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Sample records for fast lane high-temperature

  1. Embryos in the Fast Lane: High-Temperature Heart Rates of Turtles Decline After Hatching

    PubMed Central

    Du, Wei-Guo; Zhao, Bo; Shine, Richard

    2010-01-01

    In ectotherms such as turtles, the relationship between cardiovascular function and temperature may be subject to different selective pressures in different life-history stages. Because embryos benefit by developing as rapidly as possible, and can “afford” to expend energy to do so (because they have access to the yolk for nutrition), they benefit from rapid heart (and thus, developmental) rates. In contrast, hatchlings do not have a guaranteed food supply, and maximal growth rates may not enhance fitness—and so, we might expect a lower heart rate, especially at high temperatures where metabolic costs are greatest. Our data on two species of emydid turtles, Chrysemys picta, and Graptemys pseudogeographica kohnii, support these predictions. Heart rates of embryos and hatchlings were similar at low temperatures, but heart rates at higher temperatures were much greater before than after hatching. PMID:20224773

  2. Recognition of fast lane changing behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yingshi; Wang, Chang

    2014-10-01

    Aiming at the lane change behavior recognition requirements of lane change warning system, natural lane change samples were captured by using a test vehicle. Steering angle and distance between vehicle and lane mark were used as characteristic parameters of lane change behavior. Support vector machine (SVM) method was used to establish recognizing model of lane change. The sample data were filtered by Kaiman filter. Variance-Bayesian filter model was used to fast lane change behavior identification. Final recognition results show that the recognition rate for the real lane change samples can reach 92.5273% and the proposed model can also meet the real time and reliability requirements of lane change warning system.

  3. Fast vortex core switching at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebecki, Kristof M.; Legut, Dominik

    2016-08-01

    Fast ferromagnetic vortex core switching is investigated employing micromagnetic simulations. Short pulse (in the range of a few hundreds of picoseconds) of an in-plane oscillating magnetic field is applied to a thin disk (diameter 200 nm and thickness 20 nm) with material parameters resembling permalloy. Fundamental frequency of this excitation field is close to the resonance with the material spin waves. Thermal effects are introduced by replacing the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation by the Landau-Lifshitz-Bloch equation. Temperature from 300 K to 850 K is considered, just below the Curie temperature TC = 870 K. Calculations are done within the OOMMF simulation framework. We find that: (i) Period of the field necessary to switch the vortex increases approximately from 141 ps at 300 K to 572 ps for the high-temperature limit. (ii) Amplitude of the field necessary to switch the vortex core decreases roughly from 60 mT to 15 mT - even at high temperatures this amplitude is nonzero, contrary to the case of quasi-static switching. (iii) Time span between the excitation and switching (switching time) seems not to depend on the temperature. (iv) Duration of the switching itself (movement of the Bloch point in the sample) increases from a few picoseconds at low temperatures to tens of picoseconds at high temperatures.

  4. A realistic two-lane cellular automata traffic model considering aggressive lane-changing behavior of fast vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin-Gang; Jia, Bin; Gao, Zi-You; Jiang, Rui

    2006-07-01

    In real traffic, a vehicle may perform different lane-changing behavior if its preceding vehicle is different. Fast vehicle usually has aggressive lane-changing behavior when its preceding vehicle is a slow one. In this paper, we take the factor into account and propose a new symmetric two-lane cellular automata model. It is shown that aggressive lane-changing behavior of fast vehicle can depress the plug formed by slow vehicles and improve traffic flow in mixed traffic in the intermediate density range. The simulation results also indicate that ping-pang lane-changing behavior is mainly caused by fast vehicles that are hindered by fast vehicles.

  5. Fast food purchasing and access to fast food restaurants: a multilevel analysis of VicLANES

    PubMed Central

    Thornton, Lukar E; Bentley, Rebecca J; Kavanagh, Anne M

    2009-01-01

    Background While previous research on fast food access and purchasing has not found evidence of an association, these studies have had methodological problems including aggregation error, lack of specificity between the exposures and outcomes, and lack of adjustment for potential confounding. In this paper we attempt to address these methodological problems using data from the Victorian Lifestyle and Neighbourhood Environments Study (VicLANES) – a cross-sectional multilevel study conducted within metropolitan Melbourne, Australia in 2003. Methods The VicLANES data used in this analysis included 2547 participants from 49 census collector districts in metropolitan Melbourne, Australia. The outcome of interest was the total frequency of fast food purchased for consumption at home within the previous month (never, monthly and weekly) from five major fast food chains (Red Rooster, McDonalds, Kentucky Fried Chicken, Hungry Jacks and Pizza Hut). Three measures of fast food access were created: density and variety, defined as the number of fast food restaurants and the number of different fast food chains within 3 kilometres of road network distance respectively, and proximity defined as the road network distance to the closest fast food restaurant. Multilevel multinomial models were used to estimate the associations between fast food restaurant access and purchasing with never purchased as the reference category. Models were adjusted for confounders including determinants of demand (attitudes and tastes that influence food purchasing decisions) as well as individual and area socio-economic characteristics. Results Purchasing fast food on a monthly basis was related to the variety of fast food restaurants (odds ratio 1.13; 95% confidence interval 1.02 – 1.25) after adjusting for individual and area characteristics. Density and proximity were not found to be significant predictors of fast food purchasing after adjustment for individual socio-economic predictors

  6. Fast food purchasing and access to fast food restaurants: a multilevel analysis of VicLANES.

    PubMed

    Thornton, Lukar E; Bentley, Rebecca J; Kavanagh, Anne M

    2009-05-27

    While previous research on fast food access and purchasing has not found evidence of an association, these studies have had methodological problems including aggregation error, lack of specificity between the exposures and outcomes, and lack of adjustment for potential confounding. In this paper we attempt to address these methodological problems using data from the Victorian Lifestyle and Neighbourhood Environments Study (VicLANES) - a cross-sectional multilevel study conducted within metropolitan Melbourne, Australia in 2003. The VicLANES data used in this analysis included 2547 participants from 49 census collector districts in metropolitan Melbourne, Australia. The outcome of interest was the total frequency of fast food purchased for consumption at home within the previous month (never, monthly and weekly) from five major fast food chains (Red Rooster, McDonalds, Kentucky Fried Chicken, Hungry Jacks and Pizza Hut). Three measures of fast food access were created: density and variety, defined as the number of fast food restaurants and the number of different fast food chains within 3 kilometres of road network distance respectively, and proximity defined as the road network distance to the closest fast food restaurant.Multilevel multinomial models were used to estimate the associations between fast food restaurant access and purchasing with never purchased as the reference category. Models were adjusted for confounders including determinants of demand (attitudes and tastes that influence food purchasing decisions) as well as individual and area socio-economic characteristics. Purchasing fast food on a monthly basis was related to the variety of fast food restaurants (odds ratio 1.13; 95% confidence interval 1.02 - 1.25) after adjusting for individual and area characteristics. Density and proximity were not found to be significant predictors of fast food purchasing after adjustment for individual socio-economic predictors. Although we found an independent

  7. Private health insurance in Sweden: Fast-track lanes and the alleged attempts to stop them.

    PubMed

    Lapidus, John

    2017-04-01

    According to the Health and Medical Services Act (1982:763), those who have the greatest need for healthcare shall be given priority. This is being challenged by the rapid emergence of private health insurance which increases the share of private funding and creates fast-track lanes where some people get faster access to healthcare than others. The Stop Law, implemented by a Social Democratic government in 2006, was generally regarded as a way to put an end to the fast-track lanes in Swedish healthcare. Based on a thorough examination of the law and its legislative history - official reports, propositions, comments on official reports - this article argues that the Stop Law was so full of exceptions and loopholes that it did not threaten the existence of fast-track lanes. The same goes for a similar Social Democratic proposal from 2016, which is also examined in the article. Further, the article analyses centre-right wing positions on fast-track lanes in Swedish healthcare. In summary, it is argued that politicians of all stripes have allowed the development to proceed in spite of unanimous support for the idea that Swedish healthcare shall be provided to all on equal terms.

  8. Fast high-temperature superconductor switch for high current applications

    SciTech Connect

    Solovyov, VF; Li, Q

    2013-07-15

    Reversible operation of a high current superconductor switch based on the quench of high-resistance second generation high temperature superconducting wire is demonstrated. The quench is induced by a burst of an ac field generated by an inductively coupled radio-frequency coil. The switch makes a superconducting-to-normal transition within 5 ms and also has a rapid recovery to the superconducting state. The device has potential applications as an active current limiter or as a storage switch for superconducting magnetic energy storage systems. Operation in a full flux penetration/flow regime can effectively minimize the detrimental effects of the intrinsic conductor non-uniformity. (C) 2013 AIP Publishing LLC.

  9. FastLane: Agile Drop Notification for Datacenter Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-23

    IZZARD, M., MUJICA, F. A., AND HOROWITZ, M. Forwarding metamorphosis : fast programmable match-action processing in hardware for sdn. In SIGCOMM (2013...gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection of information. Send comments regarding this burden estimate or... completion time SLOs. Indirect notifications to packet drops (e.g., duplicates in an end-toend acknowledgment sequence) are an important limitation to the

  10. High Temperature Ultrasonic Transducers for In-Service Inspection of Liquid Metal Fast Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Posakony, Gerald J.; Harris, Robert V.; Baldwin, David L.; Jones, Anthony M.; Bond, Leonard J.

    2011-12-31

    In-service inspection of liquid metal (sodium) fast reactors requires the use of ultrasonic transducers capable of operating at high temperatures (>200°C), high gamma radiation fields, and the chemically reactive liquid sodium environment. In the early- to mid-1970s, the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission supported development of high-temperature, submersible single-element transducers, used for scanning and under-sodium imaging in the Fast Flux Test Facility and the Clinch River Breeder Reactor. Current work is building on this technology to develop the next generation of high-temperature linear ultrasonic transducer arrays for under-sodium viewing and in-service inspections.

  11. New Fast Lane towards Discoveries of Clusters of Galaxies Inaugurated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-07-01

    massive bound structures in the Universe. They have masses of the order of one thousand million million times the mass of our Sun. Their three-dimensional space distribution and number density change with cosmic time and provide information about the main cosmological parameters in a unique way. About one fifth of the optically invisible mass of a cluster is in the form of a diffuse hot gas in between the galaxies. This gas has a temperature of the order of several tens of million degrees and a density of the order of one atom per liter. At such high temperatures, it produces powerful X-ray emission. Observing this intergalactic gas and not just the individual galaxies is like seeing the buildings of a city in daytime, not just the lighted windows at night. This is why clusters of galaxies are best discovered using X-ray satellites. Using previous X-ray satellites, astronomers have performed limited studies of the large-scale structure of the nearby Universe. However, they so far lacked the instruments to extend the search to large volumes of the distant Universe. The XMM-Newton wide-field observations ESO PR Photo 19a/03 ESO PR Photo 19a/03 [Preview - JPEG: 575 x 400 pix - 52k [Normal - JPEG: 1130 x 800 pix - 420k] ESO PR Photo 19b/03 ESO PR Photo 19b/03 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 489 pix - 52k [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 978 pix - 464k] Captions: PR Photo 19a/03 is the first image from the XMM-LSS X-Ray survey. It is actually a combination of fourteen separate "pointings" of this space observatory. It represents a region of the sky eight times larger than the full Moon and contains around 25 clusters. The circles represent the X-Ray sources previously known from the 1991 ROSAT All-Sky Survey. PR Photo 19b/03 zooms in on a particularly interesting region of the image shown in ESO PR Photo 19a/03 with a possible cluster identified (in box). Each point on this graph represents a single X-ray photon detected by XMM-Newton. Marguerite Pierre (CEA Saclay, France), with a European

  12. Ultra-Fast Boriding in High-Temperature Materials Processing Industries

    SciTech Connect

    2008-12-01

    This factsheet describes a research project whose main objective is to further develop, optimize, scale-up, and commercialize an ultra-fast boriding (also referred to as “boronizing”) process that can provide much higher energy efficiency, productivity, and near-zero emissions in many of the high-temperature materials processing industries.

  13. From the Fast Track to the Fast Lane--To What?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weininger, Otto

    1990-01-01

    Young children are being fast tracked at early age because of pressures from parents, schools, society, and media. One result is troubled teenagers who experience stress of these pressures without having adult means to cope with them. Time spent with parents and in play activities are activities that help children to gain security, happiness, and…

  14. An observational study of consumer use of fast-food restaurant drive-through lanes: implications for menu labelling policy.

    PubMed

    Roberto, Christina A; Hoffnagle, Elena; Bragg, Marie A; Brownell, Kelly D

    2010-11-01

    Some versions of restaurant menu labelling legislation do not require energy information to be posted on menus for drive-through lanes. The present study was designed to quantify the number of customers who purchase fast food through drive-in windows as a means of informing legislative labelling efforts. This was an observational study. The study took place at two McDonald's and Burger King restaurants, and single Dairy Queen, Kentucky Fried Chicken, Taco Bell and Wendy's restaurants. The number of customers entering the chain restaurants and purchasing food via the drive-through lane were recorded. A total of 3549 patrons were observed. The percentage of customers who made their purchases at drive-throughs was fifty-seven. The overall average (57 %) is likely a conservative estimate because some fast-food restaurants have late-night hours when only the drive-throughs are open. Since nearly six in ten customers purchase food via the drive-through lanes, menu labelling legislation should mandate the inclusion of menu labels on drive-through menu boards to maximise the impact of this public health intervention.

  15. Fast learning method for convolutional neural networks using extreme learning machine and its application to lane detection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jihun; Kim, Jonghong; Jang, Gil-Jin; Lee, Minho

    2017-03-01

    Deep learning has received significant attention recently as a promising solution to many problems in the area of artificial intelligence. Among several deep learning architectures, convolutional neural networks (CNNs) demonstrate superior performance when compared to other machine learning methods in the applications of object detection and recognition. We use a CNN for image enhancement and the detection of driving lanes on motorways. In general, the process of lane detection consists of edge extraction and line detection. A CNN can be used to enhance the input images before lane detection by excluding noise and obstacles that are irrelevant to the edge detection result. However, training conventional CNNs requires considerable computation and a big dataset. Therefore, we suggest a new learning algorithm for CNNs using an extreme learning machine (ELM). The ELM is a fast learning method used to calculate network weights between output and hidden layers in a single iteration and thus, can dramatically reduce learning time while producing accurate results with minimal training data. A conventional ELM can be applied to networks with a single hidden layer; as such, we propose a stacked ELM architecture in the CNN framework. Further, we modify the backpropagation algorithm to find the targets of hidden layers and effectively learn network weights while maintaining performance. Experimental results confirm that the proposed method is effective in reducing learning time and improving performance.

  16. High temperature fast response pressure probe for use in liquid metal droplet dispensers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollinger, B.; Mansour, M.; Abhari, R. S.

    2012-06-01

    A miniature fast response high temperature pressure probe, with demonstrated use in liquid metals up to 255 °C (528 K), has been developed. Innovative packaging technologies have been applied to integrate a conventional piezoresistive silicon pressure sensor into the probe, without the need of an auxiliary water-cooling system. In situ static calibrations are used to verify the linearity of the pressure signal and the stability of the pressure sensitivity (0.5% standard deviation over 70 min at 255 °C). Dynamic calibration, completed in an air shock tube facility, yields the probe's natural frequency. This frequency, when corrected for probe operation in liquid tin, is found to be 100 kHz. The reliability and accuracy of the probe is assessed by mounting it in a tin droplet dispenser for use in an extreme ultraviolet light source. Droplet dispensers typically include an excitation mechanism, which can be based on the generation of acoustic pressure waves to impose a desired droplet frequency. The probe accuracy is verified by the comparison of pressure measurements with laser Doppler vibrometry measurements of the pressure generating structure. A reference pressure measurement, conducted at representative conditions, shows a complex frequency response, with peaks distributed over three orders of magnitude and maximum amplitude of 440 mbar. Time variance of the excitation mechanism due to thermal transients is studied by monitoring the pressure response during operation. Finally, the linearity of the excitation system, with respect to the excitation amplitude, is verified by response measurements. In conclusion, the developed probe is capable of characterizing the excitation mechanism of a liquid metal droplet dispenser. Additionally, real-time monitoring of the performance of the excitation system during long-term operation is possible.

  17. Fast, high temperature and thermolabile GC--MS in supersonic molecular beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagan, Shai; Amirav, Aviv

    1994-05-01

    This work describes and evaluates the coupling of a fast gas chromatograph (GC) based on a short column and high carrier gas flow rate to a supersonic molecular beam mass spectrometer (MS). A 50 cm long megabore column serves for fast GC separation and connects the injector to the supersonic nozzle source. Sampling is achieved with a conventional syringe based splitless sample injection. The injector contains no septum and is open to the atmosphere. The linear velocity of the carrier gas is controlled by a by-pass (make-up) gas flow introduced after the column and prior to the supersonic nozzle. The supersonic expansion serves as a jet separator and the skimmed supersonic molecular beam (SMB) is highly enriched with the heavier organic molecules. The supersonic molecular beam constituents are ionized either by electron impact (EI) or hyperthermal surface ionization (HSI) and mass analyzed. A 1 s fast GC--MS of four aromatic molecules in methanol is demonstrated and some fundamental aspects of fast GC--MS with time limit constraints are outlined. The flow control (programming) of the speed of analysis is shown and the analysis of thermolabile and relatively non-volatile molecules is demonstrated and discussed. The tail-free, fast GC--MS of several mixtures is shown and peak tailing of caffeine is compared with that of conventional GC--MS. The improvement of the peak shapes with the SMB--MS is analyzed with the respect to the elimination of thermal vacuum chamber background. The extrapolated minimum detected amount was about 400 ag of anthracence-d10, with an elution time which was shorter than 2s. Repetitive injections could be performed within less than 10 s. The fast GC--MS in SMB seems to be ideal for fast target compound analysis even in real world, complex mixtures. The few seconds GC--MS separation and quantification of lead (as tetraethyllead) in gasoline, caffeine in coffee, and codeine in a drug is demonstrated. Controlled HSI selectivity is demonstrated in

  18. Heterocycles as key substrates in multicomponent reactions: the fast lane towards molecular complexity.

    PubMed

    Isambert, Nicolas; Lavilla, Rodolfo

    2008-01-01

    Heterocycles display an intrinsic reactivity which enables rich, versatile and productive transformations. Taking into account their ubiquitous presence in natural products and drugs, the development of new, fast and efficient preparative protocols for these structures remains an urgent task in Organic Synthesis. Multicomponent reactions using heterocyclic chemistry offer new possibilities to exploit this exclusive reactivity. Recent results show relevant examples of such transformations. Several approaches which allow the construction of complex heterocyclic compounds from simple starting materials using this principle have been analyzed.

  19. High-temperature behavior of dicesium molybdate Cs2MoO4: Implications for fast neutron reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallez, Gilles; Raison, Philippe E.; Smith, Anna L.; Clavier, Nicolas; Dacheux, Nicolas

    2014-07-01

    Dicesium molybdate (Cs2MoO4)'s thermal expansion and crystal structure have been investigated herein by high temperature X ray diffraction in conjunction with Raman spectroscopy. This first crystal-chemical insight at high temperature is aimed at predicting the thermostructural and thermomechanical behavior of this oxide formed by the accumulation of Cs and Mo fission products at the periphery of nuclear fuel rods in sodium-cooled fast reactors. Within the temperature range of the fuel's rim, Cs2MoO4 becomes hexagonal P63/mmc, with disordered MoO4 tetrahedra and 2D distribution of Cs-O bonds that makes thermal axial expansion both large (50≤αl≤70 10-6 °C-1, 500-800 °C) and highly anisotropic (αc-αa=67×10-6 °C-1, hexagonal form). The difference with the fuel's expansion coefficient is of potential concern with respect to the cohesion of the Cs2MoO4 surface film and the possible release of cesium radionuclides in accidental situations.

  20. Life in the fast lane for protein crystallization and X-ray crystallography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc L.; Liu, Zhi-Jie; Tempel, Wolfram; Praissman, Jeremy; Lin, Dawei; Wang, Bi-Cheng; Gavira, Jose A.; Ng, Joseph D.

    2005-01-01

    The common goal for structural genomic centers and consortiums is to decipher as quickly as possible the three-dimensional structures for a multitude of recombinant proteins derived from known genomic sequences. Since X-ray crystallography is the foremost method to acquire atomic resolution for macromolecules, the limiting step is obtaining protein crystals that can be useful of structure determination. High-throughput methods have been developed in recent years to clone, express, purify, crystallize and determine the three-dimensional structure of a protein gene product rapidly using automated devices, commercialized kits and consolidated protocols. However, the average number of protein structures obtained for most structural genomic groups has been very low compared to the total number of proteins purified. As more entire genomic sequences are obtained for different organisms from the three kingdoms of life, only the proteins that can be crystallized and whose structures can be obtained easily are studied. Consequently, an astonishing number of genomic proteins remain unexamined. In the era of high-throughput processes, traditional methods in molecular biology, protein chemistry and crystallization are eclipsed by automation and pipeline practices. The necessity for high-rate production of protein crystals and structures has prevented the usage of more intellectual strategies and creative approaches in experimental executions. Fundamental principles and personal experiences in protein chemistry and crystallization are minimally exploited only to obtain "low-hanging fruit" protein structures. We review the practical aspects of today's high-throughput manipulations and discuss the challenges in fast pace protein crystallization and tools for crystallography. Structural genomic pipelines can be improved with information gained from low-throughput tactics that may help us reach the higher-bearing fruits. Examples of recent developments in this area are reported from

  1. Life in the Fast Lane for Protein Crystallization and X-Ray Crystallography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc L.; Liu, Zhi-Jie; Tempel, Wolfram; Praissman, Jeremy; Lin, Dawei; Wang, Bi-Cheng; Gavira, Jose A.; Ng, Joseph D.

    2004-01-01

    The common goal for structural genomic centers and consortiums is to decipher as quickly as possible the three-dimensional structures for a multitude of recombinant proteins derived from known genomic sequences. Since X-ray crystallography is the foremost method to acquire atomic resolution for macromolecules, the limiting step is obtaining protein crystals that can be useful of structure determination. High-throughput methods have been developed in recent years to clone, express, purify, crystallize and determine the three-dimensional structure of a protein gene product rapidly using automated devices, commercialized kits and consolidated protocols. However, the average number of protein structures obtained for most structural genomic groups has been very low compared to the total number of proteins purified. As more entire genomic sequences are obtained for different organisms from the three kingdoms of life, only the proteins that can be crystallized and whose structures can be obtained easily are studied. Consequently, an astonishing number of genomic proteins remain unexamined. In the era of high-throughput processes, traditional methods in molecular biology, protein chemistry and crystallization are eclipsed by automation and pipeline practices. The necessity for high rate production of protein crystals and structures has prevented the usage of more intellectual strategies and creative approaches in experimental executions. Fundamental principles and personal experiences in protein chemistry and crystallization are minimally exploited only to obtain "low-hanging fruit" protein structures. We review the practical aspects of today s high-throughput manipulations and discuss the challenges in fast pace protein crystallization and tools for crystallography. Structural genomic pipelines can be improved with information gained from low-throughput tactics that may help us reach the higher-bearing fruits. Examples of recent developments in this area are reported from

  2. Life in the fast lane for protein crystallization and X-ray crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Pusey, Marc L.; Liu, Zhi-Jie; Tempel, Wolfram; Praissman, Jeremy; Lin, Dawei; Wang, Bi-Cheng; Gavira, Jose A.; Ng, Joseph D.

    2010-07-20

    The common goal for structural genomic centers and consortiums is to decipher as quickly as possible the three-dimensional structures for a multitude of recombinant proteins derived from known genomic sequences. Since X-ray crystallography is the foremost method to acquire atomic resolution for macromolecules, the limiting step is obtaining protein crystals that can be useful of structure determination. High-throughput methods have been developed in recent years to clone, express, purify, crystallize and determine the three-dimensional structure of a protein gene product rapidly using automated devices, commercialized kits and consolidated protocols. However, the average number of protein structures obtained for most structural genomic groups has been very low compared to the total number of proteins purified. As more entire genomic sequences are obtained for different organisms from the three kingdoms of life, only the proteins that can be crystallized and whose structures can be obtained easily are studied. Consequently, an astonishing number of genomic proteins remain unexamined. In the era of high-throughput processes, traditional methods in molecular biology, protein chemistry and crystallization are eclipsed by automation and pipeline practices. The necessity for high-rate production of protein crystals and structures has prevented the usage of more intellectual strategies and creative approaches in experimental executions. Fundamental principles and personal experiences in protein chemistry and crystallization are minimally exploited only to obtain 'low-hanging fruit' protein structures. We review the practical aspects of today's high-throughput manipulations and discuss the challenges in fast pace protein crystallization and tools for crystallography. Structural genomic pipelines can be improved with information gained from low-throughput tactics that may help us reach the higher-bearing fruits. Examples of recent developments in this area are reported from

  3. Life in the fast lane for protein crystallization and X-ray crystallography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc L.; Liu, Zhi-Jie; Tempel, Wolfram; Praissman, Jeremy; Lin, Dawei; Wang, Bi-Cheng; Gavira, Jose A.; Ng, Joseph D.

    2005-01-01

    The common goal for structural genomic centers and consortiums is to decipher as quickly as possible the three-dimensional structures for a multitude of recombinant proteins derived from known genomic sequences. Since X-ray crystallography is the foremost method to acquire atomic resolution for macromolecules, the limiting step is obtaining protein crystals that can be useful of structure determination. High-throughput methods have been developed in recent years to clone, express, purify, crystallize and determine the three-dimensional structure of a protein gene product rapidly using automated devices, commercialized kits and consolidated protocols. However, the average number of protein structures obtained for most structural genomic groups has been very low compared to the total number of proteins purified. As more entire genomic sequences are obtained for different organisms from the three kingdoms of life, only the proteins that can be crystallized and whose structures can be obtained easily are studied. Consequently, an astonishing number of genomic proteins remain unexamined. In the era of high-throughput processes, traditional methods in molecular biology, protein chemistry and crystallization are eclipsed by automation and pipeline practices. The necessity for high-rate production of protein crystals and structures has prevented the usage of more intellectual strategies and creative approaches in experimental executions. Fundamental principles and personal experiences in protein chemistry and crystallization are minimally exploited only to obtain "low-hanging fruit" protein structures. We review the practical aspects of today's high-throughput manipulations and discuss the challenges in fast pace protein crystallization and tools for crystallography. Structural genomic pipelines can be improved with information gained from low-throughput tactics that may help us reach the higher-bearing fruits. Examples of recent developments in this area are reported from

  4. Life in the Fast Lane for Protein Crystallization and X-Ray Crystallography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc L.; Liu, Zhi-Jie; Tempel, Wolfram; Praissman, Jeremy; Lin, Dawei; Wang, Bi-Cheng; Gavira, Jose A.; Ng, Joseph D.

    2004-01-01

    The common goal for structural genomic centers and consortiums is to decipher as quickly as possible the three-dimensional structures for a multitude of recombinant proteins derived from known genomic sequences. Since X-ray crystallography is the foremost method to acquire atomic resolution for macromolecules, the limiting step is obtaining protein crystals that can be useful of structure determination. High-throughput methods have been developed in recent years to clone, express, purify, crystallize and determine the three-dimensional structure of a protein gene product rapidly using automated devices, commercialized kits and consolidated protocols. However, the average number of protein structures obtained for most structural genomic groups has been very low compared to the total number of proteins purified. As more entire genomic sequences are obtained for different organisms from the three kingdoms of life, only the proteins that can be crystallized and whose structures can be obtained easily are studied. Consequently, an astonishing number of genomic proteins remain unexamined. In the era of high-throughput processes, traditional methods in molecular biology, protein chemistry and crystallization are eclipsed by automation and pipeline practices. The necessity for high rate production of protein crystals and structures has prevented the usage of more intellectual strategies and creative approaches in experimental executions. Fundamental principles and personal experiences in protein chemistry and crystallization are minimally exploited only to obtain "low-hanging fruit" protein structures. We review the practical aspects of today s high-throughput manipulations and discuss the challenges in fast pace protein crystallization and tools for crystallography. Structural genomic pipelines can be improved with information gained from low-throughput tactics that may help us reach the higher-bearing fruits. Examples of recent developments in this area are reported from

  5. Fast transient infrared studies in material science: development of a novel low dead-volume, high temperature DRIFTS cell.

    PubMed

    Dal Santo, V; Dossi, C; Fusi, A; Psaro, R; Mondelli, C; Recchia, S

    2005-04-30

    A prototype DRIFTS flow reaction chamber was designed and developed in order to find analytical application in the study of heterogeneous catalysts operating at high temperatures under fast transient gas feed conditions. Minimisation of dead-volumes allows gas replacement in 8-10s at 10mLmin(-1) total flow. To overcome problems related to the reactivity of the cell walls under alternating oxidizing/reducing gases, the cell was built with Inconel 600trade mark, which was tested to be very inert even at high temperatures. The sample holder, which was developed to closely resemble a micro plug-flow reactor, poses some problems in terms of heat transfer to the outer body of the cell (limiting then the maximum reachable temperature) and of the correct measurement of the actual sample temperature. These problems were solved with a careful re-design of the upper part of the cell. The second prototype thus derived is able to reach temperatures up to 803K and allows gas replacement in less than 4s at 10mLmin(-1). The cell is inserted in a MCT-FT-IR, which allows to collect high quality spectra with a 1s time-resolution. The downstream flow can be analysed by a quadrupole mass spectrometer equipped with an enclosed source and by a commercial GC. The performances of this prototype cell are presented showing some tests carried out with ceria-zirconia (Ce(x)Zr(1-x)O(2)) catalysts for CO abatement under real operando conditions.

  6. An Analysis of Methanol and Hydrogen Production via High-Temperature Electrolysis Using the Sodium Cooled Advanced Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Shannon M. Bragg-Sitton; Richard D. Boardman; Robert S. Cherry; Wesley R. Deason; Michael G. McKellar

    2014-03-01

    Integration of an advanced, sodium-cooled fast spectrum reactor into nuclear hybrid energy system (NHES) architectures is the focus of the present study. A techno-economic evaluation of several conceptual system designs was performed for the integration of a sodium-cooled Advanced Fast Reactor (AFR) with the electric grid in conjunction with wind-generated electricity. Cases in which excess thermal and electrical energy would be reapportioned within an integrated energy system to a chemical plant are presented. The process applications evaluated include hydrogen production via high temperature steam electrolysis and methanol production via steam methane reforming to produce carbon monoxide and hydrogen which feed a methanol synthesis reactor. Three power cycles were considered for integration with the AFR, including subcritical and supercritical Rankine cycles and a modified supercritical carbon dioxide modified Brayton cycle. The thermal efficiencies of all of the modeled power conversions units were greater than 40%. A thermal efficiency of 42% was adopted in economic studies because two of the cycles either performed at that level or could potentially do so (subcritical Rankine and S-CO2 Brayton). Each of the evaluated hybrid architectures would be technically feasible but would demonstrate a different internal rate of return (IRR) as a function of multiple parameters; all evaluated configurations showed a positive IRR. As expected, integration of an AFR with a chemical plant increases the IRR when “must-take” wind-generated electricity is added to the energy system. Additional dynamic system analyses are recommended to draw detailed conclusions on the feasibility and economic benefits associated with AFR-hybrid energy system operation.

  7. SiC-based neutron detector in quasi-realistic working conditions: efficiency and stability at room and high temperature under fast neutron irradiations

    SciTech Connect

    Ferone, Raffaello; Issa, Fatima; Ottaviani, Laurent; Biondo, Stephane; Vervisch, Vanessa; Szalkai, Dora; Klix, Axel; Vermeeren, Ludo; Saenger, Richard; Lyoussi, Abadallah

    2015-07-01

    In the framework of the European I SMART project, we have designed and made new SiC-based nuclear radiation detectors able to operate in harsh environments and to detect both fast and thermal neutrons. In this paper, we report experimental results of fast neutron irradiation campaign at high temperature (106 deg. C) in quasi-realistic working conditions. Our device does not suffer from high temperature, and spectra do show strong stability, preserving features. These experiments, as well as others in progress, show the I SMART SiC-based device skills to operate in harsh environments, whereas other materials would strongly suffer from degradation. Work is still demanded to test our device at higher temperatures and to enhance efficiency in order to make our device fully exploitable from an industrial point of view. (authors)

  8. High temperature furnace

    DOEpatents

    Borkowski, Casimer J.

    1976-08-03

    A high temperature furnace for use above 2000.degree.C is provided that features fast initial heating and low power consumption at the operating temperature. The cathode is initially heated by joule heating followed by electron emission heating at the operating temperature. The cathode is designed for routine large temperature excursions without being subjected to high thermal stresses. A further characteristic of the device is the elimination of any ceramic components from the high temperature zone of the furnace.

  9. FAST NEUTRON DOSIMETER FOR HIGH TEMPERATURE OPERATION BY MEASUREMENT OF THE AMOUNT OF CESIUM 137 FORMED FROM A THORIUM WIRE

    DOEpatents

    McCune, D.A.

    1964-03-17

    A method and device for measurement of integrated fast neutron flux in the presence of a large thermal neutron field are described. The device comprises a thorium wire surrounded by a thermal neutron attenuator that is, in turn, enclosed by heat-resistant material. The method consists of irradiating the device in a neutron field whereby neutrons with energies in excess of 1.1 Mev cause fast fissions in the thorium, then removing the thorium wire, separating the cesium-137 fission product by chemical means from the thorium, and finally counting the radioactivity of the cesium to determine the number of fissions which have occurred so that the integrated fast flux may be obtained. (AEC)

  10. Invasion of Seawater-Derived Fluids at Very High Temperatures in the Oman Ophiolite - a Key for Cooling the Deep Crust at Fast-Spreading Ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koepke, J.; Mueller, T.; Linsler, S.; Schuth, S.; Garbe-Schoenberg, C. D.; McCaig, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    Prominent conceptual models for the formation of the deep, fast-spread crust are the "gabbro-glacier" model, where the lower crust is formed in the axial melt lens, and the "sheeted sill" model, where the lower gabbros are generated by the intrusion of sills of gabbroic mushes. A requirement for the latter model is a substantial hydrothermal cooling of the oceanic crust in the depth, and as long as the "Rosetta stone" for the mechanism of this deep cooling is not found, the "sheeted sill" model and derivatives cannot be accepted as reliable option how the deep oceanic fast-spread crust is formed. In recent field campaigns for establishing a geochemical and petrological profile through typical fast-spreading oceanic crust in the Wadi Gideah (Wadi Tayin massif, Oman ophiolite), we discovered several, often more than 100 m wide fault zones, cutting a coherent series of layered gabbro at many places. These zones are characterized by pervasive alteration, mainly in greenschist and sub-greenschist facies. Isotope geochemical studies of these zones imply that these zones can be interpreted as pathways for channeled hydrothermal flux, in accord with observations of Coogan et al. (2006). In most of the fault zones, we observed the occurrence of varitextured hornblende gabbro, alternating with zones of former layered gabbros showing intense overgrowth of high- temperature amphibole, and sometimes with flasered amphibolites. The petrologic record implies fluid flux in the center of this zones at very high temperatures (≤ 1000°C), enabling even the production of hornblende gabbros by hydrous partial melting of layered gabbro, shielded by zones formed at high-temperature conditions (formation of high-T amphiboles) and at low-temperature conditions (greenschist facies rocks). First thermal modeling based on the petrological record of these zones are in progress. Coogan LA, Howard KA, Gillis KM, Bickle MJ, Chapman H, Boyce AJ, Jenkin GRT, Wilson RN (2006) Am. J. Sci. 306: 389-427

  11. Braze Alloy Development for Fast Epitaxial High-Temperature Brazing of Single-Crystalline Nickel-Based Superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laux, B.; Piegert, S.; Rösler, J.

    2009-01-01

    For the repair of single-crystalline turbine components, fabricated from nickel-based superalloys, a new high-temperature brazing technology has been developed. Cracks in single-crystalline parts can be repaired by reproducing the single-crystalline microstructure over the complete gap width within very short brazing times. Nickel-manganese-based alloys were identified as systems that provide very high, epitaxial solidification rates. In contrast to commonly used braze alloys, such as nickel-boron or nickel-silicon systems, the process is not completely diffusion controlled but works with consolute systems. For brazing experiments 300- μm-wide parallel gaps as well as V-shaped gaps with a maximum width of 250 μm were used. A complete epitaxial solidification, that is, the absence of large-angle grain boundaries, could be achieved within brazing times, being up to 100 times shorter compared to commonly used transient-liquid-phase bonding technologies. To quantify the misorientation relative to the base material and the composition within and near the filled gaps, the results of the brazing experiments were visualized by means of light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Furthermore, electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analyses and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analyses were conducted.

  12. Fast-growing oysters show reduced capacity to provide a thermal refuge to intertidal biodiversity at high temperatures.

    PubMed

    McAfee, Dominic; O'Connor, Wayne A; Bishop, Melanie J

    2017-09-15

    Ecosystem engineers that modify the thermal environment experienced by associated organisms might assist in the climate change adaptation of species. This depends on the ability of ecosystem engineers to persist and continue to ameliorate thermal stress under changing climatic conditions-traits that may display significant intraspecific variation. In the physically stressful intertidal, the complex three-dimensional structure of oysters provides shading and traps moisture during aerial exposure at low tide. We assessed variation in the capacity of a faster- and slower-growing population of the Sydney Rock Oyster, Saccostrea glomerata, to persist, form three-dimensional structure and provide a cool microhabitat to invertebrates under warmer conditions. The two populations of oysters were exposed to a temperature gradient in the field by attaching them to passively warmed white, grey and black stone pavers and their growth, survivorship and colonisation by invertebrates was monitored over a 12-month period. Oysters displayed a trade-off between fast growth and thermal tolerance. The growth advantage of the fast-growing population diminished with increasing substrate temperature, and at higher temperatures, the faster-growing oysters suffered greater mortality, formed less habitat, and were consequently less effective at ameliorating low-tide air temperature extremes than slower-growing oysters. The greater survivorship of slower-growing oysters, in turn, produced a cooler microclimate which fed back to further bolster oyster survivorship. Invertebrate recruitment increased with habitat cover and was greater among the slower than the faster-growing population. Our results show that the capacity of ecosystem engineers to serve as microhabitat refugia to associated organisms in a warming climate displays marked intraspecific variation. Our study also adds to growing evidence that fast growth may come at the expense of thermal tolerance. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of

  13. High-temperature behavior of dicesium molybdate Cs{sub 2}MoO{sub 4}: Implications for fast neutron reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Wallez, Gilles; Raison, Philippe E.; Smith, Anna L.; Clavier, Nicolas

    2014-07-01

    Dicesium molybdate (Cs{sub 2}MoO{sub 4})'s thermal expansion and crystal structure have been investigated herein by high temperature X ray diffraction in conjunction with Raman spectroscopy. This first crystal-chemical insight at high temperature is aimed at predicting the thermostructural and thermomechanical behavior of this oxide formed by the accumulation of Cs and Mo fission products at the periphery of nuclear fuel rods in sodium-cooled fast reactors. Within the temperature range of the fuel's rim, Cs{sub 2}MoO{sub 4} becomes hexagonal P6{sub 3}/mmc, with disordered MoO{sub 4} tetrahedra and 2D distribution of Cs–O bonds that makes thermal axial expansion both large (50≤α{sub l}≤70 10{sup −6} °C{sup −1}, 500–800 °C) and highly anisotropic (α{sub c}−α{sub a}=67×10{sup −6} °C{sup −1}, hexagonal form). The difference with the fuel's expansion coefficient is of potential concern with respect to the cohesion of the Cs{sub 2}MoO{sub 4} surface film and the possible release of cesium radionuclides in accidental situations. - Graphical abstract: The weakness of the Cs–O bonds and the disordering of the MoO{sub 4} tetrahedra array in the high-temperature form are responsible for the huge thermal expansion of Cs{sub 2}MoO{sub 4} along the c-axis. - Highlights: • Thermomechanical behavior of Cs{sub 2}MoO{sub 4} fission products compound is studied. • High-temperature form of Cs{sub 2}MoO{sub 4} is characterized by XRD and Raman. • Thermal expansion appears very high and anisotropic. • Cohesion between Cs{sub 2}MoO{sub 4} and nuclear fuel seems questionable, and Cs release is expected.

  14. A long life in the fast lane: positive association between peak metabolic rate and lifespan in a butterfly.

    PubMed

    Niitepõld, Kristjan; Hanski, Ilkka

    2013-04-15

    High peak metabolic rates may provide a performance advantage, but it may also entail a physiological cost. A long-held assumption is that high mass-specific energy expenditure is associated with short lifespan. To examine the relationship between energy expenditure and lifespan we asked two questions. First, do individuals have a consistent rate of metabolism throughout their life? Second, is metabolic rate correlated with lifespan? We analysed the repeatability of measurements of resting (RMR) and peak flight metabolic rate (MR(peak)) throughout the life of the Glanville fritillary butterfly (Melitaea cinxia). Measurements of MR(peak) showed significant repeatability. Senescence occurred only shortly before death. RMR showed a U-shaped relationship with age and very low repeatability. Intraspecific association between metabolic rates and lifespan was tested under three conditions: in the laboratory, under field conditions and in a laboratory experiment with repeated flight treatments. There was a significant correlation between MR(peak) and lifespan in all three experiments, but the correlation was positive, not negative. RMR was not correlated with lifespan. Both MR(peak) and lifespan may reflect physiological condition and therefore be positively correlated. Individuals with a large resource pool may be able to invest in mechanisms that slow down ageing. Individuals with high metabolic capacity may also possess adaptations against ageing. Molecular polymorphism in the gene phosphoglucose isomerase (Pgi) was significantly associated with both MR(peak) and lifespan, and may have coevolved with defence mechanisms against senescence. Generalisations such as 'live fast, die young' may be too simple to explain the complex processes affecting ageing and lifespan.

  15. Curriculum in the Fast Lane.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrix, Laura

    2003-01-01

    Describes the Electric Vehicle Education Program (EVEP) validated by the Georgia Department of Education and evaluated by the University of Georgia. Discusses the potential for the curriculum and training program and the program's impact on students and communities. (KHR)

  16. Curriculum in the Fast Lane.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrix, Laura

    2003-01-01

    Describes the Electric Vehicle Education Program (EVEP) validated by the Georgia Department of Education and evaluated by the University of Georgia. Discusses the potential for the curriculum and training program and the program's impact on students and communities. (KHR)

  17. Authors in the Fast Lane!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Follos, Alison M. G.; Rubin, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    This article introduces various writers, including Laurie Halse Anderson, Linda Sue Park, Richard Peck, James Patterson, and Charles R. Smith, Jr., who will give their presentations at the 2009 American Association of School Librarians (AASL) National Conference & Exhibition in Charlotte. This November the AASL National Conference and…

  18. Fast fabrication of self-ordered anodic porous alumina on oriented aluminum grains by high acid concentration and high temperature anodization.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chuan; Ngan, Alfonso H W

    2013-05-31

    Anodic porous alumina, which exhibits a characteristic nanohoneycomb structure, has been used in a wide range of nanotechnology applications. The conventional fabrication method of mild anodization (MA) requires a prolonged anodization time which is impractical for batch processing, and self-ordered porous structures can only be formed within narrow processing windows so that the dimensions of the resultant structures are extremely limited. The alternative hard anodization (HA) may easily result in macroscopic defects on the alumina surface. In this work, by systematically varying the anodization conditions including the substrate grain orientation, electrolyte concentration, temperature, voltage, and time, a new oxalic acid based anodization method, called high acid concentration and high temperature anodization (HHA), is found, which can result in far better self-ordering of the porous structures at rates 7-26 times faster than MA, under a continuous voltage range of 30-60 V on (001) oriented Al grains. Unlike HA, no macroscopic defects appear under the optimum self-ordered conditions of HHA at 40 V, even for pore channels grown up to high aspect ratios of more than 3000. Compared to MA and HA, HHA provides more choices of self-ordered nano-porous structures with fast and mechanically stable formation features for practical applications.

  19. High-temperature fast-flow-reactor kinetics study of the reaction AlO + CO/sub 2/. -->. AlO/sub 2/ + CO. Thermochemical implications

    SciTech Connect

    Rogowski, D.F.; English, A.J.; Fontijn, A.

    1986-04-10

    The title reaction has been studied in a high-temperature fast-flow reactor (HTFFR) at temperatures from 500 to 1300 K. Laser-induced fluorescence was used to monitor relative (AlO). k(T) was determined to be (2.5 +/- 1.3) x 10/sup -14/ exp((400 +/- 280)/T) cm/sup 3/ molecule/sup -1/ s/sup -1/ (confidence level > 95%). The reaction probably proceeds via an intermediate complex which preferentially dissociates to the reactants. The negative activation energy implies D(O-AlO) greater than or equal to D(O-CO) = 127 kcal mol/sup -1/, which is incompatible with the O-AlO dissociation energy obtained for AlO/sub 2/ from Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ evaporation-mass spectrometry studies. It is argued that the latter AlO/sub 2/ may have a different structure from that of the present work. 19 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  20. NVESD mine lane facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habersat, James D.; Marshall, Christopher; Maksymonko, George

    2003-09-01

    The NVESD Mine Lane Facility has recently undergone an extensive renovation. It now consists of an indoor, dry lane portion, a greenhouse portion with moisture-controlled lanes, a control room, and two outdoor lanes. The indoor structure contains six mine lanes, each approximately 2.5m (width) × 1.2m (depth) × 33m(length). These lanes contain six different soil types: magnetite/sand, silt, crusher run gravel (bluestone gravel), bank run gravel (tan gravel), red clay, and white sand. An automated trolley system is used for mounting the various mine detection systems and sensors under test. Data acquisition and data logging is fully automated. The greenhouse structure was added to provide moisture controlled lanes for measuring the effect of moisture on sensor effectiveness. A gantry type crane was installed to permit remotely controlled positioning of a sensor package over any portion of the greenhouse lanes at elevations from ground level up to 5m without shadowing the target area. The roof of the greenhouse is motorized, and can be rolled back to allow full solar loading. A control room overlooking the lanes is complete with recording and monitoring devices and contains controls to operate the trolleys. A facility overview is presented and typical results from recent data collection exercises are presented.

  1. Field measurement analysis to validate lane-changing behavior in a cellular automaton model.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Eriko; Tanimoto, Jun; Iwamura, Yoshiro; Nakamura, Kosuke; Mitsuhiro Akimoto

    2016-11-01

    In the present study, we analyzed field measurement data obtained for a Japanese expressway and used it as a data set for the validation of microscopic simulation models. Consequently, in accordance with previous studies, we confirmed the common features depicted by the fundamental diagram (flux vs density relation) and lane-usage ratio vs density diagram. We found two things regarding lane-changing behavior: (1) a lane change occurs asymmetrically, where a lane change from a slow to a fast lane differs from that from a fast to a slow lane; and (2) the so-called incentive criterion in the case of small gaps between the preceding vehicles in both slow and fast lanes refers to the velocities and /or the relative velocities with respect to the preceding vehicles, whereas that for relatively large gaps refers to the distances to the preceding vehicles is cast into the above incentive criterion in addition to the two factors mentioned above.

  2. Field measurement analysis to validate lane-changing behavior in a cellular automaton model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Eriko; Tanimoto, Jun; Iwamura, Yoshiro; Nakamura, Kosuke; Mitsuhiro Akimoto

    2016-11-01

    In the present study, we analyzed field measurement data obtained for a Japanese expressway and used it as a data set for the validation of microscopic simulation models. Consequently, in accordance with previous studies, we confirmed the common features depicted by the fundamental diagram (flux vs density relation) and lane-usage ratio vs density diagram. We found two things regarding lane-changing behavior: (1) a lane change occurs asymmetrically, where a lane change from a slow to a fast lane differs from that from a fast to a slow lane; and (2) the so-called incentive criterion in the case of small gaps between the preceding vehicles in both slow and fast lanes refers to the velocities and /or the relative velocities with respect to the preceding vehicles, whereas that for relatively large gaps refers to the distances to the preceding vehicles is cast into the above incentive criterion in addition to the two factors mentioned above.

  3. On the morphology of dust lanes in galactic bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Menguiano, L.; Pérez, I.; Zurita, A.; Martínez-Valpuesta, I.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Sánchez, S. F.; Comerón, S.; Díaz-García, S.

    2015-07-01

    The aim of our study is to use dynamical simulations to explore the influence of two important dynamical bar parameters, bar strength and bar pattern speed on the shape of the bar dust lanes. To quantify the shape of the dust lanes we have developed a new systematic method to measure the dust lane curvature. Previous numerical simulations have compared the curvature of bar dust lanes with the bar strength, predicting a relation between both parameters which has been supported by observational studies but with a large spread. We take into account the bar pattern speed to explore, simultaneously, the effect of both parameters on the dust lane shape. To that end, we separate our galactic bars in fast bars (1 < {R} < 1.4 ) and slow bars ({R} > 1.4 ), obtaining, as previous simulations, an inverse relation between the dust lane curvature and the bar strength for fast bars. For the first time, we extend the study to slow bars, finding a constant curvature as a function of the bar strength. As a result, we conclude that weak bars with straight dust lanes are candidates for slow bars. Finally, we have analysed a pilot sample of 10 S4G galaxies, obtaining dust lane curvatures lying within the range covered by the simulations.

  4. High temperature reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulera, I. V.; Sinha, R. K.

    2008-12-01

    With the advent of high temperature reactors, nuclear energy, in addition to producing electricity, has shown enormous potential for the production of alternate transport energy carrier such as hydrogen. High efficiency hydrogen production processes need process heat at temperatures around 1173-1223 K. Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), is currently developing concepts of high temperature reactors capable of supplying process heat around 1273 K. These reactors would provide energy to facilitate combined production of hydrogen, electricity, and drinking water. Compact high temperature reactor is being developed as a technology demonstrator for associated technologies. Design has been also initiated for a 600 MWth innovative high temperature reactor. High temperature reactor development programme has opened new avenues for research in areas like advanced nuclear fuels, high temperature and corrosion resistant materials and protective coatings, heavy liquid metal coolant technologies, etc. The paper highlights design of these reactors and their material related requirements.

  5. High-temperature thermodynamics.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margrave, J. L.

    1967-01-01

    High temperature thermodynamics requiring species and phases identification, crystal structures, molecular geometries and vibrational, rotational and electronic energy levels and equilibrium constants

  6. High temperature superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Maw-Kuen

    1987-01-01

    The two principle objectives are to develop materials that superconduct at higher temperatures and to better understand the mechanisms behind high temperature superconductivity. Experiments on the thermal reaction, structure, and physical properties of materials that exhibit superconductivity at high temperatures are discussed.

  7. High temperature sensor

    DOEpatents

    Tokarz, Richard D.

    1982-01-01

    A high temperature sensor includes a pair of electrical conductors separated by a mass of electrical insulating material. The insulating material has a measurable resistivity within the sensor that changes in relation to the temperature of the insulating material within a high temperature range (1,000 to 2,000 K.). When required, the sensor can be encased within a ceramic protective coating.

  8. LANES - LOCAL AREA NETWORK EXTENSIBLE SIMULATOR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, J.

    1994-01-01

    The Local Area Network Extensible Simulator (LANES) provides a method for simulating the performance of high speed local area network (LAN) technology. LANES was developed as a design and analysis tool for networking on board the Space Station. The load, network, link and physical layers of a layered network architecture are all modeled. LANES models to different lower-layer protocols, the Fiber Distributed Data Interface (FDDI) and the Star*Bus. The load and network layers are included in the model as a means of introducing upper-layer processing delays associated with message transmission; they do not model any particular protocols. FDDI is an American National Standard and an International Organization for Standardization (ISO) draft standard for a 100 megabit-per-second fiber-optic token ring. Specifications for the LANES model of FDDI are taken from the Draft Proposed American National Standard FDDI Token Ring Media Access Control (MAC), document number X3T9.5/83-16 Rev. 10, February 28, 1986. This is a mature document describing the FDDI media-access-control protocol. Star*Bus, also known as the Fiber Optic Demonstration System, is a protocol for a 100 megabit-per-second fiber-optic star-topology LAN. This protocol, along with a hardware prototype, was developed by Sperry Corporation under contract to NASA Goddard Space Flight Center as a candidate LAN protocol for the Space Station. LANES can be used to analyze performance of a networking system based on either FDDI or Star*Bus under a variety of loading conditions. Delays due to upper-layer processing can easily be nullified, allowing analysis of FDDI or Star*Bus as stand-alone protocols. LANES is a parameter-driven simulation; it provides considerable flexibility in specifying both protocol an run-time parameters. Code has been optimized for fast execution and detailed tracing facilities have been included. LANES was written in FORTRAN 77 for implementation on a DEC VAX under VMS 4.6. It consists of two

  9. LANES - LOCAL AREA NETWORK EXTENSIBLE SIMULATOR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, J.

    1994-01-01

    The Local Area Network Extensible Simulator (LANES) provides a method for simulating the performance of high speed local area network (LAN) technology. LANES was developed as a design and analysis tool for networking on board the Space Station. The load, network, link and physical layers of a layered network architecture are all modeled. LANES models to different lower-layer protocols, the Fiber Distributed Data Interface (FDDI) and the Star*Bus. The load and network layers are included in the model as a means of introducing upper-layer processing delays associated with message transmission; they do not model any particular protocols. FDDI is an American National Standard and an International Organization for Standardization (ISO) draft standard for a 100 megabit-per-second fiber-optic token ring. Specifications for the LANES model of FDDI are taken from the Draft Proposed American National Standard FDDI Token Ring Media Access Control (MAC), document number X3T9.5/83-16 Rev. 10, February 28, 1986. This is a mature document describing the FDDI media-access-control protocol. Star*Bus, also known as the Fiber Optic Demonstration System, is a protocol for a 100 megabit-per-second fiber-optic star-topology LAN. This protocol, along with a hardware prototype, was developed by Sperry Corporation under contract to NASA Goddard Space Flight Center as a candidate LAN protocol for the Space Station. LANES can be used to analyze performance of a networking system based on either FDDI or Star*Bus under a variety of loading conditions. Delays due to upper-layer processing can easily be nullified, allowing analysis of FDDI or Star*Bus as stand-alone protocols. LANES is a parameter-driven simulation; it provides considerable flexibility in specifying both protocol an run-time parameters. Code has been optimized for fast execution and detailed tracing facilities have been included. LANES was written in FORTRAN 77 for implementation on a DEC VAX under VMS 4.6. It consists of two

  10. The flexible asymmetric shock tube (FAST): a Ludwieg tube facility for wave propagation measurements in high-temperature vapours of organic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathijssen, T.; Gallo, M.; Casati, E.; Nannan, N. R.; Zamfirescu, C.; Guardone, A.; Colonna, P.

    2015-10-01

    This paper describes the commissioning of the flexible asymmetric shock tube (FAST), a novel Ludwieg tube-type facility designed and built at Delft University of Technology, together with the results of preliminary experiments. The FAST is conceived to measure the velocity of waves propagating in dense vapours of organic fluids, in the so-called non-ideal compressible fluid dynamics (NICFD) regime, and can operate at pressures and temperatures as high as 21 bar and 400°C, respectively. The set-up is equipped with a special fast-opening valve, separating the high-pressure charge tube from the low-pressure plenum. When the valve is opened, a wave propagates into the charge tube. The wave speed is measured using a time-of-flight technique employing four pressure transducers placed at known distances from each other. The first tests led to the following results: (1) the leakage rate of 5 × {10}^{-4} {mbar l s^{-1}} for subatmospheric and 5 × {10}^{-2} {mbar l s^{-1}} for a superatmospheric pressure is compatible with the purpose of the conceived experiments, (2) the process start-up time of the valve has been found to be between 2.1 and 9.0 ms, (3) preliminary rarefaction wave experiments in the dense vapour of siloxane {D}_6 (dodecamethylcyclohexasiloxane, an organic fluid) were successfully accomplished up to temperatures of 300°C, and (4) a method for the estimation of the speed of sound from wave propagation experiments is proposed. Results are found to be within 2.1 % of accurate model predictions for various gases. The method is then applied to estimate the speed of sound of {D}_6 in the NICFD regime.

  11. Can high-temperature, high-heat flux hydrothermal vent fields be explained by thermal convection in the lower crust along fast-spreading Mid-Ocean Ridges?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontaine, Fabrice J.; Rabinowicz, M.; Cannat, M.

    2017-05-01

    We present numerical models to explore possible couplings along the axis of fast-spreading ridges, between hydrothermal convection in the upper crust and magmatic flow in the lower crust. In an end-member category of models corresponding to effective viscosities μM lower than 1013 Pa.s in a melt-rich lower crustal along-axis corridor and permeability k not exceeding ˜10-16 m2 in the upper crust, the hot, melt-rich, gabbroic lower crust convects as a viscous fluid, with convection rolls parallel to the ridge axis. In these models, we show that the magmatic-hydrothermal interface settles at realistic depths for fast ridges, i.e., 1-2 km below seafloor. Convection cells in both horizons are strongly coupled and kilometer-wide hydrothermal upflows/plumes, spaced by 8-10 km, arise on top of the magmatic upflows. Such magmatic-hydrothermal convective couplings may explain the distribution of vent fields along the East (EPR) and South-East Pacific Rise (SEPR). The lower crustal plumes deliver melt locally at the top of the magmatic horizon possibly explaining the observed distribution of melt-rich regions/pockets in the axial melt lenses of EPR and SEPR. Crystallization of this melt provides the necessary latent heat to sustain permanent ˜100 MW vents fields. Our models also contribute to current discussions on how the lower crust forms at fast ridges: they provide a possible mechanism for focused transport of melt-rich crystal mushes from moho level to the axial melt lens where they further crystallize, feed eruptions, and are transported both along and off-axis to produce the lower crust.

  12. High-Temperature Superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Johnson

    2008-11-05

    Like astronomers tweaking images to gain a more detailed glimpse of distant stars, physicists at Brookhaven National Laboratory have found ways to sharpen images of the energy spectra in high-temperature superconductors — materials that carry electrical c

  13. High-temperature electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matus, Lawrence G.; Seng, Gary T.

    1990-01-01

    To meet the needs of the aerospace propulsion and space power communities, the high temperature electronics program at the Lewis Research Center is developing silicon carbide (SiC) as a high temperature semiconductor material. This program supports a major element of the Center's mission - to perform basic and developmental research aimed at improving aerospace propulsion systems. Research is focused on developing the crystal growth, characterization, and device fabrication technologies necessary to produce a family of SiC devices.

  14. High Temperature Semiconductor Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    A sputtering deposition system capable of depositing large areas of high temperature superconducting materials was developed by CVC Products, Inc. with the support of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory SBIR (Small Business Innovative Research) program. The system was devleoped for NASA to produce high quality films of high temperature superconducting material for microwave communication system components. The system is also being used to deposit ferroelectric material for capacitors and the development of new electro-optical materials.2002103899

  15. High-temperature sensor

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1981-01-29

    A high temperature sensor is described which includes a pair of electrical conductors separated by a mass of electrical insulating material. The insulating material has a measurable resistivity within the sensor that changes in relation to the temperature of the insulating material within a high temperature range (1000 to 2000/sup 0/K). When required, the sensor can be encased within a ceramic protective coating.

  16. High temperature refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Steyert, Jr., William A.

    1978-01-01

    A high temperature magnetic refrigerator which uses a Stirling-like cycle in which rotating magnetic working material is heated in zero field and adiabatically magnetized, cooled in high field, then adiabatically demagnetized. During this cycle said working material is in heat exchange with a pumped fluid which absorbs heat from a low temperature heat source and deposits heat in a high temperature reservoir. The magnetic refrigeration cycle operates at an efficiency 70% of Carnot.

  17. High temperature pressure gauge

    DOEpatents

    Echtler, J. Paul; Scandrol, Roy O.

    1981-01-01

    A high temperature pressure gauge comprising a pressure gauge positioned in fluid communication with one end of a conduit which has a diaphragm mounted in its other end. The conduit is filled with a low melting metal alloy above the diaphragm for a portion of its length with a high temperature fluid being positioned in the remaining length of the conduit and in the pressure gauge.

  18. Three-lane changing behaviour simulation using a modified optimal velocity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Wei; Song, Wei-guo; Fang, Zhi-ming

    2011-06-01

    In real urban traffic, roadways are usually multilane and are divided into fast, medium and slow lanes according to different velocity restrictions. Microscopic modelling of single lane has been studied widely using discrete cellular automata and continuous optimal velocity models. In this paper, we extend the continuous single-lane models (OV model and FVD model) to simulate the lane-changing behaviour on an urban roadway that consists of three lanes. Considering headway difference, velocity difference, safety distance, and the probability of lane-changing intention, a comprehensive lane-changing rule set is constructed. We analyse the fundamental diagram and reveal the “faster-is-slower” effect in urban traffic induced by lane-changing behaviour. We also investigate the effect of lane-changing behaviour on the distribution of vehicles, velocity, flow and headway. Asymmetrical phenomenon with symmetrical rules on urban roadway and density inversion on the slow lane were also found. The simulation results indicate that lane-changing behaviour is not advisable on crowded urban roadway. It is hoped that information from this study may be useful for traffic control and individual moving strategy on urban roadway.

  19. Development of a fuel-rod simulator and small-diameter thermocouples for high-temperature, high-heat-flux tests in the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor Core Flow Test Loop

    SciTech Connect

    McCulloch, R.W.; MacPherson, R.E.

    1983-03-01

    The Core Flow Test Loop was constructed to perform many of the safety, core design, and mechanical interaction tests in support of the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR) using electrically heated fuel rod simulators (FRSs). Operation includes many off-normal or postulated accident sequences including transient, high-power, and high-temperature operation. The FRS was developed to survive: (1) hundreds of hours of operation at 200 W/cm/sup 2/, 1000/sup 0/C cladding temperature, and (2) 40 h at 40 W/cm/sup 2/, 1200/sup 0/C cladding temperature. Six 0.5-mm type K sheathed thermocouples were placed inside the FRS cladding to measure steady-state and transient temperatures through clad melting at 1370/sup 0/C.

  20. Ship interaction in narrow water channels: A two-lane cellular automata approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhuo; Chen, Zhonglong; Hu, Hongtao; Zheng, Jianfeng

    2015-08-01

    In narrow waterways, closed ships might interact due to hydrodynamic forces. To avoid clashes, different lane-changing rules are required. In this paper, a two-lane cellular automata model is proposed to investigate the traffic flow patterns in narrow water channels. Numerical experiments show that ship interaction can form "lumps" in traffic flow which will significantly depress the flux. We suggest that the lane-changing frequency of fast ships should be limited.

  1. High-Temperature Superconductivity

    ScienceCinema

    Peter Johnson

    2016-07-12

    Like astronomers tweaking images to gain a more detailed glimpse of distant stars, physicists at Brookhaven National Laboratory have found ways to sharpen images of the energy spectra in high-temperature superconductors — materials that carry electrical c

  2. High temperature storage loop :

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, David Dennis; Kolb, William J.

    2013-07-01

    A three year plan for thermal energy storage (TES) research was created at Sandia National Laboratories in the spring of 2012. This plan included a strategic goal of providing test capability for Sandia and for the nation in which to evaluate high temperature storage (>650ÀC) technology. The plan was to scope, design, and build a flow loop that would be compatible with a multitude of high temperature heat transfer/storage fluids. The High Temperature Storage Loop (HTSL) would be reconfigurable so that it was useful for not only storage testing, but also for high temperature receiver testing and high efficiency power cycle testing as well. In that way, HTSL was part of a much larger strategy for Sandia to provide a research and testing platform that would be integral for the evaluation of individual technologies funded under the SunShot program. DOEs SunShot program seeks to reduce the price of solar technologies to 6/kWhr to be cost competitive with carbon-based fuels. The HTSL project sought to provide evaluation capability for these SunShot supported technologies. This report includes the scoping, design, and budgetary costing aspects of this effort

  3. High temperature electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seng, Gary T.

    1991-03-01

    In recent years, the aerospace propulsion and space power communities have acknowledged a growing need for electronic devices that are capable of sustained high-temperature operation. Aeropropulsion applications for high-temperature electronic devices include engine ground test instrumentation such as multiplexers, analog-to-digital converters, and telemetry systems capable of withstanding hot section engine temperatures in excess of 600 C. Uncooled operation of control and condition monitoring systems in advanced supersonic aircraft would subject the electronics to temperatures in excess of 300 C. Similarly, engine-mounted integrated electronic sensors could reach temperatures which exceed 500 C. In addition to aeronautics, there are many other areas that could benefit from the existence of high-temperature electronic devices. Space applications include power electronic devices for space platforms and satellites. Since power electronics require radiators to shed waste heat, electronic devices that operate at higher temperatures would allow a reduction in radiator size. Terrestrial applications include deep-well drilling instrumentation, high power electronics, and nuclear reactor instrumentation and control. To meet the needs of the applications mentioned previously, the high-temperature electronics (HTE) program at the Lewis Research Center is developing silicon carbide (SiC) as a high-temperature semiconductor material. Research is focused on developing the crystal growth, growth modeling, characterization, and device fabrication technologies necessary to produce a family of SiC devices. Interest in SiC has grown dramatically in recent years due to solid advances in the technology. Much research remains to be performed, but SiC appears ready to emerge as a useful semiconductor material.

  4. Living in the Fast Lane: Evidence for a Global Perceptual Timing Deficit in Childhood ADHD Caused by Distinct but Partially Overlapping Task-Dependent Cognitive Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Marx, Ivo; Weirich, Steffen; Berger, Christoph; Herpertz, Sabine C.; Cohrs, Stefan; Wandschneider, Roland; Höppner, Jacqueline; Häßler, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Dysfunctions in perceptual timing have been reported in children with ADHD, but so far only from studies that have not used the whole set of timing paradigms available from the literature, with the diversity of findings complicating the development of a unified model of timing dysfunctions and its determinants in ADHD. Therefore, we employed a comprehensive set of paradigms (time discrimination, time estimation, time production, and time reproduction) in order to explore the perceptual timing deficit profile in our ADHD sample. Moreover, we aimed to detect predictors responsible for timing task performance deficits in children with ADHD and how the timing deficits might be positively affected by methylphenidate. Male children with ADHD and healthy control children, all aged between 8 and 13 years, participated in this longitudinal study with three experimental sessions, where children with ADHD were medicated with methylphenidate at the second session but discontinued their medication at the remaining sessions. The results of our study reveal that children with ADHD were impaired in all timing tasks, arguing for a general perceptual timing deficit in ADHD. In doing so, our predictor analyses support the notion that distinct but partially overlapping cognitive mechanisms might exist for discriminating, estimating/producing, and reproducing time intervals. In this sense, working memory deficits in terms of an abnormally fast internal counting process might be common to dysfunctions in the time estimation/time production tasks and in the time reproduction task, with attention deficits (e.g., in terms of disruptions of the counting process) additionally contributing to time estimation/time production deficits and motivational alterations additionally contributing to time reproduction deficits. Methylphenidate did not significantly alter performance of the ADHD sample, presumably due to limited statistical power of our study. The findings of our study demonstrate a

  5. High Temperature Thermosets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, Paul M.

    1999-01-01

    A thermoset or network polymer is an organic material where the molecules are tied together through chemical bonds (crosslinks) and therefore they cannot move past one another. As a result, these materials exhibit a certain degree of dimensional stability. The chemical composition and the degree of crosslink density of the thermoset have a pronounced effect upon the properties. High temperature thermosets offer a favorable combination of properties that makes them attractive for many applications. Their most important features are the excellent processability particularly of the low molecular weight precusor forms, the chemical and solvent resistance and the dimensional stability. The market for high temperature thermosets will increase as new uses for them are uncovered and new thermosets with better combinations of properties are developed.

  6. High temperature future

    SciTech Connect

    Sheinkopf, K.

    1994-09-01

    During the past few years, there have been dramatic accomplishments and success of high temperature solar thermal systems and significant development of these systems. High temperature technologies, about 500 F and higher, such as dish engines, troughs, central receiver power towers and solar process heat systems, have been tested, demonstrated and used in an array of applications, including many cost-effective utility bulk power production and demand side supply projects in the United States. Large systems provide power and hot water to prisons, schools, nursing homes and other institutions. Joint ventures with industry, utility projects, laboratory design assistance and other activities are building a solid industry of US solar thermal systems ready for use today.

  7. High-Temperature Lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    In the early 1980's, Lewis Research Center began a program to develop high-temperature lubricants for use on future aircraft flying at three or more times the speed of sound, which can result in vehicle skin temperatures as high as 1,600 degrees Fahrenheit. A material that emerged from this research is a plasma-sprayed, self-lubricating metal- glass-fluoride coating able to reduce oxidation at very high temperatures. Technology is now in commercial use under the trade name Surf-Kote C-800, marketed by Hohman Plating and Manufacturing Inc. and manufactured under a patent license from NASA. Among its uses are lubrication for sliding contact bearings, shaft seals for turbopumps, piston rings for high performance compressors and hot glass processing machinery; it is also widely used in missile and space applications.

  8. High Temperature ESP Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Jack Booker; Brindesh Dhruva

    2011-06-20

    The objective of the High Temperature ESP Monitoring project was to develop a downhole monitoring system to be used in wells with bottom hole well temperatures up to 300°C for measuring motor temperature, formation pressure, and formation temperature. These measurements are used to monitor the health of the ESP motor, to track the downhole operating conditions, and to optimize the pump operation. A 220 ºC based High Temperature ESP Monitoring system was commercially released for sale with Schlumberger ESP motors April of 2011 and a 250 ºC system with will be commercially released at the end of Q2 2011. The measurement system is now fully qualified, except for the sensor, at 300 °C.

  9. High temperature probe

    DOEpatents

    Swan, Raymond A.

    1994-01-01

    A high temperature probe for sampling, for example, smokestack fumes, and is able to withstand temperatures of 3000.degree. F. The probe is constructed so as to prevent leakage via the seal by placing the seal inside the water jacket whereby the seal is not exposed to high temperature, which destroys the seal. The sample inlet of the probe is also provided with cooling fins about the area of the seal to provide additional cooling to prevent the seal from being destroyed. Also, a heated jacket is provided for maintaining the temperature of the gas being tested as it passes through the probe. The probe includes pressure sensing means for determining the flow velocity of an efficient being sampled. In addition, thermocouples are located in various places on the probe to monitor the temperature of the gas passing there through.

  10. HIGH TEMPERATURE THERMOCOUPLE

    DOEpatents

    Eshayu, A.M.

    1963-02-12

    This invention contemplates a high temperature thermocouple for use in an inert or a reducing atmosphere. The thermocouple limbs are made of rhenium and graphite and these limbs are connected at their hot ends in compressed removable contact. The rhenium and graphite are of high purity and are substantially stable and free from diffusion into each other even without shielding. Also, the graphite may be thick enough to support the thermocouple in a gas stream. (AEC)

  11. High-temperature superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, G.

    1992-01-01

    Review of conventional superconductors. Structures. Normal-state properties. Superconducting properties. Vortex behavior, J[sub c], and applications. Index. An introductory presentation of high-temperature superconductivity, with emphasis on the experimental approach. Intended as a supplementary text for undergraduate solid state physics courses, assumes some background in physics and applicable technologies. Chapters contain unsolved problems. Bibliography and chapter notes appear at end of text.

  12. High Temperature Capacitor Development

    SciTech Connect

    John Kosek

    2009-06-30

    The absence of high-temperature electronics is an obstacle to the development of untapped energy resources (deep oil, gas and geothermal). US natural gas consumption is projected to grow from 22 trillion cubic feet per year (tcf) in 1999 to 34 tcf in 2020. Cumulatively this is 607 tcf of consumption by 2020, while recoverable reserves using current technology are 177 tcf. A significant portion of this shortfall may be met by tapping deep gas reservoirs. Tapping these reservoirs represents a significant technical challenge. At these depths, temperatures and pressures are very high and may require penetrating very hard rock. Logistics of supporting 6.1 km (20,000 ft) drill strings and the drilling processes are complex and expensive. At these depths up to 50% of the total drilling cost may be in the last 10% of the well depth. Thus, as wells go deeper it is increasingly important that drillers are able to monitor conditions down-hole such as temperature, pressure, heading, etc. Commercial off-the-shelf electronics are not specified to meet these operating conditions. This is due to problems associated with all aspects of the electronics including the resistors and capacitors. With respect to capacitors, increasing temperature often significantly changes capacitance because of the strong temperature dependence of the dielectric constant. Higher temperatures also affect the equivalent series resistance (ESR). High-temperature capacitors usually have low capacitance values because of these dielectric effects and because packages are kept small to prevent mechanical breakage caused by thermal stresses. Electrolytic capacitors do not operate at temperatures above 150oC due to dielectric breakdown. The development of high-temperature capacitors to be used in a high-pressure high-temperature (HPHT) drilling environment was investigated. These capacitors were based on a previously developed high-voltage hybridized capacitor developed at Giner, Inc. in conjunction with a

  13. High Temperature Superconducting Compounds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-10-01

    usual substrates, SrTiO3 , YSZ, MgO, and LaA103, it has been possible to deposit films on Si substrates without any buffer layer. A bolometer has been...new opportunities for the study of superconductor-insulator transitions and the investigation of photo- doping with carriers of high temperature super... SrTiO3 (00), SrTiO3 (l 10), LaA103 (100), MgO(100), and yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ). The surfaces of these films could be imaged with a scanning

  14. High temperature geophysical instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Hardee, H.C.

    1988-06-01

    The instrumentation development program was to proceed in parallel with scientific research and was driven by the needs of researchers. The development of these instruments has therefore included numerous geophysical field tests, many of which have resulted in the publication of scientific articles. This paper is a brief summary of some of the major geophysical instruments that have been developed and tested under the High Temperature Geophysics Program. These instruments are briefly described and references are given for further detailed information and for scientific papers that have resulted from the use of these instruments. 9 refs., 14 figs.

  15. High temperature detonator

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, James O.; Dinegar, Robert H.

    1988-01-01

    A detonator assembly is provided which is usable at high temperatures about 300.degree. C. A detonator body is provided with an internal volume defining an anvil surface. A first acceptor explosive is disposed on the anvil surface. A donor assembly having an ignition element, an explosive material, and a flying plate, are placed in the body effective to accelerate the flying plate to impact the first acceptor explosive on the anvil for detonating the first acceptor explosive. A second acceptor explosive is eccentrically located in detonation relationship with the first acceptor explosive to thereafter effect detonation of a main charge.

  16. High Temperature Protonic Conductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dynys, Fred; Berger, Marie-Helen; Sayir, Ali

    2007-01-01

    High Temperature Protonic Conductors (HTPC) with the perovskite structure are envisioned for electrochemical membrane applications such as H2 separation, H2 sensors and fuel cells. Successive membrane commercialization is dependent upon addressing issues with H2 permeation rate and environmental stability with CO2 and H2O. HTPC membranes are conventionally fabricated by solid-state sintering. Grain boundaries and the presence of intergranular second phases reduce the proton mobility by orders of magnitude than the bulk crystalline grain. To enhanced protonic mobility, alternative processing routes were evaluated. A laser melt modulation (LMM) process was utilized to fabricate bulk samples, while pulsed laser deposition (PLD) was utilized to fabricate thin film membranes . Sr3Ca(1+x)Nb(2-x)O9 and SrCe(1-x)Y(x)O3 bulk samples were fabricated by LMM. Thin film BaCe(0.85)Y(0.15)O3 membranes were fabricated by PLD on porous substrates. Electron microscopy with chemical mapping was done to characterize the resultant microstructures. High temperature protonic conduction was measured by impedance spectroscopy in wet air or H2 environments. The results demonstrate the advantage of thin film membranes to thick membranes but also reveal the negative impact of defects or nanoscale domains on protonic conductivity.

  17. High temperature superconducting compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, Allen M.

    1992-11-01

    The major accomplishment of this grant has been to develop techniques for the in situ preparation of high-Tc superconducting films involving the use of ozone-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The techniques are generalizable to the growth of trilayer and multilayer structures. Films of both the DyBa2Cu3O(7-x) and YBa2Cu3O(7-x) compounds as well as the La(2-x)Sr(x)CuO4 compound have been grown on the usual substrates, SrTiO3, YSZ, MgO, and LaAlO3, as well as on Si substrates without any buffer layer. A bolometer has been fabricated on a thermally isolated SiN substrate coated with YSZ, an effort carried out in collaboration with Honeywell Inc. The deposition process facilitates the fabrication of very thin and transparent films creating new opportunities for the study of superconductor-insulator transitions and the investigation of photo-doping with carriers of high temperature superconductors. In addition to a thin film technology, a patterning technology has been developed. Trilayer structures have been developed for FET devices and tunneling junctions. Other work includes the measurement of the magnetic properties of bulk single crystal high temperature superconductors, and in collaboration with Argonne National Laboratory, measurement of electric transport properties of T1-based high-Tc films.

  18. High Temperature Piezoelectric Drill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bao, Xiaoqi; Scott, James; Boudreau, Kate; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, Stewart; Badescu, Mircea; Shrout, Tom; Zhang, Shujun

    2009-01-01

    The current NASA Decadal mission planning effort has identified Venus as a significant scientific target for a surface in-situ sampling/analyzing mission. The Venus environment represents several extremes including high temperature (460 deg C), high pressure (9 MPa), and potentially corrosive (condensed sulfuric acid droplets that adhere to surfaces during entry) environments. This technology challenge requires new rock sampling tools for these extreme conditions. Piezoelectric materials can potentially operate over a wide temperature range. Single crystals, like LiNbO3, have a Curie temperature that is higher than 1000 deg C and the piezoelectric ceramics Bismuth Titanate higher than 600 deg C. A study of the feasibility of producing piezoelectric drills that can operate in the temperature range up to 500 deg C was conducted. The study includes the high temperature properties investigations of engineering materials and piezoelectric ceramics with different formulas and doping. The drilling performances of a prototype Ultrasonic/Sonic Drill/Corer (USDC) using high temperate piezoelectric ceramics and single crystal were tested at temperature up to 500 deg C. The detailed results of our study and a discussion of the future work on performance improvements are presented in this paper.

  19. High Temperature Piezoelectric Drill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bao, Xiaoqi; Scott, James; Boudreau, Kate; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, Stewart; Badescu, Mircea; Shrout, Tom; Zhang, Shujun

    2009-01-01

    The current NASA Decadal mission planning effort has identified Venus as a significant scientific target for a surface in-situ sampling/analyzing mission. The Venus environment represents several extremes including high temperature (460 deg C), high pressure (9 MPa), and potentially corrosive (condensed sulfuric acid droplets that adhere to surfaces during entry) environments. This technology challenge requires new rock sampling tools for these extreme conditions. Piezoelectric materials can potentially operate over a wide temperature range. Single crystals, like LiNbO3, have a Curie temperature that is higher than 1000 deg C and the piezoelectric ceramics Bismuth Titanate higher than 600 deg C. A study of the feasibility of producing piezoelectric drills that can operate in the temperature range up to 500 deg C was conducted. The study includes the high temperature properties investigations of engineering materials and piezoelectric ceramics with different formulas and doping. The drilling performances of a prototype Ultrasonic/Sonic Drill/Corer (USDC) using high temperate piezoelectric ceramics and single crystal were tested at temperature up to 500 deg C. The detailed results of our study and a discussion of the future work on performance improvements are presented in this paper.

  20. High temperature thermometric phosphors

    DOEpatents

    Allison, Stephen W.; Cates, Michael R.; Boatner, Lynn A.; Gillies, George T.

    1999-03-23

    A high temperature phosphor consists essentially of a material having the general formula LuPO.sub.4 :Dy.sub.(x),Eu.sub.y) wherein: 0.1 wt %.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.20 wt % and 0.1 wt %.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.20 wt %. The high temperature phosphor is in contact with an article whose temperature is to be determined. The article having the phosphor in contact with it is placed in the environment for which the temperature of the article is to be determined. The phosphor is excited by a laser causing the phosphor to fluoresce. The emission from the phosphor is optically focused into a beam-splitting mirror which separates the emission into two separate emissions, the emission caused by the dysprosium dopant and the emission caused by the europium dopent. The separated emissions are optically filtered and the intensities of the emission are detected and measured. The ratio of the intensity of each emission is determined and the temperature of the article is calculated from the ratio of the intensities of the separate emissions.

  1. High temperature thermometric phosphors

    DOEpatents

    Allison, S.W.; Cates, M.R.; Boatner, L.A.; Gillies, G.T.

    1999-03-23

    A high temperature phosphor consists essentially of a material having the general formula LuPO{sub 4}:Dy{sub x},Eu{sub y} wherein: 0.1 wt % {<=} x {<=} 20 wt % and 0.1 wt % {<=} y {<=} 20 wt %. The high temperature phosphor is in contact with an article whose temperature is to be determined. The article having the phosphor in contact with it is placed in the environment for which the temperature of the article is to be determined. The phosphor is excited by a laser causing the phosphor to fluoresce. The emission from the phosphor is optically focused into a beam-splitting mirror which separates the emission into two separate emissions, the emission caused by the dysprosium dopant and the emission caused by the europium dopant. The separated emissions are optically filtered and the intensities of the emission are detected and measured. The ratio of the intensity of each emission is determined and the temperature of the article is calculated from the ratio of the intensities of the separate emissions. 2 figs.

  2. Enjoy Life in the Fast Lane.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urshan, J.

    This guide to supermarket shopping provides information in an outline format. It first covers preliminary activities such as determining family needs, shopping on a budget, and planning at home. A number of suggestions are then made for the actual shopping. Topics include shopper aids (unit pricing, nutritional labeling, freshness coding), store…

  3. Enjoy Life in the Fast Lane.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urshan, J.

    This guide to supermarket shopping provides information in an outline format. It first covers preliminary activities such as determining family needs, shopping on a budget, and planning at home. A number of suggestions are then made for the actual shopping. Topics include shopper aids (unit pricing, nutritional labeling, freshness coding), store…

  4. High temperature adsorption measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bertani, R.; Parisi, L.; Perini, R.; Tarquini, B.

    1996-01-24

    Adsorption phenomena are a rich and rather new field of study in geothermal research, in particular at very high temperature. ENEL is interested in the exploitation of geothermal regions with superheated steam, and it is important to understand the behavior of water-rock interaction. We have analyzed in the 170-200 °C temperature range four samples of Monteverdi cuttings; the next experimental effort will be at 220 °C and over in 1996. The first results of the 1995 runs are collected in this paper. We can highlight four main items: 1. At relative pressures over 0.6 the capillarity forces are very important. 2. There is no significant temperature effect. 3. Adsorbed water can be present, and it is able to multiply by a factor of 15 the estimated reserve of super-heated steam only. 4. Pores smaller than 15 Å do not contribute to the adsorbed mass.

  5. High temperature adsorption measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bertani, R.; Parisi, L.; Perini, R.; Tarquini, B.

    1996-12-31

    Adsorption phenomena are a rich and rather new field of study in geothermal research, in particular at very high temperature. ENEL is interested in the exploitation of geothermal regions with super-heated steam, and it is important to understand the behavior of water-rock interaction. We have analyzed in the 170-200{degrees}C temperature range four samples of Monteverdi cuttings; the next experimental effort will be at 220{degrees}C and over in 1996. The first results of the 1995 runs are collected in this paper. We can highlight four main items: (1) At relative pressures over 0.6 the capillarity forces are very important. (2) There is no significant temperature effect. (3) Adsorbed water can be present, and it is able to multiply by a factor of 15 the estimated reserve of super-heated steam only. (4) Pores smaller than 15 {Angstrom} do not contribute to the adsorbed mass.

  6. High temperature structural silicides

    SciTech Connect

    Petrovic, J.J.

    1997-03-01

    Structural silicides have important high temperature applications in oxidizing and aggressive environments. Most prominent are MoSi{sub 2}-based materials, which are borderline ceramic-intermetallic compounds. MoSi{sub 2} single crystals exhibit macroscopic compressive ductility at temperatures below room temperature in some orientations. Polycrystalline MoSi{sub 2} possesses elevated temperature creep behavior which is highly sensitive to grain size. MoSi{sub 2}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} composites show an important combination of oxidation resistance, creep resistance, and low temperature fracture toughness. Current potential applications of MoSi{sub 2}-based materials include furnace heating elements, molten metal lances, industrial gas burners, aerospace turbine engine components, diesel engine glow plugs, and materials for glass processing.

  7. High temperature materials characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.

    1990-01-01

    A lab facility for measuring elastic moduli up to 1700 C was constructed and delivered. It was shown that the ultrasonic method can be used to determine elastic constants of materials from room temperature to their melting points. The ease in coupling high frequency acoustic energy is still a difficult task. Even now, new coupling materials and higher power ultrasonic pulsers are being suggested. The surface was only scratched in terms of showing the full capabilities of either technique used, especially since there is such a large learning curve in developing proper methodologies to take measurements into the high temperature region. The laser acoustic system does not seem to have sufficient precision at this time to replace the normal buffer rod methodology.

  8. High temperature strain gages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Otto J. (Inventor); You, Tao (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A ceramic strain gage based on reactively sputtered indium-tin-oxide (ITO) thin films is used to monitor the structural integrity of components employed in aerospace propulsion systems operating at temperatures in excess of 1500.degree. C. A scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of the thick ITO sensors reveals a partially sintered microstructure comprising a contiguous network of submicron ITO particles with well defined necks and isolated nanoporosity. Densification of the ITO particles was retarded during high temperature exposure with nitrogen thus stabilizing the nanoporosity. ITO strain sensors were prepared by reactive sputtering in various nitrogen/oxygen/argon partial pressures to incorporate more nitrogen into the films. Under these conditions, sintering and densification of the ITO particles containing these nitrogen rich grain boundaries was retarded and a contiguous network of nano-sized ITO particles was established.

  9. High temperature acoustic levitator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M. B. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A system is described for acoustically levitating an object within a portion of a chamber that is heated to a high temperature, while a driver at the opposite end of the chamber is maintained at a relatively low temperature. The cold end of the chamber is constructed so it can be telescoped to vary the length (L sub 1) of the cold end portion and therefore of the entire chamber, so that the chamber remains resonant to a normal mode frequency, and so that the pressure at the hot end of the chamber is maximized. The precise length of the chamber at any given time, is maintained at an optimum resonant length by a feedback loop. The feedback loop includes an acoustic pressure sensor at the hot end of the chamber, which delivers its output to a control circuit which controls a motor that varies the length (L) of the chamber to a level where the sensed acoustic pressure is a maximum.

  10. High temperature measuring device

    DOEpatents

    Tokarz, Richard D.

    1983-01-01

    A temperature measuring device for very high design temperatures (to 2,000.degree. C.). The device comprises a homogenous base structure preferably in the form of a sphere or cylinder. The base structure contains a large number of individual walled cells. The base structure has a decreasing coefficient of elasticity within the temperature range being monitored. A predetermined quantity of inert gas is confined within each cell. The cells are dimensionally stable at the normal working temperature of the device. Increases in gaseous pressure within the cells will permanently deform the cell walls at temperatures within the high temperature range to be measured. Such deformation can be correlated to temperature by calibrating similarly constructed devices under known time and temperature conditions.

  11. High temperature interfacial superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Bozovic, Ivan; Logvenov, Gennady; Gozar, Adrian Mihai

    2012-06-19

    High-temperature superconductivity confined to nanometer-scale interfaces has been a long standing goal because of potential applications in electronic devices. The spontaneous formation of a superconducting interface in bilayers consisting of an insulator (La.sub.2CuO.sub.4) and a metal (La.sub.1-xSr.sub.xCuO.sub.4), neither of which is superconducting per se, is described. Depending upon the layering sequence of the bilayers, T.sub.c may be either .about.15 K or .about.30 K. This highly robust phenomenon is confined to within 2-3 nm around the interface. After exposing the bilayer to ozone, T.sub.c exceeds 50 K and this enhanced superconductivity is also shown to originate from a 1 to 2 unit cell thick interfacial layer. The results demonstrate that engineering artificial heterostructures provides a novel, unconventional way to fabricate stable, quasi two-dimensional high T.sub.c phases and to significantly enhance superconducting properties in other superconductors. The superconducting interface may be implemented, for example, in SIS tunnel junctions or a SuFET.

  12. High Temperature Superconducting Materials Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 149 NIST High Temperature Superconducting Materials Database (Web, free access)   The NIST High Temperature Superconducting Materials Database (WebHTS) provides evaluated thermal, mechanical, and superconducting property data for oxides and other nonconventional superconductors.

  13. High Temperature Aquifer Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueckert, Martina; Niessner, Reinhard; Baumann, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Combined heat and power generation (CHP) is highly efficient because excess heat is used for heating and/or process energy. However, the demand of heat energy varies considerably throughout the year while the demand for electrical energy is rather constant. It seems economically and ecologically highly beneficial for municipalities and large power consumers such as manufacturing plants to store excess heat in groundwater aquifers and to recuperate this energy at times of higher demand. Apart from the hydrogeological conditions, high transmissivity and favorable pressure gradients, the hydrochemical conditions are crucial for long-term operation. Within the project High Temperature Aquifer Storage, scientists investigate storage and recuperation of excess heat energy into the bavarian Malm aquifer. After one year of planning, construction, and the successful drilling of a research well to 495 m b.s.l. the first large scale heat storage test in the Malm aquifer was finished just before Christmas 2014. An enormous technical challenge was the disruption of the carbonate equilibrium - modeling results indicated a carbonate precipitation of 10-50 kg/d in the heat exchangers. The test included five injection pulses of hot water (60 °C up to 110 °C) and four tracer pulses, each consisting of a reactive and a conservative fluorescent dye. Injection and production rates were 15 L/s. About 4 TJ of heat energy were necessary to achieve the desired water temperatures. Electrical conductivity, pH and temperature were recorded at a bypass where also samples were taken. A laboratory container at the drilling site was equipped for the analysis of the concentration of the tracers and the cation concentrations at sampling intervals of down to 15 minutes. Additional water samples were taken and analyzed for major ions and trace elements in the laboratory. The disassembled heat exchanger proved that precipitation was successfully prevented by adding CO2 to the water before heating

  14. High Temperature Aquifer Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueckert, Martina; Niessner, Reinhard; Baumann, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Combined heat and power generation (CHP) is highly efficient because excess heat is used for heating and/or process energy. However, the demand of heat energy varies considerably throughout the year while the demand for electrical energy is rather constant. It seems economically and ecologically highly beneficial for municipalities and large power consumers such as manufacturing plants to store excess heat in groundwater aquifers and to recuperate this energy at times of higher demand. Within the project High Temperature Aquifer Storage, scientists investigate storage and recuperation of excess heat energy into the bavarian Malm aquifer. Apart from high transmissivity and favorable pressure gradients, the hydrochemical conditions are crucial for long-term operation. An enormous technical challenge is the disruption of the carbonate equilibrium - modeling results indicated a carbonate precipitation of 10 - 50 kg/d in the heat exchangers. The test included five injection pulses of hot water (60 °C up to 110 °C) and four tracer pulses, each consisting of a reactive and a conservative fluorescent dye, into a depth of about 300 m b.s.l. resp. 470 m b.s.l. Injection and production rates were 15 L/s. To achieve the desired water temperatures, about 4 TJ of heat energy were necessary. Electrical conductivity, pH and temperature were recorded at a bypass where also samples were taken. A laboratory container at the drilling site was equipped for analysing the concentration of the dyes and the major cations at sampling intervals of down to 15 minutes. Additional water samples were taken and analysed in the laboratory. The disassembled heat exchanger prooved that precipitation was successfully prevented by adding CO2 to the water before heating. Nevertheless, hydrochemical data proved both, dissolution and precipitation processes in the aquifer. This was also suggested by the hydrochemical modelling with PhreeqC and is traced back to mixture dissolution and changing

  15. High-temperature piezoelectric sensing.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiaoning; Kim, Kyungrim; Zhang, Shujun; Johnson, Joseph; Salazar, Giovanni

    2013-12-20

    Piezoelectric sensing is of increasing interest for high-temperature applications in aerospace, automotive, power plants and material processing due to its low cost, compact sensor size and simple signal conditioning, in comparison with other high-temperature sensing techniques. This paper presented an overview of high-temperature piezoelectric sensing techniques. Firstly, different types of high-temperature piezoelectric single crystals, electrode materials, and their pros and cons are discussed. Secondly, recent work on high-temperature piezoelectric sensors including accelerometer, surface acoustic wave sensor, ultrasound transducer, acoustic emission sensor, gas sensor, and pressure sensor for temperatures up to 1,250 °C were reviewed. Finally, discussions of existing challenges and future work for high-temperature piezoelectric sensing are presented.

  16. High-Temperature Piezoelectric Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xiaoning; Kim, Kyungrim; Zhang, Shujun; Johnson, Joseph; Salazar, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Piezoelectric sensing is of increasing interest for high-temperature applications in aerospace, automotive, power plants and material processing due to its low cost, compact sensor size and simple signal conditioning, in comparison with other high-temperature sensing techniques. This paper presented an overview of high-temperature piezoelectric sensing techniques. Firstly, different types of high-temperature piezoelectric single crystals, electrode materials, and their pros and cons are discussed. Secondly, recent work on high-temperature piezoelectric sensors including accelerometer, surface acoustic wave sensor, ultrasound transducer, acoustic emission sensor, gas sensor, and pressure sensor for temperatures up to 1,250 °C were reviewed. Finally, discussions of existing challenges and future work for high-temperature piezoelectric sensing are presented. PMID:24361928

  17. High-temperature constitutive modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, D. N.; Ellis, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    Thermomechanical service conditions for high-temperature levels, thermal transients, and mechanical loads severe enough to cause measurable inelastic deformation are studied. Structural analysis in support of the design of high-temperature components depends strongly on accurate mathematical representations of the nonlinear, hereditary, inelastic behavior of structural alloys at high temperature, particularly in the relatively small strain range. Progress is discussed in the following areas: multiaxial experimentation to provide a basis for high-temperature multiaxial constitutive relationships; nonisothermal testing and theoretical development toward a complete thermomechanically path dependent formulation of viscoplasticity; and development of viscoplastic constitutive model accounting for initial anisotropy.

  18. Scaling approach and thermal-hydraulic analysis in the reactor cavity cooling system of a high temperature gas -cooled reactor and thermal-jet mixing in a sodium fast reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omotowa, Olumuyiwa A.

    This dissertation develops and demonstrates the application of the top-down and bottom-up scaling methodologies to thermal-hydraulic flows in the reactor cavity cooling system (RCCS) of the high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) and upper plenum of the sodium fast reactor (SFR), respectively. The need to integrate scaled separate effects and integral tests was identified. Experimental studies and computational tools (CFD) have been integrated to guide the engineering design, analysis and assessment of this scaling methods under single and two-phase flow conditions. To test this methods, two applicable case studies are considered, and original contributions are noted. Case 1: "Experimental Study of RCCS for the HTGR". Contributions include validation of scaling analysis using the top-down approach as guide to a ¼-scale integral test facility. System code, RELAP5, was developed based on the derived scaling parameters. Tests performed included system sensitivity to decay heat load and heat sink inventory variations. System behavior under steady-state and transient scenarios were predicted. Results show that the system has the capacity to protect the cavity walls from over-heating during normal operations and provide a means for decay heat removal under accident scenarios. A full width half maximum statistical method was devised to characterize the thermal-hydraulics of the non-linear two-phase oscillatory behavior. This facilitated understanding of the thermal hydraulic coupling of the loop segments of the RCCS, the heat transfer, and the two-phase flashing flow phenomena; thus the impact of scaling overall. Case 2: "Computational Studies of Thermal Jet Mixing in SFR". In the pool-type SFR, susceptible regions to thermal striping are the upper instrumentation structure and the intermediate heat exchanger (IHX). We investigated the thermal mixing above the core to UIS and the potential impact due to poor mixing. The thermal mixing of dual-jet flows at different

  19. Performance of Driver-Vehicle in Aborted Lane Change Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Allan Y.

    1995-01-01

    A 'lane change crash' is defined as a family of collisions that occurred when a driver attempts to change lane and strikes or is struck by a vehicle in the adjacent lane. One type of maneuver that is commonly used to avert a lane change crash involved aborting the intended lane change, and returning the vehicle to the original lane of the subject vehicle.

  20. High temperature be panel development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardesty, R.; Jensen, M.; Grant, L.

    1989-01-01

    Beryllium materials have been used for many aerospace applications over the years. Most of these applications have been fairly ambient environments. The possibility of fabricating beryllium panels for high temperature applications up to 1200 F is investigated. Joining alloys were reviewed, tested and evaluated for high temperature applications.

  1. Traffic bottleneck characteristics caused by the reduction of lanes in an optimal velocity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian; Li, Xiling; Wang, Rui; Sun, Xiaosi; Cui, Xiaochao

    2012-04-01

    In this paper, the lane reduction bottleneck is investigated using the optimal velocity model, in which two kinds of vehicles (fast and slow) are introduced. The asymmetric lane changing rules in the slowdown section and the lane squeezing behaviors at the bottleneck are taken into account. Under the periodic boundary condition, the numerical simulations are performed. The traffic states change with increasing density. And an interesting phenomenon of ratio inversion appears. When the current saturates, the headway and velocity discontinuously vary with the position. In addition, traffic patterns and the phase transition points depend greatly on the speed limit and the length of the slowdown section.

  2. Road Lane Detection by Discriminating Dashed and Solid Road Lanes Using a Visible Light Camera Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Hoang, Toan Minh; Hong, Hyung Gil; Vokhidov, Husan; Park, Kang Ryoung

    2016-01-01

    With the increasing need for road lane detection used in lane departure warning systems and autonomous vehicles, many studies have been conducted to turn road lane detection into a virtual assistant to improve driving safety and reduce car accidents. Most of the previous research approaches detect the central line of a road lane and not the accurate left and right boundaries of the lane. In addition, they do not discriminate between dashed and solid lanes when detecting the road lanes. However, this discrimination is necessary for the safety of autonomous vehicles and the safety of vehicles driven by human drivers. To overcome these problems, we propose a method for road lane detection that distinguishes between dashed and solid lanes. Experimental results with the Caltech open database showed that our method outperforms conventional methods. PMID:27548176

  3. Road Lane Detection by Discriminating Dashed and Solid Road Lanes Using a Visible Light Camera Sensor.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Toan Minh; Hong, Hyung Gil; Vokhidov, Husan; Park, Kang Ryoung

    2016-08-18

    With the increasing need for road lane detection used in lane departure warning systems and autonomous vehicles, many studies have been conducted to turn road lane detection into a virtual assistant to improve driving safety and reduce car accidents. Most of the previous research approaches detect the central line of a road lane and not the accurate left and right boundaries of the lane. In addition, they do not discriminate between dashed and solid lanes when detecting the road lanes. However, this discrimination is necessary for the safety of autonomous vehicles and the safety of vehicles driven by human drivers. To overcome these problems, we propose a method for road lane detection that distinguishes between dashed and solid lanes. Experimental results with the Caltech open database showed that our method outperforms conventional methods.

  4. Advanced High Temperature Structural Seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newquist, Charles W.; Verzemnieks, Juris; Keller, Peter C.; Rorabaugh, Michael; Shorey, Mark

    2002-01-01

    This program addresses the development of high temperature structural seals for control surfaces for a new generation of small reusable launch vehicles. Successful development will contribute significantly to the mission goal of reducing launch cost for small, 200 to 300 pound payloads. Development of high temperature seals is mission enabling. For instance, ineffective control surface seals can result in high temperature (3100 F) flows in the elevon area exceeding structural material limits. Longer sealing life will allow use for many missions before replacement, contributing to the reduction of hardware, operation and launch costs.

  5. Shipping lanes or offshore rigs

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-09-01

    This information was from the Los Angeles Steamship Association (LASSA) luncheon meeting. The problems of limiting access and availability of the Santa Barbara/Santa Catalina channels to commercial vessel traffic and other related uses. LASSA speaks for about 85% of the maritime industry in Southern California. The Association is actively seeking a compromise with the oil companies in keeping the Vessel Traffic Separation Scheme (VTSS) in the channels; however, the Western Oil and Gas Association (WOGA) is seeking to abolish VTSS as currently established in the channels and move the sea lanes outside the Channel Islands, and open up the entire Santa Barbara Channel to unlimited drilling sites. LASSA claims that moving the VTSS sea lanes outside of the Channel Islands would add 18 to 22 miles to the average trip from San Francisco to Los Angeles, with fuel cost etc. would make for a big loss to the merchant ship operators. LASSA has offered to support the concept of opening up the Buffer Zone that separates the Sea Lanes themselves to exploratory drilling. This two mile wide stretch of water is off limits to vessels and it would open new areas to the oil companies heretofore unaccessible to them. (DP)

  6. High-temperature bearing lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. J.; Parker, R. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1968-01-01

    Synthetic paraffinic oil lubricates ball bearings at temperatures in the 600 degrees F range. The lubricant contains antiwear and antifoam additives, is thermally stable in the high temperature range, but requires protection from oxygen.

  7. Advanced High Temperature Structural Seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newquist, Charles W.; Verzemnieks, Juris; Keller, Peter C.; Shorey, Mark W.; Steinetz, Bruce (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This program addresses the development of high temperature structural seals for control surfaces for a new generation of small reusable launch vehicles. Successful development will contribute significantly to the mission goal of reducing launch cost for small, 200 to 300 lb payloads. Development of high temperature seals is mission enabling. For instance, ineffective control surface seals can result in high temperature (3100 F) flows in the elevon area exceeding structural material limits. Longer sealing life will allow use for many missions before replacement, contributing to the reduction of hardware, operation and launch costs. During the first phase of this program the existing launch vehicle control surface sealing concepts were reviewed, the aerothermal environment for a high temperature seal design was analyzed and a mock up of an arc-jet test fixture for evaluating seal concepts was fabricated.

  8. High temperature current mirror amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Patterson, III, Raymond B.

    1984-05-22

    A high temperature current mirror amplifier having biasing means in the transdiode connection of the input transistor for producing a voltage to maintain the base-collector junction reversed-biased and a current means for maintaining a current through the biasing means at high temperatures so that the base-collector junction of the input transistor remained reversed-biased. For accuracy, a second current mirror is provided with a biasing means and current means on the input leg.

  9. High-temperature ceramic receivers

    SciTech Connect

    Jarvinen, P. O.

    1980-01-01

    An advanced ceramic dome cavity receiver is discussed which heats pressurized gas to temperatures above 1800/sup 0/F (1000/sup 0/C) for use in solar Brayton power systems of the dispersed receiver/dish or central receiver type. Optical, heat transfer, structural, and ceramic material design aspects of the receiver are reported and the development and experimental demonstration of a high-temperature seal between the pressurized gas and the high-temperature silicon carbide dome material is described.

  10. Modeling Jupiter's decametric modulation lanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imai, Kazumasa; Wang, Liyun; Carr, Thomas D.

    1997-04-01

    The modulation lanes in Jupiter's decametric radio spectra were discovered by Riihimaa [1968]. We have developed a model for the mechanism responsible for their production in which the free parameters have been adjusted to provide a very close fit with the observations. In our model, a grid-like interference screen composed of field-aligned columns of enhanced or depleted plasma density is located near Io's orbit close to the longitude of the sub-Earth point. The column spacing is typically about 140 km. As a band of frequency components emitted from near the foot of an excited tube of magnetic flux passes through the screen, interference patterns of slightly different orientations are produced by the different frequencies. The corotation of this set of interference patterns with Jupiter results in the sloping modulation lanes of the observed dynamic spectrum. Newly calculated results indicate that (1) the Io-B and Io-A radiations are emitted from the northern hemisphere, while that from Io-C comes mainly from the southern hemisphere, (2) the half-angle of the assumed hollow-cone emission beam for Io-B is typically 60°, with a variation of a few degrees, and (3) the equatorial lead angle of the radio-emitting previously excited flux tube ahead of the flux tube through Io at the same instant is more variable, 50° being a typical value for Io-B. Modulation lanes from Io-unrelated emission were also successfully modeled, the assumption in this case being that some source of energy other than a direct encounter with Io excited the flux tube containing the emitting radio source. The L shell value for non-Io-A was less clearly defined but was definitely between 4 and 7. Sensitive measurements of the lane modulation depths for Io-B and Io-A indicated that the decay time for the columns of the interference screen is of the same order of magnitude as Jupiter's rotation period. Although the predominant modulation lane periodicity of about 2 s indicates an upper limit on Io

  11. Traffic Flow on a 3-LANE Highway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wen-Yao; Huang, Ding-Wei; Huang, Wei-Neng; Hwang, Wen-Liang

    The traffic flow on a 3-lane highway is investigated using a cellular automaton method. Two different kinds of vehicles, cars and trucks, with different driving behaviors are presented on the highway. It is found that in the high density region, a control scheme requiring passing from the inner lane will enhance the traffic flow; while restricting the trucks to the outer lane will enhance the flow in the low density region and also has the benefit of suppressing the unnecessary lane-changing rate.

  12. High temperature Seebeck coefficient metrology

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, J.; Tritt, T.; Uher, C.

    2010-12-15

    We present an overview of the challenges and practices of thermoelectric metrology on bulk materials at high temperature (300 to 1300 K). The Seebeck coefficient, when combined with thermal and electrical conductivity, is an essential property measurement for evaluating the potential performance of novel thermoelectric materials. However, there is some question as to which measurement technique(s) provides the most accurate determination of the Seebeck coefficient at high temperature. This has led to the implementation of nonideal practices that have further complicated the confirmation of reported high ZT materials. To ensure meaningful interlaboratory comparison of data, thermoelectric measurements must be reliable, accurate, and consistent. This article will summarize and compare the relevant measurement techniques and apparatus designs required to effectively manage uncertainty, while also providing a reference resource of previous advances in high temperature thermoelectric metrology.

  13. The Very High Temperature Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hans D. Gougar; David A. Petti

    2011-06-01

    The High Temperature Reactor (HTR) and Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) are types of nuclear power plants that, as the names imply, operate at temperatures above those of the conventional nuclear power plants that currently generate electricity in the US and other countries. Like existing nuclear plants, heat generated from the fission of uranium or plutonium atoms is carried off by a working fluid and can be used generate electricity. The very hot working fluid also enables the VHTR to drive other industrial processes that require high temperatures not achievable by conventional nuclear plants (Figure 1). For this reason, the VHTR is being considered for non-electrical energy applications. The reactor and power conversion system are constructed using special materials that make a core meltdown virtually impossible.

  14. Gallium phosphide high temperature diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaffin, R. J.; Dawson, L. R.

    1981-01-01

    High temperature (300 C) diodes for geothermal and other energy applications were developed. A comparison of reverse leakage currents of Si, GaAs, and GaP was made. Diodes made from GaP should be usable to 500 C. A Liquid Phase Epitaxy (LPE) process for producing high quality, grown junction GaP diodes is described. This process uses low vapor pressure Mg as a dopant which allows multiple boat growth in the same LPE run. These LPE wafers were cut into die and metallized to make the diodes. These diodes produce leakage currents below ten to the -9th power A/sq cm at 400 C while exhibiting good high temperature rectification characteristics. High temperature life test data is presented which shows exceptional stability of the V-I characteristics.

  15. High temperature current mirror amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Patterson, R.B. III.

    1984-05-22

    Disclosed is a high temperature current mirror amplifier having biasing means in the transdiode connection of the input transistor for producing a voltage to maintain the base-collector junction reversed-biased and a current means for maintaining a current through the biasing means at high temperatures so that the base-collector junction of the input transistor remained reversed-biased. For accuracy, a second current mirror is provided with a biasing means and current means on the input leg. 2 figs.

  16. High temperature superconductor current leads

    DOEpatents

    Hull, John R.; Poeppel, Roger B.

    1995-01-01

    An electrical lead having one end for connection to an apparatus in a cryogenic environment and the other end for connection to an apparatus outside the cryogenic environment. The electrical lead includes a high temperature superconductor wire and an electrically conductive material distributed therein, where the conductive material is present at the one end of the lead at a concentration in the range of from 0 to about 3% by volume, and at the other end of the lead at a concentration of less than about 20% by volume. Various embodiments are shown for groups of high temperature superconductor wires and sheaths.

  17. High temperature solar thermal technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leibowitz, L. P.; Hanseth, E. J.; Peelgren, M. L.

    1980-01-01

    Some advanced technology concepts under development for high-temperature solar thermal energy systems to achieve significant energy cost reductions and performance gains and thus promote the application of solar thermal power technology are presented. Consideration is given to the objectives, current efforts and recent test and analysis results in the development of high-temperature (950-1650 C) ceramic receivers, thermal storage module checker stoves, and the use of reversible chemical reactions to transport collected solar energy. It is pointed out that the analysis and testing of such components will accelerate the commercial deployment of solar energy.

  18. Studies of high temperature superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Narlikar, A. )

    1990-01-01

    With the pioneering discovery of high temperature superconductors in 1986 superconductivity has ceased to remain an area of mere academic curiosity and a preserve of a small community of low temperature physicists and cryogenists. Renouncing their cold confines freed from the grip of liquid helium, superconductors have stepped into the realm of high temperatures. The area has transformed into a rich field of intensive and highly competitive research, encompassing diverse disciplines such as: structural chemistry, ceramic engineering, metallurgy, solid state electronics, experimental and theoretical, and condensed matter physics.

  19. High temperature solar thermal technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leibowitz, L. P.; Hanseth, E. J.; Peelgren, M. L.

    1980-11-01

    Some advanced technology concepts under development for high-temperature solar thermal energy systems to achieve significant energy cost reductions and performance gains and thus promote the application of solar thermal power technology are presented. Consideration is given to the objectives, current efforts and recent test and analysis results in the development of high-temperature (950-1650 C) ceramic receivers, thermal storage module checker stoves, and the use of reversible chemical reactions to transport collected solar energy. It is pointed out that the analysis and testing of such components will accelerate the commercial deployment of solar energy.

  20. High Temperature Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    These are the proceedings of the High Temperature Polymer Matrix Composites Conference held at the NASA Lewis Research Center on March 16 to 18, 1983. The purpose of the conference is to provide scientists and engineers working in the field of high temperature polymer matrix composites an opportunity to review, exchange, and assess the latest developments in this rapidly expanding area of materials technology. Technical papers are presented in the following areas: (1) matrix development; (2) adhesive development; (3) characterization; (4) environmental effects; and (5) applications.

  1. High temperature superconductor current leads

    DOEpatents

    Hull, J.R.; Poeppel, R.B.

    1995-06-20

    An electrical lead is disclosed having one end for connection to an apparatus in a cryogenic environment and the other end for connection to an apparatus outside the cryogenic environment. The electrical lead includes a high temperature superconductor wire and an electrically conductive material distributed therein, where the conductive material is present at the one end of the lead at a concentration in the range of from 0 to about 3% by volume, and at the other end of the lead at a concentration of less than about 20% by volume. Various embodiments are shown for groups of high temperature superconductor wires and sheaths. 9 figs.

  2. High temperature polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serafini, Tito T. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    These are the proceedings of the High Temperature Polymer Matrix Composites Conference held at the NASA Lewis Research Center on March 16 to 18, 1983. The purpose of the conference is to provide scientists and engineers working in the field of high temperature polymer matrix composites an opportunity to review, exchange, and assess the latest developments in this rapidly expanding area of materials technology. Technical papers are presented in the following areas: (1) matrix development; (2) adhesive development; (3) Characterization; (4) environmental effects; and (5) applications.

  3. Lane detection and tracking based on improved Hough transform and least-squares method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Peng; Chen, Hui

    2014-11-01

    Lane detection and tracking play important roles in lane departure warning system (LDWS). In order to improve the real-time performance and obtain better lane detection results, an improved algorithm of lane detection and tracking based on combination of improved Hough transform and least-squares fitting method is proposed in this paper. In the image pre-processing stage, firstly a multi-gradient Sobel operator is used to obtain the edge map of road images, secondly adaptive Otsu algorithm is used to obtain binary image, and in order to meet the precision requirements of single pixel, fast parallel thinning algorithm is used to get the skeleton map of binary image. And then, lane lines are initially detected by using polar angle constraint Hough transform, which has narrowed the scope of searching. At last, during the tracking phase, based on the detection result of the previous image frame, a dynamic region of interest (ROI) is set up, and within the predicted dynamic ROI, least-squares fitting method is used to fit the lane line, which has greatly reduced the algorithm calculation. And also a failure judgment module is added in this paper to improve the detection reliability. When the least-squares fitting method is failed, the polar angle constraint Hough transform is restarted for initial detection, which has achieved a coordination of Hough transform and least-squares fitting method. The algorithm in this paper takes into account the robustness of Hough transform and the real-time performance of least-squares fitting method, and sets up a dynamic ROI for lane detection. Experimental results show that it has a good performance of lane recognition, and the average time to complete the preprocessing and lane recognition of one road map is less than 25ms, which has proved that the algorithm has good real-time performance and strong robustness.

  4. Ceramic Adhesive for High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, Everett G.

    1987-01-01

    Fused-silica/magnesium-phosphate adhesive resists high temperatures and vibrations. New adhesive unaffected by extreme temperatures and vibrations. Assuring direct bonding of gap filters to tile sidewalls, adhesive obviates expensive and time-consuming task of removal, treatment, and replacement of tiles.

  5. High temperature lightweight foamed cements

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi.

    1989-10-03

    Cement slurries are disclosed which are suitable for use in geothermal wells since they can withstand high temperatures and high pressures. The formulation consists of cement, silica flour, water, a retarder, a foaming agent, a foam stabilizer, and a reinforcing agent. A process for producing these cements is also disclosed. 3 figs.

  6. High temperature lightweight foamed cements

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi

    1989-01-01

    Cement slurries are disclosed which are suitable for use in geothermal wells since they can withstand high temperatures and high pressures. The formulation consists of cement, silica flour, water, a retarder, a foaming agent, a foam stabilizer, and a reinforcing agent. A process for producing these cements is also disclosed.

  7. High temperature electronic gain device

    DOEpatents

    McCormick, J. Byron; Depp, Steven W.; Hamilton, Douglas J.; Kerwin, William J.

    1979-01-01

    An integrated thermionic device suitable for use in high temperature, high radiation environments. Cathode and control electrodes are deposited on a first substrate facing an anode on a second substrate. The substrates are sealed to a refractory wall and evacuated to form an integrated triode vacuum tube.

  8. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOEpatents

    Boyd, Gary L.

    1990-01-01

    A high temperature turbine engine includes a hybrid ceramic/metallic rotor member having ceramic/metal joint structure. The disclosed joint is able to endure higher temperatures than previously possible, and aids in controlling heat transfer in the rotor member.

  9. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOEpatents

    Boyd, Gary L.

    1991-01-01

    A high temperature turbine engine includes a rotor portion having axially stacked adjacent ceramic rotor parts. A ceramic/ceramic joint structure transmits torque between the rotor parts while maintaining coaxial alignment and axially spaced mutually parallel relation thereof despite thermal and centrifugal cycling.

  10. High Temperature Transparent Furnace Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, Stephen C.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the use of novel techniques for heat containment that could be used to build a high temperature transparent furnace. The primary objective of the work was to experimentally demonstrate transparent furnace operation at 1200 C. Secondary objectives were to understand furnace operation and furnace component specification to enable the design and construction of a low power prototype furnace for delivery to NASA in a follow-up project. The basic approach of the research was to couple high temperature component design with simple concept demonstration experiments that modify a commercially available transparent furnace rated at lower temperature. A detailed energy balance of the operating transparent furnace was performed, calculating heat losses through the furnace components as a result of conduction, radiation, and convection. The transparent furnace shells and furnace components were redesigned to permit furnace operation at at least 1200 C. Techniques were developed that are expected to lead to significantly improved heat containment compared with current transparent furnaces. The design of a thermal profile in a multizone high temperature transparent furnace design was also addressed. Experiments were performed to verify the energy balance analysis, to demonstrate some of the major furnace improvement techniques developed, and to demonstrate the overall feasibility of a high temperature transparent furnace. The important objective of the research was achieved: to demonstrate the feasibility of operating a transparent furnace at 1200 C.

  11. Interface high-temperature superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lili; Ma, Xucun; Xue, Qi-Kun

    2016-12-01

    Cuprate high-temperature superconductors consist of two quasi-two-dimensional (2D) substructures: CuO2 superconducting layers and charge reservoir layers. The superconductivity is realized by charge transfer from the charge reservoir layers into the superconducting layers without chemical dopants and defects being introduced into the latter, similar to modulation-doping in the semiconductor superlattices of AlGaAs/GaAs. Inspired by this scheme, we have been searching for high-temperature superconductivity in ultra-thin films of superconductors epitaxially grown on semiconductor/oxide substrates since 2008. We have observed interface-enhanced superconductivity in both conventional and unconventional superconducting films, including single atomic layer films of Pb and In on Si substrates and single unit cell (UC) films of FeSe on SrTiO3 (STO) substrates. The discovery of high-temperature superconductivity with a superconducting gap of ∼20 meV in 1UC-FeSe/STO has stimulated tremendous interest in the superconductivity community, for it opens a new avenue for both raising superconducting transition temperature and understanding the pairing mechanism of unconventional high-temperature superconductivity. Here, we review mainly the experimental progress on interface-enhanced superconductivity in the three systems mentioned above with emphasis on 1UC-FeSe/STO, studied by scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and transport experiments. We discuss the roles of interfaces and a possible pairing mechanism inferred from these studies.

  12. High-Temperature Optical Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamovsky, Grigory; Juergens, Jeffrey R.; Varga, Donald J.; Floyd, Bertram M.

    2010-01-01

    A high-temperature optical sensor (see Figure 1) has been developed that can operate at temperatures up to 1,000 C. The sensor development process consists of two parts: packaging of a fiber Bragg grating into a housing that allows a more sturdy thermally stable device, and a technological process to which the device is subjected to in order to meet environmental requirements of several hundred C. This technology uses a newly discovered phenomenon of the formation of thermally stable secondary Bragg gratings in communication-grade fibers at high temperatures to construct robust, optical, high-temperature sensors. Testing and performance evaluation (see Figure 2) of packaged sensors demonstrated operability of the devices at 1,000 C for several hundred hours, and during numerous thermal cycling from 400 to 800 C with different heating rates. The technology significantly extends applicability of optical sensors to high-temperature environments including ground testing of engines, flight propulsion control, thermal protection monitoring of launch vehicles, etc. It may also find applications in such non-aerospace arenas as monitoring of nuclear reactors, furnaces, chemical processes, and other hightemperature environments where other measurement techniques are either unreliable, dangerous, undesirable, or unavailable.

  13. High Temperature SHM/NDE

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-04

    durability and reliability Integrated Sensors High Temperature network (e.g. silicon carbide) AFOSR-MURI Functionally Graded Hybrid Composites...Strain under voltage potential •  Produce potential when strained + + + + - - - - + + + + - - - - STANDARD PZTs Sensors...PI/ PZT /SWNT   Texas A&M (SO) AFOSR-MURI Functionally Graded Hybrid Composites Sensors Development: Nanomaterials Conductivity changes Strain

  14. High-temperature plasma physics

    SciTech Connect

    Furth, H.P.

    1988-03-01

    Both magnetic and inertial confinement research are entering the plasma parameter range of fusion reactor interest. This paper reviews the individual and common technical problems of these two approaches to the generation of thermonuclear plasmas, and describes some related applications of high-temperature plasma physics.

  15. A solar high temperature kiln

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huettenhoelscher, N.; Bergmann, K.

    1981-11-01

    The feasibility of using solar energy in developing countries for baking ceramic construction materials was investigated. The solar high temperature kiln is described. It uses two parabolic concentrators which direct available radiation into the baking chamber. The Sun tracker has only one axis. Preliminary test results with the prototype kiln were satisfactory.

  16. An investigation of merging and diverging cars on a multi-lane road using a cellular automation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jetto, K.; Ez-Zahraouy, H.; Benyoussef, A.

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, we have investigated two observed situations in a multi-lane road. The first one concerns a fast merging vehicle. The second situation is related to the case of a fast vehicle leaving the fastest lane back into the slowest lane and targeting a specific way out. We are interested in the relaxation time τ, i.e., which is the time that the merging (diverging) vehicle spends before reaching the desired lane. Using analytical treatment and numerical simulations for the NaSch model, we have found two states, namely, the free state in which the merging (diverging) vehicle reaches the desired lane, and the trapped state in which τ diverges. We have established phase diagrams for several values of the braking probability. In the second situation, we have shown that diverging from the fast lane targeting a specific way out is not a simple task. Even if the diverging vehicle is in the free phase, two different states can be distinguished. One is the critical state, in which the diverging car can probably reach the desired way out. The other is the safe state, in which the diverging car can surely reach the desired way out. In order to be in the safe state, we have found that the driver of the diverging car must know the critical distance (below which the way out will be out of his reach) in each lane. Furthermore, this critical distance depends on the density of cars, and it follows an exponential law.

  17. LANE COUNTY YOUTH PROJECT. FINAL REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BREWER, EDGAR W.; AND OTHERS

    A GROUP OF LANE COUNTY, OREGON, CITIZENS WHO WERE CONCERNED ABOUT JUVENILE DELINQUENCY BANDED TOGETHER IN 1962 TO ESTABLISH THE LANE COUNTY YOUTH PROJECT (LCYP). THE PRIMARY PURPOSE OF LCYP WAS TO PLAN A MAJOR DEMONSTRATION PROJECT AIMED AT THE PREVENTION AND CONTROL OF DELINQUENCY AND RELATED YOUTH PROBLEMS IN BOTH RURAL AND SMALL CITY SETTINGS.…

  18. Multi-lane detection based on multiple vanishing points detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chuanxiang; Nie, Yiming; Dai, Bin; Wu, Tao

    2015-03-01

    Lane detection plays a significant role in Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) for intelligent vehicles. In this paper we present a multi-lane detection method based on multiple vanishing points detection. A new multi-lane model assumes that a single lane, which has two approximately parallel boundaries, may not parallel to others on road plane. Non-parallel lanes associate with different vanishing points. A biological plausibility model is used to detect multiple vanishing points and fit lane model. Experimental results show that the proposed method can detect both parallel lanes and non-parallel lanes.

  19. High Temperature Heat Exchanger Project

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony E. Hechanova, Ph.D.

    2008-09-30

    The UNLV Research Foundation assembled a research consortium for high temperature heat exchanger design and materials compatibility and performance comprised of university and private industry partners under the auspices of the US DOE-NE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative in October 2003. The objectives of the consortium were to conduct investigations of candidate materials for high temperature heat exchanger componets in hydrogen production processes and design and perform prototypical testing of heat exchangers. The initial research of the consortium focused on the intermediate heat exchanger (located between the nuclear reactor and hydrogen production plan) and the components for the hydrogen iodine decomposition process and sulfuric acid decomposition process. These heat exchanger components were deemed the most challenging from a materials performance and compatibility perspective

  20. Motor for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roopnarine (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A high temperature motor has a stator with poles formed by wire windings, and a rotor with magnetic poles on a rotor shaft positioned coaxially within the stator. The stator and rotor are built up from stacks of magnetic-alloy laminations. The stator windings are made of high temperature magnet wire insulated with a vitreous enamel film, and the wire windings are bonded together with ceramic binder. A thin-walled cylinder is positioned coaxially between the rotor and the stator to prevent debris from the stator windings from reaching the rotor. The stator windings are wound on wire spools made of ceramic, thereby avoiding need for mica insulation and epoxy/adhesive. The stator and rotor are encased in a stator housing with rear and front end caps, and rear and front bearings for the rotor shaft are mounted on external sides of the end caps to keep debris from the motor migrating into the bearings' races.

  1. High temperature structural insulating material

    DOEpatents

    Chen, W.Y.

    1984-07-27

    A high temperature structural insulating material useful as a liner for cylinders of high temperature engines through the favorable combination of high service temperature (above about 800/sup 0/C), low thermal conductivity (below about 0.2 W/m/sup 0/C), and high compressive strength (above about 250 psi). The insulating material is produced by selecting hollow ceramic beads with a softening temperature above about 800/sup 0/C, a diameter within the range of 20-200 ..mu..m, and a wall thickness in the range of about 2 to 4 ..mu..m; compacting the beads and a compatible silicate binder composition under pressure and sintering conditions to provide the desired structural form with the structure having a closed-cell, compact array of bonded beads.

  2. High temperature structural insulating material

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Wayne Y.

    1987-01-06

    A high temperature structural insulating material useful as a liner for cylinders of high temperature engines through the favorable combination of high service temperature (above about 800.degree. C.), low thermal conductivity (below about 0.2 W/m.degree. C.), and high compressive strength (above about 250 psi). The insulating material is produced by selecting hollow ceramic beads with a softening temperature above about 800.degree. C., a diameter within the range of 20-200 .mu.m, and a wall thickness in the range of about 2-4 .mu.m; compacting the beads and a compatible silicate binder composition under pressure and sintering conditions to provide the desired structural form with the structure having a closed-cell, compact array of bonded beads.

  3. High temperature structural insulating material

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Wayne Y.

    1987-01-01

    A high temperature structural insulating material useful as a liner for cylinders of high temperature engines through the favorable combination of high service temperature (above about 800.degree. C.), low thermal conductivity (below about 0.2 W/m.degree. C.), and high compressive strength (above about 250 psi). The insulating material is produced by selecting hollow ceramic beads with a softening temperature above about 800.degree. C., a diameter within the range of 20-200 .mu.m, and a wall thickness in the range of about 2-4 .mu.m; compacting the beads and a compatible silicate binder composition under pressure and sintering conditions to provide the desired structural form with the structure having a closed-cell, compact array of bonded beads.

  4. HIGH TEMPERATURE MICROSCOPE AND FURNACE

    DOEpatents

    Olson, D.M.

    1961-01-31

    A high-temperature microscope is offered. It has a reflecting optic situated above a molten specimen in a furnace and reflecting the image of the same downward through an inert optic member in the floor of the furnace, a plurality of spaced reflecting plane mirrors defining a reflecting path around the furnace, a standard microscope supported in the path of and forming the end terminus of the light path.

  5. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOEpatents

    Carruthers, William D.; Boyd, Gary L.

    1993-01-01

    A high temperature ceramic/metallic turbine engine includes a metallic housing which journals a rotor member of the turbine engine. A ceramic disk-like shroud portion of the engine is supported on the metallic housing portion and maintains a close running clearance with the rotor member. A ceramic spacer assembly maintains the close running clearance of the shroud portion and rotor member despite differential thermal movements between the shroud portion and metallic housing portion.

  6. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOEpatents

    Carruthers, William D.; Boyd, Gary L.

    1992-01-01

    A high temperature ceramic/metallic turbine engine includes a metallic housing which journals a rotor member of the turbine engine. A ceramic disk-like shroud portion of the engine is supported on the metallic housing portion and maintains a close running clearance with the rotor member. A ceramic spacer assembly maintains the close running clearance of the shroud portion and rotor member despite differential thermal movements between the shroud portion and metallic housing portion.

  7. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOEpatents

    Carruthers, William D.; Boyd, Gary L.

    1994-01-01

    A high temperature ceramic/metallic turbine engine includes a metallic housing which journals a rotor member of the turbine engine. A ceramic disk-like shroud portion of the engine is supported on the metallic housing portion and maintains a close running clearance with the rotor member. A ceramic spacer assembly maintains the close running clearance of the shroud portion and rotor member despite differential thermal movements between the shroud portion and metallic housing portion.

  8. High Temperature Solar Cell Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Raffaelle, Ryne P.; Merritt, Danielle

    2004-01-01

    The majority of satellites and near-earth probes developed to date have used photovoltaic arrays for power generation. If future mission to probe environments close to the sun will be able to use photovoltaic power, solar cells that can function at high temperatures, under high light intensity, and high radiation conditions must be developed. In this paper, we derive the optimum bandgap as a function of the operating temperature.

  9. High-temperature geothermal cableheads

    SciTech Connect

    Coquat, J.A.; Eifert, R.W.

    1981-11-01

    Two high-temperature, corrosion-resistant logging cableheads which use metal seals and a stable fluid to achieve proper electrical terminations and cable-sonde interfacings are described. A tensile bar provides a calibrated yield point, and a cone assembly anchors the cable armor to the head. Electrical problems of the sort generally ascribable to the cable-sonde interface were absent during demonstration hostile-environment loggings in which these cableheads were used.

  10. High-Temperature Test Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-01

    Center ............. las Cruces, NM White Sands Test Facility NASA-Kennedy Space Center.................... FL NASA-Langley Research Center...We believe that two former suppliers, Pyro -Metrics and lunar Infrared, are no longer in business. In addition, the Hi-Shear product line is now...nitrogen through them for cooling. High-temperature test specimen materials have included Rene’ 41, Inconel, metal matrix composites , etc. The major

  11. High temperature solar thermal receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    A design concept for a high temperature solar thermal receiver to operate at 3 atmospheres pressure and 2500 F outlet was developed. The performance and complexity of windowed matrix, tube-header, and extended surface receivers were evaluated. The windowed matrix receiver proved to offer substantial cost and performance benefits. An efficient and cost effective hardware design was evaluated for a receiver which can be readily interfaced to fuel and chemical processes or to heat engines for power generation.

  12. High-Temperature Structural Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, R. Nathan

    1980-05-01

    The unique properties of ceramics based on silicon carbide and silicon nitride make them prime candidates for use in advanced energy conversion systems. These compounds are the bases for broad families of engineering materials, whose properties are reviewed. The relationships between processing, microstructure, and properties are discussed. A review and assessment of recent progress in the use of these materials in high-temperature engineering systems, and vehicular engines in particular, is presented.

  13. Numerical study of urban traffic flow with dedicated bus lane and intermittent bus lane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, H. B.

    2010-08-01

    Based on the cellular automaton traffic flow model and the concept of public transport priority, a two-lane traffic model with an intermittent bus lane is proposed and the properties of urban traffic flow are studied. The cases of traffic with a dedicated bus lane (DBL), an intermittent bus lane (IBL) and an ordinary two-lane traffic are simulated, and comparisons in the form of the fundamental diagrams and the velocity-density profiles are made between them. It is shown that the DBL has the advantage of freeing buses from traffic interference and also has the disadvantage of disrupting traffic, the IBL is more efficient in improving the bus flow than ordinary two-lane traffic and maintaining the car flow at a higher level at the same time than the DBL, while the ordinary two-lane traffic suppresses public transportation and is not advantageous in easing urban traffic congestion. Also it is indicated that the DBL is only appropriate for low traffic flow in a two-lane traffic system, and this limitation can be partly overcome by opening the bus lane to general traffic intermittently when the bus lane is not in use by buses.

  14. Spontaneous symmetry breaking in a two-lane model for bidirectional overtaking traffic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appert-Rolland, C.; Hilhorst, H. J.; Schehr, G.

    2010-08-01

    Firstly, we consider a unidirectional flux \\bar {\\omega } of vehicles, each of which is characterized by its 'natural' velocity v drawn from a distribution P(v). The traffic flow is modeled as a collection of straight 'world lines' in the time-space plane, with overtaking events represented by a fixed queuing time τ imposed on the overtaking vehicle. This geometrical model exhibits platoon formation and allows, among many other things, for the calculation of the effective average velocity w\\equiv \\phi (v) of a vehicle of natural velocity v. Secondly, we extend the model to two opposite lanes, A and B. We argue that the queuing time τ in one lane is determined by the traffic density in the opposite lane. On the basis of reasonable additional assumptions we establish a set of equations that couple the two lanes and can be solved numerically. It appears that above a critical value \\bar {\\omega }_{\\mathrm {c}} of the control parameter \\bar {\\omega } the symmetry between the lanes is spontaneously broken: there is a slow lane where long platoons form behind the slowest vehicles, and a fast lane where overtaking is easy due to the wide spacing between the platoons in the opposite direction. A variant of the model is studied in which the spatial vehicle density \\bar {\\rho } rather than the flux \\bar {\\omega } is the control parameter. Unequal fluxes \\bar {\\omega }_{\\mathrm {A}} and \\bar {\\omega }_{\\mathrm {B}} in the two lanes are also considered. The symmetry breaking phenomenon exhibited by this model, even though no doubt hard to observe in pure form in real-life traffic, nevertheless indicates a tendency of such traffic.

  15. Lane formation in a driven attractive fluid.

    PubMed

    Wächtler, C W; Kogler, F; Klapp, S H L

    2016-11-01

    We investigate nonequilibrium lane formation in a generic model of a fluid with attractive interactions, that is, a two-dimensional Lennard-Jones fluid composed of two particle species driven in opposite directions. Performing Brownian dynamics simulations for a wide range of parameters, supplemented by a stability analysis based on dynamical density functional theory, we identify generic features of lane formation in the presence of attraction, including structural properties. In fact, we find a variety of states (as compared to purely repulsive systems), as well as a close relation between laning and long-wavelength instabilities of the homogeneous phase such as demixing and condensation.

  16. Lane formation in a driven attractive fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wächtler, C. W.; Kogler, F.; Klapp, S. H. L.

    2016-11-01

    We investigate nonequilibrium lane formation in a generic model of a fluid with attractive interactions, that is, a two-dimensional Lennard-Jones fluid composed of two particle species driven in opposite directions. Performing Brownian dynamics simulations for a wide range of parameters, supplemented by a stability analysis based on dynamical density functional theory, we identify generic features of lane formation in the presence of attraction, including structural properties. In fact, we find a variety of states (as compared to purely repulsive systems), as well as a close relation between laning and long-wavelength instabilities of the homogeneous phase such as demixing and condensation.

  17. High temperature structural sandwich panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papakonstantinou, Christos G.

    High strength composites are being used for making lightweight structural panels that are being employed in aerospace, naval and automotive structures. Recently, there is renewed interest in use of these panels. The major problem of most commercial available sandwich panels is the fire resistance. A recently developed inorganic matrix is investigated for use in cases where fire and high temperature resistance are necessary. The focus of this dissertation is the development of a fireproof composite structural system. Sandwich panels made with polysialate matrices have an excellent potential for use in applications where exposure to high temperatures or fire is a concern. Commercial available sandwich panels will soften and lose nearly all of their compressive strength temperatures lower than 400°C. This dissertation consists of the state of the art, the experimental investigation and the analytical modeling. The state of the art covers the performance of existing high temperature composites, sandwich panels and reinforced concrete beams strengthened with Fiber Reinforced Polymers (FRP). The experimental part consists of four major components: (i) Development of a fireproof syntactic foam with maximum specific strength, (ii) Development of a lightweight syntactic foam based on polystyrene spheres, (iii) Development of the composite system for the skins. The variables are the skin thickness, modulus of elasticity of skin and high temperature resistance, and (iv) Experimental evaluation of the flexural behavior of sandwich panels. Analytical modeling consists of a model for the flexural behavior of lightweight sandwich panels, and a model for deflection calculations of reinforced concrete beams strengthened with FRP subjected to fatigue loading. The experimental and analytical results show that sandwich panels made with polysialate matrices and ceramic spheres do not lose their load bearing capability during severe fire exposure, where temperatures reach several

  18. Passivation of high temperature superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, Richard P. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The surface of high temperature superconductors such as YBa2Cu3O(7-x) are passivated by reacting the native Y, Ba and Cu metal ions with an anion such as sulfate or oxalate to form a surface film that is impervious to water and has a solubility in water of no more than 10(exp -3) M. The passivating treatment is preferably conducted by immersing the surface in dilute aqueous acid solution since more soluble species dissolve into the solution. The treatment does not degrade the superconducting properties of the bulk material.

  19. High Temperature Sorbents for Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Pramod K. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A sorbent capable of removing trace amounts of oxygen (ppt) from a gas stream at a high temperature above 200 C is introduced. The sorbent comprises a porous alumina silicate support such as zeolite containing from 1 to 10 percent by weight of ion exchanged transition metal such as copper or cobalt ions and 0.05 to 1.0 percent by weight of an activator selected from a platinum group metal such as platinum. The activation temperature, oxygen sorption and reducibility are all improved by the presence of the platinum activator.

  20. High temperature sorbents for oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Pramod K. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A sorbent capable of removing trace amounts of oxygen (ppt) from a gas stream at a high temperature above 200 C comprising a porous alumina silicate support, such as zeolite, containing from 1 to 10 percent by weight of ion exchanged transition metal, such as copper or cobalt ions, and 0.05 to 1.0 percent by weight of an activator selected from a platinum group metal such as platinum is described. The activation temperature, oxygen sorption, and reducibility are all improved by the presence of the platinum activator.

  1. "Green" High-Temperature Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Michael A.

    1998-01-01

    PMR-15 is a processable, high-temperature polymer developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center in the 1970's principally for aeropropulsion applications. Use of fiber-reinforced polymer matrix composites in these applications can lead to substantial weight savings, thereby leading to improved fuel economy, increased passenger and payload capacity, and better maneuverability. PMR-15 is used fairly extensively in military and commercial aircraft engines components seeing service temperatures as high as 500 F (260 C), such as the outer bypass duct for the F-404 engine. The current world-wide market for PMR-15 materials (resins, adhesives, and composites) is on the order of $6 to 10 million annually.

  2. High-temperature oxide thermoelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terasaki, Ichiro

    2011-09-01

    We have evaluated the power factor of transition metal oxides at high temperatures using the Heikes formula and the Ioffe-Regel conductivity. The evaluated power factor is found to be nearly independent of carrier concentration in a wide range of doping, and explains the experimental data for cobalt oxides well. This suggests that the same power factor can be obtained with a thermopower larger than 2kB/e, and also suggests a reasonably high value of the dimensionless figure of merit ZT. We propose an oxide thermoelectric power generator by using materials having a thermopower larger than 300 μV/K.

  3. Thermodynamics of High Temperature Materials.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-01

    Department of Commerce 23 -1A , /7 National Bureau of Standards A102 Washington, D.C. 20234 ______________ I I. CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME AND ADDRESS Air...DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT (of this Report) r ~Appro-,’. f’or public re r-: e ; 17. DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT (of the abstract entered in Block 20, It different from...8SOLETE SCRT SEUIYCLASSIFICATION OF TNIS PAGE " e aoEtr AEOST.1-0443 THERMODYNAMICS OF HIGH TEMPERATURE MATERIALS Annual Report for the Period of 1 October

  4. CONFINEMENT OF HIGH TEMPERATURE PLASMA

    DOEpatents

    Koenig, H.R.

    1963-05-01

    The confinement of a high temperature plasma in a stellarator in which the magnetic confinement has tended to shift the plasma from the center of the curved, U-shaped end loops is described. Magnetic means are provided for counteracting this tendency of the plasma to be shifted away from the center of the end loops, and in one embodiment this magnetic means is a longitudinally extending magnetic field such as is provided by two sets of parallel conductors bent to follow the U-shaped curvature of the end loops and energized oppositely on the inside and outside of this curvature. (AEC)

  5. High temperature sealed electrochemical cell

    SciTech Connect

    Valentin Chung, Brice Hoani; Burke, Paul J.; Sadoway, Donald R.

    2015-10-06

    A cell for high temperature electrochemical reactions is provided. The cell includes a container, at least a portion of the container acting as a first electrode. An extension tube has a first end and a second end, the extension tube coupled to the container at the second end forming a conduit from the container to said first end. A second electrode is positioned in the container and extends out of the container via the conduit. A seal is positioned proximate the first end of the extension tube, for sealing the cell.

  6. The Synchrotron Radiation Beamline 8-b at VEPP-4 Collider for SAXS, WAXS and Micro Tomography Investigation of Fast Processes at Extreme Condition of High Temperature and Pressure with Nanosecond Time Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolochko, B. P.; Kosov, A. V.; Evdokov, O. V.; Zhogin, I. L.; Ten, K. A.; Pruuel, E. R.; Shekchtman, L. I.; Aulchenko, V. M.; Zhulanov, V. V.; Piminov, P. F.; Nazmov, V. P.; Zolotarev, K. V.; Kulipanov, G. N.

    The main purpose of the beamline design - realization of experiments using explosive charges up to 200 grams of TNT equivalent. To achieve this goal is necessary to use a of hard range of photons in the region of 30-60 keV. Additional requirement - the development of a powerful explosion chamber, and very fast one coordinate detector DIMEX. The fist detonation experiments was made with explosive 40 mm diameter. Test WAXS experiments was made and time resolution of 73 ps was received. SAXS/WAXS experiments was made at accelerators complex VEPP-3/VEPP-4.

  7. 8 CFR 287.11 - Pre-enrolled Access Lane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Pre-enrolled Access Lane. 287.11 Section...; POWERS AND DUTIES § 287.11 Pre-enrolled Access Lane. (a) Pre-enrolled Access Lane (PAL). A PAL is a designated traffic lane located at a Service checkpoint, which, when in operation, may be used exclusively...

  8. 8 CFR 287.11 - Pre-enrolled Access Lane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pre-enrolled Access Lane. 287.11 Section...; POWERS AND DUTIES § 287.11 Pre-enrolled Access Lane. (a) Pre-enrolled Access Lane (PAL). A PAL is a designated traffic lane located at a Service checkpoint, which, when in operation, may be used exclusively...

  9. 8 CFR 287.11 - Pre-enrolled Access Lane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Pre-enrolled Access Lane. 287.11 Section...; POWERS AND DUTIES § 287.11 Pre-enrolled Access Lane. (a) Pre-enrolled Access Lane (PAL). A PAL is a designated traffic lane located at a Service checkpoint, which, when in operation, may be used exclusively...

  10. 8 CFR 287.11 - Pre-enrolled Access Lane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Pre-enrolled Access Lane. 287.11 Section...; POWERS AND DUTIES § 287.11 Pre-enrolled Access Lane. (a) Pre-enrolled Access Lane (PAL). A PAL is a... checkpoint. (b) General requirements for Pre-enrolled Access Lane Program. (1) Participation in the...

  11. 8 CFR 287.11 - Pre-enrolled Access Lane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pre-enrolled Access Lane. 287.11 Section...; POWERS AND DUTIES § 287.11 Pre-enrolled Access Lane. (a) Pre-enrolled Access Lane (PAL). A PAL is a... checkpoint. (b) General requirements for Pre-enrolled Access Lane Program. (1) Participation in the...

  12. Containerless high temperature property measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nordine, Paul C.; Weber, J. K. Richard; Krishnan, Shankar; Anderson, Collin D.

    1991-01-01

    Containerless processing in the low gravity environment of space provides the opportunity to increase the temperature at which well controlled processing of and property measurements on materials is possible. This project was directed towards advancing containerless processing and property measurement techniques for application to materials research at high temperatures in space. Containerless high temperature material property studies include measurements of the vapor pressure, melting temperature, optical properties, and spectral emissivities of solid boron. The reaction of boron with nitrogen was also studied by laser polarimetric measurement of boron nitride film growth. The optical properties and spectral emissivities were measured for solid and liquid silicon, niobium, and zirconium; liquid aluminum and titanium; and liquid Ti-Al alloys of 5 to 60 atomic pct. titanium. Alternative means for noncontact temperature measurement in the absence of material emissivity data were evaluated. Also, the application of laser induced fluorescence for component activity measurements in electromagnetic levitated liquids was studied, along with the feasibility of a hybrid aerodynamic electromagnetic levitation technique.

  13. High temperature catalytic membrane reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-03-01

    Current state-of-the-art inorganic oxide membranes offer the potential of being modified to yield catalytic properties. The resulting modules may be configured to simultaneously induce catalytic reactions with product concentration and separation in a single processing step. Processes utilizing such catalytically active membrane reactors have the potential for dramatically increasing yield reactions which are currently limited by either thermodynamic equilibria, product inhibition, or kinetic selectivity. Examples of commercial interest include hydrogenation, dehydrogenation, partial and selective oxidation, hydrations, hydrocarbon cracking, olefin metathesis, hydroformylation, and olefin polymerization. A large portion of the most significant reactions fall into the category of high temperature, gas phase chemical and petrochemical processes. Microporous oxide membranes are well suited for these applications. A program is proposed to investigate selected model reactions of commercial interest (i.e. dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene to styrene and dehydrogenation of butane to butadiene) using a high temperature catalytic membrane reactor. Membranes will be developed, reaction dynamics characterized, and production processes developed, culminating in laboratory-scale demonstration of technical and economic feasibility. As a result, the anticipated increased yield per reactor pass economic incentives are envisioned. First, a large decrease in the temperature required to obtain high yield should be possible because of the reduced driving force requirement. Significantly higher conversion per pass implies a reduced recycle ratio, as well as reduced reactor size. Both factors result in reduced capital costs, as well as savings in cost of reactants and energy.

  14. High temperature in absorption measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krech, R. H.; Pugh, E. R.

    1981-09-01

    The temperature dependence of the absorption coefficient of water vapor was measured to determine the feasibility of using water vapor as a molecular seed to couple 10.6 micrometer CO2 laser radiation into a propellant for use in a high performance laser heated rocket thruster. A series of shock tube experiments were performed to determine the temperature dependence of the absorption coefficient of water vapor at high temperatures on the P(16), P(18) and P(20) 10.6 micrometer CO2 laser transitions. Measurements were made behind both incident and reflected shock waves encompassing a temperature range from 600 K to 3700 K at pressures from 1 to 40 atmospheres in 2, 5, and 10 mole percent water vapor in argon gas mixtures. Within the spectral range (944 to 948 cm) covered, no significant variation in the absorption coefficient was observed as a function of laser wavelength, water concentration, total pressure, or collision partner. Observations suggest that the water lines are sufficiently broadened to act as a continuum absorber under conditions to be found in a laser-heated rocket thruster. The measured laser high temperature absorption coefficients are 50 percent lower than the values obtained from the Ludwig empirical curve fit to low resolution data.

  15. High temperature loop heat pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, W.G.; Bland, J.J.; Fershtater, Y.; Goncharov, K.A.; Nikitkin, M.; Juhasz, A.

    1995-12-31

    Advantages of loop heat pipes over conventional heat pipes include self-priming during start-up, improved tolerance for noncondensible gas, and ability for ground testing in any orientation. The applications for high temperature, alkali-metal working fluid loop heat pipes include space radiators, and bimodal systems. A high temperature loop heat pipe was fabricated and tested at 850 K, using cesium as the working fluid. Previous loop heat pipes were tested with ambient temperature working fluids at temperatures below about 450 K. The loop heat pipe had a titanium envelope, and a titanium aluminide wick. The maximum cesium loop heat pipe power was only about 600 watts, which was lower the predicted 1,000 W power. The power limitation may be due to a wettability problem with the cesium not completely wetting the titanium aluminide wick. This would reduce the pumping capability of the wick, and the maximum power that the heat pipe could carry. This problem could be solved by using a refractory metal powder wick, since the alkali metals are known to wet refractory metal wicks.

  16. A versatile system for Hall effect measurements at high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunes, Murat; Sato, Hisanori; Pinsard-Gaudart, Loreynne; Berardan, David; Dragoe, Nita

    2017-10-01

    We present a fast Hall effect measurement system that can be used at high temperature. The use of a homogeneous high field permanent magnet in a Halbach configuration allows fast measurements in various DC and AC current fields with step and continuous measurement modes. The results are presented of measurements on platinum film at room temperature and Ge and BiCuSeO between 300 K and 650 K.

  17. Active faulting in the Walker Lane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesnousky, Steven G.

    2005-06-01

    Deformation across the San Andreas and Walker Lane fault systems accounts for most relative Pacific-North American transform plate motion. The Walker Lane is composed of discontinuous sets of right-slip faults that are located to the east and strike approximately parallel to the San Andreas fault system. Mapping of active faults in the central Walker Lane shows that right-lateral shear is locally accommodated by rotation of crustal blocks bounded by steep-dipping east striking left-slip faults. The left slip and clockwise rotation of crustal blocks bounded by the east striking faults has produced major basins in the area, including Rattlesnake and Garfield flats; Teels, Columbus and Rhodes salt marshes; and Queen Valley. The Benton Springs and Petrified Springs faults are the major northwest striking structures currently accommodating transform motion in the central Walker Lane. Right-lateral offsets of late Pleistocene surfaces along the two faults point to slip rates of at least 1 mm/yr. The northern limit of northwest trending strike-slip faults in the central Walker Lane is abrupt and reflects transfer of strike-slip to dip-slip deformation in the western Basin and Range and transformation of right slip into rotation of crustal blocks to the north. The transfer of strike slip in the central Walker Lane to dip slip in the western Basin and Range correlates to a northward broadening of the modern strain field suggested by geodesy and appears to be a long-lived feature of the deformation field. The complexity of faulting and apparent rotation of crustal blocks within the Walker Lane is consistent with the concept of a partially detached and elastic-brittle crust that is being transported on a continuously deforming layer below. The regional pattern of faulting within the Walker Lane is more complex than observed along the San Andreas fault system to the west. The difference is attributed to the relatively less cumulative slip that has occurred across the Walker

  18. HIgh Temperature Photocatalysis over Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westrich, Thomas A.

    Due in large part to in prevalence of solar energy, increasing demand of energy production (from all sources), and the uncertain future of petroleum energy feedstocks, solar energy harvesting and other photochemical systems will play a major role in the developing energy market. This dissertation focuses on a novel photochemical reaction process: high temperature photocatalysis (i.e., photocatalysis conducted above ambient temperatures, T ≥ 100°C). The overarching hypothesis of this process is that photo-generated charge carriers are able to constructively participate in thermo-catalytic chemical reactions, thereby increasing catalytic rates at one temperature, or maintaining catalytic rates at lower temperatures. The photocatalytic oxidation of carbon deposits in an operational hydrocarbon reformer is one envisioned application of high temperature photocatalysis. Carbon build-up during hydrocarbon reforming results in catalyst deactivation, in the worst cases, this was shown to happen in a period of minutes with a liquid hydrocarbon. In the presence of steam, oxygen, and above-ambient temperatures, carbonaceous deposits were photocatalytically oxidized over very long periods (t ≥ 24 hours). This initial experiment exemplified the necessity of a fundamental assessment of high temperature photocatalytic activity. Fundamental understanding of the mechanisms that affect photocatalytic activity as a function of temperatures was achieved using an ethylene photocatalytic oxidation probe reaction. Maximum ethylene photocatalytic oxidation rates were observed between 100 °C and 200 °C; the maximum photocatalytic rates were approximately a factor of 2 larger than photocatalytic rates at ambient temperatures. The loss of photocatalytic activity at temperatures above 200 °C is due to a non-radiative multi-phonon recombination mechanism. Further, it was shown that the fundamental rate of recombination (as a function of temperature) can be effectively modeled as a

  19. High temperature polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Michael A.

    1987-01-01

    With the increased emphasis on high performance aircraft the need for lightweight, thermal/oxidatively stable materials is growing. Because of their ease of fabrication, high specific strength, and ability to be tailored chemically to produce a variety of mechanical and physical properties, polymers and polymer matrix composites present themselves as attractive materials for a number of aeropropulsion applications. In the early 1970s researchers at the NASA Lewis Research Center developed a highly processable, thermally stable (600 F) polyimide, PMR-15. Since that time, PMR-15 has become commercially available and has found use in military aircraft, in particular, the F-404 engine for the Navy's F/A-18 strike fighter. The NASA Lewis'contributions to high temperature polymer matrix composite research will be discussed as well as current and future directions.

  20. High Temperature Particle Filtration Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Besmann, T.M.

    2001-11-13

    High temperature filtration can serve to improve the economic, environmental, and energy performance of chemical processes. This project was designed to evaluate the stability of filtration materials in the environments of the production of dimethyldichlorosilane (DDS). In cooperation with Dow Corning, chemical environments for the fluidized bed reactor where silicon is converted to DDS and the incinerator where vents are cornbusted were characterized. At Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) an exposure system was developed that could simulate these two environments. Filter samples obtained from third parties were exposed to the environments for periods up to 1000 hours. Mechanical properties before and after exposure were determined by burst-testing rings of filter material. The results indicated that several types of filter materials would likely perform well in the fluid bed environment, and two materials would be good candidates for the incinerator environment.

  1. Faraday imaging at high temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, L.A.; Reichert, P.

    1997-03-18

    A Faraday filter rejects background light from self-luminous thermal objects, but transmits laser light at the passband wavelength, thus providing an ultra-narrow optical bandpass filter. The filter preserves images so a camera looking through a Faraday filter at a hot target illuminated by a laser will not see the thermal radiation but will see the laser radiation. Faraday filters are useful for monitoring or inspecting the uranium separator chamber in an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process. Other uses include viewing welds, furnaces, plasma jets, combustion chambers, and other high temperature objects. These filters are can be produced at many discrete wavelengths. A Faraday filter consists of a pair of crossed polarizers on either side of a heated vapor cell mounted inside a solenoid. 3 figs.

  2. Faraday imaging at high temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Lloyd A.; Reichert, Patrick

    1997-01-01

    A Faraday filter rejects background light from self-luminous thermal objects, but transmits laser light at the passband wavelength, thus providing an ultra-narrow optical bandpass filter. The filter preserves images so a camera looking through a Faraday filter at a hot target illuminated by a laser will not see the thermal radiation but will see the laser radiation. Faraday filters are useful for monitoring or inspecting the uranium separator chamber in an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process. Other uses include viewing welds, furnaces, plasma jets, combustion chambers, and other high temperature objects. These filters are can be produced at many discrete wavelengths. A Faraday filter consists of a pair of crossed polarizers on either side of a heated vapor cell mounted inside a solenoid.

  3. High-temperature conventional superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eremets, M. I.; Drozdov, A. P.

    2017-02-01

    Conventional superconductors are described well by the Bardeen – Cooper – Schrieffer (BCS) theory (1957) and its related theories, all of which importantly put no explicit limit on transition temperature Tc. While this allows, in principle, room-temperature superconductivity, no such phenomenon has been observed. Since the discovery of superconductivity in 1911, the measured critical temperature of BCS superconductors has not until recently exceeded 39 K. In 2014, hydrogen sulfide under high pressure was experimentally found to exhibit superconductivity at Tc = 200 K, a record high value which greatly exceeds that of the previous class of high-temperature superconductors, the cuprates. The superconductivity mechanism in cuprates has not yet been explained. Over a period of 25 years, the critical temperature of cuprates has not been increased above 164 K. The paper reviews research on record-high Tc superconductivity in hydrogen sulphide and other hydrides. Prospects for increasing Tc to room temperature are also discussed.

  4. High-temperature conventional superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eremets, M. I.; Drozdov, A. P.

    2016-11-01

    Conventional superconductors are described well by the Bardeen - Cooper - Schrieffer (BCS) theory (1957) and its related theories, all of which importantly put no explicit limit on transition temperature T_c. While this allows, in principle, room-temperature superconductivity, no such phenomenon has been observed. Since the discovery of superconductivity in 1911, the measured critical temperature of BCS superconductors has not until recently exceeded 39 K. In 2014, hydrogen sulfide under high pressure was experimentally found to exhibit superconductivity at T_c=200 K, a record high value which greatly exceeds that of the previous class of high-temperature superconductors, the cuprates. The superconductivity mechanism in cuprates has not yet been explained. Over a period of 25 years, the critical temperature of cuprates has not been increased above 164 K. The paper reviews research on record-high T_c superconductivity in hydrogen sulphide and other hydrides. Prospects for increasing T_c to room temperature are also discussed.

  5. High Temperature Transfer Molding Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G., Jr. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    High temperature resins containing phenylethynyl groups that are processable by transfer molding have been prepared. These phenylethynyl containing oligomers were prepared from aromatic diamines containing phenylethynyl groups and various ratios of phthalic anhydride and 4-phenylethynlphthalic anhydride in glacial acetic acid to form a mixture of imide compounds in one step. This synthetic approach is advantageous since the products are a mixture of compounds and consequently exhibit a relatively low melting temperature. In addition, these materials exhibit low melt viscosities which are stable for several hours at 210-275 C, and since the thermal reaction of the phenylethynyl group does not occur to any appreciable extent at temperatures below 300 C, these materials have a broad processing window. Upon thermal cure at approximately 300-350 C, the phenylethynyl groups react to provide a crosslinked resin system. These new materials exhibit excellent properties and are potentially useful as adhesives, coatings, films, moldings and composite matrices.

  6. Nonlinear plasmonics at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivan, Yonatan; Chu, Shi-Wei

    2017-01-01

    We solve the Maxwell and heat equations self-consistently for metal nanoparticles under intense continuous wave (CW) illumination. Unlike previous studies, we rely on experimentally-measured data for metal permittivity for increasing temperature and for the visible spectral range. We show that the thermal nonlinearity of the metal can lead to substantial deviations from the predictions of the linear model for the temperature and field distribution and, thus, can explain qualitatively the strong nonlinear scattering from such configurations observed experimentally. We also show that the incompleteness of existing data of the temperature dependence of the thermal properties of the system prevents reaching a quantitative agreement between the measured and calculated scattering data. This modeling approach is essential for the identification of the underlying physical mechanism responsible for the thermo-optical nonlinearity of the metal and should be adopted in all applications of high-temperature nonlinear plasmonics, especially for refractory metals, for both CW and pulsed illumination.

  7. Nonlinear plasmonics at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivan, Yonatan; Chu, Shi-Wei

    2016-10-01

    We solve the Maxwell and heat equations self-consistently for metal nanoparticles under intense continuous wave (CW) illumination. Unlike previous studies, we rely on experimentally-measured data for metal permittivity for increasing temperature and for the visible spectral range. We show that the thermal nonlinearity of the metal can lead to substantial deviations from the predictions of the linear model for the temperature and field distribution and, thus, can explain qualitatively the strong nonlinear scattering from such configurations observed experimentally. We also show that the incompleteness of existing data of the temperature dependence of the thermal properties of the system prevents reaching a quantitative agreement between the measured and calculated scattering data. This modeling approach is essential for the identification of the underlying physical mechanism responsible for the thermo-optical nonlinearity of the metal and should be adopted in all applications of high-temperature nonlinear plasmonics, especially for refractory metals, for both CW and pulsed illumination.

  8. High-temperature-measuring device

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1981-01-27

    A temperature measuring device for very high design temperatures (to 2000/sup 0/C) is described. The device comprises a homogenous base structure preferably in the form of a sphere or cylinder. The base structure contains a large number of individual walled cells. The base structure has a decreasing coefficient of elasticity within the temperature range being monitored. A predetermined quantity of inert gas is confined within each cell. The cells are dimensonally stable at the normal working temperature of the device. Increases in gaseous pressure within the cells will permanently deform the cell walls at temperatures within the high temperature range to be measured. Such deformation can be correlated to temperature by calibrating similarly constructed devices under known time and temperature conditions.

  9. High temperature size selective membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, S.F.; Swamikannu, A.X.

    1993-09-01

    The high temperature membrane, capable of operation above 550{degree}C, is designed to be a composite membrane composed of a thin layer of a size selective membrane supported by a microporous ceramic support. The kinetic diameters of H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} are 2.96 {Angstrom} and 4.00 {Angstrom}. The thin layer will be made from CMS whose pore size will be controlled to be less than 4 {Angstrom}. The membrane will be truly size selective and be impermeable to carbon dioxide. The membrane will have higher selectivity than membranes which operate on Knudsen diffusion mechanism. The ceramic support will be fabricated from Allied Signal`s proprietary Blackglas{trademark} resin. The ceramic material, noted for its high thermal and oxidative resistance, has a coefficient of thermal expansion which matches closely that of CMS. The close match will insure mechanical integrity when the membrane is subjected to thermal cycles. The CMS layer will be produced by controlled pyrolysis of polymeric precursors. Pore size will be suitably modified by post-treatments to the carbon. The composite membrane will be tested for its permeation properties at 550{degree}C or higher. Thermal, mechanical and chemical stability of the membrane will be assessed. We have produced several samples of CMS from polymeric precursors. We have initiated work also on the preparation of microporous supports from Blackglas{trademark} resin. We have completed the design of the high temperature membrane pilot plant. The membrane cell was fabricated out of two kinds of stainless steel. The inner parts are made of SS 316 and the outer ring made of SS 420. The greater thermal expansion of the SS 316 will help obtain a leak free seal at the operating temperatures.

  10. High temperature control rod assembly

    DOEpatents

    Vollman, Russell E.

    1991-01-01

    A high temperature nuclear control rod assembly comprises a plurality of substantially cylindrical segments flexibly joined together in succession by ball joints. The segments are made of a high temperature graphite or carbon-carbon composite. The segment includes a hollow cylindrical sleeve which has an opening for receiving neutron-absorbing material in the form of pellets or compacted rings. The sleeve has a threaded sleeve bore and outer threaded surface. A cylindrical support post has a threaded shaft at one end which is threadably engaged with the sleeve bore to rigidly couple the support post to the sleeve. The other end of the post is formed with a ball portion. A hollow cylindrical collar has an inner threaded surface engageable with the outer threaded surface of the sleeve to rigidly couple the collar to the sleeve. the collar also has a socket portion which cooperates with the ball portion to flexibly connect segments together to form a ball and socket-type joint. In another embodiment, the segment comprises a support member which has a threaded shaft portion and a ball surface portion. The threaded shaft portion is engageable with an inner threaded surface of a ring for rigidly coupling the support member to the ring. The ring in turn has an outer surface at one end which is threadably engageably with a hollow cylindrical sleeve. The other end of the sleeve is formed with a socket portion for engagement with a ball portion of the support member. In yet another embodiment, a secondary rod is slidably inserted in a hollow channel through the center of the segment to provide additional strength. A method for controlling a nuclear reactor utilizing the control rod assembly is also included.

  11. Towards a semiquantitative non invasive characterisation of Tyrian purple dye composition: Convergence of UV-Visible reflectance spectroscopy and fast-high temperature-high performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detection.

    PubMed

    Clementi, Catia; Nowik, Witold; Romani, Aldo; Cardon, Dominique; Trojanowicz, Marek; Davantès, Athénaïs; Chaminade, Pierre

    2016-07-05

    In this paper, partial least square (PLS) regression is innovatively applied for a semi-quantitative non invasive study of the most precious dye of Antiquity: Tyrian purple. This original approach for the study of organic dyes in the cultural heritage field, is based on the correlation of spectrophotometric (UV-Visible) and chromatographic (Fast-HT-HPLC-PDA) data from an extensive set of textiles prepared with different snail species according to historical recipes. A cross-validated PLS model, based on the quantity of 6,6'-dibromoindigotin, displays an excellent correlation factor (R(2)Y = 0.987) between values determined by chromatography and those predicted from reflectance spectra. This indicates that the spectral features of Tyrian purple on textile fibre is strictly related to the amount of this indigoid component whose content may be non invasively predicted from reflectance spectrum. The studied correlation also highlights that, independently of the dyeing method and nature of the textile fibre used, the relative content of 6,6'-dibromindigotin may be used as a parameter to distinguish samples prepared with Hexaplex trunculus L. snails from those prepared with further mollusc species. To validate this model, archaeological textile fragments dating from the Roman period were successfully examined. The results achieved open an absolutely new way in Tyrian purple analysis in cultural heritage by non invasive spectroscopic techniques attesting their convergence with HPLC and giving them a semi-quantitative value.

  12. The Walker Lane in northeastern California

    SciTech Connect

    Saucedo, G.J.; Wagner, D.L.; Grose, T.L.T.

    1990-01-01

    The Walker Lane (Locke and others, 1940) was defined as a narrow northwest-trending dextral fault zone that separates basin- and range topography on the east from diverse topography on the west that extends discontinuously from Lake Mead to Honey Lake. The term Walker Lane Belt (Steward, 1988) expands the feature to include a wide zone east of the Sierra Nevada. Pease (1969), Hannah (1977), and Grose (1986) suggested that the tectonic characteristics of Walker Lane continue into the Modoc Plateau. The authors believe that it is useful to recognize the Walker Lane or Walker Lane Belt in the Modoc Plateau. Within the Modoc Plateau, a 25-km wide (15-mile wide) zone of northwest-southeast faults herein recognized as the Walker Lane, trends N35{degree}W from Honey Lake Basin to Medicine Lake Highland. Mapping in the Eagle Lake area revealed northwest-southeast, north-south, and northeast-southwest late Quaternary faults and rifts, eruptive fissures, small tectonic depressions, and the large Eagle Lake volcano-tectonic depression. To the east is a remarkably unfaulted Neogene volcanic terrane extending 70 km (42 miles) eastward to the Dry Valley-Smoke Creek Desert fault system in Nevada. To the west in the Cascades complex late Pliocene-Quaternary faulting, linear basaltic cones, and andesite volcanoes are all aligned N15{degree}-30{degree}W. This Modoc part of the Walker Lane Belt displays blocks tilted mostly 3{degree}-10{degree}E bounded by west-dipping normal faults and right diagonal normal faults. Left stepping north-south trending rifts occur within northwest trending, straight right diagonal-slip fault zones.

  13. High temperature two component explosive

    DOEpatents

    Mars, James E.; Poole, Donald R.; Schmidt, Eckart W.; Wang, Charles

    1981-01-01

    A two component, high temperature, thermally stable explosive composition comprises a liquid or low melting oxidizer and a liquid or low melting organic fuel. The oxidizer and fuel in admixture are incapable of substantial spontaneous exothermic reaction at temperatures on the order of 475.degree. K. At temperatures on the order of 475.degree. K., the oxidizer and fuel in admixture have an activation energy of at least about 40 kcal/mol. As a result of the high activation energy, the preferred explosive compositions are nondetonable as solids at ambient temperature, and become detonable only when heated beyond the melting point. Preferable oxidizers are selected from alkali or alkaline earth metal nitrates, nitrites, perchlorates, and/or mixtures thereof. Preferred fuels are organic compounds having polar hydrophilic groups. The most preferred fuels are guanidinium nitrate, acetamide and mixtures of the two. Most preferred oxidizers are eutectic mixtures of lithium nitrate, potassium nitrate and sodium nitrate, of sodium nitrite, sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate, and of potassium nitrate, calcium nitrate and sodium nitrate.

  14. High temperature superconducting magnetic refrigeration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumenfeld, P. E.; Prenger, F. C.; Sternberg, A.; Zimm, C.

    2002-05-01

    A near-room temperature active magnetic regenerative refrigerator (AMRR) was designed and built using a high-temperature superconducting (HTS) magnet in a charge-discharge cycle and a gadolinium-packed regenerative bed as the magnetocaloric component. Current to the HTS magnet was ramped periodically from zero to 100 amperes, which generated a ramp in field strength from zero to 1.7 tesla. Water was moved periodically through the bed and through hot and cold heat exchangers to accomplish a continuous refrigeration cycle. Cycle periods as short as 30 seconds were realized. Refrigerator performance was measured in terms of cooling capacity as a function of temperature span and in terms of efficiency expressed as a percentage of maximum obtainable (Carnot) efficiency. A three-watt cooling capacity was measured over a temperature span of 15 degrees C between hot and cold end temperatures of 25 degrees C and 10 degrees C. This experiment is directed to two possible applications for magnetic refrigeration: a no-moving part cryogenic refrigerator for space applications, and a compact permanent magnet refrigerator for commercial and consumer applications.

  15. High Temperature Superconducting Underground Cable

    SciTech Connect

    Farrell, Roger, A.

    2010-02-28

    The purpose of this Project was to design, build, install and demonstrate the technical feasibility of an underground high temperature superconducting (HTS) power cable installed between two utility substations. In the first phase two HTS cables, 320 m and 30 m in length, were constructed using 1st generation BSCCO wire. The two 34.5 kV, 800 Arms, 48 MVA sections were connected together using a superconducting joint in an underground vault. In the second phase the 30 m BSCCO cable was replaced by one constructed with 2nd generation YBCO wire. 2nd generation wire is needed for commercialization because of inherent cost and performance benefits. Primary objectives of the Project were to build and operate an HTS cable system which demonstrates significant progress towards commercial progress and addresses real world utility concerns such as installation, maintenance, reliability and compatibility with the existing grid. Four key technical areas addressed were the HTS cable and terminations (where the cable connects to the grid), cryogenic refrigeration system, underground cable-to-cable joint (needed for replacement of cable sections) and cost-effective 2nd generation HTS wire. This was the world’s first installation and operation of an HTS cable underground, between two utility substations as well as the first to demonstrate a cable-to-cable joint, remote monitoring system and 2nd generation HTS.

  16. High-temperature sand consolidation

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, R.H.; Suries, B.W.; Kleke, D.E.

    1987-05-01

    A sand consolidation system has been developed that is stable to wellbore temperatures of 700/sup 0/F (371/sup 0/C). Two improvements in technique have contributed to this development. First, a controlled quantity of catalyst is absorbed on the sand. Consequently, consolidation occurs only on or very near the sand grains, resulting in a high-permeability consolidation. Second, the reaction is driven to completion by avoiding, insofar as possible, the adverse effect of water. The resin used for the consolidation is a very viscous derivative of furfuryl alcohol that requires a diluent to make it injectable. The diulent used to reduce viscosity is a hydrolyzable ester. The diluted fluid, which is sill more viscous than water, displaces much of the water present in the pore space. During the catalyzed consolidation, water produced by the polymerization is removed by reaction with the diluent (hydrolysis of the ester). The high-molecular-weight polymeric consolidation is better able to resist the high temperatures encountered in steam-displacement producing wells. Adaptation of the technology has been made so that the process can also be used in low-temperature wells. Because of the catalysis method, long shelf life is guaranteed for the consolidating formation.

  17. Sialons as high temperature insulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, W. M.; Kuo, Y. S.

    1978-01-01

    Sialons were evaluated for application as high temperature electrical insulators in contact with molybdenum and tungsten components in hard vacuum applications. Both D.C. and variable frequency A.C. resistivity data indicate the sialons to have electrical resistivity similar to common oxide in the 1000 C or higher range. Metallographic evaluations indicate good bonding of the type 15R ALN polytype to molybdenum and tungsten. The beta prime or modified silicon nitride phase was unacceptable in terms of vacuum stability. Additives effect on electrical resistivity. Similar resistivity decreases were produced by additions of molybdenum or tungsten to form cermets. The use of hot pressing at 1800 C with ALN, Al2 O3 and Si3N4 starting powders produced a better product than did a combination of SiO2 and AIN staring powders. It was indicated that sialons will be suitable insulators in the 1600K range in contact with molybdenum or tungsten if they are produced as a pure ceramic and subsequently bonded to the metal components at temperatures in the 1600K range.

  18. High-temperature thermocouples and related methods

    DOEpatents

    Rempe, Joy L [Idaho Falls, ID; Knudson, Darrell L [Firth, ID; Condie, Keith G [Idaho Falls, ID; Wilkins, S Curt [Idaho Falls, ID

    2011-01-18

    A high-temperature thermocouple and methods for fabricating a thermocouple capable of long-term operation in high-temperature, hostile environments without significant signal degradation or shortened thermocouple lifetime due to heat induced brittleness.

  19. Yang-Mills effective action at high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oswald, M.

    2005-06-01

    Yang-Mills theory undergoes a transition from a confined to a deconfined phase in the intermediate temperature regime, where perturbation theory fails. In order to approach this phase transition from the high temperature side we study the effective action for the eigenvalues of the order parameter, the Polyakov loop, in the whole range of its possible variation. By means of a covariant derivative expansion we integrate out fast varying quantum fluctuations around background gluon fields and assume that these are slowly varying, but that the amplitude of A4 is arbitrary. Our results can be used to study correlation functions of the order parameter at high temperatures.

  20. High temperature power electronics for space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammoud, Ahmad N.; Baumann, Eric D.; Myers, Ira T.; Overton, Eric

    1991-01-01

    A high temperature electronics program at NASA Lewis Research Center focuses on dielectric and insulating materials research, development and testing of high temperature power components, and integration of the developed components and devices into a demonstrable 200 C power system, such as inverter. An overview of the program and a description of the in-house high temperature facilities along with experimental data obtained on high temperature materials are presented.

  1. High Temperature Chemistry at NASA: Hot Topics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.

    2014-01-01

    High Temperature issues in aircraft engines Hot section: Ni and Co based Superalloys Oxidation and Corrosion (Durability) at high temperatures. Thermal protection system (TPS) and RCC (Reinforced Carbon-Carbon) on the Space Shuttle Orbiter. High temperatures in other worlds: Planets close to their stars.

  2. High temperature suppression of dioxins.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Ming-Xiu; Chen, Tong; Fu, Jian-Ying; Lin, Xiao-Qing; Lu, Sheng-Yong; Li, Xiao-Dong; Yan, Jian-Hua; Buekens, Alfons

    2016-03-01

    Combined Sulphur-Nitrogen inhibitors, such as sewage sludge decomposition gases (SDG), thiourea and amidosulphonic acid have been observed to suppress the de novo synthesis of dioxins effectively. In this study, the inhibition of PCDD/Fs formation from model fly ash was investigated at unusually high temperatures (650 °C and 850 °C), well above the usual range of de novo tests (250-400 °C). At 650 °C it was found that SDG evolving from dried sewage sludge could suppress the formation of 2,3,7,8-substituted PCDD/Fs with high efficiency (90%), both in weight units and in I-TEQ units. Additionally, at 850 °C, three kinds of sulphur-amine or sulphur-ammonium compounds were tested to inhibit dioxins formation during laboratory-scale tests, simulating municipal solid waste incineration. The suppression efficiencies of PCDD/Fs formed through homogeneous gas phase reactions were all above 85% when 3 wt. % of thiourea (98.7%), aminosulphonic acid (96.0%) or ammonium thiosulphate (87.3%) was added. Differences in the ratio of PCDFs/PCDDs, in weight average chlorination level and in the congener distribution of the 17 toxic PCDD/Fs indicated that the three inhibitors tested followed distinct suppression pathways, possibly in relation to their different functional groups of nitrogen. Furthermore, thiourea reduced the (weight) average chlorinated level. In addition, the thermal decomposition of TUA was studied by means of thermogravimetry-fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (TG-FTIR) and the presence of SO2, SO3, NH3 and nitriles (N≡C bonds) was shown in the decomposition gases; these gaseous inhibitors might be the primary dioxins suppressants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Reaction-diffusion models describing a two-lane traffic flow

    PubMed

    Fouladvand

    2000-11-01

    A unidirectional two-lane road is approximated by a set of two parallel closed one-dimensional chains. Two types of cars, i.e., slow and fast ones are considered in the system. Based on the Nagel-Schreckenberg model of traffic flow [K. Nagel and M. Schreckenberg, J. Phys. 2, 2221 (1992)], a set of reaction-diffusion processes is introduced to simulate the behavior of the cars. Fast cars can pass the slow ones using the passing lane. We write and solve the mean-field rate equations for the density of slow and fast cars, respectively. We also investigate the properties of the model through computer simulations and obtain the fundamental diagrams. A comparison between our results and the v(max)=2 version of the Nagel-Schreckenberg model is made.

  4. Austenitic stainless steel for high temperature applications

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Gerald D.; Powell, Roger W.

    1985-01-01

    This invention describes a composition for an austenitic stainless steel which has been found to exhibit improved high temperature stress rupture properties. The composition of this alloy is about (in wt. %): 12.5 to 14.5 Cr; 14.5 to 16.5 Ni; 1.5 to 2.5 Mo; 1.5 to 2.5 Mn; 0.1 to 0.4 Ti; 0.02 to 0.08 C; 0.5 to 1.0 Si; 0.01 maximum, N; 0.02 to 0.08 P; 0.002 to 0.008 B; 0.004-0.010 S; 0.02-0.05 Nb; 0.01-0.05 V; 0.005-0.02 Ta; 0.02-0.05 Al; 0.01-0.04 Cu; 0.02-0.05 Co; 0.03 maximum, As; 0.01 maximum, O; 0.01 maximum, Zr; and with the balance of the alloy being essentially iron. The carbon content of the alloy is adjusted such that wt. % Ti/(wt. % C+wt. % N) is between 4 and 6, and most preferably about 5. In addition the sum of the wt. % P+wt. % B+wt. % S is at least 0.03 wt. %. This alloy is believed to be particularly well suited for use as fast breeder reactor fuel element cladding.

  5. Multifunctional, High-Temperature Nanocomposites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W.; Smith, Joseph G.; Siochi, Emilie J.; Working, Dennis C.; Criss, Jim M.; Watson, Kent A.; Delozier, Donavon M.; Ghose, Sayata

    2007-01-01

    In experiments conducted as part of a continuing effort to incorporate multifunctionality into advanced composite materials, blends of multi-walled carbon nanotubes and a resin denoted gPETI-330 h (wherein gPETI h is an abbreviation for gphenylethynyl-terminated imide h) were prepared, characterized, and fabricated into moldings. PETI-330 was selected as the matrix resin in these experiments because of its low melt viscosity (<10 poise at a temperature of 280 C), excellent melt stability (lifetime >2 hours at 280 C), and high temperature performance (>1,000 hours at 288 C). The multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), obtained from the University of Kentucky, were selected because of their electrical and thermal conductivity and their small diameters. The purpose of these experiments was to determine the combination of thermal, electrical, and mechanical properties achievable while still maintaining melt processability. The PETI-330/MWCNT mixtures were prepared at concentrations ranging from 3 to 25 weight-percent of MWCNTs by dry mixing of the constituents in a ball mill using zirconia beads. The resulting powders were characterized for degree of mixing and thermal and rheological properties. The neat resin was found to have melt viscosity between 5 and 10 poise. At 280 C and a fixed strain rate, the viscosity was found to increase with time. At this temperature, the phenylethynyl groups do not readily react and so no significant curing of the resin occurred. For MWCNT-filled samples, melt viscosity was reasonably steady at 280 C and was greater in samples containing greater proportions of MWCNTs. The melt viscosity for 20 weightpercent of MWCNTs was found to be .28,000 poise, which is lower than the initial estimated allowable maximum value of 60,000 poise for injection molding. Hence, MWCNT loadings of as much as 20 percent were deemed to be suitable compositions for scale-up. High-resolution scanning electron microscopy (HRSEM) showed the MWCNTs to be well

  6. VIEW NORTH OF AUSTRALIAN PINES THAT LINE SUNNY JIM LANE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW NORTH OF AUSTRALIAN PINES THAT LINE SUNNY JIM LANE FROM SOUTHERN MOST BARN TO THE STABLE GATE. BARNS LINE LEFT SIDE OF LANE: CD-N. - Hialeah Park Race Track, East Fourth Avenue, Hialeah, Miami-Dade County, FL

  7. An unusual ophthalmic finding in Lane-Hamilton syndrome.

    PubMed

    Villegas, Victor M; Rachitskaya, Aleksandra V; Lam, Byron L; McKeown, Craig A; Berrocal, Audina M

    2014-12-01

    Lane-Hamilton syndrome is a rare condition that is characterized by idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis and celiac disease. We report the case of an 18-month-old girl with Lane-Hamilton syndrome who had unilateral pigmentary retinopathy.

  8. The design and performance of high-temperature irradiation capsules

    SciTech Connect

    Greenslade, D.L.; Knight, R.C.; Ermi, A.M.

    1990-03-01

    Characterization of high-temperature materials behavior in a neutron environment will be required to develop reliable performance prediction models for high-temperature gas-cooled, space power, and fusion reactors. One vehicle by which material behavior in a fast neutron environment can be studied is the Materials Open Test Assembly (MOTA) in the Fast Flux Facility (FFTF). Until recently, irradiation temperatures in the MOTA were limited to 1075 K. A recent successful experiment, however, has extended the temperature capability in the MOTA to 1500 K. This report describes the design and performance of high-temperature capsules that were used in that experiment. Each of eight uniquely designed instrumented capsules (which contained refractory metal specimens) operated at an irradiation temperature between 1290 and 1500 K. Temperatures within {plus}/{minus}10 K of target were maintained in seven of the eight capsules during the 335-day irradiation. Data obtained during the experiment clearly showed the advantages of having a temperature control system for high-temperature irradiation capsules. 7 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Nonintrusive fast response oxygen monitoring system for high temperature flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oh, Daniel B.; Stanton, Alan C.

    1993-01-01

    A new technique has been developed for nonintrusive in situ measurement of oxygen concentration, gas temperature, and flow velocity of the test media in hypersonic wind tunnels. It is based on absorption of near-infrared radiation from inexpensive GaAlAs laser diodes used in optoelectronics industry. It is designed for simultaneous measurements along multiple lines of sight accessed by fiber optics. Molecular oxygen concentration is measured from the magnitude of absorption signals; rotational gas temperature is measured from the intensity ratio of two oxygen absorption lines; and the flow velocity is measured from the Doppler shift of the absorption line positions. This report describes the results of an extensive series of tests of the prototype instrument in laboratory flames emphasizing assessment of the instruments capabilities for quantitative measurement of O2 concentration (mole fraction) and gas temperature.

  10. Neal Lane: Science in a Flat World

    ScienceCinema

    Neal Lane

    2016-07-12

    Lane discusses the changes that have taken place in the world since World War II that have made it "flatter," referring to Thomas L. Friedman's book, The World is Flat. Friedman's main premise is that inexpensive telecommunications is bringing about unhampered international competition, the demise of economic stability, and a trend toward outsourcing services, such as computer programming, engineering and science research.

  11. Neal Lane: Science in a Flat World

    SciTech Connect

    Neal Lane

    2006-09-12

    Lane discusses the changes that have taken place in the world since World War II that have made it "flatter," referring to Thomas L. Friedman's book, The World is Flat. Friedman's main premise is that inexpensive telecommunications is bringing about unhampered international competition, the demise of economic stability, and a trend toward outsourcing services, such as computer programming, engineering and science research.

  12. General view along Linden Lane looking to the gym, Aloha, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view along Linden Lane looking to the gym, Aloha, and the Chapel (view close to intersection of Linden Lane and Woodstock) - National Park Seminary, Bounded by Capitol Beltway (I-495), Linden Lane, Woodstove Avenue, & Smith Drive, Silver Spring, Montgomery County, MD

  13. A microscopic lane changing process model for multilane traffic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Wei; Song, Wei-guo; Liu, Xiao-dong; Ma, Jian

    2013-03-01

    In previous simulations lane-changing behavior is usually assumed as an instantaneous action. However, in real traffic, lane changing is a continuing process which can seriously affect the following cars. In this paper, a microscopic lane-changing process (LCP) model is clearly described. A new idea of simplifying the lane-changing process to the car-following framework is presented by controlling fictitious cars. To verify the model, the results of flow, lane-changing frequency, and single-car velocity are extracted from experimental observations and are compared with corresponding simulation. It is found that the LCP model agrees well with actual traffic flow and lane-changing behaviors may induce a 12%-18% reduction of traffic flow. The results also reflect that most of the drivers on the two roads in a city are conservative but not aggressive to change lanes. Investigation of lane-changing frequency shows that the largest lane-changing frequency occurs at a medium density range from 15 vehs km lane to 35 vehs km lane. It also implies that the lane-changing process might strengthen velocity variation at medium density and weaken velocity variation at high density. It is hoped that the idea of this study may be helpful to promote the modeling and simulation study of traffic flow.

  14. High temperature silicon carbide impregnated insulating fabrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schomburg, C.; Dotts, R. L. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    High temperature insulating articles having improved performance characteristics are described. The articles comprise fabrics of closely woven refractory or heat resistant fibers having particles of silicon carbide dispersed at least partially through the fabric and bonded to the fibers with an emulsifiable polyethylene wax. Such articles exhibit significantly increased high temperature emittance characteristics and an improved retention of integrity and flexibility after prolonged exposure to high temperature.

  15. Deep Trek High Temperature Electronics Project

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce Ohme

    2007-07-31

    This report summarizes technical progress achieved during the cooperative research agreement between Honeywell and U.S. Department of Energy to develop high-temperature electronics. Objects of this development included Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) wafer process development for high temperature, supporting design tools and libraries, and high temperature integrated circuit component development including FPGA, EEPROM, high-resolution A-to-D converter, and a precision amplifier.

  16. Dynamic, High-Temperature, Flexible Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Sirocky, Paul J.

    1989-01-01

    New seal consists of multiple plies of braided ceramic sleeves filled with small ceramic balls. Innermost braided sleeve supported by high-temperature-wire-mesh sleeve that provides both springback and preload capabilities. Ceramic balls reduce effect of relatively high porosity of braided ceramic sleeves by acting as labyrinth flow path for gases and thereby greatly increasing pressure gradient seal can sustain. Dynamic, high-temperature, flexible seal employed in hypersonic engines, two-dimensional convergent/divergent and vectorized-thrust exhaust nozzles, reentry vehicle airframes, rocket-motor casings, high-temperature furnaces, and any application requiring non-asbestos high-temperature gaskets.

  17. Dynamic, High-Temperature, Flexible Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Sirocky, Paul J.

    1989-01-01

    New seal consists of multiple plies of braided ceramic sleeves filled with small ceramic balls. Innermost braided sleeve supported by high-temperature-wire-mesh sleeve that provides both springback and preload capabilities. Ceramic balls reduce effect of relatively high porosity of braided ceramic sleeves by acting as labyrinth flow path for gases and thereby greatly increasing pressure gradient seal can sustain. Dynamic, high-temperature, flexible seal employed in hypersonic engines, two-dimensional convergent/divergent and vectorized-thrust exhaust nozzles, reentry vehicle airframes, rocket-motor casings, high-temperature furnaces, and any application requiring non-asbestos high-temperature gaskets.

  18. Macroscopic modeling for traffic flow on three-lane highways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianzhong; Fang, Yuan

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, a macroscopic traffic flow model for three-lane highways is proposed. The model is an extension of the speed gradient model by taking into account the lane changing. The new source and sink terms of lane change rate are added into the continuity equations and the speed dynamic equations to describe the lane-changing behavior. The result of the steady state analysis shows that our model can describe the lane usage inversion phenomenon. The numerical results demonstrate that the present model effectively reproduces several traffic phenomena observed in real traffic such as shock and rarefaction waves, stop-and-go waves and local clusters.

  19. Space physics: A fast lane in the magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, Mary K.

    2013-12-01

    A marriage between satellite observations and modelling has shown that acceleration of electrons in the magnetosphere can be explained by scattering of these particles by plasma oscillations known as chorus waves. See Letter p.411

  20. Ford Takes the Fast Lane to Dealer Communication and Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thurman, Laura

    1995-01-01

    Describes the Ford Motor Company's satellite-based communications network called FORDSTAR that links the home office to all dealers in the United States and Canada in order to offer training that will improve customer satisfaction. Equipment, interactivity, data transmission, and future possibilities are discussed. (LRW)

  1. Ohm's law in the fast lane: general relatiivistic charge dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meier, D.

    2004-01-01

    Fully relativistic and causal equations for the flow of charge in curved spacetime are derived. It is believed that this is the first set of equations to be published that correctly describes the flow of charge, as well as the evolution of the electromagnetic field, in highly dynamical relativistic environments on timescales much shorter than the collapse time (GM/c3).

  2. Ford Takes the Fast Lane to Dealer Communication and Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thurman, Laura

    1995-01-01

    Describes the Ford Motor Company's satellite-based communications network called FORDSTAR that links the home office to all dealers in the United States and Canada in order to offer training that will improve customer satisfaction. Equipment, interactivity, data transmission, and future possibilities are discussed. (LRW)

  3. RNA polymerase II transcription on the fast lane.

    PubMed

    Marcello, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    Transcription by RNA polymerase II is the process that copies DNA into RNA leading to the expression of a specific gene. Averaged estimates of polymerase elongation rates in mammalian cells have been shown to vary between 1 and 4 kilobases per minute. However, recent advances in live cell imaging allowed direct measurements of RNA biogenesis from a single gene exceeded 50 kb·min(-1) . This unexpected finding opens novel and intriguing perspectives on the control of metazoan transcription.

  4. Learning in the Fast Lane: The Freeway Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giraud-Carrier, François C.; Schmidt, Glen M.

    2015-01-01

    When deciding whether to get on the freeway during rush hour, did you ever stop to consider that if you did so, you would slow everybody ELSE down? When we ask our students that question, they typically laugh--their only consideration is how long their own trip will take. When a decision maker does not account for all the costs or benefits…

  5. Learning in the Fast Lane: The Freeway Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giraud-Carrier, François C.; Schmidt, Glen M.

    2015-01-01

    When deciding whether to get on the freeway during rush hour, did you ever stop to consider that if you did so, you would slow everybody ELSE down? When we ask our students that question, they typically laugh--their only consideration is how long their own trip will take. When a decision maker does not account for all the costs or benefits…

  6. Careers in Auto Racing: Work in the Fast Lane

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawhorn, William

    2009-01-01

    Long before most people had seen an automobile, thrill-seekers across the globe were driving cars competitively. The speed of racecars has accelerated steadily, as has the popularity of the sport. In public opinion polls of sports popularity, in fact, auto racing consistently finishes near the top. Racecar drivers may be the star of their event,…

  7. Ohm's law in the fast lane: general relatiivistic charge dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meier, D.

    2004-01-01

    Fully relativistic and causal equations for the flow of charge in curved spacetime are derived. It is believed that this is the first set of equations to be published that correctly describes the flow of charge, as well as the evolution of the electromagnetic field, in highly dynamical relativistic environments on timescales much shorter than the collapse time (GM/c3).

  8. High-Temperature, Bellows Hybrid Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor); Sirocky, Paul J. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A high-temperature hybrid seal is constructed of multiple elements to meet the many demands placed on the seal. The primary elements are: a central high-temperature bellows, a braided ceramic sheath covering the bellows, an outer abrasion resistant sheath covering the ceramic sheath, and a structurally-sound seal-end termination.

  9. Risk Mitigation for High Temperature Superconducting Generators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    and Technology Division Background: High temperature superconduct- ing (HTS) motors and generators will enable high- efficiency , high power density...naval propulsion, and compact electrical generators for weapons and ship systems. The second-generation high temperature superconductors (2G-HTS...manufacturability of long lengths of these materials, sufficient for demonstrations of large motors and generators. Ensuring superior fatigue prop- erties

  10. Technological Evolution of High Temperature Superconductors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA THESIS Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited TECHNOLOGICAL EVOLUTION OF HIGH...AND SUBTITLE TECHNOLOGICAL EVOLUTION OF HIGH TEMPERATURE SUPERCONDUCTORS 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) Jordan R. White 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION...Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited TECHNOLOGICAL EVOLUTION OF HIGH TEMPERATURE SUPERCONDUCTORS Jordan R. White Lieutenant

  11. High temperature superconducting fault current limiter

    DOEpatents

    Hull, J.R.

    1997-02-04

    A fault current limiter for an electrical circuit is disclosed. The fault current limiter includes a high temperature superconductor in the electrical circuit. The high temperature superconductor is cooled below its critical temperature to maintain the superconducting electrical properties during operation as the fault current limiter. 15 figs.

  12. High temperature superconducting fault current limiter

    DOEpatents

    Hull, John R.

    1997-01-01

    A fault current limiter (10) for an electrical circuit (14). The fault current limiter (10) includes a high temperature superconductor (12) in the electrical circuit (14). The high temperature superconductor (12) is cooled below its critical temperature to maintain the superconducting electrical properties during operation as the fault current limiter (10).

  13. Agent-based modeling of lane discipline in heterogeneous traffic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dailisan, Damian N.; Lim, May T.

    2016-09-01

    Designating lanes for different vehicle types is ideal road safety-wise. Practical considerations, however, require road sharing. Using a modified Nagel-Schreckenberg cellular automata model for two vehicle types (cars and motorcycles), we analyzed the interplay of lane discipline, lane changing, and vehicle density. In the absence of lane changing, the transition between free flow and congested states occurs at a higher vehicle (road occupation) density when the ratio of cars to motorcycles is increased. When lane changing is allowed, the smaller motorcycles tend to fill in unused spaces, until the point when the wider cars effectively block their way at high vehicle densities. When the condition of lane discipline is not imposed, i.e. staying wholly within lane boundaries is not required, further improvement in throughput becomes possible at the cost of required driver attentiveness.

  14. Demixing-stimulated lane formation in binary complex plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Du, C.-R.; Jiang, K.; Suetterlin, K. R.; Ivlev, A. V.; Morfill, G. E.

    2011-11-29

    Recently lane formation and phase separation have been reported for experiments with binary complex plasmas in the PK3-Plus laboratory onboard the International Space Station (ISS). Positive non-additivity of particle interactions is known to stimulate phase separation (demixing), but its effect on lane formation is unknown. In this work, we used Langevin dynamics (LD) simulation to probe the role of non-additivity interactions on lane formation. The competition between laning and demixing leads to thicker lanes. Analysis based on anisotropic scaling indices reveals a crossover from normal laning mode to a demixing-stimulated laning mode. Extensive numerical simulations enabled us to identify a critical value of the non-additivity parameter {Delta} for the crossover.

  15. High-Temperature Passive Power Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    In many future NASA missions - such as deep-space exploration, the National AeroSpace Plane, minisatellites, integrated engine electronics, and ion or arcjet thrusters - high-power electrical components and systems must operate reliably and efficiently in high-temperature environments. The high-temperature power electronics program at the NASA Lewis Research Center focuses on dielectric and insulating material research, the development and characterization of high-temperature components, and the integration of the developed components into a demonstrable 200 C power system - such as an inverter. NASA Lewis has developed high-temperature power components through collaborative efforts with the Air Force Wright Laboratory, Northrop Grumman, and the University of Wisconsin. Ceramic and film capacitors, molypermalloy powder inductors, and a coaxially wound transformer were designed, developed, and evaluated for high-temperature operation.

  16. Oxygen transport is not compromised at high temperature in pythons.

    PubMed

    Fobian, Dannie; Overgaard, Johannes; Wang, Tobias

    2014-11-15

    To evaluate whether the 'oxygen and capacity limited thermal tolerance' model (OCLTT) applies to an air-breathing ectothermic vertebrate, we measured oxygen uptake (V̇(O₂)), cardiac performance and arterial blood gases during a progressive rise of temperature from 30 to 40°C in the snake Python regius. V̇(O₂) of fasting snakes increased exponentially with temperature whereas V̇(O₂) of digesting snakes at high temperatures plateaued at a level 3- to 4-fold above fasting. The high and sustained aerobic metabolism over the entire temperature range was supported by pronounced tachycardia at all temperatures, and both fasting and digesting snakes maintained a normal acid-base balance without any indication of anaerobic metabolism. All snakes also maintained high arterial PO2, even at temperatures close to the upper lethal temperature. Thus, there is no evidence of a reduced capacity for oxygen transport at high temperatures in either fasting or digesting snakes, suggesting that the upper thermal tolerance of this species is limited by other factors.

  17. The hydrological role of 'sunken lanes'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boardman, John

    2013-04-01

    The hydrological role of 'sunken lanes' Sunken lanes are found in many parts of southern England and have also been described in Belgium, France, Germany, Poland, Spain and the USA. They are associated with soft rock and long histories of vehicular and animal movements. They form important features of the cultural and physical landscape. Although most are probably Medieval in origin, some maydate back to the Iron Age. Little attention has been paid to their function as conduits for runoff, sediment and pollutants from areas of forestry and agriculture to the watercourses in valley bottoms. In the Midhurst area of West Sussex, southern England, they are important routes for eroded sediments particularly during extreme rainfall events as occurred in the autumns of 2000 and 2006. This led to the flooding of property, disruption of minor roads and the pollution of the Western Rother river, an important fish habitat.

  18. Lightning enhancement over major oceanic shipping lanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornton, Joel A.; Virts, Katrina S.; Holzworth, Robert H.; Mitchell, Todd P.

    2017-09-01

    Using 12 years of high-resolution global lightning stroke data from the World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN), we show that lightning density is enhanced by up to a factor of 2 directly over shipping lanes in the northeastern Indian Ocean and the South China Sea as compared to adjacent areas with similar climatological characteristics. The lightning enhancement is most prominent during the convectively active season, November-April for the Indian Ocean and April-December in the South China Sea, and has been detectable from at least 2005 to the present. We hypothesize that emissions of aerosol particles and precursors by maritime vessel traffic lead to a microphysical enhancement of convection and storm electrification in the region of the shipping lanes. These persistent localized anthropogenic perturbations to otherwise clean regions are a unique opportunity to more thoroughly understand the sensitivity of maritime deep convection and lightning to aerosol particles.

  19. A STUDY ON IMPLEMENTATION POLICY OF AUXILIARY PASSING LANE ON TWO-WAY TWO-LANE HIGHWAYS CONSIDERING FOLLOWER DENSITY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Hideki; Kobayashi, Masato; Catbagan, Jerome L.

    In this paper, a methodology to evaluate impacts of implementing auxiliary passing lanes on the qulity of service of two-way two-lane (TWTL) highways is developed, by adopting follower density as a measure of effectiveness. It aims to quantitatively esti mate the performance of traffic flows to be realized dependent on the passing lane length and its spacing and to provide suggestions as a design guide. Relationships between passing lane length, one-lane section length and follower density are formulated by modeling the simulation results based on traffic fl ow surveys. And possible combinations of minimum required passing lane length and its spacing required for achieving the target performance are indicated. Furthermore, the expected qulity of service of traffic flow under seve ral typical design policies of 2+1 lane highways are evaluated by applying this concept.

  20. Applications of a high temperature radiation resistant electrical insulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, M. H.

    Electrical components are being developed for service inside the reactor vessel of Fast Breeder Reactors. These components will function in an exceptionally hostile environment combining high temperature (1000 F), chemical activity (liquid sodium), and nuclear radiation (fast neutron fluences to 1021 n/sq cm). Two components which are being developed are an electromagnetically actuated shutdown system and an induction motor. The successful development of a glass-alumina insulation which is suitable for operation at high temperature and in high radiation fields is the key technological advance that has resulted in the development of these components. The insulation is applied by a dipping process similar to conventional enamel insulation utilizing a slurry of glass-alumina in an organic binder. Drying at modest temperature results in a green flexible coating that is adherent to the wire. After the wire is formed into the desired component, the wire is fired at high temperature to eliminate the binder and to fuse the glass mixture to the wire. Electromagnetic coils thus fabricated have been operated for more than 18 months in sodium systems from 850 to 1100 F.

  1. A high-temperature wideband pressure transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, A. J.

    1975-01-01

    Progress in the development of a pressure transducer for measurement of the pressure fluctuations in the high temperature environment of a jet exhaust is reported. A condenser microphone carrier system was adapted to meet the specifications. A theoretical analysis is presented which describes the operation of the condenser microphone in terms of geometry, materials, and other physical properties. The analysis was used as the basis for design of a prototype high temperature microphone. The feasibility of connecting the microphone to a converter over a high temperature cable operating as a half-wavelength transmission line was also examined.

  2. Aeronautical applications of high-temperature superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turney, George E.; Luidens, Roger W.; Uherka, Kenneth; Hull, John

    1989-01-01

    The successful development of high-temperature superconductors (HTS) could have a major impact on future aeronautical propulsion and aeronautical flight vehicle systems. A preliminary examination of the potential application of HTS for aeronautics indicates that significant benefits may be realized through the development and implementation of these newly discovered materials. Applications of high-temperature superconductors (currently substantiated at 95 K) were envisioned for several classes of aeronautical systems, including subsonic and supersonic transports, hypersonic aircraft, V/STOL aircraft, rotorcraft, and solar, microwave and laser powered aircraft. Introduced and described are the particular applications and potential benefits of high-temperature superconductors as related to aeronautics and/or aeronautical systems.

  3. High temperature resistant cermet and ceramic compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, W. M. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Cermet compositions having high temperature oxidation resistance, high hardness and high abrasion and wear resistance, and particularly adapted for production of high temperature resistant cermet insulator bodies are presented. The compositions are comprised of a sintered body of particles of a high temperature resistant metal or metal alloy, preferably molybdenum or tungsten particles, dispersed in and bonded to a solid solution formed of aluminum oxide and silicon nitride, and particularly a ternary solid solution formed of a mixture of aluminum oxide, silicon nitride and aluminum nitride. Also disclosed are novel ceramic compositions comprising a sintered solid solution of aluminum oxide, silicon nitride and aluminum nitride.

  4. Dimensionality of high temperature superconductivity in oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, C. W.

    1989-01-01

    Many models have been proposed to account for the high temperature superconductivity observed in oxide systems. Almost all of these models proposed are based on the uncoupled low dimensional carrier Cu-O layers of the oxides. Results of several experiments are presented and discussed. They suggest that the high temperature superconductivity observed cannot be strictly two- or one-dimensional, and that the environment between the Cu-O layers and the interlayer coupling play an important role in the occurrence of such high temperature superconductivity. A comment on the very short coherence length reported is also made.

  5. The high temperature superconductivity space experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, Denis C.; Nisenoff, M.

    1991-01-01

    The history and the current status of the high temperature superconductivity space experiment (HTSSE) initiated in 1988 are briefly reviewed. The goal of the HTSSE program is to demonstrate the feasibility of incorporating high temperature superconductivity (HTS) technology into space systems. The anticipated payoffs include the development of high temperature superconductor devices for space systems; preparation and space qualification of a cryogenically cooled experimental package containing HTS devices and components; and acquisition of data for future space experiments using more complex HTS devices and subsystems. The principal HTSSE systems and devices are described.

  6. High temperature chemistry of aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, L.T.

    1991-12-31

    We have not only gained new insight into the mechanism and generality of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) thermal automerization reactions, we have also uncovered several new high temperature reactions and added a third dimension to our program by applying high temperature chemistry to problems in organic synthesis. Our synthesis of corannulene has attracted much recent attention; however, we believe that the uncatalyzed ``cyclodehydrogenation reactions`` which form 5-membered rings and 6-membered rings at high temperatures may prove to be of greater general importance in the long term. This bias is reflected in the accompanying proposal.

  7. High temperature chemistry of aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, L.T.

    1991-01-01

    We have not only gained new insight into the mechanism and generality of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) thermal automerization reactions, we have also uncovered several new high temperature reactions and added a third dimension to our program by applying high temperature chemistry to problems in organic synthesis. Our synthesis of corannulene has attracted much recent attention; however, we believe that the uncatalyzed cyclodehydrogenation reactions'' which form 5-membered rings and 6-membered rings at high temperatures may prove to be of greater general importance in the long term. This bias is reflected in the accompanying proposal.

  8. Aeronautical applications of high-temperature superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turney, George E.; Luidens, Roger W.; Uherka, Kenneth; Hull, John

    1989-01-01

    The successful development of high-temperature superconductors (HTS) could have a major impact on future aeronautical propulsion and aeronautical flight vehicle systems. A preliminary examination of the potential application of HTS for aeronautics indicates that significant benefits may be realized through the development and implementation of these newly discovered materials. Applications of high-temperature superconductors (currently substantiated at 95 k) were envisioned for several classes of aeronautical systems, including subsonic and supersonic transports, hypersonic aircraft, V/STOL aircraft, rotorcraft, and solar, microwave and laser powered aircraft. Introduced and described are the particular applications and potential benefits of high-temperature superconductors as related to aeronautics and/or aeronautical systems.

  9. Symposium on high temperature and materials chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-10-01

    This volume contains the written proceedings of the Symposium on High Temperature and Materials Chemistry held in Berkeley, California on October 24--25, 1989. The Symposium was sponsored by the Materials and Chemical Sciences Division of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and by the College of Chemistry of the University of California at Berkeley to discuss directions, trends, and accomplishments in the field of high temperature and materials chemistry. Its purpose was to provide a snapshot of high temperature and materials chemistry and, in so doing, to define status and directions.

  10. Laser Brazing of High Temperature Braze Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Y. P.; Seaman, R. F.; McQuillan, T. J.; Martiens, R. F.

    2000-01-01

    the braze materials and tube substrate. Metallography of the laser braze joint was compared to the furnace braze. SEM Energy Disperse X-Ray Spectra (EDX) and back scattered imaging were used to analyze braze alloy segregation. Although all of the laser systems, CO2, ND:YAG, and direct diode laser produced good braze joint, the direct diode laser was selected for its system simplicity, compactness and portability. Excellent laser and braze alloy coupling is observed with powder alloy compared to braze alloy wire. Good wetting is found with different gold based braze alloys. The laser brazing process can be optimized so that the adverse affect on the parent materials can be eliminated. Metallography of the laser braze joint has shown that quality braze joint was produced with laser brazing process. Penetration of the laser braze to the substrate is at neglectable level. Zero penetration is observed. Microstructure examinations shown that no observable changes of the microstructure (grain structure and precipitation) in the HAZ area between laser braze and furnace braze. Wide gaps can be laser brazed with single pass for up to 0.024 inches. Finer dendritic structure is observed in laser brazing compared with equiaxial and coarser grain of the furnace brazing microstructure. Greater segregation is also found in the furnace braze. Higher hardness of the laser braze joint comparing to furnace braze is observed due to the fast cooling rate and Finer microstructure in the laser brazing. Laser braze joint properties meet or exceed the furnace joint properties. Direct diode laser for thin section tube brazing with high temperature braze alloys have been successfully demonstrated. The laser's high energy density and precise control has shown significant advantages in reducing process heat input to the substrates and provide high quality braze joints comparing to other localized braze process such as torch, TIG, and MPTA processes. Significant cost savings can be realized

  11. Laser Brazing of High Temperature Braze Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Y. P.; Seaman, R. F.; McQuillan, T. J.; Martiens, R. F.

    2000-01-01

    the braze materials and tube substrate. Metallography of the laser braze joint was compared to the furnace braze. SEM Energy Disperse X-Ray Spectra (EDX) and back scattered imaging were used to analyze braze alloy segregation. Although all of the laser systems, CO2, ND:YAG, and direct diode laser produced good braze joint, the direct diode laser was selected for its system simplicity, compactness and portability. Excellent laser and braze alloy coupling is observed with powder alloy compared to braze alloy wire. Good wetting is found with different gold based braze alloys. The laser brazing process can be optimized so that the adverse affect on the parent materials can be eliminated. Metallography of the laser braze joint has shown that quality braze joint was produced with laser brazing process. Penetration of the laser braze to the substrate is at neglectable level. Zero penetration is observed. Microstructure examinations shown that no observable changes of the microstructure (grain structure and precipitation) in the HAZ area between laser braze and furnace braze. Wide gaps can be laser brazed with single pass for up to 0.024 inches. Finer dendritic structure is observed in laser brazing compared with equiaxial and coarser grain of the furnace brazing microstructure. Greater segregation is also found in the furnace braze. Higher hardness of the laser braze joint comparing to furnace braze is observed due to the fast cooling rate and Finer microstructure in the laser brazing. Laser braze joint properties meet or exceed the furnace joint properties. Direct diode laser for thin section tube brazing with high temperature braze alloys have been successfully demonstrated. The laser's high energy density and precise control has shown significant advantages in reducing process heat input to the substrates and provide high quality braze joints comparing to other localized braze process such as torch, TIG, and MPTA processes. Significant cost savings can be realized

  12. Alloys developed for high temperature applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basuki, Eddy Agus; Prajitno, Djoko Hadi; Muhammad, Fadhli

    2017-01-01

    Alloys used for high temperatures applications require combinations of mechanical strength, microstructural stability and corrosion/oxidation resistance. Nickel base superalloys have been traditionally the prime materials utilized for hot section components of aircraft turbine engines. Nevertheless, due to their limited melting temperatures, alloys based on intermetallic compounds, such as TiAl base alloys, have emerged as high temperature materials and intensively developed with the main aim to replace nickel based superalloys. For applications in steam power plants operated at lower temperatures, ferritic high temperature alloys still attract high attention, and therefore, development of these alloys is in progress. This paper highlights the important metallurgical parameters of high temperature alloys and describes few efforts in the development of Fe-Ni-Al based alloys containing B2-(Fe,Ni)Al precipitates, oxide dispersion strengthening (ODS) ferritic steels and titanium aluminide based alloys include important protection system of aluminide coatings.

  13. NEW APPROACHES: High temperature superconductor levitation motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd-Shukor, R.; Lee, K. H.

    1998-01-01

    We show how it is possible to construct a high temperature superconductor levitation motor in an introductory physics laboratory. It is suitable for classroom demonstration and uses a simple yet efficient cooling method.

  14. High-temperature superconductivity: A conventional conundrum

    DOE PAGES

    Božović, Ivan

    2016-01-07

    High-temperature superconductivity in ultrathin films of iron selenide deposited on strontium titanate has been attributed to various exotic mechanisms, and new experiments indicate that it may be conventional, with broader implications.

  15. Altering high temperature subterranean formation permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Moradi-Araghi, A.

    1991-02-19

    This patent describes a delayed acrylamide containing polymer crosslinker having stability in an aqueous solution at high temperatures. It comprises: a combination of an aldehyde and a salicylic acid derivative selected from salicylamide and acetysalicylic acid.

  16. DEVELOPMENT OF HIGH TEMPERATURE HYDROCARBON JET FUELS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    AIRCRAFT ENGINE OILS, *AVIATION FUELS, *HYDROCARBONS, *JET ENGINE FUELS, *LUBRICANTS, *POLYCYCLIC COMPOUNDS, ALKYL RADICALS, BENZENE, CATALYSIS...CHEMICAL REACTIONS , COMBUSTION, CUMENES, DECOMPOSITION, ETHYLENES, FORMALDEHYDE, FRAGMENTATION, HIGH TEMPERATURE, HYDROGENATION, NAPHTHALENES, PHYSICAL

  17. Specimen for high-temperature tensile tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coulbert, C. D.

    1972-01-01

    Split nut with internal taper to hold specially formed specimen composed of filaments of refractory material provides means for holding at high temperature and under tension so that performance evaluations may be made.

  18. High-temperature superconductivity in perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-04-01

    The technology of superconductivity and its potential applications are discussed; it is warned that U.S companies are investing less than their main foreign competitors in both low- and high-temperature superconductivity R and D. This is by far the most critical issue affecting the future U.S. competitive position in superconductivity, and in many other emerging technologies. The major areas covered include: Executive summary; High-temperature superconductivity - A progress report; Applications of superconductivity; The U.S. response to high-temperature superconductivity; High-temperature superconductivity programs in other countries; Comparison of industrial superconductivity R and D efforts in the United States and Japan - An OTA survey; Policy issues and options.

  19. Measuring Moduli Of Elasticity At High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfenden, Alan

    1993-01-01

    Shorter, squatter specimens and higher frequencies used in ultrasonic measurement technique. Improved version of piezo-electric ultrasonic composite oscillator technique used to measure moduli of elasticity of solid materials at high temperatures.

  20. Silicon carbide, an emerging high temperature semiconductor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matus, Lawrence G.; Powell, J. Anthony

    1991-01-01

    In recent years, the aerospace propulsion and space power communities have expressed a growing need for electronic devices that are capable of sustained high temperature operation. Applications for high temperature electronic devices include development instrumentation within engines, engine control, and condition monitoring systems, and power conditioning and control systems for space platforms and satellites. Other earth-based applications include deep-well drilling instrumentation, nuclear reactor instrumentation and control, and automotive sensors. To meet the needs of these applications, the High Temperature Electronics Program at the Lewis Research Center is developing silicon carbide (SiC) as a high temperature semiconductor material. Research is focussed on developing the crystal growth, characterization, and device fabrication technologies necessary to produce a family of silicon carbide electronic devices and integrated sensors. The progress made in developing silicon carbide is presented, and the challenges that lie ahead are discussed.

  1. ALUMINUM NITRIDE AS A HIGH TEMPERATURE TRANSDUCER

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, D. A.; Tittmann, B. R.; Kropf, M. M.

    2010-02-22

    The high temperature capabilities of bulk single crystal aluminum nitride are investigated experimentally. Temperatures in excess of 1100 deg. Celsius are obtained and held for eight hours. Variation in the performance of single crystal samples is demonstrated.

  2. High-temperature superconductivity: A conventional conundrum

    SciTech Connect

    Božović, Ivan

    2016-01-07

    High-temperature superconductivity in ultrathin films of iron selenide deposited on strontium titanate has been attributed to various exotic mechanisms, and new experiments indicate that it may be conventional, with broader implications.

  3. The Conference on High Temperature Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, D. J.; Mccormick, J. B.; Kerwin, W. J.; Narud, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    The status of and directions for high temperature electronics research and development were evaluated. Major objectives were to (1) identify common user needs; (2) put into perspective the directions for future work; and (3) address the problem of bringing to practical fruition the results of these efforts. More than half of the presentations dealt with materials and devices, rather than circuits and systems. Conference session titles and an example of a paper presented in each session are (1) User requirements: High temperature electronics applications in space explorations; (2) Devices: Passive components for high temperature operation; (3) Circuits and systems: Process characteristics and design methods for a 300 degree QUAD or AMP; and (4) Packaging: Presently available energy supply for high temperature environment.

  4. High-Temperature Optical Window Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roeloffs, Norman; Taranto, Nick

    1995-01-01

    A high-temperature optical window is essential to the optical diagnostics of high-temperature combustion rigs. Laser Doppler velocimetry, schlieren photography, light sheet visualization, and laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy are a few of the tests that require optically clear access to the combustor flow stream. A design was developed for a high-temperature window that could withstand the severe environment of the NASA Lewis 3200 F Lean Premixed Prevaporized (LPP) Flame Tube Test Rig. The development of this design was both time consuming and costly. This report documents the design process and the lessons learned, in an effort to reduce the cost of developing future designs for high-temperature optical windows.

  5. High Temperature Self-Healing Metallic Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutelia, E. R.; Bakhtiyarov, S. I.; Tsurtsumia, O. O.; Bakhtiyarov, A. S.; Eristavi, B.

    2012-01-01

    This work presents the possibility to realize the self healing mechanisms for heterogeneous architectural metal/ceramic high temperature sandwich thermal barrier coating systems on the surfaces refractory metals by analogy of wound healing in the skin.

  6. Materials for high-temperature thermoelectric conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feigelson, R. S.; Elwell, D.; Auld, B. A.

    1984-01-01

    The development of materials for high temperature thermoelectric energy conversion devices was investigated. The development of new criteria for the selection of materials which is based on understanding of the fundamental principles governing the behavior of high temperature thermoelectric materials is discussed. The synthesis and characterization of promising new materials and the growth of single crystals to eliminate possible problems associated with grain boundaries and other defects in polycrystalline materials are outlined.

  7. High temperature tensile testing of ceramic composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, John Z.; Hemann, John H.

    1988-01-01

    The various components of a high temperature tensile testing system are evaluated. The objective is the high temperature tensile testing of SiC fiber reinforced reaction bonded Si3N4 specimens at test temperatures up to 1650 C (3000 F). Testing is to be conducted in inert gases and air. Gripping fixtures, specimen configurations, furnaces, optical strain measuring systems, and temperature measurement techniques are reviewed. Advantages and disadvantages of the various techniques are also noted.

  8. PLA recycling by hydrolysis at high temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Cristina, Annesini Maria; Rosaria, Augelletti; Sara, Frattari Fausto, Gironi

    2016-05-18

    In this work the process of PLA hydrolysis at high temperature was studied, in order to evaluate the possibility of chemical recycling of this polymer bio-based. In particular, the possibility to obtain the monomer of lactic acid from PLA degradation was investigated. The results of some preliminary tests, performed in a laboratory batch reactor at high temperature, are presented: the experimental results show that the complete degradation of PLA can be obtained in relatively low reaction times.

  9. High-temperature Solar Cell Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Merritt, Danielle; Raffaelle, Ryne P.; Scheiman, David

    2005-01-01

    The vast majority of space probes to date have relied upon photovoltaic power generation. If future missions designed to probe environments close to the sun (Figure 1) will be able to use such power generation, solar cells that can function at high temperatures, under high light intensity, and high radiation conditions must be developed. The significant problem is that solar cells lose performance at high temperatures.

  10. Structural ceramics for high temperature applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dapkunas, S.J.

    1995-12-31

    Structural ceramics, primarily silicon nitride and silicon carbide, are recognized as offering significant performance benefits in heat engine and other high temperature applications. These benefits accrue from superior high temperature mechanical properties, corrosion and wear resistance and lower density. Improved processing and understanding of the phenomena determining properties and performance have made these materials viable replacements for metallic components in some applications. Cost barriers hinder more widespread use.

  11. Preparation Of High-Temperature Reactive Oligomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ottenbrite, Raphael M.

    1990-01-01

    Very reactive materials form very-heat-stable polymers. Recent research directed toward synthesis of polyimides soluble in common organic solvents, melt-processable, and thermally curable without evolution of volatile by-products. Diels-Alder polymerization yields compounds that maintain integrities and toughnesses during long exposure times at high temperatures. High-temperature polymers synthesized by use of technique. Films and perhaps fibers fabricated from prepolymer in solution. Major potential at this stage of research limited to aerospace applications.

  12. Recent developments in high temperature organic polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, P. M.

    1991-01-01

    Developments in high temperature organic polymers during the last 5 years with major emphasis on polyimides and poly(arylene ether)s are discussed. Specific polymers or series of polymers have been selected to demonstrate unique properties or the effect chemical structure has upon certain properties. This article is not intended to be a comprehensive review of high temperature polymer advancements during the last 5 years.

  13. Developments on high temperature fiber optic microphone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Kenneth D., II; Zuckerwar, Allan J.

    1992-01-01

    A fiber optic microphone, based on the principle of the fiber optic lever, features small size, extended bandwidth, and capability to operate at high temperatures. These are requirements for measurements in hypersonic flow. This paper describes the principles of operation of fiber optic sensors, a discussion of the design of a fiber optic microphone, the functional elements and packaging techniques of the optoelectronic circuitry, and the calibration techniques used in the development of the high temperature fiber optic microphone.

  14. Diamond based detectors for high temperature, high radiation environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metcalfe, A.; Fern, G. R.; Hobson, P. R.; Smith, D. R.; Lefeuvre, G.; Saenger, R.

    2017-01-01

    Single crystal CVD diamond has many desirable properties as a radiation detector; exceptional radiation hardness and physical hardness, chemical inertness, low Z (close to human tissue, good for dosimetry and transmission mode applications), wide bandgap (high temperature operation with low noise and solar blind), an intrinsic pathway to fast neutron detection through the 12C(n,α)9Be reaction. This combination of radiation hardness, temperature tolerance and ability to detect mixed radiation types with a single sensor makes diamond particularly attractive as a detector material for harsh environments such as nuclear power station monitoring (fission and fusion) and oil well logging. Effective exploitation of these properties requires the development of a metallisation scheme to give contacts that remain stable over extended periods at elevated temperatures (up to 250°C in this instance). Due to the cost of the primary detector material, computational modelling is essential to best utilise the available processing methods for optimising sensor response through geometry and conversion media configurations and to fully interpret experimental data. Monte Carlo simulations of our diamond based sensor have been developed, using MCNP6 and FLUKA2011, assessing the sensor performance in terms of spectral response and overall efficiency as a function of the detector and converter geometry. Sensors with varying metallisation schemes for high temperature operation have been fabricated at Brunel University London and by Micron Semiconductor Limited. These sensors have been tested under a varied set of conditions including irradiation with fast neutrons and alpha particles at high temperatures. The presented study indicates that viable metallisation schemes for high temperature contacts have been successfully developed and the modelling results, supported by preliminary experimental data from partners, indicate that the simulations provide a reasonable representation of

  15. Development of high temperature capable piezoelectric sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suprock, Andrew D.; Tittmann, Bernhard R.

    2017-02-01

    The objective of the project was to investigate the influence of the temperature effect on ultrasonic transducers based on a comparison of the effects of high temperature conditions versus those of high temperature and irradiation on the transducer system. There was also a preliminary move towards the establishment of the means for optimizing the bulk single crystal transducer fabrication process in order to achieve peak efficiency and maximum effectiveness in both irradiated and non-irradiated high temperature applications. Optimization of the material components within the transducer will greatly increase non-destructive testing abilities for industry, structural health monitoring. Here is presented a progress report on the testing of several different piezoelectric materials under high temperature conditions. The viability of aluminum nitride (AlN) as a transducer material in high temperature conditions has been previously explored [1] and has been further tested to ensure reliability. Bistmuth Titanate (BiT) has also been tested and has displayed excellent effectiveness for high temperature application.

  16. Effects of Lane Width, Lane Position and Edge Shoulder Width on Driving Behavior in Underground Urban Expressways: A Driving Simulator Study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shuo; Wang, Junhua; Fu, Ting

    2016-01-01

    This study tested the effects of lane width, lane position and edge shoulder width on driving behavior for a three-lane underground urban expressway. A driving simulator was used with 24 volunteer test subjects. Five lane widths (2.85, 3.00, 3.25, 3.50, and 3.75 m) and three shoulder widths (0.50, 0.75, and 1.00 m) were studied. Driving speed, lane deviation and subjective perception of driving behavior were collected as performance measures. The results show that lane and shoulder width have significant effects on driving speed. Average driving speed increases from 60.01 km/h in the narrowest lane to 88.05 km/h in the widest lane. While both narrower lanes and shoulders result in reduced speed and lateral lane deviation, the effect of lane width is greater than that of shoulder width. When the lane and shoulder are narrow, drivers in the left or right lane tend to shy away from the tunnel wall, even encroaching into the neighboring middle lane. As the lane or shoulder gets wider, drivers tend to stay in the middle of the lane. An interesting finding is that although few participants acknowledged that lane position had any great bearing on their driving behaviors, the observed driving speed is statistically higher in the left lane than in the other two lanes when the lane width is narrow (in 2.85, 3 and 3.25 m lanes). These findings provided support for amending the current design specifications of urban underground roads, such as the relationship between design speed and lane width, speed limit, and combination form of lanes. PMID:27754447

  17. Effects of Lane Width, Lane Position and Edge Shoulder Width on Driving Behavior in Underground Urban Expressways: A Driving Simulator Study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuo; Wang, Junhua; Fu, Ting

    2016-10-14

    This study tested the effects of lane width, lane position and edge shoulder width on driving behavior for a three-lane underground urban expressway. A driving simulator was used with 24 volunteer test subjects. Five lane widths (2.85, 3.00, 3.25, 3.50, and 3.75 m) and three shoulder widths (0.50, 0.75, and 1.00 m) were studied. Driving speed, lane deviation and subjective perception of driving behavior were collected as performance measures. The results show that lane and shoulder width have significant effects on driving speed. Average driving speed increases from 60.01 km/h in the narrowest lane to 88.05 km/h in the widest lane. While both narrower lanes and shoulders result in reduced speed and lateral lane deviation, the effect of lane width is greater than that of shoulder width. When the lane and shoulder are narrow, drivers in the left or right lane tend to shy away from the tunnel wall, even encroaching into the neighboring middle lane. As the lane or shoulder gets wider, drivers tend to stay in the middle of the lane. An interesting finding is that although few participants acknowledged that lane position had any great bearing on their driving behaviors, the observed driving speed is statistically higher in the left lane than in the other two lanes when the lane width is narrow (in 2.85, 3 and 3.25 m lanes). These findings provided support for amending the current design specifications of urban underground roads, such as the relationship between design speed and lane width, speed limit, and combination form of lanes.

  18. Lane marking detection based on waveform analysis and CNN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Yang Yang; Chen, Hou Jin; Hao, Xiao Li

    2017-06-01

    Lane markings detection is a very important part of the ADAS to avoid traffic accidents. In order to obtain accurate lane markings, in this work, a novel and efficient algorithm is proposed, which analyses the waveform generated from the road image after inverse perspective mapping (IPM). The algorithm includes two main stages: the first stage uses an image preprocessing including a CNN to reduce the background and enhance the lane markings. The second stage obtains the waveform of the road image and analyzes the waveform to get lanes. The contribution of this work is that we introduce local and global features of the waveform to detect the lane markings. The results indicate the proposed method is robust in detecting and fitting the lane markings.

  19. Investigations into High Temperature Components and Packaging

    SciTech Connect

    Marlino, L.D.; Seiber, L.E.; Scudiere, M.B.; M.S. Chinthavali, M.S.; McCluskey, F.P.

    2007-12-31

    The purpose of this report is to document the work that was performed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in support of the development of high temperature power electronics and components with monies remaining from the Semikron High Temperature Inverter Project managed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). High temperature electronic components are needed to allow inverters to operate in more extreme operating conditions as required in advanced traction drive applications. The trend to try to eliminate secondary cooling loops and utilize the internal combustion (IC) cooling system, which operates with approximately 105 C water/ethylene glycol coolant at the output of the radiator, is necessary to further reduce vehicle costs and weight. The activity documented in this report includes development and testing of high temperature components, activities in support of high temperature testing, an assessment of several component packaging methods, and how elevated operating temperatures would impact their reliability. This report is organized with testing of new high temperature capacitors in Section 2 and testing of new 150 C junction temperature trench insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBTs) in Section 3. Section 4 addresses some operational OPAL-GT information, which was necessary for developing module level tests. Section 5 summarizes calibration of equipment needed for the high temperature testing. Section 6 details some additional work that was funded on silicon carbide (SiC) device testing for high temperature use, and Section 7 is the complete text of a report funded from this effort summarizing packaging methods and their reliability issues for use in high temperature power electronics. Components were tested to evaluate the performance characteristics of the component at different operating temperatures. The temperature of the component is determined by the ambient temperature (i.e., temperature surrounding the device) plus the

  20. A Lane Following Mobile Robot Navigation System Using Mono Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Yeongcheol; Kim, Seungwoo; Park, Seongkeun

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we develop a lane following mobile robot using mono camera. By using camera, robot can recognize its left and right side lane, and maintain the center line of robot track. We use Hough Transform for detecting lane, and PID controller for control direction of mobile robot. The validity of our robot system is performed in a real world robot track environment which is built up in our laboratory.

  1. High-temperature catalyst for catalytic combustion and decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mays, Jeffrey A. (Inventor); Lohner, Kevin A. (Inventor); Sevener, Kathleen M. (Inventor); Jensen, Jeff J. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A robust, high temperature mixed metal oxide catalyst for propellant composition, including high concentration hydrogen peroxide, and catalytic combustion, including methane air mixtures. The uses include target, space, and on-orbit propulsion systems and low-emission terrestrial power and gas generation. The catalyst system requires no special preheat apparatus or special sequencing to meet start-up requirements, enabling a fast overall response time. Start-up transients of less than 1 second have been demonstrated with catalyst bed and propellant temperatures as low as 50 degrees Fahrenheit. The catalyst system has consistently demonstrated high decomposition effeciency, extremely low decomposition roughness, and long operating life on multiple test particles.

  2. Disorder effects in cellular automata for two-lane traffic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knospe, Wolfgang; Santen, Ludger; Schadschneider, Andreas; Schreckenberg, Michael

    For single-lane traffic models it is well known that particle disorder leads to platoon formation at low densities. Here we discuss the effect of slow cars in two-lane systems. Surprisingly, even a small number of slow cars can initiate the formation of platoons at low densities. The robustness of this phenomenon is investigated for different variants of the lane-changing rules as well as for different variants on the single-lane dynamics. It is shown that anticipation of drivers reduces the influence of slow cars drastically.

  3. Sandia_HighTemperatureComponentEvaluation_2015

    SciTech Connect

    Cashion, Avery T.

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this project is to perform independent evaluation of high temperature components to determine their suitability for use in high temperature geothermal tools. Development of high temperature components has been increasing rapidly due to demand from the high temperature oil and gas exploration and aerospace industries. Many of these new components are at the late prototype or first production stage of development and could benefit from third party evaluation of functionality and lifetime at elevated temperatures. In addition to independent testing of new components, this project recognizes that there is a paucity of commercial-off-the-shelf COTS components rated for geothermal temperatures. As such, high-temperature circuit designers often must dedicate considerable time and resources to determine if a component exists that they may be able to knead performance out of to meet their requirements. This project aids tool developers by characterization of select COTS component performances beyond published temperature specifications. The process for selecting components includes public announcements of project intent (e.g., FedBizOps), direct discussions with candidate manufacturers,and coordination with other DOE funded programs.

  4. Signal Life in the Logistics Lane

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    Signal life in the logistics lane By CW2 Juan M. Dorado and CW2 James E.A. Richards Every Signal Soldier should have an understanding of the...or system design phases (Pre-Milestone A). CW2 Juan M. Dorado has been assigned to the 125th Brigade Support Battalion, 3rd Infantry Brigade Combat...Division in Iraq in 2008. Before being appointed as a War- rant Officer in 2007, Mr. Dorado held the MOS of 25B. He is currently enrolled in the

  5. How does a lower predictability of lane changes affect performance in the Lane Change Task?

    PubMed

    Petzoldt, Tibor; Krems, Josef F

    2014-07-01

    The Lane Change Task (LCT) is an established method to assess driver distraction caused by secondary tasks. In the LCT ISO standard, "course following and maneuvering" and "event detection" are mentioned as central task properties. Especially event detection seems to be a reasonable feature, as research suggests that distraction has profound effects on drivers' reactions to sudden, unexpected events. However, closer inspection of the LCT reveals that the events to be detected (lane change signs) and the required response are highly predictable. To investigate how the LCT's distraction assessment of secondary tasks might change if lane change events and responses were less predictable, we implemented three different versions of the LCT - an "original" one, a second one with lowered predictability of event position, and a third one with lowered predictability of event position and response. We tested each of these implementations with the same set of visual and cognitive secondary tasks of varying demand. The results showed that a decrease in predictability resulted in overall degraded performance in the LCT when using the basic lane change model for analysis. However, all secondary task conditions suffered equally. No differential effects were found. We conclude that although an ISO conforming implementation of the LCT might not be excessively valid regarding its depiction of safety relevant events, the results obtained are nevertheless comparable to what would be found in settings of higher validity.

  6. High temperature thrust chamber for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chazen, Melvin L. (Inventor); Mueller, Thomas J. (Inventor); Kruse, William D. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A high temperature thrust chamber for spacecraft (20) is provided herein. The high temperature thrust chamber comprises a hollow body member (12) having an outer surface and an internal surface (16) defining the high temperature chamber (10). The body member (12) is made substantially of rhenium. An alloy (18) consisting of iridium and at least alloying metal selected of the group consisting of rhodium, platinum and palladium is deposited on at least a portion of the internal surface (16) of the body member (12). The iridium and the alloying metal are electrodeposited onto the body member (12). A HIP cycle is performed upon the body member (12) to cause the coating of iridium and the alloying metal to form the alloy (18) which protects the body member (12) from oxidation.

  7. Copper Alloy For High-Temperature Uses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreshfield, Robert L.; Ellis, David L.; Michal, Gary

    1994-01-01

    Alloy of Cu/8Cr/4Nb (numbers indicate parts by atom percent) improved over older high-temperature copper-based alloys in that it offers enhanced high temperature strength, resistance to creep, and ductility while retaining most of thermal conductivity of pure copper; in addition, alloy does not become embrittled upon exposure to hydrogen at temperatures as high as 705 degrees C. Designed for use in presence of high heat fluxes and active cooling; for example, in heat exchangers in advanced aircraft and spacecraft engines, and other high-temperature applications in which there is need for such material. High conductivity and hardness of alloy exploited in welding electrodes and in high-voltage and high-current switches and other applications in which wear poses design problem.

  8. High Temperature Membrane & Advanced Cathode Catalyst Development

    SciTech Connect

    Protsailo, Lesia

    2006-04-20

    Current project consisted of three main phases and eighteen milestones. Short description of each phase is given below. Table 1 lists program milestones. Phase 1--High Temperature Membrane and Advanced Catalyst Development. New polymers and advanced cathode catalysts were synthesized. The membranes and the catalysts were characterized and compared against specifications that are based on DOE program requirements. The best-in-class membranes and catalysts were downselected for phase 2. Phase 2--Catalyst Coated Membrane (CCM) Fabrication and Testing. Laboratory scale catalyst coated membranes (CCMs) were fabricated and tested using the down-selected membranes and catalysts. The catalysts and high temperature membrane CCMs were tested and optimized. Phase 3--Multi-cell stack fabrication. Full-size CCMs with the down-selected and optimized high temperature membrane and catalyst were fabricated. The catalyst membrane assemblies were tested in full size cells and multi-cell stack.

  9. Structural characterization of high temperature composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandell, J. F.; Grande, D. H.

    1991-01-01

    Glass, ceramic, and carbon matrix composite materials have emerged in recent years with potential properties and temperature resistance which make them attractive for high temperature applications such as gas turbine engines. At the outset of this study, only flexural tests were available to evaluate brittle matrix composites at temperatures in the 600 to 1000 C range. The results are described of an ongoing effort to develop appropriate tensile, compression, and shear test methods for high temperature use. A tensile test for unidirectional composites was developed and used to evaluate the properties and behavior of ceramic fiber reinforced glass and glass-ceramic matrix composites in air at temperatures up to 1000 C. The results indicate generally efficient fiber reinforcement and tolerance to matrix cracking similar to polymer matrix composites. Limiting properties in these materials may be an inherently very low transverse strain to failure, and high temperature embrittlement due to fiber/matrix interface oxidation.

  10. High Temperature, Wireless Seismometer Sensor for Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponchak, George E.; Scardelletti, Maximilian C.; Taylor, Brandt; Beard, Steve; Meredith, Roger D.; Beheim, Glenn M.; Hunter Gary W.; Kiefer, Walter S.

    2012-01-01

    Space agency mission plans state the need to measure the seismic activity on Venus. Because of the high temperature on Venus (462? C average surface temperature) and the difficulty in placing and wiring multiple sensors using robots, a high temperature, wireless sensor using a wide bandgap semiconductor is an attractive option. This paper presents the description and proof of concept measurements of a high temperature, wireless seismometer sensor for Venus. A variation in inductance of a coil caused by the movement of an aluminum probe held in the coil and attached to a balanced leaf-spring seismometer causes a variation of 700 Hz in the transmitted signal from the oscillator/sensor system at 426? C. This result indicates that the concept may be used on Venus.

  11. High temperature environmental effects on metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grisaffe, S. J.; Lowell, C. E.; Stearns, C. A.

    1977-01-01

    The current status of knowledge and ability to predict high-temperature environmental attack of metals is reviewed with particular reference to the gas turbine engine. Environmental attack is caused by high temperatures, combustion products, and impurities. A schematic representation of life-limiting factors of turbine components shows that environmental attack can lead to very early failures. Attention is given to high-temperature oxidation with prevailing modes of oxidation attack, and to hot corrosion and other impurity effects. Erosion attack results from the direct mechanical removal of component material by impact of hard substances like ash, sand, or dirt. Solutions to hot-corrosion problems can be found semiempirically by using improved alloys or ceramics, protective surface coatings, additives to the engine environment, and air/fuel cleanup to eliminate detrimental impurities.

  12. High temperature structural fibers: Status and needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicarlo, James A.

    1991-01-01

    The key to high temperature structural composites is the selection and incorporation of continuous fiber reinforcement with optimum mechanical, physical, and chemical properties. Critical fiber property needs are high strength, high stiffness, and retention of these properties during composite fabrication and use. However, unlike polymeric composites where all three requirements are easily achieved with a variety of commercially available carbon-based fibers, structural fibers with sufficient stiffness and strength retention for high temperature metal, intermetallic, and ceramic composites are not available. The objective here is to discuss in a general manner the thermomechanical stability problem for current high performance fibers which are based on silicon and alumina compositions. This is accomplished by presenting relevant fiber property data with a brief discussion of potential underlying mechanisms. From this general overview, some possible materials engineering approaches are suggested which may lead to minimization and/or elimination of this critical stability problem for current high temperature fibers.

  13. Development of high temperature, radiation hard detectors based on diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metcalfe, Alex; Fern, George R.; Hobson, Peter R.; Ireland, Terry; Salimian, Ali; Silver, Jack; Smith, David R.; Lefeuvre, Gwenaelle; Saenger, Richard

    2017-02-01

    Single crystal CVD diamond has many desirable properties compared to current, well developed, detector materials; exceptional radiation, chemical and physical hardness, chemical inertness, low Z (close to human tissue, good for dosimetry), wide bandgap and an intrinsic pathway to fast neutron detection through the 12C(n,α)9Be reaction. However effective exploitation of these properties requires development of a suitable metallisation scheme to give stable contacts for high temperature applications. To best utilise available processing techniques to optimise sensor response through geometry and conversion media configurations, a reliable model is required. This must assess the performance in terms of spectral response and overall efficiency as a function of detector and converter geometry. The same is also required for proper interpretation of experimental data. Sensors have been fabricated with varying metallisation schemes indented to permit high temperature operation; Present test results indicate that viable fabrication schemes for high temperature contacts have been developed and present modelling results, supported by preliminary data from partners indicate simulations provide a useful representation of response.

  14. High temperature crystalline superconductors from crystallized glasses

    DOEpatents

    Shi, Donglu

    1992-01-01

    A method of preparing a high temperature superconductor from an amorphous phase. The method involves preparing a starting material of a composition of Bi.sub.2 Sr.sub.2 Ca.sub.3 Cu.sub.4 Ox or Bi.sub.2 Sr.sub.2 Ca.sub.4 Cu.sub.5 Ox, forming an amorphous phase of the composition and heat treating the amorphous phase for particular time and temperature ranges to achieve a single phase high temperature superconductor.

  15. High temperature solid state storage cell

    DOEpatents

    Rea, Jesse R.; Kallianidis, Milton; Kelsey, G. Stephen

    1983-01-01

    A completely solid state high temperature storage cell comprised of a solid rechargeable cathode such as TiS.sub.2, a solid electrolyte which remains solid at the high temperature operating conditions of the cell and which exhibits high ionic conductivity at such elevated temperatures such as an electrolyte comprised of lithium iodide, and a solid lithium or other alkali metal alloy anode (such as a lithium-silicon alloy) with 5-50% by weight of said anode being comprised of said solid electrolyte.

  16. Buckling of carbon nanotubes at high temperatures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y Y; Wang, C M; Tan, V B C

    2009-05-27

    Presented herein is an investigation into the buckling behavior of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) subjected to axial compression and torsion at high temperatures. This study is carried out by performing molecular dynamics (MD) simulations at both room temperature and extremely high temperatures. It is observed that the SWCNT becomes more susceptible to buckling in a higher temperature environment, especially when the SWCNT is subject to axial compression. The high thermal energy enhances the vibration of carbon atoms in the SWCNT significantly, which leads to bond breaking and the formation of sp(3) bonds as well as Stone-Wales (SW) defects in the postbuckling stage.

  17. High-temperature miniature blackbody radiation sources.

    PubMed

    Chernin, S M

    1997-03-01

    Various high-temperature blackbody sources for quantitative energy measurements in the IR spectral region are developed. Techniques that ensure a stable operation of the sources at high temperatures are described. The developed blackbody models with maximum temperatures of 2000, 2500, and 3000 K can also operate at other temperatures. Graphite is used as a material for radiators. These blackbodies can be used successfully in radiometric measurements in UV and visible spectral ranges. Blackbodies as high-brightness sources may find wide application in solving the problems of multipass spectroscopy. The blackbody sources developed as rocket engineering has progressed have remained outside the knowledge of foreign scientists.

  18. Insulation Blankets for High-Temperature Use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, H.; Leiser, D.; Sawko, P. M.; Larson, H. K.; Estrella, C.; Smith, M.; Pitoniak, F. J.

    1986-01-01

    Insulating blanket resists temperatures up to 1,500 degrees F (815 degrees C). Useful where high-temperature resistance, flexibility, and ease of installation are important - for example, insulation for odd-shaped furnaces and high-temperature ducts, curtains for furnace openings and fire control, and conveyor belts in hot processes. Blanket is quilted composite consisting of two face sheets: outer one of silica, inner one of silica or other glass cloth with center filling of pure silica glass felt sewn together with silica glass threads.

  19. High temperature environmental effects on metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grisaffe, S. J.; Lowell, C. E.; Stearns, C. A.

    1977-01-01

    The gas turbine engine was used as an example to predict high temperature environmental attack on metals. Environmental attack in a gas turbine engine derives from high temperature, combustion products of the air and fuel burned, and impurities. Of all the modes of attack associated with impurity effects, hot corrosion was the most complicated mechanistically. Solutions to the hot corrosion problem were sought semi-empirically in: (1) improved alloys or ceramics; (2) protective surface coating; (3) use of additives to the engine environment; and (4) air/fuel cleanup to eliminate harmful impurities.

  20. Development of high temperature strain gages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemcoe, M. M.

    1973-01-01

    High temperature electric resistance wire strain gages were developed and evaluated for use at temperatures exceeding 922 K (1200 F). A special high temperature strain gage alloy (Fe-25Cr-7.5A1), designated BCL-3, was used to fabricate the gages. Pertinent gage characteristics were determined at temperatures up to 1255 K (1800 F). The results of the evaluation were reported in graphical and tabular form. It was concluded that the gages will perform satisfactorily at temperatures to at least 1089 K (1500 F) for at least one hour.

  1. Frustrated phase separation and high temperature superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Emery, V.J. ); Kivelson, S.A. . Dept. of Physics)

    1992-01-01

    A dilute system of neutral holes in an antiferromagnet separates into a hole-rich and a hole-poor phase. The phase separation is frustrated by long-range Coulomb interactions but, provided the dielectric constant is sufficiently large, there remain large-amplitude low-energy fluctuations in the hole density at intermediate length scales. The extensive experimental evidence showing that this behavior giver, a reasonable picture of high temperature superconductors is surveyed. Further, it is shown that the scattering of mobile holes from the local density fluctuations may account for the anomalous normal-state properties of high temperature superconductors and also provide the mechanism of pairing.

  2. Frustrated phase separation and high temperature superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Emery, V.J.; Kivelson, S.A.

    1992-09-01

    A dilute system of neutral holes in an antiferromagnet separates into a hole-rich and a hole-poor phase. The phase separation is frustrated by long-range Coulomb interactions but, provided the dielectric constant is sufficiently large, there remain large-amplitude low-energy fluctuations in the hole density at intermediate length scales. The extensive experimental evidence showing that this behavior giver, a reasonable picture of high temperature superconductors is surveyed. Further, it is shown that the scattering of mobile holes from the local density fluctuations may account for the anomalous normal-state properties of high temperature superconductors and also provide the mechanism of pairing.

  3. High Temperature MEMS for Turbine Engine Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W.

    2002-01-01

    The presentation will discuss Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) research and development activities and technologies being conducted at NASA Glenn Research Center to address the needs of harsh environment applications. The focus will be on silicon carbide based h4EMS for high temperature, high power and high radiation environment as well as high temperature sensor technologies which are made possible by MEMS processing techniques. These technologies can enable new measurements and capabilities for future turbine engines. All the presentation materials are publicly available and have been presented/published before.

  4. Nanosecond responses of proteins to ultra-high temperature pulses.

    PubMed

    Steel, Bradley C; McKenzie, David R; Bilek, Marcela M M; Nosworthy, Neil J; dos Remedios, Cristobal G

    2006-09-15

    Observations of fast unfolding events in proteins are typically restricted to <100 degrees C. We use a novel apparatus to heat and cool enzymes within tens of nanoseconds to temperatures well in excess of the boiling point. The nanosecond temperature spikes are too fast to allow water to boil but can affect protein function. Spikes of 174 degrees C for catalase and approximately 290 degrees C for horseradish peroxidase are required to produce irreversible loss of enzyme activity. Similar temperature spikes have no effect when restricted to 100 degrees C or below. These results indicate that the "speed limit" for the thermal unfolding of large proteins is shorter than 10(-8) s. The unfolding rate at high temperature is consistent with extrapolation of low temperature rates over 12 orders of magnitude using the Arrhenius relation.

  5. High temperature superconductor materials and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doane, George B., III.; Banks, Curtis; Golben, John

    1990-01-01

    Research on processing methods leading to a significant enhancement in the critical current densities (Jc) and the critical temperature (Tc) of high temperature superconducting in thin bulk and thin film forms. The fabrication of important devices for NASA unique applications (sensors) is investigated.

  6. Progress in advanced high temperature materials technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freche, J. C.; Ault, G. M.

    1976-01-01

    Significant progress has recently been made in many high temperature material categories pertinent to such applications by the industrial community. These include metal matrix composites, superalloys, directionally solidified eutectics, coatings, and ceramics. Each of these material categories is reviewed and the current state-of-the-art identified, including some assessment, when appropriate, of progress, problems, and future directions.

  7. High Temperature VARTM of Phenylethynyl Terminated Imides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghose, Sayata; Watson, Kent A.; Cano, Roberto J.; Britton, Sean M.; Jensen, Brian J.; Connell, John W.; Herring, Helen M.; Linberry, Quentin J.

    2009-01-01

    LaRC phenylethynyl terminated imide (PETI) resins were processed into composites using high temperature vacuum assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM). Although initial runs yielded composites with high void content, process modifications reduced voids to <3%. Photomicrographs were taken and void contents and T(sub g)s of the panels were determined.

  8. RADIATIVE PROPERTIES OF HIGH TEMPERATURE GASES

    DTIC Science & Technology

    DENSITY, *GAS IONIZATION, *GASES, *HIGH TEMPERATURE, *QUANTUM THEORY , *THERMODYNAMICS, ABSORPTION, CONTINUUM MECHANICS, EQUATIONS OF STATE, HEAT...HYDRODYNAMICS, HYDROGEN, INEQUALITIES, INTEGRAL EQUATIONS, IONS, MATRICES(MATHEMATICS), MEASUREMENT, NITROGEN, NUMBER THEORY , OXYGEN, PHOTOELECTRIC...CELLS (SEMICONDUCTOR), PHOTOTUBES, PROBABILITY, STATISTICAL FUNCTIONS, TEMPERATURE, THEORY

  9. Reactive Plasticizers for High Temperature Quinoxaline Thermoplastics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-06-01

    involves essentially two steps, consolidation of boardy prepreg into sheet stock and thermoforming the sheet stock into structural components. A...problem associated with the fabrication process is the high temperatures required in both the consolidation and thermoforming operations. High processing

  10. Improved high-temperature silicide coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klopp, W. D.; Stephens, J. R.; Stetson, A. R.; Wimber, R. T.

    1969-01-01

    Special technique for applying silicide coatings to refractory metal alloys improves their high-temperature protective capability. Refractory metal powders mixed with a baked-out organic binder and sintered in a vacuum produces a porous alloy layer on the surface. Exposing the layer to hot silicon converts it to a silicide.

  11. Lightweight High-Temperature Thermal Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, W. R.; Fasheh, J. I.

    1985-01-01

    Fine Ni/Cr fibers sintered into corrosion-resistant, fireproof batt. Possible applications include stoves, furnaces, safes, fire clothing, draperies in public buildings, wall firebreaks, airplane walls, and jetengine components. New insulation takes advantage of some of same properties of nickel/chromium alloy useful in heating elements in toasters, namely, corrosion and oxidation resistance even at high temperatures.

  12. High Temperature Adhesives for Bonding Kapton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stclair, A. K.; Slemp, W. S.; Stclair, T. L.

    1978-01-01

    Experimental polyimide resins were developed and evaluated as potential high temperature adhesives for bonding Kapton polyimide film. Lap shear strengths of Kapton/Kapton bonds were obtained as a function of test temperature, adherend thickness, and long term aging at 575K (575 F) in vacuum. Glass transition temperatures of the polyimide/Kapton bondlines were monitored by thermomechanical analysis.

  13. High temperature pressure coupled ultrasonic waveguide

    DOEpatents

    Caines, Michael J.

    1983-01-01

    A pressure coupled ultrasonic waveguide is provided to which one end may be attached a transducer and at the other end a high temperature material for continuous ultrasonic testing of the material. The ultrasonic signal is coupled from the waveguide into the material through a thin, dry copper foil.

  14. Thermal disconnect for high-temperature batteries

    DOEpatents

    Jungst, Rudolph George; Armijo, James Rudolph; Frear, Darrel Richard

    2000-01-01

    A new type of high temperature thermal disconnect has been developed to protect electrical and mechanical equipment from damage caused by operation at extreme temperatures. These thermal disconnects allow continuous operation at temperatures ranging from 250.degree. C. to 450.degree. C., while rapidly terminating operation at temperatures 50.degree. C. to 150.degree. C. higher than the continuous operating temperature.

  15. High temperature oxidation resistant cermet compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, W. M. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    Cermet compositions are designed to provide high temperature resistant refractory coatings on stainless steel or molybdenum substrates. A ceramic mixture of chromium oxide and aluminum oxide form a coating of chromium oxide as an oxidation barrier around the metal particles, to provide oxidation resistance for the metal particles.

  16. High temperature ceramic/metal joint structure

    DOEpatents

    Boyd, Gary L.

    1991-01-01

    A high temperature turbine engine includes a hybrid ceramic/metallic rotor member having ceramic/metal joint structure. The disclosed joint is able to endure higher temperatures than previously possible, and aids in controlling heat transfer in the rotor member.

  17. NDE standards for high temperature materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, Alex

    1991-01-01

    High temperature materials include monolithic ceramics for automotive gas turbine engines and also metallic/intermetallic and ceramic matrix composites for a range of aerospace applications. These are materials that can withstand extreme operating temperatures that will prevail in advanced high-efficiency gas turbine engines. High temperature engine components are very likely to consist of complex composite structures with three-dimensionality interwoven and various intermixed ceramic fibers. The thermomechanical properties of components made of these materials are actually created in-place during processing and fabrication stages. The complex nature of these new materials creates strong incentives for exact standards for unambiguous evaluations of defects and microstructural characteristics. NDE techniques and standards that will ultimately be applicable to production and quality control of high temperature materials and structures are still emerging. The needs range from flaw detection to below 100 micron levels in monolithic ceramics to global imaging of fiber architecture and matrix densification anomalies in composites. The needs are different depending on the processing stage, fabrication method, and nature of the finished product. The standards are discussed that must be developed in concert with advances in NDE technology, materials processing research, and fabrication development. High temperature materials and structures that fail to meet stringent specifications and standards are unlikely to compete successfully either technologically or in international markets.

  18. High-temperature adhesives for polyimide films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St. Clair, A. K.; St. Clair, T. L.; Slemp, W. S.

    1979-01-01

    Linear condensation polyimides which are high-temperature polymers show promise as adhesives which form flexible film coatings compatible with polyimide films. Materials are advantageous since they can be supplied as flexible tape, already B-staged and ready for bonding.

  19. Nuclear and quark matter at high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biró, Tamás S.; Jakovác, Antal; Schram, Zsolt

    2017-03-01

    We review important ideas on nuclear and quark matter description on the basis of high-temperature field theory concepts, like resummation, dimensional reduction, interaction scale separation and spectral function modification in media. Statistical and thermodynamical concepts are spotted in the light of these methods concentrating on the -partially still open- problems of the hadronization process.

  20. High-temperature carbidization of carboniferous rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldin, B. A.; Grass, V. E.; Nadutkin, A. V.; Nazarova, L. Yu.

    2009-08-01

    Processes of thermal metamorphism of carboniferous rocks have been studied experimentally. The conditions of high-temperature interaction of shungite carbon with components of the contained rocks, leading to formation of carbide compounds, have been determined. The results of this investigation contribute to the works on searching for new raw material for prospective material production.

  1. Enamel for high-temperature superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levin, H.; Lent, W. E.

    1977-01-01

    Desired optical and high temperature enamel properties are obtained with glasses prepared from the system Li2O-ZrO2-nSiO2. Molar compositions range from n=4 to n=1.3, to which are added minor amounts in varying combinations of alumina, alkali fluorides, boric oxide, alkali oxides, and akaline earth oxides.

  2. Space applications of high temperature superconductivity technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, D. J.; Aron, P. R.; Leonard, R. F.; Wintucky, E. G.

    1991-01-01

    A review is presented of the present status of high temperature superconductivity (HTS) technology and related areas of potential space application. Attention is given to areas of application that include microwave communications, cryogenic systems, remote sensing, and space propulsion and power. Consideration is given to HTS phase shifters, miniaturization of microwave filters, far-IR bolometers, and magnetic refrigeration using flux compression.

  3. Electrical Properties Of Capacitors At High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumann, E. D.; Myers, I. T.; Overton, E.; Hammoud, A. N.

    1994-01-01

    Brief report describes results of experiments in which capacitance and dielectric loss of glass, metallized-polytetrafluoroethylene, and solid-tantalum capacitor measured at temperatures from 20 degrees C to 200 degrees C. Conclusions drawn concerning suitability of capacitors for use at high temperatures; such as in nuclear powerplants, aircraft, equipment for extracting geothermal energy, switching power supplies, and automotive integrated engine electronics.

  4. HYFIRE: fusion-high temperature electrolysis system

    SciTech Connect

    Fillo, J A; Powell, J R; Steinberg, M; Benenati, R; Dang, V D; Horn, F; Isaacs, H; Lazareth, O; Makowitz, H; Usher, J

    1980-01-01

    The Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is carrying out a comprehensive conceptual design study called HYFIRE of a commercial fusion Tokamak reactor, high-temperature electrolysis system. The study is placing particular emphasis on the adaptability of the STARFIRE power reactor to a synfuel application. The HYFIRE blanket must perform three functions: (a) provide high-temperature (approx. 1400/sup 0/C) process steam at moderate pressures (in the range of 10 to 30 atm) to the high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) units; (b) provide high-temperature (approx. 700 to 800/sup 0/C) heat to a thermal power cycle for generation of electricity to the HTE units; and (c) breed enough tritium to sustain the D-T fuel cycle. In addition to thermal energy for the decomposition of steam into its constitutents, H/sub 2/ and O/sub 2/, electrical input is required. Power cycle efficiencies of approx. 40% require He cooling for steam superheat. Fourteen hundred degree steam coupled with 40% power cycle efficiency results in a process efficiency (conversion of fusion energy to hydrogen chemical energy) of 50%.

  5. Braze alloys for high temperature service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindberg, R. A.; Mckisson, R. L.; Erwin, G., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Two groups of refractory metal compositions have been developed that are very useful as high temperature brazing alloys for sealing between ceramic and metal parts. Each group consists of various compositions of three selected refractory metals which, when combined, have characteristics required of good braze alloys.

  6. High Temperature Filler for Tile Gaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, J. W.; Wang, D. S.

    1983-01-01

    Gaps between ceramic tiles filled with ceramic-coated fabric that withstands temperatures as high as 2,000 degrees F (1,300 degrees C). Reusable high-temperature gap filler is made of fabric coated with ceramic slurry and bonded in place with room-temperature-vulcanized adhesive. Procedure used in kilns and furnaces.

  7. Broadband, High-Temperature Ultrasonic Transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, F. Raymond; Winfree, William P.; Barrows, Danny A.

    1995-01-01

    Materials chosen for endurance at high temperatures and acoustic coupling and damping. Acoustic transducer designed to exhibit broad frequency response and to survive temperatures close to melting points of brazing alloys. Attached directly and continuously to hot object monitored ultrasonically: for example, it can be attached to relatively cool spot on workpiece during brazing for taking ultrasonic quality-control measurements.

  8. Helium-cooled high temperature reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Trauger, D.B.

    1985-01-01

    Experience with several helium cooled reactors has been favorable, and two commercial plants are now operating. Both of these units are of the High Temperature Graphite Gas Cooled concept, one in the United States and the other in the Federal Republic of Germany. The initial helium charge for a reactor of the 1000 MW(e) size is modest, approx.15,000 kg.

  9. Oxidation-Strengthened High-Temperature Rivets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclemore, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    Shear strength of titanium-niobium rivets improves with oxidation. Ti-Nb rivets developed for fastening parts of Space Shuttle thrustors may be suitable also for other high-temperature applications in oxidizing environments--for example, in burner cans of commercial jet engines and boilers and retorts for coal gasification systems.

  10. Broadband, High-Temperature Ultrasonic Transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, F. Raymond; Winfree, William P.; Barrows, Danny A.

    1995-01-01

    Materials chosen for endurance at high temperatures and acoustic coupling and damping. Acoustic transducer designed to exhibit broad frequency response and to survive temperatures close to melting points of brazing alloys. Attached directly and continuously to hot object monitored ultrasonically: for example, it can be attached to relatively cool spot on workpiece during brazing for taking ultrasonic quality-control measurements.

  11. High Temperature Langasite SAW Oxygen Sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Peng; Chin, Tao-Lun; Greve, David; Oppenheim, Irving; Malone, Vanessa; Cao, Limin

    2011-08-01

    High-temperature langasite SAW oxygen sensors using sputtered ZnO as a resistive gas-sensing layer were fabricated and tested. Sensitivity to oxygen gas was observed between 500°C to 700°C, with a sensitivity peak at about 625°C, consistent with the theoretical predictions of the acoustoelectric effect.

  12. High-Temperature Capacitor Polymer Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Daniel; Zhang, Lili; Chen, Qin; Irwin, Patricia

    2014-12-01

    Film capacitor technology has been under development for over half a century to meet various applications such as direct-current link capacitors for transportation, converters/inverters for power electronics, controls for deep well drilling of oil and gas, direct energy weapons for military use, and high-frequency coupling circuitry. The biaxially oriented polypropylene film capacitor remains the state-of-the-art technology; however, it is not able to meet increasing demand for high-temperature (>125°C) applications. A number of dielectric materials capable of operating at high temperatures (>140°C) have attracted investigation, and their modifications are being pursued to achieve higher volumetric efficiency as well. This paper highlights the status of polymer dielectric film development and its feasibility for capacitor applications. High-temperature polymers such as polyetherimide (PEI), polyimide, and polyetheretherketone were the focus of our studies. PEI film was found to be the preferred choice for high-temperature film capacitor development due to its thermal stability, dielectric properties, and scalability.

  13. 6. View to north along dirt lane. Log shed (HABS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. View to north along dirt lane. Log shed (HABS No. VA-1290-N) at left, log dogtrot tenant house (HABS No. VA-1290-Q) in distance at end of lane. - Edgewood Farm, West side of State Route 600, .8 mile north of State Route 778, Clover, Halifax County, VA

  14. Efficient Lane Boundary Detection with Spatial-Temporal Knowledge Filtering

    PubMed Central

    Nan, Zhixiong; Wei, Ping; Xu, Linhai; Zheng, Nanning

    2016-01-01

    Lane boundary detection technology has progressed rapidly over the past few decades. However, many challenges that often lead to lane detection unavailability remain to be solved. In this paper, we propose a spatial-temporal knowledge filtering model to detect lane boundaries in videos. To address the challenges of structure variation, large noise and complex illumination, this model incorporates prior spatial-temporal knowledge with lane appearance features to jointly identify lane boundaries. The model first extracts line segments in video frames. Two novel filters—the Crossing Point Filter (CPF) and the Structure Triangle Filter (STF)—are proposed to filter out the noisy line segments. The two filters introduce spatial structure constraints and temporal location constraints into lane detection, which represent the spatial-temporal knowledge about lanes. A straight line or curve model determined by a state machine is used to fit the line segments to finally output the lane boundaries. We collected a challenging realistic traffic scene dataset. The experimental results on this dataset and other standard dataset demonstrate the strength of our method. The proposed method has been successfully applied to our autonomous experimental vehicle. PMID:27529248

  15. Lane-changing model with dynamic consideration of driver's propensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoyuan; Wang, Jianqiang; Zhang, Jinglei; Ban, Xuegang Jeff

    2015-07-01

    Lane-changing is the driver's selection result of the satisfaction degree in different lane driving conditions. There are many different factors influencing lane-changing behavior, such as diversity, randomicity and difficulty of measurement. So it is hard to accurately reflect the uncertainty of drivers' lane-changing behavior. As a result, the research of lane-changing models is behind that of car-following models. Driver's propensity is her/his emotion state or the corresponding preference of a decision or action toward the real objective traffic situations under the influence of various dynamic factors. It represents the psychological characteristics of the driver in the process of vehicle operation and movement. It is an important factor to influence lane-changing. In this paper, dynamic recognition of driver's propensity is considered during simulation based on its time-varying discipline and the analysis of the driver's psycho-physic characteristics. The Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) method is used to quantify the hierarchy of driver's dynamic lane-changing decision-making process, especially the influence of the propensity. The model is validated using real data. Test results show that the developed lane-changing model with the dynamic consideration of a driver's time-varying propensity and the AHP method are feasible and with improved accuracy.

  16. 2. VIEW OF LANE BARN WITH RELATIONSHIP TO LITTLE WOOD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW OF LANE BARN WITH RELATIONSHIP TO LITTLE WOOD RIVER. THE MAIN INTERSECTION OF RICHFIELD IS LOCATED THROUGH THE TREES IN THE RIGHT CENTER OF IMAGE. CAMERA IS POINTING NORTH/NORTHWEST. - James H. Lane Ranch, Barn, One Mile South of Richfield on Highway 26, Richfield, Lincoln County, ID

  17. High Temperature Thermographic Phosphor Coatings Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goedeke, Shawn; Allison, S. W.; Beshears, D. L.; Bencic, T.; Cates, M. R.; Hollerman, W. A.; Guidry, R.

    2003-01-01

    For many years, phosphor thermometry has been used for non-contact temperature measurements. A large number of applications have been associated with high temperatures, especially for aerospace systems where blackbody radiation backgrounds are large and in challenging environments, such as vibration, rotation, flame, or noise. These environments restrict the use of more common thermocouples or infrared thermometric techniques. In particular, temperature measurements inside jet turbines, rocket engines, or similar devices are especially amenable to phosphor techniques. Often the fluorescent materials are used as powders, either suspended in binders and applied like paint or applied as high-temperature sprays. Thin coatings that are less than 50 m thick are used on the surfaces of interest. These coatings will quickly assume the same temperature as the surface to which they are applied. The temperature dependence of fluorescent materials is a function of the base matrix atoms and a small quantity of added activator or dopant ions. Often for high temperature applications, the selected materials are refractory and include rare earth ions. Phosphors like Y3Al5O12 (YAG) doped with Eu, Dy, or Tm, Y2O3 doped with Eu, or similar rare earth compounds, will survive high temperatures and can be configured to emit light that changes rapidly in lifetime and intensity. For example, researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory recently observed fluorescence from YAG:Dy and YAG:Tm at temperatures above 1400 C. One of the biggest challenges is to locate a binder material that can withstand tremendous variations in temperature in an adverse aerospace environment. This poster will provide an overview into our attempt to utilize phosphors for thermometry purposes. Emphasis will be placed on the use of selected binder materials that can withstand high temperatures. This research was completed for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Glenn Research Center in Cleveland

  18. High Temperature Thermographic Phosphor Coatings Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goedeke, Shawn; Allison, S. W.; Beshears, D. L.; Bencic, T.; Cates, M. R.; Hollerman, W. A.; Guidry, R.

    2003-01-01

    For many years, phosphor thermometry has been used for non-contact temperature measurements. A large number of applications have been associated with high temperatures, especially for aerospace systems where blackbody radiation backgrounds are large and in challenging environments, such as vibration, rotation, flame, or noise. These environments restrict the use of more common thermocouples or infrared thermometric techniques. In particular, temperature measurements inside jet turbines, rocket engines, or similar devices are especially amenable to phosphor techniques. Often the fluorescent materials are used as powders, either suspended in binders and applied like paint or applied as high-temperature sprays. Thin coatings that are less than 50 m thick are used on the surfaces of interest. These coatings will quickly assume the same temperature as the surface to which they are applied. The temperature dependence of fluorescent materials is a function of the base matrix atoms and a small quantity of added activator or dopant ions. Often for high temperature applications, the selected materials are refractory and include rare earth ions. Phosphors like Y3Al5O12 (YAG) doped with Eu, Dy, or Tm, Y2O3 doped with Eu, or similar rare earth compounds, will survive high temperatures and can be configured to emit light that changes rapidly in lifetime and intensity. For example, researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory recently observed fluorescence from YAG:Dy and YAG:Tm at temperatures above 1400 C. One of the biggest challenges is to locate a binder material that can withstand tremendous variations in temperature in an adverse aerospace environment. This poster will provide an overview into our attempt to utilize phosphors for thermometry purposes. Emphasis will be placed on the use of selected binder materials that can withstand high temperatures. This research was completed for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Glenn Research Center in Cleveland

  19. High Temperature Materials Interim Data Qualification Report

    SciTech Connect

    Nancy Lybeck

    2010-08-01

    ABSTRACT Projects for the very high temperature reactor (VHTR) Technology Development Office provide data in support of Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensing of the VHTR. Fuel and materials to be used in the reactor are tested and characterized to quantify performance in high temperature and high fluence environments. The VHTR program has established the NGNP Data Management and Analysis System (NDMAS) to ensure that VHTR data are qualified for use, stored in a readily accessible electronic form, and analyzed to extract useful results. This document focuses on the first NDMAS objective. It describes the High Temperature Materials characterization data stream, the processing of these data within NDMAS, and reports the interim FY2010 qualification status of the data. Data qualification activities within NDMAS for specific types of data are determined by the data qualification category assigned by the data generator. The High Temperature Materials data are being collected under NQA-1 guidelines, and will be qualified data. For NQA-1 qualified data, the qualification activities include: (1) capture testing, to confirm that the data stored within NDMAS are identical to the raw data supplied, (2) accuracy testing to confirm that the data are an accurate representation of the system or object being measured, and (3) documenting that the data were collected under an NQA-1 or equivalent Quality Assurance program. Currently, data from two test series within the High Temperature Materials data stream have been entered into the NDMAS vault: 1. Tensile Tests for Sm (i.e., Allowable Stress) Confirmatory Testing – 1,403,994 records have been inserted into the NDMAS database. Capture testing is in process. 2. Creep-Fatigue Testing to Support Determination of Creep-Fatigue Interaction Diagram – 918,854 records have been processed and inserted into the NDMAS database. Capture testing is in process.

  20. Ultra-High Temperature Ceramics for solar receivers: spectral and high-temperature emittance characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sani, E.; Mercatelli, L.; Jafrancesco, D.; Sans, J. L.; Sciti, D.

    2012-12-01

    We report on the preparation, room temperature spectral reflectance and high-temperature thermal emittance characterization of different boride and carbide Ultra-High Temperature Ceramics (UHTCs). The investigated samples are compared with a reference material for solar absorber applications, i.e. silicon carbide. We show that spectral and thermal emittance properties of UHTCs are promising for novel solar receivers.

  1. Phase diagram of a single lane roundabout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echab, H.; Lakouari, N.; Ez-Zahraouy, H.; Benyoussef, A.

    2016-03-01

    Using the cellular automata model, we numerically study the traffic dynamic in a single lane roundabout system of four entry/exit points. The boundaries are controlled by the injecting rates α1, α2 and the extracting rate β. Both the system with and without Splitter Islands of width Lsp are considered. The phase diagram in the (α1 , β) space and its variation with the roundabout size, Pagg (i.e. the probability of aggressive entry), and Pexit (i.e. the probability of preferential exit) are constructed. The results show that the phase diagram in both cases consists of three phases: free flow, congested and jammed. However, as Lsp increases the free flow phase enlarges while the congested and jammed ones shrink. On the other hand, the short sized roundabout shows better performance in the free flow phase while the large one is more optimal in the congested phase. The density profiles are also investigated.

  2. Development of high strength, high temperature ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, W. B.

    1982-01-01

    Improvement in the high-pressure turbopumps, both fuel and oxidizer, in the Space Shuttle main engine were considered. The operation of these pumps is limited by temperature restrictions of the metallic components used in these pumps. Ceramic materials that retain strength at high temperatures and appear to be promising candidates for use as turbine blades and impellers are discussed. These high strength materials are sensitive to many related processing parameters such as impurities, sintering aids, reaction aids, particle size, processing temperature, and post thermal treatment. The specific objectives of the study were to: (1) identify and define the processing parameters that affect the properties of Si3N4 ceramic materials, (2) design and assembly equipment required for processing high strength ceramics, (3) design and assemble test apparatus for evaluating the high temperature properties of Si3N4, and (4) conduct a research program of manufacturing and evaluating Si3N4 materials as applicable to rocket engine applications.

  3. Phonon spectra of plutonium at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorado, Boris; Bottin, François; Bouchet, Johann

    2017-03-01

    Ab initio molecular dynamics calculations are used to investigate the vibrational properties of the high-temperature δ and ɛ phases of plutonium. We combine the local-density approximation (LDA)+U for strong electron correlations and the temperature-dependent effective potential method in order to calculate the phonon spectra of the two phases, as well as their dependence on temperature. Our results show that the ɛ phase can only be stabilized when temperature and correlations are simultaneously accounted for. We are also able to quantify the degree of anharmonicity of the two phases. While the δ phase is fairly harmonic up to 1000 K, we find that the ɛ phase is strongly anharmonic, which explains why this structure dominates the phase diagram at high temperature.

  4. High temperature furnace modeling and performance verifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, James E., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Analytical, numerical and experimental studies were performed on two classes of high temperature materials processing furnaces. The research concentrates on a commercially available high temperature furnace using zirconia as the heating element and an arc furnace based on a ST International tube welder. The zirconia furnace was delivered and work is progressing on schedule. The work on the arc furnace was initially stalled due to the unavailability of the NASA prototype, which is actively being tested aboard the KC-135 experimental aircraft. A proposal was written and funded to purchase an additional arc welder to alleviate this problem. The ST International weld head and power supply were received and testing will begin in early November. The first 6 months of the grant are covered.

  5. Towards simulation of high temperature methane spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borysov, A.; Champion, J. P.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Wenger, C.

    Methane plays a central role in gas layers of temperatures up to around 3000K in a number of astrophysical objects ranging from giant planets to brown dwarfs, over proto-solar nebulae, to several classes of cool stars. In order to model and analyse these objects correctly, an accurate and complete list of spectral lines at high temperature is demanded. Predicting high temperature spectra implies, however, predicting hot bands and thus modelling highly excited vibrational states. This is a real challenge in the case of methane. We report the preliminary results of a theoretical study combining the global effective Hamiltonian approach and its computational implementation (STDS package: http://www.u-bourgogne.fr/LPUB/ shTDS.html) with semi-quantitative statistical considerations.

  6. The metallurgy of high temperature alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tien, J. K.; Purushothaman, S.

    1976-01-01

    Nickel-base, cobalt-base, and high nickel and chromium iron-base alloys are dissected, and their microstructural and chemical components are assessed with respect to the various functions expected of high temperature structural materials. These functions include the maintenance of mechanical integrity over the strain-rate spectrum from creep resistance through fatigue crack growth resistance, and such alloy stability expectations as microstructural coarsening resistance, phase instability resistance and oxidation and corrosion resistance. Special attention will be given to the perennial conflict and trade-off between strength, ductility and corrosion and oxidation resistance. The newest developments in the constitution of high temperature alloys will also be discussed, including aspects relating to materials conservation.

  7. High Temperature Mechanisms for Venus Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Jerri; Narine, Roop; Kumar, Nishant; Singh, Sase; Gorevan, Steven

    Future Venus missions, including New Frontiers Venus In-Situ Explorer and three Flagship Missions - Venus Geophysical Network, Venus Mobile Explorer and Venus Surface Sample Return all focus on searching for evidence of past climate change both on the surface and in the atmospheric composition as well as in the interior dynamics of the planet. In order to achieve these goals and objectives, many key technologies need to be developed for the Venus extreme environment. These key technologies include sample acquisition systems and other high-temperature mechanisms and mobility systems capable of extended operation when directly exposed to the Venus surface or lower atmosphere environment. Honeybee Robotics has developed two types of high temperature motors, the materials and components in both motors were selected based on the requirement to survive temperatures above a minimum of 460° C, at earth atmosphere. The prototype Switched Reluctance Motor (SRM) has been operated non-continuously for over 20 hours at Venus-like conditions (460° C temperature, mostly CO2 gas environment) and it remains functional. A drilling system, actuated by two SRMs was tested in Venus-like conditions, 460° C temperature and mostly CO2 gas environment, for more than 15 hours. The drill successfully completed three tests by drilling into chalk up to 6 inches deep in each test. A first generation Brushless DC (BLDC) Motor and high temperature resolver were also tested and the feasibility of the designs was demonstrated by the extended operation of both devices under Venus-like condition. Further development of the BLDC motor and resolver continues and these devices will, ultimately, be integrated into the development of a high temperature sample acquisition scoop and high temperature joint (awarded SBIR Phase II in October, 2007). Both the SR and BLDC motors will undergo extensive testing at Venus temperature and pressure (TRL6) and are expected to be mission ready before the next New

  8. Controlled thermonuclear fusion, high temperature plasma physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1985-05-01

    The primary source of nuclear energy comes from the fission process of heavy nuclei. To utilize the energy released by a thermonuclear fusion process, methods of controlling the fusion reaction were studied. This is controlled thermonuclear fusion technology. The fuel used in a thermonuclear fusion process are isotopes of hydrogen: deuterium and tritium. They can be extracted from the almost unlimited seawater. Nuclear fusion also produces very little radioactive waste. Thermonuclear fusion is a promising energy source with an almost unlimited supply; it is economical, safe, and relatively clean. Ways to raise plasma temperature to a very high level and to maintain it to allow fusion reactions to take place are studied. The physical laws of high temperature plasma was studied to reach this goal which resulted in the development of high temperature plasma physics.

  9. High temperature aircraft research furnace facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, James E., Jr.; Cashon, John L.

    1992-01-01

    Focus is on the design, fabrication, and development of the High Temperature Aircraft Research Furnace Facilities (HTARFF). The HTARFF was developed to process electrically conductive materials with high melting points in a low gravity environment. The basic principle of operation is to accurately translate a high temperature arc-plasma gas front as it orbits around a cylindrical sample, thereby making it possible to precisely traverse the entire surface of a sample. The furnace utilizes the gas-tungsten-arc-welding (GTAW) process, also commonly referred to as Tungsten-Inert-Gas (TIG). The HTARFF was developed to further research efforts in the areas of directional solidification, float-zone processing, welding in a low-gravity environment, and segregation effects in metals. The furnace is intended for use aboard the NASA-JSC Reduced Gravity Program KC-135A Aircraft.

  10. Silicon Carbide Nanotube Oxidation at High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahlborg, Nadia; Zhu, Dongming

    2012-01-01

    Silicon Carbide Nanotubes (SiCNTs) have high mechanical strength and also have many potential functional applications. In this study, SiCNTs were investigated for use in strengthening high temperature silicate and oxide materials for high performance ceramic nanocomposites and environmental barrier coating bond coats. The high · temperature oxidation behavior of the nanotubes was of particular interest. The SiCNTs were synthesized by a direct reactive conversion process of multiwall carbon nanotubes and silicon at high temperature. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was used to study the oxidation kinetics of SiCNTs at temperatures ranging from 800degC to1300degC. The specific oxidation mechanisms were also investigated.

  11. Hole-doped cuprate high temperature superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, C. W.; Deng, L. Z.; Lv, B.

    2015-07-01

    Hole-doped cuprate high temperature superconductors have ushered in the modern era of high temperature superconductivity (HTS) and have continued to be at center stage in the field. Extensive studies have been made, many compounds discovered, voluminous data compiled, numerous models proposed, many review articles written, and various prototype devices made and tested with better performance than their nonsuperconducting counterparts. The field is indeed vast. We have therefore decided to focus on the major cuprate materials systems that have laid the foundation of HTS science and technology and present several simple scaling laws that show the systematic and universal simplicity amid the complexity of these material systems, while referring readers interested in the HTS physics and devices to the review articles. Developments in the field are mostly presented in chronological order, sometimes with anecdotes, in an attempt to share some of the moments of excitement and despair in the history of HTS with readers, especially the younger ones.

  12. Magnetic suspension using high temperature superconducting cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scurlock, R. G.

    1992-01-01

    The development of YBCO high temperature superconductors, in wire and tape forms, is rapidly approaching the point where the bulk transport current density j vs magnetic field H characteristics with liquid nitrogen cooling will enable its use in model cores. On the other hand, BSCCO high temperature superconductor in wire form has poor j-H characteristics at 77 K today, although with liquid helium or hydrogen cooling, it appears to be superior to NbTi superconductor. Since liquid nitrogen cooling is approx. 100 times cheaper than liquid helium cooling, the use of YBCO is very attractive for use in magnetic suspension. The design is discussed of a model core to accommodate lift and drag loads up to 6000 and 3000 N respectively. A comparison is made between the design performance of a liquid helium cooled NbTi (or BSCCO) superconducting core and a liquid nitrogen cooled YBCO superconducting core.

  13. High-temperature discontinuously reinforced aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zedalis, M. S.; Bryant, J. D.; Gilman, P. S.; Das, S. K.

    1991-08-01

    High-temperature discontinuously reinforced aluminum (HTDRA) composites have been developed for elevated-temperature applications by incorporating SiC particulate reinforcement into a rapidly solidified, high-temperature Al-Fe-V-Si (alloy 8009) matrix. HTDRA combines the superior elevated-temperature strength, stability and corrosion resistance of the 8009 matrix with the excellent specific stiffness and abrasion resistance of the discontinuous SiC particulate reinforcement. On a specific stiffness basis, HTDRA is competitive with Ti-6-Al-4V and 17-4 PH stainless steel to temperatures approaching 480°C. Potential aerospace applications being considered for HTDRA include aircraft wing skins, missile bodies, and miscellaneous engine, spacecraft and hypersonic vehicle components.

  14. Innovations in high-temperature particulate filtration

    SciTech Connect

    Lippert, T.

    1997-05-01

    Fluidized-bed combustion and coal gasification expose sensitive equipment, such as high-speed turbines, to hot combustion offgases. In order to prevent erosion, corrosion, and other damage to sensitive equipment, such systems now incorporate high-temperature particulate filters. One device often considered for such applications uses a design similar to a baghouse (i.e., multiple banks of porous filter bags that remove particulate from gas streams). In this case, however, instead of polyester or teflon fabric, the filter elements are made of rigid ceramic or similar materials. These devices are sometimes called `candle filters,` and the individual ceramic filter elements are frequently called `candles.` Three high-temperature applications of candle filters are described here. 2 refs., 3 figs.

  15. High-temperature helium-loop facility

    SciTech Connect

    Tokarz, R.D.

    1981-09-01

    The high-temperature helium loop is a facility for materials testing in ultrapure helium gas at high temperatures. The closed loop system is capable of recirculating high-purity helium or helium with controlled impurities. The gas loop maximum operating conditions are as follows: 300 psi pressure, 500 lb/h flow rate, and 2100/sup 0/F temperature. The two test sections can accept samples up to 3.5 in. diameter and 5 ft long. The gas loop is fully instrumented to continuously monitor all parameters of loop operation as well as helium impurities. The loop is fully automated to operate continuously and requires only a daily servicing by a qualified operator to replenish recorder charts and helium makeup gas. Because of its versatility and high degree of parameter control, the helium loop is applicable to many types of materials research. This report describes the test apparatus, operating parameters, peripheral systems, and instrumentation system.

  16. High temperature seal for large structural movements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor); Dunlap, Jr., Patrick H. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A high temperature sealing system is operative to seal an interface between adjacent hot structures and to minimize parasitic flow between such structures that move relative to one another in-plane or out-of-plane. The sealing system may be used to seal thrust-directing ramp structures of a reusable launch vehicle and includes a channel and a plurality of movable segmented sealing elements. Adjacent ramp structures include edge walls which extend within the channel. The sealing elements are positioned along the sides of the channel and are biased to engage with the inner surfaces of the ramp structures. The segmented sealing elements are movable to correspond to the contour of the thrust-directing ramp structures. The sealing system is operative to prevent high temperature thrust gases that flow along the ramp structures from infiltrating into the interior of the vehicle.

  17. High temperature thermomechanical analysis of ceramic coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padovan, J.; Braun, M. J.; Chung, B. T. F.; Dougherty, D.; Hendricks, R.

    1984-01-01

    This paper investigates the thermomechanical response of ceramically coated metal parts in elevated thermal environments. This is made possible through the development of an improved finite element algorithm that enables the efficient and stable solution of the inherently nonlinear elastic-creep (inelastic) type thermomechanical field equations associated with high temperature. Based on the improved algorithm, the results of several numerical experiments are presented. These illustrate the significant influence of inelastic behavior in generating residual stress fields.

  18. Hydrogen dominant metallic alloys: high temperature superconductors?

    PubMed

    Ashcroft, N W

    2004-05-07

    The arguments suggesting that metallic hydrogen, either as a monatomic or paired metal, should be a candidate for high temperature superconductivity are shown to apply with comparable weight to alloys of metallic hydrogen where hydrogen is a dominant constituent, for example, in the dense group IVa hydrides. The attainment of metallic states should be well within current capabilities of diamond anvil cells, but at pressures considerably lower than may be necessary for hydrogen.

  19. Substrates For High-Temperature Superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shlichta, Paul J.

    1988-01-01

    Proposed hot-dipping process prepares materials well suited to serve as substrates for high-temperature superconductors. Makes it possible to produce substrates combining properties needed for given application, such as flexibility, strength, long grains, and <001> crystal orientation. Properties favor growth of superconductive films carrying high current and fabricated in variety of useful shapes. Used in making solar cells, described in "Hot-Dipped Metal Films as Epitaxial Substrates" (NPO-15904).

  20. High temperature decomposition of hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is oxidized into nitrogen dioxide (NO2) by the high temperature decomposition of a hydrogen peroxide solution to produce the oxidative free radicals, hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl. The hydrogen peroxide solution is impinged upon a heated surface in a stream of nitric oxide where it decomposes to produce the oxidative free radicals. Because the decomposition of the hydrogen peroxide solution occurs within the stream of the nitric oxide, rapid gas-phase oxidation of nitric oxide into nitrogen dioxide occurs.

  1. High Temperature Decomposition of Hydrogen Peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is oxidized into nitrogen dioxide (NO2) by the high temperature decomposition of a hydrogen peroxide solution to produce the oxidative free radicals, hydroxyl and hydropemxyl. The hydrogen peroxide solution is impinged upon a heated surface in a stream of nitric oxide where it decomposes to produce the oxidative free radicals. Because the decomposition of the hydrogen peroxide solution occurs within the stream of the nitric oxide, rapid gas-phase oxidation of nitric oxide into nitrogen dioxide occurs.

  2. Corrosion Inhibition in High Temperature Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-28

    resistant coatings is optional. Further 5 examples of high temperature corrosion-resistant coatings are the 6 " aluminides " and "silicides", which are...produced by diffusing 7 aluminum and silicon, respectively, into the surface of superalloys 8 or other substrates. Other metallic or ceramic coatings can... superalloys to form 9 nonprotective NaAlO 2 which causes catastrophic hot corrosion. High 10 temperature chromium-containing metals which rely on chromia

  3. Establishment of Harrop, High-Temperature Viscometer

    SciTech Connect

    Schumacher, R.F.

    1999-11-05

    This report explains how the Harrop, High-Temperature Viscometer was installed, calibrated, and operated. This report includes assembly and alignment of the furnace, viscometer, and spindle, and explains the operation of the Brookfield Viscometer, the Harrop furnace, and the UDC furnace controller. Calibration data and the development of the spindle constant from NIST standard reference glasses is presented. A simple operational procedure is included.

  4. A Road Towards High Temperature Superconductors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    issue in trying to make useful high temperature superconductors is obviously to discover superconductivity at higher temperatures. But there is also...behavior of the cuprates under applied fields can be made by using an unconventional pinning mechanism directly based on the Bond Contraction...Pairing (BCP) mechanism proposed by Deutscher and de Gennes. In the second part a new mechanism for superconductivity that we may have uncovered in

  5. High temperature composites. Status and future directions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Signorelli, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    A summary of research investigations of manufacturing methods, fabrication methods, and testing of high temperature composites for use in gas turbine engines is presented. Ceramic/ceramic, ceramic/metal, and metal/metal composites are considered. Directional solidification of superalloys and eutectic alloys, fiber reinforced metal and ceramic composites, ceramic fibers and whiskers, refractory coatings, metal fiber/metal composites, matrix metal selection, and the preparation of test specimens are discussed.

  6. High temperature, flexible, fiber-preform seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor); Strocky, Paul J. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A seal is mounted in a rectangular groove in a movable structural panel. The seal comprises a fiber preform constructed of multiple layers of fiber having a uniaxial core. Helical fibers are wound over the core. The fibers are of materials capable of withstanding high temperatures and are both left-hand and right-hand wound. An outer layer wrapped over said helical fibers prevents abrasion damage.

  7. High temperature decomposition of hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is oxidized into nitrogen dioxide (NO2) by the high temperature decomposition of a hydrogen peroxide solution to produce the oxidative free radicals, hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl. The hydrogen peroxide solution is impinged upon a heated surface in a stream of nitric oxide where it decomposes to produce the oxidative free radicals. Because the decomposition of the hydrogen peroxide solution occurs within the stream of the nitric oxide, rapid gas-phase oxidation of nitric oxide into nitrogen dioxide occurs.

  8. High Temperature Decomposition of Hydrogen Peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is oxidized into nitrogen dioxide (NO2) by the high temperature decomposition of a hydrogen peroxide solution to produce the oxidative free radicals, hydroxyl and hydropemxyl. The hydrogen peroxide solution is impinged upon a heated surface in a stream of nitric oxide where it decomposes to produce the oxidative free radicals. Because the decomposition of the hydrogen peroxide solution occurs within the stream of the nitric oxide, rapid gas-phase oxidation of nitric oxide into nitrogen dioxide occurs.

  9. High temperature Hall-effect apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, C.; Lockwood, A.; Chmielewski, A.; Parker, J.; Zoltan, A.

    1984-01-01

    A high-temperature Hall-effect apparatus is described which allows measurements up to temperatures greater than 1200 K using the van der Pauw method. The apparatus was designed for measurements on refractory materials having high charge carrier concentrations and generally low mobilities. Pressure contacts are applied to the samples. Consequently, special contacting methods, peculiar to a specific sample material, are not required. The apparatus has been semiautomated to facilitate measurements. Results are presented on n- and p-type silicon.

  10. Thermal fuse for high-temperature batteries

    DOEpatents

    Jungst, Rudolph G.; Armijo, James R.; Frear, Darrel R.

    2000-01-01

    A thermal fuse, preferably for a high-temperature battery, comprising leads and a body therebetween having a melting point between approximately 400.degree. C. and 500.degree. C. The body is preferably an alloy of Ag--Mg, Ag--Sb, Al--Ge, Au--In, Bi--Te, Cd--Sb, Cu--Mg, In--Sb, Mg--Pb, Pb--Pd, Sb--Zn, Sn--Te, or Mg--Al.

  11. High Temperature Protonic Conductors by Melt Growth

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-21

    produce a family of single crystal and multiphase materials that exhibit high temperature protonic conductance, and superior mechanical properties at...with x = 0.05, 0.2, were ball-milled (WC ball and bottle) for 5 min. The resulting slurry was then dried at 70 ºC. The dried powders were heated 1000...explained taking into account the redistribution of the intercellular amorphous phase, and assuming that viscous flow plays a role at low strains. To

  12. Modeling of concrete response at high temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Pfeiffer, P.; Marchertas, A.

    1984-01-01

    A rate-type creep law is implemented into the computer code TEMP-STRESS for high temperature concrete analysis. The disposition of temperature, pore pressure and moisture for the particular structure in question is provided as input for the thermo-mechanical code. The loss of moisture from concrete also induces material shrinkage which is accounted for in the analytical model. Examples are given to illustrate the numerical results.

  13. High-temperature technological processes: Thermophysical principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rykalin, N. N.; Uglov, A. A.; Anishchenko, L. M.

    The book is concerned with the principles of thermodynamics and heat transfer theory underlying high-temperature technological processes. Some characteristics of electromagnetic radiation and heat transfer in solids, liquids, and gases are reviewed, and boundary layer theory, surface phenomena, and phase transitions are examined. The discussion includes an analysis of a number of specific processes, such as treatment by concentrated energy fluxes (electron-beam and laser processing) and plasma machining.

  14. A high temperature superconductivity communications flight experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ngo, P.; Krishen, K.; Arndt, D.; Raffoul, G.; Karasack, V.; Bhasin, K.; Leonard, R.

    1992-01-01

    The proposed high temperature superconductivity (HTSC) millimeter-wave communications flight experiment from the payload bay of the Space Shuttle Orbiter to the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) in geosynchronous orbit is described. The experiment will use a Ka-band HTSC phased array antenna and front-end electronics to receive a downlink communications signal from the ACTS. The discussion covers the system configuration, a description of the ground equipment, the spacecraft receiver, link performance, thermal loading, and the superconducting antenna array.

  15. Viscoelastic creep of high-temperature concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Pfeiffer, P.A.; Marchertas, A.H.; Bazant, Z.P.

    1985-01-01

    Presented in this report is the analytical model for analysis of high temperature creep response of concrete. The creep law used is linear (viscoelastic), the temperature and moisture effects on the creep rate and also aging are included. Both constant and transient temperature as well as constant and transient moisture conditions are considered. Examples are presented to correlate experimental data with parameters of the analytical model by the use of a finite element scheme.

  16. High temperature corrosion of engineering alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, G.Y.

    1990-01-01

    This book describes a treatment of all forms of high temperature corrosion problems encountered in industry, especially gas turbine and aerospace; heat treating; mineral and metallurgical processing; ceramic, electronic and glass manufacturing; automotive; pulp and paper; waste incineration; fossil fuel power generation; coal gasification; and nuclear. Materials problems discussed include those due to oxidation, carburization and metal dusting, nitridation, halogen corrosion, sulfidation, ash/salt deposit corrosion, molten salt corrosion, and molten metal corrosion.

  17. High-Temperature Thermoelectric Energy Conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, C.

    1987-01-01

    Theory of thermoelectric energy conversion at high temperatures and status of research on conversion materials reviewed in report. Shows highest values of thermoelectric figure of merit, Z, found in semiconductor materials. Semiconductors keep wide choice of elements and compounds. Electrical properties tailored to particular application by impurity doping and control of stoichiometry. Report develops definition of Z useful for comparing materials and uses it to evaluate potentials of different classes of materialsmetals, semiconductors, and insulators.

  18. High-Temperature Thermoelectric Energy Conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, C.

    1987-01-01

    Theory of thermoelectric energy conversion at high temperatures and status of research on conversion materials reviewed in report. Shows highest values of thermoelectric figure of merit, Z, found in semiconductor materials. Semiconductors keep wide choice of elements and compounds. Electrical properties tailored to particular application by impurity doping and control of stoichiometry. Report develops definition of Z useful for comparing materials and uses it to evaluate potentials of different classes of materialsmetals, semiconductors, and insulators.

  19. High temperature stress-strain analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Robert L.

    1985-01-01

    The objectives of the high temperature structures program are threefold: to assist in the development of analytical tools needed to improve design analysis and procedures for the efficient and accurate prediction of the nonlinear structural response of hot-section components; to aid in the calibration, validation, and evaluation of the analytical tools by comparing predictions with experimental data; and to evaluate existing as well as advanced temperature and strain measurement instrumentation.

  20. Intermetallic-Based High-Temperature Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.

    1999-04-25

    The intermetallic-based alloys for high-temperature applications are introduced. General characteristics of intermetallics are followed by identification of nickel and iron aluminides as the most practical alloys for commercial applications. An overview of the alloy compositions, melting processes, and mechanical properties for nickel and iron aluminizes are presented. The current applications and commercial producers of nickel and iron aluminizes are given. A brief description of the future prospects of intermetallic-based alloys is also given.

  1. High Temperature Studies of La-Monazite

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-07-01

    Alumina/alumina composite with a porous [55] Callender RL, Barron AR. Facile synthesis of aluminum con- zirconia interphase - processing, properties ...temperature propertie of LaPO4, with a view to its application in high-temperature structural composites. Previous studies at Rockwell and the Air Force...established that LaPO4 has a unique set of properties that make it suitable as a weakly bonded interphase material that enables damage tolerance by

  2. High temperature NASP engine seal development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Melis, Matthew E.; Orletski, Dirk; Test, Mark G.

    1991-01-01

    Key to the development of advanced hypersonic engines such as those being considered for the National Aerospace Plane (NASP) is the development and evaluation of high temperature, flexible seals that must seal the many feet of gaps between the articulating and stationary engine panels. Recent seal progress made at NASA-Lewis is reviewed in the areas of seal concept maturation, test rig development, and performance tests. A test fixture was built at NASA capable of subjecting candidate 3 ft long seals to engine simulated temperatures (up to 1500 F), pressures (up to 100 psi), and engine wall distortions (up to 0.15 in only 18 in span). Leakage performance test results at high temperatures are presented for an innovative high temperature, flexible ceramic wafer seal. Also described is a joint Pratt and Whitney/NASA planned test program to evaluate thermal performance of a braided rope seal under engine simulated heat flux rates (up to 400 Btu/sq ft s), and supersonic flow conditions. These conditions are produced by subjecting the seal specimen to hydrogen oxygen rocket exhaust that flows tangent to the specimen.

  3. High Temperature Calibration Furnace System user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The High Temperature Calibration Furnace System (HTCFS) was developed by Summitec Corporation. It is a high precision instrument providing a constant temperature which can be used to calibrate high temperature thermocouples. Incorporating the many recent technological advances from the fields of optical fiber thermometry, material science, computer systems interfacing, and process control, the engineers at Summitec Corporation have been able to create a system that can reach a steady operating temperature of 1700 C. The precision for the system requires the measurement of temperature to be within 1 C in two hours and within 2 C in 24 hours. As documented, the experimental result shows that this system has been able to stay within .5 C in 5 hours. No other systems commercially available have been able to achieve such high temperature precision. This manual provides an overview of the system design, instructions for instrument setup, and operation procedures. Also included are a vendor list and the source codes for the custom-designed software.

  4. Plasma synthesis of high temperature ceramic films

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, I.G.; Monteiro, O.R.

    1998-11-01

    Thin films of alumina, chromia, mullite, yttria and zirconia have been synthesized using a plasma-based method called metal plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (Mepiiid)--a highly versatile plasma deposition technique with ion energy control. Monolithic films (a single ceramic component) and multilayer films (individual layers of different ceramic materials) were formed. The films were characterized for their composition and structure in a number of different ways, and the high temperature performance of the films was explored, particularly for their ability to maintain their integrity and adhesion when subjected to repetitive high temperature thermal cycling up 1100 C. We found that the films retain their adhesion and quality without any apparent degradation with time, even after a large number of cycles; (the tests were extended out to a total of 40 cycles each of 24 hours duration). After repetitive high temperature thermal cycling, the film-substrate adhesion was greater than {approx}70 Mpa, the instrumental limit of measurement, and the interface toughness was approximately 0.8 MPa m{sup 1/2}.

  5. Self Healing in Coatings at High Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sloof, Wim G.

    Alloys for high temperature applications in an oxidizing environment depend on the formation of a protective and slow growing oxide scale. The composition of these alloys is such that a continuous layer of a thermodynamically stable oxide is formed through selective oxidation of one of the constituting elements. Then, the oxide layer forms a barrier between the environment and the underlying alloy. The alloys for high temperature applications can be divided into alumina (Al2O3), silica (SiO2), or chromia (Cr2O3) formers, such as stainless steels, superalloys (Reed 2006), and intermetallics (MX, where M is Ti, Fe, Co or Ni, and X denotes Al, Si, or Cr). These materials are successfully applied in for example gas turbine engines (aero, marine, and industrial), heating equipment and automotive converters etc. In this chapter, the focus will be on alumina forming alloys encountered as coating material for blades and vanes in gas turbine engines. However, the principles addressed also apply to the other mentioned classes of high temperature alloys.

  6. High temperature, high power piezoelectric composite transducers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyeong Jae; Zhang, Shujun; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, Stewart

    2014-08-08

    Piezoelectric composites are a class of functional materials consisting of piezoelectric active materials and non-piezoelectric passive polymers, mechanically attached together to form different connectivities. These composites have several advantages compared to conventional piezoelectric ceramics and polymers, including improved electromechanical properties, mechanical flexibility and the ability to tailor properties by using several different connectivity patterns. These advantages have led to the improvement of overall transducer performance, such as transducer sensitivity and bandwidth, resulting in rapid implementation of piezoelectric composites in medical imaging ultrasounds and other acoustic transducers. Recently, new piezoelectric composite transducers have been developed with optimized composite components that have improved thermal stability and mechanical quality factors, making them promising candidates for high temperature, high power transducer applications, such as therapeutic ultrasound, high power ultrasonic wirebonding, high temperature non-destructive testing, and downhole energy harvesting. This paper will present recent developments of piezoelectric composite technology for high temperature and high power applications. The concerns and limitations of using piezoelectric composites will also be discussed, and the expected future research directions will be outlined.

  7. Laser Plasma Coupling for High Temperature Hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Kruer, W.

    1999-11-04

    Simple scaling models indicate that quite high radiation temperatures can be achieved in hohlraums driven with the National Ignition Facility. A scaling estimate for the radiation temperature versus pulse duration for different size NIF hohlraums is shown in Figure 1. Note that a radiation temperature of about 650 ev is projected for a so-called scale 1 hohlraum (length 2.6mm, diameter 1.6mm). With such high temperature hohlraums, for example, opacity experiments could be carried out using more relevant high Z materials rather than low Z surrogates. These projections of high temperature hohlraums are uncertain, since the scaling model does not allow for the very strongly-driven laser plasma coupling physics. Lasnex calculations have been carried out to estimate the plasma and irradiation conditions in a scale 1 hohlraum driven by NIF. Linear instability gains as high as exp(100) have been found for stimulated Brillouin scattering, and other laser-driven instabilities are also far above their thresholds. More understanding of the very strongly-driven coupling physics is clearly needed in order to more realistically assess and improve the prospects for high temperature hohlraums. Not surprisingly, this regime has been avoided for inertial fusion applications and so is relatively unexplored.

  8. High Temperature, High Power Piezoelectric Composite Transducers

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyeong Jae; Zhang, Shujun; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, StewarT.

    2014-01-01

    Piezoelectric composites are a class of functional materials consisting of piezoelectric active materials and non-piezoelectric passive polymers, mechanically attached together to form different connectivities. These composites have several advantages compared to conventional piezoelectric ceramics and polymers, including improved electromechanical properties, mechanical flexibility and the ability to tailor properties by using several different connectivity patterns. These advantages have led to the improvement of overall transducer performance, such as transducer sensitivity and bandwidth, resulting in rapid implementation of piezoelectric composites in medical imaging ultrasounds and other acoustic transducers. Recently, new piezoelectric composite transducers have been developed with optimized composite components that have improved thermal stability and mechanical quality factors, making them promising candidates for high temperature, high power transducer applications, such as therapeutic ultrasound, high power ultrasonic wirebonding, high temperature non-destructive testing, and downhole energy harvesting. This paper will present recent developments of piezoelectric composite technology for high temperature and high power applications. The concerns and limitations of using piezoelectric composites will also be discussed, and the expected future research directions will be outlined. PMID:25111242

  9. Deformation of high-temperature superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Goretta, K.C.; Routbort, J.L.; Miller, D.J.; Chen, N.; Dominguez-Rodriguez, A.; Jimenez-Melendo, M.; De Arellano-Lopez, A.R.

    1994-08-01

    Of the many families of high-temperature superconductors, only the properties of those discovered prior to 1989 - Y-Ba-Cu-O, Tl-Ba(Sr)-Ca-Cu-O, and Bi(Pb)-Sr-Ca-Cu-O - have been studied extensively. Deformation tests have been performed on YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} (Y-123), YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 4}O{sub x} (Y-124), TlBa{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} (Bi-2223). The tests have revealed that plasticity is generally limited in these compounds and that the rate-controlling diffusional kinetics for creep are very slow. Nevertheless, hot forming has proved to be quite successful for fabrication of bulk high-temperature superconductors, so long as deformation rates are low or large hydrostatic stresses are applied. Steady-state creep data have proved to be useful in designing optimal heat treatments for superconductors and in support of more-fundamental diffusion experiments. The high-temperature superconductors are highly complex oxides, and it is a challenge to understand their deformation responses. In this paper, results of interest and operant creep mechanisms will be reviewed.

  10. Containerless measurements on liquids at high temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Richard

    1993-01-01

    The application of containerless techniques for measurements of the thermophysical properties of high temperature liquids is reviewed. Recent results obtained in the materials research laboratories at Intersonics are also presented. Work to measure high temperature liquid properties is motivated by both the need for reliable property data for modeling of industrial processes involving molten materials and generation of data form basic modeling of materials behavior. The motivation for this work and examples of variations in thermophysical property values from the literature are presented. The variations may be attributed to changes in the specimen properties caused by chemical changes in the specimen and/or to measurement errors. The two methods used to achieve containerless conditions were aeroacoustic levitation and electromagnetic levitation. Their qualities are presented. The accompanying slides show the layout of levitation equipment and present examples of levitated metallic and ceramic specimens. Containerless techniques provide a high degree of control over specimen chemistry, nucleation and allow precise control of liquid composition to be achieved. Effects of minor additions can thus be measured in a systematic way. Operation in reduced gravity enables enhanced control of liquid motion which can allow measurement of liquid transport properties. Examples of nucleation control, the thermodynamics of oxide contamination removal, and control of the chromium content of liquid aluminum oxide by high temperature containerless processes are presented. The feasibility of measuring temperature, emissivity, liquidus temperature, enthalpy, surface tension, density, viscosity, and thermal diffusivity are discussed in the final section of the paper.

  11. High temperature energy harvester for wireless sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, J. E.; Heijl, R.; Staaf, L. G. H.; Zenkic, S.; Svenman, E.; Lindblom, A.; Palmqvist, A. E. C.; Enoksson, P.

    2014-09-01

    Implementing energy harvesters and wireless sensors in jet engines will simplify development and decrease costs by reducing the need for cables. Such a device could include a small thermoelectric generator placed in the cooling channels of the jet engine where the temperature is between 500-900 °C. This paper covers the synthesis of suitable thermoelectric materials, design of module and proof of concept tests of a thermoelectric module. The materials and other design variables were chosen based on an analytic model and numerical analysis. The module was optimized for 600-800 °C with the thermoelectric materials n-type Ba8Ga16Ge30 and p-type La-doped Yb14MnSb11, both with among the highest reported figure-of-merit values, zT, for bulk materials in this region. The materials were synthesized and their structures confirmed by x-ray diffraction. Proof of concept modules containing only two thermoelectric legs were built and tested at high temperatures and under high temperature gradients. The modules were designed to survive an ambient temperature gradient of up to 200 °C. The first measurements at low temperature showed that the thermoelectric legs could withstand a temperature gradient of 123 °C and still be functional. The high temperature measurement with 800 °C on the hot side showed that the module remained functional at this temperature.

  12. High-temperature superconductivity: the explanation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, A. S.

    2011-03-01

    Soon after the discovery of the first high-temperature superconductor by Georg Bednorz and Alex Müller in 1986, the late Sir Nevill Mott in answering his own question 'Is there an explanation?' (1987 Nature 327 185) expressed the view that the Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) of small bipolarons, predicted by us in 1981, could be the one. Several authors then contemplated BEC of real-space tightly bound pairs, but with a purely electronic mechanism of pairing rather than with an electron-phonon interaction (EPI). However, a number of other researchers criticized the bipolaron (or any real-space pairing) scenario as incompatible with some angle-resolved photoemission spectra, with experimentally determined effective masses of carriers and unconventional symmetry of the superconducting order parameter in cuprates. Since then, the controversial issue of whether EPI is crucial for high-temperature superconductivity or is weak and inessential has been one of the most challenging problems of contemporary condensed matter physics. Here I outline some developments in the bipolaron theory suggesting that the true origin of high-temperature superconductivity is found in a proper combination of strong electron-electron correlations with a significant finite-range (Fröhlich) EPI, and that the theory is fully compatible with key experiments.

  13. High temperature dynamic engine seal technology development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Dellacorte, Christopher; Machinchick, Michael; Mutharasan, Rajakkannu; Du, Guang-Wu; Ko, Frank; Sirocky, Paul J.; Miller, Jeffrey H.

    1992-01-01

    Combined cycle ramjet/scramjet engines being designed for advanced hypersonic vehicles, including the National Aerospace Plane (NASP), require innovative high temperature dynamic seals to seal the sliding interfaces of the articulated engine panels. New seals are required that will operate hot (1200 to 2000 F), seal pressures ranging from 0 to 100 psi, remain flexible to accommodate significant sidewall distortions, and resist abrasion over the engine's operational life. This report reviews the recent high temperature durability screening assessments of a new braided rope seal concept, braided of emerging high temperature materials, that shows promise of meeting many of the seal demands of hypersonic engines. The paper presents durability data for: (1) the fundamental seal building blocks, a range of candidate ceramic fiber tows; and for (2) braided rope seal subelements scrubbed under engine simulated sliding, temperature, and preload conditions. Seal material/architecture attributes and limitations are identified through the investigations performed. The paper summarizes the current seal technology development status and presents areas in which future work will be performed.

  14. Bimodular high temperature planar oxygen gas sensor

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiangcheng; Liu, Yixin; Gao, Haiyong; Gao, Pu-Xian; Lei, Yu

    2014-01-01

    A bimodular planar O2 sensor was fabricated using NiO nanoparticles (NPs) thin film coated yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) substrate. The thin film was prepared by radio frequency (r.f.) magnetron sputtering of NiO on YSZ substrate, followed by high temperature sintering. The surface morphology of NiO NPs film was characterized by atomic force microscope (AFM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns of NiO NPs thin film before and after high temperature O2 sensing demonstrated that the sensing material possesses a good chemical and structure stability. The oxygen detection experiments were performed at 500, 600, and 800°C using the as-prepared bimodular O2 sensor under both potentiometric and resistance modules. For the potentiometric module, a linear relationship between electromotive force (EMF) output of the sensor and the logarithm of O2 concentration was observed at each operating temperature, following the Nernst law. For the resistance module, the logarithm of electrical conductivity was proportional to the logarithm of oxygen concentration at each operating temperature, in good agreement with literature report. In addition, this bimodular sensor shows sensitive, reproducible and reversible response to oxygen under both sensing modules. Integration of two sensing modules into one sensor could greatly enrich the information output and would open a new venue in the development of high temperature gas sensors. PMID:25191652

  15. Lane-changing behavior and its effect on energy dissipation using full velocity difference model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian; Ding, Jian-Xun; Shi, Qin; Kühne, Reinhart D.

    2016-07-01

    In real urban traffic, roadways are usually multilane with lane-specific velocity limits. Most previous researches are derived from single-lane car-following theory which in the past years has been extensively investigated and applied. In this paper, we extend the continuous single-lane car-following model (full velocity difference model) to simulate the three-lane-changing behavior on an urban roadway which consists of three lanes. To meet incentive and security requirements, a comprehensive lane-changing rule set is constructed, taking safety distance and velocity difference into consideration and setting lane-specific speed restriction for each lane. We also investigate the effect of lane-changing behavior on distribution of cars, velocity, headway, fundamental diagram of traffic and energy dissipation. Simulation results have demonstrated asymmetric lane-changing “attraction” on changeable lane-specific speed-limited roadway, which leads to dramatically increasing energy dissipation.

  16. Modelling Traffic Flow at Multi-Lane Urban Roundabouts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ruili; Ruskin, H. J.

    This paper proposes Multi-stream Minimum Acceptable Space (MMAS) Cellular Automata (CA) models to study unsignalised multi-lane (two- or three-lane) urban roundabouts. Through detailed space considerations, using Cellular Automata (CA) and the Multi-stream Minimum Acceptable Space method, heterogeneity and inconsistency of driver behavior and interactions in cross traffic at entrances of roundabouts are simulated by incorporation of four different categories of driver behavior (i.e., conservative, moderate, urgent and radical), together with reassignment of categories with given probabilities at each time step. The method is able to reproduce many features of urban traffic, for which gap-acceptance models are not robust. Multi-lane roundabout models, in particular for two-lane roundabouts, are developed with different vehicle lane-allocation patterns. Various properties of multi-lane roundabout operations have been explored including throughput, turning rates, critical arrival rates and congestion. The operations of two- and three-lane roundabouts are compared in terms of throughputs. Vehicle movements in this paper relate to left-side driving, such as found in Ireland, New Zealand and the UK. However, results are generally applicable to the countries where the give-way rule is applied.

  17. Lane change behavior with a side blind zone alert system.

    PubMed

    Kiefer, Raymond J; Hankey, Jonathan M

    2008-03-01

    This in-traffic study explored the effect of a side blind zone alert (SBZA) system on driver lane change behavior. Such a system may help drivers avoid lane change crashes by warning them with a side mirror display when a vehicle is detected in their blind zone. Participants drove with and without the SBZA system enabled, and were instructed to evaluate vehicle ride characteristics and only given an "incidental" system explanation. Overall, drivers failed to execute "over the shoulder" (blind zone) glances for 68 and 85% of the left and right lane changes, respectively. This suggests that the SBZA display provides information to the driver that often fails to be obtained via over the shoulder glances. In addition, when the SBZA system was enabled there was a 31% reduction in left lane changes attempted without the driver checking the left mirror, and a 23% reduction in right lane changes attempted without the driver checking the inside mirror. These results, coupled with the assumption that "did not see other vehicle" is a principal causal factor in many lane change crashes, suggests that the SBZA system may assist drivers in avoiding lane change crashes.

  18. High Temperature Fluoride Salt Test Loop

    SciTech Connect

    Aaron, Adam M.; Cunningham, Richard Burns; Fugate, David L.; Holcomb, David Eugene; Kisner, Roger A.; Peretz, Fred J.; Robb, Kevin R.; Wilson, Dane F.; Yoder, Jr, Graydon L.

    2015-12-01

    Effective high-temperature thermal energy exchange and delivery at temperatures over 600°C has the potential of significant impact by reducing both the capital and operating cost of energy conversion and transport systems. It is one of the key technologies necessary for efficient hydrogen production and could potentially enhance efficiencies of high-temperature solar systems. Today, there are no standard commercially available high-performance heat transfer fluids above 600°C. High pressures associated with water and gaseous coolants (such as helium) at elevated temperatures impose limiting design conditions for the materials in most energy systems. Liquid salts offer high-temperature capabilities at low vapor pressures, good heat transport properties, and reasonable costs and are therefore leading candidate fluids for next-generation energy production. Liquid-fluoride-salt-cooled, graphite-moderated reactors, referred to as Fluoride Salt Reactors (FHRs), are specifically designed to exploit the excellent heat transfer properties of liquid fluoride salts while maximizing their thermal efficiency and minimizing cost. The FHR s outstanding heat transfer properties, combined with its fully passive safety, make this reactor the most technologically desirable nuclear power reactor class for next-generation energy production. Multiple FHR designs are presently being considered. These range from the Pebble Bed Advanced High Temperature Reactor (PB-AHTR) [1] design originally developed by UC-Berkeley to the Small Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (SmAHTR) and the large scale FHR both being developed at ORNL [2]. The value of high-temperature, molten-salt-cooled reactors is also recognized internationally, and Czechoslovakia, France, India, and China all have salt-cooled reactor development under way. The liquid salt experiment presently being developed uses the PB-AHTR as its focus. One core design of the PB-AHTR features multiple 20 cm diameter, 3.2 m long fuel channels

  19. Lane bias in elite-level swimming competition.

    PubMed

    Brammer, Christopher; Cornett, Andrew; Stager, Joel

    2017-02-01

    Performance outcomes at the 2013 World Swimming Championship were previously shown to be biased depending on the swimmer's lane assignment. The purpose of this study was to determine if this kind of bias was unique, and if not, if the bias was related to the temporary or permanent nature of the pool. The effect of lane on the average odd-length split minus the preceding even-length split in the 800- and 1500-m freestyle events, and on the relative change from qualifying to preliminary performance in the 50-m events, was determined for 16 other elite-level competitions. Depending on the swimmers' direction, split times were on average 0.16 s slower or faster in at least one lane at each of the 16 competitions, and in 49% of all lanes analysed. In 5 competitions, swimmers were shown to be faster in a majority of lanes in one direction as compared to the other. Analysis of the 50-m events at these 5 competitions indicate that preliminary performances were between 0.5 and 0.9% slower or faster than qualifying times, which is consistent with the direction effect observed in the distance freestyle events. Further, lane biases occur more often in temporary pools (70% of lanes) than in permanent pools (35% of lanes), with water currents as the most plausible cause. The prevalence of lane bias at elite-level swimming competition highlights the need for the implementation of policies and procedures to prevent such bias from occurring again in the future.

  20. High temperature ReCOB piezocrystals: Recent developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shujun; Yu, Fapeng; Xia, Ru; Fei, Yiting; Frantz, Eric; Zhao, Xian; Yuan, Durong; Chai, Bruce H. T.; Snyder, David; Shrout, Thomas R.

    2011-03-01

    Piezoelectric sensors for high temperature applications have attracted attention due to their simplistic structure, fast response time and ease of integration. In this article, oxyborate ReCa4O(BO3)3 (Re: rare earth element; abbreviated as ReCOB) piezoelectric crystals were surveyed for their potential use in high temperature sensing applications. In contrast to quartz and GaPO4 crystals, no phase transformation(s) are observed prior to their melting points, being in the order of ∼1500 °C. The electrical resistivity, dielectric, piezoelectric properties and resonance-impedance characteristics were studied as a function of temperature over the range of Room Temperature (RT) to 950 °C. The resistivity of ReCOB was found to be ∼2×108 Ohm cm at 800 °C, two orders higher than langasite, another widely studied crystal system. The electromechanical coupling factors k26 and piezoelectric coefficients d26 were found to be >20% and >10 pC/N, respectively, with the variation being <20% over the studied temperature range. The resonance frequency for width shear vibration was found to decrease linearly with increasing temperature for YCOB crystals, with the Temperature Coefficient of Frequency (TCF) in the order of 70 ppm/K, while for NdCOB crystals, a nonlinear behavior was observed, demonstrating a potential zero TCF crystal cut. The high resistivity, high piezoelectric properties and low mechanical and dielectric losses, together with temperature independent characteristics, demonstrate that oxyborate crystals are promising candidates for high temperature sensing applications.

  1. High temperature barrier coatings for refractory metals

    SciTech Connect

    Malone, G.A.; Walech, T.

    1995-06-01

    Improvements in high temperature oxidation resistant metal coating technology will allow NASA and commercial entities to develop competitive civil space transport and communication systems. The success of investigations completed in this program will have a positive impact on broadening the technology base for high temperature materials. The work reported herein describes processes and procedures for successfully depositing coherent oxidation barrier coatings on refractory metals to prevent degradation under very severe operating environments. Application of the new technology developed is now being utilized in numerous Phase 3 applications through several prominent aerospace firms. Major achievements have included: (1) development of means to deposit thick platinum and rhodium coatings with lower stress and fewer microcracks than could be previously achieved; (2) development of processes to deposit thick adherent coatings of platinum group metals on refractory substrates that remain bonded through high temperature excursions and without need for intermediate coatings (bonding processes unique to specific refractory metals and alloys have been defined); (3) demonstration that useful alloys of refractory and platinum coatings can be made through thermal diffusion means; (4) demonstration that selected barrier coatings on refractory substrates can withstand severe oxidizing environments in the range of 1260 deg and 1760 deg C for long time periods essential to the life requirements of the hardware; and (5) successful application of the processes and procedures to prototype hardware. The results of these studies have been instrumental in improved thermal oxidation barrier coatings for the NASP propulsion system. Other Phase 3 applications currently being exploited include small uncooled thrusters for spacecraft and microsatellite maneuvering systems.

  2. High temperature superconductors applications in telecommunications

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, A.A.; Li, J.; Zhang, M.F.

    1994-12-31

    The purpose of this paper is twofold: to discuss high temperature superconductors with specific reference to their employment in telecommunications applications; and to discuss a few of the limitations of the normally employed two-fluid model. While the debate on the actual usage of high temperature superconductors in the design of electronic and telecommunications devices-obvious advantages versus practical difficulties-needs to be settled in the near future, it is of great interest to investigate the parameters and the assumptions that will be employed in such designs. This paper deals with the issue of providing the microwave design engineer with performance data for such superconducting waveguides. The values of conductivity and surface resistance, which are the primary determining factors of a waveguide performance, are computed based on the two-fluid model. A comparison between two models-a theoretical one in terms of microscopic parameters (termed Model A) and an experimental fit in terms of macroscopic parameters (termed Model B)-shows the limitations and the resulting ambiguities of the two-fluid model at high frequencies and at temperatures close to the transition temperature. The validity of the two-fluid model is then discussed. Our preliminary results show that the electrical transport description in the normal and superconducting phases as they are formulated in the two-fluid model needs to be modified to incorporate the new and special features of high temperature superconductors. Parameters describing the waveguide performance-conductivity, surface resistance and attenuation constant-will be computed. Potential applications in communications networks and large scale integrated circuits will be discussed. Some of the ongoing work will be reported. In particular, a brief proposal is made to investigate of the effects of electromagnetic interference and the concomitant notion of electromagnetic compatibility (EMI/EMC) of high T{sub c} superconductors.

  3. Electron attachment to halomethanes at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, T. M.; Friedman, J. F.; Schaffer, L. C.; Viggiano, A. A.

    2009-10-01

    We have modified our high-temperature flowing-afterglow apparatus to include a movable Langmuir probe, a 4-needle reactant gas inlet, and a microwave discharge plasma source for the purpose of measuring electron attachment rate constants at high temperatures. We have focused initially on molecules which have very small attachment rate constants, ka, at room temperature to see if their behavior at high temperatures can be described in Arrhenius fashion. We have reported ka for CH3Cl, but only above 600 K, because the value at 600 K was quite small: 5.8 x10-12 cm^3 s-1. The Arrhenius plot for these data imply ka = 10-17 cm^3 s-1 at 300 K, a value that is so small as to be immeasurable with any current apparatus. We now have ka for other halomethanes, CF3Cl, CF2Cl2, and CH2Cl2. The halomethane data cover seven orders-of-magnitude in ka. Electron attachment to CF3Cl is endothermic by 143 meV at 300 K, but our measurements indicate that there is a barrier of about 400 meV, probably related to the energy at which the anion surface crosses that of the neutral. The reactions for CH3Cl, CF2Cl2, and CH2Cl2 are exothermic, but our data again indicate large barriers to attachment which accounts for the extremely slow attachment at 300 K. From these data and literature measurements at 300 K, one can make educated guesses as to the behavior of ka for other halomethanes.

  4. High temperature barrier coatings for refractory metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, G. A.; Walech, T.

    1995-01-01

    Improvements in high temperature oxidation resistant metal coating technology will allow NASA and commercial entities to develop competitive civil space transport and communication systems. The success of investigations completed in this program will have a positive impact on broadening the technology base for high temperature materials. The work reported herein describes processes and procedures for successfully depositing coherent oxidation barrier coatings on refractory metals to prevent degradation under very severe operating environments. Application of the new technology developed is now being utilized in numerous Phase 3 applications through several prominent aerospace firms. Major achievements have included: (1) development of means to deposit thick platinum and rhodium coatings with lower stress and fewer microcracks than could be previously achieved; (2) development of processes to deposit thick adherent coatings of platinum group metals on refractory substrates that remain bonded through high temperature excursions and without need for intermediate coatings (bonding processes unique to specific refractory metals and alloys have been defined; (3) demonstration that useful alloys of refractory and platinum coatings can be made through thermal diffusion means; (4) demonstration that selected barrier coatings on refractory substrates can withstand severe oxidizing environments in the range of 1260 deg and 1760 deg C for long time periods essential to the life requirements of the hardware; and (5) successful application of the processes and procedures to prototype hardware. The results of these studies have been instrumental in improved thermal oxidation barrier coatings for the NASP propulsion system. Other Phase 3 applications currently being exploited include small uncooled thrusters for spacecraft and microsatellite maneuvering systems.

  5. High temperature superconductors applications in telecommunications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, A. Anil; Li, Jiang; Zhang, Ming Fang

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is twofold: (1) to discuss high temperature superconductors with specific reference to their employment in telecommunications applications; and (2) to discuss a few of the limitations of the normally employed two-fluid model. While the debate on the actual usage of high temperature superconductors in the design of electronic and telecommunications devices - obvious advantages versus practical difficulties - needs to be settled in the near future, it is of great interest to investigate the parameters and the assumptions that will be employed in such designs. This paper deals with the issue of providing the microwave design engineer with performance data for such superconducting waveguides. The values of conductivity and surface resistance, which are the primary determining factors of a waveguide performance, are computed based on the two-fluid model. A comparison between two models - a theoretical one in terms of microscopic parameters (termed Model A) and an experimental fit in terms of macroscopic parameters (termed Model B) - shows the limitations and the resulting ambiguities of the two-fluid model at high frequencies and at temperatures close to the transition temperature. The validity of the two-fluid model is then discussed. Our preliminary results show that the electrical transport description in the normal and superconducting phases as they are formulated in the two-fluid model needs to be modified to incorporate the new and special features of high temperature superconductors. Parameters describing the waveguide performance - conductivity, surface resistance and attenuation constant - will be computed. Potential applications in communications networks and large scale integrated circuits will be discussed. Some of the ongoing work will be reported. In particular, a brief proposal is made to investigate of the effects of electromagnetic interference and the concomitant notion of electromagnetic compatibility (EMI/EMC) of high T

  6. High temperature decomposition of hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is oxidized into nitrogen dioxide (NO.sub.2) by the high temperature decomposition of a hydrogen peroxide solution to produce the oxidative free radicals, hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl. The hydrogen peroxide solution is impinged upon a heated surface in a stream of nitric oxide where it decomposes to produce the oxidative free radicals. Because the decomposition of the hydrogen peroxide solution occurs within the stream of the nitric oxide, rapid gas-phase oxidation of nitric oxide into nitrogen dioxide occurs.

  7. High temperature decomposition of hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is oxidized into nitrogen dioxide (NO.sub.2) by the high temperature decomposition of a hydrogen peroxide solution to produce the oxidative free radicals, hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl. The hydrogen peroxide solution is impinged upon a heated surface in a stream of nitric oxide where it decomposes to produce the oxidative free radicals. Because the decomposition of the hydrogen peroxide solution occurs within the stream of the nitric oxide, rapid gas-phase oxidation of nitric oxide into nitrogen dioxide occurs.

  8. High-temperature polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Michael A.

    1990-01-01

    Polymers research at the NASA Lewis Research Center has produced high-temperature, easily processable resin systems, such as PMR-15. In addition, the Polymers Branch has investigated ways to improve the mechanical properties of polymers and the microcracking resistance of polymer matrix composites in response to industry need for new and improved aeropropulsion materials. Current and future research in the Polymers Branch is aimed at advancing the upper use temperature of polymer matrix composites to 700 F and beyond by developing new resins, by examining the use of fiber reinforcements other than graphite, and by developing coatings for polymer matrix composites to increase their oxidation resistance.

  9. High temperature aqueous stress corrosion testing device

    DOEpatents

    Bornstein, A.N.; Indig, M.E.

    1975-12-01

    A description is given of a device for stressing tensile samples contained within a high temperature, high pressure aqueous environment, thereby permitting determination of stress corrosion susceptibility of materials in a simple way. The stressing device couples an external piston to an internal tensile sample via a pull rod, with stresses being applied to the sample by pressurizing the piston. The device contains a fitting/seal arrangement including Teflon and weld seals which allow sealing of the internal system pressure and the external piston pressure. The fitting/seal arrangement allows free movement of the pull rod and the piston.

  10. A review of high-temperature adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, A. K.; St.clair, T. L.

    1981-01-01

    The development of high temperature adhesives and polyphenylquinoxalines (PPQ) is reported. Thermoplastic polyimides and linear PPQ adhesive are shown to have potential for bonding both metals and composite structures. A nadic terminated addition polyimide adhesive, LARC-13, and an acetylene terminated phenylquinoxaline (ATPQ) were developed. Both of the addition type adhesives are shown to be more readily processable than linear materials but less thermooxidatively stable and more brittle. It is found that the addition type adhesives are able to perform, at elevated temperatures up to 595 C where linear systems fail thermoplastically.

  11. NEW APPROACHES: High temperature superconductors take off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gough, Colin

    1998-01-01

    This article describes the progress made towards real engineering applications of high temperature superconductors (HTS) in the ten years following the Nobel Prize winning discovery by Bednorz and Müller in August 1986. Examples include HTS wires and tapes for more efficient and powerful electric motors and for increasing the electrical power into the heart of modern cities, HTS permanent magnets for levitation, microwave filters for cellular telephone networks, SQUIDs (superconducting quantum interference devices) to monitor foetal heart and brain signals, and a new generation of superfast logic devices based on the flux quantum.

  12. Applications of bulk high-temperature superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, J.R.

    1995-06-01

    The development of high-temperature superconductors (HTSs) can be broadly generalized into thin-film electronics, wire applications, and bulk applications. We consider bulk HTSs to include sintered or crystallized forms that do not take the geometry of filaments or tapes, and we discuss major applications for these materials. For the most part applications may be realized with the HTSs cooled to 77 K, and the properties of the bulk HTSs are often already sufficient for commercial use. A non-exhaustive list of applications for bulk HTSs includes trapped field magnets, hysteresis motors, magnetic shielding, current leads, and magnetic bearings. These applications are briefly discussed in this paper.

  13. High-temperature superconducting transformer evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    DeSteese, J.G.; Dagle, J.E.; Dirks, J.A.

    1995-04-01

    The advancing development of high-temperature superconducting (HTS) materials is encouraging the evaluation of many practical applications. This paper summarizes a study that examined the future potential of HTS power transformers in the 30-MVA to 1000-MVA capacity range. Transformer performance was characterized on the basis of potentially achievable HTS materials capabilities and dominant transformer design parameters. Life-cycle costs were estimated and compared with those of conventional transformers to evaluate the economic viability and market potential of HTS designs. HTS transformers are projected to have both capital and energy cost advantages attributable to their ability to be intrinsically smaller and lighter than conventional transformers of comparable capacity.

  14. Precipitation Hardenable High Temperature Shape Memory Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noebe, Ronald Dean (Inventor); Draper, Susan L. (Inventor); Nathal, Michael V. (Inventor); Crombie, Edwin A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A composition of the invention is a high temperature shape memory alloy having high work output, and is made from (Ni+Pt+Y),Ti(100-x) wherein x is present in a total amount of 49-55 atomic % Pt is present in a total amount of 10-30 atomic %, Y is one or more of Au, Pd. and Cu and is present in a total amount of 0 to 10 atomic %. The alloy has a matrix phase wherein the total concentration of Ni, Pt, and the one or more of Pd. Au, and Cu is greater than 50 atomic %.

  15. High Temperature Oxidation-Resistant Thruster Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-02-01

    Worrell, "An Investigation of High Temperature Thermodynamic Properties in the Pt-Zr and Pt- Hf Systems," Metal. Trans. A, 8A(1977)503-509. 40. A.R...impulse improvement over conventional designs in which the use of disilicide coated columbium chambers limit operation to 1300’C (2400’F). Aooession For...pulsing modes. In Phase I, an iridium-coated rhenium material system was the leading candidate selected based on the physical and mechanical properties

  16. Encapsulation of high temperature molten salts

    DOEpatents

    Oxley, James D.; Mathur, Anoop Kumar

    2017-05-16

    The present disclosure relates to a method of encapsulating microcapsules containing relatively high temperature phase change materials and the microcapsules so produced. The microcapsules are coated with an inorganic binder, film former and an inorganic filler. The microcapsules may include a sacrificial layer that is disposed between the particle and the coating. The microcapsules may also include an inner coating layer, sacrificial layer and outer coating layer. The microcapsules are particularly useful for thermal energy storage in connection with, e.g., heat collected from concentrating solar collectors.

  17. Attachment Techniques for High Temperature Strain

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    3.6.6.1 Pull Tests on Ceramic Cements and Flame Sprayed Coatings 26 3.6.6.2 Effect of Cement Age on Bond Strength. 29 3.6.6.3 Effect of Cure...Temperature on Bond Strength. 29 3.6.6.4 Effect of High Temperature Cure on Cement Strength . 29 3.7 THEORY OF ADHESION 33 3.7.1 High...broke rather than pull out of the coating 28 Figure 16 Effect of Cement Age 30 Figure 17 Cure Temperature vs. Strength 31 Figure 18

  18. Multichannel euv spectroscopy of high temperature plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Fonck, R.J.

    1983-11-01

    Spectroscopy of magnetically confined high temperature plasmas in the visible through x-ray spectral ranges deals primarily with the study of impurity line radiation or continuum radiation. Detailed knowledge of absolute intensities, temporal behavior, and spatial distributions of the emitted radiation is desired. As tokamak facilities become more complex, larger, and less accessible, there has been an increased emphasis on developing new instrumentation to provide such information in a minimum number of discharges. The availability of spatially-imaging detectors for use in the vacuum ultraviolet region (especially the intensified photodiode array) has generated the development of a variety of multichannel spectrometers for applications on tokamak facilities.

  19. Aerospace applications of high temperature superconductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinen, V. O.; Connolly, D. J.

    1991-01-01

    Space application of high temperature superconducting (HTS) materials may occur before most terrestrial applications because of the passive cooling possibilities in space and because of the economic feasibility of introducing an expensive new technology which has a significant system benefit in space. NASA Lewis Research Center has an ongoing program to develop space technology capitalizing on the potential benefit of HTS materials. The applications being pursued include space communications, power and propulsion systems, and magnetic bearings. In addition, NASA Lewis is pursuing materials research to improve the performance of HTS materials for space applications.

  20. High temperature regenerable hydrogen sulfide removal agents

    DOEpatents

    Copeland, Robert J.

    1993-01-01

    A system for high temperature desulfurization of coal-derived gases using regenerable sorbents. One sorbent is stannic oxide (tin oxide, SnO.sub.2), the other sorbent is a metal oxide or mixed metal oxide such as zinc ferrite (ZnFe.sub.2 O.sub.4). Certain otherwise undesirable by-products, including hydrogen sulfide (H.sub.2 S) and sulfur dioxide (SO.sub.2) are reused by the system, and elemental sulfur is produced in the regeneration reaction. A system for refabricating the sorbent pellets is also described.

  1. Easily Processable High-Temperature Polyimide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, James K.; Meador, Mary Ann; Meador, Michael A.; Waters, John F.; Baldwin, Larry J.

    1994-01-01

    Polymerization without volatile gases leads to high-quality resins. N-CYCAP (amiNe substituted CYClophane Addition Polyimide) is thermoset polyimide developed containing 4-amino{2.2}paracyclophane as end cap. Current improvements in synthesis of end cap include increasing yield to 60 percent overall and decreasing manufacturing time by simplifying synthetic procedure. Enables large-scale production and increases viability of cyclophane end caps for polymers for high-temperature applications. In comparison with neat resin moldings and composite matrix resins made of PMR-II-50, those made of N-CYCAP polymers found to be processable with lower void content and higher thermo-oxidative stability.

  2. High temperature surface protection. [10 gas turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, S. R.

    1978-01-01

    Alloys of the MCrAlX type are the basis for high temperature surface protection systems in gas turbines. M can be one or more of Ni, Co, or Fe and X denotes a reactive metal added to enhance oxide scale adherence. The selection and formation as well as the oxidation, hot corrosion and thermal fatigue performance of MCrAlX coatings are discussed. Coatings covered range from simple aluminides formed by pack cementation to the more advanced physical vapor deposition overlay coatings and developmental plasma spray deposited thermal barrier coatings.

  3. CARS thermometry in high temperature gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, J. Y.; Dunn-Rankin, D.

    1993-01-01

    CARS is an effective non-intrusive technique for measuring gas temperature in combustion environments. In regions of high temperature gradient, however, the CARS signal is complicated by contributions from gas at different temperature. This paper examines theoretically the uncertainty associated with CARS thermometry in steep temperature gradients. In addition, the work compares the temperature predicted from CARS with the adiabatic mixed temperature of the gas resident in the measurement volume. This comparison helps indicate the maximum sample volume size allowed for accurate temperature measurements.

  4. Experimental needs of high temperature concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Chern, J.C.; Marchertas, A.H.

    1985-01-01

    The needs of experimental data on concrete structures under high temperature, ranging up to about 370/sup 0/C for operating reactor conditions and to about 900/sup 0/C and beyond for hypothetical accident conditions, are described. This information is required to supplement analytical methods which are being implemented into the finite element code TEMP-STRESS to treat reinforced concrete structures. Recommended research ranges from material properties of reinforced/prestressed concrete, direct testing of analytical models used in the computer codes, to investigations of certain aspects of concrete behavior, the phenomenology of which is not well understood. 10 refs.

  5. Search for new high temperature thermoelectric materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caillat, Thierry; Borshchevsky, Alex; Fleurial, Jean-Pierre

    1992-01-01

    Although important efforts are actually devoted to improve Si-Ge materials, their thermoelectric energy conversion efficiency remains relatively low and the nondimensional ZT value does not exceed 1. Higher values can be obtained by investigating new materials. A search for new high temperature thermoelectric materials identified a certain number of compounds between transition metals and bismuth, antimony and germanium as potential candidates. Results of the preliminary synthesis of samples by a variety of techniques (Bridgman, mechanical alloying) are presented as well as some electrical measurements. Some compounds showed interesting properties and need to be investigated in more details.

  6. Coal transformation under high-temperature catagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Melenevsky, V.N.; Sokol, E.V.; Fomin, A.N.

    2006-07-01

    In this paper we consider products of natural pyrolysis of lignite, which resulted from the high-temperature spontaneous combustion of spoil heaps of the Chelyabinsk coal basin. These products were studied by pyrolysis, element and petrographic analyses, chromatomass spectrometry, and X-ray diffraction method. We have established that under reducing conditions, the degree of pyrogenic coal transformation and the composition of pyrolysis products vary greatly, from graphite-like phases to bitumens, and depend on the temperature and degree of the system openness.

  7. Applications of bulk high-temperature superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, J. R.

    The development of high-temperature superconductors (HTS's) can be broadly generalized into thin-film electronics, wire applications, and bulk applications. We consider bulk HTS's to include sintered or crystallized forms that do not take the geometry of filaments or tapes, and we discuss major applications for these materials. For the most part applications may be realized with the HTS's cooled to 77 K, and the properties of the bulk HTS's are often already sufficient for commercial use. A non-exhaustive list of applications for bulk HTS's includes trapped field magnets, hysteresis motors, magnetic shielding, current leads, and magnetic bearings. These applications are briefly discussed in this paper.

  8. High temperature superconducting digital circuits and subsystems

    SciTech Connect

    Martens, J.S.; Pance, A.; Whiteley, S.R.; Char, K.; Johansson, M.F.; Lee, L.; Hietala, V.M.; Wendt, J.R.; Hou, S.Y.; Phillips, J.

    1993-10-01

    The advances in the fabrication of high temperature superconducting devices have enabled the demonstration of high performance and useful digital circuits and subsystems. The yield and uniformity of the devices is sufficient for circuit fabrication at the medium scale integration (MSI) level with performance not seen before at 77 K. The circuits demonstrated to date include simple gates, counters, analog to digital converters, and shift registers. All of these are mid-sized building blocks for potential applications in commercial and military systems. The processes used for these circuits and blocks will be discussed along with observed performance data.

  9. Joining of ceramics for high temperature applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilpas, Martti

    1987-01-01

    Summarized is a literature survey of the methods for joining ceramics to ceramics or ceramics to metals for high temperature applications. Also mechanical properties and potential applications of the joints are considered. The joining of ceramics is usually carried out by brazing or diffusion bonding. Especially the latter has been found useful, increasing the application of bonded ceramics. The possibility of using electron beam and laser beam welding for joining ceramics has also recently been investigated. The bonding of ceramics has found numerous applications typical for high operating temperatures, i.e., sensors and thermocouples.

  10. High Temperature Materials Laboratory third annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Tennery, V.J.; Foust, F.M.

    1990-12-01

    The High Temperature Materials Laboratory has completed its third year of operation as a designated DOE User Facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Growth of the user program is evidenced by the number of outside institutions who have executed user agreements since the facility began operation in 1987. A total of 88 nonproprietary agreements (40 university and 48 industry) and 20 proprietary agreements (1 university, 19 industry) are now in effect. Sixty-eight nonproprietary research proposals (39 from university, 28 from industry, and 1 other government facility) and 8 proprietary proposals were considered during this reporting period. Research projects active in FY 1990 are summarized.

  11. The Northern Walker Lane Seismic Refraction Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louie, J. N.; Smith, S. B.; Thelen, W.; Scott, J. B.; Clark, M.

    2002-12-01

    We are developing a three-dimensional reference seismic velocity model for the western Great Basin region of Nevada and eastern California. The northern Walker Lane had not been characterized well by previous work. In May 2002 we collected a new crustal refraction profile from Battle Mountain, Nev. across western Nevada, the Reno area, Lake Tahoe, and the northern Sierra to Auburn, Calif. Mine blasts and earthquakes were recorded by 199 Texan instruments (loaned by the PASSCAL Instrument Center) extending across this more than 450-km-long transect. The seismic sources at the eastern end were mining blasts at Barrick's GoldStrike pit. We recorded additional blasts at the Florida Canyon and other mines between Lovelock and Battle Mountain, Nevada. The GoldStrike mine produced several ripple-fired blasts using 10,000-40,000 kg of ANFO each. First arrivals from the larger blasts are obvious to distances exceeding 250 km in the raw records. A M2.4 earthquake near Bridgeport, Calif. also produced pickable P-wave arrivals across at least half the transect, providing fan-shot data. We recorded only during working hours, and so missed an M4 earthquake that occurred at night. Events of M2 occurred during our recording to the west on the San Andreas fault near Pinnacles, Calif.; M3 events occurred near Portola and Mammoth Lakes, Calif. Arrivals from M5 events in the Mariana and Kuril Islands also appear in the records. Time-picks from these earthquakes may be possible after more work on synthetic-time modeling, data filtering, and display. We plan to record blasts at quarries in the western Sierra in future experiments, for a direct refraction reversal. We will compare our time picks against times generated from regional velocity models, to identify potential crustal and upper-mantle velocity anomalies. Such anomalies may be associated with the Battle Mountain heat-flow high, the northern Walker Lane belt, or the northern Sierran block.

  12. Adaptive high temperature superconducting filters for interference rejection

    SciTech Connect

    Raihn, K.F.; Fenzi, N.O.; Hey-Shipton, G.L.; Saito, E.R.; Loung, P.V.; Aidnik, D.L.

    1996-07-01

    An optically switched high temperature superconducting (HTS) band-reject filter bank is presented. Fast low loss switching of high quality (Q) factor HTS filter elements enables digital selection of arbitrary pass-bands and stop-bands. Patterned pieces of GaAs and silicon are used in the manufacture of the photosensitive switches. Fiber optic cabling is used to transfer the optical energy from an LED to the switch. The fiber optic cable minimizes the thermal loading of the filter package and de-couples the switch`s power source from the RF circuit. This paper will discuss the development of a computer-controlled HTS bank of optically switchable, narrow band, high Q bandstop filters which incorporates a cryocooler to maintain the 77 K operating temperature of the HTS microwave circuit.

  13. Optimization Review, Black Butte Mine Superfund Site, Lane County, Oregon

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The BBM Superfund Site (the site) is located in Lane County, Oregon, approximately 35 miles southeast of Eugene and approximately 10 miles upstream from the Cottage Grove Reservoir (CGR). Mercury mining and processing operations were active at the site...

  14. Polymer delineation system. [Patent application: traffic lane lines

    DOEpatents

    Woolman, S.; Steinberg, M.

    1975-06-24

    A delineation system (traffic lane lines) for highways is described in which polymerizable substances are applied to existing or newly prepared highway pavements. The substances would contain a suitable pigment and may incorporate reflective elements.

  15. ARROYO SECO PARKWAY SOUTHBOUND LANES AND ARROYO BOULEVARD BRIDGE. NOTE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ARROYO SECO PARKWAY SOUTHBOUND LANES AND ARROYO BOULEVARD BRIDGE. NOTE BEGINNING OF SOUTH PASADENA ROAD CUT. LOOKING 264°W - Arroyo Seco Parkway, Arroyo Drive Bridge, Milepost 30.30, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  16. 1. ARROYO SECO PARKWAY SOUTHBOUND LANES AND PASADENA AVENUE BRIDGE. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. ARROYO SECO PARKWAY SOUTHBOUND LANES AND PASADENA AVENUE BRIDGE. RAILROAD BRIDGE IN DISTANCE. LOOKING 238°WSW. - Arroyo Seco Parkway, Pasadena Avenue Bridge, Milepost 26.48, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  17. Sir William Arbuthnot Lane and His Contributions to Plastic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Breakey, Richard William F; Mulliken, John B

    2015-07-01

    Surgical subspecialties were just emerging at the turn of the 20th Century, before this time, general surgeons had to adjust their operative skills to address disorders throughout the body. Sir William Arbuthnot Lane was a British surgeon, whose restless mind led him to wander throughout the field of general surgery and beyond. Although controversial, he advanced in the repair of cleft lip and palate, introduced the "no touch" operative technique, internal fixation of fractures, and is credited as the first surgeon to perform open massage of the heart. During The Great War, he established the British Plastic Surgery unit at Sidcup and delegated the care of facial and jaw injuries to young Major Harold Gillies. Lane later founded The New Health Society, an organization that stimulated the natural food movement. Sadly, in his latter years Lane's thinking drifted further away from with the times and his professional credibility waned. Nevertheless, Lane's variegated life is of sufficient interest to deserve reassessment.

  18. Predictors of Lane-Change Errors in Older Drivers

    PubMed Central

    Munro, Cynthia A.; Jefferys, Joan; Gower, Emily W.; Muñoz, Beatriz E.; Lyketsos, Constantine G.; Keay, Lisa; Turano, Kathleen A.; Bandeen-Roche, Karen; West, Sheila K.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To determine the factors that predict errors in executing proper lane changes among older drivers. Design Cross-sectional analysis of data from a longitudinal study. Setting Maryland's Eastern Shore. Participants One thousand eighty drivers aged 67 to 87 enrolled in the Salisbury Eye Evaluation Driving Study. Measurements Tests of vision, cognition, health status, and self-reported distress and a driving monitoring system in each participant's car, used to quantify lane-change errors. Results In regression models, measures of neither vision nor perceived stress were related to lane-change errors after controlling for age, sex, race, and residence location. In contrast, cognitive variables, specifically performance on the Brief Test of Attention and the Beery-Buktenicka Test of Visual-Motor Integration, were related to lane-change errors. Conclusion The current findings underscore the importance of specific cognitive skills, particularly auditory attention and visual perception, in the execution of driving maneuvers in older individuals. PMID:20398113

  19. ARROYO SECO PARKWAY SOUTHBOUND LANES AND EXIT RAMP TO ORANGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ARROYO SECO PARKWAY SOUTHBOUND LANES AND EXIT RAMP TO ORANGE GROVE AVENUE. ORANGE GROVE AVENUE BRIDGE IN REAR. LOOKING 278°W - Arroyo Seco Parkway, Orange Grove Avenue Bridge, Milepost 30.59, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  20. Multiple-vehicle collision induced by lane changing in traffic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagatani, Takashi; Yonekura, Shoichi

    2014-06-01

    We study the multiple-vehicle collision when a vehicle changes from the first lane to the second lane on a two-lane highway. If a vehicle with high (low) speed on the first lane enters into the second lane, it may crash into the forward (rear) vehicle on the second lane and the crash may induce more collisions. We investigate whether or not the incoming vehicle induces the multiple-vehicle collision. The number of collisions depends on the initial velocity, the initial density, the incoming velocity, the incoming headway, the sensitivity, and the relative velocity. We derive the region map for the multiple-vehicle collision induced by lane changing.

  1. New Waste Calciner High Temperature Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Swenson, M.C.

    2000-09-01

    A new Calciner flowsheet has been developed to process the sodium-bearing waste (SBW) in the INTEC Tank Farm. The new flowsheet increases the normal Calciner operating temperature from 500 C to 600 C. At the elevated temperature, sodium in the waste forms stable aluminates, instead of nitrates that melt at calcining temperatures. From March through May 2000, the new high-temperature flowsheet was tested in the New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) Calciner. Specific test criteria for various Calciner systems (feed, fuel, quench, off-gas, etc.) were established to evaluate the long-term operability of the high-temperature flowsheet. This report compares in detail the Calciner process data with the test criteria. The Calciner systems met or exceeded all test criteria. The new flowsheet is a visible, long-term method of calcining SBW. Implementation of the flowsheet will significantly increase the calcining rate of SBW and reduce the amount of calcine produced by reducing the amount of chemical additives to the Calciner. This will help meet the future waste processing milestones and regulatory needs such as emptying the Tank Farm.

  2. Dynamic high-temperature-phosphor thermometry

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, K.W.; Capps, G.J.; Muhs, J.D.; Smith, D.B.; Cates, M.R.

    1990-08-01

    Dynamic surface phosphor thermometry is being investigated as part of a continuing effort by the Applied Technology Division (ATD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to develop and apply thermographic phosphor technology to an ever expanding thermometry field. The purpose of this program is to develop dynamic surface phosphor thermometry to a stage where funding proposals can be strengthened by establishing a strong information base and demonstrating a sound capability. As a new technology development in an area well established by ATD/ORNL, dynamic thermometry is extremely important for high-temperature materials, superconducting materials, advanced turbomachinery, space vehicles, industrial process equipment, and other development areas. This laboratory project illustrated the technique of continuously monitoring dynamic temperature excursions using phosphor thermography. Temperature-increase rates on the order of 100 or more degrees centigrade per millisecond were measured, which illustrated a temporal response of >0.001 s. This exceeded by a factor of ten the goal or the project and gave strong encouragement for further development of the technology. Important to the project, too, was the establishment of a clear analytical base for fluorescent-ratio data. Using the results of this study, specific solutions to dynamic-temperature-measurement problems in many application areas can be developed. In addition, the dynamic-thermographic technology can be coupled with strain measurement, two-dimensional analysis, and thermometry at very high temperatures to add interrelating remote measurement tools for systems that currently cannot be effectively studied. 13 refs., 11 figs.

  3. Nano copper based high temperature solder alternative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Akshay

    Nano Cu an alternative to high temperature solder is developed by the Advance Technological Center at the Lockheed Martin Corporation. A printable paste of Cu nano particles is developed with an ability to fuse at 200°C in reflow oven. After reflow the deposited material has nano crystalline and nano porous structure which affects its properties. Accelerated test are performed on nano Cu deposition having nano porous and nano crystalline structure for assessment and prediction of reliability. Nano Cu assemblies with different bond layer thickness are sheared to calculate the strength of the material and are correlated with the porous and crystalline structure of nano Cu. Thermal and isothermal fatigue test are performed on nano Cu to see the dependency of life on stress and further surface of failed assemblies were observed to determine the type of failure. Creep test at RT are performed to find the type of creep mechanism and how they are affected when subjected to high temperature. TEM, SEM, X-ray, C-SAM and optical microscopy is done on the nano Cu sample for structure and surface analysis.

  4. Design Considerations for High Temperature Power Inductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niedra, Janis M.

    2005-01-01

    A uniform B-field approximation model is used to develop design formulas for single-layer wound, toroidal core, ac power inductors that must handle a specified current. Such a geometry is well suited for high temperature, high frequency inductors, where removal of heat from the core becomes critical. Explicit expressions are derived for core radii, core and winding volumes, winding turns and core permeability as functions of a dimensional scaling ratio (S). A limit on the maximum allowed core B-field leads to the result that the minimum core volume is proportional to the permeability, which has a lower bound. Plots versus S are provided for a specific case, to show that good designs can be picked in the overlap regions around the minima in mass and overall size, where the mass and size are relatively flat. Data to 250 C are presented for an MPP core based inductor to show that a quasi-linear, high temperature inductor can be constructed with available materials. A similar development is applied to a toroidal air-core geometry, showing that for the same ratings, such an inductor is considerably bigger and more massive, at least in the single-layer version.

  5. The low salinity effect at high temperatures

    DOE PAGES

    Xie, Quan; Brady, Patrick V.; Pooryousefy, Ehsan; ...

    2017-04-05

    The mechanism(s) of low salinity water flooding (LSWF) must be better understood at high temperatures and pressures if the method is to be applied in high T/P kaolinite-bearing sandstone reservoirs. We measured contact angles between a sandstone and an oil (acid number, AN = 3.98 mg KOH/g, base number, BN = 1.3 mg KOH/g) from a reservoir in the Tarim Field in western China in the presence of various water chemistries. We examined the effect of aqueous ionic solutions (formation brine, 100X diluted formation brine, and softened water), temperature (60, 100 and 140 °C) and pressure (20, 30, 40, andmore » 50 MPa) on the contact angle. We also measured the zeta potential of the oil/water and water/rock interfaces to calculate oil/brine/rock disjoining pressures. A surface complexation model was developed to interpret contact angle measurements and compared with DLVO theory predictions. Contact angles were greatest in formation water, followed by the softened water, and low salinity water at the same pressure and temperature. Contact angles increased slightly with temperature, whereas pressure had little effect. DLVO and surface complexation modelling predicted similar wettability trends and allow reasonably accurate interpretation of core-flood results. Water chemistry has a much larger impact on LSWF than reservoir temperature and pressure. As a result, low salinity water flooding should work in high temperature and high pressure kaolinite-bearing sandstone reservoirs.« less

  6. High temperature electrochemical corrosion rate probes

    SciTech Connect

    Bullard, Sophie J.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.

    2005-09-01

    Corrosion occurs in the high temperature sections of energy production plants due to a number of factors: ash deposition, coal composition, thermal gradients, and low NOx conditions, among others. Electrochemical corrosion rate (ECR) probes have been shown to operate in high temperature gaseous environments that are similar to those found in fossil fuel combustors. ECR probes are rarely used in energy production plants at the present time, but if they were more fully understood, corrosion could become a process variable at the control of plant operators. Research is being conducted to understand the nature of these probes. Factors being considered are values selected for the Stern-Geary constant, the effect of internal corrosion, and the presence of conductive corrosion scales and ash deposits. The nature of ECR probes will be explored in a number of different atmospheres and with different electrolytes (ash and corrosion product). Corrosion rates measured using an electrochemical multi-technique capabilities instrument will be compared to those measured using the linear polarization resistance (LPR) technique. In future experiments, electrochemical corrosion rates will be compared to penetration corrosion rates determined using optical profilometry measurements.

  7. Development of High Temperature Gas Sensor Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W.; Chen, Liang-Yu; Neudeck, Philip G.; Knight, Dak; Liu, Chung-Chiun; Wu, Quing-Hai; Zhou, Huan-Jun

    1997-01-01

    The measurement of engine emissions is important for their monitoring and control. However, the ability to measure these emissions in-situ is limited. We are developing a family of high temperature gas sensors which are intended to operate in harsh environments such as those in an engine. The development of these sensors is based on progress in two types of technology: (1) The development of SiC-based semiconductor technology; and (2) Improvements in micromachining and microfabrication technology. These technologies are being used to develop point-contact sensors to measure gases which are important in emission control especially hydrogen, hydrocarbons, nitrogen oxides, and oxygen. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the development of this point-contact sensor technology. The detection of each type of gas involves its own challenges in the fields of materials science and fabrication technology. Of particular importance is sensor sensitivity, selectivity, and stability in long-term, high temperature operation. An overview is presented of each sensor type with an evaluation of its stage of development. It is concluded that this technology has significant potential for use in engine applications but further development is necessary.

  8. Classical behavior in high temperature chromodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Sivers, D.

    1984-01-01

    In searching for tools to describe physical systems consisting of hadronic matter at high temperature, it is worthwhile to consider the application of classical chromodynamics. Classical non-Abelian gauge theories have been extensively studied and continue to attract theoretical interest. However, the thrust of most work has been to consider classical dynamics as merely a guide to the quantum mechanical path integral. Attention has therefore focussed on particle-like field configurations or on topological structures which may be important in the presence of color confinement. Confinement in low-temperature QCD provides a substantial barrier to the use of any classical approximations. With color fields confined to isolated spatial regions, it is vey implausible that any classical approximation can be made for bulk hadronic matter. However, at temperatures above the postulated deconfining phase transition there are reasons to believe that classical physics would be a valid approximation. Statistical fluctuations at high temperature can dominate quantum fluctuations and it is possible that the behavior of a large system can be described by averaged fields which obey classical equations. The use of the classical approximation for the non-Abelian dynamics is discussed. (WHK)

  9. Solar Selective Coatings for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, Donald A.; Shumway, Dean A.

    2003-01-01

    Solar selective coatings are envisioned for use on minisatellites, for applications where solar energy is to be used to power heat engines or to provide thermal energy for remote regions in the interior of the spacecraft. These coatings are designed to have the combined properties of high solar absorptance and low infrared emittance. The coatings must be durable at elevated temperatures. For thermal bus applications, the temperature during operation is likely to be near 100 C. For heat engine applications. the temperature is expected to be much greater. The objective of this work was to screen candidate solar selective coatings for their high temperature durability. Candidate solar selective coatings were composed of molecular mixtures of metal and dielectric, including: nickel and aluminum oxide, titanium and aluminum oxide, and platinum and aluminum oxide. To identify high temperature durability, the solar absorptance and infrared emittance of the candidate coatings were evaluated initially, and after heating to temperatures in the range of 400 C to 700 C. The titanium and aluminum oxide molecular mixture was found to be the most durable.

  10. High-temperature flaw assessment procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggles, M.B. ); Takahashi, Y. ); Ainsworth, R.A. )

    1991-08-01

    Described is the background work performed jointly by the Electric Power Research Institute in the United States, the Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry in Japan and Nuclear Electric plc in the United Kingdom with the purpose of developing a high-temperature flaw assessment procedure for reactor components. Existing creep-fatigue crack-growth models are reviewed, and the most promising methods are identified. Sources of material data are outlined, and results of the fundamental deformation and crack-growth tests are discussed. Results of subcritical crack-growth exploratory tests, creep-fatigue crack-growth tests under repeated thermal transient conditions, and exploratory failure tests are presented and contrasted with the analytical modeling. Crack-growth assessment methods are presented and applied to a typical liquid-metal reactor component. The research activities presented herein served as a foundation for the Flaw Assessment Guide for High-Temperature Reactor Components Subjected to Creep-Fatigue Loading published separately. 30 refs., 108 figs., 13 tabs.

  11. Evaluation of high temperature capacitor dielectrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammoud, Ahmad N.; Myers, Ira T.

    1992-01-01

    Experiments were carried out to evaluate four candidate materials for high temperature capacitor dielectric applications. The materials investigated were polybenzimidazole polymer and three aramid papers: Voltex 450, Nomex 410, and Nomex M 418, an aramid paper containing 50 percent mica. The samples were heat treated for six hours at 60 C and the direct current and 60 Hz alternating current breakdown voltages of both dry and impregnated samples were obtained in a temperature range of 20 to 250 C. The samples were also characterized in terms of their dielectric constant, dielectric loss, and conductivity over this temperature range with an electrical stress of 60 Hz, 50 V/mil present. Additional measurements are underway to determine the volume resistivity, thermal shrinkage, and weight loss of the materials. Preliminary data indicate that the heat treatment of the films slightly improves the dielectric properties with no influence on their breakdown behavior. Impregnation of the samples leads to significant increases in both alternating and direct current breakdown strength. The results are discussed and conclusions made concerning their suitability as high temperature capacitor dielectrics.

  12. High temperature intermetallic binders for HVOF carbides

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, K.G.; Gruninger, M.F.; Jarosinski, W.J.

    1994-12-31

    Gas turbines technology has a long history of employing the desirable high temperature physical attributes of ceramic-metallic (cermet) materials. The most commonly used coatings incorporate combinations of WC-Co and Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}-NiCr, which have also been successfully utilized in other non-turbine coating applications. Increased turbine operating temperatures and other high temperature service conditions have made apparent the attractive notion of increasing the temperature capability and corrosion resistance of these coatings. In this study the intermetallic binder NiAl has been used to replace the cobalt and NiCr constituents of conventional WC and Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2} cermet powders. The composite carbide thermal spray powders were fabricated for use in the HVOF coating process. The structure of HVOF deposited NiAl-carbide coatings are compared directly to the more familiar WC-Co and Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}-NiCr coatings using X-ray diffraction, back-scattered electron imaging (BEI) and electron dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Hardness variations with temperature are reported and compared between the NiAl and Co/NiCr binders.

  13. The NASA high temperature superconductivity program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokoloski, Martin M.; Romanofsky, Robert R.

    1990-01-01

    It has been recognized from the onset that high temperature superconductivity held great promise for major advances across a broad range of NASA interests. The current effort is organized around four key areas: communications and data, sensors and cryogenics, propulsion and power, and space materials technology. Recently, laser ablated YBa2Cu3O(7-x) films on LaAIO produced far superior RF characteristics when compared to metallic films on the same substrate. This achievement has enabled a number of unique microwave device applications, such as low insertion loss phase shifters and high Q filters. Melt texturing and melt quenched techniques are being used to produce bulk materials with optimized magnetic properties. These yttrium enriched materials possess enhanced flux pinning characteristics and will lead to prototype cryocooler bearings. Significant progress has also occurred in bolometer and current lead technology. Studies are being conducted to evaluate the effect of high temperature superconducting materials on the performance and life of high power magneto-plasma-dynamic thrusters. Extended studies were also performed to evaluate the benefit of superconducting magnetic energy storage for LEO space station, lunar and Mars mission applications. The project direction and level of effort of the program are also described.

  14. High temperature structure in cool binary stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dupree, A. K.; Brickhouse, Nancy S.; Hanson, G. J.

    1995-01-01

    Strong high temperature emission lines in the EUVE spectra of binary stars containing cool components (Alpha Aur (Capella), 44 iota Boo, Lambda And, and VY Ari) provide the basis to define reliably the differential emission measure of hot plasma. The emission measure distributions for the short-period (P less than or equal to 13 d) binary systems show a high temperature enhancement over a relatively narrow temperature region similar to that originally found in Capella (Dupree et al. 1993). The emission measure distributions of rapidly rotating single stars 31 Com and AB Dor also contain a local enhancement of the emission measure although at different temperatures and width from Capella, suggesting that the enhancement in these objects may be characteristic of rapid rotation of a stellar corona. This feature might be identified with a (polar) active region, although its density and absolute size are unknown; in the binaries Capella and VY Ari, the feature is narrow and it may arise from an interaction region between the components.

  15. Medium Deep High Temperature Heat Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bär, Kristian; Rühaak, Wolfram; Schulte, Daniel; Welsch, Bastian; Chauhan, Swarup; Homuth, Sebastian; Sass, Ingo

    2015-04-01

    Heating of buildings requires more than 25 % of the total end energy consumption in Germany. Shallow geothermal systems for indirect use as well as shallow geothermal heat storage systems like aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) or borehole thermal energy storage (BTES) typically provide low exergy heat. The temperature levels and ranges typically require a coupling with heat pumps. By storing hot water from solar panels or thermal power stations with temperatures of up to 110 °C a medium deep high temperature heat storage (MDHTS) can be operated on relatively high temperature levels of more than 45 °C. Storage depths of 500 m to 1,500 m below surface avoid conflicts with groundwater use for drinking water or other purposes. Permeability is typically also decreasing with greater depth; especially in the crystalline basement therefore conduction becomes the dominant heat transport process. Solar-thermal charging of a MDHTS is a very beneficial option for supplying heat in urban and rural systems. Feasibility and design criteria of different system configurations (depth, distance and number of BHE) are discussed. One system is designed to store and supply heat (300 kW) for an office building. The required boreholes are located in granodioritic bedrock. Resulting from this setup several challenges have to be addressed. The drilling and completion has to be planned carefully under consideration of the geological and tectonical situation at the specific site.

  16. The moon as a high temperature condensate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. L.

    1972-01-01

    The accretion during condensation mechanism is used to explain the differences in composition of the terrestrial planets and the moon. Many of the properties of the moon, including the enrichment in Ca, Al, Ti, U, Th, Ba, Sr and the REE and the depletion in Fe, Rb, K, Na and other volatiles can be understood if the moon represents a high temperature condensate from the solar nebula. Thermodynamic calculations show that Ca, Al and Ti rich compounds condense first in a cooling nebula. The high temperature mineralogy is gehlenite, spinel perovskite, Ca-Al-rich pyroxenes and anorthite. The model is consistent with extensive early melting, shallow melting at 3 A.E. and with presently high speed internal temperatures. It is predicted that the outer 250 km is rich in plagioclase and FeO. The low iron content of the interior in this model raises the interior temperatures estimated from electrical conductivity by some 800 C. The lunar crust is 80 percent gabbroic anorthosite, 20 percent basalt and is about 250-270 km thick. The lunar mantle is probably composed of spinel, merwinite and diopside with a density of 3.4 g/cu cm.

  17. The NASA high temperature superconductivity program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokoloski, Martin M.; Romanofsky, Robert R.

    1990-04-01

    It has been recognized from the onset that high temperature superconductivity held great promise for major advances across a broad range of NASA interests. The current effort is organized around four key areas: communications and data, sensors and cryogenics, propulsion and power, and space materials technology. Recently, laser ablated YBa2Cu3O(7-x) films on LaAIO produced far superior RF characteristics when compared to metallic films on the same substrate. This achievement has enabled a number of unique microwave device applications, such as low insertion loss phase shifters and high Q filters. Melt texturing and melt quenched techniques are being used to produce bulk materials with optimized magnetic properties. These yttrium enriched materials possess enhanced flux pinning characteristics and will lead to prototype cryocooler bearings. Significant progress has also occurred in bolometer and current lead technology. Studies are being conducted to evaluate the effect of high temperature superconducting materials on the performance and life of high power magneto-plasma-dynamic thrusters. Extended studies were also performed to evaluate the benefit of superconducting magnetic energy storage for LEO space station, lunar and Mars mission applications. The project direction and level of effort of the program are also described.

  18. High temperature lined conduits, elbows and tees

    DOEpatents

    De Feo, Angelo; Drewniany, Edward

    1982-01-01

    A high temperature lined conduit comprising, a liner, a flexible insulating refractory blanket around and in contact with the liner, a pipe member around the blanket and spaced therefrom, and castable rigid refractory material between the pipe member and the blanket. Anchors are connected to the inside diameter of the pipe and extend into the castable material. The liner includes male and female slip joint ends for permitting thermal expansion of the liner with respect to the castable material and the pipe member. Elbows and tees of the lined conduit comprise an elbow liner wrapped with insulating refractory blanket material around which is disposed a spaced elbow pipe member with castable refractory material between the blanket material and the elbow pipe member. A reinforcing band is connected to the elbow liner at an intermediate location thereon from which extend a plurality of hollow tubes or pins which extend into the castable material to anchor the lined elbow and permit thermal expansion. A method of fabricating the high temperature lined conduit, elbows and tees is also disclosed which utilizes a polyethylene layer over the refractory blanket after it has been compressed to maintain the refractory blanket in a compressed condition until the castable material is in place. Hot gases are then directed through the interior of the liner for evaporating the polyethylene and setting the castable material which permits the compressed blanket to come into close contact with the castable material.

  19. High temperature furnace modeling and performance verifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, James E., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Analytical, numerical, and experimental studies were performed on two classes of high temperature materials processing sources for their potential use as directional solidification furnaces. The research concentrated on a commercially available high temperature furnace using a zirconia ceramic tube as the heating element and an Arc Furnace based on a tube welder. The first objective was to assemble the zirconia furnace and construct parts needed to successfully perform experiments. The 2nd objective was to evaluate the zirconia furnace performance as a directional solidification furnace element. The 3rd objective was to establish a data base on materials used in the furnace construction, with particular emphasis on emissivities, transmissivities, and absorptivities as functions of wavelength and temperature. A 1-D and 2-D spectral radiation heat transfer model was developed for comparison with standard modeling techniques, and were used to predict wall and crucible temperatures. The 4th objective addressed the development of a SINDA model for the Arc Furnace and was used to design sample holders and to estimate cooling media temperatures for the steady state operation of the furnace. And, the 5th objective addressed the initial performance evaluation of the Arc Furnace and associated equipment for directional solidification. Results of these objectives are presented.

  20. The Walker Lane Belt in northeastern California

    SciTech Connect

    Grose, T.L.T. . Dept. of Geology and Geological Engineering)

    1993-04-01

    The Walker Lane Belt (WLB) has been suspected to significantly project NW-ward into NE CA from the Pyramid Lake-Honey Lake area which has been generally regarded as its northwestern terminus. Within the WLB, most of the exposed rocks are Miocene to Late Quaternary (10--0.1 Ma) volcanics, mainly andesitic, but significantly rhyolitic and basaltic. The Hayden Hill Au mine within a Mid-Miocene NNW-SSE volcanotectonic depression and the Quaternary NE-SW Eagle lake volcanotectonic depression are confined within the WLB. Most of the faults are high-angle normal and right normal, W-dipping, NW- to N-trending, and locally left-stepping en echelon, and 2 to 18 km long. Dip slip varies from 10 to 200 m. Strike slip across the entire zone seems impossible to determine, but probably is less than 20 km since Mid-Miocene. Many faults localize volcanic vents, though most do not appear to. Tectonic tilt of beds within fault blocks is less than 10[degree]. Fault activity and volcanism both continued at a slow rate from Mid-Miocene to Late Quaternary. The WLB in NE CA is a transitional boundary between the Sierra Nevada-Cascade arc on the southwest and the Basin and Range-Modoc Plateau on the northeast.

  1. Decametric modulation lanes as a probe for inner jovian magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhypov, Oleksiy V.; Rucker, Helmut O.

    2013-11-01

    We use the specific scintillations of jovian decametric radio sources (modulation lanes), which are produced by plasma inhomogeneities in the vicinity of that planet, to probe the inner magnetosphere of Jupiter. The positions and frequency drift of 1762 lanes have been measured on the DAM spectra from archives. A special 3D algorithm is used for space localization of field-aligned magnetospheric inhomogeneities by the frequency drift of modulation lanes. As a result, the main regions of the lane formation are found: the Io plasma torus; the magnetic shell of the Gossamer Ring at Thebe and Amalthea orbits; and the region above the magnetic anomaly in the northern magnetosphere. It is shown that modulation lanes reveal the depleted magnetic tubes in practically unvisited, innermost regions of the jovian magnetosphere. The local and probably temporal plasma enhancement is found at the magnetic shell of Thebe satellite. Hence, the modulation lanes are a valuable instrument for remote sensing of those parts of jovian magnetosphere, which are not studied yet in situ.

  2. Lane-change detection using a computational driver model.

    PubMed

    Salvucci, Dario D; Mandalia, Hiren M; Kuge, Nobuyuki; Yamamura, Tomohiro

    2007-06-01

    This paper introduces a robust, real-time system for detecting driver lane changes. As intelligent transportation systems evolve to assist drivers in their intended behaviors, the systems have demonstrated a need for methods of inferring driver intentions and detecting intended maneuvers. Using a "model tracing" methodology, our system simulates a set of possible driver intentions and their resulting behaviors using a simplification of a previously validated computational model of driver behavior. The system compares the model's simulated behavior with a driver's actual observed behavior and thus continually infers the driver's unobservable intentions from her or his observable actions. For data collected in a driving simulator, the system detects 82% of lane changes within 0.5 s of maneuver onset (assuming a 5% false alarm rate), 93% within 1 s, and 95% before the vehicle moves one fourth of the lane width laterally. For data collected from an instrumented vehicle, the system detects 61% within 0.5 s, 77% within 1 s, and 84% before the vehicle moves one-fourth of the lane width laterally. The model-tracing system is the first system to demonstrate high sample-by-sample accuracy at low false alarm rates as well as high accuracy over the course of a lane change with respect to time and lateral movement. By providing robust real-time detection of driver lane changes, the system shows good promise for incorporation into the next generation of intelligent transportation systems.

  3. Materials and Process Design for High-Temperature Carburizing: Integrating Processing and Performance

    SciTech Connect

    D. Apelian

    2007-07-23

    The objective of the project is to develop an integrated process for fast, high-temperature carburizing. The new process results in an order of magnitude reduction in cycle time compared to conventional carburizing and represents significant energy savings in addition to a corresponding reduction of scrap associated with distortion free carburizing steels.

  4. The high temperature structural evolution of hafnia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haggerty, Ryan Paul

    The transformations of HfO2 are often described as analogous with the transformations in ZrO2 because of the similar crystal structures; however the phase transformations in HfO2 occur at higher temperatures. Even though this phase transformation has been extensively studied in ZrO2, the respective transformation in HfO2 is relatively unstudied and the properties that are reported are inconsistent. Much of the difficulty associated with studying HfO2 is related to the high temperatures needed and the sensitivity of the crystal to the environmental partial pressure of O2. HfO2 is expected to be capable of producing the same level of transformation toughening as ZrO2 at temperatures beyond 1000°C, the thermodynamic limit for toughened ZrO2. Despite significant effort the toughening acquired has not met with expectation. By providing information on the structure of HfO2 as it undergoes transformation, this study makes a significant step towards solving this problem. Significant advancements in experimentation have enabled a systematic study of the structure of HfO2 in its monoclinic and tetragonal phases in air. Using a quadrupole lamp furnace and a novel curved image plate detector the structure of HfO2 and ZrO 2 have been characterized by high temperature x-ray diffraction. The structural information provided by these experiments allows the properties of the transformation to be further investigated. Using phenomenological theory of martensite crystallography, the strain associated with the transformation from the tetragonal to the monoclinic phase has been described and provides insight into the lack of transformation toughening found in HfO2. Further characterization includes determination of the transformation temperature in air, the change in volume associated with the transformation and the temperature hysteresis of the transformation. In addition to transformation properties, the thermal expansion of HfO2 and ZrO2 has been thoroughly described as a function

  5. Temperature Dependent Residual Stress Models for Ultra-High-Temperature Ceramics on High Temperature Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ruzhuan; Li, Weiguo

    2017-08-01

    The strength of SiC-depleted layer of ultra-high-temperature ceramics on high temperature oxidation degrades seriously. The research for residual stresses developed within the SiC-depleted layer is important and necessary. In this work, the residual stress evolutions in the SiC-depleted layer and the unoxidized substrate in various stages of oxidation are studied by using the characterization models. The temperature and oxidation time dependent mechanical/thermal properties of each phase in SiC-depleted layer are considered in the models. The study shows that the SiC-depleted layer would suffer from large tensile stresses due to the great temperature changes and the formation of pores on high temperature oxidation. The stresses may lead to the cracking and even the delamination of the oxidation layer.

  6. Temperature Dependent Residual Stress Models for Ultra-High-Temperature Ceramics on High Temperature Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ruzhuan; Li, Weiguo

    2016-11-01

    The strength of SiC-depleted layer of ultra-high-temperature ceramics on high temperature oxidation degrades seriously. The research for residual stresses developed within the SiC-depleted layer is important and necessary. In this work, the residual stress evolutions in the SiC-depleted layer and the unoxidized substrate in various stages of oxidation are studied by using the characterization models. The temperature and oxidation time dependent mechanical/thermal properties of each phase in SiC-depleted layer are considered in the models. The study shows that the SiC-depleted layer would suffer from large tensile stresses due to the great temperature changes and the formation of pores on high temperature oxidation. The stresses may lead to the cracking and even the delamination of the oxidation layer.

  7. High-temperature microphone system. [for measuring pressure fluctuations in gases at high temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, A. J. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    Pressure fluctuations in air or other gases in an area of elevated temperature are measured using a condenser microphone located in the area of elevated temperature and electronics for processing changes in the microphone capacitance located outside the area the area and connected to the microphone by means of high-temperature cable assembly. The microphone includes apparatus for decreasing the undesirable change in microphone sensitivity at high temperatures. The high temperature cable assembly operates as a half-wavelength transmission line in an AM carrier system and maintains a large temperature gradient between the two ends of the cable assembly. The processing electronics utilizes a voltage controlled oscillator for automatic tuning thereby increasing the sensitivity of the measuring apparatus.

  8. High temperature superconductor materials and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doane, George B., III. (Editor); Banks, Curtis; Golben, John

    1991-01-01

    One of the areas concerned itself with the investigation of the phenomena involved in formulating and making in the laboratory new and better superconductor material with enhanced values of critical current and temperature. Of special interest were the chemistry, physical processes, and environment required to attain these enhanced desirable characteristics. The other area concerned itself with producing high temperature superconducting thin films by pulsed laser deposition techniques. Such films are potentially very useful in the detection of very low power signals. To perform this research high vacuum is required. In the course of this effort, older vacuum chambers were maintained and used. In addition, a new facility is being brought on line. This latter activity has been replete with the usual problems of bringing a new facility into service. Some of the problems are covered in the main body of this report.

  9. High temperature chemically resistant polymer concrete

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, T.; Kukacka, L.E.

    High temperature chemically resistant, non-aqueous polymer concrete composites consist of about 12 to 20% by weight of a water-insoluble polymer binder. The binder is polymerized in situ from a liquid vinyl-type monomer or mixture of vinyl containing monomers such as triallylcyanurate, styrene, acrylonitrile, acrylamide, methacrylamide, methyl-methacrylate, trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate and divinyl benzene. About 5 to 40% by weight of a reactive inorganic filler selected from the group consisting of tricalcium silicate and dicalcium silicate and mixtures containing less than 2% free lime, and about 48 to 83% by weight of silica sand/ and a free radical initiator such as di-tert-butyl peroxide, azobisisobutyronitrile, benzoyl peroxide, lauryl peroxide, other orgaic peroxides and combinations to initiate polymerization of the monomer in the presence of the inorganic filers are used.

  10. Fail Safe, High Temperature Magnetic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minihan, Thomas; Palazzolo, Alan; Kim, Yeonkyu; Lei, Shu-Liang; Kenny, Andrew; Na, Uhn Joo; Tucker, Randy; Preuss, Jason; Hunt, Andrew; Carter, Bart; hide

    2002-01-01

    This paper contributes to the magnetic bearing literature in two distinct areas: high temperature and redundant actuation. Design considerations and test results are given for the first published combined 538 C (1000 F) high speed rotating test performance of a magnetic bearing. Secondly, a significant extension of the flux isolation based, redundant actuator control algorithm is proposed to eliminate the prior deficiency of changing position stiffness after failure. The benefit of the novel extension was not experimentally demonstrated due to a high active stiffness requirement. In addition, test results are given for actuator failure tests at 399 C (750 F), 12,500 rpm. Finally, simulation results are presented confirming the experimental data and validating the redundant control algorithm.

  11. Filter unit for use at high temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Ciliberti, David F.; Lippert, Thomas E.

    1988-01-01

    A filtering unit for filtering particulates from high temperature gases uses a spiral ceramic spring to bias a ceramic, tubular filter element into sealing contact with a flange about an aperture of a metallic tube sheet. The ceramic spiral spring may contact the upper edge of the filter element and be restrained by a stop member spaced from one end of the tube sheet, or the spring may contact the bottom of the filter element and be restrained by a support member spaced from the opposite end of the tube sheet. The stop member and support member are adjustably secured to the tube sheet. A filtering system uses the ceramic spiral spring to bias a plurality of ceramic, tubular filter elements in a respective plurality of apertures in a tube sheet which divides a vessel into upper and lower enclosed sections.

  12. Creep resistant high temperature martensitic steel

    DOEpatents

    Hawk, Jeffrey A.; Jablonski, Paul D.; Cowen, Christopher J.

    2015-11-13

    The disclosure provides a creep resistant alloy having an overall composition comprised of iron, chromium, molybdenum, carbon, manganese, silicon, nickel, vanadium, niobium, nitrogen, tungsten, cobalt, tantalum, boron, and potentially additional elements. In an embodiment, the creep resistant alloy has a molybdenum equivalent Mo(eq) from 1.475 to 1.700 wt. % and a quantity (C+N) from 0.145 to 0.205. The overall composition ameliorates sources of microstructural instability such as coarsening of M.sub.23C.sub.6 carbides and MX precipitates, and mitigates or eliminates Laves and Z-phase formation. A creep resistant martensitic steel may be fabricated by preparing a melt comprised of the overall composition followed by at least austenizing and tempering. The creep resistant alloy exhibits improved high-temperature creep strength in the temperature environment of around 650.degree. C.

  13. Creep resistant high temperature martensitic steel

    DOEpatents

    Hawk, Jeffrey A.; Jablonski, Paul D.; Cowen, Christopher J.

    2017-01-31

    The disclosure provides a creep resistant alloy having an overall composition comprised of iron, chromium, molybdenum, carbon, manganese, silicon, nickel, vanadium, niobium, nitrogen, tungsten, cobalt, tantalum, boron, copper, and potentially additional elements. In an embodiment, the creep resistant alloy has a molybdenum equivalent Mo(eq) from 1.475 to 1.700 wt. % and a quantity (C+N) from 0.145 to 0.205. The overall composition ameliorates sources of microstructural instability such as coarsening of M.sub.23C.sub.6carbides and MX precipitates, and mitigates or eliminates Laves and Z-phase formation. A creep resistant martensitic steel may be fabricated by preparing a melt comprised of the overall composition followed by at least austenizing and tempering. The creep resistant alloy exhibits improved high-temperature creep strength in the temperature environment of around 650.degree. C.

  14. Improved high-temperature resistant matrix resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, H. E.; Chang, G. E.; Wright, W. F.; Ueda, K.; Orell, M. K.

    1989-01-01

    A study was performed with the objective of developing matrix resins that exhibit improved thermo-oxidative stability over state-of-the-art high temperature resins for use at temperatures up to 644 K (700 F) and air pressures up to 0.7 MPa (100 psia). The work was based upon a TRW discovered family of polyimides currently licensed to and marketed by Ethyl Corporation as EYMYD(R) resins. The approach investigated to provide improved thermo-oxidative properties was to use halogenated derivatives of the diamine, 2, 2-bis (4-(4-aminophenoxy)phenyl) hexafluoropropane (4-BDAF). Polyimide neat resins and Celion(R) 12,000 composites prepared from fluorine substituted 4-BDAF demonstrated unexpectedly lower glass transition temperatures (Tg) and thermo-oxidative stabilities than the baseline 4-BDAF/PMDA polymer.

  15. High temperature stress-strain analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Robert L.; Moorhead, Paul E.

    1986-01-01

    The objectives of the high-temperature structures program are threefold: to assist in the development of analytical tools needed to improve design analyses and procedures for the efficient and accurate prediction of the nonlinear structural response of hot-section components; to aid in the calibration, validation, and evaluation of the analytical tools by comparing predictions with experimental data; and to evaluate existing as well as advanced temperature and strain measurement instrumentation. As the analytical tools, test methods, tests, instrumentations, as well as data acquisition, management, and analysis methods are developed and evaluated, a proven, integrated analysis and experiment method will result in a more accurate prediction of the cyclic life of hot section components.

  16. Two High-Temperature Foil Journal Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, Michail

    2006-01-01

    An enlarged, high-temperature-compliant foil bearing has been built and tested to demonstrate the feasibility of such bearings for use in aircraft gas turbine engines. Foil bearings are attractive for use in some machines in which (1) speeds of rotation, temperatures, or both exceed maximum allowable values for rolling-element bearings; (2) conventional lubricants decompose at high operating temperatures; and/or (3) it is necessary or desirable not to rely on conventional lubrication systems. In a foil bearing, the lubricant is the working fluid (e.g., air or a mixture of combustion gases) in the space between the journal and the shaft in the machine in which the bearing is installed.

  17. High temperature superconductivity space experiment (HTSSE)

    SciTech Connect

    Ritter, J.C.; Nisenoff, M.; Price, G.; Wolf, S.A. )

    1991-03-01

    The Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) is developing an experiment to deploy high temperature superconducting (HTS) devices and components in space. A variety of devices, primarily passive microwave and millimeter wave components, has been procured and will be integrated with a cryogenic refrigerating and data acquisition system to form the space package, which will be launched late in 1992. This space experiment will demonstrate that this technology is sufficiently robust to survive the space environment and that has the potential to improve the operation of space systems significantly. The devices for the initial launch (HTSSE-I) have been received by NRL and evaluated electrically, thermally and mechanically and will be integrated into the final space package early in 1991. In this paper, the performance of the devices is summarized and some potential applications of HTS technology in space systems is outlined.

  18. High temperature insulation for ceramic matrix composites

    DOEpatents

    Merrill, Gary B.; Morrison, Jay Alan

    2004-01-13

    A ceramic composition is provided to insulate ceramic matrix composites under high temperature, high heat flux environments. The composition comprises a plurality of hollow oxide-based spheres of various dimensions, a phosphate binder, and at least one oxide filler powder, whereby the phosphate binder partially fills gaps between the spheres and the filler powders. The spheres are situated in the phosphate binder and the filler powders such that each sphere is in contact with at least one other sphere. The spheres may be any combination of Mullite spheres, Alumina spheres, or stabilized Zirconia spheres. The filler powder may be any combination of Alumina, Mullite, Ceria, or Hafnia. Preferably, the phosphate binder is Aluminum Ortho-Phosphate. A method of manufacturing the ceramic insulating composition and its application to CMC substrates are also provided.

  19. High temperature insulation for ceramic matrix composites

    DOEpatents

    Merrill, Gary B.; Morrison, Jay Alan

    2001-01-01

    A ceramic composition is provided to insulate ceramic matrix composites under high temperature, high heat flux environments. The composition comprises a plurality of hollow oxide-based spheres of various dimensions, a phosphate binder, and at least one oxide filler powder, whereby the phosphate binder partially fills gaps between the spheres and the filler powders. The spheres are situated in the phosphate binder and the filler powders such that each sphere is in contact with at least one other sphere. The spheres may be any combination of Mullite spheres, Alumina spheres, or stabilized Zirconia spheres. The filler powder may be any combination of Alumina, Mullite, Ceria, or Hafnia. Preferably, the phosphate binder is Aluminum Ortho-Phosphate. A method of manufacturing the ceramic insulating composition and its application to CMC substrates are also provided.

  20. High temperature insulation for ceramic matrix composites

    DOEpatents

    Merrill, Gary B.; Morrison, Jay Alan

    2000-01-01

    A ceramic composition is provided to insulate ceramic matrix composites under high temperature, high heat flux environments. The composite comprises a plurality of hollow oxide-based spheres of varios dimentions, a phosphate binder, and at least one oxide filler powder, whereby the phosphate binder partially fills gaps between the spheres and the filler powders. The spheres are situated in the phosphate binder and the filler powders such that each sphere is in contact with at least one other sphere. The spheres may be any combination of Mullite spheres, Alumina spheres, or stabilized Zirconia spheres. The filler powder may be any combination of Alumina, Mullite, Ceria, or Hafnia. Preferably, the phosphate binder is Aluminum Ortho-Phosphate. A method of manufacturing the ceramic insulating composition and its application to CMC substates are also provided.

  1. Turbine vane with high temperature capable skins

    DOEpatents

    Morrison, Jay A [Oviedo, FL

    2012-07-10

    A turbine vane assembly includes an airfoil extending between an inner shroud and an outer shroud. The airfoil can include a substructure having an outer peripheral surface. At least a portion of the outer peripheral surface is covered by an external skin. The external skin can be made of a high temperature capable material, such as oxide dispersion strengthened alloys, intermetallic alloys, ceramic matrix composites or refractory alloys. The external skin can be formed, and the airfoil can be subsequently bi-cast around or onto the skin. The skin and the substructure can be attached by a plurality of attachment members extending between the skin and the substructure. The skin can be spaced from the outer peripheral surface of the substructure such that a cavity is formed therebetween. Coolant can be supplied to the cavity. Skins can also be applied to the gas path faces of the inner and outer shrouds.

  2. Diamond switches for high temperature electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, R.R.; Rondeau, G.; Qi, Niansheng

    1996-04-25

    Diamond switches are well suited for use in high temperature electronics. Laboratory feasibility of diamond switching at 1 kV and 18 A was demonstrated. DC blocking voltages up to 1 kV were demonstrated. A 50 {Omega} load line was switched using a diamond switch, with switch on-state resistivity {approx}7 {Omega}-cm. An electron beam, {approx}150 keV energy, {approx}2 {mu}s full width at half maximum was used to control the 5 mm x 5 mm x 100 {mu}m thick diamond switch. The conduction current temporal history mimics that of the electron beam. These data were taken at room temperature.

  3. High temperature superconductors for magnetic suspension applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmichael, C. K.; Cooley, R. S.; Chen, Q. Y.; Ma, K. B.; Lamb, M. A.; Meng, R. L.; Chu, C. W.; Chu, W. K.

    1994-01-01

    High temperature superconductors (HTS) hold the promise for applications in magnetic levitation bearings, vibration damping, and torque coupling. Traditional magnetic suspension systems require active feedback and vibration controls in which power consumption and low frequency vibration are among the major engineering concerns. HTS materials have been demonstrated to be an enabling approach towards such problems due to their flux trapping properties. In our laboratory at TCSUH, we have been conducting a series of experiments to explore various mechanical applications using HTS. We have constructed a 30 lb. model flywheel levitated by a hybrid superconducting magnetic bearing (HSMB). We are also developing a levitated and vibration-dampled platform for high precision instrumentation. These applications would be ideal for space usages where ambient temperature is adequate for HTS to operate properly under greatly reduced cryogenic requirements. We will give a general overview of these potential applications and discuss the operating principles of the HTS devices we have developed.

  4. Gravimeter using high-temperature superconductor bearing.

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, J. R.

    1998-09-11

    We have developed a sensitive gravimeter concept that uses an extremely low-friction bearing based on a permanent magnet (PM) levitated over a high-temperature superconductor (HTS). A mass is attached to the PM by means of a cantilevered beam, and the combination of PM and HTS forms a bearing platform that has low resistance to rotational motion but high resistance to horizontal, vertical, or tilting motion. The combination acts as a low-loss torsional pendulum that can be operated in any orientation. Gravity acts on the cantilevered beam and attached mass, accelerating them. Variations in gravity can be detected by time-of-flight acceleration, or by a control coil or electrode that would keep the mass stationary. Calculations suggest that the HTS gravimeter would be as sensitive as present-day superconducting gravimeters that need cooling to liquid helium temperatures, but the HTS gravimeter needs cooling only to liquid nitrogen temperatures.

  5. Opacification of high temperature fibrous insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, W. C.; Collins, J. O.

    1984-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the merits of adding particulate materials to silica fiber felts to increase their resistance to the passage of thermal radiation. Laboratory samples containing 5, 10, and 15 percent of chromium oxide, silicon carbide, and titanium dioxide were prepared and evaluated in accordance with ASTM C-518 thermal conductivity test method at 425 C (800 F) mean temperature. The titania particles averaging 3-4 micrometers in diameter were found to be the most effective. This was followed by a short plant run, in order to confirm the initial results on the laboratory samples. These samples were tested according to ASTM C-201 High Temperature Calorimeter from 93 C to 760 C (200 F to 1400 F) mean temperature. The ten percent by weight of titania resulted in an optimum effectiveness, and reduced the conductivity over 20% at 760 C (1400 F).

  6. Graphite thermal expansion reference for high temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaal, P. S.

    1974-01-01

    The design requirements of the aerospace and high-temperature nuclear reactor industries necessitate reliable thermal expansion data for graphite and other carbonaceous materials. The feasibility of an acceptable reference for calibration of expansion measuring systems that operate in carbon-rich atmospheres at temperatures ranging to 2500 C is the prime subject of this work. Present-day graphite technology provides acceptable materials for stable, reproducible references, as reflected by some of the candidate materials. The repeatability for a single specimen in a given expansion measuring system was found to be plus or minus 1%, while the combined results of several tests made on a number of samples fell within a plus or minus 2.5% band.

  7. High temperature solder device for flat cables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haehner, Carl L. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A high temperature solder device for flat cables includes a microwelder, an anvil which acts as a heat sink and supports a flexible flat ribbon cable that is to be connected to a multiple pin connector. The microwelder is made from a modified commercially available resistance welding machine such as the Split Tip Electrode microwelder by Weltek, which consists of two separate electrode halves with a removable dielectric spacer in between. The microwelder is not used to weld the items together, but to provide a controlled compressive force on, and energy pulse to, a solder preform placed between a pin of the connector and a conductor of the flexible flat ribbon cable. When the microwelder is operated, an electric pulse will flow down one electrode, through the solder preform and back up the other electrode. This pulse of electrical energy will cause the solder preform to heat up and melt, joining the pin and conductor.

  8. Pressure sensor for high-temperature liquids

    DOEpatents

    Forster, George A.

    1978-01-01

    A pressure sensor for use in measuring pressures in liquid at high temperatures, especially such as liquid sodium or liquid potassium, comprises a soft diaphragm in contact with the liquid. The soft diaphragm is coupled mechanically to a stiff diaphragm. Pressure is measured by measuring the displacment of both diaphragms, typically by measuring the capacitance between the stiff diaphragm and a fixed plate when the stiff diaphragm is deflected in response to the measured pressure through mechanical coupling from the soft diaphragm. Absolute calibration is achieved by admitting gas under pressure to the region between diaphragms and to the region between the stiff diaphragm and the fixed plate, breaking the coupling between the soft and stiff diaphragms. The apparatus can be calibrated rapidly and absolutely.

  9. Low to high temperature energy conversion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A method for converting heat energy from low temperature heat sources to higher temperature was developed. It consists of a decomposition chamber in which ammonia is decomposed into hydrogen and nitrogen by absorbing heat of decomposition from a low temperature energy source. A recombination reaction then takes place which increases the temperature of a fluid significantly. The system is of use for the efficient operation of compact or low capital investment turbine driven electrical generators, or in other applications, to enable chemical reactions that have a critical lower temperature to be used. The system also recovers heat energy from low temperature heat sources, such as solar collectors or geothermal sources, and converts it to high temperatures.

  10. High temperature NASP engine seal development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    This video details research being conducted at the Lewis Research Center on high temperature engine seal design for the National Aerospace Plane. To maximize the speed, the jets on the NASP extract oxygen from the air rather than carry large liquid fuel tanks; this creates temperatures within the jet of over 5000 F. To prevent these potentially explosive gases from escaping, researchers are developing new technologies for use in the engine seals. Two examples explained are the ceramic wafer seal and the braided ceramic rope seal. Computer simulations and laboratory footage are used to illustrate the workings of these seals. Benefits for other aerospace and industrial applications, as well as for the space shuttle, are explored.

  11. High-temperature brushless DC motor controller

    DOEpatents

    Cieslewski, Crzegorz; Lindblom, Scott C.; Maldonado, Frank J.; Eckert, Michael Nathan

    2017-05-16

    A motor control system for deployment in high temperature environments includes a controller; a first half-bridge circuit that includes a first high-side switching element and a first low-side switching element; a second half-bridge circuit that includes a second high-side switching element and a second low-side switching element; and a third half-bridge circuit that includes a third high-side switching element and a third; low-side switching element. The motor controller is arranged to apply a pulse width modulation (PWM) scheme to switch the first half-bridge circuit, second half-bridge circuit, and third half-bridge circuit to power a motor.

  12. Strain sensing technology for high temperature applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, W. Dan

    1993-01-01

    This review discusses the status of strain sensing technology for high temperature applications. Technologies covered are those supported by NASA such as required for applications in hypersonic vehicles and engines, advanced subsonic engines, as well as material and structure development. The applications may be at temperatures of 540 C (1000 F) to temperatures in excess of 1400 C (2500 F). The most promising technologies at present are the resistance strain gage and remote sensing schemes. Resistance strain gages discussed include the BCL gage, the LaRC compensated gage, and the PdCr gage. Remote sensing schemes such as laser based speckle strain measurement, phase-shifling interferometry, and x-ray extensometry are discussed. Present status and limitations of these technologies are presented.

  13. Toroidal microinstability studies of high temperature tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Rewoldt, G.; Tang, W.M.

    1989-07-01

    Results from comprehensive kinetic microinstability calculations are presented showing the effects of toroidicity on the ion temperature gradient mode and its relationship to the trapped-electron mode in high-temperature tokamak plasmas. The corresponding particle and energy fluxes have also been computed. It is found that, although drift-type microinstabilities persist over a wide range of values of the ion temperature gradient parameter /eta//sub i/ /equivalent to/ (dlnT/sub i//dr)/(dlnn/sub i//dr), the characteristic features of the dominant mode are those of the /eta//sub i/-type instability when /eta//sub i/ > /eta//sub ic/ /approximately/1.2 to 1.4 and of the trapped-electron mode when /eta//sub i/ < /eta//sub ic/. 16 refs., 7 figs.

  14. Permanent magnets composed of high temperature superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, Roy; Chen, In-Gann; Liu, Jay; Lau, Kwong

    1991-01-01

    A study of persistent, trapped magnetic field has been pursued with high-temperature superconducting (HTS) materials. The main effort is to study the feasibility of utilization of HTS to fabricate magnets for various devices. The trapped field, when not in saturation, is proportional to the applied field. Thus, it should be possible to replicate complicated field configurations with melt-textured YBa2Cu3O7 (MT-Y123) material, bypassing the need for HTS wires. Presently, materials have been developed from which magnets of 1.5 T, at 77 K, can be fabricated. Much higher field is available at lower operating temperature. Stability of a few percent per year is readily attainable. Results of studies on prototype motors and minimagnets are reported.

  15. Stable Vanadium Isotope Fractionation at High Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prytulak, J.; Parkinson, I. J.; Savage, P. S.; Nielsen, S. G.; Halliday, A. N.

    2011-12-01

    Vanadium is a redox sensitive transition metal existing in multiple valence states at terrestrial conditions. Stable vanadium isotopes (reported as δ51V in % relative to an Alfa Aesar standard [1]) are a potentially powerful tracer of oxidation-reduction processes. However, the determination of δ51V is analytically challenging, primarily due to the extreme abundance ratio between the only two stable isotopes (51V/50V ~ 400) and, also, significant isobaric interferences of 50Ti and 50Cr on the minor 50V isotope. We have developed the first method able to determine δ51V to a precision (2 s.d. ~ 0.15%, [1,2]) that enables application of this isotope system to geological processes. To usefully investigate high temperature processes using vanadium isotopes, knowledge of the isotope composition and range of values present in the ambient mantle is required. Here we discuss the first δ51V measured in igneous materials encompassing peridotites, MORB, and primitive mantle-derived melts such as picrites. This first dataset provides a preliminary reconnaissance of the magnitude of natural fractionation. We find little isotope fractionation in suites of peridotites and MORB (< 0.5 %). However, the small but analytically significant variation appears to be related to secondary processes, with extremely altered peridotites consistently displaying slightly heavier isotope compositions. We find no resolvable δ51V variation between fresh MORB glass and fresh peridotite. Intriguingly, a suite of subduction-related peridotites from the Mariana forearc, previously characterized for fO2 [3], do not display the predicted co-variation between δ51V and fO2, but instead also have compositions identical to MORB glass. This nominally supports recent indications that there is limited difference in the oxygen fugacity of the MORB source and the subarc mantle wedge [e.g., 4, 5]. Finally, we observe large δ51V variations (~ 2 %) in a suite of evolving lavas from Hekla volcano, Iceland

  16. High Temperature Battery for Drilling Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Josip Caja

    2009-12-31

    In this project rechargeable cells based on the high temperature electrochemical system Na/beta''-alumina/S(IV) in AlCl3/NaCl were developed for application as an autonomous power source in oil/gas deep drilling wells. The cells operate in the temperature range from 150 C to 250 C. A prototype DD size cell was designed and built based on the results of finite element analysis and vibration testing. The cell consisted of stainless steel case serving as anode compartment with cathode compartment installed in it and a seal closing the cell. Critical element in cell design and fabrication was hermetically sealing the cell. The seal had to be leak tight, thermally and vibration stable and compatible with electrode materials. Cathode compartment was built of beta''-alumina tube which served as an electrolyte, separator and cathode compartment.

  17. High temperature experiment for accelerator inertial fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, E.P.

    1985-05-01

    The High Temperature Experiment (HTE) is intended to produce temperatures of 50 to 100 eV in solid density targets driven by heavy ion beams from a multiple beam induction linac. The fundamental variables (particle species, energy, number of beamlets, current and pulse length) must be fixed to achieve the temperature at minimum cost, subject to criteria of technical feasibility and relevance to the development of a Fusion Driver. The conceptual design begins with an assumed (radiation-limited) target temperature and uses limitations due to particle range, beamlet perveance, and target disassembly to bound the allowable values of mass number (A) and energy (E). An accelerator model is then applied to determine the minimum length accelerator, which is a guide to total cost. The accelerator model takes into account limits on transportable charge, maximum gradient, core mass per linear meter, and head-to-tail momentum variation within a pulse.

  18. Simulated Data for High Temperature Composite Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Abumeri, Galib H.

    2006-01-01

    The paper describes an effective formal method that can be used to simulate design properties for composites that is inclusive of all the effects that influence those properties. This effective simulation method is integrated computer codes that include composite micromechanics, composite macromechanics, laminate theory, structural analysis, and multi-factor interaction model. Demonstration of the method includes sample examples for static, thermal, and fracture reliability for a unidirectional metal matrix composite as well as rupture strength and fatigue strength for a high temperature super alloy. Typical results obtained for a unidirectional composite show that the thermal properties are more sensitive to internal local damage, the longitudinal properties degrade slowly with temperature, the transverse and shear properties degrade rapidly with temperature as do rupture strength and fatigue strength for super alloys.

  19. High-Temperature Solid Lubricant Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Christopher; Edmonds, Brian J.

    2010-01-01

    NASA PS400 is a solid lubricant coating invented for high-temperature tribological applications. This plasma-sprayed coating is a variant of the previously patented PS304 coating, and has been formulated to provide higher density, smoother surface finish, and better dimensional stability. This innovation is a new composite material that provides a means to reduce friction and wear in mechanical components. PS400 is a blend of a nickel-molybdenum binder, chrome oxide hardener, silver lubricant, and barium fluoride/calcium fluoride eutectic lubricant that can either be sprayed or deposited by other means, such as powder metallurgy. The resulting composite material is then finished by grinding and polishing to produce a smooth, self-lubricating surface.

  20. High temperatures in the early solar nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boss, Alan P.

    1988-01-01

    One fundamental controversy about terrestrial planet and asteroid formation is the discrepancy between meteoritical evidence for high temperatures (1500 to 2000 K) in the inner solar nebula, and much lower theoretical temperature predictions on the basis of models of viscous accretion disks that neglect compressional heating of infalling gas. It is shown here that rigorous numerical calculations of the collapse of a rotating, three-dimensional presolar nebula are capable of producing temperatures on the order of 1500 K in the asteroid region (2.5 astronomical units), in either nearly axisymmetric or strongly nonaxisymmetric nebula models. The latter models may permit significant thermal cycling of solid components in the early inner solar nebula.