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Sample records for fast light particles

  1. Silicon Timing Response to Particles and Light

    SciTech Connect

    Ronzhin, Anatoly; Spiropulu, Maria

    2015-01-01

    It is observed growing interest to fast timing detectors in high energy physics, related, for example, with collider luminosity increase (LHC) [1]. The options of CMS [2] calorimeter upgrade based on silicon detectors renewed interest to the timing study of this type of detectors. The article is devoted to study of silicon timing response to particles and light.

  2. Fast Fluorescence Microscopy with Light Sheets.

    PubMed

    Daetwyler, Stephan; Huisken, Jan

    2016-08-01

    In light sheet microscopy, optical sectioning by selective fluorescence excitation with a sheet of light is combined with fast full-frame acquisition. This illumination scheme provides minimal photobleaching and phototoxicity. Complemented with remote focusing and multi-view acquisition, light sheet microscopy is the method of choice for acquisition of very fast biological processes, large samples, and high-throughput applications in areas such as neuroscience, plant biology, and developmental biology. This review explains why light sheet microscopes are much faster and gentler than other established fluorescence microscopy techniques. New volumetric imaging schemes and highlights of selected biological applications are also discussed. PMID:27638692

  3. Slow and fast light switching in ruby

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajan, Rajitha P.; Riesen, Hans

    2015-05-01

    Studies about light propagation have been undertaken for more than a century. It is now well established that any material that has normal or anomalous dispersion generates slow or fast light. In this paper, we demonstrate an experimental technique to rapidly switch between slow and fast light in ruby. The experiment utilizes transient holeburning to create drastic variation in refractive index of ruby to produce slow as well as fast light. Transient hole-burning involves the depletion of the ground state leading to a highly populated excited state by single frequency laser excitation. This leads to a hole in the absorption spectrum when readout by a laser. We observed a delay of 29 ns and advancement of -11 ns in an external magnetic field of B║c = 12 mT corresponding to a group velocity of c/961 and negative group velocity of -c/365 respectively.

  4. Fast particle destabilization of TAE modes

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, C.Z.; Gorelenkov, N.N.; Hsu, C.T.

    1995-09-01

    High-n TAE modes are studied based on a kinetic model that includes full thermal ion finite Larmor radius effects, trapped electron collisions and fast particle instability drive. Lower KTAE modes are shown to be non-existent. Like TAE modes, upper KTAE modes are shown to exist due to thermal ion FLR effects in the dissipationless limit. Dissipation effects on the stability of both TAE and upper KTAE modes can be treated perturbatively. However, due to their extended mode structure in the ballooning space, upper KTAE modes usually remain stable or weakly unstable even with large fast particle free energy. On the other hand, TAE modes can be strongly destabilized. A new resonant TAE mode (RTAE) can be excited when the fast particle drive is significantly large. The RTAE mode is a beam-like mode with its frequency determined mainly by the wave-particle resonance condition. The frequency of the RTAE mode can be much less than the TAE gap frequency and may be interpreted as the BAE observed in DIII-D experiments. As plasma {beta} increases, the TAE, RTAE and kinetic ballooning modes strongly couple; the TAE mode changes into the RTAE mode and eventually connects to the kinetic ballooning mode. Numerical results and analytical analysis on the stability of the RTAE and KTAE modes will be presented and compared with the TAE mode stability.

  5. Photochronographic registration of fast light ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvin, Dmitri N.; Lazarchuk, Valeri P.; Murugov, Vasili M.; Petrov, Sergei I.; Senik, Alexei V.

    1999-06-01

    A possibility of registration of fast ions (protons, alpha- particles) with the help of an X-ray streak camera is demonstrated. The spatial resolution of the device is 50 micrometer, the physical time resolution with the use of a CsJ-cathode is 7 ps. From (alpha) -emission a secondary electrons yield is determined of (eta) equals 8 el../part. The device sensitivity makes it possible to register separate (alpha) -particles and protons. On the basis of the device there have been elaborated techniques of spatial-spectral registering of radiation of fast ions emitted by laser thermonuclear targets. The techniques are destined to study processes of interaction of high-intensive laser radiation with an appliance Iskra-5 target.

  6. All-optically simultaneous slow and fast light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhongjie; Luo, Bin; Liu, Yu; Guo, Hong

    2013-11-01

    Simultaneous slow and fast light can be realized all-optically by connecting a four-level closed-loop atom-light interaction scheme to Λ-type electromagnetically induced transparency system. Through manipulation of the relative phase of one of the coupling lights, probe light can be switched among dual-slow light, dual-fast light and simultaneous slow and fast light. A theoretical analysis based on dressed state picture is given.

  7. Light Scattering by Nonspherical Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.; Travis, Larry D.; Hovenier, Joop W.

    1998-01-01

    Improved understanding of electromagnetic scattering by nonspherical particles is important to many science and engineering disciplines and was the subject of the Conference on Light Scattering by Nonspherical Particles: Theory, Measurements, and Applications. The conference was held 29 September-1 October 1998 at the Goddard Institute for Space Studies in New York City and brought together 115 participants from 18 countries. The main objective of the conference was to highlight and summarize the rapid advancements in the field, including numerical methods for computing the single and multiple scattering of electromagnetic radiation by nonspherical and heterogeneous particles, measurement approaches, knowledge of characteristic features in scattering patterns, retrieval and remote sensing techniques, nonspherical particle sizing, and various practical applications. The conference consisted of twelve oral and one poster sessions. The presentations were loosely grouped based on broad topical categories. In each of these categories invited review talks highlighted and summarized specific active areas of research. To ensure a high-quality conference, all abstracts submitted had been reviewed by members of the Scientific Organizing Committee for technical merit and content. The conference program was published in the June 1998 issue of the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society and is available on the World Wide Web at http://www.giss.nasa.gov/-crmim/conference/program.html. Authors of accepted papers and review presentations contributed to a volume of preprints published by the American Meteorological Society' and distributed to participants at the conference.

  8. Fast optical switch having reduced light loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Bruce N. (Inventor); Cooper, Ronald F. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An electrically controlled optical switch uses an electro-optic crystal of the type having at least one set of fast and slow optical axes. The crystal exhibits electric field induced birefringence such that a plane of polarization oriented along a first direction of a light beam passing through the crystal may be switched to a plane of polarization oriented along a second direction. A beam splitting polarizer means is disposed at one end of the crystal and directs a light beam passing through the crystal whose plane of polarization is oriented along the first direction differently from a light beam having a plane of polarization oriented along the second direction. The electro-optic crystal may be chosen from the crystal classes 43m, 42m, and 23. In a preferred embodiment, the electro-optic crystal is a bismuth germanium oxide crystal or a bismuth silicon oxide crystal. In another embodiment of the invention, polarization control optics are provided which transmit substantially all of the incident light to the electro-optic crystal, substantially reducing the insertion loss of the switch.

  9. Any Light Particle Search (ALPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spector, Aaron; Any Light Particle Search (ALPS) Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    High power laser fields enabled by technologies developed for ground-based gravitational-wave observatories open up new opportunities for fundamental physics studies. One of these options is the search for axions and axion-like particles in a pure laboratory experiment. The axion is a solution to the strong CP-problem and a potential dark matter candidate. The axion has also been proposed as an additional channel to cool stars as well as a potential explanation for the TeV transparency problem. The German-US ALPS collaboration is setting up a light-shining-through-walls (LSW) experiment at DESY. LSW experiments are based on the simple idea that a high power laser field traversing a static magnetic field will transform partly into a relativistic axion field. This axion field will travel through an opaque wall into a second static magnetic field region where it turns partly back into an electromagnetic wave field with the same frequency as the laser. The ALPS collaboration is working towards a large scale LSW experiment at DESY in Hamburg, Germany. I will report on the status of the ALPS experiment. This work is supported by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, PRISMA, the Helmholtz Association, the National Science Foundation and the Heising-Simons Foundation.

  10. Polarization of fast particle beams by collisional pumping

    DOEpatents

    Stearns, J. Warren; Kaplan, Selig N.; Pyle, Robert V.; Anderson, L. Wilmer; Ruby, Lawrence; Schlachter, Alfred S.

    1988-01-01

    Method and apparatus for highly polarizing a fast beam of particles by collisional pumping, including generating a fast beam of particles, and also generating a thick electron-spin-polarized medium positioned as a target for the beam. The target is made sufficiently thick to allow the beam to interact with the medium to produce collisional pumping whereby the beam becomes highly polarized.

  11. Polarization of fast particle beams by collisional pumping

    DOEpatents

    Stearns, J.W.; Kaplan, S.N.; Pyle, R.V.; Anderson, L.W.; Schlachter, A.S.; Ruby, L.

    1984-10-19

    The invention relates to method and apparatus for polarizing a fast beam of particles by collisional pumping, including generating a fast beam of particles, and generating a thick electron-spin-polarized medium positioned as a target for said beam, said medium being sufficiently thick to allow said beam to interact with said medium to produce collisional pumping whereby said particle beam becomes highly polarized.

  12. Light as a Fundamental Particle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinberg, Steven

    1975-01-01

    Presents two arguments concerning the role of the photon. One states that the photon is just another particle distinguished by a particular value of charge, spin, mass, lifetime, and interaction properties. The second states that the photon plays a fundamental role with a deep relation to ultimate formulas of physics. (GS)

  13. Are There Faster Than Light Particles?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kreisler, Michael N.

    1969-01-01

    Based upon recent relativistic theory, the researcher describes the search for tachyons, particles having velocities greater than that of a light. The properties of these particles are speculated upon. The author delineates the difficulties anticipated in their detection and the assumptions underlying their methodology. (RR)

  14. Fast Particle Methods for Multiscale Phenomena Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koumoutsakos, P.; Wray, A.; Shariff, K.; Pohorille, Andrew

    2000-01-01

    We are developing particle methods oriented at improving computational modeling capabilities of multiscale physical phenomena in : (i) high Reynolds number unsteady vortical flows, (ii) particle laden and interfacial flows, (iii)molecular dynamics studies of nanoscale droplets and studies of the structure, functions, and evolution of the earliest living cell. The unifying computational approach involves particle methods implemented in parallel computer architectures. The inherent adaptivity, robustness and efficiency of particle methods makes them a multidisciplinary computational tool capable of bridging the gap of micro-scale and continuum flow simulations. Using efficient tree data structures, multipole expansion algorithms, and improved particle-grid interpolation, particle methods allow for simulations using millions of computational elements, making possible the resolution of a wide range of length and time scales of these important physical phenomena.The current challenges in these simulations are in : [i] the proper formulation of particle methods in the molecular and continuous level for the discretization of the governing equations [ii] the resolution of the wide range of time and length scales governing the phenomena under investigation. [iii] the minimization of numerical artifacts that may interfere with the physics of the systems under consideration. [iv] the parallelization of processes such as tree traversal and grid-particle interpolations We are conducting simulations using vortex methods, molecular dynamics and smooth particle hydrodynamics, exploiting their unifying concepts such as : the solution of the N-body problem in parallel computers, highly accurate particle-particle and grid-particle interpolations, parallel FFT's and the formulation of processes such as diffusion in the context of particle methods. This approach enables us to transcend among seemingly unrelated areas of research.

  15. Phase measurement of fast light pulse in electromagnetically induced absorption.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yoon-Seok; Lee, Hee Jung; Moon, Han Seb

    2013-09-23

    We report the phase measurement of a fast light pulse in electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA) of the 5S₁/₂ (F = 2)-5P₃/₂ (F' = 3) transition of ⁸⁷Rb atoms. Using a beat-note interferometer method, a stable measurement without phase dithering of the phase of the probe pulse before and after it has passed through the EIA medium was achieved. Comparing the phases of the light pulse in air and that of the fast light pulse though the EIA medium, the phase of the fast light pulse at EIA resonance was not shifted and maintained to be the same as that of the free-space light pulse. The classical fidelity of the fast light pulse according to the advancement of the group velocity by adjusting the atomic density was estimated to be more than 97%.

  16. Nuclear diagnostic for fast alpha particles

    DOEpatents

    Grisham, L.R.; Post, D.E. Jr.; Dawson, J.M.

    1983-11-23

    This invention relates generally to high energy confined plasmas and more particularly is directed to measuring the velocity distribution of confined energetic alpha particles resulting from deuterium-tritium fusion reactions in a confined energetic plasma.

  17. Inhomogeneous particle model for light-scattering by cometary dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markkanen, Johannes; Penttilä, Antti; Peltoniemi, Jouni; Muinonen, Karri

    2015-12-01

    We introduce an inhomogeneous irregular-particle model for reproducing the typical light-scattering features of cometary dust such as the negative polarization near the backscattering direction, and the weak increase of the backscattering intensity. The model is based on the hierarchical Voronoi-partitioning and the algorithm provides fast generation of irregular particles with a flexible control of inhomogeneity. The input parameters of the model are refractive indices, their volumetric abundances, and the number of constituents on each level. The light-scattering properties of these particles with parameters relevant to cometary dust are solved by the volume-integral-equation method. The light-scattering features of inhomogeneous particles are compared with the mixtures of homogeneous particles, and particles with the refractive index obtained by the effective-medium approximation. We show that with the inhomogeneity size of order 0.2 μm, the different models produce qualitatively similar scattering features while some quantitative differences are observed which have an effect on the retrieved material composition of dust.

  18. Fast particle loss channels in Wendelstein 7-X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faustin, J. M.; Cooper, W. A.; Graves, J. P.; Pfefferlé, D.; Geiger, J.

    2016-09-01

    One of the main goals of Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) is to demonstrate the fast particle confinement properties of the quasi-isodynamic stellarator concept. Fast particle populations will be produced either by Neutral Beam Injection (NBI) or by minority Ion Cyclotron Resonant Heating (ICRH). A fraction of these particles are expected to be lost (even without collisions), despite the optimisation procedure used for the W7-X design. Confinement properties of NBI particles in W7-X were presented in the paper of Drevlak et al (2014 Nucl. Fusion 54 073002). A detailed study is presented here where the loss patterns of an NBI population are described. In particular, focussing on a high-mirror equilibrium, the confinement of fast ions with varying energy injection is studied under collisional conditions. It is found that collisions are not only responsible for classical transport losses but also enhance drift induced losses caused by trapped particles. Moreover, an asymmetry is found in the toroidal position of particle losses which can be explained by local variation in the equilibrium field. The effects of a neoclassically resolved radial electric field are also investigated. Fast particle confinement is significantly improved by the associated \\boldsymbol{E}× \\boldsymbol{B} drift. In particular, an increasing radial electric field helps to reduce and even stop the losses due to the 3D equilibrium structure for times comparable to slowing down time.

  19. Nuclear diagnostic for fast alpha particles

    DOEpatents

    Grisham, Larry R.; Post Jr., Douglass E.; Dawson, John M.

    1986-06-03

    Measurement of the velocity distribution of confined energetic alpha particles resulting from deuterium-tritium fusion reactions in a magnetically contained plasma is provided. The fusion plasma is seeded with energetic boron neutrals for producing, by means of the reaction .sup.10 B (.alpha.,n) .sup.13 N reaction, radioactive nitrogen nuclei which are then collected by a probe. The radioactivity of the probe is then measured by conventional techniques in determining the energy distribution of the alpha particles in the plasma. In a preferred embodiment, diborane gas (B.sub.2 H.sub.6) is the source of the boron neutrals to produce .sup.13 N which decays almost exclusively by positron emission with a convenient half-life of 10 minutes.

  20. Nuclear diagnostic for fast alpha particles

    DOEpatents

    Grisham, Larry R.; Post, Jr., Douglass E.; Dawson, John M.

    1986-01-01

    Measurement of the velocity distribution of confined energetic alpha particles resulting from deuterium-tritium fusion reactions in a magnetically contained plasma is provided. The fusion plasma is seeded with energetic boron neutrals for producing, by means of the reaction .sup.10 B (.alpha.,n) .sup.13 N reaction, radioactive nitrogen nuclei which are then collected by a probe. The radioactivity of the probe is then measured by conventional techniques in determining the energy distribution of the alpha particles in the plasma. In a preferred embodiment, diborane gas (B.sub.2 H.sub.6) is the source of the boron neutrals to produce .sup.13 N which decays almost exclusively by positron emission with a convenient half-life of 10 minutes.

  1. Chirp-enhanced fast light in semiconductor optical amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Sedgwick, F G; Pesala, Bala; Uskov, Alexander V; Chang-Hasnain, C J

    2007-12-24

    We present a novel scheme to increase the THz-bandwidth fast light effect in semiconductor optical amplifiers and increase the number of advanced pulses. By introducing a linear chirp to the input pulses before the SOA and recompressing at the output with an opposite chirp, the advance-bandwidth product reached 3.5 at room temperature, 1.55 microm wavelength. This is the largest number reported, to the best of our knowledge, for a semiconductor slow/fast light device.

  2. Interaction of light particles with capillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tőkési, K.; DuBois, R. D.

    2013-04-01

    The possible similarities and differences between the transmission of slow highly charged ions and light particles, like positrons and electrons, through a single cylindrical, tapered glass capillary with large aspect ratio are studied. We address the question whether the guiding-effect is observable for low intensity positron beams.

  3. Energy-loss rate of a fast particle in graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Ang, Yee Sin; Zhang, C.; Kee, Chun Yun

    2011-08-01

    The energy-loss rate of a fast particle in graphene is studied. The energy-loss rate always increases with increasing incident particle energy, which is quite unusual when compared to electron gas in normal metal. Graphene exhibits a ''discriminating'' behavior where there exists a low energy cut-off below which the scattering process is strictly forbidden, leading to lossless traverse of an external particle in graphene. This low energy cutoff is of the order of nearest neighbor hopping bandwidth. Our results suggest that backscattering is also absent in the external particle scattering of graphene.

  4. Fast Frontend Electronics for high luminosity particle detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardinali, M.

    Future experiments of nuclear and particle physics are moving towards the high luminosity regime, in order to access suppressed processes like rare B decays or exotic charmonium resonances. In this scenario, high rate capability is a key requirement for electronics instrumentation, together with excellent timing resolution for precise event reconstruction. The development of dedicated FrontEnd Electronics (FEE) for detectors has become increasingly challenging. A current trend in R&D is towards multipurpose FEE which can be easily adapted to a great variety of detectors, without impairing the required high performance. We report on high-precision timing solutions which utilise high-bandwidth preamplifiers and fast discriminators providing Time-over-Threshold information, which can be used for charge measurements or walk corrections thus improving the obtainable timing resolution. The output signal are LVDS and can be directly fed into a multi-hit TDC readout. The performance of the electronics was investigated for single photon signals, typical for imaging Cherenkov detectors. The opposite condition of light signals arising from plastic scintillators, was also studied. High counting rates per channel of several MHz were achieved, and a timing resolution of better than 100 ps could be obtained in a test experiment using the full readout chain.

  5. Modeling light scattering from diesel soot particles

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, Patricia; Shepherd, Ian; Hunt, Arlon

    2002-07-16

    The Mie model is widely used to analyze light scattering from particulate aerosols. The Diesel Particle Scatterometer (DPS), for example, determines the size and optical properties of diesel exhaust particles that are characterized by measuring three angle-dependent elements of the Mueller scattering matrix. These elements are then fitted using Mie calculations with a Levenburg-Marquardt optimization program. This approach has achieved good fits for most experimental data. However, in many cases, the predicted real and imaginary parts of the index of refraction were less than that for solid carbon. To understand this result and explain the experimental data, we present an assessment of the Mie model by use of a light scattering model based on the coupled dipole approximation. The results indicate that the Mie calculation can be used to determine the largest dimension of irregularly shaped particles at sizes characteristic of Diesel soot and, for particles of known refractive index, tables can be constructed to determine the average porosity of the particles from the predicted index of refraction.

  6. Fast Solar Polarimeter: First Light Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnappa, N.; Feller, A.; Iglesia, F. A.; Solanki, S.

    2013-12-01

    Accurate measurements of magnetic fields on the Sun are crucial to understand various physical processes that take place in the solar atmosphere such as solar eruptions, coronal heating, solar wind acceleration, etc. The Fast Solar Polarimeter (FSP) is a new instrument that is being developed to probe magnetic fields on the Sun. One of the main goals of this polarimeter is to carry out high precision spectropolarimetric observations with spatial resolution close to the telescope diffraction limit. The polarimeter is based on pnCCD technology with split frame transfer and simultaneous multi-channel readout, resulting in frame rate upto 1 kHz. The FSP prototype instrument uses a small format pnCCD of 264x264 pixels which has been developed by PNSensor and by the semiconductor lab of the Max Planck Society. The polarization modulator is based on two ferro-electric liquid crystals (FLCs) interlaced between two static retarders. The first solar observations have been carried out with this prototype during May-June, 2013 at German Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT) on Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain. Here we present the instrument performance assessments and the first results on the magnetic field measurements. Further, we briefly discuss about the next phase of FSP which will be a dual beam system with 1k x 1k CCDs.

  7. A photodiode-based neutral particle bolometer for characterizing charge-exchanged fast-ion behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Clary, R.; Smirnov, A.; Dettrick, S.; Knapp, K.; Korepanov, S.; Ruskov, E.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Zhu, Y.

    2012-10-15

    A neutral particle bolometer (NPB) has been designed and implemented on Tri Alpha Energy's C-2 device in order to spatially and temporally resolve the charge-exchange losses of fast-ion populations originating from neutral beam injection into field-reversed configuration plasmas. This instrument employs a silicon photodiode as the detection device with an integrated tungsten filter coating to reduce sensitivity to light radiation. Here we discuss the technical aspects and calibration of the NPB, and report typical NPB measurement results of wall recycling effects on fast-ion losses.

  8. A photodiode-based neutral particle bolometer for characterizing charge-exchanged fast-ion behaviora)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clary, R.; Smirnov, A.; Dettrick, S.; Knapp, K.; Korepanov, S.; Ruskov, E.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Zhu, Y.

    2012-10-01

    A neutral particle bolometer (NPB) has been designed and implemented on Tri Alpha Energy's C-2 device in order to spatially and temporally resolve the charge-exchange losses of fast-ion populations originating from neutral beam injection into field-reversed configuration plasmas. This instrument employs a silicon photodiode as the detection device with an integrated tungsten filter coating to reduce sensitivity to light radiation. Here we discuss the technical aspects and calibration of the NPB, and report typical NPB measurement results of wall recycling effects on fast-ion losses.

  9. A photodiode-based neutral particle bolometer for characterizing charge-exchanged fast-ion behavior.

    PubMed

    Clary, R; Smirnov, A; Dettrick, S; Knapp, K; Korepanov, S; Ruskov, E; Heidbrink, W W; Zhu, Y

    2012-10-01

    A neutral particle bolometer (NPB) has been designed and implemented on Tri Alpha Energy's C-2 device in order to spatially and temporally resolve the charge-exchange losses of fast-ion populations originating from neutral beam injection into field-reversed configuration plasmas. This instrument employs a silicon photodiode as the detection device with an integrated tungsten filter coating to reduce sensitivity to light radiation. Here we discuss the technical aspects and calibration of the NPB, and report typical NPB measurement results of wall recycling effects on fast-ion losses.

  10. Light scattering by a multilayered spheroidal particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farafonov, Victor G.; Voshchinnikov, Nikolai V.

    2012-04-01

    The light scattering problem for a confocal multilayered spheroid has been solved by the extended boundary condition method (EBCM) with a corresponding spheroidal basis. The solution preserves the advantages of the approach applied previously to homogeneous and core-mantle spheroids, i.e. the separation of the radiation fields into two parts and a special choice of scalar potentials for each of the parts. The method is known to be useful in a wide range of the particle parameters. It is particularly efficient for strongly prolate and oblate spheroids. Numerical tests are described. Illustrative calculations have shown that the extinction factors to converge to average values with a growing number of layers and how the extinction vary with a growth of particle porosity.

  11. Compact, fiber-based, fast-light enhanced optical gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Caleb A.; Zavriyev, Anton; Bashkansky, Mark; Beal, A. Craig

    2013-05-01

    It has been proposed that fast-light optical phenomena can increase the sensitivity of a Ring Laser Gyroscope (RLG) of a given size by several orders of magnitude. MagiQ is developing a compact fully-fibered fast light RLG using Stimulated Brillouin Scattering (SBS) in commercial optical fiber. We will discuss our experimental results on SBS pumped lasing in commercial fibers and analyze their implications to the fast light generation. Based on these results, we envision a fast light enhanced Ring Laser Gyroscope (RLG) that will use only a few meters of fiber and require moderate pump power (only a few 100's of mW). We will present the design that is based on proven, commercially available technologies. By using photonic integrated circuits and telecom-grade fiber components, we created a design that is appropriate for mass production in the near term. We eliminated all free-space optical elements (such as atomic vapor cells), in order to enable a compact, high sensitivity RLG stable against environmental disturbances. Results of this effort will have benefits in existing applications of RLGs (such as inertial navigation units, gyrocompasses, and stabilization techniques), and will allow wider use of RLGs in spacecraft, unmanned aerial vehicles or sensors, where the current size and weight of optical gyros are prohibitive.

  12. Relativistic laser nano-plasmonics for effective fast particle production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, A.; Platonov, K.; Braenzel, J.; Lübcke, A.; Das, S.; Messaoudi, H.; Grunwald, R.; Gray, C.; McGlynn, E.; Schnürer, M.

    2016-01-01

    We have studied particle acceleration in different nanostructured targets irradiated by high intensity laser pulses of high contrast. We find that the maximum energy of emitted particles and their directionality is significantly enhanced in the case of nanostructured targets with respect to plane targets. We have studied theoretically in detail the generation and propagation of fast electrons in nanowire targets. Such targets exhibit an extraordinary high conversion efficiency of laser energy into electron kinetic energy. We observe guiding of electron bunches along the wires. Results from theory and simulation compare reasonably well with the experimental data.

  13. Teaching conservation laws, symmetries and elementary particles with fast feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Berg, Ed; Hoekzema, Dick

    2006-01-01

    Lessons about elementary particles at the secondary school level can degenerate into listing a zoo of particles and reactions, resulting in disorganized and rather meaningless knowledge. A more powerful way is to focus on conservation laws, symmetries and reaction diagrams. The conservation laws and symmetries provide generalizing power that enables the students to predict whether or not certain reactions are possible and to derive new reactions from given ones by applying the symmetries. In this article we first present simplified Feynman diagrams and three symmetry operations. Then we discuss the fast feedback teaching method and present two lessons and a worksheet for teaching symmetries and reactions using this fast feedback. The method was developed and piloted during the last two school years in Dutch secondary schools.

  14. Outdoor ultrafine particle concentrations in front of fast food restaurants.

    PubMed

    Vert, Cristina; Meliefste, Kees; Hoek, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    Ultrafine particles (UFPs) have been associated with negative effects on human health. Emissions from motor vehicles are the principal source of UFPs in urban air. A study in Vancouver suggested that UFP concentrations were related to density of fast food restaurants near the monitoring sites. A previous monitoring campaign could not separate the contribution of restaurants from road traffic. The main goal of this study has been the quantification of fast food restaurants' contribution to outdoor UFP concentrations. A portable particle number counter (DiscMini) has been used to carry out mobile monitoring in a largely pedestrianized area in the city center of Utrecht. A fixed route passing 17 fast food restaurants was followed on 8 days. UFP concentrations in front of the restaurants were 1.61 times higher than in a nearby square without any local sources used as control area and 1.22 times higher compared with all measurements conducted in between the restaurants. Adjustment for other sources such as passing mopeds, smokers or candles did not explain the increase. In conclusion, fast food restaurants result in significant increases in outdoor UFP concentrations in front of the restaurant.

  15. Outdoor ultrafine particle concentrations in front of fast food restaurants.

    PubMed

    Vert, Cristina; Meliefste, Kees; Hoek, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    Ultrafine particles (UFPs) have been associated with negative effects on human health. Emissions from motor vehicles are the principal source of UFPs in urban air. A study in Vancouver suggested that UFP concentrations were related to density of fast food restaurants near the monitoring sites. A previous monitoring campaign could not separate the contribution of restaurants from road traffic. The main goal of this study has been the quantification of fast food restaurants' contribution to outdoor UFP concentrations. A portable particle number counter (DiscMini) has been used to carry out mobile monitoring in a largely pedestrianized area in the city center of Utrecht. A fixed route passing 17 fast food restaurants was followed on 8 days. UFP concentrations in front of the restaurants were 1.61 times higher than in a nearby square without any local sources used as control area and 1.22 times higher compared with all measurements conducted in between the restaurants. Adjustment for other sources such as passing mopeds, smokers or candles did not explain the increase. In conclusion, fast food restaurants result in significant increases in outdoor UFP concentrations in front of the restaurant. PMID:26531805

  16. Simultaneous slow and fast light involving the Faraday effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macke, Bruno; Ségard, Bernard

    2016-10-01

    We theoretically study the linear transmission of linearly polarized light pulses in an ensemble of cold atoms submitted to a static magnetic field parallel to the direction of propagation. The carrier frequency of the incident pulses coincides with a resonance frequency of the atoms. The transmitted light, the electric field of which is transversal, is examined in the polarizations parallel and perpendicular to that of the incident pulses. We give explicit analytic expressions for the transfer functions of the system for both polarizations and for the corresponding group delays. We demonstrate that slow light can be observed in a polarization, whereas fast light is simultaneously observed in the perpendicular polarization. Moreover, we point out that, due to the polarization postselection, the system is not necessarily minimum phase shift. Slow light can then be obtained in situations where an irrelevant application of the Kramers-Kronig relations could lead one to expect fast light. When the incident light is step modulated, we finally show that, in suitable conditions, the system enables one to separate optical precursor and main field.

  17. Fast imaging of live organisms with sculpted light sheets.

    PubMed

    Chmielewski, Aleksander K; Kyrsting, Anders; Mahou, Pierre; Wayland, Matthew T; Muresan, Leila; Evers, Jan Felix; Kaminski, Clemens F

    2015-04-20

    Light-sheet microscopy is an increasingly popular technique in the life sciences due to its fast 3D imaging capability of fluorescent samples with low photo toxicity compared to confocal methods. In this work we present a new, fast, flexible and simple to implement method to optimize the illumination light-sheet to the requirement at hand. A telescope composed of two electrically tuneable lenses enables us to define thickness and position of the light-sheet independently but accurately within milliseconds, and therefore optimize image quality of the features of interest interactively. We demonstrated the practical benefit of this technique by 1) assembling large field of views from tiled single exposure each with individually optimized illumination settings; 2) sculpting the light-sheet to trace complex sample shapes within single exposures. This technique proved compatible with confocal line scanning detection, further improving image contrast and resolution. Finally, we determined the effect of light-sheet optimization in the context of scattering tissue, devising procedures for balancing image quality, field of view and acquisition speed.

  18. Fast imaging of live organisms with sculpted light sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmielewski, Aleksander K.; Kyrsting, Anders; Mahou, Pierre; Wayland, Matthew T.; Muresan, Leila; Evers, Jan Felix; Kaminski, Clemens F.

    2015-04-01

    Light-sheet microscopy is an increasingly popular technique in the life sciences due to its fast 3D imaging capability of fluorescent samples with low photo toxicity compared to confocal methods. In this work we present a new, fast, flexible and simple to implement method to optimize the illumination light-sheet to the requirement at hand. A telescope composed of two electrically tuneable lenses enables us to define thickness and position of the light-sheet independently but accurately within milliseconds, and therefore optimize image quality of the features of interest interactively. We demonstrated the practical benefit of this technique by 1) assembling large field of views from tiled single exposure each with individually optimized illumination settings; 2) sculpting the light-sheet to trace complex sample shapes within single exposures. This technique proved compatible with confocal line scanning detection, further improving image contrast and resolution. Finally, we determined the effect of light-sheet optimization in the context of scattering tissue, devising procedures for balancing image quality, field of view and acquisition speed.

  19. Fast imaging of live organisms with sculpted light sheets

    PubMed Central

    Chmielewski, Aleksander K.; Kyrsting, Anders; Mahou, Pierre; Wayland, Matthew T.; Muresan, Leila; Evers, Jan Felix; Kaminski, Clemens F.

    2015-01-01

    Light-sheet microscopy is an increasingly popular technique in the life sciences due to its fast 3D imaging capability of fluorescent samples with low photo toxicity compared to confocal methods. In this work we present a new, fast, flexible and simple to implement method to optimize the illumination light-sheet to the requirement at hand. A telescope composed of two electrically tuneable lenses enables us to define thickness and position of the light-sheet independently but accurately within milliseconds, and therefore optimize image quality of the features of interest interactively. We demonstrated the practical benefit of this technique by 1) assembling large field of views from tiled single exposure each with individually optimized illumination settings; 2) sculpting the light-sheet to trace complex sample shapes within single exposures. This technique proved compatible with confocal line scanning detection, further improving image contrast and resolution. Finally, we determined the effect of light-sheet optimization in the context of scattering tissue, devising procedures for balancing image quality, field of view and acquisition speed. PMID:25893952

  20. Multiple-plane particle image velocimetry using a light-field camera.

    PubMed

    Skupsch, Christoph; Brücker, Christoph

    2013-01-28

    Planar velocity fields in flows are determined simultaneously on parallel measurement planes by means of an in-house manufactured light-field camera. The planes are defined by illuminating light sheets with constant spacing. Particle positions are reconstructed from a single 2D recording taken by a CMOS-camera equipped with a high-quality doublet lens array. The fast refocusing algorithm is based on synthetic-aperture particle image velocimetry (SAPIV). The reconstruction quality is tested via ray-tracing of synthetically generated particle fields. The introduced single-camera SAPIV is applied to a convective flow within a measurement volume of 30 x 30 x 50 mm³.

  1. Large Scale Simulations of Elastic Light Scattering by a Fast Discrete Dipole Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoekstra, A. G.; Grimminck, M. D.; Sloot, P. M. A.

    Simulation of Elastic Light Scattering from arbitrary shaped particles in the resonance region (i.e., with a dimension of several wavelengths of the incident light) is a long standing challenge. By employing the combination of a simulation kernel with low computational complexity, implemented on powerful High Performance Computing systems, we are now able to push the limits of simulation of scattering of visible light towards particles with dimensions up to 10 micrometers. This allows for the first time the simulation of realistic and highly relevant light scattering experiments, such as scattering from human red — or white blood cells, or scattering from large soot — or dust particles. We use the Discrete Dipole Approximation to simulate the light scattering process. In this paper we report on a parallel Fast Discrete Dipole Approximation, and we will show the performance of the resulting code, running under PVM on a 32-node Parsytec CC. Furthermore, as an example we present results of a simulation of scattering from human white blood cells. In a first approximation the Lymphocyte is modeled as a sphere with a spherical inclusion. We investigate the influence of the position of the inner sphere, modeling the nucleus of a Lymphocyte, on the light scattering signals.

  2. A fast and light stream cipher for smartphones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal, G.; Baptista, M. S.; Mancini, H.

    2014-06-01

    We present a stream cipher based on a chaotic dynamical system. Using a chaotic trajectory sampled under certain rules in order to avoid any attempt to reconstruct the original one, we create a binary pseudo-random keystream that can only be exactly reproduced by someone that has fully knowledge of the communication system parameters formed by a transmitter and a receiver, sharing the same initial conditions. The plaintext is XOR'ed with the keystream creating the ciphertext, the encrypted message. This keystream passes the NIST's randomness test and has been implemented in a videoconference App for smartphones, in order to show the fast and light nature of the proposed encryption system.

  3. Slow and fast light propagation in nonlinear Kerr media.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qiguang; Ma, Seongmin; Wang, Huitian; Jung, S. S.

    2005-04-01

    Sub- and superluminal propagation of light pulse in Kerr materials has been investigated. Group velocities as slow as much less than 1 millimeter per second to as fast as negative several hundreds meters per second can be easily obtained in Kerr medium, which possesses large nonlinear refractive index and long relaxation time, such as Cr doped Alexandrite, Ruby, and GdAlO3. The physical mechanism is the strong highly dispersive coupling between different frequency components of the pulse. The new mechanism of slowing down pulses as well as producing superluminal pulses enlarges the very specific materials to all kinds of nonlinear optical materials.

  4. Fast frame scanning camera system for light-sheet microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Di; Zhou, Xing; Yao, Baoli; Li, Runze; Yang, Yanlong; Peng, Tong; Lei, Ming; Dan, Dan; Ye, Tong

    2015-10-10

    In the interest of improving the temporal resolution for light-sheet microscopy, we designed a fast frame scanning camera system that incorporated a galvanometer scanning mirror into the imaging path of a home-built light-sheet microscope. This system transformed a temporal image sequence to a spatial one so that multiple images could be acquired during one exposure period. The improvement factor of the frame rate was dependent on the number of sub-images that could be tiled on the sensor without overlapping each other and was therefore a trade-off with the image size. As a demonstration, we achieved 960 frames/s (fps) on a CCD camera that was originally capable of recording images at only 30 fps (full frame). This allowed us to observe millisecond or sub-millisecond events with ordinary CCD cameras.

  5. Fast frame scanning camera system for light-sheet microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Di; Zhou, Xing; Yao, Baoli; Li, Runze; Yang, Yanlong; Peng, Tong; Lei, Ming; Dan, Dan; Ye, Tong

    2015-10-10

    In the interest of improving the temporal resolution for light-sheet microscopy, we designed a fast frame scanning camera system that incorporated a galvanometer scanning mirror into the imaging path of a home-built light-sheet microscope. This system transformed a temporal image sequence to a spatial one so that multiple images could be acquired during one exposure period. The improvement factor of the frame rate was dependent on the number of sub-images that could be tiled on the sensor without overlapping each other and was therefore a trade-off with the image size. As a demonstration, we achieved 960 frames/s (fps) on a CCD camera that was originally capable of recording images at only 30 fps (full frame). This allowed us to observe millisecond or sub-millisecond events with ordinary CCD cameras. PMID:26479797

  6. White dwarfs constraints on dark sector models with light particles

    SciTech Connect

    Ubaldi, Lorenzo

    2014-06-24

    The white dwarf luminosity function is well understood in terms of standard model physics and leaves little room for exotic cooling mechanisms related to the possible existence of new weakly interacting light particles. This puts significant constraints on the parameter space of models that contain a massive dark photon and light dark sector particles.

  7. Particle detection by a light-scattering technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kormanyos, S.; Mastroeni, J.

    1972-01-01

    Instrument measures concentration of small particles in aqueous medium in terms of amount of light scattered and degree to which light transmission is attenuated. Sensitivity to small particles is optimized because both scattered and transmitted illumination levels are detected by photodiodes.

  8. Effects of asphericity on single-particle polarized light scattering.

    PubMed

    Spinrad, R W; Brown, J

    1993-10-20

    Polarized light scattering from individual particles has been analyzed to determine the effects of particle shape. Flow cytometric techniques were used on samples of spherical microspheres and naturally occurring marine algae. An analog of the depolarization ratio was obtained by using crossed polarizers in the source and detector of the flow cytometer. Results suggest that differences between the polarized light scattering of spheres and aspherical particles are not discernible unless the scattered intensities are normalized to the forward scattering, which is roughly equivalent to particulate cross section. This research indicates that polarized light scattering, when normalized to particle size, may provide an indication of the extent of asphericity of hydrosols.

  9. Computation of radiation pressure force on arbitrary shaped homogenous particles by multilevel fast multipole algorithm.

    PubMed

    Yang, Minglin; Ren, Kuan Fang; Gou, Mingjiang; Sheng, Xinqing

    2013-06-01

    A full-wave numerical method based on the surface integral equation for computing radiation pressure force (RPF) exerted by a shaped light beam on arbitrary shaped homogenous particles is presented. The multilevel fast multipole algorithm is employed to reduce memory requirement and to improve its capability. The resultant matrix equation is solved by using an iterative solver to obtain equivalent electric and magnetic currents. Then RPF is computed by vector flux of the Maxwell's stress tensor over a spherical surface tightly enclosing the particle. So the analytical expressions for electromagnetic fields of incident beam in near region are used. Some numerical results are performed to illustrate the validity and capability of the developed method. Good agreements between our method and the Lorenz-Mie theory for spherical and small spheroidal particle are found while our method has powerful capability for computing RPF of any shaped beam on a relatively large particle of complex shape. Tests for ellipsoidal and red blood cell-like particles illuminated by Gaussian beam have shown that the size of the particle can be as large as 50-100 wavelengths, respectively, for the relative refractive of 1.33 and 1.1.

  10. Open LED Illuminator: A Simple and Inexpensive LED Illuminator for Fast Multicolor Particle Tracking in Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Bosse, Jens B.; Tanneti, Nikhila S.; Hogue, Ian B.; Enquist, Lynn W.

    2015-01-01

    Dual-color live cell fluorescence microscopy of fast intracellular trafficking processes, such as axonal transport, requires rapid switching of illumination channels. Typical broad-spectrum sources necessitate the use of mechanical filter switching, which introduces delays between acquisition of different fluorescence channels, impeding the interpretation and quantification of highly dynamic processes. Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs), however, allow modulation of excitation light in microseconds. Here we provide a step-by-step protocol to enable any scientist to build a research-grade LED illuminator for live cell microscopy, even without prior experience with electronics or optics. We quantify and compare components, discuss our design considerations, and demonstrate the performance of our LED illuminator by imaging axonal transport of herpes virus particles with high temporal resolution. PMID:26600461

  11. Open LED Illuminator: A Simple and Inexpensive LED Illuminator for Fast Multicolor Particle Tracking in Neurons.

    PubMed

    Bosse, Jens B; Tanneti, Nikhila S; Hogue, Ian B; Enquist, Lynn W

    2015-01-01

    Dual-color live cell fluorescence microscopy of fast intracellular trafficking processes, such as axonal transport, requires rapid switching of illumination channels. Typical broad-spectrum sources necessitate the use of mechanical filter switching, which introduces delays between acquisition of different fluorescence channels, impeding the interpretation and quantification of highly dynamic processes. Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs), however, allow modulation of excitation light in microseconds. Here we provide a step-by-step protocol to enable any scientist to build a research-grade LED illuminator for live cell microscopy, even without prior experience with electronics or optics. We quantify and compare components, discuss our design considerations, and demonstrate the performance of our LED illuminator by imaging axonal transport of herpes virus particles with high temporal resolution.

  12. Ultrafine particles near a roadway intersection: origin and apportionment of fast changes in concentration.

    PubMed

    Klems, Joseph P; Pennington, M Ross; Zordan, Christopher A; Johnston, Murray V

    2010-10-15

    A wavelet-based algorithm was implemented to separate the high frequency portion of ambient nanoparticle measurements taken during the summer and winter of 2009 in Wilmington, Delaware. These measurements included both number concentration and size distributions recorded once every second by a condensation particle counter (CPC) and a fast mobility particle sizer (FMPS). The high frequency portion of the signal, consisting of a series of abrupt spikes in number concentration that varied in length from a few seconds to tens of seconds, accounted for 6-35% of the daily ambient number concentration with hourly contributions sometimes greater than 50%. When the data were weighted by particle volume, this portion of the signal contributed an average of 20% to the daily PM(0.1) concentration. Particle concentration spikes were preferentially observed from locations surrounding the measurement site where motor vehicles accelerate after a red traffic light turns green. As the distance or transit time from emission to sampling increased, the size distribution shifted to larger particle diameters. PMID:20843065

  13. Diffraction of entangled particles by light gratings

    SciTech Connect

    Sancho, Pedro

    2015-04-15

    We analyze the diffraction regime of the Kapitza–Dirac effect for particles entangled in momentum. The detection patterns show two-particle interferences. In the single-mode case we identify a discontinuity in the set of joint detection probabilities, associated with the disconnected character of the space of non-separable states. For Gaussian multi-mode states we derive the diffraction patterns, providing an example of the dependence of the light–matter interaction on entanglement. When the particles are identical, we can explore the relation between exchange and entanglement effects. We find a complementary behavior between overlapping and Schmidt’s number. In particular, symmetric entanglement can cancel the exchange effects. - Highlights: • Kapitza–Dirac diffraction of entangled particles shows multiparticle interference. • There is a discontinuity in the set of joint detection patterns of entangled states. • We find a complementary behavior between overlapping and Schmidt’s number. • Symmetric entanglement can cancel the exchange effects.

  14. Constraining Light Colored Particles with Event Shapes

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, David E.; Schwartz, Matthew D.

    2008-07-11

    Using recently developed techniques for computing event shapes with soft-collinear effective theory, CERN Large Electron Positron Collider event shape data are used to derive strong model-independent bounds on new colored particles. In the effective field theory computation, colored particles contribute in loops not only to the running of {alpha}{sub s} but also to the running of hard, jet, and soft functions. Moreover, the differential distribution in the effective theory explicitly probes many energy scales, so even shapes have a strong sensitivity to new particle thresholds. Using thrust data from ALEPH and OPAL, colored adjoint fermions (such as a gluino) below 51.0 GeV are ruled out to 95% confidence. This is nearly an order-of-magnitude improvement over the previous model-independent bound of 6.3 GeV.

  15. Light Absorbing Particle (LAP) Measurements in the Lower Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumgardner, D.; Raga, G. B.; Anderson, B.; Diskin, G.; Sachse, G.; Kok, G.

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation covers the capabilities and design of the Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP-2), and reviews its role on the Sage III Ozone Loss Validation Experiment (SOLVE II) field campaign during 2003. On SOLVE II the SP-2 was carried into the Arctic onboard a DC-8 aircraft, in order to determine the size distribution of light-absorbing and non light-absorbing particles in the stratosphere. Graphs and tables relate some of the results from SOLVE II.

  16. Fast and accurate line scanner based on white light interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambelet, Patrick; Moosburger, Rudolf

    2013-04-01

    White-light interferometry is a highly accurate technology for 3D measurements. The principle is widely utilized in surface metrology instruments but rarely adopted for in-line inspection systems. The main challenges for rolling out inspection systems based on white-light interferometry to the production floor are its sensitivity to environmental vibrations and relatively long measurement times: a large quantity of data needs to be acquired and processed in order to obtain a single topographic measurement. Heliotis developed a smart-pixel CMOS camera (lock-in camera) which is specially suited for white-light interferometry. The demodulation of the interference signal is treated at the level of the pixel which typically reduces the acquisition data by one orders of magnitude. Along with the high bandwidth of the dedicated lock-in camera, vertical scan-speeds of more than 40mm/s are reachable. The high scan speed allows for the realization of inspection systems that are rugged against external vibrations as present on the production floor. For many industrial applications such as the inspection of wafer-bumps, surface of mechanical parts and solar-panel, large areas need to be measured. In this case either the instrument or the sample are displaced laterally and several measurements are stitched together. The cycle time of such a system is mostly limited by the stepping time for multiple lateral displacements. A line-scanner based on white light interferometry would eliminate most of the stepping time while maintaining robustness and accuracy. A. Olszak proposed a simple geometry to realize such a lateral scanning interferometer. We demonstrate that such inclined interferometers can benefit significantly from the fast in-pixel demodulation capabilities of the lock-in camera. One drawback of an inclined observation perspective is that its application is limited to objects with scattering surfaces. We therefore propose an alternate geometry where the incident light is

  17. Planar laser light scattering technique for measurement of nonspherical particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun Woo; Choi, Man Soo; Jeong, Dae Hwa; Lee, Hyo Hyung

    2004-09-01

    Small particles are one of the biggest sources that cause loss in semiconductor and flat panel display industry. Therefore, it is important to control them during their manufacturing process. To achieve this goal, exact measurement of particles is first required. Laser light scattering is the most widely used technique for diagnosis of particles because it does not disturb flow field and enables real time and spatially resolved analysis. Measurement of nonspherical aggregates comprised of small primary particles is difficult compared with spherical particles because they have very complex morphology. In addition, most researches on aggregates using light scattering are limited to point measurement, which requires much time to inspect large area and is difficult to observe unsteady phenomenon. Motivated by this, we have developed a laser light scattering method for simultaneous measurement of spatial distributions of aggregate size and morphology. Silica aggregates that were generated in Methane/air premixed flame were used as test particles. Multiangular planar light scattering measurement was carried out using a sheet beam of Ar ion laser and an intensified charge coupled device (ICCD) camera as a light source and a detector, respectively. The result was interpreted based on the Rayleigh-Debye-Gans scattering theory for fractal aggregates to obtain the mean radius of gyration and fractal dimension that are the parameters characterizing aggregate size and morphology. The suitability of our new technique was confirmed by experiment using conventional light scattering.

  18. Three-dimensional light trap for reflective particles

    DOEpatents

    Neal, D.R.

    1999-08-17

    A system is disclosed for containing either a reflective particle or a particle having an index of refraction lower than that of the surrounding media in a three-dimensional light cage. A light beam from a single source illuminates an optics system and generates a set of at least three discrete focused beams that emanate from a single exit aperture and focus on to a focal plane located close to the particle. The set of focal spots defines a ring that surrounds the particle. The set of focused beams creates a ``light cage`` and circumscribes a zone of no light within which the particle lies. The surrounding beams apply constraining forces (created by radiation pressure) to the particle, thereby containing it in a three-dimensional force field trap. A diffractive element, such as an aperture multiplexed lens, or either a Dammann grating or phase element in combination with a focusing lens, may be used to generate the beams. A zoom lens may be used to adjust the size of the light cage, permitting particles of various sizes to be captured and contained. 10 figs.

  19. Three-dimensional light trap for reflective particles

    DOEpatents

    Neal, Daniel R.

    1999-01-01

    A system for containing either a reflective particle or a particle having an index of refraction lower than that of the surrounding media in a three-dimensional light cage. A light beam from a single source illuminates an optics system and generates a set of at least three discrete focussed beams that emanate from a single exit aperture and focus on to a focal plane located close to the particle. The set of focal spots defines a ring that surrounds the particle. The set of focussed beams creates a "light cage" and circumscribes a zone of no light within which the particle lies. The surrounding beams apply constraining forces (created by radiation pressure) to the particle, thereby containing it in a three-dimensional force field trap. A diffractive element, such as an aperture multiplexed lens, or either a Dammann grating or phase element in combination with a focusing lens, may be used to generate the beams. A zoom lens may be used to adjust the size of the light cage, permitting particles of various sizes to be captured and contained.

  20. Light absorption in conical silicon particles.

    PubMed

    Bogdanowicz, J; Gilbert, M; Innocenti, N; Koelling, S; Vanderheyden, B; Vandervorst, W

    2013-02-11

    The problem of the absorption of light by a nanoscale dielectric cone is discussed. A simplified solution based on the analytical Mie theory of scattering and absorption by cylindrical objects is proposed and supported by the experimental observation of sharply localized holes in conical silicon tips after high-fluence irradiation. This study reveals that light couples with tapered objects dominantly at specific locations, where the local radius corresponds to one of the resonant radii of a cylindrical object, as predicted by Mie theory.

  1. Scattering of polarized Gaussian light by a spheroidal particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xianming; Xiao, Sai; Ma, Lixiu; Su, Baochen

    2015-02-01

    Light scattering by a small particle can produce light with polarization characteristics different from those of the incident beam. In this article, we studied the polarized Gaussian beam scattered by a spheroidal particle within the generalized Lorenz-Mie theory framework. A theoretical procedure is given to expand an incident Gaussian beam in terms of spheroidal vector wave functions. We studied the single scattering properties of a single spheroidal particle with varying aspect ratios and size parameters. Exact analytic solutions are obtained for computing the amplitude matrix and single scattering Muller matrix for a single spheroid with normal illumination. The Muller scattering matrix elements of a single spheroid are compared between plane wave and Gaussian light beam as incident light source.

  2. SMARTIES: User-friendly codes for fast and accurate calculations of light scattering by spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somerville, W. R. C.; Auguié, B.; Le Ru, E. C.

    2016-05-01

    We provide a detailed user guide for SMARTIES, a suite of MATLAB codes for the calculation of the optical properties of oblate and prolate spheroidal particles, with comparable capabilities and ease-of-use as Mie theory for spheres. SMARTIES is a MATLAB implementation of an improved T-matrix algorithm for the theoretical modelling of electromagnetic scattering by particles of spheroidal shape. The theory behind the improvements in numerical accuracy and convergence is briefly summarized, with reference to the original publications. Instructions of use, and a detailed description of the code structure, its range of applicability, as well as guidelines for further developments by advanced users are discussed in separate sections of this user guide. The code may be useful to researchers seeking a fast, accurate and reliable tool to simulate the near-field and far-field optical properties of elongated particles, but will also appeal to other developers of light-scattering software seeking a reliable benchmark for non-spherical particles with a challenging aspect ratio and/or refractive index contrast.

  3. Particle-in-cell simulations of hot electron generation using defocused laser light in cone targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lei; Pasley, John

    2016-08-01

    The effects of defocusing a high intensity pulse of laser light on the generation of hot electrons in a cone are investigated using particle-in-cell simulations. The results indicate that defocused laser light can soften the electron energy spectrum and increase the coupling efficiency compared to the use of a laser in tight focus. It is shown that this is a consequence of the density profile of plasma produced by the laser prepulse, which is less dense in the case of the defocused laser. The relevance of this result to fast ignition inertial confinement fusion is discussed.

  4. A study of the scintillation light induced in liquid xenon by electrons and alpha particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aprile, Elena; Mukherjee, Reshmi; Suzuki, Masayo

    1990-01-01

    The time dependence and the intensity of the primary scintillation light in liquid Xe excited by Am-241 alpha particles and Bi-207 internal-conversion electrons were measured at different electric-field strengths. High-purity liquid Xe was used to fill a parallel-plate ionization chamber equipped with a CaF2 window coupled to a UV-sensitive photomultiplier tube. The effect of the specific ionization density on the scintillation light and the time correlation between the light signal and the charge signal is reported. It is demonstrated that the fast scintillation signal produced in liquid Xe by an ionizing particle provides an ideal trigger in a detector aiming at a complete three-dimensional event reconstruction with an excellent background rejection capability.

  5. QUANTUM CONTROL OF LIGHT: From Slow Light and FAST CARS to Nuclear γ-ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scully, Marlan

    2007-06-01

    In recent work we have demonstrated strong coherent backward wave oscillation using forward propagating fields only. This surprising result is achieved by applying laser fields to an ultra-dispersive medium with proper chosen detunings to excite a molecular vibrational coherence that corresponds to a backward propagating wave [PRL, 97, 113001 (2006)]. The physics then has much in common with propagation of ultra-slow light. Applications of coherent scattering and remote sensing to the detection of bio and chemical pathogens (e.g., anthrax) via Coherent Anti-Raman Scattering together with Femtosecond Adaptive Spectroscopic Techniques (FAST CARS [Opt. Comm., 244, 423 (2005)]) will be discussed. Furthermore, the interplay between quantum optics (Dicke super and sub-radiant states) and nuclear physics (forward scattering of γ radiation) provides interesting problems and insights into the quantum control of scattered light [PRL, 96, 010501 (2005)].

  6. Light induced particle organization in paramagnetic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacia, Marcin; Masajada, Jan; Drobczyński, Sławomir; Lamperska, Weronika; Kutrowska, Joanna; Walczak, Katarzyna

    2014-12-01

    Magnetic fluids (ferrofluids) consist of magnetic nanoparticles (diameter ~10nm) which are dispersed in a liquid, often with the use of surfactants. They were first developed by NASA to address the unique requirements of moving liquid fuel in microgravity conditions. With a help of a holographic optical tweezers, interaction of magnetic nanoparticles with strongly focused laser beam was observed. When the light intensity was high enough, magnetic nanoparticles were removed from the beam center and they formed a dark ring. Creation process lasts less than 330μs and cannot be observed precisely even with ultrafast camera. Such rings exist when the laser beam is affecting the sample and disappear (with a lifespan of 10'th second range) after the laser is switched off. Moreover, when several rings are created simultaneously, complex interactions between them can be observed. In this work, the results of our experiments will be presented with hypotheses about the physical background of such a behavior.

  7. Coherent Light induced in Optical Fiber by a Charged Particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artru, Xavier; Ray, Cédric

    2016-07-01

    Coherent light production in an optical fiber by a charged particle (named PIGL, for particle-induced guided, light) is reviewed. From the microscopic point of view, light is emitted by transient electric dipoles induced in the fiber medium by the Coulomb field of the particle. The phenomenon can also considered as the capture of virtual photons of the particle field by the fiber. Two types of captures are distinguished. Type-I takes place in a uniform part of the fiber; then the photon keeps its longitudinal momentum pz . Type-II takes place near an end or in a non-uniform part of the fiber; then pz is not conserved. Type-I PIGL is not affected by background lights external to the fiber. At grazing incidence it becomes nearly monochromatic. Its circular polarization depends on the angular momentum of the particle about the fiber and on the relative velocity between the particle and the guided wave. A general formula for the yield of Type-II radiation, based on the reciprocity theorem, is proposed. This radiation can be assisted by metallic objects stuck to the fiber, via plasmon excitation. A periodic structure leads to a guided Smith-Purcell radiation. Applications of PIGL in beam diagnostics are considered.

  8. Particle Shape Characterization of Lunar Regolith using Reflected Light Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarty, C. B.; Garcia, G. C.; Rickman, D.

    2014-12-01

    Automated identification of particles in lunar thin sections is necessary for practical measurement of particle shape, void characterization, and quantitative characterization of sediment fabric. This may be done using image analysis, but several aspects of the lunar regolith make such automations difficult. For example, many of the particles are shattered; others are aggregates of smaller particles. Sieve sizes of the particles span 5 orders of magnitude. The physical thickness of a thin section, at a nominal 30 microns, is large compared to the size of many of the particles. Image acquisition modes, such as SEM and reflected light, while superior to transmitted light, still have significant ambiguity as to the volume being sampled. It is also desirable to have a technique that is inexpensive, not resource intensive, and analytically robust. To this end, we have developed an image acquisition and processing protocol that identifies and delineates resolvable particles on the front surface of a lunar thin section using a petrographic microscope in reflected light. For a polished thin section, a grid is defined covering the entire thin section. The grid defines discrete images taken with 20% overlap, minimizing the number of particles that intersect image boundaries. In reflected light mode, two images are acquired at each grid location, with a closed aperture diaphragm. One image, A, is focused precisely on the front surface of the thin section. The second image, B, is made after the stage is brought toward the objective lens just slightly. A bright fringe line, analogous to a Becke line, appears inside all transparent particles at the front surface of the section in the second image. The added light in the bright line corresponds to a deficit around the particles. Particle identification is done using ImageJ and uses multiple steps. A hybrid 5x5 median filter is used to make images Af and Bf. This primarily removes very small particles just below the front surface

  9. Light scattering by a spheroidal particle.

    PubMed

    Asano, S; Yamamoto, G

    1975-01-01

    The solution of electromagnetic scattering by a homogeneous prolate (or oblate) spheroidal particle with an arbitrary size and refractive index is obtained for any angle of incidence by solving Maxwell's equations under given boundary conditions. The method used is that of separating the vector wave equations in the spheroidal coordinates and expanding them in terms of the spheroidal wavefunctions. The unknown coefficients for the expansion are determined by a system of equations derived from the boundary conditions regarding the continuity of tangential components of the electric and magnetic vectors across the surface of the spheroid. The solutions both in the prolate and oblate spheroidal coordinate systems result in a same form, and the equations for the oblate spheroidal system can be obtained from those for the prolate one by replacing the prolate spheroidal wavefunctions with the oblate ones and vice versa. For an oblique incidence, the polarized incident wave is resolved into two components, the TM mode for which the magnetic vector vibrates perpendicularly to the incident plane and the TE mode for which the electric vector vibrates perpendicularly to this plane. For the incidence along the rotation axis the resultant equations are given in the form similar to the one for a sphere given by the Mie theory. The physical parameters involved are the following five quantities: the size parameter defined by the product of the semifocal distance of the spheroid and the propagation constant of the incident wave, the eccentricity, the refractive index of the spheroid relative to the surrounding medium, the incident angle between the direction of the incident wave and the rotation axis, and the angles that specify the direction of the scattered wave.

  10. Morphologic tomography of nonspherical particles using multispectral diffusing light measurements

    PubMed Central

    Hajihashemi, Mohammad Reza; Li, Xiaoqi; Jiang, Huabei

    2011-01-01

    A series of phantom experiments are conducted to demonstrate the ability of a T-matrix–based inverse algorithm for tomographic recovery of morphologic characteristics of nonspherical particles embedded in heterogeneous turbid media. Diffusely scattered light at several wavelengths along the boundary of the phantom are collected and analyzed to allow for simultaneous extraction of the size, concentration, and aspect ratio of the spheroidal particles. PMID:22112119

  11. Fast neutral particle measurements in LHD and CHS

    SciTech Connect

    Ozaki, T.; Okamura, S.; Zanza, V.

    1996-12-31

    The development of high energy neutral particle measurement system for ion temperature measurements and high energy particle confinement analysis in Large Helical Device is described here. For NBIs, 180 keV hydrogen beams will be used in Phase 1 of LHD experiment schedule and 360 keV deuterium beams will be used in Phase 2. In ICRF heating experiment, the hydrogen and helium-3 will be used as minorities. It is important to observe the pitch angle distribution to investigate the confinement of high energy particles. For this purpose the neutral particle analyzer should have a wide observation energy range above the maximum energy of NBI and an ability to separate the particle species of hydrogen, deuterium and He-3. In Compact Helical System (CHS), the electrostatic neutral particle analyzer is used. They have compared the spectrum obtained from the measurement by a passive method in CHS with that from the calculation by PROCTR code.

  12. Light shaping along 3D curves and particle manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigo, José A.; Alieva, Tatiana

    2015-03-01

    We present a non-iterative holographic technique for efficient and versatile laser beam shaping along arbitrary 3D curves. Light beams with intensity shaped for several 3D curves: Tilted ring, Viviani's curve, Archimedean spiral, and trefoil-knotted curve have been experimentally generated and applied for optical trapping of micrometer-sized dielectric particles. The high intensity gradients and independent phase control prescribed along the curve make this kind of laser trap attractive for multiple particle manipulation and allow for forward and backward motion to the light source. Indeed, different configurations of tractor beam traps are experimentally demonstrated. This technique can also be applied for laser micro-machining.

  13. Exact simulation of polarized light reflectance by particle deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramezan Pour, B.; Mackowski, D. W.

    2015-12-01

    The use of polarimetric light reflection measurements as a means of identifying the physical and chemical characteristics of particulate materials obviously relies on an accurate model of predicting the effects of particle size, shape, concentration, and refractive index on polarized reflection. The research examines two methods for prediction of reflection from plane parallel layers of wavelength—sized particles. The first method is based on an exact superposition solution to Maxwell's time harmonic wave equations for a deposit of spherical particles that are exposed to a plane incident wave. We use a FORTRAN-90 implementation of this solution (the Multiple Sphere T Matrix (MSTM) code), coupled with parallel computational platforms, to directly simulate the reflection from particle layers. The second method examined is based upon the vector radiative transport equation (RTE). Mie theory is used in our RTE model to predict the extinction coefficient, albedo, and scattering phase function of the particles, and the solution of the RTE is obtained from adding—doubling method applied to a plane—parallel configuration. Our results show that the MSTM and RTE predictions of the Mueller matrix elements converge when particle volume fraction in the particle layer decreases below around five percent. At higher volume fractions the RTE can yield results that, depending on the particle size and refractive index, significantly depart from the exact predictions. The particle regimes which lead to dependent scattering effects, and the application of methods to correct the vector RTE for particle interaction, will be discussed.

  14. Measurements of Light Absorbing Particles on Tropical South American Glaciers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, C. G.; All, J.; Schwarz, J. P.; Arnott, W. P.; Warthon, J.; Andrade, M.; Celestian, A. J.; Hoffmann, D.; Cole, R. J.; Lapham, E.; Horodyskyj, U. N.; Froyd, K. D.; Liao, J.

    2014-12-01

    Glaciers in the tropical Andes have been losing mass rapidly in recent decades. In addition to the documented increase in temperature, increases in light absorbing particulates deposited on glaciers could be contributing to the observed glacier loss. Here we present results of measurements of light absorbing particles from glaciers in Peru and Bolivia. Samples have been collected by American Climber Science Program volunteers and scientists at altitudes up to 6770 meters. Collected snow samples were melted and filtered in the field. A new inexpensive technique, the Light Absorption Heating Method (LAHM) has been developed for analysis of light absorbing particles collected on filters. Results from LAHM analysis are calibrated using filters with known amounts of fullerene soot, a common industrial surrogate for black carbon (BC). For snow samples collected at the same field location LAHM analysis and measurements from the Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) instrument are well correlated (r2 = 0.92). Co-located SP2 and LAHM filter analysis suggest that BC could be the dominant absorbing component of the light absorbing particles in some areas.

  15. Modeling light scattering by mineral dust particles using spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merikallio, Sini; Nousiainen, Timo

    Suspended dust particles have a considerable influence on light scattering in both terrestrial and planetary atmospheres and can therefore have a large effect on the interpretation of remote sensing measurements. Assuming dust particles to be spherical is known to produce inaccurate results when modeling optical properties of real mineral dust particles. Yet this approximation is widely used for its simplicity. Here, we simulate light scattering by mineral dust particles using a distribution of model spheroids. This is done by comparing scattering matrices calculated from a dust optical database of Dubovik et al. [2006] with those measured in the laboratory by Volten et al. [2001]. Wavelengths of 441,6 nm and 632,8 nm and refractive indexes of Re = 1.55 -1.7 and Im = 0.001i -0.01i were adopted in this study. Overall, spheroids are found to fit the measurements significantly better than Mie spheres. Further, we confirm that the shape distribution parametrization developed in Nousiainen et al. (2006) significantly improves the accuracy of simulated single-scattering for small mineral dust particles. The spheroid scheme should therefore yield more reliable interpretations of remote sensing data from dusty planetary atmospheres. While the spheroidal scheme is superior to spheres in remote sensing applications, its performance is far from perfect especially for samples with large particles. Thus, additional advances are clearly possible. Further studies of the Martian atmosphere are currently under way. Dubovik et al. (2006) Application of spheroid models to account for aerosol particle nonspheric-ity in remote sensing of desert dust, JGR, Vol. 111, D11208 Volten et al. (2001) Scattering matrices of mineral aerosol particles at 441.6 nm and 632.8 nm, JGR, Vol. 106, No. D15, pp. 17375-17401 Nousiainen et al. (2006) Light scattering modeling of small feldspar aerosol particles using polyhedral prisms and spheroids, JQSRT 101, pp. 471-487

  16. MCNPX Monte Carlo simulations of particle transport in SiC semiconductor detectors of fast neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedlačková, K.; Zat'ko, B.; Šagátová, A.; Pavlovič, M.; Nečas, V.; Stacho, M.

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this paper was to investigate particle transport properties of a fast neutron detector based on silicon carbide. MCNPX (Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended) code was used in our study because it allows seamless particle transport, thus not only interacting neutrons can be inspected but also secondary particles can be banked for subsequent transport. Modelling of the fast-neutron response of a SiC detector was carried out for fast neutrons produced by 239Pu-Be source with the mean energy of about 4.3 MeV. Using the MCNPX code, the following quantities have been calculated: secondary particle flux densities, reaction rates of elastic/inelastic scattering and other nuclear reactions, distribution of residual ions, deposited energy and energy distribution of pulses. The values of reaction rates calculated for different types of reactions and resulting energy deposition values showed that the incident neutrons transfer part of the carried energy predominantly via elastic scattering on silicon and carbon atoms. Other fast-neutron induced reactions include inelastic scattering and nuclear reactions followed by production of α-particles and protons. Silicon and carbon recoil atoms, α-particles and protons are charged particles which contribute to the detector response. It was demonstrated that although the bare SiC material can register fast neutrons directly, its detection efficiency can be enlarged if it is covered by an appropriate conversion layer. Comparison of the simulation results with experimental data was successfully accomplished.

  17. Integrated ultrasonic particle positioning and low excitation light fluorescence imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bernassau, A. L.; Al-Rawhani, M.; Beeley, J.; Cumming, D. R. S.

    2013-12-09

    A compact hybrid system has been developed to position and detect fluorescent micro-particles by combining a Single Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD) imager with an acoustic manipulator. The detector comprises a SPAD array, light-emitting diode (LED), lenses, and optical filters. The acoustic device is formed of multiple transducers surrounding an octagonal cavity. By stimulating pairs of transducers simultaneously, an acoustic landscape is created causing fluorescent micro-particles to agglomerate into lines. The fluorescent pattern is excited by a low power LED and detected by the SPAD imager. Our technique combines particle manipulation and visualization in a compact, low power, portable setup.

  18. Teaching Conservation Laws, Symmetries and Elementary Particles with Fast Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van den Berg, Ed; Hoekzema, Dick

    2006-01-01

    Lessons about elementary particles at the secondary school level can degenerate into listing a zoo of particles and reactions, resulting in disorganized and rather meaningless knowledge. A more powerful way is to focus on conservation laws, symmetries and reaction diagrams. The conservation laws and symmetries provide generalizing power that…

  19. Warming of the Arctic Lower Stratosphere by Light Absorbing Particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgardner, D.; Raga, G. B.; Kok, G.; Anderson, B.

    2003-12-01

    Light absorption by particles such as soot and dust change the thermodynamic structure of the atmosphere and contribute to regional and global climate change. The lower stratosphere is particularly sensitive to the presence of light absorbing particles (LAP) since particles in this region can reside from months to years, in contrast to upper tropospheric lifetimes of days to weeks. The source of particles in the lower stratosphere may be aircraft, meteorites or transport from tropospheric sources. There is a serious deficiency of accurate and quantitative measurements of these particles that limits our understanding of the origin and lifetime of aerosols in this region of the atmosphere and how their presence alters radiative fluxes that lead to climate change. Here we present measurements in the Arctic lower stratosphere with a new, single particle soot photometer (SP2) that has detected black carbon (BC) mass concentrations of 20-1000 ng m-3. These concentrations are 10-1000 times larger than those reported in previous experimental studies and are at least 30 times larger than predictions based on fuel consumption by commercial aircraft. The comparison of the measurements of BC with published 3D model predictions suggests that particles transported from the troposphere are the likely source of LAP in the Arctic lower stratosphere. Radiative transfer calculations that include the presence of a layer of LAP between 9 and 12 km, indicate an increase in the localised heating of this layer by approximately 25%.

  20. An experimental study of light scattering by large, irregular particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguire, Audrey F.; Hapke, Bruce W.

    1995-01-01

    The intensity and polarization of light scattered by a variety of types of artificial partices large compared to the wavelength were measured as a function of phase angle. Shape, surface roughness, absorption coefficient, and internal scattering coefficient were varied systematically and their effects studied. Scattering by clear, smooth-surfaced spheres is in quantitative agreement with the predictions of the geometrical optics (ray theory) approximation to physical optics (Mie theory). The phase functions of almost all of the particles measured have both forward and backward scattering lobes. A two-parameter, double Henyey-Greenstein function generally provides reasonably good descriptions of the data, while keeping the number of free parameters to the minimum necessary. On a double Henyey- Greenstein parameter plot all of the particles fall into an L-shaped area of restricted size in which the location is characteristic of the particle type. Formalisms based on the equivalent slab model are also given for estimating the scattering efficiency of a large, irregular particle. For most dielectric particles the transmitted, forward scattered light is partially negatively polarized. It is this component that is respopnsible for the well-known maximum in the polarization curves of planetary regoliths at phase angles around 100 deg. For phase angles between about 30 deg and 70 deg the internally scattered light is found to be randomly polarized in the particles studied here, so that the only contribution to the second component of the Stokes vector is by Fresnel reflection from the particle surface. If this empirical result is general, measurement of the second Stokes vector of the light scattered from a regolith at these angles may provide a method of remotely measuring the mean refractive index.

  1. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Particle propagators on discrete spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Steven

    2008-10-01

    A quantum mechanical description of particle propagation on the discrete spacetime of a causal set is presented. The model involves a discrete path integral in which trajectories within the causal set are summed over to obtain a particle propagator. The sum-over-trajectories is achieved by a matrix geometric series. For causal sets generated by sprinkling points into 1+1 and 3+1 dimensional Minkowski spacetime the propagator calculated on the causal set is shown to agree, in a suitable sense, with the causal retarded propagator for the Klein Gordon equation. The particle propagator described here is a step towards quantum field theory on causal set spacetime.

  2. Warming of the Arctic lower stratosphere by light absorbing particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgardner, D.; Kok, G.; Raga, G.

    2004-03-01

    Recent measurements of light absorbing particles in the Arctic lower stratosphere show significantly higher mass concentrations of black carbon than were measured in 1992. The difference is primarily a result of measurements with a more quantitative and accurate technique than was previously used. We attribute the large amount of light absorbing material to transport from lower latitude, tropospheric sources rather than increases in aircraft emissions. The calculated heating rate in this aerosol layer, as compared to an atmosphere consisting of only gases, increases by 12% during the winter. This is a result of light absorption by the particles and could perturb the altitude of the local tropopause and affect tropospheric/stratospheric exchange processes.

  3. Slow and fast light in a phase sensitive system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Shuo; Xu, Xiwei; Xiao, Yanhong

    2013-03-01

    Using atomic motion to coherently spread light information stored in atoms provides a novel means to manipulate atom-light interactions. We demonstrate light splitting with moving atoms in a paraffin coated vapor cell, by using phase sensitive degenerate four wave mixing, or self-rotation. This scheme amplifies the beam splitter signal, and in the meantime maintains the phase coherence between the beam splitter channels. Light storage efficiency in the beam-splitting channel can be also enhanced. Such an amplified beam splitter should have applications in optical memory, optical routers and atomic coherence control.

  4. Fast pyrolysis of an ensemble of biomass particles in a fluidized bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabinovich, O. S.; Borodulya, V. A.; Vinogradov, L. M.; Korban, V. V.

    2010-09-01

    A combined approach to the modeling of fast pyrolysis of biomass particles in a fluidized bed has been used. We used models of different levels: two models of pyrolysis of a single particle — with lumped and distributed parameters — and a model of pyrolysis of an ensemble of biomass particles based on the continuum equations for the gas blown through the bed and the equations of motion for individual particles. We have determined optimal (in terms of the biofuel yield) temperatures of the process for various particle sizes of wood biomass and various values of its moisture.

  5. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Particle simulations in causal set theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philpott, L.

    2010-02-01

    Models of particle propagation in causal set theory are investigated through simulations. For the swerves model the simulations are shown to agree with the expected continuum diffusion behaviour. Given the limitations on the simulated causal set size, the agreement is far better than anticipated.

  6. Fast-switching initially-transparent liquid crystal light shutter with crossed patterned electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, Joon; Huh, Jae-Won; Yoon, Tae-Hoon

    2015-04-01

    We propose an initially transparent light shutter using polymer-networked liquid crystals with crossed patterned electrodes. The proposed light shutter is switchable between the transparent and opaque states, and it exhibits a fast response time and a low operating voltage. In the transparent state, the light shutter has high transmittance; in the opaque state, it can block the background image and provides black color. We expect that the proposed light shutter can be applied to see-through displays and smart windows.

  7. Dust particle growth in rf silane plasmas using two-dimensional multi-pass laser light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byoung Chai, Kil; Seon, C. R.; Park, S.; Choe, W.

    2009-10-01

    We measured a spatio-temporal distribution of particle size and a spatial growth rate in a capacitively coupled silane plasma using in situ multi-pass laser light scattering. The two-dimensional measurement was accomplished using a low power He-Ne laser and a set of spherical mirrors across the plasma that enables us to span multiple beam paths over the plasma region in the vertical direction from the electrode sheath to the bulk plasma. In temporal, the measurement result shows two particle growth periods in which the fast particle growth (nucleation) is followed by the slow particle growth (coagulation). In spatial, the fastest particle growth occurred at the highest vertical position that corresponds to the furthest position from the sheath. The particle coagulation modeling indicates that it is consistent with the largest proto particle creation rate in the plasma bulk.

  8. Development of a Bioaerosol single particle detector (BIO IN) for the Fast Ice Nucleus CHamber FINCH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bundke, U.; Reimann, B.; Nillius, B.; Jaenicke, R.; Bingemer, H.

    2010-02-01

    In this work we present the setup and first tests of our new BIO IN detector. This detector was constructed to classify atmospheric ice nuclei (IN) for their biological content. It is designed to be coupled to the Fast Ice Nucleus CHamber FINCH. If one particle acts as an ice nucleus, it will be at least partly covered with ice at the end of the development section of the FINCH chamber. The device combines an auto-fluorescence detector and a circular depolarization detector for simultaneous detection of biological material and discrimination between water droplets, ice crystals and non activated large aerosol particles. The excitation of biological material with UV light and analysis of auto-fluorescence is a common principle used for flow cytometry, fluorescence microscopy, spectroscopy and imaging. The detection of auto-fluorescence of airborne single particles demands some more experimental effort. However, expensive commercial sensors are available for special purposes, e.g. size distribution measurements. But these sensors will not fit the specifications needed for the FINCH IN counter (e.g. high sample flow of up 10 LPM). The newly developed -low cost- BIO IN sensor uses a single high-power UV LED for the electronic excitation instead of much more expensive UV lasers. Other key advantages of the new sensor are the low weight, compact size, and the little effect on the aerosol sample, which allows it to be coupled with other instruments for further analysis. The instrument will be flown on one of the first missions of the new German research aircraft "HALO" (High Altitude and LOng range).

  9. Measurement of inherent particle properties by dynamic light scattering: introducing electrorotational light scattering.

    PubMed Central

    Prüger, B; Eppmann, P; Donath, E; Gimsa, J

    1997-01-01

    Common dynamic light scattering (DLS) methods determine the size and zeta-potential of particles by analyzing the motion resulting from thermal noise or electrophoretic force. Dielectric particle spectroscopy by common microscopic electrorotation (ER) measures the frequency dependence of field-induced rotation of single particles to analyze their inherent dielectric structure. We propose a new technique, electrorotational light scattering (ERLS). It measures ER in a particle ensemble by a homodyne DLS setup. ER-induced particle rotation is extracted from the initial decorrelation of the intensity autocorrelation function (ACF) by a simple optical particle model. Human red blood cells were used as test particles, and changes of the characteristic frequency of membrane dispersion induced by the ionophore nystatin were monitored by ERLS. For untreated control cells, a rotation frequency of 2 s-1 was induced at the membrane peak frequency of 150 kHz and a field strength of 12 kV/m. This rotation led to a decorrelation of the ACF about 10 times steeper than that of the field free control. For deduction of ERLS frequency spectra, different criteria are discussed. Particle shape and additional field-induced motions like dielectrophoresis and particle-particle attraction do not significantly influence the criteria. For nystatin-treated cells, recalculation of dielectric cell properties revealed an ionophore-induced decrease in the internal conductivity. Although the absolute rotation speed and the rotation sense are not yet directly accessible, ERLS eliminates the tedious microscopic measurements. It offers computerized, statistically significant measurements of dielectric particle properties that are especially suitable for nonbiological applications, e.g., the study of colloidal particles. PMID:9138587

  10. Composite particle representation for light sd shell nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Collinson, D.F.

    1986-01-01

    The Composite Particle Representation is applied to light sd shell nuclei /sup 20/O, /sup 20/F and /sup 20/Ne. The energy spectrum is found to agree exactly with the shell model in all cases. The CPR theory is then used to examine the possible boson structure of sd shell wavefunctions. Only in the case of /sup 20/O are the wavefunctions found to have a high boson probability.

  11. Experimental detection of transverse particle movement with structured light.

    PubMed

    Rosales-Guzmán, Carmelo; Hermosa, Nathaniel; Belmonte, Aniceto; Torres, Juan P

    2013-10-02

    One procedure widely used to detect the velocity of a moving object is by using the Doppler effect. This is the perceived change in frequency of a wave caused by the relative motion between the emitter and the detector, or between the detector and a reflecting target. The relative movement, in turn, generates a time-varying phase which translates into the detected frequency shift. The classical longitudinal Doppler effect is sensitive only to the velocity of the target along the line-of-sight between the emitter and the detector (longitudinal velocity), since any transverse velocity generates no frequency shift. This makes the transverse velocity undetectable in the classical scheme. Although there exists a relativistic transverse Doppler effect, it gives values that are too small for the typical velocities involved in most laser remote sensing applications. Here we experimentally demonstrate a novel way to detect transverse velocities. The key concept is the use of structured light beams. These beams are unique in the sense that their phases can be engineered such that each point in its transverse plane has an associated phase value. When a particle moves across the beam, the reflected light will carry information about the particle's movement through the variation of the phase of the light that reaches the detector, producing a frequency shift associated with the movement of the particle in the transverse plane.

  12. Experimental detection of transverse particle movement with structured light.

    PubMed

    Rosales-Guzmán, Carmelo; Hermosa, Nathaniel; Belmonte, Aniceto; Torres, Juan P

    2013-01-01

    One procedure widely used to detect the velocity of a moving object is by using the Doppler effect. This is the perceived change in frequency of a wave caused by the relative motion between the emitter and the detector, or between the detector and a reflecting target. The relative movement, in turn, generates a time-varying phase which translates into the detected frequency shift. The classical longitudinal Doppler effect is sensitive only to the velocity of the target along the line-of-sight between the emitter and the detector (longitudinal velocity), since any transverse velocity generates no frequency shift. This makes the transverse velocity undetectable in the classical scheme. Although there exists a relativistic transverse Doppler effect, it gives values that are too small for the typical velocities involved in most laser remote sensing applications. Here we experimentally demonstrate a novel way to detect transverse velocities. The key concept is the use of structured light beams. These beams are unique in the sense that their phases can be engineered such that each point in its transverse plane has an associated phase value. When a particle moves across the beam, the reflected light will carry information about the particle's movement through the variation of the phase of the light that reaches the detector, producing a frequency shift associated with the movement of the particle in the transverse plane. PMID:24085150

  13. Fast excitation of geodesic acoustic mode by energetic particle beams

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Jintao; Qiu, Zhiyong; Zonca, Fulvio

    2015-12-15

    A new mechanism for geodesic acoustic mode (GAM) excitation by a not fully slowed down energetic particle (EP) beam is analyzed to explain experimental observations in Large Helical Device. It is shown that the positive velocity space gradient near the lower-energy end of the EP distribution function can strongly drive the GAM unstable. The new features of this EP-induced GAM (EGAM) are: (1) no instability threshold in the pitch angle; (2) the EGAM frequency can be higher than the local GAM frequency; and (3) the instability growth rate is much larger than that driven by a fully slowed down EP beam.

  14. Resonant Alfven wave instabilities driven by streaming fast particles

    SciTech Connect

    Zachary, A.

    1987-05-08

    A plasma simulation code is used to study the resonant interactions between streaming ions and Alfven waves. The medium which supports the Alfven waves is treated as a single, one-dimensional, ideal MHD fluid, while the ions are treated as kinetic particles. The code is used to study three ion distributions: a cold beam; a monoenergetic shell; and a drifting distribution with a power-law dependence on momentum. These distributions represent: the field-aligned beams upstream of the earth's bow shock; the diffuse ions upstream of the bow shock; and the cosmic ray distribution function near a supernova remnant shock. 92 refs., 31 figs., 12 tabs.

  15. Online submicron particle sizing by dynamic light scattering using autodilution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicoli, David F.; Elings, V. B.

    1989-01-01

    Efficient production of a wide range of commercial products based on submicron colloidal dispersions would benefit from instrumentation for online particle sizing, permitting real time monitoring and control of the particle size distribution. Recent advances in the technology of dynamic light scattering (DLS), especially improvements in algorithms for inversion of the intensity autocorrelation function, have made it ideally suited to the measurement of simple particle size distributions in the difficult submicron region. Crucial to the success of an online DSL based instrument is a simple mechanism for automatically sampling and diluting the starting concentrated sample suspension, yielding a final concentration which is optimal for the light scattering measurement. A proprietary method and apparatus was developed for performing this function, designed to be used with a DLS based particle sizing instrument. A PC/AT computer is used as a smart controller for the valves in the sampler diluter, as well as an input-output communicator, video display and data storage device. Quantitative results are presented for a latex suspension and an oil-in-water emulsion.

  16. Measurements of fast-ion transport by mode-particle resonances on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muscatello, C. M.; Grierson, B. A.; Harvey, R. W.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Pace, D. C.; Van Zeeland, M. A.

    2012-10-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities in tokamak plasmas manifest in a variety of ways, characterized by different scale lengths and mode frequencies. MHD activity can cause significant degradation of plasma performance due to transport of particles, energy and current. Among the many different types of MHD, arguably fishbones, sawteeth and Alfvén eigenmodes (AEs) are observed to cause the largest fluxes of superthermal ions. DIII-D's expansive suite of diagnostics makes it possible to rigorously characterize these instabilities and study their interaction with fast ions. This review paper first presents an overview of the recent additions to DIII-D's collection of fast-ion diagnostics. The extended diagnostic capabilities are employed in a series of experiments to investigate fast-ion dynamics in the presence of fishbones, sawteeth and AEs. Results from these seemingly unrelated studies are highlighted, and they reveal that mode-particle resonances play the central role in the observed deterioration of fast-ion confinement.

  17. Measurement of the information velocity in fast- and slow-light optical pulse propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenner, Michael David

    This thesis describes a study of the velocity of information on optical pulses propagating through fast- and slow-light media. In fast- and slow-light media, the group velocity vg is faster than the speed of light in vacuum c (vg > c or vg < 0) or slower than c (0 < vg < c) respectively. While it is largely accepted that optical pulses can travel at these extreme group velocities, the velocity of information encoded on them is still the subject of considerable debate. There are many contradictory theories describing the velocity of information on optical pulses, but no accepted techniques for its experimental measurement. The velocity of information has broad implications for the principle of relativistic causality (which requires that information travels no faster than c) and for modern communications and computation. In this thesis, a new technique for measuring the information velocity vi is described and implemented for fast- and slow-light media. The fast- and slow-light media are generated using modern dispersion-tailoring techniques that use large atomic coherences to generate strong normal and anomalous dispersion. The information velocity in these media can then be measured using information-theoretic concepts by creating an alphabet of two distinct pulse symbols and transmitting the symbols through the media. By performing a detailed statistical analysis of the received information as a function of time, it is possible to calculate vi. This new technique makes it possible for the first time to measure the velocity of information on optical pulses. Applying this technique to fast-light pulses, where vg/c = -0.051 +/- 0.002, it is found that vi /c = 0.4(+0.7--0.2). In the slow-light case, where vg/c = 0.0097 +/- 0.0003, information is found to propagate at vi/c = 0.6. In the slow-light case, the error bars are slightly more complicated. The fast bound is -0.5c (which is faster than positive values) and the slow bound is 0.2c . These results represent the

  18. O the Penetration of Fast-Charged Particles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, David John

    The work presented here is intended to provide theoretical support for medical physicists who are interested in improving radiotherapy treatment plans involving charged particle beams. These plans still rely heavily on empirical behavior rather than theory as a basis for making predictions. In the most frequent therapy applications, electron beams, typically with initial energies between 5-20 MeV, penetrate materials of low atomic number. Energy loss is predominately by ionization and the effects of multiple scattering by repeated Coulomb deflections from nuclei are of primary interest. Our development is strongly influenced by these applications and so we begin our work with a review of Fermi-Eyges theory. This theory and ideas which were equivalent to it have dramatically improved electron beam treatment plans over the last several years, as is now generally recognized. This theory also has significant limitations due to the approximations or assumptions that it makes. Since we can improve and extend these results by relaxing some of the key assumptions, we continue by considering some generalizations of this basic theory and we discuss those which were given by Snyder-Scott, Lewis and Yang in some detail. Yang's theory had significant potential for applications but this theory will not work properly unless its time development is handled differently. This leads us to present a wave solution to the penetration problem in our final chapter. Sample calculations of the most important distributions are given there as well.

  19. Fast atrazine photodegradation in water by pulsed light technology.

    PubMed

    Baranda, Ana Beatriz; Barranco, Alejandro; de Marañón, Iñigo Martínez

    2012-03-01

    Pulsed light technology consists of a successive repetition of short duration (325μs) and high power flashes emitted by xenon lamps. These flashlamps radiate a broadband emission light (approx. 200-1000 nm) with a considerable amount of light in the short-wave UV spectrum. In the present work, this technology was tested as a new tool for the degradation of the herbicide atrazine in water. To evaluate the presence and evolution with time of this herbicide, as well as the formation of derivatives, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (electrospray ionization) ion trap operating in positive mode was used. The degradation process followed first-order kinetics. Fluences about 1.8-2.3 J/cm(2) induced 50% reduction of atrazine concentration independently of its initial concentration in the range 1-1000 μg/L. Remaining concentrations of atrazine, below the current legal limit for pesticides, were achieved in a short period of time. While atrazine was degraded, no chlorinated photoproducts were formed and ten dehalogenated derivatives were detected. The molecular structures for some of these derivatives could be suggested, being hydroxyatrazine the main photoproduct identified. The different formation profiles of photoproducts suggested that the degradation pathway may include several successive and competitive steps, with subsequent degradation processes taking part from the already formed degradation products. According to the degradation efficiency, the short treatment time and the lack of chloroderivatives, this new technology could be considered as an alternative for water treatment.

  20. Energetic-particle-driven instabilities and induced fast-ion transport in a reversed field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, L.; Brower, D. L.; Ding, W. X.; Anderson, J. K.; Capecchi, W.; Eilerman, S.; Forest, C. B.; Koliner, J. J.; Nornberg, M. D.; Reusch, J.; Sarff, J. S.; Liu, D.

    2014-05-15

    Multiple bursty energetic-particle (EP) driven modes with fishbone-like structure are observed during 1 MW tangential neutral-beam injection in a reversed field pinch (RFP) device. The distinguishing features of the RFP, including large magnetic shear (tending to add stability) and weak toroidal magnetic field (leading to stronger drive), provide a complementary environment to tokamak and stellarator configurations for exploring basic understanding of EP instabilities. Detailed measurements of the EP mode characteristics and temporal-spatial dynamics reveal their influence on fast ion transport. Density fluctuations exhibit a dynamically evolving, inboard-outboard asymmetric spatial structure that peaks in the core where fast ions reside. The measured mode frequencies are close to the computed shear Alfvén frequency, a feature consistent with continuum modes destabilized by strong drive. The frequency pattern of the dominant mode depends on the fast-ion species. Multiple frequencies occur with deuterium fast ions compared to single frequency for hydrogen fast ions. Furthermore, as the safety factor (q) decreases, the toroidal mode number of the dominant EP mode transits from n=5 to n=6 while retaining the same poloidal mode number m=1. The transition occurs when the m=1, n=5 wave-particle resonance condition cannot be satisfied as the fast-ion safety factor (q{sub fi}) decreases. The fast-ion temporal dynamics, measured by a neutral particle analyzer, resemble a classical predator-prey relaxation oscillation. It contains a slow-growth phase arising from the beam fueling followed by a rapid drop when the EP modes peak, indicating that the fluctuation-induced transport maintains a stiff fast-ion density profile. The inferred transport rate is strongly enhanced with the onset of multiple EP modes.

  1. Fast particle confinement with optimized coil currents in the W7-X stellarator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drevlak, M.; Geiger, J.; Helander, P.; Turkin, Y.

    2014-07-01

    One of the principal goals of the W7-X stellarator is to demonstrate good confinement of energetic ions at finite β. This confinement, however, is sensitive to the magnetic field configuration and is thus vulnerable to design modifications of the coil geometry. The collisionless drift orbit losses for 60 keV protons in W7-X are studied using the ANTS code. Particles in this energy range will be produced by the neutral beam injection (NBI) system being constructed for W7-X, and are particularly important because protons at this energy accurately mimick the behaviour of 3.5 MeV α-particles in a HELIAS reactor. To investigate the possibility of improved fast particle confinement, several approaches to adjust the coil currents (5 main field coil currents +2 auxiliary coil currents) were explored. These strategies include simple rules of thumb as well as computational optimization of various properties of the magnetic field. It is shown that significant improvement of collisionless fast particle confinement can be achieved in W7-X for particle populations similar to α particles produced in fusion reactions. Nevertheless, the experimental goal of demonstrating confinement improvement with rising plasma pressure using an NBI-generated population appears to be difficult based on optimization of the coil currents only. The principal reason for this difficulty is that the NBI deposition profile is broader than the region of good fast-ion confinement around the magnetic axis.

  2. Light absorption properties of laboratory-generated tar ball particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffer, A.; Tóth, A.; Nyirő-Kósa, I.; Pósfai, M.; Gelencsér, A.

    2016-01-01

    Tar balls (TBs) are a specific particle type that is abundant in the global troposphere, in particular in biomass smoke plumes. These particles belong to the family of atmospheric brown carbon (BrC), which can absorb light in the visible range of the solar spectrum. Albeit TBs are typically present as individual particles in biomass smoke plumes, their absorption properties have been only indirectly inferred from field observations or calculations based on their electron energy-loss spectra. This is because in biomass smoke TBs coexist with various other particle types (e.g., organic particles with inorganic inclusions and soot, the latter emitted mainly during flaming conditions) from which they cannot be physically separated; thus, a direct experimental determination of their absorption properties is not feasible. Very recently we have demonstrated that TBs can be generated in the laboratory from droplets of wood tar that resemble atmospheric TBs in all of their observed properties. As a follow-up study, we have installed on-line instruments to our laboratory set-up, which generate pure TB particles to measure the absorption and scattering, as well as the size distribution of the particles. In addition, samples were collected for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and total carbon (TC) analysis. The effects of experimental parameters were also studied. The mass absorption coefficients of the laboratory-generated TBs were found to be in the range of 0.8-3.0 m2 g-1 at 550 nm, with absorption Ångström exponents (AAE) between 2.7 and 3.4 (average 2.9) in the wavelength range 467-652 nm. The refractive index of TBs as derived from Mie calculations was about 1.84 - 0.21i at 550 nm. In the brown carbon continuum, these values fall closer to those of soot than to other light-absorbing species such as humic-like substances (HULIS). Considering the abundance of TBs in biomass smoke and the global magnitude of biomass burning emissions, these findings may have

  3. Significant Attenuation of Lightly Damped Resonances Using Particle Dampers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Andrew; LaVerde, Bruce; Hunt, Ron; Knight, Joseph Brent

    2015-01-01

    When equipment designs must perform in a broad band vibration environment it can be difficult to avoid resonances that affect life and performance. This is especially true when an organization seeks to employ an asset from a heritage design in a new, more demanding vibration environment. Particle dampers may be used to provide significant attenuation of lightly damped resonances to assist with such a deployment of assets by including only a very minor set of modifications. This solution may be easier to implement than more traditional attenuation schemes. Furthermore, the cost in additional weight to the equipment can be very small. Complexity may also be kept to a minimum, because the particle dampers do not require tuning. Attenuating the vibratory response with particle dampers may therefore be simpler (in a set it and forget it kind of way) than tuned mass dampers. The paper will illustrate the use of an "equivalent resonance test jig" that can assist designers in verifying the potential resonance attenuation that may be available to them during the early trade stages of the design. An approach is suggested for transforming observed attenuation in the jig to estimated performance in the actual service design. KEY WORDS: Particle Damper, Performance in Vibration Environment, Damping, Resonance, Attenuation, Mitigation of Vibration Response, Response Estimate, Response Verification.

  4. Light scattering by lunar-like particle size distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goguen, Jay D.

    1991-01-01

    A fundamental input to models of light scattering from planetary regoliths is the mean phase function of the regolith particles. Using the known size distribution for typical lunar soils, the mean phase function and mean linear polarization for a regolith volume element of spherical particles of any composition were calculated from Mie theory. The two contour plots given here summarize the changes in the mean phase function and linear polarization with changes in the real part of the complex index of refraction, n - ik, for k equals 0.01, the visible wavelength 0.55 micrometers, and the particle size distribution of the typical mature lunar soil 72141. A second figure is a similar index-phase surface, except with k equals 0.1. The index-phase surfaces from this survey are a first order description of scattering by lunar-like regoliths of spherical particles of arbitrary composition. They form the basis of functions that span a large range of parameter-space.

  5. Debye series for light scattering by a coated nonspherical particle

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Feng; Lock, James A.

    2010-06-15

    By using the extended boundary condition method, the Debye series is developed for light scattered by a coated nonspherical particle in order to interpret the angular dependence of the scattered intensity in terms of various physical processes. Numerical calculations are performed to study the influence of the coating thickness and the ellipticity of a coated spheroid on the angular position of the {alpha} and {beta} primary rainbows, which are produced by partial waves experiencing one internal reflection. The hyperbolic umbilic focal section is demonstrated and is analyzed for both the {alpha} and the {beta} rainbows.

  6. Debye series for light scattering by a coated nonspherical particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Feng; Lock, James A.

    2010-06-01

    By using the extended boundary condition method, the Debye series is developed for light scattered by a coated nonspherical particle in order to interpret the angular dependence of the scattered intensity in terms of various physical processes. Numerical calculations are performed to study the influence of the coating thickness and the ellipticity of a coated spheroid on the angular position of the α and β primary rainbows, which are produced by partial waves experiencing one internal reflection. The hyperbolic umbilic focal section is demonstrated and is analyzed for both the α and the β rainbows.

  7. An analysis of the influence of impurities on fast particle attenuation and on fast ion spectral shape in LHD

    SciTech Connect

    Veshchev, Evgeny A.; Goncharov, Pavel R.; Ozaki, Tetsuo; Sudo, Shigeru

    2008-10-15

    Neutral particle fluxes measured by neutral particle analyzers can provide information about the ion temperature as well as the non-Maxwellian anisotropic ion distribution tails from neutral beam injection and ion cyclotron radio frequency heating. In the case of multidirectional diagnostics employing high resolution atomic energy spectrometers, the neutral atomic flux source is not localized in contrast to pellet charge exchange or diagnostic neutral beam methods. The correct interpretation of such measurements from plasma in a complex toroidally asymmetric geometry, like that of LHD, requires careful numerical modeling of the neutral flux formation. Previously a measured neutral flux calculation scheme was developed and was used for the LHD geometry and a suitable analytic expression for ionization cross sections {sigma}{sub s}{sup (z)}(E,n{sub e},T{sub e},Z{sub eff}) of impurities was formulated by Janev et al. [Nucl. Fusion 29, 2125 (1989)]. In this paper, the attenuation of fast particles by impurities is incorporated into the neutral flux calculation scheme and the influence of impurities on the calculated neutral flux spectra is shown. Finally, the behavior of the calculated and experimental suprathermal particle distributions is compared for pure hydrogen and for argon impurity seeded plasmas.

  8. An analysis of the influence of impurities on fast particle attenuation and on fast ion spectral shape in LHD.

    PubMed

    Veshchev, Evgeny A; Goncharov, Pavel R; Ozaki, Tetsuo; Sudo, Shigeru

    2008-10-01

    Neutral particle fluxes measured by neutral particle analyzers can provide information about the ion temperature as well as the non-Maxwellian anisotropic ion distribution tails from neutral beam injection and ion cyclotron radio frequency heating. In the case of multidirectional diagnostics employing high resolution atomic energy spectrometers, the neutral atomic flux source is not localized in contrast to pellet charge exchange or diagnostic neutral beam methods. The correct interpretation of such measurements from plasma in a complex toroidally asymmetric geometry, like that of LHD, requires careful numerical modeling of the neutral flux formation. Previously a measured neutral flux calculation scheme was developed and was used for the LHD geometry and a suitable analytic expression for ionization cross sections sigma(s)(z)(E,n(e),T(e),Z(eff)) of impurities was formulated by Janev et al. [Nucl. Fusion 29, 2125 (1989)]. In this paper, the attenuation of fast particles by impurities is incorporated into the neutral flux calculation scheme and the influence of impurities on the calculated neutral flux spectra is shown. Finally, the behavior of the calculated and experimental suprathermal particle distributions is compared for pure hydrogen and for argon impurity seeded plasmas.

  9. The relative contribution of fast and slow sinking particles to ocean carbon export

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, J. S.; Sanders, R.; Marsay, C.; Le Moigne, F. A. C.; Achterberg, E. P.; Poulton, A. J.

    2012-03-01

    Particulate organic carbon (POC) generated by primary production and exported to depth, is an important pathway for carbon transfer to the abyss, where it is stored over climatically significant timescales. These processes constitute the biological carbon pump. A spectrum of particulate sinking velocities exists throughout the water column, however numerical models often simplify this spectrum into suspended, fast and slow sinking particles. Observational studies suggest the spectrum of sinking speeds in the ocean is strongly bimodal with >85% POC flux contained within two pools with sinking speeds of <10 m day-1 and >350 m day-1. We deployed a Marine Snow Catcher (MSC) to estimate the magnitudes of the suspended, fast and slow sinking pools and their fluxes at the Porcupine Abyssal Plain site (48°N, 16.5°W) in summer 2009. The POC concentrations and fluxes determined were 0.2 μg C L-1 and 54 mg C m-2 day-1 for fast sinking particles, 5 μg C L-1 and 92 mg C m-2 day-1 for slow sinking particles and 97 μg C L-1 for suspended particles. Our flux estimates were comparable with radiochemical tracer methods and neutrally buoyant sediment traps. Our observations imply: (1) biomineralising protists, on occasion, act as nucleation points for aggregate formation and accelerate particle sinking; (2) fast sinking particles alone were sufficient to explain the abyssal POC flux; and (3) there is no evidence for ballasting of the slow sinking flux and the slow sinking particles were probably entirely remineralised in the twilight zone.

  10. Improvement of Light Fastness Properties of Dyed Jute Fabrics Through Pretreatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahidullah, Md.; Rabiul Islam, Md.; Alamgir Sayeed, M. M.; Kamal Uddin, Md.; Abdullah, A. B. M.

    The chemical treatments such as desizing, scouring, caustic soda mercerization, ammonia mercerization at -33°C and bleaching were carried out on jute fabrics. Then dyeing was done with various reactive dyes applying by standard procedure to investigate the change in different properties like light fastness, moisture regain and nitrogen content has been done on undyed and dyed jute products. It was observed that the moisture regain percentage of the jute fabrics increased after different treatments and the moisture regain percentage of dyed fabrics decreased in all the cases. The nitrogen content percentage of the ammonia treated and dyed fabrics were higher than other treated and undyed jute fabrics. Therefore light fastness properties of the ammonia treated and dyed fabrics will be adequate. So, it can be concluded that anhydrous liquid ammonia (-33°C) treatment improves light fastness properties of dyed jute fabrics for the diversification of jute for value addition.

  11. DNA-Based Sensor Particles Enable Measuring Light Intensity in Single Cells.

    PubMed

    Mikutis, Gediminas; Mora, Carlos A; Puddu, Michela; Paunescu, Daniela; Grass, Robert N; Stark, Wendelin J

    2016-04-13

    "Lab on a particle" architecture is employed in designing a light nanosensor. Light-sensitive protecting groups are installed on DNA, which is encapsulated in silica particles, qualifying as a self-sufficient light sensor. The nanosensors allow measuring light intensity and duration in very small volumes, such as single cells, and store the irradiation information until readout.

  12. Fast time-domain balanced homodyne detection of light.

    PubMed

    Haderka, Ondrej; Michálek, Václav; Urbásek, Vladimir; Jezek, Miroslav

    2009-05-20

    A balanced homodyne detection scheme with nanosecond time resolution and sub-shot-noise sensitivity has been developed and successfully tested yielding an efficient detection scheme for high-speed quantum-optical measurements and communication protocols, for example, quantum cryptography. The parameters of the detector and its precise balancing allow complete characterization of quantum states created by femtosecond light pulses that include the measurement of photon number, optical phase, and statistical properties with a high signal-to-noise ratio for the whole bandwidth from DC to several tens of megahertz. The electronic part of the detector is based on a commercially available amplifier that provides ease of construction and use while yielding good performance. PMID:19458739

  13. Nonthermal nuclear reactions induced by fast α particles in the solar core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronchev, Victor T.

    2015-02-01

    Nonthermal nuclear effects triggered in the solar carbon-nitrogen-oxygen (CNO) cycle by fast α particles—products of the p p chain reactions—are examined. The main attention is paid to 8.674-MeV α particles generated in the 7Li(p ,α ) α reaction. Nonthermal characteristics of these α particles and their influence on some nuclear processes are determined. It is found that the α -particle effective temperature is at a level of 1.1 MeV and exceeds the solar core temperature by 3 orders of magnitude. These fast particles are able to significantly enhance some endoergic (α ,p ) reactions neglected in standard solar model calculations. In particular, they can substantially affect the balance of the p +17O⇄α +14N reactions due to an appreciable increase of the reverse reaction rate. It is shown that in the region R =0.08 -0.25 R⊙ the reverse α +14N reaction can block the forward p +17O reaction, thus preventing closing of the CNO-II cycle, and increase the 17O abundance by a factor of 2-155 depending on R . This indicates that the fast α particles produced in the p p cycle can distort running of the CNO cycle, making it essentially different in the inner and outer core regions.

  14. Light-induced electronic non-equilibrium in plasmonic particles.

    PubMed

    Kornbluth, Mordechai; Nitzan, Abraham; Seideman, Tamar

    2013-05-01

    We consider the transient non-equilibrium electronic distribution that is created in a metal nanoparticle upon plasmon excitation. Following light absorption, the created plasmons decohere within a few femtoseconds, producing uncorrelated electron-hole pairs. The corresponding non-thermal electronic distribution evolves in response to the photo-exciting pulse and to subsequent relaxation processes. First, on the femtosecond timescale, the electronic subsystem relaxes to a Fermi-Dirac distribution characterized by an electronic temperature. Next, within picoseconds, thermalization with the underlying lattice phonons leads to a hot particle in internal equilibrium that subsequently equilibrates with the environment. Here we focus on the early stage of this multistep relaxation process, and on the properties of the ensuing non-equilibrium electronic distribution. We consider the form of this distribution as derived from the balance between the optical absorption and the subsequent relaxation processes, and discuss its implication for (a) heating of illuminated plasmonic particles, (b) the possibility to optically induce current in junctions, and (c) the prospect for experimental observation of such light-driven transport phenomena. PMID:23656152

  15. Particle sizing by weighted measurements of scattered light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchele, Donald R.

    1988-01-01

    A description is given of a measurement method, applicable to a poly-dispersion of particles, in which the intensity of scattered light at any angle is weighted by a factor proportional to that angle. Determination is then made of four angles at which the weighted intensity is four fractions of the maximum intensity. These yield four characteristic diameters, i.e., the diameters of the volume/area mean (D sub 32 the Sauter mean) and the volume/diameter mean (D sub 31); the diameters at cumulative volume fractions of 0.5 (D sub v0.5 the volume median) and 0.75 (D sub v0.75). They also yield the volume dispersion of diameters. Mie scattering computations show that an average diameter less than three micrometers cannot be accurately measured. The results are relatively insensitive to extraneous background light and to the nature of the diameter distribution. Also described is an experimental method of verifying the conclusions by using two microscopic slides coated with polystyrene microspheres to simulate the particles and the background.

  16. Light Particle Solution to the Cosmic Lithium Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goudelis, Andreas; Pospelov, Maxim; Pradler, Josef

    2016-05-01

    We point out that the cosmological abundance of 7Li can be reduced down to observed values if during its formation, big bang nucleosynthesis is modified by the presence of light electrically neutral particles X that have substantial interactions with nucleons. We find that the lithium problem can be solved without affecting the precisely measured abundances of deuterium and helium if the following conditions are satisfied: the mass (energy) and lifetimes of such particles are bounded by 1.6 MeV ≤mX(EX)≤20 MeV and few 100 s ≲τX≲104 s , and the abundance times the absorption cross section by either deuterium or 7Be are comparable to the Hubble rate, nXσabsv ˜H , at the time of 7Be formation. We include X -initiated reactions into the primordial nucleosynthesis framework, observe that it leads to a substantial reduction of the freeze-out abundances of 7Li + 7Be, and find specific model realizations of this scenario. Concentrating on the axionlike-particle case, X =a , we show that all these conditions can be satisfied if the coupling to d quarks is in the range of fd-1˜TeV-1 , which can be probed at intensity frontier experiments.

  17. Light Particle Solution to the Cosmic Lithium Problem.

    PubMed

    Goudelis, Andreas; Pospelov, Maxim; Pradler, Josef

    2016-05-27

    We point out that the cosmological abundance of ^{7}Li can be reduced down to observed values if during its formation, big bang nucleosynthesis is modified by the presence of light electrically neutral particles X that have substantial interactions with nucleons. We find that the lithium problem can be solved without affecting the precisely measured abundances of deuterium and helium if the following conditions are satisfied: the mass (energy) and lifetimes of such particles are bounded by 1.6  MeV≤m_{X}(E_{X})≤20  MeV and few100s≲τ_{X}≲10^{4}  s, and the abundance times the absorption cross section by either deuterium or ^{7}Be are comparable to the Hubble rate, n_{X}σ_{abs}v∼H, at the time of ^{7}Be formation. We include X-initiated reactions into the primordial nucleosynthesis framework, observe that it leads to a substantial reduction of the freeze-out abundances of ^{7}Li+^{7}Be, and find specific model realizations of this scenario. Concentrating on the axionlike-particle case, X=a, we show that all these conditions can be satisfied if the coupling to d quarks is in the range of f_{d}^{-1}∼TeV^{-1}, which can be probed at intensity frontier experiments. PMID:27284644

  18. Particle size distributions from laboratory-scale biomass fires using fast response instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, S.; Qi, L.; Cocker, D.; Weise, D.; Miller, A.; Shrivastava, M.; Miller, W.; Mahalingam, S.; Princevac, M.; Jung, H.

    2010-04-01

    Particle size distribution from biomass combustion is an important parameter as it affects air quality, climate modelling and health effects. To date particle size distributions reported from prior studies vary not only due to difference in fuels but also difference in experimental conditions. This study aims to report characteristics of particle size distribution in a well controlled repeatable lab scale biomass fires for southwestern US fuels. The combustion facility at the USDA Forest Service's Fire Science Laboratory (FSL), Missoula, MT provided repeatable combustion and dilution environment ideal for particle size distribution study. For a variety of fuels tested the major mode of particle size distribution was in the range of 29 to 52 nm, which was attributable to dilution of the fresh smoke. Comparing volume size distribution from Fast Mobility Particle Sizer (FMPS) and Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (APS) measurements, ~30% of particle volume was attributable to the particles ranging from 0.5 to 10 μm for PM10. Geometric mean diameter rapidly increased during flaming and gradually decreased during mixed and smoldering phase combustion. Most of fuels gave unimodal distribution during flaming phase and strong biomodal distribution during smoldering phase. The mode of combustion (flaming, mixed and smoldering) could be better distinguished using slopes in Modified Combustion Efficiency (MCE) vs. geometric mean diameter from each mode of combustion than only using MCE values.

  19. Fast visible light photoelectric switch based on ultralong single crystalline V₂O₅ nanobelt.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jianing; Hu, Ming; Tian, Ye; Guo, Chuanfei; Wang, Chuang; Guo, Shengming; Liu, Qian

    2012-03-26

    A photoelectric switch with fast response to visible light (<200 μs), suitable photosensitivity and excellent repeatability is proposed based on the ultralong single crystalline V₂O₅ nanobelt, which are synthesized by chemical vapor deposition and its photoconductive mechanism can well be explained by small polaron hopping theory. Our results reveal that the switch has a great potential in next generation photodetectors and light-wave communications.

  20. Energetic-particle-driven instabilities and induced fast-ion transport in a reversed field pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Liang

    2013-10-01

    Multiple bursty energetic-particle (EP) modes with fishbone-like structures are observed during 1 MW tangential neutral-beam injection into MST reversed field pinch (RFP) plasmas. The distinguishing features of the RFP, including large magnetic shear (tending to add stability) and weak toroidal magnetic field (leading to large fast ion beta and stronger drive), provide a complementary environment to tokamak and stellarator configurations for exploring basic understanding of these instabilities. Detailed measurements of the EP mode characteristics and temporal-spatial dynamics reveal their influence on fast ion transport and interaction with global tearing modes. Internal magnetic field fluctuations associated with the EP modes are directly observed for the first time by Faraday-effect polarimetry (frequency ~ 90 kHz and amplitude ~ 2 G). Simultaneously measured density fluctuations exhibit a dynamically evolving and asymmetric spatial structure that peaks near the core where fast ions reside and shifts outward as the instability evolves. Furthermore, the EP mode frequencies appear at ~k∥VA , consistent with continuum modes destabilized by strong drive. The fast-ion temporal dynamics, measured by a neutral particle analyzer, resemble a classical predator-prey relaxation oscillation. It contains a slow-growing phase arising from the beam fueling followed by a rapid drop (~ 15 %) when the EP modes peak, indicating the fluctuation-induced transport maintains a stiff fast-ion density profile. The inferred transport rate is strongly enhanced (× 2) with the onset of multiple nonlinearly-interacting EP modes. The fast ions also impact global tearing modes, reducing their amplitudes by up to 65%. This mode reduction is lessened following the EP-bursts, further evidence for fast ion redistribution that weakens the suppression mechanism. Possible tearing mode suppression mechanisms will be discussed. Work supported by US DoE.

  1. [Particle Size and Number Density Online Analysis for Particle Suspension with Polarization-Differentiation Elastic Light Scattering Spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-kang; Fang, Hui

    2016-03-01

    The basic principle of polarization-differentiation elastic light scattering spectroscopy based techniques is that under the linear polarized light incidence, the singlely scattered light from the superficial biological tissue and diffusively scattered light from the deep tissue can be separated according to the difference of polarization characteristics. The novel point of the paper is to apply this method to the detection of particle suspension and, to realize the simultaneous measurement of its particle size and number density in its natural status. We design and build a coaxial cage optical system, and measure the backscatter signal at a specified angle from a polystyrene microsphere suspension. By controlling the polarization direction of incident light with a linear polarizer and adjusting the polarization direction of collected light with another linear polarizer, we obtain the parallel polarized elastic light scattering spectrum and cross polarized elastic light scattering spectrum. The difference between the two is the differential polarized elastic light scattering spectrum which include only the single scattering information of the particles. We thus compare this spectrum to the Mie scattering calculation and extract the particle size. We then also analyze the cross polarized elastic light scattering spectrum by applying the particle size already extracted. The analysis is based on the approximate expressions taking account of light diffusing, from which we are able to obtain the number density of the particle suspension. We compare our experimental outcomes with the manufacturer-provided values and further analyze the influence of the particle diameter standard deviation on the number density extraction, by which we finally verify the experimental method. The potential applications of the method include the on-line particle quality monitoring for particle manufacture as well as the fat and protein density detection of milk products.

  2. [Particle Size and Number Density Online Analysis for Particle Suspension with Polarization-Differentiation Elastic Light Scattering Spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-kang; Fang, Hui

    2016-03-01

    The basic principle of polarization-differentiation elastic light scattering spectroscopy based techniques is that under the linear polarized light incidence, the singlely scattered light from the superficial biological tissue and diffusively scattered light from the deep tissue can be separated according to the difference of polarization characteristics. The novel point of the paper is to apply this method to the detection of particle suspension and, to realize the simultaneous measurement of its particle size and number density in its natural status. We design and build a coaxial cage optical system, and measure the backscatter signal at a specified angle from a polystyrene microsphere suspension. By controlling the polarization direction of incident light with a linear polarizer and adjusting the polarization direction of collected light with another linear polarizer, we obtain the parallel polarized elastic light scattering spectrum and cross polarized elastic light scattering spectrum. The difference between the two is the differential polarized elastic light scattering spectrum which include only the single scattering information of the particles. We thus compare this spectrum to the Mie scattering calculation and extract the particle size. We then also analyze the cross polarized elastic light scattering spectrum by applying the particle size already extracted. The analysis is based on the approximate expressions taking account of light diffusing, from which we are able to obtain the number density of the particle suspension. We compare our experimental outcomes with the manufacturer-provided values and further analyze the influence of the particle diameter standard deviation on the number density extraction, by which we finally verify the experimental method. The potential applications of the method include the on-line particle quality monitoring for particle manufacture as well as the fat and protein density detection of milk products. PMID:27400522

  3. Daily Rhythms of Serum Lipids in Dogs: Influences of Lighting and Fasting Cycles

    PubMed Central

    Bertolucci, Cristiano; Fazio, Francesco; Piccione, Giuseppe

    2008-01-01

    Circadian clocks organize a wide array of metabolic functions in a coherent daily schedule and ensure synchrony of this schedule with environmental rhythms. Daily rhythmicity of lipid metabolism occurs in rodents and ruminants. We examined daily level variations of serum lipids (nonesterified fatty acids [NEFA], triglycerides, phospholipids, total cholesterol and total lipids) in healthy dogs, particularly focusing on their temporal relationship to lighting and fasting cycles. Whereas serum NEFA levels did not change across the day, levels of total lipids, total cholesterol, phospholipids, and triglycerides occurred in dogs maintained under 12:12-h light:dark cycles and fed a single meal daily. Only the rhythmic pattern of triglycerides responded to a 6 h delay in light onset, suggesting a cardinal role of a light-entrained circadian oscillator in its generation. To investigate whether temporal variations in serum lipids depend to physiological postprandial changes, we measured lipid levels in fasted dogs. Rhythms of total lipids, total cholesterol, phospholipids, and triglycerides vanished when dogs were food-deprived, indicating that these rhythms are driven by the digestive process. Levels of serum NEFA patterns were significantly higher during fasting than after food intake. The increase of NEFA concentrations during fasting may reflect the mobilization of adipose tissue NEFA mediated by the decrease in insulin with its lypolitic effects. Elucidating the daily rhythmicity of lipid levels is fundamental to understanding the metabolism of the dog, an animal model frequently used for research in metabolic pathophysiology. PMID:19004375

  4. Electronic and structural response of materials to fast intense laser pulses, including light-induced superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Roland E.

    2016-06-01

    This is a very brief discussion of some experimental and theoretical studies of materials responding to fast intense laser pulses, with emphasis on those cases where the electronic response and structural response are both potentially important (and ordinarily coupled). Examples are nonthermal insulator-to-metal transitions and light-induced superconductivity in cuprates, fullerenes, and an organic Mott insulator.

  5. A source-independent empirical correction procedure for the fast mobility and engine exhaust particle sizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, Naomi; Jeong, Cheol-Heon; Wang, Jonathan M.; Ramos, Manuel; Wallace, James S.; Evans, Greg J.

    2015-01-01

    The TSI Fast Mobility Particle Sizer (FMPS) and Engine Exhaust Particle Sizer (EEPS) provide size distributions for 6-560 nm particles with a time resolution suitable for characterizing transient particle sources; however, the accuracy of these instruments can be source dependent, due to influences of particle morphology. The aim of this study was to develop a source-independent correction protocol for the FMPS and EEPS. The correction protocol consists of: (1) broadening the >80 nm size range of the distribution to account for under-sizing by the FMPS and EEPS; (2) applying an existing correction protocol in the 8-93 nm size range; and (3) dividing each size bin by the ratio of total concentration measured by the FMPS or EEPS and a water-based Condensation Particle Counter (CPC) as a surrogate scaling factor to account for particle morphology. Efficacy of the correction protocol was assessed for three sources: urban ambient air, diluted gasoline direct injection engine exhaust, and diluted diesel engine exhaust. Linear regression against a reference instrument, the Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS), before and after applying the correction protocol demonstrated that the correction ensured agreement within 20%.

  6. Impacts of fast meteoroids and the separation of dust particles from the surface of the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popel, S. I.; Golub', A. P.; Lisin, E. A.; Izvekova, Yu. N.; Atamaniuk, B.; Dol'nikov, G. G.; Zakharov, A. V.; Zelenyi, L. M.

    2016-05-01

    The possibility of the separation of dust particles owing to impacts of micrometeoroids on the surface of the Moon has been discussed. It has been shown that this effect is significant and should be taken into account when determining the number of particles rising over the surface of the Moon at the formation of a plasma-dust system. The average number of regolith particles leaving the surface of the Moon owing to the impacts of fast meteoroids has been determined for various altitudes over the Moon. The size distribution function of particles leaving the surface of the Moon because of impacts of meteoroids has been determined. It has been shown that impacts of meteoroids constitute an important source of dust microparticles in the plasma-dust system over the surface of the Moon.

  7. The linac coherent light source single particle imaging road map

    PubMed Central

    Aquila, A.; Barty, A.; Bostedt, C.; Boutet, S.; Carini, G.; dePonte, D.; Drell, P.; Doniach, S.; Downing, K. H.; Earnest, T.; Elmlund, H.; Elser, V.; Gühr, M.; Hajdu, J.; Hastings, J.; Hau-Riege, S. P.; Huang, Z.; Lattman, E. E.; Maia, F. R. N. C.; Marchesini, S.; Ourmazd, A.; Pellegrini, C.; Santra, R.; Schlichting, I.; Schroer, C.; Spence, J. C. H.; Vartanyants, I. A.; Wakatsuki, S.; Weis, W. I.; Williams, G. J.

    2015-01-01

    Intense femtosecond x-ray pulses from free-electron laser sources allow the imaging of individual particles in a single shot. Early experiments at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) have led to rapid progress in the field and, so far, coherent diffractive images have been recorded from biological specimens, aerosols, and quantum systems with a few-tens-of-nanometers resolution. In March 2014, LCLS held a workshop to discuss the scientific and technical challenges for reaching the ultimate goal of atomic resolution with single-shot coherent diffractive imaging. This paper summarizes the workshop findings and presents the roadmap toward reaching atomic resolution, 3D imaging at free-electron laser sources. PMID:26798801

  8. Performance of Advanced Light Source particle beam diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkson, J.

    1993-05-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS), a third-generation synchrotron radiation facility, is complete. The particle beam diagnostics have been installed and tested. The beam injection systems have been running for two years. We have performance data on beam position monitors, beam intensity monitors, scintillators, beam collimators, a 50 {Omega} Faraday cup, and broad-band striplines and kickers used in the linac, transport lines, and the booster synchrotron. The single-turn monitoring capability of the booster beam position monitoring system has been particularly useful for studying beam dynamics. Beam diagnostics for the storage ring are being commissioned. In this paper we describe each instrument, show its performance, and outline how the instruments are controlled and their output data displayed.

  9. The linac coherent light source single particle imaging road map

    SciTech Connect

    Aquila, A.; Barty, A.; Bostedt, C.; Boutet, S.; Carini, G.; dePonte, D.; Drell, P.; Doniach, S.; Downing, K. H.; Earnest, T.; Elmlund, H.; Elser, V.; Gühr, M.; Hajdu, J.; Hastings, J.; Hau-Riege, S. P.; Huang, Z.; Lattman, E. E.; Maia, F. R.N.C.; Marchesini, S.; Ourmazd, A.; Pellegrini, C.; Schlichting, I.; Schroer, C.; Spence, J. C. H.; Vartanyants, I. A.; Wakatsuki, S.; Weis, W. I.; Williams, G. J.

    2015-07-01

    Intense femtosecond x-ray pulses from free-electron laser sources allow the imaging of individual particles in a single shot. Early experiments at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) have led to rapid progress in the field and, so far, coherent diffractive images have been recorded from biological specimens, aerosols, and quantum systems with a few-tens-of-nanometers resolution. In March 2014, LCLS held a workshop to discuss the scientific and technical challenges for reaching the ultimate goal of atomic resolution with single-shot coherent diffractive imaging. This paper summarizes the workshop findings and presents the roadmap toward reaching atomic resolution, 3D imaging at free-electron laser sources.

  10. The linac coherent light source single particle imaging road map

    DOE PAGES

    Aquila, A.; Barty, A.; Bostedt, C.; Boutet, S.; Carini, G.; dePonte, D.; Drell, P.; Doniach, S.; Downing, K. H.; Earnest, T.; et al

    2015-07-01

    Intense femtosecond x-ray pulses from free-electron laser sources allow the imaging of individual particles in a single shot. Early experiments at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) have led to rapid progress in the field and, so far, coherent diffractive images have been recorded from biological specimens, aerosols, and quantum systems with a few-tens-of-nanometers resolution. In March 2014, LCLS held a workshop to discuss the scientific and technical challenges for reaching the ultimate goal of atomic resolution with single-shot coherent diffractive imaging. This paper summarizes the workshop findings and presents the roadmap toward reaching atomic resolution, 3D imaging at free-electronmore » laser sources.« less

  11. The linac coherent light source single particle imaging road map.

    PubMed

    Aquila, A; Barty, A; Bostedt, C; Boutet, S; Carini, G; dePonte, D; Drell, P; Doniach, S; Downing, K H; Earnest, T; Elmlund, H; Elser, V; Gühr, M; Hajdu, J; Hastings, J; Hau-Riege, S P; Huang, Z; Lattman, E E; Maia, F R N C; Marchesini, S; Ourmazd, A; Pellegrini, C; Santra, R; Schlichting, I; Schroer, C; Spence, J C H; Vartanyants, I A; Wakatsuki, S; Weis, W I; Williams, G J

    2015-07-01

    Intense femtosecond x-ray pulses from free-electron laser sources allow the imaging of individual particles in a single shot. Early experiments at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) have led to rapid progress in the field and, so far, coherent diffractive images have been recorded from biological specimens, aerosols, and quantum systems with a few-tens-of-nanometers resolution. In March 2014, LCLS held a workshop to discuss the scientific and technical challenges for reaching the ultimate goal of atomic resolution with single-shot coherent diffractive imaging. This paper summarizes the workshop findings and presents the roadmap toward reaching atomic resolution, 3D imaging at free-electron laser sources.

  12. The linac coherent light source single particle imaging road map.

    PubMed

    Aquila, A; Barty, A; Bostedt, C; Boutet, S; Carini, G; dePonte, D; Drell, P; Doniach, S; Downing, K H; Earnest, T; Elmlund, H; Elser, V; Gühr, M; Hajdu, J; Hastings, J; Hau-Riege, S P; Huang, Z; Lattman, E E; Maia, F R N C; Marchesini, S; Ourmazd, A; Pellegrini, C; Santra, R; Schlichting, I; Schroer, C; Spence, J C H; Vartanyants, I A; Wakatsuki, S; Weis, W I; Williams, G J

    2015-07-01

    Intense femtosecond x-ray pulses from free-electron laser sources allow the imaging of individual particles in a single shot. Early experiments at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) have led to rapid progress in the field and, so far, coherent diffractive images have been recorded from biological specimens, aerosols, and quantum systems with a few-tens-of-nanometers resolution. In March 2014, LCLS held a workshop to discuss the scientific and technical challenges for reaching the ultimate goal of atomic resolution with single-shot coherent diffractive imaging. This paper summarizes the workshop findings and presents the roadmap toward reaching atomic resolution, 3D imaging at free-electron laser sources. PMID:26798801

  13. Observation and interpretation of fast sub-visual light pulses from the night sky

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemzek, R. J.; Winckler, J. R.

    1989-01-01

    Fast large-aperture photometers directed at the zenith on clear nights near Minneapolis have recorded many light pulses in the msec time range, but aside from man-made events these were almost entirely due to Rayleigh-scattered distant lightning, with a residual very low rate (less than 0.1/hr) of unidentified pulses. It is argued that 1-msec light pulses seen in several previous experiments may also be mostly Rayleigh-scattered lightning, rather than fluorescent light due to electron precipitation from lightning-induced whistlers as previously proposed.

  14. Solar Energetic Particle Production by Shocks in Fast and Slow Solar Wind Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahler, S. W.; Reames, D. V.; Sheeley, N. R., Jr.

    2002-05-01

    Gradual solar energetic particle (SEP) events at 1 AU are produced by coronal and interplanetary shocks driven by coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Shocks from fast (V > 900 km/s) CMEs should be produced more easily in slow solar wind regions where the flow and fast-mode MHD wave speeds are low and less easily in fast solar wind regions where those speeds are high. We might therefore expect to observe more intense SEP events at 1 AU when the Earth lies in a slow wind region than when it lies in a fast wind region. While stream-stream interactions wash out the slow-fast stream boundaries in the solar wind speed profiles at 1 AU, the O+7/O+6 signatures of the streams are unchanged at 1 AU. We use the 20 MeV proton intensities from the EPACT instrument on Wind, the associated CMEs observed with the Lasco coronagraph on SOHO, and the ACE SWICS/SWIMS solar wind values of O+7/O+6 to look for variations of peak SEP intensities as a function of O+7/O+6. We find no significant dependence of the SEP intensities on O+7/O+6 for either poorly connected or well connected CME source regions or for different CME speed ranges. While a broad range of angular widths are associated with fast (V > 900 km/s) CMEs, we find that no fast CMEs with widths < 60 degrees are associated with SEP events. On the other hand, nearly all fast halo CMEs are associated with SEP events. Thus the CME widths are more important in SEP production than previously thought, but the solar wind source regions in which SEPs are produced are not a significant factor.

  15. Fast light generation through velocity manipulation in two vertically-stacked ring resonators.

    PubMed

    Ciminelli, C; Campanella, C E; Dell'Olio, F; Armenise, M N

    2010-02-01

    Speed manipulation of optical pulses is a very attractive research challenge enabling next-generation high-capacity all-optical communication networks. Pulses can be effectively slowed by using different integrated optical structures such as coupled-resonator waveguiding structures or photonic crystal cavities. Fast light generation by means of integrated photonic devices is currently a quite unexplored research field in spite of its crucial importance for all-optical pulse processing. In this paper, we report on the first theoretical demonstration of fast light generation in an ultra-compact double vertical stacked ring resonator coupled to a bus waveguide. Periodic coupling between the two rings leads to splitting and recombining of symmetric and anti-symmetric resonant modes. Re-established degenerate modes can form when a symmetric and an anti-symmetric mode having different resonance order exhibit the same resonance wavelength. Under degenerate mode conditions, wide wavelength ranges where the group velocity is negative or larger than the speed of light in vacuum are generated. The paper proves how this physical effect can be exploited to design fast light resonant devices. Moreover, conditions are also derived to obtain slow light operation regime. PMID:20174126

  16. A fast multispectral light synthesiser based on LEDs and a diffraction grating.

    PubMed

    Belušič, Gregor; Ilić, Marko; Meglič, Andrej; Pirih, Primož

    2016-01-01

    Optical experiments often require fast-switching light sources with adjustable bandwidths and intensities. We constructed a wavelength combiner based on a reflective planar diffraction grating and light emitting diodes with emission peaks from 350 to 630 nm that were positioned at the angles corresponding to the first diffraction order of the reversed beam. The combined output beam was launched into a fibre. The spacing between 22 equally wide spectral bands was about 15 nm. The time resolution of the pulse-width modulation drivers was 1 ms. The source was validated with a fast intracellular measurement of the spectral sensitivity of blowfly photoreceptors. In hyperspectral imaging of Xenopus skin circulation, the wavelength resolution was adequate to resolve haemoglobin absorption spectra. The device contains no moving parts, has low stray light and is intrinsically capable of multi-band output. Possible applications include visual physiology, biomedical optics, microscopy and spectroscopy. PMID:27558155

  17. A fast multispectral light synthesiser based on LEDs and a diffraction grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belušič, Gregor; Ilić, Marko; Meglič, Andrej; Pirih, Primož

    2016-08-01

    Optical experiments often require fast-switching light sources with adjustable bandwidths and intensities. We constructed a wavelength combiner based on a reflective planar diffraction grating and light emitting diodes with emission peaks from 350 to 630 nm that were positioned at the angles corresponding to the first diffraction order of the reversed beam. The combined output beam was launched into a fibre. The spacing between 22 equally wide spectral bands was about 15 nm. The time resolution of the pulse-width modulation drivers was 1 ms. The source was validated with a fast intracellular measurement of the spectral sensitivity of blowfly photoreceptors. In hyperspectral imaging of Xenopus skin circulation, the wavelength resolution was adequate to resolve haemoglobin absorption spectra. The device contains no moving parts, has low stray light and is intrinsically capable of multi-band output. Possible applications include visual physiology, biomedical optics, microscopy and spectroscopy.

  18. A fast multispectral light synthesiser based on LEDs and a diffraction grating

    PubMed Central

    Belušič, Gregor; Ilić, Marko; Meglič, Andrej; Pirih, Primož

    2016-01-01

    Optical experiments often require fast-switching light sources with adjustable bandwidths and intensities. We constructed a wavelength combiner based on a reflective planar diffraction grating and light emitting diodes with emission peaks from 350 to 630 nm that were positioned at the angles corresponding to the first diffraction order of the reversed beam. The combined output beam was launched into a fibre. The spacing between 22 equally wide spectral bands was about 15 nm. The time resolution of the pulse-width modulation drivers was 1 ms. The source was validated with a fast intracellular measurement of the spectral sensitivity of blowfly photoreceptors. In hyperspectral imaging of Xenopus skin circulation, the wavelength resolution was adequate to resolve haemoglobin absorption spectra. The device contains no moving parts, has low stray light and is intrinsically capable of multi-band output. Possible applications include visual physiology, biomedical optics, microscopy and spectroscopy. PMID:27558155

  19. Absolute calibration method for fast-streaked, fiber optic light collection, spectroscopy systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, Mark D.; Frogget, Brent; Oliver, Bryan Velten; Maron, Yitzhak; Droemer, Darryl W.; Crain, Marlon D.

    2010-04-01

    This report outlines a convenient method to calibrate fast (<1ns resolution) streaked, fiber optic light collection, spectroscopy systems. Such a system is used to collect spectral data on plasmas generated in the A-K gap of electron beam diodes fielded on the RITS-6 accelerator (8-12MV, 140-200kA). On RITS, light is collected through a small diameter (200 micron) optical fiber and recorded on a fast streak camera at the output of 1 meter Czerny-Turner monochromator (F/7 optics). To calibrate such a system, it is necessary to efficiently couple light from a spectral lamp into a 200 micron diameter fiber, split it into its spectral components, with 10 Angstroms or less resolution, and record it on a streak camera with 1ns or less temporal resolution.

  20. Scanning radiometer for measurement of forward-scattered light to determine mean diameter of spray particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchele, D. R.

    1976-01-01

    A scanning radiometer is reported that measures forward-scattered light to determine the mean diameter of spray particles. An optical scanning method gives a continuous measurement of the light-scattering angle during spray nozzle tests. A method of calibration and a correction for background light are presented. Mean particle diameters of 10 to 500 micrometers can be measured.

  1. Landau Damping of Transverse Waves in the Exosphere by Fast Particle Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tidman, D. A.; Jaggi, R. K.

    1962-01-01

    We have investigated the Landau damping of transverse waves propagating in the thermal exospheric plasma, by fast particle fluxes which also exist in these regions. The most intense non-thermal fluxes so far detected are those of the auroral producing electrons and protons measured by McIlwain. We find that these fluxes may considerably damp the propagation of whistler modes through some regions. The damping of hydromagnetic waves in the exosphere by this mechanism is negligible.

  2. On the theory of the ionization-induced drag of fast charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, D. N.

    2016-09-01

    The moments in the theory of deceleration of fast charged particles colliding with an oscillator have been considered in the dipole approximation. In this approximation, the problem has been solved exactly, and the moment of the oscillator has been determined from the initial state | m> = |0> in the form of the sum of 1D integrals. The method considered here makes it possible to calculate the moments for ion velocities close to atomic velocities ( v ~ v a).

  3. Self-Trapping of Light Particles in Dense Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reese, Terrence Lee

    1992-01-01

    A light particle (electron, positron, or positronium atom) thermalized in a dense fluid can in a certain range of density and temperature become localized in a region of altered fluid density. Because it is the presence of the light particle, lp, that initiates the localization process it is referred to as self-trapping. Self-Trapping results in non-linear dependence upon the density in experimental measurements of lp properties such as electron mobility and positron and positronium decay rate in fluids. Because of its small mass the lp has a thermal wavelength which is much greater than the thermal wavelength of the fluid molecules. Thus it is possible to treat the translational degrees of freedom by classical mechanics and the lp's degrees of freedom by quantum mechanics. This hybrid model is referred to as the adiabatic model. Density Functional Theory, DFT, and the Path Integral Monte Carlo, PIMC, technique are two approximations used to make calculations with the adiabatic model. DFT uses the Jensen inequality to approximate the trace over the lp wavefunction and calculate important equilibrium properties of an lp in a fluid. The PIMC technique uses the classical isomorphism to relate the partition function of a quantum particle to the partition function of a classical polymer. This relation allows the computation of quantum equilibrium averages by standard classical Monte Carlo methods. In this research the simplest variant of DFT and the PIMC technique are used to simulate positronium in dense fluids. DFT is shown to be able to qualitatively recreate experimental measurements of the decay rate of positronium in ethane and Argon. However, because density fluctuations are not included in DFT's the results show an unnatural discontinuity in decay rate plots. Because the PIMC technique is a microscopic model it includes density fluctuations and more closely resembles experimental measurements than DFT. The results of both approximations indicate that the

  4. Fast Pyrolysis of Wood for Biofuels: Spatiotemporally Resolved Diffuse Reflectance In situ Spectroscopy of Particles.

    PubMed

    Paulsen, Alex D; Hough, Blake R; Williams, C Luke; Teixeira, Andrew R; Schwartz, Daniel T; Pfaendtner, Jim; Dauenhauer, Paul J

    2014-02-20

    Fast pyrolysis of woody biomass is a promising process capable of producing renewable transportation fuels to replace gasoline, diesel, and chemicals currently derived from nonrenewable sources. However, biomass pyrolysis is not yet economically viable and requires significant optimization before it can contribute to the existing oil-based transportation system. One method of optimization uses detailed kinetic models for predicting the products of biomass fast pyrolysis, which serve as the basis for the design of pyrolysis reactors capable of producing the highest value products. The goal of this work is to improve upon current pyrolysis models, usually derived from experiments with low heating rates and temperatures, by developing models that account for both transport and pyrolysis decomposition kinetics at high heating rates and high temperatures (>400 °C). A new experimental technique is proposed herein: spatiotemporally resolved diffuse reflectance in situ spectroscopy of particles (STR-DRiSP), which is capable of measuring biomass composition during fast pyrolysis with high spatial (10 μm) and temporal (1 ms) resolution. Compositional data were compared with a comprehensive 2D single-particle model, which incorporated a multistep, semiglobal reaction mechanism, prescribed particle shrinkage, and thermophysical properties that varied with temperature, composition, and orientation. The STR-DRiSP technique can be used to determine the transport-limited kinetic parameters of biomass decomposition for a wide variety of biomass feedstocks. PMID:24678023

  5. Light Absorption of Biogenic Aerosol Particles in Amazonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holanda, B. A.; Artaxo, P.; Ferreira De Brito, J.; Barbosa, H. M.; Andreae, M. O.; Saturno, J.; Pöhlker, C.; Holben, B. N.; Schafer, J.

    2014-12-01

    Aerosol absorption is a key issue in proper calculation of aerosol radiative forcing. Especially in the tropics with the dominance of natural biogenic aerosol and brown carbon, the so called anomalous absorption is of particular interest. A special experiment was designed to study the wavelength dependence of aerosol absorption for PM2.5 as well as for PM10 particles in the wet season in Central Amazonia. Aerosol analysis occurred from May to August 2014, in the ZF2 ecological reservation, situated at about 55 km North of Manaus in very pristine conditions Two 7 wavelengths AE33 Aethalometers were deployed measuring in parallel, but with a PM2.5 and PM10 inlets. Two MAAP (Multiangle Aerosol Absorption Photometer) were operated in parallel with the AE33 exactly at the same PM2.5 and PM10 inlets. Organic and elemental carbon was analyzed using collection with quartz filters and analysis using a Sunset OC/EC analyzer. Aerosol light scattering for 3 wavelengths was measured using Air Photon and TSI Nephelometers. Aerosol size distribution was measured with one TSI SMPS and a GRIMM OPC to have the size range from 10 nm to 10 micrometers. Particles were measured under dry conditions using diffusion dryers. Aerosol optical depth and absorption was also measured with an AERONET sunphotometer operated close to the site. As the experiment was run in the wet season, very low equivalent black carbon (EBC) were measured, with average concentrations around 50 ng/m³ during May, increasing to 130 ng/m³ in June and July. The measurements adjusted for similar wavelengths shows excellent agreement between the MAAP and AE33 for both inlets (PM2.5 and PM10). It was not possible statistically infer absorption from the coarse mode biogenic particles, since the absorption was completely dominated by fine mode particles. AERONET measurements shows very low values of AOD, at 0.17 at 500 nm and 0.13 at 870 nm, with very low absorption AOD values at 0.00086 at 676 nm and 0.0068 at 872 nm

  6. Determination of the refractive index of microparticles by utilizing light dispersion properties of the particle and an immersion liquid.

    PubMed

    Niskanen, I; Räty, J; Peiponen, K E

    2013-10-15

    The knowledge of the refractive index of a particle is important in sensing and imaging applications, e.g., in biology, medicine and process industry. The refractive index of tiny solid particles such as microsize particles can be determined by the so-called liquid immersion technique. This study deals with three different types of interrogation methods to get the refractive index of a particle in a liquid matrix. These methods utilize thermo-optical properties and wavelength-dependent refractive index of the particle and the immersion liquids, as well as, the classical method using a set of in advance prepared set of immersion liquids with different refractive indices. The emphasis is on a method to get especially the wavelength-dependent refractive index of microparticles and exploiting different wavelength-dependences of immersion liquid and a solid particle because identification of a particle is more reliable if the refractive index of the particle is known at several wavelengths. In this study glycerol-water mixtures served as immersion liquids to obtain the refractive index of CaF2 at several discrete wavelengths in the spectral range 200-500 nm. The idea is to find the maximum value of light transmission of suspension by scanning the wavelength of a commercial spectrophotometer. The light dispersion-based method is suggested as a relatively easy, economic and fast method to determine the refractive index of a particle by a spectrophotometer at several wavelengths of light. The accuracy of the detection of the refractive index is suggested to be better than ± 0.005 refractive index units.

  7. An Optically Stabilized Fast-Switching Light Emitting Diode as a Light Source for Functional Neuroimaging

    PubMed Central

    Wagenaar, Daniel A.

    2012-01-01

    Neuroscience research increasingly relies on optical methods for evoking neuronal activity as well as for measuring it, making bright and stable light sources critical building blocks of modern experimental setups. This paper presents a method to control the brightness of a high-power light emitting diode (LED) light source to an unprecedented level of stability. By continuously monitoring the actual light output of the LED with a photodiode and feeding the result back to the LED's driver by way of a proportional-integral controller, drift was reduced to as little as 0.007% per hour over a 12-h period, and short-term fluctuations to 0.005% root-mean-square over 10 seconds. The LED can be switched on and off completely within 100 s, a feature that is crucial when visual stimuli and light for optical recording need to be interleaved to obtain artifact-free recordings. The utility of the system is demonstrated by recording visual responses in the central nervous system of the medicinal leech Hirudo verbana using voltage-sensitive dyes. PMID:22238663

  8. A fast sorting algorithm for a hypersonic rarefied flow particle simulation on the connection machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dagum, Leonardo

    1989-01-01

    The data parallel implementation of a particle simulation for hypersonic rarefied flow described by Dagum associates a single parallel data element with each particle in the simulation. The simulated space is divided into discrete regions called cells containing a variable and constantly changing number of particles. The implementation requires a global sort of the parallel data elements so as to arrange them in an order that allows immediate access to the information associated with cells in the simulation. Described here is a very fast algorithm for performing the necessary ranking of the parallel data elements. The performance of the new algorithm is compared with that of the microcoded instruction for ranking on the Connection Machine.

  9. Light touch modulates balance recovery following perturbation: from fast response to stance restabilization.

    PubMed

    Martinelli, Alessandra Rezende; Coelho, Daniel Boari; Magalhães, Fernando Henrique; Kohn, André Fabio; Teixeira, Luis Augusto

    2015-05-01

    Light fingertip touch of a static bar generates extra somatosensory information used by the postural control system to reduce body sway. While the effect of light touch has been studied in quiet stance, less attention has been given to its potential benefit for reactive postural responses. In the present study, we tested the effect of light fingertip touch of a stable surface on recovery of postural stability from a mechanical perturbation. Participants stood upright on a force plate touching a static rigid bar while being pulled backward by a load. Unpredictable release of the load induced fast anterior body sway, requiring a reactive response to recover balance. Effect of light touch on postural responses was assessed as a function of vision and malleability of the support surface, analyzing different epochs ranging from the pre-perturbation period to recovery of a relatively stable quiet stance. Results showed that light touch induced lower magnitude of muscular activation in all epochs. Center of pressure (CoP) displacement/sway was affected by interaction of light touch with manipulation of the other sensory information. For the periods associated with quiet stance, light touch led to decreased CoP sway in the malleable surface in the pre-perturbation epoch, and in the condition combining no vision and malleable surface in the balance restabilization and follow-up quiet stance epochs. For the fast reactive response epoch, light touch induced smaller amplitude of CoP displacement across conditions, and lower CoP maximum velocity in the condition combining no vision and rigid surface. These results showed that light touch modulates postural responses in all epochs associated with an unanticipated mechanical perturbation, with a more noticeable effect in conditions manipulating sensory information relevant for balance control.

  10. A method based on light scattering to estimate the concentration of virus particles without the need for virus particle standards☆

    PubMed Central

    Makra, István; Terejánszky, Péter; Gyurcsányi, Róbert E.

    2015-01-01

    Most often the determination of the concentration of virus particles is rendered difficult by the availability of proper standards. We have adapted a static light scattering based method for the quantification of virus particles (shown for poliovirus) without the need of virus particle standards. Instead, as standards, well-characterized polymeric nanoparticle solutions are used. The method is applicable for virus particles acting as Rayleigh scatterers, i.e., virus particles with equivalent diameters up to ca. 1/10th of the wavelength of the scattered monochromatic light (∼70 nm diameter). Further limitations may arise if the refractive index of the virus is unavailable or cannot be calculated based on its composition, such as in case of enveloped viruses. The method is especially relevant for preparation of virus particle concentration standards and to vaccine formulations based on attenuated or inactivated virus particles where the classical plaque forming assays cannot be applied. The method consists of: • Measuring the intensity of the light scattered by viruses suspended in an aqueous solution. • Measuring the intensity of the light scattered by polymeric nanoparticles of known concentration and comparable size with the investigated virus particle. • The concentration of virus nanoparticles can be calculated based on the two measured scattered light intensities by knowing the refractive index of the dispersing solution, of the polymer and virus nanoparticles as well as their relative sphere equivalent diameters. PMID:26150976

  11. Particle sizing by measurement of forward-scattered light at two angles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchele, D. R.

    1983-01-01

    Fundamental and practical limitations to particle sizing by measurement of forward scattered light are presented. Methods to minimize the limitations are described. Two types of instruments are compared.

  12. Counting and sizing of particles and particle agglomerates in a microfluidic device using laser light scattering: application to a particle-enhanced immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Pamme, Nicole; Koyama, Ryuji; Manz, Andreas

    2003-08-01

    A microfluidic device for counting and sizing particles and particle agglomerates based on laser light scattering is demonstrated. The particles were confined hydrodynamically and passed through a focused laser beam. Scattering at two different angles, 15 degree and 45 degree, was detected. At an acquisition rate of 10 kHz, a throughput of 150 particles s(-1) was achieved. Scattering intensity was found to depend on particle volume for 2 to 9 microm diameter particles. Size discrimination of particles with a diameter ratio of 1: 2 was accomplished. In addition, the scattering signals of particle agglomerates formed in a particle-enhanced immunoassay for C-reactive protein (CRP) were measured. Scattering intensity was found to be dependent on the CRP concentration, 100 ng CRP per mL could be detected. The particle counting method presented is generic and can be employed in a wide variety of assays as well as for cell counting and particle counting.

  13. Fast food restaurant lighting and music can reduce calorie intake and increase satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Wansink, Brian; van Ittersum, Koert

    2012-08-01

    Recent research shows that environmental cues such as lighting and music strongly bias the eating behavior of diners in laboratory situations. This study examines whether changing the atmosphere of a fast food restaurant would change how much patrons ate. The results indicated that softening the lighting and music led people to eat less, to rate the food as more enjoyable, and to spend just as much. In contrast to hypothesized U-shaped curves (people who spend longer eat more), this suggests a more relaxed environment increases satisfaction and decreases consumption. PMID:23045865

  14. The speed of information in a 'fast-light' optical medium.

    PubMed

    Stenner, Michael D; Gauthier, Daniel J; Neifeld, Mark A

    2003-10-16

    One consequence of the special theory of relativity is that no signal can cause an effect outside the source light cone, the space-time surface on which light rays emanate from the source. Violation of this principle of relativistic causality leads to paradoxes, such as that of an effect preceding its cause. Recent experiments on optical pulse propagation in so-called 'fast-light' media--which are characterized by a wave group velocity upsilon(g) exceeding the vacuum speed of light c or taking on negative values--have led to renewed debate about the definition of the information velocity upsilon(i). One view is that upsilon(i) = upsilon(g) (ref. 4), which would violate causality, while another is that upsilon(i) = c in all situations, which would preserve causality. Here we find that the time to detect information propagating through a fast-light medium is slightly longer than the time required to detect the same information travelling through a vacuum, even though upsilon(g) in the medium vastly exceeds c. Our observations are therefore consistent with relativistic causality and help to resolve the controversies surrounding superluminal pulse propagation. PMID:14562097

  15. Fast 3D optical reconstruction in turbid media using spatially modulated light

    PubMed Central

    D’Andrea, Cosimo; Ducros, Nicolas; Bassi, Andrea; Arridge, Simon; Valentini, Gianluca

    2010-01-01

    A method to perform fast 3-D optical reconstruction, based on structured light, in thick samples is demonstrated and experimentally validated. The experimental and reconstruction procedure, based on Finite Elements Method, used to reconstruct absorbing heterogeneities, with arbitrary arrangement in space, is discussed. In particular we demonstrated that a 2D sampling of the source Fourier plane is required to improve the imaging capability. PMID:21258482

  16. Quantum optics mini-program on fast light, slow light, and metamaterials.

    SciTech Connect

    Milonni, Peter W.

    2002-01-01

    The topic of electromagnetic propagation in dielectric media has been enlivened in the past decade by a number of remarkable experimental results showing the technical ability to control the speed of light propagation in exotic ways. Light pulses have been observed travelling faster than c, or slowed by many orders of magnitude, or even stopped completely. All of thcse results require careful interpretation, and a variety of theoretical interpretations have been proposed and/or published, not all agreeing with each other. At the same time, in a lower frequency range than optical, rapid development of so-called meta-materials or double-negative materials has occurred. These materials are characterized by electric permittivity and magnetic permeability with very unconventional values, both quantities negative in some cases. Such unusual properties, especially when leading to a negative value for the group velocity, clearly indicate another possibility for control of light. Such materials are being improved rapidly, but independent of their implementation in the laboratory, their theoretical properties have led to dramatic predictions such as the existence of a perfect lens, Le., a finite lens (actually even planar-flat rather than parabolic) that can deliver an ideally sharp focus unaffected by diffractive effects. There are strong contentions currently being published that such predictions are erroneous

  17. Compact, highly sensitive optical gyros and sensors with fast-light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Caleb A.; Zavriyev, Anton; Cummings, Malcolm; Beal, A. C.; Lucas, Mark; Lagasse, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Fast-light phenomena can enhance the sensitivity of an optical gyroscope of a given size by several orders of magnitude, and could be applied to other optical sensors as well. MagiQ Technologies has been developing a compact fiber-based fast light Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) using Stimulated Brillouin Scattering in optical fibers with commercially mature technologies. We will report on our findings, including repeatable fast-light effects in the lab, numerical analysis of noise and stability given realistic optical specs, and methods for optimizing efficiency, size, and reliability with current technologies. The technology could benefit inertial navigation units, gyrocompasses, and stabilization techniques, and could allow high grade IMUs in spacecraft, unmanned aerial vehicles or sensors, where the current size and weight of precision gyros are prohibitive. By using photonic integrated circuits and telecom-grade components along with specialty fibers, we also believe that our design is appropriate for development without further advances in the state of the art of components.

  18. A practical approach to fast-light enhanced fiber sensing: experiments and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Caleb A.; Zavriyev, Anton; Cummings, Malcolm; Beal, A. Craig; Lucas, Mark; Lagasse, Michael

    2014-06-01

    It has been proposed that fast-light optical phenomena can increase the sensitivity of an optical gyroscope of a given size by several orders of magnitude. MagiQ Technologies is developing a compact fiber-based fast light Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) using Stimulated Brillouin Scattering (SBS) in optical fibers with commercially mature technologies. We have demonstrated repeatable fast-light effects in the lab using off-the shelf optical components. Numerical analysis has revealed the requirements for stable, sensitive operation of gyroscopes, accelerometers or other sensors, as well as identified methods for optimizing efficiency, size, and reliability with known optical technologies. By using photonic integrated circuits and telecom-grade components along with specialty fibers, our design would be appropriate for mass production. We have eliminated all free-space optical elements or wavelength dependent elements such as atomic vapor cells in order to enable a compact, high sensitivity IMU stable against environmental disturbances. Results of this effort will have benefits in existing applications of IMUs (such as inertial navigation units, gyrocompasses, and stabilization techniques), and will allow wider use of RLGs in spacecraft, unmanned aerial vehicles or sensors, where the current size and weight of optical IMUs are prohibitive.

  19. A fast atmospheric turbulent parameters estimation using particle filtering. Application to LIDAR observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florian, Suzat; Christophe, Baehr; Alain, Dabas

    2011-12-01

    Estimating fast turbulence fluctuations in the boundary layer of the atmosphere, using remote detection instrument is an important scientific issue. Doppler LIDAR, is typically used to get this kind of information because it can make fast, distant, precise, and non-intrusive measurements of the wind field by giving the radial component in any direction. The objective of those measurements is to evaluate as precisely as possible the wind structure using the partial wind information provided, in order to estimate turbulent parameters. The approach presented in this paper, consist in coupling the remote detection system and a stochastic Lagrangian model of the atmosphere. The fluid is represented by a set of interacting particles, evolving according to an evolution system based on S.B Pope work. Data provided by the instrument are assimilated in real time in the model using a particle filtering algorithm. The purpose is to locally correct the properties of particles using measurements, to fit the real fluid observed. A precise real time estimation of the wind field, allows then to estimate turbulent parameters. The methodology has produced convincing results on simulated Doppler LIDAR measurements, in tree-dimensional modeling.

  20. Ultra-fast X-ray particle velocimetry measurements within an abrasive water jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balz, R.; Mokso, R.; Narayanan, C.; Weiss, D. A.; Heiniger, K. C.

    2013-03-01

    Ultra-fast X-ray velocimetry measurements were taken to measure velocities and spatial positions of individual abrasive particles within the solid-liquid-gaseous three-phase flow of a high-pressure injection method-based abrasive water jet (AWJ). A synchrotron X-ray source provided sufficient photon flux to take double-frame images of the AWJ with an inter-frame time interval of 5 μs. Abrasive particles with a Sauter mean diameter of 265.5 μm were detected by a scintillator optically coupled to a gated image intensifier and a high-speed camera running at a frame rate of 11,250 Hz. A commercially available particle tracking velocimetry software was used to process the acquired images and evaluate the spatial positions and velocities of abrasive particles as a function of water pressure and abrasive mass flow. The acquired data show a Gaussian radial distribution of abrasive particles within the AWJ and an almost uniform mean axial velocity, irrespective of water jet velocity and abrasive flow rates. These results are useful to validate theoretical models for the momentum/energy transfer in AWJ, to provide input for abrasion/erosion models, to further understand and advance the AWJ process, and to develop new process opportunities such as AWJ milling.

  1. Nonlinear evolution of two fast-particle-driven modes near the linear stability threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Zalesny, Jaroslaw; Marczynski, Slawomir; Berczynski, Pawel; Berczynski, Stefan; Galant, Grzegorz; Lisak, Mietek; Galkowski, Andrzej

    2011-06-15

    A system of two coupled integro-differential equations is derived and solved for the non-linear evolution of two waves excited by the resonant interaction with fast ions just above the linear instability threshold. The effects of a resonant particle source and classical relaxation processes represented by the Krook, diffusion, and dynamical friction collision operators are included in the model, which exhibits different nonlinear evolution regimes, mainly depending on the type of relaxation process that restores the unstable distribution function of fast ions. When the Krook collisions or diffusion dominate, the wave amplitude evolution is characterized by modulation and saturation. However, when the dynamical friction dominates, the wave amplitude is in the explosive regime. In addition, it is found that the finite separation in the phase velocities of the two modes weakens the interaction strength between the modes.

  2. The effect of fast and regeneration in light versus dark on regulation in the hydra-algal symbiosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bossert, P.; Slobodkin, L. B.

    1983-01-01

    Green hydra are able to regenerate tentacles after fast durations which cause brown, i.e., asymbiotic, hydra to fail completely, but the presence of endosymbiotic algae does not always enhance regeneration in fasted hydra. Green hydra whose nutritional state falls below some threshold, exhibit a light induced inhibition of regeneration. That is, hydra, fasted in the light, then randomly assigned to light or dark after decapitation, regenerate better in the dark. This effect of light does not appear to be present either in brown hydra or in normally green hydra from which the algae were removed. In a large strain of Chlorohydra viridissima, after fasts of intermediate duration (10 and 15 days), this light induced inhibition of regeneration is associated with an increase in the number of algae per gastric cell in regenerating hydra relative to non-regenerating controls.

  3. A fast method for optical simulation of flood maps of light-sharing detector modules

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Han; Du, Dong; Xu, JianFeng; Moses, William W.; Peng, Qiyu

    2016-01-01

    Optical simulation of the detector module level is highly desired for Position Emission Tomography (PET) system design. Commonly used simulation toolkits such as GATE are not efficient in the optical simulation of detector modules with complicated light-sharing configurations, where a vast amount of photons need to be tracked. We present a fast approach based on a simplified specular reflectance model and a structured light-tracking algorithm to speed up the photon tracking in detector modules constructed with polished finish and specular reflector materials. We simulated conventional block detector designs with different slotted light guide patterns using the new approach and compared the outcomes with those from GATE simulations. While the two approaches generated comparable flood maps, the new approach was more than 200–600 times faster. The new approach has also been validated by constructing a prototype detector and comparing the simulated flood map with the experimental flood map. The experimental flood map has nearly uniformly distributed spots similar to those in the simulated flood map. In conclusion, the new approach provides a fast and reliable simulation tool for assisting in the development of light-sharing-based detector modules with a polished surface finish and using specular reflector materials.

  4. A fast method for optical simulation of flood maps of light-sharing detector modules

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Han; Du, Dong; Xu, JianFeng; Moses, William W.; Peng, Qiyu

    2016-01-01

    Optical simulation of the detector module level is highly desired for Position Emission Tomography (PET) system design. Commonly used simulation toolkits such as GATE are not efficient in the optical simulation of detector modules with complicated light-sharing configurations, where a vast amount of photons need to be tracked. We present a fast approach based on a simplified specular reflectance model and a structured light-tracking algorithm to speed up the photon tracking in detector modules constructed with polished finish and specular reflector materials. We simulated conventional block detector designs with different slotted light guide patterns using the new approach and compared the outcomes with those from GATE simulations. While the two approaches generated comparable flood maps, the new approach was more than 200–600 times faster. The new approach has also been validated by constructing a prototype detector and comparing the simulated flood map with the experimental flood map. The experimental flood map has nearly uniformly distributed spots similar to those in the simulated flood map. In conclusion, the new approach provides a fast and reliable simulation tool for assisting in the development of light-sharing-based detector modules with a polished surface finish and using specular reflector materials. PMID:27660376

  5. Fast neutron relative biological effects and implications for charged particle therapy

    PubMed Central

    Jones, B; Underwood, T S A; Carabe-Fernandez, A; Timlin, C; Dale, R G

    2011-01-01

    In two fast neutron data sets, comprising in vitro and in vivo experiments, an inverse relationship is found between the low-linear energy transfer (LET) α/β ratio and the maximum value of relative biological effect (RBEmax), while the minimum relative biological effect (RBEmin) is linearly related to the square root of the low-LET α/β ratio. RBEmax is the RBE at near zero dose and can be represented by the ratio of the α parameters at high- and low-LET radiation exposures. RBEmin is the RBE at very high dose and can be represented by the ratio of the square roots of the β parameters at high- and low-LET radiation exposures. In principle, it may be possible to use the low-LET α/β ratio to predict RBEmax and RBEmin, providing that other LET-related parameters, which reflect intercept and slopes of these relationships, are used. These two limits of RBE determine the intermediate values of RBE at any dose per fraction; therefore, it is possible to find the RBE at any dose per fraction. Although these results are obtained from fast neutron experiments, there are implications for charged particle therapy using protons (when RBE is scaled downwards) and for heavier ion beams (where the magnitude of RBE is similar to that for fast neutrons). In the case of fast neutrons, late reacting normal tissue systems and very slow growing tumours, which have the smallest values of the low-LET α/β ratio, are predicted to have the highest RBE values at low fractional doses, but the lowest values of RBE at higher doses when they are compared with early reacting tissues and fast growing tumour systems that have the largest low-LET α/β ratios. PMID:22374547

  6. A Fast Induction Motor Speed Estimation based on Hybrid Particle Swarm Optimization (HPSO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aryza, Solly; Abdallah, Ahmed N.; Khalidin, Zulkeflee bin; Lubis, Zulkarnain; Jie, Ma

    Intelligent control and estimation of power electronic systems by fuzzy logic and neural network techniques with fast torque and flux show tremendous promise in future. This paper proposed the application of Hybrid Particle Swarm Optimization (HPSO) for losses and operating cost minimization control in the induction motor drives. The main advantages of the proposed technique are; its simple structure and its straightforward maximization of induction motor efficiency and its operating cost for a given load torque. As will be demonstrated, Hybrid Particle Swarm Optimization (HPSO) is so efficient in finding the optimum operating machine's flux level. The results demonstrate the good quality and robustness in the system dynamic response and reduction in the steady-state and transient motor ripple torque.

  7. Fast Three-Dimensional Single-Particle Tracking in Natural Brain Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Sokoll, Stefan; Prokazov, Yury; Hanses, Magnus; Biermann, Barbara; Tönnies, Klaus; Heine, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Observation of molecular dynamics is often biased by the optical very heterogeneous environment of cells and complex tissue. Here, we have designed an algorithm that facilitates molecular dynamic analyses within brain slices. We adjust fast astigmatism-based three-dimensional single-particle tracking techniques to depth-dependent optical aberrations induced by the refractive index mismatch so that they are applicable to complex samples. In contrast to existing techniques, our online calibration method determines the aberration directly from the acquired two-dimensional image stream by exploiting the inherent particle movement and the redundancy introduced by the astigmatism. The method improves the positioning by reducing the systematic errors introduced by the aberrations, and allows correct derivation of the cellular morphology and molecular diffusion parameters in three dimensions independently of the imaging depth. No additional experimental effort for the user is required. Our method will be useful for many imaging configurations, which allow imaging in deep cellular structures. PMID:26445447

  8. Synthesis of black phosphorus films and particles by ultra-fast laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Gang; Nian, Qiong; Deng, Yexin; Deng, Biwei; Jin, Shengyu; Charnas, Adam; Cheng, Gary; Ye, Peide

    Few-layer black phosphorus (BP) has become one of top interests among various 2D materials because of its outstanding electrical and optical properties. However, availability of large size BP thin films stands as a major roadblock against further research and its applications. Here we report a method of synthesis BP films and particles by employing ultra-fast laser ablation. We demonstrated that arbitrary BP film patterns can be defined by laser direct writing. BP particles were also achieved as byproduct through manipulating laser power and frequency. Physical mechanism of laser ablation process was investigated, which also provides an optimizing strategy of improving BP thin film quality. The work was supported in part by NSF ECCS-1449270, NSF/AFOSR EFRI 2DARE Program, and ARO W911NF-15-1-0574.

  9. Plasma flow and fast particles in a hypervelocity accelerator - A color presentation. [micrometeoroid simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Igenbergs, E. B.; Cour-Palais, B.; Fisher, E.; Stehle, O.

    1975-01-01

    A new concept for particle acceleration for micrometeoroid simulation was developed at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, using a high-density self-luminescent fast plasma flow to accelerate glass beads (with a diameter up to 1.0 mm) to velocities between 15-20 km/sec. After a short introduction to the operation of the hypervelocity range, the eight-converter-camera unit used for the photographs of the plasma flow and the accelerated particles is described. These photographs are obtained with an eight-segment reflecting pyramidal beam splitter. Wratten filters were mounted between the beam splitter and the converter tubes of the cameras. The photographs, which were recorded on black and white film, were used to make the matrices for the dye-color process, which produced the prints shown.

  10. Method for determining fast-alpha-particle confinement in tokamak plasmas using resonant nuclear reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Cecil, F.E.; Zweben, S.J.; Medley, S.S.

    1986-03-01

    The resonant nuclear reactions D(..cap alpha..,..gamma..)/sup 6/Li, /sup 6/Li(..cap alpha..,..gamma..)/sup 10/B, and /sup 7/Li(..cap alpha..,..gamma..)/sup 11/B are examined as diagnostics of fast-alpha-particle confinement in tokamak plasmas. Gamma rays from these resonant reactions with energies from 2.1 MeV to 9.2 MeV may be used to infer the alpha-particle population between energies of 0.4 MeV and 2.6 MeV. The ratio of these alpha-burnup reactions to the reactions T(D,..gamma..)/sup 5/He and /sup 3/He(D,..gamma..)/sup 5/Li provides a technique for the measurement of alpha confinement.

  11. Thermodynamic correction of particle concentrations measured by underwing probes on fast flying aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigel, R.; Spichtinger, P.; Mahnke, C.; Klingebiel, M.; Afchine, A.; Petzold, A.; Krämer, M.; Costa, A.; Molleker, S.; Jurkat, T.; Minikin, A.; Borrmann, S.

    2015-12-01

    Particle concentration measurements with underwing probes on aircraft are impacted by air compression upstream of the instrument body as a function of flight velocity. In particular for fast-flying aircraft the necessity arises to account for compression of the air sample volume. Hence, a correction procedure is needed to invert measured particle number concentrations to ambient conditions that is commonly applicable for different instruments to gain comparable results. In the compression region where the detection of particles occurs (i.e. under factual measurement conditions), pressure and temperature of the air sample are increased compared to ambient (undisturbed) conditions in certain distance away from the aircraft. Conventional procedures for scaling the measured number densities to ambient conditions presume that the particle penetration speed through the instruments' detection area equals the aircraft speed (True Air Speed, TAS). However, particle imaging instruments equipped with pitot-tubes measuring the Probe Air Speed (PAS) of each underwing probe reveal PAS values systematically below those of the TAS. We conclude that the deviation between PAS and TAS is mainly caused by the compression of the probed air sample. From measurements during two missions in 2014 with the German Gulfstream G-550 (HALO - High Altitude LOng range) research aircraft we develop a procedure to correct the measured particle concentration to ambient conditions using a thermodynamic approach. With the provided equation the corresponding concentration correction factor ξ is applicable to the high frequency measurements of each underwing probe which is equipped with its own air speed sensor (e.g. a pitot-tube). ξ-values of 1 to 0.85 are calculated for air speeds (i.e. TAS) between 60 and 260 m s-1. From HALO data it is found that ξ does not significantly vary between the different deployed instruments. Thus, for the current HALO underwing probe configuration a parameterisation of

  12. Light spin forces in optical traps: comment on "Trapping metallic Rayleigh particles with radial polarization".

    PubMed

    Iglesias, Ignacio; Sáenz, Juan José

    2012-01-30

    An incomplete modeling of the scattering forces on a Rayleigh particle without taking into account the light spin forces in "Trapping metallic Rayleigh particles with radial polarization" by Q. Zhan, leads to erroneous statements on the advantages of using radial polarization to trap metallic particles. PMID:22330519

  13. Active and fast particle driven Alfvén eigenmodes in Alcator C-Moda)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snipes, J. A.; Basse, N.; Boswell, C.; Edlund, E.; Fasoli, A.; Gorelenkov, N. N.; Granetz, R. S.; Lin, L.; Lin, Y.; Parker, R.; Porkolab, M.; Sears, J.; Sharapov, S.; Tang, V.; Wukitch, S.

    2005-05-01

    Alfvén eigenmodes (AEs) are studied to assess their stability in high density reactor relevant regimes where Ti≈Te and as a diagnostic tool. Stable AEs are excited with active magnetohydrodynamics antennas in the range of the expected AE frequency. Toroidal Alfvén eigenmode (TAE) damping rates between 0.5%<γ/ω<4.5% have been observed in diverted and limited Ohmic plasmas. Unstable AEs are excited with a fast ion tail driven by H minority ion cyclotron radio frequency (ICRF) heating with electron densities in the range of n¯e=0.5-2×1020m-3. Energetic particle modes or TAEs have been observed to decrease in frequency and mode number with time up to a large sawtooth collapse, indicating the role fast particles play in stabilizing sawteeth. In the current rise phase, unstable modes with frequencies that increase rapidly with time are observed with magnetic pick-up coils at the wall and phase contrast imaging density fluctuation measurements in the core. Modeling of these modes constrains the calculated safety factor profile to be very flat or with slightly reversed shear. AEs are found to be more stable for an inboard than for central or outboard ICRF resonances in qualitative agreement with modeling.

  14. Dust particle size measurement by the multi-channel laser light scattering method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choe, W.; Seon, C. R.; Chai, K. B.; Park, H. Y.; Shin, Y. H.; Chung, K. H.

    2006-10-01

    The measurement of the spatial distribution of dust particle size was performed by the multi-channel laser light scattering method. To self-consistently determine the time evolution of the particle size, in-situ polarization-sensitive laser light scattering was used using a 30 mW He-Ne laser. Polarization light intensities (incident and scattered light intensities with the same polarization) were measured at 71 . Before applying the method to the dusty plasmas, the measurement accuracy was confirmed using a distilled water solution of the size-known particles. In addition, the size-known particles were injected into the argon plasma, and the particles trapped inside the plasma were used for the accurate measurement of the light scattering angle. The measured size of the dust particles in an argon diluted silane capacitively-coupled plasma at 160 mTorr, 150 W, (11.4-11.8) s after the plasma on was (80-110) nm. In comparison, the scanning electron microscope photographs of the fallout particles showed (90-100) nm spherical particles under the similar experimental condition. The time evolution of the spatially distributed particle size at various plasma conditions was studied by using a 2-dimensional 16 channel photomultiplier tube as a detector of scattered laser light.

  15. Sensitivity Analysis of Reprocessing Cooling Times on Light Water Reactor and Sodium Fast Reactor Fuel Cycles

    SciTech Connect

    R. M. Ferrer; S. Bays; M. Pope

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to quantify the effects of variations of the Light Water Reactor (LWR) Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) and fast reactor reprocessing cooling time on a Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR) assuming a single-tier fuel cycle scenario. The results from this study show the effects of different cooling times on the SFR’s transuranic (TRU) conversion ratio (CR) and transuranic fuel enrichment. Also, the decay heat, gamma heat and neutron emission of the SFR’s fresh fuel charge were evaluated. A 1000 MWth commercial-scale SFR design was selected as the baseline in this study. Both metal and oxide CR=0.50 SFR designs are investigated.

  16. A fibre-optic mode-filtered light sensor for general and fast chemical assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Leiji; Wang, Kemin; Choi, Martin M. F.; Xiao, Dan; Yang, Xiaohai; Chen, Rui; Tan, Weihong

    2004-01-01

    A simple and fast-response fibre-optic chemical sensor based on mode-filtered light detection (MFLD) has been successfully developed. The sensor was constructed by inserting an unmodified fibre core into a silica capillary tubing; a charge-coupled device which acted as a multi-channel detector was positioned alongside the capillary to detect the emanated mode-filtered light. An interesting finding was observed: there was an increase in the signal upon the decrease in the sample refractive index when an unclad optical fibre was employed, which was different from the results of a polymer-clad fibre reported previously. This phenomenon of opposite signal trend can clearly be interpreted by applying a mathematical derivation based on light propagation in the optical fibre. The derived mathematical model correlates well with the experimental results. It also provides a good theoretical foundation for the future development of MFLD-based analyser in conjunction with liquid chromatographic separation and assay. The proposed MFLD sensor was successfully applied to determine acetic acid with a linear response in the range 0-90 v/v % and a correlation coefficient of 0.9959. The sensor has the advantages of high S/N ratio and very fast response time. It offers the potential for use as a general sensor in food and chemical industries.

  17. Variability of light transmission through Arctic land-fast sea ice during spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolaus, M.; Petrich, C.; Hudson, S. R.; Granskog, M. A.

    2013-06-01

    The amount of solar radiation transmitted through Arctic sea ice is determined by the thickness and physical properties of snow and sea ice. Light transmittance is highly variable in space and time since thickness and physical properties of snow and sea ice are highly heterogeneous on variable time and length scales. We present field measurements of under-ice irradiance along transects under undeformed land-fast sea ice at Barrow, Alaska (March, May, and June 2010). The measurements were performed with a spectral radiometer mounted on a floating under-ice sled. The objective was to quantify the spatial variability of light transmittance through snow and sea ice, and to compare this variability along its seasonal evolution. Along with optical measurements, snow depth, sea ice thickness, and freeboard were recorded, and ice cores were analyzed for chlorophyll a and particulate matter. Our results show that snow cover variability prior to onset of snow melt causes as much relative spatial variability of light transmittance as the contrast of ponded and white ice during summer. Both before and after melt onset, measured transmittances fell in a range from one third to three times the mean value. In addition, we found a twentyfold increase of light transmittance as a result of partial snowmelt, showing the seasonal evolution of transmittance through sea ice far exceeds the spatial variability. However, prior melt onset, light transmittance was time invariant and differences in under-ice irradiance were directly related to the spatial variability of the snow cover.

  18. Thermo-Mechanical Analysis of Coated Particle Fuel Experiencing a Fast Control Rod Ejection Transient

    SciTech Connect

    Ortensi, J.; Brian Boer; Abderrafi M. Ougouag

    2010-10-01

    A rapid increase of the temperature and the mechanical stress is expected in TRISO coated particle fuel that experiences a fast Total Control Rod Ejection (CRE) transient event. During this event the reactor power in the pebble bed core increases significantly for a short time interval. The power is deposited instantly and locally in the fuel kernel. This could result in a rapid increase of the pressure in the buffer layer of the coated fuel particle and, consequently, in an increase of the coating stresses. These stresses determine the mechanical failure probability of the coatings, which serve as the containment of radioactive fission products in the Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR). A new calculation procedure has been implemented at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), which analyzes the transient fuel performance behavior of TRISO fuel particles in PBRs. This early capability can easily be extended to prismatic designs, given the availability of neutronic and thermal-fluid solvers. The full-core coupled neutronic and thermal-fluid analysis has been modeled with CYNOD-THERMIX. The temperature fields for the fuel kernel and the particle coatings, as well as the gas pressures in the buffer layer, are calculated with the THETRIS module explicitly during the transient calculation. Results from this module are part of the feedback loop within the neutronic-thermal fluid iterations performed for each time step. The temperature and internal pressure values for each pebble type in each region of the core are then input to the PArticle STress Analysis (PASTA) code, which determines the particle coating stresses and the fraction of failed particles. This paper presents an investigation of a Total Control Rod Ejection (TCRE) incident in the 400 MWth Pebble Bed Modular reactor design using the above described calculation procedure. The transient corresponds to a reactivity insertion of $3 (~2000 pcm) reaching 35 times the nominal power in 0.5 seconds. For each position in the core

  19. Fast, Large-Area, Wide-Bandgap UV Photodetector for Cherenkov Light Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrbanek, John D.; Wrbanek, Susan Y.

    2013-01-01

    Due to limited resources available for power and space for payloads, miniaturizing and integrating instrumentation is a high priority for addressing the challenges of manned and unmanned deep space missions to high Earth orbit (HEO), near Earth objects (NEOs), Lunar and Martian orbits and surfaces, and outer planetary systems, as well as improvements to high-altitude aircraft safety. New, robust, and compact detectors allow future instrumentation packages more options in satisfying specific mission goals. A solid-state ultraviolet (UV) detector was developed with a theoretical fast response time and large detection area intended for application to Cherenkov detectors. The detector is based on the wide-bandgap semiconductor zinc oxide (ZnO), which in a bridge circuit can detect small, fast pulses of UV light like those required for Cherenkov detectors. The goal is to replace the role of photomultiplier tubes in Cherenkov detectors with these solid-state devices, saving on size, weight, and required power. For improving detection geometry, a spherical detector to measure high atomic number and energy (HZE) ions from any direction has been patented as part of a larger space radiation detector system. The detector will require the development of solid-state UV photodetectors fast enough (2 ns response time or better) to detect the shockwave of Cherenkov light emitted as the ions pass through a quartz, sapphire, or acrylic ball. The detector must be small enough to fit in the detector system structure, but have an active area large enough to capture enough Cherenkov light from the sphere. The detector is fabricated on bulk single-crystal undoped ZnO. Inter - digitated finger electrodes and contact pads are patterned via photolithography, and formed by sputtered metal of silver, platinum, or other high-conductivity metal.

  20. T-Matrix Computations of Light Scattering by Nonspherical Particles: A Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mischenko, Michael I.; Travis, Larry D.; Mackowski, Daniel W.

    1996-01-01

    We review the current status of Waterman's T-matrix approach which is one of the most powerful and widely used tools for accurately computing light scattering by nonspherical particles, both single and composite, based on directly solving Maxwell's equations. Specifically, we discuss the analytical method for computing orientationally-averaged light-scattering characteristics for ensembles of nonspherical particles, the methods for overcoming the numerical instability in calculating the T matrix for single nonspherical particles with large size parameters and/or extreme geometries, and the superposition approach for computing light scattering by composite/aggregated particles. Our discussion is accompanies by multiple numerical examples demonstrating the capabilities of the T-matrix approach and showing effects of nonsphericity of simple convex particles (spheroids) on light scattering.

  1. Measuring Subvisible Particles in Protein Formulations Using a Modified Light Obscuration Sensor with Improved Detection Capabilities.

    PubMed

    Ríos Quiroz, Anacelia; Québatte, Gabriela; Stump, Fabian; Finkler, Christof; Huwyler, Joerg; Schmidt, Roland; Mahler, Hanns-Christian; Koulov, Atanas V; Adler, Michael

    2015-06-16

    Although light obscuration is the "gold standard" for subvisible particle measurements in biopharmaceutical products, the current technology has limitations with respect to the detection of translucent proteinaceous particles and particles of sizes smaller and around 2 μm. Here, we describe the evaluation of a modified light obscuration sensor utilizing a novel measuring mode. Whereas standard light obscuration methodology monitors the height (amplitude) of the signal, the new approach monitors its length (width). Experimental evaluation demonstrated that this new detection mode leads to improved detection of subvisible particles of sizes smaller than 2 μm, reduction of artifacts during measurements especially of low concentrations of translucent protein particles, and higher counting accuracy as compared to flow imaging microscopy and standard light obscuration measurements.

  2. Measurement of dust particle size and density by a laser light scattering and extinction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seon, Changrae; Chai, Kilbyoung; Park, Hoyong; Shin, Yonghyun; Chung, Kwanghwa; Choe, Wonho

    2006-10-01

    The measurement of dust particle density was performed using the laser light extinction method. Using two spherical mirrors, a multi-pass setup was used for lowering the measurement limit of the system. In parallel, the particle size was measured using the laser light scattering method. To self-consistently determine the time evolution of the particle size, in-situ polarization-sensitive laser light scattering was used. Polarization light intensities (incident and scattered light intensities with the same polarization) were measured at 71 . Before applying the method to the dusty plasmas, the measurement accuracy was confirmed using a distilled water solution of the size-known particles. In addition, the size-known particles were injected into the argon plasma, and the particles trapped inside the plasma were used for the accurate measurement of the light scattering angle. The measured size of the dust particles in a Ar+SiH4 (5%) 13.56 MHz capacitively-coupled plasma (160 mTorr, 150 W, 10 s after plasma on) was about 118 nm, which was also confirmed by scanning electron microscope photographs. The time evolution of the particle size and its number density was studied by both methods.

  3. Elastic and inelastic light scattering of colloidal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerker, M.

    1985-06-01

    The project has been primarily concerned with both theoretical and experimental aspects of surface enhanced scattering. The theory has been extended to include concentric spherical particles, the effect of surface coverage, enhancement of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering and the effect of dielectric cavities. The experimental work included SERS (Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering) from citrate on silver hydrosols, surface enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) for dabsylaspartate on silver hydrosols, silver organosols and roughened silver electrodes, the effect of aggregates on SERS. In addition there have been ancillary studies dealing with absorption and luminescence by dye coated silver particles, analysis of biological cells by flow fluorimetry, and electromagnetic scattering by magnetic particles.

  4. ellc: A fast, flexible light curve model for detached eclipsing binary stars and transiting exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxted, P. F. L.

    2016-06-01

    Context. Very high quality light curves are now available for thousands of detached eclipsing binary stars and transiting exoplanet systems as a result of surveys for transiting exoplanets and other large-scale photometric surveys. Aims: I have developed a binary star model (ellc) that can be used to analyse the light curves of detached eclipsing binary stars and transiting exoplanet systems that is fast and accurate, and that can include the effects of star spots, Doppler boosting and light-travel time within binaries with eccentric orbits. Methods: The model represents the stars as triaxial ellipsoids. The apparent flux from the binary is calculated using Gauss-Legendre integration over the ellipses that are the projection of these ellipsoids on the sky. The model can also be used to calculate the flux-weighted radial velocity of the stars during an eclipse (Rossiter-McLaghlin effect). The main features of the model have been tested by comparison to observed data and other light curve models. Results: The model is found to be accurate enough to analyse the very high quality photometry that is now available from space-spaced instruments, flexible enough to model a wide range of eclipsing binary stars and extrasolar planetary systems, and fast enough to enable the use of modern Monte Carlo methods for data analysis and model testing. The software package is available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/591/A111

  5. Single-particle light-scattering measurement: photochemical aerosols and atmospheric particulates.

    PubMed

    Phillips, D T; Wyatt, P J

    1972-09-01

    The use of single-particle light-scattering measurements to determine the origin of atmospheric hazes has been explored by measurement of laboratory aerosols, field samples, and computer analysis of the light-scattering data. The refractive index of measured spherical particles 800 nm to 1000 nm in diameter was determined within 2%. For particles of diameter less than 500 nm the measurement of absolute scattering intensity is required for complete analysis. Distinctive nonspherical and absorbing particles were observed both in automotive exhaust and atmospheric samples. Electrostatic suspension of atmospheric particulates is demonstrated to provide a practical approach to optical measurement of single particles. The technique may be used to calibrate optical particle counters or identify particles with unique shape or refractive index.

  6. SPED Light Sheet Microscopy: Fast Mapping of Biological System Structure and Function.

    PubMed

    Tomer, Raju; Lovett-Barron, Matthew; Kauvar, Isaac; Andalman, Aaron; Burns, Vanessa M; Sankaran, Sethuraman; Grosenick, Logan; Broxton, Michael; Yang, Samuel; Deisseroth, Karl

    2015-12-17

    The goal of understanding living nervous systems has driven interest in high-speed and large field-of-view volumetric imaging at cellular resolution. Light sheet microscopy approaches have emerged for cellular-resolution functional brain imaging in small organisms such as larval zebrafish, but remain fundamentally limited in speed. Here, we have developed SPED light sheet microscopy, which combines large volumetric field-of-view via an extended depth of field with the optical sectioning of light sheet microscopy, thereby eliminating the need to physically scan detection objectives for volumetric imaging. SPED enables scanning of thousands of volumes-per-second, limited only by camera acquisition rate, through the harnessing of optical mechanisms that normally result in unwanted spherical aberrations. We demonstrate capabilities of SPED microscopy by performing fast sub-cellular resolution imaging of CLARITY mouse brains and cellular-resolution volumetric Ca(2+) imaging of entire zebrafish nervous systems. Together, SPED light sheet methods enable high-speed cellular-resolution volumetric mapping of biological system structure and function. PMID:26687363

  7. Fast-acting compressive and facilitatory nonlinearities in light-adapted fly photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Weckström, M; Juusola, M; Uusitalo, R O; French, A S

    1995-01-01

    Light-adapted fly photoreceptor cells were stimulated with brief positive and negative contrast flashes (contrast = delta I/I, I = intensity). Membrane potential responses to a wide range of flash intensities were well-fitted by a static nonlinearity followed by a compartmental model represented by a gamma function. However, the agreement improved if one parameter of the gamma function, n, varied quadratically with input light intensity. Response amplitude and time to peak were estimated from the fitted parameters. Response amplitude varied approximately linearly with contrast but showed nonlinear compression with the largest negative flashes. Reducing the background light level by 3 decades or hyperpolarizing the cell electrically produced stronger nonlinear compression with both contrast polarities. This is probably due to fast voltage-activated K+ channels. Responses to double flashes with varying time separations were well-fitted by summed gamma functions, allowing separation of the individual flash responses. There was no detectable time-dependent interaction between paired positive flashes at all separations. However, the response to two negative flashes was greater than the linear prediction at short separations, and this facilitatory nonlinearity decayed with a time constant of about 1 msec. The facilitation is probably related to resonant behavior in light-adapted photoreceptors and may be due to an IP3-induced intracellular Ca2+ release.

  8. Variability of light transmission through Arctic land-fast sea ice during spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolaus, M.; Petrich, C.; Hudson, S. R.; Granskog, M. A.

    2012-10-01

    The amount of solar radiation transmitted through Arctic sea ice is determined by the thickness and physical properties of snow and sea ice. Light transmittance is highly variable in space and time since thickness and physical properties of snow and sea ice are highly heterogeneous on variable time and length scales. We present field measurements of under-ice irradiance along repeated (March, May, June 2010) transects under un-deformed land-fast sea ice at Barrow, Alaska. The objective was to quantify seasonal evolution and spatial variability of light transmittance through snow and sea ice. Along with optical measurements, snow depth, sea ice thickness, and freeboard were recorded, and ice cores were analyzed for Chlorophyll a and particulate matter. Our results show that snow cover variability prior to onset of snow melt may cause as much spatial variability of relative light transmittance as the contrast of ponded and white ice during summer. In both instances, a spatial variability of up to three times above and below the mean was measured. In addition, we found a thirtyfold increase of light transmittance as a result of partial snowmelt. Hence, the seasonal evolution of transmittance through sea ice exceeded the spatial variability. Nevertheless, more comprehensive under-ice radiation measurements are needed for a more generalized and large-scale understanding of the under-ice energy budget for physical, biological, and geochemical applications.

  9. Improved light extraction with nano-particles offering directional radiation diagrams

    SciTech Connect

    Jouanin, A.; Hugonin, J. P.; Besbes, M.; Lalanne, P.

    2014-01-13

    We propose a unique approach for light extraction, using engineered nano-particles to efficiently decouple the light guided in transverse-magnetic guided modes into free-space radiation modes that leak out normally to the thin-film stacks. The underlying mechanism takes advantage of a small electric field variation at the nano-particle scale and induces a “polarization conversion,” which renders the induced dipole moment perpendicular to the polarization of the incident light. Our analysis is supported by 2D fully vectorial computational results. Potential applications for light emitting or photovoltaic devices are outlined.

  10. Transparency and tunable slow and fast light in a nonlinear optomechanical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ling; Nie, Wenjie; Chen, Aixi

    2016-10-01

    We investigate theoretically the optical response of the output field and the tunable slow and fast light in a nonlinear optomechanical cavity with a degenerate optical parametric amplifier (OPA) and a higher order excited atomic ensemble. Studies show that the higher-order-excitation atom which is similar to the degenerate OPA that acts as a nonlinear medium, induces an additional dip in absorption spectrum of the probe field. The coherence of the mechanical oscillator leads to split the peak in absorption in the probe field spectrum so that the phenomenon of optomechanically induced transparency (OMIT) is generated from the output probe field. In particular, the presence of nonlinearities with the degenerate OPA and the higher order excited atoms can affect significantly the width of the transparency windows, providing an additional flexibility for controlling optical properties. Furthermore, in the presence of the degenerate OPA, the optical-response properties for the probe field become phase-sensitive so that a tunable switch from slow to fast light can be realized.

  11. Transparency and tunable slow and fast light in a nonlinear optomechanical cavity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ling; Nie, Wenjie; Chen, Aixi

    2016-01-01

    We investigate theoretically the optical response of the output field and the tunable slow and fast light in a nonlinear optomechanical cavity with a degenerate optical parametric amplifier (OPA) and a higher order excited atomic ensemble. Studies show that the higher-order-excitation atom which is similar to the degenerate OPA that acts as a nonlinear medium, induces an additional dip in absorption spectrum of the probe field. The coherence of the mechanical oscillator leads to split the peak in absorption in the probe field spectrum so that the phenomenon of optomechanically induced transparency (OMIT) is generated from the output probe field. In particular, the presence of nonlinearities with the degenerate OPA and the higher order excited atoms can affect significantly the width of the transparency windows, providing an additional flexibility for controlling optical properties. Furthermore, in the presence of the degenerate OPA, the optical-response properties for the probe field become phase-sensitive so that a tunable switch from slow to fast light can be realized. PMID:27725763

  12. Fast electron energy deposition in a magnetized plasma: Kinetic theory and particle-in-cell simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Robiche, J.; Rax, J.-M.; Bonnaud, G.; Gremillet, L.

    2010-03-15

    The collisional dynamics of a relativistic electron jet in a magnetized plasma are investigated within the framework of kinetic theory. The relativistic Fokker-Planck equation describing slowing down, pitch angle scattering, and cyclotron rotation is derived and solved. Based on the solution of this Fokker-Planck equation, an analytical formula for the root mean square spot size transverse to the magnetic field is derived and this result predicts a reduction in radial transport. Some comparisons with particle-in-cell simulation are made and confirm striking agreement between the theory and the simulation. For fast electron with 1 MeV typical kinetic energy interacting with a solid density hydrogen plasma, the energy deposition density in the transverse direction increases by a factor 2 for magnetic field of the order of 1 T. Along the magnetic field, the energy deposition profile is unaltered compared with the field-free case.

  13. Transmitter Upgrade for JET Alfv'en Eigenmode Fast Particle Interaction Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woskov, P.; Porkolab, M.; Fasoli, A.; Blanchard, P.

    2009-11-01

    One of the main missions of the worldwide fusion R&D effort is to develop predictive and control capability of burning plasmas in support of ITER. A unique 8-coil antenna system has been implemented on JET to study fast-ion interactions with Alfv'en eigenmodes in the 50 -- 500 kHz range that could potentially increase losses of α particles and reduce fusion gain. The single 4 kW transmitter will be replaced with eight 1 kW transmitters that will independently power each antenna to more uniformly distribute the power among the antennas. This will improve the coupling to higher order modes (n = 5 - 30) for damping studies. Independent drivers will also be used to make possible multi frequency and arbitrary phase studies of multiple modes and traveling modes. Various analog and digital driver approaches are being considered to provide the needed flexibility. A systems design will be presented.

  14. Particle-In-Cell modeling of Fast Ignition experiments on the Titan Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Link, Anthony; Akli, K. U.; Beg, F.; Chen, C. D.; Davies, J. R.; Freeman, R. R.; Kemp, G. E.; Li, K.; McLean, H. S.; Morace, A.; Patel, P. K.; Schumacher, D. W.; Sorokovikova, A. V.; Stephens, R.; Streeter, M. J. V.; Wertepny, D.; Westhover, B.

    2012-10-01

    We report on particle-in-cell-modeling (PIC) of fast ignition experiments conducted on the Titan laser. The Titan laser was used to irradiate multilayer planar targets at intensities greater than 10^20 Wcm-2 to diagnose the laser to electron coupling, electron beam divergence, and energy spectrum of the hot electrons at relativistic intensities. Hot electron beam properties were inferred through buried fluors, escaping electrons and bremsstrahlung measurements. The PIC simulations of the experiment were conducted in two stages: a high resolution laser plasma interaction (LPI) simulation using measured on shot laser parameters but with a subscale target; and a lower resolution transport simulation containing the full scale multilayer target. The transport simulation utilized the electron source based on the output of the LPI simulation and included necessary models to simulate the experimental diagnostics. Comparison of the predicted electron source properties and the experimental data will be presented.

  15. Unperceivable noise to active light touch effects on fast postural sway.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Tetsuya; Kouzaki, Motoki; Masani, Kei; Moritani, Toshio

    2012-01-01

    Human postural sway during quiet standing is reduced when a fingertip lightly touches a stable surface. The tactile feedback information from the fingertip has been considered responsible for this effect of light touch. Studies have shown that a noise-like minute stimulation to the sensory system can improve the system's weak signal detection. In the present study, we investigated whether a noise-like unperceivable vibration on the fingertip enhances its tactile sensation and facilitates the effect of light touch during quiet standing. Thirteen volunteers maintained quiet standing while lightly touching a touch surface with the index fingertip. Based on each subject's vibrotactile threshold (VT), a noise-like vibration was applied to the touch surface at amplitudes under (0.5VT) or at VT (1.0VT), in addition to the normal light touch condition (no vibration, 0VT). The results showed that the mean velocities of the foot center of pressure (CoP) in both the anteroposterior (AP) and mediolateral (ML) directions were significantly reduced at 0.5VT compared to 0VT and 1.0VT (P<0.05), while there was no significant difference between 1.0VT and 0VT (P>0.05). Frequency analysis of CoP revealed that the power of high-frequency fluctuation (1-10Hz) was significantly reduced at 0.5VT (P<0.05), whereas no significant change was observed in that of low-frequency sway (below 1Hz) (P>0.05). These results indicate that an unperceivable noise-like vibration can facilitate the effect of light touch on postural stability, by further reducing fast postural sway. PMID:22075223

  16. Particle-based labeling: Fast point-feature labeling without obscuring other visual features.

    PubMed

    Luboschik, Martin; Schumann, Heidrun; Cords, Hilko

    2008-01-01

    In many information visualization techniques, labels are an essential part to communicate the visualized data. To preserve the expressiveness of the visual representation, a placed label should neither occlude other labels nor visual representatives (e.g., icons, lines) that communicate crucial information. Optimal, non-overlapping labeling is an NP-hard problem. Thus, only a few approaches achieve a fast non-overlapping labeling in highly interactive scenarios like information visualization. These approaches generally target the point-feature label placement (PFLP) problem, solving only label-label conflicts. This paper presents a new, fast, solid and flexible 2D labeling approach for the PFLP problem that additionally respects other visual elements and the visual extent of labeled features. The results (number of placed labels, processing time) of our particle-based method compare favorably to those of existing techniques. Although the esthetic quality of non-real-time approaches may not be achieved with our method, it complies with practical demands and thus supports the interactive exploration of information spaces. In contrast to the known adjacent techniques, the flexibility of our technique enables labeling of dense point clouds by the use of non-occluding distant labels. Our approach is independent of the underlying visualization technique, which enables us to demonstrate the application of our labeling method within different information visualization scenarios.

  17. Effect of particles on ultraviolet light penetration in natural and engineered systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamane, Hadas; Ducoste, Joel J.; Linden, Karl G.

    2006-03-01

    The effect of light scattering on measurement of UV absorbance and penetration of germicidal UVC irradiance in a UV reactor were studied. Using a standard spectrophotometer, absorbance measurements exhibited significant error when particles that scatter light were present but could be corrected by integrating sphere spectroscopy. Particles from water treatment plants and wastewater effluents exhibited less scattering (20%-30%) compared with particles such as clay (50%) and alumina (95%-100%). The distribution of light intensity in a UV reactor for a scattering suspension was determined using a spherical chemical actinometry method. Highly scattering alumina particles increased the fluence rate in the reactor near the UV lamp, whereas clay particles and absorbing organic matter reduced the fluence rate. A radiative transfer fluence rate model reasonably predicted the fluence rate of absorbing media and highly scattering suspensions in the UV reactor.

  18. Multiple particle production processes in the light'' of quantum optics

    SciTech Connect

    Friedlander, E.M.

    1990-09-01

    Ever since the observation that high-energy nuclear active'' cosmic-ray particles create bunches of penetrating particles upon hitting targets, a controversy has raged about whether these secondaries are created in a single act'' or whether many hadrons are just the result of an intra-nuclear cascade, yielding one meson in every step. I cannot escape the impression that: the latter kind of model appeals naturally as a consequence of an innate bio-morphism in our way of thinking and that in one guise or another it has tenaciously survived to this day, also for hadron-hadron collisions, via multi-peripheral models to the modern parton shower approach. Indeed, from the very beginning of theoretical consideration of multiparticle production, the possibility of many particles arising from a single hot'' system has been explored, with many fruitful results, not the least of which are the s{sup 1/4} dependence of the mean produced particle multiplicity and the thermal'' shape of the P{sub T} spectra. An important consequence of the thermodynamical-hydrodynamical models is that particle emission is treated in analogy to black-body radiation, implying for the secondaries a set of specific Quantum-Statistical properties, very similar to those observed in quantum optics. From here on I shall try to review a number of implications and applications of this QS analogy in the study of multiplicity distributions of the produced secondaries. I will touch only in passing another very important topic of this class, the Bose-Einstein two-particle correlations.

  19. Light scattering and dynamics of interacting Brownian particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsang, T.; Tang, H. T.

    1982-01-01

    The relative motions of interacting Brownian particles in liquids may be described as radial diffusion in an effective potential of the mean force. By using a harmonic approximation for the effective potential, the intermediate scattering function may also be evaluated. For polystyrene spheres of 250 A mean radius in aqueous environment at 0.00125 g/cu cm concentration, the results for the calculated mean square displacement are in qualitative agreement with experimental data from photon correlation spectroscopy. Because of the interactions, the functions deviate considerably from the exponential forms for the free particles.

  20. Monodisperse spherical mesoporous silica particles: fast synthesis procedure and fabrication of photonic-crystal films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trofimova, E. Yu; Kurdyukov, D. A.; Yakovlev, S. A.; Kirilenko, D. A.; Kukushkina, Yu A.; Nashchekin, A. V.; Sitnikova, A. A.; Yagovkina, M. A.; Golubev, V. G.

    2013-04-01

    A procedure for the synthesis of monodisperse spherical mesoporous silica particles (MSMSPs) via the controlled coagulation of silica/surfactant clusters into spherical aggregates with mean diameters of 250-1500 nm has been developed. The synthesis is fast (taking less than 1 h) because identical clusters are simultaneously formed in the reaction mixture. The results of microscopic, x-ray diffraction, adsorption and optical measurements allowed us to conclude that the clusters are ˜15 nm in size and have hexagonally packed cylindrical pore channels. The channel diameters in MSMSPs obtained with cethyltrimethylammonium bromide and decyltrimethylammonium bromide as structure-directing agents were 3.1 ± 0.15 and 2.3 ± 0.12 nm, respectively. The specific surface area and the pore volume of MSMSP were, depending on synthesis conditions, 480-1095 m2 g-1 and 0.50-0.65 cm3 g-1. The MSMSP were used to grow opal-like photonic-crystal films possessing a hierarchical macro-mesoporous structure, with pores within and between the particles. A selective filling of mesopore channels with glycerol, based on the difference between the capillary pressures in macro- and mesopores, was demonstrated. It is shown that this approach makes it possible to control the photonic bandgap position in mesoporous opal films by varying the degree of mesopore filling with glycerol.

  1. DIFFUSIVE SHOCK ACCELERATION OF HIGH-ENERGY CHARGED PARTICLES AT FAST INTERPLANETARY SHOCKS: A PARAMETER SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Giacalone, Joe

    2015-01-20

    We present results from numerical simulations of the acceleration of solar energetic particles (SEPs) associated with strong, fast, and radially propagating interplanetary shocks. We focus on the phase of the SEP event at the time of the shock passage at 1 AU, which is when the peak intensity at energies below a few MeV is the highest. The shocks in our study start between 2 and 10 solar radii and propagate beyond 1 AU. We study the effect of various shock and particle input parameters, such as the spatial diffusion coefficient, shock speed, solar wind speed, initial location of the shock, and shock deceleration rate, on the total integrated differential intensity, I, of SEPs with kinetic energies > 10 MeV. I is the integral over energy of the differential intensity spectrum at the time of the shock passage at 1 AU. We find that relatively small changes in the parameters can lead to significant event-to-event changes in I. For example, a factor of 2 increase in the diffusion coefficient at a given energy and spatial location, can lead to a decrease in I by as much as a factor of 50. This may help explain why there are fewer large SEP events seen during the current solar maximum compared to previous maxima. It is known that the magnitude of the interplanetary magnetic field is noticeably weaker this solar cycle than it was in the previous cycle and this will naturally lead to a somewhat larger diffusion coefficient of SEPs.

  2. Slow and fast light using nonlinear processes in semiconductor optical amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesala, Bala Subrahmanyam

    Ability to control the velocity of light is usually referred to as slow or fast light depending on whether the group velocity of light is reduced or increased. The slowing of light as it passes through the glass to 2/3rd its original value is a well known phenomenon. This slowing down happens due to the interaction of light with the electrons in the medium. As a general principle, stronger the interaction, larger is the reduction in velocity. Recently, a fascinating field has emerged with the objective of not only slowing down the velocity of light but also speeding it up as it goes through the medium by enhancing light-matter interaction. This unprecedented control opens up several exciting applications in various scientific disciplines ranging from nonlinear science, RF photonics to all-optical networks. Initial experiments succeeded in reducing the velocity of light more than a million times to a very impressive 17 m/s. This speed reduction is extremely useful to enhance various nonlinear processes. For RF photonic applications including phased array antennas and tunable filters, control of phase velocity of light is required while control of group velocity serves various functionalities including packet synchronization and contention resolution in an optical buffer. Within the last 10 years, several material systems have been proposed and investigated for this purpose. Schemes based on semiconductor systems for achieving slow and fast light has the advantage of extremely high speed and electrical control. In addition, they are compact, operate at room temperature and can be easily integrated with other optical subsystems. In this work, we propose to use nonlinear processes in semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs) for the purpose of controlling the velocity of light. The versatility of the physical processes present in SOAs enables the control of optical signals ranging from 1GHz to larger than 1000 GHz (1 THz). First, we experimentally demonstrate both

  3. Heavy and Light Particles of Adeno-Associated Virus

    PubMed Central

    de la Maza, Luis M.; Carter, Barrie J.

    1980-01-01

    KB cells coinfected with adenovirus and adeno-associated virus (AAV) yielded two kinds of infectious AAV particles that banded in CsCl at densities of 1.45 and 1.41 g/cm2, respectively. The 1.45 band was found to be composed of a heterogeneous group of viral particles that could be subfractionated by velocity sedimentation. The main component from this band had a smaller S value (109) than the main component from the 1.41 band (111S), although both had the same DNA/protein ratio and the same density in metrizamide gradients. Continuous-label experiments showed that early after infection, both components (1.45 and 1.41) were generated in the same amounts, but this was followed by a relative increase in the proportion of the 1.41 component over the 1.45 particles. Pulse-chase analysis failed to demonstrate a precursor-product relationship between these two bands. The slower-sedimenting components from the 1.45 band were unstable in CsCl and were present in a greater proportion early after infection. These particles contained DNA that was enriched for the terminal sequences of the AAV genomes and was accessible to digestion with micrococcal nuclease. Images PMID:6245263

  4. Determination of Particle Size by Diffraction of Light

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rinard, Phillip M.

    1974-01-01

    Describes a simplified diffraction experiment offered in a workshop with the purpose of illustrating to high school students the relation of science to society. The radii determined for cigarette smoke particles range from 0.2 to 0.5 micrometer in this experiment. Included is a description of the diffraction theory. (CC)

  5. Development of Spectral and Atomic Models for Diagnosing Energetic Particle Characteristics in Fast Ignition Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    MacFarlane, Joseph J

    2009-08-07

    This Final Report summarizes work performed under DOE STTR Phase II Grant No. DE-FG02-05ER86258 during the project period from August 2006 to August 2009. The project, “Development of Spectral and Atomic Models for Diagnosing Energetic Particle Characteristics in Fast Ignition Experiments,” was led by Prism Computational Sciences (Madison, WI), and involved collaboration with subcontractors University of Nevada-Reno and Voss Scientific (Albuquerque, NM). In this project, we have: Developed and implemented a multi-dimensional, multi-frequency radiation transport model in the LSP hybrid fluid-PIC (particle-in-cell) code [1,2]. Updated the LSP code to support the use of accurate equation-of-state (EOS) tables generated by Prism’s PROPACEOS [3] code to compute more accurate temperatures in high energy density physics (HEDP) plasmas. Updated LSP to support the use of Prism’s multi-frequency opacity tables. Generated equation of state and opacity data for LSP simulations for several materials being used in plasma jet experimental studies. Developed and implemented parallel processing techniques for the radiation physics algorithms in LSP. Benchmarked the new radiation transport and radiation physics algorithms in LSP and compared simulation results with analytic solutions and results from numerical radiation-hydrodynamics calculations. Performed simulations using Prism radiation physics codes to address issues related to radiative cooling and ionization dynamics in plasma jet experiments. Performed simulations to study the effects of radiation transport and radiation losses due to electrode contaminants in plasma jet experiments. Updated the LSP code to generate output using NetCDF to provide a better, more flexible interface to SPECT3D [4] in order to post-process LSP output. Updated the SPECT3D code to better support the post-processing of large-scale 2-D and 3-D datasets generated by simulation codes such as LSP. Updated atomic physics modeling to provide for

  6. Visible light photon counters (VLPCs) for high rate tracking medical imaging and particle astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Atac, M.

    1998-02-01

    This paper is on the operation principles of the Visible Light Photon Counters (VLPCs), application to high luminosity-high multiplicity tracking for High Energy Charged Particle Physics, and application to Medical Imaging and Particle Astrophysics. The VLPCs as Solid State Photomultipliers (SSPMS) with high quantum efficiency can detect down to single photons very efficiently with excellent time resolution and high avalanche gains.

  7. EPR and CD spectroscopy of fast myosin light chain conformation during binding of trifluoperazine.

    PubMed

    Huang, W; Wilson, G J; Brown, L J; Lam, H; Hambly, B D

    1998-10-15

    The conformations of isolated rabbit fast myosin light chains (LCs) were modified using trifluoperazine (TFP), the hydrophobic calmodulin inhibitor. CD spectroscopy showed that TFP altered secondary structural content of the LCs, with half-maximal effects at TFP concentrations of approximately 14-50 microM, which is within the range required to alter muscle fiber contraction in both agonistic and antagonistic ways [Kurebayashi, N. & Ogawa, Y. (1988) J. Physiol. 403, 407-424]. EPR spectroscopy provided structural information from paramagnetic probes on C-terminal domain surfaces. In the absence of TFP, tauR (rotational correlation time) was 1.6 ns for both alkali light chains (ALCs) and 1.8 ns for light chain 2 (LC2). This was faster than expected for proteins of this size (approximately 10 ns). TFP progressively recruited the probes into populations with tauR sevenfold to 12-fold slower, with half-maximal effects at a TFP concentration of approximately 370-800 microM. The differences probably indicate that CD spectroscopy detects changes in protein conformation due to 'specific' TFP binding at the LC hydrophobic core, while less specific binding at higher TFP concentrations is required to effect conformational changes on the protein surfaces near the paramagnetic probes. TFP binding was generally not cooperative. Comparative sequence analysis between calmodulin, troponin C, and myosin LCs indicated considerable conservation between residues expected to bind TFP.

  8. Investigation of Very Fast Light Detectors: Silicon Photomultiplier and Micro PMT for a Cosmic Ray Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervantes, Omar; Reyes, Liliana; Hooks, Tyler; Perez, Luis; Ritt, Stefan

    2016-03-01

    To construct a cosmic detector array using 4 scintillation detectors, we investigated 2 recent light sensor technologies from Hamamatsu, as possible readout detectors. First, we investigated several homemade versions of the multipixel photon counter (MPPC) light sensors. These detectors were either biased with internal or external high voltage power supplies. We made extensive measurements to confirm for the coincidence of the MPPC devices. Each sensor is coupled to a wavelength shifting fiber (WSF) that is embedded along a plastic scintillator sheet (30cmx60cmx1/4''). Using energetic cosmic rays, we evaluated several of these homemade detector modules placed above one another in a light proof enclosure. Next, we assembled 2 miniaturized micro photomultiplier (micro PMT), a device recently marketed by Hamamatsu. These sensors showed very fast response times. With 3 WSF embedded in scintillator sheets, we performed coincidence experiments. The detector waveforms were captured using the 5GS/sec domino ring sampler, the DRS4 and our workflow using the CERN PAW package and data analysis results would be presented. Title V Grant.

  9. Fast evolving pair-instability supernova models: Evolution, explosion, light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozyreva, Alexandra; Gilmer, Matthew; Hirschi, Raphael; Fröhlich, Carla; Blinnikov, Sergey; Wollaeger, Ryan T.; Noebauer, Ulrich M.; van Rossum, Daniel R.; Heger, Alexander; Even, Wesley P.; Waldman, Roni; Tolstov, Alexey; Chatzopoulos, Emmanouil; Sorokina, Elena

    2016-10-01

    With an increasing number of superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) discovered the question of their origin remains open and causes heated debates in the supernova community. Currently, there are three proposed mechanisms for SLSNe: (1) pair-instability supernovae (PISN), (2) magnetar-driven supernovae, and (3) models in which the supernova ejecta interacts with a circumstellar material ejected before the explosion. Based on current observations of SLSNe, the PISN origin has been disfavoured for a number of reasons. Many PISN models provide overly broad light curves and too reddened spectra, because of massive ejecta and a high amount of nickel. In the current study we re-examine PISN properties using progenitor models computed with the GENEC code. We calculate supernova explosions with FLASH and light curve evolution with the radiation hydrodynamics code STELLA. We find that high-mass models (200 M⊙ and 250 M⊙) at relatively high metallicity (Z = 0.001) do not retain hydrogen in the outer layers and produce relatively fast evolving PISNe Type I and might be suitable to explain some SLSNe. We also investigate uncertainties in light curve modelling due to codes, opacities, the nickel-bubble effect and progenitor structure and composition.

  10. Ultraviolet Light Enhances the Bovine Serum Albumin Fixation for Acid Fast Bacilli Stain

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Pei-Yin; Lee, Shih-Yi; Chou, Yu-Ching; Fu, Yung-Chieh; Wu, Chen-Cheng; Chiueh, Tzong-Shi

    2014-01-01

    The use of a liquid culture system such as MGIT broth has greatly improved the sensitivity of isolating mycobacteria in clinical laboratories. Microscopic visualization of acid fast bacilli (AFB) in the culture positive MGIT broth remains the first routine step for rapidly indicating the presence of mycobacteria. We modified an ultraviolet (UV) light fixation process to increase AFB cells adherence to the slide. The retained haze proportion of a 1-cm circle marked area on the smear slide was quantified after the staining procedure indicating the adherence degree of AFB cells. More AFB cells were preserved on the slide after exposure to UV light of either germicidal lamp or UV crosslinker in a time-dependent manner. We demonstrated both the bovine serum albumin (BSA) in MGIT media and UV light exposure were required for enhancing fixation of AFB cells. While applying to AFB stains for 302 AFB positive MGIT broths in clinics, more AFB cells were retained and observed on smear slides prepared by the modified fixation procedure rather than by the conventional method. The modified fixation procedure was thus recommended for improving the sensitivity of microscopic diagnosis of AFB cells in culture positive MGIT broth. PMID:24586725

  11. Slow and fast light propagation in a triple quantum well nanostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solookinejad, Ghahraman; Panahi, Mohsen; Ahmadi Sangachin, Elnaz; Asadpour, Seyyed Hossein

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we investigate the absorption and dispersion properties of a weak probe field in a triple quantum well nanostructure by using the incoherent pumping fields. A deep 7.1 nm-thick GaAs well is coupled, on one side, to two shallow 6.8 nm-thick Al0.2Ga0.8As wells by a 2.5 nm-thick Al0.4Ga0.6As barrier. The two shallow wells are separated by a 2.0 nm-thick Al0.4Ga0.8As barrier. Both sides of quantum well contact with 36 nm Al0.4Ga0.6As. Therefore, this type of triple quantum well nanostructure can be used as a suitable medium for studying the effect of spontaneously generated coherence (SGC) and interference between incoherent pumping fields on absorption and dispersion properties of weak probe light. We find that the interferences from spontaneous emission and incoherent pumping processes can change the slope of dispersion and group velocity of the probe light from slow to fast or vice versa. Moreover, it is demonstrated that the group velocity of the light pulse can be controlled with the rates of incoherent pumping fields.

  12. Influence of Ultraviolet Light on the Coulomb Coupling between Dust Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Misawa, Tatsuya; Fujita, Hiroharu

    2005-10-31

    The influence of ultraviolet light on the Coulomb coupling between dust particles was experimentally investigated in Radio-Frequency (RF, 13.56MHz) inductively coupled plasma. Flask shape dust cloud and the filamentary structure of dust particles were observed by adopting two turn ring far from the RF antenna. The ultraviolet radiation seemed to be not easy to pick up the polarization of the dust particles in the laboratory.

  13. Photoelectric charging of dust particles: Effect of spontaneous and light induced field emission of electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Sodha, M. S.; Dixit, A.

    2009-09-07

    The authors have analyzed the charging of dust particles in a plasma, taking into account the electron/ion currents to the particles, electron/ion generation and recombination, electric field emission, photoelectric emission and photoelectric field emission of electrons under the influence of light irradiation; the irradiance has been assumed to be at a level, which lets the particles retain the negative sign of the charge. Numerical results and discussion conclude the papers.

  14. Resolving Organized Aerosol Structures (Rolls and Layers) with Airborne Fast Mobility Particle Sizer (FMPS) During MILAGRO/INTEX Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapustin, V.; Clarke, A.; Zhou, J.; Howell, S.; Shinozuka, Y.; Brekhovskikh, V.; McNaughton, C.

    2007-12-01

    The Hawaii Group for Environmental Aerosol Research [http://www.soest.hawaii.edu/HIGEAR] deployed a wide range of aerosol instrumentation aboard the C-130 and the NASA DC-8 as part of MILAGRO/INTEX. These were designed to provide rapid information on aerosol composition, state of mixing (internal or external), spectral optical properties (scattering and absorption), the humidity dependence of light scattering-f(RH), and the role of condensed species in changing the absorption properties of black carbon (BC) and inferred properties of organic carbon (OC). These measurements included size distributions from about 7 nm up to about 10,000 nm and their volatility at 150, 300 and 400 C; size selected response to heating (volatility) to resolve the state of mixing of the aerosol; continuous measurements of the light scattering and absorption at 3 wavelengths; measurements of the f(RH). We also flew the first airborne deployment of the new Fast Mobility Particle Sizer (FMPS, TSI Inc.) that provided information on rapid (1Hz) size variations in the Aitken mode. This revealed small scale structure of the aerosol and allowed us to examine size distributions varying over space and time associated with mixing processes previously unresolved etc. Rapid measurements during profiles also revealed variations in size over shallow layers. Other dynamic processes included rapid size distribution measurements within orographically induced aerosol layers and size distribution evolution of the nanoparticles formed by nucleation (C-130 flights 5, 6 and 9). Evidence for fluctuations induced by underlying changes in topography was also detected. These measurements also frequently revealed the aerosol variability in the presence of boundary layer rolls aligned along the wind in the Marine Boundary Layer (Gulf region) both with and without visible cloud streets (DC-8 flight 4 and C-130 flight 7). This organized convection over 1-2 km scales influences the mixing processes (entrainment, RH

  15. Photoacoustic Doppler Effect from Flowing Small Light-Absorbing Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Hui; Maslov, Konstantin; Wang, Lihong V.

    2007-11-01

    From the flow of a suspension of micrometer-scale carbon particles, the photoacoustic Doppler shift is observed. As predicted theoretically, the observed Doppler shift equals half of that in Doppler ultrasound and does not depend on the direction of laser illumination. This new physical phenomenon provides a basis for developing photoacoustic Doppler flowmetry, which can potentially be used for detecting fluid flow in optically scattering media and especially low-speed blood flow of relatively deep microcirculation in biological tissue.

  16. Photoacoustic Doppler effect from flowing small light-absorbing particles.

    PubMed

    Fang, Hui; Maslov, Konstantin; Wang, Lihong V

    2007-11-01

    From the flow of a suspension of micrometer-scale carbon particles, the photoacoustic Doppler shift is observed. As predicted theoretically, the observed Doppler shift equals half of that in Doppler ultrasound and does not depend on the direction of laser illumination. This new physical phenomenon provides a basis for developing photoacoustic Doppler flowmetry, which can potentially be used for detecting fluid flow in optically scattering media and especially low-speed blood flow of relatively deep microcirculation in biological tissue.

  17. Apparatus and method for detection and characterization of particles using light scattered therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Johnston, R.G.

    1987-03-23

    Apparatus and method for detection and characterization of particles using light scattered therefrom. Differential phase measurements on scattered light from particles are possible using the two-frequency Zeeman effect laser which emits two frequencies of radiation 250 kHz apart. Excellent discrimination and reproducibility for various pure pollen and bacterial samples in suspension have been observed with a single polarization element. Additionally, a 250 kHz beat frequency was recorded from an individual particle traversing the focused output from the laser in a flow cytometer. 13 figs.

  18. Investigation of light scattering as a technique for detecting discrete soot particles in a luminous flame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The practicability of using a classical light-scattering technique, involving comparison of angular scattering intensity patterns with theoretically determined Mie and Rayleight patterns, to detect discrete soot particles (diameter less than 50 nm) in premixed propane/air and propane/oxygen-helium flames is considered. The experimental apparatus employed in this investigation included a laser light source, a flat-flame burner, specially coated optics, a cooled photomultiplier detector, and a lock-in voltmeter readout. Although large, agglomerated soot particles were detected and sized, it was not possible to detect small, discrete particles. The limiting factor appears to be background scattering by the system's optics.

  19. Interferometric apparatus and method for detection and characterization of particles using light scattered therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Johnston, Roger G.

    1988-01-01

    Interferometric apparatus and method for detection and characterization of particles using light scattered therefrom. Differential phase measurements on scattered light from particles are possible using the two-frequency Zeeman effect laser which emits two frequencies of radiation 250 kHz apart. Excellent discrimination and reproducibility for various pure pollen and bacterial samples in suspension have been observed with a single polarization element. Additionally, a 250 kHz beat frequency was recorded from an individual particle traversing the focused output from the laser in a flow cytometer.

  20. Study of colloidal particle Brownian aggregation by low-coherence fiber optic dynamic light scattering.

    PubMed

    Xia, Hui; Pang, Ru Yi; Zhang, Rui; Miao, Cai Xia; Wu, Xiao Yun; Hou, Xue Shun; Zhong, Cheng

    2012-06-15

    The aggregation kinetics of particles in dense polystyrene latex suspensions is studied by low-coherence fiber optic dynamic light scattering. Low-coherence fiber optic dynamic light scattering is used to measure the hydrodynamic radius of the aggregates. The aggregation kinetics data obtained can be fitted into a single exponential function, which is the characteristic of slow aggregation. It is found that the aggregation rate of particles increased with higher electrolyte levels and with larger particle concentrations. The experimental results can be explained by use of the Derjaruin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeer (DLVO) theory. PMID:22446146

  1. Weak-value amplification of the fast-light effect in rubidium vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirhosseini, Mohammad; Viza, Gerardo I.; Magaña-Loaiza, Omar S.; Malik, Mehul; Howell, John C.; Boyd, Robert W.

    2016-05-01

    We use weak-value amplification to enhance the polarization-sensitive fast-light effect from induced Raman absorption in hot rubidium vapor. We experimentally demonstrate that projecting the output signal into an appropriate polarization state enables a pulse advancement of 4.2 μ s , which is more than 15 times larger than that naturally caused by dispersion. More significantly, we show that combining weak-value amplification with the dispersive response of an atomic system provides a clear advantage in terms of the maximum pulse advance achievable for a given value of loss. This technique has potential applications for designing novel quantum-information-processing gates and optical buffers for telecommunication systems.

  2. Fast and high light yield scintillation in the Ga2O3 semiconductor material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagida, Takayuki; Okada, Go; Kato, Takumi; Nakauchi, Daisuke; Yanagida, Satoko

    2016-04-01

    We report the distinct scintillation properties of the well-known Ga2O3 semiconductor material. Under UV excitation, the photoluminescence (PL) emission peak appeared near a wavelength of 380 nm with a quantum yield of 6%, and fast decays of 8 and 793 ns were observed. In contrast, the X-ray-induced scintillation spectrum showed an intense emission band near a wavelength of 380 nm, whose decay curve was reproduced using two exponential decay components with time constants of 8 and 977 ns. The pulse height spectrum of 137Cs γ-rays measured using Ga2O3 showed a clear photoabsorption peak with a light yield of 15000 ± 1500 photons/MeV.

  3. A fast CMOS array imager for nanosecond light pulse detection in accumulation mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zint, Chantal-V.; Uhring, Wilfried; Casadei, Bruno; Le Normand, Jean-P.; Morel, Frederic; Hu, Yann

    2004-09-01

    We designed a camera based on a fast CMOS APS imager for high speed optical detection which produces images simi-larly as a streak camera. This imager produces the intensity information I as function of one spatial dimension and time (I=f(x,t)) from one frame with two spatial dimensions. The time sweeping is obtained by delaying successively the integration phase for each pixel of the same row. For the first FAMOSI (Fast MOs Imager) prototype the start of in-tegration is given by the camera itself. This signal is injected to a laser trigger. This laser emits a 10 nanoseconds light pulse onto the sensor. The temporal evolution of the light pulse is then resolved by the camera with a resolution of 800 ps. In single shot, the maximum dynamic of the camera is estimated to 64 dB and is limited by the readout noise. We decide to work in accumulation mode in order to increase the signal to noise ratio of the camera. But the high laser trigger (about 20 ns rms) does not allow accumulation of several optical events without a large spreading. The camera has been modified in order to be triggered by an external signal delivered by a trigger unit. In this new configuration the laser emit pulses at a repetition rate of 50 Hz. A photodiode detect a part of the laser pulse and generate the trigger signal for FAMOSI. The laser pulse is delayed with an optical fibre before being directed to the camera. The trigger jitter obtained is then less than 100 ps and allows accumulation without significant loss of the temporal resolution. With accumulation the readout noise is attenuated by a √N factor. Then with N = 1000 accumulations, the dynamics approach 93 dB. This allows the camera to work similarly as a synchroscan streak camera and then to observe weak signal.

  4. Novel endotoxin assay by laser light-scattering particle-counting method.

    PubMed

    Mitsumoto, Kotaro; Yabusaki, Katsumi; Kobayashi, Koji; Shirasawa, Yoshiaki; Obata, Toru

    2009-01-01

    Exposure of Limulus amoebocyte lysate to endotoxin under stirring produced light-reflective particles that appeared to be coagulin polymers. A laser light-scattering particle counter, the PA-200, detected these particles sensitively. The PA-200 detected endotoxin at a concentration as low as 0.00015 EU/ml in 71 min, whereas the minimum endotoxin concentration measured by a turbidimeter, ET-2000, was 0.0005 EU/ml in 138 min. Moreover, PA-200 was much less affected by the presence of colored substances and refractive materials than was ET-2000. We propose that the high sensitivity, speed, and high interference tolerance of the laser light-scattering particle-counting method make it more useful than the widely used turbidimetric method for quantitative endotoxin assay.

  5. Nonlinear light scattering and spectroscopy of particles and droplets in liquids.

    PubMed

    Roke, Sylvie; Gonella, Grazia

    2012-01-01

    Nano- and microparticles have optical, structural, and chemical properties that differ from both their building blocks and the bulk materials themselves. These different physical and chemical properties are induced by the high surface-to-volume ratio. As a logical consequence, to understand the properties of nano- and microparticles, it is of fundamental importance to characterize the particle surfaces and their interactions with the surrounding medium. Recent developments of nonlinear light scattering techniques have resulted in a deeper insight of the underlying light-matter interactions. They have shed new light on the molecular mechanism of surface kinetics in solution, properties of interfacial water in contact with hydrophilic and hydrophobic particles and droplets, molecular orientation distribution of molecules at particle surfaces in solution, interfacial structure of surfactants at droplet interfaces, acid-base chemistry on particles in solution, and vesicle structure and transport properties.

  6. Variability of light absorption by aquatic particles in the near-infrared spectral region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tassan, Stelvio; Ferrari, Giovanni M.

    2003-08-01

    We have measured the light absorption of a set of particle suspensions of varying nature (pure minerals, particulate standards, aquatic particles) using a double-beam spectrophotometer with a 15-cm-diameter integrating sphere. The sample was located inside the sphere so as to minimize the effect of light scattering by the particles. The results obtained showed highly variable absorption in the near-IR region of the wavelength spectrum. The same particle samples were deposited on glass-fiber filters, and their absorption was measured by the transmittance-reflectance method, based on a theoretical model that corrects for the effect of light scattering. The good agreement found between the results of the measurements carried out inside the sphere and by the transmittance-reflectance method confirms the validity of the scattering correction included in the above method.

  7. Monte Carlo simulation of light reflection from cosmetic powder particles near the human skin surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Takashi; Kumagawa, Tatsuya; Motoda, Masafumi; Igarashi, Takanori; Nakao, Keisuke

    2013-06-01

    The reflection and scattering properties of light incident on human skin covered with powder particles have been investigated. A three-layer skin structure with a pigmented area is modeled, and the propagation of light in the skin's layers and in a layer of particles near the skin's surface is simulated using the Monte Carlo method. Assuming that only single scattering of light occurs in the powder layer, the simulation results show that the reflection spectra of light from the skin change with the size of powder particles. The color difference between normal and discolored skin is found to decrease considerably when powder particles with a diameter of approximately 0.25 μm are present near the skin's surface. The effects of the medium surrounding the particles, and the influence of the distribution of particle size (polydispersity), are also examined. It is shown that a surrounding medium with a refractive index close to that of the skin substantially suppresses the extreme spectral changes caused by the powder particles covering the skin surface.

  8. Small angle light scattering characterization of single micrometric particles in microfluidic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dannhauser, David; Romeo, Giovanni; Causa, Filippo; Netti, Paolo A.

    2013-04-01

    A CCD-camera based small angle light scattering (SALS) apparatus has been used to characterize single micrometric particles flowing in a micro-channel. The measured scattering vector spans the range 2x10-2 - 6:8x101μm-1. The incident laser light is collimated to a spot of about 50 μm in diameter at the sample position with a divergence lower than 0.045 rad. Such small collimated laser beam opens the possibility to perform on-line SALS of micron-sized particles flowing in micro-channels. By properly designing the micro-channel and using a viscoelastic liquid as suspending medium we are able to realize a precise 3D focusing of the target particles. The forward scattering emitted from the particle is collected by a lens with high numerical aperture. At the focal point of that lens a homemade beam stop is blocking the incident light. Finally, a second lens maps the scattered light on the CCD sensor, allowing to obtain far field images on short distances. Measurements with mono-disperse polystyrene particles, both in quiescent and in-flow conditions have been realized. Experiments in-flow allow to measure the single particle scattering. Results are validated by comparison with calculations based on the Lorenz-Mie theory. The quality of the measured intensity profiles confirms the possibility to use our apparatus in real multiplex applications, with particles down to 1 μm in radius.

  9. Monte Carlo simulation of light reflection from cosmetic powder particles near the human skin surface.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Takashi; Kumagawa, Tatsuya; Motoda, Masafumi; Igarashi, Takanori; Nakao, Keisuke

    2013-06-01

    The reflection and scattering properties of light incident on human skin covered with powder particles have been investigated. A three-layer skin structure with a pigmented area is modeled, and the propagation of light in the skin's layers and in a layer of particles near the skin's surface is simulated using the Monte Carlo method. Assuming that only single scattering of light occurs in the powder layer, the simulation results show that the reflection spectra of light from the skin change with the size of powder particles. The color difference between normal and discolored skin is found to decrease considerably when powder particles with a diameter of approximately 0.25 μm are present near the skin's surface. The effects of the medium surrounding the particles, and the influence of the distribution of particle size (polydispersity), are also examined. It is shown that a surrounding medium with a refractive index close to that of the skin substantially suppresses the extreme spectral changes caused by the powder particles covering the skin surface.

  10. Quasi-elastic light scattering from structured particles.

    PubMed

    Chen, S H; Holz, M; Tartaglia, P

    1977-01-01

    We present a formulation by which the scattered field correlation function of a nonstationary structured particle can be calculated. Specifically, we consider the case of micron-size bacteria, where the Rayleigh- Gans-Debye approximation may be used to evaluate the correlation function. We show that the width of the intensity correlation spectrum (as measured, for example, by the photon correlation technique) exhibits I an oscillatory behavior which is characteristic of the interference pattern produced by the internal structure. Two cases are of interest: diffusion and motility are considered in detail, and some evidence of the predicted behavior is shown from the photon correlation measurement of E. coli bacteria. PMID:20168450

  11. Neutral particles in light of the Majorana-Ahluwalia ideas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvoeglazov, Valeri V.

    1995-12-01

    The first part of this article presents an overview of the theory and phenomenology of truly neutral particles based on the papers of Majorana, Racah, Furry, McLennan, and Case. The recent development of the construct undertaken by Ahluwalia could be relevant for the explanation of the present experimental situation in neutrino physics and astrophysics. Then the new fundamental wave equations for self-/anti-self-conjugate type II spinors proposed by Ahluwalia are recast into covariant form. The connection with Foldy-Nigam-Bargmann-Wightman-Wigner (FNBWW)-type quantum field theory is found. Possible applications to the problem of neutrino oscillations are discussed.

  12. Laser Light Scattering with Multiple Scattering Suppression Used to Measure Particle Sizes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, William V.; Tin, Padetha; Lock, James A.; Cannell, David S.; Smart, Anthony E.; Taylor, Thomas W.

    1999-01-01

    Laser light scattering is the technique of choice for noninvasively sizing particles in a fluid. The members of the Advanced Technology Development (ATD) project in laser light scattering at the NASA Lewis Research Center have invented, tested, and recently enhanced a simple and elegant way to extend the concentration range of this standard laboratory particle-sizing technique by several orders of magnitude. With this technique, particles from 3 nm to 3 mm can be measured in a solution. Recently, laser light scattering evolved to successfully size particles in both clear solutions and concentrated milky-white solutions. The enhanced technique uses the property of light that causes it to form tall interference patterns at right angles to the scattering plane (perpendicular to the laser beam) when it is scattered from a narrow laser beam. Such multiple-scattered light forms a broad fuzzy halo around the focused beam, which, in turn, forms short interference patterns. By placing two fiber optics on top of each other and perpendicular to the laser beam (see the drawing), and then cross-correlating the signals they produce, only the tall interference patterns formed by singly scattered light are detected. To restate this, unless the two fiber optics see the same interference pattern, the scattered light is not incorporated into the signal. With this technique, only singly scattered light is seen (multiple-scattered light is rejected) because only singly scattered light has an interference pattern tall enough to span both of the fiber-optic pickups. This technique is simple to use, easy to align, and works at any angle. Placing a vertical slit in front of the signal collection fibers enhanced this approach. The slit serves as an optical mask, and it significantly shortens the time needed to collect good data by selectively masking out much of the unwanted light before cross-correlation is applied.

  13. Comparison of the Light Charged Particles on Scatter Radiation Dose in Thyroid Hadron Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Azizi, M; Mowlavi, AA

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hadron therapy is a novel technique of cancer radiation therapy which employs charged particles beams, 1H and light ions in particular. Due to their physical and radiobiological properties, they allow one to obtain a more conformal treatment, sparing better the healthy tissues located in proximity of the tumor and allowing a higher control of the disease. Objective: As it is well known, these light particles can interact with nuclei in the tissue, and produce the different secondary particles such as neutron and photon. These particles can damage specially the critical organs behind of thyroid gland. Methods: In this research, we simulated neck geometry by MCNPX code and calculated the light particles dose at distance of 2.14 cm in thyroid gland, for different particles beam: 1H, 2H, 3He, and 4He. Thyroid treatment is important because the spine and vertebrae is situated right behind to the thyroid gland on the posterior side. Results: The results show that 2H has the most total flux for photon and neutron, 1.944E-3 and 1.7666E-2, respectively. Whereas 1H and 3He have best conditions, 8.88609E-4 and 1.35431E-3 for photon, 4.90506E-4 and 4.34057E-3 for neutron, respectively. The same calculation has obtained for energy depositions for these particles. Conclusion: In this research, we investigated that which of these light particles can deliver the maximum dose to the normal tissues and the minimum dose to the tumor. By comparing these results for the mentioned light particles, we find out 1H and 3He is the best therapy choices for thyroid glands whereas 2H is the worst. PMID:25505774

  14. A Proposed New "Nano-Particle" Theory of Light Based on Heat Transfer Principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Ashis

    2004-05-01

    Till date theories of light (visible and other radiations over electromagnetic scale) are divided into two classes viz. particle and wave theory. A particle on the classical view is a concentration of energy and other properties in space and time, whereas a wave is spread out over a larger region of space and time. It is generally understood that particle theory talks about corpuscles of finite measurable mass whereas wave theory is about packets of massless energy. This paper is a summary of thoughts collected so far on building a only - particle theory of light or other radiations assuming the Universe to be filled with "nano-particles" or very small particles and large particles. Although revolutionary and very thought provoking and unbelievably challenging the collected pointers outlined in this account appear very logical and mathematically sound although experiments are required to give this theory a firm basis for wide spread recognition in scientific forums. The major support for nano-particle theory comes from the observation of a term called "radiation pressure" which incorporates a sense of impact or pressure and therefore a force and so some particle impact although very feeble compared to normal large particle impact yielding noticeable effect on most pressure gauges measuring this. Similar feeble impact effects are possible in other phenomena like current, magnetic field etc. whose measurement will require very sensitive instruments. In this paper, I have explained that common method of estimation of momentum and heat transfer applied to very small mass nano-particles can explain at least three major phenomena of visble light viz. rectilinear propagation, reflection and refraction. Other phenomena such as diffraction, interference, polarization, diffusion etc will be presented in a future paper. This presentation is meant for collecting wide readership views to approve or deny this explanation of only particle theory after famous Compton scattering

  15. The Influence of Structural Features of Particles on their Light Scattering Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theilheim, K. O.

    The theory of the scattering of light by ensembles of particles with ir regular shape is of interest in the context of interstellar and interplanetary dust grains and particles associated with comets or observed in aerosols and hydrosols. The scattering properties of homogeneous particles are determined by both geometrical features and chemical composition as represented by the complex frequency dependent index of refraction. We have performed a systematic investigation on the former aspect, namely the influence of structural features of the surface of large dielectric particles on their light scattering properties. The geometrical surface structure will be discussed in terms of macro roughness and micro roughness as two limiting cases of a more general type of roughness. Some results will also be presented for composite roughness models. Finally I will discuss preliminary results of a scattering theory applicable to ensembles of particles with irregular shape and arbitrary size based on the method of perturbed boundary conditions.

  16. Billion particle linac simulations for future light sources

    SciTech Connect

    Ryne, R. D.; Venturini, M.; Zholents, A. A.; Qiang, J.

    2008-09-25

    In this paper we report on multi-physics, multi-billion macroparticle simulation of beam transport in a free electron laser (FEL) linac for future light source applications. The simulation includes a self-consistent calculation of 3D space-charge effects, short-range geometry wakefields, longitudinal coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) wakefields, and detailed modeling of RF acceleration and focusing. We discuss the need for and the challenges associated with such large-scale simulation. Applications to the study of the microbunching instability in an FEL linac are also presented.

  17. Fast particle-driven ion cyclotron emission (ICE) in tokamak plasmas and the case for an ICE diagnostic in ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClements, K. G.; D'Inca, R.; Dendy, R. O.; Carbajal, L.; Chapman, S. C.; Cook, J. W. S.; Harvey, R. W.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Pinches, S. D.

    2015-04-01

    The detection of fast particle-driven waves in the ion cyclotron frequency range (ion cyclotron emission or ICE) could provide a passive, non-invasive diagnostic of confined and escaping fast particles (fusion α-particles and beam ions) in ITER, and would be compatible with the high radiation environment of deuterium-tritium plasmas in that device. Recent experimental results from ASDEX Upgrade and DIII-D demonstrate the efficacy of ICE as a diagnostic of different fast ion species and of fast ion losses, while recent particle-in-cell (PIC) and hybrid simulations provide a more exact comparison with measured ICE spectra and open the prospect of exploiting ICE more fully as a fast ion diagnostic in future experiments. In particular the PIC/hybrid approach should soon make it possible to simulate the nonlinear physics of ICE in full toroidal geometry. Emission has been observed previously at a wide range of poloidal angles, so there is flexibility in the location of ICE detectors. Such a detector could be implemented in ITER by installing a small toroidally orientated loop near the plasma edge or by adding a detection capability to the ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) antennae. In the latter case, the antenna could be used simultaneously to heat the plasma and detect ICE, provided that frequencies close to those of the ICRH source are strongly attenuated in the detection system using a suitable filter. Wavenumber information, providing additional constraints on the fast ion distribution exciting the emission, could be obtained by measuring ICE using a toroidally distributed array of detectors or different straps of the ICRH antenna.

  18. Anomalous Internal Pair Conversion Signaling Elusive Light Neutral Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer, Fokke

    2005-11-01

    In this paper we report on a systematic search for a new light neutral boson in the mass range between 5 and 15 MeV in nuclear decay from high energy levels. Its signature is found in a deviation in the angular correlation of de-exciting e+e- pairs from conventional internal pair conversion (IPC) which is explained by superposition of its two-body decay. With an e+e- pair-spectrometer, a number of transitions has been investigated in the α-nuclei 8Be, 12C and 16O, following light ion induced reactions at low bombarding energies, first at IKF in Frankfurt and during the last years at ATOMKI in Debrecen. Startlingly, in all isoscalar transitions excess e+e- pairs are found at large angles with branching ratios ranging from 10-1 to 10-6. If these deviations are all related to the two-body decay of an X-boson, this observation implies additional X-bosons. An analysis of all angular spectra with a boson search program, yields a pandemonium of more than ten candidate bosons.

  19. Heterogeneous Combustion Particles with Distinctive Light-Absorbing and Light-Scattering Phases as Mimics of Internally-Mixed Ambient Atmospheric Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conny, J. M.; Ma, X.; Gunn, L. R.

    2011-12-01

    Particles with heterogeneously-distributed light-absorbing and light-scattering phases were generated from incomplete combustion or thermal decomposition to mimic real atmospheric particles with distinctive optical properties. Individual particles and particle populations were characterized microscopically. The purpose was to examine how optical property measurements of internally-mixed ambient air particles might vary based on the properties of laboratory-generated particles produced under controlled conditions. The project is an initial stage in producing reference samples for calibrating instrumentation for monitoring climatically-important atmospheric aerosols. Binary-phase particles containing black carbon (BC) and a metal or a metal oxide phase were generated from the thermal decomposition or partial combustion of liquid fuels at a variety of temperatures from 600 °C to 1100 °C. Fuels included mixtures of toluene or isooctane and iron pentacarbonyl or titanium tetrachloride. Scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy revealed that burning the fuels at different temperatures resulted in distinctive differences in morphology and carbon vs. metal/metal oxide composition. Particles from toluene/Fe(CO)5 thermal decomposition exhibited aggregated morphologies that were classified as dendritic, soot-like, globular, or composited (dendritic-globular). Particles from isooctane/TiCl4 combustion were typically spherical with surface adducts or aggregates. Diameters of the BC/TiO2 particles averaged 0.68 μm to 0.70 μm. Regardless of combustion temperature, the most abundant particles in each BC/TiO2 sample had an aspect ratio of 1.2. However, for the 600 °C and 900 °C samples the distribution of aspect ratios was skewed toward much larger ratios suggesting significant chainlike aggregation. Carbon and titanium compositions (wt.) for the 600 °C sample were 12 % and 53 %, respectively. In contrast, the composition trended in the opposite

  20. Feasibility Study of Supercritical Light Water Cooled Fast Reactors for Actinide Burning and Electric Power Production

    SciTech Connect

    Mac Donald, Philip Elsworth; Buongiorno, Jacopo; Davis, Cliff Bybee; Weaver, Kevan Dean

    2002-01-01

    The use of supercritical temperature and pressure light water as the coolant in a direct-cycle nuclear reactor offers potential for considerable plant simplification and consequent capital and O&M cost reduction compared with current light water reactor (LWR) designs. Also, given the thermodynamic conditions of the coolant at the core outlet (i.e. temperature and pressure beyond the water critical point), very high thermal efficiencies of the power conversion cycle are possible (i.e. up to 46%). Because no change of phase occurs in the core, the need for steam separators and dryers as well as for BWR-type recirculation pumps is eliminated, which, for a given reactor power, results in a substantially shorter reactor vessel than the current BWRs. Furthermore, in a direct cycle the steam generators are not needed. If a tight fuel rod lattice is adopted, it is possible to significantly reduce the neutron moderation and attain fast neutron energy spectrum conditions. In this project a supercritical water reactor concept with a simple, blanket-free, pancake-shaped core will be developed. This type of core can make use of either fertile or fertile-free fuel and retain the hard spectrum to effectively burn plutonium and minor actinides from LWR spent fuel while efficiently generating electricity.

  1. Fast space-varying convolution and its application in stray light reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Jianing; Cao, Guangzhi; Bouman, Charles A.; Allebach, Jan P.

    2009-02-01

    Space-varying convolution often arises in the modeling or restoration of images captured by optical imaging systems. For example, in applications such as microscopy or photography the distortions introduced by lenses typically vary across the field of view, so accurate restoration also requires the use of space-varying convolution. While space-invariant convolution can be efficiently implemented with the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT), space-varying convolution requires direct implementation of the convolution operation, which can be very computationally expensive when the convolution kernel is large. In this paper, we develop a general approach to the efficient implementation of space-varying convolution through the use of matrix source coding techniques. This method can dramatically reduce computation by approximately factoring the dense space-varying convolution operator into a product of sparse transforms. This approach leads to a tradeoff between the accuracy and speed of the operation that is closely related to the distortion-rate tradeoff that is commonly made in lossy source coding. We apply our method to the problem of stray light reduction for digital photographs, where convolution with a spatially varying stray light point spread function is required. The experimental results show that our algorithm can achieve a dramatic reduction in computation while achieving high accuracy.

  2. Advanced analysis of polymer emulsions: Particle size and particle size distribution by field-flow fractionation and dynamic light scattering.

    PubMed

    Makan, Ashwell C; Spallek, Markus J; du Toit, Madeleine; Klein, Thorsten; Pasch, Harald

    2016-04-15

    Field flow fractionation (FFF) is an advanced fractionation technique for the analyses of very sensitive particles. In this study, different FFF techniques were used for the fractionation and analysis of polymer emulsions/latexes. As model systems, a pure acrylic emulsion and emulsions containing titanium dioxide were prepared and analyzed. An acrylic emulsion polymerization was conducted, continuously sampled from the reactor and subsequently analyzed to determine the particle size, radius of gyration in specific, of the latex particles throughout the polymerization reaction. Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) and sedimentation field-flow fractionation (SdFFF), coupled to a multidetector system, multi-angle laser light scattering (MALLS), ultraviolet (UV) and refractive index (RI), respectively, were used to investigate the evolution of particle sizes and particle size distributions (PSDs) as the polymerization progressed. The obtained particle sizes were compared against batch-mode dynamic light scattering (DLS). Results indicated differences between AF4 and DLS results due to DLS taking hydration layers into account, whereas both AF4 and SdFFF were coupled to MALLS detection, hence not taking the hydration layer into account for size determination. SdFFF has additional separation capabilities with a much higher resolution compared to AF4. The calculated radii values were 5 nm larger for SdFFF measurements for each analyzed sample against the corresponding AF4 values. Additionally a low particle size shoulder was observed for SdFFF indicating bimodality in the reactor very early during the polymerization reaction. Furthermore, different emulsions were mixed with inorganic species used as additives in cosmetics and coatings such as TiO2. These complex mixtures of species were analyzed to investigate the retention and particle interaction behavior under different AF4 experimental conditions, such as the mobile phase. The AF4 system was coupled online

  3. LOAC (Light Optical Particle Counter): a new small aerosol counter with particle characterization capabilities for surface and airborne measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, Jean-Baptiste; Berthet, Gwenael; Jégou, Fabrice; Jeannot, Matthieu; Jourdain, Line; Dulac, François; Mallet, Marc; Dupont, Jean-Charles; Thaury, Claire; Tonnelier, Thierry; Verdier, Nicolas; Charpentier, Patrick

    2013-04-01

    The determination of the size distribution of tropospheric and stratospheric aerosols with conventional optical counters is difficult when different natures of particles are present (droplets, soot, mineral dust, secondary organic or mineral particles...). Also, a light and cheap aerosol counter that can be used at ground, onboard drones or launched under all kinds of atmospheric balloons can be very useful during specific events as volcanic plumes, desert dust transport or local pollution episodes. These goals can be achieved thanks to a new generation of aerosol counter, called LOAC (Light Optical Aerosol Counter). The instrument was developed in the frame of a cooperation between French scientific laboratories (CNRS), the Environnement-SA and MeteoModem companies and the French Space Agency (CNES). LOAC is a small optical particle counter/sizer of ~250 grams, having a low electrical power consumption. The measurements are conducted at two scattering angles. The first one, at 12°, is used to determine the aerosol particle concentrations in 19 size classes within a diameter range of 0.3-100 micrometerers. At such an angle close to forward scattering, the signal is much more intense and the measurements are the least sensitive to the particle nature. The second angle is at 60°, where the scattered light is strongly dependent on the particle refractive index and thus on the nature of the aerosols. The ratio of the measurements at the two angles is used to discriminate between the different types of particles dominating the nature of the aerosol particles in the different size classes. The sensor particularly discriminates wet or liquid particles, soil dust and soot. Since 2011, we have operated LOAC in various environments (Arctic, Mediterranean, urban and peri-urban…) under different kinds of balloons including zero pressure stratospheric, tethered, drifting tropospheric, and meteorological sounding balloons. For the last case, the total weight of the gondola

  4. Deflections of Fast Coronal Mass Ejections and the Properties of Associated Solar Energetic Particle Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahler, S. W.; Akiyama, S.; Gopalswamy, N.

    2012-01-01

    The onset times and peak intensities of solar energetic particle (SEP) events at Earth have long been thought to be influenced by the open magnetic fields of coronal holes (CHs). The original idea was that a CH lying between the solar SEP source region and the magnetic footpoint of the 1 AU observer would result in a delay in onset and/or a decrease in the peak intensity of that SEP event. Recently, Gopalswamy et al. showed that CHs near coronal mass ejection (CME) source regions can deflect fast CMEs from their expected trajectories in space, explaining the appearance of driverless shocks at 1 AU from CMEs ejected near solar central meridian (CM). This suggests that SEP events originating in CME-driven shocks may show variations attributable to CH deflections of the CME trajectories. Here, we use a CH magnetic force parameter to examine possible effects of CHs on the timing and intensities of 41 observed gradual E approx 20 MeV SEP events with CME source regions within 20 deg. of CM. We find no systematic CH effects on SEP event intensity profiles. Furthermore, we find no correlation between the CME leading-edge measured position angles and SEP event properties, suggesting that the widths of CME-driven shock sources of the SEPs are much larger than the CMEs. Independently of the SEP event properties, we do find evidence for significant CME deflections by CH fields in these events

  5. Advanced laser particle accelerator development at LANL: from fast ignition to radiation oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Flippo, Kirk A; Gaillard, Sandrine A; Offermann, D T; Cobble, J A; Schmitt, M J; Gautier, D C; Kwan, T J T; Montgomery, D S; Kluge, Thomas; Bussmann, Micheal; Bartal, T; Beg, F N; Gall, B; Geissel, M; Korgan, G; Kovaleski, S; Lockard, T; Malekos, S; Schollmeier, M; Sentoku, Y; Cowan, T E

    2010-01-01

    Laser-plasma accelerated ion and electron beam sources are an emerging field with vast prospects, and promise many superior applications in a variety of fields such as hadron cancer therapy, compact radioisotope generation, table-top nuclear physics, laboratory astrophysics, nuclear forensics, waste transmutation, SN M detection, and inertial fusion energy. LANL is engaged in several projects seeking to develop compact high current and high energy ion and electron sources. We are especially interested in two specific applications: ion fast ignition/capsule perturbation and radiation oncology in conjunction with our partners at the ForschungsZentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (FZD). Laser-to-beam conversion efficiencies of over 10% are needed for practical applications, and we have already shown inherent etliciencies of >5% from flat foils, on Trident using only a 5th of the intensity and energy of the Nova Petawatt. With clever target designs, like structured curved cone targets, we have also been able to achieve major ion energy gains, leading to the highest energy laser-accelerated proton beams in the world. These new target designs promise to help usher in the next generation of particle sources realizing the potential of laser-accelerated beams.

  6. Advanced Laser Particle Accelerator Development at LANL: From Fast Ignition to Radiation Oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Flippo, K. A.; Offermann, D. T.; Cobble, J. A.; Schmitt, M. J.; Gautier, D. C.; Kwan, T. J.; Montgomery, D. S.; Gaillard, S. A.; Kluge, T.; Bussmann, M.; Cowan, T. E.; Bartal, T.; Beg, F. N.; Gall, B.; Kovaleski, S.; Geissel, M.; Schollmeier, M.; Korgan, G.; Malekos, S.; Lockard, T.

    2010-11-04

    Laser-plasma accelerated ion and electron beam sources are an emerging field with vast prospects, and promise many superior applications in a variety of fields such as hadron cancer therapy, compact radioisotope generation, table-top nuclear physics, laboratory astrophysics, nuclear forensics, waste transmutation, Special Nuclear Material (SNM) detection, and inertial fusion energy. LANL is engaged in several projects seeking to develop compact high-current and high-energy ion and electron sources. We are especially interested in two specific applications: ion fast ignition/capsule perturbation and radiation oncology. Laser-to-beam conversion efficiencies of over 10% are needed for practical applications, and we have already shown inherent efficiencies of >5% from flat foils, on Trident using only a 5th of the intensity and energy of the Nova Petawatt laser. With clever target designs, like structured curved cone targets, we have also been able to achieve major ion energy gains, leading to the highest energy laser-accelerated proton beams in the world [3]. These new target designs promise to help usher in the next generation of particle sources realizing the potential of laser-accelerated beams.

  7. Advanced Laser Particle Accelerator Development at LANL: From Fast Ignition to Radiation Oncology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flippo, K. A.; Gaillard, S. A.; Kluge, T.; Bussmann, M.; Offermann, D. T.; Cobble, J. A.; Schmitt, M. J.; Bartal, T.; Beg, F. N.; Cowan, T. E.; Gall, B.; Gautier, D. C.; Geissel, M.; Kwan, T. J.; Korgan, G.; Kovaleski, S.; Lockard, T.; Malekos, S.; Montgomery, D. S.; Schollmeier, M.; Sentoku, Y.

    2010-11-01

    Laser-plasma accelerated ion and electron beam sources are an emerging field with vast prospects, and promise many superior applications in a variety of fields such as hadron cancer therapy, compact radioisotope generation, table-top nuclear physics, laboratory astrophysics, nuclear forensics, waste transmutation, Special Nuclear Material (SNM) detection, and inertial fusion energy. LANL is engaged in several projects seeking to develop compact high-current and high-energy ion and electron sources. We are especially interested in two specific applications: ion fast ignition/capsule perturbation and radiation oncology. Laser-to-beam conversion efficiencies of over 10% are needed for practical applications, and we have already shown inherent efficiencies of >5% from flat foils, on Trident using only a 5th of the intensity [1] and energy of the Nova Petawatt laser [2]. With clever target designs, like structured curved cone targets, we have also been able to achieve major ion energy gains, leading to the highest energy laser-accelerated proton beams in the world [3]. These new target designs promise to help usher in the next generation of particle sources realizing the potential of laser-accelerated beams.

  8. Preface: Electromagnetic and Light Scattering by Nonspherical Particles XIV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubovik, Oleg; Labonnete, Laurent; Litvinov, Pavel; Parol, Frederic; Mischenko, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The 14th Electromagnetic and Light Scattering Conference (ELS-XIV) was held at the Universit de Lille 1, Villeneuve d'Ascq, France on 17-21 June 2013. The conference was attended by 200 scientists from 26 countries. The scientific program included one plenary lecture, 12 invited reviews, 100 contributed oral talks, and 86 poster presentations. The program, the abstracts, and the slides of the oral presentations are available at the conference web site http:www-loa.univ-lille1.frELS-XIV. To highlight one of the traditional ELS themes, the ELS-XIV featured a special session on Remote sensing of aerosols and clouds using polarimetric observations. This session was sponsored and co-organized by the French space agency CNES and attracted representatives from nearly all research teams word-wide involved in the development and active use of space-borne, in situ, and ground-based polarimetric observations.

  9. Exocytosis of Alphaherpesvirus Virions, Light Particles, and Glycoproteins Uses Constitutive Secretory Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Hogue, Ian B.; Scherer, Julian

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Many molecular and cell biological details of the alphaherpesvirus assembly and egress pathway remain unclear. Recently we developed a live-cell fluorescence microscopy assay of pseudorabies virus (PRV) exocytosis, based on total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy and a virus-encoded pH-sensitive fluorescent probe. Here, we use this assay to distinguish three classes of viral exocytosis in a nonpolarized cell type: (i) trafficking of viral glycoproteins to the plasma membrane, (ii) exocytosis of viral light particles, and (iii) exocytosis of virions. We find that viral glycoproteins traffic to the cell surface in association with constitutive secretory Rab GTPases and exhibit free diffusion into the plasma membrane after exocytosis. Similarly, both virions and light particles use these same constitutive secretory mechanisms for egress from infected cells. Furthermore, we show that viral light particles are distinct from cellular exosomes. Together, these observations shed light on viral glycoprotein trafficking steps that precede virus particle assembly and reinforce the idea that virions and light particles share a biogenesis and trafficking pathway. PMID:27273828

  10. Fast space-varying convolution using matrix source coding with applications to camera stray light reduction.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jianing; Bouman, Charles A; Allebach, Jan P

    2014-05-01

    Many imaging applications require the implementation of space-varying convolution for accurate restoration and reconstruction of images. Here, we use the term space-varying convolution to refer to linear operators whose impulse response has slow spatial variation. In addition, these space-varying convolution operators are often dense, so direct implementation of the convolution operator is typically computationally impractical. One such example is the problem of stray light reduction in digital cameras, which requires the implementation of a dense space-varying deconvolution operator. However, other inverse problems, such as iterative tomographic reconstruction, can also depend on the implementation of dense space-varying convolution. While space-invariant convolution can be efficiently implemented with the fast Fourier transform, this approach does not work for space-varying operators. So direct convolution is often the only option for implementing space-varying convolution. In this paper, we develop a general approach to the efficient implementation of space-varying convolution, and demonstrate its use in the application of stray light reduction. Our approach, which we call matrix source coding, is based on lossy source coding of the dense space-varying convolution matrix. Importantly, by coding the transformation matrix, we not only reduce the memory required to store it; we also dramatically reduce the computation required to implement matrix-vector products. Our algorithm is able to reduce computation by approximately factoring the dense space-varying convolution operator into a product of sparse transforms. Experimental results show that our method can dramatically reduce the computation required for stray light reduction while maintaining high accuracy. PMID:24710398

  11. Angle-resolved second harmonic light scattering from colloidal suspensions and second harmonic particle microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ningping

    2001-08-01

    We have carried out two nonlinear optical experiments with colloidal particles. Our first nonlinear optical experiment studied Second-Harmonic Generation (SHG) light scattering from colloidal suspension. In particular, we measured the angle-resolved second-harmonic generation light scattering from suspensions of centrosymmetric micron-size polystyrene spheres with surface-adsorbed dye (malachite green). The second-harmonic scattering angular profiles differ qualitatively from the linear light scattering angular profiles of the same particles. We have investigated these radiation patterns using several polarization configurations and particle diameters. We introduce a simple Rayleigh-Gans-Debye model to account for the SHG scattering anisotropy. The model compares favorably with our experimental data. Our measurements suggest scattering anisotropy may be used to isolate particle nonlinear optical effect from other bulk nonlinear optical effects in suspension. Our second nonlinear optical experiment studied the Second-Harmonic Generation (SHG) from single micron-size particles. We built a nonlinear optical microscope for this purpose. We report experimental observations of second harmonic generation from single micron-size polystyrene (PS), silica, and PolyMethylMethAcrylate (PMMA) spheres on flat substrates by SHG microscopy. At low input light intensities the SH signals depend quadratically on the intensity of the excitation beam, but at larger input intensities some of the SH signals increase exponentially with increasing input intensity. This exponential enhancement depends on particle size and sphere composition. We describe the experiments, report the observations and provide an approximate analytical framework for understanding our measurements.

  12. On the scattered light by dilute aqueous dispersions of nanogel particles.

    PubMed

    Callejas-Fernández, J; Ramos, J; Forcada, J; Moncho-Jordá, A

    2015-07-15

    This work deals with the scattered light by nanoparticles formed by a temperature sensitive polymer networks, namely nanogel particles. The scattered light is measured as a function of the scattering angle at temperatures below and above the volume phase transition temperature (VPTT) of nanogel particles. Our experimental results indicate that nanogel particles have a core-shell structure, formed by a uniform highly cross-linked core surrounded by a fuzzy shell where the polymer density decays to zero gradually for swollen configurations and sharply for shrunken states. The theoretical fitting of the experimental curves shows that the scattered light at low angle obeys a decreasing power law with the scattering vector, q(-α). The value of exponent α provides information about the radial dependence of the polymer density at the external shell of the particles for swollen nanogels, and about the degree of roughness of the surface for the case of shrunken nanogels. On the one hand, at low temperatures (below the VPPT), the nanogel particle is in the swollen state and the light scattering data show that its shell structure follows a fractal behaviour, with a polymer density that decays as r(α-3), where r is the distance to the particle centre. On the other hand, above the VPPT the results indicate that nanogel collapses into a core of uniform polymer density and a rough shell, with a fractal surface dimension of 2.5. PMID:25837408

  13. On the scattered light by dilute aqueous dispersions of nanogel particles.

    PubMed

    Callejas-Fernández, J; Ramos, J; Forcada, J; Moncho-Jordá, A

    2015-07-15

    This work deals with the scattered light by nanoparticles formed by a temperature sensitive polymer networks, namely nanogel particles. The scattered light is measured as a function of the scattering angle at temperatures below and above the volume phase transition temperature (VPTT) of nanogel particles. Our experimental results indicate that nanogel particles have a core-shell structure, formed by a uniform highly cross-linked core surrounded by a fuzzy shell where the polymer density decays to zero gradually for swollen configurations and sharply for shrunken states. The theoretical fitting of the experimental curves shows that the scattered light at low angle obeys a decreasing power law with the scattering vector, q(-α). The value of exponent α provides information about the radial dependence of the polymer density at the external shell of the particles for swollen nanogels, and about the degree of roughness of the surface for the case of shrunken nanogels. On the one hand, at low temperatures (below the VPPT), the nanogel particle is in the swollen state and the light scattering data show that its shell structure follows a fractal behaviour, with a polymer density that decays as r(α-3), where r is the distance to the particle centre. On the other hand, above the VPPT the results indicate that nanogel collapses into a core of uniform polymer density and a rough shell, with a fractal surface dimension of 2.5.

  14. Single molecule experiments challenge the strict wave-particle dualism of light.

    PubMed

    Greulich, Karl Otto

    2010-01-21

    Single molecule techniques improve our understanding of the photon and light. If the single photon double slit experiment is performed at the "single photon limit" of a multi-atom light source, faint light pulses with more than one photon hamper the interpretation. Single molecules, quantum dots or defect centres in crystals should be used as light source. "Single photon detectors" do not meet their promise-only "photon number resolving single photon detectors" do so. Particularly, the accumulation time argument, the only safe basis for the postulate of a strictly particle like photon, has so far not yet been verified.

  15. Single Molecule Experiments Challenge the Strict Wave-Particle Dualism of Light

    PubMed Central

    Greulich, Karl Otto

    2010-01-01

    Single molecule techniques improve our understanding of the photon and light. If the single photon double slit experiment is performed at the “single photon limit” of a multi-atom light source, faint light pulses with more than one photon hamper the interpretation. Single molecules, quantum dots or defect centres in crystals should be used as light source. “Single photon detectors” do not meet their promise—only “photon number resolving single photon detectors” do so. Particularly, the accumulation time argument, the only safe basis for the postulate of a strictly particle like photon, has so far not yet been verified. PMID:20162017

  16. Independent-particle models for light negative atomic ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganas, P. S.; Talman, J. D.; Green, A. E. S.

    1980-01-01

    For the purposes of astrophysical, aeronomical, and laboratory application, a precise independent-particle model for electrons in negative atomic ions of the second and third period is discussed. The optimum-potential model (OPM) of Talman et al. (1979) is first used to generate numerical potentials for eight of these ions. Results for total energies and electron affinities are found to be very close to Hartree-Fock solutions. However, the OPM and HF electron affinities both depart significantly from experimental affinities. For this reason, two analytic potentials are developed whose inner energy levels are very close to the OPM and HF levels but whose last electron eigenvalues are adjusted precisely with the magnitudes of experimental affinities. These models are: (1) a four-parameter analytic characterization of the OPM potential and (2) a two-parameter potential model of the Green, Sellin, Zachor type. The system O(-) or e-O, which is important in upper atmospheric physics is examined in some detail.

  17. Light flash phenomena induced by HzE particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcnulty, P. J.; Pease, V. P.

    1980-01-01

    Astronauts and Apollo and Skylab missions have reported observing a variety of visual phenomena when their eyes are closed and adapted to darkness. These phenomena have been collectively labelled as light flashes. Visual phenomena which are similar in appearance to those observed in space have been demonstrated at the number of accelerator facilities by expressing the eyes of human subjects to beams of various types of radiation. In some laboratory experiments Cerenkov radiation was found to be the basis for the flashes observed while in other experiments Cerenkov radiation could apparently be ruled out. Experiments that differentiate between Cerenkov radiation and other possible mechanisms for inducing visual phenomena was then compared. The phenomena obtained in the presence and absence of Cerenkov radiation were designed and conducted. A new mechanism proposed to explain the visual phenomena observed by Skylab astronauts as they passed through the South Atlantic Anomaly, namely nuclear interactions in and near the sensitive layer of the retina, is covered. Also some studies to search for similar transient effects of space radiation on sensors and microcomputer memories are described.

  18. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Phenomenology of the equivalence principle with light scalars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damour, Thibault; Donoghue, John F.

    2010-10-01

    Light scalar particles with couplings of sub-gravitational strength, which can generically be called 'dilatons', can produce violations of the equivalence principle. However, in order to understand experimental sensitivities one must know the coupling of these scalars to atomic systems. We report here on a study of the required couplings. We give a general Lagrangian with five independent dilaton parameters and calculate the 'dilaton charge' of atomic systems for each of these. Two combinations are particularly important. One is due to the variations in the nuclear binding energy, with a sensitivity scaling with the atomic number as A-1/3. The other is due to electromagnetism. We compare limits on the dilaton parameters from existing experiments.

  19. Ultrasensitive and fast detection of denaturation of milk by Coherent backscattering of light

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Manish; Singh, Dilip K.; Senthilkumaran, P.; Joseph, Joby; Kandpal, H. C.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, Coherence backscattering (CBS) of light has been used to detect the onset of denaturation of milk. The CBS cone shape and its enhancement factor are found to be highly sensitive to the physical state of the milk particles. The onset of denaturing of milk not visible to the naked eye, can be easily detected from changes in the CBS cone shape. The onset of denaturation is confirmed by spectral changes in Raman spectra from these milk samples. Further, the possibility to estimate the dilution of milk by water as an adulterant is demonstrated. The method reported has a broad scope in industry for making an inline ultrafast cost effective sensor for milk quality monitoring during production and before consumption. PMID:25435102

  20. Fast-response IR spatial light modulators with a polymer network liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Fenglin; Chen, Haiwei; Tripathi, Suvagata; Twieg, Robert J.; Wu, Shin-Tson

    2015-03-01

    Liquid crystals (LC) have widespread applications for amplitude modulation (e.g. flat panel displays) and phase modulation (e.g. beam steering). For phase modulation, a 2π phase modulo is required. To extend the electro-optic application into infrared region (MWIR and LWIR), several key technical challenges have to be overcome: 1. low absorption loss, 2. high birefringence, 3. low operation voltage, and 4. fast response time. After three decades of extensive development, an increasing number of IR devices adopting LC technology have been demonstrated, such as liquid crystal waveguide, laser beam steering at 1.55μm and 10.6 μm, spatial light modulator in the MWIR (3~5μm) band, dynamic scene projectors for infrared seekers in the LWIR (8~12μm) band. However, several fundamental molecular vibration bands and overtones exist in the MWIR and LWIR regions, which contribute to high absorption coefficient and hinder its widespread application. Therefore, the inherent absorption loss becomes a major concern for IR devices. To suppress IR absorption, several approaches have been investigated: 1) Employing thin cell gap by choosing a high birefringence liquid crystal mixture; 2) Shifting the absorption bands outside the spectral region of interest by deuteration, fluorination and chlorination; 3) Reducing the overlap vibration bands by using shorter alkyl chain compounds. In this paper, we report some chlorinated LC compounds and mixtures with a low absorption loss in the near infrared and MWIR regions. To achieve fast response time, we have demonstrated a polymer network liquid crystal with 2π phase change at MWIR and response time less than 5 ms.

  1. Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Analysis of Symbiotic Light-Water Reactor and Fast Burner Reactor Systems

    SciTech Connect

    D. E. Shropshire

    2009-01-01

    The Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Analysis of Symbiotic Light-Water Reactor and Fast Burner Reactor Systems, prepared to support the U.S. Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) systems analysis, provides a technology-oriented baseline system cost comparison between the open fuel cycle and closed fuel cycle systems. The intent is to understand their overall cost trends, cost sensitivities, and trade-offs. This analysis also improves the AFCI Program’s understanding of the cost drivers that will determine nuclear power’s cost competitiveness vis-a-vis other baseload generation systems. The common reactor-related costs consist of capital, operating, and decontamination and decommissioning costs. Fuel cycle costs include front-end (pre-irradiation) and back-end (post-iradiation) costs, as well as costs specifically associated with fuel recycling. This analysis reveals that there are large cost uncertainties associated with all the fuel cycle strategies, and that overall systems (reactor plus fuel cycle) using a closed fuel cycle are about 10% more expensive in terms of electricity generation cost than open cycle systems. The study concludes that further U.S. and joint international-based design studies are needed to reduce the cost uncertainties with respect to fast reactor, fuel separation and fabrication, and waste disposition. The results of this work can help provide insight to the cost-related factors and conditions needed to keep nuclear energy (including closed fuel cycles) economically competitive in the U.S. and worldwide. These results may be updated over time based on new cost information, revised assumptions, and feedback received from additional reviews.

  2. Comparison of oil and fuel particle chemical signatures with particle emissions from heavy and light duty vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Matthew T.; Shields, Laura G.; Sodeman, David A.; Toner, Stephen M.; Prather, Kimberly A.

    In order to establish effective vehicle emission control strategies, efforts are underway to perform studies which provide insight into the origin of the source of vehicle particle emissions. In this study, the mass spectral signatures of individual particles produced from atomized auto and diesel oil and fuel samples were obtained using aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ATOFMS). The major particle types produced by these samples show distinct chemistry, falling into several major categories for each sample. Lubricating oils contain calcium and phosphate based additives and although the additives are present in low abundance (˜1-2% by mass), calcium and phosphate ions dominate the mass spectra for all new and used oil samples. Mass spectra from used oil contain more elemental carbon (EC) and organic carbon (OC) marker ions when compared to new oils and exhibit a very high degree of similarity to heavy duty diesel vehicle (HDDV) exhaust particles sampled by an ATOFMS. Fewer similarities exist between the used oil particles and light duty vehicle (LDV) emissions. Diesel and unleaded fuel mass spectra contain polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecular ions, as well as intense PAH fragment ions 25(C 2H) -, 49(C 4H) -, and inorganic ions 23Na +, 39K +, 95(PO 4) -. Unleaded fuel produced spectra which contained Na + and K +; likewise, LDV particle emission spectra also contained Na + and K +. Comparing oil and fuel particle signatures with HDDV and LDV emissions enhances our ability to differentiate between these sources and understand the origin of specific marker ions from these major ambient particle sources.

  3. Light charged particles emitted in fission reactions induced by protons on 208Pb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Sánchez, J. L.; Benlliure, J.; Paradela, C.; Ayyad, Y.; Casarejos, E.; Alvarez-Pol, H.; Audouin, L.; Bélier, G.; Boutoux, G.; Chatillon, A.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Gorbinet, T.; Heinz, A.; Kelić-Heil, A.; Laurent, B.; Martin, J.-F.; Pellereau, E.; Pietras, B.; Ramos, D.; Rodríguez-Tajes, C.; Rossi, D. M.; Simon, H.; Taïeb, J.; Vargas, J.; Voss, B.

    2016-09-01

    Light charged particles emitted in proton-induced fission reactions on 208Pb have been measured at different kinetic energies: 370 A ,500 A , and 650 A MeV. The experiment was performed by the SOFIA Collaboration at the GSI facilities in Darmstadt (Germany). The inverse kinematics technique was combined with a setup especially designed to measure light charged particles in coincidence with fission fragments. This measurement allowed us, for the first time, to obtain correlations between the light charged particles emitted during the fission process and the charge distributions of the fission fragments. These correlations were compared with different model calculations to assess the ground-to-saddle dynamics. The results confirm that transient and dissipative effects are required for an accurate description of the fission observables.

  4. Controlling dispersion forces between small particles with artificially created random light fields

    PubMed Central

    Brügger, Georges; Froufe-Pérez, Luis S.; Scheffold, Frank; José Sáenz, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Appropriate combinations of laser beams can be used to trap and manipulate small particles with optical tweezers as well as to induce significant optical binding forces between particles. These interaction forces are usually strongly anisotropic depending on the interference landscape of the external fields. This is in contrast with the familiar isotropic, translationally invariant, van der Waals and, in general, Casimir–Lifshitz interactions between neutral bodies arising from random electromagnetic waves generated by equilibrium quantum and thermal fluctuations. Here we show, both theoretically and experimentally, that dispersion forces between small colloidal particles can also be induced and controlled using artificially created fluctuating light fields. Using optical tweezers as a gauge, we present experimental evidence for the predicted isotropic attractive interactions between dielectric microspheres induced by laser-generated, random light fields. These light-induced interactions open a path towards the control of translationally invariant interactions with tuneable strength and range in colloidal systems. PMID:26096622

  5. A Description of the Full Particle Orbit Following SPIRAL Code for Simulating Fast-ion Experiments in Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, G.J.; Budny, R.V.; Bortolon, A.; Fredrickson, E.D.; Fu, G.Y.; Heidbrink, W.W.; Nazikian, R.; Valeo, E.; Van Zeeland, M.A.

    2012-07-27

    The numerical methods used in the full particle-orbit following SPIRAL code are described and a number of physics studies performed with the code are presented to illustrate its capabilities. The SPIRAL code is a test-particle code and is a powerful numerical tool to interpret and plan fast-ion experiments in Tokamaks. Gyro-orbit effects are important for fast ions in low-field machines such as NSTX and to a lesser extent in DIII-D. A number of physics studies are interlaced between the description of the code to illustrate its capabilities. Results on heat loads generated by a localized error-field on the DIII-D wall are compared to measurements. The enhanced Triton losses caused by the same localized error-field are calculated and compared to measured neutron signals. MHD activity such as tearing modes and Toroidicity-induced Alfven Eigenmodes (TAEs) have a profound effect on the fast-ion content of Tokamak plasmas and SPIRAL can calculate the effects of MHD activity on the confined and lost fast-ion population as illustrated for a burst of TAE activity in NSTX. The interaction between Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequency (ICRF) heating and fast ions depends solely on the gyro-motion of the fast ions and is captured exactly in the SPIRAL code. A calculation of ICRF absorption on beam ions in ITER is presented. The effects of high harmonic fast wave heating on the beam-ion slowing-down distribution in NSTX is also studied.

  6. A description of the full-particle-orbit-following SPIRAL code for simulating fast-ion experiments in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, G. J.; Budny, R. V.; Bortolon, A.; Fredrickson, E. D.; Fu, G. Y.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Nazikian, R.; Valeo, E.; Van Zeeland, M. A.

    2013-02-01

    The numerical methods used in the full particle-orbit following SPIRAL code are described and a number of physics studies performed with the code are presented to illustrate its capabilities. The SPIRAL code is a test-particle code and is a powerful numerical tool to interpret and plan fast-ion experiments in tokamaks. Gyro-orbit effects are important for fast ions in low-field machines such as NSTX and to a lesser extent in DIII-D. A number of physics studies are interlaced between the description of the code to illustrate its capabilities. Results on heat loads generated by a localized error-field on the DIII-D wall are compared with measurements. The enhanced Triton losses caused by the same localized error-field are calculated and compared with measured neutron signals. Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activity such as tearing modes and toroidicity-induced Alfvén eigenmodes (TAEs) have a profound effect on the fast-ion content of tokamak plasmas and SPIRAL can calculate the effects of MHD activity on the confined and lost fast-ion population as illustrated for a burst of TAE activity in NSTX. The interaction between ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) heating and fast ions depends solely on the gyro-motion of the fast ions and is captured exactly in the SPIRAL code. A calculation of ICRF absorption on beam ions in ITER is presented. The effects of high harmonic fast wave heating on the beam-ion slowing-down distribution in NSTX is also studied.

  7. Relation between blocking property against UV-rays by dyed fabric and its color fastness to light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mima, Tomoko; Sato, Masako

    2002-06-01

    It is predicted if the dye strongly absorbed the ray in shorter UV wavelength, the ray energy might destroy the dye structure. Color fastness of dyed fabric is also an important character from a viewpoint of aesthetic sense and textile end use. The purpose of this study is to investigate the relation between the blocking property of dyed fabric against UV-rays and its color fastness to light. The cotton fabrics dyed with different types of direct dyes (red, blue and yellow) and their dye solutions were respectively irradiated by xenon arc lamp. The results were as follow. Color fading of dyed fabrics depended on the structure of dyes. Even the dye having lower fastness property to light, the darker shade fabrics dyed with them were examined still remaining higher UV blocking property.

  8. Rigorous theoretical framework for particle sizing in turbid colloids using light refraction.

    PubMed

    García-Valenzuela, Augusto; Barrera, Rubén G; Gutierrez-Reyes, Edahí

    2008-11-24

    Using a non-local effective-medium approach, we analyze the refraction of light in a colloidal medium. We discuss the theoretical grounds and all the necessary precautions to design and perform experiments to measure the effective refractive index in dilute colloids. As an application, we show that it is possible to retrieve the size of small dielectric particles in a colloid by measuring the complex effective refractive index and the volume fraction occupied by the particles. PMID:19030060

  9. Light concentration in the near-field of dielectric spheroidal particles with mesoscopic sizes.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Manuel J; Tobías, Ignacio; Martí, Antonio; Luque, Antonio

    2011-08-15

    This paper presents a numerical study of the light focusing properties of dielectric spheroids with sizes comparable to the illuminating wavelength. An analytical separation-of-variables method is used to determine the electric field distribution inside and in the near-field outside the particles. An optimization algorithm was implemented in the method to determine the particles' physical parameters that maximize the forward scattered light in the near-field region. It is found that such scatterers can exhibit pronounced electric intensity enhancement (above 100 times the incident intensity) in their close vicinity, or along wide focal regions extending to 10 times the wavelength. The results reveal the potential of wavelength-sized spheroids to manipulate light beyond the limitations of macroscopic geometrical optics. This can be of interest for several applications, such as light management in photovoltaics. PMID:21934983

  10. Light concentration in the near-field of dielectric spheroidal particles with mesoscopic sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendes, Manuel J.; Tobías, Ignacio; Martí, Antonio; Luque, Antonio

    2011-08-01

    This paper presents a numerical study of the light focusing properties of dielectric spheroids with sizes comparable to the illuminating wavelength. An analytical separation-of-variables method is used to determine the electric field distribution inside and in the near-field outside the particles. An optimization algorithm was implemented in the method to determine the particles' physical parameters that maximize the forward scattered light in the near-field region. It is found that such scatterers can exhibit pronounced electric intensity enhancement (above 100 times the incident intensity) in their close vicinity, or along wide focal regions extending to 10 times the wavelength. The results reveal the potential of wavelength-sized spheroids to manipulate light beyond the limitations of macroscopic geometrical optics. This can be of interest for several applications, such as light management in photovoltaics.

  11. On the errors in measuring the particle density by the light absorption method

    SciTech Connect

    Ochkin, V. N.

    2015-04-15

    The accuracy of absorption measurements of the density of particles in a given quantum state as a function of the light absorption coefficient is analyzed. Errors caused by the finite accuracy in measuring the intensity of the light passing through a medium in the presence of different types of noise in the recorded signal are considered. Optimal values of the absorption coefficient and the factors capable of multiplying errors when deviating from these values are determined.

  12. Validation of a Fast-Fluid-Dynamics Model for Predicting Distribution of Particles with Low Stokes Number

    SciTech Connect

    Zuo, Wangda; Chen, Qingyan

    2011-06-01

    To design a healthy indoor environment, it is important to study airborne particle distribution indoors. As an intermediate model between multizone models and computational fluid dynamics (CFD), a fast fluid dynamics (FFD) model can be used to provide temporal and spatial information of particle dispersion in real time. This study evaluated the accuracy of the FFD for predicting transportation of particles with low Stokes number in a duct and in a room with mixed convection. The evaluation was to compare the numerical results calculated by the FFD with the corresponding experimental data and the results obtained by the CFD. The comparison showed that the FFD could capture major pattern of particle dispersion, which is missed in models with well-mixed assumptions. Although the FFD was less accurate than the CFD partially due to its simplification in numeric schemes, it was 53 times faster than the CFD.

  13. 3D real-time visualization of blood flow in cerebral aneurysms by light field particle image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlsohn, Matthias F.; Kemmling, André; Petersen, Arne; Wietzke, Lennart

    2016-04-01

    Cerebral aneurysms require endovascular treatment to eliminate potentially lethal hemorrhagic rupture by hemostasis of blood flow within the aneurysm. Devices (e.g. coils and flow diverters) promote homeostasis, however, measurement of blood flow within an aneurysm or cerebral vessel before and after device placement on a microscopic level has not been possible so far. This would allow better individualized treatment planning and improve manufacture design of devices. For experimental analysis, direct measurement of real-time microscopic cerebrovascular flow in micro-structures may be an alternative to computed flow simulations. An application of microscopic aneurysm flow measurement on a regular basis to empirically assess a high number of different anatomic shapes and the corresponding effect of different devices would require a fast and reliable method at low cost with high throughout assessment. Transparent three dimensional 3D models of brain vessels and aneurysms may be used for microscopic flow measurements by particle image velocimetry (PIV), however, up to now the size of structures has set the limits for conventional 3D-imaging camera set-ups. On line flow assessment requires additional computational power to cope with the processing large amounts of data generated by sequences of multi-view stereo images, e.g. generated by a light field camera capturing the 3D information by plenoptic imaging of complex flow processes. Recently, a fast and low cost workflow for producing patient specific three dimensional models of cerebral arteries has been established by stereo-lithographic (SLA) 3D printing. These 3D arterial models are transparent an exhibit a replication precision within a submillimeter range required for accurate flow measurements under physiological conditions. We therefore test the feasibility of microscopic flow measurements by PIV analysis using a plenoptic camera system capturing light field image sequences. Averaging across a sequence of

  14. Angle-Resolved Second-Harmonic Light Scattering from Colloidal Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, N.; Angerer, W. E.; Yodh, A. G.

    2001-09-01

    We report angle-resolved second-harmonic generation (SHG) measurements from suspensions of centrosymmetric micron-size polystyrene spheres with surface-adsorbed dye (malachite green). The second-harmonic scattering profiles differ qualitatively from linear light scattering profiles of the same particles. We investigated these radiation patterns using several polarization configurations and particle diameters. We introduce a simple Rayleigh-Gans-Debye model to account for the SHG scattering anisotropy. The model compares favorably with our experimental data. Our measurements suggest scattering anisotropy may be used to isolate particle nonlinear optics from other bulk nonlinear optical effects in suspension.

  15. Angle-Resolved Second-Harmonic Light Scattering from Colloidal Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, N.; Angerer, W. E.; Yodh, A. G.

    2001-09-03

    We report angle-resolved second-harmonic generation (SHG) measurements from suspensions of centrosymmetric micron-size polystyrene spheres with surface-adsorbed dye (malachite green). The second-harmonic scattering profiles differ qualitatively from linear light scattering profiles of the same particles. We investigated these radiation patterns using several polarization configurations and particle diameters. We introduce a simple Rayleigh-Gans-Debye model to account for the SHG scattering anisotropy. The model compares favorably with our experimental data. Our measurements suggest scattering anisotropy may be used to isolate particle nonlinear optics from other bulk nonlinear optical effects in suspension.

  16. Fast Strain Mapping of Nanowire Light-Emitting Diodes Using Nanofocused X-ray Beams.

    PubMed

    Stankevič, Tomaš; Hilner, Emelie; Seiboth, Frank; Ciechonski, Rafal; Vescovi, Giuliano; Kryliouk, Olga; Johansson, Ulf; Samuelson, Lars; Wellenreuther, Gerd; Falkenberg, Gerald; Feidenhans'l, Robert; Mikkelsen, Anders

    2015-07-28

    X-ray nanobeams are unique nondestructive probes that allow direct measurements of the nanoscale strain distribution and composition inside the micrometer thick layered structures that are found in most electronic device architectures. However, the method is usually extremely time-consuming, and as a result, data sets are often constrained to a few or even single objects. Here we demonstrate that by special design of a nanofocused X-ray beam diffraction experiment we can (in a single 2D scan with no sample rotation) measure the individual strain and composition profiles of many structures in an array of upright standing nanowires. We make use of the observation that in the generic nanowire device configuration, which is found in high-speed transistors, solar cells, and light-emitting diodes, each wire exhibits very small degrees of random tilts and twists toward the substrate. Although the tilt and twist are very small, they give a new contrast mechanism between different wires. In the present case, we image complex nanowires for nanoLED fabrication and compare to theoretical simulations, demonstrating that this fast method is suitable for real nanostructured devices. PMID:26090689

  17. Fast 3D reconstruction of tool wear based on monocular vision and multi-color structured light illuminator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhongren; Li, Bo; Zhou, Yuebin

    2014-11-01

    Fast 3D reconstruction of tool wear from 2D images has great importance to 3D measuring and objective evaluating tool wear condition, determining accurate tool change and insuring machined part's quality. Extracting 3D information of tool wear zone based on monocular multi-color structured light can realize fast recovery of surface topography of tool wear, which overcomes the problems of traditional methods such as solution diversity and slow convergence when using SFS method and stereo match when using 3D reconstruction from multiple images. In this paper, a kind of new multi-color structured light illuminator was put forward. An information mapping model was established among illuminator's structure parameters, surface morphology and color images. The mathematical model to reconstruct 3D morphology based on monocular multi-color structured light was presented. Experimental results show that this method is effective and efficient to reconstruct the surface morphology of tool wear zone.

  18. Modeling of light depolarization by cubic and hexagonal particles in noctilucent clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokhanovsky, Alexander A.

    2006-02-01

    Noctilucent clouds (NLCs) play an important indicative role in the physics of the summer polar mesopause. They consist of tiny ice crystals with characteristic dimensions generally smaller than 200 nm. However, the predominant shape of particles is not known. Therefore, biases in the size of crystals obtained from ground and space by light scattering and polarimetric techniques in the assumption of spherical scatterers can be considerable. This is due to the influence of shape effects on the scattering characteristics of particles. We test the assumption of the hexagonal and cubical particles as candidates for the predominant shapes of particles in NLCs using Maxwell electromagnetic theory to calculate the linear depolarization ratio (LDR). We compare results of recent measurements of LDRs with our calculations. Generally, theory and experiments agree very well at the NLC peak. The shape of crystals close to the cloud top cannot be explained by the model of compact particles. Relatively high light depolarization ratios detected from the upper part of the NLC are in agreement with models of elongated needle-like particles or particles having dimensions much larger than those usually attributed to NLC events.

  19. Fresnel reflectance in refractive index estimation of light scattering solid particles in immersion liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Räty, J.; Niskanen, I.; Peiponen, K.-E.

    2010-06-01

    The refractive index of homogenous particle population can be determined by the so-called immersion liquid method. The idea is to find a known liquid whose refractive index matches the index of the particles. We report on a method that simultaneously obtains the refractive index of particles and that of the immersion liquid. It is based on a system using internal light reflection and Fresnel's theory. The method includes a series of straightforward reflection measurements and a fitting procedure. The validity of the method was tested with CaF2 particles. The method has applications within scientific studies of microparticles and nanoparticles or micro-organism in suspensions. It can be also be utilized in industry for the detection of the refractive index of products involving particles for the purpose of improvement of product quality.

  20. Significant role of deformation in probing postsaddle nuclear dissipation with light particle emission

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, W.

    2010-05-15

    Using a one-dimensional Langevin model, we study the effects of deformation on the multiplicities of postsaddle neutrons, protons, alpha particles, and giant dipole resonance (GDR) gamma rays of a heavy fissioning system {sup 240}Cf as probes of postsaddle nuclear dissipation (beta). It is shown that postsaddle dissipation effects on these light particles have a significant deformation dependence. Furthermore, we find that the role of deformation depends on the type of the particle. It reduces the sensitive influence of beta on protons, alpha particles, and GDR gamma rays substantially, whereas it enhances the sensitivity of neutrons to beta. The results suggest that to accurately extract the postsaddle friction strength by comparing measured prescission particle multiplicities of heavy nuclei with calculations based on statistical models or stochastic equations like Langevin equations, it is important to take into account the deformation effects. The influence of model dimensionality is discussed.

  1. Global gyrokinetic particle simulation of toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes excited by antenna and fast ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenlu; Holod, Ihor; Lin, Zhihong; Xiao, Yong

    2012-02-01

    Linear properties of toroidal Alfvén eigenmode (TAE) is studied in global gyrokinetic particle simulations using both fast ion and antenna excitations. A synthetic antenna provides a precise measurement of the Alfvén continuum gap width and the TAE eigenmode frequency, damping rate, and mode structures. The measured gap width exhibits a linear dependence on the aspect ratio, in agreement to a local analytic theory. The TAE frequency and mode structure excited by fast ions show a significant radial symmetry breaking relative to the ideal magnetohydrodynamic theory due to the non-perturbative contributions from the fast ions. The electromagnetic capability of the global gyrokinetic toroidal code (GTC) is verified through these global gyrokinetic simulations of Alfvén eigenmode in cylindrical and toroidal geometries.

  2. Extinction of polarized light in ferrofluids with different magnetic particle concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Socoliuc, V.; Popescu, L. B.

    2012-01-01

    The magnetic field intensity and nanoparticle concentration dependence of the polarized light extinction in a ferrofluid made of magnetite particles stabilized with technical grade oleic acid dispersed in transformer oil was experimentally investigated. The magnetically induced optical anisotropy, i.e. the dichroism divided by concentration, was found to decrease with increasing sample concentration from 2% to 8%. The magnetically induced change in the optical extinction of light polarized at 54.74° with respect to the magnetic field direction was found to be positive for the less concentrated sample (2%) and negative for the samples with 4% and 8% magnetic nanoparticle concentrations, the more negative the higher the concentration and field intensity. Based on the theoretically proven fact [11] that the particle orientation mechanism has no effect on the extinction of light polarized at 54.74° with respect to the field direction, we analyzed the experimental findings in the frames of the agglomeration and long-range pair correlations theories for the magnetically induced optical anisotropy in ferrofluids. We developed a theoretical model in the approximation of single scattering for the optical extinction coefficient of a ferrofluid with magnetically induced particle agglomeration. The model predicts the existence of a polarization independent component of the optical extinction coefficient that is experimentally measurable at 54.74° polarization angle. The change in the optical extinction of light polarized at 54.74° is positive if only the formation of straight n-particle chains is considered and may become negative in the hypothesis that the longer chains degenerate to more isotropic structures (polymer-like coils, globules or bundles of chains). The model for the influence on the light absorption of the long-range pair correlations, published elsewhere, predicts that the change in the optical extinction of light polarized at 54.74° is always negative, the

  3. Monte Carlo simulation of light scattering from size distributed homogenous and coated spherical particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogoi, Ankur

    Light scattering is a subject of intensive research at the present time in diverse fields of research namely, physics, astronomy, meteorology, biology, nanotechnology, etc. Observation and theoretical calculation of the absorption and scattering properties of particles, whose size ranges from micrometer to nanometer, are not only essential to deduce their physical properties but also capable of giving useful information for better understanding of radiation transfer through a medium containing such scatterer. In addition to such experimental and theoretical studies on light scattering by particulate matter several other groups have been extensively using Monte Carlo (MC) method to simulate light (photon) propagation in scattering media. Importantly such methods of simulating light scattering properties of artificial particles are proving to be a very useful tool in verifying the experimental observations with real samples as well as providing new clues to improve the accuracy of the existing theoretical models. In this contribution we report a MC method developed by implementing Mie theory to simulate the light scattering pattern from size distributed homogenous and coated spherical particles in single scattering regime. The computer program was written in ANSI C-language. The accuracy, efficiency and reliability of the MC method were validated by comparing the results generated by using the MC method with other benchmark theoretical results and experimental results with standard samples. Notably the MC method reported here is found to be stable even for very large spherical particles (size parameters > 1000) with large values of real (= 10) and imaginary part (= 10) of the refractive index. The promising field of application of the reported MC method will be in simulating the light (or electromagnetic) scattering properties of different types of planetary and interplanetary dust particles.

  4. Effects of porous films on the light reflectivity of pigmentary titanium dioxide particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yong; Qiao, Bing; Wang, Tig-Jie; Gao, Han; Yu, Keyi

    2016-11-01

    The light reflectivity of the film-coated titanium dioxide particles (TiO2) as a function of the film refractive index was derived and calculated using a plane film model. For the refractive index in the range of 1.00-2.15, the lower the film refractive index is, the higher is the light reflectivity of the film. It is inferred that the lower apparent refractive index of the porous film resulted in the higher reflectivity of light, i.e., the higher hiding power of the titanium dioxide particles. A dense film coating on TiO2 particles with different types of oxides, i.e., SiO2, Al2O3, MgO, ZnO, ZrO2, TiO2, corresponding to different refractive indices of the film from 1.46 to 2.50, was achieved, and the effects of refractive index on the hiding power from the model prediction were confirmed. Porous film coating of TiO2 particles was achieved by adding the organic template agent triethanolamine (TEA). The hiding power of the coated TiO2 particles was increased from 88.3 to 90.8 by adding the TEA template to the film coating (5-20 wt%). In other words, the amount of titanium dioxide needed was reduced by approximately 10% without a change in the hiding power. It is concluded that the film structure coated on TiO2 particle surface affects the light reflectivity significantly, namely, the porous film exhibits excellent performance for pigmentary titanium dioxide particles with high hiding power.

  5. Optical measurement method for particles on printed substrate by light-scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibakiri, Kisho; Fujii, Shuji; Kagi, Naoki

    2014-08-01

    Printed substrates are manufactured in clean environment to avoid defective productions caused by particle contaminations. However, since area of substrate has become very large in recent years, and the control of surface cleanliness is getting more difficult. In the previous work, the particle detection method in a large surface area of the glass substrate was developed with a simple system using a single-lens reflex digital camera. And the possibility of refractive-index calculation by scattered light of particles from the multi-directions measurement was shown. In this work, in order to utilize the luminance data and the coordinates of the particles obtained by the multi-directional measurement, the particle coordinate transformation and matching methods were studied. This study suggested the particle coordination matching method using OPM algorithm was applicable for detection of particle on the printed substrate. Using this method, particles on substrate surface could be identified using by particle coordinates and luminance acquired by the multi-direction.

  6. Quantizing a relativistic free-particle on the light front: some subtle aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, A. T.; Sales, J. H. O.; Zambrano, G. E. R.

    2006-09-01

    We use the light-front "machinery" to study the behavior of a relativistic free particle and obtain the quantum commutation relations from the classical Poisson brackets. We argue that their usual projection onto the light-front coordinates from the covariant commutation relations show that there is an inconsistency in the expected correlation between canonically conjugate variables "time" x(+) and "energy" p(-). This incompatibility between canonical conjugate variables in the light front is discussed in the context of Poisson brackets and a suggestion is made on how to avoid it.

  7. Modeling of reflection-type laser-driven white lighting considering phosphor particles and surface topography.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Ho; Joo, Jae-Young; Lee, Sun-Kyu

    2015-07-27

    This paper presents a model of blue laser diode (LD)-based white lighting coupled with a yellow YAG phosphor, for use in the proper design and fabrication of phosphor in automotive headlamps. First, the sample consisted of an LD, collecting lens, and phosphor was prepared that matches the model. The light distribution of the LD and the phosphor were modeled to investigate an effect of the surface topography and phosphor particle properties on the laser-driven white lighting systems by using the commercially available optical design software. Based on the proposed model, the integral spectrum distribution and the color coordinates were discussed.

  8. Manipulation of Micro Scale Particles in Optical Traps Using Programmable Spatial Light Modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seibel, Robin E.; Decker, Arthur J. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    1064 nm light, from an Nd:YAG laser, was polarized and incident upon a programmable parallel aligned liquid crystal spatial light modulator (PAL-SLM), where it was phase modulated according to the program controlling the PAL-SLM. Light reflected from the PAL-SLM was injected into a microscope and focused. At the focus, multiple optical traps were formed in which 9.975 m spheres were captured. The traps and the spheres were moved by changing the program of the PAL-SLM. The motion of ordered groups of micro particles was clearly demonstrated.

  9. Irregular spin angular momentum transfer from light to small birefringent particles

    SciTech Connect

    Rothmayer, M.; Tierney, D.; Schmitzer, H.; Frins, E.; Dultz, W.

    2009-10-15

    The transfer of spin angular momentum from photons to small particles is a key experiment of quantum physics. The particles rotate clockwise or counterclockwise depending on the polarization of the light beam which holds them in an optical trap. We show that even perfectly disk shaped particles will in general not rotate with a constant angular speed. The particles will periodically accelerate and decelerate their rotational motion due to a varying spin angular momentum transfer from the light. Using the Poincare sphere we derive the equation of motion of a birefringent plate and verify the results by measuring the time dependent rotation of small crystals of Hg(I) iodide and 3,4,9,10-perylene-tetracarboxylic-dianhydride (PTCDA) in the trap of polarized optical tweezers. For small ellipticities of the polarized light in the tweezers the plate stops in a fixed orientation relative to the axes of the light ellipse. We discuss the origin of this halt and propose an application of small birefringent plates as self-adjusting optical retarders in micro-optics.

  10. Adaptive Fraunhofer diffraction particle sizing instrument using a spatial light modulator.

    PubMed

    Hirleman, E D; Dellenback, P A

    1989-11-15

    Integration of a magnetooptic spatial light modulator into a Fraunhofer diffraction particle sizing instrument is proposed and demonstrated theoretically and experimentally. The concept gives the instrument the ability to reconfigure a detector array on-line and thereby adapt to the measurement context.

  11. Light Scattering by Gaussian Particles: A Solution with Finite-Difference Time Domain Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, W.; Nousiainen, T.; Fu, Q.; Loeb, N. G.; Videen, G.; Muinonen, K.

    2003-01-01

    The understanding of single-scattering properties of complex ice crystals has significance in atmospheric radiative transfer and remote-sensing applications. In this work, light scattering by irregularly shaped Gaussian ice crystals is studied with the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) technique. For given sample particle shapes and size parameters in the resonance region, the scattering phase matrices and asymmetry factors are calculated. It is found that the deformation of the particle surface can significantly smooth the scattering phase functions and slightly reduce the asymmetry factors. The polarization properties of irregular ice crystals are also significantly different from those of spherical cloud particles. These FDTD results could provide a reference for approximate light-scattering models developed for irregular particle shapes and can have potential applications in developing a much simpler practical light scattering model for ice clouds angular-distribution models and for remote sensing of ice clouds and aerosols using polarized light. (copyright) 2003 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The nature of light: a description of photon diffraction based upon virtual particle exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobley, Michael J.

    2005-08-01

    Any discussion of the nature of light must include a reminder that whenever we make the observation of light (photons), we only observe particle-like properties. This paper provides a reiteration that we don"t need wave-like properties to scattered photons to describe phenomena such as diffraction or refraction of light. This paper updates the original ideas of Duane, later revived by Lande, which provided a description of light diffraction without making reference to a wave nature. These are updated using terminology more common to quantum electrodynamics which describes the interaction of particles in terms of the exchange of virtual photons. Diffraction is described in terms of an ensemble of distinct, probability weighted paths for the scattered photons. The scattering associated with each path results from the quantized momentum exchange with the scattering lattice attributed to the exchange or reflection of virtual photons. The probability for virtual particle exchange/reflection is dependent upon the allowed momentum states of the lattice determined by a Fourier analysis of the lattice geometry. Any scattered photon will exhibit an apparent wavelength inversely proportional to its momentum. Simplified, particle-like descriptions are developed for Young"s double slit diffraction, Fraunhofer diffraction and Fresnel diffraction. This description directly accounts for the quantization of momentum transferred to the scattering lattice and the specific eigenvalues of the lattice based upon the constraints to virtual photon exchange set by the Uncertainty Principle, Δπi = h/ζi.

  13. Adaptive Fraunhofer diffraction particle sizing instrument using a spatial light modulator.

    PubMed

    Hirleman, E D; Dellenback, P A

    1989-11-15

    Integration of a magnetooptic spatial light modulator into a Fraunhofer diffraction particle sizing instrument is proposed and demonstrated theoretically and experimentally. The concept gives the instrument the ability to reconfigure a detector array on-line and thereby adapt to the measurement context. PMID:20555963

  14. Narrow beam light transfer in small particles: image blurring and depolarization.

    PubMed

    Aruga, T; Igarashi, T

    1981-08-01

    Narrow beam light transfer in a layer of small particles is treated theoretically in terms of degradation of image quality and depolarization. Computer simulations using Monte Carlo methods are described, and some results of the simulations are shown. Simulations were done for cases in which a ground-based linearly polarized light beam is transmitted to a spacecraft through cloud layers, and the light is detected on the spacecraft. Image degradation and light depolarization resulting from transmission through clouds are shown qualitatively and quantitatively. The results indicate that depolarization is negligibly small, but degradation of image quality is not negligible, especially when the light beam divergence is large. At infrared wavelengths the effect of image blurring is much smaller than at visible wavelengths.

  15. Fast response organic light-emitting diode for visible optical communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Takeshi; Taniguchi, Yoshio

    2008-02-01

    We examined fast response organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) for new applications of visible optical communications. For the practical use in this field, the fast transmission speed of OLEDs is required to be used in many applications, but the low carrier mobility of organic materials and the long fluorescence lifetime (FL) organic emitting materials limit the transmission speed of OLEDs. Therefore, we investigated the influence of the FL on transient properties of photoluminescence (PL), which were evaluated by the frequency dependence of PL intensity excited by a modulated violet laser diode. The FLs of several organic emitting materials were also measured, and we found the clear relationship between the FL and the transient properties of PL intensity. The fastest cutoff frequency of PL intensity was achieved 160 MHz utilizing short FL material, 1,4-bis[2-[4-[N,N-di(ptolyl)amino]phenl]vinyl]benzene. We also investigated another way to increase the transmission speed utilizing a semiconductor-organic multilayer structure, of which ZnS was used as an electron transport layer. The maximum cutoff frequency of this device was achieved 20.3 MHz, while that of the organic multilayer structure was 8.7 MHz at a sine wave voltage of 7 V and a bias voltage of 5 V. This result indicates that the high carrier mobility of the ZnS layer causes the increase in the transmission speed of OLEDs. We demonstrated one institutive demonstrator module of visible optical communications, which consisted of the transceiver module with an OLED and the pen-type receiver module with a photo-diode at a point. The movie files was transmitted at a speed of 230 kbps, when the point of a pen-type receiver module approaches the emitting area of an OLED. Furthermore, the pseudo-random signal with 1Mbps was also transmitted with this visible optical communication system. Such a system enables to connect between transceiver and receiver module without precious alignment because of the large

  16. Multiphoton light-sheet microscopy using wavelength mixing: fast multicolor imaging of the beating Zebrafish heart with low photobleaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahou, Pierre; Vermot, Julien; Beaurepaire, Emmanuel; Supatto, Willy

    2015-03-01

    Two-photon laser scanning microscopy has become a standard to map thick and live tissues. However, its application for fast and multicolor imaging remains challenging. To address this issue, we report on the implementation of mixed wavelength excitation in a two-photon light-sheet microscope. We illustrate the potential of the technique by recording sustained multicolor two-photon movies of the beating heart in zebrafish embryos with negligible photobleaching at 28 million pixels/second. In particular, 3D reconstructions of the heart periodic motion are obtained with sufficient spatiotemporal resolution to track the fast movements of individual cells during a cardiac cycle.

  17. Characteristics of large particles and their effects on the submarine light field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Weilin

    Large particles play important roles in the ocean by modifying the underwater light field and effecting material transfer. The particle size distribution of large particles has been measured in-situ with multiple- camera video microscopy and the automated particle sizing and recognition software developed. Results show that there are more large particles in coastal waters than previously thaught, based upon by a hyperbolic size- distribution curve with a (log-log) slope parameter of close to 3 instead of 4 for the particles larger than 100μm diameter. Larger slopes are more typical for particles in the open ocean. This slope permits estimation of the distribution into the small-particle size range for use in correcting the beam-attenuation measurements for near-forward scattering. The large- particle slope and c-meter were used to estimate the small-particle size distributions which nearly matched those measured with a Coulter Counteroler (3.05%). There is also a fair correlation (r2=0.729) between the slope of the distribution and its concentration parameters. Scattering by large particles is influenced by not only the concentrations of these particles, but also the scattering phase functions. This first in-situ measurement of large-particle scattering with multiple angles reveals that they scatter more in the backward direction than was previously believed, and the enhanced backscattering can be explained in part by multiple scattering of aggregated particles. Proper identification of these large particles can be of great help in understanding the status of the ecosystem. By extracting particle features using high-resolution video images via moment-invariant functions and applying this information to lower-resolution images, we increase the effective sample volume without severely degrading classification efficiency. Traditional pattern recognition algorithms of images classified zooplankton with results within 24% of zooplankton collected using bottle samples

  18. The Classical Theory of Light Colors: a Paradigm for Description of Particle Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazilu, Nicolae; Agop, Maricel; Gatu, Irina; Iacob, Dan Dezideriu; Butuc, Irina; Ghizdovat, Vlad

    2016-06-01

    The color is an interaction property: of the interaction of light with matter. Classically speaking it is therefore akin to the forces. But while forces engendered the mechanical view of the world, the colors generated the optical view. One of the modern concepts of interaction between the fundamental particles of matter - the quantum chromodynamics - aims to fill the gap between mechanics and optics, in a specific description of strong interactions. We show here that this modern description of the particle interactions has ties with both the classical and quantum theories of light, regardless of the connection between forces and colors. In a word, the light is a universal model in the description of matter. The description involves classical Yang-Mills fields related to color.

  19. Role of minerogenic particles in light scattering in lakes and a river in central New York

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Feng; Effler, Steven W.; O'Donnell, David; Perkins, Mary Gail; Weidemann, Alan

    2007-09-01

    The role of minerogenic particles in light scattering in several lakes and a river (total of ten sites) in central New York, which represent a robust range of scattering conditions, was evaluated based on an individual particle analysis technique of scanning electron microscopy interfaced with automated x-ray microanalysis and image analysis (SAX), in situ bulk measurements of particle scattering and backscattering coefficients (bp and bbp), and laboratory analyses of common indicators of scattering. SAX provided characterizations of the elemental x-ray composition, number concentration, particle size distribution (PSD), shape, and projected area concentration of minerogenic particles (PAVm) of sizes >0.4 μm. Mie theory was applied to calculate the minerogenic components of bp (bm) and bbp (bb,m) with SAX data. Differences in PAVm, associated primarily with clay minerals and CaCO3, were responsible for most of the measured differences in both bp and bbp across the study sites. Contributions of the specified minerogenic particle classes to bm were found to correspond approximately to their contributions to PAVm. The estimates of bm represented substantial fractions of bp, whereas those of bb,m were the dominant component of bbp. The representativeness of the estimates of bm and bb,m was supported by their consistency with the bulk measurements. Greater uncertainty prevails for the bb,m estimates than those for bm, associated primarily with reported deviations in particle shapes from sphericity. The PSDs were well represented by the "B" component of the two-component model or a three parameter generalized gamma distribution [Deep-Sea Res. Part I 40, 1459 (1993)]. The widely applied Junge (hyperbolic) function performed poorly in representing the PSDs and the size dependency of light scattering in these systems, by overrepresenting the concentrations of submicrometer particles especially. Submicrometer particles were not important contributors to bm or bb,m.

  20. Measurements of light-absorbing particles on the glaciers in the Cordillera Blanca, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, C. G.; All, J. D.; Schwarz, J. P.; Arnott, W. P.; Cole, R. J.; Lapham, E.; Celestian, A.

    2015-02-01

    Glaciers in the tropical Andes have been rapidly losing mass since the 1970s. In addition to the documented increase in temperature, increases in light-absorbing particles deposited on glaciers could be contributing to the observed glacier loss. Here we report on measurements of light-absorbing particles sampled from glaciers during three surveys in the Cordillera Blanca Mountains in Peru. During three research expeditions in the dry seasons (May-August) of 2011, 2012 and 2013, 240 snow samples were collected from 15 mountain peaks over altitudes ranging from 4800 to nearly 6800 m. Several mountains were sampled each of the 3 years and some mountains were sampled multiple times during the same year. Collected snow samples were melted and filtered in the field then later analyzed using the Light Absorption Heating Method (LAHM), a new technique that measures the ability of particles on filters to absorb visible light. LAHM results have been calibrated using filters with known amounts of fullerene soot, a common industrial surrogate for black carbon (BC). As sample filters often contain dust in addition to BC, results are presented in terms of effective black carbon (eBC). During the 2013 survey, snow samples were collected and kept frozen for analysis with a Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2). Calculated eBC mass from the LAHM analysis and the SP2 refractory black carbon (rBC) results were well correlated (r2 = 0.92). These results indicate that a substantial portion of the light-absorbing particles in the more polluted regions were likely BC. The 3 years of data show that glaciers in the Cordillera Blanca Mountains close to human population centers have substantially higher levels of eBC (as high as 70 ng g-1) than remote glaciers (as low as 2.0 ng g-1 eBC), indicating that population centers can influence local glaciers by sourcing BC.

  1. Solar Energetic Particle Production by Coronal Mass Ejection-driven Shocks in Solar Fast-Wind Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahler, S. W.; Reames, D. V.

    2003-02-01

    Gradual solar energetic particle (SEP) events at 1 AU are produced by coronal/interplanetary shocks driven by coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Fast (vCME>~900 km s-1) CMEs might produce stronger shocks in solar slow-wind regions, where the flow and fast-mode MHD wave speeds are low, than in fast-wind regions, where those speeds are much higher. At 1 AU the O+7/O+6 ratios distinguish between those two kinds of wind streams. We use the 20 MeV proton event intensities from the EPACT instrument on Wind, the associated CMEs observed with the LASCO coronagraph on SOHO, and the ACE SWICS solar wind values of O+7/O+6 to look for variations of peak SEP intensities as a function of O+7/O+6. No significant dependence of the SEP intensities on O+7/O+6 is found for either poorly connected or well-connected CME source regions or for different CME speed ranges. However, in the 3 yr study period we find only five cases of SEP events in fast wind, defined by regions of O+7/O+6<0.15. We suggest that in coronal holes SEP acceleration may take place only in the plume regions, where the flow and Alfvén speeds are low. A broad range of angular widths are associated with fast (vCME>=900 km s-1) CMEs, but we find that no fast CMEs with widths less than 60° are associated with SEP events. On the other hand, nearly all fast halo CMEs are associated with SEP events. Thus, the CME widths are more important in SEP production than previously thought, but the speed of the solar wind source regions in which SEPs are produced may not be a factor.

  2. Vavilov-Cherenkov radiation when cosmic rays pass through the relic photon gas and when fast charged particles traverse an optical laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chefranov, S. G.

    2016-07-01

    Using a new [9, 10] quantum theory of Vavilov-Cherenkov radiation (VCR) based on Abraham's theory, we show that a threshold VCR effect can be excited by the relic photon gas when relativistic charged cosmic-ray particles with γ ≥ γth ≈ 1.9 × 1010 (where γ-2 = 1- v 2/ c 2, v is the particle speed, and c is the speed of light in a vacuum) pass through it. This is compatible with the well-known GZK cutoff [7, 8] at γ ≈ 1011. We have obtained the condition γ > γth ≈ 2.1 × 102 for the appearance of VCR when a sufficiently fast charged particle (an electron, a proton, or a nucleus) passes through intense laser radiation. This condition ensures that VCR can be observed experimentally (e.g., on the Large Hadron Collider) without invoking any additional conditions required from the currently existing estimate of γth > 8.8 × 104 [13] based on the now universally accepted quantum theory of VCR, which follows from Minkowski's theory (and which gives an estimate of γ > 1021 when excited by the relic photon gas).

  3. Nanostructure of Metallic Particles in Light Water Reactor Used Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, Edgar C.; Mausolf, Edward J.; Mcnamara, Bruce K.; Soderquist, Chuck Z.; Schwantes, Jon M.

    2015-03-11

    The extraordinary nano-structure of metallic particles in light water reactor fuels points to possible high reactivity through increased surface area and a high concentration of high energy defect sites. We have analyzed the metallic epsilon particles from a high burn-up fuel from a boiling water reactor using transmission electron microscopy and have observed a much finer nanostructure in these particles than has been reported previously. The individual round particles that varying in size between ~20 and ~50 nm appear to consist of individual crystallites on the order of 2-3 nm in diameter. It is likely that in-reactor irradiation induce displacement cascades results in the formation of the nano-structure. The composition of these metallic phases is variable yet the structure of the material is consistent with the hexagonal close packed structure of epsilon-ruthenium. These findings suggest that unusual catalytic behavior of these materials might be expected, particularly under accident conditions.

  4. Comparison of near-forward light scattering on oceanic turbulence and particles.

    PubMed

    Bogucki, D J; Domaradzki, J A; Stramski, D; Zaneveld, J R

    1998-07-20

    We examine and compare near-forward light scattering that is caused by turbulence and typical particulate assemblages in the ocean. The near-forward scattering by particles was calculated using Mie theory for homogeneous spheres and particle size distributions representative of natural assemblages in the ocean. Direct numerical simulations of a passive scalar with Prandtl number 7 mixed by homogeneous turbulence were used to represent temperature fluctuations and resulting inhomogeneities in the refractive index of water. Light scattering on the simulated turbulent flow was calculated using the geometrical-optics approximation. We found that the smallest temperature scales contribute the most to scattering, and that scattering on turbulence typically dominates over scattering on particles for small angles as large as 0.1 degrees . The scattering angle deviation that is due to turbulence for a light beam propagating over a 0.25-m path length in the oceanic water can be as large as 0.1 degrees . In addition, we carried out a preliminary laboratory experiment that illustrates the differences in the near-forward scattering on refractive-index inhomogeneities and particles. PMID:18285924

  5. Can the light scattering depolarization ratio of small particles be greater than 1/3?

    PubMed

    Khlebtsov, Nikolai G; Melnikov, Andrei G; Bogatyrev, Vladimir A; Dykman, Lev A; Alekseeva, Anna V; Trachuk, Lyubov A; Khlebtsov, Boris N

    2005-07-21

    According to the theory of light scattering by small randomly oriented particles, the depolarized ratio of the scattered intensities, I(vh)/I(vv), cannot exceed 1/3. Here we show that this conclusion does not hold for nonspherical plasmon resonant metal particles. Our analysis is based on the Rayleigh approximation and the exact T-matrix method as applied to spheroids and circular cylinders with semispherical ends. For small particles, the condition I(vh)/I(vv) >1/3 can be satisfied within the upper left quadrant of the complex relative dielectric permeability Real(eps) < -2 (rods) and within the upper unit semicircle centered at Real(eps) = -1 (disks). For gold nanorods with the axis ratio exceeding 2, the maximal theoretical values I(vh)/I(vv) lie between 1/3 and 3/4 at wavelengths of 550-650 nm. The extinction and static light scattering spectra (450-850 nm, at 90 degrees degrees) as well as the depolarized ratio of He-Ne laser light scattering were measured with gold nanospheres (the average diameters of 21, 29, and 46 nm) and nanorods (the longitudinal plasmon resonance peak positions at 655, 692, and 900 nm). The measured depolarization ratios of nanospheres (0.07-0.16) and nanorods (0.3-0.48) are in good agreement with theoretical calculations based on estimations of the average particle size and shape. PMID:16852700

  6. TIME-DEPENDENT PERPENDICULAR TRANSPORT OF FAST CHARGED PARTICLES IN A TURBULENT MAGNETIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Fraschetti, F.; Jokipii, J. R.

    2011-06-20

    We present an analytic derivation of the temporal dependence of the perpendicular transport coefficient of charged particles in magnetostatic turbulence, for times smaller than the time needed for charged particles to travel the turbulence correlation length. This time window is left unexplored in most transport models. In our analysis all magnetic scales are taken to be much larger than the particle gyroradius, so that perpendicular transport is assumed to be dominated by the guiding center motion. Particle drift from the local magnetic field lines (MFLs) and magnetic field line random walk are evaluated separately for slab and three-dimensional (3D) isotropic turbulence. Contributions of wavelength scales shorter and longer than the turbulence coherence length are compared. In contrast to the slab case, particles in 3D isotropic turbulence unexpectedly diffuse from local MFLs; this result questions the common assumption that particle magnetization is independent of turbulence geometry. Extensions of this model will allow for a study of solar wind anisotropies.

  7. Atmospheric fate of oil matter adsorbed on sea salt particles under UV light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaitilingom, M.; Avij, P.; Huang, H.; Valsaraj, K. T.

    2014-12-01

    The presence of liquid petroleum hydrocarbons at the sea water surface is an important source of marine pollution. An oil spill in sea-water will most likely occur due to an involuntary accident from tankers, offshore platforms, etc. However, a large amount of oil is also deliberately spilled in sea-water during the clean-out process of tank vessels (e.g. for the Mediterranean Sea, 490,000 tons/yr). Moreover, the pollution caused by an oil spill does not only affect the aquatic environment but also is of concern for the atmospheric environment. A portion of the oil matter present at the sea-water surface is transported into the atmosphere viaevaporation and adsorption at the surface of sea spray particles. Few studies are related to the presence of oil matter in airborne particles resulting from their adsorption on sea salt aerosols. We observed that the non-volatile oil matter was adsorbed at the surface of sea-salt crystals (av. size of 1.1 μm). Due to their small size, these particles can have a significant residence time in the atmosphere. The hydrocarbon matter adsorbed at the surface of these particles can also be transformed by catalyzers present in the atmosphere (i.e. UV, OH, O3, ...). In this work, we focused on the photo-oxidation rates of the C16 to C30alkanes present in these particles. We utilized a bubble column reactor, which produced an abundance of small sized bubbles. These bubbles generated droplets upon bursting at the air-salt water interface. These droplets were then further dried up and lifted to the top of the column where they were collected as particles. These particles were incubated in a controlled reactor in either dark conditions or under UV-visible light. The difference of alkane content analyzed by GC-MS between the particles exposed to UV or the particles not exposed to UV indicated that up to 20% in mass was lost after 20 min of light exposure. The degradation kinetics varied for each range of alkanes (C16-20, C21-25, C26

  8. TECHNICAL DESIGN NOTE Multi-pass light amplification for tomographic particle image velocimetry applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaemi, Sina; Scarano, Fulvio

    2010-12-01

    The light source budget is a critical issue for tomographic particle image velocimetry (Tomo-PIV) systems due to its requirement for large illuminated volume and imaging at small apertures. In this work, a light amplification system based on the multi-pass concept is investigated for Tomo-PIV applications. The system design is performed on the basis of a theoretical model providing an estimation of the most important system parameters and above all the amplification gain. The multi-pass light amplification concept is verified experimentally by measuring the scattered light intensity across the illuminated volume. The results demonstrate a gain factor of 7 and 5 times in comparison with the single-pass and double-pass illumination approaches, respectively.

  9. Giant in-particle field concentration and Fano resonances at light scattering by high-refractive-index particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tribelsky, Michael I.; Miroshnichenko, Andrey E.

    2016-05-01

    We present the results of a detailed analytical study of light scattering by a particle with high refractive index m +i κ and low losses (m ≫1 ,0 <κ ≪1 ) based on the exact Mie solution. We show that there is a dramatic difference in the behavior of the electromagnetic field within the particle (inner problem) and outside it (outer problem). With an increase in m at fixed values of the other parameters, the field within the particle asymptotically converges to a periodic function of m . The electric and magnetic type Mie resonances of different orders overlap substantially. It may lead to a giant concentration of the electromagnetic energy within the particle. At the same time, we demonstrate that the solution for the outer problem makes it possible to present each partial scattered wave as a sum of two partitions. One of them corresponds to the m -independent wave, scattered by a perfectly reflecting particle and plays the role of a background, while the other is associated with the excitation of a sharply m -dependent resonant Mie mode. The interference of the partitions brings about a typical asymmetric Fano profile. The profile is obtained from the exact Mie solution by means of identical transformations without any additional assumptions and/or fitting. It makes it possible to generalize rigorously the Fano theory to the case of finite dissipation. At an increase in m the Fano resonances in the outer problem die out and the scattered field converges to the universal, m -independent profile. The behavior of the resonances at a fixed m and varying particle size parameter (x ) is also discussed in detail. The similarities and differences of the two cases (fixed x , varying m and fixed m , varying x ) are disclosed. We also show that under certain very general conditions the scattering cross section of a large lossy sphere cannot be smaller than half its geometric cross section, while its absorption cross section cannot exceed three halves of the geometric

  10. Cylindrical particle manipulation and negative spinning using a nonparaxial Hermite-Gaussian light-sheet beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitri, F. G.

    2016-10-01

    Based on the angular spectrum decomposition method (ASDM), a nonparaxial solution for the Hermite-Gaussian (HG m ) light-sheet beam of any order m is derived. The beam-shape coefficients (BSCs) are expressed in a compact form and computed using the standard Simpson’s rule for numerical integration. Subsequently, the analysis is extended to evaluate the longitudinal and transverse radiation forces as well as the spin torque on an absorptive dielectric cylindrical particle in 2D without any restriction to a specific range of frequencies. The dynamics of the cylindrical particle are also examined based on Newton’s second law of motion. The numerical results show that a Rayleigh or Mie cylindrical particle can be trapped, pulled or propelled in the optical field depending on its initial position in the cross-sectional plane of the HG m light-sheet. Moreover, negative or positive axial spin torques can arise depending on the choice of the non-dimensional size parameter ka (where k is the wavenumber and a is the radius of the cylinder) and the location of the absorptive cylinder in the beam. This means that the HG m light-sheet beam can induce clockwise or anti-clockwise rotations depending on its shift from the center of the cylinder. In addition, individual vortex behavior can arise in the cross-sectional plane of wave propagation. The present analysis presents an analytical model to predict the optical radiation forces and torque induced by a HG m light-sheet beam on an absorptive cylinder for applications in optical light-sheet tweezers, optical micro-machines, particle manipulation and opto-fluidics to name a few areas of research.

  11. Effect of toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes on fast particle confinement in the spherical tokamak Globus-M

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Yu. V.; Bakharev, N. N.; Gusev, V. K.; Minaev, V. B.; Kornev, V. A.; Kurskiev, G. S.; Patrov, M. I.; Sakharov, N. V.; Tolstyakov, S. Yu.; Shchegolev, P. B.

    2015-12-01

    > In experiments with neutral beam injection at the early stage of a Globus-M discharge, instabilities were observed that were excited by fast ions in the frequency range of 50-200 kHz, which were identified as toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes (TAE) (Petrov et al., Plasma Phys. Rep., vol. 37, 2011, pp. 1001-1005). In contradiction with the NSTX and MAST tokamaks, a regime of TAE generation was realized with strongly developed single modes. Magnetic measurements with fast Mirnov probes have shown that most of the modes have toroidal number . The influence of the modes on the fast particle confinement was recorded by means of a tangentially directed neutral particle analyser (NPA) and neutron detector. Hydrogen and deuterium were used as target plasma and injected beam for study of the isotopic effect. At deuterium injection into the deuterium plasma, TAE led to the neutron rate dropping by 25 %, whereas NPA fluxes of high energy dropped by 75 %. At hydrogen injection, the drop in the measured NPA fluxes did not exceed 25 %.

  12. Particle Size Distributions During Laboratory-Scale Biomass Burns and Prescribed Burns Using Fast Response Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, H.; Hosseini, E.; Li, Q.; Cocker, D.; Weise, D.; Miller, A.; Shrivastava, M.; Miller, W.; Princevac, M.; Mahalingam, S.

    2010-12-01

    Particle size distribution from biomass combustion in an important parameter as it affects air quality, climate modelling and health effects. To date particle size distributions reported from prior studies varies not only due to difference in fuels but also difference in experimental conditions. This study aims to report characteristics of particle size distribution in a well controlled repeatable lab scale biomass fires for southwestern US fuels and compare with that from prescribed burns. The combustion laboratory at the USDA Forest Service’s Fire Science Laboratory (FSL), Missoula, MT provided repeatable combustion and dilution environment ideal for particle size distribution study. For a variety of fuels tested the major mode of particle size distribution was in the range of 29 to 52 nm, which is attributable to dilution of the fresh smoke. Comparing volume size distribution from FMPS and APS measurement ~30 % of particle volume was attributable to the particles ranging from 0.5 to 10 µm for PM10. Geometric mean diameter rapidly increased during flaming and gradually decreased during mixed and smoldering phase combustion. Most of fuels gave unimodal distribution during flaming phase and strong biomodal distribution during smoldering phase. The mode of combustion (flaming, mixed and smoldering) could be better distinguished using slopes in MCE vs geometric mean diameter from each mode of combustion than only using MCE values. Prescribed burns were carried out at wildland managed by military bases. Evolution of particle distribution in and out of the plume will be compared with particle distribution from lab scale burning.

  13. Theory of light scattering at nanoparticles and optical forces between small particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saenz, Juan Jose

    Appropriate combinations of laser beams can be used to trap and manipulate small particles with ``optical tweezers'' as well as to induce significant ``optical binding'' forces between particles. Here we review some basic concepts related to the optical forces on small (subwavelength) particles, focusing on the interplay between scattering asymmetry and momentum transfer. These forces are, in general, non-conservative (curl forces) which lead to a number of intriguing predictions regarding the dynamics of nanoparticles. Optical forces between small particles are usually strongly anisotropic depending on the interference landscape of the external fields. This is in contrast with the familiar isotropic van der Waals and, in general, Casimir-Lifshitz interactions between neutral bodies arising from random electromagnetic waves generated by equilibrium quantum and thermal fluctuations. As we will see, artificially created random fluctuating light fields can be used to induce and control dispersion forces between small colloidal particles. Interestingly, for relatively high refractive index semiconductor nanoparticles, the interactions can be tuned from attractive to strongly repulsive when the frequency of the external fluctuating field is tuned near the first magnetic Mie-resonance. Interactions induced by randomly fluctuating light fields open a path towards the control of translational invariant interactions with tuneable strength and range in colloidal systems.

  14. Light Charged Particle Emission and the Giant Dipole Resonance in Ce Nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gramegna, F.; Barlini, S.; Kravchuk, V. L.; Lanchais, A. L.; Wieland, O.; Bracco, A.; Moroni, A.; Casini, G.; Benzoni, G.; Blasi, N.; Brambilla, S.; Brekiesz, M.; Bruno, M.; Camera, F.; Chiari, M.; Crespi, F.; Geraci, E.; Guiot, B.; Kmiecik, M.; Leoni, S.; Maj, A.; Mastinu, P. F.; Million, B.; Nannini, A.; Ordine, A.; Vannini, G.

    2005-04-01

    The 132Ce compound nucleus was formed in fusion reactions 64Ni + 68Zn and 16O + 116Sn at different excitation energies. High energy γ -rays have been measured in coincidence with Evaporation Residues (ER) in these reactions. At the same time Light Charged Particles (LCP) were measured with the same gate on ER for all the reactions in order to verify and compare the amount of pre-equilibrium emission using mass-symmetric and mass-asymmetric entrance channels. Results on α -particle spectra will be presented together with a moving source fit analysis.

  15. Picosecond time scale modification of forward scattered light induced by absorption inside particles.

    PubMed

    Kervella, Myriam; d'Abzac, Françoix-Xavier; Hache, François; Hespel, Laurent; Dartigalongue, Thibault

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work is to evaluate the influence of absorption processes on the Time Of Flight (TOF) of the light scattered out of a thick medium in the forward direction. We use a Monte-Carlo simulation with temporal phase function and Debye modes. The main result of our study is that absorption inside the particle induces a decrease of the TOF on a picosecond time scale, measurable with a femtosecond laser apparatus. This decrease, which exhibits a neat sensitivity to the absorption coefficient of particles, could provide an efficient way to measure this absorption.

  16. Modified iterative vector similarity measure for particle size analysis based on forward light scattering.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tian'en; Shen, Jianqi; Lin, Chengjun

    2016-08-10

    The vector similarity measure (VSM), originally applied to information retrieval, has been recently introduced to analyze particle size distribution (PSD) based on forward light scattering. The VSM technique can predict the PSD with low sensitivity to the experimental errors. However, the simulations and experiments of multi-modal distributed particle systems were not satisfying. In this paper, a modified inverse algorithm is presented to improve the VSM technique. Simulated results and experimental evidence show that with this modification the VSM technique can reconstruct the PSD more efficiently. PMID:27534458

  17. Resonant transmission of light in chains of high-index dielectric particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savelev, Roman S.; Filonov, Dmitry S.; Petrov, Mihail I.; Krasnok, Alexander E.; Belov, Pavel A.; Kivshar, Yuri S.

    2015-10-01

    We study numerically, analytically, and experimentally the resonant transmission of light in a waveguide formed by a periodic array of high-index dielectric nanoparticles with a side-coupled resonator. We demonstrate that a resonator with high enough Q -factor provides the conditions for the Fano-type interference allowing one to control the resonant transmission of light. We suggest a practical realization of this resonant effect based on the quadrupole resonance of a dielectric particle and demonstrate it experimentally for ceramic disks at microwave frequencies.

  18. The Fast-Evolving phy-2 Gene Modulates Sexual Development in Response to Light in the Model Fungus Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zheng; Li, Ning; Li, Jigang; Dunlap, Jay C.; Trail, Frances

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rapid responses to changes in incident light are critical to the guidance of behavior and development in most species. Phytochrome light receptors in particular play key roles in bacterial physiology and plant development, but their functions and regulation are less well understood in fungi. Nevertheless, genome-wide expression measurements provide key information that can guide experiments that reveal how genes respond to environmental signals and clarify their role in development. We performed functional genomic and phenotypic analyses of the two phytochromes in Neurospora crassa, a fungal model adapted to a postfire environment that experiences dramatically variable light conditions. Expression of phy-1 and phy-2 was low in early sexual development and in the case of phy-2 increased in late sexual development. Under light stimulation, strains with the phytochromes deleted exhibited increased expression of sexual development-related genes. Moreover, under red light, the phy-2 knockout strain commenced sexual development early. In the evolution of phytochromes within ascomycetes, at least two duplications have occurred, and the faster-evolving phy-2 gene has frequently been lost. Additionally, the three key cysteine sites that are critical for bacterial and plant phytochrome function are not conserved within fungal phy-2 homologs. Through the action of phytochromes, transitions between asexual and sexual reproduction are modulated by light level and light quality, presumably as an adaptation for fast asexual growth and initiation of sexual reproduction of N. crassa in exposed postfire ecosystems. PMID:26956589

  19. Particle and light fragment emission in peripheral heavy ion collisions at Fermi energies

    SciTech Connect

    Piantelli, S.; Maurenzig, P. R.; Olmi, A.; Bardelli, L.; Bartoli, A.; Bini, M.; Casini, G.; Coppi, C.; Mangiarotti, A.; Pasquali, G.; Poggi, G.; Stefanini, A. A.; Taccetti, N.; Vanzi, E.

    2006-09-15

    A systematic investigation of the average multiplicities of light charged particles and intermediate mass fragments emitted in peripheral and semiperipheral collisions is presented as a function of the beam energy, violence of the collision, and mass of the system. The data have been collected with the FIASCO setup in the reactions {sup 93}Nb+{sup 93}Nb at (17,23,30,38)A MeV and {sup 116}Sn+{sup 116}Sn at (30,38)A MeV. The midvelocity emission has been separated from the emission of the projectile-like fragment. This last component appears to be compatible with an evaporation from an equilibrated source at normal density, as described by the statistical code GEMINI at the appropriate excitation energy. On the contrary, the midvelocity emission presents remarkable differences in both the dependence of the multiplicities on the energy deposited in the midvelocity region and the isotopic composition of the emitted light charged particles.

  20. Particle and light fragment emission in peripheral heavy ion collisions at Fermi energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piantelli, S.; Maurenzig, P. R.; Olmi, A.; Bardelli, L.; Bartoli, A.; Bini, M.; Casini, G.; Coppi, C.; Mangiarotti, A.; Pasquali, G.; Poggi, G.; Stefanini, A. A.; Taccetti, N.; Vanzi, E.

    2006-09-01

    A systematic investigation of the average multiplicities of light charged particles and intermediate mass fragments emitted in peripheral and semiperipheral collisions is presented as a function of the beam energy, violence of the collision, and mass of the system. The data have been collected with the FIASCO setup in the reactions Nb93+Nb93 at (17,23,30,38)A MeV and Sn116+Sn116 at (30,38)A MeV. The midvelocity emission has been separated from the emission of the projectile-like fragment. This last component appears to be compatible with an evaporation from an equilibrated source at normal density, as described by the statistical code GEMINI at the appropriate excitation energy. On the contrary, the midvelocity emission presents remarkable differences in both the dependence of the multiplicities on the energy deposited in the midvelocity region and the isotopic composition of the emitted light charged particles.

  1. Nanostructure of metallic particles in light water reactor used nuclear fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buck, Edgar C.; Mausolf, Edward J.; McNamara, Bruce K.; Soderquist, Chuck Z.; Schwantes, Jon M.

    2015-06-01

    An extraordinary nano-structure has been observed in the metallic (Mo-Tc-Ru-Rh-Pd) particles that are known to form during irradiated in light water nuclear reactor fuels. This structure points possible high catalytic reactivity through the occurrence of a very high surface area as well as defect sites. We have analyzed separated metallic particles from dissolved high burn-up spent nuclear fuel using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The larger particles vary in diameter between ∼10 and ∼300 nm and possess a hexagonally close packed epsilon-ruthenium structure. These particles are not always single crystals but often consist of much smaller crystallites on the order of 1-3 nm in diameter with evidence suggesting the occurrence of some amorphous regions. It is possible that neutron irradiation and fission product recoils generated the unusual small crystallite size. The composition of the metallic particles was variable with low levels of uranium present in some of the particles. We hypothesize that the uranium may have induced the formation of the amorphous (or frustrated) metal structure. This unique nano-structure may play an important role in the environmental behavior of nuclear fuels.

  2. Phase transition observations and discrimination of small cloud particles by light polarization in expansion chamber experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichman, Leonid; Fuchs, Claudia; Järvinen, Emma; Ignatius, Karoliina; Florian Höppel, Niko; Dias, Antonio; Heinritzi, Martin; Simon, Mario; Tröstl, Jasmin; Wagner, Andrea Christine; Wagner, Robert; Williamson, Christina; Yan, Chao; Connolly, Paul James; Dorsey, James Robert; Duplissy, Jonathan; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Frege, Carla; Gordon, Hamish; Hoyle, Christopher Robert; Bjerring Kristensen, Thomas; Steiner, Gerhard; McPherson Donahue, Neil; Flagan, Richard; Gallagher, Martin William; Kirkby, Jasper; Möhler, Ottmar; Saathoff, Harald; Schnaiter, Martin; Stratmann, Frank; Tomé, António

    2016-03-01

    Cloud microphysical processes involving the ice phase in tropospheric clouds are among the major uncertainties in cloud formation, weather, and general circulation models. The detection of aerosol particles, liquid droplets, and ice crystals, especially in the small cloud particle-size range below 50 μm, remains challenging in mixed phase, often unstable environments. The Cloud Aerosol Spectrometer with Polarization (CASPOL) is an airborne instrument that has the ability to detect such small cloud particles and measure the variability in polarization state of their backscattered light. Here we operate the versatile Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets (CLOUD) chamber facility at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) to produce controlled mixed phase and other clouds by adiabatic expansions in an ultraclean environment, and use the CASPOL to discriminate between different aerosols, water, and ice particles. In this paper, optical property measurements of mixed-phase clouds and viscous secondary organic aerosol (SOA) are presented. We report observations of significant liquid-viscous SOA particle polarization transitions under dry conditions using CASPOL. Cluster analysis techniques were subsequently used to classify different types of particles according to their polarization ratios during phase transition. A classification map is presented for water droplets, organic aerosol (e.g., SOA and oxalic acid), crystalline substances such as ammonium sulfate, and volcanic ash. Finally, we discuss the benefits and limitations of this classification approach for atmospherically relevant concentrations and mixtures with respect to the CLOUD 8-9 campaigns and its potential contribution to tropical troposphere layer analysis.

  3. PARTICLE-HOLE NATURE OF THE LIGHT HIGH-SPIN TOROIDAL ISOMERS

    SciTech Connect

    Staszczak, A.; Wong, Cheuk-Yin

    2015-01-01

    Nuclei under non-collective rotation with a large angular momentum above some threshold can assume a toroidal shape. In our previous work, we showed by using cranked Skyrme Hartree Fock approach that even even, N = Z, high-K, toroidal isomeric states may have general occurrences for light nuclei with 28 < A < 52. We present here some additional results and systematics on the particle-hole nature of these high-spin toroidal isomers.

  4. Fast evolution of tropospheric Pb- and Zn-rich particles in the vicinity of a lead smelter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choël, M.; Deboudt, K.; Flament, P.; Lecornet, G.; Perdrix, E.; Sobanska, S.

    Dusts collected on air filters at a Pb-Zn refinery located in northern France were sampled in 1997, 1999 and 2002. The low temporal variability in major elements (Pb, Zn and S) abundances suggested chemical composition of particulate emissions was stable over time. In July 2001 and March 2002, atmospheric aerosols were sampled in the vicinity of the Pb-Zn refinery upwind and downwind from the smelters. Bulk concentrations of major elements (Al, Fe, Pb and Zn) and hydrosoluble ions (Na +, NH 4+, Mg 2+, K +, Ca 2+, Cl - NO 3- and SO 42-) were, respectively, determined by atomic absorption spectrometry and ion chromatography. Elemental and molecular individual particle analyses were, respectively, performed by automated SEM-EDX and Raman microspectrometry. Continental air masses (campaign 2001) were characterized by low Na + and high SO 42-, NO 3- and NH 4+ contents upwind from the smelters. Individual particle analysis of Pb- and Zn-rich airborne particles collected downwind from the refinery indicated elemental associations and molecular speciation were similar to those obtained at the emission: Pb compounds were mainly identified as oxides, sulfates and oxy-sulfates whereas Zn compounds were identified as sulfides. Marine air masses (campaign 2002) were characterized by high Na + contents upwind from the smelters. Individual particle analysis of Pb- and Zn-rich particles collected downwind from the refinery pointed out a systematic association with Na, not emitted by the refinery, suggesting internal mixing of marine aerosols with heavy-metals dusts emitted by the refinery. Such fast evolution of airborne particles chemical composition in the vicinity of the refinery was further proven by SEM-EDX and Raman microspectrometry mappings showing physical evolution by aggregation or coagulation of Zn- and Pb-rich particles with aged sea-salts.

  5. Plasmonic particles set into fast orbital motion by an optical vortex beam.

    PubMed

    Lehmuskero, Anni; Li, Yanming; Johansson, Peter; Käll, Mikael

    2014-02-24

    We optically trap plasmonic gold particles in two dimensions and set them into circular motion around the optical axis using a helically phased vortex laser beam. The orbiting frequency of the particles reaches 86 Hz, which corresponds to a particle velocity of the order 1 mm per second, for an incident laser power of a few tens of milliwatts. The experimentally determined orbiting frequencies are found to be well in line with the notion that the beam carries an orbital angular momentum of ħl per photon.

  6. A fast and explicit algorithm for simulating the dynamics of small dust grains with smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Daniel J.; Laibe, Guillaume

    2015-07-01

    We describe a simple method for simulating the dynamics of small grains in a dusty gas, relevant to micron-sized grains in the interstellar medium and grains of centimetre size and smaller in protoplanetary discs. The method involves solving one extra diffusion equation for the dust fraction in addition to the usual equations of hydrodynamics. This `diffusion approximation for dust' is valid when the dust stopping time is smaller than the computational timestep. We present a numerical implementation using smoothed particle hydrodynamics that is conservative, accurate and fast. It does not require any implicit timestepping and can be straightforwardly ported into existing 3D codes.

  7. Light-particle-complex-fragment coincidence cross sections from intermediate energy nucleus-nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Hasselquist, B.E.; Crawley, G.M.; Jacak, B.V.; Koenig, Z.M.; Westfall, G.D.; Yurkon, J.E.; Tickle, R.S.; Dufour, J.P.; Symons, T.J.M.

    1985-07-01

    Light-particle (Zlight-particle spectra were intermediate rapidity fragments (3light-particle spectra triggered by projectilelike fragments. A single moving source parametrization is employed throughout to extract the relevant trends in the inclusive and coincidence data. The coincidence spectra are compared with a model based on the moving source model but incorporating momentum conservation to account for kinematical biases. Little difference between inclusive and complex-fragment-triggered coincidence cross sections is observed, indicating that all the fragments have a common source.

  8. Linear and Nonlinear Study of Fast Particle Excitation of Alfvén Eigemodes

    SciTech Connect

    Berk, H.L.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, C.Z.; Fu, G.Y.; Gorelenkov, N.N; Gorelenkova, M.V.; Nazikian, R.; White, R.B.

    1998-11-01

    Recent new results concerning toroidicity-induced Alfvén eigenmode (TAE) linear stability and nonlinear amplitude saturation and associated fast ion transport are presented for tokamaks, such as the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) and the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), using the numerical codes HINST, NOVA-K, and ORBIT.

  9. Black carbon and other light-absorbing particles in snow of central North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doherty, Sarah J.; Dang, Cheng; Hegg, Dean A.; Zhang, Rudong; Warren, Stephen G.

    2014-11-01

    Vertical profiles of light-absorbing particles in seasonal snow were sampled from 67 North American sites. Over 500 snow samples and 55 soil samples from these sites were optically analyzed for spectrally resolved visible light absorption. The optical measurements were used to estimate black carbon (BC) mixing ratios in snow (CBCest), contributions to absorption by BC and non-BC particles, and the absorption Ångström exponent of particles in snow and local soil. Sites in Canada tended to have the lowest BC mixing ratios (typically ~5-35 ng g-1), with somewhat higher CBCest in the Pacific Northwest (typically ~5-40 ng g-1) and Intramountain Northwest (typically 10-50 ng g-1). The Northern U.S. Plains sites were the dirtiest, with CBCest typically ~15-70 ng g-1 and multiple sample layers with >100 ng g-1 BC in snow. Snow water samples were also chemically analyzed for standard anions, selected carbohydrates, and various elements. The chemical and optical data were input to a Positive Matrix Factorization analysis of the sources of particulate light absorption. These were soil, biomass/biofuel burning, and fossil fuel pollution. Comparable analyses have been conducted for the Arctic and North China, providing a broad, internally consistent data set. As in North China, soil is a significant contributor to snow particulate light absorption in the Great Plains. We also examine the concentrations and sources of snow particulate light absorption across a latitudinal transect from the northern U.S. Great Plains to Arctic Canada by combining the current data with our earlier Arctic survey.

  10. A computer controlled television detector for light, X-rays and particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalata, K.

    1981-01-01

    A versatile, high resolution, software configurable, two-dimensional intensified vidicon quantum detector system has been developed for multiple research applications. A thin phosphor convertor allows the detection of X-rays below 20 keV and non-relativistic particles in addition to visible light, and a thicker scintillator can be used to detect X-rays up to 100 keV and relativistic particles. Faceplates may be changed to allow any active area from 1 to 40 mm square, and active areas up to 200 mm square are possible. The image is integrated in a digital memory on any software specified array size up to 4000 x 4000. The array size is selected to match the spatial resolution, which ranges from 10 to 100 microns depending on the operating mode, the active area, and the photon or particle energy. All scan and data acquisition parameters are under software control to allow optimal data collection for each application.

  11. [Light scattering extinction properties of atmospheric particle and pollution characteristics in hazy weather in Hangzhou].

    PubMed

    Xu, Chang; Ye, Hui; Shen, Jian-Dong; Sun, Hong-Liang; Hong, Sheng-Mao; Jiao, Li; Huang, Kan

    2014-12-01

    In order to evaluate the influence of particle scattering on visibility, light scattering coefficient, particle concentrations and meteorological factor were simultaneously monitored from July 2011 to June 2012 in Hangzhou. Daily scattering coefficients ranged from 108.4 to 1 098.1 Mm(-1), with an annual average concentration of 428.6 Mm(-1) ± 200.2 Mm(-1). Seasonal variation of scattering coefficients was significant, with the highest concentrations observed in autumn and winter and the lowest in summer. It was found there were two peaks for the average diurnal variations of the scattering coefficient, which could be observed at 08:00 and 21:00. The scattering efficiencies of PM2.5 and PM10 were 7.6 m2 x g(-1) and 4.4 m2 x g(-1), respectively. The particle scattering was about 90.2 percent of the total light extinction. The scattering coefficients were 684.4 Mm(-1) ± 218.1 Mm(-1) and 1 095.4 Mm(-1) ± 397.7 Mm(-1) in hazy and heavy hazy days, respectively, which were 2.6 and 4.2 times as high as in non-hazy weather, indicating that particle scattering is the main factor for visibility degradation and the occurrence of hazy weather in Hangzhou.

  12. Particle size distributions from laboratory-scale biomass fires using fast response instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, S.; Li, Q.; Cocker, D.; Weise, D.; Miller, A.; Shrivastava, M.; Miller, J. W.; Mahalingam, S.; Princevac, M.; Jung, H.

    2010-08-01

    Particle size distribution from biomass combustion is an important parameter as it affects air quality, climate modelling and health effects. To date, particle size distributions reported from prior studies vary not only due to difference in fuels but also difference in experimental conditions. This study aims to report characteristics of particle size distributions in well controlled repeatable lab scale biomass fires for southwestern United States fuels with focus on chaparral. The combustion laboratory at the United States Department of Agriculture-Forest Service's Fire Science Laboratory (USDA-FSL), Missoula, MT provided a repeatable combustion and dilution environment ideal for measurements. For a variety of fuels tested the major mode of particle size distribution was in the range of 29 to 52 nm, which is attributable to dilution of the fresh smoke. Comparing mass size distribution from FMPS and APS measurement 51-68% of particle mass was attributable to the particles ranging from 0.5 to 10 μm for PM10. Geometric mean diameter rapidly increased during flaming and gradually decreased during mixed and smoldering phase combustion. Most fuels produced a unimodal distribution during flaming phase and strong biomodal distribution during smoldering phase. The mode of combustion (flaming, mixed and smoldering) could be better distinguished using the slopes in MCE (Modified Combustion Efficiency) vs. geometric mean diameter than only using MCE values.

  13. Light induced changes in Raman scattering of carotenoid molecules in Photosystem I particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreeva, Atanaska; Abarova, Silviya; Stoitchkova, Katerina; Velitchkova, Maya

    2007-03-01

    The photosynthetic antenna systems are able to regulate the light energy harvesting under different light conditions by dynamic changes in their protein structure protecting the reaction center complexes. The changes modulate the electronic structure of the main antenna pigments (chlorophylls and carotenoids) and distort the characteristic planar structure of carotenoids, allowing their forbidden out of plane vibrations. Electronic absorption and low-temperature resonance Raman spectroscopy were used to study the changes in composition and spectral properties of the major carotenoids in spinach Photosystem I particles due to high light treatment. The duration of the applied intensity of the white light (1800 μE m -2 s -1) was 30, 60 and 120 minutes. We used Raman scattering in an attempt to recognize the type and conformation of photobleached carotenoid molecules. The resonance Raman spectra were measured at 488 and 514.5 nm, coinciding with the absorption maximum positions of the carotenoids neoxanthin and lutein, correspondingly. The results revealed nearly a full photobleaching of the long wavelength lutein molecules, whereas the bleaching of neoxantin molecules is negligible. The involvement of these changes in the photoprotection and photoinactivation of the Photosystem I particles was discussed.

  14. Lidar remote sensing of laser-induced incandescence on light absorbing particles in the atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Miffre, Alain; Anselmo, Christophe; Geffroy, Sylvain; Fréjafon, Emeric; Rairoux, Patrick

    2015-02-01

    Carbon aerosol is now recognized as a major uncertainty on climate change and public health, and specific instruments are required to address the time and space evolution of this aerosol, which efficiently absorbs light. In this paper, we report an experiment, based on coupling lidar remote sensing with Laser-Induced-Incandescence (LII), which allows, in agreement with Planck's law, to retrieve the vertical profile of very low thermal radiation emitted by light-absorbing particles in an urban atmosphere over several hundred meters altitude. Accordingly, we set the LII-lidar formalism and equation and addressed the main features of LII-lidar in the atmosphere by numerically simulating the LII-lidar signal. We believe atmospheric LII-lidar to be a promising tool for radiative transfer, especially when combined with elastic backscattering lidar, as it may then allow a remote partitioning between strong/less light absorbing carbon aerosols.

  15. Indoor anti-occlusion visible light positioning systems based on particle filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Meng; Huang, Zhitong; Li, Jianfeng; Zhang, Ruqi; Ji, Yuefeng

    2015-04-01

    As one of the most popular categories of mobile services, a rapid growth of indoor location-based services has been witnessed over the past decades. Indoor positioning methods based on Wi-Fi, radio-frequency identification or Bluetooth are widely commercialized; however, they have disadvantages such as low accuracy or high cost. An emerging method using visible light is under research recently. The existed visible light positioning (VLP) schemes using carrier allocation, time allocation and multiple receivers all have limitations. This paper presents a novel mechanism using particle filtering in VLP system. By this method no additional devices are needed and the occlusion problem in visible light would be alleviated which will effectively enhance the flexibility for indoor positioning.

  16. Beam-splitting code for light scattering by ice crystal particles within geometric-optics approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konoshonkin, Alexander V.; Kustova, Natalia V.; Borovoi, Anatoli G.

    2015-10-01

    The open-source beam-splitting code is described which implements the geometric-optics approximation to light scattering by convex faceted particles. This code is written in C++ as a library which can be easy applied to a particular light scattering problem. The code uses only standard components, that makes it to be a cross-platform solution and provides its compatibility to popular Integrated Development Environments (IDE's). The included example of solving the light scattering by a randomly oriented ice crystal is written using Qt 5.1, consequently it is a cross-platform solution, too. Both physical and computational aspects of the beam-splitting algorithm are discussed. Computational speed of the beam-splitting code is obviously higher compared to the conventional ray-tracing codes. A comparison of the phase matrix as computed by our code with the ray-tracing code by A. Macke shows excellent agreement.

  17. Development of a radiation-hardened SRAM with EDAC algorithm for fast readout CMOS pixel sensors for charged particle tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, X.; Li, B.; Chen, N.; Wang, J.; Zheng, R.; Gao, W.; Wei, T.; Gao, D.; Hu, Y.

    2014-08-01

    CMOS pixel sensors (CPS) are attractive for use in the innermost particle detectors for charged particle tracking due to their good trade-off between spatial resolution, material budget, radiation hardness, and readout speed. With the requirements of high readout speed and high radiation hardness to total ionizing dose (TID) for particle tracking, fast readout CPS are composed by integrating a data compression block and two SRAM IP cores. However, the radiation hardness of the SRAM IP cores is not as high as that of the other parts in CPS, and thus the radiation hardness of the whole CPS chip is lowered. Especially, when CPS are migrated into 0.18-μm processes, the single event upset (SEU) effects should be also considered besides TID and single event latchup (SEL) effects. This paper presents a radiation-hardened SRAM with enhanced radiation hardness to SEU. An error detection and correction (EDAC) algorithm and a bit-interleaving storage strategy are adopted in the design. The prototype design has been fabricated in a 0.18-μm process. The area of the new SRAM is increased 1.6 times as compared with a non-radiation-hardened SRAM due to the integration of EDAC algorithm and the adoption of radiation hardened layout. The access time is increased from 5 ns to 8 ns due to the integration of EDAC algorithm. The test results indicate that the design satisfy requirements of CPS for charged particle tracking.

  18. Plasma produced by impacts of fast dust particles on a thin film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Auer, Siegfried

    1994-01-01

    The thin-film impact plasma detector was pioneered by Berg for detecting small cosmic dust particles and measuring their approximate velocities in a time-of-flight configuration. While Berg's device was highly successful in establishing the flux of interplanetary dust, the accuracy of measuring the velocities of individual particles was a moderate 18 percent in magnitude and 27 degrees in angle. A much greater accuracy of less than or equal to 1 percent in determining the velocity components appears desirable in order to associate a particle with its parent body. In order to meet that need, research was initiated to determine if a thin-film detector can be designed to provide such accurate velocity measurements. Previous laboratory investigations of the impact plasma uncovered two difficulties: (1) solid or liquid spray is ejected from a primary impact crater and strikes neighboring walls where it produces secondary impact craters and plasma clouds; as a result, both quantity and time of detection of the plasma can vary significantly with the experiment configuration. Particles from an accelerator rarely have speeds v greater than or equal to 10-15 km/s, while cosmic dust particles typically impact at v = 10-72 km/s. The purpose of the tests discussed in this paper was to resolve the two difficulties mentioned. That is, the experiment configuration was designed to reduce the contribution of plasma from secondary impacts. In addition, most particles with v less than or equal to 25 km/s and all particles with v less than or equal to 10 km/s were eliminated from the beam.

  19. Performance of a fast digital integrator in on-field magnetic measurements for particle accelerators.

    PubMed

    Arpaia, P; Bottura, L; Fiscarelli, L; Walckiers, L

    2012-02-01

    The fast digital integrator has been conceived to face most demanding magnet test requirements with a resolution of 10 ppm, a signal-to-noise ratio of 105 dB at 20 kHz, a time resolution of 50 ns, an offset of 10 ppm, and on-line processing. In this paper, the on-field achievements of the fast digital integrator are assessed by a specific measurement campaign at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN). At first, the architecture and the metrological specifications of the instrument are reported. Then, the recent on-field achievements of (i) ±10 ppm of uncertainty in the measurement of the main field for superconducting magnets characterization, (ii) ±0.02 % of field uncertainty in quality assessment of small-aperture permanent magnets, and (iii) ±0.15 % of drift, in an excitation current measurement of 600 s under cryogenic conditions, are presented and discussed.

  20. Fast ignition by laser driven particle beams of very high intensity

    SciTech Connect

    Hora, H.; Read, M. N.; Badziak, J.; Glowacz, S.; Jablonski, S.; Wolowski, J.; Skladanowski, Z.; Li, Y.-T.; Liang, T.-J.; Liu Hong; Sheng Zhengming; Zhang Jie; Cang Yu; Osman, F.; Miley, G. H.; Zhang Weiyan; He Xiantu; Peng Hansheng; Jungwirth, K.; Rohlena, K.

    2007-07-15

    Anomalous observations using the fast ignition for laser driven fusion energy are interpreted and experimental and theoretical results are reported which are in contrast to the very numerous effects usually observed at petawatt-picosecond laser interaction with plasmas. These anomalous mechanisms result in rather thin blocks (pistons) of these nonlinear (ponderomotive) force driven highly directed plasmas of modest temperatures. The blocks consist in space charge neutral plasmas with ion current densities above 10{sup 10} A/cm{sup 2}. For the needs of applications in laser driven fusion energy, much thicker blocks are required. This may be reached by a spherical configuration where a conical propagation may lead to thick blocks for interaction with targets. First results are reported in view of applications for the proton fast igniter and other laser-fusion energy schemes.

  1. UV Attenuation Near Coral Reefs in the Florida Keys: Light Absorption by CDOM and Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shank, G. C.; Zepp, R. G.; Bartels, E.

    2005-12-01

    We have investigated the roles of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and suspended particles in the attenuation of UV radiation in the middle and lower regions of the Florida Keys. Extended exposure to UV radiation, along with elevated sea surface temperatures, impairs physiological processes in corals and contributes to bleaching episodes. Corals in the Florida Keys experience large variations in UV exposure due to several factors including tidal exchange and fluctuating meteorological conditions. CDOM derived from mangroves and seagrass beds is the primary attenuator of UV radiation near coral reefs in our study area. CDOM accounts for more than 90 percent of the absorption of UVB irradiance (305 nm) throughout the region. However, we have determined using the quantitative filter technique that up to 25 percent of the downwelling UVA irradiance at 380 nm may be directly absorbed by suspended particles. Resuspension from within or near the reef structure appears to be the primary particle source as phytoplankton pigments typically comprise less than 20 percent of the particle UV absorption capacity near reef sampling sites. Our research also has implications for remote sensing applications as light absorbed by particles must be considered when modeling optical data from satellites. Although this work was reviewed by EPA and approved for publication, it may not necessarily reflect official Agency policy.

  2. Ultraviolet broadband light scattering for optically-trapped submicron-sized aerosol particles.

    PubMed

    David, Grégory; Esat, Kıvanç; Ritsch, Irina; Signorell, Ruth

    2016-02-21

    We describe a broadband light scattering setup for the characterization of size and refractive index of single submicron-to-micron sized aerosol particles. Individual particles are isolated in air by a quadruple Bessel beam optical trap or a counter-propagating optical tweezer. The use of very broadband radiation in the wavelength range from 320 to 700 nm covering the ultraviolet region allows to size submicron particles. We show that a broad wavelength range is required to determine the particle radius and the refractive index with an uncertainty of several nanometers and ∼ 0.01, respectively. The smallest particle radius that can be accurately determined lies around 300 nm. Wavelength-dependent refractive index data over a broad range are obtained, including the ultraviolet region where corresponding data are rare. Four different applications are discussed: (1) the sizing of submicron polystyrene latex spheres, (2) the evaporation of binary glycerol water droplets, (3) hydration/dehydration cycling of aqueous potassium carbonate droplets, and (4) photochemical reactions of oleic acid droplets. PMID:26863396

  3. Fast separation of native proteins using sub-2 μm nonporous silica particles in a chromatographic cake.

    PubMed

    Niu, Ruijuan; Min, Yi; Geng, Xindu

    2014-08-01

    A novel method for the fast separation of native proteins was investigated using sub-2 μm nonporous silica packing inside a chromatographic cake having a diameter much larger than its thickness. Various silica-based particles ranging from 630 nm to 1.2 μm were synthesized and chemically modified with polyethylene glycol 600. The packing material was laterally packed into a series of chromatographic cakes containing the same diameter (10mm) and different thicknesses, ranging from 2 to 10 mm, and tested by hydrophobic interaction chromatography. The results showed that the sub-2 μm NPS particles in a small chromatographic cake were found to have a high efficiency at a flow rate of 10 mL/min and a backpressure of <20 MPa. The effect of the thickness of the chromatographic cake on the resolution of the proteins was also investigated and it was found that too short a column length could dramatically decrease the protein resolution; the minimum column length was also qualitatively evaluated. The presented method is expected to be useful for routine analysis of native and/or intact proteins in hospitals and as a tool for the fast screening protein drugs and optimization of experimental laboratory conditions.

  4. Hydrodynamic measurement of Brownian particles at a liquid-solid interface by low-coherence dynamic light scattering.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Katsuhiro; Iwai, Toshiaki; Xia, Hui

    2010-03-29

    The hydrodynamics of Brownian particles close to a wall is investigated using low-coherence dynamic light scattering. The diffusion coefficient of the particles in a suspension is measured as a function of distance from the wall. A sudden reduction in the diffusion coefficient near the interface is clearly observed using this method. The theoretically predicted wall-drag effect is experimentally confirmed when the influence of the spatial resolution due to the finite coherence length of the light source is accounted for. The space-dependent dynamics of Brownian particles under the wall-drag effect is obtained for the first time using our spatially resolved dynamic light scattering technique.

  5. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: 'Evaporation' of a flavor-mixed particle from a gravitational potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, Mikhail V.

    2010-09-01

    We demonstrate that a stable particle with flavor mixing, confined in a gravitational potential can gradually and irreversibly escape—or 'evaporate'—from it. This effect is due to mass eigenstate conversions which occur in interactions (scattering) of mass states with other particles even when the energy exchange between them is vanishing. The evaporation and conversion are quantum effects not related to flavor oscillations, particle decay, quantum tunneling or other well-known processes. Apart from their profound academic interest, these effects should have tremendous implications for cosmology, e.g., (1) the cosmic neutrino background distortion is predicted and (2) the softening of central cusps in dark matter halos and smearing out or destruction of dwarf halos were suggested.

  6. Calculation of energy relaxation rates of fast particles by phonons in crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prange, Micah; Campbell, Luke; Wu, Dangxin; Kerisit, Sebastien

    2015-03-01

    We present ab initio calculations of the temperature-dependent exchange of energy between a classical charged point-particle and the phonons of a crystalline material. The phonons, which are computed using density functional perturbation theory (DFPT) methods, interact with the moving particle via the Coulomb interaction between the density induced in the material by phonon excitation and the charge of the classical particle. Energy relaxation rates are computed using time-dependent perturbation theory. The method, which is applicable wherever DFPT is, is illustrated with results for several important scintillators whose performance is affected by electron thermalization. We discuss the influence of the form assumed for quasiparticle dispersion on theoretical estimates of electron cooling rates. This research was supported by the National Nuclear Security Administration, Office of DNN R&D, of the DOE. PNNL is operated by Battelle Memorial Institute under Contract DE-AC0576RL01830.

  7. Calculation of energy relaxation rates of fast particles by phonons in crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Prange, Micah P.; Campbell, Luke W.; Wu, Dangxin; Gao, Fei; Kerisit, Sebastien N.

    2015-03-01

    We present ab initio calculations of the temperature-dependent exchange of energy between a classical charged point-particle and the phonons of a crystalline material. The phonons, which are computed using density functional perturbation theory (DFPT) methods, interact with the mov- ing particle via the Coulomb interaction between the density induced in the material by phonon excitation and the charge of the classical particle. Energy relaxation rates are computed using time- dependent perturbation theory. The method, which is applicable wherever DFPT is, is illustrated with results for CsI, an important scintillator whose performance is affected by electron thermal- ization. We discuss the influence of the form assumed for quasiparticle dispersion on theoretical estimates of electron cooling rates.

  8. Construction of a fast ionization chamber for high-rate particle identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, K. Y.; Ahn, S.; Bardayan, D. W.; Chipps, K. A.; Manning, B.; Pain, S. D.; Peters, W. A.; Schmitt, K. T.; Smith, M. S.; Strauss, S. Y.

    2014-07-01

    A new gas-filled ionization chamber for high count rate particle identification has been constructed and commissioned at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). To enhance the response time of the ionization chamber, a design utilizing a tilted entrance window and tilted electrodes was adopted, which is modified from an original design by Kimura et al. [1]. A maximum counting rate of ~700,000 particles per second has been achieved. The detector has been used for several radioactive beam measurements performed at the HRIBF.

  9. Fast acoustic tweezers for the two-dimensional manipulation of individual particles in microfluidic channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, S. B. Q.; Marmottant, P.; Thibault, P.

    2012-09-01

    This paper presents a microfluidic device that implements standing surface acoustic waves in order to handle single cells, droplets, and generally particles. The particles are moved in a very controlled manner by the two-dimensional drifting of a standing wave array, using a slight frequency modulation of two ultrasound emitters around their resonance. These acoustic tweezers allow any type of motion at velocities up to few ×10 mm/s, while the device transparency is adapted for optical studies. The possibility of automation provides a critical step in the development of lab-on-a-chip cell sorters and it should find applications in biology, chemistry, and engineering domains.

  10. Fast fabrication of a novel transparent PMMA light scattering materials with high haze by doping with ordinary polymer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao; Xiong, Ying; Shen, Jiabin; Guo, Shaoyun

    2015-07-13

    Poly(methyl methacrylate)(PMMA)/poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) light scattering materials are fabricated by a simple, low-cost approach of melt blending and compression molding. We find that the competing effects of particle diameter versus number concentration of the scattering particles is the controlling factor to tailoring the optical properties of the materials, which is analyzed according to Mie scattering theory. The results show that the transmittance kept decreasing in the PET concentration range 0-10 wt% followed by a constant level in the range 10-20 wt%; however, the transmittance experienced a significant increase in the range 20-35 wt% and plateaued again after PET content exceeded 35 wt%. Therefore, the application of ordinary polymer dopant makes preparing light scattering sheets with high haze but not decreasing transmittance possible.

  11. Theoretical study of the light pressure force acting on a spherical dielectric particle of an arbitrary size in the interference field of two plane monochromatic electromagnetic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Guzatov, D V; Gaida, L S; Afanas'ev, Anatolii A

    2008-12-31

    The light pressure force acting on a spherical dielectric particle in the interference field of two plane monochromatic electromagnetic waves is studied in detail for different particle radii and angles of incidence of waves. (light pressure)

  12. Mixing states of light-absorbing particles measured using a transmission electron microscope and a single-particle soot photometer in Tokyo, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Kouji; Moteki, Nobuhiro; Kondo, Yutaka; Igarashi, Yasuhito

    2016-08-01

    Light-absorbing atmospheric aerosols such as carbonaceous particles influence the climate through absorbing sunlight. The mixing states of these aerosol particles affect their optical properties. This study examines the changes in the mixing states and abundance of strongly light absorbing carbonaceous particles by using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and single-particle soot photometer (SP2), as well as of iron oxide particles, in Tokyo, Japan. TEM and SP2 use fundamentally different detection techniques for the same light-absorbing particles. TEM allows characterization of the morphological, chemical, and structural features of individual particles, whereas SP2 optically measures the number, size, and mixing states of black carbon (BC). A comparison of the results obtained using these two techniques indicates that the peaks of high soot (nanosphere soot (ns-soot)) concentration periods agree with those of the BC concentrations determined by SP2 and that the high Fe-bearing particle fraction periods measured by TEM agree with that of high number concentrations of iron oxide particles measured using SP2 during the first half of the observation campaign. The results also show that the changes in the ns-soot/BC mixing states primarily correlate with the air mass sources, wind speed, precipitation, and photochemical processes. Nano-sized, aggregated, iron oxide particles mixed with other particles were commonly observed by using TEM during the high iron oxide particle periods. We conclude that although further quantitative comparison between TEM and SP2 data will be needed, the morphologically and optically defined ns-soot and BC, respectively, are essentially the same substance and that their mixing states are generally consistent across the techniques.

  13. The LS-CODAG experiment for light scattering measurements by dust particles and their aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levasseur-Regourd, A. C.; Cabane, M.; Chassefière, E.; Haudebourg, V.; Worms, J. C.

    1999-01-01

    Light scattering measurements are needed to provide links between the currently available observations of scattering by dust in the solar system, and the still unknown properties of the clouds of dust particles and aggregates. The fragility, the fluffiness, and the size of the aggregates make it almos impossible to obtain realistic measurements through computational models or classical laboratory measurements. In order to measure the scattering by dust particles and their aggregates, we have conceived the Light Scattering (LS) experiment for the COsmic Dust AGgregation (CODAG) module. This small and compact instrument has been developed to operate under microgravity conditions, jointly with the CODAG Sounding Rocket experiment (Blum et al., 1998), during ESA rocket flights. The purpose of the experiment is to determine accurately the intensity and the polarization phase functions of the particles that are dispersed in a low pressure chamber, and to document the temporal evolution of their scattering properties, while an aggregation process representative of the solar system formation is starting and spreading out. The instrumental principle relies on simultaneous measurements, performed on a large number of phase angles, from back to forward scattering, of the two polarized components of the scattered intensity.

  14. Investigation of unburned carbon particles in fly ash by means of laser light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iannone, R. Q.; Morlacchi, R.; Calabria, R.; Massoli, P.

    2011-02-01

    A new optical method to determine the percentage of unburned carbon particles in fly ash from combustion of pulverized coal has been developed. The technique exploits the different properties of particles of ash and coal in the elastic scattering of polarized light. The polarization measurements were performed using a linearly polarized laser source and a receiving system able to simultaneously detect the scattered radiation polarized in parallel and orthogonal planes, under the scattering angle of 60°. The parallel and perpendicular components of the scattered light intensities are measured in order to determine the polarization ratio. The operation of the system was tested under various conditions using monodisperse glass spheres. The performance of the novel device was assessed in several sets of measurements with samples of fly ash produced from coal fired power plants. A correlation between the relative content of coal and ashes and the polarization ratio of scattered light was demonstrated. The resulting polarization ratio showed values ranging from 1.25 to 0.94 for a carbon content of 1.17 wt% and 16.3 wt%, respectively. The uncertainty on the measured percentage of unburned carbon was about 1%. The proposed device represents an attractive tool for monitoring real-time burnout and combustion efficiency.

  15. Slow and Fast Light in Room Temperature Solids: Fundamentals and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Robert W.

    2004-03-01

    In recent years there has been great interest in techniques that can lead to a modification of the propagation velocity of light pulses through optical materials. Interest stems both from the intrinsic interest in the ability to control the velocity of light over large ranges and from the potential for applications such as controllable delay lines, optical data storage devices, optical memories, and devices for quantum information. Matthew Bigelow, Nick Lepeshkin, and I have recently developed a new method for achieving ultra-slow light propagation in room temperature solids. Our method makes use of an effect known as coherent population oscillations. In particular, we apply pump and probe fields to a ruby crystal, and the population of ground-state chromium ions is induced to oscillate coherently at the resulting beat frequency. These oscillations lead to a decreased absorption of the probe beam, and consequently (by the Kramers-Kronig relations) to a steep variation of the refractive index. In our laboratory studies of this effect, we observed reduced light velocities with light speeds as low as 57 m/s. We have also studied light propagation in the reverse saturable absorber alexandrite. In this case, the sign of the effect is inverted, leading to superluminal (but causal) light propagation.

  16. Smectic-A-filled birefringent elements and fast switching twisted dual-frequency nematic cells used for digital light deflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pishnyak, Oleg P.; Golovin, Andrii B.; Kreminska, Liubov; Pouch, John J.; Miranda, Félix A.; Winker, Bruce K.; Lavrentovich, Oleg D.

    2006-04-01

    We describe the application of smectic A (SmA) liquid crystals for beam deflection. SmA materials can be used in digital beam deflectors (DBDs) as fillers for passive birefringent prisms. SmA prisms have high birefringence and can be constructed in a variety of shapes, including single prisms and prismatic blazed gratings of different angles and profiles. We address the challenges of uniform alignment of SmA, such as elimination of focal conic domains. Fast rotation of the incident light polarization in DBDs is achieved by an electrically switched 90-deg twisted nematic (TN) cell.

  17. Smectic A Filled Birefringent Elements and Fast Switching Twisted Dual Frequency Nematic Cells Used for Digital Light Deflection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pishnyak, Oleg; Golovin, Andrii; Kreminskia, Liubov; Pouch, John J.; Miranda, Felix A.; Winker, Bruce K.; Lavrentovich, Oleg D.

    2006-01-01

    We describe the application of smectic A (SmA) liquid crystals for beam deflection. SmA materials can be used in digital beam deflectors (DBDs) as fillers for passive birefringent prisms. SmA prisms have high birefringence and can be constructed in a variety of shapes, including single prisms and prismatic blazed gratings of different angles and profiles. We address the challenges of uniform alignment of SmA, such as elimination of focal conic domains. Fast rotation of the incident light polarization in DBDs is achieved by an electrically switched 90 twisted nematic (TN) cell.

  18. Large dynamic light-matter entanglement from driving neither too fast nor too slow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acevedo, O. L.; Quiroga, L.; Rodríguez, F. J.; Johnson, N. F.

    2015-09-01

    A significant problem facing next-generation quantum technologies is how to generate and manipulate macroscopic entanglement in light and matter systems. Here we report a regime of dynamical light-matter behavior in which a giant, system-wide entanglement is generated by varying the light-matter coupling at intermediate velocities. This enhancement is far larger, broader ranged, and more experimentally accessible than that occurring near the quantum phase transition of the same model under adiabatic conditions. By appropriate choices of the coupling within this intermediate regime, the enhanced entanglement can be made to spread system-wide or to reside in each subsystem separately.

  19. Optical Filters to Exclude Non-Doppler-Shifted Light in Fast Velocimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Goosman, D; Avara, G; Wade, J; Rivera, A

    2002-06-19

    We have used optical velocimetry for 25 years at LLNL to measure velocity-time histories of many dynamic experiments. In certain ones, the shifted light was often quite weak compared to non-shifted light returning from surfaces and imperfections in glass components. In an intensity-measuring VISAR system, this would mean failure, and even with Fabry-Perot (FP) based systems which handle multiple frequencies, data is lost where the fringes coincide. We designed, constructed and successfully used an experimental facility for doing experiments under such conditions by selectively eliminating most of the non-shifted light. Instead of making experimental records which were mostly non-shifted light prior to the use of the filter, we now obtain records where almost all of the light is shifted. The first system had a maximum efficiency of 25% for the desired light, but another version is under construction with a maximum efficiency of over 50%. The first version excluded the non-shifted light by a factor of 300 when manually tuned, and by 150 when run in a Window-based auto-tuning mode. Our first version used a 50 mm diameter FP as the filter with a spacing of 1.65 mm and reflectivities of 77%. It was constructed for use in one of our 5-beam velocimeters. Rather than using five separate filters, we multiplexed all five records so that the desired light would reflect from the filter FPl and image onto separate fibers. These five output fibers then fed our standard tau-table with 5 cameras as described in our report for the 1996 HSPC in Santa Fe, USA. One use of the filter system involved embedding optical fibers in long sections of explosives to make continuous detonation velocity-time histories. To date we have recently carried out 6 tests with this new facility, and two prior ones without. Explosive safety required that four shutters be used to assure that no significant light could illuminate the explosive from the end of the embedded fiber when personnel were close. An

  20. The EB factory project. I. A fast, neural-net-based, general purpose light curve classifier optimized for eclipsing binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Paegert, Martin; Stassun, Keivan G.; Burger, Dan M.

    2014-08-01

    We describe a new neural-net-based light curve classifier and provide it with documentation as a ready-to-use tool for the community. While optimized for identification and classification of eclipsing binary stars, the classifier is general purpose, and has been developed for speed in the context of upcoming massive surveys such as the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope. A challenge for classifiers in the context of neural-net training and massive data sets is to minimize the number of parameters required to describe each light curve. We show that a simple and fast geometric representation that encodes the overall light curve shape, together with a chi-square parameter to capture higher-order morphology information results in efficient yet robust light curve classification, especially for eclipsing binaries. Testing the classifier on the ASAS light curve database, we achieve a retrieval rate of 98% and a false-positive rate of 2% for eclipsing binaries. We achieve similarly high retrieval rates for most other periodic variable-star classes, including RR Lyrae, Mira, and delta Scuti. However, the classifier currently has difficulty discriminating between different sub-classes of eclipsing binaries, and suffers a relatively low (∼60%) retrieval rate for multi-mode delta Cepheid stars. We find that it is imperative to train the classifier's neural network with exemplars that include the full range of light curve quality to which the classifier will be expected to perform; the classifier performs well on noisy light curves only when trained with noisy exemplars. The classifier source code, ancillary programs, a trained neural net, and a guide for use, are provided.

  1. The EB Factory Project. I. A Fast, Neural-net-based, General Purpose Light Curve Classifier Optimized for Eclipsing Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paegert, Martin; Stassun, Keivan G.; Burger, Dan M.

    2014-08-01

    We describe a new neural-net-based light curve classifier and provide it with documentation as a ready-to-use tool for the community. While optimized for identification and classification of eclipsing binary stars, the classifier is general purpose, and has been developed for speed in the context of upcoming massive surveys such as the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope. A challenge for classifiers in the context of neural-net training and massive data sets is to minimize the number of parameters required to describe each light curve. We show that a simple and fast geometric representation that encodes the overall light curve shape, together with a chi-square parameter to capture higher-order morphology information results in efficient yet robust light curve classification, especially for eclipsing binaries. Testing the classifier on the ASAS light curve database, we achieve a retrieval rate of 98% and a false-positive rate of 2% for eclipsing binaries. We achieve similarly high retrieval rates for most other periodic variable-star classes, including RR Lyrae, Mira, and delta Scuti. However, the classifier currently has difficulty discriminating between different sub-classes of eclipsing binaries, and suffers a relatively low (~60%) retrieval rate for multi-mode delta Cepheid stars. We find that it is imperative to train the classifier's neural network with exemplars that include the full range of light curve quality to which the classifier will be expected to perform; the classifier performs well on noisy light curves only when trained with noisy exemplars. The classifier source code, ancillary programs, a trained neural net, and a guide for use, are provided.

  2. Simultaneous determination of refractive index and size of spherical dielectric particles from light scattering data.

    PubMed

    Chylek, P; Ramaswamy, V; Ashkin, A; Dziedzic, J M

    1983-08-01

    The diameter and refractive index of micrometer sized spherical dielectric particles are simultaneously deduced using the wavelength dependence of backscattering data from optically levitated particles. The accuracy of the results is set by experimental errors in the determination of the wavelength of backscatter resonance peaks and the ratio of slopes of specified peaks. At present the refractive index and diameter can be deduced with relative errors of 5 x 10(-5). This represents the most accurate determination of absolute size and refractive index yet made by light scattering. A reduction of these errors by an order of magnitude is possible. We assume a priori knowledge of diameter and refractive index with accuracy of 10(-1) and 5 x 10(-3), respectively.

  3. Revisiting alpha decay-based near-light-speed particle propulsion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenwu; Liu, Zhen; Yang, Yang; Du, Shiyu

    2016-08-01

    Interplanet and interstellar travels require long-term propulsion of spacecrafts, whereas the conventional schemes of propulsion are limited by the velocity of the ejected mass. In this study, alpha particles released by nuclear decay are considered as a potential solution for long-time acceleration. The principle of near-light-speed particle propulsion (NcPP) was elucidated and the stopping and range of ions in matter (SRIM) was used to predict theoretical accelerations. The results show that NcPP by means of alpha decay is feasible for long-term spacecraft propulsion and posture adjustment in space. A practical NcPP sail can achieve a speed >150km/s and reach the brink of the solar system faster than a mass equivalent solar sail. Finally, to significantly improve the NcPP sail, the hypothesis of stimulated acceleration of nuclear decay (SAND) was proposed, which may shorten the travel time to Mars to within 20 days.

  4. Peculiarities of both light and beta-particles scattering by ultrathin diamond-like semiconductor film.

    PubMed

    Rumyantsev, Vladimir V; Shtaerman, Esfir Y

    2008-02-01

    Peculiarities of scattering of TM-polarized light wave by a diamond-like crystalline nano-layer are studied. They are due to specific dispersion of n-phonon polaritons localized in the layer. The IR polaritons discussed here (relating to diamond and Si crystals which are nonpolar materials) will only appear if some of the vibration modes become polar, e.g., due to the presence of the surface. As a result of mixing of g- and u-modes of ion oscillations along the (111)-direction in the near-surface layer, it is possible to observe additional (with respect to bulk) scattering of coherent electromagnetic waves of the Stokes and anti-Stokes frequencies. beta-particles can be utilized as an independent tool of study of new semiconductors, in particular thin diamond films. The effect associated with response of a quasi-two-dimensional diamond-like layer to the moving electron field is considered. beta-particle field induces phonon excitation modes to arise in the material. Coupled with the beta-particle electromagnetic modes they generate polaritons. Spectral density of the radiation intensity of the flashed phonon polaritons has been estimated as a function of the layer thickness as well as of the scattering angle and the beta-particle velocity.

  5. Correlations with projectile-like fragments and emission order of light charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohley, Z.; Bonasera, A.; Galanopoulos, S.; Hagel, K.; May, L. W.; McIntosh, A. B.; Stein, B. C.; Souliotis, G. A.; Tripathi, R.; Wuenschel, S.; Yennello, S. J.

    2012-10-01

    Correlations of midrapidity light charged particles (LCPs) and intermediate mass fragments (IMFs) with projectile-like fragments (PLFs) have been examined from the 35 MeV/u 70Zn+70Zn, 64Zn+64Zn, and 64Ni+64Ni reaction systems. A new method was developed to examine the flow of the particles with respect to the PLF. The invariant PLF-scaled flow allowed for the dynamics of the midrapidity Z=1-4 particles to be studied. Strong differences in the PLF-scaled flow were observed between the different isotopes. In particular, the most n-rich LCPs exhibited a negative PLF-scaled flow in comparison to the other LCPs. A classical molecular dynamics model and a three-body Coulomb trajectory simulation were both used to show that the PLF-scaled flow observable could be connected to the average order of emission of the LCPs. The experimental results suggest that the midrapidity region is preferentially populated with neutron-rich LCPs and Z=3-4 IMFs at a relatively early stage in the collision. The deuteron and 3He particles are emitted later followed, lastly, by protons and alphas. The average order of emission of the midrapidity LCPs was extracted from the constrained molecular dynamics simulations and showed good agreement with the emission order suggested by the experimental PLF-scaled flow results.

  6. Some improvements in the theory of faster-than-light particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Charles

    1982-01-01

    The relationship between differentially conserved quantities (electric current density Jμ, stress tensor density Tμν, etc.) and the conserved integral quantities (charge Q, energy-momentum Pν, etc.) is carefully studied for the case of faster-than-light particles. It is found that there is no problem of "negative-energy states" and no need for the "reinterpretation principle" used by previous authors. The central lesson learned is that the concept of "charge" or "momentum" or "energy" even for a free particle should not be taken as separable from the concept of the particle moving "in" or "out" relative to some interaction. Mathematically it is just a matter of certain minus signs in otherwise familiar formulas, but it is essential to include these factors in order to get a relativistically consistent theory for tachyons. Basic application is made to the classical theory of point particles with electromagnetic interactions, the classical theory of a free field, and the quantum theory of a free field. The earlier tachyon quantum theory of Feinberg is drastically revised.

  7. Volcanic Particle Aggregation: A Fast Algorithm for the Smoluchowski Coagulation Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, E.; Bagheri, G.; Bonadonna, C.

    2014-12-01

    Particle aggregation is a key process that significantly affects dispersal and sedimentation of volcanic ash, with obvious implications for the associated hazards. Most theoretical studies of particle aggregation have been based on the Smoluchowski Coagulation Equation (SCE), which describes the expected time evolution of the total grain-size distribution under the hypothesis that particles can collide and stick together following specific mathematical relations (kernels). Nonetheless, the practical application of the SCE to real erupting scenarios is made extremely difficult - if not even impossible - by the large number of Ordinary Differential Equations (ODE) which have to be solved to study the typical sizes of volcanic ash (1 micron to 1 mm). We propose an algorithm to approximate the discrete solutions of the SCE, which can describe the time evolution of the total grain-size distribution of the erupted material with an increased computational efficiency. This algorithm has been applied to observed volcanic eruptions (i.e., Eyjafjallajokull 2010, Sakurajima 2013 and Mt. Saint Helens 1980) to see if the commonly used kernels can explain field data and to study how aggregation processes can modify the tephra dispersal on the ground. Different scenarios of sticking efficiencies and aggregate porosity have been used to test the sensitiveness of the SCE to these parameters. Constraints on these parameters come from field observations and laboratory experiments.

  8. Optical Filters to Exclude Non-Doppler-Shifted Light in Fast Velocimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Goosman, D; Avara, G; Wade, J; Rivera, A

    2002-08-22

    We frequently measure velocity-time histories of dynamic experiments. In some, the Doppler-shifted light is often weak compared to non-shifted light reflected from stationary surfaces and imperfections in components. With our Fabry-Perot (FP) based systems which handle multiple frequencies, data is lost where the fringes coincide; if we had used an intensity-measuring VISAR system, it would probably fail. We designed a facility for doing experiments under such conditions by selectively eliminating most of the non-shifted light. Our first filter excluded non-shifted light by a factor of 300 when manually tuned, and by 150 when run in an auto-tuning mode. It used a single 50 mm diameter FP as the filter with a spacing of 1.65 mm and reflectivities of 77%, and filters five channels prior to use in one of our 5-beam velocimeters. One use of the filter system was to embed optical fibers in long sections of explosives to make continuous detonation velocity-time histories. We have carried out many such tests with this filter, and two without. A special single-beam filter was constructed with a 40% efficiency for shifted light that rejected non-shifted light by 4 million times, with a bandpass of a few GHz.

  9. Gravitational deflection of light and massive particles by a moving Kerr-Newman black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Guansheng; Lin, Wenbin

    2016-05-01

    The gravitational deflection of test particles including light, due to a radially moving Kerr-Newman (KN) black hole with an arbitrary constant velocity that is perpendicular to its angular momentum, is investigated. In harmonic coordinates, we derive the second post-Minkowskian (2PM) equations of motion for test particles, and solve them by high-accuracy numerical calculations. We then concentrate on discussing the kinematical corrections caused by the motion of the gravitational source to second-order deflection. The analytical formula of the light-deflection angle up to the second order by a moving lens is obtained. For a massive particle moving with a relativistic velocity, there are two different analytical results for the Schwarzschild deflection angle up to the second order reported in the previous works, i.e. α (w)=2≤ft(1+\\tfrac{1}{{w}2}\\right)\\tfrac{M}{b}+3π ≤ft(\\tfrac{1}{4}+\\tfrac{1}{{w}2}\\right)\\tfrac{{M}2}{{b}2} and α (w)=2≤ft(1+\\tfrac{1}{{w}2}\\right)\\tfrac{M}{b}+≤ft[3π ≤ft(\\tfrac{1}{4}+\\tfrac{1}{{w}2}\\right)+2≤ft(1-\\tfrac{1}{{w}4}\\right)\\right]\\tfrac{{M}2}{{b}2}, where M, b, and w are the mass of the lens, the impact parameter, and the particle’s initial velocity, respectively. Our numerical result is in perfect agreement with the former result. Furthermore, the analytical formula for massive particle deflection up to the second order in the Kerr geometry is achieved. Finally, the possibilities of detecting the motion effects on the second-order deflection are also analyzed.

  10. Polarimetric Studies of Solar Light Scattered by Interplanetary Dust Particles and the Eye-Sat Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levasseur-Regourd, A. C.; Lasue, J.

    2014-12-01

    Studying intensity and linear polarization of the solar light scattered by interplanetary dust is of interest for various reasons. This so-called zodiacal light constitutes a faint polarized glow that constitutes a changing foreground for observations of faint extended astronomical sources. Besides, analysis of its polarization provides information on properties of the dust particles, such as spatial density, morphology and complex refractive index. Previous observations, mostly from the Earth and with a resolution in the 10° range, have been used to infer that the local polarization at 90° phase angle increases with increasing solar distance. Numerical simulations suggest that, in the inner solar system, interplanetary dust particles consist of a mixture of absorbing and less absorbing materials, and that radial changes originate in a decrease of organic materials with decreasing solar distance under alteration or evaporation processes. To improve the quality of data on zodiacal light polarimetry, Eye-Sat nanosat is being developed in the context of the JANUS CNES cubesats program for students. The project is now in phase C-D, for a piggy-back launch in 2016. Eye-Sat triple cubesat is anticipated to demonstrate the feasibility of a series of new on-board technologies. Moreover, during its one-year mission, zodiacal light intensity and polarization are to be measured, for the first time with a spatial resolution of about 1° over a wide portion of the sky and in four different wavelengths (visible to near-IR), leading to a better assessment of interplanetary dust properties. Finally, a significant fraction of the interplanetary dust is estimated to come from comets, the most pristine objects to be found in the inner solar system. While similarities have indeed been noticed between polarimetric properties of interplanetary and cometary dust particles, the latter being currently extensively documented by the Rosetta mission to comet 67P

  11. Microscopic particle discrimination using spatially-resolved Fourier-holographic light scattering angular spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillman, Timothy R.; Alexandrov, Sergey A.; Gutzler, Thomas; Sampson, David D.

    2006-11-01

    We utilize Fourier-holographic light scattering angular spectroscopy to record the spatially resolved complex angular scattering spectra of samples over wide fields of view in a single or few image captures. Without resolving individual scatterers, we are able to generate spatially-resolved particle size maps for samples composed of spherical scatterers, by comparing generated spectra with Mie-theory predictions. We present a theoretical discussion of the fundamental principles of our technique and, in addition to the sphere samples, apply it experimentally to a biological sample which comprises red blood cells. Our method could possibly represent an efficient alternative to the time-consuming and laborious conventional procedure in light microscopy of image tiling and inspection, for the characterization of microscopic morphology over wide fields of view.

  12. Single particle imaging with soft x-rays at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Andrew V.; Andreasson, Jakob; Aquila, Andrew; Bajt, Saša; Barends, Thomas R. M.; Barthelmess, Miriam; Barty, Anton; Benner, W. Henry; Bostedt, Christoph; Bozek, John D.; Bucksbaum, Phillip; Caleman, Carl; Coppola, Nicola; DePonte, Daniel P.; Ekeberg, Tomas; Epp, Sascha W.; Erk, Benjamin; Farquar, George R.; Fleckenstein, Holger; Foucar, Lutz; Frank, Matthias; Gumprecht, Lars; Hampton, Christina Y.; Hantke, Max; Hartmann, Andreas; Hartmann, Elisabeth; Hartmann, Robert; Hau-Riege, Stephan P.; Hauser, Günther; Holl, Peter; Hoemke, André; Jönsson, Olof; Kassemeyer, Stephan; Kimmel, Nils; Kiskinova, Maya; Krasniqi, Faton; Krzywinski, Jacek; Liang, Mengning; Loh, Ne-Te Duane; Lomb, Lukas; Maia, Filipe R. N. C.; Marchesini, Stefano; Messerschmidt, Marc; Nass, Karol; Odic, Duško; Pedersoli, Emanuele; Reich, Christian; Rolles, Daniel; Rudek, Benedikt; Rudenko, Artem; Schmidt, Carlo; Schultz, Joachim; Seibert, M. Marvin; Shoeman, Robert L.; Sierra, Raymond G.; Soltau, Heike; Starodub, Dmitri; Steinbrener, Jan; Stellato, Francesco; Strüder, Lothar; Svenda, Martin; Tobias, Herbert; Ullrich, Joachim; Weidenspointner, Georg; Westphal, Daniel; White, Thomas A.; Williams, Garth; Hajdu, Janos; Schlichting, Ilme; Bogan, Michael J.; Chapman, Henry N.

    2011-06-01

    Results of coherent diffractive imaging experiments performed with soft X-rays (1-2 keV) at the Linac Coherent Light Source are presented. Both organic and inorganic nano-sized objects were injected into the XFEL beam as an aerosol focused with an aerodynamic lens. The high intensity and femtosecond duration of X-ray pulses produced by the Linac Coherent Light Source allow structural information to be recorded by X-ray diffraction before the particle is destroyed. Images were formed by using iterative methods to phase single shot diffraction patterns. Strategies for improving the reconstruction methods have been developed. This technique opens up exciting opportunities for biological imaging, allowing structure determination without freezing, staining or crystallization.

  13. Fast, high-throughput creation of size-tunable micro/nanoparticle clusters via evaporative self-assembly in picoliter-scale droplets of particle suspension.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sun; Jamshidi, Arash; Seok, Tae Joon; Wu, Ming C; Zohdi, Tarek I; Pisano, Albert P

    2012-02-14

    We report a fast, high-throughput method to create size-tunable micro/nanoparticle clusters via evaporative assembly in picoliter-scale droplets of particle suspension. Mediated by gravity force and surface tension force of a contacting surface, picoliter-scale droplets of the suspension are generated from a nanofabricated printing head. Rapid evaporative self-assembly of the particles on a hydrophobic surface leads to fast clustering of micro/nanoparticles and forms particle clusters of tunable sizes and controlled spacing. The evaporating behavior of the droplet is observed in real-time, and the clustering characteristics of the particles are understood based on the physics of evaporative-assembly. With this method, multiplex printing of various particle clusters with accurate positioning and alignment are demonstrated. Also, size-unifomity of the cluster arrays is thoroughly analyzed by examining the metallic nanoparticle cluster-arrays based on surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS).

  14. Data processing of vertical scanning white-light interferometry based on particle swarm optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jie; Cui, Changcai; Huang, Hui; Ye, Ruifang

    2013-01-01

    In order to precisely locate the position of zero optical path difference (ZOPD) between the measuring light beam and the reference light beam in Vertical Scanning White-light Interferometer and then realize accurate surface measurement, the Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) was used to process the interferometry data captured by a CCD camera. The envelope line of series of intensities of every pixel was supposed to be approximated by a Gaussian curve first. Then its parameters were optimized to find the best Gaussian curve as well as the position of ZOPD by the PSO with an objective function which minimized the residual sum of squares between the measured data and theoretical fitting curve. Finally, the measured surface can be reconstructed according to a series of best positions of ZOPD obtained by the proposed method. The simulation data and sampled data of two standard samples with different kinds of reticles from repetitive test show that the PSO is suitable for precisely locating the ZOPD with low requirements of step sampling and a small amount of pictures. Therefore, without reducing the precision, the PSO can be used in data processing of the white-light interferometry system with relatively low requirements for stepping hardware.

  15. Modeling Filamentous Cyanobacteria Reveals the Advantages of Long and Fast Trichomes for Optimizing Light Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Tamulonis, Carlos; Postma, Marten; Kaandorp, Jaap

    2011-01-01

    Cyanobacteria form a very large and diverse phylum of prokaryotes that perform oxygenic photosynthesis. Many species of cyanobacteria live colonially in long trichomes of hundreds to thousands of cells. Of the filamentous species, many are also motile, gliding along their long axis, and display photomovement, by which a trichome modulates its gliding according to the incident light. The latter has been found to play an important role in guiding the trichomes to optimal lighting conditions, which can either inhibit the cells if the incident light is too weak, or damage the cells if too strong. We have developed a computational model for gliding filamentous photophobic cyanobacteria that allows us to perform simulations on the scale of a Petri dish using over 105 individual trichomes. Using the model, we quantify the effectiveness of one commonly observed photomovement strategy—photophobic responses—in distributing large populations of trichomes optimally over a light field. The model predicts that the typical observed length and gliding speeds of filamentous cyanobacteria are optimal for the photophobic strategy. Therefore, our results suggest that not just photomovement but also the trichome shape itself improves the ability of the cyanobacteria to optimize their light exposure. PMID:21789215

  16. Modeling filamentous cyanobacteria reveals the advantages of long and fast trichomes for optimizing light exposure.

    PubMed

    Tamulonis, Carlos; Postma, Marten; Kaandorp, Jaap

    2011-01-01

    Cyanobacteria form a very large and diverse phylum of prokaryotes that perform oxygenic photosynthesis. Many species of cyanobacteria live colonially in long trichomes of hundreds to thousands of cells. Of the filamentous species, many are also motile, gliding along their long axis, and display photomovement, by which a trichome modulates its gliding according to the incident light. The latter has been found to play an important role in guiding the trichomes to optimal lighting conditions, which can either inhibit the cells if the incident light is too weak, or damage the cells if too strong. We have developed a computational model for gliding filamentous photophobic cyanobacteria that allows us to perform simulations on the scale of a Petri dish using over 10(5) individual trichomes. Using the model, we quantify the effectiveness of one commonly observed photomovement strategy--photophobic responses--in distributing large populations of trichomes optimally over a light field. The model predicts that the typical observed length and gliding speeds of filamentous cyanobacteria are optimal for the photophobic strategy. Therefore, our results suggest that not just photomovement but also the trichome shape itself improves the ability of the cyanobacteria to optimize their light exposure.

  17. High rate particle tracking and ultra-fast timing with a thin hybrid silicon pixel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorini, M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Carassiti, V.; Ceccucci, A.; Cortina Gil, E.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; Dellacasa, G.; Garbolino, S.; Jarron, P.; Kaplon, J.; Kluge, A.; Marchetto, F.; Mapelli, A.; Martin, E.; Mazza, G.; Morel, M.; Noy, M.; Nuessle, G.; Perktold, L.; Petagna, P.; Petrucci, F.; Poltorak, K.; Riedler, P.; Rivetti, A.; Statera, M.; Velghe, B.

    2013-08-01

    The Gigatracker (GTK) is a hybrid silicon pixel detector designed for the NA62 experiment at CERN. The beam spectrometer, made of three GTK stations, has to sustain high and non-uniform particle rate (∼ 1 GHz in total) and measure momentum and angles of each beam track with a combined time resolution of 150 ps. In order to reduce multiple scattering and hadronic interactions of beam particles, the material budget of a single GTK station has been fixed to 0.5% X0. The expected fluence for 100 days of running is 2 ×1014 1 MeV neq /cm2, comparable to the one foreseen in the inner trackers of LHC detectors during 10 years of operation. To comply with these requirements, an efficient and very low-mass (< 0.15 %X0) cooling system is being constructed, using a novel microchannel cooling silicon plate. Two complementary read-out architectures have been produced as small-scale prototypes: one is based on a Time-over-Threshold circuit followed by a TDC shared by a group of pixels, while the other makes use of a constant-fraction discriminator followed by an on-pixel TDC. The read-out ASICs are produced in 130 nm IBM CMOS technology and will be thinned down to 100 μm or less. An overview of the Gigatracker detector system will be presented. Experimental results from laboratory and beam tests of prototype bump-bonded assemblies will be described as well. These results show a time resolution of about 170 ps for single hits from minimum ionizing particles, using 200 μm thick silicon sensors.

  18. Bounds on new light particles from high-energy and very small momentum transfer np elastic scattering data

    SciTech Connect

    Kamyshkov, Yuri; Tithof, Jeffrey; Vysotsky, Mikhail

    2008-12-01

    We found that spin-one new light particle exchanges are strongly bounded by high-energy and small momentum transfer np elastic scattering data; the analogous bound for a scalar particle is considerably weaker, while for a pseudoscalar particle no bounds can be set. These bounds are compared with the bounds extracted from low-energy n-Pb scattering experiments and from the bounds of {pi}{sup 0} and K{sup +} meson decays.

  19. Feasibility of the preparation of silica monoliths for gas chromatography: fast separation of light hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Azzouz, Imadeddine; Essoussi, Anouar; Fleury, Joachim; Haudebourg, Raphael; Thiebaut, Didier; Vial, Jerome

    2015-02-27

    The preparation conditions of silica monoliths for gas chromatography were investigated. Silica-based monolithic capillary columns based on sol-gel process were tested in the course of high-speed gas chromatographic separations of light hydrocarbons mixture (C1-C4). The impact of modifying the amount of porogen and/or catalyst on the monolith properties were studied. At the best precursor/catalyst/porogen ratio evaluated, a column efficiency of about 6500 theoretical plates per meter was reached with a very good resolution (4.3) for very light compounds (C1-C2). The test mixture was baseline separated on a 70cm column. To our knowledge for the first time a silica-based monolithic capillary column was able to separate light hydrocarbons from methane to n-butane at room temperature with a back pressure in the range of gas chromatography facilities (under 4.1bar).

  20. Inside-outside self-assembly of light-activated fast-release liposomes.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Natalie; Shin, Jeong Eun; Ogunyankin, Maria; Zasadzinski, Joseph A

    2015-06-28

    Building additional functionality into both the membrane and the internal compartments of biocompatible liposomes by self-assembly can provide ways of enhancing colloidal stability and spatial and temporal control of contents release. An interdigitation-fusion process is used to encapsulate near infrared light absorbing copper sulfide nanoparticles in the interior compartments of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine and dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol liposomes. Once formed, the liposome membrane is modified to include lysolipids and polyethylene glycol lipids by partitioning from lysolipid and PEG-lipid micelles in solution. This results in sterically stable, thermosensitive liposomes with a permeability transition near physiological temperature that can be triggered by NIR light irradiation. Rapid changes in local concentration can be induced with spatial and temporal control using NIR laser light.

  1. Use of fast scopes to enable Thomson scattering measurement in presence of fluctuating plasma light.

    SciTech Connect

    McLean, H; Moller, J; Hill, D

    2004-04-19

    The addition of inexpensive high-speed oscilloscopes has enabled higher Te Thomson scattering measurements on the SSPX spheromak. Along with signal correlation techniques, the scopes allow new analyses based on the shape of the scattered laser pulse to discriminate against fluctuating background plasma light that often make gated-integrator measurements unreliable. A 1.4 J Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm is the scattering source. Spatial locations are coupled by viewing optics and fibers to 4-wavelength-channel filter polychrometers. Ratios between the channels determine Te while summations of the channels determine density. Typically, the channel that provides scattered signal at higher Te is contaminated by fluctuating background light. Individual channels are correlated with either a modeled representation of the laser pulse or a noise-free stray light signal to extract channel amplitudes.

  2. Fast single image haze removal via local atmospheric light veil estimation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wei; Wang, Hao; Sun, Changhao; Guo, Baolong; Jia, Wenyan; Sun, Mingui

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a novel single-image based dehazing framework is proposed to remove haze artifacts from images through local atmospheric light estimation. We use a novel strategy based on a physical model where the extreme intensity of each RGB pixel is used to define an initial atmospheric veil (local atmospheric light veil). Across bilateral filter is applied to each veil to achieve both local smoothness and edge preservation. A transmission map and a reflection component of each RGB channel are constructed from the physical atmospheric scattering model. The proposed approach avoids adverse effects caused by the error in estimating the global atmospheric light. Experimental results on outdoor hazy images demonstrate that the proposed method produces image output with satisfactory visual quality and color fidelity. Our comparative study demonstrates a higher performance of our method over several state-of-the-art methods. PMID:26744548

  3. Feasibility of the preparation of silica monoliths for gas chromatography: fast separation of light hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Azzouz, Imadeddine; Essoussi, Anouar; Fleury, Joachim; Haudebourg, Raphael; Thiebaut, Didier; Vial, Jerome

    2015-02-27

    The preparation conditions of silica monoliths for gas chromatography were investigated. Silica-based monolithic capillary columns based on sol-gel process were tested in the course of high-speed gas chromatographic separations of light hydrocarbons mixture (C1-C4). The impact of modifying the amount of porogen and/or catalyst on the monolith properties were studied. At the best precursor/catalyst/porogen ratio evaluated, a column efficiency of about 6500 theoretical plates per meter was reached with a very good resolution (4.3) for very light compounds (C1-C2). The test mixture was baseline separated on a 70cm column. To our knowledge for the first time a silica-based monolithic capillary column was able to separate light hydrocarbons from methane to n-butane at room temperature with a back pressure in the range of gas chromatography facilities (under 4.1bar). PMID:25622518

  4. ITER Plasma at Ion Cyclotron Frequency Domain: The Fusion Alpha Particles Diagnostics Based on the Stimulated Raman Scattering of Fast Magnetosonic Wave off High Harmonic Ion Bernstein Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefan, V. Alexander

    2014-10-01

    A novel method for alpha particle diagnostics is proposed. The theory of stimulated Raman scattering, SRS, of the fast wave and ion Bernstein mode, IBM, turbulence in multi-ion species plasmas, (Stefan University Press, La Jolla, CA, 2008). is utilized for the diagnostics of fast ions, (4)He (+2), in ITER plasmas. Nonlinear Landau damping of the IBM on fast ions near the plasma edge leads to the space-time changes in the turbulence level, (inverse alpha particle channeling). The space-time monitoring of the IBM turbulence via the SRS techniques may prove efficient for the real time study of the fast ion velocity distribution function, spatial distribution, and transport. Supported by Nikola Tesla Labs., La Jolla, CA 92037.

  5. Ultrahigh enhancement in absolute and relative rotation sensing using fast and slow light

    SciTech Connect

    Shahriar, M. S.; Pati, G. S.; Tripathi, R.; Gopal, V.; Messall, M.; Salit, K.

    2007-05-15

    We describe a resonator-based optical gyroscope whose sensitivity for measuring absolute rotation is enhanced via use of the anomalous dispersion characteristic of superluminal light propagation. The enhancement is given by the inverse of the group index, saturating to a bound determined by the group velocity dispersion. We also show how the offsetting effect of the concomitant broadening of the resonator linewidth may be circumvented by using an active cavity. For realistic conditions, the enhancement factor is as high as 10{sup 6}. We also show how normal dispersion used for slow light can enhance relative rotation sensing in a specially designed Sagnac interferometer, with the enhancement given by the slowing factor.

  6. Non-linear wave-particle interactions and fast ion loss induced by multiple Alfvén eigenmodes in the DIII-D tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xi; Kramer, G. J.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Fisher, R. K.; Pace, D. C.; Petty, C. C.; Podesta, M.; Van Zeeland, M. A.

    2014-08-01

    A new non-linear feature has been observed in fast-ion loss from tokamak plasmas in the form of oscillations at the sum, difference and second harmonic frequencies of two independent Alfvén eigenmodes (AEs). Full orbit calculations and analytic theory indicate this non-linearity is due to coupling of fast-ion orbital response as it passes through each AE—a change in wave-particle phase k · r by one mode alters the force exerted by the next. The loss measurement is of barely confined, non-resonant particles, while similar non-linear interactions can occur between well-confined particles and multiple AEs leading to enhanced fast-ion transport.

  7. THE CRAB NEBULA SUPER-FLARE IN 2011 APRIL: EXTREMELY FAST PARTICLE ACCELERATION AND GAMMA-RAY EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Striani, E.; Tavani, M.; Cardillo, M; Piano, G.; Donnarumma, I.; Vittorini, V.; Trois, A.; Costa, E.; Argan, A.; De Paris, G.; Bulgarelli, A.; Pittori, C.; Verrecchia, F.; Weisskopf, M.; Tennant, A.; Barbiellini, G.; Caraveo, P.; Chen, A. W.

    2011-11-01

    We report on the extremely intense and fast gamma-ray flare above 100 MeV detected by AGILE from the Crab Nebula in mid-April 2011. This event is the fourth of a sequence of reported major gamma-ray flares produced by the Crab Nebula in the period 2007/mid-2011. These events are attributed to strong radiative and plasma instabilities in the inner Crab Nebula, and their properties are crucial for theoretical studies of fast and efficient particle acceleration up to 10{sup 15} eV. Here we study the very rapid flux and spectral evolution of the event that on 2011 April 16 reached the record-high peak flux of F = (26 {+-} 5) x 10{sup -6} photons cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} with a rise-time timescale that we determine to be in the range 6-10 hr. The peak flaring gamma-ray spectrum reaches a distinct maximum near 500 MeV with no substantial emission above 1 GeV. The very rapid rise time and overall evolution of the Crab Nebula flare strongly constrain the acceleration mechanisms and challenge MHD models. We briefly discuss the theoretical implications of our observations.

  8. Application of the pseudospectral time-domain method to the scattering of light by nonspherical particles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guang; Yang, Ping; Kattawar, George W

    2008-03-01

    The pseudospectral time-domain (PSTD) method is a powerful approach for computing the single-scattering properties of arbitrarily shaped particles with small-to-moderate-sized parameters. In the PSTD method, the spatial derivative approximation based on the spectral method is more accurate than its counterpart based on the finite-difference technique. Additionally, the PSTD method can substantially diminish accumulated errors that increase with the spatial scale and temporal duration of simulation. We report on the application of the PSTD method to the scattering of light by nonspherical ice particles. The applicability of the PSTD method is validated against the Lorenz-Mie theory and the T-matrix method. The phase functions computed from the PSTD method and the Lorenz-Mie theory agree well for size parameters as large as 80. Furthermore, the PSTD code is also applied to the scattering of light by nonspherical ice crystals, namely, hollow hexagonal columns and aggregates, which are frequently observed in cirrus clouds. The phase functions computed from the PSTD method are compared with the counterparts computed from the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method for a size parameter of 20 and an incident wavelength of 3.7 microm. The comparisons show good agreement between the two methods.

  9. Measurement of light charged particles in the decay channels of medium-mass excited compound nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdré, S.; Barlini, S.; Casini, G.; Pasquali, G.; Piantelli, S.; Carboni, S.; Cinausero, M.; Gramegna, F.; Marchi, T.; Baiocco, G.; Bardelli, L.; Benzoni, G.; Bini, M.; Blasi, N.; Bracco, A.; Brambilla, S.; Bruno, M.; Camera, F.; Corsi, A.; Crespi, F.; D'Agostino, M.; Degerlier, M.; Kravchuk, V. L.; Leoni, S.; Million, B.; Montanari, D.; Morelli, L.; Nannini, A.; Nicolini, R.; Poggi, G.; Vannini, G.; Wieland, O.; Bednarczyk, P.; Ciemała, M.; Dudek, J.; Fornal, B.; Kmiecik, M.; Maj, A.; Matejska-Minda, M.; Mazurek, K.; Męczyński, W. M.; Myalski, S.; Styczeń, J.; Ziębliński, M.

    2014-03-01

    The 48Ti on 40Ca reactions have been studied at 300 and 600 MeV focusing on the fusion-evaporation (FE) and fusion-fission (FF) exit channels. Energy spectra and multiplicities of the emitted light charged particles have been compared to Monte Carlo simulations based on the statistical model. Indeed, in this mass region (A ~ 100) models predict that shape transitions can occur at high spin values and relatively scarce data exist in the literature about coincidence measurements between evaporation residues and light charged particles. Signals of shape transitions can be found in the variations of the lineshape of high energy gamma rays emitted from the de-excitation of GDR states gated on different region of angular momenta. For this purpose it is important to keep under control the FE and FF processes, to regulate the statistical model parameters and to control the onset of possible pre-equilibrium emissions from 300 to 600 MeV bombarding energy.

  10. Optimizing and extending light-sculpting microscopy for fast functional imaging in neuroscience

    PubMed Central

    Rupprecht, Peter; Prevedel, Robert; Groessl, Florian; Haubensak, Wulf E.; Vaziri, Alipasha

    2015-01-01

    A number of questions in system biology such as understanding how dynamics of neuronal networks are related to brain function require the ability to capture the functional dynamics of large cellular populations at high speed. Recently, this has driven the development of a number of parallel and high speed imaging techniques such as light-sculpting microscopy, which has been used to capture neuronal dynamics at the whole brain and single cell level in small model organisms. However, the broader applicability of light-sculpting microcopy is limited by the size of volumes for which high speed imaging can be obtained and scattering in brain tissue. Here, we present strategies for optimizing the present tradeoffs in light-sculpting microscopy. Various scanning modalities in light-sculpting microscopy are theoretically and experimentally evaluated, and strategies to maximize the obtainable volume speeds, and depth penetration in brain tissue using different laser systems are provided. Design-choices, important parameters and their trade-offs are experimentally demonstrated by performing calcium-imaging in acute mouse-brain slices. We further show that synchronization of line-scanning techniques with rolling-shutter read-out of the camera can reduce scattering effects and enhance image contrast at depth. PMID:25780729

  11. Weathering of a carbon nanotube/epoxy nanocomposite under UV light and in water bath: impact on abraded particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlagenhauf, Lukas; Kianfar, Bahareh; Buerki-Thurnherr, Tina; Kuo, Yu-Ying; Wichser, Adrian; Nüesch, Frank; Wick, Peter; Wang, Jing

    2015-11-01

    Weathering processes can influence the surface properties of composites with incorporated nanoparticles. These changes may affect the release behavior of nanoparticles when an abrasion process is applied. Therefore, the influence of two different weathering processes, immersion in water and exposure to UV light, on the properties of abraded particles from a carbon nanotube (CNT)/epoxy nanocomposite was investigated. The investigation included the measurement of the weathering impact on the surface chemistry of the exposed samples, the particle size of abraded particles, the quantity of exposed CNTs in the respirable part of the abraded particles, and the toxicity of abraded particles, measured by in vitro toxicity tests using the THP-1 monocyte-derived macrophages. The results showed that weathering by immersion in water had no influence on the properties of abraded particles. The exposure to UV light caused a degradation of the epoxy on the surface, followed by delamination of an approx. 2.5 μm thick layer. An increased quantity of exposed CNTs in abraded particles was not found; on the contrary, longer UV exposure times decreased the released fraction of CNTs from 0.6% to 0.4%. The toxicity tests revealed that abraded particles from the nanocomposites did not induce additional acute cytotoxic effects compared to particles from the neat epoxy.Weathering processes can influence the surface properties of composites with incorporated nanoparticles. These changes may affect the release behavior of nanoparticles when an abrasion process is applied. Therefore, the influence of two different weathering processes, immersion in water and exposure to UV light, on the properties of abraded particles from a carbon nanotube (CNT)/epoxy nanocomposite was investigated. The investigation included the measurement of the weathering impact on the surface chemistry of the exposed samples, the particle size of abraded particles, the quantity of exposed CNTs in the respirable part of

  12. Biological activity of particle exhaust emissions from light-duty diesel engines.

    PubMed

    Carraro, E; Locatelli, A L; Ferrero, C; Fea, E; Gilli, G

    1997-01-01

    Whole diesel exhaust has been classified recently as a probable carcinogen, and several genotoxicity studies have found particulate exhaust to be clearly mutagenic. Moreover, genotoxicity of diesel particulate is greatly influenced by fuel nature and type of combustion. In order to obtain an effective environmental pollution control, combustion processes using alternative fuels are being analyzed presently. The goal of this study is to determine whether the installation of exhaust after treatment-devices on two light-duty, exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) valve-equipped diesel engines (1930 cc and 2500 cc) can reduce the mutagenicity associated with particles collected during U.S.A. and European driving cycles. Another interesting object was to compare the ability of alternative biodiesel and conventional diesel fuels to reduce the mutagenic activity associated with collected particles from two light duty diesel engines (both 1930 cc) during the European driving cycle. SOF mutagenicity was assayed using the Salmonella/microsome test (TA 98 and TA 100 strains, +/- S9 fraction). In the first part of our study, the highest mutagenicity was revealed by TA98 strain without enzymatic activation, suggesting a direct-acting mutagenicity prevalence in diesel particulate. The 2500 cc engine revealed twofold mutagenic activity compared with the 1930 cc engine (both EGR valve equipped), whereas an opposite result was found in particulate matter amount. The use of a noncatalytic ceramic trap produced a decrease of particle mutagenic activity in the 2500 cc car, whereas an enhancement in the 1930 cc engine was found. The catalytic converter and the electrostatic filter installed on the 2500 cc engine yielded a light particle amount and an SOF mutagenicity decrease. A greater engine stress was obtained using European driving cycles, which caused the strongest mutagenicity/km compared with the U.S.A. cycles. In the second part of the investigation, even though a small number of

  13. Biological activity of particle exhaust emissions from light-duty diesel engines.

    PubMed

    Carraro, E; Locatelli, A L; Ferrero, C; Fea, E; Gilli, G

    1997-01-01

    Whole diesel exhaust has been classified recently as a probable carcinogen, and several genotoxicity studies have found particulate exhaust to be clearly mutagenic. Moreover, genotoxicity of diesel particulate is greatly influenced by fuel nature and type of combustion. In order to obtain an effective environmental pollution control, combustion processes using alternative fuels are being analyzed presently. The goal of this study is to determine whether the installation of exhaust after treatment-devices on two light-duty, exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) valve-equipped diesel engines (1930 cc and 2500 cc) can reduce the mutagenicity associated with particles collected during U.S.A. and European driving cycles. Another interesting object was to compare the ability of alternative biodiesel and conventional diesel fuels to reduce the mutagenic activity associated with collected particles from two light duty diesel engines (both 1930 cc) during the European driving cycle. SOF mutagenicity was assayed using the Salmonella/microsome test (TA 98 and TA 100 strains, +/- S9 fraction). In the first part of our study, the highest mutagenicity was revealed by TA98 strain without enzymatic activation, suggesting a direct-acting mutagenicity prevalence in diesel particulate. The 2500 cc engine revealed twofold mutagenic activity compared with the 1930 cc engine (both EGR valve equipped), whereas an opposite result was found in particulate matter amount. The use of a noncatalytic ceramic trap produced a decrease of particle mutagenic activity in the 2500 cc car, whereas an enhancement in the 1930 cc engine was found. The catalytic converter and the electrostatic filter installed on the 2500 cc engine yielded a light particle amount and an SOF mutagenicity decrease. A greater engine stress was obtained using European driving cycles, which caused the strongest mutagenicity/km compared with the U.S.A. cycles. In the second part of the investigation, even though a small number of

  14. Controlling slow and fast light and dynamic pulse-splitting with tunable optical gain in a whispering-gallery-mode microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, M.; Özdemir, Ş. K.; Chen, W.; Ikuta, R.; Yang, L.; Imoto, N.; Yamamoto, T.

    2016-05-01

    We report controllable manipulation of slow and fast light in a whispering-gallery-mode microtoroid resonator fabricated from Erbium (Er3+) doped silica. We observe continuous transition of the coupling between the fiber-taper waveguide and the microresonator from undercoupling to critical coupling and then to overcoupling regimes by increasing the pump power even though the spatial distance between the resonator and the waveguide was kept fixed. This, in turn, enables switching from fast to slow light and vice versa just by increasing the optical gain. An enhancement of delay of two-fold over the passive silica resonator (no optical gain) was observed in the slow light regime. Moreover, we show dynamic pulse splitting and its control in slow/fast light systems using optical gain.

  15. Electron correlations in single-electron capture from helium by fast protons and α particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mančev, Ivan; Milojević, Nenad

    2010-02-01

    Single-electron capture from heliumlike atomic systems by bare projectiles is investigated by means of the four-body boundary-corrected first Born approximation (CB1-4B). The effect of the dynamic electron correlation is explicitly taken into account through the complete perturbation potential. The quantum-mechanical post and prior transition amplitudes for single charge exchange encompassing symmetric and/or asymmetric collisions are derived in terms of two-dimensional real integrals in the case of the prior form and five-dimensional quadratures for the post form. An illustrative computation is performed for single-electron capture from helium by protons and α particles at intermediate and high impact energies. The role of dynamic correlations is examined as a function of increased projectile energy. The validity and utility of the proposed CB1-4B method is critically assessed in comparison with the existing experimental data for total cross sections, and excellent agreement is obtained.

  16. An initial measurement of a fast neutral spectrum for ion cyclotron range of frequency heated plasma using two-channel compact neutral particle analyzers in KSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S. H.; Wang, S. J.; Park, M.; Kim, S. K.

    2013-11-01

    The accurate measurement of fast neutral particles from high energy ion tails is very important since it is a measure of ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) or neutral beam (NB) ion heating. In KSTAR, fast neutral measurements have been carried out using a compact neutral particle analyzer based on the silicon photo diode since 2010. As a result, the fast neutral spectrum was observed consistent with the ion temperature, diamagnetic energy, and neutron flux in 2011. However, there was fast neutral count beyond the injected neutral beam energy in NB-only heating. Since it is difficult to expect the count unless the temperature is high enough to diffuse the fast ions beyond the beam energy it was required to identify what it is. During the 2012 campaign, the two-channel diode detectors with and without a particle stopper were used to distinguish fast neutral counts and other counts by a hard X-ray or neutrons. As a result, it was confirmed that the high energy component beyond the beam energy originated from a hard X-ray or neutrons. Finally, it was observed that faster neutrals are generated by ICRF heating and enhanced by electron cyclotron heating compared to NB-only heating.

  17. An initial measurement of a fast neutral spectrum for ion cyclotron range of frequency heated plasma using two-channel compact neutral particle analyzers in KSTAR

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S. H.; Park, M.; Kim, S. K.; Wang, S. J.

    2013-11-15

    The accurate measurement of fast neutral particles from high energy ion tails is very important since it is a measure of ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) or neutral beam (NB) ion heating. In KSTAR, fast neutral measurements have been carried out using a compact neutral particle analyzer based on the silicon photo diode since 2010. As a result, the fast neutral spectrum was observed consistent with the ion temperature, diamagnetic energy, and neutron flux in 2011. However, there was fast neutral count beyond the injected neutral beam energy in NB-only heating. Since it is difficult to expect the count unless the temperature is high enough to diffuse the fast ions beyond the beam energy it was required to identify what it is. During the 2012 campaign, the two-channel diode detectors with and without a particle stopper were used to distinguish fast neutral counts and other counts by a hard X-ray or neutrons. As a result, it was confirmed that the high energy component beyond the beam energy originated from a hard X-ray or neutrons. Finally, it was observed that faster neutrals are generated by ICRF heating and enhanced by electron cyclotron heating compared to NB-only heating.

  18. Light particles emitted in coincidence with evaporation residues in {sup 79}Br(930 MeV) + {sup 27}Al collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Chavez Lomeli, E.; Dacal, A.; Ortiz, M.E.; D`Onofrio, A.; Gomez del Campo, J.; Kim, H.; Korolija, M.; Shapira, D.

    1993-10-01

    Exclusive measurements of light particles, deuterons, tritons and alphas, in coincidence with Evaporation Residues (ER), were performed at the Holified Heavy Ion Research Facility of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory using the large detector array HILI (Heavy Ion Light Ion). Heavy fragments produced in the reaction (Z 35), were stopped in the Ionisation Chamber, where their energy, atomic number (Z) and position were measured. Coincident light particles, were detected in the 192 element hodoscope placed behind the chamber, where its charge (Z) and energy were measured. Also the time of flight relative to the radio frequency of the cyclotron, allowed identification of protons deuterons and tritons.

  19. Wear behavior of light-cured dental composites filled with porous glass-ceramic particles.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yanni; Liu, Yong; Grover, Liam M; Huang, Baiyun

    2010-01-01

    Wear resistance is still perceived to be one of the most important limiting factors in the long-term performance of dental restorations. Consequently, a range of different materials have been used as filler particles to reduce the rate of wear, particularly in posterior restorations. In this study, novel bioactive glass-ceramic powders exhibiting different nominal calcium-mica to fluorapatite ratios were used as fillers for light-cured dental composites. Wear tests on the resulting samples were undertaken using a micro-tribometer with a linear reciprocating ball-on-flat geometry using lubrication from artificial saliva. The surfaces of the worn composites were then evaluated using optical microscopy. In order to enhance matrix bonding, the surfaces of the different particulates were treated using hydrofluoric acid to provide a porous surface and the resulting surface morphology was evaluated using scanning electron microscopy. Although in the case of the samples containing low fluorapatite contents (20 wt%; A2), surface etching enhanced the wear resistance of the composite, etching reduced the wear resistance of materials containing 50 wt% fluorapatite (A5). The reduction in wear resistance was attributed to the friability of the A5 particles following surface treatment. This suggests that in order to optimize wear resistance, it is important to find a critical balance between surface roughness and porosity and the strength of individual particles.

  20. Gustav Mie and the evolving subject of light scattering by particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.; Travis, Larry D.

    2009-03-01

    The year 2008 marks the centenary of the seminal paper by Gustav Mie on light scattering by homogeneous spherical particles. With more than 3,800 citations, Mie's paper has been among the most influential physics publications of the twentieth century. It has affected profoundly the development of a great variety of science disciplines including atmospheric radiation, meteorological optics, remote sensing, aerosol physics, nanoscience, astrophysics, and biomedical optics. Mie's paper represented a fundamental advancement over the earlier publications by Ludvig Lorenz in that it was explicitly based on the Maxwell equations, gave the final solution in a convenient and closed form suitable for practical computations, and imparted physical reality to the abstract concept of electromagnetic scattering. The Mie solution anticipated such general concepts as far-field scattering and the Sommerfeld-Silver-Müller boundary conditions at infinity as well as paved the way to such important extensions as the separation of variables method for spheroids and the T-matrix method. Among illustrative uses of the Mie solution are the explanation of the spectacular optical displays caused by cloud and rain droplets, the detection of sulfuric acid particles in the atmosphere of Venus from Earth-based polarimetry, and optical particle characterization based on measurements of morphology-dependent resonances. Yet there is no doubt that the full practical potential of the Mie theory is still to be revealed.

  1. Wear behavior of light-cured dental composites filled with porous glass-ceramic particles.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yanni; Liu, Yong; Grover, Liam M; Huang, Baiyun

    2010-01-01

    Wear resistance is still perceived to be one of the most important limiting factors in the long-term performance of dental restorations. Consequently, a range of different materials have been used as filler particles to reduce the rate of wear, particularly in posterior restorations. In this study, novel bioactive glass-ceramic powders exhibiting different nominal calcium-mica to fluorapatite ratios were used as fillers for light-cured dental composites. Wear tests on the resulting samples were undertaken using a micro-tribometer with a linear reciprocating ball-on-flat geometry using lubrication from artificial saliva. The surfaces of the worn composites were then evaluated using optical microscopy. In order to enhance matrix bonding, the surfaces of the different particulates were treated using hydrofluoric acid to provide a porous surface and the resulting surface morphology was evaluated using scanning electron microscopy. Although in the case of the samples containing low fluorapatite contents (20 wt%; A2), surface etching enhanced the wear resistance of the composite, etching reduced the wear resistance of materials containing 50 wt% fluorapatite (A5). The reduction in wear resistance was attributed to the friability of the A5 particles following surface treatment. This suggests that in order to optimize wear resistance, it is important to find a critical balance between surface roughness and porosity and the strength of individual particles. PMID:19878904

  2. Fast-ion radial diffusivity evaluated from vertical neutral particle measurements following short pulse beam injection into a TFTR ohmic plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kusama, Y. . Naka Fusion Research Establishment); Heidbrink, W.W. ); Barnes, C.W. ); Beer, M.; Hammett, G.W.; McCune, D.C.; Medley, S.S.; Scott, S.D.; Zarnstorff, M.C. . Plasma Physics Lab.)

    1992-01-01

    The radial diffusivity of fast ions was evaluated from vertical neutral particle measurements in experiments where a short pulse of neutral deuterium beams was injected into a TFTR ohmic deuterium plasma. A comparison between the temporal evolution of the measured neutral particle flux and theoretical calculations showed that the spatially-averaged diffusion coefficient of fast ions is {le} 0.1 m{sup 2}/sec. This value is approximately an order of magnitude less than the diffusion coefficient for thermal ions and is consistent with results obtained previously on TFTR from other diagnostics.

  3. Fast synthesis of high-quality reduced graphene oxide at room temperature under light exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Some, Surajit; Kim, Sungjin; Samanta, Khokan; Kim, Youngmin; Yoon, Yeoheung; Park, Younghun; Lee, Sae Mi; Lee, Keunsik; Lee, Hyoyoung

    2014-09-01

    An approach of presenting new reducing reagents, sodium-benzophenone (Na-B) or Na-B in the presence of the hydrazine (Na-B-H) system under light exposure could produce rGOs with/without N-doping at room temperature in both the solution phase and on a solid substrate. Benzophenone activated those solutions acting as a photosensitizer under light. It was assumed that the newly generated radical anions with electrons from Na-B under light can reduce GO to rGO sheets (rGONa-B1). In addition, the Na-B-H system can allow a higher degree of reduction with the doping of nitrogen atoms by the introduction of hydrazine to produce radical anions and electrons with a sodium hydrazide complex, which helps decrease the sheet resistance of the as-made rGONa-B-H2. The excellent properties (very low oxygen content (C/O ~16.2), and low sheet resistance (~130 Ω square-1)) of the rGOs were confirmed by XPS, XRD, IR, Raman spectroscopy, TGA, wettability, and sheet resistance measurements. High-quality rGO films on flexible substrates could be prepared by directly immersing the GO films in these solutions for several minutes.An approach of presenting new reducing reagents, sodium-benzophenone (Na-B) or Na-B in the presence of the hydrazine (Na-B-H) system under light exposure could produce rGOs with/without N-doping at room temperature in both the solution phase and on a solid substrate. Benzophenone activated those solutions acting as a photosensitizer under light. It was assumed that the newly generated radical anions with electrons from Na-B under light can reduce GO to rGO sheets (rGONa-B1). In addition, the Na-B-H system can allow a higher degree of reduction with the doping of nitrogen atoms by the introduction of hydrazine to produce radical anions and electrons with a sodium hydrazide complex, which helps decrease the sheet resistance of the as-made rGONa-B-H2. The excellent properties (very low oxygen content (C/O ~16.2), and low sheet resistance (~130 Ω square-1)) of the r

  4. Optically active biological particle distinguishing apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Salzman, Gary C.; Kupperman, Robert H.

    1989-01-01

    The disclosure is directed to organic particle sorting and identification. High frequency pulses of circularly polarized light, alternating between left and right, intersect a fast moving stream of organic particles. Circular intensity differential scattering and linear intensity differential scattering are monitored to uniquely identify a variety of organic particles.

  5. Broadening-free SBS-based slow and fast light in optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Thomas; Wiatrek, Andrzej

    2013-03-01

    To change the group velocity of optical signals has a lot of possible applications in telecommunications, sensing, nonlinear optics and so on. Especially the exploitation of the effect of stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) in optical fibers is of special interest since it just requires standard telecom equipment and low to moderate optical power. However, each delay in one single, low-gain SBS based slow-light system is accompanied by pulse broadening. This is a result of the inherent Kramers-Kronig relations between the gain, the phase-change and the accompanied group velocity. For an ideal flat gain the phase-change is non-ideal, and for an ideal phase-change the gain curve leads to a broadening. Furthermore, if the gain bandwidth is broadened in order to adapt it to the signal, the delay will be reduced. Thus, for one single low-gain slow-light system the broadening can be reduced by several methods but it cannot be zero. Here we will show how a zero-broadening SBS based slow-light system can be achieved by two different methods. The basic idea is a reshaping of the original pulse by an adapted gain in a second stage. This adaptation is achieved by the superposition of two Gaussian gain profiles or by a single saturated gain. As will be shown, these systems show an almost ideal over-all gain and phase function over the bandwidth of the pulses. Thus, SBS based slow-light with a delaybandwidth product of more than 1 bit and zero distortion is possible.

  6. Fast Monte Carlo simulations of ultrasound-modulated light using a graphics processing unit.

    PubMed

    Leung, Terence S; Powell, Samuel

    2010-01-01

    Ultrasound-modulated optical tomography (UOT) is based on "tagging" light in turbid media with focused ultrasound. In comparison to diffuse optical imaging, UOT can potentially offer a better spatial resolution. The existing Monte Carlo (MC) model for simulating ultrasound-modulated light is central processing unit (CPU) based and has been employed in several UOT related studies. We reimplemented the MC model with a graphics processing unit [(GPU), Nvidia GeForce 9800] that can execute the algorithm up to 125 times faster than its CPU (Intel Core Quad) counterpart for a particular set of optical and acoustic parameters. We also show that the incorporation of ultrasound propagation in photon migration modeling increases the computational time considerably, by a factor of at least 6, in one case, even with a GPU. With slight adjustment to the code, MC simulations were also performed to demonstrate the effect of ultrasonic modulation on the speckle pattern generated by the light model (available as animation). This was computed in 4 s with our GPU implementation as compared to 290 s using the CPU.

  7. High-speed light field camera and frequency division multiplexing for fast multi-plane velocity measurements.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Andreas; Kupsch, Christian; Gürtler, Johannes; Czarske, Jürgen

    2015-09-21

    Non-intrusive fast 3d measurements of volumetric velocity fields are necessary for understanding complex flows. Using high-speed cameras and spectroscopic measurement principles, where the Doppler frequency of scattered light is evaluated within the illuminated plane, each pixel allows one measurement and, thus, planar measurements with high data rates are possible. While scanning is one standard technique to add the third dimension, the volumetric data is not acquired simultaneously. In order to overcome this drawback, a high-speed light field camera is proposed for obtaining volumetric data with each single frame. The high-speed light field camera approach is applied to a Doppler global velocimeter with sinusoidal laser frequency modulation. As a result, a frequency multiplexing technique is required in addition to the plenoptic refocusing for eliminating the crosstalk between the measurement planes. However, the plenoptic refocusing is still necessary in order to achieve a large refocusing range for a high numerical aperture that minimizes the measurement uncertainty. Finally, two spatially separated measurement planes with 25×25 pixels each are simultaneously acquired with a measurement rate of 0.5 kHz with a single high-speed camera.

  8. Synechococcus elongatus UTEX 2973, a fast growing cyanobacterial chassis for biosynthesis using light and CO2

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Jingjie; Liberton, Michelle; Cliften, Paul F.; Head, Richard D.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Smith, Richard D.; Koppenaal, David W.; Brand, Jerry J.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.

    2015-01-30

    Photosynthetic microbes are of emerging interest as production organisms in biotechnology because they can grow autotrophically using sunlight, an abundant energy source, and CO2, a greenhouse gas. Important traits for such microbes are fast growth and amenability to genetic manipulation. Here we describe Synechococcus elongatus UTEX 2973, a unicellular cyanobacterium capable of rapid autotrophic growth, comparable to heterotrophic industrial hosts such as yeast. Synechococcus 2973 can be readily transformed for facile generation of desired knockout and knock-in mutations. Genome sequencing coupled with global proteomics studies revealed that Synechococcus 2973 is a close relative of the widely studied cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942, an organism that grows more than two times slower. A small number of nucleotide changes are the only significant differences between the genomes of these two cyanobacterial strains. Thus, our study has unraveled genetic determinants necessary for rapid growth of cyanobacterial strains of significant industrial potential.

  9. Synechococcus elongatus UTEX 2973, a fast growing cyanobacterial chassis for biosynthesis using light and CO2

    DOE PAGES

    Yu, Jingjie; Liberton, Michelle; Cliften, Paul F.; Head, Richard D.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Smith, Richard D.; Koppenaal, David W.; Brand, Jerry J.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.

    2015-01-30

    Photosynthetic microbes are of emerging interest as production organisms in biotechnology because they can grow autotrophically using sunlight, an abundant energy source, and CO2, a greenhouse gas. Important traits for such microbes are fast growth and amenability to genetic manipulation. Here we describe Synechococcus elongatus UTEX 2973, a unicellular cyanobacterium capable of rapid autotrophic growth, comparable to heterotrophic industrial hosts such as yeast. Synechococcus 2973 can be readily transformed for facile generation of desired knockout and knock-in mutations. Genome sequencing coupled with global proteomics studies revealed that Synechococcus 2973 is a close relative of the widely studied cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatusmore » PCC 7942, an organism that grows more than two times slower. A small number of nucleotide changes are the only significant differences between the genomes of these two cyanobacterial strains. Thus, our study has unraveled genetic determinants necessary for rapid growth of cyanobacterial strains of significant industrial potential.« less

  10. Probing effects of polymer adsorption in colloidal particle suspensions by light scattering as relevant for the aquatic environment: An overview.

    PubMed

    Tiraferri, Alberto; Borkovec, Michal

    2015-12-01

    Modification of particle surfaces by adsorption of polymers is a process that governs particle behavior in aqueous environmental systems. The present article briefly reviews the current understanding of the adsorption mechanisms and the properties of the resulting layers, and it discusses two environmentally relevant cases of particle modification by polymers. In particular, the discussion focuses on the usefulness of methods based on light scattering to probe such adsorbed layers together with the resulting properties of the particle suspensions, and it highlights advantages and disadvantages of these techniques. Measurement of the electrophoretic mobility allows to follow the development of the adsorption layer and to characterize the charge of the modified particles. At saturation, the surface charge is governed by the charge of the adsorbed film. Dynamic light scattering provides information on the film thickness and on the behavior of the modified suspensions. The charge and the structure of the adsorbed layer influence the stability of the particles, as well as the applicability of the classical theory of Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey, and Overbeek (DLVO). This fundamental knowledge is presented in the light of environmental systems and its significance for applied systems is underlined. In particular, the article discusses two examples of environmental processes involving adsorption of polymers, namely, the modification of particles by natural adsorption of humic substances and the tailoring of surface properties of iron-based particles used to remediate contaminated aquifers.

  11. Fast, noninvasive and simultaneous near-infrared spectroscopic characterisation of physicochemical stationary phases' properties: from silica particles towards monoliths.

    PubMed

    Petter, Christine H; Heigl, Nico; Bonn, Günther K; Huck, Christian W

    2008-08-01

    The design of novel stationary phases is a permanent demanding challenge in chromatographic separation science to enable analysis with enhanced selectivity, specificity and speed. Therefore, the characterisation of chemical and physical properties is next to calculation of chromatographic parameters essential. Conventionally, chemical parameters including surface coverage are determined by burning combustion or frontal analysis, physical parameters including particle size, pore size, pore volume and surface area are determined by SEM, mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET). All these methods are time consuming, invasive and require besides special equipment some special trained laboratory staff. Therefore, we introduced near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) as a noninvasive, easy-to-handle technology with wavenumber ranging from 4000 to 10,000 cm(-1) enabling analysis within only a few seconds at higher precision than the conventional methods. Investigated materials comprise porous and nonporous silica gel, carbon-based nanomaterials (fullerenes), polymer beads and monoliths. Different carriers themselves and their kind of derivatisations (RP, normal-phase, ion-exchanger, IMAC (immobilised metal affinity chromatography), affinity) can be determined by applying principal component analysis (PCA) of recorded spectra. Partial least square regression (PLSR) enables the determination of particle size, pore size, pore volume, porosity, total porosity and surface area with one single measurement. For the optimised design of well-defined polymer beads and monoliths, real-time in situ monitoring to control, e. g. particle and pore sizes as well as monomer content during the polymerisation process, can be extremely helpful. In this article, the advantages of this fast, noninvasive high-throughput NIRS methods are summarised, discussed in detail and different applications of the individual characterised materials are shown.

  12. A fast object-oriented Matlab implementation of the Reproducing Kernel Particle Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbieri, Ettore; Meo, Michele

    2012-05-01

    Novel numerical methods, known as Meshless Methods or Meshfree Methods and, in a wider perspective, Partition of Unity Methods, promise to overcome most of disadvantages of the traditional finite element techniques. The absence of a mesh makes meshfree methods very attractive for those problems involving large deformations, moving boundaries and crack propagation. However, meshfree methods still have significant limitations that prevent their acceptance among researchers and engineers, namely the computational costs. This paper presents an in-depth analysis of computational techniques to speed-up the computation of the shape functions in the Reproducing Kernel Particle Method and Moving Least Squares, with particular focus on their bottlenecks, like the neighbour search, the inversion of the moment matrix and the assembly of the stiffness matrix. The paper presents numerous computational solutions aimed at a considerable reduction of the computational times: the use of kd-trees for the neighbour search, sparse indexing of the nodes-points connectivity and, most importantly, the explicit and vectorized inversion of the moment matrix without using loops and numerical routines.

  13. Fast parallel interferometric 3D tracking of numerous optically trapped particles and their hydrodynamic interaction.

    PubMed

    Ruh, Dominic; Tränkle, Benjamin; Rohrbach, Alexander

    2011-10-24

    Multi-dimensional, correlated particle tracking is a key technology to reveal dynamic processes in living and synthetic soft matter systems. In this paper we present a new method for tracking micron-sized beads in parallel and in all three dimensions - faster and more precise than existing techniques. Using an acousto-optic deflector and two quadrant-photo-diodes, we can track numerous optically trapped beads at up to tens of kHz with a precision of a few nanometers by back-focal plane interferometry. By time-multiplexing the laser focus, we can calibrate individually all traps and all tracking signals in a few seconds and in 3D. We show 3D histograms and calibration constants for nine beads in a quadratic arrangement, although trapping and tracking is easily possible for more beads also in arbitrary 2D arrangements. As an application, we investigate the hydrodynamic coupling and diffusion anomalies of spheres trapped in a 3 × 3 arrangement. PMID:22109012

  14. Spectral Light Absorption and Scattering by Aerosol Particles in Central Amazonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artaxo, P.; Holanda, B. A.; Ferreira De Brito, J.; Carbone, S.; Barbosa, H. M.; Rizzo, L. V.; Cirino, G. G.; Andreae, M. O.; Saturno, J.; Pöhlker, C.; Martin, S. T.; Holben, B. N.; Schafer, J.

    2015-12-01

    As part of the GoAmazon2014/5, a detailed characterization of spectral light absorption and light scattering was performed at four research sites located in the central Amazon forest at different distances upwind and downwind of Manaus. The sites ATTO (T0a) and Embrapa (T0e) are located upwind of Manaus where it is possible to observe very pristine atmospheric conditions in wet season. The site Tiwa (T2) is being operated under the direct influence of the Manaus plume at 5 km downwind of Manaus and, finally, the Manacapuru (T3) site is located at about 60 km downwind of Manaus. The spectral dependence of light absorption and light scattering were measured using Aethalometers (7-wavelengths) and Nephelometers (3-wavelengths), respectively. By calculating the Absorption Angstrom Exponent (AAE), it was possible to get information about the source of the aerosol whereas the Scattering Angstrom Exponent (SAE) gives information about its size distribution. Sunphotometers from the AERONET network were set up at T3 and T0e sites to measure column Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD). For all the stations, much higher absorption and scattering coefficients were observed during the dry season in comparison to the wet season, as a result of the larger concentration of BC and OC present in the biomass burning events. Additionally, we also observed Manaus plume pollution that alters the BC signal. There is also an increase of the AAE during the dry season due to the larger amount of aerosols from biomass burning compared with urban pollution. High values of AAE are also observed during the wet season, attributed to the presence of long-range transport of aerosols from Africa. The SAE for all the sites are lower during the wet season, with the dominance of large biological particles, and increases during the dry season as a consequence of fine particles emitted from both biomass and fossil fuel burning. The AOD at T0e and T3 (Jan-Jun/2014) showed very similar values ranging from 0.05 to

  15. Weathering of a carbon nanotube/epoxy nanocomposite under UV light and in water bath: impact on abraded particles.

    PubMed

    Schlagenhauf, Lukas; Kianfar, Bahareh; Buerki-Thurnherr, Tina; Kuo, Yu-Ying; Wichser, Adrian; Nüesch, Frank; Wick, Peter; Wang, Jing

    2015-11-28

    Weathering processes can influence the surface properties of composites with incorporated nanoparticles. These changes may affect the release behavior of nanoparticles when an abrasion process is applied. Therefore, the influence of two different weathering processes, immersion in water and exposure to UV light, on the properties of abraded particles from a carbon nanotube (CNT)/epoxy nanocomposite was investigated. The investigation included the measurement of the weathering impact on the surface chemistry of the exposed samples, the particle size of abraded particles, the quantity of exposed CNTs in the respirable part of the abraded particles, and the toxicity of abraded particles, measured by in vitro toxicity tests using the THP-1 monocyte-derived macrophages. The results showed that weathering by immersion in water had no influence on the properties of abraded particles. The exposure to UV light caused a degradation of the epoxy on the surface, followed by delamination of an approx. 2.5 μm thick layer. An increased quantity of exposed CNTs in abraded particles was not found; on the contrary, longer UV exposure times decreased the released fraction of CNTs from 0.6% to 0.4%. The toxicity tests revealed that abraded particles from the nanocomposites did not induce additional acute cytotoxic effects compared to particles from the neat epoxy.

  16. Weathering of a carbon nanotube/epoxy nanocomposite under UV light and in water bath: impact on abraded particles.

    PubMed

    Schlagenhauf, Lukas; Kianfar, Bahareh; Buerki-Thurnherr, Tina; Kuo, Yu-Ying; Wichser, Adrian; Nüesch, Frank; Wick, Peter; Wang, Jing

    2015-11-28

    Weathering processes can influence the surface properties of composites with incorporated nanoparticles. These changes may affect the release behavior of nanoparticles when an abrasion process is applied. Therefore, the influence of two different weathering processes, immersion in water and exposure to UV light, on the properties of abraded particles from a carbon nanotube (CNT)/epoxy nanocomposite was investigated. The investigation included the measurement of the weathering impact on the surface chemistry of the exposed samples, the particle size of abraded particles, the quantity of exposed CNTs in the respirable part of the abraded particles, and the toxicity of abraded particles, measured by in vitro toxicity tests using the THP-1 monocyte-derived macrophages. The results showed that weathering by immersion in water had no influence on the properties of abraded particles. The exposure to UV light caused a degradation of the epoxy on the surface, followed by delamination of an approx. 2.5 μm thick layer. An increased quantity of exposed CNTs in abraded particles was not found; on the contrary, longer UV exposure times decreased the released fraction of CNTs from 0.6% to 0.4%. The toxicity tests revealed that abraded particles from the nanocomposites did not induce additional acute cytotoxic effects compared to particles from the neat epoxy. PMID:26490158

  17. [Anxiety in patients undergoing fast-track knee arthroplasty in the light of recent literature].

    PubMed

    Ziętek, Paweł; Ziętek, Joanna; Szczypiór, Karina

    2014-01-01

    The rapid progress in knee implants technology and operational techniques go together with more and more modem medical programs, designed to optimize the patients' care and shorten their stay in hospital. However, this does not guarantee any elimination ofperioperative stress in patients. Anxiety is a negative emotional state arising from stressful circumstances accompanied by activation of the autonomous nervous system. Anxiety causes negative physiological changes, including wound healing, resistance to anesthetic induction, it is associated with an increased perioperative pain and prolong recovery period. The purpose of this work is to present the current state of knowledge on the preoperative anxiety and discuss its impact on pain and other parameters in patients undergoing fast-track arthroplasty of big joints. The work also shows selected issues of anxiety pathomechanism, and actual methods reducing preoperative anxiety in hospitalized patients. The common prevalence of anxiety in patients undergoing surgery induces the attempt to routinely identify patients with higher anxiety, which may be a predictive factor of worse results after TKA. Undertaking widely understood psychological support in these patients before and after the operation could be a favorable element, which would influence thefinal result of the treatment of patients after big joints arthroplasties. PMID:25639020

  18. Design and expected performance of a fast neutron attenuation probe for light element density measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweany, M.; Marleau, P.

    2016-10-01

    We present the design and expected performance of a proof-of-concept 32 channel material identification system. Our system is based on the energy-dependent attenuation of fast neutrons for four elements: hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen and oxygen. We describe a new approach to obtaining a broad range of neutron energies to probe a sample, as well as our technique for reconstructing the molar densities within a sample. The system's performance as a function of time-of-flight energy resolution is explored using a Geant4-based Monte Carlo. Our results indicate that, with the expected detector response of our system, we will be able to determine the molar density of all four elements to within a 20-30% accuracy in a two hour scan time. In many cases this error is systematically low, thus the ratio between elements is more accurate. This degree of accuracy is enough to distinguish, for example, a sample of water from a sample of pure hydrogen peroxide: the ratio of oxygen to hydrogen is reconstructed to within 8±0.5% of the true value. Finally, with future algorithm development that accounts for backgrounds caused by scattering within the sample itself, the accuracy of molar densities, not ratios, may improve to the 5-10% level for a two hour scan time.

  19. Design and expected performance of a fast neutron attenuation probe for light element density measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Sweany, M.; Marleau, P.

    2016-07-08

    In this paper, we present the design and expected performance of a proof-of-concept 32 channel material identification system. Our system is based on the energy-dependent attenuation of fast neutrons for four elements: hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen and oxygen. We describe a new approach to obtaining a broad range of neutron energies to probe a sample, as well as our technique for reconstructing the molar densities within a sample. The system's performance as a function of time-of-flight energy resolution is explored using a Geant4-based Monte Carlo. Our results indicate that, with the expected detector response of our system, we will be ablemore » to determine the molar density of all four elements to within a 20–30% accuracy in a two hour scan time. In many cases this error is systematically low, thus the ratio between elements is more accurate. This degree of accuracy is enough to distinguish, for example, a sample of water from a sample of pure hydrogen peroxide: the ratio of oxygen to hydrogen is reconstructed to within 8±0.5% of the true value. Lastly, with future algorithm development that accounts for backgrounds caused by scattering within the sample itself, the accuracy of molar densities, not ratios, may improve to the 5–10% level for a two hour scan time.« less

  20. Temperature control of light transmission using mixed system of silica hollow particles with nanoparticle shell and organic components.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Masahiro; Shiokawa, Kumi; Monobe, Hirosato; Shimizu, Yo

    2015-01-21

    We reported before that a silica hollow particle whose shell consists of silica nanoparticle (SHP-NP) has a high light reflection ability to prevent light transmission through the particle, which is caused from the intensive light diffusion by the hollow structure and the nanoparticle of the shell. Since the difference in the refractive indices between silica and air is responsible for the strong light reflection, the mixing of the particle with organic components having refractive indices close to that of silica such as tetradecane produced transparent mixtures by suppression of the light reflection. The transparency of the mixtures thus prepared could be controlled by temperature variation. For example, the mixture of the particle SHP-NP with tetradecane was transparent at 20 °C and opaque at 70 °C, while the mixture with n-hexyl cyclohexane was opaque at 20 °C and transparent at 70 °C. As the refractive indices of organic components changed with temperature more than 10 times wider than that of silica, the temperature alternation produced a significant change in the difference of the refractive indices between them to achieve complete control of the transparency of the mixtures. This simple control of the light transmission that can automatically regulate sunlight into the room with temperature alteration is expected to be suitable for smart glass technology for energy conservation. PMID:25536370

  1. Dynamic light scattering-based method to determine primary particle size of iron oxide nanoparticles in simulated gastrointestinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Yang, Seung-Chul; Paik, Sae-Yeol-Rim; Ryu, Jina; Choi, Kyeong-Ok; Kang, Tae Seok; Lee, Jong Kwon; Song, Chi Won; Ko, Sanghoon

    2014-10-15

    Simple dynamic light scattering (DLS)-based methodologies were developed to determine primary particle size distribution of iron oxide particles in simulated gastrointestinal fluid. Iron oxide particles, which easily agglomerate in aqueous media, were converted into dispersed particles by modification of surface charge using citric acid and sodium citrate. After the modification, zeta-potential value decreased to -40mV at pH 7. Mean particle diameters in suspensions of iron oxide nano- and microparticles stabilized by the mixture of citric acid and sodium citrate were dramatically decreased to 166 and 358nm, respectively, which were close to the particle size distributions observed in the micrographs. In simulated gastrointestinal fluid, both iron oxide nano- and microparticles were heavily agglomerated with particle diameters of almost 2600 and 5200nm, respectively, due to charge shielding on the citrate-modified surface by ions in the media. For determining primary particle size distribution by using DLS-based approach, the iron oxide particles incubated in the simulated gastrointestinal fluid were converted to monodisperse particles by altering the pH to 7 and electrolyte elimination. The simple DLS-based methodologies are well suited to determine primary particle size distribution of mineral nanoparticles at various physical, chemical, and biological conditions.

  2. Light Induced Degradation of Eight Commonly Used Pesticides Adsorbed on Atmospheric Particles: Kinetics and Product Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Socorro, J.; Durand, A.; Gligorovski, S.; Wortham, H.; Quivet, E.

    2014-12-01

    Pesticides are widely used all over the world whether in agricultural production or in non-agricultural settings. They may pose a potential human health effects and environmental risks due to their physico-chemical properties and their extensive use which is growing every year. Pesticides are found in the atmosphere removed from the target area by volatilization or wind erosion, and carried over long distances. These compounds are partitioned between the gaseous and particulate atmospheric phases. The increasingly used pesticides are semi-volatile compounds which are usually adsorbed on the surface of the atmospheric particles. These pesticides may undergo chemical and photo-chemical transformation. New compounds may then be formed that could be more hazardous than the primary pesticides. The atmospheric fate and lifetime of adsorbed pesticides on particles are controlled by the these (photo)chemical processes. However, there is a lack of kinetic data regarding the pesticides in the particle phase. This current work focuses on the photolytic degradation of commonly used pesticides in particulate phase. It aims at estimating the photolytic rates and thus the lifetimes of pesticides adsorbed on silica particles as a proxy of atmospheric particles. The following eight commonly used pesticides, cyprodinil, deltamethrin, difenoconazole, fipronil, oxadiazon, pendimethalin, permethrin, tetraconazole, were chosen because of their physico-chemical properties. The photolysis rates of tetraconazole and permethrin were extremely slow ≤ 1.2 · 10-6 s-1. The photolysis rates for the other pesticides were determined in the range of: (5.9 ± 0.3) · 10-6 < k < (1.7 ± 0.1) · 10-4 s-1 from slowest to the fastest: pendimethalin < cyprodinil < deltamethrin < difenoconazole < oxadiazon < fipronil. Finally, the identification of the surface products upon light irradiation was performed, using GC-(QqQ)-MS/MS and LC-(Q-IMS-ToF)-MS/MS. The potentially formed gas-phase products during

  3. Fast compressive measurements acquisition using optimized binary sensing matrices for low-light-level imaging.

    PubMed

    Ke, Jun; Lam, Edmund Y

    2016-05-01

    Compressive measurements benefit low-light-level imaging (L3-imaging) due to the significantly improved measurement signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). However, as with other compressive imaging (CI) systems, compressive L3-imaging is slow. To accelerate the data acquisition, we develop an algorithm to compute the optimal binary sensing matrix that can minimize the image reconstruction error. First, we make use of the measurement SNR and the reconstruction mean square error (MSE) to define the optimal gray-value sensing matrix. Then, we construct an equality-constrained optimization problem to solve for a binary sensing matrix. From several experimental results, we show that the latter delivers a similar reconstruction performance as the former, while having a smaller dynamic range requirement to system sensors.

  4. Solid polystyrene and deuterated polystyrene light output response to fast neutrons.

    PubMed

    Simpson, R; Danly, C; Glebov, V Yu; Hurlbut, C; Merrill, F E; Volegov, P L; Wilde, C

    2016-04-01

    The Neutron Imaging System has proven to be an important diagnostic in studying DT implosion characteristics at the National Ignition Facility. The current system depends on a polystyrene scintillating fiber array, which detects fusion neutrons born in the DT hotspot as well as neutrons that have scattered to lower energies in the surrounding cold fuel. Increasing neutron yields at NIF, as well as a desire to resolve three-dimensional information about the fuel assembly, have provided the impetus to build and install two additional next-generation neutron imaging systems. We are currently investigating a novel neutron imaging system that will utilize a deuterated polystyrene (CD) fiber array instead of standard hydrogen-based polystyrene (CH). Studies of deuterated xylene or deuterated benzene liquid scintillator show an improvement in imaging resolution by a factor of two [L. Disdier et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75, 2134 (2004)], but also a reduction in light output [V. Bildstein et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res., Sect. A 729, 188 (2013); M. I. Ojaruega, Ph.D. thesis, University of Michigan, 2009; M. T. Febbraro, Ph.D. thesis, University of Michigan, 2014] as compared to standard plastic. Tests of the relative light output of deuterated polystyrene and standard polystyrene were completed using 14 MeV fusion neutrons generated through implosions of deuterium-tritium filled capsules at the OMEGA laser facility. In addition, we collected data of the relative response of these two scintillators to a wide energy range of neutrons (1-800 MeV) at the Weapons Neutrons Research Facility. Results of these measurements are presented.

  5. Solid polystyrene and deuterated polystyrene light output response to fast neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, R.; Danly, C.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Hurlbut, C.; Merrill, F. E.; Volegov, P. L.; Wilde, C.

    2016-04-01

    The Neutron Imaging System has proven to be an important diagnostic in studying DT implosion characteristics at the National Ignition Facility. The current system depends on a polystyrene scintillating fiber array, which detects fusion neutrons born in the DT hotspot as well as neutrons that have scattered to lower energies in the surrounding cold fuel. Increasing neutron yields at NIF, as well as a desire to resolve three-dimensional information about the fuel assembly, have provided the impetus to build and install two additional next-generation neutron imaging systems. We are currently investigating a novel neutron imaging system that will utilize a deuterated polystyrene (CD) fiber array instead of standard hydrogen-based polystyrene (CH). Studies of deuterated xylene or deuterated benzene liquid scintillator show an improvement in imaging resolution by a factor of two [L. Disdier et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75, 2134 (2004)], but also a reduction in light output [V. Bildstein et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res., Sect. A 729, 188 (2013); M. I. Ojaruega, Ph.D. thesis, University of Michigan, 2009; M. T. Febbraro, Ph.D. thesis, University of Michigan, 2014] as compared to standard plastic. Tests of the relative light output of deuterated polystyrene and standard polystyrene were completed using 14 MeV fusion neutrons generated through implosions of deuterium-tritium filled capsules at the OMEGA laser facility. In addition, we collected data of the relative response of these two scintillators to a wide energy range of neutrons (1-800 MeV) at the Weapons Neutrons Research Facility. Results of these measurements are presented.

  6. Solid polystyrene and deuterated polystyrene light output response to fast neutrons.

    PubMed

    Simpson, R; Danly, C; Glebov, V Yu; Hurlbut, C; Merrill, F E; Volegov, P L; Wilde, C

    2016-04-01

    The Neutron Imaging System has proven to be an important diagnostic in studying DT implosion characteristics at the National Ignition Facility. The current system depends on a polystyrene scintillating fiber array, which detects fusion neutrons born in the DT hotspot as well as neutrons that have scattered to lower energies in the surrounding cold fuel. Increasing neutron yields at NIF, as well as a desire to resolve three-dimensional information about the fuel assembly, have provided the impetus to build and install two additional next-generation neutron imaging systems. We are currently investigating a novel neutron imaging system that will utilize a deuterated polystyrene (CD) fiber array instead of standard hydrogen-based polystyrene (CH). Studies of deuterated xylene or deuterated benzene liquid scintillator show an improvement in imaging resolution by a factor of two [L. Disdier et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75, 2134 (2004)], but also a reduction in light output [V. Bildstein et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res., Sect. A 729, 188 (2013); M. I. Ojaruega, Ph.D. thesis, University of Michigan, 2009; M. T. Febbraro, Ph.D. thesis, University of Michigan, 2014] as compared to standard plastic. Tests of the relative light output of deuterated polystyrene and standard polystyrene were completed using 14 MeV fusion neutrons generated through implosions of deuterium-tritium filled capsules at the OMEGA laser facility. In addition, we collected data of the relative response of these two scintillators to a wide energy range of neutrons (1-800 MeV) at the Weapons Neutrons Research Facility. Results of these measurements are presented. PMID:27131680

  7. Modeling of light absorbing particles in atmosphere, snow and ice in the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobhani, N.; Kulkarni, S.; Carmichael, G. R.

    2015-12-01

    Long-range transport of atmospheric particles from mid-latitude sources to the Arctic is the main contributor to the Arctic aerosol loadings and deposition. Black Carbon (BC), Brown Carbon (BrC) and dust are considered of great climatic importance and are the main absorbers of sunlight in the atmosphere. Furthermore, wet and dry deposition of light absorbing particles (LAPs) on snow and ice cause reduction of snow and ice albedo. LAPs have significant radiative forcing and effect on snow albedo. There are high uncertainties in estimating radiative forcing of LAPs. We studied the potential effect of LAPs from different emission source regions and sectors on snow albedo in the Arctic. The transport pathway of LAPs to the Arctic is studies for different high pollution episodes. In this study a modeling framework including Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF) and the University of Iowa's Sulfur Transport and dEpostion model(STEM) is used to predict the transport of LAPs from different geographical sources and sectors (i.e. transportation, residential, industry, biomass burning and power) to the Arctic. For assessing the effect of LAP deposition on snow single-layer simulator of the SNow, Ice, and Aerosol Radiation (SNICAR-Online) model was used to derive snow albedo values for snow albedo reduction causes by BC deposition. To evaluate the simulated values we compared the BC concentration in snow with observed values from previous studies including Doherty et al. 2010.

  8. Thermally induced light-driven microfluidics using a MOEMS-based laser scanner for particle manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremer, Matthias P.; Tortschanoff, Andreas

    2014-03-01

    One key challenge in the field of microfluidics and lab-on-a-chip experiments for biological or chemical applications is the remote manipulation of fluids, droplets and particles. These can be volume elements of reactants, particles coated with markers, cells or many others. Light-driven microfluidics is one way of accomplishing this challenge. In our work, we manipulated micrometre sized polystyrene beads in a microfluidic environment by inducing thermal flows. Therefore, the beads were held statically in an unstructured microfluidic chamber, containing a dyed watery solution. Inside this chamber, the beads were moved along arbitrary trajectories on a micrometre scale. The experiments were performed, using a MOEMS (micro-opto-electro-mechanical-systems)-based laser scanner with a variable focal length. This scanner system is integrated in a compact device, which is flexibly applicable to various microscope setups. The device utilizes a novel approach for varying the focal length, using an electrically tunable lens. A quasi statically driven MOEMS mirror is used for beam steering. The combination of a tunable lens and a dual axis micromirror makes the device very compact and robust and is capable of positioning the laser focus at any arbitrary location within a three dimensional working space. Hence, the developed device constitutes a valuable extension to manually executed microfluidic lab-on-chip experiments.

  9. Determination of optical constants and morphological parameters of biological particles from multiple light-scattering characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khairullina, Alphiya Y.

    1993-07-01

    Unified approach is suggested to determine the real (n) and imaginary (x) parts of refractive index and average size r of biological particle suspensions, biopolymers, and so on for a wide range of sizes (r equals 10-1 - 102 micrometers , n equals 1.02 - 1.15 and x equals 10 -6 - 10-4). The values to be measured are the diffuse reflection and transmission coefficients and the temporal spectra scattering intensity fluctuations of optically thick layers in the case of weak absorption (this condition is determined experimentally). The sensitivity of the proposed approach for the determination of n and x (as well as the average cosine of the phase function of light scattering and radiation pressure cross section (beta) for finding the force acting on the particle) is very high and exceeds the known methods. The methods of determining n, x, r, , (beta) have been evaluated for suspensions of erythrocytes, blood substitute (emulsions of PFC), and latexes.

  10. Revisiting alpha decay-based near-light-speed particle propulsion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenwu; Liu, Zhen; Yang, Yang; Du, Shiyu

    2016-08-01

    Interplanet and interstellar travels require long-term propulsion of spacecrafts, whereas the conventional schemes of propulsion are limited by the velocity of the ejected mass. In this study, alpha particles released by nuclear decay are considered as a potential solution for long-time acceleration. The principle of near-light-speed particle propulsion (NcPP) was elucidated and the stopping and range of ions in matter (SRIM) was used to predict theoretical accelerations. The results show that NcPP by means of alpha decay is feasible for long-term spacecraft propulsion and posture adjustment in space. A practical NcPP sail can achieve a speed >150km/s and reach the brink of the solar system faster than a mass equivalent solar sail. Finally, to significantly improve the NcPP sail, the hypothesis of stimulated acceleration of nuclear decay (SAND) was proposed, which may shorten the travel time to Mars to within 20 days. PMID:27161512

  11. Trapping of quantum particles and light beams by switchable potential wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonkin, Eduard; Malomed, Boris A.; Granot, Er'El; Marchewka, Avi

    2010-09-01

    We consider basic dynamical effects in settings based on a pair of local potential traps that may be effectively switched on and off, or suddenly displaced, by means of appropriate control mechanisms, such as scanning tunneling microscopy or photo-switchable quantum dots. The same models, based on the linear Schrödinger equation with time-dependent trapping potentials, apply to the description of optical planar systems designed for the switching of trapped light beams. The analysis is carried out in the analytical form, using exact solutions of the Schrödinger equation. The first dynamical problem considered in this work is the retention of a particle released from a trap which was suddenly turned off, while another local trap was switched on at a distance—immediately or with a delay. In this case, we demonstrate that the maximum of the retention rate is achieved at a specific finite value of the strength of the new trap, and at a finite value of the temporal delay, depending on the distance between the two traps. Another problem is retrapping of the bound particle when the addition of the second trap transforms the single-well setting into a double-well potential (DWP). In that case, we find probabilities for the retrapping into the ground or first excited state of the DWP. We also analyze effects entailed by the application of a kick to a bound particle, the most interesting one being a kick-induced transition between the DWP’s ground and excited states. In the latter case, the largest transition probability is achieved at a particular strength of the kick.

  12. A recursive regularization algorithm for estimating the particle size distribution from multiangle dynamic light scattering measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lei; Yang, Kecheng; Li, Wei; Wang, Wanyan; Guo, Wenping; Xia, Min

    2016-07-01

    Conventional regularization methods have been widely used for estimating particle size distribution (PSD) in single-angle dynamic light scattering, but they could not be used directly in multiangle dynamic light scattering (MDLS) measurements for lack of accurate angular weighting coefficients, which greatly affects the PSD determination and none of the regularization methods perform well for both unimodal and multimodal distributions. In this paper, we propose a recursive regularization method-Recursion Nonnegative Tikhonov-Phillips-Twomey (RNNT-PT) algorithm for estimating the weighting coefficients and PSD from MDLS data. This is a self-adaptive algorithm which distinguishes characteristics of PSDs and chooses the optimal inversion method from Nonnegative Tikhonov (NNT) and Nonnegative Phillips-Twomey (NNPT) regularization algorithm efficiently and automatically. In simulations, the proposed algorithm was able to estimate the PSDs more accurately than the classical regularization methods and performed stably against random noise and adaptable to both unimodal and multimodal distributions. Furthermore, we found that the six-angle analysis in the 30-130° range is an optimal angle set for both unimodal and multimodal PSDs.

  13. Laser light scattering from silicon particles generated in an argon diluted silane plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Y.; Bilik, N.; Kortshagen, U. R.; Aydil, E. S.

    2016-03-01

    We conducted laser light scattering (LLS) measurements in a 13.56 MHz capacitively coupled dusty plasma maintained in silane and argon to study the spatial distribution of silicon nanoparticles and nanoparticle agglomerates. Specifically, we focused on the temporal evolution of their spatial distribution in the plasma as a function of pressure and power. We observed three distinct types of temporal evolution behavior of the nanoparticle dust cloud in the plasma and classified these into three regimes based on pressure and power. Each regime features a distinct pattern in laser light scattering measurements. At low pressures (˜80-100 mTorr) and high powers (˜40-60 W) we observed periodically repeating expansions and contractions of a continuous dust cloud for the first time. Dust voids, which have been reported before, were also observed at high pressures (˜100-150 mTorr) and low powers (˜20-40 W) in the center of the plasma. A mechanism is proposed to explain the observed dynamics of the nanoparticles. The balance between the ion drag force and electrostatic forces and their dependence on particle size are hypothesized to be the dominant factors that determine the nanoparticle cloud dynamics.

  14. Dual-wavelength light-scattering technique for selective detection of volcanic ash particles in the presence of water droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurányi, Z.; Burtscher, H.; Loepfe, M.; Nenkov, M.; Weingartner, E.

    2015-12-01

    A new method is presented in this paper which analyses the scattered light of individual aerosol particles simultaneously at two different wavelengths in order to retrieve information on the particle type. We show that dust-like particles, such as volcanic ash, can be unambiguously discriminated from water droplets on a single-particle level. As a future application of this method, the detection of volcanic ash particles should be possible in a humid atmosphere in the presence of cloud droplets. The characteristic behaviour of pure water's refractive index can be used to separate water droplets and dust-like particles which are commonly found in the micrometre size range in the ambient air. The low real part of the water's refractive index around 2700-2800 nm results in low scattered light intensities compared to e.g. the visible wavelength range, and this feature can be used for the desired particle identification. The two-wavelength measurement set-up was theoretically and experimentally tested and studied. Theoretical calculations were done using Mie theory. Comparing the ratio of the scattered light at the two wavelengths (visible-to-IR (infrared), R value) for water droplets and different dust types (basalt, andesite, African mineral dust, sand, volcanic ash, pumice) showed at least 9-times-higher values (on average 70 times) for water droplets than for the dust types at any diameter within the particle size range of 2-20 μm. The envisaged measurement set-up was built up into a laboratory prototype and was tested with different types of aerosols. We generated aerosols from the following powders, simulating dust-like particles: cement dust, ISO 12103-1 A1 Ultrafine Test Dust and ash from the 2012 eruption of the Etna volcano. Our measurements verified the theoretical considerations; the median experimental R value is 8-21 times higher for water than for the "dust" particles.

  15. Fast fabrication of copper nanowire transparent electrodes by a high intensity pulsed light sintering technique in air.

    PubMed

    Ding, Su; Jiu, Jinting; Tian, Yanhong; Sugahara, Tohru; Nagao, Shijo; Suganuma, Katsuaki

    2015-12-14

    Copper nanowire transparent electrodes have received increasing interest due to the low price and nearly equal electrical conductivity compared with other TEs based on silver nanowires and indium tin oxide (ITO). However, a post-treatment at high temperature in an inert atmosphere or a vacuum environment was necessary to improve the conductivity of Cu NW TEs due to the easy oxidation of copper in air atmosphere, which greatly cancelled out the low price advantage of Cu NWs. Here, a high intensity pulsed light technique was introduced to sinter and simultaneously deoxygenate these Cu NWs into a highly conductive network at room temperature in air. The strong light absorption capacity of Cu NWs enabled the welding of the nanowires at contact spots, as well as the removal of the thin layer of residual organic compounds, oxides and hydroxide of copper even in air. The Cu NW TE with a sheet resistance of 22.9 Ohm sq(-1) and a transparency of 81.8% at 550 nm has been successfully fabricated within only 6 milliseconds exposure treatment, which is superior to other films treated at high temperature in a hydrogen atmosphere. The HIPL process was simple, convenient and fast to fabricate easily oxidized Cu NW TEs in large scale in an air atmosphere, which will largely extend the application of cheap Cu NW TEs.

  16. Fast fabrication of copper nanowire transparent electrodes by a high intensity pulsed light sintering technique in air.

    PubMed

    Ding, Su; Jiu, Jinting; Tian, Yanhong; Sugahara, Tohru; Nagao, Shijo; Suganuma, Katsuaki

    2015-12-14

    Copper nanowire transparent electrodes have received increasing interest due to the low price and nearly equal electrical conductivity compared with other TEs based on silver nanowires and indium tin oxide (ITO). However, a post-treatment at high temperature in an inert atmosphere or a vacuum environment was necessary to improve the conductivity of Cu NW TEs due to the easy oxidation of copper in air atmosphere, which greatly cancelled out the low price advantage of Cu NWs. Here, a high intensity pulsed light technique was introduced to sinter and simultaneously deoxygenate these Cu NWs into a highly conductive network at room temperature in air. The strong light absorption capacity of Cu NWs enabled the welding of the nanowires at contact spots, as well as the removal of the thin layer of residual organic compounds, oxides and hydroxide of copper even in air. The Cu NW TE with a sheet resistance of 22.9 Ohm sq(-1) and a transparency of 81.8% at 550 nm has been successfully fabricated within only 6 milliseconds exposure treatment, which is superior to other films treated at high temperature in a hydrogen atmosphere. The HIPL process was simple, convenient and fast to fabricate easily oxidized Cu NW TEs in large scale in an air atmosphere, which will largely extend the application of cheap Cu NW TEs. PMID:26536570

  17. Mechanisms of sequential particle transfer and characteristics of light neutron-excess and oriented nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galanina, L. I.; Zelenskaya, N. S.

    2012-03-01

    The procedure for evaluating the second-order corrections to the matrix elements of the reaction A( x, y) B, which are obtained using the method of distorted waves with a finite radius of intercluster interaction (DWBAFR), is developed. It is based on the assumption of a virtual cluster structure of light nuclei and uses integral equations for a four-body problem in the Alt-Grassberger-Sandhas formalism. These corrections are related with the mechanisms of sequential particles transfer. The latter are represented by the quadrangle diagrams. Their matrix elements are summed up coherently with those given by the pole and triangle diagrams which were calculated by using DWBAFR. The computer code QUADRO is written for the numerical implementation of the method proposed. The statistical tensors of nucleus B formed in the reaction A( x, y) B at incident particle energies of about 10 MeV/nucleon in the center of mass frame are determined. Specific calculations allowed for description of both the experimental cross sections (0-rank statistical tensors) of various reactions (including those where nucleus B has some excess neutrons) and polarized characteristics of nucleus B* (in the case of the latter produced in the exited state). A two-neutron periphery of nuclei 6He, 10Be, 12B (both in dineutron and cigarlike configurations) is restored by analyzing the differential cross sections of elastic alpha-6He-scattering and 9Be( d, p)10Be and 10B( t, p)12B reactions. It is shown that the structure of neutron peripheries is fundamentally different for these nuclei and its feature depends on the way those neutron-excess nuclei are formed: in 6He both configurations contribute to a two-neutron halo, while in 10Be there is a barely noticeable one-neutron halo, and in 12B there is a "dineutron skin". Orientation characteristics of nuclei B* are calculated. Their comparison with experimental data made it possible to draw important conclusions about a contribution to the statistical

  18. PREFACE: 1st Conference on Light and Particle Beams in Materials Science 2013 (LPBMS2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumai, Reiji; Murakami, Youichi

    2014-04-01

    From 29-31 August 2013, the 1st International Conference on Light and Particle Beams in Materials Science, LPBMS 2013, took place in the Tsukuba International Congress Center in the city of Tsukuba, Japan. The conference was a continuation of the international series Synchrotron Radiation in Materials Science (SRMS), which started in 1994. The last one, SRMS-7, was held in Oxford UK 11-14 July 2010, where the International Advisory Committee (IAC) recommended the conference be enlarged to incorporate Materials Research from Neutron, Muon, and Slow Positron Sources, as well as the science emerging from Synchrotron Light Sources. The conference brought together contributions from academics and industrial researchers with a diverse background and experience from the physics, chemistry and engineering communities. The topics covered in the LPBMS2013 include strongly correlated electron systems, magnetism and magnetic materials, soft matter, interface and surface defects, catalysts, biomaterials, and ceramics. In the 3-day scientific program, the conference consisted of 9 plenary talks, 33 invited talks, 20 oral presentations, and 126 poster presentations. We are pleased to publish the proceedings of the LPBMS2013 in this volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series. This volume contains 58 papers representing the work that was presented and discussed at the conference. We hope that this volume will promote further development of this interdisciplinary materials research emerging from synchrotron light, neutron, muon, and slow positron sciences. Finally, we would like to thank the International Advisory Committee (Chair: Professor G N Greaves), sponsors, all the participants and contributors for making possible this international meeting of researchers. Reiji Kumai & Youichi Murakami Conference photograph Details of the program and organizing committees are available in the pdf

  19. Causes of variability in light absorption by particles in snow at sites in Idaho and Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doherty, Sarah J.; Hegg, Dean A.; Johnson, James E.; Quinn, Patricia K.; Schwarz, Joshua P.; Dang, Cheng; Warren, Stephen G.

    2016-05-01

    A characterization of black carbon (BC) and other light-absorbing particles in snow is presented for three mountain valley sites in Idaho in early 2014 and for one site near Vernal, Utah, in early 2013 and 2014. The focus of the study was on constraining the magnitude and drivers of variations in particulate absorbers in midlatitude U.S. seasonal snow. Mass mixing ratios of BC in newly fallen snow were similar at all three Idaho sites, with a median of 4.7 ± 4.2 ng BC per gram of snow. The median total light-absorbing particulate mixing ratios in new snow, expressed as an equivalent mixing ratio of BC, was 18 ± 23 ng g-1. At the Utah site, which is near sources of both fossil fuel and dust, the mixing ratios of BC varied from 7 to 45 ng g-1 across seven new snowfall samples, and the BC-equivalent mixing ratios varied from 9 to 1500 ng g-1. At all sites, dry deposition and in-snow processes increase the mixing ratio of BC by up to an order of magnitude and increase the mixing ratio of all light-absorbing particulates by up to 2 orders of magnitude, highlighting the importance of capturing these processes for accurately representing snow albedo in climate models. Spatial variability at a range of scales is found to be considerably smaller than the temporal variations at a given site, with implications for the representativeness of field samples used in observation/model comparisons.

  20. Slow and fast light via SBS in optical fibers for short pulses and broadband pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalosha, V. P.; Chen, Liang; Bao, Xiaoyi

    2006-12-01

    Slow-light effect via stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) in single-mode optical fibers was considered for short probe pulses of nanosecond duration relevant to Gb/s data streams. Unlike recent estimations of delay versus pump based on steady-state small-signal approximation we have used numerical solution of three-wave equations describing SBS for a realistic fiber length. Both regimes of small signal and pump depletion (gain saturation) were considered. The physical origin of Stokes pulse distortion is revealed which is related to excitation of long-living acoustic field behind the pulse and prevents effective delay control by pump power increase at cw pumping. We have shown different slope of the gain-dependent delay for different pulse durations. Spectrally broadened pumping by multiple cw components, frequency-modulated pump and pulse train were studied for short pulses which allow to obtain large delay and suppress pulse distortion. In the pump-depletion regime of pumping by pulse train, both pulse delay and distortion decrease with increasing pump, and the pulse achieves advancement.

  1. Slow and fast light via SBS in optical fibers for short pulses and broadband pump.

    PubMed

    Kalosha, V P; Chen, Liang; Bao, Xiaoyi

    2006-12-25

    Slow-light effect via stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) in single-mode optical fibers was considered for short probe pulses of nanosecond duration relevant to Gb/s data streams. Unlike recent estimations of delay versus pump based on steady-state small-signal approximation we have used numerical solution of three-wave equations describing SBS for a realistic fiber length. Both regimes of small signal and pump depletion (gain saturation) were considered. The physical origin of Stokes pulse distortion is revealed which is related to excitation of long-living acoustic field behind the pulse and prevents effective delay control by pump power increase at cw pumping. We have shown different slope of the gain-dependent delay for different pulse durations. Spectrally broadened pumping by multiple cw components, frequency-modulated pump and pulse train were studied for short pulses which allow to obtain large delay and suppress pulse distortion. In the pump-depletion regime of pumping by pulse train, both pulse delay and distortion decrease with increasing pump, and the pulse achieves advancement. PMID:19532161

  2. Influence of refractive index on the accuracy of size determination of aerosol particles with light-scattering aerosol counters.

    PubMed

    Quenzel, H

    1969-01-01

    The scattering properties of single aerosol particles with different indices of refraction have been computed from the Mie theory considering the spectral response of light-scattering aerosol counters commercially available. It is demonstrated that high resolution of the aerosol size distribution is impossible, particularly because of the different refractive indices of the atmospheric aerosol particles. By using other ranges of scattering angle for the measurement, one may, in some cases, obtain better results.

  3. Fluorescence imaging of microbe-containing particles shot from a two-stage Light-gas gun into an aerogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaguchi, Yuko; Sugino, Tomohiro; Tabata, Makoto; Okudaira, Kyoko; Imai, Eichi; Yano, Hajime; Hasegawa, Sunao; Hashimoto, Hirofumi; Yabuta, Hikaru; Kobayashi, Kensei; Kawai, Hideyuki; Mita, Hajime; Yokobori, Shin-ichi; Yamagishi, Akihiko

    2014-02-01

    We have proposed an experiment (the Tanpopo mission) to capture microbes on the Japan Experimental Module of the International Space Station. An ultra low-density silica aerogel will be exposed to space for more than 1 year. After retrieving the aerogel, particle tracks and particles found in it will be visualized by fluorescence microscopy after staining it with a DNA-specific fluorescence dye. In preparation for this study, we simulated particle trapping in an aerogel so that methods could be developed to visualize the particles and their tracks. During the Tanpopo mission, particles that have an orbital velocity of ~8 km/s are expected to collide with the aerogel. To simulate these collisions, we shot Deinococcus radiodurans-containing Lucentite particles into the aerogel from a two-stage light-gas gun (acceleration 4.2 km/s). The shapes of the captured particles, and their tracks and entrance holes were recorded with a microscope/camera system for further analysis. The size distribution of the captured particles was smaller than the original distribution, suggesting that the particles had fragmented. We were able to distinguish between microbial DNA and inorganic compounds after staining the aerogel with the DNA-specific fluorescence dye SYBR green I as the fluorescence of the stained DNA and the autofluorescence of the inorganic particles decay at different rates. The developed methods are suitable to determine if microbes exist at the International Space Station altitude.

  4. Fluorescence imaging of microbe-containing particles shot from a two-stage Light-gas gun into an aerogel.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Yuko; Sugino, Tomohiro; Tabata, Makoto; Okudaira, Kyoko; Imai, Eichi; Yano, Hajime; Hasegawa, Sunao; Hashimoto, Hirofumi; Yabuta, Hikaru; Kobayashi, Kensei; Kawai, Hideyuki; Mita, Hajime; Yokobori, Shin-ichi; Yamagishi, Akihiko

    2014-02-01

    We have proposed an experiment (the Tanpopo mission) to capture microbes on the Japan Experimental Module of the International Space Station. An ultra low-density silica aerogel will be exposed to space for more than 1 year. After retrieving the aerogel, particle tracks and particles found in it will be visualized by fluorescence microscopy after staining it with a DNA-specific fluorescence dye. In preparation for this study, we simulated particle trapping in an aerogel so that methods could be developed to visualize the particles and their tracks. During the Tanpopo mission, particles that have an orbital velocity of ~8 km/s are expected to collide with the aerogel. To simulate these collisions, we shot Deinococcus radiodurans-containing Lucentite particles into the aerogel from a two-stage light-gas gun (acceleration 4.2 km/s). The shapes of the captured particles, and their tracks and entrance holes were recorded with a microscope/camera system for further analysis. The size distribution of the captured particles was smaller than the original distribution, suggesting that the particles had fragmented. We were able to distinguish between microbial DNA and inorganic compounds after staining the aerogel with the DNA-specific fluorescence dye SYBR green I as the fluorescence of the stained DNA and the autofluorescence of the inorganic particles decay at different rates. The developed methods are suitable to determine if microbes exist at the International Space Station altitude.

  5. Fluorescence imaging of microbe-containing particles shot from a two-stage Light-gas gun into an aerogel.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Yuko; Sugino, Tomohiro; Tabata, Makoto; Okudaira, Kyoko; Imai, Eichi; Yano, Hajime; Hasegawa, Sunao; Hashimoto, Hirofumi; Yabuta, Hikaru; Kobayashi, Kensei; Kawai, Hideyuki; Mita, Hajime; Yokobori, Shin-ichi; Yamagishi, Akihiko

    2014-02-01

    We have proposed an experiment (the Tanpopo mission) to capture microbes on the Japan Experimental Module of the International Space Station. An ultra low-density silica aerogel will be exposed to space for more than 1 year. After retrieving the aerogel, particle tracks and particles found in it will be visualized by fluorescence microscopy after staining it with a DNA-specific fluorescence dye. In preparation for this study, we simulated particle trapping in an aerogel so that methods could be developed to visualize the particles and their tracks. During the Tanpopo mission, particles that have an orbital velocity of ~8 km/s are expected to collide with the aerogel. To simulate these collisions, we shot Deinococcus radiodurans-containing Lucentite particles into the aerogel from a two-stage light-gas gun (acceleration 4.2 km/s). The shapes of the captured particles, and their tracks and entrance holes were recorded with a microscope/camera system for further analysis. The size distribution of the captured particles was smaller than the original distribution, suggesting that the particles had fragmented. We were able to distinguish between microbial DNA and inorganic compounds after staining the aerogel with the DNA-specific fluorescence dye SYBR green I as the fluorescence of the stained DNA and the autofluorescence of the inorganic particles decay at different rates. The developed methods are suitable to determine if microbes exist at the International Space Station altitude. PMID:25086872

  6. A fast, ultra-low and frequency-scalable power consumption, 10-bit SAR ADC for particle physics detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firlej, M.; Fiutowski, T.; Idzik, M.; Kulis, S.; Moron, J.; Swientek, K.

    2015-11-01

    The design and measurements results of a fast 10-bit SAR ADC with ultra-low and scalable with frequency power consumption, developed for readout systems for detectors at future particle physics colliders (ILC, CLIC, LHC Upgrade), are described. A prototype ASIC was designed and fabricated in 130 nm CMOS technology and a wide spectrum of static (INLlesssim0.5 LSB, DNLlesssim0.5 LSB) and dynamic (SINAD ~58 dB, ENOB~9.3) measurements was performed to study and quantify the ADC performance. The ADC works in wide 10 kS/s - 40 MS/s sampling frequency range, covering more than three orders of magnitude. In most of the range the power consumption scales linearly with sampling rate with a factor of about 22 μW/MS/s. A dynamic and asynchronous internal logic makes the ADC very well suited not only for commonly used synchronous sampling but also for applications with asynchronous sampling and/or the ones requiring power cycling, like the experiments at future linear collider (ILC/CLIC). The ADC layout is drawn with a small pitch of 146 μm to facilitate multi-channel integration. The obtained figure of Merit is in range 32-37 fJ/conversion for sampling frequencies 10-40 MS/s, placing the ADC among the best State of the Art designs with similar technology and specifications.

  7. Particle simulations of mode conversion between slow mode and fast mode in lower hybrid range of frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Guozhang; Xiang, Nong; Wang, Xueyi; Huang, Yueheng; Lin, Yu

    2016-01-01

    The propagation and mode conversion of lower hybrid waves in an inhomogeneous plasma are investigated by using the nonlinear δf algorithm in a two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation code based on the gyrokinetic electron and fully kinetic ion (GeFi) scheme [Lin et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 47, 657 (2005)]. The characteristics of the simulated waves, such as wavelength, frequency, phase, and group velocities, agree well with the linear theoretical analysis. It is shown that a significant reflection component emerges in the conversion process between the slow mode and the fast mode when the scale length of the density variation is comparable to the local wavelength. The dependences of the reflection coefficient on the scale length of the density variation are compared with the results based on the linear full wave model for cold plasmas. It is indicated that the mode conversion for the waves with a frequency of 2.45 GHz (ω ˜ 3ωLH, where ωLH represents the lower hybrid resonance) and within Tokamak relevant amplitudes can be well described in the linear scheme. As the frequency decreases, the modification due to the nonlinear term becomes important. For the low-frequency waves (ω ˜ 1.3ωLH), the generations of the high harmonic modes and sidebands through nonlinear mode-mode coupling provide new power channels and thus could reduce the reflection significantly.

  8. First detection of Cherenkov light from cosmic-particle-induced air showers by Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biland, A.; Britvitch, I.; Lorenz, E.; Otte, N.; Pauss, F.; Renker, D.; Ritt, S.; Roeser, U.; Schneebeli, M.

    2007-10-01

    We report on first tests of Geiger-mode APDs (G-APD) to detect Cherenkov light from cosmic particle induced air showers. The motivation for this study stems from the requirement to improve the sensitivity of large imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACT) by replacing the photomultipliers (PMT) by high detection efficiency G-APDs. Three tests have been carried out, confirming sufficiently high light sensitivity of blue-sensitive G-APDs as future replacement of PMTs in IACTs.

  9. A Study of the Jacobi Shape Transition in Light, Fast Rotating Nuclei with the EUROBALL IV, HECTOR and EUCLIDES Arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Maj, A.; Kmiecik, M.; Brekiesz, M.; Grebosz, J.; Meczynski, W.; Styczen, J.; Zieblinski, M.; Zuber, K.; Bracco, A.; Camera, F.; Benzoni, G.; Million, B.; Blasi, N.; Brambilla, S.; Leoni, S.; Pignanelli, M.; Wieland, O.; Airoldi, A.; Herskind, B.; Bednarczyk, P.

    2004-02-27

    The high-energy and discrete {gamma}-ray spectra, as well as the charged particle angular distribution have been measured in the reaction 105 MeV 18O+28Si using the EUROBALL IV, HECTOR and EUCLIDES arrays in order to investigate the predicted Jacobi shape transition in light nuclei. A comparison of the GDR line shape data with the predictions of the thermal shape fluctuation model, based on the most recent rotating liquid drop LSD calculations, shows evidence for such Jacobi shape transition in hot, rapidly rotating 46Ti. The found narrow low-energy component in the GDR line shape is interpreted as the consequence both of the elongated shape and of the Coriolis effect.

  10. Light induced heterogeneous ozone processing on the pesticides adsorbed on silica particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Socorro, J.; Désert, M.; Quivet, E.; Gligorovski, S.; Wortham, H.

    2013-12-01

    In France, in 2010, the sales of pesticides reached 1.8 billion euros for 61 900 tons of active ingredients, positioning France as a first European consumer of pesticides, as reported by the European Crop Protection Association. About 19 million hectares of crops are sprayed annually with pesticides, i.e., 35% of the total surface area of France. This corresponds to an average pesticide dose of 3.2 kg ha-1. The consumption of herbicide and fungicide is favoured in comparison to the use of insecticides in France and the other European countries, as well. The partitioning of pesticides between the gas and particulate phases influences the atmospheric fate of these compounds such as their photo-chemical degradation. There is much uncertainty concerning the behavior of the pesticides in the atmosphere. Especially, there is a gap of knowledge concerning the degradation of the pesticides induced by heterogeneous reactions in absence and especially in presence of solar light. Considering that most of the pesticides currently used are semi-volatile, it is of crucial importance to investigate the heterogeneous reactivity of particulate pesticides with light and with atmospheric oxidants such as ozone and OH radical. The aim of the present work is to evaluate the light induced heterogeneous ozonation of suspended pesticide particles. 8 pesticides (cyprodinil, deltamethrin, difenoconazole, fipronil, oxadiazon, pendimethalin, permethrin and tetraconazole) were chosen for their physico-chemical properties and their concentration levels in the PACA (Région Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur) region, France. Silica particles with well-known properties were chosen as model particles of atmospheric relevance. Kinetic rate constants were determined to allow estimate the atmospheric lifetimes relating to ozone. The rate constants were determined as follows: k = (6.6 × 0.2) 10-19, (7.2 × 0.3) 10-19, (5.1 × 0.5) 10-19, (3.9 × 0.3) 10-19 [cm3 molecules-1 s-1] for Cyprodinil

  11. Evaluation of observable phase space by fast ion loss detector by calculating particle orbits in consideration of plasma facing components and three dimensional magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinohara, Kouji; Kim, Junghee; Kim, Jun Young; Rhee, Tongnyeol

    2016-11-01

    The orbits of lost ions can be calculated from the information obtained by a fast ion loss detector (FILD). The orbits suggest a source of the lost fast ions in a phase space. However, it is not obvious whether an observable set of orbits, or phase space, of a FILD appropriately covers the region of interest to be investigated since the observable phase space can be affected by plasma facing components (PFCs) and a magnetic configuration. A tool has been developed to evaluate the observable phase space of FILD diagnostic by calculating particle orbits by taking the PFCs and 3D magnetic field into account.

  12. Nano-particle based scattering layers for optical efficiency enhancement of organic light-emitting diodes and organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Hong-Wei; Lee, Jonghee; Hofmann, Simone; Hyun Kim, Yong; Müller-Meskamp, Lars; Lüssem, Björn; Wu, Chung-Chih; Leo, Karl; Gather, Malte C.

    2013-05-01

    The performance of both organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) and organic solar cells (OSC) depends on efficient coupling between optical far field modes and the emitting/absorbing region of the device. Current approaches towards OLEDs with efficient light-extraction often are limited to single-color emission or require expensive, non-standard substrates or top-down structuring, which reduces compatibility with large-area light sources. Here, we report on integrating solution-processed nano-particle based light-scattering films close to the active region of organic semiconductor devices. In OLEDs, these films efficiently extract light that would otherwise remain trapped in the device. Without additional external outcoupling structures, translucent white OLEDs containing these scattering films achieve luminous efficacies of 46 lm W-1 and external quantum efficiencies of 33% (both at 1000 cd m-2). These are by far the highest numbers ever reported for translucent white OLEDs and the best values in the open literature for any white device on a conventional substrate. By applying additional light-extraction structures, 62 lm W-1 and 46% EQE are reached. Besides universally enhancing light-extraction in various OLED configurations, including flexible, translucent, single-color, and white OLEDs, the nano-particle scattering film boosts the short-circuit current density in translucent organic solar cells by up to 70%.

  13. Design of a fast multileaf collimator for radiobiological optimized IMRT with scanned beams of photons, electrons, and light ions

    SciTech Connect

    Svensson, Roger; Larsson, Susanne; Gudowska, Irena; Holmberg, Rickard; Brahme, Anders

    2007-03-15

    Intensity modulated radiation therapy is rapidly becoming the treatment of choice for most tumors with respect to minimizing damage to the normal tissues and maximizing tumor control. Today, intensity modulated beams are most commonly delivered using segmental multileaf collimation, although an increasing number of radiation therapy departments are employing dynamic multileaf collimation. The irradiation time using dynamic multileaf collimation depends strongly on the nature of the desired dose distribution, and it is difficult to reduce this time to less than the sum of the irradiation times for all individual peak heights using dynamic leaf collimation [Svensson et al., Phys. Med. Biol. 39, 37-61 (1994)]. Therefore, the intensity modulation will considerably increase the total treatment time. A more cost-effective procedure for rapid intensity modulation is using narrow scanned photon, electron, and light ion beams in combination with fast multileaf collimator penumbra trimming. With this approach, the irradiation time is largely independent of the complexity of the desired intensity distribution and, in the case of photon beams, may even be shorter than with uniform beams. The intensity modulation is achieved primarily by scanning of a narrow elementary photon pencil beam generated by directing a narrow well focused high energy electron beam onto a thin bremsstrahlung target. In the present study, the design of a fast low-weight multileaf collimator that is capable of further sharpening the penumbra at the edge of the elementary scanned beam has been simulated, in order to minimize the dose or radiation response of healthy tissues. In the case of photon beams, such a multileaf collimator can be placed relatively close to the bremsstrahlung target to minimize its size. It can also be flat and thin, i.e., only 15-25 mm thick in the direction of the beam with edges made of tungsten or preferably osmium to optimize the sharpening of the penumbra. The low height of

  14. Theoretical studies on particle shape classification based on simultaneous small forward angle light scattering and aerodynamic sizing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin-Bi, Zhang; Lei, Ding; Ying-Ping, Wang; Li, Zhang; Jin-Lei, Wu; Hai-Yang, Zheng; Li, Fang

    2016-03-01

    Particle shape contributes to understanding the physical and chemical processes of the atmosphere and better ascertaining the origins and chemical compositions of the particles. The particle shape can be classified by the aspect ratio, which can be estimated through the asymmetry factor measured with angularly resolved light scattering. An experimental method of obtaining the asymmetry factor based on simultaneous small forward angle light scattering and aerodynamic size measurements is described briefly. The near forward scattering intensity signals of three detectors in the azimuthal angles at 120° offset are calculated using the methods of T-matrix and discrete dipole approximation. Prolate spheroid particles with different aspect ratios are used as the shape models with the assumption that the symmetry axis is parallel to the flow axis and perpendicular to the incident light. The relations between the asymmetry factor and the optical size and aerodynamic size at various equivalent sizes, refractive indices, and mass densities are discussed in this paper. The numerically calculated results indicate that an elongated particle may be classified at diameter larger than 1.0 μm, and may not be distinguished from a sphere at diameter less than 0.5 μm. It is estimated that the lowest detected aspect ratio is around 1.5:1 in consideration of the experimental errors. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 41275132).

  15. Theoretical Study of Light Trapping in Nanostructured Thin Film Solar Cells Using Wavelength-Scale Silver Particles.

    PubMed

    Dabirian, Ali; Taghavinia, Nima

    2015-07-15

    We propose and theoretically evaluate a plasmonic light trapping solution for thin film photovoltaic devices that comprises a monolayer or a submonolayer of wavelength-scale silver particles. We systematically study the effect of silver particle size using full-wave electromagnetic simulations. We find that light trapping is significantly enhanced when wavelength-scale silver particles rather than the ones with subwavelength dimensions are used. We demonstrate that a densely packed monolayer of spherical 700 nm silver particles enhances integrated optical absorption under standard air mass 1.5 global (AM1.5G) in a 7 μm-thick N719-sensitized solar cell by 40% whereas enhancement is smaller than 2% when 100 nm ones are used. Superior performance of wavelength-scale silver particles is attributed to high-order whispering gallery modes that they support. These modes scatter the light over a wider angular range, hence increasing the density of both waveguide and resonance modes within the dye-sensitized layer. PMID:26135021

  16. Potential climatic effects of light absorbing particles over the Third Pole regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Zhenming; Kang, Shichang

    2016-04-01

    Light absorbing particles (LAPs) have important impact on regional climate over the Third Pole regions. Carbonaceous and mineral aerosols, which are considered as the anthropogenic and natural sources respectively, can absorb and scatter incident solar radiation in the atmosphere. Meanwhile, LAPs deposition in snow/ice can also change the surface albedo, resulting in perturbations in the surface radiation balance. However, most studies that have made quantitative assessments of the climatic effect of LAPs over the Third Pole regions did not consider the impact of dust on snow/ice at the surface. In this study, a regional climate model RegCM4.3.4 (Regional Climate Model version 4.3.4) coupled with an aerosol-snow/ice feedback module was used to investigate the emission, distribution, and deposition of carbonaceous and dust aerosols. The study was focused on the two issues: 1) the evaluation of model performance; 2) the assessment of climatic effects induced by carbonaceous and mineral dust aerosols, respectively.

  17. Multianalyte detection using fiber optic particle plasmon resonance sensor based on plasmonic light scattering interrogation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hsing-Ying; Huang, Chen-Han; Chau, Lai-Kwan

    2013-05-01

    A highly sensitive fiber optic particle plasmon resonance sensor (FO-PPR) is demonstrated for label-free biochemical detection. The sensing strategy relies on interrogating the plasmonic scattering of light from gold nanoparticles on the optical fiber in response to the surrounding refractive index changes or molecular binding events. The refractive index resolution is estimated to be 3.8 × 10-5 RIU. The limit of detection for anti-DNP antibody spiked in buffer is 1.2 × 10-9 g/ml (5.3 pM) by using the DNP-functionalized FO-PPR sensor. The image processing of simultaneously recorded plasmonic scattering photographs at different compartments of the sensor is also demonstrated. Results suggest that the compact sensor can perform multiple independent measurements simultaneously by means of monitoring the plasmonic scattering intensity via photodiodes or a CCD. The potential of using a combination of different kinds of noble metal nanoparticles with different types of functionalized probes in multiple cascaded detection windows on a single fiber to become an inexpensive and ultrasensitive linear-array sensing platform for higher-throughput biochemical detection is provided.

  18. Light-absorbing Particles in Snow and Ice: Measurement and Modeling of Climatic and Hydrological Impact

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Yun; Yasunari, Teppei J.; Doherty, Sarah J.; Flanner, M. G.; Lau, William K.; Ming, J.; Wang, Hailong; Wang, Mo; Warren, Stephen G.; Zhang, Rudong

    2015-01-01

    Light absorbing particles (LAP, e.g., black carbon, brown carbon, and dust) influence water and energy budgets of the atmosphere and snowpack in multiple ways. In addition to their effects associated with atmospheric heating by absorption of solar radiation and interactions with clouds, LAP in snow on land and ice can reduce the surface reflectance (a.k.a., surface darkening), which is likely to accelerate the snow aging process and further reduces snow albedo and increases the speed of snowpack melt. LAP in snow and ice (LAPSI) has been identified as one of major forcings affecting climate change, e.g. in the fourth and fifth assessment reports of IPCC. However, the uncertainty level in quantifying this effect remains very high. In this review paper, we document various technical methods of measuring LAPSI and review the progress made in measuring the LAPSI in Arctic, Tibetan Plateau and other mid-latitude regions. We also report the progress in modeling the mass concentrations, albedo reduction, radiative forcing, andclimatic and hydrological impact of LAPSI at global and regional scales. Finally we identify some research needs for reducing the uncertainties in the impact of LAPSI on global and regional climate and the hydrological cycle.

  19. Very high pressure liquid chromatography using fully porous particles: quantitative analysis of fast gradient separations without post-run times.

    PubMed

    Stankovich, Joseph J; Gritti, Fabrice; Stevenson, Paul G; Beaver, Lois Ann; Guiochon, Georges

    2014-01-10

    Using a column packed with fully porous particles, four methods for controlling the flow rates at which gradient elution runs are conducted in very high pressure liquid chromatography (VHPLC) were tested to determine whether reproducible thermal conditions could be achieved, such that subsequent analyses would proceed at nearly the same initial temperature. In VHPLC high flow rates are achieved, producing fast analyses but requiring high inlet pressures. The combination of high flow rates and high inlet pressures generates local heat, leading to temperature changes in the column. Usually in this case a post-run time is input into the analytical method to allow the return of the column temperature to its initial state. An alternative strategy involves operating the column without a post-run equilibration period and maintaining constant temperature variations for subsequent analysis after conducting one or a few separations to bring the column to a reproducible starting temperature. A liquid chromatography instrument equipped with a pressure controller was used to perform constant pressure and constant flow rate VHPLC separations. Six replicate gradient separations of a nine component mixture consisting of acetophenone, propiophenone, butyrophenone, valerophenone, hexanophenone, heptanophenone, octanophenone, benzophenone, and acetanilide dissolved in water/acetonitrile (65:35, v/v) were performed under various experimental conditions: constant flow rate, two sets of constant pressure, and constant pressure operation with a programmed flow rate. The relative standard deviations of the response factors for all the analytes are lower than 5% across the methods. Programming the flow rate to maintain a fairly constant pressure instead of using instrument controlled constant pressure improves the reproducibility of the retention times by a factor of 5, when plotting the chromatograms in time.

  20. Very high pressure liquid chromatography using fully porous particles: quantitative analysis of fast gradient separations without post-run times.

    PubMed

    Stankovich, Joseph J; Gritti, Fabrice; Stevenson, Paul G; Beaver, Lois Ann; Guiochon, Georges

    2014-01-10

    Using a column packed with fully porous particles, four methods for controlling the flow rates at which gradient elution runs are conducted in very high pressure liquid chromatography (VHPLC) were tested to determine whether reproducible thermal conditions could be achieved, such that subsequent analyses would proceed at nearly the same initial temperature. In VHPLC high flow rates are achieved, producing fast analyses but requiring high inlet pressures. The combination of high flow rates and high inlet pressures generates local heat, leading to temperature changes in the column. Usually in this case a post-run time is input into the analytical method to allow the return of the column temperature to its initial state. An alternative strategy involves operating the column without a post-run equilibration period and maintaining constant temperature variations for subsequent analysis after conducting one or a few separations to bring the column to a reproducible starting temperature. A liquid chromatography instrument equipped with a pressure controller was used to perform constant pressure and constant flow rate VHPLC separations. Six replicate gradient separations of a nine component mixture consisting of acetophenone, propiophenone, butyrophenone, valerophenone, hexanophenone, heptanophenone, octanophenone, benzophenone, and acetanilide dissolved in water/acetonitrile (65:35, v/v) were performed under various experimental conditions: constant flow rate, two sets of constant pressure, and constant pressure operation with a programmed flow rate. The relative standard deviations of the response factors for all the analytes are lower than 5% across the methods. Programming the flow rate to maintain a fairly constant pressure instead of using instrument controlled constant pressure improves the reproducibility of the retention times by a factor of 5, when plotting the chromatograms in time. PMID:24296292

  1. Unsteady Fast Random Particle Mesh method for efficient prediction of tonal and broadband noises of a centrifugal fan unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, Seung; Cheong, Cheolung; Kim, Taehoon

    2015-09-01

    In this study, efficient numerical method is proposed for predicting tonal and broadband noises of a centrifugal fan unit. The proposed method is based on Hybrid Computational Aero-Acoustic (H-CAA) techniques combined with Unsteady Fast Random Particle Mesh (U-FRPM) method. The U-FRPM method is developed by extending the FRPM method proposed by Ewert et al. and is utilized to synthesize turbulence flow field from unsteady RANS solutions. The H-CAA technique combined with U-FRPM method is applied to predict broadband as well as tonal noises of a centrifugal fan unit in a household refrigerator. Firstly, unsteady flow field driven by a rotating fan is computed by solving the RANS equations with Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) techniques. Main source regions around the rotating fan are identified by examining the computed flow fields. Then, turbulence flow fields in the main source regions are synthesized by applying the U-FRPM method. The acoustic analogy is applied to model acoustic sources in the main source regions. Finally, the centrifugal fan noise is predicted by feeding the modeled acoustic sources into an acoustic solver based on the Boundary Element Method (BEM). The sound spectral levels predicted using the current numerical method show good agreements with the measured spectra at the Blade Pass Frequencies (BPFs) as well as in the high frequency range. On the more, the present method enables quantitative assessment of relative contributions of identified source regions to the sound field by comparing predicted sound pressure spectrum due to modeled sources.

  2. Lighting.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-09-01

    Since lighting accounts for about one-third of the energy used in commercial buildings, there is opportunity to conserve. There are two ways to reduce lighting energy use: modify lighting systems so that they used less electricity and/or reduce the number of hours the lights are used. This booklet presents a number of ways to do both. Topics covered include: reassessing lighting levels, reducing lighting levels, increasing bulb & fixture efficiency, using controls to regulate lighting, and taking advantage of daylight.

  3. Role of fast sputtered particles during sputter deposition: Growth of epitaxial Ge{sub 0.99}C{sub 0.01}/Ge(001)

    SciTech Connect

    D'Arcy-Gall, J.; Gall, D.; Desjardins, P.; Petrov, I.; Greene, J. E.

    2000-10-15

    We show that fast sputtered particles in the sputter-deposition process, largely ignored in previous studies, can play a major role in determining defect densities in as-deposited layers. Epitaxial Ge{sub 1-y}C{sub y}/Ge(001), in which there is a direct correlation between C lattice configurations and the local concentration of Ge self-interstitials, is used as a model materials system. We show that increasing the fraction of fast Ge neutrals in the high-energy tail of the ejected particle distribution increases the concentration of Ge--C split interstitials and thus the film compressive strain. The Ge--C split interstitials form as a result of trapping, by incorporated substitutional C atoms, of Ge self-interstitials produced by incident hyperthermal Ge atoms. Experimental results are supported by Monte Carlo simulations and ab initio calculations.

  4. Spectral shape of a signal in light-induced diffusive pulling (pushing) of particles into a light beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkhomenko, A. I.; Shalagin, A. M.

    2015-02-01

    We study theoretically how the dependences of transport collision frequencies νi, collision broadening γ and collision shift Δ of the levels on the velocity v of resonant particles influence lightinduced diffusive pulling (pushing) (LDP) effects in the framework of a generalised model of strong collisions in the case of velocitydependent collision rates (so-called kangaroo model). It is found that allowance for the dependences νi(v), γ(v) and Δ(v) does not change the spectral shape of an LDP signal. In particular, in the case of low-intensity radiation, the spectral dependence of the LDP signal coincides with the absorption line shape. It is shown that the magnitude of the LDP effect is proportional to the difference between the diffusion coefficients of particles in the excited and ground states. It is found that the spectral anomalies previously predicted in the LDP effect [Gel'mukhanov F.Kh. JETP Lett., 55, 214 (1992)] for an idealised model of the Lorentz gas (the limiting case of heavy buffer particles), which arise due to the dependences νi(v), γ(v) and Δ(v), are typical only for this gas. At a realistic ratio of the masses of absorbing and buffer particles, spectral anomalies do not occur in the LDP effect.

  5. LIGHT MICROSCOPY DETECTION OF NANOSCALE PARTICLE INTERNALIZATION BY HUMAN LUNG CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    RATIONALE. Ultrafine particulate matter (PM) is reported to be more strongly correlated with adverse health effects relative to larger particle size fractions. These epidemiological findings are supported by toxicological studies suggesting that particle size is inversely associa...

  6. a Spectrographic Study of the Absorption and Scattering of Light by Small Particles in the Gas Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Emmet Raymond

    A new technique for studying small particles optically in the laboratory is described. A modern spectrograph using an image intensifier tube coupled to a CCD as a detector provides sensitivity comparable to that of a spectrometer using a photomultiplier tube, while preserving the advantages of a spectrograph. Using the instrument, small particles of sodium were studied in light scattering in the gas phase, and gas phase extinction measurements were made of magnesium, carbon, and C_{60} (Buckminsterfullerene). In the scattering spectra of sodium, the ability of a spectrograph to image along the slit was used to simultaneously observe along a cross section of a small particle cloud, so it was possible to record the transition from the atomic vapor to diatomic sodium to small particles to larger particles. The gas phase surface plasmon feature of magnesium appeared quite different from previous measurements of particles collected on a substrate. On the other hand the spectra of carbon appeared to be quite similar to measurements on a substrate. The measurements of C_{60 } appear to be of the molecular vapor rather than of small particles.

  7. Search for lightly ionizing particles using CDMS-II data and fabrication of CDMS detectors with improved homogeneity in properties

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, Kunj Bihari

    2013-12-01

    Fundamental particles are always observed to carry charges which are integral multiples of one-third charge of electron, e/3. While this is a well established experimental fact, the theoretical understanding for the charge quantization phenomenon is lacking. On the other hand, there exist numerous theoretical models that naturally allow for existence of particles with fractional electromagnetic charge. These particles, if existing, hint towards existence of physics beyond the standard model. Multiple high energy, optical, cosmological and astrophysical considerations restrict the allowable mass-charge parameter space for these fractional charges. Still, a huge unexplored region remains. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS-II), located at Soudan mines in northern Minnesota, employs germanium and silicon crystals to perform direct searches for a leading candidate to dark matter called Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). Alternately, the low detection threshold allows search for fractional electromagnetic-charged particles, or Lightly Ionizing Particles (LIPs), moving at relativistic speed. Background rejection is obtained by requiring that the magnitude and location of energy deposited in each detector be consistent with corresponding \\signatures" resulting from the passage of a fractionally charged particle. In this dissertation, the CDMS-II data is analyzed to search for LIPs, with an expected background of 0.078 0.078 events. No candidate events are observed, allowing exclusion of new parameter space for charges between e/6 and e/200.

  8. Supramolecularly self-organized nanomaterials: A voyage from inorganic particles to organic light-harvesting materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varotto, Alessandro

    In 2009 the U.S. National Science Foundation announced the realignment of the Chemistry Divisions introducing the new interdisciplinary program of "Macromolecular, Supramolecular and Nanochemistry." This statement officially recognizes a field of studies that has already seen the publication of many thousands of works in the past 20 years. Nanotechnology and supramolecular chemistry can be found in the most diverse disciplines, from biology to engineering, to physics. Furthermore, many technologies rely on nanoscale dimensions for more than one component. Nanomaterials and technologies are on the market with a range of applications from composite materials, to electronics, to medicine, to sensing and more. This thesis will introduce a variety of studies and applications of supramolecular chemistry to form nanoscale photonic materials from soft matter. We will first illustrate a method to synthesize metallic nanoparticles using plasmids DNA as a mold. The circular DNA functions as a sacrificial template to shape the particles into narrowly monodispersed nanodiscs. Secondly, we will describe the synthesis of a highly fluorinated porphyrin derivative and how the fluorines improve the formation of ultra thin films when the porphyrin is blended with fullerene C60. Finally, we will show how to increase the short-circuit current in a solar cell built with an internal parallel tandem light harvesting design. A blend of phthalocyanines, each with a decreasing optical band gap, is supramolecularly self-organized with pyridyl-C60 within thin films. The different band gaps of the single phthalocyanines capture a wider segment of the solar spectrum increasing the overall efficiency of the device. In conclusion, we have presented a number of studies for the preparation of inorganic and organic nanomaterials and their application in supramolecularly organized photonic devices.

  9. Intercomparison Study of the CAPS PMex (Cavity Attenuated Phase Shift Particle Light Extinction Monitor) with the combination of an Integrating Nephelometer and a Particle Soot Absorption Photometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petzold, A.; Onasch, T.; Kebabian, P.; Freedman, A.

    2012-10-01

    An evaluation of the Cavity Attenuated Phase Shift particle light extinction monitor (CAPS PMex) by means of a combination of a 3-wavelength Integrating Nephelometer (NEPH; TSI Model 3563) and a 3-wavelength filter-based Particle Soot Absorption Photometer (PSAP) was carried out using both laboratory generated test particles and ambient aerosols. An accurate determination of a fixed pathlength correction for the CAPS PMex was made by comparing extinction measurements using polystyrene latex (PSL) spheres in combination with Mie scattering calculations to account for the presence of PSL conglomerates. These studies yielded a linear instrument response over the investigated dynamical range from 20 to 450 M m-1 (10-6 m-1) with a linear correlation coefficient of R2 > 0.98. The adjustment factor was determined to be 1.05 times that previously reported. Correlating CAPS extinction to extinction measured by the NEPH-PSAP combination using laboratory-generated polydisperse mixtures of purely scattering ammonium sulfate and highly absorbing black carbon provided a linear regression line with slope m = 0.99 (R2 = 0.996) for single-scattering albedo values (λ = 630 nm) ranging from 0.35 (black carbon) to 1.00 (ammonium sulfate). For ambient aerosol, light extinction measured by CAPS PMex was highly correlated (R2 = 0.995) to extinction measured by the NEPH-PSAP combination with slope m = 0.95.

  10. Feasibility studies for light scattering experiments to determine the velocity relaxation of small particles in a fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acquista, C.; Narducci, L. M.

    1980-01-01

    An approach for measuring the non-Markoffian component in the relaxation mechanism of a Brownian particle is proposed which combines desirable features of both the shock wave experiment and conventional light scattering experiments. It is suggested that the radiation pressure generated by a C.W. laser be used to guide an individual spherical particle to terminal velocity. At an appropriate time, the beam intensity is suddenly lowered to a value at which the radiation pressure is negligible, and the ensuing velocity relaxation is measured directly.

  11. Single particle characterization using a light scattering module coupled to a time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, E. S.; Onasch, T. B.; Canagaratna, M.; Jayne, J. T.; Kimmel, J.; Yu, X.-Y.; Alexander, M. L.; Worsnop, D. R.; Davidovits, P.

    2008-12-01

    We present the first single particle results obtained using an Aerodyne time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer coupled with a light scattering module (LS-ToF-AMS). The instrument was deployed at the T1 ground site approximately 40 km northeast of the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) as part of the MILAGRO field study in March of 2006. The instrument was operated as a standard AMS from 12-30 March, acquiring average chemical composition and size distributions for the ambient aerosol, and in single particle mode from 27-30 March. Over a 75-h sampling period, 12 853 single particle mass spectra were optically triggered, saved, and analyzed. The correlated optical and chemical detection allowed detailed examination of single particle collection and quantification within the LS-ToF-AMS. The single particle data enabled the mixing states of the ambient aerosol to be characterized within the context of the size-resolved ensemble chemical information. The particulate mixing states were examined as a function of sampling time and most of the particles were found to be internal mixtures containing many of the organic and inorganic species identified in the ensemble analysis. The single particle mass spectra were deconvolved, using techniques developed for ensemble AMS data analysis, into HOA, OOA, NH4NO3, (NH4)2SO4, and NH4Cl fractions. Average single particle mass and chemistry measurements are shown to be in agreement with ensemble MS and PTOF measurements. While a significant fraction of ambient particles were internal mixtures of varying degrees, single particle measurements of chemical composition allowed the identification of time periods during which the ambient ensemble was externally mixed. In some cases the chemical composition of the particles suggested a likely source. Throughout the full sampling period, the ambient ensemble was an external mixture of combustion-generated HOA particles from local sources (e.g. traffic), with number concentrations peaking

  12. Constraining the Physical Properties of Meteor Stream Particles by Light Curve Shapes Using the Virtual Meteor Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koschny, D.; Gritsevich, M.; Barentsen, G.

    2011-01-01

    Different authors have produced models for the physical properties of meteoroids based on the shape of a meteor's light curve, typically from short observing campaigns. We here analyze the height profiles and light curves of approx.200 double-station meteors from the Leonids and Perseids using data from the Virtual Meteor Observatory, to demonstrate that with this web-based meteor database it is possible to analyze very large datasets from different authors in a consistent way. We compute the average heights for begin point, maximum luminosity, and end heights for Perseids and Leonids. We also compute the skew of the light curve, usually called the F-parameter. The results compare well with other author's data. We display the average light curve in a novel way to assess the light curve shape in addition to using the F-parameter. While the Perseids show a peaked light curve, the average Leonid light curve has a more flat peak. This indicates that the particle distribution of Leonid meteors can be described by a Gaussian distribution; the Perseids can be described with a power law. The skew for Leonids is smaller than for Perseids, indicating that the Leonids are more fragile than the Perseids.

  13. Portable sample preparation and analysis system for micron and sub-micron particle characterization using light scattering and absorption spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Stark, Peter C.; Zurek, Eduardo; Wheat, Jeffrey V.; Dunbar, John M.; Olivares, Jose A.; Garcia-Rubio, Luis H.; Ward, Michael D.

    2011-07-26

    There is provided a method and device for remote sampling, preparation and optical interrogation of a sample using light scattering and light absorption methods. The portable device is a filtration-based device that removes interfering background particle material from the sample matrix by segregating or filtering the chosen analyte from the sample solution or matrix while allowing the interfering background particles to be pumped out of the device. The segregated analyte is then suspended in a diluent for analysis. The device is capable of calculating an initial concentration of the analyte, as well as diluting the analyte such that reliable optical measurements can be made. Suitable analytes include cells, microorganisms, bioparticles, pathogens and diseases. Sample matrixes include biological fluids such as blood and urine, as well as environmental samples including waste water.

  14. Hydrogen-rich gas production via fast pyrolysis of biophysical dried sludge: Effect of particle size and moisture content on product yields and syngas composition.

    PubMed

    Han, Rong; Liu, Jinwen; Zhao, Chenxi; Li, Yuliang; Chen, Aixia

    2016-06-01

    After biophysical drying, a novel biophysical dried sludge particle was obtained. This work aims to investigate the function and effects of particle sizes and moisture contents on the fast pyrolysis of biophysical dried sludge particles. The results showed that large particles (>4 mm) favoured the oil generation with a maximum value of 19.0%, and small particles (<0.27 mm) favoured the char yield with a maximum value of 60.6%. Medium particle fractions (between 0.27 mm and 4 mm) benefited syngas production and induced higher H2 and CO emission, owing to the well-developed microstructure, enrichment of cellulose, and enhanced catalytic effects during the charring process. The introduction of proper moisture content (53.9% to 62.6%) to biophysical dried sludge was found to dramatically enhance syngas yield, hydrogen production, and carbon conversion efficiency. H2 molar concentration reached a maximum of 46.02% at a moisture content of 53.9%, which was attributed to the steam reforming and steam gasification accompanying the initial biophysical dried sludge pyrolysis. PMID:27118735

  15. Hydrogen-rich gas production via fast pyrolysis of biophysical dried sludge: Effect of particle size and moisture content on product yields and syngas composition.

    PubMed

    Han, Rong; Liu, Jinwen; Zhao, Chenxi; Li, Yuliang; Chen, Aixia

    2016-06-01

    After biophysical drying, a novel biophysical dried sludge particle was obtained. This work aims to investigate the function and effects of particle sizes and moisture contents on the fast pyrolysis of biophysical dried sludge particles. The results showed that large particles (>4 mm) favoured the oil generation with a maximum value of 19.0%, and small particles (<0.27 mm) favoured the char yield with a maximum value of 60.6%. Medium particle fractions (between 0.27 mm and 4 mm) benefited syngas production and induced higher H2 and CO emission, owing to the well-developed microstructure, enrichment of cellulose, and enhanced catalytic effects during the charring process. The introduction of proper moisture content (53.9% to 62.6%) to biophysical dried sludge was found to dramatically enhance syngas yield, hydrogen production, and carbon conversion efficiency. H2 molar concentration reached a maximum of 46.02% at a moisture content of 53.9%, which was attributed to the steam reforming and steam gasification accompanying the initial biophysical dried sludge pyrolysis.

  16. Fast-cycling superconducting synchrotrons and possible path to the future of US experimental high-energy particle physics

    SciTech Connect

    Piekarz, Henryk; /Fermilab

    2008-02-01

    The authors outline primary physics motivation, present proposed new arrangement for Fermilab accelerator complex, and then discuss possible long-range application of fast-cycling superconducting synchrotrons at Fermilab.

  17. Radiation Force Caused by Scattering, Absorption, and Emission of Light by Nonspherical Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    General formulas for computing the radiation force exerted on arbitrarily oriented and arbitrarily shaped nonspherical particles due to scattering, absorption, and emission of electromagnetic radiation are derived. For randomly oriented particles with a plane of symmetry, the formula for the average radiation force caused by the particle response to external illumination reduces to the standard Debye formula derived from the Lorenz-Mie theory, whereas the average radiation force caused by emission vanishes.

  18. Numerical simulation on the performance of the vortex pump for transporting solid-liquid two-phase with light particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, W. Y.; Song, P. Y.; Deng, Q. G.; Xu, H. J.

    2016-05-01

    With the purpose of studying performance of the vortex pump for transporting solid-liquid two-phase with light particles whose relative density smaller than 1, the numerical simulation of solid-liquid two phase flowing in the whole channel of a vortex pump with the particle diameter being 0.5 mm, 1 mm, 2 mm, 3 mm and the initial solid phase volume concentrations being 10%, 20% and 30% are respectively carried out by using the commercial software ANSYS Fluent by adopting RNG κ-ɛ turbulent flow model, Eulerian-Eulerian multi-phase flow model and SIMPLEC algorithm. The simulation results show that in the impeller region, the particles concentrate on the non-working surface of the blades, and the particles are rare on the working surface of the blades. As the initial solid phase volume concentration and particle diameter increase, the pump delivery head of vortex pump decrease. The pump delivery head of vortex pump with different initial solid phase concentrations and different particle diameters are predicted and compared with those obtained by an empirical formula, and they shows good agreement.

  19. First Direct Limits on Lightly Ionizing Particles with Electric Charge Less than e /6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnese, R.; Anderson, A. J.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Basu Thakur, R.; Bauer, D. A.; Billard, J.; Borgland, A.; Bowles, M. A.; Brandt, D.; Brink, P. L.; Bunker, R.; Cabrera, B.; Caldwell, D. O.; Cerdeno, D. G.; Chagani, H.; Chen, Y.; Cooley, J.; Cornell, B.; Crewdson, C. H.; Cushman, P.; Daal, M.; Di Stefano, P. C. F.; Doughty, T.; Esteban, L.; Fallows, S.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Godfrey, G. L.; Golwala, S. R.; Hall, J.; Harris, H. R.; Hertel, S. A.; Hofer, T.; Holmgren, D.; Hsu, L.; Huber, M. E.; Jastram, A.; Kamaev, O.; Kara, B.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kennedy, A.; Kiveni, M.; Koch, K.; Leder, A.; Loer, B.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Mahapatra, R.; Mandic, V.; Martinez, C.; McCarthy, K. A.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Moffatt, R. A.; Moore, D. C.; Nelson, H.; Nelson, R. H.; Ogburn, R. W.; Page, K.; Page, W. A.; Partridge, R.; Pepin, M.; Phipps, A.; Prasad, K.; Pyle, M.; Qiu, H.; Rau, W.; Redl, P.; Reisetter, A.; Ricci, Y.; Rogers, H. E.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Sander, J.; Schneck, K.; Schnee, R. W.; Scorza, S.; Serfass, B.; Shank, B.; Speller, D.; Upadhyayula, S.; Villano, A. N.; Welliver, B.; Wright, D. H.; Yellin, S.; Yen, J. J.; Young, B. A.; Zhang, J.; CDMS Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    While the standard model of particle physics does not include free particles with fractional charge, experimental searches have not ruled out their existence. We report results from the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS II) experiment that give the first direct-detection limits for cosmogenically produced relativistic particles with electric charge lower than e /6 . A search for tracks in the six stacked detectors of each of two of the CDMS II towers finds no candidates, thereby excluding new parameter space for particles with electric charges between e /6 and e /200 .

  20. Entrainment of mouse peripheral circadian clocks to <24 h feeding/fasting cycles under 24 h light/dark conditions

    PubMed Central

    Hamaguchi, Yutaro; Tahara, Yu; Kuroda, Hiroaki; Haraguchi, Atsushi; Shibata, Shigenobu

    2015-01-01

    The circadian clock system in peripheral tissues can endogenously oscillate and is entrained by the light-dark and fasting-feeding cycles in mammals. Although the system’s range of entrainment to light-dark cycles with a non-24 h (<24 h) interval has been studied, the range of entrainment to fasting-feeding cycles with shorter periods (<24 h) has not been investigated in peripheral molecular clocks. In the present study, we measured this range by monitoring the mouse peripheral PER2::LUCIFERASE rhythm in vivo at different periods under each feeding cycle (Tau (T) = 15–24 h) under normal light-dark conditions. Peripheral clocks could be entrained to the feeding cycle with T = 22–24 h, but not to that with T = 15–21 h. Under the feeding cycle with T = 15–18 h, the peripheral clocks oscillated at near the 24-h period, suggesting that they were entrained to the light-dark cycle. Thus, for the first time, we demonstrated the range of entrainment to the non-24 h feeding cycle, and that the circadian range (T = 22–24 h) of feeding stimulus is necessary for peripheral molecular clock entrainment under light-dark cycles. PMID:26395309

  1. Light scattering by size-shape distributions of randomly oriented axially symmetric particles of a size comparable to a wavelength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.

    1993-01-01

    Rigorously light scattering by size-shape distributions of randomly oriented axially symmetric particles are calculated by the T-matrix method, as extended to randomly oriented scatterers. The computational scheme is described along with a newly developed convergence procedure that makes it possible to substantially reduce computer time and storage requirements. The elements of the Stokes scattering matrix for a power-law size distribution of randomly oriented moderately aspherical spheroids are shown to be much smoother than and differ substantially from those of equivalent monodisperse spheroids; averaging over orientations does not eliminate the necessity of averaging over particle sizes. The angular-scattering behavior of the ensembles of nonspherical particles is found to be significantly different from that of the equivalent polydisperse spheres.

  2. Light-charged-particle emission in the spontaneous fission of /sup 250/Cf, /sup 256/Fm, and /sup 257/Fm

    SciTech Connect

    Wild, J.F.; Baisden, P.A.; Dougan, R.J.; Hulet, E.K.; Lougheed, R.W.; Landrum, J.H.

    1985-08-01

    We have measured the energy spectra for the emission of long-range ..cap alpha.. particles from the spontaneous fission of /sup 250/Cf, /sup 256/Fm, and /sup 257/Fm, and for tritons and protons from the spontaneous fission of /sup 250/Cf and /sup 256/Fm. We have determined ..cap alpha.., triton, and proton emission probabilities and estimated total light-particle emission probabilities for these nuclides. We compare these and known emission probabilities for five other spontaneously fissioning nuclides with the deformation energy available at scission and show that there is a possible correlation that is consistent with a one-body dissipation mechanism for transferring release energy to particle clusters.

  3. Elements and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in exhaust particles emitted by light-duty vehicles.

    PubMed

    Alves, Célia A; Barbosa, Cátia; Rocha, Sónia; Calvo, Ana; Nunes, Teresa; Cerqueira, Mário; Pio, Casimiro; Karanasiou, Angeliki; Querol, Xavier

    2015-08-01

    The main purpose of this work was to evaluate the chemical composition of particulate matter (PM) emitted by eight different light-duty vehicles. Exhaust samples from petrol and diesel cars (Euro 3 to Euro 5) were collected in a chassis dynamometer facility. To simulate the real-world driving conditions, three ARTEMIS cycles were followed: road, to simulate a fluid traffic flow and urban with hot and cold starts, to simulate driving conditions in cities. Samples were analysed for the water-soluble ions, for the elemental composition and for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), respectively, by ion chromatography, inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Nitrate and phosphate were the major water-soluble ions in the exhaust particles emitted from diesel and petrol vehicles, respectively. The amount of material emitted is affected by the vehicle age. For vehicles ≥Euro 4, most elements were below the detection limits. Sodium, with emission factors in the ranges 23.5-62.4 and 78.2-227μg km(-1), for petrol and diesel Euro 3 vehicles, respectively, was the major element. The emission factors of metallic elements indicated that diesel vehicles release three to five times more than petrol automobiles. Element emissions under urban cycles are higher than those found for on-road driving, being three or four times higher, for petrol vehicles, and two or three times, for diesel vehicles. The difference between cycles is mainly due to the high emissions for the urban cycle with hot start-up. As registered for elements, most of the PAH emissions for vehicles ≥Euro 4 were also below the detection limits. Regardless of the vehicle models or driving cycles, the two- to four-ring PAHs were always dominant. Naphthalene, with emission factors up to 925 μg km(-1), was always the most abundant PAH. The relative cancer risk associated with

  4. Elements and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in exhaust particles emitted by light-duty vehicles.

    PubMed

    Alves, Célia A; Barbosa, Cátia; Rocha, Sónia; Calvo, Ana; Nunes, Teresa; Cerqueira, Mário; Pio, Casimiro; Karanasiou, Angeliki; Querol, Xavier

    2015-08-01

    The main purpose of this work was to evaluate the chemical composition of particulate matter (PM) emitted by eight different light-duty vehicles. Exhaust samples from petrol and diesel cars (Euro 3 to Euro 5) were collected in a chassis dynamometer facility. To simulate the real-world driving conditions, three ARTEMIS cycles were followed: road, to simulate a fluid traffic flow and urban with hot and cold starts, to simulate driving conditions in cities. Samples were analysed for the water-soluble ions, for the elemental composition and for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), respectively, by ion chromatography, inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Nitrate and phosphate were the major water-soluble ions in the exhaust particles emitted from diesel and petrol vehicles, respectively. The amount of material emitted is affected by the vehicle age. For vehicles ≥Euro 4, most elements were below the detection limits. Sodium, with emission factors in the ranges 23.5-62.4 and 78.2-227μg km(-1), for petrol and diesel Euro 3 vehicles, respectively, was the major element. The emission factors of metallic elements indicated that diesel vehicles release three to five times more than petrol automobiles. Element emissions under urban cycles are higher than those found for on-road driving, being three or four times higher, for petrol vehicles, and two or three times, for diesel vehicles. The difference between cycles is mainly due to the high emissions for the urban cycle with hot start-up. As registered for elements, most of the PAH emissions for vehicles ≥Euro 4 were also below the detection limits. Regardless of the vehicle models or driving cycles, the two- to four-ring PAHs were always dominant. Naphthalene, with emission factors up to 925 μg km(-1), was always the most abundant PAH. The relative cancer risk associated with

  5. FAST MAGNETIC RECONNECTION AND PARTICLE ACCELERATION IN RELATIVISTIC LOW-DENSITY ELECTRON-POSITRON PLASMAS WITHOUT GUIDE FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Bessho, Naoki; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2012-05-10

    Magnetic reconnection and particle acceleration in relativistic Harris sheets in low-density electron-positron plasmas with no guide field have been studied by means of two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. Reconnection rates are of the order of one when the background density in a Harris sheet is of the order of 1% of the density in the current sheet, which is consistent with previous results in the non-relativistic regime. It has been demonstrated that the increase of the Lorentz factors of accelerated particles significantly enhances the collisionless resistivity needed to sustain a large reconnection electric field. It is shown analytically and numerically that the energy spectrum of accelerated particles near the X-line is the product of a power law and an exponential function of energy, {gamma}{sup -1/4}exp (- a{gamma}{sup 1/2}), where {gamma} is the Lorentz factor and a is a constant. However, in the low-density regime, while the most energetic particles are produced near X-lines, many more particles are energized within magnetic islands. Particles are energized in contracting islands by multiple reflection, but the mechanism is different from Fermi acceleration in magnetic islands for magnetized particles in the presence of a guide field. In magnetic islands, strong core fields are generated and plasma beta values are reduced. As a consequence, the fire-hose instability condition is not satisfied in most of the island region, and island contraction and particle acceleration can continue. In island coalescence, reconnection between two islands can accelerate some particles, however, many particles are decelerated and cooled, which is contrary to what has been discussed in the literature on particle acceleration due to reconnection in non-relativistic hydrogen plasmas.

  6. Fast drying of biocompatible polymer films loaded with poorly water-soluble drug nano-particles via low temperature forced convection.

    PubMed

    Susarla, Ramana; Sievens-Figueroa, Lucas; Bhakay, Anagha; Shen, Yueyang; Jerez-Rozo, Jackeline I; Engen, William; Khusid, Boris; Bilgili, Ecevit; Romañach, Rodolfo J; Morris, Kenneth R; Michniak-Kohn, Bozena; Davé, Rajesh N

    2013-10-15

    Fast drying of nano-drug particle laden strip-films formed using water-soluble biocompatible polymers via forced convection is investigated in order to form films having uniform drug distribution and fast dissolution. Films were produced by casting and drying a mixture of poorly water soluble griseofulvin (GF) nanosuspensions produced via media milling with aqueous hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC E15LV) solutions containing glycerin as a plasticizer. The effects of convective drying parameters, temperature and air velocity, and film-precursor viscosity on film properties were investigated. Two major drying regimes, a constant rate period as a function of the drying conditions, followed by a single slower falling rate period, were observed. Films dried in an hour or less without any irreversible aggregation of GF nanoparticles with low residual water content. Near-infrared chemical imaging (NIR-CI) and the content uniformity analysis indicated a better drug particle distribution when higher viscosity film-precursors were used. Powder X-ray diffraction showed that the GF in the films retained crystallinity and the polymorphic form. USP IV dissolution tests showed immediate release (~20 min) of GF. Overall, the films fabricated from polymer-based suspensions at higher viscosity dried at different conditions exhibited similar mechanical properties, improved drug content uniformity, and achieved fast drug dissolution.

  7. Analytical and experimental investigation of light scattering from polydispersions of Mie particles.

    PubMed

    Holland, A C; Draper, J S

    1967-03-01

    A comparison has been made between (1) the computed angular scattering coefficient for a polydisperse cloud of small, spherical (Mie) particles and (2) the measured angular scattering coefficient for a polydisperse cloud of irregular, randomly oriented (Mie) particles fitting the same distribution function and having the same material properties. The comparison has been made for eight wavelengths covering the visible range.

  8. Type I polar stratospheric cloud particles - Concentration, shape, size, light extinction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, R. F.; Ferry, G. V.; Snetsinger, K. G.; Goodman, J.; Hamill, P.; Livingston, J. M.; Mccormick, M. P.

    1990-01-01

    Results from the flight on January 24, 1989 of the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Experiment during which the ER-2 aircraft transitioned from unsaturated to ice saturated air at 20 km altitude are presented. Aerosol particles were sampled by wire impactors and examined for number density as a function of particle size by taking photomicrographs in a scanning electron microscope and visually sizing and counting the particles. Differences in the chemical, physical and optical properties of stratospheric aerosol between ice-saturated and nonsaturated air are described.

  9. Visible light curing of Epon SU-8 based superparamagnetic polymer composites with random and ordered particle configurations.

    PubMed

    Peters, Christian; Ergeneman, Olgaç; Sotiriou, Georgios A; Choi, Hongsoo; Nelson, Bradley J; Hierold, Christofer

    2015-01-14

    The performance of superparamagnetic polymer composite microdevices is highly dependent on the magnetic particle content. While high loading levels are desired for many applications, the UV absorption of these nanoparticles limits the overall thickness of the fabricated microstructures and subsequently their capability of magnetic interaction. The combination of a visible-light-sensitive photoinitiator and particle self-organization is proposed to extend the exposure depth limitation in Epon SU-8 based superparamagnetic polymer composites. While superparamagnetic iron oxide particles strongly absorb i-line radiation required to cross-link the Epon SU-8 polymer matrix, we propose the utilization of H-Nu 470 photoinitiator to expand the photosensitivity of the composite toward the visible spectrum, where the dispersed nanoparticles are more transparent. The novel photoinitiator preserves the composite's superparamagnetic properties as well as a homogeneous particle distribution. As a result, particle load or resist thickness can be more than doubled while maintaining exposure time. The self-organization of ordered magnetic structures allows for an additional increase in exposure depth of up to 40%, resulting in a 2.5-fold saturation magnetization.

  10. Impact of particle size and light exposure on the effects of TiO2 nanoparticles on Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Angelstorf, Judith S; Ahlf, Wolfgang; von der Kammer, Frank; Heise, Susanne

    2014-10-01

    The increasing use of engineered nanoparticles in industrial and consumer products leads to a release of the anthropogenic contaminants to the aquatic environment. To obtain a better understanding of the environmental effects of these particles, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans was used to investigate the organism-level effects and in vivo molecular responses. Toxicity of bulk-scale (∼160 nm) and nanoscale (21 nm) titanium dioxide (TiO2 ) was tested under dark and light conditions, following ISO 10872. The expression of sod-3, a mitochondrial superoxide dismutase, was quantified as an indicator for oxidative stress induced by the photocatalytically active material. Particle sizes were estimated using dynamic light scattering and scanning electron microscopy. Although both materials agglomerated to a comparable secondary particle size of 300 nm to 1500 nm and were ingested into the intestine, only nanoscale-TiO2 significantly inhibited reproduction (lowest-observed-effect-concentration [LOEC]: 10 mg/L). Light exposure induced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by nanoscale-TiO2 and increased toxicity of the nanomaterial from a median effect concentration of more than 100 mg/L to 53 mg/L. No evidence was found for inner cellular photocatalytic activity of nanoscale-TiO2 . Therefore, oxidative damage of the membranes of intestinal cells is suggested as a potential mode of action. Results highlight the importance of primary particle size and environmental parameters on the toxicity of TiO2 .

  11. A reliable light scattering computing for black carbon-containing particles: Hybrid discrete dipole approximation (h-DDA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moteki, N.

    2015-12-01

    Black carbon (BC) is a light-absorbing carbonaceous aerosol emitted from combustions of fossil fuels and biomasses and is estimated as the second most important contributor to positive climate forcing after the carbon dioxide. In the atmosphere, the fractal aggregate of BC-spherules may be mixed with non-absorbing (or weakly absorbing) compounds that forms morphologically complex "BC-containing particle". A reliable scattering code for BC-containing particles is necessary for predicting mass absorption efficiency of BC and designing/evaluating optical techniques for estimating microphysical properties (i.e., size distribution, mixing state, shape, refractive index) of BC-containing particles. The computational methods that derived from the volume-integral form of the Maxwell equation, such as discrete dipole approximation (DDA), are method of choice for morphologically complex object like BC-containing particles. In ordinary DDA, the entire particle volume is approximated as a collection of tiny cubical dipoles (with side length d) placed on a 3D cubic lattice. For several model BC-containing particles, the comparisons with numerically exact T-matrix method reveals that the ordinary DDA suffered from persistent positive systematic error (up to +30%) in absorption even under d <<λ. The cause of this DDA error is identified to be the shape error in BC-spherules. To eliminate the shape error in BC-spherules, we propose a new DDA methodology which may be called hybrid DDA (h-DDA): each primary BC sphere is assumed as a spherical dipole, while remaining particle volume of coating material is approximated by a collection of tiny cubical dipoles on a 3D cubic lattice. Positive absorption bias up to +30% in ordinary DDA is suppressed to within 3% in h-DDA. In h-DDA code, an efficient FFT-based algorithm for solving the matrix equation has been implemented, by utilizing the multilevel block-Toeplitz property of the submatrix corresponding to inter-dipole interaction within

  12. Reconstruction of particle-size distributions from light-scattering patterns using three inversion methods.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Ubera, Javier; Aguilar, J Félix; Gale, David Michel

    2007-01-01

    By means of a numerical study we show particle-size distributions retrieved with the Chin-Shifrin, Phillips-Twomey, and singular value decomposition methods. Synthesized intensity data are generated using Mie theory, corresponding to unimodal normal, gamma, and lognormal distributions of spherical particles, covering the size parameter range from 1 to 250. Our results show the advantages and disadvantages of each method, as well as the range of applicability for the Fraunhofer approximation as compared to rigorous Mie theory.

  13. Experimental and evaluated nuclear plus interference cross sections for light charged particles

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, S.T.; Cullen, D.E.

    1980-07-04

    Experimental and evaluated integral parameters derived from nuclear plus interference differential elastic scattering cross sections are presented for all projectile/target combinations of the particles p, d, t, /sup 3/He, and ..cap alpha... The data include reaction rates, average fractional energy losses per collision and per unit path length, and average laboratory scattering cosines. The resulting parameters are of potential use in analysis of charged-particle transport.

  14. ''Magic'' Energies for Detecting Light Elements with Resonant Alpha Particle Backscattering

    SciTech Connect

    Wetteland, C.J.; Maggiore, C.J.; Tesmer, J.R.; He, X-M.; Lee, D-H.

    1998-11-04

    Resonant backscattering is widely used to improve the detection limit of the light elements such as B, C, N and O. One disadvantage, however, is that several incident energies are normally needed if the sample contains a number of the light elements. There are ''magic'' energies at which several light elements can be detected simultaneously with suitable sensitivities. When these energies are used along with the elastic recoil detection of hydrogen, multiple elements can be detected without changing the beam energy, and the analysis time is greatly reduced. These reactions along with examples will be discussed.

  15. Reduction in biomass burning aerosol light absorption upon humidification: Roles of inorganically-induced hygroscopicity, particle collapse, and photoacoustic heat and mass transfer

    SciTech Connect

    lewis, Kristen A.; Arnott, W. P.; Moosmuller, H.; Chakrabarti, Raj; Carrico, Christian M.; Kreidenweis, Sonia M.; Day, Derek E.; Malm, William C.; Laskin, Alexander; Jimenez, Jose L.; Ulbrich, Ingrid M.; Huffman, John A.; Onasch, Timothy B.; Trimborn, Achim; Liu, Li; Mishchenko, M.

    2009-11-27

    Smoke particle emissions from the combustion of biomass fuels typical for the western and southeastern United States were studied and compared under high humidity and ambient conditions in the laboratory. The fuels used are Montana ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa), southern California chamise (Adenostoma fasciculatum), and Florida saw palmetto (Serenoa repens). Information on the non-refractory chemical composition of biomass burning aerosol from each fuel was obtained with an aerosol mass spectrometer and through estimation of the black carbon concentration from light absorption measurements at 870 nm. Changes in the optical and physical particle properties under high humidity conditions were observed for hygroscopic smoke particles containing substantial inorganic mass fractions that were emitted from combustion of chamise and palmetto fuels. Light scattering cross sections increased under high humidity for these particles, consistent with the hygroscopic growth measured for 100 nm particles in HTDMA measurements. Photoacoustic measurements of aerosol light absorption coefficients reveal a 20% reduction with increasing relative humidity, contrary to the expectation of light absorption enhancement by the liquid coating taken up by hygroscopic particles. This reduction is hypothesized to arise from two mechanisms: 1. Shielding of inner monomers after particle consolidation or collapse with water uptake; 2. The contribution of mass transfer through evaporation and condensation at high relative humidity to the usual heat transfer pathway for energy release by laser heated particles in the photoacoustic measurement of aerosol light absorption. The mass transfer contribution is used to evaluate the fraction of aerosol surface covered with liquid water solution as a function of RH.

  16. Validity of Particle-Counting Method Using Laser-Light Scattering for Detecting Platelet Aggregation in Diabetic Patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakadate, Hiromichi; Sekizuka, Eiichi; Minamitani, Haruyuki

    We aimed to study the validity of a new analytical approach that reflected the phase from platelet activation to the formation of small platelet aggregates. We hoped that this new approach would enable us to use the particle-counting method with laser-light scattering to measure platelet aggregation in healthy controls and in diabetic patients without complications. We measured agonist-induced platelet aggregation for 10 min. Agonist was added to the platelet-rich plasma 1 min after measurement started. We compared the total scattered light intensity from small aggregates over a 10-min period (established analytical approach) and that over a 2-min period from 1 to 3 min after measurement started (new analytical approach). Consequently platelet aggregation in diabetics with HbA1c ≥ 6.5% was significantly greater than in healthy controls by both analytical approaches. However, platelet aggregation in diabetics with HbA1c < 6.5%, i.e. patients in the early stages of diabetes, was significantly greater than in healthy controls only by the new analytical approach, not by the established analytical approach. These results suggest that platelet aggregation as detected by the particle-counting method using laser-light scattering could be applied in clinical examinations by our new analytical approach.

  17. Three dimensional indoor positioning based on visible light with Gaussian mixture sigma-point particle filter technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Wenjun; Zhang, Weizhi; Wang, Jin; Amini Kashani, M. R.; Kavehrad, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decade, location based services (LBS) have found their wide applications in indoor environments, such as large shopping malls, hospitals, warehouses, airports, etc. Current technologies provide wide choices of available solutions, which include Radio-frequency identification (RFID), Ultra wideband (UWB), wireless local area network (WLAN) and Bluetooth. With the rapid development of light-emitting-diodes (LED) technology, visible light communications (VLC) also bring a practical approach to LBS. As visible light has a better immunity against multipath effect than radio waves, higher positioning accuracy is achieved. LEDs are utilized both for illumination and positioning purpose to realize relatively lower infrastructure cost. In this paper, an indoor positioning system using VLC is proposed, with LEDs as transmitters and photo diodes as receivers. The algorithm for estimation is based on received-signalstrength (RSS) information collected from photo diodes and trilateration technique. By appropriately making use of the characteristics of receiver movements and the property of trilateration, estimation on three-dimensional (3-D) coordinates is attained. Filtering technique is applied to enable tracking capability of the algorithm, and a higher accuracy is reached compare to raw estimates. Gaussian mixture Sigma-point particle filter (GM-SPPF) is proposed for this 3-D system, which introduces the notion of Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM). The number of particles in the filter is reduced by approximating the probability distribution with Gaussian components.

  18. Pitfalls and novel applications of particle sizing by dynamic light scattering.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Karl; Schmidt, Manfred

    2016-08-01

    After briefly introducing the theoretical equations for DLS based particle size analysis, the need for angular dependent DLS investigations is emphasized to obtain correct particle sizes. Practical examples are given that demonstrate the possible magnitudes of errors in particle size if DLS is measured at one large scattering angle, only, as done by essentially all, most frequently utilized commercial "single angle" particle sizers. The second part is focused on a novel DLS application to sensitively trace (nano)particle interactions with concentrated blood serum or plasma that leads to the formation of large aggregates in a size regime of ≫100 nm. Most likely, such aggregates originate from protein induced bridging of nanoparticles, since it is well known that serum proteins adsorb onto the surface of essentially all nanoparticles utilized in medical applications. Thus, the protein corona around nanoparticles does not only change their biological identity but to a large extend also their size, thus possibly affecting biodistribution and in vivo circulation time.

  19. Chaotic motion of light particles in an unsteady three-dimensional vortex: experiments and simulation.

    PubMed

    Vanyó, József; Vincze, Miklós; Jánosi, Imre M; Tél, Tamás

    2014-07-01

    We study the chaotic motion of a small rigid sphere, lighter than the fluid in a three-dimensional vortex of finite height. Based on the results of Eulerian and Lagrangian measurements, a sequence of models is set up. The time-independent model is a generalization of the Burgers vortex. In this case, there are two types of attractors for the particle: a fixed point on the vortex axis and a limit cycle around the vortex axis. Time dependence might combine these regular attractors into a single chaotic attractor, however its robustness is much weaker than what the experiments suggest. To construct an aperiodically time-dependent advection dynamics in a simple way, Gaussian noise is added to the particle velocity in the numerical simulation. With an appropriate choice of the noise properties, mimicking the effect of local turbulence, a reasonable agreement with the experimentally observed particle statistics is found.

  20. Isospin effects on light charged particles as probes of nuclear dissipation

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, W.

    2009-07-15

    The multiplicities of postsaddle protons and {alpha} particles of the heavy systems {sup 234}Cf, {sup 240}Cf, {sup 246}Cf, and {sup 240}U as functions of the postsaddle dissipation strength are calculated in the framework of a dynamical Langevin model coupled with a statistical decay model. It is found that with increasing isospin of the Cf system, the sensitivity of the postsaddle proton and {alpha}-particle multiplicity to the dissipation strength decreases substantially, and it disappears for the {sup 240}U system. We suggest that on the experimental side, to accurately probe the postsaddle dissipation strength by measuring the prescission proton and {alpha}-particle multiplicity, it is best to populate heavy compound systems with low isospin.