R5P, D-ribose, and D-allose. Structural comparisons of CtRpi and TmRpi showed overall conservation of their structures with two notable differences. First, the volume of the CtRpi substrate binding pocket (SBP) was 20% less than that of the TmRpi SBP. Second, the residues next to the sugar-ring opening catalytic residue (His98) were different. We switched the key residues, involved in SBP shaping or catalysis, between CtRpi and TmRpi by site-directed mutagenesis, and studied the enzyme kinetics of the mutants. We found that tight interactions between the two monomers, narrow SBP width, and the residues near the catalytic residue are all critical for the fast enzyme kinetics of CtRpi.

  20. Glycerol and NEFA kinetics in long-term fasting king penguins: phase II versus phase III.

    PubMed

    Bernard, S F; Fayolle, C; Robin, J-P; Groscolas, R

    2002-09-01

    In spontaneously fasting birds such as penguins, below a body mass threshold corresponding to the phase II-phase III transition, a metabolic and hormonal shift occurs and feeding behaviour is stimulated ('refeeding signal'). The major aim of this study was to determine whether a decrease in non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) release from adipose tissue could be a component of this signal. Lipolytic fluxes and primary triacylglycerol:fatty acid (TAG:FA) cycling were determined in vivo in breeding, fasting king penguins (Aptenodytes patagonicus) using continuous infusions of 2-[3H]glycerol and 1-[14C]palmitate under field conditions. In phase II (after approximately 8 days of fasting, large fat stores, body protein spared, N=8), the rate of appearance (R(a)) of glycerol and of NEFA were 5.7+/-0.8 and 10.5+/-0.4 micromol kg(-1) min(-1), respectively, and the percentage of primary TAG:FA cycling was 41+/-7%. In phase III (after approximately 25 days of fasting, fat stores reduced by fourfold, increased body protein catabolism, N=9), R(a) glycerol kg(-1) body mass remained unchanged, whereas R(a) glycerol kg(-1) fat mass and R(a) NEFA kg(-1) body mass were increased by 2.8-fold and 1.5-fold, respectively. Increased R(a) glycerol kg(-1) fat mass was possibly the result of a 3.5-fold increase in circulating glucagon, the increased R(a) NEFA kg(-1) body mass being attributable to decreased primary TAG:FA cycling. Thus, triggering of the refeeding signal that redirects the behavior of fasting, incubating penguins from incubation towards the search for food after entrance into phase III cannot be ascribed to a reduction in lipolytic fluxes and NEFA availability. PMID:12151380

  1. Fasting and refeeding: cell kinetic response of jejunum, ileum and colon.

    PubMed

    Hagemann, R F; Stragand, J J

    1977-01-01

    Following a period of fasting, feeding a normal diet results in a burst of DNA synthesis in the crypts of the colonic epithelium. This is due largely to a prompt entry of cells, blocked in G1, into S. Peak levels of S cellularity exceed 4 times the fasting, and 2 times the normal fed control values. Refeeding a low residue diet (soluble casien, glucose and corn oil) results in a return to control levels of proliferative activity, but no hyperplasia. However, in jejunum and ileum, refeeding is followed by a return to near control levels of proliferation with only a slight overshoot in S phase cellularity. During the fasting period, the ileal crypt proliferative compartment (Pc-zone) and total crypt cellularity decline significantly. These changes are accompanied by an increase in the total cycle time, due to an equivalent lengthening of the G1 and S phase. Following refeeding, there is a reduction in the cycle time and a gradual return to the control values for the Pc-zone size and cellularity. In the colon, fasting has no effect on the Pc-zone size or total crypt cellularity. There is an approximate doubling of the cycle time due solely to an increase in G1. Following refeeding there is an increase in the Pc-zone size and crypt cellularity and a marked shortening of the cycle time. Evidence that a G1 cycle blockade is induced in the colon by fasting is given by a lenghening of the G1 period and by stathmokinetic studies employing vincristine.

  2. Mg-based nanocomposites with high capacity and fast kinetics for hydrogen storage.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xiangdong; Wu, Chengzhang; Du, Aijun; Lu, Gao Qing; Cheng, Huiming; Smith, Sean C; Zou, Jin; He, Yinghe

    2006-06-22

    Magnesium and its alloys have shown a great potential in effective hydrogen storage due to their advantages of high volumetric/gravimetric hydrogen storage capacity and low cost. However, the use of these materials in fuel cells for automotive applications at the present time is limited by high hydrogenation temperature and sluggish sorption kinetics. This paper presents the recent results of design and development of magnesium-based nanocomposites demonstrating the catalytic effects of carbon nanotubes and transition metals on hydrogen adsorption in these materials. The results are promising for the application of magnesium materials for hydrogen storage, with significantly reduced absorption temperatures and enhanced ab/desorption kinetics. High level Density Functional Theory calculations support the analysis of the hydrogenation mechanisms by revealing the detailed atomic and molecular interactions that underpin the catalytic roles of incorporated carbon and titanium, providing clear guidance for further design and development of such materials with better hydrogen storage properties.

  3. Competitive binding-based optical DNA mapping for fast identification of bacteria--multi-ligand transfer matrix theory and experimental applications on Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Adam N; Emilsson, Gustav; Nyberg, Lena K; Noble, Charleston; Stadler, Liselott Svensson; Fritzsche, Joachim; Moore, Edward R B; Tegenfeldt, Jonas O; Ambjörnsson, Tobias; Westerlund, Fredrik

    2014-09-01

    We demonstrate a single DNA molecule optical mapping assay able to resolve a specific Escherichia coli strain from other strains. The assay is based on competitive binding of the fluorescent dye YOYO-1 and the AT-specific antibiotic netropsin. The optical map is visualized by stretching the DNA molecules in nanofluidic channels. We optimize the experimental conditions to obtain reproducible barcodes containing as much information as possible. We implement a multi-ligand transfer matrix method for calculating theoretical barcodes from known DNA sequences. Our method extends previous theoretical approaches for competitive binding of two types of ligands to many types of ligands and introduces a recursive approach that allows long barcodes to be calculated with standard computer floating point formats. The identification of a specific E. coli strain (CCUG 10979) is based on mapping of 50-160 kilobasepair experimental DNA fragments onto the theoretical genome using the developed theory. Our identification protocol introduces two theoretical constructs: a P-value for a best experiment-theory match and an information score threshold. The developed methods provide a novel optical mapping toolbox for identification of bacterial species and strains. The protocol does not require cultivation of bacteria or DNA amplification, which allows for ultra-fast identification of bacterial pathogens.

  4. ERENA: A fast and robust Jacobian-free integration method for ordinary differential equations of chemical kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morii, Youhi; Terashima, Hiroshi; Koshi, Mitsuo; Shimizu, Taro; Shima, Eiji

    2016-10-01

    We herein propose a fast and robust Jacobian-free time integration method named as the extended robustness-enhanced numerical algorithm (ERENA) to treat the stiff ordinary differential equations (ODEs) of chemical kinetics. The formulation of ERENA is based on an exact solution of a quasi-steady-state approximation that is optimized to preserve the mass conservation law through use of a Lagrange multiplier method. ERENA exhibits higher accuracy and faster performance in homogeneous ignition simulations compared to existing popular explicit and implicit methods for stiff ODEs such as VODE, MTS, and CHEMEQ2. We investigate the effects of user-specified threshold values in ERENA, to provide trade-off information between the accuracy and the computational cost.

  5. CO and O2 Binding to Pseudo-Tetradentate Ligand-Copper(I)-Complexes with a Variable N-Donor Moiety: Kinetic/Thermodynamic Investigation Reveals Ligand Induced Changes in Reaction Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Heather R.; Meyer, Gerald J.; Karlin, Kenneth D.

    2010-01-01

    The kinetics, thermodynamics, and coordination dynamics for O2 and CO 1:1 binding to a series of pseudo-tetradentate ligand-copper(I)-complexes (DLCuI) to give CuI/O2 and CuI/CO product species are reported. The DLCuI series possess an identical tridentate core structure where the cuprous ion binds to the bispicolylamine (L) fragment. DL also contains a fourth variable N-donor moiety {D = benzyl (Bz); pyridyl (Py); imidazolyl (Im); dimethylamino (NMe2-); tert-butylphenyl pyridyl (TBP); quinolyl (Q)}. The structural characteristics of DLCuI-CO and DLCuI are detailed, with X-ray crystal structures reported for TBPLCuI-CO, BzLCuI-CO, and QLCuI. Infrared studies (solution and solid-state) confirm that DLCuI-CO possess the same four-coordinate core structure in solution with the variable D moiety ‘dangling’, i.e. not coordinated to the copper(I) ion. Other trends observed for the present series appear to derive from the degree to which the D-group interacts with the cuprous ion center. Electrochemical studies reveal close similarities of behavior for ImLCuI and NMe2LCuI (as well as for TBPLCuI and QLCuI), which relate to the O2-binding kinetics and thermodynamics. Equilibrium CO binding data (KCO, ΔH°, ΔS°) were obtained by conducting UV-visible spectrophotometric CO titrations, while CO binding kinetics and thermodynamics (kCO ; ΔH‡, ΔS‡) were measured through variable temperature (193 K – 293 K) transient absorbance laser flash photolysis experiments, λex = 355 nm. Carbon monoxide dissociation rate constants (k−CO) and corresponding activation parameters (ΔH‡, ΔS‡) have also been obtained. CO binding to DLCuI follows an associative mechanism with the increased donation from D leading to higher kCO values. Unlike that seen in previous work, the KCO values increased as the kCO and k−CO values declines; the latter decreased at a faster rate. By using the ‘flash-and-trap’ method (λex = 355 nm ; 188 K – 218 K), the kinetics and

  6. Fast, Kinetically self-consistent simulation of RF modulated plasma boundary sheaths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shihab, Mohammed; Brinkmann, Ralf Peter

    2012-10-01

    A mathematical model is presented which enables the efficent, kinetically self-consistent simulation of RF modulated plasma boundary sheaths in all technically relevant discharge regimes. The model consists of a set of kinetic equations for the ions, Boltzmann's relation for the electrons and Poisson's equation for the electrical field. Boundary conditions specify the ion flux at a point deep in the bulk and a periodically modulated sheath voltage or sheath charge. The equations are solved in a statistical sense. However, it is not the well-known particle-in-cell (PIC) scheme that is employed, but an alternative iterative algorithm termed ensemble-in-spacetime (EST). Three modules are called in a sequence: a Monte Carlo module, a harmonic analysis module, and a field module. The iteration is started with the potential values of a self-consistent fluid model and terminates when the updates become sufficiently small, i.e. when self-consistency is achieved. A drastic reduction of the computational effort compared with PIC calculations is achieved. As a first application of the new model, the influence of ion inertia on the dynamics of a collisionless sheath is studied and a comparison of the simulated ion energy distribution with published analytical solutions is performed.

  7. Fast kinetics of thiolic self-assembled monolayer adsorption on gold: modeling and confirmation by protein binding.

    PubMed

    Asiaei, Sasan; Nieva, Patricia; Vijayan, Mathilakath M

    2014-11-26

    This study presents an improved kinetics for the formation of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of thiols on gold substrates. Based on predictions of a computational model developed to study the SAM growth kinetics, SAMs of 11-mercaptoinic acid and 1-octanethiol were successfully formed for the first time within 15 min by incubation of planar gold chips in a 10 mM solution of thiols in pure ethanol. The performance of this new rapid SAM formation protocol is compared to the conventional 24 h incubation protocol by evaluating the binding capacity of a fluorescent-labeled antibody to the SAM samples prepared using both protocols. Tetramethylrhodamine conjugated polyclonal goat γ-globulin (IgG) was bound to all SAMs previously modified with 1-ethyl-3-(3-(dimethylamino)propyl)carbodiimide (EDC) to improve antibody immobilization. Resulting binding density of the fast SAM was evaluated using epifluorescence and atomic force microscopy (AFM) and found to be comparable with reported values in the literature using conventional 24 h protocols.

  8. Environmentally-friendly aqueous Li (or Na)-ion battery with fast electrode kinetics and super-long life.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xiaoli; Chen, Long; Liu, Jingyuan; Haller, Servane; Wang, Yonggang; Xia, Yongyao

    2016-01-01

    Current rechargeable batteries generally display limited cycle life and slow electrode kinetics and contain environmentally unfriendly components. Furthermore, their operation depends on the redox reactions of metal elements. We present an original battery system that depends on the redox of I(-)/I3 (-) couple in liquid cathode and the reversible enolization in polyimide anode, accompanied by Li(+) (or Na(+)) diffusion between cathode and anode through a Li(+)/Na(+) exchange polymer membrane. There are no metal element-based redox reactions in this battery, and Li(+) (or Na(+)) is only used for charge transfer. Moreover, the components (electrolyte/electrode) of this system are environment-friendly. Both electrodes are demonstrated to have very fast kinetics, which gives the battery a supercapacitor-like high power. It can even be cycled 50,000 times when operated within the electrochemical window of 0 to 1.6 V. Such a system might shed light on the design of high-safety and low-cost batteries for grid-scale energy storage.

  9. Environmentally-friendly aqueous Li (or Na)-ion battery with fast electrode kinetics and super-long life

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xiaoli; Chen, Long; Liu, Jingyuan; Haller, Servane; Wang, Yonggang; Xia, Yongyao

    2016-01-01

    Current rechargeable batteries generally display limited cycle life and slow electrode kinetics and contain environmentally unfriendly components. Furthermore, their operation depends on the redox reactions of metal elements. We present an original battery system that depends on the redox of I−/I3− couple in liquid cathode and the reversible enolization in polyimide anode, accompanied by Li+ (or Na+) diffusion between cathode and anode through a Li+/Na+ exchange polymer membrane. There are no metal element–based redox reactions in this battery, and Li+ (or Na+) is only used for charge transfer. Moreover, the components (electrolyte/electrode) of this system are environment-friendly. Both electrodes are demonstrated to have very fast kinetics, which gives the battery a supercapacitor-like high power. It can even be cycled 50,000 times when operated within the electrochemical window of 0 to 1.6 V. Such a system might shed light on the design of high-safety and low-cost batteries for grid-scale energy storage. PMID:26844298

  10. Compartmental analysis of technetium-99m-teboroxime kinetics employing fast dynamic SPECT at rest and stress

    SciTech Connect

    Chiao, P.C.; Ficaro, E.P.; Dayaniki, F.

    1994-08-01

    The authors have examined the feasibility of compartmental analysis of {sup 99m}Tc-teboroxime kinetics in measuring physiological changes in response to adenosine-induced coronary vasodilation. To evaluate the effect of tracer recirculation on {sup 99m}Tc-teboroxime kinetics in the myocardium, they also compared compartmental analysis with washout analysis (monoexponertial fitting), which does not account for this effect. Eight healthy male volunteers were imaged using fast dynamic SPECT protocols (5 sec per tomographic image) at rest and during adenosine infusion. A two-compartment model was used and compartmental parameters K1 and k2 (characterizing the diffusion of {sup 99m}Tc-teboroxime from the blood to the myocardium and from the myocardium to the blood, respectively) were fitted from myocardial time-activity curves and left ventricular input functions. Both K1 and washout estimates for the whole left ventricular myocardium changed significantly in response to coronary vasodilation. Mean stress-to-rest (S/R) ratios were almost two times higher for K1 (S/R = 2.7 {plus_minus} 1.1) than for washout estimates (S/R = 1.5 {plus_minus} 0.3). Estimation of K1 for all local regions, except the septal wall, is feasible because variations in K1 estimates for all local regions, except the septum during stress, are comparable with those for the global region. The authors conclude that quantitative compartmental analysis of {sup 99m}Tc-teboroxime kinetics provides a sensitive indicator for changes in response to adenosine-induced coronary vasodilation. 39 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  11. PLASMA EFFECTS ON FAST PAIR BEAMS. II. REACTIVE VERSUS KINETIC INSTABILITY OF PARALLEL ELECTROSTATIC WAVES

    SciTech Connect

    Schlickeiser, R.; Krakau, S.; Supsar, M. E-mail: steffen.krakau@rub.de

    2013-11-01

    The interaction of TeV gamma-rays from distant blazars with the extragalactic background light produces relativistic electron-positron pair beams by the photon-photon annihilation process. Using the linear instability analysis in the kinetic limit, which properly accounts for the longitudinal and the small but finite perpendicular momentum spread in the pair momentum distribution function, the growth rate of parallel propagating electrostatic oscillations in the intergalactic medium is calculated. Contrary to the claims of Miniati and Elyiv, we find that neither the longitudinal nor the perpendicular spread in the relativistic pair distribution function significantly affect the electrostatic growth rates. The maximum kinetic growth rate for no perpendicular spread is even about an order of magnitude greater than the corresponding reactive maximum growth rate. The reduction factors in the maximum growth rate due to the finite perpendicular spread in the pair distribution function are tiny and always less than 10{sup –4}. We confirm earlier conclusions by Broderick et al. and our group that the created pair beam distribution function is quickly unstable in the unmagnetized intergalactic medium. Therefore, there is no need to require the existence of small intergalactic magnetic fields to scatter the produced pairs, so that the explanation (made by several authors) for the Fermi non-detection of the inverse Compton scattered GeV gamma-rays by a finite deflecting intergalactic magnetic field is not necessary. In particular, the various derived lower bounds for the intergalactic magnetic fields are invalid due to the pair beam instability argument.

  12. Effect of pH and organic ligands on the kinetics of smectite dissolution at 25 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubev, Sergey V.; Bauer, Andreas; Pokrovsky, Oleg S.

    2006-09-01

    Forward dissolution rates of Na-Montmorillonite (Wyoming) SWy-2 smectite (Ca 0.06Na 0.56)[Al 3.08Fe(III) 0.38Mg 0.54] [Si 7.93 Al 0.07]O 20(OH) 4 were measured at 25 °C in a mixed-flow reactor equipped with interior dialysis compartment (6-8 kDa membrane) as a function of pH (1-12), dissolved carbonate (0.5-10 mM), phosphate (10 -5 to 0.03 M), and nine organic ligands (acetate, oxalate, citrate, EDTA, alginate, glucuronic acid, 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid, gluconate, and glucosamine) in the concentration range from 10 -5 to 0.03 M. In organic-free solutions, the Si-based rates decrease with increasing pH at 1 ⩽ pH ⩽ 8 with a slope close to -0.2. At 9 ⩽ pH ⩽ 12, the Si-based rates increase with a slope of ˜0.3. In contrast, non-stoichiometric Mg release weakly depends on pH at 1 ⩽ pH ⩽ 12 and decreases with increasing pH. The empirical expression describing Si-release rates [ R, mol/cm 2/s] obtained in the present study at 25 °C, I = 0.01 M is given by R=2.2·10-17·aH0.21+1.0·10-20+6·10-17·aOH0.33 At circum-neutral pH, the Si-release-based dissolution is promoted by the addition of the following ligands ranked by decreasing effectiveness: EDTA > 3,4-DHBA > citrate ⩾ oxalate. Phosphate, glucuronate, glucosamine, gluconate, alginate, and acetate act as inhibitors of dissolution and HCO 3-, CO 32- exhibit no effect on dissolution rate. Non-stoichiometric, non-steady-state Mg release was very weakly affected by the presence of ligands. Analysis of reacted solid products using XRD, FT-IR, and XPS revealed no major change in structure, surface chemical composition or specific surface area as a function of pH, ligand concentration, and duration of experiments. Ligand-affected rates re-calculated to constant pH were interpreted using a phenomenological equation which postulates the Langmurian adsorption of a ligand on surface sites. Overall, results of this study demonstrate that very high concentrations (0.001-0.01 M) of organic ligands, whether they are

  13. Fast and slow crystal growth kinetics in glass-forming melts.

    PubMed

    Orava, J; Greer, A L

    2014-06-01

    Published values of crystal growth rates are compared for supercooled glass-forming liquids undergoing congruent freezing at a planar crystal-liquid interface. For the purposes of comparison pure metals are considered to be glass-forming systems, using data from molecular-dynamics simulations. For each system, the growth rate has a maximum value U(max) at a temperature T(max) that lies between the glass-transition temperature T(g) and the melting temperature T(m). A classification is suggested, based on the lability (specifically, the propensity for fast crystallization), of the liquid. High-lability systems show "fast" growth characterized by a high U(max), a low T(max)/T(m), and a very broad peak in U vs. T/T(m). In contrast, systems showing "slow" growth have a low U(max), a high T(max)/T(m), and a sharp peak in U vs. T/T(m). Despite the difference of more than 11 orders of magnitude in U(max) seen in pure metals and in silica, the range of glass-forming systems surveyed fit into a common pattern in which the lability increases with lower reduced glass-transition temperature (T(g)/T(m)) and higher fragility of the liquid. A single parameter, a linear combination of T(g)/T(m) and fragility, can show a good correlation with U(max). For all the systems, growth at U(max) is coupled to the atomic/molecular mobility in the liquid. It is found that, across the diversity of glass-forming systems, T(max)/T(g) = 1.48 ± 0.15. PMID:24908023

  14. Computational studies of the first order kinetic reactions for mononuclear copper(II) complexes having a hard-soft NS donor ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaky, R. R.; Yousef, T. A.; Abdelghany, A. M.

    2014-09-01

    The chelation behaviour of 4-((E)-2-(1-(thiophen-2-yl)ethylidene)hydrazinyl)-1-(4-methoxyphenyl)-1H-pyrrole-3-carbonitrile (HL) towards Cu(II) ions has been investigated. These Cu(II) complexes are characterized by elemental analyses, molar-solid conductance, ESR, FTIR and electronic spectral studies. Also, the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters (Ea, A, ΔH, ΔS, ΔG) for all thermal decomposition steps have been evaluated using Coats-Redfern and Horowitz-Metzger methods. Furthermore, antimicrobial activity of the ligand and its complexes were studied against Gram-negative bacteria: Escherichia coli, Gram-positive Bacillus cereus, Bacillus subtilis and pathogenic fungi Pseudomonas aeruginosa by using minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) method.

  15. Fast, kinetically self-consistent simulation of RF modulated plasma boundary sheaths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shihab, Mohammed; Ziegler, Dennis; Brinkmann, Ralf Peter

    2012-05-01

    A mathematical model is presented which enables the efficient, kinetically self-consistent simulation of RF modulated plasma boundary sheaths in all technically relevant discharge regimes. It is defined on a one-dimensional geometry where a Cartesian x-axis points from the electrode or wall at xE ≡ 0 towards the plasma bulk. An arbitrary endpoint xB is chosen ‘deep in the bulk’. The model consists of a set of kinetic equations for the ions, Boltzmann's relation for the electrons and Poisson's equation for the electrical field. Boundary conditions specify the ion flux at xB and a periodically—not necessarily harmonically—modulated sheath voltage V(t) or sheath charge Q(t). The equations are solved in a statistical sense. However, it is not the well-known particle-in-cell (PIC) scheme that is employed, but an alternative iterative algorithm termed ensemble-in-spacetime (EST). The basis of the scheme is a discretization of the spacetime, the product of the domain [xE, xB] and the RF period [0, T]. Three modules are called in a sequence. A Monte Carlo module calculates the trajectories of a large set of ions from their start at xB until they reach the electrode at xE, utilizing the potential values on the nodes of the spatio-temporal grid. A harmonic analysis module reconstructs the Fourier modes nim(x) of the ion density ni(x, t) from the calculated trajectories. A field module finally solves the Boltzmann-Poisson equation with the calculated ion densities to generate an updated set of potential values for the spatio-temporal grid. The iteration is started with the potential values of a self-consistent fluid model and terminates when the updates become sufficiently small, i.e. when self-consistency is achieved. A subsequent post-processing determines important quantities, in particular the phase-resolved and phase-averaged values of the ion energy and angular distributions and the total energy flux at the electrode. A drastic reduction of the computational

  16. Recombinant Escherichia coli GMP reductase: kinetic, catalytic and chemical mechanisms, and thermodynamics of enzyme-ligand binary complex formation.

    PubMed

    Martinelli, Leonardo Krás Borges; Ducati, Rodrigo Gay; Rosado, Leonardo Astolfi; Breda, Ardala; Selbach, Bruna Pelegrim; Santos, Diógenes Santiago; Basso, Luiz Augusto

    2011-04-01

    Guanosine monophosphate (GMP) reductase catalyzes the reductive deamination of GMP to inosine monophosphate (IMP). GMP reductase plays an important role in the conversion of nucleoside and nucleotide derivatives of guanine to adenine nucleotides. In addition, as a member of the purine salvage pathway, it also participates in the reutilization of free intracellular bases. Here we present cloning, expression and purification of Escherichia coli guaC-encoded GMP reductase to determine its kinetic mechanism, as well as chemical and thermodynamic features of this reaction. Initial velocity studies and isothermal titration calorimetry demonstrated that GMP reductase follows an ordered bi-bi kinetic mechanism, in which GMP binds first to the enzyme followed by NADPH binding, and NADP(+) dissociates first followed by IMP release. The isothermal titration calorimetry also showed that GMP and IMP binding are thermodynamically favorable processes. The pH-rate profiles showed groups with apparent pK values of 6.6 and 9.6 involved in catalysis, and pK values of 7.1 and 8.6 important to GMP binding, and a pK value of 6.2 important for NADPH binding. Primary deuterium kinetic isotope effects demonstrated that hydride transfer contributes to the rate-limiting step, whereas solvent kinetic isotope effects arise from a single protonic site that plays a modest role in catalysis. Multiple isotope effects suggest that protonation and hydride transfer steps take place in the same transition state, lending support to a concerted mechanism. Pre-steady-state kinetic data suggest that product release does not contribute to the rate-limiting step of the reaction catalyzed by E. coli GMP reductase.

  17. Linear and nonlinear thermodynamics of a kinetic heat engine with fast transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerino, Luca; Puglisi, Andrea; Vulpiani, Angelo

    2016-04-01

    We investigate a kinetic heat engine model composed of particles enclosed in a box where one side acts as a thermostat and the opposite side is a piston exerting a given pressure. Pressure and temperature are varied in a cyclical protocol of period τ : their relative excursions, δ and ɛ , respectively, constitute the thermodynamic forces dragging the system out of equilibrium. The analysis of the entropy production of the system allows us to define the conjugated fluxes, which are proportional to the extracted work and the consumed heat. In the limit of small δ and ɛ the fluxes are linear in the forces through a τ -dependent Onsager matrix whose off-diagonal elements satisfy a reciprocal relation. The dynamics of the piston can be approximated, through a coarse-graining procedure, by a Klein-Kramers equation which—in the linear regime—yields analytic expressions for the Onsager coefficients and the entropy production. A study of the efficiency at maximum power shows that the Curzon-Ahlborn formula is always an upper limit which is approached at increasing values of the thermodynamic forces, i.e., outside of the linear regime. In all our analysis the adiabatic limit τ →∞ and the the small-force limit δ ,ɛ →0 are not directly related.

  18. BioRef II—Neutron reflectometry with relaxed resolution for fast, kinetic measurements at HZB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trapp, M.; Steitz, R.; Kreuzer, M.; Strobl, M.; Rose, M.; Dahint, R.

    2016-10-01

    We present an upgrade to the time-of-flight neutron reflectometer BioRef at the research reactor BER II of the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie (HZB). Through the integration of an additional chopper into the existing setup, the available wavelength resolution is significantly extended. Now two distinct operation modes can be used: a high resolution mode with Δλ/λ ranging from 1% to 5%, which allows for the investigation of thick films up to 4000 Å, and a high flux mode with Δλ/λ = 7%-11%. In the high flux mode, reflectivity curves from 0.007 Å-1 to 0.2 Å-1 with three angular settings can be recorded in 7 min. For a single angular setting and its respective window in Q-space, a time resolution of even less than 4 min is reached. The different configurations are documented by respective measurements (a) on a Ni-Ti multilayer and (b) the swelling kinetics of a solid-supported phospholipid coating upon incubation in a polyelectrolyte solution.

  19. Ultrasonic relaxation and fast chemical kinetics of some carbohydrate aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Behrends, R. |; Cowman, M.K.; Majewski, J.; Petrucci, S.; Eggers, F.; Richmann, K.H.; Eyring, E.M.; Riech, M.; Kaatze, U.

    1997-03-05

    Molecular relaxation properties of the monosaccharides (a) D-glucose, (b) methyl {beta}-D-glucopyranoside, (c) methyl {alpha}-D-mannopyranoside, (d) D-xylose, (e) D-arabinose, (f) methyl {beta}-D-xylopyranoside, (g) methyl {beta}-D-arabinopyranoside, (h) methyl {alpha}-L-(6-deoxy)mannopyranoside, and (i) 1,6-anhydro-{beta}-D-glucopyranoside, all in aqueous solution, have been studied using broad band ultrasonic spectrometry in the frequency range 0.2-2000 MHz. Ultrasonic excess absorption with relaxation characteristics near 80 MHz was found for glucose and the methyl glucosides of D-glucose and D-mannose, but no relaxation process was detected for the other monosaccharides in the same frequency range. From structural aspects it is deduced that the most likely process causing the observed relaxation is the rotation of the exocyclic -CH{sub 2}OH group, placing rotational isomerization on the nanosecond time scale. Relaxation parameters for D-glucose and methyl {beta}-D-glucopyranoside solutions were further investigated as a function of concentration and temperature, in order to confirm the assignment of the relaxation process, and to determine some of its thermodynamic and kinetic parameters. 19 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  20. A "stripping" ligand tactic for use with the kinetic locking-on strategy: its use in the resolution and bioaffinity chromatographic purification of NAD(+)-dependent dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    O'Flaherty, M; O'Carra, P; McMahon, M; Mulcahy, P

    1999-08-01

    The kinetic locking-on strategy utilizes soluble analogues of the target enzymes' specific substrate to promote selective adsorption of individual NAD(+)-dependent dehydrogenases on their complementary immobilized cofactor derivative. Application of this strategy to the purification of NAD(+)-dependent dehydrogenases from crude extracts has proven that it can yield bioaffinity systems capable of producing one-chromatographic-step purifications with yields approaching 100%. However, in some cases the purified enzyme preparation was found to be contaminated with other proteins weakly bound to the immobilized cofactor derivative through binary complex formation and/or nonspecific interactions, which continuously "dribbled" off the matrix during the chromatographic procedure. The fact that this problem can be overcome by including a short pulse of 5'-AMP (stripping ligand) in the irrigant a couple of column volumes prior to the discontinuation of the specific substrate analogue (locking-on ligand) is clear from the results presented in this report. The general effectiveness of this auxiliary tactic has been assessed using model studies and through incorporation into an actual purification from a crude cellular extract. The results confirm the usefulness of the stripping-ligand tactic for the resolution and purification of NAD(+)-dependent dehydrogenases when using the locking-on strategy. These studies have been carried out using bovine liver glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH, EC 1.4.1.3), yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH, EC 1.1.1.1), porcine heart mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase (mMDH, EC 1.1.1.37), and bovine heart L-lactate dehydrogenase (l-LDH, EC 1.1.1.27).

  1. A "stripping" ligand tactic for use with the kinetic locking-on strategy: its use in the resolution and bioaffinity chromatographic purification of NAD(+)-dependent dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    O'Flaherty, M; O'Carra, P; McMahon, M; Mulcahy, P

    1999-08-01

    The kinetic locking-on strategy utilizes soluble analogues of the target enzymes' specific substrate to promote selective adsorption of individual NAD(+)-dependent dehydrogenases on their complementary immobilized cofactor derivative. Application of this strategy to the purification of NAD(+)-dependent dehydrogenases from crude extracts has proven that it can yield bioaffinity systems capable of producing one-chromatographic-step purifications with yields approaching 100%. However, in some cases the purified enzyme preparation was found to be contaminated with other proteins weakly bound to the immobilized cofactor derivative through binary complex formation and/or nonspecific interactions, which continuously "dribbled" off the matrix during the chromatographic procedure. The fact that this problem can be overcome by including a short pulse of 5'-AMP (stripping ligand) in the irrigant a couple of column volumes prior to the discontinuation of the specific substrate analogue (locking-on ligand) is clear from the results presented in this report. The general effectiveness of this auxiliary tactic has been assessed using model studies and through incorporation into an actual purification from a crude cellular extract. The results confirm the usefulness of the stripping-ligand tactic for the resolution and purification of NAD(+)-dependent dehydrogenases when using the locking-on strategy. These studies have been carried out using bovine liver glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH, EC 1.4.1.3), yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH, EC 1.1.1.1), porcine heart mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase (mMDH, EC 1.1.1.37), and bovine heart L-lactate dehydrogenase (l-LDH, EC 1.1.1.27). PMID:10425164

  2. Kinetic analysis of binding interaction between the subgroup A Rous sarcoma virus glycoprotein SU and its cognate receptor Tva: calcium is not required for ligand binding.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xuemei; Wang, Qing-Yin; Guo, Ying; Dolmer, Klavs; Young, John A T; Gettins, Peter G W; Rong, Lijun

    2003-07-01

    Tva is the receptor for subgroup A Rous sarcoma virus, and it contains a single LDL-A module which is the site of virus interaction. In this study, we expressed the entire extracellular region of Tva (referred to as Ecto-Tva) as a GST fusion protein and characterized its refolding properties. We demonstrated that the correct folding of the Ecto-Tva protein, like that of the Tva LDL-A module, is calcium dependent. We used the IAsys system to measure the kinetics of binding between the surface (SU) subunit of the viral glycoprotein and Tva in real time. We found that the Ecto-Tva protein and the Tva LDL-A module displayed similar affinities for SU, providing direct evidence that the LDL-A module of Tva is the only viral interaction domain of the receptor. Furthermore, misfolded Tva proteins displayed lower binding affinities to SU, largely due to a decrease in their association rates, suggesting that a high association rate between SU and Tva is crucial for efficient virus-host interaction. Furthermore, we found that calcium did not influence the overall binding affinity between Tva and SU. These results indicate that, although calcium is important in facilitating correct folding of the LDL-A module of Tva, it is not essential for ligand binding. Thus, these results may have broad implications for the mechanism of protein folding and ligand recognition of the LDL receptor and other members of the LDL receptor superfamily.

  3. Coherent Events and Spectral Shape at Ion Kinetic Scales in the Fast Solar Wind Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lion, Sonny; Alexandrova, Olga; Zaslavsky, Arnaud

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we investigate spectral and phase coherence properties of magnetic fluctuations in the vicinity of the spectral transition from large, magnetohydrodynamic to sub-ion scales using in situ measurements of the Wind spacecraft in a fast stream. For the time interval investigated by Leamon et al. (1998) the phase coherence analysis shows the presence of sporadic quasi-parallel Alfvén ion cyclotron (AIC) waves as well as coherent structures in the form of large-amplitude, quasi-perpendicular Alfvén vortex-like structures and current sheets. These waves and structures importantly contribute to the observed power spectrum of magnetic fluctuations around ion scales; AIC waves contribute to the spectrum in a narrow frequency range whereas the coherent structures contribute to the spectrum over a wide frequency band from the inertial range to the sub-ion frequency range. We conclude that a particular combination of waves and coherent structures determines the spectral shape of the magnetic field spectrum around ion scales. This phenomenon provides a possible explanation for a high variability of the magnetic power spectra around ion scales observed in the solar wind.

  4. Fast and slow crystal growth kinetics in glass-forming melts

    SciTech Connect

    Orava, J.; Greer, A. L.

    2014-06-07

    Published values of crystal growth rates are compared for supercooled glass-forming liquids undergoing congruent freezing at a planar crystal-liquid interface. For the purposes of comparison pure metals are considered to be glass-forming systems, using data from molecular-dynamics simulations. For each system, the growth rate has a maximum value U{sub max} at a temperature T{sub max} that lies between the glass-transition temperature T{sub g} and the melting temperature T{sub m}. A classification is suggested, based on the lability (specifically, the propensity for fast crystallization), of the liquid. High-lability systems show “fast” growth characterized by a high U{sub max}, a low T{sub max} / T{sub m}, and a very broad peak in U vs. T / T{sub m}. In contrast, systems showing “slow” growth have a low U{sub max}, a high T{sub max} / T{sub m}, and a sharp peak in U vs. T / T{sub m}. Despite the difference of more than 11 orders of magnitude in U{sub max} seen in pure metals and in silica, the range of glass-forming systems surveyed fit into a common pattern in which the lability increases with lower reduced glass-transition temperature (T{sub g} / T{sub m}) and higher fragility of the liquid. A single parameter, a linear combination of T{sub g} / T{sub m} and fragility, can show a good correlation with U{sub max}. For all the systems, growth at U{sub max} is coupled to the atomic/molecular mobility in the liquid. It is found that, across the diversity of glass-forming systems, T{sub max} / T{sub g} = 1.48 ± 0.15.

  5. Equivalence of on-Lattice Stochastic Chemical Kinetics with the Well-Mixed Chemical Master Equation in the Limit of Fast Diffusion.

    PubMed

    Stamatakis, Michail; Vlachos, Dionisios G

    2011-12-14

    Well-mixed and lattice-based descriptions of stochastic chemical kinetics have been extensively used in the literature. Realizations of the corresponding stochastic processes are obtained by the Gillespie stochastic simulation algorithm and lattice kinetic Monte Carlo algorithms, respectively. However, the two frameworks have remained disconnected. We show the equivalence of these frameworks whereby the stochastic lattice kinetics reduces to effective well-mixed kinetics in the limit of fast diffusion. In the latter, the lattice structure appears implicitly, as the lumped rate of bimolecular reactions depends on the number of neighbors of a site on the lattice. Moreover, we propose a mapping between the stochastic propensities and the deterministic rates of the well-mixed vessel and lattice dynamics that illustrates the hierarchy of models and the key parameters that enable model reduction.

  6. Is macrocycle a synonym for kinetic inertness in Gd(III) complexes? Effect of coordinating and non-coordinating substituents on inertness and relaxivity of Gd(III) chelates with DO3A-like ligands

    PubMed Central

    Polasek, Miloslav; Caravan, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Gadolinium chelates with octadentate ligands are widely used as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), with macrocyclic ligands based on DO3A being preferred for the high kinetic inertness of their Gd chelates. A major challenge in the design of new bifunctional MRI probes is the need to control the rotational motion of the chelate, which greatly affects its relaxivity. In this work we explored facile alkylation of a secondary amine in macrocyclic DO3A-like ligands to create a short, achiral linkage to limit the undesired internal motion of chelates within larger molecular constructs. The acetate moiety on the trans nitrogen was also replaced with either a bidentate (ethoxyacetate, L1 or methyl picolinate, L2) or bulky monodentate (methyl phosphonate, L3) donor arm to give octa- or heptadentate ligands, respectively. The resultant Gd(III) complexes were all monohydrated (q = 1) and exhibited water residency times that spanned 2 orders of magnitude (τM = 2190 ± 170, 3500 ± 90 and 12.7 ± 3.8 ns at 37 °C for GdL1, GdL2 and GdL3 respectively). Alkylation of the secondary amine with a non-coordinating biphenyl moiety resulted in coordinatively saturated q = 0 complexes of octadentate ligands L1 and L2. Relaxivities were limited by slow water exchange and/or lack of water co-ligand. All complexes showed decreased inertness compared to [Gd(DO3A)] despite higher ligand denticity, and inertness was further decreased upon N-alkylation. These results demonstrate that high kinetic inertness and in vivo safety of Gd chelates with macrocyclic ligands should not be generalized. PMID:23517079

  7. Quantitative analysis of protein-ligand interactions by NMR.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Ayako; Konuma, Tsuyoshi; Yanaka, Saeko; Sugase, Kenji

    2016-08-01

    Protein-ligand interactions have been commonly studied through static structures of the protein-ligand complex. Recently, however, there has been increasing interest in investigating the dynamics of protein-ligand interactions both for fundamental understanding of the underlying mechanisms and for drug development. NMR is a versatile and powerful tool, especially because it provides site-specific quantitative information. NMR has widely been used to determine the dissociation constant (KD), in particular, for relatively weak interactions. The simplest NMR method is a chemical-shift titration experiment, in which the chemical-shift changes of a protein in response to ligand titration are measured. There are other quantitative NMR methods, but they mostly apply only to interactions in the fast-exchange regime. These methods derive the dissociation constant from population-averaged NMR quantities of the free and bound states of a protein or ligand. In contrast, the recent advent of new relaxation-based experiments, including R2 relaxation dispersion and ZZ-exchange, has enabled us to obtain kinetic information on protein-ligand interactions in the intermediate- and slow-exchange regimes. Based on R2 dispersion or ZZ-exchange, methods that can determine the association rate, kon, dissociation rate, koff, and KD have been developed. In these approaches, R2 dispersion or ZZ-exchange curves are measured for multiple samples with different protein and/or ligand concentration ratios, and the relaxation data are fitted to theoretical kinetic models. It is critical to choose an appropriate kinetic model, such as the two- or three-state exchange model, to derive the correct kinetic information. The R2 dispersion and ZZ-exchange methods are suitable for the analysis of protein-ligand interactions with a micromolar or sub-micromolar dissociation constant but not for very weak interactions, which are typical in very fast exchange. This contrasts with the NMR methods that are used

  8. Unique kinetics of nicotinic acid-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP) binding enhance the sensitivity of NAADP receptors for their ligand.

    PubMed Central

    Patel, S; Churchill, G C; Galione, A

    2000-01-01

    Nicotinic acid-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP) is a novel and potent Ca(2+)-mobilizing agent in sea urchin eggs and other cell types. Little is known, however, concerning the properties of the putative intracellular NAADP receptor. In the present study we have characterized NAADP binding sites in sea urchin egg homogenates. [(32)P]NAADP bound to a single class of high-affinity sites that were reversibly inhibited by NaCl but insensitive to pH and Ca(2+). Binding of [(32)P]NAADP was lost in preparations that did not mobilize Ca(2+) in response to NAADP, indicating that [(32)P]NAADP probably binds to a receptor mediating Ca(2+) mobilization. Addition of excess unlabelled NAADP, at various times after initiation of [(32)P]NAADP binding, did not result in displacement of bound [(32)P]NAADP. These data show that NAADP becomes irreversibly bound to its receptor immediately upon association. Accordingly, incubation of homogenates with low concentrations of NAADP resulted in maximal labelling of NAADP binding sites. This unique property renders NAADP receptors exquisitely sensitive to their ligand, thereby allowing detection of minute changes in NAADP levels. PMID:11104679

  9. Kinetic analysis of internalization, recycling and redistribution of atrial natriuretic factor-receptor complex in cultured vascular smooth-muscle cells. Ligand-dependent receptor down-regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, K N

    1992-01-01

    The kinetics of internalization, sequestration and metabolic degradation of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF)-receptor complex were studied in rat thoracic aortic smooth-muscle (RTASM) cells. These parameters were directly determined by measuring 125I-ANF binding to total, intracellular and cell-surface receptors. Pretreatment of cells with the lysosomotropic agent chloroquine and the energy depleter dinitrophenol led to an increase in the intracellular 125I-ANF radioactivity. After 60 min incubation at 37 degrees C, cell-associated 125I-ANF radioactivity fell rapidly in chloroquine-treated cells (> 85%) compared with the controls (< 45%). 125I-ANF radioactivity increased to a peak of 65% of the initial level within 15 min in chloroquine-treated cells compared with only 22% in the control cells. During the initial incubation period at 37 degrees C, chloroquine inhibited the release of both intact and degraded 125I-ANF in a time-dependent manner. However, at later incubation times, the effect of chloroquine was diminished and release of both degraded and intact ligand was resumed. Extracellular unlabelled ANF did not affect the release of degraded 125I-ANF but it accelerated the release of intact ANF by a retroendocytotic mechanism. After the endocytosis, about 30-40% of ANF receptors were restored to the cell surface from the internalized pool of receptors. The restoration was blocked by chloroquine or dinitrophenol but not by cycloheximide. Exposure of RTASM cells to unlabelled ANF resulted in a time- and concentration-dependent loss of ANF receptors. Unlabelled ANF (10 nM) induced a loss of more than 52% of 125I-ANF binding, and a complete loss occurred at micromolar concentrations. It is inferred that ANF-induced down-regulation of its receptor resulted primarily from an increased rate in internalization and metabolic degradation of ligand-receptor complex by receptor-mediated endocytotic mechanisms. PMID:1445281

  10. Ligand-Binding Affinity at the Insulin Receptor Isoform-A and Subsequent IR-A Tyrosine Phosphorylation Kinetics are Important Determinants of Mitogenic Biological Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Rajapaksha, Harinda; Forbes, Briony E.

    2015-01-01

    The insulin receptor (IR) is a tyrosine kinase receptor that can mediate both metabolic and mitogenic biological actions. The IR isoform-A (IR-A) arises from alternative splicing of exon 11 and has different ligand binding and signaling properties compared to the IR isoform-B. The IR-A not only binds insulin but also insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II) with high affinity. IGF-II acting through the IR-A promotes cancer cell proliferation, survival, and migration by activating some unique signaling molecules compared to those activated by insulin. This observation led us to investigate whether the different IR-A signaling outcomes in response to IGF-II and insulin could be attributed to phosphorylation of a different subset of IR-A tyrosine residues or to the phosphorylation kinetics. We correlated IR-A phosphorylation to activation of molecules involved in mitogenic and metabolic signaling (MAPK and Akt) and receptor internalization rates (related to mitogenic signaling). We also extended this study to incorporate two ligands that are known to promote predominantly mitogenic [(His4, Tyr15, Thr49, Ile51) IGF-I, qIGF-I] or metabolic (S597 peptide) biological actions, to see if common mechanisms can be used to define mitogenic or metabolic signaling through the IR-A. The threefold lower mitogenic action of IGF-II compared to insulin was associated with a decreased potency in activation of Y960, Y1146, Y1150, Y1151, Y1316, and Y1322, in MAPK phosphorylation and in IR-A internalization. With the poorly mitogenic S597 peptide, it was a decreased rate of tyrosine phosphorylation rather than potency that was associated with a low mitogenic potential. We conclude that both decreased affinity of IR-A binding and kinetics of IR-A phosphorylation can independently lead to a lower mitogenic activity. None of the studied parameters could account for the lower metabolic activity of qIGF-I. PMID:26217307

  11. An instrument for time resolved monitoring of fast chemical transitions: Application to the kinetics of refolding of a globular protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratner, Vladimir; Haas, Elisha

    1998-05-01

    The dynamics of kinetic intermediates of protein folding can be studied by time resolved measurements of nonradiative excitation energy transfer, in site-specific labeled protein derivatives, combined with fast mixing experiments. A new device based on the single pulse approach was developed. This experiment is performed over two time scales: the "chemical time scale" of the conformational changes (milliseconds), defined by the rates of changes of conformations in the sample, and the "spectroscopic time scale" (nanoseconds) defined by the lifetimes of the excited states of the fluorescent probes. The chemical process was synchronized by means of a fast mixing stopped flow device. The low cost laser used here is suitable for use with dyes with excitation wavelengths of 337 nm and higher. Up to 20 fluorescence decay curves per second, can be measured within a single stopped flow run. Each fluorescence decay curve is recorded within 250 ns or more. The time resolution (of the spectroscopic time scale) was 0.5 ns. The noise level is low enough to estimate distance distributions from energy transfer experiments, provided that the shortest changeable lifetime component of the fluorescence decay of the donor probes would not be lower than ˜4 ns. The amount of double labeled protein which should be used for each experiment in order to obtain a full data set, with time resolution of 10 ms during protein transition, is only fourfold more than the amount needed for a stopped flow study with steady state fluorescence monitoring. The results obtained for refolding of α-lactalbumin in the presence of 1,8-anilino-naphthalene sulfonic acid from the GuHCl induced denatured state, support the model in which the probe has two states. The first state, is characterized by a fluorescence lifetime of 14.2±0.5 ns and the second by a fluorescence lifetime of 0.5±0.4 ns or less. During refolding the dye is transferred from the first state to the second, at a rate that coincides with the

  12. Constructing Kinetic Network Models to Elucidate Mechanisms of Functional Conformational Changes of Enzymes and Their Recognition with Ligands.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Jiang, H; Sheong, F K; Pardo-Avila, F; Cheung, P P-H; Huang, X

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes are biological macromolecules that catalyze complex reactions in life. In order to perform their functions effectively and efficiently, enzymes undergo conformational changes between different functional states. Therefore, elucidating the dynamics between these states is essential to understand the molecular mechanisms of enzymes. Although experimental methods such as X-ray crystallography and cryoelectron microscopy can produce high-resolution structures, the detailed conformational dynamics of many enzymes still remain obscure. While molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are able to complement the experiments by providing structure-based dynamics at atomic resolution, it is usually difficult for them to reach the biologically relevant timescales (hundreds of microseconds or longer). Kinetic network models (KNMs), in particular Markov state models (MSMs), hold great promise to overcome this challenge because they can bridge the timescale gap between MD simulations and experimental observations. In this chapter, we review the procedure of constructing KNMs to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of enzymes. First, we will give a general introduction of MSMs, including the methods to construct and validate MSMs. Second, we will present the applications of KNMs to study two important enzymes: the human Argonaute protein and the RNA polymerase II. We conclude by discussing the future perspectives regarding the potential of KNMs to investigate the dynamics of enzymes' functional conformational changes. PMID:27497174

  13. N-Substituted Benztropine Analogs: Selective Dopamine Transporter Ligands with a Fast Onset of Action and Minimal Cocaine-Like Behavioral Effects

    PubMed Central

    Li, Su-Min; Kopajtic, Theresa A.; O'Callaghan, Matthew J.; Agoston, Gregory E.; Cao, Jianjing; Newman, Amy Hauck

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies suggested that differences between the behavioral effects of cocaine and analogs of benztropine were related to the relatively slow onset of action of the latter compounds. Several N-substituted benztropine analogs with a relatively fast onset of effects were studied to assess whether a fast onset of effects would render the effects more similar to those of cocaine. Only one of the compounds increased locomotor activity, and the increases were modest compared with those of 10 to 20 mg/kg cocaine. In rats trained to discriminate 10 mg/kg cocaine from saline none of the compounds produced more than 40% cocaine-like responds up to 2 h after injection. None of the compounds produced place-conditioning when examined up to 90 min after injection, indicating minimal abuse liability. The compounds had 5.6 to 30 nM affinities at the dopamine transporter (DAT), with uniformly lower affinities at norepinephrine and serotonin transporters (from 490-4600 and 1420–7350 nM, respectively). Affinities at muscarinic M1 receptors were from 100- to 300-fold lower than DAT affinities, suggesting minimal contribution of those sites to the behavioral effects of the compounds. Affinities at histaminic H1 sites were from 11- to 43-fold lower than those for the DAT. The compounds also had affinity for sigma, 5-hydroxytryptamine1 (5-HT1), and 5-HT2 receptors that may have contributed to their behavioral effects. Together, the results indicate that a slow onset of action is not a necessary condition for reduced cocaine-like effects of atypical DAT ligands and suggest several mechanisms that may contribute to the reduced cocaine-like efficacy of these compounds. PMID:21088247

  14. Evidence of Kinetic Control of Ligand Binding and Staged Product Release in MurA (enolpyruvyl UDP-GlcNAc synthase)-catalyzed Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, S.; Zhang, F; Chindemi, P; Junop, M; Berti, P

    2009-01-01

    MurA (enolpyruvyl UDP-GlcNAc synthase) catalyzes the first committed step in peptidoglycan biosynthesis. In this study, MurA-catalyzed breakdown of its tetrahedral intermediate (THI), with a k{sub cat}/K{sub M} of 520 M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, was far slower than the normal reaction, and 3 x 10{sup 5}-fold slower than the homologous enzyme, AroA, reacting with its THI. This provided kinetic evidence of slow binding and a conformationally constrained active site. The MurA cocrystal structure with UDP-N-acetylmuramic acid (UDP-MurNAc), a potent inhibitor, and phosphite revealed a new 'staged' MurA conformation in which the Arg397 side chain tracked phosphite out of the catalytic site. The closed-to-staged transition involved breaking eight MurA {center_dot} ligand ion pairs, and three intraprotein hydrogen bonds helping hold the active site loop closed. These were replaced with only two MurA {center_dot} UDP-MurNAc ion pairs, two with phosphite, and seven new intraprotein ion pairs or hydrogen bonds. Cys115 appears to have an important role in forming the staged conformation. The staged conformation appears to be one step in a complex choreography of release of the product from MurA.

  15. Dynamics of methionine ligand rebinding in cytochrome c.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ping; Małolepsza, Edyta; Straub, John E

    2012-06-14

    Geminate recombination of the methionine ligand to the heme iron in ferrous cytochrome c protein following photodissociation displays rich kinetics. It is of particular interest to develop an understanding of fast and slow rebinding time scales, observed in experimental studies, in terms of features of the underlying complex energy landscape. The classical empirical force field in the heme pocket has been extended by incorporating ab initio potential energy surface calculations representing the ground singlet state and quintet state associated with methionine bond breaking and rebinding. An algorithm based on the Landau-Zener nonadiabatic transition theory has been employed to model the electronic surface hopping between two spin states during the process of ligand dissociation and recombination. Multiple conformational substates of the dissociated methionine ligand are found to participate in the reaction dynamics. Varying time scales for interconversion between substates lead to a mechanism elucidating the fast and slow rebinding time scales. The reaction system may be understood in terms of a two-dimensional reaction coordinate distinctly separated from the coupled bath of surrounding protein and solvent degrees of freedom. Insights into the reaction dynamics provided by this study lead to suggestions for future experiments to further probe the role of dynamic heterogeneity in the kinetics of ligand-protein binding. PMID:22432601

  16. An instrument for fast acquisition of fluorescence decay curves at picosecond resolution designed for ``double kinetics'' experiments: Application to fluorescence resonance excitation energy transfer study of protein folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishay, Eldad Ben; Hazan, Gershon; Rahamim, Gil; Amir, Dan; Haas, Elisha

    2012-08-01

    The information obtained by studying fluorescence decay of labeled biopolymers is a major resource for understanding the dynamics of their conformations and interactions. The lifetime of the excited states of probes attached to macromolecules is in the nanosecond time regime, and hence, a series of snapshot decay curves of such probes might - in principle - yield details of fast changes of ensembles of labeled molecules down to sub-microsecond time resolution. Hence, a major current challenge is the development of instruments for the low noise detection of fluorescence decay curves within the shortest possible time intervals. Here, we report the development of an instrument, picosecond double kinetics apparatus, that enables recording of multiple fluorescence decay curves with picosecond excitation pulses over wide spectral range during microsecond data collection for each curve. The design is based on recording and averaging multiphoton pulses of fluorescence decay using a fast 13 GHz oscilloscope during microsecond time intervals at selected time points over the course of a chemical reaction or conformational transition. We tested this instrument in a double kinetics experiment using reference probes (N-acetyl-tryptophanamide). Very low stochastic noise level was attained, and reliable multi-parameter analysis such as derivation of distance distributions from time resolved FRET (fluorescence resonance excitation energy transfer) measurements was achieved. The advantage of the pulse recording and averaging approach used here relative to double kinetics methods based on the established time correlated single photon counting method, is that in the pulse recording approach, averaging of substantially fewer kinetic experiments is sufficient for obtaining the data. This results in a major reduction in the consumption of labeled samples, which in many cases, enables the performance of important experiments that were not previously feasible.

  17. Upscaling Mixed-Limited Reactions for Equilibrium and Fast Complete Kinetic Reactions in Radial and 1-D Flow.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, A. A. M.; Ginn, T. R.; Le Borgne, T.; Dentz, M.

    2015-12-01

    The new upscaling approach that implements the lamella concept utilizing the Lagrangian frame of reference gives a promising result when applied to the calcite precipitation equilibrium mixing-limited reaction. Here it is applied to the radial injection case representing aquifer remediation. To approximate aerobic biodegradation, the irreversible bimolecular kinetic reaction case is studied here also using the lamella approach for the one dimensional case. The theoretical rate for the mixing-limited kinetic reaction is derived from Gramling et al. (2002) for the special case where the total concentration of the injected component equals the total concentration of the ambient component, and then this special case is generalized for arbitrary concentrations. The results for both the equilibrium and the kinetic reaction cases are tested numerically versus COMSOL which matched the theoretical cases very well.

  18. The dynamics of ligands binding to proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callender, Robert

    2001-03-01

    The static structures of many proteins have been solved, and this has revealed much about how they function. On the other hand, although the importance of atomic motion to how proteins function has been conjectured for several decades, the characterization of protein dynamics on multiple time scales is scant. This is because of severe experimental and theoretical difficulties, particularly characterizing the nanosecond to millisecond time scales. Recently, several new techniques have been introduced that make it possible to initiate chemical reactions on fast time scales. We have applied advanced laser induced temperature jump relaxation spectroscopy with nanosecond resolution to examine the binding kinetics of ligands to several enzymes. The observed kinetics take place over multiple time scales. The results reveal the dynamical nature of the binding process and show that there are substantial populations of many structures that are in a constant dynamic equilibrium in some cases. Some of these structures lie quite far from the static structure defined in crystallographic studies, which suggest that the conventional thermodynamical picture of binding (an equilibrium between ligand free in solution and bound) is far off the mark. Moreover, the results suggest that the dynamics can certainly play a crucial role in kinetic control of protein function as in, for example, affecting the rates of enzymatic catalysis. This work is a collaborative project with Hong Deng and Nick Zhadin, also at Albert Einstein. Work supported by the NSF and NIH.

  19. An Active Learning Mammalian Skeletal Muscle Lab Demonstrating Contractile and Kinetic Properties of Fast- and Slow-Twitch Muscle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Head, S. I.; Arber, M. B.

    2013-01-01

    The fact that humans possess fast and slow-twitch muscle in the ratio of approximately 50% has profound implications for designing exercise training strategies for power and endurance activities. With the growth of exercise and sport science courses, we have seen the need to develop an undergraduate student laboratory that demonstrates the basic…

  20. LIGKA: A linear gyrokinetic code for the description of background kinetic and fast particle effects on the MHD stability in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Lauber, Ph. Guenter, S.; Koenies, A.; Pinches, S.D.

    2007-09-10

    In a plasma with a population of super-thermal particles generated by heating or fusion processes, kinetic effects can lead to the additional destabilisation of MHD modes or even to additional energetic particle modes. In order to describe these modes, a new linear gyrokinetic MHD code has been developed and tested, LIGKA (linear gyrokinetic shear Alfven physics) [Ph. Lauber, Linear gyrokinetic description of fast particle effects on the MHD stability in tokamaks, Ph.D. Thesis, TU Muenchen, 2003; Ph. Lauber, S. Guenter, S.D. Pinches, Phys. Plasmas 12 (2005) 122501], based on a gyrokinetic model [H. Qin, Gyrokinetic theory and computational methods for electromagnetic perturbations in tokamaks, Ph.D. Thesis, Princeton University, 1998]. A finite Larmor radius expansion together with the construction of some fluid moments and specification to the shear Alfven regime results in a self-consistent, electromagnetic, non-perturbative model, that allows not only for growing or damped eigenvalues but also for a change in mode-structure of the magnetic perturbation due to the energetic particles and background kinetic effects. Compared to previous implementations [H. Qin, mentioned above], this model is coded in a more general and comprehensive way. LIGKA uses a Fourier decomposition in the poloidal coordinate and a finite element discretisation in the radial direction. Both analytical and numerical equilibria can be treated. Integration over the unperturbed particle orbits is performed with the drift-kinetic HAGIS code [S.D. Pinches, Ph.D. Thesis, The University of Nottingham, 1996; S.D. Pinches et al., CPC 111 (1998) 131] which accurately describes the particles' trajectories. This allows finite-banana-width effects to be implemented in a rigorous way since the linear formulation of the model allows the exchange of the unperturbed orbit integration and the discretisation of the perturbed potentials in the radial direction. Successful benchmarks for toroidal Alfven

  1. LIGKA: A linear gyrokinetic code for the description of background kinetic and fast particle effects on the MHD stability in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauber, Ph.; Günter, S.; Könies, A.; Pinches, S. D.

    2007-09-01

    In a plasma with a population of super-thermal particles generated by heating or fusion processes, kinetic effects can lead to the additional destabilisation of MHD modes or even to additional energetic particle modes. In order to describe these modes, a new linear gyrokinetic MHD code has been developed and tested, LIGKA (linear gyrokinetic shear Alfvén physics) [Ph. Lauber, Linear gyrokinetic description of fast particle effects on the MHD stability in tokamaks, Ph.D. Thesis, TU München, 2003; Ph. Lauber, S. Günter, S.D. Pinches, Phys. Plasmas 12 (2005) 122501], based on a gyrokinetic model [H. Qin, Gyrokinetic theory and computational methods for electromagnetic perturbations in tokamaks, Ph.D. Thesis, Princeton University, 1998]. A finite Larmor radius expansion together with the construction of some fluid moments and specification to the shear Alfvén regime results in a self-consistent, electromagnetic, non-perturbative model, that allows not only for growing or damped eigenvalues but also for a change in mode-structure of the magnetic perturbation due to the energetic particles and background kinetic effects. Compared to previous implementations [H. Qin, mentioned above], this model is coded in a more general and comprehensive way. LIGKA uses a Fourier decomposition in the poloidal coordinate and a finite element discretisation in the radial direction. Both analytical and numerical equilibria can be treated. Integration over the unperturbed particle orbits is performed with the drift-kinetic HAGIS code [S.D. Pinches, Ph.D. Thesis, The University of Nottingham, 1996; S.D. Pinches et al., CPC 111 (1998) 131] which accurately describes the particles' trajectories. This allows finite-banana-width effects to be implemented in a rigorous way since the linear formulation of the model allows the exchange of the unperturbed orbit integration and the discretisation of the perturbed potentials in the radial direction. Successful benchmarks for toroidal Alfv

  2. Simultaneous Measurements of Fast Optical and Proton Current Kinetics in the Bacteriorhodopsin Photocycle using an Enhanced Spectrophotometer

    PubMed Central

    Kakareka, John W.; Smith, Paul D.; Pohida, Thomas J.; Hendler, Richard W.

    2008-01-01

    A one-of-a-kind high speed optical multichannel spectrometer was designed and built at NIH and described in this journal in 1997 [Cole et al. Vol 35, pages 161–174]. The most unique aspect of this instrument was the ability to follow an entire time course from a single activation using a single sample. The instrument has been used to study rapid kinetic processes in the photon-driven bacteriorhodopsin photocycle and electron transport from cytochrome c to cytochrome aa3 and from cytochrome aa3 to oxygen. The present paper describes a second generation instrument with a number of important enhancements which significantly improve its capabilities for multichannel kinetic studies. An example application is presented in which the kinetics of photon-induced proton flow across the biological membrane is measured simultaneously with the individual steps of the photocycle determined optically. Matching the time constants for the two processes indicates which molecular transformations are associated with major proton movements. PMID:18160131

  3. Angular distribution, kinetic energy distributions, and excitation functions of fast metastable oxygen fragments following electron impact of CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misakian, M.; Mumma, M. J.; Faris, J. F.

    1975-01-01

    Dissociative excitation of CO2 by electron impact was studied using the methods of translational spectroscopy and angular distribution analysis. Earlier time of flight studies revealed two overlapping spectra, the slower of which was attributed to metastable CO(a3 pi) fragments. The fast peak is the focus of this study. Threshold energy, angular distribution, and improve time of flight measurements indicate that the fast peak actually consists of five overlapping features. The slowest of the five features is found to consist of metastable 0(5S) produced by predissociation of a sigma u + state of CO2 into 0(5S) + CO(a3 pi). Oxygen Rydberg fragments originating directly from a different sigma u + state are believed to make up the next fastest feature. Mechanisms for producing the three remaining features are discussed.

  4. A novel fast and flexible technique of radical kinetic behaviour investigation based on pallet for plasma evaluation structure and numerical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinowski, Arkadiusz; Takeuchi, Takuya; Chen, Shang; Suzuki, Toshiya; Ishikawa, Kenji; Sekine, Makoto; Hori, Masaru; Lukasiak, Lidia; Jakubowski, Andrzej

    2013-07-01

    This paper describes a new, fast, and case-independent technique for sticking coefficient (SC) estimation based on pallet for plasma evaluation (PAPE) structure and numerical analysis. Our approach does not require complicated structure, apparatus, or time-consuming measurements but offers high reliability of data and high flexibility. Thermal analysis is also possible. This technique has been successfully applied to estimation of very low value of SC of hydrogen radicals on chemically amplified ArF 193 nm photoresist (the main goal of this study). Upper bound of our technique has been determined by investigation of SC of fluorine radical on polysilicon (in elevated temperature). Sources of estimation error and ways of its reduction have been also discussed. Results of this study give an insight into the process kinetics, and not only they are helpful in better process understanding but additionally they may serve as parameters in a phenomenological model development for predictive modelling of etching for ultimate CMOS topography simulation.

  5. In Situ TEM Observations of Sn-Containing Silicon Nanowires Undergoing Reversible Pore Formation Due to Fast Lithiation/Delithiation Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Xiaotang; Bogart, Timothy D.; Gu, Meng; Wang, Chong M.; Korgel, Brian

    2015-09-03

    In situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies were carried out to observe directly in real time the lithiation and delithiation of silicon (Si) nanowires with significant amounts of tin (Sn). The incorporation of Sn significantly enhances the lithiation rate compared to typical Si nanowires. For instance, surface diffusion is enhanced by two orders of magnitude and the bulk lithiation rate by one order of magnitude, resulting in a sequential surface-then-core lithiation mechanism. Pore formation was observed in the nanowires during delithiation, most likely as a result of the fast delithiation kinetics of the nanowires. Pore formation was reversible and the pores disappeared during subsequent lithiation. When an amorphous Si shell was applied to the nanowires, pore formation was not observed during the in situ TEM experimences. Ex situ TEM analysis of Sn-containing Si nanowires cycled in coin cell batteries also showed that the application of an a-Si shell significantly retards pore formation in these nanowires.

  6. Fast self-assembly kinetics of alkanethiols on gold nanoparticles: simulation and characterization by localized surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asiaei, Sasan; Denomme, Ryan C.; Marr, Chelsea; Nieva, Patricia M.; Vijayan, Mathilakath M.

    2012-03-01

    This study demonstrates improved kinetics for the formation of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of alkanethiols on gold nanoparticle substrates. A computational model was developed to predict SAM growth kinetics. Based on the predictions from the model, SAMs of 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (11-MUA) and 1-octanethiol (1-OT) were formed by incubation of gold nanoparticle chips in an ethanolic 10 mM solution within 20 min. The performance of this novel rapid SAM formation protocol was compared with a conventional 24 hour incubation protocol. Binding capacity of the alkanethiol SAM was investigated for a 20 min incubation protocol using biotin-streptavidin. For this purpose, the SAM loaded gold nanoparticle chips were modified with 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC) to allow attachment of EZ-Link amine PEG3 biotin to the 11-MUA molecules. Binding reactions were monitored in real time using localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) spectroscopy. The resulting LSPR absorbance peak shift was comparable to the experimental results for biotin-streptavidin reported in literature. Results of this study suggest that formation of a high quality alkanethiol SAM within 20 min on gold nanoparticles surfaces is possible and could greatly reduce the time and cost compared to conventional 24 h incubation protocols.

  7. Population density methods for stochastic neurons with realistic synaptic kinetics: firing rate dynamics and fast computational methods.

    PubMed

    Apfaltrer, Felix; Ly, Cheng; Tranchina, Daniel

    2006-12-01

    An outstanding problem in computational neuroscience is how to use population density function (PDF) methods to model neural networks with realistic synaptic kinetics in a computationally efficient manner. We explore an application of two-dimensional (2-D) PDF methods to simulating electrical activity in networks of excitatory integrate-and-fire neurons. We formulate a pair of coupled partial differential-integral equations describing the evolution of PDFs for neurons in non-refractory and refractory pools. The population firing rate is given by the total flux of probability across the threshold voltage. We use an operator-splitting method to reduce computation time. We report on speed and accuracy of PDF results and compare them to those from direct, Monte-Carlo simulations. We compute temporal frequency response functions for the transduction from the rate of postsynaptic input to population firing rate, and examine its dependence on background synaptic input rate. The behaviors in the1-D and 2-D cases--corresponding to instantaneous and non-instantaneous synaptic kinetics, respectively--differ markedly from those for a somewhat different transduction: from injected current input to population firing rate output (Brunel et al. 2001; Fourcaud & Brunel 2002). We extend our method by adding inhibitory input, consider a 3-D to 2-D dimension reduction method, demonstrate its limitations, and suggest directions for future study. PMID:17162461

  8. Fast Prediction of HCCI and PCCI Combustion with an Artificial Neural Network-Based Chemical Kinetic Model

    SciTech Connect

    Piggott, W T; Aceves, S M; Flowers, D L; Chen, J Y

    2007-09-26

    We have added the capability to look at in-cylinder fuel distributions using a previously developed ignition model within a fluid mechanics code (KIVA3V) that uses an artificial neural network (ANN) to predict ignition (The combined code: KIVA3V-ANN). KIVA3V-ANN was originally developed and validated for analysis of Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) combustion, but it is also applicable to the more difficult problem of Premixed Charge Compression Ignition (PCCI) combustion. PCCI combustion refers to cases where combustion occurs as a nonmixing controlled, chemical kinetics dominated, autoignition process, where the fuel, air, and residual gas mixtures are not necessarily as homogeneous as in HCCI combustion. This paper analyzes the effects of introducing charge non-uniformity into a KIVA3V-ANN simulation. The results are compared to experimental results, as well as simulation results using a more physically representative and computationally intensive code (KIVA3V-MPI-MZ), which links a fluid mechanics code to a multi-zone detailed chemical kinetics solver. The results indicate that KIVA3V-ANN produces reasonable approximations to the more accurate KIVA3V-MPI-MZ at a much reduced computational cost.

  9. Ultrafine Nanocrystalline CeO2@C-Containing NaAlH4 with Fast Kinetics and Good Reversibility for Hydrogen Storage.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Liu, Yongfeng; Wang, Ke; Li, You; Gao, Mingxia; Pan, Hongge

    2015-12-21

    A nanocrystalline CeO2@C-containing NaAlH4 composite is successfully synthesized in situ by hydrogenating a NaH-Al mixture doped with CeO2@C. Compared with NaAlH4 , the as-prepared CeO2@C-containing NaAlH4 composite, with a minor amount of excess Al, exhibits significantly improved hydrogen storage properties. The dehydrogenation onset temperature of the hydrogenated [NaH-Al-7 wt % CeO2@C]-0.04Al sample is 77 °C lower than that of the pristine sample because of a reduced kinetic barrier. More importantly, the dehydrogenated sample absorbs ∼4.7 wt % hydrogen within 35 min at 100°C and 10 MPa of hydrogen. Compositional and structural analyses reveal that CeO2 is converted to CeH2 during ball milling and that the newly formed CeH2 works with the excess of Al to synergistically improve the hydrogen storage properties of NaAlH4. Our findings will aid in the rational design of novel catalyst-doped complex hydride systems with low operating temperatures, fast kinetics, and long-term cyclability. PMID:26632764

  10. Ultrafine Nanocrystalline CeO2@C-Containing NaAlH4 with Fast Kinetics and Good Reversibility for Hydrogen Storage.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Liu, Yongfeng; Wang, Ke; Li, You; Gao, Mingxia; Pan, Hongge

    2015-12-21

    A nanocrystalline CeO2@C-containing NaAlH4 composite is successfully synthesized in situ by hydrogenating a NaH-Al mixture doped with CeO2@C. Compared with NaAlH4 , the as-prepared CeO2@C-containing NaAlH4 composite, with a minor amount of excess Al, exhibits significantly improved hydrogen storage properties. The dehydrogenation onset temperature of the hydrogenated [NaH-Al-7 wt % CeO2@C]-0.04Al sample is 77 °C lower than that of the pristine sample because of a reduced kinetic barrier. More importantly, the dehydrogenated sample absorbs ∼4.7 wt % hydrogen within 35 min at 100°C and 10 MPa of hydrogen. Compositional and structural analyses reveal that CeO2 is converted to CeH2 during ball milling and that the newly formed CeH2 works with the excess of Al to synergistically improve the hydrogen storage properties of NaAlH4. Our findings will aid in the rational design of novel catalyst-doped complex hydride systems with low operating temperatures, fast kinetics, and long-term cyclability.

  11. Kinetic Energy Release of the Singly and Doubly Charged Methylene Chloride Molecule: The Role of Fast Dissociation.

    PubMed

    Alcantara, K F; Rocha, A B; Gomes, A H A; Wolff, W; Sigaud, L; Santos, A C F

    2016-09-01

    The center of mass kinetic energy release distribution (KERD) spectra of selected ionic fragments, formed through dissociative single and double photoionization of CH2Cl2 at photon energies around the Cl 2p edge, were extracted from the shape and width of the experimentally obtained time-of-flight (TOF) distributions. The KERD spectra exhibit either smooth profiles or structures, depending on the moiety and photon energy. In general, the heavier the ionic fragments, the lower their average KERDs are. In contrast, the light H(+) fragments are observed with kinetic energies centered around 4.5-5.5 eV, depending on the photon energy. It was observed that the change in the photon energy involves a change in the KERDs, indicating different processes or transitions taking place in the breakup process. In the particular case of double ionization with the ejection of two charged fragments, the KERDs present have characteristics compatible with the Coulombic fragmentation model. Intending to interpret the experimental data, singlet and triplet states at Cl 2p edge of the CH2Cl2 molecule, corresponding to the Cl (2p → 10a1*) and Cl (2p → 4b1*) transitions, were calculated at multiconfigurational self-consistent field (MCSCF) level and multireference configuration interaction (MRCI). These states were selected to form the spin-orbit coupling matrix elements, which after diagonalization result in a spin-orbit manifold. Minimum energy pathways for dissociation of the molecule were additionally calculated aiming to give support to the presence of the ultrafast dissociation mechanism in the molecular breakup.

  12. Kinetic Energy Release of the Singly and Doubly Charged Methylene Chloride Molecule: The Role of Fast Dissociation.

    PubMed

    Alcantara, K F; Rocha, A B; Gomes, A H A; Wolff, W; Sigaud, L; Santos, A C F

    2016-09-01

    The center of mass kinetic energy release distribution (KERD) spectra of selected ionic fragments, formed through dissociative single and double photoionization of CH2Cl2 at photon energies around the Cl 2p edge, were extracted from the shape and width of the experimentally obtained time-of-flight (TOF) distributions. The KERD spectra exhibit either smooth profiles or structures, depending on the moiety and photon energy. In general, the heavier the ionic fragments, the lower their average KERDs are. In contrast, the light H(+) fragments are observed with kinetic energies centered around 4.5-5.5 eV, depending on the photon energy. It was observed that the change in the photon energy involves a change in the KERDs, indicating different processes or transitions taking place in the breakup process. In the particular case of double ionization with the ejection of two charged fragments, the KERDs present have characteristics compatible with the Coulombic fragmentation model. Intending to interpret the experimental data, singlet and triplet states at Cl 2p edge of the CH2Cl2 molecule, corresponding to the Cl (2p → 10a1*) and Cl (2p → 4b1*) transitions, were calculated at multiconfigurational self-consistent field (MCSCF) level and multireference configuration interaction (MRCI). These states were selected to form the spin-orbit coupling matrix elements, which after diagonalization result in a spin-orbit manifold. Minimum energy pathways for dissociation of the molecule were additionally calculated aiming to give support to the presence of the ultrafast dissociation mechanism in the molecular breakup. PMID:27523328

  13. Fast gating kinetics of the slow Ca2+ current in cut skeletal muscle fibres of the frog.

    PubMed

    Feldmeyer, D; Melzer, W; Pohl, B; Zöllner, P

    1990-06-01

    1. Calcium currents and intramembrane charge movements were measured in cut twitch muscle fibres of the frog and the time course of activation of the current was studied using various conditioning pulse protocols. 2. When a conditioning activation was produced by a depolarizing pulse which ended before inactivation occurred, a subsequent depolarization led to a faster onset of activation, indicating that the system had not completely returned to the initial state during the interval between the two pulses. 3. The interval between conditioning and test pulse was varied at different subthreshold potentials to study the time course of restoring the steady-state conditions. Complete restoration required a waiting period of about 1 min at the holding potential of -80 mV due to a very slow process but partial recovery was reached within 100 ms. This initial recovery process was strongly voltage dependent and became considerably slower when the interval potential approached the threshold for current activation. 4. Stepping to a roughly 10 mV subthreshold potential without applying a conditioning activation caused no change in the time course of the current produced by a subsequent test depolarization. Depolarizing just to the current threshold caused a slowly progressing acceleration of test current activation. 5. The peak current-voltage relation in the fast gating regime caused by a conditioning activation coincided with the current-voltage relation measured under steady-state conditions, indicating not that a new channel population had become activated but that the same channels showed a different gating behaviour. 6. Intramembrane charge movements measured in 2 mM-Cd2+ and tested at potentials between -40 and +40 mV showed negligible changes when preceded by a strong depolarization. 7. We discuss several possible models which can explain the fact that the current is speeded up by a conditioning activation while the charge movements remain unchanged. It is possible

  14. Water-mediated cation intercalation of open-framework indium hexacyanoferrate with high voltage and fast kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Liang; Shao, Hezhu; Zhou, Xufeng; Liu, Guoqiang; Jiang, Jun; Liu, Zhaoping

    2016-06-01

    Rechargeable aqueous metal-ion batteries made from non-flammable and low-cost materials offer promising opportunities in large-scale utility grid applications, yet low voltage and energy output, as well as limited cycle life remain critical drawbacks in their electrochemical operation. Here we develop a series of high-voltage aqueous metal-ion batteries based on `M+/N+-dual shuttles' to overcome these drawbacks. They utilize open-framework indium hexacyanoferrates as cathode materials, and TiP2O7 and NaTi2(PO4)3 as anode materials, respectively. All of them possess strong rate capability as ultra-capacitors. Through multiple characterization techniques combined with ab initio calculations, water-mediated cation intercalation of indium hexacyanoferrate is unveiled. Water is supposed to be co-inserted with Li+ or Na+, which evidently raises the intercalation voltage and reduces diffusion kinetics. As for K+, water is not involved in the intercalation because of the channel space limitation.

  15. Water-mediated cation intercalation of open-framework indium hexacyanoferrate with high voltage and fast kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liang; Shao, Hezhu; Zhou, Xufeng; Liu, Guoqiang; Jiang, Jun; Liu, Zhaoping

    2016-01-01

    Rechargeable aqueous metal-ion batteries made from non-flammable and low-cost materials offer promising opportunities in large-scale utility grid applications, yet low voltage and energy output, as well as limited cycle life remain critical drawbacks in their electrochemical operation. Here we develop a series of high-voltage aqueous metal-ion batteries based on ‘M+/N+-dual shuttles' to overcome these drawbacks. They utilize open-framework indium hexacyanoferrates as cathode materials, and TiP2O7 and NaTi2(PO4)3 as anode materials, respectively. All of them possess strong rate capability as ultra-capacitors. Through multiple characterization techniques combined with ab initio calculations, water-mediated cation intercalation of indium hexacyanoferrate is unveiled. Water is supposed to be co-inserted with Li+ or Na+, which evidently raises the intercalation voltage and reduces diffusion kinetics. As for K+, water is not involved in the intercalation because of the channel space limitation. PMID:27321702

  16. Water-mediated cation intercalation of open-framework indium hexacyanoferrate with high voltage and fast kinetics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liang; Shao, Hezhu; Zhou, Xufeng; Liu, Guoqiang; Jiang, Jun; Liu, Zhaoping

    2016-01-01

    Rechargeable aqueous metal-ion batteries made from non-flammable and low-cost materials offer promising opportunities in large-scale utility grid applications, yet low voltage and energy output, as well as limited cycle life remain critical drawbacks in their electrochemical operation. Here we develop a series of high-voltage aqueous metal-ion batteries based on 'M(+)/N(+)-dual shuttles' to overcome these drawbacks. They utilize open-framework indium hexacyanoferrates as cathode materials, and TiP2O7 and NaTi2(PO4)3 as anode materials, respectively. All of them possess strong rate capability as ultra-capacitors. Through multiple characterization techniques combined with ab initio calculations, water-mediated cation intercalation of indium hexacyanoferrate is unveiled. Water is supposed to be co-inserted with Li(+) or Na(+), which evidently raises the intercalation voltage and reduces diffusion kinetics. As for K(+), water is not involved in the intercalation because of the channel space limitation. PMID:27321702

  17. Water-mediated cation intercalation of open-framework indium hexacyanoferrate with high voltage and fast kinetics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liang; Shao, Hezhu; Zhou, Xufeng; Liu, Guoqiang; Jiang, Jun; Liu, Zhaoping

    2016-06-20

    Rechargeable aqueous metal-ion batteries made from non-flammable and low-cost materials offer promising opportunities in large-scale utility grid applications, yet low voltage and energy output, as well as limited cycle life remain critical drawbacks in their electrochemical operation. Here we develop a series of high-voltage aqueous metal-ion batteries based on 'M(+)/N(+)-dual shuttles' to overcome these drawbacks. They utilize open-framework indium hexacyanoferrates as cathode materials, and TiP2O7 and NaTi2(PO4)3 as anode materials, respectively. All of them possess strong rate capability as ultra-capacitors. Through multiple characterization techniques combined with ab initio calculations, water-mediated cation intercalation of indium hexacyanoferrate is unveiled. Water is supposed to be co-inserted with Li(+) or Na(+), which evidently raises the intercalation voltage and reduces diffusion kinetics. As for K(+), water is not involved in the intercalation because of the channel space limitation.

  18. Effects of hydraulic retention time on aerobic granulation and granule growth kinetics at steady state with a fast start-up strategy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong-Qiang; Zhang, Xing; Zhang, Rui; Liu, Wen-Tso; Tay, Joo-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    A hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 4, 6, and 8 h was employed, respectively, in three reactors to study the effects of HRT on granulation with a newly developed fast granulation strategy, i.e., a strategy by combining strong hydraulic selection pressure with high organic loading rate (OLR). Granules with clear boundary appeared within 24 h after reactor start-up and all reactors reached a pseudo steady state after 6-day operation. A 4-h HRT resulted in a relatively higher increasing rate in terms of granule size during granule development period, i.e., 208 μm day(-1), and the bigger granule size and the higher sludge volume index at the pseudo steady state. For HRT of 6 or 8 h, no obvious difference was observed. However, it was found that HRT influenced sludge retention time (SRT) and kinetics significantly. A HRT changing from 4 to 8 h led to an increased SRT from 3 to 21 days, a decreased observed specific biomass growth rate (μ obs) and an decreased observed biomass yield (Y obs) of stable granules from 0.37 to 0.062 days(-1), and 0.177 to 0.055 g MLVSS g(-1) COD, respectively. Both μ obs and Y obs had a linear relationship with the reciprocal of HRT. In addition, the great difference of microbial community between seed sludge, sludge retained in the reactors, and sludge washed out indicated a strong microbial selection for fast granulation within 24 h. However, during the granule development period from day 1 to 6, no more microbial selection was observed except an adjustment of microbial community. Little influence of HRT on microbial population in granular sludge indicated a minor role of HRT played for granulation with the fast start-up strategy adopted in this study. The results demonstrated that hydraulic selection pressure for granulation was mainly from short settling time, which led to strong microbial selection during the granulation period. Meanwhile, although HRT did not affect granulation with the fast start-up strategy, it played an

  19. Kinetic studies of ligand substitution rates for the Ru(NH/sub 3/)/sub 5/(H/sub 2/O)/sup 2 +/ ion in Nafion films

    SciTech Connect

    Lieber, C.M.; Schmidt, M.H.; Lewis, N.S.

    1986-10-01

    Substitution rates have been measured for reaction of a number of pyridines with the Nafion-bound Ru(NH/sub 3/)/sub 5/(H/sub 2/O)/sup 2 +/ complex. Reaction activities have been determined by electrochemical techniques, which also allow for determination of site thermodynamics and heterogeneity during the course of the reaction. Diffusion-coefficient effects are investigated by variation in polymer film thickness, and partition coefficients have been determined under equilibrium conditions by optical absorbance techniques. The partition-coefficient corrected rate law is found to be first order in Nafion-bound (Ru/sup II/) and first order in ligand concentration in the polymer phase. The partition-coefficient corrected bimolecular rate constants for a variety of pyridine ligands are found to vary by a factor of 5, which contrasts with the relatively constant substitution rates observed in aqueous solution. Also, sterically hindered ligands, such as 2-propylpyridine, exhibit surprisingly high substitution rate constants on the Nafion-bound Ru/sup II/ ion. These rate data indicate that pronounced molecular reactivity changes can occur upon electrode modification and have implications with respect to the design of chemically modified electrodes for use in electrocatalysis.

  20. Ligand-substitution mode capillary electrophoretic reactor: extending capillary electrophoretic reactor toward measurement of slow dissociation kinetics with a half-life of hours.

    PubMed

    Iki, Nobuhiko; Takahashi, Mariko; Takahashi, Toru; Hoshino, Hitoshi

    2009-09-15

    A method employing capillary electrophoresis (CE) was developed to determine the rate constant of the very slow spontaneous dissociation of a complex species. The method uses a CE reactor (CER) to electrophoretically separate components from a complex zone and, thus, spontaneously dissociate a complex. The dissociation is accelerated by ligand substitution (LS) involving a competing ligand added to the electrophoretic buffer. The LS-CER method is validated using the dissociation of a Ti(IV)-catechin complex and EDTA as a competing ligand. There is good agreement between the spontaneous dissociation rate constant (k(d) = (1.64 +/- 0.63) x 10(-4) s(-1)) and the rate constant obtained by a conventional batchwise LS reaction (k(d) = (1.43 +/- 0.04) x 10(-4) s(-1)). Furthermore, the usefulness of the method is demonstrated using a Ti(IV)-tiron complex, for which k(d) = (0.51 +/- 0.43) x 10(-4) s(-1), corresponding to a half-life (t(1/2)) of 3.8 h. Notably, a single run of LS-CER for the Ti(IV) complex is completed within 40 min, implying that LS-CER requires a considerably shorter measurement time (roughly equal to t(1/2)) than conventional CER. LS-CER can be widely applied to determine the spontaneous dissociation rates of inorganic diagnostic and therapeutic reagents as well as of biomolecular complexes.

  1. High quality reduced graphene oxide flakes by fast kinetically controlled and clean indirect UV-induced radical reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flyunt, Roman; Knolle, Wolfgang; Kahnt, Axel; Halbig, Christian E.; Lotnyk, Andriy; Häupl, Tilmann; Prager, Andrea; Eigler, Siegfried; Abel, Bernd

    2016-03-01

    This work highlights a surprisingly simple and kinetically controlled highly efficient indirect method for the production of high quality reduced graphene oxide (rGO) flakes via UV irradiation of aqueous dispersions of graphene oxide (GO), in which the GO is not excited directly. While the direct photoexcitation of aqueous GO (when GO is the only light-absorbing component) takes several hours of reaction time at ambient temperature (4 h) leading only to a partial GO reduction, the addition of small amounts of isopropanol and acetone (2% and 1%) leads to a dramatically shortened reaction time by more than two orders of magnitude (2 min) and a very efficient and soft reduction of graphene oxide. This method avoids the formation of non-volatile species and in turn contamination of the produced rGO and it is based on the highly efficient generation of reducing carbon centered isopropanol radicals via the reaction of triplet acetone with isopropanol. While the direct photolysis of GO dispersions easily leads to degradation of the carbon lattice of GO and thus to a relatively low electric conductivity of the films of flakes, our indirect photoreduction of GO instead largely avoids the formation of defects, keeping the carbon lattice intact. Mechanisms of the direct and indirect photoreduction of GO have been elucidated and compared. Raman spectroscopy, XPS and conductivity measurements prove the efficiency of the indirect photoreduction in comparison with the state-of-the-art reduction method for GO (hydriodic acid/trifluoroacetic acid). The rapid reduction times and water solvent containing only small amounts of isopropanol and acetone may allow easy process up-scaling for technical applications and low-energy consumption.This work highlights a surprisingly simple and kinetically controlled highly efficient indirect method for the production of high quality reduced graphene oxide (rGO) flakes via UV irradiation of aqueous dispersions of graphene oxide (GO), in which the

  2. High quality reduced graphene oxide flakes by fast kinetically controlled and clean indirect UV-induced radical reduction.

    PubMed

    Flyunt, Roman; Knolle, Wolfgang; Kahnt, Axel; Halbig, Christian E; Lotnyk, Andriy; Häupl, Tilmann; Prager, Andrea; Eigler, Siegfried; Abel, Bernd

    2016-04-14

    This work highlights a surprisingly simple and kinetically controlled highly efficient indirect method for the production of high quality reduced graphene oxide (rGO) flakes via UV irradiation of aqueous dispersions of graphene oxide (GO), in which the GO is not excited directly. While the direct photoexcitation of aqueous GO (when GO is the only light-absorbing component) takes several hours of reaction time at ambient temperature (4 h) leading only to a partial GO reduction, the addition of small amounts of isopropanol and acetone (2% and 1%) leads to a dramatically shortened reaction time by more than two orders of magnitude (2 min) and a very efficient and soft reduction of graphene oxide. This method avoids the formation of non-volatile species and in turn contamination of the produced rGO and it is based on the highly efficient generation of reducing carbon centered isopropanol radicals via the reaction of triplet acetone with isopropanol. While the direct photolysis of GO dispersions easily leads to degradation of the carbon lattice of GO and thus to a relatively low electric conductivity of the films of flakes, our indirect photoreduction of GO instead largely avoids the formation of defects, keeping the carbon lattice intact. Mechanisms of the direct and indirect photoreduction of GO have been elucidated and compared. Raman spectroscopy, XPS and conductivity measurements prove the efficiency of the indirect photoreduction in comparison with the state-of-the-art reduction method for GO (hydriodic acid/trifluoroacetic acid). The rapid reduction times and water solvent containing only small amounts of isopropanol and acetone may allow easy process up-scaling for technical applications and low-energy consumption.

  3. High quality reduced graphene oxide flakes by fast kinetically controlled and clean indirect UV-induced radical reduction.

    PubMed

    Flyunt, Roman; Knolle, Wolfgang; Kahnt, Axel; Halbig, Christian E; Lotnyk, Andriy; Häupl, Tilmann; Prager, Andrea; Eigler, Siegfried; Abel, Bernd

    2016-04-14

    This work highlights a surprisingly simple and kinetically controlled highly efficient indirect method for the production of high quality reduced graphene oxide (rGO) flakes via UV irradiation of aqueous dispersions of graphene oxide (GO), in which the GO is not excited directly. While the direct photoexcitation of aqueous GO (when GO is the only light-absorbing component) takes several hours of reaction time at ambient temperature (4 h) leading only to a partial GO reduction, the addition of small amounts of isopropanol and acetone (2% and 1%) leads to a dramatically shortened reaction time by more than two orders of magnitude (2 min) and a very efficient and soft reduction of graphene oxide. This method avoids the formation of non-volatile species and in turn contamination of the produced rGO and it is based on the highly efficient generation of reducing carbon centered isopropanol radicals via the reaction of triplet acetone with isopropanol. While the direct photolysis of GO dispersions easily leads to degradation of the carbon lattice of GO and thus to a relatively low electric conductivity of the films of flakes, our indirect photoreduction of GO instead largely avoids the formation of defects, keeping the carbon lattice intact. Mechanisms of the direct and indirect photoreduction of GO have been elucidated and compared. Raman spectroscopy, XPS and conductivity measurements prove the efficiency of the indirect photoreduction in comparison with the state-of-the-art reduction method for GO (hydriodic acid/trifluoroacetic acid). The rapid reduction times and water solvent containing only small amounts of isopropanol and acetone may allow easy process up-scaling for technical applications and low-energy consumption. PMID:26984451

  4. Real-time investigation of human topoisomerase I reaction kinetics using an optical sensor: a fast method for drug screening and determination of active enzyme concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristoffersen, Emil L.; Jørgensen, Line A.; Franch, Oskar; Etzerodt, Michael; Frøhlich, Rikke; Bjergbæk, Lotte; Stougaard, Magnus; Ho, Yi-Ping; Knudsen, Birgitta R.

    2015-05-01

    Human DNA topoisomerase I (hTopI) is a nuclear enzyme that catalyzes relaxation of super helical tension that arises in the genome during essential DNA metabolic processes. This is accomplished through a common reaction mechanism shared among the type IB topoisomerase enzymes, including eukaryotic and poxvirus topoisomerase I. The mechanism of hTopI is specifically targeted in cancer treatment using camptothecin derivatives. These drugs convert the hTopI activity into a cellular poison, and hence the cytotoxic effects of camptothecin derivatives correlate with the hTopI activity. Therefore, fast and reliable techniques for high throughput measurements of hTopI activity are of high clinical interest. Here we demonstrate potential applications of a fluorophore-quencher based DNA sensor designed for measurement of hTopI cleavage-ligation activities, which are the catalytic steps affected by camptothecin. The kinetic analysis of the hTopI reaction with the DNA sensor exhibits a characteristic burst profile. This is the result of a two-step ping-pong reaction mechanism, where a fast first reaction, the one creating the signal, is followed by a slower second reaction necessary for completion of the catalytic cycle. Hence, the burst profile holds information about two reactions in the enzymatic mechanism. Moreover, it allows the amount of active enzyme in the reaction to be determined. The presented results pave the way for future high throughput drug screening and the potential of measuring active hTopI concentrations in clinical samples for individualized treatment.Human DNA topoisomerase I (hTopI) is a nuclear enzyme that catalyzes relaxation of super helical tension that arises in the genome during essential DNA metabolic processes. This is accomplished through a common reaction mechanism shared among the type IB topoisomerase enzymes, including eukaryotic and poxvirus topoisomerase I. The mechanism of hTopI is specifically targeted in cancer treatment using

  5. Real-time investigation of human topoisomerase I reaction kinetics using an optical sensor: a fast method for drug screening and determination of active enzyme concentrations.

    PubMed

    Kristoffersen, Emil L; Jørgensen, Line A; Franch, Oskar; Etzerodt, Michael; Frøhlich, Rikke; Bjergbæk, Lotte; Stougaard, Magnus; Ho, Yi-Ping; Knudsen, Birgitta R

    2015-06-01

    Human DNA topoisomerase I (hTopI) is a nuclear enzyme that catalyzes relaxation of super helical tension that arises in the genome during essential DNA metabolic processes. This is accomplished through a common reaction mechanism shared among the type IB topoisomerase enzymes, including eukaryotic and poxvirus topoisomerase I. The mechanism of hTopI is specifically targeted in cancer treatment using camptothecin derivatives. These drugs convert the hTopI activity into a cellular poison, and hence the cytotoxic effects of camptothecin derivatives correlate with the hTopI activity. Therefore, fast and reliable techniques for high throughput measurements of hTopI activity are of high clinical interest. Here we demonstrate potential applications of a fluorophore-quencher based DNA sensor designed for measurement of hTopI cleavage-ligation activities, which are the catalytic steps affected by camptothecin. The kinetic analysis of the hTopI reaction with the DNA sensor exhibits a characteristic burst profile. This is the result of a two-step ping-pong reaction mechanism, where a fast first reaction, the one creating the signal, is followed by a slower second reaction necessary for completion of the catalytic cycle. Hence, the burst profile holds information about two reactions in the enzymatic mechanism. Moreover, it allows the amount of active enzyme in the reaction to be determined. The presented results pave the way for future high throughput drug screening and the potential of measuring active hTopI concentrations in clinical samples for individualized treatment.

  6. Kinetic Growth of Ultralong Metastable Zincblende MnSe Nanowires Catalyzed by a Fast Ionic Conductor via a Solution-Solid-Solid Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Yang, Qing

    2016-07-13

    The metastable semiconductor phase allows for the exploration of unusual properties and functionalities of abnormal structures, although it is often difficult to prevent thermodynamic transformations to lower energy structures from higher, unfavored energy states. Here, we show for the first time the preparation of high-quality ultralong metastable zincblende (ZB)-MnSe nanowires with a four-coordinate structure via solution-solid-solid (SSS) growth in a mild solution-phase synthetic environment (120-220 °C) in the presence of a trace amount of Ag(I). The metastable ZB-MnSe nanowires are stabilized kinetically due to the catalysis of early formed body-centered cubic (bcc) fast-ionic (superionic) Ag2Se nanocrystals from the Ag(I) source, and the ZB-MnSe nanowires grow epitaxially along the ⟨110⟩ axis rather than the ⟨111⟩ axis, as commonly observed for typical four-coordinate Grimm-Sommerfeld bonding solids. Our method provides a new route for the growth of metastable nanostructures. PMID:27254244

  7. Kinetics of complex formation by macrocyclic polyaza polycarboxylate ligands: Detection and characterization of an intermediate in the Eu{sup 3+}-dota system by laser-excited luminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Shu Ling; Horrocks, W.DeW. Jr.

    1995-07-05

    The reaction of Eu{sup 3+} with 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetate was followed by luminescence of the Eu{sup 3+} center. Reaction kinetics for the formation of intermediates and the final product, [Eu(dota)H{sub 2}O]{sup {minus}}, are reported. The rate limiting step is found to be the rearrangement of EuHdotato from the final product.

  8. Periodicity in tumor vasculature targeting kinetics of ligand-functionalized nanoparticles studied by dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and intravital microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cebulla, Jana; Huuse, Else Marie; Davies, Catharina de L.; Mulder, Willem J. M.; Larsson, Henrik B.W.; Haraldseth, Olav

    2014-01-01

    In the past two decades advances in the development of targeted nanoparticles have facilitated their application as molecular imaging agents and targeted drug delivery vehicles. Nanoparticle-enhanced molecular imaging of the angiogenic tumor vasculature has been of particular interest. Not only because angiogenesis plays an important role in various pathologies, but also since endothelial cell surface receptors are directly accessible for relatively large circulating nanoparticles. Typically, nanoparticle targeting towards these receptors is studied by analyzing the contrast distribution on tumor images acquired before and at set time points after administration. Although several exciting proof-of-concept studies demonstrated qualitative assessment of relative target concentration and distribution, these studies did not provide quantitative information on the nanoparticle targeting kinetics. These kinetics will not only depend on nanoparticle characteristics, but also on receptor binding and recycling. In this study, we monitored the in vivo targeting kinetics of αvβ3-integrin specific nanoparticles with intravital microscopy and dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging, and using compartment modeling we were able to quantify nanoparticle targeting rates. As such, this approach can facilitate optimization of targeted nanoparticle design and it holds promise for providing more quantitative information on in vivo receptor levels. Interestingly, we also observed a periodicity in the accumulation kinetics of αvβ3-integrin targeted nanoparticles and hypothesize that this periodicity is caused by receptor binding, internalization and recycling dynamics. Taken together, this demonstrates that our experimental approach provides new insights in in vivo nanoparticle targeting, which may proof useful for vascular targeting in general. PMID:23982332

  9. Equilibrium and kinetic aspects of protein-DNA recognition.

    PubMed Central

    Livshitz, M A; Gursky, G V; Zasedatelev, A S; Volkenstein, M V

    1979-01-01

    The specificity of regulatory protein binding to DNA is due to a complementarity between the sequence of reaction centres on the protein and the base pair sequence in the specific DNA site allowing the formation of a number of specific noncovalent bonds between the interacting entities. In the present communication the thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of these interactions are considered. The extent of binding specificity is shown to increase with an increase of the bond stability constants and with an increase in the number of ligand reaction centres. Kinetic analysis is carried out assuming that association process is very fast and that dissociation of nonspecific complexes is a rate-limiting step in the recognition of a specific binding site on DNA. The calculations show that a ligand can recognize its specific binding site on DNA within a reasonably limited time interval if the number of its reaction centres and the corresponding stability constants are strongly limited. PMID:461187

  10. Equilibrium and kinetic aspects of protein-DNA recognition.

    PubMed

    Livshitz, M A; Gursky, G V; Zasedatelev, A S; Volkenstein, M V

    1979-01-01

    The specificity of regulatory protein binding to DNA is due to a complementarity between the sequence of reaction centres on the protein and the base pair sequence in the specific DNA site allowing the formation of a number of specific noncovalent bonds between the interacting entities. In the present communication the thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of these interactions are considered. The extent of binding specificity is shown to increase with an increase of the bond stability constants and with an increase in the number of ligand reaction centres. Kinetic analysis is carried out assuming that association process is very fast and that dissociation of nonspecific complexes is a rate-limiting step in the recognition of a specific binding site on DNA. The calculations show that a ligand can recognize its specific binding site on DNA within a reasonably limited time interval if the number of its reaction centres and the corresponding stability constants are strongly limited.

  11. Ligand-receptor interaction rates in the presence of convective mass transport.

    PubMed Central

    Model, M A; Omann, G M

    1995-01-01

    The rate of binding of a ligand to receptors on the cell surface can be diffusion limited. We analyze the kinetics of binding, diffusion-limited in a stationary liquid, in the presence of convective mass transport. We derive a formula that expresses the reaction kinetics in terms of the mass transfer coefficient. A moderately transport-limited kinetics is not readily recognizable from the shape of the binding curve and may lead to erroneous estimates of the rate coefficients. We apply our results to practically important cases: a cell suspension in a stirred volume of liquid and a confluent cell colony under a laminar stream. Using typical numbers characterizing the ligand-receptor interactions, we show that stirring and perfusion can be important factors determining the reaction rates. With the confluent colony, the early reaction kinetics requires a different treatment, and we provide it for the case of low receptor occupancy. We show that, even with a fast perfusion, a cell monolayer can transiently generate a zone of depletion of the ligand, and that would affect the early stages of the reaction. Our results are expressed in a simple analytical form and can be used for the design and interpretation of experimental data. PMID:8580315

  12. Frizzleds and WNT/β-catenin signaling--The black box of ligand-receptor selectivity, complex stoichiometry and activation kinetics.

    PubMed

    Schulte, Gunnar

    2015-09-15

    The lipoglycoproteins of the mammalian WNT family induce β-catenin-dependent signaling through interaction with members of the Class Frizzled receptors and LDL receptor-related protein 5/6 (LRP5/6) albeit with unknown selectivity. The 10 mammalian Frizzleds (FZDs) are seven transmembrane (7TM) spanning receptors and have recently been classified as G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). This review summarizes the current knowledge about WNT/FZD selectivity and functional selectivity, the role of co-receptors for signal specification, the formation of receptor complexes as well as the kinetics and mechanisms of signal initiation with focus on WNT/β-catenin signaling. In order to exploit the true therapeutic potential of WNT/FZD signaling to treat human disease, it is clear that substantial progress in the understanding of receptor complex formation and signal specification has to precede a mechanism-based drug design targeting WNT receptors. PMID:26003275

  13. Perturbations of the distal heme pocket in human myoglobin mutants probed by infrared spectroscopy of bound CO: correlation with ligand binding kinetics.

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramanian, S; Lambright, D G; Boxer, S G

    1993-01-01

    The infrared spectra of CO bound to human myoglobin and myoglobin mutants at positions His-64, Val-68, Asp-60, and Lys-45 on the distal side have been measured between 100 and 300 K. Large differences are observed with mutations at His-64 and Val-68 as well as with temperature and pH. Although distal His-64 is found to affect CO bonding, Val-68 also plays a major role. The variations are analyzed qualitatively in terms of a simple model involving steric interaction between the bound CO and the distal residues. A strong correlation is found between the final barrier height to CO recombination and the CO stretch frequency: as compared to wild type, the barrier is smaller in those mutants that have a higher CO stretch frequency (vCO) and vice versa. Possible reasons for this correlation are discussed. It is emphasized that the temperature and pH dependence of both the kinetics and the infrared spectra must be measured to obtain a consistent picture. PMID:8506324

  14. [Allosteric effect of serotonin and mianserin on the kinetics of specific [3H]-ligand binding to adrenergic and muscarinic receptors in the rat cerebral cortex membranes].

    PubMed

    Manukhin, B N; Nesterova, L A

    2015-01-01

    The effects of serotonin receptor activation (by serotonin) and inhibition (by mianserin) on the properties of the α1-, α2-adrenoreceptors, and muscarinic cholinergic receptors in subcellular membrane fractions from the rat cerebral cortex were studied. Experimental data on the kinetics of specific antagonists binding to adrenergic and muscarinic receptors were analyzed by graphical and mathematical methods. The results suggest the presence of allosteric (cross-talk) interaction. In the control, α1- and α2-adrenoreceptors were represented by a single pool, and muscarinic receptors, by two pools. Two pools of adrenoreceptors with different affinity were detected against the background of serotonin. It was found that mianserin induces the formation of two pools of only (α2-receptors and muscarinic receptors are represented by two pools differing in the main parameters, such as dissociation constants and adrenoreceptor concentrations, in the control and experimental groups. It was shown that the allosteric effect of serotonin and mianserin is manifested in the inhibition of muscarinic receptors. It was assumed that the adrenergic and cholinergic receptors exist as dimers. The interaction between the adrenergic, cholinergic, and serotonergic systems is likely to be implemented at the cell membrane level.

  15. Mechanistic insights from resolving ligand-dependent kinetics of conformational changes at ATP-gated P2X1R ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Fryatt, Alistair G.; Dayl, Sudad; Cullis, Paul M.; Schmid, Ralf; Evans, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Structural studies of P2X receptors show a novel U shaped ATP orientation following binding. We used voltage clamp fluorometry (VCF) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate agonist action. For VCF the P2X1 receptor (P2X1R) K190C mutant (adjacent to the agonist binding pocket) was labelled with the fluorophore MTS-TAMRA and changes in fluorescence on agonist treatment provided a real time measure of conformational changes. Studies with heteromeric channels incorporating a key lysine mutation (K68A) in the ATP binding site demonstrate that normally three molecules of ATP activate the receptor. The time-course of VCF responses to ATP, 2′-deoxy ATP, 3′-deoxy ATP, Ap5A and αβmeATP were agonist dependent. Comparing the properties of the deoxy forms of ATP demonstrated the importance of the 2′ hydroxyl group on the ribose ring in determining agonist efficacy consistent with MD simulations showing that it forms a hydrogen bond with the γ-phosphate oxygen stabilizing the U-shaped conformation. Comparison of the recovery of fluorescence on agonist washout, with channel activation to a second agonist application for the partial agonists Ap5A and αβmeATP, showed a complex relationship between conformational change and desensitization. These results highlight that different agonists induce distinct conformational changes, kinetics and recovery from desensitization at P2X1Rs. PMID:27616669

  16. Mechanistic insights from resolving ligand-dependent kinetics of conformational changes at ATP-gated P2X1R ion channels.

    PubMed

    Fryatt, Alistair G; Dayl, Sudad; Cullis, Paul M; Schmid, Ralf; Evans, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    Structural studies of P2X receptors show a novel U shaped ATP orientation following binding. We used voltage clamp fluorometry (VCF) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate agonist action. For VCF the P2X1 receptor (P2X1R) K190C mutant (adjacent to the agonist binding pocket) was labelled with the fluorophore MTS-TAMRA and changes in fluorescence on agonist treatment provided a real time measure of conformational changes. Studies with heteromeric channels incorporating a key lysine mutation (K68A) in the ATP binding site demonstrate that normally three molecules of ATP activate the receptor. The time-course of VCF responses to ATP, 2'-deoxy ATP, 3'-deoxy ATP, Ap5A and αβmeATP were agonist dependent. Comparing the properties of the deoxy forms of ATP demonstrated the importance of the 2' hydroxyl group on the ribose ring in determining agonist efficacy consistent with MD simulations showing that it forms a hydrogen bond with the γ-phosphate oxygen stabilizing the U-shaped conformation. Comparison of the recovery of fluorescence on agonist washout, with channel activation to a second agonist application for the partial agonists Ap5A and αβmeATP, showed a complex relationship between conformational change and desensitization. These results highlight that different agonists induce distinct conformational changes, kinetics and recovery from desensitization at P2X1Rs. PMID:27616669

  17. Thermodynamics of ligand binding to histone deacetylase like amidohydrolase from Bordetella/Alcaligenes.

    PubMed

    Meyners, Christian; Baud, Matthias G J; Fuchter, Matthew J; Meyer-Almes, Franz-Josef

    2014-03-01

    Thermodynamic studies on ligand-protein binding have become increasingly important in the process of drug design. In combination with structural data and molecular dynamics simulations, thermodynamic studies provide relevant information about the mode of interaction between compounds and their target proteins and therefore build a sound basis for further drug optimization. Using the example of histone deacetylases (HDACs), particularly the histone deacetylase like amidohydrolase (HDAH) from Bordetella/Alcaligenes, a novel sensitive competitive fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based binding assay was developed and the thermodynamics of interaction of both fluorescent ligands and inhibitors to histone deacetylase like amidohydrolase were investigated. The assay consumes only small amounts of valuable target proteins and is suitable for fast kinetic and mechanistic studies as well as high throughput screening applications. Binding affinity increased with increasing length of aliphatic spacers (n = 4-7) between the hydroxamate moiety and the dansyl head group of ligand probes. Van't Hoff plots revealed an optimum in enthalpy contribution to the free energy of binding for the dansyl-ligand with hexyl spacer. The selectivity in the series of dansyl-ligands against human class I HDAC1 but not class II HDACs 4 and 6 increased with the ratio of ΔH(0)/ΔG(0). The data clearly emphasize the importance of thermodynamic signatures as useful general guidance for the optimization of ligands or rational drug design.

  18. Increased precision for analysis of protein-ligand dissociation constants determined from chemical shift titrations.

    PubMed

    Markin, Craig J; Spyracopoulos, Leo

    2012-06-01

    NMR is ideally suited for the analysis of protein-protein and protein ligand interactions with dissociation constants ranging from ~2 μM to ~1 mM, and with kinetics in the fast exchange regime on the NMR timescale. For the determination of dissociation constants (K ( D )) of 1:1 protein-protein or protein-ligand interactions using NMR, the protein and ligand concentrations must necessarily be similar in magnitude to the K ( D ), and nonlinear least squares analysis of chemical shift changes as a function of ligand concentration is employed to determine estimates for the parameters K ( D ) and the maximum chemical shift change (Δδ(max)). During a typical NMR titration, the initial protein concentration, [P (0)], is held nearly constant. For this condition, to determine the most accurate parameters for K ( D ) and Δδ(max) from nonlinear least squares analyses requires initial protein concentrations that are ~0.5 × K ( D ), and a maximum concentration for the ligand, or titrant, of ~10 × [P (0)]. From a practical standpoint, these requirements are often difficult to achieve. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we demonstrate that co-variation of the ligand and protein concentrations during a titration leads to an increase in the precision of the fitted K ( D ) and Δδ(max) values when [P (0)] > K ( D ). Importantly, judicious choice of protein and ligand concentrations for a given NMR titration, combined with nonlinear least squares analyses using two independent variables (ligand and protein concentrations) and two parameters (K ( D ) and Δδ(max)) is a straightforward approach to increasing the accuracy of measured dissociation constants for 1:1 protein-ligand interactions.

  19. Determination of trace amounts of mercury(II) in water samples using a novel kinetic catalytic ligand substitution reaction of hexacyanoruthenate(II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naik, Radhey M.; Agarwal, Abhinav; Prasad, Surendra

    2009-11-01

    A simple, sensitive, selective and rapid kinetic catalytic method has been developed for the determination of Hg(II) ions at micro-level. This method is based on the catalytic effect of Hg(II) ion on the rate of substitution of cyanide in hexacyanoruthenate(II) with nitroso-R-salt (NRS) in aqueous medium and provides good accuracy and precision. The concentration of Hg(II) catalyst varied from 4.0 to 10.0 × 10 -6 M and the progress of reaction was followed spectrophotometrically at 525 nm ( λmax of purple-red complex [Ru(CN) 5NRS] 3-, ɛ = 3.1 × 10 3 M -1 s -1) under the optimized reaction conditions; 8.75 × 10 -5 M [Ru(CN) 64-], 3.50 × 10 -4 M [nitroso-R-salt], pH 7.00 ± 0.02, ionic strength, I = 0.1 M (KCl), temp 45.0 ± 0.1 °C. The linear calibration curves, i.e. calibration equations between the absorbance at fixed times ( t = 15, 20 and 25 min) versus concentration of Hg(II) ions were established under the optimized experimental conditions. The detection limit was found to be 1.0 × 10 -7 M of Hg(II). The effect of various foreign ions on the proposed method has also been studied and discussed. The method has been applied to the determination of mercury(II) in aqueous solutions.

  20. Kinetic analysis of ligand binding to the Ehrlich cell nucleoside transporter: Pharmacological characterization of allosteric interactions with the sup 3 Hnitrobenzylthioinosine binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, J.R. )

    1991-06-01

    Kinetic analysis of the binding of {sup 3}Hnitrobenzylthioinosine ({sup 3}H NBMPR) to Ehrlich ascites tumor cell plasma membranes was conducted in the presence and absence of a variety of nucleoside transport inhibitors and substrates. The association of {sup 3}H NBMPR with Ehrlich cell membranes occurred in two distinct phases, possibly reflecting functional conformation changes in the {sup 3}HNBMPR binding site/nucleoside transporter complex. Inhibitors of the equilibrium binding of {sup 3}HNBMPR, tested at submaximal inhibitory concentrations, generally decreased the rate of association of {sup 3}HNBMPR, but the magnitude of this effect varied significantly with the agent tested. Adenosine and diazepam had relatively minor effects on the association rate, whereas dipyridamole and mioflazine slowed the rate dramatically. Inhibitors of nucleoside transport also decreased the rate of dissociation of {sup 3}HNBMPR, with an order of potency significantly different from their relative potencies as inhibitors of the equilibrium binding of {sup 3}HNBMPR. Dilazep, dipyridamole, and mioflazine were effective inhibitors of both {sup 3}HNBMPR dissociation and equilibrium binding. The lidoflazine analogue R75231, on the other hand, had no effect on the rate of dissociation of {sup 3}HNBMPR at concentrations below 300 microM, even though it was one of the most potent inhibitors of {sup 3}HNBMPR binding tested (Ki less than 100 nM). In contrast, a series of natural substrates for the nucleoside transport system enhanced the rate of dissociation of {sup 3}HNBMPR with an order of effectiveness that paralleled their relative affinities for the permeant site of the transporter. The most effective enhancers of {sup 3}HNBMPR dissociation, however, were the benzodiazepines diazepam, chlordiazepoxide, and triazolam.

  1. Kinetics of gravity-induced amyloplast sedimentation in statocytes of cress roots grown under fast clino-rotation, 1 g and after 180° inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svegzdiene, D.; Rakleviciene, D.; Gaina, V.

    In order to detail the relation between the initial positioning of statoliths and root graviresponsiveness, the movement of amyloplasts within root statocytes of cress ( Lepidium sativum L.) seedlings grown under fast clino-rotation (50 rpm) and vertically at 1 g or 180° inverted after growth at 1 g has been analyzed during a subsequent 6-min period of lateral (reoriented 90°) gravistimulation. The main parameters of statolith motion kinetics such as relative positions and motion velocities in transverse and longitudinal directions have been evaluated taking linear measurements of organelle position with respect to the lower longitudinal and distal wall in the cells of the 2nd-5th columella storeys. A significant discrepancy in the direction and velocity of statolith movement has been determined within the first and second minutes of root horizontal placement. Centrally or proximally located statoliths in clino-rotated or inverted root statocytes moved transversely to the lower longitudinal cell wall more quickly as compared with distally located ones in 1- g root cells. At the same time, the longitudinal displacement of proximally located statoliths towards the cell center has been determined, while this displacement of distally located plastids was significantly more pronounced. The longitudinal motion of amyloplasts grouped in the central cell part was negligible within this 2-min period. After the 6th minute of stimulation, the total downward shift of the mean relative position of statoliths amounted to 16.3% from the total cell width in clino-rotated root statocytes and 17.1% in the cells of inverted roots, while it equalled 13.3% in 1- g root statocytes. The total change of the relative longitudinal position of amyloplasts with respect to the distal cell wall remained almost unchanged in roots grown on the clinostat. In inverted roots, the initial longitudinal position of 56.2% from the total cell length has been shifted significantly to 47.8% and from 27

  2. SU-8-Induced Strong Bonding of Polymer Ligands to Flexible Substrates via in Situ Cross-Linked Reaction for Improved Surface Metallization and Fast Fabrication of High-Quality Flexible Circuits.

    PubMed

    Hu, Mingjun; Guo, Qiuquan; Zhang, Tengyuan; Zhou, Shaolin; Yang, Jun

    2016-02-01

    On account of in situ cross-linked reaction of epoxy SU-8 with poly(4-vinylpyridine) (P4VP) and its strong reactive bonding ability with different pretreated substrates, we developed a simple universal one-step solution-based coating method for fast surface modification of various objects. Through this method, a layer of P4VP molecules with controllable thickness can be tethered tightly onto substrates with the assistance of SU-8. P4VP molecules possess a lot of pyridine ligands to immobilize transitional metal ions that can behave as the catalyst of electroless copper plating for surface metallization while functioning as the adhesion-promoting layer between the substrate and deposited metal. Attributed to interpenetrated entanglement of P4VP molecules and as-deposited metal, ultrathick (>7 μm) strongly adhesive high-quality copper layer can be formed on flexible substrates without any delamination. Then through laser printer to print toner mask, a variety of designed circuits can be easily fabricated on modified flexible PET substrate.

  3. SU-8-Induced Strong Bonding of Polymer Ligands to Flexible Substrates via in Situ Cross-Linked Reaction for Improved Surface Metallization and Fast Fabrication of High-Quality Flexible Circuits.

    PubMed

    Hu, Mingjun; Guo, Qiuquan; Zhang, Tengyuan; Zhou, Shaolin; Yang, Jun

    2016-02-01

    On account of in situ cross-linked reaction of epoxy SU-8 with poly(4-vinylpyridine) (P4VP) and its strong reactive bonding ability with different pretreated substrates, we developed a simple universal one-step solution-based coating method for fast surface modification of various objects. Through this method, a layer of P4VP molecules with controllable thickness can be tethered tightly onto substrates with the assistance of SU-8. P4VP molecules possess a lot of pyridine ligands to immobilize transitional metal ions that can behave as the catalyst of electroless copper plating for surface metallization while functioning as the adhesion-promoting layer between the substrate and deposited metal. Attributed to interpenetrated entanglement of P4VP molecules and as-deposited metal, ultrathick (>7 μm) strongly adhesive high-quality copper layer can be formed on flexible substrates without any delamination. Then through laser printer to print toner mask, a variety of designed circuits can be easily fabricated on modified flexible PET substrate. PMID:26844943

  4. Equilibrium and Kinetic Investigations of the Interaction of Model Platinum(II) Complex with DNA Constituents in Reference to the Antitumour Activity: Complex-Formation Reactions of [Pd(N,N-diethylethylenediamine)(H2O)2]2+ with Ligands of Biological Significance and Displacement Reactions of DNA Constituents

    PubMed Central

    Shoukry, Eman Mohamed

    2009-01-01

    The [Pd(DEEN)Cl2] and [Pt(DEEN)Cl2] complexes were synthesized and characterized where DEEN = N,N-diethylethylenediamine. The stoichiometry and stability of the complexes formed between various biologically relevant ligands (amino acids, peptides, DNA constituents and dicarboxylic acids) and [Pd(DEEN)(H2O)2]2+ were investigated at 37°C and 0.16 M ionic strength. The stability constant of the complexes formed in solution were determined and the binding centres of the ligands were assigned. The concentration distribution diagrams of the complexes were evaluated The equilibrium constants for the displacement of representative coordinated ligands such as inosine, glycine or methionine by cysteine were calculated and the concentration distribution diagrams of the various species were evaluated. The kinetics of base hydrolysis of free and coordinated S-methylcysteine methyl ester was investigated. The mechanism of hydrolysis was discussed. PMID:19696935

  5. Physical Limit to Concentration Sensing Amid Spurious Ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mora, Thierry

    2015-07-01

    To adapt their behavior in changing environments, cells sense concentrations by binding external ligands to their receptors. However, incorrect ligands may bind nonspecifically to receptors, and when their concentration is large, this binding activity may interfere with the sensing of the ligand of interest. Here, I derive analytically the physical limit to the accuracy of concentration sensing amid a large number of interfering ligands. A scaling transition is found when the mean bound time of correct ligands is twice that of incorrect ligands. I discuss how the physical bound can be approached by a cascade of receptor states generalizing kinetic proofreading schemes.

  6. Conformational selection or induced-fit? A critical appraisal of the kinetic mechanism†

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Austin D.; Di Cera, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    For almost five decades, two competing mechanisms of ligand recognition – conformational selection and induced-fit - have dominated our interpretation of ligand binding in biological macromolecules. When binding/dissociation events are fast compared to conformational transitions, the rate of approach to equilibrium, kobs, becomes diagnostic of conformational selection or induced-fit based on whether it decreases or increases with the ligand concentration, [L]. However, this simple conclusion based on the rapid-equilibrium approximation is not valid in general. Here we show that conformational selection is associated with a rich repertoire of kinetic properties, with kobs decreasing or increasing with [L] depending on the relative magnitude of the rate of ligand dissociation, koff, and the rate of conformational isomerization, kr. We prove that, even for the simplest two-step mechanism of ligand binding, a decrease of kobs with [L] is unequivocal evidence of conformational selection, but an increase of kobs with [L] is not unequivocal evidence of induced-fit. Ligand binding to glucokinase, thrombin and its precursor prethrombin-2 are used as relevant examples. We conclude that conformational selection as a mechanism for ligand binding to its target may be far more common than currently believed. PMID:22775458

  7. Quantitative Characterization of E-selectin Interaction with Native CD44 and P-selectin Glycoprotein Ligand-1 (PSGL-1) Using a Real Time Immunoprecipitation-based Binding Assay*

    PubMed Central

    AbuSamra, Dina B.; Al-Kilani, Alia; Hamdan, Samir M.; Sakashita, Kosuke; Gadhoum, Samah Z.; Merzaban, Jasmeen S.

    2015-01-01

    Selectins (E-, P-, and L-selectins) interact with glycoprotein ligands to mediate the essential tethering/rolling step in cell transport and delivery that captures migrating cells from the circulating flow. In this work, we developed a real time immunoprecipitation assay on a surface plasmon resonance chip that captures native glycoforms of two well known E-selectin ligands (CD44/hematopoietic cell E-/L-selectin ligand and P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1) from hematopoietic cell extracts. Here we present a comprehensive characterization of their binding to E-selectin. We show that both ligands bind recombinant monomeric E-selectin transiently with fast on- and fast off-rates, whereas they bind dimeric E-selectin with remarkably slow on- and off-rates. This binding requires the sialyl Lewis x sugar moiety to be placed on both O- and N-glycans, and its association, but not dissociation, is sensitive to the salt concentration. Our results suggest a mechanism through which monomeric selectins mediate initial fast on and fast off kinetics to help capture cells out of the circulating shear flow; subsequently, tight binding by dimeric/oligomeric selectins is enabled to significantly slow rolling. PMID:26124272

  8. O2 reduction reaction by biologically relevant anionic ligand bound iron porphyrin complexes.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Subhra; Das, Pradip Kumar; Chatterjee, Sudipta; Sengupta, Kushal; Mondal, Biswajit; Dey, Abhishek

    2013-11-18

    Iron porphyrin complex with a covalently attached thiolate ligand and another with a covalently attached phenolate ligand has been synthesized. The thiolate bound complex shows spectroscopic features characteristic of P450, including the hallmark absorption spectrum of the CO adduct. Electrocatalytic O2 reduction by this complex, which bears a terminal alkyne group, is investigated by both physiabsorbing on graphite surfaces (fast electron transfer rates) and covalent attachment to azide terminated self-assembled monolayer (physiologically relevant electron transfer rates) using the terminal alkyne group. Analysis of the steady state electrochemical kinetics reveals that this catalyst can selectively reduce O2 to H2O with a second-order k(cat.) ~10(7) M(-1 )s(-1) at pH 7. The analogous phenolate bound iron porphyrin complex reduces O2 with a second-order rate constant of 10(5) M(-1) s(-1) under the same conditions. The anionic ligand bound iron porphyrin complexes catalyze oxygen reduction reactions faster than any known synthetic heme porphyrin analogues. The kinetic parameters of O2 reduction of the synthetic thiolate bound complex, which is devoid of any second sphere effects present in protein active sites, provide fundamental insight into the role of the protein environment in tuning the reactivity of thiolate bound iron porphyrin containing metalloenzymes. PMID:24171513

  9. Bis(methylpyridine)-EDTA derivative as a potential ligand for PET imaging: synthesis, complexation, and biological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Pooja; Aggarwal, Swati; Tiwari, Anjani K; Kumar, Vikas; Pratap, Ramendra; Chuttani, Krishna; Mishra, Anil K

    2014-12-01

    A novel transitional metal ligand derivatized from EDTA-conjugated 2-amino-4-methyl pyridine, an acyclic vehicle (EDTA-Mepy2 ) was designed, synthesized, and characterized for PET imaging with ⁶⁸Ga. The drug likeliness and appropriate lipophilicity were first analyzed by molecular docking studies which shows interactive property of ligand with serum albumin protein (HSA: PDB 1E78), at Lys199, Arg257, and His242 residues, which make it more appropriate in transportation as a specific ligand for PET imaging. As a confirmation, binding constant of the ligand with human serum albumin was calculated at λex = 350 nm which was found to be 4.9 × 10³ m⁻¹. The pharmacokinetics of (68) Ga-EDTA-Mepy2 was analyzed by blood kinetics (t(1/2) slow: 3 h 56 min and t(1/2) fast: 32 min) and biodistribution (maximum % ID/g was found in kidney at 1 h). Further the capability of this ligand was analyzed as optical marker also, by recording λex = 380 nm, RFU = 8000; 710 nm, RFU = 1000 units at fixed λem = 280 nm. Additionally, in physiological conditions where its stability was calculated, suggests 15-20 times selectivity over the endogenously present metal ions (KG aL /KZ nL = 14.3, KG aL /KC uL = 18.1).

  10. Thermodynamics and high-pressure kinetics of a fast carbon dioxide fixation reaction by a (2,6-pyridinedicarboxamidato-hydroxo)nickel(II) complex.

    PubMed

    Troeppner, O; Huang, D; Holm, R H; Ivanović-Burmazović, I

    2014-04-14

    The previously reported carbon dioxide fixation reaction by the planar terminal hydroxide complex [Ni(pyN2(Me2))(OH)](1-) in DMF has been further characterized by determination of the equilibrium constants K(eq)²⁹⁸ = 2.4 ± 0.2 × 10(5) M(-1) and K(eq)²²³ = 1.3 ± 0.1 × 10(7) M(-1), as well as the volume of activation for the CO2 binding (ΔV(on)(≠223) = -21 ± 3 cm(3) mol(-1)) and back decarboxylation (ΔV(off)(≠223) = -13 ± 1 cm(3) mol(-1)) by high-pressure kinetics. The data are consistent with an earlier DFT computation, including the probable nature of the transition state, and support designating the reaction as one of the most completely investigated carbon dioxide fixation reactions of any type.

  11. Ligand-Dependent Conformational Dynamics of Dihydrofolate Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Reddish, Michael J.; Vaughn, Morgan B.; Fu, Rong; Dyer, R. Brian

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes are known to change among several conformational states during turnover. The role of such dynamic structural changes in catalysis is not fully understood. The influence of dynamics in catalysis can be inferred, but not proven, by comparison of equilibrium structures of protein variants and protein–ligand complexes. A more direct way to establish connections between protein dynamics and the catalytic cycle is to probe the kinetics of specific protein motions in comparison to progress along the reaction coordinate. We have examined the enzyme model system dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) from Escherichia coli with tryptophan fluorescence-probed temperature-jump spectroscopy. We aimed to observe the kinetics of the ligand binding and ligand-induced conformational changes of three DHFR complexes to establish the relationship among these catalytic steps. Surprisingly, in all three complexes, the observed kinetics do not match a simple sequential two-step process. Through analysis of the relationship between ligand concentration and observed rate, we conclude that the observed kinetics correspond to the ligand binding step of the reaction and a noncoupled enzyme conformational change. The kinetics of the conformational change vary with the ligand's identity and presence but do not appear to be directly related to progress along the reaction coordinate. These results emphasize the need for kinetic studies of DHFR with highly specific spectroscopic probes to determine which dynamic events are coupled to the catalytic cycle and which are not. PMID:26901612

  12. Fission Fragment Mass Distributions and Total Kinetic Energy Release of 235-Uranium and 238-Uranium in Neutron-Induced Fission at Intermediate and Fast Neutron Energies

    SciTech Connect

    Duke, Dana Lynn

    2015-11-12

    This Ph.D. dissertation describes a measurement of the change in mass distributions and average total kinetic energy (TKE) release with increasing incident neutron energy for fission of 235U and 238U. Although fission was discovered over seventy-five years ago, open questions remain about the physics of the fission process. The energy of the incident neutron, En, changes the division of energy release in the resulting fission fragments, however, the details of energy partitioning remain ambiguous because the nucleus is a many-body quantum system. Creating a full theoretical model is difficult and experimental data to validate existing models are lacking. Additional fission measurements will lead to higher-quality models of the fission process, therefore improving applications such as the development of next-generation nuclear reactors and defense. This work also paves the way for precision experiments such as the Time Projection Chamber (TPC) for fission cross section measurements and the Spectrometer for Ion Determination in Fission (SPIDER) for precision mass yields.

  13. Sliding tethered ligands add topological interactions to the toolbox of ligand-receptor design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Martin; Kékicheff, Patrick; Iss, Jean; Fajolles, Christophe; Charitat, Thierry; Daillant, Jean; Marques, Carlos M.

    2015-09-01

    Adhesion in the biological realm is mediated by specific lock-and-key interactions between ligand-receptor pairs. These complementary moieties are ubiquitously anchored to substrates by tethers that control the interaction range and the mobility of the ligands and receptors, thus tuning the kinetics and strength of the binding events. Here we add sliding anchoring to the toolbox of ligand-receptor design by developing a family of tethered ligands for which the spacer can slide at the anchoring point. Our results show that this additional sliding degree of freedom changes the nature of the adhesive contact by extending the spatial range over which binding may sustain a significant force. By introducing sliding tethered ligands with self-regulating length, this work paves the way for the development of versatile and reusable bio-adhesive substrates with potential applications for drug delivery and tissue engineering.

  14. Beyond radio-displacement techniques for Identification of CB1 Ligands: The First Application of a Fluorescence-quenching Assay

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Agostino; Lembo, Francesca; Novellino, Ettore; Stornaiuolo, Mariano; Marinelli, Luciana

    2014-01-01

    Cannabinoid type 1 Receptor (CB1) belongs to the GPCR family and it has been targeted, so far, for the discovery of drugs aimed at the treatment of neuropathic pain, nausea, vomit, and food intake disorders. Here, we present the development of the first fluorescent assay enabling the measurement of kinetic binding constants for CB1orthosteric ligands. The assay is based on the use of T1117, a fluorescent analogue of AM251. We prove that T1117 binds endogenous and recombinant CB1 receptors with nanomolar affinity. Moreover, T1117 binding to CB1 is sensitive to the allosteric ligand ORG27569 and thus it is applicable to the discovery of new allosteric drugs. The herein presented assay constitutes a sustainable valid alternative to the expensive and environmental impacting radiodisplacement techniques and paves the way for an easy, fast and cheap high-throughput drug screening toward CB1 for identification of new orthosteric and allosteric modulators. PMID:24441508

  15. The influence of gastric emptying kinetics on the drug release from enteric coated pellets in fasted state: an in vitro/in vivo correlation.

    PubMed

    Stefanič, M; Locatelli, I; Vrečer, F; Sever, T; Mrhar, A; Bogataj, M

    2012-10-01

    The absorption and bioavailability of drugs can be substantially affected by the transit of dosage forms through the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Gastric emptying is one of the most critical parameters contributing to this inter- and intra-individual GI transit variability. It is especially important for the delayed release dosage forms whose release depends on the local environment and begins when the dosage form passes pylorus and comes into contact with higher pH medium in small intestine. The purpose of our research work was to predict the in vivo dissolution from enteric coated pellets for population and establish a good in vitro/in vivo correlation (IVIVC) with mean in vivo absorption profiles, obtained in a pharmacokinetic study under fasting conditions. The dissolution tests were carried out on a USP 4 - flow-through cell with enteric coated pellets containing an acid-labile drug and formulated as orodispersible tablets. Using several residence times in an acidic medium, we simulated the gastric emptying of the pellets and the exposure of different fractions of the pellets to the gastric medium for different periods of time. The amount of drug released decreased with the increasing time of exposure to the acidic medium due to the drug's degradation. The mean in vivo dissolution profiles, which were predicted on the basis of experimentally determined dissolution profiles and mathematical model of pellets' gastric emptying, gave a very good IVIVC with the mean in vivo absorption profiles. PMID:22884655

  16. Kinetic Study of OH Reactions With n-Octane and n-Decane Using Relative Rate Combining with Discharge Fast Flow and Mass Spectrometer Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhuangjie

    2004-03-31

    The combination of the relative rate method with the discharge fast flow/mass spectrometer technique (RR/DF/MS) has been developed to measure the rate constants for gas phase reactions involving OH radicals. The RR/DF/MS technique was used to measure the rate constant for reactions of the OH radical with n-octane (k3) and cyclohexane (k5) using 1,4-dioxane as a reference compound and with n-decane (k6) using n-octane and 1,4-dioxane as reference compounds. At 298 K, these rate constants were determined to be k3=(8.88 {+-} 0.31) x 10-12, k5=(6.95 {+-} 0.20) x 10-12 and k6=(1.38 {+-} 0.08) x 10-11 cm3 molecule-1 s-1, respectively, which are in very good agreement with those measured using different techniques. The features of the RR/DF/MS technique are discussed.

  17. Kinetic study of OH radical reactions with volatile organic compounds using relative rate/discharge fast flow/mass spectrometer technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhuangjie

    2004-01-01

    The combination of the relative rate method with the discharge fast flow/mass spectrometer technique (RR/DF/MS) has been developed to measure the rate constants for gas phase reactions involving OH radicals. The RR/DF/MS technique was used to measure the rate constant for reactions of the OH radical with n-octane ( k3) and cyclohexane ( k5) using 1,4-dioxane as a reference compound, and with n-decane ( k12) using n-octane and 1,4-dioxane as reference compounds. At 298 K, these rate constants were determined to be k3=(8.88±0.31) × 10 -12, k5=(6.95±0.20) × 10 -12, and k12=(1.38±0.08) × 10 -11 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1, respectively, which are in very good agreement with those measured using different techniques. The features of the RR/DF/MS technique are discussed.

  18. Role of MgATP and MgADP in the cross-bridge kinetics in chemically skinned rabbit psoas fibers. Study of a fast exponential process (C)

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, M; Halvorson, H R

    1989-01-01

    The role of the substrate (MgATP) and product (MgADP) molecules in cross-bridge kinetics is investigated by small amplitude length oscillations (peak to peak: 3 nm/cross-bridge) and by following amplitude change and phase shift in tension time courses. The range of discrete frequencies used for this investigation is 0.25-250 Hz, which corresponds to 0.6-600 ms in time domain. This report investigates the identity of the high frequency exponential advance (process C), which is equivalent to "phase 2" of step analysis. The experiments are performed in maximally activated (pCa 4.5-5.0) single fibers from chemically skinned rabbit psoas fibers at 20 degrees C and at the ionic strength 195 mM. The rate constant 2 pi c deduced from process (C) increases and saturates hyperbolically with an increase in MgATP concentration, whereas the same rate constant decreases monotonically with an increase in MgADP concentration. The effects of MgATP and MgADP are opposite in all respects we have studied. These observations are consistent with a cross-bridge scheme in which MgATP and MgADP are in rapid equilibria with rigorlike cross-bridges, and they compete for the substrate site on myosin heads. From our measurements, the association constants are found to be 1.4 mM-1 for MgATP and 2.8 mM-1 for MgADP. We further deduced that the composite second order rate constant of MgATP binding to cross-bridges and subsequent isomerization/dissociation reaction to be 0.57 x 10(6)M-1s-1. PMID:2785822

  19. Evidence that the product of the xrs gene is predominantly involved in the repair of a subset of radiation-induced interphase chromosome breaks rejoining with fast kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Okayasu, R.; Iliakis, G. )

    1994-04-01

    We classified interphase chromosome breaks into [alpha] and [beta] forms to study the requirement for the xrs gene product in the repair of each of these forms of damage. The [alpha] form of damage comprises radiation-induced interphase chromosome breaks whose rejoining is slow and sensitive to treatment with [beta]-arabinofuranosyladenine ([beta]-araA), whereas the [beta] form of damage comprises interphase chromosome breaks whose rejoining is fast and sensitive to treatment in hypertonic medium. Interphase chromosome breaks of the [alpha] form are visualized in plateau-phase cells by premature chromosome condensation (PCC) carried out in the absence of any treatment during the condensation period. More interphase chromosome breaks of the [beta] form are not visualized in experiments using standard PCC protocols but can be uncovered by treatment in hypertonic growth medium during the period allowed for PCC. In the present report, we show that the yield of interphase chromosome breaks of the [alpha] form is similar in CHO and xrs-5 cells and demonstrate that xrs-5 cells rejoin this type of interphase chromosome breaks with an efficiency similar to that observed in repair-proficient CHO cells. Furthermore, we provide evidence supporting the notion that xrs-5 cells are deficient in the rejoining of the [beta] form of interphase chromosome breaks. These results strongly suggest that the product of the xrs gene is required predominantly in the repair of the [beta] form of interphase chromosome damage and emphasize the need for discrimination between different forms of interphase chromosome breaks in irradiated cells. 41 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Kinetics of Gravity-induced Amyloplast Sedimentation in Cress Root Statocytes Formed under 1 g and on Fast-rotating Clinostat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svegzdiene, D.; Rakleviciene, D.; Gaina, V.

    The aim of the sudy was to compare the motion of a statolith complex in statocytes of roots grown vertically under 1 g and simulated weightlessness by fast-clinorotation (50 rpm) during lateral stimulation by the gravity vector; the experiments with cress (Lepidium sativum L.) on a centrifuge-clinostat device have been performed. Before gravistimulation, the statoliths are grouped in the distal region of 1g-root statocytes and at the center of statocytes in clino-rotated roots. Then roots were placed horizontally for increasing periods of time (1, 2, 4 or 6 min) and chemically fixed. Quantitative analysis of amyloplast movement in side-to-side and distal-to-proximal directions within statocytes of the 2nd to 5th statenchyma storeys was accomplished by light and electron microscopy. After the first minute of gravistimulation, the position of statolith complex in the 1g-statocytes has been changed by about 12.2% in side-to-side and 18.3% in distal-to-proximal direction versus its initial position. In roots grown on the clinostat, the plastids changed their initial position by 22.5% toward the lower longitudinal wall of the statocyte and negligibly (2.4%) -- toward the proximal cell wall during this stimulation period. Later, up to 2 min, the statoliths continued to displace following the alike trajectory in side-to-side by 36.6% as well as in distal-to-proximal direction by 34.4% in 1g-root statocytes versus their position occupied at 1 min, while they remained approximately at the same position in statocytes of clinostat-grown roots. During the period from 2 to 6 min, in the former roots a significant further shift (15.1%) parallel to the gravity vector and otherwise a reversible movement (- 13.3%) toward the distal wall of statolith complex were observed. However, within the same period of gravistimulation the statolith positioning in clinorotated-roots changed only slightly in side-to-side (4.8%) as well as in distal-to-proximal (2.1%) directions. The obtained

  1. Efficient chemoenzymatic synthesis of chiral pincer ligands.

    PubMed

    Felluga, Fulvia; Baratta, Walter; Fanfoni, Lidia; Pitacco, Giuliana; Rigo, Pierluigi; Benedetti, Fabio

    2009-05-01

    Chiral, nonracemic pincer ligands based on the 6-phenyl-2-aminomethylpyridine and 2-aminomethylbenzo[h]quinoline scaffolds were obtained by a chemoenzymatic approach starting from 2-pyridyl and 2-benzoquinolyl ethanone. In the enantiodifferentiating step, secondary alcohols of opposite absolute configuration were obtained by a baker's yeast reduction of the ketones and by lipase-mediated dynamic kinetic resolution of the racemic alcohols. Their transformation into homochiral 1-methyl-1-heteroarylethanamines occurred without loss of optical purity, giving access to pincer ligands used in enantioselective catalysis.

  2. Ligand-grafted biomaterials for adsorptive separations of uranium in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, M.Z.C.; Reeves, M.

    1999-11-01

    Many organic molecules, particularly biologicals, contain functional groups (ligands) that actively interact with metal ions in solution by adsorption, ion exchange, or chelation/coordination/complexation. Water-soluble organics have limitations as reagents for metal-ion separations from aqueous solutions. However, if the ligand molecule(s) are grafted on to an insoluble matrix, the resulting ligand(s)-containing product becomes useful for separations applications related to metal recovery or remediation. It was discovered that biomolecules containing a primary amino group, secondary amino group, or hydroxyl group could be grafted into a polyurethane polymeric network via in situ polymerization reactions. With carboxyl groups, grafted material showed good selectivity among a group of divalent metal cations, and a uranium-binding capacity of more than 10 mg/g of polymer. The material can be regenerated by sodium bicarbonate or sodium carbonate solution and reused. Data from a stirred-tank reactor showed fast uranium-binding kinetics, and breakthrough-elution studies with a packed-column reactor indicated promising process behavior.

  3. Stretchable Self-Healing Polymeric Dielectrics Cross-Linked Through Metal-Ligand Coordination.

    PubMed

    Rao, Ying-Li; Chortos, Alex; Pfattner, Raphael; Lissel, Franziska; Chiu, Yu-Cheng; Feig, Vivian; Xu, Jie; Kurosawa, Tadanori; Gu, Xiaodan; Wang, Chao; He, Mingqian; Chung, Jong Won; Bao, Zhenan

    2016-05-11

    A self-healing dielectric elastomer is achieved by the incorporation of metal-ligand coordination as cross-linking sites in nonpolar polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymers. The ligand is 2,2'-bipyridine-5,5'-dicarboxylic amide, while the metal salts investigated here are Fe(2+) and Zn(2+) with various counteranions. The kinetically labile coordination between Zn(2+) and bipyridine endows the polymer fast self-healing ability at ambient condition. When integrated into organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) as gate dielectrics, transistors with FeCl2 and ZnCl2 salts cross-linked PDMS exhibited increased dielectric constants compared to PDMS and demonstrated hysteresis-free transfer characteristics, owing to the low ion conductivity in PDMS and the strong columbic interaction between metal cations and the small Cl(-) anions which can prevent mobile anions drifting under gate bias. Fully stretchable transistors with FeCl2-PDMS dielectrics were fabricated and exhibited ideal transfer characteristics. The gate leakage current remained low even after 1000 cycles at 100% strain. The mechanical robustness and stable electrical performance proved its suitability for applications in stretchable electronics. On the other hand, transistors with gate dielectrics containing large-sized anions (BF4(-), ClO4(-), CF3SO3(-)) displayed prominent hysteresis due to mobile anions drifting under gate bias voltage. This work provides insights on future design of self-healing stretchable dielectric materials based on metal-ligand cross-linked polymers.

  4. Stretchable Self-Healing Polymeric Dielectrics Cross-Linked Through Metal-Ligand Coordination.

    PubMed

    Rao, Ying-Li; Chortos, Alex; Pfattner, Raphael; Lissel, Franziska; Chiu, Yu-Cheng; Feig, Vivian; Xu, Jie; Kurosawa, Tadanori; Gu, Xiaodan; Wang, Chao; He, Mingqian; Chung, Jong Won; Bao, Zhenan

    2016-05-11

    A self-healing dielectric elastomer is achieved by the incorporation of metal-ligand coordination as cross-linking sites in nonpolar polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymers. The ligand is 2,2'-bipyridine-5,5'-dicarboxylic amide, while the metal salts investigated here are Fe(2+) and Zn(2+) with various counteranions. The kinetically labile coordination between Zn(2+) and bipyridine endows the polymer fast self-healing ability at ambient condition. When integrated into organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) as gate dielectrics, transistors with FeCl2 and ZnCl2 salts cross-linked PDMS exhibited increased dielectric constants compared to PDMS and demonstrated hysteresis-free transfer characteristics, owing to the low ion conductivity in PDMS and the strong columbic interaction between metal cations and the small Cl(-) anions which can prevent mobile anions drifting under gate bias. Fully stretchable transistors with FeCl2-PDMS dielectrics were fabricated and exhibited ideal transfer characteristics. The gate leakage current remained low even after 1000 cycles at 100% strain. The mechanical robustness and stable electrical performance proved its suitability for applications in stretchable electronics. On the other hand, transistors with gate dielectrics containing large-sized anions (BF4(-), ClO4(-), CF3SO3(-)) displayed prominent hysteresis due to mobile anions drifting under gate bias voltage. This work provides insights on future design of self-healing stretchable dielectric materials based on metal-ligand cross-linked polymers. PMID:27099162

  5. The Dynamics of Ligand Barrier Crossing Inside the Acetylcholinesterase Gorge

    SciTech Connect

    Bui, Jennifer M.; Henchman, Richard H.; Mccammon, Andy

    2003-10-01

    The dynamics of ligand movement through the constricted region of the acetylcholinesterase gorge is important in understanding how the ligand gains access to and is released from the active site of the enzyme. Molecular dynamics simulations of the simple ligand, tetramethylammonium, crossing this bottleneck region are conducted using umbrella potential sampling and activated .ux techniques. The low potential of mean force obtained is consistent with the fast reaction rate of acetylcholinesterase observed experimentally. From the results of the activated dynamics simulations, local conformational .uctuations of the gorge residues and larger scale collective motions of the protein are found to correlate highly with the ligand crossing.

  6. Formation of Foam-like Microstructural Carbon Material by Carbonization of Porous Coordination Polymers through a Ligand-Assisted Foaming Process.

    PubMed

    Kongpatpanich, Kanokwan; Horike, Satoshi; Fujiwara, Yu-Ichi; Ogiwara, Naoki; Nishihara, Hirotomo; Kitagawa, Susumu

    2015-09-14

    Porous carbon material with a foam-like microstructure has been synthesized by direct carbonization of porous coordination polymer (PCP). In situ generation of foaming agents by chemical reactions of ligands in PCP during carbonization provides a simple way to create lightweight carbon material with a foam-like microstructure. Among several substituents investigated, the nitro group has been shown to be the key to obtain the unique foam-like microstructure, which is due to the fast kinetics of gas evolution during carbonization. Foam-like microstructural carbon materials showed higher pore volume and specific capacitance compared to a microporous carbon.

  7. Ammonia formation by metal-ligand cooperative hydrogenolysis of a nitrido ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Askevold, Bjorn; Nieto, Jorge Torres; Tussupbayev, Samat; Diefenbach, Martin; Herdtweck, Eberhardt; Holthausen, Max C.; Schneider, Sven

    2011-07-01

    Bioinspired hydrogenation of N2 to ammonia at ambient conditions by stepwise nitrogen protonation/reduction with metal complexes in solution has experienced remarkable progress. In contrast, the highly desirable direct hydrogenation with H2 remains difficult. In analogy to the heterogeneously catalysed Haber-Bosch process, such a reaction is conceivable via metal-centred N2 splitting and unprecedented hydrogenolysis of the nitrido ligands to ammonia. We report the synthesis of a ruthenium(IV) nitrido complex. The high nucleophilicity of the nitrido ligand is demonstrated by unusual N-C coupling with π-acidic CO. Furthermore, the terminal nitrido ligand undergoes facile hydrogenolysis with H2 at ambient conditions to produce ammonia in high yield. Kinetic and quantum chemical examinations of this reaction suggest cooperative behaviour of a phosphorus-nitrogen-phosphorus pincer ligand in rate-determining heterolytic hydrogen splitting.

  8. Zinc Coordination Geometry and Ligand Binding Affinity: The Structural and Kinetic Analysis of the Second-Shell Serine 228 Residue and the Methionine 180 Residue of the Aminopeptidase from Vibrio proteolyticus

    SciTech Connect

    Ataie, Niloufar J.; Hoang, Quyen Q.; Zahniser, Megan P.D.; Tu, Yupeng; Milne, Amy; Petsko, Gregory A.; Ringe, Dagmar

    2008-07-28

    The chemical properties of zinc make it an ideal metal to study the role of coordination strain in enzymatic rate enhancement. The zinc ion and the protein residues that are bound directly to the zinc ion represent a functional charge/dipole complex, and polarization of this complex, which translates to coordination distortion, may tune electrophilicity, and hence, reactivity. Conserved protein residues outside of the charge/dipole complex, such as second-shell residues, may play a role in supporting the electronic strain produced as a consequence of functional polarization. To test the correlation between charge/dipole polarity and ligand binding affinity, structure?function studies were carried out on the dizinc aminopeptidase from Vibrio proteolyticus. Alanine substitutions of S228 and M180 resulted in catalytically diminished enzymes whose crystal structures show very little change in the positions of the metal ions and the protein residues. However, more detailed inspections of the crystal structures show small positional changes that account for differences in the zinc ion coordination geometry. Measurements of the binding affinity of leucine phosphonic acid, a transition state analogue, and leucine, a product, show a correlation between coordination geometry and ligand binding affinity. These results suggest that the coordination number and polarity may tune the electrophilicity of zinc. This may have provided the evolving enzyme with the ability to discriminate between reaction coordinate species.

  9. Kinetic Atom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, David B.

    1981-01-01

    Surveys the research of scientists like Joule, Kelvin, Maxwell, Clausius, and Boltzmann as it comments on the basic conceptual issues involved in the development of a more precise kinetic theory and the idea of a kinetic atom. (Author/SK)

  10. Enzyme Kinetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moe, Owen; Cornelius, Richard

    1988-01-01

    Conveys an appreciation of enzyme kinetic analysis by using a practical and intuitive approach. Discusses enzyme assays, kinetic models and rate laws, the kinetic constants (V, velocity, and Km, Michaels constant), evaluation of V and Km from experimental data, and enzyme inhibition. (CW)

  11. Spectroscopic, Computational, and Kinetic Studies of the Mu-Sulfide-Bridged Tetranuclear CuZ Cluster in N(2)O Reductase: PH Effect on the Edge Ligand and its Contribution to Reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, S.; Gorelsky, S.I.; George, S.DeBeer; Chan, J.M.; Cabrito, I.; Dooley, D.M.; Moura, J.J.G.; Moura, I.; Solomon, E.I.

    2011-11-29

    A combination of spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT) calculations has been used to evaluate the pH effect at the Cu{sub Z} site in Pseudomonas nautica (Pn) nitrous oxide reductase (N{sub 2}OR) and Achromobacter cycloclastes (Ac) N{sub 2}OR and its relevance to catalysis. Absorption, magnetic circular dichroism, and electron paramagnetic resonance with sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption spectra of the enzymes at high and low pH show minor changes. However, resonance Raman (rR) spectroscopy of PnN{sub 2}OR at high pH shows that the 415 cm{sup -1} Cu-S vibration (observed at low pH) shifts to higher frequency, loses intensity, and obtains a 9 cm{sup -1} {sup 18}O shift, implying significant Cu-O character, demonstrating the presence of a OH{sup -} ligand at the Cu{sub I}Cu{sub IV} edge. From DFT calculations, protonation of either the OH{sup -} to H{sub 2}O or the {mu}{sub 4}-S{sup 2-} to {mu}{sub 4}-SH{sup -} would produce large spectral changes which are not observed. Alternatively, DFT calculations including a lysine residue at an H-bonding distance from the Cu{sub I}Cu{sub IV} edge ligand show that the position of the OH{sup -} ligand depends on the protonation state of the lysine. This would change the coupling of the Cu-(OH) stretch with the Cu-S stretch, as observed in the rR spectrum. Thus, the observed pH effect (pK{sub a} {approx} 9.2) likely reflects protonation equilibrium of the lysine residue, which would both raise E{sup o} and provide a proton for lowering the barrier for the N-O cleavage and for reduction of the [Cu{sub 4}S(im){sub 7}OH]{sup 2+} to the fully reduced 4Cu{sup I} active form for turnover.

  12. Handling ligands with Coot

    PubMed Central

    Debreczeni, Judit É.; Emsley, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Coot is a molecular-graphics application primarily aimed to assist in model building and validation of biological macromolecules. Recently, tools have been added to work with small molecules. The newly incorporated tools for the manipulation and validation of ligands include interaction with PRODRG, subgraph isomorphism-based tools, representation of ligand chemistry, ligand fitting and analysis, and are described here. PMID:22505262

  13. Gating Kinetics of the Cyclic-GMP-Activated Channel of Retinal Rods: Flash Photolysis and Voltage-Jump Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpen, Jeffrey W.; Zimmerman, Anita L.; Stryer, Lubert; Baylor, Denis A.

    1988-02-01

    The gating kinetics of the cGMP-activated cation channel of salamander retinal rods have been studied in excised membrane patches. Relaxations in patch current were observed after two kinds of perturbation: (i) fast jumps of cGMP concentration, generated by laser flash photolysis of a cGMP ester (``caged'' cGMP), and (ii) membrane voltage jumps, which perturb activation of the channel by cGMP. In both methods the speed of activation increased with the final cGMP concentration. The results are explained by a simple kinetic model in which activation involves three sequential cGMP binding steps with bimolecular rate constants close to the diffusion-controlled limit; fully liganded channels undergo rapid open-closed transitions. Voltage perturbs activation by changing the rate constant for channel closing, which increases with hyperpolarization. Intramolecular transitions of the fully liganded channel limit the kinetics of activation at high cGMP concentrations (>50 μ M), whereas at physiological cGMP concentrations (<5 μ M), the kinetics of activation are limited by the third cGMP binding step. The channel appears to be optimized for rapid responses to changes in cytoplasmic cGMP concentration.

  14. Ruthenium-based olefin metathesis catalysts bearing pH-responsive ligands: External control of catalyst solubility and activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balof, Shawna Lynn

    2011-12-01

    Sixteen novel, Ru-based olefin metathesis catalysts bearing pH responsive ligands were synthesized. The pH-responsive groups employed with these catalysts included dimethylamino (NMe2) modified NHC ligands as well as N-donor dimethylaminopyridine (DMAP) and 3-(o-pyridyl)propylidene ligands. These pH-responsive ligands provided the means by which the solubility and/or activity profiles of the catalysts produced could be controlled via acid addition. The main goal of this dissertation was to design catalyst systems capable of performing ring opening metathesis (ROMP) and ring closing metathesis (RCM) reactions in both organic and aqueous media. In an effort to quickly gain access to new catalyst structures, a template synthesis for functionalized NHC ligand precursors was designed, in addition to other strategies, to obtain ligand precursors with ancillary NMe2 groups. Kinetic studies for the catalysts produced from these precursors showed external control of catalyst solubility was afforded via protonation of the NMe2 groups of their NHC ligands. Additionally, this protonation afforded external control of catalyst propagation rates for several catalysts. This is the first known independent external control for the propagation rates of ROMP catalysts. The incorporation of pH-responsive N-donor ligands into catalyst structures also provided the means for the external control of metathesis activity, as the protonation of these ligands resulted in an increased initiation rate based on their fast and irreversible dissociation from the metal center. The enhanced external control makes these catalysts applicable to a wide range of applications, some of which have been explored by us and/or through collaboration. Three of the catalysts designed showed remarkable metathesis activity in aqueous media. These catalysts displayed comparable RCM activity in aqueous media to a class of water-soluble catalysts reported by Grubbs et al., considered to be the most active catalyst for

  15. Mechanokinetics of receptor-ligand interactions in cell adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ning; Lü, Shouqin; Zhang, Yan; Long, Mian

    2015-04-01

    Receptor-ligand interactions in blood flow are crucial to initiate such biological processes as inflammatory cascade, platelet thrombosis, as well as tumor metastasis. To mediate cell adhesion, the interacting receptors and ligands must be anchored onto two apposing surfaces of two cells or a cell and a substratum, i.e., two-dimensional (2D) binding, which is different from the binding of a soluble ligand in fluid phase to a receptor, i.e., three-dimensional (3D) binding. While numerous works have been focused on 3D kinetics of receptor-ligand interactions in the immune system, 2D kinetics and its regulations have been less understood, since no theoretical framework or experimental assays were established until 1993. Not only does the molecular structure dominate 2D binding kinetics, but the shear force in blood flow also regulates cell adhesion mediated by interacting receptors and ligands. Here, we provide an overview of current progress in 2D binding and regulations, mainly from our group. Relevant issues of theoretical frameworks, experimental measurements, kinetic rates and binding affinities, and force regulations are discussed.

  16. Ligand Release Pathways Obtained with WExplore: Residence Times and Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Alex; Lotz, Samuel D

    2016-06-23

    The binding of ligands with their molecular receptors is of tremendous importance in biology. Although much emphasis has been placed on characterizing binding sites and bound poses that determine the binding thermodynamics, the pathway by which a ligand binds importantly determines the binding kinetics. The computational study of entire unbiased ligand binding and release pathways is still an emerging field, made possible only recently by advances in computational hardware and sampling methodologies. We have developed one such method (WExplore) that is based on a weighted ensemble of trajectories, which we apply to ligand release for the first time, using a set of three previously characterized interactions between low-affinity ligands and the protein FKBP-12 (FK-506 binding protein). WExplore is found to be more efficient that conventional sampling, even for the nanosecond-scale unbinding events observed here. From a nonequilibrium ensemble of unbinding trajectories, we obtain ligand residence times and release pathways without using biasing forces or a Markovian assumption of transitions between regions. We introduce a set of analysis tools for unbinding transition pathways, including using von Mises-Fisher distributions to model clouds of ligand exit points, which provide a quantitative proxy for ligand surface diffusion. Differences between the transition pathway ensembles of the three ligands are identified and discussed.

  17. Ligand Release Pathways Obtained with WExplore: Residence Times and Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Alex; Lotz, Samuel D

    2016-06-23

    The binding of ligands with their molecular receptors is of tremendous importance in biology. Although much emphasis has been placed on characterizing binding sites and bound poses that determine the binding thermodynamics, the pathway by which a ligand binds importantly determines the binding kinetics. The computational study of entire unbiased ligand binding and release pathways is still an emerging field, made possible only recently by advances in computational hardware and sampling methodologies. We have developed one such method (WExplore) that is based on a weighted ensemble of trajectories, which we apply to ligand release for the first time, using a set of three previously characterized interactions between low-affinity ligands and the protein FKBP-12 (FK-506 binding protein). WExplore is found to be more efficient that conventional sampling, even for the nanosecond-scale unbinding events observed here. From a nonequilibrium ensemble of unbinding trajectories, we obtain ligand residence times and release pathways without using biasing forces or a Markovian assumption of transitions between regions. We introduce a set of analysis tools for unbinding transition pathways, including using von Mises-Fisher distributions to model clouds of ligand exit points, which provide a quantitative proxy for ligand surface diffusion. Differences between the transition pathway ensembles of the three ligands are identified and discussed. PMID:27231969

  18. Ligand modeling and design

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, B.P.

    1997-10-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop and implement a molecular design basis for selecting organic ligands that would be used in the cost-effective removal of specific radionuclides from nuclear waste streams. Organic ligands with metal ion specificity are critical components in the development of solvent extraction and ion exchange processes that are highly selective for targeted radionuclides. The traditional approach to the development of such ligands involves lengthy programs of organic synthesis and testing, which in the absence of reliable methods for screening compounds before synthesis, results in wasted research effort. The author`s approach breaks down and simplifies this costly process with the aid of computer-based molecular modeling techniques. Commercial software for organic molecular modeling is being configured to examine the interactions between organic ligands and metal ions, yielding an inexpensive, commercially or readily available computational tool that can be used to predict the structures and energies of ligand-metal complexes. Users will be able to correlate the large body of existing experimental data on structure, solution binding affinity, and metal ion selectivity to develop structural design criteria. These criteria will provide a basis for selecting ligands that can be implemented in separations technologies through collaboration with other DOE national laboratories and private industry. The initial focus will be to select ether-based ligands that can be applied to the recovery and concentration of the alkali and alkaline earth metal ions including cesium, strontium, and radium.

  19. electronic Ligand Builder and Optimisation Workbench (eLBOW): A tool for ligand coordinate and restraint generation

    SciTech Connect

    Moriarty, Nigel; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf; Adams, Paul

    2009-07-01

    The electronic Ligand Builder and Optimisation Workbench (eLBOW) is a program module of the PHENIX suite of computational crystallographic software. It's designed to be a flexible procedure using simple and fast quantum chemical techniques to provide chemically accurate information for novel and known ligands alike. A variety of input formats and options allow for the attainment of a number of diverse goals including geometry optimisation and generation of restraints.

  20. Ligand modeling and design

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, B.

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop and implement a molecular design basis for selecting organic ligands that would be used tin applications for the cost-effective removal of specific radionuclides from nuclear waste streams.

  1. Quantum.Ligand.Dock: protein-ligand docking with quantum entanglement refinement on a GPU system.

    PubMed

    Kantardjiev, Alexander A

    2012-07-01

    Quantum.Ligand.Dock (protein-ligand docking with graphic processing unit (GPU) quantum entanglement refinement on a GPU system) is an original modern method for in silico prediction of protein-ligand interactions via high-performance docking code. The main flavour of our approach is a combination of fast search with a special account for overlooked physical interactions. On the one hand, we take care of self-consistency and proton equilibria mutual effects of docking partners. On the other hand, Quantum.Ligand.Dock is the the only docking server offering such a subtle supplement to protein docking algorithms as quantum entanglement contributions. The motivation for development and proposition of the method to the community hinges upon two arguments-the fundamental importance of quantum entanglement contribution in molecular interaction and the realistic possibility to implement it by the availability of supercomputing power. The implementation of sophisticated quantum methods is made possible by parallelization at several bottlenecks on a GPU supercomputer. The high-performance implementation will be of use for large-scale virtual screening projects, structural bioinformatics, systems biology and fundamental research in understanding protein-ligand recognition. The design of the interface is focused on feasibility and ease of use. Protein and ligand molecule structures are supposed to be submitted as atomic coordinate files in PDB format. A customization section is offered for addition of user-specified charges, extra ionogenic groups with intrinsic pK(a) values or fixed ions. Final predicted complexes are ranked according to obtained scores and provided in PDB format as well as interactive visualization in a molecular viewer. Quantum.Ligand.Dock server can be accessed at http://87.116.85.141/LigandDock.html.

  2. Quantum.Ligand.Dock: protein-ligand docking with quantum entanglement refinement on a GPU system.

    PubMed

    Kantardjiev, Alexander A

    2012-07-01

    Quantum.Ligand.Dock (protein-ligand docking with graphic processing unit (GPU) quantum entanglement refinement on a GPU system) is an original modern method for in silico prediction of protein-ligand interactions via high-performance docking code. The main flavour of our approach is a combination of fast search with a special account for overlooked physical interactions. On the one hand, we take care of self-consistency and proton equilibria mutual effects of docking partners. On the other hand, Quantum.Ligand.Dock is the the only docking server offering such a subtle supplement to protein docking algorithms as quantum entanglement contributions. The motivation for development and proposition of the method to the community hinges upon two arguments-the fundamental importance of quantum entanglement contribution in molecular interaction and the realistic possibility to implement it by the availability of supercomputing power. The implementation of sophisticated quantum methods is made possible by parallelization at several bottlenecks on a GPU supercomputer. The high-performance implementation will be of use for large-scale virtual screening projects, structural bioinformatics, systems biology and fundamental research in understanding protein-ligand recognition. The design of the interface is focused on feasibility and ease of use. Protein and ligand molecule structures are supposed to be submitted as atomic coordinate files in PDB format. A customization section is offered for addition of user-specified charges, extra ionogenic groups with intrinsic pK(a) values or fixed ions. Final predicted complexes are ranked according to obtained scores and provided in PDB format as well as interactive visualization in a molecular viewer. Quantum.Ligand.Dock server can be accessed at http://87.116.85.141/LigandDock.html. PMID:22669908

  3. Kinetic study on biomass gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Bingyan, X.; Chuangzhi, W.; Zhengfen, L.; Guang, Z.X. )

    1992-09-01

    An experimental apparatus, with the features of fast heating rate and continuous record of reaction parameters, was developed to study kinetics of fast pyrolysis. The temperature effects, at a range of 400 C to 900 C, on pyrolysis rate, products profile, gas quality and quantity, and so on, were studied and the results are listed and analyzed. The effect of secondary reaction of gas phase at 700 C was tested and the regression result is expressed in an experimental formula. Based on the experimental results, the three-stage-reaction mechanism module is suggested. The kinetic expression to calculate gas formation rate is concluded as: d{alpha}/dt = A exp({minus}E/RT)(1 {minus} {alpha}){sup n}. The kinetic parameters of A, E, and n at different temperatures are given in the paper.

  4. Diffusion modifies the connectivity of kinetic schemes for multisite binding and catalysis.

    PubMed

    Gopich, Irina V; Szabo, Attila

    2013-12-01

    The simplest way to describe the influence of the relative diffusion of the reactants on the time course of bimolecular reactions is to modify or renormalize the phenomenological rate constants that enter into the rate equations of conventional chemical kinetics. However, for macromolecules with multiple inequivalent reactive sites, this is no longer sufficient, even in the low concentration limit. The physical reason is that an enzyme (or a ligand) that has just modified (or dissociated from) one site can bind to a neighboring site rather than diffuse away. This process is not described by the conventional chemical kinetics, which is only valid in the limit that diffusion is fast compared with reaction. Using an exactly solvable many-particle reaction-diffusion model, we show that the influence of diffusion on the kinetics of multisite binding and catalysis can be accounted for by not only scaling the rates, but also by introducing new connections into the kinetic scheme. The rate constants that describe these new transitions or reaction channels turn out to have a transparent physical interpretation: The chemical rates are scaled by the appropriate probabilities that a pair of reactants, which are initially in contact, bind rather than diffuse apart. The theory is illustrated by application to phosphorylation of a multisite substrate.

  5. Macromolecular Crowding Modulates Actomyosin Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Ge, Jinghua; Bouriyaphone, Sherry D; Serebrennikova, Tamara A; Astashkin, Andrei V; Nesmelov, Yuri E

    2016-07-12

    Actomyosin kinetics is usually studied in dilute solutions, which do not reflect conditions in the cytoplasm. In cells, myosin and actin work in a dense macromolecular environment. High concentrations of macromolecules dramatically reduce the amount of free space available for all solutes, which results in an effective increase of the solutes' chemical potential and protein stabilization. Moreover, in a crowded solution, the chemical potential depends on the size of the solute, with larger molecules experiencing a larger excluded volume than smaller ones. Therefore, since myosin interacts with two ligands of different sizes (actin and ATP), macromolecular crowding can modulate the kinetics of individual steps of the actomyosin ATPase cycle. To emulate the effect of crowding in cells, we studied actomyosin cycle reactions in the presence of a high-molecular-weight polymer, Ficoll70. We observed an increase in the maximum velocity of the actomyosin ATPase cycle, and our transient-kinetics experiments showed that virtually all individual steps of the actomyosin cycle were affected by the addition of Ficoll70. The observed effects of macromolecular crowding on the myosin-ligand interaction cannot be explained by the increase of a solute's chemical potential. A time-resolved Förster resonance energy transfer experiment confirmed that the myosin head assumes a more compact conformation in the presence of Ficoll70 than in a dilute solution. We conclude that the crowding-induced myosin conformational change plays a major role in the changed kinetics of actomyosin ATPase. PMID:27410745

  6. Binding Kinetics in Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Ferruz, Noelia; De Fabritiis, Gianni

    2016-07-01

    Over the last years, researchers have increasingly become interested in measuring and understanding drugs' binding kinetics, namely the time in which drug and its target associate and dissociate. Historically, drug discovery programs focused on the optimization of target affinity as a proxy of in-vivo efficacy. However, often the efficacy of a ligand is not appropriately described by the in-vitro measured drug-receptor affinity, but rather depends on the lifetime of the in-vivo drug-receptor interaction. In this review we review recent works that highlight the importance of binding kinetics, molecular determinants for rational optimization and the recent emergence of computational methods as powerful tools in measuring and understanding binding kinetics. PMID:27492236

  7. Inverse Kinetics

    2000-03-20

    Given the space-independent, one energy group reactor kinetics equations and the initial conditions, this prgram determines the time variation of reactivity required to produce the given input of flux-time data.

  8. Essential role of conformational selection in ligand binding

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Austin D.; Pozzi, Nicola; Chen, Zhiwei; Di Cera, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    Two competing and mutually exclusive mechanisms of ligand recognition – conformational selection and induced fit - have dominated our interpretation of ligand binding in biological macromolecules for almost six decades. Conformational selection posits the pre-existence of multiple conformations of the macromolecule from which the ligand selects the optimal one. Induced fit, on the other hand, postulates the existence of conformational rearrangements of the original conformation into an optimal one that is induced by binding of the ligand. In the former case, conformational transitions precede the binding event; in the latter, conformational changes follow the binding step. Kineticists have used a facile criterion to distinguish between the two mechanisms based on the dependence of the rate of relaxation to equilibrium, kobs, on the ligand concentration, [L]. A value of kobs decreasing hyperbolically with [L] is seen as diagnostic of conformational selection, while a value of kobs increasing hyperbolically with [L] is considered diagnostic of induced fit. However, this simple conclusion is only valid in the rather unrealistic assumption of conformational transitions being much slower than binding and dissociation events. In general, induced fit only produces values of kobs that increase with [L] but conformational selection is more versatile and is associated with values of kobs that increase, decrease with or are independent of [L]. The richer repertoire of kinetic properties of conformational selection applies to kinetic mechanisms with single or multiple saturable relaxations and explains the behavior of nearly all experimental systems reported in the literature thus far. Conformational selection is always sufficient and often necessary to account for the relaxation kinetics of ligand binding to a biological macromolecule and is therefore an essential component of any binding mechanism. On the other hand, induced fit is never necessary and only sufficient in a

  9. Nanomaterials can dynamically steer cell responses to biological ligands.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ram I; Schwarzbauer, Jean E; Moghe, Prabhas V

    2011-01-17

    Traditional tissue regeneration approaches to activate cell behaviors on biomaterials rely on the use of extracellular-matrix-based or soluble growth-factor cues. In this article, a novel approach is highlighted to dynamically steer cellular phenomena such as cell motility based on nanoscale substratum features of biological ligands. Albumin-derived nanocarriers (ANCs) with variable nanoscale-size features are functionalized with fibronectin III9-10 matrix ligands, and their effects on primary human keratinocyte activation are investigated. The presentation of fibronectin fragments from ANCs significantly enhances cell migration as compared to free ligands at equivalent concentrations. Notably, cell migration is influenced by the size of the underlying ANCs even for variably sized ANCs covered in comparable levels of fibronectin fragment. For equivalent ligand concentrations, cell migration on the smaller-sized ANCs (30 and 50 nm) is significantly enhanced as compared to that on larger-sized ANCs (75 and 100 nm). In contrast, the enhancement of cell migration on nanocarriers is abolished by the use of immobilized, biofunctionalized ANCs, indicating that "dynamic" nanocarrier internalization events underlie the role of nanocarrier geometry on the differential regulation of cell migration kinetics. Uptake studies using fluorescent ANCs indicate that larger-sized ANCs cause delayed endocytic kinetics and hence could present barriers for internalization during the cell adhesion and motility processes. Motile cells exhibit diminished migration upon exposure to clathrin inhibitors, but not caveolin inhibitors, suggesting the role of clathrin-mediated endocytosis in facilitating cell migratory responsiveness to the nanocarriers. Overall, a monotonic relationship is found between the nanocarrier cytointernalization rate and the cell migration rate, suggesting the possibility of designing biointerfacial features for the dynamic control of cell migration. Thus, the

  10. Single-molecule kinetics and footprinting of DNA bis-intercalation: the paradigmatic case of Thiocoraline

    PubMed Central

    Camunas-Soler, Joan; Manosas, Maria; Frutos, Silvia; Tulla-Puche, Judit; Albericio, Fernando; Ritort, Felix

    2015-01-01

    DNA bis-intercalators are widely used in molecular biology with applications ranging from DNA imaging to anticancer pharmacology. Two fundamental aspects of these ligands are the lifetime of the bis-intercalated complexes and their sequence selectivity. Here, we perform single-molecule optical tweezers experiments with the peptide Thiocoraline showing, for the first time, that bis-intercalation is driven by a very slow off-rate that steeply decreases with applied force. This feature reveals the existence of a long-lived (minutes) mono-intercalated intermediate that contributes to the extremely long lifetime of the complex (hours). We further exploit this particularly slow kinetics to determine the thermodynamics of binding and persistence length of bis-intercalated DNA for a given fraction of bound ligand, a measurement inaccessible in previous studies of faster intercalating agents. We also develop a novel single-molecule footprinting technique based on DNA unzipping and determine the preferred binding sites of Thiocoraline with one base-pair resolution. This fast and radiolabelling-free footprinting technique provides direct access to the binding sites of small ligands to nucleic acids without the need of cleavage agents. Overall, our results provide new insights into the binding pathway of bis-intercalators and the reported selectivity might be of relevance for this and other anticancer drugs interfering with DNA replication and transcription in carcinogenic cell lines. PMID:25690887

  11. Single-molecule kinetics and footprinting of DNA bis-intercalation: the paradigmatic case of Thiocoraline.

    PubMed

    Camunas-Soler, Joan; Manosas, Maria; Frutos, Silvia; Tulla-Puche, Judit; Albericio, Fernando; Ritort, Felix

    2015-03-11

    DNA bis-intercalators are widely used in molecular biology with applications ranging from DNA imaging to anticancer pharmacology. Two fundamental aspects of these ligands are the lifetime of the bis-intercalated complexes and their sequence selectivity. Here, we perform single-molecule optical tweezers experiments with the peptide Thiocoraline showing, for the first time, that bis-intercalation is driven by a very slow off-rate that steeply decreases with applied force. This feature reveals the existence of a long-lived (minutes) mono-intercalated intermediate that contributes to the extremely long lifetime of the complex (hours). We further exploit this particularly slow kinetics to determine the thermodynamics of binding and persistence length of bis-intercalated DNA for a given fraction of bound ligand, a measurement inaccessible in previous studies of faster intercalating agents. We also develop a novel single-molecule footprinting technique based on DNA unzipping and determine the preferred binding sites of Thiocoraline with one base-pair resolution. This fast and radiolabelling-free footprinting technique provides direct access to the binding sites of small ligands to nucleic acids without the need of cleavage agents. Overall, our results provide new insights into the binding pathway of bis-intercalators and the reported selectivity might be of relevance for this and other anticancer drugs interfering with DNA replication and transcription in carcinogenic cell lines. PMID:25690887

  12. Analyzing a kinetic titration series using affinity biosensors.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Robert; Katsamba, Phinikoula S; Nordin, Helena; Pol, Ewa; Myszka, David G

    2006-02-01

    The classical method of measuring binding constants with affinity-based biosensors involves testing several analyte concentrations over the same ligand surface and regenerating the surface between binding cycles. Here we describe an alternative approach to collecting kinetic binding data, which we call "kinetic titration." This method involves sequentially injecting an analyte concentration series without any regeneration steps. Through a combination of simulation and experimentation, we show that this method can be as robust as the classical method of analysis. In addition, kinetic titrations can be more efficient than the conventional data collection method and allow us to fully characterize analyte binding to ligand surfaces that are difficult to regenerate.

  13. Computational Exploration of a Protein Receptor Binding Space with Student Proposed Peptide Ligands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Matthew D.; Phillips, Paul; Turner, Matthew W.; Katz, Michael; Lew, Sarah; Bradburn, Sarah; Andersen, Tim; McDougal, Owen M.

    2016-01-01

    Computational molecular docking is a fast and effective "in silico" method for the analysis of binding between a protein receptor model and a ligand. The visualization and manipulation of protein to ligand binding in three-dimensional space represents a powerful tool in the biochemistry curriculum to enhance student learning. The…

  14. Further Insight into the Lability of MeCN Ligands of Cytotoxic Cycloruthenated Compounds: Evidence for the Antisymbiotic Effect Trans to the Carbon Atom at the Ru Center.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Ana Soraya Lima; Werlé, Christophe; Colunga, Claudia Olivia Oliva; Rodríguez, Cecilia Franco; Toscano, Ruben Alfredo; Le Lagadec, Ronan; Pfeffer, Michel

    2015-08-01

    The two MeCN ligands in [Ru(2-C6H4-2'-Py-κC,N)(Phen, trans-C)(MeCN)2]PF6 (1), both trans to a sp(2) hybridized N atom, cannot be substituted by any other ligand. In contrast, the isomerized derivative [Ru(2-C6H4-2'-Py-κC,N)(Phen, cis-C)(MeCN)2]PF6 (2), in which one MeCN ligand is now trans to the C atom of the phenyl ring orthometalated to Ru, leads to fast and quantitative substitution reactions with several monodentate ligands. With PPh3, 2 affords [Ru(2-C6H4-2'-Py-κC,N)(Phen, cis-C)(PPh3)(MeCN)]PF6 (3), in which PPh3 is trans to the C σ bound to Ru. Compound 3 is not kinetically stable, because, under thermodynamic control, it leads to 4, in which the PPh3 is trans to a N atom of the Phen ligand. Dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) can also substitute a MeCN ligand in 2, leading to 5, in which DMSO is coordinated to Ru via its S atom trans to the N atom of the Phen ligand, the isomer under thermodynamic control being the only compound observed. We also found evidence for the fast to very fast substitution of MeCN in 2 by water or a chloride anion by studying the electronic spectra of 2 in the presence of water or NBu4Cl, respectively. An isomerization related to that observed between 3 and 4 is also found for the known monophosphine derivative [Ru(2-C6H4-2'-Py-κC,N)(PPh3, trans-C)(MeCN)3]PF6 (10), in which the PPh3 is located trans to the C of the cyclometalated 2-phenylpyridine, since, upon treatment by refluxing MeCN, it leads to its isomer 11, [Ru(2-C6H4-2'-Py-κC,N)(PPh3, cis-C)(MeCN)3]PF6. Further substitutions are also observed on 11, whereby N^N chelates (N^N = 2,2'-bipyridine and phenanthroline) substitute two MeCN ligands, affording [Ru(2-C6H4-2'-Py-κC,N)(PPh3, cis-C)(N^N)(MeCN)]PF6 (12a and 12b). Altogether, the behavior of the obtained complexes by ligand substitution reactions can be rationalized by an antisymbiotic effect on the Ru center, trans to the C atom of the cyclometalated unit, leading to compounds having the least nucleophilic ligand trans to C

  15. Fast valve

    DOEpatents

    Van Dyke, William J.

    1992-01-01

    A fast valve is disclosed that can close on the order of 7 milliseconds. It is closed by the force of a compressed air spring with the moving parts of the valve designed to be of very light weight and the valve gate being of wedge shaped with O-ring sealed faces to provide sealing contact without metal to metal contact. The combination of the O-ring seal and an air cushion create a soft final movement of the valve closure to prevent the fast air acting valve from having a harsh closing.

  16. Fast valve

    DOEpatents

    Van Dyke, W.J.

    1992-04-07

    A fast valve is disclosed that can close on the order of 7 milliseconds. It is closed by the force of a compressed air spring with the moving parts of the valve designed to be of very light weight and the valve gate being of wedge shaped with O-ring sealed faces to provide sealing contact without metal to metal contact. The combination of the O-ring seal and an air cushion create a soft final movement of the valve closure to prevent the fast air acting valve from having a harsh closing. 4 figs.

  17. Revealing equilibrium and rate constants of weak and fast noncovalent interactions.

    PubMed

    Mironov, Gleb G; Okhonin, Victor; Gorelsky, Serge I; Berezovski, Maxim V

    2011-03-15

    Rate and equilibrium constants of weak noncovalent molecular interactions are extremely difficult to measure. Here, we introduced a homogeneous approach called equilibrium capillary electrophoresis of equilibrium mixtures (ECEEM) to determine k(on), k(off), and K(d) of weak (K(d) > 1 μM) and fast kinetics (relaxation time, τ < 0.1 s) in quasi-equilibrium for multiple unlabeled ligands simultaneously in one microreactor. Conceptually, an equilibrium mixture (EM) of a ligand (L), target (T), and a complex (C) is prepared. The mixture is introduced into the beginning of a capillary reactor with aspect ratio >1000 filled with T. Afterward, differential mobility of L, T, and C along the reactor is induced by an electric field. The combination of differential mobility of reactants and their interactions leads to a change of the EM peak shape. This change is a function of rate constants, so the rate and equilibrium constants can be directly determined from the analysis of the EM peak shape (width and symmetry) and propagation pattern along the reactor. We proved experimentally the use of ECEEM for multiplex determination of kinetic parameters describing weak (3 mM > K(d) > 80 μM) and fast (0.25 s ≥ τ ≥ 0.9 ms) noncovalent interactions between four small molecule drugs (ibuprofen, S-flurbiprofen, salicylic acid and phenylbutazone) and α- and β-cyclodextrins. The affinity of the drugs was significantly higher for β-cyclodextrin than α-cyclodextrin and mostly determined by the rate constant of complex formation.

  18. CHEMICAL GENETICS: LIGAND-BASED DISCOVERY OF GENE FUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Stockwell, Brent R.

    2011-01-01

    Chemical genetics is the study of gene-product function in a cellular or organismal context using exogenous ligands. In this approach, small molecules that bind directly to proteins are used to alter protein function, enabling a kinetic analysis of the in vivo consequences of these changes. Recent advances have strongly enhanced the power of exogenous ligands such that they can resemble genetic mutations in terms of their general applicability and target specificity. The growing sophistication of this approach raises the possibility of its application to any biological process. PMID:11253651

  19. LigandRNA: computational predictor of RNA-ligand interactions.

    PubMed

    Philips, Anna; Milanowska, Kaja; Lach, Grzegorz; Bujnicki, Janusz M

    2013-12-01

    RNA molecules have recently become attractive as potential drug targets due to the increased awareness of their importance in key biological processes. The increase of the number of experimentally determined RNA 3D structures enabled structure-based searches for small molecules that can specifically bind to defined sites in RNA molecules, thereby blocking or otherwise modulating their function. However, as of yet, computational methods for structure-based docking of small molecule ligands to RNA molecules are not as well established as analogous methods for protein-ligand docking. This motivated us to create LigandRNA, a scoring function for the prediction of RNA-small molecule interactions. Our method employs a grid-based algorithm and a knowledge-based potential derived from ligand-binding sites in the experimentally solved RNA-ligand complexes. As an input, LigandRNA takes an RNA receptor file and a file with ligand poses. As an output, it returns a ranking of the poses according to their score. The predictive power of LigandRNA favorably compares to five other publicly available methods. We found that the combination of LigandRNA and Dock6 into a "meta-predictor" leads to further improvement in the identification of near-native ligand poses. The LigandRNA program is available free of charge as a web server at http://ligandrna.genesilico.pl.

  20. Analysis of macromolecules, ligands and macromolecule-ligand complexes

    DOEpatents

    Von Dreele, Robert B.

    2008-12-23

    A method for determining atomic level structures of macromolecule-ligand complexes through high-resolution powder diffraction analysis and a method for providing suitable microcrystalline powder for diffraction analysis are provided. In one embodiment, powder diffraction data is collected from samples of polycrystalline macromolecule and macromolecule-ligand complex and the refined structure of the macromolecule is used as an approximate model for a combined Rietveld and stereochemical restraint refinement of the macromolecule-ligand complex. A difference Fourier map is calculated and the ligand position and points of interaction between the atoms of the macromolecule and the atoms of the ligand can be deduced and visualized. A suitable polycrystalline sample of macromolecule-ligand complex can be produced by physically agitating a mixture of lyophilized macromolecule, ligand and a solvent.

  1. Multi-scale times and modes of fast and slow relaxation in solutions with coexisting spherical and cylindrical micelles according to the difference Becker-Döring kinetic equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babintsev, Ilya A.; Adzhemyan, Loran Ts.; Shchekin, Alexander K.

    2014-08-01

    The eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the matrix of coefficients of the linearized kinetic equations applied to aggregation in surfactant solution determine the full spectrum of characteristic times and specific modes of micellar relaxation. The dependence of these relaxation times and modes on the total surfactant concentration has been analyzed for concentrations in the vicinity and well above the second critical micelle concentration (cmc2) for systems with coexisting spherical and cylindrical micelles. The analysis has been done on the basis of a discrete form of the Becker-Döring kinetic equations employing the Smoluchowsky diffusion model for the attachment rates of surfactant monomers to surfactant aggregates with matching the rates for spherical aggregates and the rates for large cylindrical micelles. The equilibrium distribution of surfactant aggregates in solution has been modeled as having one maximum for monomers, another maximum for spherical micelles and wide slowly descending branch for cylindrical micelles. The results of computations have been compared with the analytical ones known in the limiting cases from solutions of the continuous Becker-Döring kinetic equation. They demonstrated a fair agreement even in the vicinity of the cmc2 where the analytical theory looses formally its applicability.

  2. Investigations of ultrafast ligand rebinding to heme and heme proteins using temperature and strong magnetic field perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhenyu

    study the ligand recombination after photolysis. No magnetic field induced rate changes are observed in any of these ligand recombination processes within the experimental detection limit. A magnetic field dependent CO rebinding behavior is observed for the FePPIX-CO sample in 80%glycerol/20%water environment. Careful data analysis indicates that this magnetic field induced change is due to the amplitude difference of a "fast" (<10ps) response with and without the magnetic field application (the amplitude changes from ˜55% at 0 Tesla to ˜45% at 10 Tesla). Kinetics of CO rebinding to FePPIX in 80%glycerol at the extremes of the magnetic field intensities (0Tesla vs. 10 Tesla) can be decomposed into a ligand rebinding process plus two 5ps decays heme cooling with different amplitudes. It leads to suggest a magnetic field induced change of a short-lived heme cooling response after photolysis. Also, CO rebinding kinetics to different heme compounds demonstrates a wide range for the Arrhenius pre-factors. This work reveals that the "spin-selection rule" does not play a key role in the recombination process of CO to heme iron. In Appendix 1, the recombination of oxymyoglobin and its mutants is investigated in the temperature range from 275K to 318K, using a home-made cryostat. Quite surprisingly, the O2 molecule rebinds to heme iron inside myoglobin with dramatically different behavior as the temperature is varied, depending on the protein environment. It shows little dependence (Mb), no dependence (V68W Mb mutant) and large dependence (L29W Mb mutant) in this 40K temperature window. To expand this temperature window, since the motor inside the cryostat is capable to work as low as 230K, glycerol is introduced into the protein preparation. It is observed that protein samples in a glycerol/water mixture, even with only 20% glycerol (in weight), the temperature dependences of the O2 rebinding to heme iron are dramatically altered. The O 2 rebinding behavior also shows a high

  3. Carbodiphosphoranes and Related Ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petz, Wolfgang; Frenking, Gernot

    The theoretical and experimental research on carbodiphosphoranes C(PR3)2 and related compounds CL2, both as free molecules and as ligands in transition metal complexes, is reviewed. Carbodiphosphoranes are examples of divalent carbon(0) compounds CL2 which have peculiar donor properties that are due to the fact that the central carbon atom has two lone electron pairs. The bonding situation is best described in terms of L→C←L donor acceptor interactions which distinguishes CL2 compounds (carbones) from divalent carbon(II) compounds (carbenes) through the number of lone electron pairs. The structures and stabilities of transition metal complexes with ligands CL2 can be understood and predictions can be made considering the double donor ability of the carbone compounds.

  4. Reduction of persulfate ion by carbon monoxide in alkaline medium: the effect of stoichiometric and astoichiometric components on the reaction Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Abilov, M.T.; Golodov, V.A.

    1986-06-01

    The effect of the concentration of oxidant, cadalyst, and various ligands on the kinetics of the oxidation of CO have been studied kinetically, potentiometrically, and spectrometrically, and a general mechanism for the process is proposed.

  5. Ligand exclusion on acetylcholinesterase.

    PubMed

    Berman, H A; Leonard, K

    1990-11-27

    This paper examines covalent reactivity of AchE with respect to cationic and uncharged methylphosphonates and substrates in the absence and presence of cationic ligands selective for the active center and the peripheral anionic site. The organophosphorus inhibitors are enantiomeric alkyl methylphosphonothioates (1-5) containing cycloheptyl and isopropyl phosphono ester groups and S-methyl, S-n-pentyl, and S-[beta-(trimethylammonio)ethyl] leaving groups; these agents differ in their configuration about phosphorus and their steric, hydrophobic, and electrostatic characteristics. The synthetic substrates examined are acetylthiocholine, p-nitrophenyl acetate, and 7-acetoxy-4-methylcoumarin (7AMC). Antagonism of the methylphosphonothioate reaction by cationic ligands is strongly dependent on the nature of both the cation and the methylphosphonate but independent of the configuration about phosphorus. While all cations cause linear mixed inhibition of acetylthiocholine hydrolysis, there are observed a variety of inhibition patterns of 7AMC and p-nitrophenyl acetate hydrolysis that are distinctly nonlinear, as well as patterns in which the reciprocal plots intersect in the upper right quadrant. Strong antagonism of cationic (methylphosphonyl)thiocholines correlates very well with linear inhibition of acetylthiocholine. Ligands that cause only negligible antagonism of the uncharged methylphosphonates display nonlinear inhibition of uncharged substrates. These relationships, since they are most pronounced for peripheral site ligands and are strongly dependent on the charge carried by the reactant, suggest that the peripheral anionic site alters enzyme reactivity through an electrostatic interaction with the net negative active center. Such behavior indicates a potential role for the peripheral anionic site in conserving AchE catalytic efficiency within a narrow range of values. PMID:2271673

  6. EGF receptor ligands: recent advances

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Bhuminder; Carpenter, Graham; Coffey, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Seven ligands bind to and activate the mammalian epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR/ERBB1/HER1): EGF, transforming growth factor-alpha (TGFA), heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HBEGF), betacellulin (BTC), amphiregulin (AREG), epiregulin (EREG), and epigen (EPGN). Of these, EGF, TGFA, HBEGF, and BTC are thought to be high-affinity ligands, whereas AREG, EREG, and EPGN constitute low-affinity ligands. This focused review is meant to highlight recent studies related to actions of the individual EGFR ligands, the interesting biology that has been uncovered, and relevant advances related to ligand interactions with the EGFR.

  7. EGF receptor ligands: recent advances.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bhuminder; Carpenter, Graham; Coffey, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    Seven ligands bind to and activate the mammalian epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR/ERBB1/HER1): EGF, transforming growth factor-alpha (TGFA), heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HBEGF), betacellulin (BTC), amphiregulin (AREG), epiregulin (EREG), and epigen (EPGN). Of these, EGF, TGFA, HBEGF, and BTC are thought to be high-affinity ligands, whereas AREG, EREG, and EPGN constitute low-affinity ligands. This focused review is meant to highlight recent studies related to actions of the individual EGFR ligands, the interesting biology that has been uncovered, and relevant advances related to ligand interactions with the EGFR. PMID:27635238

  8. EGF receptor ligands: recent advances

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Bhuminder; Carpenter, Graham; Coffey, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Seven ligands bind to and activate the mammalian epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR/ERBB1/HER1): EGF, transforming growth factor-alpha (TGFA), heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HBEGF), betacellulin (BTC), amphiregulin (AREG), epiregulin (EREG), and epigen (EPGN). Of these, EGF, TGFA, HBEGF, and BTC are thought to be high-affinity ligands, whereas AREG, EREG, and EPGN constitute low-affinity ligands. This focused review is meant to highlight recent studies related to actions of the individual EGFR ligands, the interesting biology that has been uncovered, and relevant advances related to ligand interactions with the EGFR. PMID:27635238

  9. Rescoring ligand docking poses.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Shijun; Zhang, Youping; Xiu, Zhilong

    2010-05-01

    The ranking of ligand docking poses according to certain scoring systems to identify the best fit is the most important step in virtual database screening for drug discovery. By focusing on method development strategy, this review provides possibilities for constructing rescoring approaches based on an overview of recent developments in the field. These developments can be classified into three categories. The first category involves a scaling approach that employs a factor to scale the primary scoring function. These scaling factors are defined with respect to the geometrical match between the location of a ligand and the target binding site, or defined according to a molecular weight distribution consistent with the empirical range of molecular weights of drug-like compounds. The second category involves consensus scoring approaches that use multiple scoring functions to rank the ligand poses retained in a docking procedure, based on the preliminary ranking according to a primary scoring function. The final category involves the addition of selected accuracy-oriented energy terms, such as the solvent effect and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics treatments. PMID:20443166

  10. LASSO-ligand activity by surface similarity order: a new tool for ligand based virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Reid, Darryl; Sadjad, Bashir S; Zsoldos, Zsolt; Simon, Aniko

    2008-01-01

    Virtual Ligand Screening (VLS) has become an integral part of the drug discovery process for many pharmaceutical companies. Ligand similarity searches provide a very powerful method of screening large databases of ligands to identify possible hits. If these hits belong to new chemotypes the method is deemed even more successful. eHiTS LASSO uses a new interacting surface point types (ISPT) molecular descriptor that is generated from the 3D structure of the ligand, but unlike most 3D descriptors it is conformation independent. Combined with a neural network machine learning technique, LASSO screens molecular databases at an ultra fast speed of 1 million structures in under 1 min on a standard PC. The results obtained from eHiTS LASSO trained on relatively small training sets of just 2, 4 or 8 actives are presented using the diverse directory of useful decoys (DUD) dataset. It is shown that over a wide range of receptor families, eHiTS LASSO is consistently able to enrich screened databases and provides scaffold hopping ability.

  11. INFLUENCE OF NATURAL AND SYNTHETIC ORGANIC LIGANDS ON THE STABILITY AND MOBILITY OF REDUCED TC(IV)

    SciTech Connect

    Nathalie A. Wall; Baohua Gu

    2012-12-20

    The primary objectives were (1) to quantify the interactions of organic ligands with Tc(IV) through the generation of thermodynamic (complexation) and kinetic parameters needed to assess and predict the mobility of reduced Tc(IV) at DOE contaminated sites; and (2) to determine the impact of organic ligands on the mobility and fate of reduced Tc(IV) under field geochemical conditions.

  12. New efficient ligand for sub-mol % copper-catalyzed C-N cross-coupling reactions running under air.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Per-Fredrik; Astvik, Peter; Norrby, Per-Ola

    2012-01-01

    A new efficient ligand, N,N''-dimethyldiethylene triamine (DMDETA), has been synthesized and evaluated for sub-mol % copper-catalyzed C-N cross-coupling reactions. The efficiency of the ligand was determined by kinetic methods. DMDETA proved to display efficiency similar to DMEDA and, in addition, the resulting catalyst was tolerant to air. PMID:23209530

  13. New efficient ligand for sub-mol % copper-catalyzed C–N cross-coupling reactions running under air

    PubMed Central

    Larsson, Per-Fredrik; Astvik, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Summary A new efficient ligand, N,N’’-dimethyldiethylene triamine (DMDETA), has been synthesized and evaluated for sub-mol % copper-catalyzed C–N cross-coupling reactions. The efficiency of the ligand was determined by kinetic methods. DMDETA proved to display efficiency similar to DMEDA and, in addition, the resulting catalyst was tolerant to air. PMID:23209530

  14. Bexarotene ligand pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Hurst, R E

    2000-12-01

    Bexarotene (LGD-1069), from Ligand, was the first retinoid X receptor (RXR)-selective, antitumor retinoid to enter clinical trials. The company launched the drug for the treatment of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL), as Targretin capsules, in the US in January 2000 [359023]. The company filed an NDA for Targretin capsules in June 1999, and for topical gel in December 1999 [329011], [349982] specifically for once-daily oral administration for the treatment of patients with early-stage CTCL who have not tolerated other therapies, patients with refractory or persistent early stage CTCL and patients with refractory advanced stage CTCL. The FDA approved Targretin capsules at the end of December 1999 for once-daily oral treatment of all stages of CTCL in patients refractory to at least one prior systemic therapy, at an initial dose of 300 mg/m2/day. After an NDA was submitted in December 1999 for Targretin gel, the drug received Priority Review status for use as a treatment of cutaneous lesions in patients with stage IA, IB or IIA CTCL [354836]. The FDA issued an approvable letter in June 2000, and granted marketing clearance for CTCL in the same month [370687], [372768], [372769], [373279]. Ligand had received Orphan Drug designation for this indication [329011]. At the request of the FDA, Ligand agreed to carry out certain post-approval phase IV and pharmacokinetic studies [351604]. The company filed an MAA with the EMEA for Targretin Capsules to treat lymphoma in November 1999 [348944]. The NDA for Targretin gel is based on a multicenter phase III trial that was conducted in the US, Canada, Europe and Australia involving 50 patients and a multicenter phase I/II clinical program involving 67 patients. Targretin gel was evaluated for the treatment of patients with early stage CTCL (IA-IIA) who were refractory to, intolerant to, or reached a response plateau for at least 6 months on at least two prior therapies. Efficacy results exceeded the protocol-defined response

  15. Analysis of cell locomotion on ligand gradient substrates.

    PubMed

    Sarvestani, Alireza S; Jabbari, Esmaiel

    2009-06-01

    Directional cell motility plays a key role in many biological processes like morphogenesis, inflammation, wound repair, angiogenesis, immune response, and tumor metastasis. Cells respond to the gradient in surface ligand density by directed locomotion towards the direction of higher ligand density. Theoretical models which address the physical basis underlying the regulatory effect of ligand gradient on cell motility are highly desirable. Predictive models not only contribute to a better understanding of biological processes, but they also provide a quantitative interconnection between cell motility and biophysical properties of the extracellular matrix (ECM) for rational design of biomaterials as scaffolds in tissue engineering. In this work, we consider a one-dimensional (1D) continuum viscoelastic model to predict the cell velocity in response to linearly increasing density of surface ligands on a substrate. The cell is considered as a 1D linear viscoelastic object with position dependent elasticity due to the variation in actin network density. The cell-substrate interaction is characterized by a frictional force, controlled by the density of ligand-receptor pairs. The generation of contractile stresses is described in terms of kinetic equations for the reactions between actins, myosins, and guanine nucleotide regulatory proteins. The model predictions show a reasonable agreement with experimentally measured cell speeds, considering biologically relevant values for the model parameters. The model predicts a biphasic relationship between cell speed and slope of gradient as well as a maximum limiting speed after a finite migration time. For a given slope of ligand gradient, the onset of the limiting speed appears at longer times for substrates with lower ligand gradients. The model can be applied to the design of biomaterials as scaffolds for guided tissue regeneration as it predicts an optimum range for the slope of ligand gradient. PMID:19205048

  16. A kinetic study of the reactions of Fe+ with N2O, N2, O2, CO2 and H2O, and the ligand-switching reactions Fe+.X + Y --> Fe+.Y + X (X = N2, O2, CO2; Y = O2, H2O).

    PubMed

    Vondrak, T; Woodcock, K R I; Plane, J M C

    2006-01-28

    A series of reactions involving Fe(+) ions were studied by the pulsed laser ablation of an iron target, with detection of ions by quadrupole mass spectrometry at the downstream end of a fast flow tube. The reactions of Fe(+) with N(2)O, N(2) and O(2) were studied in order to benchmark this new technique. Extending measurements of the rate coefficient for Fe(+) + N(2)O from 773 K to 185 K shows that the reaction exhibits marked non-Arrhenius behaviour, which appears to be explained by excitation of the N(2)O bending vibrational modes. The recombination of Fe(+) with CO(2) and H(2)O in He was then studied over a range of pressure and temperature. The data were fitted by RRKM theory combined with ab initio quantum calculations on Fe(+).CO(2) and Fe(+).H(2)O, yielding the following results (120-400 K and 0-10(3) Torr). For Fe(+) + CO(2): k(rec,0) = 1.0 x 10(-29) (T/300 K)(-2.31) cm(6) molecule(-2) s(-1); k(rec,infinity) = 8.1 x 10(-10) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1). For Fe(+) + H(2)O: k(rec,0) = 5.3 x 10(-29) (T/300 K)(-2.02) cm(6) molecule(-2) s(-1); k(rec,infinity) = 2.1 x 10(-9) (T/300 K)(-0.41) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1). The uncertainty in these rate coefficients is determined using a Monte Carlo procedure. A series of exothermic ligand-switching reactions were also studied at 294 K: k(Fe(+).N(2) + O(2)) = (3.17 +/- 0.41) x 10(-10), k(Fe(+).CO(2) + O(2)) = (2.16 +/- 0.35) x 10(-10), k(Fe(+).N(2) + H(2)O) = (1.25 +/- 0.14) x 10(-9) and k(Fe(+).O(2) + H(2)O) = (8.79 +/- 1.30) x 10(-10) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), which are all between 36 and 52% of their theoretical upper limits calculated from long-range capture theory. Finally, the role of these reactions in the chemistry of meteor-ablated iron in the upper atmosphere is discussed. The removal rates of Fe(+) by N(2), O(2), CO(2) and H(2)O at 90 km altitude are approximately 0.1, 0.07, 3 x 10(-4) and 1 x 10(-6) s(-1), respectively. The initially formed Fe(+).N(2) and Fe(+).O(2) are converted into the H(2)O complex at

  17. Kinetics of Social Contagion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Zhongyuan; Iñiguez, Gerardo; Karsai, Márton; Kertész, János

    2015-11-01

    Diffusion of information, behavioral patterns or innovations follows diverse pathways depending on a number of conditions, including the structure of the underlying social network, the sensitivity to peer pressure and the influence of media. Here we study analytically and by simulations a general model that incorporates threshold mechanism capturing sensitivity to peer pressure, the effect of "immune" nodes who never adopt, and a perpetual flow of external information. While any constant, nonzero rate of dynamically introduced spontaneous adopters leads to global spreading, the kinetics by which the asymptotic state is approached shows rich behavior. In particular, we find that, as a function of the immune node density, there is a transition from fast to slow spreading governed by entirely different mechanisms. This transition happens below the percolation threshold of network fragmentation, and has its origin in the competition between cascading behavior induced by adopters and blocking due to immune nodes. This change is accompanied by a percolation transition of the induced clusters.

  18. Ligand binding and proton exchange dynamics in site-specific mutants of human myoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Lambright, D.G.

    1992-01-01

    Site specific mutagenesis was used to make substitutions of four residues in the distal heme pocket of human myoglobin: Val68, His64, Lys45, and Asp60. Strongly diffracting crystals of the conservative mutation K45R in the met aquo form were grown in the trigonal space group P3[sub 2]21 and the X-ray crystal structure determined at 1.6 [angstrom] resolution. The overall structure is similar to that of sperm whale met aquo myoglobin. Several of the mutant proteins were characterized by 2-D NMR spectroscopy. The NMR data suggest the structural changes are localized to the region of the mutation. The dynamics of ligand binding to myoglobin mutants were studied by transient absorption spectroscopy following photolysis of the CO complexes. Transient absorption kinetics and spectra on the ns to ms timescale were measured in aqueous solution from 280 K to 310 K and in 75% glycerol: water from 250 K to 310 K. Two significant basis spectra were obtained from singular value decomposition of the matrix of time dependent spectra. The information was used to obtain approximations for the extent of ligand rebinding and the kinetics of conformational relaxation. Except for K45R, substitutions at Lys45 or Asp60 produce changes in the kinetics for ligand rebinding. Replacement of Lys45 with Arg increases the rate of ligand rebinding from the protein matrix by a factor of 2, but does not alter the rates for ligand escape or entry into the protein or the dynamics of the conformational relaxation. Substitutions at His64 and Val68 influence the kinetics of ligand rebinding and the dynamics of conformational relaxation. The results do not support the hypothesis that ligand migration between the heme pocket and solvent is determined solely by fluctuations of Arg45 and His64 between open and closed conformations of the heme pocket but can be rationalized if ligand diffusion through the protein matrix involves multiple competing pathways.

  19. Kinetic buffers.

    PubMed

    Alibrandi, Giuseppe; Fabbrizzi, Luigi; Licchelli, Maurizio; Puglisi, Antonio

    2015-01-12

    This paper proposes a new type of molecular device that is able to act as an inverse proton sponge to slowly decrease the pH inside a reaction vessel. This makes the automatic monitoring of the concentration of pH-sensitive systems possible. The device is a composite formed of an alkyl chloride, which kinetically produces acidity, and a buffer that thermodynamically modulates the variation in pH value. Profiles of pH versus time (pH-t plots) have been generated under various experimental conditions by computer simulation, and the device has been tested by carrying out automatic spectrophotometric titrations, without using an autoburette. To underline the wide variety of possible applications, this new system has been used to realize and monitor HCl uptake by a di-copper(II) bistren complex in a single run, in a completely automatic experiment.

  20. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ligands; a patent review (2006-2011)

    PubMed Central

    Gündisch, Daniela; Eibl, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), pentameric ligand-gated cation channels, are potential targets for the development of therapeutics for a variety of disease states. Areas covered This article is reviewing recent advances in the development of small molecule ligands for diverse nAChR subtypes and is a continuation of an earlier review in this journal. Expert opinion The development of nAChR ligands with preference for α4β2 or α7 subtypes for the treatment of CNS disorders are in the most advanced developmental stage. In addition, there is a fast growing interest to generate so-called PAMs, positive allosteric modulators, to influence the channels’ functionalities. PMID:22098319

  1. Chemodynamics of aquatic metal complexes: from small ligands to colloids.

    PubMed

    Van Leeuwen, Herman P; Buffle, Jacques

    2009-10-01

    Recent progress in understanding the formation/dissociation kinetics of aquatic metal complexes with complexants in different size ranges is evaluated and put in perspective, with suggestions for further studies. The elementary steps in the Eigen mechanism, i.e., diffusion and dehydration of the metal ion, are reviewed and further developed. The (de)protonation of both the ligand and the coordinating metal ion is reconsidered in terms of the consequences for dehydration rates and stabilities of the various outer-sphere complexes. In the nanoparticulate size range, special attention is given to the case of fulvic ligands, for which the impact of electrostatic interactions is especially large. In complexation with colloidal ligands (hard, soft, and combination thereof) the diffusive transport of metal ions is generally a slower step than in the case of complexation with small ligands in a homogeneous solution. The ensuing consequences for the chemodynamics of colloidal complexes are discussed in detail and placed in a generic framework, encompassing the complete range of ligand sizes.

  2. Insights into Protein–Ligand Interactions: Mechanisms, Models, and Methods

    PubMed Central

    Du, Xing; Li, Yi; Xia, Yuan-Ling; Ai, Shi-Meng; Liang, Jing; Sang, Peng; Ji, Xing-Lai; Liu, Shu-Qun

    2016-01-01

    Molecular recognition, which is the process of biological macromolecules interacting with each other or various small molecules with a high specificity and affinity to form a specific complex, constitutes the basis of all processes in living organisms. Proteins, an important class of biological macromolecules, realize their functions through binding to themselves or other molecules. A detailed understanding of the protein–ligand interactions is therefore central to understanding biology at the molecular level. Moreover, knowledge of the mechanisms responsible for the protein-ligand recognition and binding will also facilitate the discovery, design, and development of drugs. In the present review, first, the physicochemical mechanisms underlying protein–ligand binding, including the binding kinetics, thermodynamic concepts and relationships, and binding driving forces, are introduced and rationalized. Next, three currently existing protein-ligand binding models—the “lock-and-key”, “induced fit”, and “conformational selection”—are described and their underlying thermodynamic mechanisms are discussed. Finally, the methods available for investigating protein–ligand binding affinity, including experimental and theoretical/computational approaches, are introduced, and their advantages, disadvantages, and challenges are discussed. PMID:26821017

  3. Sequence specific recognition of ssDNA by a lupus autoantibody: kinetics and mechanism of binding.

    PubMed

    Beckingham, J A; Glick, G D

    2001-09-01

    11F8 is a pathogenic anti-ssDNA monoclonal autoantibody isolated from a lupus-prone mouse. Previous studies have established that 11F8 is sequence specific. To determine the basis for the observed binding specificity, stopped-flow fluorescence spectroscopy was used to measure the kinetic parameters and establish the mechanisms for the association of 11F8 with its target sequence, noncognate, and nonspecific ssDNA ligands. The data revealed that sequence-specific binding follows a two-step mechanism where the initial association step is second order. Values of k(1) are fast and above the modified Smoluchowski limit for a diffusion limited interaction (10(5)-10(6)M(-1)s(-1)). The dependency of k(1) on [salt] and solvent polarity indicates that electrostatic steering is responsible for this rapid association rate. The second association step is rate limiting and is characteristic of an isomerization process during which binding interfaces are optimized. This step apparently is driven by the desolvation of hydrophobic surfaces within the binding interface. The differences in the rate of dissociation for the various DNA ligands suggest that specificity is governed primarily through the dissociation of the final complexes.

  4. Bifunctional DTPA-type ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Gansow, O.A.; Brechbiel, M.W.

    1990-03-26

    The subject matter of the invention relates to bifunctional cyclohexyl DTPA ligands and methods of using these compounds. Specifically, such ligands are useful for radiolabeling proteins with radioactive metals, and can consequently be utilized with respect to radioimmunoimaging and/or radioimmunotherapy.

  5. The maximal affinity of ligands

    PubMed Central

    Kuntz, I. D.; Chen, K.; Sharp, K. A.; Kollman, P. A.

    1999-01-01

    We explore the question of what are the best ligands for macromolecular targets. A survey of experimental data on a large number of the strongest-binding ligands indicates that the free energy of binding increases with the number of nonhydrogen atoms with an initial slope of ≈−1.5 kcal/mol (1 cal = 4.18 J) per atom. For ligands that contain more than 15 nonhydrogen atoms, the free energy of binding increases very little with relative molecular mass. This nonlinearity is largely ascribed to nonthermodynamic factors. An analysis of the dominant interactions suggests that van der Waals interactions and hydrophobic effects provide a reasonable basis for understanding binding affinities across the entire set of ligands. Interesting outliers that bind unusually strongly on a per atom basis include metal ions, covalently attached ligands, and a few well known complexes such as biotin–avidin. PMID:10468550

  6. Analysis of Hill slopes predicted by the four-ligand exponential model for a regulatory enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Ainsworth, S

    1986-01-01

    The four-ligand exponential model for a regulatory enzyme is described as it is applied to kinetic studies of yeast pyruvate kinase in which the concentrations of four ligands are systematically varied. The Hill slopes predicted by this model are calculated for the two situations in which the fourth ligand is either a substrate or an effector. It is shown that the individual terms that make up the expression for the Hill slope assist the interpretation of the observed behaviour in terms of the constants employed by the model. PMID:3718493

  7. The kinetic mechanism of wild-type and mutant mouse dihydrofolate reductases.

    PubMed

    Thillet, J; Adams, J A; Benkovic, S J

    1990-05-29

    A kinetic mechanism is presented for mouse dihydrofolate reductase that predicts all the steady-state parameters and full time-course kinetics. This mechanism was derived from association and dissociation rate constants and pre-steady-state transients by using stopped-flow fluorescence and absorbance measurements. The major features of this kinetic mechanism are as follows: (1) the two native enzyme conformers, E1 and E2, bind ligands with varying affinities although only one conformer, E1, can support catalysis in the forward direction, (2) tetrahydrofolate dissociation is the rate-limiting step under steady-state turnover at low pH, and (3) the pH-independent rate of hydride transfer from NADPH to dihydrofolate is fast (khyd = 9000 s-1) and favorable (Keq = 100). The overall mechanism is similar in form to the Escherichia coli kinetic scheme (Fierke et al., 1987), although several differences are observed: (1) substrates and products predominantly bind the same form of the E. coli enzyme, and (2) the hydride transfer rate from NADPH to either folate or dihydrofolate is considerably faster for the mouse enzyme. The role of Glu-30 (Asp-27 in E. coli) in mouse DHFR has also been examined by using site-directed mutagenesis as a potential source of these differences. While aspartic acid is strictly conserved in all bacterial DHFRs, glutamic acid is conserved in all known eucaryotes. The two major effects of substituting Asp for Glu-30 in the mouse enzyme are (1) a decreased rate of folate reduction and (2) an increased rate of hydride transfer from NADPH to dihydrofolate.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Cloud computing approaches for prediction of ligand binding poses and pathways.

    PubMed

    Lawrenz, Morgan; Shukla, Diwakar; Pande, Vijay S

    2015-01-22

    We describe an innovative protocol for ab initio prediction of ligand crystallographic binding poses and highly effective analysis of large datasets generated for protein-ligand dynamics. We include a procedure for setup and performance of distributed molecular dynamics simulations on cloud computing architectures, a model for efficient analysis of simulation data, and a metric for evaluation of model convergence. We give accurate binding pose predictions for five ligands ranging in affinity from 7 nM to > 200 μM for the immunophilin protein FKBP12, for expedited results in cases where experimental structures are difficult to produce. Our approach goes beyond single, low energy ligand poses to give quantitative kinetic information that can inform protein engineering and ligand design.

  9. Ligand Binding Shifts Highly Mobile Retinoid X Receptor to the Chromatin-Bound State in a Coactivator-Dependent Manner, as Revealed by Single-Cell Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Brazda, Peter; Krieger, Jan; Daniel, Bence; Jonas, David; Szekeres, Tibor; Langowski, Jörg; Tóth, Katalin; Vámosi, György

    2014-01-01

    Retinoid X receptor (RXR) is a promiscuous nuclear receptor forming heterodimers with several other receptors, which activate different sets of genes. Upon agonist treatment, the occupancy of its genomic binding regions increased, but only a modest change in the number of sites was revealed by chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing, suggesting a rather static behavior. However, such genome-wide and biochemical approaches do not take into account the dynamic behavior of a transcription factor. Therefore, we characterized the nuclear dynamics of RXR during activation in single cells on the subsecond scale using live-cell imaging. By applying fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), techniques with different temporal and spatial resolutions, a highly dynamic behavior could be uncovered which is best described by a two-state model (slow and fast) of receptor mobility. In the unliganded state, most RXRs belonged to the fast population, leaving ∼15% for the slow, chromatin-bound fraction. Upon agonist treatment, this ratio increased to ∼43% as a result of an immediate and reversible redistribution. Coactivator binding appears to be indispensable for redistribution and has a major contribution to chromatin association. A nuclear mobility map recorded by light sheet microscopy-FCS shows that the ligand-induced transition from the fast to the slow population occurs throughout the nucleus. Our results support a model in which RXR has a distinct, highly dynamic nuclear behavior and follows hit-and-run kinetics upon activation. PMID:24449763

  10. A Miniaturized Technique for Assessing Protein Thermodynamics and Function Using Fast Determination of Quantitative Cysteine Reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Isom, Daniel G.; Marguet, Philippe R.; Oas, Terrence G.; Hellinga, Homme W.

    2010-01-01

    Protein thermodynamic stability is a fundamental physical characteristic that determines biological function. Furthermore, alteration of thermodynamic stability by macromolecular interactions or biochemical modifications is a powerful tool for assessing the relationship between protein structure, stability, and biological function. High-throughput approaches for quantifying protein stability are beginning to emerge that enable thermodynamic measurements on small amounts of material, in short periods of time, and using readily accessible instrumentation. Here we present such a method, fast quantitative cysteine reactivity (fQCR), which exploits the linkage between protein stability, sidechain protection by protein structure, and structural dynamics to characterize the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of proteins. In this approach, the reaction of a protected cysteine and thiol-reactive fluorogenic indicator is monitored over a gradient of temperatures after a short incubation time. These labeling data can be used to determine the midpoint of thermal unfolding, measure the temperature dependence of protein stability, quantify ligand-binding affinity, and, under certain conditions, estimate folding rate constants. Here, we demonstrate the fQCR method by characterizing these thermodynamic and kinetic properties for variants of Staphylococcal nuclease and E. coli ribose-binding protein engineered to contain single, protected cysteines. These straightforward, information-rich experiments are likely to find applications in protein engineering and functional genomics. PMID:21387407

  11. Chemistry of fast electrons

    PubMed Central

    Maximoff, Sergey N.; Head-Gordon, Martin P.

    2009-01-01

    A chemicurrent is a flux of fast (kinetic energy ≳ 0.5−1.3 eV) metal electrons caused by moderately exothermic (1−3 eV) chemical reactions over high work function (4−6 eV) metal surfaces. In this report, the relation between chemicurrent and surface chemistry is elucidated with a combination of top-down phenomenology and bottom-up atomic-scale modeling. Examination of catalytic CO oxidation, an example which exhibits a chemicurrent, reveals 3 constituents of this relation: The localization of some conduction electrons to the surface via a reduction reaction, 0.5 O2 + δe− → Oδ− (Red); the delocalization of some surface electrons into a conduction band in an oxidation reaction, Oδ− + CO → CO2δ− → CO2 + δe− (Ox); and relaxation without charge transfer (Rel). Juxtaposition of Red, Ox, and Rel produces a daunting variety of metal electronic excitations, but only those that originate from CO2 reactive desorption are long-range and fast enough to dominate the chemicurrent. The chemicurrent yield depends on the universality class of the desorption process and the distribution of the desorption thresholds. This analysis implies a power-law relation with exponent 2.66 between the chemicurrent and the heat of adsorption, which is consistent with experimental findings for a range of systems. This picture also applies to other oxidation-reduction reactions over high work function metal surfaces. PMID:19561296

  12. FAST: FAST Analysis of Sequences Toolbox

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Travis J.; Kauffman, Kyle T.; Amrine, Katherine C. H.; Carper, Dana L.; Lee, Raymond S.; Becich, Peter J.; Canales, Claudia J.; Ardell, David H.

    2015-01-01

    FAST (FAST Analysis of Sequences Toolbox) provides simple, powerful open source command-line tools to filter, transform, annotate and analyze biological sequence data. Modeled after the GNU (GNU's Not Unix) Textutils such as grep, cut, and tr, FAST tools such as fasgrep, fascut, and fastr make it easy to rapidly prototype expressive bioinformatic workflows in a compact and generic command vocabulary. Compact combinatorial encoding of data workflows with FAST commands can simplify the documentation and reproducibility of bioinformatic protocols, supporting better transparency in biological data science. Interface self-consistency and conformity with conventions of GNU, Matlab, Perl, BioPerl, R, and GenBank help make FAST easy and rewarding to learn. FAST automates numerical, taxonomic, and text-based sorting, selection and transformation of sequence records and alignment sites based on content, index ranges, descriptive tags, annotated features, and in-line calculated analytics, including composition and codon usage. Automated content- and feature-based extraction of sites and support for molecular population genetic statistics make FAST useful for molecular evolutionary analysis. FAST is portable, easy to install and secure thanks to the relative maturity of its Perl and BioPerl foundations, with stable releases posted to CPAN. Development as well as a publicly accessible Cookbook and Wiki are available on the FAST GitHub repository at https://github.com/tlawrence3/FAST. The default data exchange format in FAST is Multi-FastA (specifically, a restriction of BioPerl FastA format). Sanger and Illumina 1.8+ FastQ formatted files are also supported. FAST makes it easier for non-programmer biologists to interactively investigate and control biological data at the speed of thought. PMID:26042145

  13. FAST: FAST Analysis of Sequences Toolbox.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Travis J; Kauffman, Kyle T; Amrine, Katherine C H; Carper, Dana L; Lee, Raymond S; Becich, Peter J; Canales, Claudia J; Ardell, David H

    2015-01-01

    FAST (FAST Analysis of Sequences Toolbox) provides simple, powerful open source command-line tools to filter, transform, annotate and analyze biological sequence data. Modeled after the GNU (GNU's Not Unix) Textutils such as grep, cut, and tr, FAST tools such as fasgrep, fascut, and fastr make it easy to rapidly prototype expressive bioinformatic workflows in a compact and generic command vocabulary. Compact combinatorial encoding of data workflows with FAST commands can simplify the documentation and reproducibility of bioinformatic protocols, supporting better transparency in biological data science. Interface self-consistency and conformity with conventions of GNU, Matlab, Perl, BioPerl, R, and GenBank help make FAST easy and rewarding to learn. FAST automates numerical, taxonomic, and text-based sorting, selection and transformation of sequence records and alignment sites based on content, index ranges, descriptive tags, annotated features, and in-line calculated analytics, including composition and codon usage. Automated content- and feature-based extraction of sites and support for molecular population genetic statistics make FAST useful for molecular evolutionary analysis. FAST is portable, easy to install and secure thanks to the relative maturity of its Perl and BioPerl foundations, with stable releases posted to CPAN. Development as well as a publicly accessible Cookbook and Wiki are available on the FAST GitHub repository at https://github.com/tlawrence3/FAST. The default data exchange format in FAST is Multi-FastA (specifically, a restriction of BioPerl FastA format). Sanger and Illumina 1.8+ FastQ formatted files are also supported. FAST makes it easier for non-programmer biologists to interactively investigate and control biological data at the speed of thought.

  14. Analytical model for fast-shock ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasemi, S. A.; Farahbod, A. H.; Sobhanian, S.

    2014-07-01

    A model and its improvements are introduced for a recently proposed approach to inertial confinement fusion, called fast-shock ignition (FSI). The analysis is based upon the gain models of fast ignition, shock ignition and considerations for the fast electrons penetration into the pre-compressed fuel to examine the formation of an effective central hot spot. Calculations of fast electrons penetration into the dense fuel show that if the initial electron kinetic energy is of the order ˜4.5 MeV, the electrons effectively reach the central part of the fuel. To evaluate more realistically the performance of FSI approach, we have used a quasi-two temperature electron energy distribution function of Strozzi (2012) and fast ignitor energy formula of Bellei (2013) that are consistent with 3D PIC simulations for different values of fast ignitor laser wavelength and coupling efficiency. The general advantages of fast-shock ignition in comparison with the shock ignition can be estimated to be better than 1.3 and it is seen that the best results can be obtained for the fuel mass around 1.5 mg, fast ignitor laser wavelength ˜0.3 micron and the shock ignitor energy weight factor about 0.25.

  15. Analytical model for fast-shock ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Ghasemi, S. A. Farahbod, A. H.; Sobhanian, S.

    2014-07-15

    A model and its improvements are introduced for a recently proposed approach to inertial confinement fusion, called fast-shock ignition (FSI). The analysis is based upon the gain models of fast ignition, shock ignition and considerations for the fast electrons penetration into the pre-compressed fuel to examine the formation of an effective central hot spot. Calculations of fast electrons penetration into the dense fuel show that if the initial electron kinetic energy is of the order ∼4.5 MeV, the electrons effectively reach the central part of the fuel. To evaluate more realistically the performance of FSI approach, we have used a quasi-two temperature electron energy distribution function of Strozzi (2012) and fast ignitor energy formula of Bellei (2013) that are consistent with 3D PIC simulations for different values of fast ignitor laser wavelength and coupling efficiency. The general advantages of fast-shock ignition in comparison with the shock ignition can be estimated to be better than 1.3 and it is seen that the best results can be obtained for the fuel mass around 1.5 mg, fast ignitor laser wavelength ∼0.3  micron and the shock ignitor energy weight factor about 0.25.

  16. Ligand Identification Scoring Algorithm (LISA)

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zheng; Merz, Kenneth M.

    2011-01-01

    A central problem in de novo drug design is determining the binding affinity of a ligand with a receptor. A new scoring algorithm is presented that estimates the binding affinity of a protein-ligand complex given a three-dimensional structure. The method, LISA (Ligand Identification Scoring Algorithm), uses an empirical scoring function to describe the binding free energy. Interaction terms have been designed to account for van der Waals (VDW) contacts, hydrogen bonding, desolvation effects and metal chelation to model the dissociation equilibrium constants using a linear model. Atom types have been introduced to differentiate the parameters for VDW, H-bonding interactions and metal chelation between different atom pairs. A training set of 492 protein-ligand complexes was selected for the fitting process. Different test sets have been examined to evaluate its ability to predict experimentally measured binding affinities. By comparing with other well known scoring functions, the results show that LISA has advantages over many existing scoring functions in simulating protein-ligand binding affinity, especially metalloprotein-ligand binding affinity. Artificial Neural Network (ANN) was also used in order to demonstrate that the energy terms in LISA are well designed and do not require extra cross terms. PMID:21561101

  17. Synthesis and Base Hydrolysis of a Cobalt(III) Complex Coordinated by a Thioether Ligand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roecker, Lee

    2008-01-01

    A two-week laboratory experiment for students in advanced inorganic chemistry is described. Students prepare and characterize a cobalt(III) complex coordinated by a thioether ligand during the first week of the experiment and then study the kinetics of Co-S bond cleavage in basic solution during the second week. The synthetic portion of the…

  18. TSPO ligand residence time: a new parameter to predict compound neurosteroidogenic efficacy.

    PubMed

    Costa, Barbara; Da Pozzo, Eleonora; Giacomelli, Chiara; Barresi, Elisabetta; Taliani, Sabrina; Da Settimo, Federico; Martini, Claudia

    2016-01-11

    The pharmacological activation of the cholesterol-binding Translocator Protein (TSPO) leads to an increase of endogenous steroids and neurosteroids determining benefic pleiotropic effects in several pathological conditions, including anxiety disorders. The relatively poor relationship between TSPO ligand binding affinities and steroidogenic efficacies prompted us to investigate the time (Residence Time, RT) that a number of compounds with phenylindolylglyoxylamide structure (PIGAs) spends in contact with the target. Here, given the poor availability of TSPO ligand kinetic parameters, a kinetic radioligand binding assay was set up and validated for RT determination using a theoretical mathematical model successfully applied to other ligand-target systems. TSPO ligand RT was quantified and the obtained results showed a positive correlation between the period for which a drug interacts with TSPO and the compound ability to stimulate steroidogenesis. Specifically, the TSPO ligand RT significantly fitted both with steroidogenic efficacy (Emax) and with area under the dose-response curve, a parameter combining drug potency and efficacy. A positive relation between RT and anxiolytic activity of three compounds was evidenced. In conclusion, RT could be a relevant parameter to predict the steroidogenic efficacy and the in vivo anxiolytic action of new TSPO ligands.

  19. TSPO ligand residence time: a new parameter to predict compound neurosteroidogenic efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Barbara; Da Pozzo, Eleonora; Giacomelli, Chiara; Barresi, Elisabetta; Taliani, Sabrina; Da Settimo, Federico; Martini, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    The pharmacological activation of the cholesterol-binding Translocator Protein (TSPO) leads to an increase of endogenous steroids and neurosteroids determining benefic pleiotropic effects in several pathological conditions, including anxiety disorders. The relatively poor relationship between TSPO ligand binding affinities and steroidogenic efficacies prompted us to investigate the time (Residence Time, RT) that a number of compounds with phenylindolylglyoxylamide structure (PIGAs) spends in contact with the target. Here, given the poor availability of TSPO ligand kinetic parameters, a kinetic radioligand binding assay was set up and validated for RT determination using a theoretical mathematical model successfully applied to other ligand-target systems. TSPO ligand RT was quantified and the obtained results showed a positive correlation between the period for which a drug interacts with TSPO and the compound ability to stimulate steroidogenesis. Specifically, the TSPO ligand RT significantly fitted both with steroidogenic efficacy (Emax) and with area under the dose-response curve, a parameter combining drug potency and efficacy. A positive relation between RT and anxiolytic activity of three compounds was evidenced. In conclusion, RT could be a relevant parameter to predict the steroidogenic efficacy and the in vivo anxiolytic action of new TSPO ligands. PMID:26750656

  20. Highly selective ligand binding by Methylophilus methylotrophus cytochrome c''.

    PubMed

    Quintas, Pedro O; Catarino, Teresa; Todorovic, Smilja; Turner, David L

    2011-06-28

    Cytochrome c'' (cyt c'') from Methylophilus methylotrophus is unusual insofar as the heme has two axial histidine ligands in the oxidized form but one is detached when the protein is reduced. Despite cyt c'' having an axial site available for binding small ligands, we show here that only NO binds readily to the ferrous cyt c''. Binding of CO, as well as CN(-), on the other hand requires considerable structural reorganization, or reduction of the disulfide bridge close to the heme. Standard free energies for the binding of NO and CO reveal high selectivity of the ferrous cyt c'' for NO, indicating its putative physiological role. In this work, we characterize in detail the kinetics of NO binding and the structural features of the Fe(2+)-NO adduct by stopped-flow and resonance Raman spectroscopy, respectively.

  1. Scintillation Proximity Radioimmunoassay Utilizing 125I-Labeled Ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udenfriend, Sidney; Diekmann Gerber, Louise; Brink, Larry; Spector, Sydney

    1985-12-01

    A unique type of radioimmunoassay is described that does not require centrifugation or separation. Microbeads containing a fluorophor are covalently linked to antibody. When an 125I-labeled antigen is added it binds to the beads and, by its proximity, the emitted short-range electrons of the 125I excite the fluorophor in the beads. The light emitted can be measured in a standard scintillation counter. Addition of unlabeled antigen from tissue extracts displaces the labeled ligand and diminishes the fluorescent signal. Application of scintillation proximity immunoassay to tissue enkephalins, serum thyroxin, and urinary morphine is described. Applications of the principle to study the kinetics of interaction between receptors and ligands are discussed.

  2. Scintillation proximity radioimmunoassay utilizing 125I-labeled ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Udenfriend, S.; Gerber, L.D.; Brink, L.; Spector, S.

    1985-12-01

    A unique type of radioimmunoassay is described that does not require centrifugation or separation. Microbeads containing a fluorophor are covalently linked to antibody. When an /sup 125/I-labeled antigen is added it binds to the beads and, by its proximity, the emitted short-range electrons of the /sup 125/I excite the fluorophor in the beads. The light emitted can be measured in a standard scintillation counter. Addition of unlabeled antigen from tissue extracts displaces the labeled ligand and diminishes the fluorescent signal. Application of scintillation proximity immunoassay to tissue enkephalins, serum thyroxin, and urinary morphine is described. Applications of the principle to study the kinetics of interaction between receptors and ligands are discussed.

  3. Petasis-Ugi ligands: New affinity tools for the enrichment of phosphorylated peptides.

    PubMed

    Batalha, Íris L; Roque, Ana C A

    2016-09-15

    Affinity chromatography is a widespread technique for the enrichment and isolation of biologics, which relies on the selective and reversible interaction between affinity ligands and target molecules. Small synthetic affinity ligands are valuable alternatives due to their robustness, low cost and fast ligand development. This work reports, for the first time, the use of a sequential Petasis-Ugi multicomponent reaction to generate rationally designed solid-phase combinatorial libraries of small synthetic ligands, which can be screened for the selection of new affinity adsorbents towards biological targets. As a proof of concept, the Petasis-Ugi reaction was here employed in the discovery of affinity ligands suitable for phosphopeptide enrichment. A combinatorial library of 84 ligands was designed, synthesized on a chromatographic solid support and screened in situ for the specific binding of phosphopeptides binding human BRCA1C-terminal domains. The success of the reaction on the chromatographic matrix was confirmed by both inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy and fluorescence microscopy. Three lead ligands were identified due to their superior performance in terms of binding capacity and selectivity towards the phosphorylated moiety on peptides, which showed the feasibility of the Petasis-Ugi reaction for affinity ligand development. PMID:27469904

  4. Chemical and Biological Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emanuel', N. M.

    1981-10-01

    Examples of the application of the methods and ideas of chemical kinetics in various branches of chemistry and biology are considered and the results of studies on the kinetics and mechanisms of autoxidation and inhibited and catalysed oxidation of organic substances in the liquid phase are surveyed. Problems of the kinetics of the ageing of polymers and the principles of their stabilisation are discussed and certain trends in biological kinetics (kinetics of tumour growth, kinetic criteria of the effectiveness of chemotherapy, problems of gerontology, etc.) are considered. The bibliography includes 281 references.

  5. Kinetics of actinide complexation reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, K.L.; Sullivan, J.C.

    1997-09-01

    Though the literature records extensive compilations of the thermodynamics of actinide complexation reactions, the kinetics of complex formation and dissociation reactions of actinide ions in aqueous solutions have not been extensively investigated. In light of the central role played by such reactions in actinide process and environmental chemistry, this situation is somewhat surprising. The authors report herein a summary of what is known about actinide complexation kinetics. The systems include actinide ions in the four principal oxidation states (III, IV, V, and VI) and complex formation and dissociation rates with both simple and complex ligands. Most of the work reported was conducted in acidic media, but a few address reactions in neutral and alkaline solutions. Complex formation reactions tend in general to be rapid, accessible only to rapid-scan and equilibrium perturbation techniques. Complex dissociation reactions exhibit a wider range of rates and are generally more accessible using standard analytical methods. Literature results are described and correlated with the known properties of the individual ions.

  6. Designing ligands to bind proteins.

    PubMed

    Whitesides, George M; Krishnamurthy, Vijay M

    2005-11-01

    The ability to design drugs (so-called 'rational drug design') has been one of the long-term objectives of chemistry for 50 years. It is an exceptionally difficult problem, and many of its parts lie outside the expertise of chemistry. The much more limited problem - how to design tight-binding ligands (rational ligand design) - would seem to be one that chemistry could solve, but has also proved remarkably recalcitrant. The question is 'Why is it so difficult?' and the answer is 'We still don't entirely know'. This perspective discusses some of the technical issues - potential functions, protein plasticity, enthalpy/entropy compensation, and others - that contribute, and suggests areas where fundamental understanding of protein-ligand interactions falls short of what is needed. It surveys recent technological developments (in particular, isothermal titration calorimetry) that will, hopefully, make now the time for serious progress in this area. It concludes with the calorimetric examination of the association of a series of systematically varied ligands with a model protein. The counterintuitive thermodynamic results observed serve to illustrate that, even in relatively simple systems, understanding protein-ligand association is challenging.

  7. Cesium removal and kinetics equilibrium: Precipitation kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, M.J.

    1999-12-17

    This task consisted of both non-radioactive and radioactive (tracer) tests examining the influence of potentially significant variables on cesium tetraphenylborate precipitation kinetics. The work investigated the time required to reach cesium decontamination and the conditions that affect the cesium precipitation kinetics.

  8. Optimizing Ligand Efficiency of Selective Androgen Receptor Modulators (SARMs).

    PubMed

    Handlon, Anthony L; Schaller, Lee T; Leesnitzer, Lisa M; Merrihew, Raymond V; Poole, Chuck; Ulrich, John C; Wilson, Joseph W; Cadilla, Rodolfo; Turnbull, Philip

    2016-01-14

    A series of selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) containing the 1-(trifluoromethyl)benzyl alcohol core have been optimized for androgen receptor (AR) potency and drug-like properties. We have taken advantage of the lipophilic ligand efficiency (LLE) parameter as a guide to interpret the effect of structural changes on AR activity. Over the course of optimization efforts the LLE increased over 3 log units leading to a SARM 43 with nanomolar potency, good aqueous kinetic solubility (>700 μM), and high oral bioavailability in rats (83%).

  9. Acetylcholine receptors and cholinergic ligands: biochemical and genetic aspects in Torpedo californica and Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, L.S.

    1987-01-01

    This study evaluates the biochemical and genetic aspects of the acetylcholine receptor proteins and cholinergic ligands in Drosophila melanogaster and Torpedo californica. Included are (1) a comparative study of nicotinic ligand-induced cation release from acetylcholine receptors isolated from Torpedo californica and from Drosophila melanogaster, (2) solution studies of the cholinergic ligands, nikethamide and ethamivan, aimed at measuring internal molecular rotational barriers in solvents of different polarity; and (3) the isolation and characterization of the gene(s) for the acetylcholine receptor in Drosophila melasogaster. Acetylcholine receptor proteins isolated from Drosphila melanogaster heads were found to behave kinetically similar (with regards to cholinergic ligand-induced /sup 155/Eu:/sup 3 +/ displacement from prelabeled proteins) to receptor proteins isolated from Torpedo californica electric tissue, providing additional biochemical evidence for the existence of a Drosophila acetylcholine receptor.

  10. Imaging G protein–coupled receptors while quantifying their ligand-binding free-energy landscape

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cheng; Spoerri, Patrizia M; Coughlin, Shaun R; Kobilka, Brian K; Müller, Daniel J

    2016-01-01

    Imaging native membrane receptors and testing how they interact with ligands is of fundamental interest in the life sciences but has proven remarkably difficult to accomplish. Here, we introduce an approach that uses force-distance curve–based atomic force microscopy to simultaneously image single native G protein–coupled receptors in membranes and quantify their dynamic binding strength to native and synthetic ligands. We measured kinetic and thermodynamic parameters for individual protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1) molecules in the absence and presence of antagonists, and these measurements enabled us to describe PAR1’s ligand-binding free-energy landscape with high accuracy. Our nanoscopic method opens an avenue to directly image and characterize ligand binding of native membrane receptors. PMID:26167642

  11. Molecular/cell engineering approach to autocrine ligand control of cell function.

    PubMed

    Lauffenburger, D A; Forsten, K E; Will, B; Wiley, H S

    1995-01-01

    Tissue engineering, along with other modern cell- and tissue-based health care technologies, depends on successful regulation of cell function by molecular means, including pharmacological agents, materials, and genetics. This regulation is generally mediated by cell receptor/ligand interactions providing primary targets for molecular intervention. While regulatory ligands may often be exogenous in nature, in the categories of endocrine and paracrine hormone systems, they are being increasingly appreciated as crucial in local control of cell and tissue function. Improvements in design of health care technologies involving autocrine ligand interactions with cell receptors should benefit from increased qualitative and quantitative understanding of the kinetic and transport processes governing these interactions. In this symposium paper we offer a concise overview of our recent efforts combining molecular cell biology and engineering approaches to increase the understanding of how molecular and cellular parameters may be manipulated for improved control of cell and tissue function regulated by autocrine ligands.

  12. Molecular Recognition and Ligand Association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baron, Riccardo; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2013-04-01

    We review recent developments in our understanding of molecular recognition and ligand association, focusing on two major viewpoints: (a) studies that highlight new physical insight into the molecular recognition process and the driving forces determining thermodynamic signatures of binding and (b) recent methodological advances in applications to protein-ligand binding. In particular, we highlight the challenges posed by compensating enthalpic and entropic terms, competing solute and solvent contributions, and the relevance of complex configurational ensembles comprising multiple protein, ligand, and solvent intermediate states. As more complete physics is taken into account, computational approaches increase their ability to complement experimental measurements, by providing a microscopic, dynamic view of ensemble-averaged experimental observables. Physics-based approaches are increasingly expanding their power in pharmacology applications.

  13. What are Nuclear Receptor Ligands?

    PubMed Central

    Sladek, Frances M.

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are a family of highly conserved transcription factors that regulate transcription in response to small lipophilic compounds. They play a role in every aspect of development, physiology and disease in humans. They are also ubiquitous in and unique to the animal kingdom suggesting that they may have played an important role in their evolution. In contrast to the classical endocrine receptors that originally defined the family, recent studies suggest that the first NRs might have been sensors of their environment, binding ligands that were external to the host organism. The purpose of this review is to provide a broad perspective on NR ligands and address the issue of exactly what constitutes a NR ligand from historical, biological and evolutionary perspectives. This discussion will lay the foundation for subsequent reviews in this issue as well as pose new questions for future investigation. PMID:20615454

  14. Fluorescent ligands for adenosine receptors.

    PubMed

    Kozma, Eszter; Jayasekara, P Suresh; Squarcialupi, Lucia; Paoletta, Silvia; Moro, Stefano; Federico, Stephanie; Spalluto, Giampiero; Jacobson, Kenneth A

    2013-01-01

    Interest is increasing in developing fluorescent ligands for characterization of adenosine receptors (ARs), which hold a promise of usefulness in the drug discovery process. The size of a strategically labeled AR ligand can be greatly increased after the attachment of a fluorophore. The choice of dye moiety (e.g. Alexa Fluor 488), attachment point and linker length can alter the selectivity and potency of the parent molecule. Fluorescent derivatives of adenosine agonists and antagonists (e.g. XAC and other heterocyclic antagonist scaffolds) have been synthesized and characterized pharmacologically. Some are useful AR probes for flow cytometry, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, fluorescence microscopy, fluorescence polarization, fluorescence resonance energy transfer, and scanning confocal microscopy. Thus, the approach of fluorescent labeled GPCR ligands, including those for ARs, is a growing dynamic research field.

  15. Why mercury prefers soft ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Riccardi, Demian M; Guo, Hao-Bo; Gu, Baohua; Parks, Jerry M; Summers, Anne; Miller, S; Liang, Liyuan; Smith, Jeremy C

    2013-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a major global pollutant arising from both natural and anthropogenic sources. Defining the factors that determine the relative affinities of different ligands for the mercuric ion, Hg2+, is critical to understanding its speciation, transformation, and bioaccumulation in the environment. Here, we use quantum chemistry to dissect the relative binding free energies for a series of inorganic anion complexes of Hg2+. Comparison of Hg2+ ligand interactions in the gaseous and aqueous phases shows that differences in interactions with a few, local water molecules led to a clear periodic trend within the chalcogenide and halide groups and resulted in the well-known experimentally observed preference of Hg2+ for soft ligands such as thiols. Our approach establishes a basis for understanding Hg speciation in the biosphere.

  16. The many facets of Notch ligands

    PubMed Central

    D'souza, Brendan; Miyamoto, Alison; Weinmaster, Gerry

    2009-01-01

    The Notch signaling pathway regulates a diverse array of cell types and cellular processes and is tightly regulated by ligand binding. Both canonical and noncanonical Notch ligands have been identified that may account for some of the pleiotropic nature associated with Notch signaling. This review focuses on the molecular mechanisms by which Notch ligands function as signaling agonists and antagonists, and discusses different modes of activating ligands as well as findings that support intrinsic ligand signaling activity independent of Notch. Post-translational modification, proteolytic processing, endocytosis and membrane trafficking, as well as interactions with the actin cytoskeleton may contribute to the recently appreciated multi-functionality of Notch ligands. The regulation of Notch ligand expression by other signaling pathways provides a mechanism to coordinate Notch signaling with multiple cellular and developmental cues. The association of Notch ligands with inherited human disorders and cancer highlights the importance of understanding the molecular nature and activities intrinsic to Notch ligands. PMID:18758484

  17. Multifunctional Ligands in Transition Metal Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Crabtree, Robert H

    2011-01-01

    Sophisticated ligands are now being designed that do far more than just fulfil their traditional spectator roles by binding to the metal and providing a sterically-defined binding pocket for the substrate in homogeneous transition metal catalysis. This Focus review emphasizes selected cases in which ligands carry additional functional groups that change the properties of the ligand as a result of an external stimulus or undergo catalytically-relevant ligand-based reactivity. These include proton responsive ligands capable of gaining or losing one or more protons, ligands having a hydrogen bonding function, electroresponsive ligands capable of gaining or losing one or more electrons, and photoresponsive ligands capable of undergoing a useful change of properties upon irradiation. Molecular recognition ligands and proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) are briefly discussed.

  18. Biophysics of selectin-ligand interactions in inflammation and cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siu-Lun Cheung, Luthur; Raman, Phrabha S.; Balzer, Eric M.; Wirtz, Denis; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos

    2011-02-01

    Selectins (l-, e- and p-selectin) are calcium-dependent transmembrane glycoproteins that are expressed on the surface of circulating leukocytes, activated platelets, and inflamed endothelial cells. Selectins bind predominantly to sialofucosylated glycoproteins and glycolipids (e-selectin only) present on the surface of apposing cells, and mediate transient adhesive interactions pertinent to inflammation and cancer metastasis. The rapid turnover of selectin-ligand bonds, due to their fast on- and off-rates along with their remarkably high tensile strengths, enables them to mediate cell tethering and rolling in shear flow. This paper presents the current body of knowledge regarding the role of selectins in inflammation and cancer metastasis, and discusses experimental methodologies and mathematical models used to resolve the biophysics of selectin-mediated cell adhesion. Understanding the biochemistry and biomechanics of selectin-ligand interactions pertinent to inflammatory disorders and cancer metastasis may provide insights for developing promising therapies and/or diagnostic tools to combat these disorders.

  19. LGICdb: the ligand-gated ion channel database.

    PubMed

    Le Novère, N; Changeux, J P

    2001-01-01

    Ligand-Gated Ion Channels (LGIC) are polymeric transmembrane proteins involved in the fast response to numerous neurotransmitters. All these receptors are formed by homologous subunits and the last two decades revealed an unexpected wealth of genes coding for these subunits. The Ligand-Gated Ion Channel database (LGICdb) has been developed to handle this increasing amount of data. The database aims to provide only one entry for each gene, containing annotated nucleic acid and protein sequences. The repository is carefully structured and the entries can be retrieved by various criteria. In addition to the sequences, the LGICdb provides multiple sequence alignments, phylogenetic analyses and atomic coordinates when available. The database is accessible via the World Wide Web (http://www.pasteur.fr/recherche/banques/LGIC /LGIC.html), where it is continuously updated. The version 16 (September 2000) available for download contained 333 entries covering 34 species.

  20. Thermodynamics and kinetics of adaptive binding in the malachite green RNA aptamer.

    PubMed

    Da Costa, Jason B; Andreiev, Aurelia I; Dieckmann, Thorsten

    2013-09-24

    Adaptive binding, the ability of molecules to fold themselves around the structure of a ligand and thereby incorporating it into their three-dimensional fold, is a key feature of most RNA aptamers. The malachite green aptamer (MGA) has been shown to bind several closely related triphenyl dyes with planar and nonplanar structures in this manner. Competitive binding studies using isothermal titration calorimetry and stopped flow kinetics have been conducted with the aim of understanding the adaptive nature of RNA-ligand interaction. The results of these studies reveal that binding of one ligand can reduce the ability of the aptamer pocket to adapt to another ligand, even if this second ligand has a significantly higher affinity to the free aptamer. A similar effect is observed in the presence of Mg(2+) ions which stabilize the binding pocket in a more ligand bound-like conformation.

  1. Evaluation of H2CHXdedpa, H2dedpa- and H2CHXdedpa-N,N'-propyl-2-NI ligands for (64)Cu(ii) radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Ramogida, Caterina F; Boros, Eszter; Patrick, Brian O; Zeisler, Stefan K; Kumlin, Joel; Adam, Michael J; Schaffer, Paul; Orvig, Chris

    2016-08-16

    The chiral acyclic "pa" ligand (pa = picolinic acid) H2CHXdedpa (N4O2) and two NI-containing dedpa analogues (H2CHXdedpa-N,N'-propyl-2-NI, H2dedpa-N,N'-propyl-2-NI, NI = nitroimidazole) were studied as chelators for copper radiopharmaceuticals (CHX = cyclohexyl, H2dedpa = 1,2-[[carboxypyridin-2-yl]methylamino]ethane). The hexadentate ligand H2CHXdedpa was previously established as a superb system for (67/68)Ga radiochemistry. The solid state X-ray crystal structures of [Cu(CHXdedpa-N,N'-propyl-2-NI)] and [Cu(dedpa-N,N'-propyl-2-NI)] reveal the predicted hexadentate, distorted octahedral binding of the copper(ii) ion. Cyclic voltammetry of [Cu(dedpa-N,N'-propyl-2-NI)] shows that there is one reversible couple associated with the NI redox, and one irreversible but reproducible couple attributed to the Cu(ii)/Cu(i) redox cycle. Quantitative radiolabeling (>99%) of CHXdedpa(2-) and (dedpa-N,N'-propyl-2-NI)(2-) with (64)Cu was achieved under fast and efficient labeling conditions (10 min, RT, 0.5 M sodium acetate buffer, pH 5.5) at ligand concentrations as low as 10(-6) M. In vitro kinetic inertness studies of the (64)Cu labelled complexes were studied in human serum at 37 °C over 24 hours; [(64)Cu(CHXdedpa)] was found to be 98% stable compared to previously investigated [(64)Cu(dedpa)] which was only 72% intact after 24 hours. PMID:27161975

  2. Q-DockLHM: Low-resolution refinement for ligand comparative modeling

    PubMed Central

    Brylinski, Michal; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    The success of ligand docking calculations typically depends on the quality of the receptor structure. Given improvements in protein structure prediction approaches, approximate protein models now can be routinely obtained for the majority of gene products in a given proteome. Structure-based virtual screening of large combinatorial libraries of lead candidates against theoretically modeled receptor structures requires fast and reliable docking techniques capable of dealing with structural inaccuracies in protein models. Here, we present Q-DockLHM, a method for low-resolution refinement of binding poses provided by FINDSITELHM, a ligand homology modeling approach. We compare its performance to that of classical ligand docking approaches in ligand docking against a representative set of experimental (both holo and apo) as well as theoretically modeled receptor structures. Docking benchmarks reveal that unlike all-atom docking, Q-DockLHM exhibits the desired tolerance to the receptor’s structure deformation. Our results suggest that the use of an evolution-based approach to ligand homology modeling followed by fast low-resolution refinement is capable of achieving satisfactory performance in ligand-binding pose prediction with promising applicability to proteome-scale applications. PMID:19827144

  3. Ligand-induced Epitope Masking

    PubMed Central

    Mould, A. Paul; Askari, Janet A.; Byron, Adam; Takada, Yoshikazu; Jowitt, Thomas A.; Humphries, Martin J.

    2016-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD)-containing ligand-mimetic inhibitors of integrins are unable to dissociate pre-formed integrin-fibronectin complexes (IFCs). These observations suggested that amino acid residues involved in integrin-fibronectin binding become obscured in the ligand-occupied state. Because the epitopes of some function-blocking anti-integrin monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) lie near the ligand-binding pocket, it follows that the epitopes of these mAbs may become shielded in the ligand-occupied state. Here, we tested whether function-blocking mAbs directed against α5β1 can interact with the integrin after it forms a complex with an RGD-containing fragment of fibronectin. We showed that the anti-α5 subunit mAbs JBS5, SNAKA52, 16, and P1D6 failed to disrupt IFCs and hence appeared unable to bind to the ligand-occupied state. In contrast, the allosteric anti-β1 subunit mAbs 13, 4B4, and AIIB2 could dissociate IFCs and therefore were able to interact with the ligand-bound state. However, another class of function-blocking anti-β1 mAbs, exemplified by Lia1/2, could not disrupt IFCs. This second class of mAbs was also distinguished from 13, 4B4, and AIIB2 by their ability to induce homotypic cell aggregation. Although the epitope of Lia1/2 was closely overlapping with those of 13, 4B4, and AIIB2, it appeared to lie closer to the ligand-binding pocket. A new model of the α5β1-fibronectin complex supports our hypothesis that the epitopes of mAbs that fail to bind to the ligand-occupied state lie within, or very close to, the integrin-fibronectin interface. Importantly, our findings imply that the efficacy of some therapeutic anti-integrin mAbs could be limited by epitope masking. PMID:27484800

  4. Targeting Protein-Protein Interactions with Trimeric Ligands: High Affinity Inhibitors of the MAGUK Protein Family

    PubMed Central

    Nissen, Klaus B.; Haugaard-Kedström, Linda M.; Wilbek, Theis S.; Nielsen, Line S.; Åberg, Emma; Kristensen, Anders S.; Bach, Anders; Jemth, Per; Strømgaard, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    PDZ domains in general, and those of PSD-95 in particular, are emerging as promising drug targets for diseases such as ischemic stroke. We have previously shown that dimeric ligands that simultaneously target PDZ1 and PDZ2 of PSD-95 are highly potent inhibitors of PSD-95. However, PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins contain three consecutive PDZ domains, hence we envisioned that targeting all three PDZ domains simultaneously would lead to more potent and potentially more specific interactions with the MAGUK proteins. Here we describe the design, synthesis and characterization of a series of trimeric ligands targeting all three PDZ domains of PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins, PSD-93, SAP-97 and SAP-102. Using our dimeric ligands targeting the PDZ1-2 tandem as starting point, we designed novel trimeric ligands by introducing a PDZ3-binding peptide moiety via a cysteine-derivatized NPEG linker. The trimeric ligands generally displayed increased affinities compared to the dimeric ligands in fluorescence polarization binding experiments and optimized trimeric ligands showed low nanomolar inhibition towards the four MAGUK proteins, thus being the most potent inhibitors described. Kinetic experiments using stopped-flow spectrometry showed that the increase in affinity is caused by a decrease in the dissociation rate of the trimeric ligand as compared to the dimeric ligands, likely reflecting the lower probability of simultaneous dissociation of all three PDZ ligands. Thus, we have provided novel inhibitors of the MAGUK proteins with exceptionally high affinity, which can be used to further elucidate the therapeutic potential of these proteins. PMID:25658767

  5. Targeting protein-protein interactions with trimeric ligands: high affinity inhibitors of the MAGUK protein family.

    PubMed

    Nissen, Klaus B; Haugaard-Kedström, Linda M; Wilbek, Theis S; Nielsen, Line S; Åberg, Emma; Kristensen, Anders S; Bach, Anders; Jemth, Per; Strømgaard, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    PDZ domains in general, and those of PSD-95 in particular, are emerging as promising drug targets for diseases such as ischemic stroke. We have previously shown that dimeric ligands that simultaneously target PDZ1 and PDZ2 of PSD-95 are highly potent inhibitors of PSD-95. However, PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins contain three consecutive PDZ domains, hence we envisioned that targeting all three PDZ domains simultaneously would lead to more potent and potentially more specific interactions with the MAGUK proteins. Here we describe the design, synthesis and characterization of a series of trimeric ligands targeting all three PDZ domains of PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins, PSD-93, SAP-97 and SAP-102. Using our dimeric ligands targeting the PDZ1-2 tandem as starting point, we designed novel trimeric ligands by introducing a PDZ3-binding peptide moiety via a cysteine-derivatized NPEG linker. The trimeric ligands generally displayed increased affinities compared to the dimeric ligands in fluorescence polarization binding experiments and optimized trimeric ligands showed low nanomolar inhibition towards the four MAGUK proteins, thus being the most potent inhibitors described. Kinetic experiments using stopped-flow spectrometry showed that the increase in affinity is caused by a decrease in the dissociation rate of the trimeric ligand as compared to the dimeric ligands, likely reflecting the lower probability of simultaneous dissociation of all three PDZ ligands. Thus, we have provided novel inhibitors of the MAGUK proteins with exceptionally high affinity, which can be used to further elucidate the therapeutic potential of these proteins.

  6. Neurexin/neuroligin interaction kinetics characterized by counting single cell-surface attached quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Saint-Michel, Edouard; Giannone, Grégory; Choquet, Daniel; Thoumine, Olivier

    2009-07-22

    We report what to our knowledge is a new method to characterize kinetic rates between cell-surface-attached adhesion molecules. Cells expressing specific membrane receptors are surface-labeled with quantum dots coated with their respective ligands. The progressive diminution in the total number of surface-diffusing quantum dots tracked over time collectively reflects intrinsic ligand/receptor interaction kinetics. The probability of quantum dot detachment is modeled using a stochastic analysis of bond formation and dissociation, with a small number of ligand/receptor pairs, resulting in a set of coupled differential equations that are solved numerically. Comparison with the experimental data provides an estimation of the kinetic rates, together with the mean number of ligands per quantum dot, as three adjustable parameters. We validate this approach by studying the calcium-dependent neurexin/neuroligin interaction, which plays an important role in synapse formation. Using primary neurons expressing neuroligin-1 and quantum dots coated with purified neurexin-1beta, we determine the kinetic rates between these two binding partners and compare them with data obtained using other techniques. Using specific molecular constructs, we also provide interesting information about the effects of neurexin and neuroligin dimerization on the kinetic rates. As it stands, this simple technique should be applicable to many types of biological ligand/receptor pairs.

  7. Gold Nanoparticle Monolayers from Sequential Interfacial Ligand Exchange and Migration in a Three-Phase System

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Guang; Hallinan, Daniel T.

    2016-01-01

    Using a three-phase system, centimeter-scale monolayer gold nanoparticle (Au NP) films have been prepared that have long-range order and hydrophobic ligands. The system contains an interface between an aqueous phase containing Au NPs and an oil phase containing one of various types of amine ligands, and a water/air interface. As the Au NPs diffuse to the water/oil interface, ligand exchange takes place which temporarily traps them at the water/oil interface. The ligand-exchanged particles then spontaneously migrate to the air/water interface, where they self-assemble, forming a monolayer under certain conditions. The spontaneous formation of the NP film at the air/water interface was due to the minimization of the system Helmholtz free energy. However, the extent of surface functionalization was dictated by kinetics. This decouples interfacial ligand exchange from interfacial self-assembly, while maintaining the simplicity of a single system. The interparticle center-to-center distance was dictated by the amine ligand length. The Au NP monolayers exhibit tunable surface plasma resonance and excellent spatial homogeneity, which is useful for surface-enhanced Raman scattering. The “air/water/oil” self-assembly method developed here not only benefits the fundamental understanding of NP ligand conformations, but is also applicable to the manufacture of plasmonic nanoparticle devices with precisely designed optical properties. PMID:27762394

  8. Fluorescent Approaches for Understanding Interactions of Ligands with G Protein Coupled Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Sridharan, Rajashri; Zuber, Jeffrey; Connelly, Sara M.; Mathew, Elizabeth; Dumont, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    G Protein Coupled Receptors (GPCRs) are responsible for a wide variety of signaling responses in diverse cell types. Despite major advances in the determination of structures of this class of receptors, the underlying mechanisms by which binding of different types of ligands specifically elicits particular signaling responses remains unclear. The use of fluorescence spectroscopy can provide important information about the process of ligand binding and ligand dependent conformational changes in receptors, especially kinetic aspects of these processes, that can be difficult to extract from x-ray structures. We present an overview of the extensive array of fluorescent ligands that have been used in studies of GPCRs and describe spectroscopic approaches for assaying binding and probing the environment of receptor-bound ligands with particular attention to examples involving yeast pheromone receptors. In addition, we discuss the use of fluorescence spectroscopy for detecting and characterizing conformational changes in receptors induced by the binding of ligands. Such studies have provided strong evidence for diversity of receptor conformations elicited by different ligands, consistent with the idea that GPCRs are not simple on and off switches. This diversity of states constitutes an underlying mechanistic basis for biased agonism, the observation that different stimuli can produce different responses from a single receptor. It is likely that continued technical advances will allow fluorescence spectroscopy to play an important role in continued probing of structural transitions in GPCRs. PMID:24055822

  9. Rosetta Ligand docking with flexible XML protocols.

    PubMed

    Lemmon, Gordon; Meiler, Jens

    2012-01-01

    RosettaLigand is premiere software for predicting how a protein and a small molecule interact. Benchmark studies demonstrate that 70% of the top scoring RosettaLigand predicted interfaces are within 2Å RMSD from the crystal structure [1]. The latest release of Rosetta ligand software includes many new features, such as (1) docking of multiple ligands simultaneously, (2) representing ligands as fragments for greater flexibility, (3) redesign of the interface during docking, and (4) an XML script based interface that gives the user full control of the ligand docking protocol. PMID:22183535

  10. Multicoordinate ligands for actinide/lanthanide separations.

    PubMed

    Dam, Henk H; Reinhoudt, David N; Verboom, Willem

    2007-02-01

    In nuclear waste treatment processes there is a need for improved ligands for the separation of actinides (An(III)) and lanthanides (Ln(III)). Several research groups are involved in the design and synthesis of new An(III) ligands and in the confinement of these and existing An(III) ligands onto molecular platforms giving multicoordinate ligands. The preorganization of ligands considerably improves the An(III) extraction properties, which are largely dependent on the solubility and rigidity of the platform. This tutorial review summarizes the most important An(III) ligands with emphasis on the preorganization strategy using (macrocyclic) platforms.

  11. Fast particle destabilization of TAE modes

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, C.Z.; Gorelenkov, N.N.; Hsu, C.T.

    1995-09-01

    High-n TAE modes are studied based on a kinetic model that includes full thermal ion finite Larmor radius effects, trapped electron collisions and fast particle instability drive. Lower KTAE modes are shown to be non-existent. Like TAE modes, upper KTAE modes are shown to exist due to thermal ion FLR effects in the dissipationless limit. Dissipation effects on the stability of both TAE and upper KTAE modes can be treated perturbatively. However, due to their extended mode structure in the ballooning space, upper KTAE modes usually remain stable or weakly unstable even with large fast particle free energy. On the other hand, TAE modes can be strongly destabilized. A new resonant TAE mode (RTAE) can be excited when the fast particle drive is significantly large. The RTAE mode is a beam-like mode with its frequency determined mainly by the wave-particle resonance condition. The frequency of the RTAE mode can be much less than the TAE gap frequency and may be interpreted as the BAE observed in DIII-D experiments. As plasma {beta} increases, the TAE, RTAE and kinetic ballooning modes strongly couple; the TAE mode changes into the RTAE mode and eventually connects to the kinetic ballooning mode. Numerical results and analytical analysis on the stability of the RTAE and KTAE modes will be presented and compared with the TAE mode stability.

  12. Kinetic partitioning mechanism of HDV ribozyme folding

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jiawen; Gong, Sha; Wang, Yujie; Zhang, Wenbing

    2014-01-14

    RNA folding kinetics is directly tied to RNA biological functions. We introduce here a new approach for predicting the folding kinetics of RNA secondary structure with pseudoknots. This approach is based on our previous established helix-based method for predicting the folding kinetics of RNA secondary structure. In this approach, the transition rates for an elementary step: (1) formation, (2) disruption of a helix stem, and (3) helix formation with concomitant partial melting of an incompatible helix, are calculated with the free energy landscape. The folding kinetics of the Hepatitis delta virus (HDV) ribozyme and the mutated sequences are studied with this method. The folding pathways are identified by recursive searching the states with high net flux-in(out) population starting from the native state. The theory results are in good agreement with that of the experiments. The results indicate that the bi-phasic folding kinetics for the wt HDV sequence is ascribed to the kinetic partitioning mechanism: Part of the population will quickly fold to the native state along the fast pathway, while another part of the population will fold along the slow pathway, in which the population is trapped in a non-native state. Single mutation not only changes the folding rate but also the folding pathway.

  13. Kinetic partitioning mechanism of HDV ribozyme folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiawen; Gong, Sha; Wang, Yujie; Zhang, Wenbing

    2014-01-01

    RNA folding kinetics is directly tied to RNA biological functions. We introduce here a new approach for predicting the folding kinetics of RNA secondary structure with pseudoknots. This approach is based on our previous established helix-based method for predicting the folding kinetics of RNA secondary structure. In this approach, the transition rates for an elementary step: (1) formation, (2) disruption of a helix stem, and (3) helix formation with concomitant partial melting of an incompatible helix, are calculated with the free energy landscape. The folding kinetics of the Hepatitis delta virus (HDV) ribozyme and the mutated sequences are studied with this method. The folding pathways are identified by recursive searching the states with high net flux-in(out) population starting from the native state. The theory results are in good agreement with that of the experiments. The results indicate that the bi-phasic folding kinetics for the wt HDV sequence is ascribed to the kinetic partitioning mechanism: Part of the population will quickly fold to the native state along the fast pathway, while another part of the population will fold along the slow pathway, in which the population is trapped in a non-native state. Single mutation not only changes the folding rate but also the folding pathway.

  14. Biotic ligand model does not predict the bioavailability of rare Earth elements in the presence of organic ligands.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chun-Mei; Wilkinson, Kevin J

    2015-02-17

    Due to their distinct physicochemical properties, rare earth elements (REEs) are critical to high-tech and clean-energy industries; however, their bioavailability is still largely unexplored. In this paper, the bioavailability of several REEs has been carefully examined for the freshwater alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. In the presence of organic ligands (L), the biouptake of REEs was much higher than that predicted by the biotic ligand model (BLM). Enhancement of the biouptake flux was observed for six ligands (metal = thulium) and six REEs (ligand = citric acid), indicating that this could be a common feature for these metals. In order to explore the mechanism for the enhanced uptake, Tm internalization was carefully evaluated. The Tm internalization flux (Jint) followed first-order (Michaelis-Menten) kinetics with a calculated maximum internalization flux (Jmax) of (1.1 ± 0.08) × 10(-14) mol · cm(-2) · s(-1) and an affinity constant for the reaction of the metal with the transport sites (KTm-R) of 10(7.1) M(-1). In the presence of citric acid, malic acid, or NTA, the Jint for Tm was more than 1 order of magnitude higher than that predicted by the BLM when algae were exposed to a constant 10(-9) M Tm(3+). The bioavailability of the metal complexes could not be explained by a piggyback internalization (through an anion channel) or the contribution of labile complexes. The enhanced biouptake was attributed to the formation of a ternary Tm complex {L-Tm-R} at the metal transport site. In the natural environment where organic ligands are ubiquitous, classic models are unlikely to predict the bioavailability of REEs to aquatic organisms.

  15. Polypharmacology of dopamine receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Butini, S; Nikolic, K; Kassel, S; Brückmann, H; Filipic, S; Agbaba, D; Gemma, S; Brogi, S; Brindisi, M; Campiani, G; Stark, H

    2016-07-01

    Most neurological diseases have a multifactorial nature and the number of molecular mechanisms discovered as underpinning these diseases is continuously evolving. The old concept of developing selective agents for a single target does not fit with the medical need of most neurological diseases. The development of designed multiple ligands holds great promises and appears as the next step in drug development for the treatment of these multifactorial diseases. Dopamine and its five receptor subtypes are intimately involved in numerous neurological disorders. Dopamine receptor ligands display a high degree of cross interactions with many other targets including G-protein coupled receptors, transporters, enzymes and ion channels. For brain disorders like Parkinsońs disease, schizophrenia and depression the dopaminergic system, being intertwined with many other signaling systems, plays a key role in pathogenesis and therapy. The concept of designed multiple ligands and polypharmacology, which perfectly meets the therapeutic needs for these brain disorders, is herein discussed as a general ligand-based concept while focusing on dopaminergic agents and receptor subtypes in particular. PMID:27234980

  16. A race for RAGE ligands.

    PubMed

    Schleicher, Erwin D

    2010-08-01

    In experimental animals a causal involvement of the multiligand receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) in the development of diabetic vascular complications has been demonstrated. However, the nature of RAGE ligands present in patients with diabetic nephropathy has not yet been defined; this leaves open the relevance of the RAGE system to the human disease.

  17. Fast food tips (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... challenge to eat healthy when going to a fast food place. In general, avoiding items that are deep ... challenge to eat healthy when going to a fast food place. In general, avoiding items that are deep ...

  18. Fast food (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Fast foods are quick, reasonably priced, and readily available alternatives to home cooking. While convenient and economical for a busy lifestyle, fast foods are typically high in calories, fat, saturated fat, ...

  19. Selective four electron reduction of O2 by an iron porphyrin electrocatalyst under fast and slow electron fluxes.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Subhra; Sengupta, Kushal; Mittra, Kaustuv; Bandyopadhyay, Sabyasachi; Dey, Abhishek

    2012-08-01

    An iron porphyrin catalyst with four electron donor groups is reported. The porphyrin ligand bears a distal hydrogen bonding pocket which inverts the normal axial ligand binding selectivity exhibited by porphyrins bearing sterically crowded distal structures. This catalyst specifically reduces O(2) by four electrons under both fast and slow electron fluxes at pH 7.

  20. Single-Channel Recording of Ligand-Gated Ion Channels.

    PubMed

    Plested, Andrew J R

    2016-01-01

    Single-channel recordings reveal the microscopic properties of individual ligand-gated ion channels. Such recordings contain much more information than measurements of ensemble behavior and can yield structural and functional information about the receptors that participate in fast synaptic transmission in the brain. With a little care, a standard patch-clamp electrophysiology setup can be adapted for single-channel recording in a matter of hours. Thenceforth, it is a realistic aim to record single-molecule activity with microsecond resolution from arbitrary cell types, including cell lines and neurons. PMID:27480725

  1. Kinetic Equations for the Plasma Edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abel, Ian; Hammett, Greg

    2015-11-01

    A hybrid fluid-kinetic framework for studying large-amplitude fluctuations in the edge of tokamak plasmas is presented. We derive equations for the behavior of an anisotropic plasma in the presence of both large fluctuations and steep gradients. The system consists of kinetic equations for electrons and ions, supplemented with fluid equations for the electromagnetic fields. In this way it builds upon both kinetic MHD and from the use of vorticity equations in gyrokinetics. This framework, by including both Alfvénic (including current-driven modes) and drift wave dynamics, can handle fully nonlinear perturbations such as erupting ELM filaments and blob-based turbulence. We not only present equations for such fast behavior, but also develop higher order equations that describe pedestal equilibria and slow scrape-off-layer dynamics. The relationship between this framework and existing collisional edge models is made clear.

  2. Is fast food addictive?

    PubMed

    Garber, Andrea K; Lustig, Robert H

    2011-09-01

    Studies of food addiction have focused on highly palatable foods. While fast food falls squarely into that category, it has several other attributes that may increase its salience. This review examines whether the nutrients present in fast food, the characteristics of fast food consumers or the presentation and packaging of fast food may encourage substance dependence, as defined by the American Psychiatric Association. The majority of fast food meals are accompanied by a soda, which increases the sugar content 10-fold. Sugar addiction, including tolerance and withdrawal, has been demonstrated in rodents but not humans. Caffeine is a "model" substance of dependence; coffee drinks are driving the recent increase in fast food sales. Limited evidence suggests that the high fat and salt content of fast food may increase addictive potential. Fast food restaurants cluster in poorer neighborhoods and obese adults eat more fast food than those who are normal weight. Obesity is characterized by resistance to insulin, leptin and other hormonal signals that would normally control appetite and limit reward. Neuroimaging studies in obese subjects provide evidence of altered reward and tolerance. Once obese, many individuals meet criteria for psychological dependence. Stress and dieting may sensitize an individual to reward. Finally, fast food advertisements, restaurants and menus all provide environmental cues that may trigger addictive overeating. While the concept of fast food addiction remains to be proven, these findings support the role of fast food as a potentially addictive substance that is most likely to create dependence in vulnerable populations.

  3. Is fast food addictive?

    PubMed

    Garber, Andrea K; Lustig, Robert H

    2011-09-01

    Studies of food addiction have focused on highly palatable foods. While fast food falls squarely into that category, it has several other attributes that may increase its salience. This review examines whether the nutrients present in fast food, the characteristics of fast food consumers or the presentation and packaging of fast food may encourage substance dependence, as defined by the American Psychiatric Association. The majority of fast food meals are accompanied by a soda, which increases the sugar content 10-fold. Sugar addiction, including tolerance and withdrawal, has been demonstrated in rodents but not humans. Caffeine is a "model" substance of dependence; coffee drinks are driving the recent increase in fast food sales. Limited evidence suggests that the high fat and salt content of fast food may increase addictive potential. Fast food restaurants cluster in poorer neighborhoods and obese adults eat more fast food than those who are normal weight. Obesity is characterized by resistance to insulin, leptin and other hormonal signals that would normally control appetite and limit reward. Neuroimaging studies in obese subjects provide evidence of altered reward and tolerance. Once obese, many individuals meet criteria for psychological dependence. Stress and dieting may sensitize an individual to reward. Finally, fast food advertisements, restaurants and menus all provide environmental cues that may trigger addictive overeating. While the concept of fast food addiction remains to be proven, these findings support the role of fast food as a potentially addictive substance that is most likely to create dependence in vulnerable populations. PMID:21999689

  4. G Protein-Coupled Receptor Heteromerization: A Role in Allosteric Modulation of Ligand BindingS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Ivone; IJzerman, Adriaan P.; Ye, Kai; Maillet, Emeline L.

    2011-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly recognized that G protein-coupled receptors physically interact. These interactions may provide a mechanism for allosteric modulation of receptor function. In this study, we examined this possibility by using an established model system of a receptor heteromer consisting of μ and δ opioid receptors. We examined the effect of a number of μ receptor ligands on the binding equilibrium and association and dissociation kinetics of a radiolabeled δ receptor agonist, [3H]deltorphin II. We also examined the effect of δ receptor ligands on the binding equilibrium and association and dissociation kinetics of a radiolabeled μ receptor agonist, [3H][d-Ala2,N-Me-Phe4,Gly5-ol]-enkephalin ([3H]DAMGO). We show that μ receptor ligands are capable of allosterically enhancing δ receptor radioligand binding and vice versa. Thus, there is strong positive cooperativity between the two receptor units with remarkable consequences for ligand pharmacology. We find that the data can be simulated by adapting an allosteric receptor model previously developed for small molecules, suggesting that the ligand-occupied protomers function as allosteric modulators of the partner receptor's activity. PMID:21415307

  5. Photostability of CdSe quantum dots functionalized with aromatic dithiocarbamate ligands.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yizheng; Jin, Song; Hamers, Robert J

    2013-12-26

    Organic ligands are widely used to enhance the ability of CdSe quantum dots (QDs) to resist photodegradation processes such as photo-oxidation. Because long alkyl chains may adversely affect the performance of QD devices that require fast and efficient charge transfer, shorter aromatic ligands are of increasing interest. In this work, we characterize the formation of phenyl dithiocarbamate (DTC) adducts on CdSe surfaces and the relative effectiveness of different para-substituted phenyl dithiocarbamates to enhance the aqueous photostability of CdSe QDs on TiO2. Optical absorption and photoluminescence measurements show that phenyl DTC ligands can be highly effective at reducing QD photocorrosion in water, and that ligands bearing electron-donating substituents are the most effective. A comparison of the QD photostability resulting from use of ligands bearing DTC versus thiol surface-binding groups shows that the DTC group provides greater QD photostability. Density functional calculations with natural bond order analysis show that the effectiveness of substituted phenyl DTC results from the ability of these ligands to remove positive charge away from the CdSe and to delocalize positive charge on the ligand. PMID:24256318

  6. Rheological studies of tautomerization kinetics in supercooled glibenclamide drug

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojnarowska, Z.; Wang, Y.; Sokolov, A. P.; Paluch, M.

    2012-12-01

    Rheological measurements have been applied to study the tautomerization of the pharmaceutically active compound glibenclamide. The rate constant and activation energy of the imidic-acid-amide transformation have been successfully determined by monitoring the evolution of shear viscosity. The kinetic parameters from rheological measurements agree reasonably well with the data previously obtained from dielectric spectroscopy. The present Brief Report demonstrates that rheology can provide a fast and precise way to characterize the reaction kinetics of tautomerization.

  7. Rhealogical studies of tautomerization kinetics in supercooled glibenclamide drug

    SciTech Connect

    Wojnarowska, S; Wang, Yangyang; Sokolov, Alexei P; Paluch, Marian W

    2012-01-01

    Rheological measurements have been applied to study the tautomerization of the pharmaceutically active compound glibenclamide. The rate constant and activation energy of the imidic-acid-amide transformation have been successfully determined by monitoring the evolution of shear viscosity. The kinetic parameters from rheological measurements agree reasonably well with the data previously obtained from dielectric spectroscopy. The present Brief Report demonstrates that rheology can provide a fast and precise way to characterize the reaction kinetics of tautomerization.

  8. Molecular modeling and ligand docking for solute carrier (SLC) transporters.

    PubMed

    Schlessinger, Avner; Khuri, Natalia; Giacomini, Kathleen M; Sali, Andrej

    2013-01-01

    Solute Carrier (SLC) transporters are membrane proteins that transport solutes, such as ions, metabolites, peptides, and drugs, across biological membranes, using diverse energy coupling mechanisms. In human, there are 386 SLC transporters, many of which contribute to the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of drugs and/or can be targeted directly by therapeutics. Recent atomic structures of SLC transporters determined by X-ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy have significantly expanded the applicability of structure-based prediction of SLC transporter ligands, by enabling both comparative modeling of additional SLC transporters and virtual screening of small molecules libraries against experimental structures as well as comparative models. In this review, we begin by describing computational tools, including sequence analysis, comparative modeling, and virtual screening, that are used to predict the structures and functions of membrane proteins such as SLC transporters. We then illustrate the applications of these tools to predicting ligand specificities of select SLC transporters, followed by experimental validation using uptake kinetic measurements and other assays. We conclude by discussing future directions in the discovery of the SLC transporter ligands.

  9. Ligand Exchange Governs the Crystal Structures in Binary Nanocrystal Superlattices.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jingjing; Schaeffer, Nicolas; Pileni, Marie-Paule

    2015-11-25

    The surface chemistry in colloidal nanocrystals on the final crystalline structure of binary superlattices produced by self-assembly of two sets of nanocrystals is hereby demonstrated. By mixing nanocrystals having two different sizes and the same coating agent, oleylamine (OAM), the binary nanocrystal superlattices that are produced, such as NaCl, AlB2, NaZn13, and MgZn2, are well in agreement with the crystalline structures predicted by the hard-sphere model, their formation being purely driven by entropic forces. By opposition, when large and small nanocrystals are coated with two different ligands [OAM and dodecanethiol (DDT), respectively] while keeping all other experimental conditions unchanged, the final binary structures markedly change and various structures with lower packing densities, such as Cu3Au, CaB6, and quasicrystals, are observed. This effect of the nanocrystals' coating agents could also be extended to other binary systems, such as Ag-Au and CoFe2O4-Ag supracrystalline binary lattices. In order to understand this effect, a mechanism based on ligand exchange process is proposed. Ligand exchange mechanism is believed to affect the thermodynamics in the formation of binary systems composed of two sets of nanocrystals with different sizes and bearing two different coating agents. Hence, the formation of binary superlattices with lower packing densities may be favored kinetically because the required energetic penalty is smaller than that of a denser structure. PMID:26549642

  10. Moment equations for chromatography based on Langmuir type reaction kinetics.

    PubMed

    Miyabe, Kanji

    2014-08-22

    Moment equations were derived for chromatography, in which the reaction kinetics between solute molecules and functional ligands on the stationary phase was represented by the Langmuir type rate equation. A set of basic equations of the general rate model of chromatography representing the mass balance, mass transfer rate, and reaction kinetics in the column were analytically solved in the Laplace domain. The moment equations for the first absolute moment and the second central moment in the real time domain were derived from the analytical solution in the Laplace domain. The moment equations were used for predicting the chromatographic behavior under hypothetical HPLC conditions. The influence of the parameters relating to the adsorption equilibrium and to the reaction kinetics on the chromatographic behavior was quantitatively evaluated. It is expected that the moment equations are effective for a detailed analysis of the influence of the mass transfer rates and of the Langmuir type reaction kinetics on the column efficiency.

  11. Molecular mechanism of allosteric modulation at GPCRs: insight from a binding kinetics study at the human A1 adenosine receptor

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Dong; Venhorst, Suzanne N; Massink, Arnault; van Veldhoven, Jacobus P D; Vauquelin, Georges; IJzerman, Adriaan P; Heitman, Laura H

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Many GPCRs can be allosterically modulated by small-molecule ligands. This modulation is best understood in terms of the kinetics of the ligand–receptor interaction. However, many current kinetic assays require at least the (radio)labelling of the orthosteric ligand, which is impractical for studying a range of ligands. Here, we describe the application of a so-called competition association assay at the adenosine A1 receptor for this purpose. Experimental Approach We used a competition association assay to examine the binding kinetics of several unlabelled orthosteric agonists of the A1 receptor in the absence or presence of two allosteric modulators. We also tested three bitopic ligands, in which an orthosteric and an allosteric pharmacophore were covalently linked with different spacer lengths. The relevance of the competition association assay for the binding kinetics of the bitopic ligands was also explored by analysing simulated data. Key Results The binding kinetics of an unlabelled orthosteric ligand were affected by the addition of an allosteric modulator and such effects were probe- and concentration-dependent. Covalently linking the orthosteric and allosteric pharmacophores into one bitopic molecule had a substantial effect on the overall on- or off-rate. Conclusion and Implications The competition association assay is a useful tool for exploring the allosteric modulation of the human adenosine A1 receptor. This assay may have general applicability to study allosteric modulation at other GPCRs as well. PMID:25040887

  12. Fast interceptors for theater boost-phase intercept

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1993-04-01

    Boost-phase theater intercept concepts are needed for known and existing countermeasures to current systems. Fast kinetic energy interceptors could be developed from existing and improved propulsion technology and miniaturized sensors to provide that capability. High velocity interceptors with achievable acceleration could achieve the ranges needed for protection of bases and populations, addressing most theater threats. Propulsion requires development. Drag and heating are largely predictable and controllable. Fast interceptors would also have useful applications in national and global missile defense.

  13. Interpolation method for accurate affinity ranking of arrayed ligand-analyte interactions.

    PubMed

    Schasfoort, Richard B M; Andree, Kiki C; van der Velde, Niels; van der Kooi, Alex; Stojanović, Ivan; Terstappen, Leon W M M

    2016-05-01

    The values of the affinity constants (kd, ka, and KD) that are determined by label-free interaction analysis methods are affected by the ligand density. This article outlines a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) imaging method that yields high-throughput globally fitted affinity ranking values using a 96-plex array. A kinetic titration experiment without a regeneration step has been applied for various coupled antibodies binding to a single antigen. Globally fitted rate (kd and ka) and dissociation equilibrium (KD) constants for various ligand densities and analyte concentrations are exponentially interpolated to the KD at Rmax = 100 RU response level (KD(R100)).

  14. Fast food: friendly?

    PubMed

    Rice, S; McAllister, E J; Dhurandhar, N V

    2007-06-01

    Fast food is routinely blamed for the obesity epidemic and consequentially excluded from professional dietary recommendations. However, several sections of society including senior citizens, low-income adult and children, minority and homeless children, or those pressed for time appear to rely on fast food as an important source of meals. Considering the dependence of these nutritionally vulnerable population groups on fast food, we examined the possibility of imaginative selection of fast food, which would attenuate the potentially unfavorable nutrient composition. We present a sample menu to demonstrate that it is possible to design a fast food menu that provides reasonable level of essential nutrients without exceeding the caloric recommendations. We would like to alert health-care professionals that fast food need not be forbidden under all circumstances, and that a fresh look at the role of fast food may enable its inclusion in meal planning for those who depend on it out of necessity, while adding flexibility.

  15. Quantification of the affinities and kinetics of protein interactions using silicon nanowire biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Xuexin; Li, Yue; Rajan, Nitin K.; Routenberg, David A.; Modis, Yorgo; Reed, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Monitoring the binding affinities and kinetics of protein interactions is important in clinical diagnostics and drug development because such information is used to identify new therapeutic candidates. Surface plasmon resonance is at present the standard method used for such analysis, but this is limited by low sensitivity and low-throughput analysis. Here, we show that silicon nanowire field-effect transistors can be used as biosensors to measure protein–ligand binding affinities and kinetics with sensitivities down to femtomolar concentrations. Based on this sensing mechanism, we develop an analytical model to calibrate the sensor response and quantify the molecular binding affinities of two representative protein–ligand binding pairs. The rate constant of the association and dissociation of the protein–ligand pair is determined by monitoring the reaction kinetics, demonstrating that silicon nanowire field-effect transistors can be readily used as high-throughput biosensors to quantify protein interactions. PMID:22635097

  16. Structure-kinetics relationships of Capadenoson derivatives as adenosine A1 receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Louvel, Julien; Guo, Dong; Soethoudt, Marjolein; Mocking, Tamara A M; Lenselink, Eelke B; Mulder-Krieger, Thea; Heitman, Laura H; IJzerman, Adriaan P

    2015-08-28

    We report the synthesis and biological evaluation of new derivatives of Capadenoson, a former drug candidate that was previously advanced to phase IIa clinical trials. 19 of the 20 ligands show an affinity below 100 nM at the human adenosine A1 receptor (hA1AR) and display a wide range of residence times at this target (from approx. 5 min (compound 10) up to 132 min (compound 5)). Structure-affinity and structure-kinetics relationships were established, and computational studies of a homology model of the hA1AR revealed crucial interactions for both the affinity and dissociation kinetics of this family of ligands. These results were also combined with global metrics (Ligand Efficiency, cLogP), showing the importance of binding kinetics as an additional way to better select a drug candidate amongst seemingly similar leads.

  17. Expansion of the Ligand Knowledge Base for Chelating P,P-Donor Ligands (LKB-PP).

    PubMed

    Jover, Jesús; Fey, Natalie; Harvey, Jeremy N; Lloyd-Jones, Guy C; Orpen, A Guy; Owen-Smith, Gareth J J; Murray, Paul; Hose, David R J; Osborne, Robert; Purdie, Mark

    2012-08-13

    We have expanded the ligand knowledge base for bidentate P,P- and P,N-donor ligands (LKB-PP, Organometallics2008, 31, 1372-1383) by 208 ligands and introduced an additional steric descriptor (nHe8). This expanded knowledge base now captures information on 334 bidentate ligands and has been processed with principal component analysis (PCA) of the descriptors to produce a detailed map of bidentate ligand space, which better captures ligand variation and has been used for the analysis of ligand properties. PMID:24882917

  18. FAST User Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walatka, Pamela P.; Clucas, Jean; McCabe, R. Kevin; Plessel, Todd; Potter, R.; Cooper, D. M. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The Flow Analysis Software Toolkit, FAST, is a software environment for visualizing data. FAST is a collection of separate programs (modules) that run simultaneously and allow the user to examine the results of numerical and experimental simulations. The user can load data files, perform calculations on the data, visualize the results of these calculations, construct scenes of 3D graphical objects, and plot, animate and record the scenes. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) visualization is the primary intended use of FAST, but FAST can also assist in the analysis of other types of data. FAST combines the capabilities of such programs as PLOT3D, RIP, SURF, and GAS into one environment with modules that share data. Sharing data between modules eliminates the drudgery of transferring data between programs. All the modules in the FAST environment have a consistent, highly interactive graphical user interface. Most commands are entered by pointing and'clicking. The modular construction of FAST makes it flexible and extensible. The environment can be custom configured and new modules can be developed and added as needed. The following modules have been developed for FAST: VIEWER, FILE IO, CALCULATOR, SURFER, TOPOLOGY, PLOTTER, TITLER, TRACER, ARCGRAPH, GQ, SURFERU, SHOTET, and ISOLEVU. A utility is also included to make the inclusion of user defined modules in the FAST environment easy. The VIEWER module is the central control for the FAST environment. From VIEWER, the user can-change object attributes, interactively position objects in three-dimensional space, define and save scenes, create animations, spawn new FAST modules, add additional view windows, and save and execute command scripts. The FAST User Guide uses text and FAST MAPS (graphical representations of the entire user interface) to guide the user through the use of FAST. Chapters include: Maps, Overview, Tips, Getting Started Tutorial, a separate chapter for each module, file formats, and system

  19. Controlled-deactivation cannabinergic ligands.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rishi; Nikas, Spyros P; Paronis, Carol A; Wood, Jodianne T; Halikhedkar, Aneetha; Guo, Jason Jianxin; Thakur, Ganesh A; Kulkarni, Shashank; Benchama, Othman; Raghav, Jimit Girish; Gifford, Roger S; Järbe, Torbjörn U C; Bergman, Jack; Makriyannis, Alexandros

    2013-12-27

    We report an approach for obtaining novel cannabinoid analogues with controllable deactivation and improved druggability. Our design involves the incorporation of a metabolically labile ester group at the 2'-position on a series of (-)-Δ(8)-THC analogues. We have sought to introduce benzylic substituents α to the ester group which affect the half-lives of deactivation through enzymatic activity while enhancing the affinities and efficacies of individual ligands for the CB1 and CB2 receptors. The 1'-(S)-methyl, 1'-gem-dimethyl, and 1'-cyclobutyl analogues exhibit remarkably high affinities for both CB receptors. The novel ligands are susceptible to enzymatic hydrolysis by plasma esterases in a controllable manner, while their metabolites are inactive at the CB receptors. In further in vitro and in vivo experiments key analogues were shown to be potent CB1 receptor agonists and to exhibit CB1-mediated hypothermic and analgesic effects.

  20. Kinetic methods in capillary electrophoresis and their applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezovski, Maxim V.; Okhonin, Victor; Petrov, Alex; Krylov, Sergey N.

    2005-09-01

    In recent years, capillary electrophoresis (CE) has been one of rapidly growing analytical techniques to study affinity interactions. Quick analysis, high efficiency, high resolving power, low sample consumption, and wide range of possible analytes make CE an indispensable tool for studies of biomolecules and, in particular, studies of their interactions. In the article, we discuss kinetic methods in CE. The spectrum of proven applications of kinetic CE methods includes: (i) measuring equilibrium and rate constants of protein-ligand interaction from a single experiment, (ii) quantitative affinity analyses of proteins, (iii) measuring temperature in CE, (iv) studying thermochemistry of affinity interactions, and (v) kinetic selection of ligands from combinatorial libraries. We demonstrate that new kinetic CE method can serve as a "Swiss army knife" in the development and utilization of oligonucleotide aptamers. Uniquely, they can facilitate selection of smart aptamers - aptamers with pre-defined binding parameters. We believe that further development of kinetic CE methods will provide a variety of methodological schemes for high-throughput screening of combinatorial libraries for affinity probes and drug candidates using CE as a universal instrumental platform.

  1. Presentation of Ligands on Hydroxylapatite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Barbara C. F.; Orgel, Leslie E.

    1997-01-01

    Conjugates of biotin with the decamer of glutamic acid (glu(sub 10)) and the trimer of D,L-2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (I) have been synthesized, and it has been shown that they mediate the binding of avidin to hydroxylapatite. In a similar way a conjugate of methotrexate with glu(sub 10) mediates the binding of dihydrofolate reductase to the mineral. The presentation of ligands on the hydroxylapatite component of bone may find applications in clinical medicine.

  2. Unusual ligand coordination for cesium

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, J.C.; Kavallieratos, K.; Sachleben, R.A.

    2000-04-03

    When complexed by tetrabenzo-24-crown-8, the cesium ion can accommodate unprecedented ligation. The structures of the complexes are presented. These structures are the first reported examples of linear {eta}{sup 2}-acetonitrile coordination to any metal ion and the first structures illustrating {eta}{sup 2}-acetonitrile and dichloromethane ligation to an alkali metal ion. Possible steric and electronic origins of these unusual metal-ligand interactions are discussed.

  3. Synthesis and comparative biological evaluation of bifunctional ligands for radiotherapy applications of (90)Y and (177)Lu.

    PubMed

    Chong, Hyun-Soon; Sun, Xiang; Chen, Yunwei; Sin, Inseok; Kang, Chi Soo; Lewis, Michael R; Liu, Dijie; Ruthengael, Varyanna C; Zhong, Yongliang; Wu, Ningjie; Song, Hyun A

    2015-03-01

    Zevalin® is an antibody-drug conjugate radiolabeled with a cytotoxic radioisotope ((90)Y) that was approved for radioimmunotherapy (RIT) of B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. A bifunctional ligand that displays favorable complexation kinetics and in vivo stability is required for effective RIT. New bifunctional ligands 3p-C-DE4TA and 3p-C-NE3TA for potential use in RIT were efficiently prepared by the synthetic route based on regiospecific ring opening of aziridinium ions with prealkylated triaza- or tetraaza-backboned macrocycles. The new bifunctional ligands 3p-C-DE4TA and 3p-C-NE3TA along with the known bimodal ligands 3p-C-NETA and 3p-C-DEPA were comparatively evaluated for potential use in targeted radiotherapy using β-emitting radionuclides (90)Y and (177)Lu. The bifunctional ligands were evaluated for radiolabeling kinetics with (90)Y and (177)Lu, and the corresponding (90)Y or (177)Lu-radiolabeled complexes were studied for in vitro stability in human serum and in vivo biodistribution in mice. The results of the comparative complexation kinetic and stability studies indicate that size of macrocyclic cavity, ligand denticity, and bimodality of donor groups have a substantial impact on complexation of the bifunctional ligands with the radiolanthanides. The new promising bifunctional chelates in the DE4TA and NE3TA series were rapid in binding (90)Y and (177)Lu, and the corresponding (90)Y- and (177)Lu-radiolabeled complexes remained inert in human serum or in mice. The in vitro and in vivo data show that 3p-C-DE4TA and 3p-C-NE3TA are promising bifunctional ligands for targeted radiotherapy applications of (90)Y and (177)Lu.

  4. Absolute Ligand Discrimination by Dimeric Signaling Receptors.

    PubMed

    Fathi, Sepehr; Nayak, Chitra R; Feld, Jordan J; Zilman, Anton G

    2016-09-01

    Many signaling pathways act through shared components, where different ligand molecules bind the same receptors or activate overlapping sets of response regulators downstream. Nevertheless, different ligands acting through cross-wired pathways often lead to different outcomes in terms of the target cell behavior and function. Although a number of mechanisms have been proposed, it still largely remains unclear how cells can reliably discriminate different molecular ligands under such circumstances. Here we show that signaling via ligand-induced receptor dimerization-a very common motif in cellular signaling-naturally incorporates a mechanism for the discrimination of ligands acting through the same receptor. PMID:27602720

  5. Ligand identification using electron-density mapcorrelations

    SciTech Connect

    Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Adams, Paul D.; Moriarty, Nigel W.; Cohn,Judith D.

    2006-12-01

    A procedure for the identification of ligands bound incrystal structuresof macromolecules is described. Two characteristics ofthe density corresponding to a ligand are used in the identificationprocedure. One is the correlation of the ligand density with each of aset of test ligands after optimization of the fit of that ligand to thedensity. The other is the correlation of a fingerprint of the densitywith the fingerprint of model density for each possible ligand. Thefingerprints consist of an ordered list of correlations of each the testligands with the density. The two characteristics are scored using aZ-score approach in which the correlations are normalized to the mean andstandard deviation of correlations found for a variety of mismatchedligand-density pairs, so that the Z scores are related to the probabilityof observing a particular value of the correlation by chance. Theprocedure was tested with a set of 200 of the most commonly found ligandsin the Protein Data Bank, collectively representing 57 percent of allligands in the Protein Data Bank. Using a combination of these twocharacteristics of ligand density, ranked lists of ligand identificationswere made for representative (F-o-F-c) exp(i phi(c)) difference densityfrom entries in the Protein Data Bank. In 48 percent of the 200 cases,the correct ligand was at the top of the ranked list of ligands. Thisapproach may be useful in identification of unknown ligands in newmacromolecular structures as well as in the identification of whichligands in a mixture have bound to a macromolecule.

  6. Kinetic Profiles in NSTX Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    R.E. Bell; B.P. LeBlanc; C. Bourdelle; D.R. Ernst; E.D. Fredrickson; D.A. Gates; J.C. Hosea; D.W. Johnson; S.M. Kaye; R. Maingi; S. Medley; J.E. Menard; D. Mueller; M. Ono; F. Paoletti; M. Peng; S.A. Sabbagh; D. Stutman; D.W. Swain; E.J. Synakowski; and J.R. Wilson

    2001-07-10

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is a low aspect ratio (R/a approximately 1.3) device with auxiliary heating from neutral-beam injection (NBI) and high-harmonic fast-wave heating (HHFW). Typical NSTX parameters are R(subscript ''0'') = 85 cm, a = 67 cm, I(subscript ''p'') = 0.7-1.4 MA, B(subscript ''phi'') = 0.25-0.45 T. Three co-directed deuterium neutral-beam sources have injected P(subscript ''NB'') less than or equal to 4.7 MW. HHFW plasmas typically have delivered P(subscript ''RF'') less than or equal to 3 MW. Important to the understanding of NSTX confinement are the new kinetic profile diagnostics: a multi-pulse Thomson scattering system (MPTS) and a charge-exchange recombination spectroscopy (CHERS) system. The MPTS diagnostic currently measures electron density and temperature profiles at 30 Hz at ten spatial locations. The CHERS system has recently become available to measure carbon ion temperature and toroidal flow at 17 radial positions spanning the outer half of the minor radius with 20 msec time resolution during NBI. Experiments conducted during the last year have produced a wide range of kinetic profiles in NSTX. Some interesting examples are presented below.

  7. FINDSITEcomb: A threading/structure-based, proteomic-scale virtual ligand screening approach

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hongyi; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Virtual ligand screening is an integral part of the modern drug discovery process. Traditional ligand-based, virtual screening approaches are fast but require a set of structurally diverse ligands known to bind to the target. Traditional structure-based approaches require high-resolution target protein structures and are computationally demanding. In contrast, the recently developed threading/structure-based FINDSITE-based approaches have the advantage that they are as fast as traditional ligand-based approaches and yet overcome the limitations of traditional ligand- or structure-based approaches. These new methods can use predicted low-resolution structures and infer the likelihood of a ligand binding to a target by utilizing ligand information excised from the target’s remote or close homologous proteins and/or libraries of ligand binding databases. Here, we develop an improved version of FINDSITE, FINDSITEfilt, that filters out false positive ligands in threading identified templates by a better binding site detection procedure that includes information about the binding site amino acid similarity. We then combine FINDSITEfilt with FINDSITEX that uses publicly available binding databases ChEMBL and DrugBank for virtual ligand screening. The combined approach, FINDSITEcomb, is compared to two traditional docking methods, AUTODOCK Vina and DOCK 6, on the DUD benchmark set. It is shown to be significantly better in terms of enrichment factor, dependence on target structure quality and speed. FINDSITEcomb is then tested for virtual ligand screening on a large set of 3,576 generic targets from the DrugBank database as well as a set of 168 Human GPCRs. Excluding close homologues, FINDSITEcomb gives an average enrichment factor of 52.1 for generic targets and 22.3 for GPCRs within the top 1% of the screened compound library. Around 65% of the targets have better than random enrichment factors. The performance is insensitive to target structure quality, as long as it

  8. Pulsed laser kinetic studies of liquids under high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Eyring, E.M.

    1992-09-22

    A laser flash photolysis kinetic study of 2,2{prime}-bipyridine bidentate chelating ligands with one claw in the first coordination sphere of a molybdenum carbonyl complex has been completed at pressures up to 150 MPa. The reaction mechanism for thermal ring closure is found from activation volumes to change from associative interchange to dissociative interchange as substituents on the 2,2{prime}-bipyridine ligands become bulkier. In a similar study of more rigid, substituted phenanthroline bidentate ligands it was found that substituent bulkiness had little effect on the thermal ring closure mechanism. Stability constants for lithium ion complexes with crown ethers in a room temperature molten salt, fluorescence quantum yields for cresyl violet and several other dyes in solution, and the oxidation of alcohols by OsO{sub 4} have also been investigated.

  9. Are superhalogens without halogen ligand capable of transcending traditional halogen-based superhalogens? Ab initio case study of binuclear anions based on pseudohalogen ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jin-Feng; Sun, Yin-Yin; Li, Miao-Miao; Li, Jian-Li; Yin, Bing; Bai, Hongcun

    2015-06-15

    The superhalogen properties of polynuclear structures without halogen ligand are theoretically explored here for several [M{sub 2}(CN){sub 5}]{sup −1} (M =  Ca, Be) clusters. At CCSD(T) level, these clusters have been confirmed to be superhalogens due to their high vertical electron detachment energies (VDE). The largest one is 9.70 eV for [Ca{sub 2}(CN){sub 5}]{sup −1} which is even higher than those of corresponding traditional structures based on fluorine or chlorine ligands. Therefore the superhalogens stronger than the traditional halogen-based structures could be realized by ligands other than halogen atoms. Compared with CCSD(T), outer valence Green’s function (OVGF) method either overestimates or underestimates the VDEs for different structures while MP2 results are generally consistent in the aspect of relative values. The extra electrons of the highest VDE anions here aggregate on the bridging CN units with non-negligible distribution occurring on other CN units too. These two features lower both the potential and kinetic energies of the extra electron respectively and thus lead to high VDE. Besides superhalogen properties, the structures, relative stabilities and thermodynamic stabilities with respect to the detachment of cyanide ligand were also investigated. The sum of these results identifies the potential of polynuclear structures with pseudohalogen ligand as suitable candidates with enhanced superhalogens properties.

  10. Large Deviations in Fast-Slow Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchet, Freddy; Grafke, Tobias; Tangarife, Tomás; Vanden-Eijnden, Eric

    2016-02-01

    The incidence of rare events in fast-slow systems is investigated via analysis of the large deviation principle (LDP) that characterizes the likelihood and pathway of large fluctuations of the slow variables away from their mean behavior—such fluctuations are rare on short time-scales but become ubiquitous eventually. Classical results prove that this LDP involves an Hamilton-Jacobi equation whose Hamiltonian is related to the leading eigenvalue of the generator of the fast process, and is typically non-quadratic in the momenta—in other words, the LDP for the slow variables in fast-slow systems is different in general from that of any stochastic differential equation (SDE) one would write for the slow variables alone. It is shown here that the eigenvalue problem for the Hamiltonian can be reduced to a simpler algebraic equation for this Hamiltonian for a specific class of systems in which the fast variables satisfy a linear equation whose coefficients depend nonlinearly on the slow variables, and the fast variables enter quadratically the equation for the slow variables. These results are illustrated via examples, inspired by kinetic theories of turbulent flows and plasma, in which the quasipotential characterizing the long time behavior of the system is calculated and shown again to be different from that of an SDE.

  11. fast-matmul

    SciTech Connect

    Grey Ballard, Austin Benson

    2014-11-26

    This software provides implementations of fast matrix multiplication algorithms. These algorithms perform fewer floating point operations than the classical cubic algorithm. The software uses code generation to automatically implement the fast algorithms based on high-level descriptions. The code serves two general purposes. The first is to demonstrate that these fast algorithms can out-perform vendor matrix multiplication algorithms for modest problem sizes on a single machine. The second is to rapidly prototype many variations of fast matrix multiplication algorithms to encourage future research in this area. The implementations target sequential and shared memory parallel execution.

  12. Fast robust correlation.

    PubMed

    Fitch, Alistair J; Kadyrov, Alexander; Christmas, William J; Kittler, Josef

    2005-08-01

    A new, fast, statistically robust, exhaustive, translational image-matching technique is presented: fast robust correlation. Existing methods are either slow or non-robust, or rely on optimization. Fast robust correlation works by expressing a robust matching surface as a series of correlations. Speed is obtained by computing correlations in the frequency domain. Computational cost is analyzed and the method is shown to be fast. Speed is comparable to conventional correlation and, for large images, thousands of times faster than direct robust matching. Three experiments demonstrate the advantage of the technique over standard correlation.

  13. Structure and stability of hexadentate complexes of ligands based on AAZTA for efficient PET labelling with gallium-68.

    PubMed

    Waldron, Bradley P; Parker, David; Burchardt, Carsten; Yufit, Dmitry S; Zimny, Melanie; Roesch, Frank

    2013-01-21

    Pre-organised tricarboxylate ligands based on 6-amino-perhydro-1,4-diazepine bind (68)Ga rapidly and selectively in acetate buffer at pH 4 to 7, forming kinetically stable complexes suitable for use in PET imaging. PMID:23212712

  14. Beyond kinetic relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truskinovsky, Lev; Vainchtein, Anna

    2010-09-01

    We introduce the concept of kinetic or rate equations for moving defects representing a natural extension of the more conventional notion of a kinetic relation. Algebraic kinetic relations, widely used to model dynamics of dislocations, cracks and phase boundaries, link the instantaneous value of the velocity of a defect with an instantaneous value of the driving force. The new approach generalizes kinetic relations by implying a relation between the velocity and the driving force which is nonlocal in time. To make this relation explicit one may need to integrate a system of kinetic equations. We illustrate the difference between kinetic relation and kinetic equations by working out in full detail a prototypical model of an overdamped defect in a one-dimensional discrete lattice. We show that the minimal nonlocal kinetic description, containing now an internal time scale, is furnished by a system of two ordinary differential equations coupling the spatial location of defect with another internal parameter that describes configuration of the core region.

  15. The Usefulness of Serum CXCR3 Ligands for Evaluating the Early Treatment Response in Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Wou Young; Yoon, Dukyong; Lee, Keu Sung; Jung, Yun Jung; Kim, Young Sun; Sheen, Seung Soo; Park, Kwang Joo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cell-mediated immunity plays an important role in the pathobiology of tuberculosis (TB). The ligands for CXC chemokine receptor 3 (CXCR3) activate the T-helper type 1 lymphocyte pathway. The CXCR3 ligands are reportedly useful clinical markers for the diagnosis and follow-up of TB. The objective of this study was to assess the utility of CXCR3 ligands for evaluating early treatment responses in TB. We recruited 88 patients who underwent antituberculous chemotherapy. The serum levels of interferon (IFN)-γ and the CXCR3 ligands CXCL9 (monokine induced by IFN-γ [MIG]), CXCL10 (IFN-γ-inducible 10-kDa protein [IP-10]), and CXCL11 (IFN-inducible T-cell α chemoattractant [I-TAC]) were measured before and 2 months after the start of treatment. Treatment responses were divided into “fast” and “slow” based on the clinical, radiological, and bacteriological improvement at 2 months. A change in level of 20% or more at 2 months was defined as “significant.” In patients with treatment success, 58 patients exhibited a fast response and 20 patients exhibited a slow response. Treatment failure occurred in 5 patients, and the diagnoses were changed to non-TB diseases in 5 patients. The levels of all CXCR3 ligands significantly decreased in the fast-response group (P < 0.01) but did not decrease in the other groups. IFN-γ levels showed no significant changes. The ability of significant decreases in marker levels to predict a fast response was evaluated. CXCL9 showed a sensitivity of 83%, and CXCL10 showed a specificity of 100%. Use of various combinations of CXCR3 ligands resulted in improvements in sensitivity (88%–93%), while specificity (92%–96%) was similar to that using single CXCR3 ligands. The decreases in CXCR3 ligand levels were less marked in the 2-month Mycobacterium tuberculosis culture-positive group than in the culture-negative group. There were significant differences in treatment outcomes in terms of 2-month culture positivity (P

  16. Metabotropic glutamate receptor ligands as potential therapeutics for addiction

    PubMed Central

    Olive, M. F.

    2009-01-01

    There is now compelling evidence that the excitatory amino acid neurotransmitter glutamate plays a pivotal role in drug addiction and alcoholism. As a result, there has been increasing interest in developing glutamate-based therapies for the treatment of addictive disorders. Receptors for glutamate are primarily divided into two classes: ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) that mediate fast excitatory glutamate transmission, and metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs), which are G-protein coupled receptors that mediate slower, modulatory glutamate transmission. Most iGluR antagonists, while showing some efficacy in animal models of addiction, exhibit serious side effects when tested in humans. mGluR ligands, on the other hand, which have been advanced to testing in clinical trials for various medical conditions, have demonstrated the ability to reduce drug reward, reinforcement, and relapse-like behaviors in animal studies. mGluR ligands that have been shown to be primarily effective are Group I (mGluR1 and mGluR5) negative allosteric modulators and Group II (mGluR2 and mGluR3) orthosteric presynaptic autoreceptor agonists. In this review, we will summarize findings from animal studies suggesting that these mGluR ligands may be of potential benefit in reducing on-going drug self-administration and may aid in the prevention of relapse. The neuroanatomical distribution of mGluR1, mGluR2/3, and mGluR5 receptors and the pharmacological properties of Group I negative allosteric modulators and Group II agonists will also be overviewed. Finally, we will discuss the current status of mGluR ligands in human clinical trials. PMID:19630739

  17. Probabilistic Prediction of Contacts in Protein-Ligand Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Hakulinen, Riku; Puranen, Santeri; Lehtonen, Jukka V.; Johnson, Mark S.; Corander, Jukka

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a statistical method for evaluating atomic level 3D interaction patterns of protein-ligand contacts. Such patterns can be used for fast separation of likely ligand and ligand binding site combinations out of all those that are geometrically possible. The practical purpose of this probabilistic method is for molecular docking and scoring, as an essential part of a scoring function. Probabilities of interaction patterns are calculated conditional on structural x-ray data and predefined chemical classification of molecular fragment types. Spatial coordinates of atoms are modeled using a Bayesian statistical framework with parametric 3D probability densities. The parameters are given distributions a priori, which provides the possibility to update the densities of model parameters with new structural data and use the parameter estimates to create a contact hierarchy. The contact preferences can be defined for any spatial area around a specified type of fragment. We compared calculated contact point hierarchies with the number of contact atoms found near the contact point in a reference set of x-ray data, and found that these were in general in a close agreement. Additionally, using substrate binding site in cathechol-O-methyltransferase and 27 small potential binder molecules, it was demonstrated that these probabilities together with auxiliary parameters separate well ligands from decoys (true positive rate 0.75, false positive rate 0). A particularly useful feature of the proposed Bayesian framework is that it also characterizes predictive uncertainty in terms of probabilities, which have an intuitive interpretation from the applied perspective. PMID:23155467

  18. Conformational readout of RNA by small ligands

    PubMed Central

    Kligun, Efrat; Mandel-Gutfreund, Yael

    2013-01-01

    RNA molecules have highly versatile structures that can fold into myriad conformations, providing many potential pockets for binding small molecules. The increasing number of available RNA structures, in complex with proteins, small ligands and in free form, enables the design of new therapeutically useful RNA-binding ligands. Here we studied RNA ligand complexes from 10 RNA groups extracted from the protein data bank (PDB), including adaptive and non-adaptive complexes. We analyzed the chemical, physical, structural and conformational properties of binding pockets around the ligand. Comparing the properties of ligand-binding pockets to the properties of computed pockets extracted from all available RNA structures and RNA-protein interfaces, revealed that ligand-binding pockets, mainly the adaptive pockets, are characterized by unique properties, specifically enriched in rare conformations of the nucleobase and the sugar pucker. Further, we demonstrate that nucleotides possessing the rare conformations are preferentially involved in direct interactions with the ligand. Overall, based on our comprehensive analysis of RNA-ligand complexes, we suggest that the unique conformations adopted by RNA nucleotides play an important role in RNA recognition by small ligands. We term the recognition of a binding site by a ligand via the unique RNA conformations “RNA conformational readout.” We propose that “conformational readout” is a general way by which RNA binding pockets are recognized and selected from an ensemble of different RNA states. PMID:23618839

  19. Canonical and non-canonical Notch ligands

    PubMed Central

    D’SOUZA, BRENDAN; MELOTY-KAPELLA, LAURENCE; WEINMASTER, GERRY

    2015-01-01

    Notch signaling induced by canonical Notch ligands is critical for normal embryonic development and tissue homeostasis through the regulation of a variety of cell fate decisions and cellular processes. Activation of Notch signaling is normally tightly controlled by direct interactions with ligand-expressing cells and dysregulated Notch signaling is associated with developmental abnormalities and cancer. While canonical Notch ligands are responsible for the majority of Notch signaling, a diverse group of structurally unrelated non-canonical ligands has also been identified that activate Notch and likely contribute to the pleiotropic effects of Notch signaling. Soluble forms of both canonical and non-canonical ligands have been isolated, some of which block Notch signaling and could serve as natural inhibitors of this pathway. Ligand activity can also be indirectly regulated by other signaling pathways at the level of ligand expression, serving to spatio-temporally compartmentalize Notch signaling activity and integrate Notch signaling into a molecular network that orchestrates developmental events. Here, we review the molecular mechanisms underlying the dual role of Notch ligands as activators and inhibitors of Notch signaling. Additionally, evidence that Notch ligands function independent of Notch are presented. We also discuss how ligand post-translational modification, endocytosis, proteolysis and spatio-temporal expression regulate their signaling activity. PMID:20816393

  20. Ligand placement based on prior structures: the guided ligand-replacement method

    SciTech Connect

    Klei, Herbert E.; Moriarty, Nigel W. Echols, Nathaniel; Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Baldwin, Eric T.; Pokross, Matt; Posy, Shana; Adams, Paul D.

    2014-01-01

    A new module, Guided Ligand Replacement (GLR), has been developed in Phenix to increase the ease and success rate of ligand placement when prior protein-ligand complexes are available. The process of iterative structure-based drug design involves the X-ray crystal structure determination of upwards of 100 ligands with the same general scaffold (i.e. chemotype) complexed with very similar, if not identical, protein targets. In conjunction with insights from computational models and assays, this collection of crystal structures is analyzed to improve potency, to achieve better selectivity and to reduce liabilities such as absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicology. Current methods for modeling ligands into electron-density maps typically do not utilize information on how similar ligands bound in related structures. Even if the electron density is of sufficient quality and resolution to allow de novo placement, the process can take considerable time as the size, complexity and torsional degrees of freedom of the ligands increase. A new module, Guided Ligand Replacement (GLR), was developed in Phenix to increase the ease and success rate of ligand placement when prior protein–ligand complexes are available. At the heart of GLR is an algorithm based on graph theory that associates atoms in the target ligand with analogous atoms in the reference ligand. Based on this correspondence, a set of coordinates is generated for the target ligand. GLR is especially useful in two situations: (i) modeling a series of large, flexible, complicated or macrocyclic ligands in successive structures and (ii) modeling ligands as part of a refinement pipeline that can automatically select a reference structure. Even in those cases for which no reference structure is available, if there are multiple copies of the bound ligand per asymmetric unit GLR offers an efficient way to complete the model after the first ligand has been placed. In all of these applications, GLR

  1. Protein Fibrillation Lag Times During Kinetic Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Pagano, Rodrigo S.; López Medus, Máximo; Gómez, Gabriela E.; Couto, Paula M.; Labanda, María S.; Landolfo, Lucas; D’Alessio, Cecilia; Caramelo, Julio J.

    2014-01-01

    Protein aggregation is linked to more than 30 human pathologies, including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. Since small oligomers that form at the beginning of the fibrillation process probably are the most toxic elements, therapeutic strategies involving fibril fragmentation could be detrimental. An alternative approach, named kinetic inhibition, aims to prevent fibril formation by using small ligands that stabilize the parent protein. The factors that govern fibrillation lag times during kinetic inhibition are largely unknown, notwithstanding their importance for designing effective long-term therapies. Inhibitor-bound species are not likely to be incorporated into the core of mature fibrils, although their presence could alter the kinetics of the fibrillation process. For instance, inhibitor-bound species may act as capping elements that impair the nucleation process and/or fibril growth. Here, we address this issue by studying the effect of two natural inhibitors on the fibrillation behavior of lysozyme at neutral pH. We analyzed a set of 79 fibrillation curves obtained in lysozyme alone and a set of 37 obtained in the presence of inhibitors. We calculated the concentrations of the relevant species at the beginning of the curves using the inhibitor-binding constants measured under the same experimental conditions. We found that inhibitor-bound protein species do not affect fibrillation onset times, which are mainly determined by the concentration of unbound protein species present in equilibrium. In this system, knowledge of the fibrillation kinetics and inhibitor affinities suffices to predict the effect of kinetic inhibitors on fibrillation lag times. In addition, we developed a new methodology to better estimate fibrillation lag times from experimental curves. PMID:25099810

  2. Ligand-Induced Changes of the Apparent Transition-State Position in Mechanical Protein Unfolding

    PubMed Central

    Stigler, Johannes; Rief, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Force-spectroscopic measurements of ligand-receptor systems and the unfolding/folding of nucleic acids or proteins reveal information on the underlying energy landscape along the pulling coordinate. The slope Δx‡ of the force-dependent unfolding/unbinding rates is interpreted as the distance from the folded/bound state to the transition state for unfolding/unbinding and, hence, often related to the mechanical compliance of the sample molecule. Here we show that in ligand-binding proteins, the experimentally inferred Δx‡ can depend on the ligand concentration, unrelated to changes in mechanical compliance. We describe the effect in single-molecule, force-spectroscopy experiments of the calcium-binding protein calmodulin and explain it in a simple model where mechanical unfolding and ligand binding occur on orthogonal reaction coordinates. This model predicts changes in the experimentally inferred Δx‡, depending on ligand concentration and the associated shift of the dominant barrier between the two reaction coordinates. We demonstrate quantitative agreement between experiments and simulations using a realistic six-state kinetic scheme using literature values for calcium-binding kinetics and affinities. Our results have important consequences for the interpretation of force-spectroscopic data of ligand-binding proteins. PMID:26200872

  3. [Medical aspects of fasting].

    PubMed

    Gavrankapetanović, F

    1997-01-01

    Fasting (arabic-savm) was proclaimed through islam, and thus it is an obligation for Holly Prophet Muhammad s.a.v.s.-Peace be to Him-in the second year after Hijra (in 624 after Milad-born of Isa a.s.). There is a month of fasting-Ramadan-each lunar (hijra) year. So, it was 1415th fasting this year. Former Prophets have brought obligative messages on fasting to their people; so there are also certain forms of fasting with other religions i.e. with Catholics, Jews, Orthodox. These kinds of fasting above differ from muslim fasting, but they also appear obligative. All revelations have brought fasting as obligative. From medical point of view, fasting has two basical components: psychical and physical. Psychical sphere correlate closely with its fundamental ideological message. Allah dz.s. says in Quran: "... Fasting is obligative for you, as it was obligative to your precedents, as to avoid sins; during very few days (II, II, 183 & 184)." Will strength, control of passions, effort and self-discipline makes a pure faithfull person, who purify its mind and body through fasting. Thinking about The Creator is more intensive, character is more solid; and spirit and will get stronger. We will mention the hadith saying: "Essaihune humus saimun!" That means: "Travellers at the Earth are fasters (of my ummet)." The commentary of this hadith, in the Collection of 1001 hadiths (Bin bir hadis), number 485, says: "There are no travelling dervishs or monks in islam; thus there is no such a kind of relligousity in islam. In stead, it is changed by fasting and constant attending of mosque. That was proclaimed as obligation, although there were few cases of travelling in the name of relligousity, like travelling dervishs and sheichs." In this paper, the author discusses medical aspects of fasting and its positive characteristics in the respect of healthy life style and prevention of many sicks. The author mentions positive influence of fasting to certain system and organs of human

  4. Electrochemistry of oxo-technetium(V) complexes containing Schiff base and 8-quinolinol ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Refosco, F.; Mazzi, U.; Deutsch, E.; Kirchhoff, J.R.; Heineman, W.R.; Seeber, R.

    1988-11-16

    The electrochemistry of six-coordinate, monooxo technetium(V) complexes containing Schiff base ligands has been studied in acetonitrile and N,N'-dimethylformamide solutions. The complexes have the general formula TcOCl(L/sub B/)/sub 2/ or TcO(L/sub T/)(L/sub B/), where L/sub B/ represents a bidentate-N,O Schiff base ligand or a bidentate-N,O 8-quinolinol ligand and L/sub T/ represents a tridentate-O,N,O Schiff base ligand. Cyclic voltammetry at a platinum-disk electrode, controlled-potential coulometry, and thin-layer spectroelectrochemistry were used to probe both the oxidation and the reduction of these complexes. The results of these studies, and previously reported results on the analogous Re(V) complexes, can be understood within a single general reaction scheme. The salient features of this scheme are (i) one-electron reduction of Tc(V) to Tc(IV), (ii) subsequent loss of a ligand situated cis to the Tc/identical to/O linkage, and (iii) subsequent isomerization of this unstable Tc(IV) product to more stable complex in which the site trans to the Tc/identical to/O linkage is vacant. The Tc(IV) complexes can also be reduced to analogous Tc(III) species, which appear to undergo the same ligand loss and isomerization reactions. The technetium complexes are 400-500 mV easier to reduce than are their rhenium analogues. The 8-quinolinol ligands, and especially the 5-nitro derivative, both thermodynamically and kinetically stabilize the Tc(IV) and Tc(III) oxidation states. These electrogenerated species are unusual in that they constitute the bulk of the known examples of monomeric Tc(IV) and Tc(III) complexes containing only N- and O-donating ligands. 34 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Ligand conjugation to bimodal poly(ethylene glycol) brush layers on microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cherry C; Borden, Mark A

    2010-08-17

    Using microbubbles as model systems, we examined molecular diffusion and binding to colloidal surfaces in bimodal poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) brush layers. A microbubble is a gaseous colloidal particle with a diameter of less than 10 mum, of which the surface comprises amphiphilic phospholipids self-assembled to form a lipid monolayer shell. Due to the compressible gas core, microbubbles provide a sensitive acoustic response and are currently used as ultrasound contrast agents. Similar to the design of long circulating liposomes, PEG chains are typically incorporated into the shell of microbubbles to form a steric barrier against coalescence and adsorption of macromolecules to the microbubble surface. We introduced a buried-ligand architecture (BLA) design where the microbubble surface was coated with a bimodal PEG brush. After microbubbles were generated, fluorescent ligands with different molecular weights were conjugated to the tethered functional groups on the shorter PEG chains, while the longer PEG chains served as a shield to protect these ligands from exposure to the surrounding environment. BLA microbubbles reduced the binding of macromolecules (>10 kDa) to the tethers due to the steric hindrance of the PEG overbrush while allowing the uninhibited attachment of small molecules (<1 kDa). Roughly 40% less fluorescein-conjugated streptavidin (SA-FITC) bound to BLA microbubbles compared to exposed-ligand architecture (ELA) microbubbles. The binding of SA-FITC to BLA microbubbles suggested a possible phase separation between the lipid species on the surface leading to populations of revealed and concealed ligands. Ligand conjugation kinetics was independent of microbubble size, regardless of ligand size or microbubble architecture. We observed, for the first time, streptavidin-induced surface structure formation for ELA microbubbles and proposed that this phenomenon may be correlated to flow cytometry scattering measurements. We therefore demonstrated the

  6. Integrative Physiology of Fasting.

    PubMed

    Secor, Stephen M; Carey, Hannah V

    2016-04-01

    Extended bouts of fasting are ingrained in the ecology of many organisms, characterizing aspects of reproduction, development, hibernation, estivation, migration, and infrequent feeding habits. The challenge of long fasting episodes is the need to maintain physiological homeostasis while relying solely on endogenous resources. To meet that challenge, animals utilize an integrated repertoire of behavioral, physiological, and biochemical responses that reduce metabolic rates, maintain tissue structure and function, and thus enhance survival. We have synthesized in this review the integrative physiological, morphological, and biochemical responses, and their stages, that characterize natural fasting bouts. Underlying the capacity to survive extended fasts are behaviors and mechanisms that reduce metabolic expenditure and shift the dependency to lipid utilization. Hormonal regulation and immune capacity are altered by fasting; hormones that trigger digestion, elevate metabolism, and support immune performance become depressed, whereas hormones that enhance the utilization of endogenous substrates are elevated. The negative energy budget that accompanies fasting leads to the loss of body mass as fat stores are depleted and tissues undergo atrophy (i.e., loss of mass). Absolute rates of body mass loss scale allometrically among vertebrates. Tissues and organs vary in the degree of atrophy and downregulation of function, depending on the degree to which they are used during the fast. Fasting affects the population dynamics and activities of the gut microbiota, an interplay that impacts the host's fasting biology. Fasting-induced gene expression programs underlie the broad spectrum of integrated physiological mechanisms responsible for an animal's ability to survive long episodes of natural fasting. PMID:27065168

  7. A comparison of various optimization algorithms of protein-ligand docking programs by fitness accuracy.

    PubMed

    Guo, Liyong; Yan, Zhiqiang; Zheng, Xiliang; Hu, Liang; Yang, Yongliang; Wang, Jin

    2014-07-01

    In protein-ligand docking, an optimization algorithm is used to find the best binding pose of a ligand against a protein target. This algorithm plays a vital role in determining the docking accuracy. To evaluate the relative performance of different optimization algorithms and provide guidance for real applications, we performed a comparative study on six efficient optimization algorithms, containing two evolutionary algorithm (EA)-based optimizers (LGA, DockDE) and four particle swarm optimization (PSO)-based optimizers (SODock, varCPSO, varCPSO-ls, FIPSDock), which were implemented into the protein-ligand docking program AutoDock. We unified the objective functions by applying the same scoring function, and built a new fitness accuracy as the evaluation criterion that incorporates optimization accuracy, robustness, and efficiency. The varCPSO and varCPSO-ls algorithms show high efficiency with fast convergence speed. However, their accuracy is not optimal, as they cannot reach very low energies. SODock has the highest accuracy and robustness. In addition, SODock shows good performance in efficiency when optimizing drug-like ligands with less than ten rotatable bonds. FIPSDock shows excellent robustness and is close to SODock in accuracy and efficiency. In general, the four PSO-based algorithms show superior performance than the two EA-based algorithms, especially for highly flexible ligands. Our method can be regarded as a reference for the validation of new optimization algorithms in protein-ligand docking.

  8. Kinetic barriers to the folding of horse cytochrome C in the reduced state.

    PubMed

    Bhuyan, Abani K; Kumar, Rajesh

    2002-10-22

    To determine the kinetic barrier in the folding of horse cytochrome c, a CO-liganded derivative of cytochrome c, called carbonmonoxycytochrome c, has been prepared by exploiting the thermodynamic reversibility of ferrocytochrome c unfolding induced by guanidinium hydrochloride (GdnHCl), pH 7. The CO binding properties of unfolded ferrocytochrome c, studied by 13C NMR and optical spectroscopy, are remarkably similar to those of native myoglobin and isolated chains of human hemoglobin. Equilibrium unfolding transitions of ferrocytochrome c in the presence and the absence of CO observed by both excitation energy transfer from the lone tryptophan to the ferrous heme and far-UV circular dichroism (CD) indicate no accumulation of structural intermediates to a detectable level. Values of thermodynamic parameters obtained by two-state analysis of fluorescence transitions are DeltaG(H2O) = 11.65(+/-1.13) kcal x mol(-1) and C(m) = 3.9(+/-0.1) M GdnHCl in the presence of CO, and DeltaG(H2O)=19.3(+/-0.5) kcal x mol(-1) and C(m) = 5.1(+/-0.1) M GdnHCl in the absence of CO, indicating destabilization of ferrocytochrome c by approximately 7.65 kcal x mol(-1) due to CO binding. The native states of ferrocytochrome c and carbonmonoxycytochrome c are nearly identical in terms of structure and conformation except for the Fe2+-M80 --> Fe2+-CO replacement. Folding and unfolding kinetics as a function of GdnHCl, studied by stopped-flow fluorescence, are significantly different for the two proteins. Both refold fast, but carbonmonoxycytochrome c refolds 2-fold faster (tau = 1092 micros at 10 degrees C) than ferrocytochrome c. Linear extrapolation of the folding rates to the ordinate of the chevron plot projects this value of tau to 407 micros. The unfolding rate of the former in water, estimated by extrapolation, is faster by more than 10 orders of magnitude. Significant differences are also observed in rate-denaturant gradients in the chevron. Formation and disruption of the Fe2+-M80

  9. Simple phosphinate ligands access zinc clusters identified in the synthesis of zinc oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pike, Sebastian D.; White, Edward R.; Shaffer, Milo S. P.; Williams, Charlotte K.

    2016-10-01

    The bottom-up synthesis of ligand-stabilized functional nanoparticles from molecular precursors is widely applied but is difficult to study mechanistically. Here we use 31P NMR spectroscopy to follow the trajectory of phosphinate ligands during the synthesis of a range of ligated zinc oxo clusters, containing 4, 6 and 11 zinc atoms. Using an organometallic route, the clusters interconvert rapidly and self-assemble in solution based on thermodynamic equilibria rather than nucleation kinetics. These clusters are also identified in situ during the synthesis of phosphinate-capped zinc oxide nanoparticles. Unexpectedly, the ligand is sequestered to a stable Zn11 cluster during the majority of the synthesis and only becomes coordinated to the nanoparticle surface, in the final step. In addition to a versatile and accessible route to (optionally doped) zinc clusters, the findings provide an understanding of the role of well-defined molecular precursors during the synthesis of small (2-4 nm) nanoparticles.

  10. Calculations of distance distributions and probabilities of binding by ligands between parallel plane membranes comprising receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plante, Ianik; Devroye, Luc; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2014-03-01

    Cell communication through biochemical signaling pathways is a key determinant of tissue responses to radiation. Several molecules, such as the transforming growth factor β (TGFβ), are implicated in radiation-induced signaling between cells. Brownian Dynamics (BD) algorithms have recently been used to simulate the interaction of ligands with receptors and to elucidate signal transduction and autocrine loops in ligand-receptors systems. In this paper, we discuss the simulation of particle diffusion and binding kinetics in a space bounded by two parallel plane membranes, using an exact algorithm to sample the propagator (Green’s function) of a particle located between 2 membranes. We also show that the simulation results are independent of the number of time steps used, in accordance with time discretization equations. These simulations could be used to simulate the motion and binding of ligand molecules in a cell culture, and possibly in neuronal synapses.

  11. Sliding tethered ligands add topological interactions to the toolbox of ligand–receptor design

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Martin; Kékicheff, Patrick; Iss, Jean; Fajolles, Christophe; Charitat, Thierry; Daillant, Jean; Marques, Carlos M.

    2015-01-01

    Adhesion in the biological realm is mediated by specific lock-and-key interactions between ligand–receptor pairs. These complementary moieties are ubiquitously anchored to substrates by tethers that control the interaction range and the mobility of the ligands and receptors, thus tuning the kinetics and strength of the binding events. Here we add sliding anchoring to the toolbox of ligand–receptor design by developing a family of tethered ligands for which the spacer can slide at the anchoring point. Our results show that this additional sliding degree of freedom changes the nature of the adhesive contact by extending the spatial range over which binding may sustain a significant force. By introducing sliding tethered ligands with self-regulating length, this work paves the way for the development of versatile and reusable bio-adhesive substrates with potential applications for drug delivery and tissue engineering. PMID:26350224

  12. Stochastic description of the ligand-receptor interaction of biologically active substances at extremely low doses.

    PubMed

    Gurevich, Konstantin G; Agutter, Paul S; Wheatley, Denys N

    2003-04-01

    Signalling molecules can be effective at extraordinarily low concentrations (down to attomolar levels). To handle such cases, probabilistic methods have been used to describe the formal kinetics of action of biologically active substances in these low doses, although it has been necessary to review what is meant by such a term. The mean numbers of transformed/degraded molecules and their dispersions were calculated for the possible range of ligand-receptor binding schemes. We used both analytical equations and numerical simulations to calculate the coefficients of variation (ratio of standard deviation to mean) and demonstrated that the distribution of the coefficient is highly dependent on the reaction scheme. It may, therefore, be used as an additional factor for discriminating between cooperative and noncooperative models of ligand-receptor interaction over extreme ranges of ligand dilution. The relevance to signalling behaviour is discussed.

  13. Improving the stability and inertness of Cu(ii) and Cu(i) complexes with methylthiazolyl ligands by tuning the macrocyclic structure.

    PubMed

    Le Fur, Mariane; Beyler, Maryline; Le Poul, Nicolas; Lima, Luís M P; Le Mest, Yves; Delgado, Rita; Platas-Iglesias, Carlos; Patinec, Véronique; Tripier, Raphaël

    2016-05-01

    A tacn based ligand bearing two methylthiazolyl arms (no2th) was synthesized with the aim to find ligands forming very stable and inert complexes with Cu(ii) and Cu(i) in aqueous medium for radiopharmaceutical applications. The no2th ligand was efficiently prepared following the orthoamide intermediate synthesis. The complexes with Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) were obtained and analyzed by X-ray diffraction. The [Cu(no2th)](2+) complex presents a pentacoordinated distorted square pyramidal coordination geometry, while the metal ion in [Zn(no2th)](2+) adopts a hexacoordinated distorted trigonal prismatic geometry involving the coordination of a perchlorate counter ion. The acid-base properties of no2th have been studied using potentiometric titrations, and the stability constants of Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) complexes were determined by potentiometric and UV-vis titrations using H4edta as a competitor ligand. The stability constant determined for the Cu(2+) complex is rather high (log KCuL = 20.77 and pCu = 17.15), and moreover no2th exhibits a high selectivity for copper(ii) in relation to zinc(ii). The kinetics of the copper(ii) complexation process is very fast even in acidic medium. In addition, the [Cu(no2th)](2+) complex was found to be inert under rather harsh conditions (up to 2 M HCl and 60 °C), displaying a very high half-life time of about 15 days in 2 M HCl at 90 °C. The electrochemical reduction of the copper(ii) complex in water leads to the reversible formation of a stable copper(i) species. Spectroscopic studies performed by NMR, UV-vis and EPR, assisted by theoretical calculations, show that the [Cu(no2th)](2+) complex presents a structure in solution similar to that observed in the solid state. When compared to its cyclam di-N-methylthiazolyl counterpart, the results reported in this paper unambiguously show that replacing the cyclam unit by a tacn moiety improves the stability and inertness of its Cu(ii) and Cu(i) complexes.

  14. Kinetic theory for interacting Luttinger liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchhold, Michael; Diehl, Sebastian

    2015-10-01

    We derive a closed set of equations for the kinetics and non-equilibrium dynamics of interacting Luttinger Liquids with cubic resonant interactions. In the presence of these interactions, the Luttinger phonons become dressed but still well defined quasi-particles, characterized by a life-time much larger then the inverse energy. This enables the separation of forward time dynamics and relative time dynamics into slow and fast dynamics and justifies the so-called Wigner approximation, which can be seen as a "local-time approximation" for the relative dynamics. Applying field theoretical methods in the Keldysh framework, i.e. kinetic and Dyson-Schwinger equations, we derive a closed set of dynamic equations, describing the kinetics of normal and anomalous phonon densities, the phonon self-energy and vertex corrections for a Gaussian non-equilibrium initial state. In the limit of low phonon densities, the results from self-consistent Born approximation are recaptured, including Andreev's scaling solution for the quasi-particle life-time in a thermal state. As an application, we compute the relaxation of an excited state to its thermal equilibrium. While the intermediate time dynamics displays exponentially fast relaxation, the last stages of thermalization are governed by algebraic laws. This can be traced back to the importance of energy and momentum conservation at the longest times, which gives rise to dynamical slow modes.

  15. Determination of thermodynamic and kinetic properties of biomolecules by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gülbakan, Basri; Barylyuk, Konstantin; Zenobi, Renato

    2015-02-01

    Over the past two decades, mass spectrometry (MS) has transformed the life sciences. The advances in understanding biomolecule structure and function by MS is progressing at an accelerated pace. MS has also largely been applied to study thermodynamic and kinetic structure of biomolecules. Herein, we highlight the recent discussions about native mass spectrometry and studies about determining stable gas phase structures, hydrogen/deuterium exchange studies about reaction kinetics and determination of binding constants of biomolecules with their ligands.

  16. fastKDE

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, Travis A.; Kashinath, Karthik

    2015-05-22

    This software implements the fast, self-consistent probability density estimation described by O'Brien et al. (2014, doi: ). It uses a non-uniform fast Fourier transform technique to reduce the computational cost of an objective and self-consistent kernel density estimation method.

  17. Fast and effective?

    PubMed

    Trueland, Jennifer

    2013-12-18

    The 5.2 diet involves two days of fasting each week. It is being promoted as the key to sustained weight loss, as well as wider health benefits, despite the lack of evidence on the long-term effects. Nurses need to support patients who wish to try intermittent fasting. PMID:24345130

  18. Nonisothermal Analysis of Solution Kinetics by Spreadsheet Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Levie, Robert

    2012-01-01

    A fast and generally applicable alternative solution to the problem of determining the useful shelf life of medicinal solutions is described. It illustrates the power and convenience of the combination of numerical simulation and nonlinear least squares with a practical pharmaceutical application of chemical kinetics and thermodynamics, validated…

  19. Kinetics of ion transport through supramolecular channels in single crystals.

    PubMed

    Assouma, Cyrille D; Crochet, Aurélien; Chérémond, Yvens; Giese, Bernd; Fromm, Katharina M

    2013-04-22

    Single-crystal to single-crystal transformations are possible by ion-exchange and transport reactions through supramolecular channels that are composed of crown ether molecules and use trihalide ions as scaffolds. Kinetic measurements of ion transport at different temperatures provide activation energy data and show that a very fast exchange of K(+) ions with Na(+) ions occurs.

  20. Kinetic diversity of dopamine transmission in the dorsal striatum

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, I. Mitch; Nesbitt, Kathryn M.; Walters, Seth H.; Varner, Erika L.; Shu, Zhan; Bartlow, Kathleen M.; Jaquins-Gerstl, Andrea S.; Michael, Adrian C.

    2015-01-01

    Dopamine (DA), a highly significant neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system, operates on multiple time scales to affect a diverse array of physiological functions. The significance of DA in human health is heightened by its role in a variety of pathologies. Voltammetric measurements of electrically evoked dopamine release have brought to light the existence of a patchwork of DA kinetic domains in the dorsal striatum of the rat. Thus, it becomes necessary to consider how these domains might be related to specific aspects of DA's functions. Responses evoked in the fast and slow domains are distinct in both amplitude and temporal profile. Herein we report that responses evoked in fast domains can be further classified into four distinct types, types 1-4. The dorsal striatum, therefore, exhibits a total of at least five distinct evoked responses (4 fast types and 1 slow type). All five response types conform to kinetic models based entirely on first order rate expressions, which indicates that the heterogeneity among the response types arises from kinetic diversity within the dorsal striatum terminal field. We report also that functionally distinct sub-regions of the dorsal striatum express DA kinetic diversity in a selective manner. Thus, this study documents five response types, provides a thorough kinetic explanation for each of them, and confirms their differential association with functionally distinct sub-regions of this key DA terminal field. PMID:25683259

  1. A universal rule for organic ligand exchange.

    PubMed

    You, Hongjun; Wang, Wenjin; Yang, Shengchun

    2014-11-12

    Most synthetic routes to high-quality nanocrystals with tunable morphologies predominantly employ long hydro-carbon molecules as ligands, which are detrimental for electronic and catalytic applications. Here, a rule is found that the adsorption energy of an organic ligand is related to its carbon-chain length. Using the density functional theory method, the adsorption energies of some commonly used ligand molecules with different carbon-chain lengths are calculated, including carboxylate, hydroxyl, and amine molecules adsorbed on metal or metal oxide crystal surface. The results indicate that the adsorption energy of the ligand molecule with a long carbon chain is weaker than that of a smaller molecule with same functional group. This rule provides a theoretical support for a new kind of ligand exchange method in which large organic ligand molecules can be exchanged by small molecules with same functional group to improve the catalytic properties.

  2. Ligand Migration in the Apolar Tunnel of Cerebratulus lacteus Mini-Hemoglobin*

    PubMed Central

    Pesce, Alessandra; Nardini, Marco; Dewilde, Sylvia; Capece, Luciana; Martí, Marcelo A.; Congia, Sonia; Salter, Mallory D.; Blouin, George C.; Estrin, Darío A.; Ascenzi, Paolo; Moens, Luc; Bolognesi, Martino; Olson, John S.

    2011-01-01

    The large apolar tunnel traversing the mini-hemoglobin from Cerebratulus lacteus (CerHb) has been examined by x-ray crystallography, ligand binding kinetics, and molecular dynamic simulations. The addition of 10 atm of xenon causes loss of diffraction in wild-type (wt) CerHbO2 crystals, but Leu-86(G12)Ala CerHbO2, which has an increased tunnel volume, stably accommodates two discrete xenon atoms: one adjacent to Leu-86(G12) and another near Ala-55(E18). Molecular dynamics simulations of ligand migration in wt CerHb show a low energy pathway through the apolar tunnel when Leu or Ala, but not Phe or Trp, is present at the 86(G12) position. The addition of 10–15 atm of xenon to solutions of wt CerHbCO and L86A CerHbCO causes 2–3-fold increases in the fraction of geminate ligand recombination, indicating that the bound xenon blocks CO escape. This idea was confirmed by L86F and L86W mutations, which cause even larger increases in the fraction of geminate CO rebinding, 2–5-fold decreases in the bimolecular rate constants for ligand entry, and large increases in the computed energy barriers for ligand movement through the apolar tunnel. Both the addition of xenon to the L86A mutant and oxidation of wt CerHb heme iron cause the appearance of an out Gln-44(E7) conformer, in which the amide side chain points out toward the solvent and appears to lower the barrier for ligand escape through the E7 gate. However, the observed kinetics suggest little entry and escape (≤25%) through the E7 pathway, presumably because the in Gln-44(E7) conformer is thermodynamically favored. PMID:21147768

  3. Disentangling ligand migration and heme pocket relaxation in cytochrome P450cam.

    PubMed

    Tetreau, Catherine; Mouawad, Liliane; Murail, Samuel; Duchambon, Patricia; Blouquit, Yves; Lavalette, Daniel

    2005-02-01

    In this work we show that ligand migration and active site conformational relaxation can occur independently of each other in hemoproteins. The complicated kinetics of carbon monoxide rebinding with cytochrome P450cam display up to five distinct processes between 77 K and 300 K. They were disentangled by using a combination of three approaches: 1), the competition of the ligand with xenon for the occupation of internal protein cavities; 2), the modulation of the amount of distal steric hindrance within the heme pocket by varying the nature of the substrate; and 3), molecular mechanics calculations to support the proposed heme-substrate relaxation mechanism and to seek internal cavities. In cytochrome P450cam, active site conformational relaxation results from the displacement of the substrate toward the heme center upon photodissociation of the ligand. It is responsible for the long, puzzling bimodal nature of the rebinding kinetics observed down to 77 K. The relaxation rate is strongly substrate-dependent. Ligand migration is slower and is observed only above 135 K. Migration and return rates are independent of the substrate.

  4. Enhanced dimerization drives ligand-independent activity of mutant epidermal growth factor receptor in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Valley, Christopher C.; Arndt-Jovin, Donna J.; Karedla, Narain; Steinkamp, Mara P.; Chizhik, Alexey I.; Hlavacek, William S.; Wilson, Bridget S.; Lidke, Keith A.; Lidke, Diane S.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations within the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR/erbB1/Her1) are often associated with tumorigenesis. In particular, a number of EGFR mutants that demonstrate ligand-independent signaling are common in non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), including kinase domain mutations L858R (also called L834R) and exon 19 deletions (e.g., ΔL747-P753insS), which collectively make up nearly 90% of mutations in NSCLC. The molecular mechanisms by which these mutations confer constitutive activity remain unresolved. Using multiple subdiffraction-limit imaging modalities, we reveal the altered receptor structure and interaction kinetics of NSCLC-associated EGFR mutants. We applied two-color single quantum dot tracking to quantify receptor dimerization kinetics on living cells and show that, in contrast to wild-type EGFR, mutants are capable of forming stable, ligand-independent dimers. Two-color superresolution localization microscopy confirmed ligand-independent aggregation of EGFR mutants. Live-cell Förster resonance energy transfer measurements revealed that the L858R kinase mutation alters ectodomain structure such that unliganded mutant EGFR adopts an extended, dimerization-competent conformation. Finally, mutation of the putative dimerization arm confirmed a critical role for ectodomain engagement in ligand-independent signaling. These data support a model in which dysregulated activity of NSCLC-associated kinase mutants is driven by coordinated interactions involving both the kinase and extracellular domains that lead to enhanced dimerization. PMID:26337388

  5. PL-PatchSurfer: A Novel Molecular Local Surface-Based Method for Exploring Protein-Ligand Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Bingjie; Zhu, Xiaolei; Monroe, Lyman; Bures, Mark G.; Kihara, Daisuke

    2014-01-01

    Structure-based computational methods have been widely used in exploring protein-ligand interactions, including predicting the binding ligands of a given protein based on their structural complementarity. Compared to other protein and ligand representations, the advantages of a surface representation include reduced sensitivity to subtle changes in the pocket and ligand conformation and fast search speed. Here we developed a novel method named PL-PatchSurfer (Protein-Ligand PatchSurfer). PL-PatchSurfer represents the protein binding pocket and the ligand molecular surface as a combination of segmented surface patches. Each patch is characterized by its geometrical shape and the electrostatic potential, which are represented using the 3D Zernike descriptor (3DZD). We first tested PL-PatchSurfer on binding ligand prediction and found it outperformed the pocket-similarity based ligand prediction program. We then optimized the search algorithm of PL-PatchSurfer using the PDBbind dataset. Finally, we explored the utility of applying PL-PatchSurfer to a larger and more diverse dataset and showed that PL-PatchSurfer was able to provide a high early enrichment for most of the targets. To the best of our knowledge, PL-PatchSurfer is the first surface patch-based method that treats ligand complementarity at protein binding sites. We believe that using a surface patch approach to better understand protein-ligand interactions has the potential to significantly enhance the design of new ligands for a wide array of drug-targets. PMID:25167137

  6. Effect of inorganic and organic ligands on the sorption/desorption of arsenate on/from Al-Mg and Fe-Mg layered double hydroxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caporale, A. G.; Pigna, M.; Dynes, J. J.; Cozzolino, V.; Zhu, J.; Violante, A.

    2012-04-01

    In recent decades, a class of anionic clays known as layered double hydroxides (LDHs) has attracted substantial attention due to the potential use in many applications, such as photochemistry, electrochemistry, polymerization, magnetization and biomedical science. There has also been considerable interest in using LDHs as adsorbents to remove environmental contaminants due to their large surface area, high anion exchange capacity and good thermal stability. We studied the sorption of arsenate on Al-Mg and Fe-Mg layered double hydroxides (easily reproducible at low-cost) as affected by pH and varying concentrations of inorganic (nitrate, nitrite, phosphate, selenite and sulphate) and organic (oxalate and tartrate) ligands, ii) the effect of residence time on the arsenate desorption by these ligands, and iii) the kinetics of arsenate desorption by phosphate. The Fe-Mg-LDH sorbed nearly twice the amount of arsenate compared to the Al-Mg-LDH, due, in part, to its greater surface area and lower degree of crystallinity. Moreover, the Fe-Mg-LDH sorbed more arsenate than phosphate, in contrast to the Al-Mg-LDH, which adsorbed more phosphate than arsenate, probably because of the greater affinity of arsenate than phosphate for Fe sites and, vice versa, the greater affinity of phosphate than arsenate for Al sites. Arsenate sorption onto samples decreased by increasing pH, due, maybe, to the high affinity of hydroxyl ions for LDHs and/or to the value of zero point charge of two sorbents. The rate of decline in the amount of arsenate sorbed was, however, relatively constant, decreasing the fastest for the Fe-Mg-LDH compared to the Al-Mg-LDH. The capacity of ligands to inhibit the fixation of arsenate followed the sequence: nitrate < nitrite < sulphate < selenite < tartrate < oxalate << phosphate on Al-Mg-LDH and nitrate < sulphate ≈ nitrite < tartrate < oxalate < selenite << phosphate on Fe-Mg-LDH. The inhibition of arsenate sorption increased by increasing the initial

  7. Catalytic and mechanistic studies into the epoxidation of styrenes using manganese complexes of structurally similar polyamine ligands.

    PubMed

    Ilyashenko, Gennadiy; De Faveri, Giorgio; Follier, Thomas; Al-Safadi, Rawan; Motevalli, Majid; Watkinson, Michael

    2014-02-21

    Two structurally similar polyamine ligands (7 and 8) have been prepared, which differ only by the presence of either a secondary or tertiary nitrogen donor within their N5 donor set. The ligands, in combination with iron and manganese salts, have been screened for their efficacy as catalysts for the epoxidation of styrene, using both hydrogen peroxide and peracetic acid as oxidants. Clear differences in activity between the two systems were observed, with 7 proving most effective in the presence of MnSO4 with H2O2, whereas ligand 8 proved to be effective with Mn(OTf)2, MnCl2 and Mn(ClO4)2 using peracetic acid as the oxidant. A Hammett analysis of the initial rate kinetics of the optimal systems, combined with analysis by UV-vis spectroscopy, indicates that the small structural differences in the ligands elicit profound changes in the nature of the active species formed. PMID:24395191

  8. Fast magnetic reconnection with large guide fields

    SciTech Connect

    Stanier, A.; Simakov, Andrei N.; Chacón, L.; Daughton, W.

    2015-01-09

    Here, we demonstrate using two-fluid simulations that low-βmagnetic reconnection remains fast, regardless of the presence of fast dispersive waves, which have been previously suggested to play a critical role. In order to understand these results, a discrete model is constructed that offers scaling relationships for the reconnection rate and dissipation region (DR) thickness in terms of the upstream magnetic field and DR length. We verify these scalings numerically and show how the DR self-adjusts to process magnetic flux at the same rate that it is supplied to a larger region where two-fluid effects become important. Ultimately, the rate is independent of the DR physics and is in good agreement with kinetic results.

  9. Fast magnetic reconnection with large guide fields

    DOE PAGES

    Stanier, A.; Simakov, Andrei N.; Chacón, L.; Daughton, W.

    2015-01-09

    Here, we demonstrate using two-fluid simulations that low-βmagnetic reconnection remains fast, regardless of the presence of fast dispersive waves, which have been previously suggested to play a critical role. In order to understand these results, a discrete model is constructed that offers scaling relationships for the reconnection rate and dissipation region (DR) thickness in terms of the upstream magnetic field and DR length. We verify these scalings numerically and show how the DR self-adjusts to process magnetic flux at the same rate that it is supplied to a larger region where two-fluid effects become important. Ultimately, the rate is independentmore » of the DR physics and is in good agreement with kinetic results.« less

  10. A compound containing substituted indole ligand from a hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii Hance under Zn exposure.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yan; Peng, Hongyun; Gao, Lingling; Luo, Ancheng; Yang, Xiaoe

    2013-01-01

    Sedum alfredii Hance is a fast-growing and high-biomass zinc (Zn) hyperaccumulator native to China. A compound containing substituted indole ligand was isolated from this Zn hyperaccumulator plants by sonication/ethanol extraction, macroporous resin column as well as preparative HPLC (P-HPLC). Hydroponic experiment showed that the concentrations of both Zn and the compound containing substituted indole ligand were remarkably increased in stems and leaves of both hyperaccumulator and non-hyperaccumulator as Zn rising from 0.5 to 50 micromol L(-1), with much more in the stems of hyperaccumulator than non-hyperaccumulator. At 50 micromol L(-1) Zn, hyperaccumulator grew normally but its non-hyperaccumulator suffered from strongly Zn-induced toxicity. This suggested that there was a positive correlation between the compound containing substituted indole ligand and Zn concentration in shoots of hyperaccumulator S. alfredii.

  11. Computational protein-ligand docking and virtual drug screening with the AutoDock suite.

    PubMed

    Forli, Stefano; Huey, Ruth; Pique, Michael E; Sanner, Michel F; Goodsell, David S; Olson, Arthur J

    2016-05-01

    Computational docking can be used to predict bound conformations and free energies of binding for small-molecule ligands to macromolecular targets. Docking is widely used for the study of biomolecular interactions and mechanisms, and it is applied to structure-based drug design. The methods are fast enough to allow virtual screening of ligand libraries containing tens of thousands of compounds. This protocol covers the docking and virtual screening methods provided by the AutoDock suite of programs, including a basic docking of a drug molecule with an anticancer target, a virtual screen of this target with a small ligand library, docking with selective receptor flexibility, active site prediction and docking with explicit hydration. The entire protocol will require ∼5 h. PMID:27077332

  12. Imaging neurotransmitter release kinetics in living cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Weihong; Yeung, E.S.; Haydon, P.G.

    1996-12-31

    A new UV-laser based optical microscope and CCD detection system has been developed to image neurotransmitter in living biological cells. We demonstrate the detection of serotonin that has been taken up into and released from individual living glial cells (astrocytes) based on its native fluorescence. The detection methodology has high sensitivity, low limit of detection and does not require coupling to fluorescence dyes. We have studied serotonin uptake kinetics and its release dynamics in single glial cells. Different regions of a glial cell have taken up different amounts of serotonin with a variety of kinetics. Similarly, different serotonin release mechanisms have been observed in different astrocyte cell regions. The temporal resolution of this detection system is as fast as 50 ms, and the spatial resolution is diffraction limited. We will also report on single enzyme molecule reaction studies and single metal ion detection based on CCD imaging of pL reaction vials formed by micromachining on fused silica.

  13. Accelerating search kinetics by following boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calandre, T.; Bénichou, O.; Voituriez, R.

    2014-06-01

    We derive exact expressions of the mean first-passage time to a bulk target for a random searcher that performs boundary-mediated diffusion in a circular domain. Although nonintuitive for bulk targets, it is found that boundary excursions, if fast enough, can minimize the search time. A scaling analysis generalizes these findings to domains of arbitrary shapes and underlines their robustness. Overall, these results provide a generic mechanism of optimization of search kinetics in interfacial systems, which could have important implications in chemical physics. In the context of animal behavior sciences, it shows that following the boundaries of a domain can accelerate a search process, and therefore suggests that thigmotactism could be a kinetically efficient behavior.

  14. Reusable fast opening switch

    DOEpatents

    Van Devender, John P.; Emin, David

    1986-01-01

    A reusable fast opening switch for transferring energy, in the form of a high power pulse, from an electromagnetic storage device such as an inductor into a load. The switch is efficient, compact, fast and reusable. The switch comprises a ferromagnetic semiconductor which undergoes a fast transition between conductive and insulating states at a critical temperature and which undergoes the transition without a phase change in its crystal structure. A semiconductor such as europium rich europhous oxide, which undergoes a conductor to insulator transition when it is joule heated from its conductor state, can be used to form the switch.

  15. Reusable fast opening switch

    DOEpatents

    Van Devender, J.P.; Emin, D.

    1983-12-21

    A reusable fast opening switch for transferring energy, in the form of a high power pulse, from an electromagnetic storage device such as an inductor into a load. The switch is efficient, compact, fast and reusable. The switch comprises a ferromagnetic semiconductor which undergoes a fast transition between conductive and metallic states at a critical temperature and which undergoes the transition without a phase change in its crystal structure. A semiconductor such as europium rich europhous oxide, which undergoes a conductor to insulator transition when it is joule heated from its conductor state, can be used to form the switch.

  16. fast-matmul

    2014-11-26

    This software provides implementations of fast matrix multiplication algorithms. These algorithms perform fewer floating point operations than the classical cubic algorithm. The software uses code generation to automatically implement the fast algorithms based on high-level descriptions. The code serves two general purposes. The first is to demonstrate that these fast algorithms can out-perform vendor matrix multiplication algorithms for modest problem sizes on a single machine. The second is to rapidly prototype many variations of fastmore » matrix multiplication algorithms to encourage future research in this area. The implementations target sequential and shared memory parallel execution.« less

  17. Fast Breeder Reactor studies

    SciTech Connect

    Till, C.E.; Chang, Y.I.; Kittel, J.H.; Fauske, H.K.; Lineberry, M.J.; Stevenson, M.G.; Amundson, P.I.; Dance, K.D.

    1980-07-01

    This report is a compilation of Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR) resource documents prepared to provide the technical basis for the US contribution to the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Evaluation. The eight separate parts deal with the alternative fast breeder reactor fuel cycles in terms of energy demand, resource base, technical potential and current status, safety, proliferation resistance, deployment, and nuclear safeguards. An Annex compares the cost of decommissioning light-water and fast breeder reactors. Separate abstracts are included for each of the parts.

  18. Cis-interactions between Notch and its ligands block ligand-independent Notch activity

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, William Hunt; Jia, Dongyu; Deng, Wu-Min

    2014-01-01

    The Notch pathway is integrated into numerous developmental processes and therefore is fine-tuned on many levels, including receptor production, endocytosis, and degradation. Notch is further characterized by a twofold relationship with its Delta-Serrate (DSL) ligands, as ligands from opposing cells (trans-ligands) activate Notch, whereas ligands expressed in the same cell (cis-ligands) inhibit signaling. We show that cells without both cis- and trans-ligands can mediate Notch-dependent developmental events during Drosophila oogenesis, indicating ligand-independent Notch activity occurs when the receptor is free of cis- and trans-ligands. Furthermore, cis-ligands can reduce Notch activity in endogenous and genetically induced situations of elevated trans-ligand-independent Notch signaling. We conclude that cis-expressed ligands exert their repressive effect on Notch signaling in cases of trans-ligand-independent activation, and propose a new function of cis-inhibition which buffers cells against accidental Notch activity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04415.001 PMID:25486593

  19. Chemical Kinetics Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 17 NIST Chemical Kinetics Database (Web, free access)   The NIST Chemical Kinetics Database includes essentially all reported kinetics results for thermal gas-phase chemical reactions. The database is designed to be searched for kinetics data based on the specific reactants involved, for reactions resulting in specified products, for all the reactions of a particular species, or for various combinations of these. In addition, the bibliography can be searched by author name or combination of names. The database contains in excess of 38,000 separate reaction records for over 11,700 distinct reactant pairs. These data have been abstracted from over 12,000 papers with literature coverage through early 2000.

  20. A "Stationery" Kinetics Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, L.; Goberdhansingh, A.

    1988-01-01

    Describes a simple redox reaction that occurs between potassium permanganate and oxalic acid that can be used to prepare an interesting disappearing ink for demonstrating kinetics for introductory chemistry. Discusses laboratory procedures and factors that influence disappearance times. (CW)

  1. Kinetics of human sperm acrosomal exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Sosa, C M; Pavarotti, M A; Zanetti, M N; Zoppino, F C M; De Blas, G A; Mayorga, L S

    2015-03-01

    The acrosome reaction is a unique event in the lifespan of sperm characterized by the exocytosis of the acrosomal content and the release of hybrid vesicles formed by patches of the outer acrosomal membrane and the plasma membrane. This unique regulated exocytosis is mediated by essentially the same membrane fusion machinery present in neuroendocrine cells. However, whereas secretion in neuroendocrine cells occurs in less than a second, the acrosome reaction is normally assessed after several minutes of incubation with inducers. In this report, we measured the kinetics of human sperm exocytosis triggered by two stimuli (calcium ionophore and progesterone) by using electron microscopy and three different approaches based on the incorporation of fluorescent Pisum sativum agglutinin into the acrosome upon opening of fusion pores connecting the extracellular medium with the acrosomal lumen. The results with the different methods are consistent with a slow kinetics (t½ = 14 min). We also manipulated the system to measure different steps of the process. We observed that cytosolic calcium increased with a relatively fast kinetics (t½ = 0.1 min). In contrast, the swelling of the acrosomal granule that precedes exocytosis was a slow process (t½ = 13 min). When swelling was completed, the fusion pore opening was fast (t½ = 0.2 min). The results indicate that acrosomal swelling is the slowest step and it determines the kinetics of the acrosome reaction. After the swelling is completed, the efflux of calcium from intracellular stores triggers fusion pores opening and the release of hybrid vesicles in seconds.

  2. Fragment-based ligand discovery.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Marcus; Hubbard, Roderick E

    2009-02-01

    From home building and decor to mass production, modular design is a standard feature of the modern age. The concept also promises to define drug discovery efforts in the near future, as a wide range of methodologies, from NMR to X-ray crystallography, are being adapted to high-throughput platforms. In particular, "fragment-based ligand discovery" describes the laboratory-driven evolution of drugs from libraries of chemical building blocks. "Evolution" is an apt word for the process, as a wide array of methods are used to define how compound fragments can be best fit into the binding sites of medically relevant target biomolecules. A number of compounds that evolved from fragments have entered the clinic, and the approach is increasingly accepted as an additional route to identifying new hit compounds in pharmaceutical discovery and inhibitor design. PMID:19299661

  3. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of proton conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masłowski, T.; Drzewiński, A.; Ulner, J.; Wojtkiewicz, J.; Zdanowska-Frączek, M.; Nordlund, K.; Kuronen, A.

    2014-07-01

    The kinetic Monte Carlo method is used to model the dynamic properties of proton diffusion in anhydrous proton conductors. The results have been discussed with reference to a two-step process called the Grotthuss mechanism. There is a widespread belief that this mechanism is responsible for fast proton mobility. We showed in detail that the relative frequency of reorientation and diffusion processes is crucial for the conductivity. Moreover, the current dependence on proton concentration has been analyzed. In order to test our microscopic model the proton transport in polymer electrolyte membranes based on benzimidazole C7H6N2 molecules is studied.

  4. Catalytic water oxidation by mononuclear Ru complexes with an anionic ancillary ligand.

    PubMed

    Tong, Lianpeng; Inge, A Ken; Duan, Lele; Wang, Lei; Zou, Xiaodong; Sun, Licheng

    2013-03-01

    Mononuclear Ru-based water oxidation catalysts containing anionic ancillary ligands have shown promising catalytic efficiency and intriguing properties. However, their insolubility in water restricts a detailed mechanism investigation. In order to overcome this disadvantage, complexes [Ru(II)(bpc)(bpy)OH2](+) (1(+), bpc = 2,2'-bipyridine-6-carboxylate, bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine) and [Ru(II)(bpc)(pic)3](+) (2(+), pic = 4-picoline) were prepared and fully characterized, which features an anionic tridentate ligand and has enough solubility for spectroscopic study in water. Using Ce(IV) as an electron acceptor, both complexes are able to catalyze O2-evolving reaction with an impressive rate constant. On the basis of the electrochemical and kinetic studies, a water nucleophilic attack pathway was proposed as the dominant catalytic cycle of the catalytic water oxidation by 1(+), within which several intermediates were detected by MS. Meanwhile, an auxiliary pathway that is related to the concentration of Ce(IV) was also revealed. The effect of anionic ligand regarding catalytic water oxidation was discussed explicitly in comparison with previously reported mononuclear Ru catalysts carrying neutral tridentate ligands, for example, 2,2':6',2″-terpyridine (tpy). When 2(+) was oxidized to the trivalent state, one of its picoline ligands dissociated from the Ru center. The rate constant of picoline dissociation was evaluated from time-resolved UV-vis spectra.

  5. Nanoparticle shape, thermodynamics and kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, L. D.; Peng, L.

    2016-02-01

    Nanoparticles can be beautiful, as in stained glass windows, or they can be ugly as in wear and corrosion debris from implants. We estimate that there will be about 70 000 papers in 2015 with nanoparticles as a keyword, but only one in thirteen uses the nanoparticle shape as an additional keyword and research focus, and only one in two hundred has thermodynamics. Methods for synthesizing nanoparticles have exploded over the last decade, but our understanding of how and why they take their forms has not progressed as fast. This topical review attempts to take a critical snapshot of the current understanding, focusing more on methods to predict than a purely synthetic or descriptive approach. We look at models and themes which are largely independent of the exact synthetic method whether it is deposition, gas-phase condensation, solution based or hydrothermal synthesis. Elements are old dating back to the beginning of the 20th century—some of the pioneering models developed then are still relevant today. Others are newer, a merging of older concepts such as kinetic-Wulff constructions with methods to understand minimum energy shapes for particles with twins. Overall we find that while there are still many unknowns, the broad framework of understanding and predicting the structure of nanoparticles via diverse Wulff constructions, either thermodynamic, local minima or kinetic has been exceedingly successful. However, the field is still developing and there remain many unknowns and new avenues for research, a few of these being suggested towards the end of the review.

  6. Kinetic properties and open probability of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Pesti, Krisztina; Szabo, Anett K; Mike, Arpad; Vizi, E Sylvester

    2014-06-01

    The alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) has some peculiar kinetic properties. From the literature of α7 nAChR-mediated currents we concluded that experimentally measured kinetic properties reflected properties of the solution exchange system, rather than genuine kinetic properties of the receptors. We also concluded that all experimentally measured EC50 values for agonists must inherently be inaccurate. The aim of this study was to assess the undistorted kinetic properties of α7 nAChRs, and to construct an improved kinetic model, which can also serve as a basis of modeling the effect of the positive allosteric modulator PNU-120596, as it is described in the accompanying paper. Agonist-evoked currents were recorded from GH4C1 cells stably transfected with pCEP4/rat α7 nAChR using patch-clamp and fast solution exchange. We used two approaches to circumvent the problem of insufficient solution exchange rate: extrapolation and kinetic modeling. First, using different solution exchange rates we recorded evoked currents, and extrapolated their amplitude and kinetics to instantaneous solution exchange. Second, we constructed a kinetic model that reproduced concentration-dependence and solution exchange rate-dependence of receptors, and then we simulated receptor behavior at experimentally unattainably fast solution exchange. We also determined open probabilities during choline-evoked unmodulated and modulated currents using nonstationary fluctuation analysis. The peak open probability of 10 mM choline-evoked currents was 0.033 ± 0.006, while in the presence of choline (10 mM) and PNU-120596 (10 μM), it was increased to 0.599 ± 0.058. Our kinetic model could adequately reproduce low open probability, fast kinetics, fast recovery and solution exchange rate-dependent kinetics. PMID:24486379

  7. Removal of Zinc Form Carbonic Anhydrase: A Kinetics Experiment for Upper-Level Chemistry Laboratories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Kathryn R.; Adhyaru, Bhavin

    2004-01-01

    An experiment on kinetics of deactivation of carbonic anhydrase by removal of zinc is demonstrated. Carbonic anhydrase, the enzyme that catalyzes the interconversion of carbon dioxide and bicarbonate, requires on Zn(II) ion in its active site, and removal of the zinc cofactor by complexion to another ligand leaves the apoenzyme, which is totally…

  8. An Analogy Using Pennies and Dimes to Explain Chemical Kinetics Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cortes-Figueroa, Jose E.; Perez, Wanda I.; Lopez, Jose R.; Moore-Russo, Deborah A.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the authors present an analogy that uses coins and graphical analysis to teach kinetics concepts and resolve pseudo-first-order rate constants related to transition-metal complexes ligand-solvent exchange reactions. They describe an activity that is directed to upper-division undergraduate and graduate students. The activity…

  9. Ligand-Driven Phase Separation in Binary Particle Brush Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bockstaller, Michael; Schmitt, Michael; Zhang, Jianan; Yan, Jiajun; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof

    The tethering of polymer chains to the surface of nanoparticles (to form so-called `particle brush materials') has emerged as an effective means to enable the bottom-up assembly of one-component hybrid materials with controlled microstructure and improved mechanical stability as well as novel optical or acoustic properties. The polymer-like interactions and response of these particle-brush materials suggest intriguing new opportunities to control structure formation in multicomponent particle mixtures. This contribution will demonstrate that polymer-ligand interactions can drive phase separation processes in mixed particle systems that share analogies to those of regular binary polymer blends. The role of particle size, density and degree of polymerization of tethered chains as well as the interaction parameter between the distinct tethered chains on the mechanism and kinetics of phase separation processes in mixed particle brush systems will be discussed. Ligand-driven phase separation will be shown to enable the efficient fabrication of monochromatic domain structured in mixed quantum dot systems that might find application in next generation quantum dot-enabled LEDs. Support by the National Science Foundation (via Grant DMR-1410845) is gratefully acknowledged.

  10. Modification of protein structure and function using photoactivated porphyrin ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Gabriel

    2015-03-01

    The tremendous advances in genomic research have sparked an interest in investigating the possibility to ``manipulate'' the structure of proteins that modify existing functionality. This study makes use of small molecules (e.g., porphyrins) to photosensitize proteins and modify the higher order structure of the polypeptide with the goal of engineering novel functions, or affecting/eliminating native functions. The irradiation of non-covalently bound ligands prompts charge transfer events that have the potential to locally modify the structure of the host protein. The characterization of photoinduced conformational changes in the protein/porphyrin complex is carried out using a combination of electronic spectroscopy and kinetics (e.g., fluorescence spectroscopy, fluorescence decay, circular dichroism). This study is focused primarily on human serum albumin (HSA) as a model. The structure of HSA is well established, the binding sites for an array of ligands are well characterized (including one for protoporphyrins), and HSA provides a series of functions (including some allosteric activity) that can be tested.

  11. Molecular basis of ligand recognition and transport by glucose transporters.

    PubMed

    Deng, Dong; Sun, Pengcheng; Yan, Chuangye; Ke, Meng; Jiang, Xin; Xiong, Lei; Ren, Wenlin; Hirata, Kunio; Yamamoto, Masaki; Fan, Shilong; Yan, Nieng

    2015-10-15

    The major facilitator superfamily glucose transporters, exemplified by human GLUT1-4, have been central to the study of solute transport. Using lipidic cubic phase crystallization and microfocus X-ray diffraction, we determined the structure of human GLUT3 in complex with D-glucose at 1.5 Å resolution in an outward-occluded conformation. The high-resolution structure allows discrimination of both α- and β-anomers of D-glucose. Two additional structures of GLUT3 bound to the exofacial inhibitor maltose were obtained at 2.6 Å in the outward-open and 2.4 Å in the outward-occluded states. In all three structures, the ligands are predominantly coordinated by polar residues from the carboxy terminal domain. Conformational transition from outward-open to outward-occluded entails a prominent local rearrangement of the extracellular part of transmembrane segment TM7. Comparison of the outward-facing GLUT3 structures with the inward-open GLUT1 provides insights into the alternating access cycle for GLUTs, whereby the C-terminal domain provides the primary substrate-binding site and the amino-terminal domain undergoes rigid-body rotation with respect to the C-terminal domain. Our studies provide an important framework for the mechanistic and kinetic understanding of GLUTs and shed light on structure-guided ligand design. PMID:26176916

  12. Discovery with FAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, P.

    2016-02-01

    FAST offers "transformational" performance well-suited to finding new phenomena - one of which might be polarised spectral transients. But discoveries will only be made if "the system" provides its users with the necessary opportunities. In addition to designing in as much observational flexibility as possible, FAST should be operated with a philosophy which maximises its "human bandwidth". This band includes the astronomers of tomorrow - many of whom not have yet started school or even been born.

  13. Cooperation between lateral ligand mobility and accessibility for receptor recognition in selectin-induced cell rolling.

    PubMed

    Bakowsky, Udo; Schumacher, Gabriele; Gege, Christian; Schmidt, Richard R; Rothe, Ulrich; Bendas, Gerd

    2002-04-01

    Selectin-induced leukocyte rolling along the endothelial surface is an essential step in the immune response. Several in vitro studies showed that this cell rolling is a highly regulated adhesion phenomenon, controlled by the kinetics and forces of selectin-ligand interactions. In the flow chamber study presented here, we focused on the requirements on the ligand structure in this context. A series of neoglycolipids bearing the binding epitope Sialyl Lewis X was synthesized and used as artificial ligands. These lipids differed in their spacer structures between headgroup and membrane anchor, resulting in a gradual variation in accessibility and mobility of the binding epitope when immobilized in model membranes. Consequently, analysis of cell rolling along such membranes allowed correlation of ligand structures and functionality. All model membranes containing such ligands were further characterized by film balance measurements, epifluorescence, and atomic force microscopy. Generally, the glycolipids exhibited a high tendency for lateral aggregation, but the resulting clusters were of different morphology. This was also reflected by strong differences in the rolling experiments. Our results confirm that, in addition to a sufficient headgroup accessibility, the cell rolling process is governed by two further interdependent factors: (i) the headgroup flexibility caused by the intramolecular uncoupling between the headgroup and the hydrophobic moiety due to introduction of a spacer, and (ii) the stiffness of the molecules resulting from their supramolecular arrangement in clustered assemblies. Since both factors are influenced simultaneously by the spacer modification, we present for the first time a clear correlation between structural aspects of selectin ligands and their ability to mediate cell rolling. This might help to develop a better understanding for the function of the natural selectin ligands.

  14. Explicit integration with GPU acceleration for large kinetic networks

    DOE PAGES

    Brock, Benjamin; Belt, Andrew; Billings, Jay Jay; Guidry, Mike W.

    2015-09-15

    In this study, we demonstrate the first implementation of recently-developed fast explicit kinetic integration algorithms on modern graphics processing unit (GPU) accelerators. Taking as a generic test case a Type Ia supernova explosion with an extremely stiff thermonuclear network having 150 isotopic species and 1604 reactions coupled to hydrodynamics using operator splitting, we demonstrate the capability to solve of order 100 realistic kinetic networks in parallel in the same time that standard implicit methods can solve a single such network on a CPU. In addition, this orders-of-magnitude decrease in computation time for solving systems of realistic kinetic networks implies thatmore » important coupled, multiphysics problems in various scientific and technical fields that were intractable, or could be simulated only with highly schematic kinetic networks, are now computationally feasible.« less

  15. A Generalized Kinetic Model for Heterogeneous Gas-Solid Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Zhijie; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2012-08-15

    We present a generalized kinetic model for gas-solid heterogeneous reactions taking place at the interface between two phases. The model studies the reaction kinetics by taking into account the reactions at the interface, as well as the transport process within the product layer. The standard unreacted shrinking core model relies on the assumption of quasi-static diffusion that results in a steady-state concentration profile of gas reactant in the product layer. By relaxing this assumption and resolving the entire problem, general solutions can be obtained for reaction kinetics, including the reaction front velocity and the conversion (volume fraction of reacted solid). The unreacted shrinking core model is shown to be accurate and in agreement with the generalized model for slow reaction (or fast diffusion), low concentration of gas reactant, and small solid size. Otherwise, a generalized kinetic model should be used.

  16. Explicit integration with GPU acceleration for large kinetic networks

    SciTech Connect

    Brock, Benjamin; Belt, Andrew; Billings, Jay Jay; Guidry, Mike W.

    2015-09-15

    In this study, we demonstrate the first implementation of recently-developed fast explicit kinetic integration algorithms on modern graphics processing unit (GPU) accelerators. Taking as a generic test case a Type Ia supernova explosion with an extremely stiff thermonuclear network having 150 isotopic species and 1604 reactions coupled to hydrodynamics using operator splitting, we demonstrate the capability to solve of order 100 realistic kinetic networks in parallel in the same time that standard implicit methods can solve a single such network on a CPU. In addition, this orders-of-magnitude decrease in computation time for solving systems of realistic kinetic networks implies that important coupled, multiphysics problems in various scientific and technical fields that were intractable, or could be simulated only with highly schematic kinetic networks, are now computationally feasible.

  17. Utilizing target-ligand interaction information in fingerprint searching for ligands of related targets.

    PubMed

    Tan, Lu; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2009-07-01

    Protein-ligand interaction information is captured by determination of interacting fragments (IF) of ligands available in complex X-ray structures. From IF, fingerprints (IF-FP) are calculated for similarity searching. Previously, we have shown that IF-FP often produce higher search performance than general structural fragment- or key-type fingerprints. In this study, we introduce the transfer of target-ligand interaction information from one target to a related one for which no structural information is available. Thus, IFs from a crystallographic target B-ligand complex are incorporated into structural key fingerprints of known ligands for target A. Similarity searching using these IF transfer fingerprints (IF-TFP) is shown to further increase the search performance of conventional ligand fingerprints. Thus, interaction information can be transferred between related targets in order to support ligand-based fingerprint search calculations for targets for which no structural information is currently available.

  18. Fast repetition rate (FRR) flasher

    DOEpatents

    Kolber, Zbigniew; Falkowski, Paul

    1997-02-11

    A fast repetition rate (FRR) flasher suitable for high flash photolysis including kinetic chemical and biological analysis. The flasher includes a power supply, a discharge capacitor operably connected to be charged by the power supply, and a flash lamp for producing a series of flashes in response to discharge of the discharge capacitor. A triggering circuit operably connected to the flash lamp initially ionizes the flash lamp. A current switch is operably connected between the flash lamp and the discharge capacitor. The current switch has at least one insulated gate bipolar transistor for switching current that is operable to initiate a controllable discharge of the discharge capacitor through the flash lamp. Control means connected to the current switch for controlling the rate of discharge of the discharge capacitor thereby to effectively keep the flash lamp in an ionized state between Successive discharges of the discharge capacitor. Advantageously, the control means is operable to discharge the discharge capacitor at a rate greater than 10,000 Hz and even up to a rate greater than about 250,000 Hz.

  19. Electrostatics of ligand binding: parameterization of the generalized Born model and comparison with the Poisson-Boltzmann approach

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hao-Yang; Zou, Xiaoqin

    2008-01-01

    An accurate and fast evaluation of the electrostatics in ligand-protein interactions is crucial for computer-aided drug design. The pairwise generalized Born (GB) model, a fast analytical method originally developed for studying solvation of organic molecules, has been widely applied to macromolecular systems, including ligand-protein complexes. Yet, this model involves several empirical scaling parameters, which have been optimized for solvation of organic molecules, peptides and nucleic acids, but not for energetics of ligand binding. Studies have shown that a good solvation energy does not guarantee a correct model of solvent-mediated interactions. Thus in this study, we have used the Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) approach as a reference to optimize the GB model for studies of ligand-protein interactions. Specifically, we have employed the pairwise descreening approximation proposed by Hawkins et al [1] for GB calculations, and DelPhi for PB calculations. The AMBER all-atom force field parameters have been used in this work. Seventeen protein-ligand complexes have been used as a training database, and a set of atomic descreening parameters has been selected with which the pairwise GB model and the PB model yield comparable results on atomic Born radii, the electrostatic component of free energies of ligand binding, and desolvation energies of the ligands and proteins. The energetics of the fifteen test complexes calculated with the GB model using this set of parameters also agrees well with the energetics calculated with the PB method. This is the first time that the GB model is parameterized and thoroughly compared with the PB model for the electrostatics of ligand binding. PMID:16671749

  20. Functional group based Ligand binding affinity scoring function at atomic environmental level

    PubMed Central

    Varadwaj, Pritish Kumar; Lahiri, Tapobrata

    2009-01-01

    Use of knowledge based scoring function (KBSF) for virtual screening and molecular docking has become an established method for drug discovery. Lack of a precise and reliable free energy function that describes several interactions including water-mediated atomic interaction between amino-acid residues and ligand makes distance based statistical measure as the only alternative. Till now all the distance based scoring functions in KBSF arena use atom singularity concept, which neglects the environmental effect of the atom under consideration. We have developed a novel knowledge-based statistical energy function for protein-ligand complexes which takes atomic environment in to account hence functional group as a singular entity. The proposed knowledge based scoring function is fast, simple to construct, easy to use and moreover it tackle the existing problem of handling molecular orientation in active site pocket. We have designed and used Functional group based Ligand retrieval (FBLR) system which can identify and detect the orientation of functional groups in ligand. This decoy searching was used to build the above KBSF to quantify the activity and affinity of high resolution protein-ligand complexes. We have proposed the probable use of these decoys in molecular build-up as a de-novo drug designing approach. We have also discussed the possible use of the said KSBF in pharmacophore fragment detection and pseudo center based fragment alignment procedure. PMID:19255647

  1. Potential Application of Alchemical Free Energy Simulations to Discriminate GPCR Ligand Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hui Sun; Seok, Chaok; Im, Wonpil

    2015-03-10

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) play fundamental roles in physiological processes by modulating diverse signaling pathways and thus have been one of the most important drug targets. Based on the fact that GPCR-mediated signaling is modulated in a ligand-specific manner such as agonist, inverse agonist, and neutral antagonist (termed ligand efficacy), quantitative characterization of the ligand efficacy is essential for rational design of selective modulators for GPCR targets. As experimental approaches for this purpose are time-, cost-, and labor-intensive, computational tools that can systematically predict GPCR ligand efficacy can have a big impact on GPCR drug design. Here, we have performed free energy perturbation molecular dynamics simulations to calculate absolute binding free energy of an inverse agonist, a neutral antagonist, and an agonist to β2-adrenergic receptor (β2-AR) active and inactive states, respectively, in explicit lipid bilayers. Relatively short alchemical free energy calculations reveal that both the time-series of the total binding free energy and decomposed energy contributions can be used as relevant physical properties to discriminate β2-AR ligand efficacy. This study illustrates a merit of the current approach over simple, fast docking calculations or highly expensive millisecond-time scale simulations. PMID:26579772

  2. An ELISA Based Binding and Competition Method to Rapidly Determine Ligand-receptor Interactions.

    PubMed

    Syedbasha, Mohameedyaseen; Linnik, Janina; Santer, Deanna; O'Shea, Daire; Barakat, Khaled; Joyce, Michael; Khanna, Nina; Tyrrell, D Lorne; Houghton, Michael; Egli, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    A comprehensive understanding of signaling pathways requires detailed knowledge regarding ligand-receptor interaction. This article describes two fast and reliable point-by-point protocols of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) for the investigation of ligand-receptor interactions: the direct ligand-receptor interaction assay (LRA) and the competition LRA. As a case study, the ELISA based analysis of the interaction between different lambda interferons (IFNLs) and the alpha subunit of their receptor (IL28RA) is presented: the direct LRA is used for the determination of dissociation constants (KD values) between receptor and IFN ligands, and the competition LRA for the determination of the inhibitory capacity of an oligopeptide, which was designed to compete with the IFNLs at their receptor binding site. Analytical steps to estimate KD and half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values are described. Finally, the discussion highlights advantages and disadvantages of the presented method and how the results enable a better molecular understanding of ligand-receptor interactions.

  3. Multiple alternative substrate kinetics.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Vernon E

    2015-11-01

    The specificity of enzymes for their respective substrates has been a focal point of enzyme kinetics since the initial characterization of metabolic chemistry. Various processes to quantify an enzyme's specificity using kinetics have been utilized over the decades. Fersht's definition of the ratio kcat/Km for two different substrates as the "specificity constant" (ref [7]), based on the premise that the important specificity existed when the substrates were competing in the same reaction, has become a consensus standard for enzymes obeying Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The expansion of the theory for the determination of the relative specificity constants for a very large number of competing substrates, e.g. those present in a combinatorial library, in a single reaction mixture has been developed in this contribution. The ratio of kcat/Km for isotopologs has also become a standard in mechanistic enzymology where kinetic isotope effects have been measured by the development of internal competition experiments with extreme precision. This contribution extends the theory of kinetic isotope effects to internal competition between three isotopologs present at non-tracer concentrations in the same reaction mix. This article is part of a special issue titled: Enzyme Transition States from Theory and Experiment. PMID:26051088

  4. Multiple alternative substrate kinetics.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Vernon E

    2015-11-01

    The specificity of enzymes for their respective substrates has been a focal point of enzyme kinetics since the initial characterization of metabolic chemistry. Various processes to quantify an enzyme's specificity using kinetics have been utilized over the decades. Fersht's definition of the ratio kcat/Km for two different substrates as the "specificity constant" (ref [7]), based on the premise that the important specificity existed when the substrates were competing in the same reaction, has become a consensus standard for enzymes obeying Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The expansion of the theory for the determination of the relative specificity constants for a very large number of competing substrates, e.g. those present in a combinatorial library, in a single reaction mixture has been developed in this contribution. The ratio of kcat/Km for isotopologs has also become a standard in mechanistic enzymology where kinetic isotope effects have been measured by the development of internal competition experiments with extreme precision. This contribution extends the theory of kinetic isotope effects to internal competition between three isotopologs present at non-tracer concentrations in the same reaction mix. This article is part of a special issue titled: Enzyme Transition States from Theory and Experiment.

  5. Transport regulation of two-dimensional receptor-ligand association.

    PubMed

    Ju, Lining; Qian, Jin; Zhu, Cheng

    2015-04-01

    The impact of flow disturbances on platelet adhesion is complex and incompletely understood. At the molecular scale, platelet glycoprotein Ibα (GPIbα) must associate with the von Willebrand factor A1 domain (VWF-A1) with a rapid on-rate under high hemodynamic forces, as occurs in arterial thrombosis, where various transport mechanisms are at work. Here, we theoretically modeled the coupled transport-reaction process of the two-dimensional (2D) receptor-ligand association kinetics in a biomembrane force probe to explicitly account for the effects of molecular length, confinement stiffness, medium viscosity, surface curvature, and separation distance. We experimentally verified the theoretical approach by visualizing association and dissociation of individual VWF-A1-GPIbα bonds in a real-time thermal fluctuation assay. The apparent on-rate, reciprocal of the average time intervals between sequential bonds, decreased with the increasing gap distance between A1- and GPIbα-bearing surfaces with an 80-nm threshold (beyond which bond formation became prohibitive) identified as the combined contour length of the receptor and ligand molecules. The biomembrane force probe spring constant and diffusivity of the protein-bearing beads also significantly influenced the apparent on-rate, in accordance with the proposed transport mechanisms. The global agreement between the experimental data and the model predictions supports the hypothesis that receptor-ligand association behaves distinctly in the transport- and reaction-limited scenarios. To our knowledge, our results represent the first detailed quantification of physical regulation of the 2D on-rate that allows platelets to sense and respond to local changes in their hemodynamic environment. In addition, they provide an approach for determining the intrinsic kinetic parameters that employs simultaneous experimental measurements and theoretical modeling of bond association in a single assay. The 2D intrinsic forward rate

  6. Transport Regulation of Two-Dimensional Receptor-Ligand Association

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Lining; Qian, Jin; Zhu, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    The impact of flow disturbances on platelet adhesion is complex and incompletely understood. At the molecular scale, platelet glycoprotein Ibα (GPIbα) must associate with the von Willebrand factor A1 domain (VWF-A1) with a rapid on-rate under high hemodynamic forces, as occurs in arterial thrombosis, where various transport mechanisms are at work. Here, we theoretically modeled the coupled transport-reaction process of the two-dimensional (2D) receptor-ligand association kinetics in a biomembrane force probe to explicitly account for the effects of molecular length, confinement stiffness, medium viscosity, surface curvature, and separation distance. We experimentally verified the theoretical approach by visualizing association and dissociation of individual VWF-A1-GPIbα bonds in a real-time thermal fluctuation assay. The apparent on-rate, reciprocal of the average time intervals between sequential bonds, decreased with the increasing gap distance between A1- and GPIbα-bearing surfaces with an 80-nm threshold (beyond which bond formation became prohibitive) identified as the combined contour length of the receptor and ligand molecules. The biomembrane force probe spring constant and diffusivity of the protein-bearing beads also significantly influenced the apparent on-rate, in accordance with the proposed transport mechanisms. The global agreement between the experimental data and the model predictions supports the hypothesis that receptor-ligand association behaves distinctly in the transport- and reaction-limited scenarios. To our knowledge, our results represent the first detailed quantification of physical regulation of the 2D on-rate that allows platelets to sense and respond to local changes in their hemodynamic environment. In addition, they provide an approach for determining the intrinsic kinetic parameters that employs simultaneous experimental measurements and theoretical modeling of bond association in a single assay. The 2D intrinsic forward rate

  7. Carbohydrate ligands for endothelial - Leukocyte adhesion molecule 1

    SciTech Connect

    Tiemeyer, M.; Swiedler, S.J.; Ishihara, Masayuki; Moreland, M.; Schweingruber, H.; Hirtzer, P.; Brandley, B.K. )

    1991-02-15

    The acute inflammatory response requires that circulating leukocytes bind to and penetrate the vascular wall to access the site of injury. Several receptors have been implicated in this interaction, including a family of putative carbohydrate-binding proteins. The authors report here the identification of an endogenous carbohydrate ligand for one of these receptors, endothelial-leukocyte adhesion molecule 1 (ELAM-1). Radiolabeled COS cells transfected with a plasmid containing the cDNA for ELAM-1 were used as probes to screen glycolipids extracted from human leukocytes. COS cells transfected with this plasmid adhered to a subset of sialylated glycolipids resolved on TLC plates or adsorbed on polyvinyl chloride microtiter wells. Adhesion to these glycolipids required calcium but was not inhibited by heparin, chondroitin sulfate, keratan sulfate, or yeast phosphomannan. Monosaccharide composition, linkage analysis, and fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry of the glycolipids indicate that the ligands for ELAM-1 are terminally sialylated lactosylceramides with a variable number of N-acetyllactosamine repeats and at least one fucosylated N-acetylglucosamine residue.

  8. Pulsed laser kinetic studies of liquids under high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Eyring, E.M.

    1991-11-25

    A high pressure apparatus constructed for measuring the rates of reactions in liquids under pressures ranging from 1 atm to 2000 atm has been used to measure the complexation kinetics of molybdenum hexacarbonyl reacting with 2,2-bipyridine, 4,4{prime}-dimethyl-2-2{prime}-bipyridine and 4,4{prime}-diphenyl-2-2{prime} bipyridine in toluene. Pentacarbonyl reaction intermediates are created by a 10 nsec flash of frequency tripled Nd:YAG laser light. Measured activation volumes for chelate ligand ring closure indicate a change in mechanism from associative interchange to dissociative interchange as steric hindrance increases. A similar high pressure kinetics study of molybdenum carbonyl complexation by several substituted phenanthrolines is now well advanced that indicates that with the more rigid phenanthroline ligands steric effects from bulky substituents have less effect on the ring closure mechanism than in the case of the bipyridine ligands. An experimental concentration dependence of the fluorescence quantum yield of cresyl violet has been harmonized with previously published contradictory reports. Fluorescence of cresyl violet in various solvents and in micellar systems has also been systematically explored.

  9. Emergence of ion channel modal gating from independent subunit kinetics.

    PubMed

    Bicknell, Brendan A; Goodhill, Geoffrey J

    2016-09-01

    Many ion channels exhibit a slow stochastic switching between distinct modes of gating activity. This feature of channel behavior has pronounced implications for the dynamics of ionic currents and the signaling pathways that they regulate. A canonical example is the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R) channel, whose regulation of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration is essential for numerous cellular processes. However, the underlying biophysical mechanisms that give rise to modal gating in this and most other channels remain unknown. Although ion channels are composed of protein subunits, previous mathematical models of modal gating are coarse grained at the level of whole-channel states, limiting further dialogue between theory and experiment. Here we propose an origin for modal gating, by modeling the kinetics of ligand binding and conformational change in the IP3R at the subunit level. We find good agreement with experimental data over a wide range of ligand concentrations, accounting for equilibrium channel properties, transient responses to changing ligand conditions, and modal gating statistics. We show how this can be understood within a simple analytical framework and confirm our results with stochastic simulations. The model assumes that channel subunits are independent, demonstrating that cooperative binding or concerted conformational changes are not required for modal gating. Moreover, the model embodies a generally applicable principle: If a timescale separation exists in the kinetics of individual subunits, then modal gating can arise as an emergent property of channel behavior. PMID:27551100

  10. Equilibrium and kinetic selectivity profiling on the human adenosine receptors.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dong; Dijksteel, Gabrielle S; van Duijl, Tirsa; Heezen, Maxime; Heitman, Laura H; IJzerman, Adriaan P

    2016-04-01

    Classical evaluation of target selectivity is usually undertaken by measuring the binding affinity of lead compounds against a number of potential targets under equilibrium conditions, without considering the kinetics of the ligand-receptor interaction. In the present study we propose a combined strategy including both equilibrium- and kinetics-based selectivity profiling. The adenosine receptor (AR) was chosen as a prototypical drug target. Six in-house AR antagonists were evaluated in a radioligand displacement assay for their affinity and in a competition association assay for their binding kinetics on three AR subtypes. One of the compounds with a promising kinetic selectivity profile was also examined in a [(35)S]-GTPγS binding assay for functional activity. We found that XAC and LUF5964 were kinetically more selective for the A1R and A3R, respectively, although they are non-selective in terms of their affinity. In comparison, LUF5967 displayed a strong equilibrium-based selectivity for the A1R over the A2AR, yet its kinetic selectivity thereon was less pronounced. In a GTPγS assay, LUF5964 exhibited insurmountable antagonism on the A3R while having a surmountable effect on the A1R, consistent with its kinetic selectivity profile. This study provides evidence that equilibrium and kinetic selectivity profiling can both be important in the early phases of the drug discovery process. Our proposed combinational strategy could be considered for future medicinal chemistry efforts and aid the design and discovery of different or even better leads for clinical applications.

  11. Equilibrium and kinetic selectivity profiling on the human adenosine receptors.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dong; Dijksteel, Gabrielle S; van Duijl, Tirsa; Heezen, Maxime; Heitman, Laura H; IJzerman, Adriaan P

    2016-04-01

    Classical evaluation of target selectivity is usually undertaken by measuring the binding affinity of lead compounds against a number of potential targets under equilibrium conditions, without considering the kinetics of the ligand-receptor interaction. In the present study we propose a combined strategy including both equilibrium- and kinetics-based selectivity profiling. The adenosine receptor (AR) was chosen as a prototypical drug target. Six in-house AR antagonists were evaluated in a radioligand displacement assay for their affinity and in a competition association assay for their binding kinetics on three AR subtypes. One of the compounds with a promising kinetic selectivity profile was also examined in a [(35)S]-GTPγS binding assay for functional activity. We found that XAC and LUF5964 were kinetically more selective for the A1R and A3R, respectively, although they are non-selective in terms of their affinity. In comparison, LUF5967 displayed a strong equilibrium-based selectivity for the A1R over the A2AR, yet its kinetic selectivity thereon was less pronounced. In a GTPγS assay, LUF5964 exhibited insurmountable antagonism on the A3R while having a surmountable effect on the A1R, consistent with its kinetic selectivity profile. This study provides evidence that equilibrium and kinetic selectivity profiling can both be important in the early phases of the drug discovery process. Our proposed combinational strategy could be considered for future medicinal chemistry efforts and aid the design and discovery of different or even better leads for clinical applications. PMID:26930564

  12. NMR studies of protein-ligand interactions.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Till

    2005-01-01

    Interaction between biological macromolecules or of macromolecules with low-molecular-weight ligands is a central paradigm in the understanding of function in biological systems. It is also the major goal in pharmaceutical research to find and optimize ligands that modulate the function of biological macromolecules. Both technological advances and new methods in the field of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) have led to the development of several tools by which the interaction of proteins or DNA and low molecular weight-ligands can be characterized at an atomic level. Information can be gained quickly and easily with ligand-based techniques. These need only small amounts of nonisotope labeled, and thus readily available target macromolecules. As the focus is on the signals stemming only from the ligand, no further NMR information regarding the target is needed. Techniques based on the observation of isotopically labeled biological macromolecules open the possibility to observe interactions of proteins with low-molecular-weight ligands, DNA or other proteins. With these techniques, the structure of high-molecular-weight complexes can be determined. Here, the resonance signals of the macromolecule must be identified beforehand, which can be time consuming but with the benefit of obtaining more information with respect to the target ligand complex.

  13. Fractal reaction kinetics.

    PubMed

    Kopelman, R

    1988-09-23

    Classical reaction kinetics has been found to be unsatisfactory when the reactants are spatially constrained on the microscopic level by either walls, phase boundaries, or force fields. Recently discovered theories of heterogeneous reaction kinetics have dramatic consequences, such as fractal orders for elementary reactions, self-ordering and self-unmixing of reactants, and rate coefficients with temporal "memories." The new theories were needed to explain the results of experiments and supercomputer simulations of reactions that were confined to low dimensions or fractal dimensions or both. Among the practical examples of "fractal-like kinetics" are chemical reactions in pores of membranes, excitation trapping in molecular aggregates, exciton fusion in composite materials, and charge recombination in colloids and clouds.

  14. Erbium hydride decomposition kinetics.

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrizz, Robert Matthew

    2006-11-01

    Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) is used to study the decomposition kinetics of erbium hydride thin films. The TDS results presented in this report are analyzed quantitatively using Redhead's method to yield kinetic parameters (E{sub A} {approx} 54.2 kcal/mol), which are then utilized to predict hydrogen outgassing in vacuum for a variety of thermal treatments. Interestingly, it was found that the activation energy for desorption can vary by more than 7 kcal/mol (0.30 eV) for seemingly similar samples. In addition, small amounts of less-stable hydrogen were observed for all erbium dihydride films. A detailed explanation of several approaches for analyzing thermal desorption spectra to obtain kinetic information is included as an appendix.

  15. The role of kinetic context in apparent biased agonism at GPCRs

    PubMed Central

    Klein Herenbrink, Carmen; Sykes, David A.; Donthamsetti, Prashant; Canals, Meritxell; Coudrat, Thomas; Shonberg, Jeremy; Scammells, Peter J.; Capuano, Ben; Sexton, Patrick M.; Charlton, Steven J.; Javitch, Jonathan A.; Christopoulos, Arthur; Lane, J. Robert

    2016-01-01

    Biased agonism describes the ability of ligands to stabilize different conformations of a GPCR linked to distinct functional outcomes and offers the prospect of designing pathway-specific drugs that avoid on-target side effects. This mechanism is usually inferred from pharmacological data with the assumption that the confounding influences of observational (that is, assay dependent) and system (that is, cell background dependent) bias are excluded by experimental design and analysis. Here we reveal that ‘kinetic context', as determined by ligand-binding kinetics and the temporal pattern of receptor-signalling processes, can have a profound influence on the apparent bias of a series of agonists for the dopamine D2 receptor and can even lead to reversals in the direction of bias. We propose that kinetic context must be acknowledged in the design and interpretation of studies of biased agonism. PMID:26905976

  16. Cooperative thermodynamic control of selectivity in the self-assembly of rare earth metal-ligand helices.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Amber M; Young, Michael C; Zhang, Xing; Julian, Ryan R; Hooley, Richard J

    2013-11-27

    Metal-selective self-assembly with rare-earth cations is possible with suitable rigid, symmetrical bis-tridentate ligands. Kinetically controlled formation is initially observed, with smaller cations preferentially incorporated. Over time, the more thermodynamically favorable complexes with larger metals are formed. This thermodynamic control is a cooperative supramolecular phenomenon and only occurs upon multiple-metal-based self-assembly: single-metal ML3 analogues do not show reversible selectivity. The selectivity is dependent on small variations in lanthanide ionic radius and occurs despite identical coordination-ligand coordination geometries and minor size differences in the rare-earth metals.

  17. Mini-ISES identifies promising carbafructopyranose-based salens for asymmetric catalysis: Tuning ligand shape via the anomeric effect

    PubMed Central

    Karukurichi, Kannan R.; Fei, Xiang; Swyka, Robert A.; Broussy, Sylvain; Shen, Weijun; Dey, Sangeeta; Roy, Sandip K.; Berkowitz, David B.

    2015-01-01

    This study introduces new methods of screening for and tuning chiral space and in so doing identifies a promising set of chiral ligands for asymmetric synthesis. The carbafructopyranosyl-1,2-diamine(s) and salens constructed therefrom are particularly compelling. It is shown that by removing the native anomeric effect in this ligand family, one can tune chiral ligand shape and improve chiral bias. This concept is demonstrated by a combination of (i) x-ray crystallographic structure determination, (ii) assessment of catalytic performance, and (iii) consideration of the anomeric effect and its underlying dipolar basis. The title ligands were identified by a new mini version of the in situ enzymatic screening (ISES) procedure through which catalyst-ligand combinations are screened in parallel, and information on relative rate and enantioselectivity is obtained in real time, without the need to quench reactions or draw aliquots. Mini-ISES brings the technique into the nanomole regime (200 to 350 nmol catalyst/20 μl organic volume) commensurate with emerging trends in reaction development/process chemistry. The best-performing β-d-carbafructopyranosyl-1,2-diamine–derived salen ligand discovered here outperforms the best known organometallic and enzymatic catalysts for the hydrolytic kinetic resolution of 3-phenylpropylene oxide, one of several substrates examined for which the ligand is “matched.” This ligand scaffold defines a new swath of chiral space, and anomeric effect tunability defines a new concept in shaping that chiral space. Both this ligand set and the anomeric shape-tuning concept are expected to find broad application, given the value of chiral 1,2-diamines and salens constructed from these in asymmetric catalysis. PMID:26501130

  18. Universal statistical fluctuations in thermodynamics and kinetics of single molecular recognition.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiliang; Wang, Jin

    2016-03-28

    We investigated the main universal statistical distributions of single molecular recognition. The distributions of the single molecule binding free energy spectrum or density of states were characterized in the ligand-receptor binding energy landscape. The analytical results are consistent with the microscopic molecular simulations. The free energy distribution of different binding modes or states for a single molecule ligand receptor pair is approximately Gaussian near the mean and exponential at the tail. The equilibrium constant of single molecule binding is log-normal distributed near the mean and power law distributed near the tail. Additionally, we found that the kinetics distribution of single molecule ligand binding can be characterized by log-normal around the mean and power law distribution near the tail. This distribution is caused by exploration of the underlying inhomogeneous free energy landscape. Different ligand-receptor binding complexes have the same universal form of distribution but differ in parameters. PMID:26947972

  19. High pressure phase transformation in iron under fast compression

    SciTech Connect

    Bastea, M; Bastea, S; Becker, R

    2009-07-07

    We present experimental results on the solid-solid, {alpha} to {epsilon} phase transformation kinetics of iron under high pressure dynamic compression. We observe kinetic features - velocity loops - similar with the ones recently reported to occur when water is frozen into its ice VII phase under comparable experimental conditions. We analyze this behavior in terms of general ideas coupling the steady sample compression with phase nucleation and growth with a pressure dependent phase interface velocity. The model is used to predict the response of iron when steadily driven across the {alpha} - {epsilon} phase boundary on very short time scales, including those envisioned to be achieved in ultra-fast laser experiments.

  20. Limiting Energy Dissipation Induces Glassy Kinetics in Single-Cell High-Precision Responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Jayajit

    2016-03-01

    Single cells often generate precise responses by involving dissipative out-of-thermodynamic equilibrium processes in signaling networks. The available free energy to fuel these processes could become limited depending on the metabolic state of an individual cell. How does limiting dissipation affect the kinetics of high precision responses in single cells? I address this question in the context of a kinetic proofreading scheme used in a simple model of early time T cell signaling. I show using exact analytical calculations and numerical simulations that limiting dissipation qualitatively changes the kinetics in single cells marked by emergence of slow kinetics, large cell-to-cell variations of copy numbers, temporally correlated stochastic events (dynamic facilitation), and, ergodicity breaking. Thus, constraints in energy dissipation, in addition to negatively affecting ligand discrimination in T cells, can create a fundamental difficulty in interpreting single cell kinetics from cell population level results.

  1. Nonlinear Analyte Concentration Gradients for One-Step Kinetic Analysis Employing Optical Microring Resonators

    PubMed Central

    Marty, Michael T.; Kuhnline Sloan, Courtney D.; Bailey, Ryan C.; Sligar, Stephen G.

    2012-01-01

    Conventional methods to probe the binding kinetics of macromolecules at biosensor surfaces employ a stepwise titration of analyte concentrations and measure the association and dissociation to the immobilized ligand at each concentration level. It has previously been shown that kinetic rates can be measured in a single step by monitoring binding as the analyte concentration increases over time in a linear gradient. We report here the application of nonlinear analyte concentration gradients for determining kinetic rates and equilibrium binding affinities in a single experiment. A versatile nonlinear gradient maker is presented, which is easily applied to microfluidic systems. Simulations validate that accurate kinetic rates can be extracted for a wide range of association and dissociation rates, gradient slopes and curvatures, and with models for mass transport. The nonlinear analyte gradient method is demonstrated with a silicon photonic microring resonator platform to measure prostate specific antigen-antibody binding kinetics. PMID:22686186

  2. Kinetic theory viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, C. J.; Pringle, J. E.

    2004-07-01

    We show how the viscous evolution of Keplerian accretion discs can be understood in terms of simple kinetic theory. Although standard physics texts give a simple derivation of momentum transfer in a linear shear flow using kinetic theory, many authors, as detailed by Hayashi & Matsuda, have had difficulties applying the same considerations to a circular shear flow. We show here how this may be done, and note that the essential ingredients are to take proper account of, first, isotropy locally in the frame of the fluid and, secondly, the geometry of the mean flow.

  3. The kinetic regime of the Vicsek model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chepizhko, A. A.; Kulinskii, V. L.

    2009-12-01

    We consider the dynamics of the system of self-propelling particles modeled via the Vicsek algorithm in continuum time limit. It is shown that the alignment process for the velocities can be subdivided into two regimes: "fast" kinetic and "slow" hydrodynamic ones. In fast kinetic regime the alignment of the particle velocity to the local neighborhood takes place with characteristic relaxation time. So, that the bigger regions arise with the velocity alignment. These regions align their velocities thus giving rise to hydrodynamic regime of the dynamics. We propose the mean-field-like approach in which we take into account the correlations between density and velocity. The comparison of the theoretical predictions with the numerical simulations is given. The relation between Vicsek model in the zero velocity limit and the Kuramoto model is stated. The mean-field approach accounting for the dynamic change of the neighborhood is proposed. The nature of the discontinuity of the dependence of the order parameter in case of vectorial noise revealed in Gregorie and Chaite, Phys. Rev. Lett., 92, 025702 (2004) is discussed and the explanation of it is proposed.

  4. A Fast Hermite Transform★

    PubMed Central

    Leibon, Gregory; Rockmore, Daniel N.; Park, Wooram; Taintor, Robert; Chirikjian, Gregory S.

    2008-01-01

    We present algorithms for fast and stable approximation of the Hermite transform of a compactly supported function on the real line, attainable via an application of a fast algebraic algorithm for computing sums associated with a three-term relation. Trade-offs between approximation in bandlimit (in the Hermite sense) and size of the support region are addressed. Numerical experiments are presented that show the feasibility and utility of our approach. Generalizations to any family of orthogonal polynomials are outlined. Applications to various problems in tomographic reconstruction, including the determination of protein structure, are discussed. PMID:20027202

  5. Fast Overcurrent Tripping Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullender, Craig C.; Davies, Bryan L.; Osborn, Stephen H.

    1993-01-01

    Fast overcurrent tripping circuit designed for incorporation into power metal oxide/semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) switching circuit. Serves as fast electronic circuit breaker by sensing voltage across MOSFET's during conduction and switching MOSFET's off within 1 microsecond after voltage exceeds reference value corresponding to tripping current. Acts more quickly than Hall-effect current sensor and, in comparison with shunt current-measuring circuits, smaller and consumes less power. Also ignores initial transient overcurrents during first 5 microseconds of switching cycle.

  6. Binding Kinetics versus Affinities in BRD4 Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Ming; Zhou, Jingwei; Wang, Laiyou; Liu, Zhihong; Guo, Jiao; Wu, Ruibo

    2015-09-28

    Bromodomains (BRDs) are protein modules that selectively recognize histones as a "reader" by binding to an acetylated lysine substrate. The human BRD4 has emerged as a promising drug target for a number of disease pathways, and several potent BRD inhibitors have been discovered experimentally recently. However, the detailed inhibition mechanism especially for the inhibitor binding kinetics is not clear. Herein, by employing classical molecular dynamics (MD) and state-of-the-art density functional QM/MM MD simulations, the dynamic characteristics of ZA-loop in BRD4 are revealed. And then the correlation between binding pocket size and ZA-loop motion is elucidated. Moreover, our simulations found that the compound (-)-JQ1 could be accommodated reasonably in thermodynamics whereas it is infeasible in binding kinetics against BRD4. Its racemate (+)-JQ1 proved to be both thermodynamically reasonable and kinetically achievable against BRD4, which could explain the previous experimental results that (+)-JQ1 shows a high inhibitory effect toward BRD4 (IC50 is 77 nM) while (-)-JQ1 is inactive (>10 μM). Furthermore, the L92/L94/Y97 in the ZA-loop and Asn140 in the BC-loop are identified to be critical residues in (+)-JQ1 binding/releasing kinetics. All these findings shed light on further selective inhibitor design toward BRD family, by exploiting the non-negligible ligand binding kinetics features and flexible ZA-loop motions of BRD, instead of only the static ligand-protein binding affinity. PMID:26263125

  7. Binding Kinetics versus Affinities in BRD4 Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Ming; Zhou, Jingwei; Wang, Laiyou; Liu, Zhihong; Guo, Jiao; Wu, Ruibo

    2015-09-28

    Bromodomains (BRDs) are protein modules that selectively recognize histones as a "reader" by binding to an acetylated lysine substrate. The human BRD4 has emerged as a promising drug target for a number of disease pathways, and several potent BRD inhibitors have been discovered experimentally recently. However, the detailed inhibition mechanism especially for the inhibitor binding kinetics is not clear. Herein, by employing classical molecular dynamics (MD) and state-of-the-art density functional QM/MM MD simulations, the dynamic characteristics of ZA-loop in BRD4 are revealed. And then the correlation between binding pocket size and ZA-loop motion is elucidated. Moreover, our simulations found that the compound (-)-JQ1 could be accommodated reasonably in thermodynamics whereas it is infeasible in binding kinetics against BRD4. Its racemate (+)-JQ1 proved to be both thermodynamically reasonable and kinetically achievable against BRD4, which could explain the previous experimental results that (+)-JQ1 shows a high inhibitory effect toward BRD4 (IC50 is 77 nM) while (-)-JQ1 is inactive (>10 μM). Furthermore, the L92/L94/Y97 in the ZA-loop and Asn140 in the BC-loop are identified to be critical residues in (+)-JQ1 binding/releasing kinetics. All these findings shed light on further selective inhibitor design toward BRD family, by exploiting the non-negligible ligand binding kinetics features and flexible ZA-loop motions of BRD, instead of only the static ligand-protein binding affinity.

  8. Kinetic analysis of the three-step steroid aromatase reaction of human cytochrome P450 19A1.

    PubMed

    Sohl, Christal D; Guengerich, F Peter

    2010-06-01

    Cytochrome P450 19A1 (P450 19A1), the aromatase, catalyzes the conversion of androgens to estrogens through a sequential three-step reaction, generating 19-hydroxy and 19-aldehyde intermediates en route to the product estrogen. A procedure for the heterologous expression and purification of P450 19A1 in Escherichia coli was developed (k(cat) of 0.06 s(-1) for the conversion of androstenedione to estrone). Binding of the substrate and intermediates show low micromolar dissociation constants and are at least two-step processes. Rates of reduction of the iron were fast in the presence of substrate, either intermediate, or product. P450 19A1 is a distributive rather than a processive enzyme, with the sequential reaction allowing free dissociation of the intermediates as revealed by pulse-chase experiments. Conversion of androstenedione to estrone (under single turnover conditions) generated a progress curve showing changes in the concentrations of the substrate, intermediates, and product. A minimal kinetic model containing the individual rate constants for the steps in P450 19A1 catalysis was developed to globally fit the time course of the overall reaction, the dissociation constants, the two-step ligand binding, the distributive character, the iron-reduction rates, and the steady-state conversion of the 19-hydroxy androstenedione and 19-aldehyde androstenedione intermediates to estrone. PMID:20385561

  9. Effect of the alpha subunit subtype on the macroscopic kinetic properties of recombinant GABA(A) receptors.

    PubMed

    Picton, Amber J; Fisher, Janet L

    2007-08-24

    The GABA(A) receptors (GABARs) are chloride-permeable ligand-gated ion channels responsible for fast inhibitory neurotransmission. These receptors are structurally heterogeneous, and in mammals can be formed from a combination of sixteen different subunit subtypes. Much of this variety comes from the six different alpha subunit subtypes. All neuronal GABARs contain an alpha subunit, and the identity of the alpha subtype affects the pharmacological properties of the receptors. The expression of each of the different alpha subtypes is regulated developmentally and regionally and changes with both normal physiological processes such development and synaptic plasticity, and pathological conditions such as epilepsy. In order to understand the functional significance of this structural heterogeneity, we examined the effect of the alpha subtype on the receptor's response to GABA. Each of the six alpha subtypes was transiently co-expressed with the beta3 and gamma2L subunits in mammalian cells. The sensitivity to GABA was measured with whole-cell recordings. We also determined the activation, deactivation, desensitization, and recovery kinetics for the six isoforms using rapid application recordings from excised macropatches. We found unique characteristics associated with each alpha subunit subtype. These properties would be expected to influence the post-synaptic response to GABA, creating functional diversity among neurons expressing different alpha subunits.

  10. Long tail kinetics in biophysics?

    PubMed Central

    Nagle, J F

    1992-01-01

    Long tail kinetics describe a variety of data from complex, disordered materials that cannot be described by conventional kinetics. It is suggested that the kinetics of diffusive motion in complex biological media, such as cytoplasm or biomembranes, might also have long tails. The effects of long tail kinetics are investigated for two standard biophysical measurements, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), and dynamic light scattering (DLS). It is shown that long tail kinetic data would yield significantly distorted and misleading results when analyzed assuming conventional kinetics. PMID:1420883

  11. Minimal encounter time and separation determine ligand-receptor binding in cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Robert, Philippe; Nicolas, Alice; Aranda-Espinoza, Said; Bongrand, Pierre; Limozin, Laurent

    2011-06-01

    The binding properties of biomolecules play a crucial role in many biological phenomena, especially cell adhesion. Whereas the attachment kinetics of soluble proteins is considered well known, complex behavior arises when protein molecules are bound to the cell membrane. We probe the hidden kinetics of ligand-receptor bond formation using single-molecule flow chamber assays and Brownian dynamics simulations. We show that, consistent with our recently proposed hypothesis, association requires a minimum duration of contact between the reactive species. In our experiments, ICAM-1 anchored on a flat substrate binds to anti-ICAM-1 coated onto flowing microbeads. The interaction potential between bead and substrate is measured by microinterferometry and is used as an ingredient to simulate bead movement. Our simulation calculates the duration of ligand-receptor contacts imposed by the bead movement. We quantitatively predict the reduction of adhesion probability measured for shorter tether length of the ligand or if a repulsive hyaluronan layer is added onto the surface. To account for our results, we propose that bond formation may occur in our system by crossing of a diffusive plateau in the energy landscape, on the timescale of 5 ms and an energy barrier of 5 k(B)T, before reaching the first detectable bound state. Our results show how to relate cell-scale behavior to the combined information of molecular reactivity and biomolecule submicron-scale environment.

  12. Relationships of ligand binding, redox properties, and protonation in Coprinus cinereus peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Ciaccio, Chiara; Rosati, Antonella; De Sanctis, Giampiero; Sinibaldi, Federica; Marini, Stefano; Santucci, Roberto; Ascenzi, Paolo; Welinder, Karen G; Coletta, Massimo

    2003-05-23

    The pH dependence of the redox potentials and kinetics for CO association and dissociation was determined between pH 3.0 and 13.0 at 25 degrees C for the wild-type Coprinus cinereus fungal peroxidase and for a site-directed mutant in which Asp245, which is H-bonded to N delta of the imidazole of the proximal His183, was substituted with Asn. The determination of these functional properties allowed this information to be merged in a self-consistent fashion and to formulate for the first time a complete scheme employing the minimum number of groups required to describe the whole proton-linked behavior of both redox and ligand binding properties. The overall pH dependence can be accounted for by four redox- and ligand-linked groups. The proximal H-bond, which is strictly conserved in all peroxidases, will still be present in the site-specific mutant, but will no longer have an ionic character, and this event will bring about an alteration of redox equilibria and CO binding kinetics, envisaging a relevant role played by this H-bond also in modulating redox properties and ligand binding equilibria.

  13. Kinetics and Catalysis Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falconer, John L.; Britten, Jerald A.

    1984-01-01

    Eleven videotaped kinetics and catalysis demonstrations are described. Demonstrations include the clock reaction, oscillating reaction, hydrogen oxidation in air, hydrogen-oxygen explosion, acid-base properties of solids, high- and low-temperature zeolite reactivity, copper catalysis of ammonia oxidation and sodium peroxide decomposition, ammonia…

  14. Oxidative desulfurization: kinetic modelling.

    PubMed

    Dhir, S; Uppaluri, R; Purkait, M K

    2009-01-30

    Increasing environmental legislations coupled with enhanced production of petroleum products demand, the deployment of novel technologies to remove organic sulfur efficiently. This work represents the kinetic modeling of ODS using H(2)O(2) over tungsten-containing layered double hydroxide (LDH) using the experimental data provided by Hulea et al. [V. Hulea, A.L. Maciuca, F. Fajula, E. Dumitriu, Catalytic oxidation of thiophenes and thioethers with hydrogen peroxide in the presence of W-containing layered double hydroxides, Appl. Catal. A: Gen. 313 (2) (2006) 200-207]. The kinetic modeling approach in this work initially targets the scope of the generation of a superstructure of micro-kinetic reaction schemes and models assuming Langmuir-Hinshelwood (LH) and Eley-Rideal (ER) mechanisms. Subsequently, the screening and selection of above models is initially based on profile-based elimination of incompetent schemes followed by non-linear regression search performed using the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm (LMA) for the chosen models. The above analysis inferred that Eley-Rideal mechanism describes the kinetic behavior of ODS process using tungsten-containing LDH, with adsorption of reactant and intermediate product only taking place on the catalyst surface. Finally, an economic index is presented that scopes the economic aspects of the novel catalytic technology with the parameters obtained during regression analysis to conclude that the cost factor for the catalyst is 0.0062-0.04759 US $ per barrel. PMID:18541367

  15. Kinetic tetrazolium microtiter assay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, Duane L. (Inventor); Stowe, Raymond P. (Inventor); Koeing, David W. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A method for conducting an in vitro cell assay using a tetrazolium indicator is disclosed. The indicator includes a nonionic detergent which solubilizes a tetrazolium reduction product in vitro and has low toxicity for the cells. The incubation of test cells in the presence of zolium bromide and octoxynol (TRITON X-100) permits kinetics of the cell metabolism to be determined.

  16. Ligand inducible assembly of a DNA tetrahedron.

    PubMed

    Dohno, Chikara; Atsumi, Hiroshi; Nakatani, Kazuhiko

    2011-03-28

    Here we show that a small synthetic ligand can be used as a key building component for DNA nanofabrication. Using naphthyridinecarbamate dimer (NCD) as a molecular glue for DNA hybridization, we demonstrate NCD-triggered formation of a DNA tetrahedron.

  17. Ligand engineering of nanoparticle solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voros, Marton

    Semiconductor nanoparticles (NP) are promising materials to build cheap and efficient solar cells. One of the key challenges in their utilization for solar energy conversion is the control of NP surfaces and ligand-NP interfaces. Recent experiments have shown that by carefully choosing the ligands terminating the NPs, one can tailor electronic and optical absorption properties of NP assemblies, along with their transport properties. By using density functional theory based methods, we investigated how the opto-electronic properties of lead chalcogenide NPs may be tuned by using diverse organic and inorganic ligands. We interpreted experiments, and we showed that an essential prerequisite to avoid detrimental trap states is to ensure charge balance at the ligand-NP interface, possibly with the help of hydrogen treatment Work supported by the Center for Advanced Solar Photophysics, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  18. Automated design of ligands to polypharmacological profiles

    PubMed Central

    Besnard, Jérémy; Ruda, Gian Filippo; Setola, Vincent; Abecassis, Keren; Rodriguiz, Ramona M.; Huang, Xi-Ping; Norval, Suzanne; Sassano, Maria F.; Shin, Antony I.; Webster, Lauren A.; Simeons, Frederick R.C.; Stojanovski, Laste; Prat, Annik; Seidah, Nabil G.; Constam, Daniel B.; Bickerton, G. Richard; Read, Kevin D.; Wetsel, William C.; Gilbert, Ian H.; Roth, Bryan L.; Hopkins, Andrew L.

    2012-01-01

    The clinical efficacy and safety of a drug is determined by its activity profile across multiple proteins in the proteome. However, designing drugs with a specific multi-target profile is both complex and difficult. Therefore methods to rationally design drugs a priori against profiles of multiple proteins would have immense value in drug discovery. We describe a new approach for the automated design of ligands against profiles of multiple drug targets. The method is demonstrated by the evolution of an approved acetylcholinesterase inhibitor drug into brain penetrable ligands with either specific polypharmacology or exquisite selectivity profiles for G-protein coupled receptors. Overall, 800 ligand-target predictions of prospectively designed ligands were tested experimentally, of which 75% were confirmed correct. We also demonstrate target engagement in vivo. The approach can be a useful source of drug leads where multi-target profiles are required to achieve either selectivity over other drug targets or a desired polypharmacology. PMID:23235874

  19. The Retinoid X Receptors and Their Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Marcia I.; Xia, Zebin

    2014-01-01

    This chapter presents an overview of the current status of studies on the structural and molecular biology of the retinoid X receptor subtypes α, β, and γ (RXRs, NR2B1–3), their nuclear and cytoplasmic functions, post-transcriptional processing, and recently reported ligands. Points of interest are the different changes in the ligand-binding pocket induced by variously shaped agonists, the communication of the ligand–bound pocket with the coactivator binding surface and the heterodimerization interface, and recently identified ligands that are natural products, those that function as environmental toxins or drugs that had been originally designed to interact with other targets, as well as those that were deliberately designed as RXR-selective transcriptional agonists, synergists, or antagonists. Of these synthetic ligands, the general trend in design appears to be away from fully aromatic rigid structures to those containing partial elements of the flexible tetraene side chain of 9-cis-retinoic acid. PMID:22020178

  20. Modelling of trace metal uptake by roots taking into account complexation by exogenous organic ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jean-Marc, Custos; Christian, Moyne; Sterckeman, Thibault

    2010-05-01

    The context of this study is phytoextraction of soil trace metals such as Cd, Pb or Zn. Trace metal transfer from soil to plant depends on physical and chemical processes such as minerals alteration, transport, adsorption/desorption, reactions in solution and biological processes including the action of plant roots and of associated micro-flora. Complexation of metal ions by organic ligands is considered to play a role on the availability of trace metals for roots in particular in the event that synthetic ligands (EDTA, NTA, etc.) are added to the soil to increase the solubility of the contaminants. As this role is not clearly understood, we wanted to simulate it in order to quantify the effect of organic ligands on root uptake of trace metals and produce a tool which could help in optimizing the conditions of phytoextraction.We studied the effect of an aminocarboxilate ligand on the absorption of the metal ion by roots, both in hydroponic solution and in soil solution, for which we had to formalize the buffer power for the metal. We assumed that the hydrated metal ion is the only form which can be absorbed by the plants. Transport and reaction processes were modelled for a system made up of the metal M, a ligand L and the metal complex ML. The Tinker-Nye-Barber model was adapted to describe the transport of solutes M, L and ML in the soil and absorption of M by the roots. This allowed to represent the interactions between transport, chelating reactions, absorption of the solutes at the root surface, root growth with time, in order to simulate metal uptake by a whole root system.Several assumptions were tested such as i) absorption of the metal by an infinite sink and according to a Michaelis-Menten kinetics, solutes transport by diffusion with and without ii) mass flow and iii) soil buffer power for the ligand L. In hydroponic solution (without soil buffer power), ligands decreased the trace metal flux towards roots, as they reduced the concentration of hydrated

  1. Microstructure design for fast oxygen conduction

    SciTech Connect

    Aidhy, Dilpuneet S.; Weber, William J.

    2015-11-11

    Research from the last decade has shown that in designing fast oxygen conducting materials for electrochemical applications has largely shifted to microstructural features, in contrast to material-bulk. In particular, understanding oxygen energetics in heterointerface materials is currently at the forefront, where interfacial tensile strain is being considered as the key parameter in lowering oxygen migration barriers. Nanocrystalline materials with high densities of grain boundaries have also gathered interest that could possibly allow leverage over excess volume at grain boundaries, providing fast oxygen diffusion channels similar to those previously observed in metals. In addition, near-interface phase transformations and misfit dislocations are other microstructural phenomenon/features that are being explored to provide faster diffusion. In this review, the current understanding on oxygen energetics, i.e., thermodynamics and kinetics, originating from these microstructural features is discussed. Moreover, our experimental observations, theoretical predictions and novel atomistic mechanisms relevant to oxygen transport are highlighted. In addition, the interaction of dopants with oxygen vacancies in the presence of these new microstructural features, and their future role in the design of future fast-ion conductors, is outlined.

  2. Microstructure design for fast oxygen conduction

    DOE PAGES

    Aidhy, Dilpuneet S.; Weber, William J.

    2015-11-11

    Research from the last decade has shown that in designing fast oxygen conducting materials for electrochemical applications has largely shifted to microstructural features, in contrast to material-bulk. In particular, understanding oxygen energetics in heterointerface materials is currently at the forefront, where interfacial tensile strain is being considered as the key parameter in lowering oxygen migration barriers. Nanocrystalline materials with high densities of grain boundaries have also gathered interest that could possibly allow leverage over excess volume at grain boundaries, providing fast oxygen diffusion channels similar to those previously observed in metals. In addition, near-interface phase transformations and misfit dislocations aremore » other microstructural phenomenon/features that are being explored to provide faster diffusion. In this review, the current understanding on oxygen energetics, i.e., thermodynamics and kinetics, originating from these microstructural features is discussed. Moreover, our experimental observations, theoretical predictions and novel atomistic mechanisms relevant to oxygen transport are highlighted. In addition, the interaction of dopants with oxygen vacancies in the presence of these new microstructural features, and their future role in the design of future fast-ion conductors, is outlined.« less

  3. Surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy for characterisation of membrane protein-ligand interactions and its potential for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Patching, Simon G

    2014-01-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy is a rapidly developing technique for the study of ligand binding interactions with membrane proteins, which are the major molecular targets for validated drugs and for current and foreseeable drug discovery. SPR is label-free and capable of measuring real-time quantitative binding affinities and kinetics for membrane proteins interacting with ligand molecules using relatively small quantities of materials and has potential to be medium-throughput. The conventional SPR technique requires one binding component to be immobilised on a sensor chip whilst the other binding component in solution is flowed over the sensor surface; a binding interaction is detected using an optical method that measures small changes in refractive index at the sensor surface. This review first describes the basic SPR experiment and the challenges that have to be considered for performing SPR experiments that measure membrane protein-ligand binding interactions, most importantly having the membrane protein in a lipid or detergent environment that retains its native structure and activity. It then describes a wide-range of membrane protein systems for which ligand binding interactions have been characterised using SPR, including the major drug targets G protein-coupled receptors, and how challenges have been overcome for achieving this. Finally it describes some recent advances in SPR-based technology and future potential of the technique to screen ligand binding in the discovery of drugs. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Structural and biophysical characterisation of membrane protein-ligand binding.

  4. Poly(glycidyl methacrylate)-grafted hydrophobic charge-induction agarose resins with 5-aminobenzimidazole as a functional ligand.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Lin, Dong-Qiang; Wang, Cun-Xiang; Yao, Shan-Jing

    2016-08-01

    Hydrophobic charge-induction chromatography is a new technology for antibody purification. To improve antibody adsorption capacity of hydrophobic charge-induction resins, new poly(glycidyl methacrylate)-grafted hydrophobic charge-induction resins with 5-aminobenzimidazole as a functional ligand were prepared. Adsorption isotherms, kinetics, and dynamic binding behaviors of the poly(glycidyl methacrylate)-grafted resins prepared were investigated using human immunoglobulin G as a model protein, and the effects of ligand density were discussed. At the moderate ligand density of 330 μmol/g, the saturated adsorption capacity and equilibrium constant reached the maximum of 140 mg/g and 25 mL/mg, respectively, which were both much higher than that of non-grafted resin with same ligand. In addition, effective pore diffusivity and dynamic binding capacity of human immunoglobulin G onto the poly(glycidyl methacrylate)-grafted resins also reached the maximum at the moderate ligand density of 330 μmol/g. Dynamic binding capacity at 10% breakthrough was as high as 76.3 mg/g when the linear velocity was 300 cm/h. The results indicated that the suitable polymer grafting combined with the control of ligand density would be a powerful tool to improve protein adsorption of resins, and new poly(glycidyl methacrylate)-grafted hydrophobic charge-induction resins have a promising potential for antibody purification applications. PMID:27465269

  5. Characterizing dissolved Cu and Cd uptake in terms of the biotic ligand and biodynamics using enriched stable isotopes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Croteau, M.-N.; Luoma, S.N.

    2007-01-01

    The biotic ligand model considers the biological and geochemical complexities that affect metal exposure. It relates toxicity to the fraction of physiological active sites impacted by reactive metal species. The biodynamic model is a complementary construct that predicts bioaccumulation and assumes that toxicity occurs when influx rates exceed rates of loss and detoxification. In this paper we presume that metal influx rates are mechanistically the resulting processes that characterize transmembrane transport. We use enriched stable isotopes to characterize, both in terms of the biotic ligand and biodynamics, dissolved metal uptake by a freshwater snail at water hardness varying up to 180-fold. Upon 24 h exposure, metal uptake was linear over a range encompassing most environmental concentrations; although saturation kinetics were observed at higher concentrations. Cadmium influx rates correlate with changes in the affinity of the biotic ligand, whereas those of Cu correlate with changes in both site affinity and capacity. A relationship between metal influx rate and ligand character asks whether toxicity is the result of accumulation at the biotic ligand or the rate at which metal is transported by that ligand.

  6. Fast focus field calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leutenegger, Marcel; Geissbuehler, Matthias; Märki, Iwan; Leitgeb, Rainer A.; Lasser, Theo

    2008-02-01

    We present a method for fast calculation of the electromagnetic field near the focus of an objective with a high numerical aperture (NA). Instead of direct integration, the vectorial Debye diffraction integral is evaluated with the fast Fourier transform for calculating the electromagnetic field in the entire focal region. We generalize this concept with the chirp z transform for obtaining a flexible sampling grid and an additional gain in computation speed. Under the conditions for the validity of the Debye integral representation, our method yields the amplitude, phase and polarization of the focus field for an arbitrary paraxial input field in the aperture of the objective. Our fast calculation method is particularly useful for engineering the point-spread function or for fast image deconvolution. We present several case studies by calculating the focus fields of high NA oil immersion objectives for various amplitude, polarization and phase distributions of the input field. In addition, the calculation of an extended polychromatic focus field generated by a Bessel beam is presented. This extended focus field is of particular interest for Fourier domain optical coherence tomography because it preserves a lateral resolution of a few micrometers over an axial distance in the millimeter range.

  7. Fast ForWord.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Commission of the States, Denver, CO.

    This paper provides an overview of Fast ForWord, a CD-ROM and Internet-based training program for children (pre-K to grade 8) with language and reading problems that helps children rapidly build oral language comprehension and other critical skills necessary for learning to read or becoming a better reader. With the help of computers, speech…

  8. The Integral Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Till, C.E.; Chang, Y.I. ); Lineberry, M.J. )

    1990-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory, since 1984, has been developing the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). This paper will describe the way in which this new reactor concept came about; the technical, public acceptance, and environmental issues that are addressed by the IFR; the technical progress that has been made; and our expectations for this program in the near term. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  9. Affinity Electrophoresis Using Ligands Attached To Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Alstine, James M.; Snyder, Robert S.; Harris, J. M.; Brooks, D. E.

    1990-01-01

    In new technique, reduction of electrophoretic mobilities by addition of polyethylene glycol to ligands increases electrophoretic separabilities. In immuno-affinity electrophoresis, modification of ligands extends specificity of electrophoretic separation to particles having surface electric-charge structures otherwise making them electrophoretically inseparable. Modification of antibodies by polyethylene glycol greatly reduces ability to aggregate while enhancing ability to affect electrophoretic mobilities of cells. In hydrophobic-affinity electrophoresis, addition of polyethylene glycol reduces tendency toward aggregation of cells or macromolecules.

  10. Fluid vs. kinetic magnetic reconnection with strong guide fields

    SciTech Connect

    Stanier, A. Simakov, Andrei N.; Chacón, L.; Daughton, W.

    2015-10-15

    The fast rates of magnetic reconnection found in both nature and experiments are important to understand theoretically. Recently, it was demonstrated that two-fluid magnetic reconnection remains fast in the strong guide field regime, regardless of the presence of fast-dispersive waves. This conclusion is in agreement with recent results from kinetic simulations, and is in contradiction to the findings in an earlier two-fluid study, where it was suggested that fast-dispersive waves are necessary for fast reconnection. In this paper, we give a more detailed derivation of the analytic model presented in a recent letter and present additional simulation results to support the conclusions that the magnetic reconnection rate in this regime is independent of both collisional dissipation and system-size. In particular, we present a detailed comparison between fluid and kinetic simulations, finding good agreement in both the reconnection rate and overall length of the current layer. Finally, we revisit the earlier two-fluid study, which arrived at different conclusions, and suggest an alternative interpretation for the numerical results presented therein.

  11. Fluid vs. kinetic magnetic reconnection with strong guide fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanier, A.; Simakov, Andrei N.; Chacón, L.; Daughton, W.

    2015-10-01

    The fast rates of magnetic reconnection found in both nature and experiments are important to understand theoretically. Recently, it was demonstrated that two-fluid magnetic reconnection remains fast in the strong guide field regime, regardless of the presence of fast-dispersive waves. This conclusion is in agreement with recent results from kinetic simulations, and is in contradiction to the findings in an earlier two-fluid study, where it was suggested that fast-dispersive waves are necessary for fast reconnection. In this paper, we give a more detailed derivation of the analytic model presented in a recent letter and present additional simulation results to support the conclusions that the magnetic reconnection rate in this regime is independent of both collisional dissipation and system-size. In particular, we present a detailed comparison between fluid and kinetic simulations, finding good agreement in both the reconnection rate and overall length of the current layer. Finally, we revisit the earlier two-fluid study, which arrived at different conclusions, and suggest an alternative interpretation for the numerical results presented therein.

  12. Global kinetic explorer: a new computer program for dynamic simulation and fitting of kinetic data.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Kenneth A; Simpson, Zachary B; Blom, Thomas

    2009-04-01

    We describe a new dynamic kinetic simulation program that allows multiple data sets to be fit simultaneously to a single model based on numerical integration of the rate equations describing the reaction mechanism. Unlike other programs that allow fitting based on numerical integration of rate equations, in the dynamic simulation rate constants, output factors, and starting concentrations of reactants can be scrolled while observing the change in the shape of the simulated reaction curves. Fast dynamic simulation facilitates the exploration of initial parameters that serve as the starting point for nonlinear regression in fitting data and facilitates exploration of the relationships between individual constants and observable reactions. The exploration of parameter space by dynamic simulation provides a powerful tool for learning kinetics and for evaluating the extent to which parameters are constrained by the data. This feature is critical to avoid overly complex models that are not supported by the data.

  13. Cell Surface Receptors for Signal Transduction and Ligand Transport: A Design Principles Study

    PubMed Central

    Shankaran, Harish; Resat, Haluk; Wiley, H. Steven

    2007-01-01

    Receptors constitute the interface of cells to their external environment. These molecules bind specific ligands involved in multiple processes, such as signal transduction and nutrient transport. Although a variety of cell surface receptors undergo endocytosis, the systems-level design principles that govern the evolution of receptor trafficking dynamics are far from fully understood. We have constructed a generalized mathematical model of receptor–ligand binding and internalization to understand how receptor internalization dynamics encodes receptor function and regulation. A given signaling or transport receptor system represents a particular implementation of this module with a specific set of kinetic parameters. Parametric analysis of the response of receptor systems to ligand inputs reveals that receptor systems can be characterized as being: i) avidity-controlled where the response control depends primarily on the extracellular ligand capture efficiency, ii) consumption-controlled where the ability to internalize surface-bound ligand is the primary control parameter, and iii) dual-sensitivity where both the avidity and consumption parameters are important. We show that the transferrin and low-density lipoprotein receptors are avidity-controlled, the vitellogenin receptor is consumption-controlled, and the epidermal growth factor receptor is a dual-sensitivity receptor. Significantly, we show that ligand-induced endocytosis is a mechanism to enhance the accuracy of signaling receptors rather than merely serving to attenuate signaling. Our analysis reveals that the location of a receptor system in the avidity-consumption parameter space can be used to understand both its function and its regulation. PMID:17542642

  14. Flexible ligand docking using conformational ensembles.

    PubMed Central

    Lorber, D. M.; Shoichet, B. K.

    1998-01-01

    Molecular docking algorithms suggest possible structures for molecular complexes. They are used to model biological function and to discover potential ligands. A present challenge for docking algorithms is the treatment of molecular flexibility. Here, the rigid body program, DOCK, is modified to allow it to rapidly fit multiple conformations of ligands. Conformations of a given molecule are pre-calculated in the same frame of reference, so that each conformer shares a common rigid fragment with all other conformations. The ligand conformers are then docked together, as an ensemble, into a receptor binding site. This takes advantage of the redundancy present in differing conformers of the same molecule. The algorithm was tested using three organic ligand protein systems and two protein-protein systems. Both the bound and unbound conformations of the receptors were used. The ligand ensemble method found conformations that resembled those determined in X-ray crystal structures (RMS values typically less than 1.5 A). To test the method's usefulness for inhibitor discovery, multi-compound and multi-conformer databases were screened for compounds known to bind to dihydrofolate reductase and compounds known to bind to thymidylate synthase. In both cases, known inhibitors and substrates were identified in conformations resembling those observed experimentally. The ligand ensemble method was 100-fold faster than docking a single conformation at a time and was able to screen a database of over 34 million conformations from 117,000 molecules in one to four CPU days on a workstation. PMID:9568900

  15. Steric and electronic effects of 1,3-disubstituted cyclopentadienyl ligands on metallocene derivatives of Cerium, Titanium, Manganese, and Iron

    SciTech Connect

    Sofield, C.D.

    2000-05-19

    Sterically demanding 1,3-disubstituted cyclopentadienyl ligands were used to modify the physical properties of the corresponding metallocenes. Sterically demanding ligands provided kinetic stabilization for trivalent cerium compounds. Tris(di-t-butylcyclopentadienyl)cerium was prepared and anion competition between halides and cyclopentadienyl groups which had complicated synthesis of the tris(cyclopentadienyl)compound was qualitatively examined. Bis(di-t-butylcyclopentadienyl)cerium methyl was prepared and its rate of decomposition, by ligand redistribution, to tris(di-t-butylcyclopentadienyl)cerium was shown to be slower than the corresponding rate for less sterically demanding ligands. Asymmetrically substituted ligands provided a symmetry label for examination of chemical exchange processes. Tris[trimethylsilyl(t-butyl)cyclopentadienyl]cerium was prepared and the rate of interconversion between the C1 and C3 isomers was examined. The enthalpy difference between the two distereomers is 7.0 kJ/mol. The sterically demanding cyclopentadienyl ligands ansa-di-t-butylcyclopentadiene (Me2Si[(Me3C)2C5H3]2), ansa-bis(trimethylsilyl)cyclopentadiene (Me2Si[(Me3Si)2C5H3]2) and tetra-t-butylfulvalene and metallocene derivatives of the ligands were prepared and their structures were examined by single crystal X-ray crystallography. The effect that substituents on the cyclopentadienyl ring have on the pi-electron system of the ligand was examined through interaction between ligand and metal orbitals. A series of 1,3-disubstituted manganocenes was prepared and their electronic states were determined by solid-state magnetic susceptibility, electron paramagnetic resonance, X-ray crystallography, and variable temperature UV-vis spectroscopy. Spin-equilibria in [(Me3C)2C5H3]2Mn and [(Me3C)(Me3Si)C5H3]2Mn were examined and indicate an enthalpy difference of 15 kJ/mol between the high-spin and low-spin forms. Cyclopentadienyl groups resistant to intramolecular oxidative addition

  16. Combining on-chip synthesis of a focused combinatorial library with computational target prediction reveals imidazopyridine GPCR ligands.

    PubMed

    Reutlinger, Michael; Rodrigues, Tiago; Schneider, Petra; Schneider, Gisbert

    2014-01-01

    Using the example of the Ugi three-component reaction we report a fast and efficient microfluidic-assisted entry into the imidazopyridine scaffold, where building block prioritization was coupled to a new computational method for predicting ligand-target associations. We identified an innovative GPCR-modulating combinatorial chemotype featuring ligand-efficient adenosine A1/2B and adrenergic α1A/B receptor antagonists. Our results suggest the tight integration of microfluidics-assisted synthesis with computer-based target prediction as a viable approach to rapidly generate bioactivity-focused combinatorial compound libraries with high success rates.

  17. LLNL Chemical Kinetics Modeling Group

    SciTech Connect

    Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Mehl, M; Herbinet, O; Curran, H J; Silke, E J

    2008-09-24

    The LLNL chemical kinetics modeling group has been responsible for much progress in the development of chemical kinetic models for practical fuels. The group began its work in the early 1970s, developing chemical kinetic models for methane, ethane, ethanol and halogenated inhibitors. Most recently, it has been developing chemical kinetic models for large n-alkanes, cycloalkanes, hexenes, and large methyl esters. These component models are needed to represent gasoline, diesel, jet, and oil-sand-derived fuels.

  18. Time, the Forgotten Dimension of Ligand Binding Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corzo, Javier

    2006-01-01

    Ligand binding is generally explained in terms of the equilibrium constant K[subscript d] for the protein-ligand complex dissociation. However, both theoretical considerations and experimental data point to the life span of the protein-ligand complex as an important, but generally overlooked, aspect of ligand binding by macromolecules. Short-lived…

  19. The second-shell metal ligands of human arginase affect coordination of the nucleophile and substrate.

    PubMed

    Stone, Everett M; Chantranupong, Lynne; Georgiou, George

    2010-12-14

    The active sites of eukaryotic arginase enzymes are strictly conserved, especially the first- and second-shell ligands that coordinate the two divalent metal cations that generate a hydroxide molecule for nucleophilic attack on the guanidinium carbon of l-arginine and the subsequent production of urea and l-ornithine. Here by using comprehensive pairwise saturation mutagenesis of the first- and second-shell metal ligands in human arginase I, we demonstrate that several metal binding ligands are actually quite tolerant to amino acid substitutions. Of >2800 double mutants of first- and second-shell residues analyzed, we found more than 80 unique amino acid substitutions, of which four were in first-shell residues. Remarkably, certain second-shell mutations could modulate the binding of both the nucleophilic water/hydroxide molecule and substrate or product ligands, resulting in activity greater than that of the wild-type enzyme. The data presented here constitute the first comprehensive saturation mutagenesis analysis of a metallohydrolase active site and reveal that the strict conservation of the second-shell metal binding residues in eukaryotic arginases does not reflect kinetic optimization of the enzyme during the course of evolution. PMID:21053939

  20. Asymmetric catalytic hydrogenation. Design of new Ru catalysts and chiral ligands: from laboratory to industrial applications.

    PubMed

    Genet, Jean-Pierre

    2003-12-01

    This Account covers the design of Ru catalysts and ligands. Two classes of chiral phosphine ligands are prepared: the electron-rich trans-2,4-substituted phosphetanes, readily available from optically pure 1,3-diol cyclic sulfates, and atropoisomeric ligands (SYNPHOS, MeO-NAPhePHOS, bearing heterotopic biaryl moieties, and a chiral water-soluble diguanidinium binaphthyl diphosphine, Digm-BINAP). Applications of these ligands to rhodium- and ruthenium-mediated hydrogenation of ketones and olefins have been reported with high enantioselectivities. The recognition abilities of Ru-SYNPHOS for a wide range of ketones is superior to those observed with BINAP, MeO-NAPhePHOS, and MeO-BIPHEP. Several biologically active compounds have been prepared through dynamic kinetic resolution. This work gives access to a number of highly active catalysts of the type [Ru(biphosphane)(H)(eta(6)-cot)]BF(4). These catalysts have demonstrated their utility in the enantioselective hydrogenation of the tetrasubstituted cyclopentenone "dehydrodione", which leads to the commercially important perfume component Paradisone (Firmenich).